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Full text of "Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Catalog"

CLIFFORD E. BARBOUR 
LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/pittsburghtheol198389pitt 




Pittsburgh 

Theological 

Seminary 





This catalog is a statement of the policies, 

[?rsonnel and programs of Pittsburgh 
leological Seminary as projected by the 
sponsible authorities of the Seminary, 
ttsburgh Theological Seminary reserves 
the right to alter and change its policies, 
personnel and programs, without prior 
notice, in accordance with the Seminary's 
institutional needs and academic pur- 
poses. Complete statements of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary's policies and pro- 
grams are found in the Seminary's Con- 
stitution, By-laws, Academic Regulations, 
and Board and Faculty Minutes. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary admits 
qualified students of any race, color, 
national or ethnic origin, and without 
regard to age, handicap, or sex. 



PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL' 
SEMINARY LIBRARY 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
accredited by The Association of 
Theological Schools in the United States 
and Canada, and the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 




Pittsburgh 
Theological p " 
Seminary 



616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206-2596 
412-362-5610 






L^ 



Calendar 



1983 - 1984 








Term One 


September 6 


First Day of Classes 






November 14 


Last Day of Classes 






November 15-18 


Reading and Examination Period 




Term Two 


November 28 


First Day of Classes 






Dec. 17-Jan. 2 


Christmas Break 






January 3 


Classes Resume 






February 20 


Last Day of Classes 






February 21-24 


Reading and Examination Period 




Term Three 


March 5 


First Day of Classes 






March 9-1 1 


George Orwell Days, Pittsburgh 1984 






May 14 


Last Day of Classes 






May 15-18 


Reading and Examination Period 






May 22 


188th Commencement 






June 4-8, 11-15 


D. Min. Weeks 






June 18-22 


School of Religion 


■ 


1984-1985 






■ 


Term One 


September 4 


First Day of Classes 


I 




November 9 


Last Day of Classes 






November 12-16 


Reading and Examination Period 




Term Two 


November 26 


First Day of Classes 






December 19-Jan. 1 


Christmas Break 






January 2 


Classes Resume 






February 15 


Last Day of Classes 






February 18-22 


Reading and Examination Period 




Term Three 


March 4 


First Day of Classes 






May 10 


Last Day of Classes 






May 13-17 


Reading and Examination Period 


I 




May 21 


189th Commencement 
D. Min. Weeks 
School of Religion 





Contents 





Introduction 


6 
6 
7 
9 


Purpose 

Historical Background 

Pittsburgh 

Alumni/Alumnae 




„ 


12 
14 
16 
16 




II 


The Campus 
Recreation 
Worship 
Student Groups 




Educational Programs 



22 The Master of Divinity Degree 

25 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Social Work Joint Degree 

26 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Library Science Joint Degree 

26 The Master of Arts Degree 

27 The Master of Sacred Theology Degree 
29 The Doctor of Ministry Degree 

34 The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

34 Special Programs 

38 Academic Regulations 




Course Descriptions 



42 Studies in Bible 

49 Studies in Church History 

50 Studies in Theology 

54 Studies in Church and Ministry 




Admissions 



70 M. Div./M.A. 

72 Joint Professional Degree Programs 

72 S.T.M. 

72 D. Min. 




Finances 



76 Tuition and Fees 

76 Financial Aid 

79 Awards, Prizes and Fellowships 



6 Introduction 




Introduction 



Purpose 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a grad- 
uate professional institution of the Presby- 
terian Church (U.S.A.). Located in the 
heartland of Presbyterianism, and part of 
a thriving city, we seek to prepare men 
and women for dynamic pastoral ministry 
and Christian lay leadership in all phases 
of the Church's outreach. 

Dedicated to excellence in theological 
education, the twenty-member faculty 
strives to prepare graduates who will 
demonstrate both personal piety and the 
keenest possible intellectual understand- 
ing of the Gospel and its implications for 
individual and social living. Serious atten- 
tion is given to the study of biblical lan- 
guages, and to the teaching of theological, 
historical, ethical, and practical disciplines 
for the successful and meaningful practice 
of ministry. 

The Seminary is rooted in the Reformed 
history of faithfulness to Scripture and 
commitment to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 
In keeping with our tradition, we continue 
our mission to be a caring and ecumenical 
community, to nurture personal faith and 
corporate worship, to promote global 
consciousness and service, and to 
encourage students and faculty to relate 



their studies to the numerous styles of 
ministry emerging today. 

Historical Background 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was 
created in 1959 by the consolidation of 
two previously separate institutions: 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary of 
the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America, and Western Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America. The union 
of the two denominations in 1958 led to 
the consolidation of the seminaries. 

The history of the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary began with the 
founding of Service Seminary in 1794 by 
the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania. 
Prior to that time the Presbytery had been 
dependent on a supply of ministers sent 
out from Scotland. The Reverend John 
Anderson, D.D., was elected as the first 
teacher of divinity, and the school began 
with an enrollment of six students. Service 
Seminary moved twice, first to Ohio, 
where it became Xenia Theological Sem- 
inary, and later to Missouri. It merged 
in 1930 with a seminary which had been 
founded in Pittsburgh in 1825, and 
together they formed the Pittsburgh-Xenia 




Introduction 7 



Theological Seminary. This institution 
was later augmented by the resources 
of Newburgh Seminary, which was 
founded in New York City in 1805 by John 
Mitchell Mason. 

The other branch of our pre-1959 history 
began with the establishment, in 1785 
by Joseph Smith and in 1787 by John 
McMillan, of classical academies in 
Washington, Pa. From these, in 1825, the 
General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A., created Western Semi- 
nary. It was indeed a western seminary in 
1825, the task of which was to furnish a 
ministry for the rapidly opening frontier 
territories along the Ohio River. 

Since the 1959 consolidation, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary has been located on 
the old Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary campus 
in the Highland Park/East Liberty section 
of Pittsburgh. 

Pittsburgh 

The City of Pittsburgh, in southwestern 
Pennsylvania, is built on and surrounded 
by the broken hills and wooded slopes 
which run along her three rivers. Down- 
town Pittsburgh, located at the point 
where the Allegheny and Monongahela 
Rivers merge to form the Ohio, is the third 
largest corporate headquarters city in the 
United States, and the home to such 
important firms as U.S. Steel, Gulf Oil, 
and Rockwell International. Pittsburgh is 
easily accessible via modern systems of 
air, rail, and ground travel. 



Urban renewal in the city, much 
acclaimed in recent decades, has included 
the arts and education as well as physical 
rehabilitation. An internationally acclaimed 
symphony orchestra along with resident 
opera, ballet, and theater companies per- 
form regularly in the lavish Heinz Hall for 
the Performing Arts and in other city 
theaters. The city is also the steward of 
several important art collections and 
museums. Carnegie Central Library has 
eighteen branches and a suburban Book- 
mobile service, and there are also private 
and specialized libraries in the area which 
are often open to the public. 

The City of Pittsburgh is the scene of 
Western Pennsylvania's largest and most 
important educational complex. Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary is associated 
through the Pittsburgh Council on Higher 
Education with nine colleges and univer- 
sities in the city. It operates a variety of 
shared degree programs with the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, and it is engaged in 
expanding shared programs also with 
Carnegie-Mellon University and 
Duquesne University. The cluster of edu- 
cational institutions in Pittsburgh provides 
an atmosphere of intellectual growth, and 
offers frequent lectures, on a variety of 
subjects, which interested persons may 
attend. They also provide entertainment 
in the form of musical theater produc- 
tions, and sporting events. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's 
emergence as an important center of 
theological education has paralleled the 




8 Introduction 

city's renaissance. Faculty and students 
are able to sample richly from and to join 
actively in Pittsburgh's efforts at human 
and cultural renewal. Seminary students 
live in Pittsburgh and are thus sensitized 
to the urban setting of the contemporary 
theological enterprise. Their own faith is 
challenged and enriched by sustained 
encounter with the joys and tragedies of 
urban life. 

Through the wide scope of field education 
and other work opportunities, students 
from the Seminary are involved in many 
different areas of Pittsburgh. Students 
serve as pastors in inner-city and suburban 
churches with a variety of programs, as 
chaplains in hospitals and in county and 
federal penal institutions, as campus 
ministers and in many other positions 



which affect the life of the city and its peo- 
ple. The resources of Pittsburgh for 
theological education are great, and 
Pittsburgh Seminary tries to make use of 
these resources as effectively as possible 
in the many facets of its life. The Seminary 
also attempts to be an active resource for 
the city through the stewardship of its 
facilities and the creative leadership of the 
members of the Seminary community. 

The Seminary's Immediate Environment: 
Highland Park and East Liberty 

The numerous rivers, valleys and hills 
common to western Pennsylvania divide 
Pittsburgh into a large number of 
neighborhoods. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is located on the border 
between two such neighborhoods. To the 





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&H£OLOgiCAL |j If 

Scminary ; ^r 



FOUNDSO 1794 



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Introduction 9 



north is a residential area of substantial 
and well kept homes, Highland Park, 
which takes its name from the large city 
park less than one mile from the seminary. 
One of Pittsburgh's finest, Highland Park 
offers woods, picnic areas, and paths for 
biking and walking. At the heart of the 
park is the Pittsburgh Zoo, much of which 
was built at the turn of the century, and 
which is presently undertaking a large 
scale program of modernization. 

To the south is East Liberty, a busy com- 
mercial and business center, providing 
seminary residents with easy access to a 
large department store and many small 
shops and restaurants. East Liberty's 
residential population represents a healthy 
racial and ethnic cross section of urban 
America. The seminary is a partner in the 
East End Cooperative Ministry, an exciting 



ecumenical venture involving many 
churches and agencies in cooperative 
service projects. 

Alumni/Alumnae 

There are over twenty-six hundred living 
alumni/ae of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary and its antecedent institutions. 
Since 1959, over three quarters of our 
graduates have entered the service of 
the church in parish-related ministries. 
Graduates of the Seminary also serve 
the church as college and university 
presidents, seminary and college faculty, 
and as synod and presbytery executives 
and staff. There are nine living alumni of 
the Seminary who have held the highest 
elected office in the Presbyterian Church 
(U.S.A.), that of Moderator of the General 
Assembly. 





PlTTSBURg 

SheoLogic 

SCMINARy 



FOUNDED 1794 



Seminary Life 



12 Campus 

12 Academic Buildings 

12 Housing 

14 Recreation 

16 Worship 

16 Student Groups 

17 Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Choir 

18 Orientation 

18 Plav Care for Children 



12 Seminary Life 




Seminary Life 



The Campus 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is located 
on a thirteen-acre campus, the major por- 
tion of which was once the estate of 
H. Lee Mason, Jr. The buildings, almost all 
of which have been built since 1954, are 
of American Colonial design. 

Academic Buildings 

THE GEORGE A. LONG ADMINISTRA- 
TION BUILDING is the focal point of 
campus life. In addition to administrative 
offices, the building contains lecture and 
seminar rooms, faculty offices, student 
center, bookstore, the Bible Lands 
Museum, and a large lounge which is 
used for many gatherings. 

CLIFFORD E. BARBOUR LIBRARY houses 
a collection of over 192,000 volumes. 
Four open stack areas include 103 desk 
carrels which may be reserved by 
students. In addition, thirteen enclosed 
typing carrels, which allow greater privacy 
for research work, are available for doc- 
toral students. Twenty reserved study 
rooms provide ideal conditions in which 
faculty members, visiting scholars, and 
graduate students may pursue scholarly 
research. Reading rooms and lounges are 



informally scattered throughout the build- 
ing. Facilities are also available for reading 
microfilm audio work, language study, 
and listening to music. 

Special collections and displays augment 
the book resources of the Barbour Library. 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection. 
The library contains this priceless collec- 
tion of classical theological works dating 
from the reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hym- 
nology. Several thousand valuable hymn 
and song books which came from the 
estate of James Warrington of Philadelphia 
provide research materials for scholars of 
American and English hymnody. 

Historical Collections. The archive room 
of Barbour Library contains Minutes and 
other records of Associate, Associate 
Reformed, and United Presbyterian con- 
gregations, presbyteries, synods, and 
general assemblies. Barbour Library is also 
the repository for the Upper Ohio Valley 
Historical Society and for the Pittsburgh 
Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church 
(U.S.A.). 




On display in the main floor exhibit area 
are the desk and chair of Dr. Karl Barth of 
Basel, Switzerland, which were presented 
to the Seminary by Dr. Barth in 1964. 
Accompanying the desk, at which 
Dr. Barth wrote his theological treatises, 
is an autographed copy of his Kirchliche 
Dogmatik 1/1 . 

HICKS FAMILY MEMORIAL CHAPEL is 
the newest structure on the Seminary 
campus. The sanctuary is used for worship 
during most of the Seminary's chapel serv- 
ices, and is used occasionally by local 
congregations. Hicks Chapel has a spa- 
cious and comfortable theatre-auditorium 
which is ideal for conferences, special 
lectures and concerts. 

THE JAMES L. KELSO BIBLE LANDS 
MUSEUM is named for the long-time 
Professor of Old Testament and Biblical 
Archaeology. It contains a significant 
collection of ancient Near Eastern and 
Palestinian pottery and artifacts from 
numerous excavations in which the semi- 
nary has had a part over the last fifty-five 
years. Housed in the George A. Long 
Administration Building, the museum is 
a valuable teaching and research aid for 
seminary students who may wish to par- 
ticipate in a Palestinian dig or gain some 
expertise in Palestinian archaeology. One 
of the most interesting recent acquisitions 
is a tomb group from the excavations of 
the Bab edhDhra cemetery on the south- 
east shore of the dead sea, which is in the 
probable area of the biblical cities of 
Sodom and Gomorrah. 



Seminary Life 13 

Housing for Married Students 

SAMUEL A. FULTON MEMORIAL HALL 
provides eighteen efficiency and twenty- 
one one-bedroom apartments. Each unit 
includes a kitchenette, a bath, and a 
storage locker in the basement. 

THE HIGHLANDER contains seventeen 
one-bedroom and six two-bedroom units. 
Each apartment includes a living room, 
kitchen, bath, and storage locker. 

ANDERSON HALL includes six two- 
bedroom and six three-bedroom apart- 
ments, each of which has a living room, 
kitchen, bath, and a storage locker. These 
units are equipped with wall-to-wall 
carpeting. 

McMILLAN HALL, Anderson Hall, 
and The Highlander form a quadrangle 
which encloses a play area for children. 
In McMillan Hall there are one four- 
bedroom, three three-bedroom, twelve 
two-bedroom, and three one-bedroom 
apartments. As in Anderson Hall, the units 
are equipped with wall-to-wall carpeting. 
On the ground floor of McMillan Hall 
there is a large community room which is 
used as a play care center for pre-school 
children throughout the school year. 

Apartments in all buildings are unfur- 
nished. In the case of international 
students, or others demonstrating a com- 
pelling need, a limited amount of furniture 
may be available through the housing 
office. 




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14 Seminary Life 

Each apartment is equipped with a 
refrigerator and stove; coin-operated laun- 
dry facilities are located in the basement 
of each building. 

Life for married students and their families 
is pleasant and comfortable. Rents are 
well below commercial rates. Shops and 
stores are within walking distance, public 
transportation is available at the Seminary 
gate, and public schools are nearby for 
children of all ages. 

Housing for Single Students 

JOHN McNAUGHER MEMORIAL HALL, 
the Seminary's original dormitory, now 
serves a variety of purposes. One wing 
houses women students in large private 
rooms, and another contains faculty 
offices. Attached to McNaugher Hall is 
the dining facility which consists of three 
dining halls and a modern kitchen. 



GEORGE C. FISHER MEMORIAL HALL 
accommodates men in single rooms. On 
the ground floor of Fisher Hall there is 
currently a shelter for abused women, 
which is run by an independent agency. 
Fisher Hall has student lounges on each 
floor. Single students may rent apartments 
upon availability. 

Dogs and cats are not permitted in 
Seminary apartments or dormitories. 

Recreation 

Under the auspices of the Student 
Association, athletic events and other 
recreational activities are arranged. 
Seminary students have access to the 
gymnasium and indoor swimming pool at 
Peabody High School across the street 
from the Seminary. Two new tennis courts 
are located on the campus grounds. 




Seminary Life 15 




1 








16 Seminary Life 

Worship 

Worship is an integral part of the life of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Chapel 
services, both traditional and experimen- 
tal in form, are held five times each week 
and are followed by a time of community- 
wide fellowship. Students, faculty, guests, 
and administrators share in the leadership 
of chapel services under the direction of 
the Seminary's Liturgical Committee. 
Attendance at worship services is 
voluntary. 

Student Groups 

A primary purpose of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary is to develop a 
Christian community on campus which 
lays the foundation of early and lasting 
friendships, productive of confidence 



and mutual assistance among ministers. 
Approximately three hundred and eighty 
students, drawn from over twenty states 
and several foreign countries, are enrolled 
at the Seminary. While a majority of 
students are Presbyterians, there are 
significant numbers of Methodist, Baptist, 
Lutheran, Episcopal, and Catholic students 
as well. 

Students at Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary participate in the governance of the 
institution through membership on various 
committees of the Board of Directors, 
Faculty and Administration. A number of 
student organizations flourish on campus 
to meet specific interests and concerns. 

The Student Association 

The Student Association is composed of 




"all students registered and enrolled in the 
Seminary in a course of study leading to a 
degree." The Student Association's pur- 
pose is to "conduct all student social and 
extracurricular affairs," and to "conduct 
elections of student representatives to 
other Seminary committees or organiza- 
tions as required." The Student Associa- 
tion conducts its own program of extra- 
curricular events which range from meet- 
ings dealing with issues related to the 
church and the world to social get- 
togethers. The Student Association is 
responsible for a large part of the annual 
student orientation program. Meetings of 
the Student Association are held at least 
once a month. 

Associated Women at Seminary 

Associated Women at Seminary 
(AWS) recognizes the particular needs of 
a part of the body for the good of the 
whole. AWS promotes interdependence 
among women and forwards the interests 
of women. AWS activities include the 
maintenance of sympathetic understand- 
ing and close cooperation with the faculty 
and administration; the establishment of 
an orderly succession of participation by 
women in the administration and govern- 
ance of the Seminary; and the establish- 
ment of coordinating committees to 
respond to matters of concern to women 
both within and outside the Seminary 
community. Membership is open to any 
female at the Seminary. 

The Black Seminarians Association 

The Black Seminarians Association pro- 
vides a means whereby the Seminary 
utilizes the full participation of the black 
community. Through prayer, fellowship 
and the exchange of individual talents, the 
Association brings to the Seminary's atten- 
tion both the concerns of black people 
and the particular needs of black clergy. 
The Association's extracurricular activities 
encompass these concerns through 
seminars conducted by experienced black 
pastors, annual attendance at the National 
Black Seminarians Convention and visits 
to area black churches and communities. 
Membership is open to black students in 
all academic programs of the Seminary. 



Seminary Life 17 

The Disabilities Concerns Caucus 

The Disabilities Concerns Caucus (DCC) 
recognizes the need of the disabled per- 
son to be fully included in the life and 
worship of the church. As an organization 
we are dedicated to the sharing of that 
awareness with the Seminary community, 
the eager church community, and the 
world; and, thereby, with the cooperation 
of the faculty and administration, facilitate 
the general accessability of disabled per- 
sons to all Seminary buildings and pro- 
grams. Membership is open to any con- 
cerned person. 

The Evangelical Student Fellowship 

The Evangelical Student Fellowship (ESF) 
is a fellowship of care and support for 
students and faculty of evangelical convic- 
tions. It has three organizing principles: 




18 Seminary Life 

1) to provide for the spiritual development 
of its membership; 2) to stimulate aca- 
demic excellence in evangelical scholar- 
ship; 3) to provide a forum whereby evan- 
gelical students can engage the wider 
seminary community in dialogue on 
issues of mutual concern. Any student 
is welcome to attend ESF activities. 

The International Student Association 

The International Student Association 
(ISA) is composed of all interested 
students. The organization provides an 
opportunity for international students 
at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary to 
become acquainted, share experiences, 
and support one another. The Association 
desires to make the Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary community aware of the differ- 
ent social, religious, and political views 
represented by the international students 
and their countries, thereby offering 
enrichment and growth to the commu- 
nity. ISA activities include an international 
dinner, cultural evenings and fellowship 
once each month. 

The Peace Fellowship 

The Peace Fellowship of the Seminary is 
an informal but active group of students 
and faculty who seek to comprehend and 
live out the shalom of our biblical faith. 
Our fellowship attempts to stress both 
peace education and peace activism. The 
biblical witness to peacemaking calls us to 
proclaim God's peacemaking work in the 
world, to emphasize the peacemaking 
message within the church, and to explore 
the relationship between faith and politics. 
Worship services, speakers, conferences, 
lobbying activity in Washington, D.C., and 
local political activity have been spon- 
sored by the group over the past four 
years. This seminary activity is often coor- 
dinated with the work of the Presbytery 
Peace Task Force and the Pittsburgh Peace 
Network. The Peace Fellowship functions 
according to group concensus and we 
meet once a week during lunch. 

The Preaching Association 

The Preaching Association, supported by 
the seminary but operated by students for 
the students, supplies worship leadership 
to vacant pulpits in the greater Pittsburgh 
area, providing valuable experience in 



preaching for seminarians. 

SPICE 

SPICE is the organization of single parent 
students and female and male spouses of 
students enrolled at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary. Its purpose is to provide organ- 
ized support for its members as well as 
promote and maintain a sense of com- 
munity on the Seminary campus. An 
emphasis is placed on dealing with the 
special situations that parents, couples 
and families encounter in their time here 
at Seminary. In addition, holiday parties, 
lectures and special activities are held 
throughout the school year. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Choir 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Choir is open to men and women from 
the entire Seminary community- 
students, faculty and staff. The Choir 
participates in weekly chapel services and 
presents seasonal concerts. Rehearsals are 
held each Tuesday during the academic 
year from 6:00-7:15 p.m. For further 
information, contact George E. Tutwiler, 
organist/choirmaster. 

Orientation 

Students who are entering Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary need to understand 
the critical significance of theological 
education, whether at the M.Div., M.A. 
and S.T.M. level. The M.Div. students will 
be entering the transition from laity to 
clergy. The Seminary provides an annual 
orientation program to sensitize students 
both to the goals of theological education 
in general and to the way the Seminary 
seeks to prepare men and women for 
the Christian ministry. Additionally, the 
Seminary through the Student Association 
and other student groups introduces 
entering students to the Pittsburgh scene. 

Play Care for Children 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has set 
aside a large community room located on 
the ground level of McMillan Hall as a 
play care center for pre-school children 
throughout the school year. The center 
is staffed by a paid director, volunteer 
parents and other students. The center's 
use is restricted to children of the 
Seminary community. 



Seminary Life 19 






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Educational 
Programs 



22 The Master of Divinity Degree 

25 Placement for Graduating Seniors 

25 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Social Work Joint Degree Program 

°!6 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Library Science Joint Degree Program 

26 New Cooperative Programs 

26 The Master of Arts Degree 

27 The Master of Sacred Theology Degree 
29 Doctor of Ministry Program 

34 The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

34 Special Programs 

36 Special Lectures 

37 Continuing Education 

38 Academic Regulations 




22 Educational Programs 




Educational 
Programs 



The Master of Divinity Degree 

Studies leading to the Master of Divinity 
degree are designed to prepare men and 
women for the various ministries of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and other 
denominations. It is a fundamental 
assumption of the Master of Divinity pro- 
gram that preparation for the ministry can- 
not be separated from engagement in 
ministry itself. Thus the Master of Divinity 
curriculum is designed to integrate theo- 
logical studies and the work of ministry so 
that theory and practice, academy and 
parish, become complementary com- 
ponents in the educational process. 

One hundred and eight (108) term hours 
are required for the Master of Divinity 
degree. When followed on a full-time 
basis, the program is normally completed 
in three academic years. Student Pastors 
are required to spread their degree work 
over four academic years. 

In preparing for Christian ministry students 
should develop an understanding of a 
broad spectrum of knowledge along with 
a competence in basic pastoral abilities. 
They should be able to use theological 
insights to integrate these skills and 
resources. The Master of Divinity cur- 
riculum is designed to guide the student 
through a pattern of course work and 
experience which will lead her or him to 
a basic professional competency with 
which to begin the ordained ministry. At 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary it is 
understood that this basic professional 
competency includes: 

The ability to understand and make use of 
the basic documents of faith, i.e, Scripture, 
creeds, and traditions of the church. The 
study of the Bible, both in English and in 
one of the original languages, and the 
study of church history are crucial to this 
ability. The course work in Biblical Studies 
is supplemented by a required examina- 
tion on the content of the English Bible. 
This test, which is offered annually, must 



be passed by every Master of Divinity stu- 
dent as a requisite for graduation. Presby- 
terian students generally enroll in a full 
academic year's study of both biblical 
languages in accordance with the ordina- 
tion requirements of the denomination. 

The ability to communicate through 
preaching, writing, and teaching, and to 
counsel and provide leadership in the pro- 
gram and administrative areas, fostered by 
the course work in the Pastoral Studies and 
ministry sequences. Three terms of super- 
vised field education are required of all 
Master of Divinity students in the middler 
year in conjunction with the Pastoral 
Studies sequence so that the academic 
study in the areas of education, pastoral 
care, and homiletics can be critically com- 
bined with a well-rounded, supervised 
involvement in the life of the church. 

The ability to understand in theological 
terms the sociological, ideological, and 
political content of the cultures in which 
the church ministers. This understanding 
needs to be followed by the application of 
ethical standards to the social process, 
using all of the resources available for 
making ministry effective. Two required 
courses in Church and Society, the 
Introduction to Ethics, and one elective 
course in ethics help students to reach 
these goals. 

The ability to think theologically. In 
addition to an introduction to historical 
theology, there are two required courses 
focusing on Christology, and the Church 
and Sacraments. In these courses students 
study theological method as well as the 
content of central doctrines of the faith. In 
addition each student is required to take 
one elective course in theology. 

The ability to practice ministry in an 
appropriate professional style. One of the 
first term courses introduces students to 
the concept of ministry and its varied 
responsibilities. In the senior year two 



courses lead the student to develop his or 
her own statement of faith (Credo) and to 
understand the dynamics of the formation 
of faith in the pastor and, through the 
pastor, in the people. 

The Master of Divinity Curriculum 

Junior Year 



Term 1 


Interpreting the Bible 




Language 




Church & Society: Local 




Introduction to Ministry 


Term II 


Biblical Introduction 




(OT01 orNTOD 1 




Language 




Historical Studies 1 




Elective 


Term III 


Biblical Introduction 




(OT02 or NT02) 2 




Exegesis 




Historical Studies II 




Introduction to Ethics 2 


Middler Year 


Term 1 


Pastoral Studies 1: Education 




Introduction to Modern 




Religious Thought 




Elective 




Elective 


Term II 


Pastoral Studies II: Pastoral Care 




Christology 




Elective 




Elective 


Term III 


Pastoral Studies III: Homiletics 




Elective 




Elective 




Elective 


Senior ' 


fear 


Term 1 


Church & Society: Global 




Church & Sacraments 




Elective 




Elective 


Term II 


Credo 




Elective 




Elective 




Elective 


Term III 


Faith Formation 




Elective 




Elective 




Elective 



Educational Programs 23 

Proposed Four- Year Master of Divinity 
Program for Student Pastors 

First Year 

Term I Interpreting the Bible 
Language 
Introduction to Ministry 

Term II Biblical Introduction 
Language 
Historical Studies I 

Term III Biblical Introduction 
Exegesis 
Historical Studies II 

Second Year 

Term I Pastoral Studies I: Education 
Church & Society: Local 
Introduction to Modern 
Religious Thought 



Term II 


Pastoral Studies II: 
Christology 
Elective (Polity) 


Pastoral Care 


Term III 


Pastoral Studies III 
Introduction to Etr 
Elective 


: Homiletics 
lies 


Third Year 


Term 1 


Church & Sacraments 

Elective 

Elective 


Term II 


Elective 
Elective 
Elective 




Term III 


Elective 
Elective 
Elective 




Fourth Year 


Term 1 


Church & Society: 

Elective 

Elective 


Global 


Term II 


Credo 

Elective 

Elective 




Term III 


Faith Formation 

Elective 

Elective 





'Students must take one Biblical Introduction in each 

Testament. 
2 Students may elect to postpone either the second 

Biblical Introduction or Introduction to Ethics until 

the middler year in order to make room for one 

elective in Term III, junior year. 



24 Educational Programs 

Equivalency Examinations 

At the heart of the curriculum in the 
Master of Divinity program is a core of 
required courses. Ordinarily all students 
in the program will take these courses. 
However, in certain circumstances a stu- 
dent may be excused from a required 
course. Requests should be submitted to 
the Dean's Office. The faculty in the field 
from which the student wishes to be 
excused will design appropriate tests and 
have authority to determine whether the 
student has sufficient mastery for the 
course to be waived. Such courses will be 
listed on the transcript, showing that the 
requirement was fulfilled, but no credit 
hours will be given. 

English Bible Examination 

Passing an examination on the content of 
the English Bible is required for gradua- 
tion. This examination is offered annually. 
Although this requirement may be met as 
late as the third year, it is recommended 
that students take the examination in the 
first year of Master of Divinity studies. 

Field Education Requirement 

Field education at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary assists students to learn about 
the practice of ministry, through direct 
involvement in local churches and other 
settings, under the direction of skilled field 
supervisors. 

Master of Divinity students must complete 
one year of planned, supervised, and 
evaluated field education in a setting 
approved by the Supervisor for the Prac- 
tice of Ministry. This requirement normally 
is to be fulfilled in the middler year while 
students are enrolled in the Pastoral 
Studies sequence of courses. Students are 
expected to use their field placements as 
laboratory settings for specific assignments 
in those courses. Objectives of the pro- 
gram include acquaintance with a wide 
variety of ministerial activities, develop- 
ment of skills, sensitivity to the dynamics 
of pastoral relationships, awareness of the 
social context of ministry, and theological 
reflection upon the various aspects of the 
practice of ministry. A detailed learning 
agreement, developed by each student in 
conjunction with his/her field supervisor, 
coordinates these educational objectives 



with the needs of the church or agency to 
be served, and provides a basis for a 
shared evaluation of progress at later 
points in the year. This requirement has 
been fulfilled when the final evaluation 
has been completed by supervisor and 
student and accepted by the Supervisor 
for the Practice of Ministry. This informa- 
tion is shared with the student's sponsor- 
ing judicatory where confidentiality is 
assured. 

Students in the required field education 
program are expected to give eight to ten 
hours of service in the field per week. 
Time spent with the field supervisor and in 
staff meetings should be included in this 
total, but time spent in travel to and from 
the field and in preparation for tasks on 
the field is not to be counted. 

Field education placements are negotiated 
with the intent of broadening each stu- 
dent's range of experiences in order to 
contribute to his or her personal and pro- 
fessional growth. Placements in hospitals 
and other service agencies can sometimes 
be arranged for students who anticipate 
an institutional ministry after graduation. 

Student Pastorates 

Student pastors are required by the semi- 
nary to extend their program to four years, 
taking nine credits per term instead of the 
normal twelve, to compensate for the 
amount of time required by their field 
service. An example of the four-year 
sequence of courses is listed on page 23 

Internships 

Internships in a wide variety of settings 
can be investigated through the Super- 
visor for the Practice of Ministry. Summer 
internships include pastorates, youth 
assistantships, and placements in summer 
camps or parks and secular agencies. 

Full-time internships of nine to fifteen 
months duration in local churches or 
specialized settings also provide excellent 
learning opportunities. Such internships, 
usually taken between the middler and 
senior year, are required by some 
denominations of their ministerial can- 
didates. The Seminary will provide 
assistance in facilitating these experiences. 



Other Field Experiences 

Supervised field education, usually 
scheduled in the middler year is also 
possible in the junior and senior years as 
well. Students may continue in the same 
placement for a second year if they are 
assigned new and more responsible tasks. 
Occasional preaching under the auspices 
of the Preaching Association is also 
available. Field work which is not subject 
to the same standards of supervision and 
evaluation can also be arranged for stu- 
dents who require additional income or 
experience. Entering students are cau- 
tioned to limit field work and community 
involvement so that their academic 
studies will not be put in jeopardy. 

Placement for Graduating Seniors 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's place- 
ment service assists graduating seniors 
both in locating appropriate situations of 
service in ministry and in self-evaluation 
to determine vocational commitments. 
Presbyterian students are assisted by the 
Seminary, in conjunction with the Voca- 
tion Agency, in meeting the denomina- 
tion's candidacy requirements and in 
utilizing the denomination's placement 
arrangements. Contacts for students 
of other denominations are facilitated 
according to their particular needs. An 
inventory of placement opportunities is 
kept by the Placement Office. Students 
are assisted in the writing of resumes and 
dossiers. Pastor nominating committees, 
judicatory officials and pastors visit the 
Seminary campus periodically to inter- 
view graduating seniors. 

The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Social Work Joint Degree Program 

Ministry and social work share many con- 
cerns. The mission of the Church involves 
working for the improvement of the qual- 
ity of life in diverse ways, some of which 
parallel social work efforts. Many minis- 
ters and theological students want to gain 
the insights and skills provided by social 
work education in order to enhance their 
ministry. 

To encourage and equip women and men 
to engage in social work both in and out 
of the church and to provide oppor- 
tunities in social work for students who 



Educational Programs 25 

feel a call to practice within a church set- 
ting, the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate 
School of Social Work have developed a 
program offering a joint degree, that is, 
M.DIV./M.S.W. 

This joint effort enables students to receive 
both the M.Div. and the M.S.VV. in four 
years of post-baccalaureate study instead 
of the usual five. Nevertheless, the joint 
program provides a full course of study in 
both theology and social work. This is 
effected by equating certain courses now 
taught in both schools, by making provi- 
sion for courses taken in one school to 
count as electives in the other, and by 
developing specialized field placements. 

The curriculum of the Graduate School of 
Social Work encompasses studies in four 
major curriculum areas or "clusters": 
Health/Mental Health; Juvenile and 
Criminal Justice; Poverty and Associated 
Problems; and Children and Youth. 

Candidates for the joint degree who enter 
the program through the Seminary will 
concentrate on theological studies during 
the first two years. Application should be 
made to the University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate School of Social Work during 
the first term of the second year at the 
Seminary. The third and fourth years will 
be spent predominantly at the School of 
Social Work, but one course per term will 
be taken at the Seminary. Should a stu- 
dent elect to terminate the joint program 
before its completion and seek only one 
degree, he or she will be required to com- 
plete all of the work ordinarily required for 
that degree. 

During the third year limited financial aid 
will be available for students in the joint 
program. Due to the higher tuition costs at 
the University, such students will probably 
need to secure additional financial aid 
from the University or other sources. 

Inquiries regarding the Graduate School of 
Social Work and requests for Social Work 
catalogs should be addressed to: Director 
of Admissions, Graduate School of Social 
Work, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15260. 



26 Educational Programs 

The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Library Science Joint Degree 
Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the 
School of Library and Information Science 
of the University of Pittsburgh established 
in 1968 a joint program to train men and 
women in theological librarianship. The 
program, designed to be completed in 
four academic years, culminates in two 
degrees, the M.Div. and the M.L.S. 

Normally, a student will take the first part 
of his/her work at the Seminary and begin 
work at the University in the third year. 
The program will include a course on 
resources in theological libraries and six 
credits of field experience in theological 
librarianship at the Seminary. Should a 
student elect to terminate the joint pro- 
gram before its completion and seek only 
one degree, he or she will be required 
to complete all of the work ordinarily 
required for that degree. 

Inquiries regarding the School of Library 
and Information Science and requests 
for Library Science catalogs should be 
addressed to: Director of Admissions, 
School of Library and Information 
Science, University of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

New Cooperative Programs 

In addition to the Master of Divinity/ 
Master of Social Work, the Master of 
Divinity/Master of Library Science, and 
the Ph.D. programs which are conducted 
jointly with the University of Pittsburgh, 
there are further joint degree and cooper- 
ative programs in the planning stage at the 
time this catalog goes to press. These new 
programs are to be initiated with Carnegie- 
Mellon University, Duquesne University, 
and the University of Pittsburgh. They will 
be announced in a special brochure 
which will supplement the listing in this 
catalog. 

The Master of Arts Program 

The Master of Arts Program is intended for 
men and women who wish to work in 
religious studies at the graduate level, but 
who have not yet decided on the issues 
of ecclesiastical ordination or who have 
decided against it. The goals of this course 



of study are: 1) To provide students the 
opportunity to inquire into the field of 
Judaic-Christian religion, such an inquiry 
needing no other rationale than the seek- 
ing of truth and understanding for their 
own sake or for the clarification of the 
meaning of faith. 2) To enable students, 
undecided as to church vocation, to have a 
strong sample of a theological curriculum 
within a community of faith at worship 
and work that such students might have 
more solid grounds upon which to make 
a vocational decision. 3) To provide a 
course of study, based upon specified 
core areas within the M.Div. curriculum, 
that will allow enough free electives to 
provide ample opportunity for specialized 
work in Christian education for those 
making this vocational choice for service 
within the church. 

Seventy-two term hours of studies are 
required for the degree. Thirty-six hours 
are to be distributed as follows: Bible — 
12 hrs: BI01, OT01 or NT01 or NT02, one 
elective. History/Theology— 12 hrs: CH01, 
CH02, HT01, and TH02 or TH03. Ethics— 
3 hrs: ET01. Church and Society— 3 hrs: 
CS01 or another course in Sociology of 
Religion. Pastoral Care— 3hrs: PS02. Edu- 
cation— 3 hrs: PS01. Up to twelve hours 
may be taken through cross-registration 
at PCHE schools. 

Normally two years of full-time academic 
work are needed to complete the pro- 
gram. There is a five year statute of limi- 
tations. M.A. candidates may apply for 
transfer to the M.Div. program at any time 
prior to the awarding of the M.A. degree; 
but once the degree has been awarded, 
courses credited toward the M.A. may no 
longer be used for the M.Div. 

All candidates are required to complete a 
Major Paper. Up to six (6) hours of credit 
may be received for Independent Study 
done as research for this project. These six 
(6) hours are taken under a Major Paper 
Advisor, who must be a member or 
adjunct of the Seminary faculty. 

The Director of M.A. studies has the 
responsibility of counseling all M.A. 
students in the selection of courses in 
order to insure a balance of work while 
meeting individual needs and preferences. 
The Director also assists the student in 
selecting a Major Paper Advisor. 



Educational Programs 27 





Religious Education Emphasis 

A special track which emphasizes 
religious education is available for M.A. 
candidates who wish to prepare for 
nonordained educational ministries. Their 
courses of study should reflect the balance 
of studies described above. Some work 
will be taken at the School of Education 
of the University of Pittsburgh. Choice 
of such courses will be made in consulta- 
tion with the Education faculty of the 
Seminary. The Major Paper is required as 
above and will be completed with an 
Adviser approved by the Education faculty 
of the Seminary. In addition, at least six (6) 
but no more than nine (9) term hours 
must betaken in supervised Field Educa- 
tion. Arrangements for such work will be 
made through the Supervisor for the Prac- 
tice of Ministry in consultation with the 
Director of M.A. Studies, and credit will 
be granted as Independent Study courses 
taken with the Education faculty. 

The Pre-Doctoral Master of Arts Program 

The purpose of this program is to pro- 
vide preparation for students who wish 
ultimately to apply for admission to a 
Ph.D. program but who have no M.Div. 
or its equivalent. Prerequisite is an 
undergraduate major in religion or the 
equivalent at an accredited college or 
university with a good department of 
religious studies. Students without this 
background will have to take additional 
prerequisite studies. 

Candidates in this track are required to 
take thirty-six (36) credits, the course 



selection to be determined with a view 
to: a) what they have had in their under- 
graduate work, and b) what they plan to 
designate as their field of specialization in 
the doctoral program. For example, if a 
student has had good courses in biblical 
studies and intends to specialize in ethics, 
that student may not be required to take 
further course work in Bible. 

As in the other tracks, a Major Paper must 
be written, and up to nine (9) hours of 
credit may be received for Independent 
Study done as research for this project. An 
additional requirement for candidates in 
this track is the passing of an examination 
in French or German. Those wishing to 
specialize in Old or New Testament must 
also meet the language requirements 
specified by those departments. 

The Master of Sacred Theology 
Degree (International Christian 
Studies) 

The S.T.M. Degree is an advanced degree 
for which the M.Div. degree or its 
equivalent is prerequisite. Normally, a full 
calendar year is needed for the attainment 
of the degree. 

The Program in International Christian 
Studies, for which the S.T.M. degree is 
awarded, is designed to assist both 
overseas and North-American students to 
study Christianity as an international faith. 
All the candidates will take the required 



28 Educational Programs 

year-long Seminar "International Christian 
Studies." In addition, certain elective 
courses will be designated as particularly 
appropriate to this emphasis and can- 
didates encouraged to elect them so that 
there will be interaction and exchange of 
views among students of different coun- 
tries as a feature of these courses. 

The Program will be under the overall 
supervision of a Faculty Director. 

Thirty-six (36) term hours of study are 
required for the degree. Except for the 
core Seminar, no course requirements are 
specified, in order to allow both overseas 
and North-American students to pursue 
special interests in theological studies. 
North-American students will be encour- 
aged to spend one term abroad at a theo- 
logical institution, with course work there 
approved by the Dean. 

Candidates must choose one of two 
tracks. In Track I candidates will be 
granted nine (9) credits for the writing of a 
thesis under the guidance of an adviser. 
The Thesis Committee will include a 
second faculty member. In Track II the 
focus of the study will be provided by a 
final examination, which may be either 
oral or written. Up to six (6) credits may 
be earned under the guidance of an 
adviser for preparation of this examina- 
tion, which will be conducted by the 
adviser and one other faculty member. 

There are three categories of courses 
in the Program: the Seminar required of 
all students, "International Christian 
Studies" — nine (9) credits; designated 
electives (two courses)— six (6) credits; 
and free electives. The remainder of the 
credits may be earned in guided reading 
in preparation for taking the examination 
or in writing the thesis. Up to three 
courses appropriate to the program may 
be taken as free electives at another insti- 
tution with the approval of the Director, 
the adviser, and the Dean. 

Required Seminar in International 
Christian Studies 

ICS01 Christianity in a World Context 

The church's paradox of being in the world 
but not of the world is examined in terms 
of its theological as well as its sociological 
nature. Thus, the course seeks to provide 
information and to develop awareness of the 



ambiguous process through which Chris- 
tianity has reached ecumenical reality by 
being linked to the process of Western 
socioeconomic expansion and missionary 
enterprise "to the ends of the earth." In this 
context contemporary developments in the 
ecumenical movement as well as the specific 
dynamics of the church in the Third World 
are seriously taken into account, with par- 
ticular attention given to the signs of vitality 
and creativity within Third World Christianity 
in the areas of evangelism, worship, social 
ethics, and theology. 
Term I 

ICS02 Theological Research in 
International Perspective 

An examination of the issues and assump- 
tions in the theological disciplines as defined 
within several different cultural perspectives 
and as they relate to the ways in which 
Christians perceive their international obliga- 
tions. Guidance in specific research tech- 
niques will be offered also. 
Term II 

ICS03 Group Study Project 

During the first two terms, participants will 
determine a Group Study Project, which will 
become the focus of the substance and 
structure of the third term of the Seminar. 
Term III 

Designated Electives (Subject to year 
and term offerings) 

1 . Christianity in an area of the world 
other than his/her own— e.g., 

ET30 Christianity in the Latin American 

Context: Ethical Issues 
SR1 3 The Latin American Context of 

Liberation Theology 
CH40 Contemporary Eastern 

Christianity 

2. International Issues from a Christian 
Perspective— e.g., 

CS03 Church and Society: Global 
ET25 Moral Issues in International 

Politics 
ET36 Christianity and Economic 

Systems 
ET37 The Ethics of Peacemaking 
SR1 2 Christianity and the Social 

Conflict 
SR1 5 Christianity and the American 

Indians 
SR1 8 Christianity and Cultures: 

Selected Readings from the 

Third World 



Educational Programs 29 




doctor of Ministry Program 

'urpose 

Developing competency in professional 
ninistry is a process in which ministers are 
engaged throughout their educational 
ind professional lives. One step in that 
ievelopment has been the work for a 
bachelor or Master of Divinity degree 
iesigned to help prepare for entrance into 
)rofessional ministry. Another step may 
)e engaging in programs of continuing 
education. 

fhe Doctor of Ministry Degree Program 
*oes beyond these by providing a dis- 
inctive opportunity for systematic and 
disciplined study that will help ordained 
:lergy work toward a demonstrably higher 
evel of competence in integrating all 
ispects of ministry. 

fhe intention of the program is that 
hrough ministry-related projects, studies, 
papers, and other assignments the student 



vill 



improve competency in such areas as: 
Defining and organizing complex 
situations of ministry using biblical, 
theological, sociological, political, 
and personal insights. 
Analyzing situations of ministry in 
such a way as to understand their 
nature and causes, and to identify 
opportunities for effective ministry. 
Taking responsible action with a 
deeper grasp of homiletical, educa- 
tional, counseling, and administrative 
principles enhanced by a biblical, 
historical, and theological heritage. 



4. Evaluating actions and their outcomes 
from a variety of responsible 
perspectives. 

Doctor of Ministry candidates must select 
one of the following three areas: Parish 
Focus, Pastoral Care Focus or Chaplaincy 
Focus. All courses are for three academic 
credits unless otherwise noted. 

Parish Focus 

The Parish Focus is organized around the 
intensive involvement of the pastor's 
ministerial setting in all phases of the pro- 
gram. These include the Seminar Phase, 
involving six seminars looking at all areas 
of parish ministry; the Colloquia Phase, in 
which the nature of the major project is 
developed; and the Major Project Phase, 
involving implementation of the project 
and the writing of the Project Report. 

Congregational involvement proceeds 
through a designated committee, either 
an existing church committee or one 
especially appointed for this purpose, 
depending upon the church's preference. 
The committee discusses the program 
with the director during a visit to the 
church, and then prepares a one-page 
mission statement, to be endorsed by the 
church. This then forms the basis for an 
evaluation of the church, revealing areas 
where further growth is desired. Seminar 
assignments for the pastor are made in 
light of this evaluation, and the church 
works with its pastor in implementing 
requested changes in the church. 



30 Educational Programs 

During the Colloquia Phase, the church 
consults with the pastor concerning 
possibilities for the major project. Again, 
the evaluation provides needed guidance. 
The church also decides at this time 
whether or not to design a congregational 
elective, which will involve them even 
more directly in the pastor's program. 

In the Major Project Phase, the church 
works closely with the pastor in imple- 
menting the major project. This project 
may take place at the parish level, the 
denominational level, or the ecumenical 
level, but the church must be involved to 
some extent. 

While most pastors who elect the Parish 
Focus serve a local church, others with 
specialized ministries have found it a 
flexible vehicle adaptable to their own 
ministries. These have included denomi- 
national posts, ecumenical agencies, 
prison work, and various school minis- 
tries. In every case, however, the minister, 
priest, or rabbi must intentionally involve 
his or her people in the program of study. 
This insures that the people as well as the" 
pastor benefit directly from the Doctor of 
Ministry program. 

Required Courses in the Parish Focus 

DM01 Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special 
emphasis on implications for the practice 
of ministry in today's church. Theology is 
understood and applied in light of specific 
situations in the candidates' ministry. 

DM02 Pastoral Care 

Theological and psychological insights are 
focused on the theory and practice of caring 
with case studies furnished by the pastors. 

DM03 Homiletics 

An advanced course in the theory and prac- 
tice of preaching in the context of worship, 
with pastor input central to the seminar. 

DM04 Administration 

Problems in church administration, including 
the development of stewardship and lay 
leadership, are addressed in light of theo- 
logical criteria and administrative theory. 

DM05 Education in the Context of the 
Christian Tradition 

The course is designed to help pastors imple- 
ment a complete educational program, pre- 
school through adult, in the local church. A 
clarification of the uniqueness of Christian 
education will be sought. 



DM06 Congregational and Community 
Issues 

A case method consideration of problems 
confronting the church in society, using the 
discipline of Christian ethics as a major 
resource. 

DM07 Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student in 
focusing upon an area in ministry for the 
doctoral project. Theoretical issues under- 
lying the problem and a method for address- 
ing the problem are clarified as the student 
develops a paper proposal in consultation 
with peers and faculty. Two credits. 

DM08 Biblical Colloquium 

Attention will be given to the foci and 
resources of biblical studies today. Principal 
emphasis will be placed on development of 
a hermeneutic that will lead to helpful and 
responsible use of the Bible in the doctoral 
project. Two credits. 

Options for Taking the Parish Focus 

Two time options for the Parish Focus are 
offered in order to meet the different situa- 
tions of ministers. Parish I seminars meet 
every Monday on the Pittsburgh campus 
for the three terms of the academic year, 
September through May. Two seminars 
are taken in each of the three terms, with I 
the colloquia taken in the fall term (ten 
weeks) of the second year. 

Parish II concentrates the study in four sesl 
sions of two weeks, extending over a year 
and a half. Two seminars (or the collo- 
quia) are taken at each session. At the 
established Parish II sites of Pittsburgh and 
St. Petersburg, Florida, these sessions are 
usually held in January and June; satellite 
groups generally prefer to negotiate a time 
schedule of one intensive seminar every 
three months. 

Both options require approximately three 
years for completion of the full program. 



Pastoral Care Focus 

Pastoral Care is that form of ministry 
representative of the servant-role in which 
one person tries to help another person or 
persons to resolve problems and crises so 
that each human life may reach its full 
potential. The pastor's goals are both 
ultimate and penultimate: ultimately to 
help people to relate to God meaningfully, 
and penultimately to cope creatively 
with living, especially with problematic 
situations. Therefore, the pastor uses 
theological and religious insights and 
resources as well as theory and practical 
skills learned from the social sciences, 
especially psychology. 

More people turn to the pastor than to 
any other counselor in their initial search 
for help. In many areas of the country 
there are few others to whom to turn. The 
pastor is often seen to be less threatening 
than other counselors. He or she generally 
makes no charge. For these and other 
reasons the pastor has a remarkable 
opportunity to care empathically for, and 
to counsel with, people both within the 
church and outside to help them to deal 
with their problems and grow toward 
wholeness. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has 
devised a specialty in pastoral care at the 
doctoral level to assist pastors to become 
more proficient in the art of pastoral car- 
ing and counseling. The doctoral program 
involves ten required seminars and one 
elective, scheduled in a two-year period, 
and a third year which is devoted to a 
project and clinical paper reporting that 
work. Throughout the three-year program 
theological and psychological insight will 
be used in developing the theory and 
practice of pastoral care. While attention 
is given to those areas of stress and pain 
which most command the pastor's atten- 
tion (anxiety, grief, guilt, depression, 
aging, addiction, marriage and family, 
identity crises, etc.) the program also 
focuses upon the pastor's work in helping 
people to relate to God meaningfully and 
to cope creatively with living. 

iThe clinical paper, dealing with an aspect 
of pastoral care, will be written under the 
supervision of a committee of two faculty 
in this field. No less than fifty pages in 
length, the paper must include a descrip- 



Educational Programs 31 

tion of the problem and the proposed 
methodology; a section presenting bibli- 
cal, theological, and historical material 
pertinent to the study; a review of the 
relevant literature; an empircal study of 
the subject chosen; and a concluding 
section detailing results of the inquiry 
together with any suggestions for further 
study. 

Required Courses in the Pastoral Care 
Focus 

DM01 Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special 
emphasis on implications for the practice 
of ministry in today's church. Theology is 
understood and applied in light of specific 
situations in the candidates' ministry. 
Term I -Staff 

DM21 Human Development 

This course traces human development 
along lines set forth by Freud and radically 
expanded by Erickson. With Erickson as the 
transitional figure, the course stresses 
developments in ego psychology as espe- 
cially helpful to the practice of ministry. 
The third section of the course analyzes 
communal components, deals with group 
theory, and explores implications for minis- 
try. Theological material is part of the data 
of the course, especially process theology. 
Term I -Staff 

DM22 Pastoral Care I 

This course will be taught in two parts, one 
in each of the first two years. Clinical and 
didactic components will be included in 
each. Part one will deal with the history of 
pastoral care, the identity of the pastor, the 
nature of stress, especially on persons such 
as pastors, and the basic skills in pastoral 
care. 
Term II— Staff 

DM23 Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course has in view a new theory of 
pastoral care based on process theology and 
more specifically the conceptuality of Alfred 
North Whitehead. It endeavors to incor- 
porate the relevant rich insights of Freud, 
Jung, Maslow, and Gestalt psychology within 
a process metaphysical and theological 
framework. Readings in both process 
thought and psychology are required. 
Term II— Staff 

DM24 Clinical Hospital Seminar 

This seminar is designed to integrate 
experiential learning about one's own func- 
tioning in the practice of ministry within a 
hospital setting and to relate that practice 



32 Educational Programs 

to theology, medicine, and the behavioral 
sciences. It will include interdisciplinary 
didactic sessions in hospital visitation, case 
seminars, and group process. Two credits. 
Term III— Ms. Taylor 

DM25 Assessment of Needs/Stress 

When persons are identified as needing 
help, how can the pastor understand what 
their needs are? This question is the heart of 
the course. The answer will be sought in a 
variety of models, which examine stress in 
the individual, in family systems, and in 
social groups such as the congregation. 
Term Ill-Staff 

DM26 Marriage and Family 

The dynamics of marriage and family will be 
addressed both psychologically and theolog- 
ically. A major part of the course will deal 
with the practice of marital counseling and 
caring forfamilies. 
Term I— Mr. Mackey 

DM27 Pastoral Care II 

Specific attention will be given to problems 
which are frequently encountered in min- 
istry, such as those concerned with adoles- 
cence, grief, depression, substance abuse, 
and aging. Techniques will be developed for 
working with counseling situations. 
Term 1 1 -Staff 

DM28 Clinical Seminar with Mental 
Health Professionals 

In this course students will consult with and 
learn from professionals in the mental health 
field. The student will have a choice of 
placement in different types of clinical set- 
tings in the Pittsburgh community. For 
example, the pastor may study and work 
with children, or adolescents, or in a com- 
munity mental health center. The intention 
of the seminar is to enhance the pastor's 



awareness of the needs of a particular 
population, and to enable her or him to 
learn from the professionals who work with 
such a group. Two credits. 
Term 1 1 -Staff 

DM29 Clinical Seminar in Pastoral 
Counseling 

The aim of this seminar is to enable the 
minister to decide which situations in min- 
istry are appropriate to pastoral counseling 
and to provide supervision in those that are. 
Two credits. 
Term Ill-Staff 




Chaplaincy Focus 

"he Chaplaincy Focus is designed to 
■xtend the ministry of the church more 
leeply and effectively to those who are in 
istitutional situations such as the military, 
chools, hospitals, or prisons. The Doctor 
»f Ministry goal, to increase competence 
i ministry, is applied to chaplains by 
ailoring the seminars specifically to the 
inusual needs which chaplains encoun- 
er. While the formal structure of each 
eminar addresses general needs common 
3 chaplains, there is an intentional flex- 
Dility in the seminars so that discussion of 
rie issues raised will increase insight and 
kill in the forms of ministry represented in 
ach group of chaplains. 

"he flexibility of the program is also 
lemonstrated in the negotiable timing of 
ourses. An entering group may contract 
d study together for as many as six or as 
?w as two seminars per year. As with all 
•ittsburgh Theological Seminary Doctor of 
Ministry groups, membership in the group 
; restricted to those who initially contract 
3r the program. This assures a high level 
if peer collegiality and trust, and facilitates 
le peer learning which is essential to 
ne program. 

ince seminars are offered in concen- 
rated one-week periods, usually with 
hirty class hours, readings for the class 
nd application of insight must take place 
>efore and after the course. Therefore, at 
he beginning of the program each chap- 
ain will receive syllabi for all seminars, 
"his will allow preseminar guided reading, 
nd will prepare the chaplains to benefit 
ully from the classes. Application of the 
ourse work in a specific assignment will 
>e negotiated between the professor and 
:haplain, and will usually be completed 
vithin three months of the class. 

"he Chaplaincy Focus proceeds in two 
tages. The first includes five core courses, 
us a two-week Proposal Colloquium and 
Biblical Colloquium. The second stage 
/ill include three electives related, where 
ossible, to the doctoral project, plus the 
ctual work of the project. 

)M01 Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

he theology of the Church, with special 
mphasis on implications for the practice 
I ministry in today's church. Theology is 



Educational Programs 33 

understood and applied in light of specific 
situations in the candidates' ministry. 

DM31 Pastoral Care for Chaplains 

Most chaplains spend much time in counsel- 
ing, and many have taken some advanced 
work. Basic principles, therefore, will be 
assumed; and special consideration will be 
given to pastoral problems that are particu- 
larly encountered in chaplaincy. Among 
these are stress resulting from frequent 
moves, conflicts around insecurity of inter- 
personal relationships, high incidence of 
crisis intervention, and development of com- 
munity resources in a largely transient con- 
gregation. Considerable freedom will be 
allowed for the study of cases brought by 
group members. 

DM32 Education as it Pertains 
to Adults 

Special emphasis will be on the develop- 
ment of programs for adults. Where 
appropriate, programs for women and 
minorities will be encouraged and 
developed. The course will also include 
theory and practice involving the broad 
spectrum of education as it is applied in 
institutional relationships. 

DM33 Worship 

Preaching skills and worship theory will be 
discussed. Particular attention will be given 
to the dynamics of preaching and the 
development of modes of worship in the 
unusual circumstances of chaplaincy. There 
will also be consideration of the chaplain's 
personal devotional resources. 

DM34 Social Ethics for Chaplains 

An examination through lectures, case study 
and seminar discussion of the social teaching 
of the churches relevant to the institutional 
ministry of the chaplain in schools, hospitals, 
prisons, and the military. 

DM07 Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student in 
focusing on an area in ministry for the doc- 
toral project. Theoretical issues underlying 
the problem and a method for addressing 
the problem are clarified as the student 
develops a paper proposal in consultation 
with peers and faculty. Two credits. 

DM08 Biblical Colloquium 

Attention will be given to the foci and 
resources of biblical studies today. Principal 
emphasis will be placed on development of 
a hermeneutic that will lead to helpful and 
responsible use of the Bible in the doctoral 
project. Two credits. 



34 Educational Programs 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The University of Pittsburgh and 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary have a 
cooperative graduate program in the 
study of religion. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary par- 
ticipates in the University of Pittsburgh's 
Cooperative Graduate Program in the 
Study of Religion. This program draws 
upon the resources of both institutions 
and leads to the Ph.D. degree awarded 
by the University. 

The aim of the program is to foster crea- 
tive, interdisciplinary study in several 
areas: Biblical Studies (Old and New Tes- 
tament); History of Religions (chiefly 
Christianity and Judaism, but work in 
Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism is also 
offered); Theology; Ethics; Sociology and 
Anthropology of Religion; and 
Phenomenology of Religion. For informa- 
tion about requirements, course offerings, 
preliminary and comprehensive examina- 
tions, language requirements, etc., consult 
the University of Pittsburgh's bulletin, 
Graduate Programs in the Faculty of Arts 
and Sciences. 

Inquiries and applications for admission 
should be addressed to: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Religious Studies 
University of Pittsburgh 
2604 Cathedral of Learning 
Pittsburgh, PA 15260 

Special Programs 

Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education 

The Pittsburgh Council on Higher Educa- 
tion (PCHE) is a cooperative organization 
composed of Pittsburgh area colleges, 
universities, and graduate schools. Par- 
ticipating institutions include: Carlow 
College, Carnegie-Mellon University, 
Chatham College, Community College of 
Allegheny County, Duquesne University, 
LaRoche College, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, Point Park College, Robert 
Morris College, and the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

The purposes of PCHE are: to represent a 
common voice on a variety of issues; to 
examine possibilities for cooperation 
among the member institutions; and, 
above all, to undeitake joint programs 



which expand educational opportunities 
for students and make the best use of 
institutional resources. The membership of 
the Seminary in PCHE benefits students by, 
providing possibilities for cross registra- 
tion in courses at the graduate level, by 
establishing library privileges at eight aca- 
demic libraries other than our own, and 
by initiating programs in specialized areas.? 

The American Schools of 
Oriental Research 

The Seminary is associated with the 
American Schools of Oriental Research. 
This corporation is involved in archaeo- 
logical research in the Middle East. Most , 
of their work has been concentrated in 
Palestine and Iraq, and they maintain 
schools in Jerusalem, Amman, and 
Baghdad. Since 1924, we have been 
active participants in numerous field 
projects in cooperation with the Americanf 
Schools of Oriental Research. 

Arsenal Family and Children's Center 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center 
came into being in 1952 as a result of a 
Pennsylvania mandate to the Western 
Psychiatric Institute and Clinic to "deal 
with the mental hygiene of the normal 
child in the way of study and training in 
order that there may be a program of 
prevention of mental and nervous dis- 
orders as a result of giving children the 
proper background and training that will 
prevent such disorders." The Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center has grown 
and developed into a unique field lab- 
oratory for the psychological study of 
children and their families. It also provides 
an environment in which students learn 
methods for the disciplined observation 
of children and families. It thereby con- 
tributes to the education and training 
of students for the ministry and other 
service-related careers. 



The National Capital Semester 
for Seminarians 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary par- 
ticipates in the National Capital Semester 
for Seminarians sponsored by Wesley 
Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C. 
This program provides an opportunity for 
seminary students to spend a semester in 
Washington for study and involvement in 
the processes of government and the con- 
cerns of the churches. The program is 
designed to include supervised study and 
interaction (reflection), and will provide a 
full term of academic credit. The program 
is open to any student who has completed 
at least one year of study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. Seminary graduates 
may apply for a program to begin within 
one year of their graduation. 

Clinical Pastoral Education 

Clinical Pastoral Education brings 
theological students and ministers into 
supervised encounter with persons in 
critical life situations. Out of intense 
involvement with persons in need and the 
reactions from peers and supervisors, the 
students develop new awareness of them- 
selves as persons and of the needs of 
those to whom ministry is offered. From 
theological reflection on specific human 
situations, new insight and understanding 
are derived and the student or minister is 
confronted with his or her own humanity. 
Within the interdisciplinary team-process 
of helping persons, they develop skills in 
interpersonal and interprofessional rela- 
tionships. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
grants academic credit to students who 
complete full quarters of Clinical Pastoral 
Education at centers accredited by the 
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. 

The Association for Clinical Pastoral 
Education accredits a nationwide network 
of Clinical Pastoral Education Centers and 
their supervisors. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is a member of the association. 

Special Nondegree Studies 

Clergy and lay persons who wish to enroll 
as Special Students in courses at Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary for non- 
degree purposes are invited to do so. 
Special Students may enroll in as many as 
two courses per term, up to a total of six 
courses. Special Students complete all the 



Educational Programs 35 

assigned requirements for each course in 
which they enroll and receive academic 
credit. Credits earned as a Special Student 
may be transferred to any established 
Seminary degree program in which the 
student may later enroll. Those desiring 
Special Student status must possess an 
accredited bachelor's degree and apply 
through the Admissions Office. 

Clergy and lay persons who desire to 
audit courses at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary are invited to do so. No aca- 
demic credit is given for audits. Applica- 
tions for audit shall be accompanied by a 
college transcript and be submitted to the 
Continuing Education Office along with a 
fee of $50.00 per course. The transcript 
and record of classes will be kept as a part 
of the Continuing Education files. 

International Scholars Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is com- 
mitted to serving the professional educa- 
tional needs of the whole church. Scholar- 
ships are offered annually to international 
scholars who have already completed the 
Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent 
in their own country and whose plans for 
an additional year of study are endorsed 
by the church in their own country. These 
scholarships provide tuition, room, board 
and a small monthly cash allowance for 
one academic year to international 
students endorsed to the Seminary by the 
World Council of Churches, the World 
Alliance of Reformed Churches or by the 
Leadership Development Program of the 
National Council of Churches. 




36 Educational Programs 

Distinguished Pastor-in- 
Residence Program 

This program gives the Seminary com- 
munity the opportunity to dialogue with 
persons involved in a variety of ministries. 
During each academic year, persons 
representing three different models of 
ministry are invited to spend four to eight 
weeks in residence on the campus. The 
distinguished guests visit classes, partic- 
ipate in Seminary activities, engage in 
conversations with students and faculty, 
and lead one or more chapel services. 
One guest is present each term. 

During the last two academic years, the 
Seminary welcomed distinguished pastors 
who were engaged in overseas ministries, 
urban redevelopment ministries, large 
suburban church ministries, small church 
ministries, chaplaincy ministries, and 
judicatory ministries. Distinguished guests 
include pastors who are alumni/ae of 
Pittsburgh and many other seminaries. 
Each guest is hosted by a member of the 
faculty of the Seminary. 

In addition the Seminary from time to 
time invites distinguished lay persons to 
spend several days to a week on our cam- 
pus. These church women and men share 
insights about their ministries and ways in 
which their church and work commit- 
ments interact. Distinguished guests have 
included a banker, a newspaper editor, 
management consultants, an attorney, 
corporation leaders, and others. 

Special Programs 

Special Programs 

The Special Lectures program at 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary annually 
brings scholars of national and interna- 
tional standing to the campus to make 
important learned contributions to the 
church and the world. 

The Ritchie Memorial Lectureship 

The Ritchie Memorial Lectureship will 
bring to the Seminary two distinguished 
guest lecturers from overseas in the fall 
of 1983 and 1984. 

Term I, 1983— Dr. Petr Pokorriy, 
Comenius Faculty of Theology, Prague, 
Czechoslovakia 



Term I, 1984-Dr. C. K. Barrett, Durham : 
University, England 

The Ritchie Memorial Lectureship was 
inaugurated in October, 1981. The first 
Ritchie lecturer was Professor Hans Kiing, 
Tubingen, West Germany. 

The Schaff Lectures 

The Schaff Lectures are given annually on 
any subject related to the general field of 
theological study. 

1984— Dr. Richard Stauffer, Sorbonne, 
Paris, France; "The Quest for Church 
Unity: From Calvin to D'Huisseau" 
1983-Dr. John H. Westerhoff, III, The 
Divinity School, Duke University; 
"Human Life in Dialogue with the Chris- 
tian Story: An Introduction to Practical 
Theology" 

1982-Dr. Roy W. Fairchild, San Francisco 
Theological Seminary; "Spiritual Direction: 
in Pastoral Care" 

1981 — Dr. David Tracy, University of 
Chicago Divinity School; "The Concept 
of Religion in Contemporary Christian 
Theology: The Conflict of Interpretations" 
1980— Dr. Rosemary Ruether, Garrett 
Evangelical Theological Seminary; 
"Theological and Ethical Bases for the 
Women's Liberation Movement" 

The Elliott Lectures 

The Elliott Lectures are to be given in 
theology and on literary or scientific sub- 
jects connected therewith. Recent Elliott 
Lecturers were: 

1981 — Dr. Charmarie Jenkins Blaisdell, 

Northeastern University; "The Role of 

Women in Calvinism" 

1980— Dr. Virgil Cruz, University of 

Dubuque Theological Seminary; "A New 

Look at the Apocalypse" 

1979— Dr. Robert Jewitt, Morningside 

College; "Faith and Tolerance" 

Kelso Lectures — 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Day 

1982— Dr. Alice Graham McNair, The 
Pastoral Counseling and Consultation 
Center of Greater Washington, D.C. 
1981— Colonel George W. Alexander II, 
Chaplain, Department of the Army 
1980— The Rev. Charles Marks, Associate 
Executive, Synod of Southern California 



Educational Programs 37 



1979— Dr. Preston N. Williams, The 
Divinity School, Harvard University 
1978-Dr. C. Eric Lincoln, Duke 
University 

The W. Don McClure Lectureship 

The W. Don McClure Lectures are 
delivered annually on topics of World 
Mission and Evangelism. They were 
inaugurated in September, 1982. 

1983— Dr. Dale Brunner, Whitworth 

College, Spokane, Washington; "Christian 

Mission in Matthew's Gospel" 

1982— Dr. Samuel H. Moffett, Princeton 

Theological Seminary; "Breakthrough in 

Missions" 

Continuing Education 

At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 
theological education is not confined to 
formal degree work. Realizing that educa- 
tion is a lifelong process which may begin 
with a degree program, the Seminary 
offers a program of continuing educa- 
tion aimed at improving the skills and 
knowledge of men and women engaged 
in ministry. From September through 
June, a variety of experiences is available 
to pastors and church workers ranging 
from open enrollment in Seminary 
courses to short-term seminars. All pro- 
| grams are built upon the expressed needs 
and desires of those people serving in 
church situations. Continuing Education 
Units of credit (C.E.U.) are given to all 
who participate. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary also 
recognizes its responsibility in providing 
quality educational experiences for lay 
people. The Continuing Education Office 
offers a variety of experiences aimed at 
increasing the knowledge, faith and 
leadership skills of lay people. 

The entire program of continuing educa- 
tion for pastors, church workers and lay 
people is planned and evaluated by a 
committee composed of faculty 
members, pastors and lay people from 
across the Tri-state area. 

For further information concerning any 
aspect of Continuing Education, please 
write: 




Mrs. Jeanette Rapp 

Director of Continuing Education and 

Special Events 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Continuing Education Events, 1983-84 

Following are the dates which were set 
when the catalog went to press. A bro- 
chure for the complete program will be 
available from the Office of Continuing 
Education and Special Events. 

The W. Don McClure Lectures — 
Christian Mission in Matthew's Gospel 

Dr. Dale Brunner/Whitworth College/ 
Spokane, Washington/September 26, 
27, 28 
Four Monday Mornings 

October 3, 10, 17, 24 
1) Theology and Film: Using Films 
Theologically in the Church/Professor 
Robert M. Ezzell/ 2) Liberation Theology/ 
Professor Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas/ 
3) Exegesis of New Testament Passages/ 
Dr. William F. Orr, Professor of New 
Testament, Emeritus 

Time Management 

Dr. Harold C. Howard, President/Howard 
Associates/Radnor, PA/October 18 

Pastoral Care 

Dr. Gordon E. Jackson, Professor of Pas- 
toral Theology, Emeritus/October 21, 22 

Piety, Prophecy, Personality: An 
Approach to Preaching in the Parish 

Dr. James D. Glasse/Lancaster, PA/ 
October 26, 27 

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 

Abraham Twerski, M.D. /Medical Direc- 



38 Educational Programs 

tor/Gateway Rehabilitation Center/ 
Aliquippa, PA/November 3 

The Gospel Treasures of C. S. Lewis 

Dr. Peter Mac key/ West minster College/ 
November 7 

Kelso Lecture— Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Day 

January 13 

Liturgy and Music 

Dr. Horace Allen, Boston University/Bro. 
Samuel Weber, St. Meinrad School of 
Theology, Indiana/Rev. George E. 
Tutwiler, PTS Organist and Choirmaster/ 
Mr. John Erickson, Christ United 
Methodist Church, Bethel Park, PA/ 
January 14 

Four Monday Mornings 

January 16, 23, 30, February 6/ 1) Exe- 
gesis of Selected Parts of I Corinthians/ 
Dr. James A. Walther, Professor of NT. 
Literature and Exergesis, Emeritus/ 2) 
Passages for Lenten Preaching/Professor 
Douglas R. A. Hare 

Lay Pastoral Care 

Dr. Neil R. Paylor, Pastoral Counselor and 
PTS/Guest Faculty/February 10, 11 

Role of the Church in Radio and 
Television 

Fr. Ronald P. Lengwin, Director of Com- 
munications/Christian Associates of 
Southwest Pennsylvania/February 14 

Spiritual Renewal Through Relationships 

Dr. Lloyd J. Ogilvie/First Presbyterian 
Church/Hollywood, CA/March 2, 3 

Facing Life's Losses: Grief, Illness, Aging, 
Unemployment, Retirement, Death 

Dr. Walt Menninger/Menninger Founda- 
tion/Topeka, Kansas/March 22 

Medical Ethics and the Environment 

Dr. Gordon MacLeod/Graduate School of 
Public Health, University of Pittsburgh/ 
March 28 (Three-Mile-lsland anniversary) 

Schaff Lectures— The Quest for Church 
Unity: From Calvin to D'Huisseau 

Dr. Richard Stauffer/University of Paris 
(Sorbonne)/April 2, 3, 4 or 9, 10, 11 

Writer's Workshop— Writing for 
Publication 

Roland W. Tapp/Publishing Consul- 
tant/Swarthmore, PA/April 30-May 4 

1984 School of Religion 

June 17-22 



Dates to be Announced: 

Toward an Ecological Spirituality/Dr. Mat- 
thew Fox, O.P./Professor of Spirituality/ 
Holy Names College/Oakland, CA/ 
Spring-Friday and Saturday 

Planned Special Events for 1984-85 

(Dates to be announced): 
The Nature of Reformed Ministry/Chris- 
tian Decision Making in a Business 
World/The Responsibilities of Radio, 
Television and Newsprint in a Changing 
Society/China Tour: Church and Culture 
Led by President and Mrs. C. Samuel 
Calian/J. Hubert Henderson Memorial 
Conference in Church and Ministry 

Academic Regulations 

Grading System 

Grading in the Seminary is designed to 
provide an evaluation of the scholastic 
attainment of each student, and a 
challenge for each student to work at 
his/her best. 

1 . The meaning of the grades given shall 
be as follows: 

A 4.0 Exceptional attainment (90-100) 
B+ 3.0 Superior graduate-level 

attainment (80-89) 
B 2.0 Adequate graduate-level 

attainment (70-79) 
C 1.0 Below graduate-level attainment 

(60-69) 
F 0.0 Failure (59 and below) 
WFA Withdrawal with Faculty 

Approval 
There is no category of 

Incomplete 

2. The Quality Point Average is deter- 
mined by dividing the quality points 
by the number of credit hours taken 
(excluding credit hours for Pass grades). 

3. Average for Graduation. For graduation 
with the M.Div., M.A. or S.T.M. degree a 
B average (2.0) is required. 

4. Dismissal. Two consecutive terms 
below 2.0 or three non-consecutive terms 
below 2.0 constitute reasons for dismissal 
by faculty action. 

5. Attendance. Attendance at class is not 
mandatory except where indicated by the 
faculty member on the course description 
form. 

6. Official Drop Dates. Courses may be 



dropped or added during the first and 
second weeks of each term without pen- 
alty. Courses dropped during the third 
week through the fifth week carry a pen- 
alty of one-half of the tuition fee. Courses 
dropped after the official drop date require 
full payment and recording of a failing 
grade. All dropping of courses must be 
done officially through the Registrar's 
Office. 

Types of Courses 

1. In addition to required and elective 
courses, students may do advanced work 
in a particular subject as Independent 
Study or Directed Study. An Independent 
Study is negotiated by a student with a 
faculty member with the permission of the 
Dean. A Directed Study is designed in 
the same way as an Independent Study 
course, but it is distinguished by the 
requirement of much closer tutorial work 
on the part of the professor. A further 
distinction is that Directed Study courses 
may involve more than one student but 
no more than four students. Both of these 
studies will be graded Pass/Fail, with a 
statement from the faculty member con- 
cerning the nature of the study and an 
evaluation of the student's performance. 
Normally, students may not enroll for 
more than one Independent Study or 
Directed Study per term or six per Pitts- 
burgh Seminary first degree program. 
Underenrolled classes which become 
Directed Studies count in the above total. ' 

2. Audit. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
students may attend a class for listening 
purposes with the permission of the pro- 
fessor. Audit does not require registration 
or payment, and no record of audit is 
made. 

Nondegree students may audit seminary 
courses under the Continuing Education 
Program. 

3. Audit-Credit. Students registered in a 
course for audit-credit are required to 
participate fully in reading, discussion, 
seminar and position papers, etc., but 
are not required to write a final paper or 
examination. Satisfactory completion of 

I these requirements leads to an audit-credit 
\ notation for the course on the official 
(transcript. No grade is given for the course 



Educational Programs 39 

and no credit is given toward graduation. 
Audit-credit charge is one-half the regular 
tuition. 

4. PCHE. Sixteen hours of graduate level 
work may be taken at PCHE member 
schools and may be included in the 108 
M.Div. hours. Twelve hours may be 
included in the 72 M.A. hours. These 
credits must be approved by the Dean of 
the Faculty. Registration and payment will 
be handled according to PCHE proce- 
dures for cross-registration at the graduate 
level. PCHE courses will be recorded with 
the grades given by host institution (A or 
B). Grades lower than B will not receive 
academic credit at Pittsburgh Seminary. 

For complete information regarding stu- 
dent responsibilities and pertinent regula- 
tions, consult the "Academic Principles 
and Procedures for M.Div., M.A., and 
S.T.M. Degrees." 

Faculty Advisory System 

All incoming Master of Divinity students 
are assigned advisors, selected by the 
Dean, normally from among faculty 
teaching first year courses. Newly enroll- 
ing students will be encouraged to contact 
their advisors during the opening orienta- 
tion in the fall, and the advisors will be 
expected to make themselves available for 
such contacts. An advisor's signature is 
not required for class registration. Contact 
with the advisor is the student's respon- 
sibility and may be established according 
to the need of the student. This advisory 
system applies only to first year Master of 
Divinity students. In the assignment of 
advisors, the requests of students for 
specific professors will be given prefer- 
ential consideration, but ordinarily no 
professor will be assigned more than 
six students. 

The Director of Master of Arts Studies has 
the responsibility for counseling all Master 
of Arts students in the selection of courses 
in order to insure a suitable variety of 
courses. 



Course 
Descriptions 



42 


Studies in Bible 


42 


Required Courses 


44 


Old Testament 


47 


New Testament 


49 


Studies in Church History 


49 


Required Courses 


50 


Electives 


50 


Studies in Theology 


51 


Required Courses 


51 


Electives 


54 


Studies in Church and Ministr> 


54 


Required Courses 


55 


Elective 


55 


Ministry 


55 


Church and Society 


56 


Ethics 


59 


Sociology of Religion 


60 


Education 


62 


Pastoral Care 


63 


Homiletics 


65 


Worship and Church Music 


66 


Evangelism and Mission 


67 


Administration 



42 Course Descriptions 




Course 
Descriptions 



All courses are for three academic credits 
unless otherwise noted. 

Studies in Bible 

"Thy word is a lamp to my feet and a light 
to my path" (Psalm 1 19:105). The word of 
God in Scripture nourishes and regulates 
Christian faith and action, it lays the cor- 
nerstone for every aspect of the Church's 
ministry to the world, and it sets norms 
for the structures of Christian theology. A 
rediscovery of the Bible has provided the 
impetus for every forward movement in 
the history of the Church. At the end of 
the twentieth century, when alienation 
of individuals, races, classes and nations 
threatens to tear the world apart, when 
the issue of authority continues to be 
a problem, a new and careful look at 
the sources of our common faith is 
imperative. 

The intention of the courses offered is to 
engage students in Old and New Testa- 
ment research in such a way that they 
may learn the methods of study, acquire 
the basic tools and skills necessary to 
undertake ministry, and constantly relate 
their own study of the Scriptures to all 
facets of the Christian life. 

During the first two years of work in the 
M.Div. program students will survey the 
literature of the Old and New Testaments 
as well as explore the settings and 
influences of the biblical world by means 
of three core courses, i.e. Interpreting the 
Bible, and one introduction in each Testa- 
ment (OT01 or OT02, and NT01 or NT02). 
The curriculum also calls for serious con- 
sideration of the Bible in terms of study in 
the original languages. Therefore, Hebrew 
or Greek is required for two terms in the 
junior year and is immediately followed 
by a third-term exegetical course in the 
corresponding Testament. A similar 
sequence in the other language can be 
elected in the second or third year. As for 
further elective opportunities, there are 



advanced exegetical offerings along with 
courses in the areas of the intertesta- 
mental period, archaeology, Near Eastern 
languages, biblical theology and ethics, 
hermeneutics, critical studies, etc. 

New discoveries which directly affect our 
understandings of the Bible continue to 
be announced with startling frequency. 
Pittsburgh Seminary has a rich heritage of 
excellence in the area of biblical studies 
and we are determined to enable and 
inspire future generations of Christian 
leaders to join in the exciting venture of 
these pursuits. 

Required Courses in Bible 

BI01 Interpreting the Bible 

The Bible is the foundation and touchstone 
of our Christian faith and tradition. The Bible 
is also a collection of books, compiled over 
a long period of time, written in ancient 
languages and reflecting long dead and 
distant cultures. How do we go about 
understanding it, and explaining it to others? 
This course will introduce students to their 
own presuppositions and to the ways in 
which the Church has interpreted the Bible, 
and offer the tools to begin the task. It will 
discuss the formation of the individual Books 
and their inclusion into the Canon of Holy 
Scripture, the problem of the Bible as Word 
of God in the words of humans, the problem 
of historical statements and theological affir- 
mations, the question of continuity and 
discontinuity, and the contribution which 
the Bible makes to the task of theology. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Hare and 

Mr. von Waldow 

1984-85 Mr. Hare and 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT01 Historical Books of the Old 
Testament 

An introduction to the historical books of 
the Old Testament, intended to acquaint 
students with the basic methodologies of 



Course Descriptions 43 



Old Testament research and the present state 
of Old Testament studies. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Gowan 
1984-85 Mr. Jackson 

OT02 Prophets and Psalms 

The nature of prophecy in ancient Israel, and 
its background in the cultures of the ancient 
Near East. Special attention is given to the 
genres of prophetic oracles and the 
methodologies which may be employed for 
their interpretation. The message of the great 
eighth-century prophets, Amos, Hosea, 
Micah, and Isaiah of Jerusalem stand at the 
heart of the course. The world of Jeremiah, 
Deutero-lsaiah and Ezekiel is explored. An 
introduction to the Psalms, as the product of 
Israel's cultic life, concludes the course. The 
aim of the whole is to enable the student 
to begin exegesis with a firm grasp of 
the fundamentals. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. von Waldow 
1984-85 Mr. Gowan 

NT01 Gospels, General Epistles, and 
Revelation 

The principal emphasis of this course is on 
the four Gospels and the methods employed 
in their critical study (literary, form, and 
redaction criticism). General Epistles, Revela- 
tion, and matters of text and canon are 
examined briefly. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Mauser 
1984-85 Mr. Kelley 

NT02 Acts, Pauline Epistles, and 
Hebrews 

The messages of Acts, the-Pauline epistles, 
and Hebrews are examined in the light of 
their historical context and literary structure. 
Special emphasis is placed on the life and 
thought of Paul. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Hare 
1984-85 Mr. Hare 

IOT03 Hebrew 

A course designed to lead to an appreciation 
and competent use of Hebrew as one of the 
^languages of biblical revelation. Instruction is 
in small, graded sections so that a maximum 
lof individual attention and achievement is 
•possible. Two sections will follow the induc- 
jtive method, working directly with selected 
[texts of the Hebrew Bible. One section will 
employ the more traditional approach, using 



a grammar as the basic tool of instruction. 
Students may elect either approach. 
Term I, Staff 

OT04 Hebrew 

A continuation of OT03. 
Term II, Staff 

OT05 Old Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Hebrew 
moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence. Individual professors indicate 
to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose of 
this course is two-fold: 1) Introduction to 
exegetical method: moving from grammar 
and syntax to the application of critical 
methods and the use of reference materials 
in order to arrive at conclusions concerning 
the original and present meaning of a text; 




44 Course Descriptions 




Donald Gowan 

2) Continuation of the Hebrew language 

sequence. 

Term III, Staff 

NT03 New Testament Greek 

A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of 
biblical revelation. From the outset the stu- 
dent learns inductively to read from the 
Greek New Testament, and unique study 
aids prepared by the Staff are used. Instruc- 
tion is in small, graded sections. Students 
who have previously studied Greek will be 
assigned to special sections. 
Term I, Staff 

NT04 New Testament Greek 

Continuation of NT03, teaching by the 
inductive method. 
Term II, Staff 

NT05 New Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Greek 
moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence. Individual professors indicate 
to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose of 
this course is two-fold: 1) Introduction to 
methodology of exegesis, such as problems 
and limitations of an English translation; 
source strata for selected passages which 
will be chosen by the professor for critical 
problems, structure analysis, historical 
background of sources and text; intent; 
introduction to the theology of the particular 
book; 2) Continuation of the Greek language 
sequence. 
Term III, Staff 



Douglas Hare 

Old Testament 

Required Courses in Old Testament 

OT01 Historical Books of the Old 
Testament 

OT02 Prophets and Psalms 

OT03 Hebrew 

OT04 Hebrew 

OT05 Old Testament Exegesis 

Elective Courses in Old Testament 

OT14 Deutero-lsaiah 

The purpose of this course is two-fold: 

1) Introduction to methodology of exegesis, 
such as problems and limitations of an 
English translation, form critical problems, 
structure analysis, historical background 

of the book of Deutero-lsaiah, intent; 

2) Introduction to the theology of Exile. 
In particular, the expectation of salvation 
against the background of 587 B.C., Old 
Testament eschatology. 

Term I, 1984-85 Mr. Jackson 

(Ph.D. course, by invitation only) 

OT15 Amos 

A study of the book of Amos: its major 
emphasis; the place of the prophet in Israel's 
culture; and the significance of the message 
of Amos for our situation. 
Mr. Jackson 



Course Descriptions 45 




Nancy Lapp 



jared Jackson 



OT19 Ruth, Jonah & Esther (Exegesis) 

A study of the art of story-telling in the 
Hebrew language, making use of the 
methods of form and rhetorical criticism in 
order to contribute to an appreciation of 
these books as literature in addition to a 
reconsideration of their theological 
significance. 
Mr. Gowan 

OT26 The Beginnings of the History 
of Israel 

A study of the historical question: In what 
sociological entity did Israel enter the scene 
of ancient Near Eastern History? The focus is 
on the historical background of the traditions 
of Israel in Egypt, the Patriarchs, the Sinai, 
and the occupation of the land. These con- 
siderations lead to the discussion of the 
theological question: why does the Old 
Testament tradition describe the beginning of 
the history of the chosen people differently 
from the actual course of events? 
Mr. von Waldow 

OT28 Studies in Biblical Archaeology 

Specialization in a particular period or aspect 
of archaeology as it relates to biblical studies 
is offered every third year as a supplement 
or alternative to OT29. Possible topics are: 
"The Iron Age or the Period of the Israelite 
Monarchy in Palestine," "Archaeology in the 
New Testament," "The Pottery of Palestine 
as a Chronological and Cultural Indicator." 
Term III, 1983-84 Ms. Lapp 

OT29 Archaeology of Palestine 

An introduction to archaeology's contribu- 



tion to biblical studies, how it has increased 
our understanding of biblical times, thrown 
light on biblical texts, and advanced our 
knowledge of biblical history; a survey of the 
finds of archaeology in Palestine from the 
earliest times through the New Testament 
period. 
Term III, 1984-85 Ms. Lapp 

OT30 Ancient Israel and Egypt 

The influence of the experience of slave life 
in Egypt upon the tradition of Israel's story, 
and of the continued contact between Egypt 
and Israel after the entrance of Israel into 
Canaan, and into the Exilic age and after. 
This will involve a study of the forms of 
Egyptian literature and a comparison and 
contrast with the genres of the Old Testa- 
ment. Hebrew not required. 
Mr. Jackson 

OT31 Judaism from the Exile to the 
Birth of the Church 

A survey of the history, life, and faith of the 
Jewish people, covering the postexile parts 
of the Old Testament and the literature of the 
Intertestamental Period. Deals with life-styles, 
institutions, literature, and theology as well 
as the history of the period. 
Term II, 1984-85 Mr. Gowan 



46 Course Descriptions 




Eberhard von Waldow 



OT32 Ezekiel 

This course will interpret the theology of the 
book of Ezekiel against the background of 
the fall of Jerusalem in 587 B.C. and the 
beginnings of the experience of exile in 
Babylonia. Knowledge of Hebrew will not 
be required, but assistance will be given in 
working with the Hebrew text for those who 
wish to take it as an exegetical course. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Gowan 

OT33 Prophet-Priest-Wise Man: 

A Study in Biblical Ministries 

Intended to provide a biblical basis for 
evaluating various types of ministry in the 
modern church by examining the work of 
those who were recognized to be God's 
ministers in the Old Testament. 
Mr. Gowan 

OT36 Jeremiah 

The first part of the course uses the book of 
Jeremiah to demonstrate the development 
from the original oral pronouncement of 
prophetic words to prophetic books as we 
have them today in the canon. The second 
part deals with the original theology of the 
prophet Jeremiah and its interpretation by a 
later generation which produced the prose 
sections in the book of Jeremiah. Prere- 
quisite: Hebrew (OT03 and OT04). 
Mr. von Waldow 

OT37 Worship and Psalms 

Seminar on Israel's songs and the Christian 
use of the Psalter in corporate worship. Two- 
track: students with some knowledge of 
Hebrew will be helped in exegesis; others 



will be expected to do wider reading for 
their interpretation of the Psalms. 
Mr. Jackson 

OT38 Eschatology of the Old 
Testament 

The Old Testament view of the future will be 
explored, beginning with its broadest sense 
as the fulfillment of God's promises, but con- 
centrating on the expectation of radical 
changes in humanity, society and nature to 
occur "in that day." The contributions of 
Old Testament thought to later Jewish and 
Christian eschatology and relationships with 
modern future hopes will be emphasized. 
Mr. Gowan 

OT39 Worship in Israel 

The essence of worship in Israel and the 
basic theological ideas reflected in the major 
annual feasts and some typical cultic 
activities; the importance of the Israelite 
cultic personnel, such as priests, Levites, 
and prophets. 
Mr. von Waldow 

OT40 Hebrew Reading 

Supervised reading of selected Old Testa- 
ment passages. One credit. 
Offered each term, Staff 

OT42 Faith and Culture in the Ancient 
Near East 

Ways in which different religious faiths of 
the ancient world dealt with the problem of 
conflicting cultures. The course will offer 
a study of selected texts bearing upon the 
attitudes a faith may have toward other 



Course Descriptions 47 




Robert Kelley 



faiths: tolerance and exclusivity, interna- 
tionalism and xenophobia, proselytism and 
universalism. Various theologies consistent 
with these attitudes will be examined: deity 
as "jealous" or tolerant, angry or benign, 
tribal or universal. Illustrative documents 
will be chosen from the iconography and 
literature of the cultures which surrounded 
Israel as well as from Israel's own literature. 
Mr. Jackson 

OT45 Old Testament Ethics 

The course deals with the ethical implica- 
tions of the faith of the Old Testament peo- 
ple. Points of discussion are: the authority 
behind the ethical imperative, the motivation 
of ethical behavior, the sociological and 
cultural setting of ethical precepts. In terms 
of Old Testament literature the course is 
based on the law tradition and prophetic 
writings. 
Mr. von Waldow 

OT50 Themes of Old Testament 
Theology 

Some basic Old Testament theological 
concepts which became characteristic of 
Christian theology are investigated such as: 
authority of God, revelation, history, crea- 
tion, the individual and the community. 
Included are basic aspects of Old Testament 
ethics, worship and the difference between 
Christian and Jewish interpretation. 
Term I, 1984-85 Mr. von Waldow 

Additional Language Instruction 

Courses in Aramaic, Egyptian and Ugaritic 
are available upon request. 



New Testament 

Required Courses in New Testament 

NT01 Gospels, General Epistles, and 
Revelation 

NT02 Acts, Pauline Epistles, and 
Hebrews 

NT03 New Testament Greek 

NT04 New Testament Greek 

NT05 New Testament Exegesis 

Elective Courses in New Testament 

NT12 Christianity According to 
Matthew 

An examination of the theology of the First 
Gospel in the light of the historical back- 
ground, employing redaction criticism as a 
major exegetical tool. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Hare 

NT14 Parables in Luke 

An exegetical study of the parables of Jesus 
found in the all-important central section of 
the Third Gospel (chapters 10-18). 
Mr. Kelley 

NT15 Gospel of John 

The entire Gospel examined with some 
exegetical detail but with emphasis on the 
theological dimensions of the book. Some 
attention is given to the large secondary 
literature, but the Greek text is the primary 
resource. 
Staff 



48 Course Descriptions 

NT16 Interpreting the Parables 

I he history of parable exegesis will be 
traced. Current trends in parable interpreta- 
tion will be noted. Specific parables will be 
studied. 
Term I, 1 984-85 Mr. Kelley 

NT17 Exegesis of I Corinthians 

An exegetically oriented survey of the entire 
epistle with detailed study of selected parts. 
The range of insights into the life of the early 
church and the variety of theological prob- 
lems in this letter make it an excellent source 
from which to learn the task of interpreting 
the Greek New Testament. 
Staff 



exegesis. Appropriate reading in thetwentieth- 
century literature on the subject is assigned. 
Staff 

NT29 Crises in the History of the Early 
Church 

Selected texts from the New Testament and 
from extracanonical sources are studied in 
the investigation of three crises experienced 
by the early Church: 1) the tension between 
Jewish and gentile Christians and the emer- 
gence of the Ebionite movement, 2) the 
threat of a Gnostic takeover, 3) the assault of 
charismatic enthusiasm upon the traditional 
piety inherited from the synagogue. 
Mr. Hare 



NT19 Philippians 

An advanced exegetical course dealing with 
Paul's methodology and theology in relation 
to his favorite congregation among the 
young churches. 
Mr. Kelley 

NT20 The Old Testament in the New: 
The Epistle to the Hebrews 

The Epistle to the Hebrews appears to be 
an exegetical meditation on a series of sig- 
nificant Old Testament texts. This course 
examines the hermeneutic of the epistle, 
paying special attention to the interplay 
between doctrinal statement and ethical 
exhortation. 
Mr. Hare 

NT21 I Peter 

An exegetical course on the basis of the 
Greek text of I Peter. Special emphasis is laid 
on the situation in which the epistle was 
written and on its relation to other major 
books in the New Testament. 
Mr. Mauser 

NT22 Paul's Letter to the Romans 

This exegetical seminar will examine the 
major theological and paraenetic themes of 
Romans in relation to Paul's understanding 
of the place of Israel in God's plan. 
Mr. Mauser 

NT26 Eschatology in the New 
Testament 

The New Testament materials are studied 
with particular emphasis on Mark 13, Paul's 
Thessalonian letters, and the Revelation. The 
focus is on biblical theology based on sound 



NT31 Practical Use of the New 
Testament: Mark 

An interpretation course examining the 
"First" gospel produced as a result of the 
life and ministry of Jesus and featuring its 
continuing significance for Christian faith 
and practice. 
Mr. Kelley 

NT32 Practical Use of the New 
Testament: Luke 

An investigation of the major emphases 
and patterns in the "ecumenical" gospel. 
Particular attention will be devoted to the 
didactic values in the central section of Luke, 
chapters 10-18. 
Term III, 1984-85 Mr. Kelley 

NT35 Practical Use of the New 
Testament: Acts 

An interpretation course examining the faith 
and life of the early church as reflected in 
the "bridge" 'document of the New Testa- 
ment corpus, the book of Acts. 
Mr. Kelley 

NT37 Biblical Themes I: God & the 
Gods in the Old Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in com- 
parison with and contrast to the gods of the 
ancient Near East. This is the first part of a 
sequence to be continued with a course on 
the same subject in the New Testament. 
Mr. Mauser 

NT38 Biblical Themes II: God & the 
Gods in the New Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in compar- 
ison with and contrast to Hellenistic deities 



in the New Testament period. This is the 
New Testament part of a sequence on the 
nature of the biblical God. 
Mr. Mauser 

NT40 Greek Reading 

Supervised reading of selected New Testa- 
ment or Septuagint passages. One credit. 
Offered each term, Staff 

NT41 Advanced Greek Grammar 

This course aims to give students a 
systematic grasp of Greek by combining 
the study of a grammar book with further 
reading in the New Testament text itself. 
Mr. Kelley 

NT50 Themes of New Testament 
Theology 

A study of selected major themes of the New 
Testament which are of crucial importance 
to the New Testament Theology as a whole. 
Hermeneutical questions will be stressed. 
Mr. Mauser 

NT53 Aspects of Paul's Theology 

A number of pervasive aspects of Paul's 
theology, such as eschatology, faith and law, 
justification and reconciliation, are dealt 
with. Stress is laid on the Jewish background 
of Paul's thought and on the nature of the 
opposition which he had to face. 
Mr. Mauser 

Studies in Church History 

Our aim in teaching Church history is to 
help the student to understand the history 
of the Church and its thought in the con- 
text of the twentieth century. The study of 
history is the study of roots, whether we 
deal with the history of a nation, a race 
or an idea. Christianity is firmly grounded 
in history. Its story is the account of the 
effect which the events of Christian history 
have had in human society. This involves 
both the history of doctrine as the 
Church's attempt to understand the 
significance of the biblical revelation, 
and the history of the Church itself as the 
attempt of Christians to live in response 
to those events. 

We recognize two kinds of interaction that 
are important for our understanding of the 
Church today. First, we recognize that 
there has always been a dialogue between 



Course Descriptions 49 

the Church and the society within which 
it is placed. Secondly, there is an integral 
relationship between the doctrine that the 
Church professes and the forms that it 
takes as a human community. All the 
courses offered recognize these two kinds 
of continuing interaction. 

For an adequate grasp of the Church's 
history the student will need to under- 
stand that history in broad outline, and 
then to deepen that study by examining 
particular periods or problems in more 
detail. To this end, the history faculty 
offers within the core curriculum intro- 
ductory courses, which survey the history 
of the Church from the sub-apostolic age 
to the post-reformation era. Further 
courses at an advanced level in both 
institutional Church history and the history 
of doctrine are offered regularly. 

Students who enter the Seminary with 
a rich background in historical studies 
may be permitted to waive introductory 
courses and move directly to more 
specialized study. 

Required Courses in Church History 

CH01 Historical Studies I 

This course deals with the background 
and development of the Christian 
Church, its life and thought, from the 
Sub-apostolic Age through the Middle 
Ages (c. A.D. 100-1500). 
Term 11-1983-84 Mr. Partee 
1984-85 Mr. Partee 

CH02 Historical Studies II 

A survey of the Renaissance, the Refor- 
mations of the Sixteenth Century, and 
their results (c. A.D. 1350-1650). 
Term 111-1983-84 Mr. Partee 
1984-85 Mr. Partee 

HT01 Introduction to Modern 
Religious Thought 

The course is designed to acquaint 
students with major types of Western 
religious thought which have appeared 
since the 17th century. These interpreta- 
tions of faith will be viewed in their 
historical contexts of movements and 
events. They will also be studied in 
order to identify current and perennial 
theological problems and alternative 
ways of doing theology. Students will 
thereby also be introduced to systematic 



50 Course Descriptions 

theological thinking, to questions of 

what theology is, why it is done, and 

what are the main issues in theological 

methodology. 

Term 1-1983-84 Mr. Kehm 

1984-85 Ms. Suchocki 

Elective Courses in Church History 

CH17 Calvin's Institutes 

An in-depth study of the magisterial work of 
the man whom Melanchthon called "the 
theologian." Special attention will be 
devoted to its development, architectonic, 
and misunderstanding. 
Term III, 1984-85 Mr. Partee 

CH28 Reformed Symbolics: The Creeds 
of Christendom 

This course will study the historical develop- 
ment and content of selected creeds and 
confessions of the Church with especial 
attention to the themes of Reformed 
consensus. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Partee 

CH29 The Four Reformations of the 
16th Century 

This course considers the Catholic, Lutheran, 
Calvinian and Radical Reformations of the 
16th Century. 
Mr. Partee 

CH30 Calvin and Plato 

The historical relation between theology and 
philosophy is considered by studying the 
work of these two great thinkers. 
Mr. Partee 

CH34 A Biographical History of the 
Reformation 

This course approaches the thought of Refor- 
mation figures through the events of their 
lives. Students will be expected to become 
sensitive to and appreciative of the relation 
between theology and life by concentrating 
on life in the 16th century. 
Mr. Partee 

CH40 Contemporary Eastern 
Christianity 

This course is concerned with the various 
ancient churches of the East (Russian, Greek, 
Coptic, Armenian, etc.) and their respective 
involvement in theology, culture, society 
and political power. 
Mr. Calian 



CH41 Rise of Modern Paganism 

The enlightenment of the 18th century may 

be regarded as the major break between the 

old and new worlds. This course considers 

the scientific, historical, and philosophical 

developments which produced the modern 

era. 

Mr. Partee 

CH42 History of Methodism 

This course is designed to assist United 
Methodist students in understanding their 
denominational heritage within the context 
of historic Christianity— the life and times of 
John Wesley, early English Methodism and 
American Methodism to the present, history 
of Black Methodists, the Evangelical United 
Brethren Church and the formation of The 
United Methodist Church. Required of 
United Methodist students for ordination. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Tutwiler 

NT29 Crises in the History of the 
Early Church 

TH39 Presbyterian Confessions 

Studies in Theology 

Systematic theology is the study of the 
meaning and implications of the Christian 
Faith as present in the doctrinal formula- 
tions of the historic and contemporary 
witness of the Church. Based in the nor- 
mative authority of the biblical writings as 
they inform the Gospel of Jesus Christ, 
systematic theology attempts to explicate 
rationally and structure in a consistent 
interrelationship the thematic content of 
the Word of God in Scripture. The Church 
has always recognized this task as crucial 
to its ministry of proclamation and recon- 
ciliation. Systematic theology studies those 
signficant thinkers of the past and present 
whose service as theologians the Church 
has embraced. Yet it takes seriously the 
world in which we ourselves must now 
serve. The final aim of the study of sys- 
tematic theology is the ability to engage in 
independent and responsible theological 
thinking within the practice of ministry. To 
meet this challenge, the great theologians 
of the past are read not only to familiarize 
ourselves with this rich heritage, but to 
learn how doctrinal formulations have 
resulted from the way in which particular 
theologians structured their systems. Pur- 
suant to this task, systematic theology 



Course Descriptions 51 




Charles Partee 



George Kehm 



attends 1) to the investigation of problems 
of theological method, and 2) to basic 
questions such as the foundation and 
source of authority, the reference and 
function of theological language, the 
interaction of freedom and determinism, 
and 3) to thematic issues of contemporary 
life as these focus theological concerns 
particularly relevant to ministry within the 
American cultural milieu. 

The curriculum requires one course in 
historical theology, two courses in sys- 
tematic theology and one elective. The 
required courses cover, respectively, 
Christology and Soteriology, and the 
Church and the Sacraments. Electives 
are available in the work of individual 
theologians, in specific areas of doctrine, 
in contemporary "schools" of theological 
method (Process, Liberation), and in the 
history and development of theology in 
the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, an 
interdisciplinary colloquium in the con- 
structive organization of theological 
themes in a personal statement of faith is 
required for all senior students (Credo). 



Required Courses in Systematic Theology 

HT01 Introduction to Modern 
Religious Thought 

TH02 Christology 

Problems posed for systematic thinking by 
Christian beliefs and doctrinal formulations 
concerning salvation and the significance of 
Jesus Christ. 

Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Kehm 
1984-85 Mr. Wiest 

TH03 Church & Sacraments 

A study of the Doctrine of the Church and 
Sacraments, focusing on the relation of indi- 
vidual faith to communal religious experi- 
ence, on the purpose of the Church in the 
world, on the process of religious formation 
and transformation (justification and sanc- 
tification) within the fellowship of the 
Church, and the distinctive nature of the 
Church as new Humanity and Body of 
Christ. Readings in Reformation, Post- 
Reformation and contemporary theology; 
lectures on issues and Pre- Reformation 
theology. 

Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Wiest 
1984-85 Mr. Kehm 

Elective Courses in Systematic Theology 

TH12 The Doctrine of God I 

This course takes up the question of the 
"nature" of God; the divine "essence" 
common to the persons of the Trinity. The 
answers given by classical Thomistic and 
Calvinistic Theology will be examined, as 



52 Course Descriptions 

well as the criticisms and counter-proposals 
made by such theologians as Schleier- 
macher, Barth, Tillich, Cobb, Kaufmann, 
and Daly. Prerequisite: TH01. 
Term II, 1984-85 Mr. Kehm 

TH13 The Doctrine of God II 

This course takes up the question of the 
"attributes" of God. It will explore in detail 
what is meant by the unity, power, freedom, 
wisdom, love, holiness, righteousness, eter- 
nity, etc. of God. Special attention will be 
given to the differences in meaning that 
emerge in the neo-orthodox, process, 
feminist, and other revisionist concepts of 
God. Prerequisite: TH01. 
Term III, 1984-85 Mr. Kehm 

TH14 Process Theology 

This course is an investigation into the 
theological implications of process philos- 
ophy, particularly as these implications have 
been developed by Charles Hartshorne and 
John B. Cobb, Jr. 
Ms. Suchocki 

TH15 The Doctrine of the Trinity 

A seminar to investigate the chief forms of 
the doctrine of the Trinity in Eastern and 
Western theology. Modern theological and 
philosophical criticisms of the doctrine and 
the constructive efforts of contemporary 
theologians in the face of these criticisms 
will be examined. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Kehm 

TH16 Phenomenology and Theology 

Introduction to phenomenological method 
as developed by Husserl, Heidegger, Schutz 
and Merleau-Ponty. Examination of attempts 
to apply this approach to Christian Theology 
in order to uncover the realities referred 
to by terms such as "revelation," "sin," 
"redemption," "redemptive community," 
and the "presence" of "God." 
Mr. Kehm 

TH17 A Theology of Nature 

Attitudes toward the natural environment 
in the culture and in theology: the place of 
humanity in nature; God in nature; nature, 
evil and redemption. 

Mr. Wiest 

TH18 Revelation and Scripture 

Beneath the problem of biblical authority 
lies the problem of what is meant by 



"revelation." Traditional concepts of revela- 
tion have undergone radical criticism at the 
hands of modern biblical scholarship and 
systematic theology. The prevailing unclarity 
about the idea of revelation makes this an 
opportune time for a fresh attempt to clarify 
and refine Christianity's claim to be based on 
revelation. Such a study should provide the 
proper basis and essential clues for develop- 
ing a Christian doctrine of "Holy Scripture." 
Prerequisite: TH01. 
Term I, 1984-85 Mr. Kehm 

TH20 Major Christian Theologians: 
Paul Tillich 

A study of Tillich's approach to systematic 
theology with an emphasis on both his 
method and the content of his thought. The 
course will focus on the way in which Tillich 
presents traditional Christian doctrines. 
Mr. Wiest 

TH23 Critical Theology in 

Contemporary Catholicism 

Studies in three major Catholic theologians: 
Karl Rahner, Hans Kung and David Tracy. 
Particular emphasis will be given to the 
grounds for Protestant/Catholic dialogue. 
Ms. Suchocki 

TH27 Liberation Theology 

A study of the twentieth-century emphasis 
on theology as praxis as developed by 
feminists, blacks, and Third World 
theologians. 
Ms. Suchocki 

TH28 Human Evil and Redemption 

A study of the genesis and forms of expres- 
sion of what has been called "sin" with a 
corresponding analysis of how the biblical 
symbols of God's redemptive activity in the 
death and resurrection of Jesus mediate the 
power to transcend the dynamics that 
perpetuate sin. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Kehm 

TH29 God and Evil 

An inquiry into the ways in which the inter- 
pretation of evil has affected the understand- 
ing of God and of redemption. Study includes 
both classical and modern theologians. 
Major attention is given to the formulation of 
a contemporary understanding of evil, and 
its implications for a doctrine of God. 
Term II, 1984-85 Ms. Suchocki 



Course Descriptions 53 



TH31 Theology from a Feminist 
Perspective 

We will examine 1) the symbolism of 
"woman" as it has been operative in 
western religious history; 2) the relationship 
between the symbol and the place of 
women in the church; 3) feminist theological 
reactions (rejection, revision, appropriation) 
to the symbolism. 
Ms. Suchocki 

TH32 Christian Encounter with World 
Religions 

A focus upon the issue of religious pluralism 

through 1) introducing the student to a major 

non-Christian religion (Buddhism) and 

2) studying various contemporary Christian 

responses to pluralism, with particular 

reference to Buddhism. 

Ms. Suchocki 

TH33 Twentieth Century Eschatology 

The course will focus on: 1) issues of 
eschatology; 2) twentieth century responses 
to these issues (Pannenberg, theologies of 
hope, liberation theology, Teilhard de 
Chardin); 3) development of a process 
eschatology based on the work of Alfred 
North Whitehead. 
Ms. Suchocki 

TH34 Mystical Theology 

The study will begin with consideration 
of Evelyn Underbill's analysis of mystic 
experience, and then trace the theological 
experience through four major figures in 
I Christian history: Pseudo-Dionysius, Meister 
Eckhardt, Teresa of Avila and Teilhard de 
Chardin. 
Ms. Suchocki 

TH36 The Ethics of Karl Barth 

A study of the development of Barth's ethics, 
I from his early "liberal" period, through his 
| "dialectical" period, to the Church Dog- 
matics. Special attention will be given to his 
method of relating theology to ethics, and to 
his attempts to apply his theological ethics to 
political questions. Recent controversies over 
Barth's "socialism" will be examined. 
Mr. Kehm 

TH38 The Reformed Tradition: Its Past, 
Present and Future 

The Reformed tradition has not been a 
monolithic "Calvinistic system," defended 
by some, attacked by others, maintaining its 



integrity and vitality through keeping intact 
certain essential doctrines. Some have taken 
the opposite view. But modern hermeneuti- 
cal theory as well as studies in the history of 
tradition in various Christian churches offer 
more accurate and more useful ways of 
interpreting the "trajectory" of the Reformed 
tradition. This course will investigate the 
origins of the Reformed tradition in the six- 
teenth century (especially Calvin, Zwingli 
and Bullinger); its classical confessional 
expressions (up to the Synod of Dort and 
the Westminster Confession); the "creative" 
re-interpretations attempted by various 
theologians in the 19th century (Schleier- 
macher, MacLeod Campbell, Charles 
Hodge, B.B. Warfield, James Orr, Briggs 
and Schaff); and the history of Presbyterian 
creedal revisions in the USA down to the 
Confession of 1967. Theological issues in the 
current wave of "evangelical" attacks upon 
the UPCUSA will be discussed. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Kehm 

TH39 Presbyterian Confessions 

An examination of the Book of Confessions 
of the Presbyterian Church and related 
materials, with particular attention to what it 
means to be an active member in the 
Reformed tradition in contemporary society. 
Term III, 1984-85 Mr. Calian 

TH49 Wesleyan Doctrine 

Examination of the theology of John Wesley 
through study and discussion of selected 
primary sources in the context of his life 
situations and in light of representative inter- 
preters. Required of United Methodist 
students for ordination. 
Mr. Tutwiler 

TH50 God and Some Philosophers 

Study of selected readings in Platonism and 
Aristotelianism, and in modern idealism and 
empiricism, with attention directed to: 1) the 
interpretations of religion found in these 
philosophies, 2) some of the ways in which 
they have affected theological thought, and 
3) such inferences as may be drawn from 
this material concerning the whole problem 
of the relation of philosophy to theology. 
Mr. Wiest 

CH40 Contemporary Eastern 
Christianity 






54 Course Descriptions 

Studies in Church and Ministry 

The purpose of study in the Church and 
Ministry field is to bring theory to bear 
upon the practice of Christian faith. 
Ministry means service with and for 
others. Students and professors in this area 
inquire into how Christian theory and 
practice can be united in ministry to the 
church and through the church to the 
world. Consequently, the Church and 
Ministry field is engaged in the critical 
study of the professional ministry, the 
institutional church, and contemporary 
society so that students may be ade- 
quately prepared for future ministry. 

Ministry by both professional and lay per- 
sons in the church requires knowledge 
and skills pertinent to social strategies, 
life styles, language patterns, counseling 
techniques, educational models, and 
administrative systems appropriate to the 
Gospel in today's world, to this end a 
wide variety of courses are offered in 
ministry, Church and society, ethics, 
sociology of religion, education, pastoral 
care, homiletics, worship and church 
music, evangelism and missions, and 
administration. 

In other areas of study as well there will 
be an emphasis on the social context of 
ministry. For example, professors of 
systematic theology give attention to the 
social dimensions of Christian faith as 
examined by liberation theology. There 
are biblical courses which stress the social 
milieu of ancient Israel and the application 
of biblical ethics to modern society. 
Courses dealing with moral education and 
women in society are offered regularly. 
Special interest in business values under- 
girds the seminary's commitment to pro- 
viding leadership in this area for the 
business community of Pittsburgh, the 
third largest corporate headquarters com- 
munity in the USA. The seminary's urban 
setting provides an outstanding locus for 
the study of church, society, and ethical 
concerns. 



Required Courses in Church and Ministry 

MS01 Introduction to Ministry 

This team-taught course will introduce 
students to the concept of ministry, its 
biblical and theological basis, the problems 
faced by ministers in role definition vis-a-vis 
the varying expectations of church mem- 
bers, the function of the various theological 
disciplines in preparation for effective 
ministry, and the place of the student's faith 
formation in integrating the education 
experiences at the seminary. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Calian and Staff 
1984-85 Mr. Calian and Staff 

PD01 Credo 

The purpose of this colloquium is to assist 
students to work through the main questions 
in the traditional loci of Christian doctrine, 
drawing upon their accumulated knowledge 
of Scripture, historical and systematic theol- 
ogy, and their own tradition, in order to 
enable them to formulate their own theo- 
logical position in a comprehensive, well- 
grounded way. 

Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Wiest and Staff 
1984-85 Mr. Kehm and Staff 

PD02 Faith Foundation 

This colloquium seeks to help students 
become self-conscious about the processes 
by which selfhood matures with special 
reference to faith as a formative aspect of 
selfhood. The students' theological views, 
combined with socio-psychological material, 
form the basis of the conceptual material. 
The view of faith of certain theologians and 
in classics on spiritual formation is 
investigated. 
Term III, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

CS01 Church and Society: Local 

In the first term emphasis is given to the con- 
tribution sociological methods can make to 
understanding religious life in its varied 
forms. Particular attention is given to the 
urban situation in which most Americans 
live, using Pittsburgh as a model for studying 
the dynamics of urban life. Specific attention 
is given to the historic roles of church, 
ethnic, and theological traditions in con- 
tributing to the unique character of this 
urban community. Such study provides a 



Course Descriptions 55 



pattern by which any community may be 
studied to discern the relation of religious to 
general social dynamics. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Stone 
1984-85 Mr. Stone 

CS03 Church and Society: Global 

The global context of the church is 
examined through a study of political and 
international dimensions of church life. The 
interrelatedness of national and international 
issues— population, food, militarism, energy, 
economics, repression, social justice- 
demonstrates the larger context within 
which Christian ministry is carried on, 
whether in the affluent or Third World 
countries. 

Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Castillo 
1984-85 Mr. Castillo 

ET01 Introduction to Ethics 

An introduction to the theological and 
philosophical issues in contemporary Chris- 
tian social thought. Focus on the ethics of 
the church as a social institution and Chris- 
tian political theology. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Stone 
1984-85 Mr. Wiest 

PS01 Pastoral Studies: Education 

In this segment of the Pastoral Studies 
sequence students are engaged in studying 
the many aspects and possibilities of educa- 
tion programming in churches. A general 
view of educational philosophy and method- 
ology, and their relation to theological, 
biblical, and historical studies, provides a 
basis for evaluating major denominational 
patterns and curricular materials. Correlation 
with educational responsibilities in field 
work, particularly relative to youth 
ministries, adds focus to each student's 
development of his or her own philosophy 
of education and requisite skills. 
Term I, 1983-84 Ms. Likins 
1984-85 Ms. Likins 

PS02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Concurrent field experience provides a basis 
for study of pastoral care. In these seminars 
students are helped to understand the def- 
inition of pastoral care in the history and 
Itheology of the church in terms of the iden- 
tity of the minister. Brief consideration is 
given to theories of the development of per- 
sons and how this development results in 



expectations of pastoral care. Reporting on 
and discussion of experiences arising from 
students' field placements are used in 
developing skills useful to ministering to 
the needs of persons in each situation. 
Term II, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

PS03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

The third-term seminar groups in the Pastoral 
Studies course provide an introduction to 
homiletics as a responsibility of ministers. 
Attention is given to the exegetical bases of 
preaching, to problems of hermeneutics and 
authority, and to such rhetorical considera- 
tions as sermon construction, style and 
audience. Each student prepares and 
presents sermons, and the seminar groups 
engage in the critique of these sermons. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Ezzell and Mr. Oman 
1984-85 Mr. Oman 

Ministry 

Required Courses in Ministry 

MS01 Introduction to Ministry 

PD01 Credo 

PD02 Faith Formation 

Elective Course in Ministry 

PD03 Professional and Ministerial 
Leadership 

This colloquium focuses attention upon pro- 
fessional aspects of ministerial responsibili- 
ties. The work of the term assumes a holistic 
perspective by giving an opportunity for 
reflection on the resources each student now 
brings to the interrelation of the various 
ministerial. functions. Because ministry is 
always in a particular setting and in terms of 
one's appraisal of that situation, responsible 
decisions require self-consciousness in 
diagnosis and evaluation of various situa- 
tions. This course is required for all students 
who are not eligible for MS01, Introduction 
to Ministry. 
Term II, 1984-85 Mr. Oman 



56 Course Descriptions 




Harjie Likins 

Church and Society 

Required Courses in Church and Society 

CS01 Church and Society: Local 
CS03 Church and Society: Global 

Elective Courses in Church and Society 

CS10 Women in Church and Society 

The scope of the course includes the feminist 
positions; the conditions extant within soci- 
ety which brought about the contemporary 
liberation movement and the extent to 
which it influences church women. History 
of the church's attitudes towards women 
past and present. Special attention is given 
to the needs of women in ministry and to 
the ideational and political stance(s) which 
inform them. Exploration of biblical and 
theological themes in relation to women's 
emerging leadership role in ecclesiastical 
institutions. Techniques of consciousness- 
raising and preparation in ministry for the 
new attitudes of women. 
Term II, 1983-84 Ms. Likins 

CS12 Feminism and Small Group 
Process 

The course assumes that the professional 
minister will engage in extensive work with 
both traditional and feminist women's 
groups. The existence and influence of such 
groups within the contemporary church will 



be a focus of research. There will be an 
emphasis upon skills in small group leader- 
ship and the planning of effective educa- 
tional programs. 
Term III, 1983-84 Ms. Likins 

Ethics 

Required Course in Ethics 
ET01 Introduction to Ethics 
Elective Courses in Ethics 

ET13 Human Sexuality 

An inquiry into ethical questions raised by 
the current revolution in sexual attitudes and 
behavior. Consideration of such issues as 
pre-marital and extra-marital relations, mar- 
riage and divorce, alternative marriage pat- 
terns, understandings of male and female 
sexuality, treatments of sex in literature and 
public media. 
Mr. Wiest 

ET15 Readings in Contemporary 
Theological Ethics 

Discussion of selected readings from con- 
temporary Protestant and Roman Catholic 
ethicists, such as R. Niebuhr, K. Barth, 
E. Brunner, H.R. Niebuhr, P. Ramsey, 
P. Lehmann, D. Bonhoeffer, G. Winter, 
J. Gustafson, K. Rahner, B. Haering, 
J. Maritain, J.C. Murray. 
Mr. Wiest 



Course Descriptions 57 




Walter Wiest 



ET17 Law, Theology and Ethics 

Reading and discussion of selected topics 
within the following areas: 1) comparisons 
and contrasts between jurisprudential and 
theological concepts and ways of thinking; 
relations between law, morality and religion; 
2) ethical issues such as civil disobedience, 
punishment, laws regarding sexual behavior, 
censorship, problems in church-state rela- 
tions, professional ethics. (Obtainable as 
Ph.D. course) 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Wiest 

ET18 The Ethics and Theology of 
H. Richard Niebuhr 

A consideration of the formative influences 
on the thought of H.R. Niebuhr, and an 
analysis of his major writings in ethics and 
theology. 
Mr. Stone 

I ET19 Concept of Freedom in Christian 
Ethics 

An analysis of some of the meanings which 
"freedom" ("liberty") has in Christian 
theology and ethics, with comparison 
J between these and other philosophical 
[meanings (or theological) on the contem- 
porary scene (e.g., in various liberation 
movements). Consideration will be given the 
traditional problems such as freedom vs. 
determinism, freedom and grace; and to the 
function of freedom as a normative concept 
in Christian ethics. 
Mr. Wiest 



ET20 The Thought of Reinhold 
Niebuhr 

A detailed examination of The Nature and 
Destiny of Man and the study of Reinhold 
Niebuhr's political and social writings. 
Mr. Stone 

ET21 Christian Ethics in a Business 
Ethos 

The study of Christian ethics as it relates to 
the business ethos of Pittsburgh and through 
Pittsburgh to the nation and the world. 
Mr. Calian 

ET22 Ethics of D. Bonhoeffer 

A seminar devoted to reading and discussion 
of several of Bonhoeffer's books and of some 
secondary source material. 
Term III, 1984-85 Mr. Wiest 

ET23 Social Teachings of the Christian 
Churches 

Study of selected positions in the history 
of the churches' social teaching from the 
New Testament to the end of the nineteenth 
century. Focus on the issues of Christ and 
culture, church and state, the treatment of 
women, the Christian and war. 
Mr. Stone 




Ronald Stone 



Gonzalo Castillo 



ET25 Moral Issues in International 
Politics 

The perennial problems of Christian ethics 
anci international politics; the theory of inter- 
national politics; the moral issues raised by 
hunger and nuclear armaments, particular 
case studies in United States foreign policy. 
Mr. Stone 

ET30 Christianity in the Latin American 
Context: Ethical Issues 

A critical analysis of recent developments 
within Christianity in Latin America. The 
emphasis will be on the ethical issues 
involved in the struggle for liberation; the 
taking of sides in situations of intense social 
conflict; the implications of Christian love to 
one's attitude towards the oppressed and 
the oppressors; and the church's attitude 
towards material possessions. 
Term III, 1984-85 Mr. Castillo 

ET32 Love and justice 

A seminar inquiry into the concepts and 
pra( tice of the virtues of love and justice. 
Classical and contemporary sources will be 
examined with the social ethics of Paul 
Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhrand Martin Luther 
King, Jr., receiving special attention. 
Mr. Stone 

ET33 Christian Ethics and Technology 

The pace of technological change remakes 
society and produces new ethical issues. 
This course will consider the impact of 
technology in ethical issues and the role of 
Christian ethics in the debates over techno- 
logical change with particular reference to 



issues raised by computers, space technol- 
ogy, weapons development, energy tech- 
nologies, and the limits to growth debate. 
Mr. Stone 

ET34 The Social Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A consideration of Paul Tillich as a social 
philosopher and activist. Study of his writings 
on culture, politics, ethics, religious social- 
ism, The Religious Situation, The Socialist 
Decision, Love, Power and justice, and 
Political Expectations. His Christian ethical 
thought will be analyzed in relationship to 
his biography, historical setting, and its con- 
temporary and future relevance. 
Mr. Stone 

ET35 Seminar on Medical Ethics 

This course will be taught with the help of 
a member or members of the medical pro- 
fession. The class will consider, in ethical 
perspective, such issues as the social respon- 
sibilities of the medical profession; health 
care delivery and costs; patients' rights; 
abortion and sterilization, death and dying; 
transplantation and the use oi scarce 
resources; genetics and genetic engineering; 
professional ethical codes; the relationship of 
ministers to medical professionals and of 
ministry to medical care. 
Mr. Wiest 



Course Descriptions 




ET36 Christianity and Economic 
Systems 

Seminar participants will examine the 
underlying assumptions found in capitalism, 
socialism and mixed economies involving 
these two systems. Basic questions of the 
course: What impact do economic systems 
have upon our understanding of the Chris- 
tian message? What does the Gospel have to 
say to these economic systems? This course 
will be taught in cooperation with Professor 
Beeson, Administrator of the School of 
Business and Administration at Duquesne 
[University. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Calian 

ET37 The Ethics of Peacemaking 

A seminar consideration of the religious 
quest for peace with emphases on world 
[religions and peace, the Christian theology 
[of peace, militarism, the nuclear weapons 
ebate, social justice, and the current 
mphasis of the churches on peacemaking 
inistry. 
erm II, 1983-84 Mr. Stone 



bET38 Ethical Issues of Christian 
Presence in a Revolutionary 
Society 

The seminar will focus on the ethical issues 
of liberation theology, the problem of 
violence, social change in Nicaragua, and 
Christian life in a society undergoing revolu- 
tionary change. Both social scientific and 
theological sources will be studied, and a 
variety of perspectives will be considered. 
The course serves both as a regular seminary 
elective in ethics and as orientation for a 



study tour in winter by Pittsburgh Presbytery 

and the Seminary to Nicaragua. 

Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Castillo and Mr. Stone 

Sociology of Religion 

Elective Courses in Sociology of Religion 

SR10 Introduction to the Sociology 
of Religion 

An inquiry into the nature, content and 
extension of the sociology of religion as a 
field of study within the social sciences. The 
student is made acquainted with the main 
theories on the role of religion in culture, 
personality and social structure, with 
reference to such authors as Durkheim, 
Weber, Malinowski, Freud and Marx. 
Mr. Castillo 

SR12 Christianity and the Social 
Conflict 

An analysis of the role that Christianity has 
played in selected historical situations of 
intense social conflict, leading to a critique 
and the search for alternatives. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Castillo 

SR13 The Latin American Context of 
Liberation Theology 

The political, social and religious context of 
"liberation theology" in Latin America, with 
particular reference to Father Camilo Torres 
(the guerilla priest) and his impact on 
movements for radical change both inside 
and outside the churches. 
Mr. Castillo 



60 Course Descriptions 



A. \* 




SR15 Christianity and the American 
Indians 

The clash of two radically different 
worldviews and the consequences for the 
populations involved. A critical survey of 
Christian missionary activity among the 
indigenous populations of the Americas, 
with particular attention to the doctrinal, 
moral, and ethical issues at stake. Examples 
taken from North and South America. 
Mr. Castillo 

SR16 Critical Issues in the Sociology 
of Religion 

A panoramic survey of the major devel- 
opments in the field since the time of the 
"classics." The emphasis is on the present 
status of the theses originally presented by 
Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Malinowski, 
about the nature and function of religion. 
Mr. Castillo 

SR18 Christianity and Cultures: 
Selected Readings From the 
Third World 

Discussion of selected texts from Las Casas, 
P. Freire, M.M. Thomas, Steve Biko, 
J.S. Mbiti, and E. Dussel, on such subjects 
as Western and non-Western worldviews, 
Christianity and colonialism, cultural 
disintegration and cultural reconstruction, 
Christianity and nationbuilding, salvation 
and humanization, and "the church of 
the poor." 
Mr. Castillo 



ET38 Ethical Issues of Christian 
Presence in a Revolutionary 
Society 

Education 

Required Course in Education 
PS01 Pastoral Studies: Education 
Elective Courses in Education 

ED11 Moral Education in the Church 

The course explores recent research con- 
cerning the development of values in young 
persons and adults. Most particularly it deals 
with the work of Kohlberg and Simon as it 
relates to planned educational experience 
for children, youth and adults. It also deals 
with the ways in which justice is perceived 
and the level of value perception raised. 
Ms. Likins 

ED17 Historical Shaping of Church 
Education 

An exploration into the tenacity with which 
educational patterns introduced at various 
periods in church history have survived to 
shape current church education. 
Term I, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

ED19 Group Process 

The course deals with the theory and prac- 
tice of small group leadership and participa- 
tion with a special concern for the types of 
such groups currently found in churches. 
Term II, 1984-85 Ms. Likins 



Course Descriptions 61 







Von Evving Keairns 



ED20 Youth Ministry 

A study of existing models, old and new, that 
have been or are being used in the church 
with particular emphasis upon analysis in 
regard to the needs of youth. Skills in com- 
munication with youth are emphasized. 
Survey of possibilities in terms of drama, 
film, etc. Emphasis upon program design. 
Distinction between junior and senior high 
school youth groups is emphasized. 
Term II, 1984-85 Ms. Likins 

ED21 The Development of Faith in 
Christian Education 

The Christian faith in relation to the personal 
and social developmental tasks of specific 
age levels; the resources of the church 
directed towards the religious needs of per- 
sons. Three areas will be stressed: children, 
youth and middle-aged adults. The course 
will integrate the theories of Jung, Kohlberg 
and Fowler with the potential development 
of faith experience. 
Term III, 1984-85 Ms. Likins 

ED22 Church Educational 
Development 

The course will focus upon a careful study of 
church school curriculum. The student will 
be asked to carefully examine his or her own 
denomination's curriculum and to become 
familiar with its strengths and weaknesses. 
There will also be an intensive study of 
various styles of organization and 
administration. 
Term II, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 



ED23 Educational Ministries 
with Adults 

The course will combine an investigation of 
prevalent theories, strategies and structures 
for adult education in local congregations 
with the opportunity to design specific pro- 
grams of adult education related to students' 
interests. 

Term III, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

ED25 Educational Ministry and Life 
Concerns of Persons 

The focus will be upon the integration of 
teaching and planning skills with theories of 
faith development and contemporary life 
visions. The emphasis will be upon the con- 
cepts of pilgrimage and sacrifice as they have 
been and are being utilized within 
Christianity. 
Term II, 1983-84 Ms. Likins 

ED26 Crisis Intervention for Young 
Children 

The course is conducted at the Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center. Work in 
groups provides experience for the preven- 
tion or arrest of problems in the develop- 
ment of a child. Methods are learned for the 
disciplined observation of children and 
families. Enrollment limited to 12-15 
students. 

Term III, 1983-84 Ms. Keairns 
1984-85 Ms. Keairns 



62 Course Descriptions 

Pastoral Care 

Required Course in Pastoral Care 

PS02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Elective Courses in Pastoral Care 

PC10 Psychological Foundations of 
Ministry 

This course traces human development 
along lines set forth by Freud and radically 
expanded by Erikson. With Erikson as the 
transitional figure, the course stresses 
developments in ego psychology as espe- 
cially helpful to the practice of ministry. 
The third section of the course analyzes 
communal components, deals with group 
theory, and explores implications for 
ministry. Theological material is part of 
the data of the course, especially process 
theology. Permission of instructor required. 
This course is also listed as DM21. 
Term I, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

PC12 Pastoral Care in a Hospital Setting 

Each student spends approximately seventy- 
five hours throughout the term relating to 
patients. Students are assigned different areas 
of care, i.e., emergency room, intensive 
care, thoracics. Two experiences are 
expected. The students are supervised by 
hospital staff, when possible, and by the 
seminary professor responsible for the 
course. 
Staff 

PC13 Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course has in view a new theory 
of pastoral care based on theology. It 
endeavors to incorporate the relevant rich 
insights of Freud, Jung, Maslow, and gestalt 
psychology within a process metaphysical 
and theological framework. Readings in both 
theology and psychology are required. Per- 
mission of instructor required. This course is 
also listed as DM23. 
Term I, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

PC14 Psychology of Religion 

This course is designed to study religious 
experience. Religious experience is looked at 
from four perspectives: historical, beginning 
with Jonathan Edwards and eighteenth- 
century Revivalism; psychological, including 



Freud, Jung and Allport; cross-cultural, 
singling out Otto and Eliade; and topical, 
identifying specific areas such as community, 
faith, conversion, worship, prayer, mysti- 
cism, and vocation to which twentieth- 
century psychologies of religion and con- 
temporary religious experience provide data. 
Insofar as possible the course is inductive 
and is limited to seminar size. 
Term I, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

PC18 Pastoral Care of Age Groupings 

The course deals with the different kinds 
of pastoral care rendered to children, 
adolescents, mid-life, and older age. 
Term II, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

PC19 Training the Pastor as Spiritual 
Director 

Borrowing from the rich history and insight 
of the Roman Catholic Church, this course 
intends to adapt that material to the Protes- 
tant pastor as Spiritual Director. The history 
of the Office, the theology of such an Office 
within Protestantism, psychological factors 
obtaining between Director and people, and 
programmatic elements are the content of 
the course. Open only to students who have 
had Credo and Faith Formation. 
Staff 

PC20 Issues in Pastoral Care 

This trilogy of interrelated affective states will 
be looked at from three perspectives: 1) their 
dynamics, seen both psychologically and 
theologically (for example, ontological anxi- 
ety, neurotic guilt, and depression and 
hostility); 2) their expression in affect, beha- 
vior, and life-style; 3) handling them and 
ministering to their victims. Readings will be 
taken from psychology and theology. Case 
studies are used extensively throughout the 
course. 

Term I, 1983-84 Staff 
1984-85 Staff 

PC21 Expectations of Ministers 

Ministers frequently have experiences in 
which the expectations that people have of 
them are expressed in surprising ways and 
places. These experiences are often puzzling 
as well as distressing to the minister in terms 
of how to care for the people involved. The 
recognition of these expressions, their 



Course Descriptions 63 



developmental significance, the ways in 
which they are communicated, and useful 
responses the minister may make are studied 
in this course. Experiences presented by the 
students are the primary subject matter. 
Staff 

PC22 Children and Families in Times of 
Stress 

Parents are often not available just at times 
when children need them most. Clergy are 
not always clear about how they can help 
both children and parents at such times. 
This course intends to address specific 
experiences of stress for families such as 
divorce, moving, hospitalization and death. 
The meaning of these events for both 
children and parents will be discussed and 
their implications for pastoral care will be 
developed. Mr. Fred Rogers will serve as a 
resource. 
Staff 

PC24 Pastoral Care and Faith 
Formation 

Pastoral Care and Faith Formation have 
a rich history within the Christian church. 
For too long in this century have they been 
separated. This course examines their inter- 
relations, and explores the dynamics of faith 
formation which are able to help both the 
career in her or his professional work and 
the client in her or his resolution of a crisis or 
problem. Furthermore, this course seeks to 
explore ways of enriching faith so that faith 
itself can become a major resource in pre- 
ventive therapy. The resources for the course 
are current writings seeking to connect these 
two concerns, present research pointing to a 
helpful synthesis, and the pastoral experience 
and insight of the members of the class. 
Staff 

PC50 Pastoral Counseling Seminar 

This course is an advanced case seminar for 
persons who are currently working in situa- 
tions of ministry. The aim of the seminar is 
to enable the students to think more clearly 
about the needs of people in those situations 
and whether those needs warrant pastoral 
counseling or other types of pastoral inter- 
vention. When pastoral counseling is chosen 
as a means of help, the student will be given 
supervision in its use. 
(Staff 



PC62 The Congregation as a Caring 
Community 

This course assumes that the professional 
minister is not the only minister to people in 
need, yet the congregation is not prepared 
to minister. So this course develops a design 
to equip a Remnant in the congregation to 
become a ministering people. A theology 
of care is scrutinized; a two year program 
schematized, using both theological and 
psychological material; an on-the-job train- 
ing component for laity detailed; and the 
pastor's role in the total program pin- 
pointed. Besides theological and psycho- 
logical readings, sources include D.Min. 
research projects dealing with the congrega- 
tion as a caring community. 
Staff 

ED26 Crisis Intervention for Young 
Children 

Homiletics 

Required Course in Homiletics 
PS03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 
Elective Courses in Homiletics 

HM10 Homiletics Practicum 

The course combines seminar discussion 
with the preparation and delivery of ser- 
mons, and is designed to lead students 
beyond introductory homiletics to a more 
sophisticated understanding of the 
preacher's task. In small sections students 
preach twice during the term, as well as par- 
ticipate in detailed homiletical analysis. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Ezzell 

HM20 Parish Preaching 

Planning a year's pulpit work. An analysis of 

the seasons and festivals of the Christian 

Year. Selecting resources for occasional 

sermons. 

Term I, 1984-85 Mr. Oman 



64 Course Descriptions 




Robert Ezzell 



HM21 Classical Literary Sources 
for Preaching 

A study of selected literary masterpieces 
considered significant for preaching because 
of their content and/or style. Autobiographi- 
cal, devotional and allegorical material will 
be included as well as drama and the novel. 
Mr. Oman 

HM22 Preaching from the Gospel 
of Luke 

This course will study some of the great 
preaching themes found in St. Luke's 
Gospel. Particular attention will be given 
to the four "Great Songs of the Advent 
Season," as well as to selected portions 
of the Passion narrative. 
Mr. Oman 

HM23 Twentieth Century Preaching 

An examination of methodological and 
theological developments in Christian 
preaching in the twentieth century. A study 
of contemporary preaching based on 
printed, recorded, audio and video-taped 
sermons of leading homileticians of our age. 
Mr. Oman 

HM24 Preaching from the 
Old Testament 

The course will provide an introduction to 
the special problems and possibilities offered 
by Old Testament preaching, including the 
discussion of how to use the principles of 
Old Testament interpretation for homiletical 
purposes, and experience in the preparation 
of sermons on different types of passages. 
Mr. Ezzell 



HM25 Theology and Films 

This course will introduce the student to the 
use of popular films as a resource for theo- 
logical reflection in the church. Represent- 
ative films that reflect a variety of classical 
theological themes will be viewed and 
analyzed. 
Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Ezzell 

HM26 Doctrinal Preaching 

The communication of doctrine through 
preaching. A study of the necessity, oppor- 
tunities and problems of this type of com- 
munication. Emphasis will focus on the act 
of interpretation, the use of basic exegesis, 
and the proficient handling of biblical 
materials. 
Mr. Oman 

HM27 Preaching from Romans 

An exegetic analysis of Paul's most influential 
epistle. The course will attempt to provide 
the student with comprehensive under- 
standing of the style and structure of Paul's 
argument and the homiletical possibilities it 
presents. Special attention will be given to 
hermeneutical problems attendant to such 
prominent Pauline concepts as faith, grace 
and law, as well as to the formidable forensic 
character of his language and thought. 
Mr. Ezzell 

HM29 Storytelling 

This course is two-fold in purpose and 
design. First, to examine in detail the nature 
of the story form of discourse and to attempt 
to establish its theological and persuasive 
primacy among the competing categories of 



Course Descriptions 65 




Ronald Lengwin 

discourse. Second, and foremost, the course 
aims to develop in the student the ability to 
:onstruct and narrate stories, i.e., to become 
adroit in the art of storytelling. 
Mr. Ezzell 

HM30 Contemporary Literary Sources 
of Preaching 

^n analysis of selected contemporary literary 
/vorks considered important as homiletical 
esources. The course will seek to assist the 
itudent to view such material in relation to 
lis/her biblical and theological studies, and 
o employ what is learned in homiletical 
:raftmanship. 
Ar. Oman 

HM36 The Role of the Church in Radio 
and Television 

he purpose of this course is to provide the 
tudent with a general knowledge of com- 
nunications technologies, i.e., broadcast 
adio and television, cable television, satellite 
ommunications and how these technolo- 
;ies relate to the church and its mission to 
pread the good news of Jesus Christ, 
erm III, 1983-84 Fr. Lengwin 
1984-85 Fr. Lengwin 

1M40 Pre-Homiletics Practicum 

his practicum is designed to offer students 
ie opportunity to practice their oral presen- 
ation skills prior to entering the homiletics 
ourse. The focus will be on the techniques 
f oral interpretation and public address. It 
Iso enables the student to learn theoretical 
onstructs involved in the preparation of an 
fal presentation. Students will be expected 



George Tutwiler 

to make several presentations and develop 

self-critical skills. 

Staff 

HM41 Rhetoric for the Church 

This course has three distinct foci: 1) to 
improve the student's general ability in oral 
expression; 2) to help the student cultivate 
skills and strategies for the specific rhetorical, 
i.e., persuasive, transactions in which clergy 
are characteristically engaged (e.g., moder- 
ating session, leading discussions, counsel- 
ing, presenting resolutions to judicatories); 
3) to analyze the nature and quality of the 
church's rhetoric, both that which is directed 
to itself as audience and that which is 
directed toward the outside. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Ezzell 

Worship and Church Music 

Elective Courses in Worship and 
Church Music 

WS11 Hymnology 

A survey of the Church's heritage of song: 
the Bible, Byzantine and Latin hymnody, 
the Lutheran chorale, Calvin and Psalmody, 
English hymnody of Watts and Wesley and 
their adherents, and American hymnody 
from Colonial times through the twentieth 
century. This comprehensive approach to 
the study of hymns deals with the hymn in 
perspective, in history and culture, and 
in practice. 

Term I, 1983-84 Mr. Tutwiler 
1984-85 Mr. Tutwiler 



66 Course Descriptions 




Marianne Wolfe 



WS12 Liturgy and Music 

Class members will read literature regarding 
the development of liturgy in the various 
denominations of the Eastern and Western 
Christian Church. Through lectures and 
practica, students will be encouraged to per- 
form examples of such music and liturgy in 
class, and learn to develop a well- 
constructed form of worship for use within 
their own denomination, drawing on 
resources available in area libraries and 
church archives. Emphasis will be made on 
the role of hymnody and psalmody, and on 
the place of instruments— organ, piano, 
handbells, etc.— in the context of Christian 
worship. Staff relationships within the prac- 
tice of ministry will be studied and 
evaluated. 
1984-85 Mr. Oman and Mr. Tutwiler 

WS14 The Theology and Practice of 
Christian Worship 

An introductory course on Christian wor- 
ship, concentrating on basic theological prin- 
ciples, origins and development, orders of 
worship, lessons and sermon, public prayer 
and the sacraments. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Oman 
1984-85 Mr. Oman 

WS17 History of Church Music 

A study of choral and instrumental literature 
of the Christian Church from the seventeenth 
through the twentieth centuries with empha- 
sis on the development of Protestant Church 
music in America. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Tutwiler 



WS18 Music for the Church Year 

This course will provide a study of music 
appropriate for the seasons of the church 
year. Attention will be given to the music of 
J.S. Bach with special consideration being 
given to Bach as exegete. 
1984-85 Mr. Tutwiler 

Evangelism and Mission 

Elective Courses in Evangelism 
and Mission 

EV10 Evangelism: An Investigation 
in Depth 

Five professors, representing five major 
areas of inquiry (Bible, History, Theology, 
Psychology and Ethics) will engage students 
in an in-depth examination of Evangelism, 
both theory and practice. An executive from 
the national staff in evangelism plus selected 
local pastors will be invited to participate 
when appropriate. Carefully selected 
readings will correlate with the various areas 
of investigation. Two ten-page papers will be 
required as follows: one to be selected from 
one of the areas of study listed above, the 
other, a programmatic model for evangelism 
in a local congregation. 
Staff 

ICS01 Christianity in a World Context 

The church's paradox of being in the world 
but not of the world is examined in terms 
of its theological as well as its sociological 
nature. Thus, the course seeks to provide 
information and to develop awareness of the 



Course Descriptions 



ambiguous process through which Chris- 
tianity has reached ecumenical reality by 
being linked to the process of Western 
socio-economic expansion and missionary 
enterprise "to the ends of the earth." In this 
context contemporary developments in the 
ecumenical movement as well as the specific 
dynamics of the church in the Third World 
are seriously taken into account, with par- 
ticular attention given to the signs of vitality 
and creativity within Third World Christianity 
in the areas of evangelism, worship, social 
ethics and theology. Required for S.T.M. 
students, elective for all others. 
Term II, 1983-84 Mr. Castillo 
1984-85 Mr. Castillo 

ICS02 Theological Research in 
International Perspectives 

An examination of the issues and assump- 
tions in the theological disciplines as defined 
within several different cultural perspectives 
and as they relate to the ways in which 
Christians perceive their international obliga- 
tions. Guidance in specific research tech- 
niques will be offered also. Required for 
S.T.M. students, elective for all others. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Castillo 
1984-85 Mr. Castillo 

MHO The History of Christian Missions 

This course is designed to explore the 
historical and geographical dimensions of 
the attempt to be obedient to the mandate 
for mission. 
Term I, 1984-85 Mr. Partee 

MI12 Theology and Practice of 
Stewardship 

Stewardship has many dimensions: biblical, 
theological, ethical and practical. This 
seminar is designed to discuss these aspects 
through lectures and case studies. Guest 
[speakers will be invited for their particular 
[contributions on the history of philanthropy 
land voluntarism in reference to church 
jorganizations. 
'Mr. Calian 

jAdministration 

Elective Courses in Administration 




Laird Stuart 

help Presbyterian students to prepare for 
denominational examinations in that field. 
Term II, 1983-84 Ms. Wolfe 
1984-85 Ms. Wolfe 

AD11 Parish Administration 

The course will explore the theological foun- 
dations of administrative work in the parish. 
Case studies of administrative procedures 
will be used to introduce the practice of 
administration. The different procedures for 
large, medium-sized, and small churches will 
be explored. Team-taught by experienced 
ministers of Pittsburgh Presbytery. 
Term III, 1983-84 Mr. Stuart 
1984-85 Mr. Stuart 

AD20 Baptist History and Polity 

A survey of Baptist beginnings and history to 
the present. A study of the development of 
distinctive Baptist belief and practice. An 
analysis of current organization and 
procedures. 
Mr. Goodwin 

AD29 United Methodist Polity 

The Constitution and structural relationships 
of The United Methodist Church are exam- 
ined with a particular focus upon the 
ministry and mission of the local church. 
Required of United Methodist students for 
ordination. 
Mr. Tutwiler 



AD10 Polity and Program of the 

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 
Kn introduction to the polity and program of 
the Presbyterian Church, designed in part to 




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*ms*r 









Admissions 



7 Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 

r 1 Transfer Students 

•2 Joint Professional Degree Programs 

r 2 Master of Sacred Theology 

'2 Doctor of Ministry 

3 Special Students 

3 International Scholars 



70 Admissions 




Admissions 



A student applying for admission to any 
course of study offered by Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary shall provide 
evidence of good character and of a 
Bachelor's degree from an accredited 
college or university or its academic 
equivalent, and normally shall be a 
member in full communion in some 
branch of the Christian Church. 



Master of Divinity and 
Master of Arts 

Applicants to the first degree programs are 
required to have completed the Bachelor's 
degree from a regionally accredited col- 
lege or university at the time of enroll- 
ment. This undergraduate work should 
include a substantial foundation in the 
liberal arts. Applicants may apply any time 
after the junior year in college is com- 
pleted. Applications for September 



am ibB 

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1 1 HP 1 



Admissions 71 



entrance should be made prior to June 30 
to insure full consideration for admission; 
applications for entrance in the Second or 
Third Term should be made at least six 
weeks before the beginning of the Term 
desired. All correspondence concerning 
admissions to the Seminary should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Applications are considered by the Stu- 
dent Relations Committee upon submis- 
sion of the following materials: 

1. A formal application with the desig- 
nated references. 

2. An official transcript of all the appli- 
cant's college and university work, 
showing grades for at least three years 
of undergraduate work. 

3. A statement (500-1000 words) describ- 
ing the applicant's family, educational 
and religious background, placing parti- 
cular emphasis upon motives for enter- 
ing the Seminary. 

4. A personal interview with the Director 
of Admissions or another representative 
of the Seminary designated by the 
Director of Admissions. 

5. A battery of psychological and/or men- 
tal capacity tests may be required of the 
applicant by the Director of Admissions 
and Student Relations Committee. 
Such testing is utilized only when it is 
believed the results will clarify ambigu- 
ities in the student's academic record or 
in the applicant's emotional fitness for 
the ministry. 



6. An application fee of $1 5.00. This fee is 
not refundable. 

After admission is granted and within 
thirty days of such notification, a $35.00 
placement fee is required to assure the 
applicant a place in the Term for which 
application was made. This fee is applied 
to the student's tuition and is not return- 
able except under extreme hardship at the 
discretion of the Student Relations Com- 
mittee. A certification of the student's 
"intention to enroll" must accompany 
this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another 
accredited seminary is required to submit, 
in addition to the foregoing, a complete 
transcript of previous seminary work and 
a letter of dismissal from the Dean or 
President of the Seminary. A transfer stu- 
dent must be in attendance at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary for a minimum 
of one full academic year in order to 
become a candidate for the M.Div. or 
the M.A. degree. 




72 Admissions 




Joint Professional Degree 
Programs 

In each of the joint degree programs the 
candidate must apply and be admitted to 
both Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and 
the respective university. Normally, 
application is made to the appropriate 
graduate school of the University during 
the First Term of the middler year of the 
Seminary Master of Divinity program. 

Master of Sacred Theology 

Applicants to the Master of Sacred 
Theology degree program are required to 
have successfully completed a Master of 
Divinity degree or its equivalent in addi- 
tion to the Bachelor's degree from a 
regionally accredited college or university. 
Applications for September entrance 
should be made prior to June 30; applica- 
tions for entrance in the Second or Third 
Term should be made at least six weeks 
before the beginning of the Term desired. 

In addition to the materials required for 
admission into the Master of Divinity and 
Master of Arts programs, the applicant 
must submit the transcript of their Master 
of Divinity work. Applications are con- 
sidered by the Student Relations 
Committee. 

Doctor of Ministry 

Applications for the Doctor of Ministry 
degree program are submitted to the 
Director of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program. 



The successful completion of the M.Div. 
degree or its equivalent from an accred- 
ited seminary or divinity school is required 
for admission to the program. Applicants 
are required to have completed a 
minimum of two years in the ordained 
ministry. 

The Application Process 

Applications to the Doctor of Ministry 
program must include: 

1 . Complete transcripts of all post-high 
school academic work. 

2. Information regarding participation in 
non-degree continuing education or 
other post-Master of Divinity studies. 

3. Assurance that the applicant will be 
engaged in some recognized ministerial 
position for the period of the program. 

4. An endorsement from the applicant's 
Session or Church Board approving 
expenditure of time called for by the 
program. 

5. A listing of applicant's ministerial 
experience to date. 

6. A statement (500-1000 words) outlining 
reasons for wishing to enter the Doctor 
of Ministry Program. 

7. A five-page reflection paper on some 
aspect of ministry (preaching, admin- 
istration, pastoral care, education) 
demonstrating the integration of theory 
and practice in the applicant's ministry. 

8. Check or money order for $15.00 
(non-refundable). 



Special Students 

Applicants desiring to study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary for credit on a non- 
degree basis, other than International 
Students, must possess a Bachelor's 
degree from a regionally accredited col- 
lege or university at the time of enroll- 
ment. Applicants for Special Student status 
follow the same procedures and submit 
the same materials as those applying for 
the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 
Programs. 



Admissions 73 

National Council of the Churches of 
Christ, 475 Riverside Drive, New York, 
New York 101 15 or the World Alliance of 
Reformed Churches, 150, route de Ferney, 
1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland. Applicants 
whose native language is not English will 
be required to give evidence of proficiency 
in the English language before application 
will be considered. The application dead- 
line for international students is March 1st 
for September entrance. 



International Scholars 

All applicants for the International 
Scholars program at Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary must secure endorse- 
ment of their study plans from either the 
Leadership Development Program of the 




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;.,:;; ^ ."* 




Finances 



76 Tuition and Fees 

76 Financial Aid 

/9 Awards, Prizes and Fellowships 

81 Honors Scholarship Program 



76 Finances 




Finances 



The Board of Directors of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary has approved the 
following tuition, housing rent and fees 
for the 1983-84 academic year. Modest 
increases are anticipated for the following 
year. The Seminary reserves the right to 
make changes in all tuition, housing rent, 
fees and financial aid policies without 
prior notice. 

Tuition 



Candidates for the M.Div., M.A. and S.T.M. Degrees: 



Annual charge for 36 term hours $2,664.00 

Full time per credit (nine or more credits) $ 74.00 

Part time per credit (eight or less credits) $ 80.00 

Candidates for the D.Min. Degree: 

Per credit $ 95.00 

Project/Paper $ 350.00 



Special Students: 



Per credit $ 80.00 



Candidates for the Ph.D. Degree: 



Per credit hour for Pennsylvania residents— Prices established by 
the University of Pittsburgh 

Per credit hour for non-Pennsylvania residents— Prices established by 
the University of Pittsburgh 

University Courses: 

Courses taken at area universities (University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, 
Duquesne University) through the PCHE cross-registration system are charged at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary tuition rates and tuition is paid to the Seminary. 

Audit course for enrolled students for no credit No Fee 

Fees 

Application Fee $15.00 

Matriculation Fee* $35.00 

Annual Library Fee ($7.00 per term) $21.00 

Annual Student Association Fee ($3.00 per term) $ 9.00 

Gradua tion Fee $50.00 

Transcript Fee: One copy of student's academic record will be provided 

without charge— additional copies $ 2.00 

* The Matriculation Fee is applied to tuition costs. 



Finances 77 



Room 



Annual charge tor a resident/ 
hall room ($155 per term) 


$465.00 


Apartment Fees (per month) 


Fulton Hall: Thirty-nine apartments 


Efficiency apartments 


$130.00 


One-bedroom apartments 


$165.00 


Highlander: Twenty-three apartments 


One-bedroom apartments 


$175.00 


Two-bedroom apartments 


$200.00 


Anderson/McMillan Halls: Thirty-one apartments 


One-bedroom apartments 


$190.00 


Two-bedroom apartments 


$210.00 


Three-bedroom apartments 


$235.00 


Four-bedroom apartment 


$280.00 



Board 

Meals may be purchased in the cafeteria 
Monday through Friday (breakfast and 
lunch) throughout the academic year, 
excluding vacation periods. The estimated 
cost for board for an academic year for a 
single student is $1500.00. 

Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are 
payable during the first week of each term 
as specified by the Business Office. When 
necessary, arrangements for a payment 
plan to cover a term's expenses may be 
made at the Business Office. There is a 
$5.00 late fee plus a carrying charge of 1 % 
per month on the open account balance 
under any deferred payment plan. 

Financial Aid 

Financing Your Seminary Education 

The goal of the Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary Financial Aid Program is to assist 
each student in arranging financial sup- 
port. While it remains each student's 
responsibility to meet the costs of the 
theological education, the Seminary 
desires to provide grants and work 
assistance to each full time student in the 
Divinity and Arts programs who has need, 
regardless of denominational affiliation. 
The student's denomination and family 
are also expected to share in meeting the 
financial obligation. 




78 Finances 



1983-84 Allowed Expenses 




Single Student 


Married Student 


Each Child 


Tuition 


$2,664.00 


$ 2,664.00 


$ 




Fees 


30.00 


30.00 






Rent 


465.00 


1,575.00 




270.00 


*Food 


1,500.00 


2,000.00 




500.00 


Transportation 


1,000.00 


1,200.00 






*Health Insurance 


420.00 


850.00 






*Health Medical 


100.00 


200.00 




190.00 


* Books 


380.00 


380.00 






*Clothing 


220.00 


440.00 




185.00 


* Steward ship 


100.00 


150.00 






*Miscellaneous 


481.00 


681.00 




130.00 



$7,360.00 



$10,170.00 



1,275.00 



* Estimated expenses 



Cost/Income 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary uses 
expense norms in computing a student's 
need. Following are the allowed expenses 
for the 1983-84 academic 
(9 month) year: 

From these norms is subtracted all 
anticipated income for the year. Net sum- 
mer earnings; earnings during the year, for 
the student and spouse; denominational 
grants and your congregational aid; sav- 
ings and other resources are considered 
income. Honor scholarships and prizes 
awarded by Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary are not considered income. 
Single students will need to bring a 
minimum of $2,000.00 of income and if 
you are married you will need to bring a 
minimum of $4,000.00. 

The demonstrated need will be the dif- 
ference between the allowed expenses 
and the anticipated income. That need 
will be fully met with Work Assistance, 
Grants and Loans. 

Work Assistance 

The first part of aid, up to $1,1 10.00, will 
be the awarding of a Work Assistance 
job. Campus jobs exist in all aspects of 
Seminary life, including the Playroom, 
Cafeteria, Library, and Administrative 
offices. 

Grants 

Grant Assistance is provided by our 
restricted endowment funds and annual 



gifts to the Student Aid Scholarship Fund. 
In 1982-83 over half of our students 
received Seminary Aid and the average 
grant award was $2,084.00. 

Normally our grant award will not exceed 
the tuition cost and one third is made 
available each term. In special circum- 
stances a student may be awarded an 
additional 10% of the grant. 

Loans 

Many students will enter with large educa- 
tional loans so every effort is made to 
keep this aid component to a minimum. 

Presbyterian students who are registered 
with or under the care of a Presbytery 
may apply for loan assistance from The 
Vocation Agency of the Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.) through the Financial 
Aid Officer. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary par- 
ticipates in the Guaranteed Student Loan 
(GSL) Program. In emergency situations, 
the Financial Aid Committee may provide 
a long term loan. 



Finances 79 




Additional Information 

The Seminary's Financial Aid Program is 
based on a nine month academic year. 
Each year, it aid is required, a new 
application must be filed by May 1. 
Applications are reviewed in the order 
in which they are received. 

These policies are subject to change. They 
are operative for the current academic 
year (1983-84) and represent no commit- 
ment beyond the current year. The Finan- 
cial Aid Policy Committee (including three 
students) conducts an annual review. 

Specific questions and requests for 
detailed information regarding financial 
aid should be addressed to the Seminary's 
Financial Aid Office. 

Awards, Prizes and Fellowships 

The Sylvester S. Marvin 
Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may 
be assigned upon graduation to that 
member of the senior class who is recom- 
mended by the faculty as having achieved 
the highest standard in all departments 
of the Seminary curriculum. The faculty 
reserves the right to impose special tests 
and examinations in making this award. 
The recipient must pledge himself or 
herself to a year of postgraduate study at 
some institution approved by the faculty 
following his or her graduation. 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship is given 
every year to the member of the senior 
class who has the highest average at the 
beginning of his or her final term of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship 
requires that the recipient spend a full 
academic year in study in any graduate 
institution approved by the faculty. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize is 
assigned to that member of the graduating 
class who has taken the full course of 
instruction in this institution and who has 
achieved the second highest academic 
rank of the class, if in the judgment of the 
faculty he or she is worthy in all other 
respects. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial 
Homiletical Prize 

This prize is awarded to a member of the 
senior class who has spent three years in 
the Seminary and has taken the highest 
standing in the department of Homiletics. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
will be awarded to the student who 
achieves the highest grade in an examina- 
tion in classical Greek as he or she enters 
the junior class of the Seminary. 



80 Finances 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
will be awarded to that member of the 
senior class who, having elected Hebrew, 
shall submit the best grammatical and 
exegetical treatment of a portion of the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament 
Greek will be awarded to that member 
of the senior class who, having elected 
Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best 
grammatical and exegetical treatment of a 
portion of the Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize is 
to be awarded yearly to the students tak- 
ing first and second rank respectively in 
the department of Church History. 

The Watson Samuel Boyce Music Prize 

The Watson Samuel Boyce Music Prize is 
to be awarded annually to that member 
of the senior class who makes the most 
outstanding contribution to the life of the 
Seminary in the area of church music. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The income is apportioned equally each 
year to the six members of the junior 
class who attain the highest average of 
excellence in their Seminary work. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship is given to 
the student who, upon entering Seminary, 
shall achieve the highest grade in a com- 
petitive examination in the English Bible. 
The successful competitor is to have the 



scholarship throughout the entire course 
of three years. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize 
in History and Theology 

The income from this endowed fund is 
granted to the student, who in the judg- 
ment of the professors of the History and 
Theology areas, is most worthy of this 
award at the end of the middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize 
in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical 
Studies is granted to the student who, in 
the judgment of the professors of the 
Biblical area, is most worthy of this award 
at the end of the junior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for 
Graduate Study 

This fund provides an annual award to a 
member of the graduating class desig- 
nated by the faculty for assistance in post- 
graduate study, preferably in the field of 
New Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey 
Award in Homiletics 

This award is given to a student who, at 
the end of the middler year has, in the 
judgment of the homiletics professors, 
demonstrated excellence in preaching. 

The Walter L Moser Prize in Missions 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions is 
awarded to that member of the graduating 
class who is deemed most deserving 
among those entering a denominationally 
recognized or ecumenically sponsored 
mission field. 




The Clara Edna Miller Prize 
in Pastoral Theology 

This prize is awarded to that student in the 
Master of Divinity program finishing the 
seventh term who achieves the highest 
academic standing in those courses in the 
curriculum particularly adapted to the 
practice of ministry, i.e., preaching, wor- 
ship, education, pastoral care, administra- 
tion, and leadership development. 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize 
in Pastoral Care 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in 
Pastoral Care is awarded to the graduating 
senior, whether Master of Divinity or 
Master of Arts, who has taken his or 
her full course of study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary and who has the 
highest standing in the general area of 
Pastoral Care. 

The John W. Meister Award 

The John W. Meister Award in the Pastoral 
Ministry has been established at each of 
the seven theological seminaries of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) in memory 
of Rev. John W. Meister, who at his death 
in 1974 was Director of the Council of 
Theological Seminaries. The award is 
made each year to that member of the 
graduating class who manifests to the 
greatest degree those characteristics 
which are most essential to effective 
pastoral leadership. 

The Richard J. Rapp Memorial Award 
in Doctor of Ministry Studies 

Funds have been raised by the Covenant- 
Community Presbyterian Church for a 
memorial for the Rev. Dr. Richard J. Rapp. 
It is the intention of the donors that this 
money be used to honor Dr. Rapp by 
publishing one or more outstanding Doc- 
tor of Ministry papers, and by acknowl- 
edging this in the annual commencement 
program. 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award for an 
International Student is given to a student 
who has demonstrated meritorious per- 
formance in his or her Seminary work and 
who is returning to his or her native land 
to witness to Christ there. 

Honors Scholarship Program 

The Honors Scholarship Program is one 
way Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



Finances 81 

seeks to encourage the enrollment of 
young men and women of the highest 
academic ability in the Master of Divinity 
and Master of Arts programs. Those con- 
sidered for an Honors Scholarship shall be 
from among those applicants who have 
graduated from a regionally accredited or 
internationally recognized college or uni- 
versity, normally in the top five percent of 
their class (with at least a 3.5 cumulative 
average). They shall be students of 
demonstrated potential for outstanding 
Christian service. Honor Scholarships shall 
be granted only to students enrolled for 
twelve (12) or more credits per term who 
make application to the Seminary for the 
Fall Term on or before April 15 of any 
year. Honor Scholarships are awarded for 
a maximum of three (3) years. They can 
be renewed only if the recipient maintains 
a 3.0 cumulative grade average. 

The David E. Molyneaux Honors 
Scholarship was established by the First 
Presbyterian Church of Flint, Michigan, 
in affection for their pastor, David E. 
Molyneaux, an alumnus and former Board 
member of the Seminary. 

The First Presbyterian Church of Neenah 
Honors Scholarship was established by 
the First Presbyterian Church of Neenah, 
Wisconsin, from the Bergstrom Fund, of 
which it is the trustee. 

The Carl A. Hiaasen Honors Scholarship 
Fund was established by the bequest of 

Abraham L. Mailman in honor of Mr. Carl 
A. Hiaasen, a former member of the 
Board of Directors of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. 

Those considered for an Honors Scholar- 
ship must have applied for admission to 
the Seminary before April 15th of each 
academic year. 



* 






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84 Personnel 




The members of the Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary Faculty are committed to 
the scholarly, professional and personal 
preparation of men and women for Chris- 
tian service to the Church. Many mem- 
bers of the Faculty are regular contributors 
to the Church's and world's scholarly 
knowledge through publications and 
participation in learned societies in the 
Americas, Asia and Europe. In this way 
the Faculty at Pittsburgh Theological Sem- 
inary contributes to the learned skills of 
students on campus and far away. The 
Faculty formulates the curriculum, directs 
the entire educational program, and exer- 
cises general authority over the student 
body. 

Faculty 

Carnegie Samuel Calian, Professor of 
Theology. Occidental College, B.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
University of Basel, Doctor of Theology. 

Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas, Assistant 
Professor in Church and Ministry. Union 
Theological Seminary, Cuba, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), S.T.M.; 
Columbia University (N.Y.), Ph.D. 
candidate. 

Robert M. Ezzell, Assistant Professor of 
Homiletics. Memphis State University, 
B.S.; Lexington Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; Yale Divinity School, S.T.M.; Yale 

University, M.A. 

Donald E. Gowan, Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. University of South Dakota, B.A.; 
University of Dubuque Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 

Dikran Y. Hadidian, Professor of 
Bibliography. American University of 
Beirut, B.A.; Hartford Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Th.M.; Hartford School 
of Religious Education, M.A.; Columbia 
University, M.S. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, William F. Orr 
Professor of New Testament. Victoria 
College, University of Toronto, B.A.; 
Emmanuel College, Victoria University, 
Toronto, B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), S.T.M., Th.D. 

Jared Judd Jackson, Associate Professor 
of Old Testament. Harvard College, A.B.; 
Episcopal Theological School, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), Th.D. 

George H. Kehm, Professor of Theology. 
Queens College (N.Y.), B.S.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Harvard 
Divinity School, S.T.M.; Harvard 
University, Th.D. 

Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor 
of Biblical Languages. University of 
Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, M.Div.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Th.M.; Princeton University, 
M.A., Ph.D. 

M. Harjie Likins, Associate Professor in 
Church and Ministry. Cornell College 
(Iowa), A.B.; Union Theological Seminary 
(N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 

Ulrich W. Mauser, Errett M. Grable Pro- 
fessor of New Testament. University of 
Tubingen, Doctor of Theology. 

Richard ). Oman, Howard C. Scharfe 
Professor of Homiletics. University of 
Minnesota, B.A.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; New College, University 
of Edinburgh, Ph.D. 

Charles B. Partee, Professor of Church 
History and W. Don McClure Professor of 
World Missions and Evangelism. Maryville 
College, A.B.; Austin Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; University of 
Texas, M.A.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Ph.D. 

Ronald H. Stone, Professor of Social 
Ethics. Morningside College, B.A.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Personnel 85 




Marjorie H. Suchocki, Associate Professor 
of Theology and Director of D.Min. Pro- 
gram. Pomona College, B.A.; Claremont 
Graduate School, M.A., Ph.D. 

H. Eberhard von Waldow, Professor of 
Old Testament. Bonn University, B.A., 
Doctor of Theology. 

Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy 
of Religion. Lafayette College, A.B.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 

Part-Time Faculty 

Von Ewing Keairns, Ph.D. (Duquesne 
University); Executive Director, Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 



Nancy L. Lapp, M.A.; Curator of Bible 
Lands Museum, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary; Lecturer in Archaeology and 
Hebrew 

Fr. Ronald P. Lengwin; Director of 
Communications, Christian Associates 
of Southwest Pennsylvania; Lecturer 
in Media Communications 

Laird Stuart, D.Min. (Princeton); Senior 
Minister, Westminster Presbyterian 
Church; Lecturer in Parish Administration 

George E. Tutwiler, B.A.; Minister oi 
Music, Eastminster United Presbyterian 
Church; Organist and Choirmaster, 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; Lecturer 
in Church Music and United Methodist 
Studies 



86 Personnel 




Guest Faculty 

William M. Aber, D.Min.; Executive 
Presbyter, Presbytery of Redstone; 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Administration 

Gordon E. Boak, D.D.; Pastor Emeritus, 
Glenshaw Presbyterian Church, Glen- 
shaw, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Homiletics 

J. Stanley Chesnut, Ph.D.; Associate Dean 
of Faculty, Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, 
Florida; Lecturer in Bible 

Carlton B. Goodwin, Ph.D.; Executive 
Minister, Pittsburgh Baptist Association, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Baptist Studies 

William H. Kadel, Th.D.; President 
Emeritus, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
Lecturer in Administration 

John M. Mackey, D.Min.; Executive 
Director, Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

John E. Mehl, Ph.D.; Senior Associate 
Pastor, Southminster Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Education 

Richard A. Morledge, D.D.; Pastor, First 
Presbyterian Church, Bakerstown, Penn- 
sylvania; Lecturer in Homiletics 

Neil R. Paylor, Ph.D.; Pastoral Counselor; 
Lecturer in Pastoral Care 



William L. Roberts, Ph.D.; Research 
Coordinator, Christian Education: Shared 
Approaches, Moundsville, West Virginia; 
Lecturer in Education 

June Ruth Michaelson Taylor, M.Div.; 
Director of Pastoral Service, Presbyterian- 
University Hospital, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania; Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

Marianne L. Wolfe, B.A.; Stated Clerk, 
Pittsburgh Presbytery, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania; Lecturer in Presbyterian 
Polity and Program 

Emeriti 

John M. Bald, Th.D. Emeritus Professor of 
Christian Ethics 

J. Gordon Chamberlin, Ed.D. Emeritus 
Professor of Education 

Walter R. Clyde, Ph.D. Emeritus Professor 
of Christian Mission 

John H. Gerstner, Ph.D. Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Church History 

Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D. Emeritus Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral 
Theology 

William H. Kadel, Th.D. President 
Emeritus 

William F. Orr, Ph.D. Emeritus Professor 
of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

James A. Walther, Th.D. Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of New Testament Literature and 
Exegesis 



Personnel 87 




Administrative Officers 

Carnegie Samuel Calian 

President 

B.A. Occidental College 

B.D. Princeton Theological Seminary 

D.Th. University of Basel 



Ulrich W. Mauser 

Dean of the Faculty 

D.Th. University of Tubingen 



Eugene P. Degitz 

Vice-President for Development 

B.A. Westminster College 

M.Div. Princeton Theological Seminary 

Th.M. Colgate/Rochester Divinity School 

M.S. Syracuse University 



88 Personnel 




Douglas N. Clasper 

Business Manager 
B.S. Cornell University 
Certified Public Accountant 



Timothy P. Snyder 

Registrar/Director of Financial Aid 
and Housing 

B.A. Southern Methodist University 
M.P.A. University of Pittsburgh 



John E. White 

Director of Admissions/Director of 

Student Relations 

B.A. Geneva College 

M.Div. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



: 




Personnel 

Jeanette Rapp 

Director of Continuing Education and 

Special Events 

A.B. Youngstown State University 



89 



Dikran Y. Hadidian 

Librarian 

B.A. American University of Beirut 

B.D., Th.M., Hartford Theological Seminary 

M.A. Hartford School of Religious Education 

M.S. Columbia University 





^l&IiBfl 


Bill 




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Mary Ellen Scott 

Cataloger/Archivist 

B.A. Sterling College 

M.L.S. University of Pittsburgh 



90 Personnel 




Marjorie Suchocki 

Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program 
(Sabbatic 1983-84) 

B.A. Pomona College 

M.A., Ph.D. Claremont Graduate School i 



Richard J. Oman 

Director of Senior Placement 

Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program 

(1983-84) 

B.A. University of Minnesota 

B.D. Princeton Theological Seminary 

Ph.D. New College, University of Edinburgh 



The Board Of Directors 

Officers, 1982-83 

The Rev. Robert C. Holland, Chairperson 
Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Marianne Wolfe, Vice-Chairperson 
Stated Clerk, Pittsburgh Presbytery 
Woodland United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, Secretary 
Executive Presbyter, Pittsburgh Presbytery 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Craig G. Ford, Treasurer 

Senior Vice-President, Mellon National Bank 

Wallace Memorial United 

Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Legal Counsel 

Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright & Barron 
Woodland United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Members 

The Rev. William M. Aber 

Executive Presbyter, Redstone Presbytery 
Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

Bishop James M. Ault 

Resident Bishop 

Western Pennsylvania Conference 
The United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. J. B. Belton 

Civic Leader 

First Presbyterian Church 

Brockway, Pennsylvania 

David J. Brubach 

Executive Vice-President 
Union National Bank 
Glenshaw Presbyterian Church 
Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

Dr. E. Bayley Buchanan 

Surgeon, Mercy Hospital 
Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Carnegie Samuel Calian 

President and Professor of Theology 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Personnel 91 

The Rev. Richard M. Cromie 

Southminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. St. Paul Epps 

Retired Church Exective 
Windsor, North Carolina 

Dr. Dwight C. Hanna 

Reconstructive Surgeon and 

Medical Director 
The Western Pennsylvania Hospital 
Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Jean H. Henderson 

Jefferson Center United 
Presbyterian Church 
Saxonburg, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Joseph R. Hookey 

Second Presbyterian Church 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Mrs. Blaine Hovis 

Civic Leader 

East Main United Presbyterian Church 

Grove City, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. William N. Jackson 

Christ United Presbyterian Church 
Canton, Ohio 

The Rev. Carolyn J. Jones 

Glenshaw Presbyterian Church 
Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

John E. Kaites 

President, Johnstown Coal and 

Coke Company 
Westmont Presbyterian Church 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Max A. Lauffer 

Mellon Professor, University of Pittsburgh 
Southminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

James E. Lee 

Chairman of the Board 

Gulf Oil Corporation 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mark B. Maharg 

Owner, Maharg Insurance Company 
Calvary Presbyterian Church 
Butler, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Clinton M. Marsh 

President, Knoxville College 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



92 Personnel 




Mrs. C. Taylor Marshall 

Civic Leader 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley 

Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert H. Meneilly 

Village Presbyterian Church 
Prarie Village, Kansas 

The Rev. Kenneth A. Moe 

Market Square United Presbyterian Church 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Beverly W. Mosley 

Southminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Mary E. Pardee 

Former President, United Presbyterian 

Church Women 
Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Nathan W. Pearson 

Financial Advisor, Paul Mellon 
Family Interests 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley, 
Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Nancy W. Peterson 

Alumni/ae Representative 

Center United Presbyterian Church 

Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. William G. Rusch 

Synod Executive, Synod of the Trinity 
Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. John D. Sharick 

Executive Presbyter 
Eastminister Presbytery 
Youngstown, Ohio 



The Rev. Robert J. Weingartner 

Calvary Presbyterian Church 
Logansport, Indiana 

The Rev. Alfred W. Wishart, Jr. 

Executive Director, Pittsburgh Foundation 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

J. Stuart Zahniser 

Elder, First United Presbyterian Church 
Meadville, Pennsylvania 



Field Education Supervisors 
for 1982-1983 

The following served the Seminary as Field 
Education Supervisors in the academic year 
1982-83. 

Hendrik J. H. Bossers 

Bailey Avenue United Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh 

Jack M. Bowers 

Hebron United Presbyterian Church, 
Penn Hills 

Bruce E. Bryce 

Whitehall United Presbyterian Church, 
Baldwin 

Donald G. Campbell 

Covenant United Presbyterian Church, 
Butler 

Jay A. Collins 

Mt. Hope Community United Presbyterian 
Church, Penn Hills 

Alvin Coon 

St. John the Evangelist Baptist Church, 
Pittsburgh 

James Co win 

First Baptist Church, Tarentum 

Alfred M. Deemer 

Natrona Heights United Presbyterian 
Church, Natrona Heights 

Gilbert J. Fitzsimmons 

Knoxville United Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh 

Victor E. Fogelin 

Cheswick Presbyterian Church, Cheswick 

Robert D. Forsythe 

Riverview United Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh 

John T. Galloway, Jr. 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church, Fox Chapel 

Donald H. Gordon 

Presbytery of Lake Erie 

Richard G. Goss 

Covenant Community United Presbyterian 
Church, Greentree 

William J. Green 

North Branch United Presbyterian Church, 
Monaca 

Andrew C. Harvey 

Central Highlands United Methodist Church, 
Elizabeth 



Personnel 93 

Steven E. Hein 

Lebanon Prebyterian Church, West Mifflin 

Robert B. Heppenstall III 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley, Sewickley 

William D. Hess 

Mt. Vernon Community United Presbyterian 
Church, McKeesport 

J. Robert Hewett 

East Liberty Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

Gerald Hollingsworth 

Edgewood Presbyterian Church, Edgewood 

Kenneth L. Hooten 

Gray Stone Presbyterian Church, Leechburg 

A. Adrienne Howard 

Allegheny United Methodist Church, 
Pittsburgh 

Robert S. Humes 

Unity United Presbyterian Church, Unity 

Richard K. Kennedy 

East Union United Presbyterian Church, 
Cheswick 

James E. Long 

Beulah United Presbyterian Church, 
Churchill 

James W. Matz 

Liberty Presbyterian Church, McKeesport 

Bernard S. Mayhew 

Bethesda United Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh 

John S. McCall 

Sixth Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

George H. McConnel 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

Donald K. McGarrah 

South Side Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

Thomas R. McMillan 

Mt. Nebo United Presbyterian Church, 
Sewickley 

Susan J. Meyer 

Northmont United Presbyterian Church, 
Perrysville 

Jill J. K. Minnich 

Westminster Presbyterian Church, 
Upper St. Clair 

Duane L. Morford 

Bakerstown United Methodist Church, 
Bakerstown 



94 Personnel 

Bruce L. Ogle 

Valley Presbyterian Church, Imperial 

Wendell E. Paull 

First United Methodist Church, Pittsburgh 

John C. Peterson 

Center United Presbyterian Church, 
Slippery Rock 

Ray W. Pierson 

Cross Roads United Presbyterian Church, 
Monroeville 

Stephen L. Polley 

Northmont United Presbyterian Church, 
Perrysville 

Edward O. Poole 

Beaver County Area Ministry 

James D. Robb 

First United Methodist Church, Sharon 

John W. Russell 

Emory United Methodist Church, Pittsburgh 

Kirk A. Ryckman 

Grace Community United Presbyterian 
Church, Lower Burrell 

Paul S. Sampsell 

Lutheran University Center, Univ. of 
Pittsburgh 

LeRoy Sarver 

Oil City Hospital, Oil City 

John R. Scotland 

First United Presbyterian Church of 
Allegheny, Pittsburgh 

Robert B. Shane 

Plum Creek Presbyterian Church, Plum Boro 

Robert D. Sharpe 

Ken Mawr United Presbyterian Church, 
McKees Rocks 

James K. Smith 

Baldwin United Presbyterian Church, 
Baldwin 

Carolyn Snodgrass 

Women's Center and Shelter, Pittsburgh 

James B. Snyder 

Christ United Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh 

Richard D. Sweeney 

Southwest Interchurch Ministry, Pittsburgh 

June R. Taylor 

Presbyterian-University Hospital, Pittsburgh 



Carl H. Templin 

Pittsburgh Region International Student 
Ministry, Pittsburgh 

David M. Thompson 

Aspinwall United Presbyterian Church, 
Aspinwall 

John R. Thompson 

St. Paul's United Methodist Church, 
Allison Park 

Robert F. Tuttle 

Elfinwild United Presbyterian Church, 
Glenshaw 

Peter D. Weaver 

Smithfield United Church, Pittsburgh 

Carolyn J. Wharton 

Memorial Park United Presbyterian Church, 
Allison Park 

Judson Wiley 

Third Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

John A. Wilson 

Rehabilitation Institute of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh 

James C. Wright 

Valley View United Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh 



Index 



Admissions procedures, 69 

Awards, prizes and fellowships, 79 

Board and room, 77 

Board of Directors, 91 

Clinical Pastoral Education, 62 

Continuing Education, 37 

Course descriptions, 41 

Cross-registration in PCHE institutions, 34 

Doctor of Ministry degree, 29 

Doctor of Philosophy degree, 34 

Faculty, 84 

Fees, 76 

Field education, 24 

Financial aid, 76 

Grading system, 38 

Honors scholarships program, 81 

Housing, 13 

Institutional relationships, 34 

International scholars program, 35, 73 

Library, 12 

Master of Arts degree, 26 

Religious Education emphasis, 27 

Pre-Doctoral Master of Arts Program, 27 

Master of Divinity degree, 22 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work 

degree, 25 
Master of Divinity/Master of Library 

Science degree, 26 
Master of Sacred Theology degree, 27 
Placement, 25 
Play Care Center, 18 
Preaching Association, 18 
Recreation, 14 
Rent, 77 

Special lectures, 36 
Special non-degree studies, 37 
Student associations, 16 
Tuition, 76 
Worship, 16 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206-2596 









ISS 



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Hist. 

BVUOTO 

P52 







This catalog is a statement of the 
policies, personnel and programs of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary as 
projected by the responsible authorities 
of the Seminary. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary reserves the right to alter and 
change its policies, personnel and pro- 
grams, without prior notice, in accor- 
dance with the Seminary's institutional 
needs and academic purposes. Com- 
plete statements of Pittsburgh Theolo- 
gical Seminary's policies and programs 
are founded in the Seminary's Constitu- 
tion, By-laws, Academic Regulations, 
and Board and Faculty Minutes. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
admits qualified students of any race, 
color, national or ethnic origin, and 
without regard to age. handicap, or sex 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
accredited by the Association of 
Theological Schools in the United 
States and Canada, and the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 




Pittsburgh Catalog 
Theological 1985-87 
Seminary 



616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206-2596 
412-362-5610 



40 * * jg"^ 







Contents 




Introduction 



6 Purpose 

6 Historical Background 

7 Pittsburgh 

9 The Seminary's Immediate 
Environment: Highland Park and 
East Liberty 

9 Alumni/Alumnae 




Seminary Life 



12 The Campus 

12 Academic Buildings 

13 Housing 
15 Recreation 
15 Worship 

15 Student Groups 

18 Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Choir 

19 Orientation 

19 Play Care for Children 



A 



Educational 
Programs 



22 Seminary Degree Programs 

22 The Master of Divinity Degree 

24 Field Education 

25 Placement 

25 The Master of Arts Degree 

26 The Master of Sacred Theology 
28 The Doctor of Ministry Degree 
34 Joint Degree Programs 

37 Special Programs 

39 Continuing Education and Special 

Lectures 

41 Annual Events 

41 Special Lectureships 

42 Outstanding Lecturers and Leaders 




Course 
Descriptions 



46 Studies in Bible 

46 Required Courses 

48 Old Testament 

51 New Testament 

53 Studies in Church History 

53 Required Courses 

54 Electives 



Course 
Descriptions 

(continued) 



56 Studies in Theology 

56 Required Courses 

57 Electives 

59 Studies in Church and Ministry 

60 Required Courses 
62 Ministry 

62 Church and Society 

63 Ethics 

65 Sociology of Religion 

65 Education 

67 Pastoral Care 

69 Homiletics 

70 Worship and Church Music 

71 Evangelism and Mission 

72 Administration 





Admissions 




SB *',*S3 

m 


76 Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 

76 Transfer Student 

77 Joint Professional Degree Programs 
77 Master of Sacred Theology 

77 Doctor of Ministry 




77 Special Students 

77 International Scholars 

78 Academic Regulations 




Finances 



82 Tuition and Fees 

83 Financial Aid 

84 Honors Scholarship Program 

85 Awards, Prizes and Fellowships 




Personnel 



90 Faculty 

93 Administrative Officers 

97 Staff 

97 Board of Directors 

100 Field Education Supervisors 



Photographers: 



Susan C. Burton 
John Novajosky 





Calendar 






1985-1987 




1985-1986 






Term One 






Junior Orientation 


September 5-6 




First Day of Classes 


September 9 




Last Day of Classes 


November 15 




Reading and Examination Period 


November 18-22 




Term Two 






First Day of Classes 


December 2 




Christmas Break 


December 23-January 3 




Classes Resume 


January 6 




Last Day of Classes 


February 21 




Reading and Examination Period 


February 24-28 




Term Three 






First Day of Classes 


March 10 




Last Day of Classes 


May 16 




Reading and Examination Period 


May 19-23 




190th Commencement 


May 22 




D. M in. Weeks 


June 2-6, 9-13 




School of Religion 


June 22-27, tentative 




1986-1987 






Term One 






Junior Orientation 


September 4-5 




First Day of Classes 


September8 




Last Day of Classes 


November 14 




Reading and Examination Period 


November 17-21 




Term Two 






First Day of Classes 


December 1 




Christmas Break 


December 22-January 2 




Classes Resume 


January 5 




Last Day of Classes 


February 20 




Reading and Examination Period 


February 23-27 




Term Three 






First Day of Classes 


March 9 




Last Day of Classes 


May 15 




Reading and Examination Period 


May 18-22 




191st Commencement 


May 21 




D. M in. Weeks 


June 




School of Religion 


June 






i 



6 Introduction 




Introduction 



Purpose 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a 
graduate professional institution of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Located in the 
heartland of Presbyterianism and part of a 
thriving city, we seek to prepare men and 
women for dynamic pastoral ministry and 
Christian lay leadership in all phases of the 
Church's outreach. 

Dedicated to excellence in theological 
education, the twenty-member faculty 
strives to prepare graduates who will 
demonstrate both personal piety and the 
keenest possible intellectual understanding 
of the Gospel and its implications for individ- 
ual and social living. Serious attention is 
given to the study of biblical languages and 
exposition and to the teaching of theologi- 
cal, historical, ethical and practical disci- 
plines for the successful and meaningful 
practice of ministry. 

The Seminary is rooted in the Reformed 
history of faithfulness to Scripture and com- 
mitment to the Gospel of Jesus Christ. In 
keeping with our tradition, we continue our 
mission to be a caring and ecumenical com- 
munity, to nurture personal faith and cor- 
porate worship, to promote global con- 
sciousness and service and to encourage 
students and faculty to relate their studies to 
the numerous styles of ministry emerging 
today. 

Historical Background 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was 
formed in 1959 by the consolidation of two 
previously separate institutions: Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America and 
Western Theological Seminary of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States of 
America. The union of the two denomina- 
tions in 1958 led to the consolidation of the 
seminaries. 

The history of the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theolo- 
gical Seminary began with the founding of 



Service Seminary in 1794 by the Associate 
Presbytery of Pennsylvania. Prior to that 
time the Presbytery had been dependent on 
a supply of ministers sent out from Scotland. 
The Reverend John Anderson, D.D., was 
elected as the first teacher of divinity and the 
school began with an enrollment of six 
students. Service Seminary moved twice, 
first to Ohio, where it became Xenia Theolo- 
gical Seminary and later to Missouri. It 
merged in 1930 with a seminary which had 
been founded in Pittsburgh in 1825 and 
together they formed the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary. This institution was 
later augmented by the resources of New- 
burgh Seminary, which was founded in New 
York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 

The other branch of our pre-1959 history 
began with the establishment, in 1785 by 
Joseph Smith and in 1787 by John McMillan, 
of classical academies in Washington, 
Pennsylvania. From these, in 1825, the 
General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A., created Western Seminary. 
It was indeed a western seminary in 1825, 
the task of which was to furnish a ministry 
for the rapidly opening frontier territories 
along the Ohio River. 




Introduction 7 




Since the 1959 consolidation, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary has been located on 
the old Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary campus 
in the Highland Park/East Liberty section of 
Pittsburgh. 

Pittsburgh 

The City of Pittsburgh, in southwestern 
Pennsylvania, is built on and surrounded by 
the broken hills and wooded slopes which 
run along her three rivers. Downtown Pitts- 
burgh, located at the point where the Alle- 
gheny and Monongahela Rivers merge to 
form the Ohio, is one of the largest corporate 
headquarters cities in the United States and 
the home to such important firms as Alle- 
gheny International, Aluminum Company of 
America, PPG Industries, U.S. Steel, 
Rockwell International and Westinghouse 
Electric Corporation. Pittsburgh is easily 
accessible via modern systems of air, rail 
and ground travel. 

Urban renewal in the city, much acclaimed 
in recent decades, has included the arts and 
education as well as physical rehabilitation. 
An internationally acclaimed symphony 
orchestra along with resident opera, ballet 
and theater companies perform regularly in 
the lavish Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts 
and in other city theaters. The city is also the 
steward of several important art collections 
and museums. Carnegie Central Library 
has eighteen branches and a suburban 
Bookmobile service and there are also 
private and specialized libraries in the area 
which are often open to the public. Its 
educational and cultural standard has con- 
tributed much to Pittsburgh's listing, in the 



Places Rated Almanac of 1985, as the best 
city in the United States in which to live. 

The City of Pittsburgh is the scene of 
Western Pennsylvania's largest and most 
important educational complex. Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary is associated through 
the Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education 
with nine colleges and universities in the 
city. It operates a variety of shared degree 
programs with the University of Pittsburgh 
and it is engaged in expanding shared pro- 
grams also with Carnegie-Mellon University 
and Duquesne University. The cluster of 
educational institutions in Pittsburgh pro- 
vides an atmosphere of intellectual growth 
and offers frequent lectures, on a variety of 
subjects, which interested persons may 
attend. They also provide entertainment in 
the form of musical theater productions and 
sporting events. 




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Introduction 





Introduction 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's 
emergence as an important center of theo- 
logical education has paralleled the city's 
renaissance. Faculty and students are 
able to sample richly from and to join 
actively in Pittsburgh's efforts at human 
and cultural renewal. Most seminary stu- 
dents live in Pittsburgh and are thus sensi- 
tized to the urban setting of the contem- 
porary theological enterprise. Their own 
faith is challenged and enriched by sus- 
tained encounter with the joys and 
tragedies of urban life. 

Through the wide scope of field education 
and other work opportunities, students 
from the Seminary are involved in many 
different areas of Pittsburgh. Students 
serve as pastors in inner-city and subur- 
ban churches with a variety of programs, 
as chaplains in hospitals and in county 
and state penal institutions, as campus 
ministers and in many other positions 
which affect the life of the city and its peo- 
ple. The resources of Pittsburgh for theolo- 
gical education are great and Pittsburgh 
Seminary tries to make use of these 
resources as effectively as possible in the 
many facets of its life. The Seminary also 
attempts to be an active resource for the 
city through the stewardship of its facilities 
and the creative leadership of the mem- 
bers of the Seminary community. 

The Seminary's Immediate 
Environment: Highland Park and 
East Liberty 

The numerous rivers, valleys and hills 
common to western Pennsylvania divide 
Pittsburgh into a large number of neigh- 
borhoods. Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary is located on the border between two 
such neighborhoods. To the north is a resi- 
dential area of substantial and well-kept 
homes, Highland Park, which takes its 
name from the large city park less than 
one miFe from the Seminary. One of Pitts- 
burgh's finest, Highland Park offers 
woods, picnic areas and paths for biking 
and walking. At the heart of the park is the 
Pittsburgh Zoo, much of which was built at 
the turn of the century and which is pres- 
ently undertaking a large scale program of 
modernization. 




Seminary residents with easy access to a 
large department store and many shops 
and restaurants. East Liberty's residential 
population represents a healthy racial and 
ethnic cross section of urban America. 
The Seminary is a partner in the East End 
Cooperative Ministry, an exciting ecumeni- 
cal venture involving many churches and 
agencies in cooperative service projects. 

Alumni/Alumnae 

There are approximately twenty-seven 
hundred living alumni/ae of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary and its antecedent 
institutions. Since 1959, over three quar- 
ters of our graduates have entered the ser- 
vice of the church in parish-related minis- 
tries. Graduates of the Seminary also 
serve the church as college and university 
presidents, seminary and college faculty 
and as synod and presbytery executives 
and staff. There are nine living alumni of 
the Seminary who have held the highest 
elected office in the Presbyterian Church 
(U.S.A.), that of Moderator of the General 
Assembly. 



To the south is East Liberty, a busy com- 
mercial and business center, providing 



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12 Seminary Life 




Seminary Life 



The Campus 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
located on a thirteen-acre campus, the 
major portion of which was once the estate 
of H. Lee Mason, Jr. The buildings, almost 
all of which have been built since 1954, are 
of American Colonial design. 

Academic Buildings 

THE GEORGE A. LONG ADMINISTRA- 
TION BUILDING is the focal point of cam- 
pus life. In addition to administrative 
offices, the building contains lecture and 
seminar rooms, faculty offices, student 
center, bookstore, the Bible Lands 
Museum and a large lounge which is used 
for many gatherings. 

CLIFFORD E. BARBOUR LIBRARY 
houses a collection of over 200,000 
volumes. Four open stack areas include 
103 desk carrels which may be reserved 
by students. In addition, thirteen enclosed 
typing carrels, which allow greater privacy 
for research work, are available for doc- 
toral students. Twenty reserved study 
rooms provide ideal conditions in which 
faculty members, visiting scholars and 
graduate students may pursue scholarly 
research. Reading rooms and lounges are 
informally scattered throughout the build- 
ing. Facilities are also available for reading 
microfilm, audio work, language study and 
listening to music. 

Special collections and displays augment 
the book resources of the Barbour Library. 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection. 
The library contains this priceless collec- 
tion of classical theological works dating 
from the reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection ofHym- 
nology. Several thousand valuable hymn 
and song books which came from the 
estate of James Warrington of Philadel- 
phia provide research materials for schol- 
ars of American and British hymnody. 




Historical Collections. The archive room of 
Barbour Library contains materials relat- 
ing to Associate, Associate Reformed and 
United Presbyterian congregations, pres- 
byteries, synods and general assemblies. 
Barbour Library is also the repository for 
the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society. 

On display in the main floor exhibit area 
are the desk and chair of Dr. Karl Barth of 
Basel, Switzerland, which were presented 
to the Seminary by Dr. Barth in 1964. 



Seminary Life 13 




Accompanying the desk, at which Dr. 
Barth wrote his theological treatises, is an 
autographed copy of his Kirchliche 
Dogmatik 1/1. 

HICKS FAMILY MEMORIAL CHAPEL is 
the newest structure on the Seminary 
campus. The sanctuary is used for wor- 
ship during the Seminary's chapel ser- 
vices and is used occasionally by local 
congregations. Hicks Chapel has a spa- 
cious and comfortable theatre-auditorium 
which is ideal for conferences, special lec- 
tures and concerts. 

THE JAMES L. KELSO BIBLE LANDS 
MUSEUM is named for the distinguished, 
former Professor of Old Testament and 
Biblical Archaelogy. It contains a signifi- 
cant collection of ancient Near Eastern 
and Palestinian pottery and artifacts 
brought together by travelers and archae- 
ologists over the past 60 years. Many 
exhibits resulted from the eight excava- 
tions of which the seminary has been a 
part. Housed in the George A. Long 
Administration Building, the museum is a 
valuable teaching aid for seminary 
students and tool for those who may wish 
to participate in a Palestinian dig or gain 
some expertise in Palestinian archae- 
ology. Churches, schools and community 
groups also have the opportunity to see 
Biblical times vividly illustrated. Additional 
exhibits are on permanent display in the 
chapel narthex and the reception area of 
the registrar's office. 



Housing for Married Students 

SAMUEL A. FULTON MEMORIAL HALL 
provides eighteen efficiency and twenty- 
one one-bedroom apartments. Each unit 
includes a kitchenette, a bath and a stor- 
age locker in the basement. 

THE HIGHLANDER contains seventeen 
one-bedroom and six two-bedroom units. 
Each apartment includes a living room, 
kitchen, bath and storage locker. 

ANDERSON HALL includes six two- 
bedroom and six three-bedroom apart- 
ments, each of which has a living room, 
kitchen, bath and a storage locker. These 
units are equipped with wall-to-wall 
carpeting. 

McMILLAN HALL, Anderson Hall and The 
Highlander form a quadrangle which 
encloses a play area for children. In 
McMillan Hall there are one four-bedroom, 
three three-bedroom, twelve two-bedroom 
and three one-bedroom apartments. As in 
Anderson Hall, the units are equipped with 
wall-to-wall carpeting. On the ground floor 
of McMillan Hall there is a large communi- 
ty room which is used as a play care center 
for pre-school children throughout the 
school year. 

Apartments in all buildings are unfur- 
nished. In the case of international 
students, or others demonstrating a com- 
pelling need, a limited amount of furniture 
may be available through the housing 
office. 



14 Seminary Life 




Each apartment is equipped with a refrig- 
erator and stove; coin-operated laundry 
facilities are located in the basement of 
each building. 

Life for married students and their families 
is pleasant and comfortable. Rents are 
well below commercial rates. Shops and 
stores are within walking distance, public 
transportation is available at the Seminary 
gate and public schools are nearby for 
children of all ages. 

Housing for Single Students 

JOHN McNAUGHER MEMORIAL HALL, 
the Seminary's original dormitory, now 
serves a variety of purposes. One wing 
houses women students in large private 
rooms and another contains faculty 
offices. Attached to McNaugher Hall is the 



dining facility which consists of three din- 
ing halls and a modern kitchen. 

GEORGE C. FISHER MEMORIAL HALL 
accommodates men in single rooms. 
Recent renovations have provided ade- 
quate cooking facilities for single students 
and five additional apartments. A recrea- 
tion room will soon be added. Fisher Hall 
has student lounges on each floor. Single 
students may rent apartments upon 
availability. 

SAMUEL A. FULTON MEMORIAL HALL 
provides efficiency and one-bedroom 
apartments for single students. Each unit 
includes a kitchenette, bath and a storage 
locker. 



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Dogs and cats are not permitted in Semi- 
nary apartments or dormitories. 

Recreation 

Under the auspices of the Student 
Association, athletic events and other 
recreational activities are arranged. 
Seminary students have access to the 
gymnasium and indoor swimming pool at 
Peabody High School across the street 
from the Seminary. Two new tennis courts 
are located on the campus grounds. 

Worship 

Worship is an integral part of the life of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Chapel 
services, both traditional and experimental 
in form, are held five times each week and 
are followed by a time of community-wide 
fellowship. Students, faculty, guests and 
administrators share in the leadership of 
chapel services under the direction of the 
Seminary's Liturgical Committee. Atten- 
dance at worship services is voluntary. 

Student Groups 

A primary purpose of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary is to develop a 
Christian community on campus which 
lays the foundation of early and lasting 
friendships, productive of confidence and 
mutual assistance among ministers. Over 
four hundred and thirty students, drawn 
from over twenty states and several foreign 
countries, are enrolled at the Seminary. 
While a majority of students are Presbyter- 
ians, there are significant numbers of 




United Methodist, Baptist, Lutheran, 
Episcopal and Catholic students as well. 

Students at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary participate in the governance of 
the institution through membership on 
various committees of the Board of Direc- 
tors, Faculty and Administration. A number 
of student organizations flourish on cam- 
pus to meet specific interests and 
concerns. 

The Student Association 

The Student Association (SA) is composed 
of "all students registered and enrolled in 
the Seminary in a course of study leading 
to a degree." The Student Association's 
purpose is to "conduct all student social 
and extracurricular affairs," and to "con- 



16 Seminary Life 




duct elections of student representatives 
to other Seminary committees or organiza- 
tions as required." The Student Associa- 
tion conducts its own program of extra- 
curricular events which range from meet- 
ings dealing with issues related to the 
church and the world to social get- 
togethers. The Student Association is 
responsible for a large part of the annual 
student orientation program. Meetings of 
the Student Association are held at least 
once a month. 

Association of Women at the Seminary 

The Association of Women at the 
Seminary (AWS) addresses the interests, 
concerns and needs of women of the Sem- 
inary community: students, faculty, admin- 
istrators, staff and spouses. AWS pro- 
motes mutual support and understanding 
among women at the Seminary and main- 



tains dialogue with women who have 
entered the varied ministry and mission of 
the church. AWS activities include forums 
on issues of special concern to women, 
Women's History Week, interaction with 
other seminaries and efforts to foster a 
spirit of inclusivity in all aspects of 
seminary life. Membership is open to all 
women and men at the Seminary. 

The Black Seminarians Association 

The Black Seminarians Association pro- 
vides a means whereby the Seminary uti- 
lizes the full participation of the black com- 
munity. Through prayer, fellowship and the 
exchange of individual talents, the Associ- 
ation brings to the Seminary's attention 
both the concerns of the black people and 
the particular needs of black clergy. The 
Association's extracurricular activities 
encompass these concerns through semi- 
nars conducted by experienced black pas- 
tors, annual attendance at the National 
Black Seminarians Convention and visits 
to area black churches and communities. 
Membership is open to black students in 
all academic programs of the Seminary. 

The Disabilities Concerns Caucus 

The Disabilities Concerns Caucus (DCC) 
recognizes the need of the disabled per- 
son to be fully included in the life and wor- 
ship of the church. As an organization we 
are dedicated to the sharing of that aware- 
ness with the Seminary community, the 
larger church community and the world; 
and thereby, with the cooperation of the 
faculty and administration, facilitate the 
general accessability of disabled persons 




Seminary Life 17 





18 Seminary Life 



to all Seminary buildings and programs. 
Membership is open to any concerned 
person. 

The Evangelical Student Fellowship 

The Evangelical Student Fellowship (ESF) 
is a fellowship of care and support for 
students and faculty of evangelical convic- 
tions. It has three organizing principles: 
1) to provide for the spiritual development 
of its membership; 2) to stimulate aca- 
demic excellence in evangelical scholar- 
ship; 3) to provide a forum whereby evan- 
gelical students can engage the wider 
Seminary community in dialogue on 
issues of mutual concern. Any student is 
welcome to attend ESF activities. 

The International Student Association 

The International Student Association 
(ISA) is composed of all international stu- 
dents and interested American students. 
The organization provides an opportunity 
for these students at Pittsburgh Theologi- 
cal Seminary to become acquainted, 
share experiences and support one 
another. The Association desires to make 
the Seminary community aware of the dif- 
ferent social, religious and political views 
represented by the international students 
and their countries and through mutual ex- 
change offer enrichment and growth to the 
community through its activities and 
events. 

The Peace Fellowship 

The Peace Fellowship of the Seminary is 
an informal but active group of students 
and faculty who seek to comprehend and 
live out the shalom of our biblical faith. The 
fellowship attempts to stress both peace 
education and peace activism. The bibli- 
cal witness to peacemaking calls us to pro- 
claim God's peacemaking work in the 
world, to emphasize the peacemaking 
message within the church and to explore 
the relationship between faith and politics. 
Worship services, speakers, conferences, 
lobbying activity in Washington, D.C. and 
local political activity have been spon- 
sored by the group over the past six years. 
This Seminary activity is often coordinated 
with the work of the Presbytery Peace Task 
Force and the Pittsburgh Peace Network. 
The Peace Fellowship functions according 
to group consensus and meets once a 
week during lunch. 



The Preaching Association 

The Preaching Association, supported by 
the Seminary but operated by students for 
the students, supplies worship leadership 
to vacant pulpits in the greater Pittsburgh 
area, providing valuable experience in 
preaching for seminarians. 

SPICE 

SPICE is the organization of single parent 
students and female and male spouses of 
students enrolled at Pittsburgh Theologi- 
cal Seminary. Its purpose is to provide 
organized support for its members as well 
as promote and maintain a sense of com- 
munity on the Seminary campus. An 
emphasis is placed on dealing with the 
special situations that parents, couples 
and families encounter in their time here at 
Seminary. In addition, holiday parties, lec- 
tures and special activities are held 
throughout the school year. 

The United Methodist Students 
Fellowship 

The United Methodist Students 
Fellowship, a support group for United 
Methodist students, provides opportuni- 
ties for fellowship, learning, prayer and 
Bible study. Monthly luncheon meetings 
with a variety of speakers and other events 
throughout the academic year are 
planned. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Choir 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Choir is open to men and women from the 
entire Seminary community— students, 
faculty and staff. The Choir participates in 




seminary Lire iy 



weekly chapel services and presents sea- 
sonal concerts. Rehearsals are held each 
Tuesday during the academic year from 
6:00-7:15 p.m. For further information, 
contact George E. Tutwiler, 
organist/choirmaster. 

Orientation 

Students who are entering Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary need to understand 
the critical significance of theological 
education, whether at the M.Div., M.A. or 
S.T.M. level. The M.Div. students will be 
entering the transition from laity to clergy. 
The Seminary provides an annual orienta- 
tion program to sensitize students both to 
the goals of theological education in 
general and to the way the Seminary 
seeks to prepare men and women for the 
Christian ministry. Additionally, the 



Seminary through the Student Association 
and other student groups introduces 
entering students to the Pittsburgh scene. 

Play Care for Children 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has set 
aside several rooms located on the ground 
level of McMillan Hall as a play care center 
for pre-school children throughout the 
school year. The center is staffed by a paid 
director, volunteer parents and other stu- 
dents. The center's use is restricted to 
children of the Seminary community. 




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Educational 
Programs 



22 Seminary Degree Programs 

22 The Master of Divinity Degree 

24 Field Education 

25 Placement 

25 The Master of Arts Degree 

26 The Master of Sacred Theology 
28 The Doctor of Ministry Degree 

34 Joint Degree Programs 

34 The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

35 The Master of Divinity/Master of Social 
Work Joint Degree 

35 The Master of Divinity/Master of Library 
Science Joint Degree 

36 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Business Administration Joint Degree 

36 The Master of Divinity/Master of Health 
Administration Joint Degree 

36 The Master of Divinity/Juris Doctor 
Joint Degree 

37 The Master of Arts (Religious Educa- 
tion/Church Music Degree 

37 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Science (Public Management and 
Policy) Joint Degree 

37 Special Programs 

39 Continuing Education and Special 
Lectures 

41 Annual Events 

41 Special Lectureships 

42 Outstanding Lecturers and Leaders 



22 Educational Programs 




Educational 
Programs 



The Master of Divinity Degree 

Studies leading to the Master of Divinity 
degree are designed to prepare men and 
women for the various ministries of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and other 
denominations. It is a fundamental 
assumption of the Master of Divinity pro- 
gram that preparation for the ministry can- 
not be separated from engagement in 
ministry itself. Thus the Master of Divinity 
curriculum is designed to integrate theo- 
logical studies and the work of ministry so 
that theory and practice, academy and 
parish, become complementary compo- 
nents in the educational process. 

One hundred and eight (108) term hours 
are required for the Master of Divinity 
degree. When followed on a full-time 
basis, the program is normally completed 
in three academic years. Student Pastors 
are required to spread their degree work 
over four academic years. 

In preparing for Christian ministry, 
students should develop an understand- 
ing of a broad spectrum of knowledge 
along with a competence in basic pastoral 
abilities. They should be able to use theo- 
logical insights to integrate these skills and 
resources. The Master of Divinity curricu- 
lum is designed to guide the student 
through a pattern of course work and 
experience which will lead her or him to a 
basic professional competency with which 
to begin the ordained ministry. At Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary it is 
understood that this basic professional 
competency includes: 

The ability to understand and make use of 
the basic documents of faith, i.e., Scripture, 
creeds and traditions of the church. The 
study of the Bible, both in English and in 
one of the original languages and the 
study of church history are crucial to this 
ability. The course work in Biblical Studies 
is supplemented by a required examina- 
tion on the content of the English Bible. 



This test, which is offered annually, must 
be passed by every Master of Divinity stu- 
dent as a requisite for graduation. Presby- 
terian students generally enroll in a full 
academic year's study of both biblical lan- 
guages in accordance with the ordination 
requirements of the denomination. 

The ability to communicate through 
preaching, writing and teaching and to 
counsel and provide leadership in the pro- 
gram and administrative areas, fostered by 
the course work in the Pastoral Studies and 
ministry sequences. Three terms of super- 
vised field education are required of all 
Master of Divinity students in the middler 
year in conjunction with the Pastoral Stud- 
ies sequence so that the academic study 
in the areas of education, pastoral care 
and homiletics can be critically combined 
with a well-rounded, supervised involve- 
ment in the life of the church. 

The ability to understand in theological 
terms the sociological, ideological and 
political content of the cultures in which the 
church ministers. This understanding 
needs to be followed by the application of 
ethical standards to the social process, 
using all of the resources available for 
making ministry effective. Two required 
courses in Church and Society, the Intro- 
duction to Ethics and one required elective 
course in ethics help students to reach 
these goals. 

The ability to think theologically. In addition 
to an introduction into methods and ter- 
minology of theological studies (Introduc- 
tion to Systematic Theology), there are two 
required courses focusing on Christology 
and the Church and Sacraments. In 
Church History there are three required 
courses (Historical Studies l-lll). In these 
courses students study theological and 
historical methods as well as the central 
doctrines of the faith and major periods of 
the history of the Church. 

The ability to practice ministry in an appro- 
priate professional style. One of the first 



bducational Programs 23 



term courses introduces students to the 
concept of ministry and its varied respon- 
sibilities. In the senior year two courses 
lead the student to develop his or her own 
statement of faith (Credo) and to under- 
stand the dynamics of the formation of 
faith in the pastor and, through the pastor, 
in the people. 

The Master of Divinity 
Curriculum 

Junior Year 

Term I Interpreting the Bible 
Language 

Church & Society: Local 
Introduction to Ministry 

Term II Biblical Introduction 
(OT01orNT01) 1 
Language 

Introduction to Systematic 
Theology 
Elective 

Term III Biblical Introduction 
(OT02 or NT02) 2 
Exegesis 

Historical Studies I 
Introduction to Ethics 2 

MiddlerYear 

Term I Pastoral Studies I: Education 
Historical Studies II 
Elective 
Elective 

Term II Pastoral Studies II: Pastoral Care 
Christology 
Historical Studies III 
Elective 



Term 



Pastoral Studies 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Homiletics 



Senior Year 



Term I Church & Society: Global 
Church & Sacraments 
Elective 
Elective 



Term II 



Credo 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Term III Spiritual Formation 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



Suggested Four-Year Master of Divinity 
Program for Student Pastors 

First Year 

Term I Interpreting the Bible 
Language 
Introduction to Ministry 

Term II Biblical Introduction 
Language 

Introduction to Systematic 
Theology 



Termllf 


Biblical Introduction 




Exegesis 
Historical Studies I 


Second Year 


Term I 


Pastoral Studies I: Education 




Church & Society: Local 
Historical Studies II 


Term II 


Pastoral Studies II: Pastoral Care 




Christology 
Elective (Polity) 


Term III 


Pastoral Studies III: Homiletics 




Introduction to Ethics 




Elective 


Third Year 


Term I 


Church & Sacraments 




Elective 




Elective 


Term II 


Historical Studies III 




Elective 




Elective 


Term III 


Elective 




Elective 




Elective 


Fourth Year 


Term I 


Church & Society: Global 
Elective 




Elective 


Term II 


Credo 




Elective 




Elective 


Term III 


Spiritual Formation 
Elective 




Elective 



1 Students must take one Biblical Introduction in each 
Testament. 

2 Students may elect to postpone either the second Biblical 
Introduction or Introduction to Ethics until the middler year 
in order to make room for one elective in Term III. junior 
year. A required elective in ethics has to be taken after 
completion of Introduction to Ethics. 



24 Educational Programs 



Equivalency Examinations 

At the heart of the curriculum in the Master 
of Divinity program is a core of required 
courses. Ordinarily all students in the pro- 
gram will take these courses. However, in 
certain circumstances a student may be 
excused from a required course. Requests 
should be submitted to the Dean's Office. 
The faculty in the field from which the stu- 
dent wishes to be excused will design 
appropriate tests and have authority to 
determine whether the student has suffi- 
cient mastery for the course to be waived. 
Such courses will be listed on the 
transcript, showing that the requirement 
was fulfilled, but no credit hours will be 
given. 

English Bible Examination 

Passing an examination on the content of 
the English Bible is required for gradua- 
tion. This examination is offered annually. 
Although this requirement may be met as 
late as the third year, it is recommended 
that students take the examination in the 
first year of Master of Divinity studies. 

Theological Field Education 
Requirement 

Field education at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary assists students to learn about 
the practice of ministry, through direct 
involvement in local churches and other 
settings, under the direction of skilled field 
supervisors. 

Master of Divinity students must complete 
one year of planned, supervised and eval- 
uated field education in a setting approved 
by the Supervisor for the Practice of Minis- 
try. This requirement normally is to be ful- 
filled in the middler year while students are 
enrolled in the Pastoral Studies sequence 
of courses. Students are expected to use 
their field placements as laboratory set- 
tings for specific assignments in those 
courses. Objectives of the program 
include acquaintance with a wide variety 
of ministerial activities, development of 
skills, sensitivity to the dynamics of pas- 
toral relationships, awareness of the social 
context of ministry and theological reflec- 
tion upon the various aspects of the 
practice of ministry. A detailed learning 
agreement, developed by each student in 
conjunction with his/her field supervisor, 
coordinates these educational objectives 



with the needs of the church or agency to 
be served and provides a basis for a 
shared evaluation of progress at later 
points in the year. This requirement has 
been fulfilled when the final evaluation has 
been completed by supervisor and student 
and accepted by the Supervisor for the 
Practice of Ministry. This information is 
shared with the student's sponsoring 
judicatory where confidentiality is 
assured. 

Students in the required theological field 
education program are expected to give 
eight to ten hours of service in the field per 
week. Time spent with the field supervisor 
and in staff meetings should be included in 
this total, but time spent in travel to and 
from the field and in preparation for tasks 
on the field is not to be counted. 

Field education placements are negoti- 
ated with the intent of broadening each 
student's range of experiences in order to 
contribute to his or her personal and pro- 
fessional growth. Placements in hospitals 
and other service agencies can some- 
times be arranged for students who antici- 
pate an institutional ministry after 
graduation. 

Student Pastorates 

Student pastors are required by the 
Seminary to extend their program to four 
years, taking nine credits per term instead 
of the normal twelve, to compensate for 
the amount of time required by their field 
service. An example of the four-year 
sequence of courses is listed on page 23. 

Internships 

Internships in a wide variety of settings 
can be investigated through the Super- 
visor for the Practice of Ministry. Summer 
internships include pastorates, youth 
assistantships and placements in summer 
camps or parks and secular agencies. 

Full-time internships of nine to fifteen 
months duration in local churches or spe- 
cialized settings also provide excellent 
learning opportunities. Such internships, 
usually taken between the middler and 
senior years, are required by some 
denominations of their ministerial candi- 
dates. The Seminary will provide assis- 
tance in facilitating these experiences. 



Educational Programs 25 



Other Field Experiences 

Supervised field education, usually 
scheduled in the middler year is also pos- 
sible in the junior and senior years as well. 
Students may continue in the same place- 
ment for a second year if they are assigned 
new and more responsible tasks. Occa- 
sional preaching under the auspices of the 
Preaching Association is also available. 
Field work which is not subject to the same 
standards of supervision and evaluation 
can also be arranged for students who 
require additional income or experience. 
Entering students are cautioned to limit 
field work and community involvement so 
that their academic studies will not be put 
in jeopardy. 

Placement for Graduating 
Seniors 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's place- 
ment service assists graduating seniors 
both in locating appropriate situations of 
service in ministry and in self-evaluation to 
determine vocational commitments. Pres- 
byterian students are assisted by the 
Seminary, in conjunction with the Vocation 
Agency, in meeting the denomination's 
candidacy requirements and in utilizing 
the denomination's placement arrange- 
ments. Contacts for students of other 
denominations are facilitated according to 
their particular needs. An inventory of 
placement opportunities is kept by the 
Placement Office. Students are assisted in 
the writing of resumes and dossiers. 
Pastor nominating committees, judicatory 
officials and pastors visit the Seminary 
campus periodically to interview 
graduating seniors. 

The Master of Arts Program 

The Master of Arts Program is designed 
for men and women who wish to engage 
seriously in religious studies at the 
graduate level, but who do not need the 
full range of courses required in the Master 
of Divinity Program. The goals of this 
course of study include: 1) Providing the 
opportunity for an academic inquiry into 
some aspects of the Christian religion. 2) 
Enabling students to concentrate their 
studies in one or at most two areas of 
research, under the guidance of a 
member of the faculty, in preparation for 
the writing of a thesis. 3) Affording 
specialized work in the field of Christian 



education (see Religious Education 
Emphasis). 

Seventy-two term hours of studies are re- 
quired for the degree. Thirty hours are to 
be distributed as follows: 

Bible— Nine hours: BI01 and OT01 or 
OT02 or NT01 or NT02; and one elective 

History— Six hours: CH01 or CH02 or 
CH03 

Theology— Six hours: TH01 and TH02 or 
TH03 

Ethics— Six hours: ET01 and one elective 

Sociology of Religion— Three hours 

NOTE: Up to twelve hours may be taken 
through PCHE schools. 

Normally two years of full-time academic 
work are needed to complete the program. 
There is a five-year statute of limitations. 
M.A. candidates may apply for transfer to 
theM.Div. program at any time prior to the 
awarding of the M.A. degree; but once the 
degree has been awarded, courses cred- 
ited toward the M.A. may no longer be 
used for theM.Div. 

All candidates are required to write an 
M.A. thesis, which will normally be 
between eighty and one hundred pages in 
length. Up to six (6) hours of credit may be 
received for Independent Study done as 
research for this project under the direc- 
tion of the Thesis Adviser, who must be a 
member or adjunct of the faculty. It is the 
responsibility of the candidate, with the 
assistance of the Director of the M.A. 
Studies, to select an appropriate Adviser, 
who should agree to work closely with the 
candidate. Written agreement to do so 
should be in the hands of the candidate by 
the Spring preceding expected gradua- 
tion, as the Thesis will be due at the end of 
Term II of the graduation year. 

Religious Education Emphasis 

A special track which emphasizes relig- 
ious education is available for M.A. candi- 
dates who wish to prepare for nonordained 
educational ministries. Their courses of 
study should reflect the balance of studies 
described above. Some work will be taken 
at the School of Education of the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh. Choice of such courses 



26 Educational Programs 



will be made in consultation with the Edu- 
cation faculty of the Seminary. The M.A. 
Thesis is required as above and will be 
completed with an Adviser approved by 
the Education faculty of the Seminary. In 
addition, at least six (6) but no more than 
nine (9) term hours must be taken in super- 
vised Field Education. Arrangements for 
such work will be made through the Super- 
visor for the Practice of Ministry in con- 
sultation with the Director of M.A. Studies 
and credit will be granted as Independent 
Study courses taken with the Education 
faculty. 

The Master of Sacred Theology 
Degree (International Christian 
Studies) 

The S.T.M. Degree is an advanced degree 
for which the M.Div. degree or its equiva- 
lent is prerequisite. Normally, a full calen- 
dar year is needed for the attainment of the 
degree. 

The Program in International Christian 
Studies, for which the S.T.M. degree is 
awarded, is designed to assist both over- 
seas and North-American students to 
study Christianity as an international faith. 

The S.T.M. program will pay particular 
attention to the emergence of: 1) the reality 
of global dependence and inter- 
dependence; 2) the rise of a "third world 
Church" showing signs of its own distinc- 
tiveness and creativity; and 3) the ecu- 
menical reality of the Church expressed 
both inside and outside the World Council 
of Churches. 

All the candidates will take the required 
year-long Seminar, "International Chris- 
tian Studies." In addition, certain elective 
courses will be designated as particularly 
appropriate to this emphasis and candi- 
dates encouraged to elect them so that 
there will be interaction and exchange of 
views among students of different coun- 
tries as a feature of these courses. 

The Program will be under the overall 
supervision of a Faculty Director. 
Thirty-six (36) term hours of study are 
required for the degree. Except for the 
core Seminar, no course requirements are 
specified, in order to allow both overseas 



and North-American students to pursue 
special interests in theological studies. 
North-American students will be encour- 
aged to spend one term abroad at a theo- 
logical institution, with course work there 
approved by the Dean. 

Candidates must choose one of two 
tracks. In Track I candidates will be granted 
nine (9) credits for the writing of a Thesis 
under the guidance of an adviser. The 
Thesis Committee will include a second 
faculty member. In Track II the focus of the 
study will be provided by a final examina- 
tion, which may be either oral or written. 
Up to six (6) credits may be earned under 
the guidance of an Adviser for preparation 
of this examination, which will be con- 
ducted by the Adviser and one other fac- 
ulty member. 

There are three categories of courses in 
the Program: the Seminar required of all 
students, "International Christian Stud- 
ies"— nine (9) credits; designated elec- 
tees (two courses)— six (6) credits; and 
free electives. The remainder of the credits 
may be earned in guided reading in pre- 
paration for taking the examination or in 
writing the Thesis. Up to three courses 
appropriate to the program may be taken 
as free electives at another institution with 
the approval of the Director, the Adviser 
and the Dean. 

Required Seminar in International 
Christian Studies 

ICS01 Christianity in a World Context 

The course seeks to provide information 
and develop awareness of the ambiguous 
process through which Christianity has 
reached ecumenical reality by being 
linked to the process of Western socioeco- 
nomic expansion and missionary enter- 
prise "to the ends of the earth." In this 
context contemporary developments in the 
ecumenical movement as well as the 
specific dynamics of the church in the 
Third World are taken into account, with 
particular attention given to the signs of 
vitality and creativity within Third World 
Christianity. 

Term I 



Educational Programs 27 



ICS02 Theological Research in 
International Perspective 

An examination of the issues and assump- 
tions in the theological disciplines as 
defined within several different cultural 
perspectives and as they relate to the ways 
in which Christians perceive their interna- 
tional obligations. 

Term II 

ICS03 Study Project 

During the first two terms, participants will 
determine a Study Rroject, which will 
become the focus of the substance and 
structure of the third term of the Seminar. 

Term III 

Designated Electives (Subject to year 
and term offerings) 

Specific ST. M. Elective: 

ICS04 Ephesians and the Emerging 
Church 

This study of Ephesians will concentrate 
on the emerging concept of the church as 
a global community. Recent studies in the 
sociology of early Christianity and of the 
sociology of Roman-Hellenistic society in 
general will be introduced to complement 
the use of more traditional methods of exe- 
getical study. The use of the Greek text of 
Ephesians is strongly encouraged. 

ICS05 Christian Education 

Curriculum and Cultural 
Pluralism 

An examination of selected culturally 
specific Christian education curriculum 
materials and projects. Special attention 
will be focused on Asian, Hispanic, 
Navajo, Caribbean and Afro-American 
contributions. Theological, educational 
and anthropological assumptions that 
guide curriculum design will be analyzed. 

ICS06 Reformed Tradition and Global 
Ecumenism 

This course is designed to enable the stu- 
dent to appreciate the Reformed heritage 
within today's ecumenical and global con- 
text. It will study the roots of the Reformed 
concern for the unity of the Church. It will 
deal with the most troublesome theologi- 
cal issues that emerge in ecumenical dis- 
cussions worldwide (e.g., authority, con- 
fessionalism, Scripture, tradition and 
justice issues). It will also consider what 
the Reformed stance should be on recent 
proposals toward achieving mutual recog- 



nition by the churches in the areas of bap- 
tism, eucharist and ministry. 

Electives from M.Div. Curriculum 

CS03 Church and Society: Global 

Moral Issues in International 



ET25 
ET30 

ET36 

ET37 
SR13 

SR18 



Politics 

Christianity in the Latin 
American Context: Ethical 
Issues 

Christianity and Economic 
System 

The Ethics of Peacemaking 

The Latin American Context of 
Liberation Theology 

Christianity and Cultures: 
Selected Readings from the 
Third World 




28 Educational Programs 




: 




Doctor of Ministry Program 

Purpose 

Developing competency in professional 
ministry is a process in which ministers are 
engaged throughout their lives. The Doc- 
tor of Ministry Degree Program is 
designed to facilitate this process through 
systematic and disciplined study that will 
lead to a demonstrably higher level of 
competence in integrating all aspects of 
ministry. 

The Program utilizes ministry-related proj- 
ects, studies, papers and other 
assignments to improve proficiency in 
such areas as: 

1. Defining and organizing complex situa- 
tions of ministry using biblical theologi- 
cal, sociological, political and personal 
insights. 

2. Analyzing situations of ministry in such 
a way as to understand their nature and 
causes and to identify opportunities for 
effective ministry. 

3. Taking responsible action with a deeper 
grasp of homiletical, educational, coun- 
seling and administrative principles 
enhanced by a biblical, historical and 
theological heritage. 

4. Evaluating actions and their outcomes 
from a variety of responsible 
perspectives. 

Doctor of Ministry candidates select one of 
the following areas in which to enroll: 
Parish Focus, Reformed Focus, Pastoral 
Care Focus or the Chaplaincy Focus. New 
classes are enrolled each year in the Par- 



ish Focus and the Reformed Focus. The 
Pastoral Care Focus and the Chaplaincy 
Focus are usually available in alternate 
years, depending on interest. 

Scheduling Options 

Two time options are offered for the Parish 
Focus and the Reformed Focus in order to 
meet the different situations of ministers. 
Option I classes meet every Monday on 
the Pittsburgh campus for four terms. Two 
seminars or colloquia are taken each term. 

Option II concentrates study in four ses- 
sions of two weeks, extending over a year 
and a half. Two seminars or colloquia are 
taken in each session. Guided reading 
lists are sent to students several weeks in 
advance of the sessions to allow for ade- 
quate preparation. 

Option II sites for the Parish Focus have 
been established in Pittsburgh (January 
and June) and Miami, Orlando and St. 
Petersburg, Florida, (June and October). 
However, all students must enroll in the 
Proposal and Biblical Colloquia on the 
Pittsburgh campus. The program in 
Florida is now designed as a joint offering 
of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and 
Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, 
Georgia. Details of this offering are 
available through the Doctor of Ministry 
Offices at both institutions. 

Both Options require approximately three 
years for completion of the program. 



Educational Programs 29 



Collegiality 

Clergy who enroll in a Focus during a par- 
ticular term remain together during their 
seminars and colloquia. Other students 
are not usually added to their group. This 
assures a high level of collegiality and 
trust and facilitates the peer learning 
which is essential to the program. 

Parish Focus 

The Parish Focus is organized around the 
intensive involvement of the pastor's min- 
isterial setting in all phases of the pro- 
gram. These include the Seminar Phase, 
involving six seminars looking at all areas 
of parish ministry; the Colloquia Phase, in 
which the nature of the major Doctoral Pro- 
ject is developed and two elective courses 
are completed; and the Major Project 
Phase, involving implementation of the 
project and the writing of the Project 
Report. 

Congregational involvement proceeds 
through a committee, chosen by the 
pastor. The committee discusses the pro- 
gram with the director during a visit to the 
church and prepares a one-page mission 
statement, to be endorsed by the congre- 
gation. This statement then forms the 
basis for an evaluation of the church, 
revealing areas where further growth is 
desired. It is also used to guide the 
pastor's appropriation of course work and 
becomes part of the data used to select 
and define the major project. 

During the Colloquia Phase, the commit- 
tee consults with the pastor concerning 
possibilities for the major project. Again, 
the evaluation provides needed guidance. 
The committee also decides at this time 
whether or not to design a congregational 
elective, which will involve them more 
directly in the pastor's program. 

In the Major Project Phase, the church 
works closely with the pastor in imple- 
menting the major project. This project 
may take place at the parish level, the 
denominational level, or the ecumenical 
level, but the church must be involved to 
some extent. 

While most ministers who elect the Parish 
Focus serve a local church, others with 
specialized ministries have found it a flexi- 
ble vehicle adaptable to their own minis- 



tries. These have included denominational 
posts, ecumenical agencies, prison work 
and various school ministries. In every 
case however, the minister, priest, or rabbi 
must intentionally involve his or her people 
in the program of study. This insures that 
the people as well as the pastor benefit 
directly from the Doctor of Ministry 
program. 

Required Courses in the Parish Focus 

DM01 Doctrine of Church and 
Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special 
emphasis on implications for the practice 
of ministry in today's church. Theology is 
understood and applied in light of specific 
situations in the candidate's ministry. 

DM02 Pastoral Care 

Theological and psychological insights 
are focused on the theory and practice of 
caring, with case studies furnished by the 
pastors. 

DM03 Homiletics 

An advanced course in the theory and 
practice of preaching in the context of wor- 
ship, with pastor input central to the 
seminar. 

DM04 Administration 

Problems in chuch administration, includ- 
ing the development of stewardship and 
lay leadership, are addressed in light of 
theological criteria and administrative 
theory. 

DM05 Education 

The course is designed to help pastors 
implement a complete educational pro- 
gram, pre-school through adult, in the 
local church. An examination of the 
uniqueness of Christian education will be 
sought. 

DM06 Congregational and 
Community Issues 

A case method consideration of problems 
confronting the church in society, using 
the discipline of Christian ethics as a major 
resource. 

DM07 Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student 
in focusing upon an area in ministry for the 
doctoral project. Theoretical issues under- 
lying the problem and a method for 
addressing the problem are clarified as 
the student develops a proposal in con- 



30 Educational Programs 



sultation with peers and faculty. Two 
credits. 

DM08 Biblical Colloquium 

Attention will be given to the foci and 
resources of biblical studies today. Prin- 
cipal emphasis will be placed on the devel- 
opment of a hermeneutic that will lead to 
helpful and responsible use of the Bible in 
the doctoral project. Two credits. 

Reformed Focus 

This Focus is designed to cultivate the 
Reformed emphasis on the minister as a 
theological leader of the church. The 
adjective, "theological," calls attention to 
the formative role theological reflection 
and knowledge ought to have in the prac- 
tice of ministry. There is an urgent need to 
recover this aspect of ministry. The sub- 
stantive, "leader of the church," indicates 
that the context of the theological reflec- 
tion that is needed must be the Church's 
unceasing struggle to live out all dimen- 
sions of faithful service to Jesus Christ. 

The objective of the program is to develop 
the ability of participants to formulate 
theologically based actions directed 
toward "the great ends of the Church," as 
these ends have been understood in the 
Reformed tradition. To accomplish this 
purpose the Reformed Focus provides 
more extensive opportunity for theological 
reflection than the Parish Focus. Six 
"core" seminars have been developed to 
deepen the student's awareness and 
understanding of Reformed contributions 
in the areas of Biblical Studies, Theology, 
Ethics and Worship. In addition to these 
seminars, the Proposal Colloquium and 
eight hours of electives are required for the 
degree. Three of these elective credits 
must be in the discipline most germane to 
the "practical" aspect of the student's 
project (education, pastoral care, homilet- 
ics, or administration). Three other elective 
credits must be in one of the disciplines 
contributing to the "biblical and theologi- 
cal" chapter of the major paper. The final 
two elective credits are at the discretion of 
the student and the Major Adviser and 
should be considered additional research 
for the project. 

The program is conducted along the lines 
of the Parish Focus. It includes a Seminar 
Phase, involving the six "core" seminars, 



taken in three successive terms; the Collo- 
quium Phase, in which the design of the 
major project is worked out beginning with 
the Proposal Colloquium and in which the 
required elective in one of the "practical" 
disciplines is taken; and the Major Project 
Phase, involving the completion of the 
other electives, implementation of the proj- 
ect and the writing of the Project Report. 

Congregational involvement in the stu- 
dent's work follows the design used in the 
Parish Focus Program. A congregational 
committee participates in the drafting of a 
mission statement that informs the stu- 
dent's project. The committee also func- 
tions as a sounding-board for the student 
in the planning, execution and evaluation 
of the project. 

Required Courses in the Reformed 
Focus 

DM40 Reformed Theology 

A systematic analysis of the ways in which 
different types of theology within the 
Reformed tradition have dealt with some 
of the most important doctrines of the 
Christian faith. Among the variations 
studied are the "high Calvinism" of the 
Synod of Dort; the Amyraldian theology; 
"federal" theology; the Princeton School; 
the Mercersberg theology; and represen- 
tative "liberal," "neo-orthodox," and 
"evangelical" Reformed theologians. Doc- 
trines considered include the concept of 
the "sovereignty" of God; the covenant of 
grace; the atonement of Christ; grace and 
"free will"; the Church as the "communion 
of saints"; and the Kingdom of God. 

DM41 Biblical Authority and 

Interpretation in the Reformed 
Tradition 

This course is designed to help the pastor 
synthesize the most important ingredients 
that must go into a responsible presenta- 
tion of biblical teaching in the Reformed 
tradition today. These include the history 
of the Christian canonical Scriptures; the 
meaning of the "Scripture Principle" of the 
Reformation; and the main types of bibli- 
cal interpretation before and after the 
historico-critical approach. Among the lat- 
ter types, the hermeneutics of Schleier- 
macher, the Princeton School, "Funda- 
mentalism," and Karl Barth are singled out 
for special attention. 



Educational Programs 31 



DM42 Worship in the Reformed 
Churches: Tradition and 
Timeliness 

For those whose heritage is the Protestant 
Reformation, tradition has stood for 
authority opposed to Scripture and timeli- 
ness is often contrasted with tradition. But, 
there is now a growing awareness of the 
priority of the Christian community and a 
deeper appreciation for the whole life of 
the Church as it has been nurtured and 
formed by the Holy Spirit in every age; and 
that in the Christian theology timeliness 
and tradition are held together by "Jesus 
Christ, the same yesterday and today and 
forever." It is in this context that we must 
understand worship in the Reformed 
churches. 

DM43 The Social Transforming 

Character of Reformed Ethics 

The course reviews the motifs of Chris- 
tianity's relationship with culture in the 
thought of H. Richard Niebuhr and then 
focuses on the transforming motif as 
expressed in Reformed thought. The 
Reformed tradition's relationship to poli- 
tics, revolution, economics, technology 
and vocation is investigated in Western 
culture. The case of the World Alliance of 
Reformed Church's recognition of apart- 
heid as heretical is examined for the possi- 
bilities and problems of Reformed thought 
in the developing world. 

DM44 Reformed Ecumenism 

This course is designed to enable the stu- 
dent to appreciate the Reformed heritage 
within today's ecumenical context. It 
examines the roots of the Reformed con- 
cern for the unity of the Church. It deals 
with the most troublesome theological 
issues that emerge in ecumenical discus- 
sions (e.g., authority, confessionalism, 
Scripture and tradition). It also considers 
what the Reformed stance should be on 
recent proposals towards achieving 
mutual recognition by the churches in the 
areas of baptism, eucharist and ministry. 

DM45 Theological and Ethical Issues 
Before the Church 

This course studies the positions of the 
United Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. and 
the Presbyterian Church, U.S., on ethical 
and theological issues that caused great 
controversy in the sixties and seventies 
and continue to be issues on which there 




is continuing confusion and controversy 
today. Issues such as abortion— the "right 
to life" versus the "right to choose"; capital 
punishment; nuclear weapons and the 
threat of nuclear war; environmental 
ethics; bio-medical ethics; the problems of 
Central America and the Sanctuary move- 
ment; prayer in the public schools; por- 
nography and the problem of censorship; 
are among those that may be singled out 
for close study. 

Pastoral Care Focus 

Pastoral Care is that form of ministry 
representative of the servant-role in which 
one person tries to help another person or 
persons to resolve problems and crises so 
that each human life may reach its full 
potential. The pastor's goals are both 
ultimate and penultimate: ultimately to 
help people to relate to God meaningfully 
and penultimately to cope creatively with 
living, especially with problematic situa- 
tions. Therefore, the pastor uses theologi- 
cal and religious insights and resources as 
well as theory and practical skills learned 
from the social sciences, especially 
psychology. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has 
devised a specialty in pastoral care at the 
doctoral level to assist pastors to become 
more proficient in the art of pastoral caring 
and counseling. The doctoral program 
involves ten required seminars and one 
elective, scheduled in a two-year period 
and a third year which is devoted to a proj- 
ect and clinical paper reporting that work. 
Throughout the three-year program theo- 



32 Educational Programs 



logical and psychological insights are 
used in developing the theory and practice 
of pastoral care. While attention is given to 
those areas of stress and pain which most 
command the pastor's attention (anxiety, 
grief, guilt, depression, aging, addiction, 
marriage and family, identity crises, etc.) 
the program also focuses upon the 
pastor's work in helping people to relate to 
God meaningfully and to cope creatively 
with living. 

The clinical paper, dealing with an aspect 
of pastoral care, is written under the super- 
vision of a committee of two faculty in this 
field. No less than fifty pages in length, the 
paper must include a description of the 
problem and the proposed methodology; a 
section presenting biblical, theological 
and historical material pertinent to the 
study; a review of the relevant literature; an 
empirical study of the subject chosen; and 
a concluding section detailing results of 
the inquiry together with any suggestions 
for further study. 

Required Courses in the Pastoral Care 
Focus 

DM01 Doctrine of Church and 
Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special 
emphasis on implications for the practice 
of ministry in today's church. Theology is 
understood and applied in light of specific 
situations in the candidate's ministry. 

DM07 Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student 
in focusing upon an area in ministry for the 



doctoral project. Theoretical issues under- 
lying the problem and a method for 
addressing the problem are clarified as 
the student develops a paper proposal in 
consultation with peers and faculty. Two 
credits. 

DM21 Human Development 

This course traces human development 
along lines set forth by several important 
scholars in the field. The course stresses 
development in ego psychology as espe- 
cially helpful to the practice of ministry. It 
deals also with analysis of the communal 
component and group theories and their 
implications for ministry. 

DM22 Pastoral Care I 

This course includes both clinical and 
didactic components. It deals with the his- 
tory of pastoral care, the identity of the 
pastor, the nature of stress, especially on 
persons such as pastors and the basic 
skills in pastoral care. 

DM23 Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course has in mind the dialogue 
between theology and pastoral care as 
forms of human wisdom which have their 
own origins and their own varieties of cor- 
relation. Important theological concepts 
will be brought to bear on a variety of 
theories and practices in pastoral care. 

DM24 Clinical Hospital Seminar 

This seminar is designed to integrate ex- 
periential learning about one's own func- 
tioning in the practice of ministry within a 
hospital setting and to relate that practice 
to theology, medicine and the behavioral 
sciences. It includes interdisciplinary 




Educational Programs 33 



didactic sessions in hospital visitation, 
case seminars and group process. Two 
credits. 

DM25 Assessment of Needs/Stress 

When persons are identified as needing 
help, how can the pastor understand what 
their needs are? This question is the heart 
of the course. The answer will be sought in 
a variety of models, which examine stress 
in the individual, in family systems and in 
social groups such as the congregation. 

DM26 Marriage and Family 

The dynamics of marriage and family are 
addressed both psychologically and theo- 
logically. A major part of the course deals 
with the practice of marital counseling and 
caring for families. 

DM27 Pastoral Care II 

Specific attention is given to problems 
which are frequently encountered in minis- 
try, such as those concerned with adoles- 
cence, grief, depression, substance abuse 
and aging. Techniques are developed for 
working with counseling situations. 

DM28 Clinical Seminar in Pastoral 
Counseling 

The aim of this seminar is to enable the 
minister to decide which situations in min- 
istry are appropriate to pastoral counsel- 
ing and to provide supervision in those 
that are. Two credits. 

Chaplaincy Focus 

The Chaplaincy Focus is designed to 
extend the ministry of the church more 
deeply and effectively to those who are in 
institutional situations such as the military, 
schools, hospitals, or prisons. The Doctor 
of Ministry goal, to increase competence 
in ministry, is applied to chaplains by tailor- 
ing the seminars specifically to the 
unusual needs which chaplains en- 
counter. While the formal structure of each 
seminar addresses general needs com- 
mon to chaplains, there is an intentional 
flexibility in the seminars so that discus- 
sion of the issues raised will increase in- 
sight and skill in the forms of ministry 
represented in each group of chaplains. 

The flexibility of the program is also 
demonstrated in the negotiable timing of 
courses. An entering group may contract 
to study together for as many as six or as 
few as two seminars per year. 



Since seminars are offered in concen- 
trated one-week periods, usually with 
thirty class hours, readings for the class 
and application of insight must take place 
before and after the course. Therefore, at 
the beginning of the program each chap- 
lain will receive syllabi for all seminars. 
This will allow preseminar guided reading 
and will prepare the chaplains to benefit 
fully from the classes. Application of the 
course work in a specific assignment will 
be negotiated between the professor and 
chaplain and will usually be completed 
within three months of the class. 

The Chaplaincy Focus proceeds in two 
stages. The first includes five core 
courses, plus a two-week Proposal Collo- 
quium and a Biblical Colloquium. The 
second stage includes three electives 
related, where possible, to the doctoral 
project, plus the actual work of the project. 

Required Courses in the Chaplaincy 
Focus 

DM01 Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special 
emphasis on implications for the practice 
of ministry in today's church. Theology is 
understood and applied in light of specific 
situations in the candidate's ministry. 

DM31 Pastoral Care for Chaplains 

Most chaplains spend much time in coun- 
seling and many have taken some 
advanced work. Basic principles, there- 
fore, will be assumed; and special consid- 
eration will be given to pastoral problems 
that are particularly encountered in chap- 
laincy. Among these are stress resulting 
from frequent moves, conflicts around 
insecurity of interpersonal relationships, 
high incidence of crisis intervention and 
development of community resources in a 
largely transient congregation. Consider- 
able freedom is allowed for the study of 
cases brought by group members. 

DM32 Education as it Pertains to 
Adults 

Special emphasis is placed on the 
development of programs for adults. 
Where appropriate, programs for women 
and minorities will be encouraged and 
developed. The course also includes 
theory and practice involving the broad 
spectrum of education as it is applied in 
institutional relationships. 



34 Educational Programs 



DM33 Worship 

Preaching skills and worship theory are 
discussed. Particular attention is given to 
the dynamics of preaching and the devel- 
opment of modes of worship in the 
unusual circumstances of chaplaincy. 
There is also consideration of the 
chaplain's personal devotional resources. 

DM34 Social Ethics for Chaplains 

An examination through lectures, case 
studies and seminar discussions of the 
social teaching of the churches relevant to 
the institutional ministry of the chaplain in 
schools, hospitals, prisons and the 
military. 

DM07 Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student 
in focusing on an area in ministry for the 
doctoral project. Theoretical issues under- 




lying the problem and a method for 
addressing the problem are clarified as 
the student develops a proposal in consul- 
tation with peers and faculty. Two credits. 

DM08 Biblical Colloquium 

Attention will be given to the foci and 
resources of biblical studies today. Prin- 
cipal emphasis will be placed on develop- 
ment of a hermeneutic that will lead to 
helpful and responsible use of the Bible in 
the doctoral project. Two credits. 

Joint Degree Programs 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The University of Pittsburgh and Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary have a coop- 
erative graduate program in the study of 
religion. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary partici- 
pates in the University of Pittsburgh's 
Cooperative Graduate Program in the 
Study of Religion. This program draws 
upon the resources of both institutions and 
leads to the Ph.D. degree awarded by the 
University. 

The aim of the program is to foster crea- 
tive, interdisciplinary study in several 
areas: Biblical Studies (Old and New Tes- 
tament); History of Religions (chiefly 
Christianity and Judaism, but work in 
Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism is also 
offered); Theology; Ethics; Sociology and 
Anthropology of Religion; and Phenome- 
nology of Religion. For information about 
requirements, course offerings, prelimi- 
nary and comprehensive examinations, 




Educational Programs 35 



language requirements, etc., consult the 
University of Pittsburgh's bulletin, Gradu- 
ate Programs in the Faculty of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Inquiries and applications for admission 
should be addressed to: 
Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Religious Studies 
University of Pittsburgh 
2604 Cathedral of Learning 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 

The Master of Divinity/Master 
of Social Work Joint Degree 
Program 

To encourage and equip women and men 
to engage in social work both in and out of 
the church and to provide opportunities in 
social work for students who feel a call to 
practice within a church setting, the Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary and the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh Graduate School of 
Social Work have developed a program 
offering a joint degree, that is, M.Div./ 
M.S.W. 

This joint effort enables students to 
receive both the M.Div. and the M.S.W. in 
four years of post-baccalaureate study 
instead of the usual five. Nevertheless, the 
joint program provides a full course of 
study in both theology and social work. 
This is effected by equating certain 
courses now taught in both schools, by 
making provision for courses taken in one 
school to count as electives in the other 
and by developing specialized field 
placements. 

The curriculum of the Graduate School of 
Social Work encompasses studies in four 
major curriculum areas or "clusters": 
Health/Mental Health; Juvenile and Crimi- 
nal Justice; Poverty and Associated Prob- 
lems; and Children and Youth. 

Candidates for the joint degree who enter 
the program through the Seminary will 
concentrate on theological studies during 
the first two years. Application should be 
made to the University of Pittsburgh Grad- 
uate School of Social Work during the first 
term of the second year at the Seminary. 
The third and fourth years will be spent 
predominantly at the School of Social 
Work, but one course per term will be 



taken at the Seminary. Should a student 
elect to terminate the joint program before 
its completion and seek only one degree, 
he or she will be required to complete all of 
the work ordinarily required for that 
degree. 

During the third year limited financial aid 
will be available for students in the joint 
program. Due to the higher tuition costs at 
the University, such students will probably 
need to secure additional financial aid 
from the University or other sources. 

Inquiries regarding the Graduate School 
of Social Work and requests for Social 
Work catalogs should be addressed to: 
Director of Admissions, Graduate School 
of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Library Science Joint Degree 
Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the 
School of Library and Information Science 
of the University of Pittsburgh established 
in 1968 a joint program to train men and 
women in theological librarianship. The 
program, designed to be completed in four 
academic years, culminates in two 
degrees, the M.Div. and the M.L.S. 

Normally, a student will take the first part of 
his/her work at the Seminary and begin 
work at the University in the third year. The 
program will include a course on 
resources in theological libraries and six 




36 Educational Programs 



credits of field experience in theological 
librarianship at the Seminary. Should a 
student elect to terminate the joint pro- 
gram before its completion and seek only 
one degree, he or she will be required to 
complete all of the work ordinarily required 
for that degree. 

Inquiries regarding the School of Library 
and Information Science and requests for 
Library Science catalogs should be 
addressed to: Director of Admissions, 
School of Library and Information Science, 
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania 15260. 

The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Business Administration Joint 
Degree Program 

Management of the life of the church, in 
larger local congregations and in regional 
and national agencies, increasingly 
requires familiarity with business prac- 
tices and the availability of some people 
who are able to combine professional 
knowledge and experience in the tradi- 
tions of Christian ministry and in the area 
of business administration. In addition, on- 
ly acquaintance with the actual theory and 
practice of business administration can 
enable the Christian minister to make 
informed contributions to the reality of 
business life in our time. 

Therefore the Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary and the Graduate School of 
Business at the University of Pittsburgh 
have developed a program for a joint 
degree, the M.Div./M.B.A. By adopting a 
four-year plan of study at the Seminary, 
and by using primarily evening M.B.A. 
courses, a candidate for this joint degree 
can accomplish all necessary require- 
ments within four years. A detailed plan for 
the four-year curriculum leading to the 
joint degree is available, upon request, 
through the Dean's Office at either of the 
participating institutions. For further infor- 
mation on the curriculum and admissions 
requirements at the Graduate School of 
Business, write to: The Dean's Office, 
Graduate School of Business, The Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania 15260. 



The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Health Administration Joint 
Degree Program 

While this joint degree program with the 
Graduate School of Public Health at the 
University of Pittsburgh was still awaiting 
final approval at the time this catalog was 
printed, it will probably be in operation dur- 
ing the academic year 1985-86. The pro- 
gram, designed to be completed in five 
years, will lead to two degrees, the M.Div. 
and either the Master of Health Adminis- 
tration (M.H.A.) or the Master of Public 
Health (M. PH.). 

Further details will be announced at the 
appropriate time. For information write to: 
The Dean, Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary, 616 North Highland Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania 15206-2596. 

The Master of Divinity/Juris 
Doctor Joint Degree Program 

In 1983 the School of Law at Duquesne 
University and Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary established a joint degree pro- 
gram leading to the M. Div. and Juris Doc- 
tor (J.D.) degree. The completion of both 
degrees separately would normally take 
six years; the joint program allows for the 
completion of both degrees in five years by 
permitting work in one institution to count 
as credit in advanced standing in the other 
institution. 

In the Judaeo-Christian tradition the con- 
tact is very close between justice and law, 
and the ministry of the people of God. The 
practice of ministry is frequently inter- 
twined with the administration of law. 
Graduates of the joint degree would be 
expected to work in a wide array of profes- 
sional tasks, such as law firms which spe- 
cialize in serving religious institutions as 
clients, church boards and agencies, and 
parish ministries of various kinds. 

Admission into the program is determined 
by each institution separately; admission 
into one institution does not guarantee 
admission to the other. Inquiries concern- 
ing the Law School at Duquesne Univer- 
sity should be sent to: Director of Admis- 
sions, School of Law, Duquesne Univer- 
sity, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282. 



Educational Programs 37 



The Master of Arts (Religious 
Education)/Church Music Dual 
Degree Program 

The School of Music at Duquense Univer- 
sity and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
established a joint program in Church 
Music and Christian Education in 1983. 
The program culminates in an M.A. 
degree in Church Music and Christian 
Education which is awarded by Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. 

The program can be completed in three 
years. Admissions are to be determined by 
each participating institution separately: 
admission into one institution does not 
guarantee admission by the other 
institution. 

The curriculum is designed to prepare 
qualified persons to minister to local 
parishes both musically and educationally. 
A combination of these forms of ministry is 
often found desirable and practical. 

Inquiries concerning the School of Music 
should be addressed to: The Dean, School 
of Music, Duquesne University, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania 15282. 

The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Science (Public Management 
and Policy) Joint Degree 
Program 

The School of Urban and Public Affairs 
(SUPA) at Carnegie-Mellon University and 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary began in 
1983 offering a joint degree program lead- 
ing to the two degrees of Master of Divinity 
(M. Div.) and Master of Science in Public 
Management and Policy (M.S.). 

Through the recognition by both insti- 
tutions of work performed in the other 
institutions for advanced standing, the 
program can be completed in four years. 
Normal completion of each degree pro- 
gram independently would require five 
years. Admission is determined separately 
by each institution; admission to one insti- 
tution does not guarantee admission into 
the other. 

Public management and policy is increas- 
ingly required for the practice of ministry at 
all levels. The joint degree program seeks 



to prepare persons as experts in urban pol- 
icy and management as well as theology 
in order to establish a group of specialists 
ready to serve the church as practitioners 
and consultants through a combination of 
expertise which is constantly in demand. 

Inquiries concerning the SUPA part of the 
program should be directed to: The Dean, 
School of Urban and Public Affairs, 
Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15213. 

Special Programs 

Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education 

The Pittsburgh Council on Higher Educa- 
tion (PCHE) is a cooperative organization 
composed of Pittsburgh area colleges, 
universities, and graduate schools. Par- 
ticipating institutions include: Carlow 
College, Carnegie-Mellon University, 
Chatham College, Community College of 
Allegheny County, Duquesne University, 
LaRoche College, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, Point Park College, Robert Mor- 
ris College, and the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

The purposes of PCHE are: to represent a 
common voice on a variety of issues; to 
examine possibilities for cooperation 
among the member institutions; and, 
above all, to undertake joint programs 
which expand educational opportunities 
for students and make the best use of in- 
stitutional resources. The membership of 
the Seminary in PCHE benefits students 
by providing possibilities for cross registra- 
tion in courses at the graduate level, by 
establishing library privileges at eight 
academic libraries other than our own, 
and by initiating programs in specialized 
areas. 

The American Schools of Oriental 
Research 

The Seminary is associated with the 
American Schools of Oriental Research. 
This corporation is involved in archaeo- 
logical research in the Middle East. Most 
of their work has been concentrated in 
Palestine and Iraq, and they maintain 
schools in Jerusalem, Amman, and 
Baghdad. Since 1924, we have been 
active participants in numerous field proj- 
ects in cooperation with the American 
Schools of Oriental Research. 



38 Educational Programs 



Arsenal Family and Children's Center 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center 
came into being in 1952 as a result of a 
Pennsylvania mandate to the Western Psy- 
chiatric Institute and Clinic to "deal with 
the mental hygiene of the normal child in 
the way of study and training in order that 
there may be a program of prevention of 
mental and nervous disorders as a result 
of giving children the proper background 
and training that will prevent such dis- 
orders." The Arsenal Family and Chil- 
dren's Center has grown and developed 
into a unique field laboratory for the 
psychological study of children and their 
families. It also provides an environment in 
which students learn methods for the dis- 
ciplined observation of children and fami- 
lies. It thereby contributes to the education 
and training of students for the ministry 
and other service-related careers. 

The National Capital Semester for 
Seminarians 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary par- 
ticipates in the National Capital Semester 
for Seminarians sponsored by Wesley 
Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C. 
This program provides an opportunity for 
seminary students to spend a semester in 
Washington for study and involvement in 
the processes of government and the con- 
cerns of the churches. The program is 
designed to include supervised study and 
interaction (reflection), and will provide a 
full term of academic credit. The program 
is open to any student who has completed 
at least one year of study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. Seminary gradu- 
ates may apply for a program to begin 
within one year of their graduation. 

Clinical Pastoral Education 

Clinical Pastoral Education brings 
theological students and ministers into 
supervised encounter with persons in criti- 
cal life situations. Out of intense involve- 
ment with persons in need and the reac- 
tions from peers and supervisors, the 
students develop new awareness of them- 
selves as persons and of the needs of 
those to whom ministry is offered. From 
theological reflection on specific human 
situations, new insight and understanding 
are derived and the student or minister is 
confronted with his or her own humanity. 
Within the interdisciplinary team-process 



of helping persons, they develop skills in 
interpersonal and interprofessional rela- 
tionships. Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary grants academic credit to students 
who complete full quarters of Clinical 
Pastoral Education at centers accredited 
by the Association for Clinical Pastoral 
Education. 

The Association for Clinical Pastoral Edu- 
cation accredits a nationwide network of 
Clinical Pastoral Education Centers and 
their supervisors. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is a member of the association. 

Special Nondegree Studies 

Clergy and lay persons who wish to enroll 
as Special Students in courses at Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary for non- 
degree purposes are invited to do so. Spe- 
cial Students may enroll in as many as two 
courses per term, up to a total of six 
courses. Special Students complete all the 
assigned requirements for each course in 
which they enroll and receive academic 
credit. Credit earned as a Special Student 
may be transferred to any established 
Seminary degree program in which the 
student may later enroll. Those desiring 
Special Student status must possess an 
accredited bachelor's degree and apply 
through the Admissions Office. 

Clergy and lay persons who desire to audit 
courses at Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary are invited to do so. No academic 
credit is given for audits. Applications for 
audit shall be accompanied by a college 
transcript and be submitted to the. Contin- 
uing Education Office along with a fee of 
$50.00 per course. The transcript and 
record of classes will be kept as part of the 
Continuing Education files. 

International Scholars Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is com- 
mitted to serving the professional educa- 
tional needs of the whole church. Scholar- 
ships are offered annually to international 
scholars who have already completed the 
Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent 
in their own country and whose plans for 
an additional year of study are endorsed 
by the church in their own country. These 
scholarships provide tuition, room, board 
and a small monthly cash allowance for 
one academic year to international sfu- 



Educational Programs 39 



dents endorsed to the Seminary by the 
World Council of Churches, the World Alli- 
ance of Reformed Churches or by the 
Leadership Development Program of the 
National Council of Churches. 

Distinguished Pastor-in-Residence 
Program 

This program gives the Seminary com- 
munity the opportunity to dialogue with 
persons involved in a variety of ministries. 
During each academic year, persons 
representing three different models of min- 
istry are invited to spend four to eight 
weeks in residence on the campus. The 
distinguished guests visit classes, par- 
ticipate in Seminary activities, engage in 
conversations with students and faculty, 
and lead one or more chapel services. 
One guest is present each term. 

During the last two academic years, the 
Seminary welcomed distinguished pas- 
tors who were engaged in overseas minis- 
tries, urban redevelopment ministries, 
large suburban church ministries, small 
church ministries, chaplaincy ministries, 
and judicatory ministries. Distinguished 
guests include pastors who are alumni/ae 
of Pittsburgh and many other seminaries. 
Each guest is hosted by a member of the 
faculty of the Seminary. 

In addition the Seminary from time to time 
invites distinguished lay persons to spend 
several days to a week on our campus. 
These church women and men share 
insights about their ministries and ways in 



which their church and work commitments 
interact. Distinguished guests have 
included a banker, a newspaper editor, 
management consultants, an attorney, 
corporation leaders, and others. 

Continuing Education and 
Special Lectures 

The Continuing Education program at 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is care- 
fully designed to meet the needs of both 
clergy and laity. For men and women 
engaged in professional ministry, a theo- 
logical degree begins a lifelong process of 
growth. Experiences in parish life can be 
extremely important lessons when 
brought back to the classroom and shared 
with colleagues. Updating skills and know- 
ledge under the leadership of Seminary 
faculty members and visiting professors is 
of keen interest and value to those who 
seek continued personal and professional 
growth. 

For an increasing number of laypeople 
who make their living in a variety of ways in 
the world, a theological education consists 
of short-term seminars and conferences; 
at these events, outstanding leaders intro- 
duce new thoughts, exchange takes place 
between clergy and laity and old ideas are 
challenged and reshaped, resulting in a 
new fulfillment in life. 

Each year our Continuing Education pro- 
gram consists of a basic core of events, 
with contemporary topics added in con- 




40 Educational Programs 





Educational Programs 41 



sultation with a dedicated committee of 
faculty, area clergy and laypeople. 

Annual Events 

Auditing of regular Seminary courses 

has been a traditional option for clergy in 
order to update their knowledge and for 
laity with a bachelor's degree who wish to 
gain increased familiarity with a specific 
subject. 

Independent-study-in-residence is a 

way to make excellent use of a larger block 
of time, such as study leave. The Clifford 
E. Barbour Library is available; the 
guidance of a faculty member can be 
arranged; and pleasant overnight rooms 
are available in the Continuing Education 
wing of Fisher Hall. 

Four Monday Mornings are offered twice 
a year, in the fall and in the spring. Two 
subjects are covered by different profes- 
sors each morning; a Monday evening for- 
mat will be introduced in the fall of 1985. 

An archaeological lecture is offered by a 
visiting scholar from the United States or 
abroad, combined with the opportunity for 
a guided tour of the Bible Lands Museum 
on the Seminary campus. 

The Preaching Seminar allows pastors to 
periodically study the art of preaching 
from a different perspective. In addition, 
the Seminary's Speech Studio is available 
for preaching, use of the audio-visual facil- 
ities, followed by a private critique with one 
of the Seminary's homiletics professors. 

A Writers' Workshop provides profes- 
sional guidance about the practical 
aspects of publishing written materials. 
Laypeople as well as clergy have found 
this workshop valuable, not only in polish- 
ing writing skills, but as an opportunity to 
share ideas. 

Travel-study trips to the Holy Land, Jor- 
dan and Egypt are not annual events, but 
will be conducted more frequently in the 
future. The pre-trip study is open to trip 
participants and other interested individu- 
als and provides the background neces- 
sary to understand the subsequent tour. A 
trip is planned for the spring of 1986. 

The Summer School of Religion, spon- 
sored by the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foundation, 
is held for one week each June on the 



Seminary campus. A tradition for over 40 
years, this outstanding continuing educa- 
tion experience provides exceptional 
leaders at a nominal cost to Presbyterian 
clergypersons and certain other full-time 
Presbyterian Church employed profes- 
sionals from this geographical area. 

In addition to these programs, the Continu- 
ing Education/Lay Education Committee 
has made a commitment to include at least 
one experience in Music/Worship, Theol- 
ogy, Spirituality, Church Growth, Clergy 
Skills, Media, Current Ethical Issues and 
Bible Study in Old and New Testaments 
during a four-year period. 

Special Lectures 

The Special Events at Pittsburgh 
Seminary include Concerts by the Semi- 
nary Choir, visiting scholars' presentations 
from national and international back- 
grounds and the following Special 
Lectures: 

The Ritchie Memorial Lectureship 

Established in 1977byOrland M. Ritchie in 
memory of the Reverends Charles McKel- 
vey Ritchie, Willard Vedelle Ritchie and 
Orland Melville Ritchie in the field of Chris- 
tian Education, this endowment is used to 
bring visiting professors such as Hans 
Kung, C. K. Barrett and Kenneth E. Bailey 
to teach courses in our regular curriculum. 

The Schaff Lectures 

The Schaff Lectures were established to 
honor the late David S. Schaff, Professor 
of Church History at Western Theological 
Seminary for twenty-three years and 




42 Educational Programs 




coeditor of the Schaff-Herzog Encyclo- 
pedia. Past Schaff Lecturers have been 
Rosemary Ruether, David Tracy, John 
Westerhoff, Walter Brueggemann; future 
guests include Markus Barth of Basel, 
Switzerland. The Lectures are given on 
any subject related to the general field of 
theological study. 

The Elliott Lectures 

Given in theology and on literary or scien- 
tific subjects related to theology, past 
Elliott Lecturers have been Robert Jewitt, 
Virgil Cruz and Charmarie Jenkins 
Blaisdell. 

Kelso Lectures— Martin Luther King, 
Jr., Day 

Preston Williams, Alice Graham McNair 
and Vincent Harding have been recent 
speakers who have assisted the Seminary 
community celebrate the life of Martin 
Luther King, Jr. 

The W. Don McClure Lectureship 

Covering topics of World Mission and 
Evangelism, the W. Don McClure Lectures 
have been established to honor the mis- 
sionary who spent 50 years of his life in 
overseas service before being slain in a 
Somali guerilla raid. Samuel Moffett, Dale 
Brunner and Kenneth E. Bailey have 
helped establish this lectureship; Bishop 
Festo Kivengere and Don Black will be 
future lecturers. 

The Pittsburgh Biblical Colloquium 

The Pittsburgh Biblical Colloquium pro- 
vides an annual two-day conference at 



which a single and important theme of the 
Bible is approached from the vantage 
point of Old and New Testament. The Col- 
loquium of 1984 explored the issue of 
"Shalom in the Bible"; the 1985 Collo- 
quium will deal with "A New Heaven and A 
New Earth. Significance and Interpretation 
of Apocalyptic in the Bible"; in 1986 the 
conference will focus on the dialogue be- 
tween Christians and Jews in Biblical 
interpretation. 

The J. Hubert Henderson Lectures on 
Church and Ministry 

The newest series inaugurated at the 
Seminary, this lecture honors the pastor 
for 35 years at the Wallace Memorial Pres- 
byterian Church of Pittsburgh. Martin 
Marty and Frederick Buechner will inau- 
gurate the first two years of the series. 

Outstanding Lecturers and Leaders 

Peter J. Gomes, Harvard Divinity 
School, MA 

Walter Wink, Auburn Theological 
Seminary, NYC 

Thomas Starzl, M.D., Presbyterian- 
University Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA 

Jim Wallis, Sojourners Magazine, 
Washington, D.C. 

Louis and Colleen Evans, National 
Presbyterian Church, Washingtion, D.C. 

Mary Beth Peters, Organizational Develop- 
ment Consultant, NYC 

James A. Sanders, Claremont School of 
Theology, CA 



Educational Programs 43 




Clinton Marsh, President of Knoxville Col- 
lege, TN 

Eduard R. Schweizer, University of Zurich 

John C. Wynn, Colgate-Rochester Divinity 
School, NY 

Robert H. Meneilly, Village Presbyterian 
Church, Prairie Village, KA 

James Forbes, D.Min., Union Theological 
Seminary, NYC 

John Birkbeck, Aberdeen, Scotland 

Cynthia Campbell, Austin Theological 
Seminary, TX 

Harold Wilke, Exec. Dir. Community of 
Healing, White Plains, NY 

Robert K. Hudnut, Winnetka Presbyterian 
Church, IL 

Edmund Pellegrino, M.D., Georgetown 
University Medical School, Washington, 
D.C. 

James D. Glasse, Lancaster, PA, formerly 
President of Lancaster Theological 
Seminary 

Abraham Twerski, M.D., Gateway 
Rehabilitation Center and St. Francis 
Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 

Horace Allen, Boston University, MA 

Lloyd J. Ogilvie, First Presbyterian 
Church, Hollywood, CA 

Walter Menninger, M.D., Menninger Foun- 
dation, Topeka, KS 

James E. Lee, Gulf Oil Corporation, Pitts- 
burgh, PA 



Speed Leas, Alban Institute, Washington, 
D.C. 

Robert Schuller, Crystal Cathedral, 
Garden Grove, CA 

William F. Orr, Emeritus Professor, Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary, PA 

Josephine Massyngbaerde Ford, Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame, IN 

William Hudnut, Mayor of Indianapolis, IN 

GayraudS. Wilmore, Jr., New York 
Theological Seminary, NYC 

John S. Savage, President of L.E.A.D., 
Reynoldsburg, OH 

Elayne Hyman Bass, Howard University, 
Washington, D.C. 

Doris Hill, Western PA pastor, former 
Presbyterian G.A. Staff member 

James H. Costen, Interdenominational 
Theological Center, Atlanta, GA 

Matthew Fox, O.R, Holy Name College, 
Oakland, CA 

Michael Maccoby, Director, Harvard Pro- 
ject on Work, Washington, D.C. 

William S. Kanaga, Arthur Young Co., NYC 

Richard Munro, Time, Inc., NYC 

Donald W. Shriver, Jr., President of Union 
Theological Seminary, NYC 

Robert Wood Lynn, Lilly Endowment, 
Indianapolis, IN 

Martin E. Marty, Chicago University Divin- 
ity School, IL 



Course 
Descriptions 



46 Studies in Bible 

46 Required Courses 

48 Old Testament 

51 New Testament 

53 Studies in History 

53 Required Courses 

54 Electives 

56 Studies in Theology 

56 Required Courses 

57 Electives 

;--.-■-.":■■.■ [■■"-"'. ' ;':r-"" '■■•■:.. .- :' ■'■■■ 

59 Studies in Church and Ministry 

60 Required Courses 

62 Ministry 

62 Church and Society 

63 Ethics 

65 Sociology of Religion 

65 Education 

67 Pastoral Care 

69 Homiletics 

70 Worship and Church Music 

71 Evangelism and Mission 

72 Administration 



46 Course Descriptions 




Course 
Descriptions 



All courses are for three academic credits 
unless otherwise noted. 

Studies in Bible 

"Thy word is a lamp to my feet and a light to 
my path" (Psalm 119:105). The word of God 
in Scripture nourishes and regulates Chris- 
tian faith and action, it lays the cornerstone 
for every aspect of the Church's ministry to 
the world and it sets norms for the structures 
of Christian theology. A rediscovery of the 
Bible has provided the impetus for every for- 
ward movement in the history of the Church. 
At the end of the twentieth century, when 
alienation of individuals, races, classes and 
nations threatens to tear the world apart, 
when the issue of authority continues to be 
a problem, a new and careful look at the 
sources of our common faith is imperative. 

The intention of the courses offered is to 
engage students in Old and New Testament 
research in such a way that they may learn 
the methods of study, acquire the basic tools 
and skills necessary to undertake ministry 
and constantly relate their own study of the 
Scriptures to all facets of the Christian life. 

During the first two years of work in the 
M.Div. program students will survey the 
literature of the Old and New Testaments as 
well as explore the settings and influences 
of the biblical world by means of three core 
courses, i.e. Interpreting the Bible and one 
introduction in each Testament (OT01 or 
OT02 and NT01 or NT02). The curriculum 
also calls for serious consideration of the 
Bible in terms of study in the original 
languages. Therefore, Hebrew or Greek is 
required for two terms in the junior year and 
is immediately followed by a third-term exe- 
getical course in the corresponding Testa- 
ment. A similar sequence in the other 
language can be elected in the second or 
third year. As for further elective oppor- 
tunities, there are advanced exegetical offer- 
ings along with courses in the areas of the 
intertestamental period, archaeology, Near 



Eastern languages, biblical theology and 
ethics, hermeneutics, critical studies, etc. 

New discoveries which directly affect our 
understandings of the Bible continue to be 
announced with startling frequency. Pitts- 
burgh Seminary has a rich heritage of excel- 
lence in the area of biblical studies and we 
are determined to enable and inspire future 
generations of Christian leaders to join in 
the exciting venture of these pursuits. 

Required Courses in Bible 

8101 Interpreting the Bible 

The Bible is the foundation and touch- 
stone of our Christian faith and tradition. 
The Bible is also a collection of books, 
compiled over a long period of time, writ- 
ten in ancient languages and reflecting 
long dead and distant cultures. How do we 
go about understanding it and explaining it 
to others? This course will introduce 
students to their own presuppositions and 
to the ways in which the Church has inter- 
preted the Bible and offer the tools to 
begin the task. It will discuss the formation 
of the individual Books and their inclusion 
into the Canon of Holy Scripture, the prob- 
lem of the Bible as Word of God in the 
words of humans, the problem of historical 
statements and theological affirmations, 
the question of continuity and discontinu- 
ity and the contribution which the Bible 
makes to the task of theology. 



Term I 



OT01 



1985-86 Mr. Jackson and 
Mr. Mauser 

1986-87 Mr. Jackson and 
Mr. Mauser 



Historical Books of the Old 
Testament 

An introduction to the historical books of 
the Old Testament, intended to acquaint 
students with the basic methodologies of 
Old Testament research and the present 
state of Old Testament studies. 



Term 



1985-86 Mr. von Waldow 
1986-87 Mr. von Waldow 



Course Descriptions 47 



OT02 Prophets and Psalms 

The nature of prophecy in ancient Israel 
and its background in the cultures of the 
ancient Near East. Special attention is 
given to the genres of prophetic oracles 
and the methodologies which may be 
employed for their interpretation. The 
message of the great eighth-century 
prophets, Amos, Hosea, Micah and Isaiah 
of Jerusalem stand at the heart of the 
course. The world of Jeremiah, Deutero- 
Isaiah and Ezekiel is explored. An intro- 
duction to the Psalms, as the product of 
Israel's cultic life, concludes the course. 
The aim of the whole is to enable the stu- 
dent to begin exegesis with a firm grasp of 
the fundamentals. 



Term 



NT01 



1985-86 Mr. Jackson 
1986-87 Mr. Gowan 



Gospels, General Epistles and 
Revelation 

The principal emphasis of this course is on 
the four Gospels and the methods 
employed in their critical study (literary 
form, and redaction criticism). General 
Epistles, Revelation and matters of text 
and canon are examined briefly. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Kelley 
1986-87 Mr. Hare 

NT02 Acts, Pauline Epistles and 
Hebrews 

The messages of Acts, the Pauline epistles 
and Hebrews are examined in the light of 
their historical context and literary struc- 
ture. Special emphasis is placed on the life 
and thought of Paul. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Hare 
1986-87 Mr. Kelley 

OT03 Hebrew 

A course designed to lead to an apprecia- 
tion and competent use of Hebrew as one 
of the languages of biblical revelation. 
Instruction is in small, graded sections so 
that a maximum of individual attention and 
achievement is possible. Two sections will 
follow the inductive method, working 
directly with selected texts of the Hebrew 
Bible. One section will employ the more 
traditional approach, using a grammar as 
the basic tool of instruction. Students may 
elect either approach. 

Term I Staff 



OT04 Hebrew 

A continuation of OT03. 

Term II Staff 

OT05 Old Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Hebrew 
moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence. Individual professors indicate 
to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose of 
this course is twofold: 1) Introduction to ex- 
egetical method: moving from grammar 
and syntax to the application of critical 
methods and the use of reference 
materials in order to arrive at conclusions 
concerning the original and present mean- 
ing of a text; 2) Continuation of the Hebrew 
language sequence. 

Term III Staff 

NT03 New Testament Greek 

A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of 
biblical revelation. From the outset the stu- 
dent learns inductively to read from the 
Greek New Testament and unique study 
aids prepared by the Staff are used. 
Instruction is in small, graded sections. 
Students who have previously studied 
Greek will be assigned to special sections. 

Term I Staff 

NT04 New Testament Greek 

Continuation of NT03, teaching by the 
inductive method. 

Term II Staff 







48 Course Descriptions 





Jared Jackson 



Ulrich Mauser 



NT05 New Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Greek 
moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence. Individual professors indicate 
to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose of 
this course is twofold: 1) Introduction to 
methodology of exegesis, such as prob- 
lems and limitations of an English transla- 
tion; source strata for selected passages 
which will be chosen by the professor for 
critical problems, structure analysis, 
historical background of sources and text; 
intent; introduction to the theology of the 
particular book; 2) Continuation of the 
Greek language sequence. 

Term III Staff 

Old Testament 

Required Courses in Old Testament 



OT01 


Historical Books of the Old 
Testament 


OT02 


Prophets and Psalms 


OT03 


Hebrew 


OT04 


Hebrew 


OT05 


Old Testament Exegesis 



Elective Courses in Old Testament 

OT14 Deutero-lsaiah 

The purpose of this course is twofold: 1) In- 
troduction to methodology of exegesis, 
such as problems and limitations of an 
English translation, form critical problems, 



structure analysis, historical background 
of the book of Deutero-lsaiah, intent; 2) 
Introduction to the theology of Exile. In par- 
ticular, the expectation of salvation against 
the background of 587 B.C. , Old Testament 
eschatology. 

Mr. Jackson 

OT15 Amos 

A study of the book of Amos: its major 
emphasis; the place of the prophet in 
Israel's culture; and the significance of the 
message of Amos for our situation. 

Mr. Jackson 

OT26 The Beginnings of the History 
of Israel 

A study of the historical question: In what 
sociological entity did Israel enter the 
scene of ancient Near Eastern History? 
The focus is on the historical background 
of the traditions of Israel in Egypt, the 
Patriarchs, the Sinai and the occupation of 
the land. These considerations lead to the 
discussion of the theological question: 
Why does the Old Testament tradition 
describe the beginning of the history of the 
chosen people differently from the actual 
course of events? 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT27 The Jews in a Christian World 

Discussion of the history of the Jewish 
people in the Western world. The course is 
based on the nine-part television series, 
HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE 
JEWS. The video tapes will be shown at 
the beginning of the class sessions and 



Course Descriptions 49 




Eberhard von Waldow 



Donald Gowan 



serve as a basis for discussion. Special 
attention will be given to the relationship 
between Jews and Christianity. Topics to 
be discussed include: Jesus the Jew; The 
Beginnings of Christianity as a Jewish 
sect; The Jews in the Christian Middle 
Ages; Secular and Christian anti- 
Semitism; Jews and Christians after the 
Holocaust, towards a theology of the peo- 
ple of God. Supplementary readings will 
help the student to understand the Jewish 
experience in a larger historical context. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. von Waldow 

OT28 Biblical Archaeology 

An introduction to archaeology's contri- 
bution to biblical studies, how it has 
increased our understanding of biblical 
times, thrown light on biblical texts and ad- 
vanced our knowledge of biblical history. 
Concentration will be on one particular 
period of Israel's history to illustrate ar- 
chaeology's methodology and 
contribution. 

Term II 1985-86 Ms. Lapp 
1986-87 Ms. Lapp 

OT30 Ancient Israel and Egypt 

The influence of the experience of slave 
life in Egypt upon tradition of Israel's story, 
and of the continued contact between 
Egypt and Israel after the entrance of 
Israel into Canaan and into the Exilic age 
and after. This will involve a study of the 
forms of Egyptian literature and a compari- 
son and contrast with the genres of the Old 
Testament. Hebrew not required. 
Mr. Jackson 



OT31 Judaism from the Exile to the 
Birth of the Church 

A survey of the history, life and faith of the 
Jewish people, covering the postexile 
parts of the Old Testament and the 
literature of the Intertestamental Period. 
Deals with life-styles, institutions, literature 
and theology as well as the history of the 
period. 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Gowan 

OT32 Ezekiel 

This course will interpret the theology of 
the book of Ezekiel against the 
background of the fall of Jerusalem in 587 
B.C. and the beginnings of the experience 
of exile in Babylonia. Knowledge of 
Hebrew will not be required, but 
assistance will be given in working with the 
Hebrew text for those who wish to take it as 
an exegetical course. 

Mr. Gowan 

OT33 Ancient Texts Relating to the 
Old Testament 

A study of extra-Biblical texts which have 
thrown light on the Bible; including the 
early cuneiform tablets of Ebla, Mari and 
Nuzi, the Ugaritic Canaanite literature, 
Hebrew inscriptions such as the Siloam 
inscription and the Samaria, Lachish and 
Arad ostraca, and Egyptian literature 
relating to the Old Testament. For those 
who have Hebrew there will be an oppor- 
tunity to read some of the Hebrew texts. 

Term III 1986-87 Ms. Lapp 



50 Course Descriptions 




Robert Kelley 



Douglas Hare 



OT36 Jeremiah 

The first part of the course uses the book 
of Jeremiah to demonstrate the develop- 
ment from the original oral pronounce- 
ment of prophetic words to prophetic 
books as we have them today in the canon. 
The second part deals with the original 
theology of the prophet Jeremiah and its 
interpretation by a later generation which 
produced the prose sections in the book of 
Jeremiah. Prerequisite: Hebrew (OT03 
andOT04). 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT37 Worship and Psalms 

Seminar on Israel's songs and the Chris- 
tian use of the Psalter in corporate wor- 
ship. Two-track: students with some knowl- 
edge of Hebrew will be helped in exegesis; 
others will be expected to do wider reading 
for their interpretation of the Psalms. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. von Waldow 

OT38 Eschatology of the Old 
Testament 

The Old Testament view of the future will 
be explored, beginning with its broadest 
sense as the fulfillment of God's promises, 
but concentrating on the expectation of 
radical changes in humanity, society and 
nature to occur "in that day." The contribu- 
tions of Old Testament thought to later 
Jewish and Christian eschatology and 
relationships with modern future hopes 
will be emphasized. 

Mr. Gowan 



OT39 Worship in Israel 

The essence of worship in Israel and the 
basic theological ideas reflected in the 
major annual feasts and some typical 
cultic activities; the importance of the 
Israelite cultic personnel, such as priests, 
Levites and prophets. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT40 Hebrew Reading 

Supervised reading of selected Old Testa- 
ment passages. One credit. 

Offered each term Staff 

OT42 Faith and Culture in the Ancient 
Near East 

Ways in which different religious faiths of 
the ancient world dealt with the problem of 
conflicting cultures. The course will offer a 
study of selected texts bearing upon the 
attitudes a faith may have toward other 
faiths: tolerance and exclusivity, interna- 
tionalism and xenophobia, proselytism 
and universalism. Various theologies con- 
sistent with these attitudes will be exam- 
ined: deity as "jealous" or tolerant, angry 
or benign, tribal or universal. Illustrative 
documents will be chosen from the 
iconography and literature of the cultures 
which surrounded Israel as well as from 
Israel's own literature. 



Term I 
OT43 



1986-87 Mr. Jackson 



Interpretations of History in the 
Ancient Near East 

The class will focus on 1) the question of 
history and historiography in ancient Israel 
and the surrounding cultures and 2) 



Course Descriptions 51 



samples of the problems faced by modern 
students who seek to recover and interpret 
the ancient texts, illustrated by selected 
extra-biblical texts. 

Mr. Jackson 

OT45 Old Testament Ethics 

The course deals with the ethical implica- 
tions of the faith of the Old Testament peo- 
ple. Points of discussion are: the authority 
behind the ethical imperative, the motiva- 
tion of ethical behavior, the sociological 
and cultural setting of ethical precepts. In 
terms of Old Testament literature the 
course is based on the law tradition and 
prophetic writings. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. von Waldow 

OT50 Themes of Old Testament 
Theology 

Some basic Old Testament theological 
concepts which became characteristic of 
the Christian theology are investigated 
such as: authority of God, revelation, 
history, creation, the individual and the 
community. Included are basic aspects of 
Old Testament ethics, worship and the dif- 
ference between Christian and Jewish 
interpretation. 

Mr. von Waldow 

Additional Language Instruction 

Courses in Aramaic, Egyptian and Ugaritic 
are available upon request. 




Nancy Lapp 

New Testament 

Required Courses in New Testament 

NT01 Gospels, General Epistles and 
Revelation 

NT02 Acts, Pauline Epistles and 
Hebrews 

NT03 New Testament Greek 

NT04 New Testament Greek 

NT05 New Testament Exegesis 

Elective Courses in New Testament 

NT12 Christianity According to 
Matthew 

An examination of the theology of the First 
Gospel in the light of the historical 
background, employing redaction 
criticism as a major exegetical tool. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. Hare 



NT14 Parables in Luke 

An exegetical study of the parables of 
Jesus found in the all-important central 
section of the Third Gospel (chapters 
10-18). 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Kelley 

NT15 Gospel of John 

The entire Gospel examined with some 
exegetical detail but with emphasis on the 
theological dimensions of the book. Some 
attention is given to the large secondary 
literature, but the Greek text is the primary 
resource. 



Staff 



52 Course Descriptions 



NT17 Exegesis of I Corinthians 

An exegetically oriented survey of the 
entire epistle with detailed study of 
selected parts. The range of insights into 
the life of the early church and the variety 
of theological problems in this letter make 
it an excellent source from which to learn 
the task of interpreting the Greek New 
Testament. 

Staff 

NT20 The Old Testament in the New: 
The Epistle to the Hebrews 

The Epistle to the Hebrews appears to be 
an exegetical meditation on a series of 
significant Old Testament texts. This 
course examines the hermeneutic of the 
epistle, paying special attention to the 
interplay between doctrinal statement and 
ethical exhortation. 

Mr. Hare 

NT21 I Peter 

An exegetical course on the basis of the 
Greek text of I Peter. Special emphasis is 
laid on the situation in which the epistle 
was written and on its relation to other 
major books in the New Testament. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT22 Paul's Letter to the Romans 

This exegetical seminar will examine the 
major theological and paraenetic themes 
of Romans in relation to Paul's 
understanding of the place of Israel in 
God's plan. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT23 Interpreting the Parables 

The history of parable exegesis will be 
traced. Current trends in parable inter- 
pretation will be noted. Specific parables 
will be studied. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Kelley 

NT26 EschatologyintheNew 
Testament 

The New Testament materials are studied 
with particular emphasis on Mark 13, 
Paul's Thessalonian letters and the 
Revelation. The focus is on biblical 
theology based on sound exegesis. Appro- 
priate reading in the twentieth-century 
literature on the subject is assigned. 

Staff 



NT29 Crises in the History of the 
Early Church 

Selected texts from the New Testament 
and from extracanonical sources are 
studied in the investigation of three crises 
experienced by the early Church: 1) the 
tension between Jewish and gentile Chris- 
tians and the emergence of the Ebionite 
movement, 2) the threat of a Gnostic 
takeover, 3) the assault of charismatic 
enthusiasm upon the traditional piety 
inherited from the synagogue. 



Mr. Hare 



NT31 



Practical Use of the New 
Testament: Mark 

An interpretation course examining the 
"First" gospel produced as a result of the 
life and ministry of Jesus and featuring its 
continuing significance for Christian faith 
and practice. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Kelley 

NT32 Practical Use of the New 
Testament: Luke 

An investigation of the major emphases 
and patterns in the "ecumenical" gospel. 
Particular attention will be devoted to the 
didactic values in the central section of 
Luke, chapters 10-18. 

Mr. Kelley 

NT34 Ephesians and the Emerging 
Church 

This study of Ephesians will concentrate 
on the emerging concept of the chuch as a 
global community. Recent studies in the 
sociology of early Christianity and of the 
sociology of Roman-Hellenistic society in 
general will be introduced to complement 
the use of more traditional methods of 
exegetical study. The use of the Greek text 
of Ephesians is strongly encouraged. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT35 Practical Use of the New 
Testament: Acts 

An interpretation course examining the 
faith and life of the early church as 
reflected in the "bridge" document of the 
New Testament corpus, the book of Acts. 

Mr. Kelley 

NT37 Biblical Themes I: God & the 
Gods in the Old Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in com- 
parison with and contrast to the gods of 



Course Descriptions 53 



the ancient Near East. This is the first part 
of a sequence to be continued with a 
course on the same subject in the New 
Testament. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT38 Biblical Themes II: God & the 
Gods in the New Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in com- 
parison with and contrast to Hellenistic 
deities in the New Testament period. This 
is the New Testament part of a sequence 
on the nature of the biblical God. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT40 Greek Reading 

Supervised reading of selected New Testa- 
ment or Septuagint passages. One credit. 

Offered each term Staff 

NT41 Advanced Greek Grammar 

This course aims to give students a 
systematic grasp of Greek by combining 
the study of a grammar book with further 
reading in the New Testament text itself. 



Staff 



NT50 



Themes of New Testament 
Theology 

A study of selected major themes of the 
New Testament which are of crucial impor- 
tance to the New Testament Theology as a 
whole. Hermeneutical questions will be 
stressed. 

Term III 1986-87 Mr. Mauser 

NT53 Aspects of Paul's Theology 

A number of pervasive aspects of Paul's 
theology, such as eschatology, faith and 
law, justification and reconciliation, are 
dealt with. Stress is laid on the Jewish 
background of Paul's thought and on the 
nature of the opposition which he had to 
face. 

Mr. Mauser 

Studies in History 

Our aim in teaching Church history is to 
help the student to understand the history 
of the Church and its thought in the context 
of the twentieth century. The study of 
history is the study of roots, whether we 
deal with the history of a nation, a race or 
an idea. Christianity is firmly grounded in 
history. Its story is the account of the effect 
which the events of Christian history have 



had in human society. This involves both 
the history of doctrine as the Church's 
attempt to understand the significance of 
the biblical revelation and the history of the 
Church itself as the attempt of Christians 
to live in response to those events. 

We recognize two kinds of interaction that 
are important for our understanding of the 
Church today. First, we recognize that 
there has always been a dialogue between 
the Church and the society within which it 
is placed. Secondly, there is an integral 
relationship between the doctrine that the 
Church professes and the forms that it 
takes as a human community. All the 
courses offered recognize these two kinds 
of continuing interaction. 

For an adequate grasp of the Church's 
history the student will need to understand 
that history in the broad outline and then to 
deepen that study by examining particular 
periods or problems in more detail. To this 
end, the history faculty offers within the 
core curriculum introductory courses, 
which survey the history of the Church 
from the sub-apostolic age to the modern 
era. Further courses at an advanced level 
in both institutional Church history and the 
history of doctrine are offered regularly. 

Students who enter the Seminary with a 
rich background in historical studies may 
be permitted to waive introductory courses 
and move directly to more specialized 
study. 

Required Courses in Church History 

CH01 Historical Studies I 

This course deals with the background 
and development of the Christian Church, 
its life and thought, from the Sub-apostolic 
Age through the Middle Ages (c. A.D. 
100-1500). 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Partee 
1986-87 Mr. Wilson 

CH02 Historical Studies II 

A survey of the Renaissance, the Reforma- 
tions of the Sixteenth Century and their 
results (c. A.D. 1350-1650). 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Partee 
1986-87 Mr. Partee 



54 Course Descriptions 



. il 

1 1 ... 


He a BS ■ 






Charles Partee 



John Wilson 



CH03 Historical Studies III 

Survey of church history and modern 
Christian thought from the 17th through 
the early 20th Century. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Wilson 
1986-87 Mr. Wilson 

Elective Courses in Church History 

CH16 Augustine and Aquinas 

This seminar is designed to acquaint 
students with the work of two of the 
church's most influential theologians with 
special attention to their use of the thought 
of Plato and Aristotle, respectively. 

Mr. Partee 

CH17 Calvin's Institutes 

An in-depth study of the magisterial work 
of the man whom Melanchthon called "the 
theologian." Special attention will be 
devoted to its development, architectonic 
and misunderstanding. 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Partee 

CH18 The History of Christian 
Platonism 

This seminar considers the pervasive 
influence of Plato on the history of Chris- 
tian theology from the beginning to the 
present time by focusing on such thinkers 
as Pseudo-Dionysius, Origen, Augustine, 
Bonaventure, Calvin, Schleiermacher, the 
Cambridge Platonists and Barth. 

Mr. Partee 



CH28 Reformed Symbolics: The 
Creeds of Christendom 

This course will study the historical 
development and content of selected 
creeds and confessions of the Church with 
especial attention to the themes of 
Reformed consensus. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Partee 

CH29 Puritanism 

The Puritan church and Puritan thought in 
England and especially in New England, 
together with general consideration of the 
history and theology of the period of 
church history known as "Protestant 
Orthodoxy" (17th Century). 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Wilson 

CH30 Enlightenment and Awakening 

Religious and cultural life in Europe and 
especially in North America in the 18th 
Century. Concentration on the contradic- 
tory and, to some extent, complementary 
relationship between the Enlightenment 
and the Great Awakenings— the begin- 
ning of the "divided mind" of modern 
Christianity. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Wilson 

CH34 A Biographical History of 
Reformation 

This course approaches the thought of 
Reformation figures through the events of 
their lives. Students will be expected to 
become sensitive to and appreciative of 
the relation between theology and life by 
concentrating on life in the 16th century. 

Term III 1986-87 Mr. Partee 



Course Descriptions 55 




Carnegie Samuel Calian 



George Tutwiler 



CH35 Theology of Jonathan 
Edwards 

In-depth study of Edwards' theology. 
Selected primary texts. 

Mr. Wilson 

CH36 Religious Thought of the 
Enlightenment 

Theology and philosophy from Locke to 
Kant. Selected primary texts. 

Mr. Wilson 

CH37 Religious Thought of the 19th 
Century 

Theology and philosophy from Schleier- 
macherto Nietzsche. Selected primary 
texts. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. Wilson 

CH40 Contemporary Eastern 
Christianity 

This course is concerned with the various 
ancient churches of the East (Russian, 
Greek, Coptic, Armenian, etc.) and their 
respective involvement in theology, 
culture, society and political power. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Calian 

CH42 History of Methodism 

This course is designed to assist United 
Methodist students in understanding their 
denominational heritage within the context 
of historic Christianity — the life and times 
of John Wesley, early English Methodism 
and American Methodism to the present 
history of Black Methodists, the 



Evangelical United Brethren Church and 
the formation of The United Methodist 
Church. Required of United Methodist 
students for ordination. 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Tutwiler 

CH43 Church History of the United 
States 

Survey of church history from the colonial 
period to the present. Focus on aspects of 
central importance, currently: the church- 
state relationship. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Wilson 
1986-87 Mr. Wilson 

CH44 Pietism 

History and theology of Pietism in its for- 
mation and classical periods; considera- 
tion of the continuing influence of Pietism. 
Attention is also given to the tradition of 
Spiritualism in the 17th and 18th Centuries 
(e.g.,Swedenborg). 

Mr. Wilson 

CH45 Revivalism and 
Fundamentalism 

Religious and cultural history of American 
Evangelical Protestantism especially in 
the second half of the 19th and early 20th 
Centuries: Revival (D. L. Moody), Holi- 
ness, Pentacostalism, Fundamentalism. 
Understanding the origins of correspond- 
ing contemporary movements (and their 
ambivalent relationship to politics and 
science) is of central importance. 

Mr. Wilson 



56 Course Descriptions 




Susan Dunfee 



George Kehm 



NT29 Crises in the History of the 
Early Church 

TH39 Presbyterian Confessions 

Studies in Theology 

Systematic theology is the study of the 
meaning and implications of the Christian 
Faith as present in the doctrinal formula- 
tions of the historic and contemporary 
witness of the Church. Based in the nor- 
mative authority of the biblical writings as 
they inform the Gospel of Jesus Christ, 
systematic theology attempts to explicate 
rationally and structure in a consistent 
interrelationship the thematic content of 
the Word of God in Scripture. The Church 
has always recognized this task as crucial 
to its ministry of proclamation and recon- 
ciliation. Systematic theology studies 
those significant thinkers of the past and 
present whose service as theologians the 
Church has embraced. Yet it takes 
seriously the world in which we ourselves 
must now serve. The final aim of the study 
of systematic theology is the ability to 
engage in independent and responsible 
theological thinking within the practice of 
ministry. To meet this challenge, the great 
theologians of the past are read not only to 
familiarize ourselves with this rich heri- 
tage, but to learn how doctrinal formula- 
tions have resulted from the way in which 
particular theologians structured their 
systems. Pursuant to this task, systematic 
theology attends 1) to the investigation of 
problems of theological method and 2) to 



basic questions such as the foundation 
and source of authority, the reference and 
function of theological language, the inter- 
action of freedom and determinism and 3) 
to thematic issues of contemporary life as 
these focus theological concerns par- 
ticularly relevant to ministry within the 
American cultural milieu. 

The curriculum requires three courses in 
systematic theology. These courses cover 
Introduction to Systematic Theology, 
Christology and Soteriology and the 
Church and the Sacraments. Electives are 
available in the work of individual 
theologians, in specific areas of doctrine, 
in contemporary "schools" of theological 
method (Process, Liberation) and in the 
history and development of theology in the 
19th and 20th centuries. Finally, an inter- 
disciplinary colloquium in the constructive 
organization of theological themes in a 
personal statement of faith is required for 
all senior students (Credo). 

Required Courses in Systematic 
Theology 

TH01 Introduction to Systematic 
Theology 

Study of "theological method" (i.e., the 
tasks, sources and criteria of theology) 
and the doctrines of Scripture, revelation 
and God. 

Term I 1985-86 Ms. Dunfee 
Term II 1985-86 Mr. Kehm 
1986-87 Mr. Kehm 



Course Descriptions 57 




Walter Wiest 



TH02 Christology 

Problems posed for systematic thinking by 
Christian beliefs and doctrinal formula- 
tions concerning salvation and the 
significance of Jesus Christ. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Wiest 
1986-87 Ms. Dunfee 

TH03 Church and Sacraments 

A study of the Doctrine of the Church and 
Sacraments, focusing on the relation of 
individual faith to communal religious 
experience, on the purpose of the Church 
in the world, on the process of religious for- 
mation and transformation (justification 
and sanctification) within the fellowship of 
the Church and the distinctive nature of 
the Church as new Humanity and Body of 
Christ. Readings in Reformation, Post- 
Reformation and contemporary theology; 
lectures on issues and Pre-Reformation 
theology. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Kehm 
1986-87 Mr. Wiest 

Elective Courses in Systematic 
Theology 

TH12 The Doctrine of God I 

This course takes up the question of the 
"nature" of God; the divine "essence" 
common to the persons of the Trinity. The 
answers given by classical Thomistic and 
Calvinistic Theology will be examined, as 
well as the criticisms and counter- 
proposals made by such theologians as 
Schleiermacher, Barth, Tillich, Cobb, 



Kaufmann and Daly. Prerequisite: TH01. 
Mr. Kehm 

TH13 The Doctrine of God II 

This course takes up the question of the 
"attributes" of God. It will explore in detail 
what is meant by the unity, power, free- 
dom, wisdom, love, holiness, righteous- 
ness, eternity, etc., of God. Special atten- 
tion will be given to the differences in 
meaning that emerge in the neo-orthodox, 
process, feminist and other revisionist 
concepts of God. Prerequisite: TH01. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH14 Process Theology 

This course will investigate the theological 
implications of process philosophy. Par- 
ticular attention will be given to the work of 
Charles Hartshorne, John B. Cobb, Jr., 
and MarjorieSuchocki. 

Term II 1985-86 Ms. Dunfee 

TH15 The Doctrine of the Trinity 

A seminar to investigate the chief forms of 
the doctrine of the Trinity in Eastern and 
Western theology. Modern theological and 
philosophical criticisms of the doctrine 
and the constructive efforts of contem- 
porary theologians in the face of these 
criticisms will be examined. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH16 Phenomenology and Theology 

Introduction to phenomenological method 
as developed by Husserl Heidegger, 
Schutzand Merleau-Ponty. Examination 



58 bourse Descriptions 



of attempts to apply this approach to Chris- 
tian Theology in order to uncover the reali- 
ties referred to by terms such as "revela- 
tion," "sin," "redemption," "redemptive 
community," and the "presence" of 
"God." 

Mr. Kehm 

TH17 A Theology of Nature 

Attitudes toward the natural environment 
in the culture and in theology: the place of 
humanity in nature; God in nature; nature, 
evil and redemption. 

Mr. Wiest 

TH18 Revelation and Scripture 

Beneath the problem of biblical authority 
lies the problem of what is meant by 
"revelation." Traditional concepts of 
revelation have undergone radical criti- 
cism at the hands of modern biblical 
scholarship and systematic theology. The 
prevailing unclarity about the idea of 
revelation makes this an opportune time 
for a fresh attempt to clarify and refine 
Christianity's claim to be based on revela- 
tion. Such a study should provide the 
proper basis and essential clues for 
developing a Christian doctrine of "Holy 
Scripture." Prerequisite: TH01. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH20 Major Christian Theologians: 
Paul Tillich 

A study of Tillich's approach to systematic 
theology with an emphasis on both his 
method and the content of his thought. 
The course will focus on the way in which 
Tillich presents traditional Christian 
doctrines. 

Term III 1986-87 Mr. Wiest 

TH23 A Theology of the Body 

Study of the significance of the human 
body from the standpoint of theological 
anthropology. Special attention to the 
ways in which the human body shapes 
and is disposed by human person and so 
enters into the dynamics of the struggle to 
live faithfully before God and others in the 
world. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. Kehm 

TH28 Human Evil and Redemption 

A study of the genesis and forms of 
expression of what has been called "sin" 
with a corresponding analysis of how the 



biblical symbols of God's redemptive activ- 
ity in the death and resurrection of Jesus 
mediate the power to transcend the 
dynamics that perpetuate sin. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH29 Theology of Presence and 
Communion 

Study of the modes of divine presence that 
appear in or are suggested by the biblical 
traditions. Special attention will be given to 
those connected with "atonement" or 
reconciliation and with the presence of the 
Holy Spirit in the communities of Jesus' 
disciples. 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Kehm 

TH30 The Idea of Love in Christian 
Thought 

Christians, the Gospels record, are com- 
manded to be people who love. What is the 
nature of this Christian love? How is God's 
love the ground of Christian love? How is 
Christian love different from "normal" 
human loves? Through studying Scripture 
and the work of various Christian 
theologians this course will seek to 
understand the various dimensions of the 
idea of love in Christian thought. 

Ms. Dunfee 

TH31 The Identity of Christianity 

Reexamination of the question of the 
essence of Christianity with application to 
the reinterpretation of the Christian 
message by third world theologians. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Kehm 

TH32 The Encounter of Christianity 
with World Religions 

This course will focus upon the issue of 
religious pluralism through 1) introducing 
the student to major non-Christian 
religions and 2) studying various contem- 
porary responses to pluralism. 

Term I 1986-87 Ms. Dunfee 

TH35 Major Christian Theologians: 
Kierkegaard 

This course will place Kierkegaard in the 
context of the religious/philosophical 
thought of his times and, through studying 
a variety of Kierkegaard's works, will 
explore his unique perspective on what it 
means to be a Christian. 



Term 



1985-86 Ms. Dunfee 



Course Descriptions 59 



TH36 The Theology of Karl Barth 

Study of Karl Barth's theological develop- 
ment focusing on his love-hate relation- 
ship with Schleiermacher, his revisions of 
the Reformed tradition, his "socialism," 
and influence on contemporary Protestant 
theologians of "liberation." 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Kehm 

TH38 The Reformed Tradition: Its 
Past, Present and Future 

The Reformed tradition has not been a 
monolithic "Calvinistic system," defended 
by some, attacked by others, maintaining 
its integrity and vitality through keeping 
intact certain essential doctrines. Some 
have taken the opposite view. But modern 
hermeneutical theory as well as studies in 
the history of tradition in various Christian 
churches offer more accurate and more 
useful ways of interpreting the "trajectory" 
of the Reformed tradition. This course will 
investigate the origins of the Reformed 
tradition in the sixteenth century (espe- 
cially Calvin, Zwingli and Bullinger); its 
classical confessional expressions (up to 
the Synod of Dort and the Westminster 
Confession); the "creative" re-interpre- 
tations attempted by various theologians 
in the 19th century (Schleiermacher, 
MacLeod Campbell, Charles Hodge, B. B. 
Warfield, James Orr, Briggs and Schaff); 
and the history of Presbyterian creedal 
revisions in the USA down to the Confes- 
sion of 1967. Theological issues in the cur- 
rent wave of "evangelical" attacks upon 
the PC(USA) will be discussed. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH39 Presbyterian Confessions 

An examination of the Book of Confes- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church and 
related materials, with particular attention 
to what it means to be an active member in 
the Reformed tradition in contemporary 
society. 

Term III 1986-87 Mr. Calian and Mr. Kehm 

TH42 Women's Experience and 
Christian Faith 

This course will explore the nature of 
women's experience. Who is woman? How 
do women experience their selfhood and 
how does it develop? How do dependency 
and hiding hinder women's full develop- 
ment? What are the theological questions 
raised from the perspective of women's 



experience? The course will then examine 
the reason why several women are doing 
theology — expressing faith— from the 
context of their experience as a woman. 

Term II 1986-87 Ms. Dunfee 

TH43 Women and the Bible 

This course will explore both the role of 
women in the Bible as it is understood in 
the work of several feminist scholars and 
the methods they have used to reach their 
conclusions. 

Term III 1986-87 Ms. Dunfee 

TH44 Women and Religion in the U.S. 

A study of women and religion in the U.S. 
from colonial times to the present with an 
intent to identify common and/or contra- 
dictory themes between past and current 
movements of women's spirituality. 

Ms. Dunfee 

TH49 United Methodist Doctrine 

An introduction to the theology of John 
Wesley; a consideration of theological 
transitions; and an examination of con- 
tributions by important recent Methodist 
theologians to the major doctrines of the 
Christian faith. Required of United 
Methodist students for ordination. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Tutwiler and 

Mr. Kehm 
TH50 God and Some Philosophers 

Study of selected readings in Platonism 
and Aristotelianism and in modern 
idealism and empiricism, with attention 
directed to: 1) the interpretations of religion 
found in these philosophies, 2) some of the 
ways in which they have affected theologi- 
cal thought and 3) such inferences as may 
be drawn from this material concerning 
the whole problem of the relation of philos- 
ophy to theology. 

Mr. Wiest 

CH40 Contemporary Eastern 
Christianity 

Studies in Church and Ministry 

The purpose of study in the Church and 
Ministry field is to bring theory to bear 
upon the practice of Christian faith. 
Ministry means service with and for 
others. Students and professors in this 
area inquire into how Christian theory and 
practice can be united in ministry to the 



60 Course Descriptions 




Richard Oman 



Andrew Purves 



church and through the church to the 
world. Consequently, the Church and 
Ministry field is engaged in the critical 
study of the professional ministry, the insti- 
tutional church and contemporary society 
so that students may be adequately pre- 
pared for future ministry. 

Ministry by both professional and lay per- 
sons in the church requires knowledge 
and skills pertinent to social strategies, life 
styles, language patterns, counseling 
techniques, educational models and 
administrative systems appropriate to the 
Gospel in today's world. To this end a wide 
variety of courses is offered in ministry, 
Church and society, ethics, sociology of 
religion, education, pastoral care, 
homiletics, worship and church music, 
evangelism and missions and 
administration. 

In other areas of study as well there will be 
an emphasis on the social context of 
ministry. For example, professors of 
systematic theology give attention to the 
social dimensions of Christian faith as 
examined by liberation theology. There are 
biblical courses which stress the social 
milieu of ancient Israel and the application 
of biblical ethics to modern society. 
Courses dealing with moral education and 
women in society are offered regularly. 
Special interest in business values 
undergirds the seminary's commitment to 
providing leadership in this area for the 
business community of Pittsburgh, the 
third largest corporate headquarters com- 



munity in the USA. The seminary's urban 
setting provides an outstanding locus for 
the study of church, society and ethical 
concerns. 

Required Courses in Church and 
Ministry 

MS01 Introduction to Ministry 

This team-taught course will introduce 
students to the concept of ministry, its 
biblical and theological basis, the prob- 
lems faced by ministers in role definition 
vis-a-vis the varying expectations of 
church members, the function of the vari- 
ous theological disciplines in preparation 
for effective ministry and the place of the 
student's faith formation in integrating the 
education experiences at the seminary. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Calian and Staff 
1986-87 Mr. Calian and Staff 

PD01 Credo 

The purpose of this colloquium is to assist 
students to work through the main ques- 
tions in the traditional loci of Christian doc- 
trine, drawing upon their accumulated 
knowledge of Scripture, historical and 
systematic theology and their own tradi- 
tion, in order to enable them to formulate 
their own theological position in a com- 
prehensive, well-grounded way. 

Term II 1985-86 Ms. Dunfee and Staff 

1986-87 Mr. Oman and Mr. Partee 

PD02 Spiritual Formation 

Taken at the end of the final year, this 
course in spiritual formation complements 



Course Descriptions 61 




Ronald Stone 



Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas 



work done in theological and professional 
formation. Through lectures, seminars, 
assigned readings, retreat and the keep- 
ing of a daily discipline and journal, 
students will be assisted in the practice of 
prayer as a part of the foundation of Chris- 
tian life and ministry. Students will be intro- 
duced to different spiritual traditions. Of 
special significance will be the work of the 
sections in which students will be encour- 
aged to share together their anticipations 
and fears of ministry, their continuing 
exploration of call and spiritual gifts and 
their experiences with daily disciplines. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Purves 
1986-87 Mr. Purves 

CS01 Church and Society: Local 

In the first term emphasis is given to the 
contribution sociological methods can 
make to understanding religious life in its 
varied forms. Particular attention is given 
to the urban situation in which most 
Americans live, using Pittsburgh as a 
model for studying the dynamics of urban 
life. Specific attention is given to the 
historic roles of church, ethnic and 
theological traditions in contributing to the 
unique character of this urban community. 
Such study provides a pattern by which 
any community may be studied to discern 
the relation of religious to general social 
dynamics. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Castillo 
1986-87 Mr. Stone 



CS03 Church and Society: Global 

The global context of the church is exam- 
ined through a study of political and inter- 
national dimensions of church life. The 
interrelatedness of national and interna- 
tional—population, food, militarism, 
energy, economics, repression, social 
justice— demonstrates the larger context 
within which Christian ministry is carried 
on, whether in the affluent or Third World 
countries. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Stone 
1986-87 Mr. Castillo 

ET01 Introduction to Ethics 

An introduction to the theological and 
philosophical issues in contemporary 
Christian social thought. Focus on the 
ethics of the church as a social institution 
and Christian political theology. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Stone 
1986-87 Mr.Stone 

PS01 Pastoral Studies: Education 

In this segment of the Pastoral Studies 
sequence students are engaged in study- 
ing the many aspects and possibilities of 
education programming in churches. A 
general view of educational philosophy 
and methodology and their relation to 
theological, biblical and, historical studies, 
provides a basis for evaluating major 
denominational patterns and curricular 
materials. Correlation with educational 
responsibilities in field work, particularly 
relative to youth ministries, adds focus to 



62 Course Descriptions 




Robert Ezzell 



Harjie Likins 



each student's development of his or her 
own philosophy of education and requisite 
skills. 

Term I 1985-86 Ms. Likins 

1986-87 Ms. Likins or Staff 

PS02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Concurrent field experience provides a 
basis for study of pastoral care. Students 
are helped to understand the ministry of 
pastoral care in the history and theology of 
the Church. Attention is given to the prac- 
tice of pastoral care in different settings 
and situations. Each student will prepare 
and present a case study for group 
discussion. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Purves 
1986-87 Staff 

PS03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

The third-termseminar groups in the 
Pastoral Studies course provide an intro- 
duction to homiletics as a responsibility of 
ministers. Attention is given to the exegeti- 
cal bases of preaching, to problems of 
hermeneutics and authority and to such 
rhetorical considerations as sermon con- 
struction, style and audience. Each stu- 
dent prepares and presents sermons and 
the seminar groups engage in the critique 
of these sermons. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Ezzell 
1986-87 Mr. Oman 



Ministry 

Required Courses in Ministry 

MS01 Introduction to Ministry 

PD01 Credo 

PD02 Spiritual Formation 

Elective Course in Ministry 

PD03 Professional and Ministerial 
Leadership 

This colloquium focuses attention upon 
professional aspects of ministerial 
responsibilities. The work of the term 
assumes a holistic perspective by giving 
an opportunity for reflection on the 
resources each student now brings to the 
interrelation of the various ministerial func- 
tions. Because ministry is always in a par- 
ticular setting and in terms of one's 
appraisal of that situation, responsible 
decisions require self-consciousness in 
diagnosis and evaluation of various situa- 
tions. This course is required for all 
students who are not eligible for MS01 , 
Introduction to Ministry. 

Mr. Oman 

Church and Society 

Required Courses in Church and 
Society 

CS01 Church and Society: Local 

CS03 Church and Society: Global 



Course Descriptions 63 



Elective Courses in Church and Society 

CS10 Women in Church and Society 

The scope of the course includes various 
feminist positions; the conditions extant 
within society which brought about the 
contemporary liberation movement and 
the extent to which it influences church 
women. The exploration of biblical and 
theological themes as reflected in the 
writings of Ruether, Fiorenza and Trible 
are emphasized. Special attention is given 
to the needs of women in ministry. 

Term II 1985-86 Ms. Likins 

CS12 Feminism and Small Group 
Process 

The course assumes that the professional 
minister will engage in extensive work with 
both traditional and feminist women's 
groups. The existence and influence of 
such groups within the contemporary 
church will be a focus of research. There 
will be an emphasis upon skills in small 
group leadership and the planning of 
effective educational programs. 

Term III 1985-86 Ms. Likins 

Ethics 

Required Course in Ethics 
ET01 Introduction to Ethics 

Elective Courses in Ethics 

ET13 Human Sexuality 

An inquiry into ethical questions raised by 
the current revolution in sexual attitudes 
and behavior. Consideration of such 
issues as pre-marital and extra-marital 
relations, marriage and divorce, alter- 
native marriage patterns, understandings 
of male and female sexuality, treatments of 
sex in literature and public media. 

Mr. Wiest 

ET15 Readings in Contemporary 
Theological Ethics 

Discussion of selected readings from con- 
temporary Protestant and Roman Catholic 
ethicists, such as R. Niebuhr, K. Barth, E. 
Brunner, H. R. Niebuhr, P. Ramsey, P. 
Lehmann, D. Bonhoeffer, G. Winter, J. 
Gustafson, K. Rahner, B. Haering, J. Mari- 
tain, J.C. Murray. 



ET17 Law, Theology and Ethics 

Reading and discussion of selected topics 
within the following areas: 1) comparisons 
and contrasts between jurisprudential and 
theological concepts and ways of thinking; 
relations between law, morality and reli- 
gion; 2) ethical issues such as civil dis- 
obedience, punishment, laws regarding 
sexual behavior, censorship, problems in 
church-state relations, professional ethics. 
(Obtainable as Ph.D. course) 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Wiest 

ET18 The Ethics and Theology of 
H. Richard Niebuhr 

A consideration of the formative influences 
on the thought of H.R. Niebuhr and an 
analysis of his major writings in ethics and 
theology. 

Mr. Stone 

ET19 Concept of Freedom in 
Christian Ethics 

An analysis of some of the meanings 
which "freedom" ("liberty") has in Chris- 
tian theology and ethics, with comparison 
between these and other philosophical 
meanings (or theological) on the contem- 
porary scene (e.g., in various liberation 
movements). Consideration will be given 
the traditional problems such as freedom 
vs. determinism, freedom and grace; and 
to the function of freedom as a normative 
concept in Christian ethics. 



Mr. Wiest 



ET20 



Term 



1985-86 Mr. Wiest 



The Thought of Reinhold 
Niebuhr 

A detailed examination of The Nature and 
Destiny of Man and the study of Reinhold 
Niebuhr's political and social writings. 

Mr. Stone 

ET21 Christian Ethics in a Business 
Ethos 

The study of Christian ethics as it relates to 
the business ethos of Pittsburgh and 
through Pittsburgh to the nation and the 
world. 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Calian and Mr. Stone 

ET22 Ethics of D. Bonhoeffer 

A seminar devoted to reading and discus- 
sion of several of Bonhoeffer's books and 
of some secondary source material . 

Term III 1986-87 Mr. Wiest 



64 Course Descriptions 



ET23 Social Teachings of the Chris- 
tian Churches 

Study of selected positions in the history of 
the churches' social teaching from the 
New Testament to the end of the nine- 
teenth century. Focus on the issues of 
Christ and culture, church and state, the 
treatment of women, the Christian and 
war. 



Mr. Stone 



ET25 



Moral Issues in International 
Politics 

The perennial problems of Christian ethics 
and international politics; the theory of 
international politics; the moral issues 
raised by hunger and nuclear armaments, 
particular case studies in United States 
foreign policy. 

Mr. Stone 

ET26 Business Practices and 
Religious Roots 

The interplay of business and religion has 
a long heritage in American history. This 
course seeks to understand through case 
studies and readings the tensions and 
trade-offs found in the realities of the 
marketplace. The course seeks to build a 
model of viable Christian discipleship in a 
business oriented world. 

Term III 1986-87 Mr. Calian and Staff 

ET30 Christianity in the Latin 

American Context: Ethical 
Issues 

A critical analysis of recent developments 
within Christianity in Latin America. The 
emphasis will be on the ethical issues 
involved in the struggle for liberation; the 
taking of sides in situations of intense 
social conflict; the implications of Chris- 
tian love to one's attitude towards the op- 
pressed and the oppressors; and the 
church's attitude towards material 
possessions. 

Mr. Castillo 

ET32 Love and Justice 

A seminar inquiry into the concepts and 
practice of the virtues of love and justice. 
Classical and contemporary sources will 
be examined with the social ethics of Paul 
Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhrand Martin 
Luther King, Jr., receiving special 
attention. 



ET33 Christian Ethics and 
Technology 

The pace of technological change 
remakes society and produces new ethical 
issues. This course will consider the 
impact of technology in ethical issues and 
the role of Christian ethics in the debates 
over technological change with particular 
reference to issues raised by computers, 
space technology, weapons development, 
energy technologies and the limits to 
growth debate. 

Mr. Stone 

ET34 The Social Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A consideration of Paul Tillich as a social 
philosopher and activist. Study of his writ- 
ings on culture, politics, ethics, religious 
socialism, The Religious Situation, The 
Socialist Decision, Love, Power and Jus- 
tice, and Political Expectations. His Chris- 
tian ethical thought will be analyzed in 
relationship to his biography, historical set- 
ting and its contemporary and future 
relevance. 

Mr. Stone 

ET35 Seminar on Medical Ethics 

This course will be taught with the help of a 
member or members of the medical pro- 
fession. The class will consider, in ethical 
perspective, such issues as the social 
responsibilities of the medical profession; 
health care delivery and costs; patients' 
rights; abortion and sterilization; death 
and dying; transplantation and the use of 
scarce resources; genetics and genetic 
engineering; professional ethical codes; 
the relationship of ministers to medical 
professionals and of ministry to medical 
care. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Wiest 

ET36 Christianity and Economic 
Systems 

Seminar participants will examine the 
underlying assumptions found in 
capitalism, socialism and mixed 
economies involving these two systems. 
Basic questions of the course: What 
impact do economic systems have upon 
our understanding of the Christian 
message? What does the Gospel have to 
say to these economic systems? This 
course will be taught in cooperation with 



Mr. Stone 



Course Descriptions 65 



Professor Beeson, Administrator of the 
School of Business and Administration at 
Duquesne University. 

Mr. Calian 

ET37 The Ethics of Peacemaking 

A seminar consideration of the religious 
quest for peace with emphases on world 
religions and peace, the Christian the- 
ology of peace, militarism, the nuclear 
weapons debate, social justice and the 
current emphasis of the churches on 
peacemaking ministry. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Stone 

ET38 Ministerial Ethics 

A study of ethical problems arising in the 
practice of ministry, considered from the 
perspectives of the doctrine of ministry 
and of ministry as a profession. Considera- 
tion of such problems as: truth-telling; con- 
fidentiality; the minister as cleric and as a 
human being; ministers and money; allot- 
ments of time; the ministry and social 
issues; dealing with other ministers; stan- 
dards of "success" in ministry; relation- 
ships with other professionals; and the 
role of clergy in society. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Wiest 

Sociology of Religion 

Elective Courses in Sociology of 
Religion 

SR10 Introduction to the Sociology 
of Religion 

An inquiry into the nature, content and 
extension of the sociology of religion as a 
field of study within the social sciences. 
The student is made acquainted with the 
main theories on the role of religion in 
culture, personality and social structure, 
with reference to such authors as Durk- 
heim, Weber, Malinowski, Freud and 
Marx. 

Mr. Castillo 

SR13 The Latin American Context of 
Liberation Theology 

The political, social and religious context 
of "liberation theology" in Latin America, 
with particular reference to various 
development models, forms of popular 
religiosity and liberation movements and 
their impact on theological activity in that 
part of the continent. 

Mr. Castillo 




Ronald Peters 



SR16 



Critical Issues in the Sociology 
of Religion 

A panoramic survey of the major develop- 
ments in the field since the time of the 
"classics." The emphasis is on the preset 
status of the theses originally presented by 
Marx, Weber, Durkheim and Malinowski, 
about the nature and function of religion. 

Mr. Castillo 

SR18 Christianity and Cultures: 

Selected Readings From the 
Third World 

Discussion of selected texts from Las 
Casas, P. Freire, M. M. Thomas, J. S. Mbiti 
and E. Dussel, on such subjects as 
Western and non-Western worldviews, 
Christianity and colonialism, cultural 
disintegration and cultural reconstruction, 
Christianity and nationbuilding, salvation 
and humanization and "the church of the 
poor." 

Mr. Castillo 

Education 

Required Course in Education 

PS01 Pastoral Studies: Education 

Elective Courses in Education 

ED11 Moral Education in the Church 

The course explores recent research con- 
cerning the development of values in 
young persons and adults. Most particu- 
larly it deals with the work of Kohlberg and 
Simon as it relates to planned educational 
experience for children, youth and adults. 



66 Course Descriptions 




Nancy Foltz 



It also deals with the ways in which justice 
is perceived and the level of value percep- 
tion raised. 

Term I 1985-86 Ms. Likins 

ED16 The Black Church and Urban 
Education 

This course will review the involvement 
and contributions of Black congregations 
to the education of Blacks in America 
since 1850. The student will be encour- 
aged to explore the role of the Black 
Church in addressing public issues using 
education as a starting point. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Peters 

ED17 Historical Shaping of Church 
Education 

An exploration into the tenacity with which 
educational patterns introduced at various 
periods in church history have survived to 
shape current church education. 

Term I 1986-87 Staff 

ED19 Group Process 

The course deals with the theory and prac- 
tice of small group leadership and partici- 
pation with a special concern for the types 
of such groups currently found in 
churches. 

Term I 1986-87 Ms. Likins 

ED20 Youth Ministry 

A study of existing models, old and new, 
that have been or are being used in the 
church with particular emphasis upon 
analysis in regard to the needs of youth. 



Skills in communication with youth are 
emphasized. Survey of possibilities in 
terms of drama, film, etc. Emphasis upon 
program design. Distinction between 
junior and senior high school youth groups 
is emphasized: 

Term II 1986-87 Ms. Likins 

ED21 The Development of Faith in 
Christian Education 

The Christian faith in relation to the per- 
sonal and social developmental tasks of 
specific age levels; the resources of the 
church directed towards the religious 
needs of persons. Three areas will be 
stressed: children, youth and middle-aged 
adults. The course will integrate the 
theories of Jung, Kohlbergand Fowler with 
the potential development of faith 
experience. 

Term III 1985-86 Ms. Likins 

ED22 Church Educational 
Development 

The course will focus upon a careful study 
of church school curriculum. The student 
will be asked to carefully examine his or 
her own denomination's curriculum and to 
become familiar with its strengths and 
weaknesses. There will also be an inten- 
sive study of various styles of organization 
and administration. 

Term II 1986-87 Ms. Likins 

ED23 Educational Ministries with 
Adults 

The course will combine an investigation 
of prevalent theories, strategies and struc- 



Course Descriptions 57 





Von Ewing Keairns 



John Mehl 



tures for adult education in local con- 
gregations with the opportunity to design 
specific programs of adult education 
related to students' interest. 



Term 



ED24 



1985-86 Ms. Foltz 
1986-87 Ms. Foltz 



Theory and Design of Christian 
Education Curriculum in the 
Local Church 

Curriculum may be considered as a 
systematic plan for the teaching ministry of 
the congregation. Attention will center on 
principles for the design, analysis and 
evaluation of curriculum. 

Term II 1986-87 Staff 

ED25 Education, Spirituality and 
Pilgrimage 

The focus will be upon the integration of 
teaching and planning skills with theories 
of faith development and contemporary 
life visions. The emphasis will be upon the 
concepts of pilgrimage and sacrifice as 
they have been and are utilized within 
Christianity. 



Term I 
ED26 



1986-87 Ms. Likins 



Crisis Intervention for Young 
Children 

The course is conducted at the Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center. Work in 
groups provides experience for the pre- 
vention or arrest of problems in the devel- 
opment of a child. Methods are learned for 
the disciplined observation of children and 
families.Enrollment limited to 12-15 
students. 



Term III 1985-86 Ms. Keairns 
1986-87 Ms. Keairns 

ED27 The Bible inChristian Education 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process 
as related to the teaching of the Bible in 
Christian education. Theological and edu- 
cational assumptions will be critically 
analyzed as they exist in contemporary 
Christian education literature. Special 
attention will be given to extant curriculum 
materials in Christian Education. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Mehl 

Pastoral Care 

Required Course in Pastoral Care 
PS02 Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 



Elective Courses in Pastoral Care 

PC10 Psychological Foundations of 
Ministry 

This course traces human development 
along lines set forth by Freud and radically 
expanded by Erikson. With Erikson as the 
transitional figure, the course stresses 
developments in ego psychology as espe- 
cially helpful to the practice of ministry. 
The third section of the course analyzes 
communal components, deals with group 
theory and explores implications for minis- 
try. Theological material is part of the data 
of the course, especially process theology. 
Permission of instructor required. This 
course is also listed as DM21. 



Term I 



1985-86 Staff 
1986-87 Staff 



68 Course Descriptions 




Edward Powers 



PC12 Compassion in Pastoral Care 

This course examines compassion as an 
organizing theological focus for pasioral 
care. Beginning with a thorough study of 
the compassion of Jesus, the course will 
go on to review representative theologians 
who have highlighted the "suffering with" 
of God. The practice of compassion will be 
developed, firstly, by way of a spirituality of 
suffering and secondly, by examining the 
relationship between compassion and our 
own woundedness and vulnerability. The 
course will end with a study of compassion 
in recent pastoral care literature. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Purves 

PC13 Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course will examine three significant 
attempts to think theologically about pas- 
toral ministry in the context of the history of 
pastoral care. The goal is to help the stu- 
dent to think theologically about the work 
of pastoral care. For this reason, the 
course will be conducted on a lecture and 
seminar basis, with most of class time 
being taken up in seminar work. Each stu- 
dent will take responsibility for preparing 
and leading a seminar on a portion of one 
of the primary texts. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. Purves 

PC14 Psychology of Religion 

This course is designed to study religious 
experience. Religious experience is 
looked at from four perspectives: histori- 
cal, beginning with Jonathan Edwards and 
eighteenth-century Revivalism; psycholo- 
gical, including Freud. Jung and Allport; 



cross-cultural, singling out Otto and 
Eliade; and topical, identifying specific 
areas such as community, faith, conver- 
sion, worship, prayer, mysticism and voca- 
tion to which twentieth-century psycholo- 
gies of religion and contemporary religious 
experience provide data. Insofar as possi- 
ble the course is inductive and is limited to 
seminar size. 

Staff 

PC18 Crisis of Aging and the Church 

An introduction to the aging process and 
the demographic shift in both society and 
the church. The pastoral and institutional 
response to this challenge will be 
explored. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Powers 

PC19 Training the Pastor as Spiritual 
Director 

Borrowing from the long tradition of 
spiritual direction in the Roman Catholic 
Church, this course will explore how that 
tradition can be adapted for the use by 
Protestant pastors. The history, theology 
and practice of spiritual direction will be 
examined and discussed. A novel feature 
of the course will be each student's expo- 
sure both to giving direction and being 
directed. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. Purves 

PC23 The Spirituality of Thomas 
Merton 

This course is designed to be a thorough 
examination of the theology, practice and 
influence of this very significant twentieth- 



Course Descriptions 69 



century spiritual teacher. Merton's work 
will be considered in an ongoing dialogue 
with Protestant perspectives on the theolo- 
gy and practice of prayer. The goal of the 
course is to introduce students to Merton's 
work and to his place in contemporary 
American Spirituality. Merton will be used 
to allow issues in the theology and practice 
of prayer to emerge for discussion. 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Purves 

PC50 Pastoral Counseling Seminar 

This course is an advanced case seminar 
for persons who are currently working in 
situations of ministry. The aim of the semi- 
nar is to enable the students to think more 
clearly about the needs of people in those 
situations and whether those needs war- 
rant pastoral counseling or other types of 
pastoral intervention. When pastoral coun- 
seling is chosen as a means of help, the 
student will be given supervision in its use. 

Staff 

PC62 The Congregation as a Caring 
Community 

This course assumes that the professional 
minister is not the only minister to people 
in need, yet the congregation is not pre- 
pared to minister. So this course develops 
a design to equip a Remnant in the con- 
gregation to become a ministering people. 
A theology of care is scrutinized; a two- 
year program schematized, using both 
theological and psychological material; an 
on-the-job training component for laity 
detailed; and the pastor's role in the total 
program pinpointed. Besides theological 
and psychological readings, sources 
include D.Min. research projects dealing 
with the congregation as a caring 
community. 

Staff 

ED26 Crisis Intervention for Young 
Children 

Homiletics 

Required Course in Homiletics 
PS03 Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

Elective Courses in Homiletics 

HM10 Homiletics Practicum 

The course combines seminar discussion 
with the preparation and delivery of ser- 
mons and is designed to lead students 



beyond introductory homiletics to a more 
sophisticated understanding of the 
preacher's task. In small sections students 
preach twice during the term, as well as 
participate in detailed homiletical analysis. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Ezzel I 

HM11 Voice and Speech Practicum 

This is a ten-week session in fundamen- 
tals of voice and speech to maximize com- 
municative effectiveness. One credit. 

Offered each term Ms. Kania 

HM20 Parish Preaching 

Planning a year's pulpit work. An analysis 
of the seasons and festivals of the Chris- 
tian Year. Selecting resources for occa- 
sional sermons. 

Mr. Oman 

HM22 Preaching from the Gospel of 
Luke 

This course will study some of the great 
preaching themes found in St. Luke's Gos- 
pel. Particular attention will be given to the 
four "Great Songs of the Advent Season," 
as well as to selected portions of the Pas- 
sion narrative. 

Mr. Oman 

HM23 Twentieth Century Preaching 

An examination of methodological and 
theological developments in Christian 
preaching in the twentieth century. A study 
of contemporary preaching based on 
printed, recorded, audio and video-taped 
sermons of leading homileticians of our 
age. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. Oman 

HM24 Preaching from the Old 
Testament 

The course will provide an introduction to 
the special problems and possibilities 
offered by Old Testament preaching, 
including the discussion of how to use the 
principles of Old Testament interpretation 
for homiletical purposes and experience in 
the preparation of sermons on different 
types of passages. 

Mr. Ezzell 



70 Course Descriptions 



HM25 Theology and Film 

This course will introduce the student to 
the use of popular films as a resource for 
theological reflection in the church. Repre- 
sentative films that reflect a variety of clas- 
sical theological themes will be viewed 
and analyzed. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Ezzell and 
Ms. Dunfee 

HM26 Doctrinal Preaching 

The communication of doctrine through 
preaching. A study of the necessity, oppor- 
tunities and problems of this type of com- 
munication. Emphasis will focus on the act 
of interpretation, the use of basic exegesis 
and the proficient handling of biblical 
materials. 

Mr. Oman 

HM27 Preaching from Romans 

An exegetic analysis of Paul's most influ- 
ential epistle. The course will attempt to 
provide the student with comprehensive 
understanding of the style and structure of 
Paul's argument and the homiletical possi- 
bilities it presents. Special attention will be 
given to hermeneutical problems atten- 
dant to such prominent Pauline concepts 
as faith, grace and law, as well as to the 
formidable forensic character of his lan- 
guage and thought. 

Mr. Ezzell 

HM29 Storytelling 

This course is twofold in purpose and 
design. First, to examine in detail the 
nature of the story form of discourse and to 
attempt to establish its theological and 
persuasive primacy among the competing 
categories of discourse. Second and fore- 
most, the course aims to develop in the 
student the ability to construct and narrate 
stories, i.e., to become adroit in the art of 
storytelling. 

Mr. Ezzell 

HM30 Contemporary Literary 
Sources of Preaching 

An analysis of selected contemporary 
literary works considered important as 
homiletical resources. The course will 
seek to assist the student to view such 
material in relation to his/her biblical and 
theological studies and to employ what is 
learned in homiletical craftmanship. 

Mr. Oman 



HM36 The Role of the Church in 
Radio and Television 

The purpose of this course is to provide 
the student with a general knowledge of 
communications technologies, i.e., broad- 
cast radio and television, cable television, 
satellite communications and how these 
technologies relate to the church and its 
mission to spread the good news of Jesus 
Christ. 

Staff 

HM40 Pre-HomileticsPracticum 

This practicum is designed to offer 
students the opportunity to practice their 
oral presentation skills prior to entering the 
homiletics course. The focus will be on the 
techniques of oral interpretation and pub- 
lic address. It also enables the student to 
learn theoretical constructs involved in the 
preparation of an oral presentation. Stu- 
dents will be expected to make several pre- 
sentations and develop self-critical skills. 

Staff 

HM41 Rhetoric for the Church 

This course has three distinct foci: 1) to 
improve the student's general ability in 
oral expression; 2) to help the student 
cultivate skills and strategies for the 
specific rhetorical, i.e., persuasive, tran- 
sactions in which clergy are charac- 
teristically engaged (e.g., moderating 
session, leading discussions, counseling, 
presenting resolutions to judicatories); 3) 
to analyze the nature and quality of the 
church's rhetoric, both that which is 
directed to itself as audience and that 
which is directed toward the outside. 

Term II 1985-86 Mr. Ezzell 

Worship and Church Music 

Elective Courses in Worship and Church 
Music 

WS11 Hymnology 

A survey of the Church's heritage of song: 
the Bible, Byzantine and Latin hymnody, 
the Lutheran chorale, Calvin and Psalm- 
ody, English hymnody of Watts and Wes- 
ley and their adherents, and American 
hymnody from Colonial times through the 
twentieth century. This comprehensive 
approach to the study of hymns deals with 
the hymn in perspective, in history and 
culture and in practice. 
Term II 1985-86 Mr. Tutwiler 
Term III 1986-87 Mr. Tutwiler 



Course Descriptions 71 









i 



WS12 Liturgy and Music 

Class members will read literature regard- 
ing the development of liturgy in the vari- 
ous denominations of the Eastern and 
Western Christian Church. Through lec- 
tures and practica, students will be 
encouraged to perform examples of such 
music and liturgy in class, and learn to 
develop a well-constructed form of worship 
for use within their own denomination, 
drawing on resources available in area 
libraries and church archives. Emphasis 
will be made on the role of hymnody and 
psalmody in the context of Christian wor- 
ship. Staff relationships within the practice 
of ministry will be studied and evaluated. 

Mr. Oman and Mr. Tutwiler 

WS14 The Theology and Practice of 
Christian Worship 

An introductory course on Christian wor- 
ship, concentrating on basic theological 
principles, origins and development, 
orders of worship, lessons and sermon, 
public prayer and the sacraments. 

Term II 1986-87 Mr. Oman 

WS17 History of Church Music 

A study of choral and instrumental 
literature of the Christian Church from the 
seventeenth through the twentieth centur- 
ies with emphasis on the development of 
Protestant Church music in America. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Tutwiler 

WS18 Music for the Church Year 

This course will provide a study of music 
appropriate for the seasons of the church 
year. Attention will be given to the music of 



J. S. Bach with special consideration 
being given to Bach as exegete. 

Term I 1986-87 Mr. Tutwiler 

Evangelism and Mission 

Elective Courses in Evangelism and 
Mission 

EV10 Evangelism: An Investigation 
in Depth 

Five professors, representing five major 
areas of inquiry (Bible, History, Theology, 
Psychology and Ethics) will engage stu- 
dents in an in-depth examination of Evan- 
gelism, both theory and practice. An 
executive from the national staff in 
evangelism plus selected local pastors will 
be invited to participate when appropriate. 
Carefully selected readings will correlate 
with the various areas of investigation. Two 
ten-page papers will be required as 
follows: one to be selected from one of the 
areas of study listed above, the other, a 
programmatic model for evangelism in a 
local congregation. 

Staff 

ICS01 Christianity in a World Context 

The course seeks to provide information 
and to develop awareness of the ambigu- 
ous process through which Christianity 
has reached ecumenical reality by being 
linked to the process of Western socio- 
economic expansion and missionary 
enterprise "to the ends of the earth." In 
this context contemporary developments 
in the ecumenical movement as well as 
the specific dynamics of the church in the 
Third World are taken into account, with 



72 Course Descriptions 




Marianne Wolfe 



Laird Stuart 



particular attention given to the signs of 
vitality and creativity within Third World 
Christianity in the areas of evangelism, 
worship, social ethics and theology. 
Required for S.T.M. students, elective for 
all others. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Castillo 
1986-87 Mr. Castillo 

ICS02 Theological Research in 
International Perspectives 

An examination of the issues and assump- 
tions in the theological disciplines as 
defined within several different cultural 
perspectives and as they relate to the ways 
in which Christians perceive their interna- 
tional obligations. Guidance in specific 
research techniques will be offered also. 
Required for S.T.M. students, elective for 
all others. 



Term II 



mho 



1985-86 Mr. Castillo 
1986-87 Mr. Castillo 



The History of Christian 
Missions 

This course is designed to explore the 
historical and geographical dimensions of 
the attempt to be obedient to the mandate 
for mission. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Partee 

MI12 Theology and Practice of 
Stewardship 

Stewardship has many dimensions: bibli- 
cal, theological, ethical and practical. This 
seminar is designed to discuss these 
aspects through lectures and case stud- 



ies. Guest speakers will be invited for their 
particular contributions on the history of 
philanthropy and voluntarism in reference 
to church organizations. 

Mr. Calian 

Administration 

Elective Courses in Administration 

AD10 Polity and Program of the 

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 

An introduction to the polity and program 
of the Presbyterian Church, designed in 
part to help Presbyterian students to pre- 
pare for denominational examinations in 
that field. 

Term II 1985-86 Ms. Wolfe 
1986-87 Ms. Wolfe 

AD11 Parish Administration 

The course will explore the theological 
foundations of administrative work in the 
parish. Case studies of administrative pro- 
cedures will be used to introduce the prac- 
tice of administration. The different pro- 
cedures for large, medium-sized and small 
churches will be explored. Team-taught by 
experienced ministers of Pittsburgh 
Presbytery. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Stuart 
1986-87 Mr. Stuart 

AD14 Motivating Volunteers 

In the reformed tradition of all God's peo- 
ple being ministers, the pastor has a spe- 
cial role in working with volunteers in the 



Course Descriptions 73 




Ralph Strong 



Carlton Goodwin 



church. This course would include a sur- 
vey of the history of volunteerism in church 
and society; the role of the pastor in identi- 
fying and developing lay leadership, moti- 
vating, recruiting, training, deploying of 
these lay leaders and the task of coordina- 
ting a voluntary organization. 

Term III 1985-86 Mr. Strong 
1986-87 Mr. Strong 

AD15 The Pastor as Leader 

"Prophet, Priest and King" — Is the pastor 
all— or none of these? Analytical studies of 
church life affirm the key role of the pastor 
as leader. This course will explore the 
meaning of leadership, analyze various 
leadership styles in the management of a 
voluntary organization and address the 
potential conflict between the pastor as 
spiritual leader and as the manager of an 
organization of volunteers. Identification of 
one's predominant leadership style and 
means of developing alternative styles as 
appropriate will be considered. 

Term I 1985-86 Mr. Strong 
1986-87 Mr. Strong 

AD20 Baptist History and Polity 

A survey of Baptist beginnings and history 
to the present. A study of the development 
of distinctive Baptist belief and practice. 
An analysis of current organization and 
procedures. 



AD29 United Methodist Polity 

The Constitution and structural relation- 
ships of The United Methodist Church are 
examined with a particular focus upon the 
ministry and mission of the local church. 
Required of United Methodist students for 
ordination. 

Mr. Tutwiler 



Mr. Goodwin 



76 Admissions 




Admissions 



A student applying for admission to any 
course of study offered by Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary shall provide 
evidence of good character and of a 
Bachelor's degree from an accredited col- 
lege or university or its academic equivalent, 
and normally shall be a member in full com- 
munion in some branch of the Christian 
Church. 

Master of Divinity and Master of 
Arts 

Applicants to the first degree programs are 
required to have completed the Bachelor's 
degree from a regionally accredited college 
or university at the time of enrollment. This 
undergraduate work should include a sub- 
stantial foundation in the liberal arts: Ap- 
plicants may apply any time after the junior 
year in college is completed. Applicants for 
September entrance should be made prior 
to June 30 to insure full consideration for 
admission; applications for entrance in the 
Second or Third Term should be made at 
least six weeks before the beginning of the 
Term desired. All correspondence concern- 
ing admissions to the Seminary should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Applications are considered by the Student 
Relations Committee upon submission of 
the following materials: 

1. A formal application with the designated 
references. 

2. An official transcript of all the applicant's 
college and university work, showing 
grades for at least three years of 
undergraduate work. 

3. A statement (500-1000 words) describing 
the applicant's family, educational and 
religious background, placing particular 
emphasis upon reasons for entering the 
Seminary. 

4. A personal interview with the Director of 
Admissions or another representative of 
the Seminary designated by the Director 
of Admissions. 

5. A battery of psychological and/or mental 
capacity tests may be required of the 



applicant by the Director of Admissions 
and Student Relations Committee. Such 
testing is utilized only when it is believed 
the results will clarify ambiguities in the 
student's academic record or in the appli- 
cant's emotional fitness for the ministry. 

6. A letter of reference from applicant's local 
church. 

7. An application fee of $25.00. This fee is 
not refundable. 

After admission is granted and within thirty 
days of such notification, a $50.00 fee is 
required to assure the applicant a place in 
the Term for which application was made. 
This fee is applied to the student's tuition 
and is not returnable except under extreme 
hardship at the discretion of the Student 
Relations Committee. A certification of the 
student's "intention to enroll" must accom- 
pany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another accred- 
ited seminary is required to submit, in addi- 
tion to the foregoing, a complete transcript 
of previous seminary work and a letter of 
dismissal from the Dean or President of the 
Seminary. A transfer student must be in 
attendance at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary for a minimum of one full 




Admissions 77 



academic year in order to become a can- 
didate for the M.Div. or the M.A. degree. 

Joint Professional Degree 
Programs 

In each of the joint degree programs the 
candidate must apply and be admitted to 
both Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and 
the respective university. Normally, applica- 
tion is made to the appropriate graduate 
school of the university during the First Term 
of the middler year of the Seminary Master 
of Divinity program. 

Master of Sacred Theology 

Applicants to the Master of Sacred Theology 
degree program are required to have suc- 
cessfully completed a Master of Divinity 
degree or its equivalent in addition to the 
Bachelor's degree from a regionally accred- 
ited college or university. Applications for 
September entrance should be made prior 
to June 30; applications for entrance in the 
Second or Third Term should be made at 
least six weeks before the beginning of the 
Term desired. 

In addition to the materials required for 
admission into the Master of Divinity and 
Master of Arts programs, the applicant must 
submit the transcript of their Master of 
Divinity work. Applications are considered 
by the Student Relations Committee. 

Doctor of Ministry 

Applications for the Doctor of Ministry 
degree program are submitted to the Direc- 
tor of the Doctor of Ministry Program. 

The successful completion of the M.Div. 
degree or its equivalent from an accredited 
seminary or divinity school is required for 
admission to the program. Applicants are 
required to have completed a minimum of 
two years in the ordained ministry. 

The Application Process 

Applications to the Doctor of Ministry pro- 
gram must include: 
1 . Complete transcripts of all post-high 
school academic work. 
Information regarding participation in 
non-degree continuing education or 
other post-Master of Divinity studies. 
I. Assurance that the applicant will be 
engaged in some recognized ministerial 
position for the period of the program. 
An endorsement from the applicant's 




Session or Church Board approving 
expenditure of time called for by the 
program. 

5. A listing of applicant's ministerial experi- 
ence to date. 

6. A statement (500-1000 words) outlining 
reasons for wishing to enter the Doctor 
of Ministry Program. 

7. A five-page reflection paper on some 
aspect of ministry (preaching, admini- 
stration, pastoral care, education) 
demonstrating the integration of theory 
and practice in the applicant's ministry. 

8. Check or money order for $25.00 
(non-refundable). 

Special Students 

Applicants desiring to study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary for credit on a non- 
degree basis, other than International 
Students, must possess a Bachelor's 
degree from a regionally accredited col- 
lege or university at the time of enrollment. 
Applicants for Special Student status 
follow the same procedures and submit 
the same materials as those applying for 
the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 
Programs. 

International Scholars 

All applicants for the International 
Scholars program at Pittsburgh Theologi- 
cal Seminary must secure endorsement of 
their study plans from either the Leader- 
ship Development Progam of the National 
Council of the Churches of Christ, 475 
Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10115 
or the World Alliance of Reformed 
Churches, 150, route de Ferney, 1211 



78 Admissions 




Geneva 20, Switzerland. Applicants 
whose native language is not English will 
be required to give evidence of proficiency 
in the English language before application 
will be considered. The application dead- 
line for international students is March 1 
for September entrance. 

Academic Regulations 

Grading System 

Grading in the Seminary is designed to 
provide an evaluation of the scholastic 
attainment of each student and a 
challenge for each student to work at 
his/her best. 

1. The meaning of the grades given shall 
be as follows: 

A 4.0 Exceptional attainment (90-100) 

B+ 3.0 Superior graduate-level attain- 
ment (80-89) 

B 2.0 Adequate graduate-level 
attain ment(70-79) 

C 1.0 Below graduate-level attainment 
(60-69) 

F 0.0 Failure (59 and below) 

WFA Withdrawal with Faculty Approval 
There is no category of 
Incomplete 

2. The Quality Point Average is deter- 
mined by dividing the quality points by the 
number of credit hours taken (excluding 
credit hours for Pass grades). 

3. Average for Graduation. For graduation 
with the M.Div, M.A. or S.T.M. degree a B 
average (2.0) is required. 



4. Dismissal. Two consecutive terms 
below 2.0 or three non-consecutive terms 
below 2.0 constitute reasons for dismissal 
by faculty action. 

5. Attendance. Attendance at class is not 
mandatory except where indicated by the 
faculty member on the course description 
form. 

6. Official Drop Dates. Courses may be 
dropped or added during the first and 
second weeks of each term without pen- 
alty. Courses dropped during the third 
week through the fifth week carry a pen- 
alty of one-half of the tuition fee. Courses 
dropped after the official drop date require 
full payment and recording of a failing 
grade. All dropping of courses must be 
done officially through the Registrar's 
Office. 

Types of Courses 

1. In addition to required and elective 
courses, students may do advanced work 
in a particular subject as Independent 
Study or Directed Study. An Independent 
Study is negotiated by a student with a 
faculty member with the permission of the 
Dean. A Directed Study is designed in the 
same way as an Independent Study 
course, but it is distinguished by the 
requirement of much closer tutorial work 
on the part of the professor. A further 
distinction is that Directed Study courses 
may involve more than one student but no 
more than four students. Both of these 
studies will be graded Pass/Fail, with a 
statement from the faculty member con- 
cerning the nature of the study and an 



Admissions 79 




evaluation of the student's performance. 
Normally, students may not enroll for more 
than one Independent Study or Directed 
Study per term or six per Pittsburgh 
Seminary first degree program. Under- 
enrolled classes which become Directed 
Studies count in the above total. 

2. Audit. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
students may attend a class for listening 
purposes with the permission of the pro- 
fessor. Audit does not require registration 
or payment and no record of audit is made. 

Nondegree students may audit seminary 
courses under the Continuing Education 
Program. 

3. Audit-Credit. Students registered in a 
course for audit-credit are required to par- 
ticipate fully in reading, discussion, semi- 
nar and position papers, etc., but are not 
required to write a final paper or examina- 
tion. Satisfactory completion of these 
requirements leads to an audit-credit nota- 
tion for the course on the official transcript. 
No grade is given for the course and no 
credit is given toward graduation. Audit- 
credit charge is one-half the regular 
tuition. 

4. PCHE. Sixteen hours of graduate level 
work may be taken at PCHE member 
schools and may be included in the 108 
M.Div. hours. Twelve hours may be 
included in the 72 M.A. hours. These 
credits must be approved by the Dean of 
the Faculty. Registration and payment will 
be handled according to PCHE proce- 



dures for cross-registration at the graduate 
level. PCHE courses will be recorded with 
the grades given by host institution (A or 
B). Grades lower than B will not receive 
academic credit at Pittsburgh Seminary. 

For complete information regarding stu- 
dent responsibilities and pertinent regula- 
tions, consult the 'Academic Principles 
and Procedures for M.Div., M.A. and 
S.T.M. Degrees." 

Faculty Advisery System 

All incoming Master of Divinity students 
are assigned advisers, selected by the 
Dean, normally from among faculty teach- 
ing first year courses. Newly enrolling 
students will be encouraged to contact 
their advisers during the opening orienta- 
tion in the fall and the advisers will be 
expected to make themselves available for 
such contacts. An adviser's signature is 
not required for class registration. Contact 
with the adviser is the student's respon- 
sibility and may be established according 
to the need of the student. This advisery 
system applies only to first year Master of 
Divinity students. In the assignment of ad- 
visers, the requests of students for specific 
professors will be given preferential con- 
sideration, but ordinarily no professor will 
be assigned more than six students. 

The Director of Master of Arts Studies has 
the responsibility for counseling all Master 
of Arts students in the selection of courses 
in order to insure a suitable variety of 
courses. 






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82 Finances 




Finances 



The Board of Directors of Pittsburgh Theolo- 
gical Seminary has approved the following 
tuition, housing rent and fees for the 
1985-86 academic year. Modest increases 
are anticipated for the following year. The 
Seminary reserves the right to make 
changes in all tuition, housing rent, fees and 
financial aid policies without prior notice. 



Tuition 



Candidates for the M.Div., M.A. andS.T.M. Degrees: 


Annual charge for 36 term hours 




$3,450.00 


Full time per credit (nine or more credits) 




$ 100.00 


Part time per credit (eight or less credits) 




$ 105.00 


Candidates for the D.Min. Degree: 


Per credit 




$ 120.00 


Project/Paper 




$ 440.00 


Special Students: 


Per credit 




$ 105.00 


Candidates for the Ph.D. Degree: 


Per credit hour for Pennsylvania residents— Prices established by the University of Pittsburgh 


Per credit hour for non-Pennsylvania residents— Prices established by the University of 
Pittsburgh 


University Courses: 


Courses taken at area universities (University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie- 
Duquesne University) through the PCHE cross-registration system are 
Theological Seminary tuition rates and tuition is paid to the Seminary. 


Mellon University, 
) charged at Pittsburgh 


Audit course for enrolled students for no credit 




No Fee 


Fees 


Application Fee 




$25.00 


Matriculation Fee* 




$50.00 


Annual Student Association Fee ($8.00 per term) 




$24.00 


Transcript Fee: One copy of student's academic record will be provided without 

charge— additional copies 


$ 2.00 



*The Matriculation Fee is applied to tuition costs. 



Room 



Finances 83 



Annual charge for a resident/hall room ($225 per term) 


$675.00 


Apartment Fees (per month) 


Fulton Hall: Thirty-nine apartments 


Efficiency Apartments 


$160.00 


One-bedroom apartments 


$200.00 


Highlander: Twenty-three apartments 


One-bedroom apartments 


$215.00 


Two-bedroom apartments 


$245.00 


Anderson/McMillan Halls: Thirty-one apartments 


One-bedroom apartments 


$230.00 


Two-bedroom apartments 


$255.00 


Three-bedroom apartments 


$290.00 


Four-bedroom apartment 


$345.00 


Fisher Wing: Four apartments 




One-bedroom apartments 


$195.00 



Board 

Meals may be purchased in the cafeteria 
Monday through Friday (breakfast and 
lunch) throughout the academic year, 
excluding vacation periods. The estimated 
cost for board for an academic year for a 
single student is $1,750.00. 

Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are 
payable during the first two weeks of each 
term as specified by the Business Office. 
When necessary, arrangements for a pay- 
ment plan to cover a term's expenses may 
be made at the Business Office. There is a 
$5.00 late fee plus a carrying charge of 1% 
per month on the open account balance 
under any deferred payment plan. 

Financial Aid 

Financing Your Seminary Education 

The goal of the Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary Financial Aid Program is to 
assist each student in arranging financial 
support. While it remains each student's 
responsibility to meet the costs of the 
theological education, the Seminary 
desires to provide grants and work assis- 
tance to each full-time student in the Divin- 
ity and Arts programs who has need, 
regardless of denominational affiliation. 
The student's denomination and family are 
also expected to share in meeting the 
financial obligation. 



Cost/Income 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary uses 
expense norms in computing a student's 
need. Following are the allowed expenses 
for the 1985-86 academic (9 month) year: 

From these norms is subtracted all antici- 
pated income for the year. Net summer 
earnings; earnings during the year, for the 
student and spouse; denominational 
grants and your congregational aid; sav- 
ings and other resources are considered 
income. Honors scholarship and prizes 
awarded by Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary are not considered income. Single 
students will need to bring a minimum of 





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84 Finances 



1983-84 Allowed Expenses 




Single Student 


Married Student 


Each Child 


Tuition 


$3,450.00 


$ 3,450.00 


$ 




Fees 


24.00 


24.00 






Rent 


675.00 


1,935.00 




360.00 


*Food 


1,750.00 


2,300.00 




600.00 


transportation 


1,000.00 


1,200.00 






*Health Insurance 


300.00 


1,100.00 






'Health Medical 


250.00 


500.00 




300.00 


* Books 


600.00 


600.00 






'Clothing 


350.00 


700.00 




300.00 


"Miscellaneous 


501.00 


791.00 




240.00 



Estimated Expenses 



$8,900.00 



$12,600.00 



$1,800.00 



$2,000.00 of income and if you are married 
you will need to bring a minimum of 
4,000.00. 

The demonstrated need will be the dif- 
ference between the allowed expenses 
and the anticipated income. That need 
will be fully met with Work Assistance, 
Grants and Loans. 

Work Assistance 

The first part of aid, up to $1 ,110.00, will be 
the awarding of a Work Assistance job. 
Campus jobs exist in all aspects of Semi- 
nary life, including the Playroom, Cafe- 
teria, Library and Administrative offices. 

Grants 

Grant Assistance is provided by our 
restricted endowment funds and annual 
gifts to the Student Aid Scholarship Fund. 
In 1984-85 over half of our students 
received Seminary Aid and the average 
grant award was $2,090.00. 

Our grant award is given to students 
regardless of denominational affiliation. 
However, an additional percentage will be 
given to members of the Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.). The maximum grant for 
all students will be the cost of tuition in 
effect each year. One third of the grant is 
made available each term. In special cir- 
cumstances a student may be awarded an 
additional 10% of the grant. 



Loans 

Many students will enter with large educa- 
tional loans so every effort is made to keep 
this aid component to a minimum. 

Presbyterian students who are registered 
with or under the care of a Presbytery may 
apply for loan assistance from The Voca- 
tion Agency of the Presbyterian Church 
(U.S.A.) through the Financial Aid officer. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary partici- 
pates in the Guaranteed Student Loan 
(GSL) Program. 

Additional Information 

The Seminary's Financial Aid Program is 
based on a nine-month academic year. 
Each year, if aid is required, a new applica- 
tion must be filed by May 1 . Applications 
are reviewed in the order in which they are 
received. 

These policies are subject to change. They 
are operative for the current academic 
year (1985-86) and represent no commit- 
ment beyond the current year. The Finan- 
cial Aid Policy Committee (including three 
students) conducts an annual review. 

Specific questions and requests for 
detailed information regarding financial 
aid should be addressed to the Seminary's 
Financial Aid Office. 

Honors Scholarship Program 

The Honors Scholarship program is one 
way Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



Finances 85 



seeks to encourage the enrollment of 
young men and women of the highest aca- 
demic ability in the Master of Divinity and 
Master of Arts programs. Those consid- 
ered for an Honors Scholarship shall be 
from among those applicants who have 
graduated from a regionally accredited or 
internationally recognized college or 
university, normally in the top five percent 
of their class (with at least a 3.5 cumulative 
average). They shall be students of dem- 
onstrated potential for outstanding Chris- 
tian service. Honors Scholarships shall be 
granted only to students enrolled for 
twelve (12) or more credits per term who 
make application to the Seminary for the 
Fall Term on or before April 15 of any year. 
Honors Scholarships are awarded for a 
maximum of three (3) years. They can be 
renewed only if the recipient maintains a 
3.0 cumulative grade average. 

The David E. Molyneaux Honors 
Scholarship was established by the First 
Presbyterian Church of Flint, Michigan, in 
affection for their pastor, David E. Moly- 
neaux, an alumnus and former Board 
member of the Seminary. 

The First Presbyterian Church of 
Neenah Honors Scholarship was estab- 
lished by the First Presbyterian Church of 
Neenah, Wisconsin, from the Bergstrom 
Fund, of which it is the trustee. 

The Carl A. Hiaasen Honors Scholar- 
ship Fund was established by the bequest 
of Abraham L. Mailman in honor of Mr. Carl 



A. Hiaasen, a former member of the Board 
of Directors of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary. 

Those considered for an Honors Scholar- 
ship must have applied for admission to 
the Seminary before April 15 of each 
academic year. 

Awards, Prizes and Fellowships 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial 
Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may 
beassigned upon graduation to that mem- 
ber of the senior class who is recom- 
mended by the faculty as having achieved 
the highest standard in all departments of 
the Seminary curriculum. The faculty 
reserves the right to impose special tests 
and examinations in making this award. 
The recipient must pledge himself or 
herself to a year of postgraduate study at 
some institution approved by the faculty 
following his or her graduation. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship is given 
every year to the member of the senior 
class who has the highest average at the 
beginning of his or her final term of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship 
requires that the recipient spend a full 
academic year in study in any graduate 
institution approved by the faculty. 




86 Finances 




The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial 
Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
is assigned to that member of the gradu- 
ating class who has taken the full course of 
instruction in this institution and who has 
achieved the second highest academic 
rank of the class, if in the judgment of the 
faculty he or she is worthy in all other 
respects. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial 
Homiletical Prize 

This prize is awarded to a member of the 
senior class who has spent three years in 
the Seminary and has taken the highest 
standing in the department of Homiletics. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance 
Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
will be awarded to the student who 
achieves the highest grade in an examina- 
tion in classical Greek as he or she enters 
the junior class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew will 
be awarded to that member of the senior 
class who, having elected Hebrew, shall 
submit the best grammatical and exegeti- 
cal treatment of a portion of the Hebrew 
Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New 
Testament 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament 
Greek will be awarded to that member of 
the senior class who, having elected 



Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best 
grammatical and exegetical treatment of a 
portion of the Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize is 
to be awarded yearly to the students taking 
first and second rank respectively in the 
department of Church History. 

The Watson Samuel Boyce Music Prize 

The Watson Samuel Boyce Music Prize is 
to be awarded annually to that member of 
the senior class who makes the most out- 
standing contribution to the life of the 
Seminary in the area of Church Music. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The income is apportioned equally each 
year to the six members of the junior class 
who attain the highest average of excel- 
lence in their Seminary work. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship is given to 
the student who, upon entering Seminary, 
shall achieve the highest grade in a com- 
petitive examination in the English Bible. 
The successful competitor is to have the 
scholarship throughout the entire course 
of three years. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in 
History and Theology 

The income from this endowed fund is 
granted to the student, who in the judg- 
ment of the professors of the History and 
Theology areas, is most worthy of this 
award at the end of the middler year. 



Finances 87 



The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in 
Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical 
Studies is granted to the student who, in 
the judgment of the professors of the Bibli- 
cal area, is most worthy of this award at the 
end of the junior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for Graduate 
Study 

This fund provides an annual award to a 
member of the graduating class desig- 
nated by the faculty for assistance in post- 
graduate study, preferably in the field of 
New Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey 
Award in Homiletics 

This award is given to a student who, at the 
end of the middler year has, in the judg- 
ment of the homiletics professors, 
demonstrated excellence in preaching. 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions is 
awarded to that member of the graduating 
class who is deemed most deserving 
among those entering a denominationally 
recognized or ecumenically sponsored 
mission field. 

The Clara Edna Miller Prize in Pastoral 
Theology 

This prize is awarded to that student in the 
Master of Divinity program finishing the 
seventh term who achieves the highest 
academic standing in those courses in the 
curriculum particularly adapted to the 
practice of ministry, i.e., preaching, wor- 
ship, education, pastoral care, administra- 
tion and leadership development. 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in 
Pastoral Care 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in 
Pastoral Care is awarded to the graduating 
senior, whether Master of Divinity or Mas- 
ter of Arts, who has taken his or her full 
course of study at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary and who has the highest stand- 
ing in the general area of Pastoral Care. 

The John W. Meister Award 

The John W. Meister Award in the Pastoral 
Ministry has been established at each of 
the seven theological seminaries of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) in memory of 




Rev. John W. Meister, who at his death in 
1974 was Director of the Council of Theolo- 
gical Seminaries. The award is made each 
year to that member of the graduating 
class who manifests to the greatest degree 
those characteristics which are most 
essential to effective pastoral leadership. 

The Richard J. Rapp Memorial Award in 
Doctor of Ministry Studies 

Funds have been raised by the Covenant- 
Community Presbyterian Church as a 
memorial for the Rev. Dr. Richard J. Rapp. 
It is the intention of the donors that this 
money be used to honor Dr. Rapp by pub- 
lishing one or more outstanding Doctor of 
Ministry papers and by acknowledging 
this in the annual commencement 
program. 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award for an 
International Student is given to a student 
who has demonstrated meritorious per- 
formance in his or her Seminary work and 
who is returning to his or her native land to 
witness to Christ there. 






p 







90 Personnel 




Personnel 



The members of the Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary Faculty are committed to the 
scholarly, professional and personal 
preparation of men and women for Christian 
service to the Church. Many members of the 
Faculty are regular contributors to the 
Church's and world's scholarly knowledge 
through publications and participation in 
learned societies in the Americas, Asia and 
Europe. In this way the Faculty at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary contributes to the 
learned skills of students on campus and far 
away. The Faculty formulates the curricu- 
lum, directs the entire educational program 
and exercises general authority over the stu- 
dent body. 

Faculty 

Carnegie Samuel Calian, Professor of 
Theology. Occidental College, B.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
University of Basel, Doctor of Theology. 

Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas, Associate 
Professor in Church and Ministry. Union 
Theological Seminary, Cuba, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (NY.), S.T.M.; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 

Susan N. Dunfee, Assistant Professor of 
Theology. University of Rochester, B.A.; 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, M.Div; 
Claremont (CA) Graduate School, Ph.D. 

Robert M. Ezzell, Assistant Professor of 
Homiletics. Memphis State University, B.S.; 
Lexington Theological Seminary, B.D.; Yale 
Divinity School, S.T.M.; Yale University, M.A. 

Donald E. Gowan, Robert C. Holland Pro- 
fessor of Old Testament. University of South 
Dakota, B.A.; University of Dubuque 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; University of 
Chicago, Ph.D. 

Dikran Y. Hadidian, Professor of 
Bibliography. American University of Beirut, 
B.A.; Hartford Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Th.M.; Hartford School of Religious Educa- 
tion, M.A.; Columbia University, M.S. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, William F. Orr Pro- 
fessor of New Testament. Victoria College, 
University of Toronto, B.A.; Emmanuel Col- 
lege, Victoria University, Toronto, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (NY), S.T.M., Th.D. 

Jared Judd Jackson, Professor of Old 
Testament. Harvard College, A.B.; Episcopal 
Theological School, B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (NY), Th.D. 

George H. Kehm, Professor of Theology. 
Queens College (NY), B.S.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Harvard Divinity 
School, S.T.M.; Harvard University, Th.D. 

Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, M.Div; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.M.; 
Princeton University, M.A., Ph.D. 

M. Harjie Likins, Associate Professor in 
Church and Ministry. Cornell College (Iowa), 
A.B.; Union Theological Seminary (NY), 
B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 

U I rich W. Mauser, Errett M. Grable Pro- 
fessor of New Testament. University of Tub- 
ingen, Doctor of Theology. 

Richard J. Oman, Howard C. Scharfe Pro- 
fessor of Homiletics. University of Minne- 
sota, B.A.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
B.D., New College, University of Edinburgh, 
Ph.D. 

Charles B. Partee, Professor of Church 
History and W. Don McClure Professor of 
World Missions and Evangelism. Maryville 
College, A.B.; Austin Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; University of 
Texas, M.A.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Ph.D. 

Andrew Purves, Assistant Professor of 
Pastoral Theology and Spirituality. Universi- 
ty of Edinburgh, M.A.; University of Edin- 
burgh, B.D.; Duke University Divinity School, 
Th.M.; University of Edinburgh, Ph.D. 



Personnel 91 



Ronald H. Stone, Professor of Social 
Ethics. Morningside College, B.A.; Union 
Theological Seminary (NY), B.D.; Columbia 
University, Ph.D. 

H. Eberhard von Waldow, Professor of Old 
Testament. Bonn University, B.A., Doctor of 
Theology. 

Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy of 
Religion. Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Columbia 
University, Ph.D. 

John E. Wilson, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Modern European and American Church 
History. Emory University, B.A.; Drew 
Theological School, B.D.: Claremont (CA) 
Graduate School, Ph.D. 

Part-Time Faculty 

Nancy T. Foltz, Ph.D.; Director of Leader- 
ship Development, The Western Penn- 
sylvania Conference, The United Methodist 
Church; Lecturer in Educational Ministries 
with Adults 

Deborah A. Kania, M.S.; Assistant Clinical 
Director, Speech and Hearing Clinic, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
Lecturer in Homiletics— Voice and Speech 
Practicum 

Von Ewing Keairns, Ph.D. (Duquesne 
University); Executive Director, Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

Nancy L. Lapp, M.A.; Curator of Bible 
Lands Museum, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary; Lecturer in Archaeology and 
Hebrew 

David L. Mayo, M.Div; Director of Youth 
Ministries, Southminster Presbyterian 
Church; Lecturer in New Testament— Greek 

John E. Mehl, Ph.D. (Pittsburgh); Director 
of the Doctor of Ministry Program; Lecturer 
in Church and Ministry 

Ralph A. Strong, Ed.D.; Career Consultant, 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; Lecturer 
in Administration— Motivating Volunteers 

Laird Stuart, D.Min. (Princeton); Senior 
Minister, Westminster Presbyterian 
Church; Lecturer in Parish Administration 




George E. Tutwiler, B.A.; Minister of 
Music, Eastminster Presbyterian Church; 
Organist and Choirmaster, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary; Lecturer in Church 
Music and United Methodist Studies 

Marianne L. Wolfe, B.A.; Stated Clerk, 
Pittsburgh Presbytery, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania; Lecturer in Presbyterian 
Polity and Program 

Guest Faculty 

William M. Aber, D.Min.; Executive 
Presbyter, Presbytery, Santa Fe; 
Albuquerque, NM; Lecturer in 
Administration 

Kenneth E. Bailey, Th.D.; Professor of 
New Testament, Near East School of 
Theology, Beirut, Lebanon; Lecturer in 
New Testament 

C. K. Barrett, D.D. (Cambridge, England); 
Professor of Divinity, Durham University, 
England; Lecturer in New Testament 

Gordon E. Boak, D.D.; Pastor Emeritus, 
Glenshaw Presbyterian Church, 
Glenshaw; Lecturer in Homiletics 

Ralph P. Brooks, Jr., Ph.D.; Rector of St. 
Andrew's Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania; Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

J. Stanley Chesnut, Ph.D.; Associate 
Dean of Faculty, Eckerd College, St. 
Petersburg, Florida; Lecturer in Bible 



92 Personnel 




Thomas A. Downs, D.Min.; Canon, The 
Cathedral Church of St. Luke, Orlando, 
Florida; Lecturer in Church Education and 
Administration 

Carlton B. Goodwin, Ph.D.; Executive 
Minister, Pittsburgh Baptist Association; 
Lecturer in Baptist Studies 

Denise Huot, Boston University, 
School of Theatre Arts, Boston, 
Massachusetts; Lecturer in Homiletics 
Voice and Speech Practicum 

Aurel Jivi, Professor of Church History, 
Romanian Orthodox Academy, Sibiu, 
Romania; Lecturer in Church History 

Roderick A. F. MacKenzie, S.J.; Pro- 
fessor Emeritus Regis College, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Lecturer in 
Old Testament— Wisdom Themes 

John M. Mackey, D.Min.; Director, 
Fayetteville Health Care Center, 
Fayetteville, North Carolina; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

Richard A. Morledge, D.D.; Pastor, First 
Presbyterian Church, Bakerstown, 
Pennsylvania; Lecturer in Homiletics 

Neil R. Paylor, Ph.D.; Pastoral Counselor; 
Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

Ronald E. Peters, B.A.; Minister, Martin 
Luther King, Jr. Community Presbyterian 
Church, Springfield, Massachusetts; 
Lecturer in Sociology of Religion 



Petr Pokorny, Professor of New Testa- 
ment, Komenskeho Evangelicka, 
Bohoslovecka Fakulta, Prague, 
Czechoslovakia; Lecturer in New 
Testament 

Edward A. Powers, Ph.D.; Chairperson of 
Family Environment in the Gerontology 
Program, Iowa State University, Ames, 
Iowa; Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

John D. Sharick, D.Min.; Executive 
Presbyter, Eastminster Presbytery, 
Youngstown, Ohio; Lecturer in 
Administration 

Elwyn A. Smith, Ph.D.; Retired Senior 
Pastor, Garden Crest Presbyterian 
Church, St. Petersburg, Florida; Lecturer 
in Ethics and Church History 

June Ruth Michaelson Taylor, M.Div.; 
Director of Pastoral Service, Presbyterian 
University Hospital, Pittsburgh; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

Theophilus M. Taylor, Retired General 
Secretary, General Assembly Mission 
Council, UPCUSA, New York, New York; 
Lecturer in Bible 



_ Emeriti 



John M. Bald, Th.D. Emeritus Professor 
of Christian Ethics 

J. Gordon Chamberlin, Ed.D. Emeritus 
Professor of Education 

Walter R. Clyde, Ph.D. Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Christian Mission 

John H. Gerstner, Ph.D. Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Church History 

Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D. Emeritus 
Hugh Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral 
Theology 

William H. Kadel, Th.D. President 
Emeritus 

William F. Orr, Ph.D. Emeritus Professor 
of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

James A. Walther, Th.D. Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of New Testament Literature and 
Exegesis 



Personnel 93 




Administrative Officers 

Carnegie Samuel Calian 

President 

B.A. Occidental College 

B.D. Princeton Theological Seminary 

D.Th. University of Basel 



Ulrich W. Mauser 

Dean of the Faculty 

D.Th. University of Tubingen 



Eugene P. Degitz 

Vice-President for Development 

B.A. Westminster College 
M.Div. Princeton Theological Seminary 
Th.M. Colgate/Rochester Divinity School 
M.S. Syracuse University 



94 Personnel 



^ 







\ 




Raymond F. Luber 

Director of Seminary Relations 

B.A. Westminster College 

M.Div. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



Douglas N.CIasper 

Business Manager 

B.S. Cornell University 
Certified Public Accountant 



Priscilla E. Boyd 

Registrar/Director of Financial Aid 

B.S. Shippensburg University 



Personnel 95 




John E.White 

Director of Admissions/Director of Student 
Relations and Housing 

B.A. Geneva College 

M.Div. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



Jeanette Rapp 

Director of Continuing Education and 
Special Events 

A.B. Youngstown State University 



Dikran Y. Hadidian 

Librarian 

B.A. American University of Beirut 

B.D., Th.M., Hartford Theological 

Seminary 

M.A. Hartford School of Religious 

Education 

M.S. Columbia University 



96 Personnel 




Mary Ellen Scott 

Library Cataloger/Archivist 

B.A.Sterling College 

M.L.S. University of Pittsburgh 



John E. Mehl 

Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program 

B.A. Dartmouth College 

B.D. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Th.M. Union Seminary 

Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh 



Ralph A. Strong 

Career Consultant 

A.B. Seattle Pacific College 
B.D. Presbyterian Seminary of Omaha 
M.A., Ed.D. Arizona State University 
D.D. Hanover College 



Personnel 97 



Staff 

Food Service Department 

Eloise Thomas, Director 

Carol Huebner, Cook 

Perkins Harris, Kitchen Custodian 

Library 

Mary Ellen Scott, Cataloger and Archivist 
Patricia Beam, Assistant to the Cataloger 
Clarion Maloney, Book Processing Clerk 
Martha McNally, Clerical Assistant 
Jayne Schneider, Circulation and Inter- 
Library Loan Librarian 
Linda Bowyer, Library Secretary 

Mail Department 

Virginia A. Horgan, Director 

Susan C. Burton, Mailroom Assistant 

Plant Department 

Earl Leeder, Plant Director 
James Gogal, Maintenance 
Michael Keller, Maintenance 
Charles Mulvihill, Maintenance 
Donald Burns, Maintenance 
Justine Allen, Custodial 
Calvin Carter, Custodial 
Cleotus Gaines, Custodial 
Vernon Duncan, Custodial 
Paul Gill, Custodial 
Harry Holmes, Security 
William Jackson, Security 
Steven Winston, Security 
Henry Zawacki, Security 

Playroom 

Joyce Diamondstone, Director 
Jill Juengel, Assistant Director 

Secretarial Department 

Linda Smith, Secretary to the President 

Marge Darragh, Secretary to the Business 
Manager 

Carol Spotts, Business Office 

Ellen Frisco, Business Office 

Joan Coates, Secretary to the Vice 
President for Development 

Janet Ankeny, Development Office 

Nancy Hammond, Development Office 

Debora Hutchison, Secretary to the Dean 

Nancy Fraker, Secretary to the Director of 
Admissions and Doctor of Ministry Director 



Cathy Bodnar, Secretary to the Director of 
Continuing Education and Registrar 

Joyce Thompson, Secretary to the Plant 
Director 

Mary Demyan, Receptionist and Switch- 
board Operator 

Iris Lowe, Secretary to the Faculty 

Sally Seibel, Secretary to the Faculty 

Janet Coleman, Secretary to the Faculty 

The Board of Directors 

Officers, 1984-85 

Nathan W. Pearson, Chairperson 
Financial Advisor, Paul Mellon 
Family Interests 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley, 
Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. William N. Jackson, 

Vice-Chairperson 

Christ United Presbyterian Church 

Canton, Ohio 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, Secretary 
Executive Presbyter, 
Pittsburgh Presbytery 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Craig G. Ford, Treasurer 
Senior Vice-President, 
Mellon National Bank 
Wallace Memorial United 

Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Douglas N. Clasper, Assistant 
Secretary/Treasurer 
Business Manager, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Legal Counsel 

Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. 
Attorney, Alter, Wright & Barron 
Woodland United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Members 

The Rev. William P. Baker 

First Presbyterian Church 
Allentown, Pennsylvania 

David J. Brubach 

Glenshaw Presbyterian Church 
Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 



98 Personnel 



Dr. E. Bayley Buchanan 

Surgeon, Mercy Hospital 
Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Carnegie Samuel Calain 

President and Professor of Theology 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Richard M. Cromie 

First Presbyterian Church 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

The Rev. Edward R. DeLair, Jr. 

Pigeon Creek Presbyterian Church 
Eighty-Four, Pennsylvania 
Cokeburg Presbyterian Church 
Cokeburg, Pennsylvania 

Robert E. Dickey, III 

East Liberty Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Kathleen A. Goodrich 

Assistant Director 
Presbyterians United For Biblical 
Concerns 
Pottstown, Pennsylvania 

Dr. DwightC. Hanna 

Reconstructive Surgeon and 

Medical Director 
The Western Pennsylvania Hospital 
Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Jean H. Henderson 

Jefferson Center United Presbyterian 
Church 
Saxonburg, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Dolores Hovis 

Civic Leader 

East Main United Presbyterian Church 

Grove City, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. A. Vanlier Hunter 

Associate Professor of Biblical 
Studies and Associate Dean of 
the Ecumenical Institute 

Saint Mary's Seminary and University 

Baltimore, Maryland 

The Hon. Justin M. Johnson 

Judge, Superior Court of Pennsylvania 
Bethesda United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Carolyn Jones-Golightly 

Stated Supply, Pittsburgh Presbytery 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



John E. Kaites 

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 
Paradise Valley, Arizona 

Dr. Max A. Lauffer 

Mellon Professor, University of Pittsburgh 
Southminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Mark H. Landfried 

United Presbyterian Church 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

James E. Lee 

Chairman, Gulf Oil Corporation 
Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. Laura B. Marshall 

Civic Leader 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley 

Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Jerry McAfee 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert H. Meneilly 

Village Presbyterian Church 
Prarie Village, Kansas 

Mrs. Mary E. Pardee 

Former President, United Presbyterian 
Church Women 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Douglas S. Pride 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mr. Robert R. Rumer 

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 
Williamsburg, Virginia 

The Rev. William G. Rusch 

Synod Executive, Synod of the Trinity 
Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 

Mrs. LoisShakarian 

Civic Leader 
Episcopal Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. John D. Sharick 

Executive Presbyter 
Eastminster Presbytery 
Youngstown, Ohio 

Richard L. Terrell 

First Presbyterian Church 
Naples, Florida 



Personnel 99 




Lloyd M.Whitesell 

Fairmont Presbyterian Church 
Dayton, Ohio 

Dr. Theodore R. Williams 

Professor of Chemistry, College of 

Wooster 

First Presbyterian Church 

Wooster, Ohio 

The Rev. Alfred W. Wishart, Jr. 

Executive Director, Pittsburgh Foundation 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

J. Stuart Zahniser 

First United Presbyterian Church 
Meadville, Pennsylvania 



Directors Emeritus/a 

Marian Bell (Mrs. Davitt) 

Donald C. Burnham 
Carl A. Hiaasen 
William R. Jackson, Sr. 
H. Parker Sharp 
George D. Lockhart 



100 Personnel 



Field Education Supervisors 
for 1984-85 

The following served the Seminary as 
Field Education Supervisors in the 
academic year 1984-85. 

James A. Adair 

First Presbyterian Church 
Houston, PA 

Robert Baker 

District Superintendent of the United 
Methodist Church 
Kane, PA 

Donald Benjamin 

East End Cooperative Ministry 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Daniel Berry 

First Wesleyan Church 
Newcastle, PA 

Wesley Blaha 

Monroeville United Methodist Church 
Monroeville, PA 

Philip Bongiorno 

Eastern District Council, Assembly of God 
Camp Hill, PA 

JackM. Bowers 

Hebron United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Robert Campbell 

First Presbyterian Church 
Washington, PA 

Gary Carson 

Broadway United Presbyterian Church 
East McKeesport, PA 

James Churchill 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Curt Clark 

Mt. Chestnut Presbyterian Church 
Butler, PA 

Donald Cook 

First United Methodist Church 
New Castle, PA 

Alvin Coon 

St. John the Evangelist Baptist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Ronald H. Cram 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, PA 



Linda Crawford 

East Liberty Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Earl Creps, Jr. 

Calvary Evangelical Lutheran Church 
Wilkinsburg, PA 

Roberta Croker 

Dillonvale Presbyterian Church 
Dillonvale, OH 

Robert Cummings 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Alfred Deemer 

Natrona Heights United Presbyterian 

Church 

Natrona Heights, PA 

LeRoyDilliner 

Westminster Presbyterian Church 
Steubenville,OH 

Douglas Dunderdale 

Eastminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Larry Dunster 

First United Presbyterian Church 
Irwin, PA 

Dale Dykstra 

Curwensville Presbyterian Church 
Curwensville, PA 

Richard Ellsworth 

West Second Avenue Presbyterian 

Church 

Columbus, OH 

James Farrer 

First Presbyterian Church 
Johnstown, PA 

Gerald Fennell 

First United Presbyterian Church 
Niles.OH 

Richard Flock 

Faith Lutheran Church 
Laurel Gardens, PA 

Victor Fogelin 

Cheswick Presbyterian Church 
Cheswick, PA 

Robert Forsythe 

Riverview United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 



Personnel 101 



John Garies 

Clarion Association Christian Education 
Committee of the United Church of Christ 
Rimersburg, PA 

Charles Goehring 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley 
Sewickley, PA 

Carlton Goodwin 

Pittsburgh Baptist Association 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Donald H. Gordon 

Presbytery of Lake Erie 
Saegertown, PA 

Richard Goss 

Covenant-Community Presbyterian 
Pittsburgh, PA 

NaomaHall 

United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Andrew Harvey 

Central Highlands Community United 
Methodist Church 
Elizabeth, PA 

Larry Hauck 

Ingomar United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Richard E. Hawke 

Western Pennsylvania Conference of the 
United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Steven Hein 

Lebanon Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Frank Heller 

First Presbyterian Church 
Carnegie, PA 

William D. Hess, II 

Mt. Vernon Community United 
Presbyterian Church 
McKeesport, PA 

Gilbert Hoffman 

First United Methodist Church 
Kittanning, PA 

Larry Homitsky 

South Avenue United Methodist Church 
Wilkinsburg, PA 

Kenneth Hooten 

Gray Stone Presbyterian Church 
Leechburg, PA 



A. Adrienne Howard 

Allegheny United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Robert Huber 

Penn Grove Church of Christ 
Butler, PA 

Paul Inks 

First United Methodist Church 
Johnstown, PA 

Arthur Hoachim 

First Presbyterian Church 
Toronto, OH 

Robert Kelley 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Jerald Landrey 

Memorial Park Presbyterian Church 
Allison Park, PA 

Robert Lash 

Western Pa. Conference of the United 
Methodist Church 
Washington, PA 

M. HarjieLikins 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Ellen Liotta 

District Superintendent 
The United Methodist Church 
Fairmont, WV 

George Logue 

South Hills Congregational Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

James Matz 

Liberty Presbyterian Church 
McKeesport, PA 

John McCall 

Sixth Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Tom McClaren 

Fairview Presbyterian Church 
Fairview, PA 

John McLeister 

Greenock United Methodist Church 
McKeesport, PA 

Thomas McMillen 

Mt. Nebo United Presbyterian Church 
Sewickley, PA 



102 Personnel 



Susan Meyer 

Northmont Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Paul Mikels 

Breckenridge Village 
Willoughby, OH 

Jill Minnich 

Westminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Duane Morford 

Bakerstown United Methodist Church 
Gibsonia, PA 

William Morris 

Versailles United Methodist Church 
Homestead Park, Munhall, PA 

Robert Neal 

District Superintendent of the United 
Methodist Church 
Apollo, PA 

Bruce Ogle 

Valley Presbyterian Church 
Imperial, PA 

J.Olin 

Youngstown District Superintendent of 
The United Methodist Church 
Youngstown, OH 

Cloyd Osborne 

Christ Community United Methodist 

Church 

Butler, PA 

Lee Parker 

Westview United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 



James Patrick 

Beulah Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

LeRoy Patrick 

Bethesda Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

John Patterson 

District Superintendent of the United 
Methodist Church 
Johnstown, PA 

Wendell Paull 

First United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Martha Perry 

Pittsburgh Presbytery 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Edward Poole 

Beaver County Area Ministry 
Beaver, PA 

Douglas Pride 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas Purchase 

Eastside Community Ministry 
Zanesville, OH 

Robert Richards 

District Superintendent 

The United Methodist Church Franklin 

Franklin, PA 

James Robb 

First United Methodist Church 
Sharon, PA 




Personnel 103 



William Roberts 

Quest Inc. 
Moundsville, WV 

John Russell 

Emory United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

KirkRyckman 

Grace Community United Presbyterian 

Church 

Lower Burrell, PA 

Danny Schomer 

First Presbyterian Church 
Columbiana, OH 

Roger R.Shafer 

District Superintendent of the United 
Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Rodney Smith 

Mars United Methodist Church 
Mars, PA 

James Snyder 

Christ United Presbyterian Church 
Carnegie, PA 

June Taylor 

Presbyterian University Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas Taylor 

Calvary United Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Francis Tennies 

Crafton Church 
Crafton, PA 

August Thalman 

Srader Grove Presbyterian Church 
Freeport, PA 

Sister Michele VanVoorst 

East End Cooperative Ministry 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Douglas Waggoner 

Mulberry United Presbyterian Church 
Wilkinsburg, PA 

Peter Weaver 

Smithfield United Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Michael Wenning 

Pleasant Hills Community United 
Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 




John White 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Glenna Wilson 

Southwest Interchurch Ministry of 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, PA 

Robert Wilson 

Coraopolis United Methodist Church 
Coraopolis, PA 

George Wirth 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley 
Sewickley, PA 

Richard Wright 

District Superintendent 
Buckhannon District 
Buckhannon, WV 



Index 



Academic Regulations, 78 

Admissions procedures, 75 

Awards, prizes and fellowships, 85 

Board and room, 83 

Board of Directors, 97 

Clinical Pastoral Education, 67 

Continuing Education, 39 

Course descriptions, 45 

Cross-registration in PCHE institutions, 37 

Doctor of Ministry degree, 28 

Doctor of Philosophy degree, 34 

Faculty, 90 

Fees, 82 

Field education, 24 

Financial aid, 83 

Grading system, 78 

Honors scholarships program, 84 

Housing, 13 

Institutional relationships, 37 

International scholars program, 38, 77 

Joint Degree Programs, 34 

Library, 12 

Master of Arts degree, 25 

Religious Education emphasis, 25 

Master of Divinity degree, 22 

Master of Divinity/Master of Social Work 

degree, 35 
Master of Divinity/Master of Library 

Science degree, 35 
Master of Sacred Theology degree, 26 
Placement, 25 
Play Care Center, 19 
Preaching Association, 18 
Recreation, 15 
Rent, 83 

Special lectures, 41 
Special non-degree studies, 38 
Student associations, 15 
Tuition, 82 
Worship, 15 



Directions to Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

From the North, East and West— take 
the PA Turnpike to Interchange #5 
(Route 28). Follow Route 28 south to the 
Highland Park Bridge exit. This will be 
the first exit to the left as you are travell- 
ing south on Route 28. Proceed across 
the Highland Park Bridge. Exit off the 
Highland Park Bridge to the right (the 
first exit). Make a left at the first traffic 
signal. Go past the entrance to the Pitt- 
sburgh Zoo. Continue to the top of the 
hill, making a sharp hairpin turn to the 
right near to the top. Turn left at the first 
street (Bunker Hill Street high-rise 
apartment building is at the corner). 
Proceed to Highland Avenue (fourth 
right). Turn right on Highland and pro- 
ceed to the Seminary. The Seminary is 
located on the left one and one-half 
block past the first traffic signal. 

From the South and West— take Inter- 
state 279 to Pittsburgh; go through the 
Fort Pitt Tunnel and over the bridge, 
bearing to the right out Rt. 376 to the 
Forbes Avenue (Oakland) exit. Down 
Forbes Avenue to the tenth traffic signal 
(Belief ield Avenue). Turn left for two 
blocks to the light at Fifth Avenue. Turn 
right on Fifth to the 10th traffic signal on 
Fifth (Highland Avenue). Turn left at 
Highland for six traffic lights to the 
Seminary, on the right. 

By Air— from the Pittsburgh Interna- 
tional Airport take a bus, taxi or Airport 
Limousine to downtown and the William 
Penn Hotel. At William Penn ask direc- 
tions to the 71B Highland Park bus, 
which stops in front of the Seminary. 



If you should arrive after things look 
pretty quiet on an evening, look for a 
Security Guard in a white helmet to help 
you get into your room. 



I 



I Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

I 616 North Highland Avenue 

1 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206-2596 



Pittsburgh and Vicinity 



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Pittsburgh 
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Pittsburgh 

Theological 

Semina 



Catalog 
1987-89 




This catalog is a statement of the 
policies, personnel and programs 
of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
as projected by the responsible au- 
thorities of the Seminary. Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary reserves the 
right to alter and change its policies, 
personnel and programs, without 
prior notice, in accordance with the 
Seminary's institutional needs and 
academic purposes. Complete state- 
ments of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary's policies and programs are 
found in the Seminary's Constitution, 
By-laws, Academic Regulations and 
Board and Faculty Minutes. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
admits qualified students of any race, 
color, national or ethnic origin and 
without regard to age, handicap or sex. 




Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
accredited by the Association of 
Theological Schools in the United 
States and Canada and the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 




Pittsburgh Catalog 
Theological 1987-89 
Seminary 



676 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206-2596 
(412)362-5610 



11 

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£ 


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9 







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Contents 




Introduction 

6 Purpose 

6 Historical Background 

7 Pittsburgh 

8 The Seminary's Immediate Environment: 

Highland Park and East Liberty 

9 Alumni/Alumnae 




Seminary Life 

12 The Campus 

12 Academic Buildings 

13 Housing 
15 Recreation 
15 Worship 

15 Student Groups 

19 Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Choir 

19 Orientation 

19 Play Care for Children 




Educational Proorams 

22 Seminary Degree Programs 

2 2 The Master of Divinity Degree 
24 Field Education 
26 Placement 

26 The Master of Arts Degree 

27 The Doctor of Ministry Degree 
34 Joint Degree Programs 

39 Cooperative Arrangements 
43 Special Lectures and Continuing 
Education 

45 Annual Events 

46 Special Lectureships 




50 



60 
64 



Course Descriptions 

Studies in Bible 
53 Old Testament 
57 New Testament 
Studies in History 
Studies in Theology 



Course Descriptions (continued) 

68 Studies in Church and Ministry 
71 Church and Society 
73 Ethics 
76 Education 
79 Pastoral Care 
81 Homiletics 

83 Worship and Church Music 

84 Evangelism and Mission 

85 Administration 




Admissions 

Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 

Transfer Students 

Joint Professional Degree Programs 

Doctor of Ministry 

Special Students 

International Scholars 

Academic Regulations 




Eh 



Tuition and Fees 
Financial Aid 

Honors Scholarship Program 
Awards, Fellowships, Prizes and 
Scholarships 



A 



104 Faculty 

108 Administrative Officers 

112 Staff 

115 Board of Directors 

117 Field Education Supervisors 



Directions and A 

122 Directions 
BC Maps 



Calendar 
1987-1989 



■ 



1987-1988 Term One 




Junior Orientation 


September 3-4 


First Day of Classes 


September 8 


Last Day of Classes 


November 13 


Reading and Examination Period 


November 16-20 


Term Two 




First Day of Classes 


November 30 


Christmas Break 


December 21-January 1 


Classes Resume 


January 4 


D.Min. Weeks 


January 4-8, 11-15 


Last Day of Classes 


February 19 


Reading and Examination Period 


February 22-26 


First Day of Classes 


March 7 


Seminary Sunday 


May 1 


Last Day of Classes 


May 13 


Reading and Examination Period 


May 16-20 


192nd Commencement 


May 24 


D.Min. Weeks 


June 6-10, 13-17 


School of Religion 


June 19-24 


1988-1989 Term One 




Junior Orientation 


September 1-2 


First Day of Classes 


September 6 


Last Day of Classes 


November 11 


Reading and Examination Period 


November 14-18 


Term Two 




First Day of Classes 


November 28 


Christmas Break 


December 20-January 2 


Classes Resume 


January 3 


D.Min. Weeks 


January 9-13, 16-20 


Last Day of Classes 


February 17 


Reading and Examination Period 


February 20-24 


Term Three 




First Day of Classes 


March 6 


Seminary Sunday 


May 7 


Last Day of Classes 


May 12 


Reading and Examination Period 


May 15-19 


193rd Commencement 


May 23 


D.Min. Weeks 


June 5-9, 12-16 


School of Religion 


June 18-23 



Introduction 



6 Purpose 

6 Historical Background 

7 Pittsburgh 

8 The Seminary's Immediate 
Environment: Highland Park 
and East Liberty 

9 Alumni/Alumnae 




Purpose 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a 
graduate professional institution of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Located 
in the heartland of Presbyterianism and 
part of a thriving city, we seek to prepare 
men and women for dynamic pastoral 
ministry and Christian lay leadership in 
all phases of the Church's outreach. 

Dedicated to excellence in theological 
education, the twenty-member full-time 
faculty strives to prepare graduates who 
will demonstrate both personal piety 
and the keenest possible intellectual 
understanding of the Gospel and its im- 
plications for individual and social living. 
Serious attention is given to the study 
of biblical languages and exposition and 
to the teaching of theological, histori- 
cal, ethical and practical disciplines for 
the successful and meaningful practice 
of ministry. 

The Seminary is rooted in the Reformed 
history of faithfulness to Scripture and 
commitment to the Gospel of Jesus 




Christ. In keeping with our tradition, 
we continue our mission to be a caring 
and ecumenical community, to nurture 
personal faith and corporate worship, 
to promote global consciousness and 
service and to encourage students and 
faculty to relate their studies to the numer- 
ous styles of ministry emerging today. 



Historical Background 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was 
formed in 1959 by the consolidation of 
two previously separate institutions: 
Pittsburgh- Xenia Theological Seminary 
of the United Presbyterian Church of 
North America and Western Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America. The union 
of the two denominations in 1958 led 
to the consolidation of the seminaries. 

The history of the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary began with the 
founding of Service Seminary in 1794 
by the Associate Presbytery of Pennsyl- 
vania. Prior to that time the Presbytery 
had been dependent on a supply of 
ministers sent out from Scotland. The 
Reverend John Anderson, D.D., was 
elected as the first teacher of divinity 
and the school began with an enrollment 
of six students. Service Seminary moved 
twice, first to Ohio, where it became 
Xenia Theological Seminary and later 
to Missouri. It merged in 1930 with a 
seminary which had been founded in 
Pittsburgh in 1825 and together they 
formed the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary. This institution was later 
augmented by the resources of Newburgh 
Seminary, which was founded in New 
York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 




The other branch of our pre-1959 history 
began with the establishment, in 1785 
by Joseph Smith and in 1787 by John 
McMillan, of classical academies in 
Washington, Pennsylvania. From these, 
in 1825, the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., created 
Western Seminary. It was indeed a 
western seminary in 1825, the task of 
which was to furnish a ministry for the 
rapidly opening frontier territories 
along the Ohio River. 

Since the 1959 consolidation, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary has been located 
on the old Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary 
campus in the Highland Park/East Liberty 
section of Pittsburgh. 

Pittsburgh 

The City of Pittsburgh, in southwestern 
Pennsylvania, is built on and surrounded 
by the broken hills and wooded slopes 
which run along her three rivers. Down- 
town Pittsburgh, located at the point 
where the Allegheny and Monongahela 
Rivers merge to form the Ohio, is one 
of the largest corporate headquarters 
cities in the United States and the home 
to such important firms as Allegheny 
International, Aluminum Company of 
America, PPG Industries, USX, Rockwell 
International and Westinghouse Electric 
Corporation. Pittsburgh is easily 
accessible via modern systems of air, 
rail and ground travel. 







V 

% 


; . 











accessible via modern systems of air, 
rail and ground travel. 

Urban renewal in the city, much ac- 
claimed in recent decades, has included 
the arts and education as well as physical 
rehabilitation. An internationally ac- 
claimed symphony orchestra along with 
resident opera, ballet and theater com- 
panies perform regularly in the lavish 
Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts and 
in other city theaters. The city is also 
the steward of several important art 
collections and museums. Carnegie 
Central Library has eighteen branches 
and a suburban Bookmobile service and 
there are also private and specialized 
libraries in the area which are often open 



Introduction 




to the public. Its educational and cultural 
standard has contributed much to 
Pittsburgh's listing, in the Places Rated 
Almanac of 1985, as the "most livable 
city" best city in the United States. 

The City of Pittsburgh is the scene of 
Western Pennsylvania's largest and most 
important educational complex. Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary is associated 
through the Pittsburgh Council on 
Higher Education with nine colleges and 
universities in the city. It operates a 
variety of shared degree programs with 
the University of Pittsburgh and it is 
engaged in expanding shared programs 
also with Carnegie-Mellon University 
and Duquesne University. The cluster 
of educational institutions in Pittsburgh 
provides an atmosphere of intellectual 
growth and offers frequent lectures, on 
a variety of subjects, which interested 
persons may attend. They also provide 
entertainment in the form of musical 
theater productions and sporting events. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary's 
emergence as an important center of 
theological education has paralleled the 
city's renaissance. Faculty and students 
are able to sample richly from and to 
join actively in Pittsburgh's efforts at 
human and cultural renewal. Most semi- 
nary students live in Pittsburgh and are 
thus sensitized to the urban setting of 



the contemporary theological enterprise. 
Their own faith is challenged and en- 
riched by sustained encounter with the 
joys and tragedies of urban life. 

Through the wide scope of field educa- 
tion and other work opportunities, 
students from the Seminary are involved 
in many different areas of Pittsburgh. 
Students serve as pastors in inner-city 
and suburban churches with a variety of 
programs, as chaplains in hospitals and 
in county and state penal institutions, 
as campus ministers and in many other 
positions which affect the life of the city 
and its people. The resources of Pitts- 
burgh for theological education are great 
and Pittsburgh Seminary tries to make 
use of these resources as effectively as 
possible in the many facets of its life. The 
Seminary also attempts to be an active 
resource for the city through the 
stewardship of its facilities and the 
creative leadership of the members of 
the Seminary community. 

The Seminary's Immediate 
Environment: Highland Park 
and East Liberty 

The numerous rivers, valleys and hills 
common to western Pennsylvania divide 
Pittsburgh into a large number of 
neighborhoods. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is located on the border 
between two such neighborhoods. To 
the north is a residential area of sub- 
stantial and well-kept homes, Highland 
Park, which takes its name from the 
large city park less than one mile from 
the Seminary. One of Pittsburgh's finest, 
Highland Park offers woods, picnic 
areas and paths for biking and walking. 
At the heart of the park is the Pittsburgh 
Zoo, much of which was built at the turn 
of the century and which is presently 
undertaking a large scale program of 
modernization. 

To the south is East Liberty, a busy com- 
mercial and business center, providing 
Seminary residents with easy access to 



Introduction 



a large department store and many shops 
and restaurants. East Liberty's residential 
population represents a healthy racial 
and ethnic cross section of urban 
America. The Seminary is a partner in 
the East End Cooperative Ministry, an 
exciting ecumenical venture involving 
many churches and agencies in coopera- 
tive service projects. 

Alumni/Alumnae 

There are approximately twenty-seven 
hundred living alumni/ae of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary and its antecedent 
institutions. Since 1959, over three 
quarters of our graduates have entered 
the service of the church in parish-related 
ministries. Graduates of the Seminary 
also serve the church as college and uni- 
versity presidents, seminary and college 
faculty and as synod and presbytery 
executives and staff. There are nine living 
alumni of the Seminary who have held 
the highest elected office in the Presby- 
terian Church (U.S.A.), that of Moderator 
of the General Assembly. 

Each year the Alumni/ae Council receives 
nominations and selects the Distin- 



guished Alumni/ae. Recipients of the 
award since its inception have been: 

1987— Evlyn W. Fulton 49 
1986— John M.Fife 67 
1985— Robert Meneilly 47 

George Walker Smith '56 
1984— William Rusch '50/75 
1983— T. David Parham, Jr. '44 
1982— Edwin B. Fairman '40 
1981— Platte T. Amstutz 08 
1980 — None given 
1979— Fulton C. Kissick '50 
1978— William H. Kadel '38 

Fred M. Rogers '62 
1977— W Don McClure '34 
John Bald '40 
J. Y.Jackson '28 
W.J. Harper McKnight '25 
Samuel W.Shane '28 
Robert F. Stevenson '44 
1976 — J. Lowrie Anderson '44 

Robert Wesson Gibson '21 
Clinton M. Marsh '44 
Frederick W Evans 04 
James L. Kelso 18 
Clifford E.Barbour '22 
William B.Wilson '24 
John C.Smith '28 
Samuel C. Weir '29 
Theophilus M. Taylor '41 










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12 


The Campus 


12 


Academic Buildings 


13 


Housing 


15 


Recreation 


15 


Worship 


15 


Student Groups 


19 


Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Choir 


19 


Orientation 


19 


Play Care for Children 




The Campus 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
located on a thirteen-acre campus, the 
major portion of which was once the 
estate of H. Lee Mason, Jr. The buildings, 
almost all of which have been built since 
1954, are of American Colonial design. 

Academic Buildings 
THE GEORGE A. LONG ADMINISTRA- 
TION BUILDING is the focal point of 
campus life. In addition to administra- 
tive offices, the building contains lecture 
and seminar rooms, faculty offices, 
student center, bookstore, the Bible Lands 
Museum and a large lounge which is used 
for many gatherings. 

CLIFFORD E. BARBOUR LIBRARY 
houses a collection of over 207,000 
volumes. Four open stack areas include 
103 desk carrels which may be reserved 
by students. In addition, thirteen en- 
closed typing carrels, which allow greater 
privacy for research work, are available 
for doctoral students. Twenty reserved 
study rooms provide ideal conditions in 



which faculty members, visiting scholars 
and graduate students may pursue 
scholarly research. Reading rooms and 
lounges are informally scattered through- 
out the building. Facilities are also avail- 
able for reading microfilm, audio work, 
language study and listening to music. 

Special collections and displays aug- 
ment the book resources of the Barbour 
Library. 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collec- 
tion. The library contains this priceless 
collection of classical theological works 
dating from the reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection of 
Hymnology. Several thousand valuable 
hymn and song books which came 
from the estate of James Warrington of 
Philadelphia provide research materials 
for scholars of American and British 
hymnody. 

Historical Collections. The archive room 
of Barbour Library contains materials 




Seminar 



Life 



13 



relating to Associate, Associate Reformed 
and United Presbyterian congregations, 
presbyteries, synods and general assem- 
blies. Barbour Library is also the 
repository for the Upper Ohio Valley 
Historical Society. 

On display in the main floor exhibit 
area are the desk and chair of Dr. Karl 
Barth of Basel, Switzerland, which 
were presented to the Seminary by Dr. 
Barth in 1964 . Accompanying the 
desk, at which Dr. Barth wrote his 
theological works, is an autographed 
copy of his Kirchliche Dogmatik 1/1. 

HICKS FAMILY MEMORIAL CHAPEL is 
the newest structure on the Seminary 
campus. The sanctuary is used for 
worship during the Seminary's chapel 
services and is used occasionally by 
local congregations. Hicks Chapel has 
a spacious and comfortable theatre- 
auditorium which is ideal for confer- 
ences, special lectures and concerts. 

THE JAMES KELSO BIBLE LANDS 
MUSEUM is named for the distinguished, 
former Professor of Old Testament and 
Biblical Archaeology. It contains a 
significant collection of ancient Near 
Eastern and Palestinian pottery and 
artifacts brought together by travelers 
and archaeologists over the past 60 
years. Many exhibits resulted from the 
eight excavations of which the seminary 
has been a part. Housed in the George 
A. Long Administration Building, the 
| museum is a valuable teaching aid for 
i seminary students and tool for those 
who may wish to participate in a 
Palestinian dig or gain some expertise 
in Palestinian archeology. Churches, 
schools and community groups also 
have the opportunity to see Biblical 
times vividly illustrated. Additional 
exhibits are on permanent display in 
the chapel narthex and the reception 
area of the registrar's office. 




Housing for Married Students 
SAMUEL A. FULTON MEMORIAL HALL 
provides eighteen efficiency and 
twenty-one one-bedroom apartments. 
Each unit includes a kitchenette, a bath 
and a storage locker. 

THE HIGHLANDER contains seventeen 
one-bedroom and six two-bedroom 
units. Each apartment includes a living 
room, kitchen, bath and storage locker. 

ANDERSON HALL includes six two- 
bedroom and six three-bedroom apart- 
ments, each of which has a living room, 
kitchen, bath and a storage locker. 
These units are equipped with wall-to- 
wall carpeting. 

McMILLAN HALL, Anderson Hall and 
The Highlander form a quadrangle 
which encloses a play area for children. 
In McMillan Hall there are one four- 
bedroom, three three-bedroom, twelve 
two-bedroom and three one-bedroom 
apartments. As in Anderson Hall, the 
units are equipped with wall-to-wall 
carpeting. On the ground floor of 
McMillan Hall there is a large community 
room which is used as a play care center 
for pre-school children through the 
school year. 




Apartments in all buildings are un- 
furnished. In the case of international 
students, or others demonstrating a 
compelling need, a limited amount of 
furniture may be available through the 
housing office. 

Each apartment is equipped with a 
refrigerator and stove; coin- operated 
laundry facilities are located in the 
basement of each building. 

Life for married students and their 
families is pleasant and comfortable. 
Rents are well below commercial rates. 
Shops and stores are within walking 
distance, public transportation is avail- 
able at the Seminary gate and public 
schools are nearby for children of all ages. 

Housing for Single Students 
JOHN McNAUGHER MEMORIAL HALL, 
the Seminary's original dormitory, now 
serves a variety of purposes. One wing 
houses women students in large private 
rooms and another contains faculty 
offices. Attached to McNaugher Hall is 
the dining facility which consists of 
three dining halls and a modern kitchen. 

GEORGE C. FISHER MEMORIAL HALL 
accommodates men in single rooms. Re- 
cent renovations have provided adequate 
cooking facilities for single students 



and five additional apartments. A recrea- 
tion room has also recently been added. 
Fisher Hall has student lounges on each 
floor. Single students may rent apart- 
ments upon availability. 

SAMUEL A. FULTON MEMORIAL HALL 
provides efficiency and one-bedroom 
apartments for single students. Each 
unit includes a kitchenette, bath and a 
storage locker. 

Dogs and cats are not permitted in 
Seminary apartments or dormitories. 

Accessibility 

Recent modifications and additions to 
Seminary facilities have provided access 
to our major buildings and educational 
resources for persons with disabilities. 
Classrooms, offices, dormitory and 
dining facilities, restrooms, the mail- 
room, speech studio, museum and the 
entire Library complex are currently 
accessible. The Seminary is committed 
to providing a barrier-free environment 
in order to serve all individuals regard- 
less of their physical limitations. 

Counseling 

The Rev. Everett I. Campbell, Ph.D. is 
Pastoral Counselor to the Seminary 
family. With an easily accessible office, 
he is available five days a week for per- 



Seminary Life 



15 



sonal and career (but not academic) 
counseling. Dr. Campbell is a retired 
priest of the Episcopal Diocese of 
Pittsburgh, a member of the American 
Association of Counseling and De- 
velopment, a Professional Affiliate of 
the American Association of Pastoral 
Counselors, and a member of the 
American Psychological Association. 

Recreation 

Under the auspices of the Student 
Association, athletic events and other 
recreational activities are arranged. 
Seminary students have access to the 
gymnasium and indoor swimming 
pool at Peabody High School across 
the street from the Seminary. Two 
new tennis courts are located on the 
campus grounds. 

Worship 

Worship is an integral part of the life of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Chapel 
services are held five times each week 
and are followed by a time of community - 
wide fellowship. Students, faculty, guests 
and administrators share in the leadership 
of chapel services under the direction 



of the Seminary's Liturgical Committee. 
Attendance at worship services is 
voluntary. 

Student Groups 

A primary purpose of Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary is to develop a Christian 
community on campus which lays the 
foundation of early and lasting friend- 
ships, productive of confidence and 
mutual assistance among ministers. 
Approximately four hundred students, 
drawn from over twenty states and 
several foreign countries, are enrolled 
at the Seminary. While a majority of 
students are Presbyterians, there are 
significant numbers of United Methodist, 
Baptist, Lutheran, Episcopal and 
Catholic students as well. 

Students at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary participate in the governance 
of the institution through membership 
on various committees of the Board of 
Directors, Faculty and Administration. 
A number of student organizations 
flourish on campus to meet specific 
interests and concerns. 




Seminary Life 




The Student Association 

The Student Association (SA) is com- 
posed of ' 'all students registered and 
enrolled in the Seminary in a course of 
study leading to a degree.' ' The Student 
Association's purpose is to ' 'conduct all 
student social and extracurricular affairs,' 
and to "conduct elections of student 
representatives to other Seminary com- 
mittees or organizations as required.'' 
The Student Association conducts its 
own program of extracurricular events 
which range from meetings dealing 
with issues related to the church and 
the world to social get-togethers. The 
Student Association is responsible for 
a large part of the annual student 
orientation program. Meetings of the 
Student Association are held at least 
once a month. 

Association of Women at the 
Seminary 

The Association of Women at the 
Seminary (AWS) addresses the interests, 
concerns and needs of women of the 
Seminary community: students, faculty, 
administrators, staff and spouses. AWS 
promotes mutual support and under- 
standing among women at the Seminary 



and maintains dialogue with women 
who have entered the varied ministry 
and mission of the church. AWS activi- 
ties include forums on issues of special 
concern to women, Women's History 
Week, interaction with other seminaries 
and efforts to foster a spirit of inclusivity 
in all aspects of seminary life. Member- 
ship is open to all women and men at 
the Seminary. 

The Black Seminarians 
Association 

The Black Seminarians Association 
provides a means whereby the Seminary 
utilizes the full participation of the black 
community. Through prayer, fellowship 
and the exchange of individual talents, 
the Association brings to the Seminary's 
attention both the concerns of the 
black people and the particular needs 
of black clergy. The Association's extra- 
curricular activities encompass these 
concerns through seminars conducted 
by experienced black pastors, annual 
attendance at the National Black 
Seminarians Convention and visits to 
area black churches and communities. 
Membership is open to black students 
in all academic programs of the 
Seminary. 



Seminar 



Life 



17 



The Disabilities Concerns 
Caucus 

The Disabilities Concerns Caucus (DCC) 
recognizes the need of the disabled per- 
son to be fully included in the life and 
worship of the church. As an organiza- 
tion we are dedicated to the sharing of 
that awareness with the Seminary com- 
munity, the larger church community 
and the world; and thereby, with the 
cooperation of the faculty and administra- 
tion, to facilitate the general accessibility 
of disabled persons to all Seminary 
buildings and programs. Membership 
is open to any concerned person. 

The Episcopal Fellowship 

Episcopalians and others meet for cele- 
bration of the Eucharist and luncheon 
fellowship every two weeks in the 
McNaugher Lounge. All members of the 
Seminary community are cordially 
invited. 

The Evangelical Student 
Fellowship 

The Evangelical Student Fellowship (ESF) 
is a fellowship of care and support for 
students and faculty of evangelical convic- 
tions. It has three organizing principles: 
1) to provide for the spiritual develop- 
ment of its membership; 2) to stimulate 





academic excellence in evangelical 
scholarship; 3) to provide a forum where- 
by evangelical students can engage the 
wider Seminary community in dialogue 
on issues of mutual concern. Any student 
is welcome to attend ESF activities. 

The International Student 
Association 

The International Student Association 
(ISA) is composed of all international 
students and interested American 
students. The organization provides an 
opportunity for these students at Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary to become 
acquainted, share experiences and 
support one another. The Association 
desires to make the Seminary community 
aware of the different social, religious 
and political views represented by the 
international students and their countries 
and through mutual exchange offer en- 
richment and growth to the community 
through its activities and events. 

The Peace Fellowship 

Peace Fellowship is composed of semi- 
nary students and faculty who share a 
common interest in peacemaking. The 
purpose of the fellowship is to support 
and encourage the prophetic voice of 
the Church, by supporting a wide range 
of activities aimed at communicating 
the concerns of various denominations 




regarding peace and justice. In the past 
our program has included study groups, 
a week focused on Central America, 
prayer vigils, worship services and 
speakers. We have opened a peace re- 
source room on campus. The fellowship 
meets regularly and we welcome the 
community to join us. 

The Preaching Association 

The Preaching Association, supported 
by the Seminary but operated by students 
for the students, supplies worship leader- 
ship to vacant pulpits in the greater 
Pittsburgh area, providing valuable 
experience in preaching for seminarians. 

SPICE 

SPICE is the organization of single 
parent students and female and male 
spouses of students enrolled at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. Its purpose is to 
provide organized support for its mem- 
bers as well as promote and maintain a 
sense of community on the Seminary 
campus. An emphasis is placed on 
dealing with the special situations that 
parents, couples and families encounter 
in their time here at Seminary. In ad- 
dition, holiday parties, lectures and 
special activities are held throughout 
the school year. 



11 if 

Mil 




The United Methodist Students 
Fellowship 

The United Methodist Students 
Fellowship, a support group for United 
Methodist students, provides opportuni- 
ties for fellowship, learning, prayer and 
Bible study. Monthly luncheon meetings 
with a variety of speakers and other 
events throughout the academic year 
are planned. 



S e m i n 



a r y 



Life 



19 



Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary Choir 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Choir is open to men and women from 
the entire Seminary community — 
students, faculty and staff. The Choir 
participates in weekly chapel services 
and presents seasonal concerts on and 
off campus. Rehearsals are held each 
Tuesday during the academic year from 
6:00-7:15 p.m. For further information, 
contact George E. Tutwiler, organist/ 
choirmaster. 

Orientation 

Students who are entering Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary need to un- 
derstand the critical significance of 
theological education, whether at the 
M.Div or MA. level. The M.Div. students 
will be entering the transition from laity 
to clergy. The Seminary provides an 
annual orientation program to sensitize 
students both to the goals of theological 
education in general and to the way 
the Seminary seeks to prepare men and 
women for the Christian ministry. Ad- 
ditionally, the Seminary through the 



Student Association and other student 
groups introduces entering students to 
the Pittsburgh scene. 

Play Care for Children 

The playroom serves the Seminary com- 
munity by offering child care during 
regularly scheduled daytime class hours. 
It is staffed by a Director and Assistant 
Director and students on work assistance. 
The cozy atmosphere of the infant/ 
toddler room accommodates children 
in a caring, safe environment. Develop- 
mental programs are stressed and the 
children are challenged to learn. In the 
playroom for 3 to 5 year olds, there is a 
balance between free, creative playtime 
that leads to socialization and structured, 
planned activities that promote interest 
in starting to learn readiness skills. There 
are outdoor facilities which are used 
often and occasional field trips along 
with other enrichment activities. 







— I* 



«•?* 








P 4 



Programs 



22 Seminary Degree Programs 

22 The Master of Divinity Degree 
24 Field Education 
26 Placement 

26 The Master of Arts Degree 

27 The Doctor of Ministry Degree 
34 Joint Degree Programs 

34 The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

34 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Social Work Joint Degree 

36 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Library Science Joint Degree 

36 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Business Administration Joint 
Degree 

37 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Health Administration Joint 
Degree 

37 The Master of Divinity/Juris Doctor 
Joint Degree 

38 The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Science (Public Management and 
Policy) Joint Degree 

39 The Master of Arts (Religious 
Education)/Church Music Degree 

39 Cooperative Arrangements 

43 Special Lectures and Continuing 
Education 

45 Annual Events 

46 Special Lectureships 




The Master of Divinity Degree 

Studies leading to the Master of Divinity 
degree are designed to prepare men 
and women for the various ministries 
of the Presbyterian Chureh (U.S. A) and 
other denominations. It is a fundamental 
assumption of the Master of Divinity 
program that preparation for the ministry 
cannot be separated from engagement 
in ministry itself. Thus the Master of 
Divinity curriculum is designed to inte- 
grate theological studies and the work 
of ministry so that theory and practice, 
academy and parish, become comple- 
mentary components in the educational 
process. 

One hundred and eight (108) term hours 
are required for the Master of Divinity 
degree. When followed on a full-time 
basis, the program is normally completed 
in three academic years. Student Pastors 
are required to spread their degree work 
over four academic years. 

In preparing for Christian ministry, stu- 
dents should develop an understanding 
of a broad spectrum of knowledge along 
with a competence in basic pastoral 
abilities. They should be able to use theo- 
logical insights to integrate these skills 
and resources. The Master of Divinity 
curriculum is designed to guide the 
student through a pattern of course work 
and experience which will lead her or 
him to a basic professional competency 
with which to begin the ordained minis- 
try. At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
it is understood that this basic profes- 
sional competency includes: 

The ability to understand and make use 
of the basic documents of faith, i.e., 
Scripture, creeds and traditions of the 



church. The study of the Bible, both 
in English and in one of the original 
languages and the study of church his- 
tory are crucial to this ability. The course 
work in Biblical Studies is supplemented 
by a required examination on the content 
of the English Bible. This test, which is 
offered annually, must be passed by every 
Master of Divinity student as a requiste 
for graduation. Presbyterian students 
generally enroll in a full academic year's 
study of both biblical languages in ac- 
cordance with the ordination require- 
ments of the denomination. 

The ability to communicate through 
preaching, writing and teaching and 
to counsel and provide leadership in 
the program and administrative areas, 
fostered by the course work in the 
Pastoral Studies and Ministry sequences. 
Three terms of supervised field educa- 
tion are required of all Master of Divinity 
students in the middler year in conjunc- 
tion with the Pastoral Studies sequence 
so that the academic study in the areas of 
education, pastoral care and homiletics 
can be critically combined with a well- 
rounded, supervised involvement in the 
life of the church. 

The ability to understand in theological 
terms the sociological, ideological and 
political content of the cultures in which 
the church ministers. This understanding 
needs to be followed by the application 
of ethical standards to the social process, 
using all of the resources available for 
making ministry effective. Two required 
courses in Church and Society, the 
Introduction to Ethics and one required 
elective course in Ethics help students 
to reach these goals. 



Educational Programs 



23 



The ability to think theologically. In 
addition to an introduction into methods 
and terminology of theological studies 
(Introduction to Systematic Theology), 
there are two required courses focusing 
on Christology and the Church and 
Sacraments. In Church History there 
are three required courses (Historical 
Studies I-III). In these courses students 
study theological and historical methods 
as well as the central doctrines of the 
faith and major periods of the history 
of the Church. 

The ability to practice ministry in an 
appropriate professional style. One of 
the first term courses introduces students 
to the concept of ministry and its varied 
responsibilities. In the senior year two 
courses lead the student to develop his 
or her own statement of faith (Credo) 
and to understand the dynamics of the 
formation of faith in the pastor and, 
through the pastor, in the people 
(Spiritual Formation). 

The Master of Divinity 
Curriculum 

Junior Year 

Term I Interpreting the Bible 
Language 

Church & Society: Local 
Introduction to Ministry 

Term II Biblical Introduction 
(OT01 or NT01) 1 
Language 
Historical Studies I 
Elective 

Term III Biblical Introduction 
(OT02 or NT02)2 
Exegesis 

Introduction to Systematic 
Theology 
Introduction to Ethics 2 



Middler Year 



Term I Pastoral Studies I: Education 
Historical Studies II 
Elective 
Elective 

Term II Pastoral Studies II: Pastoral 
Care 

Christology 
Historical Studies III 
Elective 

Term III Pastoral Studies III: Homiletics 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 

Term I Church & Society: Global 
Church & Sacraments 
Elective 
Elective 

Term II Credo 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 

Term III Spiritual Formation 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 




24 



Educational Programs 



Suggested Four-Year Master of 
Divinity Program for Student Pastors 

First Yea 

Term I Interpreting the Bible 
Language 
Introduction to Ministry 

Term II Biblical Introduction 
Language 
Historical Studies I 

Term III Biblical Introduction 
Exegesis 

Introduction to Systematic 
Theology 

Second Yeai 

Term I Pastoral Studies I: Education 
Church & Society: Local 
Historical Studies II 

Term II Pastoral Studies II: Pastoral 
Care 

Christology 
Elective 

Term III Pastoral Studies III: Homiletics 
Introduction to Ethics 
Elective 

Third Year 

Term I Church & Sacraments 
Elective 
Elective 

Term II Historical Studies III 
Elective 
Elective 

Term III Elective 
Elective 
Elective 

Term I Church & Society: Global 
Elective 
Elective 

Term II Credo 
Elective 
Elective 



Term III Spiritual Formation 
Elective 
Elective 

'Students must take one Biblical Introduction in 
each Testament. 

2 Students may elect to postpone either the second 
Biblical Introduction or Introduction to Ethics until 
the middlcr year in order to make room for one 
elective in Term III, junior year. A required elective 
in Ethics has to be taken after completion of 
Introduction to Ethics. 



At the heart of the curriculum in the 
Master of Divinity program is a core of 
required courses. Ordinarily all students 
in the program will take these courses. 
However, in certain circumstances a 
student may be execused from a required 
course. Requests should be submitted 
to the Dean's Office. The faculty in the 
field from which the student wishes to 
be excused will design appropriate tests 
and have authority to determine whether 
the student has sufficient mastery for 
the course to be waived. Such courses 
will be listed on the transcript, showing 
that the requirement was fulfilled, but 
no credit hours will be given. 



Passing an examination on the content 
of the English Bible is required for 
graduation. This examination is offered 
annually. Although this requirement 
may be met as late as the third year, it is 
recommended that students take the 
examination in the first year of Master 
of Divinity studies. 

Theological Field Education 
Requirement 

Field education at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary assists students 
to learn about the practice of ministry 
through direct involvement in local 
churches and other settings under the 
direction of skilled field supervisors. 

Master of Divinity students must com- 
plete one year of planned, supervised 
and evaluated field education in a setting 



Educational P r o g r 



25 



approved by the Director of Theological 
Field Education. This requirement 
normally is to be fulfilled in the middler 
year while students are enrolled in the 
Pastoral Studies sequence of courses. 
Students are expected to use their field 
placements as laboratory settings for 
specific assignments in those courses. 
Objectives of the program include 
acquaintance with a wide variety of 
ministerial activities, development of 
skills, sensitivity to the dynamics of 
pastoral relationships, awareness of the 
social context of ministry and theologi- 
cal reflection upon the various aspects 
of the practice of ministry. A detailed 
learning agreement, developed by each 
student in conjunction with his or her 
field supervisor, coordinates these edu- 
cational objectives with the needs of 
the church or agency to be served and 
provides a basis for a shared evaluation 
of progress at later points in the year. 
This requirement has been fulfilled when 
the final evaluation has been completed 
by supervisor and student and accepted 
by the Director of Theological Field 
Education. This information is shared 
with the student's sponsoring judicatory 
where confidentiality is assured. 

Students in the required theological 
field education program are expected 
to give eight to ten hours of service in 
the field per week. Time spent with 
the field supervisor and in staff 
meetings should be included in this 
total, but time spent in travel to and 
from the field and in preparation for 
tasks on the field is not to be counted. 

Field education placements are negoti- 
ated with the intent of broadening each 
student's range of experiences in order 
to contribute to his or her personal and 
professional growth. Placements in 
hospitals and other service agencies 
can sometimes be arranged for students 
who anticipate an institutional ministry 
after graduation. 



Student Pastorates 

Student pastors are required by the 
Seminary to extend their program to 
four years, taking nine credits per term 
instead of the normal twelve, to com- 
pensate for the amount of time required 
by their field service. An example of the 
four-year sequence of courses is listed 
on pages 22 and 23. 

Internships 

Internships in a wide variety of settings 
can be investigated through the Director 
of Theological Field Education. Summer 
interships include pastorates, youth 
assistantships and placements in summer 
camps or parks and secular agencies. 

Full-time internships of nine to fifteen 
months duration in local churches or 
specialized settings also provide ex- 
cellent learning opportunities. Such 
internships, usually taken between the 
middler and senior years, are required 
by some denominations of their minis- 
terial candidates. The Seminary will 
provide assistance in facilitating these 
experiences. 

Other Field Experiences 

Supervised field education, usually 
scheduled in the middler year is also 
possible in the junior and senior years 
as well. Students may continue in the 
same placement for a second year if 
they are assigned new and more re- 
sponsible tasks. Occasional preaching 
under the auspices of the Preaching 
Association is also available. Field work 
which is not subject to the same stand- 
ards of supervision and evaluation can 
also be arranged for students who re- 
quire additional income or experience. 
Entering students are cautioned to limit 
field work and community involvement 
so that their academic studies will not 
be put in jeopardy. 



26 



Educational Program 



United Methodist Studies 

Candidates for full Conference member- 
ship and ordination as elders in The 
United Methodist Church must complete 
courses dealing specifically with United 
Methodism which include three (3) 
credit hours each in history, doctrine and 
polity (Book of Discipline of The United 
Methodist Church, 1984, par. 423). Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary offers the 
following courses to meet this require- 
ment: CH42 History of Methodism, 
TH49 United Methodist Doctrine and 
AD 2 9 United Methodist Polity. Several 
elective courses also enhance the studies 
of United Methodist students. 

Placement for Graduating 
Seniors 

The Placement Office exists to assist 
graduating seniors in locating appropriate 
situations of service in ministry. Work- 
shops on dossier writing, interview 
skills, and candidacy requirements are 
held, culminating in an early spring 
Face-to-Face event with assistance from 
the Vocation Agency, during which 
Presbyterian seniors interview with 
Pastor Nominating Committees. The 



Office also distributes seniors' dossier 
coversheets to all presbyteries in the 
denomination. The Placement Resource 
Center houses an inventory of Church 
Information Forms, Opportunity Lists 
and audio-visual equipment for sermon 
critique and distribution to interested 
committees. The Placement Office also 
coordinates visits to the Seminary by 
church officials, pastors and Pastor 
Nominating Committees through the 
year. Contacts for students of other 
denominations are made according to 
their particular needs. The Seminary 
also seeks to assist alumni/ae, when 
possible, who are seeking new challenges 
of ministry. 

The Master of Arts Program 

The Master of Arts Program is designed 
for men and women who wish to 
engage seriously in religious studies at 
the graduate level, but who do not 
need the full range of courses required 
in the Master of Divinity Program. The 
goals of this course of study include: 
1) Providing the opportunity for an 
academic inquiry into some aspects of 
the Christian religion. 2) Enabling 




E d u c 



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27 



students to concentrate their studies in 
one or, at most, two areas of research, 
under the guidance of a member of the 
faculty, in preparation for the writing 
of a thesis. 3) Affording specialized 
work in the field of Christian education 
(see Religious Education Emphasis). 

Seventy-two term hours of studies are 
required for the degree. Thirty hours 
are to be distributed as follows: 

Bible-Nine hours: BI01 and OT01 
or OT02 or NT01 or NT02; and one 
elective. 

History-Six hours: CHOI or CH02 
orCH03. 

Theology-Six hours: TH01 and TH02 
orTH03. 

Ethics-Six hours: ET01 and one elective. 

Sociology of Religion-Three hours. 

NOTE: Up to twelve hours may be taken 
through PCHE schools. 

Normally two years of full-time academic 
work are needed to complete the pro- 
gram. There is a five-year statute of 
limitations. M.A. candidates may apply 
for transfer to the M.Div. program at 
any time prior to the awarding of the 
M.A. degree; but once the degree has 
been awarded, courses credited toward 
the M.A. may no longer be used for the 
M.Div. 

All candidates are required to write an 
M.A. thesis, which will normally be 
between eighty and one hundred pages 
in length. Up to six hours of credit may 
be received for Independent Study done 
as research for this project under the 
direction of the Thesis Adviser, who must 
be a member or adjunct of the faculty. 
It is the responsibility of the candidate, 
with the assistance of the Director of 
the M.A. Studies, to select an appropriate 
Adviser who should agree to work 
closely with the candidate. Written 
agreement to do so should be in the 



hands of the candidate by the Spring 
preceding expected graduation, as the 
Thesis will be due at the end of Term II 
of the graduation year. 

Religious Education Emphasis 

A special track which emphasizes reli- 
gious education is available for M.A. 
candidates who wish to prepare for 
non-ordained educational ministries. 
Their courses of study should reflect 
the balance of studies described above. 
Some work will be taken at the School 
of Education of the University of Pitts- 
burgh. Choice of such courses will be 
made in consultation with the Education 
faculty of the Seminary. The M.A. 
thesis is required as above and will be 
completed with an Adviser approved 
by the Education faculty of the Seminary. 
In addition, at least six but no more 
than nine term hours must be taken in 
supervised field education. Arrange- 
ments for such work will be made 
through the Director of Theological 
Field Education in consultation with 
the Director of M.A. Studies and credit 
will be granted as Independent Study 
courses taken with the Education faculty. 

Doctor of Ministry Program 



Developing competency in professional 
ministry is a process in which ministers 
are engaged throughout their lives. The 
Doctor of Ministry Degree program is 
designed to facilitate this process through 
systematic and disciplined study that 
will lead to a demonstrably higher level 
of competence in integrating all aspects 
of ministry. 

The program utilizes ministry-related 
projects, studies, papers and other 
assignments to improve proficiency in 
such areas as: 
1. Defining and organizing complex 

situations of ministry using biblical. 

theological, sociological, political 

and personal insights. 



Educational Program 




2. Analyzing situations of ministry in 
such a way as to understand their 
nature and causes and to identify 
opportunities for effective ministry. 

3 . Taking responsible action with a 
deeper grasp of homiletical, educa- 
tional, counseling and administrative 
principles enhanced by a biblical, 
historical and theological heritage. 

4 . Evaluating actions and their outcomes 
from a variety of perspectives. 

Doctor of Ministry candidates select one 
of the following tracks: Parish Focus, 
Reformed Focus or the Pastoral Care 
Focus. New classes are enrolled each year 
in the Parish Focus. The other focuses 
are usually available in alternating 
years, depending on interest. 

All the focuses are designed so they may 
be completed in three years. Thirty six 
(36) credit hours are usually required for 
graduation. All work must be completed 
by the end of the fourth academic year 
from the date of matriculation, unless 
an exception to the Statute of Limitations 
is granted by the Doctor of Ministry 
Committee. 



Scheduling Options 

Two time options are offered for the 
Parish Focus in order to meet the different 
situations of ministers. Option I classes 
meet every Monday on the Pittsburgh 
campus for four terms. Two seminars 
or colloquia are taken each term. 
Option II concentrates study in four 
two-week sessions, extending over two 
years. Two seminars or colloquia are 
taken in each session. Guided reading 
lists are sent to students several weeks 
in advance of the sessions to allow for 
adequate preparation. 

The Pastoral Care Focus is usually only 
offered under the Option I plan and 
the Reformed Focus under the Option 
II plan. 

On occasion satellite sites for Option II 
groups in the Parish Focus have been 
used for the required seminars. Ordi- 
narily these sites will be located in the 
Middle Atlantic States. However, all 
students must enroll in the Proposal 
and Biblical Colloquia on the Pittsburgh 
campus. For further information contact 
the Doctor of Ministry Office. 



Educational P r o g r 



29 



Collegiality 

Clergy who enroll in a focus during a 
particular term remain together during 
their seminars and colloquia. Other 
students are not usually added to the 
group. This assures a high level of col- 
legiality and trust and facilitates the peer 
learning which is essential to the program . 

Parish Focus 

The Parish Focus is organized around 
the intensive involvement of the pastor's 
ministerial setting in all phases of the 
program. These include the Seminar 
Phase, involving six seminars looking 
at all areas of parish ministry; the 
Colloquia Phase, in which the nature 
of the doctoral project is developed; 
and the Major Project Phase involving 
two elective courses, the implementation 
of the project and the writing of the 
doctoral paper. 

Congregational involvement proceeds 
through a committee, chosen by the 
pastor. The committee discusses the 
program with the director during a 
visit to the church and prepares a one- 
page mission statement to be endorsed 
by the congregation. This statement 
then forms the basis for an evaluation 
of the church, revealing areas where 
further growth is desired. It is also used 
to guide the pastor's appropriation of 
course work and becomes part of the 
data used to select and define the 
major project. 

During the Colloquia Phase, the com- 
mittee consults with the pastor con- 
cerning possibilities for the major 
project. Again, the evaluation provides 
needed guidance. 

In the Major Project Phase the Congre- 
gational Committee works with the 
pastor in implementing the major 
project. This project may take place at 
the parish level, the denominational 
level, or the ecumenical level, depending 
on the minister's situation. 



While most ministers who elect the 
Parish Focus serve a local church, others 
with specialized ministries have found 
it a flexible vehicle adaptable to their 
own ministries. These have included 
denominational posts, ecumenical 
agencies, prison work and various school 
ministries. In every case, however, the 
minister, priest, or rabbi must intention- 
ally involve his or her people in the 
program of study This insures that the 
people as well as the pastor benefit 
directly from the Doctor of Ministry 
program. 

Required Courses in the Parish 
Focus 



DM01 

Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church with special 
emphasis on implications for the practice 
of ministry in today's church. Theology 
is understood and applied in light of 
specific situations in the candidate's 
ministry. 

DM02 
Pastoral Care 

Theological and psychological insights 
are focused on the theory and practice 
of caring, with case studies furnished 
by the pastors. 

DM03 
Homiletics 

An advanced course in the theory and 
practice of preaching in the context of 
worship with pastor input central to 
the seminar. 

DM04 
Administration 

Problems in church administration, in- 
cluding the development of stewardship 
and lay leadership, are addressed in 
light of theological criteria and admin- 
istrative theory. 



30 



E d u c 



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I Pro 



grams 



DM05 
Education 

The course is designed to help pastors 
implement a complete educational 
program, preschool through adult, in 
the local church. An examination of 
the uniqueness of Christian education 
will be sought. 

DM06 

Congregational and Community 

Issues 

A case method consideration of problems 
confronting the church in society, 
using the discipline of Christian ethics 
as a major resource. 




Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student 
in focusing upon an area in minstry for 
the doctoral project. Theoretical issues 
underlying the problem and a method 
for addressing the problem are clarified 
as the student develops a proposal in 
consultation with peers and faculty. 

DM08 

Biblical Colloquium 

Attention will be given to the focuses 
and resources of biblical studies today. 
Principal emphasis will be placed on 
the development of a hermeneutic that 
will lead to helpful and responsible use 
of the Bible in the doctoral project. 

Reformed Focus 

This Focus is designed to cultivate the 
Reformed emphasis on the minister as 
a theological leader of the church. The 
adjective, "theological," calls attention 
to the formative role theological reflec- 
tion and knowledge ought to have in 
the practice of ministry. There is an 
urgent need to recover this aspect of 
ministry. The substantive, "leader of the 
church," indicates that the context of 
the theological reflection that is needed 
must be the Church's unceasing struggle 
to live out all dimensions of faithful 
service to Jesus Christ. 



The objective of the program is to 
develop the ability of participants to 
formulate theologically based actions 
directed toward "the great ends of the 
Church," as these ends have been 
understood in the Reformed tradition. 
To accomplish this purpose the Re- 
formed Focus provides more extensive 
opportunity for theological reflection 
than the Parish Focus. Six "core" semi- 
nars have been developed to deepen the 
student's awareness and understanding 
of Reformed contributions in the areas 
of biblical studies, theology, ethics and 
worship. In addition to these seminars, 
the Proposal Colloquium and nine 
hours of electives are required for the 
degree. Three of these elective credits 
must be in the discipline most germane 
to the "practical" aspect of the student's 
project (education, pastoral care, homi- 
letics, or administration). Three other 
elective credits must be in one of the 
disciplines contributing to the "biblical 
and theological" chapter of the doctoral 
paper. The final three elective credits are 
at the discretion of the student and the 
major adviser and should be considered 
additional research for the project. 

The program is conducted along the 
lines of the Parish Focus. It includes a 
Seminar phase, involving the six "core" 
seminars, taken in three successive 
terms; the Colloquium Phase, in which 



Educational Programs 



31 



the design of the doctoral project is 
worked out and the required elective 
in one of the "practical" disciplines is 
taken; and the Major Project Phase, 
involving the completion of the other 
electives, implementation of the project 
and the writing of the doctoral paper. 

Congregational involvement in the 
student's work follows the design used 
in the Parish Focus. A congregational 
committee participates in drafting a 
mission statement that informs the 
student's project. The committee also 
functions as a sounding-board for the 
student in the planning, execution and 
evaluation of the project. 

Required Courses in the Reformed 
Focus _^ 

DM40 

Reformed Theology 

A systematic analysis of the ways in 
which different types of theology within 
the Reformed tradition have dealt with 
some of the most important doctrines 
of the Christian faith. Among the varia- 
tions studied are the "high Calvinism'' 
of the Synod of Dort; the Amyraldian 
theology; "federal" theology; the 
Princeton School; the Mercersburg 
theology; and representative "liberal," 
"neo- orthodox," and "evangelical" 
Reformed theologians. Doctrines con- 
sidered include the concept of the 
"sovereignty" of God; the covenant of 
grace; the atonement of Christ; grace 
and "free will" ; the Church as the 
"communion of saints" ; and the 
Kingdom of God. 

DM41 

Biblical Authority and Interpretation 

in the Reformed Tradition 

This course is designed to help the 
pastor synthesize the most important 
ingredients that must go into a responsi- 
ble presentation of biblical teaching in 
the Reformed tradition today. These 
include the history of the Christian 
canonical scriptures; the meaning of the 



"Scripture Principle" of the Reformation; 
and the main types of biblical interpre- 
tation before and after the historico- 
critical approach. Among the latter types, 
the hermeneutics of Schleiermacher, the 
Princeton School, "Fundamentalism," 
and Karl Barth are singled out for special 
attention. 

DM42 

Worship in the Reformed Churches: 

For those whose heritage is the Protestant 
Reformation, tradition has stood for 
authority opposed to Scripture and 
timeliness is often contrasted with tra- 
dition. But, there is now a growing 
awareness of the priority of the Christian 
community and a deeper appreciation 
for the whole life of the Church as it 
has been nurtured and formed by the 
Holy Spirit in every age; and that in 
Christian theology timeliness and 
tradition are held together by ' Jesus 
Christ, the same yesterday and today 
and forever' ' It is in this context that 
we must understand worship in the 
Reformed churches. 



The Social Transforming Character of 

The course reviews the motifs of 
Christianity's relationship with culture 
in the thought of H. Richard Niebuhr 
and then focuses on the transforming 
motif as expressed in Reformed thought. 
The Reformed tradition's relationship 
to politics, revolution, economics, 
technology and vocation is investigated 
in Western culture. The case of the 
World Alliance of Reformed Church's 
recognition of apartheid as heretical is 
examined for the possibilities and prob- 
lems of Reformed thought in the 
developing world. 

DM44 

Reformed Ecumenism 

This course is designed to enable the 
student to appreciate the Reformed 
heritage within today's ecumenical 



32 



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c a t i o n a I Programs 



context. It examines the roots of the 
Reformed concern for the unity of the 
Church. It deals with the most trouble- 
some theological issues that emerge in 
ecumenical discussions (e.g., authority, 
confessionalism, scripture and tradition). 
It also considers what the Reformed 
stance should be on recent proposals 
towards achieving mutual recognition 
by the churches in the areas of baptism, 
eucharist and ministry. 

DM45 

Theological and Ethical Issues 

Before the Church 

This course studies the positions of the 
former United Presbyterian Church, 
U.S.A. and the former Presbyterian 
Church, U.S., on ethical and theological 
issues that caused great controversy in 
the sixties and seventies and continue 
to be issues on which there is confusion 
and controversy today. Issues such as 
abortion — the "right to life" versus the 
"right to choose"; capital punishment; 
nuclear weapons and the threat of 
nuclear war; environmental ethics; bio- 
medical ethics; the problems of Central 
America and the sanctuary movement; 
prayer in the public schools; pornogra- 
phy and the problem of censorship; are 
among those that may be singled out 
for close study. 



DM07 

Proposal Colloquium 

This course is designed to aid the student 
in focusing upon an area in ministry for 
the doctoral project. Theoretical issues 
underlying the situation and a method 
for addressing the problem are clarified 
as the student develops a proposal in 
consultation with peers and faculty. 

Pastoral Care Focus 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has 
devised a specialty in pastoral care 
at the doctoral level to assist pastors 
to become more proficient in the art 
of pastoral care and counseling. The 
program involves eight required semi- 
nars and two electives, scheduled over 
a two-year period, and a third year 
which is devoted to the development 
of a doctoral project and a paper re- 
porting that work. The electives are 
ordinarily related to the topic of the 
doctoral project, but may also be used 
to begin the accreditation process for 
Clinical Pastoral Education or member- 
ship in the American Association of 
Pastoral Counselors. 




Educational Programs 



33 



Required Courses in the Pastoral 
Care Focus 

DM01 

Doctrine of Church and Ministry 

The theology of the Church, with special 
emphasis on implications for the practice 
of ministry in today's church. Theology 
is understood and applied in light of 
specific situations in the candidates 
ministry. 

DM21 

Dynamics of Personal and 

Communal Transformation 

This course will examine the dynamics 
of personal and communal transfor- 
mation, integrating theological and 
psychological theories with an experi- 
ential and practical component. Special 
attention will be given to various ex- 
periences of loss in the process of growth 
and transformation throughout the life 
cycle and how women and men may 
experience this differently. In addition, 
the role of the pastor in facilitating per- 
sonal and congregational transforma- 
tional processes will be explored. 

DM22 

Pastoral Counseling I 

This seminar is designed to train the 
minister in basic counseling/communi- 
cation skills for ministry. The major 
goal in this seminar is to sharpen lis- 
tening skills and deepen one's ability to 
help people assess and solve their own 
problems. It will assist the participant 
in integrating theological and psycho- 
logical understandings of human needs 
as these bear upon practical ministerial 
situations. 

DM23 

Theological Foundations for Pastoral 

Care 

Drawing upon the historical identity 
of pastoral care as it grew out of the 
interface between biblical and systematic 
theology, on the one hand, and pastoral 
experience and need, on the other, this 
seminar will identify some key theo- 
logical issues which must inform pastoral 



care today. The goal is to help the student 
to think theologically about pastoral 
care. Special attention will be paid to 
the theological/ecclesiastical traditions 
of the students. 

DM24 

Compassion and Pastoral Care 

This course examines compassion as an 
organizing theological focus for pastoral 
care. Beginning with a study of the 
compassion of Jesus, compassion is 
developed systematically and practically 
to inform a new vision of ministry. In 
addition, attention will be paid to the 
issues involved in becoming 
compassionate. 

L ^"? 

Spiritual Formation 

In the context of theological and pro- 
fessional formation, this course will 
attend to issues in the pastor's own life 
and faith. Students will be assisted in the 
practice of prayer. Affective dimensions 
in persons' relationship with God will 
be explored. The course will also include 
issues in the pastoral care of the pastor 
and his or her family. 

DM26 

Systems Theory: Family and 

Congregational Dynamics 

Drawing upon contextual family theory 
and systems theory, this course is de- 
signed to help students reflect upon the 
patterns within their families of origin 
as these relate to their current life situa- 
tions. In addition, students will learn 
how to identify, reflect, act upon and 
evaluate their leadership role in facili- 
tating congregational dynamics from 
both a theological and a systems 
perspective. 

DM27 

Pastoral Counseling II 

Special attention is given to problems 
which are frequently encountered in 
ministry, such as those concerned with 
grief, substance abuse, aging, unemploy- 
ment and the reverberations that these 
may have in the congregation. 



34 



Educational Programs 



Joint Degree Programs 

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The University of Pittsburgh and Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary have a 
cooperative graduate program in the 
study of religion. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary par- 
ticipates in the University of Pittsburgh's 
Cooperative Graduate Program in the 
Study of Religion. This program draws 
upon the resources of both institutions 
and leads to the Ph.D. degree awarded 
by the University. 

The aim of the program is to foster cre- 
ative, interdisciplinary study in several 
areas: Biblical Studies (Old and New 
Testament); History of Religions (chiefly 
Christianity and Judaism, but work in 
Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism is also 
offered); Theology; Ethics; Sociology 
and Anthropology of Religion; and 
Phenomenology of Religion. For in- 
formation about requirements, course 
offerings, preliminary and compre- 
hensive examinations, language require- 
ments, etc. , consult the University of 
Pittsburgh's bulletin, Graduate Pro- 
grams in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 

Inquiries and applications for admission 
should be addressed to: 

Director of Graduate Studies 
Department of Religious Studies 
University of Pittsburgh 
2604 Cathedral of Learning 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

The Master of Divinity/Master 
of Social Work Joint Degree 
Program 

To encourage and equip women and 
men to engage in social work both in 
and out of the church and to provide 
opportunities in social work for students 
who feel a call to practice within a 
church setting, the Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary and the University of 



Pittsburgh Graduate School of Social 
Work have developed a program offering 
a joint degree, that is, M.Div./M.S.W. 

This joint effort enables students to 
receive both the M.Div and the M.S.W. 
in four years of post-baccalaureate 
study instead of the usual five. Never- 
theless, the joint program provides a 
full course of study in both theology 
and social work. This is effected by 
equating certain courses now taught in 
both schools, by making provision for 
courses taken in one school to count 
as electives in the other and by devel- 
oping specialized field placements. 

The curriculum of the Graduate School 
of Social Work encompasses studies in 
four major curriculum areas or ' 'clusters" : 
Health/Mental Health; Juvenile and 
Criminal Justice; Poverty and Associated 
Problems; and Children and Youth. 

Candidates for the joint degree who enter 
the program through the Seminary will 
concentrate on theological studies during 
the first two years. Application should 
be made to the University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate School of Social Work during 
the first term of the second year at the 
Seminary. The third and fourth years will 
be spent predominantly at the School 
of Social Work, but one course per term 
will be taken at the Seminary. Should 
a student elect to terminate the joint 
program before its completion and seek 
only one degree, he or she will be 
required to complete all of the work 
ordinarily required for that degree. 
During the third and fourth year stu- 
dents will no longer be able to receive 
financial aid through the Seminary. 
They will pay tuition to the University 
of Pittsburgh and might need to apply 
for financial assistance from the Univer- 
sity or from other sources. 



Educational Programs 



35 



Sample of a Flexible M.Div./M.S.W. 
Joint Degree Course Work 

YEAR I (Seminary 

Term I Interpreting the Bible 
Language 

Church & Society: Local 
Introduction to Ministry 

Term II Biblical Introduction 
(OTOlorNTOl) 
Language 
Historical Studies I 
Elective 

Term III Biblical Introduction 

(OT02 or NT02) 
Exegesis 
Introduction to Systematic 

Theology 
Introduction to Ethics 



YEAR II (Seminary)* 

Term I Pastoral Studies I: Education 
Historical Studies II 
Elective 
Elective 

Term II Pastoral Studies II: 
Pastoral Care 
Christology 
Historical Studies III 
Elective 

Term III Pastoral Studies III: 
Homiletics 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 

* Field Education required 
during this year 



YEAR III (Seminary/University 

Term I Church & Society: Global 
Urban Analysis 

Social Welfare Research & Lab 
Human Behavior 
Social Welfare 
1.) Basic Specialization 

Requirement 
2.) Basic Specialization 

Requirement 

Term II Elective 

Concentration Human Behavior 
Concentration Social Welfare 

Requirement 
Third Specialization 

Requirement 
Fourth Specialization 
Requirement 
Field Work 

Term III Spiritual Formation 
Field Work 

YEAR IV (Seminary/University) 

Term I Church & Sacraments 

Second Research Requirement 
Fifth Special Requirement 

or Elective 
Elective 
Elective 
Field Work 

Term II Credo 

Elective for Specialization 
Elective for Specialization 
Elective for Specialization 
Elective 
Field Work 

Term III Elective (if needed) 



Inquiries regarding the Graduate School 
of Social Work and requests for Social 
Work catalogs should be addressed to: 

Director of Admissions 
Graduate School of Social Work 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 




The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Library Science Joint Degree 
Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and 
the School of Library and Information 
Science of the University of Pittsburgh 
established in 1968 a joint program to 
train men and women in theological 
librarianship. The program, designed 
to be completed in four academic 
years, culminates in two degrees, the 
M.Div. andtheM.L.S. 

Normally, a student will take the first 
part of his or her work at the Seminary 
and begin work at the University in the 
third year. The program will include a 
course on resources in theological 
libraries and six credits of field experi- 
ence in theological librarianship at the 
Seminary. Should a student elect to 
terminate the joint program before its 
completion and seek only one degree, 
he or she will be required to complete 
all of the work ordinarily required for 
that degree. 

Inquiries regarding the School of Library 
and Information Science and requests 



for Library Science catalogs should be 
addressed to: 

Director of Admissions 

School of Library and Information 

Science 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Business Administration Joint 
Degree Program 

Management of the life of the church, in 
larger local congregations and in regional 
and national agencies, increasingly re- 
quires familiarity with business practices 
and the availability of some people who 
are able to combine professional knowl- 
edge and experience in the traditions of 
Christian ministry and in the area of 
business administration. In addition, 
only acquaintance with the actual theory 
and practice of business administration 
can enable the Christian minister to make 
informed contributions to the reality of 
business life in our time. 

Therefore the Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary and the Graduate School of 



Educational Programs 



37 



Business at the University of Pittsburgh 
have developed a program for a joint 
degree, the M.Div. /MB. A. By adopting 
a four-year plan of study at the Semi- 
nary, and by using primarily evening 
M.B.A. courses, a candidate for this joint 
degree can accomplish all necessary re- 
quirements within four years. For further 
information on the curriculum and 
admissions requirements at the Graduate 
School of Business, write to: 

The Deans Office 
Graduate School of Business 
The University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260. 

The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Health Administration or 
Master of Public Health Joint 
Degree Program 

This joint degree program with the 
Graduate School of Public Health at the 
University of Pittsburgh is designed to 
be completed in five years. It is part of 
greatly increased interest in coordinated 
work in medicine and theology, and it 
provides for the need to have fully 
qualified experts who are able to. com- 
bine the Christian ministry with the 
expanding fields of Health Administra- 
tion and Public Health. The program 
leads to two degrees, the M.Div. and 
either the Master of Health Administra- 
tion (M.H.A.) or the Master of Public 
Health (M.P.H.). For further information 
write to: 

The Dean 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206-2596. 

The Master of Divinity/Juris 
Doctor Joint Degree Program 

In 1983 the School of Law at Duquesne 
University and Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary established a joint degree 
program leading to the M.Div. and Juris 
Doctor Q.D.) degrees. 



In the Judaeo-Christian tradition the 
contact is very close between justice 
and law, and the ministry of the people 
of God. The practice of ministry is 
frequently intertwined with the adminis- 
tration of law. Graduates of the joint 
degree would be expected to work in a 
wide array of professional tasks, such 
as law firms which specialize in serving 
religious institutions as clients, church 
boards and agencies, and parish minis- 
tries of various kinds. 

Due to the nature of the professional 
requirements of the practice of law and 
ministry neither the Law School nor 
the Seminary can surrender any of 
their required courses. However, while 
the completion of both degrees, sepa- 
rately, would normally take six years the 
joint program allows for the completion 
of both degrees in five years by permitting 
work done in one institution to count 
for credit in the other institution. 
Credits sufficient to enable a participant 
to graduate in five (5) years will accrue 
by awarding elective credit for certain 
mutually agreed upon courses. The 
Law School may award elective credits 
not to exceed nineteen (19) in the day 
division and fifteen (15) in the evening 
division for some Seminary courses 
and the Seminary may award elective 
credits for courses taken at the Law 




38 



Educational Programs 



School up to eighteen (18) hours. The 
faculties have drawn up a list of courses 
which are agreed upon to be credited 
by the other institution. This list is 
available upon request. 

Admission into the program is deter- 
mined by each institution separately; 
admission into one institution does not 
guarantee admission to the other. While 
students may apply to both institutions 
concurrently, there are three basic 
sequences envisioned for the double- 
competency program: 

Option 1 

Year 1 Seminary 

Year 2 Law School (Day Division) 

Year 3 Law School (Day Division) 

Year 4 Seminary 

Year 5 Seminary and Law School 



Year 1 Law School (Day Division) 

Year 2 Seminary 

Year 3 Law School (Day Division) 

Year 4 Seminary 

Year 5 Seminary and Law School 

Option 3 

(one or the other) 

Year 1 
Year 2 
Year 3 
Year 4 
Year 5 
or 

Year 1 
Year 2 
Year 3 
Year 4 
Year 5 



Seminary 

Seminary 

Law School (Day Division) 

Law School (Day Division) 

Seminary and Law School 

Law School (Day Division) 

Law School (Day Division) 

Seminary 

Seminary 

Seminary and Law School 



The Master of Divinity/Master of 
Science (Public Management 
and Policy) Joint Degree 
Program 

The School of Urban and Public Affairs 
(SUPA) at Carnegie-Mellon University 
and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
began in 1983 offering a joint degree 
program leading to the two degrees of 
Master of Divinity (M.Div.) and Master 
of Science in Public Management and 
Policy (M.S.). 

Through the recognition by both insti- 
tutions of work performed in the other 
institutions for advanced standing, the 
program can be completed in four years. 
Normal completion of each degree pro- 
gram independently would require five 
years. Admission is determined separately 
by each institution; admission to one 
institution does not guarantee admission 
into the other. 

Public management and policy is in- 
creasingly required for the practice of 
ministry at all levels. The joint degree 
program seeks to prepare persons as 
experts in urban policy and management 
as well as theology in order to establish 
a group of specialists ready to serve the 
church as practitioners and consultants 
through a combination of expertise 
which is constantly in demand. 

Inquiries concerning the SUPA part of 
the program should be directed to: 

The Dean 

School of Urban and Public Affairs 
Carnegie-Mellon University 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213- 



Inquiries concerning the Law School at 
Duquesne University should be sent to: 

Director of Admissions 
School of Law 
Duquesne University 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282. 




The Master of Arts (Religious 
Education)/Church Music 
Dual Degree Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and 
The School of Music at Duquesne 
University established a joint program 
in Church Music and Christian Education 
in 1983. The program culminates in an 
M.A. degree in Church Music and 
Christian Education which is awarded 
by Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 

The program can be completed in three 
years. Admissions are to be determined 
by each participating institution sepa- 
rately; admission into one institution 
does not guarantee admission by the 
other institution. 

The curriculum is designed to prepare 
qualified persons to minister to local 
parishes both musically and educa- 
tionally. A combination of these forms 
of ministry is often found desirable and 
practical. 

Inquiries concerning the School of Music 
should be addressed to-. 

Director of Graduate Studies 
School of Music 
Duquesne University 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15282. 



Cooperative Arrangements 

Pittsburgh Council on Higher 

The Pittsburgh Council on Higher 
Education (PCHE) is a cooperative 
organization composed of Pittsburgh 
area colleges, universities, and graduate 
schools. Participating institutions in- 
clude: Carlow College, Carnegie-Mellon 
University, Chatham College, Com- 
munity College of Allegheny County, 
Duquesne University, LaRoche College, 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Point 
Park College, Robert Morris College, 
and the University of Pittsburgh. 

The purposes of PCHE are: to represent 
a common voice on a variety of issues; 
to examine possibilities for cooperation 
among the member institutions; and, 
above all, to undertake joint programs 
which expand educational opportuni- 
ties for students and make the best use 
of institutional resources. The member- 
ship of the Seminary in PCHE benefits 
students by providing possibilities for 
cross registration in courses at the 
graduate level, by establishing library 
privileges at eight academic libraries 
other than our own, and by initiating 
programs in specialized areas. 



40 



Educational Program 



The American Schools of Oriental 
Research 

The Seminary is associated with the 
American Schools of Oriental Research. 
This corporation is involved in archae- 
ological research in the Middle East. Most 
of their work has been concentrated in 
Palestine and Iraq and they maintain 
schools in Jerusalem, Amman, and 
Baghdad. Since 1924 we have been active 
participants in numerous field projects 
in cooperation with the American 
Schools of Oriental Research. 

Arsenal Family and Children's Center 

The Arsenal Family and Children's Center 
came into being in 1952 as a result of a 
Pennsylvania mandate to the Western 
Psychiatric Institute and Clinic to "deal 
with the mental hygiene of the normal 
child in the way of study and training 
in order that there may be a program of 
prevention of mental and nervous dis- 
orders as a result of giving children the 
proper background and training that will 
prevent such disorders.' ' The Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center has grown 
and developed into a unique field lab- 
oratory for the disciplined observation 
of children and families. It thereby 



contributes to the education and training 
of students for the ministry and other 
service-related careers. 

The National Capital Semester for 
Seminarians 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary par- 
ticipates in the National Capital Semester 
for Seminarians sponsored by Wesley 
Theological Seminary in Washington, 
DC. This program provides an oppor- 
tunity for seminary students to spend a 
semester in Washington for study and 
involvement in the processes of govern- 
ment and the concerns of the churches. 
The program is designed to include 
supervised study and interaction (reflec- 
tion), and will provide a full term of 
academic credit. The program is open 
to any student who has completed at 
least one year of study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. Seminary gradu- 
ates may apply for a program to begin 
within one year of their graduation. 




Educational Programs 



41 



Clinical Pastoral Education 

Clinical Pastoral Education brings 
theological students and ministers into 
supervised encounter with persons in 
critical life situations. Out of intense 
involvement with persons in need and 
the reactions from peers and supervisors, 
the students develop new awareness of 
themselves as persons and of the needs 
of those to whom ministry is offered. 
From theological reflection on specific 
human situations, new insight and 
understanding are derived and the 
student or minister is confronted with 
his or her own humanity. Within the 
interdisciplinary team-process of helping 
persons, they develop skills in inter- 
personal and interprofessional relation- 
ships. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
grants academic credit to students who 
complete one unit of credit of Clinical 
Pastoral Education at centers accredited 
by the Association for Clinical Pastoral 
Education. The Association for Clinical 
Pastoral Education accredits a nation- 
wide network of Clinical Pastoral 
Education Centers and their supervisors. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is a 
member of the Association. 

The Center for Business, Religion 
and the Professions 

The purpose of the Center for Business, 
Religion and the Professions is threefold: 
(1) To focus attention on the quality of 
life in our communities engaging a cross 
section of business, professional and 
religious leaders, (2) to develop creative 
options for the future that call for in- 
clusive participation and understanding 
of complexity in a changing environment 
and (3) to articulate basic ethical values 
essential for keeping God central in 
human life in an economically and 
politically oriented society. 

The Center seeks to implant the above 
intentions through organized discus- 
sions, workshops, seminars, and con- 
ferences. By this means, we will become 
conscious of the total human context 



that comprises the marketplace and 
the individuals struggles, ambitions, 
and concerns to bring greater meaning 
to their lives. The Center seeks to be a 
place where dreams for betterment can 
take shape and creative leadership can 
suggest ways to implement them in 
communities. 

As the Center seeks to develop and im- 
plement a more holistic view of society, 
in a more immediate sense, it provides 
a forum where clergy, business, labor, 
government and professional leaders 
can build trust among its members, an 
essential factor behind any effective plan 
to enhance the quality of life for com- 
munities. The Center serves as part of 
the Seminary's outreach program and 
is integral to its continuing education 
efforts on behalf of the church and 
society. 

The Pittsburgh Institute for Biblical 

Tfion/nni/ 

The Institute is designed to pursue two 
goals: (1) To foster the theological in- 
terpretation of the Bible through the 
dialogue between Old and New Testa- 
ment interpretation and (2) to assist all 
theological disciplines in using Biblical 
resources in developing their own 
subject matter. The Institute seeks to 
accomplish its task by a series of regular 
conferences, occasional workshops, 
special seminars, and presentations by 
invited guests. It will encourage research 
work dedicated to make scholarly con- 
tributions to its two goals, and it will 
attempt to facilitate the publication of 
this work. 

Special Non-degree Studies 

Clergy and lay persons who wish to 
enroll as Special Students in courses at 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminar) for 
non-degree purposes are invited to do 
so. Special Students may enroll in as 
many as two courses per term, up to a 
total of six courses. Special Students 
complete all the assigned requirements 



42 



Educational Programs 



for each course in which they enroll and 
receive academic credit. Credit earned 
as a Special Student may be transferred 
to any established Seminary degree 
program in which the student may later 
enroll. Those desiring Special Student 
status must possess an accredited 
bachelor's degree and apply through 
the Admissions Office. 

Clergy and lay persons who desire 
to audit courses at Pittsburgh Theologi- 
cal Seminary are invited to do so. No 
academic credit is given for audits. Appli- 
cations for audits shall be accompanied 
by a college transcript and be submitted 
to the Continuing Education Office 
along with a fee of $100.00 per course. 
The transcript and record of classes 
will be kept as part of the Continuing 
Education files. 

International Scholars Program 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
committed to serving the professional 
educational needs of the whole church. 
Scholarships are offered annually to 
international scholars who have already 
completed the Master of Divinity degree 
or its equivalent in their own country 
and whose plans for an additional year 
of study are endorsed by the church in 
their own country. These scholarships 
provide tuition, room, board and a small 
monthly cash allowance for one aca- 
demic year to international students 
endorsed to the Seminary by the World 
Council of Churches, the World Alliance 
of Reformed Churches or by the Leader- 
ship Development Program of the 
National Council of Churches. 

Distinguished Pastor-in-Residence 
Program 

This program gives the Seminary com- 
munity the opportunity to dialogue with 
persons involved in a variety of minis- 
tries. During each academic year persons 
representing three different models of 
ministry are invited to spend four to 
eight weeks in residence on the campus. 




The distinguished guests visit classes, 
participate in Seminary activities, engage 
in conversations with students and 
faculty, and lead one or more chapel 
services. Usually one guest is present 
each term. 

During recent academic years, the 
Seminary welcomed distinguished 
pastors who were engaged in overseas 
ministries, urban redevelopment minis- 
tries, large suburban church ministries, 
small church ministries, chaplaincy 
ministries, and judicatory ministries. 
Distinguished guests include pastors who 
are alumni/ae of Pittsburgh and many 
other seminaries. Each guest is hosted 



Educational Program 



43 



by a member of the faculty of the 
Seminary. 

In addition the Seminary from time to 
time invites distinguished lay persons 
to spend several days to a week on our 
campus. These church women and men 
share insights about their ministries 
and ways in which their church and work 
commitments interact. Distinguished 
guests have included a banker, a news- 
paper editor, management consultants, 
an attorney, corporation leaders, and 
others. 

Special Lectures and 
Continuing Education 

Special Lectures 

The Special Events at Pittsburgh Semi- 
nary include Concerts by the Seminary 
Choir, the Tuesday Evenings at 8 concert 
series in cooperation with the Duquesne 
University School of Music, visiting 
scholars' presentations from national 
and international backgrounds and the 
following Special Lectures: 

The Ritchie Memoriai Lectureship 

Established in 1977 by Orland M. Ritchie 
in memory of the Reverends Charles 
McKelvey Ritchie, Willard Vedelle Ritchie 
and Orland Melville Ritchie in the field 
of Christian Education, this endowment 
is used to bring visiting professors such 
as Hans Kung, C. K. Barrett, Kenneth 
E. Bailey, Alasdair Heron, Aurel Jivi and 
Petr Pokorny to teach courses in our 
regular curriculum. 

The Schaff Lectures 

The Schaff Lectures were established to 
honor the late David S. Schaff, Professor 
of Church History at Western Theologi- 
cal Seminary for 23 years and coeditor 
of the Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia. Past 
Schaff Lecturers have been Rosemary 
Ruether, David Tracy, John Westerhoff, 
Walter Brueggemann, Markus Barth and 
William F. May; future guests include 




Thomas Troeger, Colgate-Rochester and 
Jane D. Douglass of Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary. 

The Elliott Lectures 

Given in theology and on literary or 
scientific subjects related to theology, 
past Elliott Lecturers have been Robert 
Jewitt, Virgil Cruz and Charmarie 
Jenkins Blaisdell. 

Kelso Lectures- 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 

Vincent Harding, Congressman Walter 
Fauntroy and Dr. G. Murray Branch have 
been recent speakers who have assisted 
the Seminary community to celebrate 
the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The W. Don McClure Lectureship 

Covering topics of World Mission and 
Evangelism, the W Don McClure Lec- 
tures have been established to honor 
the missionary who spent 50 years of 
his life in overseas service before being 
slain in a Somali guerilla raid. Samuel 
Moffett, Dale Brunner, Kenneth E. Bailey 
and Don Black have helped establish this 
lectureship; Bishop Festo Kivengere of 
Uganda and Peter Beyerhaus of Tubingen 
will be the 1987 and 1988 Lecturers. 




The Pittsburgh Biblical Colloquium 
provides an annual two-day conference 
at which a single and important theme 
of the Bible is approached from the 
vantage point of Old and New Testament. 
Shalom and Apocalyptic themes in the 
Bible have been topics in the past, with 
"The Hebrew Scriptures: A Christian- 
Jewish Dialogue" taking place in 1986. 
All of these papers have been published 
in Horizons in Biblical Theology. The 
1987 conference will focus on Cos- 
mology and Theology. 

The J. Hubert Henderson Lectures on 
Church and Ministry 

The newest series inaugurated at the 
Seminary, this lecture honors the pastor 
of 35 years at the Wallace Memorial 
Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh. 
Martin Marty and Frederick Buechner 
were the first two lecturers in the series. 

Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education program at 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
carefully designed to meet the needs 
of both clergy and laity. For men and 
women engaged in professional ministry, 



a theological degree begins a lifelong 
process of growth. Experiences in parish 
life can be extremely important lessons 
when brought back to the classroom and 
shared with colleagues. Updating skills 
and knowledge under the leadership of 
Seminary faculty members and visiting 
professors is of keen interest and value 
to those who seek continued personal 
and professional growth. 

For an increasing number of laypeople 
who make their living in a variety of 
ways in the world, a theological educa- 
tion consists of short-term seminars and 
conferences; at these events, outstanding 
leaders introduce new thoughts, ex- 
change takes place between clergy and 
laity and old ideas are challenged and 
reshaped, resulting in a new fulfillment 
in life. 

Each year our Continuing Education pro- 
gram consists of a basic core of events, 
with contemporary topics added in con- 
sultation with a dedicated committee 
of faculty, area clergy and laypeople. 



Educational Programs 



45 



Annual Events 

Auditing of regular Seminary 
courses has been a traditional option 
for clergy in order to update their knowl- 
edge and for laity with a bachelor's 
degree who wish to gain increased famili- 
arity with a specific subject. 

Independent-study-in-residence is 

a way to make excellent use of a larger 
block of time, such as study leave. The 
Clifford E. Barbour Library is available; 
the guidance of a faculty member can 
be arranged; and pleasant overnight 
rooms are available in the Continuing 
Education wing of Fisher Hall. 

Four Monday Mornings are offered 
twice a year, in the fall and in the spring. 
Two subjects are covered by different 
professors each morning. Monday 
evening series are also offered. 

An archaeological lecture is offered 
annually by a visiting scholar from the 
United States or abroad, combined with 
the opportunity for a guided tour of 
the Bible Lands Museum on the Seminary 
campus. 

The Preaching Seminar allows 
pastors to study periodically the art of 
preaching from a different perspective. 
In addition, the Seminary's Speech 
Studio is available for preaching, with 
video playback privately critiqued by 
one of the Seminary's homiletics 
professors. 

A Writers' Workshop provides pro- 
fessional guidance about the practical 
aspects of publishing written materials. 
Laypeople as well as clergy have found 
this workshop valuable, not only in 
polishing writing skills, but as an oppor- 
tunity to share ideas. 

Travel-study trips to the Holy Land, 
Jordan, Egypt and other lands are peri- 
odically scheduled. The pre-trip study 
is open to trip participants and other 



interested individuals and provides the 
background necessary to understand the 
subsequent tour. An England/Scotland 
study tour is planned for June 1988. 

The Summer School of Religion, 

sponsored by the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foun- 
dation, is held for one week each June 
on the Seminary campus. A tradition 
for over 45 years, this outstanding con- 
tinuing education experience provides 
exceptional leaders at a nominal cost to 
Presbyterian clergy and certain other 
full-time Presbyterian Church employed 
professionals from this geographical area. 

In addition to these programs, the 
Continuing Education/Lay Education 
Committee has made a commitment 
to include at least one experience in 
Music/Worship, Theology, Spirituality, 
Church Growth, Clergy Skills, Media, 
current Ethical Issues and Bible Study 
in Old and New Testaments during a 
four-year period. 




46 



Educational Programs 



Outstanding Lecturers and Leaders 

Peter J. Gomes, Harvard Divinity 
School, Cambridge, MA 

Walter Wink, Auburn Theological 
Seminary, New York, NY 

Thomas Starzl, M.D., Presbyterian- 
University Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA 

Jim Wallis, Sojourners Magazine, 
Washington, DC 

Louis and Colleen Evans, National 
Presbyterian Church, Washington, DC 

James A. Sanders, Claremont School of 
Theology, CA 

Clinton Marsh, President of Knoxville 
College, TN 

Eduard R. Schweizer, University of 
Zurich, Switzerland 

John C. Wynn, Colgate-Rochester 
Divinity School, NY 

Robert H. Meneilly, Village 
Presbyterian Church, Prairie Village, KS 

James Forbes, D.Min., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York, NY 

Harold Wilke, Executive Director, 
Community of Healing, 
White Plains, NY 

Robert K. Hudnut, Winnetka 
Presbyterian Church, IL 

Edmund Pellegrino, M.D., Georgetown 
University Medical School, 
Washington, DC 

James D. Glasse, formerly President of 
Lancaster Theological Seminary, PA 

Abraham Twerski, M.D., Gateway 
Rehabilitation Center and St. Francis 
Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 

Horace Allen, Boston University, MA 

Lloyd J. Ogilvie, First Presbyterian 
Church, Hollywood, CA 

Walter Menninger, M.D., Menninger 
Foundation, Topeka, KS 



James E. Lee, Gulf Oil Corporation, 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Maggie Kuhn, Gray Panthers, 
Philadelphia, PA 

George W. Coats, Jr. , Lexington 
Theological Seminary, KY 

Speed Leas, Alban Institute, 
Washington, DC 

Robert Schuller, Crystal Cathedral, 
Garden Grove, CA 

William F. Orr, Emeritus Professor, 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, PA 

Josephine Massyngbaerde Ford, 
University of Notre Dame, IN 

William Hudnut, Mayor of 
Indianapolis, IN 

Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., New York 
Theological Seminary, NY 

John S. Savage, President of Leadership, 
Education And Development, 
Reynoldsburg, OH 

James H. Costen, Interdenominational 
Theological Center, Atlanta, GA 

Matthew Fox, O.P., Holy Name 
College, Oakland, CA 

Michael Maccoby, Director, Harvard 
Project on Work, Washington, DC 

William S. Kanaga, Arthur Young Co., 
New York, NY 

Richard Munro, Time, Inc., 
New York, NY 

Donald W Shriver, Jr. , President of 
Union Theological Seminary, 
New York, NY 

Peggy Shriver, National Council of 
Churches, New York, NY 

Charlie and Martha Shedd, nationally 
known authors and lecturers, Athens, GA 

Robert Short, Author of The Gospel 
According to Peanuts, Wilmette, IL 



Educational Program 



47 







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Martin E. Marty, Chicago University 
Divinity School, IL 

William Scott Green, University of 
Rochester, NY 

Edward A. Powers, Iowa State 
University, Ames, IA 

S. Dean McBride, Jr. , Union 
Theological Seminary, Richmond, VA 

J. Christiaan Beker, Princeton 
Theological Seminary, NJ 

Donald A. Hagner, Fuller Theological 
Seminary, Pasadena, CA 

Paul D. Hansen, Harvard Divinity 
School, Cambridge, MA 

Howard Clark Kee, Boston University 
School of Theology, MA 

V. Bruce Rigdon, McCormick 
Theological Seminary, Chicago, IL 

John Cobb, Claremont School of 
Theology, CA 

Roy W. Pneuman, Alban Institute, 
Washington, DC 



Johanna Bos, Louisville Theological 
Seminary, KY 

Virginia Stem Owens, Texas A & M 
University, College Station, TX 

Lawrence T. Geraty, Atlantic Union 
College, South Lancaster, MA 

Carl Dudley, McCormick Theological 
Seminary, Chicago, IL 

Richard Avery and Donald S. Marsh, 
First Presbyterian Church, 
Portjervis, NY 

Ernest S. Frerichs, Brown University, 
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Course 
Descriptio 



50 Studies in Bible 

50 Required Courses 
53 Oid Testament 
57 New Testament 

60 Studies in History 

60 Required Courses 
60 Eiectives 

64 Studies in Theology 

64 Required Courses 

65 Eiectives 

68 Studies in Church and Ministry 
69 Required Courses 
71 Eiectives 
71 Church and Society 
73 Ethics 
76 Education 
79 Pastoral Care 
81 Homiletics 

83 Worship and Church Music 

84 Evangelism and Mission 

85 Administration 



Descriptions 



All courses are for three academic credits 
unless otherwise noted. 

Studies in Bible 

"Thy word is a lamp to my feet and a 
light to my path" (Psalm 119:105). The 
word of God in Scripture nourishes 
and regulates Christian faith and action, 
it lays the cornerstone for every aspect 
of the Church's ministry to the world 
and it sets norms for the structures of 
Christian theology. A rediscovery of the 
Bible has provided the impetus for every 
forward movement in the history of 
the Church. At the end of the twentieth 
century, when alienation of individuals, 
races, classes and nations threatens to 
tear the world apart, when the issue of 
authority continues to be a problem, a 
new and careful look at the sources of 
our common faith is imperative. 

The intention of the courses offered 
is to engage students in Old and New 
Testament research in such a way that 
they may learn the methods of study, 
acquire the basic tools and skills neces- 
sary to undertake ministry and constantly 
relate their own study of the Scriptures 
to all facets of the Christian life. 

During the first two years of work in 
the M.Div. program students will survey 
the literature of the Old and New Testa- 
ments as well as explore the settings and 
influences of the biblical world by means 
of three core courses, i.e., Interpreting 
the Bible and one Introduction in each 
Testament (OT01 or OT02 and NT01 
or NT02). The curriculum also calls 
for serious consideration of the Bible in 
terms of study in the original languages. 
Therefore, Hebrew or Greek is required 
for two terms in the junior year and is 



immediately followed by a third-term 
exegetical course in the corresponding 
Testament. A similar sequence in the 
other language can be elected in the 
second or third year. As for further elec- 
tive opportunities, there are advanced 
exegetical offerings along with courses in 
the areas of the intertestamental period, 
archaeology, Near Eastern languages, 
biblical theology and ethics, hermeneu- 
tics, critical studies, etc. 

New discoveries which directly affect 
our understandings of the Bible continue 
to be announced with startling frequency. 
Pittsburgh Seminary has a rich heritage 
of excellence in the area of biblical 
studies, and we are determined to enable 
and inspire future generations of Chris- 
tian leaders to join in the exciting 
venture of these pursuits. 

Required Courses in Bible 

BI01-1001 
Interpreting the Bible 

The Bible is the foundation and touch- 
stone of our Christian faith and tradition. 
The Bible is also a collection of books, 
compiled over a long period of time, 
written in ancient languages and re- 
flecting long dead and distant cultures. 
How do we go about understanding it 
and explaining it to others? This course 
will introduce students to their own 
presuppositions and to the ways in which 
the Church has interpreted the Bible 
and offer the tools to begin the task. It 
will discuss the formation of the indi- 
vidual Books and their inclusion into 
the Canon of Holy Scripture, the problem 
of the Bible as Word of God in the 
words of humans, the problem of histori- 
cal statements and theological affirma- 
tions, the question of continuity and 



Course Descriptions 



51 



discontinuity and the contribution 
which the Bible makes to the task of 
theology. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Hare and 

Mr. von Waldow 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Hare and 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT01-1101 

Historical Books of the Old 

Testament 

An introduction to the historical books 
of the Old Testament, intended to ac- 
quaint students with the basic method- 
ologies of Old Testament research and 
the present state of Old Testament studies. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Gowan 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Gowan 

0702-7702 
Prophets and Psalms 

The nature of prophecy in ancient 
Israel and its background in the cultures 
of the ancient Near East. Special atten- 
tion is given to the genres of prophetic 
oracles and the methodologies which 
may be employed for their interpretation. 
The message of the great eighth-century 
prophets, Amos, Hosea, Micah and 
Isaiah of Jerusalem stand at the heart of 
the course. The world of Jeremiah, 
Deutero-Isaiah and Ezekiel is explored. 
An introduction to the Psalms, as the 
product of Israel's cultic life, concludes 
the course. The aim of the whole is to 
enable the student to begin exegesis 
with a firm grasp of the fundamentals. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. J. Jackson 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. J. Jackson 

A/707-7207 

Gospels, General Epistles and 

Revelation 

The principal emphasis of this course 
is on the four Gospels and the methods 
employed in their critical study (literary, 
form, and redaction criticism). General 
Epistles, Revelation and matters of text 
and canon are examined briefly. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Kelley 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Hare 






fe n 




NT02-1202 

Acts, Pauline Epistles and Hebrews 

The messages of Acts, the Pauline epistles 
and Hebrews are examined in the light 
of their historical context and literary 
structure. Special emphasis is placed on 
the life and thought of Paul. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Mauser 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Mauser 

0703-7703 
Hebrew 

A course designed to lead to an appreci- 
ation and competent use of Hebrew as 
one of the languages of biblical revela- 
tion. Instruction is in small, graded 
sections so that a maximum of individual 
attention and achievement is possible. 
Two sections will follow the inductive 
method, working directly with selected 
texts of the Hebrew Bible. One section 
will employ the more traditional ap- 
proach, using a grammar as the basic 
tool of instruction. Students may elect 
either approach. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Gowan, 

Mr. J. Jackson and 

Mr. von Waldow 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Gowan, 

Ms. Lapp and 

Mr. von Waldow 



52 



Course Description 







J$£3f*-) 




^E2&*/ 




^^ 


\, 




Douglas Hare 



Eberhard von Waldow 



A continuation of OT03. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Gowan, 

Mr. J. Jackson and 

Mr. von Waldow 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Gowan, 

Ms. Lapp and 

Mr. von Waldow 

0705-7705 

Old Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Hebrew 
moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence Individual professors indicate 
to students whether a book or particular 
passasges will be exegeted. The purpose 
of this course is twofold: 1) Introduction 
to exegetical method: moving from 
grammar and syntax to the application 
of critical methods and the use of refer- 
ence materials in order to arrive at 
conclusions concerning the original and 
present meaning of a text; 2) continua- 
tion of the Hebrew language sequence. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Gowan, 

Mr. J. Jackson and 

Mr. von Waldow 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Gowan, 

Mr. J. Jackson and 

Mr. von Waldow 



A/703-7203 

New Testament Greek 

A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of 
biblical revelation. From the outset the 
student learns inductively to read from 
the Greek New Testament and unique 
study aids prepared by the Staff are 
used. Instruction is in small, graded 
sections. Students who have previously 
studied Greek will be assigned to 
special sections. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Hare, 

Mr. Kelley and Staff 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Hare, 

Mr. Mauser and Staff 

NT04-1204 

New Testament Greek 

A continuation of NT03, teaching by the 
inductive method. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Hare, 

Mr. Kelley and Staff 
Term II 1988-89 Mr Hare, 

Mr. Mauser and Staff 

A/705-7205 

New Testament Exegesis 

Each of the language sections in Greek 
moves to the exegesis segment of the 
sequence. Individual professors indicate 
to students whether a book or particular 
passages will be exegeted. The purpose 



C o u r s 



D e 




Donald Gowan 



Jared Jackson 



of this course is twofold: 1) Introduction 
to methodology of exegesis, such as 
problems and limitations of an English 
translation; source strata for selected 
passages which will be chosen by the 
professor for critical problems, structure 
analysis, historical background of sources 
and text; intent; introduction to the 
theology of the particular book; 2) con- 
tinuation of the Greek language sequence. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Hare, 

Mr. Kelley and Staff 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Hare and 

Mr. Kelley 



Old Testament 

Required Course* 



fd Testament 



OT01-1101 

Historical Books of the Old 

Testament 

OT02-1102 
Prophets and Psalms 

0703-1103 
Hebrew 

OT04-1104 
Hebrew 

OT05-1105 

Old Testament Exegesis 



Elective Courses in Old Testament 

OT14-1114 
Deutero-lsaiah 

The purpose of this course is twofold: 
1) Introduction to methodology of 
exegesis, such as problems and limita- 
tions of an English translation, form 
critical problems, structure analysis, 
historical background of the book of 
Deutero-lsaiah, intent; 2) Introduction 
to the theology of Exile. In particular, 
the expectation of salvation against the 
background of 587 B.C., Old Testament 
eschatology. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. J. Jackson 

OT15-1115 
Amos 

A study of the book of Amos: its major 
emphasis; the place of the prophet in 
Israels culture; and the significance of 
the message of Amos for our situation. 

Mr. J. Jackson 

0726-7726 

The Beginnings of the History of 

Israel 

A study of the historical question: In 
what sociological entity did Israel enter 
the scene of ancient Near Eastern His- 
tory? The focus is on the historical 
background of the traditions of Israel 
in Egypt, the Patriarchs, the Sinai and 



54 



C o u r 



Descriptions 






Robert Kelley 



Ulrich Mauser 



the occupation of the land. These con- 
siderations lead to the discussion of 
the theological question: Why does the 
Old Testament tradition describe the 
beginning of the history of the chosen 
people differently from the actual course 
of events? 

Mr. von Waldow 

0727-7727 

The Jews in a Christian World 

Discussion of the history of the Jewish 
people in the Western world. The course 
is based on the nine-part television series, 
HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE 
JEWS. The video tapes will be shown at 
the beginning of the class sessions and 
serve as a basis for discussion. Special 
attention will be given to the relation- 
ship between Jews and Christianity. 
Topics to be discussed include: Jesus 
the Jew; The Beginnings of Christianity 
as a Jewish Sect; The Jews in the Christian 
Middle Ages; Secular and Christian 
Anti-Semitism; Jews and Christians after 
the Holocaust, towards a theology of the 
people of God. Supplementary readings 
will help the student to understand the 
Jewish experience in a larger historical 
context. 



0728-7728 

Biblical Archaeology 

An introduction to archaeology's con- 
tribution to biblical studies, how it has 
increased our understanding of biblical 
times, thrown light on biblical texts 
and advanced our knowledge of biblical 
history. Concentration will be on one 
particular period of Israel's history to 
illustrate archaeology's methodology 
and contribution. 

Term II 1987-88 Ms. Lapp 
Term III 1988-89 Ms. Lapp 

0730-7730 

Ancient Israel and Egypt 

The influence of the experience of slave 
life in Egypt upon the tradition of Israel's 
story, and of the continued contact be- 
tween Egypt and Israel after the entrance 
of Israel into Canaan and into the Exilic 
age and after. This will involve a study 
of the forms of Egyptian literature and 
a comparison and contrast with the 
genres of the Old Testament. Hebrew 
not required. 

Mr. J. Jackson 



Mr. von Waldow 



C o u r 



Descriptions 



55 




Nancy Lapp 



OT31-1131 

Judaism from the Exile to the Birth of 

the Church 

A survey of the history, life and faith of 
the Jewish people, covering the postexile 
parts of the Old Testament and the litera- 
ture of the Intertestamental Period. Deals 
with life-styles, institutions, literature 
and theology as well as the history of 
the period. 

Mr. Gowan 

OT32-1132 
Ezekiel 

This course will interpret the theology 
of the book of Ezekiel against the back- 
ground of the fall of Jerusalem in 587 
B.C. and the beginnings of the experi- 
ence of exile in Babylonia. Knowledge 
of Hebrew will not be required, but 
assistance will be given in working with 
the Hebrew text for those who wish 
to take it as an exegetical course. 

Mr. Gowan 

OT33-1133 Ancient Texts Relating to 
the Old Testament 

A study of extra-biblical texts which have 
thrown light on the Bible; including 
the early cuneiform tablets of Ebla, Mari 
and Nuzi, the Ugaritic Canaanite litera- 
ture, Hebrew inscriptions such as the 
Siloam inscription and the Samaria, 



Lachish and Arad ostraca, and Egyptian 
literature relating to the Old Testament. 
For those who have Hebrew there will 
be an opportunity to read some of the 
Hebrew texts. 

Ms. Lapp 

OT36-1136 

The first part of the course uses the 
book of Jeremiah to demonstrate the 
development from the original oral 
pronouncement of prophetic words 
to prophetic books as we have them 
today in the canon. The second part 
deals with the original theology of the 
prophet Jeremiah and its interpretation 
by a later generation which produced 
the prose sections in the book of 
Jeremiah. Prerequisite: Hebrew (OT03 
and OT04). 

Term II 1988-89 Mr. von Waldow 

OT37-1137 

Seminar on Israel's songs and the Chris- 
tian use of the Psalter in corporate 
worship. Two-track: students with some 
knowledge of Hebrew will be helped in 
exegesis; others will be expected to do 
wider reading for their interpretation 
of the Psalms. 

Mr. von Waldow 



56 



Course Descriptions 



OT38-1138 

Eschatology of the Old Testament 

The Old Testament view of the future 
will be explored, beginning with its 
broadest sense as the fulfillment of 
God's promises, but concentrating on 
the expectation of radical changes in 
humanity, society and nature to occur 
"in that day." The contributions of Old 
Testament thought to later Jewish and 
Christian eschatology and relationships 
with modern future hopes will be 
emphasized. 

Mr. Gowan 

0739-7739 
Worship in Israel 

The essence of worship in Israel and 
the basic theological ideas reflected in 
the major annual feasts and some typical 
cultic activities; the importance of the 
Israelite cultic personnel, such as priests, 
Levites and prophets. 

Mr. von Waldow 

OT40-1140 
Hebrew Reading 

Supervised reading of selected Old Testa- 
ment passages. One credit. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Gowan 
Term II 1987-88 Mr. J. Jackson 
Term III 1987-88 Mr. von Waldow 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Gowan 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. von Waldow 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. J. Jackson 

0742-7742 

Faith and Culture in the Ancient Near 

East 

Ways in which different religious faiths 
of the ancient world dealt with the 
problem of conflicting cultures. The 
course will offer a study of selected texts 
bearing upon the attitudes a faith may 
have toward other faiths: tolerance and 
exclusivity, internationalism and xeno- 
phobia, proselytism and universalism. 
Various theologies consistent with these 
attitudes will be examined: deity as 
"jealous" or tolerant, angry or benign, 
tribal or universal. Illustrative documents 



will be chosen from the iconography 
and literature of the cultures which 
surrounded Israel as well as from Israel's 
own literature. 

Mr. J. Jackson 

0743-7743 

Interpretations of History in the 

Ancient Near East 

The class will focus on 1) the question 
of history and historiography in ancient 
Israel and the surrounding cultures and 
2) samples of the problems faced by 
modern students who seek to recover 
and interpret the ancient texts, illustrated 
by selected extra-biblical texts. 

Mr. J. Jackson 

0745-7745 

Old Testament Ethics 

The course deals with the ethical impli- 
cations of the faith of the Old Testament 
people. Points of discussion are: the 
authority behind the ethical imperative, 
the motivation of ethical behavior, the 
sociological and cultural setting of 
ethical precepts. In terms of Old Testa- 
ment literature the course is based on 
the law tradition and prophetic writings. 

Mr. von Waldow 

0746-7746 
Widsom Literature 

A study of selected texts from Proverbs, 
Job and Ecclesiastes, with emphasis on 
the way Wisdom deals with questions 
concerning justice and the relationship 
between God and human beings. Knowl- 
edge of Hebrew will not be required, 
but assistance will be given in working 
with the Hebrew text for those who 
wish to take it as an exegetical course. 
Note: This course can be upgraded to 
serve as a Ph.D. offering. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Gowan 



57 




0747-1147 
Genesis 1-11 

The theology of this "prologue to the 
history of salvation ' will be studied, 
with considerable attention being given 
to the history of interpretation of these 
chapters. Knowledge of Hebrew will 
not be required, but assistance will be 
given in working with the Hebrew text 
for those who wish to take it as an ex- 
egetical course. Note: This course can 
be upgraded to serve as a Ph.D. offering. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Gowan 

OT48-1148 

The Hebrew Scriptures in 

Contemporary Judaism and 

Christianity 

The purpose of this course is to introduce 
the Jewish/Christian Dialogue into the 
classroom and to discuss what Christians 
and Jews have in common and where 
they do not agree. Four major topics 
(Covenent and Torah, Prophecy in the 
Old Testament, The Concept of Hu- 
manity, The Messianic Expectation) 
will be introduced by the two professors 
from their respective point of view with 
the hope that this will lead to extensive 
student discussion. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Cohn and 
Mr. von Waldow 



OT50-1150 

Themes of Old Testament Theology 

Some basic Old Testament theological 
concepts which became characteristic 
of the Christian theology are investigated 
such as: authority of God, revelation, 
history, creation, the individual and the 
community. Included are basic aspects 
of Old Testament ethics, worship and 
the difference between Christian and 
Jewish interpretation. 

Mr. von Waldow 

Additional Language Instruction 

Courses in Aramaic, Egyptian and 
Ugaritic are available upon request. 

New Testament 

Required Courses in New Testament 

NT01-1201 Gospels, General Epistles 
and Revelation 

NT02-1202 Acts, Pauline Epistles and 
Hebrews 

NT03-1203 New Testament Greek 

NT04-1204 New Testament Greek 

NT05-1205 New Testament Exegesis 

Elective Courses in New Testament 

NT12-1212 

Christianity According to Matthew 

An examination of the theology of the 
First Gospel in the light of the historical 
background, employing redaction criti- 
cism as a major exegetical tool. 



NT14-1214 
Parables in Luke 

An exegetical study of the parables of 
Jesus found in the all- important central 
section of the Third Gospel (chapters 
10-18). 

Mr. Kelley 



58 



Course Description 



NT15-1215 
Gospel of John 

The entire Gospel examined with some 
exegetieal detail but with emphasis on 
the theological dimensions of the book. 
Some attention is given to the large 
secondary literature, but the Greek text 
is the primary resource. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Hare 

A/777-7277 

Exegesis of I Corinthians 

An exegetically oriented survey of the 
entire epistle with detailed study of 
selected parts. The range of insights 
into the life of the early church and the 
variety of theological problems in this 
letter make it an excellent source from 
which to learn the task of interpreting 
the Greek New Testament. 

Staff 

A/720-7220 

The Old Testament in the New: The 

Epistle to the Hebrews 

The Epistle to the Hebrews appears to 
be an exegetieal meditation on a series 
of significant Old Testament texts. This 
course examines the hermeneutic of 
the epistle, paying special attention to 
the interplay between doctrinal state- 
ment and ethical exhortation. 

Mr. Hare 

A/727-7227 
/ Peter 

An exegetieal course on the basis of the 
Greek text of I Peter. Special emphasis 
is laid on the situation in which the 
epistle was written and on its relation 
to other major books in the New 
Testament. 

Mr. Mauser 



A/722-7222 

Paul's Letter to the Romans 

This exegetieal seminar will examine 
the major theological and paraenetic 
themes of Romans in relation to Paul's 
understanding of the place of Israel in 
God's plan. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Hare 

A/723-7223 

Interpreting the Parables 

The history of parable exegesis will be 
traced. Current trends in parable interpre- 
tation will be noted. Specific parables 
will be studied. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Kelley 

A/726-7226 

Eschatology in the New Testament 

The New Testament materials are 
studied with particular emphasis on 
Mark 13, Paul's Thessalonian letters 
and the Revelation. The focus is on 
biblical theology based on sound 
exegesis. Appropriate reading in the 
twentieth-century literature on the 
subject is assigned. 

Staff 

A/729-7229 

Crises in the History of the Early 

Church 

Selected texts from the New Testament 
and from extracanonical sources are 
studied in the investigation of three crises 
experienced by the early Church: 1) the 
tension between Jewish and gentile Chris- 
tians and the emergence of the Ebionite 
movement, 2) the threat of a Gnostic 
takeover, 3) the assault of charismatic 
enthusiasm upon the traditional piety 
inherited from the synagogue. 

Mr. Hare 



C o u r 



Descriptions 



59 



NT31-1231 

Practical Use of the New Testament: 

Mark 

An interpretation course examining 
the "First" Gospel produced as a result 
of the life and ministry of Jesus and 
featuring its continuing significance for 
Christian faith and practice. 

Mr. Kelley 

NT32-1232 

Practical Use of the New Testament: 

Luke 

An investigation of the major emphases 
and patterns in the ' 'ecumenical' ' Gospel. 
Particular attention will be devoted to 
the didactic values in the central section 
of Luke, chapters 10-18. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. Kelley 

NT34-1234 

Ephesians and the Emerging Church 

This study of Ephesians will concentrate 
on the emerging concept of the Church 
as a global community. Recent studies 
in the sociology of early Christianity and 
of the sociology of Roman-Hellenistic 
society in general will be introduced to 
complement the use of more traditional 
methods of exegetical study. The use of 
the Greek text of Ephesians is strongly 
encouraged. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT35-1235 

Practical Use of the New Testament: 

Acts 

An interpretation course examining the 
faith and life of the early Church as re- 
flected in the "bridge" document of the 
New Testament corpus, the book of Acts. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Kelley 



NT37-1137 

Biblical Themes I: God & the Gods in 

the Old Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in com- 
parison with and contrast to the gods 
of the ancient Near East. This is the 
first part of a sequence to be continued 
with a course on the same subject in 
the New Testament. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT38-1238 

Biblical Themes II: God & the Gods in 

the New Testament 

The nature of the biblical God in com- 
parison with and contrast to Hellenistic 
deities in the New Testament period. This 
is the New Testament part of a sequence 
on the nature of the biblical God. 

Mr. Mauser 

NT40-1240 
Greek Reading 

Supervised reading of selected New Testa- 
ment or Septuagint passages. One credit. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Hare 
Term II 1987-88 Mr. Hare 
Term III 1987-88 Mr. Kelley 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Mauser 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Hare 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Kelley 

NT41-1241 

Advanced Greek Grammar 

This course aims to give students a sys- 
tematic grasp of Greek by combining the 
study of a grammar book with further 
reading in the New Testament text itself. 

Staff 

NT50-1250 

Themes of New Testament Theology 

A study of selected major themes of the 
New Testament which are of crucial im- 
portance to the New Testament Theology 
as a whole. Hermeneutical questions 
will be stressed. 



Term II 1988-89 Mr. Mauser 



60 



C o u r s 



D e s c r i p t i 



NT53-1253 

Aspects of Paul's Theology 

A number of pervasive aspects of Pauls 
theology, such as eschatology, faith and 
law, justification and reconciliation, are 
dealt with. Stress is laid on the Jewish 
background of Pauls thought and on 
the nature of the opposition which he 
had to face. 

Mr. Mauser 

Studies in History 

Our aim in teaching Church history is 
to help the student to understand the 
history of the Church and its thought 
in the context of the twentieth century. 
The study of history is the study of 
roots, whether we deal with the 
history of a nation, a race or an idea. 
Christianity is firmly grounded in 
history. Its story is the account of the 
effect which the events of Christian 
history have had in human society. 
This involves both the history of doc- 
trine as the Church's attempt to under- 
stand the significance of the biblical 
revelation and the history of the Church 
itself as the attempt of Christians to live 
in response to those events. 

We recognize two kinds of interaction 
that are important for our understanding 
of the Church today. First, we recognize 
that there has always been a dialogue 
between the Church and the society 
within which it is placed. Secondly, there 
is an integral relationship between the 
doctrine that the Church professes and 
the forms that it takes as a human com- 
munity. All the courses offered recognize 
these two kinds of continuing interaction. 

For an adequate grasp of the Church's 
history the student will need to under- 
stand that history in the broad outline 
and then to deepen that study by ex- 
amining particular periods or problems 
in more detail. To this end, the history 
faculty offers within the core curriculum 
introductory courses, which survey the 



history of the Church from the sub- 
apostolic age to the modern era. Further 
courses at an advanced level in both 
institutional Church history and the his- 
tory of doctrine are offered regularly. 

Students who enter the Seminary with 
a rich background in historical studies 
may be permitted to waive introductory 
courses and move directly to more 
specialized study. 

Required Courses in Church History 

CH01-1301 
Historical Studies I 

This course deals with the background 
and development of the Christian 
Church, its life and thought, from the 
Sub-apostolic Age through the Middle 
Ages (c. A.D. 100-1500). 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Partee 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Wilson 

CH02-1302 
Historical Studies II 

A survey of the Renaissance, the Reforma- 
tions of the Sixteenth Century and their 
results (c. A.D. 1350-1650). 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Partee 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Partee 

CH03-1303 
Historical Studies III 

Survey of Church history and modern 
Christian thought from the seventeenth 
through the early twentieth century. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Wilson 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Wilson 

Elective Courses in Church History 

CH16-1316 

Augustine and Aquinas 

This seminar is designed to acquaint 
students with the work of two of the 
Church's most influential theologians 
with special attention to their use of 
the thought of Plato and Aristotle, 
respectively. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. Partee 



Course Description 




Charles Partee 



John Wilson 



CH17-1317 
Calvin's Institutes 

An in-depth study of the magisterial 
work of the man whom Melanchthon 
called "the theologian. 1 ' Special attention 
will be devoted to its development, 
architectonic and misunderstanding. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Partee 

CH18-1318 

The History of Christian Platonism 

This seminar considers the pervasive 
influence of Plato on the history of 
Christian theology from the beginning 
to the present time by focusing on such 
thinkers as Pseudo-Dionysius, Origen, 
Augustine, Bonaventure, Calvin, 
Schleiermacher, the Cambridge Platon- 
ists and Barth. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Partee 

CH28-1328 

Reformed Symbolics: The Creeds of 

Christendom 

This course will study the historical 
development and content of selected 
creeds and confessions of the Church 
with especial attention to the themes 
of Reformed consensus. 



CH29-1329 
Puritanism 

The Puritan Church and Puritan 
thought in England and especially in 
New England, together with general 
consideration of the history and theo- 
logy of the period of Church history 
known as "Protestant Orthodoxy" 
(seventeenth century). 

Mr Wilson 

CH30-1330 

Religious and cultural life in Europe 
and especially in North America in the 
eighteenth century. Concentration on 
the contradictory and, to some extent, 
complementary relationship between the 
Enlightenment and the Great Awaken- 
ings — the beginning of the ' 'divided 
mind" of modern Christianity. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Wilson 



Term II 1988-89 Mr. Partee 



Course D e 




Carnegie Samuel Calian 



George Tutwiler 



CH34-1334 

A Biographical History of the 

Reformation 

This course approaches the thought of 
Reformation figures through the events 
of their lives. Students will be expected 
to become sensitive to and appreciative 
of the relation between theology and 
life by concentrating on life in the 
sixteenth century. 

Mr. Partee 

CH35-1335 

Theology of Jonathan Edwards 

In-depth study of Edwards' theology. 
Selected primary texts. 

Mr. Wilson 

CH36-1336 

Religious Thought of the 

Enlightenment 

Theology and philosophy from Locke 
to Kant. Selected primary texts. 

Mr. Wilson 

CH37-1337 

Religious Thought of the 19th Century 

Theology and philosophy from 
Schleiermacher to Nietzsche. Selected 
primary texts. 

Mr. Wilson 



CH40-1340 

Contemporary Eastern Christianity 

This course is concerned with the 
various ancient Churches of the East 
(Russian, Greek, Coptic, Armenian, 
etc.) and their respective involvement 
in theology, culture, society and 
political power. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Calian 

CH42-1342 

History of Methodism 

This course is designed to assist United 
Methodist students in understanding 
their denominational heritage within 
the context of historic Christianity — 
the life and times of John Wesley, early 
English Methodism and American 
Methodism to the present history of 
Black Methodists, the Evangelical United 
Brethren Church and the formation of 
The United Methodist Church. Required 
of United Methodist students for 
ordination. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. Tutwiler 



Course Description 



63 



CH43-1343 

American Church History 

Survey of Church history in North 
America from the colonial period to 
the present. Focus on aspects of central 
importance, currently: the church-state 
relationship. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Wilson 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Wilson 

CH44-1344 
Pietism 

History and theology of Pietism in its 
formation and classical periods; con- 
sideration of the continuing influence 
of Pietism. Attention is also given to the 
tradition of Spiritualism in the 17th and 
18th Centuries (e.g., Swedenborg). 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Wilson 

CH45-1345 

Revivalism and Fundamentalism 

Religious and cultural history of Ameri- 
can Evangelical Protestantism especially 
in the second half of the nineteenth 
and early twentieth centuries: Revival 
(D. L. Moody), Holiness, Pentecostalism, 
Fundamentalism. Understanding the 
origins of corresponding contemporary 
movements (and their ambivalent rela- 
tionship to politics and science) is of 
central importance. 




George Kehm 

NT29-1229 

Crises in the History of the Early 

Church 

Selected texts from the New Testament 
and from extracanonical sources are 
studied in the investigation of three 
crises experienced by the early Church: 
1) the tension between Jewish and 
gentile Christians and the emergence 
of the Ebionite movement, 2) the threat 
of a Gnostic takeover, 3) the assault of 
charismatic enthusiasm upon the tradi- 
tional piety inherited from the synagogue . 

Mr. Hare 

TH39-1439 

Presbyterian Confessions 

An examination of the Book of Confes- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church and 
related materials, with particular atten- 
tion to what it means to be an active 
member in the Reformed tradition in 
contemporary society. 

Mr. Calian and 
Mr. Kehm 



Term I 1987-88 Mr. Wilson 



64 



Course 



Description 



Studies in Theology 

Systematic Theology is the study of the 
meaning and implications of the Chris- 
tian Faith as present in the doctrinal 
formulations of the historic and con- 
temporary witness of the Church. Based 
in the normative authority of the bibli- 
cal writings as they inform the Gospel 
of Jesus Christ, Systematic Theology 
attempts to explicate rationally and 
structure in a consistent interrelation- 
ship the thematic content of the Word 
of God in Scripture. The Church has 
always recognized this task as crucial to 
its ministry of proclamation and recon- 
ciliation. Systematic Theology studies 
those significant thinkers of the past 
and present whose service as theologians 
the Church has embraced. Yet it takes 
seriously the world in which we our- 
selves must now serve. The final aim of 
the study of Systematic Theology is the 
ability to engage in independent and 
responsible theological thinking within 
the practice of ministry. To meet this 
challenge, the great theologians of the 
past are read not only to familiarize 
ourselves with this rich heritage, but to 
learn how doctrinal formulations have 
resulted from the way in which particular 
theologians structured their systems. 
Pursuant to this task, Systematic Theo- 
logy attends 1) to the investigation of 
problems of theological method and 2) 
to basic questions such as the foundation 
and source of authority, the reference 
and function of theological language, 
the interaction of freedom and determin- 
ism and 3) to thematic issues of con- 
temporary life as these focus theological 
concerns particularly relevant to minis- 
try within the American cultural milieu. 

The curriculum requires three courses 
in Systematic Theology. These courses 
cover Introduction to Systematic Theo- 
logy, Christology and Soteriology and 
the Church and the Sacraments. Electives 
are available in the work of individual 
theologians, in specific areas of doctrine, 
in contemporary "schools" of theo- 



logical method (Process, Liberation) 
and in the history and development of 
theology in the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. Finally, an interdisciplinary 
colloquium in the constructive organ- 
ization of theological themes in a 
personal statement of faith is required 
for all senior students (Credo). 

Required Courses in Systematic 
Theology 

TH01-1401 

Introduction to Systematic Theology 

Study of "theological method "(i .e., the 
tasks, sources and criteria of theology) 
and the doctrines of Scripture, revelation 
and God. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Kehm 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Calian 

TH02-1402 
Christology 

Problems posed for systematic thinking 
by Christian beliefs and doctorinal formu- 
lations concerning salvation and the 
significance of Jesus Christ. 

Term II 1987-88 Ms. Dunfee 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Kehm 

TH03-1403 

Church and Sacraments 

A study of the Doctrine of the Church 
and Sacraments, focusing on the relation 
of individual faith to communal re- 
ligious experience, on the purpose of 
the Church in the world, on the process 
of religious formation and transforma- 
tion (justification and sanctification) 
within the fellowship of the Church and 
the distinctive nature of the Church 
as new Humanity and Body of Christ. 
Readings in Reformation, Post-Refor- 
mation and contemporary theology; 
lectures on issues and Pre-Reformation 
theology. 

Term I 1987-88 Ms. Dunfee 
Term I 1988-89 Ms. Dunfee 



C o u r 



Descriptions 



65 




Susan Dunfee 

Elective Courses in Systematic 
Theology 

TH12-1412 

The Doctrine of God 

This course takes up questions that are 
at the heart of contemporary debate 
about God. What sort of meaning does 
language about God have? Are there ap- 
propriate criteria for judging the meaning 
and validity of statements about God? 
How is God related to human ' experi- 
ence"? Does God have a "nature? 
Readings will be selected representing 
the Thomistic, Reformed, Whiteheadian 
and liberationist points of view. Pre- 
requisite: TH01 Introduction to System- 
atic Theology. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH14-1414 
Process Theology 

This course will investigate the theologi- 
cal implications of process philosophy. 
Particular attention will be given to the 
work of Charles Hartshorne, John B. 
Cobb, Jr., and Marjorie Suchocki. 

Term III 1987-88 Ms. Dunfee 

TH16-1416 

Phenomenology and Theology 

Introduction to phenomenological 
method as developed by Husserl 
Heidegger, Schutz and Merleau-Ponty. 



Examination of attempts to apply this 
approach to Christian Theology in 
order to uncover the realities referred 
to by terms such as "revelation," "sin," 
"redemptive community," and the 
"presence of God." 

Mr. Kehm 

TH20-1420 

Major Christian Theologians: Paul 

Tillich 

A study of Tillichs approach to system- 
atic theology with an emphasis on 
both his method and the content of his 
thought. The course will focus on the 
way in which Tillich presents traditional 
Christian doctrines. 

Staff 

TH28-1428 

Human Evil and Redemption 

A study of the genesis and forms of ex- 
pression of what has been called "sin" 
with a corresponding analysis of how 
the biblical symbols of Gods redemptive 
activity in the death and resurrection 
of Jesus mediate the power to transcend 
the dynamics that perpetuate sin. 

Mr. Kehm 



Theology of Presence and 

>«n ^^ ^^ ■ 

Study of the modes of divine presence 
that appear in or are suggested by the 
biblical traditions. Special attention 
will be given to those connected with 
' atonement" or reconciliation and with 
the presence of the Holy Spirit in the 
communities of Jesus' disciples. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH30-1430 

The Idea of Love in Christian Thought 

Christians, the Gospels record, are 
commanded to be people who love. 
What is the nature of this Christian 
love? How is Gods love the ground of 
Christian love? How is Christian love 
different from "normal" human loves? 
Through studying Scripture and the 



66 



Course 



Description 



work of various Christian theologians 
this course will seek to understand the 
various dimensions of the idea of love 
in Christian thought. 

Ms. Dunfee 

TH31-1431 

The Identity of Christianity 

Reexamination of the question of the 
essence of Christianity with application 
to the reinterpretation of the Christian 
message by third world theolgians. 

Mr. Kehm 

TH32-1432 

The Encounter of Christianity with 

World Religions 

This course will focus upon the issue 
of religious pluralism through 1) 
introducing the student to major non- 
Christian religions and 2) studying 
various contemporary responses to 
pluralism. 

Ms. Dunfee 

TH35-1435 

Major Christian Theologians: 

Kierkegaard 

This course will place Kierkegaard in 
the context of the religious/philosophi- 
cal thought of his times and, through 
studying a variety of Kierkegaard's works, 
will explore his unique perspective on 
what it means to be a Christian. 

Term II 1988-89 Ms. Dunfee 

TH36-1436 

The Theology of Karl Barth 

Study of Karl Barth's theological 
development focusing on his love- hate 
relationship with Schleiermacher, his 
revisions of the Reformed tradition, his 
"socialism," and influence on con- 
temporary Protestant theologians of 
"liberation." 



TH38-1438 

Trajectories of Reformed Doctrine 

This course will trace the shifting inter- 
pretations of a number of prominent 
theological themes in Reformed the- 
ology. Among the themes to be studied 
are: the inspiration of Scripture; election 
and predestination; the "sovereignty" 
of God; the covenant of grace; the 
atoning work of Christ; the Church as 
"the communion of saints"; and the 
explanations of the way sacraments 
work. Readings will be selected from 
theologians and confessions spanning 
the whole history of Reformed theology. 

TH39-1439 

Presbyterian Confessions 

An examination of the Book of Confes- 
sions of the Presbyterian Church and 
related materials, with particular atten- 
tion to what it means to be an active 
member in the Reformed tradition in 
contemporary society. 

Mr. Calian and 
Mr. Kehm 

TH42-1442 

Women's Experience and 

Christian Faith 

This course will explore the nature of 
women's experience. Who is woman? 
How do women experience their self- 
hood and how does it develop? How 
do dependency and hiding hinder 
women's full development? What are 
the theological questions raised from 
the perspective of women's experi- 
ence? The course will then examine the 
reason why several women are doing 
theology — expressing faith — from the 
context of their experience as a woman. 

Term I 1988-89 Ms. Dunfee and 
Ms. Robbins 



Term III 1988-89 Mr. Kehm 



C o u r 



Descriptions 



67 




Martha Robbins 

TH43-1443 

Women and the Bible 

This course will explore both the role 
of women in the Bible as it is understood 
in the work of several feminist scholars 
and the methods they have used to reach 
their conclusions. 

Term III 1988-89 Ms. Dunfee 

TH44-1444 

Women and Religion in the 

United States 

A study of women and religion in 
the United States from colonial times to 
the present with an intent to identify 
common and/or contradictory themes 
between past and current movements 
of women's spirituality. 

Ms. Dunfee 

TH49-1449 

United Methodist Doctrine 

An introduction to the theology of 
John Wesley; a consideration of theo- 
logical transitions; and an examination 
of contributions by important recent 
Methodist theologians to the major 
doctrines of the Christian faith. Required 
of United Methodist students for ordina- 
tion. Prerequisite: TH01 Introduction 
to Systematic Theology 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Kehm and 
Mr. Tutwiler 






i 



Edward Powers 

TH50-1450 

God and Some Philosophers 

Study of selected readings in Platonism 
and Aristotelianism and in modern 
idealism and empiricism, with attention 
directed to: 1) the interpretations of 
religion found in these philosophies, 
2) some of the ways in which they have 
affected theological thought and 3) such 
inferences as may be drawn from this 
material concerning the whole problem 
of the relation of philosophy to theology. 

Staff 

TH45-1445 
Theology of Aging 

Drawing on the various theological 
disciplines, this course will explore the 
ramifications of aging for the different 
dimensions of ministry, asking how the 
aging experience can inform the way 
in which one approaches theology, 
scripture, preaching, counseling, educa- 
tion, comforting and preparation for 
ministry in general. 

Term II 1987-88 Ms. Dunfee and 
Mr. Powers 




John Mehl 

CH40-1340 

Contemporary Eastern Christianity 

This course is concerned with the 
various ancient churches of the East 
(Russian, Greek, Coptic, Armenian, 
etc.) and their respective involvement 
in theology, culture, society and 
political power. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Calian 

Studies in Church and Ministry 

The purpose of study in the Church 
and Ministry field is to bring theory to 
bear upon the practice of Christian faith. 
Ministry means service with and for 
others. Students and professors in this 
area inquire into how Christian theory 
and practice can be united in ministry 
to the Church and through the Church 
to the world. Consequently, the Church 
and Ministry field is engaged in the 
critical study of the professional minis- 
try the institutional Church and con- 
temporary society so that students may 
be adequately prepared for future 
ministry. 

Ministry by both professional and lay 
persons in the Church requires knowl- 
edge and skills pertinent to social 
strategies, life styles, language patterns, 
counseling techniques, educational 
models and administrative systems ap- 



Andrew Purves 

propriate to the Gospel in today's world. 
To this end a wide variety of courses is 
offered in ministry, Church and society, 
ethics, sociology of religion, education, 
pastoral care, homiletics, worship and 
Church music, evangelism and missions 
and administration. 

In other areas of study as well there will 
be an emphasis on the social context of 
ministry. For example, professors of 
systematic theology give attention to 
the social dimensions of Christian faith 
as examined by liberation theology. 
There are biblical courses which stress 
the social milieu of ancient Israel and 
the application of biblical ethics to 
modern society. Courses dealing with 
moral education and women in society 
are offered regularly. Special interest 
in business values undergirds the 
Seminary's commitment to providing 
leadership in this area for the business 
community of Pittsburgh, the third 
largest corporate headquarters com- 
munity in the United States. The 
Seminary's urban setting provides an 
outstanding locus for the study of 
Church, society and ethical concerns. 




Ronald Stone 



Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas 



Required Courses in Church and 
Ministry 

MS01-1501 
Introduction to Ministry 

This team-taught course will introduce 
students to the concept of ministry, its 
biblical and theological basis, the prob- 
lems faced by ministers in role definition 
vis-a-vis the varying expectations of 
Church members, the function of the 
various theological disciplines in prepa- 
ration for effective ministry and the place 
of the student's faith formation in inte- 
grating the education experiences at 
the Seminary. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Mehl 
Term I 1988-89 Staff 

PD01-1601 
Credo 

The purpose of this colloquium is to 
assist students to work through the main 
questions in the traditional loci of Chris- 
tian doctrine, drawing upon their 
accumulated knowledge of Scripture, 
historical and systematic theology and 
their own tradition, in order to enable 
them to formulate their own theologi- 
cal position in a comprehensive, well- 
grounded way. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Calian 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Kehm 



PD02-1602 
Spiritual Formation 

Taken at the end of the final year, this 
course in spiritual formation comple- 
ments work done in theological and 
professional formation. Through 
lectures, seminars, assigned readings, 
retreat and the keeping of a daily dis- 
cipline and journal, students will be 
assisted in the practice of prayer as a 
part of the foundation of Christian life 
and ministry. Students will be intro- 
duced to different spiritual traditions. 
Of special significance will be the work 
of the sections in which students will 
be encouraged to share together their 
anticipations and fears of ministry, their 
continuing exploration of call and 
spiritual gifts and their experiences 
with daily disciplines. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Purves 
Term III 1988-89 Ms. Robbins 

CS01-1701 

Church and Society: Local 

In the first term emphasis is given to 
the contribution sociological methods 
can make to understanding religious 
life in its varied forms. Particular atten- 
tion is given to the urban situation in 
which most Americans live, using 
Pittsburgh as a model for studying the 
dynamics of urban life. Specific atten- 
tion is given to the historic roles of 




Byron Jackson 



Harjie Likins 



Church, ethnic and theological traditions 
in contributing to the unique character 
of this urban community. Such study 
provides a pattern by which any com- 
munity may be studied to discern the 
relation of religious to general social 
dynamics. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Stone 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Stone 

CS03-1703 

Church and Society: Global 

The global context of the church is 
examined through a study of political 
and international dimensions of church 
life. The interrelatedness of national 
and international factors— population, 
food, militarism, energy, economics, 
repression, social justice— demonstrates 
the larger context within which Chris- 
tian ministry is carried on, whether in 
the affluent or Third World countries. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Castillo 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Castillo 

ET01-1801 
Introduction to Ethics 

An introduction to the theological and 
philosophical issues in contemporary 
Christian social thought. Focus on the 
ethics of the Church as a social institu- 
tion and Christian political theology. 



Term III 1987-88 Mr. Stone 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Stone 

PS01-2801 

Pastoral Studies: Education 

In this segment of the Pastoral Studies 
sequence students are engaged in 
studying the many aspects and possi- 
bilities of education programming in 
churches. A general view of educational 
philosophy and methodology and their 
relation to theological, biblical, and 
historical studies, provides a basis 
for evaluating major denominational 
patterns and curricular materials. Corre- 
lation with educational responsibilities 
in field work, particularly relative to 
youth ministries, adds focus to each 
student's development of his or her own 
philosophy of education and requisite 
skills. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. B. Jackson and 

Ms. Likins 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. B. Jackson and 

Ms. Likins 

PS02-2802 

Pastoral Studies: Pastoral Care 

Concurrent field experience provides a 
basis for study of pastoral care. Students 
are helped to understand the ministry 




Robert Ezzell 



Richard Oman 



of pastoral care in the history and the- 
ology of the Church. Attention is given 
to the practice of pastoral care in differ- 
ent settings and situations. Each student 
will prepare and present a case study for 
group discussion. 

Term II 1987-88 Ms. Robbins 
Term II 1988-89 Mr. Purves 

PS03-2803 

Pastoral Studies: Homiletics 

The third-term seminar groups in the 
Pastoral Studies course provide an intro- 
duction to homiletics as a responsibility 
of ministers. Attention is given to the 
exegetical bases of preaching, to prob- 
lems of hermeneutics and authority and 
to such rhetorical considerations as 
sermon construction, style and audience. 
Each student prepares and presents ser- 
mons and the seminar groups engage in 
the critique of these sermons. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Ezzell and 

Mr. Oman 
Term III 1988-89 Mr. Ezzell and 

Mr. Oman 

Elective Courses in Church 
and Ministry 



unufon 



Society 



Required Courses in Church 
and Society 

CS01-1701 Church and Society: Local 

CS03-1703 Church and Society: 
Global 

Elective Courses in Church 



ICS01-2701 

Christianity in a World Context 

The course seeks to provide information 
and develop awareness of the ambiguous 
process through which Christianity has 
reached ecumenical reality by being 
linked to the process of Western socio- 
economic expansion and missionary 
enterprise "to the ends of the earth." 
In this context contemporary develop- 
ments in the ecumenical movement as 
well as the Third World are taken into 
account, with particular attention given 
to the signs of vitality and creativity 
within Third World Christianity. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 



Church and Society 



72 



Course 



Descriptions 



ICS02-2702 

Theological Research in International 
Perspective 

An examination of the issues and assump- 
tions in the theological disciplines as 
defined within several different cultural 
perspectives and as they relate to the 
ways in which Christians perceive their 
international obligations. 

Term II 1988-89 Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 

SR10-1910 

Introduction to the Sociology of 

Religion 

An inquiry into the nature, content and 
extension of the sociology of religion 
as a field of study within the social 
sciences. The student is made acquainted 
with the main theories on the role of 
religion in culture, personality and social 
structure, with reference to such authors 
as Durkheim, Weber, Malinowski, Freud 
and Marx. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 

SR13-1913 

The Latin American Context of 

Liberation Theology 

The political, social and religious con- 
text of "liberation theology" in Latin 
America, with particular reference to 
historical roots and to the various de- 
velopment models, forms of popular 
religiosity and liberation movements, 
and their impact on theological activity 
in that part of the continent. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 

SR16-1916 

Critical Issues in the Sociology of 

Religion 

A panoramic survey of the major de- 
velopments in the field since the time 
of the "classics." The emphasis is on 
the present status of the theses originally 
presented by Marx, Weber, Durkheim 
and Malinowski, about the nature and 
function of religion. 

Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 



SR18-1918 

Christianity and Cultures: Selected 

Readings From the Third World 

Discussion of selected texts from Las 
Casas, P. Freire, MM. Thomas, J. S. 
Mbiti and E. Dussel, on such subjects as 
Western and non-Western world views, 
Christianity and colonialism, cultural 
disintegration and cultural reconstruc- 
tion, Christianity and building of nation, 
salvation and humanization and "the 
church of the poor.' ' 

Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 

CS04-1704 

Issues in Cross-Cultural Ministry 

The course will explore and define the 
ethical issues and the possibilities for 
Christian ministry arising in cross- 
cultural situations, using as an example 
the critical border zone (Zona 
Fronteriza) of the Juarez-El Paso area 
on the United States-Mexican border. 
Issues related to human and civil rights 
of various groups such as migrant 
workers, exiled persons, refugees, and 
"illegal" aliens commuting back and 
forth across the border line will be 
considered, as well as the resources, 
both theological and pastoral, to deal 
with such issues. The course will involve 
a "field study visit" of two weeks du- 
ration hosted by the Project Program 
Verdad, of the Presbyterian Church, 
United States of America, located in 
Juarez. The visit will include: orienta- 
tion tours in both Juarez and El Paso 
(three days); identification and acquaint- 
ance with relevant agencies and organi- 
zations of the poor, churches and service 
projects (three days); direct involvement 
in a service project (three days); and a 
reflection seminar involving analysis 
and identification of issues (two days). 
Back at campus the students will meet 
in three-hour sessions once a week, 
for five weeks, for analysis and inter- 
pretation of the issues and possibilities 
for ministry. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 



C o u r 



Descriptions 



73 



CS10-1710 

Women in Church and Society 

The scope of the course includes various 
feminist positions; the conditions extant 
within society which brought about the 
contemporary liberation movement and 
the extent to which it influences Church 
women. The exploration of biblical 
and theological themes as reflected in 
the writings of Ruether, Fiorenza and 
Trible are emphasized. Special attention 
is given to the needs of women in 
ministry. 

Term II 1987-88 Ms. Likins 

CS12-1712 

Feminism and Small Group Process 

The course assumes that the profes- 
sional minister will engage in extensive 
work with both traditional and feminist 
women's groups. The existence and 
influence of such groups within the con- 
temporary Church will be a focus of 
research. There will be an emphasis 
upon skills in small group leadership and 
the planning of effective educational 
programs. 

Term III 1987-88 Ms. Likins 

Ethics 

Required Course in Ethics 

ET01-1801 Introduction to Ethics 

Elective Courses in Ethics 

ET13-1813 
Human Sexuality 

An inquiry into ethical questions raised 
by the current revolution in sexual 
attitudes and behavior. Consideration 
of such issues as pre-marital and extra- 
marital relations, marriage and divorce, 
alternative marriage patterns, under- 
standings of male and female sexuality, 
treatments of sex in literature and 
public media. 




ET15-1815 

Readings in Contemporary 

Theological Ethics 

Discussion of selected readings from 
contemporary Protestant and Roman 
Catholic ethicists, such as R. Niebuhr, 
K. Barth, E. Brunner, H. R. Niebuhr, 
P. Ramsey, P. Lehmann, D. Bonhoeffer, 
G. Winter, J. Gustafson, K. Rahner, 
B. Haering,J. Maritain, J. C. Murray. 

Term III 1988-89 Staff 

ET17-1817 

Law, Theology and Ethics 

Reading and discussion of selected 
topics within the following areas: 1) 
comparisons and contrasts between 
jurisprudential and theological concepts 
and ways of thinking; relations between 
law, morality and religion; 2) ethical 
issues such as civil disobedience, punish- 
ment, laws regarding sexual behavior, 
censorship, problems in Church-state 
relations, professional ethics. (Obtain- 
able as Ph.D. course.) 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Wiest 



Term II 1988-89 Staff 



74 



Course 



Descriptions 



ET18-1818 

The Ethics and Theology of 

H. Richard Niebuhr 

A consideration of the formative in- 
fluences on the thought of H. R. Niebuhr 
and an analysis of his major writings in 
ethics and theology. 

Mr. Stone 

ET20-1820 

The Thought of Reinhoid Niebuhr 

A detailed examination of The Nature 
and Destiny of Man and the study of 
Reinhoid Niebuhr's political and social 
writings. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. Stone 

ET21-1821 

Christian Ethics in a Business Ethos 

The study of Christian ethics as it relates 
to the business ethos of Pittsburgh and 
through Pittsburgh to the nation and 
the world. 

Mr. Calian and 
Mr. Stone 

ET23-1823 

Social Teachings of the Christian 

Churches 

Study of selected positions in the history 
of the Churches' social teaching from 
the New Testament to the end of the 
nineteenth century. Focus on the issues 
of Christ and culture, Church and state, 
the treatment of women, the Christian 
and war. 

Mr. Stone 

ET25-1825 

Moral Issues in International Politics 

The perennial problems of Christian 
ethics and international politics; the 
theory of international politics; the 
moral issues raised by hunger and 
nuclear armaments, particular case 
studies in United States foreign policy. 

Mr. Stone 



ET26-1826 

Business Practices and 

Religious Roots 

The interplay of business and religion 
has a long heritage in American history. 
This course seeks to understand through 
case studies and readings the tensions 
and trade-offs found in the realities of 
the marketplace. The course seeks to 
build a model of viable Christian dis- 
cipleship in a business oriented world. 

Mr. Calian and 
Staff 

ET30-1830 

Christianity in the Latin American 

Context: Ethical Issues 

A critical analysis of the relations 
between Church and society in Latin 
America, with particular emphasis on 
the critical issues of socio-political 
ethics: the nature of "development," 
"revolution," and "liberation" ; the 
relation between Christians and 
Marxists; the ethical issues involved in 
illegal and violent revolution; and the 
relation between the Kingdom of God 
and particular "historical projects." 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Castillo-Cardenas 

ET32-1832 

A seminar inquiry into the concepts 
and practice of the virtues of love and 
justice. Classical and contemporary 
sources will be examined with the 
social ethics of Paul Tillich, Reinhoid 
Niebuhr and Martin Luther King, Jr., 
receiving special attention. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Stone 

ET33-1833 

Christian Ethics and Technology 

The pace of technological change re- 
makes society and produces new ethical 
issues. This course will consider the 
impact of technology in ethical issues 
and the role of Christian ethics in the 
debates over technological change with 
particular reference to issues raised by 



C o u r s 



Descriptions 



75 



computers, space technology, weapons 
development, energy technologies and 
the limits to growth debate. 

Mr. Stone 

ET34-1834 

The Social Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A consideration of Paul Tillich as a social 
philosopher and activist. Study of his 
writing on culture, politics, ethics, reli- 
gious socialism, The Religious Situation, 
The Socialist Decision, Love, Power 
and Justice, and Political Expectations. 
His Christian ethical thought will be 
analyzed in relationship to his biography, 
historical setting and its contemporary 
and future relevance. 

Mr. Stone 

ET35-1835 

Seminar on Medical Ethics 

This course will be taught with the 
help of a member or members of the 
medical profession. The class will 
consider, in ethical perspective, such 
issues as the social responsibilities of 
the medical profession; health care 
delivery and costs; patients' rights; 
abortion and sterilization; death and 
dying; transplantation and the use of 
scarce resources; genetics and genetic 
engineering; professional ethical 
codes; the relationship of ministers to 
medical professionals and of ministry 
to medical care. 

Term I 1988-89 Staff 

ET36-1836 

Christianity and Economic Systems 

Seminar participants will examine the 
underlying assumptions found in capi- 
talism, socialism and mixed economies 
involving these two systems. Basic 
questions of the course: What impact 
do economic systems have upon our 
understanding of the Christian message? 
What does the Gospel have to say to 
these economic systems? This course 
will be taught in cooperation with 



Professor Beeson, Administrator of the 
School of Business and Administration 
at Duquesne University. 

Mr. Calian 

ET37-1837 

A seminar consideration of the religious 
quest for peace with emphases on world 
religions and peace, the Christian the- 
ology of peace, militarism, the nuclear 
weapons debate, social justice and the 
current emphasis of the Churches on 
peacemaking ministry. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Stone 

ET38-1838 
Ministerial Ethics 

A study of ethical problems arising in 
the practice of ministry, considered 
from the perspectives of the doctrine 
of ministry and of ministry as a profes- 
sion. Consideration of such problems 
as: truth- telling; confidentiality; the 
minister as cleric and as a human being; 
ministers and money; allotments of 
time; the ministry and social issues; 
dealing with other ministers; standards 
of "success'' in ministry; relationships 
with other professionals; and the role 
of clergy in society. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Wiest 

ET39-1839 

Christian Ethics and Contemporary 

Political Philosophy 

A seminar which analyzes issues in 
contemporary political philosophy and 
their implications for Christian ethics. 
Particular reference is made to British 
political philosophy and the American 
realist school. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Stone 



76 



Course Description 




Ronald Peters 



ET40-1840 

Comparative Ethics, Gandhi and King 

The course will examine the influence 
of Christian and Western thought upon 
Gandhis social ethic and the influence 
of Gandhi's thought upon the social 
ethic of Martin Luther King, Jr. The 
contexts of India, South Africa, and the 
Black Church in America will be con- 
sidered as sources of these social-trans- 
forming religious ethics. 

Mr. Stone 



Education 

Required Course in Education 

PS01-2801 Pastoral Studies: 
Education 

Elective Courses in Education 

ED11-2011 

Moral Education in the Church 

The course explores recent research 
concerning the development of values in 
young persons and adults. Most particu- 
larly it deals with the work of Kohlberg 
and Simon as it relates to planned educa- 
tional experience for children, youth 
and adults. It also deals with the ways in 
which justice is perceived and the level 
of value perception raised. 



ED16-2016 

The Black Church and Urban 

Education 

This course will review the involvement 
and contributions of Black congregations 
to the education of Blacks in America 
since 1850. The student will be en- 
couraged to explore the role of the Black 
Church in addressing public issues using 
education as a starting point. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Peters 

ED17-2017 

Historical Shaping of Church 

Education 

An exploration into the tenacity with 
which educational patterns introduced 
at various periods in Church history 
have survived to shape current Church 
education. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. B.Jackson 

ED19-2019 
Group Process 

The course deals with the theory and 
practice of small group leadership and 
participation with a special concern 
for the types of such groups currently 
found in Churches. 

Term II 1987-88 Ms. Likins 
Term III 1988-89 Ms. Likins 



Term I 1987-88 Ms. Likins 



C o u r s 



Descriptions 



77 




Nancy Foltz 



ED20-2020 
Youth Ministry 

A study of existing models, old and new, 
that have been or are being used in the 
Church with particular emphasis upon 
analysis in regard to the needs of youth. 
Skills in communication with youth are 
emphasized. Survey of possibilities in 
terms of drama, film, etc. Emphasis upon 
program design. Distinction between 
junior and senior high school youth 
groups is emphasized. 

Term III 1988-89 Ms. Likins 

ED21-2021 

The Development of Faith in Christian 

Education 

The Christian faith in relation to the 
personal and social developmental tasks 
of specific age levels; the resources of 
the church directed towards the religious 
needs of persons. Three areas will be 
stressed: children, youth and middle- 
aged adults. The course will integrate 
the theories of Jung, Kohlberg and 
Fowler with the potential development 
of faith experience. 



ED22-2022 

Church Educational Development 

and Administration 

The primary focus of the course is upon 
the administration and organization of 
educational systems in both large and 
small Churches. It includes a method- 
ology for studying and making choices 
of curriculum. Organization of the 
Church school, recruitment and training 
of volunteers and similar practical matters 
will be considered. The course is de- 
signed to prepare those who intend to 
serve the Church as educators. 

Term III 1988-89 Ms. Likins 

ED23-2023 

Educational Ministries with Adults 

The course will combine an investiga- 
tion of prevalent theories, strategies and 
structures for adult education in local 
congregations with the opportunity to 
design specific programs of adult educa- 
tion related to students' interest. 

Ms. Foltz 



Term III 1987-88 Ms. Likins 




Von Ewing Keairns 



Laird Stuart 



ED24-2024 

Theory and Design of Christian 

Education Curriculum in the Local 

Church 

Curriculum may be considered as a sys- 
tematic plan for the teaching ministry 
of the congregation. Attention will center 
on principles for the design, analysis 
and evaluation of curriculum. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. B. Jackson 

ED25-2025 

Education, Spirituality and 

Pilgrimage 

The focus will be upon the integration 
of teaching and planning skills with 
theories of faith development and con- 
temporary life visions. The emphasis 
will be upon the concepts of pilgrimage 
and sacrifice as they have been and are 
utilized within Christianity. 

Term II 1988-89 Ms. Likins 

ED26-2026 

Crisis Intervention for Young 

Children 

The course is conducted at the Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center. Work in 
groups provides experience for the 
prevention or arrest of problems in the 
development of a child. Methods are 



learned for the disciplined observation 
of children and families. Enrollment 
limited to 12-15 students. 

Term III 1987-88 Ms. Keairns 
Term III 1988-89 Ms. Keairns 

ED27-2027 

The Bible in Christian Education 

Analysis of the teaching- learning process 
as related to the teaching of the Bible in 
Christian education. Theological and 
educational assumptions will be critically 
analyzed as they exist in contemporary 
Christian education literature. Special 
attention will be given to extant cur- 
riculum materials in Christian education. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. B.Jackson 

ED29-2029 

Educational Ministries with Smaller 

Congregations 

This course is an exploration of educa- 
tional ministry with small membership 
congregations. Particular attention is 
given to structure and organization, lay 
leadership, and pastoral leadership. 
Students will gain skills in accessing 
the needs of small membership churches 
and acquire competence in the praxis 
of religious education. 

Term III 1987-88 Ms. Foltz 
Term III 1988-89 Ms. Foltz 



Course Description 



79 



Pastoral Care 

Required Course in Pastoral Care 

PS02-2802 Pastoral Studies: 
Pastoral Care 

Elective Courses in Pastoral Care 

PD03-1603 

Professional and Ministerial 

Leadership 

This colloquium focuses attention 
upon professional aspects of ministerial 
responsibilities. The work of the term 
assumes a holistic perspective by giving 
an opportunity for reflection on the re- 
sources each student now brings to the 
interrelation of the various ministerial 
functions. Because ministry is always 
in a particular setting and in terms of 
one's appraisal of that situation, responsi- 
ble decisions require self-consciousness 
in diagnosis and evaluation of various 
situations. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. Oman 

PC10-2110 

Psychological Foundations 

of Ministry 

This course traces human development 
along lines set forth by Freud and radi- 
cally expanded by Erikson. With Erikson 
as the transitional figure, the course 
stresses developments in ego psychology 
as especially helpful to the practice of 
ministry. The third section of the course 
analyzes communal components, deals 
with group theory and explores impli- 
cations for ministry. Theological material 
is part of the data of the course, especial- 
ly process theology. Permission of 
instructor required. 

Term I 1987-88 Ms. Robbins 

PC12-2112 

Compassion in Pastoral Care 

This course examines compassion as an 
organizing theological focus for pastoral 
care. Beginning with a thorough study 
of the compassion of Jesus, the course 
will go on to review representative 



theologians who have highlighted the 
"suffering with" of God. The practice 
of compassion will be developed, firstly, 
by way of a spirituality of suffering and 
secondly, by examining the relationship 
between compassion and our own 
woundedness and vulnerability. The 
course will end with a study of compas- 
sion in recent pastoral care literature. 

Term III 1988-89 Mr. Purves 

PC13-2113 

Theology and Pastoral Care 

This course will examine three signifi- 
cant attempts to think theologically 
about pastoral ministry in the context 
of the history of pastoral care. The goal 
is to help the student to think theo- 
logically about the work of pastoral care. 
For this reason, the course will be con- 
ducted on a lecture and seminar basis, 
with most of class time being taken up 
in seminar work. Each student will 
take responsibility for preparing and 
leading a seminar on a portion of one 
of the primary texts. 

Mr. Purves 

PC14-2114 

This course is designed to study religious 
experience. Religious experience is 
looked at from four perspectives: histori- 
cal, beginning with Johnathan Edwards 
and eighteenth-century Revivalism; 
psychological, including Freud, Jung 
and Allport; cross-cultural, singling out 
Otto and Eliade; and topical, identifying 
specific areas such as community, faith, 
conversion, worship, prayer, mysticism 
and vocation to which twentieth-century 
psychologies of religion and contempo- 
rary religious experience provide data. 
Insofar as possible the course is induc- 
tive and is limited to seminar size. 

Staff 



C o u r s 



Descriptions 



PC18-2118 

Crisis of Aging and the Church 

An introduction to the aging process and 
the demographic shift in both society 
and the Church. The pastoral and insti- 
tutional response to this challenge will 
be explored. 

Mr. Powers 

PC19-2119 

Training the Pastor as Spiritual 

Director 

Borrowing from the long tradition of 
spiritual direction in the Roman Catholic 
Church, this course will explore how 
that tradition can be adapted for the 
use by Protestant pastors. The history, 
theology and practice of spiritual direc- 
tion will be examined and discussed. A 
novel feature of the course will be each 
students exposure both to giving direc- 
tion and being directed. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Purves 

PC23-2123 

The Spirituality of Thomas Merton 

This course is designed to be a thorough 
examination of the theology, practice 
and influence of this very significant 
twentieth- century spiritual teacher. 
Merton's work will be considered in an 
ongoing dialogue with Protestant per- 
spectives on the theology and practice 
of prayer. The goal of the course is to 
introduce students to Merton's work and 
to his place in contemporary American 
Spirituality. Merton will be used to allow 
issues in the theology and practice of 
prayer to emerge for discussion. 

Mr. Purves 

PC50-2150 

Pastoral Counseling Seminar 

This course is an advanced case seminar 
for persons who are currently working 
in situations of ministry. The aim of the 
seminar is to enable the students to 
think more clearly about the needs of 
people in those situations and whether 
those needs warrant pastoral counseling 
or other types of pastoral intervention. 



When pastoral counseling is chosen as 
a means of help, the student will be 
given supervision in its use. Prerequisite: 
PC 10 Psychological Foundations of 
Ministry or PS02 Pastoral Studies: 
Pastoral Care. 

Term III 1987-88 Ms. Robbins 
Term II 1988-89 Ms. Robbins 

PC62-2162 

The Congregation as a Caring 

Community 

This course assumes that the professional 
minister is not the only minister to 
people in need, yet the congregation is 
not prepared to minister. So this course 
develops a design to equip a Remnant 
in the congregation to become a minis- 
tering people. A theology of care is 
scrutinized; a two-year program sche- 
matized, using both theological and 
psychological materials; an on-the-job 
training component for laity detailed; 
and the pastor's role in the total program 
pinpointed. Besides theological and 
psychological readings, sources include 
D.Min. research projects dealing with 
the congregation as a caring community. 

Staff 

ED26-2026 

Crisis Intervention for Young Children 

The course is conducted at the Arsenal 
Family and Children's Center. Work in 
groups provides experience for the 
prevention or arrest of problems in the 
development of a child. Methods are 
learned for the disciplined observation 
of children and families. Enrollment 
limited to 12-15 students. 

Term III 1987-88 Ms. Keairns 
Term III 1988-89 Ms. Keairns 



Course Description 



81 



Homiletics 

Required Course in Homiletics 

PS03-2803 Pastoral Studies: 
Homiletics 

Elective Courses in Homiletics 

HM10-2210 
Homiletics Practicum 

The course combines seminar discussion 
with the preparation and delivery of 
sermons and is designed to lead students 
beyond introductory homiletics to a 
more sophisticated understanding of the 
preacher's task. In small sections students 
preach twice during the term, as well 
as participate in detailed homiletical 
analysis. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Ezzell 
Term I 1988-89 Mr. Ezzell 

HM11-2211 

Voice and Speech Practicum 

This is a ten-week session in funda- 
mentals of voice and speech to maximize 
communicative effectiveness. One credit. 

Offered each term 1987-88 Ms. Kania 
Offered each term 1988-89 Ms. Kania 

HM20-2220 
Parish Preaching 

Planning a years pulpit work. An 
analysis of the seasons and festivals of 
the Christian Year. Selecting resources 
for occasional sermons. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Oman 

HM22-2222 

Preaching from the Gospel of Luke 

This course will study some of the great 
preaching themes found in St. Lukes 
Gospel. Particular attention will be given 
to the four "Great Songs of the Advent 
Season," as well as to selected portions 
of the Passion narrative. 




Deborah Kania 

HM23-2223 

Twentieth Century Preaching 

An examination of methodological and 
theological developments in Christian 
preaching in the twentieth century. A 
study of contemporary preaching based 
on printed, recorded, audio and video- 
taped sermons of leading homileticians 
of our age. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Oman 

HM24-2224 

Preaching from the Old Testament 

The course will provide an introduction 
to the special problems and possibilities 
offered by Old Testament preaching, 
including the discussion of how to use 
the principles of Old Testament inter- 
pretation for homiletical purposes and 
experience in the preparation of sermons 
on different types of passages. 

Term I 1988-89 Mr. Ezzell and 
Mr. Gowan 



Term I 1988-89 Mr. Oman 



82 



Course Descriptions 



HM25-2225 
Theology and Film 

This course will introduce the student 
to the use of popular films as a resource 
for theological reflection in the church. 
Representative films that reflect a variety 
of classical theological themes will be 
viewed and analyzed. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Ezzell 

HM26-2226 
Doctrinal Preachino 
The communication of doctrine through 
preaching. A study of the necessity, 
opportunities and problems of this type 
of communication. Emphasis will focus 
on the act of interpretation, the use of 
basic exegesis and the proficient handling 
of biblical materials. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Oman 

HM27-2227 

Preaching from Romans 

An exegetic analysis of Paul's most in- 
fluential epistle. The course will attempt 
to provide the student with compre- 
hensive understanding of the style and 
structure of Paul's argument and the 
homiletical possibilities it presents. 
Special attention will be given to herme- 
neutical problems attendant to such 
prominent Pauline concepts as faith, 
grace and law, as well as to the formi- 
dable forensic character of his language 
and thought. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Ezzell 

HM29-2229 
Storytelling 

This course is twofold in purpose and 
design. First, to examine in detail the 
nature of the story form of discourse 
and to attempt to establish its theological 
and persuasive primacy among the com- 
peting categories of discourse. Second 
and foremost, the course aims to develop 
in the student the ability to construct 
and narrate stories, i.e. , to become adroit 
in the art of storytelling. 

Term II 1988-89 Mr. Ezzell 



HM30-2230 

Contemporary Literary Sources of 

Preaching 

An analysis of selected contemporary 
literary works considered important as 
homiletical resources. The course will 
seek to assist the student to view such 
material in relation to his/her biblical 
and theological studies and to employ 
what is learned in homiletical 
craftmanship. 

Term III 1987-88 Mr. Oman 

HM36-2236 

The Role of the Church in Radio and 

Television 

The purpose of this course is to provide 
the student with a general knowledge 
of communications technologies, i.e., 
broadcast radio and television, cable 
television, satellite communications and 
how these technologies relate to the 
Church and its mission to spread the 
good news of Jesus Christ. 

Staff 

HM40-2240 
Pre-Homiletics Practicum 

This practicum is designed to offer 
students the opportunity to practice 
their oral presentation skills prior to 
entering the homiletics course. The 
focus will be on the techniques of oral 
interpretation and public address. It 
also enables the student to learn 
theoretical constructs involved in the 
preparation of an oral presentation. 
Students will be expected to make 
several presentations and develop self- 
critical skills. 

Staff 

HM41-2241 

Rhetoric for the Church 

This course has three distinct focuses: 
1) to improve the student's general 
ability in oral expression; 2) to help the 
student cultivate skills and strategies 
for the specific rhetorical, i.e., per- 
suasive, transactions in which clergy 
are characteristically engaged (e.g., 



Course Description 



83 




© 8 9 




moderating session, leading discussions, 
counseling, presenting resolutions to 
judicatories); 3) to analyze the nature 
and quality of the Church's rhetoric, 
both that which is directed to itself as 
audience and that which is directed 
toward the outside. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr Ezzell 

Worship and Church Music 

Elective Courses in Worship and 
Church Music 

WS11-2311 
Hymnology 

A survey of the Church's heritage of song: 
the Bible, Byzantine and Latin hymnody, 
the Lutheran chorale, Calvin and 
Psalmody, English hymnody of Watts 
and Wesley and their adherents, and 
American hymnody from Colonial times 
through the twentieth century. This 
comprehensive approach to the study 
of hymns deals with the hymn in per- 
spective, in history and culture and 
in practice. 

Term II 1988-89 Mr Tutwiler 



WS12-2312 
Liturgy and Music 

Class members will read literature re- 
garding the development of liturgy in 
the various denominations of the Eastern 
and Western Christian Church. Through 
lectures and practica, students will be 
encouraged to perform examples of 
such music and liturgy in class, and learn 
to develop a well-constructed form of 
worship for use within their own de- 
nomination, drawing on resources 
available in area libraries and church 
archives. Emphasis will be made on the 
role of hymnody and psalmody in the 
context of Christian worship. Staff 
relationships within the practice of 
ministry will be studied and evaluated. 

Term II 1987-88 Mr. Oman and 
Mr. Tutwiler 



Course Description 




WS14-2314 

The Theology and Practice of 

Christian Worship 

An introductory course on Christian wor- 
ship, concentrating on basic theological 
principles, origins and development, 
orders of worship, lessons and sermon, 
public prayer and the sacraments. 

Term II 1988-89 Mr. Oman 

WS17-2317 

History of Church Music 

A study of choral and instrumental 
literature of the Christian Church from 
the seventeenth through the twentieth 
centuries with emphasis on the de- 
velopment of Protestant Church music 
in America. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Tutwiler 

WS18-2318 

Music for the Church Year 

This course will provide a study of 
music appropriate for the seasons of 
the Church year. Attention will be 
given to the music of J. S. Bach with 
special consideration being given to 
Bach as exegete. 

Mr. Tutwiler 



WS19-2319 

Prayer and the Christian Life 

This course will study the biblical ante- 
cedents for prayer, and the reformed 
doctrine of prayer. A survey-history of 
significant prayer- figures in the life of 
the Church will be included. Students 
will examine and critique the relation- 
ships between corporate and, private 
prayer. An analysis of various Church 
prayers as to their theological and wor- 
ship integrity and value will be matter 
of special focus. 

Term II 1988-89 Mr. Oman 

Evangelism and Mission 

Elective Courses in Evangelism 
and Mission 

EV11-2411 
Evangelism 

An in-depth investigation of the Biblical, 
theological and psychological compo- 
nents of evangelism. The course will 
include selected readings, researching, 
analyzing and evaluation of a variety of 
evangelism programs and techniques. 
Emphasis will be placed upon preparing 
students to assist congregations in de- 
veloping evangelism and outreach 
programs appropriate to their life styles 
and community settings. The course will 



Course Description 




Marianne Wolfe 

require the student to design a program 
of evangelism and outreach suitable for 
a local congregation. 



Term II 
Term II 



1987-88 Mr. Giles 
1988-89 Mr. Giles 



MI10-2510 

The History of Christian Missions 

This course is designed to explore the 
historical and geographical dimensions 
of the attempt to be obedient to the 
mandate for mission. 

Term II 1988-89 Mr. Partee 

MI12-2512 

Theology and Practice of 

Stewardship 

Stewardship has many dimensions: 
biblical, theological, ethical and 
practical. This seminar is designed to 
discuss these aspects through lectures 
and case studies. Guest speakers will 
be invited for their particular contri- 
butions on the history of philanthropy 
and voluntarism in reference to Church 
organizations. 

Mr. Calian 



Carlton Goodwin 

Administration 

Elective Courses in Adminstration 

AD10-2610 

Polity and Program of the 

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) 

An introduction to the polity and 
program of the Presbyterian Church, de- 
signed in part to help Presbyterian 
students to prepare for denominational 
examinations in that field. 

Term III 1987-88 Ms. Wolfe 
Term III 1988-89 Ms. Wolfe 

AD20-2620 

Baptist History and Polity 

A survey of Baptist beginnings and 
history to the present. A study of the 
development of distinctive Baptist 
belief and practice. An analysis of 
current organization and procedures. 

Term I 1987-88 Mr. Goodwin 

AD29-2629 

United Methodist Polity 

The Constitution and structural relation- 
ships of The United Methodist Church 
are examined with a particular focus 
upon the ministry and mission of the 
local Church. Required of United Meth- 
odist students for ordination. 



Term I 1988-89 Mr. Tutwiler 



88 Master of Divinity and Master 
of Arts 

89 Transfer Students 

89 Joint Professional Degree 
Programs 

89 Doctor of Ministry 

90 Special Students 

90 International Scholars 
90 Academic Regulations 




A student applying for admission to 
any course of study offered by Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary shall provide 
evidence of good character and of a 
Bachelor's degree from a regionally 
accredited college or university or its 
academic equivalent, and normally 
shall be a member in full communion 
in some branch of the Christian Church. 

Master of Divinity and 
Master of Arts 

Applicants to the first degree programs 
are required to have completed the 
Bachelor's degree from a regionally 
accredited college or university at the 
time of enrollment. This undergraduate 
work should include a substantial 
foundation in the liberal arts. Applicants 
may apply any time after the junior 
year in college is completed. Applica- 
tions for September entrance should be 
made prior to June 30 to insure full 
consideration for admission; application 
for entrance in the Second or Third 
Term should be made at least six weeks 
before the beginning of the Term 
desired. All correspondence concerning 
admissions to the Seminary should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

Applications are considered by the 
Student Relations Committee upon 
submission of the following materials: 

1. A formal application with the 
designated references. 

2. An official transcript of all the 
applicant's college and university 
work, showing grades for at least 
three years of undergraduate work. 

3. A statement (500-1000 words) 
describing the applicant's family, 
educational and religious background, 



placing particular emphasis upon 
reasons for entering the Seminary. 

4. A personal interview with the 
Director of Admissions or another 
representative of the Seminary 
designated by the Director of 
Admissions. 

5 . A battery of psychological and/or 
mental capacity tests may be required 
of the applicant by the Director of 
Admissions and Student Relations 
Committee. Such testing is utilized 
only when it is believed the results 
will clarify ambiguities in the student's 
academic record or in the applicant's 
emotional fitness for the ministry. 

6. A letter of reference from applicant's 
local church. 

7. An application fee of $2 5. 00. This 
fee is not refundable. 

8. Applicants whose native language is 
not English will be required to take 
the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) prior to March 
30th before the application will be 
considered for September entrance. 




Admissions 



89 



After admission is granted and within 
thirty days of such notification, a $50.00 
fee is required to assure the applicant a 
place in the Term for which application 
was made. This fee is applied to the 
student's tuition and is not returnable. 
A certification of the students "intention 
to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another 
accredited seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a 
complete transcript of previous seminary 
work and a letter of dismissal from the 
Dean or President of the Seminary. A 
transfer student must be in attendance 
at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary for 
a minimum of one full academic year 
in order to become a candidate for the 
M.Div. or the MA. degree. 

Joint Professional Degree 
Programs 

In each of the joint degree programs 
the candidate must apply and be 
admitted to both Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary and the respective university. 
Normally, application is made to the 
appropriate graduate school of the 
university during the First Term of the 
middler year of the Seminary Master of 
Divinity program. 

Doctor of Ministry 

Applications for the Doctor of Ministry 
degree program are submitted to the 
Director of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program. 

The successful completion of the 
M.Div. degree or its equivalent from an 
accredited seminary or divinity school 
is required for admission to the program. 
Applicants are required to have corn- 
Dieted a minimum of two years in the 
Drdained ministry. 




The Application Process 

Applications to the Doctor of Ministry 
program must include: 

1. Complete transcripts of all post-high 
school academic work. 

2. Information regarding participation 
in non-degree continuing education 
or other post-Master of Divinity 
studies. 

3. Assurance that the applicant will be 
engaged in some recognized 
ministerial position for the period of 
the program. 

4 . An endorsement from the 
applicant's Session or Church Board 
approving expenditure of time 
called for by the program. 

5. A listing of applicant's ministerial 
experience to date. 

6. A statement (500-1000 words) out- 
lining reasons for wishing to enter 
the Doctor of Ministry program. 

7. A five-page reflection paper on some 
aspect of ministry (preaching, ad- 
ministration, pastoral care, education) 
demonstrating the integration of 
theory and practice in the applicant's 
ministry. 

8. Check or money order for $2 5. 00 
(non-refundable). 



90 



A d m i 



s i o n s 



Special Students 

Applicants desiring to study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary for credit on a 
non-degree basis, other than Inter- 
national students, must possess a 
Bachelors degree from a regionally 
accredited college or university at the 
time of enrollment. Applicants for 
Special Student status follow the same 
procedures and submit the same 
materials as those applying for the 
Master of Divinity and Master of Arts 
programs. 

International Scholars 

All applicants for the International 
Scholars program at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary must secure 
endorsement of their study plans from 
either the Leadership Development 
Program of the National Council of the 
Churches of Christ, 475 Riverside 
Drive, New York, New York 10115 or 
the World Alliance of Reformed 
Churches, 150, Route de Ferney, 1211 
Geneva 20, Switzerland. Applicants 
whose native language is not English 
will be required to take the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
before the application will be con- 
sidered. The application deadline for 
the International Scholars Program is 
January 30th for September entrance. 

Academic Regulations 

Grading System 

Grading in the Seminary is designed to 

provide an evaluation of the scholastic 

attainment of each student and a 

challenge for each student to work at 

his/her best. 

1. The meaning of the grades given 

shall be as follows: 

A 4.0 Exceptional attainment 

(90-100). 
B+ 3.0 Superior graduate-level 

attainment (80-89). 
B 2.0 Adequate graduate-level 

attainment (70-79). 



C 1.0 Below graduate-level 
attainment (60-69). 

F 0.0 Failure (59 and below). 

P (Pass). Adequate graduate level 
attainment or better. 

WFA (Withdrawal with Faculty 

Approval). Upon the request 
of the student the faculty can 
grant a WFA if special circum- 
stances justify it. WFAs can 
be granted by the faculty only 
up until the due dates for 
grades to be delivered by the 
professors to the Registrar. 

I There is no category of 

Incomplete. 

2 . The Quality Point Average is deter- 
mined by dividing the quality points by 
the number of credit hours taken 
(excluding credit hours for Pass grades). 

3. Average for Graduation. For 
graduation with the M.Div. and M.A. 
degrees a B average (2.0) is required. 

4. Dismissal. Two consecutive terms 
below 2.0 or three non- consecutive 
terms below 2.0 constitute reasons for 
dismissal by faculty action. 

5. Attendance. Attendance at class is 
not mandatory except where indicated 
by the faculty member on the course 
description form. 

6. Official Drop Dates. Courses may be 
dropped or added during the first and 
second weeks of each term without 
penalty. Courses dropped during the 
third week through the fifth week 
carry a penalty of one-half of the tuition 
fee. Courses dropped after the official 
drop date require full payment and 
recording of a failing grade. All dropping 
of courses must be done officially 
through the Registrars Office. 

Types of Courses 

1. Independent/Directed Study. 

In addition to required and elective 
courses, students may do advanced 
work in a particular subject as Inde- 



: 



A d m i s 



91 



pendent Study or Directed Study. An 
Independent Study is negotiated by a 
student with a faculty member with 
the permission of the Dean. A Directed 
Study is designed in the same way as an 
Independent Study course, but it is 
distinguished by the requirement of 
much closer tutorial work on the part 
of the professor. A further distinction is 
that Directed Study courses may involve 
more than one student but no more 
than four students. Both of these studies 
will be graded Pass/Fail, with a state- 
ment from the faculty member 
concerning the nature of the study and 
an evaluation of the students perform- 
ance. Normally, students may not enroll 
for more than one Independent Study 
or Directed Study per term or six per 
Pittsburgh Seminary first degree pro- 
gram. Under- enrolled classes which 
become Directed Studies count in the 
above total. 

2. Audit Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary students may attend any course 
with the permission of the professor. 
Audit requires registration and payment 
of $50.00 per course through the Con- 
tinuing Education Office. No record of 
audit is made on official transcripts but 
is kept in the Contining Education files. 

Vondegree students may audit Seminary 
ourses under the Continuing Educa- 
ion Program. 

lit. Students registered in 

course for audit-credit are required to 
3articipate fully in reading, discussion, 
seminar and position papers, etc. , but 
ire not required to write a final paper 
)r examination. Satisfactory completion 
)f these requirements leads to an audit- 
:redit notation for the course on the 
)fficial transcript. No grade is given for 
he course and no credit is given toward 

raduation. Audit-credit charge is one- 
lalf the regular tuition. 

IE. Sixteen hours of graduate 
evel work may be taken at PC HE 
nember schools and may be included 



in the 108 M.Div hours. Twelve hours 
may be included in the 72 M. A. hours. 
These credits must be approved by the 
Dean of the Faculty. Registration and 
payment will be handled according to 
PCHE procedures for cross-registration 
at the graduate level. PCHE courses will 
be recorded with the grades given by 
host institution (A or B). Grades lower 
than B will not receive academic credit 
at Pittsburgh Seminary (further details 
regarding PCHE can be found on pages 
38 and 39). 

For complete information regarding 
student responsibilities and pertinent 
regulations, consult the ' Academic 
Regulations" for Master of Divinity and 
Master of Arts, which can be found in 
the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Student Handbook. 

Fdcultv Advisorv SvstQrn 

All incoming Master of Divinity students 
are assigned advisers, selected by the 
Dean, normally from among faculty 
teaching first year courses. Newly 
enrolling students will be encouraged 
to contact their advisers during the 
opening orientation in the fall and the 
advisers will be expected to make 
themselves available for such contacts. 
An advisers signature is not required 
for class registration. Contact with the 
adviser is the students responsibility 
and may be established according to 
the need of the student. This advisory 
system applies only to first year Master 
of Divinity students. In the assignment 
of advisers, the requests of students for 
specific professors will be given prefer- 
ential consideration, but ordinarily no 
professor will be assigned more than 
six students. 

The Director of the Master of Arts 
Studies has the responsibility for 
counseling all Master of Arts students 
in the selection of courses in order to 
insure a suitable variety of courses. 




Theology 
Seminary 




Finances 



94 Tuition and Fees 

95 Financial Aid 

97 Honors Scholarship Program 

98 Awards, Fellowships, Prizes and 
Scholarships 




The Board of Directors of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary has approved 
the following tuition, housing rent and 
fees for the 1987 - 88 academic year. 
Modest increases are anticipated for 
the following year. The Seminary re- 
serves the right to make changes in all 
tuition, housing rent, fees and financial 
aid policies without prior notice. 



Tuition 



Candidates for the M.Div. and M.A. Degrees: 



Annual charge for 36 term hours 



$4,125.00 



Full time per credit (nine or more credits) 



$ 120.00) 



Part time per credit (eight or less credits) 



$ 125.00) 



Candidates for the D.Min. Degree: 



Per credit 



$ 139.00) 



Annual continuation fee (after 4 years) 



$ 200.00 



Special Students: 



Per credit 



$ 12500 



Per credit hour for Pennsylvania residents - Prices established by the University 
of Pittsburgh. Per credit hour for non-Pennsylvania residents - Prices established 

by the University of Pittsburgh 

University Courses: 

Courses taken at area universities (University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie - Mellon 

University, Duquesne University) through the PCHE cross - registration system are 
charged at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary tuition rates and tuition is paid to the 
Seminary I 



Audit course for enrolled students for no credit 




$ 


50.00 


Fees 






1 


Application Fee 




$ 


25. 0C 


Matriculation Fee* 




$ 


50.0C, 


Annual Student Association Fee ($8.00 per term) 




$ 


24.0C 


Transcript Fee: One copy of student's academic record will be 
without charge - additional copies 


provided 


$ 


2.0C 


The Matriculation Fee is applied to tuition costs 









Finances 


95 


Rent 


\nnual charge for a Dormitory Room ($325 per term) 


$975.00 


Apartment Fees (per month) 


^ulton Hal Thirty-nine apartments 


Efficiency apartments 


$ 190.00 


Dne-bedroom apartments 


$240.00 


Twenty-three apartments 


3ne-bedroom apartments 


$260.00 


rwo-bedroom apartments 


$295.00 


Thirty-one apartments 


3ne-bedroom apartments 


$280.00 


rwo-bedroom apartments 


$305.00 


rhree-bedroom apartments 


$350.00 


^our-bedroom apartment 


$415.00 



3oard 

tfeals may be purchased in the cafeteria 
Monday through Friday (breakfast and 
unch) throughout the academic year, 
excluding vacation periods. The esti- 
nated cost for board for an academic 
^ear for a single student is $1,800.00. 



in^fi/ CWi f/*otf 



.. 



andatory Medical and 
Hospitalization Insurance 

rhe Board of Directors of the Seminary 
las determined that students must be 
idequately covered with health insur- 
mce, either by participating in a group 
)lan offered by the Seminary, or by 
mother plan. It is important that this 
tost be included in the student's esti- 
nate of expenses. 

3r}i//npnf nf &pc 

ill academic fees and expenses are 
>ayable during the first two weeks of 
:ach term as specified by the Business 
)ffice. When necessary, arrangements 
or a payment plan to cover a term's 
xpenses may be made at the Business 
)ffice. There is a $5.00 late fee plus a 
arrying charge of 1% per month on 
he open account balance under any 
leferred payment plan. 



The goal of the Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary Financial Aid Program is to 
assist each student in arranging financial 
support. While it remains each student's 
responsibility to meet the costs of his 
or her theological education, the Semi- 
nary desires to provide grants and work 
assistance to each full-time student in 
the Divinity and Arts programs who 
has need, regardless of denominational 
affiliation. The student's denomination 
and family are also expected to share in 
meeting the financial obligation. 




96 



F i n 



1987-88 Allowed Expenses 





Single Student 


Married Student 


Each Child 


Tuition 


$4,125.00 


$4,125.00 


$ 


Fees 


24.00 


24.00 




Rent 


975-00 


2,340.00 


400.00 


*Food 


1,800.00 


2,400.00 


600.00 


* Transportation 


1,000.00 


1,200.00 




* Health Insurance 


350.00 


1,500.00 




* Health Medical 


250.00 


500.00 


300.00 


* Books 


600.00 


600.00 




* Clothing 


350.00 


700.00 


300.00 


* Miscellaneous 


501.00 


811.00 


250.00 


* Estimated Expenses 


$9,975.00 


$14,200.00 


$1,850.00 



Cost/Income 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary uses 
expense norms in computing a student's 
need. Following are the allowed ex- 
penses for the 1987-88 academic (9 
month) year: 

The demonstrated need will be the 
difference between the allowed ex- 
penses and the anticipated income. 

That need will be fully met with Work 
Assistance, Grants and Loans. 

From these norms is subtracted all 
anticipated income for the year. Net 
summer earnings; earnings during the 
year, for the student and spouse; de- 
nominational grants and your congre- 
gational aid; savings and other resources 
are considered income. Honors scholar- 
hips and prizes awarded by Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary are not considered 
income. Single students will need to 
bring a minimum of $2,000.00 of in- 
come and if you arc married you will 
need to bring a minimum of $4,000.00. 



Work Assistance 

The first part of aid, up to $1,110.00, will 
be the awarding of a Work Assistance job. 
Campus jobs exist in all aspects of Semi- 
nary life, including the Playroom, Cafe- 
teria, Library and Administrative offices. 

Grants 

Grant Assistance is provided by our re- 
stricted endowment funds and annual 
gifts to the Student Aid Scholarship Fund. 
In 1986-87 over half of our students 
received Seminary Aid. 

Our grant award is given to students re- 
gardless of denominational affiliation. 
However, an additional percentage will 
be given to members of the Presby- 
terian Church (U.S.A.). The maximum 
grant for all students will be the cost of 
tuition in effect each year. One third of 
the grant is made available each term. 
In special circumstances a student may 
be awarded an additional 10% of the 
grant. 



Finance 



97 



Loans 

Many students will enter with large 
educational loans so every effort is 
made to keep this aid component to a 



minimum. 



academic year (1987-88) and represent 
no commitment beyond the current 
year. The Financial Aid Policy Committee 
(including three students) conducts an 
annual review. 



Presbyterian students who are registered 
with or under the care of a Presbytery 
may apply for loan assistance from The 
Vocation Agency of the Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.) through the financial 
aid officer. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary partici- 
pates in the Guaranteed Student Loan 
(GSL) Program. 

Additional information 

The Seminary's Financial Aid Program 
is based on a nine-month academic 
year. Each year, if aid is required, a new 
application must be filed by May 1. 
Applications are reviewed in the order 
in which they are received. 

These policies are subject to change. 
They are operative for the current 



Specific questions and requests for de- 
tailed information regarding financial 
aid should be addressed to the Seminary's 
Financial Aid Office. 



The Honors Scholarship program is one 
way Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
seeks to encourage the enrollment of 
young men and women of the highest 
academic ability in the Master of Divinity 
and Master of Arts programs. Those 
considered for an Honors Scholarship 
shall be from among those applicants 
who have graduated from a regionally 
accredited or internationally recognized 
college or university, normally in the 
top five percent of their class (with at 
least a 3-5 cumulative average). They 
shall be students of demonstrated po- 
tential for outstanding Christian service. 




98 



Finances 




Honors Scholarships shall be granted 
only to students enrolled for twelve (12) 
or more credits per term who make 
application to the Seminary for the Fall 
Term on or before April 15 of any year. 
Honors Scholarships are awarded for a 
maximum of three (3) years. They can 
be renewed only if the recipient main- 
tains a 3.0 cumulative grade average. 

The David E. Molyneaux Honors 
Scholarship was established by the 
First Presbyterian Church of Flint, 
Michigan, in affection for their pastor, 
David E. Molyneaux, an alumnus and 
former Board member of the Seminary. 

The First Presbyterian Church of 
Neenah Honors Scholarship was 

established by the First Presbyterian 
Church of Neenah, Wisconsin, from 
the Bergstrom Fund, of which it is the 
trustee. 

The Carl A. Hiaasen Honors 
Scholarship Fund was established by 
the bequest of Abraham L. Mailman in 
honor of Mr. Carl A. Hiaasen, a former 
member of the Board of Directors of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 



The Faggs Manor Presbyterian 
Church (USA)/John McMillan 
Honors Scholarship was established 
in 1986 by the Faggs Manor Presbyterian 
Church (USA), Cochranville, Pennsyl- 
vania in the names of this congregation 
and of the Rev. Dr. John McMillan, son 
of the Faggs Manor Presbyterian Church 
(USA) and a pioneer teacher and leader 
in theological education in Western 
Pennsylvania whose work had great in- 
fluence in the establishment of Western 
Theological Seminary, one of the ante- 
cedents of Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary. Preference shall be given for this 
Honors Scholarship to qualified full- 
time students who are members of Pres- 
byterian Churches (USA) within the 
boundaries of Donegal Presbytery and/or 
who are under care of Donegal Presby- 
tery of the Presbyterian Church (USA). 

Those considered for an Honors Scholar- 
ship must have applied for admission 
to the Seminary before April 15 of each 
academic year. 

Presidential Scholarships 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers 
a limited number of Presidential Scholar- 
ships to Master of Divinity and Master 
of Arts candidates who have attained 
high academic achievements in previous 
degree studies. Presidential Scholar- 
ships shall be granted only to students 
enrolled for twelve (12) or more credits 
per term who make application to the 
Seminary for Term One on or before 
April 15 of any year. 

Awards, Fellowships, Prizes 
and Scholarships 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial 
Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellow- 
ship may be assigned upon graduation 
to that member of the senior class who 
is recommended by the faculty as having 
achieved the highest standard in all 
departments of the Seminary curriculum. 



F i n 



99 



The faculty reserves the right to impose 
special tests and examinations in making 
this award. The recipient must pledge 
himself or herself to a year of postgradu- 
ate study at some institution approved 
by the faculty following his or her 
graduation. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship is 
given every year to the member of the 
senior class who has the highest average 
at the beginning of his or her final term 
of study. The acceptance of this scholar- 
ship requires that the recipient spend a 
full academic year in study in any gradu- 
ate institution approved by the faculty. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial 
Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial 
Prize is assigned to that member of the 
graduating class who has taken the full 
course of instruction in this institution 
and who has achieved the second 
highest academic rank of the class, if in 
the judgment of the faculty he or she is 
worthy in all other respects. 



The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial 
Homiletical Prize 

This prize is awarded to a member of 
the senior class who has spent three 
years in the Seminary and has taken the 
highest standing in the department of 
Homiletics. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance 
Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance 
Prize will be awarded to the student 
who achieves the highest grade in an 
examination in classical Greek as he 
or she enters the junior class of the 
Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in 
Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
will be awarded to that member of the 
senior class who, having elected Hebrew, 
shall submit the best grammatical and 
exegetical treatment of a portion of the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 




100 




The John Watson Prize in New 
Testament 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament 
Greek will be awarded to that member 
of the senior elass who, having elected 
Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best 
grammatical and exegetical treatment 
of a portion of the Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History 
Prize 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Prize 
is to be awarded yearly to the students 
taking first and second rank respectively 
in the department of Church History. 



The Watson Samuel Boyce Music 
Prize 

The Watson Samuel Boyce Music Prize 
is to be awarded annually to that 
member of the senior class who makes 
the most outstanding contribution to 
the life of the Seminary in the area of 
Church Music. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The income is apportioned equally each 
year to the six members of the junior 
class who attain the highest average of 
excellence in their Seminary work. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship is given 
to the student who, upon entering Semi- 
nary, shall achieve the highest grade in 
a competitive examination in the English 
Bible. The successful competitor is to 
have the scholarship throughout the 
entire course of three years. 



F i n 



101 



The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial 
Prize in History and Theology 

The income from this endowed fund 
is granted to the student, who in the 
judgment of the professors of the His- 
tory and Theology areas, is most worthy 
of this award at the end of the middler 
year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in 
Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Bibli- 
cal Studies is granted to the student 
who, in the judgment of the professors 
of the Biblical area, is most worthy of 
this award at the end of the junior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for 
Graduate Study 

This fund provides an annual award to 
a member of the graduating class desig- 
nated by the faculty for assistance in 
postgraduate study, preferably in the 
field of New Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L McConkey 
Award in Homiletics 

This award is given to a student who, at 
the end of the middler year has, in the 
judgment of the homiletics professors, 
demonstrated excellence in preaching. 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions 

The Walter L. Moser Prize in Missions is 
awarded to that member of the graduat- 
ing class who is deemed most deserving 
among those entering a denomination- 
ally recognized or ecumenically 
sponsored mission field. 



The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in 
Pastoral Care 

The Larry G. Nagel Memorial Prize in 
Pastoral Care is awarded to the gradu- 
ating senior, whether Master of Divinity 
or Master of Arts, who has taken his or 
her full course of study at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary and who has the 
highest standing in the general area of 
Pastoral Care. 

The Richard J. Rapp Memorial Award 
in Doctor of Ministry Studies 

Funds have been raised by the Covenant 
Community Presbyterian Church of 
Pittsburgh as a memorial for the Rev. 
Dr. Richard J. Rapp. It is the intention 
of the donors that this money be used 
to honor Dr. Rapp by publishing one or 
more outstanding Doctor of Ministry 
papers and by acknowledging this in 
the annual commencement program. 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award 

The Edwin Dwight McKune Award for 
an International Student is given to a 
student who has demonstrated meritori- 
ous performance in his or her Seminary 
work and who is returning to his or 
her native land to witness to Christ there. 



The Clara Edna Miller Prize in 
Pastoral Theology 

This prize is awarded to that student in 
the Master of Divinity program finishing 
the seventh term who achieves the 
highest academic standing in those 
courses in the curriculum particularly 
adapted to the practice of ministry, i.e., 
preaching, worship, education, pastoral 
care, administration and leadership 
development. 






704 Faculty 

108 Administrative Officers 

112 Staff 

115 Board of Directors 

117 Field Education Supervisors 



104 




The members of the Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary Faculty are committed 
to the scholarly, professional and per- 
sonal preparation of men and women 
for Christian service to the Church. Many 
members of the Faculty are regular 
contributors to the Church's and world's 
scholarly knowledge through publica- 
tions and participation in learned socie- 
ties in the Americas, Asia and Europe. 
In this way the Faculty at Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary contributes to the 
learned skills of students on campus 
and far away. The Faculty formulates the 
curriculum, directs the entire educa- 
tional program and exercises general 
authority over the student body. 

Faculty 

Carnegie Samuel Calian, Professor 
of Theology. Occidental College, B.A.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
University of Basel, Doctor of 
Theology. 

Gonzalo Castillo-Cardenas, 

Associate Professor of Church and 
Society and Third World Studies. 
Union Theological Seminary, Cuba, 
B.D.; Union Theologicay Seminary 
(NY), S.T.M.; Columbia University, 
Ph.D. 

Stephen D. Crocco*, Director of the 
Library and Assistant Professor of 
Bibliography. University of Pittsburgh, 
B.A.; Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 
M.Div.; Harvard Divinity School, 
Th.M.; Princeton University, M.A., 
Ph.D. 

Susan N. Dunfee, Assistant Professor 
of Theology. University of Rochester, 
B.A.; Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 
M.Div; Claremont Graduate School, 
Ph.D. 



Robert M. Ezzell, Assistant Professor 
of Homiletics. Memphis State 
University, B.S.; Lexington Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Yale Divinity School, 
S.T.M.; Yale University, M.A. 

Donald E. Gowan, Robert C. Holland 
Professor of Old Testament. University 
of South Dakota, B.A.; University of 
Dubuque Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
University of Chicago, Ph.D. 

Douglas R. A. Hare, William F. Orr 
Professor of New Testament. Victoria 
College, University of Toronto, B.A.; 
Emmanuel College, Victoria University, 
Toronto, B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (NY), S.T.M., Th.D. 

Byron H.Jackson, Assistant 
Professor of Christian Education and 
Director of Field Education. Randolph- 
Macon College, B.A.; Union 
Theological Seminary (VA), M.Div; 
Columbia University, Ed.D. 

Jaredjudd Jackson, Professor of Old 
Testament. Harvard College, A.B.; 
Episcopal Theological School, B.D.; 
Union Theological Seminary (NY), 
Th.D. 

George H. Kehm, Professor of 
Theology. Queens College (NY), B.S.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Harvard Divinity School, S.T.M.; 
Harvard University, Th.D. 

Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Professor of 
Biblical Languages. University of 
Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, M.Div; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.M.; Princeton University, M.A., 
Ph.D. 



Personnel 



105 



M. Harjie Likins, Associate Professor 
in Church and Ministry. Cornell 
College (Iowa), A.B.; Union 
Theological Seminary (NY), B.D.; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 

Ulrich W. Mauser, Errett M. Grable 
Professor of New Testament. University 
of Tubingen, Doctor of Theology. 

Richard J. Oman, Howard C. Scharfe 
Professor of Homiletics. University of 
Minnesota, B.A.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; New College, 
University of Edinburgh, Ph.D. 

Charles B. Partee, Professor of 
Church History and W. Don McClure 
Professor of World Missions and 
Evangelism. Maryville College, A.B.; 
Austin Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; University of Texas, 
M.A.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Ph.D. 

Andrew Purves, Assistant Professor 
of Pastoral Theology and Spirituality. 
University of Edinburgh, M.A.; 
University of Edinburgh, B.D.; Duke 
University Divinity School, Th.M.; 
University of Edinburgh, Ph.D. 

Martha A. Robbins, Assistant 
Professor of Pastoral Care and 
Psychology. Maryville College (MO), 
B.A.; St. Louis University, MA. 

Ronald H. Stone, Professor of Social 
Ethics. Morningside College, B.A.; 
Union Theological Seminary (NY), 
B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 

H. Eberhard von Waldow, Professor 
of Old Testament. Bonn University, 
Doctor of Theology. 

John E. Wilson, Jr., Associate* 
Professor of Modern European and 
American Church History. Emory 
University, B.A.; Drew Theological 
School, B.D.; Claremont Graduate 
School, Ph.D. 

* Pending appointment by the Board of 
Directors, 13 May 1987 



Part-Time Faculty 
Nancy T. Foltz, Ph.D.; Director of 
Leadership Development, The Western 
Pennsylvania Conference, The United 
Methodist Church; Lecturer in 
Educational Ministries with Adults 

J. William Giles, D.Min.; Senior 
Minister, Hebron United Presbyterian 
Church; Lecturer in Evangelism 

Deborah A. Kania, M.S.; Assistant 
Clinical Director, Speech and Hearing 
Clinic, University of Pittsburgh; 
Lecturer in Homiletics — Voice and 
Speech Practicum 

Von Ewing Keairns, Ph.D. ; Executive 
Director, Arsenal Family and Children's 
Center; Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

Nancy L. Lapp, M.A.; Curator of Bible 
Lands Museum, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary; Lecturer in Archaeology and 
Hebrew 

David L. Mayo, M.Div; Director of 
Youth Ministries, Southminster 
Presbyterian Church; Lecturer in New 
Testament — Greek 

John E. Mehl, Ph.D. ; Director of the 
Doctor of Ministry Program, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary; Lecturer in 
Church and Ministry 




106 



Personnel 




Laird Stuart, D.Min.; Senior Minister, 
Westminster Presbyterian Church; 
Lecturer in Parish Administration 

George E. Tutwiler, B.A.; Minister of 
Music, Eastminster Presbyterian 
Church; Organist and choirmaster, 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; 
Lecturer in Church Music and United 
Methodist Studies 

Walter E. Wiest, Emeritus Professor 
of Philosophy of Religion* ; Lecturer in 
Theology and Ethics 

Marianne L. Wolfe, B.A.; Stated 
Clerk, Pittsburgh Presbytery, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Presbyterian Polity and Program 

* Pending appointment by the Board of 
Directors, 13 May 1987 

Recent Guest Faculty 

William M. Aber, D.Min.; Executive 
Presbytery, Santa Fe Presbytery, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico; Lecturer in 
Administration 



Kenneth E. Bailey, Th.D.; Professor 
of New Testament, Near East School of 
Theology, Beirut, Lebanon; Lecturer in 
New Testament 

C. K. Barrett, D.D., Professor of 
Divinity, Durham University, England; 
Lecturer in New Testament 

Gordon E. Boak, D.D.; Pastor 
Emeritus, Glenshaw Presbyterian 
Church, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania; 
Lecturer in Homiletics 

Ralph P. Brooks, Jr., Ph.D.; Rector of 
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

J. Stanley Chesnut, Ph.D.; Associate 
Dean of Faculty, Eckerd College, St. 
Petersburg, Florida; Lecturer in Bible 

Carlton B. Goodwin, Ph.D.; 
Executive Minister, Pittsburgh Baptist 
Association; Lecturer in Baptist Studies 

Gordon E.Jackson, Ph.D.; Emeritus 
Hugh Thomson Kerr Professor of 
Pastoral Theology; Lecturer in Pastoral 
Care 



Personnel 



107 



Aureljivi, Professor of Church 
History, Romanian Orthodox Academy, 
Sibiu, Romania; Lecturer in Church 
History 

Roderick A. F. MacKenzie, S.J.; 
Professor Emeritus Regis College, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Lecturer in 
Old Testament 

Richard A. Morledge, D.D.; Pastor, 
First Presbyterian Church, Bakerstown, 
Pennsylvania; Lecturer in Homiletics 

Neil R. Paylor, Ph.D.; Pastoral 
Counselor; Lecturer in Pastoral Care 

Ronald E. Peters, B.A.; Minister, 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Community 
Presbyterian Church, Springfield, 
Massachusetts; Lecturer in Sociology of 
Religion 

Petr Pokorny, Professor of New 
Testament, Komenskeho Evangelicka, 
Bohoslovecka Fakulta, Prague, 
Czechoslovakia; Lecturer in New 
Testament 

Edward A. Powers, Ph.D.; 
Chairperson of Family Environment in 
the Gerontology Program, Iowa State 
LIniversity, Ames, Iowa; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 

JohnD. Sharick, D.Min.; Executive 
Presbyter, Eastminster Presbytery, 
Youngstown, Ohio; Lecturer in 
Administration 

Elwyn A. Smith, Ph.D.; Retired 
Senior Pastor, Garden Crest 
Presbyterian Church, St. Petersburg, 
Florida; Lecturer in Ethics and Church 
History 

Ralph A. Strong, Ed.D.; Retired 
Associate Synod Executive, Synod of 
the Trinity, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania; 
Lecturer in Administration 

June Ruth Michaelson Taylor, 

M.Div.; Director of Pastoral Service, 
Presbyterian-University Hospital, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Lecturer in 
Pastoral Care 



James A. Walther, Sr., Th.D. ; 

Emeritus Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis; Lecturer in 
Biblical Studies 

* Pending appointment by the Board of 
Directors, 13 May 1987 

Emeriti 

John M. Bald, Th.D., Emeritus 
Professor of Christian Ethics 

J. Gordon Chamberlin, Ed.D., 
Emeritus Professor of Education 

Walter R. Clyde, Ph.D., Emeritus 
Professor of Christian Mission 

John H. Gerstner, Ph.D., Emeritus 
Professor of Church History 

Gordon E.Jackson, Ph.D., Emeritus 
Hugh Thomson Kerr Professor of 
Pastoral Theology 

William H. Kadel, Th.D., President 
Emeritus 

William F. Orr, Ph.D., Emeritus 
Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis 

James A. Walther, Sr., Th.D., 

Emeritus Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis 

Walter E. Wiest, Ph.D.; Emeritus 
Professor of Philosophy of Religion 




108 



Personnel 




Administrative Officers 

Carnegie Samuel Calian 

President 

B.A. Occidental College 

B.D. Princeton Theological Seminary 

D.Th. University of Basel 




Ulrich W. Mauser 

Vice-President of Academic Affairs 
and Dean 

D.Th. University of Tubingen 




Eugene P. Degitz 

Vice - President for Development 

B.A. Westminster College 

M.Div. Princeton Theological 

Seminary 

Th.M. Colgate/Rochester Divinity 

School 

M.S. Syracuse University 



Personnel 



109 




Raymond F. Luber 

Director of Seminary Relations 

B.A. Westminster College 
M.Div. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary 




Douglas N. Clasper 

Vice-President for Business Affairs and 

Business Manager 

B.S. Cornell University 
Certified Public Accountant 




Priscilla E. Boyd 

Registrar/Director of Financial Aid 

B.S. Shippensburg University 



110 



Personnel 




John E. White 

Director of Admissions. Director of 
Student Relations and Housing 

B.A. Geneva College 

M.Div. Pittsburgh Theological 

Seminary 




Jeanette Rapp 

Director of Continuing Education and 
Special Events 

A.B. Youngstown State University 



i J WL 



Director of the Library and Assistant 
Professor of Bibliography 

B.A. University of Pittsburgh 

M.Div Pittsburgh Theological 

Seminary 

Th.M. Harvard Divinity School 

M.A.; Ph.D. Princeton University 






Personnel 



111 




Mary Ellen Scott 

Library Cataloger/Archivist 

B.A. Sterling College 

MLS. University of Pittsburgh 




John E. Mehl 

Director of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program 

B.A. Dartmouth College 

M.Div. Pittsburgh Theological 

Seminary 

Th.M. Union Seminary (VA) 

Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh 




Jean H. Henderson 

Director of Placement and Associate in 
Field Education 

B.A. Davis and Elkins College 

M. Div. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



112 



Personnel 



Staff 




Cokesbury Bookstore 

Gwen Larner, Supervisor 



Counselor Personnel Consultant 

Everett I. Campbell, Ph.D. John Elgin 




Food Service Department 

Eloise Thomas, Director 

Carol Huebner, Cook 

Perkins Harris, Kitchen Custodian 

Mail Department 

David C. Tamblyn, Director 

Susan C. Burton, Mailroom Assistant 



Joyce Diamondstone, Director 
Jill A. Juengel, Assistant Director 



Personnel 



113 




Mary Ellen Scott, Cataloger and 

Archivist 
Patricia Beam, Assistant to the 

Cataloger 
Clarion Maloney, Book Processing 

Clerk 



Jayne Schneider, Circulation and Inter- 

Library Loan Librarian 
Peggy Cooper, Library Secretary 




Earl Leeder, Plant Director 
Deborah R. Cowden, Secretary to 

Plant Director 
Michael Keller, Maintenance 
William H. Neely, Maintenance 
Raymond Choice, Maintenance 
John J. Bendzsuk, Maintenance 
Trade D. Ruther, Housekeeping 



Calvin Carter, Custodial 
Cleotus Gaines, Custodial 
Vernon P. Duncan, Custodial 
Paul F. Gill, Custodial 
Harry Holmes, Security 
Mark Harber, Security 
Henry Zawacki, Security 




Secretarial Department 

President: 

Linda Smith, Secretary to the President 



MUduemic 



Debora R. Hutchinson, Secretary to the 

Dean 
Nancy L. Fraker, Secretary to the 

Director of the Doctor of Ministry 

Program and Secretary to the Director 

of Admissions/Director of Student 

Relations and Housing 
Peggy Cooper, Secretary to the Registrar 

and Director of Financial Aid 
Alexandria F. Ragan, Secretary to the 

Faculty 
Connie Raymond, Secretary to the 

Director of Continuing Education and 

Special Events 
Sally Seibel, Secretary to the Faculty 
Joyce Thompson, Secretary to the 

Director of Theological Field 

Education, Secretary to the Director 

of Placement and Secretary to the 

Faculty 



Development: 

Joan Coates, Secretary to the Vice- 
President for Development 

Suzanne J. Gredlein, Secretary to the 
Director of Seminary Relations 

Nancy Hammond, Clerk/Typist, 
Development Office 

Mary Demyan, Head Receptionist and 
Switchboard Operator 

Marge Darragh, Secretary to the 

Business Manager 
Carol Spotts, Bookkeeper, Business 

Office 
Ellen Frisco, Bookkeeper, Business 

Office 



Personnel 



115 



The Board of Directors 

Officers, 1986-1987 

Nathan W. Pearson, Chairperson 

Financial Advisor, Paul Mellon Family 

Interests 

Presbyterian Church of Sewickley, 

Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. John D. Sharick, 

Vice-Chairperson 

Executive Presbyter, Eastminster 

Presbytery, Youngstown, Ohio 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, Secretary 
Executive Presbyter, Pittsburgh 
Presbytery, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Craig G. Ford, Treasurer 

Senior Vice-President, Mellon National 

Bank 

Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian 

Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Douglas N. Clasper, Assistant 

Secretary/Treasurer 

Vice President for Business Affairs and 

Business Manager, Pittsburgh 

Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 

Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Legal 

Counsel 

Attorney, Alter, Wright & Barron 

Woodland United Presbyterian Church, 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Members 

David J. Brubach 

Retired, Union National Bank, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Member, Glenshaw Presbyterian 
Church, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

E. Bayley Buchanan, M.D. 

Surgeon, Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 

Shadyside Presbyterian Church, 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Carnegie Samuel Calian 

President and Professor of Theology, 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Roxanna Ryman Coop 

The Program Agency, Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.), New York, New York 

The Rev. Richard M. Cromie 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida 

The Rev. Edward R. DeLair, Jr. 

Pastor, Pigeon Creek Presbyterian 
Church, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania 

Robert E. Dickey, HI 

Chairman and President, Dravo 
Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Member, East Liberty Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Nancy Hart Glanville 

Member, Noroton Presbyterian Church, 
Darien, Connecticut 

The Rev. Kathleen A. Goodrich 

Graduate Student, Reading, 
Pennsylvania 

Dwight C. Hanna, M.D. 

Retired, Plastic Surgical Associates, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Member, Fox Chapel Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Jean H. Henderson 

Director of Placement and Associate in 
Field Eduacation, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 

The Rev. A. Vanlier Hunter 

Associate Professor of Biblical Studies 
and Associate Dean of the Ecumenical 
Institute, St. Mary's Seminary & 
University, Baltimore, Maryland 

Justin M.Johnson 

Judge, Superior Court of Pennsylvania, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Member, Bethesda United Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

John E. Kaites 

Self-employed, Paradise Valley, Arizona 
Member, Mountain View Presbyterian 
Church, Scottsdale, Arizona 



If6 



Personnel 



The Rev. Mark H. Landfried 

Pastor, The United Presbyterian 
Church, New Kensington, 
Pennsylvania 

Max A. Lauffer 

Retired Mellon Professor, University of 
Pittsburgh, Department of Biological 
Science, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Middletown, Pennsylvania 

James E. Lee 

Retired, Gulf Oil/Chevron Corporation, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Member, Fox Chapel Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Claudia Costello Lewis 

Associate Pastor, Faith United Church 
of Christ, Richmond, Heights Ohio 

Laura B. Marshall 

Member, Presbyterian Church of 
Sewickley, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

Jerry McAfee 

Retired, Gulf Oil Corporation 
Member, Shadyside Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Robert H. Meneilly 

Pastor, Village Presbyterian Church, 
Prairie Village, Kansas 

Mary E. Pardee 

Member, Fox Chapel Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Robert R. Rumer 

Member, Williamsburg Presbyterian 

Church, Williamsburg, Virginia 

The Rev. William G. Rusch 

Synod Executive, Synod of the Trinity, 
Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 

Judith Scotford 

Member, Westminster Presbyterian 
Church of Boardman, Boardman, Ohio 

The Rev. Laird J. Stuart 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Richard L. Terrell 

Retired, General Motors Corporation 
Member, First Presbyterian Church, 
Naples, Florida 

Thomas D. Thomson 

Attorney, Thomson, Rhodes & Cowie, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Member, Shadyside Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lloyd M. Whitesell 

Retired, Harris Corporation 
Member, Fairmont Presbyterian 
Church, Dayton, Ohio 

Theodore R. Williams 

Professor of Chemistry, College of 
Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 
Member, First Presbyterian Church, 
Wooster, Ohio 

The Rev. Alfred W. Wishart, Jr. 

Executive Director, Pittsburgh 
Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

J. Stuart Zahniser 

Retired, Talon Corporation 
Member, First Presbyterian Church, 
Boca Raton, Florida 

Directors Emeritus/a 
Marian Bell 
Donald C. Burnham 
Andrew R. Cochrane 
Merle E. Gilliand 
Carl A. Hiaasen 
William R. Jackson, Sr 
Robert R. Lavelle 
George D. Lockhart 
H. Parker Sharp 

The John Anderson Award of Merit 
This newly created award, named after 
one of the founders of the Seminary, 
recognizes the unique service and 
contribution of special friends of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 

1986-Benjamin R. Fisher 
G. Albert Shoemaker 



Personnel 



117 




Field Education Supervisors 
For 1986-87 

The following served the Seminary 
as Field Education Supervisors 
in the academic year 1986-87. 

David B. Antonson 

Northmont United Presbyterian 

Church 

Pittsburgh, PA 

Albert M. Beckes 

Curtisville Presbyterian Church 
Curtisville, PA 

Wayne C. Blaser 

Poke Run United Presbyterian Church 
Apollo, PA 

Jack M. Bowers 

Hebron United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Gary W. Carson 

Broadway United Presbyterian Church 
East McKeesport, PA 

James A. Churchill 

Fox Chapel Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 



I. Mark Conner 

Aldersgate United Methodist Church 
Wheeling, WV 

Hugh D. Crocker 

Baldwin Community Methodist 

Church 

Pittsburgh, PA 

James E. Davison 

Westminster Presbyterian Church 
Upper St. Clair, PA 

Douglas A. Dunderdale 

Eastminster Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Janet Edwards 

Mellwood Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Donald R. Ewing 

Christ United Presbyterian Church 
Carnegie, PA 

Jean Fairley 

Magee Women's Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Richard Allen Farmer 

Bethany Baptist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 



1f8 



Personnel 



James Farrer 

First Presbyterian Church 
Johnstown, PA 

Victor E. Fogelin 

Cheswick Presbyterian Church 
Cheswick, PA 

Robert D. Forsythe 

Riverview United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Charles H. Goehring 

The Presbyterian Church 
Sewickley, PA 

Donald H. Gordon 

Presbytery of Lake Erie 
Saegertown, PA 

Steven Hamilton 

Covenant United Presbyterian Church 
Butler, PA 

Andrew C. Harvey 

Central Highlands United Methodist 

Church 

Elizabeth, PA 

Elizabeth Hawkins 

Allegheny General Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Stephen E. Hein 

Lebanon Presbyterian Church 
West Mifflin, PA 

Frank Edwin Heller 

First Presbyterian Church 
Carnegie, PA 

Willis M. Hickerson 

Mt. Olive Baptist Church 
Canonsburg, PA 

Jack High 

First Presbyterian Church of Castle 

Shannon 

Pittsburgh, PA 

Glen Irvin 

United Methodist Church 
New Bethlehem, PA 

William Jackson 

Chautauqua Institution 
Chautauqua, NY 



Gregory Kronz 

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church 
Wilkinsburg, PA 

Jerald B. Landrey 

Memorial Park Community 
Presbyterian Church 
Allison Park, PA 

Barton B. Leach 

Third Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Reginald Lilley 

Evangelical United Methodist Church 
Brookville, PA 

Ellen Carter Liotta 

Catawba United Methodist Charge 
Fairmont, WV 

John J. Lolla,Jr. 

Presbyterian Church of Plum Creek 
Pittsburgh, PA 

James E. Long, Jr. 

Beulah Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

John S. McCall 

Sixth Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Thomas R. McMillen 

Mt. Nebo United Presbyterian Church 
Sewickley, PA 

Susan J. Meyer 

Northmont Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Leonard E. Millison 

Hillcrest United Presbyterian Church 
Monroeville, PA 

Robert Mitchell 

St. Margaret Memorial Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

William F. Moore 

Sharon Community Presbyterian 

Church 

Coraopolis, PA 

Duane L. Morford 

Bakerstown United Methodist Church 
Gibsonia, PA 



Personnel 



119 



S. Thomas Niccolls 
Elizabeth Stuart Niccolls 

Hiram Christian Church 
(Disciples of Christ) 
Hiram, OH 

Robert Noble 

Union Presbyterian Church of 
Robinson Twp. 
McKees Rocks, PA 

Richard R. Ollinger 

Cross Roads Presbyterian Church 
Monroeville, PA 

Harry Parker 

Lorenz Avenue Baptist Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Donald B. Patchel 

Irons Memorial Presbyterian Church 
McDonald, PA 

Lee D. Penvose 

St. Marks Lutheran Church 
New Stanton, PA 

Edward O. Poole 

Beaver County Area Ministry 
Beaver, PA 

Daniel Rift 

Bower Hill Community Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Richard A. Schempp 

First Presbyterian Church 
Jamestown, PA 

John R. Scotland 

First United Presbyterian Church of 
Allegheny 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Rodney Smith 

Mars United Methodist Church 
Mars, PA 

June R. Taylor 

Presbyterian - University Hospital 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Francis E. Tennies 

Crafton United Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 




William H. Thomas 

Duquesne First Presbyterian Church 
Duquesne, PA 

Susan E. Vande Kappelle 

Fourth Presbyterian Church 
Washington, PA 

Paul Votaw 

Southminister Presbyterian Church 
Mt. Lebanon, PA 

Peter D. Weaver 

Smithfield United Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Michael H. Wenning 

Pleasant Hills Community Presbyterian 

Church 

Pittsburgh, PA 

John A. Wilson 

The Rehabilitation Institute 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Clay R. Woodbury 

The Pittsburgh Baptist Association 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Margaret Yingling 

Trinity Presbyterian Church 
Pittsburgh, PA 








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90 Academic Regulations 
87 Admissions Procedures 

108 Administrative Officers 

98 Awards, Prizes and Fellowships 
115 Board of Directors 

4 1 Clinical Pastoral Education 

44 Continuing Education 

49 Course Descriptions 

9 1 Cross-registration in PCHE Institutions 

122 Directions to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

27 Doctor of Ministry 

34 Doctor of Philosophy 
104 Faculty 

94 Fees 

24 Field Education 

95 Financial Aid 
90 Grading System 

97 Honors Scholarships 

13 Housing 

39 Institutional Relationships 

90 International Scholars Program 

34 Joint Degree Programs 

39 Master of Arts/Church Music 

36 Master of Divinity/Business Administration 

37 Master of Divinity/Health Administration 

37 Master of Divinity/Juris Doctor 
36 Master of Divinity/Library Science 

38 Master of Divinity/Science (Public Management) 
34 Master of Divinity/Social Work 

12 Library 

39 Master of Arts 

39 Religious Education Emphasis 
22 Master of Divinity 

26 Placement 

19 Play Care for Children 

18 Preaching Association 

15 Recreation 

95 Rent/Room and Board 
43 Special Lectures 
41 Special Non-Degree Studies 
112 Staff 

1 6 Student Associations 
94 Tuition 

15 Worship 



122 



Directions to Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

From the North, East and West-take 
Pennsylvania Turnpike (1-76) to 
Interchange §5 (Route 28). Follow 
Route 28 south to the Highland Park 
Bridge exit This will be the first exit 
to the left as you are travelling south 
on Route 28. Proceed across the 
Highland Park Bridge. Exit off the 
Highland Park Bridge to the right (the 
first exit). Make a left at the first traffic 
signal. Go past the entrance to the 
Pittsburgh Zoo. Continue to the top 
of the hill, making a sharp hairpin 
turn to the right near to the top. Turn 
left at the first street (Bunker Hill 
Street [high-rise apartment building 
is at the corner]). Proceed to 
Highland Avenue (fourth right). Turn 
right on Highland and proceed to the 
Seminary. The Seminary is located 
on the left, one and one-half blocks 
past the first traffic signal. 



From the South and West-take 
Interstate 279 to Pittsburgh; go 
through the Fort Pitt Tunnel and over 
the bridge, bearing to the right out 
Interstate 376 to the Forbes Avenue 
(Oakland) exit. Down Forbes Avenue 
to the tenth traffic signal (Belief ield 
Avenue). Turn left for two blocks to 
the light at Fifth Avenue. Turn right on 
Fifth to the tenth traffic signal on 
Fifth (Highland Avenue). Turn left at 
Highland for seven traffic signals; to 
the Seminary, on the right. 

ByAir-from the Pittsburgh 
International Airport take a bus, taxi 
or Airport Limousine to downtown 
and the William Penn Hotel. At 
William Penn ask directions to the 
71 B Highland Park bus, which stops 
in front of the Seminary. 

If you should arrive on campus after 
things look pretty quiet, look for a 
Security Guard to help assist you in 
getting to your final destination. 



Photooraphersi 

David Aschkenas 
Susan C. Burton 
Richard E. Kolson 
John Novajosky 
Paul Selvaggio 
Witalis Burke Associates 



uesigm 

The Communication Works, Inc. 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206-2596 










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For Reference 

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