(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pittston gazette centennial hand-book, 1778-1878 : one hundredth anniversary of the battle and massacre of Wyoming, July 3 & 4, 1878 : containing a complete historical sketch of Wyoming Valley .."

^ 






F 157 
.W9 P69 
Copy 1 



r 



0f'^ 



'f§M Q. 




i CENTENNIALS 




ONE HUNDREDTH AMMVEKiiAKY UE IHE BATTLE 
AND MASSACRE OF WYOMING. 



ooisTTj^iisriisra- 

A Complete Historical Sketch of Wyoming Valley with Illustrations and 
Portraits, Descriptions of Points of Interest in the Vicinity, Statis- 
tics showing the Wonderful Progress of the Valley during 
the Past Century, atid its Prospective Greatness, together 
with the Order of Exercises of the Centennial Anni- 
versary of the Historic Struggle which 
has made NA/yoming famous 
throughout the Worid. 




PITTSTON, PA. 

GAZETTE PRINT. 

187S. 




FJSI 

^^ I know no way of judging the future but by the past'^ — P. Henry. 

Study the statistics given on another page. Apply the above rule, and ihen 
try to imagine the possibilities, or, rather, the probabilities of the future of the 
Wyoming Valley. The policy of shriveling up values by the effort to make 
gold alone do the work of gold, silver and paper money having been aban- 
doned, it is now time to study the situation and act wisely with reference to 
the future. The question that now interests everybody is, has the shrinkage 
in values ceased ? Have the bottom prices been reached ? Now stop croak- 
ing. We are at the end of the panic of 1873. From this time forward look 
for values to enhance. There will be no further contraction of the currency, 
and, consequently, no further contraction of prices. By September ist, 1878, 
all the bankrupts will have reported. Hitherto many manufacturers and oth- 
ers have been selling a dollar's worth of goods for fifty cents, and making their 
profit by settling with creditors for twenty-five cents on the dollar. No in- 
ducements of that kind hereafter. Now buy— buy anything that will not spoil 
in sixty days, unless it b2 four per cent, bonds at par. Buy personal property. 
Buy houses. Buy farms. Buy stocks of merchandise. Buy timber tracts. 
Buy good machinery. Buy stores. Buy where can you buy what you want for 
the least money. If you want real estate or securities ; if you want a farm, a 
town site, a truck farm, a mill, a store, a residence, good-renting property, a 
stock of goods, or, if you want bank stock, bridge stock, mortgages, borough 
bonds, water stock, gas stock, bridge bonds, or almost any other investment, 
call on G. B. Thompson, at his office in the First National Bank building, 
Pittston, Pa. He pays particular attention to titles and security of invest- 
momts, and claims never to have had a lawsuit grow out of any of his very 
numerous transactiofns. Now for business ! 



BURSCHEKS 



dOii^:i^i£:iFi! 



THE MOST POPULAR I.\ PITTSTOX 



OiHiosite the Sutler House, 



Allen & Boslock, 
GROGERYg PROVISION DEALERS 



38 North Main St., rittston, Pa. 



a specialty. 



YOU WILT^ KIISTD A.T 

G. F. S. 



£_^^ 



'S, 



THE BEST STOCK OF 



IPI 






S'l'lB^iQ 



AID CtEHTS' FUEHISSraa GOODS 

TO SE IFOTJITID IInT 1= I T T S T O InT • 



*MidM 



No. 42 North Main Street, 

J^" Ladies' Sacques Cut and syiade to Order. 



S13:A.FiM:EY, 
JVb. o^ South Main Street, Pittstou, Fejm'a, 

Paper, Window Shades 

AWD JfAINTEBS' SUPPLIES. 

THE FINEST LINE OF 

Hotur$ Frames, Mirrors and Wahut Brackets in the Valley, 

fi^" Always in stock — Handsome Chromes and Engravings, Stereoscopes and 
Views, Glass Shades and AYax (for Wax Work), Stationery, &c. 

>S®- AN INSPECTION OF STOCK AND PRICES IS SOLICITED =i2a 

(I) 



BEAR HALL. 



3&\ 




THE ONLY RELIABLE, FASHIONABLE 







AND DEALER IN 



TBDNKS. VALISES, SHAWL STRAPS AND UMBRELLAS, 

No. 4 SonLtli Main Street, 

B3g^ T»i'iiice and peasant served alllte — OIVEl PPtldU and 
no deviation. 



At S. Y. RICHARDS' 



Corner Main & Water Sts., 

over Kyle's Ilat Store, 

PITTSTOSr, PEBTBf' A., 

is the best T)]ace to get first-class RETOUCH- 
ED rilOTOGKAPHS. A trial will 
convince you. 

^S^ GIVE ME A CALL. 

General Blacksmithing. 




WAGON AND CARRIAGE IRONING 

a Bpecialty. 
JS^McKnae & Fitzpatrick'a old stand. 
\VEST END, PJTT8T0N, Pa. 



J. S. SICKLER, 

Dealer in 

G-roceriesd^ Provisions 

West End, Pittston. 



^^®~ Country Produce a specialty. 

MRS. M. A. JONES, 



lV6HlSMa 



Headquarters for 

TOYS & FANCY OOODS 



123 So. Main St., 

pittston, pa. 



(2) 



^VEST PITTSTON 





Linden Street, near Graded School, West Pittston, 



AI,L FAf IB aii PAIlFf IBS' SIPPLIIS, 

COACH VARNISH AND MASURY'S COLORS, 

M00I MmgrmwirngM^ 

School Books, Stationery, and Brackets. 

Headquarters Fop 



i 






Ml 



^® 



WREATH AND WAX WORK FRAMES ALWAYS IN STOCK 

FANCY GOODS, SILK VELVET PASSPERTOUTS, TOYS, 

FIREWORKS, &c. 

The VERY LOW PRICES at which Mr. Chumard is doing the finest work 

in PICTURE FRAMING, explains the great popularity of the 

I 

j^Vest Pittston Store, whose principal advertisement is its superior work 

distributed over a large territory. 

CALL AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. 

E. M. CHUMARD, 

Post Office, PITTSTON, PA. 

i (3) 





Manufacturers of and Dealers in 




&j§fi mQsfi WiiQsii 



42 SO. MAIM ST., PITTSTON,FA. 
87 West Side PiMic Square, Wilkes- Barre, Pa 



Minis, llOilllOS, Ifllf 1011 



BTj-^r iro'ws. 



16 PI 

Jy 




LIE! 



) 



.A-T- 






S &Sil 



''M 



MONTGOMERY ST, WEST PITTSTON. 
fi@" Fresh Country Produce received DaiByi for which be 
Market Prices are Paid. 



11 



JlS; M^] %J^ ^^^^ ^ja^ v-v-v • 











1 



131 North Main M., MUston, JPa. 



Bar supplied with the best brands of Cigars, and Imported Wines and Liquo 
DRAUGHT LAGER ALWAYS ON TAP. 
Also Collector, Cashier and Treasurer of , 



(4) 



.J" 



i 



ESTABLISHED 1866. 





^^Li^ 



Smokers and Jobbers of 

OVIJBIO 






WATER & CRON STS„^PITTSTON, PA. 

CORN EXCHANGE. 



ff^^^'^sssn^y^ 



"Wholesale ond Retail DeaUrs ia 



« 



^ ^ bs ^13! ii i ur ^'^- ^~ -■^~ i. -♦.- A i- A 



ft w m ^j 

FLOUR, FEED, HA.Y, &c., 

110 North Main Street, 

PITTSTON, PA 



J. D.WILLIAMS, 

Manufacturer ai<I Wholtsale and Retail 
Dealer iu 



&ntt 



J^I^TJD ICE CI^E^^IVT, 

37 So. Maiu St., PITTSTOX, Pa. 



l&B' Parties, Festivals and Picnics supplied at 
reduced rates. 



X'lTT^^TOlV 



lempsrance Mutual hM km'hl^ 

ONLY LIFE INSURANCE COIMPANY OF THE KIND 
IN THE UNITED STATES. 

The First class inchules only stricUy temper- 
ate jiersons; Second class -similar to other Mu- 
tual ciinii)anles, but tlie business of each class Is 
kept entirely separate. 

'UDIES IHSSaEB Ml AS CENILEKEil, 

This company has been In existence eight 
years, and its record has demonstrated the fact 
that the expense Is less than one-third ot that In 
the old line companies. For further Icformatlon 
address or apply to 

HENRY STEVENS, 

Local Agent for Pif.ston, Pa., and vicinity. 



STEAM DYE WORKS. 

Dress Goods, Shawls, Cloaks, 
Capes, and Gents' Clothing 

Dyed, Scoured and Renovated in first-class 

style. All kinds of work done 

at short notice. 

LAW & McMillan, 

General Dealers in 

DEI GOODS I diCERIES. 

Crockery &. Wooden Ware, 
PHOVISION?, FLOUR, FEED, 

Boots, Shoes, &c., 

PITTS TON, Pa. 



Andrew H. Lkw, 
Jas. L. McMillan, 



(5) 



ESTABLISHED 1850. 



® 




JLl, 



GAZETTE BUILDING, 

iFITTSTOIsT, :E'u^., 

Does Job Printing of all kinds, and keeps on hand a full supply of Stationery 

for all kinds of work. 



OQilETIl 



y fill 



?ieis' iMiis, 



DEEDS, MORTGAGES, NOTES, &C., FOR SALE. 



— Prints to Order- 



LETTER HEADS, 
ENVELOPES, 

BILL HEADS, 

STATEMENTS, 
CIRCULARS, 



BALL PROGRAMMES, 
DODGERS, 

PROGRAMMES, 

INVITATIONS. 
BALL TICKETS, 
POSTERS. 



PAPER BOOKS, 
AT LOWEST CASH RATES. 



ESTIMATES FURNISHED, 

f, SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



® 



(6) 



1^1!^. AUKm'E'N. 




» 






Carries a Full Stock of Eyei\ything 
IN THE -Rai^p^^ai^e Line. 



ifS 



^^ p, 






Kf eiF 



ALREADY GROUND FOR IMMEDIATE USE. 



The ^^Bristor' Grain Cradk 



M ¥ FWEEM AMI 



A 



^<. 



Best quality Goods of standard malies at prices to 

suit the times, 

(7) 




ill, , 




^' 




ELLITHO 



PvP 



CO., 



(limited) 



amaifa.cti^i-er'^ oi* ^ii"i>ei'io3:" 



U I 



IP' 



€^ 



^' 



f S 111 



""T^^J 



^(T^ 



M0W 



In White and Scarlet. 



mrM. Ave., W0Bt FMtBi^wM^^ 



E 1 



SELLING AGENTS ; 



4S ^' 4S White St., J^EW YORK. 

(8) 



G. DAVID, 







a. 



No. 41 SOUTH MA IN ST. 

Call and examine our stock of Ready-Made Clothing. We can give you 
a GOOD SUIT for LESS MONEY than any other clothing house in the 
Valley. Remember the place — 41 So. Main Street. 

CALL AMB CONVINCE YOUSSELF, 

s&r Our Goods all Warranted as represented. 




Nos. 127 and 129 North Main Street, 

Conducted on European Plan. PITTSTON, PA. 

BAR SUPPLIED WITH BEST BRANDS ALES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS. 
TERMS 3I0DERATE. ¥.. M. SINCLAIR, Prop'r. 



J. tl. BliOTV ]V, 



ILLEB, 



STONE .^IILL, 



ISlorth Main St. 



PITTSTON, Pa. 



GETHING HOUSE, 



L k B. JUNCTION. 



WM.GETHING Prop'e. 



4®~ GxeoUent accommodatioas and conveni- 
ent to the Depot. 



T. W, HAINES, 



mw^- 



id J, M^ 'kl 






um 



32 Railroad Streets 

PiTTSTON, Pa.' 



BlaclsmilliiVetefinafy Surgeon 

30 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS. 

Horses' Diseased Feet a Specialty* 



Mill St., Near Ferry Bridge, 
pitts to ¥, pa, 



(9) 



JAMES SEATTLE, 

Dealer ia 

WAKHEULOCKSiJEWELIi! 

C!or. Main & Water Sts., Pittston, Pa. 
J8®" ENGRAVING A SPECIALTY."®* 



F.BRANDENBURG, 



147 SO. M.\IN STREET, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

GROCEE, 



355 N. Main St. 



PITTSTON. 



S, 
Groceries and Provisions, 

261 So. Main St. Pittston, Pa. 

Geo. Butler, 
The "Old Reliable" Barber 

224 So. Main St., Pittston, Pa. 



SteiasfliryjlaiLayiii 

GEO. J. LliE'WEI.IiYN, 

Yard and Shop just above Ferry Bridge, 
Pittston, Pa. 



B. J. DURKIN, 
C3- K; O O E ;e?; 

227 South Main Street, 
PITTSTON, PA. 

H. J. SCOTT, 

S'ashicnakle Barkr and Hairdresser, 



SODA WATER, 

ALL THE P0PUL.4R FLAVORS, 

At WILLIS BRENTON'S 

JDrmg Store^ 

Water Street, PITTSTON, PA. 

J. J. GhALLAGMIEIi, 

BOTTLER 

B.nd. mauufacturer of 

Fancy TemperanceDrlnks 

Railroad Street, near Main, 
PITTSTON, PA. 

' S, Y. RICHARDS, ' 

IceCrgaiGariiaiflParlors, 

Cutler Cottage, Main St., 
pittston, pa. 

Wholesale Dealer in 



Opp;, L. V. Depot, Pittston, Pa. 



17 North 5th St, Cor. Commerce, Philadelphia. 

1). T. HATFIELD, 

a- ISy O C E K; 

(Gazette Building) 

PITTSTON, PA. 

HARRIS BROWN, 

Barber and Hairdresser, 



Under Eagle Hotel, Pittston. 



(10) 



WM. O'MALLET, 

BtriLDEE & COKTBACTOE, 

PITTSTON, PJl, 

Contracts for Brick and Stone Work 
a specialty. 

JORDAN, 

Dealer in 

205 Market Street, 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

Fruits, Vegetables, Fish, 

OYSTERS, CLABViS, &c., 

Wholesale & Retail. 

Cor. Northamptou & Washington Sts., 

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. 

CHAS. A, LINNEKIN, 

;139 Main Street, 

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. 
i8®" Ladies' and gents' Felt and Straw Hals 
changed to ihe latept styles. 



W#^r#2SS:J$JlT^ 




DR. C. M. WILLIAMS, 




DENTIST, 

7 North Main St., Pittston. 



B^- ALZ WOIiK WATlJtANTED. 



BRYCE R. BLAIR, 

SHOVEL, SPADE, mj I mi m} 



MANUFACTURER, 



WyomingShovel Works, 



Wyoming, Luzerne Co., Pa. 



No. 9 MAIN STREET, 

PITTSTON, PA. 
C3~ Solid Silver and Gold Goods a Specialty. 

HO^VELL & KING, 

BREWERS OP 

AND 

Celebrated XXXX Ales, 

FITTSTOK, PA. 

EAGLE HOTEL, 

pittstox, pa., 
In the Business Centre of the City 

JULIUS SCOTT Peop'r. 

OOOD SA9IPI.B ROO)n.<i. 



Late of the Pittston House. 

SALOON I RESTAURANT 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS. 
Third Poor below Phoenix Block, 



121 Souxn Maix St. 



PITTSTON, Pa, 



(II) 







JLH^ID IDS^^XiIEiiaS i2sr 



"^29 SOUTH MAIN ST., PITTSTON, PA. 

FUMWACB Work anjd> Roofing- a Specialty. 

None but first-class goods kept in stock, which will be sold at the very low- 
est prices for cash. Our Tinware we warrant to be the best in the county. 
Our work is all done under our personal supervision and warranted to be as 
represented. 
B^^We have secured the agency for the celebrated "Pride of the East" Churn. 

W. S. WHINTON'S 



HUNLOCK & HARRIS, 

All kinds of work In their line at lowest llvlu<,^ 
rates. 

MOHUMEMTAL WGHK 

a specialty. 
COJtNER MILZ & MAIN STnJ<:ETS, 

(opposite Ferry Bridge) 

PITTSTON, PA. 



I iiej £) ij 1 



i 



# iji:.0t0)gjt'il|3-ttjeiV 

7 NORTH MAIN ST., 



PARLOR SALOON, 



Sign of the Keg, 6G So. Main Street, 



PITTSTOX, PA.. 



Finest Imported Wines and Liquors. 

PARSLOW & HESTOR, 



26 So. Main St., Pittston. 



Jg®"" Parly and Dress Suits a specialty. 



>^#| 



nttston., Pa. 



Jolm li.obissoii, 

ToNSORiAL Artist, 

6.5 South Main Street, Pittston. 
Pleasant Booms and First-class Workmen. 



no North Main St., 

PITTSTON, PA. 

AHLBORN BROS., 

jSIanufaetiirers of all kindu of 

Soap artd Candles, 

Cor. Canal and Northampton Sts,, 

WILKRS-BAKRE, Pa. 

a. L. PALMER, 
HA TTER cO FURRIER 



134 Market Street, 

WILICK3-HARRE, PA. 



(12) 



YOST S> L UTTO^r, Editors and Puhlishers. 



The Press has a large and increasing circulation. It is delivered by 
carriers in the Borouglis of Pittston, West Pittscon, Pleasant Valley, and the 
city of Scranton, at 

10 CENTS A WEEK. 



GORDON'S 



mm 



3ttl| 



140 NORTH MAIN ST., 



0pp. Butler House. 



Pittston, !Pa. 



-8S-ALL KINDS OF PRINTING AT LOWEST LIV- 
ING RATES. 



PUBLISHED SIMULTANEOUSLY IN SCRANTON, 
WILKES-BARRE AND PITTSTON. 



Everywhere spoken of as the hest Sunday news- 
paper ever published in this section 
of the State. 
Per AnDum, by mail $200 

By Carriers (in Scranton, Wilkes-Barre and Pit tston) 2.50 

Single Copies 5 cts. 

J8@^ Specimen Copies Sent FREE to Any Address. 

(13) 



DR. A. KNAPP, 



OIEIIBT, 



32 NORTH MAIN .ST., PITTSTON, PA., 

DEALER IN 
PATENT MEDICINES, HORSE MEDICINES, DYE STUFFS, OILS, PERFUMERY, GARDEN 
SEEDS, BONE MEAL AND OTHER FERTILIZERS, 

Sole proprietor of the WYOMING CENTENNIAL POULTRY POWDER, 

for the prevention and cure of the various diseases incident to Poultry or Barn 
Yard Fowls. This valuable Powder is the best known in the market. Be sure 
and ask for the " Wyoming Centennial Poultry Powder," and take no other. 
Price 20 cents a package. 




» €^^ 



Manufacturer of all kinds of 

'SE^'R.J.NTTmGr F^ 

62 Inch Cylinder Machine. 



Capacity 3000 lbs. per 24 hours. 



Pittston, Pefin^a: 



A. B. ROMMEL, 

FLORIST & GARDEN 



G-ROA^ER OW ^LL KINDS OF 



m. 



mm 



immft 



m^ 






B^ GREEN HOUSES AND GARDENS— West Side Sus- 
quehanna River, above West Pittston, opposite Campbell's 
Ledge. 

JP. O. ADDJtJESS—TITTSTOJf, FA. 



FRANK ROCKAFELLEE, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer In 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

i33NorthMain St., Pittston, Pa. 

H. C, BERLEW, 

Constable, 

WEST PITTSTON, PA. 



J. D. GREEN, 

Dealer in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 

WYOMING, Pa. 

W. F. PIER, M. D., 

WYOMING, PA. 



Office at Wilson's DrugStQre. 

Ofpicb Howbs : 
From 10 to 12 k. M. 
2 to 4 P. M. 



(14) 






te' 



ffli 



^E 



ALL KINDS OF FRESH FISH, 

Foreign and Domestic Fmits and Vegetables 



I3Sr SE.A.S03Sr 



3DDS^^XJEI^ in^ 



• 



m.%L 



m m 



'•9 



i^-ix^ei^rosf, WM,, 



e:s:celsioi^ 



POULTRY 



ER. 



Try it— Best in Market 

Manufactured by 

L. M. STROH, 

West End Dnig Store. 
FOR SALE EVERYWHERE, 

W. A. STEINMEYER, 



No- 31 SO. MAIN STREET, 

PITT8T0N, PA. 



^^ Wholesale and Ketail Dealar, 



GEO. SMITH'S 

Billiard Parlors 

AND SALOON, 

People's Bank Building, North Main St., 

PITThTO?f, PA. 



Four fine Griffith Tables. Best Brands of 
Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 



Dealer in General Merchandise 

WINES AND LIQUORS AT WHOLESALE. 

126 A 128 South Main St., 

PITTSTON, Pa. 



(15) 












\ &c. 



ijiii...ni..i p mi.« i » . ..i. ^nTT.Trj-.ai ii.i. — iii.-m ■■■»Hall^lJUMJlln.^ll^l^■t;^'^^p^l^■^ll 



A full and complete stocli in every department, 
at prices that ivill convince every one that we are 




f\\ 






I 



■c^Ji 






LINDSAY & LIDDLE 



119 Wyoming Avenue, 



9 Xf JLt 



BRANCH STORE AT 
1 1 North Main Street, 

PiTTSTON, Pa. 

(i6) 



w 



YOMING 



V 



ALLEY. 



A SKETCH OF ITS EARLY ANNALS. 



{^Compiled from Isaac A. Chapnafi^s History of Wyoming.'] 




"TTTYOMING is the final corruption of Maugh/im-vanie, signi- 



fying, in the dialect of the Delaware Indians, " large flats 
without trees " — in ihe "Mingo" or Iroquois dialect, SgnhontO' 
tcanno, meaning the same. 

Indian traditions make the ancestors of the "Delawares" to have 
come from the Northwest. They displaced the "Allegenni," 
whom they found in possession, and occupied the country from 
the Hudson to the Potomac. The " Shawanese " came from the 
South, settled on the Wabash river, and subsequently divided, 
part remaining there and part coming to Wyoming. The ''Nan- 
ticokes came from Maryland and settled in the lo"ver end of the 
valley. These tribes all willingly or unwillingly acknowledged 
the dominion of the Six Nations, or confederacy of New York In- 
dians which embraced the Oneidas, Oaondagas, Senecas, Cayugas, 
Mohawks and Tuscaroras. 

When William Penn purchased the Delaware title to the lands 
below the Kitatiany or Blue Mountain, he made inquiry after 
•other titles and subsequently learned that the Six Nations claimed them. A council was 
therefore called, which met at Philadelphia in 1742. The result of this council was the expul- 
sion of the Delawares from the country below the mountains and their settlement in and 
about Wyoming. 

Soou after this event the " Grasshopper War" broke out between the Shawanese and the 
Delawares. This resulted in the expulsion of the former from the Valley, leaving the Dela- 
wares in possession. . 

The French having built a chain of fortresses along the western frontier, succeeded in win- 
ning to their interests the Shawanese and Delawares. This led to a council at Easton, in 
"which a treaty of peace was concluded between the Governor of Pennsylvania, on the one 
hand, ^nd Tedeuscund, sachem of the Delawares, on the other. Subsequently, another grand 
council was held at the same place, in which all the Indian tribes of New York and Pennsyl- 
vania were represented, and the peace was confirmed by a general treaty in the year 1753. 

After this brief review of Indian history of Wyoming, we now come to its "white" history. 
To understand this, it is necessary to glance at the several charters from the British Crown. 

March 3, 1620, King James I. gave a charter, called theTlymouth Charter, embracing the 
territory in America between the fortieth and forty-eighth parallels of north latitude, and run- 
ning through to the South Sea or Pacific Ocean. The Plymouth Company conveyed their 
rights to the Duke of Warwick, who in turn transferred them to Lords Say, Seal and Brook, 
in 1631. Under these noblemen Connecticut was settled, and the Colony acquired the title 
in 1644. The Dutch, however, had discovered the Hudson river, and taken possession of th3 
adjacent territory, as far up as Albany, in 1614. The General Court at Hartford now ad- 
dressed a petition to the King, and on the 23d of April, 1662, His Majesty granted a charter to 



1 8 EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 

the Colony of Connecticut., embracing "all the territory bounded north by the south line of 
Massachusetts, south by the sea, and running on the line of the Massachusetts Colony to the- 
South Sea." 

March 12, 1664, King Charles II. granted a patent to the Duke of York, and on Novem- 
ber 28, 1683, a mutual survey, jointly made by the Colony of Connecticut and the Province of 
New York, and confirmed by both parties (24th February 1685,) fixed the western boundary 
of Connecticut at a point twenty miles east of the Hudson liver. Thus it will be seen that the- 
Connecticut Charter, two years older than the Duke of York's, embraced the territory between 
the present parallels of Connecticut, continued through the country "to the South Sea," saving- 
and reserving the Dutch settlements which had been expected in the purchase from the Ply- 
mouth Company. March 4, 1681, King Charles II. granted a Charter to William Penn for ter- 
ritory "from a point on the Delaware river, twelve miles north of New Castle, unto the three- 
and-fortieth degree of north latitude, and extending westward five degrees in longitude from 
the said eastward bounds." This charter overlapped the north bounded of Connecticut and 
embraced Wyoming, thus establishing two conflicting claims, under European titles, but, as 
yet, neither party having extinguished the Indian title. 

Observe that the modes of acquiring and possessing new lands, under the charters of Con- 
necticut and Pennsylvania, were essentially diflferent. In Pennsylvania the lands were all 
granted to one individual, and hejwssessed the exclusive rii:ht of purchasing of the Indians. 
In the Connecticut Charter the lands were granted to the inhabitants of the colony in their 
collective capacity, and all possessed an equal right to purchase. In Pennsylvania, claimants 
held of the "Proprietaries." In Connecticut, individuals or companies, and generally some 
religious corporation, took possession, j^urchased the Indian title, and then settled by town- 
ships. 

During the year 1753 a number of Connecticut people associated themselves together as the 
Susquehanna Company, for the purpose of purchasing lands of the Indians and forming set- 
tleme'nts at Wyoming. James Hamilton, Proprietary Governor of the Province of Pennsylva- 
nia, at once wrote to Sir William Johnson, His Majesty's Indian Agent for the Colonies, de- 
siring his good ofiSces to preyent a purchase of the Indians by the Susquehanna Company at 
the approaching council to be held at Albany. 

The agents of the Susquehanna Company, however, appeared at Albany and efiected a pur- 
chase July 11, 1754. This purchase included Wyoming, and embraced the territory as far 
west as the heads of the Allegheny river. The commissioners of Pennsylvania to the Albany 
Council had many conferences with the Indians while there, a report of which conferences is 
entered on the minutes of council at Philadelphia, Aug. 6, 1754, as follows : "The Commis- 
sioners of Pennsylvania, having a private treaty with the Six Nations while at Albany, for the 
purpose of buying lands, their report was likewise read and ordered to be entered." The Sus- 
quehanna Company at this time consisted of 673 persons, ten of whom lived in Pennsylvania, 
and they proposed at once to divide up the purchase among the claimants. 

The treaty at Albany above referred to, as concluded with the Six Nations oy Pennsylvania, 
was — " for all the said river Susquehanna, an d on both sides thereof, eastward as far as the 
springs thereof, and westward to the setting sun, and from the mouth of said river up to- 
Tayamantesatche or the Blue Mountain." This deed was signed by twenty-three chiefs of the 
Oneidas, Onondagas, Senecas and Tuscaroras. The purchase did not, however, include Wyo- 
ming, which they utterly refused to sell. 

In August, 1762, about two hundred persons left Connecticut, and, under the authority of 
the Susquehanna Company, commenced a settlement at Wyoming, building their block house 
and cabins at the mouth of Mill Creek, where that stream is now spanned by the aqueduct of 
the Pennsylvania canal. 

The Proprietaries of Pennsylvania about thi^ time submitted their claims to the judgment of 
the English Attorney General. This functionary (afterwards Lord Camden) replied, taking 
grounds in their favor, and assuming that the settlement of Connecticut's boundaries with 
New York barred all claim west of the line thereby dratvn parallel to the Hudson river and 
twenty miles east of it. 

The government of Connecticut now proceeded to submit their claims to eminent counsel in 

England, who decided " that the agreement between Connecticut and New York as to their 

mutual boundaries could in no wise aflfect any claims which either party might have in other 

quarters, and as the charter to Connecticut ante-dated that to William Penn by eighteen yearS;, 

the Crown could make no effectual grant of a territory so recently granted to others." 



EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 



19 



Hitherto the surrounding Indians had acted in a friendly manner, but now a change was to 
come. Tedeuscund, the great Delaware Sachem, was about this time murdered by a party of 
the Six Nations, in revenge for his assumed superiority at the Great Council in 1758, andj. 
with Indian cunning, this deed of treachery was charged upon the whites. 

The consequences were soon apparent Oa the 16th of October, 1763, while busy in the- 
fields, the settlers were attacked, twenty killed and the village burned. The survivors— men, 
women and children— fled to the mountains, and in their nakedness and distress commenced a 
sad journey of two hundred and fifty miles on foot to Connecticut. 

Peace between England and France having this year been concluded, the government of the 
former instructed its agents to cultivate peace with the Indians. 

Accordingly a general treaty was concluded with them at Fort Stanwix, in October, 1768, at 
which ths Proprietaries of Pennsylvania procured adeed from the Six Nations for all the lands 
within the province ot Pennsylvania not hitherto sold. This purchase included Wyoming and 
all the territory previously sold to the Susquehanna Company. 

A meeting of that company was now called, and it was resolved that " forty persons at once 
proceed to Wyoming and commence settlement as proprietors, to be followed by two hundred 
more in the Spring, and that £200 be raised to supply them with implements and necessaries.'" 
The resolution also ■ ..^-^^^?^.S^^^i^-gS?l^SH..._ _. 

designated Isaac ,*hs**^-- iiTl^rAfSs^^^^^^^^SJS^^i^Isiii-jS^'jf. 

Tripp, Benjamin 
Follett, John Jen- 
kins, Wm. Buck 
and Benj. Shoe- 
maker a special 
committee to super- 
vise the govern- 
ment and superin- 
tendence of the 
colony. This Com- 
mittee were to be 
increased to nine 
men on the arrival 
of the Spring rein- 
forcements, and the 
Committee, as thus 
constituted, were 
clothed with full 
executive, legisla- 
tive and judicial 
powers, sui)ject, 
however (as in the 
Spartan govern- old forty fokt. 

ment of Lycurgus), to the supreme authority of the Company, which was to be exercised at 
Hartford. 

Alarmed at these energetic movements, which evidently "meant business," the Proprietaries, 
of Pennsylvania, acting by John Peun, leased to Charles Stewart, Amos^ Ogden and John Jen- 
nings, one hundred acres of land at Wyoming, " for seven years with authority to establish a 
trading post, and to defend it and those claiming under them from all enemies whatsoever." 

Stewart at once proceeded to lay out the valley into two manors— one on the east side of the 
Susquehanna, extending from Nauticoke, to Monockonock Island, to be called "Manor of 
Stoke," and the other on the west side, of the same dimensions, to be called " Manor of Sun- 
bury." The Pennsylvania party took possession of the improvements from which the Indians 
had driven the Connecticut men, and commenced new improvements at the same point in 
January, 17()!). 

On the eighth of the following month, the " forty" Connecticut men arrived and found 
Stewart and Ogden in possession of a fortified block house at Mill Creek. The Connecticut 
party at once besieged the block house. After some time, a parley took place, during which 
Jennings, by stratagem, captured three of the principal men of the Yankees, and took them to 
Easton. They were, however, .soon released on bail, returned to Wyoming, and, with their 
companions, proceeded to erect a substantial stockade, surrounded by ramp.irt and entrench- 
ment, calling it "Fort Durkee." 




:20 EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 

Jennings assembled a large party of Pennsylvania men, and arrived at Wyoming about the 
'last of May, 17(39, bat found the Connecticut people too well prepared to venture an attack. 
Thus, ready for coming events, the latter began their agricultural operations for the season. 
The,Susquehanna Company now despatched Col. Dyer and Major Elderkin to Philadelphia, 
and laid before Benjamin Chew, Esq., agent for the Proprietaries, a proposition *' to settle all 
disputes by a court of law to be constituted by the parties, or by referees mutually chosen, 
whose decisions should be conclusive." This proposition was rejected, as military preparations 
were now on foot for the reduction of the Connecticu'' settlement. 

A formal letter of instructions was made out by th e Pennsylvania government, and directed 

to the Sheriff of Northampton county, directing him to raise the posse of the county, proceed 

'to Wyoming and dispossess all persons holding any other title than that of the Proprietaries. 

Amos Ogdeu, with a parfy of forty men, hearing of Jennings' approach, surprised and cap- 

'tured several of the Yankee families, among whom was that of Col Durkee. Jennings arrived 

•before the fort with two hundred men and a four-pounder cannon, and proceeded to reduce it. 

This was effected in a few days. 

By the articles of capitulation the fort and buildings were to be given up to Ogden and 
Jennings, it being promised that the property, homes and crops should be unhurt, and should 
be guarded by seventeen of the Connecticut men, left for that purpose. 

As soon as the surrender was complete, the Pennsylvanians commenced an indiscriminate 

• plunder of everything valuable, driving off the cattle and swine towwards the Delaware 

• and the seventeen men left in possession fled for their lives, leaving their foes in undisputed 
mastery. 

In February, 1770, a number of Lancaster county men, sympathizing with the Connecticut 
settlers, came up to the valley. These were commanded by Lazarus Stewart, and were joined 
by a few of the returned settlers. They invested Fort Durkee, and captured it with little op- 
' position. They now proceeded to the reduction of Ogden's block house, and for that purpose 

• erected another immediately opposite it on the west side of the river, mounting the four- 
pounder as a siege gun. 

Finding the range too great, they transported their artillery again to the east side, threw up 
a breastwork, and soon succeeded in burning the attached storehouse and capturing the gar- 
rison of the block house, Ogden and his party were allowed to depart, leaving six occupants 
in one house to take charge of the effects of the Pennsylvanians. 

Governor Penn and the Proprietaries now proceeded to raise a force of over one hundred 
-and sijcty men, which was placed under Ogden's command, and they, in company with Aaron 
■Van Campen and other civil officers representing the State authority, marched upon the Valley. 

iFrom the summit of "Penobscot" this party reconnoitred the flats, saw the settlers disperse 
>to theif labors on the morning of Sept. 22, 1770, and at once made such disposition as enabled 
'them to capture the whole Connecticut party, who were marched to Easton jail, while Ogden 
-and his men proceeded to gather the haryest and plunder the settlement of everything movable. 

The Connecticut settlers having now about disappeared from the disputed territory, the 
Pennsylvanians garrisoned the fort and considered themselves secure for the winter. 

Delusive hope ! On the morning of December ISth, at three o'clock, a " huzza for King 
•George ! " was heard within the stockade, and the garrison awaking found Stewart with 
'thirty men in complete possession. These immediately drove the Pennsylvanians to the 
'mountains, and again garrisoned and victualed the fort for another struggle. . 

The Judges of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania now issued warrants for the arrest of 
'Lazarus Stewart and his companions, directed to the sherifl' of Northampton county. He 

• raised a posse, and arriving at Wyoming on the 18th day of January, 1771, demanded admit- 

> tance into the fort. 

Stewart, looking over the parapet, informed him that none but fri nds could be admitted ; 
■ that Wyoming was under the jurisdiction of Connecticut, and that no authority emanating 
'from Pennsylvania could be recognized. 

The sheriff's party then fired upon the fort, and the fire was instantly returned, killing 
' Nathan Ogden, a brother of the Pennsylvania leader, Stewart that night abandoned the fort 
'to the possession of twelve of his own men. These were captured and marched to Easton, 

• leaving the fort in possession of Ogden. 

1 About the 6th of July, Capt. Zebulon Butler, with seventy Connecticut men, arrived, and 

> •were soon after joined by Capt, Lazarus Stewart with a reinforcement. Ogden's party, which, 
-with women and children, now airounted to eighty-two, occupied a new fort which they had 
"built upon the river bank a short distance above Fort Durkee and named ''Fort Wyoming," 
I'J'he Coooecticutmen atonoe threw up redo^ bts on both sides of the river, above and below 



EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 2D 

the fort, and a third oa a small hill adjacent, still known as ''Redoubt Hill," thus completing 
the investment. 

Ogden was equal to the emergency. On a moonlight night he tied his clothes in a bundle, 
surmounted it with his hat, and attaching a cord, permitted the bundle to float behind him 
while he swam down the river. Thus drawing the bjisieger's fire, he escaped, arrived safe at 
Philadelphia, and soon obtained assistance for further enterprises. 

The Council at once resolved that one hundred men should be raised for the relief of Wyo- 
ming and voted £300 expen8e money. This force was in two divisions, one commanded by 
Captain Joseph Morris, the other by Captain John Dick, and all under command of Col. 
Asher Clayton. But these were ambushed by the besiegers, and disparsed with the loss of 
four pack horses loaded with provisions, twenty-two men only succeeding in their attempt to 
enter the fort. 

The siege was now pushed with all diligence, and on the 14th of August the fort surren- 
dered, Clayton, Ogden and the Peunsylvanians agreeing to remove from the Valley. 

The government of Pennsylvania, finding that the Connecticut people had strongly forti- 
fied themselves, and that their number was rapidly increasin.', gave orders for withdrawing 
the troops, and left the settlers in quiet possession. 

Again this beautiful Valley enjoyed a short respite of repose and peace, which was im- 
proved in the most eti'ective manner. They laid out townships, formed settlements, erected 
fortifications, levied and collected taxes, passed laws for the direction of civil suits, and ■ 
established a militia. 

Neither Greece nor Rome, in their happiest days, could boast a government more purely- 
democratic. The meeting of the Proprietors formed the Grand Council, to which an appea 
■was in all cases reserved. Its records formed the Statute Book of the infant colony. The 
exeutive power vested in a committee of settlers, one from each township, deciding upon all 
matters ciyil and criminal. The judicial power inhered in the above bodies, and a third, or 
" Ordinary Court," consisting of three freeholders, who were to decide all questions arising 
between two or more individuals and make return to the " Committee of Settlers," who issued . 
execution to the proper constable. Such was the simple and eflectual scheme of government 
" for the well ordering and governing the proprietors and settlers on the Susquehanna Pur- 
chase." 

[The author here remarks : — Several of the laws passed at this time have the appearance o 
great severity, but may have been justified by the circumstances of the times. One, in par- 
ticular, passed at Wilkes-Barre, December 28th, 1772, provided " that no person or persons, 
settlers or foreigners, shall sell or give to any Indian any spirituous liquors on pain of for- 
feiture of all goods and chattels, rights and efl'ects within this purchase, and also be voted out 
of the company." Allow us U. incjuire en passant how much has the lapse of one hundred 
and six years enabled the children to improve on the legislation of the fathers?] 

The General Assembly of Connecticut now passed an Act creating a Board of Commission- 
ers, with full powei to make final settlement of all boundaries and claims in dispute. Accord- 
ingly, Col. Dyer, Dr. Johnson and Mr. Strong were commissioned, and in December, 1773, laid 
their case before the Council of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, reciting in full the boundaries 
described in the Connecticut charter of 1662, and adding, '-which limits and boundaries do in- 
clude a considerable part of the land afterwards granted by the Crown to Sir William Pcnn, 
in 1081, and which constitute a part of the Province of Pennsylvania, as now claimed by the 
Proprietaries," also adding, "and we, on the part of the said colony, are now ready to agree 
on Commissioners to run the lines of the patent, and execute the same in the most effective 
manner." 

Governor Penn, in his reply of December 17th, declined to enter into any negotiations on 
the subject, declined to join in an application to Ilis Majesty for the appointment of Commis- 
sioners to settle the matter, and contented himself with the expression of an opinion that " the 
claim made by your government of any lands westward of New York is without the least 
foundation." 

Much correspondence subsequently passed between the Commissioners and the Governor, 
eliciting, ho.Tever, no new facts or principles. Among these letters was one from the Governor, 
which laid stress upon the purchase made of the Indians at Fort Stanwix, in 1768. To this 
the Commissioners reply : — " It were easy to observe that the purchase from the Indians by. 
the Proprietaries, and the sales by them made, were they c^en more ancient than they are, 
could add no strength to the Pennsylvania title, since the right of pre-emption from the: 
natives was by the royal grant exclusively vested in the Colony of Connecticut." 



■2 2 



EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 




BRANT, THE MOHAWK CHIEF. 



Oq the 17th of January, 1774, the General Assembly of Pennsylvania addressed the Governor, 
earnestly requesting him " to use every effort to call the claimants before His Majesty in Coun- 
cil, and bring the claim to an immediate decision," but the King of England had by this time 
more important matters to settle with his American subjects. 

The colonists now abandoned the hope of being constituted a separate colony by royal grant, 
and applied to the General Assembly of Connecticut for closer political annexation. An Act 
■was accordingly passed in January, 1774, by which the Susquehanna settlements, bounded 

north and south by the charter limits, and ex- 
tending fifteen miles beyond Wyoming, were 
constituted the " Town of Westmoreland," 
and attached to the County of Litchfield. 
From this date Wyoming ceased to exist as a 
separate '"Republic," the laws of Connecticut 
being extended over her in full force. 

These proceedings having been formally 
communicated to Governor Penn, he issued 
his proclamation forbidding all persons from 
attending " the Town Meeting thus notified 
by Zebulon Butler, and from settlingany lands 
at Wyoming without consent of the Proprieta- 
ries." This proclamation appears to have 
been regarded by the inhabitants of the "Town 
of Westmoreland" wiih as little attention as 
they would a royal edict from the King of 
Spain. 

A Yankee settlement commenced on the 
West Branch at Muncy, was attacked Sept 
28lh, 1775, by militia from Northumberland 
— part dispersed and part conveyed prisoners to Sunbury. Boats from Wyoming trading 
down the river were also waylaid and plundered near the later place. 

Alarmed by the re-kindling of civil war, at a time so inopportune, Congress at Philadel- 
phia, resolved "that the Assemblies of the said colonies be requested to take the most effectual 
steps to prevent such hostilities." 

No orders, however, came from any quarter's for the release of the prisoners at Sunbury, 
and the inhabitants of that good town became alarmed lest a detachment from Wyoming 
should descend the river for their rescue. 

Wm. Plunkett, who had been a principal sharer in the booty obtained by pillage on the 
West Branch, joined with others in an address to the Governor of Pennsylvania, setting forth 
the rapid growth of the Yankee settlements, and the pressing danger from the apprehended 
rescue, and asking the authorization of a military expedition to exterminate the Wyoming 
people. 

Nothing could have been more in consonance with tlie gubernatorial desire, and orders 
were immediately issued to Plunkett to raise " the posse," expel the Connecticut men, and 
" restore peace and good order in the country." 

Seven hundred men were raised, and with their munitions and supplies on a large boat, 
the little army of Penasylvanians started from '•" Fort Augusta " in all the " pomp and cir- 
cumstance of glorious war," early in December, 177.5, bound up the river for the conquest of 
Yankeedom. 

Arrived at the lower end of the Vallej', and advancing through Nanticoke Gap, the force 
was confronted by a rude breastwork erected at the point now represented by the inlet lock of 
the canal on the west side of the river. Here the Cotinecticut men were securely intrenched, 
and poured an effective tire upon the invaders. The latter were thrown into the utmost confu- 
sion, and hastily crossed the river with their boat. Here they were ambushed, and again 
routed by another Yankee squad. Plunkett threw himself prostrate in the boat to avoid a 
galling fire, and, ordering a retreat, the whole force retired from the fitld, leaving it to the 
victors. 

Thus ended the last attempt of Colonial Pennsylvania to possess herself of Wyoming. 
These desultory warfares were now to be interrui)ted for a time by a struggle of a more ex- 
tended and eventful character. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 



23 




WYOMING BATTLE-GROUND. 



24 EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 

The following year (1776) commenced a new era in the history of the American colonies, 
A census was taken, and the Westmoreland settlements were found to contain five thousand! 
souls. Their militia amounted to 1100 men capable of bearing arms, and three companies were- 
enlisted at Wyoming for service in the army of the colonies. Regular garrison duty was per- 
formed in the seVeral fortifications and a patrol was on duty night and day through the Valley. 
Early in the spring ot 1778 a force of about eight hundred men, composed of British regulars, 
Torips and Indians, under command of Colonel John Butler, assembled at Niagara and marched 
for the destruction of Wyoming. The Indians numbered four hundred, and were commanded 
by Joseph Brant ("Thayendanegea"),a warlike chief of mixed blood. [The author's statement 
here is disputed. The late Eleazer Carey has often assured his step-son (C. I. A. C.) that 
Brant was not at Wyoming, asserting that, while in early youth among the New York Indians, 
he had frequently heard it claimed, and never denied, that the Indians weie led by the 
chiefs called " Little Beard" and " Blue Throat."] 

Embarking on boats and rafts at Tioga Point,the invaders floated down the Susquehanna,, 
landed below the mouth of Bowman's Creek, which enters the river opposite the present flour- 
ishing village of Tunkhannock, thence marched across the mountains, and entering the Valley .~ 
took possession of "VVintermoot's," a fortified settlement occupied by a Tory family and situated 
about a mile below " Fort Jenkins," a stockade whose site is now covered by the thriving 
borough of West Pittston. From these headquarters the British commander sent scouting par- 
ties throughout the Valley. Upon the arrival of the enemy, the settlers collected their principal 
strength within a fortification situated on the west bank of the river at a large eddy below Mon- 
ockonock Island. This work had been constructed by forty of the settlers in that vicinity, and 
thence obtained the name of Forty Fort. The garrison amounted to three hundred and sixty- 
eight men. 

About a month previous, messengers had been sent to the commander-in-chief of the- 
Army requesting a detachment for succor. None, ho\^ever, arrived, and on the morning of the 3d' 
of July a council was held to determine the question of immediately attacking the enemy or 
waiting longer for assistance. During this conference five men, citizens of Wyoming, arrived 
at the fort, three of whom had resigned their commissions in the army. These had heard- 
■othing of the messengers. 

The advocates of immediate attack now prevailed in the council, and at dawn of day the 
little baud left the fort and began their march up the Valley. Having proceeded about two- 
miles, they halted to reconnoitre, and volunteers were asked for the service. Abraham Pike 
and an Irish companion (whose name has not been preserved) oifered their services. These 
found the enemy in possession of" Wintermoot's," carousing in supposed security, but on their 
return the scouts met two strolling Indians, by whom they were fired upon, and immediately 
returned the fire without efl^ect. 

Hastening their advance, the little army found the enemy formed in line of battle — their 
left under command of Col. John Butler, resting upon the river's bank, and their right, com- 
posed of Indians and painted Tories, resting upon the swamp which still appears a prominent 
feature in the landscai)e. The settlers immediately deployed and formed in corresponding order 
— the right commanded by Col. Zebulon Butler and Major John Garrett, the left by Col. Na- 
than Denison, supported by Lieut. Col. George Dorrance. 

It was five o'clock and the battle had begun. It was contested for sometime with unflinch- 
ing courage, each man advancing a few steps at every discbarge. The efl"ect was soon apparent 
upon the British line, which was already slowly retiring, when a horrid yell on the left pro- 
claimed that the savages had penetrated the swamp and turned Denison's wing. He now gave 
the order to "fall back," intending to double his line at the point menaced and wheel to the- 
left, pivoting uj)on the centre. This movement was difficult of execution, with raw militia, 
and the order was misunderstood. 

At the same moment the British Colonel Butler succeeded in bringing a party of troops- 
through the bushes on the river's bank and turned the right of the settlers. Thus, enfiladed 
and outflanked, the latter were forced back on each other, and the rout became general.. 
" Stand up to your work, Sir," said Col. Dorrance to one of his men who was wavering while- 
the Indians were sprint;iiig forward with savage yells. " Don't leave me, my children !" cried 
Col. ButL^r ; " stand firm, and the victory is ours ! " But all was of no avail ; the force of num- 
bers told with fearful effect, and the battle was already lost. 

Some of the settlers succeeded in reaching the river, and escaped by swimming; ethers- 
reached the mountains, after the savages (now oc(^upied by plunder) had given up pursuit. 
Many of those who escaj)ed, with the women and children, took refuge in Wyoming. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 



25 



On the next day the combined British and Indian forces appeared there and demanded it» 
surrender. It was stipulated in the articles of capitulation that the garrison was to surrender 
their prisoners and military stores, and remain in the country unmolested. 

Three hundred of the settlers were either killed or missing. Among them were one Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, one Major, ten Captains, six Lieutenants and two Ensigns. 

The conditions of the capitulation were entirely disregarded by the yictors, and every species 
of barbarity wantonly committed. No known adjunct of savage cruelty was unemployed upon 
the defenceless settlement. The village of Wilkes-Barre,then consisting of twenty-three houses^ 
was burned, and men, wives and children separated and borne into captivity. The "remaining 
inhabitants, driven from the Valley, wandered on foot sixty miles through the Great Swamp, 
almost without food or clothing. Numbers perished on the journey, principally women and 
children, some died of their vounds, while others wandered from the path and were lost. 

The Battle and Massacre of Wyoming having produced much ])ublic sensation. General 
Washington sent a detachment of two thousand five hundred men, under command of Gtneral 
John Sullivan, to drive out the British and Indians, restore peace to the valley and lay waste 
the Indian towns of southern New York. This gallant officer arrived with his command oii 
the 22d of June, 1779, and continued in the Valley until the 31st of July. Nine days before, 
a company of Pennsylvania militia, who had marched to the Lackawaxen, were attacked by 
one hundred and forty Indians and defeated with the loss of fifty men. 

At the same time British and Indian parties attacked Freeland Fort above Northumber- 
land, and Minisink on the Delaware, hoping by these diversions to distract Sullivan from 
his purpose. No such re- 
sult occurred. The intrepid 
officer, putting his whole 
force in motion, on the last 
day of July moved from 
his quarters with pack 
horses in front, baggage in 
barges on the river, and 
martial music front and 
rear. He camped the first 
night at Lackawanna, then 
successively at Buttermilk 
Falls, Tunkhanrock, Wil- 
liamson's, Wysauking, She- 
shequin and Tioga, and, 
leavinga garrison at the lat- 
ter place, pushed on to the 
attack of the Indian settle- 
ments. He found the ene- 
my, in number about a 
thousand, entrenched be- 
hind a breastwork at New- 
town (now Elmira), at- 
tacked them August 29th. 
and routed them with con- 
siderable slaughter. H e 
then proceeded through the 
country of the Six Na- 
tions, and laid it waste as 
far as the Genesee rivei^ 
destroying eighteen vil- 
lages, with countless or- 
chards and corn-fields. Re- 
turning by the same loute 
he was received and enter- 
tained with great ceremony by Col. Butler and the settlers who had found their way back. 
The danger of Indian incursions now removed, the inhabitants returned in great numbers 
to Wyoming, where the settlemtn's again flourished and the village was rebuilt. 

The State of Pennsylvania, however, viewed with great displeasure a colony within her 




26 EARLY HISTORY OS WYOMING. 

borders which refused to acknowledge her jurisdiction. She therefore applied to Congress, 
requesting the appointment of a tribunal to determine the dispute between herself and Con- 
necticut. Congress accordingly appointed a board of Commissioners who met at Trenton in 
December, 1782. Connecticut was represented by Dyer, Johnson and Root; Pennsylvania by 
Bradford, Reed, Wilson pnd Sargent. After five weeks of deliberation this body pronounced 
their opinion as follows : 

"We are unanimously of the opinion that the jurisdiction and pre-emption of all land lying 
within the charter bounds of Pennsylvania, and now claimed by the State of Connecticut, 
does of right belong to the State of Pennsylvania." 

How far policy, and not justice, aifected the rendering of this judgment, has never 
transpired. 

The Connecticut settlers now quietly acquiesced, and united in an humble petition to the Gen- 
eral Assembly of Pennsylvania, tendering their allegiance, and asking protection, justice, and 
a confirmation of their claims. This paper is dated January 18, 1783, and bears the endorse- 
ment, " Read January 2Ist, and ordered to lie ou the table." 

February 25th, the assembly appointed William Montgomery, Moses McLean and Joseph 
Montgomery, who were directed " to attend at Wyoming on the 15th of April, act as magis- 
trates, and recommend what measures should be adopted in reference to the Wyoming set- 
tlers." These commissioners reported in favor of a reasonable compensation to those fallen in 
battle against the common enemy, and to those who ''should immediately relinquish all 
claim to the soil and deliver up possession to the rightful owners under Pennsylvania by the 
first of April next." 

Captains Shrawder and Robinson were ordered to march with their companies to Wyoming 
and occupy the forts and the country. The settlers had understood that the question of poli- 
tical jurisdiction had been settled at Trenton, not the question of private ownership. They 
aow saw before thine eyes another scene opening in which they were to be the passive victims 
•of judicial and executive tyranny, enforced by the bayonets of a commonwealth, which 
should have welcomed them with open arms and adopted them as her children. 

The winter cf 1783-4 opened with unexampled severity and continued with uniform cold. 
In March immense masses of snow and ice went off with sudden thaw and rain. The Susque- 
hanna rose to an unprecedented height, inundating the Valley and driving theinhabitants to 
the hills with the loss of a great portion of their produce and property. The president of the 
Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, Mr. Dickinson, addressed the General Assembly 
■asking immediate relief for the suffering people of Wyoming. 

In the midst of this extreme want, two Justices, Patter&on and West, who had accompanied 
the troops to Wyoming, and to whom the Council had entrusted the administration of affairs, 
began a system of extortion and tyranny worthy the darkest ages of the world's history. The 
■unhappy husbandtjan saw his cattle driven ofi", his barns ou fire, and his wife and daughters 
a prey to a licentious soldiery. 

The inhabitants drivep to desperation by their calamities, now began to resist their oppres- 
sors, and refused to comply with the demands of the mock tribunals established by Patterson 
and West. Their resistance enraged the magistrates, and on the I2th of May orders were is- 
•sued to the troops to diiiarm the people. 

Under this pretense, one hundred and fifty families were turned out of their dwellings, 

many of which were burned, and all ages and sexes reduced to the same dreadful destruction. 

Plundered of their remaining property, they were forced out of the Valley and driven by 

the Lackawaxen route to the Delaware country. One shocking instance is mentioned of a 

mother who actually roasted one of her children piecemeal for the sustenance of the others. 

The better feelings of Eennsylvanians, shocked at such barbarities perpetrated upon a de- 
fenceless people, now demanded a rigid investigation, in such tones that the General Assembly 
could not disregard them. Commissioners were sent who examined into the outrages, and 
made a report, which soon led to the withdrawal of the troops and ^proclamation inviting the 
fugitives to return, under promise of protection. 

Many of the troops, however, were still surreptitiously employed by Pennsylvania land 
■claimants. These formed a band of freebooters, who, taking post at Kingston, pillaged the 
surrounding country. They afterward joined Patterson at Fort Wyoming, which the latter 
had named " Fort Dickinson." The inhabitants, for their mutual defence and support, gar- 
risoned themselves at Forty Fort. 

July 20th, 1784, a party of settlers on their wpy to the lower flats were ambushed by Pat- 



EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 2/ 

terson's men, and Chester Pierce and Elisha Garrett, two highly respected young men, shot 
dead. This crowning act of violence aroused a determined spirit of vengeance. 

The people, under lead of Col. John Franklin, collected and laid siege to Fort Dickinson, 
which at that time mounted four pieces of cannon. 

While these events were transpiring, the Council of Pennsylvania were holding under ad- 
visement a new scheme of pacification. John Boyd and John Armstrong were appointed 
Commissioners, with authority "for carrying into execution such measures as shall be judged 
necessary and expedient for establishing peace and good order in the county of Northumber- 
land." Armstrong and Boyd, with a military force commanded by Col. lloore, marched as 
far as Pocono Mountain, where they were met by a party of settlers, commanded by Captain 
John Swift. Desultory firing occurred, killing one of the Pennsylvania party and wounding 
two others, after which the Connecticut men withdrew. 

Armstrong entered the Valley with a small force, and was joined by Magistrates Hewitt, 
Mead and Martin, with a party of men from Northumberland. These together constituted a 
force of about 400 men under Col. Armstrong. This celebrated functionary, who subsequent- 
ly filled the position of Secretary of War and Minister to France, had little stomach for an 
open conflict with the settlers. Through life it was his preference to obtain his objects by 
stratagem and duplicity. Declaring by proclamation that he had come only to protect the 
defenceless and enforce peace, he wheedled the settlers into a conference, took them prisoners, 
and despatched forty, bound with ropes, to Sunbury, and the balance, tied in pairs, to Easton. 
Most of the troops were now discharged, leaving however a sufficient garrison in Fort 
Dickinson, while Armstrong, Patterson and their associates proceeded to gather the harvest 
and appropriate it to their own use. 

Many settlers residing remote from the scene of these events now commenced coming in, 
and appointed a rendezvous at Bowman's Creek. So soon as th« party considered themselves 
strong enough, they set out for the Valley, re-occupied Forty Fort, and commenced opera- 
tions against Armstrong. The latter, after several skirmishes and the capture of a part ot the 
arms and ammunition of the settlers, concluded to repair to Philadelphia to report progress 
and demand reinforcements. 

Sept. 27th, fifteen of the people surrounded the house of Patterson and his commissioners, 
and commencel an assault, which lasted two hours, resulting in the death of Reed and Hen- 
derson, two of the Pennsylvania magistrates. The Ceuncil at Philadelphia, hearing of these 
events, after consultation with Armstrong, ordered that fifty men of the militia of Bucks 
county, and a like number from Berks county, be equipped and despatched to Wyoming, 
" for quieting the disturbances and supporting the eivil authority in that district," appointing 
at the same time John Armstrong to be Adjutant General. 

This enterprise was opposed by John Dickinson, Es,q., President of the Council, who 
set forth his views in a letter still on file ; whereupon the Council resolved " that the 
measures adopted on the 2d inst. be pursued," and on the same day issued a proclamation 
off'eriug a reward of twenty-^five pounds sterling for the apprehension of fifteen of the prin- 
cipal inhabitants of Wyoming. Armstrong met with no little difficulty in organizing the 
second expedition. The opinion was gaining ground that the Connecticut settlers at Wy- 
oming were a persecuted people. He, Lowever, commenced his march with only forty men, 
and arrived in the Valley on the IGtb of October, the settlers retiring into garrison at 
Forty Fort. 

The " Council of Censors" (an institution erected by the first Constitution of Pennsyl- 
vania, and clothed with the sieneral power of revising all legislation, examining the disposition 
of taxes, and generally guarding the popular interest) had made special call for persons and 
papers touching the difficulties at Wyoming. This call was contemptuously refused by the 
General Assembly, but the refusal only confirmed the Censors in their opinion " of the truth 
of tne complaints from Wyoming, and the utter neglect of the Government to protect the op- 
pressed inhabitants." They .say : " And lastly, we regret the fatal example these proceedings 
have set— of private persons, at least e(iually able with their opponents to maintain their own 
cause, procuring the interest of the commonwealth and the aid of the public treasury in their 
behalf. We therefore hold this business up to public censure, to prevent, if possible, further 
instances of bad government which might convulse ana disturb our new formed nation." 

Notwithstanding this remonstrance from so high a source, the Supreme Executive Council, 
in contempt of public opinion, proceeded to exert their utmost endeavors to furnish Armstrong 
with re-enforcements. In this they failed, and the redoubtable leader was compelled to re- 
main with his forty men in the ruins of Fort ckinson, too weak for extended plunder or even 



28 EARLY HISTORY OF WYOMING. 

for a successful attack upon his enemies at Forty Fort. These latter held stubbornly to their 
post while they gathered in the remnant of their crops, meantime joining ia petitions to the 
legislatures both of Pennsylvania and Connecticut. 

As winter approached, Armstrong abandoned the block house, disbanded his troops, and 
returned to Philadelphia. Thus ended the last expedition fitted out by Pennsylvania to per- 
secute and destroy her own peaceful citizens. 

March, 1787, the people of Wyoming, hopeless of any equitable settlement of their 
claims, now offered a compromise, proposing to the General Assembly that if the Commonwealth 
would grant them the seventeen townsLips which had been laid out and settled previous to the 
Decree of Trenton, they would relinquish all claims to other lands on the Susquehanna pur- 
chase. In consideration of this agreement being confirmed by the Assembly, the Pennsylva- 
nia claimants were to relinquish such lands (lying within the same townships) as the State 
had previously granted them. 

Accordingly (28th of March, 1787), a law was passed, complying with the request of the 
inhabitants, and under it Commissioners were appointed to re-survey the lots claimed by the 

settlers, and give them certificates of the regularity of 
their claims. Hence our term, " Certified Tuwiiships." 
These Commissioners— Timothy Pickering, William 
Montgomery and Stephen Balliot, shortly proceeded to 
Wyoming and entered upon their duties. The abduction 
of Pickering and his subsequent rescue were startling 
episodes to vary the scene, but v^f small historic import- 
ance. There was, however, a class of persons of a differ- 
ent character from those concerned in this lawless out- 
rage, to whom the State had sold lands. These viewed 
with intense disgust an act of the Legislature to deprive 
them of their lands in favor of the Connecticut claim- 
ants. Opposition from these was seated and strenuous, 
leading to the repeal of the law — again opening the 
question, and subjecting the country to all the eyils of 
uncertain land tenure. Wisdom and justice, however 
finally prevailed over factious selfishness and greed 
TIMOTHY PICKERING. Pennsylvania had adopted anew Constitution and was 

now governed by a more liberal policy. Petitions poured in for the enactment of some meas- 
ure to make final disposition of the long-vexed question ; and in April, 1789, an act was passed 
for a final settlement of the controversy so far as related to the •' Seventeen Townships." 

By this act, commissioners were appointed, to cause a survey of aU lands claimed by the 
Connecticut settlers, and which had been assigned them previous to the Decree of Trenton, 
to value the lands, to divide them into four classes of lots, aciordiug to quality, to make out 
a ''Certificate" for each claimant, specifying the number, location and quality of his acres 
with attached draft. Also to re-survey all the lands claimed by Pennsylvania claimants- 
within the seventeen townships, which should be released or re-conveyed to the Common- 
wealth, and divide the same into four classes, according to their value. As soon as forty 
thousand acres should be releaned to the State, and the Connecticut settlers claiming to th<? 
same amount should bind themselves to submit to the determination of the Commissioners, 
the law was to take effect. 

The Pennsylvania claimants were to be compensated from the State Treasury at the rate 
of ;?i'e i:Zo;/(n-s per acre for lands of the first class, three dollars per acre tor lands of the 
second class, ./<;% cfy)/*' per acre for lands of the third class, and twenty-five cents for lands of 
the fourth class. The Connecticut claimants were to receive patents from the State confirm- 
ing their lands, on condition of paying tiro dollars per acre for the first class, one dollar and 
twenty cents for the second class, ./?;% cents for the third class, and eight and one third cents for 
the fourth class. Tnus, while the State was selling her wild lands to her other citizens at 
twenty cents per acre, she demanded of the Connecticut settlers a sum which, upon the suppo- 





Luzerne county erected in 1787, and Bradford and Susquehanna counties in their turn--the 
famous " Wvoining Controversy" became a memory of the past, and the " beautiful ^ 'I'l'^y. , 
under a mild and liberal government, enjoyed that repose which a long term of unparallelled 
sufferings rendered necessary to its hapi)iness and prosperity. 



A Century's Progress. 



The re-occupation of Wyoming, after the sweepins: devastation of 1778, began a new epoch 
in its history, and from the time of the adjustment ot the Yankee and Pennamite tronblessoon 
after, we may properly date its settlement, in noting the subsequent almost unexampled pros- 
perity which has marked its history. The recurrence of the one-hundredth anniversary of 
the memorable 3d of July, is therefore an appropriate occasion to review the Valley's progress 
— in the development of our rich mining treasures, the successful establishment of industrial 
enterprises, the construction of railroads and facilities for transportation, the perfection of 
school privileges, and the various other enterprises and influences calculated to promote the 
material and moral welfare ot the people, whose rapidly increasing numbers have been truly 
marvellous. 

POPULATION. 

The annexed statement, compiled from the United States Census, shows the increase of 
population of Luzerne County, per decade, from 1790 to 1870 as compared to the State of Penn- 
sylvania, the United States, and also the seventeen States composing the United States in 
1790. In order to complete the comparison the population is given of territory that has been 
taken from the county since 1790. 
Year 1790 ISOO ISIO 1820 1S30 1S40 1850 1860 i870 1878* 



43 


40 


47 


t4784 




61 


78 




3t 


26 


21 


t 711 


36 


36 


23 


t 881 
t 408 



59,924 


127,053 


96 


112 


30,320 


i53,862 


19 


12 



Population of Luzerne Countv 4,904 12,839 18,109 20 027 27,379 44 006 56,072 90,244 160.9;5 261,486 

Pop. 1-.. Bradford Co. set off 1810 5 777 9 873 16.385 21,415 24,367 26,602 2S,552 

Pop. Susquehanna Co. set off ISIO... 9,960 16,787 21,195 28,688 36,267 37,523 38,573 

Pop. Wyoming Co. set off 1842 10,655 12 540 14,585 16,480 

Total for original area 4,904 1?,839 18,109 35,704 54,039 81,586116,830 163,4 '8 239,625 345,091 

Per cent. Of growth original area 162 41 97 51 51 '" '" '" ''""" 

Per ct. of growth of Luz Co. from 1850... 

" State of Penn 39 34 -20 29 28 

•' United States 35 36 33 34 .33 

" " the 17 States composing the United States in 1790, 

^Estimated at same rate as from i860 to 1870 wliich may be rather too high. 
tPer centage of growth from 1790 to 1870. 

It will be noted that although the counties set off from Luzerne have been of compara- 
tively slow growth, that still the populatioa within the original limits has increased nearly 
seven times the average of the State, over five times that of the United States including 
its increased area, and nearly twelve times that of the seventeen States that represented 
the population of 1790. A comparison of the twelve coal townships of the county shows a 
still more remarkable increase. It is as follows : 

1850 I860 1870 

Population 12 Coal Townsliips 30,510 

Percent, of increase In same 

Population 28 other townships in Luzerne County 25,562 

Per cent, of increase in same 

The only county of the State that shows a greater increase between 1860 and 1870 is 
Venango, in the Oil Regions, which gained 91 per cent, or only 13 per cent, more than Lu- 
zerne, and only 25 per cent, more than her average for eighty years. 

The following statement shows the increase of population of Luzerne Co. as compared 
with the State, the United States, several of the Western States, and several of the Counties 
of Pennsylvania from 1860 to 1870 : 

1P60. 

*U. S and Territories, population 31,443.321 

Pennsylvania, 2,906.215 

■Colorado, 34,277 

Indiana, 1,350,428 

Texas 604,215 

Illinois 1,711,951 

Midiitran 749,113 

Oiesrou .52,465 

Iowa 674 913 

Luzerne County, Pa., 90,244 

Twelve Coal Townships in Luzerne Co., 59,924 

Allruh.nv Co., Pa., 178,831 

Philadelphia 565,529 

Montour County, Pa., 13,053 

Wyoming County, 12.540 

Columbia County, 25.065 

"Land area Increasedlo per cent. 

Should the population of the Twelve Coal Townships continue to increase as rapidly as the 
Average, per decade, from 1850, which was 104 per cent., the result will be as follows : Popu- 



1870. 




38 558.371 


Growth 23 per cent, 


3,521 951 


21 •• 


39.864 


16 


1,680,637 


15 


818,579 


35 


2,539.891 


48 


1,184,059 


53 


90,923 


74 


1.191,020 


77 


160 915 


78 


127,053 


• 112 


162,204 


47 


674,022 


19 


15,344 


18 


14,585 


16 


28,766 


15 



30 A CENTURY S PROGRESS. 

lation, 259,188 in 1880 ; 528.743 in 1890, and 1,078,635 in 1900. If we dare judge the future 
by the past, these results will be reached. It is hard to believe them passible, yet perhaps 
it would have been Just as hard in 1850 when the population of these townships was 30,510> 
to have believed that in 1870 it would be 127,053. 

MANUFACTHRES. 
There are also other influences at work, that if properly cared for, will contribute to the 
same result. The seeds of manufacturing industries have bere been sown in the last few 
years, and their success under the most adverse times that have ever been known to manufac- 
turers, leads to the conclusion that this must become a great manufacturing centre. We have 
n surplus of labor, cheap fuel and a ready market at home and are as near the New York and 
Philadelphia markets as many of the large Elastern manufacturing towns. It is proposed tO' 
utilize our vaat culm piles and thereby furnish power in almost unlimited amount and at such 
a price as to lead to the abandonment of water power, which to reach, is generally done at the 
sacrifice of the other conditions of success. We point with pride to the Wyoming Knitting 
Mills in West Pittston, that, regardless of declining markets, hard times, and the usual draw- 
backs to a new enterprise, have proved to be a complete success, while many of the old estab- 
lishments at Cohoes, run by water power, and having the advantage of a business estab- 
lished in good times, have tailed. The iron and steel works" of the Lackawanna Iron & Coal 
Company, the locomotive works of the Dickson Manufacturing Company, the Scranton Silk 
Manufactory, the Pittston Arms Company, the Union Stove & Manufacturing Company a^ 
Pittston, the lumber mills of the Messrs. J. E. Patterson & Co., at Pittston and Wilkes-Barre 
the Wyoming Shovel Works, the terra cotta establishments at Pittston and Wyoming, the 
Hazard Wire Eope Manufacturing Company, are other examples in this line. We might 
name a few more and then we would be done in a county that the census of 1870 showed to. 
contain a two hundred and fortieth, and now doubtless contains at least a two hundredth part 
of the population of the United States. 

*Taxes in Luzerne county in ISTO, on true valuation, averaged 2 mills 

Pennsylvania " ■• •• ■• &\: ■■ 

Allegheny county •■ •• •• •• 4' •■ 

Bradford and Schuylkill counties (each In 18T0) •■ 4X " 

I" Wyoming county in iSTO, on time valuation •• 5" •• 

Columbia county •• •• •• •• 6 

Philadelphia ■• •■ •• •• 7 

Lycoming county •• •• " •• 9 

*The data from which this statement is made is furnished in the United States Census Re- 
port of 1870, the assessed valuation of Luzerne county being given at S1S,703.1 16, while the 
true valuation was returned at $174,032,720, so that the taxes are about 20 mills on the asses- 
sed or 2 mills on the true valuation. 

THE COAL TRADE. 

We have another statement to make that warrants great expectations in the future. The 
production of coal in tlie United States for the year 1877 is stated to haye been 54, 398, 250' 
tons or about 1:^ tons to each inhabitant. The production of Great Britain for the same year 
is stated to have been 132,000,000 tons, or about 4 tons to each inhabitant, and the home con- 
sumption was about 3i tons per inhabitant. Great Britain produced in 1858, 65 000.000 tons 
of coal or about twentj' per cent, more than is now produced in the United States. The pro- 
duction of coal in Great Britain in 1876 was 133,344,766 tons or more than double the output 
of eighteen years before. Suppose that in twelve years from this time, or in 1890, we put the 
population of the United States at 50,000,000 and the present production of 4 tons per head in 
England is reached, our annual output would then be nearly four times what it now is, or 
200,000,000 tons. The following is a statement of the coal production for the years named, 
in tons of 2240 lbs : 

1820 Production Anthracite coalin the Wyoming region sno 

1830 •• ■• •• •• •• •• lf.,200 

1840 •• •• •• •• •• •• 177,867 

1850 •• •• •• •• •• •• 972 692 

1860 •• •■ • •• •• •• 3,SSS,97a 

1S70 •• •• •• ■• •• •• 8,814,024 

1875 •• ~ •• •• •• •• 11045,998 

1875 •• •• •• •• Ilazleton •• about 2,()00,ooo- 

1875 •• •• •■ In Luzerne Co. •• 1S,04.'>,99S 

1S7T '• •• •• •• In Pennsylvania 2.-3.6i9,9ii 

187T •• Bituminous " •• T2,.5()o.ooo 

187T •• •• •• balance of tlie U. 8 ls,27s;W9^ 

187T ■ •• of all kinds in the United States .54 3^)8 250 

187T •• of coal in Great Britain i:!2,ooo,ooo 

1870 •• •■ the world 197,.'i57.499- 

18TI •• •• ■• 247 092.701 

1872 •• •• •• 2.58,141,623 

1873 •• •• •• 207,7^7,179 

1874 •• •• •• 202,785 029 

IS75 •• •• •• 272 2(!0,9fi() 

1876 •■ •• •• 27(),S:iO,9G5 

Square miles of coal In the United States 192,000 

•■ Great Britain 11900 

•• the world 293,800 

Luzerne county produces about one-eighieenth of the entire production of the globe ; over 
one-fourth of that of the United States, and oyer one-half the Anthracite produced in Penn'a. 



A CENTURY S PROGRESS. 3I 

PITTSTON. 

This place is situated at the head of the Wyoming Valley at the junction of the Lacka- 
wanna and Susquehanna rivers, and is overlooked, as is the whole valley, by Campbell's 
Ledge. It is GV hours from New York, 6 hours from Philadelphia, 9 miles from Scranton, 
3 miles from Wyoming, and 8 miles from Kingston and Wilkes-Barrc. Thirty-six passenger 
trains leave and arrive daily as follows : Ten ou the U. L. & W. R. II , Bloomsburg Divi- 
sion ; 16 on the Lehigh Valley Railroad ; 10 on the Central Railroad of New Jersey. Thi& 
place is now a trading centre for about 24,000 people. The United Slates census shows the 
following population, nearly all of whom get their mails at the Pittston Postoffice : 

ISOO 1870 

Pittston Borough, area about Pa square miles, population 3 ('.^2 6,7H0 increase 84 per cent. 

West Pittston •• 1 •• 599 1,416 •■ 136 

Pittston Township ■>,"b:i 4,447 

Jenkins Township 1.574 2,505 

Total s,Gos 13,128 increase 76 per cent. 

Allowing the same rate of growth to 1878, 7 3-5 per cent, per year, or 60 per cent, for 
eight years (which is more than three times the averaire of the State or the U. S. for the same 
time) and we have a trading popul.ttion of 24,204 in a territory in which the buildings are 
nearly continuous, although not forming an incorporated city. Neither does this come trom 
increasing the area, which so frequently accounts for a sudden and rapid growth. Compare 
this with any other town, east or west, where the boundaries haye not been enlarged. 

WEST PITTSTON. 

In 1852 this now beautiful village contained hut three houses. It is now a place of about 
3,000 inhabitants, and is one of the most desirable places of residence, to be found. There is 
nol a drinking saloon in the place. They have been kept out by public sentiment alone, which 
shows the character of its inhabitants. It is a village of homes. All are neat and tasteful, 
with handsome yards, flowers and trees, and everything to make them look pleasant and at- 
tractive. The borough occupies an area of ab«ut one square mile and is nicely laid out with 
broad streets and avenues. It is well supplied with water and gas — the former conveyed to the 
top of the highest houses. This town is connected to Pittston, where its residents mainly have 
their business, by one new railroad bridge and two handsome wagon and foot bridges. These 
span the Susiuehanna, which at this point is over 1000 feet wide! 




JONES LAKE, SWITCHBACK RAILROAD. 
Engraved expressti/ Jor Hachelder's "Popular Hesorts, and How to Reach Thenu" 



Points of Interest. 



WYOMING MONUMENT. 



The imposing column which marks the place of sepulture of most of those slain in the 
Battle and Massacre of Wyoming is alwa)'S an object of interest to visitors to the Valley. 
Those slain in the battle were necessarily left upon the field where they fell until some 
three months after, when a detachment of soldiers under Lieut. John Jenkins, gathered 
up the unrecognizable remains and interred them in a common grave, near the main 
road through the present village of Wyoming. Repeated efforts to provide for the erec- 
tion of a monument to the fallen heroes were successful, and it was not until the 3d of 
July, 1833, that the corner stone was laid — Elisha Biackman and Samuel Carey, two 
veterans of the battle, taking part in the imposing ceremonies. From that time the 
patriotic enterprise languished, until the ladies of the valley finally took the matter in 
hand, organized the " Luzerne County Monumental Association," and in 1S46 succeeded 
in completing the structure. 

The monument is of Luzerne County granite, and is sixty-two and a half feet high. 
Upon three marble slabs imbedded in the pedestal is the following inscription and list 
of those then known to have fallen in the battle : 

" Duke et decorum est pro patria niori." 

" Near this spot was fought, on the afternoon of Friday, the third day of July, 1778, The Battle of 
Wyoming, in which a small band of patriotic Americans, chiefly the undisciplined, the youthful, and the 
aged, spared by inefficiency from the distant ranks of the republic, led by Colonel Zebulon Butler and 
Colonel Nathan Denison, with a courage that deserved success, boldly met and bravely fought the com- 
bined British, tory and Indian force of thrice their number. Numerical superiority alone gave success 
to the invader, and widespread havoc, desolation, and ruin marked his savage and bloody footsteps 
through the valley. This Monument, commemorative of these events, and in memory of the actors in 
them, has been erected over the bones of the slain by their descendants and others, who gratefully ap- 
preciate the services and sacrifices of their patriotic ancestors. 

LIST OF KILLED: 

Officers: Lieut. -Col. Geo, Dorrance ; Major Jonathan Wait Garrett ; Captains. James Bidlack, Jr., 
Aholiab Buck, Robert Durkee, Rezin Geer, Joseph Whittlesey, Dethic Hewitt, William McKaraghan, 
Samuel Ransom, Lazarus Stewart, James Wigton ; Lieutenants, A. Atherton, Stoddart Bowen, Aaron 
Gaylord, Timothy Pierce, Perrin Ross, Elijah Shoemaker, Lazarus Stewart, Jr., Asa Stevens, Flavius 
Waterman, James Wells; Ensigns, Jeremiah Bigford, Asa Gore, Silas Gore, Titus Hinman, Jonathan 

Otis, William White. Privates: Jabez Atherton, Christ. Avery, Aeke, A. Benedict, Jabez 

Beers, Samuel Bigford, Elias Bixbv, David Bixby, John Boyd, John Brown, Thomas Brown, William 
Buck, Joseph Budd, Asa Bullock, Henry Bush, John Caldwell, Isaac Campbell, Josiah Cameron, Joseph 
Cary, Joel Church, James Coffrin, William Coffrin, Samuel Cole, Robert Comstock, [three] brothers 
Cook, Christopher Cartright, John Courtright, Anson Coray, Rufus Coray. Jenks Coray, Samuel 
Crocker, Joseph Crocker, Jabez Darling, D. Denton, Conrad Davenport, Anderson Dana, James Di- 
vine, George Downing, Levi Dunn, William Dunn, Ducher, Benjamin Finch, John Finch, Dan- 
iel Finch, Elisha Fish, Cornelius Fitchett, Eliphalet Follett, Thomas basen, John Franklin, Thomas 
Fuller, Stephen Fuller, Gardner, George Gore, Green, Samuel Hutchinson, William Ham- 
mond, Silas Harvey, Benjamin Hatch, Cyprian Hebard, Levi Hicks, James Hopkins, Nathaniel How- 
ard, John Hutchins, Israel Inman, Elijah Inman, Joseph Jenning, Samuel Jackson, Robert Jameson, 

Henry Johnson, Lester, Joshua Landon, Daniel Lawrence, William Lawrence, Francis Ledyard, 

James Lock, Conrad Lowe, Jacob Lowe, Nicholas Manvill, Job Marshall, Nero Matthewson, C. McCar- 
tee, Ale.x. McMillan, Robert Mclntire, Andrew Millard, John MurpTiy, Joseph Ogden, John Pierce, 

Abel Palmer, Silas Parke, William Parker, Henry Pencil, Noah Pettebone, Jr., Jeremiah Ross, 

Reynolds, Elisha Richards, Elias Roberts, Enos Rcckwav, Timothy Rose, James Shaw, Constant Searle, 
Abel Seely, Joseph Shaw, Abraham Shaw, Darius Spaiford, Levi Spencer, James Spencer, Eleazar 
Sprague, Aaron Stark, Daniel Stark, Reuben Staples, Rufus Stevens, James Stevenson, Naler Swead, 
Ichabod Tuttle, John Van Wee, Abraham \"angorder, Elihu Waters, Bartholomew Weeks, Jonathan 
Weeks, Philip Weeks, Peter Wheeler, Stephen Whiton, Esen Wilcox, John Williams, Elihu Williams, 

Jr., Rufus Williams, Azibah William, John Ward, John Wilson, Parker Wilson, Wade, William 

Woodringer, Ozias Yale ; Gershom Prince (colored.) 

The number of names in the above list is 164, while the best authorities estimate the 
total number of slain at from 250 to 300. According to ofTicial reports to the British 
government, Brant was credited by them with 227 scalps, taken about that time, and the 
Indian chieftain was paid a bounty on each by that government. A committee appointed 
during the preparations for the observance of the Centennial Anniversary, to ascertain 
as many of the missing names as possible, have obtained about 30 of them, which will 
be added to the list as given above. 



POINTS OK INTEREST. 

AT WYOMING MONUMENT. 

By Susan E. Dickinson. 



33 



O, beautiful vision of summer delight ! 

O, marvelous sweep of the circling hills ! 
Where sunshine and shadow contend on the height 

And a deeper green follows the path of the rills 
As they leap to tlie valley, whose gold and green 
Add the finishing charm to the exquisite scene. 

I stand on the spot where the brave ones sleep. 
Whose memory makes this a sacred vale ; 

The century-olden shadows sweep 

From my backward gaze, and the mystic veil 

Of the Past uplifts, to reveal once more 

That vision of blood in the days of yore. 

O, patriot souls ! from your home above, 
Do ye see the land that ye loved at rest ? 

Can its wealth of blessing your spirits move 
To an added gladness among the blessed ? 

So I lain would hope, as I win release 

From weariness, breathing this air of peace — 



A peace that deepens— a peace that flows 

Like the waves of a river that seeks the sea ; 
Enfolding the heart in a charmed repose, 

.As the spell of some wonderful harmony- 
Breathed out from Beethoven's soul and brain, 
Swelling, and sinking, and rising again. 

Far oflT, when the tidal rush and spray 
Of our hurrying life the spirit whelm. 

The treasured charm of this golden day 
Will memory bring from her silent realm — 

Its sunshine and shadow, its odor and balm. 

Its freshness and verdure, its blessing of calm. 

O, beautiful Wyoming ! lingering still. 
By the loveliness spell-bound, I pause in fare- 
well ; 
May the winter touch lightly each verdure-crown- 
ed hill 
Where summer is weaving her 'wildering spell, 
And each summer to come on thy valley outpour 
A more radiant bloom from its bountiful store. 



QUEEN ESTHER'S OR BLOODY ROCK. 

None of the tragic events connected writh the struggle of Jul}' 3, 1778, retain a strong- 
er hold upon the popular mind than the treacherous and brutal murder of si.xteen pris- 
oners, on the night after the Battle, at what is known as Queen Esther's or Bloody 
Rock ; and all who are interested in the history of the Valley have a desire to view the 
scene of the savage slaughter. Reports of the affair are conflicting, it being maintained 
by some that besides the prisoners killed at this place, about the same number were 
tortured to death by fire at a point near the battle-ground, at the village of Sturmer- 
ville ; and that Joseph Elliott, whom some of our historians state escaped with Lebbens 
Hammond from the executioners at Bloody Rock, was among the prisoners at the other 
place and there eluded his savage captors. According to the accounts given of the 
tragedy at Bloody Rock, the sixteen prisoners were placed in a circle around the stone, 
each man held by an Indian, and Queen Esther, a half-breed, in revenge for the loss of 
a son in the battle, dashed out their brains with a death-mall and tomahawk. Miner 
says : — " The mangled bodies of fourteen or fifteen were afterward found round the rock 
where they had fallen, scalped and horribly mangled." The rock is but a short dis- 
tance from the Monument, and a log cabin has recently been erected over it, to preserve 
it from mutilation by relic-hunters, much of it having already been chipped off and car- 
ried away by visitors. 

FORTY FORT. 

The residents in the vicinity of the village bearing the name of the historic old fortress 
which was the headquarters of the Connecticut settlers in all their troubles with the 
Pennamites, and from which the patriot band marched forth to meet the invading 
foe on the fatal 3d of July — have recently rebuilt the stockade near the old site, exactly 
as it originally appeared, it is said. 

CAMPBELL'S LEDGE. 

This far-famed resort is situated in the most northern part of the Valley, where the 
Susquehanna seems to have broken through a mountain barrier, forming a wide gorge 
of picturesque beauty. The Ledge was originally called Dial Rock, from having served 
to mark the sun at full meridian — the Indians of the Valley having in this way a time- 
piece more serviceable than many a town-clock. It is a prominent feature in the land- 
scape, presenting a bare, verdureless face which is conspicuously seen from almost all 
points of view, for many miles distant. The mountain peak on which the Ledge is sit- 
uated reaches a height of six hundred feet, and from its summit, the rugged mountain 
range opposite, the outspreading fields of ripening grain or fairest verdure lying almost 
beneath, threaded by the winding river, with Monockonock and adjacent islands far 
away on its bosom, and the lovely blue line of hills bounding the other extremity of the 
Valley — form a prospect which well repays the toil of making the ascent of the moun- 
tain. The cool breezes, perfumed by the odors of pine, spruce and cedar trees, with the 
forest shades and fine scenery, make this point an attractive one for pleasure seekers, 
and few pleasant days in the summer season are passed without the presence there of 
picnic parties from all parts of the surrounding country. 

The name, Campbell's Ledge, is b}' many supposed to have been given in honor of 



34 roiNTS or interest. 

the author of " Gertrude of Wyoming," who sung so sweetly — " On SusijuLhanna's side, 
fair Wj'oming ;" but there is a legend that it immortalizes a man of the same name, who 
won distinction in another than the field of literature. A hunter, as mighty in a Nim- 
rodic way as was his namesake with the pen, was upon this mountain deer hunting one 
day and pursued an antlered beauty so closely that the deer, seeing no other chance for 
escape, ran directly towards the Ledge ; and the hunter, anxious to secure his game, 
caught it by the tail, and the deer jumped from the Ledge to the opposite mountain, 
taking the hunter with him. Here the legend kindly leaves him, with no other record 
except this one marvelous feat. 

FALLING SPRING. 

Just beyond Campbell's Ledge, on the northern side of the mountain, is a very pretty 
waterfall fifty-eight feet high, called Falling Spring. The deep rocky recess, where 
beautiful mosses and ferns make a framework lor the waterfall, is a delightful retreat, 
and is another favorite resort of pleasure seekers. It was long thought that there were 
mines of precious minerals in the mountain around the Falling Spring, and a number 
of persons have spent considerable time in trying to discover these coveted ores. Be- 
tween thirty-five and forty years ago a man named White was strangely impressed with 
the belief that there were silver veins there, and made manj^ attempts to discover them 
with pick and divining-rod. The most valuable treasure found is the fine sandstone 
which has been used in building. the County prison and other structures. 

THE JUNCTION OF THE SUSQUEHANNA AND LACKAWANNA RIVERS. 

The junction of the Lackawanna river with the Susquehanna, near Campbell's Ledge, 
is another point of natural beauty, recalling most vividly the words of Tom Moore : 
" There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet, 
As the vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet, 
V\ here the storms that we feel in this cold world should cease, 
And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace." 

Mrs. Sigourney has made this spot classical ground by the following beautiful poem: 

, , ■ , And in dell and forest she hid from thee ; 

Rush on, glad stream, in thy power and piidc, jji,t ^jie ^^y of her fond caprice is o'er. 

To claim the hand ot the promised bnde And she seeks to part from thy breast no more. 
For she hastes Irom the realms ot the darkened 

mine, • . , ■ I'ass on, in the jov of the blended tide. 

To mingle her murmured vows with thine : Through the land where the blessed Mignon died. 

Ye have met, ye have met, and your shores pro- Nq red-man's blood, with its guilty stain, 

long . Hath cried unto God from that broad domain ; 

The liquid tone of your nuptial song. ^Vith the seeds of Peace they have sown the soil, 

Kring a harvest of v.ealth tor their hour of toil. 
Methinks ye wed as the white man s son, 

And the child of the Indian king have done. Qn, on, through the vale where the brave ones 
I saw the bride as she strove in vain sleep, 

To cleanse her brow from the carbon stain ; Where the waving foliage is rich and deep. 

But she brings thee a dowry so rich and true i have stood on the mountain and roamed through 
That thy love must not shrink from the tawny hue. j^e glen. 

To the beautiful homes of the western men ; 

Her birth was rude in a mountain cell, ygt naught in that region of glory could see 

And her infant freaks there are none to tell, <^o laj, ^g t^g vale of M'yoming to me. 
Yet the path of her beauty was wildiand free, 

THE JENKINS AND HARDING CEMETERY, 

on Wyotning Avtinuc and Linden Street, West Pittston, is a place of much historic in- 
terest. The ground was given for a place of burial by Judge Jenkins, who made the 
treaty with the Indians for the lands lying on the Susquehanna. The treaty was made 

... . / -1 t^ 1 r^ ' T.. ,1 T„„i.:„„ ,!,„ C ,,-.«....,„,«( .l,« 



30th, 1778 ; K aged 25 years ; S aged 23 years. Sweet be the sleep of these who 

prefer Death to Slavery." This grave attracts universal attention, and is about the old- 
est in this vicinity. A rude stone bears this inscription as nearly as can be made out : 

" Here lies the body of Jeremiah W , died June the i— " Another interesting stone, 

much battered and worn, marks the grave of a Revolutionary soldier, and is inscribed : 
" In memory of Aaron Perkins, who died Nov., 1S45, aged 82 years." There is a well- 
preserved plot of graves, with old-fashioned stones, bearing the name of Smith. One, 
quite ancient, reads: ",In memory of Betsey Smith, who died August 22d, 1788, aged 



i-oiNTS OK IN rL:Ri';sT. 35 

57." There are three Union soldiers' graves in the cemeter}' which are as 3'et unmark- 
ed. This plot of ground possesses additional interest from the fact that while all that 
surrounds it has undergone the changes of modern improvement, it alone remains un- 
disturbed. 

AT PITTSTON. 

From no point does the natural beauty of the Valley appear more clearly to the be- 
holder than at and about the thriving town of Pittston. The hills rising abruptly from 
the Main street afiord fine views in every direction. Three costly bridges here span 
the river within half a mile, and from either of the traveled structures the noble Sus- 
(juehanna presents a lovel}' appearance, with the banks green to the water's edge, 
and the islands in the vicinity like emerald settings on the smooth surface of the river, 
the movements of Ihe steamers and pleasure crafts enlivening and beautifying the scene. 

Upon the present site of J. E. Patterson & Co.'s planing mills stood the old Pittston 
Fort in 177S, sometimes designated as Fort Hrown, and a double log block house stood 
on the ground now occupied by the Lehigh V^alley depot, while on the opposite side of 
the river was Fort Jenkins, the most northern of the stockades constructed in the 
Vallej', and which figured conspiciiouslv in the struggles with the Indians. It was situ- 
ated on the bank of the river, about fifty yards above the west end of the Ferry Bridge, 
but the ground where it stood has since been washed away. 

MINE ACCIDENTS. 

Strangers in our Valley are generally desirous of learning the locality of the mines 
in which the several accidents, involving great loss of life, occurred during the past 
decade. The most disastrous ever known in this countr}- was that at Avondale, two 
miles below Plymouth, in 1869, when no men were killed by the burning of the break- 
er, no one inside the mine surviving. A similar accident at the West Pittston shaft, in 
1S71, resulted in the death of 20 men, 17 of the miners imprisoned 300 feet under 
ground having been brought out alive. About three months after the West Pittston ac- 
cident, 17 men were killed in E.agle Shaft, situated on the bank of the river just below 
Pittston, by an explosion of gas. 

PROSPECT ROCK AND BALD MOUNTAIN. 

Of the points of special interest to be found in the vicinity of Wilkes-Barre, Prospect 
Rock should probably be first named, as the nearest and most widely known. It is a 
beautiful height, two miles from the city, in the Wyoming range of mountains, which 
form the southeastern boundary of the valley. It is the VVilkes-Barre mountain in this 
range which the Lehigh Valley Railroad ascends ; and, in circling which, the traveler 
by this route obtains the widely celebrated view of the entire valley in perspective. 
The summit level of the railroad is over one thousand feet above the river, while that 
of Prospect Rock is but seven hunched and fifty feet above. But the view which it gives 
is a different and an exceedingly beautiful one, justifying fully its wide celebrity. It 
is a favorite resort for strangers and for jiicnic parties, and is ver}- easil}- reached by 
means of the Lehigh and Suscjuelianna road. 

For the benefit of those who desire to know in what direction to look for other often 
named heights, we will say that Penobscot Knob is in the same mountain range, three 
miles to the south of Prospect Rock. And that Bald Mountain, the magnificent view 
from whose summit is so often spoken of, is four miles still further south, or nine miles 
in all from Wilkes-Barre. This view includes the waters of the west branch of the 
Susquehanna, the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Mountain, and a wide stretch both of 
wilderness and of highly cultivated country in the vales between the ranges. This 
mountain is not to be confounded with Bald Mount in the Capouse range. 

NANTICOKE AND THE HONEY POT. 

There is no more lovely view of the lower Wyoming Valley to be had than that se- 
cured by a steamer trip down the river to Nanticoke. Lee's Mountain stretches along 
the eastern bank of the Susquehanna, below Nanticoke, and the Honey Pot is its north- 
eastern terminus. The river makes an acute double bend, to the west and then to the 
south, directly in front of Nanticoke Landing ; and as the steamer comes down the 
river before you, looks as if it were either shut into a cul-de-sac, or forced down under 
the mountain. The Homy Pot, with its eight hundred and sixty-five feet of height, 
seems to form a frowning battlement above you. Opposite, on the west bank of the 
river, Kingston Mountain comes dcjwn to the water's edge, and the whole scene is one 
which makes the beholder wish to linger. The return trip is even more delightful, \yitl^ 
its continual succpssion of qharmini^ vistas, than that going down {he river. 



36 POINTS or INTEREST. 

HARVEY'S LAKE. 

By far the most attractive spot to be easily reached from VVilkes-Barre is Harvey's 
Lake. This is twelve miles distant from the city, and is reached by stage over a fine 
mountain road. The ride itself far more than compensates for any fatigue incurred, 
even without the view of the lake itself. If this lake were but a little less removed 
from the beaten path of travel, its fame would, long ere this, " on all the winds have 
flown." It is to the northwest of Wilkes-Barre, and lies on the very summit of a moun- 
tain one thousand feet above the level of the Susquehanna. All around it rise the 
wooded slopes of still higher mountains, shutting it in to an inviolate seclusion. It is 
simply an enormous mountain spring, covering a space of over two square miles, and 
is about two hundred feet in depth. Its waters of an intense sapphire blue, except along 
the shore where overhanging forests darken them into utter opaqueness. The spot is 
a favorite resort of amateur fishermen, the supply of fish being superior and abundant. 
The Lake House is an attractive hostelry, large, commodious, and with broad piazzas 
on which it is a delight to sit and dream, if one is too indolent or too weary to row out 
upon the translucent waters. But those who want to take in the full charm of the lake 
will secure a broad-keeled boat, and leisurel}' explore all its hidden reaches and re- 
cesses, shut in by jutting points covered with thick woods along the shore. 

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN AND WYOMING CAMP GROUND. 

Lying directly back from the village of Wyoming is Lookout Mountain, the highest 
point in the Kingston range on the west of the Valley. The lovely mountain road 
■which leads to it winds up through Schooley's Gap, down which came the pitiless in- 
vaders upon the doomed Valley one hundred years ago. More than half way up the 
mountain, upon its western declivit3\ you come upon the Wyoming Camp Ground. It 
lies upon a broad plateau, covered with a heavy growth of pine and beech and maple. 
Through the forest have been cut the avenues upon which the cottages have been built, 
and as you drive past you catch only glimpses of them from the highway. At camp 
meeting time, during the last week of August, the road and the woods are alive with 
people. The spot makes a pleasant summer resort, and some of the cottages are al- 
ways inhabited during the three months of the "heated term." 

Beyond the camp ground the road stretches up for another mile over often steep and 
rocky ground to the mountain summit. The view from here is the most extensive one 
to be obtained from any point that overlooks the Valley. The whole of the historic 
vale lies outspread below one in the near view. To the northeast stretches out the 
Lackawanna Valley, sometimes called "the sister of Wyoming." Through it you can 
see across Scranton, and Dunmore beyond, to where the smoke curls up from No. 6 
plane on the gravity road, of which there will be further occasion to speak. To the 
south and southeast the view spreads on, taking in the Lehigh Valley also as far as to 
the Lehigh Gap below Mauch Chunk. 

OVER THE PENNSYLVANIA COAL COMPANY'S GRAVITY ROAD. 

This wonderful achievement of engineering skill, with its twenty-two planes — (twelve 
on the "loaded track" outward, and ten on the return "light track") — was built in 1850 
to convey the coal from the upper Wyoming region across the Wyoming and Moosic 
ranges to Hawley, where it connects with a branch of the Erie Railway, and is thence 
conveyed by it to tidewater. It begins at Port Griflith, a suburb of Pittston almost di- 
rectly opposite the Wyoming Monument, on the east side of the river. The distance 
from that point to Hawie}' is 47 miles. Many persons who wish to enjoy the mountain 
and wilderness beauty through which it passes take the coal cars at Pittston. But it is 
better to omit the first five planes, which carry the road across the Wyoming ranges, 
and to start from No. 6, at Dunmore, alreadj' mentioned. This borough immediately 
joins Scranton, and from the foot of No. 6 the " Pioneer" — the little train of pleasure 
cars — starts at 7.30 a. m. for the trip to Hawley across the Moosic range or Highlands. 
This is the most picturesque part of the road ; and the distance from Dunmore to Haw- 
ley is 35 of the entire 47 miles. But before leaving Pittston for Scranton, the stranger 
should not fail to visit the scene of 

THE BURNING MINE. 

Ordinarily a mine fire is utterly out of sight and reach of all persons save those who 
have the perilous task of battling with it, hundreds of feet under ground. But this 
fire in the PSutler Coal Company's works happens to be in the Baltimore vein, where it 
strikes upward to its " outcrop," or terminus ne.ir tUc surface. Passengers on the Le- 
high and Susquehanna road, where it passes to the east of Pittston, can see the curling 
steam and sulphurous gases as they rush up from the great cave holes and fissures on 
the hill slope. For the fire is almost on the very sutnmit of Butler Hill, high above the 



POINTS OK INTEREST. 37 

Valley ; so that water cannot be turned in to flood the mine. And the vein lies here so 
near the surface that it continually undermines the earth, and breaks it up into open- 
ings more or less like volcano craters, so that there is no possibility of forcing and 
shutting in steam to destroy the fire. The only resource was to surround it with a 
deep trench cut deep enough to reach below the vein, to face the trench on either side 
with solid stone, and leave the fire to burn itself out in the enclosed space — which it 
will take at least five years to do. There are now over sixty acres of burning coal, and 
through many of the great cave holes you m.ay catch the crimson glow, and see the 
overlying rock crumbling to white ashes. The sulphurous fumes that rush up from 
.these places, and the intense heat at some points under your feet will give you a vivid 
idea of Dante's or Milton's regions of despair, as they pictured themselves to them. 
But where the surface is not yet broken its deep, intense green forms an exquisite con- 
trast to these desolate spots. The under ground fires first force the vegetation into 
lusty life before destroying it, and the cattle are dotted about in the verdurous spots, 
peacefully cropping the luxuriant grass where in another daj' may be desolation. 

IN SCRANTON, AND ACROSS THE MOOSIC HIGHLANDS. 

Even those persons who are not usually interested in the triumphs of mechanics 
could not but feel themselves repaid by a morning spent in the ClifT Locomotive 
Works of the Dickson Company, and at the blast furnaces of the Lackawanna Iron 
and Coal Company. It may interest a great many who saw the Corliss engine at the 
Philadelphia International Exhibition to know that, while that engine was a little over 
2,000 horse power, each of these at the blast furnaces is over 4,000 horse power. For 
those who, before leaving the coal region, desire to go 

DOWN INTO A MINE. 

they cannot do better than, if in Scranton, to drive out to the Pyne Shaft in Kaiser 
Valley. Or, if in Pittston, to seek admission to the Exeter Shaft and mine in West 
Pittston. Or, if in Wilkes-Barre, to obtain the desired boon at the Diamond mine. 
But there are plenty of others at hand, if it be not convenient to reach these. 

THE MOOSIC HIGHLANDS. 

Of the trip across the Moosic on the gravity railroad it can but be said that there is 
no one to whom it can fail to bring thorough delight. Of its long succession of planes 
every one, as its height is reached, presents a different vista of forest, mountain, and 
stream. No two miles of the journey are alike ; the change and contrast are delight- 
ful. You breathe in an ever fresh delight as your arrowy, fireless train sweeps onward. 
Nowhere can you bring the charge of monotony against the landscape — now a rush 
through a narrow cut in the solid rocks, where the train scarce finds room ; nowa wide 
vision on either hand, a view across the valley, of stream, and upland losing itself in 
the far distance in another range of hills, until the misty outline of others still beyond 
blending with the faint blue in the sky; then a rushing waterfall, or long quiet stretch 
of the primeval forest, thick with undergrowth and fascinating in its deep silence. 

Paupack Falls, at Hawley, are well worth seeing in the three hours the train waits 
there, before leaving at i p. m. for the return journey. Jones's Lake, in full view at 
the foot of No. 19, is a lovely sheet of water, a favorite resort for excursion parties. - 
The road from this point to Bunker Hill, just above Dunmore, is exquisite in its ro- 
mantic alternation of woodland, rushing brook, and abrupt grandeur of cliff andheadt 
land. Like many another trip this keeps its best things for the last. Leaving your las 
plane, No. 21, in the distance you speed round a double curve, and over the bridge 
where Roaring Brook sounds far below, and find your iron pathway circling midway 
the mountain opposite to and towered overby Barney's Bluff. The tiny train sweeps 
on, clinging closer to the mountain side on the narrow ledge it follows, halfway down 
the precipitous wall. It hurries under Hanging Rock as if afraid it might fall upon 
you. And presently a sudden curve and swift descent brings you out directly above 
the city of Scranton, and at 3 p. m. you find yourself at your morning starting place. 

CARBONDALE, CRYSTAL LAKE, AND THE GRAVITY ROAD TO HONES- 
DALE. 

Those whose time will permit them to explore further this beautiful region will do 
well to take the Delaware and Hudson Railroad at Scranton, and go up to Carbondale. 
an hour's ride, at the head of Lackawanna Valley. To Crystal Lake is a drive of six 
miles across the mountain road. It is a beautiful sheet of water, well deserving its 
name, and covering over 300 acres. Its depth in many places is unknown, the sound- 
ing line having failed to touch bottom. Like Haivey's Lake, it is an immense moun- 
f^in spring. 



38 POINTS OF INTEREST. 

From Carbondale you reach Honesdale over the Delaware and Hudson Coal Com- 
pany's gravity road. This presents a complete contrast in the charm of its scenery to 
that of the Pennsylvania Coal Company of the Moosic. That, as we have seen, is a 
wild, solitary, wilderness beauty. This reveals a picture of undulating hills, of cul- 
tured valleys, of upland levels — a rich farming region with its happy homesteads and 
waving harvest fields. Halfway down No. 9 you catch a glimpse of the Catskills, 
eighty miles away. At Honesdale you may look up — or climb, if you choose — Irving's 
Clifil, so called on the 4th of July, 1844, when the renowned Washington Irving visited 
Honesdale, and ascended the cliff. On the return journey you sweep through some 
deep cuts and around some dizzy ravines, of which the most famous is known as Shep- 
herd's Crook. The distance from Carbondale to Honesdale is 16 miles, and you cross 
twelve planes in going and returning. 

MANY OTHER PLACES 
might be named, of the numerous points of interest in this vicinity, but a visit to all 
of these will employ much time, and the observing tourist will readily acknowledge 
that the half has not been told of the unrivaled wonders and beauties of the Wyoming 
Valley. 




37/ITCHB',CK RAILROAD, MOOSIC HIGHLANDS, 

Scranton, Penn. 
y.tiqva'-i'il eri>re.<sliifor Bucliehler's " Popri'nr Refoi-tx^ Cftttf 
/hw«) Knt-U TliciV 



Order of Exercises 

FOR IHE 

Centennial Anni\'ersary ? Battle S Massacre of Wyomino- 



JULY 3d— AT WYOMING. 

[Salute of thirteen guns by Wyoming Artillerist?, at Forty Fort, at i) A. M. Exercises at Moii- 
umeut Grounds in Wyoming to begin at llie same hour.] 

1. Music by Band — Selection from "Maritana" Wallace 

2. Prayer Rev. D. J. Waller 

3. Opening and Reception Address Hon. Hendrick B. Wright 

4. Original Ode Mrs. H. S. Watres ("Stella of Lackawanna") 

C/iorus of firr Imndrrd voices — Band accovip(t)iimcnt (si.r/i/ piercx). 
WYOMING. 



Ml sic r,Y C. B. Dekman. 



As clears the mist from the forehead of night. 
Brightened the sky ; see ! what sparkle, what 

light, 
O'er the green slope of meadow and hill, 
Where the wild roses are nodding at will: 
Over the river that moaned in its flow. 
Twice fifty perilous summers ago. 
Where, by its tide, in the sunset's low fires. 
Fell, with slow torture, our fiend-hunted sires. 

Down the far centuries— winding their way 
'Mong the gray vapors of time— shall the clay, 
Tenderly wrapped at the granite's pure leet, 
Be all forgot in life's hurry and heat ? 
No, sob the waves from the muse-haunted shore ; 
No, sigh the forests, with arms drooping lower ; 
Nor may the years — swift as eagles above — 
Purge the red stain from the \'hllcy we love. 

Over a century's historic dust. 
This be our legacy, this our proud trust — 
That no invading and arrogant tread 
Press the dear turf folded over our dead : 
And the sweet tide of each incoming spring 
To our fair homes no disloyalty bring : 
This be our legacy, this our proud trust. 
Over a century's love-hallowed dust. 

Addresses Hon. K. L. Dana and C. I. A. Chapman, Esq 

Poem Dr. Henry Coppee, of Bethlehem 

Historical Address Steuben Jenkins, Esq 

Poem Mrs. Mary B. Richart 

Music by Band — "Golden Crown Overture" . Heermans 



Over the dust of a century's dead. 

Hushed be our laughter, and mufHed our tread ; 

Voice no loud anthem ; we stand where they 

stood — 
Kinsmen that hallowed the turf with their blood : 
Soft as the strains of a lute o'er the sea. 
Let the deep chords of our sj'mphonies be ; 
Noiseless the footfall, and low bowed the head, 
Over the dust of a century's dead. 

Who has not shuddered, with cheek ashen pale. 
At the appalling and soul-thrilling tale. 
Traced o'er the page of a weird long ago, 
With the deep pathos of measureless woe ? 
Who never traversed — tho' seas roll between — 
Cool breathing wiUUvood and shadowed ravine. 
Where rang the war-whoopand bended the bow, 
Ot a red-handed and treacherous foe ? 

Curls the blue smoke from a home so apart 
That never quickened a throb of the heart. 
O'er the dire story of rapine and wrong. 
Blighting our beautiful valley so long ? 
Stretches a solitude — gloom-girt and tar — 
Where gleams a sunbeam, or glitters a star. 
That never caught, from the night-wailing blast. 
Hints of our tragic and terrible past ? 



INTERMISSION — REASSEMBLE AT 2 P. ^L 

1. Music by Band — " Diadem Overture" Heermans 

2. Prayer '. Rev. H. H. Welles 



40 ORDER OI' JsXERCISES. 

3. Original Ode Miss Susan E. Dickinson 

FOR THE WYOMING ANNIVERSARY 



Music by Chas. Pabst. 

Voice of proud song, on all our hills Yet with the dirge should blend a strain 

Send forth a mightv tone ! To tell ot triumph won ! 

Make thou our dead who nobly died We reap the fruit they sowed in tears, 

To latest ages known. Sing out their benison ! 

Let every wind that sweeps abroad 

He vocal with their fame. Remember these, with those who pressed 
Till high hearts, near or far, are stirred To battle bravely on ; 

At fair AVyoming's name. The young, whose bright fair brows yet wore 

The glory of the dawn ; 

Breathe low, breathe low, oh voice of song ! The old, who gathered back their strength, 

Kor martyred ones who fell, For God and home to die ! 

Mother and babe, by burning homes, Ring out, ring out, oh voice of song. 

Thy requiem notes must swell. Of praise and victory ! 

4. Poem Jesse Harding, Esq. 

5. Address Rev. Wm. P. Abbott 

6. Original Ode Steuben Jenkins, Esq 

BATTLE OF WYOMING. 



Music by H. E. Cogswell. 



Strike the lyre in warning strain ! 
Wake the hearts 01 daring men ! 
Bid them tor their country stand. 
Guard their homes and cherished land ! 
Tyrants trampling on their rights, 
bavage hordes whose presence blights, 
March their homes to desolate ; 
Bid them rise ere yet too late ! 

Strike the lyre in martial strain ! 
Rouse to action, valiant men ! 
See! they meet in battle's shock. 
Meet as waves meet frowning rock ! 
Crushed beneath o'erwhelmidg lorce. 
Carnage marks their flight's fell course, 
Three tc one the torces prove. 
Three opposed to one we love. 

Strike the lyre in mournful strain ! 
Let it peal a sad retrain ! 
Let its notes a requiem prove. 
O'er the graves ot those we love. 



Martyrs for our liberty - 
Dying that we might be free — 
Honored be the patriot dead ! 
Glorious be the gory bed. 

Strike the lyre in joyful strain ! 
Strike, O strike it yet again ! 
Let its joyful tones resound. 
Let it echo all around ! 
Kid it tell of glorious deeds ! 
Bid it tell how freedom speeds ! 
Tell what gallant men have done^ 
Tell how liberty was won ! 

Strike the lyre in dulcet strain ! 
Strike lor all good-willing men ! 
Fruitful blessings on each hand 
Flow throughout our happy land ; 
Perfect love in full accord, 
Peace and plenty crown the board ; 
All from bondage now are tree, 
All rejoice in liberty. 



7. Addresses, 



. . Rutherford B. Hayes, President of the United States 
and other Distinguished Speakers. 

8. Music — "Old Hundred" Chorus, Band and Audience 

.9 Benediction Rev. E. PI. Snowden 



JULY 4th— AT WILKES-BARRE. 
[Salute of one hundred guua at sunrise, by Wyoming Artillerists.] 

The Procession, under direction of Col. Stanley Woodward, Chief Mar- 
shal, will form at lo a. m., composed of seven divisions, viz : First — Military, 
under Major General Osborne. Second — Grand Army of the Republic, Col. 
Harry A. Laycock, Marshal. Third — The Veteran Corps, Major C. M Con- 
yngham, Marshal. Fourth — Fire Department, T. S. Hillard and Chas. Law, 
Marshals. Fifth — Civic and Benevolent Societies, Dr. Olin, F. Harvey and 
James P. Dennis, Marshals. Sixth — Historical Tableaux, L. C. Bristow and 
James P. Dickson, Marshals. Seventh— Trade and Mechanical display. Col. 
W. N. Monies and J. W. Patten, Marshals. 

At 4 o'clock p. M., assemble on River street where there will be Orations, 
Reading of Declaration of Independence, and Addresses by Gov. Hartranft, 
Hon. Chas R. Buckalew, Hon. Wayne McVeagh, Gen. Geo. B, McClellan, 
Hon. Alexander K. McClure, and others. At 8:30 o'clock p. m., a magnifi- 
cent display of fireworks upon rafts on the river, the city being illuminated. 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 

CARPETS ! CARPETS ! 

OIL-CLOTHS, RUGS AND MATS, 



ALWAYS TO 1;E FOl'Nn AT 



GOODMANS, ""N'" mj'MoTkT ^^""*' 

AT THE LOWEST CITY PRICES. If you wish to save money call there 
before purchasing elsewhere. 

ASTONISHING SUCCESS. 



THE BOSTON SHOE STORE! 

Everywhere acknowledged to be 

The Leading Shoe House in Pittston. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR HARD TIMES! 

THE PLACE FOR POOR MEN TO GET BARGAINS. 



Boots, Shoes & Rubber Goods 

AT WHOLESALE AND IIETAIL. 

THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF LADIES' AND GENTS' 
FINE GOODS ALWAYS ON HAND AT PRICES TO SURPRISE YOU. 

CUSTOiVl WORK AND REPAIRING AT SHORT NOTICE. 

55 South Main Street. Sign of the Med Boot. 

v~ A. C. HOLDEN, 

\ 

; MANUFACTURER OF 

J Harness, Saddles, Collars, Fly-Nets, <(c., 

AND DEALER IN 

WHIPS, BLANKETS, ROBES, BRUSHES, COMBS, LAP DUSTERS, &C. 

FIJVE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

Repairing done in the best manner, at reasonable rates. 

28 North Main St., (Gazette Building,) 

■Al 




PITTSTON 

LEATHER STORE! 

Under People's Savings Bank, 



AND DEALER IN 

HIDES, LEATHER and FINDINGS. 



Highest Cash Price paid for Beef Hides, Cah' and Sheep Skins, 
Tallow, Furs, and all odier articles pertaining to the trade. 



M/I\IER LEATHER A SPECIALTY. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Miner Boots and Shoes, Kip and Hungarian Boots, at Wholesale Only. 



PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS. If found correct, all claims for defi- 
ciencies made witliin five days after receipt of goods, will be promptly allowed. 



A long experience in the trade, and as we tan and finish our own stock, we can un- 
dersell any other dealers in this section, and 

DEFY COMPETITION IN PRICES, 

Call and Examine our Goods before making purchases else- 
where. 

THE LAE&EST AND BEST STOCK IN THE COUNTY. 

Under the People's Savings Bank, 

Don't fail to ascertain the Cash Prices for Hides, Skins, &c., 

at the Pittston Leather Store— the highest paid in town. 

42 






5 











PITTSTOH and WEST PITTSTOH, PA. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

Di'iigs,Mdiies& Chemicals, 

American and Foreign Perfumery, 

Toilet Articles and Soaps, 
Hair and Tootli Brushes, 

Fancy G-oods and Stationery, 
Trusses and Shoulder-Braces, 

Pure Wines and Liquors, 

Sold for Medicinal Purposes Only. 

The attention of physicians is especially called to the fact that 
the stock of Medicine and Chemicals comprises largely the 
manufacture of products of the following reliable and well-known 
American Houses — Dr. Squibb, Warner, Powers & Weight- 
man ; English Houses — Allen, Herring, and Howard; Ger- 
niaii Houses — Merck, and Schorring. 

The established maxim of the proprietor is: "To serve all with the 
best goods the market offers." 



It is desired to inform the public that under no consideration will the business be 
turned into "a mere catch-penny trade" by selling inferior goods at apparently low 
prices ; yet comparison with the prices of others for like quality is at all times invited. 



ALWAYS READY, DAY OR NIGHT, TO PREPARE PHYSICIANS' PRESCRIPTIONS. 



43 



O^^XJI:FOI^3^TI-^ O-^SH STOJ^E- 



p. BATTLE, 

PITTSTON, PA., 

General Dealer in Fine Groceries and Provisions, 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC DRYmQOODS, 

WHICH I WILL SELL 

CHEAP FOR CASH OR COUNTRY PRODUCE, 
B3 South Main Street. 

I. C SHOEMAKER'S SONS. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Miners' Flannels, Stocking Yarns, &c. 

— ALSO— 

AND DEALERS IN 

FLOUR, FEED, MEAL, GRAIN, &C. 

WYOMING 

— AND— 

AGRICULTURAL WAREHOUSE. 

ESTABLISHED 1852 BY 

J. MULFORD. 

LIGHTJVIJVG ROBS A SPECIALTY. 
Reapers and Mowing Machines, 

RAKES, DRILLS, CULTIVATORS, &C., 




J. J. MERRIAM. 
Portrait and Landscape 

West PIttston, Pa. 

PHOTOGRAPHS PAINTED IN OIL OR 'WATER COLORS. 

Paintings and Sketches of Scenery in the 
Valley (or sale. 



/\MOS STROH, 



WAGON and SLEIGH BUILDER, 



T^Tilliam. St., 



44 



PITTSTON. PA. 



S. STURMER'S 

OLD ESTABLISHED 







109 NORTH MAIN STREET, 

PITTSTON, PA. 



Best Goofls fir tie Least fflonej 



JOMM SClKi:*ICi;iiO)iUK, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Pliiiili?rs'Materals,&asFiitftres,&c. 

PLUMBING, GAS AND STEAM FITTING A 
SPECIALTY. 

Cron Street, opp. Gazette Office, Pittston. 

MISS KATE FLEMING, 

FASHIONABLE 

ID I^ E S S 3^ .^^ 2^ E le, 

405 South Main Street, Pittston, Pa. 

im:. c- .^^:e"I', 
Practical Upliolsterer 



General Agent and dealer in all kinds of 

SEWING MACHINES, 

Also, Parts and Attachments for any make of 
machine. Repairing piomptly attended to. 

No. 2 Water Street. Pittston, Pa. 

J. S. BAKER'S 

Natioaal Tolacco anil Cipr Store, 

2S SOUTH MAIN STREET, 

PITTSTON, PA. 



APOZiZiO SiLZaZi, 



PITTSTON, FA. 



JUSTUS HOFFMAN. Proprietor. 



CUTTER AND MAKER Ol 



lAMBREQUINS AND SLIP COVERS FOR PARLOR 

SUITS, Also, CARPET SEWING. 
P. O. Bex 557. yiTTSrON, PA. 

DEALER IN 

(jroceries & Provisions, 

409 South Main Street, Pittston, Pa. 

fapii ail Carriap Biiilfler ! 

2.>i> SOITH MAIS STRKKT. 

PITTSTON, PA, 



45 



Millinery and Fancy Goods, 

WEST PITTSTON, PA. 

Miss Maggie Cosgrovs, 

FASHIONABLE DRESSMAKER, 

Eine Sewing of all kinds in the latest 

styles, over P. Henry's Store, 56 

South Main St., Pittston, Pa. 

DR. E. B. LONG,_ 

Main Street, Pittston Pa. 

LACEYVILLE, PA. 
GEO L. KENNARD, - Proprietor. 

Contractor & Builder, 

WEST PITTSTON, PA. 

General Jobbing and Repairing Promptly Done. 



EST-A^BX-iISiaiEir) 1SS2. 






■W^i 



«T3^^K. 



'is 



/?yVZ? WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

CORDIALS, BITTERS, &a 

75^ South Main Street, PITTSTON, PA. 



tir 



8^Q., AT MBTAllh F^iaiS, 



ESTABLISHED 1848. 



PITTSTOI BEEWERY, 

Manufacturers of 

Ale and Porter. 



P. V^INTERS, 

Saloon and Restaurant. 



THE BEST QUALITY of Malt and 
Hops used in the manufacture of their Ale 
and Porter, which are unsurpassed. 

^IRWIN HOUSET 

Cor. Main & Mill Sts., Pittston, Pa. 

(OPPOSITE IRON BRIDGE.) 

RAIHGEBER & GINZ, - Proprietors. 



Choicest Imported Wines and Liquors, 
and best brands of Cigars, 



LEVY BLOCK, 



PITTSTON, PA, 



Labor Reform House, 



WM. H. LLOYD, Proprietor. 



A large Brick Stable, with room for forty 
horses, connected with the house. 

Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars always 
on hand. Fresh Lager always on tap. 

Sole Agents for Forest Castle Brewery 
Co.'s Celebrated Bottled Beer, for Pittston 
and vicinity. 



46 



Bar supplied with Purest Liquors and best 
brands of Cigars, 

20{> SOUTH MAIN STREET. 

PITTSTON, PA. 



T. R. STALEY, 



M:\% Clocks ad Jswslry ! 

CAREFULLY REPAIRED. 

No. 2 WATER STREET, 
PITTSTON, PA. 

In Mahon's Sewing Machine Depot. 

JOEL BRENTON, 



MISS A. ALLEN, 

DEALER IN 

Books and Stationery ! 

57 SOUTH MAIN STREET, 

PITTSTON, PA. 



DEALER IN 



Painters' Supplies, Wall Paper, 

WINDOW SHADES, GLASS, 
PICTURE FRAMES, (Stc, 

Main Street, Opposite First National Bank, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

D. eT^aylor, 

DEALER IN 

FOREIGN k DOMESTIC 

DRY-GOODS, 

SACKS' BLOCK, 



ONE PRICE ONLY! 

THE BAT^tTtIT 

ORGANS! 



-^T 



R. Siiiitli's Jewelry Store, 

33 SOUTH .MAIN STREET. 

PITTSTON, PA. 



SCHOOL BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 

~H. E. AR M E S, 

GROCER, 

AND 

Dealer in Vegetables ! 

2G3 SOITH MAIN STREET. 

PITTSTON, PA. 

UNDERTAKER, 

AND 

Furniture Dealer, 

No. 209 NORTH MAIN ST., 

PITTSTON, PA. 

a. hiiTLers. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

LEATHER! 

AND FINDINGS, 

No. 207 NORTH MAIN ST., 

(Ackley Building), 

PITTSTON, PA. 



47 



QEO. ADAMS, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS & SHOES. 

GAITERS, RUBBERS, &c. 



Custom Work and Repairing done 
at Short Notice. 



MAIN STREET, 



PITTSTON, PA. 



EVAN R. JONES, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

STONE\VARE, 

COMPRISING 

JUGS, CHURNS, MILK-PANS, 

Spittoons ; Cream, Butter and Flower Pots, 

Milk-Pans, Pickle and Preserve Jars, 

Stove Tubes, Calla Pots, &c., 

566 North Main St., Pittstoii, Pa. 

The best quality of Ware oflered at the 
very lowest prices that can be afforded. 
Bills of any magnitude put up on short 
notice. 

8. F, WILMAMB ^ CO,, 

Wholesale ar.d Retail Dealer in 

and a general line of goods belonging to 
the trade, 

STOVES, LAMPS, &G., &G., 

Butler Store Building, 
PITTSTON, PENNA. 

Edwards" Flour Weigher and Sifter^ 

The Housekeeper's Invaluable Friend. 



I3^.i^ 



S T O IS E, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Tesi8j C'Oiees ami Bpices, 
CASE k KNIGHT, 

44 SOnir MAIxN STREET, 

PITTSTON, PA. 



Dr.&.W.WILLIAISOI, 



213 South Main Street, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

Who has practiced medicine and surgery 
over thirty years, and twenty years of that 
time in this county, has, after much solic- 
itation, concluded to make a specialty of 
treating CANCERS. 

Best of references and testimonials fur- 
nished on application. 



;^.BHOAi)^^ 




APOTHECARY AND DBUGQIST, 
No. 8 South Main Street, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

GEO. W. BENEDICT, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

Is going to close out his entire Grocer)- 
stock and deal in nothing but 

FLOUR, FEED 

Hay and Grain. 

All parties wishing to buy Groceries at a 
bargain will please call. 

BUTLER HOUSE 

Main Street, Pittston, Pa. 



TEIElIiviES 2s/£OIDE3I^.<^T:H!. 



First-Class Accommodations for Transient 
Guests. 



48 



JOHN TREFFISON. 



MRS. J. McDOUGALL, 

DEALER IN 

SCHOOL AND HYMN BOOKS, 

MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS. PRAYER BOOKS. 

All the Newspapers and Periodicals of the da}-, and everything pertaining to a 
FIRST-CLASS BOOK bTORE. 

115 South Main Street, Plttston, Pa. 

J. & A. McDOUGALL, 

DEALERS IN 

STO YES, HEATERS, R AHGES 

Tin, Sheet-Iron and Hollow-Ware, 
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS, 

GLASS AND WILLOW-WARE. 

Roofing and Repairing Promptly Attended to. 

prrxsTON. PA^ 

W. L. McDOUGALL, 



fyyy fei.|lj/^'iLlLiJL%*/=ikdi" GE »|J ^ W ^ Jl 



ESaRAVIIf& A SPECIALTY. 



MoDQWadLL'S GQENEE, FITTBTQM, FA. 

49 



STEEL AND IRON, ROUND AND FLAT 



WIRE ROPE 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. FOR 



SHAFTS. SLOPES. FERRIES. GUYS. ELEVATORS. &C. 

A Large Stock of All Sizes constantly on hand, from which 
orders can be furnished at short notice. Address 

HAZARD MANUFACTURING CO.. 



■\;^7"ill^es-B£irre, XjiJLzeriie Co., IPa. 
WIIxLIAMS&ATEN, : T 7^ T\ \ A f A VT 

MANUFACTURERS OF L/, VTr X^ JTA^ iVJL ^ A. J. \ ^ 




LIGHT CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, I'llAETUNS, LIGHT 
AND HEAVY SPRING WAGONS. 
Repairing and Horse-Shoeing neatly done. 

W. D. WILLIAMS, 
S. W. ATEN. 

Warren St., West Pittston. 




Livery and Boarding Stable, 

(Rear of Residence.) RIVER ST, WEST PITTSTON. 



READ THIS. ' 3"- T- TOHiTEs, 



WE KEEP A HANDSOIVIE LINE OF 

EMBROIDERIES, LISLE THREAD and KID 
GLOVES, FANCY PEARL BUTTONS, RIB- 
BONS, HOSIERY, CORSETS and 
NOTIONS. 

Cheviot Shirting a Specialty. 

n. E- coT7;r-^isiD, 

"Water St., Pittston, P»a. 



PLUMBER. 

GAS AND WATER PIPE WORK A SPECIALTY: 

Cor. Butler ^ Main Sts., 



GET YOUR MEALS AT 
EUROPEAN HOTEL, 



50 



COR. EAST MARKET AND CANAL STS., ■WILKES-BARRB. 
TERMS, $i.oo PER DAY. 




LOOK OUT FOR THE 

OLD POLLOCK HOUSE 

WITH THE 

DEMOCRATIC, 

LABOR REFORM and 

REPUBLICAN 

TICKETS. 

Wyoming, Pa. 

C. S. STARK, 

A T T C R II E Y AT LAV/. 
PITTSTON, PA. 



JOHN RICHARDS' 

LAW OFFICE, 
TEMPERANCE HALL BUILDING, PITTSTON. 

in. c. IvrosiFGR, 

ATTORNEY AT LAY/, 
SECOND DOOR BELOW MINERS' BANK, PITTSTON, PA. 

Gr. S. inERRis, 

ATTORNEY AT LAY/, 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING, PITTSTON, PA. 



READ AND BE WISE. 

2,500,000 

Acres of the best wheat and grazing lands in the United States for sale by the ATCHI- 
SON, TOPEKA AND SANTA FE RAILROAD CO. in SOUTHWESTERN KAN- 
SAS, at the astonishingly low price of FROM $2.50 to $0.00 per acre, and 
ELEVEN YEARS' CRE'DIT, or .'i.'i 1-3 per cent. ofT for cash— thus GIVING A 
MAN A FARM ALMOST AT HIS OWN PRICE AND UPON HIS OWN TERMS, 
where it is no uncommon thing for an energetic man to pa}' for his farm and the im- 
provements and cultivation thereof from the first crop, thereby securing for himself a 
home and all the attending comforts in the short space of eighteen months or two 
)-ears, besides being assured withal that when you move your family into that country 
you are going into ONE OF THE HEALTHIEST SECTIONS OF THE UNITED 
STATES, where no such thing as miasma was ever known to exist, and where an 
abundant supply of WATER IS TO BE FOUND. OF THE PUREST KIND, which 
can be obtained by digging at nearly all points from six to thirty feet. COAL IS ALSO 
BEING DEVELOPED for fuel in many portions of the Stale, furnished to the settlers 
at from $2.50 to $6 per ton. Where parties are desirous of securing for themselves 
and families ahome, I think NO OTHER SUCH OPPORTUNITY EXISTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE STATES. For any and all particulars relative to prices of 
lands, location thereof, excursion, passenger and freight rates, apply to the District 
Agent of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Co. at PITTSTON. 



A98 A^orth Main St. 
51 



INSURANCE AGENCY, 

(Room No, 2, Second Floor of Gazette Building,) 

MAIN ST., PITTSTON, PA. 

Represents Some of the Most Reliable Companies in the 

United States. 

I have a Company that insures nothing but Dwellings, Barns, and their contents; 
must be separate from business places. Brick and Stone Churches a specialt}'. In- 
sures against damage by lightning, whether fire ensues or not. Live Stock insured in 
diis Company will be paid for if killed b}' lightning on the premises. 

The Farmers' and 3Iechanics' Mutual Insurance Co , of 

MILLERSBURG, PA., 
With Assets to Meet Losses Over $310,000. 

Specialty on Stores, Hotels, Shops, Farm Properties, &c., outside of large cities and 
•oil regions, and only insures within the State. Insures no steam works, coal breakers, 
and like hazardous properties — thereby making this one of the most desirable compa- 
nies for the above properties. SURPLUS RISKS placed in the strongest companies 
in the United States. 

BENJ. JONES, Agent. 

SOMETHING ITEVT ! 

There is being manufactured in Pittston an improved PATENT CHURN, which 
makes butter in the remarkably short space of FIVE MINUTES, taking out every 
drop of buttermilk, and producing as good butter as can be made by the most ap- 
proved processes, besides yielding more butter than the ordinary churn. All having 
Avork of this kind to do should examine this wonderful invention and learn how to ob- 
viate the labor of churning, which even dogs slink and hide away from. From ^'J' to 
ljil5, according to size, will buy one of these churns, and it is not surprising that thev 
are being manufactured by thousands. There is evidently a day of deliverance at 
hand for the wearv and worn who ply early and late at the old dash churn. This new 
invention is called the " PRIDE OF THE EAST" FIVE MINUTES CHURN, and is 
manufactured and sold by T. S. BARRITT, PITTSTON, PA. They are made of ash 
and pine, put together in the best and most substantial manner, and every one war- 
ranted. 

MRS. M. L. BROWN'S 

I=^a.sl:LiorLa,1ole 3ivd:illirLer37- Store, 

People's Bank Building, Pittston, Pa. 

All the latest styles and the most elegant assortment of Trimmings and Flowers kept 
in this section. The best hands in the business are em_ loyed. 



FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 



Piitsion Sswer Pipe Gompany, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



SCOTCH VITRIFIED PIPE 

CHIMNEY TOPS, 

Fire Srick and Oven Bottom lilo, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

crofutWuseT 

L. & B. JUNCTION. 

Meals it Iwki at All Mi, 

AND EVERY ATTENTION GIVEN TO GUESTS. 

J. T. CROFUT, Prop. 



C. I A. CHAPMAN, 

SURVEYOR AND 

CIVIL ENGINSER 

P. O. Address. 



P. HENRY & CO., 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



GIVE ME A CALL. OPPOSITE THE DEPOT. 

LEWIS COHENT 

Merchant Tailor, 

AND DEALER IN 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

65 South Main Street, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

€, M,WILLIAMS^€CD., 



AT 



Lowest Cash Figures, 

56 South Main Street, Pittston, Pa, 





MANUFACTURERS OF 



CARRIAGES & WAGONS, 

LIGHT AND HEAVY, 
of all descriptions. 



4S South Main Street, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

GEO. W, STRENG, PBQPEIETOH, 



A First-Class Barber Shop and Spacious 
Hall. 



I 



GENERAL JOBBING PROMPTLY DONE. 



Exeter St., West Pittston, Pa. 



53 



A FULL LINE OF 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, Trunks, 
Satchels, Traveling Bags, dic. 

137 NORTH 3IAIN STREET, 

PITTSTON, PA. 



THE XjE-^3DEI3. 

The LEADER goes weekly into 2,500 homes in Luzerne county, and is read by at 
ieast 12,000 people. 

It is acknowledged to be one of the best weekly papers in Pennsylvania. 

It is of interest to the Family Circle, to the Business Public, to the Political World, 
to the Moral Community, to the Young Men, to the Young Women, to Boys and Girls, 
in fact to everybody who can read. 

It is a live journal, keeping pace with the times. Sparing no pains to please the 
people, and according to its Motto, The Welfare of the People its Supreme Law. 

Its wonderful success is unprecedented, showing that the people appreciate a news- 
paper printed especially for them. 

The best advertising medium in Luzerne ! 

Subscription price, $r.50 per year. 

Send in your name, and have the LEADER left by the carrier or mailed to your ad- 
dress. 

CONYNGHAM & PAINE, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

PROYISIONS. 

PORK-PACKERS AND SMOKERS. 

Hams, Shoulders, Smoked and Dry Salt Breakfast Bacon, Lard in 
Tierces, Tubs and Tin Pails Constantly on Hand. 

Office in Central Store, between L. & S. and L V. R. R. Depots, WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

Track Connections ivith both Roads. 
PROPRIETORS OF EMPIRE, SUGAR NOTCH AND ASHLEi MINING STORES. 

L. C. PAIJYE. ' 

L. C. & J. C. PAi:NrE, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



OILS 



KEROSEJVE, MIMERS, L UBRICATIJVG, LARD, LlJf- 
SEED AJYD OTHER OILS. 

•J E ^V K T T & S O JSr S ' "WHITE 11, E A D. 

OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE NEAR L. & S. AND L. V. R. R. DEPOTS. 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

BOOKS, STATIONERY AND FANCY GOODS, 

J\rO. 2 PUBLIC SQUARE, 

Orders for American or Foreign Publications not in Stock will Receive 

JPrompt Attention. 

54 



M. NORTON, 





^Vjvr) DE^LEPi i?<r 



Wall-Paper, 



WiMow-SMes, Toys, GaiDGS, aai Fancy 




punfliin p vrDD 
drtiviULL ij.nLiiirr 



c^:y;2i3e«^^. 



«"S>^ t^> -ft ^SjSJQCTS^ 



Wyoming House Block, 415 Lackawanna Avenue, 

1|@^Furnishing of Churches f^ Halls a Specialty. 



CHICKERING PIANOS, 

POWELL'S MUSIC STORE, 

115 WYOMING AVENUE, SCRANTON, PA. 
THE ONLY PLACE TO BUV 

WHITE and GOLD-BAND CHINA, 

ra ANY NUMBER OF PIECES WANTED, 

Fine Cutlery &. Silver-Plated Ware, dic, 

IS AT H. A. COURSENS. 



Norton Brothers, 

^teamhipteiK^^tatioper?, 

303 "Wyoming -A.-\-ern.ie, 
SCRANTON, PA. 



GOLDSMITH BROTHERS, 

No. 304 Lackawanna Avenue, 



422 Lackawanna Avenue, 



SCRAHTON, PA. JOBBING A SPECIALTY, 



SCRANTON, PA 



W. J. NAGLE, 

Carriase Trimer M Faiiter 

5.59 SOUTH MAIN STREKT, 

PITTSTON, PA. 



A. C. KONARSON, 

107 Wyoming Ave., Scranton, Pa., 

Dealer in Diamosis, Watches, Clocks, Jevelrj, 

SILVER AND PLATED-WARE. 



THE SCRANTON REPUBLICAN, 

1746 Best Advertising Mediums in Northeastern I'tnnsylvania 

THE iOB DEPARTMENT has better facilities for doing all kinds of Book and Job Printing than any other 

office in this part of the stale. 
The Only Book-Bindery in the proposed new County of Lackawanna is in the Republican Office. 

55 



"TAKEN IN." 



'iJ'Jil'llll'lli'i^^'fllHillhftui 




THIS FARMER WAS TAKEN IN 



WHILE ON HIS WAY TO 



THE ONE PRICE CLOTHIER. 



Opposite the Wyoming House, 



soie^^n^Ton^, lE^a.. 



56 



Esarj^BLXSHEX) isso. 




rtTTBTO^gf, S>S:W3»^A. 



The Oldest and most Widely Circulated 
Paper in Luzerne County. 



For nearly thirty years the Gazette has maintained its position as the 
', ;cling paper in the Wyoming Valley, and is without a rival. It circulates 
thoroughly throughout Luzerne and adjoining counties, and in Pittston and 
adjacent farming districts and mining settlements, is taken generally by the 
large class who patronize but one weekly home paper. Emigrants to various 
parts of the country, who desire to keep informed in regard to affairs at their 
old home, almost invariably subscribe for the Gazette in preference to any 
other county paper, and all over the land— East, West, North and South, in 
Canada and Great Britain — the Gazette makes its welcome weekly visits to 
over two thousand homes, having upwards of 

TEN THOUS^jSTE) READERS. 

For several years past we have devoted special attention to the publication 
of local historical and biographical sketches. This feature will be retained in 
the Gazette and no effort spared to extend its reputation as A FIRST-CLASS 
FAMILY JOURNAL. We are about to begin the publication of a series of 

local historical papers of thrilling interest — ''truth stranger than fiction" 

something whicii has never yet been recorded by any historian, and which will 
certainly attract great^ attention throughout the State. 

The GAZETTE is recognized as one of the Best Advertising 
Mediums among the Weekly Papers of the State. 

Terms, T\vo Dollars pei' AnnLim. 

THEO. HART, JR., 



liditor and Pidprieior. 



57 



WISNER & STRONG, 




Mianiafactvix'ei's of 

r- STEAMS ENOINES, 
BOILERS, 

Crackers, Shafting, Drums 

MINE PUMPS AND 

MINING MACHINERY GENERALLY, 

A\^est Fittston, Pa. 



THE DAILY 



l^^tOril 




mxn^ 



PUBLISHED AT "WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

The only Daily Evening Paper in the County receiving: 
Associated Press Dispatches. 

Correspondents furnish daily letters containing all the Local News from 

Scranton, Pittston, Mauch Chunk, Berwick, Shickshinny, 

and other important points. 

m- FURNISHED REGULARLY EVERY EVENING AT ALL POINTS WITHIN 
REACH OF THE RAILROADS AT 50 CENTS PER MONTH. 

Address— Record of tlie Times, 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 



J. C. Engel, 

ORUGGISTi PHARMACEUTIST 

Drdgs, Keiicines, Fane; Articlss, Ic, 

Cor. Main & Northampton Sts., 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

Soda and Mineral Waters. 



HARNESS MANUFACTURER, 



122 & i24Penn Avenue, 



D. B. Brainard, 



. Prop'r. 



FIRST-CLASS ACCOMMODATIONS. 



O- Mates, $2.00 per Day. 



and dealer in 



lips, Blankets, Robes, Pl|-Nets 

VALISES, TRAVELING BAGS, &.c., 
113 West Market St., 

'WILKES-BARRE, PA. 



I^. "W. Haiglit, 

WATCHMAKER and JEWELER, 

Wyoming National Bank Building, 

138 West Market St., WILKES-BARKE. 

Always on hand a full line of 

American "Watches both in Gold and 
Silver Cases. 



^^ Careful attention paid to repairing 
fine Watches, Clocks and Jewelry. 



^n xmTn^v^t> 



COAL BREAKER. 



For many years those interested in coal operations in the Anthracite fields 
have felt the absolute necessity of an improvement in the machinery used for 
preparing coal. This want has been sui)plied in the invention of Joseph B. 
Miller, of Wilkes-Barre. The improved Coal Breaker does away with the cyl- 
inder system, substituting therefor a substantial machine, with a hopper at 
each end ; between the hoppers is an eccentric, driven by the main shaft. The 
inner side ol the hoppers is a perforated plate through which pass pointed steel 
teeth, striking the coal and crushing it; as the teeth are withdrawn by the mo- 
tion of the eccentric, the coal passes toward the screen. The leading features 
of this invention are : Simplicity of construction, durability, economy of 
wear and tear and a great saving in the waste of coal. 

The invention can be easily applied to the crushing of any other minerals 
or ores, and its general utility must commend itself readily to any and all pur- 
poses for which it is designed. The inventor, Mr. Joseph B. Miller, is 
draughtsman at the Vulcan Iron Works of Wilkes Barre, under the superinten- 
dency of E. H. Jones, an establishment favorably known for the superiority of 
the machinery built there. The Improved Coal Breaker will be manufactured 
by the Vulcan Iron Works, where models of the invention may be seen and its 
practicability tested. 



!;irs Srick anl Terra Cstta Works. 



HUTCHIHS, SHOEMAKER & CO., 

:PI^OI=I^IDsa?OI^s. 

OFFICE AND TACTORY WYOMING, PA- 

Manufacturers of Fire Brick, Boiler Blocks, Chink Blocks, Drain Pi pe, 
Sewer Pipe, Heat Pipe, Chimney Tups, Chimney Flues, &c. 

City and Town Sewers contracted for, and estimates furnished on appli- 
cation. All of our Sewer Pipe is salt-glazed vitrified and as durable as any 
imported English or Scotch Pipe. 




LACKAWANNA VALLEY 

HOUSE, 



W. & G, F. TOWNEND, 



I, E, WHIPPLE, Proprietor, 

The most convenient House to the 
D. L. & W. Depot in the City. 



Dealers iii 



Boots, Shoes & Rubbers 



WYOMING, Pa. 



59 



WILSON'S 
iDKua Stoke i 

WYOMING, PA. 
.^^^ Prescriptions carefully compounded. 



!^ ! t t 



TPIIS COMMODIOUS and attractive Printing House was constructed in 1872, 
by J. A Scranton, proprietor of The Republican, the cost of the property 
being $50,000. It is built of cream colored brick from Milwaukee, Wis., and 
richly trimmed with gray limestone from Syracuse, N. Y., the basement and first 

story front being entirely 
of stone. The window 
openings and pilasters 
are richly trimmed with 
f-tone, and the main en- 
trance stoop and steps 
are of the same mate- 
rial. The interior of 
the building is admira- 
bly arranged for the 
business, well furnished 
with all modern conven- 
iences and heated 
throughout with steam. 
The several departments 
of the establishment, 
which includes a well 
appointed BOOK BIND- 
ERY and extensive JOB 
PRINTING OFFICE, 
occupy nearly all of the 
entire building, five sto- 
ries and basemeut-cellar. 
The power is furnished 
by a twenty-five horse 
engine of fine finish and 
design, which runs five 
new fast presses of the 

most approved make and design, being unsurpassed by any others in the State? 

it also moves two elevators communicating between the basement and the upper 

stories. 

The Republican is one of the most prosperous newspapers in the State, and 
has a larger daily circulation than any Pennsylvania journal outside of Philadel- 
phia and Pittsburg, while its weekly circulation is also large and of a superior 
character. 




60 



LUZERNE HOUSE, 



■^7;7-EST iFiTTSTonsr, :e=.^^, 



TMQS. aMI^FPEMMWi, 'Pmo^mmwom. 



rmEST srauEE resobt m the wyomikg vallet. 



'O Love! in such a wilderness as this, 

Where transport and security entwine, 

Here is the empire of thy perfect bliss. 

And here thou art a God indeed divine. 

Here shall no forms abridge, no hours confine. 

The views, the walks, that boundless joy inspire !" 

— Gettrude of Wyoming. 

LOCALITY. 
This House is located in the heart of the far-famed Wyoming Valley, and in the very 
centre of the grandest panorama of natural scenery in the whole country. Its porticoes 
are fanned by the breezes which sweep over the broad Susquehanna and the lovely Vale 
of Wyoming for miles, and are shadowed on the northwest by the historic heights of 
Campbell's Ledge. About it, above it, and upon all sides, classic beauties rise to invite 
admiration and charm the sight'. It offers unequaled inducements as a place of summer 
rest and recreation, especially of ladies or gentlemen of limited means. It has every 
convenience of a summer house; it is situated within half a mile of the picturesque 
Susquehanna, which can be reached through any of the beautiful avenues of West Pitt- 
ston. On the other side lies the long range of wooded hills with their winding moun- 
tain roads and romantic solitudes. The Lackawanna & Bloomsburg and Lehigh Valley 
Railroads offer almost hourly facilities for delightful excursions oi from two to twenty 
miles, and the depot of the former road is within a hundred yards of the house. 

SURROUNDINGS. 

There is not a locality in the State which offers so many excellent advantages for en- 
joyment in the way of drives and rambles, as West Pittston. From the Luzerne House 
for miles up and down the river, the handsomest of roads stretch away, all wide and 
level, and for the most part shaded by grand old trees which have stood the stormy 
shocks of centuries. The mountain passes are all in excellent condition, affording the 
finest opportunity for travel among their primeval shadows. The Susquehanna affords 
splendid opportunities for boating, and hundreds of small craft and little pleasure 
steamers offer fine advantages to sail over the placid waters and to view the glorious 
sunsets which here have an especial charm and beauty peculiarly their own. A few 
hours' drive or walk leads to streams and lakes abounding in trout and other fish. The 
whole country about is bewildering in its extravagance of beauty. 

The rooms of the Luzerne House being very large and airy, many of them suitable 
for accommodating three or four persons, the proprietor offers board to such as, for the 
sake of reduced rates, prefer so to share their rooms, at very reasonable figures. 

Persons intending to visit this famous resort would do well to engage rooms at once, 
and a letter addressed to the proprietor. West Pittston, would suffice to secure accom- 
modations for any length of time. 

For terms and further information, apply to or address, 

THOS. HALFPENNY, Proprietor. 

6i 



J.FRANKLKE, ALEX. FARNH AM, LATHAN W. JONES, F. r. MOSIER, 

President. Secretary. Treasurer. General Manager. 



A 



emmwAW 

I3^00:RI=0I?.-^TDEID. 1877. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 



P 



REVOLVING FIRE • ARMS. 



NICKEL ■ PLATING 

Promptly Executed. 

Having an armory equipped with improved machinery are now turning out 
Revolvers which in price, durability design and finish will compare with those 
of any Fire arms Manufactory in the world. 

Steam Fire Engines, Hose Carriages, Trumpets, Military Equipments, Old 
Guns, Pistols, Cutlery, &c., &c., Nickel Plated, and all work warranted. 

H. H. HAMLIN, General Aorent, 26 Warren St., New York. 




Mom/faeturers and Dealers in 



AMdMllEmii §i light fB&Mii. 

Repairing Neatly Done on Reasonable Terms. Wyoming, Pa. 



Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, CLOCKS AND 

BRONZES. 

la, BQ PmM§ BQmBE, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Special agent for the Gorham Solid Silver Ware, and Rogers' Knives, 
Forks and Spoons. Having the largest jewelry establishment in Northern 
Pennsylvania, we can offer special advantages. 

62 



iSJkAO ■ MVTi 



Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



i 



DR.Y QOODi 



■«Tia»g, 



Sorai, B'Br Gtooms Stobess 

330 Lackawanna Avenue Scranton,Pa. 
131 War k et Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

fl'bolesale and Retail Dealer in 

Groceries, ProTisioDs, 

DRY GOODS, 



I'lT'THTOIV, £»A. 




LIVERY i BOARDING STABLE. 

FIRST-CLxVSS ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Water «t., PITTSTOlSr, Pa. 

Henry Colieii, 



Merchant Tailor 

and Dealer in fine 

READY-MADE CLOTHING, 

123 North Main St., 

PITTSTON. PA, 



63 



THE 

Ne^v York Store, 

20 N. Main St., Pittston, Pa., 



13: E .^ ID<^ TJ ^^ I^ T E I^ S 



DRY GOODS. 

WALTER & BRYDEN, 

Proprietors. 

LEHIGH VALLEY RAILROAD HOUSE 

NKXT TO THE DEPOT, 

'WI3L.KES-BA.RR.B, P^^. 

ANTON LINDACHER Prop'r. 

J^*- Meals and lodging at all hours of 
day and night, 

F. B. McCANNA, 
HOTEL & LIVERY. 

FINE BAND WAGON FOR PARTIES. 

8 South Main St., Pittston, Pa. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

TOBA.CCO JkN^D CIGJIlRlS, 

MUSIC HALL BLOCK, PITTSTON, PA. 

5®°" Agents for J. Eavenson & Sons' Family and Fine Toilet Soaps. 



. G. WHYTE. 



H. E. WHYTE. 



LUZERNE BOTTUi HOUSE, 



"WILK.ES-T3A.RRE] 



- HCRAjSTTOISr 



W, E. Wh^i Smi, Pi§fi, 



EOTTXjEE,S OIF 



J5®°Clausen's Celebrated New York Lager a Special ty"®a 



wm. m. clark, 

Enqmayem ow Woojd>^ 

434 Chcslnnt St., PHILADELPHIA. 



GJ^- IVI- STAIMi, 



Dealer in Fine 



GROCERIES m PROVIINS, 

Wyoming, Pa. 

BURSCHElTs 



CiOlfHSTIEIlR 



J8@=-THE MOST POPULAR Ifi PITTSTOX-^M 
Opposite the Butler House 



PITTSTON, PA. 



APlTAIi, .... $500,000 
Surplus, SIOO.OOO. 



T. Strong. Pres't, T. Ford V.Pres't. 
W. L. Watson, Cashier. 

People's Savings Bank 

Pixxgs-rojsr, I'a. 
Capital, $75,000. 

C. S. STARK, Pres't. 

SAM'L PRICE. V. Pres't. 

H. C DEWEY, Cashier. 



Miners' Savings Bank, 

PITTSTON, PA. 

A. A. Bryden, Pres't. 

J. L. McMiLtAN, V. Pres't. 

Frank P. Reap, Cashier. 



6t 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGE. I 

Anthony D Cover 

Alien & Ho.stock I 

ALLEN, WM 7 

AhlborB Bros., Wilkes-Barre 12 

Apt, M. C • 4.5 

APen, Miss. A 47 

Armes, H. E 47 

Adams, Geo 48 

Burschel, J. A. A. 1 & tU 

Bech'.old, Wm 4 

Brown, J. H 9 

Brandenburg, F 10 

Butler, Geo 10 

Brenton. Willis lii 

Brown, Harris 10 

Berry, W. W 11 

Berlew, H. 14 

Brvden, J. J 15 

Bohan, Paul 1.5 

BOSTON STORE, Scranton and Piitston 16 

Boston Shoe Store 4i 

Brune, F 43 

Battle. P 44 

Baker, J. S 45 

Bevan, B 46 

Brenton, Joel 47 

Benedict, Geo. \V 48 

Butler House 4.S 

Barre't, T. S 52 

Brown, Mrs. M. L 52 

Brown, S. L, WilUes-Barre 64 

CHUMARD, E. M 3 

Cosgrove, J. S 45 

Cosjirove, Miss Ma;;gie 45 

Case & Knight 48 

Coward, H. E 50 

Crofu" Souse 53 

Colien lewis 53 

Chapman, C. I. A 53 

Conyngham & Paine, Wilkes-Barre 54 

Coursen, H. A., Scranton 55 

Cohen, Henry 63 

Clark. W. M., Phila 64 

Lavid, G 9 

Durkin, B. J 10 

Drury, Wm „ 11 

Daman, L. G 50 

JJavidsburg, D., Wilkes-Barre 62 

Eaton, M. H., Phllad'a 10 

Eagle Hotel 11 

Evening Pre-s 13 

European Hotel. VViiues-Parre 5o 

Engel, J. C, Wilkes-Barre 58 

Eastman, M. J., WestPittslon 45 

Fleraiug, Miss Kate 45 

Ferris, G S 51 

Franklin House 53 

First Natl Bank 64 

(.iething Hous^ .- "' 

Galiasiher, J, J 10 

Gordon, L 13 

Green, J. D, Wyoming 14 

Garrett, H. V 15 

Goodman, N. G 41 

Goldsmith Bros., Scranton 50 

Hurlbut, J. S cover 

Haines, T. W .T. 9 



PAGE. 

Howell, J onah 9 

flolvey, Wm 10 

Hughes, John 10 

Hatfield, D.T 10 

Holilen, A.0 41 

Hoffman, Justus 45 

Hillers, G 47 

HAZARD MFG. CO., WilUes-Barre 50 

Henry, P. & Co ; 53 

Horton Brotheis, ^^cranton 55 

HIN'jDELL, Scranton 56 

Haight, R. W., Wilkes-Barre -58 

Hagadorn & Evans 64 

Irwin House 46 

Jones, Mis M. A 2 

Jordan, N. P., Wilkes-Barre 11 

Jnckson. Mrs. W H., West Pittston 45 

Jones, Evan R 48 

Jones, J. T 50 

J nes, Benj 52 

S G.Kerr, Scranton 55 

Kyte, T. W & H. D., West Pittston cover 

Kyty, J. R 2 

Kerr, W. H 2 

Keystone Marble Works 12 

Knapp, Dr. A 14 

Kennard House, Lacewille 45 

Konarson, A. C. Scranion 55 

Law & McMillan 5 

Llewellyn. Geo. J lo 

Linnekin, C. A., Wilkes-Barre U 

Long, Dr. E B 45 

Labor Reform House 46 

Leader, Wilkes-Barre 54 

Lack. Valley House, Scranton 59 

Luzevne House, West Pittston 61 

Laycock <fe Crouse, Wyomini.' 62 

Levy, Isaac, Scranton <& Wilkes-Barre 63 

Lamb, D 63 

L. V. R House, Wi kes-Batre 63 

Marks. A & Co., Pittston & Wilkes-Barre 4 

Miller, J. W 12 

Mulford,.!., Wyoa ing 44 

Merriatn, .J. J 44 

Miihon. ■;. H 45 

McDOUGALLS 49 

Mtisler, F C .51 

Miller, Joseph B., WiKes-Barre 69 

Maloney, Thos 63 

McCanua, F. B ...63 

M ners' Savings Bank „.64 

Nimmo ACompton 1 

National House 9 

Nagie. \V. J 55 

Norton, M , Scranton '. .-5 

O'Malley, Wm 11 

Pittsioii Steam Cracker Bakery cover 

Puiili Bros 5 

Pittston l.>ye Works 5 

Parslow & Hester 12 

Palmer, G. i .. Wilkes-Burre 12 

Pier, Dr. W. F.. Wyoming 14 

PITT.-TON LEATHER ST' KE 42 

Pitt ton Brewery •. 46 

Pollock House. Wyoming 51 

Pittston Sewer Pipe Co 53 

Paine, L. C. & J. C, Wilkes-Barre. 54 



66 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGE. 

Powell, L B., Scranton 55 

PITTSTON GAZETTE 57 

Pittston Arms Co 62 

People's Savings Bank tii 

Richards S. Y 2 & 10 

Ross & Co 5 

RICHART, G. M 6 

Rommel, Frank,Wilke8-Barre 11 

Robison, John 12 

Rommel, A. B 14 

Rockafeller, Frank 14 

Ruoff, A 47 

Rhoades, 8. H 48 

Richards, John 51 

Record of the Times, Wilkes-Barre 58 

Sharkey, G. F 1 

Sharkey, T. M 1 

S'ckler, J. S 2 

Swartwood, H. L., Wosi Pittston 4 

Stevens, Henry 5 

Searle. Jas 10 

Scott, H. J - 10 

Stevens Bros * 12 

Sunday Plain Dealer. .^1 13 

Stroh, L. N _ -..-. 15 

Steinmeyer, W. A 16 

Smith, Gfeo 15 

Shoematcers, I. C. Sons, Wyoming 44 

Stroh, Amos 44 

Sturmer, S 45 

Scrimgeour, John 45 

Smith, N.J..... 46 



PAOE. 

Staley,T. R 47 

Smith, Richard 47 

Siark, C. S 51 

Sacks, L ."iS 

Stahl, J. W , WHkes-Barre 5S 

St. Charles Hotel Seraiuoa 58 

SO ANTON REPUBLICAN 60 

Stark, G.M., Wyoming (4 

THOMPSON, G. B cover 

Taylor. D. E 47 

To^'nend, W.& G. F Wyoming 59 

UNION STOVE & MFG CO covpr 

Union Brewery...; ,..ll 

Williams, J. D 5 

WY0.V4L. KNITTING MILLS, West Pittsion 8 

;Willams, Dr.C {M 11 

Wyoming Shovel Woiae 11 

Walsh Bros 12 

Whioton, W. S 12 

Wyoming Valley Paper Mill 14 

Winters, P 46 

Williams, S. P. * Co 48 

Williamson, Dr. G. W 48 

Williams & Aten. West Pittston 50 

Williamson, D .< 51 

Wear, James R 51 

Williams, C H. A Co.. West Pittston 53 

Wisner J: Strong. West Piitston 58 

Wyoming Terra Cotta Works 59 

Wilson, Druggist, Wyoming ,...59 

Walter* Bryden.. 63 

Whyte's, W. E. Sons, Wilkes-Barre ! 64 



All not otherunse indicated are located in Pittston, 



ITHACA 



CALENDAR 





ITHACA, IS.Y., manufacture the 

@Mj MeMaMe 0mMm§ai' €ImM MMb ! 

Indicating Perpetually the Hour, Day of the Week and Month, 
and the Month of the Year. 

ACKNOWLEDGED TO BE A NECESSITY IN EVERY BUSINESS OFFICE, AND 
FAST BECOMING A NECESSITY IN EVERY HOUSEHOLD, 




Have been manufactured and sold during the past twelve years. 



Prices Range from $10 to $50, according to the Style of 

Case. 



(9] 



MERCHANT TAIi_OR 



<-^=^.A.iNriDt 



Sisli!^ M §snis' 




yj 



mOM 



South Main St. 



TViivTJEK^S' block:, 

PITTSTOrJ, PA. 






Gener 




^'l^"^'F'l^ 



.O 



■WEST FiTTSTOisr, :e>^^_ 



Highest Prices l^nid for Country Proriurr. 



f S^ FARMERS SUPPL8ED AT BOTTOEVl PRDOEQ. 



T23: ]E 



, «!ili 









^^•xXTSTOijNj-, ir='S.z<ri>T'^>^. 



^'© l3)« 



IWSE^BWr, A-'f 



D-Mlcr i:i Fine 



-o 






Groceries O' rroViSicjis, 

FOBBKH AID EOHSJnC FB7iTa c:, 

Oi po ite Fiiset National Tank; 1 ii" T ; ; v. 



LIBRPRY OF CONGRESS 



WITH SMYTH'S PATE> 

MANUFACTURED BY 



007 212 122 3 






PITTSTON, PA. 



rn 












C 


■-3 


c: 


a 






0/ 


"rf. I 



Z3 =? 

eS § M- E 

^ ?i C 5 

^- I ^ 

be 4, o 



S S 
5 2 




FOR SALE BY IIKST CLA^S DK.ILSRS THROUGHOUT THE COUMRY. 





'S'da.r. 



AVE CLAIM IT TO BE THE 

SIMPLEST DEVICE 

FOR THE 

INSTANT REMOVAL 

OF 

ASHES, SLATE AND CLINKERS, 

ever yet brouffht licfore tlie puWtc. 



>^.&. 




Fig-. 2 Represents the 
same reversed, allow- 
ing- the ashes to escape 
and retataljiff the lire 



Fig'. 1 ReiiresontHtlicIMiple?: 
Grate hi proptT i)Ositlon to 
Starr, thp tWv, and the ^Mne In 
whlcii It lis g'enerally iiis«d. 

The advantages claimed for this improvement are as follows : 

ist. By one movenu-iit of the handle the ashes and clinkers are efffctiially removed, and tliej 
Are la left upon a clean Orati^ j 

2d. As theoi)fr;itlon isperformed when the Rang-e Is clo.sed no ashes or dust can escape lutoi 
111. -ooin, which, as Is %\ ell known. Is not ti-ue of the so-called antl-cUnker grates now In use. 

'Ml. The entirf- clinker is removed regardless of size, while with other grates, the large cllnkei> 
must lie broken before the.v e.an be rem()ved 

4tli. "No skill or experience upon the part of the operator is required