(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Catalog"

CLIFFORD E. BARBOUR 
LIBRARY 



PITTSBURGH 

THEOLOGICAL 

SEMINARY 



CATALOG '79-80 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is accredited by 
The Association of Theological Schools in the 
United States and Canada, and the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 



This biennial catalog is a forecast of the policies, personnel and programs of Pittsbur 
Theological Seminary as projected by the responsible authorities of the Seminal 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary reserves the right to alter and change its polici< 
personnel and programs, without prior notice, in accordance with the Seminary's i 
stitutional needs and academic purposes. Complete statements of Pittsburgh Theolo; 
cal Seminary's policies and programs are found in the Seminary's Constitution, By-lav 
Academic Regulations and Board and Faculty Minutes. 




P 99 



ANNUAL CATALOG 
1979-1980 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

616 North Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

412-362-5610 



ftgC-t: < r 

f>V^o7D 



SEMINARY CALENDAR FOR 1979-80 



TERM ONE 


17-19 September 


20 September 


20 September 


15 November 


22-23 November 


30 November 


3-7 December 


TERM TWO 


2 January 


15 January 


11 March 


12-14 March 


TERM THREE 


24 March 


4 April 


14-16 April 


14 May 


2 June 


3-6 June 


10 June 


10 June 



Junior Orientation and Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Opening Convocation and Community Luncheon 

Semiannual Meeting, Board of Directors 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Week 



First Day of Classes 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday Observance 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Period 



First Day of Classes 

Good Friday (No Classes) 

Schaff Lectures 

Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Period 

Alumni Day 

184th Annual Commencement 



Table of Contents 

I. Purpose and History 5 

II. Campus Setting 9 

III. Educational Programs 15 

Master of Divinity 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work 

Master of Divinity/Master of Library Science 

Master of Arts 

Doctor of Ministry 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Continuing Education 

Special Students 

International Scholars 

IV. Academic Regulations 27 

V. Course Descriptions 29 

VI. Faculty 47 

VII. Finances and Financial Aid 55 

VIII. Student Life 61 

IX. Admissions Procedures 65 

X. Special Lectures 69 

XI. Board of Directors and Administrative Officers . . .71 
Index 75 



i • .^ . .-. • 







I. PURPOSE AND HISTORY 

PURPOSE 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a graduate professional institution 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. The 
General Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America exercises control of the Seminary through the Board of Di- 
rectors of the Seminary. The primary purpose of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is to prepare pastors for the United Presbyterian ministry so that 
they may demonstrate both personal piety and the keenest possible intel- 
lectual understanding of the Gospel and its implications for individual 
and social living, so that they may promote the peace, unity and purity of 
the church among the ministers of the church, and so that they may lay the 
foundation of early and lasting friendships, productive of confidence and 
mutual assistance among ministers. 

The theological position of the United Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America is stated in the Constitution of the denomina- 
tion, Part I, Book of Confessions. This is the theological stance of Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary. Diversity of theological views within the 
framework of these confessions is inevitable. Those holding different 
theological viewpoints, especially when based upon their understanding 
of the Book of Confessions, should respect one another, accept criticism of 
one another's views in a Christian spirit, be willing to be challenged by 
different views and be tolerant of those views. Within such a setting, 
which should be expected in any academic institution and be markedly 
evident in a Christian community, students and faculty alike should 
experience the kind of spiritual and intellectual climate in which to grow. 
The Seminary should be a visible witness that in Christ there is unity in 
diversity. 

At least a two-third portion of the faculty at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary are members of the United Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America or are associated with the World Alliance of Reformed 
Churches. Faculty members who are from communions other than the 
United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America are expected 
to be faithful to the theological affirmations of their particular denomina- 
tions. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary maintains its ecumenical stance by 
welcoming students from every denomination, and assists in preparing 
them for service in their respective communions. The Seminary is a 
Christian community seeking to be obedient to Jesus Christ, under the 
authority of Scripture, and continually guided by the Book of Confessions, 
and is not merely a professional and graduate school of religion. 

HISTORY 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the consoli- 
dation of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America, and Western Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America. The union of the two denominations in 



1958 led to the consolidation of the two seminaries which were both 
located in Pittsburgh. 

The history of Pittsburgh Seminary began with the founding of Service 
Seminary in 1794 by the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania. Prior to 
this time the Presbytery had been dependent upon the supply of ministers 
sent out from Scotland. The Rev. John Anderson, D.D., was elected the 
first teacher of divinity and the school began with an enrollment of six 
students. Service Seminary later moved to Ohio where it became Xenia 
Theological Seminary. Later it moved to Missouri. This institution was 
merged in 1930 with a seminary founded in 1825 in Pittsburgh to form 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. This institution was later aug- 
mented by the resources of Newburgh Seminary which was founded in 
New York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 




Ronald V. Wells 

Interim President 

Denison University, A.B.; 
Crozer Theological Seminary, 

B.D.; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Western Seminary, formally established in 1825 by the General Assem- 
bly of the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., began with classical academies 
founded by Joseph Smith in 1785 and John McMillan in 1787 in Washing- 
ton, Pennsylvania. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 1825, whose 
task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening western territories 
along the Ohio River. 

Since the consolidation, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has been 
located in the East Liberty section of Pittsburgh on the campus previously 
occupied by Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary. 

There are over twenty-six hundred living alumni of Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary and its antecedent institutions. Since 1959 over three 
quarters of these graduates have entered the service of the church in 
parish-related ministries. In addition, graduates of the Seminary serve the 
church as college and university presidents, seminary and college faculty, 
and as synod and presbytery executives and staff. There are nine living 
graduates of the Seminary who have held the highest elective office in the 



United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America — Moderator 
of the General Assembly. 

ACCREDITATION 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is fully accredited by the Association 
of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, and by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

INSTITUTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS 

Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education 

The Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education (PCHE) is a cooperative 
organization composed of Pittsburgh area colleges, universities, and 
graduate schools. Participating institutions are Carlow College, Car- 
negie-Mellon University, Chatham College, Community College of Alle- 
gheny County, Duquesne University, LaRoche College, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, Point Park College, Robert Morris College and the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

The purposes of PCHE are: to represent a common voice on appropriate 
issues; to examine possibilities for cooperation among the member in- 
stitutions; to undertake joint programs which expand educational oppor- 
tunities for students, extend faculty resources and conserve institutional 
resources; and to initiate joint sponsorships of appropriate programs. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's membership in PCHE benefits stu- 
dents by opening possibilities for cross-registration in courses at the 
graduate level, by establishing library privileges at eight academic li- 
braries other than the Seminary's own, and by initiating studies and 
programs in specialized areas such as Black Studies. 

The University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary conducts two joint degree programs 
with the University of Pittsburgh. These are described more fully in the 
section on Educational Programs. 

The American Schools of Oriental Research 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is associated with the American 
Schools of Oriental Research. This corporation is involved in archaeologi- 
cal research in the Middle East. Most of the work has been concentrated in 
Palestine and in Iraq, with schools being maintained in Jerusalem, Am- 
man, and Baghdad. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary since 1924 has been 
an active participant in numerous field projects in cooperation with the 
American School of Oriental Research. 

Arsenal Family and Children's Center 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center came into being in 1952 as a 
reflection of a Commonwealth mandate to the Western Psychiatric Insti- 
tute and Clinic to "deal with the mental hygiene of the normal child in the 
way of study and training in order that there may be a program of pre- 
vention of mental and nervous disorders as a result of giving children the 
proper background and training that will prevent such disorders." The 
Arsenal Family and Children's Center has grown and developed into a 
unique "field laboratory" for the in-depth psychological study of children 



and their families as well as a "field laboratory" on how to observe 
children and families, thereby contributing to the education and training 
of students for the ministry and other service-oriented careers. 

Association for Clinical Pastoral Education 

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education accredits a nationwide 
network of Clinical Pastoral Education Centers and supervisors. Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary is a member seminary of the Association. 




II. CAMPUS SETTING 

PITTSBURGH 

The City of Pittsburgh stands in Western Pennsylvania at the conflu- 
ence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers, which fonns the Ohio 
River. Historically the industrial gateway to the West, Pittsburgh has been 
nationally celebrated in recent decades as "The Renaissance City," the 
scene of vital urban human renewal. As the center of the nation's ninth 
largest metropolitan area, Pittsburgh is home to such important firms as 
U. S. Steel, Gulf Oil and Rockwell International. The spectacular down- 
town "Golden Triangle" of business and residential skyscrapers testifies 
to the joint effort of industrial, political and other community leaders to 
keep Pittsburgh a source of human endeavor and achievement. 

Pittsburgh's acclaimed renewal has included the arts and education as 
well as physical rehabilitation. An internationally regarded symphony 
orchestra along with resident opera, ballet and theater companies perform 
regularly in the lavish Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts. The City is also 
the steward of several important art collections and museums. Major 
league baseball, football and hockey teams play in the spacious facilities 
of Three Rivers Stadium and the Civic Arena. 

The City of Pittsburgh is the scene of Western Pennsylvania's major 
educational complex. Three major educational institutions, the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, Duquesne University and Carnegie-Mellon University 
plus four private colleges are located in the city. Visiting scholars, busi- 
ness and labor leaders, government officials and students, and other 
visitors have ready access to Pittsburgh via modern systems of air, rail and 
ground travel. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's emergence as an important center of 
theological education has paralleled the city's renaissance. Faculty and 
students are able to sample richly from and to join actively in Pittsburgh's 
efforts at human and cultural renewal. Seminary students live in Pitts- 
burgh and are thus sensitized to the urban setting of the contemporary 
theological enterprise. Their own faith is challenged and enriched by 
sustained encounter with the joys and tragedies of urban life. 

Through the wide scope of field education and other work opportuni- 
ties, students from the Seminary are involved in many different areas of 
Pittsburgh. Students serve as pastors in inner-city and suburban churches 
with a variety of programs as Chaplains in hospitals, county and federal 
penal institutions, as campus ministers, and in many other positions 
which affect the life of the city and its people. The resources of Pittsburgh 
for theological education are great, and Pittsburgh Seminary tries to make 
use of these resources as effectively as possible in the many facets of its 
life. The Seminary also attempts to be an active resource for the city 
through the stewardship of its facilities and the creative leadership of the 
members of the Seminary community. 

EAST LIBERTY 

The numerous rivers, valleys and mountains common to Western Penn- 
sylvania divide Pittsburgh into a series of neighborhoods many of which 



are ethnically defined. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is located in one 
of these neighborhoods, East Liberty. The area around the Seminary is a 
combination of commercial and residential sectors. The attractive East 
Liberty Mall is a shopping and business center. The Highland Park 
residential area is a well kept cluster of substantial homes bordering a 
large city park and zoo. 

The East Liberty section is the center of much of the Seminary's active 
involvement in the life of Pittsburgh. The Seminary is a formal participant 
in an exciting ecumenical witness, the East End Cooperative Ministry. 
Seminary facilities house several E.E.C.M. youth ministry programs in- 
cluding a recreational center. 




THE CAMPUS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is located on a thirteen-acre campus. 
The major portion of the campus was once the estate of H. Lee Mason, Jr. 
The buildings, almost all of which have been built since 1954, are of 
American Colonial design. 

Academic Buildings 

George A. Long Administration Building is the focal point of campus 
life. In addition to administrative offices, the building contains the main 
lecture and seminar rooms, some faculty offices, the student center, the 
bookstore, an audio and video tape center, the Bible Lands Museum and a 
large lounge. 



10 



Clifford E. Barbour Library houses a collection of over 180,000 vol- 
umes. Four open stack areas include 103 desk carrels which may be 
reserved by Master of Divinity, Master of Arts and Doctor of Ministry 
students. In addition, thirteen enclosed typing carrels, which allow great- 
er privacy for research work, are available for Doctor of Philosophy stu- 
dents. Twenty reserved study rooms provide ideal conditions in which 
faculty members, visiting scholars and graduate students may pursue 
scholarly research. Reading rooms and lounges are informally placed 
throughout the building. Facilities are also available for seminars, small 
conferences, microfilm reading, audio-visual work, language study and 
music listening. 

Special collections and displays augment the book resources of the 
Barbour Library. 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection. The research area of the 
library contains this priceless collection of classical theological works 
dating from the Reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology. Several thousand 
valuable hymn and psalm books which came from the estate of James 
Warrington of Philadelphia provide research materials for scholars of 
American and English hymnody. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection. An endowed fund established by 
Frank J. Brittain, Esq., is used for the purchase of theological works which 
are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 

The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection. An endowed 
fund established in memory of Clarence J. Williamson, for eighteen years 
Professor of Church History and Government at Pittsburgh Seminary, is 
used for the purchase of books on church history and closely related 
subjects. 

Historical Collections. The archive room of Barbour Library contains 
Minutes and other records of Associate, Associate Reformed and United 
Presbyterian congregations, presbyteries, synods and general assemblies. 
Barbour Library is also the depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Histori- 
cal Society and for Pittsburgh Presbytery of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the U.S.A. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of Dr. 
Karl Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh Seminary by Dr. 
Barth in 1964. Accompanying the desk at which Dr. Barth wrote his 
theological treatises from 1922 is an autographed copy of his Kirchliche 
Dogmatik 111 . 

Hicks Family Memorial Chapel is the newest structure on the Seminary 
campus. The large sanctuary is used for worship during many of the 
Seminary's chapel services, and is used occasionally by local congre- 
gations. Hicks Chapel has a spacious and comfortable theatre-auditorium 
which is ideal for conferences and special lectures. 

The James L. Kelso Bible Lands Museum. Named for the long-time 
Professor of Old Testament and Biblical Archaeology, the James L. Kelso 
Bible Lands Museum contains a significant collection of ancient Near 
Eastern and Palestinian pottery and artifacts from numerous excavations 
led by Dr. Kelso and his successors. Housed in the George A. Long 
Administration Building, the museum is a valuable teaching and research 

11 



aid for the serious seminary student who may wish to participate in a 
Palestinian dig or gain some expertise in Palestinian archaeology. 

Housing for Married Students 

Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall provides eighteen efficiency and 
twenty-one one-bedroom apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette, a 
bath and a storage locker in the basement. 

The Highlander contains seventeen one-bedroom and six two-bedroom 
units. Each apartment includes a living room, kitchen, bath and storage 
locker. 

Anderson Hall includes six two-bedroom and six three-bedroom apart- 
ments, each of which has a living room, a kitchen and a storage locker. 
These units are equipped with wall-to-wall carpeting. 

McMillan Hall, together with Anderson Hall and The Highlander, 
forms a quadrangle which encloses a play area for children. One four- 
bedroom, three three-bedroom, twelve two-bedroom and three one- 
bedroom apartments are enclosed within the building. As in Anderson 
Hall, the units are equipped with wall-to-wall carpeting. A large com- 
munity room is located on the ground level of McMillan Hall. The com- 
munity room is used as a play care center for pre-school children through- 
out the school year. 




12 



The Sheridan Apartments are six units, each of which consists of living 
room, kitchen and one or two bedrooms. 

All of the apartments are unfurnished. In the case of international 
students or others demonstrating a compelling need, a limited amount of 
furniture may be available through the Housing Office. 

Each apartment is equipped with a refrigerator and stove; coin- 
operated laundry facilities are located in the basement of each building. 

Life for married students and their families is pleasant and comfortable. 
Rents are well below commercial rates, shops and stores are within walk- 
ing distance, public transportation is available at the Seminary gate and 
public schools are nearby for children of all ages. 

Housing for Single Students 

John McNaugher Memorial Hall, the Seminary's original dormitory, 
now serves a variety of purposes. One wing houses single women stu- 
dents, while another contains faculty offices. Attached to McNaugher Hall 
is the dining facility which consists of three dining halls and a modern 
kitchen. 

George C. Fisher Memorial hall accommodates eighty men in single 
rooms. Six apartments for married students are also located on the ground 
floor of the building. Fisher Hall has student lounges on each floor in 
addition to a game room and a snack room on the ground floor. 



WORSHIP 

Worship is an integral part of the life of Pittsburgh Theological Sem- 
inary. Chapel services, both traditional and experimental in form, are held 
twice each week during the academic year. Students, faculty and admin- 
istration share in the leadership of chapel services under the direction of 
the Seminary's Liturgical Committee. In addition, worship and study are 
conducted on a weekly basis by the Evangelical Student Fellowship. A 
service of Holy Communion is held weekly by students and faculty of the 
Episcopal Church. Attendance at the worship services of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary is voluntary. 



13 





14 



III. EDUCATIONAL 
PROGRAMS 

THE MASTER OF DIVINITY DEGREE 

Studies leading to the Master of Divinity degree are designed to pre- 
pare men and women for the various ministries of the United Presbyterian 
Church and other denominations. It is a fundamental assumption of the 
Master of Divinity program that preparation for the ministry cannot be 
separated from engagement in ministry itself. Thus, the Master of Divin- 
ity curriculum is designed to integrate theological studies and the work of 
ministry so that theory and practice, academy and parish become com- 
plementary components in the educational process. 

One hundred and six term hours are required for the Master of Divinity 
degree. When followed on a full-time basis the program is normally 
completed in three academic years. Some students, particularly those 
involved in student pastorates, may find it necessary to spread their 
degree work over four academic years. An approved four-year sequence of 
Master of Divinity studies is available for such students, copies of which 
can be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

In preparing for Christian ministry a student should develop an in- 
depth understanding of a broad range of knowledge along with a compe- 
tence in basic pastoral abilities. The student should be able to demon- 
strate a theological understanding of the integration of these resources. 
The Master of Divinity curriculum is designed to guide the student 
through a pattern of course work and experience which will lead him or 
her to a basic professional competency with which to begin the ordained 
ministry. At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary it is understood that this 
basic professional competency includes: 

The ability to understand and make use of the basic documents of faith, 
i.e., Scripture, creeds and traditions of the church. The study of the Bible, 
both in English and in at least one of the original languages, and the study 
of church history are crucial to this ability. The course work in Biblical 
Studies is supplemented by a required examination on the content of the 
English Bible which is offered annually and which must be passed by 
every Master of Divinity student as a requisite for graduation. Normally, 
United Presbyterian students enroll in a full academic year's study of both 
biblical languages in accordance with the ordination requirements of the 
denomination. 

The ability to communicate through preaching, writing and teaching, 
and to counsel and provide leadership in the program and administrative 
areas, fostered by the course work in the Pastoral Studies and Profes- 
sional and Personal Development sequences. The Pastoral Studies se- 
quence is taken in conjunction with field education experience, so that 
the academic study in the areas of education, pastoral care and homiletics 
can be critically combined with a well-rounded, supervised involvement 
in the life of the church. 

The ability to understand in theological terms the sociological, ideo- 
logical and political content of the cultures in which the church min- 



15 



isters. This understanding needs to be followed by the ability to apply 
ethical standards to the social process and by the ability to make use of all 
the resources available for making ministry effective. In addition to the 
work done in the Church and Society sequence and in the Introduction to 
Ethics course, each student is required to take one elective course in 
ethics. 

The ability to think theologically. The Theological Studies sequence 
concentrates on basic issues in both the method and content of Christian 
theology. The systematic examination of issues such as the problems of 
religious language, the definitions of meaning and truth, the doctrinal 
formulations concerning salvation and Christology, and the doctrines of 
the Church and the sacraments will enable the student to think critically 
about the questions which are integral to the life and ministry of the 
Church. In addition to the Theological Studies sequence, each student is 
required to take one elective course in theology. 

The ability to practice ministry in an appropriate professional style. 
The Professional and Personal Development sequence helps the student 
articulate a theological interpretation by creedal formulation, by under- 
standing the process and meaning of faith formation, and by study of 
responsible leadership models. 



THE MASTER OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 



Term I 
Church and Society 

(Local) 
Biblical Studies I 
Language 
Historical Studies I 



Term I 
Pastoral Studies 
(Pastoral Care) 
Theological Studies III 
Biblical Studies III 
Elective 



Term I 
Personal and Profes- 
sional Development 
(Faith Formation) 



Electives (3) 



Junior Year 

Term II 
Church and Society 

(National) 
Biblical Studies II 
Language 
Theological Studies I 



Term III 
Church and Society 

(Global) 
Theological Studies II 
Exegesis 
Historical Studies II 



Junior Year Credits — 34 



Middler Year 

Term II 



Term III 



Pastoral Studies Pastoral Studies 

(Education) (Homiletics) 

Introduction to Ethics Historical Studies 
Biblical Studies IV Elective 
Elective Elective 

Middler Year Credits — 36 



III 



Senior Year 

Term II 
Personal and Profes- 
sional Develop- 
ment (Credo) 



Electives (3) 



Term III 
Personal and Profes- 
sional Development 
(Ministerial Leader- 
ship) 
Electives (3) 



Senior Year Credits — 36 



16 



Equivalency Examinations 

The Master of Divinity curriculum of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
is basically a required curriculum. Ordinarily, no one will be excused 
from the required courses; however, in certain circumstances this may be 
possible. Requests may be submitted to the Dean's Office. The faculty in 
the field from which the student wishes to be excused design appropriate 
tests and have authority to determine whether the student has sufficient 
mastery for the course to be waived. Such courses will be listed on the 
transcript, showing that the requirement was fulfilled, but no credit hours 
will be given. 

English Bible Examination 

The passing of an examination on the content of the English Bible is 
required for graduation. This examination is offered annually. Although 
this requirement may be met as late as the third year, it is recommended 
that students take the examination in the fall of their first year of Master of 
Divinity studies. The incoming student who achieves the highest grade 
on this examination will be named the recipient of the Andrew Reed 
Scholarship. 

THE MASTER OF DIVINITY/MASTER OF 
SOCIAL WORK JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM 

Ministry and social work share many concerns. The mission of the 
Church involves working for the improvement of the quality of life in 
diverse ways, some of which parallel social work efforts. Many ministers 
and theological students want to gain the insights and skills provided by 
social work education in order to enhance their ministry. 

To encourage and to equip men and women to engage in social work 
both in and out of the church, and to provide the opportunity for social 
work for students who feel a call to practice within a church setting, the 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh Grad- 
uate School of Social Work have developed a program offering a joint 
degree, that is, an M.DIV./M.S.W. 

This joint effort enables students to receive both the M. Div. and the 
M.S.W. in four years of post baccalaureate study instead of the usual five. 
Nevertheless, the joint program provides a full course of study in both 
theology and social work. This result is effected by equating certain 
courses now taught in both schools, by making provision for courses taken 
in one school to count as electives in the other, and by developing special- 
ized field placements. 

The curriculum of the Graduate School of Social Work encompasses 
work in four major curriculum areas, or "clusters": Health/Mental Health; 
Juvenile and Criminal Justice; Poverty and Associated Problems; and 
Children and Youth. 

Candidates for the joint degree who enter the program through the 
Seminary will concentrate on theological studies during the first two 
years. The third and fourth years will be spent predominantly at the 
School of Social Work, but one course per term will be taken at the 
Seminary. Should a student elect to terminate the joint program before its 
completion and seek only one degree, he or she will be required to 
complete all of the work ordinarily required for that degree. 



17 



During the third year, the Seminary Financial Aid program will con- 
tinue to be in effect for each student in the joint program. At least for 
out-of-state students, however, this income will need to be supplemented 
by aid from the University or other sources to cover the higher tuition 
costs at the University. 

Inquiries regarding the Graduate School of Social Work and requests 
for Social Work catalogs should be addressed to: Director of Admissions, 
Graduate School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15260. 

THE MASTER OF DIVINITY/MASTER OF 
LIRRARY SCIENCE JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the School of Library and Infor- 
mation Science of the University of Pittsburgh established in 1968 a joint 
program to train men and women in theological librarianship. The pro- 
gram, designed to be completed in four academic years, culminates in two 
degrees, the M.Div. and the M.L.S. 

Normally, a student will take the first part of his/her work at the Sem- 
inary and begin work at the University in the third year. The program will 
include a course on resources in theological libraries and six credits of 
field experience in theological- librarianship at the Seminary. Should a 
student elect to terminate the joint program before its completion and 
seek only one degree, he or she will be required to complete all of the 
work ordinarily required for that degree. 

Inquiries regarding the School of Library and Information Science and 
requests for Library Science catalogs should be addressed to: Director of 
Admissions, School of Library and Information Science, University of 
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

THE MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Master of Arts Program is designed for persons who are not study- 
ing for ordination but who wish to work in religious studies at the graduate 
level. The Master of Arts Program (M.A.) is suited for people who wish to 
enter non-ordained professional positions in the Church; for laypersons 
who desire to deepen their understanding of the Christian faith; and for 
persons interested in preparing for Ph.D. or other graduate studies. 

Because of the wide range of interests that may be served by this 
degree, the program has been designed to provide candidates maximum 
freedom and flexibility in planning their own courses of study. No specific 
courses are required. Certain sorts of specialization are allowed, but the 
advisory process is provided to guarantee acquaintance with the main 
theological fields and appropriate nontheological studies. 

Seventy-two (72) term hours of studies are required for the degree. Up 
to twelve (12) hours may be taken through cross-registration at other 
institutions, usually those schools that are members of the Pittsburgh 
Council on Higher Education. Normally two years of full-time academic 
work are needed to complete the program. There is a five year statute of 
limitations. M. A. candidates may apply for transfer to the M. Div. pro- 
gram at any time prior to the awarding of the M. A. degree; but once the 



18 



degree has been awarded, courses credited toward the M. A. may no 
longer be used for the M. Div. 

All candidates are required to complete a Major Paper. Up to nine (9) 
hours of credit may be received for Independent Study done as research 
for this project. These nine (9) hours are taken under a Major Paper 
Adviser, who must be a member or adjunct of the Seminary Faculty. 

The Director of M. A. Studies has the responsibility of counseling all 
M. A. students in the selection of courses in order to insure a balance of 
work while meeting individual needs and preferences. The Director must 
require that the student become acquainted with the main theological 
fields and will recommend appropriate nontheological studies in con- 
sultation with knowledgeable colleagues. The Director also assists the 
student in selecting a Major Paper Adviser. 

Religious Education Emphasis 

A special track which emphasizes religious education is available for 
M. A. candidates who wish to prepare for non-ordained educational min- 
istries. Their courses of study should reflect the balance of studies de- 
scribed above. Some work will be taken at the School of Education of the 
University of Pittsburgh. Choice of such courses will be made in consulta- 
tion with the Education faculty of the Seminary. The Major Paper is 
required as above and will be completed with an Adviser approved by the 
Education faculty of the Seminary. In addition, at least six (6) but no more 
than nine (9) term hours must be taken in supervised Field Education. 
Arrangements for such work will be made through the Director of Field 
Education in consultation with the Director of the M. A. Studies, and 
credit will be granted as Independent Study courses taken with the 
Education Faculty. 

Other Specializations 

Within the guidelines of the basic M. A. program described above 
students may specialize in a particular field. Details will be worked out 
with the Director and appropriate Seminary faculty. Such a program can 
be directed toward further study at the doctoral level. 



FIELD EDUCATION 

Field Education at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary assists students to 
learn in the context where ministry is being done. The objectives of the 
program include structured learning, competent supervision, personal 
and spiritual growth, interpersonal sensitivity, acquaintance with minis- 
terial roles and responsibilities, the development of skills and attention to 
the social context of ministry. This field-based learning should have a 
pattern of responsibility and recognition for the teaching church and its 
leaders, integration of that learning environment with the seminary cur- 
riculum, and the involvement of faculty at the Seminary with their asso- 
ciates in the field. Other desirable components are support groups in the 
placement and peer learning groups where review and guidance can take 
place. In each aspect of the program students are to be trained for theo- 
logical reflection to develop skilled interpreters of the faith in expressed 
thought and considered action. 



19 



Placements are negotiated to cover the church settings for ministry and 
to broaden the range of other experiences that contribute to professional 
growth. Students are helped to take responsibility for their own learning 
through initial interviews, and by developing with their supervisors de- 
tailed learning agreements that display sound patterns of teaching and 
learning and which employ the action/reflection model. Such an educa- 
tional plan coordinates a student's learning objectives with the tasks of 
service anticipated in the placement. Training and peer support for 
supervisors are provided through a workshop in the fall and monthly 
consultations. 

Required Field Education 

The Seminary requires that students be in an approved placement 
while enrolled in the Master of Divinity core courses in Pastoral Studies. 
Students use data from the field to meet course requirements. Arrange- 
ments for placement are made in consultation with the Director of Field 
Education. Students must work out a learning agreement and participate 
in periodic evaluation to complete the requirement. This information is 
shared with the student's sponsoring judicatory where confidentiality is 
assured. Students in the required field education program are expected to 
give eight to ten hours of actual service on the field per week. Supervision 
and staff meetings should be included in this calculation of time. Travel to 
and from the field, and preparation to understand the task being per- 
formed should not be included. Students are expected to work in their 
placement during vacation periods in the school year. They should not be 
expected to be on the field during examination week. 

Student Pastorates 

Student supply pastors will be accommodated to either the field educa- 
tion model when qualified supervision and local church participation can 
be arranged, or to the lesser expectation of unsupervised field work, when 
necessary. Students supplying local churches are expected to extend their 
studies at the Seminary to four years at a reduced academic load of nine 
credits per term to compensate for the greater amount of time spent in the 
field (up to half time). 

Full-Time Placement 

Programs of study and involvement in social service and social change 
in various parts of the world as aspects of the Church's mission are 
facilitated through the field education office. 

Internships in the summer include pastorates, camp and conference 
leadership, youth assistantships and placements in secular agencies. A 
learning agreement, monthly reports, and a final evaluation are requested 
by the Field Education Office, but not required. These reports are in- 
cluded in the student's records. 

Full-time internships from nine to fifteen months in local churches or in 
special settings are other extraordinary learning opportunities. Some 
denominations require them of students preparing for the ministry. The 
field education office will provide every assistance possible to facilitate 
these experiences. 



20 



Other Services 

In the year after their mandatory field education placement, students 
will be permitted to continue in the same placement if new and more 
responsible tasks are negotiated. Occasional preaching under the aus- 
pices of the Preaching Association is also available. Field work, which has 
a lesser standard of accountability and deliberate pedagogy, will be ar- 
ranged for students who have need for income or for a wider range of 
experience than has been possible through the field education program. 
Placement of entering students will be negotiated. These students are 
cautioned to plan field work and community involvement so that learning 
and spiritual growth will be integrated with classroom and library study. 

THE NATIONAL CAPITAL SEMESTER 
FOR SEMINARIANS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a participating institution in the 
National Capital Semester for Seminarians sponsored by Wesley Theo- 
logical Seminary, Washington, D. C. This program provides an opportun- 
ity for seminary students to spend a semester in Washington, D. C, for 
study and involvement in the processes of government and the concerns 
of the churches. The program is designed to include supervised study and 
interaction (reflection), and will provide a full term of academic credit. 
The program is open to any student who has completed at least one year of 
study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Seminary graduates may apply 
for a program to begin within one year of their graduation. 

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Clinical Pastoral Education brings theological students and ministers 
into supervised encounter with persons in critical life situations. Out of 
intense involvement with persons in need and the feedback from peers 




21 



and supervisors, the students develop new awareness of themselves as 
persons and of the needs of those to whom ministry is offered. From 
theological reflection on specific human situations, new insight and 
understanding is derived and the student or minister is confronted with 
his or her own humanity. Within the interdisciplinary team-process of 
helping persons, they develop skills in interpersonal and interprofes- 
sional relationship. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary grants academic 
credit to students who complete full quarters of Clinical Pastoral Educa- 
tion at centers accredited by the Association of Clinical Pastoral Educa- 
tion. 



DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROGRAM 

Purpose 

Developing competency in professional ministry is a process in which 
ministers are engaged throughout their educational and professional life. 
One step in that development has been the work for a Bachelor or Master 
of Divinity Degree designed to help prepare for entrance into profes- 
sional ministry. Another step may be engaging in programs of continuing 
education. 

The Doctor of Ministry Degree Program goes beyond these by pro- 
viding a distinctive opportunity for systematic and disciplined study that 
will help ordained clergy work toward a demonstrably higher level of 
competence in the integrating of all aspects of ministry. 

The intention of the program is that through ministry-related projects, 
studies, papers and other assignments the student will be enabled to 
improve competency in such areas as: 

1. Defining and organizing complex situations of ministry utilizing 
biblical, theological, sociological, political and personal insights. 

2. Analyzing situations of ministry in such a way as to understand 
their nature and causes and identify opportunities for effective 
ministry. 

3. Taking responsible action with a deeper grasp of homiletical, 
educational, counseling and administrative principles enhanced 
by a biblical, historical and theological heritage. 

4. Evaluating actions and their outcomes from a variety of respon- 
sible perspectives. 

Degree Requirements 

When accepted into the Doctor of Ministry Program, the student with a 
group of ten to twelve others engages in activities organized in three 
stages: 

Stage One 

The First Stage is built around five seminars: 

□ Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

□ Church Administration 

□ Church Education 

□ Pastoral Care 

□ Practice and Theology of Preaching 

22 



The intention and function of these seminars is to provide the setting for 
concentrated reflection on various aspects of ministry. Field-oriented 
learning is incorporated extensively in all of the seminars of Stage One. 
For example, the case study method is employed in Pastoral Care with 
cases drawn from the situations of the students. A distinctive feature of the 
Doctor of Ministry Program is its direct relation to the student's work 
situation. 

Stage Two 

Stage Two incorporates two colloquia and three elective courses. 

□ Integrative Colloquium 

□ Proposal Colloquium 

□ Elective courses which provide an opportunity to focus on special- 
ized studies in any of the classical or functional areas. 

Stage Three 

In Stage Three the student will be involved in conducting a project of 

study related to some aspect of his/her present ministry and in writing 

a major paper. 

At the end of each seminar and colloquium the student will have an 

interview with the professor(s) for a shared evaluation of the work. A 

written evaluation will be given of the student's participation, strengths, 

and areas that need strengthening. 

At the completion of Stage One, two faculty members and either the 
Dean or the Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program will be a com- 
mittee to evaluate the overall progress and decide when the student will 
be admitted to Stage Two and to degree candidacy. Following this de- 
cision, each candidate will be assigned for the duration of his/her work in 
Stages Two and Three to a committee of two faculty, who will direct and 
evaluate the remaining course of study and the writing of the doctoral 
paper. 

Track Options and Locations 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers two Tracks for the Doctor of 
Ministry Program in order to meet different situations of ministers. Track I 
seminars meet on the Pittsburgh campus one day a week for each term 
during the academic year, September to June. Track II concentrates the 
study in three-week sessions in Junes and Januarys which meet at the 
Pittsburgh campus or at the Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, Florida cam- 
pus. Applicants may designate which Track and location will be most 
suitable to their schedules. 

Basic Courses for the Doctor of Ministry Degree 

1. Doctrine of Church and Ministry — The theology of the church is 
studied with special emphasis on the implications for the practice of 
ministry in today's church. 

2. Church Administration — The administrative processes students 
employ on the field are analyzed, and projected revisions are eval- 
uated. 

3. Church Education — Present educational programs are studied and a 
carefully designed project is carried out in the student's field of 
work. 



23 



4. Practice and Theology of Preaching — The course centers on ser- 
mons actually preached by students for critical examination and 
reflection. 

5. Pastoral Care — The case study method is employed with cases 
drawn from the situations of the students. 

6. Integrative Colloquium — The colloquium is designed to enable the 
student to integrate the work of the first five seminars and to develop 
proficiency in the use of biblical, ethical, historical, and theological 
insights when addressing practical pastoral problems. 

7. Proposal Colloquium — This colloquium is designed to enable the 
student to present the Doctoral Paper Proposal for critique by pro- 
fessor and peers. 

THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

The University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
have a cooperative graduate program in the study of religion. Interdis- 
ciplinary in character, the program draws upon the resources of both 
institutions and leads to the Ph.D. degree awarded by the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

The aim of the program is to foster interdisciplinary, creative study in 
biblical, historical, theological and ethical fields, broadly conceived. To 
this end the student is encouraged to move beyond the necessary prelim- 
inary steps as quickly as possible to independent research in a special area 
and to the writing of a dissertation which is deemed by the joint faculty to 
be a contribution to human knowledge. A second and no less important 
aim is to engage the student, if possible, in actual teaching and research 
assistance, under the direction of the faculty. The number of candidates 
will be deliberately limited to afford close supervision by the directing 
professors. 

Further information concerning the Ph.D., application forms for ad- 
mission and financial aid may be obtained by writing to: 

Coordinator, Ph.D. Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

616 North Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, theological education is not con- 
fined to formal degree work. Realizing that education is a lifelong process 
which may begin with a degree program, the Seminary offers a full-time 
program of Continuing Education aimed at improving the skills and 
knowledge of men and women engaged in ministry. From September 
through June, a variety of experiences is available to pastors and church 
workers ranging from open enrollment in Seminary courses to short-term 
seminars. All programs are built upon the expressed needs and desires of 
those people serving in church situations. Continuing Education Units of 
credit (C.E.U.) are given to all who participate. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary also recognizes its responsibility in 
providing quality educational experiences for lay people. The Continuing 
Education Office is currently in the midst of developing a variety of 



24 



experiences aimed at increasing the knowledge, faith and leadership 
skills of lay people. 

The entire program of continuing education for pastors, church workers 
and lay people is planned and evaluated by a Committee composed of 
faculty members, administration and thirteen pastors and lay people from 
across the Tri-state area. 

For further information concerning any aspect of Continuing Edu- 
cation, please write: 

Director of Continuing Education 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

616 North Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



Continuing Education Schedule 1979-80 

Eight Week Courses 

Monday Mornings — September 24-November 12 

Homiletics Refresher Course — Dr. Richard Oman 
Gospel of John — Dr. William Orr 

Monday Mornings — April 14-June 2 

Death and Dying — Dr. Gordon Jackson and Dr. Richard Rapp 
Contemporary Problems in Ethics — Dr. Ronald Stone 

Three Day Seminars 

1) October 29-31 "The Poetry of the Hebrew Bible" 

Dr. David Noel Freedman, Director 
Program on Studies in Religion 
University of Michigan 
"Advent Preaching Workshop" 
Dr. Walter Wiest, Professor 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
"Becoming A More Effective Spiritual 

Leader" 
Dr. James Glasse, President 
Lancaster Theological Seminary 
"Lenten Preaching Workshop" 
Faculty 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Homiletics Workshop — "Expand Your 

Imagination" 
Dr. Robert W. Duke 
Professor of Homiletics 
Lancaster Theological Seminary 
"Theology of Play" 
Dr. Robert Neale 

Professor of Psychiatry and Religion 
Union Theological Seminary, N. Y. 
"Worship With Children" 
Dr. David Ng 

Professor of Church Program and Nurture 
Austin Theological Seminary 
Pitcairn-Crabbe Summer School of Religion — June 16-20 



2) November 6-8 



3) November 12-14 



4) January 7-9 



5) May 7-9 



6) May 12-14 



7) May 19-21 



25 



SPECIAL NON-DEGREE STUDIES 

Clergy, lay persons and others who wish to enroll as Special Students in 
courses at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary for non-degree purposes are 
invited to do so. Special Students may enroll in as many as two courses per 
term, up to a total of six courses. Special Students complete all the as- 
signed requirements for each course in which they enroll and receive 
academic credit. Credits earned as a Special Student may be transferred to 
any established Seminary degree program in which the student may later 
enroll. Those desiring Special Student Status must possess an accredited 
bachelor's degree and apply through the Admissions Office. 

Clergy, lay persons and others who desire to audit courses at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary are invited to do so. No academic credit is given for 
audits. Applications for Audit shall be accompanied by a college transcript 
and be submitted to the Continuing Education Office along with a fee of 
$50.00 per course. The transcript and record of class(es) will be kept as a 
part of the Continuing Education files. 

INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is committed to serving the profes- 
sional educational needs of the whole church. Three scholarships are 
offered annually to international students who have already completed 
the Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent in their own country and 
whose plans for an additional year of non-degree study are endorsed by 
the church in their own country. These scholarships provide tuition, 
room, board and a small monthly cash allowance for one academic year to 
international students endorsed to the Seminary by the World Council of 
Churches, the World Alliance of Reformed Churches or by the Leader- 
ship Development Program of the National Council of Churches. 



26 



IV. ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The faculty grades according to a student's actual achievement rather 
than on the basis of effort or achievement relative to the student's ability. 

1. The meaning of the grades given shall be as follows: 
A 4.0 Exceptional 

B 3.0 Superior 

C 2.0 Satisfactory 

D 1.0 Unsatisfactory 

F 0.0 Failing 

WFA — Withdrawal with Faculty approval 

There is no category of Incomplete. 

2. The Quality Point Average is determined by dividing the quality 
points by the number of credit hours taken (excluding credit hours 
for Pass grades). 

3. Average for Graduation. For graduation with the M. Div. or M. A. 
degree a C average (2.00) is required. 

4. Dismissal. Two consecutive terms below 2.00, or three non-consecu- 
tive terms below 2.00, constitute reasons for dismissal by faculty 
action. 

5. Graduation Honors: 

Summa Cum Laude 3.75-4.0 

Magna Cum Laude 3.50-3.74 

Cum Laude 3.25-3.49 

6. Attendance. Attendance at class is not mandatory except where indi- 
cated by the faculty member on the course description form. 

7. Official Drop Dates. Courses may be dropped or added the first 
week of each term. Courses dropped during the second week 
through the fifth week carry a penalty of one-half of the tuition fee. 
Courses dropped after the official drop date require full payment and 
recording of a failing grade. All dropping of courses must be done 
officially through the Registrar's Office. 

TYPES OF COURSES 

1. In addition to required and elective courses, students may do ad- 
vanced work in a particular subject as Independent Study or Directed 
Study. Registration in such courses is dependent upon faculty approval 
and availability. "Directed Study" is designed in the same way as an 
Independent Study course, but it is distinguished by the requirement of 
much closer tutorial work on the part of the professor. A further distinction 
is that Directed Study courses may involve more than one student but no 
more than four students. Both of these studies will be graded Pass/Fail, 
with a statement from the faculty member concerning the nature of the 
study and an evaluation of the student's performance. Normally, students 
may not enroll for more than one Independent Study or Directed Study 



27 



per term or six per Pittsburgh Seminary first degree program. Under-en- 
rolled classes which become Directed Studies count in the above total. 

2. Audit. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary students may attend a class 
for listening purposes with the permission of the professor. Audit does not 
require registration or payment, and no record of audit is made. 

Non-degree students may audit seminary courses under the Continuing 
Education Program. 

3. Audit-Credit. Students registered in a course for audit-credit are re- 
quired to participate fully in reading, discussion, seminar and position 
papers, etc., but are not required to write a final paper or examination. 
Satisfactory completion of these requirements leads to an audit-credit 
notation for the course on the official transcript. No grade is given for the 
course and no credit is given toward graduation. Audit-credit charge is 
one-half the regular tuition. 

4. PCHE. Sixteen hours of graduate level work may be taken at PCHE 
member schools and may be included in the 106 M. Div. hours. Twelve 
hours may be included in the 72 M. A. hours. These credits must be 
approved by the Dean of Faculty. Registration and payment will be 
handled according to PCHE procedures for cross-registration at the grad- 
uate level. PCHE courses will be recorded with the grades given by host 
institution (A or B). Grades lower than B will not receive academic credit 
at Pittsburgh Seminary. 

For complete information regarding student responsibilities and perti- 
nent regulations, consult the "Academic Principles and Procedures for 
M. Div. and M. A. Degrees." 



FACULTY ADVISORY SYSTEM 

All incoming Master of Divinity students are assigned advisors, se- 
lected, where possible, by the Dean from among faculty teaching first 
year courses. Newly enrolling students will be encouraged to contact 
their advisor during the opening orientation in the fall, and the advisors 
will be expected to make themselves available for such contacts. An ad- 
visor's signature is not required for 
registration of classes. Contact with 
the advisor is the students' respon- 
sibility and may be established accord- 
ing to the need of the student. This 
advisory system applies only to first 
year Master of Divinity students. In 
the assignment of advisors, the re- 
quests of students for specific pro- 
fessors will be given preferential con- 
sideration, but ordinarily no professor 
will be assigned more than six students. 

The Director of Master of Arts 
Studies has the responsibility for 
counseling all Master of Arts students 
in the selection of courses in order to 
insure a balance of work. 



28 




V. COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 

All courses are for three academic credits unless otherwise noted. 

CORE SEQUENCES FOR THE 
MASTER OF DIVINITY DEGREE 

At the core of the required curriculum are three sequences of courses, 
one for each of the three years. In the Church & Society sequence in the 
Junior year students examine the cultural phenomena and social context 
within which the church must practice its ministry and to which it must 
bring its theological message. In the Pastoral Studies sequence in the 
Middler year students are introduced to the basic pastoral skills, with 
special emphasis given to the experience in ministry provided by the field 
education program. The colloquia in Professional and Personal De- 
velopment are designed to assist seniors to integrate the various aspects of 
their theological education and to attain a sense of their readiness for 
ministry. 

Required Courses 

CS01 Church and Society: Local 

In the first term emphasis is given to the contribution sociological methods can 
make to understanding religious life in its varied forms. Particular attention is 
given to the urban situation in which most Americans live, using Pittsburgh as a 
model for studying the dynamics of urban life. Specific attention is given to the 
historic roles of church, ethnic, and theological traditions in contributing to the 
unique character of this urban community. Such study provides a pattern by which 
any community may be studied to discern the relation of religious to general social 
dynamics. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Stone 

CS02 Church and Society: National 

Focusing upon explicitly exposing the value-laden beliefs undergirding much 
of American culture, this course examines such issues as individualism and its 
relation to nationalism, technology as a source of grace and fulfillment in human 
life, law and order and the American tradition of justified violence, preferences of 
the youth culture, the conflation of psychology and religion, images of maleness 
and femaleness, and American popular religion. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Ezzell 

CS03 Church and Society: Global 

The global context of the church is examined through a study of political and 
international dimensions of church life. The inter-relatedness of national and 
international issues — population, food, militarism, energy, economics, repres- 
sion, social justice — demonstrates the larger context within which Christian 
ministry is carried on, whether in the affluent or Third World countries. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Castillo 

PS01 Pastoral Studies: Education 

In this segment of the Pastoral Studies sequence students are engaged in 
studying the many aspects and possibilities of education programming in 



29 



churches. A general view of educational philosophy and methodology, and their 
relation to theological, biblical, and historical studies, provides a basis for evaluat- 
ing major denominational patterns and curricular materials. Correlation with 
educational responsibilities in field work, particularly relative to youth ministries, 
adds focus to each student's development of his or her own philosophy of edu- 
cation and requisite skills. 

Term II, 1979-80 Ms. Likins 

PS02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Concurrent field experience provides a basis for study of pastoral care. In these 
seminars students are helped to understand the definition of pastoral care in the 
history and theology of the church and in terms of the identity of the minister. Brief 
consideration is given to theories of the development of persons and how this 
development results in expectations of pastoral care. Reporting on and discussion 
of experiences arising from students' field placements are used in developing 
skills useful in ministering to the needs of persons in each situation. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Paylor 

PS03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

The third-term seminar groups in the Pastoral Studies course provide an intro- 
duction to homiletics as a responsibility of ministers. Attention is given to the 
exegetical bases of preaching, to problems of hermeneutics and authority, and to 
such rhetorical considerations as sermon construction, style and audience. Each 
student prepares and presents sermons, and the seminar groups engage in the 
critique of these sermons. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Ezzell and Mr. Oman 



PD01 Professional and Personal Development: Credo 

The purpose of this colloquium is to assist students to work through the main 
questions in the traditional loci of Christian doctrine, drawing upon their accumu- 
lated knowledge of Scripture, historical and systematic theology, and their own 
tradition, in order to enable them to formulate their own theological position in a 
comprehensive, well-grounded way. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Mauser and Mr. Partee 



PD02 Professional and Personal Development: Faith Formation 

This colloquium seeks to help students become self-conscious about the proc- 
esses by which selfhood matures with special reference to faith as a formative 
aspect of selfhood. The students' theological views, combined with sociopsycho- 
logical material, form the basis of the conceptual material. The view of faith of 
certain theologians and in classics on spiritual formation is investigated. 

Term I. 1979-80 Mr. Hare and Mr. G. Jackson 

PD03 Professional and Personal Development: 
Professional and Ministerial Leadership 

This colloquium focuses attention upon professional aspects of ministerial 
responsibilities. The work of the term assumes a holistic perspective by giving an 
opportunity for reflection on the resources each student now brings to the inter- 
relation of the various ministerial functions. Because ministry is always in a 
particular setting and in terms of one's appraisal of that situation, responsible 
decisions require self-consciousness in diagnosis and evaluation of various situa- 
tions. 

Term III, 1979-80 Ms. Likins and Mr. Oman 



30 



Studies in Bible 

"Thy word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path" (Psalm 1 19: 105). 
The word of God in Scripture nourishes and regulates Christian faith and 
action, it lays the cornerstone for every aspect of the Church's ministry to 
the world, and it sets norms for the structures of Christian theology. A 
rediscovery of the Bible has provided the impetus for every forward 
movement in the history of the Church. At the end of the twentieth 
century, when alienation of individuals, races, classes and nations threat- 
ens to tear the world apart, when the issue of authority continues to be a 
problem, a new and careful look at the sources of our common faith is 
imperative. 

The intention of the courses offered is to engage students in Old and 
New Testament research in such a way that they may learn the methods of 
study, acquire the basic tools and skills necessary to undertake ministry, 
and constantly relate their own study of the Scriptures to all facets of the 
Christian life. 

During the first two years of work in the M. Div. program students will 
survey the literature of the Old and New Testaments as well as explore the 
settings and influences of the biblical world by means of four core courses 
(two in each Testament). The curriculum also calls for serious considera- 
tion of the Bible in terms of study in the original languages. Therefore, 
Hebrew or Greek is required for two terms in the junior year and is 
immediately followed by a third-term exegetical course in the cor- 
responding Testament. A similar sequence in the other language can be 
elected in the second or third year. As for further elective opportunities, 
there are advanced exegetical offerings along with courses in the areas of 
Intertestament, archaeology, Near Eastern languages, biblical theology 
and ethics, hermeneutics, critical studies, etc. 

New discoveries which directly affect our understanding of the Bible 
continue to be announced with startling frequency. Pittsburgh Seminary 
has a rich heritage of excellence in the area of biblical studies and we are 
determined to enable and inspire future generations of Christian leaders 
to join in the exciting venture of these pursuits. 



Required Courses in Old Testament 

OT01 Biblical Studies I: Historical Books 

An introduction to the historical books of the Old Testament, intended to 
acquaint students with the basic methodologies of Old Testament research and 
the present state of Old Testament studies. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Gowan 

OT02 Biblical Studies IV: Prophets and Psalms 

The nature of prophecy in ancient Israel, its background in the cultures of the 
ancient Near East. Special attention is given to the genres of prophetic oracles and 
the methodologies which may be employed for their interpretation. The message 
of the great eighth-century prophets, Amos, Hosea, Micah, and Isaiah of Jerusalem 
stand at the heart of the course. The world of Jeremiah, Deutero-Isaiah and 
Ezekiel is explored. An introduction to the Psalms, as the product of Israel's cultic 
life, concludes the course. The aim of the whole is to enable the student to begin 
exegesis with a firm grasp of the fundamentals. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. J. Jackson 



31 



OT03 Hebrew 

A course designed to lead to an appreciation and competent use of Hebrew as 
one of the languages of biblical revelation. Instruction is in small, graded sections 
so that a maximum of individual attention and achievement is possible. Two 
sections will follow the inductive method, working directly with selected texts of 
the Hebrew Bible. One section will employ the more traditional approach, using a 
grammar as the basic tool of instruction. Students may elect either approach. Two 
credits. 

Term I, 1979-80 Staff 

OT04 Hebrew 

A continuation of OT03. Two credits. 

OT05 Old Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Hebrew moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence (3 hours). Individual professors indicate to students whether a book or 
particular passages will be exegeted. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 

1) Introduction to exegetical method: moving from grammar and syntax to the 
application of critical methods and the use of reference materials in order to arrive 
at conclusions concerning the original and present meaning of a text; 

2) Continuation of the Hebrew language sequence. 
Term III, 1979-80 Staff 

Elective Courses in Old Testament 

OT14 Deutero-Isaiah 

The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Introduction to methodology of 
exegesis, such as problems and limitations of an English translation, form critical 
problems, structure analysis, historical background of the book of Deutero-Isaiah, 
intent; 2) introduction to the theology of Exile. In particular, the expectation of 
salvation against the background of 587, B.C., Old Testament eschatology. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. von Waldow 

OT15 Amos 

A study of the book of Amos: its major emphasis; the place of the prophet in 
Israel's culture; and the significance of the message of Amos for our situation. 
Term I, 1979-80 Mr. J. Jackson 

OT26 The Beginnings of the History of Israel 

A study of the historical question: In what sociological entity did Israel enter the 
scene of ancient Near Eastern history? The focus is on the historical background of 
the traditions of Israel in Egypt, the Patriarchs, the Sinai, and the occupation of the 
land. These considerations lead to the discussion of the theological question: why 
does the Old Testament tradition describe the beginning of the history of the 
chosen people different from the actual course of events? 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. von Waldow 

OT29 Archaeology in the Old Testament 

An introduction to archaeology's contribution to biblical studies, how it has 
increased our understanding of biblical times, thrown light on biblical texts, and 
advanced our knowledge of biblical history; a study of the finds of archaeology in 
Palestine from the earliest times through the New Testament period. 

Term I, 1979-80 Ms. Lapp 

OT31 Judaism from the Exile to the Birth of the Church 

A survey of the history, life, and faith of the Jewish people, covering the 
post-exile parts of the Old Testament and the literature of the Intertestamental 
Period. Deals with life-styles, institutions, literature, and theology as well as the 
history of the period. Mr. Gowan 

32 



OT33 Prophet-Priest-Wise Man: A Study in Biblical Ministries 

Intended to provide a biblical basis for evaluating various types of ministry in 
the modern church by examining the work of those who were recognized to be 
God's ministers in the Old Testament. 

Mr. Gowan 

OT36 Jeremiah 

The first part of the course uses the book of Jeremiah to demonstrate the 
development from the original oral pronouncement of prophetic words to proph- 
etic books as we have them today in the canon. The second part deals with the 
original theology of the prophet Jeremiah and its interpretation by a later genera- 
tion which produced the prose sections in the book of Jeremiah. Prerequisite: 
Hebrew. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT37 Worship and Psalms 

Seminar on Israel's songs and the Christian use of the Psalter in corporate 
worship. Two-track: students with some knowledge of Hebrew will be helped in 
exegesis; others will be expected to do wider reading for their interpretation of the 
Psalms. 

Mr. J. Jackson 

OT38 Eschatology of the Old Testament 

The Old Testament view of the future will be explored, beginning with its 
broadest sense as the fulfillment of God's promises, but concentrating on the 
expectation of radical changes in humanity, society and nature to occur "in that 
day." The contributions of Old Testament thought to later Jewish and Christian 
eschatology and relationships with modern future hopes will be emphasized. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Gowan 

OT39 Worship in Israel 

The essence of worship in Israel and the basic theological ideas reflected in the 
major annual feasts and some typical cultic activities; the importance of the 
Israelite cultic personnel, such as priests, Levites, and prophets. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. von Waldow 

OT40 Hebrew Reading 

Supervised reading of selected Old Testament passages. One credit. 
Offered each term Staff 



OT45 Old Testament Ethics 

The course deals with the ethical implications of the faith of the Old Testament 
people. Points of discussion are: the authority behind the ethical imperative, the 
motivation of ethical behavior, the sociological and cultural setting of ethical 
precepts. In terms of Old Testament literature the course is based on the law 
tradition and prophetic writings. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT50 Themes of Old Testament Theology 

Selected themes: "Egypt" — captivity and oppression; "Exodus" — liberation 
from slavery and freedom for God; "Sinai" — election and covenant with God's 
people; "Promised Land" — Canaan as Yhwh's inheritance for Israel; "City of 
David" — God's choice of Zion and covenant with David; "Justice in the Gate" — 
social dimensions of Israel's laws and the prophetic presentation of Yhwh's ex- 
pectations and verdict. 

Mr. J. Jackson 



33 




Required Courses in New Testament 

NT01 Biblical Studies II: Gospels, General Epistles, and Revelation 

The principal emphasis of this course is on the four Gospels and the methods 
employed in critical study of the Gospels (literary, form, and redaction criticism). 
General Epistles, Revelation, and matters of text and canon are examined briefly. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Kelley 

NT02 Biblical Studies III: Acts, Pauline Epistles, and Hebrews 

The messages of Acts, the Pauline epistles, and Hebrews are examined in the 
light of their historical context and literary structure. Special emphasis is placed 
on the life and thought of Paul. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Walther 

NT03 New Testament Greek 

A course designed to lead to a competent use of Greek as one of the languages of 
biblical revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to read from the 
Greek New Testament, and unique study aids prepared by the Staff are used. 
Instruction is in small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied 
Greek will be assigned to special sections. Two credits. 

Term I, 1979-80 Staff 

NT04 New Testament Greek 

Continuation of NT03, teaching by the inductive method. Two credits. 
Term II, 1979-80 Staff 

NT05 New Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Greek moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence (3 hours). Individual professors indicate to students whether a book or 
particular passages will be exegeted. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 



34 



1) Introduction to methodology of exegesis, such as problems and limitations of an 
English translation; source strata for selected passages which will be chosen by 
the professor for critical problems, structure analysis, historical background of 
sources and text; intent; introduction to the theology of the particular book; 

2) Continuation of the Greek language sequence. 
Term III, 1979-80 Staff 



Elective Courses in New Testament 

NT 12 Christianity According to Matthew 

An examination of the theology of the First Gospel in the light of the historical 
background, employing redaction criticism as a major exegetical tool. 

Mr. Hare 

NT 14 Parables in Luke 

An exegetical study of the parables of Jesus found in the all-important central 
section of the Third Gospel (chapters 10-18). 
Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Kelley 

NT 15 Gospel of John 

The entire Gospel examined with some exegetical detail but with emphasis on 
the theological dimensions of the book. Some attention is given to the large 
secondary literature, but the Greek text is the primary resource. 

Mr. Walther 

NT 17 Exegesis of I Corinthians 

An exegetically oriented survey of the entire epistle with detailed study of 
selected parts. The range of insights into the life of the early church and the variety 
of theological problems in this letter make it an excellent source from which to 
learn the task of interpreting the Greek New Testament. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Walther 



T19 Philippians 

An advanced exegetical course dealing with Paul's methodology and theology 
relation to his favorite congregation among the young churches. 



NT19 

An 
in re 



Mr. Kelley 



NT20 The Old Testament in the New: The Epistle to the Hebrews 

The Epistle to the Hebrews appears to be an exegetical meditation on a series of 
significant Old Testament texts. This course examines the hermeneutic of the 
epistle, paying special attention to the interplay between doctrinal statement and 
ethical exhortation. Mr. Hare 

NT21 I Peter 

An exegetical course on the basis of the Greek text of I Peter. Special emphasis 
is laid on the situation in which the epistle was written and on its relation to other 
major books in the New Testament. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Mauser 

NT26 Eschatology in the New Testament 

The New Testament materials are studied with particular emphasis on Mark 13, 
Paul's Thessalonian letters, and the Revelation. The focus is on biblical theology 
based on sound exegesis. Appropriate reading in the twentieth-century literature 
on the subject is assigned. Mr. Walther 

NT29 Crises in the History of the Early Church 

Selected texts from the New Testament and from extra-canonical sources are 
studied in the investigation of three crises experienced by the early Church: 1) the 
tension between Jewish and gentile Christians and the emergence of the Ebionite 



35 



movement, 2) the threat of a Gnostic takeover, 3) the assault of charismatic en- 
thusiasm upon the traditional piety inherited from the synagogue. 
Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Hare 

NT30 The Teaching of Jesus and the New Testament Church 

The content of the New Testament didache is considered both as to its ident- 
ifiability and its significance. The possibilities of interrelationships among the 
Old Testament, Gospel records and other New Testament documents are studied 
as to their didactic and paraenetic intent. 

Mr. Walther 

NT33 The Judaism of Jesus and Rabbinic Judaism 

This course will examine the foundations of proto-rabbinic Judaism as back- 
ground to the New Testament and the rise and separation of Christianity. The 
relationship of Jesus' thought according to the Synoptic Gospels and John, with an 
emphasis upon Halakhah, to that of First Century Judaism as reflected in rabbinic 
literature, will be explored. There will be some discussion of Paul and James. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Sigal 

NT35 Practical Use of the New Testament: Acts 

An interpretation course examining the faith and life of the early church as 
reflected in the "bridge" document of the New Testament corpus, the book of 
Acts. Mr. Kelley 

NT40 Greek Reading 

Supervised reading of selected New Testament or Septuagint passages. One 
credit. 

Offered each term Staff 

NT41 Advanced Greek Grammar 

This course aims to give students a systematic grasp of Greek by combining the 
study of a grammar book with further reading in the New Testament text itself. 

Mr. Kelley 

NT50 Themes of New Testament Theology 

A study of selected major themes of the New Testament which are of crucial 
importance to the New Testament Theology as a whole. Hermeneutical questions 
will be stressed. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT51 History and Literature of New Testament Times 

A research seminar with primary emphasis on the bibliographical approach to 
the study of Christian origins. Theological, organizational, geographical, literary 
and historical questions and problems are considered. 

Mr. Hadidian 

NT52 Dissenting Voices: The Non-Canonical Gospels of Jewish Christianity 

The fragmentary remains of gospels used by Jewish Christians but successfully 
suppressed by the Great Church give us some idea of the diversity which pre- 
vailed in the early Church and may at certain points bring us closer to pre-Pauline 
Christianity. 

Mr. Hare 

NT53 Aspects of Paul's Theology 

A number of pervasive aspects of Paul's theology, such as eschatology, faith and 
law, justification and reconciliation, are dealt with. Stress is laid on the Jewish 
background of Paul's thought and on the nature of the opposition which he had to 
face. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Mauser 



36 



Studies in Church History 

Our aim in teaching Church history is to help the student to understand 
the history of the Church and its thought in the context of the twentieth 
century. The study of history is the study of roots, whether we deal with 
the history of a nation, a race or an idea. Christianity is firmly grounded in 
history. Its story is the account of the effect which the events of Christian 
history have had in human society. This involves both the history of 
doctrine as the Church's attempt to understand the significance of the 
biblical revelation, and the history of the Church itself as the attempt of 
Christians to live in response to those events. 

But we recognize two kinds of interaction that are important for our 
understanding of the Church today. First, we recognize that there has 
always been a dialogue between the Church and the society within which 
it is placed. Secondly, there is an integral relationship between the doc- 
trine that the Church professes and the forms that it takes as a human 
community. All the courses offered recognize these two kinds of continu- 
ing interaction. 

For an adequate grasp of the Church's history the student will need to 
understand that history in broad outline, and then to deepen that study by 
examining particular periods or problems in more detail. To this end, the 
history faculty offers within the core curriculum introductory courses, 
which survey the nearly two millennia from the sub-apostolic age to the 
present time. Further courses at an advanced level in both institutional 
Church history and the history of doctrine are offered regularly. 

Students who enter the Seminary with a rich background in historical 
studies may be permitted to waive introductory courses and move directly 
to more specialized study. 

Required Courses in Church History 

CHOI Historical Studies I 

This is an elementary, introductory course which surveys the history of the 
Christian Church from the Sub-Apostolic Age through the Middle Ages. A de- 
tailed syllabus, diagrams, study outlines on major treatises and other helps are 
provided. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Partee 

CH02 Historical Studies II 

A study of the pivotal Sixteenth Century. This reformation era will be examined 
in itself and for its augury of the future. The foci of the course will be Martin Luther 
and the later Calvinistic developments. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Partee 

CH03 Historical Studies III 

Continuation of the history of the Church and of Christian thought from the 
period immediately after the Reformation (c. 1600) to the present time. 
Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Gerstner 

Elective Courses in Church History 

CH25 American Theology I 

Discussion of Ahlstrom's readings in American theology plus other sources 
beginning with Puritanism and extending to the contemporary American Theo- 
logical scene. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Gerstner 



37 



CH26 American Theology II 

This section of American Theology deals with the nineteenth century. Knowl- 
edge of the preceding period is not presupposed but will be incidentally intro- 
duced. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Gerstner 

CH29 The Four Reformations of the 16th Century 

This course considers the Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinian and Radical Reforma- 
tions of the 16th Century. 

Mr. Partee 

CH30 Calvin and Plato 

The historical relation between theology and philosophy is considered by 
studying the work of these two great thinkers. 

Mr. Partee 

CH34 A Biographical History of the Reformation 

This course approaches the thought of Reformation figures through the events of 
their lives. Students will be expected to become sensitive to and appreciative of 
the relation between theology and life by concentrating on life in the 16th century. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Partee 

CH35 The Theology of Jonathan Edwards I 

This is a three-term historic-theological study of Edwards based on a mimeo- 
graphed series of studies by the professor. The first course dealing with the first 
section is concerned with Edwards' place in history and his doctrine of God. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Gerstner 

CH36 The Theology of Jonathan Edwards II 

This course will deal with Edwards' doctrine of man, Christ and salvation. 
Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Gerstner 

CH37 The Theology of Jonathan Edwards III 

This course will deal with Edwards' doctrine of the church and of the future. 
Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Gerstner 



Studies in Theology 

Systematic Theology is the study of the meaning and implications of the 
Christian Faith as present in the doctrinal formulations of the historic and 
contemporary witness of the Church. Based in the normative authority of 
the biblical writings as they inform the Gospel of Jesus Christ, systematic 
theology attempts to explicate rationally and structure in a consistent 
interrelationship the thematic content of the Word of God in Scripture. 
The Church has always recognized this task as crucial to its ministry of 
proclamation and reconciliation. So systematic theology studies those 
significant thinkers of the past and present whose service as theologians 
the Church has embraced. Yet it takes seriously the world in which we 
ourselves must now serve. So, the final aim of the study of systematic 
theology is the ability to engage in independent and responsible theo- 
logical thinking within the practice of ministry. To meet this challenge, 
the great theologians of the past are read not only to familiarize ourselves 
with this rich heritage, but to learn how doctrinal formulations have 
resulted from the way in which particular theologians structured their 
systems. Pursuant to this task, systematic theology attends 1) to the in- 
vestigation of problems of theological method, and 2) to basic questions 



38 



such as the foundation and source of authority, the reference and function 
of theological language, the interaction of freedom and determinism, etc., 
and 3) to thematic issues of contemporary life as these focus theological 
concerns particularly relevant to ministry within the American cultural 
milieu. 

The curriculum requires a sequence of thre<° courses in Systematic 
Theology and one elective. The required courses cover, respectively, 
introduction and the doctrine of God, Christology and Soteriology, and 
the Church and the Sacraments. Electives are available in the work of 
individual theologians, in specific areas of doctrine, in contemporary 
"schools" of theological method (Process, Liberation), in the history and 
development of theology in the 19th and 20th centuries, and in the 
interrelationship of theological themes and American cultural values. 
Finally, an interdisciplinary colloquium in the constructive organization 
of theological themes in a personal statement of faith is required for all 
senior students. 



Required Courses in Systematic Theology 

TH01 Theological Studies I 

An introduction to theological thinking. Difficulties in Christian belief; re- 
ligious language, meaning and truth; the "what" of theology (definition and 
scope); the "why" of theology (faith and understanding, the critical role of theol- 
ogy in the Church); the "how" of theology (theological method, how to think 
theologically); the doctrine of God; some issues (how do we know God, what are 
we to believe about the nature of God?). Attention is paid to issues such as the 
problem of normative authority in theology, the roles of Scripture and tradition, 
the relation of theological truth-claims to those of scientific and historical inquiry, 
the function of theology in the practice of ministry. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Wiest 

TH02 Theological Studies II 

Problems posed for systematic thinking by Christian beliefs and doctrinal 
formulations concerning salvation and the significance of Jesus Christ. 
Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Kehm 

TH03 Theological Studies III 

A study of the Doctrine of the Church and Sacraments, focusing on the relation 
of individual faith to communal religious experience, on the purpose of the 
Church in the world, on the process of religious formation and transformation 
(justification and sanctification) within the fellowship of the Church, and the 
distinctive nature of the Church as new Humanity and Body of Christ. Readings in 
Reformation, Post-Reformation and contemporary theology; lectures on issues 
and Pre-Reformation theology. 

Term I, 1979-80 Ms. Suchocki 



Elective Courses in Systematic Theology 

TH12 Protestant Theology from Barth to Pannenberg 

A survey of the leading Protestant theologians and theological development in 
the twentieth century. The course serves not only to introduce students to the 
ideas of some eminent thinkers, but also to show how Protestant theology has 
responded to developments in philosophy, history, the behavioral sciences, and 
the natural sciences. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Kehm 



39 



TH14 Process Theology 

This course is an investigation into the theological implications of process 
philosophy, particularly as these implications have been developed by Charles 
Hartshorne and John B. Cobb, Jr. 

Term II, 1979-80 Ms. Suchocki 

TH15 Karl Barth and Process Theology 

A comparative study of Barthian and process doctrines of God. Particular atten- 
tion will be given to the respective implications for doctrines of creation, incarna- 
tion, history and eschatology. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Kehm/Ms. Suchocki 

TH16 Phenomenology and Theology 

Introduction to phenomenological method as developed by Husserl, Hei- 
degger, Schutz and Merleau-Ponty. Examination of attempts to apply this ap- 
proach to Christian theology in order to uncover the realities referred to by terms 
such as "revelation," "sin," "redemption," "redemptive community," and the 
"presence" of "God." Mr. Kehm 

TH17 A Theology of Nature 

Attitudes toward the natural environment in the culture and in theology: the 
place of humanity in nature; God in nature; nature, evil and redemption. 
Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Wiest 

TH20 Major Christian Theologians: Paul Tillich 

A study of Tillich's approach to systematic theology with an emphasis on both 
his method and the content of his thought. The course will focus on the way in 
which Tillich presents traditional Christian doctrines. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Wiest 

TH23 Critical Theology in Contemporary Catholicism 

Studies in three major Catholic theologians: Karl Rahner, Hans Kiing and David 
Tracy. Particular emphasis will be given to the grounds for Protestant/Catholic 
dialogue. Ms. Suchocki 

TH26 Interpreting Texts 

An introduction to "hermeneutics" with special attention to the nature of lan- 
guage, speech, text, symbolism, metaphor, meaning, and understanding. The 
theory of interpretation developed in the lectures is applied to selected biblical 
texts in seminar sessions. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Kehm 

TH27 Liberation Theology 

A study of the twentieth-century emphasis on theology as praxis as developed 
by feminists, blacks, and Third World theologians. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH28 Human Evil and Redemption 

A study of the genesis and forms of expression of what has been called "sin" with 
a corresponding analysis of how the biblical symbols of God's redemptive activity 
in the death and resurrection of Jesus mediate the power to transcend the dynam- 
ics that perpetuate sin. Mr. Kehm 

TH29 God and Evil 

An inquiry into the ways in which the interpretation of evil has affected the 
understanding of God and of redemption. Study includes both classical and 
modern theologians. Major attention is given to the formulation of a contemporary 
understanding of evil, and its implications for a doctrine of God. 

Ms. Suchocki 



40 



TH32 Christian Encounter with World Religions 

A focus upon the issue of religious pluralism through 1) introducing the student 
to a major non-Christian religion (Buddhism) and 2) studying various contem- 
porary Christian responses to pluralism, with particular reference to Buddhism. 

Term III, 1979-80 Ms. Suchocki 

TH34 Mystical Theology 

The study will begin with consideration of Evelyn Underbill's analysis of 
mystic experience, and then trace the theological experience through four major 
figures in Christian history: Pseudo-Dionysius, Meister Eckhardt, Teresa of Avila 
and Teilhard de Chardin. 

Ms. Suchocki 



Studies in Church and Ministry 

The purpose of study in the Church and Ministry field is to bring theory 
to bear upon the practice of Christian faith. Ministry means service with 
and for others. Students and professors in this area inquire into how 
Christian theory and practice can be united in ministry to the world. 
Consequently the Church and Ministry field is engaged in the critical 
study of the professional ministry and the institutional church in order 
that the students be adequately prepared for future ministry. 

Attempting to honor the injunction to be "wise as serpents and innocent 
as doves" the Church and Ministry field recognizes that ministry by both 
professional and lay persons in the church requires knowledge and skills 
of social strategies, life styles, language patterns, counseling techniques, 
educational models, and administrative systems appropriate to the Gos- 
pel in the world of the late 20th Century. 



Ethics 

Required Course in Ethics 

ET01 Introduction to Ethics 

An introduction to the theological and philosophical issues in contemporary 
Christian social thought. Focus on the ethics of the church as a social institution 
and Christian political theology. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Stone 

Elective Courses in Ethics 

ET12 The Ideal Society 

A study of Utopianism as seen in selected Christian and non-Christian sources, 
in relation to its possible contributions to the creation or reformation of the 
structures of society. 

Mr. Stone 

ET13 Human Sexuality 

An inquiry into ethical questions raised by the current revolution in sexual 
attitudes and behavior. Consideration of such issues as pre-marital and extra-mari- 
tal relations, marriage and divorce, alternative marriage patterns, understandings 
of male and female sexuality, treatments of sex in literature and public media. 

Mr. Wiest 



41 



ET15 Readings in Contemporary Theological Ethics 

Discussion of selected readings from contemporary Protestant and Roman 
Catholic ethicists, such as R. Niebuhr, K. Barth, E. Brunner, H. R. Niebuhr, P. 
Ramsey, P. Lehmann, D. Bonhoeffer, G. Winter, J. Gustafson, K. Rahner, B. 
Haering, J. Maritain, J. C. Murray. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET17 Law, Theology and Ethics 

Reading and discussion of selected topics within the following areas: 1) com- 
parisons and contrasts between jurisprudential and theological concepts and ways 
of thinking; relations between law, morality and religion; 2) ethical issues such as 
civil disobedience, punishment, laws regarding sexual behavior, censorship, 
problems in church-state relations, professional ethics. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Wiest 

ET20 The Thought of Reinhold Niebuhr 

A detailed examination of The Nature and Destiny of Man and the study of 
Reinhold Niebuhr's political and social writings. 
Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Stone 

ET22 Ethics of D. Bonhoeffer 

A seminar devoted to reading and discussion of several of Bonhoeffer's books 
and of some secondary source material. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Wiest 

ET23 Social Teachings of the Christian Churches 

Study of selected positions in the history of the churches' social teaching from 
the New Testament to the end of the nineteenth century. Focus on the issues of 
Christ and culture, church and state, the treatment of women, the Christian and 
war. 

Mr. Stone 

ET25 Moral Issues in International Politics 

The perennial problems of Christian ethics and international politics; the the- 
ory of international politics; the moral issues raised by hunger and nuclear arma- 
ments, particular case studies in United States foreign policy. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Stone 

ET30 Christianity in the Latin American Context: Ethical Issues 

A critical analysis of recent developments within Christianity in Latin America. 
The emphasis will be on the ethical issues involved in the struggle for liberation; 
the taking of sides in situations of intense social conflict; the implications of 
Christian love to one's attitude towards the oppressed and the oppressors; and the 
church's attitude towards material possessions. 

Mr. Castillo 



Sociology of Religion 

Elective Courses in Sociology of Religion 

SR10 Introduction to the Sociology of Religion 

An inquiry into the nature, content and extension of the sociology of religion as a 
field of study within the social sciences. The student is made acquainted with the 
main theories on the role of religion in culture, personality and social structure, 
with reference to such authors as Durkheim, Weber, Malinowski, Freud and Marx. 

Mr. Castillo 



42 



SRI 2 Christianity and the Sociology of Conflict 

An analysis of the role that Christianity has played in selected historical situa- 
tions of intense social conflict, leading to a critique and the search for alternatives. 
Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Castillo 

SRI 3 The Latin American Context of Liberation Theology 

The political, social and religious context of "liberation theology" in Latin 
America, with particular reference to Father Camilo Torres (the guerrilla priest) 
and his impact on movements for radical change both inside and outside the 
churches. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Castillo 

SRI 5 Christianity and the American Indians 

The clash of two radically different worldviews and the consequences for the 
populations involved. A critical survey of Christian missionary activity among the 
indigenous populations of the Americas, with particular attention to the doctrinal, 
moral, and ethical issues at stake. Examples taken from North and South America. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Castillo 

SRI 6 Critical Issues in the Sociology of Religion 

A panoramic survey of the major developments in the field since the time of the 
"classics." The emphasis is on the present status of the theses originally pre- 
sented by Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Malinowski, about the nature and func- 
tion of religion. 

Mr. Castillo 

CS10 Women in Church and Society 

The scope of the course includes the feminist positions; the conditions extant 
within society which brought about the contemporary liberation movement and 
the extent to which it influences church women. History of the church's attitudes 
towards women past and present. Special attention is given to the needs of women 
in ministry and to the ideational and political stance(s) which inform them. Ex- 
ploration of biblical and theological themes in relation to women's emerging 
leadership role in ecclesiastical institutions. Techniques of consciousness-raising 
and preparation in ministry for the new attitudes of women. 

Ms. Likins 



Education 

Elective Courses in Education 

ED11 Moral Education in the Church 

The course explores recent research concerning the development of values in 
young persons and adults. Most particularly it deals with the work of Kohlberg and 
Simon as it relates to planned educational experience for children, youth and 
adults. It also deals with the ways in which justice is perceived and the level of 
value perception raised. 

Ms. Likins 

ED 15 Education Laboratory 

The course is designed to give initial experience and to develop skills in 
methods and techniques commonly utilized in church groupings. It will relate 
specifically to the present tasks of students engaged in field work as well as to 
future vocational skill needs, and will acquaint students with resources provided 
by church agencies for updating educational programs. Three credits for work in 
two terms. 

Terms I and III, 1979-80 Ms. Likins 



43 



ED 17 Historical Shaping of Church Education 

An exploration into the tenacity with which educational patterns introduced at 
various periods in church history have survived to shape current church educa- 
tion. 

Ms. Likins 

ED 19 Group Process 

The course deals with the theory and practice of small group leadership and 
participation with a special concern for the types of such groups currently found in 
churches. 

Term II, 1979-80 Ms. Likins 

ED20 Youth Ministry 

A study of existing models, old and new, that have been or are being used in the 
church with particular emphasis upon analysis in regard to the needs of youth. 
Skills in communication with youth are emphasized. Survey of possibilities in 
terms of drama, film, etc. Emphasis upon program design. Distinction between 
junior and senior high school youth groups is emphasized. 

Term I, 1979-80 Ms. Likins 

Pastoral Care 

Elective Courses in Pastoral Care 

PC 10 Psychological Foundations of Ministry 

This course traces human development along lines set forth by Freud and 
radically expanded by Erickson. With Erickson as the transitional figure, the 
course stresses developments in ego psychology as especially helpful to the 
practice of ministry. The third section of the course analyzes communal com- 
ponents, deals with group theory, and explores implications for ministry. Theo- 
logical material is part of the data of the course, especially process theology. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

PC 12 Pastoral Care in a Hospital Setting 

Each student spends approximately seventy-five hours throughout the term 
relating to patients. Students are assigned different areas of care, i.e., emergency 
room, intensive care, thoracics. Two experiences are expected. The students are 
supervised by hospital staff, when possible, and by the seminary professor respon- 
sible for the course. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. G. Jackson 

PC 13 Process Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course has in view a new theory of pastoral care based on process theology 
and more specifically the conceptuality of Alfred North Whitehead. It endeavors 
to incorporate the relevant rich insights of Freud, Jung, Maslow, and Gestalt 
within a process metaphysical and theological framework. Readings in both proc- 
ess thought and psychology are required as are three brief papers. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. G. Jackson 

PC 14 Psychology of Religion 

This course is designed to study religious experience. Religious experience is 
looked at from four perspectives: historical, beginning with Jonathan Edwards 
and eighteenth-century Revivalism; psychological, including Freud, Jung and 
Allport; cross-cultural, singling out Otto and Eliade; and topical, identifying 
specific areas such as community, faith, conversion, worship, prayer, mysticism, 
and vocation to which twentieth-century psychologies of religion and contem- 
porary religious experience provide data. Insofar as possible the course is induc- 
tive and is limited to seminar size. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. G. Jackson 



44 



PC 19 Training the Pastor as Spiritual Director 

Borrowing from the rich history and insight of the Roman Catholic Church, this 
course intends to adapt that material to the Protestant pastor as Spiritual Director. 
The history of the Office, the theology of such an Office within Protestantism, 
psychological factors obtaining between Director and people, and programmatic 
elements are the content of the course. Open only to students who have had Credo 
and Faith Formation. Mr. G. Jackson 

PC20 Issues in Pastoral Care: Anxiety, Guilt, Hostility 

This trilogy of interrelated affective states will be looked at from three perspec- 
tives : 1 ) their dynamics, seen both psychologically and theologically (for example, 
ontological anxiety, neurotic guilt, and depression and hostility); 2) their ex- 
pression in affect, behavior, and life-style; 3) handling them and ministering to 
their victims. Readings will be taken from psychology and theology. Case studies 
are used extensively throughout the course. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

PC21 Expectations of Ministers 

Ministers frequently have experiences in which the expectations that people 
have of them are expressed in surprising ways and places. These experiences are 
often puzzling as well as distressing to the minister in terms of how to care for the 
people involved. The recognition of these expressions, their developmental sig- 
nificance, the ways in which they are communicated, and useful responses the 
minister may make are studied in this course. Experiences presented by the 
students are the primary subject matter. 

Mr. Paylor 

PC52 Practicum with Children 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center provides students the opportunity 
for observing the development of normal 3, 4 and 5 year old children as it is 
expressed in their play. These observations are discussed with the Arsenal staff 
against the background of concurrent readings in developmental theory which the 
students are doing. A weekly seminar relating the observations and readings to a 
ministry to children forms a third part of the course. This course is open to 
advanced M.Div. and D.Min. students. 

Mr. Paylor 

PC62 The Congregation as a Caring Community 

This course assumes that the professional minister is not the only minister to 
people in need, yet the congregation is not prepared to minister. So this course 
develops a design to equip a Remnant in the congregation to become a ministering 
people. A theology of care is scrutinized; a two year program schematized, using 
both theological and psychological material; an on-the-job training component for 
laity detailed; and the pastor's role in the total program pin-pointed. Besides 
theological and psychological readings, sources include D.Min. research projects 
dealing with the congregation as a caring community. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

Homiletics 

Elective Courses in Homiletics 

HM10 Homiletics Practicum 

The course combines seminar discussion with the preparation and delivery of 
sermons, and is designed to lead students beyond introductory homiletics to a 
more sophisticated understanding of the preacher's task. In small sections stu- 
dents preach twice during the term, as well as participate in detailed homiletical 
analysis. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Ezzell 



45 



HM17 Black Preaching 

This course seeks to: 1) analyze critically the style, structure, and content of 
historic and current trends in Black Preaching, utilizing recordings, tapes, and 
actual preaching situations; 2) understand the unique contributions of Theology; 
and 3) provide the opportunities to help students become more effective in the 
communication of the Gospel to congregations within the Black Community. 

Mr. Pugh 

HM20 Parish Preaching 

Planning a year's pulpit work. An analysis of the seasons and festivals of the 
Christian Year. Selecting resources for occasional sermons. 

Mr. Oman 

HM21 Literary Sources for Preaching 

A study of selected literary masterpieces considered significant for preaching 
because of their content and/or style. Autobiographical, devotional and allegorical 
material will be included as well as drama and the novel. 

Term I, 1979-80 Mr. Oman 

HM27 Preaching from Romans 

An exegetic analysis of Paul's most influential epistle. The course will attempt 
to provide the student with comprehensive understanding of the style and struc- 
ture of Paul's argument and the homiletical possibilities it presents. Special 
attention will be given to hermeneutical problems attendant to such prominent 
Pauline concepts as faith, grace and law, as well as to the formidable forensic 
character of his language and thought. 

Term III, 1979-80 Mr. Ezzell 

WS14 The Theology and Practice of Christian Worship 

An introductory course on Christian Worship, concentrating on basic theologi- 
cal principles, origins and development, orders of worship, lessons and sermon, 
public prayer and the sacraments. 

Term II, 1979-80 Mr. Oman 

Administration 

Elective Courses in Administration 

AD 10 Polity and Program of the United Presbyterian Church 

An introduction to the polity and program of the United Presbyterian Church, 
designed in part to help United Presbyterian students to prepare for denomina- 
tional examinations in that field. 

Term III, 1979-80 Staff 

AD30 United Methodist History, Doctrine and Policy 

Required of United Methodist students for graduation; elective for other stu- 
dents. 

Staff 



46 



VI. THE FACULTY 




Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas, Assis- 
tant Professor in Church and Min- 
istry. Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, Cuba, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), 
S.T.M. 



Robert M. Ezzell, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Homiletics. Memphis State 
University, B.S.; Lexington Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Yale Di- 
vinity School, S.T.M. ; Yale Uni- 
versity, M.A. 





John H. Gerstner, Professor of 
Church History. Westminster Col- 
lege, B.A.; Westminster Theologi- 
cal Seminary, M.Div., M.Th.; Har- 
vard University, Ph.D. 



47 



Donald E. Gowan, Professor of Old 
Testament. University of South 
Dakota, B.A.; University of Du- 
buque Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; University of Chicago, Ph.D. 





Dikran Y. Hadidian, Professor of 
Bibliography. American Univer- 
sity of Beirut, B.A.; Hartford Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D., Th.M.; 
Hartford School of Religious Edu- 
cation, M.A.; Columbia University, 
M.S. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, Interim Dean 
and William F. Orr Professor of 
New Testament. Victoria College, 
University of Toronto, B.A.; Em- 
manuel College, Victoria Univer- 
sity, Toronto, B.D.; Union Theo- 
logical Seminary (N.Y.), S.T.M., 
Th.D. 




48 




Gordon E. Jackson, Hugh Thom- 
son Kerr Professor of Pastoral 
Theology. Monmouth College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh Theological Sem- 
inary, Th.B., Th.M.; University of 
Chicago, Ph.D. 



Jared Judd Jackson, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Old Testament. Harvard 
College, A.B.; Episcopal Theo- 
logical School, B.D.; Union Theo- 
logical Seminary (N.Y.), Th.D. 





George H. Kehm, Professor of 
Theology. Queens College (N.Y.), 
B.S.; Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Harvard Divinity 
School, S.T.M.; Harvard Univer- 
sity, Th.D. 



49 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate 
Professor of Biblical Languages. 
University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 
M.Div., Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Th.M.; Princeton Uni- 
versity, M.A., Ph.D. 





M. Harjie Likins, Associate Profes- 
sor in Church and Ministry. Cor- 
nell College (Iowa), A.B.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Ulirich W. Mauser, Errett M. Gra- 
ble Professor of New Testament. 
University of Tubingen, Doctor of 
Theology. 




50 




Richard J. Oman, Howard C. 
Scharfe Professor of Homiletics. 
University of Minnesota, B.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; New College, University of 
Edinburgh, Ph.D. 



Charles B. Partee, Professor of 
Church History. Maryville Col- 
lege, A.B.; Austin Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Uni- 
versity of Texas, M.A.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Ph.D. 





Neil R. Paylor, Associate Professor 
in Church and Ministry. Hanover 
College, A.B.; Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary, B.D.; Harvard Uni- 
versity, Ph.D. 



51 



Ronald H. Stone, Professor of So- 
cial Ethics. Morningside College, 
B.A.; Union Theological Seminary 
(N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, 
Ph.D. 





Marjorie Suchocki, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Theology, Pomona Col- 
lege, B.A.; Claremont Graduate 
School, M.A., Ph.D. 



H. Eberhard von Waldow, Profes- 
sor of Old Testament. Bonn Uni- 
versity, B.A.; Doctor of Theology. 





James A. Walther, Professor of 
New Testament Literature and 
Exegesis. Grove City College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh Theological Sem- 
inary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel College, 
Victoria University, Toronto, 
Th.D. 



Walter E. Wiest, Professor of 
Philosophy of Religion. Lafayette 
College, A.B.; Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary, B.D.; Columbia 
University, Ph.D. 




53 



EMERITI 

William H. Kadel, Th.D., President Emeritus 

William F. Orr, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of New Testament Literature and 
Exegesis. 



GUEST FACULTY 
Martha Ezzell, M.A. . 
Nancy L. Lapp, M.A. 



Alfred L. Pugh, B.D. 



Phillip Sigal, Ph.D. 



.Speech Tutor 

.Curator of Bible Lands Museum, 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Lecturer in Archaeology 

.Pastor, Macedonia Baptist Church, 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lecturer in Homiletics 

.Lecturer in Theology, Duquesne 

University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lecturer in New Testament 




54 



. 



VII. FINANCES AND 
FINANCIAL AID 

FINANCES 

The Board of Directors of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has ap- 
proved the following tuition, housing rent and fees for the 1979-80 aca- 
demic year. The Seminary reserves the right to make changes in all 
tuition, housing rent, fees, and financial aid policies without prior notice. 

Tuition 

Candidates for the M.Div. and M.A. Degrees: 

An annual comprehensive charge for 36 term hours $1950.00 

Additional charge per credit hour beyond 36 term hours .$ 54.17 

Part-time candidates for the M.Div. and M.A. Degrees: 

Part-time status by Seminary requirement — per course . . .$ 162.50 

Part-time status by individual preference: 

Per course for three courses $ 174.00 

Per course for two courses $ 190.00 

Per course for one course $ 211.00 

Candidates for the D.Min. Degree: 

Stage I $ 952.00 

Stage II $ 846.00 

(Proportional based upon credit accepted from other institutions) 

Stage III $ 264.00 

TOTAL tuition for the D.Min. Degree $2062.00 

All work beyond the 32 term hours required for the D.Min. 
Degree per credit hour $ 64.50 

Candidates for the Ph.D. Degree: 

Per credit hour for Pennsylvania residents $ 70.00 

Per credit hour for non-Pennsylvania residents $ 144.00 

University courses: 

Courses taken at area universities (University of Pittsburgh, 
Carnegie-Mellon University, Duquesne University) through the 
PCHE cross-registration system are charged at Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary tuition rates and tuition is paid to the Seminary. 

Special non-degree students: 

Per course for three courses $ 174.00 

Per course for two courses $ 190.00 

Per course for one course $ 211.00 

Audit course for enrolled students for no credit No Fee 

Fees 

Matriculation Fee $ 35.00 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

Annual Library Fee $ 10.00 

Annual Student Association Fee $ 5.00 

Graduation Fee $ 25.00 

Transcript Fee: One copy of student's academic record 

will be provided without charge — additional copies . . . .$ 1.00 



55 



Board 

Breakfast and lunch may be purchased Monday through Friday 
throughout the academic year, excluding vacation periods. Kitchen 
facilities are available in the dormitories for single students. The esti- 
mated cost for board for an academic year for a single student is $1285.00 

Room 

Charge for the academic year for dormitory room $ 315.00 

Apartment Fees (per month) 

The Highlander: 

one-bedroom apartments $ 118.00 

two-bedroom apartments $ 133.00 

Fulton Hall: 

Efficiency apartments $ 87.00 

one-bedroom apartments $ 110.00 

Anderson Hall: 

two-bedroom apartments $ 142.00 

three-bedroom apartments $ 157.00 

McMillan Hall: 

one-bedroom apartments $ 126.00 

two-bedroom apartments $ 142.00 

three-bedroom apartments $ 157.00 

four-bedroom apartments $ 188.00 

Sheridan Apartments: 

one-bedroom apartments $ 83.00 

two-bedroom apartments $ 91.00 

FINANCIAL AID 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary provides financial aid from endowed 
and general funds for first degree students who demonstrate that their 
resources are not sufficient to meet Seminary expenses. Students are 
expected to make every effort toward self-support within the restrictions 
of time imposed by the program of study. Some sources the student should 
utilize: 

1. Savings. The amount of a student's savings to be applied to Sem- 
inary expenses is to be a pro-rated share of the total expenses each 
year. 

2. Summer employment. 

3. Academic year employment. Off-campus work can usually be found 
in the Pittsburgh area. Field education positions are also remunera- 
tive. 

4. Student's family. The student is strongly encouraged to seek all 
possible assistance from his or her family. 

5. Student's spouse. If there are no children, the spouse is expected to 
be employed. The income will usually be sufficient to support the 
family. 

6. Local congregation and judicatory support. Students are strongly 
encouraged to seek financial assistance from their churches and 
judicatories. 



56 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is aware that many students will have 
financial needs which exceed their own resources, thus Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary will seek to provide financial aid. 

The financial aid program is based on a concept of an agreed-upon norm 
established annually by estimating basic living expenses. For 1979-80 
this norm is $4,580.00 for a single student, and $6,510.00 for married 
students. An additional allowance of $610.00 is provided for each child 
living with and dependent on the family. These norms include expenses 
for Seminary tuition and rentals, food, books, medical costs, medical 
insurance, clothing, laundry and entertainment. Not included are auto- 
mobile operating costs, payment on purchases, repayment of indebted- 
ness and travel expenses to and from the Seminary. The student lists the 
source and amount of anticipated income and is required to bring a 
minimum of $1,000.00 a year from employment and/or other sources. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary will commit itself to seek to provide 
each qualifying student a percentage of the balance, as determined each 
year. For the academic year 1979-80 the percentage will be 91%. 

The financial aid awarded to the student will be a combination of three 
types of financial assistance: work assistance, loan and grant. 

1. Work assistance jobs are provided for a limited number of campus 
jobs in the dining hall, dormitories, library, etc. 

2. Long-term Seminary loans to be repaid in regular installments with 
low interest rates beginning six months after the student leaves the 
Seminary. 

3. Seminary grants are awarded on the basis of demonstrated need 
except for a limited number of merit prizes and merit scholarships. 

Pittsburgh Seminary's financial aid program is based on a nine-month 
academic period and is not automatically renewable from year to year. 
Each year, if aid is required, a new application must be filed by May 1. 
New students also are advised to file financial aid applications by that 
date. Applications will be reviewed in the order in which they are re- 
ceived. 

Specific questions and requests for detailed information regarding 
financial aid should be addressed to the Seminary's Financial Aid Officer. 



AWARDS, PRIZES AND FELLOWSHIPS 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation 
to that member of the senior class who is recommended by the faculty as 
having achieved the highest standard in all departments of the Seminary 
curriculum. The faculty reserves the right to impose special tests and 
examinations in making this award. The recipient must pledge himself or 
herself to a year of post-graduate study following his or her graduation at 
some institution approved by the faculty. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship is given every year to the member of 
the senior class who has the highest average at the beginning of his/her 
final term of study. 






57 



The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a 
full academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by the 
faculty. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize is assigned to that member of 
the graduating class who has taken the full course of instruction in this 
institution and who has achieved the second highest academic rank of the 
class, if in the judgment of the faculty he or she is worthy in all other 
respects. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize is awarded to a member of the senior class who has spent 
three years in the Seminary and has taken the highest standing in the 
department of homiletics. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize will be awarded to the stu- 
dent who achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek 
as he or she enters the junior class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew will be awarded to that mem- 
ber of the senior class who, having elected Hebrew, shall submit the best 
grammatical and exegetical treatment of a portion of the Hebrew Old 
Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament 

The John Watson Prize in NT Greek will be awarded to that member of 
the senior class who, having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best 
grammatical and exegetical treatment of a portion of the Greek New 
Testament. 




58 



The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize is to be awarded yearly to the 
students making first and second rank respectively in the department of 
Church History. 
The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize is to be awarded to that member of the graduating class who 
has exhibited to the greatest degree, throughout the three years of the 
Seminary course, leadership, originality and accomplishments beyond 
the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The income is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the 
junior class who attain the highest average of excellence in their Seminary 
work. 
The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship is given to the student who, upon enter- 
ing Seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in a competitive examina- 
tion in the English Bible. The successful competitor is to have the 
scholarship throughout the entire course of three years. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

The income from this endowed fund is granted to the student, who in 
the judgment of the professors of the History and Theology Areas, is most 
worthy of this award at the end of the middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies is granted to the 
student who, in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical Area, is most 
worthy of this award at the end of the junior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for Graduate Study 

This fund provides an annual award to a member of the graduating class 
designated by the faculty for assistance in post-graduate study, preferably 
in the field of New Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 

This award is given to a student who, at the end of the middler year has, 
in the judgment of the homiletics professors, demonstrated excellence in 
preaching. 
The Edgewood Presbyterian Church Prize in Missions 

The Edgewood Presbyterian Church Prize in Missions is awarded to 
that member of the graduating class who is deemed most deserving among 
those entering a denominationally recognized or ecumenically sponsored 
mission field. 

The Clara Edna Miller Prize in Pastoral Theology 

This prize is awarded to that student in the M.Div. program finishing 
the seventh term who achieves the highest academic standing in those 
courses in the curriculum particularly adapted to the practice of ministry, 
i.e., preaching, worship, education, pastoral care, administration, and 
leadership development. 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in Pastoral Care 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in Pastoral Care is awarded to the 
graduating senior, whether Master of Divinity or Master of Arts, who has 



59 



taken his or her full course of study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
and who has the highest standing in the general area of pastoral care. 

The John W. Meister Award 

The John W. Meister Award in the Pastoral Ministry has been estab- 
lished at each of the seven theological seminaries of the United Presbyter- 
ian Church U.S.A. in memory of Rev. John W. Meister, who at his death in 
1974 was Director of the Council of Theological Seminaries. The award is 
made each year to that member of the graduating class who manifests to 
the greatest degree those characteristics which are most essential to effec- 
tive pastoral leadership. 



HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Honors Scholarship Program is one way Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary seeks to encourage the enrollment of young men and women of 
the highest academic ability in the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 
programs. Those considered for an Honors Scholarship shall be from 
among those applicants who have graduated from a regionally accredited 
or internationally recognized college or university, normally in the top 
five percent of their class (with at least a 3.5 cumulative average). They 
shall be students of demonstrated potential for outstanding Christian 
service. 

There are presently two Honors Scholarships. 

The David E. Molyneaux Honors Scholarship was established by the 
First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Michigan, in affection for their 
pastor, David E. Molyneaux, an alumnus and former Board member 
of the Seminary, and provides a substantial cash award to an entering 
first degree student selected by the faculty. 

The First Presbyterian Church of Neenah Honors Scholarship was 
established by the First Presbyterian Church of Neenah, Wisconsin, 
from the Bergstrom Fund of which it is the trustee, and provides a 
significant cash award to an entering first degree student selected by 
the Seminary faculty. 
Those considered for either Honors Scholarship must have applied for 
admission to the Seminary before April 15th of each academic year. 



60 



VIII. STUDENT LIFE 

A primary purpose of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is to develop a 
Christian community on campus which lays the foundation of early and 
lasting friendships, productive of confidence and mutual assistance 
among ministers. Approximately three hundred students, drawn from 
over twenty states and several foreign countries, are enrolled at the Sem- 
inary. While a majority of students are United Presbyterians, there are 
significant numbers of Methodists, Baptists, Lutherans and Episcopal 
students as well. The larger number of students live on campus. 

Students at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary participate in the govern- 
ance of the institution through membership on various committees of the 
Board of Directors, faculty and administration. A number of student or- 
ganizations flourish on campus to meet specific interests and concerns. 

The Student Association 

The Student Association is composed of "all students registered and 
enrolled in the Seminary in a course of study leading to a degree." The 
Student Association's purpose is to "conduct all student social and extra- 
curricular affairs," and to "conduct elections of student representatives to 
other Seminary committees or organizations as required." In addition to 
pot-luck dinners, picnics, square dances and movies, extra-curricular 
events dealing with controversial issues related to the church and world at 
large foster a community spirit. The Student Association is responsible for 
a large part of the annual student orientation program. Meetings of the 
Student Association are held at least once a month. 

The Associated Women Seminarians 

The Associated Women Seminarians (AWS) recognizes the particular 
needs of a part of the student body for the good of the whole. AWS 
promotes interdependence among women and forwards the interest of 
women. AWS activities include the maintenance of sympathetic under- 
standing and close cooperation with the faculty and administration; the 
establishment of an orderly succession of participation by women stu- 
dents in the administration and governance of the Seminary; and the 
establishment of coordinating committees to respond to matters of con- 
cern to women both within and outside the Seminary community. Mem- 
bership is open to any female student at the Seminary. 

The Black Seminarians Association 

The Black Seminarians Association provides a means whereby the 
Seminary utilizes the full participation of the black community. Through 
prayer, fellowship and the exchange of individual talents the Association 
brings to the Seminary's attention both the concerns of black people and 
the particular needs of black clergy. The Association's extra-curricular 
activities encompass these concerns through seminars conducted by ex- 
perienced black pastors, annual attendance at the National Black Sem- 
inarians Convention and visits to area black churches and communities. 
Membership is open to black students in all academic programs of the 
Seminary. 



61 




The Evangelical Student Fellowship 

The Evangelical Student Fellowship (ESF) is an organization holding 
an evangelical Christian faith, as stated in its creed. The ESF has three 
organizing principles: 1) to provide for the spiritual development of the 
membership; 2) to stimulate academic excellence in evangelical scholar- 
ship; 3) to provide a forum whereby evangelical students can engage the 
wider seminary community in dialogue on issues of mutual concern and 
of importance to the church of Jesus Christ. This includes a bibliography 
of evangelical sources which covers all subjects taught at the Seminary. 
While any student is welcome to attend ESF activities, voting member- 
ship is limited to those who sign the ESF creed in good faith. 

The Preaching Association 

The Preaching Association supplies worship leadership to vacant pul- 
pits in the greater Pittsburgh area, providing valuable experience for 
Seminary students in preaching. 

SPICE 

SPICE is the organization of the female and male spouses of students 
enrolled at Pittsburgh Seminary. In addition to providing organized sup- 
port for its members, SPICE helps promote and maintain a sense of 
community on the Seminary campus. Pot-luck dinners, movies, and holi- 
day parties are sponsored by SPICE, often in association with the Student 
Association and the Association of Women Seminarians. Lectures and 
discussions are held to stimulate and enlighten the Seminary community. 



62 



Orientation 

Students who are entering Pittsburgh Theological Seminary need to 
understand the critical significance of theological education, whether at 
the M.Div. or M.A. level. The M.Div. students will be entering the 
transition from laity to clergy. The Seminary provides an annual orienta- 
tion program to sensitize students both to the goals of theological edu- 
cation in general and to the way the Seminary seeks to prepare men and 
women for the Christian ministry. Additionally, the Seminary through the 
Student Association and other student groups introduces entering stu- 
dents to the Pittsburgh scene. 

Play Care for Children 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has set aside a large community room 
located on the ground level of McMillan Hall as a play care center for 
pre-school children throughout the school year. The center is staffed by a 
paid director, volunteer parents and other students. The center's use is 
restricted to children of the Seminary community. 




63 





* imt^mam 



64 



IX. ADMISSIONS 
PROCEDURES 

A student applying for admission to any course of study offered by 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary shall provide evidence of good char- 
acter and of a Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university 
or its academic equivalent, and normally shall be a member in full com- 
munion in some branch of the Christian Church. 

Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 

Applicants to the first degree programs are required to have completed 
the Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university at 
the time of enrollment. This undergraduate work should include a sub- 
stantial foundation in the liberal arts. Applicants may apply any time after 
the junior year in college is completed. Applications for September en- 
trance should be made prior to June 30 to insure full consideration for 
admission; applications for entrance in the Second or Third Terms should 
be made at least six weeks before the beginning of the Term desired. All 
correspondence concerning admissions to the Seminary should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Applications are considered by the Student Relations Committee upon 
submission of the following materials: 

1. A formal application with the designated references. 

2. An official transcript of all the applicant's college and university 
work, showing grades for at least three years of undergraduate work. 

3. A statement (500-1000 words) describing the applicant's family, 
educational and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon motives for entering the Seminary. 

4. A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another 
representative of the Seminary who may be designated by the Di- 
rector of Admissions. 

5. A photo or snapshot of the applicant. 

6. A battery of psychological and/or mental capacity tests may be re- 
quired of the applicant by the Director of Admissions and Student 
Relations Committee. Such testing is utilized only when it is be- 
lieved the results will clarify ambiguities in the student's academic 
record or in the applicant's emotional fitness for the ministry. 

7. A medical report on a form furnished by the Seminary. 

8. An application fee of $15.00. This fee is not refundable. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, a 
$35.00 placement fee is required to assure the applicant a place in the 
Term for which application was made. This fee is applied to the student's 
tuition and is not returnable except under extreme hardship at the discre- 
tion of the Student Relations Committee. A certification of the student's 
"intention to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another accredited seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 



65 



seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President of the 
Seminary. A transfer student must be in residence at Pittsburgh Theologi- 
cal Seminary for a minimum of one full academic year in order to become a 
candidate for the M.Div. or the M.A. degree. 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work and Master of Div- 
inity/Master of Library Science 

In each of the joint degree programs the candidate must apply and be 
admitted to both Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of 
Pittsburgh. Normally, application is made to the appropriate graduate 
school of the University during the First Term of the middler year of the 
Seminary Master of Divinity program. 

Doctor of Ministry 

Applications for the Doctor of Ministry degree program are submitted to 
the Admissions Office. Track I applications are accepted for the First 
Term of every odd-numbered year and should be submitted by April 15th. 
Track II applications are accepted for every even-numbered year. Exact 
application dates and dates for the start of Track II groups can be obtained 
by writing the Admissions Office at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 

The successful completion of an M.Div. degree or its equivalent from 
an accredited seminary or divinity school is required for admission into 
the program. Applicants are required to have completed a minimum of 
two years in the ordained ministry. 

The Application Process 

Applications to the Doctor of Ministry program must include: 

1. A formal application. 

2. Transcripts of all prior academic work plus information regarding 
participation in non-degree continuing education. 

3. An endorsement from the applicant's Session or Church Board and 
assurance the applicant will be engaged in a recognized ministerial 
position for the period of the program. 

4. A statement (500-1000 words) detailing the applicant's ministerial 
experience to date. 

5. A statement (500-1000 words) outlining reasons for entering the 
program. 

6. Designated letters of recommendation as specified on the appli- 
cation form. 

7. Interviews with' the Director of Admissions and Director of the 
Doctor of Ministry Program and, if chosen for further consideration, 
with selected faculty members. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The Ph.D. degree program in the study of religion is a cooperative 
program offered by Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University 
of Pittsburgh. Since the degree is awarded by the University, application 
is made through University channels before it is reviewed by a joint 
Seminary-University committee. 

Either a Master of Divinity degree, Master's degree in an appropriate 
field, or equivalent is required for admission to the program. If the appli- 
cant's major field is to be one normally taught by the University rather 



66 



than by the Seminary, he or she should have had the equivalent of an 
undergraduate major, or have received the Master's degree in that field. 

The Application Process 

The following documents are required: 

1. Official transcripts of all prior academic work. 

2. Three letters of recommendation as specified on the application 
form. 

3. Thesis, seminar paper, or other evidence of scholarly research ex- 
perience. 

4. Scores on (preferably) the Graduate Record Examination (verbal and 
quantitative) or, alternatively, on the Miller Analogies Test. 

Inquiries may be addressed to: 
Coordinator, Ph.D. Program 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

Special Students 

Applicants desiring to study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary for 
credit on a non-degree basis, other than International Students, must 
possess a Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or uni- 
versity at the time of enrollment. Applicants for Special Student status 
follow the same procedures and submit the same materials as those apply- 
ing for the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts Programs. 

International Students 

All applicants from outside the United States must secure endorsement 
of their study plans from the Program Agency of the United Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A., or the World Council of Churches. Applicants whose 
native language is not English will be required to give evidence of 
proficiency in the English language before application will be consid- 
ered. The application deadline for international students is March 1 for 
September entrance. 




67 




i. 







68 



X. SPECIAL LECTURES 

The Special Lectures program at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
annually brings scholars of national and international standing to the 
campus to make important learned contributions to the church and the 
world. 

The Schaff Lectures 

The Schaff Lectures are given annually on any subject related to the 
general field of theological study. 

1981 Dr. David Tracy, University of Chicago Divinity School 

"The Concept of Religion in Contemporary Christian 

Theology: The Conflict of Interpretations" 
1980 Dr. Rosemary Ruether, Garrett Evangelical Theological 

Seminary 

"Theological and Ethical Bases for the Women's Liberation 

Movement" 
1979 Dr. Fred B. Craddock, The Graduate Seminary of Phillips 

University 

"What You Have Heard in a Whisper, Shout" 

1978 Dr. Donald K. Swearer, Swarthmore College 
"Christianity and the World Religions" 

Dr. Ronald E. Clements, Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge 

University 

"Isaiah and the Deliverance of Jerusalem" 

The Elliott Lectures 

The Elliott Lectures are to be given on specialties in theology and 
on literary or scientific subjects connected therewith. 

1979 Dr. Mary Daly, Boston College; Dr. Kathryn Gonzalez, 
Columbia Theological Seminary; Dr. Jill Raitt, Duke 
University 

"The Challenge of Mary Daly" 

1977 Dr. Sallie McFague, The Divinity School of Vanderbilt 
University 

"Conversion: Life on the Edge of the Raft, Reflections 
from Religious Autobiographies" 

Kelso Lectures — Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 

1979 Dr. Preston N. Williams, The Divinity School, Harvard 
University 

1978 Dr. C. Eric Lincoln, Duke University 

1977 Dr. Benjamin Mays, President Emeritus, Morehouse 
College 



69 




70 



XI. BOARD OF 
DIRECTORS AND 
ADMINISTRATION 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers, 1979-80 
Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Chairperson & Counsel 
Attorney, Alter, Wright & Barron, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, Vice-Chairperson 

Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. Alfred W. Wishart, Secretary 

Director & Secretary, The Pittsburgh Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Robert J. Dodds, Jr., Treasurer 

Attorney, Reed, Smith, Shaw & McClay, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Christopher Hodgkin, Assistant Secretary/Treasurer 
Business Manager 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



Members 
The Rev. Donald A. Aull 

Bessemer United Presbyterian Church 

Bessemer, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Davitt S. Bell 

Civic Leader 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. J. B. Belton 

Civic Leader 

First Presbyterian Church 

Brockway, Pennsylvania 

David J. Brubach 

Executive Vice-President 

Union National Bank 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. J. Mabon Childs 

Episcopal Lay Leader 

Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. St. Paul Epps 

Director, Self Development of People, UPCUSA 

New York, New York 

Craig G. Ford 

Senior Vice-President 

Mellon National Bank 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



71 



Merle E. Gilliand 

Chairman of the Board and 

Chief Executive Officer 

Pittsburgh National Bank 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Jean H. Henderson 

Stated Supply 

Jefferson Center United Presbyterian Church 

Saxonburg, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert C. Holland 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Joseph R. Hookey 

First Presbyterian Church 

Washington, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Blaine Hovis 

Civic Leader 

East Main United Presbyterian Church 

Grove City, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. William N. Jackson 

Christ Presbyterian Church 

Canton, Ohio 

William R. Jackson, Sr. 

Chairman of the Board 

Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Carolyn J. Jones 

Glenshaw Presbyterian Church 

Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

John Kaites 

President 

Johnstown Coal and Coke Company 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Gail Buchwalter King 

Community of Reconciliation 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Robert R. Lavelle 

President 

Lavelle Real Estate Company 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

James E. Lee 

President 

Gulf Oil Corporation 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Myles MacDonald 

Mt. Lebanon United Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mark B. Maharg 

Owner 

Maharg Insurance Company 

Butler, Pennsylvania 



72 



The Rev. Clinton M. Marsh 

Associate Executive 

Synod of the South 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Mrs. C. Herman Meyer 

Elder 

Hill Top United Presbyterian Church 

Toronto, Ohio 

The Rev. Nicholas Mikita 

Wilson United Presbyterian Church 

Clairton, Pennsylvania 

Captain T. David Parham, Chaplain, USN 

Chief, Pastoral Care Service 

Naval Regional Medical Center 

Portsmouth, Virginia 

Nathan W. Pearson 

Financial Executive 

Paul Mellon Family Interests 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. William G. Rusch 

Synod Executive 

Synod of the Trinity 

Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott 

Executive Presbyter 

Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert H. Stephens 

Retired Pastor 

Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 

Main Street United Presbyterian Church 

Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Anthony L. Wolfe 

Stated Clerk 

Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

J. Stuart Zahniser 

Retired Manufacturer 

Quality Assurance for Talon, Inc. 

Meadville, Pennsylvania 



73 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Ronald V. Wells, Ph.D Interim President 

Douglas R. A. Hare, Th.D Interim Dean of the Faculty 

Frank W. Penick Vice-President for Development 

Wesleyan Univ. (Ct.), B.A.; Princeton Theological 

Seminary, B.D., Th.M. 
Warren K. Martin Director of Deferred Giving 

Washington and Jefferson College, B.A.; Pittsburgh 

Theological Seminary, M.Div. 
Christopher Hodgkin Business Manager and Assistant Treasurer 

St. John's College; Union College (N.Y.), M.S. 

Dikran Y. Hadidian, M.S Librarian 

Jean Oberlin Financial Aid Officer and Registrar 

University of Kansas, A.B.; Pittsburgh 

Theological Seminary, M.R.E. 
Edgar R. Jones III Director of Admissions 

Muskingum College, B.A.; Andover Newton Theological School, 

B.D.; Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, D.Min. 

Richard J. Rapp Director of Continuing Education/ 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

Youngstown State University, A.B.; Pittsburgh Theological 

Seminary, M.Div.; University of Pittsburgh, M.A.; Duquesne 

University, Ph.D. 

L. William Yolton Director of Field Education/ 

Director of Senior Placement 

Harvard College, A.B.; Union Theological Seminary (N.Y.), 

M.Div.; Harvard Divinity School, Th.M.; Harvard Graduate 

School of Arts and Sciences, M.A. 

Library Staff 

Mary Ellen Scott Cataloger/Archivist 

Sterling College, B.A.; University of Pittsburgh, M.L.S. 



74 



INDEX 

Academic buildings 10 

Accreditation 7 

Admissions procedures 65 

Associated Women Seminarians 61 

Awards, prizes and fellowships 57 

Black Seminarians Association 61 

Board and Meals 56 

Board of Directors 71 

Campus Setting 9 

Clinical Pastoral Education 21 

Continuing Education 24 

Course descriptions 

studies in Bible 31 

studies in church history 37 

studies in theology 38 

studies in church and ministry: 

ethics 41 

sociology of religion 42 

education 43 

pastoral care 44 

homiletics 45 

administration 46 

Doctor of Ministry degree 22 

Doctor of Philosophy degree 24 

Evangelical Student Fellowship 62 

Faculty 47 

Faculty advisory system 28 

Fees 55 

Field Education 19 

Financial aid 56 

Grading system 27 

History 5 

Honors Scholarships Program 60 

Housing 12 

Institutional relationships 7 

International Scholars Program 26 

Library 11 

Master of Arts degree 18 

Master of Divinity degree 15 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work Degree 17 

Master of Divinity/Master of Library Science Degree 18 

National Capital Semester for Seminarians 21 

Officers of Administration 74 

Orientation 63 

Play Care Center 63 

Preaching Association 62 

Purpose 5 

Rent 56 

Special lectures 69 

Special non-degree students 26 

SPICE 62 

Student Association 61 

Tuition 55 

Worship 13 



PITTSBURGH 

THEOLOGICAL 

SEMINARY 



CATALOG '80-81 




Pljjc-- • THEOLOGICAI 
SEMINARY LIBRARY 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is accredited by 
The Association of Theological Schools in the 
United States and Canada, and the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 



This catalog is a forecast of the policies, personnel and programs of Pittsburgh Theolog 
cal Seminary as projected by the responsible authorities of the Seminary. Pittsburg 
Theological Seminary reserves the right to alter and change its policies, personnel an 
programs, without prior notice, in accordance with the Seminary's institutional neec 
and academic purposes. Complete statements of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
policies and programs are found in the Seminary's Constitution, By-laws, Academi 
Regulations and Board and Faculty Minutes. 




ANNUAL CATALOG 
1980-1981 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

616 N. Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

412-362-5610 



ms-v. 



SEMINARY CALENDAR FOR 1980-81 



TERM ONE 

4-5 September 

8 September 

9 September 

30 Sept.-l Oetober 
12 November 
14 November 
17-21 November 

TERM TWO 

1 December 
20 Dee.-4 January 
5 January 
15 January 
20 February 
23-27 February 

TERM THREE 

9 March 

17 April 
20-22 April 

13 May 

18 May 
19-22 May 

19 May 



Junior Orientation and Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Opening Convocation and Community Luncheon 

Elliott Lectures 

Semiannual Meeting, Board of Directors 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Week 



First Day of Classes 

Christmas Break 

Classes Resume 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday Observance 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Week 



First Day of Classes 

Good Friday (No Classes) 

Schaff Lectures 

Annual Meeting, Board of Directors (Tentative) 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Period 

185th Annual Commencement 






Table of Contents 

I. Purpose and History 5 

II. Campus Setting 9 

III. Educational Programs 15 

Master of Divinity 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work 

Master of Divinity/Master of Library Science 

Master of Arts 

Doctor of Ministry 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Continuing Education 

Special Students 

International Scholars 

IV. Academic Regulations 27 

V. Course Descriptions 29 

VI. Faculty 49 

VII. Finances and Financial Aid 57 

VIII. Student Life 65 

IX. Admissions Procedures 69 

X. Special Lectures 73 

XI. Board of Directors and Administrative Officers . . .75 
Index 79 



I. PURPOSE AND HISTORY 

PURPOSE 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a graduate professional institution 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. The 
General Assembly of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America exercises control of the Seminary through the Board of Di- 
rectors of the Seminary. The primary purpose of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is to prepare pastors for the United Presbyterian ministry so that 
they may demonstrate both personal piety and the keenest possible 
intellectual understanding of the Gospel and its implications for individ- 
ual and social living, so that they may promote the peace, unity and purity 
of the church among the ministers of the church, and so that they may lay 
the foundation of early and lasting friendships, productive of confidence 
and mutual assistance among ministers. 

The theological position of the United Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America is stated in the Constitution of the denomina- 
tion, Part I, Book of Confessions. This is the theological stance of Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary. Diversity of theological views within the 
framework of these confessions is inevitable. Those holding different 
theological viewpoints, especially when based upon their understanding 
of the Book of Confessions, should respect one another, accept criticism of 
one another's views in a Christian spirit, be willing to be challenged by 
different views and be tolerant of those views. Within such a setting, 
which should be expected in any academic institution and be markedly 
evident in a Christian community, students and faculty alike should 
experience the kind of spiritual and intellectual climate in which to grow. 
The Seminary should be a visible witness that in Christ there is unity in 
diversity. 

At least a two-third portion of the faculty at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary are members of the United Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America or are associated with the World Alliance of Reformed 
Churches. Faculty members who are from communions other than the 
United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America are expected 
to be faithful to the theological affirmations of their particular denomina- 
tions. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary maintains its ecumenical stance by 
welcoming students from every denomination, and assists in preparing 
them for service in their respective communions. The Seminary is a 
Christian community seeking to be obedient to Jesus Christ, under the 
authority of Scripture, and continually guided by the Book of Confessions, 
and is not merely a professional and graduate school of religion. 

HISTORY 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the consoli- 
dation of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America, and Western Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America. The union of the two denominations in 



1958 led to the consolidation of the two seminaries which were both 
located in Pittsburgh. 

The history of Pittsburgh Seminary began with the founding of Service 
Seminary in 1794 by the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania. Prior to 
this time the Presbytery had been dependent upon the supply of ministers 
sent out from Scotland. The Rev. John Anderson, D.D., was elected the 
first teacher of divinity and the school began with an enrollment of six 
students. Service Seminary later moved to Ohio where it became Xenia 
Theological Seminary. Later it moved to Missouri. This institution was 
merged in 1930 with a seminary founded in 1825 in Pittsburgh to form 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. This institution was later aug- 
mented by the resources of Newburgh Seminary which was founded in 
New York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 




Carnegie Samuel Calian 

President 

(assumes office February, 1981) 

Occidental College, B.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 

B.D.; 
University of Basel, D.Theol. 



... 



aV 



Western Seminary, formally established in 1825 by the General Assem- 
bly of the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., began with classical academies 
founded by Joseph Smith in 1785 and John McMillan in 1787 in Wash- 
ington, Pennsylvania. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 1825, whose 
task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening western territories 
along the Ohio River. 

Since the consolidation, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has been 
located in the East Liberty section of Pittsburgh on the campus previously 
occupied by Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary. 

There are over twenty-six hundred living alumni of Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary and its antecedent institutions. Since 1959 over three 
quarters of these graduates have entered the service of the church in 
parish-related ministries. In addition, graduates of the Seminary serve the 
church as college and university presidents, seminary and college faculty, 
and as synod and presbytery executives and staff. There are nine living 
graduates of the Seminary who have held the highest elective office in the 



United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America — Moderator 
of the General Assembly. 

ACCREDITATION 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is fully accredited by the Association 
of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, and by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

INSTITUTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS 

Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education 

The Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education (PCHE) is a cooperative 
organization composed of Pittsburgh area colleges, universities, and 
graduate schools. Participating institutions are Carlow College, Car- 
negie-Mellon University, Chatham College, Community College of Alle- 
gheny County, Duquesne University, LaRoche College, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, Point Park College, Robert Morris College and the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

The purposes of PCHE are: to represent a common voice on appropriate 
issues; to examine possibilities for cooperation among the member in- 
stitutions; to undertake joint programs which expand educational oppor- 
tunities for students, extend faculty resources and conserve institutional 
resources; and to initiate joint sponsorships of appropriate programs. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's membership in PCHE benefits stu- 
dents by opening possibilities for cross-registration in courses at the 
graduate level, by establishing library privileges at eight academic li- 
braries other than the Seminary's own, and by initiating studies and 
programs in specialized areas such as Black Studies. 

The University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary conducts two joint degree programs 
with the University of Pittsburgh. These are described more fully in the 
section on Educational Programs. 

The American Schools of Oriental Research 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is associated with the American 
Schools of Oriental Research. This corporation is involved in archaeologi- 
cal research in the Middle East. Most of the work has been concentrated in 
Palestine and in Iraq, with schools being maintained in Jerusalem, 
Amman, and Baghdad. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary since 1924 has 
been an active participant in numerous field projects in cooperation with 
the American Schools of Oriental Research. 

Arsenal Family and Children's Center 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center came into being in 1952 as a 
reflection of a Commonwealth mandate to the Western Psychiatric Insti- 
tute and Clinic to "deal with the mental hygiene of the normal child in the 
way of study and training in order that there may be a program of pre- 
vention of mental and nervous disorders as a result of giving children the 
proper background and training that will prevent such disorders." The 
Arsenal Family and Children's Center has grown and developed into a 
unique "field laboratory" for the in-depth psychological study of children 



and their families as well as a "field laboratory" on how to observe 
children and families, thereby contributing to the education and training 
of students for the ministry and other service-oriented careers. 

Association for Clinical Pastoral Education 

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education accredits a nationwide 
network of Clinical Pastoral Education Centers and supervisors. Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary is a member seminary of the Association. 




II. CAMPUS SETTING 

PITTSBURGH 

The City of Pittsburgh stands in Western Pennsylvania at the conflu- 
ence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers, which forms the Ohio 
River. Historically the industrial gateway to the West, Pittsburgh has been 
nationally celebrated in recent decades as "The Renaissance City," the 
scene of vital urban human renewal. As the center of the nation's ninth 
largest metropolitan area, Pittsburgh is home to such important firms as 
U. S. Steel, Gulf Oil and Rockwell International. The spectacular down- 
town "Golden Triangle" of business and residential skyscrapers testifies 
to the joint effort of industrial, political and other community leaders to 
keep Pittsburgh a source of human endeavor and achievement. 

Pittsburgh's acclaimed renewal has included the arts and education as 
well as physical rehabilitation. An internationally esteemed symphony 
orchestra along with resident opera, ballet and theater companies perform 
regularly in the lavish Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts. The city is also 
the steward of several important art collections and museums. Major 
league baseball, football and hockey teams play in the spacious facilities 
of Three Rivers Stadium and the Civic Arena. 

The City of Pittsburgh is the scene of Western Pennsylvania's major 
educational complex. Three major educational institutions, the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, Duquesne University and Carnegie-Mellon University 
plus four private colleges are located in the city. Visiting scholars, busi- 
ness and labor leaders, government officials and students, and other 
visitors have ready access to Pittsburgh via modern systems of air, rail and 
ground travel. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's emergence as an important center of 
theological education has paralleled the city's renaissance. Faculty and 
students are able to sample richly from and to join actively in Pittsburgh's 
efforts at human and cultural renewal. Seminary students live in Pitts- 
burgh and are thus sensitized to the urban setting of the contemporary 
theological enterprise. Their own faith is challenged and enriched by 
sustained encounter with the joys and tragedies of urban life. 

Through the wide scope of field education and other work opportuni- 
ties, students from the Seminary are involved in many different areas of 
Pittsburgh. Students serve as pastors in inner-city and suburban churches 
with a variety of programs, as chaplains in hospitals, county and federal 
penal institutions, as campus ministers, and in many other positions 
which affect the life of the city and its people. The resources of Pittsburgh 
for theological education are great, and Pittsburgh Seminary tries to make 
use of these resources as effectively as possible in the many facets of its 
life. The Seminary also attempts to be an active resource for the city 
through the stewardship of its facilities and the creative leadership of the 
members of the Seminary community. 

EAST LIBERTY 

The numerous rivers, valleys and mountains common to Western Penn- 
sylvania divide Pittsburgh into a series of neighborhoods many of which 



are ethnically defined. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is located in one 
of these neighborhoods, East Liberty. The area around the Seminary is a 
combination of commercial and residential sectors. The attractive East 
Liberty Mall is a shopping and business center. The Highland Park 
residential area is a well kept cluster of substantial homes bordering a 
large city park and zoo. 

The East Liberty section is the center of much of the Seminary's active 
involvement in the life of Pittsburgh. The Seminary is a formal participant 
in an exciting ecumenical witness, the East End Cooperative Ministry. 
Seminary facilities house several E.E.C.M. youth ministry programs in- 
cluding a recreational center. 




THE CAMPUS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is located on a thirteen-acre campus. 
The major portion of the campus was once the estate of H. Lee Mason, Jr. 
The buildings, almost all of which have been built since 1954, are of 
American Colonial design. 

Academic Buildings 

George A. Long Administration Building is the focal point of campus 
life. In addition to administrative offices, the building contains the main 
lecture and seminar rooms, some faculty offices, the student center, the 
bookstore, an audio and video tape center, the Bible Lands Museum and a 
large lounge. 



10 



Clifford E. Barbour Library houses a collection of over 189,000 vol- 
umes. Four open stack areas include 103 desk carrels which may be 
reserved by Master of Divinity, Master of Arts and Doctor of Ministry 
students. In addition, thirteen enclosed typing carrels, which allow 
greater privacy for research work, are available for Doctor of Philosophy 
students. Twenty reserved study rooms provide ideal conditions in which 
faculty members, visiting scholars and graduate students may pursue 
scholarly research. Reading rooms and lounges are informally placed 
throughout the building. Facilities are also available for seminars, small 
conferences, microfilm reading, audio- visual work, language study and 
music listening. 

Special collections and displays augment the book resources of the 
Barbour Library. 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection. The research area of the 
library contains this priceless collection of classical theological works 
dating from the Reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology. Several thousand 
valuable hymn and psalm books which came from the estate of James 
Warrington of Philadelphia provide research materials for scholars of 
American and English hymnody. 

Historical Collections. The archive room of Barbour Library contains 
Minutes and other records of Associate, Associate Reformed and United 
Presbyterian congregations, presbyteries, synods and general assemblies. 
Barbour Library is also the repository for the Upper Ohio Valley Histori- 
cal Society and for Pittsburgh Presbytery of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the U.S.A. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of Dr. 
Karl Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh Seminary by Dr. 
Barth in 1964. Accompanying the desk at which Dr. Barth wrote his 
theological treatises from 1922 is an autographed copy of his Kirchliche 
Dogmatik 111. 

Hicks Family Memorial Chapel is the newest structure on the Seminary 
campus. The large sanctuary is used for worship during many of the 
Seminary's chapel services, and is used occasionally by local congre- 
gations. Hicks Chapel has a spacious and comfortable theatre-auditorium 
which is ideal for conferences and special lectures. 

The James L. Kelso Bible Lands Museum. Named for the long-time 
Professor of Old Testament and Biblical Archaeology, the James L. Kelso 
Bible Lands Museum contains a significant collection of ancient Near 
Eastern and Palestinian pottery and artifacts from numerous excavations 
led by Dr. Kelso and his successors. Housed in the George A. Long 
Administration Building, the museum is a valuable teaching and research 
aid for the serious seminary student who may wish to participate in a 
Palestinian dig or gain some expertise in Palestinian archaeology. 

Housing for Married Students 

Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall provides eighteen efficiency and 
twenty-one one-bedroom apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette, a 
bath and a storage locker in the basement. 

The Highlander contains seventeen one-bedroom and six two-bedroom 



11 



units. Each apartment includes a living room, kitchen, bath and storage 
locker. 

Anderson Hall includes six two-bedroom and six three-bedroom apart- 
ments, each of which has a living room, a kitchen and a storage locker. 
These units are equipped with wall-to-wall carpeting. 

McMillan Hall, together with Anderson Hall and The Highlander, 
forms a quadrangle which encloses a play area for children. One four- 
bedroom, three three-bedroom, twelve two-bedroom and three one- 
bedroom apartments are enclosed within the building. As in Anderson 
Hall, the units are equipped with wall-to-wall carpeting. A large com- 
munity room is located on the ground level of McMillan Hall. The com- 
munity room is used as a play care center for pre-school children through- 
out the school year. 

All of the apartments are unfurnished. In the case of international 
students or others demonstrating a compelling need, a limited amount of 
furniture may be available through the Housing Office. 

Each apartment is equipped with a refrigerator and stove; coin- 
operated laundry facilities are located in the basement of each building. 

Life for married students and their families is pleasant and comfortable. 
Rents are well below commercial rates, shops and stores are within walk- 
ing distance, public transportation is available at the Seminary gate and 
public schools are nearby for children of all ages. 




12 



Housing for Single Students 

John McNaugher Memorial Hall, the Seminary's original dormitory, 
now serves a variety of purposes. One wing houses single women stu- 
dents, while another contains faculty offices. Attached to McNaugher Hall 
is the dining facility which consists of three dining halls and a modern 
kitchen. 

George C. Fisher Memorial Hall accommodates eighty men in single 
rooms. Fisher Hall has student lounges on each floor in addition to a game 
room and a snack room on the ground floor. 

Dogs and cats are not permitted in Seminary apartments and dormi- 
tories. 



WORSHIP 

Worship is an integral part of the life of Pittsburgh Theological Sem- 
inary. Chapel services, both traditional and experimental in form, are held 
twice each week during the academic year. Students, faculty and admin- 
istration share in the leadership of chapel services under the direction of 
the Seminary's Liturgical Committee. In addition, worship and study are 
conducted on a weekly basis by the Evangelical Student Fellowship. A 
service of Holy Communion is held weekly by students and faculty of the 
Episcopal Church. Attendance at the worship services of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary is voluntary. 



13 





14 



III. EDUCATIONAL 
PROGRAMS 

THE MASTER OF DIVINITY DEGREE 

Studies leading to the Master of Divinity degree are designed to pre- 
pare men and women for the various ministries of the United Presbyterian 
Church and other denominations. It is a fundamental assumption of the 
Master of Divinity program that preparation for the ministry cannot be 
separated from engagement in ministry itself. Thus, the Master of Divin- 
ity curriculum is designed to integrate theological studies and the work of 
ministry so that theory and practice, academy and parish become com- 
plementary components in the educational process. 

One hundred and eight term hours are required for the Master of 
Divinity degree. When followed on a full-time basis the program is nor- 
mally completed in three academic years. Some students, particularly 
those involved in student pastorates, may find it necessary to spread their 
degree work over four academic years. An approved four-year sequence of 
Master of Divinity studies is available for such students, copies of which 
can be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

In preparing for Christian ministry a student should develop an in- 
depth understanding of a broad range of knowledge along with a compe- 
tence in basic pastoral abilities. The student should be able to demon- 
strate a theological understanding of the integration of these resources. 
The Master of Divinity curriculum is designed to guide the student 
through a pattern of course work and experience which will lead him or 
her to a basic professional competency with which to begin the ordained 
ministry. At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary it is understood that this 
basic professional competency includes: 

The ability to understand and make use of the basic documents of faith, 
i.e., Scripture, creeds and traditions of the church. The study of the Bible, 
both in English and in at least one of the original languages, and the study 
of church history are crucial to this ability. The course work in Biblical 
Studies is supplemented by a required examination on the content of the 
English Bible which is offered annually and which must be passed by 
every Master of Divinity student as a requisite for graduation. Normally, 
United Presbyterian students enroll in a full academic year's study of both 
biblical languages in accordance with the ordination requirements of the 
denomination. 

The ability to communicate through preaching, writing and teaching, 
and to counsel and provide leadership in the program and administrative 
areas, fostered by the course work in the Pastoral Studies and ministry 
sequences. The Pastoral Studies sequence is taken in conjunction with the 
required field education experience, so that the academic study in the 
areas of education, pastoral care and homiletics can be critically combined 
with a well-rounded, supervised involvement in the life of the church. 

The ability to understand in theological terms the sociological, ideo- 
logical and political content of the cultures in which the church min- 
isters. This understanding needs to be followed by the ability to apply 



15 



ethical standards to the social process and by the ability to make use of all 
the resources available for making ministry effective. In addition to the 
work done in the two required courses in Church and Society and in the 
Introduction to Ethics course, each student is required to take one elec- 
tive course in ethics. 

The ability to think theologically. In addition to an introduction to 
historical theology, there are two required courses focusing on Christol- 
ogy, and Church and Sacraments. In these courses students will study 
theolological method as well as the content of central doctrines of the 
faith. In addition each student is required to take one elective course in 
theology. 

The ability to practice ministry in an appropriate professional style. 
One of the first term courses will introduce students to the concept of 
ministry and its varied responsibilities. In the senior year two courses will 
help the student to develop his or her own statement of faith (Credo) and 
understand the dynamics of the formation of faith in the pastor and 
through the pastor in the people. 



THE MASTER OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 



Term I 
Interpreting the Bible 
Language 
Church & Society: 
Local 



Junior Year 

Term II 
Biblical Introduction 

(OT01 or NT01) 1 
Language 
Historical Studies I 



Introduction to Ministry Elective 



Term III 
Biblical Introduction 

(OT02 or NT02) 2 
Exegesis 

Historical Studies II 
Introduction to Ethics 2 



Term I 
Pastoral Studies I: 

Education 
Introduction to Modern 

Religious Thought 
Elective 
Elective 



Middler Year 

Term II 
Pastoral Studies II 

Pastoral Care 
Christology 
Elective 
Elective 



Senior Year 

Term II 
Credo 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Term III 
Pastoral Studies III: 

Homiletics 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Term III 
Faith Formation 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Term I 
Church & Society: 

Global 
Church & Sacraments 
Elective 
Elective 

Students must take one Biblical Introduction in each Testament. 
2 Students may elect to postpone either the second Biblical Introduction or 

Introduction to Ethics until the middler year in order to make room for 

one elective in Term III, junior year. 



16 



Equivalency Examinations 

The Master of Divinity curriculum of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
is basically a required curriculum. Ordinarily, no one will be excused 
from the required courses; however, in certain circumstances this may be 
possible. Requests may be submitted to the Dean's Office. The faculty in 
the field from which the student wishes to be excused design appropriate 
tests and have authority to determine whether the student has sufficient 
mastery for the course to be waived. Such courses will be listed on the 
transcript, showing that the requirement was fulfilled, but no credit hours 
will be given. 

English Bible Examination 

The passing of an examination on the content of the English Bible is 
required for graduation. This examination is offered annually. Although 
this requirement may be met as late as the third year, it is recommended 
that students take the examination in the first year of Master of Divinity 
studies. 



THE MASTER OF DIVINITY/MASTER OF 
SOCIAL WORK JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM 

Ministry and social work share many concerns. The mission of the 
Church involves working for the improvement of the quality of life in 
diverse ways, some of which parallel social work efforts. Many ministers 
and theological students want to gain the insights and skills provided by 
social work education in order to enhance their ministry. 

To encourage and to equip men and women to engage in social work 
both in and out of the church, and to provide the opportunity for social 
work for students who feel a call to practice within a church setting, the 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh Grad- 
uate School of Social Work have developed a program offering a joint 
degree, that is, an M.DIV./M.S.W. 

This joint effort enables students to receive both the M. Div. and the 
M.S.W. in four years of post baccalaureate study instead of the usual five. 
Nevertheless, the joint program provides a full course of study in both 
theology and social work. This result is effected by equating certain 
courses now taught in both schools, by making provision for courses taken 
in one school to count as electives in the other, and by developing spe- 
cialized field placements. 

The curriculum of the Graduate School of Social Work encompasses 
work in four major curriculum areas, or "clusters": Health/Mental Health; 
Juvenile and Criminal Justice; Poverty and Associated Problems; and 
Children and Youth. 

Candidates for the joint degree who enter the program through the 
Seminary will concentrate on theological studies during the first two 
years. The third and fourth years will be spent predominantly at the 
School of Social Work, but one course per term will be taken at the 
Seminary. Should a student elect to terminate the joint program before its 
completion and seek only one degree, he or she will be required to 
complete all of the work ordinarily required for that degree. 



17 



During the third year, the Seminary Financial Aid program will con- 
tinue to be in effect for each student in the joint program. At least for 
out-of-state students, however, this income will need to be supplemented 
by aid from the University or other sources to cover the higher tuition 
costs at the University. 

Inquiries regarding the Graduate School of Social Work and requests 
for Social Work catalogs should be addressed to: Director of Admissions, 
Graduate School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15260. 

THE MASTER OF DIVINITY/MASTER OF 
LIRRARY SCIENCE JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the School of Library and Infor- 
mation Science of the University of Pittsburgh established in 1968 a joint 
program to train men and women in theological librarianship. The pro- 
gram, designed to be completed in four academic years, culminates in two 
degrees, the M. Div. and the M. L. S. 

Normally, a student will take the first part of his/her work at the Sem- 
inary and begin work at the University in the third year.The program will 
include a course on resources in theological libraries and six credits of 
field experience in theological librarianship at the Seminary. Should a 
student elect to terminate the joint program before its completion and 
seek only one degree, he or she will be required to complete all of the 
work ordinarily required for that degree. 

Inquiries regarding the School of Library and Information Science and 
requests for Library Science catalogs should be addressed to: Director of 
Admissions, School of Library and Information Science, University of 
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

THE MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Master of Arts Program is designed for persons who are not study- 
ing for ordination but who wish to work in religious studies at the graduate 
level. The Master of Arts Program (M.A.) is suited for people who wish to 
enter non-ordained professional positions in the Church; for laypersons 
who desire to deepen their understanding of the Christian faith; and for 
persons interested in preparing for Ph.D. or other graduate studies. 

Because of the wide range of interests that may be served by this 
degree, the program has been designed to provide candidates maximum 
freedom and flexibility in planning their own courses of study. No specific 
courses are required. Certain sorts of specialization are allowed, but the 
advisory process is provided to guarantee acquaintance with the main 
theological fields and appropriate non-theological studies. 

Seventy-two (72) term hours of studies are required for the degree. Up 
to twelve (12) hours may be taken through cross-registration at other 
institutions, usually those schools that are members of the Pittsburgh 
Council on Higher Education. Normally two years of full-time academic 
work are needed to complete the program. There is a five year statute of 
limitations. M. A. candidates may apply for transfer to the M. Div. pro- 
gram at any time prior to the awarding of the M. A. degree; but once the 



18 



degree has been awarded, courses credited toward the M. A. may no 
longer be used for the M. Div. 

All candidates are required to complete a Major Paper. Up to nine (9) 
hours of credit may be received for Independent Study done as research 
for this project. These nine (9) hours are taken under a Major Paper 
Adviser, who must be a member or adjunct of the Seminary Faculty. 

The Director of M. A. Studies has the responsibility of counseling all 
M. A. students in the selection of courses in order to insure a balance of 
work while meeting individual needs and preferences. The Director must 
require that the student become acquainted with the main theological 
fields and will recommend appropriate non-theological studies in con- 
sultation with knowledgeable colleagues. The Director also assists the 
student in selecting a Major Paper Adviser. 

Religious Education Emphasis 

A special track which emphasizes religious education is available for 
M. A. candidates who wish to prepare for non-ordained educational min- 
istries. Their courses of study should reflect the balance of studies de- 
scribed above. Some work will be taken at the School of Education of the 
University of Pittsburgh. Choice of such courses will be made in con- 
sultation with the Education faculty of the Seminary. The Major Paper is 
required as above and will be completed with an Adviser approved by the 
Education faculty of the Seminary. In addition, at least six (6) but no more 
than nine (9) term hours must be taken in supervised Field Education. 
Arrangements for such work will be made through the Director of Field 
Education in consultation with the Director of the M. A. Studies, and 
credit will be granted as Independent Study courses taken with the 
Education Faculty. 

Other Specializations 

Within the guidelines of the basic M. A. program described above 
students may specialize in a particular field. Details will be worked out 
with the Director and appropriate Seminary faculty. Such a program can 
be directed toward further study at the doctoral level. 



FIELD EDUCATION 

Field Education at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary assists students to 
learn in the context where ministry is being done. The objectives of the 
program include structured learning, competent supervision, personal 
and spiritual growth, interpersonal sensitivity, acquaintance with minis- 
terial roles and responsibilities, the development of skills and attention to 
the social context of ministry. This field-based learning should have a 
pattern of responsibility and recognition for the teaching church and its 
leaders, integration of that learning environment with the seminary cur- 
riculum, and the involvement of faculty at the Seminary with their asso- 
ciates in the field. Other desirable components are support groups in the 
placement and peer learning groups where review and guidance can take 
place. In each aspect of the program students are to be trained for theo- 
logical reflection to develop skilled interpreters of the faith in expressed 
thought and considered action. 



19 



Placements are negotiated to cover the church settings for ministry and 
to broaden the range of other experiences that contribute to professional 
growth. Students are helped to take responsibility for their own learning 
through initial interviews, and by developing with their supervisors de- 
tailed learning agreements that display sound patterns of teaching and 
learning and which employ the action/reflection model. Such an educa- 
tional plan coordinates a student's learning objectives with the tasks of 
service anticipated in the placement. Training and peer support for 
supervisors are provided through a workshop in the fall and monthly 
consultations. 

Required Field Education 

The Seminary requires that students be in an approved placement 
while enrolled in the Master of Divinity core courses in Pastoral Studies. 
Students use data from the field to meet course requirements. Arrange- 
ments for placement are made in consultation with the Director of Field 
Education. Students must work out a learning agreement and participate 
in periodic evaluation to complete the requirement. This information is 
shared with the student's sponsoring judicatory where confidentiality is 
assured. Students in the required field education program are expected to 
give eight to ten hours of actual service on the field per week. Supervision 
and staff meetings should be included in this calculation of time. Travel to 
and from the field, and preparation to understand the task being per- 
formed should not be included. Students are expected to work in their 
placement during vacation periods in the school year. They should not be 
expected to be on the field during examination week. 

Special relationships with neighboring church judicatories are being 
developed to select and resource special teaching parishes where the 
focus is on distinctive learning opportunities and supervision. Variations 
from the normal parish context for supervised field education are arranged 
to meet the differing vocational objectives of some students. 

Student Pastorates 

Student supply pastors will be accommodated to either the field educa- 
tion model when qualified supervision and local church participation can 
be arranged, or to the lesser expectation of unsupervised field work, when 
necessary. Students supplying local churches are expected to extend their 
studies at the Seminary to four years at a reduced academic load of nine 
credits per term to compensate for the greater amount of time spent in the 
field (up to half time). 

Full-Time Internships 

Programs of study and involvement in social service and social change 
in various parts of the world as aspects of the Church's mission are 
facilitated through the field education office. 

Internships in the summer include pastorates, camp and conference 
leadership, youth assistantships and placements in secular agencies. A 
learning agreement, monthly reports, and a final evaluation are requested 
by the Field Education Office, but not required. These reports are in- 
cluded in the student's records. 

Full-time internships from nine to fifteen months in local churches or in 
special settings are other extraordinary learning opportunities. Some 

20 



denominations require them of students preparing for the ministry. The 
field education office will provide every assistance possible to facilitate 
these experiences. 

Other Services 

In the year alter their mandatory field education placement, students 
will be permitted to continue in the same placement if new and more 
responsible tasks are negotiated. Occasional preaching under the aus- 
pices of the Preaching Association is also available. Field work, which has 
a lesser standard of accountability and deliberate pedagogy, will be ar- 
ranged for students who have need for income or for a wider range of 
experienee than has been possible through the field education program. 
Placement of entering students will be negotiated. These students are 
cautioned to plan field work and community involvement so that learning 
and spiritual growth will be integrated with classroom and library study. 

Placement for Graduating Seniors 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's placement service assists grad- 
uating seniors both in locating appropriate situations of service in minis- 
try and in self-evaluation to determine vocational commitments. United 
Presbyterian students are assisted by the Seminary, in conjunction with 
the Vocation Agency, in meeting the denomination's candidacy require- 
ments and in utilizing the denomination's placement arrangements. 
Contacts for students of other denominations are facilitated according to 
their particular needs. An inventory of placement opportunities is kept by 
the Placement Office. Students are assisted in the writing of resumes and 
dossiers. Pastor nominating committees, judicatory officials and pastors 
visit the Seminary campus annually to interview graduating seniors. 

THE NATIONAL CAPITAL SEMESTER 
FOR SEMINARIANS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a participating institution in the 
National Capital Semester for Seminarians sponsored by Wesley Theo- 
logical Seminary, Washington, D. C. This program provides an opportun- 
ity for seminary students to spend a semester in Washington, D. C, for 
study and involvement in the processes of government and the concerns 
of the churches. The program is designed to include supervised study and 
interaction (reflection), and will provide a full term of academic credit. 
The program is open to any student who has completed at least one year of 
study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Seminary graduates may apply 
for a program to begin within one year of their graduation. 

CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Clinical Pastoral Education brings theological students and ministers 
into supervised encounter with persons in critical life situations. Out of 
intense involvement with persons in need and the feedback from peers 
and supervisors, the students develop new awareness of themselves as 
persons and of the needs of those to whom ministry is offered. From 
theological reflection on specific human situations, new insight and 



21 



understanding is derived and the student or minister is confronted with 
his or her own humanity. Within the interdisciplinary team-process of 
helping persons, they develop skills in interpersonal and interprofes- 
sional relationship. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary grants academic 
credit to students who complete full quarters of Clinical Pastoral Educa- 
tion at centers accredited by the Association of Clinical Pastoral Educa- 
tion. 




DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROGRAM 

Purpose 

Developing competency in professional ministry is a process in which 
ministers are engaged throughout their educational and professional life. 
One step in that development has been the work for a Bachelor or Master 
of Divinity Degree designed to help prepare for entrance into profes- 
sional ministry. Another step may be engaging in programs of continuing 
education. 

The Doctor of Ministry Degree Program goes beyond these by pro- 
viding a distinctive opportunity for systematic and disciplined study that 
will help ordained clergy work toward a demonstrably higher level of 
competence in the integrating of all aspects of ministry. 

The intention of the program is that through ministry-related projects, 
studies, papers and other assignments the student will be enabled to 
improve competency in such areas as: 

1. Defining and organizing complex situations of ministry utilizing 
biblical, theological, sociological, political and personal insights. 

2. Analyzing situations of ministry in such a way as to understand 
their nature and causes and identify opportunities for effective 
ministry. 

3. Taking responsible action with a deeper grasp of homiletical, 



22 



educational, counseling and administrative principles enhanced 
by a biblical, historical and theological heritage. 
4. Evaluating actions and their outcomes from a variety of respon- 
sible perspectives. 

Degree Requirements 

When accepted into the Doctor of Ministry Program, the student with a 
group of ten to twelve others engages in activities organized in three 
stages: 

Stage One 

The First Stage is built around six seminars: 

□ Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

□ Church and Community Issues 

□ Church Administration 

□ Church Education 

□ Pastoral Care 

□ Practice and Theology of Preaching 

The intention and function of these seminars is to provide the setting for 
concentrated reflection on various aspects of ministry. Field-oriented 
learning is incorporated extensively in all of the seminars of Stage One. 
For example, the case study method is employed in Pastoral Care with 
cases drawn from the situations of the students. A distinctive feature of the 
Doctor of Ministry Program is its direct relation to the student's work 
situation. 

Stage Two 

Stage Two incorporates two colloquia and two elective courses. 

□ Biblical Colloquium 

□ Proposal Colloquium 

□ Elective courses which provide an opportunity to focus on spe- 
cialized studies in any of the classical or functional areas. 

Stage Three 

In Stage Three the student will be involved in conducting a project of 
study related to some aspect of his/her present ministry and in writing 
a major paper. 

At the end of each seminar and colloquium the student will have an 
interview with the professor(s) for a shared evaluation of the work. A 
written evaluation will be given of the student's participation, strengths, 
and areas that need strengthening. 

At the completion of Stage One, two faculty members and either the 
Dean or the Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program will be a com- 
mittee to evaluate the overall progress and decide when the student will 
be admitted to Stage Two and to degree candidacy. Following this de- 
cision, each candidate will be assigned for the duration of his/her work in 
Stages Two and Three to a committee of two faculty, who will direct and 
evaluate the remaining course of study and the writing of the doctoral 
paper. 

Track Options and Locations 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers two Tracks for the Doctor of 
Ministry Program in order to meet different situations of ministers. Track I 

23 



seminars meet on the Pittsburgh campus one day a week for each term 
during the academic year, September to May. Track II concentrates the 
study in three-week sessions in Junes and Januarys which meet at the 
Pittsburgh campus or at the Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, Florida, 
campus. Applicants may designate which Track and location will be most 
suitable to their schedules. 

Basic Courses for the Doctor of Ministry Degree 

1. Doctrine of Church and Ministry — The theology of the church is 
studied with special emphasis on the implications for the practice of 
ministry in today's church. 

2. Church and Community Issues — In this seminar issues faced by the 
pastor are addressed primarily from the perspective provided by the 
discipline of Christian ethics. 

3. Church Administration — The administrative processes students 
employ on the field are analyzed, and projected revisions are 
evaluated. 

4. Church Education — Present educational programs are studied and a 
carefully designed project is carried out in the student's field of 
work. 

5. Pastoral Care — The case study method is employed with cases 
drawn from the situations of the students. 

6. Practice and Theology of Preaching — The course centers on ser- 
mons actually preached by students for critical examination and 
reflection. 

7. Proposal Colloquium — This colloquium is designed to enable the 
student to present the Doctoral Paper Proposal for critique by pro- 
fessor and peers. 

8. Biblical Colloquium — The focus of this colloquium is on 
hermeneutics and the responsible use of biblical material in relation 
to situations in the parish. 



THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

The University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
have a cooperative graduate program in the study of religion. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary participates in the University of 
Pittsburgh's Cooperative Graduate Program in the Study of Religion. This 
program draws upon the resources of both institutions and leads to the 
Ph.D. degree awarded by the University. 

The aim of the program is to foster creative, interdisciplinary study in 
several areas: Biblical Studies (Old and New Testament); History of 
Religions (chiefly Christianity and Judaism, but work in Islam, Hinduism 
and Buddhism is also offered); Theology; Ethics; Sociology and Anthro- 
pology of Religion; and Phenomenology of Religion. For information 
about requirements, course offerings, preliminary and comprehensive 
examinations, language requirements, etc., consult the University of 
Pittsburgh's bulletin, Graduate Programs in the Faculty of Arts and 
Sciences. 



24 



Inquiries and applications for admission should be addressed to: 
Coordinator, Ph.D. Program 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, theological education is not con- 
fined to formal degree work. Realizing that education is a lifelong process 
which may begin with a degree program, the Seminary offers a program of 
Continuing Education aimed at improving the skills and knowledge of 
men and women engaged in ministry. From September through June, a 
variety of experiences is available to pastors and church workers ranging 
from open enrollment in Seminary courses to short-term seminars. All 
programs are built upon the expressed needs and desires of those people 
serving in church situations. Continuing Education Units of credit 
(C.E.U.) are given to all who participate. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary also recognizes its responsibility in 
providing quality educational experiences for lay people. The Continuing 
Education Office is currently in the midst of developing a variety of 
experiences aimed at increasing the knowledge, faith and leadership 
skills of lay people. 

The entire program of continuing education for pastors, church workers 
and lay people is planned and evaluated by a Committee composed of 
faculty members, administration and pastors and lay people from across 
the Tri-state area. 

For further information concerning any aspect of Continuing Edu- 
cation, please write: 

Director of Continuing Education 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

616 North Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

SPECIAL NON-DEGREE STUDIES 

Clergy, lay persons and others who wish to enroll as Special Students in 
courses at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary for non-degree purposes are 
invited to do so. Special Students may enroll in as many as two courses per 
term, up to a total of six courses. Special Students complete all the as- 
signed requirements for each course in which they enroll and receive 
academic credit. Credits earned as a Special Student may be transferred to 
any established Seminary degree program in which the student may later 
enroll. Those desiring Special Student Status must possess an accredited 
bachelor's degree and apply through the Admissions Office. 

Clergy, lay persons and others who desire to audit courses at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary are invited to do so. No academic credit is given for 
audits. Applications for Audit shall be accompanied by a college transcript 
and be submitted to the Continuing Education Office along with a fee of 
$50.00 per course. The transcript and record of classes will be kept as a 
part of the Continuing Education files. 



25 



INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is committed to serving the profes- 
sional educational needs of the whole church. Three scholarships are 
offered annually to international students who have already completed 
the Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent in their own country and 
whose plans for an additional year of non-degree study are endorsed by 
the church in their own country. These scholarships provide tuition, 
room, board and a small monthly cash allowance for one academic year to 
international students endorsed to the Seminary by the World Council of 
Churches, the World Alliance of Reformed Churches or by the Leader- 
ship Development Program of the National Council of Churches. 




26 



IV. ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The faculty grades according to a student's actual achievement rather 
than on the basis of effort or achievement relative to the student's ability. 

1. The meaning of the grades given shall be as follows: 
A 4.0 Exceptional 

B 3.0 Superior 

C 2.0 Satisfactory 

D 1.0 Unsatisfactory 

F 0.0 Failing 

WFA — Withdrawal with Faculty approval 

There is no category of Incomplete. 

2. The Quality Point Average is determined by dividing the quality 
points by the number of credit hours taken (excluding credit hours 
for Pass grades). 

3. Average for Graduation. For graduation with the M. Div. or M. A. 
degree a C average (2.00) is required. 

4. Dismissal. Two consecutive terms below 2.00, or three non-con- 
secutive terms below 2.00, constitute reasons for dismissal by faculty 
action. 

5. Graduation Honors: 

Summa Cum Laude 3.75-4.0 

Magna Cum Laude 3.50-3.74 

Cum Laude 3.25-3.49 

6. Attendance. Attendance at class is not mandatory except where indi- 
cated by the faculty member on the course description form. 

7. Official Drop Dates. Courses may be dropped or added the first 
week of each term. Courses dropped during the second week 
through the fifth week carry a penalty of one-half of the tuition fee. 
Courses dropped after the official drop date require full payment and 
recording of a failing grade. All dropping of courses must be done 
officially through the Registrar's Office. 

TYPES OF COURSES 

1. In addition to required and elective courses, students may do ad- 
vanced work in a particular subject as Independent Study or Directed 
Study. Registration in such courses is dependent upon faculty approval 
and availability. "Directed Study" is designed in the same way as an 
Independent Study course, but it is distinguished by the requirement of 
much closer tutorial work on the part of the professor. A further distinction 
is that Directed Study courses may involve more than one student but no 
more than four students. Both of these studies will be graded Pass/Fail, 
with a statement from the faculty member concerning the nature of the 
study and an evaluation of the student's performance. Normally, students 
may not enroll for more than one Independent Study or Directed Study 



27 



per term or six per Pittsburgh Seminary first degree program. Under-en- 
rolled classes which become Directed Studies count in the above total. 

2. Audit. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary students may attend a class 
for listening purposes with the permission of the professor. Audit does not 
require registration or payment, and no record of audit is made. 

Non-degree students may audit seminary courses under the Continuing 
Education Program. 

3. Audit-Credit. Students registered in a course for audit-credit are re- 
quired to participate fully in reading, discussion, seminar and position 
papers, etc., but are not required to write a final paper or examination. 
Satisfactory completion of these requirements leads to an audit-credit 
notation for the course on the official transcript. No grade is given for the 
course and no credit is given toward graduation. Audit-credit charge is 
one-half the regular tuition. 

4. PCHE. Sixteen hours of graduate level work may be taken at PCHE 
member schools and may be included in the 108 M. Div. hours. Twelve 
hours may be included in the 72 M. A. hours. These credits must be 
approved by the Dean of Faculty. Registration and payment will be 
handled according to PCHE procedures for cross-registration at the grad- 
uate level. PCHE courses will be recorded with the grades given by host 
institution (A or B). Grades lower than B will not receive academic credit 
at Pittsburgh Seminary. 

For complete information regarding student responsibilities and perti- 
nent regulations, consult the "Academic Principles and Procedures for 
M. Div. and M. A. Degrees." 

FACULTY ADVISORY SYSTEM 

All incoming Master of Divinity students are assigned advisors, se- 
lected, where possible, by the Dean from among faculty teaching first year 
courses. Newly enrolling students will be encouraged to contact their 
advisor during the opening orientation in the fall, and the advisors will be 
expected to make themselves available for such contacts. An advisor's 
signature is not required for registration of classes. Contact with the 
advisor is the students' responsibility and may be established according to 
the need of the student. This advisory system applies only to first year 
Master of Divinity students. In the assignment of advisors, the requests of 
students for specific professors will be given preferential consideration, 
but ordinarily no professor will be assigned more than six students. 

The Director of Master of Arts Studies has the responsibility for coun- 
seling all Master of Arts students in the selection of courses in order to 
insure a balance of work. 



28 



V. COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 

All courses are for three academic credits unless otherwise noted. 

Studies in Bible 

"Thy word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path" (Psalm 1 19: 105). 
The word of God in Scripture nourishes and regulates Christian faith and 
action, it lays the cornerstone for every aspect of the Church's ministry to 
the world, and it sets norms for the structures of Christian theology. A 
rediscovery of the Bible has provided the impetus for every forward 
movement in the history of the Church. At the end of the twentieth 
century, when alienation of individuals, races, classes and nations threat- 
ens to tear the world apart, when the issue of authority continues to be a 
problem, a new and careful look at the sources of our common faith is 
imperative. 

The intention of the courses offered is to engage students in Old and 
New Testament research in such a way that they may learn the methods of 
study, acquire the basic tools and skills necessary to undertake ministry, 
and constantly relate their own study of the Scriptures to all facets of the 
Christian life. 

During the first two years of work in the M. Div. program students will 
survey the literature of the Old and New Testaments as well as explore the 
settings and influences of the biblical world by means of three core 
courses, i.e. Interpreting the Bible, and one introduction in each testa- 
ment (OT01 or OT02, and NT01 or NT02). The curriculum also calls for 
serious consideration of the Bible in terms of study in the original lan- 
guages. Therefore, Hebrew or Greek is required for two terms in the 
junior year and is immediately followed by a third-term exegetical course 
in the corresponding Testament. A similar sequence in the other language 
can be elected in the second or third year. As for further elective op- 
portunities, there are advanced exegetical offerings along with courses in 
the areas of Intertestament, archaeology, Near Eastern languages, biblical 
theology and ethics, hermeneutics, critical studies, etc. 

New discoveries which directly affect our understanding of the Bible 
continue to be announced with startling frequency. Pittsburgh Seminary 
has a rich heritage of excellence in the area of biblical studies and we are 
determined to enable and inspire future generations of Christian leaders 
to join in the exciting venture of these pursuits. 

Required Courses in Bible 

BT01 Interpreting the Bible 

The Bible is the foundation and touchstone of our Christian faith and tradition. 
The Bible is also a collection of books, compiled over a long period of time, written 
in ancient languages and reflecting long dead and distant cultures. How do we go 
about understanding it, and explaining it to others? This course will introduce 
students to their own presuppositions and to the ways in which the Church has 
interpreted the Bible, and offer the tools to begin the task. It will discuss the 



29 



formation of the individual Books and their inelusion into the Canon of Holy 
Scripture, the problem of the Bible as Word of God in the words of humans, the 
problem of historical statements and theological affirmations, the question of 
continuity and discontinuity, and the contribution which the Bible makes to the 
task of theology. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. von Waldow and Mr. Walther 

OT01 Historical Books of the Old Testament 

An introduction to the historical books of the Old Testament, intended to 
acquaint students with the basic methodologies of Old Testament research and 
the present state of Old Testament studies. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Gowan 

OT02 Prophets and Psalms 

The nature of prophecy in acient Israel, its background in the cultures of the 
ancient Near East. Special attention is given to the genres of prophetic oracles and 
the methodologies which may be employed for their interpretation. The message 
of the great eighth-century prophets, Amos, Hosea, Micah, and Isaiah of Jerusalem 
stand at the heart of the course. The world of Jeremiah, Deutero-Isaiah and 
Ezekiel is explored. An introduction to the Psalms, as the product of Israel's cultic 
life, concludes the course. The aim of the whole is to enable the student to begin 
exegesis with a firm grasp of the fundamentals. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. J. Jackson 

NT01 Gospels, General Epistles, and Revelation 

The principal emphasis of this course is on the four Gospels and the methods 
employed in critical study of the Gospels (literary, form, and redaction criticism). 
General Epistles, Revelation, and matters of text and canon are examined briefly. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Kelley 

NT02 Acts, Pauline Epistles, and Hebrews 

The messages of Acts, the Pauline epistles, and Hebrews are examined in the 
light of their historical context and literary structure. Special emphasis is placed 
on the life and thought of Paul. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Mauser 

OT03 Hebrew 

A course designed to lead to an appreciation and competent use of Hebrew as 
one of the languages of biblical revelation. Instruction is in small, graded sections 
so that a maximum of individual attention and achievement is possible. Two 
sections will follow the inductive method, working directly with selected texts of 
the Hebrew Bible. One section will employ the more traditional approach, using a 
grammar as the basic tool of instruction. Students may elect either approach. 

Term I, 1980-81 Staff 

OT04 Hebrew 

A continuation of OT03. 

Term II, 1980-81 Staff 

OT05 Old Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Hebrew moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence. Individual professors indicate to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Introduc- 
tion to exegetical method: moving from grammar and syntax to the application of 
critical methods and the use of reference materials in order to arrive at conclusions 
concerning the original and present meaning of a text; 2) Continuation of the 
Hebrew language sequence. 

Term III, 1980-81 Staff 



30 



NT03 New Testament Greek 

A course designed to lead to a competent use of Greek as one of the languages of 
biblical revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to read from the 
Greek New Testament, and unique study aids prepared by the Staff are used. 
Instruction is in small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied 
Greek will be assigned to special sections. 

Term I, 1980-81 Staff 

NT04 New Testament Greek 

Continuation of NT03, teaching by the inductive method. 
Term II, 1980-81 Staff 

NT05 New Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Greek moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence. Individual professors indicate to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Introduc- 
tion to methodology of exegesis, such as problems and limitations of an English 
translation; source strata for selected passages which will be chosen by the pro- 
fessor for critical problems, structure analysis, historical background of sources 
and text; intent; introduction to the theology of the particular book; 2) Continua- 
tion of the Greek language sequence. 

Term III, 1980-81 Staff 

Elective Courses in Old Testament 
OT14 Deutero-Isaiah 

The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Introduction to methodology of 
exegesis, such as problems and limitations of an English translation, form critical 
problems, structure analysis, historical background of the book of Deutero-Isaiah, 
intent; 2) introduction to the theology of Exile. In particular, the expectation of 
salvation against the background of 587, B.C., Old Testament eschatology. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT15 Amos 

A study of the book of Amos: its major emphasis; the place of the prophet in 
Israel's culture; and the significance of the message of Amos for our situation. 

Mr. J. Jackson 

OT19 Ruth, Jonah & Esther (Exegesis) 

A study of the art of story-telling in the Hebrew language, making use of the 
methods of form and rhetorical criticism in order to contribute to an appreciation of 
these books as literature in addition to a reconsideration of their theological 
significance. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Gowan 

OT26 The Beginnings of the History of Israel 

A study of the historical question: In what sociological entity did Israel enter the 
scene of ancient Near Eastern History? The focus is on the historical background 
of the traditions of Israel in Egypt, the Patriarchs, the Sinai, and the occupation of 
the land. These considerations lead to the discussion of the theological question: 
why does the Old Testament tradition describe the beginning of the history of the 
chosen people differently from the actual course of events? 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT29 Archaeology in the Old Testament 

An introduction to archaeology's contribution to biblical studies, how it has 
increased our understanding of biblical times, thrown light on biblical texts, and 
advanced our knowledge of biblical history; a study of the finds of archaeology in 
Palestine from the earliest times through the New Testament period. 

Ms. Lapp 



31 



OT30 Ancient Israel & Egypt 

The influence of the experience of slave life in Egypt upon the tradition of 
Israel's story, and of the continued contact between Egypt and Israel after the 
entrance of Israel into Canaan, and into the Exilic age and after. This will involve a 
study of the forms of Egyptian literature and a comparison and contrast with the 
genres of the Old Testament. An interpretation course. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. J. Jackson 

OT31 Judaism from the Exile to the Birth of the Church 

A survey of the history, life, and faith of the Jewish people, covering the 
post-exile parts of the Old Testament and the literature of the Intertestamental 
Period. Deals with life-styles, institutions, literature, and theology as well as the 
history of the period. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Gowan 

OT33 Prophet-Priest-Wise Man: A Study in Biblical Ministries 

Intended to provide a biblical basis for evaluating various types of ministry in 
the modern church by examining the work of those who were recognized to be 
God's ministers in the Old Testament. 

Mr. Gowan 

OT36 Jeremiah 

The first part of the course uses the book of Jeremiah to demonstrate the 
development from the original oral pronouncement of prophetic words to pro- 
phetic books as we have them today in the canon. The second part deals with the 
original theology of the prophet Jeremiah and its interpertation by a later genera- 
tion which produced the prose sections in the book of Jeremiah. Prerequisite: 

Hebrew - Mr. von Waldow 

OT37 Worship and Psalms 

Seminar on Israel's songs and the Christian use of the Psalter in corporate 
worship. Two-track: students with some knowledge of Hebrew will be helped in 
exegesis; others will be expected to do wider reading for their interpretation of the 

Mr. J. Jackson 



Psalm 



OT38 Eschatology of the Old Testament 

The Old Testament view of the future will be explored, beginning with its 
broadest sense as the fulfillment of God's promises, but concentrating on the 
expectation of radical changes in humanity, society and nature to occur "in that 
day." The contributions of Old Testament thought to later Jewish and Christian 
eschatology and relationships with modern future hopes will be emphasized. 

Mr. Gowan 

OT39 Worship in Israel 

The essence of worship in Israel and the basic theological ideas reflected in the 
major annual feasts and some typical cultic activities; the importance of the 
Israelite cultic personnel, such as priests, Levites, and prophets. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT40 Hebrew Reading 

Supervised reading of selected Old Testament passages. One credit. 
Offered each term Staff 

OT45 Old Testament Ethics 

The course deals with the ethical implications of the faith of the Old Testament 
people. Points of discussion are: the authority behind the ethical imperative, the 
motivation of ethical behavior, the sociological and cultural setting of ethical 
precepts. In terms of Old Testament literature the course is based on the law 
tradition and prophetic writings. Mr yon Waldow 

32 



OT50 Themes of Old Testament Theology 

Some basic Old Testament theological concepts which became characteristic of 
Christian theology are investigated such as: authority of God, revelation, history, 
creation, the individual and the community. Included are basic aspects of Old 
Testament ethics, worship and the difference between Christian and Jewish 
interpretation. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. von Waldow 

Elective Courses in New Testament 

NT 12 Christianity According to Matthew 

An examination of the theology of the First Gospel in the light of the historical 
background, employing redaction criticism as a major exegetical tool. 
Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Hare 

NT 14 Parables in Luke 

An exegetical study of the parables of Jesus found in the all-important central 
section of the Third Gospel (chapters 10-18). 

Mr. Kelley 

NT 15 Gospel of John 

The entire Gospel examined with some exegetical detail but with emphasis on 
the theological dimensions of the book. Some attention is given to the large 
secondary literature, but the Greek text is the primary resource. 

Mr. Walther 

NT 17 Exegesis of I Corinthians 

An exegetically oriented survey of the entire epistle with detailed study of 
selected parts. The range of insights into the life of the early church and the variety 
of theological problems in this letter make it an excellent source from which to 
learn the task of interpreting the Greek New Testament. 

Mr. Walther 

NT 19 Philippians 

An advanced exegetical course dealing with Paul's methodology and theology 
in relation to his favorite congregation among the young churches. 

Mr. Kelley 

NT20 The Old Testament in the New: The Epistle to the Hebrews 

The Epistle to the Hebrews appears to be an exegetical meditation on a series of 
significant Old Testament texts. This course examines the hermeneutic of the 
epistle, paying special attention to the interplay between doctrinal statement and 
ethical exhortation. 

Mr. Hare 

NT21 I Peter 

An exegetical course on the basis of the Greek text of I Peter. Special emphasis 
is laid on the situation in which the epistle was written and on its relation to other 
major books in the New Testament. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT22 Paul's Letter to the Romans 

This exegetical seminar will examine the major theological and paraenetic 
themes of Romans in relation to Paul's understanding of the place of Israel in 
God's plan. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Mauser 

NT26 Eschatology in the New Testament 

The New Testament materials are studied with particular emphasis on Mark 13, 
Paul's Thessalonian letters, and the Revelation. The focus is on biblical theology 



33 



based on sound exegesis. Appropriate reading in the twentieth-century literature 
on the subject is assigned. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Walther 

NT29 Crises in the History of the Early Church 

Selected texts from the New Testament and from extra-canonical sources are 
studied in the investigation of three crises experienced by the early Church: 1) the 
tension between Jewish and gentile Christians and the emergence of the Ebionite 
movement, 2) the threat of a Gnostic takeover, 3) the assault of charismatic en- 
thusiasm upon the traditional piety inherited from the synagogue. 

Mr. Hare 

NT30 The Teaching of Jesus and the New Testament Church 

The content of the New Testament didache is considered both as to its identifia- 
bility and its significance. The possibilities of interrelationships among the Old 
Testament, Gospel records and other New Testament documents are studied as to 
their didactic and paraenetic intent. 

Mr. Walther 

NT35 Practical Use of the New Testament: Acts 

An interpretation course examining the faith and life of the early church as 
reflected in the "bridge" document of the New Testament corpus, the book of 
Acts. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Kelley 

NT37 Biblical Themes I: God & the Gods in the Old Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in comparison with and contrast to the gods of the 
ancient Near East. This is the first part of a sequence to be continued with a course 
on the same subject in the New Testament. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Mauser 

NT38 Biblical Themes II: God & the Gods in the New Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in comparison with and contrast to Hellenistic 
deities in the New Testament period. This is the New Testament part of a se- 
quence on the nature of the biblical God. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Mauser 

NT40 Greek Reading 

Supervised reading of selected New Testament or Septuagint passages. One 
credit. 

Offered each term Staff 

NT41 Advanced Greek Grammar 

This course aims to give students a systematic grasp of Greek by combining the 
study of a grammar book with further reading in the New Testament text itself. 

Mr. Kelley 

NT50 Themes of New Testament Theology 

A study of selected major themes of the New Testament which are of crucial 
importance to the New Testament Theology as a whole. Hermeneutieal questions 
will be stressed. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT51 History and Literature of New Testament Times 

A research seminar with primary emphasis on the bibliographical approach to 
the study of Christian origins. Theological, organizational, geographical, literary 
and historical questions and problems are considered. 

Mr. Hadidian 



34 



NT53 Aspects of Paul's Theology 

A number of pervasive aspects of Paul's theology, such as eschatology, faith and 
law, justification and reconciliation, are dealt with. Stress is laid on the Jewish 
background of Paul's thought and on the nature of the opposition which he had to 
face. 

Mr. Mauser 

Studies in Church History 

Our aim in teaching Church history is to help the student to understand 
the history of the Church and its thought in the context of the twentieth 
century. The study of history is the study of roots, whether we deal with 
the history of a nation, a race or an idea. Christianity is firmly grounded in 
history. Its story is the account of the effect which the events of Christian 
history have had in human society. This involves both the history of 
doctrine as the Church's attempt to understand the significance of the 
biblical revelation, and the history of the Church itself as the attempt of 
Christians to live in response to those events. 

But we recognize two kinds of interaction that are important for our 
understanding of the Church today. First, we recognize that there has 
always been a dialogue between the Church and the society within which 
it is placed. Secondly, there is an integral relationship between the doc- 
trine that the Church professes and the forms that it takes as a human 
community. All the courses offered recognize these two kinds of con- 
tinuing interaction. 

For an adequate grasp of the Church's history the student will need to 
understand that history in broad outline, and then to deepen that study by 
examining particular periods or problems in more detail. To this end, the 
history faculty offers within the core curriculum introductory courses, 
which survey the history of the Church from the sub-apostolic age to the 
post-reformation era. Further courses at an advanced level in both insti- 
tutional Church history and the history of doctrine are offered regularly. 

Students who enter the Seminary with a rich background in historical 
studies may be permitted to waive introductory courses and move directly 
to more specialized study. 

Required Courses in Church History 

CHOI Historical Studies I 

This course deals with the background and development of the Christian 
Church, its life and thought, from the Sub-apostolic Age through the Middle Ages. 
(C. 100 A.D. — 1500 A.D.) 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Partee 

CH02 Historical Studies II 

A survey of the Renaissance, the Reformations of the Sixteenth Century, and 
their results (C. 1350—1650). 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Partee 

Elective Courses in Church History 

CHI 7 Calvin's Institutes 

An in-depth study of the magisterial work of the man whom Melanchthon called 
"the theologian." Special attention will be devoted to its development, architec- 
tonic, and misunderstanding. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Partee 

35 



CH29 The Four Reformations of the 16th Century 

This course considers the Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinian and Radical Reforma- 
tions of the 16th Century. 

Mr. Partee 

CH30 Calvin and Plato 

The historical relation between theology and philosophy is considered by 
studying the work of these two great thinkers. 

Mr. Partee 

CH34 A Biographical History of the Reformation 

This course approaches the thought of Reformation figures through the events of 
their lives. Students will be expected to become sensitive to and appreciative of 
the relation between theology and life by concentrating on life in the 16th century. 

Mr. Partee 



Studies in Theology 

Systematic Theology is the study of the meaning and implications of the 
Christian Faith as present in the doctrinal formulations of the historic and 
contemporary witness of the Church. Based in the normative authority of 
the biblical writings as they inform the Gospel of Jesus Christ, systematic 
theology attempts to explicate rationally and structure in a consistent 
interrelationship the thematic content of the Word of God in Scripture. 
The Church has always recognized this task as crucial to its ministry of 
proclamation and reconciliation. So systematic theology studies those 
significant thinkers of the past and present whose service as theologians 
the Church has embraced. Yet it takes seriously the world in which we 
ourselves must now serve. So, the final aim of the study of systematic 
theology is the ability to engage in independent and responsible theo- 
logical thinking within the practice of ministry. To meet this challenge, 
the great theologians of the past are read not only to familiarize ourselves 
with this rich heritage, but to learn how doctrinal formulations have 
resulted from the way in which particular theologians structured their 
systems. Pursuant to this task, systematic theology attends 1) to the in- 
vestigation of problems of theological method, and 2) to basic questions 
such as the foundation and source of authority, the reference and function 
of theological language, the interaction of freedom and determinism, and 
3) to thematic issues of contemporary life as these focus theological con- 
cerns particularly relevant to ministry within the American cultural mi- 
lieu. 

The curriculum requires one course in Historical Theology, two 
courses in Systematic Theology and one elective. The required courses 
cover, respectively, Christology and Soteriology, and the Church and the 
Sacraments. Electives are available in the work of individual theologians, 
in specific areas of doctrine, in contemporary "schools" of theological 
method (Process, Liberation), and in the history and development of 
theology in the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, an interdisciplinary 
colloquium in the constructive organization of theological themes in a 
personal statement of faith is required for all senior students (Credo). 



36 



Required Courses in Historical Theology and Systematic Theology 

HT01 Introduction to Modern Religious Thought 

The course is designed to acquaint students with major types of Western reli- 
gious thought which have appeared since the 17th century. These interpretations 
of faith will be viewed in their historical contexts of movements and events. They 
will also be studied in order to identify current and perennial theological prob- 
lems and alternative ways of doing theology. Students will thereby also be intro- 
duced to systematic theological thinking, to questions of what theology is, why it is 
done, and what are the main issues in theological methodology. 

Mr. Wiest 

TH02 Christology 

Problems posed for systematic thinking by Christian beliefs and doctrinal 
formulations concerning salvation and the significance of Jesus Christ. 

Staff 

TH03 Church & Sacraments 

A study of the Doctrine of the Church and Sacraments, focusing on the relation 
of individual faith to communal religious experience, on the purpose of the 
Church in the world, on the process of religious formation and transformation 
(justification and sanctification) within the fellowship of the Church, and the 
distinctive nature of the Church as new Humanity and Body of Christ. Readings in 
Reformation, Post-Reformation and contemporary theology; lectures on issues 
and Pre-Reformation theology. 

Term I, 1980-81 Ms. Suchocki 

Elective Courses in Historical Theology and Systematic Theology 

TH12 Protestant Theology from Barth to Pannenberg 

A survey of the leading Protestant theologians and theological development in 
the twentieth century. The course serves not only to introduce students to the 
ideas of some eminent thinkers, but also to show how Protestant theology has 
responded to developments in philosophy, history, behavioral sciences, and the 
natural sciences. Mr Kehm 

TH14 Process Theology 

This course is an investigation into the theological implications of process 
philosophy, particularly as these implications have been developed by Charles 
Hartshorne and John B. Cobb, Jr. Ms. Suchocki 

TH15 Karl Barth and Process Theology 

A comparative study of Barthian and process doctrines of God. Particular atten- 
tion will be given to the respective implications for doctrines of creation, incarna- 
tion, history and eschatology. 

Mr. Kehm/Ms. Suchocki 

TH16 Phenomenology and Theology 

Introduction to phenomenological method as developed by Husserl, Hei- 
degger, Schutz and Merleau-Ponty. Examination of attempts to apply this ap- 
proach to Christian Theology in order to uncover the realities referred to by terms 
such as "revelation," "sin," "redemption," "redemptive community," and the 
"presence" of "God." 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Kehm 

TH17 A Theology of Nature 

Attitudes toward the natural environment in the culture and in theology: the 
place of humanity in nature; God in nature; nature, evil and redemption. 

Mr. Wiest 



37 



TH20 Major Christian Theologians: Paul Tillich 

A study of Tillich's approach to systematic theology with an emphasis on both 
his method and the content of his thought. The course will focus on the way in 
which Tillich presents traditional Christian doctrines. 

Mr. Wiest 

TH23 Critical Theology in Contemporary Catholicism 

Studies in three major Catholic theologians: Karl Rahner, Hans K'img and David 
Tracy. Particular emphasis will be given to the grounds for Protestant/Catholic 
dialogue. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH26 Interpreting Texts 

An introduction to "hermeneutics" with special attention to the nature of lan- 
guage, speech, text, symbolism, metaphor, meaning, and understanding. The 
theory of interpretation developed in the lectures is applied to selected biblical 
texts in seminar sessions. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH27 Liberation Theology 

A study of the twentieth-century emphasis on theology as praxis as developed 
by feminists, blacks, and Third World theologians. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH28 Human Evil and Redemption 

A study of the genesis and forms of expression of what has been called "sin" with 
a corresponding analysis of how the biblical symbols of God's redemptive activity 
in the death and resurrection of Jesus mediate the power to transcend the dynam- 
ics that perpetuate sin. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH29 God and Evil 

An inquiry into the ways in which the interpretation of evil has affected the 
understanding of God and of redemption. Study includes both classical and 
modern theologians. Major attention is given to the formulation of a contemporary 
understanding of evil, and its implications for a doctrine of God. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH32 Christian Encounter with World Religions 

A focus upon the issue of religious pluralism through 1) introducing the student 
to a major non-Christian religion (Buddhism) and 2) studying various contem- 
porary Christian responses to pluralism, with particular reference to Buddhism. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH33 Twentieth Century Eschatology 

The course will focus on: 1) issues of eschatology; 2) twentieth century re- 
sponses to these issues (Pannenberg, theologies of hope, liberation theology, 
Teilhard de Chardin); 3) development of a process eschatology based on the work 
of Alfred North Whitehead. 

Term III, 1980-81 Ms. Suchocki 

TH34 Mystical Theology 

The study will begin with consideration of Evelyn Underbill's analysis of 
mystic experience, and then trace the theological experience through four major 
figures in Christian history: Pseudo-Dionysius, Meister Eckhardt, Teresa of Avila 
and Teilhard de Chardin. 

Term III, 1980-81 Ms. Suchocki 



38 



TH36 The Ethics of Karl Barth 

A study of the development of Barth \s ethies, from his early "liberal" period, 
through his "dialectical" period, to the Church Dogmatics. Speeial attention will 
be given to his method of relating theology to ethies, and to his attempts to apply 
his theological ethies to political questions. Recent controversies over Barth's 
"socialism" will be examined. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Kehm 

TH37 Liberation Theology's Challenge to the Future Shaping 
of Christian Theology 

An attempt to survey and assess the main criticisms and constructive proposals 
that have been made by the political types of liberation theology (Black, Latin 
American, and German) in various areas of Christian doctrine. The objective of the 
course will be to attempt the kinds of revisions of various Christian doctrines that 
meet the valid criticisms of liberation theology and carry out more comprehen- 
sively and coherently the important constructive suggestions that have so far been 
developed along narrow lines of interest. Areas of special concern will be: biblical 
hermeneutics; the ideas of God and revelation; the inter-relatedness of personal 
sin and structural injustice, of deliverance from bondage to sin and liberation from 
socio-economic-political oppression; Christology; the Church and the Kingdom of 
God. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Kehm 



Studies in Church and Ministry 

The purpose of study in the Church and Ministry field is to bring theory 
to bear upon the practice of Christian faith. Ministry means service with 
and for others. Students and professors in this area inquire into how 
Christian theory and practice can be united in ministry to the world. 
Consequently the Church and Ministry field is engaged in the critical 
study of the professional ministry and the institutional church in order 
that the students be adequately prepared for future ministry. 

Attempting to honor the injunction to be "wise as serpents and innocent 
as doves," the Church and Ministry field recognizes that ministry by both 
professional and lay persons in the church requires knowledge and skills 
pertinent to social strategies, life styles, language patterns, counseling 
techniques, educational models, and administrative systems appropriate 
to the Gospel in the world of the late 20th Century. 

Ministry 

Required Courses in Ministry 
MS01 Introduction to Ministry 

This team-taught course will introduce students to the concept of ministry, its 
biblical and theological basis, the problems faced by ministers in role definition 
vis-a-vis the varying expectations of church members, the function of the various 
theological disciplines in preparation for effective ministry, and the place of the 
student's faith formation in integrating the education experiences at the seminary. 

Term I, 1980-81 Ms. Likins and Mr. Paylor 

PD01 Credo 

The purpose of this colloquium is to assist students to work through the main 
questions in the traditional loci of Christian doctrine, drawing upon their ac- 
cumulated knowledge of Scripture, historical and systematic theology, and their 



39 



own tradition, in order to enable them to formulate their own theological position 
in a comprehensive, well-grounded way. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Kehm and Mr. Partee 

PD02 Faith Formation 

This colloquium seeks to help students become self-conscious about the proc- 
esses by which selfhood matures with special reference to faith as a formative 
aspect of selfhood. The students' theological views, combined with socio- 
psychological material, form the basis of the conceptual material. The view of faith 
of certain theologians and in classics on spiritual formation is investigated. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Hare and Mr. G. Jackson 

PD03 Professional and Ministerial Leadership 

This colloquium focuses attention upon professional aspects of ministerial 
responsibilities. The work of the term assumes a holistic perspective by giving an 
opportunity for reflection on the resources each student now brings to the inter- 
relation of the various ministerial functions. Because ministry is always in a 
particular setting and in terms of one's appraisal of that situation, responsible 
decisions require self-consciousness in diagnosis and evaluation of various situa- 
tions. This course is required for all students who are not eligible for MS01, 
Introduction to Ministry. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Oman and Mr. Pavlor 



Church and Society 

Required Courses in Church and Society 

CS01 Church and Society: Local 

In the first term emphasis is given to the contribution sociological methods can 
make to understanding religious life in its varied forms. Particular attention is 
given to the urban situation in which most Americans live, using Pittsburgh as a 
model for studying the dynamics of urban life. Specific attention is given to the 
historic roles of church, ethnic, and theological traditions in contributing to the 
unique character of this urban community. Such study provides a pattern by which 
any community may be studied to discern the relation of religious to general social 
dynamics. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Castillo 

CS03 Church and Society: Global 

The global context of the church is examined through a study of political and 
international dimensions of church life. The interrelatedness of national and 
international issues — population, food, militarism, energy, economics, re- 
pression, social justice — demonstrates the larger context within which Christian 
ministry is carried on, whether in the affluent or Third World countries. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Castillo 



Ethics 

Required Course in Ethics 

ET01 Introduction to Ethics 

An introduction to the theological and philosophical issues in contemporary 
Christian social thought. Focus on the ethics of the church as a social institution 
and Christian political theology. 

Terms II and III, 1980-81 Mr. Stone and Mr. Wiest 



40 



Elective Courses in Ethics 

ET12 The Ideal Society 

A study of Utopianism as seen in selected Christian and non-Christian sources, 
in relation to its possible contributions to the creation or reformation of the 
structures of society. Mr $ Ume 

ET13 Human Sexuality 

An inquiry into ethical questions raised by the current revolution in sexual 
attitudes and behavior. Consideration of such issues as pre-marital and extra- 
marital relations, marriage and divorce, alternative marriage patterns, under- 
standings of male and female sexuality, treatments of sex in literature and public 
media. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Wiest 

ET15 Readings in Contemporary Theological Ethics 

Discussion of selected readings from contemporary Protestant and Roman 
Catholic ethicists, such as R. Niebuhr, K. Barth, E. Brunner, H. R. Niebuhr, P. 
Ramsey, P. Lehmann, D. Bonhoeffer, G. Winter, J. Gustafson, K. Rahner, B. 
Haering, J. Maritain, J. C. Murray. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Wiest 

ET17 Law, Theology and Ethics 

Reading and discussion of selected topics within the following areas: 1) com- 
parisons and contrasts between jurisprudential and theological concepts and ways 
of thinking; relations between law, morality and religion; 2) ethical issues such as 
civil disobedience, punishment, laws regarding sexual behavior, censorship, 
problems in church-state relations, professional ethics. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET19 Concept of Freedom in Christian Ethics 

An analysis of some of the meanings which "freedom" ("liberty") has in Chris- 
tian theology and ethics, with comparison between these and other philosophical 
meanings (or theological) on the contemporary scene (e.g., in various liberation 
movements). Consideration will be given the traditional problems such as free- 
dom vs. determinism, freedom and grace; and to the function of freedom as a 
normative concept in Christian ethics. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Wiest 

ET20 The Thought of Reinhold Niebuhr 

A detailed examination of The Nature and Destiny of Man and the study of 
Reinhold Niebuhr's political and social writings. 

Mr. Stone 

ET21 Christian Ethics in a Business Ethos 

The study of Christian ethics as it relates to the business ethos of Pittsburgh and 
through Pittsburgh to the nation and the world. 
Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Stone 

ET22 Ethics of D. Bonhoeffer 

A seminar devoted to reading and discussion of several of Bonhoeffer' s books 
and of some secondary source material. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET23 Social Teachings of the Christian Churches 

Study of selected positions in the history of the churches' social teaching from 
the New Testament to the end of the nineteenth century. Focus on the issues of 
Christ and culture, church and state, the treatment of women, the Christian and 

war - Mr. Stone 

41 



ET25 Moral Issues in International Politics 

The perennial problems of Christian ethics and international politics; the the- 
ory of international politics; the moral issues raised by hunger and nuclear arma- 
ments, particular case studies in United States foreign policy. 

Mr. Stone 

ET30 Christianity in the Latin American Context: Ethical Issues 

A critical analysis of recent developments within Christianity in Latin America. 
The emphasis will be on the ethical issues involved in the struggle for liberation; 
the taking of sides in situations of intense social conflict; the implications of 
Christian love to one's attitude towards the oppressed and the oppressors; and the 
church's attitude towards material possessions. 

Mr. Castillo 

ET32 Love and Justice 

A seminar inquiry into the concepts and practice of the virtues of love and 
justice. Classical and contemporary sources will be examined with the social 
ethics of Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr and Martin Luther King, Jr., receiving 
special attention. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Stone 



Sociology of Religion 

Elective Courses in Sociology of Religion 

SR10 Introduction to the Sociology of Religion 

An inquiry into the nature, content and extension of the sociology of religion as a 
field of study within the social sciences. The student is made acquainted with the 
main theories on the role of religion in culture, personality and social structure, 
with reference to such authors as Durkheim, Weber, Malinowski, Freud and Marx. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Castillo 

SRI 2 Christianity and the Sociology of Conflict 

An analysis of the role that Christianity has played in selected historical situa- 
tions of intense social conflict, leading to a critique and the search for alternatives. 

Mr. Castillo 

SRI 3 The Latin American Context of Liberation Theology 

The political, social and religious context of "liberation theology" in Latin 
America, with particular reference to Father Camilo Torres (the guerrilla priest) 
and his impact on movements for radical change both inside and outside the 
churches. 

Mr. Castillo 

SRI 5 Christianity and the American Indians 

The clash of two radically different worldviews and the consequences for the 
populations involved. A critical survey of Christian missionary activity among the 
indigenous populations of the Americas, with particular attention to the doctrinal, 
moral, and ethical issues at stake. Examples taken from North and South America. 

Mr. Castillo 

SR16 Critical Issues in the Sociology of Religion 

A panoramic survey of the major developments in the field since the time of the 
"classics." The emphasis is on the present status of the theses originally pre- 
sented by Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Malinowski, about the nature and func- 



tion of religion. 



Mr. Castillo 
42 



SRI 7 Christianity in the Third World 

The course will give due attention to the history of Christianity in the Third 
World, linked to the process of Western socio-economic expansion and missionary 
enterprise to the ends of the earth. However, the main emphasis will be an 
interpretive analysis of the present condition of the Church in Asia, Africa and 
Latin America by means of a typology of socio-political contexts that condition its 
existence in the three continents. Special attention will also be given to signs of 
vitality in such areas as Evangelism, Social Ethics and Theologv. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Castillo 

CS10 Women in Church and Society 

The scope of the course includes the feminist positions; the conditions extant 
within society which brought about the contemporary liberation movement and 
the extent to which it influences church women. History of the church's attitudes 
towards women past and present. Special attention is given to the needs of women 
in ministry and to the ideational and political stance(s) which inform them. Ex- 
ploration of biblical and theological themes in relation to women's emerging 
leadership role in ecclesiastical institutions. Techniques of consciousness-raising 
and preparation in ministry for the new attitudes of women. 

Term II, 1980-81 Ms. Likins 



Education 

Required Course in Education 

PS01 Pastoral Studies: Education 

In this segment of the Pastoral Studies sequence students are engaged in 
studying the many aspects and possibilities of education programming in 
churches. A general view of educational philosophy and methodology, and their 
relation to theological, biblical, and historical studies, provides a basis for 
evaluating major denominational patterns and curricular materials. Correlation 
with educational responsibilities in field work, particularly relative to youth 
ministries, adds focus to each student's development of his or her own philosophy 
of education and requisite skills. 

Term I, 1980-81 Ms. Likins 

Elective Courses in Education 

ED11 Moral Education in the Church 

The course explores recent research concerning the development of values in 
young persons and adults. Most particularly it deals with the work of Kohlberg and 
Simon as it relates to planned educational experience for children, youth and 
adults. It also deals with the ways in which justice is perceived and the level of 
value perception raised. 

Term III, 1980-81 Ms. Likins 

ED 15 Education Laboratory 

The course is designed to give initial experience and to develop skills in 
methods and techniques commonly utilized in church groupings. It will relate 
specifically to the present tasks of students engaged in field work as well as to 
future vocational skill needs, and will acquaint students with resources provided 
by church agencies for updating educational programs. Three credits for work in 
two terms. 

Ms. Likins 



43 



ED 17 Historical Shaping of Church Education 

An exploration into the tenacity with which educational patterns introduced at 
various periods in church history have survived to shape current church educa- 
tion. 

Ms. Likins 

ED 19 Group Process 

The course deals with the theory and practice of small group leadership and 
participation with a special concern for the types of such groups currently found in 
churches. 

Ms. Likins 

ED20 Youth Ministry 

A study of existing models, old and new, that have been or are being used in the 
church with particular emphasis upon analysis in regard to the needs of youth. 
Skills in communication with youth are emphasized. Survey of possibilities in 
terms of drama, film, etc. Emphasis upon program design. Distinction between 
junior and senior high school youth groups is emphasized. 

Term I, 1980-81 Ms. Likins 

ED22 Church Educational Development 

The course will focus upon a careful study of church school curriculum. The 
student will be asked to carefully examine his or her own denomination's cur- 
riculum and to become familiar with its strengths and weaknesses. There will also 
be an intensive study of various styles of organization and administration. 

Term III, 1980-81 Ms. Likins 



Pastoral Care 

Required Course in Pastoral Care 

PS02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Concurrent field experience provides a basis for study of pastoral care. In these 
seminars students are helped to understand the definition of pastoral care in the 
history and theology of the church in terms of the identity of the minister. Brief 
consideration is given to theories of the development of persons and how this 
development results in expectations of pastoral care. Reporting on and discussion 
of experiences arising from students' field placements are used in developing 
skills useful to ministering to the needs of persons in each situation. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Paylor 

Elective Courses in Pastoral Care 

PC 10 Psychological Foundations of Ministry 

This course traces human development along lines set forth by Freud and 
radically expanded by Erickson. With Erickson as the transitional figure, the 
course stresses developments in ego psychology as especially helpful to the 
practice of ministry. The third section of the course analyzes communal com- 
ponents, deals with group theory, and explores implications for ministry. Theo- 
logical material is part of the data of the course, especially process theology. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

PC 12 Pastoral Care in a Hospital Setting 

Each student spends approximately seventy-five hours throughout the term 
relating to patients. Students are assigned different areas of care, i.e., emergency 
room, intensive care, thoracics. Two experiences are expected. The students are 
supervised by hospital staff, when possible, and by the seminary professor respon- 

Mr. G. Jackson 



sible for the course. 



44 



PC 13 Process Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course has in view a new theory of pastoral care based on process theology 
and more specifically the conceptuality of Alfred North Whitehead. It endeavors 
to incorporate the relevant rich insights of Freud, Jung, Maslow, and Gestalt 
within a process metaphysical and theological framework. Readings in both proc- 
ess thought and psychology are required as are three brief papers. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

PC 14 Psychology of Religion 

This course is designed to study religious experience. Religious experience is 
looked at from four perspectives: historical, beginning with Jonathan Edwards 
and eighteenth-century Revivalism; psychological, including Freud, Jung and 
Allport; cross-cultural, singling out Otto and Eliade; and topical, identifying 
specific areas such as community, faith, conversion, worship, prayer, mysticism, 
and vocation to which twentieth-century psychologies of religion and contem- 
porary religious experience provide data. Insofar as possible the course is induc- 
tive and is limited to seminar size. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

PC 19 Training the Pastor as Spiritual Director 

Borrowing from the rich history and insight of the Roman Catholic Church, this 
course intends to adapt that material to the Protestant pastor as Spiritual Director. 
The history of the Office, the theology of such an Office within Protestantism, 
psychological factors obtaining between Director and people, and programmatic 
elements are the content of the course. Open only to students who have had Credo 
and Faith Formation. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

PC20 Issues in Pastoral Care: Anxiety, Guilt, Hostility 

This trilogy of interrelated affective states will be looked at from three perspec- 
tives: 1) their dynamics, seen both psychologically and theologically (for example, 
ontological anxiety, neurotic guilt, and depression and hostility); 2) their ex- 
pression in affect, behavior, and life-style; 3) handling them and ministering to 
their victims. Readings will be taken from psychology and theology. Case studies 
are used extensively throughout the course. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. G. Jackson 

PC21 Expectations of Ministers 

Ministers frequently have experiences in which the expectations that people 
have of them are expressed in surprising ways and places. These experiences are 
often puzzling as well as distressing to the minister in terms of how to care for the 
people involved. The recognition of these expressions, their developmental sig- 
nificance, the ways in which they are communicated, and useful responses the 
minister may make are studied in this course. Experiences presented by the 
students are the primary subject matter. 

Mr. Paylor 

PC50 Pastoral Counseling Seminar 

This course is an advanced case seminar for persons who are currently working 
in situations of ministry. The aim of the seminar is to enable the students to think 
more clearly about the needs of people in those situations and whether those 
needs warrant pastoral counseling or other types of pastoral intervention. When 
pastoral counseling is chosen as a means of help, the student will be given 
supervision in its use. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Paylor 

PC52 Practicum with Children 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center provides students the opportunity 
for observing the development of normal 3, 4 and 5 year old children as it is 

45 



expressed in their play. These observations are discussed with the Arsenal staff 
against the background of concurrent readings in developmental theory which the 
students are doing. A weekly seminar relating the observations and readings to a 
ministry to children forms a third part of the course. This course is open to 
advanced M.Div. and D.Min. students. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Paylor 

PC62 The Congregation as a Caring Community 

This course assumes that the professional minister is not the only minister to 
people in need, yet the congregation is not prepared to minister. So this course 
develops a design to equip a Remnant in the congregation to become a ministering 
people. A theology of care is scrutinized; a two year program schematized, using 
both theological and psychological material; an on-the-job training component for 
laity detailed; and the pastor's role in the total program pin-pointed. Besides 
theological and psychological readings, sources include D.Min. research projects 
dealing with the congregation as a caring community. 

Mr. G. Jackson 



Homiletics 

Required Course in Homiletics 

PS03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

The third-term seminar groups in the Pastoral Studies course provide an intro- 
duction to homiletics as a responsibility of ministers. Attention is given to the 
exegetical bases of preaching, to problems of hermeneutics and authority, and to 
such rhetorical considerations as sermon construction, style and audience. Each 
student prepares and presents sermons, and the seminar groups engage in the 
critique of these sermons. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Ezzell and Mr. Oman 

Elective Courses in Homiletics 

HM10 Homiletics Practicum 

The course combines seminar discussion with the preparation and delivery of 
sermons, and is designed to lead students beyond introductory homiletics to a 
more sophisticated understanding of the preacher's task. In small sections stu- 
dents preach twice during the term, as well as participate in detailed homiletical 
analysis. 

Mr. Ezzell 

HM17 Black Preaching 

This course seeks to: 1) analyze critically the style, structure, and content of 
historic and current trends in Black Preaching, utilizing recordings, tapes, and 
actual preaching situations; 2) understand the unique contributions of Theology; 
and 3) provide the opportunities to help students become more effective in the 
communication of the Gospel to congregations within the Black Community. 

Mr. Pugh 

HM20 Parish Preaching 

Planning a year's pulpit work. An analysis of the seasons and festivals of the 
Christian Year. Selecting resources for occasional sermons. 

Mr. Oman 



46 



HM21 Literary Sources for Preaching 

A study of selected literary masterpieces considered significant for preaching 
because of their content and/or style. Autobiographical, devotional and allegorical 
material will be included as well as drama and the novel. 

Mr. Oman 

HM22 Preaching from the Gospel of Luke 

This course will study some of the great preaching themes found in St. Luke's 
Gospel. Particular attention will be given to the four "Great Songs of the Advent 
Season,'' as well as to selected portions of the Passion narrative. 

Term I, 1980-81 Mr. Oman 

HM23 Twentieth Century Preaching 

An examination of methodological and theological developments in Christian 
preaching in the twentieth century. A study of contemporary preaching based on 
printed, recorded, audio and video-taped sermons of leading homileticians of our 
age. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Oman 

HM24 Preaching from the Old Testament 

The course will provide an introduction to the special problems and possibili- 
ties offered by Old Testament preaching, including the discussion of how to use 
the principles of Old Testament interpretation for homiletical purposes, and 
experience in the preparation of sermons on different types of passages. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Ezzell 

HM27 Preaching from Romans 

An exegetic analysis of Paul's most influential epistle. The course will attempt 
to provide the student with comprehensive understanding of the style and struc- 
ture of Paul's argument and the homiletical possibilities it presents. Special 
attention will be given to hermeneutical problems attendant to such prominent 
Pauline concepts as faith, grace and law, as well as to the formidable forensic 
character of his language and thought. 

Mr. Ezzell 

HM29 Storytelling 

This course is two-fold in purpose and design. First, to examine in detail the 
nature of the story form of discourse and to attempt to establish its theological and 
persuasive primacy among the competing categories of discourse. Second, and 
foremost, the course aims to develop in the student the ability to construct and 
narrate stories, i.e., to become adroit in the art of storytelling. 

Term III, 1980-81 Mr. Ezzell 

WS14 The Theology and Practice of Christian Worship 

An introductory course on Christian Worship, concentrating on basic theologi- 
cal principles, origins and development, orders of worship, lessons and sermon, 
public prayer and the sacraments. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. Oman 

EV10 Evangelism: An Investigation in Depth 

Five professors, representing five major areas of inquiry (Bible, History, Theol- 
ogy, Psychology and Ethics) will engage students in an in-depth examination of 
Evangelism, both theory and practice. An executive from a national staff in evan- 
gelism plus selected local pastors will be invited to participate when appropriate. 
Carefully selected readings will correlate with the various areas of investigation. 
Two ten-page papers will be required as follows: one to be selected from one of 
the areas of study listed above, the other, a programmatic model for evangelism in 
a local congregation. 

Term II, 1980-81 Mr. G. Jackson 

47 



Administration 

Elective Courses in Administration 

AD 10 Polity and Program of the United Presbyterian Church 

An introduction to the polity and program of the United Presbyterian Church, 
designed in part to help United Presbyterian students to prepare for denomina- 
tional examinations in that field. 

Term III, 1980-81 Staff 

AD30 United Methodist History, Doctrine and Policy 

Required of United Methodist students for graduation; elective for other stu- 
dents. 

Term III, 1980-81 Staff 



48 



VI. THE FACULTY 

The twenty full-time members of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Faculty are committed to the scholarly, professional and personal 
preparation of men and women for Christian service to the Church. Many 
members of the Faculty are regular contributors to the Church's and 
world's scholarly knowledge through publications and participation in 
learned societies in the Americas, Asia and Europe. In this way the 
Faculty at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary contributes to the learned 
skills of students on campus and far away. The Faculty formulates the 
curriculum, directs the entire educational program, and exercises general 
authority over the student body. 



Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas, Assis- 
tant Professor in Church and Min- 
istry. Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, Cuba, B.D.; Union 

Theological Seminary (N.Y.), 
S.T.M. 





Robert M. Ezzell, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Homiletics. Memphis State 
University, B.S.; Lexington Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Yale Di- 
vinity School, S.T.M.; Yale Uni- 
versity, MA. 



49 



Donald E. Gowan, Professor of Old 
Testament. University of South 
Dakota, B.A.; University of Du- 
buque Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; University of Chicago, Ph.D. 




:'::;::2l|' :7 ' : )l|'' 



A 




Dikran Y. Hadidian, Professor of 
Bibliography. American Univer- 
sity of Beirut, B.A.; Hartford 
Theological Seminary, B.D., 
Th.M.; Hartford School of Re- 
ligious Education, M.A.; Columbia 
University, M.S. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, Dean and 
William F. Orr Professor of New 
Testament. Victoria College, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, B.A.; Em- 
manuel College, Victoria Univer- 
sity, Toronto, B.D.; Union Theo- 
logical Seminary (N.Y.), S.T.M., 
Th.D. 




50 




Gordon E. Jackson, Hugh Thom- 
son Kerr Professor of Pastoral 
Theology. Monmouth College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, Th.B., Th.M.; Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Ph.D. 



Jared Judd Jackson, Associate 
Professor of Old Testament. Har- 
vard College, A.B.; Episcopal 
Theological School, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), 
Th.D. 








George H. Kehm, Professor of 
Theology. Queens College (N.Y.), 
B.S.; Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Harvard Divinity 
School, S.T.M.; Harvard Univer- 
sity, Th.D. 



51 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate 
Professor of Biblical Languages. 
University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 
M.Div., Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Th.M.; Princeton Uni- 
versity, M.A., Ph.D. 





M. Harjie Likins, Associate Profes- 
sor in Church and Ministry. Cor- 
nell College (Iowa), A.B.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Ulrich W. Mauser, Errett M. Gra- 
ble Professor of New Testament. 
University of Tubingen, Doctor of 
Theology. 




52 




Richard J. Oman, Howard C. 
Scharfe Professor of Homiletics. 
University of Minnesota, B.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; New College, University of 
Edinburgh, Ph.D. 






Charles B. Partee, Professor of 
Church History. Maryville Col- 
lege, A.B.; Austin Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Uni- 
versity of Texas, M.A.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Ph.D. 





Neil R. Paylor, Associate Professor 
in Church and Ministry. Hanover 
College, A.B.; Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary, B.D.; Harvard Uni- 
versity, Ph.D. 



53 



Ronald H. Stone, Professor of So- 
cial Ethics. Morningside College, 
B.A.; Union Theological Seminary 
(N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, 
Ph.D. 





Marjorie Suchocki, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Theology, Pomona Col- 
lege, B.A.; Claremont Graduate 
School, M.A., Ph.D. 



H. Eberhard von Waldow, Profes- 
sor of Old Testament. Bonn Uni- 
versity, B.A.; Doctor of Theology. 




54 




James A. Walther, Professor of 
New Testament Literature and 
Exegesis. Grove City College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh Theologieal 
Seminary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel 
College, Victoria University, Tor- 
onto, Th.D. 



Walter E. Wiest, Professor of 
Philosophy of Religion. Lafayette 
College, A.B.; Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary, B.D.; Columbia 
University, Ph.D. 




55 



EMERITI 

William H. Kadel, Th.D., President Emeritus 

William F. Orr, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of New Testament Literature and 
Exegesis. 

GUEST FACULTY 

Martha Ezzell, M.A Career Development Specialist 

Carlow College 

Speech Tutor 
Carlton B. Goodwin, Ph.D Executive Minister 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lecturer in Baptist Studies 
Nancy L. Lapp, M.A Curator of Bible Lands Museum 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Lecturer in Archaeology 
John E. Mehl, Ph.D Associate Pastor 

Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lecturer in Education 
Ronald H. Miller, Ph.D Rector 

St. Alban's Episcopal Church 

Murrysville, Pennsylvania 

Lecturer in Episcopal Studies 
Alfred L. Pugh, B.D Pastor, Macedonia Baptist Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lecturer in Homiletics 
William L. Roberts, Ph.D Research Coordinator 

Christian Education: Shared Approaches 

Moundsville, West Virginia 

Lecturer in Education 
Marianne L. Wolfe, B.A Stated Clerk 

Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lecturer in United Presbyterian 
Polity and Program 



56 



VII. FINANCES AND 
FINANCIAL AID 



FINANCES 

The Board of Directors of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has ap- 
proved the following tuition, housing rent and fees for the 1980-81 aca- 
demic year. The Seminary reserves the right to make changes in all 
tuition, housing rent, fees, and financial aid policies without prior notice. 

Tuition 

Candidates for the M.Div. and M.A. Degrees: 

An annual comprehensive charge for 36 term hours $2100.00 

Additional charge per credit hour beyond 36 term hours .$ 58.00 

Part-time candidates for the M.Div. and M.A. Degrees: 

Part-time status by Seminary requirement — per course . . .$ 175.00 

Part-time status by individual preference: 

Per course for three courses $ 187.00 

Per course for two courses $ 205.00 

Per course for one course $ 227.00 

Candidates for the D.Min. Degree: 

Stage I $1242.00 

Stage II $ 690.00 

Stage III $ 300.00 

TOTAL tuition for the D.Min. Degree $2232.00 

Candidates for the Ph.D. Degree: 

Per credit hour for Pennsylvania residents $ 81.00 

Per credit hour for non-Pennsylvania residents $ 162.00 

University courses: 

Courses taken at area universities (University of Pittsburgh, 
Carnegie-Mellon University, Duquesne University) through the 
PC HE cross-registration system are charged at Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary tuition rates and tuition is paid to the Seminary. 

Special non-degree students: 

Per course for three courses $ 187.00 

Per course for two courses $ 205.00 

Per course for one course $ 227.00 

Audit course for enrolled students for no credit No Fee 

Fees 

Matriculation Fee $ 35.00 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

Annual Library Fee $ 10.00 

Annual Student Association Fee $ 5.00 

Graduation Fee $ 25.00 

Transcript Fee: One copy of student's academic record 

will be provided without charge — additional copies . . . .$ 1.00 



57 



Board 

Breakfast and lunch may be purchased Monday through Friday 
throughout the academic year, excluding vacation periods. Kitchen 
facilities are available in the dormitories for single students. The esti- 
mated cost for board for an academic year for a single student is $1000.00. 

Room 

Annual charge for dormitory room $ 345.00 

Apartment Fees (per month) 
The Highlander: 
Twenty-three apartments 

one-bedroom apartments $ 130.00 

two-bedroom apartments $ 146.00 

Fulton Hall: 
Thirty-nine apartments 

efficiency apartments $ 96.00 

one-bedroom apartments $ 121.00 

Anderson Hall: 
Twelve apartments 

two-bedroom apartments $ 156.00 

three-bedroom apartments $ 173.00 

McMillan Hall: 
Nineteen apartments 

one-bedroom apartments $ 139.00 

two-bedroom apartments $ 156.00 

three-bedroom apartments $ 173.00 

four-bedroom apartments $ 207.00 

Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are payable during the first two 
weeks of each term as specified by the Business Office. When necessary, 
arrangements for a payment plan to cover a term's expenses may be made 
at the Business Office, permitting three (3) equal payments. There is a 
carrying charge of $5.00 for the deferred payment plan. Failure to pay any 
deferred payment within ten days from the due date will incur a penalty 
of 1% of the amount due. Settlement of all Seminary bills is required be- 
fore registration for a new term, and before graduation or the release of of- 
ficial transcripts. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The primary responsibility for meeting the costs of a theological educa- 
tion at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary belongs to the student and to the 
denomination of which the student is a member. The spouse of a student 
at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is expected to contribute to financing 
the student's education. Students anticipating a need for financial aid are 
required to apply for and accept all denominational, judicatory and con- 
gregational financial support for which they may be eligible. Since the 
Seminary is aware that some students will have financial needs which 
exceed their own personal, family and ecclesiastical resources, it provides 
financial aid from endowed and general funds. Only students enrolled on 

58 



more than a half-time basis in the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 
programs at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary are eligible to apply for 
financial aid. Students enrolled in a joint degree program with the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh are not eligible for financial aid from Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary after the third year of study. 

The financial aid program at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is based 
on the concept of an agreed upon norm. This norm is established annually, 
according to the student's marital status and by estimating basic living 
expenses, including seminary tuition, fees, books, medical costs, in- 
surance, laundry, entertainment and certain personal expenses. Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary will commit itself to seek to provide each 
qualifying student a percentage of this norm. For 1980-81 this norm is 
$5,140 for single students and $7,215 for married students. An additional 
$ 1,000 is allowed for each child living with and dependent on the student. 
Awards are computed at 89% of these norms. Each student must contrib- 
ute a minimum of $1,000 a year to his/her expenses. The financial aid 
application requires that the student list the source and amount of all 
anticipated income. This will include the earnings of the spouse and 
denominational and congregational support. 

The financial aid package awarded to the student will be in a combina- 
tion of three forms: work assistance, grant and loan. 

1. Work Assistance jobs are provided for a limited number of campus 
jobs in the dining hall, dormitories, library, etc. Student pastors (as 
defined by Field Education Office) and single parents with children 
are not expected to hold campus jobs. Students with Field Education 
positions are expected to work a minimum of five hours per week. All 
other students on financial aid are expected to work ten hours per 
week. 

2. Students are expected to apply for the loan amount through a state 
loan program. When a student is unable to obtain a state loan, Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary will make a long term loan for the 
amount established as part of the financial aid package. 

3. It is from the grant portion of the financial aid package that the 
Seminary tuition, fees and rent (when in default two months) are 
automatically deducted. Any remaining portion of the grant award 
will then be paid to the student in nine monthly installments. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's financial aid program is based on a 
nine month academic year. Financial aid packages are not automatically 
renewable from year to year. Each year, if aid is required, a new appli- 
cation must be filed by May 1. New students also are advised to file 
financial aid applications by that date. Applications will be reviewed in 
the order in which they are received. 

Specific questions and requests for detailed information regarding 
financial aid should be addressed to the Seminary's Financial Aid Officer. 



AWARDS, PRIZES AND FELLOWSHIPS 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation 
to that member of the senior class who is recommended by the faculty as 



59 



having achieved the highest standard in all departments of the Seminary 
curriculum. The faculty reserves the right to impose special tests and 
examinations in making this award. The recipient must pledge himself or 
herself to a year of post-graduate study following his or her graduation at 
some institution approved by the faculty. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship is given every year to the member of 
the senior class who has the highest average at the beginning of his/her 
final term of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a 
full academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by the 
faculty. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize is assigned to that member of 
the graduating class who has taken the full course of instruction in this 
institution and who has achieved the second highest academic rank of the 
class, if in the judgment of the faculty he or she is worthy in all other 
respects. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize is awarded to a member of the senior class who has spent 
three years in the Seminary and has taken the highest standing in the 
department of homiletics. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize will be awarded to the stu- 
dent who achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek 
as he or she enters the junior class of the Seminary. 




60 



The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew will he awarded to that mem- 
ber of the senior elass who, having eleeted Hebrew, shall submit the best 
grammatical and exegetieal treatment of a portion of the Hebrew Old 
Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament 

The John Watson Prize in NT Greek will be awarded to that member of 
the senior class who, having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best 
grammatical and exegetieal treatment of a portion of the Greek New 
Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize is to be awarded yearly to the 
students taking first and second rank respectively in the department of 
Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize is to be awarded to that member of the graduating class who 
has exhibited to the greatest degree, throughout the three years of the 
Seminary course, leadership, originality and accomplishments beyond 
the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The income is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the 
junior class who attain the highest average of excellence in their Seminary 
work. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship is given to the student who, upon 
entering Seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in a competitive 
examination in the English Bible. The successful competitor is to have the 
scholarship throughout the entire course of three years. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

The income from this endowed fund is granted to the student, who in 
the judgment of the professors of the History and Theology Areas, is most 
worthy of this award at the end of the middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies is granted to the 
student who, in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical Area, is most 
worthy of this award at the end of the junior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for Graduate Study 

This fund provides an annual award to a member of the graduating class 
designated by the faculty for assistance in post-graduate study, preferably 
in the field of New Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 

This award is given to a student who, at the end of the middler year has, 
in the judgment of the homiletics professors, demonstrated excellence in 
preaching. 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions is awarded to that member of the 
graduating class who is deemed most deserving among those entering a 
denominationally recognized or ecumenically sponsored mission field. 

61 



The Clara Edna Miller Prize in Pastoral Theology 

This prize is awarded to that student in the M.Div. program finishing 
the seventh term who achieves the highest academic standing in those 
courses in the curriculum particularly adapted to the practice of ministry, 
i.e., preaching, worship, education, pastoral care, administration, and 
leadership development. 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in Pastoral Care 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in Pastoral Care is awarded to the 
graduating senior, whether Master of Divinity or Master of Arts, who has 
taken his or her full course of study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
and who has the highest standing in the general area of pastoral care. 

The John W. Meister Award 

The John W. Meister Award in the Pastoral Ministry has been estab- 
lished at each of the seven theological seminaries of the United Pres- 
byterian Church U.S.A. in memory of Rev. John W. Meister, who at his 
death in 1974 was Director of the Council of Theological Seminaries. The 
award is made each year to that member of the graduating class who 
manifests to the greatest degree those characteristics which are most 
essential to effective pastoral leadership. 

The Richard J. Rapp Memorial Award in Doctor of Ministry Studies 

Funds have been raised by the Covenant-Community Presbyterian 
Church for a memorial for Rev. Dr. Richard J. Rapp. It is the intention of 
the donors that this money be used to honor Dr. Rapp by publishing one or 
more outstanding D. Min. papers, and by acknowledging this in the 
annual commencement program. 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award for An International Student is 
given to a student who has demonstrated meritorious performance in his 
or her Seminary work and who is returning to his or her native land to 
witness to Christ there. 



HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Honors Scholarship Program is one way Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary seeks to encourage the enrollment of young men and women of 
the highest academic ability in the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 
programs. Those considered for an Honors Scholarship shall be from 
among those applicants who have graduated from a regionally accredited 
or internationally recognized college or university, normally in the top 
five percent of their class (with at least a 3.5 cumulative average). They 
shall be students of demonstrated potential for outstanding Christian 
service. 

There are presently two Honors Scholarships. 

The David E. Molyneaux Honors Scholarship was established by the 
First Presbyterian Church of Flint, Michigan, in affection for their 
pastor, David E. Molyneaux, an alumnus and former Board member 
of the Seminary, and provides a substantial cash award to an entering 
first degree student selected by the faculty. 

62 



The First Presbyterian Church of Neenah Honors Scholarship was 

established by the First Presbyterian Church of Neenah, Wisconsin, 
from the Bergstrom Fund of which it is the trustee, and provides a 
significant cash award to an entering first degree student selected by 
the faculty. 
Those considered for either Honors Scholarship must have applied for 
admission to the Seminary before April 15th of each academic year. 



63 



VIII. STUDENT LIFE 

A primary purpose of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is to develop a 
Christian community on campus which lays the foundation of early and 
lasting friendships, productive of confidence and mutual assistance 
among ministers. Approximately three hundred students, drawn from 
over twenty states and several foreign countries, are enrolled at the Sem- 
inary. While a majority of students are United Presbyterians, there are 
significant numbers of Methodist, Baptist, Lutheran and Episcopal stu- 
dents as well. The larger number of students lives on campus. 

Students at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary participate in the govern- 
ance of the institution through membership on various committees of the 
Board of Directors, faculty and administration. A number of student or- 
ganizations flourish on campus to meet specific interests and concerns. 

The Student Association 

The Student Association is composed of "all students registered and 
enrolled in the Seminary in a course of study leading to a degree." The 
Student Association's purpose is to "conduct all student social and extra- 
curricular affairs," and to "conduct elections of student representatives to 
other Seminary committees or organizations as required." In addition to 
pot-luck dinners, picnics, square dances and movies, extra-curricular 
events dealing with controversial issues related to the church and world at 
large foster a community spirit. The Student Association is responsible for 
a large part of the annual student orientation program. Meetings of the 
Student Association are held at least once a month. 

The Associated Women Seminarians 

The Associated Women Seminarians (AWS) recognizes the particular 
needs of a part of the student body for the good of the whole. AWS 
promotes interdependence among women and forwards the interest of 
women. AWS activities include the maintenance of sympathetic under- 
standing and close cooperation with the faculty and administration; the 
establishment of an orderly succession of participation by women stu- 
dents in the administration and governance of the Seminary; and the 
establishment of coordinating committees to respond to matters of con- 
cern to women both within and outside the Seminary community. Mem- 
bership is open to any female student at the Seminary. 

The Black Seminarians Association 

The Black Seminarians Association provides a means whereby the 
Seminary utilizes the full participation of the black community. Through 
prayer, fellowship and the exchange of individual talents the Association 
brings to the Seminary's attention both the concerns of black people and 
the particular needs of black clergy. The Association's extracurricular 
activities encompass these concerns through seminars conducted by ex- 
perienced black pastors, annual attendance at the National Black Sem- 
inarians Convention and visits to area black churches and communities. 
Membership is open to black students in all academic programs of the 
Seminary. 



65 




The Evangelical Student Fellowship 

The Evangelical Student Fellowship (ESF) is an organization holding 
an evangelical Christian faith, as stated in its creed. The ESF has three 
organizing principles: 1) to provide for the spiritual development of the 
membership; 2) to stimulate academic excellence in evangelical scholar- 
ship; 3) to provide a forum whereby evangelical students can engage the 
wider seminary community in dialogue on issues of mutual concerns and 
of importance to the church of Jesus Christ. This includes a bibliography 
of evangelical sources which covers all subjects taught at the Seminary. 
While any student is welcome to attend ESF activities, voting member- 
ship is limited to those who sign the ESF creed in good faith. 

The International Student Association 

The International Student Association (ISA) is composed of students 
from five continents of the world. The organization provides an oppor- 
tunity for international students at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary to 
become acquainted, share experiences and support one another. The 
Association desires to make the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary com- 
munity aware of the different social, religious and political views inter- 
nationally, thereby offering enrichment and growth to the community. 
ISA activities include an international dinner, cultural evenings and fel- 
lowship once each month. 

The Preaching Association 

The Preaching Association supplies worship leadership to vacant pul- 
pits in the greater Pittsburgh area, providing valuable experience for 
Seminary students in preaching. 



66 



SPICE 

SPICE is the organization of the female and male spouses of students 
enrolled at Pittsburgh Seminary. In addition to providing organized sup- 
port for its members, SPICE helps promote and maintain a sense of 
community on the Seminary campus. Pot-luck dinners, movies, and holi- 
day parties are sponsored by SPICE, often in association with the Student 
Association and the Association of Women Seminarians. Lectures and 
discussions are held to stimulate and enlighten the Seminary community. 

Orientation 

Students who are entering Pittsburgh Theological Seminary need to 
understand the critical significance of theological education, whether at 
the M.Div. or M.A. level. The M.Div. students will be entering the 
transition from laity to clergy. The Seminary provides an annual orienta- 
tion program to sensitize students both to the goals of theological edu- 
cation in general and to the way the Seminary seeks to prepare men and 
women for the Christian ministry. Additionally, the Seminary through the 
Student Association and other student groups introduces entering stu- 
dents to the Pittsburgh scene. 

Play Care for Children 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has set aside a large community room 
located on the ground level of McMillan Hall as a play care center for 
pre-school children throughout the school year. The center is staffed by a 
paid director, volunteer parents and other students. The center's use is 
restricted to children of the Seminary community. 




67 




68 



IX. ADMISSIONS 
PROCEDURES 

A student applying for admission to any course of study offered by 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary shall provide evidence of good char- 
acter and of a Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university 
or its academic equivalent, and normally shall be a member in full com- 
munion in some branch of the Christian Church. 

Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 

Applicants to the first degree programs are required to have completed 
the Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university at 
the time of enrollment. This undergraduate work should include a sub- 
stantial foundation in the liberal arts. Applicants may apply any time after 
the junior year in college is completed. Applications for September en- 
trance should be made prior to June 30 to insure full consideration for 
admission; applications for entrance in the Second or Third Terms should 
be made at least six weeks before the beginning of the Term desired. All 
correspondence concerning admissions to the Seminary should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Applications are considered by the Student Relations Committee upon 
submission of the following materials: 

1. A formal application with the designated references. 

2. An official transcript of all the applicant's college and university 
work, showing grades for at least three years of undergraduate work. 

3. A statement (500-1000 words) describing the applicant's family, 
educational and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon motives for entering the Seminary. 

4. A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another 
representative of the Seminary who may be designated by the Di- 
rector of Admissions. 

5. A battery of psychological and/or mental capacity tests may be re- 
quired of the applicant by the Director of Admissions and Student 
Relations Committee. Such testing is utilized only when it is be- 
lieved the results will clarify ambiguities in the student's academic 
record or in the applicant's emotional fitness for the ministry. 

6. An application fee of $15.00. This fee is not refundable. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, a 
$35.00 placement fee is required to assure the applicant a place in the 
Term for which application was made. This fee is applied to the student's 
tuition and is not returnable except under extreme hardship at the discre- 
tion of the Student Relations Committee. A certification of the student's 
"intention to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A^tudent transferring from another accredited seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 
seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President of the 
Seminary. A transfer student must be in attendance at Pittsburgh Theo- 

69 



logical Seminary for a minimum of one full academic year in order to 
become a candidate for the M.Div. or the M.A. degree. 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work and Master of Divin- 
ity/Master of Library Science 

In each of the joint degree programs the candidate must apply and be 
admitted to both Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of 
Pittsburgh. Normally, application is made to the appropriate graduate 
school of the University during the First Term of the middler year of the 
Seminary Master of Divinity program. 

Doctor of Ministry 

Applications for the Doctor of Ministry degree program are submitted to, 
the Admissions Office. Applications for both Track I and Track II are 
accepted annually and should be submitted by March 31st. However, 
admission for the St. Petersburg, Florida, Track II program is granted only 
in even numbered years. The exact dates for the start of both Track I and 
Track II groups can be obtained from the Admissions Office at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. 

The successful completion of an M.Div. degree or its equivalent from 
an accredited seminary or divinity school is required for admission into 
the program. Applicants are required to have completed a minimum of 
two years in the ordained ministry. 

The Application Process 

Applications to the Doctor of Ministry program must include: 

1. A formal application. 

2. Transcripts of all prior academic work plus information regarding 
participation in non-degree continuing education. 

3. An endorsement from the applicant's Session or Church Board and 
assurance the applicant will be engaged in a recognized ministerial 
position for the period of the program. 

4. A statement (500-1000 words) detailing the applicant's ministerial 
experience to date. 

5. A statement (500-1000 words) outlining reasons for entering the 
program. 

6. Designated letters of recommendation as specified on the appli- 
cation form. 

7. Interviews with the Director of Admissions and Director of the 
Doctor of Ministry Program and, if chosen for further consideration, 
with selected faculty members. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Requests for application forms should be addressed to : 
Coordinator, Ph.D. Program 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 
Information about documents that must accompany the application 
before it can be processed by the Admissions Committee will be provided 
by the Coordinator. Applicants should have either a Master of Divinity 
degree, a Master's degree in a field directly related to their proposed area 

70 



of concentration, or a strong undergraduate major in religion. Those lack- 
ing a Master's degree will have to complete 72 credits of course work, 
whereas those with an appropriate Master's degree may receive 24 credits 
for such work and would have to complete only 48 credits to complete the 
course requirements for the Ph.D. A minimum QPA of 3.00 is required. 

Special Students 

Applicants desiring to study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary for 
credit on a non-degree basis, other than International Students, must 
possess a Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or uni- 
versity at the time of enrollment. Applicants for Special Student status 
follow the same procedures and submit the same materials as those 
applying for the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts Programs. 

International Scholars 

All applicants for the International Scholars program at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary must secure endorsement of their study plans from 
either the Leadership Development Program of the National Council of 
the Churches of Christ, 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10115 
or the World Alliance of Reformed Churches, 150, route de Ferney, 1211 
Geneva 20, Switzerland. Applicants whose native language is not English 
will be required to give evidence of proficiency in the English language 
before application will be considered. The application deadline for inter- 
national students is March 1st for September entrance. 



71 



FV 




72 



X. SPECIAL LECTURES 

The Special Lectures program at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
annually brings scholars of national and international standing to the 
campus to make important learned contributions to the church and the 
world. 

The Schaff Lectures 

The Schaff Lectures are given annually on any subject related to the 
general field of theological study. 

1981 Dr. David Tracy, University of Chicago Divinity School 
"The Concept of Religion in Contemporary Christian 
Theology: The Conflict of Interpretations" 
1980 Dr. Rosemary Ruether, Garrett Evangelical Theological 
Seminary 

"Theological and Ethical Bases for the Women's Liberation 
Movement" 

1979 Dr. Fred B. Craddock, Candler School of Theology, Emory 
University 

"What You Have Heard in a Whisper, Shout" 

1978 Dr. Donald K. Swearer, Swarthmore College 
"Christianity and the World Religions" 

Dr. Ronald E. Clements, Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge 

University 

"Isaiah and the Deliverance of Jerusalem" 

The Elliott Lectures 

The Elliott Lectures are to be given on specialties in theology and 
on literary or scientific subjects connected therewith. 

1980 Dr. Virgil Cruz, University of Dubuque Theological Semin- 
ary "A New Look at the Apocalypse" 

1979 Dr. Robert Jewitt, Morningside College 
"Faith and Tolerance" 

1979 Dr. Mary Daly, Boston College; Dr. Kathryn Gonzalez, 
Columbia Theological Seminary; Dr. Jill Raitt, Duke 
University 

"The Challenge of Mary Daly" 

Kelso Lectures — Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 

1980 The Rev. Charles Marks, Associate Executive, Synod of 
Southern California 

1979 Dr. Preston N. Williams, The Divinity School, Harvard 

University 
1978 Dr. C. Eric Lincoln, Duke University 



73 



- -SI 



XL BOARD OF 
DIRECTORS AND 
ADMINISTRATION 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers, 1980-81 
Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Chairperson & Counsel 
Attorney, Alter, Wright & Barron, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. Robert C. Holland, Viee-Chairperson 
Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. Harold E. Scott, Secretary 

Executive Presbyter, Pittsburgh Presbytery, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Robert R. Lavelle, Treasurer 
President, Lavelle Real Estate Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Members 
The Rev. Donald A. Aull 

Bessemer United Presbyterian Church 

Bessemer, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Davitt S. Bell 

Civic Leader 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. J. B. Belton 

Civic Leader 

First Presbyterian Church 

Brockway, Pennsylvania 

David J. Brubach 

Executive Vice-President 

Union National Bank 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. E. Bayley Buchanan 

Surgeon 

Mercy Hospital 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. J. Mabon Childs 

Episcopal Lay Leader 

Episcopal Diocese of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. St. Paul Epps 

Retired Church Executive 

Windsor, North Carolina 

Craig G. Ford 

Senior Vice-President 

Mellon National Bank 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



75 



Merle E. Gilliand 

Chairman of the Board and 

Chief Executive Officer 

Pittsburgh National Bank 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Jean H. Henderson 

Stated Supply 

Jefferson Center United Presbyterian Church 

Saxonburg, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Joseph R. Hookey 

First Presbyterian Church 

Washington, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Blaine Hovis 

Civic Leader 

East Main United Presbyterian Church 

Grove City, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. William N. Jackson 

Christ Presbyterian Church 

Canton, Ohio 

The Rev. Carolyn J. Jones 

Glenshaw Presbyterian Church 

Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

John Kaites 

President 

Johnstown Coal and Coke Company 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Gail Buchwalter King 

Community of Reconciliation 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Max A. Lauffer 

Mellon Professor 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

James E. Lee 

President 

Gulf Oil Corporation 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Myles MacDonald 

Mt. Lebanon United Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mark B. Maharg 

Owner 

Maharg Insurance Company 

Butler, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Clinton M. Marsh 

Interim Synod Executive 

Synod of the South 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Mrs. C. Herman Meyer 

Elder 

Hill Top United Presbyterian Church 

Toronto, Ohio 



76 



The Rev. Nicholas Mikita 

Wilson United Presbyterian Chureh 

Clairton, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Kenneth Moe 

Faith Presbyterian Chureh 

Kittanning, Pennsylvania 

Nathan W. Pearson 

Financial Executive 

Paul Mellon Family Interests 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. John Sharick 

Executive Presbyter 

Eastminster Presbytery 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Mrs. Beatrice S. Smith 

Ministry to Black Students 

Edinboro State College 

Edinboro, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert H. Stephens 

Retired Pastor 

Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 

Main Street United Presbyterian Church 

Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Arthur D. Webster, Jr. 

Vance Memorial United Presbyterian Church 

Wheeling, West Virginia 

Mrs. Anthony L. Wolfe 

Stated Clerk 

Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

J. Stuart Zahniser 

Retired Manufacturer 

Quality Assurance for Talon, Inc. 

Meadville, Pennsylvania 



77 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Carnegie Samuel Calian, D.Theol President 

Douglas R. A. Hare, Th.D Dean of the Faculty 

Eugene P. Degitz Vice-President for Development 

Westminster College (Pa.), B.A.; Princeton Theological 

Seminary, M.Div.; Colgate Rochester Divinity School, Th.M.; 

Syracuse University, M.S. 
Warren K. Martin Director of Deferred Giving 

Washington and Jefferson College, B.A.; Pittsburgh 

Theological Seminary, M.Div. 
Dikran Y. Hadidian, M.S Librarian 

Jean Oberlin Financial Aid Officer and Registrar 

University of Kansas, A.B.; Pittsburgh 

Theological Seminary, M.R.E. 
Edgar R. Jones III Director of Admissions 

Muskingum College, B.A.; Andover Newton Theological School, 

B.D.; Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, D.Min. 

L. William Yolton Director of Field Education/ 

Director of Senior Placement 

Harvard College, A.B.; Union Theological Seminary (N.Y.), 

M.Div.; Harvard Divinity School, Th.M.; Harvard Graduate 

School of Arts and Sciences, M.A. 

Library Staff 

Mary Ellen Scott Cataloger/Archivist 

Sterling College, B.A.; University of Pittsburgh, M.L.S. 



78 



INDEX 

Academic buildings 10 

Accreditation 7 

Admissions procedures 69 

Associated Women Seminarians 65 

Awards, prizes and fellowships 57 

Black Seminarians Association 65 

Board and Meals 58 

Board of Directors 75 

Campus Setting 9 

Clinical Pastoral Education 21 

Continuing Education 25 

Course descriptions 

studies in Bible 29 

studies in church history 35 

studies in theology 36 

studies in church and ministry: 

ethics 40 

sociology of religion 42 

education 43 

pastoral care 44 

homiletics 46 

administration 48 

Doctor of Ministry degree 22 

Doctor of Philosophy degree 24 

Evangelical Student Fellowship 66 

Faculty 49 

Faculty advisory system 28 

Fees 57 

Field Education 19 

Financial aid 58 

Grading system 27 

History 5 

Honors Scholarships Program 62 

Housing 11 

Institutional relationships 7 

International Scholars Program 26 

International Student Association 66 

Library 11 

Master of Arts degree 18 

Master of Divinity degree 15 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work Degree 17 

Master of Divinity/Master of Library Science Degree 18 

National Capital Semester for Seminarians 21 

Officers of Administration 78 

Orientation 67 

Placement 21 

Play Care Center 67 

Preaching Association 66 

Purpose 5 



79 



Rent 58 

Special lectures 73 

Special non-degree students 25 

SPICE 67 

Student Association .65 

Tuition 57 

Worship 13 






80 




PITTSBURGH 

THEOLOGICAL 

SEMINARY 



CATALOG '81-83 




PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY LIBRARY 



This catalog is a statement of the policies, personnel and programs of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary as projected by the responsible authorities of the Seminary. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary reserves the right to alter and change its policies, 
personnel and programs, without prior notice, in accordance with the Seminary's 
institutional needs and academic purposes. Complete statements of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary's policies and programs are found in the Seminary's Con- 
stitution, By-laws, Academic Regulations, and Board and Faculty Minutes. 





PITTSBURGH 

THEOLOGICAL 

SEMINARY 



616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206-2596 
412-362-5610 




Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is ac- 
credited by The Association of Theological 
Schools in the United States and Canada, 
and the Middle States Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools. 



SEMINARY CALENDAR 



1981 - 1982 



TERM ONE 



September 8 
November 16 
November 17-20 


First Day of Classes 
Last Day of Classes 
Reading and Examination Period 


TERM TWO 




November 30 
Dec. 19-Jan. 3 
January 4 
February 19 
February 22-26 


First Day of Classes 

Christmas Break 

Classes Resume 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Period 


TERM THREE 




March 8 
May 17 
May 18-21 
May 25 
June 7-11 
June 14-18 


First Day of Classes 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Period 

186th Commencement 

D. Min. Week 

School of Religion 




1982 - 1983 


TERM ONE 




September 7 
November 15 
November 16-19 


First Day of Classes 
Last Day of Classes 
Reading and Examination Period 


TERM TWO 




November 29 
Dec. 18-Jan. 2 
January 3 
February 18 
February 21-25 


First Day of Classes 

Christmas Break 

Classes Resume 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Period 


TERM THREE 




March 7 
May 16 
May 1 7-20 
May 24 
June 6-10 
June 20-24 


First Day of Classes 

Last Day of Classes 

Reading and Examination Period 

187th Commencement 

D Min. Week 

School of Religion 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



An Introduction to Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 5 

Educational Programs 13 

The Master of Divinity Degree, 

The Master of Divinity/Master of Social 

Work Joint Degree, 

The Master of Divinity/Master of Library 

Science Joint Degree, 

The Master of Arts Degree, 

The Master of Sacred Theology Degree, 

The Doctor of Ministry Degree, 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Special Programs 27 

Academic Regulations 29 

Course Descriptions 33 

Faculty 61 

Finances and Financial Aid 75 

Student Life 83 

Admissions Procedures 87 

Special Lectures and 

Continuing Education 91 

The Board of Directors and 

Administrative Officers 97 

Index 105 



AN INTRODUCTION 
TO PITTSBURGH 
THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 




PURPOSE 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a graduate professional institution of the United 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. Located in the heartland of 
Presbyterianism, and part of a thriving city, we seek to prepare men and women for 
dynamic pastoral ministry and Christian lay leadership in all phases of the Church's 
outreach. 

Dedicated to excellence in theological education, the twenty-member faculty 
strives to prepare graduates who will demonstrate both personal piety and the 
keenest possible intellectual understanding of the Gospel and its implications for 
individual and social living. Serious attention is given to the study of biblical 
languages, and to the teaching of theological, historical, ethical, and practical 
disciplines for the successful and meaningful practice of ministry. 

The Seminary is rooted in the Reformed history of faithfulness to Scripture and 
commitment to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. In keeping with our tradition, we con- 
tinue our mission to be a caring and ecumenical community, to nurture personal 
faith and corporate worship, to promote global consciousness and service, and to 
encourage students and faculty to relate their studies to the numerous styles of 
ministry emerging today. 




HISTORY 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the consolidation of two 
previously separate institutions: Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary of the 
United Presbyterian Church of North America, and Western Theological Seminary 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. The union of the two 
denominations in 1958 led to the consolidation of the seminaries. 






The history of the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary began with the found- 
ing of Service Seminary in 1 794 by the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania. Prior 
to that time the Presbytery had been dependent on a supply of ministers sent out 
from Scotland. The Reverend John Anderson, D.D., was elected as the first teacher 
of divinity, and the school began with an enrollment of six students. Service 
Seminary moved twice, first to Ohio, where it became Xenia Theological Seminary, 
and later to Missouri. It merged in 1930 with a seminary which had been founded 
in Pittsburgh in 1825, and together they formed the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary. This institution was later augmented by the resources of Newburgh 
Seminary, which was founded in New York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 

The other branch of our pre-1959 history began with the establishment, in 1785 
by Joseph Smith and in 1787 by John McMillan, of classical academies in 
Washington, Pa. From these, in 1825, the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A., created Western Seminary. It was indeed a western seminary in 
1825, the task of which was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening frontier ter- 
ritories along the Ohio River. 

Since the 1959 consolidation, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has been located 
Dn the old Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary campus in the Highland Park/East Liberty sec- 
tion of Pittsburgh. 

PITTSBURGH 

The City of Pittsburgh, in southwestern Pennsylvania, is built on and surrounded by 
the broken hills and wooded slopes which run along her three rivers. Downtown 
Pittsburgh, located at the point where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers 
merge to form the Ohio, is the center of the nation's ninth largest metropolitan area 
and is home to such important firms as U.S. Steel, Gulf Oil, and Rockwell Interna- 
tional. Pittsburgh is easily accessible via modern systems of air, rail, and ground 
travel. 

Urban renewal in the city, much acclaimed in recent decades, has included the 
arts and education as well as physical rehabilitation. An internationally esteemed 
symphony orchestra along with resident opera, ballet, and theater companies per- 
orm regularly in the lavish Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts and in other city 
heaters. The city is also the steward of several important art collections and 
museums. Carnegie Central Library has eighteen branches and a suburban 
3ookmobile service, and there are also private and specialized libraries in the area 
vhich are often open to the public. 

The city of Pittsburgh is the scene of Western Pennsylvania's largest and most im- 
)ortant educational complex. Three major educational institutions, the University 
)f Pittsburgh, Duquesne University, and Carnegie-Mellon University, plus four 
)rivate colleges are located in the city. These institutions provide an atmosphere of 
ntellectual growth, and offer frequent lectures, on a variety of subjects, which in- 
erested persons may attend. They also provide entertainment in the form of 
nusical and theater productions, and sporting events. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's emergence as an important center of 
heological education has paralleled the city's renaissance. Faculty and students 
ire able to sample richly from and to join actively in Pittsburgh's efforts at human 
ind cultural renewal. Seminary students live in Pittsburgh and are thus sensitized to 
he urban setting of the contemporary theological enterprise. Their own faith is 
:hallenged and enriched by sustained encounter with the joys and tragedies of ur- 
)an life. 

Through the wide scope of field education and other work opportunities, 
tudents from the Seminary are involved in many different areas of Pittsburgh. 

7 



Students serve as pastors in inner-city and suburban churches with a variety of pro 
grams, as chaplains in hospitals and in county and federal penal institutions, as 
campus ministers and in many other positions which affect the life of the city and its 
people. The resources of Pittsburgh for theological education are great, and Pitts 
burgh Seminary tries to make use of these resources as effectively as possible in the 
many facets of its life. The Seminary also attempts to be an active resource for the 
city through the stewardship of its facilities and the creative leadership of the 
members of the Seminary community. 







THE SEMINARY'S IMMEDIATE ENVIRONMENT: 
HIGHLAND PARK AND EAST LIBERTY 

The numerous rivers, valleys and hills common to western Pennsylvania divide 
Pittsburgh into a large number of neighborhoods. Pittsburgh Theological Seminar 
is located on the border between two such neighborhoods. To the north is < 
residential area of substantial and well kept homes, Highland Park, which takes it 
name from the large city park less than one mile from the seminary. One of Pitts 
burgh's finest, Highland Park offers woods, picnic areas, and paths for biking anc 
walking. At the heart of the park is the Pittsburgh Zoo, much of which was built a 
the turn of the century, and which retains, along with its more modern features, < 
bit of the charm of times past. 

8 



To the south is East Liberty, a busy commercial and business center, providing 
eminary residents with easy access to a large department store and many small 
hops and restaurants. East Liberty's residential population represents a healthy 
acial and ethnic cross section of urban America. The seminary is a partner in the 
ast End Cooperative Ministry, an exciting ecumenical venture involving many 
hurches and agencies in cooperative service projects. 



HE CAMPUS 

ittsburgh Theological Seminary is located on a thirteen-acre campus, the major 
ortion of which was once the estate of H. Lee Mason, Jr. The buildings, almost all 
f which have been built since 1954, are of American Colonial design. 

academic Buildings 

HE GEORGE A. LONG ADMINISTRATION BUILDING is the focal point of cam- 
us life. In addition to administrative offices, the building contains lecture and 
eminar rooms, faculty offices, student center, bookstore, the Bible Lands 
luseum, and a large lounge which is used for many gatherings. 

CLIFFORD E. BARBOUR LIBRARY houses a collection of over 192,000 volumes, 
pur open stack areas include 103 desk carrels which may be reserved by students, 
i addition, thirteen enclosed typing carrels, which allow greater privacy for 
^search work, are available for doctoral students. Twenty reserved study rooms 
rovide ideal conditions in which faculty members, visiting scholars, and graduate 

udents may pursue scholarly research. Reading rooms and lounges are informally 
:attered throughout the building. Facilities are also available for reading microfilm 
udio work, language study, and listening to music. 

Special collections and displays augment the book resources of the Barbour 

brary. 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection. The library contains this priceless col- 

ction of classical theological works dating from the reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection ofHymnology. Several thousand valuable hymn 
nd song books which came from the estate of James Warrington of Philadelphia 
rovide research materials for scholars of American and English hymnody. 

Historical Collections. The archive room of Barbour Library contains Minutes and 
ther records of Associate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congrega- 
ons, presbyteries, synods, and general assemblies. Barbour Library is also the 

pository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society and for the Pittsburgh 
resbytery of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

On display in the main floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of Dr. Karl Barth 
f Basel, Switzerland, which were presented to the Seminary by Dr. Barth in 1964. 
ccompanying the desk, at which Dr. Barth wrote his theological treatises, is an 
Jtographed copy of his Kirch liche Dogmatik 1/1. 

HICKS FAMILY MEMORIAL CHAPEL is the newest structure on the Seminary 
ampus. The sanctuary is used for worship during many of the Seminary's chapel 
?rvices, and is used occasionally by local congregations. Hicks Chapel has a 
)acious and comfortable theatre-auditorium which is ideal for conferences and 
)ecial lectures. 

THE JAMES L. KELSO BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM is named for the long-time Pro- 

ssor of Old Testament and Biblical Archaeology. It contains a significant co-llec- 
Dn of ancient Near Eastern and Palestinian pottery and artifacts from numerous 



excavations in which the seminary has had a part over the last fifty-five years. 
Housed in the George A. Long Administration Building, the museum is a valuable 
teaching and research aid for seminary students who may wish to participate in a 
Palestinian dig or gain some expertise in Palestinian archaeology. One of the most 
interesting recent acquisitions is a tomb group from the excavations of the Bab edh- 
Dhra cemetery on the southeast shore of the dead sea, which is in the probable 
area of the biblical cities of Sodom and Gomorrah. 

Housing for Married Students 

SAMUEL A. FULTON MEMORIAL HALL provides eighteen efficiency and twenty- 
one one-bedroom apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette, a bath, and a 
storage locker in the basement. 

THE HIGHLANDER contains seventeen one-bedroom and six two-bedroom 
units. Each apartment includes a living room, kitchen, bath, and storage locker. 

ANDERSON HALL includes six two-bedroom and six three-bedroom apartments, 
each of which has a living room, kitchen, bath, and a storage locker. These units 
are equipped with wall-to-wall carpeting. 

MCMILLAN HALL, Anderson Hall, and The Highlander form a quadrangle which 
encloses a play area for children. In McMillan Hall there are one four-bedroom, 
three three-bedroom, twelve two-bedroom, and three one-bedroom apartments. 
As in Anderson Hall, the units are equipped with wall-to-wall carpeting. On the 
ground floor of McMillan Hall there is a large community room which is used as a 
play care center for pre-school children throughout the school year. 

Apartments in all buildings are unfurnished. In the case of international students, 
or others demonstrating a compelling need, a limited amount of furniture may be 
available through the housing office. 

Each apartment is equipped with a refrigerator and stove; coin-operated laundry 
facilities are located in the basement of each building. 

Life for married students and their families is pleasant and comfortable. Rents are 
well below commercial rates. Shops and stores are within walking distance, public 
transportation is available at the Seminary gate, and public schools are nearby for 
children of all ages. 

Housing for Single Students 

JOHN MCNAUGHER MEMORIAL HALL, the Seminary's original dormitory, now 
serves a variety of purposes. One wing houses women students in large private 
rooms, and another contains faculty offices. Attached to McNaugher Hall is the 
dining facility which consists of three dining halls and a modern kitchen. 

GEORGE C. FISHER MEMORIAL HALL accommodates men in single rooms. On 
the ground floor of Fisher Hall there is currently a shelter for abused women, which 
is run by an independent agency. Fisher Hall has student lounges on each floor. 

Dogs and cats are not permitted in Seminary apartments or dormitories. 



RECREATION 

Under the auspices of the Student Association, athletic events and other recrea- 
tional activities are arranged. Seminary students have access to the gymnasium and 
indoor swimming pool at Peabody High School across the street from the 
Seminary. New recreational facilities on campus are currently under development. 

10 



WORSHIP 

Vorship is an integral part of the life of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Chapel 
ervices, both traditional and experimental in form, are held five times each week 
nd are followed by a time of community-wide fellowship. Students, faculty, and 
dministrators share in the leadership of chapel services under the direction of the 
eminary's Liturgical Committee. Attendance at worship services is voluntary. 




NSTITUTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS 

ittsburgh Council on Higher Education 

he Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education (PCHE) is a cooperative organization 
Dmposed of Pittsburgh area colleges, universities, and graduate schools. Par- 
cipating institutions include: Carlow College, Carnegie-Mellon University, 
hatham College, Community College of Allegheny County, Duquesne University, 
aRoche College, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Point Park College, Robert 
torris College, and the University of Pittsburgh. 

11 



The purposes of PCHE are: to represent a common voice on a variety of issues; to 
examine possibilities for cooperation among the member institutions; and, above 
all, to undertake joint programs which expand educational opportunities for 
students and make the best use of institutional resources. The membership of the 
Seminary in PCHE benefits students by providing possibilities for cross registration 
in courses at the graduate level, by establishing library privileges at eight academic 
libraries other than our own, and by initiating programs in specialized areas. 

The University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary conducts several joint degree programs with the 
University of Pittsburgh. These are described more fully in the section on Educa- 
tional Programs. 

The American Schools of Oriental Research 

The Seminary is associated with the American Schools of Oriental Research. This 
corporation is involved in archaeological research in the Middle East. Most of their 
work has been concentrated in Palestine and Iraq, and they maintain schools in 
Jerusalem, Amman, and Baghdad. Since 1924, we have been active participants in 
numerous field projects in cooperation with the American Schools of Oriental 
Research. 

Arsenal Family and Children's Center 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center came into being in 1952 as a result of a 
Pennsylvania mandate to the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic to "deal with 
the mental hygiene of the normal child in the way of study and training in order 
that there may be a program of prevention of mental and nervous disorders as a 
result of giving children the proper background and training that will prevent such 
disorders." The Arsenal Family and Children's Center has grown and developed in- 
to a unique field laboratory for the psychological study of children and their 
families. It also provides an environment in which students learn methods for the 
disciplined observation of children and families. It thereby contributes to the 
education and training of students for the ministry and other service-related 
careers. 

Association for Clinical Pastoral Education 

This association accredits a nationwide network of Clinical Pastoral Education 
Centers and their supervisors. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a member of the 
association. 

ALUMNI/ALUMNAE 

There are over twenty-six hundred living alumni/ae of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary and its antecedent institutions. Since 1959, over three quarters of our 
graduates have entered the service of the church in parish-related ministries. 
Graduates of the Seminary also serve the church as college and university 
presidents, seminary and college faculty, and as synod and presbytery executives 
and staff. There are nine living alumni of the Seminary who have held the highest 
elected office in the United Presbyterian Church, that of Moderator of the General 
Assembly. 



12 






EDUCATIONAL 
PROGRAMS 




THE MASTER OF DIVINITY DEGREE 

Studies leading to the Master of Divinity degree are designed to prepare men and 
women for the various ministries of the United Presbyterian Church and other 
denominations. It is a fundamental assumption of the Master of Divinity program 
that preparation for the ministry cannot be separated from engagement in ministry 
itself. Thus the Master of Divinity curriculum is designed to integrate theological 
studies and the work of ministry so that theory and practice, academy and parish, 
become complementary components in the educational process. 

One hundred and eight (108) term hours are required for the Master of Divinity 
degree. When followed on a full-time basis, the program is normally completed in 
three academic years. Student Pastors are required to spread their degree work 
over four academic years. An approved four-year sequence of Master of Divinity 
studies is available for such students. An outline of the sequence can be obtained 
from the Registrar's Office. 

In preparing for Christian ministry students should develop an understanding of a 
broad spectrum of knowledge along with a competence in basic pastoral abilities. 
They should be able to use theological insights to integrate these skills and 
resources. The Master of Divinity curriculum is designed to guide the student 
through a pattern of course work and experience which will lead her or him to a 
basic professional competency with which to begin the ordained ministry. At Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary it is understood that this basic professional competen- 
cy includes: 

The ability to understand and make use of the basic documents of faith, i.e., Scrip- 
ture, creeds, and traditions of the church. The study of the Bible, both in English 
and in one of the original languages, and the study of church history are crucial to 
this ability. The course work in Biblical Studies is supplemented by a required ex- 
amination on the content of the English Bible. This test, which is offered annually, 
must be passed by every Master of Divinity student as a requisite for graduation. 
United Presbyterian students generally enroll in a full academic year's study of both 
biblical languages in accordance with the ordination requirements of the 
denomination. 

The ability to communicate through preaching, writing, and teaching, and to 
counsel and provide leadership in the program and administrative areas, fostered by 
the course work in the Pastoral Studies and ministry sequences. Three terms of 
supervised field education are required of all Master of Divinity students in the mid- 
dler year in conjunction with the Pastoral Studies sequence so that the academic 
study in the areas of education, pastoral care, and homiletics can be critically com- 
bined with a well-rounded, supervised involvement in the life of the church. 

The ability to understand in theological terms the sociological, ideological, and 
political content of the cultures in which the church ministers. This understanding 
needs to be followed by the application of ethical standards to the social process, 
using ail of the resources available for making ministry effective. Two required 
courses in Church and Society, the Introduction to Ethics, and one elective course 
in ethics help students to reach these goals. 

The ability to think theologically. In addition to an introduction to historical 
theology, there are two required courses focusing on Christology, and the Church 
and Sacraments. In these courses students study theological method as well as the 
content of central doctrines of the faith. In addition each student is required to take 
one elective course in theology. 



14 



The ability to practice ministry in an appropriate professional style. One of the first 
term courses introduces students to the concept of ministry and its varied respon- 
sibilities. In the senior year two courses lead the student to develop his or her own 
statement of faith (Credo) and to understand the dynamics of the formation of faith 
in the pastor and, through the pastor, in the people. 



THE MASTER OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 





Junior Year 




Term 1 


Term II 


Term III 


Interpreting the Bible 


Biblical Introduction 


Biblical Introduction 


Language 


(OT01 or NT01) 1 


(OT02 or NT02) 2 


Church & Society: 


Language 


Exegesis 


Local 


Historical Studies 1 


Historical Studies II 


Introduction to Ministry 


Elective 

Middler Year 


Introduction to Ethic 


Term 1 


Term II 


Term III 


Pastoral Studies 1: 


Pastoral Studies II: 


Pastoral Studies III: 


Education 


Pastoral Care 


Homiletics 


ntroduction to Modern 


Christology 


Elective 


Religious Thought 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Senior Year 




Term 1 


Term II 


Term III 


Zhurch & Society: 


Credo 


Faith Formation 


Global 


Elective 


Elective 


Zhurch & Sacraments 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 


Elective 







Students must take one Biblical Introduction in each Testament. 
Students may elect to postpone either the second Biblical Introduction or In- 
troduction to Ethics until the middler year in order to make room for one elective 
in Term III, junior year. 

Equivalency Examinations 

Kt the heart of the curriculum in the Master of Divinity program is a core of re- 
quired courses. Ordinarily all students in the program will take these courses. 
However, in certain circumstances a student may be excused from a required 
ourse. Requests should be submitted to the Dean's Office. The faculty in the field 
rom which the student wishes to be excused will design appropriate tests and have 
mthority to determine whether the student has sufficient mastery for the course to 
>e waived. Such courses will be listed on the transcript, showing that the require- 
nent was fulfilled, but no credit hours will be given. 

English Bible Examination 

'assing an examination on the content of the English Bible is required for gradua- 
ion. This examination is offered annually. Although this requirement may be met 
is late as the third year, it is recommended that students take the examination in 
he first year of Master of Divinity studies. 

15 



Field Education Requirement 

Field education at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary assists students to learn about 
the practice of ministry, through direct involvement in local churches and other 
settings, under the direction of skilled field supervisors. 

Master of Divinity students must complete one year of supervised field education 
in a setting approved by the Supervisor for the Practice of Ministry. This require- 
ment is to be fulfilled in the middler year while students are enrolled in the Pastoral 
Studies sequence of courses. Students are expected to use their field placements as 
laboratory settings for specific assignments in those courses. Objectives of the pro- 
gram include acquaintance with a wide variety of ministerial activities, develop- 
ment of skills, sensitivity to the dynamics of pastoral relationships, awareness of the 
social context of ministry, and theological reflection upon the various aspects of the 
practice of ministry. A detailed learning agreement, developed by each student in 
conjunction with his/her field supervisor, coordinates these educational objectives 
with the needs of the church or agency to be served, and provides a basis for a 
shared evaluation of progress at later points in the year. This requirement has been 
fulfilled only when the final evaluation has been completed by supervisor and stu- 
dent and accepted by the Supervisor for the Practice of Ministry. This information is 
shared with the student's sponsoring judicatory where confidentiality is assured. 

Students in the required field education program are expected to give eight to ten 
hours of service in the field per week. Time spent with the field supervisor and in 
staff meetings should be included in this total, but time spent in travel to and from 
the field and in preparation for tasks on the field is not to be counted. Students are 
expected to continue their field service during vacation periods in the school year, 
but should be excused from week-day obligations during examination weeks. 

Field education placements are negotiated with the intent of broadening each 
student's range of experiences in order to contribute to his/her professional 
growth. Placements in hospitals and other service agencies can sometimes be ar- 
ranged for students who anticipate an institutional ministry after graduation. 

Student Pastorates 

Student pastors are required by the seminary to extend their program to four years, 
taking nine credits per term instead of the normal twelve, to compensate for the 
amount of time required by their field service. Copies of the four-year sequence of 
courses can be obtained from the Registrar. 

Internships 

Internships in a wide variety of settings can be arranged through the Supervisor for 
the Practice of Ministry. Summer internships include pastorates, youth assistant- 
ships, and placements in summer camps and secular agencies. A learning agree- 
ment, monthly reports, and a final evaluation are required for the experience to 
qualify as an internship. These reports are included in the student's records. 

Full-time internships of nine to fifteen months duration in local churches or 
specialized settings also provide excellent learning opportunities. Such internships, 
usually taken between the middler and senior year, are required by some 
denominations of their ministerial candidates. The seminary will provide every 
assistance possible in facilitating these experiences. 



16 



)ther Field Experiences 

jpervised field education, while mandatory in the middler year only, is possible in 
le junior and senior years as well. Students may continue in the same placement 
>r a second year if they are assigned new and more responsible tasks. Occasional 
reaching under the auspices of the Preaching Association is also available. Field 
ork which is not subject to the same standards of supervision and evaluation can 
so be arranged for students who require additional income or experience. Enter- 
ig students are cautioned to limit field work and community involvement so that 
leir academic studies will not be put in jeopardy. 

HE MASTER OF DIVINITY/MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 
OINT DEGREE PROGRAM 

linistry and social work share many concerns. The mission of the Church involves 
orking for the improvement of the quality of life in diverse ways, some of which 
arallel social work efforts. Many ministers and theological students want to gain 
le insights and skills provided by social work education in order to enhance their 
tinistry. 

To encourage and equip women and men to engage in social work both in and 
jt of the church and to provide opportunities in social work for students who feel 
call to practice within a church setting, the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and 
ie University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Social Work have developed a pro- 
•am offering a joint degree, that is, M.DIV./M.S.W. 

This joint effort enables students to receive both the M.Div. and the M.S.W. in 
•ur years of post-baccalaureate study instead of the usual five. Nevertheless, the 
int program provides a full course of study in both theology and social work. This 
effected by equating certain courses now taught in both schools, by making pro- 
sion for courses taken in one school to count as electives in the other, and by 
Bveloping specialized field placements. 

The curriculum of the Graduate School of Social Work encompasses studies in 
•ur major curriculum areas or "clusters": Health/Mental Health; Juvenile and 
riminal Justice; Poverty and Associated Problems; and Children and Youth. 
Candidates for the joint degree who enter the program through the Seminary will 
Dncentrate on theological studies during the first two years. The third and fourth 
?ars will be spent predominantly at the School of Social Work, but one course per 
rm will be taken at the Seminary. Should a student elect to terminate the joint 
-ogram before its completion and seek only one degree, he or she will be re- 
jired to complete all of the work ordinarily required for that degree. 
During the third year limited financial aid will be available for students in the joint 
■ogram. Due to the higher tuition costs at the University, such students will prob- 
)ly need to secure additional financial aid from the University or other sources. 
Inquiries regarding the Graduate School of Social Work and requests for Social 
ork catalogs should be addressed to: Director of Admissions, Graduate School of 
)cial Work, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

HE MASTER OF DIVINITY/MASTER OF LIBRARY 
CIENCE JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM 

ttsburgh Theological Seminary and the School of Library and Information Science 
the University of Pittsburgh established in 1968 a joint program to train men and 
Dmen in theological librarianship. The program, designed to be completed in 
ur academic years, culminates in two degrees, the M.Div. and the M.LS. 

17 



Normally, a student will take the first part of his/her work at the Seminary and 
begin work at the University in the third year. The program will include a course on 
resources in theological libraries and six credits of field experience in theological 
librarianship at the Seminary. Should a student elect to terminate the joint program 
before its completion and seek only one degree, he or she will be required to com- 
plete all of the work ordinarily required for that degree. 

Inquiries regarding the School of Library and Information Science and requests 
for Library Science catalogs should be addressed to: Director of Admissions, School 
of Library and Information Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania 15260. 

THE MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Master of Arts Program is designed for persons who are not studying for ordina- 
tion but who wish to work in religious studies at the graduate level. The Master of 
Arts Program (M.A.) is suited for people who wish to enter nonordained profes- 
sional positions in the Church; for laypersons who desire to deepen their 
understanding of the Christian faith; and for persons interested in preparing for 
Ph.D. or other graduate studies. 

Because of the wide range of interests that may be served by this degree, the pro- 
gram has been designed to provide candidates maximum freedom and flexibility in 
planning their own courses of study. No specific courses are required. Certain sorts 
of specialization are allowed, but the advisory process is provided to guarantee ac- 
quaintance with the main theological fields and appropriate nontheological 
studies. 

Seventy-two (72) term hours of studies are required for the degree. Up to twelve 
(12) hours may be taken through cross-registration at other institutions, usually 
those schools that are members of the Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education. 
Normally two years of full-time academic work are needed to complete the pro- 
gram. There is a five year statute of limitations. M.A. candidates may apply for 
transfer to the M.Div. program at any time prior to the awarding of the M.A. 
degree; but once the degree has been awarded, courses credited toward the M.A. 
may no longer be used for the M.Div. 

All candidates are required to complete a Major Paper. Up to nine (9) hours of 
credit may be received for Independent Study done as research for this project. 
These nine (9) hours are taken under a Major Paper Adviser, who must be a 
member or adjunct of the Seminary Faculty. 

The Director of M.A. Studies has the responsibility of counseling all M.A. 
students in the selection of courses in order to insure a balance of work while 
meeting individual needs and preferences. The Director must require that the stu- 
dent become acquainted with the main theological fields and will recommend ap- 
propriate nontheological studies in consultation with knowledgeable colleagues. 
The Director also assists the student in selecting a Major Paper Adviser. 

Religious Education Emphasis 

A special track which emphasizes religious education is available for M.A. can- 
didates who wish to prepare for nonordained educationl ministries. Their courses 
of study should reflect the balance of studies described above. Some work will be 
taken at the School of Education of the University of Pittsburgh. Choice of such 
courses will be made in consultation with the Education faculty of the Seminary. 
The Major Paper is required as above and will be completed with an Adviser ap- 
proved by the Education faculty of the Seminary. In addition, at least six (6) but no 

18 



nore than nine (9) term hours must be taken in supervised Field Education. Ar- 
angements for such work will be made through the Director of Field Education in 
:onsultation with the Director of M.A. Studies, and credit will be granted as In- 
lependent Study courses taken with the Education faculty. 

rhe Pre-Doctoral Master of Arts Program 

"he purpose of this program is to provide preparation for students who wish 
iltimately to apply for admission to a Ph.D. program but who have no M.Div. or its 
equivalent. Prerequisite is an undergraduate major in religion or the equivalent at 
in accredited college or university with a good department of religious studies, 
•tudents without this background will have to take additional prerequisite studies. 

Candidates in this track are required to take thirty-six (36) credits, the course 
election to be determined with a view to: a) what they have had in their under- 
;raduate work, and b) what they plan to designate as their field of specialization in 
he doctoral program. For example, if a student has had good courses in biblical 
tudies and intends to specialize in ethics, that student may not be required to take 
urther course work in Bible. 

As in the other tracks, a Major Paper must be written, and up to nine (9) hours of 
redit may be received for Independent Study done as research for this project. An 
dditional requirement for candidates in this track is the passing of an examination 
i French or German. Those wishing to specialize in Old or New Testament must 
Iso meet the language requirements specified by those departments. 

rHE MASTER OF SACRED THEOLOGY DEGREE 

he S.T.M. degree is a one-year advanced degree for which the M.Div. degree or 
:s equivalent is prerequisite. 

The Program in International Christian Studies, for which the S.T.M. is awarded, 
; designed to assist both overseas and North-American students to study Christiani- 
I as an international faith. All the candidates will take the required course "Chris- 
lanity in a World Context." In addition, certain advanced elective courses will be 
esignated as particularly appropriate to this emphasis and candidates encouraged 
d elect them so that there can be interaction and exchange of views among 
tudents of different countries as a feature of these courses. 

Thirty-six (36) term hours of study are required for the degree. Except for the core 
ourse, no course requirements are specified, in order to allow both overseas and 
Jorth-American students to pursue special interests in theological studies. North- 
American students will be encouraged to spend one term abroad at a theological 
istitution, with course work there approved by the Dean. 

Candidates must choose one of two tracks. In Track I candidates will be granted 
p to nine (9) credits for the writing of a thesis under the guidance of an adviser, 
he Thesis Committee will include a second faculty member. In Track II, the focus 
f the study will be provided by a final examination, which may be either oral or 

ritten. Up to six (6) credits may be earned under the guidance of an adviser for 
reparation for this examination, which will be conducted by the adviser and one 
ther faculty member. 

There are three categories of courses in the Program in International Christian 
Itudies: the course required of all students, "Christianity in a World Context;" 
iesignated electives (five courses); and free electives (four courses). The remainder 
f the credits may be earned in guided reading in preparation for taking the ex- 
mination or writing the thesis. Up to three courses appropriate to the program 

19 



may be taken as free electives at another institution with the approval of the adviser 
and the Dean. 

Required Course in International Christian Studies 

Ml 01 Christianity in a World Context 

The church's paradox of being in the world but not of the world is examined in 
terms of its theological as well as its sociological nature. Thus, the course seeks to 
provide information and to develop awareness of the ambiguous process through 
which Christianity has reached ecumenical reality by being linked to the process of 
Western socio-economic expansion and missionary enterprise "to the ends of the 
earth." In this context contemporary developments in the ecumenical movement 
as well as the specific dynamics of the church in the Third World are seriously 
taken into account, with particular attention given to the signs of vitality and 
creativity within Third World Christianity in the areas of evangelism, worship, 
social ethics and theology. 

Term I— Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 

Designated Electives (1981-82 and 1982-83) 

Term I, 1981-82 

TH31 Theology from a Feminist Perspective Ms. Suchocki 

Term II, 1981-82 

TH17 A Theology of Nature Mr. Wiest 

ET37 The Ethics of Peacemaking Mr. Stone 

WS14 The Theology and Practice of 

Christian Worship Mr. Oman 

MI11 The World Mission of the Church Mr. Webster 




20 



rerm III, 1981-82 

OT42 Faith and Culture in the Ancient Near East Mr. J. Jackson 

CH39 Christianity in the Modern World Mr. Webster 
ET30 Christianity in the Latin American 

Context: Ethical Issues Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 

SR10 Introduction to Sociology of Religion Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 



rerm I, 1982-83 
MHO The History of Christian Missions 

rerm II, 1982-83 
SR12 Christianity and Social Conflict 
NT37 God and the Gods in the Old Testament 
WS14 The Theology and Practice of 
Christian Worship 

rerm III, 1982-83 
CH40 Contemporary Eastern Christianity 
SR18 Christianity and Cultures: Selected Readings 

from the Third World 
HM29 Storytelling 

NT38 God and the Gods in the New Testament 
ET23 Social Teachings of the Christian Churches 
TH32 Christian Encounter with World Religions 



Mr. Partee 

Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 
Mr. Mauser 

Mr. Oman 
Mr. Calian 

Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 
Mr. Ezzell 
Mr. Mauser 
Mr. Stone 
Ms. Suchocki 



OOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROGRAM 

'urpose 

Developing competency in professional ministry is a process in which ministers are 
mgaged throughout their educational and professional lives. One step in that 
levelopment has been the work for a Bachelor or Master of Divinity degree de- 
igned to help prepare for entrance into professional ministry. Another step may be 
engaging in programs of continuing education. 

The Doctor of Ministry Degree Program goes beyond these by providing a 
listinctive opportunity for systematic and disciplined study that will help ordained 
:lergy work toward a demonstrably higher level of competence in integrating all 
ispects of ministry. 

The intention of the program is that through ministry-related projects, studies, 
>apers, and other assignments the student will improve competency in such areas 
s: 

1. Defining and organizing complex situations of ministry using biblical, theo- 
logical, sociological, political, and personal insights. 

2. Analyzing situations of ministry in such a way as to understand their nature 
and causes, and to identify opportunities for effective ministry. 

3. Taking responsible action with a deeper grasp of homiletical, educational, 
counseling, and administrative principles enhanced by a biblical, historical, 
and theological heritage. 

4. Evaluating actions and their outcomes from a variety of responsible per- 
spectives. 

Doctor of Ministry candidates must select one of the following three areas: Parish 
ocus, Pastoral Care Focus or Chaplaincy Focus. All courses are for three academic 
redits unless otherwise noted. 



21 




PARISH FOCUS 

The Parish Focus is designed to enrich the total practice of ministry within a con- 
gregational setting. It builds upon the education, training, and experience of the 
pastor to strengthen weaknesses and to enhance strengths. The several com- 
ponents, briefly described below, implement the parish program from several 
perspectives. 

The Congregational Committee, chosen by the pastor, ties the congregation into 
the program itself. The committee and the pastor develop a Mission Statement for 
the church. The pastor and committee conduct an assessment of both the church 
and the ministry of the church in light of the Mission Statement. This should reveal 
both strengths and weaknesses, and will be used to guide the pastor's learning 
through course work. It will later become part of the data used to select and define 
the doctoral paper. The Congregational Committee continues to work with the 
pastor in this selection and definition. 

Stage One of the Parish Focus comprises six seminars and two colloquia, as 
described below. Stage Two requires the satisfactory completion of a doctoral 
paper which must demonstrate the candidate's ability to identify a problem, issue, 
or concern in his or her own ministry, marshall appropriate resources, both con- 
ceptual and professional, and develop a method for addressing the issue. Two elec- 
tives must be taken during this stage, preferably focusing in the general area of the 
doctoral project. A faculty committee of two, appointed by the Dean with the 
recommendations of the student, will consult with the candidate throughout Stage 
Two. In the entire course of study the candidate's self-evaluation and assessment 
by peers, as well as the supportive evaluation of the professors, are central to the 
educational process. 

22 



Required Courses in the Parish Focus 

)M01 Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special emphasis on implications for the prac- 
ce of ministry in today's church. Theology is understood and applied in light of 
Decific situations in the candidates' ministry. 

IM02 Pastoral Care 

Theological and psychological insights are focused on the theory and practice of 
aring with case studies furnished by the pastors. 

>M03 Homiletics 

An advanced course in the theory and practice of preaching in the context of 
'orship, with pastor input central to the seminar. 

►M04 Administration 

Problems in church administration, including the development of stewardship 
nd lay leadership, are addressed in light of theological criteria and administrative 
leory. 

>M05 Education in the Context of the Christian Tradition 

The course is designed to help pastors implement a complete educational pro- 
ram, preschool through adult, in the local church. A clarification of the unique- 
ess of Christian education will be sought. 

>M06 Congregational and Community Issues 

A case method consideration of problems confronting the church in society, us- 
ig the discipline of Christian ethics as a major resource. 

>M07 Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student in focusing upon an area in ministry for 
le doctoral project. Theoretical issues underlying the problem and a method for 
^dressing the problem are clarified as the student develops a paper proposal in 
Dnsultation with peers and faculty. Two credits. 

M08 Biblical Colloquium 

Attention will be given to the foci and resources of biblical studies today. Prin- 
pal emphasis will be placed on development of a hermeneutic that will lead to 
elpful and responsible use of the Bible in the doctoral project. Two credits. 

)ptions for Taking the Parish Focus 

*vo time options for the Doctor of Ministry program are offered in order to meet 
le different situations of ministers. Option I seminars meet on the Pittsburgh cam- 
us one day a week (usually Mondays) each term during the academic year, 
?ptember to May. Option II concentrates the study in sessions of one to three 
eeks (usually in January and June) over two years. Established sites for Option II 
*e the Pittsburgh campus, the Eckerd College campus in St. Petersburg, Florida 
id The Thompson Center, St. Louis, Missouri. Other sites are under considera- 
Dn. 

ASTORAL CARE FOCUS 

astoral Care is that form of ministry representative of the servant-role in which one 
erson tries to help another person or persons to resolve problems and crises so 
tat each human life may reach its full potential. The pastor's goals are both 
Itimate and penultimate: ultimately to help people to relate to God meaningfully, 

23 



and penultimately to cope creatively with living, especially with problematic situa- 
tions. Therefore, the pastor uses theological and religious insights and resources as 
well as theory and practical skills learned from the social sciences, especially 
psychology. 

More people turn to the pastor than to any other counselor in their initial search 
for help. In many areas of the country there are few others to whom to turn. The 
pastor is often seen to be less threatening than other counselors. He or she general- 
ly makes no charge. For these and other reasons the pastor has a remarkable op- 
portunity to care emphatically for, and to counsel with, people both within the 
church and outside to help them to deal with their problems and grow toward 
wholeness. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has devised a specialty in pastoral care at the 
doctoral level to assist pastors to become more proficient in the art of pastoral car- 
ing and counseling. The doctoral program involves ten required seminars and one 
elective, scheduled in a two-year period, and a third year which is devoted to a 
project and clinical paper reporting that work. Throughout the three-year program 
theological and psychological insight will be used in developing the theory and 
practice of pastoral care. While attention is given to those areas of stress and pain 
which most command the pastor's attention (anxiety, grief, guilt, depression, ag- 
ing, addiction, marriage and family, identity crises, etc.) the program also focuses 
upon the pastor's work in helping people to relate to God meaningfully and to 
cope creatively with living. 

The clinical paper, dealing with an aspect of pastoral care, will be written under 
the supervision of a committee of two faculty in this field. No less than fifty pages in 
length, the paper must include a description of the problem and the proposed 
methodology; a section presenting biblical, theological, and historical material per- 
tinent to the study; a review of the relevant literature; an empirical study of the sub- 
ject chosen; and a concluding section detailing results of the inquiry together with 
any suggestions for further study. 

Required Courses in the Pastoral Care Focus 

DM01 Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special emphasis on implications for the prac- 
tice of ministry in today's church. Theology is understood and applied in light of 
specific situations in the candidates' ministry. 

Term I, 1981-82— Ms. Suchocki 
1982-83-Mr. Wiest 



DM21 Human Development 

This course traces human development along lines set forth by Freud and radical- 
ly expanded by Erickson. With Erickson as the transitional figure, the course 
stresses developments in ego psychology as especially helpful to the practice of 
ministry. The third section of the course analyzes communal components, deals 
with group theory, and explores implications for ministry. Theological material is 
part of the data of the course, especially process theology. 

Term I— Mr. G. Jackson 

DM22 Pastoral Care I 

This course will be taught in two parts, one in each of the first two years. Clinical 
and didactic components will be included in each. Part one will deal with the 
history of pastoral care, the identity of the pastor, the nature of stress, especially on 
persons such as pastors, and the basic skills in pastoral care. 

Term II— Mr. G. Jackson & Mr. Paylor 

24 



DM23 Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course has in view a new theory of pastoral care based on process theology 
and more specifically the conceptuality of Alfred North Whitehead. It endeavors to 
incorporate the relevant rich insights of Freud, Jung, Maslow, and gestalt 
psychology within a process metaphysical and theological framework. Readings in 
both process thought and psychology are required. 

Term II— Mr. G. Jackson 

DM24 Clinical Hospital Seminar 

This seminar is designed to integrate experiential learning about one's own func- 
tioning in the practice of ministry within a hospital setting and to relate that practice 
to theology, medicine, and the behavioral sciences. It will include interdisciplinary 
didactic sessions in hospital visitation, case seminars, and group process. Two 
credits. 

Term III— Ms. Taylor 

DM25 Assessment of Needs/Stress 

When persons are identified as needing help, how can the pastor understand 
what their needs are? This question is the heart of the course. The answer will be 
sought in a variety of models, which examine stress in the individual, in family 
systems, and in social groups such as the congregation. 

Term III— Mr. G. Jackson & Mr. Paylor 

DM26 Marriage and Family 

The dynamics of marriage and family will be addressed both psychologically and 
theologically. A major part of the course will deal with the practice of marital 
counseling and caring for families. 

Term I— Mr. Mackey 

DM27 Pastoral Care II 

Specific attention will be given to problems which are frequently encountered in 
ministry, such as those concerned with adolescence, grief, depression, substance 
abuse, and aging. Techniques will be developed for working with counseling situa- 
tions. 

Term II— Mr. G. Jackson & Mr. Paylor 

DM28 Clinical Seminar with Mental Health Professionals 

In this course students will consult with and learn from professionals in the men- 
tal health field. The student will have a choice of placement in different types of 
clinical settings in the Pittsburgh community. For example, the pastor may study 
and work with children, or adolescents, or in a community mental health center. 
The intention of the seminar is to enhance the pastor's awareness of the needs of a 
particular population, and to enable her or him to learn from the professionals who 
work with such a group. Two credits. 

Term II— Staff 

DM29 Clinical Seminar in Pastoral Counseling 

The aim of this seminar is to enable the minister to decide which situations in 
ministry are appropriate to pastoral counseling and to provide supervision in those 
that are. Two credits. 

Term Ill-Staff 



25 



CHAPLAINCY FOCUS 

The Chaplaincy Focus is designed to extend the ministry of the church more deeply 
and effectively to those who are in institutional situations such as the military, 
schools, hospitals, or prisons. The Doctor of Ministry goal, to increase competence 
in ministry, is applied to chaplains by tailoring the seminars specifically to the 
unusual needs which chaplains encounter. While the formal structure of each 
seminar addresses general needs common to chaplains, there is an intentional flex- 
ibility in the seminars so that discussion of the issues raised will increase insight and 
skill in the forms of ministry represented in each group of chaplains. 

The flexibility of the program is also demonstrated in the negotiable timing of 
courses. An entering group may contract to study together for as many as six or as 
few as two seminars per year. As with all Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Doctor of 
Ministry groups, membership in the group is restricted to those who initially con- 
tract for the program. This assures a high level of peer collegiality and trust, and 
facilitates the peer learning which is essential to the program. 

Since seminars are offered in concentrated one-week periods, usually with thirty 
class hours, readings for the class and application of insight must take place before 
and after the course. Therefore, at the beginning of the program each chaplain will 
receive syllabi for all seminars. This will allow preseminar guided reading, and will 
prepare the chaplains to benefit fully from the classes. Application of the course 
work in a specific assignment will be negotiated between the professor and 
chaplain, and will usually be completed within three months of the class. 

The Chaplaincy Focus proceeds in two stages. The first includes six core courses, 
plus a two-week Proposal Colloquium on the Pittsburgh campus. The second stage 
will include three electives related, where possible, to the doctoral project, plus the 
actual work of the project. 

DM01 Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special emphasis on implications for the prac- 
tice of ministry in today's church. Theology is understood and applied in light of 
specific situations in the candidates' ministry. 

DM31 Pastoral Care for Chaplains 

Most chaplains spend much time in counseling, and many have taken some ad- 
vanced work. Basic principles, therefore, will be assumed; and special considera- 
tion will be given to pastoral problems that are particularly encountered in 
chaplaincy. Among these are stress resulting from frequent moves, conflicts around 
insecurity of interpersonal relationships, high incidence of crisis intervention, and 
development of community resources in a largely transient congregation. Con- 
siderable freedom will be allowed for the study of cases brought by group 
members. 

DM32 Education as it Pertains to Adults 

Special emphasis will be on the development of programs for adults. Where ap- 
propriate, programs for women and minorities will be encouraged and developed. 
The course will also include theory and practice involving the broad spectrum of 
education as it is applied in institutional relationships. 

DM33 Worship 

Preaching skills and worship theory will be discussed. Particular attention will be 
given to the dynamics of preaching and the development of modes of worship in 
the unusual circumstances of chaplaincy. There will also be consideration of the 
chaplain's personal devotional resources. 

26 



DM34 Social Ethics for Chaplains 

An examination through lectures, case study and seminar discussion of the social 
teaching of the churches relevant to the institutional ministry of the chaplain in 
schools, hospitals, prisons, and the military. 

DM07 Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student in focusing on an area in ministry for 
the doctoral project. Theoretical issues underlying the problem and a method for 
addressing the problem are clarified as the student develops a paper proposal in 
consultation with peers and faculty. Two credits. 

DM08 Biblical Colloquium 

Attention will be given to the foci and resources of biblical studies today. Prin- 
cipal emphasis will be placed on development of a hermeneutic that will lead to 
helpful and responsible use of the Bible in the doctoral project. Two credits. 

THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE 

The University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary have a 
cooperative graduate program in the study of religion. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary participates in the University of Pittsburgh's 
Cooperative Graduate Program in the Study of Religion. This program draws upon 
the resources of both institutions and leads to the Ph.D. degree awarded by the 
University. 

The aim of the program is to foster creative, interdisciplinary study in several 
areas: Biblical Studies (Old and New Testament); History of Religions (chiefly Chris- 
tianity and Judaism, but work in Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism is also offered); 
Theology; Ethics; Sociology and Anthropology of Religion; and Phenomenology of 
Religion. For information about requirements, course offerings, preliminary and 
comprehensive examinations, language requirements, etc., consult the University 
of Pittsburgh's bulletin, Graduate Programs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 
Inquiries and applications for admission should be addressed to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Department of Religious Studies 

University of Pittsburgh 

2604 Cathedral of Learning 

Pittsburgh, PA 15260 

THE NATIONAL CAPITAL SEMESTER 
FOR SEMINARIANS 

D ittsburgh Theological Seminary participates in the National Capital Semester for 
Seminarians sponsored by Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D. C. This 
Drogram provides an opportunity for seminary students to spend a semester in 
Washington for study and involvement in the processes of government and the 
:oncerns of the churches. The program is designed to include supervised study and 
nteraction (reflection), and will provide a full term of academic credit. The pro- 
gram is open to any student who has completed at least one year of study at Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary. Seminary graduates may apply for a program to begin 
vithin one year of their graduation. 



27 



CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Clinical Pastoral Education brings theological students and ministers into super- 
vised encounter with persons in critical life situations. Out of intense involvement 
with persons in need and the feedback from peers and supervisors, the students 
develop new awareness of themselves as persons and of the needs of those to 
whom ministry is offered. From theological reflection on specific human situations, 
new insight and understanding are derived and the student or minister is con- 
fronted with his or her own humanity. Within the interdisciplinary team-process of 
helping persons, they develop skills in interpersonal and interprofessional relation- 
ships. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary grants academic credit to students who 
complete full quarters of Clinical Pastoral Education at centers accredited by the 
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. 

PLACEMENT FOR GRADUATING SENIORS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's placement service assists graduating seniors 
both in locating appropriate situations of service in ministry and in self-evaluation 
to determine vocational commitments. United Presbyterian students are assisted 
by the Seminary, in conjunction with the Vocation Agency, in meeting the 
denomination's candidacy requirements and in utilizing the denomination's place- 
ment arrangements. Contacts for students of other denominations are facilitated 
according to their particular needs. An inventory of placement opportunities is 
kept by the Placement Office. Students are assisted in the writing of resumes and 
dossiers. Pastor nominating committees, judicatory officials and pastors visit the 
Seminary campus periodically to interview graduating seniors. 

SPECIAL NONDEGREE STUDIES 

Clergy and lay persons who wish to enroll as Special Students in courses at Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary for non-degree purposes are invited to do so. Special 
Students may enroll in as many as two courses per term, up to a total of six courses. 
Special Students complete all the assigned requirements for each course in which 
they enroll and receive academic credit. Credits earned as a Special Student may 
be transferred to any established Seminary degree program in which the student 
may later enroll. Those desiring Special Student status must possess an accredited 
bachelor's degree and apply through the Admissions Office. 

Clergy and lay persons who desire to audit courses at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary are invited to do so. No academic credit is given for audits. Applications 
for audit shall be accompanied by a college transcript and be submitted to the Con- 
tinuing Education Office along with a fee of $50.00 per course. The transcript and 
record of classes will be kept as a part of the Continuing Education files. 

INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is committed to serving the professional educa- 
tional needs of the whole church. Scholarships a re offered annually to international 
students who have already completed the Master of Divinity degree or its 
equivalent in their own country and whose plans for an additional year of study are 
endorsed by the church in their own country. These scholarships provide tuition, 
room, board and a small monthly cash allowance for one academic year to interna- 
tional students endorsed to the Seminary by the World Council of Churches, the 
World Alliance of Reformed Churches or by the Leadership Development Program 
of the National Council of Churches. 

28 



ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 




GRADING SYSTEM 

Grading in the Seminary is designed to provide an evaluation of the scholastic at- 
tainment of each student, and a challenge for each student to work at his/her best. 

1 . The meaning of the grades given shall be as follows: 
A 4.0 Exceptional 

B + 3.5 Superior 
B 3.0 Satisfactory 

C 2.0 Unsatisfactory 

F 0.0 Failing 

WFA Withdrawal with Faculty approval 

There is no category of Incomplete 

2. The Quality Point Average is determined by dividing the quality points by 
the number of credit hours taken (excluding credit hours for Pass grades). 

3. Average for Graduation. For graduation with the M.Div. or M.A. degree a 
B average (3.00) is required. 

4. Dismissal. Two consecutive terms below 3.00 or three nonconsecutive 
terms below 3.00 constitute reasons for dismissal by faculty action. 

5. Attendance. Attendance at class is not mandatory except where indicated 
by the faculty member on the course description form. 

6. Official Drop Dates. Couses may be dropped or added during the first and 
second weeks of each term without penalty. Courses dropped during the 
third week through the fifth week carry a penalty of one-half of the tuition 
fee. Courses dropped after the official drop date require full payment and 
recording of a failing grade. All dropping of courses must be done officially 
through the Registrar's Office. 

TYPES OF COURSES 

1 . In addition to required and elective courses, students may do advanced work 
in a particular subject as Independent Study or Directed Study. An Independent 
Study is negotiated by a student with a faculty member with the permission of the 
Dean. A Directed Study is designed in the same way as an Independent Study 
course, but it is distinguished by the requirement of much closer tutorial work on 
the part of the professor. A further distinction is that Directed Study courses may in- 
volve more than one student but no more than four students. Both of these studies 
will be graded Pass/Fail, with a statement from the faculty member concerning the 
nature of the study and an evaluation of the student's performance. Normally, 
students may not enroll for more than one Independent Study or Directed Study 
per term or six per Pittsburgh Seminary first degree program. Underenrolled classes 
which become Directed Studies count in the above total. 

2. Audit. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary students may attend a class for listen- 
ing purposes with the permission of the professor. Audit does not require registra- 
tion or payment, and no record of audit is made. 

Nondegree students may audit seminary courses under the Continuing Educa- 
tion Program. 

3. Audit-Credit. Students registered in a course for audit-credit are required to 
participate fully in reading, discussion, seminar and position papers, etc., but are 
not required to write a final paper or examination. Satisfactory completion of these 
requirements leads to an audit-credit notation for the course on the official 
transcript. No grade is given for the course and no credit is given toward gradua- 
tion. Audit-credit charge is one-half the regular tuition. 

30 



4. PCHE. Sixteen hours of graduate level work may be taken at PCHE member 
chools and may be included in the 108 M.Div. hours. Twelve hours may be in- 
:luded in the 72 M.A. hours. These credits must be approved by the Dean of Facul- 
y. Registration and payment will be handled according to PCHE procedures for 
:ross-registration at the graduate level. PCHE courses will be recorded with the 
;rades given by host institution (A or B). Grades lower than B will not receive 
icademic credit at Pittsburgh Seminary. 

For complete information regarding student responsibilities and pertinent regula- 
ions, consult the "Academic Principles and Procedures for M.Div. and M.A. 
)egrees." 

: ACULTY ADVISORY SYSTEM 

\\\ incoming Master of Divinity students are assigned advisors, selected by the 
)ean, normally from among faculty teaching first year courses. Newly enrolling 
tudents will be encouraged to contact their advisors during the opening orienta- 
on in the fall, and the advisors will be expected to make themselves available for 
uch contacts. An advisor's signature is not required for class registration. Contact 
/ith the advisor is the student's responsibility and may be established according to 
ie need of the student. This advisory system applies only to first year Master of 
)ivinity students. In the assignment of advisors, the requests of students for specific 
rofessors will be given preferential consideration, but ordinarily no professor will 
e assigned more than six students. 

j The Director of Master of Arts Studies has the responsibility for counseling all 
laster of Arts students in the selection of courses in order to insure a suitable varie- 
/ of courses. 



31 



COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 

All courses are for three 
academic credits unless 
otherwise noted. 



STUDIES IN BIBLE 

'Thy word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path" (Psalm 1 1 9:1 05). The word 
of God in Scripture nourishes and regulates Christian faith and action, it lays the 
cornerstone for every aspect of the Church's ministry to the world, and it sets 
norms for the structures of Christian theology. A rediscovery of the Bible has pro- 
vided the impetus for every forward movement in the history of the Church. At the 
end of the twentieth century, when alienation of individuals, races, classes and na- 
tions threatens to tear the world apart, when the issue of authority continues to be 
a problem, a new and careful look at the sources of our common faith is im- 
perative. 

The intention of the courses offered is to engage students in Old and New Testa- 
ment research in such a way that they may learn the methods of study, acquire the 
basic tools and skills necessary to undertake ministry, and constantly relate their 
own study of the Scriptures to all facets of the Christian life. 

During the first two years of work in the M.Div. program students will survey the 
literature of the Old and New Testaments as well as explore the settings and in- 
fluences of the biblical world by means of three core courses, i.e. Interpreting the 
Bible, and one introduction in each testament (OT01 or OT02, and NT01 or NT02). 
The curriculum also calls for serious consideration of the Bible in terms of study in 
the original languages. Therefore, Hebrew or Greek is required for two terms in the 
junior year and is immediately followed by a third-term exegetical course in the 
corresponding Testament. A similar sequence in the other language can be elected 
in the second or third year. As for further elective opportunities, there are advanc- 
ed exegetical offerings along with courses in the areas of Intertestament, ar- 
chaeology, New Eastern languages, biblical theology and ethics, hermeneutics, 
critical studies, etc. 

New discoveries which directly affect our understandings of the Bible continue 
to be announced with startling frequency. Pittsburgh Seminary has a rich heritage 
of excellence in the area of biblical studies and we are determined to enable and 
inspire future generations of Christian leaders to join in the exciting venture of 
these pursuits. 

Required Courses in Bible 

BT01 Interpreting the Bible 

The Bible is the foundation and touchstone of our Christian faith and tradition. 
The Bible is also a collection of books, compiled over a long period of time, written 
in ancient languages and reflecting long dead and distant cultures. How do we go 
about understanding it, and explaining it to others? This course will introduce 
students to their own presuppositions and to the ways in which the Church has in- 
terpreted the Bible, and offer the tools to begin the task. It will discuss the forma- 
tion of the individual Books and their inclusion into the Canon of Holy Scripture, 
the problem of the Bible as Word of God in the words of humans, the problem of 
historical statements and theological affirmations, the question of continuity and 
discontinuity, and the contribution which the Bible makes to the task of theology. 

Term I, 1981-82— Mr. J. Jackson and Mr. Mauser 
1982-83— Mr. Gowan and Mr. Hare 

OT01 Historical Books of the Old Testament 

An introduction to the historical books of the Old Testament, intended to ac- 
quaint students with the basic methodologies of Old Testament research and the 
present state of Old Testament studies. 

Term II, 1981-82— Mr. Gowan 
34 1982-83— Mr. von Waldow 



>T02 Prophets and Psalms 

The nature of prophecy in ancient Israel, and its background in the cultures of 
le ancient Near East. Special attention is given to the genres of prophetic oracles 
nd the methodologies which may be employed for their interpretation. The 
lessage of the great eighth-century prophets, Amos, Hosea, Micah, and Isaiah of 
rusalem stand at the heart of the course. The world of Jeremiah, Deutero-lsaiah 
id Ezekiel is explored. An introduction to the Psalms, as the product of Israel's 
jltic life, concludes the course. The aim of the whole is to enable the student to 
egin exegesis with a firm grasp of the fundamentals. 
Term III, 1981-82— Mr. von Waldow 
1982-83— Mr. Gowan 

T01 Gospels, General Epistles, and Revelation 

The principal emphasis of this course is on the four Gospels and the methods 
npioyed in their critical study (literary, form, and redaction criticism). General 
Distles, Revelation, and matters of text and canon are examined briefly. 
Term II— Mr. Walther 

T02 Acts, Pauline Epistles, and Hebrews 

The messages of Acts, the Pauline epistles, and Hebrews are examined in the 
*ht of their historical context and literary structure. Special emphasis is placed on 
le life and thought of Paul. 
Term Ill-Mr. Kelley 

»T03 Hebrew 

A course designed to lead to an appreciation and competent use of Hebrew as 
ne of the languages of biblical revelation. Instruction is in small, graded sections 
) that a maximum of individual attention and achievement is possible. Two sec- 
Dns will follow the inductive method, working directly with selected texts of the 
ebrew Bible. One section will employ the more traditional approach, using a 
•ammar as the basic tool of instruction. Students may elect either approach. 
Term I— Staff 

T04 Hebrew 

A continuation of OT03. 
Term II— Staff 

>T05 Old Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Hebrew moves to the exegesis segment of the 
quence. Individual professors indicate to students whether a book or particular 
assages will be exegeted. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Introduction to 
<egetical method: moving from grammar and syntax to the application of critical 
ethods and the use of reference materials in order to arrive at conclusions con- 
?rning the original and present meaning of a text; 2) Continuation of the Hebrew 
nguage sequence. 
Term Ill-Staff 

T03 New Testament Greek 

A course designed to lead to a competent use of Greek as one of the languages of 
blical revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to read from the 
reek New Testament, and unique study aids prepared by the Staff are used. In- 
ruction is in small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied Greek 
ill be assigned to special sections. 
Term I— Staff 



35 



NT04 New Testament Greek 

Continuation of NT03, teaching by the inductive method. 
Term II — Staff 

NT05 New Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Greek moves to the exegesis segment of the se- 
quence. Individual professors indicate to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Introduction to 
methodology of exegesis, such as problems and limitations of an English transla- 
tion; source strata for selected passages which will be chosen by the professor for 
critical problems, structure analysis, historical background of sources and text; in- 
tent; introduction to the theology of the particular book; 2) Continuation of the 
Greek language sequence. 

Term Ill-Staff 

Old Testament 

Required Courses in Old Testament 

OT01 Historical Books of the Old Testament 

OT02 Prophets and Psalms 

OT03 Hebrew 

OT04 Hebrew 

OT05 Old Testament Exegesis 

Elective Courses in Old Testament 

OT14 Deutero-lsaiah 

The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Introduction to methodology of ex- 
egesis, such as problems and limitations of an English translation, form critical 
problems, structure analysis, historical background of the book of Deutero-lsaiah, 
intent; 2) Introduction to the theology of Exile. In particular, the expectation of 
salvation against the background of 587 B.C., Old Testament eschatology. 

Term I, 1982-83— Mr. von Waldow 

OT15 Amos 

A study of the book of Amos: its major emphasis; the place of the prophet in 
Israel's culture; and the significance of the message of Amos for our situation. 
Mr. J. Jackson 

OT19 Ruth, Jonah & Esther (Exegesis) 

A study of the art of story-telling in the Hebrew language, making use of the 
methods of form and rhetorical criticism in order to contribute to an appreciation 
of these books as literature in addition to a reconsideration of their theological 
significance. 

Mr. Gowan 

OT26 The Beginnings of the History of Israel 

A study of the historical question: In what sociological entity did Israel enter the 
scene of ancient Near Eastern History? The focus is on the historical background of 
the traditions of Israel in Egypt, the Patriarchs, the Sinai, and the occupation of the 
land. These considerations lead to the discussion of the theological question: why 
does the Old Testament tradition describe the beginning of the history of the 
chosen people differently from the actual course of events? 

Mr. von Waldow 
36 



)T28 Studies in Biblical Archaeology 

Specialization in a particular period or aspect of archaeology as it relates to 
iblical studies is offered every third year as a supplement or alternative to OT29. 
ossible topics are: "The Iron Age or the Period of the Israelite Monarchy in 
alestine," "Archaeology in the New Testament/' "The Pottery of Palestine as a 
hronological and Cultural Indicator." 

1983-84-Ms. Lapp 

fl"29 Archaeology of Palestine 

An introduction to archaeology's contribution to biblical studies, how it has in- 
reased our understanding of biblical times, thrown light on biblical texts, and ad- 
anced our knowledge of biblical history; a survey of the finds of archaeology in 
alestine from the earliest times through the New Testament period. 

Term I, 1981-82-Ms. Lapp 

>T30 Ancient Israel and Egypt 

The influence of the experience of slave life in Egypt upon the tradition of Israel's 
ory, and of the continued contact between Egypt and Israel after the entrance of 
rael into Canaan, and into the Exilic age and after. This will involve a study of the 
rms of Egyptian literature and a comparison and contrast with the genres of the 
Id Testament. Hebrew not required. 
Mr. J. Jackson 

T31 Judaism from the Exile to the Birth of the Church 

A survey of the history, life, and faith of the Jewish people, covering the postexile 
arts of the Old Testament and the literature of the Intertestamental Period. Deals 
ith life-styles, institutions, literature, and theology as well as the history of the 
riod. 
Mr. Gowan 

T33 Prophet-Priest-Wise Man: A Study in Biblical Ministries 

Intended to provide a biblical basis for evaluating various types of ministry in the 
odern church by examining the work of those who were recognized to be God's 
inisters in the Old Testament. 
Mr. Gowan 

T36 Jeremiah 

The first part of the course uses the book of Jeremiah to demonstrate the 
?velopment from the original oral pronouncement of prophetic words to pro- 
letic books as we have them today in the canon. The second part deals with the 
iginal theology of the prophet Jeremiah and its interpretation by a later genera- 
>n which produced the prose sections in the book of Jeremiah. Prerequisite: 
ebrew (OT03 and OT04). 
Mr. von Waldow 

T37 Worship and Psalms 

Seminar on Israel's songs and the Christian use of the Psalter in corporate wor- 

ip. Two-track: students with some knowledge of Hebrew will be helped in ex- 

[esis; others will be expected to do wider reading for their interpretation of the 

alms. 

Mr. J. Jackson 



37 



OT38 Eschatology of the Old Testament 

The Old Testament view of the future will be explored, beginning with its 
broadest sense as the fulfillment of God's promises, but concentrating on the ex- 
pectation of radical changes in humanity, society and nature to occur "in that 
day." The contributions of Old Testament thought to later Jewish and Christian 
eschatology and relationships with modern future hopes will be emphasized. 

Term I, 1981-82— Mr. Gowan 

OT39 Worship in Israel 

The essence of worship in Israel and the basic theological ideas reflected in the 
major annual feasts and some typical cultic activities; the importance of the 
Israelite cultic personnel, such as priests, Levites, and prophets. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT40 Hebrew Reading 

Supervised reading of selected Old Testament passages. One credit. 
Offered each term— Staff 

OT42 Faith and Culture in the Ancient Near East 

Ways in which different religious faiths of the ancient world dealt with the prob- 
lem of conflicting cultures. The course will offer a study of selected texts bearing 
upon the attitudes a faith may have toward other faiths: tolerance and exclusivity, 
internationalism and xenophobia, proselytism and universalism. Various theologies 
consistent with these attitudes will be examined: deity as "jealous" or tolerant, 
angry or benign, tribal or universal. Illustrative documents will be chosen from the 
iconography and literature of the cultures which surrounded Israel as well as from 
Israel's own literature. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. J. Jackson 

OT45 Old Testament Ethics 

The course deals with the ethical implications of the faith of the Old Testament 
people. Points of discussion are: the authority behind the ethical imperative, the 
motivation of ethical behavior, the sociological and cultural setting of ethical 
precepts. In terms of Old Testament literature the course is based on the law tradi- 
tion and prophetic writings. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT50 Themes of Old Testament Theology 

Some basic Old Testament theological concepts which became characteristic of 
Christian theology are investigated such as: authority of God, revelation, history, 
creation, the individual and the community. Included are basic aspects of Old 
Testament ethics, worship and the difference between Christian and Jewish inter- 
pretation. 

Mr. von Waldow 

Additional Language Instruction 

Courses in Aramaic, Egyptian and Ugaritic are available upon request. 



38 



^Jew Testament 

Required Courses in New Testament 
sITOI Gospels, General Epistles, and Revelation 
JT02 Acts, Pauline Epistles, and Hebrews 
JT03 New Testament Greek 
JT04 New Testament Greek 
JT05 New Testament Exegesis 

ilective Courses in New Testament 

JT12 Christianity According to Matthew 

An examination of the theology of the First Gospel in the light of the historical 
>ackground, employing redaction criticism as a major exegetical tool. 
Mr. Hare 

JT14 Parables in Luke 

An exegetical study of the parables of Jesus found in the all-important central see- 
on of the Third Gospel (chapters 10-18). 
| Term II, 1982-83-Mr. Kelley 

JT15 Gospel of John 

The entire Gospel examined with some exegetical detail but with emphasis on 
be theological dimensions of the book. Some attention is given to the large secon- 
ary literature, but the Greek text is the primary resource. 

Term I, 1981-82-Mr. Walther 

IT17 Exegesis of I Corinthians 

An exegetically oriented survey of the entire epistle with detailed study of 
lected parts. The range of insights into the life of the early church and the variety 
theological problems in this letter make it an excellent source from which to 
am the task of interpreting theGreek New Testament. 
Term I, 1982-83-Mr. Walther 

T19 Philippians 

An advanced exegetical course dealing with Paul's methodology and theology in 
lation to his favorite congregation among the young churches. 
Mr. Kelley 

T20 The Old Testament in the New: The Epistle to the Hebrews 

The Epistle to the Hebrews appears to be an exegetical meditation on a series of 
gnificant Old Testament texts. This course examines the hermeneutic of the epis- 
2, paying special attention to the interplay between doctrinal statement and 
hical exhortation. 
Mr. Hare 

T21 I Peter 

An exegetical course on the basis of the Greek text of I Peter. Special emphasis is 
d on the situation in which the epistle was written and on its relation to other ma- 
r books in the New Testament. 
Mr. Mauser 

T22 Paul's Letter to the Romans 

This exegetical seminar will examine the major theological and paraenetic 

39 



themes of Romans in relation to Paul's understanding of the place of Israel in God's 
plan. 
Mr. Mauser 

NT26 Eschatology in the New Testament 

The New Testament materials are studied with particular emphasis on Mark 13, 
Paul's Thessalonian letters, and the Revelation. The focus is on biblical theology 
based on sound exegesis. Appropriate reading in the twentieth-century literature 
on the subject is assigned. 

Mr. Walther 

NT29 Crises in the History of the Early Church 

Selected texts from the New Testament and from extracanonical sources are 
studied in the investigation of three crises experienced by the early Church: 1 ) the 
tension between Jewish and gentile Christians and the emergence of the Ebionite 
movement, 2) the threat of a Gnostic takeover, 3) the assault of charismatic en- 
thusiasm upon the traditional piety inherited from the synagogue. 

Mr. Hare 

NT30 The Teaching of Jesus and the New Testament Church 

The content of the New Testament didache is considered both as to its iden- 
tifiability and its significance. The possibilities of interrelationships among the Old 
Testament, Gospel records, and other New Testament documents are studied as to 
their didactic and paraenetic intent. 

Mr. Walther 

NT31 Practical Use of the New Testament: Mark 

An interpretation course examining the "First" gospel produced as a result of the 
life and ministry of Jesus and featuring its continuing significance for Christian faith 
and practice. 

Term II, 1981-82-Mr. Kelley 

NT35 Practical Use of the New Testament: Acts 

An interpretation course examining the faith and life of the early church as 
reflected in the "bridge" document of the New Testament corpus, the book of 
Acts. 

Mr. Kelley 

NT37 Biblical Themes I: God & the Gods in the Old Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in comparison with and contrast to the gods of the 
ancient Near East. This is the first part of a sequence to be continued with a course 
on the same subject in the New Testament. 

Term II, 1982-83-Mr. Mauser 

NT38 Biblical Themes II: God & the Gods in the New Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in comparison with and contrast to Hellenistic 
deities in the New Testament period. This is the New Testament part of a sequence 
on the nature of the biblical God. 

Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Mauser 

NT40 Greek Reading 

Supervised reading of selected New Testament or Septuagint passages. One 
credit. 
Offered each term— Staff 



40 



JT41 Advanced Greek Grammar 

This course aims to give students a systematic grasp of Greek by combining the 
tudy of a grammar book with further reading in the New Testament text itself. 
Mr. Kelley 

JT50 Themes of New Testament Theology 

A study of selected major themes of the New Testament which are of crucial im- 
ortance to the New Testament Theology as a whole. Hermeneutical questions will 
e stressed. 

Mr. Mauser 

JT51 Life and Thought in the Early Church 

A research seminar with primary emphasis on the bibliographical approach to 
ie study of Christian origins. Theological, organizational, geographical, literary 
nd historical questions and problems are considered. 

Mr. Hadidian 

JT53 Aspects of Paul's Theology 

A number of pervasive aspects of Paul's theology, such as eschatology, faith and 
iw, justification and reconciliation, are dealt with. Stress is laid on the Jewish 
ackground of Paul's thought and on the nature of the opposition which he had to 
ice. 

Mr. Mauser 



ITU DIES IN CHURCH HISTORY 

)ur aim in teaching Church history is to help the student to understand the history 
f the Church and its thought in the context of the twentieth century. The study of 
istory is the study of roots, whether we deal with the history of a nation, a race or 
n idea. Christianity is firmly grounded in history. Its story is the account of the ef- 
?ct which the events of Christian history have had in human society. This involves 
ioth the history of doctrine as the Church's attempt to understand the significance 
fthe biblical revelation, and the history of the Church itself as the attempt of Chris- 
ans to live in response to those events. 

We recognize two kinds of interaction that are important for our understanding 
f the Church today. First, we recognize that there has always been a dialogue be- 
ween the Church and the society within which it is placed. Secondly, there is an 
itegral relationship between the doctrine that the Church professes and the forms 
lat it takes as a human community. All the courses offered recognize these two 
inds of continuing interaction. 

For an adequate grasp of the Church's history the student will need to under- 
tand that history in broad outline, and then to deepen that study by examining 
articular periods or problems in more detail. To this end, the history faculty offers 
/ithin the core curriculum introductory courses, which survey the history of the 
Church from the sub-apostolic age to the post-reformation era. Further courses at 
n advanced level in both institutional Church history and the history of doctrine 
re offered regularly. 

Students who enter the Seminary with a rich background in historical studies 
lay be permitted to waive introductory courses and move directly to more 
pecialized study. 

41 



Required Courses in Church History 

CH01 Historical Studies I 

This course deals with the background and development of the Christian Church, 
its life and thought, from the Sub-apostolic Age through the Middle Ages (c. A.D. 
100-1500). 

Term II— Mr. Partee 

CH02 Historical Studies II 

A survey of the Renaissance, the Reformations of the Sixteenth Century, and their 
results (c. A.D. 1350-1650). 
Term III— Mr. Partee 

HT01 Introduction to Modern Religious Thought 

The course is designed to acquaint students with major types of Western religious 
thought which have appeared since the 1 7th century. These interpretations of faith 
will be viewed in their historical contexts of movements and events. They will also 
be studied in order to identify current and perennial theological problems and 
alternative ways of doing theology. Students will thereby also be introduced to 
systematic theological thinking, to questions of what theology is, why it is done, 
and what are the main issues in theological methodology. 

Term I— Mr. Wiest 

Elective Courses in Church History 

CH17 Calvin's Institutes 

An in-depth study of the magisterial work of the man whom Melanchthon callec 
"the theologian." Special attention will be devoted to its development, architec- 
tonic, and misunderstanding. 

Term I, 1981-82-Mr. Partee 

Term II, 1982-83— Mr. Partee 

CH28 Reformed Symbolics: The Creeds of Christendom 

This course will study the historical development and content of selected creeds 
and confessions of the Church with especial attention to the themes of Reformec 
consensus. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Partee 

CH29 The Four Reformations of the 16th Century 

This course considers the Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinian and Radical Reforma 
tions of the 16th Century. 
Mr. Partee 

CH30 Calvin and Plato 

The historical relation between theology and philosophy is considered by study 
ing the work of these two great thinkers. 
Mr. Partee 

CH34 A Biographical History of the Reformation 

This course approaches the thought of Reformation figures through the events o 
their lives. Students will be expected to become sensitive to and appreciative of the 
relation between theology and life by concentrating on life in the 16th century. 

Mr. Partee 



42 



CH39 Christianity in the Modern World 

This course will examine the internal changes and the external challenges ex- 
perienced by Christianity in the last two centuries, and will seek a perspective on 
the present ecumenical situation of the Church. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Webster 

CH40 Contemporary Eastern Christianity 

. This course is concerned with the various ancient churches of the East (Russian, 
Creek, Coptic, Armenian, etc.) and their respective involvement in theology, 
culture, society and political power. 
Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Calian 

NT29 Crises in the History of the Early Church 

TH39 Presbyterian Confessions 

STUDIES IN THEOLOGY 

Systematic theology is the study of the meaning and implications of the Christian 
Faith as present in the doctrinal formulations of the historic and contemporary 
witness of the Church. Based in the normative authority of the biblical writings as 
:hey inform the Gospel of Jesus Christ, systematic theology attempts to explicate ra- 
:ionally and structure in a consistent interrelationship the thematic content of the 
Word of God in Scripture. The Church has always recognized this task as crucial to 
ts ministry of proclamation and reconciliation. Systematic theology studies 
:hose significant thinkers of the past and present whose service as theologians the 
Ihurch has embraced. Yet it takes seriously the world in which we ourselves must 
now serve. The final aim of the study of systematic theology is the ability to 
engage in independent and responsible theological thinking within the practice of 
ministry. To meet this challenge, the great theologians of the past are read not only 
:o familiarize ourselves with this rich heritage, but to learn how doctrinal formu- 
ations have resulted from the way in which particular theologians structured their 
systems. Pursuant to this task, systematic theology attends 1) to the investigation of 
Droblems of theological method,- and 2) to basic questions such as the foundation 
and source of authority, the reference and function of theological language, the in- 
fraction of freedom and determinism, and 3) to thematic issues of contemporary 
ife as these focus theological concerns particularly relevant to ministry within the 
American cultural milieu. 

The curriculum requires one course in historical theology, two courses in 
systematic theology and one elective. The required courses cover, respectively, 
Zhristology and Soteriology, and the Church and the Sacraments. Electives are 
available in the work of individual theologians, in specific areas of doctrine, in con- 
:emporary "schools" of theological method (Process, Liberation), and in the 
nistory and development of theology in the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, an in- 
:erdisciplinary colloquium in the constructive organization of theological themes in 
a personal statement of faith is required for all senior students (Credo). 

Required Courses in Systematic Theology 
HT01 Introduction to Modern Religious Thought 

FH02 Christology 

Problems posed for systematic thinking by Christian beliefs and doctrinal 
formulations concerning salvation and the significance of Jesus Christ. 
Term II— Ms. Suchocki 

43 



TH03 Church & Sacraments 

A study of the Doctrine of the Church and Sacraments, focusing on the relation 
of individual faith to communal religious experience, on the purpose of the Church 
in the world, on the process of religious formation and transformation (justification 
and sanctification) within the fellowship of the Church, and the distinctive nature oi 
the Church as new Humanity and Body of Christ. Readings in Reformation, Post- 
Reformation and contemporary theology; lectures on issues and Pre-Reformation 
theology. 

Term I, 1981-82-Mr. Kehm 

1982-83-Ms. Suchocki 

Elective Courses in Systematic Theology 

TH12 Protestant Theology from Barth to Pannenberg 

A survey of the leading Protestant theologians and theological development in 
the twentieth century. The course serves not only to introduce students to the ideas 
of some eminent thinkers, but also to show how Protestant theology has responded 
to developments in philosophy, history, behavioral sciences, and the natural 
sciences. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH14 Process Theology 

This course is an investigation into the theological implications of process 
philosophy, particularly as these implications have been developed by Charles 
Hartshorne and John B. Cobb, Jr. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH15 Karl Barth and Process Theology 

A comparative study of Barthian and process doctrines of God. Particular atten- 
tion will be given to the respective implications for doctrines of creation, incarna- 
tion, history and eschatology. 

Mr. Kehm and Ms. Suchocki 

TH16 Phenomenology and Theology 

Introduction to phenomenological method as developed by Husserl, Heidegger, 
Schutz and Merleau-Ponty. Examination of attempts to apply this approach to 
Christian Theology in order to uncover the realities referred to by terms such as 
"revelation," "sin," "redemption," "redemptive community," and the 
"presence" of "God." 

Term II, 1981-82-Mr. Kehm 

TH17 A Theology of Nature 

Attitudes toward the natural environment in the culture and in theology: the 
place of humanity in nature; God in nature; nature, evil and redemption. 
Term II, 1981-82-Mr. Wiest 

TH20 Major Christian Theologians: Paul Tillich 

A study of Tillich's approach to systematic theology with an emphasis on both his 
method and the content of his thought. The course will focus on the way in which 
Tillich presents traditional Christian doctrines. 

Mr. Wiest 



44 



TH23 Critical Theology in Contemporary Catholicism 

Studies in three major Catholic theologians: Karl Rahner, Hans Ku'ng and David 
Tracy. Particular emphasis will be given to the grounds for Protestant/Catholic 
dialogue. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH26 Interpreting Texts 

An introduction to "hermeneutics" with special attention to the nature of 
language, speech, text, symbolism, metaphor, meaning, and understanding. The 
theory of interpretation developed in the lectures is applied to selected biblical 
texts in seminar sessions. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH27 Liberation Theology 

, A study of the twentieth-century emphasis on theology as praxis as developed by 
'eminists, blacks, and Third World theologians. 
Ms. Suchocki 

I"H28 Human Evil and Redemption 

A study of the genesis and forms of expression of what has been called "sin" with 
I corresponding analysis of how the biblical symbols of God's redemptive activity 
n the death and resurrection of Jesus mediate the power to transcend the 
dynamics that perpetuate sin. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Kehm 

FH29 God and Evil 

An inquiry into the ways in which the interpretation of evil has affected the 
jnderstanding of God and of redemption. Study includes both classical and 
nodern theologians. Major attention is given to the formulation of a contemporary 
jnderstanding of evil, and its implications for a doctrine of God. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH31 Theology from a Feminist Perspective 

We will examine 1) the symbolism of "woman" as it has been operative in 
vestern religious history; 2) the relationship between the symbol and the place of 
vomen in the church; 3) feminist theological reactions (rejection, revision, ap- 
propriation) to the symbolism. 

Term I, 1981-82— Ms. Suchocki 

["H32 Christian Encounter with World Religions 

A focus upon the issue of religious pluralism through 1) introducing the student 
o a major non-Christian religion (Buddhism) and 2) studying various contemporary 
Christian responses to pluralism, with particular reference to Buddhism. 

Term III, 1982-83-Ms. Suchocki 

TH33 Twentieth Century Eschatology 

The course will focus on: 1) issues of eschatology; 2) twentieth century responses 
o these issues (Pannenberg, theologies of hope, liberation theology, Teilhard de 

hardin); 3) development of a process eschatology based on the work of Alfred 
slorth Whitehead. 

Ms. Suchocki 



45 



TH34 Mystical Theology 

The study will begin with consideration of Evelyn Underfill's analysis of mystic 
experience, and then trace the theological experience through four major figures in 
Christian history: Pseudo-Dionysius, Meister Eckhardt, Teresa of Avila and Teilhard 
de Chardin. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH36 The Ethics of Karl Barth 

A study of the development of Barth's ethics, from his early 'liberal" period, 
through his "dialectical" period, to the Church Dogmatics. Special attention will be 
given to his method of relating theology to ethics, and to his attempts to apply his 
theological ethics to political questions. Recent controversies over Barth's 
"socialism" will be examined. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH37 Liberation Theology's Challenge to the Future Shaping 
of Christian Theology 

An attempt to survey and assess the main criticism and constructive proposals 
that have been made by the political types of liberation theology (Black, Latin 
American, and German) in various areas of Christian doctrine. The objective of the 
course will be to attempt the kinds of revisions of various Christian doctrines that 
meet the valid criticisms of liberation theology and carry out more comprehensive- 
ly and coherently the important constructive suggestions that have so far been 
developed along narrow lines of interest. Areas of special concern will be: biblical 
hermeneutics; the ideas of God and revelation; the inter-relatedness of personal sin 
and structural injustice, of deliverance from bondage to sin and liberation from 
socio-economic-political oppression; Christology; the Church and the Kingdom of 
God. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH38 The Reformed Tradition: Its Past, Present and Future 

The Reformed tradition has not been a monolithic "Calvinistic system," de- 
fended by some, attacked by others, maintaining its integrity and vitality through 
keeping intact certain essential doctrines. Some have taken the opposite view. But 
modern hermeneutical theory as well as studies in the history of tradition in various 
Christian churches offer more accurate and more useful ways of interpreting the 
"trajectory" of the Reformed tradition. This course will investigate the origins of 
the Reformed tradition in the sixteenth century (especially Calvin, Zwingli and Bul- 
linger); its classical confessional expressions (up to the Synod of Dort and the 
Westminster Confession); the "creative" re-interpretations attempted by various 
theologians in the 19th century (Schleiermacher, MacLeod Campbell, Charles 
Hodge, B. B. Warfield, James Orr, Briggs and Schaff); and the history of 
Presbyterian creedal revisions in the USA down to the Confession of 1967. 
Theological issues in the current wave of "evangelical" attacks upon the UPCUSA 
will be discussed. 

Term I, 1981-82-Mr. Kehm 

TH39 Presbyterian Confessions 

An examination of the Book of Confessions of the United Presbyterian Church 
and related materials, with particular attention to what it means to be an active 
member in the Reformed tradition in contemporary society. 

Mr. Calian 



46 



H50 God and Some Philosophers 

Study of selected readings in Platonism and Aristotelianism, and in modern 
iealism and empiricism, with attention directed to: (1) the interpretations of 
?ligion found in these philosophies, (2) some of the ways in which they have af- 
?cted theological thought, and (3) such inferences as may be drawn from this 
laterial concerning the whole problem of the relation of philosophy to theology. 

Mr. Wiest 

TUDIES IN CHURCH 
kND MINISTRY 

he purpose of study in the Church and Ministry field is to bring theory to bear 
pon the practice of Christian faith. Ministry means service with and for others. 
:udents and professors in this area inquire into how Christian theory and practice 
an be united in ministry to the church and through the church to the world. Con- 
?quently, the Church and Ministry field is engaged in the critical study of the pro- 
•ssional ministry, the institutional church, and contemporary society so that 
udents may be adequately prepared for future ministry. 

Ministry by both professional and lay persons in the church requires knowledge 
id skills pertinent to social strategies, life styles, language patterns, counseling 
■chniques, educational models, and administrative systems appropriate to the 
ospel in today's world. To this end a wide variety of courses are offered in 
linistry, Church and society, ethics, sociology of religion, education, pastoral 
are, homiletics, worship and church music, evangelism and missions, and ad- 
linistration. 

In other areas of study as well there will be an emphasis on the social context of 
linistry. For example, professors of systematic theology give attention to the social 
imensions of Christian faith as examined by liberation theology. There are biblical 
Durses which stress the social milieu of ancient Israel and the application of 
iblical ethics to modern society. Courses dealing with moral education and 
omen in society are offered regularly. Special interest in business values 
ndergirds the seminary's commitment to providing leadership in this area for the 
usiness community of Pittsburgh, the fourth largest corporate headquarters com- 
mnity in the U.S.A. The seminary's urban setting provides an outstanding locus 
»r the study of church, society, and ethical concerns. 

equired Courses in Church and Ministry 

IS01 Introduction to Ministry 

This team-taught course will introduce students to the concept of ministry, its 
iblical and theological basis, the problems faced by ministers in role definition vis- 
vis the varying expectations of church members, the function of the various 
leological disciplines in preparation for effective ministry, and the place of the stu- 
ent's faith formation in integrating the education experiences at the seminary. 
Term I— Mr. G. Jackson and Mr. Stone 

D01 Credo 

The purpose of this colloquium is to assist students to work through the main 
jestions in the traditional loci of Christian doctrine, drawing upon their ac- 
jmulated knowledge of Scripture, historical and systematic theology, and their 
*vn tradition, in order to enable them to formulate their own theological position 
j a comprehensive, well-grounded way. 
Term II, 1981-82-Mr. Kehm 

1982-83-Mr. Hare and Mr. Wiest 

47 



PD02 Faith Formation 

This colloquium seeks to help students become self-conscious about the proc- 
cesses by which selfhood matures with special reference to faith as a formative 
aspect of selfhood. The students' theological views, combined with socio- 
psychological material, form the basis of the conceptual material. The view of faith 
of certain theologians and in classics on spiritual formation is investigated. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. G. Jackson 

1982-83— Mr. Hare and Mr. G. Jackson 

PD03 Professional and Ministerial Leadership 

This colloquium focuses attention upon professional aspects of ministerial 
responsibilities. The work of the term assumes a holistic perspective by giving an 
opportunity for reflection on the resources each student now brings to the inter- 
relation of the various ministerial functions. Because ministry is always in a par- 
ticular setting and in terms of one's appraisal of that situation, responsible decisions 
require self-consciousness in diagnosis and evaluation of various situations. This 
course is required for all students who are not eligible for MS01, Introduction to 
Ministry. 

Term I, 1981-82— Mr. Oman and Mr. Paylor 

CS01 Church and Society: Local 

In the first term emphasis is given to the contribution sociological methods can 
make to understanding religious life in its varied forms. Particular attention is given 
to the urban situation in which most Americans live, using Pittsburgh as a model for 
studying the dynamics of urban life. Specific attention is given to the historic roles 
of church, ethnic, and theological traditions in contributing to the unique character 
of this urban community. Such study provides a pattern by which any community 
may be studied to discern the relation of religious to general social dynamics. 

Term I— Mr. Castillo 

CS03 Church and Society: Global 

The global context of the church is examined through a study of political and in- 
ternational dimensions of church life. The interrelatedness of national and interna- 
tional issues— population, food, militarism, energy, economics, repression, social 
justice— demonstrates the larger context within which Christian ministry is carried 
on, whether in the affluent or Third World countries. 

Term I, 1982-83— Mr. Stone 

ET01 Introduction to Ethics 

An introduction to the theological and philosophical issues in contemporary 
Christian social thought. Focus on the ethics of the church as a social institution 
and Christian political theology. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Stone 
1982-83-Mr. Wiest 

PS01 Pastoral Studies: Education 

In this segment of the Pastoral Studies sequence students are engaged in studying 
the many aspects and possibilities of education programming in churches. A 
general view of educational philosophy and methodology, and their relation tc 
theological, biblical, and historical studies, provides a basis for evaluating majoi 
denominational patterns and curricular materials. Correlation with educationa 
responsibilities in field work, particularly relative to youth ministries, adds focus tc 
each student's development of his or her own philosophy of education and req- 
uisite skills. 

Term I— Ms. Likins 

48 



»S02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Concurrent field experience provides a basis for study of pastoral care. In these 
eminars students are helped to understand the definition of pastoral care in the 
listory and theology of the church in terms of the identity of the minister. Brief con- 
ideration is given to theories of the development of persons and how this develop- 
ment results in expectations of pastoral care. Reporting on and discussion of ex- 
periences arising from students' field placements are used in developing skills 
iseful to ministering to the needs of persons in each situation. 

Term II, 1981-82— Mr. Paylor 

1982-83-Mr. G. Jackson 

>S03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

I The third-term seminar groups in the Pastoral Studies course provide an introduc- 
Son to homiletics as a responsibility of ministers. Attention is given to the exegetical 
>ases of preaching, to problems of hermeneutics and authority, and to such 
hetorical considerations as sermon construction, style and audience. Each student 
>repares and presents sermons, and the seminar groups engage in the critique of 
hese sermons. 
Term III— Mr. Ezzell and Mr. Oman 



Ministry 

Required Courses in Ministry 

4S01 Introduction to Ministry 
PD01 Credo 
D02 Faith Formation 
'D03 Professional and Ministerial Leadership 

Zhurch and Society 

Required Courses in Church and Society 

ZS01 Church and Society: Local 

3S03 Church and Society: Global 

lective Courses in Church and Society 

-S10 Women in Church and Society 

The scope of the course includes the feminist positions; the conditions extant 
vithin society which brought about the contemporary liberation movement and 
he extent to which it influences church women. History of the church's attitudes 
owards women past and present. Special attention is given to the needs of women 
n ministry and to the ideational and political stance(s) which inform them. Explora- 
ion of biblical and theological themes in relation to women's emerging leadership 
ole in ecclesiastical institutions. Techniques of consciousness-raising and prepara- 
jon in ministry for the new attitudes of women. 

Ms. Likins 



49 



CS12 Feminism and Small Group Process 

The course assumes that the professional minister will engage in extensive wori 
with both traditional and feminist women's groups. The existence and influence o 
such groups within the contemporary church will be a focus of research. There wii 
be an emphasis upon skills in small group leadership and the planning of effectiv* 
educational programs. 

Ms. Likins 

Ethics 

Required Course in Ethics 

ET01 Introduction to Ethics 

Elective Courses in Ethics 

ET13 Human Sexuality 

An inquiry into ethical questions raised by the current revolution in sexual at 
titudes and behavior. Consideration of such issues as pre-marital and extra-marita 
relations, marriage and divorce, alternative marriage patterns, understandings o 
male and female sexuality, treatments of sex in literature and public media. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET15 Readings in Contemporary Theological Ethics 

Discussion of selected readings from contemporary Protestant and Romar 
Catholic ethicists, such as R. Niebuhr, K. Barth, E. Brunner, H. R. Niebuhr, P 
Ramsey, P. Lehmann, D. Bonhoeffer, G. Winter, J. Gustafson, K. Rahner, B. Haer 
ing, J. Maritain, J. C. Murray. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET17 Law, Theology and Ethics 

Reading and discussion of selected topics within the following areas: 1) com 
parisons and contrasts between jurisprudential and theological concepts and way: 
of thinking; relations between law, morality and religion; 2) ethical issues such a; 
civil disobedience, punishment, laws regarding sexual behavior, censorship, prob 
lems in church-state relations, professional ethics. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET18 The Ethics and Theology of H. Richard Niebuhr 

A consideration of the formative influences on the thought of H. R. Niebuhr, anc 
an analysis of his major writings in ethics and theology. 
Mr. Stone 

ET19 Concept of Freedom in Christian Ethics 

An analysis of some of the meanings which "freedom" ("liberty") has in Chris 
tian theology and ethics, with comparison between these and other philosophica 
meanings (or theological) on the contemporary scene (e.g., in various liberatior 
movements). Consideration will be given the traditional problems such as freedorr 
vs. determinism, freedom and grace; and to the function of freedom as a normative 
concept in Christian ethics. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET20 The Thought of Reinhold Niebuhr 

A detailed examination of The Nature and Destiny of Man and the study o 
Reinhold Niebuhr's political and social writings. 
Term II, 1981-82— Mr. Stone 

50 



T21 Christian Ethics in a Business Ethos 

The study of Christian ethics as it relates to the business ethos of Pittsburgh and 
hrough Pittsburgh to the nation and the world. 
Term I, 1981-82— Mr. Calian, Mr. Stone, and Mr. Wiest 

T22 Ethics of D. Bonhoeffer 

A seminar devoted to reading and discussion of several of Bonhoeffer's books 
nd of some secondary source material. 
Term I, 1981-82— Mr. Wiest 

:T23 Social Teachings of the Christian Churches 

Study of selected positions in the history of the churches' social teaching from the 
Jew Testament to the end of the nineteenth century. Focus on the issues of Christ 
nd culture, church and state, the treatment of women, the Christian and war. 

Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Stone 

T25 Moral Issues in International Politics 

The perennial problems of Christian ethics and international politics; the theory 
f international politics; the moral issues raised by hunger and nuclear armaments, 
^articular case studies in United States foreign policy. 

Mr. Stone 

T30 Christianity in the Latin American Context: Ethical Issues 

A critical analysis of recent developments within Christianity in Latin America, 
he emphasis will be on the ethical issues involved in the struggle for liberation; the 
iking of sides in situations of intense social conflict; the implications of Christian 
Dve to one's attitude towards the oppressed and the oppressors; and the church's 
ttitude towards material possessions. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Castillo 

T32 Love and Justice 

A seminar inquiry into the concepts and practice of the virtues of love and 
jstice. Classical and contemporary sources will be examined with the social ethics 
f Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr and Martin Luther King, Jr., receiving special 
ttention. 

Mr. Stone 

T33 Christian Ethics and Technology 

The pace of technological change remakes society and produces new ethical 
sues. This course will consider the impact of technology in ethical issues and the 
Die of Christian ethics in the debates over technological change with particular 
Terence to issues raised by computers, space technology, weapons development, 
nergy technologies, and the limits to growth debate. 

Mr. Stone 

T34 The Social Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A consideration of Paul Tillich as a social philosopher and activist. Study of his 
/ritings on culture, politics, ethics, religious socialism, The Religious Situation, The 
ocialist Decision, Love, Power and Justice, and Political Expectations. His Christian 
thical thought will be analyzed in relationship to his biography, historical setting, 
nd its contemporary and future relevance. 

Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Stone 



51 



ET35 Seminar on Medical Ethics 

This course will be taught with the help of a member or members of the medicai 
profession. The class will consider, in ethical perspective, such issues as the social 
responsibilities of the medical profession; health care delivery and costs; patients' 
rights; abortion and sterilization, death and dying; transplantation and the use ol 
scarce resources; genetics and genetic engineering; professional ethical codes; the 
relationship of ministers to medical professionals and of ministry to medical care. 

Term II, 1982-83-Mr. Wiest 

ET36 Christianity and Economic Systems 

Seminar participants will examine the underlying assumptions found in 
capitalism, socialism and mixed economies involving these two systems. Basic 
questions of the course: What impact do economic systems have upon out 
understanding of the Christian message? What does the Gospel have to say to these 
economic systems? 

Mr. Calian 

ET37 The Ethics of Peacemaking 

A seminar consideration of the religious quest for peace with emphases on world 
religions and peace, the Christian theology of peace, militarism, the nuclear 
weapons debate, social justice, and the current emphasis of the churches on 
peacemaking ministry. 

Term II, 1981-82— Mr. Stone 



Sociology of Religion 

Elective Courses in Sociology of Religion 

SR10 Introduction to the Sociology of Religion 

An inquiry into the nature, content and extension of the sociology of religion as a 
field of study within the social sciences. The student is made acquainted with the 
main theories on the role of religion in culture, personality and social structure, 
with reference to such authors as Durkheim, Weber, Malinowski, Freud and Marx, 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Castillo 

SR12 Christianity and the Social Conflict 

An analysis of the role that Christianity has played in selected historical situations 
of intense social conflict, leading to a critique and the search for alternatives. 
Term II, 1982-83-Mr. Castillo 

SR13 The Latin American Context of Liberation Theology 

The political, social and religious context of "liberation theology" in Latir 
America, with particular reference to Father Camilo Torres (the guerrilla priest) anc 
his impact on movements for radical change both inside and outside the churches 

Mr. Castillo 

SR15 Christianity and the American Indians 

The clash of two radically different worldviews and the consequences for the 
populations involved. A critical survey of Christian missionary activity among the 
indigenous populations of the Americas, with particular attention to the doctrinal, 
moral, and ethical issues at stake. Examples taken from North and South America 

Mr. Castillo 



52 



*16 Critical Issues in the Sociology of Religion 

A panoramic survey of the major developments in the field since the time of the 
:lassics." The emphasis is on the present status of the theses originally presented 
/ Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Malinowski, about the nature and function of 
ligion. 
Mr. Castillo 

118 Christianity and Cultures: Selected Readings From the Third World 

Discussion of selected texts from Las Casas, P. Freire, M. M. Thomas, Steve Biko, 
S. Mbiti, and E. Dussel, on such subjects as Western and non-Western 
orldviews, Christianity and colonialism, cultural disintegration and cultural 
construction, Christianity and nationbuilding, salvation and humanization, and 
he church of the poor." 
Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Castillo 



ducation 

equired Course in Education 

§01 Pastoral Studies: Education 

lective Courses in Education 

D11 Moral Education in the Church 

The course explores recent research concerning the development of values in 
Dung persons and adults. Most particularly it deals with the work of Kohlberg and 
mon as it relates to planned educational experience for children, youth and 
Jults. It also deals with the ways in which justice is perceived and the level of 
ilue perception raised. 
Ms. Likins 

D17 Historical Shaping of Church Education 

An exploration into the tenacity with which educational patterns introduced at 
irious periods in church history have survived to shape current church education. 
Ms. Likins 

D19 Group Process 

The course deals with the theory and practice of small group leadership and par- 

zipation with a special concern for the types of such groups currently found in 

lurches. 

Term II, 1981-82-Ms. Likins . 

D20 Youth Ministry 

A study of existing models, old and new, that have been or are being used in the 
hurch with particular emphasis upon analysis in regard to the needs of youth. 
<ills in communication with youth are emphasized. Survey of possibilities in terms 
f drama, film, etc. Emphasis upon program design. Distinction between junior and 
;nior high school youth groups is emphasized. 

Term I, 1981-82-Ms. Likins 



53 



ED21 The Development of Faith in Christian Education 

The Christian faith in relation to the personal and social developmental tasks of 
specific age levels; the resources of the church directed towards the religious needs 
of persons. Three areas will be stressed: children, youth and middle-aged adults. 
The course will integrate the theories of Jung, Kohlberg and Fowler with the poten- 
tial development of faith experience. 

Ms. Likins 

ED22 Church Educational Development 

The course will focus upon a careful study of church school curriculum. The stu- 
dent will be asked to carefully examine his or her own denomination's curriculum 
and to become familiar with its strengths and weaknesses. There will also be an in- 
tensive study of various styles of organization and administration. 

Ms. Likins 

ED23 Educational Ministries with Adults 

The course will combine an investigation of prevalent theories, strategies and 
structures for adult education in local congregations with the opportunity to design 
specific programs of adult education related to students' interests. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Mehl 

ED24 Curriculum Design and Use 

A critical/constructive analysis of Christian Education: Shared Approaches 
materials, analyzing method, design, the written materials and their use in a church 
school classroom. Conclusions will be developed concerning how a pastor can 
assist in the supervision of church school teachers. 

Term II, 1982-83— Mr. Roberts 

ED25 Educational Ministry and Life Concerns of Persons 

The focus will be upon the integration of teaching and planning skills with 
theories of faith development and contemporary life visions. The emphasis will be 
upon the concepts of pilgrimage and sacrifice as they have been and are being 
utilized within Christianity. 

Ms. Likins 

Pastoral Care 

Required Course in Pastoral Care 

PS02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Elective Courses in Pastoral Care 

PC10 Psychological Foundations of Ministry 

This course traces human development along lines set forth by Freud and radical- 
ly expanded by Erickson. With Erickson as the transitional figure, the course 
stresses developments in ego psychology as especially helpful to the practice of 
ministry. The third section of the course analyzes communal components, deals 
with group theory, and explores implications for ministry. Theological material is 
part of the data of the course, especially process theology. Permission of instructor 
required. This course is also listed as DM21. 

Term I— Mr. G. Jackson 



54 



112 Pastoral Care in a Hospital Setting 

Each student spends approximately seventy-five hours throughout the term 
lating to patients. Students are assigned different areas of care, i.e., emergency 
om, intensive care, thoracics. Two experiences are expected. The students are 
pervised by hospital staff, when possible, and by the seminary professor respon- 
se for the course. 
Mr. G. Jackson 

113 Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course has in view a new theory of pastoral care based on process theology 
id more specifically the conceptuality of Alfred North Whitehead. It endeavors to 
corporate the relevant rich insights of Freud, Jung, Maslow, and gestalt 
ychology within a process metaphysical and theological framework. Readings in 
)th process thought and psychology are required. Permission of instructor re- 
ared. This course is also listed as DM23. 
Term II— Mr. G. Jackson 

14 Psychology of Religion 

This course is designed to study religious experience. Religious experience is 
oked at from four perspectives: historical, beginning with Jonathan Edwards and 
ghteenth-century Revivalism; psychological, including Freud, Jung and Allport; 
oss-cultural, singling out Otto and Eliade; and topical, identifying specific areas 
ch as community, faith, conversion, worship, prayer, mysticism, and vocation to 
hich twentieth-century psychologies of religion and contemporary religious ex- 
igence provide data. Insofar as possible the course is inductive and is limited to 
minar size. 
Mr. G. Jackson 

18 Pastoral Care of Older Adults 

The increasing proportion of older adults in our churches, together with the 
Itural stereotypes through which they are viewed make the work of their pastoral 
re imperative, but especially difficult. This course wiil attempt to describe older 

lults as persons and to identify their wide variety of both limitations and 

sources. It will examine the significance of the stereotypes from the perspective 
human growth and development. The final segment of the course will be con- 

irned with understanding what significance the materials we have studied have 

r a pastoral care ministry of older adults. 

Term I, 1982-83-Mr. Paylor 

119 Training the Pastor as Spiritual Director 

Borrowing from the rich history and insight of the Roman Catholic Church, this 
>urse intends to adapt that material to the Protestant pastor as Spiritual Director. 
ie history of the Office, the theology of such an Office within Protestantism, 
ychological factors obtaining between Director and people, and programmatic 
ements are the content of the course. Open only to students who have had Credo 
id Faith Formation. 
Mr. G. Jackson 

220 Issues in Pastoral Care: Anxiety, Guilt, Hostility 

This trilogy of interrelated affective states will be looked at from three perspec- 
/es: 1) their dynamics, seen both psychologically and theologically (for example, 
itological anxiety, neurotic guilt, and depression and hostility); 2) their expression 

affect, behavior, and life-style; 3) handling them and ministering to their victims. 

adings will be taken from psychology and theology. Case studies are used exten- 
^ely throughout the course. 
Mr. G. Jackson 55 



PC21 Expectations of Ministers 

Ministers frequently have experiences in which the expectations that people 
have of them are expressed in surprising ways and places. These experiences are 
often puzzling as well as distressing to the minister in terms of how to care for the 
people involved. The recognition of these expressions, their developmental 
significance, the ways in which they are communicated, and useful responses the 
minister may make are studied in this course. Experiences presented by the 
students are the primary subject matter. 

Mr. Paylor 

PC22 Children and Families in Times of Stress 

Parents are often not available just at times when children need them most. 
Clergy are not always clear about how they can help both children and parents at 
such times. This course intends to address specific experiences of stress for families 
such as divorce, moving, hospitalization and death. The meaning of these events 
for both children and parents will be discussed and their implications for pastoral 
care will be developed. Mr. Fred Rogers will serve as a resource. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Paylor 

PC24 Pastoral Care and Faith Formation 

Pastoral Care and Faith Formation have a rich history within the Christian church. 
For too long in this century have they been separated. This course examines their 
interrelations, and explores the dynamics of faith formation which are able to help 
both the career in her or his professional work and the client in her or his resolution 
of a crisis or problem. Furthermore, this course seeks to explore ways of enriching 
faith so that faith itself can become a major resource in preventive therapy. The 
resources for the course are current writings seeking to connect these two con- 
cerns, present research pointing to a helpful synthesis, and the pastoral experience 
and insight of the members of the class. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

PC50 Pastoral Counseling Seminar 

This course is an advanced case seminar for persons who are currently working 
in situations of ministry. The aim of the seminar is to enable the students to think 
more clearly about the needs of people in those situations and whether those 
needs warrant pastoral counseling or other types of pastoral intervention. When 
pastoral counseling is chosen as a means of help, the student will be given super- 
vision in its use. 

Mr. Paylor 

PC52 Practicum with Children 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center provides students the opportunity for 
observing the development of normal 3, 4 and 5 year old children as it is expressed 
in their play. These observations are discussed with the Arsenal staff against the 
background of concurrent readings in developmental theory which the students 
are doing. A weekly seminar relating the observations and readings to a ministry to 
children forms a third part of the course. This course is open to advanced M.Div. 
and D.Min. students. 

Mr. Paylor 



56 



C62 The Congregation as a Caring Community 

This course assumes that the professional minister is not the only minister to peo- 
)le in need, yet the congregation is not prepared to minister. So this course 
jevelops a design to equip a Remnant in the congregation to become a ministering 
)eople. A theology of care is scrutinized; a two year program schematized, using 
>oth theological and psychological material; an on-the-job training component for 
aity detailed; and the pastor's role in the total program pin-pointed. Besides 
heological and psychological readings, sources include D.Min. research projects 
lealing with the congregation as a caring community. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

Homiletics 

Required Course in Homiletics 

>S03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

lective Courses in Homiletics 

HM10 Homiletics Practicum 

The course combines seminar discussion with the preparation and delivery of 
ermons, and is designed to lead students beyond introductory homiletics to a 
nore sophisticated understanding of the preacher's task. In small sections students 
breach twice during the term, as well as participate in detailed homiletical analysis. 

Term I— Mr. Ezzell 

HM20 Parish Preaching 

Planning a year's pulpit work. An analysis of the seasons and festivals of the Chris- 
ian Year. Selecting resources for occasional sermons. 
Term I, 1981-82-Mr. Oman 

HM21 Classical Literary Sources for Preaching 

A study of selected literary masterpieces considered significant for preaching 
)ecause of their content and/or style. Autobiographical, devotional and allegorical 
naterial will be included as well as drama and the novel. 

Mr. Oman 

HM22 Preaching from the Gospel of Luke 

This course will study some of the great preaching themes found in St. Luke's 
Hospel. Particular attention will be given to the four "Great Songs of the Advent 
Jeason," as well as to selected portions of the Passion narrative. 

Term I, 1982-83-Mr. Oman 

HM23 Twentieth Century Preaching 

An examination of methodological and theological developments in Christian 
^reaching in the twentieth century. A study of contemporary preaching based on 
printed, recorded, audio and video-taped sermons of leading homileticians of our 
ige. 

Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Oman 

HM24 Preaching from the Old Testament 

The course will provide an introduction to the special problems and possibilities 
offered by Old Testament preaching, including the discussion of how to use the 
principles of Old Testament interpretation for homiletical purposes, and ex- 
Derience in the preparation of sermons on different types of passages. 

Mr. Ezzell 

57 



HM25 Theology and Films 

This course will introduce the student to the use of popular films as a resource for 
theological reflection in the church. Representative films that reflect a variety of 
classical theological themes will be viewed and analyzed. 

Term I, 1981-82-Mr. Ezzell 

HM26 Doctrinal Preaching 

The communication of doctrine through preaching. A study of the necessity, op- 
portunities and problems of this type of communication. Emphasis will focus on the 
act of interpretation, the use of basic exegesis, and the proficient handling of 
biblical materials. 

Term II, 1982-83— Mr. Oman 

HM27 Preaching from Romans 

An exegetic analysis of Paul's most influential epistle. The course will attempt to 
provide the student with comprehensive understanding of the style and structure of 
Paul's argument and the homiletical possibilities it presents. Special attention will 
be given to hermeneutical problems attendant to such prominent Pauline concepts 
as faith, grace and law, as well as to the formidable forensic character of his 
language and thought. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Ezzell 

HM29 Storytelling 

This course is two-fold in purpose and design. First, to examine in detail the 
nature of the story form of discourse and to attempt to establish its theological and 
persuasive primacy among the competing categories of discourse. Second, and 
foremost, the course aims to develop in the student the ability to construct and nar- 
rate stories, i.e., to become adroit in the art of storytelling. 

Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Ezzell 

HM30 Contemporary Literary Sources of Preaching 

An analysis of selected contemporary literary works considered important as 
homiletical resources. The course will seek to assist the student to view such 
material in relation to his/her biblical and theological studies, and to employ what 
is learned in homiletical craftmanship. 

Term II, 1981-82-Mr. Oman 

HM40 Pre-Homiletics Practicum 

This practicum is designed to offer students the opportunity to practice their oral 
presentation skills prior to entering the homiletics course. The focus will be on the 
techniques of oral interpretation and public address. It also enables the student to 
learn theoretical constructs involved in the preparation of an oral presentation. 
Students will be expected to make several presentations and develop self-critical 
skills. 

Term II— Ms. Ezzell 

HM41 Rhetoric for the Church 

This course has three distinct foci: (1) to improve the student's general ability in 
oral expression; (2) to help the student cultivate skills and strategies for the specific 
rhetorical, i.e., persuasive, transactions in which clergy are characteristically en- 
gaged (e.g., moderating session, leading discussions, counseling, presenting resolu- 
tions to judicatories); (3) to analyze the nature and quality of the church's rhetoric, 
both that which is directed to itself as audience and that which is directed toward 
the outside. 

Term II— Mr. Ezzell 

58 



Worship and Church Music 

Elective Courses in Worship and Church Music 

WS11 Hymnology 

A survey of the Church's heritage of song: the Bible, Byzantine and Latin hym- 
nody, the Lutheran chorale, Calvin and Psalmody, English hymnody of Watts and 
Wesley and their adherents, and American hymnody from Colonial times through 
the twentieth century. This comprehensive approach to the study of hymns deals 
with the hymn in perspective, in history and culture, and in practice. 

Term I, 1981-82— Mr. Tutwiler 

WS14 The Theology and Practice of Christian Worship 

An introductory course on Christian Worship, concentrating on basic theological 
principles, origins and development, orders of worship, lessons and sermon, public 
prayer and the sacraments. 

Term II— Mr. Oman 

WS17 History of Church Music 

A study of choral and instrumental literature of the Christian Church from the 
seventeenth through the twentieth centuries with emphasis on the development of 
Protestant Church music in America. 

Term III, 1981-82— Mr. Tutwiler 

WS18 Music for the Church Year 

This course will provide a study of music appropriate for the seasons of the 
church year. Attention will be given to the music of J. S. Bach with special con- 
sideration being given to Bach as exegete. 

Term III, 1982-83-Mr. Tutwiler 



Evangelism and Mission 

Elective courses in Evangelism and Mission 

EV10 Evangelism: An Investigation in Depth 

Five professors, representing five major areas of inquiry (Bible, History, 
Theology, Psychology and Ethics) will engage students in an in-depth examination 
of Evangelism, both theory and practice. An executive from the national staff in 
evangelism plus selected local pastors will be invited to participate when ap- 
propriate. Carefully selected readings will correlate with the various areas of in- 
vestigation. Two ten-page papers will be required as follows: one to be selected 
from one of the areas of study listed above, the other, a programmatic model for 
evangelism in a local congregation. 

Mr. G. Jackson 

MI01 Christianity in a World Context 

The church's paradox of being in the world but not of the world is examined in 
terms of its theological as well as its sociological nature. Thus, the course seeks to 
provide information and to develop awareness of the ambiguous process through 
which Christianity has reached ecumenical reality by being linked to the process of 
Western socio-economic expansion and missionary enterprise "to the ends of the 
earth." In this context contemporary developments in the ecumenical movement 



59 



as well as the specific dynamics of the church in the Third World are seriously 
taken into account, with particular attention given to the signs of vitality and 
creativity within Third World Christianity in the areas of evangelism, worship, 
social ethics and theology. Required for S.T.M. students, elective for all others. 
Term I— Mr. Castillo 

MHO The History of Christian Missions 

This course is designed to explore the historical and geographical dimensions of 
the attempt to be obedient to the mandate for mission. 
Term I, 1982-83-Mr. Partee 

MI11 The World Mission of the Church 

An introduction which will enable students to relate their local congregations in- 
telligently to the world mission of the Church today. Six themes will be treated: the 
biblical basis for mission, theologies of mission, Christian encounter with other 
religions, the churches of the Third World, American churches and Third World 
churches, and the local congregation and world-wide mission. 

Term II, 1981-82-Mr. Webster 

MM 2 Theology and Practice of Stewardship 

Stewardship has many dimensions: biblical, theological, ethical and practical. 
This seminar is designed to discuss these aspects through lectures and case studies. 
Guest speakers will be invited for their particular contributions on the history of 
philanthropy and voluntarism in reference to church organizations. 

Term III, 1981-82-Mr. Calian 



Administration 

Elective Courses in Administration 

AD10 Polity and Program of the United Presbyterian Church 

An introduction to the polity and program of the United Presbyterian Church, 
designed in part to help United Presbyterian students to prepare for denomina- 
tional examinations in that field. 

Term II, 1981-82-Ms. Wolfe 

AD20 Baptist History and Polity 

A survey of Baptist beginnings and history to the present. A study of the develop- 
ment of distinctive Baptist belief and practice. An analysis of current organization 
and procedures. 

Mr. Goodwin 

AD30 United Methodist History, Doctrine and Polity 

This course is designed to assist United Methodist students in understanding their 
denominational heritage within the context of historic Christianity— the life and 
times of John Wesley, early English Methodism and American Methodism to the 
present, history of Black Methodists and the Evangelical United Brethern Church. 
The Constitution and connectional relationships of The United Methodist Church 
will be examined with a particular focus upon the workings of the local church. Re- 
quired of United Methodist students for ordination; elective for other students. 



60 



THE FACULTY 




■ 



The twenty members of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Faculty are committed 
to the scholarly, professional and personal preparation of men and women for 
Christian service to the Church. Many members of the Faculty are regular con- 
tributors to the Church's and world's scholarly knowledge through publications 
and participation in learned societies in the Americas, Asia and Europe. In this way 
the Faculty at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary contributes to the learned skills of 
students on campus and far away. The Faculty formulates the curriculum, directs 
the entire educational program, and exercises general authority over the student 
body. 



Carnegie Samuel Calian, Pro- 
fessor in Theology. Occidental 
College, B.A.; Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Universi- 
ty of Basel, Doctor of Theology. 





Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas, 

Assistant Professor in Church and 
Ministry. Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, Cuba, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), 
S.T.M. 



62 



Robert M. Ezzell, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Homiletics. Memphis 
State University, B.S.; Lexington 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Yale 
Divinity School, S.T.M.; Yale 
University, M.A. 





Donald E. Gowan, Professor of 
Old Testament. University of 
South Dakota, B.A.; University of 
Dubuque Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 



Dikran Y. Hadidian, Professor of 
3ibliography. American Univer- 
ity of Beirut, B.A.; Hartford 
rheological Seminary, B.D., 
fh.M.; Hartford School of 
Religious Education, M.A.; Co- 
umbia University, M.S. 



*§» 




63 




J>,1 



*,.; 




Douglas R. A. Hare, William F. 
Orr Professor of New Testament. 
Victoria College, University of 
Toronto, B.A.; Emmanuel Col- 
lege, Victoria University, Toron- 
to, B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), S.T.M., Th.D. 



Gordon E. Jackson, Hugh Thom- 
son Kerr Professor of Pastoral 
Theology. Monmouth College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, Th.B., Th.M.; Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Ph.D. 




"V - " 




Jared Judd Jackson, Associate 
Professor of Old Testament. Har- 
vard College, A.B.; Episcopal 
Theological School, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), 
Th.D. 



64 



George H. Kehm, Professor of 
Theology. Queens College 
(N.Y.), B.S.; Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Harvard 
Divinity School, S.T.M.; Harvard 
University, Th.D. 





Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate 
Professor of Biblical Languages 
and Supervisor for the Practice of 
Ministry. University of Pitts- 
burgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary, M.Div.; Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary, 
Th.M.; Princeton University, 
M.A., Ph.D. 



M. Harjie Likins, Associate Pro- 
fessor in Church and Ministry. 
Cornell College (Iowa), A.B.; 
Union Theological Seminary 
(N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia Universi- 
ty, Ph.D. 




65 




Ulrich W. Mauser, Dean and Er- 
rett M. Grable Professor of New 
Testament. University of Tub- 
ingen, Doctor of Theology. 



Richard J. Oman, Howard C. 
Scharfe Professor of Homiletics. 
University of Minnesota, B.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; New College, University of 
Edinburgh, Ph.D. 





Charles B. Partee, Professor of 
Church History and W. Don Mc- 
Clure Professor of World Mis- 
sions and Evangelism. Maryville 
College, A.B.; Austin Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; University of Texas, M.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Ph.D. 



66 



Neil R. Paylor, Associate Pro- 
fessor in Church and Ministry 
and Director of Senior Place- 
ment. Hanover College, A.B.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 





Ronald H. Stone, Professor of 
Social Ethics. Morningside Col- 
lege, B.A.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia 
University, Ph.D. 






Marjorie Suchocki, Associate 
Professor of Theology and Direc- 
tor of D.Min. Program. Pomona 
College, B.A.; Claremont 
Graduate School, M.A., Ph.D. 




67 




H. Eberhard von Waldow, Pro- 
fessor of Old Testament. Bonn 
University, B.A.; Doctor of 
Theology. 



James A. Walther, Professor of 

New Testament Literature and 
Exegesis. Grove City College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel Col- 
lege, Victoria University, Toron- 
to, Th.D. 





Walter E. Wiest, Professor of 
Philosophy of Religion. Lafayette 
College, A.B.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Co- 
umbia University, Ph.D. 



68 



PART-TIME FACULTY 



Martha Ezzell, MA. 

Career Development Specialist 
Carlow College 
Lecturer in Speech 





Nancy L. Lapp, M.A. 
Curator of Bible Lands Museum 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Lecturer in Archaeology 



George E. Tutwiler, B.A. 
Organist and Choirmaster 
Eastminster Presbyterian Church and 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Lecturer in Church Music 




69 



GUEST FACULTY 

William M. Aber, D.Min Executive Presbyter 

Presbytery of Redstone 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Administration 

J. Stanley Chestnut, Ph.D Associate Dean of Faculty 

Eckerd College 

St. Petersburg, Florida 

Lecturer in Bible 

Carlton B. Goodwin, Ph.D Executive Minister 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Baptist Studies 

William H. Kadel, Ph.D President Emeritus 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Administration 

John M. Mackey, D.Min Executive Director 

Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

John E. Mehl, Ph.D Senior Associate Pastor 

Southminster United Presbyterian 

Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Education 

Eugene L. Reddell, M.Div Chief of Chaplain Service 

Veterans Administration Medical Center 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

William L. Roberts, Ph.D Research Coordinator 

Christian Education: Shared Approaches 
Moundsville, West Virginia 
Lecturer in Education 

Harold E. Scott, Ph.D Executive Presbyter 

Pittsburgh Presbytery 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Administration 

Norman Shawchuck, Ph.D Owner, Shawchuck & Associates, Ltd. 

Boise, Idaho 

Lecturer in Administration 

June Ruth Michaelson Taylor, M.Div. . . . Director of Pastoral Service 

Presbyterian University Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

John C. B. Webster, Ph.D Professor of Church History 

United Theological College 
Bangalore, India 
Visiting Professor in Church 
History and Missions 

70 



Marianne L. Wolfe, B.A Stated Clerk 

Pittsburgh Presbytery 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in United Presbyterian 
Polity and Program 

EMERTI 

William H. Kadel, Th.D. President Emeritus 

William F. Orr, Ph.D. Emeritus Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

FIELD EDUCATION SUPERVISORS FOR 1981-1982 

The following will serve the Seminary as Field Education Supervisors in the 
academic year 1981-82. 

John W. Aupperle 

First United Methodist Church, Pittsburgh 
Raymond V. Bengston 

Trinity Tower United Methodist Church, Pittsburgh 
John Blewitt 

Penn Hills Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Hendrik J. H. Bossers 

Bailey Avenue United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Jack Bowers 

Hebron United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Ralph P. Brooks 

St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh 
Donald G. Campbell 

Covenant United Presbyterian Church, Butler 
Jack Dawson 

Brookline Boulevard United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Thomas Fairley 

Waverly United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
I Dudley L. Field 

First United Presbyterian Church, Pataskala, Ohio 
Victor Fogelin 

Cheswick Presbyterian Church, Cheswick 
Robert Forsythe 

Riverside United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
John Galloway, Jr. 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
George Goodrich 

First Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
William J. Green 

North Branch United Presbyterian Church, Monaca 
Keith Grill 

St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Pittsburgh 

Robert Hewett 

East Liberty Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

71 



Gerald Hollingsworth 

Edgewood Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Kenneth L. Hooten 

Gray Stone Presbyterian Church, Leechburg 
John Hopkins 

Point Breeze United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

Richard Kennedy 

East Union United Presbyterian Church, Cheswick 

Walter Kenyon 

Gospel Fellowship Presbyterian Church of America, Valencia 
Robert S. Lash 

Emory United Methodist Church, Pittsburgh 

Ernest Lewis 

First Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

Robert M. Lucas, Jr. 

Bradford Woods Community Church, Bradford Woods 
James W. Matz 

Liberty Presbyterian Church, McKeesport 
John McCall 

Sixth Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
George McConnell 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Donald McGarrah 

South Side Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
William F. Moore 

Sharon Community Presbyterian Church, Coraopolis 
Duane L. Morford, Sr. 

Bakerstown United Methodist Church, Bakerstown 
Susan Nilsen 

East Liberty Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Kenneth Nolin 

Bethlehem United Presbyterian Parish, Fredericktown 
Bruce L. Ogle 

Valley Presbyterian Church, Imperial 
Kirk A. Ryckman 

Grace Community United Presbyterian Church, Lower Burrell 
Robert Shane 

Plum Creek Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Robert Sharpe 

Ken Mawr United Presbyterian Church, McKees Rocks 
James Smith 

Baldwin United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
James Snyder 

Christ United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Thomas Sonley 

Mt. Lebanon United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
June Taylor 

Presbyterian Hospital Chaplaincy, Pittsburgh 

72 



August Thalman, Jr. 

Armstrong Area Presbyterian Ministry, Kittanning 
David Thompson 

Aspinwall United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 
Peter Weaver 

Smithfield United Methodist Church and United Church of Christ, Pittsburgh 
John Wilson 

Rehabilitation Institute of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh 
William R. Wilson 

First United Methodist Church, McKeesport 
Judson Wylie 

Third Presbyterian, Pittsburgh 
Margaret Yingling 

Southwest Interchurch Ministry, Pittsburgh 



73 



£** 




Board 

Meals may be purchased in the cafeteria Monday through Friday throughout the 
academic year, excluding vacation periods. The estimated cost for board for an 
academic year for a single student is $1350.00. 

Room 

Annual charge for dormitory room $ 369.00 

Apartment Fees (per month) 

Fulton Hall: 

Thirty-nine apartments 

efficiency apartments $ 102.00 

one-bedroom apartments $ 1 29.00 

Highlander: 

Twenty-three apartments 

one-bedroom apartments $ 1 38.00 

two-bedroom apartments $ 1 56.00 

Anderson Hall: 

Twelve apartments 

two-bedroom apartments $ 1 65.00 

three-bedroom apartments $ 186.00 

McMillan Hall: 

Nineteen apartments 

one-bedroom apartments $ 1 50.00 

two-bedroom apartments $ 1 65.00 

three-bedroom apartments $ 186.00 

four-bedroom apartment $ 222.00 

Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are payable during the first two weeks of each term 
as specified by the Business Office. When necessary, arrangements for a payment 
plan to cover a term's expenses may be made at the Business Office, permitting 
three (3) equal payments. There is a carrying charge of $5.00 for the deferred pay- 
ment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within ten days from the due date 
will incur a penalty of 1 % of the amount due. Settlement of all Seminary bills is re- 
quired before registration for a new term, and before graduation or the release of 
official transcripts. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The primary responsibility for meeting the costs of a theological education at Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary belongs to the student and to the denomination of 
which that student is a member. The spouse of a student at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is expected to contribute to financing the student's education. Students 
anticipating a need for financial aid are required to apply for and accept all 
available denominational, judicatory and congregational financial support for 
which they may be eligible. Since the Seminary is aware that some students will 
have financial needs which exceed their own personal, family and ecclesiastical 
resources, it provides financial aid from endowed and general funds. Only students 
enrolled on more than a half-time basis in the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 
programs at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary are eligible to apply for financial aid. 
Limited financial aid is available to students enrolled in the joint degree programs in 

77 



the professional graduate schools at the University of Pittsburgh, e.g., 
M.Div./M.S.W., M.Div./M.L.S. Tuition remission will be available for the spouse of 
a United Presbyterian Minister. 

To determine each student's financial need, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
uses allowed expense norms which are established annually according to the stu- 
dent's status, i.e., single, married, single parent, number of children. 

For 1 981 -82 the norm is $5800 for single students, $7950 for married students. An 
additional $1070 is allowed for each child living with and dependent on the student 
(up to a maximum of three children). The financial aid application requires the stu- 
dent to list the source and amount of all anticipated income. This will include stu- 
dent earnings, field education, earnings of spouse (less taxes, travel, child care, and 
payments on the spouse's own education debt), family contribution, and 
denominational and congregational support. It is required that each student con- 
tribute a minimum of $1200.00 a year toward education expenses. 

The student's measured need will be the difference between the allowed ex- 
penses and the anticipated income. To help meet this need, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary will assign a campus job and make an award grant. The student will be 
expected to borrow (through a state loan program, the Vocation Agency of the 
UPCUSA, or other source) the balance not granted. 

A limited number of campus jobs are available in the dining hall, dormitories, 
library, etc. All students on financial aid, except student pastors (as defined by the 
Field Education Office) and single parents with children, are expected to work ten 
hours per week at a campus job. Students with Field Education positions will work 
a minimum of five hours per week. A student may make a written appeal to the 
Financial Aid Committee to be excluded from a campus job for medical reasons (on 
doctor's certification) or other exceptional circumstances. 

It is from the award grant that Seminary tuition and fee charges and rent (when in 
default two months) are automatically deducted if the grant is sufficient to cover 
those charges. A lump sum of up to $200.00 from the student's grant will be 
available to the student upon request at the beginning of the school year in 
September. Any remaining portion of the grant award will then be paid to the stu- 
dent in nine monthly installments, normally on the tenth of each month. 

The Seminary's Financial Aid Program is based on a nine month academic 
period, and is not automatically renewable from year to year. Each year, if aid is re- 
quired, a new application must be filed by May 1 . Applications are reviewed in the 
order in which they are received. 

These policies are subject to change. They are operative for the current academic 
year (1981-82) and represent no commitment beyond the current year. 

Specific questions and requests for detailed information regarding financial aid 
should be addressed to the Seminary's Financial Aid Officer. 



78 



AWARDS, PRIZES AND FELLOWSHIPS 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation to that 
member of the senior class who is recommended by the faculty as having achieved 
the highest standard in all departments of the Seminary curriculum. The faculty 
reserves the right to impose special tests and examinations in making this award. 
The recipient must pledge himself or herself to a year of postgraduate study at some 
institution approved by the faculty following his or her graduation. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship is given every year to the member of the senior 
class who has the highest average at the beginning of his or her final term of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a full 
academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by the faculty. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize is assigned to that member of the 
graduating class who has taken the full course of instruction in this institution and 
who has achieved the second highest academic rank of the class, if in the judgment 
of the faculty he or she is worthy in all other respects. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

> This prize is awarded to a member of the senior class who has spent three years 
in the Seminary and has taken the highest standing in the department of homiletics. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize will be awarded to the student who 
achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek as he or she enters 
the junior class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew will be awarded to that member of the 
senior class who, having elected Hebrew, shall submit the best grammatical and 
sxegetical treatment of a portion of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek will be awarded to that member 
Df the senior class who, having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best gram- 
natical and exegetical treatment of a portion of the Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize is to be awarded yearly to the students 
aking first and second rank respectively in the department of Church History. 

The Watson Samuel Boyce Music Prize 

The Watson Samuel Boyce Music Prize is to be awarded annually to that member 
Df the senior class who makes the most outstanding contribution to the life of the 
Seminary in the area of church music. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The income is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the junior 
:lass who attain the highest average of excellence in their Seminary work. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship is given to the student who, upon entering 
Seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in a competitive examination in the 
English Bible. The successful competitor is to have the scholarship throughout the 

ntire course of three years. 

79 



The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

The income from this endowed fund is granted to the student, who in the judg- 
ment of the professors of the History and Theology Areas, is most worthy of this 
award at the end of the middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies is granted to the student who, 
in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical Area, is most worthy of this award 
at the end of the junior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for Graduate Study 

This fund provides an annual award to a member of the graduating class 
designated by the faculty for assistance in postgraduate study, preferably in the 
field of New Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 

This award is given to a student who, at the end of the middler year has, in the 
judgment of the homiletics professors, demonstrated excellence in preaching. 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions is awarded to that member of the 
graduating class who is deemed most deserving among those entering a denomina- 
tionally recognized or ecumenically sponsored mission field. 

The Clara Edna Miller Prize in Pastoral Theology 

This prize is awarded to that student in the Master of Divinity program finishing 
the seventh term who achieves the highest academic standing in those courses in 
the curriculum particularly adapted to the practice of ministry, i.e., preaching, wor- 
ship, education, pastoral care, administration, and leadership development. 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in Pastoral Care 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in Pastoral Care is awarded to the graduating 
senior, whether Master of Divinity or Master of Arts, who has taken his or her full 
course of study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and who has the highest stand- 
ing in the general area of pastoral care. 

The John W. Meister Award 

The John W. Meister Award in the Pastoral Ministry has been established at each 
of the seven theological seminaries of the United Presbyterian Church U.S.A. in 
memory of Rev. John W. Meister, who at his death in 1974 was Director of the 
Council of Theological Seminaries. The award is made each year to that member of 
the graduating class who manifests to the greatest degree those characteristics 
which are most essential to effective pastoral leadership. 

The Richard J. Rapp Memorial Award in Doctor of Ministry Studies 

Funds have been raised by the Covenant-Community Presbyterian Church for a 
memorial for Rev. Dr. Richard J. Rapp. It is the intention of the donors that this 
money be used to honor Dr. Rapp by publishing one or more outstanding Doctor 
of Ministry papers, and by acknowledging this in the annual commencement pro- 
gram. 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award for an International Student is given to a stu- 
dent who has demonstrated meritorious performance in his or her Seminary work 
and who is returning to his or her native land to witness to Christ there. 



80 



HONORS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Honors Scholarship Program is one way Pittsburgh Theological Seminary seeks 
to encourage the enrollment of young men and women of the highest academic 
ability in the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts programs. Those considered for 
an Honors Scholarship shall be from among those applicants who have graduated 
from a regionally accredited or internationally recognized college or university, 
normally in the top five percent of their class (with at least a 3.5 cumulative 
average). They shall be students of demonstrated potential for outstanding Chris- 
tian service. Each Honors Scholarship provides a substantial cash award to an 
entering first-degree student selected by the faculty. 

The David E. Molyneaux Honors Scholarship was established by the First 
Presbyterian Church of Flint, Michigan, in affection for their pastor, David E. 
Vlolyneaux, an alumnus and former Board member of the Seminary. 

The First Presbyterian Church of Neenah Honors Scholarship was established by 
:he First Presbyterian Church of Neenah, Wisconsin, from the Bergstrom Fund, of 
which it is the trustee. 

The Carl A. Hiaasen Honors Scholarship Fund was established by the bequest of 
Abraham L. Mailman in honor of Mr. Carl A. Hiaasen, a former member of the 
Board of Directors of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 

I Those considered for an Honors Scholarship must have applied for admission to 
he Seminary before April 15th of each academic year. 



81 




STUDENT LIFE 



A primary purpose of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is to develop a Christian 
community on campus which lays the foundation of early and lasting friendships, 
productive of confidence and mutual assistance among ministers. Approximately 
three hundred students, drawn from over twenty states and several foreign coun- 
tries, are enrolled at the Seminary. While a majority of students are United 
Presbyterians, there are significant numbers of Methodist, Baptist, Lutheran and 
Episcopal students as well. 

Students at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary participate in the governance of the 
institution through membership on various committees of the Board of Directors, 
faculty and administration. A number of student organizations flourish on campus 
to meet specific interests and concerns. 

The Student Association 

The Student Association is composed of "all students registered and enrolled in the 
Seminary in a course of study leading to a degree." The Student Association's pur- 
pose is to "conduct all student social and extracurricular affairs," and to "conduct 
elections of student representatives to other Seminary committees or organizations 
as required." In addition to pot-luck dinners, picnics, square dances, movies, and 
extracurricular events dealing with controversial issues related to the church and 
world at large foster a community spirit. The Student Association is responsible for 
a large part of the annual student orientation program. Meetings of the Student 
Association are held at least once a month. 




84 



rhe Associated Women Seminarians 

rhe Associated Women Seminarians (AWS) recognizes the particular needs of a 
>art of the student body for the good of the whole. AWS promotes in- 
erdependence among women and forwards the interests of women. AWS ac- 
ivities include the maintenance of sympathetic understanding and close cooper- 
ition with the faculty and administration; the establishment of an orderly succes- 
ion of participation by women students in the administration and governance of 
he Seminary; and the establishment of coordinating committees to respond to 
natters of concern to women both within and outside the Seminary community, 
•lembership is open to any female student at the Seminary. 

rhe Black Seminarians Association 

'he Black Seminarians Association provides a means whereby the Seminary utilizes 
he full participation of the black community. Through prayer, fellowship and the 
•xchange of individual talents the Association brings to the Seminary's attention 
10th the concerns of black people and the particular needs of black clergy. The 
association's extracurricular activities encompass these concerns through seminars 
onducted by experienced black pastors, annual attendance at the National Black 
eminarians Convention and visits to area black churches and communities, 
/tembership is open to black students in all academic programs of the Seminary. 

he Evangelical Student Fellowship 

he Evangelical Student Fellowship (ESF) is an organization holding an Evangelical 
Christian faith, as stated in its creed. The ESF has three organizing principles: 1) to 
rovide for the spiritual development of the membership; 2) to stimulate academic 
xcellence in evangelical scholarship; 3) to provide a forum whereby evangelical 
jtudents can engage the wider seminary community in dialogue on issues of 
liutual concern and of importance to the church of Jesus Christ. A bibliography of 
ivangelical resources which covers all subjects taught at the Seminary is prepared 
nd distributed. While any student is welcome to attend ESF activities, voting 
lembership is limited to those who sign the ESF creed in good faith. 

he International Student Association 

he International Student Association (ISA) is composed of students. The organiza- 
on provides an opportunity for international students at Pittsburgh Theological 
eminary to become acquainted, share experiences, and support one another. The 
association desires to make the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary community aware 
f the different social, religious, and political views represented by the international 
udents and their countries, thereby offering enrichment and growth to the com- 
lunity. ISA activities include an international dinner, cultural evenings and 
Hlowship once each month. 

he Preaching Association 

he Preaching Association, supported by the seminary but operated by students for 
ie students, supplies worship leadership to vacant pulpits in the greater Pittsburgh 
rea, providing valuable experience in preaching for seminarians. 



85 



SPICE 

SPICE is the organization of the female and male spouses of students enrolled at 
Pittsburgh Seminary. In addition to providing organized support for its members, 
SPICE helps promote and maintain a sense of community on the Seminary campus. 
Pot-luck dinners, movies, and holiday parties are sponsored by SPICE, often in 
association with the Student Association and the Association of Women 
Seminarians. Lectures and discussions are held to stimulate and enlighten the 
Seminary community. 

Orientation 

Students who are entering Pittsburgh Theological Seminary need to understand the 
critical significance of theological education, whether at the M.Div. or M.A. level. 
The M.Div. students will be entering the transition from laity to clergy. The 
Seminary provides an annual orientation program to sensitize students both to the 
goals of theological education in general and to the way the Seminary seeks to 
prepare men and women for the Christian ministry. Additionally, the Seminary 
through the Student Association and other student groups introduces entering 
students to the Pittsburgh scene. 

Play Care for Children 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has set aside a large community room located on 
the ground level of McMillan Hall as a play care center for pre-school children 
throughout the school year. The center is staffed by a paid director, volunteer 
parents and other students. The center's use is restricted to children of the 
Seminary community. 




86 



ADMISSIONS 
PROCEDURES 












i 



warn i 

r :Sfi 





A student applying for admission to any course of study offered by Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary shall provide evidence of good character and of a Bachelor's 
degree from an accredited college or university or its academic equivalent, and 
normally shall be a member in full communion in some branch of the Christian 
Church. 

Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 

Applicants to the first degree programs are required to have completed the 
Bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university at the time of 
enrollment. This undergraduate work should include a substantial foundation in 
the liberal arts. Applicants may apply any time after the junior year in college is 
completed. Applications for September entrance should be made prior to June 30 
to insure full consideration for admission; applications for entrance in the Second 
or Third Term should be made at least six weeks before the beginning of the Term 
desired. All correspondence concerning admissions to the Seminary should be ad- 
dressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Applications are considered by the Student Relations Committee upon submis- 
sion of the following materials: 

1. A formal application with the designated references. 

2. An official transcript of all the applicant's college and university work, show- 
ing grades for at least three years of undergraduate work. 

3. A statement (500-1000 words) describing the applicant's family, educational 
and religious background, placing particular emphasis upon motives for 
entering the Seminary. 

4. A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another represen- 
tative of the Seminary designated by the Director of Admissions. 

5. A battery of psychological and/or mental capacity tests may be required of the 
applicant by the Director of Admissions and Student Relations Committee. 
Such testing is utilized only when it is believed the results will clarify am- 
biguities in the student's academic record or in the applicant's emotional 
fitness for the ministry. 

6. An application fee of $15.00. This fee is not refundable. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, a $35.00 
placement fee is required to assure the applicant a place in the Term for which ap- 
plication was made. This fee is applied to the student's tuition and is not returnable 
except Under extreme hardship at the discretion of the Student Relations Commit- 
tee. A certification of the student's "intention to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another accredited seminary is required to submit, in 
addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous seminary work and a 
letter of dismissal from the Dean or President of the Seminary. A transfer student 
must be in attendance at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary for a minimum of one full 
academic year in order to become a candidate for the M.Div. or the M.A. degree. 



88 



Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work and 
Master of Divinity/Master of Library Science 

In each of the joint degree programs the candidate must apply and be admitted to 
both Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh. Normally, 
application is made to the appropriate graduate school of the University during the 
First Term of the middler year of the Seminary Master of Divinity program. 

Doctor of Ministry 

Applications for the Doctor of Ministry degree program are submitted to the Admis- 
sions Office. 

The successful completion of an M.Div. degree or its equivalent from an ac- 
credited seminary or divinity school is required for admission to the program. Ap- 
plicants are required to have completed a minimum of two years in the ordained 
ministry. 

The Application Process 

Applications to the Doctor of Ministry program must include: 

1. A formal application. 

2. Transcripts of all prior academic work plus information regarding participation 
in non-degree continuing education. 

3. An endorsement from the applicant's Session or Church Board and assurance 
the applicant will be engaged in a recognized ministerial position for the period 
of the program. 

4. A statement (500-1000 words) detailing the applicant's ministerial experience to 
date. 

5. A statement (500-1000 words) outlining reasons for entering the program. 

6. Designated letters of recommendation as specified on the application form. 

7. An interview with the Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program. 

Special Students 

Applicants desiring to study at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary for credit on a non- 
degree basis, other than International Students, must possess a Bachelor's degree 
from a regionally accredited college or university at the time of enrollment. Ap- 
plicants for Special Student status follow the same procedures and submit the same 
materials as those applying for the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts Programs. 

International Scholars 

All applicants for the International Scholars program at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary must secure endorsement of their study plans from either the Leadership 
Development Program of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, 475 
Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10115 or the World Alliance of Reformed 
Churches, 150, route de Ferney, 1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland. Applicants whose 
native language is not English will be required to give evidence of proficiency in the 
English language before application will be considered. The application deadline 
for international students is March 1st for September entrance. 



89 



$ PTW 



;-. ir-V'V 



* ;S *& 



f> ^ 



% 1. 



4' 'sk % V* *■*. 



,r\ 









■V-' 



f 



^fe£ 






^ 












i -k 






SPECIAL LECTURES AND 
CONTINUING EDUCATION 



SPECIAL LECTURES 

The Special Lectures program at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary annually brings 
scholars of national and international standing to the campus to make important 
learned contributions to the church and the world. 

The Ritchie Memorial Lectureship 

The Ritchie Memorial Lectureship will be inaugurated October 19-20, 1981. The 
first Ritchie Lecturer will be Professor Hans Kung of Tubingen, West Germany. 

The Schaff Lectures 

The Schaff Lectures are given annually on any subject related to the general field of 

theological study. 

1983 Dr. John H. Westerhoff, III, The Divinity School, Duke University 

(Christian Education) 
1982 Dr. Roy W. Fairchild, San Francisco Theological Seminary 

(Pastoral Care) 
1981 Dr. David Tracy, University of Chicago Divinity School 

"The Concept of Religion in Contemporary Christian Theology: 

The Conflict of Interpretations" 

1980 Dr. Rosemary Ruether, Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary 
'Theological and Ethical Bases for the Women's Liberation Movement" 

1979 Dr. Fred B. Craddock, Candler School of Theology, Emory University 
"What You Have Heard in a Whisper, Shout" 

The Elliott Lectures 

The Elliott Lectures are to be given on specialties in theology and on literary or 
scientific subjects connected therewith. 

1981 Dr. Charmarie Jenkins Blaisdell, Northeastern University 
"The Role of Women in Calvinism" 

1980 Dr. Virgil Cruz, University of Dubuque Theological Seminary 
"A New Look at the Apocalypse" 

1979 Dr. Robert Jewitt, Morningside College 
"Faith and Tolerance" 



Kelso Lectures— Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 

1981 Colonel George W. Alexander II, Chaplain, Department of the Army 
1980 The Rev. Charles Marks, Associate Executive, Synod of 

Southern California 
1979 Dr. Preston N. Williams, The Divinity School, Harvard University 
1978 Dr. C. Eric Lincoln, Duke University 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, theological education is not confined to formal 
degree work. Realizing that education is a lifelong process which may begin with a 
degree program, the Seminary offers a program of continuing education aimed at 
improving the skills and knowledge of men and women engaged in ministry. From 
September through June, a variety of experiences is available to pastors and church 

92 



vorkers ranging from open enrollment in Seminary courses to short-term seminars. 
^11 programs are built upon the expressed needs and desires of those people serv- 
ng in church situations. Continuing Education Units of credit (C.E.U.) are given to 
ill who participate. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary also recognizes its responsibility in providing 
luality educational experiences for lay people. The Continuing Education Office 
offers a variety of experiences aimed at increasing the knowledge, faith and leader- 
hip skills of lay people. 

The entire program of continuing education for pastors, church workers and lay 
>eople is planned and evaluated by a committee composed of faculty members, 
>astors and lay people from across the Tri-state area. 

For further information concerning any aspect of Continuing Education, please 
vrite: 

Mrs. Jeannette Rapp 

Co-ordinator of Continuing Education 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

616 North Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206-2596 

Continuing Education Events, 1981-82 

lerygma, Bible Study-in-Depth of the People of God 

Professor James A. Walther, Sr. and Associates 

Wednesday evenings beginning September 9 for 30 weeks (three terms) 

Ministry in Conflicts 

Professor Hugh F. Halverstadt, McCormick Theological Seminary 
September 21-23 

vents Celebrating the Inauguration of Carnegie S. Calian as President of Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary 

The Mission of Theological Education in Dialogue with Business, Politics and 
Education 

Wednesday, September 16 

Religion and Business: The Role of the Church in the 1980's 
(Special Focus— Business and Professional Communities) 

Thursday, September 17 

Religion and Politics: The Role of the Church in the 7980's 
(Special Focus— Alumni/ae, Judicatory Executives, Ministers) 

i Friday, September 18 

' Religion and Education: The Role of the Church in the 1980's 

I (Special Focus— College and University Teachers of Religion) 

j Inauguration of Dr. Carnegie Samuel Calian as President of Pittsburgh Theological 

I Seminary 

jight Mondays: September 28 - November 23 (Except October 19) 
| Storytelling— Professor Robert M. Ezzell 

The Reformed Tradition: Its Past, Present, and Future— Professor George H. 

Kehm 

Teaching and Preaching the Parables— Professor Robert L. Kelley 

hristianity in a Business World 

President C. S. Calian, and Professors W. Wiest and R. Stone 
Seven Wednesday evenings: September 30 through November 11 
Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, PA 

93 



Advanced Lay Pastoral Care 

Professor Neil R. Paylor 

Six Wednesdays: October 7 - November 11 

Satan in Myth and History 

Professor Walter Wink, Auburn Theological Seminary 
October 13-14 

Conversations with Hans Kiing (in association with the Ritchie Lectures) 
October 19-20 

Self-Renewal Through Faith Renewal 

Professor Gordon E. Jackson 

October 20 - 22 at St. Vincent Seminary, Latrobe, PA 

Elliott Lectures 1981: The Role of Women in Calvinism 

Dr. Charmarie Blaisdell, Associate Professor of History, Northeastern University 
October 26 - 27 

Evangelism in the Context of Worship 

Rev. Grady N. Allison, Evangelism Program Director, UPCUSA 

Rev. James G. Kirk, Discipleship and Worship Program Director, UPCUSA 

November 2 - 4 

Ministry to Children 

Dr. Yvonne E. Keairns, Director, Arsenal Family and Children's Center 
Seven Tuesdays: January 5 through February 16 
Arsenal Family and Children's Center, Pittsburgh, PA 

Bible Study: Alternative Approaches 

Professor James A. Walther, Sr., author and founder of Kerygma 
Dr. Harley A. Swiggam, editor and founder of Bethel Bible Series 
Dr. Frank T. Hainer, editor Bible Studies Cooperative Uniform Series 

January 18-19 

Self-Renewal Through Faith Renewal 

Professor Gordon E. Jackson 

February 9 - 11 at St. Vincent Seminary, Latrobe, PA 

The Study of the Future 

Dr. Edward Lindaman, President Emeritus, Whitworth College 
February 23 

A Call to Conversion 

James Wallis, editor of Sojourners 
February 25 

Enriching Christian Marriage 

Dr. and Mrs. Louis Evans, Jr., National Presbyterian Church, Washington, D.C. 
March 5 - 6 

Developing the Ministry with Single Adults 

Rev. William L. Flanagan, Minister with Single Adults 
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Newport Beach, CA 
Rev. Allen Timm, Pastor of Relational Ministries 
First Presbyterian Church, Bethlehem, PA 
March 8-10 

The Care and Feeding of Volunteers 

Mary Beth Peters, Organizational Development Consultant 
Four Mondays: March 8, 15, 22, 29 

94 



Eight Mondays: March 15 - May 3 

Christendom - The Great Debates— Professor Charles Partee 

Preaching - A Challenge and a Joy— Dr. Charles P. Robshaw, Pastor Emeritus 

East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

Christianity and Judaism after the Holocaust— Professor H. Eberhard von 

Waldow 

The Nature of Mission for Global Citizens— Ruling Elder Mary E. Pardee, 

former National President, United Presbyterian Women 
Money Management Seminar for Women 

Carol Cushing Mullaugh, Vice President, Parker/Hunter, Inc. 

April 14 

How to Raise Money in the Local Church 

Ketchum, Inc. & Associates 
April 21 - 22 

Program Development Ideas 

Rev. Lyle Schaller, Parish Consultant, Yokefellow Institute 
April 24 

Schaff Lecture Series 1982: "Spiritual Direction" in Pastoral Care 

Dr. Roy Warren Fairchild, Professor of Education and Social Psychology, 
San Francisco Theological Seminary 
April 26 - 28 

rhe Church Responding to the Needs of Today's Youth 

Robert R. Long and Associates, Coalition for Christian Outreach 
May 1 

Doctor of Ministry Week 

June 7-11 

School of Religion for Pastors (by invitation only) 
June 14 - 18 

Planned for Spring, 1982 
Concern for the Disabled: A Workshop 

Dr. Harold Wilke, Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Religion, 
Union Theological Seminary, NYC 

Issues in Law and Ethics 

Professor Walter E. Wiest and invited guests 

Conference on Medicine and Ethics 

Dr. Kenneth L. Vaux, Professor of Ethics in Medicine 
University of Illinois College of Medicine 
Professor Walter E. Wiest and invited guests 



95 



BOARD OF 
DIRECTORS AND 
ADMINISTRATION 



». •" * '* 






j 



e ^ 



i.A, ^ 



: c 




THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers, 1981-82 

The Rev. Robert C. Holland, Chairperson 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Marianne Wolfe, Vice-Chairperson 

Stated Clerk, Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Woodland United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, Secretary 

Executive Presbyter, Pittsburgh Presbytery, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Craig G. Ford, Treasurer 

Senior Vice-President, Mellon National Bank 

Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

LEGAL COUNSEL 

Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright & Barron 

Woodland United Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Members 

Bishop James M. Ault 

Resident Bishop, Western Pennsylvania Conference 

United Methodist Church 

Mrs. Davitt S. Bell 

Civic Leader 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. J. B. Belton 

Civic Leader 

First Presbyterian Church, Brockway, Pennsylvania 

David J. Brubach 

Executive Vice-President 

Union National Bank 

Glenshaw Presbyterian Church, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

Dr. E. Bayley Buchanan 

Surgeon, Mercy Hospital 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Richard Cromie 

Southminster Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. St. Paul Epps 

Retired Church Executive 

Windsor, North Carolina 

Merle E. Gilliand 

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer 

Pittsburgh National Bank 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



98 



Dr. Dwight C. Hanna 

Reconstructive Surgeon and Medical Director 
Western Pennsylvania Hospital 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. Jean H. Henderson 
lefferson Center United Presbyterian Church 
Saxonburg, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. Joseph R. Hookey 
Second Presbyterian Church 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Mrs. Blaine Hovis 
Civic Leader 

East Main United Presbyterian Church 
Grove City, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. William N. Jackson 
Christ Presbyterian Church 
Canton, Ohio 
The Rev. Beverly James 
Southminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
The Rev. Carolyn J. Jones 
Glenshaw Presbyterian Church 
Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 
|ohn Kaites 

President, Johnstown Coal and Coke Company 
Westmont Presbyterian Church, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
Dr. Max A. Lauffer 

vtellon Professor, University of Pittsburgh 
Southminster Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
lames E. Lee 

^resident, Gulf Oil Corporation 

z ox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Mark B. Maharg 

Owner, Maharg Insurance Company 
Calvary Presbyterian Church, Butler, Pennsylvania 
|rhe Rev. Clinton M. Marsh 
president, Knoxville College 
|Cnoxville, Tennessee 
virs. C. Herman Meyer 
|:lder, Hill Top United Presbyterian Church 
oronto, Ohio 
!4rs. C. Taylor Marshall 
'ivic Leader 
|ewickley Presbyterian Church, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

I he Rev. Kenneth Moe 

jaith United Presbyterian Church 
ittanning, Pennsylvania 



99 



Mrs. Mary E. Pardee 

Former President, United Presbyterian Church Women 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Nathan W. Pearson 

Financial Advisor, Paul Mellon Family Interests 

Sewickley Presbyterian Church, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Nancy Peterson 

Alumni/ae Representative 

Center United Presbyterian Church, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. William G. Rusch 

Synod Executive, Synod of the Trinity 

Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. John D. Sharick 

Executive Presbyter, Eastminster Presbytery 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Mrs. Beatrice S. Smith 

Ministry to Black Students, Edinboro State College 

First United Presbyterian Church, Edinboro, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Arthur D. Webster, Jr. 

Vance Memorial Presbyterian Church 

Wheeling, West Virginia 

The Rev. Alfred W. Wishart, Jr. 

Executive Director, Pittsburgh Foundation 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Stuart Zahniser 

Elder, First United Presbyterian Church 

Meadville, Pennsylvania 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Carnegie Samuel Calian 

President 



Ulrich W. Mauser 

Dean of the Faculty 




Eugene P. Degitz 

Vice-President for Development 



Richard T. Gaab 

Business Manager 




Warren K. Martin 

Director of Deferred Giving 




»•***%, '- ^ 



Dikran Y. Hadidian 

Librarian 



Timothy P. Snyder 

Registrar/Director of Student Services 



John E. White 

Director of Admissions 




102 



Marjorie Suchocki 

Director of the Doctor of 
Ministry Program 




Robert L. Kelley, jr. 

Supervisor for the Practice 
of Ministry 




Mary Ellen Scott 

Cata I oger/ Archivist 




103 



INDEX 

Admissions procedures 87 

Awards, prizes and fellowships 79 

Board and room 77 

Board of directors 98 

Clinical pastoral education 28 

Continuing education 92 

Course descriptions 33 

Cross-registration in PCHE institutions 11 

Doctor of Ministry degree 21 

Doctor of Philosophy degree 27 

Faculty 61 

Fees 76 

Field education 16 

Financial aid 77 

Grading system 30 

Honors scholarships program 81 

Housing 10 

Institutional relationships 11 

International scholars program 28 

Library 9 

Master of Arts degree 18 

Religious education emphasis 18 

Pre-Doctoral Master of Arts program 19 

[Master of Divinity degree 14 

I Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work degree 17 

i Master of Divinity/Master of Library Science degree 17 

(Master of Sacred Theology degree 19 

(Placement 28 

iPlay care center 86 

|Preaching Association 85 

•Recreation 10 

Rent 77 

ijSpecial lectures 92 

Special non-degree studies 28 

'Student associations 84 

ijTu ition 76 

'Worship 11 



105 




PITTSBURGH 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206-2596 
412-362-5610 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



Deacidified using the Bookkeeper process. 
Neutralizing Agent: Magnesium Oxide 
Treatment Date: 

APR 1995 




R 



mnuuER 



PER 



PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 

1114 William Flinn Highway 
Glenshaw.PA 15116-2657 
412-486-1161