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Place-Names 



OF THE 



Province of Nova Scotia 




BY 



THOMAS J. BROWN 



1922 



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A WORD IN JUSTIFICATION, 



THE towns, villages, capes, coves, hills, valleys, rivers, lakes 
and harbors of this, our glorious province by the sea, have 
many strange and beautiful names. Many of them were 
named by the original Indian tribes; others, by the brave Sp&nish, 
French, Norse and English adventurers of the eariy times; and still 
others by the Scotch, Irish and English emigrants who at a later 
date luckily made this province their adopted home. 

Often have we heard the "stranger within our gates" exclaim: 
*'What an odd [or pretty] name!" "What does it mean?" "And 
why was it so named?" 

This little book is intended to furnish, to a limited extent, the 
answers to these questions. 

The material has been gleaned from many sources; it would 
obviously have added considerably to the work to have credited 
the many authorities from which the information has been so ruth- 
lessly plundered. The Author (?) will, however, frankly admit 
that so far as he is concerned, there is very little of the contents 
original matter. 

The manuscript has been placed in the hands of the printer 
with the full knowledge of its imperfections, but with the hope that 
it may some day be of assistance to a more competent crafts- 
man. 

As a "Peace Offering," it is dedicated to the memory of Nova 
Scotia's past and present historians. 

Rock Eyrie, 

North Sydney, N. S., THOS. J. BROWN. 

December, 1922. 



" Names of places form an important part of our history. They stand as 
memorials of men and events in the past. They throw light on the scenes and 
movements of former ages, and therefore cannot be neglected in our study of the 
development of our country." 

An extract from an unpublished MS. on Place-Names, by the late 
Rev. Dr. Patterson, of Pictou, N. S. 



M25^M3 



THE INDIAN NAMES OF CANADA. 



The memory of the Red Man, 

How can it pass away, 
While their names of music linger 

On each mount and stream and bay; 
While Musquodoboit's waters 

Roll sparkling to the main; 
While falls the laughing sunbeam 

On Chegoggin's fields of grain; 

While floats our country's banner 

O'er Chebucto's glorious wave, 
And frowning cliffs of Scatarie 

The trampling surges brave; ^ 

While breezy Aspotogan 

Lifts high its summit blue, 
And sparkles on its winding way 

The gentle Sissibou; 

While Eskasoni's fountains 

Pour down their crystal tide; 
While Ingonish's mountains 

Lift high their forms of pride;' 
Or while on Mabou's river 

The boatman plies his oar, 
Or the billows burst in thunder 

On Chickaben's rock-girt shore ? 

The memory of the Red Man, 

It lingers like a spell 
On many a storm-swept headland. 

On many a leafy dell; 
Where Tusket's thousand islets 

Like emeralds stud the deep; 
. Where Blomidon, a sentry grim. 

His endless watch doth keep. 

It dwells round Catalone's blue lake. 

Mid leafy forests hid, 
Round fair Descouse and the rushing tides 

Of the turbid Pisiquid; 
And it lends, Chebogue, a touching grace 

To thy softly flowing river. 
As we sadly think of the gentle race 

That has passed away forever. 



Written by 

Mr. Richard Huntington, 
Yarmouth, 1883. 



AMERICA. 

The name first appears in 1499, and is called after Amerigo 
Vespucci, an Italian Astronomer and Explorer. The name as 
applied to the New Worid had its origin in Germany. 

Colimibia, the name sometimes applied to America, is so called 
from Columbus, who discovered America in 1492. 



CANADA. 

The name first appears in 1540, and is derived from the Indian 
word "Kannata" or "Kannatha" which means a settlement, or 
collection of cabins. It is said to be of Iroquois Indian derivation, 
and was supposed to have been applied to the Indian encampment 
at Montreal, but was unwittingly appHed by Cartier to the whole 
country. 

MARITIME PROVINCES. 

The Maritime Provinces were known by the Indians as "Mega- 
mage" i. e. home of the Micmacs, or the true man. 

Note. 1. — The names in this book are in alphabetical or diction- 
ary order. Immediately after the name appears the initial letter, 
or letters of the County in which the place is located. 



Annapolis 


(A) 


Antigonish 


(Ant.) 


Cape Breton 


(C. B.) 


Colchester 


(Col.) 


Cumberland 


(C) 


Digby 


(D) 


Guysborough 


(G) 


Halifax 


(H) 


Hants 


(Hts.) 


Inverness 


(I) 


Kings 


(K) 


Lunenburg 


(L) 


Pictou 


(P) 


Queens 


(Q) 


Richmond 


(R) 


Shelbume 


(S) 


Victoria 


(V) 


Yarmouth 


(Y) 



Note 2. — So far as adopted by them to this date the spelling 
of the place names throughout is the spelling approved by the 
Geographic Board of Canada. 



Place-Names of Nova Scotia. 



ABERCROMBIE(P.)— This place was likely so named after 
General James Abercrombie, a British General, who was connected 
with the 42nd or the first battalion of Royal Highlanders. He 
made several campaigns in Canada, and was killed at Bunker Hill 
in 1775. 

ABERDEEN, C. B.— See New Aberdeen. 

ABUPTIC HARBOR AND RIVER (Y.)— See Argyle River, 

ACADIA. — Acadia, sometimes Cadie or Kaddy, is the Micmac 
Indian equivalent of region, field, ground, land or place, the place 
of; and when joined to an adjective, it denotes that the place 
referred to is the appropriate or special place of the object expressed 
by the noun or noun-adjective. In the Micmac Indian language 
adjectives of this kind are formed by suffixing **a" or "wa" to the 
noun. 

As an example: Segubbun is the Micmac Indian for ground 
nut. Segubbuna, of or relating to ground nuts. Segubbuna- 
Kaddy, is the place or region of ground nuts. This gives us the 
place name of "Shubenacadie." 

The Malicite Indians used the word "quoddy" for "Kaddy,*, 
as it occurs in the place name "Passamaquoddy." 

Acadia included the greater part of Maine, Nova Scotia and 
New Brunswick, and was known as "the Duke's territory" and later 
as "the King's territory", it was also sometimes called "the province 
of Sagadahock." 

ACADIA COLLEGE— See Wolfville. 

ACADIAVILLE (R.)— Formerly Little Arichat, changed by 
Act of Parliament to its present name in 1866. 

ADDINGTON FORKS (Ant.)— Likely so named in honor 
of the Addington who was the British Prime Minister in the years 
that Edward, the Duke of Kent, was Commander-in-Chief of Nova 
Scotia, 1796-1800. 

^ AINSLIE (I.)— The Township of Ainslie one of the four sub- 
divisions of the north-western part of Cape Breton Island, was 
formed in the year 1828 and was named after Lake Ainslie which 



8 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

in turn had been named after Lt.-Govemor Ainslie, who was the 
Lt.-Governor of Cape Breton Island 1816-1820. 

(See Lake Ainslie). 

ALBA (L) — This place formerly known as "Boom" was given 
its present name by Act of Parliament in 1893. It is the Latin 
name for ** white" and the name is appHcable owing to the large 
quantities of white plaster rocks to be found in the neighborhood. 

ALBERT BRIDGE (C. B.)— The Bridge and place was no 
doubt named in honor of the Prince Coilsort, who married Queen 
Victoria in 1840. 

ALDERNE Y (R.) — A place on Isle Madame, named after the 
Channel Island Alderney, which name is a corruption of the French 
"Aurigny." A number of Alderney fishermen frequented this port 
of Cape Breton. 

ALLEN RIVER OR CREEK (A.)— This is the name now given 
the smaller Annapolis River, once known as "L'Esquilla" from the 
German "Equille", meaning **a sea needle" or little fish; French 
meaning "splinter." This name "L'Equille" is now given to an- 
other river in this county. Called by Dierville in 1708, Du Moulin 
River, the French for "Mill River." 

ALMA (P.) — So named in commemoration of the place where 
a great victory was won by the Allies over the Russians in the 
Crimean War in the year 1854. 

AMAGUADUS POND (C. B.)— This place is said to be named 
from a Micmac Indian word meaning "plenty." It was first settled 
by Europeans in the year 1805. At the request of the inhabitants 
the name was changed to Castle Bay (see) in the year 1896. 

AMETHYST COVE (K.)— So named owing to then umber of 
Agate, Jasper, and Amethyst specimens found there. 

AMET ISLAND (Col.)— The original name of this island is 
supposed to have been "Isle L'Ormet" or "L'Ormet" and the name 
is supposed to be suggested by its resemblance to an "Armet" or 
helmet. 

AMHERST (C.) — This place was named after Lord Jeffrey 
Amherst (1717-1797) who, in co-operation with Admiral Boscawen, 
captured Louisbtu-g in 1758. He was appointed Commander-in- 
Chief and Governor General in America in 1761. Previous to 
1759, it was called by the French "Les Planches." The Micmac 
Indian name was "Nemaloos Kudaagun" and "Nemcheboogwek," 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 9 

the latter meaning * 'going up rising ground." One of the three 
township divisions of Cumberland County is called Amherst. 

AMIRAULT HILL (Y.) — ^Jacques Amirau (corruption from 
Amirault, sometimes Amero) settled lands on the Tusket River in 
Yarmouth County in 1766. The Hill retains his name. 

ANDERSON LAKE (H.)— Given this name after an early set- 
tler. This lake is sometimes known as Gough's Lake. 

ANDERSON MOUNTAIN (P.)— Named after Andrew Ander- 
son, who received a grant of lands there. He was the first settler. 

ANDERSON POINT (C. B.)— Near Sydney, named after a 
Mr. James Anderson, who did a general mercantile business there 
about 1840. 

ANNAPOLIS (A.)— It is said that Champlain was filled with 
admiration with the security and spaciousness of this place and gave 
it the name "Port Royal." It was founded by De Monts in 1604. 
In some old documents this name appears as ''Royal Haven." 
The Micmac Indian name for AnnapoHs River was "Taoopskek" 
meaning "flowing out between rocks." The River was for a short 
time called by the French the "Dauphin," meaning "the eldest son 
of royalty." It received its present name from the English in 
1710 in honor of Queen Anne of England. The name was formed 
by connecting the name of Queen Anne with the Greek word 
"polls" meaning city. It was one of the five earliest counties of the 
Province which were formed in the year 1759. The settlement was 
destroyed by Sir Samuel Argyle in the year 1618 in the name of 
Great Britain. 

AnnapoHs was the capital of Nova Scotia from 1710 to 1749, 
when Halifax became the capital. 

Annapolis County is divided into four townships — Annapolis, 
Granville, Wilmot and Clements. 

Annapolis County is the smallest county in the Province. It 
contains 552 square miles. 

Annapolis was captured by the English in 1654, restored to the 
French in 1668, again captured in 1690 and again restored in 1697; 
finally captured by Nicholson in 1710, when it was renamed. 

1620-1630 an ephemeral Scottish Colony was located at Annap- 
olis. In 1626 it was captured by Sir David Kirk with an English 
Fleet. In 1634 it was granted to Claude de Ragilly. 

ANSE DE LA CHOUX (R.)— Near St. Esprit; so named by 
the French owing to a wild celery found there, excellent for salads 
and soups. Anse is the French for cove or creek and Choux is the 
plural of the French word chou, meaning cabbage. 



10 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



ANSE LE BLANG (D.)— Le Blanc Cove, settled in 1769 and 
named after Charles Le Blanc, an early settler. Anse being the 
French for cove and Blanc the French for white; the English named 
the place White Cove. 

ANTHONY'S NOSE (COL.)— A point on the Shubenacadie 
River where the coral and shell cliff, nearly fifty feet high, reminded 
some early settlers of a man's nose and two robust cheeks. They 
called it St. Anthony's Nose — now Anthony's Nose. 

ANTIGONISH (ANT.)— The Micmac Indian spelling of this 
word is "Nalegelkooneech." Dr. Rand says the Micmac meaning 
of the word is : the place where branches are torn oft the trees by 
bears getting beech nuts. Several writers say the name is from an 
Indian word meaning "River of fish," but Dr. Rand's derivation 
is likely the correct one. 

Antigonish County is divided into four Townships — Antigo- 
nish, Tracadie, St. Andrews, and Arisaig. 

On Nicholas Deny's map of 1672 he calls it "River d'Anticon- 
nachie." In 1685 the name appears on Father Jumeau's map as 
Artigonieche. In 1733 it appears as Antigonich. In 1744 Bellin 
spells it Antigoniche. In 1755 it first appears as Antigonish, the 
present form. Father Pacific gives a Micmac spelling of Antigo- 
nish as "Alitgonieljg" and says the meaning is "broken branches" 
which partly agrees with Dr. Rand's interpretation. French set- 
tlers were in Antigonish as early as 1762. An English officer 
Timothy Hierlihy was in the country in 1775. He and eighty 
others received a very large grant of land in 1784. 

The name "Antigonish" as applied to the County, replacing 
ts former county name of "Sydney," first appears in 1863, when it 
was changed by an Act of Parliament. 

The Antigonish town of today was one time known as "Dor- 
chester," the name of the township of which Antigonish is the 
shire town. 

In Antigonish is the St. Francis Xavier College, a Diocesan 
Institution opened as Arichat College, at Ajichat, C. B., in 1853, 
transferred to Antigonish and established as a college under its 
present name in 1855; University powers created by an Act of 
Legislature in 1866. Named after Saint Francis Xavier, the 
Patron Saint of Canada. 

, ANTON (COL.)— Formerly known as Polly Bog, changed to 
Anton in 1880 by an Act of Parliament. 

ANTRIM (H.)— So named after the Ulster Town or County 
in Ireland of that name. 

APAGWIT (G.)— A small island in the Gut of Canso. An 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 11 

Indian word meaning "moored in shelter" or "sheltered by the 
encircling shore." (This, or "Abagwit" was the original Indian 
name for Prince Edward Island). 

APPIN (ANT.) — Named after a small district near Loch 
Linnhe in Argyleshire, Scotland. 

APPLE RIVER (C.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Agoomakun" meaning "where they catch herring." 

APSLEY (C. B.) This name is found in 1820 applied as the 
"Parish of Apsley" in the County of Bathurst. It was within 
the present County of Cape Breton boundaries. The name comes 
from the house of Lord Bathurst "Apsley," which became famous; 
as it was the house presented to the Duke of Wellington by a 
grateful country in the year 1820. 

ARCADIA (Y.) — This place was once known as Upper Che- 
bogue. It received its present name on the 27th of January, 1863. 
The name was chosen because of the building of a brig there in 
1817 by Bartlett Gardner. The brig was named "Arcadia." 

ARCHIBALD MILLS (H.)— The Indian name for this place 
was "Kesokedek" meaning "the road that runs over a hill." 

ARCHIBALD POINT (V.)— A point north of North Bay, 
Ingonish, said to be named after Archibald & Co, a firm that ran a 
fishing establishment near there some years ago. 

ARDNESS (P.) — The name, in a Scottish settlement, suggests 
Aird, a town in the Isle of Skye, from which some of the settlers 
came; and "Ness," akin to nose, a point of land running into the sea. 
It is an inland village, but nevertheless we believe that this is how 
the name was constructed. The prefix "Ard" is found in a number 
of place names of Scotland. 

ARENBERG ISLAND (L.)— Sometimes called "Paradise 
Island." Named after a family named Arenberg, who for many 
years made the island their home. 

ARGYLE (Y.) — One of the two township divisions of Yar- 
mouth County. This place is no doubt named after Argyle or 
Argyll, in Western Scotland. The Township was granted in 1771, 
and contained 187 sq. miles. The Indian name for this place was 
"Bapkoktek." It was named Argyle by Capt. Ronald McKinnon 
who received a grant of land here in consideration of his services 
as a soldier. 



12 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

ARGYLE (I.) — Formerly known as South Side Lake Ainslie, 
in the year 1893 by an Act of Parliament was changed to its pres- 
ent name. 

ARGYLE RIVER (¥.)— Was known as Abuptic River. The 
Indian name and spelling was *Tobbobtek" or "Bapkoktek. It 
was settled in the year 1763. The settlement was named Argyle 
by Captain Ronald McKinnon, an early settler from the Western 
Highlands of Scotland, and the name of the settlement was applied 
to the River. 

ARICHAT (R.)— The Micmac Indian name "Nerichat" was 
by transformation brought to Arichat. On some early plans it is 
found as "Nerichau." West Arichat was at one time named 
** Acadia ville," as some of the Acadians after their expulsion from 
Grand Pre, settled in this place. The Indians also had the name of 
"Liksake" for Arichat, meaning worn rocks, also **EHksake" mean- 
ing "the camping ground " 

ARISAIG (ANT.) — This place was settled just previous to 
1815 by families from Arisaig in the Highlands of Scotland, who 
gave their old home name to their new home. The grants were 
dated 1815, but there is no doubt the settlers were there at an 
earlier date. It is one of the four Township divisions of Antigonish 
County. 

ARLINGTON (H.)— The old name for this place was Moose- 
land. It was given its present name by an Act of Parliament 
passed in 1897. (See Arlington West). 

ARLINGTON WEST (A.)— So named in 1876 by the inhab- 
itants who met together for that purpose at the time of the opening 
of a Post Office for the community. The name was probably 
suggested by some citizen after Arlington in Massachusetts. 

ASHVILLE (I.) — Formerly named Sodom. In the year 1875 
the name was changed to Ashville by an Act of Parliament. 

ASKILTON (I.) — At one time part of and known as River 
Inhabitants, but in the year 1865 was named "Askilton," a word 
coined from the name of Donald McAskill, who was the Postmaster 
at that time. 

ASPOTOGAN (L.)— Also "Ashmutogun." The name is 
derived from the Indian name "Ukpudeskakun, " which means 
"When they blockade the passageway," referring to the place 
where the seals go in and out. The In diansused to block up the 
passage in order to enable them to kill the seals. "Kebego Kooctk," 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 13 



meaning "a closing of the passage" is another Micmac name for 
Aspotogan. There are the Harbor, Mountain, Peninsula and 
Village of this name. 

ASPY BAY (V)— The French called this bay Havre D'Aspe or 

D'Achepe. Some authorities say that the Basque sailors named it 
Pic d'Aspe, after a Pyrenees Mount; others say it is from the Mic- 
mac Indian word "apago" meaning codfish. There is also the 
River of this name. 

ATHOL (C) — A name possibly suggested by descendants of 
the Loyalists after John Murray the 4th Duke of Athol. The 
name is now applied to the place that was formerly known as ''Little 
Forks." The change was authorized by Parliament in 1871. 

AULD COVE (G)— First settled about the year 1785. It is 
named after one of its first settlers, a Mr. Alexander Auld. 

AVON RIVER (HTS)— was at one time known as ''Ingogon." 
The Indian name was "Tooetunook" meaning, "flowing square 
into the sea." The largest branch of the river the Indians called 
"Amagapeskjik" which means "running over stones." The present 
name is after the river Avon in Scotland, made famous in song. 
The eastern branch of this river was called by the Indians "Apset- 
kwechk", meaning, "running small" and the largest branch was 
known as "Amagapakitjik", meaning "rushing over rocks" or 
"running over stones." 

AYLESFORD (K)— Granted as early as 1770. The township 
was one of the four townships of Kings County and was formed 
in the year 1784. The name was probably given in honor of the 
Fourth Earl of Aylesford, Lord of the Bedchamber to King George 
III. 

Aylesford Bog the Indians called "Kobetek" meaning "beaver" 
or "the beavers' home" from a little beaver-shaped island. 



14 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



B 



BACCARO, BACCARO POINT (S)— This place is named 
from the Basque word Baccalaos, meaning cod fish. The name 
Baccalaos was at one time given to Newfoundland and Nova 
Scotia, later to Nova Scotia only. This place and a small Isle in 
Conception Bay, Newfoundland, are the only remains of a general 
name "Baccaleanmi Regis" which was at one time (1542) applied 
to Canada. 

BADDECK (V.)— Strictly speaking, Bedek or Ebedek, an old 
Micmac Indian name changed by the early French to Bedeque. 
Dr. Rand gives the spelling as Epdek or Eptek and the meaning 
as — the warm place — but he applies this meaning to Bedeque, P. E. 
I. For Victoria County *'Baddeck" he gives the word "Abadak," 
meaning a portion of food put aside for some one. Dr. Patterson 
says it is Indian, meaning, place with an island near ; this would 
fit Baddeck, as Kitson Island is directly in front of the village. 

BAILLIE BROOK (P.) — Takes its name from one of its earli- 
est settlers, John Baillie, a native of Sutherlandshire, Scotland, 
who took up lands and settled near the brook. 

BAIN ROAD (Y.)— Named after an early settler, Mr. Alex- 
ander Bain. 

BAIRD COVE (C. B.)— On the south shore of Morien Bay, 
so named owing to James Baird having opened a coal mine nearby 
in the year 1867. 

BAKER ISLAND (L.)— So named after a settler named 
James Baker. 

BALACHE POINT (I.)— In the Strait of Canso named after 
a Jersey family of early settlers, sometimes called, incorrectly, 
McMillan's Point and Plaster Cove. 

BALEINE (R.) — Probably named by the French at an earlier 
date after Baleine in France. At one time known as Puerto Nova 
(New Port). Captain Leigh in 1597 says he was in Puerto Nova. 

It has been said that the name was suggested by a whale- 
shaped island at the entrance — the French word for whale being 
"baleine." 

Lord Ochiltree built a fort here in 1629 and made an effort 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 15 

to colonize the place, but was forced by the French under Captain 
Daniel to abandon it. 

BALL CREEK (C. B.)— Named after an English family of 
this name, who came to Sydney in its early days and settled near 
where the present bridge crosses the creek. 

BALMORAL (C. B.), BALMORAL (R), BALMORAL 
MILLS (C O L) — Named after the place in Scotland made famous 
by being a residential choice of Royalty. 

BARN RIVER (D.) — Named so owing to an early settler 
John Hill having built a barn at the river. 

BARNES CREEK, BARNES POINT (Y.)— Named so after 
an early settler John Barnes, who settled in Plymouth, Yarmouth 
County, 173L 

BARNEY RIVER (P.)— There is a river and village of this 
name named after Barnabas, or Barney McGee, who was the first 
settler in Merigomish. He moved to Barney River in the year 1776. 

BARRACK POINT (C. B.)— Part of Sydney, so named owing 
to the existence of Military Barracks there. This point was fort- 
ified in 1794 and was then called "Fort Ogilvie." 

BARRA HEAD (V.)— Near St. Ann's. The Indian name of 
this place was "Bootlotek" (See Barra Strait). 

BARRA STRAIT (C. B.)— (See Grand Narrows). This 
place was settled about 1802 and named after Barra, Scotland. The 
original "Barra" is so named in honor of the Saint "Kilbar," or 
"Bar of the cell." 

BARRACHOIS HARBOR (COL.)— (See Barrasois). This 
place was at one time known as Joseph Harbor, as named by Col. 
Joseph Frederick Wallet Desbarres, after himself. 

BARRASOIS or BARACHOIS— A descriptive name found 
in many places throughout Nova Scotia. The word is from Acad- 
ian French "Barre a cheoir," and means lagoon or pond. It is 
generally applied to ponds separated from larger bodies of water 
by necks of land or sand bars. 

In Pichon's History (1760) he refers to the name "Bara- 
chois" thus "They give the name in this country to small ponds 
near the sea from which they are separated only by a kind of 
causeway. There is no possibility of travelling even the distance of 
a league along the coa«st of Cape Breton without meeting with some 
of these pieces of water." 



16 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

BARRIE BEACH (H.)— The old name of this place was 
Stoney Beach. 

HARRINGTON (S)— Called by the French "La Passage'^ 
and by the Indians "Ministiguish," or "Ministegek" meaning "he 
has gone for it." It was settled in 1760-63 by eighty families from 
Nantucket and Cape Cod. 

The town, township and passage received their present name 
after the 2nd Viscount Barrington (1717-1793). He was secretary 
of war 1755-61 and again 1765-78. 

Shelbume County is divided into two townships, Shelburne, 
and Barrington, which was formed in the year 1767. 

BARRINGTON COVE (C. B.)— (See Prince of Wales Land- 
ing). 

BARTON (D.)— So named after Lt.-Col. Joseph Barton an 
early Loyalist settler. It was formerly known as Specht's Cove 

BATESTON (C. B.)— So called after a family of early settlers 
named Bates. 

BATTERY POINT (C. B.)— At Sydney Mines. There 
was a Battery of guns on this point (which was then known as 
Pecks Head) in the year 1794. The fort was called Fort Dundas. 

BATTERY POINT (L.)— There was a Blockhouse on this 
point in 1753, hence the name. It was at one time called "Fort 
Boscawen." 

BAXTER HARBOR (K.)— This place had an early settler 
whose name was Dr. William Baxter, after whom it was named. 

BAYER SETTLEMENT (H.)— First settled in the year 1779 

by a family named Bayer and named after the family. 

BAYFIELD (ANT)--So named in honor of Admiral Henry 
Wolsay Bayfield, who surveyed and made charts for the Gulf of 
St. Lawrence, and many other parts of Canada, between the years 
1814 and 1854. 

BAY OF FUND Y— The Portugese called the place "Baia 
Fundo" meaning deep bay, hence the present name. Others 
claim that the word "Fundy" is derived from "fond" meaning the 
end or top of the bay. In 1604 DeMonts called the bay "le grande 
Bay Francoise," a name it retained until the English renamed it. 
Sir William Alexander in 1624 called it Argall's Bay after Sir 
Samuel Argall, an English adventiirer who raided it in 1613. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 17 

BAYSWATER (L.)— By an Act of the Legislature passed in 
1865 Sandy Beaches, Northwest Cove, Southwest Cove, Cole- 
man's Cove and Aspotogan Harbor, on the western side of 
St. Margaret's Bay, were all included under the name of Bayswater. 

BAY VERTE (C.)— Named by the French *'Baie Verte," 
meaning "green bay." It is said to be so named owing to the salt 
water grasses, which at times present the appearance of green 
meadows. The Micmacs called it *'Weg-wam-a-gwek," which 
means "land's end." 

BAY VIEW ISLAND (A.)— This island was first called "L'Isle 
du Couchons," by the French; and "Hog Island," — which is a 
direct translation from the French name — by the English. 

BEAL ISLAND (Y.)— An Island in Chebogue Harbor which 
received its name from an early settler Josiah Beal, who came from 
New England about the year 1761. 

BEAR RIVER (D.)— This place was at one time called "St. 
Anthony" also at one time called "Imbert" after Simon Imbert, a 
Frenchman who commanded a relief ship for Port Royal in 1612. 
Corrupted from Imbert to Bear River. The Indian name was 
"Eelsetkook" meaning "flowing along by high rocks." 

The name of this place appears on some modern maps as 
"Hillsborough." Some say the name was given it because the 
famous Rogers Rangers killed a bear on its bank, but it is more 
likely a corruption of Imbert, or Herbert, after Louis Herbert an 
apothecary who accompanied Champlain in 1604. It is referred 
to as "Riviere Herbert" in Lescarbot's "History de la Nouvelle 
France" 1612. 

BEAVER COVE (C. B.)— Beavers may have been plentiful 
here, and hence the name; but in the early years of the 19th century 
an Irishman named Beaver lived in this vicinity, and the place was 
very likely named after him. 

BEAVER HARBOR (H.)— The Indian name of this harbor 
was "Kobelawakwemoode" meaning beaver harbor. Indian tra- 
dition relates that here Glooscap threw one of the large rocks there 
at the mystical beaver. 

BEAVER LAKE (Q.)— So named owing to the beavers at 
one time being found in numbers in its vicinity. 

BEAVER RIVER (Y.)— So named because beavers were at 
one time plentiful there. The settlement first took the name of 
the River, but part of it was later named Maitland. 



18 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



BEDFORD (H.)— Named in honor of the Duke of Bedford, 
who was Secretary of State in 1749. The Indians called this place 
"Kwebek" meaning the head of the tide. It was known as Fort 
Sackville before receiving its present name. 

BEINN BHREAGH (V.)— Formerly known as Red Head a 
descriptive name given it owing to the reddish character of the 
rocks. The property of the late Prof. Graham Bell, the inventor 
of the telephone. 

The name is the Gaelic for ''Beautiful Mountain." The Indian 
name for this place was **Megwatpatek," meaning the red head. 

BELFRY LAKE (C. B.)— Near Gabarouse Lake. Pichon 
says — "Near Gabarus is a pond called '* Belief euille." It is quite 
possible that Belfry is a corruption of the French name. 

BELLE COTE (L)— Formerly known as East Side Margaree 
Harbor, given its present name by an Act of Parliament in the year 
1892. The name is French, meaning "Pretty hillside." 

BELLENDEN HEAD— See Pettipas. 

BELLI SLE (A.) — Received its name from Alexander Le- 
Borgne, an early settler, whose title was the "Sieur de Bellisle" and 
who was left by the Sieur de Morillon de Bourg in 1668 as the 
Commander-in-Chief of Port Royal. 

BELLIVEAU COVE (D.)— So named after a French Acadian 
family of that name who settled there. There is also a village of 
the same name in Digby. 

BELL COVE (L) — Near Lower Dublin, received its name after 
an early settler named Bell. 

BELL ISLAND (L.) — Named after an early settler, Alexander 
Bell. 

BELLONI (C. B.) — Named after an American, Robert 
Belloni, who at one time owned and operated a coal mine in this 
part of Cape Breton. 

BELMONT (Hts.) — This place was previously known as 
Highfield. It was changed to its present name by an Act of Parlia- 
ment in the year 1873. 

BENACADIE (C.B.)— The original of this name is the Mic- 
mac Indian word "Ooobunakade" meaning "place of bringing 
forth." It was a moose resort in the calling or mating season. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 19 

Again it is said to be from the Micmac Indian word "Benakade" 
meaning "the humble place." 

BEN EOIN (C. B.)— This is a Gaelic word meaning "Jona- 
than's Mountain" — the Scotch often call two of their family 
by the same Christian name. When it is John, the second is 
generally known as Jonathan. One of the early settlers was known 
as Jonathan, the Gaelic of which is Eoin, hence the name of the 
place. 

BERLIN (0.)— See East and West Berlin. 

BERWICK (K.) — It is said that this district was settled as 
far back as 1760 by English from Connecticut who took the places 
vacated by the unfortunate Acadians. It was formerly named 
"Pleasant Valley," and the village was known as "Currie's Comer," 
later called "Congdon's Corner" and in 1835 "Davison's Corner," 
after a man named Davison, an early settler. 

The present name was given it in 1857 — at a meeting called 
for that purpose — and is after the English seaport town on the 
Tweed. At the meeting it was also decided the word would be 
pronounced Ber-wick, not Ber-ick, as is the English name. 

BHEIN VIORACH (I.)— A Gaelic name meaning sharp 
mountain. 

BIG BEACH (C. B.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Amamkeak," meaning "the long sand beach." 

BIG POND (C. B.)— A descriptive name. The Micmac 
Indians called Big Pond and its neighborhood "Edoobukuk." 
The maps as recent as 1868 give this name. Big Pond itself, Dr. 
Rand says, the Indians called "Naookteboojooik," meaning "it 
stands alone." The name of this place also appears as "Anse du 
Charbon" which is the French for Coal Cove. 

BIG THRUMCAP (H.)— See Thrumcap. 

BIG TUSKET ISLAND (Y.)— (See Tusket.) This Island is 
sometimes known as Magray Island, owing to its first settler who 
came there from Marble Head in 1774, being named John Magray. 

BILLTOWN (K.)— About the year 1770 this place was settled; 
one of the settlers was William C. Bill, after whom the place was 
named. 

BIRCHTOWN (S.)— A descriptive name, as the birchwood 
was plentiful there. This place is opposite Shelburne town. It 



20 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



was laid out about the year 1783 as a town for the negroes. They 
numbered about four thousand at the time and built quite a large 
town there. The greater number of them were removed to 
Sierra Leone in 1790 or 1791. 

BIRD ISLANDS (V.)— A resort for many kinds of sea birds. 
The name of these islands appears on the very old maps as 
^'Ciboux Islands" and being near the entrance to St. Ann's, gives 
rise to the belief that the name "Cibou" was given to St. Ann's 
and not to Sydney, as stated by some authorities. (See Sydney.) 

The Indian name for these islands was **Kloopskeaakade." On 
some plans the outer Bird Island is called Hiboux, evidently a 
mistake for Ciboux ; the inner island appears as Hertford Island. 

BISHOPVILLE (K.)— Named after John Bishop or some of 
his descendants. He and four sons came and settled at or near 
Horton in 1760. They came from Connecticut. 

BLACKAVON (Ant.)— This was a portion of the settle- 
ment known as Black River, and was given its present name by 
an Act of Parliament in 1891. 

BLACKETT LAKE (C. B.)— At one time known as Portage 
Lake, later Barn Lake, owing to one of the first settlers, Ingoville's, 
bam being near. Still later known as Forks Lake. Received its 
present name after a family of residents. 

BLACK RIVER (Ant.)— One time part of Beauly. Divided 
and named Black River by an Act of Parliament in the year 1887. 

BLACK ROCKS (L.)— A descriptive name. This place was 
first settled by families named Tanner and Allen. 

BLANCHARD (P.)— Settled by William Cummings from 
Inverness, Scotland, in the year 1802. The road was cut out by 
Colonel Blanchard of Tiuro, hence the name. 

BLANDFORD (L.)— Named and settled by several Irish 
families: Murphys, Carrolls. Keatings and Rileys, some time 
previous to 1767. 

BLOCKHOUSE HILL (L.)— This hill is near the town of 
Lunenburg. It was in the early days called Windmill Hill, from 
the fact that there was a corn mill on it. It was fortified by a 
blockhouse as early as 1753. The last blockhouse was destroyed 
by fire in 1874. 

BLOMIDON (K.)— The Micmac Indians called this place 
"Glooscap's week." i. e., Glooscap's home. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 21 

The Indian name as given by Dr. Rand was "Owkogegechk," 
meaning "dogwood grove." The name **Blomidon" is said by- 
most authorities to have been given the place by the Portuguese. 
The Indian name for the cape was 'Tlekteok" meaning a hand- 
spike. Navigators in old times used to call the cape "Blow-me- 
down." 

BLONDE ROCK (Y.)— Received its name from the fact that 
a ship named the ''Blonde" was wrecked on the rock on the 10th of 
May 1782. 

BLOODY CREEK (A.)— About twelve miles from Annapolis. 
So named because the Indians killed an officer and some men, and 
took about sixty prisoners, at this place. They were from the fort 
at Annapolis and were sent to deal with some insurgent Acadians 
when the Indians fell upon them. 

At one time called * 'Bloody Run," also "Moccasin Hollow." 

BLOOMFIELD (D.)— At one time called "West Settlement" 
and again "Thomas' Road"; was settled about the year 1800 by 
Gains Prit chard. 

BLOOMINGTON (A.)— The earliest, or at least, early settlers 
were Jesse Viditi and John Hoofman. The present name was sug- 
gested by Elias Grimes of Torbrook, and was adopted by the resi- 
dents. 

BLUE MOUNTAINS (P.)— So named by Wm. Ross, who 

settled there in 1818. Wm. Urquhart, from Scotland, was the 
£rst settler, in the year 1815. 

BLUE MOUNTAINS (Y.)— This place the Indians called 
^'Kookujook" meaning "the giant's home," from "Kookwes" a 
^iant. 

BLUE ROCKS (L.)— A descriptive name. The place was 

first settled by German families named Knickle and Heinrich. 

BL YSTEINER LAKE (L.)— So named after a family of early 
settlers. 

BOAR'S BACK (K.)— A ridge near Parrsborough, named by 
the Indians "Ou wokun," or "Awokun" meaning a portage or a 
short cut. 

BOISDALE (C. B.) — Named after a place of this name in 
•South Uist, Scotland, where the first settlers, Mclntjnres and Camp- 
bells came from in 1823. There were some Irish settlers named 



22 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

Lockman, Bray, Beaver, etc., at this place, but they left shortly after 
the Scotch arrived. This name is found spelled "Borsdell" in some 
records of 1840. 

The Indian name was "Migtcetcwegatic." 

BOLMAN HILL (L.) — So named after a Doctor Bolman who 
lived near by. 

BONNAR HEAD (C. B.)— Named after a family named 
Bonnar, of Scottish descent, who had their home on the point for 
many years, and some of the family are still there. 

BOOT ISLAND, Near Horton (A.)— Indian name "Kade- 
bunegek" meaning "clam diggings," or place where clams are dug. 

BOTTLE BROOK (L.)— Near Hebb Mills, a favorite drinking 
brook for man and horse, which indirectly gives the reason for its 
name. 

BOUCHE HARBOR (Ant.)— French name meaning mouth 
or entrance. It was so named by the early French because the 
expanse of the harbor cannot be seen until the mouth or entrance is 
passed through. 

BOULARDERIE (C. B.)— The first Frenchman who obtained 
a grant to settle and develop the fine island at the entrance to the 
Bras d'Or Lakes was Louis Simon de St. Aubin de Poupet, Cheva- 
lier de la Boularderie. His name was given to the island. He 
distinguished himself at the defence of Annapolis in 1707. He was 
taken prisoner at Louisburg in 1745. It was once called by the 
French "He de Verderonne." Captain Bayfield gives the name of 
this island as "Boulactria." 

BOUTILIER (H.)— Cove, Lake, and Point are all named after 
a George Boutilier (1756-1831) an early settler of this district, 

BOWSER STATION (H.)— Named in 1900 after a man named 
Angus Bowser, who ran a small hotel there and was the first Post- 
master. 

The first settler was a French Huguenot named Nicholas 
Boutilier (about the year 1825). 

It is only ten miles from Halifax, and the old Boutilier farm 
was a great hunting ground in bygone days. In the year I860,. 
King Edward VII, then Prince of Wales, and his following visited 
here on a fishing trip and camped over night. (See Timberlea.) 

BOYLSTON (G.)— This place was settled and laid out inta 
lots in the year 1786, by the Loyalist settlers, who were settled oa 
the Hallowel Grant of Milford Haven. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 23 

BRAS D'OR (C. B.)— This beautiful name is said to be (and 
we should like to believe it) from the French meaning "The Golden 
Arm." The Micmac Indian name was "Petoobook," meaning "a 
long dish full of salt water." On the maps of 1872 and earlier, the 
Lake is named "Le Lac de Labrador," and this is more likely the 
true derivation of the present name. The literal meaning of 
Labrador is ' * Laborer. ' ' 

The Indians called the entrance to the little Bras d'Or "Bano- 
skek," meaning "a deep cutting." 

The present Little Bras d'Or settlement was known as French 
Village, Owing to the settlers all being French and French Aca- 
dians. 

The Big or Great Bras d'Or Lake was named by the Indians 
"Moglakadik" meaning "place of brant geese." 

In a paper prepared by the late Dr. Patterson for the Nova 
Scotia Historical Society he says he believed the name Bras d'Or 
came from the Breton form of Bras 'd'eau arm of water or of the 
sea. 

BRENTWOOD (CoL)— The former name Graham Siding 
was replaced by the present name by an Act of Parliament in 1903. 

BREWSTER PLAINS (K.)— This place is named after one 
of its early settlers, Mr. Samuel Brewster. 

BRIAN LAKE (H.)— The second of the Tangier Lakes, named 
by the Indians "Milpagech." 

BRICK KILNS (C.)— Near Parrsboro named by the Indians 
"Kooltanegoochk," meaning "the neck cord" or "strung together." 

BRIDGES CREEK ( Y.)— The place received its name from an 
early settler, George Bridges, who was a British Navy man and 
settled there in the year 1765. 

BRIDGEPORT (C. B.)— Named in honor of a Mr. Bridge, 
a member of the London firm of jewellers, Messrs. Rundell, Bridge 
and Rundell, the original members of the General Mining Asso- 
ciation. This Association's history is closely woven in the early 
political and economic history of the Province. The Indians called 
the place "Melasuk" meaning "abundance" or "a place of 
beauty." 

BRIDGETOWN (A.)— This place was first known as 
Hicks' Ferry. The present name was given it in the year 1824 
because of the bridge connecting Granville with Annapolis, which 
caused it to grow into a town of considerable importance. 



24 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



BRIDGEWATER (L.)— Appropriately named owing to loca- 
tion near the Bridge over the La Have River. It was settled about 
the year 1810. It was incorporated as a Town in the year 1899. 

BRIGHTON (D.)— Received this name in 1861. Was form- 
eriy known as "Head of St. Mary's Bay." 

BRILEY BROOK (Ant.)— One of the eariy settlers Ensign 
John Brailey, Breariy or Briley owned a portion of land inAntigo- 
nish in the present town. The brook ran through his place and 
received his name. He is said to be the founder of the present 
town of Antigonish. 

BRINE (H.)— A lake named after a family of early settlers 
named Brine, not Brian. 

^ BRISTOL (OO— This place formeriy known as "Dean's 
Point," was named after a Captain Dean, who with others estab- 
lished a whale fishery at Green Harbor. 

The present name is modern, and after the English seaport 
city of this name. (The former name for Bristol in England was 
Bristowe) . 

BROAD COVE (I)— A descriptive name. This place was 
formerly known as "Hunter's Bay." 

BROAD COVE MINES (I.)— This place was formeriy known 
as Loch Leven and was changed to its present name by an Act of 
Parliament passed in 1895. 

BROAD RIVER LAKE (O-)— A descriptive name. The 
Indians named this lake "Wobe-akade," meaning "white place," 
from woba meaning white, and akade meaning place. It is some- 
times translated as Swan-land. 

BROOKDALE (R.)— The old name for this place was Black 
River Rear. It was in 1907 given its present name by an Act of 
Parliament. 

BROOKFIELD (Col.)— Was first settled and named about 
the year 1786. The first settlers were William Hamilton and 
Daniel Moore, later joined by William Downing, William Carter 
and James Boomer. The Indian name for this place was "Sibumea- 
dook." 

BROOKFIELD (O-)— A descriptive name. First settled 
by William Burke. Burke was a remarkable pioneer, and is said to 
be the first white man to explore the interior of Queens County. * 

The Indian name of this place was "Bankwenopskw," meaning 
"We hunt him among the rocks." (See Greenfield.) 

BROOKLAND (Ant.) — Formerly known as a portion of 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 25 



Hallowell Grant, given its present name by an Act of Parliament in 
1892. 

BROOKLYN (Hts.)— The Indians called the place "Nelegan- 
kunek" meaning * 'broken snowshoes." 

BROOKLYN (0-) — The Indian name for this place was 
"Katkooch," and also "Katkoolch," meaning "a hill on the opposite 
side." The place was formerly known as ''Herring Cove:" 

BROOKLYN (Y.)— First settled by Stephen Durkie and was 
at one time known as "Squirrel Town." 

BRORA (P.) — Named after a village in Sutherlandshire 
Scotland. 

BROUGHAM (Q.)— Settled and named in 1822. ^ Evidently 
named after Lord Brougham, who was Lord Chancellor in England 
about this date. 

BROWN'S POINT (P.)— Named after an early settler John 
Brown. 

BRUE HILL (Hts.) — Named after an early French Acadian 
settler named La Brun. 

BRULE (COL.) — This is so named from the French, meaning 
Burnt Land. The Harbor was named by the Indians "Segwak' 
meaning a "barren place." 

BUCKFIELD (Q.)— See Greenfield. 

BUDD BROOK (D.)— So named after an early settler Elisha 
Budd, who settled there about the year 1789. 

BULLS GUT (H.)— The Indians named the place "Emkok- 
etcajitwakade," meaning the abode or place of toads. 

BUNKER ISLAND (Y.)— Named in memory of Hezekiah 
Bunker, a very early settler of Yarmouth. 

BUNKER LAKE (Y.)— Probably so called after Mr. Paul 
Bunker, an early settler of Yarmouth. 

BURNCOAT (Hts.)— First settled by Thomas and Robert 
Faulkner about 1795. A story goes that it received its name 
in this way: They left a coat on the marsh and went off and 
set fire to the hay; the fire spreading, burnt up the coat. 

BURTON SETTLEMENT (D.)— First settled by Timothy 
Burton and named after him. 



26 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



CABBAGE CREEK (R.)— See Anse de la Choux. 

CALDWELL COVE (D.)— So named after a first settler Mr. 
John Caldwell, a Scottish crofter who settled here about the year 
1789. 

CALEDONIA (Q.)— Settled and named by six Scotch fam- 
ilies in the year 1820. There are many places in the Province with 
this name or variations of it, all named by seUlers in honor of their 
Scottish home. 

CALUM-RUADH BROOK^ (L)— This place is named after 
a nearby resident. It is a Gaelic word meaning "Red Malcolm's 
Brook." 

CAMPBELL HILL (Col.)— So named after one of Tatama- 
gouche's early and progressive settlers Alexander Campbell, the 
founder of shipbuilding in that place. 

CAMPBELLTON (I.) — This place received its name after a 
family of residents by Act of Parliament in the year 1885. It was 
hitherto known as Rear Loch Ban. 

CANADA CREEK (K.)— This place is named after an early 
settler named Kennedy, sometimes pronounced Kanidy. This is a 
case where a change of form has given the place its name. 

There are some, however, who claim it was named after an 
original grantee of Cornwallis township a Major William Canada. 

CANARD RIVER (K.)— The old Indian name for this 
River was " Apcheechkumoochwa-akade, " meaning "abounding in 
little ducks." Hence the French name "Canard" which means 
"duck." 

CANNES (R.) — Named after the watering-place "Cannes" in 
France, is a French settlement. The post office was opened in 
1884. It was first settled by Louis McPhee, Marshall and Andrew 
Dugast and others about 1795. 

CANNING (K.)— Was first named "Apple Tree Landing," 
later was called "Habitant Corner." About the year 1830 at a 
citizens* meeting called for the purpose, it was named in honor of 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 27 

George Canning, Prime Minister of England, 1827 (Born 1770; 
died 1827). He was a great Constitutionalist. 

CANN HILL (Y.) — Named after Hugh Cann, who settled in 
the vicinity in the year 1784. 

CANSO (G.) — Some authorities say this word was derived 
from the name of a French navigator, Canse, and**eau" (water). 
Others say that the French spelling "Campseau" suggests that the 
Harbour was so called because it was a common rendezvous for 
vessels. Haliburton says: "It is said that the derivation of the 
word "Canso" is from the Spanish "Ganso" a goose, a name 
given to it on a'ccount of the immense flocks of geese then seen 
there." Dr Rand states it is from the Indian word "Kamsok," 
meaning "opposite the lofty cliffs." This would appear to be the 
proper derivation of the name as the Indians called White Head 
nearby "Kamsokootc" meaning "the little place opposite the lofty 
cliffs." 

In 1765 the town was known as Wilmot Town, so named in 
honor of Montague Wilmot, Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia 
at that time. 

The strait was at one time called "Straits of Fronsac" also 
at one time called by the French "Passage du Glas." 

Canso Township was one of the four sub-divisions of the north- 
western part of Cape Breton Island, formed in 1828. 

The Micmac Indians sometimes applied the name "Taooog- 
unak" to the Gut of Canso. This name appears to particularly 
apply to the passage, and it is the general Micmac word for any 
passage. 

CANTICOOK (Hts.)— This place in Newport Township 
was called by the Micmac Indians "Kunetkook" meaning "place 
near or close at hand." This Indian word was eventually brought 
to the present form. 

CAPE A GROS NEZ (R.)— Named so by the eariy French 
meaning Cape of the Great Nose. It is near Petit de Grat on Isle 
Madame. 

CAPE BLOMIDON (K.)— (see Blomidon). 

CAPE BRETON (C. B.)— The Cape from which the whole 
Island received its name was so named by Basque or Breton fisher- 
men after a cape of the same name in their own country. 

The mariners know this place better by the name "Port Novy 
Land," called so from the small adjacent islands of " Puerto Neuvo." 
We find this Cape called ' 'Flourillon. ' ' "Forillon' * is a word applied 
by the French to a large rock split off the coast. 



28 PLACE-NAMES OR NOVA SCOTIA 

CAPE BRETON— Discovered by John Cabot in 1497. The 
old Indian name of Cape Breton was "Oonamaagik" sometimes 
appearing as "Oonamggee." This spelling "Onumage" or "Wum 
age" traces the meaning back to a variation of the name "Meg- 
amage,"the name the Indians applied to the whole of the Maritime 
Provinces, which means "home of the Micmacs or the true men." 
It was also called "Baccalaos," the Basque word for codfish. It was 
named St. Laurent or St. Lawrence Island by Champlain in 1603. 
Vevazzano named Cape Breton "Isle Du Cap." Later it was 
known as "Isle Royale" (1714). 

The Cape was probably given its name by Basque or Breton 
fishermen in remembrance of the land of their origin, Cape Breton 
in the Basque country, and this name was later applied to the whole 
island. 

Cape Breton is the oldest French name in American geography. 
In the year 1621 Sir William Alexander transferred the Island of 
Cape Breton to his friend Sir Robert Gordon of Lochenvar. Sir 
Robert and his son obtained a royal charter and named the island 
the Barony of New Galloway. The present county of Cape 
Breton contains 1169 square miles. (See Sydney, Louisburg and 
Cape Breton.) 

The Island was ceded to England in 1763, was a separate 
colony from 1784 to 1820, and was annexed to and incorporated 
with Nova Scotia in 1820. 

A "County of Cape Breton" was formed in the year 1765, on 
December 10th. It included all of the Island of Cape Breton 
and all islands within three leagues of it. 

In 1821, Cape Breton had three Townships formed, named St. 
Andrew's, St. Patrick and Sydney. 

In 1828, the north-western part of Cape Breton Island was 
divided into four townships, and they were named Canso, Port 
Hood, Ainslie and Margaree. 

The following list of ancient spelling appearing on old maps 
for the name "Cape Breton" may be of interest: 

1527 "C. de berton." 
1529 "Terra de bretto." 
1542 "Cabo Bretos." 

"Cavo de bretoni." 

1544 "Del berto." 

1546 "Terre des Britons." 

"Cap aux Bretons." 

"C. Bretain." 

1550 "Tierra de los broton." 
1554 "Terra de los bertoms." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 29 



1540 "C. Britonum." 
1558 "C. dos bertoens," 
1558 "Tierra de los Briton." 
1569 "Cap de Breton." 
1593 "C. de brits." 
1596 "C. de Bertram." 
1715 "Gaspey Island." 

CAPE BRULE (C.B.)— So named from the French word 
"Brul^" meaning burnt, owing to a coalpit being fired there in 1752. 

CAPE CHIGNECTO (C.)— At one time called "Cape of 
Two Bays" because it separated Chignecto Bay (see) from the 
Basin of Minas. 

CAPE DAUPHIN (V.)— Indian name for Cape Dauphin was 
"Kookumijenagwanak" meaning "our grandmother" named from 
a certain rock. 

St. Ann's Bay was called Port Dauphin by the French in 1711, 
when they believed it was a better place than Louisburg, and were 
advocating its being fortified. It is now applied to the Cape only. 
Dauphin, from the French "Dauphin," the eldest son of Royalty — 
"Prince" is the English equivalent. Sometimes erroneously 
spelled "Dolphin." 

CAPE D'OR (C.)— Was at one time called "Cap des Mines," 
owing to the attempts made here to mine copper. The French 
named it "Cap d'Or," i. e. "Golden Cape," they having mistaken 
its native copper for gold. 

CAPE EGMONT (V.)— See Egmont Lake. 

CAPE GEORGE (Ant.)— Formerly known as Cape St. 
George, undoubtedly so named by the English after one of the 
English kings of that name. Earlier than this it was known as 
Cape St. Louis, named by the French after their royalty. The 
Micmac Indians named it "Memkatc," meaning "the small field." 

CAPE JOHN (P.)— The Indian name for this cape was 
"Wenjooteamwakade" meaning "the cow pasture, or cattle land." 

CAPE LA HAVE (L.)— Named "Cape de la Have" in 1604 
by Champlain. He evidently saw some resemblance to Cap de la 
Have in France and gave the name to the Cape. This was three 
years in advance of the first English settlement in Jamestown, 
Virginia. 

CAPE LA RONDE (R.)— This place was named by the earU 



30 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



French "La Cap a la Ronde" after a man named "La Ronde" 
who settled on the extreme cape. Marquis De La Ronde was Sir 
Nicholas Denys' grandson, and some believe the Cape may have 
been named after him. 

CAPELIN COVE (R.)— Or sometimes "Caplin," so named 
owing to the large number of these small fish of the smelt family 
that sometimes appear in this cove. 

CAPE NEGRO (S.)— Called by the Micmac Indians "Kes- 
pooguit." (See N.) 

CAPE NORTH (V.)— By some historical students Cape North 
is believed to be the "prima tiera vista" or the actual landfall first 
seen by John Cabot. On some old maps it is shown as "prima vista." 
The Indians called Cape North "Uktutunook" meaning "the land's 
end." It is probable that this Cape was named "Cape Lorraine" 
or "Laurent" by Jacques Cartier in 1535, when he named the St. 
Lawrence, and the name was afterwards wrongfully applied to 
Lorraine, near Louisburg. 

It is said that the first settlers at Cape North were named 
Stanley and Matatal and John Gwynn, an American refugee, in 
1812. Gwynn- was the first preacher in the northern wilds of Cape 
Breton. His name appears on some records as John Gunn ; he was a 
Methodist. 

Cape North has been aptly called the "Watch Tower of the 
Gulf." 

CAPE SABLE (S.)— Named from the French word "sablon" 
meaning Sand Island. (See.) The Micmac Indian name for the Cape 
was "Kespoogwitk" meaning "the last place" or the "end of land." 
It is interesting to note that Charles de la Tour was known as 
"Lord of Cape Sable," and Lieut, of the King in Acadia." The 
name of the Cape appears on old plans as "Cape Sandy." 

CAPE SABLE ISLAND (S.)— The name "Sable" is said to 
have come from the French word "Sablon" meaning "sand." 

CAPE SMOKY (V.)— The old French name of this place was 
"Cape Enfume," and it was so named on account of the cloud of 
mist which so often envelops this storm-swept landmark of the Gulf. 
The Indian name for this cape was "Sakpeedich," meaning "a 
smooth bathing place." There are two white hills or cliffs to the 
south-west of the cape. Pichon says these two hills were known 
(1760) as the "Veils of Cape Enfume." 

CAPE SPLIT (Y.)— Called by Champlain "Cap Fendu" 
later called "Cloven Cape," was called "Cap de Poutrincourt," 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 31 



owing to it being stated that Poutrincourt in his voyage (1604- 
1607) fell from this cape and nearly lost his life. (See Champlain's 
Journal.) The present name is of course the English name sug- 
gested by the early French name "Cloven Cape." The Indians 
called this place 'Tlekteok," meaning "huge handspikes for break- 
ing open a beaver dam." They also called it "Plegum," which 
means "an opening in a beaver dam"; and the high rocks were 
known as "Plekteok." 

CARIBOU HARBOR (P.)— This name is said to have arisen 
from some of the first explorers having seen a herd of caribou on, 
the east point of what is now known as the Big Island, but which 
was then a headland connected with the shore, and which was 
called "Caribou Point." The old Indian name was "Komagunuk,'s 
meaning "a decoy place where they set duck decoys". Dr. Rand" 
Dictionary gives the spelling of the Indian name as "Komagunuk.' 

CARIBOU MARSH (P.)— The Indian name of this place was 
"Kalebooakade," meaning Caribou Place. 

CARIBOU MINES (H.)— Named Caribou because deer 
were common and Mines because of its being a gold mining dis- 
trict. 

CARLETON (Y.)— The first settler was Daniel Raymond. 
At one time it was known as "Nine Partners' Falls" owing to nine 
settlers having formed a partnership to run a mill there. It was 
also formerly known as "Temperance," owing to the settlers having 
formed a Temperance compact to eschew all intoxicating liquors. 
Its present name is in honor of the first Baron of Dorchester, 
Sir Guy Carleton, who was Commander-in-Chief in America in 
1782, afterwards Governor of Quebec, up to 1796. 

CARRINGTON (C.)— Named so by a meeting of its residents 
called for that purpose in the year 1910. It was formerly known 
as Eel Creek. The first settlers were families named Bigney and 
Angus. 

CARROLL'S CORNERS (H.)— Named in 1843 after a man 
named John Carroll, who owned a house and small store at this 
place. 

CARRYING PLACE (H.)— This is the name given to the 
land between the Ponhook Lake in Halifax County and the Dau- 
pheneys Lake in Lunenburg County, meaning the portage or place 
where canoes can be carried from lake to lake. 

CASTLE BAY(C. B.)— Was given this name in the year 1896. 



32 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

It was formerly called Amaguadus Pond, a Micmac Indian word 
meaning "plenty." Settled in the year 1805. An Act confirming 
the present name was passed by Parliament in 1906. 

CASTLEREAGH (Col.)— Named in honor of the Marquis 
of Londonderry (Robert Stewart), who was also Viscount Castle- 
reagh. 

CATALONE (C. B.)— "Catalogne" said to have been named 
after a French version of the Spanish "Catalona," the ancient 
Province of Catalonia in Spain. There was a French Engineer in 
Louisburg in 1728-1735 named M. de Catalogne, and in all proba- 
bility his name was given to Catalone. There is evience that he 
owned an extensive tract of land in the vicinity of thi place, which 
was then known as the "Barachois de Mire." 

CAVEAU POINT (I.)— This is a French word meaning 
"a small hole, opening or cave," likely so named becasre of a small 
opening in the nearby rocks. 

CENTREVILLE (D.)— Formerly known as Tro Cove. 

CHAMBERS POINT (Col. So named after an early 
settler Robert Chambers, who in 1806 received a grant of the 
Point from Col. DesBarres. 

CHARLO (G.) — Was settled about the year 1760 and named 
after its first settler Charles Richard; sometimes called Charlos 
Cove. 

CHAPEL ISLAND (R.)— See "Indian Island." 

CHASWOOD (H.)— The places formerlyk nown as Gay's 
River Road and Taylorville were changed to Chaswood by an Act 
of Parliament passed in the year 1901. The name is in honor of a 
Mr. Charles Wood of Halifax, who fell in the South African war 
in the year 1897. 

^ CHEBEC (Y.)— An Indian word, meaning "The Narrows" 
which was the Indian name for Tusket Wedge. No doubt origin- 
ally "Kebec" (Quebec) or "Narrows." 

CHEBOGUE (Y.)— Sometimes found as "Jeboque." Indian 
words "che" (great) and "paug" (still water). Another authority 
says the name is from the Indian word "Utkubok" or spring 
water, or "Teceboque" meaning cold water. It was permanently 
settled in 1761, but an unsuccessful attempt at settlement was made 
by some French in the year 1739. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 33 

CHEBOGUE POINT (Y.)— See Chebogue. This place was 
first settled by and granted to John McKinnon. He was a brother 
of Captain Ronald McKinnon, the first settler, and it was he who 
gave Argyle its name. (See Argyle.) 

CHEBUCTO HEAD (H.)— This was the old Indian name for 
Halifax, now only applied to this head. It is from the Micmac 
Indian word "Chebookt," meaning "chief harbor." 

CHEDABUCTO (G.)— This name is a corruption of the Mic- 
mac Indian name ''Sedabiooktook", meaning "running far back." 
It forms part of the separating waters between Cape Breton and 
Nova Scotia. 

CHEDABUCTO BAY (G.)— The Indian spelling was "Seda- 
booktook," meaning "running far back" or "a deep extending 
harbor." 

CHEGOGGIN (Y.)— There is a point and village of this 
name. Indian "che" (great) and "goggin" (encampment), i. e., 
"great encampment" (1630. The real Indian name was "Noo- 
jeogun" from which we have the present name. The meaning 
given above is likely correct.) 

CHESLEY CORNER (L.)— The first settler at this place was 
one Condore, followed by a German named Cross. John Chesley 
later came here from Annapolis, and the place was named after 
him. 

CHESTER (L.)— Settled in 1761. £50 was paid in that year 
for briri^ing settlers from New England to Chester, at one time 
named "Shorham," after the seaport town Shoreham in Sussex, 
England. 

The Indian name for this place was "Meneskwaak," meaning 
"the marshy place." 

Chester is one of the two township division of Lunenburg 
County, and was formed into a separate district in 1863. East 
Chester was formerly known as Scotch Cove. 

CHETICAMP (D.)— See "Cheticamp, Inverness County." 

^ CHETICAMP (I.)— Harbor, Island, Point, Village and River. 
This name is French, derived from the two words "chetit" and 
"camp" and meaning a poor camping ground or a poor encamp- 
ment, a miserable or unhealthy camp. 

In the year 1775 or 1776, fourteen Acadian families crossed 
over from Prince Edward Island, and settled at "Cheticamp." 



34 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



CHEVERIE POINT (Hts.)— The Indian name for this place 
was "Naooktaboogwadik" meaning, "It stands alone." (See 
Chiverie.) 

CHEVERIE SPLIT (Hts.)— The Indian name was "Naea- 
dich" meaning ''heaving in sight." 

CHEZZETCOOK (H.)— The old spelling of this word was 
"Chillincook". It was once part of and included in Musquodoboit. 
The name is from thp Micmac Indian "Sesetkook" or "Tceset- 
kook" meaning "flowing rapidly in many channels." 

CHIGNECTO (C.)— From the Micmac Indian word "Sig- 
niukt" meaning "a foot of cloth." This name appears in the 
English records in the year 1691 as "Siganectoe." 

The Bay was at one time called by the French "Bay de 
Gennes," i. e., "Bay of Twins." A fanciful derivative for this 
name is "Chignon Du Col," meaning "nape of the neck." Chig- 
necto sometimes appears as "Chignitou," was also known as 
"Beaubasin." This was after a family of Beaubasins descendants 
of the Sier de la Potherie who served in Acadia; although it is 
claimed by others to have been so named as descriptive meaning, 
"beaut^'ful basin." (See Cumberland.) 

CHIGNECTO CAPE (C)— In 1607 Champlain came in sight 
of Cape Chignecto, which he named the Cape of Two Bays, be- 
cause it was the western extremity of the land which divided 
Chignecto Bay from the Basin of Minas. (See Chignecto.) 

An Indian name for the Cape was "Elmojooiktook." 

CHIMNEY CORNER (I.)— This place was settled by people 
from Scotland in the year 1811. It received its name from a high 
pinnacle of rock, resembling a chimney, which is at the entrance to 
the cove. The name is said to have been given to it by a French 
admiral. 

CHIMNEY CORNER (L.)— A small harbor on the west 
shore of St. Margaret's Bay, given the name owing to the position 
of the rocks which form the entrance. 

CHIPMAN (K.)— Brook and Village. Named after some 
member of the old King's County family of Chipman. 

CHIVERIE (Hts.)— See Cheverie. 

CHRISTMAS ISLAND (C. B.)— Was settled in the year 
1802, and received its name from a leading Micmac Indian said to 
be a Chief named "Noel" which is the French for "Christmas," 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 35 



who died there and was buried on the island opposite the present 
railway station. The old Indian name for this place was **Abad- 
akwitcetc" meaning, "the small reserved portion." 

CHURCH HILL (H.)— Near Dartmouth. Here the first 
church was built on the eastern side of Halifax Harbor. It was 
built by the Government for the use of the Maroons or Negroes who 
were brought from Jamaica and settled in that vicinity in the year 
1796. 

CHURCHILL LANDING (Y.)— Named after an early 
settler Lemuel Churchill who came from Plymouth and settled here 
about the year 1762. 

CHURCH POINT (D.)— Received its first colonists in 1771. 
The college of St. Anne's here was founded in 1890 by the Eudist 
Fathers. The point was at one time known as "Point de I'Eglise." 

This is the neighborhood that was known to the Indians as 
"Chicaben." (See Port Acadia). 

CHURCHVILLE (P.)— Was first settled by John Robertson, 
a Scottish (Highland) immigrant to Pictou in 1784. So named 
from its being the site of a church. 

CHUTE (A.) — A Cove named after a family of early settlers. 

^ CIBOUX ISLANDS (V.)— Generally called the "Bird Islands" 
owing to the large number of wild sea birds found near. The name 
is Indian, meaning "River Islands." The name "Cibou" (Big 
River) was at one time been applied to St. Ann. 

These islands are at the southern entrance of St. Ann Bay. 

CLAM HARBOR (G.)— See Port Shoreham. 

CLAM HARBOR (H.)— The clams were plentiful there. The 
Indian name was "Aasugadich," "Asuk" is the Indian word for 
clam. 

CLARENCE (A.)— So named in honor of Edward, Duke of 
Kent, who took a great interest in the settlement of the place, and 
spent some time there. The first and earlier settlers were Samuel 
Elliott, Henry Barks, William Marshall, and Francis Jackson. 

CLARE TOWNSHIP (D.)— One of the two township divisions 
of Digby County. Formed as a Township iai the year 1768, wa^ 
named "Clare" by Michael Franklyn, who was i^t the time Lieuten- 
ant-Governor of Nova Scotia, no doubt after the subdivision of 
Munster, Ireland, of this name. Clare was known formerly as 



36 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



French Town, as it was laid out and settled by some of the French 
Acadians who had returned from exile. 

CLARK (C. B.) — A point in Gabarus Bay, one time known as 
Low Point, named after residents there. 

CLARKVILLE (CoL)— See Hilden. 

CLAVERHOUSE (L)— So named by the early Scotch set- 
tlers, who were evidently admirers of John Graham, the Viscount 
Dundee. 

CLAY ISLAND (L.)— The excellent clay for use in brick- 
making found there gave this island its name. 

CLEAVELAND (H.)— See Cleveland. 

CLELAND CORNER (Y.)— Named after the Cleland family, 
who were the first settlers there. 

CLEMENT ISLAND (Y.)— An island in Chebogue Harbor 
named after an early settler, John Clements, who came from Marble 
Head and settled there in the year 1769. 

CLEMENTS TOWNSHIP (A.)— One of the four Township 
divisions of Annapolis County, was formed and named in the year 
1784 and was at this time settled by Hessians and Loyalists. 

CLEMENTSPORT (A.)— Named after the Township of 
"Clements." Was first settled by United Empire Loyalists in 
1784. Was at one time called Moose River. Moses Shaw, M. P. P., 
by a petition from the residents, had the name changed to Clements- 
port in 1856. 

CLEMENTSVALE (A.)— See Clements. 

CLEVELAND (R.)— Named after a President of the United 
States. It was formerly known as River Inhabitants Bridge. It 
was given its present name by an Act of Parliament in the year 
1891. 

CLEVELAND POINT (H.)— Sometimes wrongfully called 
"Cleaveland." The name appears on maps of Halifax in 1864. 
It received the name after a family that lived at the Point. 

CLIFTON (CoL)— Formerly called "Old Barns" as the bams 
of the French Acadians were still standing when the English settlers 
came to the place. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 37 



CLYBURN BROOK (V.)— So named after an old settler 
named Clybum who settled near the brook about the year 1840. 

CLYDESDALE (Ant.)— So named by an Act of Parliament 
in the year 1876. 

COACHMAN (L.) — A head in Mahone Bay.^ One time known 
as Covey Head, given its present name by Captain P. F. Shortland, 
R. N., in 1864. 

COBEQUID (CoL)— From the Micmac Indian word "Wak- 
obetgitk" said to mean ''the end of flowing water" — the bore. 
In a geographic description of the Province written in 1771, the 
Cobequid Mountains are called the 'Xady Mountains." The Abbe 
De Loutre refers to Cobequid as "Gobetick" in 1738. This name is 
found as V'Cocobequy" and lands here were granted to Mathieu 
Martin in tjhe year 1689. 

COCHRAN'S LAKE (C. B.)— This lake is said to have been 
named by the late Lt. -Governor David McKeen, who was at one 
time a land surveyor. One of his chainmen named Cochrane fell 
into the lake and he gave it the chainman's name. 

COGMAGUN (Hts.) — Said by some authorities to be an 
Indian word meaning * 'crooked river." Dr. Rand says perhaps 
it is derived from an Indian word "Cootumeegun" meaning "your 
hatchet." (See Hilford). 

COINNEACH BROOK (I.)— This place is named after one 
of its early settlers. The word Coinneach is the Gaelic for Kenneth. 

COLBART LAKE (H.)— This lake is near Purcell's Cove, 
Halifax, and bears a family name. 

COLCHESTER— Formerly called "Cobequid" (see). Changed 
to "Colchester" in 1780, then called the "District of Colchester." 
Named after the town in Essex, England, of that name: Anglo- 
Saxon, "Colneceaster," from its being situated on the Colone River. 

Raised to the dignity of a County in 1836. Is divided into 
four Townships viz: Truro, Onslow, Londonderry and Stirling. 
Colchester County contains 1308 square miles. 

COLE BROOK (P.)— This brook received its name from an 
early settler, one of the 82nd regiment grantees, named Colin 
McDonald, but was known as Cole McDonald. 

COLE HARBOR (H.)— At one time known as "Inner Harbor 
of Musquodoboit." The Indian name was "Wonpeak," meaning 
■"white water." 



38 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



COLIN'S POINT (H.)— This point in Dartmouth was one 
time known as Warren's Point. 

COMEAU HILL (Y.>— Named after a family of Acadians 
who resettled at this place after their expulsion. 

COMEAUVILLE (D.)— Once called "Clare." Received its 
present name owing to a family named Comeau residing there. 

CONDON SETTLEMENT (K.)— This place received its name 
from a family named Congdon, who came from Rhode Island and 
settled in Kings County. James Congdon's name appears as 
one of the original grantees of Cornwallis in 1764. 

CONN MILLS (C.)— This Village was named after an early 
settler who was a miller. 

CONVICT POINT (C. B.)— Near Mainstdieu. A vessel 
loaded with convicts was lost on this point ; hence the name. 

CONWAY TOWNSHIP (D.)— This was the former name for 
Digby County; was given the name in honor of the Rt. Hon. Henry 
Seymour Conway who was Secretary of State (English) in 1765. 
(See Digby.) 

COOK COVE, (G.)— Named after a family of Loyalists who 
settled at this cove in the year 1772. The Cooks like all other 
Loyalists would not take up arms against England and came to 
Nova Scotia to settle. 

COOK HARBOR (Y.)— Named after a Captain Ephraim 
Cook, said to be the first English settler of Yarmouth. He had a 
fishing post at this Harbor. 

COOKUMIJENAWANAK (H.)~This is the name given by 
the Micmac Indians to a rock in the outlet of the Grand Lake into 
the Shubenacadie River. The name means the "Grandmother's 
Place." It was believed by the Indians that this rock was placed 
there for them to fish from. 

COOLIN COVE (H.)— A Cove in Shag Bay, named after a 
family named Coolin. 

CORNING HEAD (Y.)— Named after Jonathan and Ebenezer 
Corning, to whom it was granted in 1765. 

CORKUM LAKE (L) — So named after an early settler named 
James Corkum. 

CORNWALLIS (K.>— Named after Colonel the Honorable 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 39 

Edward Cornwallis, who was gazetted Governor of Nova Scotia, 
the 9th of May 1749. He arrived in Halifax with 2576 immi- 
grants in July 1749. 

The Indian name for Cornwallis River was "Ijiktook" mean- 
ing "uncertainty." The French called it "Grand Habitant River." 
Cornwallis is one of the four Townships of Kings County and was 
formed into a Township in 1759. 

COSSMAN CREEK (D.)— Named after Captain John Coss- 
man a resident of the place. 

COTEAU INLET (R.)— A general descriptive name of sur- 
rounding lands. From the French, meaning "hillock" or "rising 
ground." 

COUNTRY HARBOR (G.)— At one time this place was called 
"Mocoudom," or "Moukodome." The Indian name for it was 
"Moolaboogwek" meaning "gullied and deep." 

First settled in the year 1783, by men of the Royal North 
and South Carolina Regiments, and Carolina Rangers. It was for a 
long time known as "Green Harbor." Changed to its present name 
in 1914, to avoid duplication of the name "Green." 

COW BAY (C. B.)— See Morien. 

COW BAY (H.)— The Indian name for this place was "Noo- 
loktookch". 

COYLE COVE (H.)— So named by Capt. P. F. Shortland 
(R. N.) in 1864. Sometimes called "Kieley." 

CRAMMOND ISLAND (I.)— Evidently so named after a 
family of Crammonds, whose name appears in the early records 
of Inverness County. This island is sometimes erroneously called 
Smith Island. 

CRANBERRY HEAD (C. B.)— There is a bog near this place 
and in the early days cranberries grew in abundance here; hence 
the present name, which is a regrettable change from the old name 
"Richard Point," by which it is known on the maps of 1829. 

CRANBERRY HEAD (Y.)— So named owing to the plenti- 
tude of cranberries found there; this is another regrettable change 
from the old Micmac Indian name "Soonecaty," which means 
"place of cranberries." 

CRAWLEY CREEK (C. B.)— Named after Captain Crawley 



40 PLAGE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

of the Royal Navy, who came to Sydney in its early days and settled 
at Point Amelia, near the Creek, which since bears his name. 

CRAWLEY ISLAND (Y.)— Named after John Crawley, 
known as Squire Crawley, who settled in Yarmouth about 1761, 
and was one of a committee in authority in 1762. He came from 
England to Marble Head and later to Yarmouth. 

CREEK AUX NAVIREfS (R.)— Named by the French, 
meaning "the creek for ships." 

CREESER COVE (L.)— Named after an early settler, George 
Creeser. 

CREIGHTON COVE (H.)— This Cove in Dartmouth is named 
after an Englishman named James Creighton, or one of his family, 
who owned considerable land nearby about the year 1845. 

CREIGNISH (I.) — After a place of the same name in Scot- 
land. Said to mean "Creig-Rock" and "Nish-here, or Gaelic for 
"here is rock," or "a rocky place." 

CRESCENT BEACH (L.)— So named owing to its shape. This 
Beach was formerly known as "Romkeys." 

CRICHTON (R.)— This beach, head, island and shoal is named 
after David Crichton, an immigrant to Pictou from Dundee, 
Scotland in 1812, who bought land on the island and established 
a fishing station there in 1824. 

CROCKER POINT (Y.)— This place received its name from 
an early settler Daniel Crocker, who settled there about the year 
1765. 

CROSSBURN (A.)— Named after J. W. Cross, who was the 
Woods Superintendent of the Davidson Lumber Company, which 
makes, or did make Crossbum its headquarters. 

CROUSE TOWN (L.)— Named after early settlers, John 
and Philip Grouse. 

CULLODEN (D.) — This place is named after a British ship 
called the "Culloden" which was wrecked there in the year 1859. 
It was formerly known as "Broad Gove." 

CUMBERLAND— The old Indian name was "Kwesomalegek" 
meaning "hardwood ridge" or "point." Cumberland Basin was at 
one time called by the French "Beaubasin," and is now known as 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 41 

Chignecto, one time spelled as "Chinictou." The name Fort 
Beausejour was changed to 'Tort Cumberland" in 1755, by Robert 
Monckton, who was at that time Lieutenant-Governor at Annapollis 
The name was afterwards given to the Bay, Township and County. 
The County was formed in 1759. In 1784 New Brunswick 
was made a separate Province, and Cumberland was included in 
Nova Scotia. 

It is said that it was named in honor of the Duke of Cumber- 
land, the son of George II, who commanded the British armies in 
Flanders and Hanover. (See Chignecto). 

Cumberland County is divided into three Townships, Amherst, 
Parrsborough and Wallace, and contains 1612 square miles. 

CUMBERLAND BASIN— So named by the English in 1755, 
replacing the name "Beaubasin" used by the French. (See Cum- 
berland) . 




42 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



D 



DALHOUSIE (K.) — Named in honor of George Ramsay, the 
ninth Lord Dalhousie, who was Lieut. -Governor of Nova Scotia 
in 1816 and afterwards Governor of Canada from 1820-28. 

DALHOUSIE (A.)— (See Dalhousie, K.). 

DALHOUSIE COLLEGE^(See Halifax.) 

DALHOUSIE MOUNTAINS (P.)— First settled by Peter 
Arthur, a native of the Orkneys; later in 1815 by a number of 
families from the Lowlands of Scotland. (See Dalhousie.) The 
first settlers here had some difficulty about their titles, some spec- 
ulators laying claim to them. The Earl Dalhousie interfered and 
made satisfactory arrangements for the settlers, who in their 
gratitude named the place after him. 

DALHOUSIE ROAD (L.)— (See Dalhousie). 

DANE CORNER ( Y.) — Named after a resident and very early 
settler, Thomas Dane. 

DARES POINT— (L.)— A point on the east side of Mahone 
Bay called after a family of Dares, which is a very common fam- 
ily name in Lunenburg County. 

DAREY LAKE (L.) — Named after an early settler James 
Darey, whose name appears among the original grantees of Lunen- 
burg Township. 

DARTMOUTH (H.) — One of the Townships of Halifax Coun- 
ty. Was first settled in the year 1751. Named after the Earl of 
Dartmouth, an English Secretary of State, and great confidant of 
Queen Anne. His name was William Legge; born 1731, died 1801. 
The first immigrants arrived in 1750 or 1751 in the ship "Alderney." 
In 1784 thirty Nantucket families settled in Dartmouth. 

Dartmouth was incorporated as a town in 1873. 

DAUPHIN (V.)— (See Cape Dauphin). 

DAUPHINIE LAKE (L.)— Named after an old family of 
early settlers ; the name 'John Dauphinie appears among the orig- 
inal grantees of Lunenburg. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 43 

DAYSPRING LAKE (P.)— The children of the Presbyterian 
churches in the Lower Provinces in the year 1863-64 built a vessel 
in New Glasgow to be used as a mission ship in the South Seas. 
They named it the "Dayspring." The spars for the vessel were 
brought from the neighborhood of this lake, which was for this 
reason named after the vessel. 

DEADMAN COVE (C. B.)— Near Bridgeport, on the southern 
side of Lingan Bay. So named because a number of bodies that 
had been washed ashore were found and buried there. 

DEBERT (CoL) — The grant for this place was previous to 
the grant of the Township of Londonderry (1775) and was given 
to the first settler, Anthony Caverley. 

DEBERT POINT (Col.)— The Indian name for this point was 
"Pelegaloolkek," meaning "smooth flowing water." 

The Indian name of this locality was "Wasokagek," meaning, 
"it is bright, or seen in the distance as a signal." 

DEEP COVE (L.) — An arm of the sea which runs up to the base 
of Aspotogan. The water at the head is of sufficient depth to permit 
of the largest ship to lie close to the shore, hence the name. 

DELAP COVE (A.)— First settled about the year 1800 by 
Isaac Haley and John McCaul. Haley likely Irish ; McCaul was a 
Scotchman. The place was named after Lawrence Delap, who did 
not reside there, but built vessels at the place about the year 1850. 
The Indian name for this cove was "Medabankeajetc," meaning 
"the little red bank." 

DELHAVEN (K.)— Formerly known as Middle Pereaux, 
changed to its present name by an Act of Parliament in the year 
1880. 

D'ENTREMONT (Y.)— Named after the Frenchman, D'En- 
tremont, who brought the French immigrants that settled there in 
1650. It is of interest to note that this man Philip D'Entremont 
was made Baron Pobomcon (see Pubnico) byiCharles de la Tour, 
who was himself known as Lord of Cape Sable and Lt. of the King 
(French) in Acadia. 

DENYS (L)— (See River Denys). 

DESCOUSSE (R.)— This name was known as early as 1752. 
The whole of Isle Madame was at one time called "Decoux" by the 
writer Pichon (1760). 



44 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

DEVIL'S GOOSE PASTURE (K.)— The legend has it that 
the country near Aylesford where there is a barren sand plain was 
once owned by the Lord, the King, and the Devil. The glebe lands 
to the first, the ungranted lands to the second, and the barren sand 
plain to the last, hence the name. 

DHU POINT (C. B.)— This place bears a Gaelic name, the 
word Dhu meaning black. 

DIGBY — Called at one time **Conway." Received its present 
name in honor of Admiral Robert Digby, who commanded the 
British convoy "Atalanta," and who brought 1500 refugees from 
New England in 1785. He was made commander-in-chief in North 
America in 1781. Formed into a County about 1841. Has two 
Township divisions namely, Digby and Clare. Digby Town was 
incorporated in 1890. The County contains 1021 square miles. 

DIGBY GUT (D.)— At one time known as St. George's Chan- 
nell. The Indians called it "Tee Wee Den," said to signify "Little 
Hole." In 1710 it was known as the "Gutt" and later as "Jennys 
Streights." 

DIGBY NECK (D.)— Settled by Loyalists in 1783. The 
Indian name for this place was "Oositookun" meaning "an ear"; 
again it is found called by the Indians "Wagweik," meaning "the 
end." 

DILIGENT RIVER (€.)— First settled by Lieut. Taylor and 
Captain Wilson about the year 1777 The place was visited by the 
Provincial Goverjnor Parr, and, finding Lieut. Taylor so industrious 
ancj diligent in his effort to make a home, he named the place 
"Diligent River." 

DINGWALL (V.)— This place was first called "Young's 
Cove." In the seventies, a man named Robert Dingwall, who kept 
a small store at Young's Cove, made application for a post office, 
and suggested to the Government the name of "Dingwall." Parlia- 
ment confirmed the name "Dingwall" in April 1883. 
•» 

DOCTOR HEAD (C. B.)— Between Sydney Harbor and 
Little Bras d'Or. Named after Doctor Jean, who owned the place 
and lived there in the early part of the nineteenth century. It is 
called Oxford Point on some of the old maps. 

DOG ISLAND (R.)— One time called Seal Island. Received 
both its old and present names from the fact that dog seals were 
plentiful there. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 45 

DOGGETT POINT (Q.)— Named after John Doggett, an 
estimable first settler of Queens County. He came from New Eng- 
land in 1759, and built a house at this place. 

DOMINION (C. B.)— This place was formerly part of Bridge- 
port ; when the Dominion Coal Company sank a coal mine there it 
was called "Dominion No. 1." By an Act of Parliament in the 
year 1906 the place was named "Dominion." 

DONKIN (C. B.) — Known as Dominion No. 6, one of the coal 
mining communities of the Dominion Coal Co., named after Hiram 
Donkin, a civil engineer, at one time the Company's Manager, and 
later Deputy Minister of Public Works and Mines for the Nova 
Scotia Government. 

It was previous to this included in the district known as 
"Schooner Pond." 

DONNYBROOK (P.)— Quite an unusual name to find in 
Pictou County. Named after the village in County Dublin, Ire- 
land, noted for its fairs. 

D'OR CAPE (C.)— So called by the French explorers who mis- 
took native copper for gold. 

DORCHESTER (Ant.)— A Township of Antigonish County. 
This subdivision of the County was at one time known as "Anti- 
gonish Interval." Named in honor of Sir Guy Carleton, whose 
title was First Baron Dorchester. (See Guysborough.) 

DORY RIPS (C.) — At Cape d'Or a submarine cape extends 
southerly into the sea, and produces whirlpools, which is the ex- 
planation of the name. 

DOUCETTE POINT (D.)— Named so after an early settler 
Pierre Doucette. 

DOUGLAS (Hts.)— One of the six Township Divisions of 
Hants County. 

DOUGLASS ROAD (A.)— Called after one of its early settlers 
named Douglas . 

DOVER SOI (H.) — Pronounced Dover Swa; the meaning is 
obscure but is said to mean Dover Run. The name Soi appears in a 
number of places in Nova Scotia, and is always applied to small 
running streams. 

DRAGOON ISLAND (C. B.)— An island on the Mira River. 



46 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



Legend has it that in early days when Sydney was a garrisoned 
town, two dragoons deserted with their horses. Coming to the 
Mira, they swam their horses from the point above Cupid's Cove 
to the Island. 

DUBLIN, NEW DUBLIN, DUBLIN SHORE (L.)— Settled 
by Alexander McNutt's colonists, brought from Ireland in the year 
1762. They did not remain at Dublin, but scattered throughout 
the Province, most of them going to New England. There were 
200 in all. 

DUFFERIN (H.) DUFFERIN MINES (G.)— So named in 
honor of Frederick Temple Hamilton Blackwood, the Marqui s of 
Duffer^, who was Governor-General of Canada from 1872-1878. 

DUNDEE (R.)— Named after the Scottish City "Dundee" the 
"Hill on the Tay." Dun being a Celtic root word meaning "Hill." 
The name as a whole comes from the Latin "Taodunum" meaning 
"Hill on the Tay." 

DUNMAGLASS (Ant.) — Received its name after a town 
named Dunmaglass, Inverness, Scotland, from which the first 
settlers came in 1791. There were three brothers: Andrew, Alex- 
and Angus McGillvray, and John McEachem. It was so named in 
the year 1879, and the name was suggested by the Rev. Andrew 
McGillvray, Parish Priest, a native and descendant of the original 
settlers, and an Act of Parliament was passed in that year confirm- 
ing the naming of the place. 

DUNVEGAN (I.) — This place, which was hitherto known as 
Broad Cove Marsh, is named after the cold, bleak, rock-built castle 
of the "McLeods of Skye." It received its present name by an 
Act of Parliament in the year 1885. In the Gaelic language the 
word "dun" means a hill. 

DURHAM (P.) — This place was named after John George 
Lambton, the Earl of Durham, who came to Canada in 1838 to 
bring order out of the chaos caused by the Rebellion. The name 
was suggested by William Graham, merchant, and was confirmed 
at a public meeting held for that purpose. The place was previously 
known as West River. 

DURKEE ISLAND (Y.)— On the Eastern side of Chebogue 
River. It was named after an early settler, Amasa Durkee. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 47 



E 



EARLTOWN (Col.)— Was first surveyed in the year 1817 by 
Alex. Miller, who gave it its name in honor of the Earl of Dalhousie 
who was at that time Governor of the Province. 

Miller surveyed boundary lines for different Townships and 
gave some of them their names. 

Earltown was first settled by Donald Mcintosh and Angus 
Sutherland in 1813. They came from Sutherlandshire, Scotland. 

EAST BAY (C. B.) — The modem and inappropriate name now 
generally applied to St. Andrew's Channel. The Micmac Indians 
called this place ''Aglaseawakade," "the English settlement," or 
"place of the English." 

EAST BERLIN (Q.)— Formerly known as Pudding Pan, 
given the present name by an Act of Parliament in the year 1886. 

EAST CHESTER (L.)— Sometimes called "Scotch Cove." 
First settled by John Hutcheson, John Duncan and Thomas 
Thompson, from Scotland. 

EAST DOVER (H.)— See Ocean Glen. 

EASTON (D.) — Sometimes known as New Jerusalem, first 
settled by Enoch McMullin in the year 1856. 

EAST RIVER (P.)— Was called by the Indians "Duckland," 
which is in their language "Apcheekumook-waakade." 

Sometimes called by the early Highland settlers "Great River," 
owing to its being the largest of the three rivers, East, West and 
Middle River, which flow into Pictou Harbor. 

ECONOMY (Col.) — Village and River. Micmac Indian 
name was "Kenomee," which means "Sandy Point" or a long point 
jutting out into the sea. This name is found in old church records 
and tokens spelled "Oeconomy." Later it was found spelled 
"Conomy" and at present "Economy," which suggests a meaning 
altogether different and less appropriate than the original "Keno- 
mee." 

ECUM SECUM (H.) — This sounds like an Indian name, but 
the Indians knew the place as, and called it "Megwasagunk," 
meaning "a red house." 



48 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

EDEN (P.)— See Garden of Eden. 
EDWARDSVILLE (C. B.)— See Point Edward. 

EEL BROOK ( Y.)— The Indian name was "Wiplcomegakum,'* 
meaning "place of eels, but they were poor and lean." 

Was settled in 1767 by seven Acadians who escaped deporta- 
tion. 

EEL CREEK (Y.)— The Indian name was "Wipkomagakum," 
meaning "place of plum stones." 

EGERTON (P.)~A Township of Pictou County. The 
County was subdivided in the year 1807 into three Townships, 
namely: Pictou, Egerton and Maxwelton. Probably named after 
Francis Egerton the third and last Duke of Bridgewater. He was a 
great projector of canals and was known as "The Father of British 
Inland Navigation." 

EGMONT LAKE (H.)— Named after the Right Honorable 
Earl of Egmont, who obtained a grant of 100,000 acres on the Shu- 
benacadie River in the year 1769. 

The Indian name for Egmont Bay was "Wegwaak." 
There is a cape of this name in Victoria County, Cape Breton 
— doubtless named after the same gentleman. It was formerly 
known as Aspe, and it is the southern promontory of the Bay of 
that name. (See Aspy Bay.) 

EIGHT MILE BROOK (P.)— Given this name because of it 
being eight miles from the starting point of the old Cobequid Road 
to the point where it crosses the road. 

EISNER COVE (H.)— Named after a family. 

ELDERBANK (H.)— Formeriy called Little Musquodoboit, 
named after St. Andrew's Church of Elderbank, which in its turn 
was named after the farm on which it was built. 

ELDER HEAD (Y.)— Named after a resident, Mr. Ebenezer 
Moulton, who was a church elder. He came from Massachusetts 
in 1761 and is said to be the first preacher in Yarmouth. 

ELGIN (P.) — So named in honor of James Bruce the eighth 
Earl of Elgin (1811-1863), a Governor-General of Canada during 
the troublesome years 1846-1854. 

ELLERSHOUSE (Hts.)— Named after^ Francis V. Ellers- 
hausen, a native of Germany, who settled in Hants County in 



PLACE-NAMES OP NOVA SCOTIA 49 

1864. He acqtdred a grant of 60,000 acres of land, including the 
Lakes Panuke and Stillwater. He built a large steam mill at 
Stillwater, and another at what is now known as Hartville. 

ELLISON RIVER (D.)— Formerly known as Craig's Brook. 

ELM SD ALE (H.) — Received its name from the number of 
elm trees growing in the Intervale. First settled by a man named 
Tremoine; later by Frasers and McDonalds from Pictou County. 

EMULOUS REEF (S.)— On Ram Island, Lockeport Harbor, 
called after H. M. Sloop "Emulous" of 18 guns, which was wrecked 
here August 2nd, 1812. 

ENFIELD (Hts.) — So named at a public meeting called at 
Malcolm's Pottery 1862; suggested by Mr. Thomas B. Donaldson 
after his home town, Enfield, in the Connecticut River Valley. 
Was previously called "The Crossing." 

First settler was William Hall (about 1830). 

ENFUME (V.)— See Cape Smoky. 

ENON (C. B.) — Originally a part of Loch Lomond, changed in 
1905 by an Act of Parliament to the present name. 

ERINVILLE (G.)— So named by lovers of Ireland who settled 
in this district. 

ERNST ISLAND (L.)— Named after an early settler Mr. 
Mathias Ernst. 

ESKASONI (C. B.)— "Eskasoni" is said to be an Indian word 
meaning "still water." But Dr. Rand gives the spelling as "Es- 
kusoognik" and the meaning as "green boughs." This place is 
still settled by Micmac Indians and reserved for their use. 

ESTMERE (V.)— So named by an Act of ParUament in the 
year 1887 — "mere" a rare word meaning "a pond, pool or lakelet" 
— also old Scottish word for the sea. 

ETNA (K.) — A point on the Blue Mountains named after the 
fanous Sicilian volcano. 

EUREKA (P.) — A milling company was established here 
known as the Eureka Milling Company; hence the village name. 



50 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



FAIRMONT (Ant.) — This place was formerly known as part 
of Hallowell Grant. By an Act of Parliament in the year 1892 it 
was given its present name. 

FAIRY LAKE (Q.)— This Lake and the Falls are so named 
because the Indian name appeared to mean the English word 
"Fairy" or "Witch." 

FAIRY HOLE (V.)— This place between Great Bras d'Or 
Entrance and St. Ann's Bay is so called owing to the caverns that 
start in from the shore extending into the cliffs for a considerable 
distance. These caves are of great interest to geologists and others 
visiting the place. A somewhat similar cave is found in Pictou 
County called Peter Eraser's Cave. 

FALES BROOK^ (K.)— A small stream in Aylesford flowing 
into the Annapolis River, named after an early settler Benjamin 
Fales, who was employed by Brigadier General Ruggles in clearing 
the southern slope of the North Mountain. 

FALKLAND (H.) — Received its name in honor of Lady Falk- 
land, who laid the corner-stone of the first church built there in the 
year 1845. Lady Falkland was the wife of Lucius Bentinck Falk- 
land, Viscount, then Governor of Nova Scotia. She was the young- 
est daughter of William IV. Its name previous to this was 
Fergusson's Cove. 

FALKLAND (L.)— See Falkland (H.). 

FALKLAND RIDGE (A.)— Named in honor of Lucius 
Bentinck Falkland, who was for a time Governor of Nova Scotia. 

FALMOUTH (Hts.) — Named after the seaport and watering 
place of that name in Cornwall, England. It is one of the six town- 
ship divisions of Hants County, and was formed into a Township 
in 1759. It was previous to this, part of King's County. 

FALSE BAY BEACH (C. B.)— A low strip of sand which pre- 
vents the communication between Cow Bay and Mira Bay, and, by 
the appearance of an entrance, deceives the mariners when approach- 
ing from the sea, hence the name. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 51 



FARIBAULT BROOK (I.)— On the Cheticamp River 
named after a Dominion geologist. 

FERRONA (P.)— From 'Terra" (iron). Named by officers 
of the Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co., when the Company were 
manufacturing pig iron there. 

FIFTH LAKE (Q.)— (See Liverpool). 

FINLAY POINT (I.)— Near Mabou named after a settler 
Finlay Beaton. 

FIRST LAKE (0.)~See Liverpool. 

(0.)~ " Port Medway. 
(H.)— " Tangier. 

FISHERMEN'S CARD TABLE (L.)— The name given to a 
large square rock in a very elevated position with a fiat even surface* 

FISHER'S GRANT (P.)--The old Micmac Indian name for 
this place was "Soogunugade" or "rotting place." 

FIVE HOUSES (L.) — So named because for a long time in 
the early days there were but five houses at this place. 

FIVE ISLANDS (C.)— The Indians called these Islands "Nan- 
kulmenegool" meaning "Five Islands." 

FLAT POINT (C. B.)— Generally called Low Point, is the 
Eastern Point of of Sydney Harbor. The name is descriptive. 

FLEMING ISLAND (H.)— An island near Port Dover, 
named after a family of the district. 

FLINT ISLAND (C. B.)--This place received its name from 
the name given to it by the French. "He a pierre a fusil" referring 
to the hardness of its rock. 

FLORENCE (C. B.)— Formerly known as "Cox*s." About 
the year 1905 the Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co. started a coal mine 
there and the village was named after the wife of the Counties 
Dominion Parliamentary Representative, Mr. D. D. McKenzie. 

FOLLY VILLAGE (CoL)— See new name Glenholm. 

FOLLY LAKE AND MOUNTAIN (CoL)— This word applied 
to the name of a place is often found, and in this case expresses 
the opinion of neighbors on an unfortunate location by one of their 



52 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



number named Flemming. At first it was knownh as Flemming 
Folly, later "The Folly"; it then became "Fawleig." and is now 
on the railway time tables as "Folleigh." 

FOOTE CORNER (Y.)— Named after a family of Footes' 
who were very early settlers. 

FORBES BROOK (P.)— So named after an early Scotch 
settler. Was one time called "The Half Mile Brook." A number 
of brooks on the West River were known as Four, Six, and Eight 
Mile brooks being the distance on the Cobequid Road from the 
point of departure. 

FORBES POINT (Q.)— This place is sometimes called 
"Wreck Point." The present name is after a Scotchman named 
Forbes, who was the first settler in this neighborhood. 

FORT CLARENCE (H.)— Was first erected in the year 1754. 
The name is probably in honor of Edward, Duke of Kent. 

FORT EDWARD, (K.)— Now a mere ruin, was named 
after the Duke of Kent. 

FORT ELLIS (CoL)— An old fort on the Shubenacadie River. 
It apparently received the name Ellis owing to a man of this name 
having a farm nearby. 

FORT LATOUR (S)— Named in honor of the brave 
Charles La Tour, who built a fort here in the year 1627. 

FORT LAWRENCE (C.)— At one time known as "Beau- 
basin." Settled in 1672. The Indian name was "Kwesomalegek," 
meaning "a hardwood point." This place was also known as 
Missiquash, a name now only applied to the river dividing Nova 
Scotia from New Brunswick. The fort was built by a Major Law- 
rence who was sent there to reduce the French and Indians to obed- 
ience and who built the fort in 1750. The district now bears the 
name he gave the fort. 

FORT MASSEY (H.)— Named after General Massey, Com- 
mander-in-chief in Nova Scotia in 1776. The name "Fort Massey" 
was given to the military cemetery in Halifax, later to the surround- 
ing residential area ; now, chiefly to designate the cemetery and the 
famous church of that name. 

FOSTER SETTLEMENT (L.)— This place is named after 
two brothers, Ezekiel and Henry Foster, who were the first settlers. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 53 

FOURCHE (R.)— This is the French for "forked" or "cloven." 

FOUR MILE BROOK (P.) — So named because of its being 
four miles from the beginning of the old Cobequid Road where it 
crosses the road. 

FOURTH LAKE (Q.)— See Liverpool 

(0.)— " Port Medway. 
(H.)— " Tangier. 

^ FOX ISLAND (G.)— An Island in the Gut of Canso. The 
Indian name was "Sebelogwokum," meaning "where skins are 
stretched" or "the drying place. 

FRAMBROISE (R.)— This is the French for "raspberry." 
The place was long known as Framboise Cove. The Micmac 
Indian name of this place was "Tawanok" or "Tawitk" meaning 
the outlet or flowing out. 

FRANCKLIN MANOR (C.)— First applied to a home, and 
now to the place. Named and owned by the Honorable Michael 
Francklin, who was Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia in 1766 
and Governor in 1772. 

ERASER POINT (P.)— Named after the first settler, Captain 
Eraser of the 82nd Hamilton Highlanders 1783. 

FREDERICK LAKE (H.)— This Lake bears the surname of a 
keen Halifax angler of about 1860. Sometimes called Pine Wood 
Lake. 

FREEPORT (D.)— Originally known as Long Island, changed 
to present name by an Act of Parliament in 1865. 

FRENCH CROSS (K.)— See Morden. 

^ FRENCH LANDING (H.)— This place is in Bedford Basin. 
It is believed to be the landing place and the encampment ground 
for the men who were with the ill-fated, disease-stricken, Due 
D'Anville*s fleet that arrived at Halifax in the year 1746. 

FRENCH RIVER (P.)— The French had a settlement at the 
mouth of this river in the early days, hence its name. 

FRENCH RIVER (Col.)— This place was settled by the 
French as early, if not earlier than 1737 and has ever since borne 
their name. 

FRENCH SETTLEMENT (D.)— For a long time known as 



54 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



Doucette Settlement, after David Doucette, who settled there in 
1830. 

FRENCH VALE^ (C.^ B.)— Nearly all the present settlers of 
French Vale trace their origin from four brothers who were French 
Acadians, and came from Prince Edward Island early in the nine- 
teenth century. 

FRENCH VILLAGE BROOK (CoL)— When Winslow's 
soldiers were hunting the French Acadians in these parts in 1775 
some of them fled up Salmon River to a brook, which has ever 
since been called French Village Brook. 

FROSTFISH COVE (H.)— This place received its name owing 
to the tom-cod being plentiful in its waters. It is interesting to 
note that tom-cod is a corruption of *a Canadian French word 
**tacaud" meaning plenty fish, and is of Indian origin. 




PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 55 



GABARUS (C. Bw) — Bay, Cape, Lake and Village said to be 
named after a French officer of Bayonne named **Gabarus." This 
is generally accepted as the right derivation. On maps of 1853 
we find it called "Bay de Gabory," and on an old map of 1752, "Gab- 
arus." Again it is said to come from the French name Cap Rouge, 
Red Cape. The village is named from the cape. The peninsulas 
north-west of the cape are called by Pichon "Desgoutins" and the 
"Governors." Pichon also refers to a mountain near Gabarus 
which he calls the "Devil's Mountain." Cape Gabarus appears 
on some early maps as Cape Portland. 

GAETZ COVE (L.) — This is a common family name in Lun- 
enburg County, and the cove is likely named after an early settler. 

GAIRLOCH (P.)— In the year 1805, a vessel arrived with 
passengers from Gairloch a small arm of the sea on the western 
coast of Ross-shire, Scotland. Three of them took up their lands 
at a brook, which they named after their native parish in Scotland 

GAIRLOCH MOUNTAINS (C. B.)— Named by the Scottish 
settlers after the arm of the sea of that name on the western coast of 
Ross-shi!re, Scotland. 

GALLOWS HILL (K.) — So named owing to the unfortunate, 
necessity at one time of erecting a scaffold on the hill. 

GALLOWS HILL (L.)— This hill was known in early days as 
**Star Fort" owing to the shape of the fence which enclosed the 
Garrison Fort in 1753. 

GARDNER MINES (C. B.)— Said to be named after Mr. 
Michael Gardner, an early Irish settler. 

GARDEN OF EDEN (P.)— Evidently so named by William 
McDonald, who came from Caithness, Scotland, and settled there 
in 1830. He was called the "Adam of the Garden" because he was 
the first man there. See Mount Adam and Eden Lake in the same 
vicinity, doubtless named so for the same reason. 

GASPEREAUX (K.)— The original French spelling is "Gas- 
parot" (an ale-wife). The "ale-wife" is a fish resembling a herring 
and is found in great numbers in certain parts of Nova Scotia. 



56 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



The Indians called Gaspereau River "Magapskejetc," meaning 
"rushing or tumbling over large rocks." 

The Indian name for Gaspereau Lake was "Pasedoock," 
meaning *'it has big whiskers," referring to its many small islands 
covered with shrubbery. 

The French Acadians called part of what is now Gaspereau 
"Melanson." 

GASPEREAU LAKE (A.)— See Gaspereau (K.). 

GATES FERRY (A.) — A crossing place near Middleton 
named after a nearby early settler, Oldham Gates. 

GAY'S RIVER (G.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Wisunawon," meaning Beaver Castor. 

GELLFELLAN ISLAND (Y.)— Named after its early settler 
James Gellfellan, who came from Londonderry, Ireland, and settled 
there about the year 1766. 

GENERAL'S BRIDGE (A.)— The Indians called this place 
"Eskunuskek," meaning "the ground is hard and grassy," also 
"Eisuneskwek," meaning "Eison's place." Here a bridge crosses 
the Annapolis River. 

GEORGEFIELD (Hts.)— Settled in 1826, or thereabouts 
by George Miller, and named after him, "Georgefield." 

GEORGE (Ant.)— yBay and Cape named after King George 
II, Known as St. Louis on old maps. Was first named George 
and St. George by DesBarres in 1781, the saint being a survival of 
the old French name. 

GEORGE ISLAND (H.)— Named by Governor Comwallis in 
honor of King George II. Was first fortified in the year 1750. 

GERRARD ISLAND (H.)— Named after its first settler 
William Gerrard. He was an Englishman, and died on the Island 
in the year 1789. 

GETSON COVE (L.)~Named after an early settler Mr. 
John Getson. 

GHOUL'S COVE (C. B.)— This cove is also locally known as 
"Three Echo Cove," from the fact that it has acoustic proper- 
ties producing on still nights a triple echo. This explains the origin 
of the name. 

GIBBONS' BRIDGE (Near Sydney, C, B.)— Named after 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 57 

Chief Justice Richard Gibbons, who was one of the first of the Civil 
Establishment in the Town of Sydney, in the year 1784. He was 
taken prisoner by the French when on a voyage from Falmouth to 
Halifax. He died of fever in a Nantz prison. 

GIBRALTAR— The Indians named this place *'Wesek," 
meaning a "sapling" or Weesik" meaning "the beaver's home. 
The original town and fortress in Spain received its name from 
the Saracen Leader Tarik "Gebel-al-Tarik" the hill of Tarik. 

GIBSON'S WOODS (K.)— This is a negro settlement, and 
was named after the chief negro family among them. 

GILBERT COVE (D.)— Named after Lt. Thomas Gilbert, a 
celebrated Loyalist Pioneer about 1783. 

GILFILLAN ISLAND ( Y.)— This island was granted to John 
Perry in 1765, and to James Gilfillan in 1767, and from the last 
named received its name. 

GILLIS LAKE (C. B.)— Called after a family named Gillis; 
the Indian name was "Elbegatkik." 

GILLISVALE (I.)— So named in 1881. 

GISBORNE LAKE (V.)— Named after Frederick Newton 
Gisbome, an Englishman, who was about the year 1879 superin- 
tendent of the Dominion Telegraph and Signal Service. Gisbome 
laid the first submarine cable in America, and it was he who laid 
the first cable from Newfoundland. 

GLACE BAY, (C. B.) — It was at one time known as Windham 
River — after a General Windham. It evidently received its present 
name from the French, who must have found it frozen over, and 
named it "Glace" (ice). Incorporated as a town in 1901. The 
Indian name for this place was "Wosekusegwon," meaning "bright 
house" or the "home of glory." The head of Big Glace Bay is 
known as "Dyson Pond." 

GLADSTONE (I.)— A happy change from the ^ old name 
"Victoria Line" in honor of the great statesman William Ewart 
Gladstone. The name was approved by Parliament in 1901. 

GLASSBURN (Ant.)— This place was a portion of Black 
River settlement and was given its present name by an Act of Par- 
liament in the year 1891. 

. GLENCOE (I.)— Named after the ill-fated glen of the same 
name in Argyleshire, Scotland, where Chief Maclan and his Mac- 
donald followers were massacred in 1692. 



68 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

GLENCOVE (I.)— Formerly known as Turk settlement, 
changed to the present name by an Act of Parliament in 1872. 

GLENDALE (C. B.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Amasastokek" meaning "the river with inhabitants-" 

GLEN DHU (L)— "Dhu" is a Gaelic word meaning black or 
possibly here Dark Glen. 

GLEN DHU (P.)— See Glen Dhu, Inverness County. 

GLENDYER (L)— In 1848, Donald McLean McDonald came 
here from New Glasgow, N. S. and erected a mill for the dyeing 
and dressing of hand-made cloth. As this was the first establish- 
ment of the kind in Cape Breton, Mc Donald became known as 
"The Dyer" and his home was called "The Dyer's Glen" which 
he himself transposed to "Glendyer." 

GLEN-ELG (G.)— No doubt in honor of Lord Glenelg, who 
was the Colonial Secretary in 1837 ;" but there is a place of this name 
in Scotland, after which it may have been namicd. This place was 
first settled in 1801 and was then named St. Mary's. 

GLENGARRY (P.)— Named by the early Scotch settlers 
after the famous Glen in Inverness-shire, Scotland. Aft^r Culloden 
in 1746, many Scottish Highlanders immigrated to Canada. 

GLENHOLM (Col.)— This is the name given the old Folly 
Village settlement by an Act of Parliament in the year 1909. 

GLEN MARGARET (H.)— Named after Mrs. James Fraser 
about the year 1876. Previously named "Lower Ward." 

GLENORA (D— So named in 1881. 

GLENTOSH (V.)— Formerly known as Big Hill, given its 
present name in honor of the Rev. Abraham Mcintosh, who was a 
Presbyterian minister in this district in the earlier days. 

GLENVILLE (L)— So named in 1876. 

GLEN-UIG (Ant.)— Settled and named in the early part of 
the nineteenth century by Scotchmen from the place of that name 
in Scotland. 

GLENWOOD (Ant.) — Formerly known as Lower Keppoch, 
given its present name by an Act of Parliament in the year 1892. 

GLENWOOD (R.)— The district known as Hay Cove, was 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 59 



changed to this name in 1914, and an Act of Parliament was passed 
in this year confirming the change. 

GOAT ISLAND (C. B.)— This is a very old name for this 
island, and appears on very early maps of Cape Breton. It is near 
Louisburg, and the French had a battery on it to defend the en- 
trance. 

GOAT ISLAND (A.)— This island was first called "Biencourt- 
ville" in honor of Biencourt. Then it became known as "Arm- 
strong's Island", after a possessor named Armstrong. At one time 
also it was called Vane's Island, after Charles Vane, to whom it 
was granted. The French named it *'Isle aux Chevres" that is 
"Isle of the Goat." The English called it "Goat Island," by which 
name it is known today. 

GOFF'S (H.) — Named after one of its early settlers, Mr. 
William Goff. 

GOLDBORO (G.)— By an Act of Parliament in the year 1898 
changed from its old name East Side Isaac's Harbour. 

GOLD RIVER (L.)— There is a tradition that gold was orig- 
inally found at this river by the early French settlers, and hence the 
name; but another authority asserts that the name was "Gould 
River" after an early settler, and it became changed to its present 
name. The Indian name for this place was "Amagapskeget" 
meaning "rushing over stones." 

GOOSE HARBOR (G.)— See St. Francis. 

GORE MOUNTAINS (Hts.)— No doubt named in honor of 
Sir Charles S. Gore, General-in-chief in North America, with his 
residence in Halifax (1837). (Gore District in Upper Canada 
was not named after this officer, but after Sir Francis Gore, who was 
Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, 1806-1877). 

GOSCHEN (G.)— Named after the pastoral city of Biblical 
fame, which was situated in Egypt. This name also appears, or 
did appear, as the name for settlements in Antigonish, Hants and 
Colchester Counties. 

GOTTINGEN (H).— On April 6th, 1764, the suberbs of Hali- 
fax were called "Gottingen" at the request of a number of people 
of the neighborhood. It is named after the Prussian city in Han- 
over. 

GOUGH LAKE (H.)— See Anderson Lake. 



60 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



GOUZAR (Col.) — Basin of water at the head of Tatamagouche 
Bay, so named after a man named Gouzar or Geeser. Its name 
one time appeared as Port Gauzar. It has been supposed that the 
Indians gave it its name because of the abundance of geese which 
gather there, but this is said to be erroneous. 

GOVERNOR'S ISLAND (L.)— A tenting place of the Earl 
of Mulgrave, when he was governor, hence the name. 

GOVERNOR LAKE (H.)— See Parr Lake. 

GOWEN POINT (Y.)— This point is named after Patrick 
Gowen, who settled there about the year 1762. 

GOWRIE MINES (C. B.)— So named after the beautiful 
home of Thos. D. Archibald at Sydney Mines, who was one of the 
principal owners. The mines were at Port Morien. 

GRAFTON (K.)— Settled in 1821. Probably named after 
the Duke of Grafton, or perhaps after the American town in Massa- 
chusetts of this name (The name "Grafton" in New Brunswick is 
said to be a word coined from "graft" as applied to fruit-grafting 
and nursing, practised at that place in 1876.) 

GRAFTON LAKE (Q.)— See Grafton. 

GRAND ANSE (R.) — A descriptive French name meaning 
Big Cove. 

GRAHAM SIDING (Col.)— See Brentwood, 

GRAND ETANG (I.)— A French name, meaning "Large 
Pond." 

GRANDIQUE (R.)— First settled by a family named Kav- 
anagh, about 1790. The name is French, meaning **Big Ditch." 
The Indian name was "Gebemkek." 

GRAND LAKE (H.)— The Indians called this place "Tulu- 
gadik" meaning "the settlement." 

GRAND NARROWS (C. B.)— "Grand" to distinguish it from 
the "Little Narrows," on the same "Bras b'Or Lakes," where they 
lie in Victoria County. The Grand Narrows was, and we think is 
still, so far as the Strait is concerned called "Barra Strait." This 
of course, after the Sound of Barra on the Isle of Barra in the 
Scottish Hebrides, where the most of the settlers in this neighbor- 
hood came from about the year 1802. They came directly from 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 61 

Pictou County. The Indian name was "Tawitk" meaning "the 
outlet." 

GRAND PASSAGE (D.)— and 

GRAND PASSAGE (R.)— Known to the Indians as "Taoo- 
itk" or the "opening." 

GRAND PRE (K.>— French meaning "the great prairie," a 
village on the shores of the Basin of Minas, the scene of many con- 
jBicts between the French and English, also the scene of the Expul- 
sion of the Acadians (1755). 

GRANVILLE (A.)— Granville Centre, Granville Ferry, Lower 
Granville, in honor of Lord John Cartaret, who became Eart 
Granville in 1744, and was English Secretary of State. On what 
was known as the Grarivijle Shore, about opposite to Goat Island 
is the site of the first European settlement in North America (See 
Patterson's "Sir William Alexander") Granville, one of the four 
Townships of Annapolis County, was formed and granted in the year 
1764 with 168 proprietors. Here the senior De La Tour built his 
first fort. 

GRAPNEL BEACH (V.)— This place is so named because 
the anchorage or holding ground in the adjoining waters is good 
Grapnel means a small boat anchor. 

GREEN BAY (L.) — At one time named Palmerston Bay. 

GREENDALE (Ant.)— This place was known as Greenfield; 
but the name was so common it was changed to its present descrip- 
tive name by an Act of Parliament in 1886. 

GREENFIELD (CoL)— Surveyed and named by a Mr. Alex- 
ander Miller, about the year 1817. He surveyed the lines and 
boundaries of Earltown, Kemptown, and Greenfield, in this County 
and named them all. 

GREENFIELD (0-)— A farming village so admirably situated 
it is said that the season is a fortnight earlier than in other parts 
of the County. Early green suggested the name. It is near the 
"Ponhook," or "first lake" on the Medway River. In this County 
the affix "field" in naming their places appeared to be popular, 
as we find places named "Middlefield," "Brookfield," "Westfield," 
"Northfield," and "Buckfield," all within a very short distance of 
each other, the place name being formed by prefixing the word 
"field" by a descriptive or decorative word. 

GREEN HILL (P.)— The old Micmac Indian name was "Es- 
pakumegek" meaning "high land." 



62 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

GREENVALE (P.)— This place was formerly known as 
"Mcintosh Mills." It was changed to its present name by an Act 
of Parliament in the year 1891. 

GREENWICH (K.)— After the town on the Thames in Kent, 
England, noted as the great Observatory Town. 

GRENADIER'S LEAP (C. B.)— Near Louisburg. Named 
after a Captain Grenadier, who led a party of English at the first 
siege of Louisburg, and who was supposed to have made a long, 
dangerous leap from his boat to the shore. History tells us it was 
a Captain Brooks who led the landing. 

GREVILLE BAY (C.)— Named in honor of a former English 
Parliamentary General, Robert Greville, the second Lord Brooke 
1794-1866. 

GRINTON SETTLEMENT (A.)— Named after a first settler, 
James Grinton, who settled there in 1819. He was from Corstor- 
phine, Scotland. (See Springfield). 

GROSVENOR (G.)— Said to have been named by a. Mr. J. B 
Hadley of Mulgrave. Was first settled by families named Kennys 
and Tait (before 1800). Probably named after the Lord of that 
name or after Grosvenor Square. 

GULLIVER'S HOLE (D.)— So named from a legend that a 
pirate named Gulliver once visited the place. Sometimes called 
Gulliver's Cove. First settled in 1780 by a WilHam McDormand. 

GUYSBOROUGH— First named "Chedabucto," when Sir 
Nicholas Deny located a fishing station there about 1635. Named 
in honor of Sir Guy Carleton (See Guysborough Township, Queens 
County). Sir Guy was first Baron Dorchester; at one time Govern- 
or of Canada ; was a Loyalist leader and a great promoter of Loyalist 
settlements in Nova Scotia. 

This County was named Sydney when St. Mary's Township 
was formed in 1818. The Townships are Guysborough, St 
Mary's and Manchester. The County contains 1656 square miles 
and was formed in 1836. 

GUYSBOROUGH TOWNSHIP (0)— One of the two 

Township divisions of Queens County granted to Donald McPher- 
son and one hundred and two others in the year 1784. They were 
disbanded soldiers who had served under Sir Guy Carleton during 
the Revolutionary War. They named the place "Guy's Borough 
in his honor. The second year after their settlement, the whole 
village was destroyed by fire. They then removed to Cape Canso. 
(See Guysborough). 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 63 



H 



HACKETT (H.)— Cove and Village, formerly Hagget's Cove 
named after one of the first settlers, whose real name wasHaggart., 

HALIBURTON (P.)— Named in honor of Thomas Chandler 
Haliburton a native of Nova Scotia, who wrote extensively 
and well of Nova Scotia, was a member of the Nova Scotia Legis- 
lature and a Judge of the Supreme Court. 

HALIBUT HEAD (QO^So named after the Halibut, a large 
species of flat fish which abound on the Nova Scotia coast. 

HALIFAX — The Indian name was "Chebookt" meaning 
"Chief Harbor," or "Great Long Harbor." Halifax was known as 
Chebucto up to the year 1749. On the 18th day of July of that 
year it was called "Halifax" in honor of the Earl of Halifax, then 
President of the English Board of Trade, whose title was from the 
English city of that name. His name was George Dunk Montague 
He died in 1772. It is said that Lord Halifax, having no family 
and wishing to immortalize his name, sent Edward Comwallis as 
Governor of Nova Scotia. Cornwallis arrived with 2576 immi- 
grants in July 1749, and it was he who changed the name "Che- 
bucto" to Halifax in honor of his patron. 

It is interesting to note the probable derivation of the word 
"Halifax." The word means "Holy Hair" the name being account- 
ed for by the fact that the head of a virgin who had been murdered 
was suspended from a tree in the neighborhood of the English city 
"Halifax." 

Lord Halifax was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1761. 

Halifax was declared a free port in 1817 and was incorporated 
in the year 1841. It became the capital of Nova Scotia in the year 
1749, when the Provincial Headquarters were removed from 
Annapolis, which was capital or Provincial Headquarters from 1710 
to 1749. 

Halifax County is divided into four townships, namely: Hali- 
fax, Dartmouth, Lawrencetown and Preston. 

The north end of Halifax City in the early days was known as 
"Dutchtown" and the south and suburbs as "Irishtown." 

In Halifax is Dalhousie College, named in honor of George 
Ramsay the ninth Viscount Dalhousie, who was Lt. -Governor 
of Nova Scotia 1816 and Governor of Canada 1820-28. The Earl 
was the founder of the college in the year 1818. Its Act of Incor- 
poration was passed in 1821. University powers were created in 



64 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



1841. Closed for some years, but was re-opened and re-organized 
in 1863. 

HALL HARBOR (K.)— This place was named after Captain 
Samuel Hall, who in 1779 piloted a privateering band of seventeen 
men from the revolting colonies in America to the place, and from 
here they conmitted a number of thieving raids on the settlers of 
the surrounding country. 

HAMILTON CORNER (K.)— This place was at one time 
called "The Whalebone," and later ''Jawbone Comer," owing to 
there being a gateway, with posts made from a whale's jawbone, 
near the place where the four roads meet. Later changed to 
"Hamilton's Comer," no doubt after a settler of that name. 

HAMMONDS PLAIN (H.)— Named in honor of Sir Andrew 
Snape Hammonds, who was Lieutenant-Governor from 1781 to 
1783. 

HANDLE Y MOUNTAIN (K.)— Named after an early settler. 
This place was settled mostly by disbanded soldiers. 

HANTS COUNTY— In 1781, Windsor, Falmouth and New- 
port, with lands contiguous thereto, were detached from the county 
of Kings and made a separate county to be called the Coltoty of 
Hants. The name "Hants" which was, and is used, is in abbrevia- 
tion of Hampshire. (The old English for Hampshire was Hantes- 
shire — hence the abbreviation). The name was probably suggested 
by the Loyalists from New Hampshire. 

A new township was added in 1824, and named "Kempt" in 
honor of Sir James Kempt, the then Lieutenant-Governor of the 
Province. 

Hants is divided into six Townships, viz: Windsor, Newport, 
Kempt, Falmouth, Douglas and Rawdon. This county contains 
1179 square miles. 

HANTSPORT (Hts.)-~On the banks of the Avon River. The 
Indian name for this place was "Kakagwek," meaning "the place 
of dried meat." Elsewhere we find "Kakagwek" given as meaning 
"the place of dried fish." (See Hants). 

HARBOR BOUCHE (Ant.)— See Bouche. 

HARBOR LAKE (H.)— At one time called Black Duck Run, 
given its present name by Captain P. F. Shortland R. N., in 1864. 

^ HARMONY (0.)— Settled in 1821. 

HARTLING (H.)— So named in 1912 after James Hartling 
the Postmaster. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 65 

HAULOVER ISTHMUS (R.)— Near St. Peter's. So named 
because of its being the narrow strip of land over which they hauled 
their boats from or to the waters of St. Peter's Bay and the Bras 
d'Or Lakes. 

HAUTE ISLAND (C.)— See Isle Haut. 

HASKILL BROOK (Y.)— Named after an early settler Wm. 
Haskill, who came to Yarmouth from Beverley, Mass., in the year 
1763 and settled near this brook. 

HASTINGS (C.)~-Formerly known as Porter Town, changed 
to Hastings in the year 1864 by an Act of Parliament. The name 
in honor of Warren Hastings, the celebrated English Statesman. 

HATCH CREEK (D.)— So named after a first settler John 
Hatch. 

HAVELOCK (D.)— Named in honor of Sir Henry Havelock, 
who distinguished himself in the Indian Mutiny and particularly 
at Lucknow in 1857. 

HAWKESBURY (R.)— One of the four Townships of Rich- 
mond County, named in honor of Admiral Edward Hawke, an 
English Baron. (See Port Hawkesbury). 

HAY COVE (R.)— See new name "Glenwood." The Indian 
name for this place was "Galnotek." 

HEATHERTON (Ant.)— So named by an Act of Parlia- 
ment in the year 1879. 

HEBB MILLS, HEBB CROSS, HEBBVILLE (L.)— These 
places are all named after one of the first settlers of Lunenburg 
County, Mr. Adam Hebb, and his descendants. 

^ HEBERT RIVER (C.)— Named after the French Courier du 
Bois Hebert (1749), who as a Lieutenant had charge of the fort at 
Hebert. 

HEBRON (Y.) — The name Hebron Comer was given this 
settlement by Captain Landers, an estimable early Yarmouth 
settler. As the settlement extended beyond the Comer, the latter 
part of the name was left out. 

The name is after a place in Palestine, the chosen land of 
Abraham. The word is Hebrew, meaning "friendship," or "asso- 
ciation." 

HECKMAN ISLAND (L.)— Named after a German family of 



66 PLACE-NAMES OF [NOVA SCOTIA 

first settlers, named Heckman. John Heckman of Lunenburg was a 
parliamentary representative from 1819 to 1847. 

HECTOR POINT (V.)— A point near Grand Narrows prob- 
ably so named after Mr. Hector F. McDougall, who lived nearby 
and was for years a parliamentary representative for Cape Breton 
County. 

HELL BAY (L.) — Named, it is supposed, by a seaman who 
had an experience in its waters, which were turbulent enough to 
suggest the name of a thickly settled place without the confines of 
Nova Scotia. 

HENNIGAR (Hts.)— Formerly named "Northfield." Changed 
a few years ago to *'Hennigar" in honor of its first settler John 
Hennigar. The other first settlers were Laffins and Millers. The 
Brook was once known as Weir Brook. 

HENRY ISLAND (I.)— The name given to outer Port Hood 
Island. It is sometimes wrongly called W. D. Smith's Island. 

HERMAN ISLAND (L.)— The name Philip Herman appears 
as one of the original grantees of Lunenburg Township in 1761. 
This island is probably named after him or some of his descendants. 

HERRING COVE (H.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Moolepchugech" meaning **a deep chasm, valley or gorge." 

HERRING COVE (Q.)— Now called "Brooklyn." An im- 
portant fishing station, probably as early as 1635, as it is believed 
that Denys and Razilly had their establishment at this place 
about that time. 

There is also a lake in Queens County of this name. 

HERSEY RIVER (Y.)— Named so after a family of early 
settlers. 

HIBERNIA (0.)— Settled in the year 1820 by two Irishmen, 
and so named in honor of their home land. 

HIGHFIELD (Hts.)— See Belmont. 

HIGHLAND (D.) — The former name of this place was Mink 
Cov€. Changed to the present name by an Act of Parliament 
passed in 1907. 

HIGHLANDS (I.) — This place was formerly known as Cape 
Mabou. It received its present name, which was suggested by the 
hilly nature of the district, by an Act of Parliament in 1888. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 67 

HILDEN (CoL)— The settlement formerly known as **Slab 
Town," ** Clark ville," and "Johnston's Crossing," were united and 
given the name of Hilden by an Act of Parliament passed in 1895. 

HILLFORD (Hts.)— So named by an Act of Parliament 
passed in 1895, changing it from **Cogmagum." (See.) 

HILLGROVE (D.) — The former names of this place were 
"Digby," "Joggins" and also "Hainesville." 

HILLSBOROUGH (L)— Named after the Right Honorable 
Earl of Hillsborough, Secretary of State, 1769. 

HILLSDALE (I.) — So named by an Act of Parliament in 
1880. 

HILTON POINT (Y.)— This place was named after its early 
settler Amos Hilton, who came from Massachusetts and settled 
there, about the year 1765. 

HIRTLE HILL (L.)— Named after an early settler. One of 
the original grantees of Lunenburg was Jacob Hirtle, senior. 

HOG ISLAND (A.)— About 1660 deeded from M. d'Aulnay 
to Jacob Bourgois, acquired by Governor M. de Brouillan in 1702. 
Called by the French "L'Isle aux Cochons" that is "Island of 
pigs." 

HOPEWELL (P.) — Received its name after the name of the 
vessel which brought Alexander McNutt and his Ulster colonists 
to Colchester County in 1761. 

HORSE SHOE COVE (L.)— This place is supposed to be 
between Bridgewater and Summerside, it is a miniatiire semi- 
circular shaped harbor. It is the "Hufeisen Bucht" of Judge Hali- 
burton in "The Old Judge." 

HORTON BLUFF (K.)— The Indian name of this place was 
"Maktomkus" meaning the "black reef" or "black rocks." 

HORTON (Lower) (K.)— The Indian name was "Umtaban" 
meaning "an overflowing flood." The name was suggested by the 
fact that before the dyke was built all communication with Long 
Island was cut off by the high tides. 

HORTON TOWNSHIP (K.)— The Township of Hortonwas 
granted and formed in the year 1759. It is one of the four Town- 
ship divisions of Kings County. 



68 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

HORTONVILLE (K.)— Was called Horton Landing. Changed 
to its present name by An Act of Parliament in 1897. 

HOSIER RIVER (H.)— Sometimes known as "Osier River." 
Probably named after an early settler named Hosier 

HOWARD ISLAND (Y.)— Named after one Howard, to 
whom it was granted in 1762. 

HUBBARDS (H.)— The original Hubbard, for whom the place 
was named, lived on Green Island, about 1800. One time known 
as Hubbards Cove. In 1905 by an Act of Parliament the word 
Cove was dropped. 

HUBLEY (H.)— Cove in St. Margaret's Bay, also a lake and 
a Railway Station, named after a family of early residents. (See 
Seabright.) 

HUNTER'S MOUNTAIN (V.)— This mountain is named after 
an early settler, John Hunter. 

HUNT ISLAND AND POINT (Q.)— Settled in 1813 by 
Deacon Samuel Hunt, one of the original proprietors of Liverpool. 
The lands were granted to Hunt in 1788. 

HUNTINGTON POINT (K.)— Named after some member of 
this Old Kings County family. Caleb Huntington came to this 
County from Connecticut and was one of its early settlers. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



I 



IMPEROYAL (H.) — The name given the place situated 
about two miles south from Dartmouth on the eastern side of 
Halifax Harbor. The name is made up from part of the Company's 
name that has built an Oil Refining and Storage System there, the 
Imperial Oil Company. 

INDIAN BROOK (V.)— So named after a Micmac Indian 
named "Joe," a cooper by trade who lived in this vicinity. 

INDIAN COVE (C. B.)— See "Prince of Wales Landing." 

INDIAN CROSS POINT (P.)— So called owing to the dis- 
CO very of a large Iron Cross about ten feet high. 

The Indians called it "Soogunagade," or "rotting place." 
Now known as Fisher's Grant. 

INDIAN POINT (L.)— A Micmac Indian headquarters in 
the early days, hence the name. The first white settlers were of 
German descent, among them were Lohnes, Ernst, Wentzel, 
Hyson, Eisenhauer and Zwicker. 

INDIAN GARDENS (Q.)— This place on the Rossignol (now 
Liverpool River), was a great Indian resort, and was at one time 
called "Liverpool Ponhook." "Ponhook," an Indian word meaning 
"first lake." 

^ INDIAN ISLAND (R.)— Also known as "Chapel Island." 
This is the place where the Micmac Indians of the surrounding 
districts assemble each year to the "Feast of St. Anne." The 
famous French Missionary, Father Maillard, gave the island its 
early name of "He Ste Famille," (The Island of the Holy Family). 

It was given to the Indians in 1792 by Lieutenant-Governor 
McCormick, and permission was granted them to build a church 
upon it. In the "permission" the name is spelled "St. Villemai," 
which was evidently intended for "Ste. Famille." 

INDIAN ROAD BROOK (Hts.)— See Pebak. 

INGONISH (V.)— This place was once known as "Port of 
Orleans." The old spelling was "Inganis" and "Inganiche" and on 
old plans "Ninganiche." Some believed it to be a Portuguese 
name, spelled "Ninganis." However, the meaning of the name 
is lost. 



70 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

It is said that the Portuguese had an important settlement 
here as early as 1521. The Indians called this place "Kegannag- 
wetck." 

In 1726 this was, with the exception of Louisburg, the most 
important place in Cape Breton. 

INGRAMPORT (H.)— So named in 1905. Was previously 
known as *' Ingram River." First settled by a family named 
Webbers. 

INHABITANTS (R.)— See River Inhabitant— This is the 
name adopted by the Geographic Board of Canada, not Habitants 
nor River Inhabitants. 

INVERNESS — Obviously named by the Scotch settlers in 
honor of their home land. It was at one time named "Justin au 
corps." Was set off from Cape Breton County in 1836, and formed 
into an independent County. As early as 1791, a large number of 
Scotch Roman Catholic settlers came to Inverness from the Heb- 
rides. This County contains 1385 square miles. 

IRISH COVE (C. B.)— This place was the home of a number 
of Irish settlers notably Cash's, Cashens and O'Callaghans and 
owing to this received its name. The Micmac Indian name was 
"Golbankik." 

IRONBOUND ISLAND (L.)— There is an island of this name 
in Chester Bay and LaHave. One is called the "Chester Bay 
Iron Bound Island," and the other "LaHave Iron Bound Island. 
The latter was granted in the year 1778 to Leonard Christopher 
Wolfe. 

IRISH MOUNTAIN (P.)— Named so owing to an Irishman 
named Patrick Finner being one of the first settlers there. 

lONA (V.) — On the western side of the Grand Narrows or 
Barra Strait ajnd once part of what was known as Grand Narrows 
Settlement. First settled by Scotch from the Hebrides via Pictou 
County in the year 1802. 

Was first named "Saundrie," but was changed and called after 
the historic and sacred Isle in Scotland, in the year 1873, at the 
suggestion of Bishop McKinnon, who had visited the Scottish 
"lona" and said that "Saundrie" resembled it. The name "lona" 
was confirmed by an Act of Parliament in 1891. This place had a 
district or township name at one time of "Brooklesby." 

"lona" is Hebrew, after "Jonas," the prophet. Its equivalent 
in Latin is "Columba," and in English "Dove." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 71 

lONA WEST (V.)— See lona. Was formerly Grand Narrows 
rear, by an Act of Parliament in 1891 was given its present name. 

ISAAC HARBOR (G.)— This place was named after an early 
negro settler named Isaac Webb. (See Goldboro.) 

ISLAND POINT (C. B.)— An island point on Boularderie 
Island called by the Indians "Menakweskawei." 

ISLE HAUT (C.)— Champlain in 1607, rounding Cape Chig- 
necto, called here and named the Island "Isle Haut" in consequence 
of its elevation. 

The Micmac Indians called this Island "Maskusetkik" from 
the word "Maskuset" meaning wild potatoes. "Maskusetkik" 
meaning "the place of wild potatoes." 

ISLE MADAME (R.)— "My Lady's Isle." Once called 
"Nericka." Rand gives the Indian name as "Neilksaak." 

This place was at one time named "Maurepas" by the French, 
in honor of a well-known French statesman of that name. 

Nicholas Denys at one time referred to the Island as "The 
Island of St. Marie." 

In the year 1768 a nimiber of Acadians, who in 1765 had emi- 
grated to St. Pierre and Miquelon, came to Cape Breton, took the 
oath of allegiance to Great Britain, and settled on Isle Madame. 

ISKUNISH (Col.) — A stream near Onslow. The name is 
derived from an Indian word "Nesakunechkik" meaning "Place 
of Eel Weirs." 



72 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



JACKSON POINT (V.)— Named after a Jackson family 
who were early settlers in this neighborhood. 

JAMES RIVER (Ant.)— Named after Rev. James Munro, the 
first Presbyterian Minister in Antigonish County, who was lost in 
the woods and followed the river to the coast. 

JAMESVILLE (V.) — This district was given this name by an 
Act of Parliament in 1883. 

JANVRIN ISLAND (R.)— Said to be named after a native of 
Jersey named Janvrin, who owned land on the Island at the begin- 
ning of the 19th century. This island appears on some old maps 
as "Conway Island," also as "Janurius Island." The Indian name 
was "Liksakechech" (see Arichat), meaning "Little Liksak" or 
"Little Arichat." 

JEDDORE (H.)— Mentioned as "Jadore" as far back as 1727. 
In some places mentioned as "Isadora." The Indian name wa 
"Wineboogwechk," meaning "the swearing place." 

The Indian name for Jeddore rocks was "Mundooapsku," 
meaning "Devil's Rock." 

The string of small islands near Jeddore was named by the 
Micmac Indians "Mooeantik," meaning "haunt" or "place of sea 
duck." 

JIMTOWN (Ant.)— Named after an early Scotch settler 
named Captain James McDonald. 

JOGGINS (C.) — Gesner says: "Descriptive notches or jogs in 
the rock," hence "jog in," but it is more likely of Micmac origin. 
It might be connected with Chegogin (see). Maps as far back as 
1750 use the name ''Joggin.'' 

JOHNSTOWN (R.)— The place was named by the people in 
honor of an old and much respected Parish Priest, the late Reverend 
John McDougall. 

The Micmac Indians named it "Nemtegowak," meaning "the 
sitting place." 

JOHN'S POINT (P.)— Named after John Patriquin, an early 

settler. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 73 

JORDAN RIVER (S.)— A village at the head of the river. 
The name is biblical. The Indians called the place "Esiktaweak" 
meaning "oozing from dead water." On old Portuguese maps the 
name appears as "Ribera des Jardins." 

JORDAN TOWN (D.)— Named after the Reverend Charles 
Jordan, a minister of the Baptist Church, who lived near by. 

JUDIQUE (I.) — This name is said to mean a river or stream 
where the waters turn swiftly forming eddies, and is of French 
origin. 




74 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



K 



KADUSKAK (Q.) — A narrow channel which discharges into 
Lake Rossignol. The rapid, flowing, roaring water suggested 
the name "Kaduskak" which is the Indian word for "screecher." 

KARSDALE (A.) — Received its name in honor of Sir William 
Fenwick Williams, who defeated the Russians at the Battle of IGars, 
October 29th, 1855. He was bom at Annapolis, N. S. and was 
Governor of Nova Scotia, 1865. 

KEJIMKUJIK OR KEDGEMAKOOGIC LAKE (A.) (Q.) 
— A Micmac Indian name "Koojumkoojik" meaning "attempting 
to escape," sometimes spelt "Kedgemakoogic." Some authorities 
say it means *Tairylake." This is the fourth lake on the Liverpool 
River. This lake was known as "Segum Sega." 

KELLEY COVE (Y.)— Named after a James Kelley who was 
an early settler. He came from Massachusetts about the year 
1765. 

KELPY COVE (R.)— Probably so named owing to the quan- 
tity of kelp or large sea weeds thrown ashore there; although it 
may have been so called "Kelpy" or "Kelpie" an old name for an 
imaginary spirit of the waters generally appearing in the form of a 
horse. 

KEMPT (OO — One of the six township divisions of Hants 
County. Was settled in 1821, and named by and after Sir James 
Kempt, who visited the settlements in Queen County in 1822. He 
was Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, 1820-1828; Governor of 
Canada 1828-1830. 

KEMPT LAKE (K.)— (See Kempt). One of the principal 
lakes of the group known as the Aylesford Lakes. 

KEMPT TOWNSHIP (Hts.)— Formed and added to Hants 
County in the year 1824. (See Kempt.) 

KEMPT TOWN (Col.)— Surveyed and named by Alexander 
Miller, about the year 1817. (See Kempt.) 

KEMPTVILLE (Y.)— Named in honor of Sir James Kempt, 
who was Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia. The first settler 
was Abner Andrews who had lan4s laid out there in the year 1821. 



PLACE-NAMES IN NOVA SCOTIA 75 



KENNETCOOK (Hts.)— While uncertain, it is thought this 
name is from the Micmac Indian word "Kunetkook" meaning 
"a place near or close at hand." 

KENNINGTON COVE (C. B.)— Probably called after a 
British War Vessel, the **Kennington," which took part in the taking 
of Louisburg. Was at one time called "Freshwater Cove" and also 
earlier known as **Anse de la Cormorandiere." 

KENTVILLE (K.)— Settled by the English in 1760. Named 
in honor of Prinoe Edward, the Duke of Kent,~the father of Queen 
Victoria. This place was previously known as "Horton Corner." 
Incorporated as a town in the year 1887. The Indian name for 
this pla,ce was "Penooek" meaning Pineo's place. Kentville is 
one of the four Township divisions of Kings County. 

KENZIEVILLE (P.)— Settled by ajid named after William 
McKenzie, who ca^e to this country in 1803. He settled in 
"Kenzieville" in 1807. He came from Sutherlandshire. 

KETCH HARBOR (H.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Nemagakunuk," meaning "a good fishing place." 

KIDNEY LAKE (OO— A lake on the Liverpool River, called 
owing to its shape, "Boogulwcftipak," Booduleoon being the Mio- 
mac Indian word for kidney. 

KIDSTON'S ISLAND (V)— Opposite Baddeck. It was 
named after an old settler. Some of the early maps of Cape Breton 
name this Island ''Duffus Island." 

KIGIGIAK OR KEGSHOOK RIVER (Y.)— A Micmac 
Indian word meaning "great establishment." The name is also 
found as "Kegicapigiak. " 

KILL AM LAKE (Y.) — This lake received its name after a 
Yarmouth County family. 

KINBURN (L.)— See Mahone Bay. 

KINGS COLLEGE (K.)— See Windsor. 

KINGS COUNTY.— This name no doubt was chosen along 
with Queens as an expression of loyalty to the monarchy. The 
County was formed in 175,9, and then included part of Lunenburg, 
the whole of Hants, one-third of Colchester, and about one-half of 
Cumberland. Kings was first settled by the French who built 
a village at Horton which they called Mines or Minas; after their 
expulsion many of their farms were taken by emigrants from the 



76 PLACE-NAMES IN NOVA SCOTIA 

New Englaii,d States. The County is divided into four Townships, 
namely — Kentville, Horton, Comwallis, and Aylesford. Kings 
County contains 811 square miles 

KINGSBURG (L.)--This place was first settled by families 
named Mossman, Kaezer, Knock and Hautman. It used to be 
called "The Lunenburg Bank," owing to the monetary assistance 
the young men from Lunenburg received from the thrifty people 
of Kijngsburg. 

KINGSTON (KO—Changed from Kingston Station by an Act 
of Parliament in 1916 to its present name. Named after the County 
whjich in turn was named after royalty. 

KINLOCH (I.)— The word is from the Gaelic Caennloch 
meaning "the head of the lake." 

KINNEY TOWN (D.)— So named after Herman and John 
Kinney, who were early settlers. 

KINSMAN (K.) — Named after Benjamin Kinsman, one of 
the Comwallis grantees, who kept a store at a comer, one time 
known as Kinsman's Comer. 

KNOYDART (Ant.)— Settled by Martin McDonald, who 
arrived from the Highlands of Scotland in 1787, and settled at 
"Knoydart" to which he gave the name of his native place. 

KITIWITI (H.)— Sometimes known as Kittee Wittee Shoals, 
possibly of the same derivation as Quidvidi fishing settlement near 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 

KITPOO— AKYADY (Hts.)— A place near Shubenacadie, 
Micmac Indian name meaning "the place of eagles." 

KOCH'S POINT (L.)— John Koch, an early German settler, 
used this place as a shipping poibt, and built a house here in 1820. 
The place was called after him. 

KWEEDUBADE (O-)— A place in Brookfield named by the 
Indians, the word meaning "a soaky place" or "a soaking place." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 77 



LAHAVE (LO— Founded by De Razilly in 1636. 

French"La Have," i e., "The Harbor." "Fond du port de la 
Have," i. e., "Head of the Harbor." Again, the word "Heve" seems 
to have a local meaning, as the following would go to show. Littre 
says: "Heve," a name in lower Normandy for cliffs hollowed out 
below where fishermen search for crabs. 

The Indian name for LaHave River was "Pijenoorskak," 
meaning "having long joints." 

This river is known as the "Rhine of Nova Scotia." The name 
being suggested by its beauty and the fact of its settlement by people 
of German descent. 

LAHAVE ISLAND (L)— Granted in the year 1785, and settled 
by Joseph Pernette, Henry Volger, Matthew Park, Joseph Whit- 
ford and Baker. 

LAHAVE LAKE (L.)— A lake on the LaHave River (see). 
The Indians knew it as "Sooleawagitk," meaning "Silver lies in the 
water." 

LAKE AINSLIE (I.) — Named in honor of Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor Ainsley, (1816-1820). He was Lieutenant-Governor of Cape 
Breton Island. 

Ainsley Township, one of the four subdivisions of the north- 
western part of Cape Breton Island, was formed in 1828. 

Previous to 1816 the lake was known as Marguerite, which 
gives the name to the beautiful river which flows from it. 

LAKEDALE (G,) — Formerly known as Grant's Lake, changed 
by an Act of Parliament in the year 1894 to its present name. 

LAKE EGMONT (H.)~No doubt named in honor of the Earl 
of Egmont, who received a very large grant of land at Shubenacadie 
in 1769. (See Egmont.) 

LAKELAND— The district between Windsor and Halifax 
which was known to the Indians as "Enskoomadedetic," meaning 
a place where conversation can be carried on at a long range, both 
being hidden. 

LAKE LAWSON (L.)-~The lake was named "Lawson," 
in honor of Thomas Lawson by Captain Ross, in gratitude for 
what Lawson had done to assist Ross and some others of the first 



78 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

settlers who were shipwrecked in the "Archduke Charles" about 
the year 1816. 

LAKES O'LAW (L)— After a lake in Scotland. This place 
is found named "Mario" on an old map. Whether this name was 
applied to the lakes or the district is not clear. 

The lakes are now called "Harvard Lakes." There is a settle- 
ment near called "Emerald," so that the Irish must have had some 
representative among the early settlers. 

LAKE ROSSIGNOL (Q.)— Was called after an eariy French 
adventurer and trader named Rossignol whose property and ship 
were confiscated near Liverpool by De Monts and his party, who 
founded Port Royal. (See Liverpool). 

Rossignol, who was the first white man to visit the place, 
wandered off into the wilderness, and is said to have died on a small 
island near the north end of the lake which bears his name. 

LAKE TUPPER (Q.)— This place was likely named after a 
fine old family of Queens County. Nathan Tupper was an early 
Parliamentary representative of the county. 

LAKE WALLACE (Sabk Island)— This small lake on Stble 
Island was named in honor of Michael Wallace who was an acting 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province about the year 1818. 

LAKE WENTWORTH (D.)— This place was first settled by 
Frederick A Robichaud in 1836. It is sometimes called "Robi- 
c^auds Lake." Named in honor of Governor (1793-1807) Sir John 
Wentworth. (See Wentworth). 

LANARK (A.) — Named after the inland county of Scotland 
of this name. 

LANSDOWNE (P.)— Named in 1884 in honor of Henry 
Charles Keith Petty-Fit zmaurice, the fifth Marquis of Landsdowne 
who was Governor General of Canada (1883-1888). 

LANTZ SIDING (Hts.)— Received its name about 1898 
from a gentleman named Lantz, who operated a brick and tile 
manufacturing plant at this place. 

L'ARCHEVEQUE (R.)— Village and Cove, a French word 
meaning Archbishop. 

L'ARDOISE (R.)— So named by the French, meaning "The 
Ba;y of Slate," because of the slate cliffs along the shore. The 
Indian name for this place was "Moglakachk", meaning "the place 
of brant or geese." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 79 



LARRYS COVE (H.)— See Ocean Glen. 

LARRYS RIVER (G.)— Settled about 1767 and named after 
an early Irish settler, Larry Keating. 

LAWRENCETOWN (A.)— In 1754, 20,000 acres of land was 
granted to twenty gentlemen who named their new domain in honor 
of Governor Lawrence, who was Governor of Nova Scotia at the 
time. 

LAWRENCETOWN (H.)— One of the four Townships of 
Halifax County, once covered by the name "Musquodoboit.* 
Named after Colonel Lawrence who was Lieutenant-Governor of 
Nova Scotia in 1754 and Governor in 1756. 

Old Indian names of this district were "Wampack," "Chezzet- 
cook," and "Taboolsimkek," the last meaning **two small branches 
flowing through sand." 

The first grant to twenty families is dated 10th of June, 1754. 

Just below Lawrencetown there is a place named by the Indians 
"Nesogwakade" meaning **the place of eel traps." 

LAWLOR'S ISLAND (H.)— This island was formerly called 
*'Bloss Island" after Captain Bloss who was a settler about the year 
1750; he was a half-pay captain of a man-of-war. 

LAZYTOWN (C. B.)— The old town of Sydney Mines was 
given this name by the visiting farmers. The coal miners in former 
days went to the pits at a very early hour; their wives, after pre- 
paring the early meal for their husbands went back to their beds 
and when the farmers came to town to market their produce they 
found the window blinds drawn and the families sleeping. This is 
how the name originated. 

LEAMINGTON (C.)— First known as "Maccan Mountain.'* 
In 1886 a meeting of the residents named it Leamington, no doubt 
after the Warwickshire town of that name. 

It was first settled about 1825 by William Bostock, Peter 
Nelson, David Gilroy and another named Cooke — no doubt Loy- 
alists. 

LE BLANC (D.) — -Named after settlers of that name. Form- 
erly and now sometimes called Major's Point. 

LEITCHE'S CREEK (C. B.)— Named after a family of early 
settlers who were named "Leech." It will be noticed that the 
spelling of the word has recently been changed to the present form. 
The old maps show it, as "Leech's Creek." 

LENNOX (Ant.) — There is a town of this name in Berkshire 



80 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



County, Massachusetts. It may have received its name from this 
town, but it is more likely to have been named in honor of Charles 
Lennox, the Duke of Richmond and Lennox, who was at one time 
English Secretary of State. 

LENNOX (R.) — One of the four townships of Richmond, 
named no doubt, in honor of some personage. The County was 
called after Charles Lennox the Duke of Richmond and Lennox 
He was one time English Secretary of State (Bom 1735 — Died 
1806). 

LENNOX PASSAGE (R.)— See Lennox. 

LEQUILLE RIVER (A.)— The river bearing this name today 
is not the one to which the name was applied by Champlain in 
1604 (L'Esquille, French for a small fish of that name with which 
the water abounded). It is a misnomer. The river was formerly 
known as "Mill Brook" because on it was erected the first mill in 
America. It was once called "Allain's River," after a man named 
Louis Allain, who owned land at its head. At another time it 
bore the name of "Jenny River." 

LEVY SETTLEMENT (L.)— This place was first settled 
by a man named Captain John Evans, who was accompanied by 
Lieutenants Enwright, Harris and Beatty. The place was formerly 
known as "Sherwood." The change to its present name is regret- 
table. 

LIBERTY ROW SETTLEMENT (D.)— Named so after an 
early settler, Logree Liberty, who was a Guinea Negro. 

LILY LAKE (Q.) — There are a great many small lakes in 
the Province bearing this name. This particular one is said to 
have been named by John McPherson, the local poet, who was 
known as the "Harp of Acadia." Large white lilies grow on the 
lake. 

LINDEN (G.)— Formerly called Goose River. 

LING AN (C. B.) — A curious English corruption of the French 
name L*Indienne Bay (Indian Bay). 

In the year 1745 the French had a mine here, and called the 
place "Cape Coal." They also erected a fort. The mine and fort 
were destroyed by fire in 1752. Th'e Indian name was"Milesek.'* 

LINWOOD (Ant.)— So named by an Act of Pariiament 
passed in the year 1884. 

LITTLE CANSO (G.)— The Indian name was "Kamsogooch,'* 
meaning "little place opposite cliffs." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 81 



LISCOMB HARBOR (G.)— So named as far back as 1717. 

The Indian name for this place was *'Megadawik" meaning 
"splendid eeling place." 

The Malisceet Indians called it "Magaguadavic." 

The harbor and village are said to be named after Liscomb 
House, Tudor Mansion, Buckinghamshire. 

LITTLE ARICHAT (R.)— The Indian name was "Neliksaaku^ 
geech," which means "a small fissure." 

LITTLE CARIBOU ISLAND (P.)— See Caribou Harbor. 
This place was called by the Micmac Indians "Tedootkesik," 
meaning "the place of running to the bushes," owing to the Micmac 
Indians having taken refuge in the woods from an attack by their 
enemy the Mohawks, who were said to have all been drowned at 
this place. 

LITTLE HARBOR (P.)— The old Indian Micmac name was 
"Mumbegweek," meaning "Little Harbor." 

LITTLE HARBOR (H.)— The Indians named this place 
"Segunakigunuk" meani^ng "torn in shreds" or "scraps of sails." 

LITTLE HOPE (Q.)— The great number of disastrous wrecks 
on this little islet suggested its name. 

LITTLE NARROWS (V.)— The Indian name for this place 
was "Tawilketc," meaning "the little opening" or "outlet." 

LITTLE RIVER (Ant.)— The Indian name for this river was 
' * Aksegaguntcetc . ' ' 

LITTLE RIVER (H.)— A branch of Sheet Harbor. The 
Indian name was "Kesooskowostoogwek," meaning "flowing 
through hemlock boughs." The other branch of Sheet Harbor 
was named "Ukchipkoodapakook" meaning "the largest pool." 

LIVERPOOL (0.) — One of the two township divisions of 
Queens County. A Mr. John Dogget was paid 40 pounds in the 
year 1761 for his outlay in settling Liverpool. It was at one time 
named Rossignol. It is obviously named after the English Liver- 
pool. Liverpool the original is named after a legendary bird 
something like the crane, called the "Liver," — and the word 
"pool." 

The name "Rossignol" was given to the place by De Monts 
after the master of a ship he had seized there. A number of Ply- 
mouth Rock families settled there in 1759. 



82 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



Liverpool's Indian name was "Ogumkwigeok," meaning "the 
place of departure." It was also once known as "Port Senior." 
Near here is a place which was called by the Indians "Nesogwade" 
or "place of eel pots." 

LIVERPOOL LAKES— The first Liverpool Lake was named 
by the Indians "Banook," meaning "the first lake met as you ascend 
a river. (See Ponhook). 

The second lake of the Liverpool chain of lakes was named by 
the Indians "Kedooskek," meaning "surrounded by tall grass." 

The third Liverpool lake was named by the Indians "Poosuk," 
the Indian name for the Juniper tree, or "a fragment." 

The fourth lake of the Liverpool chain of lakes was named by 
the Indians "Koojumkoojik," which means "attempting to escape." 

The fifth lake of the Liverpool chain of lakes was named by the 
Indians "Imooekek," meaning "leading straight on." 

The sixth lake of the Liverpool chain of lakes was named by the 
Indians "Tobeadookook," meaning "lined with alders." 

LIVERPOOL RIVER (Q.)— (See Liverpool), At one time 
this river was named Mersey after the English river of that name. 

LIVINGSTONE COVE (Ant.)— This place received its name 
after its first settler, a Malcolm Livingstone, who settled there 
about the year 1800. 

LLOYD COVE (C. B.)— Named after the famous Marine 
Insurance Clearing House "Lloyds." 

It was at this cove on the 4th of September, 1711 Admiral 
Walker's fleet of forty-two sail anchored. He had a large cross 
erected on the shore, claiming the whole of Cape Breton for the 
English. A carpenter and two of his crew landed, and were killed 
and scalped by the Indians. 

This cove is the landing place of an Atlantic cable from Ireland 
via Heart's Content, Newfoundland. 

LOBSTER BAY (Y.)— In 1633, Jean de Laite calls this Bay 
"La Baie Courante." 

LOCHABER (Ant.)— Named after the place of that name 
in Invernesshire, Scotland. It was at one time called College Lake. 

LOCH BAN (I.)— In English "White Lake'' Scottish "Loch" 
meaning "lake" and Gaelic "Ban" meaning "white." 

LOCH BROOM (P.) — So named because of its resemblance 
from its harbor approaches, to Loch Broom in Inverness-shire 
Scotland. First settled by Alexander Cameron in or about 1773. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 83 

Cameron was a relative of "Camercn of Lochiel," of Culloden 
fame. It is said that at this place the first church was erected in 
Pictou County. 

LOCH KATRINE (Ant.)— Named after the Lake, or Loch 
of that name, which is twenty-five miles from Glasgow and was made 
famous by Sir Walter Scott. 

LOCH LEVEN (I.)— See Broad Cove Mines. 

LOCH LOMOND (C. B.)— Named in remembrance of the 
place of the same name in Scotland, by the Scottish settlers, who 
settled here in 1827. 

LOCKARD POINT (CoL)— This point is on the north side of 
the Shubenacadie River and was named after a Captain Lockard. 
Some of the early settlers moved by vessel from Cumberland to 
Colchester County in 1772. They landed at this point, and it was 
called after the master of the vessel. 

Among the settlers were the "Ashmores," now known as 
"Creelmans." 

LOCKE ISLAND (S.)— Named after Jonathan Locke, a 
pioneer settler (See Lockport). At one time called Ragged or 
Rugged Island. 

LOCKPORT (S.)— Was first settled by three families from 
New England: Joseph Hardy, Josiah Churchill and Jonathan 
Locke, and was named after Locke. 

The Indian name was "Sebunisk." 

LOCKHARTVILLE (K.)— Named after Nathan Lockhart, 
an estimable first settler of this district, in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century. The Lockhart family were of Scotch-Irish 
origin. 

LOGAN'S TANNERY (P.)— See new name Lyon Brook. 

LONDONDERRY (Col.)— Settled by Alexander McNutt's 
Ulster Colonists who arrived and settled in the year 1761. They 
arrived in a vessel named the "Hopewell" on the 9th of October 
1761 at Cornwallis Island. They later came to Cobequid Town- 
ship, and the place was appropriately named Londonderry, after 
the Irish County from which they came. 

The grant of Londonderry Township, one of the four Town- 
ships of Colchester County, was for 75,000 acres, and was for sixty- 
nine settlers. It was dated March 1775 and signed by Governor 
Legge. (See Truro). 



84 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

LONG ISLAND (C. B.)— An island in the Little Bras d'Or 
Lake first granted to the Rev. Hibbert Binney. It was at that 
time (1820) called "Parturient Island," likely intended to mean 
"fruitful" or perhaps to convey the idea of a child, or offspring of the 
larger island. 

LONG ISLAND (K.)— Near Horton. The Indians named 
this place "Mesadek," meaning "separated." 

LONG LAKE (CoL)— Near Truro. The Indian name for 
this lake is "Pilbok," meaning "long and narrow." 

LOON LAKE (C. B.)— Said to be so named by the late Lt.- 
Govemor David McKeen, who was a land surveyor, and when 
camped near the lake his sleep was distiurbed by the lonesome call 
of the loons. 

LOREMBEC (C. B.)— The original name of this place was 
"Laurenbec." The name "Lorembec" appears on the maps of 
1751, 1764 and 1790. 

LORNEVILLE (C), LORNE (CoL)— Named in honor of the 
Marquis of Lome (Duke of Argyll), who was Governor-General of 
Canada in the years 1878-1883. 

LORRAINE (C.^ B.)— Near Louisburg, settled by Germans 
from Alsace-Lorraine in 1753. 

The name is found in the earlier days with various spellings, 
viz: Loram, Loran, Lorambec, Laurent and Laurent le bee. 

LOUISBURG (C. B.)— Until 1713 this place was known as 
English Harbor (Havre a TAnglois). It was founded in 1713, 
named in honor of King Louis XIV of France. Was named by 
St. Ovide, Port St. Louis tentatively and a little later Louisburg. 
Capttired by the British in 1745 and ceded back to France in 1748 ; 
and again captured by the British in 1758. The Dunkirk of Amer- 
ica was what Louisburg was considered and called in the early 
days. 

The Indians named it "Eloibolg" a corruption of the French 
name. 

As early as 1720 the foundations of a town, two and one-half 
miles in circiunf erence were laid down on a neck of land on the south 
side of the harbor. 

LOUISDALE (R.) — The earliest name of this place was Seal 
Cove; it was afterwards named "Barrasois St. Louis." In 1905 at 
the suggestion of Mr. J. Nelson Scott, the Postmaster, it was 
changed by an Act of Parliament to its present name, which retains 
part of the old name with a local descriptive addition. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 85 

LOUSE HARBOR AND ISLAND (G.)— The changing from 
an old to a new name is not always for the best, but here is a case 
where any change would be an improvement. 

LOVETT GROVE (Y.)— So named after an early settler 
Mr. Israel Lovett. 

LOVET ROAD (A.)— This place near Round Hill was called 
**Lablalot" by the Indians. 

LOWER DUBLIN (L.)— Settled in 1762 by some Irish families 
and named in honor of one of the principal towns of their native 
land. 

LOWER HORTON (A.)— See Horton. 

LOW POINT (C. B.)— An important lighting and signalling 
station on the south-eastern extremity of Sydney Harbor. The 
ground is flat and low, there being no high cliffs at the point, but 
extremely high cliffs south and west of it. This accounts for the 
name. All early and some modem maps and charts call it "Flat 
Point," which was its earlier name. 

The Indians named this place "Mooinakuntcetc," meaning 
"the little Black Berry Picking Place." 

LOYAL HILL (Hts.) — So named by an early American Loyal- 
ist settler, Mr. John Grant, in honor of its first settlers' loyalty 
to the English King. 

LUCASVILLE (H.) — Settled by Americans named James 
Lucas, Oliver and Dishna. It was first known as Lucas Settle- 
ment. A church was built in 1819, and since that date the place 
has been known as Lucas ville. 

LUNENBURG — This place was at one time named "Mala- 
gash" and also "Mirliguesche." "Meligech" is no doubt the 
Indian word for "milk," and it is generally conceded that this is 
the origin of the name "Malagash." The name is first mentioned 
in 1630. 

"Mirliguesche" is said to mean "milky surf" or "milky bay," 
referring to its white appearance in a storm. The Indians also 
called this place "Asceedik," meaning "clam land," or "place of 
clams." 

Desbrisay quoted Rand as saying that the Indian spelling was 
^'Malligglak," meaning "mal-bad" and the termination meaning 
■"inherent" and "inanimate." and that the name was applied to the 
whole coast along by Lunenburg. 

In 1630 Sir WiUiam Alexander granted to Sir Claude de St. 
Etienne, Lord of La Tour, and his son Charles, a large stretch of 
lands along the coast which included Mirliguesche. 



86 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

It was settled in 1751-1753 by a party of Germans from Prus- 
sian Hanover, whose King, George II, was also King of England. 
It was named in May 1753, after "Luneberg" in Hanover. 

The Township, one of the two township divisiions of the County 
was formed i]n 1753. The Town was incorporated in 1888. The 
County contains 1116 square mijes. 

LYNDALE (C.) — A settlement east of WilHamsdale, was; 
named as above by an Act of Parliament in the year 1879. 

LYNN (Col.)— Named after a city in Massachusetts, which 
was called after the English seaport town, Lynn Regis, or "King's, 
Lynn." 

LYONS BROOK (P.)— Named after the Rev. James Lyons, 
one of the Philadelphia emigrants, who arrived in the Brig **Hope" 
in 1767. 

By an Act of Parliament passed in 1903 it was enacted that. 
Logans Tannery, Scotch Hill and Lyons Brook be thereafter knowa 
as Lyons Brook. 

LYON COVE (K.) — Named after an estimable and early 
settler of Kings County, or some of his descendants. 




PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 87 



M 



MABOU (I.)— Nicholas Denys called the place "Le Chadye." 
The name is a corruption of the Indian word "Malabo." The 
Indians named the place "Malabokak" — the meaning is obscure. 

MACCAN RIVER (C.)— The Indian name was "Maakan/^ 
or "Maagan," meaning "the fishing place." The English changed 
the spelling to its present form. 

MACNAB CREEK (R.)— Named after a family of MacNabs 
early Scotch settlers of Richmond County. 

MADER COVE (L.)— Named for Bernard Mader, a native 
of Germany, from which country he came to Nova Scotia, and was 
one of the original colonists locating at a point in Lunenburg 
County, which took the family name, and has since been known as 
"Mader Cove." 

MAGRAY ISLAND ( Y.)— See Big Tusket Island. 

MAHONE BAY (L.)— In 1754 Captain Ephriam Cook of 
Halifax formed a settlement here. It was called "Mush a Mush" 
in 1756. It is said that the name "Mahone" was first given to the 
Bay because it was a resort for pirates. As their vessels were low 
crafts the French word "Mahonne," which means "Venetian 
boats," was given to the Bay. The name was later applied to the 
village. 

The name "Kinburn," "Kindred Streams," was used in 1857, 
but the name fell into disuse. "Mahone Bay" was shortened to 
"Mahone." 

On a map dated 1672 this place appears as La Baye de Toutes 
Isles, or the Bay of Many Islands. 

MAINADIEU (C. B.)— Some French maps have it "Mena- 
dou." Charlevois has it "Penadou." It is an old Indian word, 
but drifted into the French spelling. 

Some give this story: "Main a Dieu," said some storm-tossed 
sailor, who believed he saw the hand of God (Dieu) stretched forth 
to save. 

Latter day Indians call it by the name "Luskuch," meaning a 
hieroglyphical direction, drawn on bark and placed as a direction 
to others. Mainadieu was at one time known as Little Cape Breton. 



88 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



MAITLAND (A.)— See Maitland, Hants. 

MAITLAND (R.)— One of the four Townships of Richmond 
County named in honor of Sir Peregrine Maitland, who was Gov- 
ernor of Nova Scotia 1823-31. 

MAITLAND (Hts.) — Named in honor of Sir Peregrine Mait- 
land (1777-1854), whowas Governor of the Province 1823-31. After 
the French deportation the first settler was John Raines or Rhines. 
The first land grant was to William Putnam and Luke Upham, 
dated Janusry 30th, 1771. The Indian name was **Menesatung" 
meaning "healing waters." Before Maitland received its present 
name it was known as Beaver River (see) Settlement. 

MAITLAND (Y.)— See Maitland, Hts. 

MALAGA LAKE (Q.)— This is the second lake on Port 
Medway River, and the name is from the Indian word "Maligeak" 
meaning "fretful water." 

MALAGASH (C.) — This place was called by the Indians 
"Malegawate," meaning "the mocking place," or the place where 
the Indians used to meet to play games. Some Micmac students say 
that the word is from the Micmac word meaning "end of smooth 
waters." 

The water between Malagash Point and Cape John was at one 
time known as Frederick Bay, so named by Colonel Joseph Freder- 
ick Wallet Desbarres, after himself. 

The Malagash Point or Cape was called by the Indians "Wag- 
woskoogwek" meaning "the end of the still water." 

MALAGAWATCHT (I.)— Said to be a Micmac Indian word 
meaning a triangular piece of land formed by a river on two sides 
and a lake or larger body of water on the third side. 

In New Brunswick there appears the name "Malegawaachk" 
given a lake with many islands in it. 

MALIGEAK LAKE (L.) — An Indian word said to mean 
"loose" not firm. The word is compounded of "Mal-bad-loose" 
with a termination denoting inherent and inanimate. (See Lunen- 
burg). 

MALIGNANT COVE (P.)— So called owing to the wreck 
near-by of a British man-of-war vessel named the "Malignant" 
bound to Quebec. (See new name Milbum.) 

M ALONE Y CREEK (Near North Sydney) (C.B.)— Named 
after a family of this name who settled and for a long time ran a 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 89 



grist mill, at this place. Sydney's first settler was an Irishman 
named John Meloney or Maloney (1784). (See Muggah's Creek.) 

MANASETTE CAPE (G.)— Said to have been named after 
a steamship. 

MANCHESTER (G.)— One of three townships of^ Guysbor- 
ough County, so named, in all probability, after the English City of 
Manchester. 

MAN-OF-WAR POINT (V.)— Received its name from a ves- 
sel which was built there and not finished when the Island was 
taken by the British, and they burned her. The marks of the forge 
are still to be seen there, and a few years ago the blocks on which 
she was built could be seen sunk in the sand. 

MAPLETON (C.)— Portion of Maccan (see) changed to the 
above name by an Act of Parliament passed in the year 1879. 

MAPLETON (Hts.) — This place was once known as the 
Three Mile Plains (see). The name was changed to Mapleton 
by an Act of Parliament in the year 1901. 

MAPLEWOOD (L.) — The place formerly known as Lower 
Foster Settlement, by an Act of Parliament in 1907 was changed 
to its present name. 

MARBLE MOUNTAIN (I.)— Received its name owing to the 
hill or mountain of excellent limestone found there. 

MARGAREE (I.)— Named by the French "Marguerite" 
River, and by the Indians ''Weeukuch" or "Weukuto." 

The Indians called the mouth of the Margaree "Weeukuch" 
meaning "red ochre," and the river mouth they called "Oochaa- 
dooch" which means "where they get it." (the Red Ochre). 

Margaree Township was one of the four subdivisions of the 
north-western part of Cape Breton, formed in the year 1828. 

MARGARETVILLE (A.)— Named after the wife of Judge 
Haliburton, who was at the time Chief Justice of Nova Scotia. It 
was at one time called "Reagh's Cove," also said to have been at 
one time called Peter's Point. 

MARJORIE ISLAND (R.)— Formerly known as Gooseberry 
Island. Received its present name about 1884 after Miss Marjorie 
Campbell, daughter of Sir Alexander Campbell. 

MARKLAND— See Nova Scotia. 



90 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

MARR BROOK (D.)— So named after an early settler Thomas 
Marr. 

MARSHY HOPE (P.)— A valley in the Antigonish Moun- 
tains. 

When his neighbors were in the habit of saying to James 
Mappel (about 1810) "Leave this marshy place; the frost will 
destroy your crops," he always replied "I hope it will improve." 
Hence his neighbors made the remark that his hope was a marshy 
hope, which became the name of the valley. 

MARSHALL COVE (A.)— See Port Lome. 

MARSHALL TOWN (D.)— Named after a first settler 
Anthony Marshall. 

MARTIN RIVER^ (L)— Near Mahone Bay. ^The Indian 
name was 'Tiktoojook,'* meaning "small explosions." 

MARTIN POINT (Col.)— Near Londonderry. The Indian 
name was "Wosoksegek" meaning "seen in the distance, as a signal; 
bright land mark." 

MARY JOSEPH (G.)— The Indian name of this place was 
"Megwasagunk," meaning "red shells." 

^ MASSACRE ISLAND (Q.)— An Island in Port Mouton. 
It is said that a French ship was wrecked upon this island, and the 
crew were all cruelly murdered by the Indians. The bones of many 
human bein!gs were found from time to time beneath the sands on 
the beach of the island — hence the gruesome name. 

MASON ISLAND (L.) — So named owing to the excellent 
quality of sand and gravel to be found on the island which was ex- 
tensively usfed by local and other masons, 

MASSTOWN (Col.)— At one time called "Cobequid Village." 
This village takes its present name from the fact that the French 
Acadians had a place of worship or mass-house there, Winslow 
herded them into this church before taking them on board his 
vessels in the year 1775. 

MATTIE (G.) — This place is named so because of a number 
of the residence bearing the name Mattie. 

M AUGER BEACH (H.)— This beach is near the entrance of 
Halifax Harbor. At one time it was owned by a man, Joshua 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 91 

Mauger, who in the year 1749 was Provincial Agent in London for 
Nova Scotia. He came to Halifax from Louisburg, and in 1751 was 
Victualler to the Navy at Halifax. 

There is a Township and an Island in New Brunswick also 
named after this man. 

MAXWELTON TOWNSHIP (P.)— A Township of Pictou 
County. In the year 1807 the County of Pictou was subdivided 
into three townships; namely, Pictou, Egerton and Maxwelton. 

MAYFIELD (Ant.)— First settled in 1820 by James Mc- 
dougall from Keppoch, Scotland. He named it "Keppoch." It 
was changed to Mayfield about the year 1888. 

MAYPOLE BROOK (Col.)— A brook near St.^ Andrews 
River, where the Indians used to assemble and hold their councils 
and kindle their fire under a large tree, which later suggested the 
name "Maypole." 

McCULLY HILL (Col.)— Named after a resident William 
McCully, a son of William McCully an early Scotch settler of French 
River. 

McGRATH COVE (H.)— Named after William McGrath, 
who settled here in the year 1851. (See Ocean Glen; see also Rock- 
haven.) 

McKINNON HARBOR (V.)— Named after a family of set- 
tlers. The Indian name was "Amasiboogwek," meaning "a grand 
river." 

McLENNAN MOUNTAIN (P.)— Received its name from 
John McLennan, the first settler at the mouth of the brook that 
flows past the iDase of the mountain. Here it is claimed was 
organized the first Presbyterian Church in the Province of Nova 
Scotia. 

MACNAB'S ISLAND (H.)— In 1750 was called Comwallis 
Island. It was named after Peter MacNab who bought the island 
for £1000 in 1783. The name appears on the Colonial Office map 
of the year 1815. 

McNEIL BAY (C. B.)— A Bay on the Mira River named after 
an early settler Lieutenant McNeil. 

McNUTT ISLAND (S.)— Alexander McNutt, an enthus- 
iastic adventurer from the north of Ireland, who was the means of 
settling Truro, Onslow and Londonderry — also the County of Shel- 



92 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



bume — at the close of his life resided on an island there and in 1765 
was drowned crossing to the shore. The island has since been 
known as McNutt's. 

MEAGHER'S GRANT (H.)— So named after a Captain 
Meagher to whom the Government granted this tract of land about 
the year 1784 to compensate him for the loss of a schooner which 
he had loaned to the Government. 

MEANDER (Hts.)— In Newport. The Indian name was 
"Miltcigatc." 

MEAT COVE (V.) — Received its name owing to the great 
number of moose and caribou found there in the early days, which 
furnished the natives and others withs supply of meat. 

MEDWAY RIVER (Q.)— See Port Medway. 

MEISNER POINT (L.)— Named after the Postmaster 
Jeffrey Meisner. 

MELROSE (G.)— , MELROSE HILL (I.)— After Melrose in 
Roxburgshire, Scotland. 

MELVERN SQUARE (A.)— First settled in 1790. Was 
named "Mill Town." About fifty years ago at a public meeting 
called for the purpose, it was named "Melvem Square" at the sug- 
gestion of William Gates. The Gates family were among the first 
settlers of the place. Four roads meet at this square. 

MELVILLE ISLAND (H.)— Was at one time called "Couries 
Island" probably named after Henry Dundas, the first Viscount 
Melville, at one time Secretary of State, and was Lord of the 
Admiralty 1804-1805. 

MERIGOMISH (P.)— Micmac "Mallegomichk." At one 
time called "Malegonish." The Micmac word means "Hardwood 
Grove." First settled by Barnabas McGee, a native of the north of 
Ireland who emigrated to Pennsylvania or Maryland and from 
there to Merigomish in the year 1776. 

Dr. Rand says the name is from the Indian word "Malegomitc" 
meaning "the place of merry making." 

Merigomish River was at one time known as Port Luttrell. 

Merigomish Island sometimes known as Robertson's Island, 
after Colonel Alex Robertson, who owned it at one time. 

Dr. Patterson finds the Micmac meaning for Mallegomichk as 
diversified by coves; he quotes no authority but it is beautifully 
appropriate. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 93 

MERLAND (Ant.) — At one time named "Usher" changed by 
an Act of Parliament to its present name in 1868. It was first 
settled by the following Irish families: Dominic Daley, Thomas 
Coffey, Thomas Power, Michael Hogan and Patrick Dunn, about 
the end of the eighteenth century. It is said this place was named 
in honor of a former priest the Reverend James Merle. Merle is, 
the Scotch name for a black bird. 

MERRITT POINT (C. B.)— Near Little Bras d'Or, named 
after a family who settled near and owned the land which forms 
the point. They were of Scotch descent. 

METEGHAN (D,)— The Indian "Mitihikan" meaning "wood- 
en fence" — weir. The village was first settled by Prudent Robi- 
cheaud in the year 1785. The Geographic Board of Canada 
states that it is a descriptive Indian name meaning "blue stone." 

MEUSE POINT (Y.)— Named after a French Acadian, 
Benjamin Meuse, an early settler. 

MICA HILL (V.)— A hill near Neil's Harbor, about 900 feet 
high. Received its name owing to mica being present in the near 
neighborhood. 

^ MICHAUD POINT (R.)— Appears sometimes as "Micheaux 
Point." Denys in his descriptive passage around the Island refers 
to the Isles Michaur, the name or a variation of it, still given the 
point. The islands are known as the Basque Islands. 

MIDDLEFIELD (Q.)— See Greenfield. 

^ MIDDLE HEAD (V.)— A name given to the point of land 
which divides the north and south Ingonish Bays. 

MIDDLE RIVER (H.)— Near Sheet Harbor. The Indian 
name was "Kookwejoogwode," meaning "the haunted place" or 
"the place of spectres." The Indian game of Blind Man's Buff 
was played here. 

MIDDLE RIVER (V.)— The original Indian name was 
"Wagamatcook," or "Wokumutkook," meaning "little green 
water," elsewhere said to mean "somewhat cleaner." 

MIDDLETON (A.)— So called because it is nearly the mid- 
point between Annapolis and Kentville. 

MIDDLE RIVER (P.)— The Micmac Indian name for this 
place was "Nemcheboogwek," meaning "straight flowing," or 
"flowing down hill in a straight course." 



94 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

MILBURN (Ant.) — By an Act of Parliament in the year 1915 
the name Malignant Cove (see) was changed to the present name. 

MILFORD (I.) — So named bv an Act of Parliament in the 
year 1884. 

MILFORD HAVEN (G.)— Settled by Benjamin Hallowel and 
others in the year 1784. The grant was given in 1765. Hallowel 
q^me from Boston. He divided his 20,000 acre grant among 
Loyalists, in 1784. In 1786 they planned and laid out a town 
named "Boylston." 

MILL BROOK (CoL)— Here William Waugh, son of the first 
settler Wellwood Waugh, built a water mill at a very early date, 
hence the name. 

MILL BROOK (P.) — ^First settled by Thomas and John Fiaser 
in the year 1800. They built a mill there in 1808, hence the name. 
It was earKer than this known as Bear Brook, owing to their ha\nng 
trapped a large bear on their first visit to the Brook. 

MILLIGAN SWAMP (D.)— Named after an early settler 
John Milligan. 

MILL CREEK (C.)— On the River Hebert. The Indians 
called the place "Booktowaagun," meaning "fire works." 

MILLVIEW (H.) — The settlement formerly known as Lower 

Bedford, The Dump and Doyle's Dump, changed to its present 
name by an Act of Parliament passed in the year 1896. 

MILL VILLAGE (O-)— At one time called Mills Village. 
It received its name owing to the first settlers Smith and Moseley, 
having erected a grist mill there. The place was surveyed and 
granted about 1760. 

MILTON (0.)— This place was called "the Falls" until the 
year 1830. It received its name owing to the excellent milling 
opportunities in the locality. 

Richard Kempton and his four sons were the first settlers. 

MILTON (Y.)— This place was known as "The Mills" in 
1820. In this year a brig was built here, and the place of building 
was filed in the Registry as "Milltown." The Customs Officer 
changed it to Milton, and so the name was evolved. This place 
was first settled by Sealed Landers in the year 1761; he was one 
of the three first settlers in Yarmouth. They came from Cape Cod. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 95 

MINAS BASIN — Minas, Manis, Menis, as it has been various- 
ly called. Was named by the French "Les Mines.*' It was named 
after the Cape which owes its name to the fact that veins of copper 
had been found at Cape d'Or, called also Cap de Mines. 

MINAS CHANNEL— The Indians caUed this place "Pleegun," 

meaning "opening in a beaver dam." 

MINAS RIVER, MINAS SETTLEMENT, MINAS REG- 
ION, MINAS BASIN— The home of the Acadians, all named after 
the Cape of that name. These places are now covered by the names: 
Avonport, Hortonville, Grand Pre, Gaspereau, Wolfville, Port 
Wilhams, New Minas, Kentville, Starr's Point, the two Canards, 
Comwallis and Pereau. 

MINASVILLE (Hts.)— See "Minas Basin." This name was 
given it by an Act of Parliament in the year 1890; it was hitherto 
known as Moose Brook Settlement. 

MINT COVE (D.)— Often called Mink Cove, was settled in 
1789. 

MINE HOLE (Col.)— Believed to be the result of very early 

excavating for copper ore, hence the name. 

MINUDIE (C.)— An Indian word "Menoodek" meaning "a 
small bay." A fanciful derivation for the name is "Main a Dieu, 
i. e., "God's Hand." The Indian word "Mtinoodek" means "a 
sack" or "a bag" and the name may have been derived from this 
word. 

MIRA RIVER (C. B.)— The Indian name was "Soolakade," 
meaning "the silver-place." It was named "Mire^' in honor of a 
French officer, Lieutenant M. de Mire, in the year 1746. We find 
it on the maps about the year 1800 as "Miray" and "Myre." 

In 1737 Mons St. Ovide de Brouillan, at that time the French 
King's Lieutenant on the Island, received a large grant of splendid 
land on the Mira River. There is a little river, a branch of the 
Mira, which the Indians named "Mtoodcok," meaning "a difficult, 
dangerous place." 

MISPOUK LAKE (Y.)— This name is from the Indian words 

"mis" (great) and "paug" (still water). 

^ MISSAQUASH (C.)— The little tidal river that formed the 
division line between the French Fort B cause jour and the 
British Fort Lawrence. Doubtless Micmac Indian. We find it 



96 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

spelled "Mezagouesch," "Mesagoueche," In 1750 records it 
appears as "Musaguash." In 1755 the French called the river 
"Ste. Marguerite." 



MISTAKE RIVER, MISTAKE SETTLEMENT (D. 

Lumbermen under William Hassett, who was foreman for John 
Heavy side, an early enterprising lumber merchant, at one time 
reached the shore and thought it was the north-east branch of the 
Sissibou; finding they were mistaken they gave it the name as above, 
this was about the year 1828. Sometimes called Irish Settlement. 

MOLASSES HARBOR (G.)— See Port Felix. 

MONASTERY (Ant.) — This place received its name from the 
fact that there was a monastery there, which was established by 
a Father Vincent in the year 1839. 

MONEY POINT (on Mira River) (C. B.)— The story is told 
that a passing boatman saw exposed on the sands at this place a cask 
which he thought contained money. He came back at night to 
get it, but the swift change in tide had covered it. 

MONEY POINT (V.)— This place is so named owing to the 
fact that a specie ship was lost there and up to the present time 
gold coins are found in the sands and rocks of the place. 

MONTAGUE (H.) — This district received its name in honor 
of Gore Montague, the son of Col. George Montague a descendant 
of the Duke of Manchester, who owned lands at Lake Loon, near 
Dartmouth. 

MONTROSE (Col.)— Named after the seaport town of this 
name in the North Sea in Forfarshire, Scotland. 

MOODY POINT (P.)— The Indian name of this place was 
*Toogunipkchk." 

MOOEANUK (H.) — A string of islands near Jeddore. An 
Indian nam^e meaning "the haunt of the seia duck." 

MOOSELAND (H.)— See Arlington. 

MOOSE RIVER (A.)— Was at one time called by the French 
**La Riviere d'Orignal, ' ' after some man of that name. The English 
confounded this word ''Orignal" with "Oregnol," which in French 
means a "moose." Hence the present name. 

MOOSE RIVER (C.)— The Indians named the place 
"Kesegwitck," meaning "the current flows swiftly." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 97 

MOOSE RIVER (Q.)— Once named "Ruisseau de la Roche" or 
*'Rock Brook." 

MORAR (Ant.) — Formerly known as North Side Cape 
George, given its present name by an Act of Parliament in the year 
1888. Named after a county on the western coast of Scotland. 

MORDEN (K.)— Named after a Kings County family ''Mor- 
den." It was formerly named "French Cross," a name given it for 
the reason that a large black cross had been erected at this place 
by some of the French Acadians who escaped at the time of the 
"Expulsion," and spent some time at this place. A number of them 
died and were buried there, and the cross was erected by the sur- 
vivors to mark their resting place. 

Some of them escaped to friends on the opposite side of Minas 
Channel. Their place of landing was called "Refugee Cove." 

MORE-RUM BROOK (Y.)— A watering place for horses, 
about a mile west from Tusket Bridge. One historian says, it 
derived its name from the circumstances that, while the horses 
were drinkifig, travellers used the opportunity offered by the excel- 
lent spring water for mixing purposes, to take another glass of grog, 
generally rum. Another Yarmouth historian says it received ityS 
name in this strange way: "When the road was being cut out the 
rum which was being served to the men gave out when the work- 
men reached this point; they refused to go beyond the brook 
until the rum was forthcoming. The surveyor in charge told them 
they could drink from the brook until more rum arrived, hence 
the name "More-Rum Brook." 

MORGANVILLE (D.)— Settled in 1828, sometimes called 
Morgan Settlement, after the first settler, Edward Morgan. 

MORIEN, C. Bj— At one time called "Cow Bay," so named 
owing to the finding there of a cow belonging to the first settler of 
Sydney, John Maloney, it having strayed from his farm in Sydney. 
Previously called by the French "Morrienne Bay." The French 
mined coal here as early as 1720. 

The Micmac Indian name for this place was "Noolektootc," 
meaning "place jammed with ice," or "a bivouacking place." The 
present name, an abbreviation of the old French name, was fixed 
by an Act of Parliament in 1895. 

MORRIS ISLAND (Y.)— Named after John Morris, who in 
the year 1773 received a grant of the whole island. 

MORRIS LAKE (H,) — Sometimes known as McDonald Lake. 
It is near Dartmouth. Probably named in honor of Charles 
Morris, who was Surveyor-General of the Province about the year 



PLACE-NAMES GF NOVA SCOTIA 



1780; or perhaps in honor of his son who bore the same name and 
succeeded him as Surveyor-General in 1781. The Geographic 
Board of Canada states it is named after an Indian family of 
Morris living at the lake. 

MORRISON ISLAND (P.)— The Micmac Indian name of 
this place was "Tumakunawaakade/' meaning "the pipe stone place" 

MORTIMER POINT (P.)— Near Pictou. Named after 
Edward Mortimer, an Englishman who settled in Pictou and 
became a wealthy merchant. 

He built "Norway House," a historic and interesting place in 
the town. 

Was for some time known as Gordon's Point, owing to a 
Lieutenant Gordon having settled there. 

MORVAN (Ant.)— First settled by McDonalds and McDou- 
galls. It was named "Keppoch" by James McDougall, after his 
Scottish home village. Later it was named "Morvan." 

MOSER ISLAND (L.)— So named after a Mr. Jacob Moser, 
one of the early grantees of the Township of Lunenburg. 

MOSHER (H.)— An Island and Point named after an old St. 
Margaret's Bay family — one time known as Grampus Island and 
Point. 

MOSHERVILLE (Hts.)— This place was formerly known as 
Middle Kennetcook and was by an Act of Parliament in 1870 
changed to its present name. 

MOUNT ADAM (P.)— See Garden of Eden. 

MOUNT DENSON OR DENISON (Hts.)— This place re- 
ceived its name in honor of Colonel Henry Denny Denson, an Eng- 
lishman who settled here about 1755, and took up a large grant. 
His home was called "Mt. Denson." 

Denson's name appears as a member for Newport (Kings 
County) in 1767. 

MOUNT EGERTON (P.)— See Egerton. 

MOUNT EPHRAIM, MOUNT THOM (P.)— Thomas Troop 
and Ephraim Howard, coming from Pictou to Truro to meet and 
assist the first settlers who were arriving from Philadelphia in the 
Brig "Hope," called these mountains after themselves. 

The old Indian name for Mount Thorn was "Pamdunook" 
(a mountain chain.) 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 99 



MOUNT GRENVILLE (R.)— See St. Peter's. 

MOUNT HANLEY (A.)— Called after a man named Hanley, 
who crossed over it in the e^rly days. It was named Hanley's 
Mountain" up to 1896; then it was changed to its present name. 

A very noted Loyalist named Thomas Barclay, afterwards 
Speaker of the Nova Scotia Legislature, settled himself and a num- 
ber of Loyalists here. 

MOUNT PLEASANT (D.)— Settled and named by settlers 
from Digby in the year 1787. 

MOUNT THOM (P.)— See Mount Ephraim. 

MOUNT UNIACKE (Hts.)— This place was settled in 1808 
by an Irishman named Richard John Uniacke, who came to Cum- 
berland County in 1774, where he received a large grant of land. 
He was Solicitor-General of the Province in 1782. He died at 
Mount Uniacke in 1830. 

MOUNT VARNER (L.)— So named after Elias Vamer. 
The Mount is on lands owned by him. 

MOUNT YOUNG (I.)— It is said that this place was named 
after Sir William Young (1799-1887), who was the first representa- 
tive of this County. He was Premier of Nova Scotia 1854-1857 and 
again in 1860 when he was appointed Chief Justice of Nova Scotia 
and was knighted in 1868. The County was in 1836 known as 
"Juste au corps." 

MOUSE ISLAND (C. B.)— Near Long Island, in the Bras 
d'Or Lake. Granted in 1820 to Rev. Hibbert Binney, with Long 
Island. A very small island near the comparatively large one 
suggested the name. , 

MO YD ART (Ant.)— Evidently named after the Scottish 
County "Moidart" on the west coast, although the spelling is 
unlike the original. 

MUD BRIDGE, near Wolfville (K.)— The Indian name was 
"Mtaban," meaning "mud-catfish ground." 

MUGGAH CREEK, near Sydney (C. B.)— Named after 
Mr. John Muggah a native of Banffshire, Scotland. He was 
employed as a military engineer at Sydney. He married a Miss 
Meloney, a daughter of Sydney's first settler, John Meloney, and 



100 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

settled at Muggah's Creek. The plant of the Dominion Iron & 
Steel Company is located on the old Muggah farm. 

(It is strange that the creek in the northern arm of Sydney- 
Harbor is named after the family to which this man's wife belonged 
— "Maloney's Creek.) 

A very early authority refers to this creek and stream as 
"Dartmouth River." 

MULLEGASH (C.)— See Malagash. 

MULL RIVER (I.)— Named after the Island or Sound of 
this name in the Hebrides, Scotland, by the settlers of Scotch 
origin. 

MUNRO POINT (VO-T-A point in St. Ann's Harbor, named 
after a resident family spelling their jiame thus. There is also a 
point of this name on Boularderie Island, named after the owners, 
a very respectable family of Scotch descent who lived there. 

MURCHYVILLE (H.)— Settled by Scotch about the year 
1812. It was for years called "Mill Village." The first settlers 
were named Merson. The first post office was established in 1876. 
A number of the inhabitants are named "Murchy" — hence the 
name of the village. 

^ MURDERERS ISLAND (L.)— The Island was so named 
owing to the many crimes committed on it by the Indians in the 
early days. 

MURPHY'S BRIDGE (Y.)— So named after William, one of 
the six sons of a very early Yarmouth settler James Murphy. 

MURRAY (V.) — This place was so named in honor of the 
Honorable George H. Murray, Premier of Nova Scotia, by the 
manager of an American Lumber and Pulp Company doing 
business there. 

MURRAYFIELD (P.)— Named after an early Scotch settler 
named Murray. 

MUSHABOOM (H.>--This is an old Indian name by which 
the Post Office at this place is still known. It was at one time called 
"Winchester Harbor." It is locally known as "Chelsea Bay." 

MUSOUODOBOIT (H.)— Indian name. The original spel- 
ling was "Mascoudabouet" and also appears as "Muskoodeboowek," 
said to mean "flowing out square," or "rolling out in foam or sud- 
denly widening out after a narrow entrance at its mouth." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 101 

This place was first settled by Europeans about 1692. The 
first grant was to Sieur de Gautiers. 

Lower Musquodoboit was formerly known as "Meagher's 
Grant," and was settled in 1799. 

Upper Musquodoboit was at one time called "Deacontown" 
after Samuel Fisher Archibald, who came from Truro and settled 
here in 1798 ; he was a deacon. There is a point near called "Mount 
William," so named owing to the fact that a William Guild, who 
was drowned in the river, was buried on the Hill. 

Used to be called "the Garden of Halifax" and the old settlers 
claimed that the Indians knew it as ''the chosen water." 

The Indians named Middle Musquodoboit "Natkamkik" 
meaning "the river extends up hill," and Upper Musquodoboit 
they called "Kesokudek," meaning "the road runs over the hill." 

MYRA (H.)— A Cove and Island in Blind Bay, Halifax 
County, called after a family named Myra. 




102 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



N 



NAPPAN (C.)— The Indians called the place "Menabank," 
meaning "washed away." Old spelling was "Nepan" and the 
meaning was "a good place to get camp or wigwam poles." 

NASS POINT (L.)— So named after an early settler Mr. 
Thomas Nass, of German origin. 

NAUFFTS POINT— So named after an early Musquodoboit 
family Nauffts. 

NAVY ISLAND (H.)— An island in Bedford Basin, Halifax. 
Prior to 1866 the Admiralty had a lease on the island for rifle 
practice, hence the name, formerly Stevens Island. 

NECUM TEUCH (H.)— This is said to be an Indian name 
meaning "gravelly river, or beach of fine sand." The old spelling is 
* 'Noogoomkeak. " 

NEGRO CAPE AND PORT (S.)— This place was so named by 
Champlain in 1604. He gave as the reason for so naming it, that 
opposite the Cape were rocks which resembled at a distance a 
negro's head. The Indians called the place "Kespoogwitk," mean- 
ing "land's end." 

NEIL HARBOR (V.)— Named after one Neil McLennan. 
We believe that this is the place referred to by Pichon as "Quara- 
choque' between Niganiche (Ingonish) and Aspre (Aspy Bay). 
He refers to it as a creek. 

NERISSA (G.) — This place was ^ formerly known as Clam 
Harbor, was named Nerissa in the year 1900. Evidently so named 
by some admirer of "The Merchant of Venice," as it is the name of 
one of Shakespeare's characters in this play. 

NEW ABERDEEN (C. B.)— See Aberdeen. 

NEW ANNAN, EAST ANNAN, CENTRAL ANNAN (CoL)— 
The first settler Mr. John Bell, of Annandale, Dumfrieshire, Scot- 
land. He came to Nova Scotia in 1806, and left Tatamagouche^ 
settled and named New Annan in honor of his old home, in 1815. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 103 

NEW CAMPBELLTON (V.)— This name was suggested to 
the residents because a Mr. Charles Campbell was a very influential 
resident here, and a parliamentary representative at one time. 

The place was known as "Kelly Cove" or Kelly's Cove"; 
received its present name in 1862. 

NEWCOMB CORNER (H.)— The place was named after its 
first Postmaster, Judson Newcomb, in the year 1868. It was first 
settled by a John Higgins, about 1780, later by a Joseph Miller, 

NEW CORNWALL (L.)— At the head of the Mush-a-Mush 
Lake. It was first settled by Rafuse, Brum and Hallamore fam- 
ilies, in the year 1800. Some of them were likely from Cornwall, 
and named the place for their homeland town. 

NEW DUBLIN (L.)— On the 3rd of May, 1762, Alexander 
McNutt arrived with 170 North of Ireland settlers, who were to go 
to this Township, at that time named "Dublin." Few of them 
actually settled here, but the name was given the place in honor of 
these Irish settlers. 

NEWDY OUODDY (H.)— Or Noody Quoddy, said to be 
from an Indian name "Noodaagwode," meaning "plenty of seals," 
or "place of seals." 

NEW EDINBURGH (H.)— See Weymouth. Settled in 1783 
by Anthony Stewart and others. 

NEW ELM (L.) — Named by early German settlers after the 
German River Elm. 

NEW GERMANY (L.)— Named after their native place by 
early German settlers, about 1785. John Fiendal built the first 
house here. 

NEW GLASGOW (P.)— Settled in 1809, and named by the 
early Scotch settlers, after the Scottish city "Glasgow." Mr. 
James Carmichael who built the first house here, was an estimable 
early settler, and is said to have the credit of selecting New Glasgow 
site for a town, and New Glasgow for its name. 

The first grant of land was for 500 acres to John McKenzie in 
1809. 

NEW HARRIS, NEW HARRIS FORKS (C. B.)— So named 
by early Scotch settlers after "Harris," a subdivision of the Northern 
Hebrides in Scotland. 

NEW HARRIS (V.)— See Slois A Brochan. 



104 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



NEW HAVEN (V.)— This place was formerly known as 
"Hungry Cove." 

NEW INLET (D.)— Sometimes called Bartlett's River after 
an early settler of 1799 Lemuel B art let t. 

NEW MINAS (K.)— See "Minas Basin." 

NEWPORT (Hts.)— The Township of Newport, one of the 
six Townships of Hants County, was formed and thus named in the 
year 176 L The old name was "West Falmouth." The present 
name was suggested by Mr. Morris, Surveyor-General of the Prov- 
ince to the Honorable Jonathan Belcher (who was then Lieutenant- 
Governor of the Province) in honor of Lord Newport, who was a 
particular friend of the Lt. -Governor's. It was erronously gener- 
ally supposed this name was given because of former association of 
the early inhabitant with Newport, R. I. 

NEW ROSS (L.)— This place was formerly called "Sher- 
brooke," after Governor Sir John Coape Sherbrooke; but as great 
inconvenience was daused by two places in the Province bearing this 
name, the name was dianged to "New Ross'' during the adminis- 
tration of Lord Mulgrave, in honor of his lordship, whose second 
title was derived from the town of New Ross, in Ireland. 

NEW ROSS CROSS (L.)~-Named after "New Ross" and the 
fact that this is the place where the roads to Lunenburg, Kings and 
Annapolis intersect each other. 

NICKERSON ISLAND (Y.)Named after Nathan Nickerson 
who was the original grantee (in 1762). 

NICTAUX FALLS (A.)-~A Micmac Indian name "Niktak," 
meaning "the forks of a river." 

NINE MILE LAKE (L.) — So named owing to its position, 
sometimes called "Big Sherbrooke Lake." 

NINE MILE RIVER (Col.)— The Indians named this river 
"Nenadoogweboogwek" meaning "he is clean" or "clean water." 

NINE MILE RIVER (H.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Wokimieak" meaning "the trail route." 

NINEVEH (V.) — Named after the ancient capital of the Assy- 
rian Empire. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA lOS 

NINMOCAH (0.)— A western branch of the Liverpool 
River. The word is the Indian for a lake with a river running 
through the middle and whole length of it — or a river widening 
for a long distance. 

NOEL (Hts.)— Head, Bay and Village. This place was likely 
named by the French after a man of that name, or "Christmastide." 

The first white settler was Timothy O'Brien, of Londonderry, 
Ireland, with his Scotch wife from Ayr, in the year 1770. 

NORTHS (K.)— A village named after the North family, who 
were early residents. 

NORTHERN HEAD (C. B.)— InLingan Bay. This place was 
known to the French as "Cap Charbon" i. e., Cape Coal. 

NORTHFIELD (L.)— First settled and named by families 
named MacKay, Ramey, Fancy, Wagner and Tibert. MacKay 
was a British soldier who was paid off in Halifax and came to North- 
field and settled there. 

NORTHFIELD (Q.)— See Greenfield. 

NORTH MOUNTAIN (K.)— Descriptive name given to the 
mountain which terminates the majestic Bluff of Cape Blomidon* 
dropping into the Basin of Minas. 

NORTH RIVER (C. B.)— A river running into St. Anne's 
Bay. It was at one time known as "Rouvilles River,*' after the 
French Marquis de'Rouville. 

NORTH SYDNEY(C. B.)— Was long known as "North Bar,'' 
owing to the sand bar extending into Sydney Harbor at this point. 
There is a similar bar on the south side of the harbor, directly 
opposite which gives "South Bar" its name. These bars make the 
inner Sydney Harbor such a safe retreat and protection for shipping. 

The Indian name for the place was "Gwesomkeak." 

NORTHUMBERLAND STRAIT— There was a ship named 
the "Northumberland" lost in the Strait in the year 1747, and the 
name may have come in this manner. It is, however, very uncer- 
tain. The Strait, or at least part of it, was named "St. Luniare" by 
Cartier. Its southern end was at one time called the "Red Sea." 

NORTHWEST ARM (H.)— Was called at one time "Sandwich 
River," also "Hawkes River." The Indian name was "Waygwal- 
teech," meaning "salt water all the way up." 



106 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

NOOSABOON (H.)— An Indian word meaning "the hair of 
my head." Here, says the Indian tradition, the fairies used to play 
ball, running and seizing each other by the hair, pulling out locks 
and scattering them on the ground. 

NOVA SCOTIA — Said to have been visited, or at least sighted, 
by Erik, an Icelander, in 986, and by him named "Markland," 
meaning "forest-clad land." It was referred to in 1516 as "Bac- 
caloes," said to be the Basque word for "codfish," but this name was 
a very general one for all places at or near the entrance of the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence. Afterwards it was known as "Acadia." (See.) 

It was at one time also called "Arambec." The Indians knew 
Nova Scotia as "Megumaage," i. e., "Micmac Land," or "the home 
of the Micmac or true man" ; this name the Micmac Indian applied 
to the Maritime Provinces generally. 

It received its present name "Nova Scotia," i. e., "New Scot- 
land," in the year 1621, when a deed or grant was given by King 
James the First of England and Sixth of Scotland, granting the 
Province under the present name to Sir William Alexander; just 
previous to this date it was known as "Nova Francia." New 
Brunswick was included in it until 1784. 

Scotland was at one time known as "Scotia Nova" or "New 
Scotland" to distinguish it from the whole or part of Ireland that 
was then called Scotland, i. e., "Land of the Scoti" or "Scots." 
Some of the Scots later left Ireland and settled in North Britain in 
the part now known as Scotland. 

Some old maps bear the name "New Caledonia" for Nova 
Scotia and "New Alexandria" for New Brunswick. 

The first representative Assembly, consisting of twenty-two 
members, was held in the year 1758. 

NYANZA (V.) — Named after Victoria Nyanza, the great 
ake of Africa, which is supposed to be the source of the Nile. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 107 



o 



OAK ISLAND (L.)^ — This island was made famous by the 
interesting search for hidden treasure which was made upon it at 
different times. It was at one time covered by heavy oak trees, 
hence the name. 

The first settlers were named McMullin and Mclnnis. 

OAKLANDS (L.) — Descriptive name given owing to the 
groves of oak found there at the time of settlement. 

This place was first settled in 1780. One of the earlijest settlers 
was a man named Kneiss, who buijt a mill there. 

OAK POINT (K.)— Called by the Indians "Upkwaweegan," 
meaning "a houee covered with spruce rinds." 

OCEAN GLEN (H.)— The settlement known as Larrys Cove, 
Whistlers Cove, McGraths Cove and East Pover are all included 
and named "Ocean Glen" by an Act of Parliament passed in the 
year 1893, 

OBAN (R.)^Named after the seaport town "Oban" in Argyll- 
shire, Scotland. 

ODIN (Col.) — Evidently named after the Norse mythological 
god of that name — ^making a rather pretty placfe-name. 

OGDEN (G.) — This place was named after a Mr. Alfred Ogden 
who was at one time the parliamentary representative of the County 
of Guysborough. 

OHIO ( Y.) — First settled by Nehemiah and Benjamin Church- 
ill who about the year 1826 decided with a number of other Yar- 
mouth families to go to Ohio, United States. For some reason 
these two men changed their minds and settled beyond the utmost 
settler, at what was known as the "Ponds." They gave the name of 
"Ohio" to their farms, which has -thus become the name of the 
settlement. 

ONSLOW (Col.)— So named in 1759 by a Mr. Knowlton and 
fifty-two others who resolved to form a township there. The town- 
ship grant was given the 21st of February, 1769, and is one of the 
four townships of Colchester County. The place was originally 
settled by New Englanders. Later, about 1776, a number of 
Ulsterites from Londonderry and Truro came in. (See Truro.) 



108 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

The original grantee of the Township of Onslow was Anthony 
Elliott, a discharged English soldier. The grant was dated 1769. 

The River Onslow was named by the Indians "Peleguloolkek," 
meaning "smooth flowing water." (See Debert River.) 

OSTREA LAKE (H.)— This place was first settled about 1780 
by families named Williams and Temple. It was formerly called 
Williams' Settlement; was named "Ostrea" about 1881. 

This lake is noted for its oyster beds, which suggested the root 
word for "oyster" as its name. 

OVENS POINT (L.)— -The Ovens, about twelve miles from 
Lunenburg, so called owing to the deep caverns worn into the sides 
of the rocky cliffs. These holes or caves are formed by the constant 
action of the salt water decomposing the p3aites crumbling the 
softer slates and decaying quartz away. 

OWLS HEAD (H.)— The Indian name of this place was 
"Pujooopskook" meaning "cormorant rock." 

OXNER COVE AND BEACH, OXNER SHOAL (L.)— So 
named after an early German settler Henry Oxner whose name 
appears as one of the early grantees of Lunenburg Township. 

OYSTER POND (H.)— The Indian name for these ponds was 
"Pegoodebek" meaning "a second apartment." 




PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 109 



PALMER ROAD (K.)— Named after Louis Palmer a New 
York Loyalist who came to Kings County from Shelbume about 
the year 1785. 

PARADISE (H.) — A place near Lawrencetown. The Indians 
called it "Nesogwaakade," meaning "place of eel weirs." 

PARKDALE (L.) — The old name of this settlement was 
Upper Foster. It was changed to its present name by an Act of 
Parliament in 1902. 

PARKER COVE (A.)— Called after an early settler named 
Parker. 



PARKS CREEK (L.)— Named after the first settler, James 
Parks, an Irishman, who came from Petite Riviere and settled here. 

PARKS FERRY (L.)— (See Parks Creek) named after some 
member of the Parke family who settled nearby in the early days 
of the district's settlement. 

PARRSBORO (C.)— Parish, River and Town in Cumberland 
County. Named in honor of Vive-Admiral John Parr, who was 
Governor of Nova Scotia 1782-1791. 

The Indian name for this place was "Owokun," or **Owwokun," 
"a crossing over place," "a portage or short cut." Parrsboro 
Township, one of the three townships into which Cumberland 
County is divided, was at first included in the County of Kings. 

PARR LAKE (H.) — Named in honor of John Parr, who was 
Governor of Nova Scotia in 1782, sometimes called Governor Lake. 

PARTRIDGE ISLAND (€.)— The Indian name for this 
island was "Pulowecha Munegoo," which means Partridge Island. 

PATTEN HILL (Y.)— So named after its first settler Richard 
Patten. He was from Marble Head and settled here about the 
year 1770. 



110 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

PEARL ISLAND (L.)— Named after the Pearl family, 
Albert Pearl being Light keeper 1873-1908, and M. B. Pearl since 
1908; named Pearl in 1914 to avoid duplication of "Green" its 
former name. 

PEASBROOK (G.) — This place is supposed to have received 
its name because of the plentiful growth of wild peas found near the 
btook; was first settled ^bout the year 1760. 

PEBAK (Hts.) — A small stream near Shubenacadie. A Mic" 
mac Indian name meaning "a wilderness." Sometimes known as 
Indian Road Brook. 

PECKS HEAD (C. B.)— Near Sydney, so named after an 
early Irish family who settled near by (See Battery Point). 

PEGGY COVE (H.) — Locally said to be named after a woman 
named Peggy, an early settler. 

PEGGY SOI (H.)— Pronounced Peggy Swa. (See Dover 
Soi.). 

PENNANT POND (H.)— The Indian name of this place was 
**Skabank," which means "where they eat raw." 

PEREAU (K.)— Part of the "Land of the Acadians." The 
Micmac name for this place was "Wojechk," meaning "white 
water," or "white signal far off." 

PERRANG COVE (H,)— This name was given this place in 
1864 by Capt. P. F. Shortland, R. N. 

PERRY'S CREEK (Y.)— Named after one of Yarmouth's 
first three settlers, Moses Perry, who came from Cape Cod and 
settled in Yarmouth in the year 1761. 

PETER ERASER'S CAVE (P.)— The name of a singular 
fissure in Pictou County; the roof is formed by limestone rocks 
leaning against each other, the interior illumined by ntunerous 
stalactites that are suspended from the roof. A somewhat similar 
cave known as the "Fairy Hole" is found in Victoria County, Cape 
Breton. 

PETITE (Hts.) — The Indian name for this place was "Was- 
okwesoogwode. " 

PETIT ANSE (R.)— The French for small cove. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 111 

PETIT DE GRAT (R.)— Said to be of Basque origin, grat 
meaning a fishing station, a small fishing station. There is a Cape 
Grat in Newfoundland and several other places in which the word 
appears. 

PETITE PASSAGE (D.)— The Indian name for this place 
"Tawilketc," meaning "the little outlet" or "opening." 

PETITE RIVIERE (L.)— Isaac de Razillys, a Frenchman, 
settled here in 1672. There were only two settlers in the year 
1745. The first British settler was Benjamin Harrington. 

A descriptive name. There are two of these rivers, the Indians 
called one of them "Simkook" and the other "Upsamkook." 

PETITE RIVER (Hts.)— The Indians called this place 
* * Wasokwesoogwode . ' ' 

PETITE RUISSEAU (D.)— English "Little Brook," so named 
by the early French settlers. 

PETPESWICK (H.)— Cape, Harbor ,^ Lake and Village. The 
Indian name for this place was "Koolpijooik." 

PETRIE REEF (C. B.)— A reef on the south side of Sydney 
Harbor named after a Petrie family who were seagoing and very 
early settlersi 

PETTIPAS— Changed to "Bellenden's Head" in 1725, in 
memento mori of Lieutenant John Bellenden, was was descended 
from a noble family, and who was buried there. 

PHINNEY COVE, PHINNEY MOUNTAIN (A.)-~So called 
after a family named Phinney, who owned the land and were set- 
tled there as far back as 1856. 

PICTOU — Pictou County contains 1058 square miles. 

There are a number of theories relative to the origin of this 
name. A few of them are given below. 

According to Dr. Rand, it is the Micmac word "Pictook." 
The "k" at the end of Micmac names, he says, marks what gram- 
marians call the locative case, expressing "at" or "in," The word 
"Pict" means an "explosion of gas." Whenever the noun ends in 
the sound of "kt" the regular form of the case locative is the addi- 
tion of "ook." Thus "Pict" becomes "Pictook,"- and the "k" 
being dropped, we have the name "Pictou." 

The entrance to Pictou Harbor the Indians called "Poogune- 
kpachk." Also the Micmac word "bucto," meaning "fire" might 



112 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

be the original. The Micmac Indian word "Bucto" or "Booktook,** 
meaning "Big Harbor" would appear to be a plausible derivation of 
the ilame. 

It is questionable whether there is any place that has had so 
many names as this town, as it was at different times known as : 
Coleraine, New Paisley, Alexandria, Donegal, Tiegnmouth, South- 
ampton, Walmsley. 

A place near Pictou Light House was known by the Indians as 
"Esasok" meaning "the western encampment. 

Changed from Walmsley to its present name in 1790. 

The Indian name for Pictou Harbor was "Poogunekpechk." 

The first settlers of Pictou were about a dozen families from 
Maryland, who came in the brig "Hope" in the year 1767. 

The "Hector" settlers from the North of Scotland came in the 
year 1773. In 1783 at the close of the American Revolution many 
other settlers arrived. 

The first frame house in Pictou was built in 1789. 

In 1807 Pictou was divided into townships, named Pictou, 
Egerton and Maxwelton. It was set off from Colchester as a sep- 
arate district m 1792 and was raised to the dignity of a county in 
1836. 

The name was supposed by many to have been a corruption of 
Poictou, the name of an old Province of France. It is found so 
spelled in many old documents and plans. Others claim it was so 
named owing to the bottle-shaped appearance of its harbor. 

PICTOU ISLAND (P.)— The Micmac Indian name was 
"Akoogomich" also "Gunsunkook." In 1762 it was referred to as 
"Isle Poitee" in a report made by Lieutenant-Governor Belcher 
to the Home Government. (See "Pictou.") 

370 emigrants from the Isle of Barra in Scotland settled on 
Pictou Island in the year 1802. A number of these later went to 
and settled in Cape Breton. 

PIEDMONT (P.)— Named by the Reverend Dugald McKei- 

chan, the first minister of Barney's River, so named from its situa- 
tion at the foot of a range of "^ hills. "Pied" from "Pes" (Ped) 
Latin for foot ; "mount" (mountain). Generally by an extension 
this word pertains to any place situated at or near the foot of 
mountains. 

It was first settled in 1810-1816 by Scotsmen from Perthshire 
and Blair Athole. 

PINKNEY POINT (Y.)— Named after an early settler John 
Pinkney who settled there in the year 1777. 

PIPERS GLEN (I) — This place was so named because Niel 
Jamison a bag-pipe player of considerable local fame resided there. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA lia 

PIPERVILLE (I.) — This place was known as rear of East Lake 
Ainsley; an Act of Parliament changed it to its present name in the 
year 1886. (See Pipers Glen.) 

PIPER POND (Hts.)— So named after a probably mythical 
piper of a Highland regiment who was supposed to have lost his 
watch in the waters, dived after it and was drowned. 

PIRATES HARBOR or COVE (G.)— On the Strait of Canso. 
Called by the Indians "Tesogwode," meaning "the place where 
goods were sorted" or "Place of Flakes." It is said to have been a 
resort for pirates in the olden days. Nearby is a small island and 
between this island and the shore there was a safe anchorage and 
an excellent hiding place for small vessels. 

PISSI QUID (Hts.)— The old name for Windsor. The Mic- 
mac spelling was "Pesegilk," meaning "to flow split- wise" — as the 
tide passes up near Windsor and divides off into the St. Croix 

Pissiquid is an old French settlement, and was included in 
the Minas territory that was settled and farmed by the Acadians. 

PLANT POINT (C. B.)— On the south side of the entrance to 
Little Bras d'Or. So named after Samuel Plant, an early settler at 
this place. 

PLEASANT HARBOR (H.)— This place was formerly known 
as "Shoal Bay" and was changed by an Act of Parliament to its 
present name in 1886. 

PLEASANT POINT (L.)— This name was substituted for the 
old name "Indian Point" by an Act of Parliament passed in the 
year 1907. 

PLEASANT RIVER (Q.)— This place was first settled in the 
year 1802 by Zenas Waterman, an ex-soldier from the American 
Army, and by a man named Harlow. 

PLEASANT VIEW (C.)— Hendersons Settlement was changed 
to the above name by an Act of Parliament passed in 1874. 

POCK WOCK LAKE (H.)— A lake near Hammonds Plain. 
From an Indian word "Pogwek," meaning "the smoky" or "dry 
lake." 

POCK WOCK LAKE (Q.)— Said to mean Indian "Paak- 
waak" — "stop here; you cannot go further," but given by Dr. 
Rand as "Pogwek" meaning "dry lake." 



114 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



POINT ACONI (C. B.)— So called from its sharp, needle-like 
promontory. The word must come from the Greek "Aeon" (a 
dart) ; may have been named by the Spanish (?). 

POINT AMELIA, Sydney H^rboi (C. B.)— Named by 
Captain Crawley (for whom Crawley's Creek was named) in honor 
of Princess Amelia, daughter of King George IIL 

One of Sydney's streets is named "Amelia," and Frederick 
Amelia Lovell was the first born and first baptised in Sydney. 

POINT BETTY ISLAND (P.)— Said to have been named 
after Captain Savage's vessel, the "Betty" which was lost here. 

The old Indian name for this place was "Mkobeel," which 
means "beaver place." 

POINT CARLETON (S.)— Named in honor of Sir Guy 
Carleton who was Commander-in-Chief in Canada in 1796. The 
place was first settled by Isaac Wilkins, an American Loyalist. 

POINT EDWARD AND EDWARDSVILLE (C. B.)— A point 
and village between the two Sydneys formerly known as "West 
Arm." The present name is in honor of King Edward VII, who as 
Prince of Wales visited Sydney Harbor in the year 1860. 

POINT MICHAUD (R.)— Named after an early French 
settler. 

Two names, — which have entirely disappeared — are given on 
old maps for this point or a point near by ; viz : Cape Hinchinbroke 
and Cape "Henlopen." There is a cape on the eastern coast of 
Delaware of the latter name. 

Denys calls the islands near here "Isles Michour/* 

POINT PLEASANT (H.)— At one time known as "Sand- 
wich Point." When Comwallis in 1749 first thought to form the 
City of Halifax, it was at this place he intended to locate the City' 
The North West Arm Halifax, was at one time known as "Sand- 
wich River. 

POINT TUPPER (R.)— Said to be named after Sir Charles 
Tupper, a Canadian statesman and politician, one of the "Fathers 
of Confederation," of whom he was the last survivor. He was 
bom in 1821; died 1915. 

The old name was Guernsey; it was given its new name by a 
resident Henry Painit. It is held by some that this place was not 
named after Sir Charles but after a family of settlers. 

POLLY BOG (CoL)— See Anton. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 115 

POMQUET (Ant.)— The place was first settled by three men 
named Duon, Dorion and Vincent. Old papers dating 128 years 
back (from 1916) spell the name "Pommquette." 

Dr. Rand gives the Micmac name as "Pogumkek," meaning 
"raining along" and from this the present name has been formed. 

A place near here was known to the Indians as "Pogimiko- 
oigitk" meaning "flowing over dry sand." 

PONHOOK LAKE (Q.)— Indian, "Bahnook,"— first lake in 
the chain. There is one lake of this name on Liverpool, and 
another on Port Medway River ; and still another in Halifax County. 

POPE HARBOR (H.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Kwemoodetc," meaning "the little loon place." 

POQUETVILLE (V.)— This name is given to the territory 
between the Half-way House, Neil's Harbor and Cape North, and 
was given it by an Act of Parliament in the year 1893. 

PORCUPINE CAPE (Ant.)— So named owing to the curious 
resemblance the cape has to the back of a porcupine. 

The Indian name was "Pookudapskwode," and also "Madooes- 
wotp," meaning "the head of a porcupine." 

PORT ACADIA (D.)--Named by an Act of Parliament 
passed in the year 1860, was formerly known as "Church Point." 
(See). 

PORTAGE CREEK (V.)— See Whycocomagh Portage. 

PORTAPIQUE (CoL)— River and Village in Colchester 
County. Descriptive French* name meaning "Port under a hill." 

PORT BAN (I.)— An English-Gaelic word meaning "white 
port." "Ban" is Gaelic for a degree of whiteness. 

PORT BEVIS (V.)— Originally, and now sometimes called 
"Big Harbor." The present name was given it in honor of an 
American who was identified with the company that at one time 
was engaged in mining plaster rock at this place. 

PORT BICKERTON (G.)— This place is said to have been 
named in honor of an English Lord Bickerton, who was Vice- 
Admiral some time on the West Indian Station. 

PORT DUFFERIN (H.)— Was formerly known as Salmon 
River. In the year 1899 by an Act of Parliament the name was 



116 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

changed to the above in honor of the Marquis of Dufferin, who was 
Governor-General of Canada, 1872-1878. 

PORTER LAKE (Hts.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Amaguntcetc," meaning "the little breezy place." 

PORTER TOWN (C.)— See Hastings. 

PORT FELIX (O— Formerly known as Molasses Harbor. 
An Act of Parliament passed in the year 1869 changed it to its 
present name. The Indian name for Molasses Harbor was "Wol- 
unkak," meaning "the scooped out place." 

PORT GEORGE (A.)— Named after English Royalty, the 
Indian name was "Goolwagopskooch," meaning "Hood seal rock." 

PORT GREVILLE (C.)— This place takes its name from 
Greville Bay in Cumberland County. The Bay was no doubt 
named in honor of Robert Greville, the second Lord Brooke, a 
famous English Parliamentary General, 1794-1866. It was form- 
erly known as Ratchford River, but was changed to its present 
name by an Act of Parliament in 1865. 

PORT HASTINGS (I.)— At one time named "Plaster Cove," 
owing to gypsum deposits in the neighborhood. The old name was 
changed by An Act of Parliament in the year 1869. It received 
its present name in honor of Sir Hastings Doyle, at one time Lieu- 
tenant Governor of Nova Scotia. 

PORT HAWKESBURY (I.)— At one time called "Ship 
Harbor," which was changed by an Act of Parliament in the year 
1860 to its present name, owing to their being a "Ship Harbor" in 
Halifax County. 

It was named in honor of Admiral Edward Hawke, an English 
Baron. (See Hawkesbury). 

PORT HEBERT (S.)— Named by de Monts in 1623, after his 
apothecary, Louis Hebert. 

PORT HOOD (I.)~Harbor, Island and Town. At one time 
called "Juste au corps" by the French. 

The British changed the name to its present name in honor of 

the famous Admiral First Viscount Samuel Hood (1724-1816). 

He was appointed Commander-in-Chief in North America in 1767. 

The first English settler is said to have been John Smith, who 

settled there in 1789. 

The Indians called the place "Kagweamkek," meaning "sand- 
bar." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 117 

On some maps the Port Hood Island is called "Smith's Island" 
and on others "Henry Island." 

PORT HOOD TOWNSHIP (C. B.)— One of the four sub- 
divisions of Cape Breton Island (the north-western part) formed in 
the year 1828. 

PORT HOWE (O— This place was Hkely named after Vis- 
count Howe, who commanded the British forces sent out in the year 
1757 to take Louisburg from the French. Admiral Holborne had 
charge of the fleet and Howe of the troops. 

It was at one time "Toney Bay." It was given its present 
name in Match 1883 — There was an English Captain How, who was 
treacherously shot in this vicinity in the year 1750 and although 
the spelling is not the same it may have been named after him. 

PORT JOLI (0.) — A descriptive French name meaning 
"pretty." 

The India;ns named this place "Emsik," from a word probably 
meaning "blown along by the wind." This place was at one time 
called by the FrSnCh "Port Noir," that is "the black port." The 
Portuguese namecTthis place Baya Formo^e. 

PORT LA TOUR (S.)— Named after a Frenchman, Charles 
Amador, the Marquis de la Tour. It was at one time known as 
"L'Omeroy," or "L'esmeron." Strange to say, about the year 
1620, this place was named "Port Louis" in honor of the French 
King, by the interesting man whose name it now bears. La Tour 
built a fort at this place for convenience as a depot for Indian trade. 
It is near Cape Sable. 

La Tour was known as Lord of Cape Sable and Lieutenant of 
the King (French) in Acadia. 

PORT LORNE (A.)— This place was likely named in honor 
of the Marquis of Lome (Duke of Argyle) who was Governor- 
General of Canada 1883-1888. One time known as Marshall Cove 
and again as Port Williams. 

PORT MALCOLM (R.)— At one time named "Caribou Cove 
Main," which was changed by an Act of Parliament in the year 
1886 to its present name, which is the name of a number of families 
who settled there. In former times the place was a great resort for 
Caribou, which suggested its first name. 

PORT MEDWAY (Q.)— This place was called by the French 
"Port Moltare." The old Indian name was "Alacah," meaning 
"a river with many branches or streams." The Indians also 
knew this place as "Ulgwedook," "the place of mushrooms." 
The present name is no doubt after the English River "Medway." 



118 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

The second lake on the Port Medway River was calledby the 
Indians "Malegeak," meaning "fretful waters." 

The third lake on Port Medway River was named by the 
Indians "Miriegooskek, meaning "the place of the Little Islaaid." 

The fourth lake on Port Medway River was named by the 
Indians "Nabegwonchuk," meaning "the ships' place." 

This name appears in several plans as "Port Metway." 

PORT MORTEN (C. B.)— See Morien. 

PORT MOUTON (Q.)— Town, Island and Port. Named 
"Luke's Bay" which was the name of the ship "St. Luke" sent out 
with colonists by Sir William Alexander in the year 1623, but the 
older French name stuck to it. The name was given to it by 
De Monts in 1604, from the circumstance of a sheep jumping over- 
board and being nearly drowned before it was rescued. 

The proper form is "Port du (not au) Mouton" — nOw "Port 
Mouton." 

The name "Port Matoon" appears on some modern maps as 
the present form of this name. In 1771 we find a reference to this 
place, and it is called "Port Mattois." 

The name "Gambier Harbor" appears as the name for this 
port at one time. The Indian name was " Wolugumkook, ' ' meaning 
"a deep gully" or "hole in the river." 

PORT MULGRAVE (G.)— Named in 1859 in honor of the 
Earl of Mulgrave, Governor of Nova Scotia in 1858. The old 
Indian name for this place was "Wolumkwagunuchk," meaning 
"the lobster ground." 

PORT NOVA (C. B.)— (See "Cape Breton"— the "Cape.") 
Pichon spells it (1760) "Portenove." The cape was known as 
"Le Chameau in 1725. 

PORT PHILIP (C.)— Formerly known as "Mouth of River 
Philip," changed to the above by an Act of Parliament in 1867. 

PORTREE (I.)— Named by Scotch settlers after the Northern 
division of the Isle of Skye on the west coast of Scotland. 

PORT ROSEWAY (S.)— Formed by Alexander McNutt in 
1765. This is the old name for Shelburne Harbor. This name is 
the old French name Port Razoir transformed into an English name 
of similar sound. 

PORT ROSSIGNOL (OO— On May 12th, 1604, De Monts 
put in at Liverpool Harbor, where he found Captain Rossignol of 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 119 

Havre, carrying on a contraband trade with the Indians. De 
Monts arrested the Captain and confiscated his vessel, naming 
the port after the captain. 

PORT ROYAL (R.)— This name adopted and the old name 
"Grand Rosseau" discontinued. The change approved by an Act 
of Parliament passed in 1867. 

PORT SALTER (C.) — So named by an Act of Parliament in 
1882. 

PORT SHOREHAM (G.)— In 1901 an Act was passed by 
Parliament changing the old name of this place *'Clam Harbor" to 
Port Shoreham, after the sea port town in Sussex, England 

PORT WADE (A.)— Opposite Digby. It was known until a 
few years ago as "West Ferry" named about 1905 after Mr. F. B. 
Wade, a member for Annapolis County, who was partially instru- 
mental in having a railway terminus and pier built at this place. 

It was originally settled by French; later by United Empire 
Loyalists. 

PORT WILLIAM (K.)— This place was formerly known as 
"Terry's Creek," so called after one of the early settlers named 
Terry. Its present name is after a former Governor of the 
Province. 

POTTER'S POINT (D.)— First settled and named after 
Joseph Potter. 

POTTLE'S LAKE (C. B.)— The lake from which the Towns 
of North Sydney and Sydney Mines receive their water supply. 
It was nkmed after the original grantee, an Englishman named 
Pottle. 

POULAMON (R.) — This place bears the Acadian French 
name for the small codfish known as the "Tom cod." The word 
"Tom cod" is a corruption of the American Indian word "Tacaud" 
"plenty fish." 

PRESQU'ILE (I.) — A French word meaning peninsula, from 
the word "Presque," meaning near or almost an "isle," meaning 
"island." "Nearly an island," that is "peninsula." 

PRESTON (H.)— One of the four township divisions of Hali- 
fax County, settled in 1812 by colored men and women who were 
plantation slaves, among them descendants of the Maroons from 
Jamaica who settled there a few years previously. 



120 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

It was originally surveyed and laid out in 1784 by on Theophile- 
us Chamberiain, and granted to him and his associates, sixty-three 
other Loyalists. 

PRIM POINT (D.)— The Hghthouse on the point bears the 
name of Prim Point Lighthouse, since the year 1817. 

PRINCE OF WALES LANDING PLACE (C. B.)— This 
Cove, on the shore of Sydney Harbor, between North Sydney and 
Sydney Mines, was originally known as "Indian Cove," and is 
locally known as ''Barrington's Cove," after the family of that name 
who own the beautiful adjoining property. 

It received its present name owing to the fact that in the year 
1860, on the 28th of July, the then Prince of Wales and afterwards 
King Edward VII of England, who was en route from St. John's, 
Newfoundland to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in the ships ''Hero" and 
"Ariadne," made a landing at this place and visited the Sydney 
Mines and inspected the Sydney Mines Volunteers. 

PRING ISLAND (Y.)— Named after WilHam Pring. It was 
given to him and John Crawley in the year 1762 for assistance 
rendered to the first families that settled in Yarmouth ; they arrived 
in 1761 and suffered great distress during the first year. 

PRIVATEER COVE (D.)— So named owing to a privateering 
vessel having used the port about the year 1777. The vessel was 
lost at the time on Baxter's Point near by. 

PROSPECT (H.)— In 1771 this place is referred to as "Pros- 
per"; at one time called "Passepac." The Indian name was 
"Naspadakun," meaning "an herb mixed with tobacco." 

PUBNICO (Y.)— Named from the Indian word "Pogomkook," 
meaning "land from which the trees have been removed to fit it for 
cultivation." The old French spelling was "Pomboncoup," from 
which the transition to "Pubnico" was easy. It is also stated that 
it was called "Poubomcoup," after a French family of that name 
who lived there or thereabout in 1705, but it is more likely that the 
Indian derivation is the correct one. Of the Indian word "Pog- 
bumkook," or "Bogbumkook," we find the following English and 
French variations "Pommicoup," Poumicoup," "Pobomcon," 
"Pignico," and "Pubnico." 

PUGWASH (O— This is from an Indian name "Pagweak," 
meaning "shallow water," or "a shoal." Settled by the French 
about 1750. Was one time called "Waterford." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



121 



PUZZLE POINT (C. B.)— The eastern end of Long Island in 
the Bras d'Or Lakes. Sailing westerly, i. e., coming into the 
Lakes, it is difficult to discern the opening between the Island and 
the mainland; hence the name. 




122 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 







QUAKER ISLAND (L.)— So named because a number of 
Quakers from New England, wishing to fit out for whale fishing, 
were at one time anxious to make the Island their headquarters. 
They could not secure it, so they abandoned the scheme and re- 
turned to New England. The name still clings to the Island. 

QUEENS COUNTY— On August 21st, 1761, the Council at 
Halifax advised that the Townships of Barrington, Liverpool and 
Yarmouth be erected into a County and to be known by the name 
of "Queens" — chosen no doubt to express loyalty to the monarchy. 
It is now divided into two townships, Liverpool and Guysborough. 
The County contains 1065 square miles. 

QUARRY ISLAND (P.)— Received its name from its stone 
quarries which were well adapted for the making of grindstones. 

QUINAN (Y.)— Once called Tusket Forks up to the 15th of 
May, 1885. Then changed to Quinan in honor of a deceased 
pastor of that name. 

QUEENPORT (G.) — This place which was at one time known 
as Crow Harbor, was named in honor of Queen Victoria in 1897, 
being her Diamond Jubilee year. The Act confirming its name 
was passed in 1898. The Indian name for Crow Harbor was 
**Wedoonik" meaning "having a mouth." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 123 



R 



RATCHFORD HEAD (C.)— The records show that a number 
of American emigrants were settled in this part of Nova Scotia in 
and previous to 1775. This point was probably named after one 
of them. The name appears sometimes spelled "Rotchford." 

RAYS HILL (C. B.)— Near North Sydney. Named after an 
English soldier who settled near there. 

RAWDON (Hts.)— The first inhabitants of Rawdon were dis- 
banded soldiers who had served under Lord Rawdon in the War of 
Independence, most of them having been enlisted in the Carolinas. 
The place was named in his honor, he was afterwards created 
Marquis of Hastings. The Township of Rawdon, one of the 
six township divisions of Hants County was granted in 1784 to 
Lt. Col. Small for the location of the 2nd Battalion of the 84th 
Regiment. 

RED HEAD (V.)— See Beinn Breagh. 

RED ISLANDS (R.) — This place received its name from the 
Islands near by. The soil and rock is of a reddish color and the sun 
at certain times of the day gives them a beautiful red appearance. 
The Indian name of this place was "Gwesassek." 

REDMOND COVE (HOy-A cove in St. Margaret^s Bay 
named after a Redmond family. 

RED POINT (G.)— In the Gut of Canso, was known by the 
Indians as "Wipkoogweiik." 

REARLAND (R.) — A rather pleasant name formed by making 
one word of the two, which meant Rear or Back lands, being lands 
situated back of lands generally more advantageously located near 
the shore or leading roadway. 

REFUGEE COVE (C.)— See "Morden" (K.). 

So named owing to a number of French Canadian Refugees 
landing here from the opposite side of the Basin. Now known as 
"French Cross" or "Morden." 

REID ROCK (H.)— In 1752 a Solomon Reid was living in the 
south suburb of Halifax, and as the rock is near the shore and Reid 
or Reed owned the adjoining land, it is probably the name came in 
this manner. 



124 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

RENFREW (Hts.) — A gold mining camp commenced in 1862. 

One of the late King Edward the Seventh's younger titles 
was Baron Renfrew. This, it is said, is where the name Renfrew 
was found. 

RESERVE (C. B.)— When the General Mining Association 
owned all the coal in Cape Breton County, the coal at this place 
was known to exist, but the Company's operations were then con- 
fined to Pictou, Sydney Mines and Lingan, the coal seams outside 
of Glace Bay being held in * 'reserve" for future operations. Hence 
"Reserve Mines" now ''Reserve." In 1827, about the time 
the above-named Association was formed, we find all of the coal 
mines referred to as "Royal Reserved Mines." 

RIDGEVALE (S.)— Named by Judge Lewis Morris Wilkins, 
who made his home there. The place was known for many years as 
"Wilkins' Folly." 

RICHMOND COUNTY— Named in honor of Charles Lennox, 
fourth Duke of Richmond, who was Governor General of British 
North America 1818-1819. 

Was cut off from Cape Breton County in 1836, and formed 
into a separate county. The townships of Richmond County are 
four: Arichat, Lenox, Maitland and Hawkesbury. This county 
contains 623 square miles. 

RISER'S POINT (L.)— This point was formerly known as 
Lovely's Point. 

RING POINT (Y.)— This place received its name from an 
early settler, George Ring, who came from Massachusetts and 
settled here about the year 1762. 

RIVER BOURGEOIS— The Indian name for this place was 
"Nabigwonchek" meaning a "brig" or "ship," the whole meaning 
"a brig or ship's place." 

RIVERDALE (D.)— For a long time known as "Wagoner 
Settlement," as it was first settled in 1833 by a Mr. Benjamin 
Wagoner. 

RIVER DENYS (I.)— Named a//^r and it is said by Sir Nich- 
olas Denys, Sieur de Fronsac, a native of Tours, France. He was a 
very enterprising Frenchman, who obtained a patent in 1654 from 
the King of France. In 1654 he was appointed Governor of Cape 
Breton, Prince Edward Island, and part of Newfoundland. 

RIVER INHABITANTS (R.)— The Inhabited River or River 
of Inhabitants. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 125 

RIVER JOHN (P.)— One time known as "Deception River" 
and ''John's River." Said to be named after John Patuguin, an 
early settler. A cape nearby was known as Cap Jean. Probably 
the name came from this. Des Barres' chart dated 1770 names it 
"Harbor" or "River" John. The Indians called it "Kajeboogwek" 
meaning "winding through the wilderness," or "desert place." 
Dr. Patterson, Pictou's Historian, gives the spelling of the Micmac 
name as "Cajje Book Wek" and says the meaning is "flowing 
through a wilderness." Cajje from "Cajjah" to be alone. 

RIVER PHILIP (€.)— The Indians named this place "Kesoos- 
kiboogwek" meaning "flowing through hemlock." It is said that 
the name Philip is after a popular old Doctor of that name who 
practised and had his home there. 

RIVERPORT (L.)— One of Sir Nicholas Denys' headquarters 
and fishing stations. Previous to 1904 it was called "Ritcey's 
Cove," then changed by an Act of Parliament to its present name. 

RIVER RYAN (C. B.)— Formerly known as "The Head of 
Lingan Bay" given its present name after a reside'iit named Patrick 
Ryan. 

RIVERSDALE (L.)— Settled about the year 1820 by Moss- 
mans .Knocks and Eisenhauers, who came from Kingsburg to this 
place 

ROBERTA (R.)— In 1906 by an Act of Parliament the old 
name of this place. Cross Roads St. George's Channel, was changed 
to its present name. 

ROBERTA (G.)— This place was named in 1851, after the 
postmaster whose name was Robert. 

ROBERT'S ISLAND ( Y.)— This Island was long called 
"Non Present" and "Non Prison." It received the name in this 
way : 

At the deportation, a number of Acadians who had been col-, 
lected ready to be taken to Boston were placed on this Island, 
which was thought to be a safe place. Between wading and swim- 
ming, they managed to escape. When Prebble came with his ships- 
to carry them away, they were not to be found, so the Island was 
named in derision "Non-present Island." 

ROBERTSON ISLAND (P.)— Named and^ first settled about 
the year 1783 by Colonel Robertson of Struan, Perthshire. He 
was of the 82rid Hamilton Regiment. This island is generally 
known as Big Merigomish Island, 



126 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

ROBINS (C. B.)— Named after a family Robins who settled 
there about the year 1790. 

ROCKFIELD (P.) — This name was given this place by an 
Act of Parliament in the year 1885. It was hitherto known as the 
settlement of "Auclein Caim." 

ROCKHAVEN (H.)— By an Act of Parliament this name was 
substituted for the old name "McGrath Cove" in the year 1908. 

ROCKINGHAM (H.)— Named after Charles Watson-Went- 
worth, Marquis of Rockingham, who was English Prime Minister in 
1782. 

ROCKVILLE (Y.) — A descriptive name. It was once known 
as "Rocky Nook." 

ROCKYVILLE (I.)— See Tupperdale. 

RODNEY (C.) — Named after Rodney, Ontario, in the year 
1866 by a Mr. Howard Mills. First settled by three families named 
Boss, Rysley, and Schurman. 

The name "Rodney" was originally, no doubt, in honor of 
Baron (George Brydges) Rodney, the noted EngHsh Admiral. 

ROSEWAY (S.)— See Port Roseway. 

ROGERS HILL (P.) — The old Indian name of this place was 
"Nimnokunaagunikt" meaning "blackbird grove." Received its 
present name after John Rogers who owned the land, and was one 
of the settlers to arrive from Philadelphia in the brig "Hope" in 
1767. This place has recently been named "Scotsburn." (See). 

ROGERTON (G.)— Called so owing to the number of fam- 
ilies named Rogers living there. 

ROGERS POINT (D.)— Called after a Major Rogers who was 
an early settler. 

ROSEBURN (I.)— Formerly known as Bridge End, in the 
year 1887 changed to its present name by an Act of Parliament. 

ROSETTE (0.)— Settled and named in 1822. 

ROSIGNOL LAKE (0-)— See Lake Rosignol. 

ROSS POINT (Col.)— Named after a Presbyterian minister, 
the Rev. Hugh Ross, who resided there in 1824. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 127 

ROSSWAY (D.)— First settled in the year 1785 by Major 
Robert Timpany and Capt. Frederick Williams from Annapolis. 

ROUNDHILL (A.) — This name appears in early Nova Scotian 
history as **Le Pre Ronde," also known at one time as **Lovetts." 
The Indian name was "Lablalot," named after an old resident. 

ROUSE BROOK, ROUSE ISLAND (L.)— This place was 
named in honor of Captain John Rous, who was Master of the ship 
that landed the first settler in the county in the year 1750. The 
Brook is the spot where the landing was made. Captain Rous was 
a very successful English Captain, and took part in nearly all of the 
stirring events in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia between the years 
1744-1759. In 1760 he became a resident of Halifax, and a member 
of the Council of Nova Scotia. 

ROYAL CENTRE (P.)— This place in Pictou County was 
previous to 1906 known as Rear Meadows. In that year an Act 
changing the name was passed. 

RUDDERHAM CREEK (C. B.)— In Sydney Harbor, named 
after William Rudderham, an early English settler whose descend- 
ants are still living near the creek. 

RUDHA MHINISTEAR (I.)— Gaelic meaning "The Min- 
ister's Point." It is near Malaga watcht and was named so owing 
to a Presbyterian Minister the Rev. Donald McDonald having 
settled there in 1824. 

RUDOLF POINT (L,)— Named after Charles and William 
Rudolf, who as early as 1820 built vessels of considerable size there. 

RUSSELL LAKE (H.) — A Lake near Dartmouth named in 
honor of an early settler Nathaniel Russell, an American Loyalist. 



128 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



SABLE ISLANI>— In 1505 ilamed "Santa Cruz." In 1544 
it appears on the map as "I da Cms." In 1548 its name appears as 
"Isolla del Arena." The present name appears as early as 1546 
when Joaiiiles Freire, a Portuguese map-maker, calls it "I. do 
Sable." It is said by some to have received its name from the 
Frencji word "sablon" meaning "sand." 

The name appears on very old maps as "Sandy He." Sir 
Humphrey Gilbert visited it in 1583. La Roche left 50 convicts 
on it in 1508. 

Owing to the great number of vessels that have been lost on 
this treacherous island which is forty miles long and two and one- 
half miles wide, it is known as the "Graveyard of the Atlantic." 

SABLE RIVER (S.)— The Indian name for this river was 
"Neseamk," meaning "riley water flowing down over sand." 
Another part of the river they named "Pijeboogwek," meaning 
"a long flowing river." 

SACRIFICE ISLAND (L.)— Near Heckmdn's Island. Known 
by this name as it is said that a white child was offered as a sacrifice 
by the Indians on this island. 

SACKVILLE (H.) — This place was named in honor of George 
Sackville Germain, first Viscount Sackville, who was made Com- 
mander of the British forces in the year 1758 and Secretary of State 
for the Colonies 1775-1782. The Indian name for this place was 
"Alobsoolawakade," meaning "the place of measles." 

Again an Indian name appears as "Kwebaco," applied to 
Sackville, meaning "the head of the tide." 

SALMON RIVER (Y.)— Changed from the Micmac Indi § 
name "Boonamoogwade," meaning "place of frost fish," or "Tom- 
cod-ground." 

SALMON RIVER SETTLEMENT (Y.)— This place was 
settled about the beginning of the 19th century by liberated negro 
slaves. These slaves were owned by some of the early settlers of 
Yarmouth. 

SALMON RIVER (H.)— (See Port Dufferin).^ The Indian 
name for the River was "Pulammoa-seboo," meaning, "Pulmo" 
(salmon) "Seeboo" (river). 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 129 

SALMON RIVER (€.)— This river was named by the Indians 
"Wagobagitk," meaning ''the end of the flowing, or bounds of the 
rushing water, the tide, or bore." (See Cobequid). 

SALMON RIVER (D.)— By the French named "Riviere aux 
Salmon" owing to the large number of Salmon found there. 

SALTER HEAD (Hts.)— Named after a Mr. Salter of Hali- 
fax, who was granted 2500 acres of land in this vicinity in the year 
1765, and who afterwards sold it to General Small. (See Rawdon 
and Selmah). 

SALT MOUNTAIN (I.)— Near Whycocomagh. It received 
its name from the saline springs to be found near its top. 

SALT POND (Y.)— Before 1799 this place was called simply 
"Flats." It was settled in 1799 by twenty-five proprietors, and 
dyked at an expense of 270 pounds. It contains 165 acres. 

SALT SPRINGS (P.)— At the foot of Mount Thom. In the 
year 1813 afi attempt was made to manufacture salt from the saline 
springs which rise here; hence the name. 

SAMBRO CAPE (H.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Meseebakun," meaning "the constant mocker." At one time 
the spelling was "Sezambre," evidently so named after Sesambre an 
sland near St. Malo. 

SAMSONVILLE (C. B.) — Named after a man named Samp- 
son, who was the Postmaster. 

SANDFIELD (C. B.)— A settlement on the Mira River, so 
named because the soil forms part of a great dune. 

SAND RIVER (C.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Agoomakunuk," meaning "where they catch the herring." 

SAULNIERVILLE (D.)— Named after a French Acadian 
family of first settlers named "Saulnier." 

SAVAGE POINT (P.) — So named for a Captain Savage, of 
Truro, who died while his vessel was lying there. He was buried 
in the sand on the shore. His vessel the "Betty" was said to have 
been cast ashore near here.. (See Point Betty Island). 

SAVAGE'S ISLAND (Col.)— Here is an old Micmac burying 
ground and wooden monument, marking the Redman's last resting 
place; this is the reason for its name. 



130 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

SAVALLETTE PORT (G.)— Named by Champlain after a 
Basque shipmaster. It is now called * 'Whitehaven." 

SAVARY BROOK (D.)— So called after an early settler 
named Nathan Savary. 

SAW-MILL BROOK (P.)— The Indian name of this place, 
meaning "Saw-mill Brook," was Nawegunichk." 

The first settler was William Kennedy, who built a mill here — 
hence the name. The mill is said to have been the first frame 
building erected in Pictou County. It was built in 1769. Kennedy 
came from Truro. 

SCATARI — It is so spelled in a pamphlet on Cape Breton, 
dated 1746. Formerly called "Little Cape Breton." Called 
"Ponchartrain" on some old French maps. It is probably a cor- 
ruption of a European name ; although finding it called "Secetere" on 
very old maps it presumably means "dry land." There is a little 
island at the mouth of the Shannon River in Ireland named "Scat- 
tery." 

SCHNORE (H.)— After a family of residents of this name. 

SCHOONER POND (C.^ B.)— Received its present name 
owing to a certain schooner having been lost on its dangerous shore. 
Sometimes called Big Glace Bay — called by the early French "Bay 
de Charbon" i. e., "Coal Bay." 

SCOTCH OR SCOTTS FORT (A.)— So named in 1628. It 
was built by Sir William Alexander's son and a party of Scotch 
immigrants. 

SCOTCH HILL (P.)— See Lyons Brook. 

SCOTSBURN (P.)— Formerly called Rogers Hill (see) and 
given its present name by an Act of Parliament passed in the year 
1867. 

SCOTSVILLE (I.)— Formerly "Outlet of Lake Ainsley," 
named by its residents who are sons of, or descendants of sons of old 
Scotland. Received its present name in April 1883. 

SCOTT'S BAY (K.)— So called owing to some Scotch immi- 
grants having been wrecked at this place, on their way to settle at 
Cap d'Or, about the year 1764. They remained there for some time, 
but eventually moved elsewhere. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 131 

SCOTT'S ISLAND ( Y.)— This place received its name from 
its earliest settler, Moses Scott who settled there in the year 1763, 
he came from Fitchburg, Mass. 

SCRAGGY LAKE (H.)— One of the Tangier River Lakes. 
The Indians called it "Misegumisk," meaning "scraggy and rough.' 

SCULPIN HARBOR (G.)— The Indian name was "Chulok- 
wegook," meaning the **Sculpin." 

SEABRIGHT (H.)— This place was at one time known as 
"Hubley Settlement." In 1901 it was changed to Hubley." The 
Act was amended in 1902 changing the name to "Seabright." 

SEAL ISLANDS (Y.)— These islands were named by Samuel 
Le Sieur Champlain who accompanied DeMonts in 1604. The 
explorers found an abundance of seals and named the islands "Isle 
aux Loups Martins," or "Island of Seals." 

SEA VIEW (R.)— Was formerly known as "Sporting Moun- 
tain," received its present name by an Act of Parliament in the 
year 1890. 

SECCOMBE ISLAND (L.)— Named after the Rev. John 
Seccombe, from Medford, Massachusetts, who came here in the 
year 1708, and lived on the island for some years. 

SECOND LAKE (Q.)— See Liverpool (Q.) 

See Port Medway (Q.) 
See Tangier (H). 

SELMAH (Hts.)— This place was first settled by the French, 
who were driven out by the English in 1755. A Mr. Salter of 
Halifax was granted 2500 acres in 1765. He sold it in 1785 to 
General Small, who, after the American Revolution, settled Kennet- 
cook and other districts with American soldiers. General Small's 
home estate was known as "Selma." Some person added the 
"h." 

There is a city in Alabama of this name; the spelling is "Selma." 

SEVEN-PENCE HA'PENNY BRANCH (D.)— Said to be 
so named because a coin of that denomination was found on its 
bank. 

SHAG BAY AND HEAD (H.), SHAG ROCK (C. B.)— After 
a wild sea-bird of this name which frequented the Bay. 

SHEEHAN LAKE (H.)— Named after a family of early 
residents. 



132 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

SHEET HARBOR (H.)^The Indian name for this place was 
"Weijooik," which means "running crazily, spreading every way. 
There is a small stream running into Sheet Harbor which the Indians 
called "Kajoogwajek," meaning "the place where gold thread 
grows." 

SHEET HARBOR LAKE (H.)--This place was named by the 
Indians "Punakade," meaning "the place of bringing forth." 

SHEFFIELD VAULT (K.)— A brook flowing into Minas 
Channel, named so because it has comparatively waterless channels 
called vaults. 

SHELBURNE—Bay, Harbor and Town. In 1765 Alexander 
McNutt applied for a charter to found a city which he called "New 
Jerusalem." This is now "Shelbume." It was so named by 
Governor Parr on the 22nd day of July, 1783, in honor of the Earl 
of Shelbume, Secretary of State. It is said that as the Governor 
named the place, the flag-staff which stood on Stanhope Hill, on 
which the British colors were flying, fell to the ground. 

Over 5,000 United Empire Loyalists, principally from New 
York, settled here in 1783. The Town grew at an astonishing pace 
and it is interesting to note that at one time it had a larger popula- 
tion than Quebec and Montreal combined. The Indian name for 
this place was "Sogumkeegun," meaning "a short cut through a 
sandy b^r." 

Shelbume was formed into a county about the year 1799; 
it is divided into two Townships, Shelbume and Barrington. In 
1836 the County was divided, part of Shelbume going into Yar- 
mouth County. This county contains 948 square miles. 

Shelbume Harbor was at one time called Port Razoir by the 
French and Port Roseway by the English. 

SHENACADIE (C. B.)— The Indian name was "Soonakadde," 
meaning "the place of cranberries." The name appears on old 
maps as "Sunakady." 

SHERBROOKE (G.)— Named after Sir John Coape Sher- 
brooke, Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia (1811-1816), Gov- 
ernor-General of Canada (1816-1818). 

Le Girandiere had a farming place and a small fort, afterwards 
a fishing and fur-trading station, at the head of Chedabucto Bay, 
now Sherbrooke; doubtful date, but previous to 1659. 

SHERBROOKE LAKE (L.)— (See Sherbrooke.) 

SHINIMICAS (C.) — This is said to be an Indian name 
meaning "Shining River." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 133 

SHIP HARBOR (H.)— The Indians called the place "Ted- 
umuna-Boogwek," meaning "a water- worn rock," or "blunt har- 
bor." Ship Harbor Lake was named by the Indians "Wagwosk," 
meaning "the end." 

SHOAL BAY (H.)— A small bay on the Tangier Riyer, called 
by the Indians "Wospegeak," meaning "the sunshine is reflected 
from the water." 

SHOOK POINT (D.)— So named after a first settler Deacon 
Shook. 

SHUBENACADIE (Hts.)— Indian name "Segunbunakadie/ 
meaning "the place where the ground nut or Segubun (the Micmac 
potato) grows." In 1724 the spelling was "Shickabenacadie." 

Near Shubenacadie River is a place called "Kitpoo-aykaddy," 
meaning "the place of eagles." This place was also called at one 
time "Shepondie." Very old grants give the name of this place as 
"Chicabenacadie." The Indians called the Shubenacadie River 
"Agekade." 

SHULIE (C.)— Sometimes spelled "Shulee" or "Shoulie." 
Derivation not definitely known, but the pronunciation of some of 
the early French settlers leads to the theory that it is a corruption of 
the French word "joli," — (pronounced "sholee") — meaning "ptet- 
ty." 

It was a favorite shad fishing harbor for the French. 

SHURTLEFF'S POINT (Y.)— This place was named after 
an early settler, Henry Shurtleff . 

SIEMENS (Col.)— Formerly "Acadia Mines," changed by an 
Act of Parliament to this name in 1877. 

SILVER CRAIG (C.)— So called owing to the brightness of 
the gypsum cliffs when the sun shines upon them. 

SILVER LAKE (Q.) — So called from the white appearance 
of the water : this is owing to the lake being situated between high 
lands and the bottom being of a whitish cast. 

SISSIBOU — A western Nova Scotia River. The name is 
Micmac for "Big River" — the same as "Cibou." It was given to 
this river because it is said to discharge the largest body of fresh 
water of any river in the Province. 

There is a legend that the name is derived from the French 
word for "six" and the Indian word "hibou" (an owl) as the story 
says there were six owls found there by the first discoverers. 



134 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

SIXTH LAKE {Q.)—See Liverpool. 

SIX MILE BROOK (P.)— Given this name because it was 
six miles from the place the old Cobequid Road started to the 
point where this brook crosses the road. 

SKIR DHU (V.)— This is a Gaelic name, meaning "Black 
Rock." 

SLAB TOWN (Col.)— See Hilden. 

SLATE MOUNTAIN (C. B.)— The Indian name was "Ken- 
eskwotpat," meaning "having a peaked head." A brook near by 
was named by the Indians "Egogek," meaning "next to the woods." 

SLAUGHENWHITE POINT (H.)— One time called "Oak- 
land." Received its present name from Captain P. F. Shortland» 
R. N., 1864, and is a common family name about St. Margaret's 
Bay. 

SLOANE POINT (L.)— Named after an Irish settler named 
John Sloane, who came from Lower Dublin 

SLOIS A BHROCHAN (V.)— (See New Harris). "Slois" 
is the Gaelic for place or countryside. "Bhrochan" is the Gaelic 
for gruel, or very thin porridge. The name was a derisive one and 
the Scotch settlers have recently changed it to "New Harris," 
likely their former home in Scotland. It is on the Great Bras d'Or 
Strait. 

SMASHEMS HEAD (P.)— An early Robertson Island settler 
named Robert Stewart was known as "smashem" owing to this being 
a favorite expression of his in describing battle scenes. 

SMELT BROOK (C. B.)— A brook in North Sydney originally 
known as "Sparling Brook" after an early land owner, but un- 
fortunately changed to its present name. 

SMITH COVE (G.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Segegueegunk. " 

SMITH ISLAND (PORT HOOD) (I.)— The name given to 
the Inner Port Hood Island, named in honor of the first settler 
John Smith, who settled in Port Hood in 1789. 

SMITH MOUNTAIN (V.)— Near Cape Dauphin. These 
high hills were at one time known as "Les Quatres Fils d'Aymon,'* 
which was the title of a French Medieval Prose Romance. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 135 



SMOKEY (V.)— See Cape Smokey. 

SOLDIERS' COVE (R.)— The St. Georges Channel was at 
one time known as Soldiers' Gulf, the name was evidently retained 
as the name of this cove. 

SOULIS COVE (D.)— So named in honor of an early settler. 
Daniel Soulis. 

SOUTH BAR (C. B.)— The village was known as Victoria 
Pier. The Bar extends into Sydney Harbor opposite North Bar 
forming a splendid breakwater. Was one time called "Guion's 
Bar." Was fortified in 1794 and known as "Fort Edward." 

SOUTHAMPTON (C.)— The old name for this place was 
"Maccan." (See). A portion of Maccan was given the above 
name in honor of the English seaport city of the same name by an 
Act of Parliament passed in the year 1872. 

SOUTH HEAD (C. B.)— South Head, Cow Bay, appears on 
the maps of 1829 as "Murgain." 

SOUTHVILLE (A.)— This place was formerly known as 
Negro Line ; it was changed to its present name by an Act of Parlia- 
ment in 1891. 

SOUTHVILLE (D.)— Formerly known as "Duck Pond." 
First settled in 1827 by Gilbert Crossett. This place was also 
called New Salem. 

SPECTACLE ISLANDS (L.)— These two islands are con- 
nected by a narrow sand bar, which suggested the name. 

SPENCER ISLAND (C.)— The Indian name for this island 
was "Wochuk" meaning "a small kettle or pot." 

SPLIT (Y.)— See Cape Split. 

SPRINGFIELD (D.)— This place was formerly called "Sun- 
rise." 

SPRINGFIELD (A.) — This place was at one time known as 
"Grinton Settlement." (See). 

SPRINGHILL (O— This town is situated on a hill, and has 
excellent natural water springs, which gives reason for the name. 

The earliest settlers were families named Hunter, Gilroy, 
Anderson, Boss, Mills and others. 

Coal was discovered here in 1834 by a man named Lodovick 
Hunter. 



136 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

SPRINGVILLE (P.)— Settled about 1780 by John Eraser and 
some others. An extremely large spring which issues from the foot 
of a hill in this locality suggested the name. 

SPRY BAY (H.)— The Indian name for this place was "Kwem- 
oodetc" meaning **the little loon place." 

SPRY HARBOR (H.)— The Indian name of the smaller 
harbor was "Kwemodetc," meaning **the little loon place." The 
larger harbor was called by them **Sebimkooaak" meaning "a bog 
extending across." The name of this harbor appears on some old 
maps as '*Winchelsea Harbor" named after one of the Cinque ports 
in Sussex on the English Channel. 

SPRY HEAD (H.)— The Indian name for Cape Spry was 
*'Noogoomkegawaachk," meaning **a small place of soft sand." 



STANFORD LAKE (L.)— This lake is named after a Mr. 
John Stanford, an English settler who arrived in Chester about 
1845, where he established a tannery. 

STANLEY (Hts.) — This settlement was a portion of Douglas 
Township. It was given its present name by an Act of Parliament 
passed in 1872, in honor of Frederick Arthur Stanley, the Earl of 
Derby who was Governor-General of Canada 1888-1893. 

STANWOOD BEACH (Y.)— Named after a family of Stan- 
woods who were the first settlers there. 

STARR POINT (K.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Nesoogwitk," meaning "lying on the water between two other 
points." 

The French called the place "Boudrobank." The present 
name is from a family named Starr. 

STEEL ISLAND (Col.)— Named after a family of early 
settlers of this name. The late Frank Steel used to relate that he 
found a large number of human bones on the beach of this island. 

STELLARTON (P.)— So named after a singular bed of coal 
known as ''Stellar" or "oil" coal, so called from its peculiar scintilla- 
tions in burning, and for its yield of oil. 

STERLING (Col.)— One of the four township divisions of 
/Colchester County. 

STEW ARTD ALE (I.)— So named by an Act of Parliament in 
1884. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 137 



STEWART ISLAND (CoL)— This island is named after a 

Stewart family, but is known by various names. On the charts 

' it is known as "War Island." In ship-building days owing to oak 

growing upon it it was known as "Shipyard Island," and for the 

same reason sometimes called "Oak Island." 

STEWIACKE (CoL)— Mentioned in 1759. The name is 
from the Indian word "Siktaweak" or "Esiktaweak," meaning 
"oozing from dead water." It appears in 1816 as "Sewack." 

The first settler was a William Kennedy who came from New 
England in 1780. He came to Stewiacke from Pictou County 
where he had a mill at what was long known as "Kennedy's Hill." 

The meaning of the word "Siktaweak" is found in another 
authority as meaning "Whimpering or whining as it goes out." 

The Indians called a branch of the Stewiacke River "Wedak- 
unak," meaning "long sea- weed or kelp," and another small branch 
they named "Pepkuse." 

STIRLING (C. B.)— A mining village in Glace Bay. (See 
Stirling) . 

STIRLING (R.)— Named by the settlers of Scottish origin 
in honor of the Royal burgh, the capital of Stirlingshire, Scotland. 
The place was first settled in the year 1830. 

STORMONT (G.)— This place was settled by parts of Caro- 
lina Regiments, in the year 1783. They built a small town and 
named it "Stormont." This name is also given to the Township. 

ST. ANDREW (Ant.)— One of the four Townships of the 
County of Antigonish, named in honor of the Scotch Saint. 

ST. ANDREW CHANNEL (C. B.), ST. GEORGE CHAN- 
NEL_ (R.), ST. PATRICK CHANNEL (V.)— Three important 
divisions of the Bras d'Or Lakes, named in honor of the Scotch, 
English and Irish settlers. 

St. Andrew and St. Patrick Townships were the subdivisions, 
if we include Sydney, of Cape Breton. They were formed into 
Townships in the year 1821. 

St. Andrew Channel is now generally known as "East Bay." 

St. George Channel was at one time called "Soldiers' Gulf." 

ST. ANDREW RIVER (Col.)— The old Indian name for this 
river in Colchester Harbor was "Wesunawan," meaning "castor 
place." 

ST. ANN (V.) — At one time named "Port des baleines," or 
"port of whales." A Scotchman named James Stuart built a fort 



138 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

here in 1629. In 1710 the place was called "Port Dauphin," a 
name still given to the Cape. The Indian name for the bay was 
"Great Cibou," and for the village "M'tleegalitek." 

A Frenchman named Captain Daniels is supposed to have first 
given it the name of "St. Ann" in honor of St. Ann the Mother 
of Mary the Mother of Jesus. Daniels captured the English 
settlers and carried them to Falmouth and some of them to France. 
In 1713 St. Ovide changed the name St. Anne's to Port Dauphin, 
but the name given it by Daniels survived. 

The northern arm of St Annes Harbor was for years known as 
"Rouville River," after a French Captain of Infantry of some con- 
sequence named M. de Rouville, who evidently had received a 
grant here. Rouville made application for a grant of "Niganiche" 
(Ingonish), but without success. 

ST. COLUMBO (C. B.)— Named in honor of "The Apostle of 
Caledonia," who founded the Monastery at lona. This name was 
given it and an Act of Parliament passed confirming it in 1903. 
The former name of the settlement was "Grand Narrows Rear." 

ST. ESPRIT (R.)— There was a French Order "Saint Esprit" 
founded by Henry III in the 16th century. "Esprit" is French 
from the Latin "spiritus," meaning "spirit." The prefix "St." 
is rather a puzzle. The French also knew this place as "rade 
foreine," which signifies that trading vessels could have access to it 
only at particular times of the year. 

The Indian name for this place was "Asukadite," meaning 
"the place of clams." 

ST. FRANCIS (G.)— Formerly known as "Goose Harbor" 
changed in 1871 to the present name. 

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER COLLEGE-See Antigonish. 

ST. GEORGE CHANNEL (R.)— See St. Andrew's Channel. 

ST. GEORGE'S BAY (Ant.)— See George. 

ST. MARGARET'S BAY (H.)— Named by Champlain in 
1631, "Le Port Saincte Marguerite." 

A number of people came here from Lunenburg in 1783 and 
settled permanently. 

ST. MARYS (G.)— One of the three Townships of Guys- 
borough. Was formed into a township in 1818. 

The Indian name for the river was "Naboosakun," meaning 
"a bead string." It takes its present name from St. Mary's Bay. 
(See). 



PLACE-NAMET OF NOVA SCOTIA 139 

ST. MARY'S BAY (D.)— Named by De Monts in 1604 "La 
Baie Saincte Marie." The Indians called this bay "Wagweiik," 
meaning "the end." 

There is a large cove in the bay that the Indians named "Wes- 
kabok," meaning "salt water." 

ST. MARY'S RIVER FORKS (P.)— This junction the In- 
dians named "Mimnogun," or Nimnogum," meaning "a black 
birch tree." 

ST. PATRICK'S CHANNEL (V.)~(See St. Andrew's Chan- 
nel.) 

ST. PAUL ISLAND— Called so by Cabot in 1535-36. It was 

at one time called the "Island of Monego." The Indians called the 
island "Kewtuminege," meaning "the round island." 

ST. PETER'S (R.)— The Indian name was "Baslova-akade." 
The Portuguese called it "San Pedro." The French in 1713 named 
it "Port Toulouse," after Comte de Toulouse, the illegitimate son 
of Louis Quatorze and Madame de Montespan. Denys settled 
it in 1755, and he named it "St. Pierre," (St. Peter's). 

The spelling of the Indian name is very similar to that of the 
Indian name for Cape Traverse in Prince Edward Island, which is 
"Bouselooa," meaning "to travel by water," and as it was the rest- 
ing place and portage for the natives in their travels from the lakes 
to the ocean, it is very likely the same word, or a variation of it. 

Near here is a mount which in the year 1790 appears in several 
records as Mount Grenville; there was a redoubt here and eight 
guns mounted. It was named in honor of Grenville who was in 
1790 English Secretary of State. 

ST. PETER'S ISLAND (R.)— Named after the place and 
bay. (See). It was named "Isle Vert" by Nicholas Denys. 

STRATHLORNE (I.)— Formeriy known as Broad Cove 
Interval, named by a local lady in 1879, in honor of the Marquis 
of Lome. "Strath" is a Gaelic word, meaning "a broad valley" 
and is often used in Scotch place-names. 

STRATHMORE (Ant.)-— This was formeriy known as North 
Grant Settlement, was given its present name by an Act of Parlia- 
ment in the year 1888. "Strathmore" means "a great valley." 
(See Strathlorne.) 

STRICKLAND'S COVE (D.)— This cove is named after a 
family of Stricklands who settled here; they came from Weymouth, 
Massachusetts. 



140 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

ST. ROSE (I.)— Formerly known as "Broad Cove Ponds." 
By an Act of Parliament in 1891 changed to its present name. 

ST. SAUVER PORT— On the Island named Mount Desert, 
called by the Indians "Pemetig." At one time called "Mount 
Deserts." It was given its present name in 1613. 

STRONACH (K.)— A section of the North Mountain named 
after an early settler, George Stronach, who came from Glasgow, 
Scotland. 

SUGAR LOAF (C.) — This place was named by the Micmac 
Indians "Keneskwoktuk," meaning "a pointed mountain." 

SUGAR LOAF (V.)— Near Cape North. This descriptive 
name occurs in various counties. The Micmac Indian name was 
"Squa-dichk," meaning "the highest point." 

SUMMERSIDE (Ant.)— So named by an Act of ParHamxcnt 
in the year 1869. 

SUMMERVILLE (Hts.)— The Indians called part of this 
place including a creek, "Achegechk." 

^ SUNNYSIDE (R.)— Formerly known as "Bear Island" and 
again as "McPherson's Ferry." Changed by an Act of Parliament 
in 1894 to its present name. 

SURETTE ISLAND (Y.)— Named after Frederick Surrett, 
who with some others settled on the island (859 acres) about 1812. 

SUTHERLAND COVE (C. B.)— On the eastern side of Syd- 
ney River, about three miles from Sydney, named after an early 
settler a Scotch Presbyterian named George Sutherland. 

SUTHERLAND ISLAND (P.)— (See Sutherland River). 
The Indian name for this island was "Coondawaakade," 
meaning "a stone quarry." 

SUTHERLAND LAKE (K.)— A small lake named after a Mr. 
Kenneth Sutherland, whose home was near by. 

SUTHERLAND RIVER (P.)— This received its name from a 
Scotchman named John Sutherland, who was a passenger on the 
"Hector," and who settled near it in the year 1785. 

SWEET'S CORNER (Hts.)— First settled by families named 
Dill, Cochran, Hunter and Sweet. One Sweet had a grocery store 
here at one time (about 1840). The place was named after him. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 141 

SWIVEL POINT (C. B.)— The point of land near Cranberry 
Head on the northern side of Sydney Harbor, so named because it 
is the swivel or turning point for vessels coming from the Bras d'Or 
Lakes to the Sydney s, or vice versa. 

SYDNEY (C. B.)— The Indian name was "Cibou." Captain 
Leigh in a voyage away back in 1597 cast anchor in the River of 
Cape Breton (Sydney) on the 24th day of June. He said the 
savages told him the harbor was "Cibo." Dr. Rand spells the 
Indian name "Seboo" and gives its meaning as "river." It would 
then appear to be a name applicable to any river. 

Champlain's map of Cape Breton dated 1632, calls Sydney 
Harbor "Gran Sibou," meaning "Great River." Historian Brown 
suggests that St. Ann's Bay may have been originally "Cibou" 
and Sydney "Gran-Sibou" as both names appear. 

The Indians called Sydney River "Ulsebook," meaning 
"little river." 

Previous to 1783 it was known as "Baie de Espagnol" or 
"Spanish River." In 1783 it was given its present name in honor 
of the Honorable Thomas Townshend, the first Viscount Sydney. 
It is said that at this time Governor Desbarres suggested the place 
be named "Pittsburgh." 

In 1788 Sydney Harbor was named "Prince William Henry 
Sound," by Governor McCormick, in honor of King William IV. 
The name appears in many old documents, but did not survive. 

It was founded in 1784; the first settler was an Irishman named 
John Meloney. 

It was the seat of the Local Government until 1820, was in 
corporated as a town in 1886 and as a city in 1904. 

SYDNEY FORKS (C. B.)— This place the Indians named 
"Natwagemk." 

SYDNEY MINES (C. B.)--In 1820-30 Sydney Mines was 
known as "The Mines." It was incorporated as a town in 1890. 



142 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



TABLE ISLAND (Col.)— An island near Tatamagouche 
named by the Indians "Tcegoonkootc" meaning the "small knee." 

TAILOR ISLAND (I.)— Named after a tailor Mr. John McRae 
who is said to have been the first settler on the Island. 

TANCOOK LITTLE (L.)— First granted to Patrick Suther- 
land. It was originally called "Queen Charlotte Island." The 
name is from the Indian name "Uktankook" meaning "facing the 
open sea." 

TANGIER RIVER (H.)— The Indian name was "Ah-ma- 
gops-ke-keek," meaning "tumbling over the rocks." 

A Morocco seaport and an island in Chesapeake Bay bears 
this name. It was owned by Portugal and the early Portuguese 
may have given it its name, but it is said to have been named after 
a schooner wrecked there in 1830. The Indians at one time called 
this place "Wospegeak" meaning "the sunshine reflected from the 
water." The Forks of the Tangier River was named by the In- 
dians "Niktookpak" meaning "the place where the still water 
branches off." 

TANGIER LAKE (H.)— The first of the Tangier Lakes, 
named by the Indians "Wiskusok," meaning "a branch of a tree." 

The second of the Tangier Lakes was named by the Indians 
"Milpagech" meaning "variegated." (See Brian Lake). 

The third of the Tangier Lakes was named by the Indians 
"Emasakunek," meaning "he could walk on snowshoes." They 
also knew it as "Pedawispak" or "barren lake." 

The fourth of the Tangier Lakes was named by the Indians 
"Pedawikpaak" meaning "the flowing is obstructed in the midst 
of a barren." 

^ TANGIER GRAND LAKE (H.)— The fourth of the Tangier 
chain of lakes named by the Indians "Pedawikpeak." 

TANTALLON (H.)— Previous to 1890 this place was called 
"Head Harbor." It was first settled by German and French. 
The present name is after the famous stronghold of the Douglas 
Family in Haddingtonshire, Scotland. 

TARBOT, TARBOTVALE (C. B.)— Named after "Tarbot" 
in the sub-division of Harris in the Hebrides, Scotland; suggest- 
ed, no doubt, by descendants of emigrants from these parts. 
The Scottish spelling is "Tarbert." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 143 

TATAMAGOUCHE (Col.)— This place is mentioned as far 
back as 1738 when La Loutre refers to it as "Tahamigouche" said 
to be the Indian word for "the place where two rivers meet." The 
Waugh and French River meet here. The termination "oochk" 
or as it appears "ouche" is the Micmac locative termination which 
gives the word the meaning of "place at "or "at the." Tatama- 
gouche Township was for a time called Southampton, and the 
harbor "Southampton Harbor." Rand's dictionary says the Indian 
name was "Takamegootck" meaning "barred across the entrance 
with sand." 

TAYLORVILLE (H.)— See Chaswood. 

TEDDY FOLEY HILL AND BROOK (C. B.)— Near Syd- 
ney, so named after a colored man named Edward Foley, who was 
employed on the old Ingovill'e Farm and had his cabin on the hill. 

TEDFORD HILL (Y.)— This hill received its name after an 
old Yarmouth County family named Tedford. 

TENNYSON ROCK (C.)— This rock is the pinnacle of 
Pinnacle Island (one of the Five Islands, Basin of Minas.) The 
rock is solitary, and nearly two hundred feet high at low water, — 
a seated figure strongly resembling, as seen from the basm, Lord 
Tennyson in his old age — with his cloak about him, for this reason 
the Rock is so named. 

TERENCE BAY (H.)— This place had at different times the 
following names: Tenants Bay, Tern Bay, Turner Bay and Turner 
Bay Rock. 

THE HUB (C. B.) — This place is now included in the bounds of 
New Aberdeen. It was at one time called "Burnt Head" owing to 
a fire in one of the old coal mines. The name "Hub" which is now 
applied only to the coal mine, came about in this manner : Nearly 
all of the coal mines at one time in operation in this district were 
opened on the outcrop of the various coal seams, which swing around 
in a circle. "The Hub" was near the shore in the centre of the 
circle — hence the name. 

THE MARTYRS (L.)— These islands were so called by Cham- 
plain. The name was suggested by the fact that a number of 
Frenchmen were killed on the Islands by the Indians. 

^^ THE NARROWS (H.)— This place was known to the Indians 
as "Kebek" or "the narrow place." (This word is also the possible 
origin of the name "Quebec".) 



144 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

THE OVENS (L.)— See Ovens Point. 

THE PINES (K.) — This place was at one time known as 
"Pine Woods," now called "The Pines." It is a negro settlement. 

THE ROOST (C. B.)— Near Glace Bay, was known in the 
early days as the "Shag Roost" because of the fact that large flocks 
of the sea birds known as "shags" roosted on the point of land. The 
name Shag was in time dropped. 

THE WEDGE (Tusket) (Y.)— Settled by Acadians in 1767. 
The Indian name was "Nizigouziack"; also "Olsegou." 

THIBEAUVILLE (R.) — This place received its present name 
August 1st, 1907. It was named after the majority of its inhab- 
itants, who are named "Thibeau." It was first settled by Jacob 
Thibeau about 1836. 

THIRD LAKE (Q.)— See Liverpool. 

(0.) — See Port Medway. 
(H.)— See Tangier. 

THORBURN (P.)— Formerly known as Vale Colliery, was 
given its present name by an Act of Parliament in the year 1886. 
The name made up of "Thor" the Scandinavian god of Thunder, 
and "bvirn" the Scotch and north of England word for "brook or 
small river." 

THREE FATHOM HARBOR (H.)— The Indian name of 
this place was "Amagunchech," meaning "the little breezy place," 

THREE-MILE PLAINS (Hts.)— A village so named because 
it is three miles from Windsor. (See Mapleton). 

THRUMCAP (H.) — Shoal and Island near entrance to Hali- 
fax Harbor, probably so named from the thrumming or noise of the 
surf on the cape. The Indians named it "Elpasaktcatc," meaning 
"canted over." 

THURSTON'S CORNER (Y.)— Received its name after one 
of the early settlers named John Thurston. 

TIDDVILLE (D.) — So named after an early Loyalist settler 
Samuel Tidd. 

TIDNISH (C.)— This name is probably the same as "Tignish" 
or Micmac "Mtagunechk," meaning "a paddle." 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 145 



TILBURY ROCK (R.)— A reef near St. Esprit, westward 
from Louisburg, so named owing to a British warship named 
"Tilbury" being wrecked there in the year 1757. The "Tilbury" 
was one of the eleven ships under the command of Viscount Howe 
and Admiral Holborne that made a fruitless attempt to capture 
Louisburg in that year. 

TIMBERLEA (H.)— Formerly named Bowser Station (see) ; 
recently given this name. It is the centre of a considerable lum- 
bering district. 

TINKHAM ISLAND (Y.)— Called after an eariy settler 
named Edward Tinkham, who came from Marble Head and settled 
here in 1762. 

TIVERTON (D.)— Settled in 1785 by Messrs. Robert Out- 
house and John McKay, was known as Petite Passage. It re- 
ceived its present name in 1842 after the borough of that name in 
England, long represented in Parliament by Lord Palmerston. 

TOBEATIC LAKE (Q.)— The sixth lake on the Liverpool 
River, called by the Indians "Toobeadoogook." 

TONEY RIVER (P.)— Named in honor of Captain Toney, a 
Frenchman who was a great chief among the Micmac Indians. He 
is said to have made a treaty of peace with the English in 1761. 
The old Micmac Indian name was "Booktowtagun," meaning 
"spark of fire," or flint" or "what strikes fire," or literally, the place 
where flint stone is found. 

TONGE ISLAND— So called after Colonel Winckworth- 
Tonge, who commanded the Engineers at the seige of Port Beause- 
jour in 1755, and who received a grant of land in which this 
island was included. He was of Irish birth, and represented 
Kings County in the "Long Parliament" 1770-1785. He was at 
some time during those years Chief Naval Officer for Nova Scotia. 

TOR BAY (G.)— Tor is Scottish for Rock or Pinnacle. This 
.place was neamed by the early EngHsh mariners after Tor Bay on 
the south east coast of England. The Indian name was "Taboo-" 
esimkek," meaning "two in company picking berries." (This is 
where "Tabusintac, N. B., gets its name.) 

TOWN GUT (P.) — At this creek a survey was at one time 
made for a town; the creek has ever since borne the name of the 
Town Gut. 



14|5 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

TOWN POINT ( Y.)— In 1763 a committee intended to survey 
and form a town on a projecting point of land on the Chebogue 
Harbor. This place is still known by the name of Town Point. 

TRACADIE (Ant.) — One of the four township divisions of 
Antigonish County. The Micmac Indian name was *'Tulukaddy" 
which means "place of residence." Champlain mentions it in 
1631 as 'Tregate." Another explanation of the derivation of this 
name is that the Indians called it 'Telegadik" a word used by the 
Micmacs to denote any particular inhabitated place or camping 
ground. The English changed the *T' to ''r" (there is no "r" in 
Micmac), making it "Etragadie," from which we get the name 
"Tracadie." 



TRAFALGAR (G.)— Named after Cape Trafalgar in Spain or 
after the great British naval victory gained there in 1805. 

TRENTON (P.)— Named thus owing to the Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co. having their steel manufacturing plant at this place, 
and after the busy manufacturing capital of the State of New 
Jersey. The name originally was after the English River Trent. 
The choice of a name for this ambitious little Nova Scotia town 
was unfortunate as it lacks originality, and the name is used to de- 
note a battle between the Americans and British, in which the 
British were defeated. 

TRUEMANVILLE (C.)— Named by Act of Pariiament 
passed in 1876. 

TRURO (Col.)— First settled in 1761 by McNutt's colonists 
from Ulster. The Township was granted the 31st of October, 
1765. It was at one time called "Cobequid." The present name 
is after the Town of Truro, the chief town of Cornwall. Truro 
is one of the four Townships of Colchester County. In the Court 
House in Truro there is a tablet erected by the Nova Scotia His- 
Historical Society in 1912, unveiled by H. R. H. the Duke of Con- 
naught, which reads as follows: "This Tablet commemorates the 
British settlement of Truro, Onslow and Londonderry 1760:-1762 
partly by a colony of English stock from New England, chiefly by 
Scots-Irish from New Hampshire and Ireland under the leadership 
of Colonel Alexander McNutt etc., etc. 

TUMBLIN ISLAND (L.)— Named after a resident, Benja- 
min Tumblin. 

TUN ISLAND (H.)— An island in Blind Bay> named by 
Captain P. F. Shortland, R. N., in 1864. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 147 

TUPPERDALE (I.)— Former name Rocky Ridge. Changed 
to its present name in honor of Sir Charles Tupper by an Act of 
Parliament in the year 1897. 

TUPPER LAKE (Q.)— See Lake Tupper. 

TUPPERVILLE (A.)— See Tupperdale. 

TUSKET (Y.) — This place derives its name from the Micmac 
Indian word "Neketaouksit" meaning "the great forked tidal 
river. 

Tusket Wedge was at one time called "Chebec." 

Tusket Island in 1633 is called by Jean de Laite "Isles aux 
Tangneux" or "Gannet Islands." The Indians also knew this 
place as "Aglassawakade," or "place of the English." 

The name also appears as "Tousquet" in Rameau's history 
of the French colonies 1859. 

TUSKET WEDGE (Y.)— See the new name "Wedgeport." 

TWEEDMOOGE (C. B.)~The Indian name given to the 
Barrasois or Lagoon at the head of East Bay or St. Andrew's 
Channel. "Tweedmooge" was the name by which the portage from 
East Bay to Sydney River was known. 




148 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



u 



UISGE BAN FALLS (V.)— Near Baddeck. The words 
Uisge Ban are Gaelic, meaning "white water." 

UNIACKE (Hts.)— See Mount Uniacke. 

UPPER SHIP HARBOR RIVER (H.)— The Indians called 
this part of Ship Harbor River "Chipkootopskook" meaning "the 
gulley formed by a waterfall." 

URBANIA (Hts.)— At one time called "Carleton." The 
name was changed about 1860 to "Urbania." 




PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 149 



V 



VARNER BRIDGE (L.)— Named after Elias Varner, who 
lived near this place. 

VAUGHAN (Hts.)— Called after a family named Vaughan, 
who settled here about the year 1833. 

VERNAL (Ant.)— Evidently meaning "Spring." This place 
was settled about the year 1800. 

VESUVIUS (K.) — A point on the Blue Mountains named after 
the famous Bay of Naples Volcano. 

VICTORIA COUNTY— So named in honor of her late 
Gracious Majesty, Queen Victoria; formed into a county about 
the year 1851. The name ''Victoria" is applied to a number of 
places throughout the Province and was given, of course, in honor of 
"'Victoria the Good," who reigned over the British Empire for 
sixty-four years (1837 to 1901). 

VICTORIA LINE (I.)— See new name Gladstone. 

yOGLER COVE (L.)— First settled by a McDonald an old 
soldier from Scotland. The Cove received its name from a later 
settler of Prussian origin, Frederick Vogler. 




^yz/iiiF 



160 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



w 



WAGONER SETTLEMENT. (D.)— Settled in 1833 by Ben- 
jamin Wagoner, and called after him. Now known as Riverdale. 

WALLACE (C.) — One of the three Township divisions of 
Cumberland County. This place was at one time called * 'Ramsack" 
or **Ramshag." It was settled in 1784 by American Loyalists. 
In the year 1810, Alexander Stewart, for many years the County 
(Cumberland) representative in the legislature, had the name 
changed to "Wallace" in honor of Michael Wallace, Provincial 
Secretary. Wallace acted as Lt.-Governor of the Province in 1818 
and again in 1824. The name has spread to Wallace Bay River 
Bridge — Station — Grant^^Highland — Ridge — East Wallace — Head 
of Wallace Bay — North and South, etc. — all in Cumberland County. 
This appears to be a regrettable multiplicity of nearly similar 
names, and must lead to endless mistakes and misunderstandings. 

WALKERVILLE (R.)— The old name for this place was Basin 
River Inhabitants. It was renamed by an Act of Parliament in 
1906. 

WALTON (Hts.)— The name was formerly "Little Petite." 
It was changed about 1830 to "Walton" after a gentleman named 
James Walton Nutting of Halifax, who owned considerable property 
there. 

WARREN (C.) — So named in honor of Warren Hastings. 
(See Hastings). 

WARREN LAKE (V.)— Named after a family who are said 
to be one of the first English-speaking settlers at North Bay, 
Ingonish, after the exodus of the French. 

WASHABUCK (V.)— Said to be a Micmac Indian word 
meaning an angle of land formed between a river and a lake. Some- 
times spelled Washabuckt, and "Watchabuckt." There is an 
Indian name "Wosobachuk" which means "placid water" and is 
likely the word the name is derived from. 

^ WATERFORD (C. B._)— A mining town located near a lake 
which is known as "Waterford Lake" — hence the name. Locally, 
the lake was known in recent years as "Kearney's Lake" after an 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 151 

Irish settler whose farm was situated on its margin. The locality 
was formerly known as the Barrasois (see) and previous to 1911 this 
name included all the territory between Low or Flat Point and 
Lingan. 

WATERNISH (G.)— This place was formerly part of Still- 
water. The name is said to be that of the Scottish home town of 
the first Postmaster McKenzie, **Nish" is the Gaelic for here, or 
place, hence "water place." 

WATSON CREEK (C. B.)— A creek in Sydney Harbor 
named after an early Scotch settler, Daniel Watson. His descend- 
ants still live near the creek. 

WAUGH RIVER (Col.)— Named after the first Scotch set- 
tler, Wellwood Waugh, who in 1777 came from the County of Dum- 
fries in the south of Scotland, and settled on an intervale on this 
River which has ever since borne his name. 

WAVERLEY (H.)— The name given by Mr. Charles P. Allen 
to a house, and afterwards applied to the village or district. Mr. 
Allen was a great admirer of Scott's famous Waverley novels — 
hence the name. 

WEAVER SETTLEMENT (D.)— The name was given in 
honor of the first settler, Michael Weaver. 

WEDGEPORT (Y.)— The former name of this place was 
Tusket Wedge. In 1909 by an Act of Parliament, it was changed 
to the present name. 

WELLINGTON (Y,), WELLINGTON SETTLEMENT (H.) 
— Both obviously named after the English Lord and General, so 
famous early in the nineteenth century. 

WELSFORD ^ (P.)— Was formerly known as River John 
Village, and was given its present name by an Act of Parliament 
passed in 1858. 

WELTON CORNER (K.)— Called after a family of this name 
who came from Annapolis County — but originally from Connec- 
ticut. 

WENTWORTH, WENTWORTH CENTRE, WENT- 
WORTH STATION (C.)— Named in honor of Sir John Went- 
worth, who was Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia in the year 
1792. 



152 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

WENTWORTH CREEK (Neai Sydney) (C. B.)— Named 
after Lieutenant-Governor Sir John Wentworth, who was at one 
time also Surveyor-General for the Province. 

WENTWORTH LAKE (Q.)— See Wentworth. 

WENTZELL LAKE (L.)— So called in honor of an early 
settler named Nathaniel Wentzell. This lake was at one time 
known as "MacKay's Lake." 

WEESIK (G.)— A hill near Country Harbor. It is an Indian 
word meaning "The beavers' home." 

WESKAWENAAK (D.)— A place near Digby. An Indian 
name meaning "Happy Land" or "Laughing Place." 

WEST ARICHAT (R.)— This place was at one time named 
*'Acadiaville." 

WEST BAY (L)— The Indian name for this place was "Wol- 
namkeak," meaning "a sandy cove," "Wolna" being the Micmac 
for Cove. Was first settled in 1813 by a few Scotch famiHes who 
came from Pictou, N. S. 

WEST BERLIN (Q.)— This place was formerly called "Blue- 
berry" owing to the number of these berries found there. The 
present name was given it by an Act of Parliament in the year 1886. 

WESTHAVER ISLAND (L.)— An island at the entrance of 
Mahone Bay, evidently named after one of the original grantees 
of land in these parts, Jacob Westheffer or some of his descendants. 

WESTFIELD (QO— This place was settled in the year 1822. 
(See Greenfield) . 

WEST RIVER (P.)— Was called by the Micmac Indians 
"Pebloogowaak." 

WESTVILLE (P.)— So named because the Colleries and Rail- 
way started in 1869 were further west than the colleries already in 
operation. 

WESTVILLE (D.)— This place was formerly called Brinley 
Town by the freed slaves who came with the Loyalists. 

WEYMOUTH (D.)— Laid out in the year 1784. It was at 
one time called "Wessagussett." In 1784 there is a record of the 
forming of two towns on the Sissiboo River in Digby County, to be 
called "Edinburgh" or "New Edinburgh" on the east side, and 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 153 

* 'Weymouth" on the opposite side. Edinburgh was evidently 
given up, although we find a village named New Edinburgh on the 
Sissiboo River, about twelve miles from Weymouth. Some of the 
pioneer settlers came from Weymouth, Norfolk Co., Massachu- 
setts, and they probably gave it the name. The American town 
was named after Weymouth, Dorsetshire, England, which was in 
turn named after the River Wey upon which it is situated. 

WHETSTONE LAKE (L.)— So named because of the fact 
that whetstones (scythe and other stones) of a superior quality are 
made from stones found near by. 

WHEATON VAULT (K.)— A brook so named because it is a 
comparatively waterless channel. These channels are called vaults 
and were cut by geologically ancient streams flowing into the Bay 
of Fundy depression. 

WHISTLER'S COVE (H.)— See Ocean Glen. 

WHITEBURNE (Q.)— This place was settled in the year 
1822. 

WHITE HEAD (C. B.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Kamsokooteetc," meaning the "little place opposite small cliffs." 

WHITEROCK (K.)— A descriptive name. One time known 

as White Rock Mills. 

WHITES (K.)— Not Whites Corner. Named after a Mr. 
David White, a sometime Postmaster. 

WHITEHAVEN (G.)— Once called "Savalet" in honor of a 
Captain Sa valet from St. Jean de Luz, who had a fishing place here 
and was found here by Poutrincourt on his voyage, (1604-1607. He 
had sixteen men in his employ, and claimed that this was his forty- 
second voyage to these parts from France. 

WHITE POINT (C. B.)— The Indian name of this Head was 
"Kamsokootectc," meaning "the little place opposite small cliffs." 

WHITESIDE (C. B.)— This place was so named in 1902 after 
families named White. The former name was "Basin of River 
Inhabitants." 

WHITNEY (C. B.)— Originally and still locally known as 
"International Pier." The actual piers or shipping docks of the 
Dominion Coal and Dominion Steel Company are known as Inter- 
national Piers. The Poet Office and the district are now known as 



154 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

* 'Whitney Pier." It is part and a suburb of the City of Sydney. 
It was named after an Americal gentleman, Mr. Henry M. Whitney, 
who was the founder and the first President of the Dominion Coal 
Company, formed in the year 1^93. 

WHYCOCOMAGH (V,)— This is an Indian name meaning 
"the head of the water," or "end of the bay." The Indian spelling 
of the word is "Wakogumaak." Although this meaning given 
appears in several places, Dr. Rand in his Dictionary gives the 
meaning as "beside the sea" or "beside the flowing wave tops." 
It was first settled in the year 1821 by John McKinnon from Scot- 
land. 

WHYCOCOMAGH PORTAGE (V.)— This name is given to 
the strip of land where the Indians portaged or carried their canoes 
from the waters of the Great Bras d'Or Lakes to Whycocomagh 
Bay or vice versa. 

WILBURN (I.) — The place formerly known as South Why- 
cocomagh, was changed to Wilburn by an Act of Parliament in the 
year 1901. 

WILDCAT (0») — A place near Liverpool which the Indians 
named "Kwebejook." The Indian word for wildcat is "Utkoweeh." 

WILE SETTLEMENT (Hts.)— This place was settled about 
1858 by the following families, who came from Kings and Lunen- 
burg Counties: James Boyde, Abraham Zwicker, Charles and 
Israel Wile. From the last two comes the name. 

WILEVILLE, WILE LAKE (L.)— Called after an early 
German settler named Wile. The lake is sometimes known as 
"Oakhill Lake." 

WILLIAMSDALE (C.)— In the year 1867, by an Act of Par- 
liament, the old name of the place, "East Branch River" was dis- 
carded and the present name adopted. 

WILMOT (A.) — One of the four Townships of Annapolis 
County, was formed in the year 1764, and named after Montague 
Wilmot, who was appointed Lt. -Governor of Nova Scotia in 1763 
and Governor in 1764. It was settled about four years after the 
arrival of the vessel "Charming Molly" with the first emigrants for 
Annapolis from New England. 

WINDHAM HILL (C.)— Settled early in the nineteenth 
century by a colored family named Rodgers. It was named by a 
Mr. John Bragg, a J. P. in honor of General Windham. 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 155 

Glace Bay, in Cape Breton County, was at one time called 
"Windham River" after the same man. 

WINDSOR (Hts.)— The Indian name for Windsor was 
"Setunook" meaning a lake extending back or where the sea water 
flows back. The township, one of the six Townships of Hants, was 
formed in the year 1764. Previous to 1764, the township, or the 
land covered by it, was known as "Pessequid" meaning to flow 
split-wise (as the tide does here) . Windsor was first included in the 
County of Halifax. 

At Windsor is located Kings College, which was opened in 
1788, and an establishing Act passed in 1789. Received a Royal 
Charter in the year 1802. It is a Church of England Institution, 
and its name is a tribute to Royalty. 

WINE HARBOR (G.)— The Indian name for this place was 
"Pulamkeegunucht," meaning "the fish spawning place" (Pulamoo 
is salmon) . It is said to have received its present name because of 
a vessel having been wrecked there with a cargo of wine. 

WINGING POINT (C. B.)— The name given the east head- 
land of Forchu Bay. It is said to be so named owing to many 
wild duck being shot there on the wing. 

WITTENBURG (Col.)~Named^ after the Saxony town of 
that name by settlers of Prussian origin. 

WOLFE ISLAND (L.)— Named after the Grantee, Wendel 
Wolfe, an early settler of German origin. 

^ WOLFE ROCK (C. B.)— A rock in Gabarus Bay, so named 
owing to its being the landing place of Wolfe at the last taking of 
Louisburg in 1759. 

WOLFVILLE (K.)— Situated on the Cornwallis River and 
known as the Academic Town. This place was originally called 
**Mud Creek." In 1830, the Postmaster, whose name was De Wolfe, 
and who was a descendant of Judge Elisha DeWolf e, who had enter- 
tained the King at "Mud Creek" a generation earlier, petitioned 
the authorities to change the name. It was at that time named 
"Wolfville" in honor of the DeWolfes. The Micmac Indian knew 
this place as "M'taban." 

At Wolfvilleis the Acadia College, founded by the Nova Scotia 
Baptist Education Society in 1838. University power created in 
1840; given its present name by Act of Legislature in 1841. 

WOODEN COVE (H.)— A cove in St. Margaret's Bay, named 
after a family of early residents. 



156 PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 

WOODSIDE (H.)— Near Dartmouth. This was the name of 
the home of the Honorable John E. Fairbanks, who at one time 
owned the property that is now known as "Woodside." 

WOODVILLE (D.) — Named so owing to the excellent quality 
of timber found there. First settler in 1825, Abraham Robert. 

WOODWORTH COVE (K.)— So named after one of the num- 
ber of Woodworths who appear as grantees of Cornwallis Town- 
ship. 

WYNOTT POINT (H.)— Named by Captain P. F. Short- 
land, R. N., in 1864. One time known as Smith's Point. 

WYSE CORNER (H.)— So named after William Wyse, who 
was an early settler at Dollars Lake, near by. 

WYVERN (C.)— So named by the then Postmaster-General's 
Office in 1890. It was formerly known as "West Branch River 
Phillips." It was first settled about 1836. 




PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 157 



YARMOUTH— At one time called "Fourchu," i. e., "forked 
or cloven cape." It was given this name by Champlain in 1604, 
"inasmuch as its figure was so." The present name first appears 
in a grant made in September 1759, in which it is provided that the 
tract of land hitherto known as Cape Fourchu "shall be a township 
to be called hereafter and known by the name of the Township of 
Yarmouth." 

Some authorities say it was named after the Township and 
Town of Yarmouth in the State of Massachusetts; others say this 
is absurd, although it is admitted that some of the earliest settlers 
came from that place. 

Mr. Campbell, a Yarmouth historian, states that Cape Fourchu 
River was by the EngHsh named the "Yar," and infers that the 
County received its name in this manner. 

As all the counties were evidently named by English author- 
ities, it would appear that Yarmouth was named — as Digby, Shel- 
burne, etc. — after an English titled personage of that time. 

The Indians called Yarmouth "Keespongwitk," meaning 
"Land's End." 

The Indian name for Yarmouth River was "Maligeak," mean- 
ing "fretful waters," which appears to be the same name they ap- 
plied to Malaga Lakes in Queens County. 

The district of Yarmouth was cut off from Shelburne County 
in 1836, and made an independent county. The Township of 
Argyle was included. Yarmouth Town was incorporated in the 
year 1890. The first settlers of Yarmouth were Acadian French 
and refugees from New England. Yarmouth County is divided 
into two Townships — Yarmouth and Argyle. The County con- 
tains 736 sq. miles. 

YOUNG ISLAND (L)— Named after the original owner, 
Mr. Peter Young. 

YOUNG COVE, YOUNG MOUNTAIN (A.)— Called after 
an early settler named Young. 



158 



PLACE-NAMES OF NOVA SCOTIA 



ZWICKER'S ISLAND (L.)— Named after an early settler 
Mr. Peter Zwicker. 




UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 
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