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Full text of "A pilgrimage to the shrines of patriotism, being the report of the commission to dedicate the monument erected by the state of New York, in Andersonville, Georgia, to commemorate the heroism, sacrifices and patriotism of more than nine thousand of her sons who were confined in that prison ... with an account of services of the New York resident surviving Andersonville veterans held thereat and also enroute at Richmond and Danville, Va., Salisbury N.C., and Lookout mountain, Tenn., April 26-30, 1914"

DEDICATION OF MONUMENT 

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ONVILLE,GEORGIA 



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I-'ront of Andersoxmllk Munlment 



DEDICATION OF MONUMENT 



ERECTED BY THE 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



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ANDERSONVILLE, GEORGIA 
1914 











A PILGRIMAGE 

TO THE SHRINES OF 

PATRIOTISM 












BEING THE REPORT OF THE COMMIS- 
SION TO DEDICATE THE MONUMENT 
ERECTED BY THE STATE OF NEW 
YORK, IN ANDERSONVILLE, GEORGIA 

To Commemorate the Heroismi, Sacrifices and 
Patriotism of More Than Nine Thousand of 
Her Sons Who Were Confined in That Prison, of 
Whom More Than Two Thousand Five Hundred 
Perished There, with an Account of Services 
of the New York Resident Surviving Anderson- 
ville Veterans Held Thereat and Also Enroute at 
Richmond and Danville, Va., Salisbury, N. C, 
and Lookout Mountain, Tenn., April 26-30, 1914 

17 -1^7 ^o 9 












PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK 
1'^. l^CUi,^ UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE 

ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION COMMISSION 




ALBANY : J. B. LYON COMPANY, PRINTERS. I9I6 









REPORT 



OF THE 



ANDERSON VI LLE MONUMENT 
DEDICATION COMMISSION 

To the Legislature of the State of New York, Albany, N. Y.: 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 413, Laws of 1913, we have 
the honor to submit herewith a report of the Commission for the dedi- 
cation of the monument of the State of New York in Andersonville, 
Ga., on April 29, 1914, with some account of the exercises held in con- 
nection therewith ; with a record also of services enroute at Richmond 
and Danville, Va., Salisbury, N. C, and Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 
from April 27 to 30, 1914. 

In behalf of the Andersonville Monument Dedication Commis- 
sion, we are 

Your obedient servants, 

A. J. PALMER, Chairman, 

WM. B. CARS WELL, Treasurer, 

W. R. HERRICK, 

W. P. HAMILTON, Jr., 

J. L. PATRIE, 

JNO. KERRIGAN, 

F. M. BRADLEY, 
C. H. BAUMES, 
S. G. BURDICK, 
I. M. FOSTER, 

R. B. McCULLY, 

G. R. BROWN, 
JNO. MACKENZIE, 

Commissioners. 

JOSEPH L. KILLGORE, Secretary. 

5 



D. of D. 
JUN 5 1917 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Foreword 11 

Explanatory 13 

The Journey 25 

The First Day — Richmond, Va 28 

The Second Day — Danville, Va., and Salisbury, N. C 30 

The Third Day — Andersonville, Ga 34 

Richmond, Va 39 

The First Day — Exercises at National Cemetery, Richmond, Va 40 

Address by Senator A. J. Palmer 41 

Address by Hon. Harold J. Hinman 45 

Address by Hon. J. L. Patrie 50 

Grant Memorial Banquet, Richmond, Va 55 

Address by Senator A. J. Palmer 55 

The Second Day — Danville, Va 59 

Services at National Cemetery 59 

Prayer by Rev. Dr. I. M. Foster 59 

Address by Mayor Wooding 60 

Address by Hon. William Pinkney Hamilton, Jr 62 

Address by Senator A. J. Palmer 63 

The Second Day (Afternoon) — Salisbury, N. C 65 

Services at National Cemetery 66 

Prayer by Rev. Mr. Detera 66 

Address by Mayor of Salisbury 67 

Address by Colonel Boyden 68 

Address by Hon. John Kerrigan 70 

Address by Col. Samuel C. Pierce 72 

Address by Hon. Robert L. Drummond 75 

Address by Superintendent Fonda 80 

The Third Day — Andersonville, Ga 81 

The Monument Itself 83 

7 



8 CONTENTS 



Faoe 

Services in Prison Cemetery, Andersonville, Ga 87 

Prayer by Rev. .1. II. Rohinson 87 

Address l)y Senator A. J. Palmer 88 

Address hy Secretary Josej))! I>. Killgore 9i 

Story of the 85th N. Y., by Commissioner Burdick 96 

Address by Commissioner Bm"dick !»7 

A Tribute of Honor — Poem Written by Mrs. Martha A. T. Rurdick 98 

Address by Commissioner I. M. Foster 100 

Address by Commissioner McCully 108 

Address by Commissioner Brown Ill 

Address by Commissioner Mackenzie Ill 

Presentation of Medals, within the Prison Stockade 112 

Presentation of I>oving Cup by Commissioner I. M. Foster 1 13 

Response by Senator A. J. Palmer 115 

Continuation of Services at the Monument: 

Prayer by Commissioner I. M. Foster 117 

Address by Senator \. J. Palmer 118 

Address by Hon. Thaddeus C. Sweet 118 

Address by Senator A. J. Palmer 121 

Dedicatory Prayer 121 

Presentation Address by Hon. John F. Murtaugh 122 

Address of Acceptance by Colonel Langfitt 126 

Farewell Address by Senator A. J. Palmer 128 

Lookout Mountain, Tenn 129 

Address by Secretary Joseph L. Killgore 129 

Final Address by Senator A. J. Palmer 131 

Alphaljetical List of Entire Party Who Attended the Dedication 139 

Report by Clara Barton on Expedition to Andersonville, July, 1865 145 

Dorence Atwater — A Biography, by Hon. Francis Atwater, His Brother .... 159 

The Dead at Andersonville — Introduction by Dorence Atwater 165 

List of New York State Soldiers Buried in Andersonville National Ceme- 
tery 171 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Front of Andersonville Monument Frontispiece 

FAcnra paoe 

Senator A. J. Palmer 16 

■ Senator William B. Carswell 16 

Senator Walter R. Herrick 24 

Assemblyman William P. Hamilton, Jr 24 

Assemblyman J. L. Patrie 32 

Assemblyman John Kerrigan 32 

Assemblyman Frank M. Bradley 40 

Assemblyman Caleb H. Baumes 40 

Comrade Silas J. Burdick 48 

Comrade Rev. Isaac M. Foster 48 

Comrade Robert B. McCully 56 

Comrade George R. Brown 56 

Comrade John Mackenzie 64 

Comrade Joseph L. Killgore 64 

Salisbury Exercises 72 

Confederate Veterans and Daughters of Confederacy Who Honored Us at 

Danville, Va 72 

Plan of Andersonville Prison Grounds 80 

View of Andersonville Taken from the North Gate, August 14, 1864 80 

Back of Andersonville Monument 88 

Andersonville Prison Park 88 

Mrs. Martha A. Irish Burdick 96 

Providence Spring at Andersonville as it is To-day 104 

Line Up at Andersonville for Presentation of New York State's Commemo- 
rative Dedication Medal ; : 112 

Survivor's Medal 120 

Dedication of Monument at Andersonville 128 

Dedication Party at the Foot of New York Monument, Lookout Mountain, 

Tenn 136 

Clara Barton at Time of Civil War 144 

9 



10 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

rACIMO PAGE 

Dorence Atwater 160 

Union Dead in Andcrsonville 168 

Graves Across Road in Front of New York Monument at Andcrsonville 

During Dedication Ceremony 192 



FOREWORD 

THE WHOLE subject of prisoners of war is one of the most 
delicate and pathetic in the history of nations. The story of 
their privations and sufferings has been such a pitiful tale as 
to excite horror upon the narration of it, and then a desperate resolve 
to cast it from the mind as unutterable and irremediable. Particularly 
is this so when a people are to be conquered by exhaustion; then the 
prisoners suffer first. In all history this has been a ghastly and 
inhuman tale. 

Monuments to soldiers who have perished in prison are rare in- 
deed. Monuments usually have been reared on battle-fields or in cities 
where the people could behold them. In the war that saved the Union, 
not only the nation has built monuments to commemorate great deeds 
and great men, but many of the States have done the same. New York 
has not been behind her sister States. Her monuments stand on every 
battle-field among the noblest that adorn them. She has, however, 
erected but one monument to her prison dead — that at Anderson- 
ville, Ga. Eleven other States had preceded her in this. They are : 
Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan and Iowa. 

The monument, concerning.the dedication of which this report has 
to do, is that erected by the State of New York in Andersonville, Ga. 
There were many places within the Southern Confederacy where pris- 
oners were confined at one time or another throughout the war. It is 
said there were sixty-eight of such prisons. Many, however, were but 
transient and prisoners were removed from place to place as conditions 
required. The five great prisons in the Southern Confederacy from 
1861 to 1865 were located at Richmond, Va., Danville, Va., Salisbury, 
N. C, Florence, S. C, and Andersonville, Ga. These were, in a sense, 

11 



12 FOREWORD 



permanent prisons, at which the prisoners were finally assembled and 
confined. At times there were many prisoners in Charleston and 
Columbia, S. C, and Macon, Ga., and at many other places through- 
out the South. However, the great prisons were at the places above 
named. 

It is at these that national cemeteries are maintained by the nation 
as sepulchres of its distinctively prison dead, and, with the exception 
of two monuments in Salisbury, N. C, all the States have erected their 
memorials to their dead prisoners either within the stockade or in the 
prison cemetery adjoining at Andersonville, Ga. 



EXPLANATORY 

MONUMENTS to commemorate national heroes have been 
erected in all ages. The pyramids are but the monmnents of 
the Egyptians. The chief lesson of monvmients is but the 
spirit of Kipling's famous line, " Lest we forget." Of course, monu- 
ments are not always militarj', but yet are chiefly so. Moreover, they 
commemorate victories but not defeats. The triumphal arches have 
no corresponding arches of defeat. The names on the nation's memo- 
rials are those of its heroes: Grant, on Riverside Drive; Lincoln, in 
Springfield; McKinlej^ in Ohio. The battle-field at Gettysburg is 
adorned with hundreds of monuments bearing the names of its gen- 
erals, or marking the precise spots where designated regiments fought 
valiantly. The purpose of monuments is, moreover, not onlj'^ to com- 
memorate the past, but to teach lessons for the future to the youth of 
the land. 

Our country is perhaps the only nation which has preserved in dis- 
tinctly prison cemeteries the ashes of its dead. Of these there are five : 
At Riclmiond, Va., Danville, Va., Salisbury, N. C, Florence, S. C, 
and Andersonville, Ga. The latter was the latest and the largest of 
the prisons. Although probably during the four years of war there 
were more prisoners in Richmond, Va., than ever were confined in 
Andersonville, Ga. (it is estimated that 125,000 prisoners were at one 
time or another confined at Richmond), yet Andersonville, while it 
existed as a prison only from February, '64, to April, '65, had within 
its borders at one time more than 30,000 prisoners. Therefore, it was 
at Andersonville that the State of New York determined to erect a 
monument to its prisoners. 

Considering the number of the prison dead, there has been great 
indifference to the erection of monuments to their memory. Some, 

13 



14 STATE OF NEW YORK 

doubtless, have felt that these painful memories should speedily be for- 
gotten ; others, perhaps, that as only private soldiers — " enlisted 
men " — perished in the prisons, they were of less aecoimt; at any rate 
there have been few influential voices in public life lifted in their 
behalf. 

At last, however, in 1905, the State of New York did empower its 
Monuments Commission (see Chapter 717 of the Laws of New York, 
1905), to erect, on a site to be selected by the commissioners, in the 
national cemetery at Andersonville, State of Georgia, or within the 
prison grounds adjacent thereto, a suitable monument to commemo- 
rate the heroism, sacrifices and patriotism of more than nine thousand 
New York soldiers of the Union army in the War of the Rebellion, 
who were confined as prisoners of war in Andersonville, of whom more 
than two thousand five hundred died in that prison. Three additional 
commission.ers, all survivors of Andersonville, who had served in New 
York regiments, were added to the Commission for tliis purpose. This 
legislation was secured mainly through the efforts of Hon. George A. 
Green of the 12th Assembly District, Kings county, and Senator 
Witter of Allegany county. 

The monument thus authorized was duly erected but remained im- 
dedicated until 1913, when finally an act was passed (introduced by 
Senator Wm. B. Carswell of Kings county), authorizing the appoint- 
ment of a Commission for this service. 

It is Chapter 413, Laws of 1913, and is as follows: 

AN ACT 

To create a commission to dedicate the monument erected by the 
state of New York, at Andersonville, in the state of Georgia, to com- 
memorate the heroism, sacrifices and patriotism of more than nine 
thousand New York soldiers, who were confined as prisoners of war in 
Andersonville prison, Georgia, of whom more than two thousand five 
hundred died in the prison, and making an appropriation therefor. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and 
Assembly, do enact as follows: 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 15 

Section 1. A commission is hereby created to consist of thirteen 
members — three senators, to be appointed by the president of the sen- 
ate, five members of assembly, to be appointed by the speaker of the 
assembly, and five veterans of the civil war, who enlisted from the state 
of New York, who are survivors of Andersonville prison, and who are 
at present citizens of the state of New York, to be appointed by the 
governor, such appointments in each case to be made within tliirty 
days after the passage of this act. 

§ 2. This commission so created shall have complete charge of the 
ceremonies to dedicate the monument erected by the state of New 
York, at Andersonville, in the state of Georgia, to commemorate the 
heroism, sacrifice and patriotism of more than nine thousand New 
York soldiers, who were confined as prisoners of war in Andersonville 
prison, Georgia, of whom more than two thousand five hundred died 
in the prison. Irmnediately after their appointments, the commis- 
sioners shall meet and select a chairman and secretary. 

§ 3. Twenty thousand dollars ($20,000), or as much thereof as 
may be necessary, are hereby appropriated for the proper carrying out 
of the provisions of this act, the same to be paid by the treasurer on the 
warrant of the comptroller, on proper vouchers, duly certified by the 
chairman and secretary of this commission. 

§ 4. This act shall take effect immediately. 

Previous legislation to accomplish this object had been defeated 
by executive disapprovals. However, the Hon. William Sulzer, the 
Governor of New York, approved this act and it became a law on 
April 30, 1913. Under this act the following commissioners were 
appointed : The three Senators were named by Lieutenant-Governor 
Martin H. Glynn as follows: 

Senator Abraham J. Palmer, Milton-on-Hudson, N. Y. ; Senator 
Wm. B. Carswell, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Senator Walter R. Herrick, New 
York City. 

The Hon. Alfred E. Smith, Speaker of the Assembly, designated 
the following five Assemblymen as members of this Commission : 



16 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Hon. Wm. P. Hamilton, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Hon. J. L. Patrie, 
Catskill, N, Y. ; Hon. John Kerrigan, New York City ; Hon. Frank 
M, Bradley, Barker, N. Y.; Hon. Caleb H. Baunies, Newburgh. 
N. Y. 

Governor Sulzer appointed the following five veterans who had 
been prisoners at Andersonville, as commissioners: 

Silas G. Burdick, Cuba, N. Y. ; Isaac M. Foster, Walton, N. Y. ; 
Robert B. McCully, New York City; George R. Brown, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; John Mackenzie, Watervliet, N. Y. 

The Commission thus appointed organized by electing the follow- 
ing officers : 

Hon. Abraham J. Pahner, chairman; Hon. William B. Carswell, 
treasurer ; Mr. Joseph L. Killgore, secretary. 

Subsequent action of the Commission at its various meetings 
should be noted here as follows : 

1. It was ordered that the usual rules and usages that apply to 
legislative committees shall apply also to this Commission. 

2. The chairman was authorized to " prepare a program and in- 
vite such guests as he may elect, and perform such other duties as he 
may deem necessary in furtherance of the Commission." 

3. The date of the dedication was left to the chairman. 

4. The moneys available for the purpose of this Commission were 
ordered distributed upon vouchers or warrants " signed by the treas- 
urer and countersigned by the chairman." 

5. On motion of Senator Herrick, the following itinerary was 
adopted : 

Leave New York, Sunday, April 26th, 10 p. m. 
Arrive Richmond, Monday, April 27th. 
Day at Richmond (Grant Birthday Dinner). 
Leave Richmond, Monday, April 27th, 11 :30 p. m. 
Arrive Danville, Va., Tuesday, April 28th, 7 a. m. 
Leave Danville, Va., Tuesday, April 28th, 12 m. 




Senator A. J. Palmer 
Chairman of Commission 




Senator William B. Carswell 
Member of Commission 



^-^^^ 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 17 

Arrive Salisbury, N. C, Tuesday, April 28th, 3 p. m. 
Leave Salisbury, N. C, Tuesday, April 28th, 7 p. m. 
Arrive Andersonville, Wednesday, April 29th, 8 to 9 A. M. 
Leave Andersonville, Wednesday, April 29th, 8 P. M. 
Arrive Chickamauga, Thursday, April 30th, 6 A. M. 
Leave Chickamauga, Thursday, April 30th, Noon. 
Lookout Mountain, Tenn., 2 p. m. 
Leave Chattanooga, 6 p. m. 
Arrive New York, Friday, May 1st, 9 p. M. 

6. It was determined to serve a dinner within the site of the old 
prison grounds at Andersonville at noon on April 29, 1914. The 
details were left to the officers of the 'Commission. 

7. Report of Commissioner Brown — that after considering 
many designs for badges and medals submitted by several competing 
firms, he recommended that the Commission adopt the one offered by 
Whitehead & Hoag Company, 253 Broadwaj% New York City, as the 
New York Survivor's Medal of Honor, and the one presented by J. 
F. Neuman of 11 John street. New York City, as the badge for the 
guests. This was adopted. 

The intention of the Commission to follow the example of other 
States and invite to participate in the dedicatory services at Ander- 
sonville all survivors of that prison who had been soldiers of the State 
of New York at the time of their capture, involved an enormous 
amount of labor. 

Delays were inevitable and it was felt, also, that the utmost econ- 
omy must be practiced. So instead of hiring an office as was custom- 
ary, by com-tesy of Adjutant-General Henry DeWitt Hamilton, his 
private office in the State Arsenal building, at 7th avenue and 35th 
street, in the city of New York, was placed gratuitously at the disposal 
of the chairman of the Commission, where he might call the meetings 
of the Commission, conduct the necessary correspondence, and where 
the comrades might assemble when the time of departure arrived. 

2 



18 STATE OF NEW YORK 

It was felt, also, that there should be no partiality; that no one 
should be invited to be the guest of the State except those qualifying, 
but that all who did fulfil the conditions should have an opportunity to 
participate in the dedication. 

Three methods were used to reach every veteran throughout the 
State. First: Letters were printed in newspapers calling on every 
surviving prisoner of Andersonville, who had been a New York sol- 
dier, to correspond with the Commission. Second: Every Grand 
Army Post throughout the State was requested to circulate, not only 
among its own comrades but as widely as possible, a similar invitation. 
And, Third: Members of the Legislature, both Senators and Assem- 
blymen, were requested to distribute throughout their respective dis- 
tricts this invitation, so that in the remotest spot in the State the hum- 
blest veteran who had been a prisoner at Andersonville should be in- 
formed of his opportunity. 

The following one is typical of the many letters sent out: 

jANUi^IlY, 1914. 

To the Commanders of Posts, Department of New York, G. A. R.: 
Will you kindly annoimce to the Comrades of your Post the ap- 
pended invitation, and request through them the general circulation 
of this inquiry? It is hoped thus to reach every Union veteran of the 
State of New York who was confined in Andersonville, so that if his 
health will warrant his attendance at these dedicatory services and the 
State should provide the transportation, etc., he may have the oppor- 
tunity of re-visiting, after fifty years, the scenes which witnessed both 
his valor and his sufferings. 

The Commission will appreciate your prompt compliance with this 
request. 

Yours in F. C. & L., 

A. J. PALMER, 

Chairman. 

J. L. KiLLGORE, Secretary. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 19 

The monument erected by the State of New York at Anderson- 
ville, Ga., to commemorate her soldiers who died in that prison fifty 
years ago, is to be dedicated tliis coming April. Comrades who served 
in New York regiments at the time of their capture, who were confined 
in Andersonville and who are able to attend the dedicatory services, 
provided that arrangements can be made therefor, should at once send 
their names and addresses (also company and regiment) to 
Senator A. J. PALMER, Chairman, 

Andersonville Monument Dedication Com- 
mission, Arsenal Building, 

7th Avenue and 35th Street, 
New York City, 
N. B. — It is hoped to stop enroute at the prison cemeteries at 
Riclimond and Danville, Va., Salisbury, N. C, and Florence, S. C. 
In these five cemeteries, 36,784 Union soldiers are buried, of which it 
is estimated between 9,000 and 10,000 were from the State of New 
York. 

April 14, 1914. 
Dear Sir and Comrade: 

We are sending you herewith an application blank for transporta- 
tion and subsistence from New York City to Andersonville, Ga., and 
return. It includes berth in Pullman car and meals enroute. 

The bill, which passed the Legislature unanimously, making an 
additional appropriation of $30,000, has failed of approval. If we 
could have secured that it would have enabled us to provide also for 
your fare from your home to New York City and return. This we 
are now, alas, unable to promise. 

If you can go, fill out this blank and return at once in enclosed 
addressed envelope, this application must reach us not later 

THAN MONDAY, APRIL 20tH. 

If any friends, or members of your family, desire to accompany 
you at their own expense, they may do so. It will cost from New 
York to Andersonville and return, including berth and meals, ap- 
proximately $60 each. The name or names should accompany your 
application, also check for above amount, payable to Wm. B. Cars- 
well, Treasurer. 



20 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Great promptness is now imperative, that we may have time to 
book the necessary reservations. 

Fraternally yours, 

A. J. PALMER, 
J. L. KiLLGORE, Secretary. Chairman. 

A typical letter to an individual : 

Dear Comrade: 

The Andersonville monument will be dedicated April 30, 1914. 
Train bearing guests and soldiers leaves Pennsylvania Station, 33d 
street and 7th avenue. New York City, on Sunday night, April 26th. 
On the assumption that Governor Glynn will sign the bill now before 
him, appropriating moneys to defray necessary expenses from New 
York to Andersonville and return, are you in a position to go to An- 
dersonville with the Commission? Kindly advise me by return mail 
whether or not you can go. 

If your reply is in the affirmative, kindly forward me the name and 
address of your family physician for the records of the Commission. 

With best wishes, I am 

Fraternally yours, 

A. J. PALMER, 

Chairman. 

Much time and an elaborate correspondence ensued. Certificates 
of physicians were required, and every effort was made to confine the 
list strictly to the eligible and the worthy. 

Sample Circular for Reply 
IMPORTANT.— Read Carefully, Fill In and Return at Once. 
This application must reach us not later than Monday, April 20th. 

To the New York State Andersonville Monument Dedication Com- 
mission, Arsenal Building, 7th Avenue and 35th Street, New 
York City: 
Gentlemen: 

I, , hereby make application for 

transportation to Andersonville, Ga., and return to attend the dedica- 
tion of the New York State monument, on train leaving Pennsylvania 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 21 

Railroad Station, 33rd street and 7th avenue, New York City, Sun- 
day, April 26, 1914, 9 o'clock p. m. 

I attest upon my honor as a man and a soldier that I was a member 

of Company of the N. Y. at the time of my 

capture, and was confined in the following Rebel prisons 

; that I did not at any time take the oath of alle- 
giance to the Southern Confederacy nor was in any way disloyal to 
the Union, and that I was honorably discharged from the service of 
the United States. 

The name of my family physician is 

his address is 

Yours truly. 

Dated at Signature 

this day of April, 1914. Address 

Finally the date was fixed, after the adjournment of the Legisla- 
ture of 1914, as April 26th of that year. The precise reason for choos- 
ing this day was that it was the date of Memorial — or "Decoration" 
— Day in the State of Georgia, whither we were bound. It did not 
occur to any one until subsequently that the itinerary adopted would 
bring the Commission and the comrades to the city of Richmond, Va., 
on the birthday of General Grant. 

Arrangements were satisfactorily made with the officers of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company for the entire journey, including 
Pulhnan cars, in which every comrade had a berth, and meals were 
served in the dining cars, with the exceptions later mentioned. These 
arrangements were faithfully fulfilled. 

The Conmiission had determined to visit Andersonville only, but 
as the trains were passing directly through Richmond and Danville, 
Va., and Salisbury, N. C, it was decided to stop at each of those ceme- 
teries for a brief service. 

Seven thousand New York State flags were provided, one of which 
was placed upon each New York soldier's grave in all the national 
prison cemeteries throughout the South. Badges and medals were 
also provided, and upon the breast of every New York survivor of 



22 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Andersonville was pinned a medal of honor, conferred upon him by 
the State within the stockade at Andersonville itself, as the reader of 
this report will learn. 

The Government at Washington did us many favors. The Secre- 
tary of War ordered a band from Savannah, Ga. (at the nation's ex- 
pense) , to proceed to Andersonville, Ga., on the day of the dedication, 
and their services are gratefully acknowledged. The President first 
appointed Gen. L. L. Mills and subsequently Col. W. C. Langfitt, of 
the Engineer Corps, U. S. A., to represent him in his absence. Gen- 
eral Mills' letter accepting the appointment is as follows: 

Hon. A. J. Palmer, April 18, 1914. 

Chairman, State of New York Andersonville Monument Dedica- 
tion Commission, 

Arsenal Building, 7th Avenue and 35th Street, New 
York City. 
My dear Senator Palmer : 

I am in receipt this morning of your very kind letter of the 17th 
instant inviting me, as the officer designated to represent the President 
at the dedication of New York's monmnent at Andersonville, Ga., to 
accompany your official train from the city of New York for the en- 
tire trip, also extending to Mrs. Mills the same very kind invitation. 
In reply I regret very much not being able to accept, due to the 
inadvisability of my being away from my duties here in Washington, 
just at this time, any longer than necessary. Both Mrs. Mills and 1 
greatly appreciate the attractive invitation extended to her and regret 
that we can not be one of the party to enjoy the attractive schedule of 
visits you have planned for the occasion. 

I will arrange to leave Washington so as to join you at Anderson- 
ville early on the morning of the 29th. Looking forward to the pleas- 
ure of meeting the Commission there at that time, I remain, with 
kindest regards and wishes. 

Very sincerely yours, 

L. L. MILLS, 
Brigadier-General, General Staff, 
United States Army. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 23 

The superintendents of all the cemeteries wei-e instructed to serve 
us in every way, which all faithfully did. 

The total number that arrived on the evening of April 26th to 
make the journey proved to be 222. 

There were two trains of Pullman cars and three dining cars were 
attached at Danville, Va. The cars were comfortable and every old 
soldier was given a berth. The meals were satisfactory but inexpen- 
sive, and all fared alike. 

The distance traveled was approximately 3000 miles from a point 
at the center of the State of New York to Andersonville, Ga., and re- 
turn. The gi-eat age of these ex-prisoners of war, whom the State had 
invited to make the journey (the average age was over 72% years; 
some were over 80) , made it necessary that they should be transported 
in at least modest comfort. 

The journey was successfully accomplished as will appear in the 
following pages. 

April 27th was spent in Richmond. 

The morning of the 28th at Danville, Va., the afternoon at Salis- 
bury, N. C. 

The entire day of April 29th was spent at Andersonville and the 
monument was impressively dedicated. 

A stop was made at Chattanooga on the return trip, and a brief 
final service was held at Lookout Mountain, Tenn. A detailed state- 
ment of the journey and of the exercises appears in the following 
pages. 

No accident or illness occurred to mar the success of the trip, and 
the weather was ideal. The speeches were largely made by the veterans 
themselves who had experienced the privations of these prisons in their 
youth, and if all the people of the State of New York could have wit- 
nessed these scenes, particularly, perhaps, that at Andersonville, when, 
with uncovered heads and reverend steps, these survivors of this prison 
entered again, after fifty years, the cemetery where their comrades 



24 STATE OF NEW YORK 



slept, the tremendous pathos would have impressed them; and whoever 
will catch the spirit of this pilgrimage by reading the pages which fol- 
low will learn in detail the glory of the soldiers who perished in these 
prisons, and the worthy tribute that was paid them, after half a cen- 
tury, by their comrades and their State. 

The Commission learns with regret that during the preparation of 
this report one of the commissioners, The Rev. Isaac M. Foster, 
D. D., has died. As the reader of these pages peruses his many elo- 
quent words which will be found herein, he is reminded that they were 
uttered by lips that are now silent forever. 




Senator Walter R. Herrick 
Member of Coniniission 





Assemblyman Wm. P. Hamilton, Jr. 
Meniljer of Commission 



THE JOURNEY 

IT WAS a notable company of aged men who gathered at the State 
arsenal in the city of New York on April 26, 1914. 

They were all ex-prisoners of war who had served in New York 
regiments at the time of their capture, and had been confined in the 
prison at Andersonville, Ga., in 1864-5. 

They had been invited to be the guests of the State at the dedica- 
tion of the monument at Andersonville, Ga., which had been erected 
on that pathetic spot, which fifty years before had been the scene of 
their tragic suffering. They came from all parts of the State — from 
the remote towns and villages as well as the largest cities — and upon 
each face there was a happy and exultant smile. To them it was the 
event of their lives. 

They proved to be healthy men and men of good character, also of 
evident social standing in their respective communities. They had 
survived the half century because of exemplary habits, and, of course, 
of organic soundness of the vital organs as well. Otherwise the priva- 
tions of their youth would long before this have broken down their 
strength. 

They were, however, but a handful of siu'vivors of the many thou- 
sands of their comrades with whom they had shared unutterable priva- 
tions in the war that saved the Union. Their average age was slightly 
above seventy. They had been, therefore, but a little over twenty at 
the time of their imprisonment. Some were even younger. Commis- 
sioner Brown had spent his sixteenth birthday in the Andersonville 
stockade, and the ^vriter had passed his seventeenth birthday in the 
prisons of Richmond. They had all been but lads who had " learned 
to use a gun before they did a razor " at the time of their capture, and 
now they had survived life's perils for half a century, and, as the 

25 



26 STATE OF NEW YORK 

guests of the State, were to re-visit the scenes of their sufferings and 
the graves of their comrades. It was a great day for them and a 
worthy deed of the State. 

The number of veterans who proved able to accept the State's in- 
vitation was less than had been hoped for. Of the four hundred names 
estimated as the actual number of " survivors " who were living in the 
Empire State, only 248 men, after long and patient inquiry, were 
placed upon the list as able to go. The delays materially reduced this 
number. If we had made the journey in 1913, more, doubtless, would 
have been well enough to accompany us. A year is an appreciable 
period of time to men as aged as these. 

Steadil}^ during these months the Commission received word from 
one and another, who had declared their ability and wish to go, of 
their inability to do so. Some had become ill. A pathetic letter was 
frequently received from a son or daughter saying, " Father had died," 
and adding how much he had wished to live to make the journey; and 
so the list of 248 dwindled away until in April, 1914, many were act- 
ually able to reach New York and start upon the pilgrimage. 

It was hoped that if we started on their Memorial day the people 
of Georgia would appreciate the delicate courtesy which was intended. 
The singular fact, however, resulted that we found ourselves in Rich- 
mond, Va., on the 27th of April, which was the 92nd birthday of Gen. 
Ulysses S. Grant. Richmond was the capital of the Southern Con- 
federacy — Grant was its conqueror. Grant's birthday in Richmond 
— what a day and what an opportunity ! 

Word had preceded us to Riclmiond and much discussion had re- 
sulted in which we did not participate. 

We were his soldiers and we were on the scene of his triumph and 
we were not afraid. Yet we did not wish to vaunt ourselves or to 
offend the people of that historic city. Throughout the journey we 
steadfastly studied to avoid that, and with success. Not a single 
criticism is known to have followed us from the people, among whom 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 27 

our dead were lying and above whose silent faces, daj' after day, we 
planted oui* flags and sang our songs to their honor. 

Thus it was a notable gathering that met at the Pennsylvania 
depot in New York on the evening of the 26th. A goodly number of 
the veterans were accompanied by their wives, or sons or daughters, 
always at their own expense, and so, with the Commission, the guests 
and the veterans, the total number who started on the " pilgrimage " 
was 222. 

Little State flags adorned the cars and the engines, and it was ob- 
vious enough everywhere we passed that this was the State of New 
York upon a pathetic pilgrimage to the graves of her wortluest sons. 

While the " pilgrims " had all been comi'ades in prison fifty years 
before, very few recognized each other, except such as had served in 
the same regiments or lived in the same locality and had therefore 
maintained their friendship throughout the years. 

Conmiissioner Mackenzie and Senator Palmer had spent the cruel 
winters of '63-4 together on Belle Island and had tramped together for 
many a winter's night, doubtless, through snow and sleet in that des- 
perate struggle to survive. Yet neither could recall the least ground 
for recognition of the other, only as they knew they had been comrades 
on that spot, their hearts rushed together in fraternal embrace. 

So it was with all. It was a band of brothers, reunited after long 
separation, for an hour, at the scenes of their great sufferings. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad (with whom the contract had been 
signed for the entire trip), had made every arrangement to our satis- 
faction. Its officers were on hand to see us off, also the agents of the 
other railroads which served us with their trackage on our long jour- 
ney, and many friends of the veterans as well ; in all a goodly company 
was on hand to bid us " bon voyage " and a safe return. 

Each veteran had a card indicating the train and car and berth to 
which he was assigned. On arrival he simply went to the car, pre- 
sented his card and was at once directed to the berth which had been 



28 STATE OF NEW YORK 

reserved to him for the trip. Each car on both trains was in the care 
of one of the commissioners. 

On Train 1 : 
Car 1 — Was in charge of Commissioner Carswell. 
Car 2 — Was in charge of Commissioner Herrick. 
Car 3 — Was in charge of Commissioner Kerrigan. 
Car 4 — Was in charge of Commissioner Foster. 
Car 5 — AVas in charge of Commissioner Palmer (chairman). 

On Train 2 : 

Car 1 — Was in charge of Commissioner Burdick. 

Car 2 — Was in charge of Commissioner McCuUy. 

Car 3 — Was in charge of Commissioner Brown. 

Car 4 — Was in charge of Commissioner Mackenzie. 

Cars 5 and 6 — Were in charge of Secretary Killgore. 

Promptly at 9 :30 p. m., " All aboard " was shouted along the plat- 
form ; everybody was in his right place ; Train No. 1 began to move 
and we were off on our " pilgrimage to the shrines of patriotism." 

THE FIRST DAY 

Richmond, Va. 

The train arrived safely at Riclimond early in the morning of 
April 27th. " On to Richmond! " had been the war cry fifty years 
before and now we were " on the spot." 

The party left the trains here and spent the day at the Jefferson 
Hotel, where the pre-arrangements had been faithfully carried out 
and the physical comfort of the entire company was satisfactorily 
attended to. 

Breakfast was served in the upper corridors and it seemed indeed 
as if the entire facilities of the great hostelry were at our disposal. 

At 10 A. M., automobiles and busses were promptly on hand and 
carried the entire company to the national cemetery, just outside the 
city limits, on the northeast, where the exercises of the forenoon were 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 29 

held. This was the bui'ial ground of the prisoners who had died in 
Richmond. 

A State flag had been placed by the superintendent on every 
known grave of a New York soldier, and grouped to the center of 
" unknown " graves were as many flags as the estimated number from 
the State required. This estimate was based upon the fact that while 
one- fourth of all troops in Gettysburg were from New York, yet some 
prisoners were confined in Riclimond, from the western armies, and 
the percentage of the graves of New York's prisoners would probably 
be less than that, or somewhere between one-fifth and one-sixth of the 
entu-e number here entombed. 

The day was perfect. The exercises were held in a pavilion in the 
center of the grounds, the entire party being grouped around. With 
the exception of a few children from adjacent streets, who were at- 
tracted by the imusual scene, no visitors from the city attended the 
services. 

It was evident here, as at the hotel, that we were to be left strictly 
to ourselves. No one interfered with us and no one joined us. Across 
the threshold of that pathetic spot, where for fifty years have lain in- 
terred the men of Belle Island and Libby prison, no foot of man or 
woman from the city of Richmond or the State of Virginia is said to 
have passed. 

The exercises were admirable. They will appear in these pages in 
their proper order. 

This is the spot above all others in the South where a great monu- 
ment should be erected, so worthy architecturally of the dead there 
commemorated, that they should no longer lie unnoticed. 

At the close of the morning exercises the entire party returned to 
the hotel for lunch, and spent the afternoon as their inclinations led 
them. Many of them had been imprisoned in Richmond, in one prison 
or another at some period, and they re-visited the places where these 
prisons were, with a pathetic interest. 



30 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Some crossed the footbridge to Belle Island, to the scene of the old 
stockade, recalling their grim experiences upon that spot. 

Many found their way to Libby or Mayo Prison hospital — Castle 
Thunder — and some even went to Petersburg and the battle-field of 
Seven Pines, wherever they had served in battle. 

The commissioners and State officers, called on the Governor of 
Virginia in the afternoon, in the State capitol, which had been the capi- 
tol of the Confederacy throughout the war. 

Governor Stuart, a nephew of the Confederate General, J, E. B. 
Stuart, received us cordially, but, owing to a previous engagement did 
not accept our invitation to attend the Grant Birthday banquet in 
the evening. 

At night, the banquet in celebration of the 92nd birthday of Grant 
was held in the magnificent banquet hall of the Jefferson Hotel. It 
was the most noticeable event of the entire trip, with the exception of 
the dedication of the monument itself at Andersonville, and the decor- 
ating with the medals of honor of the survivors within the prison 
stockade, two days later. A detailed account of the banquet will ap- 
pear in its proper place in these pages. 

Suffice to say here that it was worthy of the great occasion, an 
imique event not in our lives only but so far as is recalled in the experi- 
ences of veteran soldiers everywhere in history. 

Before midnight the party had again entrained and started south- 
ward. 

The first day of the " pilgrimage " was past and it will be forever 
memorable. 

THE SECOND DAY 

Tuesday, April 28th 

The trains arrived safely at Danville, Va., in the early morning. 
Here the dining cars were attached, one on Train No. 1 and two on 
Train No. 2. In these the entire party were to be fed tliroughout the 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 31 

remainder of the journey, with the sole exception (as already stated) of 
the dinner at the prison grounds at Andersonville on the following day. 

The prisons at Danville had been used largely to accommodate the 
overflow from those in Riclimond. The prison cemetery was situated 
about a mile from the • station. Trolleys and private automobiles 
quickly took us all to that quiet and modest resting-place. It is the 
smallest of the prison cemeteries, yet is as well preserved and cared 
for as are the others. 

Here, also, the good superintendent had placed the State flags on 
the graves of New York soldiers, and the Daughters of the Confeder- 
acy in Danville had adorned them with flowers. 

Here the citizens greeted us with the heartiest cordiality. The 
mayor addi'essed us. The Camp of Confederate Veterans came 
with their automobiles to carry us about and to the scene of the ser- 
vices; they also joined us in the exercises and with the utmost good 
fellowship. 

There were evidences everywhere of the typical southern hos- 
pitality and welcome for us. The ladies of the rival camps vied with 
each other to greet us with their blessings on our way. 

Danville prides itself on being the " last capital of the Confeder- 
acy," for here Jefferson Davis, retreating from Richmond, made his 
last stand, issued his last message and performed probably his last act 
as the chief of a cause which was lost. 

At the close of the services in the prison cemetery we again en- 
trained (about noon), and started on southward. As we passed the 
cemetery a mile beyond the city we could see the flowers and flags still 
upon the graves of our comrades, and we were not without a feeling, 
growing out of the cordiality of our greeting by the people of that 
city, that our dead were not indifferent to the hearts of the good people 
among whom they are destined forever to lie. 

Promptly on time in the early afternoon we reached Salisbury, 
N.C. 



32 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Here is the greatest of the prison cemeteries, with the sole excep- 
tion of Andersonville, and here also we were greeted with the greatest 
cordiahty by the people. If there was a single one among the popula- 
tion who did not welcome om- coming, he was not in evidence. Ban- 
ners were in the air and the mayor and the leading citizens accom- 
panied us to the grounds and participated in the services. 

The State of Pennsylvania has done itself great honor by the 
splendid monument it has erected at the entrance to the cemetery to 
Salisbury's " unknown " dead. The spot itself is " beautiful for situa- 
tion," although not large, and it has been preserved, as have all the 
national cemeteries throughout the South, with the greatest care. 

Here the great name that the people mentioned as having given 
distinction to their city was not Jefferson Davis but Andrew Jackson. 
We were shown his residence and the office where he started the 
practice of law. 

The pathos of Salisbury is the enormous number of the dead who 
are " unknown." 

No nomenclature of the prisoners appears to have survived, if one 
was kept, so comparatively few of the interments have their names 
upon their graves, but, instead, a definite area, level as a lawn, but sur- 
rounded by a hedge to define its outline, contains the sepulchre of 
12,000 Union prisoners, all of whom were " unknown." It was their 
destiny to " lie among those who are numbered and not among those 
who are named." 

The whole area where these men were buried is less than an acre in 
extent. They told us that eighteen huge trenches were dug, parallel 
to each other, and, as the dead were borne from the prisons, they were 
simply piled upon each other, day after day, and the earth shoveled 
over them as fast as the trenches were filled. The way they ascer- 
tained the number thus interred was by digging do^vn along the edge 
of the trenches and counting how many deep the dead were lying, then 
by multiplying this by the length and nimiber of the trenches, they 




Assemblyman J. L. Patrie 
Member of Commission 




Assemblyman John Kerrigan 
Member of Commission 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 33 

reached the appalling result that 12,000 Union prisoners had been thus 

rudely sepulchred upon that spot and lie there till this day 

" Unknown as veiled beneath the sheltering sod. 
But they are dear to liberty 
And they are known to God." 

The overwhelming memories of the comrades who had been long 
confined here (as also at Danville and Richmond) , and who now, after 
half a century re-visited the spot, can only be imagined by the people 
of the State who had no such grim experiences in their own youth, and 
the civilians on the " pilgrimage," commissioners and members of the 
Legislature, have expressed themselves as so mightily impressed at 
witnessing it that they never shall forget it. Many stood silent, with 
vmcovered heads and in tears. 

It should be remembered that the prisons in Richmond, Danville 
and Salisbury existed for practically the whole four years of the war, 
while that at Andersonville, whither we were bound, was only during 
the last year, and that at Florence for a less period. Indeed, it was 
only when Sherman, in his march to the sea, entered Georgia, that the 
fear that he would march to Andersonville and release the prisoners 
caused the construction of the stockade at Florence and minor ones 
elsewhere, to which the prisoners could be transferred in that event. 

We did not on this trip visit Florence, as it was not on our route ; 
still the superintendent of that cemetery was so kind as to place our 
State flags upon the graves of om* dead on the day of our passing 
through the State of South Carolina enroute to Andersonville. With 
the single exception of Florence we " stopped awhile," planted our 
flags, sung our songs and voiced our reverential tribute to New 
York's prison dead in every distinctively prison cemetery in the 
South. 

The afternoon at Salisbury drew finally to a close. Comrades who 
had been prisoners there wandered about seeking the familiar spots. 
The writer accompanied Mayor Boynton and the Hon. Robert L. 

3 



34 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Drummond of Auburn, N. Y., to the site where the prison itself had 
stood. Mr. Drumniond recognized the precise spot, though the build- 
ings were gone, by the surrounding conformation of the land. Mayor 
Bo3'nton corroborated his statements. 

The accuracy of the nimiber of dead in these cemeteries is to be 
questioned. Their estimates are doubtless the minimum number in 
all cases. 

That the dead in Salisbury should even exceed those in Richmond 
is to be explained, not by decreasing those at Salisbury but by assum- 
ing that only a fraction of the prisoners who died in Richmond are in 
every way accounted for. 

The motive of the prison authorities in minifying the number of 
dead prisoners is obvious, 'and the probabilities are that the number 
who died in Richmond was as great as at Salisbury, while at Danville 
many more than the estimated number doubtless perished. It should 
be remembered also that the terrible mortality occurred in Richmond, 
Danville and Salisbury over a period of four years, while at Ander- 
sonville it was in one. 

At early evening we were again on the trains, the people accom- 
panying us to the station with farewell greetings, and we once more 
were away on the last leg of our journey into the southland. 

Behind us lay the dead of Richmond, Danville and Salisbury, to 
whom we had paid our humblest tribute. Before us on the morrow, 
'Andersonville. 

THE THIRD DAY 

We arrived promptly on time at 8 a. m., on Wednesday, April 29, 
1914, at Andersonville, Ga. 

Here we found awaiting us Col. W. C. Langfitt of the Engineer 
Corps, U. S. A., who was President Wilson's representative on the 
occasion, and the splendid band which the Government had sent us 
from Fort Screven, Tybee Island, Savannah, Ga., to participate in 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 35 

the ceremonies. Also a number of people from the country around 
were on hand (a few from Americus and Fitzgerald, nearby places), 
but as Andersonville is remote from any town or city of any consider- 
able size, the nmnber from the' vicinage who greeted us was small. 

But the day was perfect, a veritable " day in Jime." The foliage 
was out in full, flowers were in bloom, the air was balmy, the tempera- 
ture that of early summer with us. All had arrived in good health. 
Thus the day long anticipated had come at last and Nature had 
lavished all her charms to make of that spot, that was once so grim 
and ruthless, to-day a place of beauty, where trees and lawns, paths 
and monuments, flowers and flags adorned it; and, with uncovered 
heads and reverent step, these survivors for fifty years of the unutter- 
able horrors of that prison (at Andersonville) , re-entered it, with ban- 
ners and with bugles; with gratitude in their hearts and songs upon 
their lips ; with cheers for the living and tears for the dead, to dedicate 
the noble monument which the State of New York had there erected 
to the memory of her sons who, on that spot, had perished. 

The superintendent of the cemetery and the authorities of the Cen- 
tral of Georgia Railroad had co-operated with us in pre-arrangements. 
The State flags were on all New York soldiers' graves (2,500 of 
them), and over acre after acre of graves these were clearly distin- 
guished as far as the eye could see. 

The monument itself was draped by a national flag. A modest 
platform had been erected immediately in front of it and draped with 
bunting. 

The band preceded the procession, as with solemn step it entered 
under the arches within those hallowed acres. It was an impressive 
sight, perhaps unprecedented. 

Other States had sent their delegations and their veterans here 
before to dedicate their monuments, but years had elapsed since the 
last of these had occurred, and now a full half century had passed 
since the prison at Andersonville had been crowded with Union 



36 STATE OF NEW YORK 

soldiers in " durance vile," and yet these men had lived to celebrate 
the semi-centennial of their freedom on the spot of their sufferings. 

From every lip there sprung a wish that every citizen of the State 
of New York could have been an eye witness of this pathetic pil- 
grimage, thus culminating, as these survivors of this prison re-entered 
it with heads erect and hearts aglow ; with music and with prayer, to 
stand above the faces of their comrades who had lain entombed so 
silent and so long upon the sacred spot. 

The exercises of the forenoon consisted of addresses by the 
ex-prisoners themselves, no others being permitted to participate in 
them. Even the prayer was made by a clergyman who had been a 
prisoner here. 

At noon the entire party passed southward to the old prison stock- 
ade, and the survivors were aligned upon the very spots where their 
rude huts once stood, and on the breast of each one (as his name was 
called and he stepped out in front), was pinned a badge of honor, 
inscribed with his name, his Company and his Regiment, and the 

words, " Survivor — Presented to by the State 

of New York in recognition of his heroism, sacrifice and patriotism." 
The ladies who had been selected to perform this delicate service were, 
respectively, either the mother, daughter or grand-daughter of one of 
the commissioners to whom the State had entrusted the duty of this 
dedication. 

Then followed the barbecue, served under the trees which had 
sprung up within the prison grounds since it had ceased to be a prison 
and had become a park under the ownership and care of the nation. 
It was intended that the " survivors " should have one " square meal " 
of local character upon the very spot where once they had " hungered 
and thirsted for righteousness' sake." 

After the barbeque, the chairman was surprised to hear a call to 
the veterans to gather in a group, and, standing among them, a loving 
cup was brought forth, which had been procured in Riclimond, and 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 37 

which was presented to him as a token of the " love and esteem of his 
comrades." The loving cup was filled with water from " God's 
Providence Spring." 

The illustrations and addresses which accompany this report in 
these pages will give to the reader but a faint conception of the 
memorable scenes. 

Afterward, the comrades scattered over the stockade, each trying 
to identify the precise place where he had once slept, judging it by its 
distance from some identified spot. Upon the exact place where, fifty 
years before, some Tennesseans and others, with Secretary Killgore, 
were engaged in digging a tunnel in an effort to escape, Thomas 
O'Dea (author of the famous picture of Andersonville) , found a brass 
U. S. A. button which he presented to Mr. Killgore, who regards it as 
of priceless value. 

Promptly in the early afternoon the bugles sounded the call ; the 
band played its national music and all gathered in the cemetery again 
before the monument for the final scene of its dedication. 

The addresses now were by the Speaker of the Assembly, the 
Leader of the Senate, representing the Governor in his absence, and 
the representative of the President of the United States. The prayer, 
however, was by one of the surviving veterans, and then, with drums 
rolling, slowly the monument was unveiled and the magnificence of the 
bas-relief appeared to all eyes. Then a final prayer of dedication, a 
benediction and the bugles sounded "taps ;" the dedication was accom- 
plished and the monument was left in the care of the nation forever. 

Thereafter the afternoon was spent by the party strolling around 
the graves, many seekiiig the resting-places of those whom they had 
knov/n, their relatiA^es or their comrades. Deciphering the names of 
the headstones was not difficult, since they had been preserved with 
care; and the hearts of all were grateful to the Government for the 
splendid preservation which it had here maintained of the sepulchres 
of its heroes. 



38 STATE OF NEW YORK 

At early evening all were again on the trains and away. It had 
been a day never to be forgotten and never to be repeated — a great 
day in our lives. A proud day also for the State we represented; a 
day in which she had at last, if tardily, conferred her final honor and 
tribute upon those of her sons who had served her more sublimely than 
those who had died in battle, and were indeed the last flower of her 
glory and her pride. 

Thiu-sday morning, April 30th, we arrived at the battle-ground of 
Chickamauga, Tenn., Train No. 2 being somewhat belated by the 
heavy grades over the moimtains. 

The entire party, in automobiles, now drove through the historic 
battle-field, along Missionary Ridge, into Chattanooga. Here, also, 
whenever we passed a monument which marked the valor of a New 
York regiment, a State flag was planted, the whole procession pausing 
a moment at each such spot. 

The afternoon was spent at Lookout Mountain, where, at the base 
of the New York Peace Monument, a final session of farewell was 
held. 

Starting northward again in the early evening, the second train 
was again delayed in reaching Washington the next day, which gave 
those on Train No. 1 a few hours at the capital. Both trains started 
together, however, on the last run from Washington and were in sight 
of each other all the way to New York. They arrived promptly on 
time in the Pennsylvania terminal at the same hour on which five days 
before they had started from that same platform. 

All were well. There had been a few delays; no accidents; the 
weather had been perfect; the 2,500 miles had been without discom- 
fort; and, with radiant faces and grateful hearts, all returned safely 
home, and the " pilgrimage to the shrines of patriotism " was accom- 
plished. 



RICHMOND, VA. 

RICHMOND, VA., was the capital of the Confederate States 
and the center of its military operations. To that city the 
prisoners captured from the Union armies were generally first 
taken and thence were distributed to the other prison camps as the 
Rebel authorities ordained. It is estimated that -altogether 125,000 
Union soldiers were at some time imprisoned in the city of Riclimond. 

The chief prisons were Libby, Belle Island, Castle Thundei', 
Smith, Pemberton and Mayo's Prison hospital. These were all, 
except Belle Island, tobacco warehouses, idle on account of the wai% 
and used temporarily for this purpose. 

Libby prison, on the southeast corner of Carey and 18th streets, 
has become the most widely known. It was there that the commis- 
sioned officers were confined. This famous bastille of the Confederates 
was removed, brick by brick, to Chicago at the time of the World's 
Fair. 

Belle Island was, however, the largest prison of Richmond, for 
there the private soldiers were assembled in great numbers. Belle 
Island is situated in the James river immediately opposite the city of 
Richmond and just above the long bridge which connects the north 
and south banks of that stream. It embraces an area of perhaps 100 
acres. The prison camp was located on the lower end of the island 
facing the city. It consisted of an enclosure of about ten acres. It 
was stockaded and had a fatal but undefined " dead line." The num- 
ber of prisoners confined here varied from one to ten thousand. Their 
sufferings during the extremely cold winters of '63 and '64 are inde- 
scribable. The ratio of mortality on Belle Island probably surpassed 
that of any other prison in the Confederacy. 

39 



40 STATE OF NEW YORK 

The hospital known as Mayo's was simply a double tobacco ware- 
house which was set apart for the care of the sick prisoners, to which 
they were brought from all the prisons where enlisted men were 
confined. 

The national cemetery at Riclimond lies just beyond the city limits 
on the northeast. Here the dead were brought from all the prisons 
and rudely interred. In this national cemetery at Richmond there 
are .5,670 graves, of which 892 are known and 5,678 unknown. Not a 
single monument has been erected to commemorate these dead. The 
Government, however, gives to their resting-place its constant care. 
In a pavilion in the midst of the graves the services on the morning of 
April 27th were held. 

THE FIRST DAY 

National Cemetery, Richmond, Va., April 27, 1914, at 11 a. m. 

EXERCISES 

The chairman, Senator A. J. Palmer, standing in the pavilion in 
the midst of the graves, with the comrades gathered around, opened 
the services with a brief invocation and address as follows : 

Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, we thank Thee that we live ; 
that after fifty years " with long life Thou hast satisfied us and shown 
us Thy salvation " and that we are privileged this beautiful morning 
in this lovely southland to stand with reverence above the quiet faces 
of our comrades who half a century ago here gave their lives for their 
country, and have lain here so long in silence. 

" Great God of Battles ! Hear us yet, 
Lest we forget, lest we forget." 

God bless our country. God bless these veterans of the Union 
armies who survived their own imprisomiient and are now privileged 
to make this great undertaking in memory of their comrades who here 
perished, and who lie all about us so long asleep, and unto Thee be 
eternal glory, w^orld without end. Amen. 




Assemblyman Frank M Bradley 

Member of Commission 




Assemblyman Caleb H. Baumes 
Member of Commission 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 41 

Comrades, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

We are gathered this morning at the first of the national ceme- 
teries, where, in this pathetic journey to dedicate a monument to those 
who perished in the last of the prisons at Andersonville, we have 
paused awhile. 

We are to celebrate in this city the birthday of General Grant, in 
quietness, without ostentation, and without offending, I trust, any 
one's sensibilities, but without a particle of fear that anywhere in our 
country where we may be on the 27th of April, we shall not remember 
Ulysses S. Grant. (Applause.) 

Now, of the four Confederate prisons where we will find ourselves 
in the coming three days — here on Monday ; to-morrow at Danville, 
Va., and at Salisbury, N. C, and all day Wednesday at Andersonville 
— this happens to be the only one where I was personally confined. I 
spent nine months of my boyhood in Confederate prisons. I was cap- 
tured at the night assault on Fort Wagner, S. C, on the 18th day of 
July, 1863, and spent three days in the jail at Charleston; two months 
in the prison at Columbia, S. C, whence in September we were moved 
" On to Richmond." Now, " On to Riclamond! " was a phrase in our 
boyhood. At the head of all the papers stood a tremendous headline, 
" On to Riclimond! " and we were at last " on the spot." (Laughter.) 

We had come our weary journey from Columbia, S. C, stopping 
a day in transit in Salisburjs N. C, and Danville, Va., and late at 
night we were arraj^ed on Shocko Hill in front of the Confederate 
capitol in Riclimond, Va. We were counted, and we expected that 
night that we were to be immediately paroled and sent home, for we 
had been promised that if we behaved ourselves all the way from South 
Carolina, as soon as we reached the capitol of the Confederacy at Rich- 
mond, we would be exchanged and allowed to go back to our regiments 
and our people. Instead of that, when we asked, "Are we to be 
paroled? " " No," they replied, " not much, Yanks ; you-uns are to be 
took to Libby prison." 



42 STATE OF NEW YORK 

As we approached it, a voice from an upper window broke into 
singing, " We are coming. Father Abraham, three hundred thousand 
more." That was a sweet voice, my comrades. I often heard it in 
after years. It is silenced now, alas, forever, but never did he sing as 
on that hour in the Confederate capital when we approached at mid- 
night the doors of X^ibby prison. That singer was Chaplain McCabe. 
(Applause.) 

They marched us into Libby prison. They counted us; they 
searched us ; they stripped us of everything of any value. They even 
felt under our armpits to see if we had not a greenback hidden away 
there. They had the color wrong of the " backs " which they would 
have found. (Laughter and applause.) They were, however, wel- 
come, as far as I was concerned, to all they got from me, for the water- 
melons in Columbia had been very good, I tell you, the whole summer 
through. 

Then, three days afterward, the private soldiers were taken to 
Belle Island. You know they had no business much with private 
soldiers here where the comforts were. The commissioned officers had 
much more consideration than the private soldiers in all the Confeder- 
ate prisons. So we were sent to Belle Island, and we went to sleep 
that night on Mother Earth. I never will forget the day we crossed 
the two bridges to Belle Island. There ought to be a tower on that 
island still, and on that tower a bell, and it should toll for a thousand 
years a knell for the heroes who died on that cruel spot. 

We received one ration a day, at 11 o'clock. It consisted of a lump 
of corn bread, the size of your fist, and sometimes a cubic inch of meat 
or a swallow of soup — nothing more. 

We slept on the ground and in each other's arms, or we walked 
tlirough the night in squad formation to keep from freezing when the 
nights were cold. There is one night that I remember, late in the win- 
ter, when I grew faint and ill, and but for my two comrades would 
have perished like the rest. Their names were John Wilgus and John 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 43 

Clark, both of Company " D," of the 48th N. Y. The three of us 
" bunked " together anywhere in a hollow out of the wind, for we had 
but one blanket between us, and I remember that because I was a little 
fellow I always slept in the middle. When the dawn broke, after that 
bitter night of sickness and of cold, my faithful comrades wi-apped me 
in that one blanket and carried me out to the doctor at the gate of the 
stockade. They left the blanket with me and they both perished them- 
selves for want of it. 

Somewhere about us here, in an unknown grave, one of them lies. 
We will find the other in a marked grave at Andersonville, and I have 
asked my daughter to stand upon one these unknown graves, hoping 
it may be his, and lay a wreath upon it, in some memorial of the com- 
rades who carried me out and left the blanket with me. She will do 
the same at Andersonville, where the other sleeps. 

From Belle Island they took me to a prison hospital, known as 
Mayo's tobacco warehouse, just below Libby prison on Carey street, 
and there I remained until April. 

Richmond was the spot where practically all the prisoners of the 
Union in the northern part of the soutliland were originally confined. 
The officers were in Libby, the privates on Belle Island or in Castle 
Thunder, or in Pemberton, or in Smith's, but all of them, when they 
were ill, in the Mayo's Prison hospital. 

Every morning I would take the list and write out their names, 
when I grew better. These that lie about you are the prisoners who 
perished here. The entire number buried here is said to be 6,572, of 
which 874 are known and 5,678 are unknown. 

It was fifty years and ten days ago, on the 17th of April, 1864, 
that I managed, after nine months, to escape from that prison hos- 
pital ; crept out, before daylight in the morning, at a little gate that I 
would like to show you all, and got on a boat that was going down the 
river, and was transferred to a flag of truce boat under an assumed 
name, and saw once more, after nine months, the flag of my country 
over my head. (Applause.) 



44 STATE OF NEW YORK 

I pause here, this morning in Richmond, to pay a belated tribute 
that I have often paid elsewhere, in many audiences all over this 
country and afar, to one class of women that served us well in the 
prison hospital in the city of Richmond. I refer to the Sisters of 
Charity. (Applause.) Day by day, they, and they alone, visited our 
lonely cots, and while I live I shall venerate their memory for that one 
deed ; and though it is fifty years ago and although they were not of 
my creed, I have never passed a Sister of Charity on the streets of any 
city without lifting my hat to her in grateful memory of those good 
women. (Applause.) 

As I shall incidentally, here and there along the journey (if I do 
not weary you or am not overwearied myself), add a line and a word 
as we pass, I will no longer this morning detain you from the formal 
speakers of the day. 

I look upon these comrades that have lain here in unmarked graves 
so long as the supreme heroes of the war. Every single one of them 
had a way to escape. All you had to do was to walk out to the gate 
and hold up your hands and say you were ready to take the oath of 
allegiance to the Confederacy, and you would have walked out scot 
free. You would have been stripped of the shreds of your blue uni- 
form and clothed in Confederate gray. You would have been sent to 
the rear in some secondary service, but you. would have lived to see 
your home again. How many of them did it? In the city of Rich- 
mond, not eighty of them, all told ; but six thousand of them lie dead 
about om* feet rather than do that. 

So I call them the supreme heroes of the war that saved the Union. 
It is true they were mere private soldiers. They were not what you 
call, therefore, great soldiers; that is, they were not generals. They 
were not colonels, or captains. They were privates. But they were 
gTcat spirits and their sufferings ennobled them until they became the 
noblest names in all the history of our country, and every single one of 
them, when he went down to his death, believed that he was dying in 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 45 

order that he might keep his country on the map of the world and her 
flag in Heaven — and he did it. 

My comrades, and ladies and gentlemen, I have the honor now to 
introduce to you the Hon. Harold J. Hinman, majority leader of the 
Assembly of the State of New York. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS BY THE HON. HAROLD J. HINMAN 

Mr. Chairman, Members of the Commission, Veterans, Ladies 
AND Gentlemen: 

It is an inspiration to all of us to be called from the pursuits of 
peace to scenes like this. As representatives of the grateful people of 
a grateful State, ours is a labor of love, bearing testimony after half a 
century that the sacrifices and sufferings of these brave men will never 
fade away. We, in turn, draw inspiration from the lives and loyalty 
of our sleeping sons in these peaceful graves, an inspiration to 
strengthen us in the cause of right. 

We do not come in a spirit of sectionalism, voicing the plaudits of 
a section alone; but rather, delivering the verdict of New York in 
harmony with the verdict of the nation. These men have won the 
plaudits of their State but they deserve, as do all who are buried here, 
the grateful homage of their nation. They gave up their lives that the 
nation might live. We are indeed proud, however, that New York 
State did her full share, and our presence here to-day, like the monu- 
ments here erected, bears witness that the Divine Hand will never 
draw a veil of oblivion over the lives and deeds of these brave sons who 
are sleeping here. (Applause.) 

I shall attempt no further eulogy. The story of their privations 
and sufferings will outlast even these monuments that symbolize a 
nation's gratitude to its slain defenders. 

We do not come in a spirit of controversy. This hallowed groimd, 
this beautiful cemetery, adding respect and veneration to heroic sepul- 
chre, the presence of these veteran survivors late in the evenings of 



46 STATE OF NEW YORK 

their days, which a hounteous Heaven has lengthened out that they 
might behold a better and reunited country, fill us with tender and 
patriotic emotions. We come, not to stir up hatred, but to whisper 
benedictions on our country; not to kindle anew sectional prejudice, 
but, in everlasting memory of those who fell, to learn to love our 
country which was saved with such a price, and to allay all sectional 
bitterness as we rejoice in a nation united for all time, a blessing to 
our whole people and to all the nations of the earth. (Applause.) 

We are doubly grateful in the realization that the South itself 
would not to-day have the result other than was achieved — one gov- 
ernment under one flag. (Applause.) Time has wiped out the 
Mason and Dixon's line. The South, as well as the North, gazes with 
loyalty at the stars and stripes floating from the public buildings at 
Richmond and throughout the South. And so we come to-day, not 
bearing the old signals of war, but the nobler messages of peace, the 
peace which every sentiment of Chi'istianity and humanity prompts as 
we witness the awful ravages of barbarous warfare, when we visit the 
scenes of battle where soldiers of the North and South lay across each 
other in one red burial, when we stand as we do to-day upon fields now 
himmiing with the sounds of peace amidst these monuments marking 
their last resting-place for patriot pilgrims. 

To know how sweet a thing is peace, we need to see it through war 
— " grim-visaged war " — with its blood and its tears, its heartburn 
and its woes ; and so we are deeply impressed with om- duty to try to 
hasten the glad day when war shall be no more and the v-ictories of 
peace shall be greater than the victories of war. 

The nations of the earth are being invited to join with Great 
Britain and the United States in 1915 in a world-wide peace jubila- 
tion. A manifesto has been issued by an international conference, 
appealing " that the time has come when international rivalries and 
diff'erences, though numerous and severe, may be settled without the 
carnage and horrors of war." 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 47 

But even as these plans of peace are materializing, the clouds of 
war are hanging over us. The hope of the nation that President 
Wilson might adjust our differences with Mexico under a policy of 
peace and honor, it seems may not be realized. Once more may come 
the call to arms, but a call, thank God, to which both the North and 
the South will respond. (Applause.) In elbow touch they will face 
the enemy together as they did at Manila and Santiago, comrades and 
patriots under one flag. 

Mr. Chairman, as I stand here to-day, on hallowed ground, I can- 
not help wondering whether this Union, preserved by the heroic sacri- 
fices of these brave men, will endure forever as a republic. I am not a 
pessimist, but I cannot help feeling there is an undertow which has a 
tendency to drag us from our moorings as a nation and a people, and 
which invites the earnest consideration of all our thoughtful citizens. 
Our fathers took the greatest political step in history when they wrote 
into our constitution provisions which distributed the powers of the 
various governmental branches. They moored our ship of state with 
the great cables of State government, as well as national, and with the 
executive, legislative and judicial branches of both. They devised 
safeguards that have prevented any man or group of men from being 
the dictators of government, and promised to every man equal rights 
under the law. 

If we would stem the tide of paternalism which is driving this 
coimtry to over-centralization and making our great ship of state 
strain hard at every cable, we need to preserve every cable intact. The 
tendency is to place too great reliance upon the cable of national gov- 
ernment, to the exclusion of the State ; of the executive as opposed to 
the legislative and judicial. 

I believe in a perfect Union. I rejoice that it has been preserved, 
in the words of the Supreme Court, "An indissoluble union of inde- 
structible states." The danger that threatens is the increasing ten- 
dency to concentrate in the Federal government powers that should be 



48 STATE OF NEW YORK 

left to the States, and to exalt the executive and dwarf the legislative 
and judicial, and to create powers that neither the State nor the nation 
should have, with the effect to overgovern a people who can best 
govern themselves. 

It is not by powers congested in the hands of a strong central gov- 
ernment, but by the enlightenment of the conscience of the people that 
popular government can best be preserved. The triumph of our gov- 
ernment has been that it exists for the individual and not the individual 
for the government, to protect the individual in the enjoyment of life, 
liberty and ownership of property, to build up the individual, to leave 
room for and to invite the growth and development of his character, 
independence, self-reliance and manhood. (Applause.) 

As the State is the unit of the nation, the citizen is the unit of the 
State, and instead of having the Government do everything for him, 
we need to teach him to lean on the State for nothing that his own arm 
can do, and on the nation for nothing that his State can do. Thus 
only can the tremendous forces of this republic be kept in balance. It 
is ours to decide whether, in this government which carries the hopes 
of the human race, there are one hundred million people who are cap- 
able, and will alwaj's continue to be capable, of self-government; or, 
whether in the unbalancing of forces, in the dwarfing of the responsi- 
bility of the citizen to himself, his family, his country and his God, 
there shall be chaos. Character, individual character, bids fair to be 
lost in the dazzling splendor of a strong paternalistic govermnent. 
With the loss of individual character, with the loss of the integrity of 
the home, and with the dwarfing of any of our fundamental checks and 
balances, the needs of this vast and complex goverrmient cannot be 
met. It means, eventually, a rush to despotism. 

Our republic, for which these men fought and died, and for which 
many amongst us to-day have dared to die, is menaced with great dan- 
gers — not the danger of sectional revolt, for, thank God, the denial 
of the right of a State to leave this Union has been decided forever — 




Comrade Silas G. Burdick 
Member of Commission 




Comrade Rev. Isaac M. Foster 
Member of Commission 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 49 

but the danger of a class revolt ; not the stars and bars of secession, but 
the red flag of communism, or the black flag of anarchy ; not the estab- 
lishment of a separate nation carved out of this nation, but the 
re-establishment of ourselves as a socialistic nation in denial of that 
which is the fundamental basis of our prosperity; not keeping the 
Union intact, but keeping the constitution intact. 

Where would they lead us? To the point where the many may say 
to the few, " It is our will that you give up what you have got." 
Lincoln, down to the dark hours of the Rebellion, refused to interfere 
with slavery because the constitution forbade it. It was not until 
death to slavery meant life to the republic, until it seemed necessary as 
a war measm'e to punish those in rebellion who had forfeited their 
rights under the constitution, that he issued his proclamation of eman- 
cipation, and then only to free the slaves of those who were in rebellion 
against the Union. 

Are we going to forget it was only by the sacrifice of individual 
rights that the Ijacedemonians, Athenians and Romans possessed any 
democratic government? Is it at such government we could arrive? 

Woe unto us when we can no longer appeal in an orderly way, 
under a government of law, to courts having authority to say that the 
fundamental rights of no man shall be violated. Woe unto us when 
it no longer pays to be provident, self-reliant and responsible ! When 
the improvident, shiftless and irresponsible are fed at the hands of an 
overgrown government which levies its toll upon one class for the 
benefit of another; when a portion of a people would exist but by the 
entire enslavement of the other portion of the people. Our republic 
which we love — and for the perpetuity of which these brave men are 
buried here after unexampled sufferings, heroic sacrifices and devotion 
through a fearful ordeal — our republic cannot endure unless we fight 
for the perpetuity of the dominion of fundamental law, guaranteeing 
individual liberty, equality and opportunitj^ and preserving the wise 
distribution of authority which our fathers established. 
4 



50 STATE OF NEW YORK 

And so the world moves on, bringing in its wake new problems 
which are continually testing whether this nation, as Lincoln said, 
" Conceived in liberty and dedicated to equal rights and justice to all," 
can long endure. It is for us, the living, therefore, to be dedicated 
here to the great unfinished and never-ending task which those who 
fought fifty years ago so nobly advanced. (Applause.) 

Mr. Chairman, I thank you for this opportunity to speak; and, 
ladies and gentlemen, I thank you very much for the courtesy of your 
attention. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS BY HON. J. L. PATRIE 

Mr. Chairman, Members of the Commission, Survivors of 
Andersonville Prison, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

It was only a few moments ago when I was asked if I wovdd say a 
few words here this morning, and upon that occasion I was admon- 
ished to be very brief if I did say anything, and I suggested to the 
chairman that I would be brief indeed, if I had any remarks to make. 

I have not the honor, due to my youth, to be among the living here 
as a survivor of the great civil strife, or even the greater honor to lie 
here beneath the sod with the 7,500 heroes who are lying here, whose 
faces were paled in death fifty years ago, and, gentlemen, I know of 
no greater honor that an individual might obtain than that of being 
here as a survivor, or, possibly, perhaps a greater honor, to lie here 
among the slain. 

Very much has been said in regard to these dead heroes and the 
survivors, and I will not undertake to enlarge thereon, but must apolo- 
gize for the feeble command which I have of the English language — 
my best effort would be inadequate and the words which I might com- 
mand would be insignificant compared with the emphasis with which I 
wish to express them. I desire to reiterate in substance what has been 
said by the chairman, Mr. Palmer, and also by the other speaker, Hon. 
Assembhuian Hinman. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 51 

We are here to-day in what was the center of the Confederacy, the 
capital, if you please, and as has been said, the cry in the North was, 
*' On to Riclimond! " Richmond was at that time the objective point, 
a point of great importance, and to-day, as we look back and observe 
the reconstruction which has taken place during the past fifty years, 
we will note that this vicinity is yet rich with historic surroundings 
and historic facts. The city of Riclmiond has developed from a small 
town, which was founded about 1773, and was, just before the Civil 
War, incorporated into a city which has become one of the great and 
important factors in this commonwealth and in the United States. 

I believe it is to-day a city of approximately 150,000 inhabitants, 
with many of the best institutions obtainable. I will mention one 
institution, the College of Richmond, which is known tliroughout the 
length and breadth of the United States as an institution recognized 
by the great educational authorities throughout the United States. 
When the educational department of the State of New York will 
recognize an institution as giving adequate and sufficient training to 
compare favorably with the institutions of the great Empire State, you 
may rest assured, gentlemen, that that institution gives proper and 
sufficient training, and the College of Richmond is recognized by our 
State educational institutions and societies as meeting these require- 
ments. That is sufficient. 

It is absolutely necessary that higher and better educational facili- 
ties should obtain in order that the training for our boys and girls 
should be adequate and proper, as the gentleman, Mr. Hinman, who 
preceded me, suggested — and, you will pardon me if I drive a little 
away from the mark, gentlemen, because he brought the matter to our 
attention, and it is a very important subject. Let me suggest to you, 
gentlemen, that I have given the matter some attention, having been 
in the Legislature of the State of New York many years. There we 
have to consider all kinds of suggestions, " isms " and devices which 
detract, weaken and poison the minds of individuals who are not as 



52 STATE OF NEW YORK 

strong mentally as they might be, tending to incline them and to lead 
them to anarchy and socialism. Let me suggest to you that the consti- 
tution of this nation when originally drawn was drawn by great men, 
many of whom lived in this vicinity and it has seldom been amended. 
Many of the framers of our constitution resided right here, and inside 
the walls of one church in this city five presidents of the United States 
had their place of worship. 

I guess I have lost track of what I was about to say ; I will get back 
to it — let me ask you to stand by the constitution of the United 
States ; let no one destroy the sacred provisions contained therein or its 
beautiful effect. Do not lose sight of the fact that there are editorials 
published throughout the State, from time to time, for the purpose of 
exciting and inflaming the weak minds of some people who will readily 
purchase these papers in large nvmibers. Great headlines sell readily 
even if the sensational matter is inflaming the minds of the many 
readers with anything except Americanism. Let me ask you to stand 
firmly by the constitution of the United States. It was well and care- 
fully prepared — so well prepared and our rights so properly safe- 
guarded that few, very few, amendments have ever been made, and 
then only to meet changed conditions, requiring such amendments. 

Let us remember that the man or individual who by his thrift, 
industry and economy has brought together a certain amount of prop- 
erty and wealth for the maintenance of those about him, is entitled to 
the use and enjoyment of that wealth for himself and those dependent 
upon him ; and the irresponsible man who comes shouting and clamor- 
ing, and the paper which would advocate that his property should be 
torn from liim and divided among all classes — including anarchists 
and I. W. W's., existing in different parts of the country — that man 
is an enemy to all good government under which we exist and have 
prospered. (Applause.) 

We have in the State of New York to-day just a few papers which 
publish such articles, and the individuals back of them and the man- 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 53 

agers are eager and anxious to sell those papers to the extent, that, I 
believe, they would plunge our country into war if they could sell a few 
more, a few hundred thousand copies extra. They will come out with 
headlines almost this high (indicating), dangerous, sensational, 
imaginative, suggesting facts which do not exist ; they simply imagine 
that they might soon exist and then they claim priority in publication. 
Avoid these dangerous publications. 

In this I concur with Assembly Hinman — and he is opposed to 
me politically. He and I have stood together in the Legislature for 
many measures because we each believed they were right. We stood 
there often, shoulder to shoulder, gentlemen, when we were satisfied 
the measures were right, fighting for them. "When we were satisfied 
certain measures were wrong, we, together, opposed them. We have 
oftentimes fought for measures which were not advocated by the 
leaders of our respective parties, but we stood by them because we 
believed they were right, and I believe that Mr. Hinman and myself, 
although opposed politically, have drawn closer together on more 
important political questions than any other assemblymen have done, 
who have been in the Legislature of the great imperial State for the 
last half dozen j^ears. 

I scarcely know what to say about the reconstruction policy any 
further, except that the interests of our country are identical. ^Vhat 
is good for the northern section must be good for the southern. You 
need in your great southern section, the manufacturing industries of 
the North to aid you. We need, from your great tropical section of 
the South, all that grows in abundance here, to feed om- millions of 
manufactm'ers. Our interests are therefore identical, and what is for 
the great benefit of one particular section, though we may not see it 
so, is for the mutual benefit of our whole country as a unit. 

As I stand here to-daj'^ on this hallowed ground, I clearly see indi- 
cations that we all come without malice, and that the hearts of the 
American people are drawn closer and closer together as years go by 



54 STATE OF NEW YORK 

and that we stand as one people and one country undivided; each State 
an unselfish unit or part and a helper of our great common govern- 
ment. We assemble to-day with no malice toward the people of this 
section and they receive us with open arms. We come here with our 
hearts filled with love, kindness and devotion for all mankind and with 
the spirit of oneness and unity. We come, primarily, in commemora- 
tion of the heroes who have passed before us, who have given their lives 
to our country, and we come here secondarily to indicate that we are 
part of the greatest Union under the sun which is indissoluble and 
inseparable and which will stand as long as a kingly Providence per- 
mits the earth to revolve. 

I thank you. (Applause. ) 

Senator Palmer: 

"Under the sod and the dew, waiting the judgment day, 
" Under the roses the blue; under the lilies the gray," 

and those who have survived are only less noble than those who are 
dead by the will of God. My comrades, this service is complete. 

You will be met with the automobiles about half past twelve. You 
will take luncheon, as we took breakfast, at the Jefferson Hotel. You 
are free to go where you will during the afternoon. You can visit 
Belle Island, Libby prison, Mayo's hospital ; anywhere you please. 

Be sure to be at your place at seven o'clock to-night, at the banquet 
in honor of the birthday of General Grant. 



GRANT MEMORIAL BANQUET AT 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Monday Evening^ April 27, 1914 

THE GRANT birthday banquet was held in the banquet hall 
of the Jefferson Hotel. It had been decorated, both walls 
and tables, with flags of the nation and of the State of New 
York ; also flowers adorned the tables. A string band from Richmond 
furnished appropriate music. The comrades largely wore their imi- 
forms, and the civilians present, both ladies and gentlemen, were 
mostly in evening dress. At one long table which crossed the entire 
room were seated the commissioners and the official guests. Others 
were at round tables, suitably arranged, filling the entire room. The 
banquet itself was worthy of the occasion, but without ostentation. 
There were no formal addresses but great enthusiasm. 

Senator Palmer: We are gathered, ladies and gentlemen and 
comrades, on an unique occasion. I suppose j^ou can ransack the his- 
tory of the world in vain to find precisely what you witness here 
to-night. Gettysburg was an imique occasion. You can not imagine 
the English and the French gathering fifty years after the battle of 
Waterloo on that historic field and shaking hands with one another, 
as did the boys that wore the blue and the boys that wore the gray, last 
summer at Gettysburg. (Applause.) And I suppose if the Duke of 
Wellington's birthday had been celebrated in the city of Paris fifty 
years after Waterloo by the few survivors of that obstinate body of 
the British, against which those fiery French legions had " flung their 
white wrath in vain," that nobody would have attended that banquet 
in the French capital. 

Or fancy, if you can, that fifty years after Austerlitz the survivors 
of the French legions who there had triumphed had gone to Vienna to 

55 



56 STATE OF NEW YORK 

celebrate the birthday of the Emperor Xapoleon. Such a thing is 
indeed unthinkable, for racial and national antagonisms surviv-e, alas, 
for centuries, beyond the seas. It is great proof that the estrange- 
ment between our countrymen of the North and the South, fifty years 
ago, was but temporary and happilj'- has passed away; that we can 
gather in safety and without molestation in the capital of the Southern 
Confederacy on the birthday of General Grant. It was Judge Alton 
B. Parker, who then expected to accompany us, who first called my 
attention, before we left home, to the fact that if we did pause an hour 
in Richmond to celebrate the birthday of General Grant, it would be 
an unique and unprecedented event. We make here no comparisons 
between the soldiers of the North and the South. We do not mention 
eren the names of the famous warriors of the Confederacy, who fought 
all too fiercely on this spot to destroy the Union, but we do not here 
forget that it was Grant and the boys in blue who triumphed. 

Gentlemen, I am told that some vnt of Richmond has announced 
in the morning papers that on the 92nd birthday of General Grant the 
Yankees have " entered Riclunond, unannounced and unopposed." 
(Laughter and applause.) I regret that we were unannounced but 
am glad that we are unopposed. 

I have all day long been pondering in my mind whether I should 
select a half dozen of you to speak at this banquet to-night, for I know 
that I am surrounded at these tables by Senators and Assembljinen, 
and speakers of at least State-wide reputation. In other words, 
whether it is the best of taste for us to have some oratory to-night, such 
as we would have if we were gathered at home with the Grant Post in 
Brooklyn, for example. Considering this is without precedent and 
that we come among a people whom we now all love so well, and that 
the boys that may go to Mexico will be the grandsons of the boj's who 
wore the gray as well as of the boys that wore the blue (applause) , and 
that we are one country now and are to be one country forever, and 
that while we need not forget we all should now forgive, I have finally 




Comrade Robert B. McCully 
Member of Commission 




Comrade George R. Browx 
Member of Commission 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 57 

determined, with the concui'rence of my associates, that perhaps it will 
he as well if we simply rise now and drink together a toast in silence, 
rather than have any prolonged oratory, even on the birthday of that 
distinguished soldier who led us all to triumph. 

I could easily speak a while myself about General Grant, and I 
was once a very appropriate person to speak of hun, because he was 
the head of the army and I was the tail of it. (Laughter.) I was a 
little fellow way down in the ranks, out of sight. I have always had 
the reputation of being the youngest enlisted man in the army. I was 
precisely fourteen years, six months and six days old on that day when 
I erdisted as a soldier in the army of the United States, and there is 
not a man anywhere that I have ever met, and thousands have con- 
tested it, that has not conceded that I was the youngest enlisted soldier, 
and I was also only a private soldier. 

I was an acting corporal one night, on the picket lines in front of 
Petersburg. Except for that I was always just a private soldier. We 
all got what we deserved, you know, in those days. I had served three 
years before I was seventeen and one-half years old. So from me to 
General Grant there was a long distance. There were a great number 
of corporals ahead of the privates, and I was a little fellow in the rear 
ranks, short of stature, even among the privates. There were lots of 
privates " bigger " than me. Then there were all the sergeants. Then 
all the lieutenants. Then all the captains and the majors and the 
lieutenant-colonels, and then the colonels that commanded the regi- 
ments, and the brigadier-generals that commanded the brigades, then 
all the major-generals that commanded the army corps, and all of 
them were betwpen " him and me." It was a long ways from the tail 
of the army to the head of it fifty years ago. Yet, somehow, that 
qualifies me to propose this toast to-night, for while there was but one 
of him, there was a million of me. 

I saw him first in Petersburg, the day the mine was exploded. He 
was riding along the lines and we threw up our hats and cheered. 



58 STATE OF NEW YORK 

I saw him afterward in private life. He did me the unique honor 
the last time in his life that he appeared in public to come and hear me 
speak. I never saw his face again, but I came a thousand miles to 
follow in that procession up Riverside Drive to his sepulchre; and 
when the ships came home from Santiago I was in the conning tower 
of one of them, and they sailed through the narrows, up the bay, up 
the harbor and up the river. They stopped when they passed the 
battery and then went on till they reached the tomb on Riverside 
Drive, and above all their cannons that came home from a successful 
war, above the smoke and above the noise, somehow I heard a voice 
proceeding out of that tomb and from the silent lips, " Let us have 
peace." 

INIy comrades, without further words, I am going to ask you now 
to rise and drink in silence a toast to the memor}^ of Grant. We will 
remain standing a moment and the band will lead us in singing, " My 
Coimtry, 'Tis of Thee." 

Now I wonder if I can find a single sentence to characterize Grant! 
Peer of Wellington, Peer of Marlborough, Peer of Hannibal, the 
quiet man, under whose leadership all our armies marched to victory ; 
soldier of one epoch, statesman of another; " patient in toils, secure 
amid alarms ; inflexible in peace, invincible in arms ; " calm under 
calumny, magnanimous in victory; the greatest soldier of the age 
and the greatest man, and here in Virginia, the home of Wasliington 
and of Jefferson, we toast without fear to the meinory of Grant. 

And now, good-night. You will find busses waiting for you at 
your convenience. You should be in the cars by half past ten. I 
thank you for your faithful attention during the day and trust it will 
long live as a great day in your memory. You may take with you as 
souvenirs the flags that are on your tables. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 59 

THE SECOND DAY 

Danville, Va. 

The city of Danville, Va., is located on the south bank of the River 
Dan, from which it derives its name, and was a thriving town before 
the war on account of the extensive manufactm-e of tobacco. The 
prisons were abandoned tobacco warehouses usually three stories in 
height and known by numbers. No. 3 was used for commissioned 
officers, the remaining numbers for the enlisted men. 

Danville was the prison nearest to Richmond and to which, when 
there was room, the prisoners that overflowed Belle Island were first 
sent. 

The cemetery at Danville is at the southern extremity of the city 
and contains 1,331 graves, of which 1,172 are known and 159 unknown. 
There is no monument, but a mound stands in the center of the ceme- 
tery, and about a flag-pole upon that mound the services on the morn- 
ing of April 28th were held. 

SERVICES AT THE NATIONAL CEMETERY, DANVILLE, VA. 

April 28, 1914, 10 a. m. 

Prayer by the Rev. Dr. I. M. Foster: 

Almighty God, Thou who art from everlasting to everlasting, the 
same yesterday, to-day and forever, we worship Thee. We give 
praise and thanksgiving unto Thy -great name and rejoice in Thy 
goodness, for Thou has cared for us and kept us and led us into this 
state. We are thankful that in the past Thou has been mindful of us 
as a people and that out of the darkness we have been led by Thy 
power into the light of a new day. 

Great God! help us as we receive Thy blessing through our 
national life and through the relation we sustain to each other; help 
us to bring back to Thee that measure of service to our fellows, to our 
country and to the world that shall speak forth Thy praise. Let Thy 
blessing be upon us as a people. Guide us in all affairs of life. Bless 



60 STATE OF NEW YORK 

our nation and give us the benediction of Heaven, through Christ 
Jesus, our Lord. Anien. 

Senator P^vlmkr : I will ask CA'cry survivor or comrade, who was 
a prisoner in Danville, and those only, to gather closest about this 
flag-pole now. 

I wish to remark that the flowers, the lilacs and indeed all the 
flowers wliich are in bloom here are the gift to us, comrades, of the 
Daughters of the Confederacy (applause), except the wreath which 
was sent by the Confederate Camp. (Cheers.) 

If at the end of our long journey of more than two thousand miles 
through the southland we will go back and all our people of New York 
will know that we have loved all the people we have met and they have 
honored us, it will be well for the future of our country and for us all. 

I have the pleasure of introducing to you now the Mayor of Dan- 
ville, Mr. Wooding. 

ADDRESS BY MR. WOODING 

Mr. Chairman, Members of the Commission, ex-Union Soldiers 
AND Ladies and Gentlemen : 

In full accord with my own and in accord with the wishes of the 
people I represent, it affords me very great pleasure to greet and to 
meet and to welcome each and all of you to the last capital of the 
Southern Confederacy, for within the corporate limits of om* city 
Jefferson Davis wi-ote and published his last official proclamation. 
The time has been when we were arrayed against each other. .Thank 
Gk)d that time has passed! (Applause.) Thank God that the 
patriotism, the liberality and the brotherhood of the brother citizens 
of the great State of Pennsylvania made it possible last Jul)^ to have 
the most unique and far-reaching reunion that has been recorded in 
the pages of history. (Applause.) 

There, fifty years from the day on which the gray and the blue por- 
trayed the highest type of American bravery, than which no higher 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 61 

type can the world show, they met in friendly social intercourse, and 
the blue and the gray mutually rejoiced that their sons had fought 
side by side, gallantly upon distant lands and foreign seas to ease the 
down-trodden and oppressed inliabitants from the cruel rule of Spain. 
(Applause.) 

As a rule, when there is a murmur of war in the West, there comes 
a voice from the far East where roll the billows of the mighty Atlantic 
on the bleak coast of Maine, a voice comes from where the southern 
breezes blow over the orange groves of Florida, a voice comes from 
where the sparkling waves of the golden Pacific kiss the shores of 
California, and all those voices proclaim in thundering tones that no 
nation shall ever insult the American flag. (Applause.) 

Thank God, fifty years after the conflict, the blue and the gray, 
hand in hand on the classic field of Gettysburg, buried forever, too 
deep for resurrection, all animosities, antagonisms, and, I trust, 
unkind feelings which were engendered by the causes which led up to 
the conduct and the result of the war, and to-day we Confederate 
soldiers — I am proud to say I am the Commander of the Confederate 
Camp, and ex-Commander of the Grand Camp of Veterans of Vir- 
ginia, and in their name I give to each and to all a most cordial and 
hearty welcome and wish you God-speed in going to pay tribute t» 
those who stood by you in the day of your trials and tribulations, for 
they did all they could, no matter how much honor may be heaped 
upon the generals, for among those names recorded in history there 
is not one entitled to more praise and credit than these who silently 
sleep in our town and whose souls, we trust, have fovmd peace in the 
better world. (Applause.) 

Senator Palmer : Mr. Mayor, I thank you for the cordial greet- 
ings which you have given my comrades on the tender errand that 
takes us from New York to Andersonville, more than two thousand 
miles of travel through the South, to dedicate there to-morrow a monu- 
ment which has been erected by the people of New York to commemo- 



62 STATE OF NEW YORK 

rate twenty-five hundred of its soldiers who, fifty years ago, died 
within that prison stockade tiiat they might preserve the Union. I 
thank you for your greetings as a Confederate soldier, the most grate- 
ful word that has reached us thus far on the journey being your kindly 
and fraternal welcome to-day. A soldier is a soldier everywhere. 
(Applause.) 

Now, I love a soldier. I would rather have hun with me than 
against me in the hour of battle, but I love him anyway because a 
soldier is a man who is willing to pay with his own life the price of his 
own convictions. (Applause.) 

On behalf of the Conmiission, I also thank the ladies for the 
flowers. We are on a tender errand. Ten thousand soldiers of New 
York lie buried in the prison cemeteries at Riclimond, at Danville, at 
Salisbury, at Florence and at Andersonville. We are making a little 
joiu-ney to the places of their burial, fifty years after they were thus 
rudely sepulchred, many of them in unknown graves. 

" Unknown as veiled beneath the sheltering sod, 

But they are dear to liberty and they are known to God." 

(Applause.) 

I now introduce as the one speaker of the morning Hon. William 
Pinkney Hamilton, Jr., of New York. 

ADDRESS OF MR. HAMILTON 

Veterans, there lie our dead countrymen. 

How softly they lie, beneath the verdant sod. How fair the day; 
how blue the sky. See, in the pine trees a gentle breeze is stirring — 
but they are dead. 

Death? There is no death. "Wliat seems so is transition. Death? 
"WHiat soldier fears it? What man? They are not dead — but they 
are gone. 

There have been tears for those who lie here. There have been 
those who waited, but they came not. Wliether in mansion or in i^'y- 
covered cottage, waiting and watching while they lay stark in death. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 63 

That, after all, is the horror of war. That is the sadness of war. 

^Vhen some beloved voice that was to you both sound and sweet- 
ness faileth suddenlj% and silence, against which you dare not cry, 
aches round you like a strange disease, and now, what hope, what help, 
what music will mido that silence to your senses? Not friendship's 
sigh, not reason's subtle account. No, none of these; but, chastened 
and subdued, we turn to Him, in whom alone we put our faith; ahl 
then we pray. 

And so I take it, veterans, we come here this morning in a sub- 
dued and prayerful spirit. We come here to do reverence to these, 
our brothers, who have gone before. 

To you, the warhke scene is fresh and green. Now come the 
drums, the bugles and the slirieking fifes. Torn banners, flashing 
sabres, the rattle of cavalry, the crackling of flames, the rhytlim of 
marching men. You hear again the roar of cannon, you see again the 
carnage of battle — how peaceful here, where our coxmtrymen are 
sleeping. 

Oh, veterans, we come in a spirit of reverence and it is peculiarly 
fitting that these brief remarks this morning should be closed with 
prayer. And by prayer, I mean man-fashion prayer, soldier prayer. 

Let us pray. 

Oh, Lord, our God, we thank Thee that in Thy infinite wisdom 
Thou hast vouchsafed to us this day. We thank Thee for this visit 
with our coimtrymen, who have gone before. We thank Thee Lord, 
our God, that they, as we, have kept the faith, that they have been 
faRhful even unto death. We thank Thee, Lord, our God, for our 
unconquerable souls. Amen! 

Senator Palmer: I will ask every ex-Union prisoner who was 
confined here in Danville to hft up his hand. ( It was ascertained that 
twenty of the comrades had been imprisoned here.) 

This, my friends, as you know, is the smallest of the prison 
cemeteries. New York State flags have been placed by the courtesy 



64 STATE OF NEW YORK 

of the superintendent of the cemetery upon all the known graves of 
New York's soldiers among which we reverently stand to-day. 

I feel very much like expressing our special thanks to our friends 
of the South who have gathered with us here. Nobody will make me 
beheve that the boy in blue did anything else but love the southern 
people. There has been, historically between New York and "Virginia, 
an especial friendship. Wlioever is familiar with the constitutional 
period that followed the Revolutionary War will remember that when 
these two great commonwealths voted for the constitution and not 
until then, the constitution was finally adopted. In the city of Pough- 
keepsie in New York State, Alexander Hamilton overcame a hostile 
majority which Governor Clinton had to start with, and when he 
turned a majority of two to one against the constitution into a major- 
ity of two to one for the constitution, couriers started from Pough- 
keepsie and rode rapidly in relays down the Hudson river, across New 
Jersey, across Pennsylvania, through Delaware and Maryland into 
Virginia, where the convention was waiting to hear from the conven- 
tion in New York, and when one adopted it, both adopted it, and then 
and there the indissoluble Union of these States was formed. 

Home of Washington, home of Jefferson, home of that great 
orator who said, " Give me liberty or give me death " — Virginia, God 
bless her forever. 

My Confederate friends, the boy in blue who sadly had to come 
here in his youth, armed and uniformed, did not come in any spirit of 
hostility to the southern people, whom he always considered his 
countrymen. They came to save the Union, and they did it, that we 
might have one country in this land, and not two ; one flag, and not 
many ; and you are glad of it. There is not a man in all Virginia that 
would to-day reverse the issue if he could, and if they want war in 
Mexico and they get it, the boys from Virginia and the bo}'s from New 
York, under one flag, cheering each other, will march away together. 
( Applause. ) The boys from the North fifty years ago, these boys that 




Comrade John Mackenzie 
Member of Commission 




CoMHADE Joseph L. Killgore 
Secretary of Commission 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 65 

wore the blue, were as you were, the products of their environment, 
their education and their heredity. They came here to war not because 
they hated you, but in order that every American mother should own 
her own child, that wherever a babe was born, in a mansion or in a 
cabin, the moment it gasped for its first breath of American air, that 
moment it should be free; also, they were the only soldiers in liistory 
who have gone to their deaths in battle in order that they might make 
their enemies their equals. 

Also, they wanted to keep their country the beacon and the light 
of the world, for all men everywhere love liberty, and om- country is 
liberty's hope. One day, when the Civil War broke out, the English 
manufacturers cheered it in Parliament, when Jolin Bright, the friend 
of our country, because the friend of mankind, leaped to his feet and 
shouted, " My countrymen, my countrj^men, remember this, there will 
be one wild shriek of freedom to startle all mankind if that American 
repubhc should be broken up." 

The Union soldiers who perished in the prisons in Danville sleep 
at our feet to-day in eternal silence. I am glad to know that in resting 
here in yovu* city they do so with yom* reverent regard. We appreciate 
every flower that you or your children, or your children's children, 
ever will lay upon their graves, for we gray-headed men will come this 
way no more. When. we say good-bye to-day at Danville, we will say 
good-bye forever, until that eternal morning dawns which awaits us 
all. God bless you. (Applause.) 

SECOND DAY— (AFTERNOON) 

Sai^isbuuy, N". C. 

The city of Salisbury is located at the junction of the two branches 
of the North Carolina Railroad in Rowan county, N. C. The prison 
here was a four-story brick factory, measuring 40x100 feet, together 
with five smaller buildings, which had been used as boarding-houses 
for the factory operatives. A plain board fence surrounded these 
5 



66 STATE OF NEW YORK 

buildings, enclosing altogether an area of some eleven acres. Water 
was obtained from nine wells sunk within the enclosure and from 
the creek, one-half mile distant. 

The prison at Salisbury had a larger capacity than that at Dan- 
ville. It is even estimated that in the winter of 'G4 nearly 10,000 pris- 
oners were here confined. 

The cemetery at Salisbury contains 12,148 graves, of which only 
113 are known and 12,035 are unknowTi. The Government and the 
State of Pennsylvania liave erected monuments at Salisbury. The 
" unknown " are buried within a level enclosure immarked with head- 
stones, less than an acre in extent. 

In a pavilion at the head of this enclosure the services were held 
on the afternoon of April 28th. 

SERVICES HELD AT NATIONAL CEMETERY, SALISBURY, N. C. 

April 28, 1914, 2 p. m. 

Prayer by the Rev. JMk. DsxEiui: 

Oh, Thou God, Father of us all, we thank Thee for the measure of 
Thy favor that has attended us in the past. As we come here together 
on this occasion this day, we pray Thee that Thy continued favor and 
blessing may attend us; that Thou wilt show us that Thou art ever 
guiding and protecting the destinies of men, and may we come to real- 
ize that only as we look unto Thee for guidance and direction will we 
be enabled to accomplish life's great purpose. We pray Thee that 
Thy blessings may attend these Thy servants who have come from 
remote portions of our country into our midst. We pray Thee that 
Thou wilt protect them on the journey upon which they have entered 
and are pursuing, and that as they go up and down the length of our 
land in their return to their respective homes, may they receive the 
impulse and conception of a new life as embodied in a reunited coun- 
try, and may they ever realize that we are one nation, one people and 
followers of one God ; and unto Thee shall be all the honor and glory 
in a world without end. Amen. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 67 

Senator Pai^mer: Comrades, ladies and gentleman, I present 
the Mayor of Salisbury. (Applause.) 

MAYOR OF SALISBURY'S SPEECH 

Mr. Chairman, Gentlemen of the New York Delegation, 
Ladies and Gentlemen : 

Salisbury is distinctly honored in having within her borders to-day 
this splendid delegation of representative citizens of the great Empire 
State of New York. As mayor of this city it is my great pleasure to 
extend to you on the part of every man, woman and child within her 
limits a most hearty and cordial welcome. (Applause.) 

You are to-day in a section of your own land, surrounded by your 
fellow men and your friends (applause), eager to give you the glad 
hand of welcome and join with you in this sacred and solemn service, 
doing honor to whom honor is due. 

The unparalleled sacrifices, the matchless bravery and fortitude of 
the men composing the armies of the North and of the South in our 
mighty civil struggle resulted in the establishment of the pre-eminence 
of the American soldier. (Applause.) Our debt of gratitude to 
every actor in that mighty struggle is eternal. Gentlemen, there is a 
monument, a fitting monument, erected by the people of Maine to 
their dead (indicating). Yonder, near the entrance to this cemetery, 
is a magnificent memorial erected by the citizens of Pennsylvania in 
honor of their dead, and I want soon to see erected here, my dear sirs, 
another monument in memory of New York's dead, commensurate 
with the mightiest State in the Union. (Applause.) 

We regret, gentlemen, that your stay is so short. We would like 
to show you the genuineness of otir welcome. Our club rooms are 
open to you. Our buildings and our streets and our parks and our 
homes are open to you, and we all welcome you. We want you to 
come back to see us. We want you to stay longer with us. We want 
to show you this beautiful southland of ours. We want to show you 



68 STATE OF NEW YORK 

our hospitality. We want you to come and meet our good people, and 
above all, we want to show you the iriendship we have for you. 
(Applause.) 

Senator Palmer: In behalf of my comrades and the commis- 
sioners, the Senators and Assemblymen of New York who are present 
(two hundred and twenty-two of us all together), we thank you for 
your greeting. We feel as if we liad heard a brother's voice, and we 
grasp a brother's hand. (Applause.) 

We are now at one of the great prison cemeteries of the world. 
Within the enclosure of those flags, less than an acre of ground, there 
lie interred 12,000 dead, of whom more than two thousand were from 
New York, and they have slept here now for fifty years. 

Salisbury, N. C, is distinguished among the prison cemeteries in 
that it has so vast a number of the unknown dead. 

Not less to those who are unknown than for those who are known, 
we come to pay tribute. Alas! it was their destiny to sleep forever 
" among those who are numbered, and not among those who are 
named." 

The speakers of the afternoon will be three. One will be one of 
our commissioners from New York, Mr. Kerrigan. One will be the 
Conmiander of the Department of New York of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, who was once imprisoned here. Colonel Pierce. The 
other speaker is a distinguished lawj'^er from the city of Auburn, 
N. Y., who also was confined here, Mr. Drummond. A brief word 
will also be offered by Colonel Boyden, a resident of this city and a 
Confederate soldier, and I will pay the tribute to the Confederate 
soldiers of introducing him first. 

ADDRESS OF COLONEL BOYDEN 
Friends and Comrades: 

I do not think I could possibly make you, gentlemen and brother 
conrrades, feel more at home than by quoting the language of our dis- 
tinguished Commander, Bennet H. Young, when on that great 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 69 

battle-field of Gettysburg he opened his speech by these remarks, " I 
am half of a thousand miles away from home, and yet I feel perfectly 
at home in the confines of this, my counti'y." 

I trust, my fellow comrades, that the feeling that existed there on 
the battle-field at Gettj-sburg and in the heart of every man who wore 
the gray is in the hearts of you gentlemen who wore the blue. 
(Applause.) 

I understand your mission, gentlemen, is to pay a tribute to your 
fallen dead and to dedicate a monument at the prison at Anderson- 
ville. To me, that should excite the admiration of every patriotic 
American, and especially every man who wore the gray. It is long 
deferred, gentlemen, but, thank God, it has come at last ; and I want 
to say to you, fellow comrades, that the ambition of my life has been 
that before I close my eyes I may put in bronze or marble the record 
of North Carolina at the battle of Gettysburg. In reading history, as 
I have, I find that the two great contending parties of soldiers there 
were North Carolinians and New Yorkers. They lost in proportion 
almost similarljr on that great field. Their record was superb, and I 
hope some day that I may be able to place, as you have placed on 
those hills, a monument in memory to young Harry Burgwyn of the 
26th North Carolina, that went into the fight on the first day of July, 
1862, with 800 as fine men as God Almighty ever saw, the flower of 
the southland, a young boy who had just passed his manhood; and 
when night closed that evening, 598 of that 800 lay dead and wounded 
upon that field, fourteen color bearers shot down — Burgwyn the 
eleventh color bearer — scarcely a man left to tell the tale. 

That has been the ambition of my life, and no man can appreciate 
more than I do the tribute you pay to your fallen dead who perished 
here and at Andersonville. I feel, my fellow comrades, that the 
reunion at Gettysburg was the greatest epoch in the history of 
America. I, myself, witnessed that, and I want to express my feel- 
ings to-day and re-echo and re-affirm the sentiments that were 



70 STATE OF NEW YORK 

expressed on that day. There were enough friendly statements on 
both sides uttered there that day to forever cement this country, and 
it was felt by every man that was on that battle-field. 

I mingled with the men; I slept with the men. I heard the men 
discuss the great questions of the war, and I can say I never heard one 
word fall from any man wearing the blue or the gray that would hurt 
the feelings of any other man on that battle-field. Was there ever 
such a record as that? (Applause.) I came away from that gather- 
ing with all the rancor and all the antagonism that might ever have 
been in my heart years ago entirely blotted out, and I speak the senti- 
ments of every man on that battle-field. (Applause.) 

M}^ fellow comrades, we are only too sorry the time is so short that 
we cannot give you or show you our hearts and our homes. God bless 
you all. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS OF THE HON. JOHN KERRIGAN 

Mr. Chairman and Friends and Fellow Citizens, Comrades 
FROM Both the North and the South : 

It is certainly a grand thing to hear two gentlemen from Salisbury 
expressing the feelings of the American people, expressed as when the 
thirteen original States of this Union declared that this country would 
not stand for taxation without representation, and New York and 
Virginia joined hands with George Washington and the other eleven 
States and they eradicated from this country the power of monarch- 
ism, giving to our people a government of their own, a government of 
the people by the people, a government which is supported and 
adhered to until this day by both the North and the South. 

Washington and his men fought for eight years, struggling not 
with the arms we have now, but with far cruder implements and great 
privations ; but they left their wives and homes and went out to battle 
for eight long years. New York shoulder to shoulder with Virginia, 
and they were successful in forming this splendid republic. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 71 

In 1812 the same condition prevailed, and New York and Virginia 
and South CaroHna and the other ten States stayed together and 
fought successfully. 

In 1847 the same condition prevailed, and when the Union soldiers 
of New York and Virginia together got into Mexico, what was the 
result? (Applause.) 

But, in 1861, a family quarrel occurred and divided our States, not 
our Union, Oh, no, the South was as good for the Union as the North, 
but they wanted two Unions, and the North said, " No; one," and the 
House of Congress divided on the question, and when the division was 
made it was brother against brother and father against son, and one 
of the most vicious wars that ever was fought in this or any other 
country occurred. When it was over — it might have been the Lord 
Almighty who had changed the result — but we do Icnow and we will 
know that the grandest country in the world, the grandest country on 
top of God's green earth, is the United States to-day, welded together 
(applause), Virginia shoulder to shoulder with New York, and the 
other forty-six States; and Admiral Dewey at the battle of Manila 
showed the European coimtries what America can do, and he did not 
lose a single man. (Applause.) 

Gentlemen, what a proud distinction it is to be a citizen of this 
great country ! What a grand thing it is for you to look back and see 
what we have accomplished! There are no more tyrannical laws in 
Em"ope. Oh, no. A king is an ordinary person there. The seeds of 
liberty are planted in Europe, and if they had done the things a hun- 
dred years ago that our forefathers did, there would be a republic in 
place of every kingdom in Eiu'ope, brought on by you and your peo- 
ple; and may the stars and stripes go shoulder to shoulder with the 
president of the United States to-day, and let Virginia and New York 
send down to Mexico men to make the greasers salute the flag or tell 
them the reason why. (Applause.) 



72 STATE OF NEW YORK 

I was not old enough to go to the war, but mj- eldest brother 
seventeen years of age, enlisted in a New York regiment. JMy father 
was dead. My brother was the eldest of our family. I was nine years 
old, and I wish I could have shouldered a musket, but I was not big 
enough. There was one thing you could depend upon, in the North 
or South ; if 5'ou were able to go to the war, either north of the Mason 
and Dixon line, or south of it, and you did not go and you had a sweet- 
heart, she would say you were a coward and did not deserve her. 
(Laughter and applause.) 

The Legislature of the State of New York, by a bill introduced by 
Senator Carswell, appropriated $20,000 to bring our veterans down to 
Andersonville, to dedicate this beautiful monument that is already 
erected to the memory of our New York dead. We are proud to be 
here among you. We are proud to say that we are once more a united 
country, hand in hand, and God help the nation that tries to oppose 
us. (Applause.) 

The Chairman: I have the honor to introduce to you a former 
prisoner in Salisbury, who to-day is the honored Commander-in-Chief 
of the Department of New York of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
Col. Samuel C. Pierce of Rochester. 

ADDRESS OF COLONEL SAMUEL C. PIERCE 

Senator Palmer, Members of the Commission, Comrades of the 
Confederate Soldiers — not Confederate Soldiers — 
Ladies and Friends: 
It has been my privilege, not only in this but in foreign countries, 
to gaze upon monimients erected at immense expense, under whose 
massive bases rest the ashes of men who have made history. On those 
statues or monuments have been written inscriptions, either in endur- 
ing brass or deeply carved by the cunning graver, showing the virtues 
and achievements of those who rest under the monument. Lessons 
instructive, lessons of worth, lessons of value can be learned from gaz- 




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ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 73 

ing upon the monmiients of these people ; but to my mind, and I 
believe to that of many who are here to-day with me, there is more of 
loyalty, there is a lesson more impressive to be learned from those 
small protruding shafts of marble which point upward to where we 
believe that the souls of those whose ashes rest below them have gone. 

Beneath the verdant sod of that field, a field different from any 
other of the cemeteries which we have visited or shall visit, there rest, 
as you have been told, unmarked and unknown, the remains of a 
myriad of soldiers who gave up their lives in the defense of our coun- 
try. They died doing their duty here and they merit the same meed 
of praise as those who fell upon the field of battle. Doubtless, every 
one of the 10,000 would have preferred to give up his life facing the 
foe, giving and receiving blows and welcoming a quick and painless 
death ; but here still in the line of duty, each one fought a losing fight 
with famine, want and disease, wasting away slowly, slowly, but firm 
to the last in the belief that he was serving a cause which would event- 
uate in the uplift of humanity and tend to perpetuate the Union of the 
States which he had sworn to defend. They died ignorant of the final 
result, unless as many of us believe, those who have gone to their 
eternal rest are cognizant of earthly happenings. 

What a lesson this has been to us all through this most eventful 
trip! It is not a junket. It is one of the saddest, most impressive 
journeys ever taken by any body of men during all the years of oui" 
nation's existence. We have come to pay our tribute of respect to our 
comrades who went away from us a half a century ago. 

You all heard, I know, with pleasure that magnificent address of 
our former foe, but now our friend, telling you all about those glorious 
days at Gettysburg. I am happy to say that I was permitted to be 
there and to act in the capacity of Commander of the Department of 
the Grand Army of the Republic of the State of New York and to do 
what I could to make their visit pleasant and profitable. What a 
glorious time that was, supplemented later by a reunion with hun- 



74 STATE OF NEW YORK 

dreds, yes, thousands of them, at the following meeting of the national 
encampment of this organization in far off Chattanooga, where we 
hope shortly to be, if nothing untoward happens. 

Comrades of the Grand Army of the Republic, I wish to say a 
word particularly to you. Coming as you have from all quarters of 
the State of New York, members of posts scattered from Erie to 
IMontauk Point and from St. Lawrence to Staten Island, I want you 
to go home and impress upon your comrades the lesson you have 
learned upon this trip. Tell them the good words you have heard 
from our friends who fought against us. Tell them all that you have 
seen, and I believe that you will tell your tale to willing and attentive 
ears, and the interests of our organization will be enlianced by your 
recital of what you have seen and done during these eventful days. I 
well know that no one of you can ever forget the impressive speech 
made yesterday in Riclimond by the Hon. Mr. Hinman, when he out- 
lined certain perils that confront the American people. 

Like him, I am no pessimist, but I do believe that the problems he 
laid before you should be taken to yom* hearts, and that you, dm-ing 
all the remaining years of your lives, should see to it that there is 
implanted in the minds of the coming generation a love of liberty, not 
license ; liberty under the law, and that everyone has his o^\ti right to 
life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness and the accumulation of prop- 
erty. You can do no better than to instill into the minds of all the 
organizations that are affiliated with the Grand Armj^ of the Republic 
the duty that lies before them. For fifty years, you veterans of the 
Civil War have endeavored to do your duty as soldiers of peace. Your 
work is nearly over, and it is for your descendants to take up your 
work and carry it on so that all over the length and breadth of this 
land there may be no person to stand up uncontradicted who advocates 
class distinctions and whose utterances breed only hatred and discon- 
tent. Let every one have an equal show, and this country will remain 
as it is now, the greatest country in the world. If this journey shall 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 75 

have impressed upon your minds the tremendous cost of the preserva- 
tion of the Union and shall have engendered a more profound respect 
for the dignity, the worth and the responsibilities of true American 
citizenship then it may well be said, as it was said of old: " It was 
good for us to be here." (Applause.) 

Senator Palmer: I have now the honor to introduce to you a 
long-time prisoner in Salisbury. I have tried to persuade the com- 
rades all along the way to tell us something about their experiences in 
the prisons in which they were confined. 

When this matter of the dedication of this monument arose, I 
began to get frequent letters from all over the State advocating it, 
and when the question was at issue in the Legislature, one day the 
Governor handed me a letter which he had received from Auburn, 
N. Y., absolutely stating the situation the most perfectly of anything 
that I read during a long and elaborate correspondence. 

I now have the honor of introducing the writer of that letter, the 
Hon. Robert L. Drummond of Auburn, N. Y., who will tell you 
something, I hope, about Salisbury, N. C. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS OF HON. ROBERT L. DRUMMOND 

Mr. Chairman, Comrades of Both the Blue and the Gray, and 
Ladies and Gentlemen : 

Fifty years: and during all that time, these dear brave boys, to 
the number of 13,000, have been sleeping on this southern hillside, in 
these imknown and unmarked graves. ^Vhen I tell you that of tliis 
loyal 13,000 dead, I saw nearly every one, with my own eyes, carried 
to tliis, his lasting resting-place, and of this 13,000 dead, I carried or 
helped carry with my own hands, hundreds of them to the building 
assigned as the receptacle for the dead of the prison, as I stand here, 
fifty years afterward, and look over those 13,000 graves, my feelings 
and emotions may be imagined by those present, but they cannot in 
the least be understood. 



76 STATE OF NEW YORK • 

A^Hiat was the character of those comrades who lie in these 
unkno^v^l and unmarked graves? They came from the best homes of 
the Empire State. They were the first born of a thousand of the best 
firesides of the State of IVew York which gave up that first born son 
freely as a sacrifice on the altar of their country. 

Wlience came those men to this, their place of imprisonment? 
Some of them had climbed the heights of Vicksburg; some of them 
had been with Joe Hooker fighting the Battle above the Clouds at 
Lookout Mountain; some of them had been eye witnesses to that 
grand sight of your own Burgwj'n, who has been mentioned, when, for 
the eleventh time, he himself took up the fallen colors of the 26th 
Xorth Carolina and called upon those surviving of that immortal regi- 
ment to rally behind the colors held by their colonel. 

Some of these men that lie here were eye witnesses of your owti 
grand man, Lewis A. Armistead, as he marched steadily over that 
field of death with his hat upon his sword as a rallying point for his 
devoted followers, and in the end pierced the Federal line and fell 
mortally wounded among the enemy. 

Some of these men who lie here, and of whose death I was an eye 
witness, were present when your own Pettigrew made that grand 
world renowned assault on that stone wall at Gettysburg; and the 
major of my owti regiment, the 111th New York Infantry, told me 
that on the night of that awful day at Gettysburg, by the light of a 
lantern, he found the 26th Xorth Carolina and the 111th New York 
so intermingled, the dead and the dying, that it was difficult for him 
to distinguish the blue and the gray; and he went about among them, 
finding them lying there, to use his own language, " ISIore like brothers 
lying asleep than those who as mortal foes had met each other in the 
deadly conflict of the day." 

Some of these men who lie here, my prisoner comrades, as I have 
stated, were the first born of the best homes of the Empire State. 
They left their mothers who bade them good-bye for the last time. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 77 

looking at them through their bhnding tears. They bade their sisters 
good-bye as they hung over the garden gate of the old homestead. In 
many cases, they bade a young wife good-bye as she held their first 
born baby in her arms, the father kissing the wife and the child whose 
faces he was never to look upon again. Some of them bade their sweet- 
hearts good-bye under the silent stars of the Empire State, when there 
was none present to mar the sacredness of the occasion, and for the 
last time on earth they pledged their loyalty to each other, whom they 
were never to see again. 

As I stand here and think of those thousands of boys and men 
imprisoned in the stockade of this city, I recall the fact that day after 
day I have listened to the roll call of fourteen divisions of 1,000 men 
each, which meant that 14,000 Federal soldiers at one time were 
imprisoned within the gates of this now fair city ; and as I stand here 
to-day with this grand expression of the people of Salisbmy, I do not 
want to forget, but I desire to make expression of my remembrance of 
the fact that I stand and that you assemble in the home city of that 
grand man. Rev. Adolphus W. Mangimi, then a young Methodist 
clergyman, stationed in this city at the time of our imprisonment, the 
chaplain of the 6th North Carolina, an ardent Confederate who had 
given his life and his interests and his energies to the cause of the Con- 
federacy; but, at the same time, his heart was so great and his sym- 
pathy so tender that he came in among us day after day and preached 
the word of Life to us, and sang sacred hymns to those suffering and 
dying men; and on one occasion, I remember that as a boy I stood 
leaning against an oak tree in the stockade within the confines of this 
city, listening to this same Rev. Adolphus W. Mangum breaking the 
Bread of Life to an audience of 14,000 ragged, hungry and des- 
pondent men and boys. 

If there is one within the sound of my voice that claims kith or kin 
to him, if there is one within the sound of my voice that even claims the 
honor of an old acquaintance, I want him to know that at least one 



78 STATE OF NEW YORK 

ex-prisoner from the stockade at Salisbury remembers kindly and 
reverently the Bread that he then cast upon the troubled waters of our 
miseries and our sufferings and which is perhaps returning to you and 
to his, after these fifty years, as we ex-prisoners of war come back 
bearing olive branches in our hands and preaching the doctrine of 
peace and good will and a reunited country under one and the same 
flag. (Applause.) 

As I stood here looking into the faces of these men and women and 
listened to the eloquent words of the young mayor of the city of Salis- 
bury and to the eloquent words of our friend, Colonel Boyden, com- 
rade in arms who wore the gray, who met us in the past upon the hard- 
fought fields of battle, but who is now our firm friend and comrade — 
as I stood and listened to that address of welcome, I do not want to 
forget that we all stand here to-day within that State that gave to the 
Confederacy such men as Vance, as Armistead, as Burgwyn and as 
Pettigrew. I do not want to forget that we stand here to-day in the 
State that is the home of Josephus Daniels, whose name is in every 
home within the Empire State at the present time, a household word 
because of the good deeds he has done and the good words that he has 
said in the cause of good government, of moral greatness, progressive- 
ness and of puritj'. I do not want to forget, my good friends, but I 
want to make recognition of the fact that we all stand here on this 
beautiful afternoon within the home city of the United States Senator 
from this State, Lee S. Overman, whose good deeds and good words 
are known to all the thinking and reading people of the Empire State. 
I do not want to forget, but I want to make recognition of the fact, 
comrades, that we stand in the home of John S. Henderson and in that 
of Archibald H. Boyden, who has addressed us so earnestly and so 
eloquently, and I want to state to you what he once wrote to me thirty 
years after the close of the Civil War. It was like this — it was very 
like him to write it, and it was very like me, I hope, to remember it : 

" Come down here and see us, and I, as mayor of the city of Salis- 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 79 

bury, will give you the freedom of the city, and we will treat you so 
well here among our people that you will forget that you were ever 
here before." 

I take it from the grand meeting and reception that he has given 
you this day that he has not forgotten the promise he once made to me 
as an individual, but that he has taken the whole of you old comrades, 
and our good friend. Senator Palmer, and all of the young Senators 
and Assemblymen, and the members of this honorable Commission, 
under his wing, and he has extended to you, through the mayor, the 
freedom of the city. Surely, he wants us to forget that any one of 
our number was ever here from the State of New York under different 
circimistances. 

Comrades, I know you are tired, that you are weary with the ride 
that you have already taken and with the prospect of the one that lies 
before you, but I want to say to you how honored I feel when called 
upon to speak to such an audience as this upon the same ground where 
fifty years ago I came as a boy prisoner from the Empire State, vmder 
protest and at the point of the bayonet. I want to say to you how 
honored and thankful I feel that this grand Commission from the 
Empire State has felt it fitting to call upon me to add my feeble words 
and expressions to the importance and the sentiment of the occasion. 

I feel confident that all of you, both the blue and the gray, will 
unite with me in rejoicing that it was one of our great judges from the 
Empire State who wrote : 

" No more shall the war cry sever. 
Or the winding rivers be red; 
They banish our anger forever 

When they laurel the graves of our dead! " 

And I hope both the blue and the gray remember that it was a 
loyal woman from the North that wrote: "Albert Sidney Johnston," 
and among other things said : 

" They were a royal race of men, these brothers face to face, 
Their fury speaking through their guns, their frenzy in their pace." 



80 STATE OF NEW YORK 

And I want you men who wore the gray to remember that we com- 
rades of the North who wore the blue do not forget that it was youi' 
great southerner who stood at the bier of Charles Sumner, and, in 
words that seemed then and now prophetic, closed that wonderful 
oration with the declaration : " My countrymen ! Know one another, 
and you will love one another." 

In closing these brief remarks, let me say to you that I hope I 
express the sentiment of both the blue and the gray when I say : 

" Oh, veterans of the blue and the gray, who fought on Shiloh field, 
The purposes of God are true. His judgment stands revealed; 
The pangs of war have rent the veil, and lo. His high decree; 
One heart, one hope, one destiny, one from sea to sea." 

(Applause.) 

(Miss Lucretia Mackenzie sang) 

Senator Palmer: Now, comrades, j'ou have an hour to ramble 
around in the most pathetic spot I have ever seen. "When you think 
that if you walk across that lawn, your feet will tread upon the dust 
of 12,000 heroes whose names are unknown, who for fifty years have 
slept here in silence, surely you have a pathetic privilege. 

Somebody said that the tourist who went to Waterloo must tread 
lightly, for "his step was on an empire's dust." I say to you now, 
tread lightly here, for those who lie beneath your feet made an empire 
immortal. (Applause.) 

I introduce to you Superintendent Fonda, who is superintendent 
of this cemetery, and then, if you will keep quiet, I am going to 
shake hands with the mayor of this city for purposes of portraiture. 

ADDRESS BY MR. FONDA 

Comrades, I want to say just a word to you. ^\lien this prison 
was here the doctors kept a record of the men that were in the hos- 
pital. We have a record now of 1,020 men from the State of New 
York that lay in that hospital, and the dates of their deaths, but they 
were all put in the trenches, so we have no single graves. The high- 




Plan of Andersonville Prison Grounds 



1. Caretaker's House, erected by the National V.'. R. C 

2. " Providence Sprinji." 

3. Site of proposed National Monument. 

4. Outline of purchased property. 

5. Outline of Stockade enclosing prisoners. 

6. Outline of Outer Stockade (only partially completed). 

7. " Dead Line." 

S. Confederate Forts and Batteries. 

9. Main Fort, or " Star Fort," southwest corner. 

10. Siie of Gallows, where marauders were hung. 

11. Powder Magazines in " Star Fort." 



12. Site of Capt. Wirtz' Headtiuarters. 

13. Gate to Roadway leading to the Cemetery. 

14. Wells and Tunnels dug by prisoners. 

15. Site of Dead House. 

16. Entrenched Camp for Guards. 

17. Roadway, lOOf cct wide, leading to railroad station. 
IS. " Stockade Creek," a branch of Sweetwater. 

19. North Gate of Stockade. 

20. South Gate of Stockade. 

21. Flag Sta£f. 




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ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 81 

est number of dead from any New York regiment is the 51st. I 
myself am from Oswego. I was with the 147th New York, and the 
51st has the biggest number. They have forty lying there that died 
in this prison. Right in that enclosure lie 11,700 men. 

Senator Palmer: We thank you; we thank you all. We most 
earnestly thank 'the comrades in charge of these cemeteries where we 
tarry enroute for an hour. You understand that we are on our way 
to Andersonville. We stopped in Richmond yesterday ; we spent the 
forenoon to-day in Danville, this afternoon here in Salisbury, and 
though we would not go by you, we cannot tarry. 

We thank you for your courtesies, and we wish you God's blessing 
forever. 

THIRD DAY 

Andersonville^ Ga. 

The prison at Andersonville was located in as lonely and inaccessi- 
ble a spot as could well have been found within the bounds of the 
Confederacy east of the Mississippi river. Perhaps it was selected 
because of this very inaccessibility by one W. S. Winder on the 27th 
of November, 1863. 

The first detachment of prisoners reached Andersonville on the 
15th of February, 1864. Gen. John H. Winder took command in 
April, 1864. He had previously been in command of the prisoners at 
Richmond and such was his reputation that the Richmond Examiner, 
when he was sent South, said, " God have mercy upon those to whom 
he is sent." Winder died on February 9, 1865. Capt. Henry Wirz, 
the commander of the stockade, was a native of Switzerland, a 
physician by profession, and before the war was a citizen of Louisi- 
ana. In October, 1865, he was tried by the Union Military Com- 
mission and was executed. 

The stockade was built in the winter of 1863-64. It was formed 
by plain pine logs imbedded in the groimd on end. The main or 
6 



82 STATE OF NEW YORK 

inner stockade was twenty feet high. Outside of it were two other 
stockades; the inner one sixteen feet high and the outer one twelve 
feet liigh, originally enclosing some fifteen acres, but was enlarged 
until it finally contained about twenty-six acres. It is now a prison 
park maintained by the Government. 

The national cemetery is situated one-third of a mile north of the 
stockade. Here the monuments have mostly been erected. Magnifi- 
cent trees, with graded walks and lawns, adorn the spot. The Gov- 
ernment maintains it with great care. The place, however, is so 
remote and inaccessible that scarcely any one will ever see that monu- 
ment except he makes a journey with that in view. Modest but 
effective headstones, many acres in extent, have been placed in regu- 
lar rows above these graves as far as the ej^e can see. Names of the 
known dead have been inscribed on the headstones with, doubtless, 
little accuracy that the name written on any individual headstone 
does in fact indicate the exact person bm-ied beneath it. The num- 
ber of graves in Andersonville was 13,722, of wliich 12,791 are known 
and 931 unknown. 

With the exception of the presentation of medals of honor to the 
surviving veterans, the " Georgia " dinner and the " loving cup," 
which were within the prison grounds themselves, the services of the 
entire day, April 29th, were held about the New York monument in 
the cemetery. A modest platform, covered with bunting, had been 
erected precisely opposite the monument from which all the exercises 
were conducted. 



THE MONUMENT ITSELF 

BY CHAPTER 717 of the Laws of New York, 1905, the New 
York Monuments Commission was authorized to erect, on a 
site to be selected by the commissioners, in the national ceme- 
tery at Andersonville, State of Georgia, or within the prison grounds 
adjacent thereto, a suitable monument to commemorate the heroism, 
sacrifices and patriotism of more than nine thousand New York 
soldiers of the Union army in the War of the Rebellion, who were 
confined as prisoners of war in Andersonville prison, Georgia, and of 
whom more than two thousand five hundred died in the prison. 

The commissioners having decided to erect the monument in the 
national cemetery at Andersonville, they selected, with the approral 
of the War Department, a plot 120 feet by 100 feet on the westerly 
side of the pathway leading southerly from the circle at the flag-pole 
to the wall forming the boundary of the inclosed portion of the 
cemetery. 

The monimient at its base measures 17 feet long by 9 feet 6 inches 
wide, and is 21 feet high above the foundation. It is constructed in 
eight horizontal coui'ses of one stone each, the heaviest of which — 
that of the third course — weighs, approximately, twenty-seven tons. 

This monument is built of granite from the quarries of the North 
Carolina Granite Corporation at Mount Airy, N. C. The exterior of 
the structure is polished with the exception of the vertical face of the 
first course, which is fine hammered. 

On the front and reverse of the monument, in an appropriate 
location is affixed the New York State coat-of-arms. This is cast in 
bronze and is eighteen inches in diameter. 

A recess panel, 6 feet 2 inches wide at the bottom, 6 feet wide at 
the top and 9 feet and 1 inch high, was sunk in the face and reverse 

83 



84 STATE OF NEW YORK 

of the monument; and within these panels were placed bronze alto 
relievos, which covered the spaces with the exception of about three- 
quarters of an inch on the sides and top. 

On the bronze alto relievo, upon the front, or easterly side, of the 
monument, is modeled in high relief a female figure, 7 feet 3 inches 
high, typical of the State of New York, this figure with extended 
right hand, in which is held a wreath to decorate the graves of the 
New York soldiers buried in the cemetery. There is also a wreath in 
her left hand, while several more, reserved for the same purpose, 
appear in the foreground. This tablet contains the following 
dedicatory inscription : 

NEW YORK 

This monument, erected by the State of New York, commemorates the 
patriotism, sacrifices and fortitude of about nine thousand New York soldiers of 
the Union armies in the War of the Rebellion who were coniined in the Confederate 
States Military Prison at Andersonville, Georgia, of whom twenty-two hundred and 
sixty-one are known to have died in prison and were buried in this cemetery. 

Erected A. D. 1911. 

On the bronze alto relievo upon the reverse, or westerly side, of 
the monument, it was the aim of the sculptor to represent in the 
stockade, which can be noticed in the background, two prisoners of 
war — a younger and an older veteran — from the State of New 
York. The elder of the prisoners is seen with downcast face, weary 
and disheartened, his head resting on his right hand; the youthful 
prisoner, sitting in an opposite direction, with upturned face, is 
apparently inspired by the vision of an angel of compassion and hope, 
holding the symbol of peace (an olive branch) in her right hand, and 
coming to reassure and cheer him and to reveal to him the approach- 
ing and lasting peace between the North and the South. 

In his conception of the figures for this panel the sculptor had in 
mind combining the real and the ideal, with a view of portraying in 
a way that would not be unpleasantly remindful to the people of the 
South the sufferings and fortitude of the northern prisoners at the 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 85 

time of the Civil War, and to show in an allegorical manner the peace 
and reconciliation which now exists between the then contending 
sections. 

Mr. R. Hinton Perry of New York was the sculptor for the panel 
on the front of the mommient, and Mr. Louis A. Gudebrod of 
Meriden, Conn., was the sculptor for the panel on the reverse, or west 
side, of the monument. 

The contractor for the construction and erection of the granite 
work of the monument, including the foundation, was the North 
Carolina Granite Corporation of Mount Airy, N. C, and the Roman 
Bronze Works of Brooklyn, N. Y., were the contractors for furnish- 
ing the bronze alto relievos from the full-size plaster models pre- 
pared by the sculptors. These alto relievos were each cast in one 
piece. 

The appropriation for the monument was $25,000.00. 



SERVICES HELD IN PRISON CEMETERY 
ANDERSONVILLE, GA. 



P 



April 29, 1914, 10 a. m. 

RAYER was offered by the Rev. J. H. Robinson of Albany, 
N. Y., who was himself a long-time prisoner in Anderson- 
villa, as follows: 

PRAYER OF THE REV. J. H. ROBINSON 

Almighty God, God and Father of nations and of men, who 
didst teach us by Thy Son and by all that he endured for humanity 
that all that is best for humanity can be purchased only through 
suffering, and who didst show and develop the spirit of liberty among 
our fathers, and they suffered ; and then in a later day men were found 
to suffer the sorrow, to wait, to hear, to bear, to die, that the flag that 
had been unfurled might still float to the breeze. 

We thank Thee that so many were found ready to give up life, and 
while we, some of us, who saw their sufferings and suffered with 
them, felt deeply for them and wept as they passed out of sight, we 
are glad to-day that they and we were ready to make all the sacrifices 
for the sake of the dear old flag; and we rejoice this day that their 
sufferings and their dying were not in vain, but though for years 
there was a rent nation, that there is no rent flag to-day, but the stars 
and stripes float over us all, and North and South and East and 
West honor the old flag. 

But, Lord, what can we say as we stand in the presence of those 
whom we saw breathe out their last in the midst of suffering! Oh, 

87 



88 STATE OF NEW YORK 

God, may the lesson abide in the hearts of these comrades! May it 
sink deep into the hearts of these younger people, and may this nation 
ever be a nation loving liberty and law and order and loving God; 
and grant, we pray, if it may be, that no storm of war shall ever again 
be ours, but that peace may reign not only on all our borders, but be 
we so always in all our relations with the nations of the earth. 

And now. Oh, God, breathe upon these dear comrades who stood, 
who suffered, and now, no longer with the springing step of youth as 
aforetime, but with halting step, many of them, and bowed shoulders, 
God bless them ; but O, God, make us every one here to-day, all who 
participate in these exercises, all who listen, all who love our flag, 
make us worthy of those who so suffered here. 

Hear our prayer. Lead us, and when we, as soon many of us 
must, step out of the ranks and fall by the way, maj' we, too, be 
gathered home. 

We ask it in the name of Him who suffered for us all, even Jesus 
Christ, our Lord. Amen. 

Senator Palmer: My comrades, we have reached at last our 
Mecca, the goal for which we started. This is Andersonville. The 
stockade itself is a short walk south of here where we will shortly 
take ourselves. This spot is the national cemetery. "What art could 
do to garnish nature has here been accomplished. 

\Vlien Andersonville was chosen for a prison camp it was because 
of its remoteness from the lines of travel, and, in general, its isolation 
from the world that had eyes to see. The magnificence of the trees 
over our heads, the lawns, the flowers that bloom about, bespeaking 
the care that the nation renders to the graves of its heroes, all thrill 
us with emotion and gratitude. 

We started from the city of New York three days ago, on our way 
to this spot to unveil and dedicate the monument that stands veiled 
before you. The day in Richmond was memorable because Richmond 
was the capital of the Confederacy, because the prisoners entombed 




Back of Andersonville Monument 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 89 

there had died during the whole period of the war and were from all 
sections of the North, and because it was the birthday of General 
Grant. 

The day at Danville and Salisbury (that is, yesterday), is 
memorable because of the cordial greeting we received from the resi- 
dents of those cities as well as the pathos of the lonely magnificence of 
these two prison cemeteries ; but this is the great day of the feast. 
Here with bands playing and with uncovered heads, you, who long 
ago were here confined in prison, moving proudly on with banners and 
with bugles, have entered at last upon the very spot for which you 
started, with the yet veiled monument before you. 

From February, 1864, to April, 1865, the number of Union pris- 
oners confined here in Andersonville is recorded as 49,485. The aver- 
age period of imprisonment was four months. The greatest number 
of prisoners at one time was on August 8, 1864 — 33,414. The great- 
est number of deaths on a single day was on August 10, 1864 — 300. 

All about us are monuments which our sister States have erected to 
the memory of their dead. They also came here as we have done, gen- 
erally with the soldiers of their States who had been imprisoned here, 
returning to participate in the dedication of their monuments as the 
guests of their respective States, precisely as we have come to-day. 

Our coming differs from most of theirs cliiefly in that we have 
come a longer distance and at a later period of time, so that, although 
we come from the greatest of the States which had here the largest 
munber of prisoners, we are, perhaps, the smallest in number of any 
who have preceded us, not because the State did not invite all the sur- 
vivors of this prison to return as its guests, but because so many years 
have fled that we have now become so few in nimiber. This is the 
belated but proud tribute of the great State of New York to her 
immortal martyrs. 

The prison stockade here at Andersonville was laid out by one 
W. S. Winder, the son of Gen. John H. Winder, who commanded the 



90 STATE OF NEW YORK 



prisoners from Richmond and on southward in the winters of '63 and 
'64. No more out of the waj^ or lonely spot could probably have at 
that time been chosen on the line of any railroad than the combination 
of forests and marshes and swamps that then surrounded the little 
station of Andersonville. 

Slaves were employed to cut down trees, hew the logs and erect the 
stockade wall. The stockade was originally about fifteen and one-half 
acres in area. Through it ran a creek. It was built of pitch pine tim- 
bers, twelve inches thick and as wide as the trees from which they were 
cut would admit. The timbers, about twenty feet long, were set in 
trenches about five feet deep and the earth firmly packed about them. 

At intervals of about eighty feet boxes were constructed, six feet 
in length and four feet in width, and of such height that when the sen- 
trj' stood erect on the floor of his " house," the top of the stockade was 
on a level with his breast. These sentry boxes were reached from the 
outside by ladders and were covered with boards for shelter against the 
sun and storms. 

Within the enclosure, and fifteen or eighteen feet from it, was a 
railing, some four feet in height, running parallel with the prison 
walls. It was made by nailing scantling upon posts. This formed the 
famous " dead line." 

In 1864. the prison was enlarged by adding eleven and one-half 
acres to its area. 

In this national cemetery of Andersonville where we are this morn- 
ing, there are interred 13,722 dead, of which 12,791 are known and 
931 are miknowTi. 

You will find, if j'ou walk about, 2,500 State of New York flags, 
one placed at every known New York soldier's grave. There were 
10,000 of the youth of New York imprisoned here once. You were 
among them, my comrades — you who have survived life's perils for 
fifty years and are permitted, in God's Providence, to re-visit this 
scene and participate in the dedication of this monimient. If there 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 91 

should ever be a grateful hour in all your lives, surely it is this. God 
bless you. 

Perhaps I may now outline for you in a general way the antici- 
pated order of our services during this da}^ The exercises of the 
morning will consist of addresses, limited strictly to those who once 
were imprisoned here. At noon we will form in procession, with the 
band preceding us, and, with solemn tread, march from the cemetery 
into the prison stockade itself. At 12:30, within that stockade, the 
badges of honor will be pinned upon the bi'easts of the valiant men 
whom God has mercifully spared to see this day and to stand again — 
not young and ardent as when you first entered here — but old and 
grim, yet grateful and triumphant as you are this hour. 

Afterward, a Georgian banquet will be served. As you will 
doubtless remember, many a poor ration was doled out to you by the 
prison commissaries once upon this spot. I trust this collation to 
which the State of New York invites you to-day will be a mighty con- 
trast to any you had here before. 

The following six ladies have been invited to pin the medals of honor 
upon your breasts: Mrs. Carswell, Mrs. Andrus, Miss Gratia Patrie, 
Miss Margaret Kerrigan, Miss Lucretia Mackenzie, Miss Mabel Foster. 

These ladies are respectively either a mother, a daughter, or a 
grand-daughter of one of the commissioners. The officer of the day, 
Commissioner Brown, will so arrange it that each man, when his name 
is called, will step to the front and the designated lady will pin upon 
his breast the medal conferred by the State of New York in his honor, 
long delayed, it is true, and yet not too late for you. 

At 2:30 we will retm-n to this cemetery and re-assemble on this 
spot for the unveiling of the monument, for its dedication and its 
transfer from the ownership of the State to that of the nation. It will 
be unveiled just before its presentation. 

The speakers of the afternoon will be the Hon. Thaddeus C. 
Sweet, Speaker of the Assembly of the State of New York ; Senator 



92 STATE OF NEW YORK 

John F. Murtaugh, the President Pro Tempore of the Senate of New 
York, representing the Governor; and Colonel Langfitt, U. S. A., 
representing the President of the United States. 

The commissioners who will speak here this morning, that is, the 
commissioners other than those who are Senators and Assemblymen, 
were not eligible for that office miless they possessed certain qualifica- 
tions therefor. It was required by the law that they be citizens of 
New York, soldiers of New York and prisoners at Andersonville. 
Before introducing them to you, I will present, for your greeting. 
Colonel Langfitt, the President's representative. 

I introduce to you the first speaker of the morning, the honored 
secretary of the commission, who is not a member of the Commission 
only because he did not serve in a New York regiment, but who was, 
in fact, the man whose persistent interest in advocating the enabling 
act made possible this achievement. Comrade Joseph L. Killgore of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ADDRESS OF SECRETARY KILLGORE 

Me. Chaieman, Comrades and Friends: 

I am not a stranger to some of you. If ever I wished for the ability 
of a Demosthenes it is now; yet if I possessed it the effort would be a 
vain one, because no words of mine, nor of the English language that 
ever were coined, could tell you half; no pen can write it — the most 
eminent artist of the world, or all that ever lived, could not paint the 
scenes which were enacted here fifty years ago so that the pictures 
would adequately express the truth. These graves and monuments 
bear silent testimony to the awful tragedy of Andersonville. The skel- 
eton forms of many, the livid, swollen, distorted figures of others, and 
all a scene of desolation and death, is beyond the power of your imagina- 
tion. It is difficult for me, in speaking now, to control my emotion. 

Before attempting to say another word in relation to the suffer- 
ings and sacrifices of our comrades, it may be proper for me (possibly 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 93 

as your representative ) to say a few words about the magnanimity of 
the great State of New York (applause) and to point out a few of 
the members of the Legislature who aided in bringing you here. I 
appreciate their services and thank each one of them most 
cordially, particularly so because before I undertook the mission for 
you I was told repeatedly that in going to Albany my errand was a 
useless one, that the bill would never be passed, but much to our grati- 
fication it became a law by unanimous vote. I wish to introduce to 
this audience, through the courtesy of the chairman, three of the men 
who did so much to secure its passage. The bill was introduced in the 
Senate by the Hon. William B. Carswell. (Senator Carswell, will 
you stand up ? ) ( Applause. ) The vote in the Senate was unanimous, 
and in the Assembly the same, where it was in charge of Hon. William 
Pinkney Hamilton, Jr. (Mr. Hamilton, will you stand up?) 
(Applause.) (I wish the boys to see you, gentlemen.) It was car- 
ried to the Governor of the State by Senator A. J. Palmer, our chair- 
man (applause), so that you now see some of the men who were 
responsible for the bill in the Legislature. I am betraying no secret 
when I tell you that before its unanimous passage by both houses the 
Governor had personally assured me of his sympathy and support. 
Any reference I may make to my efforts, please do not think they are 
uttered in a spirit of self-laudation, because what I did was in your 
name, and the great State of New York listened to you and granted 
your request. Hon. Wm. Sulzer added to his reputation as the friend 
of the soldier and deserves our warmest thanks. I cannot refrain from 
referring to the great service of Senators Robert F. Wagner, Elon R. 
Brown, and others, and in the Assembly to Speaker Smith, Mr. Levy, 
Mr. Hinman and others. We thank everybody in both houses. 

Now, boys, there are many things published in connection with the 
history of the war that are not true. I do not mean to startle you 
when I say that there never was a war between the North and the 
South. There was a war for the preservation of the Union, in which 



94 STATE OF NEW YORK 

many men from the southland took active and prominent participation 
in its favor. We forget that the ansM^ering shot at Sumter was fired 
b}' a southern man, Robert Anderson, of Kentucky. We rememt)er 
that about tliis time fiftj^ years ago a great national convention was 
held in the city of Chicago, 111, (not by southern men), which 
declared the war a failure, and one of the planks of the platform 
insisted that the Govermnent of the United States should exchange 
the prisoners of war, which meant to give back to the Confederacy 
forty or fifty thousand fresh troops in place of skeletons, fit only for 
the graveyard or hospital. Then these northern allies of the Con- 
federacy became busy to have the friends and relatives of the Union 
prisoners know how deeply our boys were in favor of that particular 
plank of the platform. A mock election was held in the Confederate 
prisons, the result of which (if favorable) was to be sent through the 
lines to be used against Mr. Lincoln. The conspirators thought that 
with that plank of the platform urged upon the Union prisoners a 
majority at least would vote a white bean, which represented their 
candidate, McClellan, and the black beans were for Lincoln. 
(Applause.) Here were the white beans, wliich, according to that 
platform, stood for freedom and life. There were the black beans for 
Lincoln, suffering and death. But those black beans in the ej'es of 
the Union prisoners were symbolic of the Union and its flag, and 
when the votes were counted there was one white bean for McClellan 
to at least one hundred for Lincoln, and the Union prisoners had 
demonstrated their ability to discount or reverse the famous utterance 
of Patrick Henry, " Give me liberty or give me death! " 

In that part of our country, then known as the " loyal States," the 
vote in favor of this platform (the popular vote) , was one million eight 
hundred thousand, but these suffering, starving, dying Union prison- 
ers of war would have none of it. 

It may not be necessary for me to say this, but I wish to prove to 
vou that within this cemetery is the evidence of southern loyalty. The 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 95 

record shows that as many men from the six southern, or slave States, 
of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Missouri, Kentucky, and Tennes- 
see, are bm-ied here as from the six New England States, or from the 
six western States of Indiana, Kansas, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota 
and Wisconsin. In this cemetery lie seven hundred and twenty-three 
men from the Confederate State of Tennessee, as against seven 
hundred and sixty-seven from Massachusetts, and six hundred and 
fifty-three from Indiana. I merely refer to this fact that you may 
understand that the American Union was saved by men of the South, 
men of the North, and men of the West. The Union men, loyal citi- 
zens of this great nation, came from all sections of the country. 

In the first place, if it had not been for the encouragement and 
promises of help which were held out by certain prominent politicians 
of the North, the southern leaders would never have dared to seduce 
or coerce their people into secession and war. I am dropping these 
remarks that the younger people present may understand and know 
that the Union was saved by the loyal people of the nation without 
regard to any section. (Applause.) Let me tell you another thing, 
and those of you who are mathematicians can make your own calcu- 
lations. It is this, that from these slave, or southern. States there were 
at least four hundred thousand men who served in the Union army. 
Let us stop to think just a half minute — take those southern men 
from the Union army and add them to the Confederate, and you will 
see what I mean. Let us select a few individuals. Tell me if you 
can point to any soldier in the Union army who was the superior of 
that magnificent Virginian, George H. Thomas (applause), then go 
to the navy, search through its records, look in every direction, and 
select if you can a more distinguished sailor than that grand old Ten- 
nessean, David G. Farragut (applause); then stop and think of 
three hundred thousand men from six of the southern States ; it was 
easy to enlist in the Union army. North and West. Brass bands were 
parading the streets. It was a popular thing and it only took a few 



96 STATE OF NEW YORK 

steps to a recruiting office to enroll your name; then consider the 
loyalty of the man who will travel more than two hundred miles 
across moimtains and ravines, taking all sorts of chances, facing every 
danger, traveling immense distances, to enroll as a Union soldier. It 
meant much to him, and when we gather here rejoicing for the great 
State of New York and for other northern or western States, as we 
see proper to call them, let us not forget the loyal southern man. 

I have been delighted and instructed since we left New York and 
I think yesterday's exhibition of the feeling of the ex-Confederates 
should tell to all of us that the war is over and that the sanctity of our 
flag is safe ; that its future is secure, and that no hand, whether domestic 
or foreign, can ever be successfully raised against it. (Applause.) 

STORY OF ONE REGIMENT, THE 85TH NEW YORK 
By Commissioner Burdick 

On April 20, 1864, at Plymouth, N. C, after three days of san- 
guinary fighting, four hundred sixty-tliree enlisted men and thirty 
officers of the 85th N. Y., with other troops, constituting Wessel's 
brigade, were surrendered to the Confederate forces of General Hoke. 
"Eleven of the 85th had been killed and forty-three wounded. All the 
wounded who could walk were taken vnth the uninjured to Anderson- 
ville, Ga., where the most of the Plymoutli garrison arrived on April 
30, 1864. A few of the more severely wounded were brought in as 
soon as their wounds had healed sufficiently so that they could be 
transported. 

In the early part of September, after the fall of Atlanta, most of 
the living members of the regiment were transferred to Charleston, 
S. C. , where, with many other prisoners, they were held for a little 
over four weeks on the old racing park grounds, when the living were 
sent to Florence, S. C, and held in another stockade until General 
Sherman had captured Columbia, when those who could walk were 




Mrs. Martha A. Irish Burdick 

Author of Poem read at Andersonville Dedication, entitled 
" A Tribute of Honor " 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 97 

taken to Goldsboro, N. C, whence on February 27, 1865, all were 
paroled and sent to Wilmington, N. C. 

During the time the regiment was held at Andersonville, 176 died 
and were buried there. Of the regiment, while held as prisoners of 
war, three hundred and eleven gave their lives as martyrs to the cause 
of human liberty. To-day, as nearly as can be ascertained, seventy 
of the one hundred forty-five who survived the horrors of that year 
are alive; sixty-seven of these enlisted in the fall of 1861 and were 
continuously in the service from the day of enlistment to the day of 
discharge. Every one of these men was on the fighting line during 
the four days of the battle at Plymouth. 

On April 26, 1914, thirty-one of the survivors of Andersonville, 
members of the 85th, as an organization went with the other New 
York ex-prisoners on the pilgrimage to the dedication of New York's 
monument at Andersonville. These men were veterans, having served 
nearly four years during the great conflict, and having been in seven- 
teen different engagements, besides many scouting scenes and skir- 
mishes. Very few indeed of the volunteer soldiers were shirks or 
cowards. They hurl into the teeth of their maligners the assertion that 
" they were skulkers " for every one was on the firing line doing his 
best for his coimtry. To-day every one of those who went to Ander- 
sonville in 1914 is an honorable man, doing his part in making our 
country great, and, as truly as it may be said of most of those who 
could not go with us, they are worthy citizens to-day as they were good 
soldiers then, 

ADDRESS BY COMMISSIONER BURDICK 

My comrades, fifty years ago to-morrow we entered the stockade 
at Andersonville, 463 members of the 85th regiment among those pris- 
oners who carried the musket, on the 1st day of April, 1865, the last 
ones left, excepting those who are lying out yonder. One hundred and 
seventy-six of the 85th New York are buried in this cemetery. One 
7 



98 STATE OF NEW YORK 

hundred and thirty-five of them are buried somewhere else in other 
southern cemeteries. Three hundi-ed and eleven men from the 85th 
regiment, all told, died as prisoners of war, the largest number from 
any organization in the United States. 

TAventy-four years ago we attended services here on Decoration 
day, and Mrs. Burdick read the poem from the stage over yonder, 
"A Pilgrimage." To-day she wished very much that she might be 
here, but for five years she has been an invalid. She is not able to 
walk, but her mind is here with us to-day. 

Commissioner Burdick then read the poem written for the occasion 
by Mrs. Martha A. I. Burdick, who had two brothers and her hus- 
band (Commissioner Burdick) in AndersonviUe prison: 

A TRIBUTE OF HONOR 

The rolling tides of peaceful years 
Have laved and smoothed the war-ridged crests 
Of lands where sleep our buried slain 
With still hands folded on their breasts. 

Time dulls the edge of keenest grief, 

But neither time nor tide can dim 
The altar fires that God hath lit 

And guarded by love's cherubim. 

Enshrined within our hearts, we hold 

The loving memory of those 
Whose lives were sacrificed to save 

The Nation from mistaken foes. 

We rear our monuments inscribed 

With Honor's tribute, richly due 
To those who kept the Union whole 

When War his vengeful trumpet blew. 

Here where we stand with reverent feet, 

With heaven's blue dome above us spread, 
A silent, sleeping army waits 

The resurrection of the dead. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 99 



The constellations of the skies 

Stand guard above these voiceless halls 

Whose marble doors swing ever back, 
And where no martial bugle calls. 

These men were prisoners of war, — 

Our sires, our brothers, and our sons,— 

Made captive at the battle's front 

'Mid clash of arms and booming guns. 

Within the prison pen they bore 
Till death the agonies and woes 

Whose harvest the grim reaper gleaned. 
Whose aftermath no mortal knows. 

No sword or gun or bayonet 

Lies by the side of those who sank 

Unarmed and unresisting here, 

Unknown to fame or fortune's rank. 

They died, and yet they might have lived - 
Might have escaped their awful lot — 

If they had bartered loyalty 

For their release, but they would not. 

True to the pledge of patriot sires. 
Ten thousand heroes perished here. 

And generations yet to come 

Their names shall honor and revere. 

A rescued Nation tribute pays 

In sculptured stone and letters bronze 

Whose words shall tell to coming years 
The record of her martyred sons. 

Build to the skies, if thus ye may. 
Oh, loyal freemen, true to trust. 

Build marble towers and granite domes 
Above these ranks of silent dust. 

Float, starry banner of the free 
Forever float, undimmed, above 

Our altar fires whose incense bears 

To heaven our pledge of ceaseless love. 



100 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Our garlands of forget-me-nots 

With amaranths of fadeless bloom 
We twine with tear-wet laurel wreaths 

Above each martyr-hero's tomb. 

Sweet Peace with snowy wings shall guard 

This spot where sleep our loved and lost. 
And a saved Nation teach her sons 

What victory and peace have cost. 

The monument we dedicate 

For the Great Empire State this day 
Acknowledges in eloquence 

The debt of love she cannot pay. 

But monuments and laurel crowns, — 

All symbols and all eloquence, — 
Can never voice the sacrifice 

That only God can recompense. 

Our stricken hearts, our lonely homes, 

Our pride in valor and in worth. 
We leave with Him within whose hand 

Are held the destinies of earth. 

Time bears us onward and will bring 

Eternity's glad dawn at last. 
With Heaven's pure light to overshine 

The midnight shadows of the past. 

I have copies enough of the poem. Mrs. Burdick wanted them 
given to each of the comrades here present and any of the friends who 
may want them; enough for every one. (Applause,) 

(A rising vote was taken in honor of Mrs. Burdick and thanks for 
her poem was unanimous. ) 

ADDRESS OF COMMISSIONER I. M. FOSTER 

Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, Comrades: 

This is a sacred day, a sacred service. Echoes from the past break 
in on my heart. Visions stand out before me, brighter and clearer than 
the leaves on these trees. I will not permit myself to go into the past 
and say much about this prison. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 101 

Some things that relate themselves to this prison, to the experiences 
of men here, shall live as long as time rolls by. It was a splendid 
thing to save the Union, but, comrades, do not misunderstand me 
when I say, we fought for two years and did not win a battle under 
the cry, " The Union must be preserved," but out of a woman's heart 
and a woman's brain, touched with the finger of God, we came to face 
the great truth that was underlying the conflict at that time. 

Great principles were involved in the war, principles that touched 
not only the lives of those in our own land, but the lives of men every- 
where on earth who felt the heel of tyranny upon their necks. We 
were bearing to the future, and pushing out to the front, the interests 
that related to all men for all time. Better that a nation die than the 
truth should be crushed forever. Better that Spain be destroyed 
than that Cuba should be crushed. (Applause.) And so I am just 
going to say a few words concerning what these men fought for. 

I am going to show you how true those men were who were in this 
prison. God never made men truer than the men imprisoned here. 
Loyalty was their god, and devotion to the principles of righteousness. 
Those old prison walls ! I can see them as distinctly as I see these trees. 
The groups of men on every side pass before my vision now, and the 
gates are open yonder. It is about eleven or twelve o'clock. Coming 
at the gate yonder are a dozen or fifteen Confederates, splendid men 
in form and physique, and they go about among the prisoners making 
offers — and many had the opportunity ; you have heard it, every one 
of you. 

See that poor fellow over there? The brightness of the noonday 
sun is shining upon him. Visions of beauty are taking form and shape 
before him. See the smile that plays upon his features. Yonder in 
the vision that rises before him is the old homestead, and on its porch 
his gray-haired father and mother, waiting for his coming. Just at 
the gate yonder stands his wife, looking and longing for his return, and 
on the lawn yonder are playing the children of his love and life. 



102 STATE OF NEW YORK 

He is not in prison now. He is home again. The vision is taking 
shape and body before him, and the smile fills his features as he steps 
into the embrace of his father and mother and feels their kisses, and 
the children climb up in his arms, their arms about his neck, and their 
voices ring in his ears, sweeter than the voices of angels. All, he is not 
in prison now. Gone are all thoughts of the prison in the vision that 
has arisen before him. 

His mother says, " Dinner is served," and there is his accustomed 
place, and he takes his old seat again. In his thought and in his heart 
he bows his head, as his father lifts his voice in prayer of thanksgiving 
to God for having preserved his son and brought him home again. 
He is not in prison now. 

Yes, he is lying over yonder. Ai'oused from the dream by the offer 
of the men that come in at the gate: " Take the oath of allegiance to 
the Southern Confederacy and we will feed you; we will clothe you. 
We will bring back health and strength. We will make the vision real 
in the future." 

And I can see him now, as, his eyes snapping fire and spurning 
with contempt the offer, he says: "What? I take the oath of alle- 
giance to the Southern Confederacy? What? I strike against the old 
flag? Yes, this is a fearful place we are in. We are suffering and 
starving and dying here, but before I take the oath of allegiance to 
the Southern Confederacy I will lie here and rot and die and be for- 
gotten by my father and mother and wife and children, before I will 
take the oath of allegiance to the Southern Confederacy, or raise my 
hands against the stars and stripes." (Applause.) 

And I tell you, comrades, that is the kind of courage God 
Almighty honors and humanity crowns ; the kind of courage no battle- 
field produces. 

A Comrade : Right. 

Commissioner Foster: Right? I can demonstrate to any unpre- 
judiced mind that it is the kind of courage never uncovered on a battle- 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 103 

field. There is one thing to help a man when he goes into battle. Yes, 
there is : pride of a man's heart, lest he be called a coward. No man 
cares to be called a coward. Do not smile when I tell you one thing : 
God Ahnighty never made a woman who would marry a coward if she 
knew it. She will follow a drunkard down the street, thinking she can 
make him a sober man. She will follow a criminal to his cell, thinking 
she can bring him back to honor and manhood. She will relinquish 
everything dear to her soul for the man she loves, but she will spvu-n a 
coward as a poisonous viper. 

Yes, and if any of you fellows hear an old soldier say he had no 
fear when he first went into battle, that is proof he never saw a battle. 
(Applause and laughter.) 

A Comrade : Right. 

Commissioner Foster : God never made a man who is not afraid 
of bullets. Because a man is a little timid and afraid, that is no indi- 
cation of cowardice. Brave men fear danger and leap into its very 
jaws in obedience to duty. 

If I had five minutes more I would just use a little illustration of 
myself. I am going to steal a minute or two. You see where I made 
a point is this: We came in on eastern time and I am talking on 
Georgia time, and that gives me an hour. 

A Comrade : We will give you more, anyhow. 

Commissioner Foster: I am going to take it anyway. I was 
just going to say a word about cowardice and fear. They deployed 
us into the line of battle at the battle of Chancellorsville on the hill. 
Somebody blundered. They frequently do, you know. We should 
have been deployed at the base of the hill. Chancellorsville was not 
my first fight. I had been among the men crossing into Fredericks- 
burg and rushed up those stone walls. I knew about war before, but 
something that day, I do not know what, happened to me, and my 
knees caved under. The guns opened fire just yonder and my whole 
form trembled. Twelve pieces of artillery opened fire on us and 



104 STATE OF NEW YORK 

began to drop on us, and I said to Mould, the orderly sergeant, " I 
(stuttering) do not know what's the matter with me. I cannot stand 
still." Yet when we charged those twelve pieces of artillery I did 
keep my place in line with the rest of the men. (Applause.) 

That helps a man in battle, — the pride of his own heart. And 
there is another thing that helps men in battle : that is the privilege of 
striking back. Every man of you rise and tell me you are going to 
attack me. My hands and limbs are free and I may run the gauntlet 
and escape ; but bind my hands and my feet and throw me on my back, 
and then tell me you are going to attack me and there is nothing left 
for me then but to wait your approach. That was our condition in 
prison. And there is another thing that helps a man in battle: that 
is the possibility of victory and triumph. My brigade, Mr. Chairman, 
took Little Round Top at Gettysburg. I saw Pickett's charge. I 
can hear the echoes come down resounding through the generations 
past of that marvellous triumph when we lifted the flag so high above 
the smoke and dust of battle that all the nations of the earth could see 
it and were impressed with the majesty and magnificence of our 
strength. 

There is something wonderful in the possibility of victory, but you 
fellows knew the feeling I refer to, when we were lying over yonder 
and those men came and offered the privileges of returning to hfe, or 
returning to health, of looking once more upon your homes, or staying 
there and eating a pint of meal and water, and another pint of meal 
and another pint of beans — that was all. That was all they gave us. 
I say those men were true in a condition and in a situation which 
exalted the old flag, in the demonstration of the fact that we had estab- 
lished forever the truth of human rights and individual liberty. 

We were not fighting for the black man nor the white man. We 
were fighting for manhood, and we were declaring to the nations of the 
earth that because a man is a man, and because of that fact, the God 
Almighty set a stamp of manhood upon him — I would rather be a 




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ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 105 

man than an angel. I would rather have a good right arm than an 
angel's wing. It is not written an3'where in the Book that man will 
ever be anything but man through all eternitj^ — redeemed manhood. 
God has appeared to men in the past, always in the form of man; God 
met the prophets and sat with them in their tents, but sat with them 
in the form of man. We approach the throne in the name of the Man, 
Jesus Christ, and it was in the interest of common humanity that we 
fought for the grand old flag. It was in the interest of mankind for 
generations to come that men suffered and gave their lives in the 
interest of truth. It meant something. 

How kind and true some men were to us in the past. I am a 
Methodist minister. I have lived in a Methodist parsonage on second- 
hand furniture all my life. (Laughter.) That is right. I have just 
moved from one parsonage to another within the past month and there 
is not a new thing in it. Only a new house and a new man and a new 
wife and a few of my- things; that is all. My father was a Methodist 
minister before me. I am not introducing anything religious into this 
at all. It is not in any sense a religous worship, but I will never for- 
get — and there are many of you who remember — those hot days of 
July and August. I have forgotten the names of two or three of those 
Catholic priests that came in to give us cheer and help. 

A Comrade: Whelan, Hamilton and Clavereul. 

Commissioner Foster: I speak of them, and there came to my 
mind to-day these words I found written in the Book : " Other sheep 
have I that are not of this fold." And if loyalty to the spirit that is 
Christly, if the uncovering of the heart that is divine, if the charity of 
the hand that flashed like an incandescent light with its faith and its 
cleanliness, is to give expression of loyalty to that which is divine, then 
these men came to comfort us and lay hold with the fingers of God. 

It is a great da}^ What education this is to stand here, beneath 
the shadows of these trees, in the presence of the dead, and hear their 
voices as they speak to us of duty and responsibility and future oppor- 



106 STATE OF NEW YORK 

tunity. Here it is that we are drilled in the jjrinciples of loyalty, of 
patriotism, of truth, and of devotion. Here it is that we marshal the 
hosts of the United States. 

Oh, yes, England has sustained continuously a standing army of 
two hundred and fifty thousand men to maintain her peace. France 
has a standing army of a couple of hundred thousand men or more to 
maintain her peace. Germany has a standing army of some five or six 
hundred thousand men to maintain her peace at great public expense. 
Russia has a standing army of six or seven hundred thousand men to 
sustain all the time at great public expense to maintain her peace. We 
have got a little, insignificant army of about sixty-five thousand men 
stretched from ocean to ocean and from the lakes to the coast, and 
from sea to sea, and we span the globe. Sixty-five thousand, did I 
say, Mr. Chairman, is that about right? I am mistaken. My mind 
was a little more quickened just now. We have an army of men — 
3,000,000, or 4,000,000, or 5,000,000 of men — and we gather them 
together on these great days, by the side of men who sleep, and drill 
them in the principles of righteousness and truth and loyalty to gov- 
ernment, and so magnificent is the standing army of this great nation, 
drilled by the graves of men who have sacrificed their lives that its 
power might be upheld, so magnificent is this, that the nations of the 
earth stand aloof and the old flag we unfurled floats out without fear 
and without thought concerning the possibilities of the future. 

God, help us to be true. One other word. I have come to know 
my friend, Mr. Hinman, splendidly. I have read some things about 
him and I took occasion to say to him yesterday that what I did desire 
to say — and that is the only thing I had thought out to say to-day — 
is this : that what he said was true in that magnificent speech he gave 
us in Richmond when he warned against the dangers that line along 
the path of anarchism and socialism and these various teachers against 
individual liberty; but the greatest danger, comrades and fellow citi- 
zens, is not, to me, along that line. I endorse everything he said and 
believe all he uttered to be true, but I believ6 the nation's greatest 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 107 

danger lies in its departure from the morals of God's laws ; that when 
vice shall rule in place of truth, and when men shall wink at iniquity, 
and when men shall disregard the commandments of God, then shall 
the foundations of the nation crmnble and decay. In the history of 
the world, from Babylon to Jerusalem, from Jerusalem to Rome, and 
from Rome to the fall and decline of the Spanish power, there is not 
recorded a single instance of the overthrow and destruction of upright 
and God-fearing people. Vice and iniquity alone represent the ruin 
of nations ; and if we shall be as true to God and truth in the future 
as in the past; if we shall strike out in the things that come with the 
devotion to loyalty that has characterized the men now sleeping in this 
cemetery here, we have nothing to fear. 

Oh, yes, I saw the men that were hung here. I could stand here 
until the shadows go down and tell you of the experiences of prison 
life, but that is not mine to do. I would not encroach upon the pro- 
gram of the day. It is a privilege to stand here. It is a benediction 
to stand here. I brought my wife and children to see the spot where 
I fought, bled, and died several times. (Applause.) Yet they all 
say I am one of the liveliest corpses they ever saw. At the same time 
it is a privilege that we cannot express, in our appreciation of it, to be 
permitted to come here, fifty years after our departure. Fifty years 
have rolled away and the men who were here are nearly all gone, but 
we are here, thank God. 

If we shall be as true in the future as we have been in the past, the 
history of the decline and fall of the American republic will never be 
written. If Christians shall be loyal to their Maker ; if philanthropists 
shall go forth on errands of mercy ; if patriots shall be true to their 
high calling, then it shall never be said that the ocean was dug for our 
grave, or that the grass grew for our shroud, or that the mountains 
were reared to mommient our departed glory, but the old flag we love 
so well shall wave on and wave ever, until its starry folds shall glow 
resplendent in the glories of the last day. 

God help us to be true. (Applause.) 



108 STATE OF NEW YORK 



ADDRESS BY COMMISSIONER McCULLY 

Mr. Chaikman, Ladies, Gentlemen and Comk.vdes: 

Much has been said and written about the great Civil War, but 
there still remains much to be told and recorded. History gives us no 
parallel of its horrors, especially the sufferings of those who were con- 
fined in the southern prison pens. Of the nine thousand from the 
State of New York who were confined in this prison, ninety-seven 
per cent have gone to the eternal camping-grounds, and the other 
three per cent are rapidly following. 

On the 2nd day of September, 1864, General Sherman entered 
Atlanta. The Confederates here thought he was going to send his 
cavalry to release us, and began as soon as possible to remove us ; ten 
thousand were sent to a stockade at Florence, S. C. On their arrival 
at Charleston, S. C. (enroute), the first one thousand were put in an 
open space of ground in front of a large public building in the center 
of the city and a double guard placed around us. The next morning 
there came into the camp some Sisters of Charity; they talked with 
some of the boys and went away. The following morning they came 
with a wagon-load of bread; two of the Sisters filled their arms and 
attempted to go through the guard line, when one of the guards said, 
" We-uns got orders not to let you-uns go in thar. " One of the Sisters 
replied, " Well, sir, do your duty and thrust us through if you will, 
and we ^vill do om- duty and feed these starving men," and she went 
like a shot past that guard (applause), and distributed the armful of 
bread. Then she went back, and they concluded it would be difficult 
to get through as a body, so they went to the wagon and loaded their 
arms with bread, came over to the lines and threw it over the heads 
of the guards to us. That is what the Sisters of Charity did for us in 
Charleston that day. (Applause.) At that time, our gunboats were 
shelling the city. The shells went over us and on all sides, but none 
entered the camp. We were there about two weeks, waiting for the 
stockade at Florence to be finished, and during that time not a shot 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 109 

dropped into our camp. We concluded those gunners knew our 
location, hence no shells reached us. 

Day before yesterday, Senator Palmer in his remarks referred to 
the Sisters of Charity and their kindness to the prisoners at Belle Isle 
in Richmond, and I recall what he said, that although he was not of 
the same faith, he never met a Sister of Charity to whom he did not 
take off his hat. I simply add to what he said, that I hope the dear 
Lord will bless here and everywhere the Sisters of Charity; and I can 
say with Senator Palmer that I, too, am not of the same faith. I 
never see one of them, however, but that it brings back to me recollec- 
tions of what happened in Charleston. (Applause. ) 

Great honor and credit has been given to the men of the Civil War, 
and too little to the noble women whose mental sufferings were ten 
times greater than our physical and mental combined; and we who 
were here in Andersonville know what that means. Just one or two 
references to their part in the war and I am through. 

A woman in Massachusetts, Mrs. Bixby by name, had five sons. 
They all went to war ; they were all killed. On the 21st day of Novem- 
ber, 1864, President Lincoln went into the Secretary of War's office. 
The Secretary said: " Mr. President, I have just received a report 
from the Adjutant- General of the State of Massachusetts, who 
informs me that Mrs. Bixby's last son of five has been killed," What 
did the President do? With his great sympathetic heart, he sat down 
and wrote Mrs. Bixby as follows : 

Executive Mansion, 

Washington, November 21, 1864. 
To Mrs. Bixby, Boston, Mass. 
Dear Madam: 

I have been shown in the files of the War Department a 
statement of the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts that 
you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on 
the field of battle. I feel how weak and fruitless must be 



no STATE OF NEW YORK 

any word of mine which should attempt to beguile you from 
the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain 
from tendering you the consolation that may be found in the 
thanks of the republic they died to save. I pray that our 
Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereave- 
ment, and leave you onlj' the cherished memory of the loved 
and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have 
laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom. 
Yours very sincerely and respectfully, 

A. LINCOLN. 

In the city of Chicago, we have a Federal judge who was born 
about the time of the battle of Kenesaw Mountain. His name is 
Kenesaw Mountain Landis. He is the judge who fined the Standard 
Oil Company $29,000,000 and is a brother of the Hon. Charles E. 
Landis, M. C. 

Their father. Colonel Landis, raised and organized a regiment and 
with him he took four of his brother Jacob's boys. At the battle of 
Stone River in 1863, the last one was killed. On looking for him the 
next day, he found him on the battle-field, dead. He sat down and 
wrote the family, consoling them as best he could, and closed with 
these words: 

Dear Brother Jacob: 

This will be a sad blow to you, this being the fourth boy 
that you have given to your country. But in your sorrow 
you have this consolation: They died fighting for the best 
country on which the sun has ever shone. 

Those words were true in 1863. They are true to-day in 1914. 
This is the best coimtry on which the sun has ever shone (applause), 
and that flag, with its beautiful stripes and bright stars; that flag, 
with its emblematic color of red, white and blue ; that flag whose folds 
protect alike the foreign and American born, and represents the 
country of free schools, religious liberty, and equal rights to all, is the 
best flag on this earth to-day. (Applause.) 



ANDERSON VILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 111 



ADDRESS BY COMMISSIONER BROWN 

Mr. Chairman and Representatives of the State, Ladies and 

Gentlemen, Comrades: 

I want to say I am very glad I am here on this occasion to partici- 
pate in the dedication of the beautiful monument that stands there. 
I was one of the first that entered that prison. I was not then sixteen 
years old; I passed my sixteenth birthday there. As I said, I am 
glad to be with you and do all I can to make this occasion memorable. 
I thank you, Mr. Chairman, for calling upon me. My voice is 
troubling me and I ask you to excuse me. I thank you for your 
attention. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS BY COMMISSIONER MACKENZIE 

My Comrades and My Friends: 

That is all I have in this world now — comrades and friends, and 
I hope and trust that every man who wore the blue or the gray is a 
comrade of mine (applause) ; and every person who acknowledges 
God is a friend of mine. 

I do not know what I can say here. I may have a voice, but I 
have not the ability of some of my commissioner friends. However, 
I want to tell you this: I would like to impress upon your minds 
that which was impressed upon mine fifty years ago — my first fight. 
Comrades, you know what the fight was; friends, I hope you will 
never know such a fight. 

I remember when we were pushing to the front, when I heard the 
shots of the advance guards, when we saw the Confederate cavalry 
come to meet us, when we went and met them, and " they were not 
ours." (Laughter.) That was our first march on to Fredericksburg. 
We called it Falmouth. 

From that time until after the battle of South Mountain, we were 
on the firing line. Then we came back into Virginia and I was cap- 
tured. I remember the trip over the Virginia Central road from 



112 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Orange courthouse around down to Richmond; the night and day in 
Libby prison; the winter on Belle Island, the six and a half months 
down here in Andersonville prison. I remember leaving this place, 
going to the Andersonville station, back to Milen, and then going 
back to Savannah and getting aboard the old " New York " with the 
Star-Spangled Banner flying over my head. 

Comrades and friends, I thought that was the grandest hour of my 
Kfe. That was fifty years ago, but to-day I stand before you and I 
tell you that this is the grandest hour of our lives. (Applause.) 

The war is over, thank God, and we are all comrades and we are 
all friends, and my prayer to Him who rules everything is that we 
shall ever be comrades and friends. (Applause.) 

Senator Palmer: Now one moment, your attention. The 
services reminiscent are over. If you will follow our guidance for the 
next hour or so the medals will be given you. We will return for the 
formal unveiling and dedication of the monument, and you will have 
an hour or two hours to ramble around here amid the graves of your 
comrades before you entrain yourselves to depart. I am anxious you 
shall have, each man undisturbed, two hours to himself. 

The medals will be conferred upon you in the prison pen. 

WITHIN THE PRISON STOCKADE 
12:30 p. M. 
PRESENTATION OF MEDALS 

The veterans having been assembled in military order within the 
prison stockade, the services of decorating them with the medals now 
occurred. 

Senator Palmer: Mr. Officer of the Day and comrades, in 
behalf of the State of New York, represented here by this Commis- 
sion and by the Senators and the Assemblymen, who stand here side 
by side, we are, as the representatives of the State of New York, now 



Line Lp at Andebsoxville for Presentation of New York State's CoMMt;MOKATivE Dedication Medal 



ANDERSON VILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 113 

about to confer on you each a medal inscribed with your name, your 
company and regiment, which you may wear proudly upon your 
breast to your life's end, in testimony of the Empire State's apprecia- 
tion of your sufferings upon this spot fifty years ago. 

These ladies have been selected to pin these medals upon your 
breasts. One is the mother of one of the commissioners ; f oin* are the 
daughters of the commissioners and one the grand-daughter of a com- 
missioner. In other words, every lady who will now perform this 
duty is related by blood to the commissioners, and but one from each 
family. 

Each comrade, when his name is called, will march to the front 
and receive his medal. 

The banquet under the trees which had grown up within the 
stockade was then partaken of. 

PRESENTATION OF LOVING CUP 

At the conclusion of the banquet, the comrades were assembled 
underneath the trees within the prison stockade and the chairman of 
the Commission being sent for was surprised indeed by the presenta- 
tion to him of a loving cup filled with the water of Providence Spring. 

The presentation address was made by Commissioner I. M. Foster 
as follows : 

Senator Palmer, in behalf of all who have participated in this trip, 
I am commissioned to present to you this loving cup, the gift of your 
comrades in token of their love and esteem. Comrades, I have known 
Senator Palmer for many years. Indeed, I have been his friend and 
he has been mine all along life's joiu-ney, and it is a particularly grate- 
ful task to me that upon this spot I should be privileged to present to 
my friend this loving cup, which we procured unknown to him in 
Richmond, where he was long a prisoner, and which we now present 
to him as & token not only of our love, but of the obligations which we 
8 



114 STATE OF NEW YORK 

are under to hiin for his patient and successful labors as chairman of 
the Commission in gathering us from all parts of the State, and bring- 
ing us safely to this place and hour. 

Senator Palmer has many qualities of manhood, never forgets liis 
friends, is true to the principles of life, and loyal to every respon- 
sibility in life ; he is in possession of the rarest jewels that man ever 
carries, the friendships of all these men. The friendship ! These lives 
will fade and die, and that which I am going to give to you, sir, will 
rot by and by, but the friendship and loyalty of these hearts to j'ou, 
sir, will abide forever. Yes, sir. I am speaking out of my own heart 
and out of the heart and conscience of every man that is here. 

Very few of these men know, sir, how assiduously and with what 
undivided attention you have toiled early and late for weeks and 
weeks, without any other thoughts of remuneration except a success- 
ful trip; and God has crowned you with health and permitted us to 
come here with you under yom* general direction, with the assistance 
of the men now gathered about you ; and, sir, it has cropped up in our 
hearts to express to you here and now on this sacred spot om- apprecia- 
tion of your toil and effort in bringing us here. 

In this loving cup we express to you our confiding regard and in 
it now is just a little of the water from Old Providence Spring. 

God swept over this place once with a tornado ; as it seemed to us, 
the heavens had conspired with our foes to destroy us. The black 
clouds gathered from the four corners of the skj\ They seemed to 
meet just over this prison to unite their force and power in destroying 
us. The muttering thunder was like the voice of threatening, the 
flashing lightning told us of its devastating power; then the gates 
opened and the rain descended in torrents and that little stream 
became a mighty rushing river and the water rushed down the two 
hills and it seemed to open everything so as to destroy us ; but at last 
the storm swept by. Then we discovered that God's right hand had 
reached down into the soil and had opened a spring out of which was 



ANDERSON VILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 115 

pouring water, pure and clear, sufficient to satisfy the wants of the 
prison, and b}^ common consent we named it " Providence Spring," 
as if the hand of God in the fury of the storm had opened the earth 
to bring forth water for famished thousands. 

In this loving cup which expresses our friendship is the water 
Almighty God brought us when we were famishing for water; it is 
an expression of our appreciation of your toil, which we hope may 
always remind you in years to go by of the friendship and regard of 
these men. 

RESPONSE BY SENATOR PALMER 

My comrades, I thank you. I never was more surprised, for not 
the least intimation had come to me that you intended to make me 
any gift whatever; above all, so splendid a loving cup, which I accept 
gratefully and will keep to the end of my life in memory of your 
appreciative friendship. 

Of course, I have for many months, bj' night and day, done what 
I could to make this trip successful, to bring you from your far-scat- 
tered homes in comfort to this spot, so that all who were invited to the 
privileges of this trip, and no others, should be here assembled. Also, 
that every man should have a good breakfast and dinner and supper 
and a comfortable sleeping car berth, and avoiding all extravagance, 
yet that you should make this long journey in comfort as the guests 
of the Empire State. Also, we brought along a good nurse, a fair 
girl from Albany, whose father was a prisoner here, who has cared for 
you on the trains ; and a phj^sician as well, in case of any illness, who 
also was himself a prisoner here and who lives within the bounds of 
my senatorial district. I have had the co-operation of my colleagues 
in so far as their assistance has been necessary, and if I have served 
to make this extraordinary journey a successful celebration of your 
achievements on this spot, I am, in that alone, repaid. 



116 STATE OF NEW YORK 

I was never a prisoner myself here at Andersonville as you all 
were. I spent nine months in Confederate prisons, but not here. It 
was therefore you that suffered here and not I. It was that great 
statesman of New York, Roscoe Conkling, who once said that, " The 
fibre of a man is determined not so much by what he can perform as 
by what he can endure." Comrades, you who spent months and years 
of your youth in these prisons, surely developed the virtue of endur- 
ance as few men in history have done. 

It has so happened that in the passage of the years I seem to have 
become the last Union soldier remaining in legislative office in the 
State of New York. Not many years ago there were twenty or thirty 
men who served in the Senate or Assembly who were Union soldiers. 
The Lieutenant-Governor was usually an old soldier who was honored 
with this office, because, in addition to his personal qualifications, he 
had an historic record. 

With the defeat for re-election of Dr. Bush of Chemung last year, 
I have become the only man left in the Legislature whose youth was 
spent in the army. I have no doubt that it was largely therefor that 
I was given the privilege to serve you as the chairman of this Com- 
mission. Moreover, I wish to say in this presence, to the honor of 
my friend, Lieutenant-Governor Robert F. Wagner, that despite the 
fact that I am not of his politics, yet at his suggestion I was designated 
to membership in this Commission and by the votes of my associates 
was unanimously elected its -chairman. I have tried, therefore, to 
carry out my duties without any political preference whatever to one 
or another. 

I have tried, also, to make every one comfortable, so that if all the 
people of the State, whose guests you really are and at whose expense 
you have made this journey, could know of every dollar of their money 
which has been expended for your comfort, all would gladly approve 
it, and if we have succeeded in bringing you here in comfort and shall 
get you home in safety, that will be my real reward. 



ANDERSON VILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 117 

I trust it will be in our power, also, on our return to reimburse you 
for your expenses from yom* respective homes to the city of New 
York and return.* 

I thank you now for the loving cup with all my heart. 

A Comrade: Three cheers for our Senator. 

A Comrade: Three cheers for the Empire State of New York. 

Secretary Killgore: I propose three cheers for William B. 
Carswell and the other men who aided us in getting the bill through 
the Legislature. 

Commissioner Foster: Three cheers for the secretary who 
worked so assiduously. 

2:30 p. m. 

(The comrades are re-assembled about the yet veiled monument.) 

PRAYER BY COMMISSIONER FOSTER 

Almighty God, the Father of us all. Giver of all the mercies of 
life : We give praise and thanksgiving to Thee for the privilege that 
is granted us this hour of gathering together on this sacred spot to 
dedicate to the memory of those who sacrificed their lives in the 
interest of truth the pillar of stone that as the days go by shall speak 
of their loyalty and of their service to truth. 

Grant us Thy blessing and impress upon our hearts, deeper than 
ever before, the value of truth, and help us ever to associate our- 
selves with that which is true and pure and good, to the glory of Thy 



* The Legislature of 1915 appropriated a sum sufficient to refund to each New 
York Andersonville survivor, living outside of the city of New York who attended 
the dedication of the monument, the amount of the railroad fare from his home to 
New York City and return. 

This amount has been paid to each survivor living, or the proper representative 
of deceased, by the treasurer of the State of New York, and thus the Empire State 
has redeemed its promise, for the accomplishment of which our thanks are extended 
to both branches of the Legislature and particularly to Senators Carswell and Sage, 
Speaker Sweet, Assemblyman McDonald and to Hon. Charles S. \VhitmaB, 
Governor. 



118 STATE OF NEW YORK 

great name, to the honor of our nation's hfe, to the advancement and 
exaltation of truth, as the days shall go. 
Hear us for Thy name's sake. Amen. 

ADDRESS BY SENATOR PALMER 

I request the keeper of this cemetery, Mr. Bryant, whose services 
have been very great to us, and the keeper of the prison stockade, by 
whose courtesy we were permitted to have our dinner served within 
its bounds to-day, to accept seats upon the platform. 

We have come now, my comrades, almost to the closing services 
of this long itinerary. The average one of you has probably come 
1,500 miles from your home to this spot and there will be an equal 
distance in return, which I pray God you may all make in safety. 

The hour has now arrived for the dedication of the monument 
itself. It will be turned over by the Commission to the representative 
of the State, and by him, in turn, to the representative of the Presi- 
dent of the United States unveiled. This completed monument to 
her dead the State of New York to-day gives over to the nation for 

its eternal care. 

• 

ADDRESS OF THE HON. THADDEUS C. SWEET 
Mr. Chairman, Veterans, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

For me to attempt to add to the impressiveness of this occasion 
would not only be sacrilegious but a mockery. It seems that the 
most befitting service would be for us to bow our heads with these 
surviving veterans in solemn thought and turn our faces then heaven- 
ward with thankful hearts to our most gracious Lord for the preser- 
vation of these many veterans who have been spared to assemble here 
to-day in peaceful communion. 

In all the ages of the past the true soldier who has battled for 
human life and his country and its institutions has won and received 
the homage of the American people, the loving gratitude of his 
countrymen. 



ANDERSON VILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 119 

We have gathered together here to-day to dedicate this monu- 
ment to the brave men who gave up their Hves that this country- 
might hve ; but they have a more enduring monument than this, for, 
friends, when this shaft shall crumble and decay, when the very names 
it is intended to memorialize shall have been effaced from this monu- 
ment, their names will still be sacred in the hearts of the American 
people. 

As we look upon this monument to-day it awakens many sad 
memories, for within yon prison walls that once stood upon these adja- 
cent grounds, one of my own flesh and blood wasted and went down 
to an untimely but a true soldier's grave. 

You can remember when the agitation for State's rights and 
secession culminated in that mad act which trained the batteries of 
Charleston and sent their hissing globes of destruction upon the for- 
tress of Sunipter. You remember the tlii-ill that ran tlirough the 
North when that flag of our countrj^ had been stricken from the air 
in which it had floated for almost a century ; but those guns fired from 
the harbor of Charleston, like the guns fired from the bridge of Lex- 
ington, echoed around the world, and hardly had the echo died away, 
when, born for the place he filled, the greatest man ever President of 
the United States, Abraham Lincoln (applause), called on all those 
who loved their country to come to the defense of it. You remember 
how the volunteer soldier came from the office, the shop, the factory 
and the farm. You remember that mighty tide that poured from our 
hillsides and valleys and went down to the defense of an endangered 
country. 

You remember the long and weary march, the lonesome and sickly 
camp, the wild carnage of battle and the prison horrors. You remem- 
ber the return of the worn and weary troops when the war was done, 
clothed with honor and with fame. You remember, alas, that many 
came before, but it was in their leaden cases, folded underneath the 
flag they bore. 



120 STATE OF NEW YORK 

But out of all this sadness there is to-day joy in our hearts, and 
what joy there would have been in the hearts of our soldier dead if 
they could have lived to have known what you and I know to-day. 
If they could have known that at the first alarm of the war, at the 
first insult to our flag, that the sons of the South and the sons of the 
North would be marching shoulder to shoulder ; that the sons who once 
wore the gray were proud to join the blue and march again under the 
same flag. If they could have seen their country take its proud posi- 
tion among the nations of the East, if they could have seen the flag 
they followed waving in the front for human right, feared by tj-ranny 
and respected by the world, they would have known the honor that 
comes with a duty well and nobly done ; but no nation has ever become 
great until it has been dotted with the graves of those who died to 
defend it, and, Mr. Chairman, how beautifully pictured is that truth 
in these few lines: 

Then give me the land where the ruins are spread 
And the living hold dear the graves of their dead. 
Yes, give me the land that has story and song 
To tell of the strife of the right and the wrong. 
Oh, give me the land that has legends and lays 
To tell of the story of long vanished days. 
Oh, give me the land of the wreck and the tomb; 
There's a grandeur in graves; there's glory in gloom. 
For out of the gloom future brightness is born 
As after the night comes the sunlight of morn, 
And each single grave, though with grass o'er grown. 
May yet be a footstool for liberty's throne, 
And each single wreck in the pathway of might 
May yet be a rock in the temple of right. 

Mr. Chairman, I thank you for this opportimity of assembling 
with this delegation and Commission representing the State of New 
York on this most memorable occasion. It was mj^ privilege and 
pleasure to be a guest of the State of New York at its celebration at 
Gettysburg last summer, the most solemn, most sacred that I had 
ever attended; but to-day when I breathe in this air and feel that I 




Obv 



erse 




lieverse 
Survivor's Medal 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 121 

have trodden over the gi'aves in this hallowed ground upon which, as 
I have mentioned before, my own flesh and blood sacrificed his life to 
his country, I feel that no greater honor could ever come to a citizen 
of the State of New York, and I most sincerely thank you, Mr, 
Chairman. (Applause.) 

ADDRESS OF SENATOR PALMER 

I will now ask the lady who has been designated for the unveiling 
of the monument to take her place. Others will kindly gather 
around, but move to either side, so that the view may be unobstructed. 
We are now about to take two portraits of the monument as it is 
unveiled. The most artistic bas-relief I know of anywhere in tliis 
country is now about to be revealed. After the monument itself is 
unveiled, pictures will be taken of it, with 'all remaining seated. 

I have also asked the ladies, who this morning fastened on the 
breasts of the veterans the medals of honor, to take their places in the 
order that their names were called, that a portrait may also be taken 
of them in front of the monument. Colonel Langfitt, representing 
the President of the United States, and Senator John F. Murtaugh, 
representing the Governor of New York, will kindly stand by me. 

Dedicatory Prayer 

An now. Almighty God, sacred unto Thee is the death of Thy 
saints; safe in the keeping of Thy Providence forever may be this 
bronze and granite — safe from storms and earthquakes and all the 
ravages of time — this monument which the State of New York this 
day, on this spot, dedicates to the memory of her dead. 

(The monument was then unveiled by Mrs. Helen Palmer 
Andrus of New York; comrades remained standing while the band 
played the Star-Spangled Banner.) 

A great sculptor once was chiseling nothing more beautiful than 
that, and he could not bear to think that he who wrought it should so 



122 STATE OF NEW YORK 

soon be forgotten, so he carved his name up against the wall where no 
one could see it. A bystander asked, " ^Vliy do you carve your name 
there where no one can see it? " And he gave this answer which 
has lived always: "Ah, but the gods will see it." 

I congratulate the artist that wrought this thing of beauty, to the 
honor of our comrades who here perished, and the glory of the State 
of New York; and now. Senator Murtaugh, my dear colleague, as 
the representative of the Governor of the State in his absence and at 
his request, in behalf of the Commission which was entrusted with the 
dedication of this memorial to our dead, I turn over to you this monu- 
ment with the request that you, in turn, will transfer it to the repre- 
sentative of the President and the keeping of the nation, and thus our 
labors, I trust, are not unworthily accomplished. 

ADDRESS OF THE HON. JOHN F. MURTAUGH 

We are assembled to dedicate a monument that will perpetuate to 
future generations the sacrifices and patriotism of nine thousand 
New York soldiers, who, at the call of their country, left their homes 
to preserve the Union, marched to the front, stamped the story of 
their valor on many battle-fields, were made prisoners of war, and 
three thousand of whom died upon the gi-ound where this monument 
now stands. 

We come here, at the command of a Government of nine millions 
of people, to pay the honor New York State declares should be con- 
ferred on its martyred sons. Our State has never forgotten its brave 
defenders. It has given them preference over other citizens in the 
service of the Government; it has established and maintained homes 
for the old soldier in his declining years; it has erected on many fields 
beautiful monuments to commemorate the deeds of its soldiers; and 
to-day it places upon the graves of those heroes, who fell not on the 
field of strife, but amid the gloom of prison camp, this beautiful stone 
as an emblem, a lasting tribute, to the noble sacrifice and patriotic 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 123 

devotion that these brave men made foi* their State, their country 
and mankind. 

This is another event along the course that marks the affection 
of the American people for the private soldier. All along the path- 
way striking landmarks are erected. Nmnerous fields are covered 
with emblems of remembrance. This is as it should be — for we 
are a nation of the people. In other ages and countries, imposing 
testimonials have been erected to able generals, great warriors, kings 
and emperors. Egypt has pyramids to her kings, England has West- 
minster Abbey to her gi'eat, the tombs of Napoleon and Charlemagne 
adorn France, but on every battle-field of America rise beautiful 
monuments to the memory of the private soldier, to the citizen who 
became a soldier, to the man who laid down his axe and took up his 
gun and on everj^ field of battle left the story of his valor in letters 
of blood. (Applause.) 

It is wise for the American people to honor the memories of the 
men who fought and died that the American institution might live. 
No nation can long survive that fails to honor its soldiers and 
defenders. The quality of the martial strength consists more in the 
spirit than in the number of men. When this republic forgets its 
soldiers, it will have none. One way to prepare the nation for the 
wars of the future is to honor the heroes of the past. 

That is why we are here to-day. We come to pay tribute to the 
memorj^ of the soldier who died in the prison camp ; he is equally 
entitled to honor with him who died on the field of battle. It is a 
mournful sorrow that goes out to the soldier who passed away amid 
the horrors of a war prison. There was for him none of the glorj^ 
that comes to one who meets his death on the field of service. He is 
far from the land of his birth; amid strangers, he suffers in sorrow 
and misery; sickness, hunger and despair, surrounding him, shut out 
the sunlight of hope. Death comes with none of the inspirations that 
buoy the warrior in battle, no martial music, no thought of a fort to 



124 STATE OF NEW YORK 

be captured or a height to be stormed. He meets death alone, in 
prison, and in misery, with no dream of future glory. 

\Vliat a contrast between this death and that of the soldier who 
dies amid the thunder of cannon and the clash of infantry. The 
boys who marched to the front at Antietam and Vicksburg, who 
fought Jackson at Chancellorsville, or repulsed Pickett on the heights 
of Gettysburg, were fighting in an atmosphere of glory ^vith a chance 
of victory, but the prisoners at Andersonville stood in the face of 
death and defeat. They had to fight as they fought, and die as they 
died, in the cold shadow of foregone disaster. It was not their fault, 
poor, humble, brave soldiers, that they did not die on the field of 
glory. They did and dared and died just as bravely and just as 
gamely amid the human WTeckage at Andersonville as they would 
have done amid the glories of Gettysburg. (Applause.) It is 
all the same at last. The nation will ever remember their bravery, 
cherish their loyalty and never let the glory of their patriotism grow 
dim. (Applause.) 

There is a beautiful custom in Switzerland. At the crossing of 
their mountains, the Swiss are wont to bury those whom the people 
delight to honor and then to mark the spot with a small pile of stones. 
Thereafter, each passer-by whose heart beats in sympathy and unison 
with the spirit that lies beneath the groimd picks up a stone and casts 
it on the pile ; and so in the lapse of years there springs up an impres- 
sive, enduring and ever-growing memorial in honor of the departed. 
On this day we engrave on our tablets of remembrance the image of 
this monument which will ever recall the memorj'^ of those who died 
here. We place this memorial here to add to the impressiveness of 
the scene where so many heroes sleep. We pilgrims who have 
gathered here to-day place this monument on the memorial pile of the 
dead. May it stand tlu-ough the j-ears, grow more stately with the 
lapse of time and remain an everlasting remembrance to the memory 
of brave and good men. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 125 

Far from here, the beautiful city of Eknira nestles among the 
hills of southern New York. It is the city of my birth. When the 
great Civil War racked the nation manj'^ a southern soldier was cap- 
tured and spent his last days in the war prison at Elmira. This place, 
these graves and this occasion carries my mind back to my native city. 
There, in the quiet part of Elmira, in the shadow of the western hills, 
where the sun casts its last lingering glance as it sets for the day, is 
Woodlawn cemetery, a well kept resting-place of the dead. There 
lie sleeping thousands of southern soldiers, captured in battle, who 
passed from earth while prisoners of war, whose graves are covered 
in spring by the green sod and in winter by a beautiful mantle of 
snow. 

Between Elmira and the people of the South there exists a pathetic 
bond. Within the portals of our city we still watch with tender 
care the graves of the southern dead. Nearby is many a northern 
soldier who died on his way to the front. Year after year, the people 
of my city have decked alike the graves of the soldier dead. They 
have guarded and cared for them; over the roimded mounds stand 
white markers, and in books of record are the names of the brave men. 
It matters not whether they wore the blue or the gray. The war is 
over and with it ceased all anger and hate. 

The southern soldiers sleeping in Woodlawn cemetery at Elmira 
are not aliens, but Americans who fought for what they thought was 
right. They are the dead of a united nation. The' soldier boys in 
blue, resting in the same graveyard with the boys in gray, were parted 
in life; they are united in death. They are resting under the same 
sod. The sun, as it rises in the morning, looks alike upon their 
graves ; when it sets over the western hill, it gives them both a peace- 
ful benediction. Above them, and over their union in the grave, floats 
the flag of a united country. (Applause.) 

New York, to-day, with military pomp and civic splendor, offers 
this tribute to her dead sons at Andersonville. Rachel-like, she weeps 



126 STATE OF NEW YORK 

for her lost ones, bends in sadness over their graves and bows in 
reverence to the memory of the brave heroes whose hves were sacri- 
ficed for the State and Union. After fifty years this may be a tardy 
recognition, but it cannot be said that the State has been ungrateful. 
The Empire State will never forget how these soldier boys fought 
and died in the dark days of the country's need. As long as an 
i^^jnerican lives and salutes the stars and stripes, as long as the heart 
of an American beats for his country, so long will a grateful people 
remember the heroic devotion and awful sacrifice these sleeping 
heroes made for the preservation of our glorious republic. 
(Applause.) 

Mr. Chairman, it now becomes our duty as members of the Com- 
mission appointed by the State of New York to present to the repre- 
sentative of the Government of the United States this memorial of 
the departed dead — this memorial to the prisoners of war, of whose 
loyalty and patriotism the people of the State of New York will 
ever be proud. 

On behalf of the State of New York, and pursuant to the power 
in this Commission vested, we now present and deliver this monu- 
ment to the representative of the Government of the United States. 
( Applause. ) 

ADDRESS BY COLONEL LANGFITT 

Mk. Chairman and Gentlemen Representing the State of 
New York, Comrades — if I may call you so — and Ladies 
AND Gentlemen : 
It is peculiarly difficult for me to fittingly represent the President 
of the United States, the Commander-in-Chief of the forces which 
have succeeded those whom we are to-day gathered together to honor. 
His well chosen words, perhaps few in number, yet so apt, would ren- 
der any effort of mine poor indeed by comparison. I shall attempt 
no formal address, and what I have to say will be only a few of the 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 127 

sentiments naturally arising in the heart of a soldier before the tomb 
of those whose great privilege it was to defend and serve their flag, 
even mito the bitter end. 

We are here, you are here, ladies and gentlemen of New York 
and fellow survivors of the Andersonville prison, to complete the 
last sad rite in memory of those gallant soldiers from the great 
Empire State, who, through fortunes of war, were not privileged to 
fall upon the field of battle but who met their end in a no less honor- 
able way, succumbing to the rigors, so to speak, of a necessarily rigid 
confinement, a confinement where both guarding and guarded often 
lacked the necessaries of life; where force of circumstances, the 
undeveloped state of prison management, the lack of hospital sup- 
plies and medicines, and even of surgeons and physicians, rendered 
high the mortality. It is recorded that of the total nimiber of pris- 
oners, 45,000 or 50,000, confined here, in a locality selected because the 
country was well wooded, with ample water, manj' farms, and blessed 
by nature with a salubrious and delightful climate, some 12,912 died 
of various diseases; and of these, your State, Mr. Chau'man, was 
represented by the largest number of all, some 2,572 being interred 
in this beautiful national cemetery, the next largest representation 
being Pennsylvania with only 1,811. It is stated, also, that there are 
119 Confederate prisoners of war also interred in this cemetery. 

A few years ago it was my privilege to erect, at the charge of the 
national Government, a monument to the Confederate prisoners who 
died in the Federal camp of confinement at Point Lookout, Md. 
Other similar monuments have been erected elsewhere, and I hare 
now in charge the erection of a stone " Reared by The Congress of the 
United States as a Nation's Tribute to Brigadier-Generals James 
Screven and Daniel Stewart," both of Revolutionary fame. 

^Vhen I think of these things and the many monvmients that have 
been erected, both East and West, and North and South; when I 
look upon this beautiful memorial whose dedication we are to-day 



128 STATE OF NEW YORK 

consummating, as a soldier I feel a deep thanksgiving that the people 
of this great country appreciate and honor the soldier's calling, and 
when he has made the last great sacrifice his name and deeds are for- 
ever recorded in their hearts and commemorated in imchanging 
marble and bronze. 

No one regrets more than I, though appreciating most deeply the 
great compliment of having been selected as his representative, that 
His Excellency the President of these United States was prevented 
by harrassing cares of state from being present in person to accept 
on behalf of the general government from the State of New York this 
monument to her sons. He would no doubt have assured you that so 
long as he retained his high office he would extend every effort to see 
that it received that loving care which its intention and object so well 
warrants. He would thank you in the name of the nation for so fit- 
tingly recording in such endurable and beautiful material the sacri- 
fices made by the sons of your State that these United States should 
forever be united in one indissoluble bond ; and on his behalf I hereby 
accept this monument from the State of New York. 

ADDRESS BY SENATOR PALMER 

Now, my comrades, farewell. I trust we shall journey safely to 
our homes together. Farewell to the dear lads who have slept here 
so long and will lie here in silence forever. We will not come this 
way again. When we meet them it will be yonder in the great roll 
call that awaits us, to which, please God, we all shall answer. 




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LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, TENN. 

April 30, 1914, 2 p. m. 
(Miss Mackenzie of Watervliet, N. Y., sang "America.") 

ON MOTION of Commissioner Kerrigan, a vote of thanks was 
unanimously passed to Senator Carswell and Assemblyman 
Hamilton of Brooklyn, who introduced into the Legislature 
the bill which authorized the appointment of the Andersonville 
Monument Dedication Commission. 

On motion of Commissioner Patrie, a unanimous vote of thanks 
also was tendered to Miss Julia A. Littlefield of Albany, N. Y., a 
daughter of an Andersonville prisoner and the superintendent of the 
Homeopathic Hospital of Albany, N. Y., who had accompanied us 
for three thousand miles, with no recompense whatever except the 
privilege to lend a hand to some unfortunate survivor who should 
become ill upon this journey; and to Dr. Edwin L. Ford of Lexing- 
ton, Greene county, N. Y., also an Andersonville survivor, who gave 
his services freely to any one who was in need of medical attendance 
on the trip. 

The secretary of the Commission, Mr. Joseph L. Killgore, then 
made the following impromptu address: 

ADDRESS OF MR. KILLGORE 

Comrades, Friends: 

You will notice in addressing you that I use the word comrades 
first, not with any thought of disrespect to any of our well wishers 
in this audience. You cannot appreciate the tie which exists between 
the comrades of the Union army and navy or fully realize the bond 
of fraternity shared by the survivors of Confederate prisons, particu- 
larly Andersonville. My heart has always been with these survivors 

9 129 



130 STATE OF NEW YORK 

and the Union men of the soutliland. I am more than grateful to the 
chairman for gi\'ing me the opportunity to explain the matter at this 
very appropriate place. I am gratified at the success of this memor- 
able trip. I have only the most sincere thanks for those who made it 
possible for us to be here. 

I mentioned yesterday the men who gave up their lives in the 
prison pens that our Union might remain one and inseparable, and 
believe that those who suffered in the prison pens of the Confederacy 
were doing as much for the success of the Union cause as the 
defenders who were facing the guns of its enemies. History shows 
that they were. Yet their heroic fortitude and that of the southern 
Unionists has never been appreciated or recognized by the nation. 
I tliink I am justified in saying that without their great sei'vice and 
unyielding loyalty the triumph of the Union arms would have been 
much longer delayed, if not indefinitely postponed. It is fitting that 
I should utter these words on this historic spot, because, looking out 
from this eminence, we can almost see the homes of thousands of 
southern men whose devotion to the Union was as rugged and true as 
these eternal hills about us. 

In studying the " Battle above the Clouds " fought here, it is a 
significant fact that the stars and stripes in that combat were first 
planted on Lookout Mountain, where we are now gathered, by the 
Union soldiers from Kentucky. Southern Union men, if you please. 
Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, 
and other States of the South, under the circumstances in which they 
were placed, did their full share in saving the Union. There were 
many loyal supporters of our cause in each of these States. 

I have been trying for months to interest the American people in 
an effort to recognize the spirit of loyalty which controUed the 
Unionists of the South and the Union prisoners of war. If this 
nation is to live and be the great disseminator of the principles of 
liberty and equality, it seems silly to suppose that it can be done by 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 131 

ignoring the faithful, and consigning to oblivion the story of their 
devotion. Loyalty should be recognized as the crown of an American 
citizen and the people taught to regard it as such. 

I had hoped upon this citadel of patriotism to hastily outline the 
proposition to you, but the sun will not obey me as it did Joshua of 
old and " stand still." Chairman Palmer is anxious to have our 
photographer secure a good picture of this audience before the sun 
recedes ; he has requested me to temporarily discontinue my remarks. 

Under the circumstances, I am sure you will agree with me that 
the time is too limited for me to make a satisfactory explanation so I 
will defer the matter for the present, but will detain you long enough 
to ask for a vote as to your sympathy and support of the movement 
as far as you understand it. 

(A vote was then taken, which was a unanimous one in the affirma- 
tive and in assurance of support. ) 

I thank you most cordially for this vote. I will remember the 
time, the place, and the people who made it. (Applause.) 

FINAL ADDRESS OF SENATOR PALMER 

And now, my comrades, we have gathered about this noble 
monument of our State on the summit of Lookout Mountain for a 
last word together, ere we find our way to the trains and journey 
homeward. You may consider this, therefore, a sort of closing 
ceremony. 

Here, where the " Battle above the Clouds " was fought — a 
deed so glorious that all the world has sung its praises — we have now 
gathered, having journeyed in safety thus far on our way, pausing at 
Richmond and Danville, Va., at Salisbury, N. C, and Andersonville, 
Ga., paying our tribute of honor to these victims of the war that 
saved the Union who lie asleep in these bleak cemeteries. 

Above every one of their faces we have planted a flag of the State, 
have sung our songs and spoken our words in their honor, and at 



132 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Andersonville itself have dedicated the monument which the State 
has there erected for their eternal remembrance. 

If the weather had been made to order it could not have been more 
glorious for our trip, and so Providence has smiled upon us with the 
sunshine of His favor on every step of our progress. 

This journey has been, as it was intended to be, a solemn pilgrim- 
age; a pilgrimage to the shrines of patriotism. 

It is, perhaps, the last journey of this character that any of us 
will ever make, for we will not pass this way again. There have been 
flowers; there have been banners; there has been music. These are 
outward signs of our tribute to the dead, but the real tribute has been 
that of our hearts, we who here have prided ourselves in grateful 
memory that in our own youth we were comrades with these dead, in 
their privations, and have been spared in the infinite mercy of our 
Heavenly Father to re-visit their sepulchres after half a century of 
time has passed. 

I trust that you all may arrive safely at your homes and that 
until the end of life's journey you may cherish the sweet memory that 
the State of New York honored you with this privilege and with the 
satisfaction that you have done j'^our duty faithfully. 

Those of you who are members of the Commission, but not the 
survivors of the prisons, have wondered every day why such cruel 
sufferings were not averted by the exchange of prisoners between the 
Union and the Confederacy; in other words, why these faithful men 
had been permitted thus to perish. In a word, the explanation is 
this : There did exist a cartel of exchange of prisoners which was in 
force generally until the summer of '63, that is to say, until Gettys- 
burg and Vicksburg, because the number of prisoners previous to 
that summer was approximately the same on both sides. 

That cartel called for an exchange of either man for man, or all 
for all, and where the number was the same it was immaterial which 
prevailed, but after Gettysburg and Vicksburg the number greatly 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 133 

increased in favor of the North. Then the Confederates at first 
refused to exchange man for man, as that would have left many of 
their soldiers in northern prisons for which the)^ held no complemen- 
tary numbers. 

Afterward, when they did favor exchange of prisoners in any 
manner, it was the North that refused to further carry out the cartel. 

Grant had paroled some 26,000 prisoners at Vicksburg and 
insisted upon their being counted in the exchange. Also the question 
of colored soldiers captured by the Confederates was a serious com- 
plication. However, the prevailing reason was doubtless this, that it 
had been discovered after two years and more of desperate conflict 
that there were Anglo-Saxons on both sides of the lines and the 
Union could never be preserved except by the exhaustion of the 
rebellious States. The Federal army could be recruited far easier 
than the Confederate, and Confederate soldiers in northern prisons 
were better fed, clothed and housed, and if they had been exchanged 
would have reinforced the Confederate armies by whole army corps 
or more of hale and hearty veterans, while the Union armies would 
have received in return the men from Belle Island, Salisbury and 
Andersonville, so emaciated by their privations as to be for a long 
period of little use in the ranks of the army. 

Then it was that two men rose up in our country who " Shut tiie 
Gates of Mercy of Mankind," broke the cartel of exchange and left 
the Union soldiers in the Confederate prisons to pine and perish 
there. Their names were Edward M. Stanton and Ulysses S. 
Grant, and I say that they did right; but it made every man that 
perished for the Union in prison a hero glorious, since his confine- 
ment there had put hors de combat one or more Confederate soldiers 
in northern prisons whose return to their army would have prolonged 
the war, if it had not imperiled the result; so that on a day when 
there were 20,000 men in Andersonville, 10,000 in Salisbury, 5,000 in 
Danville and 5,000 in Richmond, 40,000 Union prisoners " in durance 



134 STATE OF NEW YORK 

vile," the day Grant entered the Wilderness and Sherman started 
from Atlanta to the sea, the exchange of prisoners ceased, and these 
40,000 soldiers of the Union were left in their prisons — destined to 
suffer in silence and sublimity where no man but onh' God saw them ; 
where no banners waved nor cannon roared, but where the cruel 
" dead line " confronted them; where the bleak winds smote or blaz- 
ing svm scorched them ; without food, without shelter, without hope — 
and thus perished the noblest spirits of those who saved the Union and 
preserved the American republic forever. 

There is one further matter of which I wish to speak before I bid 
you farewell. You will note that day by day I have called your atten- 
tion to the remarkable fact that in these prison cemeteries practically 
all the dead were the " enlisted " men of the armies. There were no 
commissioned officers at all confined in Andersonville. The monu- 
ment, therefore, that celebrates their glory is to the enlisted soldier 
alone. Also, there were few, if any, commissioned officers that died 
in the prisons or are interred either at Danville, Salisburj-, Florence 
or Riclmiond. The reason, of course, as has been explained, is that 
the commissioned officers received better treatment and were less in 
number. For example: one whole regiment, the 85th N. Y., was 
confined in Andersonville, except the commissioned officers, who were, 
sent to Macon, Ga. 

I trust that it is not necessary to say to you that this glorifying of 
the enlisted men who perished in prison is not with any purpose to dis- 
parage or disqualify the honor of the commissioned officers in the 
army. It is simply a statement of fact, a glorious fact indeed for the 
enhsted man without reflection upon the officers who commanded 
him. 

Of course, we honor our great conmianders. Did we not pause at 
Richmond to pay a tribute to the greatest of them all — General 
Grant? And for all who led us well we have a grateful appreciation 
and render them every honor that is their due. Nevertheless, it is to 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 135 

the glory of the enlisted man that in the prison records it was he who 
endm-ed all things ; he who suffered in silence ; of hunger and naked- 
ness; of cold and heat, with the cruel "dead line" and the cruel 
keeper. Thus it is to him the State has erected the monument and 
to him belongs the glory. 

A soldier when he volunteers in the service of his country knows 
that he may fall in battle. Often in his mind he has forecast what 
possibly would be his fate. He did not, however, often anticipate the 
sufferings of the hospitals or the privations of the prisons. He fore- 
saw himself in the hour of battle, rushing forward with his comi-ades 
by his side, the bugles blaring, the flag floating over his head, all 
cheering, and falling, with a thud, dead on his face on the field of 
battle. That was how he pictured his possible fate, but many of our 
comrades lived to learn that that indeed were a merciful death in com- 
parison to that from hunger and thirst and cold, without a friend to 
cheer you, without a word from home, without a thought beyond 
to-morrow's ration, and without a hope as days and months went 
wearily by, and he saw and felt the end of his strength approaching. 
That was the hovu" of his real sublimity and no man in all history has 
been the spiritual superior of this humble private soldier who went 
down piteously to his death in the cruel prisons which we have 
re-visited, and lies now for fifty years asleep in the cemeteries where 
we have reverently stood. 

Thus there remains a certain quality of unselfishness that must 
ever distinguish the glory of the private soldier from that of the officer 
who commanded him. The recruit who volunteered to serve his coun- 
try, provided he could be an officer or bargained that he should have 
a captaincy or command a regiment, sm-ely was not so unselfish a 
soul as he who wrote his name on the roUs of the army without 
regard to his rank or remuneration — a private soldier. Here, for 
example, is an illustration: 

Off Cape St. Vincent, Lord Nelson was strolling his quarter- 
deck, anticipating the glorious hour of victory that that day awaited 



136 STATE OF NEW YORK 

him. Somebody is said to have heard him muttering to himself, 
" This day will mean for me a peerage or Westminster Abbey." lie 
did a glorious deed for the Anglo-Saxon race that day, and yet he was 
thinking of what it would mean for himself. 

Contrast that with Korneloff and the men who stood with him 
about the gun in the third bastion at Sebastopol as the last charge 
was forming. Listen, and you will hear him shout : " Here they 
come, men, here they come. We will die but we will not surrender 
the bastion," and up from the throats of these private soldiers, 
recruited from the Russian peasantry, we still hear their dying cry: 
" We will die huzza, we will die huzza." On came the charge. They 
captured the bastion, but when the smoke of battle lifted, Korneloff 
and all his men were dead about their gun. I do not contrast their 
courage with that of the famous English Admiral, who, on the morn- 
ing of his greatest victory, could think of his peerage or his monu- 
ment. Neither would I compare it to that of the plain privates in 
the bastion of Sebastopol, who could shout for joy that then and 
there they were about to die for their country — and leave their 
names unknown. This is the glory everywhere of the private soldier. 

There was once a man who had a poet's soul who immortalized 
this hero as the " Common Man." He was not thinking of generals 
or marshals, or of the men to whom wars brought emolmiients or fame, 
but of the grandeur of the man who sprang from the conunon people 
and yet became sublime, when he dipped his pencil one morning in 
God's sunshine and wrote these lines: 

These men were common men, 'tis true, 

Just common men like me and you; 
The plain man is the basic sod 

From which j'ou grow the derai-god. 

Plain common men of every day. 

Who left their homes to march away, 
And perish on a battle's plain, 

As common men will do again. 



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ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 137 

To lift a glaring, glazing eye. 

Up to a lurid stranger skv. 
And then to die and testifj' 

To all the ages, far and nigh. 
How great a thing it is to die. 

It is not only now and then 

You find such hearts in common men. 
For standing face to face with fate. 

The common man is always great. 

For men are cowards in the gloom 

Of their own little selfish fears. 
Not when the thunder steps of doom 

Stride down the trembling years. 
And in the mighty fight with fate. 

The common man is always great. 

^Vhen we were boys, my comrades, when we girded our loins with 
strength and these gray hairs that have now come upon our foreheads 
were but a future thought, there was a day in our country when there 
was a sound in the air that every youth distinctly heard. It was the 
roll of a drum on the heights of Arlington ; it was the boom of a cannon 
in the harbor of Charleston; it was the voice of our country calling her 
sons to come and die for her. Every farmer's son dropped his plough 
and listened; every student in a dormitory closed his book when he 
heard it; every operator in a factory; every single youth in all the 
land heard that sound alike. Then occurred the great demarcation 
between man and man, which in all ages and all nations has separated 
those who served themselves from those who could live and die for 
others. So a white line of men is distinguishable in all history, the 
men who live not for themselves alone. 

Some of the youth who heard that call thought of themselves, 
saying, " There will be war ; we will get into some good business ; 
there will be wealth for those who know how to seek it ; there will be 
opportunity for men who will stay at home and seize it," and even so 
they found it. These youths had their reward. They became rich; 



138 STATE OF NEW YORK 

the spoils of war piled into their laps; they were contractors; they 
were commissaries; they were investors in every line of business that 
resulted from the war. To-day these are the men who dwell in man- 
sions, who ride in equipages, who jjass in haughty self-complacency 
along the ways of life. Veril}', I say unto you, they had their reward. 

The youth who heard the call of their country and did not think 
only of themselves did none of these deeds. What they thought was, 
" Oiu" country needs us now." '\^Tiat they did was to kiss their 
mothers and sweethearts good-bye, to write their names upon the roll 
of a regiment and to march away with cheers following them down 
the country road or the city street. Many of them never came back. 
They fell in battle; they perished in hospitals and prisons; but verily 
I say unto you, they also had their reward. They did not get rich — 
you cannot get rich on $13.00 a month — but their reward was this : 
whether they perished in battle or hospital or prison, or whether they 
survived war's perils and live to this hour, the glorious memory 
that when their country called them they volunteered, and the 
sweet consciousness that is a " crown upon their heads that no man 
taketh from them," that though they were plain farmers' sons, yet on 
their bleeding hands they upbore this mighty nation to freedom and 
to lasting renown — these are they above whose sepulchres we have 
reverently stood throughout this journey and you, also, my comrades, 
are of them whom God has spared, despite like perils, to see this day 
and to share in tliis dedication. And now, farewell, a loving, a long, 
a last farewell. 

In behalf of the State of New York and the Commission who have 
served you, I trust, to your satisfaction, and who have been anxious 
for your safety and comfort, I bid you all an affectionate farewell. 
You will resimie your places in the trains that await you at Chatta- 
nooga. We will start homeward as soon as all are safely aboard and 
by God's favor this " pilgrimage to the shrines of patriotism " is 
accomplished. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE ENTIRE PARTY WHO 

ATTENDED THE DEDICATION OF THE NEW 

YORK STATE MONUMENT AT ANDER- 

SONVILLE, GEORGIA, APRIL 

26 TO MAY 1, 1914 

William H. Allan, Co. A, 4.7th N. Y., Pottsville, Pa. 

George AUen, Co. M, 7th N. Y. H. Art., Troy, N. Y. 

Mrs. Helen Palmer Andrus, New York City. 

John Angood, Co. C, 6th N. Y. Cav., Andover, N. Y. 

Michael Anstett, Co. I, 147th N. Y., Darien Center, N. Y. 

Robert E. Arnold, Co. D, 8th N. Y. Cav., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Gordon E. Babcock, Co. C, 85th N. Y., Scio, N. Y. 

Henry I. Banzett, Co. I, 57th N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Chas. L. Barnes, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Mrs. Chas. H Bateman, Somer\'ille, N. J. 

Hon. Caleb H. Baumes, Commissioner, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Mrs. Caleb H. Baumes, Newburgh, N. Y. 

John Beecher, Co. E, 14th N. Y. H. Art., Canaseraga, N. Y. 

Col. M. B. Birdseye, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

Sherlock F. Black, Co. C, 27th N. Y., Co. H. 14th N. Y. H. Art, Binghamton, 

N. Y. 
Jonathan M. Boynton, Co. F, 157th N. Y., Smyrna, N. Y. 
Townsend Bragaw, Co. C, 6th N. Y. Cav., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Charles Brandegee, Co. A, 146th N. Y., Farmington, Conn. 
Freeman J. Brazeant, Co. L, 15th N. Y. Cav., Oswego, N. Y. 
Sylvester Brewer, Co. D, 140th N. Y., West Webster, N. Y. 
George R. Brown, Commissioner, Co. K, 15th N. Y. Cav., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs. George R. Brown, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Joel A. Burdick, Co. A, 85th N. Y., Portville, N. Y. 
Silas G. Burdick, Commissioner, Co. C, 85th N. Y., Cuba, N. Y. 
John Burke, Co. D, 2nd N. Y. Cav., Noroton Heights, Conn. 
Henry Campbell, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Luccius Campbell, Co. H, 85th N. Y., Wellsville N Y. 
William D. Campbell, Co. E, 25th N. Y. Cav., Columbia, Pa. 
James S. Carson, Co. B, 85th N. Y., Shortsville, N. Y. 
Mrs. David B. Carswell, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

139 



140 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Walter B. Carswell, Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Hon. William B. Carswell, Commissioner-Treasurer, Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Henry F. Clapp, Co. F, 85th N. ¥., Black Creek, N. Y. 

Mrs Henrietta C. Cleaver, Brooklyn, X. 'Y. 

John Cochran, Co. I, 7th X. Y. H. Art., Owego, X. Y. 

Michael Collins, Co. F, 85th N. Y., Allegany, N. Y. 

W. L. Conklin, Co. H and G, 8th X. Y. Cav., Brockport, N. Y. 

H. S. Corbin, Co. C, 85th N. Y., Belmont, X. Y. 

J. W. Corbin, Co. C, 85th X. Y., Franyinville, X. Y. 

Ira S. Crandall, Co. C, 85th N. Y., Wellsville, X. Y. 

Charles F. Davis, Co. E, 85th X. Y., Andover, N. Y. 

John W. Davis, Co. I, 120th X. Y., Jersey City, X. J. 

John M. Detrick, Co. K, 143rd X. Y., Port Jervis, X. Y. 

Fred Dezendord, Co. C, 124th X. Y., Cornwall Landing, X. Y. 

Ira M. Deyo, Co. B, 85th X. Y., Honeoye, N. Y. 

Hon. Henry W. Doll, Sergeant-at-Arms, Senate, State of Xew York, Xew York City. 

George L. Donellon, Xew York City. 

Hon. R. L. Drummond, Auburn, X. Y. 

Charles DuMond, Co. A, 120th X. Y., Hurley, X. Y. 

Richard Dunn, Co. E, 24th X. Y. Cav., Syracuse, X. Y. 

Mrs. John L. Durant, Xew York City. 

Lafayette Empey, Co. E, 146th X. Y., Camden, X. J. 

Major James H. Everett, 120th X. Y., Kingston, X. Y. 

Mrs. James H. Everett, Kingston, N. Y. 

Prof. Amos W. Farnham, Fulton, X. Y'. 

Mrs. Amos W. Farnham, Fulton, X. Y. 

Robert Farrell, Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Eugene C. Ferry, Co. I, 8th N. Y. Cav., Utica, N. Y. 

Samuel G. Fletcher, Co. D, 5th X. Y. H. Art., Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Joseph Flood, Co. F, 2nd X. Y. Cav., Mt. Kisco, X. Y\ 

George Flosher, Co. D, 72nd X. Y., Cleveland, O. 

George W. Flynn, Co. F, 85th X. Y., Buffalo, X. Y. 

Mrs. George W. Flynn, Buffalo, X. Y. 

David Ford, Lexington, N. Y. 

Dr. Edwin L. Ford, Co. F, 120th X. Y., Lexington, X. Y'. 

Rev. Isaac M. Foster, Commissioner, Co. H, 46th X. Y'., Red Hook, X. Y. 

Mrs. Isaac M. Foster, Red Hook, X. Y. 

Leon Foster, Red Hook, X. Y. 

Miss Mabel Foster, Red Hook, X. Y'. 

Henry I. Frederick, Co. B and H, 43rd X. Y., Voorheesville, X. Y. 

Michael Garrity, Co. D, 1st X. Y. Cav., Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Benedict J. Geronimo (Clerk), Jamaica, X. Y. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 141 

Maurice M. Geronimo (Assistant Clerk), Jamaica, N. Y. 

Miss Clara Gilbert, Greenville, Pa. 

Edward Gilbert, Co. K, 70th N. Y., Greenville, Pa. 

William J. Gilboy, Co. K and I, 19th N. Y. Cav., Batavia, N. Y. 

Thomas J. Glenn, Co. B, 85th N. Y., Glens Falls, N. Y. 

John T. Goodfellow, Co. G, 146th N. Y., E. Rochester, N. Y. 

Z. W. Gooding, Co. B, 85th N. Y., Belding, Mich. 

Warren Goodrich, Co. D, 5th N. Y. Cav., WhitehaU, N. Y. 

Joseph Gough, Co. D, 2nd N. Y. H. Art., Providence, R. I. 

Linsley M. Gould, Co. D, 140th N. Y., Rochester, N. Y. 

Hiram Grow, Co. C, 85th N. Y., Little Genesee, N. Y. 

Mrs. Hiram Grow, Little Genesee, N. Y. 

George W. Graves, Co. C, 21st N. Y. Cav., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Jesse C. Green, Co. H, 85th N. Y., Andover, N. Y. 

H. H. Halbert, Co. A, 43rd N. Y., Norwich, N. Y. 

Wilbur L. Hale, Co. I, 120th N. Y., Kingston, N. Y. 

B. F. Hall, Co. A, 5th N. Y. Cav., Glens Falls, N. Y. 

E. A. Hallbert, Norwich, N. Y. 

William Hallenbeck, Durham, N. Y. 

Hon. William Pinckney Hamilton, Commissioner, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Alfred R. Hammond, Co. C, 82nd N. Y., New York City. 

Gustavus Hart, Co. C, 43rd N. Y., Monsey, N. Y. 

G. A. Hart, 120th N. Y., Kingston, N. Y. 

Mrs. G. A. Hart, Kingston, N. Y 

Joseph Hepworth, Co. L, 14th N. Y. H. Art., New York Mills, N. Y. 

Hon. Walter R. Herrick, Commissioner, New York City, N. Y. 

Henry Hewitt, Co. K, 85th N. Y., McGraw, N. Y. 

Frederick M. Hicks, Co. L, 5th N. Y. Cav., Rome, Pa. 

Hon. Harold J. Hinman, Member of Assembly, State of New York, Albany, N. Y. 

Mrs. Harold J. Hinman, Albany, N. Y. 

William H. Hisard, Co. D, 120th N. Y., West Coxsackie, N. Y. 

Clay W. Holmes, Elmira, N. Y. 

Charles A. B. Holt, Co. C, 82nd N. Y., Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Daniel B. Horton, Co. C, 2nd N. Y. Cav., New Haven, Conn. 

Charles Humphrey, Co. B, 85th N. Y., Passaic, N. J. 

R. D. Humphrey, Passaic, N. J. 

A. G. Hunt, Co. F, 22nd N. Y. Cav., Albion, N. Y. 

Harvey Hurlburt, Co. H, 85th N. Y., Richburg, N. Y. 

John A. Jones, Co. E, 85th N. Y., Angelica, N. Y. 

Alvia Jordan, Co. C, 85th N. Y., Friendship, N. Y. 

Mrs. Alvia Jordan, Friendship, N. Y. 

Miss Anna Kerrigan, New York City. 



142 STATE OF NEW YORK 



James R. Kerrigan, New York City. 

Hon. John Kerrigan, Commissioner, New York City. 

Mrs. John Kerrigan, New York City. 

Joseph L. Killgore, Secretary, Co. D, 4th Del., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Joseph L. Killgore, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Charles L. King, Co. H, ItOth N. Y., Oriskany Falls, N.Y. 

George Knapp, Co. G, 152nd N. Y., Susquehanna, Pa. 

J. C. Knapp, Co. K, 85th N. Y., Palmer, Nebr. 

George H. Lamb, Co. E, 168th N. Y., Co. L, 5th N. Y. Cav., Cornwall Landing, 

N. Y. 
David Lavere, Co. I, 106th N. Y., Waddington, N. Y. 
Martin A. Leach (Stenographer), Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs. Martin H. Leaeh, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs. William J. Leigh, New York City. 
John Lestner, Co. H, 85th N. Y., Wellsville, N. Y. 
Miss Julia A. Littlefield (Nurse), Albany, N. Y. 
William Logan, Co. L, 8th N. Y. Cav., Rochester, N. Y. 
Alfred Lj'th, Co. H, 100th N. Y., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Mrs. Alfred Lyth, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Hon. Alexander Maedonald, Member of Assembly, State of New York, Regis Falls, 

N. Y. 
Mrs. Alexander Maedonald, Regis Falls, N. Y. 

John Mackenzie, Commissioner, Co. D, 2nd N. Y. Cav., Watervliet, N. Y. 
Mrs. John Mackenzie, Watervliet, N. Y. 
Miss Lucretia Mackenzie, Watervliet, N. Y. 
Hon. W. D. McKinstry, Watertown, N. Y. 
Mrs. W. D. McKinstry, Watertown, N. Y. 
John Mann, Co. A, 2nd N. Y. H. Art., Mt. Morris, N. Y. 
William Mann, Co. I, 2nd N. Y. H. Art., Wadsworth, N. Y. 
DeForest Marsters, Co. A, 85th N. Y., Sherburne, N. Y. 
George F. Mason, Co. A, 10th N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Anson Moore, Co. G, 125th N. Y., Hampton, Va. 
C. S. Morris, Co. D, 85th N. Y., Garland, Pa. 
Charles C. Mosher, Co. B, 85th N. Y., Geneva, N. Y. 
Adam Mosther, Co. H, 15th N. Y., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Robert B. MeCully, Commissioner, Cos. F and B, 81st N. Y., Bronx, N. Y. 
Mrs. Robert B. IMcCully, Bronx, N. Y. 
Mr. Joseph McDonald, Newburgh, N. Y. 
Patrick McDonald, Co. I, 91st N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 
N. C. McElheny, Co. F, 85th N. Y., Black Creek, N. Y. 
Isaac McGraw, Co. A, 134th N. Y., Otsego, O. 
Alexander McLean, Co. A, 117th N. Y., Rochester, N. Y. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 143 

Edward A. McManus, New York City. 

Daniel F. Murphy, Elmira, N. Y. 

Hon. John F. Murtaugh, Senator, State of New York, Elmira, N. Y. 

John F. Murtaugh, Jr., Elmira, N. Y. 

John Nugent, Co. I, 91st N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 

Thomas O'Dea, Co. E, 16th Me., Cohoes, N. Y. 

Mile L. Olmstead, Co. B, 100th N. Y., Leroy, N. Y. 

Roman Ovenburg, Co. B, 140th N. Y., Rochester, N. Y. 

Hon. Abraham J. Palmer, Commissioner (Chairman), Co. D, 48th N. Y., Milton-on- 

Hudson, N. Y. 
Mrs. Abraham J. Palmer, Milton-on-Hudson, N. Y. 
Hon. Addison D. Parker, Watertown, N. Y. 
Mrs. Addison D. Parker, Watertown, N. Y. 
Miss Gratia Patrie, Catskill, N. Y. 
Hon. J. L. Patrie, Commissioner, Catskill, N. Y. 
Mrs. J. L. Patrie, Catskill, N. Y. 
Miss Clara Pattinson, Coxsackie, N. Y. 
Gilbert Peck, Co. D, 12Cth N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 
Edward Pennefeather, Co. B, 7th N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 

Col. Samuel C. Pierce, Commander, Dept. of N. Y., G. A. R., Rochester, N. Y. 
George Rafferty, Co. G, 8£nd N. Y., Paterson, N. J. 
John Ragan, Co. I, 100th N. Y., Binghamton, N. Y. 
William Ramage, Co. G, 3rd N. Y., New York City. 
William R. Raynor, Co. F, 82nd N. Y., New York City. 
Col. Henry S. Redmans, Asst. Adj.-Gen., Dept. of N. Y., G. A. R., Rochester, 

N. Y. 
George Rice, Co. L, 8th N. Y., Geneseo, N. Y. 
Dowain Richards, Co. A, 140th N. Y., Clarkson, N. Y. 
Orman Rhinevault, Co. C, 5th N. Y., Vestal Center, N. Y. 
James Robinson, Co. I, 146th N. Y., Albany, N. Y. 
Charles W. Root, Co. A, 140th N. Y., Brockport, N. Y. 
George W. Rugg, Co. F, 85th N. Y., Newark, Ohio. 
Charles Schoenbin, Co. B, 39th N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Arthur T. Schoenjahn, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman Schroeder, Co. K, 57th N. Y., West Hoboken, N. J. 
George Scott, Co. F, 123rd N. Y., Fort Edward, N. Y. 
John Sears, Co. F, 119th N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Col. Franklin P. Sellers, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
George Shuman, 3rd Ind. B, Paterson, N. J. 
John Simmons, Co. C, 49th N. Y., White Plains, N. Y. 
James R. Sloane, New York City. 
Warren P. Smith, Co. A, 121st N. Y., West Coxsackie, N. Y. 



144 STATE OF NEW YORK 



Waiard S. Smith, Co. B, UTth X. Y., Lestershire, N. Y. 

Theodore D. Sperry, Co. B, 140th N. Y., Rochester, N. Y. 

C. Edison Spicer, Adams, N. Y. 

Ramiro E. Spicer, Co. E, 7Gth N. Y., Adams, N. Y. 

George W. Steenrod, Co. C, 85th N. Y., Colwich, Kans. 

William Stephens, Co. H, 76th N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Henry C. Stowell, Co. E., 146th N. Y., Weedsport, N. Y. 

Hon. Thaddeus C. Sweet, Speaker of Assembly, State of New York, Phoenix, N. Y. 

Mrs. Thaddeus C. Sw«et, Phoenix, N. Y. 

Paul Snyder, Co. G, 120th N. Y., Saugerties, N. Y. 

S. Hugh Taylor, Co. K, 3rd N. Y. L. Art., Auburn, N. Y. 

Mrs. S. Hugh Taylor, Auburn, N. Y. 

Daniel B. Taxter, Co. G, 7th N. Y., Tarrytown, N. Y. 

George M. Thorpe, Co. C, 91st N. Y., Newburgh, N. Y. 

William M. Tripp, Co. 5, U. S. Cav., New York City. 

Abram Turk, Co. M, 22nd Pro., Saugerties, N. Y. 

William Verrinder, Co. H, 1st N. Y. Cav., Rochelle Park, N. J. 

Charles W. Waage, Co. A, 47th N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

I. G. Walters (Photographer), Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Theodore Weberg, Co. C, 82nd N. Y., New York City. 

John F. WTieeler, Co. D, 149th N. Y., East Syracuse, N. Y. 

James Whitlock, Co. J, 5th N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Charles E. Whitney, Co. I, 154th N. Y., Allegany, N. Y. 

John Williams, Co. A, 47th N. Y., Elizabeth, N. J. 

George Winter, Co. E, 102nd N. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

William H. Wood, Co. A, 2nd N. Y. Cav., Roslyn, L. I. 

Robert J. Woodward, Co. C, 154th N. Y., FranklinviUe, N. Y. 

Hartman Yox, Co. F, 100th N. Y., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Mrs. Hartman Yox, Buffalo, N. Y. 




Clara Baktox at Time of Civil War 



REPORT BY CLARA BARTON 

Report of an expedition to Andersonville, Ga.,, July, 1865, for 
the purpose of identifying the graves and enclosing the grounds of 
a cemetery created there during the occupancy of that place as a 
prison for Union soldiers in Rebel hands. 

To THE People of the United States of America : 

HAVING by an official invitation been placed upon an expedi- 
tion to Andersonville for the purpose of identifying and 
marking the graves of the dead contained in those noted 
prison grounds, it is perhaps not improper that I make some report 
of the circumstances which induced the sending of such an expedition, 
its work, and the appearance, conditions and surroundings of that 
interesting spot, hallowed alike by the suffering of the martyred dead 
and the tears and prayers of those who mourn them. 

During a search for the missing men of the United States army, 
begun in March, 1865, under the sanction of our late lamented Presi- 
dent Lincoln, I formed the acquaintance of Dorence Atwater of 
Connecticut, a member of the 2d New York Cavalry, who had been 
a prisoner at Andersonville and Belle Isle twenty-two months, and 
who had been charged by the Rebel authorities with the duty of keep- 
ing the death register of the Union prisoners who died amid nameless 
cruelties of the first-named prison. 

By minute inquiry I learned from Mr. Atwater the method 
adopted in the burial of the dead, and by carefully comparing his 
accoimt with a draft which he had made of the grounds appropriated 
for this purpose by the prison authorities, I became convinced of the 
possibUity of identifying the graves simply by comparing the nimi- 
bered post or board marking each man's position in the trench in 

10 145 



146 STATE OF NEW YORK 

which he was bui'ied with the corresponding number standing against 
his name ujjon the register kept by Mr. Atwater, which he informed 
me was then in possession of the War Department. 

Assm-ed by the intelhgence and frankness of my informant of 
the entire truthfulness of his statements, I decided to impart to the 
officers of the Government the information I had gained, and accord- 
ingly brought the subject to the attention of General Hoffman, 
commissary-general of prisoners, asking that a party or expedition be 
at once sent to Andersonville for the purpose of identifying and 
marking the graves, and enclosing the grounds, and that Dorence 
Atwater with his register accompany the same as the proper person 
to designate and identify. The subject appeared to have been not 
only unlieard of, but unthought of, and from the generally prevailing 
impression that no care had been taken in the burial of our prisoners 
the idea seemed at first difficult to be entertained. But the same facts 
which had served to convince me presented themselves favorably to 
the good understanding and kind heart of General Hoffman, who took 
immediate steps to laj' the matter before the Hon. Secretary of War, 
upon whom, at his request, I called the following day and learned 
from him that he had heard and approved my proposition and decided 
to order an expedition consisting of materials and men, under charge 
of some Government officer, for the accomplishment of the object set 
forth in my request, and invited me to accompany the expedition in 
person, which invitation I accepted. 

Accordingly, on the 8th of July, the propeller Virginia, having on 
board fencing material, headboards, the prison records, forty work- 
men, clerks, and letterers, imder command of Capt. James M. Moore, 
A. Q. M., Dorence Atwater and myself, left Washington for Ander- 
sonville via Savannah, Ga., arriving at the latter place July 12th. 
Having waited at Savannah seven days and then resumed the 
journey by way of Augusta, Atlanta and Macon, the entire party 
reached its destination in safetv about noon on the 2oth of Julv. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 147 

We found the prison grounds, stockade, hospital sheds and the 
minor structures almost in the same condition in which they had been 
evacuated ; and care is taken to leave these historic monuments undis- 
turbed as long as the elements will spare them. 

There is not, and never was, any town or village at this place 
except what grew out of its military occupation. Anderson station, 
on the railroad from Macon to Eufala, was selected as a depot for 
prisoners probablj' on account of its remoteness and possible security, 
and the prison itself, with the buildings which sprang up around it, 
constituted all there was of Andersonville. 

The land around is broken and undulating, and at the time of the 
occupation was covered with forests, mostly of the long-leafed pine 
common to the uplands of the South. The bases of the hills are lined 
with cozy springs, which unite to form little rivulets, one of which 
winds sluggishly through each of the intervening marshy valleys. 

The original inclosure of nineteen acres was made in the unbroken 
woods, and the timber was only removed as it was wanted for the 
necessity of the prison. The inclosure was made in January, 1864, 
and enlarged during the summer to 25% acres, being a quadrangle of 
1,295 by 865 feet. The greatest length is from north to south, the 
ground rising from the middle toward each end in rather a steep, 
rounded hill, the northern one being at once the highest and of the 
greatest extent. A small stream, rising from springs a little to the 
westward, flows across it through a narrow valley filled with a com- 
post washed down by the rains. The enclosing stockade is formed of 
pine logs, twenty feet in length and about eight inches in diameter, 
sunk five feet in the ground, and placed close together. This is 
again surrounded by two successive and precisely similar palisades, a 
portion of the last of which is gone. It seems never to have been 
completed. Two inner walls remain entire. Within the interior 
space, at a distance of about seventeen feet from the stockade, runs 
the famous " dead line " marked by small posts set in the ground and 



148 STATE OF NEW YORK 

a slight strip of pine boards set on the top of them. The gates, of 
whieh there are two, situated on the west side, were continuations of 
the stockade, inclosing spaces of thirty feet square, more or less, with 
massive doors at either end. They were arranged and worked on 
the principle of canal locks. Upon the inner stockade were fifty-two 
sentry boxes, raised above the tops of the palisades and accessible to 
the guards by ladders. In these stood fifty-two guards with loaded 
arms, so near that they could converse with each other. 

In addition to these, seven forts mounted with field artillery com- 
manded the fatal space and its masses of perishing men. 

Under the most favorable circumstances and best possible manage- 
ment, the supply of water would have been insufficient for half the 
number of persons who had to use it. The existing arrangements 
must have aggravated the evil to the utmost extent. The sole estab- 
lislmients for cooking and baking were placed on the bank of the 
stream inmiediately above and between the two inner lines of stockade. 
The grease and refuse from them were found adhering to the banks 
at the time of our visit. The guards, to the number of about 3,600, 
were principally encamped on the upper part of the stream, and when 
the heavy rains washed down the hillsides covered with 30,000 human 
beings, and the outlet below failed to discharge the flood which backed 
and filled the valley, the water must have become so foul and loath- 
some that every statement I have seen of its offensiveness must be con- 
sidered as falling short of the reality. And yet within rifle shot of 
the prison flowed a stream fifteen feet wide and three deep of pure, 
delicious water. Had the prison been so placed as to include a section 
of the " Sweet Water Creek " the imnates might have drank and 
bathed to their hearts content. 

During the occupation a beautiful spring broke out, like the 
waters of JVIeribah, from the solid ground near the foot of the north 
slope, just under the western dead line. It is still there, cool and 
clear, the only pleasing object in this horrid place. 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 149 

The scarcity of water, the want of occupation, and perhaps the 
desire to escape by tunneUing, imijelled the prisoners to dig wells. 
Forty of these, finished and unfinished, remain, those on the highest 
ground being sunk in the hard soil to the depth of eighty feet. The 
work was done with knives, spoons, sticks, and other tools but little 
better. The diggers brought up the earth in their pockets and 
blouses and sprinkled it about the ground to conceal the quantity. In 
some wells, excellent water was reached, and in others horizontal gal- 
leries were attempted for escape. In at least one instance a tunnel 
was carried through the hill and a few prisoners are said to have got 
through. 

The steep face of the northern hill is burrowed throughout its 
whole extent. The little caves are scooped out and arched in the form 
of ovens, floored, ceiled and Strengthened, so far as the owners had 
means, with sticks and pieces of boards, and some of them are pro- 
vided with fireplaces and chimneys. It would seem that there were 
cases during long rains where the house would become the grave of 
its owner by falling in upon him during the night. In these burrows 
are still found remnants of wretched food and rude utensils of the 
occupants — drinking cups made of sections of horns, platters and 
spoons wi'ought from parts of old canteens, kettles and pans made 
without solder from stray pieces of old tin or sheet iron. I brought 
away a considerable nmnber of these articles, which may some day be 
of interest to the curious. 

Five sheds stand on the top of the northern hill, erected in the 
early part of the occupation, and five more on the opposite height, 
built a short time before the evacuation. 

Like nearly all southern land, the land is liable to be washed away 
by the rains, and on the slopes of the hills ravines are now formed, 
gullied to the depth of twelve feet. It seems impossible that men 
could have kept their footing on these hillsides when slippery with 
rain. 



150 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Outside the inclosui'e and nearly parallel with its south end is the 
hospital stockade, 800 feet by .SoO. It contains twenty-two sheds, 
for the most part without sides, erected about three months before 
the place was abandoned. The old hospital, occupied up to that time, 
in which so many brave men died, consisted only of tents inclosed by 
a board fence and surrounded by a guard. Confused heaps of rub- 
bish alone mark the place it occupied. 

About half a mile from the main prison, and near Anderson sta- 
tion, is the officers' stockade, a small inclosure in which were never 
imprisoned more than 250 officers, and it was chiefly used for the 
confinement of Rebel offenders. 

The cemetery, around which the chief interest must gather, is 
distant about 300 yards from the stockade in a northwesterly direc- 
tion. The graves, placed side by side in close continuous rows, cover 
nine acres, divided into three imequal lots by two roads which inter- 
sect each other nearly at right angles. The fourth space is still unoc- 
cupied, except by a few graves of " Confederate soldiers." 

'No human bodies were found exposed and none were removed. 
The place was found in much better condition than had been antici- 
pated, owing to "the excellent measures taken by Major-General 
Wilson, commanding at Macon, and a humane, public-spirited citizen 
of Fort Valley, Ga., a ^Ir. Griffen, who, in passing on the railroad, 
was informed by one of the ever-faithful negroes that the bodies were 
becoming exposed and were rooted up bj' animals. Having verified 
this statement, he collected a few negroes, sunk the exposed bodies 
and covered them to a proper depth. He then reported the facts to 
General Wilson, and requested authority to take steps for protecting 
the grounds. That patriotic officer visited Andersonville in person, 
appointed Mr. Grifi^en temporary superintendent and gave him such 
limited facilities as could be furnished in that destitute country. It 
was determined to inclose a square of fifty acres; and at the time of 
our arrival the fence Avas nearly one-third built from old lumber found 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 151 

about the place. He had also erected a brick kiln and was manufac- 
turing brick for drains to conduct the water away from the graves 
and protect and strengthen the soil against the action of heavy rains. 
We found Mr. Griffen with a force of about twenty negroes and a 
few mules at work upon the ground. I have understood that that 
gentleman furnished the labor at his own cost, while General Wilson 
issued the necessary rations. 

The part performed by our party was to take up and carry for- 
ward the work so well begun. An additional force was obtained 
from the military commandant at Macon for completing the enclos- 
ui'e and erecting the headboards. It seems that the dead had been 
buried by Union prisoners, paroled from the hospital and stockade 
for that purpose. Successive trenches, capable of containing from 
100 to 150 bodies each, thickly set with little posts or boards, with 
numbers in regular order carved upon them, told to the astonished 
and tear-dimmed eye the sad story of buried treasures. It was only 
necessary to compare the nimiber on each post or board with that 
which stands opposite the name on the register and replace the whole 
with a more substantial, uniform and comely tablet, bearing not only 
the original number, but the name, company and regiment and date 
of death of the soldier who slept beneath. 

I have been repeatedly assured by prisoners that great care was 
taken at the time by the men to whom fell the sad task of originally 
marking this astonishing number of graves to perform the work with 
faithfulness and accuracy. If it shall prove that the work performed 
by those who followed, under circumstances so much more favorable, 
was executed with less faithfulness and accm-acy than the former, it 
will be a subject of much regret — but fortunately not j'et beyond 
the possibility of correction. The nmnber of graves marked is 12,920. 
The original records, captured by General Wilson, furnished about 
10,500 ; but as one book of the record had not been secured, over 2,000 
names were supplied from a copy (of his own record) made by Mr. 



152 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Atwater in the Andersonville prison and brought by him to Annapolis 
on his return with the paroled prisoners. 

Interspersed throughout this Death Register were 400 numbers 
against which stood the dark word, " UNKNOWN." So, scattered 
among the thickly designated graves, stand 400 tablets, bearing only 
the number and the touching inscription, " UNKNOWN UNION 
SOLDIER." 

Substantially, nothing was attempted beyond inclosing the 
grounds, identifying the gi'aves and marking them, placing appro- 
priate mottoes at the gates and along the spaces designed for walks 
and erecting a flag-staff in the center of the cemetery. The work 
was completed on the 17th of August, and the party took the route 
homeward by the way of Chattanooga, Nashville and Cincinnati, 
arriving at Washington on the morning of August 24th. 

The health of the party during the expedition was remarkablj- 
good, when the season of the year, the fatigue and the want of cus- 
tomary accommodations are taken into consideration. Cases of slight 
chills and fever were not infrequent; but during the entire time we 
had only one case of severe illness, and that, to our grief, terminated 
fatally. Edward Watts of Georgetown, D. C, a clerk in the Quarter- 
master's Department, in this city, sickened of typhoid fever during 
the passage up the Savannah river, and died on the 10th day of 
August. His remains were taken home to his friends. Mr. Watts 
was a young man of education and refinement and of the highest type 
of moral and religious character; he suffered patiently, and died 
nobly and well. I have thought that he might be regarded as the 
last martyr of Andersonville. 

The future of this historic spot cannot fail to constitute a subject 
of deep and abiding interest to the people of this entire country, and 
it would seem fitting that it should be preserved as one of the sanctu- 
aries of the nation, and in due time decorated with appropriate 
honors. Its susceptibility of internal improvement is very great 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 153 

Water can be had for irrigation, and the climate will produce nearly 
all the flora of the temperate zone. Both national gratitude and 
personal affection will suggest the erection of a suitable monument 
within the cemetery, where, if desirable, may be preserved in durable 
form the names of the martyrs who sleep around. And as the land 
on which these interesting associations are clustered is still the prop- 
erty of private individuals, never having passed from the hands of 
the original owners, it would seem desirable that the cemetery at 
least, and its immediate surroundings, become the property of the 
nation. A mile square will embrace all points of general and historic 
interest. 

There are numerous smaller burial-places in the State of Georgia, 
which, from their seeming lesser importance, will scarcely be kept 
up as national cemeteries, and in reference to which, without ventur- 
ing to suggest, I would merely remark that the fifty acres inclosed at 
Andersonville would afford ample space for all whom it might ever be 
deemed advisable to remove to that point. 

During the occupation of Andersonville as a prison it was a pun- 
ishable offense for a colored man or woman to feed, shelter, aid, or 
even converse with the prisoners on parole. To others they had no 
access. I have been informed that they were not allowed about the 
prison grounds; and so great was their superstitious horror of the 
cruelties perpetrated upon the prisoners that only a comparatively 
small number had ever found the courage to visit the cemetery up to 
the time of our arrival. But the presence of so many northern people 
on such an errand, and especially a lady, entirely overcame their 
fears, and they visited the cemetery and myself by scores, men, 
women and children, sometimes a hundred in a day. It was no 
uncommon occurrence, upon opening up my tent in the morning, to 
find a group standing in front of it who had walked fifteen or twentj' 
miles to see the " Yankee Lady," and ask her " if it were true that 
Abraham Lincoln was dead, and they were free," and " how Massa 



154 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Lincoln's great paper read," and " what they ought to do," and tell 
her how the " poor Yankee prisoners " ran before the dogs " like us " 
and they could not have saved them — starved, and they could not 
feed them — died, and they could not see them. 

Remember, mothers, that the pitying tear of the old-time slave, 
whom your son helped to freedom, is the only tear that falls upon 
his distant grave to-day. 

I have endeavored to point out to you, as faithfully as I am able, 
the various objects of interest, painful or otherwise, which presented 
themselves to my observation during the time occupied in the work 
of the expedition ; and while I would not dwell upon the terribleness 
of the sufferings imposed upon om- prisoners, nor stir the hearts 
already sunk in grief to deeper woe, still we owe it alike to the living 
and the dead that a proper knowledge and a realization of the 
miseries which they endured be entertained by all. We are wont to 
attribute their chief suffering to the insufficiency of food, and while 
this is probably just, still, to the mind of one who has looked over the 
scanty, shelterless, pitiful spot of earth to which they were confined, 
and taken into consideration the numberless trials which must have 
grown out of the privation of space and necessary conveniences of 
life, the conviction will force itself that these latter woes fell but little 
short of the former. It is to be remembered that dm-ing thirteen long 
months they knew neither shelter or protection from the changeable 
skies above or the pitiless, imfeeling earth beneath. 

The treacherous nature of the soil, parcliing to seams in the sun, 
and gullying and sliding under their feet with every shower, must 
have augmented their ills almost beyond conception. I watched the 
eflPect of a heavy fall of rain upon the enclosed grounds, and in thirty 
minutes the entire hill sides, which had constituted their sole abiding 
place, were one rolling mass of slippery mud, and this the effect of a 
mere summer shower. "WHiat of the continued rains of autumn? 
Think of thirty thousand men penned in by a close stockade of 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 155 

twenty-six acres of ground, from which every tree and shrub had 
been uprooted for fuel to cook their scanty food, huddled, like cattle, 
without shelter or blanket, half-clad and hungry, with dreary night 
settling in, after a day of autumn rain. The hill tops would not hold 
them all, the valley was filled with the swollen brook; seventeen feet 
from the stockade ran the fatal dead line, beyond which no man might 
step and live. What did they do? I need not ask, " "Wliere did they 
go?" for on the face of the whole green earth there was no place but 
this for them. But where did they place themselves? How did they 
live? Aye, how did they die? But this is only one feature of their 
suiFering, and perhaps the lightest. Of the long dazzling months when 
gaunt famine stalked at noonday and pestilence walked by night, and 
upon the seamed and parching earth the cooling rains fell not, I will 
not trust me to speak. I scarce dare think. If my heart were strong 
enough to draw the picture, there are thousands upon thousands all 
through our land too crushed and sore to look upon it. But after 
this, whenever any man who has lain a prisoner within the stockade 
at Andersonville would tell you of his sufferings, how he fainted, 
scorched, drenched, hungered, sickened, was scoffed at, scourged, 
hunted and persecuted, though the tale be long and twice told, as you 
would have your own wrongs appreciated, your own woes pitied, 
your own cries for mercj^ heard, I charge you to listen and believe 
him. However definitely he may have spoken, know that he has not 
told you all. However strong he may have outlined, or deeply he 
may have colored his picture, know that the reality calls for a better 
light and a nearer view than your clouded distant gaze will ever get. 
And your sympathies need not be confined to Andersonville, while 
similar horrors glared in the sunny light and spotted the flower-girt 
garden fields of that whole desperate, misguided and bewildered 
people. Wherever stretched the form of a Union prisoner, there 
arose the signal for cruelty and the cry of agony, and there, day by 
day, grew the skeleton graves of the nameless dead. 



156 STATE OF NEW YORK 

But, braving and enduring all this, some thousands have returned 
to you. And you will bear with me, and these noble men will pardon 
me, while in conclusion, I speak one word of them. 

The unparalleled severities of our four years' campaigns have 
told upon the constitutional strength even of the fortunate soldier 
who alone marched to the music of the Union, and slept only beneath 
the folds of the flag for which he fought. But they whom fickle for- 
tune left to crouch at the foot of the shadowless palmetto, and listen 
to the hissing of the serpent, drank still deeper of the unhealthful 
draught. These men bear with them the seeds of disease and death, 
sown in that fatal clime and ripening for an early harvest. With 
occasional exceptions, thej^ will prove to be short-lived and enfeebled 
men, and whether they ask it or not, will deserve at your hands no 
ordinary share of kindly consideration. The survivor of a Rebel 
prison has endured and suffered what you never can, and what, I 
pray God, your children may never have to. With loss of strength, 
and more of sad and bitter memories, he is with you now, to earn the 
food so long denied him. If he ask " leave of toil " give it to him 
before it is too late; if he need kindness and encouragement, bestow 
them freely, wliile you may ; if he seek charity at your hands remem- 
ber that " the poor you have always with you " but him you have not 
always, and withliold it not. If hereafter you find them making 
organized effort to provide for the widow and the orphan of the 
Union soldier, remember it grew out of the heart sympathy which 
clusters around the memories of the comrades who perished at their 
side, and a well-grounded ajiprehension for the future of their own, 
and aid them. 

In conclusion, tremulously, lest I assume too much, let me has- 
ten to commend to the grateful consideration of this noble, generous 
people alike the soldier who has given his strength, the prisoner who 
has sacrificed his health, the widow who has offered up her husband, 
the orphan who knows only that its father went out to the battle and 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 157 

comes no more forever, and the lonely distant gi-ave of the martyr, 
who sleeps alone in the stranger soil, that freedom and peace might 
come to ours. 

One word of explanation, in conclusion, and I have done. You 
have long and justly felt that some report of this expedition, embrac- 
ing a record of the graves identified and reclaimed, was your due. 
And three thousand letters addressed to me upon the subject have 
revealed only too plainly and painfully the bitter anxiety with which 
you have watched and waited. 

A mere report, unaccompanied by the " record," seemed but a 
hollow mockery, which I would not impose upon you, and this is my 
first opportunity for such accompaniment. For the record of your 
dead you are indebted to the forethought, courage and perseverance 
of Dorence Atwater, a young man not yet twenty-one years of age; 
an orphan, four years a soldier, one-tenth part of his whole life a 
prisoner, with broken health and ruined hopes, he seeks to present for 
your acceptance the sad gift he has in store for you; and, grateful 
for the opportunity, I hasten to place beside it this humble report, 
whose only merit is its truthfulness, and beg you to accept it in the 
spirit of kindness in which it is offered. 

CLARA BARTON. 



DORENCE AT WATER 

By His Brother, Hon, Francis Atwater, 
Neav Haven, Conn. 

AMONG the many private soldiers who by some gallant deed, 
or worthy act, have won for themselves a place in the his- 
toric record of their country, perhaps there is not one to 
whom as many thousand hearts thi'oughout the entire land would so 
gratefully accord the page, and so lovingly embellish it with 
" immortelles," glistening with the tear drops of sad and tender 
memories, as the young soldier whose name stands at the head of this 
sketch — and a type of whose noble, and, it would almost seem, 
inspired work, follows it. 

Dorence Atwater, the son of Henry and Catherine Ferm 
Atwater, was born at Terryville, Litchfield county. Conn., February 
8, 1845, being the third in a family of eight children. 

Inheriting from his mother an exceedingly active temperament, 
and from his father — who, though a mason by profession, was also 
a successful school teacher and justice of the peace — a rare degree 
of intelligence, integrity, and the early foundation for a good educa- 
tion, Dorence started in at the age of fourteen as clerk in a store and 
post-office, which position he occupied until August, 1861, when, at 
the age of sixteen, he enlisted in the Connecticut squadron which 
helped to form the famous regiment of Harris Light Cavalry, com- 
manded by Colonel, afterward General, Kilpatrick. A soldier from 
choice, a bold rider, and knowing little of fear, it is natural to con- 
clude that Atwater was never happier than when dashing into Rich- 
mond with Kilpatrick on his brilliant raid of May, 1862. But there 
was destined to come a day when he would enter the Rebel capital 
under circumstances less exhilarating, as a few days subsequent to 

159 



160 STATE OF NEW YORK 

the battle of Gettysburg, wliile bearing despatches to his general — 
with the last home letter in his pocket which brought the intelligence 
of the sudden death of his mother — he was captured and taken a 
prisoner to Ricliniond and Belle Isle. This was the beginning of 
misfortunes, the shadow of which, up to the end of his life, was never 
quite lifted from his pathway. 

After five months of suffering and illness in Belle Isle, at the 
intercession of the adjutant of his regiment, also a captive in Rich- 
mond, and whose regimental clerk Atwater had been, he was taken 
to Riclimond and detailed to take account of the supplies sent by the 
U. S. Government to its own men suffering in Rebel prisons. 

Holding this position for some weeks, he was, in February, 1864, 
sent with the first detachment of prisoners to Andersonville. From 
the shelterless " stockade " in midwinter, to the scarcely better pro- 
tected " old hospital " outside — three months more of fever, scurvj', 
and starvation, and again he was detailed to the Rebel surgeon's 
office and set to keep the daily death record of his comrades, the 
Union prisoners, as score by score thej' perished by his side. He was 
now nineteen, and though wasted to a skeleton, naturally active and 
faithful, a clerk of no ordinary skill and experience, rendered 
thoughtful by suffering, tender by affliction, it would seem that he 
had been providentially fitted for the great work given him to do. 

With a degree of judgment and forethought which would have 
done credit to a man of twice his years, he appears to have measured 
his task and comprehended its importance at the outset and directed 
every energy of both mind and body to its faithful accomplishment. 
Day by day, he watched the long trenches fill with the naked skeleton 
forms of the once sturdy Union blue — the pride of the American 
armies — and day by day he traced on the great brown pages of his 
Confederate sheet record tlie last and all that was ever to be known 
of the brave dead sleepers in their crowded, coffinless beds — the 
name, company, regiment, disease, date of death, and number of 
grave. 




■^^>h^^' 




DORENCE AtWATER 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 161 

Five more weary months of this; but when, in September, he 
found himself registering a hundred names a day, and saw seven- 
tenths of them followed by the word " scorbutus " — for although 
midsummer in a country teeming with vegetation, no green thing had 
been permitted to find its way inside that deadly palisade — Atwater 
came to the conclusion that a record which told so fearful a tale of 
wilful cruelty or design against the perpetrators would never be per- 
mitted to exist and pass into history; but that, in any case, whichso- 
ever side might ultimately succeed, southern pride would compel the 
destruction of that record, and with it must pass forever from the 
page of the earth the last authentic information, in a majority of 
instances the last trace, of the fate of every man who perished in 
" Andersonville," leaving only anxiety, distress, the agony of sus- 
pense, and the darkness of oblivion to the thousands upon thousands 
of waiting mourners throughout the North. The loving memories of 
his own mother, whose last words had been of her soldier boys, clung 
tenderly about his heart, and his soul yearned for some means by which 
to save the thousands of other mothers from this needless agony of 
uncertainty worse than death, and he decided upon commencing a 
duplicate of his own record, upon separate sheets of paper which he 
managed to abstract, even going back of himself and gleaning all that 
he could of the first three months while he lay in stockade and hospital. 
Bringing his duplicate up to date in October, and concealing it from 
all eyes, both friend and foe, from that time he kept both his secret 
and his double record as he had at first kept the one, with little 
expectation of living to bring it away himself, but hoping that he 
might be enabled to pass it into the hands of some stronger comrade 
who could get it through our lines. 

In February, 1865, it was decided to remove the prisoners from 
Andersonville to the region of Columbia, S. C, and Atwater, with a 
guard, was ordered to precede the main body and make ready his 
papers and records for the registry of the incoming dead. He left 

11 



162 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Andersonville on the 20th of February with his duphcate record con- 
cealed about his person, but before the journey was completed they 
were met by the news of the capture of Columbia by General Sher- 
man; the destination was changed and Atwater was hurried away to 
Salisbury. Two days after his arrival came the earliest order for 
exchange and he chanced to be among the first 10,000 paroled at 
Wilmington. The middle of March, '65, found our boy captive of 
twenty-two months a paroled prisoner at Annapolis, with his record 
of the 13,000 dead of Andersonville, while as many thousand homes 
were slirouded in darkness, as many thousand families waited in 
agonized suspense for the unveiling of its fearful mysteries. So far, 
the boy's prophecies were proven and his sad dream realized, he had 
not miscalculated the terrible anxiety of the public, and chafed under 
his parole for liberty to give up his record to the people for whom 
alone he had kept it. 

Then comes the story of his trouble with the Government, which 
had learned of his great work. At the time of his release from Ander- 
sonville, he had served twenty-two months since his capture. He 
went to his home in Terrj'ville, Conn., a skeleton of his former self. 
He was taken down with diphtheria and lay at the point of death, 
but soon rallied, and before he had fully recuperated, had been 
summoned to Washington. His precious rolls were demanded for 
Government use, and, while he was anxious to publish them for the 
benefit of relatives and friends of the Andersonville victims, under 
threats of confiscation he consented his names should be copied. He 
then enlisted in the general service, U. S. A., and was detailed as a 
clerk in one of the departments at Washington. 

The Goverrmient had copied his rolls but refused to return them. 
In July, 1865, he informed Secretary Stanton he could identify all 
of the graves at Andersonville if the work were undertaken immedi- 
ateh'. The Secretary of War ordered the work performed and 
detailed Captain Moore and forty others, including Dorence, to go to 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 163 

Andersonville at once. Included in the party was Clara Barton, one 
of the world's greatest benefactors. The original rolls were also 
taken. Headboards were erected to the 13,000 martyrs and the 
party returned. Shortly after, the rolls were missed. No one knew 
where they were until Dorence was questioned when he promptly 
answered he had taken his property where he could find it, which he 
said the law allowed a man to do. He was told he could have twenty- 
four hours to return his rolls, but he said he was determined to keep 
them. He was then and there arrested, placed in the old capitol 
prison; was tried by court-martial and adjudged guilty, whereupon 
he was sent to Auburn State prison to serve at hard labor for eighteen 
months, fined $300, and to stand committed until the rolls were 
returned. He possessed the old Kentish spirit of never being con- 
quered. In irons he was taken from Washington to Auburn, where 
he served for two months, when he was discharged without the 
formality of a pardon. 

This came about because Secretary Stanton feared Gen. B. F. 
Butler was about to start an investigation which was demanded by 
newspapers all over the country, the most persistent of which was 
the New York Tribune. Upon the release of Dorence, his rolls were 
taken from their hiding-place, put in alphabetical order, and 25,000 
copies printed by the Tribune Association and placed on the book- 
stands all over the country before the Government knew what was 
being done. 

He was now in his twenty-fii-st year, broken down in health, a vic- 
tim of both the South and the North, and although he had been 
cruelly and unjustly punished so far as the Government was con- 
cerned, he was simply a discharged convict, released without the grace 
of a pardon. The Government recognized this in a slight way by 
giving him a consulship in the far-off Seychelles Islands, and later 
transferred him to the Society Islands in the South Pacific, where he 
served faithfully for twenty-six years. A few years ago the court- 



164 STATE OF NEW YORK 

martial was set aside by Congress and he was given back the good 
name that should never have been taken awaj'; but, so far as com- 
pensation goes, he never was given anything in recognition of his great 
service, nor was he even allowed a pension. 

Do you wonder, years later, that in one of his letters he should 
remark, " The word soldier makes me mad, while the sight of a uni- 
form makes me froth at the mouth." His self-imposed task, however, 
is appreciated by those whose loved ones rest at Andersonville, for 
they, at least, have the satisfaction of knowing the fate that befell 
them, that their graves have been preserved and identified, and in 
personal letters Dorence was given the thanks of those who valued his 
information. In all the intervening years he went on with his life 
work, uncomplaining, extending the good hand of fellowship, and 
when death came he went to sleep with a smile, just as forgiving as 
when he said his prayers at his mother's knee. 



THE DEAD AT ANDERSONVILLE 

Introduction by Dorence Atwater 

To the Sxjrviving Relatives and Friends of the Martyred 
" Dead " at Andersonville, Ga. : 

THIS record was originally copied for you because I feared 
that neither you nor the Government of the United States 
would ever otherwise learn the fate of your loved ones whom 
I saw daily dying before me. I could do nothing for them, but I 
resolved that I would at least try and let you sometime know when 
and how they died. This, at least, I am now able to do. 

So many conflicting rumors have been in circulation in regard to 
these rolls and myself, that I deem it prudent to give a brief state- 
ment of my entire connection with this DEATH REGISTER, and 
to show how and why it was so long withheld from you. 

On the 7th da}" of July, 1863, I was taken prisoner near Hagers- 
town, Md., and taken to Belle Island, Richmond, Va., via Staunton, 
where I remained five months. I then went to Smith's tobacco fac- 
tory, Riclimond, where I kept the account of supplies received from 
our Government and issued to Federal prisoners of war. In the latter 
part of Februarj", 1864, I was sent to Andersonville with a squad of 
four hundred other prisoners from Belle Island, arriving there on 
the first day of March. I remained inside the stockade until the mid- 
dle of May, when I was sent to the hospital. On the 15th of June I 
was paroled and detailed as a clerk in Surgeon J. H. White's office 
to keep the daily record of deaths of all Federal prisoners of war. I 
also made monthlj^ and quarterly abstracts of the deaths; the latter 
one was said to be for the Federal Government, which I have since 
learned was never received. 

165 



166 STATE OF NEW YORK 

The appalling mortality was such that I suspected that it was the 
design of the Rebel Government to kill and maim our prisoners by- 
exposure and starvation so that they would forever be totallj' unfit 
for military service and that they withheld these facts. Accordingly, 
in the latter part of August, 1864, I began to secretly copy the entire 
list of oui' dead, which I succeeded in doing, and brought it safely 
tlu-ough the lines with me in 1865. Arriving at Camp Parole, at 
Annapolis, Md., I learned that I could not get a furlough on account 
of my term of service having expired some seven months before. I 
immediately WTote to the Secretary of War, asking for a furlough of 
thirty days, for the purpose of having my DEATH REGISTER 
published for the relief of the many thousand anxious in regard to 
the fate of their dead. Before an answer could have returned I 
received a fm-lough from the commandant of the camp. I then went 
to my home in Terryville, Conn., where I was taken sick the next day 
after my arrival, which confined me for three weeks. On the 12th of 
April, I received a telegram from the War Department, requesting 
me to come immediately to Washington and bring my rolls, and, if 
they were found acceptable, I should be suitably rewarded. I started 
the next day for Washington. Arriving there I went to the War 
Department and learned that the person (Colonel Breck) with 
whom I was to make arrangements was absent at the Fort Sumter 
celebration. I left my rolls with the chief clerk for safe keeping. In 
a day or two Colonel Breck returned and he informed me that the 
Secretary of War had authorized him to pay me three hundred dollars 
($300) for the rolls. I told him I did not wish to sell the rolls, that 
they ought to be published for the benefit of the friends of the dead 
for whom chiefly they had been copied. He told me that if I went 
to publish them the Government would confiscate them, that I could 
have until 9 o'clock the next morning to decide whether I would take 
the tliree hundred dollars or not. The rolls were then in his possession. 
I told him if I could have a clerkship in the department, which he had 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 167 

described to me, three hundred dollars, and the rolls back as soon as 
copied, I should consider it satisfactory. To this he agreed. He then 
informed me that it would be necessary for me to enlist in the general 
service in order to get the clerkship. To this I objected, but in no other 
way was it available, and I accepted. I was mustered out of my origi- 
nal enlistment and given permission to visit home and return for duty 
by the 1st of June. While in New York in the latter part of May, I 
telegraphed Colonel Breck, asking if my rolls were copied, to which I 
received a reply, " Not yet." 

Soon after my arrival in Washington in June, I called on Colonel 
Brack and asked the privilege of taking sheets of my rolls out after 
business hours to copy and return them the next morning. He said 
he would have to ask General Townsend's consent. I again met him 
in a few days; he told me he had been unable to see General Town- 
send. I then wrote to Colonel Breck asking if he did or did not 
intend to return my rolls, that I had promised that the rolls should 
be published for the benefit of the friends of the deceased. He 
returned my letter endorsed as follows : "I have fully explained the 
matter to General Townsend and he says the rolls shall not be copied 
for any traffic whatever." I had never spoken of trafficking in them ; 
I only wished to give them to the people for whom I had copied them 
at some personal risk. Nothing more was said about the rolls until 
after my return from Andersonville in August. 

Miss Clara Barton of Washington, D. C, upon learning the con- 
dition of the cemetery at Andersonville, and that the graves could 
be identified, had reported the facts to the Secretary of War, who 
ordered the necessary arrangements to be made for marking the 
graves. A party charged with this duty left Washington on the 8th 
day of July, consisting of Miss Clara Barton, Capt. J. M. Moore, 
myself, and forty-two letterers, painters and clerks, arriving in 
Andersonville on the 25th day of July. 



168 STATE OF NEW YORK 

Before leaving AVashington it was found that the original regis- 
ter, captured by General Wilson, was deficient in one book contain- 
ing about twenty-four hundred names, and my rolls were sent to sup- 
ply this deficiency. The original was also found blurred and imperfect 
in many places, through want of care, and my rolls were fre- 
quently in the hands of all who had occasion to consult them and so 
came into my hands in the course of duty. They had been copied at 
Washington, according to my agreement with Colonel Breck, and 
were mine, and lawfully in mj' possession. I proposed to retain 
them and give them to you as soon as I could. I did not propose to 
injure any one, to do anything unlawful or improper with them, much 
less to traffic or speculate on the information they contained, but I 
did retain them. AMien the originals were needed in the Wirz trial 
at Washington, they and my copy were in my tent ^shen the messen- 
ger arrived in Andersonville. He took the original and left my copy. 

AAHien we started home I placed these rolls with my other prop- 
erty in my trimk and brought them to Washington. Upon my 
arrival I reported to Colonel Breck at the War Department. He 
asked me if I knew where my rolls were. I said, " I have them ; will 
you allow me to keep them, now you have them copied here." He 
told me, " We miglit as well come to an understanding about these 
rolls. This is the last conversation we shall have about them : if you 
>vill pay back three hundred dollars j^ou can keep the rolls, otherwise 
you must retui-n them." I asked him " if he did not agi'ce to give 
them back when copied ; " he said, " Yes, but you were going to set 
yourself up in business by publisliing them, and we do not consider 
ourselves held to our agreement." I told hini, " I had a right to pub- 
lish them ( if he called that setting mj'self up in business ) and it was 
my duty to do so." I then turned to leave, intending to see Secretary 
Stanton. He said: " I infer you do not intend to give up the rolls." 
I said : " Xot yet ; I must go further to see about them." He said : 
" You will go to the 'old Capitol ' if j'ou do not give them up," and 




> 

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K 
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ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 169 

then sent for a guard and had me arrested. My room and trunk 
were searched, but the rolls could not be found. I was then put in 
the guardliouse for two days and then transferred to the " old 
Capitol Prison," and in a few daj^s I was arraigned and tried by 
court-martial on the following charges and specifications: 

Charge 1. Conduct prejudicial to good military discipline. 

Charge 2. Larceny. 

Specifications: In this that private Dorence Atwater, of the 
general service of the United States Army, did seize and unlawfully 
take from the tent or quarters of J. M. Moore, Assistant Quarter- 
master, U. S. Ai'my, certain property of the United States then and 
there in the proper charge and custody of the said Captain J. M. 
Moore, to wit: a certain document, consisting of a list, written upon 
about twenty-four sheeets of paper, of Federal prisoners of war who 
had died at Andersonville, Ga., the same having been prepared by the 
said Atwater while a prisoner of war at said Andersonville, and sold 
and disposed of by him to the United States for the sum and price of 
three hundred dollars, and did appropriate and retain the said prop- 
erty to his own use. This at Andersonville, Ga., on or about the 16th 
day of August, 1865. 

I was convicted and sentenced as follows : " To be dishonorably 
discharged from the United States service, with loss of all pay and 
allowances now due; to pay a fine of three hundred dollars; to be 
confined at hard labor for the period of eighteen months, at such place 
as the Secretary of War may direct; to furnish to the War Depart- 
ment the property specified in the second specification as the prop- 
erty stolen from Captain J. M. IMoore, and stand committed at hard 
labor until the said fine is paid and the said stolen property is fur- 
nished to the War Department." 

On the 26th day of September I arrived at Auburn State prison, 
New York, where I remained over two months at hard labor, when I 
was released under a general pardon of the President of the United 
States. 



170 STATE OF NEW YORK 

I reached New Haven, Conn., on the following day, and learned 
that the record had not been furnished you. I immediately set about 
preparing it for publication and have arranged to have it printed 
and placed within your reach at the cost of the labor of printing and 
material, having no means by which to defray these expenses myself. 

I regret that you have waited so long for information of so much 
interest to you. 

DORENCE ATWATER. 



LIST OF SOLDIERS CREDITED TO THE STATE OF NEW 

YORK BURIED IN THE ANDERSONVILLE, GA., 

NATIONAL CEMETERY, AS THEY APPEAR 

ON BURIAL REGISTER CORRECTED 

TO DATE, FEBRUARY 18, 1914 



No. 

2038 

3141 

•1719 

8001 

6i 

8497 
6467 
8559 
3226 
6575 
1700 
4383 

12397 
3349 

13005 

846 
7062 

6698 
7007 
1755 

11389 

11212 

3293 
12452 

5569 

5844 

11479 



Name 
Abbey, Orange Cpl. Co. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. 

Abbey, William H Pvt. Co. 

Abel, Charles Pvt. Co. 

Ackerman, Martin Pvt. Co. 

Ackhert, David F Pvt. Co. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. 

Adams, Hiram Pvt. Co. 

Adams, Octave Pvt. Co. 

Adams, Sharp Sgt. Co. 

Adams, Thomas R Pvt. Co. 

Adamy, Francis S Pvt. Co. 

Ades, Edward Pvt. Co. 

Ahem, Daniel Pvt. Co. 

Akay, Peter Pvt. Co. 

Akin, John W Pvt. Co. 

Alban, W 



Organization 

H, 154, N. Y. Inf June 

says "Orange J. Abbey.") 

E, 85, N. Y. Inf June 

C, 15, N. Y. Art Aug. 

L, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 

A, 80, N. Y. Inf Mch. 

says " David F. Ackert.") 

G, 98, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

C, 61, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

G, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

H, 85, N. Y. Inf July 

K, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

C, 8, N. Y. Cav June 

F, 170, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 
E, 140, N. Y. Inf.... Jan. 
H, 85, N. Y. Inf July 



Died 


Catise 


16, 


1864.. 


A. Diarrhoea 


18, 


1864.. 


, C. Diarrhoea 


4, 


1864. , 


, Diarrhoea 


6, 


1864. 


. Diarrhoea 


19, 


1864. . 


. Pleuritis 


11, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


23, 


1864., 


. Diarrhoea 


13, 


1864.. 


Scorbutus 


^'^, 


1864.. 
1864., 




23, 


. Diarrhoea 


7, 


1864. , 


. Debilitis 


31, 


1864.. 


, Diarrhoea 


5. 


1865., 


. Scorbutus 


15, 


1864. . 


Pneumonia 



(Headstone marked " N. Y." Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

Albert, George Pvt. Co. F, 52, N. Y. Inf May 3, 1864.. Wounds 

Albinson, Joseph Pvt. Co. C, 42, N. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph Abbinson, also served in 59, & 83, Inf.") 

Alburty, William C Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 24, 1864.. Dysentery 

Alderman, Frederick Pvt. Co. H, 15, N. Y. Cav Aug. 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Alexander, Joseph Pvt. Co. C, 125, N. Y. Inf June 9, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Joseph ^. Alexander.") 

Alexander Wallace F. . . Pvt. Co. C, 3, N. Y. Cav Oct. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William F. Alexander.") 

Alfred, Henry C Pvt. Co. F, 153, N. Y. Inf Oct. 20, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Henry C. AUerd.") 

Allen, Adolphus W Pvt. Co. M, 14, N. Y. Art July 14,1864.. Diarrhoea 

Allen, James A Pvt. Co. A, 82, N. Y. Inf Jan. 14, 1865. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Transferred to Co. E, 59, Inf.") 

AUen, William Pvt. Co. H, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Aug. 13, 1864. . Dysentery 

AUenberger, J Pvt. Co. B, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 
Alligier, Jaques Pvt. Co. I, 48, N. Y. Inf Oct. 26, 18C4.. Wounds 

171 



172 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



No. Xnme Organization Died C'atue 

837-t AUison, William J Pvt. Co. F, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. E.") 

7587 AUman, Charles Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 3, 186*. . Scorbutus 

6941 Almy, Franklin Pvt. Co. K, 111, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5938 Alphord. J Pvt. Co. G, 75, N'. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864. . Scorl)utus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Alphord. Co. G, 71, Inf.") 

7739 Alsaver, Sanford Pvt. Co. H, 147, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 3, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Sanford Alsfver.") 

7478 Altenborud, Edward ... Pvt. Co. D, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. 

800 Ambler, Frederick Pvt. Co. H, 47, N. Y. Inf Apr. 28, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Fred Emler.") 

2344 Ambrust, Jacob Cpl. Co. G, 9, N. Y. Cav June 23, 1864. 

10642 Ames, Henry Pvt. Co. A, 3, X. Y. Art Oct. 10, 1864. 

4654 Ames, James R Sgt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 3, 1864. 

3739 Anderson, Andrew Pvt. Co. I, 100, X. Y. Inf July 21, 1864. 



Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 



Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
Intermittent 

fever 

Scorbutus 

Debilitis 

Gangrene 



4890 Anderson, Andrew Pvt. Co. H, 99, X. Y. Inf Aug. 6,1864.. 

537 .\nderson, Henry Pvt. Co. M, 20, N. Y. Cav Apr. 14, 1864. . 

8819 Anderson, J Pvt. Co. E, 39, X'. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864. . 

4110 Anderson, L Pvt. Co. D, 14, X. Y. Cav July 27, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X'. Y. says " Xot found. — There was a Lewis Anderson, Co. I, 8-t, Inf., transferred 
to Co. G, 5, Vet. Inf. June 2, 1864.") 

1389 Andrews, Glenn Pvt. Co. I, 111, X. Y. Inf .May 26, 1864.. 

7533 Andrews, William Pvt. Co. K, 85, X'. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . 

8717 Anson, James R Pvt. Co. K, 1, X. Y. Cav Sept. 14, 1864. . 

6548 Answell, J Pvt. Co. A, 15, X. Y. Cav Aug. 23, 1864. 

8720 Antisdel, George H Pvt. Co L, 5, X. Y. Cav Sept. 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(.•\d. G. X. Y. says "George H. Antcsdel.") 

12202 Antler, F Pvt. Co. B, 39, X. Y. Inf Dec. 1, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

6976 Appleby, Silas W Pvt. Co. K, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 27. 1864. . 

1084 Archer, John A Pvt. Co. F, 61, X. Y. Inf May 14, 1864. . 

11172 Armond, WiUiam Pvt. Co. F, 7, X. Y. Oct. 19, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

10818 Armstrong, John Pvt. Co. C, 164, X^ Y. Inf Oct. 12, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. X'. Y. says "John //. Armstrong.") 

9475 Armstrong, Moses Pvt Co. G, 140, X. Y. Inf Sept. 21, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads " Ky." but change of latter to "X'. Y." has been directed by Chief, 

Quartermaster Corps.) 

11571 Armstrong, William Prt. 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... Oct. 27, 1864.. 

7470 Arnold, Rodolphus B. . . Pvt. Co. L, 7, X. Y. Art Sept. 1, 1864. . 

C951 Arnot, Charles Pvt. Co. C, 47, X''. Y. Inf -Aug. 26, 1864. . 

9741 Artz, Christian Pvt Co. E, 6, X. Y. H. Art. . . Sept 25, 1864. . 

(Headstone reads " C. H. Art.") 

1580 Ashley, Charles G Pvt. Co. G, 146, X. Y. Inf. . . . June 3, 1864. , 

12622 A.shley, S Citizen, , X. Y Feb. 9, 1865. 

5544 Ashton, C Cpl. Co. I, 10, X. Y. Aug. 13. 1864. , 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

3666 Atwill, Theodore Sgt. Co. M, 6, X. Y. Cav July 20, 1864.. 

7207 Atwood, George S Pvt 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 29, 1864. 



C. Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Dysentery 



Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Dysentery 



Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Dysenterj' 

C. Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

Phthisis 
Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 173 

No. Name Organization Died Canise 

950 Aubrey, Richard Sgt. Co. A, 14, N. Y. Cav May 9, 1864.. . C. Diarrhoea 

11748 AugUn, James Sgt. Co. D, 66, N. Y. Inf Nov. 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Anglain.") 

7743 Auguere, Gregory Pvt. Co. E, 47, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Gregory Angcraro.") 

5027 Augustein, John Pvt. Co. A, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 8, 1864. . Dysentery 

1736 Austin, Alpheus Pvt. Co. A, 147, N. Y. Inf June 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3094 Austin, Oliver Pvt. Co. A, 7, N. Y. Art July 10, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

12820 Avers, Garrett S Pvt. Co. G, 147, N. Y. Inf Mch. 30, 1865. . Scorbutus 

3066 Baljcock, Isaac Pvt. Co. H, 72, N. Y. Inf July 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4638 Babcock, Jacob S Pvt. Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 3, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

12347 Babcock, Julius M Pvt. Co. I, 140, X. Y. Inf Dec. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Julius A'. Babcock.") 

1712 Babcock, Nelson Pvt. Co. G, 111, N. Y. Inf June 7, 1864.. Anasarca 

4893 Babcock, R Pvt Co. D, 9, N. Y. Aug. 6, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Ransom Babcock, private Co. D, 83, N. Y. Inf., also borne as ' Remsen 

W. Babcock.'") 

11831 Babcock, W. N Pvt. Co. L, 13, N. Y. Nov. 5, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William K. Babcock, pvt. Co. L, 15, N. Y. Cav.") 

2870 Bacchus, Asbury Pvt. Co. A, 169, N. Y. Inf July 4, 1864.. Dysentery 

3447 Bachelder, Benjamin F. Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... July 17, 1864.. Congestive 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Corporal.") fever 

11272 Bachus, E. R Pvt. Co. F, 15, N. Y. Art Oct. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4302 Back, John Pvt. Co. H, 97, N. Y. Inf July 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

754 Bacon, Escock P Pvt. Co. B, 154, N. Y. Inf Apr. 26, 1864.. C. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Eseck P. Bacon.") 

9101 Bacon, James Pvt. Co. E, 154, N. Y. Inf Sept. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " James F. Bacon.") 

61 Bahn, William Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Mch. 18, 1864.. Pneumonia 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") Possibly a duplicate of No. 12942, Donald Bayne, with 
nearly identical record. Latter was a smallpox case, and original grave 

number was 61. 

7890 Bailey, Amos Pvt. Co. K, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 5, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10163 Bailey, Coenelius Pvt. Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Oct. 1, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5697 Bailey, George W Pvt. Co. G, 154, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7493 Bailey, John Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 1, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Bailey, Jr.") 

8650 Bailey, Thomas H Prt. Co. I, 42, N. Y. Inf Sept. 13, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Paroled.") See Ad. G. report N. Y. 1901, serial No. 30, page 253, and 

serial No. 26, page 376. 

3550 Baker, Edgar Pvt Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf July 18, 1864. . Dysentery 

8759 Baker, Henry W Pvt. Co. F, 146, N. Y. Inf Sept 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8052 Baker, Ira Pvt Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11660 Baker, John Cpl. Co. K, 16, X. Y. Cav Oct 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8215 Baker, John Pvt 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept 8, 1864.. Pleuritis 

10636 Baker, Uriah Pvt Co. B, 93, N. Y. Inf Oct 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

7591 Baldwin, Chauncey Pvt. Co. M, 24, N. Y. Cav Sept. 2, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6853 Baldwin, George Pvt Co. C, 154, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 25, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4457 BaUard, Robert B Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864.. Constipation 



174 STATE OF NEW YORK 

iVo. X(ime Organizaliiin Died Cause 

53-J.7 Buiicroft, Albert H Cpl. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(No rank cut on headstone.) 

9819 Banker, Irving F Pvt. Co. G, 152, N. Y. Inf Sept. 26, 186+.. Typhus fever 

5536 Banker, Jefferson M Pvt. Co. K, 118, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Dysentery 

12315 Barber, Henrj' Cpl. Co. B, 96, K. Y. Inf Dee. 20, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7877 Barklett, HartweU Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(\iX. G. N. Y. says "HartweU Barrett.") 

4364 Barnard, Wellington ... Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6963 Barnes, A. C Pvt. Co. D, 35, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

1835 Harnett, J Pvt Co. C, 132, N. Y. Inf June 11, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Jo/in Barnes.") 

6771 Barnes, James S Pvt Co. E, 10, N. Y. Cav Aug. 25, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3748 Barns, Jonathan A Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav July 22, 1864.. Dysentery 

8821 Barnes, IlosweU H Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10418 Barnes, Thomas A Pvt Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Oct 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11343 Barnes, Walter D Cpl. Co. F, 115, N. Y. Inf Oct 23, 1864.. Wounds 

1375 Barney, Joseph Pvt. Co. G, 13, N. Y. Cav May 26, 1864. . Dysentery 

8361 Bamuni, H Pvt Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

10153 Barrett George Pvt. Co. A, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

588 Barrett Daniel Pvt. Co. H, 13, N. Y. Cav Apr. 17, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11605 Barrigan, A Pvt. Co. A, 82, N. Y. Inf Oct. 28, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

11056 Barringer, John Pvt Co. K, 126, N. Y. Inf Oct 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3580 Barrows, Marwin Vvt. Co. E, 14, N. Y. Art July 19, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Marrin Barrows, Co. (?.") 

6552 Barsch, Charles Pvt Co. B, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

4769 Bartlett, Lewis Pvt Co. D, 118, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864.. Debilitis 

11612 Bartlett, Richard Pvt Co. F, 164, N. Y. Inf Oct 29, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8409 Bartow, David Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 11, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8097 Basford, John Pvt. Co. G, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept 7, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph Basfonl.") 

8217 Bass, George Pvt. Co. A, 63, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

530 Bates, James H Pvt. Co. A, 97, N. Y. Inf Apr. 13, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

1069 Bates, Lester W Pvt Co. A, 97, N. Y. Inf May 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9487 Batterson, David Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "David Baterson.") 

8443 Bauman, Henry Pvt Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

474 Baumeister, John Cpl. Co. I, 54, N. Y. Inf Apr. 10, 1864.. Anasarca 

12942 Bayne, Donald Pvt Co. D, 57, N. Y. Inf July 4, 1864. . Small Pox 

(See note above, Wm. Bahn.) 

6021 Beam, D Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Cav Aug. 17, 1864. . Djsentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12509 Bearfield, C Citizen, , N. Y Jan. 22, 1865 

10999 Beaty, Aaron Pvt Co. K, 132, N. Y. Inf Oct 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10556 Beaty, William Pvt. Co. G, 139, N. Y. Inf Oct. 9, 1864. . Dysentery 

4468 Becker, Charles Pvt Co. I, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12376 Becker, George R Pvt Co. K, 40, N. Y. Inf Jan. 1, 1865.. Scorbutus 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



175 



No. Name Organization Died 

6034 Beckhorn, Thompson B. Pvt Co A, 10, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864. 

9216 Beckstein, J Cpl. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 18, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Louis Beckstein.") 

8472 Beckwith, Charles V Pvt. Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Sept 11, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Clark V. Beckwith.") 

8992 Beebe, John E Pvt. Co. G, 111, N. Y. Inf Sept 16, 1864., 

11933 Beers, Edward W Pvt. Co. B, 82, N. Y. Inf Nov. 9, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Transferred to Co. G, 59, Inf.") 

3843 Beham, John Pvt. Co. A, 43, N. Y. Inf July 23, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Behan.") 

8010 Beldon, William Pvt Co. E, 82, N. Y. Inf Sept 6, 1864., 

3267 BeU, Darius S Pvt Co. D, 80, N. Y. Inf July 13, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says ''David S. BeU.") 

11124 BeU, Henry C Pvt Co. D, 120, N. Y. Inf.... Oct 18, 1864., 

9136 BeU, J Pvt. Co. B, 6, N. Y. Sept. 18, 1864. , 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8942 BeU, John Cpl. Co. K, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864. , 

6670 Bender, Justus Pvt Co. I, 100, N Y. Inf.... Aug. 24, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Justus Bedner.") 

11066 Bender, Peter Pvt. Co. M, 16, N. Y. Cav Oct. 17, 1864. , 

3606 Benesteel, Stephen A Pvt. Co. C, 80, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1865. 

5847 Benjamin, Evan Pvt Co. E, 97, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864. 

3138 Bennett, B Pvt Co. B, 146, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 10, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3089 Bennett James H Pvt Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf July 9, 1864., 

10071 Benthuysen, Henry Van. Pvt Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Sept 30, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Henry Benthuysen.") 

5945 BenUey, Calvin Pvt Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 17, 1864. 

6979 Benway, Charles Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 27, 1864. 

6598 Berrel, Martin E Pvt Co. A, 125, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 22, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. .says "Martin E. BerrnH.") 

6137 Bersha, John Pvt. Co. B, IS, N. Y. Art Aug. 19, 1864. , 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5934 Bessnett, Charles Pvt. Co. B, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 17, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "A. Bessmett") 

S749 Best, Isaac Pvt Co. G, 142, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864. 

351 Bidon, Simon Pvt Co. A, 52, N. Y. Inf Apr. 4, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Simon Beidon.") 

10635 Bidwell, John W Pvt Co. G, 5, N. Y. Cav Oct 9, 1864.. 

331 Biel, S Pvt. Co B, 42, N. Y. Inf Apr. 3, 1864., 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3232 Bigelow, Lawson R Pvt Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf July 12, 1864.. 

601 Billings, WUliam H Pvt Co. G, 52, N Y. Inf Apr. 17, 1864. 

10005 Bingham, C. E Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 28, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Charles E. Bingham.") 

619 Binns, Edmond J Pvt Co. D, 13, N. Y. Cav Apr. 19, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Edmund J. Binns.") 

7626 Bioner, John Pvt Co. I, 66, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " John Bjomer.") 



Catise 
Intermittent 

fever 
Dysentery 

Scorbutus 



Scorbutus 

Dysentery 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Enteritis 
Pleuritis 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Catarrh 
Dysentery 
C. Diarrhoea 

Marasmus 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Typhus fever 

C. Diarrhoea 
Debilitis 



DebUitis 
Diarrhoea 

Ascites 

Diarrhoea 



176 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

12831 Bird, Martin Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Apr. 14, 1865.. Diarrhoea 

4780 Bird, Patrick Cpl. Co. K, 7, K. Y. Art Aug. 5, 1804. . Pneiiinonia 

6590 Bishop, C. M. C Pvt. Co. M, 7, N. Y. Art ,\ug. 23, 18G4. . Dvsentcrv- 

5706 BisseU, John S Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 18G4. . Diarrlioca 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "James S. BisseU.") 

11971 Black, Henry C Pvt. Co. H, 42, N. Y. Inf Nov. 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Transferred to 59. suljscquently to 82, wliile prisoner of war.") 

11018 Black, John Pvt. Co. G, 42, N. Y. Inf Oct. 16, 1864. . Scorl)utus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Transferred to 59, then to 82d Infs. while prisoner of war.") 

2574 Black, Lewis Pvt. Co. A, 97, N. Y. Inf June 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lewis S. Black.") 

1885 Blackman, John Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf June 13, 1864. . Debilitis 

4076 Blackwood, William H.. Pvt. Co. G, 115, N. Y. Inf July 28, 1864.. Typhus fever 

12469 Blair, James J Cpl. Co. K, 8, N. Y. Cav Jan. 16, 1865. . Scorbutus 

2439 Blake, George Pvt. Co. I, 100, N. Y. Inf June 25, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

3231 Blake, Willard D Pvt. 4, N. Y. Ind. Battery July 12, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William D. Blake, 24, Battery.") 

6129 Blanchard, Elisha Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 19, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y says "Elihti Blanchard.") 

8340 Blanchard, Lathrop Pvt. Co. K, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Luther Blanchard.") 

10083 Blanvelt, w'ilUam Pvt. Co. B, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Wiliam Blfouvelt, Co. A.") 

498 Blazier, Harrison Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art Apr. 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Harrison Blaacier.") 

7888 Bleier, Tobias Pvt. Co. C, 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 5, 1864.. Dysentery 

2777 Bliner, Sherman Pvt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf July 2, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Sherman Blinn.") 

4933 Bliss, James H Pvt. Co. I, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 7, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8959 Block, John G Pvt. Co. F, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

7206 Blood, Lovell Pvt. Co. G, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2035 Blumer, Jacob Pvt. Co. K, 175, N. Y. Inf June 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

2989 Bodihay, J Pvt. Co. F, 7, N. Y. ■ July 6, 1864. . Anasarca 

4401 Bodies, David Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Art July 31, 1864. . Dysentery 

3073 Bohl, Herman Pvt. Co. E, 10, N. Y. Cav July 9, 1864. . Anasarca 

5953 Boiler, WiUiam Cpl. Co. B, 23, N. Y. Cav Aug. 17, 1864. . Marasmus 

8267 BoUes, Jasper A Pvt. Co. I, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 9, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

7627 Bolton, Thomas Pvt. Co. G, 43, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. .says "And Co. D.") 

12521 Boorman, John H Pvt. Co. D, 1, Vt. N. Y. Cav.. Jan. 25, 1865.. Scorbutus 

11120 Bopp, John E Pvt. Co. A, 15, N. Y. Art Oct. 18, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Edward Bopp.") Headstone reads "J. E. Bopp." 

6371 Bories, August Pvt. Co. D, 178, N. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "August Boice*.") 

3165 Boshen, Franz Pvt. Co. C, 54, N. Y. Inf July 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

9838 Bossoney, Charles Pvt. Co. C, 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles Bossonjr.") 

6171 Boursha, Thomas S Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 19, 1864.. Marasmus 

5269 Bourst, Edward S Cpl. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 10, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N, Y. says " Edward S, Borst.") 



ANDERSON VILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 177 

No. Name Organization Died Cause 

S635 Bowen, Samuel Pvt. Co. H, 147, N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6744 Bowen, T. H Pvt. Co. B, 65, N. Y. Inf Aug. 34, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

4601 Bowie, John F Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 3, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

1 1718 Bowlby, Orson Pvt. Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Nov. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11944 Bowman, H Pvt. Co. K, 84, N. Y. Inf Nov. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

1275 Box, George Pvt. Co. D, 111, N. Y. Inf May 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

9728 Boyce, Ambrose A Pvt Co. I, 3, N. Y. Cav Sept. 25, 1864. . Debilitis 

2673 Boyce, R Pvt. Co. M, 6, N. Y Cav June 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10 Boyle, Patrick Pvt. Co. A, 63, N. Y. Inf Mch. 5, 1864.. Pneumonia 

8912 Boyle, Patrick Pvt. Co. F, 43, N. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Served also in Cos. B, & C") 

11974 Boyle, Thomas Pvt. Co. L, 16, N. Y. Cav Nov. 13, 1864. . Scorbutus 

9380 Boywood, Julius Sgt. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4365 Bradford, David A Pvt. Co. B, 7, N. Y. Art July 31, 1864.. Dysentery 

5232 Bradley, John Pvt. Co. K, 69, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

12219 Brady, Joseph Pvt. Co. E, 140, N. Y. Inf Dec. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3979 Bragg, Julian Pvt. Co. E, 2, N. Y. Cav July 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7704 Branden, O Pvt. Co. A, 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 3, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. .says " Not found.") 

592 Brant, Charles Pvt. Co. A, 9, N. Y. Apr. 17, 1864 

8415 Brell, Christopher Pvt. Co. F, 140, N. Y. Inf Sept. 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

519 Bremer, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 111, N. Y. Inf Apr. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12263 Brenner, William L Pvt. Co. B, 5, N. Y. H. Art.. Dec. 12, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William L. Breman.") 

1800 Breny, James Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf June 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

5133 Brewer, Frederick Pvt. Co. C, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " John F. Brower.") 

11685 Brewer, Henry Sgt. Co. G, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 31, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

10231 Brewer, John S Pvt. Co. B, 6, N. Y. H. Art.. Oct. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1365 Brewer, Sidney Pvt. Co. K, 15, N. Y. Cav May 25, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

8116 Briggs, William H Pvt. Co. C, 104, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11627 Brightmyer, George .... Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Art Oct 29, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6953 Brink, Charles Pvt Co. K, 109, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864.. Gangrene 

6882 Broder, Henry Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

12002 Brogan, James M Pvt Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Nov. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " James N. Brogan.") 

9148 Brooks, Wesley Pvt Co. I, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Wesley BrocA;.") 

1324 Brooks, W Cpl. Co. E, 10, N. Y. Inf May 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William Brooks, private Co. E, 10, N. Y. Cav.") 

1321 Brott, Anthony Pvt. Co. K, 1, N. Y. Cav May 19, 1864. . Anasarca 

7517 Brough, Charles Pvt Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art Sept 1, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Charles Brought") 

51 Broughton, Hiram Pvt Co. H, 77, N. Y. Inf Mch. 16, 1864.. Pneumonia 

2465 Brown, Alex Pvt Co. C, 72, N. Y. Inf June 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alexander Brown, Musician.") 

12 



178 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



jVo. Xame Organization Died Came 

5538 Brown, Barnard M Pvt Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4112 Brown, C Vv\. Co. C, 103, N. Y. Inf July 27, 1864. . Bronchitis 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6623 Brown, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 97, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864 

11928 Brown, Charles Pvt. Co. M, 1, N. Y. Cav Nov. 8, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(.■\d. G. N. Y. says " 1st Veteran cavalr)-.") 

11953 Brown, Charles Pvt. Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Nov. 10, 1864 

9556 Brown, Christian Cpl. Co. K, 66, N. Y. Inf Sept. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Christ Brown.") 

7501 Brown, Daniel C Pvt. Co. B, 118, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 1, 1864. 

3659 Brown, EU W. G Pvt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art July 20, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Levi W. Brown.") 

9674 Brown, George H Cpl. Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 24, 1864. 

7985 Brown, George H Pvt. Co. C, 63, N. Y. Inf Sept. 6, 1864. 



Diarrhoea 



Scorbutus 



C. Diarrhoea 
Pneumonia 



Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Dysentery 
Diarrhoea 



Dysentery 



Dysentery 
Diarrhoea 
.\nasarca 



Diphtheria 



7266 Brown, Henrj- Cpl. Co. F, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30. 1864. . 

10668 Brown, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 140, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 11, 1864.. 

1879 Brown, Henry Pvt. Co. H, 12, N. Y. Cav June 12, 1864. . 

7658 Brown, J. Pvt Co. C, 16, N. Y. Sept. 3, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6655 Brown, James Pvt Co. E, 4, N. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. . 

6691 Brown, James Pvt Co. K, 170, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864.. DebiUtis 

11073 Brown, John S Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Art Oct. 17, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7615 Brown, J. S Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. H. Art.. Oct 17, 1864. 

1887 Brown, Joseph Pvt Co. B, 125, N. Y. Inf June 13, 1864. 

428 Brown, W Pvt. Co. A, 42, N. Y. Inf Aug. 8, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Wm. Brown, mustered out July 8, 1865, at New York City as of Co. E, 

42, N. Y. Inf.") 

552 Brown, Warren Pvt Co. K, 120, N. Y. Inf Apr. 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7390 Broxmaier, Thomas Pvt Co. E, 15, N. Y. Art Aug. 31, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Thomas Braxmaier.") 

1559 Brumaghira, Frank Pvt Co. E, 125, N. Y. Inf.... June 2, 1864. 

7668 Bryan, William Pvt. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9690 Bryant Albert A Pvt. Co. B, 146, N. Y. Inf Sept 24, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

4475 Bryant, Darius Pvt. Co. B, 179, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. D.") 

7248 Bryant, Henry Pvt Co. C, 82, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864.. Anasarca 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Transferred to Co. F, 59, N. Y. Inf.") 

6794 Buchaupt, John Pvt Co. A, 100, N. Y. Inf Aug. 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Buchoupt") 

3814 Buck, Addison T Pvt. Co. H. 24, N. Y. July 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Addison T. Beech, p^t. Co. H, 24, N. Y. Cav.") 

7567 Buckley, Edwin A Pvt Co. E, 97, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Edwin A. Burtcley.") 

3115 Buckley, Charles Pvt 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... July 10, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles E. Buckley.") 

10585 Buckley, William Pvt. Co. D, 122, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 10, 1864.. 

5714 Buell, George W Pvt Co. E, 115, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 15, 1864.. 

8234 Buell, John Sgt Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 9, 1864. . 

2459 Buess, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 75, N. Y. Inf June 25, 1864. . 

12417 Bufifum, Lewis Sgt. Co. K, 100, N. Y. Inf. . . . Jan. 8, 1865. . 



Typhus fever 



Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Anasarca 

Pneumonia 

Dysentery 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



179 



Sept. 4, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 
June 18, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 



June 



y^o. IS'ame Organization Died Cause 

9642 Bullock, Eber Cpl. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 24, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4137 Bunday, Joseph M Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art July 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

6452 Burbank, Jacob D Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 32, 1864.. Dysentery 

978 Burdeck, C Pvt. Co. F, 42, N. Y. May 9, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10924 Burdick, Addison A Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct. 13, 1864 

7838 Burdick, Lamont Pvt. Co L, 22, N. Y. Cav. 

2134 Burdick, Samuel C Pvt. Co. A, 125, N. Y. Inf 

1689 Burger, Henry, Jr Sgt. Co. A, 120, N. Y. Inf 

(Headstone reads " Berger.") 

10955 Burgis, Edmund Pvt Co. B, 146, N. Y. Inf Oct. 15, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Edmond Burge**.") 

5196 Burke, John M Pvt Co. K, 69, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864. 

540 Burke, William H Pvt. Co. F, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 14, 1864. 

1224 Burke, William H Pvt. Co. I, 120, N. Y. Inf May 19, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " M'illiam Burk.") 

10016 Burleigh, Lafayette Pvt. Co. F, 6, N. Y Art Sept. 29, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12389 Burley, C Pvt. Co. B, 3, N. Y. Jan. 4, 1865. . Diarrhoea 

924 Burnes, John Pvt Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf May 

(Ad. G. N. Y. .says "John Burns.") 
477 Burnes, John Pvt. Co. I, 40, N. Y. Apr. 10, 1864. . 



1864.. C. Diarrhoea 



Dysentery 
Pneumonia 



6, 1864. . Dysentery 



Intermittent 
fever or 
dysentery 

5991 Bums, Daniel Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Art Aug. 17, 1864. . Cerebritis 

8745 Bums, Michael Pvt Co. C, 3, N. Y Cav Sept 14, 1864.. Typhus fever 

11881 Bums, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 108, N. Y. Inf Nov. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7247 Burr, Nelson Pvt. Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

9870 BurriU, WiUiam Pvt Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Sept 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William Burrell.") 

2875 Burt, James O Pvt Co. A, 2, N. Y. Cav July 4, 1864. . Debilitis 

6039 Burton, F Pvt. Co. G, 69, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " George Burton, absent sick since May, 1864, as per muster out rolls.") 

7214 Burton, George E Pvt Co. K, 85, N. Y Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. Dysentery 

217 Burton, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 140, N. Y. Inf Mch. 29, 1864.. Diarrheoa 

6457 Bush, Ephraim Pvt. Co. D, 80, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11366 Bushby, William Cpl. Co. A, 5, N. Y. Art Oct. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2047 Buskirk, Lorenzo Pvt Co. D, 13, N. Y. Cav June 16, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

486 Bushman, John R Sgt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 11, 1864.. Pneumonia 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " John R. Busphman."). 

1415 Bushnell, Nathaniel Pvt. Co. B, 65, N. Y. Inf May 27, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

1360 Buskirk, Adolphus Pvt. Co. H, 47, N. Y. Inf May 25. 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "iJudolphus Buskirk.") 

9235 Butler, Daniel Pvt. Co. D, 126, N. Y. Inf Sept. 19, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

10848 Butler, James Pvt Co. D, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 13, 1864. . Scorbutus 

721 Butler, Thomas Pvt Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4183 Butler, William Pvt. Co. D, 43, N. Y. Inf July 28, 1864.. Dysentery 

12651 Butoff, R Sgt. Co. C, 124, N. Y. Inf.... Feb. 13, 1865.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5805 Button, James Pvt 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 16, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " James H. Britton, borne as ' John H. Britton.' "> 



180 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



Wounds 

C. Diarrhoea 



Scorbutus 



Scorbutus 



Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Anasarca 
Scorbutus 



yo. yame Organizalion Died Cause 

3446 Butts, Americus Pvt Co. C, 111, N. Y. Inf July 17, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

i230 Buyer, H Pvt. Co. K, 2i, X. Y. Aug. 10, 1861. . Scorliutns 

9790 Byrne, James Cpl. Co. A, 69, N. Y. Inf Sept. 26, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "Private.") 

2191 Cadmus, Cornelius Pvt. Co. .\, 48, N. Y. Inf June 19, 1864.. Anasarca 

10765 Cady, George Pvt Co. I, 66, N. Y. Inf Oct. 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2377 Cady, J Pvt. Co. E, 77, N. Y. Inf June 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10721 Cady, John J Pvt Co. H, 14, N. Y. Art Oct. 11, 1864. 

2971 Caesar, Daniel Pvt. Co. B, 7, X. Y. Art July 6, 1864. 

793 Cain, Peter Sgt Co. M, 20, N. Y. Cav Apr. 28, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Private.") 

11807 Caldwell, Andrew Pvt Co. A, 42, X. Y. Inf Xov. 4, 1864.. 

(.\d. G. X. Y. says "Also served in 59, & 82, Infs.") 

7557 CaldweU, Dewitt C Sgt. Co. E, 2, X. Y. Art Sept 4, 1864.. 

(Headstone reads "Ills." The case will be reported for correction.) 

11530 Caling, Edward Pvt Co. H, 7, X. Y. Oct. 26, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Not found.") 

9706 Calkins, Stephen V Pvt Co. D, 120, X. Y. Inf Sept. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8411 Callbrock, J Pvt Co. B, 147, X. Y. Inf Sept 12, 1864.. Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Xot found.") 

2848 Cameron, John Pvt. Co. H, 1, X. Y. Cav July 4, 1864. . 

1770 Camp, Xicholas Pvt Co. F, 21, X. Y. Cav June 9,1864.. 

1238 Campbell, Daniel Pvt Co. H, 8, X. Y. Cav Jlay 20, 1864. . 

7236 CampbeU, John H Pvt Co. I, 99, X. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. 

946 Campbell, Lewis R Pvt Co. B, 104, X. Y. Inf May 7, 1864.. Dysentery 

11294 CampbeU, W Pvt Co. C, 2, X. Y. Oct. 12, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7378 CampbeU, WiUiam Pvt Co. B, 76, X. Y. Inf ., Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8136 Carborius, W Cpl. Co. C, 39, X. Y. Inf Sept 7, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

12178 Card, Abel Sgt. Co. C, 152, X. Y. Inf Xov. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5034 Card, Chester Cpl. Co. F, 109, X. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Xo rank cut on headstone.) 

7555 Carey, Denis Pvt. Co. A, 51, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

3832 Carey, Joseph Pvt Co. G, 100, X. Y. Inf July 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Joseph Gary.") 

11512 Carey, Thomas Pvt Co. E, 65, X. Y. Inf Oct 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

372 Carl, Joseph Pvt Co. A, 14, X. Y. Cav Apr. 5, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5545 Carle, Laurence Pvt Co. G, 120, X. Y. Inf.... Aug. 13, 1864.. Catarrh 

9420 Carman, WilUam W Pvt Co. K, 2, X. Y. Jlounted Sept. 21. 1864 

Rifles 
(Ad. G. X. Y. says " WiUiam F. Carman.") 

7655 Carmer, Andrew Pvt. Co. G, 85, X. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. X\ Y. says "Andrew Carner.") 

3102 Carnes, T Pvt Co. B, 13, X. Y. Cav July 10, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " P. Carms.") 

9879 Carney, Francis Pvt. Co. C, 3, X. Y. Art Sept. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

10806 Carpenter, Frank Pvt. Co. C, 7, X. Y. Art Oct 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8854 Carpenter, George Pvt Co. D, 7, X. Y. Art Sept 15, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

4632 Carpenter, HamUton A.. Pvt Co. A, 2, X. Y. Art .\ug. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 181 

No. Name Organization Died Cause 

3916 Carpenter, L Pvt. Co. B, 3, N. Y. Art July 25, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3977 Carpenter, Napoleon B.. Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf July 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6743 Carr, A Pvt. Co. F, 27, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3959 Carr, David Pvt. Co. B, 23, N. Y. Cav July 24, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

6470 Carr, George A Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art Aug. 22, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

581 Carr, Lafayette Cpl. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art Apr. 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

€304 Carr, William Pvt. Co. E, 97, N. Y. Inf Aug. 20, 1864. . Gangrene 

5673 Carr, William O Pvt. Co. K, 125, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William A. Carr.") 

9040 Carragher, John Pvt. Co. L, 8, N. Y. Cav Sept. 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4139 Carroll, James Pvt. Co. A, 69, N. Y. Inf July 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9186 Carroll, Lawrence Pvt. Co. G, 21, N. Y. Cav Sept. 18, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

10293 Carroll, Patrick Cpl. Co. E, 95, N. Y. Inf Oct. 4, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11331 Carroll, Patrick Pvt. Co. E, 100, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 23, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Patrick Carrol.") 

12339 Carroll, Thomas Pvt Co. D, 1, N. Y. Cav Dec. 26, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1st Veteran Cavalry.") 

2061 CarroU, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 132, N. Y. Inf June 16, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Thomas Carrell.") 

12015 CarroU, W Pvt. Co. B, 42, N. Y. Inf Nov. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William Curran.") 

6433 Carson, Elisha Pvt. Co. A, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864.. I>ysentery 

8023 Cart, Mitchell Pvt. Co. F, 118, N. Y. Inf Sept. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Mitchell Carte.") 

1987 Carter, Adam J Pvt. Co. E, 146, N. Y. Inf.... June IS, 1864.. Bronchitis 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Adam J. Carter.") 

5212 Carter, Edward Cpl. Co. A, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8479 Case, Abel F Pvt. Co. A, 8, N. Y. Cav Sept. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8377 Case, Edward Pvt. Co. M, 8 N. Y. Cav Sept. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

6296 Case, H. J Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5271 Casey, P Pvt. Co. A, 174, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

<Ad. G. N. Y. says "Patrick Key, Co. E, 174, Inf. RoU for April 30, 1863, says 'deserted 

Feb. 14, 1863.'") 

8421 Cassells, Samuel Pvt. Co. D, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Samuel Cassell, private, Co. G, 86, N. Y. Inf.") Headstone reads 

"Sam'l Cas.sel/s." 

2643 Cassius, John S Pvt. Co. B, 24, N. Y. — June 29, 1864.. Pneumonia 

1177 Castino, Juan Pvt. Co. H, 104, N. Y. Inf May 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Juan Casta(/«o."') 

1785 Castle, James A Pvt. Co. H, 147, N. Y. Inf June 10, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

6128 Castle, William H Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Art Aug. 19, 1864. . Dysentery 

2136 Cate, J Sgt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf June 18, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

1534 Cavanaugh, John P\'t. Co. H, 146, N. Y. Inf June 1, 1864.. Anasarca 

11640 Caveny, Michael Pvt. Co. L, 83, N. Y. Inf Oct. 30, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. saj's " Michael Kavneji") 

2157 Chadbourn, Henry Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... June 18, 1864.. Intermittent 

fever 



182 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



]V'o. Name Organization Died Caute 

9682 Chaffee, Rufus A Pvt Co. H, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 2\, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5860 Chamberlain, Calvin T.. Pvt. Co. H, 154, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. Marasmus 

3209 Chamberlain, Horton ... Pvt. Co. D, 1, N. Y. Cav July 12, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Horton Chamberlin, ist Vet. Cav.") 

moi Chambers, James Pvt. Co. F, 140, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 17, 1864. 

6557 Chambers, John Pvt. Co. E, 147, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 23, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

4768 Champlain, William ... Pvt Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7865 Changan, Eugene Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 5,1864. 

4726 Chapel, Alfred Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 4, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alfred Chap/e.") 

5831 Chapell, Alphonzo Pvt. Co. E, 39, N. Y. . . . . Aug. 16, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alphonzo Chappell.") 

3222 Chapin, Thomas J Pvt. Co. A, 24, N. Y. Cav July 12, 1864. 

8033 Chapman, Oscar C Pvt Co. C, 6, N. Y. Art Sept. 6, 1864. 

3286 Chapman, Joel Pvt. Co. K, 85, X. Y. Inf July 14, 1864. 



C. Diarrhoea 



Debilitis 



Typhus fever 
Diarrhoea 

Enteritis 



6653 Chapman, Sidney M. 



Diarrhoea 
Remittent 

fever 
Dysenterj' 



Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 



3. 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 



6. 1864. . Scorbutus 



Diarrhoea 



Pvt Co. F, 2, X. Y. Mounted Aug. 23, 1864.. 
Rifles 

S478 Chappell, Robert Pvt Co. A, 6, N. Y. Cav Aug. 13, 1864. . 

8470 Charnahan, Charles Pvt 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept 11, 1864.. 

(Headstone reads " Chas. Cha;)nahan.") 

1593 Chase, Alanson J Pvt Co. H, 111, X. Y. Inf.... June 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Alson Chase.") 

4856 Chase, D Pvt Co. I, 98, X. Y. Inf Aug. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Not found.") 

5469 Chase, Xason F Pvt Co. K, 85, N. Y Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. 

7450 Chase, Sidney M Pvt. Co. D, 4, X. Y. Art Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7539 Chasty, John Pvt. Co. G, 174, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept 2, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " October 31, 1863, roll says ' deserted Sept 12, 1863 at Baton Rouge, 

La.' ") 

9919 Chatterton, George G... Pvt Co. B, 95, X. Y. Inf Sept 20, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7189 Chesby, Philip S Pvt Co. H, 10, X. Y. Cav Aug. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Philip Chesley.") 

10680 Chichester, Charles Pvt Co. I, 57, N. Y. Inf Oct 11, 1864.. Dysenterj- 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Mustered out with company, Aug. 13, 1864.") Evidence from Pen- 
sion Bureau shows this man died at Andersonville as recorded. 

6317 Childs, A Pvt. Co. I, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 20, 1864.. Intermittent 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Alphonzo Childs.") 

4141 Childs, WiUiam Pvt Co. A, 73, X. Y. Inf July 28, 1864. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

10612 Christy, James C Pvt Co I, 1, X. Y. Dragoons. Oct 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Christy.") 

5824 Church, Charles L Pvt. Co. C, 5, X. Y. Cav Aug. 16, 1864.. 

5413 Churcli, Frank M Pvt. Co. D, 2, X. Y. Cav Aug. 12, 1864. . 

4257 ChurchiU, Charles D.... Pvt Co. I, 99, X. Y. Inf July 29, 1864.. 

3449 Clancev, Robert Pvt. Co. E, 164, X. Y. Inf.... July 17, 1864.. 

10748 Clapple, Elijah Pvt Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Oct 12. 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Elijah Cftappe/.") 
2114 Clark, Aaron Sgt Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf June 17, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 



fever 
Diarrhoea 



Marasmus 
C. Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



183 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

516T Clark, Chr Pvt. Co. F, i2, N. Y. Cav Aug. 9, 1864. . Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charie* Clark.") 

2947 Clark, Frederick Pvt. Co. B, 8, N. Y. Cav July 6, 1864. . Dysentery 

12114 Clark, Ira A Pvt. Co. K, 8, N. Y. Art Nov. 21, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2154 Clark, John Pvt. Co. D, 48, N. Y. Inf June 18, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

11304 Clark, Luther Pvt Co. G, 100, N. Y. Inf Oct 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10611 Clark, P Pvt Co. B, 42, N. Y. Inf Oct. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

580^ Clemens, A Pvt. Co. F, 15, N. Cav Aug. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. say^ " Not found. There was an Oliver Clemon, pvt. Co. F. 16, Cav., who 

died at Andersonville.") The latter does not appear on register of cemetery, 

therefore may be identical with the man reported as buried here. 

1947 Clements, David Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Art Sept 14, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(June 14/64 probable date of death.) 

6909 Clerment, Henry Pvt Co. F, 65, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found. — Records show that Henry Clement, Co. E, 65, Inf., 
transferred to detachment left in field.") 

11028 Clewes, William Pvt Co. F, 43, N. Y. Inf Oct 15, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Also Co. C") 

813 Clifford, Charles Cpl. Co. B, 16, N. Y. Cav Apr. 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

740 Clifford, George Pvt Co. K, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 26, 1864.. Dysentery 

6494 Cline, Bela Pvt Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11437 Cline, John W., Jr Pvt Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6243 Clingman, J Pvt Co. L, 15, N. Y. Aug. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Joachim, ^infcmann.") 

12471 CUnton, Thomas Pvt Co. D, 102, N. Y. Inf.... Jan. 17, 1865.. Diarrhoea 

5993 Cluff, Sylvanus Pvt Co. E, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 17, 1864. . Marasmus 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says " Sylv«nus Cluff.") 

1497 Clute, Henry V Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... May 31, 1864.. Anasarca 

5955 Clyens, Joseph P Pvt Co. B, 147, N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

7343 Coanes, William Pvt Co. D, 73, N. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864. . Wounds 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10129 Coburn, Amasa Pvt. Co. H, 106, N. Y. Inf Oct 1, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Headstone reads "Arnasa Coburn.") 
5365 Coburn, Charles Pvt. Co. E, 122, N. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864. 



Remittent 

fever 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 



7992 Cochran, John Pvt. Co. K, 126, N. Y. Inf Sept. 6, 1864. 

11775 Cochran, Michael Pvt Co. A, 42, N. Y. Inf Sept 6, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

933 Coddington, WilUam J.. Pvt Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf May 7, 1864.. Dysentery 

10651 Cogger, W Pvt Co. B, 125, N. Y. Inf.... Oct 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William Cogger.") 

371S Cogswell, Levi Pvt Co. M, 6, N. Y. Art July 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Levi CoiweU.") 

7855 Colby, Aaron Pvt. Co. M, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept. 5, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1st N. Y. Veteran cavalry.") 

10062 Cole, Edgar B Pvt. Co. B, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8456 Cole, George Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 11, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

6241 Cole, John J Pvt. Co. M, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5890 Cole, Martin Pvt. Co. M, 15, N. Y. Art Aug. 16, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 



184 STATE OF NEW YORK 

■ ^ 

TVo. Name Organization Died Came 

4143 Cole, Russell L Pvt. Co. H, 152, N. Y. Inf.... Julr 28, 1864.. Pleuritis 

11589 Cole, Theron Pvt. Co. K, 109, N. Y. Inf Oct. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10553 Coleman, Patrick Pvt. Co. I, 2, N. Y. Art Oct 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4519 Coles, William Pvt Co. H, 61, N. Y. Inf Aug. 2, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " WUUam Cole.") 

3070 Collins, Alfred Pvt Co. B, 98, N. Y. Inf July 9, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5743 Colwell, John Pvt Co. A, 102, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5238 Combs, Benjamin Pvt Co. A, 69, X. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

10626 Combs, James Pvt. Co. I, 96, N. Y. Inf... Oct 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

936 Comers, John Pvt Co. D, 99, N. Y. Inf May 7, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Conners.") 

6969 Comstock, G. E Pvt Co. A, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 27, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. K. Y. says "George E. Comstock.") 

3509 Condon, Thomas Pvt Co. F, 22, N. Y. Cav July 18, 1864. . Pneumonia 

4320 Cone, R Pvt Co. A, 8, N. Y. July 30, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " B.euben Cane, 8, X. Y. Cav.") 

8919 Conger, Jonas Cpl. Co. A, 49, X. Y. Inf Sept. 16. 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Jonas F. Conger.") 

2160 ConkUn, Henry Pvt. Co. A, 69, N. Y. Inf June 19, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Co. C") 

10699 Conlan, Daniel Pvt Co. A, 5, X. Y. Oct 11, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. saj-s "5th Veteran Infantry.") 

9619 Conlin, John Pvt. Co. K, 125, X. Y. Inf Sept. 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6729 Connell, Oscar B Cpl. Co. D, 1, X. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Oscar B. Cornell, Co. D, 1, N. Y. Vet. Cav.") Xo rank cut on 

headstone. 

11513 ConneU, Thomas Pvt Co. E, 139, X. Y. Inf Oct 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2033 Connelly, Frank Pvt Co. B, 52, X. Y. Inf June 16, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

5528 Connolly, Patrick Pvt Co. G, 164, X. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4025 Connor, Henry P^-t. Co. D, 52, X. Y. Inf July 26, 1864. . A. Dysentery 

10006 Connors, Edward Pvt Co. D, 43, X\ Y. Inf Sept 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1995 Conroy, Peter Pvt Co. H, 99, X. Y. Inf June IS, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

9971 Constable, James W Pvt Co. C, 125, X. Y. Inf Sept 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7842 Coogrove, F Pvt Co. H, 16, X. Y. . . . , Sept 4, 1864. . Debilitis 

7485 Cook, George W Pvt Co. E, 146, X. Y. Inf Sept 1, 1864.. Dysentery 

3693 Cooney, F Pvt Co. L, 14, X. Y. Cav July 21, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

10723 Cooney, Thomas Pvt Co. E, 82, X^ Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

2195 Coons, F Pvt. Co. B, 52, X. Y. Inf June 19, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

5816 Cooper, James Pvt Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 16, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

12274 Cooper, Xicholas Pvt. Co. L, 22, X. Y. Cav Dec. 12, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1150 Copeland, John Pvt. Co. I, 106, N. Y. Inf May 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John Coapland, died May 15, 1864, at Richmond, Va." — Commissioner 

of Pensions says " Died at Richmond, Va., May 15, 1864, while prisoner of 

war." Chief, Quartermaster Corps sajs " Died at Andersonville " 

See 297163, Oct. 13/14.) 

1778 Corbin, Benjamin F Pvt. 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... June 9, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Sergeant.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



185 



jYo. Name Organization Died Cause 

10529 Corbitt, John Pvt. Co. C, 64, N. Y. Inf Oct. 8, 186i. . Scorbutus 

6662 CorUss, Roswell B Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7182 Cornelius, John Pvt Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 29, 1864. . Dysentery 

3899 Cortney, William H Pvt. Co. A, 13, N. Y. Cav July 24, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

12767 Cosselman, G Pvt. Co. K, 152, N. Y. Inf Mch. 13, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "George Coss/eman." ) 

7471 Coston, John Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 1, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

12434 Cotter, John P Pvt. Co. B, 99, N. Y. Inf Jan. 10, 1865.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. .says "John Cotter.") 

7786 Cotton, Zachary T Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 4, 1864.. Anasarca 

5329 Countryman, Robert H. Pvt. Co. A, 120, N. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Dysentery 

1197 Courtney, Patrick Pvt. Co. K, 126, N. Y. Inf May 18, 1864 

8976 Cowen, J Pvt. Co. I, 4, N. Y. Sept. 16, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

7058 Cox, David Pvt. Co. H, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Aug. 28, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says David M. Cox.") 

9721 Coyle, William Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Transferred to Co. D.") 

11158 Coyne, Morris Pvt. Co. H, 95, N. Y. Inf Oct 19, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7274 Cozinn, James E Pvt Co. E, 82, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James E. Cozine, transferred to Co. I, 59, Inf.") 

8221 Craig, John Pvt Co. H, 139, N. Y. Inf Sept 8, 1864. . Dysentery 

2644 Crampton, James Cpl. Co. F, 14, N. Y. Cav June 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph Crampton, private.") 

8399 Crandall, J. MarshaU... Cpl. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2950 CrandaU, Russell Pvt Co. I, 115, N. Y. Inf July 6, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8328 CrandeU, David Pvt Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 9, 1864.. Dysentery 

3061 Crandle, John F Pvt Co. K, 120, N. Y. Inf July 9, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John F. CrandelV) 

334 Crapen, Jesse A Pvt. Co. E, 134, X. Y. Inf Apr. 3, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Jesse A. Crapser.") 

12649 Crapper, Samuel D Pvt Co. K, 2. N. Y. Cav Feb. 13, 1865 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Samuel D. Crappen, transferred to Co. B, 2, Cav.") Headstone reads 

" Crappen." 

9511 Crapps, Henry Pvt. Co. G, 42, N. Y. Inf Sept 22, 1864. . Dysentery 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

2273 Crause, George A Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... June 21, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " George A. Crounse") 

3432 Crawford, John Pvt Co. B, 61, N. Y. Inf July 17, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

11471 Crim, George Pvt Co. K, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 26, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "And Co. B.") 

8783 Cristman, Joseph Pvt. Co. F, 140, N. Y. Inf Sept 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph Cftristraan.") 

2822 Crocker, James Pvt Co. E, 95, N. Y. Inf July 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5886 Cromack, Joseph Sgt Co. B, 77, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8695 CromweU, Townsend ... Pvt Co. C, 6, N. Y. Art Sept 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Townsend P. CromweU.") 

3324 Crosby, Morton Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... July 14, 1864.. Typhus fever 

8644 Cross, James G Pvt Co. A, 148, N. Y. Inf Sept 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11269 Crow, Frank Pvt. Co. D, 115, N. Y. Inf Oct 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11297 Crowley, Charles Prt Co. B, 2, N. Y. H. Art.. Oct 22, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 



186 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



A'o. Name Organization Died Cause 

5440 Cruesius, I-"rederick Pvt. Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 12, 1864.. Typhus fever 

4119 Culver, Alpha L Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... July 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

89G6 Cummings, Bird.sall Pvt. Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 16, 18G4. . C. Diarrhoea 

6721 Cunningham, J Pvt. Co. D, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864.. Debilitis 

5476 Cunningham, James Pvt. Co. E, 170, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1204 Curley, Patrick Pvt. Co. E, 125, N. Y. Inf May 19, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Patrick Curly.") 

11347 Currier, Charles Pvt. Co. C, 1, N. Y. Cav Oct. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "1st Veteran cavalry.") 

3627 Curry, John Pvt Co. B, 146, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

9237 Cushion, John J Pvt. Co. C, 140, K. Y. Inf Sept. 19, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Cushion.") 

4458 Custerman, Francis Pvt. Co. G, 47, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9540 Cute, A Pvt. Co. A, 8, N. Y. Cav Sept. 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

10482 Cuthel, C Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Oct. 7, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. .V. Y. says "Not found.") 

9611 Cutler, C. P Cpl. Co. G, 2, N. Y. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

4846 Cutter, William Pvt. Co. B, 59, N. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William Cu/ter.") 

8193 Dahler, George Pvt. Co. D, 66, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " George Dohler.") 

8095 Dailey, John H Cpl. Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Sept 7, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

1480 Daley, James Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf May 30, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Daly.") 

3577 Daly, William Pvt Co. I, 5, N. Y. Cav July 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William Daily.") 

9787 Dalzensky, John Pvt Co. E, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept 26, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10741 Damon, Andrew J Pvt Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Oct 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7278 Dampey, John Pvt Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11122 Daniels, William O Sgt Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Oct 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William C. Daniels, private.") 

4099 Dannison, John Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav July 28, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6726 Darling, George H Pvt. Co. F, 10, N. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. . Dysentery 

5083 Darling, James Pvt. Co. C, 4, N. Y. Cav Aug. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. I.") 

5599 Darrott, Lewis C Pvt Co. G, 111, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 14, 1864.. Catarrh 

(Ad. G. N. Y. say "Lewis C. Dara/i.") 

7562 Dart Charles W Pvt Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 2, 1864.. Dysentery 

3259 Devendorff, Frands G... Pvt Co. B, 147, N. Y. Inf July 13, 1864.. Wounds 

6404 Davidson, Maxwell Pvt. Co. M, 15, N. Y Cav Aug. 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6391 Davies, David Pvt. Co. G, 164, N. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6037 Davis, G Pvt Co. I, 1, N. Y. Aug. 18, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

1383 Davis, H Pvt Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Jlay 26, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7670 Davis, Henry . Pvt. Co. D, 1, N. Y. Art Sept. 3, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8089 Davis, Henry G Pvt Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 7, 1864.. Scorbutus 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



187 



4, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5, 1864. . Scorbutus 
3, 1864. . Scorbutus 



Diarrhoea 

C. Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
Anasarca 
Scorbutus 

C. Diarrhoea 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

12652 Davis, Henry T Pvt. Co. G, 5, N. Y. Cav Feb. 14, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Discharged, expiration of service." Commissioner of Pensions says 
" Died at Andersonville, Ga., February 14, 1864.") 

961 Davis, Humphrey R Cpl. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf May 9, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5128 Davis, J Pvt. Co. H, 85, N. Y Inf Aug. 9, 1864. . Bronchitis 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

11817 Davis, John Pvt. Co. E, 74, N. Y. Inf Nov. 

7894 Davis, John J Cpl. Co. B, 43, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

10241 Davis, Peter A Cpl. Co. I, 94, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

10018 Davy, John J Pvt. Co. A, 2, N. Y. Cav Sept. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Davy.") 

3866 Dean, Cyrus Pvt. Co. D, 43, N. Y Inf July 24, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9400 Dean, J Pvt. Co. G, 3, N. Y. Cav Sept. 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

2305 Dean, John Pvt. Co. K, 6, N. Y. Art June 22, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

9958 Decker, Abraham Pvt. Co. I, 82, N. Y. Inf Sept. 27, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. F, 59, Inf.") 

7S0S DeCierce, E. W Pvt. Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 1, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William E. DeClerci/.") 

10555 Dedrick, P Pvt. Co. K, 9, N. Y. Inf Oct. 8, 1864. . 

4400 Deffer, Louis Pvt. Co. H, 40, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864. . 

4914 DeGormo, George ...... Pvt. Co. E, 48, N. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " George De^arrao.") 
6283 DeGraff, Charles H.... Pvt. Co. H, 115, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 20, 1864.. 

12074 DeGroat, William Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John DeGroat.") 

6045 Degroot, Hugh Pvt. Co. B, 13, N. Y Cav Aug. 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "Hugh Degert " "Degroot" verified as correct by Ad. G. U. S. A. See 
No. 213333 — Q. M. G. O.— Sept. 9, 1907.) 

10089 Deindle, John Pvt. Co. I, 122, N. Y. Inf Sept. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Johrmm Deindl.") 

7261 Delano, Miller Pvt. Co. C, 111, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 30, 1864.. Debilitis 

11206 Delany, Conn Pvt. Co. H, 52, N. Y. Inf Oct. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " ComeUtis Delaney.") 

7598 Delavan, Edward Pvt. Co. M, 4 N. Y. Art Sept. 2, 1864. . 

10103 Demerest, Hartman V.. Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Cav Sept. 30, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Hartman V. Deinarest.") 

9S92 Deming, Francis M Pvt. Co. H, 85 N. Y. Inf Sept. 22, 1864.. 

(" F. M." on headstone.) 

7623 Demming, Lyman Cpl. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. 

12257 Denison, John Sgt. Co. I, 155, N. Y. Inf Dec. 10, 1864.. 

6773 Denman, Smith Pvt. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 25, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "5th N. Y. Veteran Infantry.") 

8244 Denn, L. H Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept. 9, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 'Lewis H. Dunn, p\-t. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Vet. Cav.") 

9930 Dennis, Alvin A Pvt. Co. H, 106, N. Y. Inf Sept. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1489 Dennis, Thomas Pvt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf May 31, 1864.. Remittent 

fever 

7461 Dennison, James Pvt. Co. M, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6324 Densmore, Eleazer Sgt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Anasarca 

8588 Depert, Anthony Pvt. Co. A, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept. 12, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Anthony Deppert, Corporal.") 



Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 



188 STATE OF NEW YORK 

No. Same Organization Died Cause 

U'603 Desmond, Daniel A Cpl. Co. C, 82, N. Y. Inf Feb. 6, 1865.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Daniel H'. Desmond, private Co. E, o9, N. Y. Inf.") 

7059 De Sotell, Israel Pvt. Co. D, 98, N. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11854 Devendorf, Randolph .. Pvt. Co. L, 2, N. Y. Art Nov. 5, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1799 Devereux. Henry E Pvt. Co. I, S9, N. Y. Inf June 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

12228 Devil, Charles Pvt. Co. G, 7, N. Y. Art Dee. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5502 Devlin, James Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 13, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

6641 Devoren, John Pvt. Co. K, 47, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

9334 DeWitt, John S Cpl. Co. H, 43, N. Y. Inf Sept. 21, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2839 Dewitt, Steoer C Sgt Co. E, 120, N. Y. Inf July 3, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Sie-phen C. Dewitt, corporal") 

7935 Deyette, Francis Pvt. Co. D, 98, N. Y. Inf Sept. 5, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

9855 Dickinson, Madison Cpl. Co. K, 152, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2T, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3574 Dikeman, David Pvt Co. F, 22, N. Y Cav July 19, 1864.. Pneumonia 

10144 Dimond, Frederick Pvt. Co. E, 146, N. Y. Inf Oct. 1, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Ueindrich Dainan.") 

8761 Dinehartt, WilUam D... Pvt. Co. F, 111, N. Y. Inf Sept. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William D. Dinehart.") 

1821 Dingier, Charles Pvt. Co. A, 4, N. Y. Cav June 10, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Sergeant.") 

2320 Dinsmore, Sylvanus Pvt. Co. G, 115, N. Y. Inf June 22, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Sylvanus Densmore, Corporal.") 

8i'45 Doan, Alfred Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3773 Dodson, Elmore Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf July 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

l-'SSO Doennann, Max Pvt. Co. E, 66, N. Y. Inf Dec. 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. saj's "Max Doerrmaren.") 

1959 Dolan, James Pvt. Co. E, 48, N. Y. Inf June 14, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

5658 Dolan, P Pvt. Co. I, 30, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11884 Domick, E Pvt. Co. A, 4, N. Y. Art Nov. 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11357 Donneley, Matthew Pvt. Co. F, 10, N. Y. Oct. 22, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Mathew Donnely, bitgler, Co. F, 10, N. Y. Cav.") 

12718 Donnell, William Pvt. Co. A, 4, N. Y. Art Mch. 2, 1865. . Pleuritis 

229 Donnelly, Edward J.... Pvt. Co, H, 82, N. Y. Inf Mch. 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone and register reads " E. J. Donley" and was first marked "unknown" by Ad. 
G. N. Y. subsequently verified as recorded.) 

655 Donnelly, James T Sgt. Co. D, 2, N. Y. Cav Apr. 21, 1864. . DebiUtis 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James C. Donnelly.") 

3081 Donovan, John Pvt. Co. A, 14, N. Y. Art July 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11805 Doolan, Michael Pvt. Co. F, 6, N. Y. Cav Nov. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3533 Dorchester, Hofifman S. Vet. Sgn. 12, N. Y. Cav.. July 18, 1864.. Anasarca 

(No rank cut on headstone.) 

12715 Dornitz, M Citizen, , N. Y. Mch. 1, 1865. . Debilitis 

9416 Doty, Edward L Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2052 Dougherty, Owen Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf June 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10992 Doughty, Edwin T Pvt. Co. A, 48. N. Y. Inf Oct. 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Edwin F. Doughty.") 
10356 Douglass, Peter Pvt. Co. C, 147, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 4, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



189 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

7375 Douglass, Samud G Pvt. Co. D, 48, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Samuel G. Douglas.") 

9308 Dow, Merrill P Pvt. Co. H, 122, N. Y. Inf Sept. 20, 1864. . Diarrheoa 

2809 Dowd, Daniel Pvt. Co. I, 155, N. Y. Inf July 3, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

6149 Dowdle, Bartholomew .. Pvt. Co. G, 111, N. Y. Inf Aug. 19, 1864.. A. Diarrhoe.'i 

5705 Downey, John A Pvt. Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Intermittent 

fever 

10320 Doxey, Joseph Pvt. Co. E, 139, N. Y. Inf. . . . Oct. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4827 Doyle, James Pvt. Co. H, 120, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2561 Doyle, John Pvt. Co. G, 5, N. Y. Cav June 27, 1864. . Dysentery 

9142 Doyle, Michael Pvt Co. I, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Sept. 18, 1864. . Dysentery 

2347 Drake, David B Pvt. Co. B, 158, N. Y. Inf June 23, 1864.. Debilitis 

1394 Dresselman, Carl Pvt. Co. M, 4, N. Y Cav May 26, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

699 Driscoll, Michael Pvt. Co. B, 52, N. Y. Inf Apr. 23, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8453 Dritman, William Pvt. Co. C, 42, N. Y. Inf Sept. 11, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

2826 Drun, Thaddeus Pvt. Co. E, 155, N. Y. Inf July 3, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Thaddeus Drum.") 

8669 Duane, Thomas Pvt. Co. E, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6905 Duble, Henry Pvt. Co. E, 61, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Hantz Dublee.") 

3490 Dudley, Gideon C Sgt. Co. H, 10, N. Y. Inf July 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 10th cavalry.") 

3957 Duel, Rosaloo Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Art July 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Rozaleo Duel.") 

10102 Duell, William H Pvt. Co. D, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William H. Duel.") 

6087 Dull, Levi Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Levi DueL") 

12271 Dumaran, John Pvt. Co. F, 108, N. Y. Inf Dec. 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5264 Dumond, A Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Intermittent 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") fever 

5810 Dumond, Conrad Pvt. Co. A, 120, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Conrad W. Dumond.') Headstone reads "Charles Dumond, supposed 
to have been buried in this grave, but who was mustered out Jime 3, 1865. 

3063 Dumphrey, Dennis Pvt. Co. I, 100, N. Y. Inf July 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11104 Dunham, Richard Pvt. Co. G, 14, N. Y. Art Oct. 18, 1864. . Dysentery 

9116 Dunlap, James Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5732 Dunn, James Pvt. Co. D, 98, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7621 Dunn, James Pvt. Co. G, 40, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

1695 Dunn, James M Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf June 7, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3234 Dunn, Michael Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf July 12, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Michael /. Dunn.") 

919 Dunn, Owen Pvt. Co. H, 126, N. Y. Inf May 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

3584 Dunning, WilUam Pvt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William W. Dunning.") 

7554 Durand, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 82, N. Y. Inf Sept 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Transferred to Co. I, 59, Infantry.") 



190 STATE OF NEW YORK 

iVo. A'amp Organization Died Catite 

4833 Durand, James C Pvt. Co. E, 10, N. Y. Cav Aug. 6, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " J. E. Durrand.") 

39+ Durfee, Joseph Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Apr. fi, 18G+. . Diarrhoea 

2972 Durham, Abram E PvL Co. C, 120, N. Y. Inf.... July 7, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Abnr/iam E. Durham.") 

9357 Durr, John Pvt. Co. A, 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 20, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10077 Dwyer, Dennis Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. H, Art. . . Sept. 30, 1864. . Anasarca 

10918 Dwyer, Phillip Pvt. Co. A, 67, N. Y. Inf Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Transferred to Co. A, 65, Inf. Sept 1, 1864.") 

9716 Dwyer, Stephen Pvt. Co. H, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

2234 Dyckman, Frederick ... Pvt. Co. C, 47, N. Y. Inf June 20, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4085 Dyer, John W Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . July 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10597 Dykerman, William B. . Pvt. Co. A, 6, N. Y. Art Oct. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William B. Dyrkman.") 

2738 Eagan, John Pvt. Co. D, 125, X. Y. Inf July 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9033 Earl, Charles J Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles L. Earle.") 

2443 Earl, H Pvt. Co. H, 154, N. Y. Inf June 25, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Haney /. Earl.") 

8157 Eastman, Daniel Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Headstone reads " D. Eastman, Mass." but has been verified as recorded. See 489355, 
C. Q. M. C, Jan. 31, 1914. On the list for a new headstone.) 

3919 Eastman, WiUiam Pvt. Co. C, 10, X. Y. Cav July 25, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "10th Infantry.") 

4239 Easton, Edward E Pvt. Co. F, 52, X. Y. Inf July 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3203 Easton, Theodore Pvt. Co. L. 5, X. Y. Cav July 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X'^. Y. says "Theodore M. f^aston.") 

4410 Eastwood, Edwin M Pvt. 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... July 31, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4612 Eber, Jacques Pvt. Co. I, 104, X^ Y. Inf Aug. 3, 1864.. C. Dysentery 

7449 Eber, John Pvt. Co. B, 76, X. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John Eaber.") 

11263 Eberle, George Pvt. Co. I, 108, X. Y. Inf Oct. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9454 Edghill, Hazulum Pvt. Co. L, 14, X. Y. Art Sept. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X'. Y. says " Hazflum Edghills.") 

3552 Edmonds, L Pvt. Co. .M, 5, N. Y. Cav July 18, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

7309 Edson, John Pvt. Co. D. 64, X'. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7850 Edson, W Pvt. Co. E, 105, X. Y. Inf Sept. 5, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4288 Edwards, Samuel Pvt. Co. F, 52, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3597 Eldard, James E Pvt. Co. F, 76, X. Y. Inf July 19, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James E. Eldrcrf.") 

7420 Eldery, Bronson Pvt. Co. E, 146, X. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X'. Y. says " Bronson Eldcn.") 

6507 Eldred, Henry A Pvt. Co. K, 152, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 22, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8960 Elliott, Theodore T Pvt. Co. B, 76, X. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Theodore P. Elliott.") 

9736 Ellis, Cheater Pvt Co. G, 85, X. Y. Inf Sept 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10339 Ellis, James Pvt Co. H, 2, X. Y. H. Art. . . Oct. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7304 Ellis, Reuben Pvt. Co. F, 76, X'. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12071 ElUs, WiUiam Pvt. Co. E, 2, X. Y. Art Xov. 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 191 

No. Name Organization Died Cause 

1107 Ellis, WilUara H Pvt. Co. F, 119, N. Y. Inf May 15, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8163 Ells, Lycurgis Cpl. Co. I, 3, N. Y. Cav Sept. 8, 1864.. Intermittent 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lycurgis Ellis.") fever 

3526 EUs, Perry Pvt. Co. I, 106, N. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6343 Ellston, James V Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 21, 1864. . Diarrlioea 

9564 Elwell, William Pvt. Co. B, 47, N. Y. Inf Sept. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8152 Emery, Charles T Cpl. Co. G, 48, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1954 Emig, Abraham Pvt. Co. K, 162, N. Y. Inf June 14, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Abraham EmigA.") 

2454 Emslie, William H Pvt. Co. G, 2, N. Y. Cav June 25, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

9961 Engel, John Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6096 Engel, Wilhelm Pvt. Co. B, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9086 EngUsh, G Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Cav Sept. 17, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10375 Erst, James Pvt. Co. I, 51, N. Y. Inf Oct. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

2731 Ethiar, John A Pvt. Co. E, 15, N. Y. Cav July 1, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John A. Ethier.") 

9459 Evans, Franklin Pvt. Co. D, 140, N. Y. Inf Sept. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5817 Everett, Isaac B Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Isaac D. Everett.") 

6429 Everett, J Pvt. Co. K, 58, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6786 Evers, Bernard Pvt. Co. B, 66, N. Y. Inf Aug. 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7415 Face, John Pvt Co. A, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7666 Fairfax, Charles Pvt. Co. A, 111, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5946 Fairman, Henry Pvt Co. M, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Henry P. Fairman.") 

1622 Fallon, Patrick Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art June 4, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Patrick Fallen.") 

11247 Farley, William Pvt Co. F, 14, N. Y. Art Oct 21, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

12091 Farley, Thomas Pvt Co. E, 6, N. Y. Cav Nov. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Corporal, mustered out June 28, 1865, at Cloud's Mills, Va."— Com- 
missioner of Pensions says " Died at Andersonville, Ga., November 18, 1864. — 
Widow died May 13, 1906, Jennie D. Essig, administrator. No. 6411 
Pollard St, Los Angeles, Cal.") 

10259 Farrell, James Pvt. Co. A, 100, N. Y. Inf Oct. 3, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5840 Farrer, Charles Pvt. Co. G, 169, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Charles Farrar.") 

3452 Farris, John Pvt Co. H, 5, N. Y. Cav July 17, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. H, 5, Veteran Cavalry.") 

6619 Fedenbergh, James Pvt Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Anasarca 

7412 Felton, George Pvt Co. C, 164, N. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7915 Ferdon, Edward T Pvt Co. D, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept. 5, 1864. . Diarrfioea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Edwin T. Ferdin.") 

7260 Ferguson, H. C Pvt Co. C, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Henry C. Fwrguson.") 

1660 Ferris, John W Pvt. Co. A, 80, N. Y. Inf June 6, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Ferris.") 
8439 Ferris, Robert M Pvt. Co. J, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 



192 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

C. Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 



Enteritis 
Diarrhoea 
Catarrh 
Tj-phus fever 

Typhus fever 



No. Xame Organization Died Cause 

i760 Fetler, F Pvt. Co. C, 69, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 186+.. Djsentery 

(.\d. G. X. Y. says " Feder Feederson. Also borne as Feeder Fedderson, Federson Feder, 

and Feeder Feederson.") 

247 Fich, John Pvt. Co. M, 8, N. Y. Cav Mch. 30, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6192 Fields, F Pvt Co. L, 2, N. Y. Cav Avg. 19, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Franklin Fields, Co. L, 2, X. Y. Art.") 

3713 Filer, Jerome B Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf July 21, 1864. 

6656 Finch, Henry Pvt. Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. 

8699 Finch, Jonas Pvt. Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav Sejit. 13, 1864. 

3869 Fincuan, John Pvt. Co. E, 96, N. Y. Inf July 24, 1864. 

(.\d. G. X'. Y. says " Xot found.") Headstone reads "John Fincuean." 

10072 Findley, Andrew Pvt. Co. D, 1, X'. Y. Cav Sept. 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

11482 Finley, Andrew Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12507 Finnerly, Peter Pvt Co. C, 155, N. Y. Inf Jan. 22, 1865.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Andrew Finner(y, Co. C") 

S752 Fish, Frederick Pvt Co. K, 52, X. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864. 

9723 Fish, John W Sgt Co. E, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept 25, 1864. 

6215 Fish, Lester N Pvt Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 21, 1864. 

279 Fish, William Pvt Co. H, 10, N. Y. Apr. 1, 1864. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Not found.") 

11651 Fisher, Charles P. F Pvt Co. C, 124, N. Y. Inf Oct 30, 1864. 

10049 Fisher, Conrad Pvt Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st N. Y. Veteran Cavalry.") 

5104 Fisher, Daniel Pvt. Co. F, 45, X'. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

2389 Fisher, Douglass Pvt Co. K, 125, X". Y. Inf June 24, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

12542 Fisher, Henry C Pvt Co. A, 69, N. Y. Inf Jan. 28, 1865 

10966 Fisher, Lorenzo Pvt Co. D, 39, X. Y. Inf Oct 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Headstone reads " Lorenze Fisher.") 

4412 Fisk, Hosea Pvt. Co. A, 179, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 31, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Hosea Fish.") 

10171 Fitch, A Pvt Co. A, 3, N. Y. Oct 1, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

4819 Fitch, Charles W Pvt 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 5, 1864. 

3569 Fitzgerald, Nicholas .... Pvt Co. C, 111, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1864. 

6453 Fitzgerald, Thomas Pvt 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 22, 1864. 

12400 Fitzpatrick, James Pvt Co. G, 10, N. Y. Cav Jan. 5, 1865. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Fitzpatrick.") 

6961 Fitzpatrick, Owen Pvt Co. E, 100, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6500 Flagler, Wesley Cpl. Co. M, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 22, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

7452 Flanigan, Edward Pvt Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art Sept 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5558 Flannagan, Peter W Pvt Co. D, 40, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Dysentery 

8583 Fleming, Peter Pvt. Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 12, 1684. . Intermittent 

fever 

190 Fletcher, William Cpl. Co. G, 13, N. Y. Cav Mch. 27, 1864.. Tj^ihus fever 

12537 Flintoff, Thomas Pvt Co. E, 102, N. Y. Inf Jan. 28, 1865.. Scorbutus 

774 Florence, B Pvt Co. H, 99, X. Y. Inf Apr. 28, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 



Dysentery 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 




z 
c 

K 
K 

W 

c 

< 
o 

3 

Q 

c 
g 

S 

C 

K 



O 
K 
C 



H 

z 



O 



'/^ 



Z 

o 
« 



o 



a; 

03 
O 
K 
O 

<; 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



193 



Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
A. Diarrhoea 

Dysentery 
Scorbutus 



Dysentery 

Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 
C. Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Anasarca 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

7690 Fluke, J Pvt. Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. K. 147, N. Y. Inf.") 

8378 Flynn, James Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery. . . Sept. 10, 1864. . 

11958 Flynn, James Pvt. Co. K, 13, N. Y. Cav Nov. 11, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "James L. Flynn.") 

9242 Flynn, William Pvt. Co. E, 71, N. Y. Inf Sept. 19, 1864. . 

1589 Fogel, George H Cpl. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf June 3, 1864. . 

(Headstone reads "Geo. H. Fogie.") 

4623 Fogele, Antonio Pvt. Co. C, 10, N. Y. Inf Aug. 3, 1864.. 

11363 Fogerty, Thomas Pvt. Co. C, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 33, 1864. . 

10841 Folard, James H Pvt. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Oct. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8042 Folder, Henry Pvt. Co. B, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11736 Foley, F Pvt. Co. B, 73, N. Y. Inf Nov. 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Francis Foley.") 

S987 FoUet, D Pvt. Co. A, 1, N. Y. Cav July 26, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 
8283 Folmsbee, Abram C... Pvt. Co. A, 169, N. Y. Inf.... Sept 19, 1864.. 

175 Ford, Edward V Sgt. Co. K, 133, N. Y. Inf Mch. 26, 1864.. 

408 Foster, James Pvt. Co. D, 2 N. Y. Cav Apr. 6, 1864. . 

757 Foster, John Pvt. Co. G, 5. N. Y. Cav Apr. 27, 1864. . 

6115 Fox, Adam Pvt. Co. H, 94, N. Y. Inf Aug. 19, 1864. 

11173 Fox, Delos Pvt. Co. E, 153, N. Y Inf.... Oct. 19, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2830 Fox, Michael Pvt. Co. K, 15, N. Y. H. Art. . July 3, 1864. . Dysentery 

S917 Frackin, Joseph Pvt. Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4227 FrankUn, Ira O Pvt. Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav July 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10484 Fraser, John H Pvt Co. C, 73, N. Y. Inf Oct 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

13194 Frayley, James Pvt. Co. A, 36, N. Y. Inf Dec. 24, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

9507 Freeman, Orrin M Pvt. Co. D, 2, N. Y. H. Art. . . Sept. 23, 1864. . 

1395 Freese, John H Pvt Co. K, 111, N. Y. Inf May 26, 1864. . 

11576 French, Elias H Pvt. Co. D, 43, N. Y. Inf Oct 38, 1864. . 

10968 French, James Pvt Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct 15, 1864. . 

11363 French, James Pvt. Co. H, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 23, 1864. . 

6989 French, John C Pvt Co. H, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 27, 1864. . 

6668 Friee, Carl Pvt Co. B, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864.. 

5124 Frisbie, Willard L Cpl. Co. B, 111, N. Y. Inf. . . . Aug. 9, 1864. . 

(June 1, 1870, the Quartermaster General, U. S. A., directed that these remains be disinterred 

and delivered to Mr. A. Snedaker, for removal to friends in New York state. 

No evidence of such removal. Headstone still at grave. 

9432 Froworth, Ferd Pvt. Co. I, 57, N. Y. Inf Sept 21, 1864. . 

(Headstone reads "Yrederick Froworth.") 

10140 Fuchs, Alphonzo Pvt Co. L, 63, N. Y. Inf Oct. 1, 1864. . 

(Headstone reads "A. Fricks.") 

11638 FuUer, Charles Pvt Co. H, 52, N. Y. Inf Oct 29, 1864. . 

11050 Fuller, Mortimer Pvt Co. C, 15, N. Y. Cav Oct 17, 1864. . 

10295 Fuller, W Pvt Co. A, 122, N. Y. Inf Oct. 4, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10328 Fundy, Fitch Pvt Co. B, 59, N. Y. Inf Oct 7, 1864. . 

7498 Furgerson, Michael Pvt Co. G, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept 1, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Michael Ferg«son.") 

13 



Scorbutus 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 



Wounds 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 



194 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



No. 
9779 

6995 
2553 
5773 

2472 

7930 
6106 
4699 

114S 

10489 

6993 

982 

11153 

1323 

5251 

9206 

7926 
3765 
2688 

7044 
7216 
7033 

10539 
385 

(This 

5270 
94 

6868 
8383 

12145 

7120 

12910 

10813 

6942 

6728 

3413 



yame Organization Died Cause 

Furguson, John M Pvt Co. G, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept. 26, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John M. Forguson.") 

Fun-, John Pvt. Co. C, 2, N'. Y. Art Aug. 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Gaffney, John Pvt. Co. D, 104, N. Y. Inf June 27, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

Gage, George Cpl. Co. A, 2, N. Y. Cav Aug. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Gagin, Thomas Pvt Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf June 25, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Thomas Gagan.") 
Gaiser, Charles Pvt Co. D, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept 5, 1864.. Dysentery- 
Gallagher, Peter Pvt Co. D, 47, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Gallavan, J Pvt Co. F, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 4, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

Gallegher, Patrick Pvt. Co. D, 5, X. Y. Cav May 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Patrick Gallagher.") 

Galuska, Waterman Pvt Co. E, 5, N. Y. Cav Oct 7, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Waterman GalusAa.") Latter name on headstone. 

Gannon, Solomon, Jr.... Pvt Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Gardiner, Herman Pvt Co. E, 132, N. Y. Inf May 9, 1864. 

Gardner, Henry Pvt. Co. A, 52, X. Y. Inf Oct 19, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Xot found.") 

Gardner, Orange T Pvt Co. C, 104, N'^. Y. Inf May 24, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N^. Y. says "Orange C. Gardner.") 

Gardner, Robert Pvt Co. K, 155, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Robert P. Gardiner.") 

Gardner, William Pvt Co. I, 9, X. Y. Sept. 18, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "9, Cavalry:') 

Garlock, John Pvt Co. B, 146, X. Y. Inf Sept 5, 1864. 

Garner, John Pvt. Co. B, 147, X. Y. Inf July 22, 1864. 

Garrison, John Pvt Co. H, 65, X. Y. Inf June 30, 1864. 



Dysentery 
Scorbutus 

Dysentery 



Scorbutus 



Dysentery 
Diarrhoea 
Intermittent 
fever 

Gartland, John Pvt. Co. G, 169, X'. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Gartsee, Henry Sgt Co. L, 22, X. Y. Cav Aug. 29, 1864. . Dysentery 

Garvey, James Pvt Co. C, 95, N". Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Gatliff, Henry Pvt. Co. D, 82, N. Y. Inf Oct. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Gauzy, Charles Pvt. Co. B, 94, X. Y. Inf Apr. 5, 1864. . Pneumonia 

name is not checked by Ad. G. X. Y., no remark made, does not appear on roster of 
regiment and is, therefore, regarded as " Xot foimd.") 

Gavett, Leander Pvt Co. E, 134, X. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Dysentery 

Gawey, John Pvt Co. K, 32, X. Y. Inf Mch. 22, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

Geary, James Pvt Co. A, 142, X. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Gehies, ChrisHan Pvt Co. A, 40, N. Y. Int Sept 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says '• Xot found.") 

Geiger, Franz Pvt Co. A, 15, X'^. Y. Art Xov. 24, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Geiss, Andrew Pvt. Co. I, 95, X. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Genner, Henry Pvt Co. K, 3, X. Y. Art Apr. 19, 1864. . Small Po.\ 

German, William Pvt. Co. D, 8, X". Y. Cav Oct. 12, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

Gettings, James H Pvt Co. H, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Gian, Benjamin Pvt. Co. H, 11, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 
Gibb, James A Pvt Co. K, 111, N. Y. Inf June 24, 1864. . Anasarca 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



195 



No. 

3318 

10967 

6359 

12017 
2042 

10925 
4185 
1834 
8317 



10160 
3339 

7898 
11270 
12345 
(Ad. 

8351 

3103 

8563 

3946 

1678 

10336 

12529 

7088 
4145 
7342 
8228 
3042 
4561 
3291 
8982 
2115 
2203 
12604 
11985 
2962 
3322 

12200 

8339 



Scorbutus 
Anasarca 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 



Sept. 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 
Oct. 1, 1864.. Scorbutus 
July 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



Name Organization Died Cause 

Gibeson, J Pvt. Co. A, 170, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 12, 1864 

Gibbs, Charles Pvt Co. B, 4, N. Y. Art Oct. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Myron Gibbs.") 

Gibbs, Myron Pvt. Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 20, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Myron H. Gibbs.") 

Gibson, John Pvt. Co. I, 82, N. Y. Inf Nov. 15, 1864., 

Gifford, Henry N Pvt. Co. K, 111, N. Y. Inf.... June 16, 1864.. 

Gilbert, Charles Pvt. Co. B, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct. 14, 1864. . 

Gilbert, Elijah Sgt. Co. D, 85, N'. Y. Inf July 28, 1864.. 

Gilbert, Newton Pvt. Co. K, 111, N. Y. Inf June 11, 1864.. 

Gile, Guile, or Almon 
Gyle, or Almon L. 

Gyle Sgt. Co. C, 154, N. Y. Inf. . . . 

Gill, John F Pvt. Co. B, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. 

Gillen, M Pvt. Co. E, 107, N. Y. Inf. . . . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

Gillett, William H Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Gillis, John Pvt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Gillmore, M Cpl. Co. B, 17, N. Y. Dec. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

G. N. Y. says " Martin Gilmore, corporal, Co. B, 17, Vet. Inf.") No rank cut on 

headstone. 

Gilmartin, Andrew Pvt. Co. D, 69, N. Y. Inf Sept. 10, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 18g, Infantry.") 

Gimnick, Peter Pvt Co. K, 2, N. Y. Cav July 10, 1864. . 

Gleason, John Pvt Co. B, 100, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 12, 1864. . 

Gleason, Thomas Pvt Co. D, 97, N. Y. Inf July 25, 1864.. 

Gleich, William Sgt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Cav June 6, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

Goaume, J Pvt Co. K, 16 N. Y. Oct. 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

Godell, Frank B Cpl. Co. K, 122, N. Y. Inf.... Jan. 26, 1865.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Frank B. GoodeU.") 

Goodbread, Jacob F Pvt Co. B, 147, N. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864.. Dysentery 

Goodenough, James Cpl. Co. D, 140, N. Y. Inf. . . . 

Goodman, Jefferson Pvt. Co. A, 154, N. Y. Inf 

Goodno, Ira A Pvt Co. I, 64, N. Y. Inf 

Goodrich, FrankUn L. . . Pvt. Co. B, 154, N. Y. Inf 

Goodrich, George Cpl. Co. D, 2, N. Y. Cav 



Scorbutus 

Debilitis 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 



July 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 
Aug. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 
Sept 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 
July 8, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 
Aug. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 



Gorman, F Pvt Co. B, 6, N. Y. Art July 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Gorman, John Pvt. Co. H, 126, N. Y. Inf Sept 16, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Gorman, Timothy Pvt Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art June 17, 1864. 



Goss, James Pvt Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf June 19, 1864.. 

Gott, Charles Pvt Co. B, 49, N. Y. Inf Feb. 7, 1865.. 

Gough, Hugh Pvt Co. B, 146, N. Y. Inf Nov. 13, 1864.. 

Gould, Erastus Pvt Co. C, 104, N. Y. Inf July 6, 1864.. 

Gould, Richard Pvt Co. D, 61, N. Y. Inf July 14, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

Coves, Samuel Pvt Co. D, 2, N. Y. Cav Nov. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Samuel Groves.") Headstone reads " Samuel Gooes." 
Gowers, John Pvt Co. C, 111, N. Y. Inf.... Sept 9, 1864.. Dysentery 



C. Diarrhoea 
A. Diarrhoea 
Rheumatism 
Scorbutus 
A. Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 



196 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



No. Name Organization Died Caute 

12328 Gowine, Charles Pvt. Co. H, 69, N. Y. Inf Dec. 24, 1864. . Scorbstus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1S2, Infantry.") 

10499 Graef, Francis Pvt. Co. M, 14, N. Y. Cav Oct. 8, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3693 Graft, Benedict Pvt. Co. D, 48, X. Y. Inf July 21, 1864.. Dysentery 

9347 Graliuni, James Pvt. Co. L, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept. 20, 18G4.. Diarrhoea 

7089 Graham, WilUam Pvt. Co. F, 12, X. Y. Cav Aug. 28, 1864.. Anasarca 

10093 Grampy, X. J Pvt. Co. B, 52, X. Y. Inf Sept. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

2640 Grandin, Daniel Pvt. Co. E, 111, X. Y. Inf June 29, 1864.. Bronchitis 

3638 Granger, Francis A Pvt. Co. I, 93, X. Y. Inf July 20, 1864.. Bronchitis 

5798 Granger, John Pvt. Co. H, 147, X. Y. Inf .\iig. 15, 1864.. Dysentery 

3212 Grant, Charles Pvt. Co. B, 96, X. Y. Inf July 12, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3875 Grant, Job A Sgt. Co. K, 125, X. Y. Inf July 24, 1864.. Dysentery 

4787 Graves, William T Pvt. Co. H, 80, X. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Dysentery 

1342 Green, Ethan S Pvt. Co. C, 85, X. Y. Inf May 24, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

12522 Green, Henry \V Pvt. Co. E, 146, X. Y. Inf Jan. 26, 1865.. Scorbutus 

10277 Green, James H Pvt. Co. K, 109, X. Y. Inf Oct. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5202 Green, Othaniel Pvt. Co. G, 154, X. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Dysentery 

2184 Greenman, John S Sgt. Co. D, 2, X'. Y. Cav June 19, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

6863 Greer, John Pvt. Co. B, 76, X. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7634 Gregory, David D. L... Pvt. Co. E, 120, X. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4322 Gregory, John Pvt. Co. E, 61, X. Y. Inf July 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Deserted as of Co. D, May 14, 1864.") 

7492 Gregorj', Lyman Pvt. Co. M, 7, X. Y. Art Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6651 Grenehan, John Pvt. Co. G, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7201 Grevals, H Pvt. Co. F, 70, X. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

5354 Grey, John B Pvt. Co. M, 6, X. Y. Art Aug. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John B. Gray.") 
3816 Griffin, John Pvt. Co. H, 40, N. Y. Inf July 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11502 Griffin, John B Pvt. Co. D, 2, X". Y. Cav Oct. 26, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5766 Griffin. William Pvt. Co. F, 52, X. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3101 Griffith, Albert Pvt. 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... July 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11185 Griffith, Edward B Pvt. Co. D, 85, X. Y. Inf Oct. 19, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

9372 Grinnell, John Pvt. Co. B, 2, X. Y. Cav Sept. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

3815 Griswold, B. F Cpl. Co. F, 109, X. Y. Inf July 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9653 Gross, Jacob Pvt. Co. I, 140, X. Y. Inf Sept. 24, 1864.. Gangrene 

9981 Gross, Joseph Pvt. Co. B, 151, X. Y. Inf Sept. 29, 1864.. Bronchitis 

10944 Grosse, Carl Pvt. Co. E, 68, X. Y. Inf Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3092 Grover, Joseph Pvt. Co. F, 47, X. V. Inf July 9, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(.\d. G. X. Y. says "Joseph Groven."') 
4131 Gruet, Henry Pvt Co. I, 62, X. Y. Inf July 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

10997 Grundy, Robert Pvt Co. G, 73, X. Y. Inf Oct 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7678 Gunby, James Pvt Co. F, 3, X\ Y. Cav Sept 3, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "James Cauly.") 

5867 Gundloek, Frederick ... Pvt. Co. A, 95, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. Enteritis 

1459 Gunn, Calvin Pvt Co. F, 12, X. Y. Cav May 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8671 Gunther, John Pvt Co. D, 94, X. Y. Inf Sept. 13, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

1220 Gutchie, Marcus Pvt. Co. E, 47, X. Y. Inf May 19, 1864. . Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



197 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

10878 Haas, John Pvt. Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav Oct. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11947 Haas, John F Pvt. Co. F, 49, N. Y. Inf Nov. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

13323 Haber, John Pvt. Co. D, 48, N. Y. Inf Oct. 21, 1864 

6495 Hack, Joseph Pvt Co. K, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 32, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10193 Hackett, Christopher .. Sgt. Co. C, 43, N. Y. Inf Oct. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2623 Hackett, James Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav June 8, 1864.. Typhus fever 

8275 Hadden, Charles Pvt. Co. B, 80, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6181 Haddle, William Pvt. Co. M, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 19, 1864. . Cerebritis 

3646 Hagen, Jacob Pvt. Co. A, 59, N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

7113 Hagerde, John Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 28, 1864.. Dysentery 

6869 Haggerty, William Pvt. Co. E, 147, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864.. Debilitis 

6876 Hagle, Jacob Pvt. Co. F, 10, N. Y. Cav Aug. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8924 Haight, Joseph E Pvt. Co. H, 8, N. Y. Art Sept. 16, 1864. . Dy.sentery 

3394 Haines, W Pvt. Co. G, 2, N. Y. H. Art... July 16, 1864.. Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William C. Haines.") 

11036 Halbert, Albert B Cpl. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct. 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5003 Hall, Charles Pvt. Co. E, 109, N. Y. Inf. . . . Aug. 8, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

2214 Hall, Charles Pvt. Co. K, 12, N. Y. Cav June 20, 1864. . Anasarca 

11310 Hall, Charles Pvt. Co. H, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Oct. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

870 Hall, Edwin Pvt. Co. C, 111, N. Y. Inf May 3, 1864.. Dysentery 

12370 Hall, George W Pvt. Co. I, 40, N. Y. Inf Jan. 1, 1865.. Wounds 

4459 Hall, John Pvt. Co. E, 109, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2846 Hall, Joseph Pvt. Co. E, 9, N. Y. Cav July 3, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

9661 HaU, L Pvt. Co. L, 14, N. Y. Cav Sept. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " L. S. HaU.") 

7731 Hall, William Pvt. Co. K, 8, N. Y. Cav Sept. 3, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7819 Hall, William Pvt. Co. K, 2, N. Y. Mounted 

Rifles Sept. 4, 1864. . Anasarca 

10865 Hallenbeck, Thomas ... Cpl. Co. B, 135, N. Y. Inf Oct. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10646 Halley, Theodore W Pvt. Co. E, 76, N. Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Theodore W. Holley.") 

9253 Halpin, Peter Pvt. Co. F, 63, N. Y. Inf Sept. 19, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8213 Hamilton, Henry Pvt. Co. D, 133, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

10032 Hamilton, John Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Art Sept. 39, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

12405 Hamilton, John H Pvt. Co. G, 111, N. Y. Inf Jan. 7, 1865.. Scorbutus 

6601 Hamilton, Thomas Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5634 Hammond, Rudolph ... Pvt. Co. E, 66, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Rudolph Hermann.") 

1104 Hand, Lawrence Pvt. Co. C, 5, N. Y. Cav May 15, 1864.. Pneumonia 

11076 Hand, William S Pvt. Co. A, 169, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10306 Handfest, John B Pvt. Co. K, 100, N. Y. Inf Oct. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3857 Hanley, D Pvt. Co B, 22, N. Y. Cav July 24, 1864.. Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

13448 Hanley, William Pvt. Co. D, 29, N. Y. Inf Jan. 13, 1865.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

9862 Hanlon, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 180, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found, no such regiment.") 

6627 Hannick, Charles Pvt. Co. I, 140, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 23, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7929 Hannon, John CpL Co. I, 164, N. Y. Inf Sept. 5, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



198 STATE OF NEW YORK 

No. Name Organization Died Came 

6432 Hanson, C Pvt. Co. F, 67, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Christian Hanson, private Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf.") 

10101 Hardee, Richard Pvt. Co. E, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11149 Hardy, Hugh Pvt. Co. C, 95, N. Y. Inf Oct. 19, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9363 Hardy, John Sgt. Co. I. 5, X. Y. Cav Sept. 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1504 Harenstein, Heinrich ... Pvt. Co. R, 48, N. Y. Inf May 31, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5482 Harnes, Herman Pvt. Co. I, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8323 Harper, James Pvt. Co. G, 126, N. Y. Inf vSept. 9, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

2526 Harra, Augustus Pvt. Co. K, 143, N. Y. Inf June 26, 1864.. Dysentery 

1378 Harrington, Patriclt ... Pvt. Co. D, 71, N. Y. Inf May 26, 1864.. Anasarca 

5550 Harris, John Pvt Co. A, 63, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864. . D.vsentery 

6784 Harris, Thomas Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 25, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

4056 Harris, Volney S Pvt. Co. M, 8. N. Y. Cav July 27, 1864. . Dysentery 

10384 Harrison, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Od. 5, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8362 Harrison, O Pvt. Co. K, 14, N. Y. S. M Sept 10, 1864. . Di: rrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

4705 Hart, Daniel K Cpl. Co. C, 109, N. Y. Inf Aug. 4, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11524 Hart, John Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Oct 26, 1864. . Scrrbutus 

5748 Hart Joseph Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 15, 1864. . Ictus SoUs 

8287 Hart Samuel Cpl. Co. B, 146, N. Y. Inf Sept 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7432 Hartman, Matthew Pvt. Co. H, 40, N. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Debilitis 

10812 Haskell, Albert Pvt Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf Oct 12, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8758 Hasler, M Pvt. Co. C, 119, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 14, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Michael Hasler.") 

1891 Hathaway, Charles Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... June 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1207 Hauer, Frank Pvt Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav May 19, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

11461 Havens, George A Pvt Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct. 25, 1864.. Scorlnitus 

3826 Havens, Henry Pvt Co. A, 141, K. Y. Inf July 23, 1864.. Dysentery 

4814 Havens, Stephen R Sgt Co. A, 104, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Discharged July 12, 1865, as 'Stephen.'") 

2262 Haviland, Hammond ... Pvt Co. B, 6, N. Y. Art June 21, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3589 Hawkes, John Pvt Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav July 19, 1864.. C. Dysentery 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "1st Veteran ca%-alr.v.") 

11629 Hawlev, William L Pvt Co. D, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct 29, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5355 Hayatt L. P Cpl. Co. A, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

10904 Hayes, James Pvt. Co. E, 39, N. Y. Inf Oct 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

9080 Hayes, John Pvt. Co. A, 6, X. Y. Cav Sept 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

1411 Haynes, PhiUp Pvt Co. I, 85, X. Y. Inf May 27, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10220 Haynor, L Prt. Co. H, 125, N. Y. Inf Oct 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11786 Hays, Chauncey E Pvt Co. F, 3, N. Y. Mounted Xov. 4, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Rifles 

8022 Hays, William Pvt Co. G, 69, N. Y. Inf Sept 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10662 Heacock. Richard Sgt. Co. H, 66, X. Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9137 Head, Thomas I Pvt Co. A, 6, X. Y. Art Sept 19, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Thomas J. Head.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



199 



No. Name Organization Died 

3523 Hebenstreit, Hermann . Pvt Co. E, 66, N. Y. Inf July 18, 1864. 

3581 Hecker, Charles Pvt. Co. C, 47, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1864. 

31SS Heflferman, Daniel Pvt. Co. C, 132, N. Y. Inf July 11, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Daniel Heffernan.") 

473 Heidiz, John Pvt. Co. A, 14, N. Y. Cav Apr, 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2106 Heimann, John Pvt. Co. E, 45, N. Y. Inf June 17, 1864. 

11382 Helff, Conrad Pvt. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Cav Oct. 24, 1864. , 

11996 Hemance, J Pvt. Co. C, 100, N. Y. Inf. . . . Nov. 13, 1864. 

2898 Hennell, George Pvt. Co. A, 100, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 5, 1864. 

8336 Hennessey, M Pvt. Co. A, 3, N. Y. Art Sept. 9, 1864. 

3072 Hennis, Daniel Pvt. Co. B, 1, N. Y. Cav July 9, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

7196 Henyen, William H Pvt. Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864. 

196 Hergot, John Pvt Co. I, 111, N. Y. Inf.... Mch. 27, 1864. 

3119 Hermance, Franklin C. Cpl. Co. A, 80, N. Y. Inf July 10, 1864. 

4495 Herrick, C Pvt. Co. C, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

10115 Herron, Frederick Pvt. Co. C, 52, N. Y. Inf Oct 1, 1864.. 

6828 HesUer, Daniel Pvt. Co. C, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 25, 1864. 

10566 Hestolate, John Pvt. Co. — , 69, N. Y. Inf Oct. 9, 1864. , 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

99 Hetzel, Christian Pvt. Co. B, 52, N. Y. Inf Mch. 22, 1864. 

11380 Heurtes, B Pvt. Co. I, 15, N. Y. Art Oct. 24, 1864., 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12104 Hewes, J Pvt. Co. A, 1, N. Y. Cav Nov. 20, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7301 Hibberd, Abiel Prt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 147, Infantry.") 

7605 Hicks, William H Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864., 

888 Higgins, William A Pvt. Co. B, 99, N. Y. Inf May 5, 1864., 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

4058 Higley, George Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf July 28, 1864. . 

11733 Hilbert, George Pvt. Co. I, 5, N. Y. Nov. 2, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "5th Veteran Infantry") 

7652 Hildreth, Horace W.... Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864.. 

3698 HUdreth, Levi C Pvt. Co. D, 88, N. Y. Inf July 21, 1864. . 

777 HiU, Andrew A Pvt. Co. G, 44 N. Y. Inf Apr. 28, 1864., 

2887 HiU, George H Pvt. Co. A, 85, N. Y. Inf July 4, 1864 . . 

11912 HiU, WiUiam H Pvt. Co. E, 24, N. Y. Cav Nov. 8, 1864. , 

11998 HiUe, Lewis Pvt Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Nov. 13, 1864. . 

170 HiUier, Godfredy Pvt Co. K, 12, N. Y. Cav Mch. 26, 1864. . 

3316 Hilman, George Pvt Co. B, 95, N. Y. Inf July 14, 1864.. 

8643 HiUs, Andrew J .... Cpl. Co. M, 20, N. Y. Cav Sept 13, 1864. . 

31 Hinckley, Bradley Sgt. Co. B, 9, N. Y. Cav Mch. 9, 1864. . 

(Headstone reads " Bradley Hinkley.") 

4454 Hines, J. Pvt. Co. G, 126, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 1, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 



Cause 
C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 



10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Bronchitis 
Anasarca 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Intermittent 

fever 
Debilitis 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Typhus fever 
Dysentery 
C. Diarrhoea 
Pneumonia 

Scorbutus 



200 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



iV'o. Name Organization Died Cause 

6255 Hinklev, D Pvt. Co. K, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 20, 186i. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5331 Hinton, J Pvt Co. D, U, N. Y. Art Aug. 11, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2967 Hinton, Tliomas Cpl. Co. E, 12, N. Y Cav July 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

395 Hoag, John Pvt. Co. L, 21, N. Y. Cav Apr. 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7192 Hoag, Jonathan Pvt. Co. A, 169, N. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. Dysentery 

11670 Hoar, Henry Pvt. Co. I, 120, N. Y. Inf Oct. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2085 Hobbs, J Pvt. Co. H, 8, N. Y. June 17, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

2984 Hobson, ■William Sgt. Co. F, 14, N. Y. Cav July 7, 1864. . A, Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6556 Hodge, Jacob Pvt Co. A, 23, X. Y. Cav Aug. 23, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

4677 Hoeger, Anton Pvt. Co. A, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1037 Hofert, John Pvt. Co. A, 132, N. Y. Inf May 11, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

11662 Hoff, Jacob Pvt Co. E, 48, N. Y. Inf Oct. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5010 Hoffman, Frederick Pvt Co. B, 48, N. Y. Inf Aug. 8, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6248 Hoffman, H Pvt. Co. F, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 20, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3811 Hoffman, Henry Pvt Co. E, 47, N. Y. Inf July 23, 1864.. Dysentery 

4932 Hoffman, Hiram Cpl. Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 7, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7718 Hofgersank, Frank Pvt Co. I, 21, N. Y. Cav Sept 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11317 Hogan, John Pvt Co. F, 63, N. Y. Inf Oct. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5489 Hogan, John Jr Pvt. Co. M, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

162 Hoisington, Edward L,. Pvt. Co. F, 94, N. Y. Inf Mch. 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6465 Holbrook, Griggs Pvt Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 3-2, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

6327 Holbrook, James E Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5013 Holcomb, Wilton D Pvt Co. F, 95, N. Y. Inf Aug. 8, 1864.. Dysentery 

2204 Holcomb, Theodore Pvt. Co. K, 44, N. Y. Inf June 19, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

6475 Holiday, Spencer Pvt Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2510 Hollands, H Pvt Co. E, 115, N. Y. Inf June 26, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 
2573 Hollenback, John H.... Pvt Co. G, 120, N. Y. Inf.... June 27, 1864.. Debilitis 
(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John H. HalenbfcA-, also borne as ' HoUenbeck.' ") 

7218 Holler, Melchert Pvt. Co. A, 152, N. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7051 HoUoday, Solomon Cpl. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Headstone reads "Solomon Holladay.") 

4175 HoUoway, Joseph H.... Pvt Co. D, 146, N. Y. Inf.... July 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "Joseph H. Halloway.") 

10624 Holman, J Pvt. Co. C, 50, N. Y. Inf Oct 5, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7953 Holmes, C Pvt. Co. A, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

7104 Holmes, Edmund Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 28, 1864. . Diarihoea 

5531 Holmes, Henry Pvt Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12467 Holmes, James Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Jan. 16, 1865. . Scorbutus 

7826 Homrighausen, Frederick. Pvt Co. B, 140, N. Y. Inf.... Sept 24, 1864.. Dysentery 
(Headstone reads " Frd'k Hurarighausen.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



201 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

8040 Homstead, Henry Pvt. Co. A, 2-2, N. Y. Cav Sept. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7117 Hooker, Thomas Pvt. Co. D, 111, N. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864.. Typhus fever 

6114 Hore, Richard Cpl. Co. L, 16, N. Y. Cav Aug. 19, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

1062S Horton, F. H Pvt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art Oct. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

2445 Hosford, William F Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... June 25, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Headstone reads "W. S. Hosford.") 

6977 Hotchkiss, Albert G. . . . Pvt. Co. M, 8, N. Y. Cav Aug. 27, 1864. . Dysentery 

1462 Hough, Emmerson Pvt. Co. C, 140, N. Y. Inf May 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10817 Houghtoling, Charles .. Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Art Oct. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads " Chas. Houghtoling.") 

6094 HoughtaUng, Martin A. Pvt. Co. D, 120, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5652 Hour, James Pvt. Co. E, 119, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

11099 Houston, E Pvt. , N. Y 

(Not checked by Ad. G. N. Y. — Lead pencil notation on the register says "Co. G, 95, N. Y. 
Inf." but name is not found on rolls of that regiment. — 11099 & 9532, may 

be duplicates.) 

9532 Houston, Eli Pvt. Co. G, 95, N. Y. Inf Oct. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 9532 & 11099 may be duplicates. 

11693 Howard, Alvin Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Art Oct. 31, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

847T Howard, Joseph Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4387 Howard, William Pvt. Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7457 Howe, Asa R Pvt. Co. C, 96, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10114 Howe, George Pvt. Co. M, 16, N. Y. Cav Sept. 30, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

12292 Howe, Samuel Pvt. Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Dec. 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11064 Howell, Charles R Pvt. Co. C, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 

6622 Hoye, John Pvt. Co. I, 9, N. Y. Art Aug. 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8337 Hoyt, Samuel Pvt. Co. M, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 9, 1864. . Anasarca 

11704 Huba, Conrad Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Art Oct. 31, 1864. . Scorbutus 

416 Huber, Charles Pvt. Co. A, 14, N. Y. Cav Apr. 7, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7721 HudseU, Charles Pvt. Co. L, 2, N. Y. Art Sept. 3, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10666 Hudson, John Pvt. Co. A, 148, N. Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864.. 

9562 Hudson, Sidney R Pvt. Co. L, 15, N. Y. Car Sept. 22, 1864. . 

7330 Hudson, William J Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864. . 

16 Huganir, Danzil M Pvt. Co. I, 64, N. Y. Inf Mch. 6, 1864.. Dysentery 

7931 Hugenir, Alfred Sgt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 5, 1864.. Dysenterj- 

7805 Hughes, John Pvt. Co. E, 93, N. Y. Inf Sept. 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. A'.") 

11191 Hughes, Michael Sgt. Co. K, 82, N. Y. Inf Oct. 20, 1864.. Dysentery 

11193 Hughes, Richard Cpl. Co. C, 100, N. Y. Inf Oct. 20, 1864.. Dysentery 

7287 Hughes, Thomas Pvt. Co. G, 61, N. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864. . Dysentery 

9500 Hughs, Adelbert Pvt. Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 22, 1864 

9051 Hulbert, John W Pvt. Co. M, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 17, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

3342 Hulburt, Lyman Pvt. Co. D, 1, N. Y. Vet. Cav. July 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2563 Hulet, WiUiam H Pvt. Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav June 27, 1864. . Typhus fever 



C. Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Dysenterj' 



202 STATE OF NEW YORK 

JVo. Name Orpanization Died Cause 

93B7 Hull, Charles E Pvt. Co. E, j2i, N. Y. Cav Sept. 20, 1861.. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "Charles Hall.") 

11049 Hulpin, John Pvt. Co. F, 134, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Halpin.") 

7584 Hulse, George W Pvt. Co. B, 99, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1474 Hulse, William S Pvt. Co. G, 47, N. Y. Inf May 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

12614 Hummell, Julius Pvt. Co. E, 10, N. Y. Cav Feb. 8, 1865. . Diarrhoea 

7153 Humphreys, H. D Cpl. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

2618 Humphreys, Joseph Pvt. Co. I, 155, N. Y. Inf June 38, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

476 Hunt, Thomas J Pvt. Co. D, 64, N. Y Inf Apr. 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3365 Hunter, Edward, Jr Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... July 15, 1864.. Tj-phus fever 

10978 Hunter, J. H Pvt. Co. — , 115, N. Y. Inf Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Not found.") 

5841 Huntsmore, G Pvt. Co. E, 66, X. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5497 Hurlbert, Simon B Pvt Co. E, 100, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4430 Hurley, John Pvt. Co. A, 52, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

3112 Hutchings, Simeon A Pvt. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Cav July 10, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

898 Hutchins, Franklin Pvt. Co. D, 13, N. Y. Cav May 5,1864.. Diarrhoea 

5024 Hutchins, William Pvt. Co. G, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 8, 1864. . Dysentery 

11019 Hutchinson, Merrick ... Cpl. Co. G, 52, N. Y. Inf Oct. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9173 Hutchinson, William E. Pvt. Co. B, 2, N. Y. Art Sept. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8955 Hyde, Calvin Pvt. Co. F, 147, N. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11083 Hyde, Garrett Pvt. Co. C. 42, N. Y. Inf Oct. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8770 Hyde, John F Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11781 Ibelbeck, W Pvt. Co. E, 15, N. Y. Art Nov. 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3428 Imer, J Pvt. Co. H, 1, N. Y. Cav July 16, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

2187 Imhofif, Rudolph Pvt. Co. G, 2, N. Y. Cav June 19, 1864. . Dysentery 

4019 Imlay, Eugene C Sgt Co. A, 95, N. Y. Inf July 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

10549 IngersoU, Samuel J Pvt. Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Oct. 9, 1864. . Dysentery 

4685 Ingraham, Charles B.... Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 4, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4359 Inman, John T Pvt. Co. A, 1, N. Y. Cav July 31, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st Veteran Cavalrj-.") 

7647 Ireland, George Pvt. Co. E, 14, N. Y. .\rt Sept. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4587 Irish, George H Pvt. Co. C, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug 2, 1864.. Dysentery 

7596 Jack, John W Pvt. Co. H, 95, X. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3660 Jackman, Jasper G Pvt. Co. B, 104 N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864.. Dvsentery 

6558 Jackson, Andrew Pvt. Co. E, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

9048 Jackson, J Pvt. Co. K, 43, N. Y. Inf Sept. 17, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " John Jackson.") 

5403 Jackson, John F Pvt. Co. F, 109, X\ Y. Inf Aug. 12, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11391 Jackson, Truman A Pvt. Co. E, 122, X. Y. Inf Oct. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7253 Jackson, William Pvt. Co. E, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

4795 Jameson, Andrew Pvt. Co. A, 51, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8159 Jaquays, Reuben Pvt. Co. L, 9, N. Y. Art Sept. 8, 1864.. Pleuritis 

3645 Jarvis, Edward Pvt. Co. H, 106, N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 203 

JTo. Name Organization ■ Died Cause 

6671 Jay, John Pvt. Co. I, 8, N. Y. Art Aug. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3984 Jeffers, Benjamin Pvt. Co. D, 9, N. Y. Art July 26, 1864.. Dysentery 

1120 Jelly, John Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf May 15, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

10757 Jennings, Charles Pvt. Co. K, 147, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 12, 1864.. Wounds 

8878 Jennings, John Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Art Sept. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

6966 Jermain, James Pvt. Co. I, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

744 Jewell, James R Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art Aug. 26, 1864. . Dysentery 

11182 Johnson, Albert Pvt. Co. A, 7, N. Y. Art Oct. 19,1864.. Wounds 

9934 Johnson, Alex Pvt. Co. C, 74, N. Y. Inf Sept. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12121 Johnson, Benjamin Pvt. Co. A, 182, N. Y. Inf Nov. 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12477 Johnson, Benjamin F... Pvt. Co. H, 82, N. Y. Inf Jan. 18, 1865.. Pleuritis 

10118 Johnson, Charles H Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct. 1, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9495 Johnson, George B Cpl. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept. 22, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5916 Johnson, Henry Pvt. Co. I, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

6232 Johnson, Hyatt Pvt. Co. C, 10, N. Y. .... Aug. 20, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "10th Infantry.") 

7712 Johnson, James Pvt. Co. I, 89, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12546 Johnson, Jerry Pvt. Co. A, 146, N. Y. Inf Jan. 28, 1865.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " .Te««e Johnson, Jr.") 

10043 Johnson, Lyman F Pvt. Co. C, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5935 Johnson, Marshall B Pvt. Co. H, 96, N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3427 Johnson, Richard Pvt. Co. I, 120, N. Y. Inf July 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8054 Johnson, Robert Pvt. Co. A, 111, N. Y. Inf Sept. 7, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5980 Jones, C. W Pvt. Co. C, 10, N. Y. Cav Aug. 17, 1864. . Marasmus 

6898 Jones, Davis Pvt. Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3650 Jones, Evan Pvt. Co. F, 134, N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864.. Dysentery 

10769 Jones, Ezra C Pvt. Co. E, 147, N. Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4373 Jones, George O Pvt. Co. A, 20, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3282 Jones, George W Pvt. Co. F, 47, N. Y. Inf July 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8771 Jones, James B Pvt. Co. F, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5582 Jones, John Pvt. Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864. . Remittent 

fever 

11855 Jones, John Pvt. Co. E, 6, N. Y. Cav Nov. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2487 Jones, Richard J Pvt. Co. B, 99, N. Y. Inf June 26, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4403 Jones, Thomas Pvt. Co. B, 116, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8867 Jones, William Pvt. Co. C, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5042 Jones, William Pvt. Co. B, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5753 Jones, William H Pvt. Co. I, 10, N. Y. Cav Aug. 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9528 Jourdan, Barney Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Barney Jordan.") 

4047 Joyce, Thomas Pvt. Co. C, 22, N. Y. Cav July 27, 1864. . Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Thomas Joice.") 

4188 Jull, H Pvt. Co. E, 51, N. Y. Inf July 28, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 
9107 Jump, Orrin Pvt. Co. B, 8, N. Y. Cav Sept. 18, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 



204 STATE OF NEW YORK 

No. Name Organization Died Cause 

3062 Kain, M Pvt. Co. E, 132, N. Y. Inf.... July 9, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Michael Kain.") 

3155 Kalterboon, Joseph Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art July 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1-'170 Kane, Thomas Pvt. Co. A, 82, N. Y. Inf Nov. 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10960 Kannan, Alfred Pvt. Co. K, 70, N. Y. Inf Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

9060 Kauflfman, Augustus ... Pvt. Co. G, 140, X. Y. Inf Sept. 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5198 Kaulbaum, Adolph Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "Adolph //a/ilbaum.") 

2383 Kays, Michael Pvt. Co. I, 95, N. Y. Inf June 23, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5258 Kearney, David J Pvt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

10222 Kearny, William Pvt. Co. A, 16, N. Y. Cav Oct. 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8452 Keating, Michael Pvt. Co. A, 146, N. Y. Inf Sept. 12, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4484 Keating, Thomas Pvt. Co. L, 83, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1250 Keeney, George W Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... May 21, 1864.. Tj-phus fever 

7387 Keers, Matthew Pvt. Co. A, 49, X. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11904 Kehn, W Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William Kehn.") 

11756 Kehoe, Thomas Pvt. Co. E, 155, N. Y. Inf Nov. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10341 Keily, Michael Pvt. Co. L, 2, N. Y. Art Oct. 4, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8873 Keiser, George W Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "George W. Kenzor.") Neither of these names appear on the list of 76, 
N. Y. Inf., as published by Ad. G. N. Y. 

10649 Keller, John Pvt. Co. E, 140, N. Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10675 Kelley, James Pvt. Co. K, 146, N. Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6577 Kelley, William Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Dysentery 

6739 Kelly, D Cpl. Co. C, 45, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6997 Kelly, James Pvt. Co. F, 40, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

10388 Kelly, Michael Pvt. Co. B, 63, N. Y. Inf Oct. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9676 Kelly, Patrick J Pvt. Co. B, 106, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 24, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12209 Kelly, Thomas Sgt. Co. F, 82, N. Y. Inf Dec. 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12026 Kemble, Samuel Sgt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11425 Kennedy, Michael E Pvt. Co. K, 82, N. Y. Inf Oct. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9865 Kennedy, William Pvt. Co. D, 132, N. Y. Inf Sept. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3572 Kenney, A. W Pvt. Co. D. 85, N. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "A. W. Kmney.") 

239 Kenney, Luke Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Mch. 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3671 Kenney, Michael Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav July 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. checks as correct. — Ad. G. N. J. says "Michael Kearney, 1st Sgt. Co. F, 

2, N. J. Volunteers, died July 20, 1864, number of grave, 3671.") The 

Ad. G. N. J. claims this information was furnished from 

Quartermaster-General's office. 

4398 Kent, Enock R Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7403 Kenwill, Richard Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 31, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11244 Kenyon, Frank Pvt. Co. H, 8, N. Y. Art Oct. 21, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Frank A. Kenyon, killed Jime 3, 1864, at Cold Harbor, Va.") 

1079 Keogh, Peter Pvt. Co. C, 132, N. Y. Inf May 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

S310 Kern, Charles L Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2484 Kerr, Howard Pvt. Co. L, 2, N. Y. Cav June 25, 1864. . Anasarca 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 205 

No. yame Organization Died Cause 

3915 Kersler, F Pvt. Co. K, 1T8, N. Y. Inf.... July 25, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7650 Kesler, Joseph Pvt. Co. E, 65, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2797 Kester, Charles Sgt. Co. G, 141, N. Y. Inf July 3, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5589 Kettle, Ebenezer Cpl. Co. E, 125, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11075 Kevan, William Pvt. Co. I, 47, N. Y. Inf Oct. 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

650 Keyes, Orson S Sgt. Co. E, 5, N. Y. Cav Apr. 20, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

9015 Keys, Richard E Pvt. Co. A, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

1932 Kidd, Owen Pvt. Co. K, 126, N. Y. Inf. . . . June 14, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

4606 Killner, Sanford Pvt. Co. F, 125, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 3, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Sanford KiUmer.") 

1864 Kilmer, J Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Jmie 12, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10614 Kilson, J Pvt. Co. E, 115, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3262 Kimberly, Owen Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf July 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says Orrcn Kimberly.") 

12853 King, John Pvt. Co. I, 176, N. Y. Inf. . . Nov. 30, 1865 

9816 King, Nicholas Pvt. Co. G, 21, N. Y. Cav Sept. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

3787 King, Richard Sgt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf July 22, 1864.. Anasarca 

8738 King, Sylvanus Pvt. 24, N Y. Ind. Battery... Sept. 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7999 King, T Pvt. Co. I, 9% N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

3095 Kingsley, J Pvt. Co. H, 12, N. Y. Cav July 10, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Kingsley, Co. A") 

9689 Kingsley, James M Pvt. Co. K, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8400 Kinney, James Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. V. Inf Sept. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Kinney, Jr") 

11558 Kinney, Michael Cpl. Co. C, 42, N. Y. Inf Oct. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Borne as 'William Smith;") 

564 Kinsey, Benjamin B Sgt. Co. K, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7977 Kinsman, John E Pvt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12839 Kinsman, William J Pvt. Co. I, 86, N. Y. Inf Apr. 20, 1865.. Diarrhoea 

4297 Kirby, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav July 30, 1864.. Anasarca 

7087 Kirkland, Joseph Pvt. Co. D, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 28, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12742 Kirkpatrick, S Pvt. Co. D, 12, N. Y. Cav Mch. 6, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11622 Kitte, Solomon Pvt. Co. K, 2, N. Y. Art Oct. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12021 Kline, Samuel M Pvt. Co. H, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Nov. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2604 Knabe, Ernst Pvt. Co. C, 48, N. Y. Inf June 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4525 Knapp, Henry H Cpl. Co. A, 24, N. Y. Cav Aug. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12318 Knauer, Henry Pvt. Co. C, 66, N. Y. Inf Dec. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7949 Knight, William Pvt. Co. C, 142, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 6, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8868 Knop, Charles Pvt. Co. B, 49, N. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11240 Koch, George Pvt. Co. E, 66, N. Y. Inf Oct. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9194 Koepf, George Pvt. Co. F, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept. 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7159 Kolbatz, William Sgt. Co. D, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9211 Kranz, Herman Cpl. Co. E, 54, N. Y. Inf Sept. 19, 1864. . Scorbutus 



206 STATE OF NEW YORK 

!fo. Same Organization Died Cause 

11976 Krassar, William Pvt. Co. F, 51, N. Y. Inf Nov. 12, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

1208 Krause, Gcrhardt R Pvt. Co. H, 178, N. Y. Inf May 19, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8860 Krauspas, J Pvt. Co. L, 65, X. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6952 Kreib, Jacob Pvt. Co. D, 132. N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864.. Marasmus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Jacob Kreeb.") 

11948 Krelan, A Pvt. 13, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Nov. 10, 1864.. Wounds 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

12115 Kriete, John Sgt. Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav Nov. 21, 1864. .Scorbutus 

3892 Krone, C. E Pvt. Co. G, 164, N. Y. Inf July 24, 1964.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11408 Kuhn, George F Pvt. Co. K, 65, N. Y. Inf Oct. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8447 Lacey, Patrick Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10736 Lackey, P. T Pvt. Co. — , 7, N. Y. Cav Oct. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8372 Lacoste, Henry Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3601 Lacy, Willis L Cpl. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11527 Ladue, Ambrose Pvt. Co. E, 9, N. Y. Art Oct. 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7156 Lagor, Frank Pvt. Co. B, 118, N. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8956 Lahey, Patrick Pvt. Co. D, 1, N. Y. Sept. 17, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1st N. Y. Mounted Rifles.") 

10365 Lahie, Patrick Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Cav Oct. 5. 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st N. Y. Veteran Cavalry.") 

12775 LahifF, Dennis Pvt. Co. K, 43, N. Y. Inf Mch. 14, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

12110 Lake, William L Pvt. Co. K, 146. N. Y. Inf Nov. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William //. Lake.") 

11599 Lambley, J Pvt. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Cav Oct. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1st N. Y. Veteran Cavalry.") 

10095 Lamery, Joseph Pvt. Co. G, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11318 Lampman, Michael S Pvt. Co. M, 6, N. Y. Art Oct. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3283 Landers, Charles Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Art July 14, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7462 Lane, Charles Pvt. Co. E, 3, N. Y. Cav Sept. 1, 1864. . .\nasarca 

12214 Lane, Cornelius Pvt. Co. E, 146, N. Y. Inf Dec. 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2678 Lane, Girdin W Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf June 30, 1864.. Dysentery 

11499 Lane, John W Pvt. Co. M, 15, N. Y. Cav Oct. 26, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

2288 Lang, Alex Cpl. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf June 21, 1864.. Tj-phus fever 

8238 Langdon, Albert M Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10096 Langin, A Pvt. Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

13 Langs, William W Pvt. Co. K, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Mch. 6, 1864.. Pneumonia 

4375 Lansing, William Pvt. Co. B, 12, N. Y. Cav July 31, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7480 Lapham, Henry P Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Henry P. Lopham.") 

4871 Lapham, Ledratt H Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Batten,-... Aug. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11213 La Porte, Russell Pvt. Co. B, 98, N. Y. Inf Oct. 20, 1864.. Debilitis 

(Headstone reads "Russell Laport, and register credits soldier to 93, Inf., but record as 
given has been verified by Ad. G. N. Y.) 

9836 Larabee, Edward Cpl. Co. D, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept. 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7268 Larcock, Edward Pvt. Co. M, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6631 Larkins, Major C Pvt Co. A, 100, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 23, 1864.. Wounds 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 207 

No. Name Organization Died Cause 

U Lason, Benjamin F Pvt. Co. F, 6, N. Y. Cav Mch. 6, 1864.. Remittent 

851 Latourette, Jacob Sgt. Co. A, 1, N. Y. Mounted fever 

Rifles May 3, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Register credits this soldier to Co. A, 1, N. Y. Cav., but record as given has been verified 

by Ad. G. N. Y.) 

8162 Lawler, John Pvt. Co. B, 69, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Catarrh 

4101 Lawson, John Pvt Co. D, 2, N. Y. Cav July 27, 1864. . Dysentery 

6434 Layman, Chauncey Pvt. Co. K, 120, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864.. Dysentery 

10066 Layton, Peter Pvt. Co. A, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2119 Leach, Stephen H Pvt. Co. E, 10, N. Y. Cav June 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

41 Leahy, Daniel Pvt. Co. I, 82, N. Y. Inf Mch. 13, 1864.. Pneumonia 

(Headstone reads "David Leahy.") 

1737 Lear, H. H Pvt. Co. L, 21, N. Y. Cav June 8, 1864 . . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Henry H. Lear.") 

9979 LeBarren, Christopher .. Pvt. 12, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8419 Lech, John H Pvt. Co. I, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 11, 1864. . Typhus fever 

7142 Lederer, WilUam Pvt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

12175 Ledwitch, Alfred Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1944 Lee, Abraham Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... June 14, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

2169 Lee, Francis Pvt. Co. F, 15, N. Y. Cav June 19, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4325 Lee, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 11, N. Y. July 30, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2573 Lee, P Pvt. Co. A, 2, N. Y. Art June 27, 1864. . Remittent 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") fever 

9696 Lee, William Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Cav Sept. 24, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6487 Lehman, August Pvt. Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6399 Leichinger, J Pvt. Co. D, 3, N. Y. Cav Aug. 21, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6381 Lemereaux, Joseph Pvt. Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9712 Lenroy, Charles Pvt. Co. A, 40, N. Y. Inf Sept. 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3686 Lent, Abram Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... June 30, 1864.. Pneumonia 

12076 Leonard, Charles H Pvt. Co. A, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8987 Leonard, James W Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7499 Leonhardt, August Pvt. Co. B, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10065 Lestruff, C Pvt. Co. A, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8774 Le Valley, Simeon Pvt. Co. A, 140, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9045 Lewis, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 17, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

11906 Lewis, Charles Pvt. Co. M, 16, N. Y. Cav Nov. 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3727 Lewis, Charles S Pvt. Co. E, 52, N. Y. Inf July 21, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

1329 Lewis, F. A Pvt. Co. G, 9, N. Y. May 24, 1864. . Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 
11915 Lewis, George W Pvt. Co. G, 146, N. Y. Inf Nov. 8, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8988 Lewis, George W Pvt. Co. K, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Sept. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8297 Lewis, James Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Art Sept. 9, 1864. . Bronchitis 

5114 Lewis, Parmer A Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Parmer W. Lewis.") 
11S51 Limbach, John Cpl. Co. D, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Oct. 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 



208 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



A'o. yame Organization 

11893 Limbricht, Albert Cpl. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. 

(N'o rank cut on headstone.) 

5772 Linch, Daniel Pvt. Co. A, 164, N. Y. Inf. . . . Aug. 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Daniel Lynch.") 

10559 Lindlay, David Pvt. Co. E, 147, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 

7815 Linehan, Thomas Pvt. Co. C, 125, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 

6759 Ling, John Pvt. Co. F, 4, N. Y. Art Aug. 

38 Link, Gottleib Pvt. Co. K, 54, N. Y. Inf Mch. 

3565 Linne, August Pvt. Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf July 

11697 Linnotce, Victor Pvt. Co. I, 47, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

10073 Little, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

10933 Livingstone, Angus Pvt. Co. C, 1, N. Y. Cav Oct. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " 1st Veteran Cavalry." 

8395 Llovd, Sullivan Pvt. Co. D, 47, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Solomon Lloyd.") 

12403 Locke, John B Sgt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Jan. 

4543 Locker, Conrad Pvt. 15, N. Y. Ind. Battery... .Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

8246 Loftus, Frank Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 

7010 Lones, R Pvt. Co. A, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 

11591 Long, J Pvt Co. A, 75, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7924 Long, Lewis Pvt. Co. I, 40, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lewis Long. Also served in 

4514 Longle, William Pvt. Co. B, 4, N. Y. Art Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

5434 Loomis, John Pvt. Co. M, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 

13670 Lord, Alvin H Cpl. Co. E, 90, N. Y. Inf Jan. 

9988 Lorzbran, J Pvt. Co. E, 64, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8087 Loucks, Gilbert Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

10879 Loucks, Morris B Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct. 

9663 Louis, H Pvt. Co. E, 25, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

12329 Love, Jason Pvt. Co. A, 125, N. Y. Inf Dec. 

7146 Lovejoy, Corydon Pvt. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Aug. 

10248 Lovery, Francis Pvt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art Oct. 

5566 Lovett, Alfred Pvt. Co. B, 98, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

12313 Lowery, G Pvt. Co. A, 7, N. Y. Dec. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

2568 Lowery, James S Pvt. Co. A, 140, N. Y. Inf June 

9354 Luce, Varnal Pvt. Co. D, 140, N. Y. Inf . . . . Sept. 

6150 Lucha, John Pvt. Co. C, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 

10311 Lucia, Alex Pvt. Co. H, 95, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

13233 Ludwick, C Pvt. Co. K, 78, N. Y. Inf Nov. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6895 Lynch, Patrick Cpl. Co. K, 43, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

931 Lynch, Patrick Cpl. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf May 



Die> 


i 


Catue 


7, 


1864. . 


C. Diarrhoea 


15, 


1864.. 


, Diarrhoea 


9, 


1864. . 


Diarrhoea 


4, 


1864.. 


Diarrhoea 


25, 


1864., 


, A. Diarrhoea 


13, 


1864.. 


, C. Dysentery 


19, 


1864., 


, Dysentery 


31, 


1864.. 


, Diarrhoea 


30, 


1864., 


, Scorbutus 


1*. 

) 

10, 


1864., 


. Diarrhoea 


1864. 


. Dysentery 


6, 


1865. 


. Scorbutus 


3 


1864. 


. Dysentery 


9, 


1864. 


. C. Diarrhoea 


27, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


28, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


5, 


1864. 


. Anasarca 


101, 


, Inf." 


) 


1, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


12, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


3, 


1866. 





,29, 


1864. 


. Diarrhoea 


■ 7, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


13, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


, 24, 


1864. 


. Diarrhoea 


25, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


29, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


3, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


13, 


1864. 


. C. Diarrhoea 


20, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


27, 


1864. 


. A. Diarrhoea 


20, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


IQ 


1864. 
1864. 




4, 


. Scorbutus 


12, 


1864. 





26, 


1864. 


. Anasarca 


7, 


1864. 


. C. Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



209 



iVo. IVame Organization 

5845 Lynchlin, Franz, also 

borne as Luchlin, Franz Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 

(Latter name on headstone and register.) 

8343 Lyon, J. H Pvt. Co. — , 5, N. Y. Art Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

12633 Lyons, Charles Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Cav Feb. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

1427 Lyons, Michael Prt. Co, E, 99, N. Y. Inf May 

6156 Lyons, Thomas Pvt. Co. G, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 

7913 Lyons, William J Cpl. Co. A, 47, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

37 Mace, Jefferson Pvt. Co. I, 134, N. Y. Inf Mch. 

10850 Mack, J Pvt. Co. D, 39, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Jacob Mack.") 

13069 Mackey, John H Pvt. Co. I, 5, N. Y. Nov. 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "5th Veteran Infantry." 

4823 Madden, Charles Pvt. Co. D, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st Veteram Cavalry.") 

10506 Madden, Furgus Sgt. Co. E, 123, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

3933 Madden, Peter Pvt. Co. E, 155, N. Y. Inf July 

11257 Maddigan, John Pvt. Co. B, 135, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 

9798 Madison, D Pvt. Co. C, 75, N. Y. Inf Sept. 



Died 
16, 1864. 
10, 1864. 



Cause 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 



10, 1865.. DeblUtis 



28, 1864. 
19, 1864. 
5, 1864. 
13, 1864. 
13, 1864. 



C. Diarrhoea 
A. Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 



IT, 1864.. Scorbutus 



5, 1864.. Scorbutus 



(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

9353 Maerkle, John G Pvt. Co. A, 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 

4709 Maguckin, Andrew Sgt. Co. C, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 

4028 Mahon, C Pvt Co. G, 17, N. Y. Inf July 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

122 Mahon, Samuel Pvt. Co. K, 132, N. Y. Inf Mch. 

2896 Maiers, Wilhelm Pvt. Co. C, 54, N. Y. Inf July 

S842 Mailer, James R Sgt. Co. B, 134, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

11679 Main, William C Pvt. Co. A, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

7942 MaUich, Michael Pvt. Co. D, 6, N. Y. Cav Sept. 

9457 Malone, Patrick Pvt. Co. F, 123, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

11447 Maloney, James Pvt. Co. G, 73, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

4392 Manahan, John Pvt. Co. D, 73, N. Y. Inf July 

(Ad. G. N.. Y. says "John Monahan.") 

7600 Mandeville, William Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

2802 Mangam, Michael Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. H. Art... July 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Michael Mangum.") 

10728 Manning, Benjamin F. . . Pvt. Co. A, 14, N. Y. Art Oct. 

10623 Manning, T Pvt. Co. — , 33, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10540 Manning, Thomas Pvt. Co. B, 125, N. Y. Inf . . . . Oct. 

2952 Mannweiler, Jacob Pvt. Co. C, 74, N. Y. Inf July 

7830 Manson, George Pvt. Co. H, 6, N. Y. Art Sept. 

8370 Manzer, David Pvt. Co. C, 3, N. Y. Art Sept. 

10308 Margraff, William Pvt. Co. H, 64, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

4000 Marley, John Pvt. Co. E, 53, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

676 Maroney, Joseph Pvt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph Moroney.") 

14 



8, 1864.. 

35, 1864.. 
21, 1864., 

36, 1864.. 

30, 1864.. 

4, 1864. 
26, 1864. . 

23, 1864.. 

5, 1864.. 
16, 1864. , 

31, 1864.. 

5, 1864.. 
21, 1864.. 
34, 1864.. 
31, 1864.. 

2, 1864.. 

3, 1864.. 

11, 1864.. 
10, 1864.. 

8, 1864.. 

6, 1864.. 

4, 1864.. 

9, 1864.. 
4, 1864.. 

26, 1864.. 



C. Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Dysentery 
Tonsilitis 

Tj'phus fever 

Anasarca 

Erysipelas 

Scorbutus 

C. Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

A. Diarrhoea 

Dysentery 

Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 



23, 1864. . Phthisis 



210 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



E>3rsentery 
Diarrhoea 

Anasarca 
Scorbutus 
Dysentery 

C. Diarrhoea 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

3824 Marsh, Ira Pvt. Co. M, 6, N. Y Art July 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2856 Marsh, Jerome D Pvt. Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav July 3, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

5407 Marsh, John Pvt Co. D, 104, N. Y. Inf Aug. 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John March.") 

1073 Marten, William Pvt. Co. D, 13, N. Y. Cav May 13, 1864.. C. Diarrlioca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William Martin." Latter on headstone.) 

3441 Martin, Anthony Cpl. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav July 17, 1864. . 

6543 Martin, Charles Pvt Co. G, 42, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "And 82, Inf.") 

435 Martin, Collins Pvt Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Apr. 8, 1864. , 

11600 Martin, Edward A Pvt Co. B, 5, N. Y. Cav Oct. 28, 1864. . 

4321 Martin, H Pvt Co. H, 76, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

5086 Martin, Hector C Pvt Co. B, 24, N. Y. L. Art. . Aug. 8, 1864. . 

(This is supposed to be intended for " 24, N. Y. Independent Battery " though record as 
given was checked as correct by Ad. G. N. Y.) 

6293 Martin, John Cpl. Co. L, 16, N. Y. Cav Aug. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12208 Martin, John Pvt. Co. G, 39, N. Y. Inf Dec. 2, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Martin.") 

8003 Martin, Nicholas Pvt Co. F, 142, N. Y. Inf Sept 6, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9164 Martin, Patrick Pvt Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Sept. 18, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1256 Martin, Peter Pvt Co. I, 40, N. Y. Inf -May 21, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

8746 Martin, William H Pvt Co. M, 4, N. Y. H. Art.. Sept 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

617 Marton, Charles Pvt Co. A, 47, N. Y. Inf Apr. 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles Martin.") Headstone reads " Chas. Monton." 

10483 Mason, Theodore Cpl. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art Oct 7, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11997 Mastenson, Andrew Pvt Co. C, 65, N. Y. Inf Nov. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Headstone reads "Andrew Matenson.") 

11290 Masterson, Edward Pvt. Co. L, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 22, 1864. . 

2315 Mastin, Samuel P Pvt Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf June 22, 1864.. 

5651 Matterson, Richard Pvt Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864. . 

4472 Matthews, H Pvt. Co. M, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 1, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " H^nr^ Matthews.") 

2100 Mattice, Henry C Pvt Co. E, 134, N. Y. Inf June 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8241 Maiirschutz, Baron V... Pvt Co. F, 65, N. Y. Inf Sept 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11296 Ma.xson, Horace L Pvt Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Register and headstone reads "Horace L. Mason" but record as given has been verified 

by Ad. G. N. Y.) 

4946 Maxum, Smith E Pvt Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 7, 1864. . 

10498 MaxweU, Joseph Pvt Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct. 8, 1864. . 

1477 Maxwell, Robert Pvt Co. B, 48, N. Y. Inf May 30, 1864.. 

3618 Maynic, Frank Pvt. Co. F, 99, N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Frank Maynicie.") 

9864 McArdell, Moses Pvt Co. H, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept 27, 1864. . 

10519 McAllister, James A.... Pvt. Co. I, 125, N. Y. Inf.... Oct 8, 1864.. 

6227 McArthur, William Pvt. Co. L, 9, N. Y. Cav Aug. 30, 1864. . Dysentery 

1035 McArty, Patrick Pvt. Co. K, 132, N. Y. Inf May 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9633 McArty, Timothy E Pvt. Co. K, 2, N. Y. Rifles Sept. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

9266 McAuley, H. W Sgt Co. G, 47, N. Y. Inf Sept 19, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7995 McBride, Thomas Pvt Co. K, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 



Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 



Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Wounds 
Dysentery 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



211 



No. Name Organization 

2196 McCabe, J Pvt. Co. C, 44, N. Y. Inf June 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

4508 McCabe, James Pvt. Co. E, 88, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

3233 McCabe, John Pvt. Co. F, 13, N. Y. Cav July 

2517 McCabe, P Sgt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav June 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Patrick McCabe.") 

732 McCabe, Peter Sgt. Co. E, 2, N. Y. Cav Apr. 

(No rank on headstone.) 
8324 McCafferty, Wesley .... Pvt. Co. D, 100, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 

10716 McCane, L Pvt. Co. C, 18, N. Y. Oct. 

7620 McCartin, Laughlin Pvt. Co. B, 9, N. Y. Art Sept. 

4480 McCarty, Dennis Pvt Co. G, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 

3413 McCarty, Dennis Pvt. Co. G, 155, N. Y. Inf July 

5121 McCarty, James Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

6136 McCarty, John Pvt Co. E, 104, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

4759 McCarty, John P\i:. Co. K, 69, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

2965 McCarty, Simon J Pvt Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf July 

8354 McCarty, Michael Pvt. Co. A, 69, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

6440 McCloud, John Pvt. Co. A, 97, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

(Death probably occurred Aug. 22, 1864.) 

8242 McClusky, Thomas Pvt. Co. E, 139, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

1344 McColgan, Patrick Pvt. Co. F, 99, N. Y. Inf May 

8507 McColIum, Daniel Pvt. Co. F, 57, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

4416 McConnell, Levi Pvt Co. E, 9, N. Y. Art July 

1433 McCormack, Peter Pvt Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf May 

7441 McCormick, John Pvt Co. F, 43, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

3629 McCormick, John Pvt. Co. H, 155, N. Y. Inf July 

6697 McCormick, Hugh Pvt Co. K, 69, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

9018 McCormick, Hugh Pvt Co. F, 178, N. Y. Inf Sept 

11110 McCormick, Michael Pvt. Co. K, 93, N. Y. Inf Oct 

10258 McCormick, Patrick Pvt. Co. D, 43, N. Y. Inf Oct 

5203 McCormick, W Pvt. Co. I, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 'William McCormick." 

8685 McCotter, Wilson Pvt. Co. B, 83, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

6012 McCourt, Hugh Pvt. Co. G, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Hugh M. McCourt." 

7675 McCoy, John Pvt Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1st Veteran Cavalry." 

7730 McCrackin, Benjamin .. Pvt Co. B, 7, N. Y. Art Sept 

6203 McCrlnk, John Pvt 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery. . . Aug. 

10778 McDavid, J Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Oct 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6912 McDermott Peter Pvt. Co. H, 164, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

8126 McDevjne, Matthew Pvt Co. C, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Matthew Devine.") 
8969 McDonald, Archibald ... Cpl. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept 

7140 McDonald, Bernard Pvt. Co. B, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

(Headstone reads " Barnard McDonald.") 
4013 McDonald, John Pvt. Co. D, 164, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 



Died 
19, 1864. 

1, 1864. 
12, 1864 



A. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 



12, 


1864., 


. C. Diarrhoea 


25, 


1864. 


. Dysentery 


9, 


1864. . 


C. Diarrhoea 


10, 


1864.. 


Scorbutus 


2, 


1864.. 


C. Diarrhoea 


1. 


1864., 


. C. Diarrhoea 


16, 


1864.. 


A. Diarrhoea 


9, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


19 


1864., 





5, 1864. 

6, 1864. 

10, 1864. 
1, 1864. 

9, 1864. 

24, 1864. 

11, 1864. 
31, 1864. 
28, 1864. 

1, 1864. 

20, 1864. 

24, 1864. 

17, 1864. 

18, 1864. 
3, 1864. 

10, 1864. 

) 

13, 1864. 

17, 1864. 
) 



Diarrhoea 
A. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

A. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

A. Diarrhoea 

Dysentery 

Dysentery 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

C. Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 



3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

) 
3, 1864. 
19, 1864. 
11, 1864. 

26, 1864. 
8, 1864. 

16, 1864. 
28, 1864. 



Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 



26, 1864.. Dysentery 



212 STATE OF NEW YORK 

iS'o. yame Organization Died Cause 

7T+5 McDonald, John H Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

10002 McDonald, Thomas Cpl. Co. A, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12138 McDonald, Thomas Pvt. Co. D, 16, X. Y. Cav Nov. 23, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Thomas McDone//, i)rivate Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav.") 

7359 McDowell, William Pvt. Co. D, 14, X. Y. Art Aug. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4089 McElroy, John Pvt. Co. I, 43, N. Y. Inf July 37, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Mc^llroy.") 

9581 McEneary, Patrick Pvt. Co. G, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Sept. 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Patrick McEneany.") 

4001 McFadden, James Pvt. Co. F, 39, X. Y. Inf July 25, 1864.. Dysentery 

338 McFarland, Andrew Pvt. Co. I, 72, X. Y. Inf -Apr. 4, 1864.. Pneumonia 

13334 McGarvey, John Pvt. Co. A, 176, X. Y. Inf Xov. 23, 1864 

3665 McGeehan, John Pvt. Co. H, 99, X. Y. Inf June 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3551 McGibony, Henderson .. Pvt. Co. E, 85, X. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. Phthisis 

12478 McGinn, John Pvt. Co. B, 170, X. Y. Inf Jan. 19, 1865.. Scorbutus 

2756 McGiven, William Cpl. Co. B, 158, X. Y. Inf.... July I, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " WiUiam JIcGivemi.") 

8225 McGowan, Frank Pvt. Co. H, 170, X. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11116 McGowan, Michael Pvt. Co. L, 6, X. Y. Art Oct. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

248 McGowen, John Pvt. Co. K, 132, X. Y. Inf.... Mch. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John MtOowan.") 

11714 McGrath, George H Pvt. Co. C, 61, X. Y. Inf Xov. 1, 1864.. Dysentery 

1112 McGrath, M Pvt. Co. E, 12, X. Y. Cav May 15, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " yiichael McGrath, 12, Infantry") 

354 McGrath, Patrick Pvt. Co. D, 52, X. Y. Inf Apr. 4, 1864.. Pneumonia 

4995 McGuire, Felix Pvt. Co. C, 140, N. Y. Inf .\ug. 7, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

6827 McGuire, Patrick Pvt. Co. C, 10, X. Y. Aug. 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

3220 McGuire, Patrick Pvt. Co. F, 100, X. Y. Inf July 12, 1864 

12664 McKenna, X Cpl. Co. F, 12, X. Y. Cav Feb. 16, 1865. . Ulcers 

(Ad. G. XT. Y. says " Xei7 McKenna.") 

9390 McKenney, John Pvt. Co. D, 82, X. Y. Inf Sept. 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " John McKenna, or McKinlei/, subsequently transferred to 59, Inf.") 

5359 McKerchy, J. M Pvt. Co. F, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

1168 McKinley, John Pvt. Co. I, 99, X. Y. Inf May 17, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4268 McLaren, Robert Pvt. Co. M, 20, X'. Y. Cav July 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6850 McLaughlin, John Cpl. Co. B, 63, X. Y. Inf Aug. 25, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X'^. Y. says "John yichotighlin.") Xo rank on the headstone. 

10055 McLaughlin, Owen Pvt. Co. F, 9, N. Y. H. Art... Sept. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10392 McLean, Robert Pvt. Co. F, 42, X. Y. Inf Oct. 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(.\d. G. X. Y. says " Robert McClean, also 83d, and 59th Infs.") 

3611 Mc.Minn, Clarence L Pvt. Co. E, 3, X. Y. Cav July 19, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6814 McMurn, William Pvt. Co. L, 2, X. Y. Cav Aug. 35. 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9969 McXamara, William Pvt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Sept. 38, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5406 McXutty, Martin Pvt. Co. E, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 12, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Martin MeXurty.") 

2279 McOmber, Walter Pvt. Co. I. 85, X. Y. Inf June 21, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3724 McPeck, Henry Pvt. Co. B, 2, X. Y. Cav July 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Henry McPefk.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



213 



Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

Dysentery 

C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

7371 McPherson, WiUiam .... Pvt. Co. F, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5868 McQuillian, Alex Pvt. Co. L, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alexander McQuillian.") 

8899 McSorley, James Pvt. Co. M, 30, N. Y. Cav Sept. 16, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3137 Mead, Patrick Pvt. Ret. Co. L, N. Y. L. Art. July 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " The only ' Patrick Mead ' in 1, N. Y. L. Art., was Co. F, who appears 
as a deserter May 4, 1861, at Culpeper, Va.") 

4381 Meek, Christian Pvt. Co. E, 39, N. Y. Inf July 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " ChTisfo])her Meek.") 
ISO Megran, or Megram, 

Wm. H Pvt. Co. E, 99, X. Y. Inf Mch. 25, 1864. . Pneumonia 

(Headstone reads " Wm. H. Megram."— Q. M. G. O., No. 213,333, Apr. 8, '08) Report 
of Ad. G. N. Y. 1903, pp. 1319 states this man is also borne as " McGran 

and " Megrean.") 

11580 Meinhardt, Charles Pvt. Co. B, 39, N. Y. Inf Oct. 28, 1864.. 

11485 Melech, Auge Pvt. Co. A, 48, N. Y. Inf Oct. 26, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Auge Mel/c/cp.") 

11167 MeUns, WiUiam Pvt. Co. B, 82, N. Y. Inf Oct. 19, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "And 59th Inf.") 

2068 Menzie, Adam Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art June 16, 1864. . 

6537 Merriam, Irving Cpl. Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 23, 1864. . 

1123 Merrin, John Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf May 15, 1864.. Dj-sentery 

6043 Merritt, Harry D Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Dysentery 

1560 Merville, Sherry A Pvt. Co. C, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. June 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Sperry A. MerviUe.") 

11214 Merz, F. M Pvt. Co. I, 5, N. Y. Cav Oct 20, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

8906 Messing, Franz Pvt. Co. A, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2523 Metcalf, Atkinson Pvt Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf June 26, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

9941 Metzdorff, Charles Pvt Co. D, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept 37, 1864.. 

8853 Meyer, Henry Cpl. Co. F, 66, N. Y. Inf Sept 15, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Henry Myer.") 

11723 Meyer, Jacob Pvt Co. F, 51, N. Y. Inf Nov. 1, 1864.. 

6321 Meyers, Joseph Pvt Co. K, 66, N. Y. Inf Aug. 19, 1864.. Dysentery 

3750 Midlam, Francis Cpl. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav July 22, 1864.. Anasarca 

3709 Miesener, Herman Sgt. Co. D, 54, N. Y. Inf June 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads " Hemiann Miesener.") 

6303 Milan, Thomas J Sgt. Co. A, 13, N. Y. Cav Aug. 19, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8063 MiUeman, Gardner Pvt. Co. B, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 7, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Gardner Milliman.") 

4647 Miller, Charles Pvt Co. I, 111, N. Y. Inf Aug. 3, 1864.. Anasarca 

6469 Miller, Charles B Pvt Co. E, 24, N. Y. Cav Aug. 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

13553 Miller, Franklin Pvt. Co. G, 159, N. Y. Inf Sept. 20, 1864 

11523 Miller, George Pvt Co. G, 1 N. Y.— Oct 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

10627 Miller, Horace W Sgt Co. E, 96, N. Y. Inf Oct 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Horace F. MiUer.") 

SS31 Miller, Jacob Pvt Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8278 Miller, James Pvt. Co. E, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11516 Miller, James A Pvt Co. C, 152, N. Y. Inf Oct 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 



Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 



214 STATE OF NEW YORK 

No. Name Orr/anization Died Cause 

950 Sliller, John Pvt. Co. A, 13, N. Y. Cav Sept. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

628 Miller, John E Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Cav Apr. 19, 1864. . Pneumonia 

3131 Miller, Joseph Pvt. Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav July 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

708 Miller, O Pvt. Co. G, 126, N. Y. Inf.... Apr. 24, 1864.. C. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5155 Miller, Thomas Sgt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9986 Miller, William Pvt. Co. C, 2, N. Y. Art Sept. 29, 1864.. Scorbutus 

168 Milling, Adam Pvt. Co. E, 125, N. Y. Inf Meh. 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Adam Millius.") Headstone reads "Adam Millings." 

4720 Millington, Charles Cpl. Co. H, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 4, 1864. . Bronchitis 

8862 Mills, Jay J Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2844 Mills, S Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav July 3, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Samuel Mills.") 

79 Milne, John Pvt. Co. G, 95, N. Y. Inf Mch. 20, 1864. . Pneumonia 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "James A. Milne.") 
4854 Milspaugh, Frederick . . . Pvt. Co. D, 6, N. Y. H. Art. . . Aug. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 
(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Frederick Mikspaugh.") 

1889 MindJer, Peter Pvt. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Cav June 13, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

4771 Miner, J. Guile Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 5, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

10116 Missinger, C Pvt. Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav Oct. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

9939 MitcheU, John Pvt. Co. L, 120, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads '' U. S. A." change to " N. Y." to be made.) 

8080 Mitchell, Jonathan T Pvt. Co. E, 125, N. Y. Inf Sept. 7, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2486 Moe, John J Pvt. Co. I, 120, N. Y. Inf June 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

4121 Moffet, James Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art July 28, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Moffat*.") 

5720 Monaghon, John Sgt. Co. D, 66, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "John Monaghon.") 

4441 Monahon, John Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11537 Manahon, Peter Pvt. Co. D, 88, N. Y. Inf Oct. 27, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11961 Monroe, Andrew J Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Nov. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4658 Monroe, George R Cpl. Co. G, 111, N. Y. Inf Aug. 3, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3512 Montag, George Pvt Co. B, 39, N. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5635 Montel, Henry Pvt. Co. B, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Dysentery 

10631 Montross, George H Pvt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art Oct. 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhcer. 

8461 Moody, Charles R Pvt. Co. B, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6423 Moody, Thomas Pvt. Co. B, 147, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8417 Mooney, James Pvt. Co. D, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3108 Mooney, Peter Pvt. Co. I', 3, N. Y. Art July 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10886 Mooney, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 139, N. Y. Inf Oct. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3651 Mooney, Timothy Pvt. Co. D, 188, N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2766 Moore, Ara Bugler Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav.. July 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7656 Moore, Chester C Pvt. Co. B, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Sept 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11829 Moore, Claus Pvt Co. B, 2, N. Y. Art Nov. 5, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7767 Moore, John Pvt. Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept 4, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Corporal Co. /.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



215 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

658 Moore, Martin Pvt. Co. C, 7i, N. Y. Inf Apr. 21, 186+.. Diarrhoea 

442 Moore, Piiilip H Pvt. Co. M, S, N. Y. Cav Apr. 9, 1864.. Pneumonia 

457 Moore, WilUam H. H... Pvt. Co. F, 125, N. Y. Inf Apr. 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " WiUiam H. H. Moojj.") 

9778 Moore, WilUam S Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept, 26, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11650 Moran, D. G Pvt. Co. G, 40, N. Y. Inf Oct. 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6565 Moran, Thomas Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Ictus Solis 

11621 Morcartz, J Pvt. Co. M, 1, N. Y. Oct. 28, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y, says "Not found.") 

8913 Morgan, Edward L Cpl. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 16, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Edwin L. Morgan.") 

10781 Morgan, Elam Cpl. Co. H, 14, N. Y. Art Oct. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7563 Morgan, Emmons A Pvt. Co. C, 179, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. Dysentery 

624 Morgan, Henry Pvt. Co. H, 21, N. Y. Cav Apr. 19, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7453 Morgan, Miles Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Milo Morgan.") 

4686 Morris, Edmond Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3780 Morris, H Pvt. Co. F, 71, N. Y. Inf July 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11226 Morris, James Pvt. Co. A, 99, N. Y. Inf Oct. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

6069 Morris, John Pvt. Co. K, 70, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864. . Typhus fever 

5865 Morris, John A Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 16, 1864. . Enteritis 

9373 Morris, Lyman R Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lyman K. Morris.") 

12387 Morris, Robert Pvt. Co. G, 66, N. Y. Inf Jan. 3, 1865. . Scorbutus 

7703 Morris, Theodore A Sgt. Co. E, 111, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9944 Morris, Thomas Pvt. Co. C, 65, N. Y. Inf Sept. 28, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8596 Morrison, John Pvt Co. E, 146, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 12, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8638 Morrison, William Pvt. Co. I, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept 13, 1864. . Gangrene 

7958 Morse, Ezra Pvt. Co. L, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8031 Morse, John L Cpl. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12511 Morse, Joseph Pvt. Co. L, 1, N. Y. Cav Jan. 23, 1865. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1st Veteran Cavalry.") 

7672 Mortimer, William Pvt. Co. A, 5, N. Y. Sept. 3, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3181 Morton, Henry Pvt. Co. C, 61, N. Y. Inf July 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Henry Mortun.") 

2872 Moses, Luther Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf July 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7079 Mosher, E Pvt. Co. D, 9, N. Y. Art Aug. 28, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11016 Mosher, Marion W Pvt. Co. G, 4, N. Y. Oct 16, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "4th Artillery.") 

10152 Mosier, Edward Pvt. Co. E, 9, N. Y. Art Oct. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8711 Moss, William S Cpl. Co. M, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 13, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10211 Mott, Henry Pvt Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Oct. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12003 Motts, C Pvt 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Nov. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 



216 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



No. Name 

6585 Moylan, John . . 



Scorbutus 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

A. Diarrhoea 



Organization Died Cause 

.... Pvt. Co. F, 51, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says 'John Mi/on.") 

6865 Mueler, Frederick Pvt. Co. D, 15, N. Y. Art Aug. 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Fre<lericli Muller.") 

U22 Muhan, Thomas Pvt. Co. C, 120, N. Y. Inf May 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Thomas Meehan.") 

7997 Mulcahy, Dennis Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 6, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Headstone reads " D. D. Mulcahy.") 

11466 Mulcahy, William Sgt. Co. E, 42, N. Y. Inf Oct. 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12155 Mullane, James Pvt. Co. G, 82, N. Y. Inf Nov. 25, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "And 59th Inf.") 

10959 MuUen, Alex Pvt. Co. B, 59, N. Y. Inf Oct. 15, 1864.. 

3521 Muller, Fredericli H.... Pvt. Co. D, 132, N. Y. Inf.... July 18, 1864.. 

6958 Mulligan, J Pvt. Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12240 MulUn, Charles Pvt- Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Dec. 7, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles Mullfn.") 

6665 Murce, L Pvt. Co. H, 48, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8404 Murchison, D Sgt. Co. D, 4, N. Y. Cav Sept. 11, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Duncan Murchison.") 

6218 Murney, M Pvt. 11, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 20, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lafayette M. Murray, and Marcus L. Murray.") 

12118 Murray, J Pvt. Co. F, 23, N. Y. Nov. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11273 Murray, Jere Pvt. Co. I, 47, N. Y. Inf Oct. 23, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Jeremiah Murraj'.") 

11519 Murray, John Pvt. Co. F, 63, N. Y. Inf Oct. 26, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11954 Murray, M Cpl. Co. D, 98, N. Y. Inf Nov. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " ilarvin Murray.") 

8947 Murrey. Alex Pvt Co. C, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 16, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alex Murray.") 

3389 Murrey, Edward Pvt. Co. C, 158, N. Y. Inf.... July 16, 1864.. 

146 Murphy, John Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Mch. 35, 1864. . 

5918 Murphy, Lawrence Pvt. Co. E. 170, N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864.. 

10199 Murphy, Martin Pvt. Co. D, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 2, 1864. . 

6550 Murphy, William S Pvt. Co. K, 40, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864. . 

11803 Murphy, R Cpl. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Nov. 4, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Richard Murphy, corporal Co. 95, Inf.") 

5804 Murphy, Tiiomas Pvt. Co. B, 61, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. 

11764 Murtaugh, John Pvt. Co. A, 6, N. Y. Cav Nov. 2, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says John Mortaugh.") 

12494 Musslemun, Jefferson . . . Pvt. Co. K, 2, N. Y. Cav Jan. 20, 1865. . 

(Headstone reads "Jefferson Mussetoun.") 

1384 Myers, Edmund Pvt. Co. D, 154, N. Y. Inf May 26, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3134 Meyer, Frederick Pvt. Co. G, 45, N. Y. Inf July 10, 1864. . Pneumonia 

(Headstone and register reads " Fred'k Myers " but name and record as given has been 

verified by the Ad. G. N. Y., and will be found in report of that 

officer for 1901, serial number 24, page 361.) 



Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Dysentery 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



217 



No. Xame Organization Died Cause 

4958 Meyer, Henry Pvt. Co. A, 47, N. Y. Inf Aug. 7, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone and register reads " H. Myers " with no record on register, but name and 

record as above has been verified by Ad. G. N. Y., and will be found in 

report of that officer for 1901, serial numljer iJ4, page 789.) 

8970 Myers, John J Pvt. Co. M, 20, N. Y. Cav Sept. 16, 1864. . Dysentery 

5000 Myers, Noah L Pvt. Co. H, 147, N. Y. Inf Aug. 7, 1864.. Dysentery 

10587 Nedden, J Pvt. Co. A, 82, N. Y. Inf Oct. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

5333 Neeb, Philip Pvt. Co. C, 10, N. Y. Cav Aug. 10, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7396 Neitly, Samuel Pvt. Co. L, 12, N. Y. Cav Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

7922 Nellman, Adolph Pvt. Co. I, 66, N. Y. Inf Sept. 5, 1864.. 

(Headstone reads "Adolph IFellman.") 

2541 Nelson, Bernhard Pvt. Co. A, 39, N. Y. Inf June 27, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Bernhard Nilson.") 

6051 Nelson, John Pvt. Co. D, 82, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "And 59th Inf.") 

11062 Nelson, John Pvt. Co. D, 2, N. Y. Oct. 17, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11520 Neuters, G Pvt. Co. L, 10, N. Y. Cav Oct. 26, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3022 Nevlns, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 100, N. Y. Inf July 8, 1864. . 

4880 Nevins, William H Pvt Co. G, 102, N. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864. . 

5227 Newton, Cyrus W Cpl. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. Consumption 

2985 Newton, Lorenzo Pvt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art July 7, 1864.. Pneumonia 

4469 Newton, Riley J Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 1, 1864.. 

4943 Newton, Samuel D Pvt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 7, 1864. . 

4520 Nicholas, Alex Pvt. Co. A, 66, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alex Nicoto««.") 

5109 Nichols, David A Pvt. Co. D, 125, N. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Daniel A. Nicholas.") 

7050 Nichols, Eugene Cpl. Co. F, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

4983 Nichols, Jackson P Pvt. Co. C, 6, N. Y. S. S. Bat. Aug. 7, 1864.. Dysentery 

9017 Nobles, Edgar Pvt. Co. .\, 14, N. Y. H. Art. . Sept. IT, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11533 Nolan, Michael Pvt. Co. C, 5, N. Y. Art Oct. 26, 1864.. Dysentery 

11356 Nolan, Patrick Pvt. Co. E, 88, N. Y. Inf Oct. 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

13671 Noon, Elbert Pvt. Co. D, 90, N. Y. Inf Dec. 13, 1865 

5050 Noonan, Edward Sgt. Co. L, 16, N. Y. Cav Aug. 8, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4633 Norman, John Pvt. Co. H, 15, N. Y. Art Aug. 3, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. .says "Not found.") 

633 Northrop, David A Pvt. Co. H, 125, N. Y. Inf.... Apr. 19, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5928 Northup, V Pvt. Co. G, 10, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 17, 1864.. Enteritis 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Vander Northrup, private Co. G, 10, Cav.") 

17 Norton, Alonzo Pvt. Co. A, 154, N. Y. Inf Mch. 7, 1864.. Pneumonia 

4451 Norwood, Eugene F Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 1, 1864.. 

4735 Nostrand, Winchester . . . Pvt Co. I, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 4, 1864. . 

12241 Nott, Lindorf A Pvt Co. D, 1, N. Y. Vet Dec. 7, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st N. Y. Veteran Cavalry.") 

4217 Nucer, James Pvt. Co. H, 15, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 



Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 



Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 



Anasarca 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 

C. Diarrhoea 



218 STATE OF NEW YORK 

No. Xante Organization Died Came 

2549 Nutt, Martin L Pvt. Co. D, \2G, N. Y. Inf.... June 21, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

11681 Nutterville, William Pvt Co. G, 8, N. Y. Cav Oct. 31, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Register ami headstone reads "Win. WattcrviUe " but name and record as given has 

been verified by Ad. G. N. Y.) 

1553 O'Brian, William Pvt. Co. A, 8, N. Y. Cav June 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5439 O'Brien, Jere Pvt. Co. F, 63, N. Y. Inf Aug. 12, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Jeremiah O'Brien.") 

9765 O'Brien, Michael Pvt. Co. A, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept 25, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8036 O'Brien, S Pvt Co. L, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6^70 O'CarrolI, Timothy Pvt. Co. A, 69, X. Y. Inf Aug. 20, 1864.. Marasmus 

7359 Och, Seno Pvt Co. D, 46, X. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Siano Och*.") 

3530 O'ConneU, Thomas Pvt Co. B, 72, X. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "And 120th Inf.") 

2755 O'Dougherty, John Pvt. Co. F, 51, X. Y. Inf July 1, 1864.. Dysentery 

9737 O'Keefe, Charles Pvt Co. F, 146, X. Y. Inf Sept 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6435 Older, William M Pvt Co. L, 15, X. Y. Cav Aug. 22, 1864.. Dysentery 

9916 Oldham, Abraham Pvt Co. F, 63, X. Y. Inf Sept 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10069 Olmstead, Franklin H... Pvt Co. I, 8, X. Y. Art Sept 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1448 Omat M Pvt Co. B, 78, X. Y. Inf May 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

12150 O'Meara, James Prt. Co. F, 7, X. Y. Art Xov. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8208 O'Xeil, Edward Pvt Co. B, 164, X. Y. Inf Sept 8, 1864.. Dysentery 

11404 O'Xell, John Pvt. Co. H, 39, X". Y. Inf Oct 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John O'XeilZ.") 

8973 O'Xeil, Patrick Pvt. Co. E, 22, X. Y. Cav Sept. 16, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

9122 O'Reiley, Patrick Pvt Co. K, 164, X. Y. Inf Sept 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

7504 O'Reilley, Philip Pvt Co. I, 2, X^ Y. Art Sept 1, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

7131 Osborn, Ebenezer Pvt Co. I, 14, X\ Y. Art Aug. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6456 Osborne, Robert H Sgt. Co. E, 22, X. Y. Cav Aug. 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

12 Osterstuck, William .... Pvt Co. I, 154, X. Y. Inf.... Mch. 5, 1864.. C. Dysentery 

1988 Osterthal, Louis Sgt Co. C, 73, X. Y. Inf June 15, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "Louis Osterthol.") 

12269 Ostrander, John Pvt. Co. A, 86, X. Y. Inf Dec. 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

108 Ostrander, John H Pvt Co. F, 120, X. Y. Inf Mch. 23, 1864.. Congestive 

chill 

7728 O'Sullivan, Patrick Cpl. Co. E, 155, N. Y. Inf Sept 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6326 Otis, John Pvt. Co. A, 94, X. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8768 Otto, Charles L Pvt Co. F, 100, X. Y. Inf.... Sept 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

656 Otto, James L Cpl. Co. E, 10, X\ Y. Cav Apr. 21, 1864 . . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "James S. Otto.") 

2714 Ousterhoudt B. S Pvt Co. C, 120. X. Y. Inf July 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5447 Owens, Edward Pvt Co. G, 47, X. Y. Inf Aug. 12, 1864.. Dysentery 

8218 Owston, George Pvt Co. F, 141, X. Y. Inf Sept 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9319 Page, Ozias D Pvt Co. F, 146, X. Y. Inf.... Sept 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6753 Pallett David Pvt. Co. K, 15, X. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. . Dysentery 

2325 Palmer, Hosea W Pvt Co. D, 85, X\ Y. Inf June 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

2582 Palmer, T Cpl. Co. F, 17, X. Y. June 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



219 



No. Name Organization 

20 Palraiter, RisseU H Cpl. Co. D, 86, N. Y. Inf Mch. 

5958 Pamperin, William Pvt Co. H, 71, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "And 130th Inf.") 

3350 Pardv, Erastus W Sgt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf July 

5710 Parish, Delbert Pvt. Co. E, 146, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Delbert Parrish.") 

12180 Parker, Frederick Cpl. Co. A, 108, N. Y. Inf Nov. 

2819 Parker, Isaac W Pvt. Co. G, 124., N. Y. Inf.... July 

1392 Parker, J Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf May 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2953 Parker, J Pvt. Co. G, 154, N. Y. Inf.... July 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2092 Parker, J Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf June 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Isaac R. Parker.") 

3386 Parker, Jasper Pvt. Co. F, 15, N. Y. Cav July 

4732 Parkinson, Alfred H. . . . Pvt. Co. C, 4, N. Y. Art Aug. 

11956 Parks, William Pvt. Co. K, 109, N. Y. Inf.... Nov. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11218 Parsons, Warren B Pvt. Co. E, 64, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

5880 Patterson, Alex Pvt. Co. M, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 

3440 Patterson, George W Pvt. Co. M, 15, N. Y. Art July 

(Headstone reads " Geo. W. Paterson.") 

6165 Patterson, Henry Pvt Co. D, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 1st N. Y. Vet. Cav.") 

5279 Patterson, Isaac A Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

7011 Patterson, N Pvt. Co. L, 9, N. Y. H. Art. . . Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

4708 Pattyson, James H Pvt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

6696 Pease, Martin Pvt. Co. C, 3, N. Y. Cav Aug. 

2166 Peck, James G Pvt. Co. F, 22, N. Y. Cav June 

11630 Peckins, William L Pvt. Co. K, 21, N. Y. Cav Oct. 

11673 Pedro, Francis Pvt. Co. C, 12, N. Y. Cav Oct. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Francis Petro.") 

2321 Peeler, Daniel Pvt. Co. I, 115, N. Y. Inf June 

1542 Pellett, Edward Pvt. Co. I, 15, N. Y. Cav June 

2763 Pendleton, John Pvt. Co. F, 69, N. Y. Inf July 

7172 Perkins, Joseph P Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 

10562 Perry, Alfred Cpl. Co. G, 39, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

7866 Perry, Wilber C Pvt. Co. D, 2, N. Y. Rifles. . . . Sept. 

12182 Perry, William Pvt. Co. A, 79, N. Y. Inf Nov. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3721 Perry, William Pvt. Co. E, 99, N. Y. Inf July 

3082 Persons, Warren B Pvt. Co. D, 64, N. Y. Inf July 

4063 Pertell, Simeon Pvt. Co. A, 47, N. Y. Inf July 

(Ad. G. N. Y. "Simon PerteU.") 

5224 Peters, Fritz Pvt. Co. C, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

3914 Peters, J Pvt. Co. F, 114, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 
9120 Peterson, Andrew Pvt. Co. B, 48, N. Y. Inf Sept. 



Died 
6, 1864. 
17, 1864. 

15, 1864. 

15, 1864. 

27, 1864. 

3, 1864. 
26, 1864. 

6, 1864. 

17, 1864. 

16, 1864. 

4, 1864. 
11, 1864. 

20, 1864. 

16, 1864. 

17. 1864. 



Cause 
Dysentery 
Enteritis 

C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

C. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Dysentery 



19, 1864.. Cerebritis 



11, 1864. 
27, 1864. 

4, 1864. 

24, 1864. 

19, 1864. 

20, 1864. 
30, 1864. 

22, 1864. 

1, 1864. 

2, 1864. 
29, 1864. 

9, 1864. 

5, 1864. 
27, 1864. 

21, 1864. 
9, 1864. 

27, 1864. 

10, 1864. 

25. 1864. 



C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 

Dysentery 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 

Typhus fever 

Diarrhoea 

Dysentery 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Phthisis 

Diarrhoea 

Dysentery 

C. Dysentery 
C. Diarrhoea 



18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



220 STATE OF NEW YORK 



yo. yame Organization Died Cause 

5684 Peterson, Carl Pvt Co. I, 178, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 15, 186t 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles Pcttcrson.'") 

5537 Petrie, Joseph Pvt Co. I, 81, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, IStil.. Scorbutus 

3302 Pettis, Aloiuso Pvt. Co. F, 100, N. Y. Inf July 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Lorenzo P. Pettis.") 

11348 Pew, Charles H Pvt. Co. D, 6, N. Y. Art Oct. 23, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Also borne as ' Pugh.' ") 

12481 Philips, Joseph Pvt. Co. E, 6, N. Y. Cav Jan. 18, 1865.. Scorbutus 

4235 Phillips, George A Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3318 Phillips, Richard D Cpl. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf July 14, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

7637 Phillips, William M Sgt. Co. H, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6005 Piarsons, William H.... Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Wm. H. Piersons, and H. Parsons, in 147, and 91, Infs.") 

4152 Pierce, Albert Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Art July 28, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11663 Pierce, Darwin H Pvt. Co. H, 8, N. Y. Cav Oct. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5371 Pierct, Hiram Cpl. Co. D, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Dysentery 

6027 Pierce, Joseph Pvt. Co. D, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4517 Pierson, Abram Pvt. Co. H, 61, X. Y. Inf Aug. 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Abram Peerson.") 

9422 Pilarick, Frederick Pvt. Co. E, 61, N. Y. Inf Sept. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1532 Pinion, John Prt. Co. I, 99, X. Y. Inf June 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9994 Pitts, George Pvt Co. K, 97, X. Y. Inf Sept. 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11441 Pivant, A Pvt. Co. D, 61, X. Y. Inf Oct. 25, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

6086 Place, Edward Pvt. Co. F, 47, X. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1861 Plank, John M Pvt. Co. A, 95, X. Y. Inf June 12, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

815 Plass, Herman Prt. Co. G, 120, X. Y. Inf Apr. 30, 1864.. Dysentery 

11379 Phmkett, John Pvt. Co. A, 146, X. Y. Inf.... Oct. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(This man also served in Co. C, 55, Pa. Vols. See C. Q. M. C, Xo. 489355, Jan. 31, 1914.) 

4432 Pollock, Robert Pvt. Co. L, 16, X\ Y. Cav July 31, 1864.. Anasarca 

1843 Pomeroy, Calvin Pvt. Co. G, 21, X. Y. Cav June II, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

4531 Pontius, Godfrey Pvt. Co. K, 16, X. Y. Cav Aug. 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1830 Popple, Barber G Pvt. Co. B, 85, X. Y. Inf June 11, 1864 

10368 Posser, Paul Pvt. Co. D, 39, X. Y. Inf Oct. 5, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12291 Post, Henry E Pvt. Co. G, 125, X. Y. Inf Dec. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12425 Post, Jacob A Pvt. Co. E, 94, X. Y. Inf Jan. 10, 1865.. Dehilitis 

6385 Potter, Henry Pvt. Co. E, 48, X. Y. Inf Aug. 2, 1864. . Dysentery 

4352 Potter, Joel M Pvt. Co. C, 47, X. Y. Inf July 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

1582 Potter, William H Sgt. Co. F, 85, X. Y. Inf June 3, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5115 Powell, George Pvt. Co. H, 7, X. Y. Art Aug. 9, 1864. . Dysentery 

6390 Powers, John Pvt. Co. I, 6, X. Y. Art Aug. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3367 Powers, John Pvt. Co. K, 10, X. Y. Inf July 15, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

2948 Powers, Osman Pvt. Co. H, 24, X". Y. Cav July 6, 1864. . C. Dysentery 

5435 Pratt, Benjamin Pvt. Co. G, 146, X^ Y. Inf Aug. 12, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

1479 Pratt, George B Pvt. Co. D, 10, X^ Y. Cav May 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6455 Pratt, Philander Pvt. 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3771 Predigar, Peter 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Peter Podigcr, private Co. E, 47, Inf., died July 31, 1864. Also borne 

as ' Predigar.' ") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



221 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

11432 Preenan, Leonard Cpl. Co. F, UT, X. Y. Inf Oct. 24, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Leonard A. Preenan.'") 

5523 Preston, Walter G Pvt. Co. G, 9, N. Y. MiUtia.. Aug. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " 9th Mil. became the 83d Inf.") 

1096 Price, Anson D Pvt. Co. A, 154, N. Y. Inf May 14, 1864.. Anasarca 

12346 Price, J Citizen from New York 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

1651 Priest, William Pvt. Co. E, 132, N. Y. Inf June 5, 1864.. Pneumonia 

7964 Pringle, Thomas W Cpl. Co. A, 148, N. Y. Inf Sept. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2997 Probst, John Cpl. Co. B, 52, N. Y. Inf July 7, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

6916 Prow, John Pvt. Co. L, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

9907 PufiP, J Pvt. Co. — , 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 28, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Jacob Ruf, Co. A.") 

3781 Pugh, Robert Pvt. Co. F, 2, N. Y. Cav July 22, 1864. . Dysentery 

729 Pullers, U Pvt. Co. E, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 25, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2395 Putnam, Luther Pvt. Co. C, 14, N. Y. Art June 24, 1864. . Laryngitis 

9046 Quackenbush, Peter Pvt. Co. K, 111, N. Y. Inf Sept. 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8227 Quigley, John Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864.. Dysentery 

8064 Quinn, Edson F Pvt. Co. B, 10, N. Y. Cav Sept. 7, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

512 Rafferty, Michael Pvt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 12, 1864.. Dysentery 

2534 Rafferty, Peter Pvt. Co. M, 5, N. Y. Cav June 26, 18G4. . A. Dysentery 

11330 Rafferty, Thomas Pvt. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Art Oct. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1265 Ramsay, Hiram Pvt. Co. K, 31, N. Y. Inf May 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

2880 Ramsay, Isaac Pvt. Co. I, 86, N. Y. Inf July 4, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Isaac Ramsay.") 

3751 Ranch, Joseph Pvt. Co. D, 100, N. Y. Inf July 22, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph Raach.") 

9320 Randall, Abner B Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 20, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

10875 RandaU, James Pvt. Co. A, 99, N. Y. Inf Oct. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4305 Randolph Pvt. Co. E, 9, N. Y. July 30, 1864. . DebiUtis 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11760 Rapp, William Pvt. Co. B, 42, N. Y. Inf Nov. 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7778 Rastiford, John Pvt. Co. A, 100, N. Y. Inf Sept 4, 1864.. Dysentery 

11648 Rathburn, William Pvt. Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Oct 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4216 Rattery, John Pvt Co. I, 104, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864.. Dysentery 

10937 Ray, Christopher Pvt Co. B, 3, N. Y. Cav Oct 15, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10246 Ray, Reuben S Pvt Co. F, 154, N. Y. Inf Oct 3, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

4336 Raynard, Fitch Pvt Co. F, 125, N. Y. Inf July 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

6041 Read, WiUiam D Pvt Co. H, 146, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Wiliam D. Reid.") 

3682 Reakard, Herman Pvt Co. E, 47, N. Y. Inf July 21, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Herman Rencard.") 

2186 Reamer, William H Pvt. Co. B, 111, N. Y. Inf June 19, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

12455 Rebman, Joseph Pvt Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Jan. 15, 1865.. C. Diarrhoea 

8155 Reckhow, John B Pvt Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 8, 1864.. Dysentery 

11695 Reddy, Reter V Pvt. Co. M, 8, N. Y. Cav Oct 31, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Peter Reddy.") 



222 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 



A'o. i\'ame Organization Died Came 

10467 Redmond, James Pvt. Co. C, 43, N. Y. Inf Oct. 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Redman.") 

2830 Redmond, James Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. H. Art. . . July 3, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

7332 Reed, Frederick U Pvt Co. E, 64, X. Y. Inf Aug. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8574 Reed, Jacob Pvt. Co. H, 140, X. Y. Inf Sept. 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

406 Reed, Simeon G Pvt. Co. D, 13, N. Y. Cav Apr. 6, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Simeon G. Read.") 

8492 Reed, William J Pvt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5694 Reeves, George Pvt. Co. H, 152, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Headstone reads " VI." change to "N. Y." will be made.) 

1680 Reeves, John W Pvt. Co. H, 57, N. Y. Inf June 6, 1864. 

10911 Regnor, William H Pvt. Co. M, 22, X. Y. Cav Oct. 14, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William H. Rignor") 

10232 Reid, W. J Pvt. Co. I, 44, X. Y. Inf Oct. 3, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Xot found.") 

6546 Reidy, Jere D Pvt. Co. I, 65, X. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Jeremiad D. Reidy.") 

2885 Reiley, John Pvt. Co. C, 99, X. Y. Inf July 4, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John Reil/ey.") 

6347 Reiley, John Pvt. Co. G, 39, X. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John ReiUy.") 

11694 Relyea, Charles E Pvt. Co. F, 179, X. Y. Inf Oct. 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3352 Remsen, Cornelius H Pvt. Co. M, 2, X'. Y. Cav July 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7195 Renback, C Pvt. Co. — , 29, N. Y. Aug. 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Xot found.") 

3561 Reutsche, Rudolph Pvt. Co. K, 66, X. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(.'Vd. G. X\ Y. says " ' Richey ' and ' Rutche.' ") borne as latter. 

40 Rew, Xewton C Sgt. Co. E, 5, X. Y. Cav Mch. 12, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

6799 Reynolds, Oren S Pvt. Co. E, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8209 Reynolds, Owen Pvt. Co. E, 155, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1026S Reynolds, Samuel Pvt. Co. H, 92, X. Y. Inf Oct. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

6350 Reynolds, William Pvt. Co. I, 140, X. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Dysentery 

8005 Rhenebault, R. H Pvt. Co. B, 21, N. Y. Sept. 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

4318 Rice, Thomas Cpl. Co. I, 39, X. Y. Inf July 30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

12289 Rich, James Pvt. Co. C, 82, X". Y. Inf Dec. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "And 59th Inf.") 

3077 Rich, Thurman Pvt 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... July 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12243 Richard, A Pvt Co. C, 9, X. Y. Dec. 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

5317 Richard, Augustus Pvt Co. D, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

6674 Richards, Albert Pvt Co. E, 41, X. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Gangrene 

7578 Richards, Xewton J Sgt. Co. C, 146, X. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4240 Richardson, H. M Pvt Co. M, 20, X. Y. Cav July 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Wenrij M. Richardson.") 

2427 Rider, Edward Pvt Co. E, 178, X. Y. Inf June 24, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Edward R;/der.") On War Department records this name is foimd 
as " Rider " and " Rvder." Headstone reads " Kv." To be changed to " X. Y." 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



223 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

415 Rikel, Robert . . Pvt. Co G, 135, N. Y. Inf Apr. 7, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads " Rob'n Rikel.") 

12382 Riley, James Pvt. Co. E, 73, N. Y. Inf Jan. 2, 1865. . Dysentery 

S021 Riley, John Pvt. Co. C, 176, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 7, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

11163 Ripley, Francis A Pvt Co. C, 152, N. Y. Inf Oct. 19, 1864.. Scorbutus; 

3514 Rising, Christopher .... Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. Diarrhoea' 

10310 Risley, George Pvt. Co. G, 47, N. Y. Inf Oct. 4, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

-2558 Ritcher, F Sgt. Co. A, 132, N. Y. Inf. . . . June 27, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " F. Richter.") 

12193 Ritcher, Merritt R Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Art Nov. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7748 Ritter, David Pvt. Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 3, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

7245 Ritzson, Samuel Pvt. Co. E, 18, N. Y. Cav Aug. 29, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

1775 Roach, Francis Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf June 9, 1864.. Anasarca 1 

7663 Roberts, A Pvt. Co. C, 173, N. Y. Inf Sept 5, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

59 Roberts, Alfred B Sgt. Co. D, 8, N. Y. Cav Mch. 18, 1864. . Pneumonia 

11195 Robertson, Clarence A... Pvt Co. B, 123, N. Y. Inf Oct 20, 1864.. Dysentery 

8554 Robertson, William Pvt Co. B, 96, N. Y. Inf Sept 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

27 Robbins, AUen L Cpl. Co. K, 154, N. Y. Inf Mch. 8, 1864.. Pneumonia 

7607 Robinson, Albert Pvt Co. I, 111, N. Y. Inf Sept 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9970 Robinson, Henry Pvt Co. K, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3680 Robinson, Henry C Pvt Co. I, 95, N. Y. Inf July 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6419 Robinson, John Pvt Co. A, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2346 Robinson, W. H Pvt Co. F, 134, N. Y. Inf June 23, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

11342 Rockafeller, Harrison . . . Pvt. Co. M, 15, N. Y. Art Oct. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3813 Rockafeller, Peter Pvt Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf July 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3959 Rocks, Frank Pvt. Co. F, 6, N. Y. Art July 25, 1864. . Dysentery 

7585 Rockwall, Miles C Pvt Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Sept 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Miles C. Rockw^'ll.") 

2609 Rodener, Chancey F Pvt Co. H, 130, N. Y. Inf June 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Chancey F. Rodmner.") 

6059 Rodgers, Aaron Pvt. Co. H, 125, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4912 Rodgers, Michael Pvt Co. D, 43, N. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864.. Anasarca 

11772 Roemer, Frederick Pvt. Co. D, 9, N. Y. Cav Nov. 3, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Frederick Reomer.") 

3616 Roeser, Ludrig Pvt. Co. B, 48, N. Y. Inf July 20, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " iMuis Roeser.") 

4350 Rogers, Amos Pvt Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art July 31, 1864. . Scorbutus 

S791 Rogers, George D Pvt. Co. F, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864. . Rheumatism 

4387 Rogers, Henry C Pvt: Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf July 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8369 Rogers, Henry J Pvt Co. E, 2, N. Y. Art Sept 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3011 Rogers, James Pvt Co. A, 133, N. Y. Inf July 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads " Ky." Verified " N. Y." by A. G. O., U. S. A. Stone on list for change 

to proper state.) 

7308 Rogers, Orria S 1st Sgt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf. . Aug. 39, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Orro S. Rogers.") Headstone reads " Ky." Carded for new head- 
stone as " Orra S. Rogers, 1st Sgt." 



1 



224 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



Died 


Cau$e 


i25. 


18(i4. 


. Diarrhoea 


23. 


1864.. 


. C. Diarrhoea 


3, 


1864. 


. Diarrhoea 


23, 


186+.. 


Dy.sentery 


22, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


2%, 


1864.. 


, Diarrhoea 


2\, 


1864.. 


Diarrhoea 


8, 


1864.. 


. Pneumonia 


11. 


1864. . 


. Scorbutus 


18, 


1864.. 


, Scorbutus 


lb-, 


1864.. 


, Dysentery 


13, 


1864.. 


, Diarrhoea 


H, 


1864. 


. Anasarca 


<■. 


1864.. 


, Diarrhoea 


3, 


1864.. 


, Scorbutus 



23, 1864.. Dysentery 



No. Name Organization 

6824 Rogers, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Aug. 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says " 12th Cavalry.") 

2354 Rohrbecher, Philip Pvt. Co. B, 46, X. Y. Inf June 

4593 Roker, Lewis Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Ludwig liuhkopf") 

9549 Rolack, John Pvt. Co. C, 85, X. Y. Inf Sept. 

6503 RoUnger, Jacques Pvt Co. B, 47, X. Y. Inf Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Jacques Ral/inger."') 

9963 Roney, John Pvt. Co. G, 152, X. Y. Inf.... SepL 

3722 Ronge, William Pvt. Co. F, 12, X. Y. Cav July 

1735 Rood, LeGrand D Pvt. 24, X. Y. Ind. Battery... June 

(Headstone reads '^ Leg. Rood.") 

8468 Rooke, George Pvt Co. E, 6, N. Y. Art Sept. 

9102 Rooney, Michael Pvt. Co. F, 132, N. Y. Inf . . . . Sept. 

8922 Rooney, Peter .; Pvt Co. C, 2, X. Y. H. Art. . . Sept 

8667 Rooney, Terrence Pvt Co. H, 69, X. Y. Inf Sept 

5570 Root Asa W Pvt Co. C, 85, X^ Y. Inf Aug. 

2998 Roots, William F Pvt Co. H, 120, X. Y. Inf July 

10278 Rose, Anton Pvt Co. L, 16, X. Y. Oct. 

(.\d. G. X. Y. says "16th Cavalry.") 

9550 Rosenkrans, John E Pvt Co. H, 125, X. Y. Inf Sept 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " John E. Rosenkrani.") 

2924 Rosepaugh, Dubois Pvt Co. A, 120, X. Y. Inf July 

6741 Rosh, George Pvt Co. K, 76, X. Y. Inf Aug. 

9751 Ross, Andrew Pvt Co. M, 1, X. Y. Cav Sept. 

5591 Ross, David Pvt Co. D, 27, X. Y. Inf Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Xot found.") 

3874 Ross, Edwin F Pvt. Co. I, 111, X. Y. Inf. . . . July ; 

727 Ross, Jacob P\'t. Co. A, 151, N. Y. Inf Apr. 

11963 Ross, James H Pvt Co. G, 121, X. Y. Inf Xov. 

12635 Ross, John Pvt. Co. K, 2, X. Y. Cav Feb. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

8171 Ross, Walter Pvt. Co. A, 23, X. Y. Cav Sept 

8737 Rossean, Charles Pvt. Co. I, 34, X. Y. Cav Sept. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Charles Rosseaw.") 

12259 RosweU, Joseph Pvt. Co. C, 93, X. Y. Inf Dec. 

1842 Rotch, Charles R Pvt. Co. E, 85, X. Y. Inf June 

5097 Roth, Louis Pvt Co. D, 39, X. Y. Inf Aug. 

8504 Rothwell, WilUam Cpl. Co. M, 20, X. Y. Cav Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " AVilliam RouthweU.") 

7709 Roubotham, R Pvt. Co. L, 11, X. Y. Cav July 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

4762 Rourke, John Pvt Co. I, 66, X. Y. Inf Aug. 

1940 Rowe, William J Pvt Co. B, 120, X. Y. Inf. . . . June 

3493 Rowel, Levi X Prt. Co. H, 99, X. Y. Inf July 

(.\d. G. X. Y. says " Leroy X. Rowel.") 

5857 Rowell, John E Pvt. Co. G, 70, X\ Y. Inf Aug. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "And 86th Inf.") 

867 Ruddle, William Pvt Co. M, 120. X. Y. Inf. . . . May 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Xot found.") 



5, 


1864.. 


C. Diarrhoea 


24, 


1864.. 


Diarrhoea 


25, 


1864.. 


Scorbutus 


14, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


24, 


1864. . 


Typhus fever 


25, 


1864., 


. C. Diarrhoea 


11, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


10, 


1865. 


. C. Diarrhoea 


8, 


1864.. 


. Dvsenterv 


13. 


1864.. 


. Diarrhoea 


10, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


11, 


1864. , 


. C. Diarrhoea 


9, 


1864. 


. Scorbutus 


12, 


1864.. 


. Scorbutus 


21, 


1864.. 


Scorbutus 


•5, 


1864.. 


. Scorbutus 


14, 


1864.. 


. C. Diarrhoea 


17, 


1864.. 


Diarrhoea 


16, 


1864. 


. Marasmus 


3, 


1864.. 


. Dysentery 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 225 

Xo. Same Organization Died Cause 

8431 Runcimam, James R Pvt. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

684 Rush, John Pvt. Co. E, 111, N. Y. Inf Apr. 23, 1864. . A. Dysentery 

8856 Russell, Jonathan Cpl. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Sept 15, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

7369 Ruty, John Pvt. Co. A, 53, N. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

5094 Ryan, Daniel Pvt. Co. B, 106, N. Y. Inf Aug. 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8741 Ryan, James Pvt. Co. E, 93, N. Y. Cav Sept. 14, 1864. . Typhus fever 

6306 Ryan, James M Pvt. Co. E, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 19, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

8599 Ryan, John Pvt Co. E, 95, N. Y. Inf Sept. 12, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7358 Ryan, Owen Pvt. Co. A, 13, N. Y. Cav Aug. 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

13674 Ryan, Patrick Pvt. Co. E, 160, X. Y. Inf Sept. 38, 1865 

13673 Ryerson, John Pvt. Co. C, 90, ^^ Y. Inf Xov. 13, 1865 

6413 Ryerson, John Pvt Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7234 Sackitt, Richard S Pvt. Co. G, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 29, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Richard L. SackeU.") 

1939 Sadley, M Pvt. Co. H, 77, X. Y. Inf June 14, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

1880 Safford, Pembroke J Pvt 34, X. Y. Ind. Battery... June 12, 1864.. Dysentery 

10652 Salisbury, E Pvt Co. D, 16, N. Y. Oct. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. O. N. Y. says " Erfu'in Salisbury, 16th Cavalry.") 

11871 Salisbury, Henry Pvt Co. M, 7, X. Y. H. Art. . Xov. 6, 1864 

(Headstone reads "Pa." Verified Co. M, 7, X. Y. H. Art., by A. G. O.— Headstone to be 

changed to "X. Y.") 

10880 Samet, W Pvt. Co. H, 15, X. Y. Cav Oct 13, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

10923 Samlett Pvt. Co. I, 13, X. Y. Oct 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Xot found.") 

3769 Sampson, J Pvt. Co. K, 116, X. Y. Inf. . . . July 2-2, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Xot found.") 

346 Sanders, Charles Cpl. Co. A, 9, X. Y. MiliUa. . . Apr. 4, 1864. . Remittent 

fever 
(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles Saunders, 83d Inf.") The 9th X. Y. Mil. became the 83d Inf. 

3818 Sanders, George Sgt Co. H, 99, X. Y. Inf July 23, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

4433 Sanford, Roelin O Cpl. Co. L, 7, X. Y. Art July 31, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Roelim O. Stanford.") 

2341 Sangling, John Pvt Co. F, 12, X. Y. Cav June 23, 1864. . Remittent 

fever 

Sarsfield, John Pvt Co. — , 144, X. Y. Inf July 11, 1864 

(Ad, G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") This man was hung by the prisoners for murder and 
robbery, after a trial by Drum-Head Court Martial. 

629 Sattler, Henry Pvt. Co. H, 99, X. Y. Inf Apr. 19, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

1319 Sauerbeck, George Pvt Co. A, 53, X. Y. Inf May 23, 1864. . Anasarca 

9857 Saunders, John Pvt. Co. A, 13, X. Y. Cav Sept 37, 1864. . Scorbutus 

11332 Sayles, Albert G Pvt Co. E, 23, X. Y. Cav Oct. 21, 1864 

8205 Schaerer, Henrich Pvt. Co. E, 5, X. Y. Cav Sept 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Henry Scherr«r.") 

782 Schafer, Heinrich Pvt Co. F, 103, N. Y. Inf.... Apr. 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

6120 Schaler. I Pvt. Co. M, 8, X. Y. Cav Aug. 19, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Not found.") 

16 



226 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



jYo. Name 

10+88 Schnll, John ... 



Organization Died Came 

.... Pvt. Co. L, 7, N. y. Art Oct. 8, 186i. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Scohi/I.") 

2151 Schatz, Christian Pvt. Co. F, HI, N. Y. Inf June 18, 1861.. C. Diarrhoea 

11905 Schenap, Martin Pvt. Co. F, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. II, 1864.. .Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Martin Schcm^).") 
2795 Schenorfski, Rcnhard ... Pvt. Co. A, 170, X. Y. Inf.... July 3, 1864.. Dysentery 

3190 Schermerhorn, William H Pvt. Co. F, 130, N. Y. Inf July 13, 186t. . Diarrhoea 

3557 Schicks, Blassius Pvt. Co. G, 3, N. Y. Cav July 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(.\d. G. N. Y. .says " Blassitis Schick.") 

2933 Schlieter, John F Pvt. Co. F, 48, N. Y. Inf July 5, 1964. . Dysentery 

1335 Schlosser, John Pvt. Co. H, Q3, N. Y. Inf May 24, 1864. . Dysentery 

9578 Schmake, John Pvt. Co. I, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 23, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10291 Schmaley, J Pvt. Co. G, 1, N. Y. Oct. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12503 Schmidt, Adam Pvt. Co. F, 7, N. Y. Art Jan. 22, 1865.. Scorbutus 

803 Schmidt, Bernard Cpl. Co. B, 133, N. Y. Inf \pr. 29, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

7612 Schmidt, Charles Pvt. Co. K, 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12027 Schmidt, Johann Pvt. Co. D, 46, X. Y. Inf Feb. 10, 1865.. Debilitis 

11210 Schmidt, John Pvt. Co. A, 53, N. Y. Inf Oct. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5311 Schneider, Charles Pvt. Co. .\, 39, X. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

740S Schnod, Ludwig Pvt. Co. D, 15, X. Y. Art Aug. 31, 1864. . Dysentery 

8796 Schofield, Joseph Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Joseph Scofield.") 

2441 Scholl, John Pvt. Co. D, 54, X'. Y. Inf June 25, 1804. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John ShoU.") 

7814 Schrader, Gustavus E. . . Pvt Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 4, 1804. . Diarrhoea 

8550 Schriner, J Pvt. Co. K, IS, N. Y. .Vrt. . . . Sept. 12, 1804. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Schrifner.") 

11422 Schriver, I.uderick Pvt. Co. C, 59, X. Y. Inf Oct. 23, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X'. Y. says '' l.\u\uig Schriver.'") 

11515 Schroeticcair, John W. . . Sgt. Co. L, 1, X. Y. Cav Oct. 20, 1804. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X'. Y. says "John "\V. Schroeti.f.'air.") 

7798 Schuler, Charles Pvt. Co. G, 53, X. Y. Inf Sept. 4, 1804. . Diarrhoea 

11822 Schultz, Charles Cpl. Cn. F, 66, X". Y. Inf Xov. 5, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10794 Schutt, Theodore Pvt. Co. A, 109, X. Y. Inf Oct. 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6888 Schuyler, Alexander H. . Pvt. Co. M, 21, X. Y. Cav Aug. 26, 1804. . Pnsumonia 

4280 Schweyer, Frederick Pvt. Co. K, 12, X. Y. Cav July 30, 1804. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Frederick Schwnyer.") 

10550 Schwieger, Albis Pvt. Co. A, 39, X. Y. Inf Oct. 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4849 Scott, Jason C Sgt. Co. K, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 0, 1804 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Jason L. Scott.") 

6857 Scott, Luther C Pvt. Co. G, 14, N. Y. Cav Aug. 26, 1864 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "14th Art.") 

8622 Scott, Watson W Pvt Co. F, 2, X. Y. Cav Sept. 13, 1864. . Scorbutus 

0013 Screck, Adolph Pvt Co. G, 60, X. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1804 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Adolph Schrein, also borne as ' Sc/ireck ' and 'Screck.'") 

1070 Scrivner, William Pvt Co. B, 80, X. Y. Inf May 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11813 Scumaker, Pius Pvt. Co. K, 100, N. Y. Inf X'ov. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2374 Seabrook, John W Pvt Co. B, 157, N. Y. Inf June 23, 1864. . Pneumonia 

8514 Seagrisf, William Pvt Co. E, 111, X. Y. Inf. . . . Sept 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 227 



No. ]fame Orfjanizalion Died Cause 

10856 Seaman, Alfred E Pvt Co. H, 2, N. Y. Art Oct. 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

3612 Seaman, Edward L Cpl. Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1864.. . Diarrhoea 

8824 Seeley, Ansor J Pvt. Co. A, 140, N. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea <■ 

11374 Seely, Charles B Pvt. Co. F, 15, N. Y. Cav Oct. 24, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10027 Segars, Edwin Pvt. Co. F, 8, N. Y. Cav Sept. 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Also borne as ' E. A. Sigor' and 'Edward E. Segar.' Also served in 

Co. A.") 

7458 Seigel, John R Pvt. Co. K, 120, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 1, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Randolph SiVgel.") 

4960 Seiler, Lewis Pvt Co. E, 140, N. Y. Inf Aug. 7, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lewis Sicler.") 

4256 Selelee, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 100, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864. . Dysentery 

11886 Selsam, Henry Pvt. Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Nov. 6, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1466 Sentre, Alex Pvt. Co. H, 16, N. Y. Cav May 29, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

1746 Servier, Horace Pvt. Co. M, 4, N. Y. Cav June 8, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

3457 Sevier, R Pvt. Co. C, 40, N. Y. Inf July 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

9828 Seymour, Franklin Pvt. Co. F, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept. 27, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st Vet. Cav.") 

1372 Seyres, Theodore Pvt. Co. B, 2, N. Y. Cav May 25, 1864. . Dysentery 

201 Shae, Patrick Pvt. Co. E, 61, N. Y. Inf Mch. 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Patrick Shai/.") Headstone reads "Patrick Shea." 

4801 Shaefer, Miner Pvt. Co. M, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 5, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Miner Shafer.") 

4584 Shaffer, Jacob Pvt. Co. E, 66, N. Y. Inf Aug. 2, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

564^5 Shank, Latar H Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " La6a« Shank.") 

4446 Shannon, Edward Pvt. Co. H, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 1, 1864. . Anasarca 

11280 Sharp, Frederick Pvt. Co. K, 125, N. Y. Inf Oct. 22, 1864.. Gangrene 

10067 Shatt, J Pvt. Co. A, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6747 Shaughnessy, James Pvt. Co. A, 6, N. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

290 Shaw, Alex Pvt. Co. A, 3, N. Y. L. Art. . . Apr. 1, 1864. . Pneumonia 

12814 Shaw, Isaac W Pvt. Co. F, 7, N. Y. Art Mch. 25, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

.5474 Shaw, Jerome B Pvt. Co. E, 2, N. Y. Cav Aug. 13, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8335 Shaw, Martin Pvt. Co. D, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Moses Shaw.") 

9667 Shaw, Thomas J Pvt. Co. M, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7660 Shea, John Pvt. Co. B, 69, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864, . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3360 Sheldon, Marquis P Pvt. Co. B, 7, N. Y. Art July 15, 1864.. Dysentery 

9923 Sheppard, William H... Sgt. Co. H, 9, N. Y. MiUtia... Sept. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 
(Ad. G. N. Y. says "and 83d Inf.") 9th MUitia became 83d Inf. 

4247 Sheperdson, Lorenzo Pvt. Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav July 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lorenzo A. Sheperdson.") 

10930 Sheridan, James Pvt. Co. F, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 12, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7437 Sherlock, Riley Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8822 Sherwood, Gilbert Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads " F. Sherwood, Mass." record as given verified by Ad. G. U. S. A., carded 

for new headstone.) 



228 STATE OF NEW YORK 

No. Name Organization Died Cause 

4676 Sherwood, Jones Pvt. Co. G, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. i, 186+.. C. Diarrhoea 

10495 Shidler, George Pvt. Co. F, 97, N. Y. Inf Oct. 8, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "George Sheidler.") 

720 Shiels, Hichard Pvt. Co. F, 132, N. Y. Inf Apr. 25, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

8206 Schindler, Joseph Pvt. Co. E, 15, N. Y. yVrt Sept. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5837 Shippy, Eugene Pvt. Co. D, 85, X. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8595 Shockney, Timothy F Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept. 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Headstone reads " T. M. Schockeney.") 

5755 Shortley, Robert Pvt. Co. B, 164, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

5343 ShotlifF, James Sgt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 11, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(No rank on headstone.) 

2975 Shults, John Pvt. Co. F, 118, X. Y. Inf.... July 6, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Xot found.") 

6633 Shultz, Frederick Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Dysentery 

See Sloats No. 6819 

12194 Shultz, William Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art Nov. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

2340 Shurley, Phares Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... June 23, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Phares Shirley.") 

2463 Shuster, Conrad Pvt. Co. C, 54, N. Y. Inf June 25, 1864. . A. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Conrad Schaster.") 

8290 Sibble, W Pvt. Co. G, 148, N. Y. Inf Sept 9, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Not found.") 

5951 Sicard, Louis Pvt. Co. E, 77, N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864. . Marasmus 

(Headstone reads " Louis Ci^ard.") 

4557 Sickler, Edward Y Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 2, 1864-. . Diarrhoea 

3210 Sickles, Alonzo Pvt. Co. D, 120, N. Y. Inf July 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

11950 Siddell, George Pvt. Co. H, 40, N. Y. Inf Nov. 10, 1864. . Scorbutus 

4362 Sieke, R Pvt. Co. E, 5, N. Y. July 31, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

12284 Simmons, Almond Pvt. Co. H, 8, N. Y. H. Art.. Dec. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6364 Simmons, Charles J. G.. Sgt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8316 Simon, Henry Pvt Co. B, 146, N\ Y. Inf Sept 10, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6284 Simons, Henry L Sgt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 20, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

242 Simpson, David Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Mch. 30, 1864. . Congestive 

chiU 

6345 Sisson, P. V Sgt Co. M, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

701 Skeete, Edward Pvt Co. K, 52, N. Y. Inf Apr. 23, 1864. . Catarrh 

12029 Skelly, Thomas Pvt. Co. H, 66, N. Y. Inf Nov. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12534 Slater, Edward Sgt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Jan. 27, 1865. . Scorbutus 

700 Slater, John Pvt Co. H, 120, N. Y. Inf. . . . Apr. 23, 1864. . DebiliUs 

11163 Slater, Richard Pvt. Co. E, 2, N. Y. Art Oct 19, 1864. . Scorbutus 

12811 Sleight C Pvt Co. I, 32, N. Y. Inf Mch. 24, 1865.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

142 Slimmundinger, B. P Pvt Co. I, 155, N. Y. Inf Mch. 24, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N'. Y. says " Boney Paete Slimindinger.") I^atter name on headstone. 

10125 Slimp, W Pvt. Co. A, 146, X\ Y. Inf Oct 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6819 Sloats, Frederick Pvt Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Same man as Frederick Shult Na 6633. Borne as ' Sholt,' ' Shutts,' 

and ' Sloats.' ") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



229 



No. 

7628 

12083 

762 
9427 

11371 



Name Organization 

Smades, W Pvt. Co. D, 9, N. Y. Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " W. Smeade, 83d Inf." 

Small, S Pvt. Co. F, 53, N. Y. Inf Nov. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Stephen A. SmaU, Co. F, 51, N 

SmaUey, George Pvt. Co. H, 140, N. Y. Inf Apr. 

Sraalley, S. S Pvt. Co. K, 16, N. Y. . . . . Sept. 

(This name is not checked by Ad. G. N. Y. 

Smith, A Pvt. Co. A, 9, N. Y. Militia. . . Oct. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Amasa A. Smith, Co. A, 8S, N. 

Alonzo Pvt Co. B, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

Ambrose J Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

Benjamin Pvt. Co. H, 2, N. Y. Cav May 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Berryman Smith.") 

Charles Pvt. Co. A, 61, N. Y. Inf June 

Charles Pvt. Co. B, 100, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

Charles Pvt. Co. E, 53, N. Y. Inf July 

Eli Pvt. Co. D, 61, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

Francis Pvt. Co. F, 48, N. Y. Inf June 

Frank Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf May 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Franci* Smith.") 

George R Pvt. Co. H, 2, N. Y. Cav Nov. 

Henry Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Jan. 

Henry Pvt. Co. C, 132, N. Y. Inf.... May 

Jackson Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

James Pvt. Co. A, 61, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

James Cpl. Co. B, 59, N. Y. Inf Nov. 

James Pvt Co. I, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 

James Pvt. Co. M, 20, N. Y. Cav May 

James Pvt. Co. B, 4, N. Y. Cav July 

James Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Cav July 

James C Pvt. Co. G, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

James M Pvt. Co. A, 59, N. Y. Inf Oct 

John Pvt. Co. G, 69, N. Y. Inf Oct. 

John Pvt Co. F, 66, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

John Pvt. Co. C, 71, N. Y. Inf Apr. 

John Pvt Co. E, 41, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

John J Pvt Co. C, 109, N. Y. Inf. . . . Aug. 

John R Pvt. Co. E, 3, N. Y. Cav Apr. 

John S Pvt Co. E, 48, N. Y. Inf Sept 

JuUus Cpl. Co. D, 13, N. Y. Cav Oct 

K Pvt. Co. K, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

Levi N Pvt. Co. F, 7, N. Y. Art Sept 

Mason C Cpl. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery. . . May 

Melville Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art Apr. 

Seleh Pvt Co. I, 111, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 

Sherman A Cpl. Co. F, 132, N. Y. Inf. . . . Aug. 

Theodore Pvt. Co. E, 147, N. Y. Inf Aug. 

Thomas Pvt. Co. C, 47, N. Y. Inf Aug. 



5009 Smith, 


7326 Smith, 


1310 Smith, 


2659 Smith, 


4534 Smith, 


3735 Smith, 


11283 Smith, 


1819 Smith, 


1246 Smith, 


11839 Smith, 


12394 Smith, 


1247 Smith, 


7610 Smith, 


7004 Smith, 


11787 Smith, 


9300 Smith, 


1245 Smith, 


3504 Smith, 


3238 Smith, 


4834 Smith, 


11454 Smith, 


10547 Smith, 


5602 Smith, 


305 Smith, 


5496 Smith, 


S882 Smith, 


534 Smith, 


7706 Smith, 


10456 Smith, 


10079 Smith, 


9973 Smith, 


1039 Smith, 


325 Smith, 


2780 Smith, 


5854 Smith, 


6709 Smith, 


6361 Smith, 



Died 

3, 1864.. 

I 

18, 1864.. 

Y. Inf.") 
27, 1864.. 
21, 1864.. 

) 

23, 1864.. 
Y. Inf.") 

8, 1864.. 
30, 1864.. 

23, 1864.. 

29, 1864. 
2, 1864. 

21, 1864. 

22, 1864. 
10, 1864. 
20, 1864. 

5, 1864. 

5, 1865. 
20, 1864. 

2, 1864. 

27, 1864. 

4, 1864. 
20, 1864. 

20, 1864. 
18, 1864. 

13, 1864. 

6, 1864. 

24, 1864. 

9, 1864. 

14, 1864. 

2, 1864. 
13, 1864. 
16, 1864. 
13, 1864. 

3, 1864. 

7, 1864. 

30, 1864. 

28, 1864. 
12, 1864. 

3, 1864. 

2, 1864. 
16, 1864. 
24, 1864. 

21, 1864. 



Cause 
Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Hydrothorax 
Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 
Typhus fever 

C. Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 
C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

C. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Dysentery 

C. Dysentery 

Dysentery 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

Typhus fever 

Diarrhoea 

Pneumonia 

Marasmus 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 



230 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



No. 
9i99 
3372 

7550 

10164 

532 

139 

812 

3708 

4448 

10076 

5169 

2403 

2773 

3534 

10526 

2877 

8124 

11346 

5421 

9954 

6975 

11824 

5568 

12712 

10989 
4877 
5982 
3532 
5821 
3593 

10730 

889 

4574 
10078 

1698 
2570 



30, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 



21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



yame Organization Died Cause 

Smith, Thomas R Pvt. Co. M, 2, X. Y. Cav Sept. 22, 1864. . Gangrene 

Smith, Urial Pvt. Co C, 9, N. Y. Cav July 15, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Urial Smith, Jr.") 

Smith, William I'vt. Co. L, 2, N. Y. Rifles.... Sept. 2, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

Smith, William Pvt. Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf. . . . Oct. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Smith, William E Pvt. Co. A, 104, N. Y. Inf.... Apr. 13, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

Smith, William H Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Mch. 24, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "William Smith.") 

Smith, William J Pvt. Co. B, 106, X. Y. Inf.... Apr. 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "William Smith, Jr.") 

Snedaker, Albert S Pvt. Co. D, 111, X. Y. Inf... July 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Albert J. Snedaker.") 

Snyder, Benedict Pvt. Co. B, 2, N. Y. H. Art.. Aug. 1, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Snyder, William Pvt. Co. E, 1, X. Y. Dragoons. Sept. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Somers, John Pvt. Co. E, 2, X. Y. Aug. 9, 1864. . Debilitis 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

Soper, Strong Cpl. Co. K, 102, X. Y. Inf June 24, 1864. . Debilitis 

Sopher, Joseph Pvt. Co. F, 132, N. Y. Inf July 2, 1864. . Dysentery 

Southard, Matthew Pvt. Co. C, 5, X. Y. Cav July 18, 1864.. Debilitis 

Southard, Xelson H Pvt. Co. H, 2, X. Y. Cav Oct. 8, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Headstone reads "Pa." will be changed to "X. Y.") 

Southern, Henry H Pvt. Co. K, 69, X. Y. Inf July 4, 1864. . Dysentery 

Southworth, Robert Sgt. Co. E, 22, X. Y. Cav Sept. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Southworth, Wathan A.. Pvt Cu. I, 85, X. Y. Inf Oct. 23, 1864.. Gangrene 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " jVathan A. Southworth.") 

Raiding, H Pvt. Co. F, 1. X. Y. Cav Aug. 12, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

Spark, G Sgt. Co. C, 16, X. Y. Art Sept. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " Xot found.") 

Sparks, Elijah Pvt. Co. G, 10, N. Y. Aug. 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " 10th Inf.") 

Spaulding, Frazier Pvt. Co. L, 7, X. Y. H. Art... Xov. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Spellman, John Pvt. Co. B, 66, X. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Spencer, A Pvt. Co. D, 93, N. Y. Inf Feb. 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Ambrose Spencer.") 

Sperry, Asa Pvt. Co F, 51, X. Y. Inf Oct 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Spink, Alanson A Pvt Co. F, 146, X. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864.. Dysentery 

Sponburg, Simon Pvt Co. C, 14, X. Y. Art Aug. 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

Spoon, James Pvt Co. H, 147, X. Y. Inf July 18, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

Sprague, Edwin H Qr. Mr. Sgt — , 10, X. Y. Inf. Aug. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Sprague, James Pvt Co. I, 85, X. Y. Inf July 19, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Sprague, James A Pvt Co. E, 24, X\ Y. Cav Oct. 11, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says " James A. Spraigue.") 

Stacy, John Pvt Co. I, 99, X. Y. Inf May 5, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "John Stacey.") 

Stader, Charles Sgt Co. A, 39, X. Y. Inf Aug. 2, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Stancliff, A. B Pvt Co. H, 106, X. Y. Inf. . . . Sept 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Almeno B. Stanclif.") 

Stanley, John C Cpl. Co. C, 85, X. Y. Inf June 7, 1864.. Pneumonia 

Stanton, Hiram Pvt Co. E, 22, X. Y. June 27, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



231 



iVo. Name Organization Died 

7381 Stanton, Levi H Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 31, 1864.. 

2530 Starkey, Thomas H Pvt. Co. A, 1:21, N. Y. Inf June 26, 1864.. 

5187 Sterks, John D Cpl. Co. A, 100, N. Y. Inf .Vug. 9, 1864.. 

11740 Starkweather, Levitt .... Pvt. Co. E, 146, N. Y. Inf Xov. 2, 1864.. 

10290 St. Dennis, Levi Pvt. Co. F, 16, N. Y. Cav Oct. 4, 1864. . 

6443 Stead, Joseph Pvt. Co. D, 15, N. Y. Cav Aug. 22, 1864. . 

2543 Stead, Joshua Pvt. Co. F, 115, N. Y. Inf June 27, 1864. . 

6531 Stebbins, Chauncey A.... Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. 

1863 Stebbins, William H Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf June 12, 1864.. 

4193 Steel, James Pvt. Co. E, 164, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James C. Steel.") 

3782 Steinhoff, Ernst Pvt. Co. C, 15, N. Y. Art July 22, 1864.. 

6049 Stellrecht, David Pvt. Co. L, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 18, 1864. . 

(Headstone reads "David Stelfcrecht.") 

7028 Stephens, WiUiam T Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864.. 

7636 Stevens, E Pvt. Co. C, 130, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 2, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found." 130th became 1st dragoons." 

4678 Stevens, John S Pvt. Co. F, 100, N. Y. Inf. . . . Aug. 4, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John L. Stevens.") 

95 Stevenson, William Pvt. Co. G, 132, N. Y. Inf.... Mch. 22, 1864.. 

2034 Stewart, John Pvt. Co. G, 89, N. Y. Inf June 16, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

9903 Stewart, Peter Pvt. Co. B, S, N. Y. .... Sept. 27, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

10149 Stickles, Edward Pvt. Co. A, 169, N. Y. Inf Oct. 1, 1864.. 

11832 Stiles, George W Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Nov. 5, 1864. . 

4385 Stillman, RusseU Pvt. Co. E, 2, N. Y. Art July 31, 1864. . 

915 Stine, John Pvt. Co. C, 5, N. Y. Cav May 6, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Stem.") 

11755 Stivers, Robert Pvt. Co. F, 111, N. Y. Inf. . . . Nov. 2, 1864. . 

7075 Stitt, David Pvt. Co. D, 133, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864. . 

5629 Stockerman, Samuel Pvt. Co. K, 9T, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Samuel Stackerman.") 

11043 Stoddard, Ira* A Pvt. Co. F, 111, N. Y. Inf Oct. 17, 1864.. 

6722 Stone, Lyman Pvt. Co. K, 24, N. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. . 

3997 Storing, Alonzo Pvt. Co. B, 57, N. Y. Inf July 26, 1864. . 

4665 Stormes, James H Pvt. Co. H, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 4, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James H. Storms.") 

12650 Storr, Christian Pvt. Co. D, 15, N. Y. Art Feb. 13, 1865.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Discharged April 13, 1865, at Camp Parole. 

10377 Stout, WiUiam A Pvt. Co. E, 146, N. Y. Inf. . . . Oct. 5, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "WiUiam A. Sloat.") 

8520 Strain, John N Pvt. Co. I, 2, N. Y. Cav Sept. 12, 1864. . 

116 Strate, Lewis Pvt. Co. A, 132, N. Y. Inf Mch. 23, 1864. . 

2401 Stratton, Charles E Pvt. Co. K, 195, N. Y. Inf.... June 24, 1864.. 

10589 Stratton, Edgar H Pvt. Co. E, 76, N. Y. Inf Oct. 10, 1864.. 

6988 Stratton, James H Pvt. Co. H, 140, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James H. Straiten.") 
3905 Streeter, Frederick Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf July 34, 1864., 



Cavse 
Dysentery 
A. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Tj'phus fever 
Anasarca 
Dysentery 
Phthisis 

Anasarca 
Cerebritis 

Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 
I 
C. Diarrhoea 

Typhus fever 
Dysentery 

Scorbutus 

Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Dysentery 
Dysentery 

Scorbutus 
Dysentery 
Scorbutus 

C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 

Debilitis 
") 
Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 
Pneumonia 
C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Dysentery 

Scorbutus 



232 STATE OF NEW YORK 

iVo. Xame Organization Died Cause 

5342 Streeter, Frederick Pvt Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Au}?. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Frederick Streator") 

11967 Strip, W Cpl. Co. C, 42, N. Y. Inf Nov. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4798 Struli, Jacob Pvt. Co. B, 178, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864.. .Scorbutus 

6102 Stump, W Pvt. Co. K, 6, N. Y. Aug. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

7845 Sturdevant, George H... Pvt. Co. I, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept. 4, 1864.. Diarrhoci. 

5534 Sturdevant, W Pvt. Co. M, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 13, 1864 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " N'ot found.") 

5994 Stutzman, Philip Pvt. Co. D, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 17, 1864.. Marasmus 

9953 Sugbern, J Pvt. Co. B, 2, N. Y. H. Art. . . Sept. 28, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says "Not found.") 

640 Sullivan, Edward Pvt. Co. A, 69, N. Y. Inf Apr. 20, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11249 SulUvan, Florence Pvt. Co. C, 76, N. Y. Inf Oct. 21, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

6048 Sullivan, Michael Pvt. Co. K, 69, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Cerebritis 

1493 Sullivan, Patrick Cpl. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf May 31, 1864.. Debilitis 

10661 Sutliff, Edward Cpl. Co. M, 15, N. Y. Cav Oct. 11, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

9002 Sutton, Oscar ,J Pvt. Co. H, 14, N. Y. H. Art. . Sept. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12765 Swancent, J Pvt. Co. A, 2, N. Y. Mch. 13, 1865.. C. Diarrhoea 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

1 Swarner, Jacob Pvt. Co. H, 2, N. Y. Cav Feb. 27, 1864. . Pneumonia 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Adam Swarner.") 

7783 Swartz, John Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 4, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

12267 Swayer, John Pvt. Co. F, 10, N. Y. Dee. 12, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3527 Sweat, Edwin E Pvt. Co. F, 93, N. Y. Inf July 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

2322 Sweeney, James Pvt. Co. I, 155, N. Y. Inf June 22, 1864.. A. Diarrhoea 

5835 Sweeney, Midore Pvt. Co. C, 121, N. Y. Inf Aug. 16, 1864.. Marasmus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Madore, or IFidor Sweeney.") 

2921 Sweet, Levi H Pvt. Co. M, 4, N. Y. H. Art. . July 5, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

13497 Sweet, Robert Pvt. Co. B, 176, N. Y. Inf. . . . Mch. 14, 1865 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Died March 14, 1866, of smallpox, at Citizens hospital, Americus, Ga.") 

4005 Sworm, J Pvt. Co. H, 2, N. Y. Cav July 26, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Jacob Swarner") 

4326 Tanchwlt, Edward Pvt. Co. E, 15, N. Y. Art July 30, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Edward Tauchwit.") 

2120 Tanner, George B Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf June 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

3976 Tanner, Myron Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. July 25, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

4867 Taylor, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

551 Taylor, Charles H Pvt. Co. C, 154, N. Y. Inf.... Apr. 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11321 Taylor, Lorenzo D Pvt. Co. D, 141, N. Y. Inf Oct. 22, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12290 Taylor, Myron Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Dec. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

9993 Taylor, Silas B Cpl. Co. K, 147, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 29, 1864. . Scorbutus 

492 Taylor, Thomas B Pvt. Co. E, 10, N. Y. Cav Apr. 11, 1864. . Rlieumatism 

12480 Taylor, WilUam Pvt. Co. B, 42, N. Y. Inf Jan. 18, 1865.. Scorbutus 

8961 Taylor, William Sgt. Co. A, 2, N. Y. Cav Sept. 16, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10157 Taylor, William Pvt. Co. C, 24, N. Y. Cav Oct. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10738 Taylor, W. H Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Cav Oct. 11, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 
10370 Taylor, William H Pvt. Co. C, 7, N. Y. Art Oct. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 233 

ifo. Name Organization Died Cause 

2742 Taylor, Richard H Pvt. Co. F, 125, N. Y. Inf July 1, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

V019 TeU, William Pvt. Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Aug. 27, 1864.. Dysentery 

9064 Teneyck, Monroe Pvt. Co. E, 14, N. Y. H. Art.. Sept. 17, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "N. H." Record as given has been verified by War Department and 
headstone will be made to read " N. Y.") 

12465 Terney, Peter Pvt. Co. B, 99, N. Y. Inf Jan. 16, 1865.. C. Diarrhoea 

10494 Terrill, Miles T Pvt. Co. A, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct. 7, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

6445 TerwilUger, David R Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864.. Intermittent 

fever 

9480 Thair, William Pvt. Co. D, 115, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 22, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "William Thayer.") 

12843 Thayer, Gersham Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Apr. 22, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

679 Thierback, Otto Pvt. Co. D, 39, N. Y. Inf Apr. 22, 1864.. Typhus fever 

3598 Thomas, Henry Pvt. Co. D, 88, N. Y. Inf July 19, 1864. . Dysentery 

4619 Thomas, Joseph Pvt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 3, 1864. . Typhus fever 

3711 Thomas, Wesley L Pvt. Co. H, 3, N. Y. Cav July 21, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5510 Thompkins, Ira S Pvt. Co. G, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Ira S. Tompkins.") Latter on headstone. 

6730 Thompson, Aaron B Pvt. Co. A, 146, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, J864.. Scorbutus 

8167 Thompson, Charles W... Pvt. Co. K, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

320 Thompson, D Pvt. Co. E, 142, N. Y. Inf Apr. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

9143 Thompson, Horace Pvt. Co. D, 9, N. Y. Cav Sept. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5784 Thompson, John Pvt. Co. G, 104, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4781 Thompson, John Pvt. Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1964. . Diarrhoea 

2613 Thompson, Thomas Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav June 28, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

5524 Thompson, Veitch Pvt. Co. E, 10, N. Y. Inf Aug. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11235 Thornton, Judson M Pvt. Co. L, 14, N. Y. Art Oct. 21, 1864 

6309 Thorpe, Hoyt C Pvt. Co. F, 82, N. Y. Inf Aug. 20, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. A.") 

4393 Thurston, George M Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf July 31, 1864. . Dysentery 

5147 Thurston, Nelson E Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8283 Tillason, Ansel P Pvt. Co. D, 51, N. Y. Inf Sept. 9, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

11230 Tilton, Henry, Jr Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Batter}'... Oct. 20, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8849 Timerson, Eldert Pvt. Co. I, 2, N. Y. Art Sept. 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Elbert Ti/merson.") 

2680 Timmish Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf June 30, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

659 Tims, David Pvt. Co. E, 79, N. Y. Inf Apr. 21, 1864. . Debilitis 

6047 Tobias, Abraham Pvt. Co. G, 120, N. Y. Inf Aug. 18, 1864.. Dysentery 

10727 Tobin, Patrick Pvt. Co. K, 164, N. Y. Inf.... Oct. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12636 Toedt, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Feb. 10, 1865. . Diarrhoea 

12708 Tomlinson, Wilber F. . . . Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Feb. 28, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

4909 Toohey, James Pvt. Co. H, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Sergeant.") 

3681 Torbeck, August Pvt. Co. L, 16, N. Y. Cav July 20, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4774 Torney, Lawrence Pvt. Co. D, 100, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5833 Towner, Lent H Pvt. Co. G, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 16, 1864. . Enteritis 

535 Townsend, George M Pvt. Co. F, 111, N. Y. Inf Apr. 14, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3883 Townsend, John H Pvt. Co. A, 52, N. Y. Inf July 24, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 



234 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



jVo. Name Organization Died Came 

8068 Townsend, Lutlier Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Inf Sept. 7, 1861. . Dysentery 

10422 Townsend, William M . . . Pvt. Co. B, HI, N. Y. Inf Oct. 6, 1864.. Scorbutus 

100 Tracj', Patrick Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf Mch. 22, 1864.. Typhus fever 

8.544 Trainor, Michael Pvt. Co. F. 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

6448 Trautman, James Pvt. Co. D, 9, N. Y. H. Art... Aug. 22, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

7187 Travis, Horton Pvt. Co. G, 8, N. Y. Cav Aug. 29, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7344 Triber, Albert Pvt. Co. E, U', N. Y. Cav Aug. 31, 1864. . Anasarca 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Albert Treber.") 

3193 Tripp, Ira Sgt. Co. B, 77, N. Y. Inf July 12, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10443 Tripp, Oscar S. O Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art Oct. 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3425 Trompeter, Francis Sgt. Co. B, 140, N. Y. Inf July 16, 1864.. Wounds 

11421 Troville, Francis Pvt. Co. L, 16, N. Y. Cav Oct. 24, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4820 Trueberg, E Pvt. Co. F, 52, K. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

4052 Truesdale, William J Pvt. Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf July 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3882 Trumbull, H Pvt. Co. I, 115, N. Y. Inf July 24, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

7629 Truman, Ransom S Cpl. Co. G, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 2, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

7317 Trumpp, Ernest Pvt. Co. F, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 30, 1864. . Debilitis 

3538 Trush, George Pvt. Co. K, 5, N. Y. Cav July 18, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Borne as 'Tiesch' and 'Tresh.'") 

3788 Tubbs, William Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf July 22, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3129 Tucker, Lewis Pvt. Co. D, 120, N. Y. Inf July 10, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

10604 Tuf, Edward B Pvt. Co. C, 109, N. Y. Inf Oct. 10, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Edward B. Tuf?.") 

7413 TuUey, Joseph Pvt. Co. E, 95, N. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8805 Tunei-t, T. J Pvt. Co. D, 110, N. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

9609 Tunis, Clawson Pvt. Co. E, 100, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 23, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11376 Turner, John Pvt. Co. M, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct. 24, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John J. Turner.") 

7970 Turner, John Pvt. Co. A, 49, N. Y. Inf Sept. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1688 Turner, Thomas Pvt. Co. B, 16, N. Y. Cav June 7, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

707 Turner, William Cpl. Co. G, 5, N. Y. Cav Apr. 24, 1864. . C. Dysentery 

7421 Turton, William H Pvt. Co. I, 2, N. Y. Art Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

10535 Tuthill, Cliarles Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct. 8, 1864. . Scorbutus 

9687 TuthiU, Cyrus D Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Art Sept. 24, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

2893 Tuttle, Winfield H Pvt. Co. K, 48, N. Y. Inf July 4, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Winfield H. TutAiH.") 

2112 Twomy, Joseph T Cpl. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf June 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph F. Twomy.") 

12401 Udell, James Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Jan. 5, 1865. . Scorbutus 

10887 Uhner, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 15, N. Y. Art Oct. 14, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

254 UnderhiU, HewUtt Pvt. Co. E, 47, N. Y. Inf Mch. 30, 1864. . Intermittent 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Hulet Underbill.") fever 

1495 Undermyer, Anthony ... Pvt. Co. F, 62, N. Y. Inf May 31, 1864.. Pneumonia 

4196 Vail, William Pvt. Co. F, 6, N. Y. Art July 29, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

9087 Van AUen, Charles Cpl. Co. E, 7, N. Y. H. Art. . . Sept. 18, 1864. . Dysentery 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



235 



Died Cause 

Aug. 23, 1864.. Dysentery 
Sept 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 
Jan. 28, 1865. 
Apr. 21, 1864. 



C. Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 



C. Diarrhoea 



Debilitis 



Dysentery 



Diarrhoea 



Diarrhoea 



iVo. Name Organization 

6634 Van Alstyne, Charles M.. Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art 

8782 Van Alstyne, Harvey Pvt. Co. A, 152, N. Y. Inf... 

12539 Van Bramer, Francis Pvt. Co. K, 71, N. Y. Inf 

664 Van Bureh, Henry Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. L. Art. . 

7635 Van Buren, John A Pvt Co. B, 15, N. Y. Cav Sept 2, 1864. . 

1025 Van Buren, John \V.... Pvt Co. K, 3, N. Y. L. Art... May 11, 1864.. 

1091 Vancleck, WUUam Pvt Co. I, 106, N. Y. Inf.... May 14, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Borne as ' Van Clake ' and ' Vanklick.' ") 

5661 Vancott, Samuel Pvt Co. H, 2, N. Y. Cav Aug. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

1577 Vanderbeck, Abraham .. Pvt Co. B, 133, N. Y. Inf.... June 3, 1864.. Dysentery 
1418 Vanderbogent, WilUam J. Pvt Co. F, 104, N. Y. Inf.... May 27, 1864.. 
(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William J. Vanderbojfard.") 

2317 Vanderburgh, Lewis W.. Pvt. Co. G, 77, N. Y. Inf June 22, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lewis W. Vandenburgh.") 

3463 Vandusen, Henry Pvt Co. M, 24, N. Y. Cav July 17, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Henry C. Vandusen.") 

3333 Vanest, James H Pvt Co. B, 14, N. Y. Art July 15, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " James H. VaniVest, Co. /.") 

3371 Van Houton, John Pvt Co. A, 124, N. Y. Inf July 15, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") This man has been verified as "John VanHouten, Co. 

B, 124, N. Y. Inf., though he never joined the regiment and was never taken up 

on the rolls of that regiment. See two letters attached to last 

sheet relative to this case. 

6560 Van Housen, Columbus.. Pvt Co. A, 95, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8806 Vankleck, Francis Pvt. Co. B, S, N. Y. H. Art. . . Sept. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8309 Van Marter, Alfred A. . . Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Cav Sept. 10, 1864 

7243 Van Ness, Monroe Pvt. Co. K, 2, N. Y. Cav Aug. 29, 1864. . Dysentery 

10656 Vanoeson, Brainard Pvt 12, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Oct. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Brainerd VanHoesen." ) 

11596 Vanornam, Isaac Pvt. Co. E, 8, N. Y. Cav Oct. 28, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Isaac Vanorman.") 

7506 Van Osten, Charles Pvt. Co. F, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles Van Ost") 

2879 Vansant George W Pvt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art July 4, 1864. . 

11446 Vanscoyck, Lemuel B... Pvt Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Oct 24, 1864.. 

83 Vanvelsen, J. H Pvt. Co. A, 120, N. Y. Inf . . . . Mch. 21, 1864. . 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Jacob W. Van Velsan.") 

7564 Vanvelzer, John M Pvt. Co. I, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept 2, 1864.. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " John N. Vanveler.") 

7252 Vanzant, William Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 30, 1864. . 

6472 Varney, Cassius M. C Pvt Co. E, 169, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864. . 

2089 Vaughn, WiUiam H Pvt. Co. K, 8, N. Y. Cav June 17, 1864. . 

1539 Vernon, Samuel Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Cav June 1, 1864. . 

973 Vesper, James W Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf May 9, 1864. . 

6525 Vibbard, George Pvt. Co. E, 22, N. Y. Cav Aug. 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

8407 Viesel, Andreas Pvt. Co. F, 7, N. Y. Art Sept 11, 1864. . Dysentery 

7846 Vincent, Robert Pvt. Co. I, 178, N. Y. Inf.... Sept 4, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

2715 Visch, Rudolph Pvt Co. E, 178, N. Y. Inf.... July 1, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Rudolph Vesch.") 



Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Bronchitis 

Dysentery 

Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 



236 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



iVo. Name Organization Died Cause 

10023 Voerling, Hubert Pvt. Co. C, 15, N. Y. Art Sept. 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Corporal") 

5285 Vogel, Abram Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 11, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Abram Vode, Xogde, or \oed.") 

4807 Volck, Peter Pvt. Co. F, 100, N. Y. Inf Aug. 5, 1864.. Anasarca 

3657 Volmoore, Isaac Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art July 20, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Isaac Valmoore.") 
3891 Von Reitzcnstein, Chris- 
topher Cpl. Co. D, 132, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 24, 1864. , 

(No rank on headstone.) 

5503 Voorhees, Alfred H Pvt. Co. H, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 13, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alfred H. Vorh/es.") 

11507 Voorhies, Edwin R Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct. 26, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Ewin R. VoorheiS.") 

6682 VoorheiS, George Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 24, 1864. 

9668 Vrooman, Simon H Pvt. Co. H, 149, N. Y. Inf. . . . Sept. 24, 1864. 

9356 Wade, Martin Pvt. Co. D, 14, N. Y. Art Sept. 20, 1864. 

6046 Waechter, Joseph Sgt. Co. G, 119, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 18, 1864. 

10686 Wagner, Christian Pvt. Co. K, 93, N. Y. Inf Oct. 11, 1864. 

4060 Wailes, Charles H Pvt. Co. K, 109, N. Y. Inf. . . . July 27, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles H. Wales.") 

1564 Walcott, Gedeon P Pvt. Co. D, 67, N. Y. Inf June 2, 1864. 

9869 Waldron, John Pvt. Co. E, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 27, 1864. 

(Headstone reads "John Waldon.") 

6978 Waldron, Nelson Pvt. Co. K, 146, N. Y. Inf.... Aug. 27, 1864. 

2294 Wales, Jared Sgt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf June 21, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st Sergeant.") 

8146 Walker, James Pvt. Co. D, 2, N. Y. Art Sept. 7, 1864. 

8198 WaU, Joseph Pvt. Co. I, 64, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph WaM.") 

11061 WaUace, Caleb M Pvt. Co. G, 22, N. Y. Cav Oct. 17, 1864. 

2827 Wallace, John Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Cav July 3, 1864. 

(.\d. G. N. Y. says "Corporal.") 

1398 Wallace, John T Pvt. Co. B, 11, N. Y. Cav May 26, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6425 Walling, George Pvt. Co. B, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 22, 1864. 

1184 Walls, Peter Pvt. Co. B, 4, N. Y. Cav May 18, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

3336 Walser, John Pvt. Co. D, 15, N. Y. Art July 15, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Waliher") 

8177 Walsh, John Pvt. Co. H, 39, N. Y. Inf Sept. 8, 1864. 

3381 Waltcrhouse, E Pvt. Co. I, 9, N. Y. July 16, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Edward Waterhouse, 83d Inf., same as 9th M 

9858 Walters, Daniel Pvt. Co. E, 125, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 27, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Daniel Waters.") 

1557 Walters, Nelson Sgt. Co. K, 120, N. Y. Inf. . . . June 2, 1864. 

7249 Waltz, Madison Pvt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 31, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Madison M. Walt«.") 

2238 Ward, H Pvt. Co. I, 95, N. Y. Inf June 20, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 



C. Diarrhoea 

C. Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 

Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 
Scorbutus 
Scorbutus 
Diarrhoea 

Debilitis 
Scorbutus 

Dysentery 
C. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Diarrhoea 

Dysentery 
Pneumonia 

Diarrhoea 

Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 

Diarrhoea 
Dysentery 

ilitia.") 

. Scorbutus 

. A. Diarrhoea 
. Diarrhoea 

. Debilitis 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



237 



No. Xante Organization Died Cause 

10920 Ward, John Pvt. Co. H, 40, N. Y. Inf Oct. 12, 1864. . Anasarca 

5126 Ward, John Pvt. Co. G, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864. . Ascitis 

10543 Ward, Patrick Pvt. Co. D, 88, N. Y. Inf Oct. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

400 Ward, William A Pvt. Co. B, 99, N. Y. Inf Apr. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9258 Warner, Daniel Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 19, 1864.. Scorbutus 

4120 Warner, George M Pvt. Co. F, 2, N. Y. Cav July 28, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12419 Warner, Luther Pvt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Jan. 9, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

11083 Warrell, Charles Sgt. Co. I, 57, N. Y. Inf Oct. 17, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7444 Warren, Elon G Pvt. Co. F, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

4026 Warren, Lafayette Pvt. Co. I, 95, N. Y. Inf July 26, 1864.. Dysentery 

11001 Warren, Patricli J Pvt. Co. G, 7, N. Y. Art Oct. 16, 1864.. Ulcers 

7351 Warriner, Philander P... Pvt. Co. M, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

13480 Washburn, James M Pvt. Co. E, 137, N. Y. Inf. . . . Nov. 27, 1864 

(Ad. G. X. Y. says ^* Junius E. Washburn.") 

5679 Washburn, Nicholas Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

3731 Washington, Isaac Pvt. Co. G, 76, N. Y. Inf July 21, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7376 Washurst, Samuel Pvt. Co. I, 7, N. Y. Art Aug. 30, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

11945 Waterman, Sely Pvt. Co. K, 109, N. Y. Inf Nov. 10, 1864.. Scorbutus 

10313 Waters, Alanson Pvt. Co. F, 8, N. Y. Cav Oct. 4, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Alanson L. Waters.") 

8939 Watron, George Pvt. Co. I, 6, N. Y. Art Sept. 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 

10965 Watson, James Pvt. Co. M, 15, N. Y. Art Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

6947 Watson, Thomas S Pvt. Co. I, 99, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864.. Dysentery 

9977 Watts, C Pvt. Co. C, 6. N. Y. Sept. 28, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

9155 Wear, Johnson Pvt. Co. A, 148, N. Y. Inf Sept. 18, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7078 Weaver, Benjamin S Pvt. Co. I, 96, N. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

9428 Weaver, Jacob Pvt. Co. E, 1, N. Y. Cav Sept. 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

6370 Webb, Miron E Pvt. Co. F, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 21, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " M^/ron E. Webb.") 

6002 Weber, Frederick Pvt. Co. E, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 17, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

5593 Webster, Elwood Pvt. Co. K, 76, N. Y. Inf Aug. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

9731 Webster, G. Pvt. Co. C, 29, N. Y. Inf Sept. 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

6755 Webster, Henry Pvt. Co. M, 23, N. Y. Cav Aug. 24, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1598 Webster, James Pvt. Co. C, 137, N. Y. Inf June 4, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

3273 Weeks, Daniel Pvt. Co. D, 63, N. Y. Inf July 13, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

8204 Weeks, James Pvt. Co. G, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

2023 Wagner, Charles Pvt. Co. E, 39, N. Y. Inf June 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

10972 Weidman, Jacob W Pvt. Co. H, 16, N. Y. Cav Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Jacob Weidmann." "Weidmann" on stone.) 

5001 Weihl, Joseph Sgt. Co. G, 15, N. Y. Art Aug. 7, 1864. . Scorbutus 

6927 Weiper, Charles Pvt. Co. A, 115, N. Y. Inf Aug. 26, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Ad. G. N. Y. says " Charles Weeper.") 

7667 Weisener, Henry Pvt. Co. I, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 3, 1864.. Typhus fever 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Henry Weisner." 

8083 Weitzhausen, F Pvt. Co. L, 9, N. Y. Sept. 7, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 
5030 Welch, Conrad Pvt. Co. B, 3, N. Y. Cav Aug. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 



238 STATE OF NEW YORK 

A'o. Tfame Organization Died Cause 

5181 Welch, Edward Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Aug. 9, 186i.. Dysentery 

6692 Welch, James Farrier, Co. K, 5, N. Y. Cav. . Aug. 24, lH(i4. . Scorbutus 

10085 Welch, John Sgt. Co. A, 9, N. Y. Inf. Sept. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Not found.") 

10013 Welch, William Pvt. Co. G, 76, N. Y. Inf Sept. 29, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Wiliam J. Welch.") 

365 Weldon, Edson Pvt. Co. M, 20, N. Y. Cav. .... Mch. 30, 1864. . C. Dysentery 

3728 Welkley, Samuel Pvt. Co. B, 8, N. Y. Cav July 21, 1864.. Dysentery 

7987 WelUngton, R. G Sgt. Co. A, 12, N. Y. Cav Sept. 6, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st Sergeant.") 

12036 Wells, Edmund Pvt. Co. K, 69, N. Y. Inf Nov. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Edward Wells, private Co. K, JSS, N. Y. Inf., Also known as '69th 

National Guard Artillery.' ") 

7472 Wells, Jefferson Pvt. Co. H, 9, N. Y. Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "83d N. Y. Inf.") 

11127 Welsh, James Pvt. Co. D, 5, N. Y. Cav Oct. 18, 1864 

2310 Welsh, Lawrence Pvt. Co. B, 146, N. Y. Inf June 22, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Lawrence Welch.") 

7561 Welton, James H Pvt. Co. K, 74, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "James Welton.") 

739 West, George Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art Apr. 26, 1864. . Dysentery 

1537 West, James Pvt. Co. K, 3, N. Y. Art June 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

9572 West, Stephen Pvt. Co. F, 13, N. Y. Cav Sept. 23, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

3964 West, William Pvt. Co. E, 157, N. Y. Inf July 25, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Died Aug. 15, 1864, of C. Diarrhoea, at Hilton Head, S. C") 

11397 Westbrook, Daniel Pvt. Co. K, 16, N. Y. Cav Oct. 24, 1864. . Debilitis 

(Headstone reads "D. Westerbrook " and register credits him to Co. D, 155, N. Y'. Inf. At 
first Ad. G. N. Y. remarked "unknown" subsequently identified as recorded.) 

9506 Westervelt, Piatt S Pvt. Co. L, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 22, 1864. . Scorbutus 

3235 Westfall, John Pvt. Co. H, 151, N. Y. Inf July 12, 1864 

10303 Weston, Lloyd Pvt. Co. F, 115, N. Y. Inf Oct. 4, 1864.. Scorbutic 

Diarrhoea 

507 Westrop, Henry Pvt. Co. B, 12.5, N. Y. Inf Apr. 12, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

4104 Whalen, M Pvt. Co. M, 9, N. Y. July 27, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

10433 Wharton, Robert Pvt. Co. L, 5, N. Y. Cav Oct. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 

6611 W'heeler, David A Pvt. Co. H, 147, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864.. C. Diarrhosa 

4155 Wheelock, WilUam H Pvt. Co. I, 14, N. Y. Art July 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

3084 Whipple, H Sgt. Co. H, 154, N. Y. Inf July 9, 1864.. Pneumonia 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Henry F. Whipple, Isi Sergeant.") 

8611 Whipple, Martin D Pvt. Co. D, 22, N. Y. Cav Sept. 13, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

9743 Whipple, WilUam C Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 25, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " William C. Whi«le.") Latter name on the headstone. 

11724 Whitbeck, Joseph Cpl. Co. B, 100, N. Y. Inf Nov. 1, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Joseph W. Whitbeck.") 

3034 AVhite, Ebenezer S Pvt. Co. D, 10, N. Y. Cav July 8, 1864. . Dysentery 

11555 White, Henry Cpl. Co. E, 47, N. Y. Inf Oct. 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 

8680 White, James H Cpl. Co. D, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Sept. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

11879 White, Luke Pvt. Co. G, 8, N. Y. Art Nov. 6, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Died from wounds.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 



239 



No. Name Organization Died Cause 

9878 Whitlenour, Marcus Pvt. Co. M, IS, N. Y. Art Sept. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Marcus Wlntemour.") Headstone reads "Marcus Whittenour." 

5770 Whetmore, Henry B Pvt. Co. A, 40, N. Y. Inf Aug. 15, 1864.. Dysentery 

7543 Whitmore, J Pvt. Co. I, 140, N. Y. Inf Sept. 4, 1864.. Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

5207 Whitney, Ira Pvt. Co. E, 104, N. Y. Inf Aug. 10, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Headstone reads "Pa." has been verified " N. Y." and stone will be changed to that state.) 

7417 Whitney, Jokn Sgt. Co. K, 39, N. Y. Inf Aug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8792 Whitney, Mendall A Pvt. Co. D, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 15, 1864.. Scorbutus 

5663 Wicks, Frank Pvt. Co. K, 1, N. Y. Art Aug. 14, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(.Vd. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

8729 Wiggins, James Pvt. Co. D, 52, N. Y. Inf Sept. 13, 1864.. Scorbutus 

8855 Wilbur, E. G Pvt. Co. K, 120, N. Y. Inf.... Sept. 16, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Y.seck G. Wilber.") 

4539 Wilcox, Allen Pvt. Co. C, 14, N. Y. Art Aug. 2, 1864. 

11428 Wilcox, Charles R Sgt. Co. G, 5, N. Y. Cav Oct. 24, 1864. 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Charles L. Wilcox, Qr. Mr. Sergeant.") 

8478 Wilcox, Franklin E Pvt. Co. B, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 10, 1864. 

1938 Wilcox, George Pvt. Co. F, 12, N. Y. Cav June 14, 1864. 



Diarrhoea 
C. Diarrhoea 



Scorbutus 
Remittent 

fever 
Scorbutus 
C. Diarrhoea 



mil Wilcox, Hugh R Pvt. Co. C, 59, N. Y. Inf Oct. 18, 1864. 

9496 Wilcox, William, Jr Sgt. Co. G, 43, N. Y. Inf Sept. 22, 1864. 

(No rank on headstone.) 

11689 Wilds, J Pvt. Co. B, 154, N. Y. Inf Oct. 31, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

12607 Wiley, James Sgt. Co. B, 59, N. Y. Inf Feb. 7, 1865. . C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "1st Sergeant") 

7622 Wiley, W Pvt. Co. G, 115, N. Y. Inf Sept. 2, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Wi7Hrtm H. Wiley.") 

10977 Wilkinson, John N Cpl. Co. A, 42, N. Y. Inf Oct. 14, 1864.. Scorbutus 

12697 Williams, Asa Pvt. Co. I, 94, N. Y. Inf Feb. 23, 1865.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Gained from prisoner of war April 18, 1865, and 'was absent sick at 

muster out.") 

6219 Williams, Charles R Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf Aug. 20, 1864.. Anasarca 

4522 WilUams, Edward Pvt. Co. I, 42, N. Y. Inf Aug. 2, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Corporal.") 

4080 Williams, Franklin Pvt. Co. A, 125, N. Y. Inf.... July 27, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4603 Williams, George Cpl. Co. K, 1, N. Y. Cav Aug. 3, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

1567 Williams, H Pvt. Co. A, 9, N. Y. Militia. . . June 2, 1864. . Pneumonia 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "83d Inf.") Same regiment. 

11130 Williams, Henry Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Cav Oct. 18, 1864. . Scorbutus 

7945 Williams, Jan-es Pvt. Co. G, 63, N. Y. Inf Sept. 5, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

4701 WiUiams, John Pvt. Co. K, 52, N. Y. Inf Aug. 4, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Co. D.") 

7112 WiUiams, John B Pvt. Co. C, 24, N. Y. Cav Aug. 28, 1864. . Dysentery 

6861 Williams, Lawrence Pvt. Co. L, 16, N. Y. Cav Aug. 26, 1864. . Scorbutus 

9516 Williams, Lucian D Pvt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Co. C") 
3947 Williams, Oliver Sgt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... July 25, 1864.. Diarrhoea 



240 



STATE OF NEW YORK 



No. 

10122 
9057 
5870 
6«i-2 
1645 
1133 
3757 
2044 

11983 
7122 

2104 
(Ad. 



10945 

6233 

7980 

3069 

11474 

9441 

4272 

4643 

12237 

12049 

6130 

11821 
591 

12356 
7581 
3607 

10063 
9715 

7686 
5039 
3881 
10141 
5696 
9132 

9874 

7884 



Name Orrjanizalion Died Caute 

Willis, John Pvt. Co. G, 121, N. Y. Inf Oct. 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Wilsey, David B Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 17, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Wilson, Andrew J Pvt. Co. A, 57, N. Y. Inf Au;;. 16, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

Wilson, An<lrow M Pvt. Co. A, 2, N. Y. Art Aup. 25, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Wilson, Benjamin Pvt. Co. H, 48, N. Y. Inf June 5, 1864.. Dysentery 

Wilson, James H Pvt. Co. K, 132, N. Y. Inf May 16, 1864. . Pneumonia 

Wilson, John Pvt. Co. A, 95, N. Y. Inf July 22, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Wilson, Robert Pvt. Co. A, 14, N. Y. Cav June 15, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Wilson, William Pvt. Co. H, 1.55, N. Y. Inf Nov. 13, 1864.. Dysentery 

Windsor, John Pvt. Co. I, 117, N. Y. Inf Aug. 28, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John B. Winsor.") 

Winegardner, L Pvt. Co. H, 48, N. Y. Inf June 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

G. N. Y. says " I.ouis Winegardner, killed in acton at Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864.") 
The dead from Olustee were moved to Andersonville after close of war, but the 

number of grave, in this case, would be above 13,000 if state 
records are correct. 

Wings, George Pvt. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Art Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "George J/ings.") 

Winkoopp, Adolph Pvt. Co. L, 15, N. Y. Art Aug. 10, 1864.. Wounds 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Adolph Winkopp.") 

Winn, James Pvt. Co. D, 7, N. Y. Art Sept. 6, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Winn, Peter Pvt Co. M, 20, N. Y. Cav July 9, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Winnie, George A Pvt. Co. D, 100, N. Y. Inf Oct. 26, 1864. . Dysentery 

Witter, Charles H Pvt. Co. C, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 21, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Witter, George H Pvt. Co. E, 85, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Witter, William A Pvt. Co. G, 5, N. Y. Cav Aug. 3, 1864. . Dysentery 

Witter, William O Pvt. Co. I, 49, N. Y. Inf Dec. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Wittmayer, Pitt Pvt. Co. E, 66, N. Y. Inf Nov. 16, 1864.. Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Fetcr Wittmeyer, Corporal") 

Wolfe, Frederick Cpl. Co. K, 24, N. Y. Cav Aug. 19, 1864.. DebiUtis 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says ''Private.") 

Wolfe, Patrick Pvt. Co. D; 88, N. Y. Inf Nov. 5, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Wolfram, August Pvt. Co. C, 52, N. Y. Inf Apr. 17, 1864.. C. Diarrhoea 

Wolley, George C Pvt. Co. K, 7, N. Y. Art Dec. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Wood, Emmit T Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery... Sept. 3, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Wood, Francis Pvt. Co. I, 5, N. Y. Cav July 19, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Wood, Henry Pvt. Co. D, 115, N. Y. Inf Sept. 30, 1864.. Scorbutus 

Wood, John Pvt Co. M, 10, N. Y. Cav Sept. 25, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "John Woods.") 

Wood, John Pvt Co. D, 97, N. Y. Inf Sept 3, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Wood, John S Pvt. Co. B, 6, N. Y. Art Aug. 8, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

Wood, Martin Pvt Co. H, 111, N. Y. Inf July 24, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

Wood, Wilson J Pvt. Co. H, 85, N. Y. Inf Oct 1, 1864. . Scorbutus 

WoodhuU, David H Pvt. Co. E, 8, N. Y. Cav Aug. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

Woodmemsey, D. M Pvt. Co. M, 3, N. Y. Cav Sept. 18, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "David M. Woodmanci/.") 

Woods, H Pvt Co. G, 115, N. Y. Inf Sept. 27, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 
Woodward, Hiram J.... Cpl. Co. I, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Sept. 5, 1864.. Anasarca 
(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Hiram J. Woodard, signature.") 



ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT DEDICATION 241 

No. Name Organization Died Cause 

8382 Woodworth, B Pvt. Co. D, 56, N. Y. Inf Sept. 10, 1864. . Dysentery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

11031 Woolf, William F Pvt. Co. M, 2, N. Y. Art Oct. 16, 1864. . Scorbutus 

13816 Worden, Hector B Pvt. Co. B, 5, N. Y. Art Mch. 25, 1865.. C. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Hector B. AVerden.") 

4847 Wright, Charles S Pvt. Co. E, 118, N. Y. Inf Aug. 6, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

10941 Wright, Daniel Pvt. Co. G, 43, N. Y. Inf Oct. 15, 1864. . Scorbutus 

5125 Wright, Joseph J Pvt. Co. I, 148, N. Y. Inf Aug. 9, 1864.. Scorbutus 

7784 Wulehleger, John Sgt. Co. G, 85, N. Y. Inf Sept. 4, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " John Wul«rlileger.") 

4589 Wyatt, James Pvt. Co. G, 174, N. Y. Inf Aug. 3, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7334 Wyncoop, G Sgt. Co. H, 13, N. Y. Cav Aug. 30, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Not found.") 

7433 Yates, Warren C Pvt. Co. H, 71, N. Y. Inf Sept. 1, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

4984 Yencer, James D Pvt. 24, N. Y. Ind. Battery. . . Aug. 7, 1864. . Dysentery 

12501 Yeomand, George Pvt. Co. A, 7, N. Y. Art Jan. 22, 1865. . Diarrhoea 

8224 Young, Addis N Pvt. Co. L, 2, N. Y. Art Sept. 8, 1864. . C. Diarrhoea 

6539 Young, Charles Pvt. Co. D, 41, N. Y. Inf Aug. 23, 1864. . Scorbutus 

1306 Young, Eugene L Pvt. Co. G, 111, N. Y. Inf May 23, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

8733 Young, George C Pvt. Co. H, 23, N. Y. Cav Sept. 13, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "George C. Youngs.") 

6946 Young, John Sgt. Co. B, 1, N. Y. Dragoons. Aug. 26, 1864. . Diarrhoea 

7411 Young, Talcott B Pvt. Co. A, 148, N. Y. Inf .\ug. 31, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12617 Ziegler, Frederick Pvt. Co. G, 145, N. Y. Inf Feb. 8, 1865.. Scorbutus 

4204 Zilgner, Charles Pvt. Co. C, 10, N. Y. Inf July 29, 1864.. Diarrhoea 

12204 Zoller, F. W Pvt. Co. D, 40, N. Y. Inf Dec. 2, 1864. . Scorbutus 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says "Frederick W. ZoUer.") 

13704 Zurcher, Gottlieb Pvt. 1, N. Y. Ind. Battery 

(Ad. G. N. Y. says " Co. A, Independent Battalion Lt. Inf., killed Feb. 20, 1864, at Olustee, 
Fla., also Co. D, 1st Engineers. Not found as of 1st Battery.") 



ANALYSIS OF ABOVE LIST 

Total number of names credited to New York 2507 

Number reported by Ad. G. N. Y. as " Not found " 254 

Number reported by Ad. G. N. Y. as " Paroled " 1 

Number reported by Ad. G. N. Y. as " Mustered out " 2 

Number reported by Ad. G. N. Y. as "Absent sick at muster out " 2 

Number reported by Ad. G. N. Y. as " Deserters " 3 

Number of doubtful cases, Copeland, No. 1150; Houston, No. 11099; Keiser, 
No. 8873; Kenney, No. 3671; Kenyon, No. 11244; Sloats, No. 6919 and 

West, No. 3964 T 

269 

Total number of New York troops supposed to be buried here, including all correc- 
tions to date 



16 




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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



013 786 744 8 






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