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I 





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1 






iMned Uarcfa IS, 1883. 



L. 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
• , :. BtmEAD OF PLANT INDUSTKY. 

II WILLUU A. TAYLOB, ChWi/Smau, 



INVENTORY ••7:/ 

OF 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED ADD PUNT INTRODDCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 

TO JUKE 30, 1917. 



(No. 51; Nob. 44446 to 44934. 



VAnanTQTOH: 



« 

• * 



Isaued Msreh 15, 1022. 

a. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
•q. S BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. (^^^-^^ '//*"'^11*^ 

WILLIAM A. TAYLOR, CAIc/i^£«r(aH, j/L^^ J ^cir.^'^^^' 



INVENTORY 

■ OF 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRODUCTION 
DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL I 
TO JUNE 30, 1917. . 



( No. 51; Nob. 44446 to 44934.) 



WASHIMOTOM: 

FfUKTma OITIOS. 

im. 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



I Chief of Bureau, William A. Tatlob. 



A$80Ciate Chief of Bureau, Kabl P. Kbllbbman. 
Officer in Charge of PuhUcatioM, J. E. Rockwsll. 
A98ietaHt in Charge of Bueinesa Operatione, U. E. Allaksox. 



FOBBiON Seed and Plant Introduction. 

aCIBNTIPIC STAFF. 

I>aTid Pairchlld, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

P. H. Dorsett, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Plant Introduction Gardens. 

B. T. Galloway. Pkmt Pathologiet, Special Research Projects. 
Peter Bisset, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Experimenters' Service. 
WilBOD Popenoe and Joseph F. Rock, Agricultural Explorers. 

R. A. Toung, Plant Introducer,, in Charge of Dasheen Investigations. 

H. C. Skeels, Botanist, in Charge of Collections. 

G. P. Van Eseltine, Assistant Botanist, in Charge of Publications. 

L. G. Hoover, Assistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Chayote Investigations. 

C. C. Thomas, Asiistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Jufuhe Investigations, 
E. I.. Crandall. Assistant, in Charge of Photographic Laboratorp. 

P. O. Russell and Patty T. Newbold, Scientific Assistants. 

David A. BlfKtet, Superintendent, Bell Plant Imtroduction Oarden, Olenn Dale, Md. 
Edward Goucher, Plant Propagator. 

J. E. Morrow, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Caiif. 
Henry Klopfer, Plant Propagator. 

Edward Slmmonds, Superintendent, Plant Introduction 0<irden, Miami, Fla. 
Charles H. Steffani, Plant Propagator. 

Henry E. Juenemann, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Bellingham, Wash. 

Wllbar A. Patten, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Brooksville, Fla^ 

E. J. Rankin, Assistant in Charge, Plant Introduction Garden, Savannah, Go. 

Collaborators: Thomas W. Brown and Robert H. Forbes, Cairo, Egypt; A. C. Hartless, 
Seharunpur, India; Barbour Lathrop* Chicago, III.; Dr. H. L. Lyon, Honolulu, Hawaii; 
H. Nehrlinff, Gotha, Fla.; Charle« T. Simpson, Littleriver, Fla.; Dr. L. Trabut, 
Director, Service Botanique, Algiers, Algeria; H. N. Whltford, School of Forestry, New 
Haven, Conn.; E. H. Wilson, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mass.; E. W. D. 
Holway, Faribault, Minn. ; Dr. William Trelease, Vrbana, III. 






CONTENTS. 



I'ace. 

Introductory statement 5 

Inventory 18 

Index of common and scientific names 93 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Plate I. Beechis as they are sold in the Chinese markets. (EleocJiarU 

iuheroHa (Roxb.) Schult., S. P. I. No. 44573.) 26 

II. A beech! ixirid near Canton. {Eleocharis tuhei'osa (Roxb.) 

Schult., S. P. I. No. 44573.) ' 2(J 

III. A fruiting branch of the Barcelona filbert. {Corylus aveUana 

L., S. P. I. No. 44608.) 32 

IV. A young tree of the Barcelona filbert. {Coryluf avellana L., 

S. P. I. No. 44608.) 32 

V. Numbering a selected avocado to avoid errors in cutting bud 

wood. {Persea americana Mill., S. P. I. No. 44625.) 32 

VI. A Guatemalan girl holding a cluster of the Tumln avocados. 

(Persea americann Mill., S. P. I. No. 44627.) 32 

VII. A new relative of the avocado, the Guatemalan coyfi. {Persea 

schiedeana Nees., S. P. I. No. 44682.) 48 

VIII. The yam bean as a cover crop. {Cacara erosa (L.) Kuntze, 

S. P. I. No. 44839.) 48 

IX. The parent tree of the Tertoh avocado. {Persea americana Mill., 

S. P. I. No. 44856.) 80 

X. The guayacan. or " liginini-vit«e," an ornamental shrub from 
Guatemala. {Guaiacum guatemalense Planch., S. P. I. No. 
44858.) 80 

3 



INVENTORY OF SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED BY 
THE OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PUNT IN- 
TRODUCTION DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 
1 TO JUNE 30, 1917 (NO. 51; NOS. 44446 TO 44934). 



INTBODUCTOBY STATEMENT. 

The period covered by this inventory is that immediately follow- 
ing the entry of America into the great World War, and it is interest- 
ing to record the fact that the work of plant introduction carried on 
by the office was continued without interruption and that during the 
three months — April, May, and June — 489 new introductions were 
brought in, carefully inspected, held in the detention greenhouses 
when nece^ry, and later sent out to experimeiiters. 

The foreign exploration work was more seriously affected, although 
it had already felt the effects of the war. Nevertheless, during this 
period Mr. Meyer continued his exploring work under difficulties 
along the Yangtze River between Hankow and Ichang and Mr. Wil- 
son Popenoe made a study of the seedling avocado varieties of Guate- 
mala, making excursions on horseback to Antigua, the Los Altos 
region, Amatitlan, Chimaltenango, Solola, and Totonicapam, where 
he obtained some of the most promising selections of his collection. 

The avocado varieties listed in this inventory are the PancJwy^ an 
early-ripening variety; the Benik^ a midseason sort; the Tumin^ an 
unusually productive sort with fruit resembling the Trapp in shape; 
the Kekchi^ a small, very early sort with a long ripening season ; the 
May apart ^ which Mr. Popenoe believes is one of the best of all; the 
Cabndl^ a variety with a particularly nutty flavor; the Cantel^ which 
has a very small seed ; the Pankay^ which he found at an altitude of 
8,500 feet, which is more than 1,000 feet above the zone of citrus 
fruits; and the TertoJi^ which produces fruits weighing 4 poimds. 
This collection of selected avocado seedlings was made with the 
greatest care. Not only has Mr. Popenoe placed on record in this 
office a description of the exact locality of each original tree from 
which he took bud wood, but he made a photograph of the tree itself, 
wherever it was possible, showing its habit of growth and productive- 
ness ; a photograph of the fruit, showing its shape and size and the 

5 



6 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

relation between seed and flesh and the thickness of the skin ; and a 
most careful pomological description of its flavor, texture, and other 
characteristics, together with notes written in the field as to its prob- 
able season of ripening and productivity. In other words, Mr. Pope- 
noe's collection, as it is being sent out to growers for trial, has had 
eliminated from it about all the chances for disappointment which 
it is humanly possible to eliminate when a foreign fruit tree 
is introduced into an entirely new environment. While the sea- 
son of ripening may change, the degree of frost which it will 
stand may change, and even the flavor be affected, it is not 
to be expected that any great changes in the form of the fruit or in 
the proportion of seed to flesh will appear in his collection when the 
fruits ripen in the United States. The difficulty which nurserymen 
and growers find in handling the cumbersome numbers under which 
the plants of this office are sent out made it appear necessary to 
assign names to the various seedlings. In order to do honor to the 
people from whose country they came and to distinguish them as 
emigrants from that country, selected names were taken from the 
Maya language. To this race belongs the distinction of having 
learned the value of the hard-skinned avocado, and it seems proper 
that as these Guatemalan varieties become .commercially grown in 
this country they should be called by these Maya names rather than 
by Americanized names which have no real philological significance. 
It is believed that these names will enrich rather than impoverish the 
language of that commerce which is growing up about this important 
food plant. See Persea americana^ Nos. 446*25 to 44628, 44679 to 
44681, 44781 to 44783, 44785, and 44856. 

While looking for varieties of the avocado, Mr. Popenoe found a 
very rare species of Persea known as the coy 6 or shucte {Persea 
schiedeana^ No. 44682) which deserves to be introduced into all 
strictly tropical countries. In its wild state and without any at- 
tempts having been made at its domestication, it appears to have 
seedlings which rival the avocado in the size of their fruits and in the 
quality of these fruits for the table. It seems to have been com- 
pletely overlooked by the tropical botanic gardens of the world. 

Mr. Popenoe also obtained material of the following : The tortoise- 
shell custard-apple (Annona testudinea, No. 44774) which bears fruit 
with large seed, hard shell, and flesh that is devoid of all grittiness: 
the monkey -flower tree {Phi/lloca7*pus se ptentrionalis^ No. 44775), a 
species which, according to the explorer, compares in beauty with 
the royal poinciana and produces in January a mass of crimson- 
scarlet flowers; the lignum- vitae (Guaiacum guatertialense^ No. 
44858), which as a small tree with evergreen foliage has already 
attracted attention in Florida and which, according to Mr. Popenoe, 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1911 7 

lias "attractive lavender-purple flowers distinguishable for long 
distances across the plains"; and a wild cherry {Prunus salicifoliaj 
No. 44886) of the Guatemalan highlands, which bears fruits three- 
fourths of an inch in diameter, with a flavor suggesting the Bigar- 
reau cherry. The facts that this cherry produces its fruits in 
racemes and that the individual fruits are of such unusual size sug- 
gest that it be tried in crosses with the chokecherries of the northern 
IJnited States. 

The desire persists in the Tropics for a tropical grape of good 
quality, and possibly the callulos (Vitis sp., No. 44921), which has 
unusually large berries in a solid bunch and which has shown itself 
adapted to cultivation in Florida, may contribute toward that end. 

Of seeds and plants which have come in as a result of the interest 
of foreigners or have been imported through correspondence, the 
following merit mention in this statement: 

The guabiroba (Compomanesia femliana^ No. 44784), a fruit tree 
of which a new quantity of seed has been sent in from Lavras, 
Brazil, by Mr. Hunnicutt, was first brought to this country by 
Messrs. Dorsett, Shamel, and Popenoe in 1914. Three-year-old trees 
of it which were standing in the plant-introduction garden at Miami 
were not injured by the freeze of 1917 and have already flowered. 
This shows promise of becoming a valuable fruit plant where it 
can be grown. 

Consul Dawson, of Rosario, has sent in the seeds of a bitter variety 
of corn {Zea may 8^ No. 44564) which has proved of interest to tfiose 
sections of Argentina which are overrun by locusts or grasshoppers, 
owing to the fact that the leaves are so bitter that these insects will 
not eat it unless there is nothing else to devour. Although the va- 
riety is a poor yielder and the corn itself is not immune to the 
attacks of the locusts, is it not possible that so striking a character 
as that of bitterness might be valuable in breeding work for the 
purpose of producing varieties of corn immune to various insects and 
fungous diseases ? 

It is a curious coincidence that the highbush cranberry of the 
Northwestern States and the Kansu viburnum {VibumuTn kan- 
suense^l^o. 44547) should both be used for the making of preserves. 
In the improvement of our native species (F. americanum) ^ may 
not the Chinese species be of value ? 

The susceptibility of one of our best ornamental bushes, the bar- 
berry, to the wheat rust and the fact that the various species of 
barberries cross easily make it a problem of not a little importance 
to get the various species of these shrubs together and by crossing 
them to produce superior forms. The existence of hardy evergreen 
forms and of forms with seedless fruits can not but add to the possi- 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBTED. 

bilities of the situation. As these shrubs are among the most hardy 
known, as they are very heavy bearers, and as some of the varieties 
are seedless, a large-fruited seedless variety which could be used 
for jam production might not be so unimportant as it would seem at 
first thought (Berberis spp., Nos. 44523 to 44630). 

Through the Central Experimental Farm of Ottawa, Ontario, a re- 
markable collection of new selected seedling varieties of apples (Nos. 
44713 to 44720) has been introduced. Five of them are seedlings of 
the well-known Wealthy variety, which, because of the hardiness of 
the trees and the most excellent eating qualities of the fruit, deserve 
especial attention by our horticulturists in the northern tier of States. 

In connection with the search for a species of the genus Pyrus 
which might prove immune to the pear-blight, is it not possible that 
the closely related genus Docynia, of which the species D. delouvayi 
occurs in western Szechwan and also in Yunnan, might furnish such 
a species and at the same time prove a suitable stock for the culti- 
vated pear? E. H. Wilson photographed a tree which was 25 feet 
tall and 7 feet in circumference and reports it to bear edible fruits 1 
inch long. No. 44677 represents seeds of this species sent in by Mr. 
Frank Pilson, but it can be easily grown from cuttings. 

The existence of delicious- fruited hybrids between the cherimoya 
and the sugar-apple, produced independently by Wester in the 
Philippines and by Simmonds in Florida, and the fact, according to 
Pittier, that these hybrids occur in Venezuela and are recognized as 
distinct from the ordinary cultivated anonas, make the production 
by Wester of a hybrid which represents three species (Nos. 44671 
to 44673) of special interest. The large number of related species 
and the fact that so many of them have edible fruits and that, as 
orchard trees, they bear early would seem to single out this family, 
Annonaceee, as one particularly favorable for the plant breeder's 
work. The biribd of Brazil, Rollima mucosa (Nos. 44658 and 
44659), is another species introduced for the breeders of this family. 

The great beauty of the different species of Styrax for use as 
shrubs around the dooryard, where they follow in their flowering 
habit the early-flowering shrubs like the lilac and spirea, will 
make the collection {Styrax spp., Nos. 44591 to 44595) imported 
from Chenault & Sons, Paris, welcome to nurserymen. 

Dr. E. D. Merrill, of the Department of Agriculture of the Phil- 
ippine Islands, has sent in a remarkable species of ornamental 
Ficus, Ficu8 pseudopalma (No. 44470), from Corregidor, which, 
because of its resemblance to a slender-stemmed palm, is known as 
the little coconut. It has a crown of leaves which are nearly a meter 
in length. 



APEHi 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 9 

In the Coachella Valley the most rapidly growing species of tree 
is a North African tamarisk {Tamarix aphylla). It makes so re- 
markable a growth there that trees 2^ years old have a girth of 3 
feet a foot above the ground. Dr. Trabut sends with the seed of 
this species (No. 44554) the information that a mite (acarian) in 
the Sahara produces galls on the tree which contain as high as 45 
per cent of pyrogallic tannin ; and the suggestion of the use of this 
remarkable tree as a source of tannin is perhaps allowable. 

Though the parkways are often lined with what is called Oatdlpd 
lungei, in reality a form of C. hignonioides^ the true C, bungei is a 
very rare tree in this country. Mr. Frank N. Meyer pointed out some 
years ago that it had unusual promise as a timber tree for the semi- 
arid regions of the Southwest along irrigating ditches. It grows to 
a height of 100 feet; its timber resembles walnut and is in great 
demand for table tops and furniture because of its nonwarping char- 
acter. It is extensively planted by the Chinese. (No. 44664.) 

Without raising the question of the landscape value of the common 
Casiuirina equisetifolia^ which has been planted by millions along 
the roadways of southern Florida, the doubtful hardiness of that 
species as contrasted with at least one of the other species {C, can- 
ningliamiana) has made it advisable to secure the ether members 
of this genus, and No. 44909 {C. atricta) and No. 44532 {G, cun- 
ninghamiana) are recorded in this inventory. If they prove to be 
hardier than C. equisetifolia^ a good deal will be gained. 

There seems to be some advantage in the use of certain kinds of 
melons in the making of preserves, especially types which have 
rinds containing large amounts of pectose. The Mankataan melon 
of Natal, CUtuUvs vulgaris (No. 44842), which will keep six months 
and is used extensively in Cape Colony for preserving, is worth the 
attention of housekeepers. 

So many valuable grasses have come from South Africa and Aus- 
tralia that a species on which sheep pasture at altitudes of 6,000 
feet near Pretoria, Panicum serratv/m (No. 44518), and the meadow 
rice-grass of Australia and New Zealand, Microlaena stipoides (No. 
44802), which is said to bear overstocking better than any other 
grass native there, are worth trying on the high-altitude pastures 
of the Pacific slope, where a ground cover which will hold moisture 
is so much needed. 

We are so accustomed to connecting the flavor of onions with a 
round-bladed species of bulbous plant that Dr. Trabut's newly 
domesticated AUmm triquetrwm^ with triangular leaves, strikes one 
as remarkable. The onion odor is scarcely perceptible in it, al- 
though as a vegetable it is very delicate indeed (No. 44793). 



.10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

The demand for large- fruited varieties of olives for pickling pur- 
poses may make the Tafahi olive (No. 44709) from the Fayimi Oasis 
of Egypt peculiarly interesting to olive growers, for it is 4.5 cm. 
long and 3 cm. in shorter diameter, according to Prof. S. C. Mason, 
who arranged for its introduction. 

It is a curious fact that in Great Britain black currants are looked 
upon as a delicacy, while in America little or no attention is paid to 
this fruit, although it is peculiarly adapted to cultivation in the 
extreme North. Collections of black and red currants are repre- 
sented in this inventory under Nos. 44475 to 44499, 44581 to 44587, 
44638 to 44648, 44706, 44707, and 44904. 

The Chinese grafted jujube has reached a stage in this country 
where it will soon go on a commercial basis, but the investigation of 
all the other forms of the jujube which are to be found in the world 
should go on, and the tropical species from Khartum, Ziziphvs mu- 
cronata (No. 44748), may be of value. 

The question whether it would ever be profitable to cultivate the 
species of Acacia which yield the gum arabic of commerce is one 
which can hardly be expected to be answered a priori. The fact that 
to-day the Brazilian sources of Para rubber have sunk into insignifi- 
cance in comparison with the plantation rubber from the cultivated 
Para rubber trees in the East Indies should certainly make advisable 
an investigation of the possibilities of desert plantations of these gum- 
producing plants. For this purpose two of the African gum acacias 
have been introduced (Nos. 44922 and 44923). 

The new problem of growing chestnuts in orchards, which the chest- 
nut bark disease has brought up, has attracted attention to the smaller 
species of oriental chestnut trees, such as Castanea rtiollissima^ and to 
the hybrids between our chinkapin and the Japanese chestnut. Is 
it not possible that a dwarf species of the related genus Castanopsis 
may have value in this breeding work ? Seeds of this species, Castwiiea 
mollisaima (No. 44448), from Nanking, have been sent in by Eev. 
Joseph Bailie, of Nanking, who has just had the distressing experience 
of being beaten nearly to death by Chinese bandits while at work to 
help the Chinese establish a better forest jK)licy. 

The introduction by Mr. H. M. Curran of a species of cactus, 
Cephdlocereus lanuginoaus (No. 44454), from Curasao, which has at- 
tractive red fruits, brings up the whole question of the utilization of 
the fruits of the Opuntias in this country. With thousands of acres 
in California where the best fruit-bearing varieties will grow to per- 
fection and with hundreds of people in the Eastern States who have 
been accustomed from their childhood in the Mediterranean region 
to eat the "fico d'India," it seems unfortunate that a method has 
not been devised for the removal of tlie small spicules which are 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 1] 

invariably scattered in pustules over these fruits. Such a discovery, 
it would seem, would raise a perfectly good, wholesome, and perhaps 
even medicinal fruit from a state of local consumption to one in 
which it could compete with other fruits in the world market. It 
has as remarkable keeping qualities as any fruit known. Specimens 
have been kept successfully in cold storage for over a year. 

The botanical determinations of seeds introduced have been made 
and the botanical nomenclature revised by Mr. H. C. Skeels and the 
descriptive and botanical notes arranged by Mr. G. P. Van Eseltine, 
who has had general supervision of this inventory, as of all the pub- 
lications of this office. The manuscript has been prepared by Mrs. 
Ethel M. Kelley. 

DAvro Fairchild, 
Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington^ D. C.^ December 2^, 1919. 



INVENTORY/ 



44446. Opxtntia monacantha (Willd.) Haw. Cactacese. 

From Singapore, Straits Settlements. Cuttings presented by Mr. I. Henry 
Burkill, director, Botanic Gardens. Received April 2, 1017. 

" Opuntia monacantha is the only species of its genus which has established 
itself wild here, and that only very sparingly." (BurkUh) 

"An upright, branching cactus, native of Argentina, reaching a height of 6 
feet or more, with rather thick, oblong, flat joints 5 to 12 inches long ; areoles 
furnished with yellowish brown bristles ; and one or two erect, yellow or brown 
spines up to 1^ inches long in each fascicle. The yellow flowers are about 8 
inches wide, and the red, spiny, pear^haped fruits are sometimes proliferous." 
{J. N. Rose.) 

44447. Omphalophthalma rubra Karst. Asclepiadacese. 

From Curacao, Dutch West Indies. Collected by Mr. H. M. Curran. 
Received April 2, 1917. 

" Mari poni poen. Green fruit, cooked as a vegetable." (Curran,) 

A climbing shrubby, hairy plant, native of the island of St Martin, West 
Indies, with opposite long-petioled, heart-shaped leaves nearly 3 inches long 
and dark-pnrple, rather small flowers in the axils of the leaves. (Adapted 
from Karsien, Florae Columbiae, vol 2, p. 119, pi, 16S.) 

44448 and 44449. 

From China. Presented by Rev. Joseph Bailie, University of Nanking, 
Nanking. Received April 2, 1917. 

44448. Castanea mollissima Blume. Fagaceie. Che^nut. 
"Chestnuts from the capital of Anhwei." {Bailie.) 

44449. Castanopsis sp. Fagacea^. Chestnut. 
" Dwarf chestnuts from the country near Anchin, Province of Anhwei." 

{BaiHe,) 

44450. Lagenaria vulgaris Seringe, Cueurbitacese. Gourd. 

From San Juan Bautista, Tabasco, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Gabriel 
Iti^, director, Agricultural Experiment Station. Received April 3, 1917. 

" Known under the native name of fiux. The very large fruit is used as a 
containing vessel.'* (IM,) 

*AI1 introdnctloiis consist of seeds unless otherwise noted. 

13 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44451 to 44468. 

F'rom Curasao, Dutch West Indies. Collected by Mr. H. H. Currau. Re- 
ceived April 3, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Curran. 

44451. Abelmoschus E8CULENTU8 (L.) Moench. Malvaceie. Okra. 

(Hibiscus esculentus L.) 

** Ciamko, A raalvaceous plant, the green aeM pods of which are 
cooked as a vegetable and are very palatable, having a slight mucilagi- 
nous quality." (See S. P. I. No. 37806.) 

44452. Acacia villosa (Swartz) Wllld. Mimosaceie. 

" Watapaana gjimaron. Markets at VVillemstad, March 9, 1917." 

A thoriiless shrub, native to (.■ura^ao, Dutch West Indies, with pinnate 
leaves composed of 10 to 15 pairs of leaflets, each about 5 cm. (2 Inches) 
long, flower heads in a curtainlike inflorescence, and flat, dry, brown pods. 
The natives call it Mata galienja and wild dividivi. (Adapted from 
Boldingh, Flora voor de Nederlandsch Went Indische Eilanden, p. 206.) 

44453. An NONA muricata I^. Annonacete. Soursop. 

" Sorsaaka. Edible fruit. March 9, 1917." 

"A small, evergreen, tropical American tree, about the size of a peach 
tree, with leathery, Ill-smell Ing, glossy leaves, large flowers with fleshy 
petals, and very large, fleshy, green fruits often as large as a child's head 
and weighing as much as 5 pounds, containing white, Juicy, pleasantly 
subacid pulp. It is commonly cultivated In the Tropics of the Old W^orld. 
A flne drink Is made from the juice, and the pulp makes excellent JeUy 
and preserves. It Is easily propagated from seeds or by budding." ( W. E. 
Safford, ) 

44454. Cephalocerei'h lanuginosi's (L.) Brltt. and Hose. Cactacese. 

" Kadoesji. Edible fruit. March 9, 1917." 

"An upright, columnar, unbranched West Indian cactus, up to 6 cm. 
(2i Inches) hi diameter, with eight or nine ribs, round areoles covered 
with brown wool which turns gray and flnally disappears, and two kinds 
of spines borne In the areoles. The 8 to 10 radial spines are up to 2 cm. 
(four-flfths of an inch) In length, and t)ie central spines, up to four in 
number, are reddish brown and about 3.5 cm. (1^ inches) long. The 
flowers are about 5 cm. (2 inches) long, funnel shaped, with green sepals 
and red-margined petals. The nearly globular, soft, fleshy red berry is 
about 3.5 cm. (1^ inches) In diameter, filled with shining black seeds. 
(Adapted from tichumann, Gesamtbeschreihung der Kakteen^ p. 183, as 
Pilocereus lanugivosns.) 

44455. Coccoi:oBis diversifolia J acq. I'olygonaceie. 

" Kaimalia. Edible fruit. March 9, 1917." 

A small West Indian tree. 8 or 10 feet high, with greenish brown 
branches; bright-green, leathery, smooth, shiny leaves which are very 
variable in shape; white, inconspicuous flowers in spikes 4 to 6 inches 
long; and round, purple-fleshed drupes about the size of a small cherry. 
The natives eat the fruits, but the flavor is not very pleasant. (Adapted 
from W. ./. Hooker, Exotic Flora, vol. 2, pi. 102.) 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 15 

44451 to 44468— Continued. 

44456. Haematoxylum brasiletto Karst. Gsesalplniacese. 

" Brazieja.'' A small tree, native of the Dutch West Indies, with stout 
thorns on the outer branches, compound leaves composed of three or four 
pairs of notched leaflets up to 3.5 cm. (Is Inches) loiifc, with a thorn at 
the foot of each leafstalk, short clusters of flowers, and flat pods. 
(Adapted from Boldinghj Mora voor dc Nederlandsch West Indische 
Eilanden, p. 212.) 

44457. HoLCus sobgh^m L. Poaceie. Sorghum. 
{Sorghum vulgar e Pers.) 

" Maiz chikiioe haaen harina.'* 

44458. Malpighia punicifolia L. Malpighiaceee. 

" Sjimaroekoe. Edible fruit, March 9, 1917." 

A shrub, native to the Dutch West Indies, about 12 feet high, with 
smooth, oval leaves 4 cm. (If inches) long, flowers in the axils of tlie 
leaves, and edible stone fruits. In some of the islands this is called 
cherry. (Adapted from Boldingh, Flora voor de Nederlandsch West 
JndUche Eilanden, p. 239.) 

44459. Phaseolus lunatus L. Fabacete. Lima bean. 
" Markets of Willemstad, March 9, 1917." 

44460. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Fabacete. Common bean. 
'* Boonchi pintado. Markets of Willemstad, March 9, 1917.' 



»» 



44461. Randia aculeata Ij. Rubiacese. 

" Leele.*' A dwarfish, gray-barked West Indian shrub with roundish, 
shining green leaves; white, solitary, sessile flowers; and globose fruits 
which yield a fast-blue dye, giving rise to the .Jamaica name of indigo- 
berry. Propagation is by cuttings. (Adapted from Curtis* s Botanical 
Magazine, vol. ^3. pL 18)1, as Oardenia randia.) 

44462. Sesamum orient ale L. Pedaliacetp. Sesame. 
{S. indicum L.) 

" Sjoajole. Markets of Willemstad, March 9, 1917." 

44463. Phaseolus semierectus L. Fabacese. 

"A leguminous plant common in lowlands at St. Joris. April 9, 1917." 

44464 to 44468. Vigna sinensis (Torner) Savi. Fabacete. Cowpea. 

44464. Boonchi di Baliza. Markets of Willemstad, March 10, 1917. 
Edible bean." 

44465. "boonchi di color No. 1. Markets of Willemstad, March 9, 
1917." 

44466. " Boonchi di color No. 2. Markets of Willemstad, March 9, 
1917." ^ 

44467. "Boonchi di color No. 3. Markets of Willemstad, March 9, 
1917." 

44468. ** Boonchi di color No. 4. Markets of Willemstad, March 9. 
1917." 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44469. Amaranthus panicuiatus L. Amaranthacese. Alegria. 

From San Juan Bautista» Tabasco, Mexico. Purchased from Mr. Gabriel 
Iti^, director, Agricultural Experiment Station. Received April 3, 1917. 

Alegria Is produced in Tlajomulco, Zacoalco, and San Pedro Tlaquepaque, 
districts belonging to the State of Jalisco. This annual Is sown in nurseries; 
in the month of December It Is harvested and is used in the making of sweets. 
I was told the seeds in question are found with difficulty in the pueblos near 
Guadalajara, for the inhabitants do not put them to any practical application ; 
and, if they are sometimes used, it Is when they are m^xed with dulce for 
children. They are surely very insipid. [These seeds are sold in Mexico City, 
and] they are also seen in the State of Mlchoacan, where they are used for the 
same purpose." (/W^.) 

44470. Ficus pseudopalma Blanco. Moraceue. 

From the Philippine Islands. Presiented by Dr. E. D. Merrill, acting 
director, Bureau of Science, Manila. Received April 5, 1917. 

"A single fruit of Ficus pseudopalma, which apparently has fertile seeds. 
This fruit was recently sent to me from Corregidor. The species is a most 
striking ornamental and will probably thrive out of doors in southern Florida 
and in southern California; it is well worthy of cultivation In greenhouses. 
The stems are erect, unbranched, and usually about 3 cm. in diameter. The 
stem is tipped by a dense crown of very characteristic leaves which are some- 
times nearly a meter in length. The fruits are borne in the leaf axils. On 
account of its palmlike aspect Blanco selected the name pseudopalma; the com- 
mon Tagalog name is niogniogafiy which literally means * little coconut.' " 
(MerriU,) 

44471 to 44473. 

From Granada, Spain. Plants purchased from the Pedro Glraud Nurs- 
eries, through Mr. Percival Gassett, American consul, Malaga. Received 
April 7, 1917. 

44471 and 44472. Ficus cabica L. Moracese. "Fig, 

44471. "Albanes, the name by which the Paharero fig is here known.'* 
(Oassett.) 

44472. " laabeles, the most d^icious fig, much sought after." ( Gas- 
sett) 

44473. Pyrus communis L. Malacese. Pear. 

Peraleta. A dwarf variety of the common pear. 

44474. CiTRULLus vulgaris Schrad. Cucurbitacefle. Watermelon. 

From Lusambo, Belgian Kongo, Africa. Presented by Mr. E. B. Stilz. Re- 
ceived April 10, 1917. 

" Seed of a native watermelon. It grows here like a weed ; the vine is almost 
exactly like that of the cultivated watermelon, only not quite so fuzzy. The 
fruit also resembles a watermelon, being green and about the size of a man's 
head when ripe. The rind is very tough and the meat is white and stringy and 
about as fit to eat as that of a gourd. It has the watermelon smell, however. 
I do not know whether It Is the ancestor or a degenerate descendant of our 
watermelon." (Stilz.) 



APEIIi 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 17 

44475 to 44499. Ribes spp. Grossulariaceae. Currant. 

From Angers, France. Plants purchased from the Andr6 Leroy Nurseries. 
Bec^ved April 11, 1917. 

44475 and 44476. Rises vulgabe Lam. Garden currant. 

44475. No. 1. Belle de 8t, QiUes, 

44476. No. 3. De Boulogne blanc. (Boulogne white.) 

44477 to 44480. Ribes NiGBpsc L. Black currant. 

44477. No. 4. Cassis d fruit noir, (Blaclc-fruited currant.) 

44478. No. 6. Cassis ii fruit brun, (Brown-fruited currant.) 

44479. No. 5. Cassis d feuUles dories, (Golden-leaved black currant. ) 
4480. No. 11. Cassis Royal de Naples, " Neapolitan. Medium-sized, 

spicy berries." (Hesse^s cataiogue.) 
44481 to 44499. Ribes vuloabe Lam. Garden currant. 

44481. No. 12. DuCaucase. "Caucasian. Bunches of medium length, 
currants very large, a prolific shrub. A good table fruit for the 
home garden." (8pdth*s cataiogue.) 

44482. No. 14. Cerise llanche. (White cherry.) 

44483. No. 15. Chenonceau rougey "A good table fruit with iarge 
berries." (AndrS Leroy' s catalogue,) 

44484. No. 16. Commun d fruit blanc. (Ck>mmon white fruited.) 

44485. No. 17. Commun d fruit rouge. (Ck>mmon red fruited.) 

44486. No. 18. Fay's New ProHfUK "Very long bunches with very 
large berries." {Andr^ Leroy* s catalogue.) 

44487. No. 19. Fertile d' Angers. (Angers prolific.) 

44488. No. 20. Fertile de Bertin. ''A heavy-bearing variety with 
clear red, medium-sized berries." (Hessefs catalogue.) 

44489. No. 22. Frauendorf. 

44490. No. 23. Gloire des Sablons. 

44491. No. 24. Grosse blanche transparente. (Large transparent 
white.) 

44492. No. 27. De Hollande d longue grappe. (liOng-bunch Dutch.) 

44493. No. 28. Imp^riale blanche. (Mperial white.) 

44494. No. 29. Imp&riale rouge. (Imperial red.) 

44495. No. 30. Knight, " KnighVs red, with very large red berries." 
{Hessf^s catalogue.) 

44496. No. 81. La Turinoise. 

44497. Nb.85. VersaUlaise. 

44498. No. 38. Rouge clair de Buddins. (Bunddins* dear red.) 

44499. No. 84. De Verri^res. 

44500 to 44517. Fabacese. 

From Yihsien. Shantung Province, China. Presented by Rev. R. G. 
Coonradt Received April 10, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Coonradt 

* 

44600. DouoHOS lablab L. Bonavist bean. 

•* No. 9. Used for cooking." 

50628—22 2 



18 SEEDS AND PIANTS IMPORTED. 

44500 to 44517— Continued. 

44501 to 44505. Phasbolus spp. ' 

44901 and 44502. Phasbolus angui^abis (WlUd.) W. F. Wi^t. 

Adsuki bean. 

44501. ** No. 13. Small red bean ; used for soup." 

44502. " No. 16. Small white bean ; used for boiling.'* 

44503 to 44505. Phasbolus aureus Roxb. Hung bean. 

44503. " Hairy green bean ; used for soup. Planted in June.'* 

44504. '*No. 7. Smooth green bean; used in soup. Planted in 
June.** 

44505. " No. 8. Smooth brown bean ; used for soup. Planted in 
June." 

44506. PisuM SATIVUM L. Garden pea. 

" No. 1. Wan; large winter pea. Planted in November.** 

44507 to 44513. Soja max (L.) Piper. Soybean. 

iOlycine hispida Maxim.) 

44507. " No. 2. Large red bean ; used for baking or boiling. Planted 
in the spring.** 

44508. "No. 3. Large black bean; used for baking and boiling. 
Planted in the spring.** 

44500. "No. 4. Large yellow bean; used for baking and boiling. 
Planted in the spring.*' 

44510. " No. 5. Large blue bean ; used for baking and boiling. Planted 
in the spring.'* 

44511. "No. 11. Small yellow bean; used for oil curd and animal 
feed.** 

44512. " No. 12. Tea-colored bean ; used for animal feed. Planted ii 
June.** 

44513. " No. 17. Used for soup.** 

44514. Stizolobium pachtlobium Piper and Tracy. 
" No. 0. Beans used for cooking.*' 

44515. ViGNA SESQUiPEDALis. (L.) iYuwlrtli. Yard Long bean. 
" No. 10. Homed bean." 

44516 and 44517. Yigna sinensis (Tomer) Savi. Cowpea. 

44516. " No. 14. Large Chiang bean ; used for soup and boiling." 

44517. "No. 15. White Chiang bean; used for soup and boiling.** 

44618. Panicum sebratum (Thunb.) Spreng. Poacese. Grass. 

From the Union of South Africa. Presented by Mr. I. B. Pole Evans* 
chief, Division of Botany, Department of Agriculture, Pretoria. Re- 
ceived April 12, 1917. 

** Collected at Kaalfontein, near Pretoria. This grass flourishes on our high 
v^d (4,000 to 6,000 feet) in this neighborhood and is much relished by sheep 
and cattle.** (Evans,) 

44519. PoxTFARTiA AXILLARIS (Boxb.) King and Prain. Anacar- 
diaceae. 

From Augusta, Ga. Plants purchased from P. J. Berckmans Go. Received 
April 13, 1917. 



APEIL 1 TO JUIS^ 80, 1917. 19 

A rather common tree at low altitudes In the valleys of western Ohlna, grow- 
Ing to a height of 15 to 25 m. (50 to 80 feet) and having a trunk often 8 feet 
in diameter near the hase. It has gray bark, massive branches, declduoui^ 
leaves, and inconspicuous flowers. The yellow, oval fruits, which are about 
an inch long, are eaten by the Chinese, who call the tree Hsuan tsao. Known 
also as Spondias axillaris. (Adapted from Sargent, Plantae Wilsonianae, p. 
J72, 19U.) 

44620 to 44549. 

From Ventimiglia, Italy. Presented by the superintendent, La Mortola 
Botanic Gardens. Received April 6, 1017. 

44520. Alectbton subcinebeum (A. Gray) Radlk. Saplndaces. 

A shrub or small tree, native to New South Wales, Australia, with 
compound leaves composed of one to three pairs of shining, oblong or 
lance-shaped leaflets 2 to 4 inches long, very small flowers in short 
axillary panicles, and 2 to 3 lobed capsules which inclose globose seeds 
with fleshy arils. (Adapted from Gray, ^- S. Explorinff Expedition, 
vol, 15, Botany, p. 258, as Cupania subcinerean) 

44521. Alectbton tomentosum (F. Muell.) Radlk. Sapindace«e. 

An Australian tree, 20 to 30 feet high, with rusty velvety young 
branches, small flowers crowded In woolly panicles, and rather hard, 
depressed, indehlscent fruits. (Adapted from Bentham, Flora Austra- 
UenHs, vol. 1, p. 466.) 

44522. Aloe sucootbina Lam. Liliacese. Aloe. 

A succulent herbaceous plant, native to Africa, usually simple but 
sometimes branched, with thick, linear or lance-shaped leaves with shiny 
margins and tips, disposed in the form of a rosette, either green or 
yellowish in color. The red flowers are borne in a spike. The }uice is 
evaporated to obtain a drastic purgative known as aloes. This plant is 
cultivated in South America and many other subtropical places. (Adapted 
from Loefffren, Notas sobre as Plantas Exotioa^ Introduzidas no Estado 
de 8. Paulo, p. 27.) 

44523 to 44530. Bebbebis spp. Berberidacese. Barberry. 

44523. Bebbebis actinacantha Mart. 

An evergreen bush, native to the mountainous regions of Chile, 
with peculiar 5-parted spines, roundish oval, rigid, spiny-dentate 
leaves, and deep-yellow, sweet-scented flowers. In cultivation it 
reaches 3 to 4 feet in height and grows freely in a rich sandy loam. 
(Adapted from Edward's Botanical Register, vol. 31, pi. 55.) 

4AbZ^. Bebbebis globosa Benth. 

A spiny shrub, native to the Arfdes of Colombia, 6 to 8 feet high, 
with rigid, mucronate leaves a little more than an inch long and a 
quarter of an inch wide, yellow flowers a little larger than those 
of the common barberry, and globular fruits about the size of a 
small pea. (Adapted from Bentham, Plantae Eartwegianae, p. 158.) 

44525. Bebbebis guimpeli Koch and Bouche. 

A shrub, 5 to 7 feet in height, native to the Caucasus, with clus- 
tered obovate entire leaves, racemes of early-blooming yellow flowers, 
and attractive red berries appearing in autumn. It needs a sunny 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44520 to 4454&— Continued. 

situation for best results. (Adapted from Ouimpel^ Abbildung der 
fremden in Deutsohland ausdauemden Holzarten, p. 79j as B, oana" 
denHs.) 

44526. Bebbebib ilicifolia Forst. 

A straggling bush, native to Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, about 8 
feet in height, with yellow-brown young wood, angular stems, 3- 
parted often curved spines, dark-green hollylike leaves, flowers in 
axillary racemes, and deep steel-blue subglobose fruits. (Adapted 
from Curti^s Botanical Magazine^ vol, 79, pi. 4S(f8.) 

44527. Bebbebib fbatti O. Scfaneid. 

A western Chinese shrub 6 to 10 feet high, with finely hairy 
grooved young twigs; slender, 3-parted spines up to two-thirds of 
an inch long; ovate leaves up to 1| inches long in fascicles of four 
or five; yellow flowers in narrow panicles; and ovoid salmon-red 
fruits a quarter of an inch in length. It grows very freely and is 
quite hardy in cultivation at Kew, England. (Adapted from Cur- 
Ms Botanical Magazine, vol. HO, pi. 8549.) 

44528. Bebbebib babobntiana O. Schneid. 

A black-berried barberry from western Hupeh, Ohina, reaching a 
height of 7 feet. It is the only evergreen barberry which has 
proved entirely hardy at the Arnold Arboretum. (Adapted from 
Sargent, Plantae Witsonianae, vol. 1, p. 359.) 

For further description, see S. P. I., No. 42973. 

44589. Bebbebis stjbgattlialata C. Schneid. 

A thickly branched shrub from Tibet, up to 41 feet high, with 
spines up to an inch in length, finely membranaceous, lance-shaped 
leaves about an inch long, and reddish yellow globular fruits a quar- 
ter of an inch in diameter. (Adapted from Schneider, Illustriertes 
Handbuch der Laubholzkunde, vol. 2, p. 919.) 

44530. Bebbebis vibescens Hook. f. 

This Himalayan barberry is a spreading shrub with shining 
brown bark; ovate, pale-green, spiny toothed leaves in tufts; slender 
3-parted thorns; small greenish yellow flowers in fascicles or short 
racemes ; and oblong or constricted scarlet or black berries. (Adapted 
from Ourtis*8 Botanical Magazine, vol 116, pi. 7116.) 

44531. BuDDLEiA DAvmn Franch. Loganiacen. 

A tall shrub, native to the mountainous parts of northern Ohina, with 
very variable foliage. The opposite dark-green leaves are 4 inches to a 
foot in length, oblong or narrowly lance shaped, and either coarsely 
serrate or entire. The clear lilac-colored flowers are crowded in dense 
heads 4 to 6 inches long, and the fruits are clavate capsules about a 
quarter of an inch long.. (Adapted from Curtia's Botanical Magazine, 
vol. 124, Pl' 7609, as Buddleia variabilis.) 

44532. Gasuabina cunninghamiana Miquel. Casuarinacese. 

An Australian tree 30 to 40 feet high, with slender branches, male 
flowers in slender spikes, and globular fruiting cones not more than a 
third of an inch in diameter. The wood is dark colored, close grained, 
and prettily marked.* (Adapted from Bailey, Queensland Flora, pt. 5, 
p. U9i') 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1911. 21 

44520 to 44549— Continued. 

44533. Glebodendbum tbiohotomum fargesii (Dode) Rehder. Verbena- 

ceffi. 

A Chinese shrub, 3.5 to 4 meters (10 to 15 feet) In height; with dark- 
green, oval, lance-shaped leaves, 10 to 15 cm. (4 to 6 inches) long; very 
fragrant light-pink flowers in axillary cymes; and dark-purple drupes, 
4 to 5 mm. (one-fifth of an inch) in diameter, with very hard, black seeds. 
It is easily raised from seed in ordinary soil. (Adapted from J. PineUe, 
in Revue Htn^icole, roL 8S, p, 522, as Olerodendron fargesii.) 

44534. Abbcastrttm bomanzoffianum (Cham.) Becc. Phoenicacece. 
(Cocos romanzofflana Cham.) Falxn. 

Yar. plumosa. ** A Brazilian palm, commonly cultivated in Florida and 
California as an ornamental, with an unarmed trunk about 90 feet high 
and a foot in diameter, bearing a crown of plumelike pinnate leaves 12 
to 15 feet long. It has two spathes, the inner somewhat woody, splitting 
along one side and exposing the much-branching spadix which is crowned 
with the monoecious flowers. The fruit is a pale-orange drupe about the 
size of a large acorn, inclosing a bony seed which has three eyes near 
the base." (C. B, Doyle.) 

44535. DiosPTBos lotus L. Diospyracese. 

A deciduous Chinese tree, usually less than 80 feet high in cultivation 
in temperate countries, but probably twice as high in warmer climates. 
It has oval, shining dark-green leaves 2 to 5 inches long, greenish red 
dicecious flowers, the pistillate solitary and the staminate one to three 
in a cluster. The purplish or yellowish, orange-shaped fruits are half 
an inch to three-quarters of an inch across, but because of their astringent 
quality are unfit for food. On damp days the trees emit a curious heavy 
odor, probably due to an exhalation from the leaves. (Adapted from 
Bean, Trees and Shruhs Hardy in the British Isles, vol. i, p. 494.) 

* 

Ordinarily used in China and Japan as a stock for the kaki, or Japa- 
nese persimmon. 

44536. DoDONAEA THUNBEBGiANA EckL and Zeyh. Sapindaces. 

A South African shrub, 5 to 10 feet high, with somewhat viscid, narrow 
leaves 1^ to 2i inches long and a quarter of an inch wide, dense racemes 
of polygamous green flowers, and resinous, shining, winged capsules about 
lialf an inch long and wide. A decoction of the root is used as 
a purgative in fevers. (Adapted from Harvey and Sender , Flora Capensis, 
vol. 1, p. 242.) 

44537. LoNicEBA standishii Carr. Caprifoliacese. Honeysuckle. 

A charming, fragrant, early-flowering, deciduous, Chinese shrub, with 
pale yellowish brown branches; pale-green, oval to lance-shaped leaves 
3 to 5 inches long; and white, sweet-scented flowers appearing in pairs, 
one-fifth to half an inch long. (Adapted from Curtis' s Botanical Maga- 
zine, vol. 94, pi. 5709.) 

445381. Pbunus conbadinae Koehne. Amygdalaceie. Cherry. 

A graceful tree from central China, reaching a height of 25 feet, with 
oval or oblong, doubly serrate leaves 2 to 6 Inches long; whitish or pink 
flowers about three-quarters of an inch long in two to four flowered umbels, 
and red ovoid fruits one-third to one-half an inch long. (Adapted from 
Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 5, p. 2840.) 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44520 to 44549— Continued. 

44539. Pbunus tomentosa Thunb. Amygdalacese. Cherry. 

A broad, vigorous shrub from northern China. One of the earliest 
cherries to flower. The flowers are large, with the white petals more or 
less tinged with red toward the base, and the small, bri^t-red, slightly 
hairy fruits are of good flavor. It Is now being cultivated in the north- 
western part of the United States and in southwestern Canada where 
other cherries are not hardy. (Adapted from the Arnold Arboretum 
BuUetin of Popular Information No. 19, April 25, 1912,) 

This fruiting shrub thrives under a very wide range of climatic con- 
ditions, from those of Georgia and southern California to those of Mon- 
tana and the plains of Canada. Its attractive berries have been used 
successfully in the production of excellent preserves. Its productiveness, 
attractiveness, and hardiness make it worthy a place in any dooryard. 

44540 to 44546. Rosa spp. Rosncese. Bose. 

44540 to 44543. Rosa spp. 

The names given in the following notes are not used as valid for 
the material that we have, since the seeds received do not agree 
with seeds of these species received directly from the Arnold Arbore- 
tum. The notes are published merely to enable us to hold the in- 
formation together. 

44540. Received as Wilson No. 666, Rosa helenae. 

44541. Received as Wilson No. 666a, Rosa rubus. 

44542. Received as Wilson No. 1125, Rosa bruftonU. 

44543. Received as Wilson No. 1128. This number, Mr. Rehder 
informs us, is Sorbus esserteauiana, and he suggests that the 
number should have been 1126, Rosa davidii elongata. 

44544. Rosa banksiae normalis Regel. 

A climbing bush, 6 m. (20 feet) or more tall, common in western 
Hupeh and eastern Szechwan, China, from the river level to 1,000 
m. (3,250 feet) altitude. It often rambles over trees, and E. H. 
Wilson has seen trees 50 feet high completely festooned with this 
rose. The fragrant flowers are always pure white, and the fruits 
are dull red and abundant. The root bark is used locaUy for 
strengthening flshing nets and dyeing them brown. (Adapted from 
Sargent, Plantae Wilsonianae, vol 2. pt. 2, p. 317.) 

44545. Rosa moyesii Hemsl. and Wils. 

Forma rosea Rehder and Wilson. An upright bush, found in 
western Szechwan, China, up to 3,300 ra. (11,000 feet) altitude, 
growing to a height of 1 to 5 m. (3 to 16 feet), and distinguished 
from the typical species by its large leaves and large, pale-pink 
flowers. The large fruits are either dull red or scarlet. (Adapted 
from Sargent, Plantae WUsonianae, vol 2, pt. 2, p. S25,) 

44546. Rosa bubus Lev. and Van. 

A climbing shrub, common everywhere in western Hupeh and 
eastern Szechwan, China, from the river level to 1,300 m. (4,200 
feet) altitude. It is readily distinguished from its near relatives 
by the densely hairy shoots and leaves. It grows to a height of 
2,5 to 4 m. (8 to 13 foet), with dull-red globose fruits. (AdaptcMi 
from Sargent, Plantae M^ihon4ana4>, vol. 2, pt. 2, p. 308.) 



APRIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 23 

44520 to 44549— Continued. 

44547. ViBUBNUM KANSUENSE Batal. Caprifoliacese. 

A taU Chinese shrub of loose and open habit, found at altitudes of 
6,000 to 9,000 feet. It has oblong leaves, and its Juicy, red berries can 
be used in making agreeable drinks. (Adapted from note of Frank N. 
Meyer, May 11, 1915,) 

See also S. P. I. No. 40692 for further description. 

44548. ViBtTBNUM KANSUENSE Batal. CaprifoUacefie. 

A form differing from the preceding number in habit and size. 

44549. Ampelopsis aconitifoua Bunge. Yitacese. 

A very handsome northern Chinese vine with finely divided foliage. 
The leaves are five parted and 2 to 3 inches long; the inconspicuous 
flowers appear in summer, and the small orange berries mature in 
autumn. It should be planted where only a light covering is desired 
and is liardy in the northern United States. (Adapted from Bailey, 
Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 1, p, 278,) 

44550 to 44553. Amygdalus perbioa L. Amygdalacese. Peach. 

iPrunus peraica Stokes.) 

From Chef 00, China. Presented by Mr. Lester Maynard, American consul 
general. Received April 5, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Maynard. 

44550. "No. 4. ChHu Vao tzU (autumn peach); grown at Fushanhsien. 
This is considered one of the best varieties; a freestone, green skin, 
white flesh, average weight 7i ounces to 1 pound ; ripens in August." 

44551. "No. 5. JSsieh Tao' (blood peach); grown at Fushanhsipn. The 
largest peach grown in this district; average weight, 7^ ounces to 1 
pound ; a freestone ; skin and flesh red, flesh hard and dry, very little 
juice, taste sour ; ripens in August" 

44552. "No. 6. ChHng pH Ian (green skin blue) ; grown at Laiyang. One 
of the best peaches grown in Shantung, being both sweet and }uicy; 
about the size of Ch'iu Vao tzH [S. P. I. No. 44550], average weight, 
7i ounces to 1 pound, freestone, green skin, white flesh; ripens in 
September." 

44553. "No. 7. Tung Vao (winter peach) ; grown at Fushanhsien. Con- 
sidered the best quality of i)each grown in this district ; about the size 
of ChHng pH Ian [S. P. I. No. 44552], average weight, 7i ounces to 1 
pound ; freestone, green skin, white flesh ; ripens in November." 

44554. Tamarix APHYLLA (L.) Karst. Tamaricaceae. Tamarisk. 
(T. articulata Vahl.) 

From Algiers, Algeria. Cuttings presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received 
April 12, 1917. 

*'A tamarisk from the Sahara ; a beautiful tree which is very ornamental and 
produces a gall very much used in the south by the natives for tanning. This 
^all contains 45 per cent of pyrogallic tannin. It is produced by an acarian, 
Eriophyes tlaiae Trab. I have been able to reproduce it easily on our Tamarix 
articulata, I estimate that an annual harvest of 20 quintals is possible from 1 
hectare." {Trabut.) 



24 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44666 and 44666. 

From Tolga, via Cairns, Queensland, Australia. Presented by Mr. J. A. 
Hamilton. Received April 12, 1917. 

44555. CucuBBiTA ep, Cucurbitacese. Melon. 
" Chinese pie or Jam melon ; very productive ; the point in its tavor is 

that the seeds are all in one cavity and not embedded in the flesh as in the 
othef preserving melons." {Hamilton,) 

44556. Passiflora subebosa L. Passlfloracese. 

" Wild passion vine ; the flowers are pretty, but I can not say whether 
the fruit is edible or not." (HanUUon.) 

44667 to 44661. 

From Jerusalem, Palestine. Presented by Mr. E. F. Beaumont, The Amer- 
ican Colony Stores, through Mr. Abrtim I. Elkus, American consul. Re- 
ceived April 17, 1917. 

44557. Lawsonia inkbmis L. Lythracese. Henna. 
A handsome shrub, probably native to northern Africa, western and 

southern Asia, but widely cultivated in tropical countries. The flower? 
are white, pink, or cinnabar red and are very fragrant. From the leaves 
is produced the henna or alhenna of the Arabs ( Cyprus of the ancients), 
a yellow dye which is used in Egypt and elsewhere by women to color 
their nails, by men to dye their beards, and for similar purposes. It is 
the camphire of the authorized version of the Bible. (Adapted from 
Bailey t Standard Cyclopedia of HorHouVture^ vol, 4, p. 18S0.) 

44558. Medigago ciliabis (L.) All. Fabacesa. Bur clover. 

An annual Asiatic plant, growing on the coast and up to 800 m. above 
sea level, with squarish leaflets ; yellow flowers about one-third of an inch 
long, in few-flowered clusters or solitary ; and hairy coiled pods, with six 
to eight rather loose coils having two rows of awl-shaped prickles on the 
thick flat margin. (Adapted from Post, Flora of Syri/a, Palestine, and 
Sinai, p. 2S0.) 

44559. Medigago SGUTELLATA (L.) Mill. Fabaceee. Bur clover. 

An annual Asiatic herb, 12 to 20 inches high, with rather large oval or 
oblong, acutely denticulate leaflets, orange flowers, one-sixteenth of an 
inch long in small clusters or solitary, and smooth, coiled pods, nearly 
half an inch in diameter, composed of flve to six coils. (Adapted from 
Post, Flora of Syria, Palestine, and Sinai, p. 2X7,) 

44560. PI8X7M FULVUM Slbth. and Smith. Fabacese. Pea. 
A slender-stemmed annual, common in rocky places around the eastern 

Mediterranean countries, about 5 dm. tall, with oval to round, dentate 
leaflets up to 2 cm. long, rusty yellow flowers, pods 4 cm. long, and velvety 
black, round peas about 4 mm. in diameter. (Adapted from Post, Flora 
of Syria, Palestine, and Sinai, p. 296.) 

44561. PI8TAGIA TEBEBiNTHUs L. Auacardlacete. Terebinth. 
A medium-sized tree, native to the Mediterranean countries, 12 to 15 

m. high, with compound shining leaves having 7 to 11 oblong, caducous 
leaflets which when bruised give off a strong terebinth odor, hence the 
name of the plant. The small purple flowers occur in axillary panicles od- 
the previous year's growth; and the fruit is a little, dry, purple drupe 
which becomes brown when fully mature, is slightly acid and edible. It 
produces a transparent gum which is used as a chewing gum. The leaves 
are used as a fodder by the Arabs. (Adapted from M, Bangol, Bulletin de 
la SocUt6 d' Horticulture de Tunisie, vol. H, p. 15$.) 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 25 

44662. GossTPiuM sp. Malvaceae. , Cotton. 

From Kribi, Kamerun, West Africa. Presented by Rev. H. W. Grieg, 
Presbyterian Church Mission. Received April 12, 1917. 

Seeds sent in response to a request for a native cotton reported to be used by 
the Bulus in weaving cloth. 

44668. Balanites aeoyftiaca (L.) Delile. Zygophyllaceae. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. F. G. Walsingham, Gizeh Branch, 
Ministry of Agriculture. Received April 14, 1917. 

A tropical African tree, 3 to 5 meters high, with straight, rigid branches; 
woolly, papery, ovate leaves ; green flowers in 3 to 5 flowered cymes ; and edible 
drupes 3 cm. long, with a bitter-sweet flavor. The natives make an intoxicating 
drink from these fruits, which are also eaten raw with a laxative effect. The 
seeds yield an oil known as oil of betu, which is used as a liniment, for food, 
and, to some extent, as a medicine. The wood is hard and close grained, and 
the bark of the young trees yields a very strong flber. One of the ingredients of 
the celebrated spikenard perfume is supposed to have been furnished by this 
tree. (Adapted from Post, Flora of Syria, Palestine, and Sinai, p. 199, and 
from Kew Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, Additional Series IX, p. 1S8,) 

44664. ZeamatsL. Poacese. Corn. 

From Rosario, Argentina. Presented by Mr. William Dawson, jr., American 
consul. Received April 16, 1917. 

"A Rosario landowner who has made extensive experiments with corn re- 
cently reported to the Rosario Bolsa de Comercio with respect to the advisa- 
bility of sowing bitter corn (maiz amargo) which is indorsed in some quarters 
as locust proof. His recommendations are strongly against this variety. While 
the locust, unless hard pressed, will not eat the leaves if it flnds the plant in 
flower or grain, it will eat bitter com as well as any other form. The growth 
of bitter com is very slow and requires 9 to 10 months, and even more. With 
its enormous leaves it exhausts the soil, and after the harvest the hard green 
stalks make it very difficult to clear the ground, especially in Argentina, where 
farm labor is costly. Finally, its yield is very small and from 25 to 50 per cent 
of that which any other common variety of com will give under similar condi- 
tions, to say nothing of the yields obtained from selected seed. 

"The landowner mentioned, who makes a specialty of selected seed, states 
that bitter com is the only variety that he does not sell. He considers it useful 
only in the Chaco where * land is as plentiful as locusts,* and there is little objec- 
tion to exhausting the soil. Furthermore, in the Chaco the distance between 
farms is too great to permit an organized defensive campaign against locusts, 
which under ordinary circumstances respect the leaves of bitter corn." {Daw- 
son, in Commerce Reports, January 4, J 917, p. 36.) 

44666. Mtristica fragrans Houtt. Myristicacese. Nutmeg. 

From Grenada, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. L. F. de Backer, 
New York City. Received April 16, 1917. 
An East Indian tree, 20 to 25 feet high, with smooth grayish brown bark; 
oval, dark-green, sharp-pointed leaves 3 to 6 inches long, slightly aromatic 
when bruised ; pale yellowish dioecious flowers in axillary racemes ; and nearly 
spherical, pearlike drupes. The fiesih. of these drupes is yellowish and full of 
astringent juice, and discloses the oval, hard-shelled, rugged, dark-brown nut. 
This contains the nutmeg of commerce, an oval, pale-brown seed which soon 
becomes shriveled and wrinkled. (Adapted from Curtis' s Botanical Magazine, 
pis. 2756 and 2757, as Myristica officinalis.) 



26 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44666 and 44667. A^iaranthus oangeticus L. Amaranthacese. 

Amaranth. 

From China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for 
the Department of Agriculture. Received April 14, 1917. 

44566. "(No. 2383a. Peking, China, February 17, 1917.) A red Amaran- 
thus, used locally as a vegetable, like spinach, when young. Sometimes 

'the seed is sown in a moist, dark, and warm place, and the young, red- 
colored seedlings are eaten as a rare delicacy at feasts. The seed itself 
is apparently never used in the north of China as a grain food. Chinese 
name Hung hsien ts'ai (red hsien vegetable). (Meyer.) 

44567. "(No. 2384a. Peking, China, February 17, 1917.) . A green Ama- 
ranthus, used locally as a vegetable, like spinach, when young. Some- 
times the seed is sown in a moist, dark, and warm place, and the 
young seedlings are eaten as a rare delicacy at feasts. Chinese name 
CKing hsien ts*ai (groen hsien vegetable). (Meyer.) 

44668. Ankona cherimola Mill. Annonaceae. Cherimoya. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Re- 
ceived April 13, 1917. 

A horticultural variety with large fruits, sent under the name of Annona ma- 
crocarpa Hort. 

44669 to 44679. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Co. 
Received April 17, 1917. 

44569. Apios fobtunei Maxim. FabaceiE. 

Hodo-imo. Tubers of a perennial leguminous climbing plant, native 
to Japan, sometimes 10 feet long, with compound leaves having three 
to five leaflets, panicles of greenish yellow flowers, and pods about 21 
inches long. The round, bulletlike tubers are boiled and eaten, ami a 
kind of starch is maimfactured from them. (Adapted from Useful 
Plants of Japan, Agricultural Society of Japan, Tokyo, p. 69.) 

44570. (^HENOPODiTJM ACUMINATUM Willd. Chenopodiuceae. 

Akaza. Seed of an annual Japanese herbaceous plant, growing wild 
everywliere, and attaining a lieipht of 4 to 5 feet. The large, old stems 
are used for canes. There are several horticultural varieties, all being 
used for the same purpose. (Adapted from Useful Plants of Japan, 
Agricultural Society of Japan, Tokyo, p. 15. ) 

44571. Coix LACRYMA-joBi L. Poacece. Job's-tears 

Seeds received under the name Coix agrestis Lour., which is now con- 
sidered a synonym of the above. Loureiro describes it as differing from 
the common form by its simple stems, smooth leaves, and nearly globular 
seeds. Obtained for the work of the Oflice of Forage-Crop Investigations. 

44572. DiANTHUB JAPOKicus Thuub. Silenacese. Pink. 

Plants Of a glabrous perennial, native of Japan and Manchuria, with 
simple stems about 20 inches tall, ovate, lance-shaped, sharp-pointed 
leaves twisted at the base, and red flowers six to eight in a head. 
(Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. t, 

p. 1000.) 



y 51, Seeds and Plants 






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APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 191*7. 27 

44569 to 44579— Continued. 

44575. Eleochabis TUBiaiosA (Roxb.) Schult. Oyperacese. Beechi. 

These beechi tubers are mostly eaten raw, but are also sliced and 
shredded in soups and in meat and flsh dishes. Foreigners in China 
grate them and serve them boiled as a winter vegetable, in whiqh state 
they very much resemble sweet com in looks and taste. The plants need 
a hot summer to mature and are grown on a muck or clayey soil with 
several inches of standing water on top, in very much the same manner 
as wet-land rice. (See S. P. I. No. 41680.) 

For illustrations of beechi tubers and growing plants, see Plates I 
and II. 

44574 and 44575. Ebiobotrta .taponica (Thunb.) Limll. Malacese. 

lioquat. 

44574. Motogirbitca, (Trees.) 44575. Haragami-biwa. (Trees.) 

44576. Ficus PYBii'OLiA Burm. Moracese. Fig. 

The name Ficus pyrifolia is of doubtful application. These plants may 
be F. benjamina^ F. erecta^ F, fontanesii, or F. rubra. (See Bailep, 
Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. S, p, 12SS,) 

44577. Malus sylvestkis Miller. Malacete. Apple. 
(Pyrus malua L.) 

Nakanaruko. Tree>j of " a variety of apple known in Japan as the 
Jtcai or Nakanaruko. This variety is supposed to have come from this 
country, but it has also been said that it is of German origin. It has 
become a leading fall variety in Japan." (J. K, Shaw, pomoloffist, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College.) 

44578. Pybus sp. (?) Malacese. Pear. 
44570. ZiNziDEB MioGA Roscoe. Zinziberaceae. 

Roots of a perennial Japanese herb about 3 feet high, both wild and 
cultivated, with nearly linear, smooth, membranaceous leaves up to 15 
inches long; white flowers in spikes 2 to Z\ inches long; and ovoid 
capsules. In summer and autumn the flowers, with the bracts, are 
eaten either raw or boiled ; they have a slight acid taste and an aromatic 
o<lor. (Adapted from Useful Plants of Japan, Agricultural Society of 
Japan, Tokyo, p. SO, and from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticul- 
ture, vol. 6, p. 35 U') 

44580. SoLANUM TUBEROSUM L. SolanacBJie. Potato. 

From Bogota, Colombia. Tubers presented by Mr. Jorge Ancizar. Received 
April 19, 1917. 

Papa criolla. Tubers shaped like the common potato, but only about an inch 
in shortest diameter. " The Creole potatoes come out in three months and are 
delicious fried with their skins." (Ancizar.) 

44581 to 44687. Ribes spp. Grossulariacece. Currant. 

From Ottawa, Canada. Plants presented by Mr. W. T. Macoun, Dominion 
Horticulturist, Central Experimental Farm. Received April 20, 1917. 

44581. Rises vulgare Lam. Garden currant. 

Cumberland. A strong, moderately spreading grower and one of the 
most productive currants. The bright scarlet fruits are acid, medium 
sized, of fairly good quality, and occur in bunches of average length, 
usually only about half filled. The season is medium. (Adapted from 
Macoun^ Bulletin 56, Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, p. 11.) 



28 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44581 to 44587— Continued. 

44582. Rises TTTLOiutx Lam. Garden currant. 

Large white, A strong, upright, early, productive currant, with pale- 
yellow, medium to large, briskly subacid fruits in medium to large, half- 
filled bunches. This currant is better than most in quality. (Adapted 
flrom Macoun, Bulletin 56, Central EmperimetUal Farm, Ottawa, Canada, 
p. 11) 

44583 to 44587. Rises niobuic L. Black currant. 

44583. Buddenborg, A strong-growing, moderately productive, late 
black currant, with large to very large, thick-skinned, subacid 
fruits of good quality and flavor and ripening fairly evenly. One 
of the largest fruiting varieties and one of the best in quality. 
(Adapted from Macoun, Bulletin 56, Central Experimental Farm, 
Ottawa, Canada, p. 16.) 

44584. Magnus. A strong-growing and very productive black cur- 
rant, with large, rather thick skinned, subacid fruits of good 
flavor and quality, in medium-sized clusters. It is promising be- 
cause of its productiveness, large size, and good quality. (Adapted 
from Macoun, Bulletin 56, Central Experimenta} Farm, Ottawa, 
Canada, p. 18.) 

44585. EcUpge. A rather strong growing, early, productive black 
currant, with medium to large, rather thick skinned, fairly tender, 
subacid fruits of good quality. (Adapted from Macoun, Bulletin 
56, Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Canada, p. 18A 

44586. Eagle, A strong-growing, productive black currant, with 
mostly large, moderately thick skinned, briskly subacid fiiiits of 
medium quality. It ripens somewhat unevenly and is not as good 
in quality as some others. (Adapted from Macoun, Bulletin 56, 
Central Experimental Farm, Ottaioa, Canada, p. 18.) 

44587. CoUins* Prolific. A strong-growing, productive Canadian 
black currant with mostly large, thick-skinned, acid fruits of 
medium quality, in large bunches. It ripens late and rather un- 
evenly, but is one of the best commercial varieties on the market 
(Adapted from Macoun, BuUetin 56, Central Experimental Farm, 
Ottatca, Canada, p. 11.) 

44688. DioscoREA sp. Dioscoreacefie. Yam. 

From Ogbomosho, Nigeria, West Africa. Tuber presented by Dr. O^rge 
Green. Received April 23, 1917. 

The natives plant yams following a good shower in the summer or dry season 
(November to March). Such a storm usually comes about the end of January. 
The yams are cut crosswise into sections about 3 inches thick, and these sections 
are cut longitudinally. Only one piece Is planted, about 4 Inches deep, In each 
of the hills or heaps, which are about 3 feet in diameter, 2 feet in height, and 
4 feet apart. A tuft of grass is placed on top of the hill to protect the planted 
yam from the sun, and soil is thrawn on to prevent the wind blowing the grass 
away. The vines are supported by stout sticks or often by broken cornstalks. 
Yams require about six months to mature, those planted in .January being ready 
for digging in July. Yams may be left in the ground for a week or two after 
the vines have died down. (Adapted from noic ly Dr. Green.) 



APBIL 1 TO JUNK 30, 1911. 29 

44689 and 44690. 

From Siena, Italy. Presented by Dr. AgllulfuB Preda, director, Botanic 
Garden, Unlyeraity ot Siena. Received April 28, 1917. 

44589. GoBNtrs CAPrrATA Wall. Gomacece. Bentham's cornel. 

' A deciduous or partially evergreen tree, native to the Himalayas and 
Obina, 30 to 40 or more feet high, of bushy habit, with opposite, leathery 
leaves 2 to 5 inches long and minute, inconspicuCTus flowers crowded in 
hemispherical masses about half an inch wide. The beauty of the inflo- 
rescence is in the four or six creamy-white or sulphur-yellow bracts which 
are about 2 inches long. The fruit forms a fleshy, strawberry-shaped 
crimson head a little more than an inch wide. The beauty of the flower 
bracts and of the fruits makes this an ezcell^it ornamental. (Adapted 
from Bean, Trees and Shruhs Hardy in the British Isles, vol. 1, p. 587, 
and Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol 2, p. 855,) 

" This species is now fruiting at several places in California, notably 
in the Golden Gate Park, at Niles, and at Palo Alto." (Fairchild.) 

See S. P. I. No. 42597 for previous introduction. 

44590. Ptebocabta itbaxinifolia (l4im.) Spach. Juglandacese. 
(P. caucasica Meyer.) 

A large, ^reading, ornamental tree, native to western Asia, growing to 
a height of 60 feet, with compound leaves 8 to 15 inches long, composed 
of 11 to 25 serrate leaflets; monoecious flowers in catkins; and small, 
l^seeded, winged nuts. It is hardy as far north as Massachusetts, but 
needs some protection when young. Although it thrives best In rich, 
moist soil, it will grow well in drier localities. (Adapted from Bailey, 
Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 5, p. 258S.) 

44691 to 44696. Styrax spp. Styracaceae. Storax. 

From Orleans, France. Plants purchased from Messrs. L4on Chenault & 
Sons. Received April 23, 1917. 

44591. Sttbax californicum Torr. 

An upright, branching shrub, usually about 6 feet high, with broad 
oval leaves from 1 to 21 inches long; whitish flowers in mostly 3-flowered 
racemes; and 1-seeded fruits. It is native to the Sacramento Valley in 
northern California and is the most northern species of the genus. It 
bears a strong resemblance to Styrax officinale of southern Europe, from 
which it differs by its fewer flowered racemes and thickened pedicels. 
(Adapted from John Torrey, in Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge^ 
vol, 6, p, 4.) 

44599. Styrax dasyanthum Perkins. 

A deciduous shrub or small tree, native to central China, with broadly 
oval or obovate pointed leaves 2 to 4 inches in length, and white flowers 
one-half to three-quarters of an inch long, produced in July in slender 
terminal racemes. It has proved hardy in the vicinity of London, 
Eni^nd. (Adapted from Bean, Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British 
Isles, vol. 2, p, 557,) 

44598. Stybax onriciNALE L. 

An ornamental shrub or small tree, with broadly oval or ovate leaves 
1 to 3 inches long; white, fragrant flowers appearing in June in short, 
terminal, few-flowered clusters ; and roundish fruits ; a native of Greece 
and Asia Minor at altitudes up to 3,600 feet. The fragrant resin known 



30 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44591 to 44595— Continued. 

as storax is obtained from this slimb by bruising tlie stem. Hardy in 
tbe southern United States. (Adapted from Bean, Trees and Shruh$ 
Hardy in the British Isles, vol, 2, pp. 559, 560, and from BaileVy Standard 
Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 6, p. S280,) 

44594. Stybax vettchiobum Hemsl. and Wlls. 

A small tree, 12 to 16 feet high, with lanceolate, taper-pointed, thin, 
downy leaves, 3 to 5 Inches long; and slender panicles of white flowers 
nearly an inch across, produced in groups at the ends of shoots from 
the uppermost leaf axi& Native to central China. It is hardy at Veitch's 
Nursery, Coombe Wood, England. (Adapted from Bean, Trees and 
Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles, vol. 2, p, 560,) 

44505. Stybax wilsonii Rehder. 

A very ornamental deciduous shrub, native to western China, 6 to 10 
feet high, twiggy and much branched, with ovate, green leaves half an 
inch to an inch long, usually ^itire, but sometimes with the ends three 
lobed or sparsely toothed. The solitary, nodding flowers are pure glisten- 
ing white, flve-eighths to three^uarters of an inch wide, produced in June 
on short stalks from the leaf axils. The shrub is remarkable in that it 
begins to flower when only a few inches high and 2 or 3 years old. It is 
probably hardy as far north as Philadelphia. (Adapted from Bean, 
Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles, vol, t, p. 560, and from 
Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 6, p. S279,) 

44596. Prosopis chilenjsis (Molina) Stuntz. MimosacesB. 

iP, juiifiora T>c,) Algaroba. 

From Oran, Salta, Argentina. Presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. Received 
April 19, 1917. 

"Late-fruiting black and white Algarohas from' the district at the junction 
of the Provinces of Salta, Catamarca, and Tucuman." {Damon,) 

See S. P. I. Nos. 44484 and 44435 for previous introduction and description 
of the black and white varieties of the Algaroba, This introdui-tion is a mix- 
ture of the two. 

44597 to 44599. So J a max (L.) Piper. Fabaceae. Soy bean. 

{Glycine hispida Maxim.) 

From Japan. Presented by Rev. Christopher Noss, Wakamatsu, Iwashiro, 
Japan. Received April 23, 1917. 

"Under date of November 24, 1916, you asked that I should obtain for 
you a quantity of the Hato-koroshi^daizu soy bean for experimental planting. I 
inquired at Kawamata, the town where I first found this variety, and asked 
our Japanese pastor to make a thorough search. No one could be found who 
knew anything about a bean called Hato-koroshi-daizu or who could exactly 
match the sample. Finally the pastor sent me 6 quarts of a variety which, 
he said, seemed to be about the same. This variety is called Uba^na-kantsu- 
bushi (nurse's mastication), referring to its flattened shape, as though mashed 
between the teetli of a nurse for a little child. (Japanese mothers and nurses 
are accustomed to masticate food that is hard before feeding it to their little 
ones.) 

" I appealed to another of my Japanese workers, who Is a graduate in agri- 
culture and has served the Government as an agricultural expert. He undertook 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1W7. 31 

to find the bean for me and made one special trip to look it up. He, too» 
reported that he could not find Hato-koroshi-daizu, and that the variety which 
seemed to be id^itlcal with it was in his district called Shiroishi (white stone, 
the name of a noted river in northern Japan). Of this variety he sent me about 
4 quarts, which he said was all that he could fldd. 

■* I wrote to the chief agricultural school in my province and to the leading 
seedsman of Sapporo, the place from which we generally buy seeds for use In 
the north, apd could find no trace of Hato-koroahi-daizu. 

" I Judge that the bean must have come from the south." (Noss.) 

44597. From Wakamatsa. 44690. From Kawamata. 

44598. From Odaka. 

44600 to 44606. Saccharum officinarum L. Poacese. 

Sugar cane. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad, British West Indies. Cuttings presented 
by Mr. J. de Verteuil, Superintendent of Field Experiments, Department 
of Agriculture. Received April 27, 1917. 

Introduced for the Sugar Experiment Station, New "Orleans, La. . 
44600. BadUla (New Guinea No, 15). 

44601. 3-9922. 44604. BSiSO, 

44602. B-mi* 44605. B-68S5, 
44608. B-eSOS, 44606. Ba. 6032, 

44607 to 44609. Cortlus avellana L. Betulacese. Filbert. 

From Angers, France. Plants purchased from Mr. Charles D^trJchC. Re- 
ceived April 11, 1917. 

44607. Oeante des HaUes, 44609. Proliflque d coque serr^e, 

44608. Barcelona, 

For illustrations showing a fruiting branch and a growing tree of the Bar- 
celona filbert, see Plates III and IV. 

44610. Mammea AMERICANA L. Clusiacese. Mamey. 

From New Orleans, La. Obtained in the marliet by Mr. C. V. Piper, of the 
Department of Agriculture. Received April 20, 1917. 

A large and unusually handsome West Indian tree of erect, compact habit, 
with glossy, dark-green, leathery leaves, fragrant white flowers, and globose 
msaet fruits 8 to 6 inches in diameter. The tree is widely cultivated for its 
edible fruits, which are eaten raw or cool^ed, the flavor suggesting that of 
the apricot. They have a thiclc leathery rind and firm yellow flesh inclosing 
several large seeds. 

44611 to 44622. Saccharum officinarum L. Poacese. 

Sugar cane* 

From the Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. Adn. Hernandez, director^ 
Bureau of Agriculture, Manila. Received April 25, 1917. 

The following varieties were grown at the Alabang Stoclc Farm Station, 
Alabang, Rizal, P. I., and were imported for experimental purposes for the 
sugar exi>eriment station. New Orleans, La. 



32 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44611 to 44622— Continued. 

"Hawaii No. 20 and Louisiana Striped are the most extensively caltivated 
varieties of sugar cane in the Philippines. The yield per hectare (2.47 acres) 
in cane and the sugar content of these varieties is about 100 metric tons and 
18 per cent, as compared with the yield of the best Philippine variety {Kegrot 
Purple), 80 metric tons per hectare and a sugar content of 14 per cent*' 
(Weater, Food Plants of the Philippines,) 

44611. Chenois, 44614. Hatcaii 20 X Saieaii 809. 

44612. Hawaii 20. 44615. Hawaii 27 X Hawaii S09. 

44613. Hatcaii 20. 44616. Java 2i7. 

44617. Lahaina. "Long straight leaves of light color; rapid grower, 
deep rooting ; hard rind when mature ; superior richness of juice ; firm, 
compact fiber, making the trash easy to handle." (Deerr and Eckart, 
Bulletin 26, Hawaiian Sugar-Planters* Association Experiment Station,) 

44618. Lahaina X Yellow Caledonia, 

44619. Louisiana Striped. 

44620. Louisiana Striped X Lahaina. 

44621. New Guinea 15, or BadiUa. 

44622. Yellow Caledonia. 

44623 and 44624. Chatota eduus Jacq. CucurbitaceaB. 

{SecHum edule Swartz.) Chayote. 

From Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Fruits presented by Mr. 
George Yalder, director, Department of Agriculture. Received June 80, 
1017. 

" The two varieties grown in New South Wales." (Valder.) 

44628. White variety. 4465M. Green variety. 

44626 to 44628. Persea americana Mill. Lauraceea. Ayocado. 

(P. gratissima Gaertn. f.) 

From Guatemala. Bud wood collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural 
explorer. Received April to June, 1917. 

44625. "(Nos. Ill, 121, 139. Avocado No. 18.) Panchoy.* "This is a 
very thick skinned fruit of unusually good quality. It is rather above 
medium size, weighing 15 to 18 ounces, and is of pleasing form— broadly 
obovoid. Perhaps its most striking characteristic is Its unusually thick 
skin ; but its quality deserves even more notice, for in this respect it 
is one of the very best in the collection. The seed Is small. 

"The parent tree is growing In the flnca La Polvora in Antigua, 
Guatemala. The altitude is approximately 5,100 feet. The ground 
beneath the tree is planted in coffee bushes, which are now about 
8 feet high. The soil Is rich sandy loam, friable, black, and fer- 
tile. The tree is about 45 feet high, with a straight trunk 18 inches 

* This and other varietal names for Mr. Popenoe's Guatemalan avocados are arbitrarily 
selected from appropriate words in the Maya language, the language of one of the most 
remarkable races of Central America, whose ruins and agricultural practices show it to 
have been peculiarly an agricultural race. It seems entirely fitting that to this race 
should be given the credit for first appreciating this distinct type of avocado, and no 
better way could be found than that of attaching to these varieties Maya names which 
some day may be as commonly used as Bartlctt pear or Baldwin apple are used to-day in 
sections of this country. Furthermore, the names will indicate the Guatemalan origTji of 
these plants as English names could not. 



entory SI, Seeds and Plants In 



liip 



iss|li 

IfHi 



antory 51. Seeds and Plm 



A YouNQ Tree of the Barcelona Filbert. 



'olix Gillette, of Nevada Clly, ralit., khs a pinnrvr Id thp introdu^lion of the fllb«rt inio tbe 
FapJAc coast regloo. His roilceilon of rarlctle.^, in viitcli tho niireitu of PJaat Induslr)- «m- 
trlbutcd, vus mntntaincd for some time Bftn his death. From It, I^f. A. A. Quambere, of 
VannnivM-. Wuh.. Dblalncd Some of the first plants of his filbert collDctiDQ, which Is nov 
: ono In this roimtrr. Tbe iucrrssliu Interest Iti Qlberl eroving In the 
"'""'" '■'^—'-bI photograph ottho Iwfrtonlng of the industrT wortb 
HitcbM, at Nevada City, IMit., 1801: P149SF8.1 



puMMUng, (Photographed by l)atid Pam? 



NUMBERINQ A SELECTED AVOCADO TO AVOID ERRORS IN CUTTINO BUO WOOD. 

This tree li (he Fancbor eeMHnt. Mr. Popeuoe's seleclioa No. 18. It is one of the eirelliMit 
varlvtie« found In Ouatemala. Ur. Pop«ioe empToyed the method ol cutting a number In the 
bark to mark his selected seedling trees. This enabled him to cut several lots ol bud nood at 



A Guatemalan Girl Holding a Cluster of Tumin Avocados. 

Tills varli^ty, ihe Tiimln, is now living pcopaEali^I fn Florida and CalllOTDia from bud wood 
olitalDPd >iy Mr. I'opfnw Croni (he tree which vifllilod the (nilis shov,Ti here. The TiunlD 
avnrado is iinii.<uall; produrtive, its Iruli.s itrovini: in clusters of tuo to six. these fruits 
resemUB cltrvlv In form the Tiapp I'ariety. wrieh about a pound, and hare a smooth, 
glossy, purplp^lilark skin. Thev are of Eiwd quality. ( t'hotwraphed by Wilroa Popcnoe, 
Antigua, (iuatfniala, February i!4, 1917: Pl71l'/FS.j 



APBH. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917, 83 

44626 to 44628— Continued. 

thick at the base, glying off its first branch 18 feet from the ground. 
The crown is not very broad, but open and sparsely branched, some of 
the limbs showing a tendency to droop. The age of the tree is not 
definitely known, but it is probably 15 to 20 years. The character of 
bud wood produced by the tree is fairly satisfactory; the growths 
are short, but the buds are well formed and show no t^idency to drop. 

" Lacking a definite test in the United States, it must be assumed 
that the variety is about average in hardiness. The climate of Antigua 
is not sufficiently cold to demonstrate the hardiness of a variety. 

"The flowering season is February and March. The fruit ripens 
rather early for this region, the first ones commencing to drop in 
February, while a few hang on until April or May. The season may be 
called January to April. This rather early season of ripening is of 
especial importance to California, and the variety should be given a 
careful trial in that State. The productiveness of the variety is satis- 
factory. The crop which ripened in the spring of 1917 was good, but 
few fruits were set from the blooms of 1917. This is nothing unusual, 
since the Guatemalan race of avocado does not as a rule bear heavily 
every year. 

'* The fruit is broadly obovoid, 1 pound in weight, round and yellow- 
ish green on the surface, with a skin almost as thick as a coconut shell, 
but easily cut The fiesh is almost as yellow as butter, clean and free 
from discoloration, and of very rich flavor, while the seed is compara- 
tively small and tight in the cavity. The variety has every appearance 
of being an excellent one. 

"The fruit may be formally described as follows: Form obovoid, 
slightly oblique at the apex ; size above medium to large, weight 15 to 
18 ounces, length 4i inches, greatest breadth 3i inches ; base rounded 
or obscurely pointed ; stem stout, 4 inches long, inserted obliquely with- 
out depression ; apex obliquely flattened, depressed around the stigmatic 
point; surface heavily pebbled to rough, green to yellowish green in 
color, with numerous small, rounded, yellowish dots; skin thick, about 
one-eighth of an inch throughout, not thicker toward the apex than 
near the base, as in many avocados, woody, very brittle; flesh flrm, 
smooth, rich yellow in color, tinged with green near the skin, flber or 
discoloration entirely lacking, the flavor very rich and pleasant ; quality 
excellent; seed medium sized or rather smaU, roundish conic in form, 
weighing 2 ounces, tight in the cavity, with both seed coats adhering 
closely." (Popenoe.) 

For an illustration of the Panchoy avocado, see Plate V. 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual 
Report of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 127, flg. 23 ; re- 
print, 1918, p. 26, flg. 23 ; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture Bulletin No. 743, p. 64, pi. 17. 

44626. "(Nos. 112, 119, 141. Avocado No. 21.) Benik. This is a very 
handsome fruit of fine quality. When cut in halves the contrast of its 
purplish maroon skin with its rich yellow flesh is very attractive, the 
purple of the skin intensifying the yellow of the flesh. The tree is a 
good bearer, and the variety seems well worthy of a trial in the 
United States. 

"The parent tree is growing in the flnca La Polvora in Antigua, 
Guatemala. It has recently been girdled, with the intention of killing 

5062^-22 3 



84 SBEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44626 to 44628-X7ontmued. 

it to make room for more coffee bushes, so that it will probably not be 
in existence a year hence. The altitode here is about 5,100 feet The 
tree stands among cofl^ bushes, many of which grow boieath its 
branches. The soil is a loose sandy loam, deep and fertile. The tree 
is about 85 feet high, the trunlc 18 inches in diameter at the base, and 
the first branches 12 feet from the ground. The crown is round, dense, 
of good form, but hifi^ above the ground. The age of the tree is not 
known, but it would appear to be at least 20 years. The growth is 
vigorous and shapely, though the branchlets are rather short The 
bud wood furnished by the tree is quite satisfactory, the eyes being 
well developed and not losing their outer bud scales or falling early. 
The bud sticks, however, are short 

" The hardiness of the variety must be considered about average until 
the facts can be ascertained by a test in the United States. Antigua is 
not cold enough to show up the hardiness of an avocado of the Guate- 
malan race. 

" The tree flowers in late February and March. It ripened a fairly 
good crop of fruit in 1917 from the 1916 blooms, and set a very heavy 
crop to ripen in 1918. Its productiveness, therefore, seems to be above 
the average. The season of ripening is from February, when the 
fruits change from green to purple and thus indicate their maturity, 
to May, when the last fruits fall to the ground. It is a midseason sort, 
commencing to ripen a trifle earlier, perhaps, than the average. 

"The fruit is broadly obovold to pear shaped, about 20 ounces in 
weight, with a rough surface of rich purplish maroon color. It pre- 
sents a very attractive appearance. The skin is rather thin and some- 
what pliable, but coarsely granular in texture. The flesh is rich 
cream yellow in color, free from discoloration, and of very rich, pleasant 
flavor. The seed \b medium sized and tight in the cavity. 

"A formal description of the fruit is as follows: Form broad pyri- 
form to obovoid; size very large, weight 20 ounces, length 5 inches, 
greatest breadth 3} inches; base pointed, the stem inserted obliquely 
without depression; apex rounded, slightly d^ressed immediately 
around the stigmatic point; surface pebbled to rather rough, deep 
purplish maroon in color, almost glossy, with few inconspicuous, light- 
colored dots ; skin rather thin for this race, about one-sixteenth of an 
inch throughout, fairly pliable and peeling from the flesh when fully 
ripe, the purplish maroon color of the surface extending dear through 
the skin ; flesh rich cream yellow in color, changing to pale green dose 
to the skin, firm, of rich flavor ; quality excellent ; seed medium rized. 
weighing about 3 ounces, roundish conical, tight in the cavity, with 
both seed coats adhering closely.*' {Popenoe.) 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual 
Report of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 129, fig. 25; 
reprint, 1918, p. 25, fig. 25 ; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture Bulletin No. 743, p. 57, pi. 18. 

44627. "(Nos. 113, 120. 140, 163, 225. Avocado No. 20.) Tumin. Tliis 
variety is remarkable for its unusual productiveness, the fruits often 
being borne in clusters of two to five, a characteristic which is quite 
rare in the Guatemala race. The fruit is almost identical with the 
Florida Trapp in form ; it weighs almost a pound, and is of handsome 
appearance, with a smooth, glossy skin of purple-black color. The 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 35 

44626 to 4462&— Continued. 

flesh is of excellent appearance and flavor. The seed is medium sized. 
Taken all around, this seems a very promising variety, especially for 
Florida, where many of the Guatemalan avocados do not hear heavily. 

"The parent tree is growing in the finca La Polvora in Antigua, 
Guatemala. The altitude is approximately 6,100 feet. On all sides of 
the tree; and crowding it somewhat, are large coffee hushes. The soil 
is a rich, sandy loam of volcanic origin, deep and friable. The tree 
is probably 6 or 7 years old. It is 20 feet in height, very slender in 
habit, the trunk 6 inches through at the base, branching at 8 feet from 
the ground. The crown is slender, sparsely branched, with very little 
fruiting wood. Its growth seems to be reasonably vigorous, the young 
branchlets being stout, though very short. The wood is rather brittle. 
The bud wood furnished by this tree is rather poor, owing to the 
shortness of the growths and the fact that the buds are too closely 
crowded together. The eyes, however, are well formed and show no 
tendency to drop and leave a blind bud. It may be found that the tree 
will require training when young to keep it stocky and of good form. 

** The hardiness of the variety can not be ascertained at present, 
since the climate of Antigua is not cold. It may be assumed, untU a 
test is made in the United States, that it is about as hardy as the aver- 
age of the Guatemalan race. 

''The tree did not flower in 1017, owing, quite likely, to the heavy 
crop which it ripened from the 1916 blooms. Probably under better 
cultural conditions and by thinning heavy crops greater regularity in 
bearing can be induced; in Guatemala, where no cultural attention is 
given to the trees, it is common for them to bear very heavily one 
season and fail to bear the next. Judging by the appearance of the 
spring flush of growth, which always accompanies the flowers, the 
variety will flower here in March. The fruits ripen from March to 
May. Although the tree has very little fruiting wood, it produced 
125 fruits in 1917, which can be considered a very heavy crop. Several 
of the branches, in fact, were broken by the weight of the fruits they 
were carrying. 

"The form of the fruit, as already mentioned, is practically the 
same as that of the Trapp — oblate or roundish oblate. The average 
weight Is 12 to IG ounces, but it may be expected that the weight of 
this and all other varieties in the collection will be slightly greater 
under good culture in the United States than it is in Guatemala, 
where the trees receive no attention. The skin Is rather thin and 
smooth on the surface. The color is a deep purple, almost black. 
Unlike most Guatemalan avocados, the surface possesses a decided 
glossiness. The flesh is rich yellow in color, free from discoloration 
or fiber, and of very rich flavor. The seed varies from small to slightly 
large. In this connection it may be noted that the seeds of round or 
oblate avocados frequently are found to vary considerably in size, 
even among the fruits of a single tree. In this particular variety the 
average is not large, but occasional fruits were found in which the 
seed was a trifle too large. In others it is comparatively small. It is 
always tight in the cavity. 

" The following is a formal description of the fruit : Form roundish 
oblate or oblate; size medium to above medium; weight 12 to 15 
ounces, length Si inches ; greatest breadth 31 to 3f inches ; base rounded. 



36 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBXED. 

44626 to 44628— Continued. 

the very short, stout stem inserted without depression and almost 
squarely; apex flattened, not depressed; fruits borne singly or in 
clusters of two to six ; surface almost smooth or very lightly pebbled, 
deep purple in color, glossy, with very numerous minute yellowish 
dots; skin thin for this race, one-sixteenth of an inch at apex and 
slightly less toward the base of the fruit, pliable, peeling readily; 
flesh firm, smooth, rich cream yellow changing to pale green near 
the skin, free from fiber or discoloration, and of rich, pleasant flavor; 
quality excellent; seed roundish oblate, variable in size, weighing 1} 
to 3, commonly 2, ounces, tight in the cavity, with both seed coats ad- 
hering closely to the cotyledons." (Popenoe,) 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual 
Report of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 128, fig. 24; 
reprint, 1918, p. 25, fig. 24 ; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture Bulletin No. 743, p. 55. 

For an illustration of fruits of the Tumin avocado, see Plate VI. 

44628. "(No. 114. Avocado No. 19.) Hunapuh. From the finca La 
Polvora in Antigua, Guatemala. Altitude approximately 5,100 feet. 

"A fruit of large size and attractive appearance, with a comparatively 
small seed. The quality, while fairly good, did not seem to be up to 
the standard of those included in the Guatemalan collection, hence the 
variety is not recommended for general distribution with the rest. 
However, on the possibility that it may prove to be of better flavor 
when grown under more favorable conditions, bud wood has been 
sent in for trial at the Plant Introduction Garden, Miami, Fla., and 
perhaps at one or two places in Oalifomia. 

" Form obovoid to ovoid ; size extremely large, weight 1^ to 1} 
pounds, length 5 to 5i inches, greatest breadth 4 inches ; base rounded, 
the very short, stout stem inserted without depression, slightly oblique ; 
apex rounded, very slightly depressed close to the stigmatic point ; sur- 
face almost smooth to lightly pebbled, dull purple in color, with numer- 
ous minute yellowish dots; skin thick, one-eighth of an inch toward 
the apex of the fruit, slightly less near the base, coarsely granular, 
brittle; flesh firm, creamy yellow in color, changing to pale green near 
the skin, free from fiber and with very slight discoloration, the flavor 
pleasant but not very rich; quality fair to good; seed oblong conic, 
rather small, weighing 2 ounces, tight in the seed cavity, with both 
seed coats adhering closely ; season early to midseason or rather late, 
February to June." (Popenoe.) 

44629 to 44637. AMYGOAiiUS persica L. Amygdalacese. Peach. 

(Prumts persica Stokes.) 

From Genoa, Italy. Obtained through Mr. David F. Wilber, American 
consul general. Received April 26, 1917. 

Seeds of the following varieties of peaches were obtained in response to a 
request from Mr. W. F. Wight, of the Oflice of Horticultural and Pomological 
Investigations, for botanical study and breeding experiments. 

44629. B(^8oina di Polcevera (from Cesino). August 

44630. Bascina di Polcevera (from Llvellato). August. 

44631. Oialla di Cesimo (Cesino Yellow). August. 



APBHi 1 TO JUNE 30, 1&17. 87 

44629 to 44637— Continued. 

44632. OiaUa Qrigui (Yellow Grigui from S. Oipriano). August 

44633. Qrigui (from S. Cipriano.) Early. 

44634. Ro99a Basoina Tardiva (Late Bascina from Maneseno, S. Cipri- 
ano, Vallee Calda). 

44635. Rosm ComM di Comago (Red Combi from Oomago). Early. 

44636. Bossa Tardiva Grigui (Late Red Grigui from S. Cipriano). 

44637. Trionfo Primaticcia (Early Triumph). " Light yellow pulp, fruit 
maturing in June. Tree large and prolific.** {Fratelli Ingegnoli, 
Catalogo Oenerale, 19H, p. 79.) 

44638 to 44648. Bibes spp. Grossulariacese. 

From Saonara (Padua), Italy. Plants purchased from Fratelli Sgara- 
vatti. Received April 26, 1917. 

44638 to 44640. Rises nigrum L. Black currant. 

44638. Ca99i8 Oialla. " Medium - sized fruit, yellowish hrown." 
(Sgaravatti catalog.) 

44639. Neapolitana {Bang Up), A strong-growing, moderately pro 
ductive hlack currant, with rather large fruits In medium-sized 
bunches. The flavor is briskly subacid, and the quality a little 
above the average. (Adapted from Macoutij Bulletin 56 j Central 
Experiment Station, OttatDa, Ca^iada.) 

44640. Regina Vittoria, {Victoria,) A rather vigorous, moderately 
productive, rather late black currant, with large or very large 
thick-skinned subacid fruits in large bunches. The quality is 
good, but the fruit ripens somewhat unevenly. (Adapted from 
Macoun, Bulletin 56, Central Experiment Station, Ottawa, Canada.) 

44641 to 44648u Ribes vulgare Lam. Garden currant. 

44641. Bella di Veraaglia ro8sa (red). " Long bunches, fruit large.** 
{Sgaravatti catalog, October, 1908.) 

44642. Bella di Versaglia bianca (white). "Long bunches, fruits 
large." {Sgaravatti catalog, October, 1908.) 

44643. Camea. "Red, lax." {Sgaravatti catalog, October, 1908.) 

44644. Ciliegia a frutto rosso (red-fruited cherry). 

44^5. D'Ollana bianca (White Dutch). A moderately productive, 
fairly vigorous, white currant with uneven, pleasantly acid fruits 
in large, well-filled bunches. (Adapted from Macoun, Bulletin 56, 
Central Experiment Station, Ottaxca, Canada,) 

44646. D'Ollana rossa (Red Dutch). A vigorous, spreading, very 
productive red currant with snnall to medium-sized acid fruits in 
large bunches. (Adapted from Macoun, Bulletin 56, Central Ex- 
periment Station, Ottawa, Canada.) 

44647. Qrossa bianca de Werder (Werder*s large white). 

44648. Qrossa perla rossa (large pearl red). 



38 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44649 to 44667. Aktgdalus persiga L. Amygdalaceae. Peach. 

(PrunuM periioa Stokes.) 

From Palermo, Italy. Obtained through Mr. Samuel H. Shank, American 
consul. Received April 26, 1917. 

These peach varieties were sent in response to a request for peach seeds for 
the botanical studies and breeding experiments of the Office of Horticultural and 
Pomological Investigations. 

44649. Fragolara, From the Macchlarelle estates. Early. 

44650. Fragolara selvatica. From garden at Bagheria. 

44651. MarUlina. From Passo di Rigano, near Morano. Early. 

44652. ManUina, From garden of Rossi Ignacio. Early. 

44658. Pesca agosHna (August peach). From garden at Trabia. Good 
quality. Native name Bervaggia tardia (late servaggia). 

44654. Pesca Martorana. From garden at Trabia. Oood quality. 

44655. Pesca Martorana, From gard«i at Ficorotti, near Macchlarelle. 

44656. Rossa Martorana (red Martorana). From gardens at Macchla- 
relle and Ficorotti. 

44657. Settembrino (S^tember). From Scillata. Gollected by Prof. 
Accarati. 

44658 and 44659. Rollinia mucosa (Jaoq.) Baill. Annonaoeae. 

Birib&. 

From Para, BraziL Presented by Dr. J. SimAo da Costa. Received April 
28. 1917. 

Two s^;>arate packages. " I can not assert that they are different varieties, 
but the outward appearance of the fruits from which they were extracted was 
so different that I thought I would send them separately.*' (Do Costa,) 

A small tree, with oblong, pointed leaves and compound, fleshy fruits with 
glabrous tuberded skins and edible, viscous pulp of rather poor flavor; it re- 
sembles the common custard-apple, Annona reticulata, in habit Native of 
the island of Martinique, French West Indies. (Adapted from Bailey, Stand- 
ard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 5, p. 2975.) 

44658. No.l. 44659. No. 2. 

44660 to 44670. 

From Nanking, China. Presented by Prof. Joseph Bailie, of the University 
of Nanking. Received April 27, 1917. 

44660. Acer bxtebgebianum Miquel. Aceracese. ICaple. 

{A, trifidum Hook, and Arn., not Thunb.) 

"Gollected in open land, Nanking, December, 1916. Chinese name 
Ta f^g (forked maple)." {BaiUe,) 

A large tree, with glabrous branches, 3-lobed, bright-green, papery 
leaves with entire margins; inconspicuous greenish flowers appearing at 
the same time as the leaves ; and glabrous fruits up to 2 cm. (four-flfths 
of an inch) in length. (Adapted ftom Koidzumi, Journal of the CoUege 
of Science, Imperial University of Tokyo, vol. 92, pt. 1, p. 29, pU 17,) 



APBIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1W7. 39 

44660 to 44670— Continued. 

44661. AuEUBiTES FOSDn Hemsl. Euphorbiaces. Tung-oil tree. 

Collected on a mountain, Chekiang, November 14 to 80, 1016. Chinese 
name Yu fungJ* {BaiUe.) 

**A rapid-growing, broad-leaved deciduons tree which attains a height 
of 25 to 35 feet. It is said to be comparatively short lived. Clusters 
of pinkish white flowers are produced Just as the leaves begin to come 
out in the spring and are followed by green or reddish fruits somewhat 
larger than the fruit of the black walnut. The fruits contain the large 
nutlike oily seeds ft'om which tung oil, a valuable drying oil, is ex- 
pressed. The oil constitutes about 24 per cent (by weight) of the seeds, 
or about 40 per cent of the kernels from which the shells have been 
removed. The tree appears to be particularly well adapted to the sandy 
clay soils and climate of northwestern Florida and the adjacent regions 
of Alabama and Georgia." {R. A, Young.) 

44662. QUEBCUS sp. Fagaceffi. Oak. 

" From Anhwei, November 14 to 30, 1916. Collected by students of Nan- 
king University.'* (Bailie.) 

44663. Castanopsis sclebophtlla (Lindl.) Schottky. Fa.gace8p. 
(Querou8 9clerophyUa LindL) 

'* From grave land on a mountain, Chekiaug, November 14 to 30, 1916. 
Obtained from natives by students of tb» university. Chinese name K*u 
ehu tzik (bitter acorn)." (BaiUe.) 

An evergreen tree 25 to ((5 feet tall, growing in the woods of Hupeh and 
Chekiang, China, at altitudes up to 1,500 m. (5,000 feet). It is a hand- 
some tree with nearly smooth, dark-gray bark and a densely branched 
flattened crown. The natives gather the nuts and crush them, making an 
edible paste resembling bean curd in appearance and the chinkapin in 
flavor. (Adapted from Bargeni, Plantae WUsonianae, vol. 9, p. tOl.) 

44664. Cataip A bunqbi Meyer. Bignoniaceae. 

'* From open land, Chekiang, Chhia, November 14 to 80, 1916. Chinese 
name TziL" (BaUie.) 

A quick-growing Chhiese tree, up to 100 feet in height, with a trunk 
10 to 15 feet in circumference a few feet above the ground. The wood, 
which is strong, light, durable, and nonwarping, resembles walnut to a 
large extent and is in much demand for fine furniture. The tree might be 
cultivated in the semiarid sections of the United States where the winters 
are not too severe. It prefers a porous soil and is easily propagated from 
suckers which spring up from the roots that are near the surface of tht. 
ground. (Adapted from a note of Frank N. Meyer under 8. P. /. No. 
S&^4.) 

44665. Belis laucbolata (Lamb.) Sweet Pinaceffi. 
iOunninghamia sinensis R. Br.) 

*' Collected on a mountain, C!hekiang, November 14 to 80, 1916. Chinese 
name Bhan shu (pine tree) .'* (Bailie. ) 

" This handsome tree is found all over the temperate parts of China 
from sea level up to 2,000 m. altitude, but does not occur where the 
winters are severe It is abundant in Fukien, Hunan, Hupeh, and more 
especially in western Szechwan, where it is partial to red sandstone and 
forms pure forests. The trunk is mastlike; and the branches are 



40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44660 to 4467a-Continued. 

numerous, slender, short, and horizontally spreading, giving a lax pyram- 
idal appearance to the tree. The leaves, usually dark green above, are 
frequently more or less glaucescent. After trees are felled i^routs 
spring from the old stumps and develop Into new trees. This peculiarity 
explains why this tree is still common in regions near densely populated 
areas. 

" Gunnlnghamia is the Bhan $hu of the Chinese and is esteemed the most 
useful of all their timber trees. The wood is fragrant, soft, and easily 
worked ; and it is extensively employed in all branches of carpentry, in 
general construction work, for pillars and planking, and as masts for 
native boats. It is also the principal coffin wood of central and western 
China, the fragrant properties being considered to act as a preservative. 
In parts of western Szechwan, notably in the Chienchang Valley, and in 
the valley of the Tung River a few days' Journey west of Fulin, whole 
forests of this tree were engulfed by an earthquake two or three centuries 
ago. The wood of these trees is to-day mined and furnishes the most 
valuable of all coffin material. From these logs, known as Haiang-mm 
(fragrant wood) or Yin-ch^mu (long-buried wood), planks of huge size 
can be cut, and a coffin made of them sells for a thousand to fifteen 
hundred ounces of silver. This burled wood is pale brown, close in tex- 
ture, but easily worked and pleasantly fragrant. Trees of this conifer 
equaling in size those buried giants can not be found in China to-day 
except as rare and isolated specimens associated with temples or Bhrines.'* 
(Sargent, Plantae Wilaonianae, voL 2, p, 51,) 

M666. laQTHDAKBAA FOBMOs^NA Hauce. Hamamelidacese. 

" From open land, Oheckiang, November 14 to 30, 1916. Chinese name 
FSng hiiang (fragrant maple).*' (BaUie,) 

A handsome tree 20 to 40 m. (65 to 180 feet) in height, with a straight 
trunk, a much-branched head, and, frequently, buttressed roots. The 
leaves turn to a chestnut brown or red in the autumn and are retained 
late into the winter. In Juvenile plants the leaves are live lobed, while 
in the adult trees the leaves are only three lobed and are smaller. In 
Kiangsi the wood is used for* making tea chests. This is one of the most 
widely distributed trees in China, being particularly abundant in western 
Hupeh. It is cultivated in Japan. (Adapted from Sargent, Planiae 
WUsonianae, vol. i, p. J^iL) 

44667. Plattcabya strobilacea Sieb. and Zucc. Juglandacese. 

*' Collected on a mountain, Anhwei, November 14 to 80, 1016, by student? 
of the university. Chinese name Hua kuo shu." (BaUie.) 

A bush, small tree, or rarely a tree up to 65 feet in height, with thick» 
dark, and deeply furrowed bark. The branches are moderately thick and 
form a rounded or flattened head. The leaves, which are 8 to 12 inches 
long, are composed of 9 to 17 sessile, doubly serrate leaflets; the fruiting 
cones are oval, brown, and up to li inches in length. In Hup^ China, 
a black dye for cotton is prepared from the fruit. (Adapted from Bailey , 
Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 5, p. 2708, and from Sargent, 
Plantae WiUonianae, vol. S, p. 180,) 

44668. QuEBCUs sp. Fagacese. Oak. 

" From Kiangsi, November, 1916. Collected by Miss Holt'* (BaUie.) 

As many Chinese oaks have proved hardy and desirable trees in tiie 
United States, this may also prove of value. 



APEIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1911. 41 

44660 to 4467a-Contmued. 

44669. QuEBGUs vabiabilis Blume. Fagacese. Oak. 

"Bought from natives, Anhwei, November 14 to 80, 1016. Chinese 
name Ma li (hemp chestnut)." (Bailie.) 

A large tree, up to 25 m. (80 feet) in height, in mixed woods or form- 
ing pure stands at altitudes of 800 to 1,600 m. (2,600 to 5,200 feet) in 
central and western China. It has handsome, pale-gray, deeply fur- 
rowed bark, dark-green, crenately serrate leaves with bristlelike teeth, 
and almost sessile roundish acorns. This oak has proved hardy in 
Massachusetts and western New York. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard 
Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 5, p. 2S85, and from Sargent, Plantae 
MHlsonianae, vol. 5, p. 219, where it is doubtfully referred to Q. variath 
His.) 

44670. Tbachycaepus excelsus (Thunb.) Wendl. Phcenicacese. Palm. 

*' From open land in a vegetable garden, Cheklang, November 14 to SO, 
1016. Obtained by forestry students of the university. Chinese name 
T9vng Itt (tree whose bark furnishes clothes for poor people)." (BaUie,) 

A tall, robust, unarmed palm, clothed by the old leaf sheaths, with 
large, fan-shaped, finely cut leaves which eventually become 4 or 5 feet 
wide. The flowers are small, clustered two to four on tubercles in the 
leaf axils, and the fruits are roundish drupes. This ornamental palm 
is native to China, but is cultivated in many places in Asia and will 
grow in the open in the southern United States as far north as G^rgia. 
(Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 6, p, 
SS62, and from Flore des Serres et dea Jardina de VEurope, vol, 22, 
p. 207,) 

44671 to 44673. Annona (cherimola X squamosa) X RExicuiiATA. 

Aimonaceae. Cuatemoya. 

From Lamao, Philippine Islands. Cuttings presented by Mr. P. J. Wester, 
horticulturist in charge of the Lamao Experiment Station. Received 
May 7, 1017. 

The following hybrids were obtained by the pollination of an atemoya {A. 
cherimola X squamosa) by a custard-apple {A. reticulata). The fruit is well 
shaped but rather small, about the size of a sugar-apple, with a yellowish green, 
almost glabrous surface, very thick, tough skin, and white, tender, melting, 
Juicy, subacid, aromatic flesh of excellent flavor. (Adapted from Wester, Phil- 
ippine Agricultural Review, February, 1914,) 

44671. No. 3685-1. 44673. No. 3685-16. 
4467$^ No. 3685-2. 

44674 and 44e75, Pyrus spp. Malacece. Pear. 

From Ningpo, China. Cuttings obtained by Rev. L. C. Hylbert, American 

Baptist Mission, through Rev. G. W. Sheppard, English Methodist Mission. 

Received May 3, 1917. 

These cuttings were sent in response to a request for propagating material 

of certain pear trees from the island of Chusan which produce immense fruit 

Mr. Hylbert reports that " the cuttings were secured from a gentleman's garden 

and are said to be beyond price." 

44674. No. 1. 44675. No. 2. 



42 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44676. Ilex pabaquariensis St. Hil. Aquifolkceae. Terba matfi. 

From Oran, Salta, Argentina. Presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. Received 
June 80, 1017. 

'' Var. alba de Llamas. For planting these seeds, deep, porous, well-sifted 
earth should be prepared. The surface of the soil should be perfectly level. 
Sow in lines fairly w^l spaced, covering with half an inch of finely powdered 
earth containing much humus. Keep the planting with not less than 18 per 
cent or more than 32 per cent moisture. When the first young growth is noted 
protect it from the direct rays of the sun. Seeds will take from 6 to 12 months 
to germinate. The young plants need a damp soil and atmosphere and much 
protection from the direct rays of the sun, as they are very delicate until 2 years 
old. The plant requires a mean annual temperature of , about 72'' F. These 
seeds came from what is considered the best plantation in the world.'* {Damon.) 

44677 and 44678. 

From Yunnanfu, Yunnan Province, China. Purchased from Mr. Frank 
Pilson. Received June 25, 1917. 

44677. DocYNiA delavayi (Franch.) C. Schneid. Malacese. 

" ToH. Wild pear." (Pilson.) 

An ornamental, evergreen, spiny tree, up to 30 feet in height, with 
glossy, ovate-lanceolate leaves, 2 to 4 inches long, and umbels of white 
flowers which appear in the spring. The fruit is an ovoid pome about an 
inch long. The tree is a native of southwestern China and has recently 
been introduced into the subtropical regions of the United States. The 
fruits are more or less acid and are used for cooking. They could pos- 
sibly be improved by selection and hybridization. The tree is propagated 
by seeds and might possibly be grafted on apple stock. (Adapted from 
BaUey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticuliure^ vol. 2, p. 1063.) 

44678. QUEBCVS sp. Fagacese. Oak. 

** I sent back to Ssemao to get acorns of Quercus rex. Talifu Is 14 
days from here by sedan chair and Szemao 20, so that I found it neces- 
sary to enlist the aid of friends in securing these seeds." {Pilson.) 

Received as Querous re»^ but the material does not agree with that of 
this species previously received. 

44679 to 44681. Pessea americana Mill. Lauraceae. Avocado. 

(P. gratissima Qaertn. f.) 

From Guatemala. Bud wood collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural 
explorer. Received April to June, 1917. 

44679. "(Nos. 98, 158, 177. Avocado No. 22.) Kekehi. A remarkable 
little fruit, valuable not only for its earliness but also for its produc- 
tiveness and good quality. It commences to ripen in December, at least 
two months before most of the other avocados in the same region. 
Though small in siae, the seed is proportionately small, leaving a good 
amount of flesh of excellent quality. It has a very long ripening season, 
which suggests its use as a variety for the home gard^i. 

" The parent tree is growing in a sltio belonging to Santiago Men- 
doza, in the town of Purula, Department of Baja Vera Paz, Guate- 
mala. The altitude is approximately 5,150 feet The soil is a heavy 
clay loam. The tree stands on a slope, in the midst of a small patch of 
maize (Indian com). It is about 35 feet in height, with a trunk 2 feet 



APRIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 43 

44679 to 44681— Continued. 

thick at the base, branching about 10 feet from the ground. The crown 
is broad and spreading, but sparsely branched. .To Judge from the siae 
of the tree it must be at least 80 or 40 years old. It seems to be a vig- 
orous grower, the branchlets being stout, well formed, and of good 
length. The bud wood furnished by this tree is quite satisfactory, 
having well-developed eyes which do not show a tendency to drop and 
leave a blind bud. The tree is uncared for and has much dead wood 
in it 

"While Purula is scarcely higher than Antigua, it has a colder 
climate. It is not, however, sufficiently cold. to test the hardiness of 
avocado trees of the Guatemalan race. 

"The tree has not been seen in bloom, but probably flowers about 
February. In good seasons it carries an enormous crop of fruit This 
would be expected of a small-fruited variety. The first fruits turn 
color about the first of December and can then be picked. The height 
of the season, however, is not until February, at which time the fruits 
are fully mature. If allowed to remain on the tree, many of them 
hang until April or May. 

"The fruit is pear shaped or obovoid, small, weighing not over 6 
ounces (it will probably weigh more when grown under cultivation in 
California and Florida), somewhat rough on the surface, and maroon 
colored. The skin is thick and woody. The fiesh is yellow, sometimes 
slightly discolored with fiber streaks, but with no objectionable fiber. 
The fiavor is rich and pleasant. The seed is medium sized in com- 
parison with the size of the fruit In comparison with the seeds of 
most other 6-ounce fruits it would be called small. 

"The variety may be formally described as follows: Form broadly 
obovoid to pyriform ; size small, weight 6 to 6 ounces, length 3i to 3} 
inches, greatest breadth 2| to 2f inches; base tapering, the moderately 
stout stem, which is 5i inches long, being inserted slightly obliquely 
without depression; apex rounded or almost imperceptibly flattened; 
surface rough, deep dull purple-maroon or purple in color, with rather 
few small russet xlots; skin thick, one-sixteenth of an inch at base, 
nearly one-eighth of an inch toward the apex of the fruit, coarsely 
granular and woody in texture; flesh rich cream yellow, changing to 
pale green near the skin, sometimes marked with fiber traces but with- 
out any tough fibers, melting and buttery in texture, of very rich and 
agreeable fiavor; quality very good; seed roundish oblate, small to 
medium in size, weighing less than 1 ounce, tight in the seed cavity, 
with both seed coats adhering closely." (Popenoe.) 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual 
Report of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 130, fig. 26; 
reprint, 1018, p. 25, fig. 26; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture Bulletin No. 743, p. 68, pi. 19. 

44680. "(Nos. 99, 159, 178. Avocado No. 23.) Mayapan, This variety 
possesses several excellent commercial characteristics — ^round form, de- 
sirable size (nearly 1 pound), attractive purple color, thick, firm skin, 
and flesh of excellent quality. In this latter respect it is one of the 
very best varieties in the collection. The seed Is not large and the 
tree is very productive. It seems a very promising avocado. 

" The parent tree is growing in a sitio owned by Arcadio Saguirre, 
but now occupied by Eusebio Guzman, in the town of Purula, Depart* 



44 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44679 to 44681— Continued. 

ment of Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. The altitude of this town is 
approximately '5,150 feet. The soil is a heavy clay loam, black, very 
fertile, and retentive of moisture. The tree stands at the rear of a 
small garden, close to a hedge of chichicaste {Loiisa speoiosa). It ia 
slender, apparently not more than 15 to 20 years old, about 40 feet 
high, with a trunk 1 foot thick at the base. The crown is slender, but 
well branched, with an abundance of fruiting wood. The youn^ 
growths are quite vigorous and shapely, indicating that the variety 
will probably be a good grower. The bud wood from the parent tree 
is satisfactory, 4he branchlets being of good length, round, smooth, 
with the eyes well placed, strong, and not inclined to fall early. If the 
young trees show a tendency to grow tall and slender, they can easily 
be kept in hand by judicious pruning. 

'* The climate of Purula is colder than that of Antigua, though the 
altitude is about the same. It is not sufficiently cold, however, to 
test the hardiness of avocados of the Guatemalan race. It must be 
assumed that this variety is of average hardiness until it can be put 
to a test in the United States. 

"The flowering season of the parent tree is in March and early 
April. It blooms profusely and sets a heavy crop of fruit. The crop 
produced in 1917 from the 1916 blooms was very heavy, and another 
equally heavy crop w^as set from the 1917 blooms. The productiveness 
of the variety gives promise of being well above the average. The 
ripening season commences about the middle of March and extends 
to the first of July. It can probably be considered midseason or 
slightly later than midseason. 

" The fruits are of attractive round form, nearly a pound in weight, 
with a slightly rough surface of purple color. The skin is much thicker 
than the average, but not very brittle. The flesh is rich yellow in 
color, absolutely free from discoloration of any sort, dry and oily, 
cutting like soft cheese. The flavor is exceptionally rich and nutty. 
The seed is rather small and is tight in the cavity. The size of the 
fruit conforms admirably to hotel and restaurant requirements, where 
it is desired to serve a half fruit as a portion, and the quality is so 
unusually good that it would seem that this variety is of exceptional 
promise. 

"Following is a formal description of the fruit: From spherical to 
roundish obovoid, sometimes slightly oblique; size medium to above 
medium, weight 13 to 16 ounces, length 3| to 4 inches, greatest breadth 
3i to 3} inches; base rounded or obscurely pointed, the stem rather 
slender, 7 inches long, inserted obliquely, without depression; apex 
rounded or slightly flattened obliquely; surface decidedly rough, 
greenish purple to dull purple in color, with numerous large greenish 
yellow dots ; skin very thick, varying from as much as three-sixteenths 
of an inch near the stem, where it is thickest, to somewhat more than 
one-sixteenth of an inch near the apex, coarsely granular In texture, 
woody, but separating readily from the flesh at the right stage of ripe- 
ness ; flesh rich cream yellow in color, without fiber discoloration, firm, 
meaty, of rich and pleasant fiavor; quality excellent; seed oblate- 
spherical to spherical in form, medium sized, weighing 1} to 2 ounces, 
tight in the cavity, with both seed coats adhering closely to the smooth 
cotyledons." (Popenoe.) 



APBHi 1 TO JUNE 30, 191*7. 46 

44679 to 44681— Continued. 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, An- 
nual Report of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 131, fig. 27 ; 
reprint, 1918, p. 25, fig. 27 ; afld The Avocado In Guatemala, U. . S. 
Department of Agriculture Bulletin No. 743, p. 59, pi. 20. 

44681. "(Nos. 100, 160. Avocado No. 25.) Kayah. This is a variety of 
excellent quality and desirable shape. It resembles the Florida Trapp 
and the Chisoy (S. P. I. No. 43935) of this collection in form and 
size. Some of the specimens examined had large seeds, but the best 
ones had seeds v^hich could be termed medium sized or almost small in 
comparison with the size of the fruit. In small specimens of any 
variety the seed commonly appears large. This variety was not 
studied as thoroughly as some of the others, but it is considered well 
worthy of a trial in the United States. 

" The parent tree is growing in the cafetal of Francisco Muus called 
'Chiquitop' (Tres Chorros in Spanish), in the edge of the town of 
San Cristobal, Department of Alta Vera Paz, Guatemala. The altitude 
is about 4,Q00 feet. The soil is heavy reddish clay, which is very 
tenacious when wet. The tree stands among coffee bushes 6 to 8 feet 
bigh. It \fi about 40 feet in height, with the trunk 18 inches thick 
at the base, branching 12 feet from the ground. The crown is broad 
and spreading, well branched and dense. The branchlets are rather 
short, but of good appearance, being well formed and stout. The bud 
wood is good, but it is difilcult to get long bud sticks from the parent 
tree. The eyes are well developed and do not drop early. 

" Varieties growing at this altitude in Guatemala are not subjected 
to severe frosts; hence, there is no way of telling whether they are 
hardier than the average until they are tested in the United States. 

" The tree probably flowers in late February and March. It is said 
to fruit heavily, but at the time it was examined in 1917 only a few 
fruits were left on it The ripening season is from February to May, 
which is about the main season for avocados at San Cristobal. 

"The fruit is round, about a pound in weight, yellowish green in 
color, with a moderately thick skin. The flesh is yellow, clear, dry, 
of very rich flavor, and free from any discoloration. The seed is 
medium sized in large specimens, being rather large in some of the 
smaller specimens examined. In many instances the seed is placed 
to one side of the center of the fruit. 

"A formal description of the fruit follows : Form obliquely spherical, 
sometimes slightly narrowed toward pie base; size medium to very 
large; weight 14 to 20 ounces, length 3} to 4 inches, breadth 3| to 4 
Inches; base slightly flattened, oblique, the stem inserted obliquely 
without depression; apex obliquely flattened; surface pebbled, most 
conspicuously so around the base of the fruit, deep green to yellowish 
green in color, almost glossy with numerous small russet or yellowish 
dots ; skin moderately thick, one-sixteenth to one-eighth of an inch, hard 
and woody ; flesh cream yellow in color, without flber or discoloration, 
firm, dry, of very rich flavor; quality excellent; seed medium sized, 
weighing about 2 ounces, sometimes excentric, tight in the seed cavity, 
with both seed coats adhering closely to the cotyledons." (Popenoe.) 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual 
Report of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 132, flg. 28; 
reprint, 1918, p. 25, flg. 28 ; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture Bulletin No. 748, p. 60. 



46 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44682. Persea schiedeana Nees. Lauraceae. C!oy6. 

From Guatemala. Bud wood collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural 
explorer. Received April 26, 1017. 

" In the mountains of northern and eastern Guatemala there grows a fruit 
closely resembling the avocado yet suflSciently different in foliage and flower to 
indicate that it is a distinct species. In eastern Guatemala, around Zacapa* 
Gualan, Ghiqnimula, and El Rancho, it is called shucte, chuctet or sometimes ] 
chaucte, while In the northern part of the Republic, immediately across the 
great Sierra de las Minas, it is Icnown under the names coyd and coyoci^. These 
latter names have been thought by some to indicate two distinct fruits, perhaps 
distinct species, but an examination of several trees in the Alta Vera Paz 
shows that they are in reality the same. Apparently the Indians call the culti- 
vated fruit (for it is often grown in their gardens and around their huts) coy6, 
and the wild tree, which is abundant in the mountains, ooyoct4. The suffix ti 
in the Kekchi language Is said to mean tree; coyoct^ would therefore mean 
nothing more than coy6 tree. 

" In some sections of the Alta Vera Paz the coy6 is fully as common as the 
avocado and seems to be held by the Indians in practically the same high 
esteem. An American coffee planter who lives in this region tells me that be 
considers the coy6 even superior to the avocado in flavor, and after testing it 
I am inclined to agree with him. 

" The coy6 must be considered, then, an unusually interesting new fruit, but 
it has certain defects which make it seem, on the whole, inferior to the avocado. 
It has, for example, a large seed in most cases, and the flesh is sometimes dis- 
agreeably fibrous. But it is quite variable, like its relative the avocado, and 
some coy6s are much superior to others. 

" The coy6 tree looks, at first glance, much like an avocado tree and usually' 
reaches about the same size. It is distinguishable from the avocado by the 
character of its leaves which, upon close examination, differ from those of the 
avocado in form, are larger, and have more or less brownish pubescence on the 
lower surface, especially along the midrib. The flowers, when seen from a dis- 
tance, look like those of the avocado. 

"The fruits are remarkably similar in general appearance to avocados of 
the West Indian race, such as are grown in Florida. Like avocados, they vary 
greatly in form. Most commonly they are pyriform, with a well-defined neck,, 
but they are sometimes obovoid, sometimes broadly pyriform, and sometimes 
long and slender. They are also quite variable in size, but the majority seem 
to be from three-quarters of a pound to li pounds in weight. I have heard of 
coy 6s weighing 2 to 3 pounds. The surface is about as smooth as that of a 
West Indian avocado and often of similar color, yellowish green, but some- 
times it is purplish or bronze. The skin is thicker than that of any of the 
avocados except those of the Guatemalan race; it is not hard, however, as in 
the latter, but leathery and pliable. Frequently it adheres to the flesh, which 
is of a peculiar brownish white color, gives off a milklike juice when squeezed* 
and is of fine, oily texture like the flesh of an avocado. Usually there are 
numerous fibers running through the flesh, although some coy6s are said to be 
practically free from fiber. The flavor is strongly suggestive of the avocado* 
being of the same rich, nutty character, but is nevertheless distinct; it has a 
richness and nuttiness of its own, which suggest to me the flavor of a ripe 
coconut. The seed is larger in comparison to the size of tie fruit than it is 
in the best of our budded varieties of the avocado, but it is no larger than 
in many seedling avocados. In general appearance it resembles an avocado 
seed, but the cotyledons when cut are a dull rose pink instead of whit?sh. The 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 47 

flesh often adheres closely to the seed, making It difficult to prepare the coy6 
for eating. I have seen some fruits, however, in which the two halves could 
be separated, leaving a cavity In which seasoning can be placed. 

" The coy6 is used by the Indians of Guatemala in the same manner as the 
avocado, which is to say that it is eaten out of hand, without the addition of 
seasoning of any sort, and frequently to the accompaniment of tortillas— thin, 
round cakes made from Indian corn, which are a staple article of diet through- 
out this part of Central America. I have not yet experimented to see how the. 
coy6 tastes when prepared in salads or seasoned with vinegar, salt, and 
pepper, but I have found it excellent when diced and eaten ih bouillon, as is 
often done with the avocado by Guatemalans of the upper classes. To me its 
flavor is decidedly agreeable, and a good coy6, free from fiber and with a 
seed not too large in proportion to the size of the fruit, would impress me as a 
worthy rival of the avocado. 

" The tree grows under a variety of conditions. In the valley of the Motagua 
River, near Zacapa and El Rancho, it is found near the banks of streams. 
The air in these regions is exceedingly hot and dry during a large part of 
the year, and the hillsides are covered with typical desert vegetation — cacti, 
euphorbias, thorny leguminous shrubs, and small trees. Contrasted with these 
conditions, the upper Polochic Valley, in Alta Vera Paz, where the coy6 is 
exceedingly abundant, is a very moist region with rainfall, as the inhabitants 
state, 'thirteen months in the year.' In this part of Guatemala I have seen 
coy6s at altitudes well above 5,000 feet. Like the Guatemalan race of avocado, 
it is very abundant from 4,000 to 5,000 feet, but unlike the latter it seems also 
to do very well at lower altitudes and is found around Zacapa at altitudes of 
500 feet above the sea, where the Guatemalan race of avocados is usually re- 
placed by the West Indian. 

" To Judge from its behavior in Guatemala, the coy6 ought to be successful 
in both California and Florida. During the coming summer I hope to make a 
search for superior trees and to obtain bud wood for introduction into the 
United States. The season of ripening is from June to August in the lowlands 
and from August to October or even November in the highlands. There are 
thousands of trees in Alta Vera Paz, and it should certainly be possible to 
find among them a few superior ones well worthy of propagation. 

"In the coy6 we have a fruit new to North American horticulture, yet one 
which is grown by the Indians of northern Guatemala as extensively as the 
avocado and apparently looked upon by them as almost its equal. When good 
varieties have been obtained and propagated by budding, it seems reasonable 
to expect that the coy6 will find a place in the orchards of the United States 
throughout approximately the same belt in which the avocado is grown." 
(Popenoe.) 

For an illustration of the coy6 fruits, see Plate VII. 

See also The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. Department of Agriculture Bul- 
letin No. 743, p. 37. 

44683 and 44684. 

From Guatemala. Cuttings collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural 
explorer. Received April 26, 1917. 

44683. PoLYGALA FLOBiBUNDA Bcnth. PolygalacesB. Chupak. 

"(No. 102. From Chitzuhai, near Tactic, Alta Vera Paz. ^April 17, 
1917.) A handsome flowering shrub found in the gardens of the Indians 
In the settlement C9n«Hi nh^tzuhiii. about 5 miles north of the town of 



48 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44683 and 44684— Continued. 

Tactic, in the Department of AHa Vera Paz. Since the altitude Is about 
6,000 feet, the plant should be slightly hardy, and may succeed in Cali- 
fornia as well as in Florida. It reaches a height of about 8 feet; its 
leaves are narrow and about 3 inches long ; the flowers are borne in long 
spikes and are individually about half an inch la diameter and bright 
purple in color. The plant is used by the Indians in place of soap, the 
leaves when macerated in water making green suds.'* (Popenoe.) 

44684. RoNDELETiA RUFESCENs Roblnsou. RubiaceBB. 

"(No. 103. From Chitzuhai, near Tactic, Alta Vera Paz. April 11. 
1917.) A handsome pink-flowered shrub from the mountains north of 
Tactic, near the settlement of Chitzuhai, Alta Vera Paz, at an altitude 
of more than 6,000 feet. This plant grows among second-growth timber, 
where there is an abundance of sunlight. It is slender in habit, reach- 
ing a height of 8 feet or more, and bears large corymbs of small, ex- 
ceedingly fragrant flowers of a delicate shell-pink color. It seems well 
worthy of a trial In California and Florida." {Popenoe.) 

44685. AsTiLBE TAQUETi Vilm. Saxifragacese. 

From Paris, France. Plants purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. 
Received May 16. 1917. 

A very robust perennial herb, 2 to 2^ feet in height, with tripinnate, finely 
and doubly dentate leaves, and panicles of reddish purple flowers borne on 
stout flowering stems in July. The flowering stems are covered with long red 
hairs which are especially abundant on young growth. The plant may be prop- 
agated from the abundant seeds, but If placed near closely related species there 
would be danger of hybridization. (Adapted from Revue Horticole, December 
16, 1916.) 

44686 to 44688. 

From China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for 
the Department of Agriculture. Received at the Plant Introduction Gar- 
den, Chlco, Calif., April 21, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Meyer. 

44686. Amtgdalus davidiana (Carr.) Zabel. Amygdalacese. Peach. 
(Prunua davidiana Fl*anch.) 

"(No. 2328a. Peking, China, December 15, 1916.) Stones of the david- 
iana peach gathered in Chihli Province by various Chinese collectors and 
purchased from them. To be grown as stock for various stone fmlts in 
the semiarid regions in the United States.'* 

44687. ZiziFHUs jujuba Mill. Rhamnaceee. Jujube. 
(Z. aativa Gaertn.) 

"(No. 2329a. Peking, China, December 16, 1916.) Small dried jujube 
fruits, selected for good kernels, purchased in the open market at Peking. 
To be grown for stocks for improved varieties." 

44688. DiosPYBOfi lotus L. Diospyracese. Persixnxnon. 

"(No. 2331a. Peking, China, December 16, 1916.) Dry ghoomia fruits 

full of seeds, purchased in the open market at Peking. To be distributed 

among growers of oriental persimmons in semiarid sections of the United 

States as a drought and alkali resistant stock. Chinese name Hei Uao 

(black Jujube), which is a misnomer." 



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APBIL 1 TO JUNE 90^ 1917. 49 

44680 and 44690. Poacese. Grasses. 

From Oran, Salta, Argentina. Presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. Received 
AprU 20, 1917. 

" Large, reedlike, tufted perennial grasses which grow to a height of 8 or 9 
feet, forming immense clumps, in the more barren sandy portions of the region 
where the provinces of Tucuman, Gatamarca, and Salta Join. They grow in 
almost pure sand, more or less alkaline, in districts where no rain falls for 
months at a time, and are readily eaten by cattle and horses. They might 
prove to be good ornamentals and useful forage crops for the semiarid por- 
tions of the southwestern United States.*' 

44689. Ck)BTADERiA BUDiuscxn:.A Stapf. 44690. Spobobolus sp. 

44691 to 44698. 

From Kew, England. Presented by Sir David Prain, director, Royal 
Botanic Gardens. Receive^ April 26, 1917. 

Introduced for the work of the Office of Forage-Crop Investigations. 

44691 to 44695. Lathtbus spp. Fabacese. 

44691. Latbybus sp. ' 

These seeds were received under the name of L. unduUitus^ but 
they do not agree with the seeds of that species in the office seed 
collection. 

44690^ liATHTBUs CIBBH08U8 Serluge. 

A glabrous, climbing annual, 4 to 10 dm. (16 to 40 inches) long, 
with a woody, straight-winged stem; leaves composed of two to 
three pairs of nearly oblong leaflets, terminated by branching ten* 
drils; purple or pinkish flowers in three to eight flowered loose 
racemes ; and smooth, tawny pods about 2\ inches long, native to the 
barren slopes of the Pyrenees. (Adapted from X, Philippe^ Flore des 
Pvr4n4es, p. 261,) 

44693. Lathtbus laziflobus (1>esf.) Kuntse. 

An erect herbaceous plant, native of the island of Crete, with a 
simple, slender, angled, hairy stem about a foot tall ; alternate hairy 
leaves composed of two oval pointed leaflets, without tendrils; lax 
racemes of three to five bluish violet flowers ; and hairy pods about 
an inch long. It is said to have a twisted root 1 foot long and 4 
inches thick, with white flesh and long fibers. (Adapted from M. 
Deafantaines, in Atmalea du Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, vol, 12, 
p, 57, 1908^ as Orohus Ittxiflorus.) 

Index Kewensis refers this to Lathyru9 hirsutua L., but Ascherson 
and Graebner consider it a distinct species. 

44694. liATHTBtTS PISirOBMIS L. 

A stout clambering perennial, up to 3^ feet in length, with 
narrow or broad-winged stem; compound leaves with three to five 
pairs of nearly ovate leaflets, terminated by rather slender tendrils; 
dense racemes of small violet flowers; and dark-brown pods about 
2 Inches long. It is native to central Europe and central and 
southern Asia. (Adapted from Ascherson and Oraebner, Synopsis 
der Mitteleurop&ischen Flora, vol, 6, p. 10S4,) 

50628—22 4 



50 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44691 to 44698— Continued. 

44695. Lathtbus stlvestbis L. Flat pM. 

A straggling or climbing European perennial, 8 to 5 feet In length, 
with a stout, winged stem and a creeping rootstock. It has thick, 
linear-lanceolate leaflets, rose-colored flowers half an Inch long with 
the wings pnrple at the summit, and lance-shaped pods 2 to 3 inches 
long. As an ornamental It Is Inferior to other perennials, but it 
grows well on poor, sandy soil, will stand severe frosts and droughts, 
and is useful as a forage plant and for plowing under in a greeD 
state as a fertilizer. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of 
Hortiouliure, voU 4, p. 1825,) 

Received as Lathyrus variegatui Gilib., which is now referred to 
L. sylvestris. 

44696. Phalabis bxtlbosa Juslen. Poacese. Ganarj gnaa, 

A perennial tufted grass, with shiny leaves about two-fifths of an inch 
wide and roots penetrating the soil to a depth of nearly 3 feet; it is 
native to the Mediterranean countries. It is now cultivated in New Soath 
Wales, Australia, where it appears to be an excellent permanent winter 
grass for coastal and tableland districts. Owing to its deep roots it 
can endure a considerable amount of drought Seeds are borne very 
sparsely on short stems thrown up from the center of the crown. 
(Adapted from Aicherson and Oraebner, Synapsis der Mitteleuropdischen 
Flora, vol, 2, p, 17, and from the AffricuUurdl Gazette of New South 
Wales, November 2, 1916.) 

Received as Phalaris tuherosa Li., but Juslenius's name is earlier. 

44697. Phalabis pabadoxa L. Poaceae. Canary grass. 

An erect annual grass, 2\ feet high, often branched from the low^ 
Joints, with rough leaves 8 to 7^ inches long and one-sixteenth of an inch 
wide, and flower panicles appearing as though gnawed below. It Is native 
to the Mediterranean countries and has been introduced into California. 
(Adapted from W, L, Jepson, Flora of Western Middle CdUfonUa, p, S5.) 

44698. Phleum abenabixtm L. Poaceie. Orass. 

An annual, tufted, erect, or ascending grass, up to a foot In height, 
with smooth leaves about an inch long and one-sixteenth of an inch wide. 
It is native to Europe and the northern coast of Africa. (Adapted from 
Ascherson and Cfraehner, Synopsis der Mitteleuropdischen Flora, vol 2, 
p. U9.) 

44699. X Kibes robustxim Jancz. Grossulariacese. (Gooseberry. 

From Kew, England. Cuttings presented by Sir David Prain, director. 
Royal Botanic Gardens. Received April 26, 1917. 

This hybrid {R, niveum X Mrtellum) is intermediate betwe^i the parents. 
It is a spiny, vigorous shrub, with white or pinkish flowers and black fruits. It 
was originally received at Kew from the gardener of the King of Denmark, but 
is of unknown origin. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of JETortt- 
CuHure, vol, 5, p. 2964.) 



APRIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, 191*7. 51 

44700. Gladiolus oghroleucus Baker. Iridacese. Oladiolus. 

From South Africa. Collected in Basutoland and presented by Mr. L. 
Perlnguey, director, South African Museum, Cape Town. Received April 
26, 1917. 

A South African gladiolus with medium-sized globose conns ; a stem up to 3 
feet tall. Including the inflorescence; and four to six rigid, sword-shaped, 
strongly ribbed leaves, up to a foot in length, arranged in a basal rosette. The 
eight to twelve plain creamy yellow flowers occur in lax spikes 6 to 9 inches 
long, the individual flowers being nearly 2 inches in length. (Adapted from 
If. r. ThiseltonrDyer, Flora Capensis, vol. 6, p. 151.) 

44701 and 44702. 

From Bogota, Colombia. Presented by Mr. M. T. Dawe, director, EstaciCn 
Agronomica Tropical de Juan de Dios Carrasquilla, San Lorenzo, Tolima, 
Colombia. Received April 28, 1917. 

44701. Dbimyb gsanatensib Mutis. Magnoliacefe. 

" Caia de anta. (No. 134. Andes of Bogota.) This is the species of 
Drimys found on the Andes of Bogota.'* {Datoe.) 

A white-flowered evergreen shrub 5 to 12 feet in height, with few 
branches and oval-oblong leathery leaves with rounded ends. The few* 
flowered umbels appear near the ends of the branches, and the obovate 
fruit is berrylike, a quarter of an inch long, with succulent flesh inclos- 
ing the numerous seeds. From the crushed leaves a tonic is prepared. 
The bark Is the basis of an aromatic tonic, and the dried fruits are used 
as a spice. (Adapted from M. A. de SaintSilaire, Plantes Usu€lle$ des 
BrtMiliens, pis. 26-28, 1824.) 

44702. Tebnstboemia mebidionalis Mutis. Theacese. 

"(No. 185. Andes of Bogota.) A shrub whose seeds afford a scarlet 
dye." (Dawe.) 

An ornamental evergreen shrub with leathery leaves, whitish flowers, 
and indehiscent fruits containing large seeds. (Adapted from Lindley, 
Treasury of Botany, vol. 2, p. 11 32.) 

44703 and 44704. Htosgyamus nicer L. Solanacese. Henbane. 

From the Office of Drug, Poisonous, and Oil Plant Investigations. To be 
grown for that office. Received April 18, 1917. 

A coarse, clammy, ill-smelling herbaceous plant, up to about 2^ feet in height, 
with irregularly lobed leaves 3 to 7 Inches long, greenish yellow, purple-veined 
flowers; and circumscissile capsules. The leaves and flowering tops are of 
medicinal value. It is annual, biennial, or perennial. (Adapted from Bailey, 
Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 3, p. 1629.) 

44708. Seeds from wild plants. 44704. An annual variety. 

44705. CiNNAMOHUH OAMFHORA (L.) Nees and Eberm. Lauracese. 

Camphor tree. 

From China. Presented by Prof. Joseph Bailie, of the University of 
Nanking. Received April 27, 1917. 



52 SEEDS AND PLANTS IBCPOBTED. 

" Ck)Uected in open land, Ohekiang, November 14 to 90, 1916. Chinese name 
Hsiang chang (fragrant camphor)." (Bailie,) 

A moderate-sized, much-branched tree with an enlarged base, up to 40 feet 
in height It has alternate, ovate-elliptic leaves which are pinkish on the 
young growths, and small, yellow flowers. The fruits are drupes about the 
size of a large pea. It is native to China and Japan, but is cultivated in Florida, 
the Gulf States, and southern California. From the wood is extracted the 
commercial camphor. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horti- 
culture, vol. 2, p. 773.) 

Introduced for comparison with the camphor trees already growing in the 
South. 

44706 and 44707. Bibes vttlgare Lam. Grossulariacee. 

Oarden currant. 

From Lowdham, Nottingham, England. Plants purchased from J. R. Pear- 
son & Sons. Received April 30, 1917. Notes adapted from catalogue of 
J. R. Pearson & Sons. 

44706. KnighVs Sweet Red. A very prolific currant with large fruits in 
evenly ripening bunches. It is less acid than other red currants. 

44707. Wenttoorth Leviathan. A vigorous, prolific variety with very 
large white fruits. 

44708 and 44709. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Plants presented by Mr. Thomas W. Brown, director, 
horticultural division, Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received 
May 1, 1917. Quoted notes by Prof. S. C. Mason, of the Bureau of Plant 
Industry. 

44708. Ficus sycqmobus L. Mora'cese. Sycamore fig. 

Var. Roumi. *' The variety Roumi is the large-fruited sort, cultivated 
for its fruits, as distinguished from the Kalabiy or ' dog figs,* having small 
and worthless fruits. In diflferent parts of Egypt Balady, SuUany, and 
Arahi are varietal terms synonymous with Roumi.** 

44700. Olea kuropaea L. Oleaceae. Olive. 

** Tafahi. Fron) the omda of the village of Fedimine Mr. Brown secured 
the promise of some rooted sprouts of the Fayum olive varieties for me. 
These he afterwards obtained and grew in the gardens at Gizeh. The 
above specimen is one of them. 

" The Tafahi, or apple olive, is held in the highest repute of the three 
varieties grown in Fayum, the industry centering around the village of 
Fedimine. Though reputed as only moderately productive, its large size 
and fine appearance cause it to be in great demand throughout the 
Egyptian delta. As the fiesh is very soft and buttery when fully ripe it 
is marketed about November 1, when it begins to color. From the largest 
ripe fruit found at Fedimine November 20, I made the follow^ing descrip- 
tion: Fruit deep purplish black with lilac bloom, 4.6 cm. long, 3 cm. 
broad, broadly ovate with blunt apex terminating in a Aort, acute tip. 
There is a rather deep cavity around the stalk, and some fruits show a 
slight fold. The fiesh is about 1 cm. in thickness; the pit is large and 
rough, with deep longitudinal furrows, about 2 cm. long and 1 cm. broad. 



APRIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 53 

44708 and 4470©— Continued. 

broadly rounded at the base, obtusely pointed at the apex. The fresh 
olives are packed in leaves in crates (holding about 3 pecks each) made 
from the ribs of the date leaf and are pickled by the people of the valley 
according to their fancy. Pickled Tafahi olives were seen by the writer 
both at Fedimine and in Cairo. 

"At present no oil is manufactured from the Fayum olive», but in one 
of the villages were seen stones of ancient oil mills of beautiful red 
Aswan granite and no doubt of Roman origin. Their purpose was un- 
known to the present Inhabitants. From this it may be conjectured that 
the present olive trees of Fayum, as well as those of Dakhleh Oasis, have 
come down from the time of the Roman occupation during the first 
century A. D." 

44710. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Fabaceae. Common bean. 

From Bahia, Brazil. Presenteil by Dr. V. A. Argollo Ferrfto. Received 
May 4. 1917. 

Mulatinho (little mulatto). A Brazilian bush variety of the common kidney 
bean, cultivated in the coastal States, Especially in Sao Paulo, where it matures 
in 00 days, thus allowing two crops a year. The beans contain a large amount 
(36 per cent) of starch and are used for human food in much the same manner 
as the kidney bean. (Adapted from Journal of Commerce, New York, January 
27,1917.) 

44711. Carapa GUiANENsis Aubl. Meliacese. Crabwood tree. 

From Trinidad, British West Indies. Obtained from Mr. R. O. Williams, 
curator, St. Clair Experiment Station. Received May 4, 1917. 

A tall tree, with compound leaves li feet long, small axillary flowers, and 
thick-shelled, russet-brown fruits about 3 inches in diameter, containing two to 
six chestnutlike seeds. The native name in Guiana is andiroba (bitter oil), re- 
ferring to the oil expressed from the seeds. This oil is used by the natives, who 
rub It into their skin to protect themselves from noxious insects; it is also 
made into a varnish or lacquer for iron objects, protecting these from rust 
From the bark and leaves a decoction is prepared which is a remedy for skin 
disease; the bark contains an alkaloid termed carapina. The tree should be 
tried as an ornamental in southern Florida and southern California. (Adapted 
from J. B. Rodriguea, Hortus Fluminensia, p. 73, and note of Dorset t, Shamel, 
and Popenoe, under S. P. I. No. 86715.) 

Introduced for trial as an insecticide. 

44712. Cannabis sativa L. Moracese. Hemp. 

From Manchuria. Presented by Mr. M. Toyonaga, director. Central Experi- 
ment Station, Keijo, Chosen (Korea). Received May 4, 1917. 

In Manchuria, where this plant is grown for the oil, the seeds are crushed 
and steamed, and subjected to great pressure, yielding the oil which the Chi- 
nese call ma tzH yu (hemp-seed oil). (Adapted from A, Hosie, Manchuria, p. 
188, 1901,) 

Introduced for the Office of Drug, Poisonous, and Oil Plant Investigations. 



54 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44713 to 44720. Malus stlvestris Miller. Malacese. Apple. 

(PyruB malu$ L.) 

From Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Cuttings presented by Mr. W. T. Bla- 
conn, Dominion horticulturist. Received May 4, 1917. Quoted notes 
from the Reports of the Horticulturist, Experimental Farms, Ottawa, 
Canada, 1906 to 1915, which should be referred to for a full account of 
the development of the remarkable collection of seedlings at the Experi- 
mental Farms, Ottawa. 

44713. "Anson {Winter St. Lawrence seedling). Fruit of medium size, 
roundish, slightly ribbed; cavity of medium depth and width; stem 
short, stout; basin deep, narrow, wrinkled; calyx closed; skin mod- 
erately thick, tough, pale yellow to almost white, thinly splashed and 
streaked with carmine; the dots obscure; flesh white, fine grained, 
tender, Juicy ; core and seeds of medium size ; flavor subacid, pleasant, 
Fameuselike; quality good to very good; season October, probably 
through November. 

'• Resembles Winter 8t, Lawrence a little in flavor. Distinctly of the 
Fameuse group. Quite promising, season coming Just before McIntosK 
and Fameuse,** 

44714. "Battle (Wealthy seedling). Fruit above medium to large in 
size, roundish conic; cavity deep, of medium width; st^m short to 
medium, stout; basin of medium width and depth, almost smooth; 
calyx closed or partly open ; skin moderately thick, tough, pale green- 
ish yellow, well splashed and washed with bright purplish red; the 
dots few, yellow, distinct; flesh white, tinged with red, firm, cri^, 
breaking, tender, rather coarse. Juicy ; flavor briskly subacid, aromatic, 
raspberrylike ; core medium ; quality good ; season late August to early 
S^tember ; ripens before Duchess. 

"Handsome in appearance. Resembles Wealthy somewhat in out- 
ward appearance and flavor. Should make an excellent cooking apple, 
and is good for dessert." 

44715. '* Drumbo {Winter St. Lawrence seedling). Fruit above medium 
to large in size, conical ; cavity deep, of medium width, russeted ; stem 
short, stout ; basin deep, medium width, slightly wrinkled ; calyx open 
or partly open ; skin thick, moderately tender, pale yellow, well washed 
and splashed with dark crimson ; the dots few, gray, conspicuous ; seeds 
medium size, acute ; flesh white, rather coarse, tender, Juicy ; core me- 
dium ; flavor subacid, pleasant ; quality good ; season, late November to 
February or later. Resembles Winter 8t Lanvrence very much in out- 
ward appearance, flesh, and flavor. Evidently a better keeper than 
Winter St. Lawrence** 

44716. "Oaletta {Wealthy seedling). Fruit above medium In size, 
roundish, flattened at both ends; «'avity deep, open, slightly russeted; 
stem short, stout; basin deep, open, wrinkled; calyx closed or partly 
open; skin thick, moderately tough, pale yellow, washed and splashed 
with red, with a suggestion of pink, mostly on the sunny side, the 
dots obscure; flesh white, crisp, tender. Juicy; core medium; flavor 
subacid, pleasant; quality good; season late August to early Septem- 
ber. Promising. Of good quality. A good eating apple. Resembles 
Wealthy somewhat in outward appearance.** 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 65 

44713 to 44720— Continued. 

44717. "Jethro {Wealthy seedling). Fruit above medium size, oblate 
to roundish, conic; cavity medium depth and width; stem short, 
stout; basin deep, medium width, wrinkled; calyx open; skin moder- 
ately thick, moderately tough, pale yellow, washed and splashed with 
orange, red, and carmine, green about cavity; the dots numerous, 
yellow, distinct ; flesh yellowish, crisp, tender ; core medium size, open ; 
seeds medium size, acute; flavor juicy, briskly subacid, pleasant; 
quality good ; season late September to December. Resembles Wealthy 
very much in flesh and flavor." 

44718. " Luke (Wealthy seedling) . Fruit above medium to large ; oblate 
to roundish conic ; cavity narrow, medium depth, russeted ; stem short, 
moderately stout; basin open, medium depth, almost smooth; calyx 
open or partly open; skin thick, moderately tough, pale greenish 
yellow washed with deep red, mostly on sunny Bide> dots obscure ; 
flesh dull white or yellowish, rather «roarse, tender, moderately juicy ; 
core small ; flavor subacid, pleasant ; quality good ; season October and 
November, probably to middle or late December. 

" Resembles Wealthy considerably in outward appearance, character 
of flesh, and flavor. A better keeper than Wealthy.*'^ 

44710. **MelfHn (Wealthy seedling). Fruit of medium size; roundish; 
cavity deep, of medium width, sometimes lipped; slightly russeted; 
stem medium to long, slender to moderately stout; basin medium 
depth and width, smooth, calyx open or partly open ; skin thin, tough, 
pale yellow, well splashed and washed with rather dull red, but at- 
tractive, the dots few, pale, distinct; flesh yellow with traces of red 
near skin, very tender, melting ; core medium ; flavor briskly subacid, 
spicy, gdod ; quality good ; season middle to end of August 

** Considerably Uke Sops of Wine in outward appearance and quality, 
but juicier and of much better quality. Also resembles Wealthy some- 
what in outward appearance and in its aromatic flavor.*' 

44720. " Rupert (Russian seedling). Fruit above medium in size, oblate ; 
cavity medium depth and width, russeted; stem short, stout; basin 
medium depth and width, wrinkled; calyx closed; skin thick, tough, 
pale greenish yellow, sometimes with a faint pink blush, the dots 
numerous, green. Indistinct; flesh white, juicy, tender; core medium; 
flavor pleasant, briskly subadd, almost acid ; quality above medium to 
good; season early August As early or earlier than Tetofsky and 
much better in quality. Better in quality than Yellow Transparent, 
Inclined to water-core." 

44721. Phaseolus lunatus L. Fabaceae. Lima bean. 

Prom Concepcion, Paraguay. Presented by Mr. T. R. Gwynn. Received 
May 7. 1917. 

Lynconia, ** I named the butter beans Lynoonia In honor of the estancia 
in the Province of Buenos Aires from which they originaUy came. It is a 
remarkable bean which has been yielding fruit since the middle of last October 
and is still bearing heavily (March 28).*' (Choynn.) 



56 SEEDS AND PLAJ^TS IMPORTED. 

44722 to 44728. Oladiolus spp. Iridacese. Oladiolus. 

From Johannesburg, Union of South Africa. Presented by Mr. J. Burtt 
Davy, Agricultural Supply Association. Received May 7, 1917. 

44722. Gladiolus alatus L. 

A South African gladiolus with an upright stem 6 to 8 inches in 
height and with three to four leathery, linear or sword-shaped, stiff 
leaves, the outermost being twice as long as the others. The five to ten 
reddish yellow flowers have a Aragranoe like that of sweetbrier. 
(Adapted fromr CurtWs Botanical Maffozine, vol, 15, pi. 586.) 

44723. Gladiolus angustus L. 

A plant with an ascending stem up to 2 feet in height, and narrow, 
upright leaves with prominent midribs. The white, scentless flowers 
grow in a lax, one-sided spike. It is native to the Cape of Good Hope. 
(Adapted from CurtU'i Botanical Magazine, voh X7, pi. 60t.) 

447M. Gladiolus blandus Ait. 

A South African plant with sword-shaped leaves somewhat shorter 
than the stem, which is fromr 6 inches to 2 feet in height and bears three 
to ten white or reddish tinged scentless flowers. There are many very 
ornamental horticultural varieties which are easily propagated from 
seeds and offisets. (Adapted from Curtis* 8 Botanical Mag<izine, voL X7, 
pi. 625.) 

44725. Gladiolus cuspidatus Jaoq. 

An erect bulbous plant, 2 to 3 feet high, with sword-shaped leaves 
usually shorter than the stem, and four to eight white or pinkish flowers 
in a lax, one-sided spike. It is native to the Cape of Good Hope, where 
it flowers in May and June. (Adapted from Curtis's Botjinical Magazine, 
vol, 15, pL 582,) 

44726. Gladiolus becubvus L. 

An ornamental plant, 1 to 8 feet tall, with three linear leaves having 
prominent midribs. The two to flve yellowish purple flowers have a 
strong violet odor and are produced during April in a lax spike. It 
is a native of the Cape of Good Hope. (Adapted from Curtis' s Botanical 
Magazine, vol, 15, pi, 578,) 

44727. Gladiolus tbistis L. 

Avondbloem. A South African plant with two or three linear leaves 
which are four winged toward the top, due to the comparative size of 
the midrib, which equals the blades in width. The yellowish flowers, 
sometimes lightly streaked with purple, give off a very strong fragrance 
at night, but are practically scentless during the day. (Adapted from 
Curtis's Botanical Magazine, vol, 27, pi, 1098,) 

44728. Gladiolus undulatus Jacq. 

A bulbous plant, with a stem a foot in height, including the spike and 
several sword-shaped leaves about a foot long. The four to jsix flowers 
are milk white marked with red and are produced in a very lax spike. 
It is native to South Africa. (Adapted from W, T, Thiselton-Dyer, 
Flora Capensis, vol. 6, p, 155,) 






APBUi 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 67 

44729 and 44730. Lactuca sativa L. Cichoriacese. Lettuce. 

Seeds grown by Mr. George W. Oliver, of the Bureau of Plant Industry, 
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, from two 
forms selected by Dr. B. T. Galloway several years ago. Received May 
28, 1917. 

"Both varieties are identical in growth and are strictly hothouse lettuces. 
Under good conditions in a cool house they have very large heads from 8 to 10 
inches in diameter. Everyone who has sampled them sa3rs that they are by 
far the best forcing lettuces.*' (OUver.) 

44729. " No. 39. White seeded. Parents Golden Queen X Grand Rapids.** 

44730. " No. 39. Black seeded. Parents Golden Queen X Grand Rapids.** 

44731 to 44739. Raphanus sativus L. Brassicacew. Badisli. 
From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Go. 
Received May 7, 1917. 

44731. Bottle. A large bottle-shaped radish, called Tokuri in Japanese. 
It is about a foot long. (Adapted from Useful Plants of Japan, p. 21.) 

44732. Long String. A radish with a root over 3 feet long and only 2 or 
8 inches in circumference. Very suitable for pickling. (Adapted from 
Catalogue of the YokoJiama Nursery Co., 1916-17, p. 77.) 

44733. Nerima Long {Mikado). A variety with large, long, cylindrical 
roots. 

44734. AU Season. ** Called ToMshiraza in Japan. It is a very large, 
long, deep-rooted, snow-white rndish which does not extend above the 
soil; it is always tender and crisp and has a delicious flavor." {Ag- 
geler d Musser Seed Co., catalogue, 1911, p. 5S.) 

44735. Miyashige. A variety found chiefly in Miyashige, Province of 

Owari, Japan, with a conical root about li feet in length and 3i 
inches in diameter. It is very sweet and should be boiled, dried, or- 
pickled. (Adapted from Useful Plants of Japan, p. 21.) 

44736. Ninengo. A variety with white, thin, hard roots. It is a bien- 
nial, and the seeds are sown at the end of spring. (Adapted from 
Useful Plants of Japan, p. 22.) 

44737. Six Weeks. No description is available for this variety. 

44738. Sakurfljima Mammoth. The largest variety of radish known, cul- 
tivated chiefly at Sakurajima, Osumi, Japan. It is nearly globular, 
about 3 feet in circumference in the largest forms, and weighs 20 to 
30 pounds. It is eaten raw, boiled, dried, or preserved in salt, and has a 
sweet, whol€isome taste. (Adapted from Useful PUmts of Japan, p. 20. 

44739. Shogoin. A variety obtained from seed of variety Horio sown in 
Shogoin, Province of Yamashlro, Japan. It is about a foot long, 6 to 
7 inches in circumference, and is of excellent flavor. (Adapted from 
Useful Plants of Japan, p. 22.) 

44740. Jasminum MXTLTiPARnruM Hochst. Oleaceae. Jasmine. 

From Cape Town, Union of South Africa. Presented by Mr. L. Peringuey, 
director, South African Museum. Received May 7, 1917. 

A climbing, much-branched, ornamental shrub up to 10 feet in height, with 
opposite, glabrous, ovate to lanceolate leaves nearly 3 inches in length; the 
solitary, terminal or axillary, fragrant white flowers are about 1^ inches long. 
It Is native to Natal, South Africa. (Adapted from J. Medley Wood, Natal 
rianU, vol. 4, pi. S28.) 



68 SEEDS AKD PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44741. Eraqrostis superba Peyr. Poaceae. Orass. 

From Johannesburg, Union of South Africa. Presented by Mr. J. Burtt 
Davy, Agricultural Supply Association. Received May 8, 1917. 

Introduced for the Office of Forage-Orop Investigations. 

"(March, 1917. Pretoria district.) One of the best native pasture grasses on 
the high veld, extending also to the bush veld, its range being from about 3,500 
feet (or lower) to 5,5(X) feet or more. It is common in sandy soils in British 
Bechuanaland, where the rainfall is perhaps not more than 10 inches, coming 
in summer." (Davy.) 

A perennial tufted grass with culms 2 to 3 feet in length and blades 2 to 8 
inches long. It is native to South Africa, where it is widely distributed. 
(Adapted from W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, Flora CapenHa, vol. 7, p. 622,) 

44742 and 44743. Papaver sohkiferuh L. Papaveracese. 

Poppy. 

From the Office of Drug, Poisonous, and Oil Plant Investigations. Seed to 
be grown for Dr. W. W. Stockberger, Physiologist in Charge. Received 
May 8, 1917. 

An erect annual, with handsome varicolored flowers, which is cultivated in 
the Orient for opium manufacture. It was originally introduced into the United 
States for the use of its palatable seeds in confectionery and the preparation of 
morphia for medicinal purposes. The seeds yield a comestible oil. It is of com- 
paratively easy culture. 

44744 and 44746. 

From Auckland, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. H. R. Wright Received 
May 12, 1917. 

44744. Rhopalostylis safida (Soland.) Wendl. and Dnide. Phoeni- 
cacee. Nikau palm. 

A graceful tree, sometimes 30 feet tall, with a ringed, green stem and 
leaves 14 feet in length, which are used by the Maoris in making their 
huts. The flowers and the flowering axis are both white. The fruit is a 
vivid red drupe about half an inch long and so hard that the settlers have 
used them for ammunition. The top of the stem is quite juicy and is 
sometimes eaten. (Adapted from Lainif and Blackwell, PlarUt of New 
Zealand, p. 84.) 

44745. CoBYNocABPUS LAEVIGATA Forst. Ck)rynocarpaceffi. Xaraka. 

A handsome evergreen tree with glossy, laurellike, oblong leaves 3 to 
7 inches long, erect panicles of small white flowers 4 inches in length, 
and oblong, orange-colored fruits an inch long. The outside of the fruit 
is extremely poisonous, but the kernel is edible and forms one of the 
staple foods of the Maoris, who cultivate the tree for its seeds. The 
wood has been much used by the natives of the Chatham Islands in the 
making of canoes. (Adapted from Laing and Blachwell, PlanU of New 
Zealand, p. 293.) 

44746. Enterolobium cyclooarpum (Jacq.) Griseb. Mimosaces. 

From Coro, Venezuela. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Received May 
14, 1917. 

A lofty, unarmed, leguminous tree with bipinnate leaves, heads of greenish 
flowers, and leathery, indehlscent, pulpy, curved pods forming complete circles 



APRIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, IWI. 59 

abont 4 inches in diameter. These pods make very good food for cattle and 
hogs throughout tropical America where this tree is native. The wood is said 
to be durable and easily worked, and the bark is used for tanning and also 
as a soap by the Mexicans. The tree would probably make an excellent shade 
tree for the southern and southwestern United States. (Adapted from QHse- 
hach, Flora of the British West Indian Islands, p. 226, and from Contributions, 
U. 8. National Herbarium, vol, 5, p. 228.) 

44747. Brassiga sp. Brassicacese. 

From Ningpoi China. Presented by Prof. Victor Hanson, Shanghai Baptist 
College, Shanghai. Received May 14, 1917. 

Chinese name yu t^ad (oil vegetable). Sent in reply to our request for the 
yiu ts^ai, said to be the best variety of Chinese cabbage grown at Shanghai. 
Probably either Brassica chinensis or B. pekinensis. 

44748. ZiziPHus mucronata Willd. Rhamnaceae. 

From Khartum, Sudan, Africa. Presented by the principal. Central Re- 
search Farm, Education Department, Sudan Government. Received 
May 14, 1917. 

A tree 15 to 30 feet tall, with alternate, crenate,*or serrate leaves up to 3 
inches long, spinelike stipules, and small^ greenish flowers in axillary cymes up 
to an inch in length. The numerous globose dark-red fruits, about half an inch 
in diameter, are edible and are believed to be the lotus mentioned by Mungo 
Park as being used for making into bread which tastes like gingerbread. A 
paste made of the leaves and a decoction of the root are used medicinally ; the 
wood is tough and is used for yoke keys, and the seeds are used for making 
rosaries. It is native to tropical and southern Africa. Arabic name Siddir or 
nabbak, (Adapted from T. R. Sim, Forests and Forest Flora of Cape Colony, 
p. 177, and from Kew Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, Additional Series 
IX, pt, i, p. 1G2, 1908.) 

44748 and 44750. Saccharum officikarum L. Poacese. 

Sugar cane. 

From St Croix, Virgin Islands, West Indies. Cuttings presented by Dr. 
Longfleld Smith, director of the experiment station. Received May 16, 
1917. 
Introduced for the sugar experiment station. New Orleans, La. 

44749. Santa Cruz 12/4. " I think this would be suitable for Loulrtana 
on account of its rapid growth, early maturing, and richness in sac- 
charose." (Smith.) 

44750. Santa Cruz 12/11. Received without notes. 

44751 to 44765. 

From Venezuela. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Received May 12, 1917. 

44751. Abexmosghus esculbntus (L.) Moench. Malvacese. Okra. 
{Hibiscus esculentus L.) 

"(From Cumarebe, April, 1917.)" (Curran.) 

44752. Acacia sp. Mimosaceee. 

"(From Paraguana, April, 1917.) Small tree or low thorny shrub." 
(Curran.) 



60 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44751 to 44765— Continued. 

4475S. Canavali obtusifolium (Lam.) DC. Fabacese. 

"(From Cerro de Santa Ana, Paraguana, April, 1917.) A commoa 
vine." {Curran,) 

A West Indian leguminous vine with obovate or roundish blunt leaves,, 
purplish flowers an inch in length, and oblong pods up to 6 inches long, 
containing ovoid, chestnut-colored seeds. (Adapted from QrUebachy Flora 
of the British West Indian Islands, p. 197.) 

44754. CITBT7IXU8 VDLGABis Schrad. Cucurfoitacese. Watermelon^ 

" (From Cumarebe, April, 1917.)" (Curran,) 
To be grown for comparison with other varieties. 

44755. Etttespe sp. Phoenicaceffi. Falrn^ 

"(From Cerro de Santa Ana, Paraguana, April, 1917.) Ornamental; 
90 feet high. C!ommon on top of the mountain." {Curran,) 

44756. QossYPiUH sp. Malvaceae Cottoiu 

"(From La Vela de Coro, April, 1917.) Wild cotton. Grows on arirf 
lands near the sea." (Curran,) 

44757. Omphalophthalma bubra Karst. Asclepiadacese. 

■ 

" (From Paraguana, April, 1917.) A common vine; used for food Id 
Curacao." (Curran,) 

A climbing, shrubby, hairy milkweed with opposite, heart-shaped leaves 
nearly 8 inches long, and dark-purple, rather small flowers in the axils 
of the leaves. It is a native of the island of St. Martin, British West 
Indies. (Adapted from H, Karsten, Florae CoUymMae, vol, 2, p. 119^ 
pi. 163,) 

44758 to 44761. Phase»lus luitatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 

44758. (From Paraguana, April 8, 1917.) Tapirama chicoa. 

" Small gray bean, with a yellow eye. An unusual marking for this 
species." (D, N, Shoemaker,) 

44759. (From Miraca, Paraguana, April, 1917.) Tapirama hlanca. 

*' SndBill white bean, very similar to beans received from Ceylon,. 
Burma, and Java." (D, N, Shoemaker,) 

44760. (From Paraguana, April, 1917.) Tapirama Colorado. 

" Small red bean, not like any variety of Lima in the American 
trade." (/>. N. Shoemaker,) 

4476 1. ( From Miraca, Paraguana, April 8, 1917. ) Tapirama amariUa^ 

" Small yellow bean ; an unusual color for this species." (D. N, 
Shoemaker. ) 

44762. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Fabaceae. Common bean. 

(From Paraguana, April 8, 1917.) Tapiram>a pintada. 

" Small mottled beans similar in marking to Jackson Wonder and 
Florida Butter," (/>. N, Shoemaker.) 

44763. Sesamum orientale L. Pedaliacefe. Sesame. 
(S. indicum L.) 

(From Paraguana, April, 1917.) Tapirama aJonfoU. 

An erect annual plant, 2 to 3 feet hig^, with ovate-lanceolate leaves^ 
rosy-white flowers, and ovoid-oblong capsules. It is a native of the 
East Indies and tropical Africa, but is cultivated in tropical America 



inOL 1 TO JUSTB aO, 1917. 61 

44751 to 44765— Continued. 

and the southern United States. The seeds are very rich in oil, which 
is expressed and used as a table oil and also medicinally. (Adapted from 
Orisebach, Flora of the British West Indian Islands, p. 458, and from 
MacnUUan, Handbook of Tropical Gardening and Planting, p. 5S8.) 

44764. Clerodendrum lioustbinum (Jacq.) R. Br. Verbenace«e. 
**(From Paraguana, April, 1917.) A common tree.*' {Curran.) 

44765. YioNA CYLiNDRiCA (Sticlcm.) Skeels. Fabacese. Catjang. 

(From Miraca, Paraguana, April 8, 1917.) BonoJUta, 

An annual rambling vine with three rhomboid-ovate stalked leaflets, 
white or purplish flowers in twos or threes on long axillary peduncles, 
and small, erect pods 3 to 5 inches In length, tit is probably native to 
southern Asia, but is now cultivated throughout the Tropics for the seeds 
and fodder. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horiicuh 
ture, vol, 6, p, 3469.) 

44766 and 44767. Dolichos lablab L. Fabacese. 

Bonavist bean. 

From Georgetown, British Guiana. Presented by Mr. John F. Waby. 
Received May 19, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Waby. 

44766. " Var. macrocarpus, A natural hybrid of Park Runner and Vil- 
morin*8 Stringless, which undoubtedly will prove a welcome addition to 
our green vegetables. It bears the largest pod of any of the ' Lablab * 
class which has yet appeared, and on that account fewer i)ods will be 
needed to form a dish. It is proliflc; the pods are longer than those 
of either of its parents and have the width of those of the ' Vilmorin ' 
bean, which till now is the widest known. 

" The new bean is a much stronger grower than either of Its parents, 
so will need more room. The seeds should be planted 6 to 6 feet 
apart. The stakes or trellis for it to climb on should not be more than 
5 to 6 feet high, for the convenience of picking for a green vegetable. 
Use in the same manner as French beans before the seeds are well 
formed; if allowed to mature, as bonavists generally are, the seeds 
can be shelled in the same manner, though I consider the young green 
pods are the most useful, as good green vegetables are scarce." 

44767. "Var. nankvnensis. Small white seeds. 



44768. PiSTACiA CHiNENSis Bunge. Anacardiaceae. 

From China. Obtained by Mr. Eidwin S. Cunningham, American consul 
general at Hankow, through Mr. Nelson T. Johnson, American consul 
at Changsha. Received April 19, 1917. 

(Collected at Nlnghwai, Hunan Province, November, 1916.) A beautiful 
Chinese tree with graceful pinnate leaves which are at first dark red, then 
glossy green, and finally, in autumn, becoming scarlet, purple, and yellow. 
Trees of previous introductions have done so well in many parts of our country 
that we cdn recommend this beautiful tree for park and avenue planting. 
Where the winters are not too severe it has withstood temperatures of —4* F. 
without injury, as at Washington, D. C. It is especially valuable for the 
Southern and Pacific (3oast States when planted in a well-drained situation. 
Individual specimens sometimes live to be centuries old and attain great size. 



62 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44769* Macadamia TERNiFOiiiA F. Muell. Proteacese. Ifacadamla, 

From Sydney, Australia. Purchased from Messrs. Anderson ft Go. Re- 
ceived May 14, 1917. 

In Its typical form this Is a tall tree with dense foliage, the leaves hein^ 
glabrous, shining, oblong or lanceolate, in whorls of three or four, and up to a 
foot in length. The white flowers are In racemes almost as long as the leaves. 
The nearly globular fruits, up to an inch in diameter, are thick shelled and 
contain one or two edible seeds half an inch or more in diameter; these seeds 
are white and crisp, with a flavor resembling that of the Brazil nut This 
tree Is cultivated to a small extent in southern California and southern Florida, 
and it has recently fruited in Cuba, where it appears to thrive. Its ornamental 
appearance alone makes.it worthy of introduction into the warmest parts of 
the United States. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticul- 
ture, vod^ 4, p. 1988.), 

44770 to 44772. 

From Allahabad, India. Presented by Mr. William Bembower, horticul- 
turist, Ewing Christian College. Received May 17, 1917. 

44770. Annona squamosa Li. Annonacese. Sugar-apple. 
" Shirifa, The common type found here." (Bemhoioer.) 

44771. DiosPYBos sp. Dlospyracese. Persimmon. 

"This Diospyros is, I believe, a native of this region; I found it 
fl-uitlng in December and January at Etah, in the United Provinces. 
The fruit is not eaten, but it promises to be a valuable stock for warmer 
regions or for breeding purposes." {Bemhoioer.) 

44772. DoLiCHOS lablab L. Fabacese. Bonavist bean. 

"A local bean, common in the United Provinces. A very prolific bearer, 
thriving in the driest seasons and producing long vines." (Bembower.) 

A twining vine with broadly ovate leaflets, white or pinkish purple 
flowers, and broad flat pods 2 to 8 inches long. It is a native of India 
and has been cultivated since ancient times. In tropical and subtropical 
countries it is usually grown for human food, but in temperate regions 
it is more commonly known as an ornamental plant (Adapted from 
Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, voL t, p. 1065, and from 
Bulletin No. 818, U. 8. Department of Agriculture.) 

44773. Nannorrhops ritchieana (Griffith) Wendl. Phoenicacese. 

Uazri palm* 

From Seharunpur, India. Presented by Mr. A. C. Hartless, superintendent. 
Government Botanical Gardens. Received May 18, 1917. 

A low gregarious shrub, usually stemless, but sometimes with a stem 10 to 
20 feet in length. The leaves, which are 2 to 4 feet long and of a grayish 
green color, are beaten with mallets to remove the fiber, which is used in 
making mats, baskets, etc The fruit is a nearly round, 1-seeded drupe. The 
reddish brown wool of the petioles is impregnated with saltpeter and used as a 
tinder for matchlocks. This palm is a native of Baluchistan and Mekran* 
where it ascends to 5,500 feet. In Europe it grows best in a well-drained sandy 
loam and is propagated by seeds and ofbets. (Adapted from E. Blatter, Jour^ 
nal Bombay Natural History Society, vol. 21, p. 72.) 



APBIIi 1 TO JUNE 30, 191*7. 63 

44774 to 44776. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural explorer. 
Received May 24, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

44774. Annona testudinea Safford. Annonacese. 

Tortoise-shell custard-apple. 

"(No. 128a. From the city of Guatemala, May 15, 1917.) The tortoise- 
shell custard-apple, from the town of £1 Rancho, in eastern Guatemala. 
It may not have been grown at this place, as it was purchased in the 
market, but it was probably grown somewhere in the immediate vicinity. 

" This interesting anona belongs to the section Chelonocarpus, or hard- 
shell custard-apple group, establisbed by Safford (Journal of the Wash- 
ington Academy of Sciences, vol. 3, no. 4, Feb. 19, 1913). The tree, which 
has not been seen by me, is described as 12 to 15 meters high, with oblong 
or oblong-elliptic leaves, acuminate at the apex, and 25 to 35 cm. long. 

'* The fruit is more or less globose in form, about 4 inches in length, 
with a hard shell divided on the surface into polygonal areoles by slightly 
raised ridges. It strongly resembles the common custard-apple, being 
dull green and somewhat pruinose. The seeds, also, are quite different 
from those of the common custard-apple (Annona reticulata), being con- 
siderably larger and pointed at the apex. The flesh is white, soft, 
watery, free from the grittiness which is so objectionable in A, reticulata, 
sweet, and of pleasant flavor. The pulp does not adhere to the seeds in 
the ripe fruit 

"This species seems worthy of a trial in southern Florida. It wiU 
probably be too tender for cultivation in California, except in the most 
favored locations, such as Santa Barbara." 

44775. Phyixocabpus seftentrionalis Donn'. Smith. Csesalpiniacere. 

"(No. 124a. From El Progreso; sent from the city of Guatemala, May 
15, 1917.) Flor de mico (monkey flower). A magnificent flowering tree 
found in sandy loam along watercourses near El Progreso, in eastern 
Guatemala, at altitudes of 1,5(X) to 2,000 feet. It is of broad, spreading 
habit, reaching a height of 40 to 50 feet, and is semideciduous at the time 
of flowering, which is in January and February. 

"The leaves are compound, composed of three or four pairs of alter- 
nate leaflets oblong-elliptic to obovate in form, an inch to 1) inches in 
length, rounded to acute at the apex, glabrous, and light green in color. 
During the flowering season the tree is a mass of crimson-scarlet flowers, 
which are produced in small clusters and are individually about an inch 
broad, with a tuft of crimson stamens up to 2 inches long. When in flower 
the tree may be compared to the royal poinciana, but the flowers are 
individually much smaller, and the color is deeper than in the poinciana. 
This tree should be given a trial in southern Florida, where it seems 
likely to succeed, and also in the most favored sections of southern Cali- 
fornia. As it grows along the banks of streams, it will probably demand 
a good deal of water." 

44776. Persea schiedeana Nees. Lauracese. Coy6. 

"(No. 125a. From the city of Guatemala, May 15, 1917.) Oay6, 
shuete, or chucte. Seeds from specimens purchased in Zacapa. It is 
still too early for this fruit to be abundant, but the flrst of the season 
are now conunencing to appear in the lowlands around Zacapa. The 
ones from which these seeds were taken were slender pyriform, rather 
pointed at the apex, over 5 inches long, and about 10 ounces in weight. 



64 SEEDS AKD PLAKTS IMPORTED. 

44774 to 44776— Continued. 

The skin was light green, thicker than in an avocado of the West Indian 
type, while the fiesh was pale brown, almost free from fiber, and of very 
nutty flavor. The seed was large in comparison with the fruit.'* 

See also S. P. I. No. 44682 for previous introduction and description. 

44777 and 44778. Gossypium spp. Malvacese. Cotton. 

From Cristobal, Canal Zone. Presented by Mr. S. P. Verner. Received 
AprU 20, 1917. 

44777. Sample No. 1. 4477a Sample No. 2. 

44779 and 44780. Pandanus spp. Pandanacese. Screw pine. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Plants presented by Mr. Joseph F. Rock, bota- 
nist, College of Hawaii. Received May 29, 1917. 

44779. Pandanus tectobius sinensis Warb. 

A much-branched tree 20 feet or more high, with a flexuous trunk sup- 
ported by aerial roots. The light-green leaves are linear-lanceolate, 
terminated by a long flagellum, and are furnished with marginal spines. 
The variety differs from the species in having smaller leaves and larger 
marginal spines. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horti- 
culture, vol, 5, p. 2Ji50, and from Warburg, in Engler, Pflanzenreich, vol. 
4, f>t, 9, p, 48,) 

44780. Pandanus rockii MarteUi. 

" I brought back from Palmyra Island a number of seeds of Pandanus 
rockii. It grows in actual salt water below the low-tide mark.** (Rock.) 

A slender, erect tree, 8 to 10 m. (26 to 33 feet) in height* with bright- 
green leaves, large, wedge-shaped fruits 8 cm. (3 inches) long and 6 cm. 
(2| inches) broad at the apex. It was originally collected on Hole! 
Islet, Palmyra Island, in July, 1913. (Adapted from Bulletin No. 4, 
College of Hawaii Publications, p. 42, 1916.) 

44781 to 44783. Persea americana Mill. Lauraceae. Avocado. 

(P. gratissima Gaertn. f.) 

From Guatemala. Bud wood collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricul- 
tural explorer. Received May to June, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. 
Popenoe. 

44781. "(No. 117. Avocado No. 29. From the flnca Santa Rosa, An- 
tigua.) Katun. A small, handsome avocado from the finca Santa 
Rosa in Antigua, Guatemala (altitude 5,100 feet). The parent tree 
ripened an excellent crop of fruit in the spring of 1917. A few fruits 
of this variety which were examined had a slightly bitter taste. It 
is not known whether this is a characteristic of the variety or not, but 
it does not seem advisable to make a general distribution until this 
point can be determined. 

" Technically the fruit may be described as follows ; Form broadly 
obovoid, oval, or oblong-oval; size below medium to medium, weight 
10 to 14 ounces, length 3^ to 4 inches, breadth 3 to 3i inches; base 
rounded to bluntly pointed, the stem Inserted somewhat obliquely with- 
out depression ; apex obliquely flattened, though not markedly so, slightly 
depressed around the stigmatic point ; surface nearly smooth to lightly 
pebbled, glossy purplish black in color, with numerous smaU to large 
yellowish dots; skin rather thin, one-sixteenth of an inch or slightly 



APEIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 65 

44781 to 44783— Continued. 

less; flesh rich yellow, almost golden yellow, pale green near the skin, 
jEree from fiber or disc<doration, and of fairly rich flavor, with some- 
times a trace of bitterness ; quality doubtful ; seed small to medium in 
size, spherical, not over 1 ounce in weight, tight in the cavity. Ripens 
midseason, March to May at Antigua." 

44782. "(Nob. U8, 142, ^. Avocado No. 2T.) Oalmal. A very pro- 
ductive variety whose fruits are of pleasing round form, good size, 
and rich flavor. It gives promise of being somewhat later in ripening 
than most other Antiguan varieties. 

'* The parent tree is growing in a sitio occupied by Atanasio Salazar 
in the outskirts of Antigua, Guatemala, a short distance beyond the 
first kilometer post on the Guatemala road. The altitude is approxi- 
mately 5,100 feet. The tree stands beside a small stream, with several 
Jocote trees (Spondiaa mombin L.) close around it. Its age is un- 
known, but it appears to be at least 25 years old, perhaps more. It 
stands about 30 feet high, the trunk, about 15 inches thick at the base, 
giving off its first branches 10 feet above the ground. The crown is 
rather broad, dense, and well branched. The young branches are 
erect, stout, stiff, and well formed, indicating that the tree is a vigor- 
ous grower. The wood is not unduly brittle. The bud wood is excel- 
lent, the branches being of good length with the buds well placed. The 
eyes are large, well developed, and show no tendency to fall and leave 
a blind bud. 

" The climate of Antigua is not cold enough to test the hardiness of 
Guatemalan avocados, but it may reasonably be assumed that this 
variety is of average hardiness for the Guatemalan race. 

"The flowering season is late February and March. The tree pro- 
duced a heavy crop of fruit from the 1916 blooms and set an equally 
heavy crop in March, 1917, to be ripened in 1918. The bearing habits 
of this variety give promise of being exceUent. The fruit ripens in 
March and April, but can be left on the trees until June or even later. 
The ripening period may be termed midseason to late. 

" The fruit is round, weighing three-fourths of a pound to a pound, 
rather rough, and dark green or yellowish green externally, with a skin 
of moderate thickness. It is attractive in appearance and of conven- 
ient and desirable size and form. The flesh is cream yellow, very oily 
in texture, and of rich flavor. There is a peculiar nuttiness about the 
flavor which is not found in the other varieties of this collection. It 
may, perhaps, be said to suggest the coconut. The seed is variable in 
size, but on the average is rather small for a round fruit It is tight in 
the cavity. 

"A formal description of the fruit is as follows : Form spherical ; size 
below medium to above medium ; weight 10 to 16 ounces, length 81 to 
3{ inches, breadth 3^ to 3f inches ; base rounded, the slender stem in- 
serted slightly to one side without depression; apex flatteoed and 
slightly depressed around the stigmatic point ; surface pebbled, usually 
rather heavily so, dull green in color, with a few small yellowish dots ; 
skin thick, about one-eighth of an. inch, coarsely granular toward the 
flesh, hard and woody; flesh rich cream yellow in color, with no flber 
and only very slight discoloration, pale green near the skin, fairly dry, 
and of rich, nutty flavor; quality very good; seed rather round or 

60628—22 6 



66 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44781 to 44783— Continued. 

oblate, medium sized, varying from 1 to 2 ounces in wei^t, tight in 
the cavity, with both seed coats adhering closely to the ootyledons.** 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual 
Report of the California Avocado Associatibn, 1917, p. 184, fig. SO; 
reprint, 1918, p. 26, fig. 80; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture Bulletin No* 748, p. 02, pL 21. 

44788. "(Nos. 122, 143. Avocado No. 28.) Csntel. The parent tree of 
this variety is Just coming into bearing and produced but few fruits 
in 1917. While it is too early to know definitely what its bearing habits 
will be, the character of the fruit is so unusual as to make it wortb 
while to test the variety in the United States. Most round avocados 
have a medium-sized or large seed. This one, however, has an uih 
usually small seed, and if the variety proves desirable in other respects 
it will be well worth cultivating. In quality it is good. 

" The parent tree is growing in the finca La Candelaria, In Antigusu 
Guatemala. The altitude is approximately 5,100 feet The tree has 
been planted to shade coffee bushes and is still young, its age not be^ 
ing more than 5 or 6 years. It is tall and slender in habit, about 2D 
feet high, with a trunk 6 inches thick at the base. As is customary iu 
fincas, the tree has not been allowed to branch low, the first branche& 
being more than 6 feet from the ground. The growth looks unusually 
strong and healthy, the young branchlets being stout, long, stiff, and 
well formed. The bud wood is excellent, having the buds well placed 
and vigorous. 

" Little can be determined regarding the flowering and fruiting habits 
of the tree at this early day. When it was first seen, early in May, 
1917, it had only three fruits on it. It may have borne more this year, 
as the crop had already been harvested from many of the trees in the 
finca. The ripening season is probably March to May. 

" The hardiness of the tree can not be determined until it is tested 
in the United States, as it is never very cold in Antigua. 

** The fruit is round, about a pound in wei^t, green, with a moder- 
ately thick skin. The flesh is of good color and quality and in quan- 
tity nmch greater than in the average round avocado, since the seed 
is quite small. 

'*The variety may be described as follows: Form oblate; size 
medium, weight 16 ounces, length 3) inches, breadth 31 inches; base 
slightly flattened, the long, slender stem inserted without depressioo 
almost in the longitudinal center of the fruit; apex flattened, slightly 
depressed around the stigmatic point; surface pebbled, de^ yellow- 
green in color, with numerous minute yellowish dots; skin not very 
thick for this race, one-sixteenth of an inch or slightly more, hard, 
granular toward the flesh; flesh cream colored around the seed, 
becoming pale green close to the skin, very slightly discolored, with 
brownish flber tracings, but witir no fiber; fiavor rich and pleasant; 
quality very good ; seed very small for a round fruit, oblate, weighing 
less than 1 ounce, tight in the cavity, with both seed coats adhering 
closely to the cotyledons." 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual 
Report of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 135, fig. 31; 
reprint, 1918, p. 26, fig. 31 ; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture Bulletin No. 743, p. 63. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30> i&l7. 67 

44784. Camfomanesia fenzuana (Berg.) Glaziou. Myrtaceae. 

Ouabiroba. 

From LayraB, Minas Geraes, BrasU. Presented by Mr. B. H. Hunnicutt, 
director, Bscola Agricola de Lavraa Received May 18, 1917. 

"Arsmall Brazilian tree witli foliage remarkably similar to that of some of 
the European oaks. It is usually 20 to 25 feet in height, though occasionally 
taller. The fruits greatly resemble small guavas, being orange-yellow, oblate 
in form, and up to an inch in diameter. The skin is thin' and incloses a layer 
of granular, light yellow pulp which has a flavor somewhat stronger than 
tliat of the guava. The fruits are used principally for making Jams and 
Jellies. The tree should prove suitable for southern California and southern 
Florida." (Note of Dorsett, Shamel, and Popenoe.) 

See also S. P. I. Nos. 87834 and 44086 for previous introductions. 

44785. Persea ahericana Mill. Lauraceae. Avocado* 

<P. graiisHma Gaertn. f.) 

Oom Guatemala. Bud wood collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural 
explorer. Received June 8, 1917. 

"(Nos. 132, 213. Avocado No. 12.) Pankay, This variety has been included 
in the set primarily for its probable hardiness. The parent tree is growing at 
an altitude of 8,600 feet, which is more than a thousand feet above the asone in 
which citrus trees are seen in Guatemala. Avocados are rarely found at this 
altitude. Several other avocado trees in the same town (Totonicapam) had 
been badly injured by a recent frost at the time Pankay was selected, but 
this variety had escaped practically untouched. How much may be due to 
situation or other circumstances, however, is not Imown, and not too much 
confidence should be placed in the superior hardiness of this variety until it 
has been thoroughly tested in Florida and Galifomia. Since, in addition to its 
probable hardiness, it is a fruit of very good quality, it can be strongly recom- 
mended for trial in the United States. 

"The parent tree is growing in the patio of Jesusa v. de Camey, corner of 
Calle Cabanas and 10a Avenida Norte, Totonicapam. The altitude of this town 
is approximately 8,000 feet, perhaps a little higher. The situation is some- 
what sheltered, since the tree stands in the patio of a house close to the north 
waU. Since the top of the tree, however, extends 10 feet or more above the 
roof of the house, the protection can not be of great importance, except from 
one point of view: The tree may have been effectively protected when young, 
being thus enabled to develop uninjured during the first few years of its 
growth, after which it was better able to withstand severe frosts. The age of 
the tree is said to be about 25 years; it stands 40 feet high, with a broadly 
oval, dense crown, the top of which has been cut out to avoid danger of its 
breaking in high wind and falling upon the tile roof of the house. The trunk 
is about 20 inches thick at the base, dividing 8> feet from the ground to form 
two main branches, which give off secondary branches at 20 feet from the 
ground. While the tree appears to be vigorous and hardy, it may be found 
somewhat difiicult to propagate, as it does not make the best type of bud wood. 
The eyes are not plump, but somewhat slender, with the outer bud scales fall- 
ing early, and the bud itself shows a tendency to fall at an early stage. The 
wood seems to be rather brittle. 

*' The flowering season is late April and May. The tree is quite productive, 
bearing its fruits often in clusters. It produced a good crop from the 1915 
blooms and another good one from the 1916 blooma Owing to the great eleva- 



68 SEEDS AITD PIAKTS IM70BTED. 

I 

tion of Totonicapam and the consequent lack of heat, the fruits are very slow 
in reaching maturity. The season of ripening is from September until the end 
of the year, but the fruits which ripen at this time are those from the pre- 
vious year's bloom — that is, flowers which appeared in May, 1916, developed 
fruits which were not fully ripe until September or October, 1917! 

" The fruit is of medium size, of attractive pyriform shape, smooth, and 
green in color. The flesh is of good quality, free from fiber, and the seed Is 
comparatively small. It can be considered a fruit of very good quality and 
desirable from other points of view than that of its probable hardiness. 
• . ** Following is a formal description of this variety : Form pyriform, rather 
slender, and slightly necked; size medium, weight 12 ounces, length 4f inches, 
greatest breadth 3 inches; base tapering, narrow, the stem inserted almost 
squarely without depression ; stem 3^ inches long, stout ; apex rounded, slightly 
depressed around the stigmatic point ; surface smooth or nearly so, light green 
and almost glossy, with numerous yellow dots; skin moderately thick, about 
one-sixteenth of an inch, woody and brittle; flesh deep-cream color, changing 
to pale green near the skin, free from fiber, and of very rich fiavor ; quality ex- 
cellent ; seed rather small, conical, weighing about li ounces, tight in the cavity, 
with both seed coats adhering closely." (Popenoe,) 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual Report 
of the California Ayocado Association, 1917, p. 125, fig. 21 ; reprint, 1918, p. 24, 
fig. 20 ; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. Department of Agriculture Bulle- 
tin No. 743, p. 50. 

44786. Cryptostegia grandiflora E. Br. Asclepiadacese. 

Falay rubber. 

From Old Fort, New Providence, Bahamas. Presented by Mr. W. F. Doty, 
American consul, Nassau, Bahamas, who secured it from Dr. Charles S. 
Dolley. Received May 24, 1917. 

A twining shrub, native of India, but cultivated in many places in the Tropics 
for the rubber obtained from the sap. It has opposite, elliptic leaves and tenni- 
nal cymes of large reddish purple flowers which bloom all the year. The leaves 
and stems contain an abundance of latex which yields a quantity of rubber esti- 
mated at 2 per cent of the weight of the fresh plant. From the bast flber of the 
Inner bark a good quality of wrapping paper has been made. The seed coma 
furnishes a silky floss which can be made into an excellent felt. Propagation 
is by seeds. (Adapted from C. S. Dolley, On the Occurrence of Palay Ru'bJ)er in 
Mexico, India-Rubber Journal, May 20, 1911,) 

44787 to 44789. 

From Ranchl, India. Presented by Mr. A, C. Dobbs, Deputy Director of 
Agriculture, Chota Nagpur Division. Received May 24, 1917. 

44787. Bbassica campestbis sabson Prain. Brassicacese. Sarson. 

An erect annual of rigid habit, cultivated in many places in India for 
the seeds. There are two forms — one with erect pods and one with 
pendent pods, the former being the true sarson and the latter being 
found commonly only In northern Bengal and eastern Tirhut. The seed 
is sown in September, either broadcast or in parallel lines, usually with 
wheat or barley, and the plants are cut soon after the harvest of the 
associated crop. Sarson is very liable to be attacked by insects and 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 69 

44787 to 44789— Continued. 

' blight and is quite susceptible to climatic vicissitudes. (Adapted from 
Watt, Commercial Products of India, p. 176.) 

44788. Brassica kapus dichotoma (Roxb.) Praln. Brassicacese. Tori. 

An annual plant cultivated throughout India, especially in the lowei^ 
provinces. There are two forms — one tall and rather late, the other 
shorter and very early. The seeds are usually brown and the same size 
as those of the sarson {Brassica cam^esiris sarson). The oil content 
is very variable. (Adapted from Watt, Commercial Products of India, 
p. 178.) 

44789. GuizoTiA abyssinica (L. f.) Cass. Asteraceie. 

An annual composite, native of tropical Africa, but cultivated in most 
of the provinces of India for the oil-producing seeds. The seed is sown 
from June to August and harvested in November and December. Light 
sandy soil is generally chosen, and the seed is drilled in rows 11 to 13 
inches apart. The oil is pale yellow or orange, nearly odorless, and has 
a sweet taste. It is used for making paints, for lubrication, and for 
lighting purposes. (Adapted from Watt, Commercial Products of India, 
p. 625.) 

44790 to 44792. Physalis peruviana L. Solanaceae. Foha. 

From Dundas, New South Wales, Australia. Presented by Mr. Herbert J. 
Rumsey. ReceiTed May 29, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Rumsey. 

" The green and purple varieties and the crosses between them make a 
muddy looking Jam with a peppery taste, distasteful to many ; but the yellow 
variety makes jam of a clear amber color, which is almost free from the hot 
taste." 

44790. " Large Purple. Grown from seed received recently from Living- 
stones. This appears to be the original type of the fruit." 

44791. " Phenomenal Large Qreeii. A type frequently in evidence among 
our seedlings." 

44792. " Phenomenal Large Yelloxc. The result of our selection for six 
or seven .years. The fruit from which this was saved is the type at 
which we are aiming.'' 

44793 and 44794. 

From Mustapha, Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut Received 
May 26, 1917. 

44793. Allium tbiquetrum L. Liliacese. 

A bulbous plant with a 3-angled stem, common on the coast of Algeria. 
In its usual surroundings this plant is a rather dwarfed weed of dry tex- 
ture, but it has been found that when it is transplanted to good garden 
soil with plenty of fresh water it produces, during the winter, large plants 
with white, tender, and succulent underground parts. If the green leaves 
are removed, the rest of the stem forms a delicate vegetable with no odor 
of garlic. (Adapted from Trabut, Revue Horticole, July 1, 191S, p. SIl.) 

44794. OosBYPiUM sp. Malvaceae. Cotton. 

''This cotton is derived from a CaravoMca hybrid crossed with Mit 
Afifl. For several years it has proved very prolific and fairly early. It 



70 SBEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBTED. 

44793 and 44794— Continued. 

has long, silky fiber of first-rate quality. It bears little or nothing the 
first year, but the following year is covered with bolls. It should be 
planted at the rate of three to five thousand plants for each 2 acres. It 
may remain in place four or five years. The seeds should be collected 
from the best plants, as this hybrid is still incompletely fixed. The plants 
should be started in a nursery and planted the second year.** (TraMtl.) 

Caravanica is supposed to be a hybrid between kidney cotton, Chi- 
svpiwn sp., and G. harbadense; Mil Afifl is usually referred to O, bar- 
hadense. 

44795 to 44800. 

From Venezuela. Presented by Mr. Henry Pittier. Received Blay 29, 
1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Pittier. 

447&5. Amtgdalus pebsiga L. Amygdalaceffi. Peach. 

{Prunu8 persica Stokes.) 

*'(No. 7112. From Caracas, March, 1917.) A small peach, with thin, 
acidulous flesh, sold In the market at Caracas; collected in the neigh- 
boring mountains." 

44706. Bbomelia chbysantha Jacq. Bromeliacese. 

"(No. 7111. From Caracas, March, 1917.) This has been called Bro- 
meUa chrysantha, but it may be simple B. plnffuin. The fruit, which is 
sweet acidulate and quite agreeable to the taste when mature, is sold 
in the market'* 

44797 to 44799. QossTpn7i£ sp. Malvaceie. Cotton. 

Introduced for the Office of Crop Acclimatization and Adaptation In- 
vestigations. 

44797. "(No. 7110. From Siquire VaUey, Miranda, April, 1917.) 
A deciduous shrub of pyramidal habit, with 4-locked ftuits. It 
grows among bushes on alluvial flats." 

44798. "(No. 7094. From Caracas, March, 1917.) Cultivated io 
a garden." 

44799. "(No. 7109. From Caracas, March, 1917.) A pyramidal 
perennial shrub, 2 to 8 meters (7 to 10 feet) high, growing around 
houses, bushes, etc.'* 

44800. SoLANTTic sp. Solanaceae. 

"(No. 5972. From Caracas.) An herbaceous trailing plant, bearing 
edible fruits; desirable for cultivation in cool, shady places in a mild 
climate." 

44801. Aknona (cherimola X squamosa) X RETicni.ATA. Anno- 
naceffi. Cuatemoya. 

From Lamao, Philippine Islands. Cuttings presented by Mr. P. J. Wester, 
horticulturist in charge of the Lamao Experiment Station. Received 
May 19, 1917. 

"No. 8685-11." 

See S. P. I. Nos. 44671 to 44673 for previous introductions and descriptiim. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 71 

44802. MiCROLAENA 8TIFOIDE8 (LabiU.) R. Br. Poacese. 

Ueadow 'rice-^ass. 

From Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Purchased from Messrs. 
Arthur Yates ft Co. (Ltd). Received May 31, 1917. 

These seeds were introduced for the Office of Forage-Orop Investigations. 

A perennial, erect or ascending grass, 1 to 2 feet in height, with usually 
rather short and very acute leaves, narrow panicles 3 to 6 inches long, and 1- 
flowered spikelets. It keeps beautifully green throughout the year and will 
live in poor soil, provided it be damp. It bears overstocking better than any 
other native grass and maintains a close turf. It is native in Australia and 
also in New Zealand. (Adapted from BaUey, Queensland Flora, pt. 6, p. 1872, 
and from Maiden, Useful Native Plants of Australia, p. 94.) 

44803. SoLAKUM TUBEBOSUM L. Solanaceae. Potato. 

From Allahabad, India. Presented by J^r. William Bembower, horticul- 
turist, Ewing Christian College. Received May 31, 1917. 

" Potato seed produced on the farm of the Agricultural Department of the 
Ewing Christian College, Allahabad. Gathered in March, 1917. The variety or 
varieties we have here are of Inferior quality generally, and we And a little 
difficulty in carrying them over the hot season, but we are trying to improve 
the local kinds." (Bembotcer.) 

44804 and 44805. 

From Yihsien, Shantung, C!hina. Presented by Rev. R. G. Coonradt. Re- 
ceived June 1, 1917. 

44804. Cannabis sativa L. Moraceie. Hemp. 

"The hemp is planted here in March, in rich, black soil, and often 
irrigated. From the fiber taken from the outside of the stalk our best 
rope is made.'* (Coonradt,) 

For the use of the Office of Fiber Investigations. 

44805. PoLTOoNuif TiNCTOBiTTM Lour. Polygonacese. 

"The 'blue plant' may be common in America. When mature, it is 
put through a process to obtain the dye with which all of our blue 
clothes are colored." (Coonradt.) 

An annual herb commonly cultivated in dry fields in China and Japan, 
growing to a height of 1 to 2 feet. The leaves are variable in shape, 
ranging from long narrow to short and oval, and the pink fiowers 
are borne in spikes. The dried leaves are made into "indigo balls," from 
which the dye is obtained. (Adapted from Useful Plants of Japan, 
p, lOL) 

44806. CANAVAiii OLADIATUM (Jacq.) DC. FabacesB. Sword bean. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. F. G. Walsingham, horticultural 
division, Qizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received June 1, 1917. 

A robust, woody, perennial climbing plant, with leaves composed of three 
roundish leaflets, 2 to 6 inches long, and axillary racemes of dark-purple 
flowers. The scimitar-shaped pods are about a foot long and contain numerous 
red or white seeds which resemble large beans. The young pods are sliced and 
boiled for table use and are also pickled. Propagation is by seeds. (Adapted 
from Undley, Treasury of Botany^ vol. 1, p, 212, and from Maomillan, Hand- 
book of Tropical Cktrdening and Plawtinff, p. 207.) 



72 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOKEBD, 

44807. Oryza sativa L. Poaceae. Bdce. 

From Chosen (Korea). Presented by Miss Katherine Wambold, Yunmot- 
kol, Keijo, through Mrs. M. W. Spaulding, Washington, D. C. Beceived 
June 1, 1017. 

"Pepsi or pay. Planted In water ; when ahout a month old it is transplanted 
to deeper water; then, later, weeding is done, fertilizing haying been done 
before the seed is planted. It is a difficult crop to raise." {WamboldA 

44808 to 44814. 

From Chile. Presented by Mr. O. F. Arms, Coquimbo, Chile. Received 
June 2, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Arms. 

44808 to 44818. Fbaoabia chilo&nsis (L.) Duchesne. Rosaceie. 

Strawberry. 

Introduced for the Office of Horticultural and Pomological Investiga- 
tions. 

44808. "Wild strawberries from near Temuoo, Chile; secured by 
Mr. George T. Smith." 

44800. " Conical strawberries from Mr. W. D. Carhart, Concepcion^ 
Chile." 

44810. ** Montanescas (?). Common large berries, with deep-aet 
seeds, from Mr. W. D. Carhart, Concepcion, Chile." 

4481 1. " Red, shining seeds. From Tome, near Concepcion. Secured, 
by Mr. W. D. Carhart." 

44812. *' Montafi€8cas, Deep-set seeds; from Mr. W. D. Carhart." 

44818. "Cultivated strawberries, with large seeds well on the sur- 
face of the berry. From * Granideros,* the farm of Mr. Cello 
Rioseco, at CoUepuUi, south of Concepcion, Chile." 

44814. Mebembbyanthbmum chilense Molina. Alzoacese. Boca. 

**Dooa, or frutillas del mar (strawberries of the sea). Collected on the 
sea beach near Serena, Chile." 

A glabrous, succulent plant about a meter (3i ft.) in length, with oppo- 
site, triangular, green leaves from 4 to 7 cm. (1} to 3 in.) long, solitary 
purplish flowers, and fleshy fruits. It grows flat in the sand on the sea- 
coast ftom Coquimbo to Rio Bueno, Chile. The fruit is edible, having an 
agreeable taste, but if eaten in abundance has a purgative effect. 
(Adapted from A. Murillo, Plant es Medicinales du Chilij p. 99,) 

44816. CncuMis melo L. Cucurbitacese. Muskmelon. 

From Turkestan. Collected and presented by Mr. Philip M. Lydig> New 
York City. Received June 4, 1917. 

"These melons are delicious six months after being taken from the vine.** 
(Lydig.) 

44816. Caesalpinia MELANOCARPA Griseb. Csesalpiniaceee. 

From Paraguay. Presented by Mr. C. F. Mead, Asuncion, Paraguay. Re- 
ceived June 4, 1917. 

" Ouayacan, From Chaco Paraguayo, near Asuncion, Paraguay. A very 
handsome and useful timber tree, though for the most part useless in Chaco 
through being unsound. In many respects it corresponds to teak. The bark 
has medicinal properties. It may do well in the southern United States.** 
(Mead.) 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 191*7. 73 

44817. VoANDZEiA 8UBTERRANEA (L.) Thouars. Fabaceee. 

From Umkomaas, Natal, Union of South Africa. Presented by Rev. H. D. 
Ooodenough. Received June 5, 1017. 

'* Woandzii, The natives plant these when the first rains come, on new 
ground, preferably a sandy loam. They look very much like peanuts, but in 
cooking they are boiled in their shells.*' {Ooodenough.) 

A yellow-flowered annual with upright, long-stalked compound leaves com- 
posed of three leaflets. Like the common peanut, the flower stalks bend down 
to the earth after flowering, and the pods are ripened underneath the ground. 
In the requisite cultural conditions the plant much resembles the common pea- 
nut. (Adapted from Maomillariy Handbook of Tropical Gardening and Plant-^ 
ing^ p. 292,) 

44818 to 44822. 

From Guatemala. Ck)llected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural explorer. 
Received May 4, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

44818. Cleome sp. Capparidacese. 

"(No. 104a. From Purula, Department of Baja Vera Paz.) Seeds 
of alcochofli, an herbaceous plant found in the mountains at an altitude 
of about 6,000 feet It sends up slender stems to a height of about 6 
feet, producing large numbers of delicate pale blue and white flowers. 
The leaves and stems, when crushed, have a pungent odor." 

44819. Dahlia excelsa Benth. Asteraceee. DahHa. 

"(No. 105. From Purula, Department of Baja Vera Paz.) Outtings 
of a double pink variety of the common tree dahlia. It is pale Iilac» 
the same color asvthe typical form, but unlike the latter, which has large 
single flowers, this variety has double flowers resembling in form some 
of the common garden dahlias of the North. The plant grows to a 
height of 15 feet, or even more, and blooms during a long period. It is 
cultivated in the gardens of the Indians, but is not common. In the 
Pokom dialect it is called shikhor; in Kekchi tzoloh." 

44820. Pebsea Americana Mill. Lauracese. Avocado. 
(P. gratissima Gaertn. f.) 

"(No. 87a. Seeds of avocado No. 15 [S. P. I. No. 44438] from the 
finca Santa Lucia, Antigua.) These seeds are to be grown and distributed 
as choice seedlings to those who wish to plant a seedling tree on the 
possibility that it may become a valuable new variety. It will be inter- 
esting to watch these trees when they come into fruit and to compare 
their fruits with those of their parent, avocado No. 15. The latter is a 
very choice variety." 

44821. Maximilianea. vitifolia (Willd.) Krug and Urb. Cochlosper- 
{Cochlospermutn hibiacoides Kunth.) [macese. 

"(No. I(y7a.) Tecomasuche, Seeds of a common shrub or small tree 
of eastern and central Guatemala, 'from the highlands at about 4,000 
feet doT^n to a level of 1,000 feet or perhaps lower. The plant occasionally 
reaches a height of 85 feet, is always stifiC, rather sparsely branched, and 
bears stout branchlets, which usually carry leaves only toward their 
tips. The plant is leafless from December or January to May in most 
sections; at this period it produces at the ends of the branchlets numer- 
ous large yellow flowers, single, brilliant in color, with a deep-orange 
center. They are followed by oval seed pods as large as a hen's egg." 



74 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBTSD. 

44818 to 44822— Continued. 

44822. Maubandia bcaitdbns (Gav.) Pers. Scropbnlariaceffi. 

** (No. 106a. From Purula, Department of Baja Vera Pas.) Seeds of 
a slender creeper from a garden. It has delicate foliage and fmuiel- 
shaped flowers about an inch broad and lavender in color. Since it is 
found at an altitude of over 5,000 feet, it should be sufficiently hardy to 
grow in southern Oalifomia as well as in Florida." 

44823. PiMENTA ACRis (Swartz) Kosteletsky. Myrtaceae. 

Bay tree. 

From Port Louis, Mauritius. Presented by Mr. O. Regnard. Recetved 
June 4, 1917. 

A small, erect tree, the leaves of which are very aromatic, yielding by dis- 
tillation an oil which is used in the preparation of bay mm. It is a native 
of the West Indies, but is cultivated in other tropical places also. The dried 
leaves and the bay rum form an important export from St. Thomas and other 
West Indian Islands. (Adapted from MtiomiUan, Handbook of Tropical Garden^ 
inff and PUmting, p. B61,) 



44824. PiMBNTA OFFICINALIS Luidl. Mjrtaceae. 

From Port Louis, Mauritius. Presented by Mr. Q. Regnard. Received 
June 5, 1917. 

A small tree with smooth, grayish bark, native to Central America and the 
West Indies, but cultivated in many places throughout the Tropics for the 
berries. These when ripe are glossy black and the size of small peas, but when 
dried before ripening are the allspice or pimento of commerce. It is considered 
to yield best in a hot and rather dry climate and prefers a loose loam or an 
alluvial, well-drained soil. At the present time Jamaica is the only place from 
which allspice is exported. (Adapted from Macmillan, Handbook of Tropical 
Oardening and Planting, p, 259.) 

44825. Erythrochiton sp. Rutacese. 

From Para, Brazil. Presented by Mr. J. Simfto da Costa. Received June 5, 
1017. 

"A rutaceous plant which may be called a botanical curiosity, from the queer 
way in which its flowers are borne. It prefers a warm, moist atmosphere and 
not too much light" (Da Costa,) 

The flowers of Erythrochiton hypophyllanthus, a related species, are borne 
on the midribs of the leaves. 

Received as Erythrochiton paraenais, for which no place of publication has 
yet been found. 

44826 to 44828. Holcus sorghum L. Poacese. Sorj^huxn. 

{Sorghum vulgare Pers.) 

From Salisbury, Rhodesia, Africa. Presented by Mr. J. O. S. Walters, 
assistant agriculturist. Department of Agriculture. Received June 5, 
1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Walters. 

Introduced for the Office of Forage-Crop Investigations. 

44826. " The cultivated variety." 

44827. " The wild variety." 

448538. ** Probably a cross. All of these native sorghums cross readily." 



APRIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917, 75 

44829. Brassica olebagea viridis L. Brassicace®. 

From Jersey Island, Channel Islands, Great Britain. Presented by Mr. 
D. R. Bisson, St. John. RecelTed June 6, 1917. 

"Jersey tree kale or eoto calihage. In this section Jersey kale is sown at 
the end of summer, then transplanted to 2 or 8 feet apart about November. It 
must be protected to stand continued severe frost Its stalk attains a height 
of 8 to 12 feet. The leaves of the growing plant are used for feeding cattle and 
pigs." (BiSBim,) 

44830. Zea mays L. Poaceae. Ck>m« 

From Johannesburg, Union of South Africa. Purchased from the Agri- 
cultural Supply Association, for the use of the Office of Cereal Investiga- 
tions. Received May 9, 1917. 

**Izotsha maize is a strain (apparently of Boone County White) which, is 
successfully grown in a limited area on the south coast of Natal, bordering 
Pondoland, an area which is subject to great extremes of drought and heat 
during the summer. It is claimed by farmers in that locality that it is the only 
breed of maize which has been found satisfactory in that particular vicinity, 
but as they are isolated from the main maize belt of South Africa Jt is quite 
possible they have not tried some of the more drought-resistant types which are 
now being grown in other parts of the Union. (Letter of J, Burtt Davy, dated 
August 18, 1911.) 

44881 to 44838. 

From Sydney, Australia. Presented by Mr. J. H. Maiden, director, Botanic 
Gardens. Received June 8, 1917. 

44831. Chobizema oobdatuic LindL Fabaceae. 

A tall, slender, glabrous, evergreen shrub, 7 to 10 feet high, with 
weak branches, more or less prickly leaves about 2 inches in length, and 
numerous red flowers. It is propagated from cuttings and may be 
grown in the open in southern California and southern Florida, being 
excellent for training on pillars and treHises. In colder regions it is an 
attractive plant for the cool greoihouse. (Adapted from BaUey, Standard 
Cyclopedia of If ortieuUtire, vol, 2, p. 75f.) 

44832. Cttisus stenofbtalus (Webb) Christ Fabacese. Oada. 

A shrub or small tree, up to 20 feet in height, with crowded, slender- 
stemmed trifoliate leaves, silky pubescent oh both sides, or sometimes 
smooth on the upper surface. The bright yellow, slightly fragrant 
flowers occur in short terminal racemes, and the flat d^iscent pod con- 
tains from five to seven seeds. It is a native of the Madeira Islands, and 
is cultivated there and in Australia as an ornamental. In the Canary 
Islands it is said to be used as fodder. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard 
Cyclopedia of .Horticulture, vol 2, p. 94$, and from Report of the Direc- 
tor of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney, Australia, 1916, p. 5.) 

44833. Eugenia cyanocabpa F. Muell. Myrtacese. 

Although the frijits of this species are inferior to those of the Eugenias 
ordinarily cultivated (Eugenia uniflora and E, domheyi), yet they may 
have some economic importance in the future. (Adapted from Maiden, 
Report of the Sydney Botanic Gardens, 1915.) 



76 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44831 to 44838— Continued. 

44834. IsoTOMA AZiLLABiB LliidL Gampanulaceffi. 

An erect perennial plant, 6 to 12 inches high, which flowers the first 
year, appearing to be annual, but forming at length a hard rootstock. 
It has a few spreading branches, irregularly pinnatiild linear leaves 2 
to 3 inches long, and large, bluish purple axillary flowers. It is a natiye 
of Australia, where it is now cultivated as an ornamental. (Adapted 
from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 3, p. 1707.) 

44835. Pebsoonia kybtilloides Sieber. Proteacese. 

A much-branched spreading shrub about 4 feet high, with rigid, oblong- 
lanceolate leaves about an inch in length and axillary flowers nearly 
half an inch long. It is a native of the Blue Mountains in New South 
Wales. (Adapted from Bentham and Mueller, Flora AustrtUiensis, voL 

5, p. m.) 

44836. Petbophila pujjchella (Schrad.) R. Br. Proteacese. 

An erect, shrubby plant, with alternate, much-divided threadlike 
leaves and a conical head of small white flowers. It is a native of 
Australia, where it is sometimes cultivated as an ornamental. (Adapted 
from Curtis* 8 Botanical Magazine, vol. Bl, pi. 796, as Protea puicheUa.} 

44837. Telopea speciosissima (J. E. Smith) R. Br. Proteacese. 

Waratah* 

A stout, erect, glabrous shrub 6 to 8 feet high, with leathery, cuneate- 
oblpng leaves 5 to 10 inches long and very handsome crimson flowers 
in dense heads or racemes 3 inches. in diameter. The fruit is a leathery, 
recurved follicle 8 to 4 inches long, containing 10 to 20 seeds. It is 
native to New South Wales. (Adapted from Bentham and Mueller, Flora 
Auatraliensii, vol. 5, p. SSJ^.) 

44838. ViTTADiNiA TBiLOBA (Gaud.) DC. Asteraoeae. 
(V. australis A. Rich.) 

An herbaceous plant, either erect and apparently annual or with dif- 
fusely ascending stem from a perennial woody base, usually not more 
than a foot high. The leaves are entire or coarsely three lobed» and the 
purplish flo\ver heads are solitary and terminal. It is a native of 
southern Australia and might be useful as an ornamental in borders. 
(Adapted from Bailey, Queensland Flora, pt. 3, p. 8Ii.) 

44839. Cacara brosa (L.) Kuntze. Fabaceae. Yam bean. 

{Pachyrhizus angulatua Rich.) 

From Mayaguez, Porto Rico. Presented by Mr. C. P. Kinman, horticul- 
turist, Agricultural Experiment Station. Received June 8, 1917. 

*'UaMUa." A shrubby, twining, tnberous-roote'l vine with trifollolate leaves, 
reddish flowers in racemes up to a foot In length, and straight pods 6 to 9 
inches long, containing 8 to 12 seeds. It is (cultivated throughout the Tropics 
for the sake of the edible roots, which ore prepared and eaten like potatoes 
or subjected to a process for extracting the starch. This starch is pure white 
and is said to be equal in every respect to that obtained from arrowroot It is 
very palatable and is used in making custards and puddings. The powdered 
tubers make a very excellent flour. Although the ripe beans are poisonous, the 
pods are not and when young are eaten like string beans. In Florida and in 
the island of Mauritius this bean is used as a cover crop. 

For an illustration of the yam bean as a cover crop, see Plate VIII. 



APBIIi 1 TO JXmR 20, idil. 77 

44840. SisYBiNCHiuM sp. Iridaceae. 

From Guatemala. Plant collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural 
explorer. Received June 8, 1917. 

"(No. 13.5. Si ay 28, 1917.) A flowering plant from the hillsides near 
Momostenango, In the Department of Totonlcapam, at an altitude of ^500 feet. 
It grows to a height of about 2 feet, with slender, grasslike leaves. In May it 
produces flower stalks up to about 2^ feet high, each ^bearing several pale- 
blue flowers about an inch in diameter, with six lanceolate petals. It Is called 
in Spanish Flor de Mayo (May flower). This should be adapted to cultivation 
in California and Florida. It seems to like a heavy soil." (Popenoe,) 

44841. Annona ch£rimola Mill. Annonaceae. CSherimoya. 

From Oran, Salta, Argentina. Presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. Received 
June 9, 1917. 

" Seeds of Annona efierimola from rather good fruit which I ate a few days 
ago. The trees which bore the fruit withstood, last winter, a temperature of 
about 15** F." (Damon,) 

44842. CiTRULLus vulgaris Schrad. Cucurbitaceae. Watermelon. 

From Durban, Natal, Union of South Africa. Presented by Mr. William W. 
Masterson, American consul. Received June 8, 1917. 

Mankataan. A melon much cultivated throughout Natal for use as cattle feed. 
It is exceptionally tough, enduring rough handling and keeping for six months 
after ripening without spoiling; but, at the same time, It is very watery and 
makes an excellent green fodder for live stock, especially when mixed with sucli 
feed as alfalfa hay or cornstalks. It is also v^ry suitable for jam making, 
some of the Cape Colony firms using large quantities for this purpose. One 
pound of seed will plant 2 or 8 acres, and as much as 120 tons of melons has 
been taken from a single acre. It might be suitable for the semiarid regions 
of the United States. (Adapted from William W. MMteraon, consular report, 
Apra 18, 1917.) 

44848. Coix LACRYMA-JOBi MA- YUEN (Rom.) Stapf. Poaceee. 

Job's-tears. 

From Chosen (Korea). Presented by Miss Katherine Wambold, Yunmot- 
kol, Keijo, through Mrs. M. W. Spaulding, Washington, D. C. Received 
June 1, 1917. 

** Yul6 moo. Grows in ordinary fields. Made into meal by mixing with 
water, then draining, drying, and pounding. When mixed with water and salt 
it is made into a kind of bread." {Wamhold,) 

This variety might be called the cultivated edible Job's-tears, and it includes 
many forms, all of which are characterized by having a thin, loose, easily 
broken shell. They are often longitudinally striated and in many examples are 
constricted at the base into what has been called an annulus. In the central 
provinces of India, among the aboriginal tribes, this grain forms an important 
article of food. It has been introduced into Japan, where the seeds are 
pounded in a mortar and eaten as meal. '(Adapted from the Agrumlturdl 
Ledger, No. IS, p. 2n, 1904.) 



78 SEEDS AI^^D PLANTS IMPOfiTED. 

44844. Carpinus orebntalis Mill. Betulacese. 

Oriental hombean. 

From Petrograd, Russia. Presented by Dr. A. Fischer de Waldhdm, 
director, Jardin Botanique de Pierre le Grand. Received June 5, 1917. 

A small tree or large shrub, up to 20 feet high, having ovate, dark glossy-green 
leaves, 1 to 2 inches long, with doubly dentate margins. The staminate catkins 
are up to three-quarters of' an inch in length, and the exposed nuts are about 
one-sixteenth of an inch long. It is a native of southeastern Europe and Asia 
Minor and Is cultivated in European gardens merely as an interesting rarity. 
(Adapted from Bean, Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles, vol, U 
p. t9e.) 

44845. RuBus uneatus Beinw. Rosace®. 

From Lawang, Java. Presented by Mr. M. Buysman. Received June 9, 1917. 

A stout, semierect herb with softly pubescent branches, straight prickles or 
none at all, and compound leaves composed of three to five leathery, often doubly 
serrate leaflets up to 5 inches in length and 2\ inches in width. The flowers 
occur either in short axillary heads or in elongated terminal panicles, and the 
berries are red. It is a native of the Sikkim Himalayas, where it is found 
at altitudes ranging from 6,000 to 9.000 feet It is very variable in the size of 
the flowers and the width of the leaflets. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of 
British India, vol. 2, p. SSS.) 

44846 to 44854. 

From Avondale, Auckland, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. H. R. Wright. 
Received June 9, 1917. 

44846.' Oyphokandra betacea (Cav.) Sendt. Solanacese. Tree-tomato. 

An evergreen, semi woody plant, native to Peru. Cultivated throughout 
the Tropics for the edible, ovoid, smooth-skinned fruits which are pro- 
duced in hanging clusters at the ends of the branches. When mature 
these fruits are reddish yellow, with a subacid pulp of an agreeable flavor ; 
although pleasant when eaten fresh, they are used chiefly for stewing 
or for Jam or preserves. The tree is a quick grower, commencing to bear 
when about 2 years old, and thrives l>est on deep soil. Propagation is by 
seeds. (Adapted from Macmillan, Handbook of TrofHcal Oardeninff and 
Planting, ed, 2, p. 19i,) 

44847. DovYALis caffba (Hook, and Harv.) Warb. Flacourtiacese. 

{Aberia caffra Hook, and Harv.) XTmkolo. 

** Fruits used for Jams and Jellies ; the plant is grown for hedges. It is 
very prickly and is hardy in New Zealand." (Wright.) 

A shrub or small tree, with pale>green leaves 1^ inches long and up 
to an inch in width. The edible fruit resembles a small yellowish apple 
and is so exceedingly acid when fresh that it is said to be used without 
vinegar as a pickle. It is a native of tropical Africa, but has been intro- 
duced into southern California and southern Florida. (Adapted fron> 
The Pacific Garden, August, 1914.) 

44848 and 44849. Leptospebmum scopabium Forst. Myrtacese. 

« 

Manuka. 
" Very hardy. Used for firewood, as it gives great heat Very pretty 
when in flower. Grows 6 to 10 feet high." (Wright,) 

One of the most abundant of New Zealand shrubs, reaching occa- 
sionally a height of 30 feet, with hard, leathery, sharp-pointed leaves and 



APBUi 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 79 

44846 to 44854r-Continued. 

white or pinkish, odorless flowers up to three-quarters of an inch in 
width. This plant flowers so profusely that the entire country appears 
as though covered with snow. The entire plant is very aromatic, and the 
leaves have been used for maldng tea. The wood is used for fences and 
firewood. (Adapted from Laing and Blacktcell, Plants of New 'Zealand, 
p. 272.) 

.M84a (No.l.) 44849. (No. 2.) 

44850. Nagela. excsxsa (D. Don.) Kuntze. Taxaceie. 
(Podocarpus dacrydMdes A. Rich.) 

"This is the one tree exclusively used in this country for making 
butter boxes, the wood being odorless and of a nice white color. The 
tree grows very tall and often has a trunk 5 or 6 feet in diameter." 
{Wright.) 

A tall tree, often branchless for 70 or 80 feet, with flat, bronze-colored 
young leaves, which become green and scalelike when mature. The very 
small catkins are borne on the tips of the branchlets, and the fruit is set 
upon a fleshy red receptacle which is eaten by the Maoris. The tree is 
native to New Zealand, where it is called by the Maori name Kahikatea, 
It furnishes a light-colored, very heavy timber which is well suited for 
making paper pulp. (Adapted from Laing and Blacktoell, Plants of New 
Zealand, p. 70, as Podooarpus dacryd'ioides.) 

44851. Naoeia febbxjginea (G. Benn.) Kuntze. Taxaces. Mlro. 
(Podocarpus ferruginea G. Benn.) 

A large tree with gray or grayish black bark which peels off in large 
flakes; native to New Zealand. It has narrow, pointed leaves, axillary 
dioecious flowers, and bright-red fruits about the size of a small plum. 
The native pigeons are very fond of the miro berries and become very 
fat and lazy from feeding on them. The fruits have the odor and taste 
of turpentine and ripen in July and August. The timber is hard and 
rough and is not easily worked, nor is it especially durable. The gmn 
which oozes from the tree possesses healing properties. (Adapted from 
Laing and Blachwell, Plants of New Zealand, p. 68, as Podocarpus 
ferruginea.) 

44858. Passiflora sp. Passifloracefle. Oranadilla. 

**Bell-apple or Indian passion fruit. A delicious fruit requiring tropical 
heat." (Wright.) 

44853 and 44854. Passiflora EDTn:.is Sims. Passifloracete. 

Purple granadllla. 
44853. **Fij%:* 

44854. ' " Oiant. An improved strain of the common passion fruit as 
grown in New Zealand and Australia. Largely grown commer- 
cially. Will grow wherever frosts are not too heavy in winter." 
(Wright.) 

44855. AcHBAS zapota L. Sapotacese. SapodiUa. 

(A. sapota L.) 
From Curacao, Dutch West Indies. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Re- 
ceived June 11, 1917. 
^'Nispero. From very large, choice fruits." (Curran,) 



80 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44856. Persea Americana Mill. Lauracese. Avocado. 

(P. gratiasima Gaertn. f.) 

From Guatemala. Budwood collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agri- 
cultural explorer. Received June 12, 1917. 

**(Nos. 146, 193, 221. Avocado No. 30.) Tertah, A famous variety from 
Mixco, near the city of Guatemala, noted for Its large size and excellent 
quality. 

"The parent tree is growing in the sitlo of Leandro Castillo, Just above 
the plaza of Mixco, at an altitude of approximately 5,700 feet. The tree is 
said by the owner to have been grown by his grandfather from a seed brought 
from Moran, a small village about 10 nriles distant. While Its age is not defi- 
nitely known, it is estimated at about 60 years. It is about 25 feet high, broad 
and spreading in habit, with a trunk 15 inches thick at the base, branching 7 
feet from the ground to form a dense crown fully 30 feet broad. A peculiarity 
of the tree is its very brittle wood. This may be against the variety In Cali- 
fornia and Florida, where strong winds occasionally do much damage. The 
growth seems to be vigorous, and the budwood is very satisfactory, the twigs 
being stout, well formed, and supplied with vigorous buds. 

" The climate of Mixco is cool, but not cold enough to test the hardiness of 
the variety. This can only be determined by a trial in the United States. 

"The tree flowers In March. According to the owner. It has not borne as 
well in recent years as formerly. He attributes this to the fact that the tree 
is getting old, but it seems in addition to have been weakened by the attacks 
of Insects. No fruits were produced from the 1916 blooms. The 1917 blooms 
resulted In a good crop, but many of the fruits dropped to the ground when 
nearly full grown. Upon examination they appeared to have been attacked by 
some insect, whose burrows could be seen toward the base of the fruit. The 
season of ripening is said to be from February to April, the fruits being at 
their best in March. They can, however, be picked as early as January. To- 
ward the end of the season they become very rich in flavor. 

"The fruit is long and slender, tending toward pyriform. It weighs as 
much as 3 pounds in some instances. It is de^ purple in color when fully ripe 
and has a rather thin skin (for this race) and deep cream-colored flesh of very 
rich flavor. The seed is very small in comparison to the size of the fruit 

"An American relates that he once brought a fruit from the tree to his home 
in the city of Guatemala, where it sufficed to make salads for two meals for 
a household of 10 people. 

" The variety may be formally described as follows : Form oblong to slender 
pyriform ; size extremely large, weight 28 to 36 ounces, and occasionally up to 
48 ounces, length 7 to 8i inches, greatest breadth Sf to 4| inches; base broad 
to narrow, sometimes pointed, the slender stem about 5 inches long inserted 
slightly obliquely without depression; apex rounded; surface nearly smooth, 
deep dull purple in color' with numerous russet dots and patches ; skin mod- 
erately thick, about one-sixteenth of an inch or slightly more, coarse, granular 
and woody; flesh cream yellow in color, free from fiber or discoloration and 
of fine texture; flavor rich and pleasant; quality excellent; seed very small 
slender conical in form, about 1^ ounces in weight, tight in the seed cavity, with 
both seed coats adhering closely to the cotyledons." (Popenoe.) 

See also Exploring Guatemala for Desirable New Avocados, Annual Report 
of the California Avocado Association, 1917, p. 135, fig. 32 ; reprint, 1918, p. 26, 
fig. 32 ; and The Avocado in Guatemala, U. S. Department of Agriculture Bulle- 
tin No. 743, p. 64, pi. 22. 

For an illustration of the parent tree of the Tertoh avocado, see Plate IX. 



InvsntorySI.Ssedsand Plant! Imported. PLATE IX. 

Illl 



'' Sails 
5|S* 



Sliii 



i r.ii 

I li 

° iii* 

^ i ipl 
^ 5 iM 

s i :tUi 

* : £---9 - 

■ E -Sglii 

w 1 fJ-^'^ 
2 ' iS*=«- 

iifllH 

° Ifiti 

i 'wii 

^ Sil'4 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 81 

44867. Nephroubfis sp. Polypodiaceae. Fern. 

From Gnatemala. Plants collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural 
explorer. Received June 25, 1917. 

''(No. 147. June 9, 1917.) Ferns collected in the forest at Quirigua, wh^e they 
were found growing in the leaf axils of the corozo palm (Attalea oohune 
Mart)." {Popenoe.) 

Introduced for the monographic study of Mr. R. C. Benedict, of the Brooklyn 
Botanic Garden. 

44868. GuAiACUM guatemausnse Planch. Zygophyllacese. 

Guayacan. 

From Guatemala. Ck>llected by Dr. F. S. Johnson and sent through Mr. 
Wilson Popenoe, agricultural explorer. Receiyed June 25, 1917. 

*'<No. 145a. From Zacapa, June 5, 1917.) The guayaoauy sometimes called by 
Americans lignum-vit€s, is found in abundance upon the plains of the lower 
Motagua Valley, in the vicinity of El Rancho, Zacapa, and other towns. It is a 
small tree^ sometimes attaining 30 feet in height, usually somewhat^spreading in 
habit, with a trunk sometimes gnarled and twisted and having slender branches. 
The leaves are small and delicate. Toward the end (^ the dry season, i. e., in 
February or March, the tree comes into flower, and it is then a mass of lavender 
puiple, distinguishable for long distances across the plains. It remains in bloom 
for several weeks. 

"The wood is exceedingly hard and, though difficult to work, is of value for 
cabinet purposes. The heartwood is rich brown in color, while the sapwood 
which surrounds it is light yellow. Both take a fine polish. 

" The tree thrives In a warm climate with little rainfall. The soil upon which 
it grows is oft^i roclcy and poor. Whether it will stand any frost can not be 
stated, but it seems likely that it may succeed in parts off Oalifomia and Arizona 
and perhaps also in Florida. Small 'trees often flower profusely. It should be 
given a trial as an ornamental in the regions menti<med." {Popenoe.) 

For an illustration of the guayacan as grown in Florida, see Plate X. 

44869 to 44864. 

From Nice^ France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Received 
Jwe^ 11, 1917. 

44850. AiANGiUM CHiNENSE (Lour.) Rehder. Ck>rnacefle. 
(Marlea hegoniaefolia Roxb.) 

"A tree, hardy here, but it loses its leaves in winter ; this might not hap- 
pen in a warmer climate.*' (Prosehowaky.) 

A tall tree, up to 00 feet in height, with ovate, entire or slightly lobed 
leaves about 8 inches in length, and cymea of small, whitish, fragrant 
flowers. It is a native of Africa and southern and eastern Asia. This 
tree might be grown in the extreme southern United States. (Adapted 
from BaUey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. i, p. i4S, as 
Alanffium hegonittefolium.) 

44860. BoBHMEBiA MACBOPHTLLA D. Dou. UrticacesB. 

A pretty shrub with narrow dentate leaves 6 to 12 inches in length 
and very long, drooping flower spikes. It is a native of Upper Burma 
and northeastern India, where it ascends to 4,000 feet. The wood is 
light reddish brown and moderately hard and yields a good fiber, which 
is used for ropes and fishing lines. (Adapted from J. B. Oombie, Manual 
of Indian Timlen, p. 668.) 

C0e28 — 



82 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44859 to 44864r--C!ontiiiued. 

44861. BoEHicEBiA PLATYPHYLLA D. Don. Urtlcacese. 

• 

A very common shrub, growing in ravines in the tropical ahd sub- 
tropical HlmalayasL It has thin grayish brovm bark, vny variable 
leaves 8 to 9 inches long, and simple or branched spikes of small globnlar 
flower clusters. The wood is reddish brown and moderately hard. 
(Adapted from J, B. Gamble, ifanttol o/ Indian TimX>erB^ p. 668.) 

44862. Meibomia tiliaefoua (Don) Kuntze. Fabacese. 
{Dewiodium tUiaefolium Don.) 

" Hardy and more or less omamentaL" {Protohowihtf,) 

A large deciduous shrub, with slender, terete branches, tlii<^, greea 
trifoliolate leaves about 4 inches long, and red flowers in lax racemes 
often a foot in length. It is a native of the Himalayas, at altitudes rang- 
ing from 8,000 to 9,000 feet The bark yields an excellent flber, exten- 
sively employed in rope making; the leaves are good fodder, and the 
roots are used medicinally as a tonic and diuretic. (Adapted from 
Hooker, Flora of British India, vol, 2, p. J68, and from Watt, DicMoiMry 
of the Boonomio Products' of India, vol, S, p. 8S,) 

44863. PiPTANTHus NSPALBNsis (Hook.) Sweet. Fabacese. 

A pretty shrub, with greenish gray bark and handsome, large, yellow 
flowers in rather dense racemes. The wood is white, with irregular gray 
heartwood. It is a native of the Himalayas at altitudes above 7,000 
feet and is sometimes grown as an ornamental in European gardens. 
(Adapted from J. S. Oamble, Manual of Indian Tknhen, p, 229,) 

44864. Tkachtcabpus MABTiAZTUs (WalL) Wendl. iPhoenicacee. Palm. 

" Quite hardy and ornamental hera" (Prosdhowihif,) 

A tall palm, with a slender trunk 20 to 60 feet hig^, naked for most of 
its length, being clothed beneath the crown with persistent leaf sheaths. 
The rigid, leathery, roundish leaves are 4 to 5 feet in diameto' and are 
cut about halfway down into linear 2-lobed segments. The flowers are 
yellow, and the one to three dull blue drupes are half an inch lon^. It 
is a native of tiie temperate parts of the Himalayas, at altitudes of 
4,000 to 8,000 feet (Adapted from Booker, Flora of BritUh India, voL 
6, p. 4S6,) 

44865 to 44884. 

From tropical America. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Received June 
6, 1917. 

44865. Acacia villosa (Swartz) WiUd. Mimosacen. 

"(Curagao, Dutch West Indies, March 9, 1917.) Watapaana sjimaron, 
A shrub or tree of rapid growth; used for flrewood." {Curran,) 

See S. P. I. No. 44452 for description. 

44866. AcHRAs zafota L. Sapotacese. SapodilU. 
{A, sapota L.) 

"(Curagao, Dutch West Indies, March, 1917.) Seeds from the best and 
largest nispero 1 have ever eaten." (Curran,) 

44867. Cappabis sp. Capparidaoeie. 

''(Urumaco, Venezuela, May, 1917.) A tree with large oval dark- 
green leaves. Fruits rq;M)rted to be edible.*' iOurran.) 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 88 

44865 to 44884— Continued. 

44868. Gabica papaya L. Papayaceie. Papaya. 

*'(OuraQao, Dutch West Indies, March, 1917.) Seeds of a medium- 
quality papaya sold in the market here.** {Cwran,) 

44869. OrrBTjix.T78 vuloasib Schrad. Cucurbitaceie. Watermelon. 

"(Curacao, Dutch West Indies, March, 1917.) The watermelons of 
Curacao are the best I have tasted in the Tropics." (Curran.) 

44870. CucuMis mblo L. Cucurbltacese. Muskmelon. 

"(Curacao, Dutch West Indies, March 9, 1917.) Muskmelon from the 
Curacao market; of fair quality." (Curran.) 

44871 to 44874. Gosstpium sp. Malvacese. Cotton. 

44871. "(Altagracia, Venezuela, May, 1917.) Alffodan de Peru. 
Grown as a commercial crop which sells at the rate of $20 for 
500 poundsw" (Ourran,) 

44872w "(Altagracia, Venezuela, May, 1917.) Algodan moreno, 
Ommercial cotton, grown and manufactured in the same region." 
{Curran.) 

« 

44873. "(Los Quemazons, Venezuela, May, 1917.) Algodan de Peru, 
Commercial crop." (Curran.) 

44874. "(Los Quemazons, Venezuela, May, 1917.) Algodan moreno. 
Ommerdal crop (?)," (Curran.) 

44875. HoLcus sobohum L. Poacese. Soz^ghum.* 
(Sorghum vulgare Pers.) 

"(Market, WiUemstad, Curacao, Dutch West Indies, March, 1917.) 
Mais chiquito. Used for making meal." (Curran,) 

44876. Phaseoltts lunatus L. Fabacese. Idma bean. 

"(Market, Willemstad, Curacao, Dutch West Indies, March, 1917.) 
Klein hoontie.** (Curran.) 

"Small forms of the large flat Lima bean. The shape, color, and 
markings are like types in this country. They* may be either the bush, or 
the pole form." (D, N. Shoemaker.) 

44877. Phaseolub vuloabis L. Fabaceie. Common bean. 

"(Market, Willemstad, Curacao, Dutch West Indies, March, 1917.) 
Klein hoantje," (Curran.) 

"Probably the variety known as Dutch Caseknife," (D. N. Shoe- 
maker.) 

44878. Rttpbechtia fagifolia Meisn. Polygonaceie. l>uraznillo. 

"(La Estacadita, near Sabanita de dJoro, Venezuela, May, 1917.) 
Komari. A small tree." (Curran.) 

A South American tree with smooth bark which, in renewing Itself, 
each year, wrinkles in a peculiar way, giving the tree a characteristic 
appearance. In the spring it is covered with yellowish flowers which 
later become pinkish, making the tree very ornamental. The wood Is of 
no commercial use, so far as is known. (Adapted from Venturi and 
LillOf Contribucion al Vonodmiento de las Arholea de la Argentina^ p. 83.) 

44879. Sesamum obientale L. Pedallaceie. Sesame. 
(S. indicum L.) 

"(Willemstad, Curacao, Dutch West Indies, March 9, 1917.) Ajonjoli. 
Sold in the market; for making sweetmeats." (Curran,) 

See S. P. I. No. 44763 for description. 



84 SEEDS AND PLAKTS IMPORTED. 

44865 to 44884— C!ontinued. 

44880 to 44888. Viona siztbnsis (Torner) Savi. Fabaceie. Cowpea. 

"(Market, Willemstad, Curacao, Dutch West Indies, March, 1917.) 
Boawtje del Baliza,** {Curran.) 

Descriptive notes by Mr. W. J. Morse, Office of Forage-Crop Investiga- 
tions, Bureau of Plant Industry. 

44880. " No. 1. A red cowpea, quite similar to our Red Ripper." 

44881. "No. 2. A day-colored cowpea, resembling some of our 
medium-maturing Clay varieties.'* 

44882. "No. 3. A speckled cowpea, resembling our WhippoanciM 
variety." ^ 

44883. Mbligocca bijvga L. Sapindacete. 

"(Sabanete de Montiel, Venezuela, May, 1917.)" (Curran.) 

44884. Mimosa sp. Mimosaceee. 

"(La Estacadita, near Sabanita de Coro, Venezuela, May, 1917.) 
Cahuderd. A common, small, leguminous tree with white flowers.** 
(Curran.) 

44886. Prunus salicifolia H. B. K. Amygdalacea. Capuli. 

From the city of Guatemala, Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Po- 
penoe, agricultural explorer. Received June 12, 1917. Quoted notes by 
Mr. Popenoe. 

'*(No. 128a. May 16, 1917.) The wild cherry of the Guatemalan highlands, 
called oereza in Spanish and oapuH in the Kich4 Indian dialect The tree is 
found both wild and cultivated in the mountains of Guatemala, from altitudes 
of about 4,000 up to 9,000 feet or perhaps higher. As commonly seen, the tree 
is erect, often somewhat slender, reaching a height of about 80 feet, the trunk 
stout (occasionally as much as 8 feet thick), and the bark rough and grayish. 
The young branchlets are dotted with grayish lenticels. The leaves, which are 
borne upon slender petiole three-quarters of an inch long, are commonly 4i 
inches in length, 1} to 1} inches in breadth at the widest point, oblong- 
lanceolate in outline, with a^long, slender tip. The upper surface is dull greea 
the lower surface glaucous, and the margin is rather finely serrate. The flow- 
ers, which are produced from January to May, are white, about three-eighths 
of an inch wide, and very numerous, on slender racemes 2 to 4 inches in 
length. 

As many as 15 or 20 fruits sometimes develop on a single raceme, but many 
drop off before reaching maturity, with the result that two to five ripe fruits are 
commonly found on each raceme. The season of ripening in Guatemala is from 
May to September. The ripe fruits, which are slightly oblate in form and up to 
three-quarters of an inch in diameter, separate readily from the short fruit 
stalks, leaving the green 5-toothed calyxes adhering to the latter. In color the 
fruit is deep glossy maroon-purple. The skin is thin and tender, but so firm that 
the fruit is not easily injured by handling. The flesh is pale green, meaty, but 
full of Juice. The flavor is sweet, suggestive of the Bigarreau type of cherry, 
with a trace of bitterness in the skin. The stone is a trifle large in comparison 
with the size of the fruit 

" Pleasant to eat out of hand, this cherry can also be eaten In various other 
ways — stewed or made into preserves or Jams. In Guatemala it is most com- 
monly eaten out of hand and as a sweet preserve. 



r AFBIIi 1 TO JUKE 90, 1917. 85 

" This species does not appear to be adapted to hot tropical seacoasts, but it 
seems to be distinctly subtropical in character. It may succeed in moist sub- 
tropical regions, such as Florida, where other types of cherries do not thrive." 

44886 and 44887. Mar^ynia spp. Martyniaceae. 

From La Mortola, Ventimiglia, Italy. Presented by Mr. Joseph Benbow, 
superintendent. La Mortola gardens. Received June 13, 1917. 

Introduced for the plant-breeding experiments of Prof. David M. Mottier, 
Bloomington, Ind. 

44886. Mabtynia Louisiana Mill. XTnicom plant. 
(If. proboscidea Glox.) 

An ascending or prostrate annual, with branches 2 to 3 feet in length 
and large roundish leaves 4 to 12 inches wide. The dull white or yellow- 
ish flowers are li to 2 inches long, occurring in short, loose, terminal 
racemes, and the fruit is a more or less fleshy capsule 4 to 6 inches long 
at maturity, with a beak equaling or exceeding the body. It is a native 
of the United States, excepting in the North and East. (Adapted from 
Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. ^, p. 2005, ) 

44887, Marttnia lutea Lindl. 

A pale annual, with roundish, heart-shaped leaves and large greenish 
yellow flowers with orange interiors, occurring in erect, few-flowered 
racemes. The fruit is a woody, boat-shaped capsule with two beaks 2 
inches in length. It is a native of Brazil and has been cultivated in 
European greenhouses for the sake of the showy flowers. (Adapted from 
Bailey f Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. h* P< 2005.) 

44888. Melia floribunda Carr. Meliacese. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Re- 
ceived June 13, 1917. 

This species is considered by some to be a very floriferous and precocious form 
of the China tree {Melia azedarach), bilt the plant grown in the United States 
under this name is a bushy species 8 or 10 feet high, with pinnate leaves com- 
posed of lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, taper-pointed leaflets. It is said to 
begin to bloom when 1 or 2 feet high and is an ornamental adapted to the 
southern United States. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horti- 
culture, vol. 4, p. 2025.) 

44889. Carica papaya L. Papayaceee. Papaya. 

From Santa Barbara, Isle of Pines, West Indies. Presented by Mr. R. G. 
Rice. Received June 14, 1917, 

** Very fine quality ; the fruits weigh from 4 to 7i pounds each." (Rice.) 

44890 and 44891. 

From Bogota, Colombia, Presented by Mr. George E. Child. Received June 
14. 1917. 

44890. AcHBAs ZAPOTA L. Sapotaceae. Sapodilla. 

{A. sapota L.) 

A small, symmetrical tree, 25 to 30 feet high, with leathery, dark-gieen, 
shiny leaves and round or oblong fleshy fruits, resembling in outward ai>- 
pearance a smooth-skinned brown potato. It is a native of tropical Amer- 



86 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44880 and 44891— Continued. 

lea, althouierh cultivated in the Asiatic Tropics as well. When thoroughly 
ripe, the fruit is very fine for eating, a very thin skin inclosing a pale- 
brown, Juicy pulp of delicious flavor. It is best propagated by cuttings, 
although it may be raised from seeds. (Adapted from MacmiUan, Hand- 
book of Tropical Gardening and Planting, p. JSS.) 

448&1. Cabyophtllus jaicbos (L.) Stokes. Myrtaoes. Rose-apple. 
(Eugenia jambos L.) 

A handsome medium-sized tree, native to India and the Malay Penin- 
sula, but cultivated in many tropical countries for the edible, fragrant, 
pinkish fruits, which are about the size of a hen's egg, of a sweetish acid 
taste, and said to be sometimes used in preserves. It thrives best in 
moist regions at altitudes up to 3,000 feet, preferring a deep, rich soil, 
and is propagated by seed. (Adapted from MacnUUan, Handbook of 
Tropical Gardening and Planting, p. 161.) 

44892. Brassica pekinensis (Lour.) Gagn. Brassicaceae. 

Pai ts'al 

From Ann Arbor, Mich. Purchased from Mrs. Fred Osborn, manager. 
Varsity City CJelery Co. Received June 15, 1917. 

" Lun Gar Bak. Of the dozens of strains of Chinese cabbage, the short-leaved, 
solid-headed strain is the one that we have always used and found most 
profitable. 

"'As a field crop sow in rows 3 feet apart and thin to 18 inches in the row. 
Keep the plants well watered and cultivated, for as soon as growth is checked 
the seed head is formed and bursts forth as soon as moisture is again applied." 
(Osborn,) 

44893. Capsicum sp. Solanacese. Pepper. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, agricultural explorer. 
Received June 18, 1917. 

"(No. 136a. June 1, 1917.) A perennial bush pepper from Momostenango 
(altitude 7,5(X) feet), in the Department of Totonicapam. The plant makes 
a large bush 6 feet or more in height and produces throughout the year waxy, 
golden-yellow, broad peppers about 2 inches long, bluntly three pointed at the 
apex, with thick meat and a few seeds .near the base of the fruit. The taste 
is rather sharp, so that it can not be classed as belonging to the sweet peppers. 
It is an unusually handsome pepper and seems to be of excellent quality. It 
should be tested in the warmer portions of the United States.'* (Popenoe.) 

44894. Trichoscypha sp. Anacardiaceee. 

From Loanda, Angola, Africa. Presented by Mr. John Gossweller, Servicos 
de Agricultura, Angola. Received June 18, 1917. 

** (No. 6882. February 27, 1917.) A palm-shaped unbranched tree with agree- 
ably acid fruits borne on the trunk.'* (Goasweiler.) 

44896 to 44901. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. J. C. Koningsberger, director. 
Botanic Garden. Received June 20, 1917. 

44895. Cynometba caulifloba L. Csesalpiniaceee. 

A medium-sized tree, with a very Irr^^lar, knotty trunk, covered with 
thick, brown bark, marked with numerous grayish and whitish spots. 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1&17. 87 

44885 to 44901— Continued. 

The alternate, compound leayes are smooth and light green when mature, 
but when young are red or pink or, in some varieties, yellow. From the 
trunk and branches appear the corymbs of small pink or white flowers. 
The flattenedt roundish, light-brown pods have a fleshy portion which is 
very palatable when stewed. The tree is a native of Java. (Adapted 
from Van Nooten, Fleura et Fruita de Java, pt. 6, pi, 4.) 

44896. Htdnocaspus alpina Wight Flacourtiacete. 

Var. elongata. Apparently an unpublished varietal name. 

The species may be described as foUows: A large tree, 70 to 100 feet 
in height, with very variable leaves (red when young and deep green 
when old) up to 7 inches in length and 2^ Inches in width, and dioecious 
flowers in axillary racemes. The fruit is globose, about the size of an 
apple, with a brown, hairy surface. The seeds yield an oil which is used 
as fuel, and the wood is employed for general carpentry. It is a native 
of the Nilgiri Hills in southern India. (Adapted from Watt, Dictionary 
of the Economic Products of India, vol, h V- S08, and from Hooker, Flora 
of Britiah India, vol. 1, p. 197.) 

44807. Laoebstboemia speciosa (Muenchh.) Pers. Lytbracese. 

{L, floa-reginae Retz.) Crape myrtle. 

A large deciduous tree, with smooth grayish bark, elliptic or lanceolate 
leaves 4 to 8 inches in length, and large panicles of flowers. The indi- 
vidual flowers are 2 to 8 inches wide and change from pink to purple 
from morning to evening. It is a native of India and Burma, where it 
is considered one of the most important timber trees, the light-red wood 
being hard and shiny. The tree has been introduced into southern Cali- 
fornia as an ornamental. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of 
Horticulture, vol, 4, p, 1115, and from Qamble, Manual of Indian Timbers, 

p. yts.) 

44898. MussASNDA bufinebvia Miquel. Rubiacese. 

A shrub with shiny, elliptic-oblong leaves 4 to 6 inches in length, red- 
dish flowers about half an inch long in terminal corymbs, and oval-oblong 
fleshy berries. It is a native of Sumatra. (Adapted from Miquel, Flora 
Indiae Batwvae, voL 2, p, 211,) 

44809. OroPBOBA alata Blume. Sapindacese. 

Piaang tjina, A tall Javanese tree, with compound, glabrous, green 
leaves, and purplish flowers in pendulous axillary racemes, or sometimes 
solitary. The fruits are not much eaten, but hang in graceful clusters, 
remarkable for their beauty. The Juice of the fruits is said to be useful 
in r^noving stains from linen. (Adapted from Vtin Nooten, Fleura et 
Fruita de Java, pt, S, pi, 4.) 

44900. Sabaca dbclinata (Jack) Miquel. Csesalpiniacefle. 

Kiaokka. An ornamental tree, rarely more than 20 feet high, with 
alternate, pinnate leaves composed of six to eight pairs of oblong-lanceo- 
late leaflets which are purplish brown when young. The bright-yellow, 
reddish tinged flowers occur in corymbs, sometimes on the trunk, and 
make a pleasing contrast with the crimson peduncles of the corymb. 
The oblong, flat pods are about a foot long and are a beautiful purplish 
crimson while immature. (Adapted from Van Nooten, Fleura et Fruita 
de Java, pt, S, pi, 2.) 



88 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTSED. 

44896 to 44901— Continued. 

44901. Stbophanthus oattdatus (Burm.) Kurz. Apocynacefe. 
(S. dicJiotamus D. C.) 

Kikoeija. A very ornamental, shrubby vine, with white-dotted, dark- 
brown bark, simple, opposite, smooth, oval-acuminate, green leaves, and 
large, showy, red and white flowers occurring either singly or in corymbs. 
The fruits are follicles sometimes 2 feet In length, and the seeds, whicb 
are provided with long, silky hairs, are very pretty. This vine is a native 
of the East Indies, where the women use the flowers to adorn their head- 
dresses. (Adapted from Van Nooten, Fleura et Fruits de Java, pt, 7. 
pi. i. ) 

44902 to 44905. 

From Lawang, Java. Presented by Mr. M. Buysman. Received June 19, 
1917. 

44902. Bbassaiopsis speciosa Dec. and Planch. Araliaceie. 

A small tree with the upper part of the branches, and sometimes the 
panicle, prickly. The glabrous, digitate leaves with lanceolate or elliptic 
leaflets are up to 8 Inches in length and 3 inches in width, and the 
flowers occur in large panicles a foot or more in length. The tree is 
native to the eastern Himalayas from Nepal to Assam, firom sea lev^ up 
to 5,000 feet. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of Britith Ifidi^ vol. 2, p. 
757.) 

44903. LoNicERA macrantha (D. Don) Spreng. Caprlfoliacete. 

Honeysuckle. 

A rather common Himalayan shrub with leathery, cordate-oblong, 
hairy leaves an inch wide and 2^ Inches long, and white, paired flowers, 
fading to yellow, appearing in subterminal panicles. li grows at altitudes 
of 6,000 to 10,000 feet or occasionally lower. (Adapted from Hooker, 
Flora of BritUh India, vol. S, p, 10, ) 

44904. RiBEs GRiFFiTHn Hook. f. and Thoms. Grosaulariacese. 

An erect shrub about 8 feet high, with sharply serrate, 5-16bed leaves 
2 to 3 Inches long, and very lax, pendent racemes S to 6 inches long. 
The red, glabrous berries are about a quarter of an inch in length. The 
shrub Is a native of the eastern Himalayas at altitudes ranging from 
7,500 to 13,000 feet. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, vol 
2, p. 4^1.) 

44905. RuBUs lineatus Reinw. Rosacese. 

See S. P. I. No. 44845 for description and previous introduction. 

44906. Trifolium pratense L. Fabaceee. Bed clover. 

From Petrograd, Russia. Presented by Mr. I. A. Pullman, through Dr. 
Robert Regel, Bureau of Applied Botany. Received June 21, 1917. 

"(March 25, 1917.) Late, tufted Second generation; Mr. I A. Pullman, 
selector. Crop of 1916. From 2.7 acres were harvested 10,000 pounds of hay 
and 600 pounds of seeds.*' (Pullman,) 

Introduced for the Office of Forage-Crop Investigations. 



APRIL. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 89 

44907. BoNTiA DAPHNoiDES L. Myoporaceae. 

Prom Curacao, Dutch West Indies. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Re- 
ceived June 22, 1917. 

"A small, glossy leaved, ornamental tree, suitable for planting in dry situa- 
tions near tbe sea in southern California and Texas." (Currtm.) 

A small tree with a habit so similar to that of the olive that it has been put 
Into the olive family by botanists who did not recognize its true nature. It 
has alternate lanceolate leaves and axillary flowers which are either solitary 
or in pairs. The fruits are fleshy drupes, each containing eight hard seeds. 
(Adapted firom Lindley, Treasury of Botany ^ vol. 1, p. 156.) 

44908. Artocarpus communis Forst. Moracese. Breadfruit. 

(A. incisa L. f.) 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Plant presented by Mr. Gerrit P. Wilder. Re- 
ceived June 25, 1917. 

" Ulu. (Hawaiian variety.)" This variety, which now grows wild through- 
out the Hawaiian Islands, was originally introduced from Tahiti. It has 
large, rough, ovate, deeply lobed leaves, and the stamlnate flowers appear In 
large yellow catkins. The large-stemmed fruit is either round or oblong and 
varies from 5 to 8 inches in diameter. The thick tough rind, which is brownish 
at maturity. Incloses a firm, very starchy, and somewhat fibrous pulp, which 
becomes mealy when cooked, slightly resembling a dry sweet potato, and is 
much esteemed as an article of diet. The tree is propagated by suckers or by 
'layering. (Adapted from Wilder, Fruits of the Hawaiian Islands, p. 100, 
Pl. 48,) 

44909. Casuarina stricta Ait. Casiiarinacese. 

From Burringbar, New South Wales, Australia. Presented by Mr. B. 
Harrison, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received June 28, 1917. 

An Australian tree, 20 to 30 feet in height, known in New South Wales as 
Feld's fodder tree, suitable for dry or semiarid sections. The foliage is 
eagwly eaten by cattle, especially in times of drought, and it is said that one 
tree has supported 8 to 10 head of stock at one time. Even in large quanti- 
ties it does not appear to have an injurious effect on the cattle. The wood is 
used for cabinetwork and shingles and makes an excellent fuel. (Harrison,) 

44910. Cassia tomentosa L. f. Csesalpiniacese. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. F. G. Walsingham, Gizeh Branch, 
Ministry of Agriculture. Received June 28, 1917. 

A shrub, 10 to 12 feet high, with compound leaves composed of six to eight 
pairs of oval-oblong, obtuse leaflets with vehlte-velvety lower surfaces. The 
flowers are deep yellow. It is a native of tropical America and is said lo be 
a good winter bloomer in southern California. (Adapted from Bailey, Stand- 
ard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 2, p. 680,) 

44911. Attalea sp. Phoenicaceae. Palm. 

From Venezuela. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Received June 26, 
1917. 

"(No. 1027. From Colon, Estado Tachira, south of Lake Maracaibo, Vene- 
zuela, June 6, 1917.) Coruba, a common palm." {Curran.) 



90 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44912 and 44913. Cyphomandra betacea (Cav.) Sendt. Solana- 

cea>. Tree-tomato. 

From Qnayaquil, Ecuador. Presented by Dr. Frederic W. Groding, Ameri- 
can consul general. Received June 25, 1917. 

" The fruit Is delicious; It Is eaten In the raw state or as preserves." (God- 

For a general description, see S. P. I. No. 4484G. 

44912. " Yellow tree-tomato. December 4, 1916." 

44913. ** White tree-tomato. December 6, 1916." 

44914 to 44921. 

From Zacuapam, Vera Cruz, Mexico. Secured from Dr. C. A. Purpus. Re 
celved June 25, 1917. 

44914. Acacia spadicigeba Cham, and Schlecht. Mimosacese. 

Bull-hom acada. 

*'An Interesting shrub or small tree, with spreading branches armed 
with thorns resembling the horns of a bull and consequently called, to- 
gether with Its allies, IfuU-hom acacia. The thorns attracted the atten- 
tion of early botanists from the fact that they are usually hollowed out 
and inhabited by stinging ants which serve as oodyguards, protecting 
the plant from herbivorous animals. The present species is very closely 
allied to Acacia comigera of Llnnseus, if not identical with that species. 
The hollow, indehiscent pods, terminating in sharp spines, inclose a num- 
ber of hard seeds surrounded by a sugary aril which Is much relished by 
cattle and other animals." (W. B, Safford,) 

44915. Amabanthus sp. Amaranthacese. Amaranth. 

Quelite, *' This is used as a vegetable, tasting like spinach. It grows 
about the houses and fields and does not need any care." (Purpu$,) 

44916. Gacaha ebosa (L.) Kuntze. Fabacese. Yam bean. 
{Pachyrhizus angulatus Rich.) 

For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 44839. 

44917 and 44918. Exooonium pubga (Wender.) Benth. Ck>nvolvulace«. 

{Ipomoea purga Hayne.) Jalap. 

A perennial twining vine which bears handsome rose-purple flowers 
similar to those of the common morning-glory. It Is a native of the 
eastern slopes of the mountains of western Mexico, at altitudes of 5,000 
to 8,000 feet, in regions where rain is very frequent and abundant It 
is cultivated in Mexico and also In other tropical places for the sake of 
the drug which is extracted from the dried tubers. In cultivation the 
plant requires a rich forest loam, and must be supported by trellises. 
(Adapted from the National Standard Dispensatory, p. 834,) 

44917. "Wild form." (Purpus.) 

44918. " Cultivated form, from the sierras around Mount Orizaba." 
(Purpus.) 

44919. Lycopebsicon esculentum Mill. Solanacese. Tomato. 

" Var. cerasiforme. Growing wild in bean fields." (Purpus.) 

A variety which is smaller and more erect than the common tomato 
and has smaller, more numerous, and grayer leavea The globular re«l 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1917. 91 

44914 to 44921— Continued. 

and yellow fruits are used for pickles and conserves. (Adapted from 
Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 4, p. 19S1.) 

44920. PsmiUM sp. Myrtacese. 

"A wild guava which tastes lilte a strawberry." (Purpus,) 

44921. ViTis sp. Vitacese. 

** Callulos** " Several species of Vitis are found in the Mexican low- 
lands. The commonest of these is Vitia tiliaefoUa. Another belongs 
apparently to the Muscadine group and produces fruits much like those 
of the James, although usually smaller. These tropical grapes should 
be brought together in some suitable region, such as extreme southern 
Florida, and there developed by a competent plant breeder. We do not 
have as yet a first-class table grape suited to strictly tropical regions. 
With the excellent material available for breeding, it should be com- 
paratively simple to produce one." (Popenoe,) 

44922 to 44924. Acacia spp. Mimosacese. 

From the vicinity of Khartum, Sudan, Africa. Presented by Mr. F. G. 
Walsingham, Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture, Cairo, Egypt Re- 
ceived June 28, 1917. 

44922. Acacia albida Delile. 

A large, much-branched tree, with whitish bark and stipular spines 
u£rually from one-half to three^iuarters of an inch in length. The 
compound leaves are composed of four to six pairs of pinnie, and the 
white flowers occur in axillary spikes up to 5 inches long. The flat, 
oblong pods are 2 to 4 inches long. The tree is a native of tropical and 
northern Africa and yields a gum similar to gum arable. The leaves 
are eaten by goats, and the bark is used in curing leather. (Adapted 
from Oliver, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol, 2, p. SS9,^ and from Kew 
Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, Additional Series IX, pt, 2, p. 288,) 

44923. Acacia seyal Delile. 

A smaU or medium-sized tree with brown or reddish brown bark, 
slender, recurved, ivory-white spines 1 to 2 inches long, and bipinnate 
leaves with three to nine pairs of pinnee. The very fragrant flowers 
are in heads, and the leathery, sickle-shaped pods are from 3 to 6 inches 
long. The tree is common in tropical Africa north of the Equator and 
is one of the principal gum-yielding acacias in the Nile region. This 
gum, which flows freely from aU wounds, is of a bright amber color, 
becoming white and brittle wljen thoroughly dry. It has a relatively 
high viscosity and strong adhesive power. (Adapted from Oliver, Flora of 
Tropical Africa, vol. 2, p. S51, and from Keto Bulletin of Miscellaneous 
Information, Additional Series IX, pt, 2, p. 295,) 

44924. AoACiA vebuobra Schweinf . 

A taU tree, up to 60 feet in height, with gray or greenish gray bark, 
and long, slender, straight, spreading spines. The bipinnate leaves are 
composed of seven to eight pairs of pinnse, and the heads of flowers are 
In axillary fascicles of four to eight. (Adapted from Oliver, Flora of 
Tropical Africa, vol, 2, p. S5i,) 



92 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44926 to 44934. Triticuk spp. Poaceae. 

From Paris, France. Presented by Messrs. VUmorin-Andrieux & Go. Re^ 
celved June 90, 1917. 

The following varieties were sent in response to a request for rust- resistant 
wheats. 

44025 to 44932. Triticum aestivuk L. Wheat 

(T. vulgare Vill.) 

44025. " Altkirch Red Winter." 

44026. "Autumn Saumur; Gray St. Laud." 

44027. " Broad-Headed Winter, hybrid." 

44028. "Dreadnought or Steadfast; Early Hybrid. Suitable for 
autumn or early February sowing ; good ylelder ; short straw." 

44020. " Lamed hybrid ; reddish yellow grain." 

44030. " Red St. Laud." 

44031. " Scotch Red, Blood Red, or Golden Drop." 

44032. "Treverson." 

44088. TanicuM spelta L. Spelt 

" White beardless spelt." 
44034. Triticum turqioum L. foulard wheat 

"Nonette de Lausanne,** 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Abeltnoschus esculentvg, 44451, 44751. 
Aberia caffra. See DovyaUi oaifra. 
Acacia 8fp., 44752. 
aVbida, 44022. 

bull-horn, Acacia spadicigeraj 44014 
seyal, 44023. 
spadicigera, 44014. 
verugera, 44024. 
vUlosa, 44452, 44865. 
Acer buergerianum, 44660. 

trifidum. See Acer buergerianum. 
Achras sapota. See Aohras zapoia, 

zapoia, 44855, 44866, 44800. 
AJonJoll, Sesamum crientale^ 44879. 
Akaza, Chenopodium acum4naiumf 

44570. 
Alangium cJUnenie, 44860. 
Alcochofli, Cleome sp., 44818. 
^leciryon subc^neretin^ 44520. 

tOfneti^OMfm, 44621. 
Alegria, AmaranthuB paniovHatUB, 

44460. 
Ale«r(t6« fordii, 44661. 
Algaroba, Proacpis dhUen9i9, 44006. 
Allium triquetrum, 44708. 
Allspice, jPimenIa ofllcinaHs, 44824. 
Aloe 9uccotrlna, 44522. 
Amaranth, AmaraaUhu% spp.: 

green, Amaranihus gangetUms^ 

44567. 
Mexican, Amaranthu$ paniouiatu^, 

44460. 
red, Amaranihus gangetUmSt 
44566. 
Amoran<A«« sp., 44015. 

^ani)relioii«, 44566, 44567. 
paniotf7a<««, 44460. 
Ampelopiis accntUfoUa, 44540. 
AmygdcUus davidiana, 44686. 

per«toa, 44550 to 44558, 44620 to 
44637, 44640 to 44657, 44706. 
Annona cherimola^ 44568, 44841. 

(cherim^la X squamosa) X retic- 
ulata, 44671 to 44678, 44801. 



Annona muricata, 44453. 

squamosa, 44770. 

testudinea, 44774. 
Apios fortunei, 44560. 
Apple, Malus sylvestris: 

Anson, 44713. 

BatUe, 44714. 

Drumbo, 44715. 

Galetta, 44716. 

Iwal, 44577. 

Jethro, 44717. 

Luke, 44718. 

Melvin, 44710. 

Nakanaruko, 44577. 

Rupert, 44720. 
Arecastrum romanzoJJUanum^ 44534., 
Artocarpus communis, 44008. 

incisa. See Artocarpus communis. 
AstUbe taqueti, 44685. 
Attalea sp., 44011. 
Avocado, Persea amerioana: 

Benik, 44626. 

Cabnal, 44782. 

Gantel, 44783. 

Guatemalan, 44625 to 44628, 44670 
to 44681, 44781 to 44783, 44785, 

44820, 44856. 
Hunapuh, 44628. 
Katun, 44781. 

Kayab, 44681. 
Kekchi, 44670. 
Mayapan, 44680. 
Panchoy, 44625. 
Pankay, 44785. 
Tertoh, 44856. 
Tumin, 44627. 

Balanites aegyptiaca, 44563. 
Barberry, Berberis spp., 44523 to 

44530. 
Sargent'3 Berberis sargentiana, 

44528. 
Bay tree, Pimenta acris, 448^. 

08 



94 



SBEDS AND PLAJTTS IMPORTED. 



Bean, adsukl, Phaseolus an^i»2ar(«, 
44501, 44502. 
bODEvist, Dolichos laJblah, 44600, 

44766, 44767, 44772. 
Boonchi pintado, PfutseolM vul- 
garis, 44460. 
Chiang, large, Viffwi sinenHs, 
44616. 
white, Vigna Hneruia, 44617. 
common, Phaseolus vulgaris, 

44460, 44710, 44762, 44877. 
horned, Vigna sesquipedalis, 44616. 
Klein boontje, PhaSiSoVus spp., 

44876, 44877. 
Lima, Phaseolus lufiaiuSt 44458, 
44721, 44758 to 44761, 44876, 
Lynconia, Phaseolus lunatus, 

4472L 
Mulatinho (little mulatto), Phase- 
olus vulgaris, 44710. 
mung, Phaseolus aureus, 44608 to 

44606. 
soy, 8oja max, 44607 to 44618, 

44687 to 44688. 
sword, Canavali gladiafum, 44806. 
Waby's hybrid bonavlst, Dolichos 

lahlah, 44766. 
yam, Cacara erosa, 44838, 44816. 
Yard Long, Vigna sesquipedaUs, 
44616. 
Beechi, Eleocharis tuherosa, 44673. 
Belis lanceolata, 44665. 
Bell-apple, Passiftora sp., 44862. 
Berberis actinacantha, 44523. 
globosa, 44524. 
guimpeli, 44626. 
ilicifolia, 44526. 
prattii, 44527. 
sargentiana, 44628. 
subcaulialata, 44628. 
virescens, 44630. 
Birib&, ISoUtnia mucosa, 44668, 44668. 
Blue plant. Polygonum tinetotium, 

44805. 
Boehmeria nuwrophyUa, 44860. 

platyphyUa, 44861. 
Bontia daphnoides, 44807. 
Bra««<]t{opai« speciosa, 44802. 
Brassica sp., 44747. 

campestris sarson, 44787. 
na|m« dichotoma, 44788. 
oZerocea i^iridi^, 44828. 
p6A;inen«{«, 44882. 



Brazieja, Haematoasylum brasUeito, 
44456. 

Breadfruit, Hawaiian, ^rtocarpiw 

communis, 44808. 
Prom«2ia oAry^an^Aa, 44786. 
Buddleia davidii, 44531. 

Cabbage, Chinese, Brassica sp., 44747. 
cow, Brassica oleracea viridis, 
44828. 

Cabuder5, Mimosa sp.. 44884. 
Cacara erosa, 44838, 44816. 
Caesalpimia melanocarpa, 44816. 
Callulos, Vit^ sp., 44821. 
Camphor, fragrant, Clnfiaf9iom«m oam- 
phora, 44705. 

C7ampom«ne«ia fenzliana, 44784. 
Canavali gladiatum, 44806. 
ohtusifolium, 44753. 

Canna&a ^o^iva, 44712, 44804. 
Capparis sp., 44867. 
Capsicum sp., 44883. 
Capuli, Prumitf salioifolia, 44885. 
Carapa guianensis, 44711. 
Cartoa papaya, 44868, 44888. 
Carpinus orientalis, 44844. 
CaryophyUus jambos, 44881. 
Casca de anta, Drimys granatensis, 
44701. 

Cassia tomentosa, 44810. 
Ca$tanea moUissima, 44448. 
Castancpsis sp., 44448. 
«c{en>pAi/Ua, 44663. 

CMuariita cunninghamiana, 44532. 
^ricto, 44808. 

CataZpa bungei, 44664. 
Catjang, Vigrfia cyUndrica, 44765. 
Cephalocereus lanuginosus, 44464. 
Cereza, Prunu* saUcifoUa, 44885. 
Chayota edulis, 44623, 44624. 
Chayote, Chayota eduUs: 

green variety, 44624. 

white variety, 44623. 

Chenopodium acuminatum, 44570. 
Cherimoya, Xmiona cherimola, 44668, 

44841. 
Cherry. See Prwniw spp. 

wild, Pn»M«« salidtolia, 44885. 

Chestnut, Ca«toi»ea molli««tma» 44448. 
dwarf, Castanopsis sp., 44448. 
hemp, Otfer(n»« vorfadOi^, 44608. 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1911. 



95 



Chorizema cordaium, 44881. 

Chucte, Persea scMedeana, 44682, 

44776. 

Ghupak, Polygala floribunda, 44688. 

Ciamko, Ahelmoaohua esculentus, 44^1. 

Cinnanwrrmm oampTiora^ 44706. 

Citrullus vulgaris, 44474, 44754, 44842, 

44869. 

Cleome sp., 44818. 

Clerodendrum Ugustrinum, 44764. 

trichoto^num fargesii, 44533. 

Clover, bur, Medicago ciUaris, 44558. 

acutellata, 44559. 

red, TrifoUum pratense, 44906. 

CoccolohU diveraifoUa, 44465. 

CochJospermtim MbUooideB. See Masf- 

inUUanea vitifoUa, 

Cocos romanzofflana. See Arecastrum 

romanzofflanunK 

Coia lacrynuhfohi^ 44671. 

laervfMi'joM ma-yuen, 44843. 

Corn, Zea mays, 44564, 44880. 

Izotshat 44880. 

Gomel, Bentham'B, Comus capiiaia, 

44689. 

Comus oapitata, 44589. 

Coriaderia rudiusoula, 44689. 

Corylus aveUana, 44607 to 44609. 

Corynocarpus laevigata, 44745. 

Cotton, Cfossypium spp., 44562, 44756, 

44777, 44778, 44794, 44T97 to 

44799, 44871 to 44874. 

wild, Oossypium ep., 44766. 
Cowpea, Vigna sinensis, 44464 to 44468, 

44516, 44517, 44880 to 44882. 

Ooy6, Persea schiedeana, 44682, 44776. 

Grabwood tree, Carapa guianensis, 

44711. 

Crape myrtle, Lagerstroemia speoiosa, 

44897. 

Cryptostegia grandiflora, 44786. 

Cnatemoya, Awnana (oherimola X 

squamosa) X reticulata, 44671 to 

44678, 44801. 

Cucumis melo, 44815, 44870. 

Cuourbita sp., 44656. 

Ciinnlngham4a sinensis. See BeUs 

lanoeolata. 

Carrant, black, Ribes nigrum: 

black, black-fruited, 44477. 

brown-fruited, 44478. 

Buddenborg, 44688. 

Collins' Prolific, 44587. 



Currant, black, Ribes nigrum — Contd. 

black. Eagle, 44586. 

Eclipse, 44585. 

Giallo, 44638. 

golden-leaved, 44479. 

Magnus, 44584. 

Neapolitan, 44480. 
Neapolitana, 44639. 

Reglna Vittoria, 44640. 

Royal de Naples, 44480. 
garden, Ribes vulgare: 

Belle de St GlUes, 44475. 

Cerise blanche ( white cherry ) , 
44482. 

Chenonceau rouge, 44483. 

Gommun H fruit blanc, 44484. 

Conunun k fruit rouge, 44486. 

Cumberland, 44581. 

De Boulogne blanc, 44476. 

De Hollande k longue grappe, 
44492. 

De Verri^res, 44499. 

Du Caucase, 44481. 

Fay's New Prolific, 44486. 

Fertile d'Angers, 44487. 

Fertile de Bertin, 44488.' 

Frauendorf, 44489. 

Gloire des Sablons, 44490. 

Grosse blanche transparente, 
44491. 

Imp^rlale blanche, 44493. 

Imp^riale rouge, 44494. 

Italian, 44641 to 44648. 

Knight, 44495. 

Knight's Sweet Red, 44706. 

large white, 44682. 

La Turinoise, 44496. 

Rouge Clair de Buddins, 44498. 

Versaillaise, 44497. 

Wentworth Leviathan, 44707. 
Custard-apple, tortoise-shell, Annana 

testudinea, 44774. 
Cynom^tra oauHfiora, 44895. 
Cyphonumdra' betacea, 44846, 44912, 

44913. 
Cytisus st^kopetalus, 44832. 

Dahlia excelsa, 44819. . 

Dahlia, tree, DahUa excelsa, 44819. 

Desmodium tiliasfolium. See Mei- 

bomia tiUasfolia. 
Dianthus japonictis, 44572. 
Dioscorea sp.. 44588. 



96 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



DioBpyroB sp., 44771. 

lotuB, 44535, 44688. 
Doca, MeBembryanthemum chilense, 
. 44814. 

Docynia delavayi, 44677. 
Dodonaea thunhergiana, 44586. 
Dolichos lablab, 44500, 44766, 44767, 

44772. 
Dovyalis caffra, 44847. 
Drimys granatenHB, 44701. 
DurazniUo, Ruprechtia fagifolia^ 

44878. 

Eleocharis tuberosa, 44573. 
Enterolghinm cydooarpumf 44746. 
Srd^ostis superba, 44741. 
Briobotrya iaptmica^ 44574, 44575. 
Erythrochiton sp., 44825. 
EuffeMa cyanocarpa, 44833. 
Eugenia jamboi. See CaryophyUus 

jambos, 
Euterpe sp., 44755. 
Exogonium purga, 44917, 44918. 

Feld's fodder tree, Casuarina stricta, 

44900. 
Feng hsiang, Li^idambar formosana, 

44666. 
Fern, NephrolepU sp., 44857. 
Ficua oarioa, 44471, 44472. 
pseudopakna, 44470. 
pyHfoUa, 44576. 
ByoomoruB^ 44708. 
Fig, Fieiix corica, 44471, 44472. 
pyrifoUa, 44576. 
Albanes, 44471. 
Isabeles, 44472. 

Sycamore, FicuB BycomaruB, 44708. 
Filbert, CorylUB avellana: 
Barcelona^ 44606. 
Geante des Halles, 44607. 
Prolifiques k coque serrte, 44609. 
Flor de mico, PhyllocarpuB Beptentrio- 

fuUiB, 44775. 
Fragaria chiloenBiB, 44808 to 44818. 
Frutillas del mar, MeBembryowthemum 
chUenBe, 44814. 

Gadai OyttBUB BtenopetaluB, 44832. 
GladMuB aUUuB, 44722. 

anguBtuB, 44723. 

bUmdUB, 44724. 

cuBpid4ituB, 44725. 



iUladiolUB ochroleucuB, 44700. 
* recurrtM, 44726. 
fr<«<i«, 44727. 
undulatUB, 44728. 
Glycine hUpida. See fifoia fiukP. . 
Qooseberry, RibeB robuBtun^ 44699. 
Go««ypitMn spp., 44562, 44756, 44777, 
44778, 44794, 44797 to 44790, 44871 
to 44874. 
Qourd, Lagenaria wUgariB, 44460. 
Qranadilla, PCBBiflora sp., 44852. 

purple, PoBBiflora eduUB, 44853, 
44854. 

Grass, canary, PhalarU spp., 44696, 
44697. 

Cartaderia rudiUBOula, 44689. 

EragroBiiB Buperba^ 44741. 

Panicum Berratum, 44518. 

PMeum arenariwn, 44698. 

BporoboUiB sp., 44600. 
Guabiroba, CampomaneBia femliana, 

44784. 
Giiatacum guatemalenBe, 44858. 
Guava, wild, P«tdfttm sp., 44820. 
Guayacan. Ouaiacum guatenuUenBe, 

44858. 
Guelite, AmaranthuB sp., 44915. 
Cfui48otia abyBBinica, 44789. 

Habilla, Cacara eroBa, 44839. 
Haematoxylum broBiletto, 44456. 
Haragaml-blwa, Eriobotrya japtmica, 

44575. 
Hemp, CannahiB BcUiva, 44712, 44891 
Henbtfne, HyoBcyamuB niger, 4470B, 

44704. 

Henna, LawBonia inermiB, 44557. 
Hib4«ciM e«ctcien<iM. See AbeknoBchui 

eBculentuB, 
Hodo-imo, ApiOB fariunei, 44569. 
HolcuB Borghum, 44457, 44826 to 44828, 

44875. 
Honeysuckle, Lonicera macrantha, 
44903. 
Lonicera BiandUhii, 44537. 
Hornbeam, oriental, CarpinuB oriB^ 

taHB, 44844. 
Hua kuo shn, Plaiycarya BtrobUaceCt 

44667. 
Huz, Lagenaria vulgariB, 44450. 
HydnocarpuB olpina, 44896. 
HyoBcyamuB niger, 44703, 44704. 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, l»n. 



97 



Ilex paraguariensi^, 44676. 

Ipomoea purga. See Exogonium purga, 

Isotoma axillans, 44834. 

Jalap, Exogonium purga, 44917, 44018. 
Jasmine, Jasminum multipaftitum, 

44740. 
Jasminum multipartitum, 44740. 
Job*s-tears, Coix lacryma-johi, 44571. 
Coix lacryma-jobi ma-yuen, 44843. 
Jujube, Zisiphus Jujuba, 44687. 

Kadoesjf, Cephalocereus lanuginogus, 
44454. 

Karaka, Corgnocarpus laevigata, 44745. 
Kawaalia, CoccoloMa diversifoUa, 
44465. 

Kikoeija, Strophanthus caudatu$, 

44901. 
Kisokka, Saraca decUnata, 44900. 
Komari, Ruprechtia fagifolia, 44878. 

Lactuca sativa, 44729, 44780. 
Lagenaria vulgaris, 44450. 
Lager9troemia flos-reginae. See Lager- 
siroenUa speeioBa. 
speoiosa, 44897. 
Lathyrus sp., 44691. 
cirrhosus, 44692. 
laxifiarus, 44698. 
pisiformia, 44694. 
sylvestris, 44695. 
Z/aii7«onia inermis, 44557. 
Leele, Randia aouleata, 44461. 
Leptospermum scoparium, 44848, 44849. 
Lettuce, black-seeded, Laotuca sativa, 
44730. 
white-seeded, Laciuca saliva, 44729. 
I<i9tfi<2am&ar formosana, 44666. 
Lonicera macrantlia, 44903. 

standishii, 44537. 
Loquat, Eriohoirya japonica, 44574, 
44575. 
Haragami-biwa, 44575. 
Motogi-biwa, 44574. 
Lun Gar Bak, Brasgica pekinenMs, 

44892. 
Lycopersicon esculentum, 44919. 

Macadamia ternifolia, 44769. 

Mais chiqulto, fi^olcu* sorghum, 44875. 

Malz chikitoe hasen harina, Holcus 

sorghum, 44467. 
Maize. See ^ea mai/9. | 



Ma li, Quercus variabilis, 44669. 
Malpighia punidfoUa, 44458. 
Jf a{«# «ylt>6«*H«, 44577, 44713 to 44720. 
Mamey, Mammea amerioana, 44610. 
Mammea americana, 44610. 
Mankataan, Citrullus vulgaris, 44842. 
Manuka, Leptospermum scopariumf 

44848, 44849. 
Maple, forked, Acer buergerianum, 
44660. 
fragrant, Liquidambar formosana^ 
44666. 
Mari poni poen, OmphalopMJMma 

rubra, 44447. 
Jforlea begoniaefolia. See ^Zon^iim 

Martynia UnUsiana, 44886. 

lutea, 44887. 

pro&OAoidea. See Martynia loui- 
siana, 
Maurandia scandens, 44822. 
MaximiUafiea vitifoUa, 44821. 
Medicago ciUaris, 44558. 

«cif teZto^a, 44559. 
Meibomia tiUaefoUa, 44862. 
If eKa /lori&ttfkfa, 44888. 
Melicocea bijuga^ 44883. 
Melon, Cuourbita sp., 44555. 
Afe«em&r}/an/;^em4im chUense, 44814. 
Microlasna stipoides, 44802. 
Mimosa sp., 44884. 
Miro, Nageia ferruginea, 44851. 
Monkey flower, Phyllocarpus septets 
trionnllH, 44775. 

Motogi-biwa, Eriobotrya japonica, 
44574. 

Muskmelon, CiMn^m4« meZo, 44815, 

44870. 
Mussaenda rufinervia, 44898. 
Myristioa fragrann, 44565. 

Nageia excelsa, 44850. 
ferruginea, 44851. 
Nannorrhops ritchieana, 44773. 
Nephrolepis sp., 44857. 
Nispero, Achras zwpota, 44855, 44866, 

44890. 
Nutmeg, Myri^tica fragrans, 44565. 

Oak, gt^rciM spp., 44662. 44668, 44669, 
44678. 

Okra, Abelmoschtts est-ulentus. 44451, 
44751. 



98 



SEEDS A17D PIANTS IMPOBTED. 



Olea eurapaem, 44709. 

Qllve, Tafahi, Olea ettrapaea, 44709. 

Omphalophthalma rubra, 44447, 4^67. 

Opuntia manaoatUha, 44446. 

Oryza sativat 44807. . 

Otophara alatii, 44809. 

Pachyrhizus angulatus. See Cacara 
crosa, 

Pai ts*ai, Br<M«k» pekinenais, 44892. 
Palm, Arcc<w<rum romanzofflanum, 
44584. 
Attalea sp., 44911. 
^tt^erpe sp., 44755. 
Mazrl, yannorr?top8 ritchieana, 

44773. 
Nikan, i2/iopato«fy{i« sapida, 44744. 
Trachy carpus exceUus, 44670. 
mar<iarM/«, 44864. 
Pan<fantt« rockii, 44780. 

<ec^ori«« jrfneiww, 44779. 
Panioum serraium, 44518. 
Papa criolla, Solatium tuheronumt 
44580. 

Papaver somniferum, 44742, 44743. 
Papaya, Cartca papaya, 44868, 44889. 
PasHflora sp., 44852. 

6diai«, 44853, 44854. 

«ii&ero»a, 44556. 
Passion fruit, Passiflora spp. : 

Fiji, Passiflora eduUa, 44858. 

giant, Passiflora edulis, 44854. 

Indian, Passiflora iqp., 44852. 
Passion vine, wild, Passiflora suberosa, 
44556. 

Paa, Pisum fulvutn^ 44560. 

flat, Lathyrus sylvestris, 44695. 

garden, Ptowm ^a^iiHim, 44506. 
Peach, Amygdalus davidiana^ 44686. 

Amygdalus persica, 44650 to 44558, 
44629 to 44637, 44649 to 44657, 
44795. 

antnmn, 44650. 

blood, 44551. 

green skin blue, 44662. 

ItaUan, 44629 to 44637, 44649 to 
44667. 

winter, 44558. 
Pear, Pyrus spp., 44578, 44674, 44676. 

Pyrus oommufUs, 44478. 

Peraleta, 44478. 

wild, Dooynia delavaui, 44677. 



Pepper, Capsicum sp., 44898. 
Persea americana, 44625 to 44628, 44679 
to 44681, 44781 to 44783, 44785, 
44820, 44856. 

gratissima. See Per sea americawk 

schiedeana, 44682, 44776. 
Persimmon, Diospyros sp., 44771. 

Diospyros lotus, 44688. 
Persoonia myrtUloides, 44885. 
Petrophila pulcTiella, 44836. 
Phalaris bulbosa, 44696. 

po/radosBa, 44697. 
Phaseolus angularis, 44501, 44502. 

aureus, 44508 to 44506. 

lunaius, 44459, 44721, 44758 to 
44761, 44876. 

semierectus, 44463. 

vulgaris, 44460, 44710, 44762, 44877. 
PhleuTH arenarium, 44698. 
PhyUocarpus septentrionalis, 44775. 
Physalis peruviana, 44790 to 44792. 
Pimenta aoris, 44828. 

otfloinaUs,44B2^ 
Pine, screw, Ptmdanus spp., 44779, 
44780. 

tree, BeUs lanoeoUM, 44666. 
Pink, Dianthus Japonious, 44672. 
Piptanthus nepalensis^ 44863. 
Pisang tjina, Otophora alata, 44899. 
Pistache, Chinese, PAtoofa cMnaiiM, 

44768. 
Pistacia chinensis, 44768. 

<ere&ifii;ttM, 44561. 
Pisum fulvum, 44560. 

«a^imm, 44606. 
Platycarya strobilacea, 44667. 
Podocarpus d<u>rydioides. See Nageia 
efecelsa, 

ferruginea. See Naceia f & r ug i nm * 
Poha, Physalis peruviana, 44790 to 
44792. 

Large Purple, 44790. 

Phenomenal Large Green, 44791. 

Phenomenal Large Y^ow, 447S2. 
Polygala floribunda, 44683. 
Polygonum tinotorium, 44805. 
Poppy, Papaver somniferum, 447^ 

44743. 
Potato, Solanum tuberosum, 44580, 

44803. 
Poupartia axillaris, 44619. 
Prosopis chUensis, 44596. 

juUflora. See Prosopis cMtoiui*. 



APBIL 1 TO 3XJKE 30, 1917. 



99 



PruniM conradinae, 44588. 

davidiana. See AmygdaJus davidi- 
ana. 

persica. See Amygdalus peraica. 

salidfoUa, 448S5. 

tomentosa, 44539. 
Psidium sp., 44920. 

Pterocarya caucasica. See Pterocarya 
fraxinifolia. 

fraxinifolia, 44590. 
Pyrus spp., 44578. 44674, 44675. 

oomnmnis, 44473. 

malus. See Mains sylvestris, 

Ouercus spp., 44662, 44668, 4467& 
sclerophylla. See Casttmopsis 

scleraphyUa. 
variahilis, 44668. 

Badlsh, Raphanus sativus, 44731 to 
44739. 

All Season, 44734. 

Bottle, 44731. 

Long String, 44732. 

Miyashige, 44735. 

Nerima Long (Mikado), 44733. 

Nlnengo, 44736. 

Saknrajima Mammoth, 44738. 

Shogoln, 44739. 

Six Weeks, 44737. ■ 
Randia aouleata, 44461. 
RcLphamis sativus, 44731 to 44739. 
Rhopalostylia aapida, 44744. 
Ribes ffrimhii, 44904. 

nigrum, 44477 to 44480, 44583 to 

44587, 44638 to 44640. 
robustum, 44699. 

vtagare, 44475, 44476, 44481 to 

44499, 44581, 44582, 44641 to 

44648, 44706, 44707. 

Rice, Oryza sativa, 44807. 
Rice-grass, meadow, Microlaena stir 

poides, 44802. 
RoUinia mucosa, 44658, 44669. 
Rondeletia rufescens, 44684. 
Rosa spp., 44540 to 44548. 
Rosa banksi<i€ normalis, 44544. 
moyesii, 44545. 
rtf&««, 44546. 
Rose. See Rosa spp. 
Rose-apple, Caryophyllus jambos, 44891. 
Rubber, Palay, Oryptostegia grandi- 

flora, 44786. 



Bubus meatus, 44845, 44905. 
Ruprechtia fagifoUa, 44878. 

Saccharum offloinarum, 44600 to 44606, 

44611 to 44622, 44749, 44750. 
Sapodilla, Aohras zapota, 44855, 44866, 

4^x10. 

Saraca deiMnata, 44900. 

Sarson, Brassica campeatris sarson, 

44787. 
Sechium edule. See Chayota eduUs. 
Sesame, Sesamum orientale, 44462, 

44763, 44879. 
Sesamum indicum. See Sesamum ori- 
entale, 

orientale, 44462, 44768, 44879. 
Shan shu, BeHs lanceolata, 44665. 
Shirifa, Annona squamosa, 44770. 
Shncte, Persea schiedeana, 44682, 44776. 
Sisyrinchium sp., 44840. 
SJimaroekoe, Malpighia punlcifoUa, 

44458. 
Sjosjole, Sesamum orientdle, 44462. 
Soja max, 44507 to 44518, 44597 to 

44599. 
Solanum sp., 44800. 

tuberosum, 44580, 44808. 
Sorghum, Holcus sorghum, 44457, 44826 
to 44828, 44875. 

cultivated, 44826. 

vulgare. See Holcus aorghum. 

wild, 44827. 
Sorsaaka, Annona murioata, 44453. 
Soursop, Annona muricata, 44453. 
Spelt, Triticum spelta, 44988. 
Sporobolus sp., 44690. 
Stizolobium pachylobium, 44514. 
Storax, Styrax spp., 44591 to 44595. 
Strawberry, Fragaria chUoensis, 44808 
to 44813. 

conical, 44809. 

cultivated, 44813. 

Montafiescas, 44810, 44812. 

wild, 44808. 
Strophanthus ca/udatus, 44901. 

dichotomAis. See Strophanthus 
caudatus. 
Styrax califomicum, 44591. 

dasyanthum, 44692. 

officinale, 44593. 

veitchiorum, 44594. 

uHlsonih 44595. 
Sugar-apple, Annona squatnosa, 44770. 



100 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Sugar cane, Sacohamm offMnarum, 

44600 to 44606, 44611 to 44622, 

44749. 44750. 
Badilla, 44600. 
Ohenois, 44611. 
Hawaii 20, 44612, 44618. 
Hawaii 20 X Hawaii 809, 44618. 
Hawaii 27 X 809, 44616. 
Java 247, 44616. 
Lahaina, 44617. 
Lahaina X Yellow Caledonia, 

44618. 
Louisiana Striped, 44619. 
Louisiana Striped X Laliaina, 

44620. 
New Guinea 15, or Badilla, 44621. 
Santa Cruz 12/11. 44750. 
Santa Cruz 12/4, 44749. 
Yellow Caledonia, 44622. 

Tamarisk, Tamarix aphyUa, 44554. 
Tamariw aphyllos 44554. 

articulata. See Tamarix aphylia, 
Tecomasuche, Maximilianea vitifoUa^ 

44821. 
Telopea speciosisHma, 44837. 
Terebinth, Pistacia terebifUhut, 44561. 
T^riMtroemia meridionalis, 44702. 
To-1. Doci/nia delavayij 44677. 
Tomato, Lycopersicon eioulentum, 

44919. 
Tori, Brassica napus cichotoma, 44788. 
Trachycarpus excelsus, 44670. 

martianus, 44864. 
Tree kale, Jersey^ Brassica oleracea 

viridis, 44829. 
Tree-tomato, Cyphomandra betacea, 
44846, 44912, 44913. 

white, 44913. 

yellow, 44912. 
Trichosoypha sp.. 44894. 
Trifolium pratense, 44906. 
Triticum aestivum, 44925 to 44932. 

spelta, 44933. 

turgidum, 44934. 

vul^are. See Triticum aestivum. 
Tung-oil tree, Aleurites fordii, 44661. 

Ulu, Artocarpus communis, 44908. 
Umkolo, Dovyalis caffra, 44847. 



Unicorn plant, Martynia louiHtma, 
44886. 

Viburnum kansuense, 44547, 44548. 
Vigna cylindrica, 44765. 

sesQuipedaiiSf 44515. 

sinenHs, 44464 to 44468, 44516r 
44517, 44880 to 44882. 
Vitis sp., 44921. 

Vittadinia australis. See Vittadinio 
triloba. 

tHloba, 44888. 
Voandzeia subterranea, 44817. 

Waratah, Telopea speciosissimOi 44887. 
Watapaana sjimaron, Acacia vtOoio, 

44452, 44865. 
Watermelon, Citrullus vulgaris, 44474, 

44754, 44842v 44869. 
Wheat, THtUmm spp., 44825 to 44982. 

Altkirch Red Winter, 44925. 

Autumn Saumur, 44926. 

Blood Red, 44931. 

Broad-Headed Winter, 44927. 

Dreadnought, 44928. 

Early Hybrid, 44928. 

Golden Drop, 44931. 

Gray St. Laud, 44926. 

hybrid, 44927. 

Lamed Hybrid, 44929. 

Nonette de Lausanne, 44934. 

Red St. Laud, 44930. 

Scotch Red, 44931. 

Steadfast, 44928. 

Treverson, 44982. 

Triticum turgidum, 44934. 
Woandzu, Voandzeia subterranea, 
44817. 

Yam, Dioscorea sp., 44588. 

Yerba mat€, Ilex paraguariensis, 44676. 

Yul§ moo, Coix lacrymorjobi m^i-yuenw 

44843. 
Yu ts'ai, Brassica sp., 44747. 
Yu t'ung, Aleurites fordii, 44661. 

Zea mays, 44564, 44830. 
Zinziber mioga, 44579. 
Ziziphus jujuba, 44687. 

mucronata, 44748. 

sativa. See Ziziphus juiub€^ 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
U . 5. BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

- WILLIAU A. TAYLOB, ChltfqfBweoH. 



INVENTORY 

OF 

SEEDS AND PUNTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRODUCTION 

DHRING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 

TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 



(Ho. S2; Nos. UOSS TO 46220.) 



Imwd llMOh 25, 1823. 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

WILLIAU A. TAYLOR, CMtf <i/ Burt/m. 



INVENTORY 

OF 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFrTCE or FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTKODUCTION 

DURING THE PEEIOD FROM JULY 1 

TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 



( No. 52; Nos. 44935 TO 45220.) 



BUKEAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



Chief of Bureau, William A. Taylor, 
Associate Chief of Bureau, Karl F. Keller man'. 
Officer in Cfiartje of Publications, J. E. Rockwell. 
Assistant in Charge of Business Operations, H. E. Allansox. 



FonBiON Seed and Plant Introiujction. 

SCIENTIFIC STAFF. 

David Fairchild. AgrlaiUural Exphtrer in Charge. 

P. H. Dorsctt, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Plant Tntroduotion Gardens. 

B. T. Galloway, Plant Pathologist, Special Research Profeots, 
Peter Binset, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Erperimenters' Service. 
Wilson Popenoe and Joseph F. Rock, Agricultural Ettplorers. 

R. A. Young, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Daisheen Investigations. 

H. C. Skeels, Botanist, in Charge of Collections. 

G. P. Van Eseltine, Assistant Botanist, in Charge of Publications. 

L. Q. Hoover, Assistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Ohayote Investigations. 

C. C. Thomas, Assistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Bamboo, Date, Fig, and Jujube 
Investigations. 

E. L. Crandall, Assistant in Charge of Photographic Laboratory. 

P. G. Russell and Patty Newbold, Scientific Assistants. 

David A. Bisset, Superintendent, Bell Plant Introduction Garden, Glenn Dale, Md. 
Edward Goucher, Plant Propagator. 

J. E. Morrow, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Chioo, OaUf. 
Henry Klopfer, Plant Propagator. 

Edward Simmonds, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Uiami, Fla. 
Charles H. Steffani, Plant Propagator, 

Henry E. Juenemann, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Bellingham, Wash. 

Wilbur A. Patten, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Brooksville, Fla. 

E. J. Rankin, Assistant in Charge, Plant Introduction Garden, Savannah, Go. 

Collaborators: Thomas W. Brown and Robert H. Forbes, Cairo, Egypt; A. C. Hartleys, 
Seharunpur, India; E. W. D. Holway, Faribault, Minn.; Barbour Lathrop, Chicago, III.: 
Dr. H. L. Lyon, Honolulu, Hawaii; Henry Nehrllng, Gotha, Fla.; Charles T. Simpson* 
Littleriver, Fla.; Dr. L. Trabut, Director, Service Botanique, Algiers, Algeria; Dr. Wil- 
liam Trelease, Irbana, III. ; FJ. H. Wilson, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mas». 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Iiitr<Hluctory statement 5 

Inventory 1> 

Index of common and scientific names 51 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



I'l.ATE I. The pacayito, a new orimmentul palm from Guatemala. 

iChamaedorea sp., S. P. I. No. 44994) 1<5 

II. A 3'oung coy6 tree in Guatemala. {Persea schicdcana Nees., 

S. P. I. No. 44999) 1<^ 

III. The yellow tanyah, an edible aroid for the southeastern coast 

region. {Colocasia sp., S. P. I. No. 45065) '^^ 

IV. A promising hybrid anona. (Annona cherimola X A. aquamoaaf 

S. P. I. No. 45181) '^2 

3 



LNVE.NTORY OF SEEDS AiND PLAJ^TS IMPORTED BY THE 
OFFICE OF FOREIGiN SEED AND PLAKT LNTRODUCTIOiN 
DURIKG THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 
1917 (NO. 62; NOS. 44935 TO 45220). 



INTS.ODUCTOBY STATEMENT. 

This small inventory covers a period of the World War during 
which every energy which could be utilized was directed to the most 
active war work and the shipping of seeds and plants was nearest at 
a standstill. 

A few of the introductions, however, merit mention in this intro- 
ductory statement. 

The success of such introduced forage grasses as Rhodes grass and 
Sudan grass in the South and Southwest makes the introduction of 
four forage grasses from Xew South Wales (Nos. 45037 to 45040) 
and a promising collection from the Belgian Kongo (Nos. 45204 to 
45214) of particular interest to those who are pioneering in the live- 
stock industry in these warm regions. 

Mr. Wilson Popenoe sent in from Guatemala seeds of an undescribed 
species of Persea (No. 44996), which, although having leaves very 
much like those of the avocado, has fruits with a fleshy, persistent 
calyx. The hybridizing which is going on between different races of 
Persea americana may make this species of value for hybridization 
purposes. Mr. Popenoe's large-fruited form of the coyo (No. 45081), 
which weighed 2 pounds and was of good quality, deserves to be called 
to the attention of tropical horticulturists and a comparison made on 
a considerable scale between it and the West Indian forms of avocado. 

Just how different specifically the Carica dodecaphylla (No. 
45141) of Argentina is from the ordinary C, papaya remains to 
be seen when they are grown side by side in Florida, but as already 
crosses between C. candamarcensis and O, papaya are being at- 
tempted it is important to bring into the hands of the plant breed- 
ers all the species and varieties obtainable. 

Those interested in tropical species of Eubus may find in Ruhv^s 
racemosus (No. 45044) from the Nilgiri Hills of India a useful 
form. The delicious rambutan of Java {Nephelium lappaceum) 
and the litchi of South China appear to have a rival in N. bassacense 
(No. 45131) from Cochin China, a species whose fruits have longer 

spines even than the beautiful rambutan. 

6 



6 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

The success of the Chinese grafted jujube in this countr}^ will 
make many experimenters interested in Ziziphus mauritiana (No. 
44940), a tropical species the fruit of which is used, both fresh and 
dried, in India and of which the best variety comes from Kandahar. 

Flavoring plants are not used as much in America as in France 
and Italy, except where Creole cooking still lingers. A tropical 
vine (No. 45220) with flowers and flower buds which impart a 
flavor of oysters to milk or potato soup may, however, interest those 
who live where the vine can be grown. One of the most conspicuous 
ingredients of the Japanese "rice tafel," or curry, of Java, is the 
l)ickled fruits of Chietum gnemoii (No. 45152), a shrub or small 
tree which furnishes not only singular potatolike fruits but edible 
leaves, which are stewed and eaten like spinach. 

The Chinese pai ts'ai has met with such success in America and i^ 
now marketed by so many truck growers that a considerable niunber 
of people will be interested in a collection of varieties (Nos. 45183 
to 45189) secured by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, which includes sorts 
which may be planted in April or May, others in August, and still 
others as late as September. 

Ideal house palms are hard to find, and the pacayito of Guatemala 
(No. 44994) would seem to approach this ideal in that it has a grace- 
ful form while quite young, is suitable for the so-called fern dishes 
which adorn the center of the table, and because it fruits when not 
over a foot high, maturing its small, round, interesting seeds in the 
winter season. 

The behavior on high pine land at Gotha, Fla., of the hardy palm, 
Butia capitata (No. 45009), a close relative of the genus Cocos, makes 
it seem worth while to distribute more widely over these pine lands 
this interesting species from Argentina, which bears showy, edible 
fruits. 

Those who know Dr. Pittier well will be interested in his account 
of his experience with the fruit of an undescribed species of 
Calycophysum (No. 45219), which resembles a wild passion fruit but 
is intense orange-yellow in color and outdoes the red pepper in flavor. 
It occurs in the forests near Caracas, Venezuela. 

The brilliant blue-flowered Salvia patens has made everyone who 
saw it long for a more robust form. It is possible that in S. hemp- 
titeadiana (No. 44995) Mr. Popenoe has found one which can be 
grow^n more satisfactorily as an annual in this country. 

To any who have watched the gi'owth of hybrid walnut trees and 
who believe, as Dr. Sargent does, in the future of hybrid trees for 
timber production, the introduction of a tropical black walnut from 
Porto Rico (No. 45033) can hardly fail to be of interest, particularly 
when the scarcitv of black-walnut timber is considered. Wlietber it 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBBB 30, 1917. 7 

will be feasible to plant a whole mountain slope in the Adirondacks 
with one of Japan's largest and loveliest flowering cherry trees for 
the production of cherry wood remains to be seen. Prunua serrulata 
sachdHnensis (Nos. 45074 and 45178), which forms a forest tree 60 
feet tall and several feet in diameter, is probably the best timber-pro- 
ducing species of th« true cherries. In 1906 the writer introduced for 
his private place in Maryland a collection of Japanese cherry trees, 
bu^'ing them from the Yokohama Nursery Co., of Japan. Out of 23 
varieties several have shown themselves particularly well adapted to 
the soil and climate of the region, and although the Japanese names 
which accompanied them are some of them not listed in the Arakawa 
collection it is deemed desirable to make a distribution of budded 
trees from these trees which have proved themselves so well suited 
to the conditions on the Atlantic seaboard (Nos. 45049 to 45062). 

An unusual interest attaches to. two species of Hubiaceee, Pavetta 
indica (No. 45153) and Psychotria bacteriophUa (No. 45155) from 
Java, because of the fact that their leaves have embedded in them 
nodules, like the nodules on the roots of leguminous plants, which 
furnish to the plants nitrogen gathered from the air. The question 
of whether or not these shrubs will be of service in Florida in the 
enrichment of the soil must be answered by actual tests. 

The botanical determinations of seeds introduced have been made 
and the botanical nomenclature revised by Mr. H. C. Skeels and the 
descriptive and botanical notes arranged by Mr. 0. P. Van Eseltine, 
who has had general supervision of this inventory, as of all the pub- 
lications of this office. The manuscript of the inventory has been 
prepared by Mrs. Ethel M. Kelley. 

David Fairchild, 
Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foijkio:^ Seed and Plaxt Introduction, 

Washington^ D, C. Januar\i 81^ 1921. 



INVENTORY/ 



44936. Brassica pekinensis (Lour.) Gagn. Brassicaceae. 

Fai ts'ai. 

From Lo8 Angeles, Calif. Purchased from Aggeler & Musser Go. Received 
July 6. 1917. 

"A cabbage with short cylindrical solid heads. It is not suitable for spring 
planting, for when sown early it runs to seed without heading. It should be 
sown in seed beds late in July and transplanted to rich, moist earth, spacing 15 
inches, in rows 2 to 3 feet apart. It should be harvested after the first light 
frost; the roots should be left on and the outer leaves removed. It may be 
stored in layers under dry straw with a heavy covering of soil. By cutting 
off all green leaf tips it can be cooked without the penetrating cabbage odor." 
(Peter Bisset.) 

. For previous introduction and further description, see S. P. I. No. 40604. 

44936 and 44937. Juglans regia L. Juglandacese. Walnut. 

From China. Nuts purchased from Mr. E. K. Lowry, manager, American 
Machinery & Export Co., Tieatshi. Received July 2, 1917. 

44836. " Sample No. 524. Soft shell, 1916 crop ; grown In the district of 
Ohangll, northern China.*' (LoKTry.) 

44037. " Sample No. 525. Hard shell ; grown in the Western Hills, west 
of Peking." (Lawrv.) 

44938. Cakavali bnbiformjb (L.) DC. Fabacese. Jack bean. 

From Mombasa, British East Africa. Presented by Kerslake Thomas & 
Co., Gotani estate, Changamwe, at the request of Mr. Henry P. Starrett, 
American consul, Mombasa. Received July 2, 1817. Quoted notes by 
Kerslake Thomas & Co. 

" OO'ta-ni bean. It is an exceedingly heavy cropper, yielding about 2,200 
pounds per acre under ordinary conditions. It is very hardy and a great 
drought reslster. In this country it is a perennial, 2 J feet in height, and 
grows well on a clay loam and also on a light sandy soil. It would probably 
do well in the southern United States and California. Upon analysis it is 
found that the bean contains an exceptionally high percentage of albuminoids 
and oil, while the moisture is low. The high percentage of fiber is accounted 

1 All Introductions consist of seeds unless otherwise noted. 

It should be understood that the varietal names of fruits, yegetables, cereals, and other 
plants used in this Inventory are those under which the material was received when Intro- 
daced by the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, and, further, that the printing 
of such names here does not constitute their official publication and adoption in this coon- 
try. As the different varieties are studied, their Identity fully established, their entrance 
into the American trade forecast, and the use of varietal names in American literature 
becomes necessary, the foreign varietal designations appearing there will be subject to 
change with a view to bringing the forms of the names into harmony with recognised 
American codes of nomenclature. 

61662—22 2 



10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

for by the tough consistency of the outer covering of the bean. There is 
nothing to indicate that it would not be fit for food, although the tough outer 
covering would better be removed. No prussic acid has been detected in the 
macerated product." 

Received as a hybrid between the so-called Madagascar butter bean (Phaac- 
olua lunatU8) and the sword bean {Canavali gladiatum). 

44939. Vicx^ FABA L. Fabacese. Broad bean. 

From Camden, N. J. Presented, by Mr. A. T. Ivanhoe. Received July 
2, 1917. 

" In Russian called Konskie Bobi (horse bean), or plain Boh, Plant at the 
same time as peas in good garden soil which is not too dry.*' {Ivanhoe.) 

44940. ZizEPHus MAURiTiANA Lam. Hhamnaceae. Bor. 

(Z. jujuha Lana., not Mill.) 

From Seharunpur, India. Seeds presented by Mr. A. O. Hartless, superin- 
tendent, Botanic Garden. Received July 2, 1917. 

" The tree is mainly cultivated for its fruit, which on the wild or commoner 
kinds is more or less globose, and on the cultivated and improved kinds ovoid 
or oblong. The pulp is mealy, sweetish, with a pleasant taste, and some of 
the cultivated kinds are very good indeed. The dried fruits are sold in the 
bazaars of the Panjab under the name of unab; the best kind is imported from 
Kandahar." (D. Brandis, Forest Flora of India, p. 88,) 

44941 and 44942. Carica papaya L. Papayaceae. Papaya. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Presented by Mr. J. M. Westgate, Agricultural 
Bxperiment Station. Received July 6, 1917. 

These papaya varieties were introduced for comparative studies In papain 
content and fruit production. 

44841. " No. 2594." 44942. " No. 3598-12." 

44943 to 44953. Triticum aestivum L. Poacero. Wheat 

(T, vulgare ViU.) 

From Paris, France. Presented by Vilmorin-Andrieux ft Co. Received 
July 6, 1917. 

The following varieties were sent in response to a request for rust-resistant 
wheats. (Quoted notes by Vilmorin-Andrieux & Go.) 

44943. " Alli^ Hybrid:* 44849. "Japhet, or Red Marvel; yel- 

44944. " Autumn Victoria:' ^om? grain:' 

44045. *' Bearded Pearl of 44950. *'Jolly Farmer's Hybrid, or Sci^ 
Nuisement:* sation:' 

44946. ** Cr^pi:* 44951. " Massy, Hybrid" 

44947. " DattclHybrid^ov White 44952. "Red-Bearded Autumn:* 
Mai^^el" 44953. " Treasure Hybrid:* 

44048. " Early No4, or Blue:* 

44954. Bixa orellana L. Bixacese. Annatto tree. 

From Sao Paulo, Brazil. Presented by the Empreza Editora de Chacaras 
e Quintaes. Received July 6, 1917. 

" UrucH:* A large-leaved tropical tree, about 30 feet high, with panicles of 
showy pinkish flowers. It is cultivated in the East and West Indies for the 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, l&ll. 11 

annatto dye prepared from the orange-red pulp which surrounds the seeds. 
This dye is the coloring matter chiefly used in butter and cheese. (Adapted 
from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 1, p, 510,) 

44865 and 44966. 

From Auckland, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. H. R. Wright, Avondale 
Nursery. Received July ^, 1917. 

44955. IxERBA RiiEXioiDES A. OuHu. Escallonlacese. 

" Tatcari:' A beautiful evergreen tree, sometimes 70 feet tall, with 
thick, leathery, coarsely serrate leaves 3 to 7 inches long and very hand- 
some waxy, \vhite flowers 1^. inches wide, occurring in flat panicles. It 
is a native of New Zealand, where it is not common, and is considered 
by some to be the most beautiful tree Indigenous to that country. 
(Adapted from Laing and Blackwell, Plants of New Zealand, p. 186.) 

44956. Rymandra excelsa Salisb. Proteaceoe. 
{Knightia exceUa R. Br.) 

A New Zealand tree, sometimes 100 feet in height, with stiff, linear- 
oblong, roughly toothed leaves 4 to 8 inches long and racemes of red, 
velvety flowers 2 to 3 inches long and 2 inches in diameter. The tree 
bears a considerable resemblance to the Lombardy poplar when seen 
from a distance. The wood is much used for cabinetwork. (Adapted 
from Laing and Blacktveil, Plants of New Zealand, p. IJ^S,) 

44967 to 44961. 

Prom Richmond, Victoria, Australia. Presented by Mr, F. H. Baker. Re- 
ceived July 7, 1917. 

44057. Albizzia lophantha (Willd.) Benth! ^linioHaceae. 
(Acacia lophantha Willd.) 

" Cape or crested wattle. CJollected near Hursts Bridge, Victoria. 
Before planting soak in boiling water and allow to cool.'* (Baker.) 

A shrub or small tree 6 to 20 feet high, with graceful, feathery foliage 
and yellowish summer-blooming flowers in spikes about 2 inches in 
length. The flat, oblong pods are th{ckened at the edges. The shrub 
is a native of Western Australia, often cultivated as a greenhouse shrub 
in temperate regions, and is now naturalized in southern California. 
(Adapted from Botanical Register, vol, 5, pi. 361, and from Bailey, Stand- 
ard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 1, p. 2iS.) 

44958. BsAGHTCHrroN acerifolium F. Muell. Stenniliacetv. 
(Sterculia aceri folia A. Cunn.) 

An Australian tree, up to 3o feet in height, with very dark-green, 
shining, maplelike leaves 6 to 10 inches wide and scarlet bell-shaped 
flowers which hang from the tree in large clusters. It is sometimes 
called the Australian flame tree, because of the fact that when it comes 
Into bloom upon shedding its leaves in midsummer the tree appears like 
a huge flame. In the Paciflc States it is considered a very fine avenue 
tree. (Adapted from The Pacific Garden, November, 191S.) 

44959. EucALYPTVs calophylla Liiidl. Myrtacese. 

Variety rosea. A medium-sJzed Australian tree with dense foliage and 
dark, corky, deeply furrowed bark. The thick, firm leaves are ovate- 
lanceolate, nnd the large pink flowers appear in large clusters. It is 
an ornamental tree of slow growth, not enduring frost or drought, and 



12 SKEUS AND PLAKTS IMPORTKD. 

44957 to 44961— Continued. 

is used as a shade tree in California. The wood is tough and used for 
building, but is not durable under ground. The bark is rich in kino, and 
the fall bloom is valuable for bees. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard 
Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, ft, p, 1152.) 

44960. Eugenia ventenatii Benth. Myrtaeese. 

An Australian tree 40 to 60 feet high and 2 to 3 feet in diameter, with 
oblong-lanceolate leaves 3 to 5 inches long and flowers in compound 
panicles. The fruit is a roundish 1-seeded drupe about half an inch in 
diameter. The wood is of a gray or pinkish hue and beautifully marked. 
It is close grained, hard, heavy, nnd tough and is used for tool handles, 
flooring, etc. (Adapted from Maiden, Useful Native Plant8 of Australia, 
p. 5S2, and from Bailey, Queensland Flora, part 2, p. 658.) 

44061. Pandorea austbalis (U. Br.) Spach. Bignoniacete. 
{Tecoma australis R. Br.) 

A beautiful climbing vine with abundant, dark-greon foliage of hand- 
some appearance and loose terminal p«anicles of yellowish flowers. It is 
a native of New Soutli Wales, wlu*re it is called the Konga-iconga vine, 
and is cultivated ia the southern United States. It requires a rich st)il 
and must be watered freely during the dry spring months. If frozen it 
readily sprouts from the vigorous rootstock. (Adapted from W. C, Stcde. 
in the Florida Agriculturist ^ Oct, 2S, 1001.) 

44962. PiSTACiA CHINENSI8 Biuige. Anacardiacece. 

Chinese pistache. 

From Chefoo, China, geeds obtained through Mr. Lester Maynard, Ameri- 
can consul. Received July 10, 1917. 

A beautiful Chinese tree with graceful pinnate leaves which are at first 
dark red, then glossy green, and finally, in autumn, become scarlet, purple, and 
yellow. Trees of previous introductions have done so well in many parts of onr 
country that we can now recommend this beautiful tree for park and avenue 
planting. Where the winters are not too severe it has withstood temperatures 
of 4** F. without injury, as at Washington, D. C. When planted in a well- 
drained situation it is especially valuable for the Southern and Pacific Coast 
States and should become a welcome addition to the list of cultivated troths 
becanse of the beautiful autumnal coloration of its foliage. Individual speci- 
mens .sometimes live to be centuries old and attain great size. The tree may 
I)rove a go(Kl stock for Pistacia vera L., the edible plst«che nut. 

44963 and 44964. Saccharum officinarum L. Poaceec. 

Sugar cane. 

From St. Croix, Virgin Islands, Cuttings presented by Dr. Longtield 
Smith, director. Agricultural ExiM»rinient Station. Received .July 10, 
1917. 

44963. Santo Cruz t?JSl. 44964. Santa Cruz 13/32. 

44966 to 44993. 

From Argentina. Presented by Mr. W. Henry Robertson, American con- 
sul general, Buenos Aires. Received July 3, 1917. Quoted notes by 

Dr. D. N. Shoemaker. 

These seeds are a collection obtained by the Argentine Department of Agri- 
culture from various parts of Argentina. 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1W7. 13 

44966 to 44993— Continued. 

44965 to 44967. Phabbolus lunatus L. Fabaceip. Lima bean. 

44965. (No. 2. Estaci6n Eri^eriniental, La Bauda, Santiago del 
Estero.) Manteca. **A form of White Sieva Lima" 

44966. (No. 3. Estacl6n Experimental, Tigre.) Manteca, "A form 
of White Sieva Lima:' 

44967. (No. 17.) Small fiicra Manteca, "The Small Sieva Uma,"* 
44968. Phaseolus coccineus L. Fabacete, Scarlet Bunner bean. 

(No. 5.) Colorado dc Espana, ''Identified as the ordinary Scarlet 
Runner" 

44969 to 44980. Phaskolus vulgaris L. Fabaceie. Common bean. 

44969. (No. 1. Kstuci6n Experimental, La Banda, Santiago del 
Estero.) Blanco crioUo. "Similar to Calif Of;nia Small White 
bean." 

44970. (No. 4.) Blanco de manteca pcqnefio. " SlmlUir to Medium 
beans of New Tca-k State." 

44971. (No. 6.) 100 X 1 (dwarf). "A bright-brown small bean not 
like any well-known variety in the United States.*' 

44972. (No. 8.) Dutch Case Knife. "The variety as grown in the 
United States. 

44973. (No. 9.) Bicolor, "A large bean with white ground color 
over half of the bean on the dorsal side; remainder of the bean 
brown and purple mottled. Not like any variety commonly 
grown in the United States." 

44974. (No. 10.) Bicolor, " Identical with No. 9." 

44975. (No. 11.) Tlwrbum Large. "Similar to Giant SttHtiglcss 
Chreen Pod." 

44976. (No. 12.) Hardlong French. "A small white bean the size 
of California Small White." 

44977. (No. 13.) Hudson Wax (dwarf). "This Is not Hudson 
Wax; the seeds are black. It may be Wax Podded." 

44978. (No. 14,) Negro de Belgica (dwarf). "This variety has 
small black beans." 

44979. (No. 15.) Blanco de manteca pequeflo. "White beans, about 
the size of Medium beans of New York State." 

44980. (No. 18.) Southern Prolific. "True to nam^ as gi'own in 
the United States." 

44981 to 44991. Pisum sativtm L. Fabacefe. Garden pea. 

44981. (No. 19.) Ojo negro. "A largo smooth i)ea with a black 
hilum." 

44982. (No. 20.) ' Mararilla del mercado. "A slightly wrinkled 
white pea." 

44988. (No. 21. EstnciCn Experimental, La Bauda, Santiago del 
Estero.) Automovil. "A large wrinkled pea." 

44984. (No. 22. Estaci6n Experimental, La Banda, Santiago del 
Ii^tero.) Orgullo del mercado. "A small wrinkled pea," 

44985. (No. 23. Estaci6n Experhnental, La Banda, Santiago del 
Estero.) ^^'illiam Hurst (dwarf). "A small wrinkled pea.' 



i» 



14 SEEDS AXn PLANTS IMPORTED. 

44966 to 44993— Continued. 

44086. (No. 24. Estac!6ii Experimental, Lii Baiida, Santiago del 
E.stero.) De ^0 dias. "A j^reeuish medium-sized semiwrinkled 
l)ea." 

44987. (No. 25. Estacl6n Experimental, La Banda, Santiago del 
Estero.) Srnador (dwarf). "A medium-sized wrinkled pea." 

44988. (No. 26. Estacl6n Experimental, La Banda, Santiago del 
Estero.) Cien por uno. "A medium-sized wrinkled pea." 

44989. (No*. 27. Estaci6n Experimental, La Banda, Santiago del 
Estero.) TeUgrafo. "A rather small wrinkled pea." 

44990. (No. 28. Estacion Exijeriniental, La Banda, Santiaj2:o del 
Estero.) Gladiador (dwarf). "A large wrinkled pea." 

44991. (No. 29. Estaci6n Experimental, TIgre.) Comun. "A small, 
smooth, green pea." 

44992 and 44993. Vign a sinensis (Torner) Savi. Fabaceae. Cowpea. 

44992. (No. 7.) Careta. "Identified as a black-eyed cowpea." 

44993. (No. 16.) Southern Creaseback. "Identified as a cowpea." 

44994 to 44999. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, Agricultural Explorer 
of the Bureau of Plant Industry. Received July 19, 1917. Quoted notes 
by Mr. Popenoe. 

44994. Chamaedorea sp. Phoenicacese. Pacayito palm. 

"(No. 150. July 9, 1917.) Plants of a dwarf palm collected in dense 
forests near Purula, Department of Baja Vera Paz, at an altitude of ap- 
proximately 5,500 feet. 

"This species is usually called by Spanish-speaking Guatemalans 
pacayito, which means ' small pacaya.* By the Indians of Alta Vera 
Paz, who speak the Kekchl language. It is called ko-kiip, which also 
means * small pacaya,' and in Purula I heard it called pamak. This 
name is doubtless given because of the resemblance to the common 
pacaya, a palm which is extensively cultivated in Guatemala for Its 
edible flower buds. Probably the name pacayito may be chosen as best 
suited to use in the United States. 

"Judging from accounts given me by various residents of Vera Paz, 
this palm commonly occurs In the mountains of that region at altitudes 
of about 4,000 to 6,000 feet. It always grows in dense forests and must 
be constidered a shade and moisture loving species. The soil in which 
it grows is nothing but decayed leaves for the first several inches and is 
kept continually moist by the abundant rains of this region. In Coban 
the pacayito is a favorite house plant, being grown in pots and tubs and 
used to decorate living rooms and patios. In the city of Guatemala it is 
occasionally used for the same purpose, the plants being brought down 
from Cohan. 

" In the forests the pacayito seems never to reach a greater heiglit 
than 3 feet. It is a true dwarf (one might almost call It a miniature 
palm), for it reaches maturity and comes Into fiower when not over a 
foot high. This dwarf habit makes it of unusual interest as a pot plant 
for the North, as it can be fruited in an ordinary living room when 
growing in an 8-inch pot. 

'* It makes its character leaves almost as soon as the young plant is 
out of the seed. I have seen many plants in tlie forest which were not 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1»17. 15 

44994 to 44999— Continued. 

over 4 Inches high and already had two to four fully characterized 
leaves. When quite small it strongly resembles Cocoa weddeUiana, but 
the pinnfie are somewhat broader and not so numerous. For fern dishes 
in the Northern States it should have great value. 

** When mature, the plant has a slender trunk, perhaps half an inch 
thick and 2 feet high. The leaves are a foot to 18 inches in length, rather 
finely pinnate, deep green, graceful, with the rachis stiff but arching 
slightly. In Vera Paz the flowers are produced in June and July, and 
the small, round seeds, about as large as small peas, ripen in December. 

" Since it is found at considerable elevations in Vera Paz, it seems 
likely that this palm will be sufficiently hardy for cultivation in the open 
in California and Florida. It should be provided with ample shade, how- 
ever, and planted In a very moist situation in soil containing a large pro- 
portion of leaf mold. 

'* As a house plant for tlie Nortliem States and for use in fern dishes 
it seems to me that this plant possesses unusual possibilities, and I 
strongly recommend it for trial" 

For an illustration of the pacayito palm, see Plate I. 

44995. Salvia hempsteadiana Blake. Menthaceee. 

"(No. 151. July 9, 1917.) Plants of an herbaceous i)erennial collected 
on the banks of a small stream at Purula, Department of Baja Vera Paz 
(altitude 5,200 feet). 

" The plants commonly grow 1^ to 2 feet in height, and soon after the 
beginning of the rainy season (May) send up spikes of briUiant blue 
flowers, tubular in form and about an inch long. It is a conspicuous 
thing when in bloom, and is strongly recommended for trial in California 
and Florida, where it should be hardy." 

44996. Persea sp. Lauracese. • 

"(No. 152a. Seeds from the Chuacus Mountains, near Rincon Grande, 
about 5 miles from Salama, at an approximate altitude of 3,0(X) feet. 
July 9, 1917.) 

" I do not know what this species may be; possibly it is as yet unde- 
scribed. Only one tree has been seen up to the present, and this was 
erect, rather slender in habit, and 30 feet in height. The foliage strongly 
resembles that of Persea americana, but is more heavily pubescent beneath 
than is common in that species. In form and size the leaves could not 
be distinguished from some of the cultivated avocados. The young leaves 
and branchlets are covered with a velvety tomentum. 

"The fruits, which ripen in June, are oval or oblong-oval in outline, 
about li inches in length, shining black in color, with a membranous 
skin and a very small amount of greenish pulp having a strongly resinous 
taste. The seed is quite large in comparison with the size of the fruit, 
elliptical in outline, with the seed coats thin, brownish, and brittle, and 
adhering closely. The cotyledons are whitish, with the embryo at the 
base of tlie seed. The fruit is distinct from that of the avocado in having 
a large, fleshy, bluntly toothed calyx, pinkish or whitish in color, which 
remains on the tree when the fruit falls. 

"This species is introduced in connection with the experiments now 
being carried on with a view to determining the best stock on which to 
bud the avocado." 

44997. DiPHTSA sp. Fabaceee. 

"(No. 153a. July 9, 1917.) Seeds of a leguminous shrub common in 
the mountains of the northern part of the Department of Baja Vera Paz, 



16 SEEDS AJm FLAXrrS niFOREBD. 

44994 to 44999— Continued. 

between Salama and Santo Tomas. It grows In dry, rocky places and also 
along the banks of streams, reaching a height of about 8 feet under the 
former cohdittons and 6 feet under the latter. The foliage is coars^ 
pinnate, with oval, glancoos leaflets. The flowers, which are produced 
in clusters of considerable size, are of a deep lilac and quite attractive. In 
form they resemble the flowers of the common pea, but are smaller, being 
about half an Inch broad. The shrub seems well worthy of trial In Cali- 
fornia and Florida.** 

4499S. Tabebitia pentaphtlla (L.) Hemsl. Bignonlacem. 

"(No. 154a. July 9, 1917.) Matiliscuate, Seeds of a handsome 
flowering tree found in north-central Guatemala, especially in the 
Valley of Salama, and commonly growing near small streams. I have 
seen it at altitudes of 2,000 to 8,500 feet The tree is about 35 feet high 
at maturity, with a spreading crown, deciduous during the latter part 
of the dry season (January to March), and producing large clusters of 
pink flowers which make the tree a mass of color visible for some dis- 
tance. Its flowering season is from January to March, and the seeds, 
which are produced in long, slender pods, ripen in May and June. 

"As an ornamental tree for cultivation in southern Florida and possibly 
also in California the matiliacutUe seems well worthy of trial. Its only 
defect is its habit of dropping its leaves during the dry months of the 
year. If it flowers in the same months in Florida as it does In Guate- 
mala, howevor, it should be a valuable addition to the flowering trees 
of that region. It thrives on heavy but rocky land and does not seem 
to require a large amount of water.'* 

44099. Pebsea scnncDEANA Nees. Ijaunicefc. C076. 

X "(No. 161. Bud wood from the sltio of Don David Pierri, San Cristo- 
bal, Vera Paz, July 3, 1917.) 

"The coydf chude, shucte, or, as it Is sometimes called, cJiauote^ is a 
species of Persea which is undoubtedly indigenous in this region. It Is 
reported also from Zacapa and Chiquimula, but I have seen it only here 
up to the present The tree grows on the banks of streams, where the 
soil is moist and rich. The hills in this region are dry, rocky, and covered 
with a scanty vegetation of cacti, Pereskla, thorny leguminous shrubs 
and small trees, and a few other plants. As well as being indigenous in 
this region, the chucte must be classed as a cultivated fruit tree, since it 
is occasionally, but not often, planted in gardens. 

"At the present time the chvcte is neither in flower nor in fruit. It is 
said to bloom in February and to ripen its fruit in May and June, con- 
tinuing until August. One of the two trees which I have seen (this one 
standing on the north bank of the Rio Motagua a short distance above 
El Rancho) was about 60 feet in height. The other one was not more 
than 45 feet high. The general appearance of the tree, its habit of 
growth, size, and character of bark and fbliage are remarkably sug- 
gestive of an avocado of the West Indian type, but on closer examina- 
tion it is seen that the leaves are larger than is common with the 
avocado, the venation is impressed on the upper surface of the leaf, and. 
most conspicuous of all, the ends of the young branchlets and the 
petioles are covered with a ferruginous tomentum. The foliage is sai«l 
to fall Just before the tree comes into bloom, the flowers making their 
appearance along with the new leaves. 



entoty 52, Saeds »nd Plan 



Thcee graceful dvul palms nre used verv eiTectirely [or borne decorBtlon In Quatcmala. 
ptluu shown ban were In the " eorrolor^' or the residence ol Don Enrinue DleseldorD »t C< 
It Is a question nbettier or not tbej will endure Ihe steam heat ol buUdlng; In tbe colder 
oltbeCiiltedSIiMa, but tli«y wlllsuraly beorvalueon tbe wostcoutaodlnllieCiuUrt 
(PbotacraphedbjWUsODPDpeboe, Coban, Guatemala, September, iai7; P17(T3FD.} 



sntory 53, Seed! and Plant) Imported. 



A YouNO Coy6 Tree in Guatemala. (Persea schiedeana Nees.. 
S. P. I. No. 44999.) 

Wilaoa PoMnoe raaslders (he coyd a better flavored frull than IhaavDndD. to whJcli It b closd; 
allied. tTntortuiiatd]', hortlcuUijrL>i3 bare given It no attention up to the present time: 
(leubtlesA (srprul seleetloD and breeding will produce superior varieties, and It aeerrfs to ba 

alborilculturlats, aslt conaliliJiesaiiewfrult. It occurs la 

mSODtoe.onoleeland will also possibi; sucieed m soutbem 
(Pbotegraphed by Wilson Fopenoe, Sepaculte, OuatenulA. 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 17 

44994 to 44999— Continued. 

"The leaves are clustered at the ends of the branchlets, though not 
crowded. The leaf blades are oblong-elliptic, truncate at the- base, 
sharply acute to shortly acuminate at the apex, 8 to 12 inches long, 4 to 
7 inches broad, bright green and glabrous above, glaucous and rather 
heavily pubescent below; the pubescence is ferruginous on the midrib 
and to a less degree on some of the larger transverse veins. The vena- 
tion is slightly impressed on the upper surface and very prominent be- 
low. The petioles are 1 to If inches long, narrowly canaliculate toward 
the articulation with the leaf blade, and ferruginous pubescent like the 
branchlets from which they ari^ 

" The fruit is described as long and slender, almost black, with a large 
and long seed and thin flesh. The flavor is described as rich and bland, 
similar, but superior, jto that of the avocado. It is highly esteemed by 
the inhabitants, and it is stated that it has even been shipped to the 
city of Guatemala and sold in the market there." (Quoted from de- 
scription furnished with Mr. Popenoe^s No. 72.) 

For an illustration of a coy6 tree, see Plate II. 

45000 and 45001. 

From Amsterdam, Netherlands. Procured through Mr. Frank W. Mahin» 
American consul, from J. B. Wijs & Zoon. Received July 21, 1917. 

" Official statistics as to the exports of these mustards are lacking, but it is 
estimated that they aggregate about 4,000 tons annually, while the home consump- 
tion is about 500 tona This seed in Holland Is sown in May in sandy soil and 
must grow for two years." (Mahin.) 

These seeds were introduced for the Bureau of Chemistry, for investigations 
of commercial mustards. 

45000. Brassica ALBA (L.) Boiss. Brass icacese. White mustard. 

45001. Brabsica nigba (L.) Koch. Brassicacese. Black mustard. 

45002 and 45003. Linum usitatissimum L. Linacese. Tlax. 

From Amsterdam, Netherlands. Procured through Mr. Frank W. Mahin, 
American consul, from J. B. Wijs & Zoon. Received July 21, 1917. 

These seeds were introduced for the Office of Fiber-Plant Investigations. 

45002. No. 1. Blue blossom. 45003. No. 2. White blossom. 

45004. Hyphaene thebaica (L.) Mart. Phoenicaceffi. 

Doum palm. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Fruits presented by Mr. F. G. Walsingham, Horti- 
cultural Division, Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received July 
21 and 27, 1917. 

"Obtained in the District of Aswan, Upper Egypt, where the species is 
fairly abundant." (Walsinoham.) 

An Egj'ptian palm, 3 to 9 meters (10 to 40 feet) in height, with a trunk about 
30 centimeters (a foot) in diameter, either simple or, more frequently, 
dichotomously branched. The 20 to 30 fan-shaped leaves on the ends of each 
branch are sheathed at the base by spiny margined petioles. The spadices 
are 80 to 100 cm. (32 to 40 inches) in length, and up to 5 cm. (2 inches) thick 
at the base. The fruit is usually an obliquely ovoid nut about 6 cm. (2f inches) 
long. (Adapted from Muschler, Manual Flora of Egypt, vol. i, p. 188.) 
51562—22 3 



18 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45005. Craniolaria annua L. Martyniaceae. 

From Kew, England. Presented by Sir David Praln, director, Royal 
Botanic Gardens. Received July 23, 1917. 

A coarse, wide-spreading, rank annua), about 2 feet high, with large, opposite, 
palmately lobed leaves with dentate margins, racemes of white flowers, and a 
two-valve<i many-seeded capsule with a long incurved beak. It is a native of 
northern South America, where it is known as Creole acorzonera and where the 
thick, fleshy root Is preserved in sugar as a comfit. (Adapted from Bailey, 
Standqrd Cyelopedia of Horticulture, i»o/. 2, p. 877.) 

45006 to 45008. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Re- 
ceived July 23, 1917. 

45006. FoENicLXUM vuLOARE Hill. Aplacew. PenneL 

Fenmiil doux. The sweet fennel is quite popular as a winter and 
spring vegetable in southern Europe. The young shoots are eaten like 
asparagus tips, either plain boiled or served with a sauce. The plant 
will grow on very stony, steep slopes, where it serves as a soil binder, 
but it responds ivadily to better treatment. (Adapted from letter of 
Dr. A, Robertson Proscfiowsky dated June 30, 1917.) 

45007. Mx'SA PAKADisiACA SEMiNiFi!»A (Lour.) Baker. Musaceie. 

Plantain. 

A wild set»d-bearing form of the plantain, having small, oblong, greenish 
fruits full of seed. These fruits are about a third of the size of the 
common banana and are of pleasant taste, although encumbered by 
numerous seeds. The plant Is quite ornamental and hardier than the 
common banana, so that it might be possible, by selection or hybridiza- 
tion, to extend the range of banana culture. (Adapted from tetter of 
Dr. A. Robertson Prosehowsky dated June 30, 1917.) 

*ft008. pRioTROPis CYTisoiDES (Roxb.) Wight and Am. Fabaceie. 

A leguminous bush with slender branches, trifoliate leaves 2 to 3 inches 
long, and numerous mjiny-flowered racemes of pale-yellow flowers. It 
is a native of the tropical region of the eastern Himalayas and is culti- 
vated in Nice. France, where from November to April the abundant necta- 
riferous flowers furnish about the only food available to the bees. Its 
winter-blooming habit and attractive flowers make it a desirable orna- 
mental for regions not subject to severe frost (Adapted from Hooker, 
Flora of British In4ia, vol. 2, p. 6o, and from letter of Dr, A. Robertson 
Proschoirsky dO'ted June 30, 1917.) 

45000. BuTiA CAPiTATA (Mart.) Becc. Phoenicacese. Palm. 

From Gotha, Fla. Fruits presented by Mr. H. Nehrling. Received July 23, 
1917. 
" This is the most massive of hardy Cocos species which I have. The bunches 
of fruits usually weigh about 50 pounds each. I raised the plant from seeils 
received from the late Dr. Hermann Burmeister, of Buenos Aires, who in- 
formed me that the seeds had been collected by Dr. Nlederlein at Bntre Rios, 
Argentina, about 22 years ago. These Ck)C08 species are the most beautiful and 
hardy on the high pinelands, and most of them are edible and very aromatic.** 
{Kehrling.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 19 

45010. Spondias lutea L. Anacardiaceee. Yellow mombin. 

From Bahia, Brazil. Presented by Dr. Leo Zehntner. Received July 
24, 1917. 

"Tliis species Is generally considered inferior In quality to the red mombin 
(Spondias motnhin). Its cultivation is much less extensive, but it occurs 
abundantly as a wild tree in many tropical regions. The name hog-plu'm, which 
has been applied to it in the West Indies, has perhaps given it a worse repu- 
tation than it merits. This name should not, as Cook and Collins point out, 
cast any reflection on the character of the fruit, inasmuch as it refers to the 
fact that hogs are extremely fond of it and fatten upon the fruit which falls 
to the ground from wild trees In the forest. 

"The tree is tall and stately in appearance. Under favorable conditions it 
may reach GO feet in height. The leaves are 8 to 12 inches long, composed of 
7 to 17 ovate-lanceolate or lanceolate-serrulate leaflets, oblique at the base and 
2i to 4 inches in length. The yellowish white flowers are borne in loose pan- 
icles 6 to 12 inches long. The fruit is ovoid, commonly an inch in length, 
bright yellow, with a thin skin and an oblong seed of relatively large size. The 
flesh is yellow, very soft and juicy, and of subacid, rather puhgent flavor. 
Many varieties are scarcely pleasant to the taste ; others are sweet and agree- 
able. The fruit is usually eaten while fresh. 

" This species is considered to be cosmopolitan in the Tropics. In Spanish- 
speaking countries it is called jobo. In Brazil it is known as caid. In the 
French colonies the names moniMn jaune and prune myrobalan are current. 

"Occasional trees are seen in cultivation throughout tropical America. 
Cook and Collins state that it is planted extensively in Porto Rico. In southern 
Florida it succeeds, but has never become common. In California no trees of 
fruiting age are known. The species is rather susceptible to frost ; it is found 
In the Tropics only at low elevations, and it probably will not withstand tem- 
peratures much below the freezing point, particularly when young." (Wilson 
Popenoe. ) 

45011 to 45018. 

From Venezuela. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Received July 24, 1917. 

4501 L Acacia sp. Mimosacese. 

"(Caracas, 500 to 3,000 feet elevation.) Cuji. A Prosoplslike tree 
with a short trunk; requires more moisture than Prosopis." (Curran,) 

45012. Acacia fabnesiana (L.) Willd. Miraosace«. 
" Caasie. From Caracas." 

A much-branched shrub 6 to 10 feet high, with compound leaves 
having linear leaflets and very fragrant deep-yellow flowers in large, 
globular heads. The cylindrical, indehiscent pods finally become turgid 
and pulpy. The shrub is probably a native of tropical America, but 
is now cultivated as an ornamental in many places and is grown in 
France for perfume. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of 
Horticulture, voL i, p. 188,) 

45013. BuMEUA sp. Sapotaceffi. 

"(La Guaira, June, 1917.) A small tree growing in the forests along 
the coast, bearing large quantities of edible black fruits.'* (Curran.) 

45014. FxTRCRAEA sp. Amaryllidaceffi. 

"(No. 1128. Caracas and Puerto Cabello, 4,000 to 5,000 feet. June 27, 
1917.) The cultivated cocuisa, one of the fiber plants of Venezuela." 
(Curran.) 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45011 to 46018--Continued. 

45015. Malpighia sp. Malpighiaceie. 

"(Puerto Cabello.) Simaruco. A tree or shrub; ornamental when 
in fruit; fruits red, edible." (Curran.) 

45016. Passiflora quadranoularis L. Passifloraceie. GranadiUa. 

''(I^ Guaira. June, 1917.) Oyama. Fruits large, 8 inches long and 
6 inches In diameter. Used as a preserve." (Curratk) 

A stout quick-growing climber, with large oval leaves and square stems. 
Its large greenish yellow ft'uit is not unlike a short and thick vegetable 
marrow and contains in Its hollow center a mass of purple subacid pulp 
mixed with the flat seeds. The root is usually swollen and fleshy and 
is sometimes eaten like a yam. The plant is propagated by seeds or 
cuttings, and the flowers should be fertilized by hand to insure good 
crops. Although a native of tropical America, this plant is wid^y 
cultivated throughout the tropical regions of the Old World. (Adapted 
from MacnUUcm, Handbook of Tropical OardetUng and Planting, p. 180,) 

45017. RuBUS sp. Rosaceae. Blackberry. 

"(No. 1119. Caracas, June, 1917.) The common blackberry of the 
upper slopes, 4,000 to 6,000 feet altitude." (Curran.) 

45018. (Undetermined.) Aracese. 

"(No. 1140. Puerto Cabello, June, 1917.) A terrestrial or epiphytic 
aroid; suitable as a house plant." (Curran,) 

45019. AsiMiNA TRILOBA (L.) Dunal. Annonaceae. Papaw. 

From De Kalb, Mo. Cuttings presented by Mr. J. C. Roach. Received 
July 27. 1917. 

"(July 23, 1917.) Long John papaw. 6ro\^Ti on the John Cole farm, 8 miles 
south of De Kalb." (Roach,) 

The fruit of this variety is of unusual shape, very long in proportion to its 
breadth (sometimes almost like a banana in form), and weighs 7 or 8 ounces. 
The quality Is good but not equal to that of several others, and the fruit is a 
good shipper, perhaps the best of all, the skin being notably tough and thick. 
(Adapted from Journal of Heredity, January, 1917, in which is described the 
offer of the American Genetic Association which brought this and many other 
varieties of papaws together for comparative study.) 

46020 to 45022. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Wilson Popenoe, Agricultural Explorer of 
the Bureau of Plant Industry. Received July 26, 1917. Quoted notes by 
Mr. Popenoe. 

450^. An NONA CHEBiMOLA Mill. Annonaceae. Cherimoya. 

"(No. 164. Bud wood from the sitio of Julio Guerra, Antigua, July 
16, 1917.) 

"An unusually productive and otherwise desirable cherimoya from 
the garden of Julio Guerra, who keeps a small tienda across the street 
from the rear of the Hotel Rojas. This is the most productive tree I 
have seen in this entire region, though I have examined a large number, 
not only in Antigua but in many of the surrounding villages. 

"There is one peculiarity worthy of mention. Both this tree, and 
the one in Duenas, from which I obtained bud wood (No. 49, S. P. I. No. 
43485), have been topped within the last few years, and the present 
crown is all new wood. These two trees are the only ones I have seen 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 21 

46O20 to 46022— Continued. 

bearing good crops of fruit, and this naturally brings up the question, 
• Is the productiveness of these trees due to the fact that they have been 
topped? It rather }pola as though it may be, and it would be well 
worth while experimenting with some of the old seedling trees in south- 
ern California to see if topping would render them more productive. 
Topping is not done here with the intention of making the trees pro- 
duce more fruit ; it has been purely accidental in these two cases. The 
large limbs have been cut back within a foot or two of their union with 
the trunk. From the stubs numerous sprouts have made their appear- 
ance, and on these much 'more fruit is produced than upon the fruiting 
branches of the ordinary crown. 

*'The tree from which this bud wood was taken has a trunk about 
10 inches in diameter, and the crown is now about 10 feet broad. I 
counted over 50 fruits on the tree, which is a large crop for a cherimoya. 

" In form the fruits are heart shaped or bluntly conical, much freer 
from irregularities than many varieties, of large size, averaging about 
a pound in weight. The surface is clean and almost smooth, the carpel- 
lary areas being indicated by raised lines. 

" This is a variety of pleasing form and appearance, of good size for 
handling and marketing, and the quality seems to be good. It ripens 
earlier here than most of the other seedlings, the first fruits having 
already dropped, while the fruits on most of the other trees I have seen 
are still immature. It should be tried in California." 

45021. Annona chebimola Mill Annonacese. Cherimoya. 

"(No. 165. Cuttings from the sitio of Julio Guerra, Antigua, July 
16, 1917.) A productive variety of the cherinioya, or anona as it is 
called in the Guatemalan highlands. 

"The tree is small, though not young. Apparently it has been cut 
back heavily, leaving only one limb of the several which formerly com- 
posed the crown. The height of the tree at present is about 15 feet, 
while the trunk is about 8 inches thick at the base. The crown is 
slender and unsymmetrical. 

**At this date (July 16) the tree is carrying 102 young fruits and is 
still flowering. The season of ripening is from November to January. 
In form the fruits are cordate to conical. When ripe the larger ones 
will weigh more than 1 pound. The surface is rough, the carpellary 
areas on some specimens giving rise to short protuberances, while on 
other specimens the protuberances are almost wanting. 

" Julio Guerra says the ripe fruit has very white flesh and is of 
good quality. The unusual productiveness of the parent tree com- 
mends the variety for trial in California and Florida." 

45022. Chamaedokea sp. Phoenicacese. Facaya palm. 

"(No. 167a. Seeds from San Cristobal, Department of Alta Vera 
Paz, July 16, 1917.) Nearly every garden in Coban, San Cristobal, and 
other towns of Alta Vera Paz contains a number of these attractive 
palms, grown not so much for ornament as for the edible inflorescences 
which they produce. In some parts of central Guatemala, such as San 
Antonio Aguas Calientes, the pacaya is occasionally seen, but it appears 
to be much more abundant in Vera Paz than in any other section of 
the Republic. It is cultivated at varying altitudes, the lowest observed 
being about 3,000 feet and the highest 5,200. From the fact that it 
succeeds at such high elevations as 5,000 feet it must be considered 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45020 to 45022— Continued. 

slightly hardy and may be found sufficiently so to be grown outdoors in 
southern Californ!a and Florida. 

"The palm grows to a height of 15 to 25 feet, more commonly the 
former than the latter. The trunk is slender, erect, and about 2 inches 
thick. The leaves are 3 to 6 feet long, with 18 to 24 pairs of pinnae 
subopposite toward the base of the rachis, often becoming alternate 
farther up. The lowermost pinnie are narrow and not over 8 or 10 
inches long; farther up they become 18 or 20 inches long and nearly 
2 inches wide. In general, the foliage of this palm suggests that of 
the well-known Areca lutescena (properly Chrysalidocarpus iutescens) 
of northern conservatories. It is graceful, of rich green color, and in 
every way pleasing. 

" The inflorescences api)ear from October to May, a few coming at 
other seasons of the year. They appear along the trunk a short distance 
beneath tlie lowermost leaves. Before the spathes burst and the flowers 
appear, these buds, which are 8 to 12 inches in length, are cut for use. 
The part which, is eaten is the tender, white, much-branched inflo- 
rescence within the spathe. Its preparation for the table consists in 
dipping it in a batter made of eggs and then frying it; in enveloping 
it in an omelet ; in boiling it and serving it as a vegetable ; or in mixing 
it with other vegetables to form a salad. Wlien very young and tender 
its flavor is most agreeable. When the buds are nearly ready to burst, 
the inflorescence frequently has a bitter taste, which is objectionable 
to some people, though much liked by others. 

"This palm grows on a variety of soils, seeming to do well on clay 
and also on black sandy loam. It is frequently planted in gardens 
among coffee bushes, and in some sections it is planted beneath the 
shade of large trees. It may be necessary to supply shade for the plant 
in regions such as southern California. If so, this can be easily done 
by means of a lath or slat house. 

"As an article of food the pacaya is much used in Guatemala and 
by local standards commands a good price, single inflorescences selling 
commonly at flve or six for a peso (2^ cents) in the regions where they 
are grown. The leaves are widely used for decorative purposes, l>eing 
cut to adorn houses during the many fiestas which take place in this 
country." 

45023. SoLANUM TUBEROSUM L. Solanaceae. Potato. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Tubers presented by Mr. J. M. Westgate, agron- 
omist in charge, Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station. Received 
July 24, 1917. 
Portuguese Red, These were submitted by Mr. J. B. Thompson, superinten- 
dent of the Glenwood Experiment Station, Hawaii. They are important be- 
cause they are remarkably immune to the diseases (late-blight, wilt, etc.) which 
afl!ect the ordinary potato." (Westgaie,) 

45024. BiBES sPEciosuM Pursh. Grossulariaceae. Gteosebeny. 

From Los Angeles, Calif. Presented by Mr. P. D. Bamhart. Numbered 
August 2, 1917. 
" The books say that this is evergreen, but this is not true, for no matter 
how much water may be applied to it during the rainless season, it sheds its 
leaves and becomes dormant. As soon as the rains set in it springs into life, 
the rich, dark-green foliage appearing as though it were varnished. The new 
growth is bright red, thickly beset with spines of the same color. The brilliant 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 23 

red flowers are pendent all along the stems of the previous year's growth. A 
hillside covered with these plants is a glorious sight. For some reason very 
few of the bushes set fruit." iBamhart.) 

45026. Ulmtjs pumila L. Ulmacea*. Elm. 

From Peking, China. Collected by Mr. Frank X. Meyer, Agricultural Ex- 
plorer of the Bureau of Plant Industry. Received July 24, 1917. 

A rather low Chinese tree, from 10 to ;16 meters (35 to 50 feet) In height* 
witli a short trunk up to 2.6 meters (8^ feet) in circumference. The bark is 
rough and deeply corrugated, and the spreading branches form a bushy crown. 
It is grown all over northern China and Manchuria as an avenue, shade, and 
timber tree. The strong Chinese carts are constructed chiefly from its wood, 
it resists drought, extremes of temperature, and neglect remarkably well and 
thrives in the semlarid regions of the Great Plains as well as in the Southwest. 
(Adapted from notes of Frank N. Meyer, and from Sargent, Plantae Wi7«on{a- 
fiae, vol. 5, p. 24h) 

45026 and 45027. Babella rubra L. Basellaceae. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 
July 26, 1917. 

45026. An East Indian annual or biennial cultivated in the Tropics as a 
potherb, like spinach. It is branched, grows to about 6 feet high, and 
has fleshy, green leaves and small greenish or redd'sh flowers. The 
leaves are produced very freely during the summer, when they are 
eaten as greens. The seeds are sown early in March or April in a 
warm place and in May or June are transplanted to the foot of a wall 
with a southern exposure. The plants should be supported by a trellis. 
The seeds are said to retain their viability for about five years. 
(Adapted from Vilmorin-Andrieux <£• Co., Plant es Potageres, p. 32.) 

45087. Vfiriety eordifoUa. This is the largest variety of this species and 
the most cultivated, being used to cover trellises and dwellings. It is 
the most succulent variety also and is more used as a potherb than the 
others. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, vol. 5, p. 21.) 

45028. Securidaca lamarckii Griseb. Polygalaceae. 

Easter blossom. 

From St. Vincent, British West Indies. Presented by the agricultural 
superintendent. Botanic Gardens, at the request of Mr. A. G. Howell, 
Imperial Department of Agriculture. Received July 27, 1917. 

A climbing woody vine with oval leaves up to 2 inches in length and scattered, 
lax, simple racemes of rosy scentless flowers, each about half an inch long. The 
fruit is a samara, somewhat sinrilar to the samara of the maple tree. This vine 
Is a native of Jamaica and St. Vincent and probably other islands of the British 
^Ve8t Indies. (Adapted from Orisehach, Flora of the British West Indian 
Itflands, p. SO.) 

45029 to 45031. Saccharum ofi^icinarum L. Poacese. 

Sugar cane. 

Prom St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Cuttings presented by Dr. Longfield Smith, 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Chrlstiansted. Received July 31, 1917. 

Introduced for the Sugar Experiment Station, New Orleans, La. 

45029. Santa Cruz H/7. 45081. iSanta Cruz 13/13. 

45030. Santa Cruz 14/47. 



24 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45032, Phttelephas macrocarpa Ruiz and Pav. Phoenicaceae. 

Ivory-nut palm. 

From Panama, Canal Zone. Presented by Mr. B. H. A. Groth, National 
School of Agriculture. Received July 28, 1917. 

An arborescent palm with a thick, rough, creeping trunk, from the under sur- 
face of which roots are given off. The leaves which crown the trunk closely re- 
semble those of the coconut palm in size, shape, and disposition. The flowers 
emit a powerful perfume, especially the large, white, pistillate flowers, wtrlch are, 
however, few in number. The ripe fruit consists of three portions — an exterior 
part which is dark, rough, and woody; a middle part, which consists of a 
yellowish, oily, sweet-tasting pulp ; and an Inner part, the seed, whijch is the 
vegetable ivory of commerce. These fruits grow on the trunk just above the 
bases of the leaves in bunches of six or seven and are called caheza de negro 
by the natives of Colombia. The palm is a native of South America and Cen< 
tral America. The albumen of the seed is the so-called vegetable ivory, and 
this becomes whiter and more opaque on exposure to the air. (Adapted from 
West Indian Bulletin, vol. 9, p. 279, 1908,) 

45033. JuoLANS poRTORiCENsis Dode. Juglandacese. 

Porto Bican walnut. 

From Mayaguez, Porto Rico. Seeds presented by Dr. D. W. May, agrono- 
mist in charge, Agricultural Experiment Station. Received July 28, 1917. 

A Porto Rican walnut tree 20 to 25 meters (65 to 80 feet) in height, with 
slightly hairy, compound leaves composed of 7 to 13 pairs of broadly oval, 
pointed leaflets. The round brownish red fruit, 3 to 5 centimeters (1 to 2 
inches) long, incloses a wrinkled subconical nut. (Adapted from Bulletin 
Soci^t^ Dendrologique de France, No. IS, p. 201, 1909.) 

45034 to 45036. Poacese. 

From Port au Prince, Haiti. Presented by Capt. John Marston, civil 
administrator. Received July 28, 1917. 

45084 and 45035. Obyza sativa L. Bice. 

Haitian Rangoon rice. Grown at the Thor Experiment Station, Port 
au Prince. 

45034. Small dark-seeded form. 

45035. Large light-seeded form. 

45036. Zea mays L. Com. 

" Selected maize. A prolittc bearer throughout Haiti — in the moun- 
tains, along the beach, and in the valleys and lowlands.*' (Marston.) 

45037 to 45040. 

From Burringbar, New South Wales, Australia. Presented by Mr. B. 
Harrison. Received July 30, 1917. 

45037. Andbopogon ebianthotdes F. Muell. Poaceae. Grass. 

" Satintop.** An erect glaucous grass, 2 or 3 feet high, with rather 
narrow leaves and usually three or four sessile, erect spikes about 3 
inches in length. It Is a native of New South Wales and Queensland, 
where it is considered a very superior grass for forage purposes. It 
produces a heavy crop of rich, succulent foliage, spreads from the roots, 
and also seeds freely. (Adapted from Bentham, Flora AustraliensiSt 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 26 

45037 to 46040— Continued. 

vol. 7, p. 529y and from Maittcn, Vtteful yalirc Plants of Australia, 

p. 75.) 

45038. Andsopogon inteumedius R. Br. Poacefe. Oraas. 

An erect grass with rather narrow leaves and slender spikes, growing 
in large clumps. 2 feet or more in height. It is a native of Australia, 
where it is used as a forage grass. It is readily propagated from the 
roots. (Adapted from Bentham, Flora Australiensis, p. 531 , and from 
Agricultural Gazette, New South Wales, May 2, 191^.) 

45089. Chaetochloa barbata (Lam.) Hitchc. and Chase. Poacese. 

Grass. 

A weak-stemmed annual grass which grows freely in open and waste 
ground from the West Indies to Brazil. It is a native of tropical Asia, 
and in Australia has been recommended as a forage grass. (Adapted 
from Hitchcock and Chase, Grasses of the West Indies, and from letter 
of B, Harrison.) 

45040. Panici'm decompositvm R. Br. Poaceie. Grass. 

A tall, coarse, succulent, semiaquatic grass, cultivated in many parts 
of Australia as a forage crop. It produces an abundance of forage and 
is greatly relished by stock. It has yielded under cultivation as nmch 
as 3 tons of hay per acre. The seed9 are produced in December and 
January. (Adapted from Maiden^ Useful Native Plants of Australia, p. 
97.) 

46041 to 46043. Hordeum vuloare coeleste L. Poaceae. 

Barley. 

From Nanking, China. Presented by Mr. J. H. Reisner, College of Agri- 
culture and Forestry, University of Nanking. Received July 30, 1917. 

" Hull-less barley, collected in Chinese fields, June, 1917. These hull-less bar- 
leys mature earlier than the hulled varieties and are harvested early in May." 
(Reisner.) 

45041. Light 45043. Dark. 

45042. Medium. 

46044. RuBus racemosus Boxb. Eosacece. Blackberry. 

From Kingston, Jamaica, British West Indies. Seeds presented by Mr. 
William Harris, Hope Gardens, Department of Agriculture. Received 
July 31, 1917. 

A rambling bush, with the branchlets, petioles, and inflorescence covered 
with glandular hairs and with straight or hooked prickles on the stems. The 
leaves are composed of five to seven oval or roundish dentate leaflets, and the 
large red flowers are in ai^lllary or terminal corymbs. The plant is a native 
of the Nilgiri Hills, India. (Adapted from Hooker^ Flora of British India, vol. 
2.PS40.) 

46046. BuTiA EBiOBPATHA (Mart.) Becc. Phoenicaceae. Palm. 

{Cocos eriospatha Mart.) 

From Gotha, Fla. Fruits presented by Mr. H. Nehrling. Received August 
1, 1917. 

"A most beautiful glaucous pinnate-leaved palm with slightly violet-colored 
leaf stems. The seeds were received under the name of Cocos blumenavia from 
51552—22 i 



26 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

Blumenaii, in Brazil, in 1892. This palm bore its first bunches of fruit four 
years ago. The lar|?e cream-colored flower cluster Is inclosed in a spathe 
densely covered with a felty, brown, soft wool. The fruits have no odor. 
They are the size of a very large cherry or small plum, are yellow, and are 
covered with deep-brown spots. The fruit is the most delicious of all the hardy 
Cocos and reminds one of the flavor of a very good, sweet plum. The palm 
grows on high, dry pineland and is hardier than the orange." (Nehrling.) 

C0008 blum€nai'>ia Hort., is referred by Beccari, L'Agricoltura CJolonlale, 
vol. 10, p. 612, to his new genus Butia, as either Butia eriospatha or B. capitata. 

45046. Pyrus ussuriensis Maxim. Malaceap. Pear. 

From Charles City, Iowa. Cuttings presented by Mr. Charles G. Patten. 
Received August 4, 1917. 

The origin of these cuttings is given in the following account: In Grundy 
Center, Iowa, there is a pear tree which endured the extremely cold winters 
of 1883 to 1885. This tree, now owned by Mr. O. A. Bardhall, a tailor, was im- 
ported from China as a sand pear by John S. Collins & Sons, of New Jersey, 
and was supposed by them to bear fruit nearly the size of Flemish Beauty, 
but only of cooking quality. The extreme hardiness of the tree appealed to 
Mr. Charles G. Patten, of Charles City, Iowa, who planted one in his orchard, 
and the following year planted two more. The second year after that the tree 
bore fruit, but on account of its early blooming and consequent lack of polli- 
nation bore only a scanty number of small, green-colored, hard pears. (Adapted 
from Charles O. Patten, Report of the Iowa fitate Horticultural Society for 
1912, p. 162,) 

45047. Melicogca bijuoa L. Sapindacece. 

From Caracas, Venezuela. Presented by Mr. Henry Plttier, Agricultural 
Experiment Station. Received August 6, 1917. 

" A small or middle-sized tree with thick foliage. The round or oval fruits 
are about the size of a pigeon*s egg and are borne in racemes hanging from 
the ends of the branchlets. Each fruit has a single seed, with a layer of 
sweet. Jellylike pulp between the seed and the green pericarp. The roasted 
seeds are said to be of fine flavor. The tree grows from sea level to 1,200 
meters (3,900 feet) and should thrive in Florida." (Pittier.) 

45048. DovYALis tristis (Sond.) Warb. Flacoui-tiace«. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Seeds presented by Mr. I. B. 
Pole Evans, chief. Division of Botany, Department of Agriculture, Union 
of South Africa. Received August 6, 1917. 

•'A tree which occurs on the .kopjes (low hills) around Pretoria and which 
bears an abundance of small fruits. These fruits make a delicious jelly." 
(Evtms.) 

Usually an unarmed shrub or small tree, 10 to 15 feet high, with leathery, 
obovate, glabrous leaves with shining upper surfaces. The inconspicuous 
flowers appear in November, followed in January by the roundish, yellow, 
pulpy fruits, which are about half an inch long. The fruits are highly flavored 
and are eaten raw or made into jelly. (Adapted from Sim, Forests and Forest 
Flora of Cape Colony, p. ISO.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 27 

45049 to 45064. Prunus spp. Amygdalacese. 

Japanese flowering cherry. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Rockville, Md., from scions 
presented by Mr. David Fairchild from his place* " In the Woods," 
Chevy Chase, Md. The collection came originally from the Yokohama 
Nursery Co., of Japan, in 1906. Numbered August 27, 1917. Quoted notes 
by Mr. Fairchild. 

If anyone would grow these lovely flowering -trees, he should be prepared to 
protect them from the San Jose scale by spraying them every spring before 
they flower (February pr March) uith the lime-sulphur solution. 

45048 to 45052. Prunus serbulata Lindl. 

45049. "Variety Xadeii. One of the loveliest of the very double, 
delicate pink varietiea I^te flowering, about May 1. Flowers 
hang in clusters of two to Ave on long stems. Buds at first deep 
pink and truncate as though their tips had been cut off; they 
expand slowly and form wonderful, double, very large (li inches), 
flat flowers with petals of a delicate pink, deeper colored at the 
margins. Flowers in rifts. Tree extremely Japanesque. Fairly 
vigorous. One of the loveliest for small-lawn planting." 

45050. "Variety Hosokaica, A very beautiful double-flowered form 
with truncate deep-pink buds and flat light-pink flowers in clusters 
of two to three on rather long pendent flower stalks. Very florif- 
erous. Resembles closely the Naden [S. P. I. No. 45049], but 
the tree appears to be less vigorous. Late bloomer (May 1 in 
Maryland)." 

45051. "Variety Ojochin, Flowers very slightly double, large (li 
inches), almost pure white, on short upright stems; slightly 
fragrant, late flowering (May in Maryland). Though the flowers 
are not borne in masses and the tree is not, therefore, as showy 
as trees of other varieties, the unusual size and beauty of the 
individual flowers, which resemble single roses, make it attractive 
for dooryards. Foliage bronze and golden in autumn. Tree not 
very vigorous." 

45052. "Variety Daiztm. S'ngle, white, medium- si zed flowers (1 
inch) with distinct cherry fragrance. Midseason (Apr. 20 to May 
1 in Marj'land). The flowers are scattered most attractively 
through the tree, but the green leaves come out early, mixing with 
the flowers and preventing the tree from being very striking. Not 
one of the showy varieties, but an unusually vigorous grower that 
produces many seeds. Foliage in autumn golden yellow. 

45053. Pbunus siEHOLDir (Carr.) Wittmack. 

" Variety Mikurumihgaiicshi, Early flowering (Apr. 10 to 20 in Mary- 
land), very light pink, semidouble, medium large flowers on long upright 
stems. Very floriferous. Ti'ee vigorous and because of earliness of 
flowering a very desirable variety, though the individual flowers per- 
haps are not so lovely as very double late-blooming sorts. 

45054 to 45062. Pbunus serbulata Lindl. 

45054. " Variety Amenogaica, Translated meaning, * milky way.* 
One of the most striking varieties because of its upright or fastlgi- 
ate grow^th. Peculiarly suited for architectural uses. Medium size. 



28 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45049 to 450e4r-Continued. 

white to very light pink flowers on short stems borne in great 
masses, concealing the branches. As seen from below, the tree 
suggests the characteristic name. Tree not very vigorous." 

45055. "Variety Vssussumi. Very late variety (May 1 In Mary- 
land), with hanging, large, very double flowers borne In clusters. 
The petals are tinged with light brown, giving them a strange, 
though not unattractive appearance. The leaves, coming out at 
the same time as the flowers, are dark bronze. In autumn they 
turn to claret red after a sharp frost. Tree a fairly rapid grower, 
but trunk inclined to be tender. Very floriferous." 

45056. "Variety Murasaki, Deep pink, semidouble flowers (1 inch) 
on short upright stems; very free flowering. While perhaps not 
quite so delicate as some of the very double light-pink varieties, 
this makes a striking show from a distance and for park use can 
be highly recommended. Tree low-heading, vigorous, flowering in 
midseason (Apr. 20 to May 1 in Maryland). Young foliage bronze 
color; in autumn golden yellow." 

45057. "Variety Choshu, Very large deeivpink double flowers di 
inches), borne on long pendent stems in clusters of two to five. 
Flower buds very deep pink. Late flowering (May 1 in Mary- 
land). Young foliage a beautiful bronze; In autumn gold and 
crimson. ^ Tree not very vigorous or floriferous." 

45058. "Undetermined variety. Single, medium sized (1 Inch 
across )< white flowers borne ver>' profusely in short upright 
clusters; not fragrant. Midseason (Apr. 10 to 20). Tree a 
vigorous grower; very Japanesque. Trunk not often diseased. 
On fairly fertile soil forms a tree 20 feet tall in 10 years. Named, 
evidently incorrectly, Joheni.'* 

45059. " Variety Asafri, A rare variety with pale-green flowers, 
which when they first open have a strange but very attractive 
appearance; later the centers of the flowers turn red and they 
are then le.ss attractive. Not showy at a distance, but delicately 
beautiful for u.»i;e in house decoration. Tree rather delicate; late 
bloomer." 

45060. "Variety M'asemiijako. Large, semidouble, almost pure white 
flowers, upright on short stems, very attractively arranged on 
the branches, ^iidseason (Apr. 20 in Maryland). Tree only 
fairly vigorous. Suitable for lawn planting, and showy from a 
distance." 

45061. "Variety Miijakohcni. Midseason variety (Apr. 10 to 20 in 
Maryland) with semidouble flowers. 1\ inches across, borne on 
short upright steins in clusters of two or three. Buds pointed; 
quite pink. Flowers pale pink when young, turning reddish with 
age; slightly fragrant. Tree very floriferous; a vigorous grower, 
attaining 20 feet in 10 years." 

45062. "Variety Toranoiro. Large (1^ inches) extremely double 
flowers; deep pink when in bud, becoming delicate light pink in 
full bloom; hanging on long stems in clusters of two to five. 
Buds flat as though tips wei'e cut off. Not so free flowering as 
Naden [S. P. I. No. 45049], but with deeper pink flowers; promi- 
nent green pistils. Tree fairly vigorous." 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917, 29 

■ 

46049 to 460e4r-Continued. 

45063 and 45064. Pbuni's Mr me Sieb. and Zucc. Japanese apricot. 

45063. " Variety Tsukasa-shibori Semfdouble, very light pink flow- 
ered variety, blooming in Maryland in the middle of April. 
Though spoken of as the ' flowering plum of Japan/ the ' mume ' 
of Japan is really an apricot. The delicate fragrance of the 
flowers, the extremely picturesque habit of growth of the tree, 
and its extreme earliness (April in Maryland), make it worthy 
of extensive trial. It rarely sets fruit in America. JFruits sour, 
but delicious when pickled." 

45064. " Variety Oteno. The * Japanese flowering plum * is really an 
apricot. The picturesque form of the tree and its extremely beau- 
tiful and fragrant blossoms, combined with the fact that it is one 
of the earliest of all trees to bloom, often so early that the snow 
falls on it, have made it the favorite of Japanesei poets. It is 
hardy in the Atlantic Coast States, and even though its blossoms 
often are killed by ft-ost it is worthy of extensive trial. Its fruits 
are sour and remind one of the American wild plum in flavor. 
When pickled they form part of the army ration of Japan." 

45065. CoLOCASiA sp. Aracese. Taro. 

Grown for botanical study at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Brook.s- 
ville, Fla., from tubers received in March, 1912, from Mr. J. St. Clair 
Wlilte, Gough, S. C. 

" This is the * yellow tanyah,* grown in small patches by some of the planters 
along the Cooper River and in the coast region of South Carolina. It derives 
its name from the yellowish color of the cooked corms and cormels, as con- 
trasted with the much darker, somewhat bluish color of the ' blue tanyah,* the 
only other variety commonly grown in the same region. The yellow tanyah 
plant is of slightly smaller growth than the so-called blue variety. The corms 
and cormels are also smaller, and the buds of these are white, while those of 
the blue tanyah are pink. Tlie corms of the yellow tanyah are extremely acrid 
and require two hours' boiling in preparation for the table. The flavor is pro- 
nounced' and is richer than that of the blue tanyah. The yellow tanyah strongly 
I'esembles the Jgname btauca, or white taro [S. P. I. No. 19990], of Madeira." 
{R. A. Young,) 

For an illustration of this taro, see Plate III. 

46066 to 45069. 

From Puerto Bertc-ni, Paraguay. Presented by Dr. Moises S. Bertoni. Ue- 
ceive<l August 1, 1917. Quoted notes by Dr. Bertoni. 

45066. Arecastbum bomanzoffianum australe (Mart.) Becc. Phcenica^ 
cese. Pindo palm. 

" (May, 1917.) Pindd-poi, A very tall palm with a habit like a slender 
reversed pyramid. In the forests of eastern Paraguay it frequently be- 
comes 20 njeters or more in height, equaling the tallest trees of the fine 
forest which covers a great part of this region. The mature specimens of 
th's palm furnish a very hard and resistant wood for 6 to 12 meters from 
the ba.se of the trunk." 

45067 and 45068. Eugenia unifix>ba L. Myrtacese. Fitanga. 

45067. "(June, 1917.) Atlangapirih-apud, A fruit tree 3 to 8 me- 
ters high. It prefers to grow In wooded lowlands drained by 



30 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45066 to 45069— Continued. 

arroyoTasins or on rocky slopes ; in such situations the little tree 
becomes tall, with few branches and short twigs. In open places 
and in good soil it becomes less tall and more branched. The 
fruit is quite similar in appearance and taste to tlie pitanga of 
Brazil, but the tree is more resistant to cold, for it grows in 
localities where the minimum temperature reaches —5" or — 6* C." 

4506a. "(June, 1917.) Aflangapirih variety. A variety of the pre- 
ceding; equally edible." 

45069. Tbichilia catiqua Juss. Meliacese. Katigu&. 

" (June, 1917.) A small ornamental tree found throughout the forests 
of Paraguay. The bark, according to our analyses, contains 20.5 per cent 
of crude tann'n and a large proportion of coloring matter for dyeing. The 
leather thus tanned is of red color, which is much esteemed." 

45070 to 45072. Vitis vinifera L. Vitacese. Grape. 

From Melbourne, Australia. Cuttings presented by Mr. Frangois de Ca»- 
tella. Government vitlcullurlst, Departra^it of Agriculture, Victoria, Aus- 
tralia. Received August 6, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Castella. 

45070. ** Red May, A seedling of Bicane or Raisin dcs Dames which 
originated in the Bendigo District of this State (Victoria). It is a 
fine grape, of good flavor, and carries very well c*onsidering its Juici- 
ness." 

45071. '* Doradillo. The well-known grape of southern Spain. It is a 
very heavy bearer and is being much planted in this State (Victoria) 
for brandy distillafon." 

45072. " King George V. A Gros Colman sport, which is inferior to that 
variety, for the bunches are very badly filled although the berry Is 
larger." 

45073. BuTiA CAPiTATA ODORATA (Barb.-Eodr.) Becc. Phoenicaoeae. 

{Cocos odorata Barb.-Rodr.) Palm* 

From Gotha, Fla. Presented by Mr. H. Nehrling. Received July 27, 1917. 

" The partially bright-red fruit, larger than those of Cocos anstralis, comes 
ttom a taller, open tree. There are not many fruits in a bunch, and I have 
hot tasted them, but they appear to be good. This tree was also grown from 
seed received from Blumenau, Brazil, in 1890, which was collected by Gaertner 
from wild trees growing in stony or rather dry soil. These Cocos palms {Cocos 
australis, C. gaertneri^ C. daiilj C. cani'pestris, C. eriospatha, and several others) 
all have rather hard bluish green leaves and thrive to perfection on our high^ 
dry Flor.da pineland. I think they will grow all along the South Atlantic 
and Gulf coast. They all are fine ornamentals in any garden.'* (Nehfiing.) 

45074. Prunus serrulata sachalinensis (Schmidt) Makino. 

( P. sargetitii Rehder. ) [ Amygdalacese. Sargent's cherry. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Seeds presented by Dr. C. S. Sargent, Arnold 
Arboretum. Received August 3, 1917. 

A handsome large tree, of great ornamental value; hardy as far north as 
Massachusetts and bearing profusely, in early spring, handsome rose-pink pingle 
flowers. 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 31 

45075 and 45076. Prosopis chilensis (Molina) Stuntz. Mimo- 

(P. juu/iora DC.) fsacese. Algaroba. 

From Oran, Province of Salta, Argentina. Presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. 
Received August 10, 1917. 
Introduced for the work of the Office of Forage-Crop Investigations. 
45075. White. 45076. Black, 

45077. Annoxa cherimola Mill. Annonaceae. Cherimoya, 

. From Jujuy, Argentina. Seeds presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. Received 

August 11, 1917. 
Reported to be frost resistant, having withstood 9 or 10 degrees C. of frost. 
Said to be a fine anona, weighing up to 2 kilograms. 

45078 to 45081. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, Agricultural Explorer 
of the Bureau of Plant Industry. Received August 8, 1917. Quoted 
notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

45078. Pebsea Americana Mill. Lauracese. Avocado. 
(P. gratissima Gaertn. f.) 

"(No. 171. Avocado 31. From Mazatenango, Department of Suchite- 
pequez. Altitude 1,148 feet.) Nimah. Bud wood of a variety obtained 
especially for trial in Florida, since it comes from the hot lowlands 
and may be better adapted to the conditions which obtain in extreme 
southern Florida than are those from the Guatemalan highlands. 

"This is a pear-shaped fruit, sometimes curved, with a well-defined 
neck. It is of medium size, weighing about 11 or 12 ounces, deep green 
in color, with a rough surface and a thick, tough skin. The flesh Is deep 
j'^llow in color, free from fiber, and of rich flavor. The seed is medium 
sized. On the whole the variety is satisfactory in point of flavor and 
quality, yet it is not good enough to be included in the Guatemalan col- 
lection on these characteristics alone." 

45079. Chamaedorea sp. Phcenlca( ese. Pacayito palm. 

"(No. 168a. July 22, 1917.) Seeds of a dwarf palm which grows in 
the forests of the Department of Baja Vera Paz at altitudes of 4,000 to 
5,000 feet. 

" The Indians term this plant ko-kiip, which means * small pacaya,' but 
as this name is applied to several other dwarf palms it does not possess 
much significance. 

" On the mountain sides, under dense forest, this dwarf palm grows 
abundantly, apparently thriving in the deepest shade and in soils which 
are nothing but decaying vegetation. It has a slender stem, less than 
half an inch thick, which at times becomes half trailing, as it grows to 
4 or 5 feet in length and is not strong enough to support the weight of the 
foliage. Probably if the plant received more light than it does In the 
dense forest it would remain erect and develop a stiflfer trunk. 

" In the young plants the leaves are once divided, resembling a fishtail 
In outline. They are about 6 inches in length and breadth and of light- 
green color. As the plant becomes older, the foliage becomes pinnate, 
with about three pairs of pinnse, the terminal pair larger than the re.st 
and joined together for some distance along the rachis. 



82 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45078 to 45081— Continued. 

"This is an interesting and decorative small palm, which may be of 
value for house decoration in the United States. Since it comes from a 
cool climate it may be adapted to open-air culture in California and 
Florida." 

45080. MiKANiA sp. Asteracese. 

"(No. ie9a. July 22, 1917.) Seeds of an herbaceous climber from the 
borders of Lake Amatitlan (altitude 3,9(X) feet). It scrambles over 
bushes and low vegetation, producing freely its flame-scarlet flowers, 
about an inch in diameter. Apparently it is a very rapid grower, and 
when in full bloom it is quite showy. It seems worthy of a trial in the 
United States." 

45081. Fersea schiedeana Nees. Lauracete. Coy6. 

"(No. 170a. July 23, 1917.) Seeds of a very large variety of coy6 
from the town of El Rnncho, in eastern Guatemala. The fruits from 
which these seeds were taken weighed from 1 to 2 pounds each. They 
were bright green in color, with very thick skins and milky white to 
brownish white flesh of very rich, nutty flavor. They contained a little 
fiber, but not as much as is connnonly found in the coy6. 

** These seeds should be planted in California and Florida and fruited 
as seedlings." 

45082. Belou marmelos (L.) Lyons. Rutacese. Bel. 

(Aegle marmelos Correa.) 

From Burma. Seeds presente<l by Rev. William H. S. Hascall, Riverside, 
R. I. Received August 6, 1917. 

" This small tree, which is closely related to the orange, is grown in India, 
Ceylon, and near-by regions for its fruits. These are not much eaten by Euro- 
peans, but are popular among the natives. They are considered to have medici- 
nal value. 

" In size and form the fruit resembles an orange, but it -has a hard, woody 
shell, inclosing a yellowish, somewhat nnicllaginous pulp. The flavor is sweet 
and somewhat mawkish to the unaccustomed palate. 

" The bel tree has been planted in southern Florida and gives promise of 
succeeding there, although its growth is slow. It is probably too susceptible to 
frost for cultivation in California." {M'iUon Popenoe,) 

46088. Persea americana Mill. Laiiraceae. Avocado. 

(P. gratissima Gaertn. f.) 

From Bogota, Colombia. Seeds presented by Sr. Alvaro Uribe. Received 

August 11, 1917. 

"One of the best Colombian avocados, which grows at elevations of from 

3,000 to 4,500 feet at temperatures ranging from 20** to 26** C. and ripens in 

April. The fruits are well shaped and excellent in taste. The trees are 

very robust and require only suflUcient moisture in the air." {Uribe.) 

45084. Theobroma cacao L. Sterciiliacece. Cacao. 

From TJlkeumeuh, Bultenzorg, Java. Presented by the manager of the 
experimental garden, TJlkeumeuh, at the request of Dr. P. J. S. Cramer, 
chief of the Plant Breeding Station, Bultenzorg, Java. Received August 
13, 1917. 
" Djati Roetiggo hybrid." 



Invsntory 52. Seeds i 



The Yellow Tanyah. an Edible Aroid for the Southeastern Coast 



Tbe yellow tuiyah. Cotoen'la ap., of Ibt 

centurlea Id that icclli 
two hours to prepare 
In cooUdi;. Tht< ttaxt 



(COLOCASIA SP.. S. P. I. No. 46065.) 



d( South CaroUiia and GuirgiB. This Is 
taro, or lanyah. i;rown for perbaps two 
1 ejrtrflmely acrid and require boJTlDg r<^ 
; vblte, but becomes sllcbtly Tellovlsb 



■tennined species of Colocasia related to Ibe danhDon, C. 
lon^leld Station,' Brooksiille, Fia., October 16, lef 



: Pl^SF 



ISsS 

in 



•^ iiiii 
■*. |J|I 

i HHz- 

; liiK 

o SSStt 

i IMS 

?Mi 

S =1 I 

I II i| 

s I||J 
F|3I 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 33 

45085 to 45087. 

From Venezuela. Oollected by Mr. H. M. Curran. Received August 14, 
1917. 

450S5. Bauhinia sp. Gsesalpinlaceie. 

" From Quanta, Venezuela. A small ornamental leguminous tree grow- 
ing in dense stands on the crest of hills in the dry, rocky, coast regions 
around Quanta." (Curran.) 

45086. Spondias lutea L. Anacardlaceje. Yellow mombin. 

"From the Orinoco E>elta, Venezuela. A tree 100 feet in height and 
3 feet in diameter, yielding large yellow edible fruits. Common name 
jobo:* {Currafi,) 

45067. Manicasia saccifera Qaertn. Phcenicacese. Lemiche palm. 

From the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela." {Curran.) 



•( 



45088. Tabebuia pextaphylla (L.) Hemsl. Bignoniace®. 

From Puerto Cabello, Venezuela. Seeds presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. 
Received August 16, 1917. 

"AfMitfMto. A timber tree with a profusion of ornamental pink flowers." 
(Curran,) 

45089. Citrus nobims deliciosa (Ten.) Swingle. Rutaceae. 

Tangerine. 

From Paranagua, Brazil. Cuttings purchased from Rev. R. B. Pettigrew. 
Received August 16, 1917. 

"June 14, 1917. A tangerine orange. Known here as Mimosa, ABsunguy 
River, about 80 miles north of l»arnnagua. State of Parana, Brazil." (Petti- 
grew.) 

These cuttings were sent in response to a request for a Brazilian tangerine. 
Said to be *' the flnest tangerine that grows, as large as a grapefruit, and to 
retail in New York at 25 cents each." 

45090. Nephrolepis sp. Polypodiaceae. Fern. 

From Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. Plants presented by Mr. H. A. Van 
Hermann, Agricultural Experiment Station. Received August 17, 1917. 

"From the mountains of Cuba." (Van Hermann.) 

Introduced for the monographic studies of Nephrolepis by Mr. R. C. Benedict, 
of the Brooklyn Botanic Qarden. 

45091. Persea AMERICANA Mill. Lauracese. Avocado. 

(P. gratissima Qaertn. f.) 

From the city of Quateniala. Quatemala. Seeds obtained by Mr. Wilson 
Popenoe, Agricultural Explorer of the Bureau of Plant Industry. Re- 
ceived August- 23, 1917. 

Ordinary varieties of avocados from the Quatemalan markets; sent in to 
be grown as stocks for the better varieties of Quatemalan avocados. 



34 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45092. LivisTONA australis (R. Br.) Mart. Phoenicaceae. 

Australian fan palm. 

From Sydney, New South Wales. Seeds presented by Mr. W. J. Allen, 
Department of Agriculture, New South Wales, through Prof. S. C. 
Mason, of the Bureau of Plant Industry. Received August 23, 1917. 

A tall, slender palm, 12 to 18 inches in diameter and 100 to 130 feet in 
height. Native to eastern Australia. The moderately hard wood is ll^t 
colored and is occasionally used for light construction. The leaves are used 
for baskets: and the unexpanded fronds, after being dipped in boiling water, 
are dried and the fiber used in making hats resembling Panamas. The ** cab- 
bage," oither raw or cooked, is highly esteemed by the natives. (Adapted 
from Maiden, Useful Native Plants of Amtraiia.) 

46098. Kennedya sterltINoii Lindl. Fabacew. 

From Sydney, New South Wales. Presented by Mr. Hugh Dixson. Re- 
ceived August 24, 1917. 

*' Put seed into boiling water ; when cool, sow. Plant out seedlings in sandy, 
peaty soil, well drained. Plants will not stand temperatures below frost 
point." (Dixson.) 

A trailing or twining leguminous perennial with trifoliolate leaves, the leaf- 
lets orbicular, and with scarlet or pale vermilion flowers in one or three 
pairs. Native to Western Australia. (Adapted from Botanical Register^ 
plate W,5.) 

45094. HoHERiA populnea a. Cunn. Malvaceae. 

From Avondale, Auckland, New Zealand. Seeds presented by Mr. H. R. 
Wright. Received August 24, 1917. 

" Commonly called lacehark." (Wright) 

A handsome small tree or shrub, 10 to 30 feet in height, with very variable 
leaves and snow-white flowers produced in great profusion. (Adapted from 
BaMey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. S, p. H96.) 

46095. Anacardium occidentale L. Anacardiacea?. Cashew^. 

From Pernambuco, Brazil. Seeds presented by Mr. Arminius T. Haeberle, 
American consul. Received July 17, 1917. 

A spreading tree, 30 to 40 feet in height, with large leathery leaves, bearing 
fruits consisting of a large, swollen, pear-shaped stalk, 2 to 4 inches long, and 
a small kidney-shaped nut, about an inch long, at the extremity. The stalk 
is Juicy and acid and is used in preserves ; the nut has an edible seed, which is 
roasted and served as a dessert. The tree is supposed to be a native of the 
West Indies and is propagated from seeds or by layering. (Adapted from Mac- 
nUlUin, Handbook of Tropical Oardening and Planting, p. 134.) 

46096. Berberis trifolioi/Ata Moric. Berberidaceie. Barberry. 

Plants grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Chico, Calif., from 

seeds originally received from Dr. David Griffiths, collected in Texas. 

Numbered August 31, 1917. 

Evergreen shrub, 2 to 5 feet In height, often forming large thickets. The 

leaves compound, the three leaflets each threp to five lobed and spiny. Berries 

red, aromatic, and acid, about as large as peas; ripening In May; much used 

for tarts, jellies, etc. (Adapted from Contrihutions from the V. S. NationcU 

Herbarium, vol. 2, p. 10.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, lOll. 86 

45097 to 45100. Amygdalus communis L. Amygdalaceas. 

(Pruwus amygdalus Stokes.) Almond. 

Selected varieties from seedlings of the Jordan almond, grown at the 
Plant Introduction Field Station, Chico, Calif., under S. P. I. No. 29615. 
Numbered for convenience in recording distribution. 

45097. Tree No. 4. 45099. Tree No. 8. 

4509S. Tree No. 6. 45100. Tree No. 12. 

46101 and 45102. Carissa orandiflora (E. Mey.) DC. Apocy- 

nacese. Carissa. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Miami, Fla., from seedlings 
of S. P. I. No. 32482. Numbered for convenience in recording distri- 
bution. 

Selected varieties from seedlings of S. P. I. No. 32482, chosen because of their 
compact, bushy habit and their fruitfulness. 

46103. Crescentia alata H. B. K. Bignoniaceae. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Miami, Fla., from seed 
received from Mr. David Fairchild. Numbered for convenience in record- 
ing distribution. 

A small ornamental tree, 10 to 20 feet high, with fascicled, trifollolate leaves, 
closely allied to the calabash tree, Crescentia cujete. The brownish rank-scented 
flowers are borne singly upon the trunk ; and the hard, globose fruits are about 
2 inches in diameter. This tree is occasionally cultivated in the Philippines, 
where it was introduced from Mexico at an early date. 

46104 and 46105. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Miami, Fla., from seed 
brought in by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, from Cuba, in May, 1915. Numbered 
for convenience in recording distribution. Quoted notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

45104. Chbysophyllum cainito L. Sapotaceee. Gaimito. 

*' In Cuba, in Jamaica, and in several other tropical American countries 
the caimito is a common dooryard tree and its fruit is held in the same 
esteem as that of the sapote and the sapodilla. As an ornamental tree 
it is excellent, since it has deep-green glossy foliage, satiny brown beneath. 
The fruits are as large as apples and either green or purple in color. 
They have soft, melting flesh of sweet, agreeable flavor, suggesting the 
sapodilla. The tree is successful in Florida as far north as Palm Beach 
and should be more commonly planted in that State." 

Purple variety. ' 

45105. Tamabindus indica L. Csesalpiniacese. Tamarind. 

"A magniflcent evergreen tree, widely cultivated in many tropical 
countries, preferring deep alluvial soil and abundant rainfall. The plump, 
slightly curved pod has a thin, brittle shell which incloses a soft brownish 
edible pulp containing sugar with acetic, tartaric, and citric acids. The 
fruit is widely used in India and Arabia as an article of diet and in Latin 
America as the chief constituent of a refreshing beverage.'* 



86 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45106. Annona chekimola Mill. Annonacese. CSheiimoya. 

From Brisbane, Australia. Seeds presented by Mr. Leslie Gordon Corrie. 
Received August 28, 1917. 

Seeds of a cherimoya growing wild in Queensland. To be grown as stocks | 
for improved varieties. 

45107 to 45109. 

From Matania el Saff, Egypt. Presented by Mr. Alfred Bircher, Middle 
Egypt Botanic Station. Received August 24, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. 
Bircher. 

45107. Ghbysophyllum monopybenum Swartz. Sapotacese. Satin leaf. 

"A sapotaceous tree, up to 85 feet in height; native of the West • 
Indies. The leaves are broad, green above, and covered with a rusty 
or white tomentum beneath. The small white flowers are clustered 
at the nodes or in the axils. The fruit is oblong, egg shaped, blackish, 
1} inches in length, usually 1-seeded, and is said to be insipid. At 
Matania el Saff the tree has changed its flowering time and now bears 
flowers in July instead of November, as formerly." 

45108. Eugenia punokivs Berg. Myrtaceffi. GuabiylL 

"A bush from South America, with pungent leaves and myrtlelike 
flowers. The black fruits, mostly in pairs, hang on slender peduncles; 
they are about an inch across and contain a sweet yellow flesh, inclosing 
one or two large green seeds. Although the fruit at present is iniripld 
in flavor, it might be improved by continuous culture." 

45109. Eugenia supba-axillaiiis Spring. Myrtacefe. 

"A glossy leaved evergreen shrub from eastern Brazil, bearing clusters 
of white flowers. The black globose 1-seeded fruits are sessile, in 
clusters of 8 to 10, and are about the size of small cherries. The flesh 
surrounding the hard round seed has a sweet, very resinous taste, 
somewhat resembling juniper berries. Formerly it flowered in Novem- 
ber, but it now blooms in July.** 

46110. Jasminum ANGULARE Vahl. Oleacese. Jasmine. 

From the Union of South Africa. Seeds presented by Mr. I. B. Pole 
Evans, chief. Division of Botany, Department of Agriculture, Pretoria. 
Received August 24, 1917. 

"Collected in the eastern Province of the Cape Colony." (Evans,) 

A climbing shrub with angled twigs and trifollolate leaves. The flowers are 
white and in three to seven flowered terminal or axillary cymes; the tube of 
the corolla is half an inch long. Native of South Africa. 

45111 and 45112. 

Seeds presented by Dr. David Griffiths, of the Bureau of Plant Industry. 
Received July 24, 1917. 
45111. Baileya multibadiata Harv. and Gray. Asteraces. 

A very handsome composite, common on the mesas of the Southwest in 
early spring. The large heads of yellow flowers with showy, bright- 
yellow persistent rays, which are reflexed in age, are sometimes pro- 
duced throughout the summer and until late in the fall. (Adapted from 
Wooton and Standley, Flora of New Mexico, p. 718.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBEE 30, 1917. 87 

45 1 1 1 and 45 1 1 2— Continued. 

, 45112. Orthocabpus pubpurascens Bentb. Scrophulariaceie. 

Purple escobita. 

A California annual about 1 foot bigb, with gaudy bracts and crimson 
or purplish corollas about 1 inch long. A common showy plant grown In 
the Sierra Nevada foothills, interior valleys, and coast ranges. (Adapted 
from Jepson, Flora of Middle Western Calif omia^ p. 4x4.) 

46113* HoRDEUM vuLGARE PALLIDUM Seringe. Poacese. 

' Black-kernel barley. 

From Siokhe, Fukien, China. Presented by C. E. Gauss, American consul, 
Amoy, China, who obtained it from Rev. H. J. Voskuil. Received August 
24, 1917. 

*• This appears to be the subvariety coerulescena." {H, V, Harlan,) 
45114 to 45130. Cocos nugifera L. Phoenicacese. Coconut. 

From Ceylon. Presented by Mr. Alex. E. Rajapakse, Mudaliyar, Magdalene 
House, Negombo, at the request of the Ceylon Agricultural Society, Pera- 
deniya. Received through Mr. Walter A. I^eonard, American consul, Co- 
lombo, Ceylon, August 25, 1917. 

A collection of the various forms of coconuts grown In Ceylon, secured for 
trial and comparative study in southern Florida. 

45114. Greenish red. Large nuts. 

45115. Brownish green. Very large size. 

45116. Red. Medium size, rather long. 

45117. Dark green. Large nuts. 

45118. Deep red. Round, medium size. 

45119. Green. Very long, medium size. 

45120. Brown (light). Medium. 

45121. Green. The ordinary variety. 

45122. Light brown. Round, medium size. 

45128. Green. Similar to S. P. I. No. 45121, but smaller. 

45124. Light red. Similar to S. P. I. No. 45120, but smaller. 

45125. Green. Perfectly round. 

45126. Red. Small nut with a very thick kernel. 

45127. Greenish red. Similar to S. P. I. No. 45125, but different in color. 

45128. White King coconut. 
45128. King coconut. 

45130. (Maldivian.) Greenish. 

45131. Nephelium bassa cense Pierre. Sapindacese. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Seeds presented by the director, Department 
of Agriculture and Commerce. Received August 27, 1917. 

A rather tall tree found in Cochin China, resembling Nephelium lappaceutn 
in general appearance, but having straighter spines, red hairs on the lower 
surfaces of the leaves, etc. Its horticultural value is about the same as the 
rambutan (N. lappaceum), (Adapted from Pierre, Flore Forestiere de la 
CochincTUne, plate S19,) 



38 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45132 to 45137. Saccharum offiginarum L. Poaceae. 

Sugar cane. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Cuttings presented by the experiment station of 
the Hawaiian Sugar-Planters' Association. Received August 23, 1917. 

45132. Demerara No. 1135^ 

45133. " Hawaiian No. 20, Of a greenish yellow color, turning slightly 
red when exposed to the sun ; internodes long and the rind hard ; re- 
sists insects quite well and withstands w^inds better than many of the 
other varieties. It is a ver>' popular cane in Hawaii to-day." {PhUip- 
pine AgrUsulturul Review^ JulVy 191^.) 

45134. "Hawaiian No. 27. Very large, erect, dark-green or yellow stalk; 
somewhat resembles Lahaina, but has shorter internodes; rind firm 
but not quite as hard as Hatvaiia/n No. 20; stools well and gives a 
good tonnage; juice usually rich in sucrose." {Philippine Agricultural 
Review, July, J914.) 

45135. Hawaiian No. 100. A rose-colored seedling of the Lahaina va- 
riety, with hard rind, very slight rooting tendency, medium eyes and 
Internodes. It is of good milling quality, of good hopper resistance, 
has eight canes in the stool, and no recumb«icy. The purity of the 
juice is 92.8 per cent and the sucrose percentage 17.9. (Adapted from 
Circular No. 4, Report of the Experiment Station of the HatcaHan 
Sugar-Planters' Asaooiaiion, 1907, p. 12.) 

45136. Hawaiian No. 1^6. A yellow seedling of Barbados 306, with no 
recumbency, very fair hopper resistance, 10 canes In the stool, medium 
internodes, prominent eyes, hard rind, and no rotting tendency. It 
is of good milling quality, and the percentage of sucrose is 16.0 and 
of purity 90.4. The weight of the cane per foot is 8.5 ounces. (Adapted 
from Circular No. 4, Report of the Experiment Station of the Hawaiian 
Sugar-Planters^ Association, 1907, p. 14.) 

45137. "Hawaiian No. 227. An erect and tall cane; rind of a yellowish 
color and very hard; leaves stand up well and have a midrib which 
is slightly greenish but not conspicuous. Tonnage and purity results 
at the bureau experiment station the past year were very satisfactory." 
{Philippine Agricultural Revi&iv, July, 19H.) 

45138 to 45140. Saccharum officinarum L. Poacese. 

Sugar-cane. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Seeds presented by the experiment station of the 
Hawaiian Sugar-Planters* Association. Received August 23, 1017. 

45138. "Lahaina. Stalk of medium size, yellowish green in color, and 
somewhat recumbent on account of the extremely soft outer tissue; 
internodes very long. This cane was once the popular cane of Hawaii." 
{Philippine Agricultural Review, July, 1914.) 

45139. Demerara No. 1135. 

45140. Hawaiian No. 109. See S. P. I. No. 45136 for description. 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 39 

46141. Carica dodecaphylla Veil. Papayacece. Papaya. 

From Misiones, Argentina. Seeds presented by Mr. Gustavo Haack, Buenos 
Aires, tiirougli Mr. W. Henry Robertson, American consul general, 
Buenos Aires. Received August 27, 1917. 

" Yacarati-d, A papaya, native to the Provinces of Misiones and Corrientes, 
Argentina. Tlie trunk attains a circumference of 5 feet. The wood is much 
softer than that of the ordinary papaya ; in fact, it may be said that there is 
no wood at all, simply bark. It is so easily worked that the peons with machete 
alone are able to make a canoe from the trunk in a very short time. When 
the tree becomes old the trunk often assumes a bottlel'ke shape, similar to 
tliat of the Palo borracho (Choriaia insignis). The fruit is large and is edible, 
either raw or cooked." {Venturi and LillOy Contribucidn al Conocimiento de 
lo8 Arhol€8 de la Argent itia, p. 80). 

46142 to 45151. Triticum aesttvum L. Poacese. Wheat. 

(T. vulgare Vill.) 

From Sydney, Australia. Presented by Mr. George Valder, undersecretary 
and director, Department of Agriculture. Received August 27, 1917. 

45142. Bunyip. A very early w^heat, grown for grain only. 

45143. Comeback. An early wheat used both for grain and hay. 

45144. Firbank. A very early wheat used for both grain and hay. 

45145. Florence. " It was noticed that during the 1916-17 season, when 
a great deal of rust was experienced all over this State, the Florence 
proved more rust resistant than any of the other varieties sent" 
{Valder.) 

45146. MarshalVa Xo. S. A late wheat recommended for both grain and 
hay. 

45147. Rymer. A late variety of wheat recommended for both grain and 
hay. 

45148. Sunset. A very early wheat. 

45149. Warren, A midseason wheat recommended for both grain and 
hay. 

45150. YandUla King. A late wheat recommended for both grain and 
hay. 

45151. Zealand. A late wheat grown for hay only. 

46162 to 45155. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Seeds presented by the director of the Botanic 
Garden. Received August 6, 1917. 

45152. Gnetum gnemon L. Gnetaceffi. 

An evergreen shrub or small tree extending from the Khasi Hills of 
India southward to Singapore and Java. The sessile orange-colored 
fruits are about an inch long and are eaten by the natives. The leaves 
arc eaten boiled like spinach, and the bark is said to furnish a strong 
bast fiber. (Adapted from Koorder a^d Valeton, Boomsoorten op Java, 
vol. 61, p. Si9.) 

45153. Pavetta indica L. Rubiacete. Pawatta. 

A common and very variable bush or small tree found throughout 
India and Malaysia. It bears few-flowered clusters of fragrant white 



40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45152 to 45155--Continued. 

flowers. The root is used medicinally as a diuretic and purgative; it 
is bitter, but not of an unpleasant flavor. The fruit is said to be pickled 
and eaten in Madras, and the flowers are also used as a food by some 
of the hill tribes. (Adapted from Watt, Dictionary of Economic Prod- 
ttcts of India, voL 6, p. 115,) 

45154. Phaeomeria magnifica (Roseoe) Schum. Zinzlberaceie. 
(P. imperialis Lindl.) 

A perennial herb of large dimensions, reaching a height of 20 feet 
when planted in a rich soil. The leaves are 1 to 2 feet long, lanceolate 
or elliptic, the upper side green, the lower side reddish brown. Flowers 
numerous, with large, bright scarlet and green bracts crowded in a 
globose head. This species, originally from Mauritius, is sometimes 
grown as a hothouse ornamental. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard 
Cyclopedia of Horticulture, p, 1109,) 

Received as Elcitaria speciosa, but now considered as belonging to the 
genus Phaeomeria. 

45155. PsYCHOTBiA BACTERioPHiLA Valet. Rublaceffi. 

A shrub, 2 to 3 meters (7 to 10 feet) high, native of the Comoro 
Islands, Madagascar. The elliptic or ovate-oblong, fleshy, dark-gre«i 
leaves are short petioled and usually thickly covered with little tubercles 
formed by bacteria. The greenish white flowers are in numerous dense 
thyrses up to 3 inches long, and the fruits are subglobular drupes about 
one-quarter of an inch in diameter. (Adapted from Valeton, Icones 
Bogoriensea, vol. 5, plate 271.) 

45156. LiTCHi cHiNENsis Sonner. Sapindacese. Ifychee. 

{Nephelium litchi Cambess.) 

From Canton, China. Seeds presented by Mr. Ung Wah. Received August 
23, 1917. 

" Sunhing lycliee." 

45157. Sapindus oahuensis Hillebr. Sapindacese. 

Hawaiian soap tree. 

From Kealia lands, Waianae Mountains, Oahu, Hawaii. Presented by Mr. 
J. F. Rock, Honolulu. Received August 29, 1917. 

A tree, 20 to 30 feet tall, remarkable in the genus for its simple leaves, 
which never show any indication of division. It Is found in the valleys of the 
Kaala Range on the island of Oahu, where it is conspicuous from a distanr^ 
because of its pale foliage. The flesh of the shiny fruits is full of saponin 
and forms a strong lather when beaten up in water. (Adapted from JSille- 
brand. Flora of the Hawaiian Islands, p. 85.) 

46168 and 45169. 

From Calcutta, India. Presented by Mr. C. C. Calder, Royal Botanic 
Garden. Received August 31, 1917. 

45158. Blumea myriocephala DC. Asteracero. 

"(From Kalighora, at 1,000 feet elevation, March 5, 1917.)" 

A shrubby composite, with stems as thick as the forefinger and very 
stout branches ; native of the Sikkim Himalayas east to Burma. Flower 
heads very numerous, one-fourth to one-third of an inch long, clustered in 
pyramidal panicles. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, 
vol. S, p. 268.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBKR 30, 1917. 41 

46158 and 45159— Continued. 

45 169. Pabamigkya honophylla Wight. Rutacese. 

A stout, climbiog, evergreen shrub, native of the Sikkini Himalayas 
and the mountains of Khasi at elevations of 2,000 to 5,000 feet The 
wood is white, hard, and close grained. The root has a bitter saline 
taste, contains large crystals of oxalate of lime, and is used by the 
country people of Goa as an alterative tonic. (Adapted from Watt, 
Dictionary of the Economic Products of India, vol, 6, p. 110.) 

46160. BsiiOu MASMELOs (L.) Lyons. Rutaceae. Bel. 

{Aegle mannelos Correa.) 

From Zafarwal, Punjab, India. Presented by Rev. H. S. Nesbit, Ameri- 
can United Presbyterian Mission. Received September 7, 1917. 

" Large specimens of bel fruit, about the largest I have ever seen, their 
nverage size being three times that eoramouly attained by this fruit." {Ncm- 
bit,) 

For furtlier description, see S. P. I. No. 45082. 

45161. Claucena LANsiuM (Lour.) Skeels. Sutaceai!. Wampi. 

(C. ivanvpi Oliver.) 

From Canton, China. Seeds presented by Mr. Ung Wah. Received August 
23, 1917. ■ 

A low, .spineless tree, native of South China, where it is commonly grown 
for its fruits. Kxperiuieuts are now being carried on with the wampi as a 
stock for citrus fruits. 

45162 to 45166. 

From Venezuela. Presented by Mr. H. M. Curran. Received August 23, 
1917. 

45162 and 45163. Citbullus vulgaris Schrad. Cucurbitace«. 

Watermelon. 

"From tilt' Guajira Indian plantation, Isla de San Carlos, May 9, 
li)17." 

45164. Bavhinia sp. Csesalpiniaceae. 

" From Quanta, June, 1917. A small leguminous tree with velvety 
lea vcs. " ( Cu rran. ) 

45165. Pbosopis chilknsis (Molina) Stuntz. Mimosacene. Algaroba. 
(P. juHfiora DC.) 

•*A leguminous tree, with small flowers in little heads or spikes. The 
pod is more or Kss thlckenod, and the leaves are composed of a large 
iimnber of leaflets. This tree is a native of Mexico and the West 
Indies." (ir. Harris, under 8. P. I, No, 426J,3,) 

45166. Tabebuia pentaphylla (L.) Hemsl. Bignonlacese. 

"From Puerto Cabello, June, 1917. Apamato. A timber tree with a 
profusion of ornamental pink flowers." {Curran.) 

45167 to 45169. 

From Paraguay. Presented by Dr. Moises S. Bertoni, Puerto Bertoni. 
Received September 6, 1917. Quoted notes by Dr. Bertoni. 

45167. Eugenia sp. Myrtacese. 

"No. 7689. June, 1917. A shrub, 1 to U meters high, from the 
meadows or savannahs of northeastern Paraguay at elevations of 170 



42 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMFOBTED. 

45167 to 45169— Continued. 

to 230 meters. The fruits are small, of an orange-yellow color, and the 
leaves are used in making a native medicine." 

4516& Passiflora sp. Passifloracese. Granadilla. 

" An ornamental vine from the fields and prairies of northeastern 
Paraguay at altitudes of 170 to 260 meters. The annual growth, which 
is 1 to 2 meters, is ashy white in color. May, 1917.** 

45169. PsiDHJM sp. Myrtacese. Chiava. 

*' Aracd mbayd, A shrub, 2 to 3 meters high, which grows among 
rocks and stones at altitudes of 170 to 230 meters. The fruit is sweet, 
nonacid, yellow when ripe, ovate, and 2 centimeters or more in length." 

45170 to 45175. 

From Soochow, China. Presented by Mr. N. Gist Gee, Soochow University. 
Received September 10, 1917. 

45170. CiTBUixTTB vuLGABis Schrad. Gucurbitaceee. Watermelon. 
Chinese name Ma ling kua {Mo. ling quo), meaning horse-beU melon. 

45171 to 45175. CucuMis melo Lt Cucurbitacese. Muskmelon. 

45171. Chinese name Huang mi lu {Waung mih loo), meaning yellow 
honey melon. 

45172. Chinese name PHn kuo kua {Bing quo quo), meaning apple 
melon. 

45173. Chinese name Zeh lung quo, meaning lined melon. 

45174. Chinese name Su hsiang kua {Soo shang quo), meaning 
soochow sweet-smelling melon. 

45175. Chinese name Ch'ing p*i lu jou kua {THng bi loh nyoh quo), 
meaning blue-skin green-flesh melon. 

45176. Prunus mume Sieb. and Zucc. Amygdalaceae. 

Japanese apricot. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Chlco, Calif., from scions 
presented by Mr. David Fairchild, from his place, " In the Woods," Chevy 
Chase, Md. The coUection was imported in 1905-6 through the Yokoliama 
Nursery Co., of Japan. Numbered September 2fi, 1917. 

•* Variety (Hnfukwin, A white-flowered variety of the so-called * Japanese 
flowering plum tree.' These are among the most picturesque of aU flowering 
trees and compose a large part of the illustrations on Japanese screens. Be- 
cause of their extreme earliness and the fragrance of their blooms they deserve 
a place in our gardens. The fruits are sour, but have a delicious wild flavor 
about them. The flowers of many varieties are often caught by the frost, but 
the Ginfukurin is rather slow in coming into bloom and so is more likely to 
escape." ( FaircMld. ) 

45177. Tbtrazygia bicolor (Mill.) Cogn. Melastomacese. 

(Miconia bicolor Triana.) 

From Homestead, Fla. Seeds presented by Mr. Charles A. Mosier. Re- 
ceived September 13, 1917. 

A low ornamental shrub, 5 to 10 feet high, remarkable for the white powdery 
down of the branchlets and the inflorescence. leaves 3 to 5 Inches long, entire ; 
flowers white, in flve to seven flowered cymes. Native to the West Indies. 
(Adapted from Orisebach, Flora of the British West Indian Islands, p. 25-^, as 
Tetrazygia angustifolia argyrophyUa.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER dO, 191". 43 

45178, Prunus serrulata sachalinensis (Schmidt) Makino. 
(P. sargentii Rehder.) [Amygdalacea?. Sargents' cherry. 
From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Co. Re- 
ceived August 8, 1917. 

" Yamazakura (mountain cherry)." A deciduous tree, 40 to 80 feet in lieight, 
with a trunk sometimes 3 feet in diameter and sharply serrate oval leaves, 
which are often reddish when young. The deep-pink flowers, from 1} to 11 
inches wide, are produced in short-stalked umbels of two to six flowers. The 
fruit is a small black cherry, one-third of an inch in diameter. This tree, a 
native of Japan, is probably the finest timber tree among the true cherries and 
is also remarkable for its beautiful flowers, which appear in April. The seeds 
germinate freely after lying dormant for a year. (Adapted from Bean, Trees 
and Shrubs Hardy in tlie British Isles, voL 2, p. 250.) 

46179 and 45180. 

From Dominica, British West Indies. Seeds presented by Mr. Joseph Jones, 
curator. Botanic Gardens. Received September 20, 1917. 

45179. DuKio ziBETHiNUs Murray. Bonibacaceie. Durian. 

" I believe Dominica is the only place in the western Tropics in which 
the durian tree has fruited. It first bore fruit in this island as far back 
as 1892." (Jones.) 

"The durian grows on a large and lofty forest tree, somewhat re- 
sembling an elni in its general chai-acter, but with a more smooth and 
scaly bark. The fruit is round or slightly oval, about the size of a large 
coconut, of a green color, and covered all over with short, stout spines, the 
bases of >vhich touch each other and are consequently somewhat hex- 
agonal, while the points are very strong and sharp. It is so completely 
armed that if the stalk is broken off it is a difficult matter to lift one 
from the ground. The outer rind is so thick and tough that from what- 
ever height it may fall it is never broken. From the base to the apex five 
very faint lines may be traced, over which the spines arch a little ; these 
are the sutures of the carpels and show where the fruit may be divided 
with a heavy knife and a strong hand. The five cells are satiny white 
within and are each filled with an oval mass of cream-colored pulp, 
embedded in which are two or three seeds about the size of chestnuts. 
This pulp is the eatable part, and its consistence and flavor are inde- 
scribable. A rich butterlike custard highly flavored with almonds gives 
the best general idea of it, but intermingled with it come wafts of flavor 
that call to mind cream cheese, onion sauce, brown sherry, and other 
incongruities. Then, there is a rich glutinous smoothness in the pulp 
which nothing else possesses, but which adds to its delicacy. It is neither 
acid, nor sweet, nor Juicy, yet one feels the want of none of these qualities, 
for It is perfect as it is. In fact, to eat durians is a new sensation, worth 
a voyage to the East to experience. 

" When the fruit is ripe it falls off the tree, and the only way to eat 
durians in perfection is to get them as they fall; and the smell is then 
less overpowering. When rli)e, it makes a very good vegetable if cooked, 
and it is also eaten by the Dyaks raw. In a good season large quantities 
are preserved salted in Jars and bamboos and kept the year round, when 
it acquires a most disgusting odor to Europeans, but the Dyaks appre- 
ciate it highly as a relish with their rice. There are in the forest two 
varieties of wild durians with much smaller fruits, one of them orange 



44 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46178 and 45180— Continued. 

colored Inside; and these are probably the origin of the large and line 
durians, which are never found wild. It would not, perliapa^ be correct 
to say that the durian is the best of all fruits, because it can not supply 
the place of the subacid, Juicy kinds, such as the orange, grape, mango, 
and mangosteen, whose refreshing and cooling qualities are so wbole- 
some and grateful ; but as producing a food of the most exquisite flavor 
it is unsurpassed. If I had to fix on two only, as representing the per- 
fection of the two classes, I should certainly choose the durian and the 
orange as the king and queen of fruits." (A. R, Wallace, The Malay 
Archipelago, p. 57.) 

45180. Garcinia mangostana L. Cluslacese. Man^rosteen. 

A moderate-sized conical tree, with large leathery leaves, indigenous 
to Malaya. Its globular purplish brown fruit, about the size of an 
apple, is famed as one of the most delicious fruits of the Tropics. Tht* 
delicate white juicy pulp surrounding and adhering to the seed is the 
part eaten. In striking contrast to it is the dense, thick, reddiali rind 
containing tannic acid and a dye. The tree is of very slow growth ami 
does not usually come into bearing until about 9 or 10 years old. The 
essentlaj conditions for it are a hot, moist climate and deep, rich, well- 
drained soil. Propagation is usually by seed, but may also be elTecte<i 
by "gootee" or layering. (Adapted from Macmillan, Handbook of 
Tropical Gardening and Planting, p. 16i.) 

46 181. An NONA cherimola X squamosa. 'Annonacea^. Anona. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Miami, Pla., from ganlei 
No. 1803, tree C. Numbered September 25, 1917. 

A hybrid between the cherimoya and the sugar-apple, produced by Mr. Edwanl 
Simmouds, of the Miami Field Station. It combines the unusual sweetness of 
the sugar-apple with the firmness and better shipp'ng quality of the cherimoya. 
The trees show unusual vigor, having withstood the freeze of Februar>'. 1917. 
without being much damaged. 

For an illustrtition of this anona, st?e Plate IV. 

45182 to 46188. 

From China. Seeds collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer 
of the Bureau of Plant Industry. Received September 18, 1917. Quotwl 
notes by Mr. Meyer. 

45182 and 45183. Amabanthus gangeticus L. Amaruuthacete. 

« Amaranth. 

45180. "(No. 2385a. Hankow, China. March 9, 1017.) A irreen 
leaved amaranth, much cultivated in central China an a garden 
vegetable and eaten, when young, like spinach. The plant stands any 
amount of moist heat and can be sown at inten-als throughout tin' 
summer. As the seedlings suffer a good deal at times fnm\ 
damping-off, the Chinese generally have the beds ralsefl slighilv 
above the surrounding land and then cover the surface with a 
sifted mixture of soot, ashes, and lime, which acts as a fertilizer 
as well as a fungicide. Chinese name Pai han is'at meaning whitt' 
amaranth vegetable. This Han ts^ai probably can be made a pcipn- 
lar hot-weather vegetable throughout the southern sections uf tli«' 
United States." 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1017. 45 

45182 to 46189— Continued. 

45183. "(No. 2386a. leUfliip. Hupeli, China. March 24. 1917.) 
Mixed strains of Han ts'ai, a leaf vegetable for hot weatlier. It 
thrives best in well-drained, rich, light soil, but it is not very 
particular after once having started well. Mix seeds with slfteil 
dry soil or sand and sow broadcast over a well-prepared bed; or 
sow between the poles on which Yard Long beans, etc., are raised." 

45184. Ipomoea beptans (L.) Poir. Gonvolvulaceee. 
(/. aquatica Forsk.) 



«« 



(No. 2387a.. Wuchang, Hupeh, China. June 15, 1017.) The Kuan 
ts'aiy an annual herb, is cultivated by the Chinese as a hot-weather leaf 
vegetable and is prepared and eaten much like spinach. It is usually 
sown in rows at intervals during the spring and summer, to insure a 
continuous supply of greens. It thrives l)est in a rather wet, heavy soil 
and withstands being submerged (even for several days) without Injury. 
The foliage resembles that of the sweet potato a good deal, but the roots 
are not fleshy. The young shoots are cut at intervals until the plants 
become exhausted. The white or pale rose-colored flowers appear in July 
and August, and shortly after flowering the plants set a good supply of 
seeds which are harvested for the next season*s crop. Chinese name 
Kuan ts'ai {Wimg tocU), meaning Jar vegetable or bamboo>leaf vegetable." 

45185 to 45189. Brassica pekinensis (Lour.) Gagn. Brassicnceje. 

Pal ts'al. 

45185. "(No. 288Sn. Taianfu, Shantung, Chinn. March 1, 1917.) 
A heavy winter pai ts'ai of fine quality, making firm much-elon- 
gated heads. Sowji out In early August and transplanted in rich 
well-worked soil ; it must not suffer from lack of water. Can be 
kept throughout the whole winter wiien stored in a cool dugout 
cellar ; can also be held In good condition for several months when 
iiung from the rafters of a cool storeroom or kept in an airy box." 

45186. "(No. 2389a. Hankow, China. June 9, 1917.) A spring and 
autumn variety of Chinese^ cabbage of open growth ; eaten boiled, 
like kale or mustard siirouts. Sown from early April to the end 
of May for spring consumption ; for autumn use it is planted from 
the end of July to the end of August. Clilnese name Ya hao 
pai t.s*aij meaning fresh-leaf cabbage." 

45187. "(No. 2390a. Hankow. China. June 9. 1917.) An open- 
headtil, very, dark green variety of Chincso cabbaj^e, sown out In 
September; persists throughout the winter in mild climates. 
Chinese name Hri pai tsUii, meaning blaok pai ts'ai. Probably 
this should be cultivated as greens for winter in the South Atlantic 
ami Gulf States." 

45188. "(No. 2391a. Hnnkow, China. June 9, 1917.) An open- 
headed Variety of Chinese cabbage, sown out in August and used 
as a fall and winter vegetable. Chinese name Chiang kan pai ta'at. 
meaning oar-shaped pai ts'ai. This should probably be cultivated 
as greens for winter use in the South Atlantic and Gulf States." 

45180. "(No. 2392a. Hankow, China. June 9, 1917.) A winter va- 
riety of pai ts'ai with solid heads; sown out in September. 
Chinese name Nan ching pai t8*ai. This should probably be culti- 
vated as greens for winter use in the South Atlantic and Gtilf 
States." 



46 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45190 to 45193. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Chico, Calif. Numbered 
for convenience in distribution. 

45190. Anisacanthus thubberi (Torr.) A. Gray. Acanthaceip. 

Ornamental acantliaceous shrub, 2 to 4 feet high, with opposite, nearly 
lanceolate, thickish leaves and showy purplish red funnelform flowers, 
solitary or in leafy clusters in the axils. Native of Mexico, New Mexico, 
and Arizona. (Adapted from Grap, Synoptical Flora of North Amerita, 
vol, 2, part i, 2d ed., p, S28,) 

45191. Abgemone plattcebas Link and Otto. Pai>avcracea\ 

A rose-colored form of a show^ flowered annual occasionally met with 
in gardens and found growing wild In the Southwestern States, A very 
spiny, glaucous-leaved, robust plant with large poppylike flowers. 

45192. QuAMocLTDioN MUi/riFLOBUM Torr. NyctaginacefiB. 

A low diffusely branched perennial herb with smooth, ovate leaves 
and large purplish red flowers in clusters in a broad calyxlike involucre. 
The showj' flowers have a thick, rather long tube spreading into a wide 
limb. Native from Colorado to western Texas and Arizona. (Adapted 
from Wootmi and Standlcy, Flora of New Mexico, p. 222.) 

45193. Zauschnbbia caufobnica Presl. Onagraceee. 

California fuchsia. 

A half-hardy perennial with showy scarlet flowers ref9embUng those 
of fuchsia but erect, not pendent It is rather variable in form of 
leaves and in hardiness. Native of the southwestern United States. 

45194. CuDRANiA TRiousPiDATA (Carr.) Bureau. Moraceae. 

((7. triloba Hance.) 

Grown at the Yarrow Plant Introduction Field Station, Rockville, Md.. 
from seed received from the P. J. Berckmans Co., Augusta, Ga., Novem- 
ber, 1916. Numbered for convenience in distribution. 

A small deciduous tree, with slender, thorny branches and fleshy subglobose 
edible fruits. The P.. J. Berckmans Co., in sending in the seed, reported that 
although the one tree left in their nursery at that time had fruited very well, 
it was rather difllcult to get many fruits at one time, because the laborers 
seem very fond of them. 

45195. Madhuca indica Gmel. Sapotaceae. Ifahwa. 
(Bassia latifolia Roxb.) 

From Seharunpur, India. Seeds presented by Mr. A. C. Hartless. super- 
intendent, Government Botanic Gardens. Received September 24, 1917. 

A large deciduous tree from northern India, cultivated widely In India for 
its cream-colored, fleshy, sweet corollas, which are dried, for eating an<l for 
the manufacture of spirits. Introduced for trial in Florida. 

45196. Croton tiglium L. Euphorbia<;eie. Oroton-oil plant. 

From St. Louis, Mo. Presented by Mr. G. H. Pring, Missouri Botanical 
Garden. Received September 24, 1917. 

"A small omamental tree with ovate leaves varying in color from metallic 
green to bronze and orange. The powerful purgative, croton oil, is obtained 
from the seeds by crushing.*' (J. B. F>. Noifon,) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 191*7. 47 

45197. Brunsfelsia hopeana (Hook.) Benth. Solanacese. 

KanacH. 

From Para, Brazil. Seeds presented by Senhor J. Slmao dn Costa. Re- 
ceived September 24, 1917. 

A small spreading shrub, native to the States of Amazonas and Sao Paulo, 
Brazil. The leaves are alternate, narrow, and dark green ; the spreading purple 
flowers are very fragrant. In Brazil the plant is used medicinally, the root 
serving as an antiseptic, a purgative, and a diuretic. , By means of ether, a 
perfume is extracted from the flowers. (Adapted from Curtis*8 Botanical 
Magazine, vol. 55, pi. 2829 , and from Correa, Flora. do Brazil, p. 102,) 

45198 to 45203. 

From the Kachin Hills tract, Bhamo District, Upper Burma. Presented 
by B. Thompstone, Esq., Deputy Director of Agriculture, Northern Circle, 
Burma. Received September 24, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Thompstone. 

45198. Coix LACRYMA-JOBi MA-YtTEN (Rom.) Stapf. Poacese. Job's-tears. 

" Kachin name, Mung-Kawng. Job's-tears is seldom cultivated ; it 
occurs on the banks of streams and watercourses, and sporadically Mn 
the clearings of the hillmen. The seed, when ripe, is collected and 
utilized." 
45190 to 45203. Zea mays L. Poacese. Com. 

" The maize Is scattered broadcast in the rainy weather, usually July, 
after the land has been plowed and harrowed. The crop is weeded once 
or twice, beyond which no care is given it." 

45190. •' Kachin name, W^Lwe; Burmese name, Kauk-aaw." 

45200. " Kachin name, WHpraw; Burmese name, Pyaung-pyu" 

45201. " Kachin name, Hkainu." 

45202. " Kachin name, V-Pan; Burmese name, Ah-lat'* 

45203. " Kachin name, WHH; Burmese name, Kauk-kyi:' 

46204 to 45214. 

From Leverville, Belgian Kongo. Presented by Pfere Hyacinthe Vanderyst, 
Jardin Agrostologique, through Mr. C. V. Piper, of the Bureau of Plant 
Industry. Received September 24, 1917. Quoted notes by P6re Van- 
deryst 
45204 and 45205. Andropooon finitimus Hochst. Poacese. Grass. 

45204. "(Andropogon Uigngaensis VDR. variety lei^ervillensis VDR. 
Jardin Agrostologique, Leverville, July, 1917.) A good forage 
grass." 

45205. "(Jardin Agrostologique, Leverville, July, 1917.) A good 
forage grass." 

« 

Received as Andropogon familiaris variety levervillensis VDR. 

45206. Anthephoba obistata (Doell) Hack. Poacese. Grass. 

" (Jardin Agrostologique, Leverville.) A good pasture, when young, 
for small animals." 

45207. Cenchrus barbatits Schumach. Poacese. Grass. 

" (Jardin Agrostologique, Leverville, July, 1917.) Unsuitable for 
pasture on account of its thorny fruits." 



48 SEEDS AND PLANTS TRtPORTKn. 

46204 to 45214— Continued. 

45808. Ghlobis breviseta Bentb. Poncece. Grass. 

" (Jardin Afp'ostologique, Lev«nrille, July, 1917.)" A West African 
grass from the Cape Coast region, resembling Chloris oompressa in tbe 
structure of its flowers. The new growth is said, In Belgian Kongo, to 
form an excellent pasture for small animals. 

Rhodes grass, C. gayana, also from western tropical Africa, has suc- 
ceeded so well in the Southern States that this grass also should receive 
a thorough trial. 

45200. HoLCUs sorghum verticilliflorus (Steud.) Hitchc. Poaceic. 

Tabudd grass. 

" (Variety astolonifeims VDR. Jardin Agrostologique, T^verville, July 
1917.)" 

45210. Panicum diagonale Nees. PoacecB. Grass. 

" (Jardin Agrostologique, Leverville.) Useful as pasture in the young 
state." 

A perennial tufted grass reaching a height of more than 3 feet. Native 
to Central and East Africa. 

45211. Pennisetum benthami Steud.. Poacece. Grass. 

" (Jardin Agrostologique, IveverviUe, July, 1917.) A good forage 
species for cattle." 

45212. Penntsetum setosum (Swartz) L. Rich. Poaceee. Grass. 

" (Jardin Agrostologique, Leverville, July, 1917.) Pasture In the 
young state for small animals." 

A tall, leafy, branching perennial, erect or ascending from a geniculate 
base, the long, flat blades pubescent or scabrous, the purplish spikes 10 to 
15 centimeters (4 to 6 Inches) long. On grassy slopes and in open woods, 
Mexico and West Indies to South America, and also In tropical Asia and 
Africa. (Adapted from Hitchcock and Ch€tse, GnuscB of the Went In- 
dies, p. S54.) 

45213. Perotis indica (L.) Kuntze. Poafeie. Grass. 
(P. latifolia Ait.) 

"(.Tardln Agrostologique, Leverville.)" An annual or subperennial 
grass, with stout and branching leafy culms and usually short, broad, 
rigid, ciliate blades, common throughout tropical Africa and Asia. It 
grows to a height of 10 inches, and is said in the Belgian Kongo to be 
a good pasture in the young state for small animals. 

45214. Sporobolus holleri Hack. Poacese. Grass. 

"(Cultivated in the Jardin Agrostologique. Leverville, July 8, 1917.) 
Value as yet undetermined." 

45215. Prunus conradinae Koehne. Amygdalaceae. Cherry. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Rockville, Md., from scions 
presented by Mr. David Falrchild from his place, "In the Woods," 
Chevy Chase, Md. Introduced originally by the Arnold Aboretum, Ja- 
maica Plain, Mass. Numbered September, 1917. 

A handsome tree from western China, up to 40 feet in height, with the 
trunk 8 to 20 inches in diameter, thin, pale-green leaves, and white to deep 
blush-colored flowers, an inch or less across, which appear early in the spring. 
It is very similar to Sargent's cherry {Prunua aerrulata sachalinensi^) . 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1917. 49 

46216. Prunus subhirtella pendula (Sieb.) Tanaka. Amygdala- 
cese. Bose-bud cherry. 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, UockvIUe,. Md., from scions 
presented l»y Mr. David Falrchild from his place. "In the Woods/* 
Chevy Chase, Md. Originally introduced through the Yokohama Nursery 
Co., of Japan. Numbered September, 1917. 

A small tree with drooping branches, mostly narrowly oval, light-green leaves, 
and long-stalked clusters of rose-pink flowers three-quarters of an inch across. 
One of the handsomest of early-flowering trees, producing its dainty flowers in 
profusion. Hardy in central New York. Deserves to be planted in all parts 
and as dooryard trees when there is room enough. Grows to very large size, 
but flowers when 3 years old. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of 
Horticulture, voL 5, p. 2841- ) 

45217 and 46218. Fragaria spp. Eosacese. Strawberry. 

From Bedford, England. Plants purchased from Laxton Bros. Received 
September 28, 1917. 

45217. Keen's Seedling. An old and well-known English sort of the finest 
quality, which does not generally succeed in America. Flowers per- 
fect; fruit large, roundish, often cockscomb shaped, dark purplish 
scarlet, with polished surface and rich, highly flavored, flrm flesh. 
(Adapted from Downing^ Fruits and Fruit Trees of America, p. 992,) 

452^18. Old Pine, or Carolina. An American variety, with perfect flowers 
and medium-sized, conical, bright-scarlet fruit, with a neck and solid, 
Juicy, rich flesh. (Adapted from Downing, Fruits and Fruit Trees of 
America^ p. 998.) 

46219. Calycx)physum brevipes Pittier. Cucurbitaceae. 

From Venezuela. Seeds presented by Mr. Henri Pittier, director, EJstaclon 
Experimental y Catastro de Baldios, Caracas. Received September 
28, 1917. 

"(CerroB de Avila, above Caracas, August, 1917.) A Calycophysum, which 
I collected at about 1,7(X) meters altitude on the slopes of the Avila Mountains 
above Caracas. It is a high climber, growing in the outskirts of the forest. 
The fruit Is large and quite ornamental, the pericarp being of an intense 
orange-yellow color. It looks very attractive to a thirsty person, and when 
I picked the flrst one I opened and tasted it without losing time. The flavor 
was quite sweet, and I lost no time in swallowing the * swallowable ' part of 
a whole fruit. Five minutes later my mouth was burning Just as if I had 
swallowed a very hot pepper and my Insides soon began to make themselyes 
felt. For several hours I had nausea and some fever, with a strong head- 
ache. Then it passed away. I suspect the peppery agent to be contained in 
the dissepiments of the seeds, and if it could be made away wit^, the firuit 
would certainly be very palatable. It goes mostly by the name of parcha de 
culebra^ parcha being a name common to the edible Passiflora fruits. But I 
am also assured that it is the coco de mono, to which depilatory properties 
are ascribed. The facial hair ornaments (?) which are the glory of men in 
other countries are here the common privilege of an unusual number of the 
members of the fair sex, and as they do not relish it, it is said that they make 
away with it by means of the endocarp of the coco de mono, I would not 
he surprised if this were the fruit in question, but the same name is given 



60 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

also to the fruits of the two or three native species of Ck>uroupita, and prob- 
ably to those of other members of the Lecythideee. So the question of the 
depilatory properties is not yet settled." (Pitiier.) 

45220. (Undetermined.) Apocynacese. Lorocco vine. 

From Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Seeds presented by Mr. I. H. Gammack, 
" La Misi6n." Received September 28, 1917. 

" This is a deciduous perennial vine which grows best on moist mountain 
sides where the climate is always temperate. Its flowers and flower buds are 
fine for flavoring mills and vegetable soups, especially potato soup, giving it the 
flavor of oysters. The vine should have a space of 5 to 10 feet for climbing and 
spreading,' and it will require greenhouse protection in cold weather." {Cam- 
mack,) 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Arftria sp., 45011. 

famesianaf 45012. 

fnphantha. See Albizzia lophati- 
tha. 
Aegle marmelos. See Belou marmelo*, 
Mhizzia lophantha, 44957. 
Algaroba, Prosopis chUensis, 45075, 

45076, 45165. 
Almond, Amygdaivs commtmiit, 45097- 

45100. 
Amaranth, Aniaranthus gangeticus^ 

45182, 45ia3. 
Amaranthus gangetious, 45182, 45183. 
Amygdalus communis^ 45007-15100. 
Anacardium oceidentale, 45095. 
Afiangapirfh, Eugenia uniflora, 45068. 
Afi,ii]j;apirfh-apuA, Euffenia tiniflora, 

45067. - 
Andropogon erianthoides, 45087. 

nniW)iU8, 45204, 45205. 

intermedins. 45038. 
Ani9acanthu8 Ihurberi, 45190. 
Annatto tree, Bispa orellana, 44954. 
Annona cherimola, 45020, 45021, 45077, 
45106. 

f //«« mona , 451S1 . 
Aiiona. See Annona spp. 
Anthephora cristata, 45206. 
Apamato, Tabehuia pcntaphylla, 45088, 

45166. 
Apricot, Japanese, Prunus rnume: 

Oinfukurin, 45176. 

Oteno, 45064. 

Tsukasa-shlbori, 450C3. 
M'tu'd mlmjA, Pffiflhim sp., 451C0. 
Arecastrum romanzofflannm australe, 

45066. 
Argcmone platyceias, 45101. 
AHimlna trilobay 45019. 
Avooado, Pcvftca americana. 45078, 
45083, 45091. 

Nlmah, 45078. 

fiaUrifa multiradiata, 45111. 



Barberry, Berberia trifoliolata, 45096. 
Barley, black-kernel, Hordeum vulgar e 
pallidum^ 45113. 
hulMess, Hordeum vulgare coelr 
este, 45041-45043. 
Basella rubra, 45026, 45027. 
Bassia latifolia. See Madhuca indica. 
Bt^hinia spp., 45085, 45164. 
Bean, broad, Vicia faba, 44939. 
common, Phaseolus i^ilffaria: 
Bicolor, 44973, 44974. 
Blanco criollo, 44969. 

de manteca pequefio, 
44970, 44979. 
Dutch Case Knife, 44972. 
Hardlong French, 44076. 
Hudson Wax, 44977. 
Negro de Belgica, 44978. 
Southern Prolific, 44980. 
Thorburn Large, 44975. 
100 X 1, 44971. 
Go-ta-ni, CanavaU ensiforme, 44938. 
horse, Vioia faba, 44939. 
Jack, CanavaU ensiforme, 44988. 
Lima, Phaseolus lunatua: 
Manteca, 44965, 44966. 

Small Sieva, 44967. 
White Sieva, 44965, 44966. 
Scarlet Runner. See Phaseolus 
coccineus. 
Colorado de Espafia, 44968. 
Bel, Belou mannelos, 45082, 45160. 
Belou marmclos, 45082, 45160. 
Berberis tHfoliolata, 45096. 
Bixa orella/na, 44954. 
Blackberry, Rubus spp., 45017, 45044. 
Blumea myriocepJiala, 45158. 
Bob, broad bean, Vicia faba, 44939. 
iJor, Ziziphna mnuritiana, 44940. 
Brack ycJiiton acerifolium, 44958. 
Brassica alba, 45000. 
nigra, 45001. 

pekinensis, 44935, 45185-45189. 
Brunsfelsia hopeana, 45197. 

61 



62 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Jiumelia sp., 45013. 
/iutia capitata, 45009. 

capifnta odorata. 45073. 

erioapatha, 45045. 

Cabeza de negro, Phytelephas macro- 
carpa, 45032. 

Cacao, Theobroma cacao, 45084. 
Caiinlto, ChrysophylXum cainito, 45104. 
Cnjri, i^pondia.? lutca, 45010. 
Calycftphysum breiipes, 45219. 
Canavali ensiforme, 44038. 
Carica dodecaphylla, 45141. 
papaya, 44941, 44942. 

Caiissa, Carissa grandiflora, 45101, 
45102. 

Carissa grandifiora, 45101, 45102. 
Cashew, Anacardium oooidentale, 
45095. 

Cassie, Acacia /ame«iana, 46012. 
Cenchrug barbatus, 45207. 
Chaetochloa barbata, 460S9. 
Chamaedorea spp., 44994, 45022, 45079. 
Cliaucte. St»e Coyo, Per sea schiedeami, 
Cherimoya, Amiona cherimola, 45020, 
45021, 45077, 45106. 

Cherry, Prumia .spp. : 

Japanese flowering, 45049-45062. 
Amenogawa, 45054. 
Asagi, 45059. 
Choshn, 45057. 
Daizen, 45052. 
Hosokawa, 45050. 
Jobenl, 45058. 
Mikuruma-gayeshi, 45058. 
Miyakobeni, 45061. 
Murasaki, 45056. 
Naden, 45049. 
OJochin, 46051. 
Toranowo, 45062. 
Ussussuml, 45056. 
Wasemiyako, 46060. 
Prvnu8 conradinae, 45216. 
Rose-bud, Prunvs subhirteHa pen- 

dula, 45216. 
Sargent's, Pntniis nvrrulata sach- 
alinetisis, 45074, 45178. 
Chloris brevUeta, 45208. 
Chrysophyllum cainito, 46104. 

nwnopyrenum, 46107. 
Chuete. See Coy6, Persea schiedeana. 
OUrullus vulgaris, 45162, 46163, 46170. 



Citrus nobilis deliciosa, 45089. 
Claucena lansium, 45161. 

icampi. See Claucena lansium. 
Coco (le mono, Calycophysum brevipa. 
45219. 

Coconut, Coeos nucifera, 45114r-45130. 
Cocas capitata. See Butia capitaia. 

eriospatha. See Butia eriospatho. 

nudfera, 45114-45130. 

odorata. See Butia capitata otht- 
rata. 
Cociiisji, Furvraca sp., 45014. 
Coix lacryma-jobi ma-yucn, 4519S. 
Colocasia sp., 45065. 
Com, Zea mays, 45036, 45199-4.52a3. 
Cowpea, Vigna sinensis: 

Careta, 44992. 

Southern Creaseback, 44993. 
Coy6, Persea schiedeana, 44999, 4.'>0S1. 
Craniolaria annua, 45005. 
Creole scorzonera, Craniolaria annua. 

45005. 
Crescentia alata, 45103. 
Croton-oil plant, Croton tiglium, 4r)190. 
Croton tiglium, 45196. 
Cucumis melo, 45171-45175. 
Cudrania tricuspidata, 45194. 

triloba. See Cudrania tricunpi- 
data. 
Cujf, Acacia sp., 45011. 

Dipluym sp., 44097. 
Dovyalis tristiSy 45048. 
Durlan, Durio zibethinus, 45179. 
Durio zibethinus, 4517D. 

Easter blossom, Scvuridava lanmnhU. 

46028. 
Elm, Ulmus pumila, 45025. 
Bscobita, purple, Orthocarpus pur- 

purascens, 45112. 
Eucalyptus calophylla, 44959. 
Eugenia sp., 45167. 

pungens, 45108, 

9upra-<ixillans, 45109. 

uniflora, 45067, 45068. 

ventenatii, 44960. 

Fennel, Foeniculum vutgare, 45006. 
Fenouil doux, FoeMculum vulgare, 

46006. 
Fern, Nephrolepis sp., 45090. 
Flame tree, Australian, Brachyohiton 

acerifoUum, 44968. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMKS. 



53 



Flax, Linum uaiiatiaHm/ufn: 

blue blossom, 45002. 

white bloflsom, 45003. 
FoenicuUtm vulgare, 45000. 
Fragaria spp., 45217, 45218. 
Fuchsia, California, Zaudchneria ooU- 

fomica, 451d8. 
Furcraea sp., 45014. 

' Garoinia mangostanat 45180. 
Gneium gnemon, 45152. 
Gooseberry, Rfbes speaosum, 46024. 
Granarlilla, Pa asi flora spp., 45016, 

45168. 
GraiK?, yitiB vinifera: 
DoradiUo, 45071. 
King George V, 46072. 
Rtfl May, 45070. 
(} r a s s . AmJropogon erianihoidet, 
4o037. 
Androftofitni finitimus, 45204, 
45205. 
inten)icdiu9, 45088. 
Anthephora crUtata, 45206. 
. Cenchma harbatus, 45207. 
Chaetoohloa barhata, 45089. 
Chloris breviseia, 45208. 
Panicum decompoHtum, 45040. 

diagondley 45210. 
Petmisetum benthami, 46211. 

aetosum, 46212. 
PeroM ituUca, 46218. 
SporohoUis moUeri, 45214. 
tabueki, Holcu8 sorghum verti- 
cilUflorus, 45209. 
Ouabiytl, Eugenia pungens, 45108. 
Oiiava, Psidium sp., 45160. 

Hoheria populnea, 45004. 

Holcus sorghum verticilUflorus, 45209. 

Hordeum vulgare coeleste, 46041-46048^ 

vulgare paUidum, 45113. 
Ifyphaene thebaica^ 45004. 

Ipomoea aquatica. See Ipomoea rep- 
tans, 
repians, 45184. 
Ixerba brexioides^ 44955. 

JaKmine, Jasminum angulare, 45110. 
Ja^minum angulare, 45110. 
Job's-tears, Coix lacryma-jobi ma-yuen, 

45198. 
•Tobo. Spondias lutea, 45010, 45086. 



Jugluny jtortoricetisifty 45033. 
regia, 44936, 44037. 

Katignd, TrichiUa catigua, 45069. 

Kermedya sterlingH, 45098. 

Knightia ewcelsa. See Rpmandra ex* 

celsa. 
Ko-kilp, pacaylto palm, Ghamaedorea 

spp., 44994, 45079. 
Konskie Bobi, Vicia faba, 44939. 
Kuan ts'ai, Ipomoea reptans, 45184. 

Lacebark, Hoheria populnea, 45094. 
Linum usitatissimum, 45002, 45003. 
Liichi chinensiSf 45156. 
Livistona australis, 45092. 
Lorocco vine, undetermined, 45220. 
Lyehee, Sunhlng, Litchi chincntii^, 
45156. 

Madhuca indica, 45195. 

Mahwa, Madhuca indica, 45195. 

Malpighia sp., 45015. 

ManacA, BrunsfeUia hopeana^ 45197. 

Mangosteen, Oarcinia mangostana, 

45180. 
Manicaria saccifera, 45087. 
Matiliscuate, Tabebvia pentaphylla, 

44998. 
Melicocca bijuga, 45047. 
Miconia bicolor. See Tetrazygia bi- 

color. 
Mikania sp., 45080. 
Mombin, yellow, Spondias luteal 45010, 

45086. 
Musa paradisiaca seminifera, 45007. 
Muskmelon, Cucumis melo, 45171- 

45175. 
Mustard, black, Brassica nigra^ 45001. 
white, Brassica alba, 45000. 

Nephelium bassaoenae, 45181. 

litchi. See Litchi chinenais. 
Nephrolepis sp., 45090. 

Orthocarpua purpuraacens, 45112. 
Oryza saiiva, 45034, 45035. 
Oyama, Passiflora quadrangularis, 
45016. 

Pa! ts'ai, Brnsaica pekinensis, 44935, 
45185-45189. 



54 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Palm, Butia capitata, 45009. 

Butia capitata odorata, 45073. 

eriospaifia, 45045. 
doum, Hyphaene thehaieaf 45004« 
fan, Australian, LivUtona austra- 

Us, 45002. 
ivory - nut, Phytelephas macro- 

carpa, 45032. 
lemiche, Manicaria aaooifera, 

45087. 
pacaya, Chattuiedorea sp., 46022. 
pacayito, Chamaedorea spp., 44094, 

45079. 
pindo, Arecaslrum romanzofflanum 
australe, 45066. 
Pamak, pacayito palm, Chamaedorea 

sp., 44994. 
Pandorea australis, 44961. 
Panicum decompoHtum, 45040. 

diagonals, 45210. 
Papaw, Long John, Asimina trilohay 

45019, 
Papaya. See Carica spp. 
ParanUffnya monophylla, 45159. 
Parrhii de culebrn, CaUfcophysum 

brevipes, 45219. 
Passiflora sp., 45168. 

quadrangulahs, 45016. 
Pavetta indica, 45153. 
Pawatta, Pavetta indica, 45153. 
Pea, garden, Piaum sativum: 
Automovil, 44983. 
Cien por une, 44988. 
Comuii, 44991. 
De 40 dias, 44986. 
Gladiador, 44990. 
Maravilla del mercado, 44982. 
OJo negro, 44981. 
Orgullo del mercado, 44984. 
Senador, 44987. 
Telegrafo, 44989. 
William Murst, 44985. 
Pear, Pyrun ussuriefisis, 4r)040. 
Penniseium benthami, 45211. 

aetosum, 45212. 
Pcrotis indica, 45213. 

latifolia. See PerotUi indica. 
Pei-sea sp., 44996. 

americana, 45078, 45083, 45001. 
uni t iniiiin a . See Per sea amerieana, 
sehiedeana, 44999, 45081. 
Phaeom^ia imperialis. See Phacome- 
ria magniflca, 
magnifica^ 45154. 



Phaseolus ooodneuSf 44068. 
lunatus, 44965-44967. 
vulgaris, 44968-44980. 

Phytelephas macrocarpa, 45032. 
Pind<>-pof, Arecastrwn romansofflanum 
austrole, 45066. 

Pistache, Chinese, Pistaoia chinensis, 
44962. 

Pistacia chinensis, 44962. 
Pisum sativum, 44981-44991. 
Pitonga, Eugenia uniflora, 45067, 45068, 
Plantain, Musa paradisiacal seminifera, 

45007. 
Potato, Portuguese Red, Solanum 

tuberosum, 45023. 

Priotropis cytisoides, 45008. 
Prosopis cMlensU, 45075, 45076, 45165. 
juliflora. See Prosopis chilensit. 
Prune myrobalan, Spondias lutea, 

45010. 
Prunus amygdalus. See Amygdalu^ 
communis, 
conradinae, 45215. 
mume, 45063, 45064, 45176. 
sargentii. See Prunus serruiata 

sachalinensis. 
serrula ^ a , 45049-45052, 45054- 
45062. 
sachalinefisis, 45074, 45178. 
sieboldii, 45053. 
subhirtella pendula, 45216. 
Psidium sp., 45169. 
Psychotria bacteriophila, 45155. 
Pyrus ussuriensis, 45046. 

Quamoclidion m/ultiflorum, 45192. 

Ribes speoiosum, 45024. 

Rice, Haitian Rangoon, Orysa sativa. 

45034, 45035. 
Rubus sp., 45017. 

ra^iemosus, 45044. 
Rymandra excel sa, 44956. 

« 

Saccharum ofjicinarum, 44963, 44964, 

4502^-45031, 45132-45140. 
Salvia hempsteadiana, 44995. 
Sapindus oahuensis, 45157. 
Satin leaf, Chrysophyllum fnonopyrc. 
num, 45107. 
top, Andropo g on erianthoides, 
45037. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



55 



Securidaca lamarckUt 45028. 

Shucte. See Coy<>, Persea schiedeana. 

SiDiaruco, Malpighia sp., 45015. 

Soap tree, Hawaiian, Sapindun 

oahuensis, 45157. 
Solcmum tuberosum, 46023. 
Spondias lutea, 45010, 45086. 
Sporobolus moUeri, 45214. 
Sterculia ncerifoUa, See Brachychiton 

acerifoUum. 

Strawberry, Fragaria spp. : 
Carolina, 45218. 
Keen's Seedling, 45217. 
Old Pine. 45218. 

Sugar cane, Saccharum offlcinarum: 
Demerara No. 1135, 45132, 45189. 
Hawaiian No. 20, 45133. 

No. 27, 45134. 

No. 109. 45135, 45140. 

No. 146, 45136. 

No. 227, 45137. 
Lahaina, 45138. 
Santa Cruz 13/13, 45a31. 

12/37, 44963. 

13/32, 44964. 

14/7, 45029. 

14/47, 45030. 

Tahebvia pentaphylia, 44998, 45088, 

45166. 
Tamarind, Tamurindus indica, 45105. 
TamaHndus indica^ 45105. 
Tangerine, Citnis nohUii deliciosa, 

45089. 

Tanyali, yellow, Colocasia sp., 45065. 
Taro, Colooasia sp., 45065. 
Tawari, Ixerha J^exioides, 44955. 
Tecoma austraUs. See Pandorea auB* 

tralU. 
Tetrazygia IHcolor, 45177. 
Theohrotna cacao, 45084. 
TrichUia catigua, 45069. 
THticum aestivum, 44943-44953, 45142- 
45151. 
vulgare. See Triticum acsiicum. 

Vim us piimUa, 45025. 
T'nab, Ziziphus mauritiana, 44940. 
Undetermined, 45018, 45220. 
Tructl, Biwa orellana, 44954. 



ViciV/ faho, 44939. 

Vigna sinensis, 44992, 44993. 

litis vinifera, 45070-45072. 

Walnut, Juglans regia, 44936, 44937. 

Porto Rican, Juglans portoricen- 
sis, 45033. 
Wanipi, Clanaccna lansium, 45161. 
Watermelon, CitrMus vulgaris, 45162, 

45163, 45170. 
Wattle, Cape, Alhiezia lophantha, 
•44957. 

cTcstwl, Albizzia lophantha, 44057. 
Wheat, Triticum aestivum: 

Allies Hybrid, 44943. 

Autumn Victoria, 44944. 

Bearded Pearl of Nuisement, 
44945. 

Blue, 44948. 

Bunyip, 45142. 

Comeback, 45143. 

Cr^pi, 44946. 

Dattel Hybrid, 441)47. 

Early No6, 44948. 

Flrbnnk, 45144. 

Florence, 45145. 

Japhet, 44949. 

Jolly Farmer's Hybrid, 44950. 

Marshall's No. 3, 45146. 

Massy Hybrid, 44951. 

Red-Bearded Autunm, 44952. 

Red Marvel, 44949. 

Rymer, 45147. 

Sensation, 44950. 

Sunset, 45148. 

Treasure Hybrid, 44953. 

Warren, 45149. 

White Marvel, 44947. 

Yandllla King, 45150. 

Zealand, 45151. 
Wonga-wonga, Pandorea australis, 
44961. 

Yacaratl-A, Carica dodecaphyUa, 45141. 
Yamazakura. Prunus serrulata sa- 
chnlinensis, 45178. 

Zauschneria califomdca, 45193. 
Zea mays, 45036, 45199-45203. 
Ziziphus jujuba. See Ziziphus mau- 
ritiana. 
mauritiana, 44940. 



o 



^" iMwd April IT, itto. 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 
r-'c^ y '3 -BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

'1 L 



INVENTORY 

OF 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 

TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



( No. U; NiM. 4S221 to 45704.) 



wuaaxoTor: 



Issued April IT, 1922. 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

WILLIAM A. TAYLOR, Ckkf '/ Burtau. 



INVENTORY 

OF 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DKFIOE or FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 

TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



( No. 53; Noa. 45221 to 45704. ) 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



Chief of Bureau, Williau A. Taylor. 
ABBociate Chief of Bureau, Karl F. Kellebman. 
Officer in Charge of Publioations, J. E. Rockwbli<. 
ABBietant in Charge of BuBincBB OperationB, II. K. .Xij^avmon. 



Foreign Ssid and Plant Introdcction. 

SCIBNTiriC STAFF. 

David Falrchlld, Agricultural Bwplorer in Charge 

P. H. Doreett, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Plant Introduction Oardene. 

B. T. Galloway, Plant PathologiBt, Special ReBearch ProjeotB, 
Peter Bisset, Plant Introducer, in Charge of ExperimenterB* Bervioe. 
Wilson Popenoe and J. F. Bock, Agriculturai BwplorerB. 

R. A. Young, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Daeheen and Tropical Yam InveetigationB. 

11. C. Skeels, BotaniBt, in Charge of CdlectionB, 

O. P. Van Eeeltlne, ABBietant BotaniBt, in Charge of PublicationB. 

li. G. Hoover, ABBiBtant Plant Introducer, in Cliarge of Chayote InveetigationB. 

C. C. Thomas, ABBiBtant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Jujube InvcBtigationB. 
R. L. Crandall, ABBiBtant in Charge of Photographic Laboratory. 

P. O. Russell and Patty Newbold, Scientific ABBiBtantB, 

David A. Bisset, Superintendent, Bell Plant Introduction Garden, Glenn Dale, Md. 
E^dward Goucher, Plant Propagator. 

.7. E. Morrow, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Calif. 
Henry Klopfer, Plant Propagator. 

Edward Slmmonds, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Miami, Fla, 
Charles H. Steffani, Plant Propagator. 

Henry E. Juenemann, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, BelUngham, Wash. 

Wilbur A. Patten, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Brooksville, Fla. 

E. J. Rankin, AsBiBtant in Charge, Plant Introduction Garden, Savannah, Ga. 

CollaboratorB: Thomas W. Brown and Robert H. Forl)es, Cairo, Egypt; A. C. Hartlesa, 
Seharunpur, India; Barbour Lathrop, Chicago, III.; Dr. H. L. Lyon, Honolulu, HatcaH; 
Henry Nehrling, Qotha, Fla.; Charles T. Simpson, Littleriver, Fla.; Dr. L. Trabnt, 
Director, Service Botanique, AlgierB, Algeria; E. H. Wilson, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica 
Plain, McBB. ; E. W. D. Holway, Faribault, Minn. ; Dr. William Trelease, University of 
IllinoiB, Urbana, III. 

2 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 
Introductory statement 5 

Inventory 13 

Index of common and scientific names 81 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Page. 
PiATE I. A fruiting branch of the wampl {Claucena lansium (Lour.) 

Skeels, S. P. I. No. 45328) 26 

II. An Indian boy holding a cluster of wild tropical grapes {Vitis 

tUiaefolia Humb. and Bonpl., S. P. I. No. 45361) 26 

III. The Chinese horse-chestnut in its native habitat. {Aesculus toil- 

sonii Rehder. S. P. I. No. 45532) 48 

ly. The sweet granadllla of Guatemala. {P.a»siflora ligularis .Tuss.. 

S. P. I. No. 45614) 48 

FiGiRE 1. Wilson Popenoe's routes of exploration in Guatemala from Sep- 
tember 6, 1916, to December 13, 1917 6 

3 



mVEJ^TORY OF SEEDS AND PUMTS IMPORTED BY 
THE OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRO- 
DUCTION DURING THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1917 (NO. 53; NOS. 45221 TO 
45704). 

INTBODUCTOBY STATEMENT. 

This inventory covers the period from October to December, in- 
chisive, 1917. During this time Agricultural Explorer Frank X. 
Meyer was on his last trip, exploring the upper Yangtze River around 
Ichang, and Agricultural Explorer Wilson Poi>enoe was in the 
Vera Paz region of Guatemala (fig. 1). The collections of these 
two men form a substantial addition to the new plants of this 
country. 

Mr. Meyer found about 40 varieties of citrus fruits in the region 
around Ichang; of these he sent in some interesting varieties of 
mandarins and pummelos (Nos. 46311 to 45315) and a large- fruited 
Wampi {Claueena l<msium^ No. 45328), which is closely related to 
* Citrus but has small pubescent fruits. As yet this fruit is prac- 
tically unknown in America, although a great favorite with the 
Chinese. Mr. Meyer's suggestion that the large ocher-yellow flowered 
Lycoris aurea and the carmine-red flowered species L. radiata^ to- 
gether with its yellow variety, ought to thrive throughout the South 
is worth emphasizing. He found these in great abundance in Hupeh 
Province (Nos. 45625 to 45628). The Ichang lemon (No. 45634) he 
thinks may be distinctly hardier than the common lemon, and the 
rare Chinese horse-chestnut {Aeseulus wilsonii, No. 45632), which 
has naiTower leaves than the common species grown by us, is now 
well established in America through the seeds which Mr. Meyer 
procured. 

It seems probable that few of the introductions by Mr. Meyer will 
be of greater value than some of his cultivated varieties of that 
blight-resistant species of pear {Pyrus cdlleryana^ No. 45686) which 
he calls the domestic crab-apple pear and which he found in many 
varieties near Kingmen, Hupeh. The pioneer work of Dr. Reimer 
has brought this species of pear to the foreground because of its 
peculiar resistance to blight, and some of these cultivated sorts bid 
fair to become of great value for stocks upon which to work the 

5 



6 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



more luscious varieties of Pyrua coTnmunis, Under No. 45592 Mr, 
Meyer sent in 100 pounds of seed of the small-fruited wild pear of 
the same species, and specialists are experimenting with these. 

Wilson Popenoe sends in from the Vera Paz region a smallyf ruited 
chayote no larger than a hen's egg (No. 45350) ; the inga, which he 
says is a fruit worthy of a place in the gardens of the amateur in 
southern Florida (No. 45351) ; an interesting tropical walnut 
{Jiiglans mollis^ No. 45352), which makes a small tree only 45 feet 




Fig. 1. — Wilson Popenoe's routes of exploration in Guatemala from September 6. 1916, to 
December 13. 1917. The search for hardy avocados which Mr. Popenoe made during 
the 16 months of his agricultural exploration of Guatemala constitutes a noteworthy 
horticultural accomplishment. His Journeys on muleback and on foot traversed over 
2,000 miles of the mountain trails and roads of that Republic and resulted in the 
successful introduction into this country of 36 distinct types of the hard-shelled hardy 
avocado. Each one of these represents the successful importation of bud sticks from a 
selected seedling avocado tree from which he collected the fruits and of which he took 
record photographs, not only of the fruit itself but of the tree as well. The collection 
is further remarkable in that each number in It is backed up by a careful description, 
written on the spot, of the characteristics of the tree from which the budwood wa.-* 
taken. This precaution will make it possible years hence to study the variation which 
takes place in the fruit, as well as the trees which are grown from the imported bads. 
In addition to this, which was Mr. Popenoe's main quest, he discovered and introduced 
two wild relatives of the avocado, the anay and the coy6j both worthy of the careful at- 
tention of tropical horticulturists, and also 190 other especially selected rare and useful 
species of plants which he believes can be grown in the warmer sections of the Uniied 
States and similar regions throughout the world. 

tall, but which fruits abundantly and bears nuts with even thicker 
shells than those of our own black walnut; a species of tropical Ruhus 
(No. 45356) with soft seeds and of good flavor, which fruits abun- 
dantly and should be tried in the Southern States ; and seeds of the 
coyo (Persea schiedeana^ No. 45354), on which will be grafted his 
large-fruited variety of this new fruit, which he declares is more 
highly esteemed by the Indians of the Vera Paz region than the 
avocado itself and deserves to be brought to the attention of all 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECElliBEB 31, 1917. 7 

tropical horticulturists as a hitherto entirely neglected tropical 
fruit tree. From the valley of the Rio Polochic he sends in seeds 
of a handsome flowering shrub {Pogonopvs specioaus^ No. 45360) 
with brilliant scarlet bracts suggestive of the poinsettia; and 'from 
the vicinity of San Cristobal a wild grape (No. 45361) with fair- 
sized berries, which he thinks is the largest fruited grape he has 
yet seen in the Tropics and should be capable of development by 
selection. 

Six of Mr. Popenoe's selected avocados are described in this in- 
ventory, including the Akbal (No. 45505), which he considers, on ac- 
count of its earliness, one of his promising sorts, the Manik (No. 
45560), Kaguah (No. 45661), Ishim (No. 45562), Kanan (No. 45563), 
and Chabil (No. 45564). Under No. 45506 he describes the fruit of 
a species of Malpighia called the azerola^ which may be hardier than 
its relative, the Barbados cherry, and if so would be well worth 
distributing as a dooryard shrub in southern California and even in 
southern Texas. 

The possibility of a terrestrial orchid which would produce a good 
flower for use in the house is emphasized by Mr. Popenoe in his in- 
troduction, from an altitude of 4,000 feet, of the Sohralia macranthi 
(No. 45547), which grows there to a height of 4 feet and has a large 
showy flower. His " ilama," a species of Annona {A, diversifolia, 
No. 46548), which appears to be adapted to the lower levels of the 
tropical coastal plain, can not fail to be of interest to tropical horti- 
culturists, for it has fruits as fine in flavor as the cherimoya and will 
thrive on the coastal plain where the cherimoya refuses to grow. . Dr. 
Safford has named after Mr. Popenoe a new species of Dahlia (No. 
45578), which in his opinion is in all probability the ancestor of the 
cactus dahlia and to which the breeders mav have to turn to re- 
juvenate their stock of this wonderful flowering plant. 

With the introduction of the large-fruited tropical hawthorn (No. 
45575), which Mr. Popenoe found growing in the mountains of 
Guatemala and which is used for the production of a distinctive and 
delicate preserve by the people there, we now have in this country 
the material for the breeding of new types of hawthorns, which 
should be adapted to a wide range of conditions. Our numerous 
native species, the Chinese Crataegus pmnatiftda with its large- 
fruited strains, and this Guatemalan tropical species, C, stip^ilosa^ 
should attract some one to the problem. 

The remarkable breeding work of Dr. Walter Van Fleet is well 
known to the rosarians, but his activities in other fields are less well 
known. This inventory gives descriptions of selections and hybrids 
(Nos. 45330 to 46342) which he has produced by the breeding of the 
chinquapin (Castanea pumila) ^ the Chinese chestnut {C. rnollhsima)^ 
the American chestnut {C, dentata). and the Japanese species {C, 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

C7'enata). He has been working with these for many years and has 
a remarkable collection of bearing trees at his place in Maryland. 
The selections of the Chinese species are so resistant to the bark 
disease as to make it safe to recommend them for orchards, where 
with careful wat<!hing they ought to be as safe investments as peaches 
or peal's or others of our fruit trees. They are not large forest trees. 
The fate of that other Chinese chestnut (Castanea henryi^ No. 45670), 
which grows to a height of 75 to 100 feet on the upper Yangtze 
River as far west as Mount Omei, remains to be seen. If it should 
prove resistant to the bark disease it might in a measure take the 
place of our forest chestnut in certain localities. Although the bar- 
berry has been given a jolt through the association which its rust 
disease has with the rust of wheat, there are species that are per- 
fectly safe from attacks of rust and may be grown freely as door- 
yard shrubs. Let us hope that this is the case with Dr. Van Fleet's 
cross (No. 46477) between Berberui wUsonae^ which E. H. Wilson 
found in China, and B. wggregata.. The hybrids are very handsome 
plants for borders, having a spreading low-growing habit, and are 
hardy in Maryland. 

We are so accustomed to think of our own cereal crops as always 
having been the great food-producing plants of the world that it is 
a surprise to find in Mexico under cultivation to-day a relative of our 
common pigweed which in the times of Montezuma formed one of 
the staple cereal foods of the Aztecs. The seeds of this amaranth 
{Amaranthus panicvlatus^ No. 45535) filled 18 granaries, each hold- 
ing '9,000 bushels, in the time of the great ruler. It was made into 
cakes known as " alegi-fa " and was so highly valued that it had a part 
in the religious ceremonies of that time. Our present interest in it 
arises from the fact that it has a most remarkably low water require- 
ment and consequently has distinct possibilities in our Southwest, 
where water is precious. It may be hoped that our predilection for 
other but no more palatable grains will not be so strong as to make 
it impossible to market this ancient one of the Aztecs, which Mrs. 
Zelia Nuttall sends in from Mexico. 

Lamb's-quarters (Chenopadium album) has been used in this 
country by many people, and those who know it declare it is more 
delicate than that introduced vegetable, spinach, which is now the 
fashion. The huauhtli of the Aztecs {Chenopodium nutttdliae^ No. 
45536), which Mrs. Nuttall sends in from Mexico, is there used when 
the seeds are ''in the milk," and she considers it a most delicate 
vegetable. 

One of the most interesting of recently introduced vegetables is the 
mitsuba of Japan (No. 45247), sent in by Mr. Barbour Lathrop as 
one of the commonest vegetables among the Japanese. Botanically 
it is Deringa (or Cryptotaema) canadensis^ and curiously enough 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 9 

this species, although it occurs from Nova Scotia to Texas and was 
known in the old days as honewort, has never been cultivated or 
even used as a vegetable by Americans. It is easily grown and 
deserves to be carefullv studied bv amateurs. Its food value is 
probably similar to that of celery. 

The success of the Japanese flowering cherries makes the introduc- 
tion of the pink-flowered wild forest cherry {Prunua aerruUUa var. 
sachaZinensiSj No. 45248) of particular interest. The cherry-wood 
timber from it is said to be excellent, and if some one would plant 
a hillside with this tree it would not only make a place to which we 
should all sooner or later want to make a pilgrimage as one does to 
the Azalea gardens near Charleston, but in the years to come it would 
furnish for market an excellent quality of cherry wood. 

So remarkable as money producers have been some of the new 
-grasses introduced through the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant 
Introduction that cultivators are watching with a great deal of 
interest the behavior of the Napier grass of Rhodesia {Pennisetum 
pv^pureunK No. 45572). According to Harrison, the agrostologist of 
South Africa, it promises there to be one of tlie most remarkable 
drought-resistant fodder plants yet introduced into cultivation, mak- 
ing a yield of 27 tons of green fodder per acre and remaining green 
even during six or eight months of drought. It must be remembered 
that the South African dry season comes in the winter, when it is 
cool. It is very different from the scorching droughts of our own 
Plains. However, Napier grass is already making its mark in this 
country. 

It is always with keen satisfaction that one records the arrival of 
the second generation of an imported plant in the New World. That 
loveliest of all flowering legumes Camoensia maa^ima (No. 45608), 
from the coast of Portuguese West Africa, was introduced in 1901 
and scattered in vain in Florida. A plant was sent to Dr. R. M. 
Gray, in charge of the Harvard Experiment Station at Cienfuegos, 
Cuba. This has grown and flowered and produced fruit, so that 
this liana, named after the great Portuguese poet, Camoens, is suc- 
cessfully established in the West Indies. It deserves to be grown 
wherever it can be in the tropical forests of the New World. 

The species of crab apple which was formerly much cultivated in 
Japan {Mains prmu folia rnj^v'. No. 45679) but was driven out by 
the American varieties, according to Prof. Sargent, of the Arnold 
Arboretum, may prove as hardy as Pyru^ haccata^ and he suggests 
that it be crossed with the Siberian crab-apple varieties and new 
hardy varieties of apples procured for trial in Canada. 

Dr. Trabut's suggestion that the wild Moroccan pear {Pyrus martw- 
rerutis^ No. 45612), which inhabit^^ the dry sandy noncalcareous soils 
of the Mamora, should be considered as a stock ife well worthy of trial. 



10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

There is a place for a peach in the southern part of Florida, if 
only the tree suited to that region of tropical southern rains can be 
found. A freestone variety (No. 45662) of the peen-to type from the 
French West Indies, which is said to resist decay, may furnish this 
southern peach. 

It has seemed a little strange that so excellent a fruit as that of 
the passion vine, which ranks among the best fmits of Australia, 
should still be practically an unknown fruit on our markets. The 
hard-shelled sweet granadilla of Guatemala {Pasdfiora ligularis^ No. 
45614), which instead of being purple in color is a deep orange- 
yellow and instead of shriveling keeps its plump form, may attract 
people more than the commoner species, P, edvlis, 

Mr. Frank N. Meyer's introduction of the grafted varieties of the 
Chinese jujube has resulted in the development of that very heat- 
resistant fruit in Texas and California. The introduction of 34 
distinct varieties of jujubes from the island of Mauritius, which be- 
long to a different botanical species (Ziziph/us Trumriticma^ Nos. 
45625 to 45658), may make the creation of new forms possible. This 
Mauritian fruit is said to be sold in the villages of the island ih 
large quantities and to be appreciated by the Europeans as well as 
by the native inhabitants of the island. This inventory announces 
also the introduction of a third species from Argentina {Ziziphus 
7fiistol^ No. 45227). Since no breeding has ever been done in this 
genus, it will be interesting to see what can be done in the crossing 
of these different species. News comes of the existence in the Punjab 
of jujubes of large size, whether of one of these species is not yet 
definitely known here. 

The wide use of Casiuxrina eguisetifolia as a street tree in southern 
Florida has engendered considerable discussion as to its benefits. It 
is possible that the Siraiatra species {C, sunuUra/na^ No. 46659)^ which 
is more handsome, may prove hardy enough and beautiful enough 
to warrant its substitution for the ''Australian pine." 

The breeders who are working with the genus Ribes will be glad 
to get the Chinese form, Ribes fasGUnilatuni cJwnense (No. 45689), 
which is unique in that it ripens its bright-red fruits in the fall of 
the year instead of in the summer. 

The Smyrna fig industry is an established thing in California, 
but apparently much work remains to be done in getting the best 
series of caprifig varieties which will harbor the Blastophaga. 
Dr. Trabut's hybrid (No. 45235) between the Abyssinian or Ery- 
threan fig {Ficus palmata) and the common fig {F, carica) may play 
a role in this respect, since the Abyssinian species makes excellent 
caprifigs. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 11 

The botanical determinations of seeds introduced have been made 
and the botanical nomenclature revised by Mr. H. C. Skeels and 
the descriptive and botanical notes arranged by Mr. G. P. Van 
Eseltine, who has had general supervision of this inventory, as of 
all the publications of this office. The manuscript of this inventory 
has been prepared by Miss Esther A. Celander. 

Davu) Fairchild, 
Agricultural Explorer in Charrje, 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington^ D. C,^ June 15^ 19:21, 



J 



• INVENTORY.' 



45221 to 45225. Triticum aestivum L. Poacese. Wheat. 

{T, vulgare ViU.) 

From Guatrache, Pampa, central Argentina. Presented by Seflor Juan 
Williamson, Estacion Agronomica, through the Office of Cereal Investiga- 
tions. Received October, 1917. • 

45221. Barletta (Pampa). 45223. Barletta 24. 

45222. Barletta 77. 45224. Barletta 44. 

45225. Barletta from a farm in the viciuity of the experiment station 
(not from the fields of the station). 

45226 and 45227. 

From Oran, Argentina. Seeds presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. Received 
September 6, 1917. 

45226. Passifloba sp. Passifloracese. Oranadilla. 

"A yellow-fruited, acid type which I consider superior to the purple 
type." (Datnon.) 

45227. ZizipHus mistol Griseb. Rhamnacefe. Histol. 

A spiny tree, native to Argentina, up to 30 feet in height, with ovaj, 
leathery, short-stemmed leaves about an inch long and edible, black 
fruits about one-third of an inch in diameter. 

For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 44436. 

45228. Nefhrolefis sp. Polypodiacese. Fern. 

From Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. Plants collected by 
Mr. Wilson Popenoe, Agricultural Explorer for the Department of Agri- 
culture. Received October 19, 1917. 

"(No. 175. October 1, 1917.) A common fern found along watercourses in 
the vicinity of Purula, Baja Vera Paz, at altitudes of about 5,000 feet. It forms 
dense masses in open places among scrub." (Popenoe.) 

45229. Prunus nigra Ait. Amygdalaceae. Plum. 

From Ottawa, Canada. Seeds purchased from Mr. W. T. Macoun, Domin- 
ion horticulturist. Central Experimental Farm. Received October 1, 1917. 

** The cultivated trees of Prunus nigra in this district practically never have 
mature fruit on them, as the fruits become diseased before they become fully 

' All introductions consist of seeds unless otherwise noted. 

It should be understood that the varietal names of fruits, vegetables, cereals, and 
other plants used in this inventory are those under which the material was received when 
introduced by the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction ; and, further, that the 
printing of such names here does not constitute their official publication and adoption 
in this country. As the different varieties are studied, their Identity fully established, 
their entrance into the American trade forecast, and the use of varietal names for them 
in American literature becomes necessary, the foreign varietal designations appearing in 
this inventory will be subject to change with a view to bringing the forms of the names 
into harmony with recognized American codes of nomenclature. 

13 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

grown. It has been this way as long as I can remember — at least for 25 
years. There might occasionally be a year with a few good fruits; but, as 
a rule, there are none. However, there is one man about here who has been 
cultivating these fairly extensively and keeping his trees thoroughly sprayed, 
and I am getting the seed from him. There is just a possibility of these being 
crossed with Prunus americana, as he has a few trees of the latter in his 
orchard." ( Maooun, ) 

45230. Brunsfelsia hopeana (Hook.) Bentham. Solanacese. 

From Para, Brazil. Seeds presented by Senhor J. SimAo da Costa. Re- 
ceived October 1, 1^7. 

** A slender twiggy free-branching shrub ; leaves lanceolate-oblong, thin in 
texture, rich dark green, paler beneath. Flowers small but freely produced, 
solitary or in pairs all along the leafy growths; limb light violet-blue on first 
opening, fading to almost pure white with age; tube very slender, curved 
upwards, nearly white, 1 inch long; calyx three-fourths of an inch long, teeth 
obtuse." (Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 1, p. 582.) 

45231. Ajnnona marggravh Mart. Annonacese. 

From Caracas, Venezuela. Seeds presented by Mr. Henri Pittier, director, 
£i8taci6n E2xpcrimental y Catastro de Baldio& Received October 4. 
1917. 

A tree with the trunk, form of the branches, and color of the bark resem- 
bling those of the orange, but with different leaves, flowers, and fruit. Its 
leaves are about half a foot long, deep green and glossy above, pale green be- 
neath, and tongue shaped. The yellow flower is large and conspicuous, and 
has a sickening sweet odor. It is followed by the fruit, which ripens in 
December and January. This fruit, which is conoid in shape and about 5 
Inches in greatest diameter, is green and white mixed or pale green on the 
outside, and the surface is areoled, with a brown tubercle in each areole. Not 
until the fruit falls of its own accord is it eaten, and then it is so soft that 
it can be peeled with the fingers. The yellowish pulp has an odor like ferment- 
ing bread dough to which honey has been added, with a sweetish subacid and 
somewhat bitter taste. The seeds are oval, golden yellow and glossy, smooth, 
and hard. This tree is a native of Brazil and Venezuela. (Adapted from 
Saffoi'd, Contributiona from the National Herharium, vol. 18, pU i, p. 25.) 

45232. Lyoopersicon escul.entum Mill. Solanaceae. Tomato. 

From the Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. O. D. Conger, U. S. N., 
Washington, D. C. Received October 5, 1917. 

** From the Province of Cavite, near the municipality of Alfonso. Seeds 
of a tomato growing wild in the Philippines. The vine should spread out 
in every direction and climb up on any near-by house or tree. I found these 
vines growing in the Jungles usually in places where there had been habita- 
tions in former times. The fruit grows to the size of a large cherry." 
{Conger.) 

45233 and 45234. Triticum aestivum L. Poaceee. Wheat. 

(T. vulgare Vill.) 

From Tokyo, Japan. Presented by Mr. Telzo Ito, chief. Plant Industry 
Division, Imperial Department of Agriculture and Commerce. Received 
October 12, 1917. 

45233. Iga-chikugo. 45234. Aka-komugi. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 15 

45235 and 45236. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Seeds presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received 
October 13, 1917. Quoted notes by Dr. Trabut. 

45235. Ficus palmata X carica. Moracese. Fig. 

" I am sending you seeds of Ficus palmata fertilized by F. carica. 
F. palmata, originally from Abyssinia and Erythrea. appears interesting; 
first, as one of the probable ancestors of F, carica; second, the male 
plants are excellent caprifigs to supply the Blastophaga. The autumn 
figs (Mammoni) now have the male flowers and at this moment it is 
still possible for the Blastophaga to carry the pollen. The female 
plants yield mediocre edible fruits. The hybrids should be interesting 
for desert regions." 

45236. ViTis vinifera L. Vitacene. Qrape. 

" Cabernet X Malbec No. 2. Cabernet is, in my opinion, the best 
vine for red wine of the Bordeaux type ; but it is a light bearer. I have 
interesting hybrids. The seeds which I am sending you come from a 
number which have given us an excellent wine." 

45237 and 45238. Pbukus armeniaca L. Amygdalacese. 

Apricot. 

From Chefoo, China. Seeds presented by Mr. A. Sugden, Commissioner 
of Customs, through Mr. Lester Maynard, American consul, Chefoo. 
Received October 13, 1917. 

45237. Seeds sent in as a supposed cross ^between apricot and plum, 
resulting from grafting plums on apricots. The seeds do not appear 
to differ from those of ordinary apricots. 

45238. " Seeds of some very good apricots, which were of fair size, good 
flavor, and looked well ; there was a lot of red about them.*' (Sugden.) 

46239. Dbguelia sp. Fabacese. 

(Derris sp.) 

From Luzon, Rizal Province, Philippine Islands. Fruits presented by Mr. 
E. D. Merrill, Bureau of Science, Manila. Received October 15, 1917. 

" TugU or tubli. This is supposed to be one of the species of Derris used 
here for flsh poison. The seeds are not so used, only the bark and roots." 
(Merrill.) 

45240. Cynara hystrix Ball. Asteracese. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Seeds presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received Oc- 
tober 15, 1917. 

" Seeds of Cynara hystrix from Morocco, a species near to C. carduneulus, 
Interesting to study and to hybridize. The seeds are large." (Trabut.) 

45241. AcTiNiDiA ARGT3TA (Sicb. and Zucc.) Planch. Dilleniacese. 

From Bronx Park, N. Y. Cuttings from Mr. George V. Nash, New York 
Botanical Garden. Received October 18, 1917. 

"There is no flner climbing shrub for porches in this latitude than 
AcHnidia arguta. Its foliage, which is of a beautiful dark-green color with 
reddish midribs, seems to be practically free from diseases. Its flowers are 
large, greenish white, and attractive. It is a very vigorous grower und will 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

cover a trellis 20 feet long and 10 feet high in two or three years. The flavor 
of the fruits is very sweet and pleasant, reminding one of figs. Thej* are 
about the size of damson plums, have very thin skins, and are filled with 
extremely small seeds. A climbing plant which deserves the widest distribu- 
tion." (Faif^child.) 

45242 to 45245. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Seeds presented by Mr. J. F. Rock, botanist, 
College of Hawaii. Received October 19, 1917. 

45242. HiBiscADELPurs giffardianus Rock. Malvacea?. 

''The Hau kuafUtoi is a remarkable tree. At first appearance one 
would think it to be the common Hau {Hibiscus tiliiiceus), but at closer 
inspection one can not but wonder at the most peculiar shape of the 
deep magenta flowers and the large yellow tuberculate capsules. It is a 
rather low tree, with not erect but rather inclining trunk a foot in 
diameter, with a many-branched round crown. It differs from the 
genus Hibiscus in Its very peculiar flowere [which are curved and con- 
voluted] and mainly In the calyx, which is not persistent with the 
capsules but drops together with the bracts as soon as the capsules are 
formed." {Rock.) 

45243. HiBiscADELPHus HUALALAiENsis Rock. MalvacesB. 

A tree, 16 to 23 feet high, with erect trunk, white bark, somewhat reni- 
form leaves, and sta&U ovate capsules. It belongs to the almost-extinct 
genus Hibiscadelphus, of the three species of which two are represented 
by a single tree each and the present one by a dozen or so living trees. 
Seedlings of all the species are growing, however, in various Hawaiian 
gardens. 

This exceedingly interesting and distinct species was found by the 
writer in the year 1909 on the lava fields of Mount Hualalai, in North 
Kona, Hawaii, and in the forest of Waihou of the same district, where 
about a dozen trees are still in existence. The writer revisited the above 
locality in March, 1912, and found the trees in flower, while on his 
previous visit, June 18, 1909, only a few worm-eaten capsules could be 
found. The trees are badly attacked by several species of moths which 
feed on the leaves and mature capsules. Mr. Gerrit Wilder, however, 
succeeded in growing a few plants from healthy seeds collected by the 
writer. (Adapted from Rock, Indigenous Trees of the Hawaiian 
[ stands t p. SOI.) 

45244. PiTTOspoRUM H08MERI LONGiFoLiUM Rock. PittosporncejE. 

The variety differs from the species in that the leaves are very much 
longer and the capsules are smaller. The tree is quite common at 
Kapua, South Kona, Hawaii, on the lava flows, and occurs also at 
Kilauea and Hualalai, but does not reach such a height and S'ze as at 
Puuwaawaa. The trees of the latter locality are loaded with fruit 
during June and July, while those of Kapua bear mature fruit during 
the month of February. However, the fruiting season of these, like 
nearly all the other Hawaiian trees, can not be relied upon. The fruits 
of Pittosporum hosmeri and variety are a source of food for the native 
crow, which pecks open the large woody capsules and feeds on the oily 
seeds within. (Adapted from Rock, Indigenous Trees of the HatcaiiAin 
Islands, p. 161.) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 17 

45242 to 45245— Continued. 

45d45. Vaccinium rbticulatum J. E. Smith. VaccinlaceiB. Ohelo. 

" Seeds of Vaccinium reiiaUatumf a species whicb grows up to an 
altitude of 10,000 feet on the big islands (Maui and Hawaii). It is the 
well-lcnown ohelo of the natives, and the fruits are eaten and used 
similarly to your eastern Vacciniums." (Rock.) 

A low erect shrub, 1 to 2 feet high, the stiff crowded branches angular 
and densely foliose; leaves coriaceous; flowers solitary; berry globose, 
one-third to one-half an inch in diameter, pale rose or yellow, covered 
with a waxy bloom. Found In the high mountains of Hawaii and 
eastern Maui from about 4,000 up to 8,000 feet, where It grows 
gregariously, often covering large tracts of open ground. The shining 
fleshy berry, the ohelo, is the principal food of the wild mountain goose. 
Although astringent, it Is not unpleasant to the taste, and makes a good 
preserve. (Adapted from Hillebrand, Flora of the Hatvaiian Inlands, 
p, 271,) 

45246. Cabica papaya L. Papayaceae. Papaya. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Seeds presented by Mr. G. P. Wilder. Received 
October 6 and 19, 1917. 

" Seed from selected fruit." {Wilder,) 

45247. Derixga canadensis (L.) Kuntze. Apiaceae. Mitsuba. 
(Cryptotaenia canadensis DO.) 

From Brooklyn, N. Y. Plants presented by Mr. C. Stuart Gager, director, 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Received October 26, 1917. 

" Mitsuba Is a common wild plant of the American continent, being scattered 
pretty well over America from New Brunswick to South Dakota and southward 
to Georgia and Texas. It belongs to the family which has furnished a number 
of our good garden vegetables such as celery, the carrot, and the parsnip. 

" Mr. Lathrop writes from Japan regarding mitsuba : * Udo costs more than 
mitsuba, and far less of it is consumed by the poor. Every part of the mitsuba 
is edible, and Its leaves, stems, and roots are cooked as desirable vegetables. 
Like udo, It Is grown from seed and In rather light soil. It requires less time 
for maturing than udo and Is procurable on the market at far less expense. 
Mitsuba Is i>opular with everybody from the highest rank to the lowest. Be- 
sides being cooked, the stems are eaten as we eat celery.' 

"Pal ts'al has found its niche In our agriculture, and large quantities are 
being consumed ; and udo Is' being grown by a large number of amateurs who 
have learned to like It. This new vegetable, mitsuba, also from the Orient, may 
find Its place beside them. The ease of culture of mitsuba : the fnot that the 
plant can be grovm over such a wide range of territory ; and the excellence of 
its green leaves, blanched shoots, and roots, for use In a variety of ways, should 
appeal to our practical sense and Induce us to give It a careful test under 
widely varying conditions and through a number of seasons. Especially should 
It be tried on celery lands — ^In the Northern States, along the Gulf coast, and In 
California — to determine Its possible economic Importance and to see if it has 
any points of advantage over celery." (FairohiJd.) 

65587—22 2 



18 SEEDS AXD PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45248. Prunus serrulata sachaunensis (Schmidt) Makino. 
(P. aargentii Rehder.) [Amygdalacese. Sargent's cherry. 

From Tokyo, Japan. Seeds purchased from the Tokyo Plant, Seed, & 
Implement Co. Received October 19 and 22, 1917. 

A large tree, attaining a height of 60 "to 80 feet, which produces yaluable 
wood ; the bark Is reddish and lustrous, the branches becoming chestnut brown 
in age. The leaves are large, ovate, glabrous, and lustrous, turning to erimson 
and yellow In autumn. Flowers two to four together, Tery showy, rose pink, 
about li inches across, appearing before the leaves. Fruit the size of a pea, 
bright red, becoming black and shining at maturity. A valuable timber tree of 
great ornamental value which is hardy in New York and Massachusetts and 
bears its handsome broad flowers in great profusion. Native of northern Japan, 
Sakhalin, and Chosen (Korea). (Adapted from Bailey , Standard Cyclopedia of 
Horti^mliurey vol 5, p. 28S9.) 

45249 and 45250. 

From Kerman, Persia. Seeds presented by Capt. J. N. Merrill, First Regi- 
ment of Cavalry, Persian Army. Received October 10, 1917. 

45249. Citrus gbandis (L.) Osbeck. Rutacew. Pummelo. 
(C. decum4ina Murray.) 

" Seeds of the Persian ' pumaloe,' a fruit like that of China and the 
i^hillppines, about 8 or more inches in diameter, with a skin that is 
spongy, very thick, and oily. The fruit is slightly bitter and add, but 
not disagreeable to the taste. Used by the Persians as a decorative 
fruit ; a preserve made by boiling the skin with sugar is highly esteemed. 
The fruit Is grown at Khabis, some 65 miles east of here, elevation 1,800 
feet, near the edge of the great desert of Persia. Personally, I found 
the fruit, when eaten with powdered sugar, a good dish, though the 
Persians do not eat it." (Merrill.) 

45250. Lawsonia inermis L. Lythracese. Henna. 

'*A shrub bearing very fragrant, small, white, rose-colored, or greenish 
flowers. It is readily propagated from cuttings, grows in the form of a 
bush sending up shoots, and is suitable for hedges. When k^t clipped 
it is not unlike privet. Its odor at short range is rank and overpower- 
ing, but from a distance it is like that of mignonette. On the shores of 
Central America the land breezes frequently waft the odor out to sea. 
This species is the ' sweet-smelling camphire ' of Solomon. It is a native 
of western Asia, Egypt, and the African coasts of the Mediterranean, 
and now grows wild in some parts of India. *It is also cultivated in many 
countries. It has been a favorite garden plant in the East from the 
time of the ancient Egyptians to the present day." (TT. E, Safford.) 

45251 to 45262. 

From China. Seeds presented by Dr. Yamei Kin, Peking, China. Received 
October 23, 1917. Quoted notes by Dr. Kin. 

45251 to 45254. Brassica pekinensis (Lour.) Gagn. Brasslcacese. 

Palts'aL 

45251. "Mi 8ze pai t8*ai. Especially useful for salting down." 

452521. " Tu tB'ai, Light variety, from Yuyao, Chekiang Province. 
Said to be a very rapid grower, coming to maturity in four weeks 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBKR 31, ISHT. 19 

45251 to 45262— Continued. 

or, at most, not more than six weeks from the time of germina- 
tion. It is specially prized for its sweet * buttery • flavor which I 
have heard is characteristic of certain varieties of lettuce. It is 
not eaten raw or for salad purposes ; but, dropped into boiling hot 
water after being cut up in fairly large pieces, it makes a staple 
green vegetable. The rapid growth struck me as being valuable, 
for If in the same time as is necessary for growing lettuce one can 
obtain a good cabbage green, it will undoubtedly be as popular 
here as it is in China." 

45258. " Pai ts'ai. From Taianfu, Shantung Province." 

45254. " Yu ta'ai. Dark-colored, late variety from Yuyao, Chekiang 
Province. Grows taller than the very early kind, and while also 
good for greens, is of a darker color, it is said; and the seed is 
used largely for the production of the so-called rapeseed oil that 
is used so largely in food all through Middle China and South 
China." 

45255 and 45256. Castaitea cbenata Sieb. and Zucc. Fagacese. 

Chestnut. 
" Japanese chestnuts from Hangchow, Chekiang Province." ^ 

45255. A variety with large nuts. 

45256. A variety with medium-sized nuts. 

45257. CtrctJMis melo L. Cucurbltacese. Muskmelon. 
" White melon from Tientsin. Chihli Province." 

45258. CtrcuMis sativus L. Cucurbitacese. Cucumber. 
" Early cucumber from Taianfu, Shantung Province." 

45259. CucuBBiTA pepo L. Cucurbitace^. Squash. 
Parti-colored squash from Taianfu, Shantung Province." 

45260 and 45261. Raphanus sativus L. Brassicacese. Kadish. 

45260. " Round radish. Will not stand frost. Plant about July." 

45261. *' Long radish. Hardy. Plant later than the round variety." 

45262. Spinacia olebacba L. Chenopodiacese. Spinach. 

"Mi sze Chi Tien. From Woosung, Kiangsu Province. Spinach, to 
be planted the Inst of August. Cover with soil 1 inch thick; will sprout 
in a month. Can cut one crop in January and another in March." 

45263 to 45320. 

From China. Seeds collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Ex- 
plorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received October 6, 1917. 
Quoted notes by Mr. Meyer. 

4526S. Brassica sp. Brassicaceie. Mustard. 

"(No. 2393a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. June 5, 1917.) Chieh tzH. 
Mustard seeds, said to have come from the north, where mustard is a 
summer crop. However, it might have been grown as a winter crop* In 
the Yangtze Valley. Price, 37 cents. Yuan silver, per catty [IJ pounds]. 
Test this mustard as a summer crop where flax thrives ; as a winter crop 
in the Gulf States," 

Received as Brassica juncea, but apparently not this species. 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45263 to 45320— Continued. 

i 45264. Pebilla namkirbnsis (Lour.) Decalsne. Menthacete. 

5 (P. a/v/M/a Beiith.) 

**(No. 2394a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. June 5, 1917.) Hei 9u tzi 
(black periUa). An annual herb, germinating very early in the year; 
generally with purple foliage, though green plants are seen also. The 
young plants are eaten as a potherb or are used to give flavor to soups. 
The odor, however, is not pleasing to most people, since it resembles that 
of the bedbug (Gimex). The seeds are used medicinally for coughs and 
in throat troubles, together with other preparations." 

45S85. Pebilla frutescens (L.) Britton. Menthacese. 

(P. ocjfwoides L.) 

"(No. 2395a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. June 5, 1917.) Pat su tzu 
(white periUa). An annual herb grown entirely for its seed, from which 
is extracted an oil that is used in waterproofing. The seeds are also 
used medicinally, like the preceding number, and as a bird food.** 

45266 to 45268. Obtza sativa L. Poacese. Bice. 

45266. :*(Xo. 2396a. Hanyang, Hupeh Province. March 6, 1917.) 
Ching 8hui mi ku (clear- water rice grain). A fine local variety of 

* rice, said to be prolific and early ripening. On account of its 
earliness to be tested primarily in California." 

45267. "(No. 2397a. Changsha, Hunan Piovlnce. May 12. 1917. > 
Li ku (corn grain). A fine variety of rice, said to be an early 
ripeuer. To be tested like the preceding number." 

4526a "(No. 2399a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 9, 1917.) 
Ching shui mi (clear-water rice). A fine quality of early ripening 
rice. To be tested like the preceding numbers." 

45269 to 45295. Soja max (L.) Piper. Fabacese. Soy bean. 

(Olycine hisfnda Maxim.) 

[Note : These numbers are nearly all said to be late-ripening varieties 
of soy beans ; they come fro ma region greatly resembling in climate the 
Gulf States (southern parts). They should therefore be tested in dis- 
tricts where cotton and rice are grown.] 

45269. "(No. 2401a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 7, 1917. » 
Huang tou (yellow bean). A small to medium-sized, yellow soy 
bean, used mostly as a human food in the form of bean curd." 

45270. "(No. 24()2a. Wuchang, Hupeh Province. March 9, 1917.) 
Huang tou. A small to medium sized, yellow soy bean." 

45271. "(No. 2403a. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 16, 1917.) 
Huang tou. A small, yellow soy bean, used almost exclusively for 

■ 

bean-curd production." 

45272. "(No. 2404a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Huang tou. A small, yellow soy bean, said to ripen in early Au- 
gust. Used like the preceding number." 

45273. "(No. 2405a. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 16, 1917.) 
Huang tou. A small to medium-sized, yellow soy bean. Used like 
the preceding numbers." 

45274. "(No. 2406a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. May 24. 1917.) 
Huang tou. A medium-sized, yellow soy bean with a dark hilum. 
Said to be a medium late ripener." 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 21 

45263 to 45320— Continued. 

45275. "(No. 2407a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Huang tmi, A large yeHow soy bean." 

45276. "(No. 2408a. Changsba, Hunan Provln^re. May 16, 1917.) 
Huang ton. A medium-sized, yellow soy bean.'' 

45277. "(No. 2409a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, i917.) 
Huang ton. A very small variety of yellow soy bean." 

4527a "(No. 2410a. Wuchang, Hupeh Province. March 9, 1917.) 
Hsiao huang tou (small yellow bean). A very small variety of 
yellow soy bean." 

45279. "(No. 2411a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Huang iou, A small, greenish yellow soy bean." 

45280. "(No. 2412a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Huang tou. A small, greenish yellow variety of soy bean, used 
almost entirely in bean-curd production." 

45281. " ( No. 2413a. Shuichaipang. Hupeh Province. April 2, 1917. ) 
Hsiao huang tou (small yellow bean). An exceedingly small va- 
riety of yellowish soy bean, used in making bean curd." 

45282. "(No. 2414a. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 12, 1917.) 
Tien chHng tou (field green bean). A medium-large, pale-green 
variety of soy bean; rare. Eaten as a sweetmeat when roasted 
with sugar; it is then a very tasteful, wholesome, and nourishing 
product" 

45288. "(No. 2415a. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 16, 1917.) 
ChHng tou (green bean). A dull pale-green variety of soy bean.*' 

45284. "(No. 24iea. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 16, 1917.) 
Ch'ing tou. A small, green soy bean, often used as an appetizer 
with meals, when slightly sprouted, scalded, and salted. Also 
eaten as a fresh vegetable when having firm sprouts 3 inches long." 

45285. "(No. 2417a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
ChHng pi tou (green skin bean). A dark-green soy bean of me- 
dium size, used like the preceding number. The beans are also 
eaten fried in sweet oil with salt sprinkled over them, as an appe- 
tizer before and with meals." . 

45286. "(No. 2418a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 7; 1917.) 
Ch*ing tou, A medium-sized, dull-green variety of soy bean, used 
in the same way as the preceding number." 

45287. "(No. 2419a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Ch^ing p'i tou, A medium-sized variety of green soy bean, often, 
speckled with black. Eaten like No. 2416a [S. P. I. No. 45284]." 

4528a "(No. 2420a. Changsha. Hunan Province. May 16, 1917.) 
A rare variety of soy bean, of pale-green color, with brown 
flashes." 

45288. "(No. 2421a. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 12. 1917.) 
Ch'a hua tou (tea-fiower bean). A peculiar variety of soy bean, 
of dull brown color, said to ripen very late. Locally much eaten 
when roasted, with salt sprinkled over, like salted peanuts. Very 
nourishing and appetizing. Well worth introducing to the Ameri- 
can public as a new, wholesome, and nourishing sweetmeat." 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45263 to 45320— Continued. 

45290. "(No. 2422a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1937.) 
Hei tou (black bean). A medium-large, black soy bean, used wbeu 
boiled, .as a food for hard-working field animals and for oil pro- 
duction ; it is also eaten by the poor." 

45201. "(No. 2423a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 7, 1917.) 
Uei tou. A medium-sized, black soy bean, used like the preceiling 
number." 

45292. "(No. 2424a. Wuchang, Hupeh Province. March 9, 1917.) 
Hei tou. A medium-sized variety of black soy bean ; said to be an 
early rlimier. Used like No. 2422a [S. P. I. No. 452901. 

4529a. "(No. 2425a. Wuchang, Hui)eh Province. March 9, 1917.) 
Hsiao hei tou (small black benin). A small, flat, black soy bean, 
used when boiled, salted, and fermented as the main ingredient in 
a sauce ; also fe<l, when boiled, to water buffaloes." 

45294. "(No. 2426a. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 16, 1917J 
Hei tou. A small, flat soy bean of shining black color, used like 
the preceding number." 

45295. "(Np. 2427a. Changsha, Hunan Province. May 16, 1917.) 
Hei tou. A small, round variety of soy bean of dull black color: 
used like No. 242.5rt [S. P. I. No. 45293]." 

45296 and 45297. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Fabaceae. Common bean. 

45296. "(No. 2428a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. IVIarch 24, 1917.) 
Hua 88U chi tou (mixed or variegated four seasons bean). Multi- 
colored strains of garden beans, much cultivated as summer vege- 
tables. To be tested in the southern sections of the United States." 

45297. "(No. 2429a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
88U chi tou (four seasons bean). A reddish variety of garden bean, 
used like the preceding number. To be tested like No. 2428a." 

45298 and 45299. Ph.\seolus angularis (Willd.) W. F. Wight 

Fabacese. Adsukl bean. 

45298. "(No. 2430a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 7, 1917.) 
Hung tou (red bean). A large, red, adsuki bean eaten boiled with 
dry rice and in soups •„ also pountled with sugar into a paste and 
used as a filling in certain cakes. Produces bean sprouts of excel- 
lent juicy quality, which can be raised at home in winter." 

45299. "(No. 2431a. Hankow, Hupeh Province, May 30, 1917.) 
Hung lii tou (red-green bean). A rare variety of adsukl bean, 
of red color. Utilized like the preceding number. Said to ripen in 
August." 

45300. Phaseolus aureus Roxb. Fabacete. Mung bean. 

"(No. 2433a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 7, 1917.) Lu tou (green 
bean). Mixed strains of dull and shining green mung beans; utilized like 
No. 2430a [S. P. I. No. 45298]." 

45301. ViGNA SINENSIS (Tomer) Savl. Fabaceae. Cowpea. 
"(No. 2434a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 7, 3J917.) Pai chiang 

tou (white precious bean). A black-eyed, white cowpea eaten as a human 
food; boiled with i\vy rice generally, but also much used in stews and 
soups. The young pods are used a great deal as a vegetable; they are 
also dried for winter use. and in some localities are pickled in brine." 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 23 

45263 to 45320— Continued. 

45302. VioNA CYLiNDBiCA (Stickxn.) Skeels. Fabaceee. Catjang. 

"(No. 2435a. Shuichaipang, Hupeh Province. April 2. 1917.) Hung 
Chiang tou (red precious bean). A small, red-brown cowpea grown on 
pebbly river flats. Used as human food." 

45303 and 45304. Pibum sativum L. FabaceflB. Oarden pea. 

45308. "(No. 2436a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Wan tou. A medium-sized, pale yellow variety of pea, grown as a 
winter crop throughout the Yangtze Valley on rice lands which 
have been drained for the winter months. Sown in October and 
harvested in April. The peas are boiled either with the pods, when 
very twider, or after shelling, when old. When dry they are used 
in stews or soups and baked into cakes. In the winter the sproute<l 
peas are eaten after having been scalded. A fresh gelatine is also 
made from them, much eaten during the hot summer months, with 
sauce and pickles, as a * pick-me-up ' between meals. To be tested 
as a winter crop in the southern sections of the Gulf States and in 
California." 

45304. "(No. 2437a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March '7. 1917.) 
Wan tou. A small, pale-yellow variety of pea, srcnvn and used 
like the preceding number." 

45305 to 45307. Vicia faba L. Fabaceffi. Broad bean. 

45305. "(No. 2438a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Ts'a^i tou (silkworm bean). A medium large variety of broad 
bean, much grown as a winter crop on rice lands which have been 
drained for the cool season. The beans are much eaten when 
fresh, like green peas, and they form a very tasteful and nutritious 
dish. After soaking In water over night the dry beans are often 
fried in oil, and salt is sprinkled over them; they are then eaten 
as a delicacy, like salted peanuts. The Chinese name is possibly 
given on account of the silky hairs covering the outside and the 
inside of the pods. To be tested as a winter crop in the southern 
parts of the Atlantic and Gulf States and on the Pacific const ; as 
a summer crop in the intermountain regions and along the northern 
Pacific coast." 

45306. " (No. 2439a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. March 7. 1917.) 
A somewhat smaller variety than the preceding number, otherwise 
the same remarks apply to it." 

45307. "(No. 2440a. Idiang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) 
Hsiao t8*an tou (small silkworm bean). A very small variety 
of broad or horse bean. Grown like the two preceding numbers. 
A meal is made from this bean, which is eaten by the poor in the 

^ form of noodles and dumplings. To be tested like No. 2438a." 

45306 Lentilla lens (L.) W. F. Wight. Fabaceee. Lentil. 
{Lens esculenta Moench.) 

"(No. 2441a. Idiang, Hupeh Province. March 24, 1917.) Ching tou 
(capital bean). A small brown variety of lentil, grown as a winter 
crop on rather poor lands in tlie mountain districts of western Hupeh. 
The seeds are eaten boiled in stews and soups, but are not much ap- 
preciated. To be tested like No. 2438a." 



24 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45263 to 45320— Continued. 

45309. Indigofeba tinctobia L. Fabacese. Indig^o. 

"(No. 2442a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. June 14, 1917.) Euai Ian 
(blue legume). A plant from which a blue dye Is obtained; said to be 
grown on well-drained land. The seed is sown in April, and the twigs 
with leaves are harvested in August.*' 

45310. Bbabsica sp. Brassicacece. Mustard. 

•*(No. 2444a. Ichaug, Hupeh Province. March 26, 1917.) Chieh tsU. A 
mustard said to be cultivated in the mountains of Szechwan, possibly as 
a summer crop, but perhaps also as a winter crop. See notes under No. 
2393a [S. P. I. No. 45263] for suggestions." 

45311. CiTBus sp. Rutacefle. 

"(Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 22, 1917.) PHng Vou kan (flat-head 
mandarin). A peculiar variety of mandarin orange, of dark orange color 
and medium size, with heavy, loose, warty, and corrugated rind. Seg- 
ments closely adhering to each other. Bitter-sweet taste ; of tonic prop- 
erties apparently. Some specimens contain far more seeds than others. 
Said to grow around- Itu, on the Yangtze River, south of Ichang." 

45312. CiTBUB sp. Rutacese. 

"(Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 27, 1917.) P'ao kan (spongy man- 
darin). A large variety of mandarin orange, often over 4 inches in 
diameter; skin of bright orange color, somewhat wrinkled, but not very 
rough. Segments small, easily separatetl ; seeds large and many. Taste 
sour and bitter. The fruits keep a very long time and are used as orna- 
ments in rooms ; the heavy rind is used in flavoring spirits. Said to be 
grown around Peisha, southwest of Ichang, and is considered one of the 
hardiest of all local varieties." 

45313 and 45314. Cftrus grandis (L.) Osbeck. Rutacese. Puxnmela 

(C. (Jecumana Murray.) 

45813. "(Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 27, 1917.) A large pum- 
melo of somewhat conical shape." 

45314. "(Ichang, Hupeh Province. March 27, 1917.) A pummelo of 
medium size; shape flattened, flesh juicy, sweet, and of good flavor; 
contains few seeds." 

45315. GiTBUs sp. Rutacece. 

"(Ichang, Hupeh Province. ^larch 21, 1917.) Shih Vou kan (lion's 
head mandarin) or Xai Vou kan (nipple-head mandarin). A large and 
heavy mandarin orange, of round-oblong shape, often with a neck dose 
to the peduncle. Skin very warty and rough, deep orange in color; it 
separates very easily from the segments, which are also easily separated ; 
seeds large, not many. Taste bitter and sour; used only medicinally h^ 
the Chinese. Said to be cultivated around Yltoo (or Itu) on the Yangt>° 
River. About 40 different varieties of citrus fruits are said to be ii 
cultivation In the region around Ichang; many of these are quite looa 
products, and it seems that extensive hybridization has taken place be- 
tween many species of citrus and crossing between various varieties," 

45316. Oryza sativa L. Poacese. Rice. 

"(No. 2398a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. June 7, 1917.) No mi ku 
(sticky rice grain). A glutinous variety of rice, said to •ripen early. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 25 

45263 to 45320— Continued. 

It is much eateu boiled like dumplings, with sugar sprinkled over; also 
eaten with boiled jujubes. This is a good type of rice for making 
puddings. This sample is, to be tested like Nos. 2396a and 2397a [S. P. I. 
Xos. 45266 and 45267]." 

45817. HoLcus sorghum L. Poaceie. Sorghum. 
(Sorghum vulgare Pers.) 

"(No. 2400a. Yuanan. Hupeh Province. April 3, 1917.) Kao liang 
(tall grains). The heads are used to make brooms. It is grown but 
sparsely, here and there, in western Hupeh. It should be tested m a 
region with warm, moist summers." 

45818. Phaseolub aubeus Roxb. Fabacese. Mung bean. 

"(No. 2432a. Ichang, Hupeh Province. March, 19, 1917.) Mixed 
strains of mung beans, grown mostly in Huiieli Province for bean-sprout 
production. 

" In the future, bean sprouts may be much more widely eaten than 
they now are. In very cold and bleak regions, such as Labrador, north- 
em Canada, northern Siberia, etc., and on sailing vessels a long time 
away from ports, bean sprouts from adsuki, mung, and small soy beans, 
together with seedlings of cress, mustard, and amaranth, are about the 
only fresh vegetables that can be raised. A dark, moi^t and warm place, 
like the inside of a cupboard, box, large jar, tin, etc., kept near a source 
of continuous, gentle heat, is necessary." 

45319 and 45820. Amygdalus pessica L. Amygdala cese. Peach. 

(Prunus persica Stokes.) 

45319. "(No. 2445a. Hankow, Hupeh Province. June and July, 
1917.) Mixed types of Chinese peaches to be tested by specialists." 

45dlK). "(Felcheng, Shantung Province. February 27, 1917.) Stones 
of various varieties for specialists." 

45321 and 45322. 

From Manchester, England. Seeds presented by Mr. I. Henry Watson. 
Received October 11, 1917. 

45321. Lapeyboubia cbuenta (Lindl.) Benth. Iridacese. 

African bulbs somewhat resembling freesias, though lapeyrousias 
will probably never have anything like the popularity enjoyed by freesias 
because of their later season of bloom and lack of fragrance. Lapey- 
rouaia cruenta is probably the most popular kind, growing 6 to 10 inches 
high and blooming in summer and fall. The thin linear leaves, usually 
six, are erect from a basal tuft, 6 inches to a foot in length, and the 
bright carmine flowers with three darker spots at the base of the three 
smaller segments are an inch across. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard 
Cyclopedia of Hortioulture, voh 4, p. 1821, and TMselton-Dyer, Flora 
Capensis, vol, 6, p. 96,) 

45322. LnjUK BUBEixvif Baker. Liliaceffi. Lily. 

This fine Japanese lily ifi nearest to LUium japoniaim (L, krameri), 
from which it differs by its broad speciosumlike leaves and its smaller 
pink flowers with obtuse segments. The bulb is quite similar to that 
of L, japonicum, but more oval in shape; the stem is 1 to 2 feet high, 
smooth, green, spotted and tinged with purple, and the lower part is 



26 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45321 and 45322— Continued. 

bare. The leaves, usually 15 to 20, are 4 to 5 inches long and from 
three-fourths of an inch to an inch wide. The flowers are <3 to 4 
inches long and as wide, fragrant, and^of the same color variations as 
L. japonicum, with yellow or orange anthers. It blooms in June and 
early July. It possesses a better constitution than does L. japonicwn, 
being rather more robust and permanent. (Adapted from Gardeners' 
Chronicle, May 21, 1898, p. 321, and from BaHey, Standard Cyclopedia 
of Horticulture, vol. 4, p. 1869,) , 

45323 to 45325. TRrricuM aestivum L. Poacese. Wheat 

(T. viilgare VIU.) 

From Urumiah, Persia. Presented by Mr. Edward C. M. Richards. Re- 
ceived October 17, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Richards. 

*' Wheats from near the village of Bend, southwest of Urumiah." 

45d2S. " Wheat from irrigated land." 

45324. " • Dame,' or unirrigated wheat." 

45325. " * Dame,' or unirrigated wheat." 

45326. GossYPiuM obtusifolium Roxb. Malvacese. Cotton. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Seeds presented by Dr. L. Trabut Received 
October 22, 1917. 

*'A variety cultivated by the natives of the oases of the Sahara Desert" 
(Trabut.) 

45327. Annona cherimola Mill. Annonaceae. Cherixnoya. 

From Brisbane, Australia. Presented by Mr. L. G. Corrie. Received 
October 6, 1917. 

Seeds sent in for stock purposes. 

45328. Claucena lansium (Lour.) Skeels. Rutacese. Wampi. 

(C. wampi Oliver.) 

From Yeungkong, Canton, Kwangtung Province, China. Presented by 
W. H. Dobson, M. D., The Forman Memorial Hospital. Received Octo- 
ber 29, 1917. 

" Seeds from the largest Wong pi I have ever seen. The Wong f>i is a 
grapelike fruit with large green seeds and evergreen leaves." {Dobson,) 

A low spineless tree with spreading branches, spirally arranged evergreen 
pinnate leaves, and 4 to 5 parted small white flowers in large terminal panicles. 
Fruit ovoid-globose, about 1 inch long; skin glandular, pubescent; seeds green. 
The wampi is a native of South China, where it is commonly grown for its 
fruits. It is cultivated to some extent in Hawaii and California. It can be 
grafted on grapefruit and other species of Citrus, which makes it desirable 
to test it as a stock for common citrus fruits. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard 
Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 2, p. 786.) 

For an illustration of a fruiting branch of the wampi, see Plate I. 



ertory S3, SsBds and Plants Impcnad. 






1 tnill Is B an( favorite wilti tbe Chi 
1 llttlo like that of the goaetbtrry, h 
CO grape fniit and otlipr citnifi spen^^ 



. „ ^ — -, - -^noe, Santa Barbara, I 

P162MFS.) 



An Indian Boy Holding a Cluster of Wild Tropical Grapes (Vitis 
tiliaefolia humb. and bonpl., s. p. i. no. 46361). 

The problem of produciuit Uble gnpe which Tillgrow Uid fruit well Id Ihe TroMoliptoliablr 
one ot plant breeding. Tbeeilateiiceaf thlsatrlctly tRVlcslBpeclesof Vltla, whicB bMnelnslen 
of fralt of rail alie and quaUtr. ihoold enccurege the plant bceeden lo hybilalie It with Uw laiser 
fmllod cultlTBted grape. '!%■ photograph li ol a closter from a vine bund near Vara Ciui. 
Keilco, but the invenbiry descnptlon ii of B lOnn which, acMrdliu to Vllim PiqwDoe, li Terr 
JnloT, Tery >our, and contain! only two seeds. It bean heavily and the tniit« ate of talrly good 



OCTOBER 1 TO DE;CEMBER 31, 1D17. 27 

46329. X Castanea neglecta Dode. Fagacese. 

Hybrid chestnut. 

From Madison County, Va. Presented by Mr. Daniel Grinnan, Uiohmond. 
Received October 29, 1917. 
*• One of these hybrids {Castanea pumila X dentaia) was discovered some 40 
years ago in Madison County, Va., on the Rapidan River. It was preserved and 
now stands in a pasture. The tree is quite large and vigorous, about 40 or 50 
feet high, and nearly 2 feet in diameter near the ground. It bears a large crop 
of nuts like the chinquapin, but somewhat larger." (Grinnan.) 

45330 to 45342. Castanea spp. 

From Bell, Md. Seeds presented by Dr. W. Van Fleet. Received October 
29, 1917. Quoted notes by Dr. Van Fleet, unless otherwise indicated. 
45330 to 45337. Castanea ckenata Sieb. and Zucc. Fragaceae. Chestnut. 

45330. No. 1. "Cross within species. Third generation of variety 
selection. From Arlington Farm, Va." 

45331. No. 12. " Cross within species. Third generation of variety 
selection. From Arlington Farm, Va. Same as S. P. I. No. 45330, 
but from a different tree." 

45332. No. 1-a. " Fourth generation. Mixed lots of seed too small 
to be separated. Grown at Bell, Md." 

45333. No. 1h1. " Mixed stock from Arlington Farm, Va. Variable 
in size." 

45334. Bell No. 1. " Fourth generation by straight selection. Started 
by a variety cross between two early prolific types of Castanea 
crenata, A very large nut, with good cooking qualities, but poor 
eating qualities when raw. The tree has ^ good habit ; the trunk 
Is clean and bright, with thin handsome branches and very narrow 
leaves." 

45335. Bell No. 2. '* Fourth generation by selection. Tree about 7 
feet high, with clean limbs. It is a prolific bearer. The fruit is 
very large and is good for cooking, but not for eating when raw. 
It is more bitter than S. P. I. No. 45334." 

45336. Bell No. 3. "Fourth generation. Much like S. P. L No. 
45335." 

45337. Bell No. 4. "Fourth generation by selection. The trees 
have very much the same habit as S. P. I. Nos. 45334 to 45336, 
and the nuts are about the same size — ^very large. The nuts have 
good eating qualities and are better than those of the numbers 
referred to above." 

45338. Castanea mollissima Blume. Fagaceie. Chestnut. 

This is the common chestnut of China. It is distributed from tlie 
neighborhood of Peking in the northeast to the extreme limits of 
Szechwan and Yunnan in the west and southwest. Near villages and 
towns, where the woody vegetation is continually cut down to furnish 
fuel, this chestnut is met with as a bush or a low scrub; but in the 
thinly populated areas it is a tree from 15 to 20 meters tall, witli a trunk 
from 1.5 to 2 meters in girth. The nuts are a valued article of food. The 
Chinese name for this chestnut is Pan-li. (Adapted from Sargent, 
Plantae Wilsonianae, vol. 3, p. 19^.) 



28 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45330 to 4534Ji-Continued. 

45339 to 45342. Gastanea pumila X ckenata. Fagaceie. 

Hybrid chestnut. 

45338. No. 1-b. ** Mixed lot of seed for stocks. Grown at Bell, Md." 

45340. Bell No. 5. "A very attractive nut of fair quality, which 
looks as though it would be a good commercial nut" 

45341. Bell No. 8. " Second generation. A very prolific tree, yield- 
ing from 3 to 4 pound.s of nuts this season. The tree is about 7 
feet high. The nuts are of very good flavor and of good size for 
chinquapin, but small for chestnut." 

45342. Arlington No. 6. " Second generation. Part of a lot of 15 
pounds of seed grown at Arlington Farm, Va. The nuts are 1 inch 
in diameter and are of good quality." 

45343 to 45345. 

From Kingaroy, Queensland. Seeds presented by Mrs. R. A. Pearse through 
Mr. Dudley Harmon, Washington, D. C. Received October 30, 1917. 

" I am sending several packages of seeds, some of which you may already have 
but you may get different results from these, since they are acclimatized to 
Queensland." (Pearse.) 

45343. CucuMis sativus L. Cucurbitaceie. Cucumber. 
" Mammoth.** 

45344. Phaseolus vulgabis L. Fabacete. Common bean. 
" Zehra Runner.** 

45345. ViGNA SESQUiPEDALis (L.) Fruwirth. Fabacese. Yard Long: bean. 

" Snake hean.**.^ 

45346. Carica papaya L. Papayaceae. Papaya. 

From Honolulu. Hawaii. Presented by the Hawaii Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. Received October 29, 1917. 

Selected seeds sent in for breeding work, 

45347. CoRYLus colurxa L. Betulacese. Hazelnut. 

From Rochester, N. Y. Presented by Mr. John Dunbar, Superintendent of 
Parks, through Mr. C. A. Reed, of the Bureau of Plant Industry. Re- 
ceived October 30, 1917. 

" The plants from which these nuts were obtained came from L. Sp&th, Berlin, 
Germany, 25 years ago. They began to bear fruit about 6 years ago. The 
trees are now about 25 feet tall. It took these nuts 2 years to germinate.** 
(Dunbar.) 

The tree is well worth growing for Its stately form, so remarkable for a hazel, 
and for its curiously enveloped nuts. Native of southeastern Europe and Asia 
Minor; Introduced to England about the middle of the seventeenth century. 
(Adapted from Bean, Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles, vol, i, p. 

m) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DBCEMBEE 31, I9i1. 29 

45348. HoLcus sorghum L. Poacese. Sorghum. 

{Sorghum vulgare Pers.) 

From JohanDesburg, Union of South Africa." Presented by the Agricultural 
Supply Association, Ltd., through Mr. J. Burtt Davy, botanist. Received 
November 1, 1917. 

" Kafir corn grown by the natives in the Vereeniging district of the Trans- 
vaal, and claimed by them to be earlier in maturing than any other sorts grown 
is the neighborhood. This strain may prove of immense value in areas having 
a short growing season. The rainfall at Vereeniging averages about 27 inches 
and comes almost entirely in the summer." {Davy.) ^ 

45349 to 45357. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Jopenoe, Agricultural Explorer 
for the Department of Agriculture. Received November 6, 1917. Quoted 
notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

45349. Chamaedobea sp. Phcenicacese. Facayito. 

'* (Xo. 174a. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Seeds of the pacayito, of which plants have been sent in under 
No. 174 [S. P. I. No. 44994]. These seeds are from the garden of DoCia 
Ines Dieseldorff. in Coban, and are from the taller, more slender, and 
more graceful of the two probable species included under No. 174 [S. P. I. 
No. 44994]." 

45350. Chayota edulis Jacq. Cucurbltateae. Chayote. 
{Sechiurrk edule Swartz.) 

" (No. 181a. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Seeds of a rather small variety but little larger than a hen's 
egg. It is a waxy white in color, oval or subpyriform in shape, spineless, 
and considered by the Guatemalans a very choice vegetable. 

"This variety of gUisquil or chayote from San Cristobal Vera Paz is 
known as perulero, or as chima in the Kekchi dialect, which is that 
spoken in the Alta Vera Paz region." 

See notes under S. P. I. Nos. 43393 to 43401 for further data in re- 
gard to the various forms of chayotes found in Guatemala. 

45351. I NO A sp. Mimosace®. 

•* (No. 183a. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Cojiniquil. Seeds of an indigenous si)eoies of Inga common 
along watercourses in Alta Vera Paz and also planted for shade in 
coffee plantations. The tree is medium sized, reaching about 40 feet in 
height, with a broad, open crown and scant foliage. The leaves are 
large, compound, with three to four pairs of leaflets. The fruits, which 
are produced in abundance during September and October, are slender 
pods about 6 inches in length. They contain 6 to 10 irregularly oblong, 
dark-green seeds, each surrounded by white, jellylike pulp of sweet, 
aromatic flavor, strikingly suggestive of the lychee {Litchi chinensis). 
While the quantity of pulp is not great, the flavor is really excellent, 
and the fruit seems to be popular among the inhabitants of the region. 

"Though it is not anticipated that this fruit will become of com- 
mercial importance in the United States, the species is well worthy of 
trial by plant fanciers in Florida for the interest which It possesses." 



30 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45349 to 45357— Continued. 

45352. JuGLANS MOLLIS Engelm. Juglandaceffi. Walnut- 
*'(Xo. 180a. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15. 

1917.) Seeds of the wild walnut of the Vera Paz region. It is not a 
common tree, but it is seen occasionally on mountain sides and along 
watercourses at altitudes of 1,500 to 4,500 feet. So far as my own 
observations go, the tree is only moderately large, rarely reaching a 
greater height than 40 to 45 feet. The nuts, which are sometimes^ pro- 
duced very abundantly, are as large as a good specimen of Juglans niffra, 
but have a thicker shell and consequently less kernel. 

" This species is of interest in connection with the attempt now being 
made to obtain good nut-bearing trees for the Tropics. It should be 
planted in such regions as southern Florida and Cuba. Since it appears 
to thrive in Guatemala under a rather wide range of climatic conditions, 
it may succeed in many parts of the Tropics and Subtropies." 

45353. Lobelia fuloens WiUd. Campanulacee. 

"(No. 186a. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Seeds of a handsome herbaceous plant commonly found along 
roadsides and in meadows of the region between Tactic and San Cristobal 
Vera Paz. It resembles the larkspur in habit, sending up a single stalk 
to the height of 2 or 3 feet, and producing toward the summit numerous 
l>right scarlet-crimson flowers. These appear to be tubular at first 
glance, but are split along the upper surface and deeply five lobed at 
the mouth ; three of the lobes extend downward and the remaining two 
upward. As the lower flowers wither and turn brown, new ones are pro- 
duced at the apex of the stalk; the plant thus remains in bloom for a 
long i)erlod. 

" The stalk and leaves are softly pubescent or pilose ; the leaves are 
linear-lanceolate in outline, 4 to 6 Inches long, one-haff to three-quarters 
of an inch broad, entire or finely and irregularly serrate, adnate to the 
stem, with the margins extending down the stem some distance in the 
form of two prominent ridges." 

45354. Pebsea schiedeana Nees. Lauracese. Coy6. 

"(No. 179a. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Seeds of the coy6 from San Cristobal Vera Paz and Tactic, 
both in the Department of Alta Vera Paz. 

"These were taken mainly from fruits of inferior quality and are 
intended to serve for the production of seedling plants on which to bud 
or graft superior varieties of the coy6. 

"Among the hundreds of coy6 trees which are found throughout the 
Vera Paz region, an exceedingly small number produce fruits of excellent 
quality. Up to the present time I have found only two which seem 
worthy of vegetative propagation. The vast majority of trees produce 
small, often malformed fruits, with a large seed and fibrous fiesh of poor 
quality and unattractive color. The best varieties, however, such as that 
found in the property of Padre Rivera, of Tactic, are as large as a good 
avocado of the West Indian race. The seed is no larger in proportion 
than the seed of a good budded avocado, and the flesh is creamy white, 
free from fiber, and of a very rich nutty fiavor. If a variety like this 
can be established in the United States, it seems reasonable to believe 
that it will become popular. The fruit so strongly resembles an avocado 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBEK 31, 1917. 31 

45349 to 45357— Continued. 

in general appearance that it would not be taken by one unfamiliar with 
avocados for a distinct species, but the flavor is so distinct that the 
difference can be recognized at once. 

** In general, the coy6 does not seem to be nearly so productive as the 
avocado. Occasionally trees bear heavily, but most of them do not pro- 
duce good crops. The season of ripening is much shorter thQ,n with the 
avocado; mature fruits will rarely hang on the tree more than six 
weeks, while avocados often remain three or four months. When picked 
and laid away to ripen, the coy6 requires only three or four days to 
soften, while the avocado sometimes takes eight or nine days. Among 
the Indians of the Vera Paz region the coy6 seems to be preferred to 
the avocado." 

45355. PiMENTA sp. Myrtacese. 

"(No. 185a. Finca Chejel. Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) A small tree grown in the gardens of San Cristobal Vera Paz 
for its aromatic seeds, which are known as pinUenta and are much used 
by the natives for seasoning. This is possibly the common allspice, 
Pimenta offlcinaliSf but on the chance that it may be a different species 
a few seeds have been obtained." 

45356. RuBus ruTicAEForjus Polr. Rosacese. 

"(N'o. 186a.) Seeds of a very interesting sijecles of Uubufi, which I 
have seen only in the Vera Paz region. It Is common about Purula, 
Tactic, and San Cristobal, and I have seen it as far east as Sepacuite. 
It occurs at altitudes of approximately 3,000 to 6,000 feet. There is 
another wild Rubus in this region which is more common, but its fruits 
are much more seedy and of acid flavor. 

" This plant sends up strong, rather stiff canes, sometimes 10 or 15 feet 
in length. They are covered abundantly with reddish spines, the young 
branchlets appearing coarsely hairy. The leaves are trifoliolate (dis- 
tinguishable by this means from the other species, whose leaves are 
composed of five leaflets) and velvety in texture. The leaflets are ovate 
acuminate, about 3 inches long, and finely serrate. 

" The flowers, which are rather small, are produced in large terminal 
racemes. The fruits are not as large as in many wild blackberries, being 
scarcely more than half an Inch in length ; but they aVe of delicious flavor, 
and the seeds are so soft that they are scarcely felt in the mouth. In" 
this latter respect the species is a marked contrast to the others seen in 
Guatemala, the seeds of wild blackberries being usually very large 
and hard. 

"The plant bears abundantly, and the sweetness of the fruits makes 
them very desirable for eating in the fresh state. This Rubus can be 
strongly recommended for trial In the southern United States." 

45357. SoBBALiA sp. Orchidacese. 

"(No. 187. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Plants of a handsome terrestrial orchid found on rocky banks in 
the vicinity of Tucuru, Alta Vera Paz. It grows about 3 feet in height, 
and produces at the apex of each stalk a handsome lilac-purple flower, 
2 to 8 inches in diameter. Should be tried in southern Florida." 



82 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45358 and 45359. Castanea alnifolia Nutt. Fagace». 

From Gainesville, Fla. Plants and scions collected by Mr. J. E. Morrow 
at the Agricultural College. Received December 10, 1917. 

A low shrub, up to 2 feet in height, and forming wide patches by means of 
the underground stems. The nut is solitary and very small. (Adapted from 
Small, Flora of the Southeastern States, p. ^^7.) 

To be grown for experimental purposes. 

45358. An erect form. 45359. A prostrate form. 

45360 and 45361. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, Agricultural Explorer 
for the Department of Agriculture. Received November 6, 1917. Quoted 
notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

m 

45360. PoGONOPUS speciosus (Jacq.) Schum. Rublacese. 

"(No. 191. Flnca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Cuttings of <a handsome flowering shrub from the valley of the 
Rio Polochic, near Tucuru, Alta Vera Paz. The brilliant scarlet bracts 
make the plant a striking object among the vegetation along the slopes 
of the valley, suggesting the poinsettia in color. The plant Is bush^' in 
habit, reaching 15 feet in height, the leaves broadly lanceolate, acuminate, 
3 to 5 Inches long, with margins entire. The flowers are tubular, about 
an inch long, produced in corymbs 2 to 4 inches broad. Many of the 
flowers are subtended by ovate, acute bracts, 1 inch to li inches in length, 
and of brilliant crimson-scarlet color. This species should be tested as an 
ornamental shrub in Florida and California." 

45361. ViTis TiUAEFOLiA Humb. and Bonpl. Vitaceee. Grape. 
(V. caribaea DC.) 

"(No. 182a. Finca Chejel, Baja Vera Paz, Guatemala. October 15, 
1917.) Seeds of a wild grape from the vicinity of San Cristobal Vera 
Paz, where it is known simply as uva sUvestre (wild grape). Numerous 
inquiries have failed to bring to light any Indian name for it. 

" This seems to be a different form from that sent in under S. P. I. 
No. 44960; at least, the fruits are much larger and of a different color. 

" The plant makes slender growths, with forked tendrils and cordate 
subserrate leaves 3 to 4i inches long by 3 to 3i inches broad. The 
racemes are 2 to 3 inches long, and compact; the berries are three- 
eighths of an inch in diameter, dull or rather pale purplish maroon in 
color, with abundant, very acid juice and only one or two seeds. The 
fruits seem to be little used in the Vera Paz region as they are too sour 
to eat out of hand, and the Indians are not accustomed to make Jelly or 
other products of similar nature. 

"This grape impresses me as the best which I have seen in the 
Tropics, and its use in connection with the development of a really choice 
grape for tropical regions suggests itself. It bears heavily, and the 
fruits are of fairly good size. They need only to be made sweeter to be 
of value for table use." 

For an illustration showing a cluster of these graiies. see Plate II. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DBCEMBEB 31, 1917. 83 

45362 to 45364. 

From Puerto BertonS Paraguay. Seeds presented by Dr. Moises Bertoni 
Received October 15, 1917. 

40308. CTPHOiTAinwA sp. Solnnftcese. Tree-tomato. 

" Aguard'ihvd. July, 1917. A perennial shrub, up to 50 cm", high, 
wltti large leaves and large, edible, depressed-globular fruits. Found 
on the plains or savannahs in this vicinity, at altitudte of 170 to 270 
meters." ( Bertoni. ) 

45863. SoLANUM CHACOENSE Bitter. SolaBacese. Potato. 

''^Collected July 25, 1917. A tuberous species fotmd in stony and 
sandy places at the edge of woods." (Bertoni.) 

It is related to Solo/num tubero9uni and its varieties, but is distin- 
guished from tliem by having the calyx divided up to one-third of the 
length. The tubers are globose or subglobose, three-fifths of an inch in 
diameter, with thin yellowish skin. (Adapted from Bitter^ In Fedde 
Repertorium, t>ol. 9, p. 115, 1911.) 

45364^ SoLAinjM violaefolium Schott. Solanacese. 

"August, 1917. When fully ripe the fruit is edible and of excellent 
flavor. Found in partly shady places at altitudes of 170 to 230 meters. 
Used as a cover crop between coffee trees, etc." {Bertoni.) 

45365. KuBus glaucus Benth. RosacesD . Andes beny. 

From Manizales, Ooldmbia. Seeds presented by Mr. M. T. Dawe. Received 
October 20, 1917. 

*' The Andes berry is fbund in the highlands of tropical America from south- 
em Mexico to Ecuador and Peru. In character of growth and foliage it is an ex- 
tremely vigorous raspberry, but in fruit it more closely resembles a blackberry, 
since it does not ' pull off ' or come away from the receptacle when ripe. The 
plant grows to 15 feet in height, with slender, half-trailing canes; the berries 
are oblong to heart-shaped, an inch long, dark maroon, soft and Juicy, with 
small soft seeds. In flavor they resemble our loganberry, but they are somewhat 
sweeter and better. The plant should be tested throughout the southern and 
western United States." {Wilsim Popenoe.) 

45366 to 45447. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, Union of South Africa. Se^s presented by 
Mr. I. B. Pole Evans, chief, Division of Botany, Department of Agricul- 
ture. Received October 15, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Bvana. 

45366. HoBDEUM intebmedium coknutum (Schrad.) Harlan. Poacete. 

Barley. 

''No. 18. A rust-resistant barley from Fauresmith, one of the im- 
portant wheat-growing areas in the Orange Free State.'* 

45367. Secale cebealb L. Poacese. * Bye. 

" Rust-resistant rye-wheat from one of the most important wheat-grow- 
ing areas in the Orange Free State.'* 

66587—22 3 



84 SBEDS AND pla:&7Ts imported. 

45366 to 45447— Continued. 

46368 to 45440. TsmGUU aebtivuh L. Poaceee^ Wheat. 

(T. vulgare VIU.) 

Yarteties of rust-reststant wheat which, came chiefly fnaathe most 
important wheat-growing areas in the Orange Free State. 

45d6& *' Na 1. JSarljf BetMrd, from Edenburg, Orange Free State/* 

45868. *'No. & Du Toif's wheat, from Klipfontein, P. O. Austens 
Poort" 

45870. " No. 4. AfuUrtAian wheat'* 

46871. "No. 5. Klem reoi korenr 

46872. " No. 6. Defiance, from Edenburg, Orange Free State." 

46878. •* No. 7. Beard wheat, from * Melkbosch,' Bethulie Bistrict." 

45874. " No. 8. Red Egyptian, known also . as * Stromherg rooi 
koren,'' from Llfton." 

45375. " No. 9. Transvaal ioolhaar, from Tagelberg, Bethulie Dis- 
trict." 

45376. " No. 10. Talawair, from Klein Zuurfontein." 

45377. " No. 11. CUliers wheat, from Hammonla, Orange Free 
State." 

458781. "No. 12. Wit baard koren, from Hammonia, Orange Free 
State," 

45379. " No. 13. Unnamed variety, from Zastron." 

45380. " No. 14. Colony Red wheat, from Fauresmith." 
45881. "No. 15. Ou JHwrdf late» from Klein Zunrfontein." 

45888. "No. 16. Gluya9, early, from Mr. F. Jooste, BtetfontefD, 
Edenburg." 

40888. "No. 17. Rooi kadi koren, from Teurfontein/ Fauresmith." 

45384. " No. 19. Bibies koren, from Fauresmlth." 

45385. " No. 20. Klein koren, from Bethulie District*' 

45386. " No. 21. Wolhuter "wheat." 

45387. " No. 23. Early Beard, from Mr. F. Jooste, Rietfontein, Eden- 
burg." 

45888. " No. 24. Early Beard, from Mr. F. Jooste, Rietfontfeift, Eden- 
burg." 

45888. "No. 25. Defiaaioer 

46890. " No. 26. Unnamed variety, from Koi5fyf onteln." 

45801. " No. 27. Stromherg rooi, from Mr. A. G. t\' . van' dor Merwe, 
Tagelberg, Bethulie District." 

45802. " No. 28. Unnamed variety, from Mr. J. L. Combrink, Spring- 
bokflats, Bethulie District." 

45393. " No. 29. Early Beard, from Mr. A. J. Grlsel, Kleluzuurfon- 
teln." 

45894. " No. 30. Unnamed variety, from Mr. P. Richie.^' 

45395. "No. 31. Early Beard, from Mr. G. J Saalihan, * Schuins- 
hoogte,* Bloemfontein." 

45396. " No. 32. Transvaal rooi tcolhaar, from Mr. P. D. Jacobs, 
' Koksfontein,' Fanresmith." 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 35 

45366 to 45447— Continued. 

45397. " No. 33. Unnamed variety, from Koflfyfontein." 

453GS. " No. 34. Transvaal wolhaar, from Messrs. de VllUers & 

Adams, Belgium Farm, Bethulie District." 
45390. " NV). 35. Transvaal icolhaar, from Glass Bros., Llfton." 

45400. " No. 36. Etirly Beard, from Fauresmlth." 

45401. " No. 37. Unnamed variety, from Mr. T. J. van der Menve, 

m 

Maritzburg.*' 

45402. "No. 38. Early Beard, from Mr. H. J. Joubert, Middelfon- 
teln, Bethulie District." 

45408. "No. 39. Red Egyptian, from Messrs. de Vllliers & Adams, 

Bethulie District." 
45404. " No. 42. Transvaal wolhaar, from Mr. F. J. de Jonge, Zaa 

tron." 

45406. " No. 43. Early Beard, from Mr. F. J. de Jonge, Zastron.*' 

45406. " No. 44. Ou haard, from Fauresmlth." 

45407. " No. 45. Unnamed variety, from Fauresmlth." 

45408. "No. 46. Early Oluyas, from Fauresmlth." 

45409. " No. 47. Unnamed variety, from Fauresmlth." 

45410. "No. 48. Unnamed variety." 

45411. "No. 49. Unnamed variety, from Holland, Posthmus." 

45412. " No. 50. Unnamed variety." 

45413. " No. 52. Unnamed variety." 

45414. " No. 53. Unnamed variety." 

45415. "No. 54. Red Egyptian, from Mr. Ferdinand Wande, Ham- 
monia. Orange Free State." 

45416. "No. 55. Unnamed variety." 

45417. "No. 56. Unnamed variety.' 

45418. " No. 57. Unnamed variety.' 

45419. " No. 58. Unnamed variety." 

45420. " No. 59. Root wolhaar, from Posthmus." 

45421. " No. 60. Ekstein wheat, from Holland, Posthmus." 

45422. " No. 61. Spring wheat, from Holland, Posthmus." 

45423. " No. 62. Bob*s wheat, from Mr. H. Stubbs, Corunna." 

45424. " No. 63. White Austrdlian, from Mr. H. Stubbs, Corunna." 

45425. " No. 64. Unnamed variety." 

45426. "No. 66. Ijzerrark, from Mr. H. J. Joubert, Middelfontein,. 
Bethulie District." 

45427. "No. 67. Delaware, from Mr. H. J. Joubert, Middelfontein,. 
Bethulie District." 

45428. "No. 68. Early Beard, from Mr. H. J. Joubert, Middelfon- 
tein, Bethulie District." 

45429. " No. 69. Primrose wheat, from Burghersdorp." 

45430. " No. 70. Early spring wheat, from Burghersdorp.' 

45431. " No. 71. BosjesveUd wheat, from Burghersdorp.' 

45432. " No. 73. Early Oluyas, from Burghersdorp." 



»» 



»« 






86 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45366 to 45447— Continued. 

45433. " No. 75. Transvaal trolhaar, from Mr. Andries L. Lonibartl, 
Grootfontein, P. O. Dewetsdorp." 

45434. *' No. 76. Transvaal trolhaar^ from Mr. G. van Toiider, 
waterworks, Bloemfontein." 

45435. "No. 77. Wol koren, grown without water; from Mr. J. J. 
Badenhorst, Verliesiian, P. O. Dewetsdorp." 

45436. "No. 78. Oeluks koren, grown without water; from Mr. 
M. L. Badenhorst, Klipfontein, Dewetsdorp." 

45437. " No. 79. Board koren, grown without water ; from Mr. J. J. 
Badenhorst, Yerllespan, P. O. Dewetsdorp." 

45438. "No. 80. Early wheat, from Mr. A. L. Lombard, Grootfon- 
tein, P. O. Dewetsdorp." 

45439. " No. 82. Early rust-proof wheat, from Mr. A. D. J. Taylor, 
*KiUarney,* Harrismith District." 

45440. " No. 83. Malan's, a spring wheat grown in black soil ; front 
Mr. C. J. Pieters, * Nox,' Harrismith District." 

45441 to 45446. TBmcuM durum Desf. Poaceae. Durom wheat. 

" Varieties of rust-res!stant wheats which came chiefly from the most 
important wheat-growing areas in the Orange Free State." 

45441. " No. 2. Blue Beard from Klipfontein, P. O. Austens Poort." 

45442. " No. 40. Unnamed variety, from Mr. D. J. C. van Nlekerk, 
Davidsrust, Jacobsdal." 

45443. " No. 41. Unnamed variety, from Mr. W. J. Lubbe, Ramsdam, 
Honey Nest Kloof." 

45444. "No. 65. Bengal wheat or Ztcaari board, from Mr. P. van 
Aardt, Broekpoort." 

45445. " No. 72. Media wheat, from Burghersdorp." 

45446. " No. 74. Golden Ball wheat, from Mr. W. H. Waster, Vall- 
bank, P. O. I>ewetsdorp." 

45447. Triticum tuboidum L. Poacese. Poulard wheat. 

" No. 81. Lauren's wheat, sown in March, 1915, reaped in January, 1916. 
From Mr. P. J. Moolman, Beulah, Harrismith District. A rust-resistant 
wheat which came from one of the most important wheat-growing areas 
in the Orange Free State.' 



»» 



45448. CuDRANiA TRicuspiDATA (Carr.) Bureau. Moraceas. 

(C. triloba Hance.) 

From Augusta, Ga. Seeds presented by the P. J. Berckmans Ck>mpany. 
Received October 24, 1917. 

" This tree is very easily propagated from suckers. The tree that we have 
In our nursery is about 12 feet high and about 6 feet broad. It would have 
been considerably larger than this but for the fact that some four years ago 
we headed it back to about 31 feet from the ground. This tree had at least 
li bushels of fruit which matured from the middle of August up to November. 
It is most prolific, the fruits on this one tree running up into the thousands." 
(Berckmans,) 

The fruit much resembles in appearance a dense cluster of very large red 
raspberries of the strigosus type, and when fully ripe has much the flavor of 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 37 

an overripe red raspberry. It has possibilities for jelly making. The numer- 
ous seeds are large, but, as considerable variation has been noted in their size, 
selection may ultimately reduce them sufficiently to make the fruit a popular 
one. 

45449 to 45476. 

From Soochow, China. Seeds presented by Prof. H. Gist Gee, of the Soo- 
chow University, through Dr. Yamel Kin. Received October 27, 1917. 
Quoted notes by Prof. Gee. 

45449. Benincasa hispida (Thunb.) Cogn. Cucurbitaceie. Wax gourd. 
(Benincasa cerifera Savi.) 

" Tung kUa (tree melon)." 

45450 and 45451. Citbullus vulgabis Schrad. Cucurbitacese. 

Watermelon, 

45450. ** Haiieh jang hsi kua (snow-flesh watermelon).** 

45451. "Hei pH hsi kua (black-skin watermelon).** 

45452. Coix LACBYMA-joBi MA-YUEN (Rom.) Stapf. Pnace». Ma-yxien. 
" Hui j^r 

45453 and 45454. Cucumis melo L. Cucurbitaceap. Muskmelon. 

45453. " Sheng kua (fresh or raw melon).*' 

45454. "iVftt chiao kua (ox-hom melon).'* 

45455. Fagopybitm vulgabe Hill. Polygonaceap. Buckwheat. 

(F. eBonienium Moenoh.) 

" CWiao maV* 

45456 to 45458. Holcus sobghum L. Poacefe. Sorghum. 

(Sorghum vulgare Pers.) 

45456. *'Tang hain lu chir 45458. " Kao Hang lu chi." 

45457. « Kao Hang,*' 

45459 to 45461. Hobdeum vulgabe coeleste L. Poacete. Barley. 

45459. " Hei liu sJiih Jai mai (black upland seasonal wheat).'* 

45460. ** Pal liu ahih lai mai (white upland seasonal wheat)." 

45461. ** Sang cMn hung lai mai (mulberry-red wheat).'* 

45462 and 45463. Hobdeum vulgabe pallidum Seringe. Poacese. 

Barley. 

45462. "Tsao ta mai (early barley).** 

45463. **Ju ku cKing ta mai (mushroom blue barley)." 

45464 to 45466. Obyza sativa L. Poacete. Bice. 

45464. " Yu nuing pai han tao (awned white upland rice).'* 
45465.. " Wu mang hung han tao (awnless red iipland rice)." 
45466. " Wu mang pai han tao (awnless white iipland rice)." 

45467. Panicum miltaceum L. Poaceie. Proso. 
"Huang chi (yellow millet)." 

45468. PisuK sativum L. Fabacese. Garden pea. 
''Hsiao han (small, cold).** 

45469. Raphanus sativus L. Brassicacese. Badish. 
•' Lo p*u:' 



38 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45449 to 45476— Continued. 

45470. SojA MAX (L.) Piper. P'abacete. Soy bean. 
(Olycine hispida Maxim.) 

" Ya tou (soy beans for sprouts)." 

45471. Spinacia oleracea L. Otienopodiacese. Spinach. 

45472 and 45473. Triticum AKfiTivTrw L. Poaceffi. Wlieat. 

(T. vulgare ViU.) 

45472. '* Ssii fshih Vou u-m mang hsiao mai (four-season head a>vnless 
wheat)." 

45473. *' 88U shih Vou yu mang hsiao mai (four-season head awned 
wheat)." 

45474 to 45476. Vicia faba L. Fabacece. Broad bean. 

45474. " Ta ch'ing ts'an tou (large green broad bean)." 

45475. ** ChHng ts'an tou (green broad bean)." 

45476. *' Hung t8*an tou (red broad bean)." 

45477, Berberis wilsonae X aggregata. Berberidaceae. 

Barberry. 

From Bell, Md. Cuttings presented by Dr. W. Van Fleet. Received Oc- 
tober 29, 1017. 

" Hybrids of Berberis icUsoyme and B, aggregata grown from seeds secured 
by pollination under glass in May, 1914. Both species are late bloomers when 
grown outside. Berberis aggregata, the pollen parent, is an upright grower 
with larger foliage than B, tcilsonae and with very short flower clusters. The 
hybrids, however, are even more spreading in growth than B. tcilsonae, with 
very thick foliage that turns deep purple at the apprt)ach of frost and holds 
on until midwinter. All the hybrids are quite uniform In appearance and are 
very handsome and hardy. Flowers and fruits have not yet appeared on these 
seedlings." (Van Fleet.) 

45478« Areca catechu L. Phoenicaceee. BeteL-nut palm. 

From Porto Rico. Seeds presented by the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Mayaguez, l*orto Rico. Received November 6, 1917. 

This palm is grown very widely In the Tropics. When mature it forms a grace- 
ful tree 40 to 100 feet tall. The fibrous spathes and the covering of the fruits 
are used in packing. The seeds contain a dye and are the source of the betel 
nuts used so nearly universally in the East for chewing with lime and pepper 
leaves. In India alone, where 17 varieties are recognized, the trade in the nuts 
exceeds $30,000,000 yearly. The cultivation of Areca is not difficult, and with a 
little care it can be grown in a greenhouse. The young plants are very deco- 
rative, and when old are probably the most graceful palms hi cultivation. 
(Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture^ voL i, p. 587.) 

45479. Indigofera sp. Fabacese. 

From Costa Rica. Seeds presented by Mr. George T. Carter, of Paraiso, 
Costa Rica, through Mr. Benjamin F. Chase, American consul, San Jose. 
Received November 6, 1917. 

This plant, Pico de pajaro (bird's beak), grows wild in Costa Rica. It is 
commonly found growing beneath the trees in orange groves, where it forms a 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 39 

bush about 3 feet high, resembling our commbn locuert iti its fol'age, hut having 
no spines. The plants are cut away at each clearing of the ground about the 
orange trees, but soon grow again. This plant is said to be a good producer of 
the nitrogen-fixing bacteria; it is said that the roots show more nodules than 
either clover or bean roots. (Adapted from report of J/r. Chase, October 19y 
1917,) 

45480. Ajleurites trisperma Blanco. Euphorbiaceee. 

Soft lumbang. 

From the Philippfne Islands. Seeds presented throiigh Mr. Adn. Hernandez, 
Director of Agriculture, Manila. Received November 20, 1917. 

" Soft lumbang is one of the Philippine names given to Uiis .species to distia- 
gu'sh it from the true lumbang, Aleuritea moluocana. It is a strictly tropical 
species of very limited distribution and is reported to fruit rather irregularly. 
The shell of the seed is much thinner and more easily broken than that of A, 
moluccana, and the oil obtained from the kernel is said to be very similar in 
dryiag properties to that of A. fordd4,the tung-oll tree of China." (R.A, Young,) 

45481. CoLOCASiA esculekta (L.) Schott. Araceee. Taro. 

From Japan. Seeds purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Co., Yokohama. 
Received November 22, 1917. 

**K4nukat8ugi. A Japanese taro of the dasheen type, producing a coniMerable 
number of small cormels, or tubers. It is cona'dered by the Japanese to be one 
of their finest varieties. The cormels are similar in appearance to those of other 
Japanese taros tested in this country; but, though small, they are of better 
quality." (R. A. Young.) 

45482 to 45485. 

From Porto Murtinho, Matto Grosso, Brasil. Seeds presented by Mr. C. F. 
Mead. Received November 5, 1917. 

45482. Abaohib hypogaea L. Fabace«e. Peanut. 

"This peanut, in GuaranI called mandui guazu.is planted by the Indians 
and is customarily eaten, shell and all, after boiling. Plenty of space 
(2 feet square) must be allowed each plant, and the main crop will come 
from branches, which should be covered up from the main plant to the 
end, leaving the tip of each branch uncovered." (Mead.) 

45483. AcBocoMiA totai Mart. Phcenicaceae. Palm. 

"This palm, coco cordillero (mountain coco), was found on Wlls be- 
tween Sapucoy and Caballero, in Paraguay. The plant is small, rarely 
over 1 meter in height, with fruit clustered at the base." (Mead,) 

45484. Attalea guabanitica Barb.-Rodr. Phoenicaceae. Palm. 
" Coco mbocaya^ the base stock for oil, is a very valuable crop even 

as harvested here, and I see no reason why it should not do well in 
your southern sections where citrus fruits thrive." (Mead.) 

A palm, native to tropical South America, with large, pinnate leaves 
and with fruits that hang in large clusters; each nut consists of three 
cells knd contains as many seeds, a circumstance which serves to dis- 
tinguish the genus from all its alliea (Adapted from Lindley, Treas- 
vnf of Boiany, pt i, p, 109.) 



i 



40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED, 

46482 to 45485— Continued. 

45485. Pterooyne nitens Tulasne. Cffisalpinlaceae. 

" fbyrd-r6. In many ways this timber is the most useful found 
hereabouts, especially for hulls of boats, coach work, etc. You have no 
timber at all like it." (Mead.) 

A tall, stout, unarmed tree, abundant in parts of Argentina and BraziL 
The wood is very strong and resistant and is used in the construction 
of carts, excepting the spokes. It is considered an excellent wood in 
Mislones, whence it is exported. It is also highly valued in Salta and is 
U8e<l in coach making. (Adapted from Venturi and lAUo, Goniribucion 
al Conocimiento de los Ar boles de 7a Argentina, p. 57,) 

45486 to 45489. 

From Sao Paulo, Brazil. Seeds presented by Comte Amadeu A. Barbiellini. 
Received November 8, 1917. 

45486. Annona sp. Annonacete. 

Sent in as Araticum p(mh4 (Annona marcgravU), but it does not agree 
with other material of this number already received. It is to be grown 
for identification. 

45487. Annona chebimola Mill. Annonaeeffi. Clieximoya. 
A Brazilian horticultural variety of cherlmoya. 

45488. Stbeftoghaeta shgata Schrad. Poaceie. Grass. 

A very rare South American grass, the morphology of which is not 
well understood. It is to be grown for the studies of the Department 
agrostologists. 

45489. ZoBNiA DiPHYLLA GRACILIS (DC.) Beuth. Fabaceae, 

A tufted annual with wiry stems, lanceolate leaflets dotted with black 
glands, 3 to 12 flowered racemes 1 to 3 inches long, and pods with two 
to six densely prickly joints. It is stacked by the Foulahs for horse 
provender. The variety gracilis is a slender form of this species. Native 
to tropical America and Brazil. (Adapted from Mariius, Flora BrasUien- 
sis, vol. 15, pU 2, p. 8S, and from Lindley, Treasury of Botany, pt. 2, p. 
J352.) 

45490 to 45499. 

From Montevideo, Uruguay. Seeds pre.«;ented by Seiior Rlcardo Salgueiro 
Silveira, for the secretary of the Association of Agriculturists. Received 
November 9, 1917. 

45490. Abachis htpogaka L. Fabaceffi. Peanut. 
** Mani Brasilera." Said to be excellent varieties, acclimated In Uru- 
guay. 

45491. A VENA SATiVA L. Poaceae. Oats. 
" J888.'* Reported as a superior variety. 

45492. HoBDEUM yulgabe pallidum Seringe. Poacese. Barley. 
" 1551," Said to give excellent yields. 

45408. LiNUM usiTATissiMUM L. Linacese. Flax. 

" 1961.'' Said to be a superior form under Uruguayan conditions. 

45494 and 45495. Medicago sativa L. Fabacese. Alfalfa. 

Two lots sent in as Argentine and Peruvian strains, but not distin- 
guished in any way. 

45494. Alfalfa " 1697:' 45495. Alfalffe " 1994^' 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 41 

45490 to 4549&-Continued. 

45406. Phalakis canabiensis L. Poaceae. Canary grass. 

Said to be a heavy-yielding variety. 
45497. R1CINU8 COMMUNIS L. Eiiphorbiacese. Castor-bean. 

Reported to be an excellent variety as grown in Uruguay. 

45408 and 45400. Zea mays L. Poaceie. Com. 

Two lots of com received as common maize aiul Cuarenteno maize, but 
not distinguished in any way. 

45408. Corn " 1898." 45490. Corn " 1645:' 

45500. JuNiPERus CEDRus Webb. Pinaceee. Juniper. 

From Teneriffe, Canary Islands. Seeds presented by Dr. George V. Perez, 
Santa Ursula, through the Forest Service, United States Department of 
Agriculture. Received February 2, 1917. 

"No. 1. From Palma, one of the Canary Island group." (Perez,) 

" It is native to the Canary Islands, where it ascends the mountains to a 
height of 7,000 to 9,000 feet, sometimes attaining a large size. Dr. G. V. Perez, 
of Teneriffe, considers it might be planted with advantage under forest con- 
ditions for its timber." (Irish Gardening, Feb, 17, 1917,) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 41463. 

45501 « Phaseolus acutifolius latifolius G. F. Freeman. Fa- 
baceae. Tepary bean. 

From Lakeside, Calif. Seeds presented by Mr. R. B. Kanady. Received 
November 2, 1917. 

"This bean yields heavily and has been found to be excellent for canning. 
The quality is fine and the bean swells in cooking more than any other that we 
have tried. It should be tested in a bean-growing section, as it may prove a 
valuable addition to the list of varieties already widely used." (Kanady,) 

45502. Drosophyixum lusitanicum (L.) Link. Droseraceae. 

From Edinburgh, Scotland. Seeds presented by the Royal Botanic Garden, 
through Prof. Isaac Bailey Balfour. Received November 12, 1917. 

An interesting insectivorous plant from Europe. This is a subshrubby plant, 
with a simple stem, 2 to 6 inches high, bearing at the top long, linear glandular 
leaves. It is an interesting fact that these leaves are revolute, rather than 
involute, as in the Droseras and other such plants. The bright-yellow flowers, 
about 1^ inches across, are borne on a stalk about a foot high. The glands on 
the leaves are purple, some stalked and some sessile, viscid, and not motile as 
in Drosera. (Adapted from Bailey , Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, 
vol 2, p. 1017.) 

45503. DiospYROs kaki L. f . Diospyracese. Eakl. 

From Felton, Del. Scions collected by Mr. Peter Blsset on the property 
of Mr. J. W. Killen. Received November 14, 1917. 

"This tree has lived through several winters at Felton, Del. This type of 
persimmon, as is well known, is rather susceptible to low temperatures, and a 
tree which. has stood the winter of Delaware should receive the attention of 
growers." (Bisset.) 



42 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46604. Castanospermum australe Cunn. and Fraser. Fabaceap. 

Moreton Bay chestnut. 

From I>omlnica, British West Indies. Seeds presented by the Botanic 
Garden tlirough the curator, Mr. Joseph Jones. Keceived November 16. 
1917. 

The Moreton Bay chestnut is a large ornamental leguminous tree, native to 
Queensland and New South Wales, where it is said to grow abundantly along 
rivers. The large evergreen leaves and the racemes of bright orange-yellow 
flowers make an attractive picture in any subtropical garden. The pod, 8 to 9 
inches long, bears four to five globular seeds larger than Italian chestnuts. 
These seeds are roasted and eaten like chestnuts. (Adapted from Bailey, 
Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 2, p. 688, and Oardener$' Chronide, 
Sd 8€r., voK 38, p. 2U') 

45505 and 45506. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, Agricultural Ex- 
plorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received November 17, 1917. 

45505. Persea Americana Mill. Lauracese. Avocado. 

(P. gratissirna Gaertn. f.) 

" ( No. 195. Avocado No. 32. City of Guatemala, Guatemala. Noveml>er 
6, 1917.) Akbal, This is a variety noteworthy for earliness, and bud 
wood has been Included In the set primarily for this characteristic. It 
Is, however, of very good quality and has no visible defects except a 
somewhat undesirable shape. Judging by its behavior in Guatemala, 
it should be the earliest variety In the collection, but It is not safe to 
depend upon its retaining this characteristic in the United States, since 
slight local variations In soil or climate sometimes affect the time of 
ripening very noticeably and its earliness may not be altogether an 
Inherent characteristic. 

" The parent tree Is growing in the grounds of Eulogio Duarte, near 
Amatitlan. The location is known as Los Rastrojos and Is about 
2 miles from the plaza of Amatitlan, on the road which leads past the 
cemetery toward the hills. The altitude is approximately 4,200 feet. 
The tree is about 40 feet high, spreading but of compact growth, the 
crown being fairly dense. The trunk is about 20 Inches thick at tiie base, 
and it branches 10 feet from the ground. According to the owner, the 
tree is 6 years old, but to judge from Its size It can not be less than 20. 
It seems to be vigorous and In good condition. The bud wood which 
it yields is fairly satisfactory, the growths being well formed though 
not very stout, while the eyes are vigorous and do not drop quickly. 

*'Thls Is a rather warm region; hence, there Is nothing to indicate 
that the variety will be unusually hardy. 

"The crop harvested in the fall of 1917 was a good one. According 
to tlie owner, It was 600 fruits, but it seems probable that It was con- 
siderably more. The bearing habit of the tree gives promise of being 
very satisfactory. The flowering season Is In November and December, 
and the fruit ripens from the following August to November. It is 
fully ripe and In jierfect condition for picking by the middle of October, 
whereas the average variety of the same region Is not mature until Jan- 
uary at the earliest. 

" In two characteristics this variety does not seem to agree with the 
Guatemalan race. It has a thin skin, and the seed coats do not adhere 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 43 

45505 and 4550©— Continued. 

closely to the cotyledons. A few other varieties showing these snme 
characteristics were seen in the same locality, and it is possible that 
they may not be true Guatemalan avocados, though in most respects 
they appear to belong to this race. 

'* In form tlie fruit is long and slender, sometimes slightly curved, 
and sometimes becoming pyriform. It is medium sized, weighing about 
12 ounces. The surface is smooth and deep green in color. The skin 
is thin and surrounds deep-yellow flesh of good quality, without fiber 
or discoloration. The seed is medium sized, and while it never rattles In 
its cavity it does not fit as snugly as in nearly all other Guatemalan 
varieties. 

" A formal description of th's variety is as follows : 
" Form elongated to slender pyriform, sometimes curved ; size medium, 
weight 12 ounces, length 5i to 6i inches, greatest breadth 2i to 3 inches ; 
base narrow, rounded, the short, stout stem (2 to 3 Inches long) in- 
serted obliquely; apex quite smooth, uniformly bright green in color, 
with very numerous minute yellowish dots; skin very thin, less than one- 
sixteenth of an inch, but fina and tough ; flesli rich yellow near the 
seed cavity, changing to light green near the skin, firm, of fine texture, 
free from fiber, and of rich, nutty flavor; quality very good; seed 
medium sized, weighing about lit ounces, conical to slender conical in 
form, the cotyledons smooth, with the seed coats adhering loosely." 
(Popenoe.) 

45506. Malpighta sp. Malpighiacese. 

" (No. 196. City of Guatemala, Guatemala. November 6, 1917.) 
Cuttings of azerola, from Amatitlan (altitude 3,9(X) feet). The name 
azerola, which properly belongs to species of Crataegus, is applied, in 
central Guatemala, -to a large Malpighia the fruits of which are not 
unlike those of the Barbados cherry {Malpighia edulU). I have seen 
the plant only In a few places; it is most abundant at Amatitlan, where 
it is seen in a large proi)ortion of the gardens and dooryards. 

" This si>ec es is much larger than J/, cdulis, often becoming a small 
bushy tree 20 feet 'n height, but more commonly seen as a large shrub, 
spreading hi habit, with a dense crown. When young, the leaves are 
covered with a thick whitish tonientum ; when mature, they are mem- 
branaceous, elliptic-acuminate in form, about 4 inches long, cuneate at 
the base, brght green and glabrous above, heavily pubescent with the 
venat'on prominent below. The flowers are produced in small axillary 
clusters. Individually, they are scarcely an inch broad, with clawed 
crapelike petals of lilac-pink color. The fruits, which ripen mainly dur- 
ing August and September, are the size of a large cherry, but flattened 
and sometimes pointed toward the apex. They are bright red when 
fully ripe, with a tender skin and juicy, whitish flesh of peculiar sub- 
acid flavor. The seeds, three in number, are roughly winged. The 
character of. the growth suggests that this plant may be slightly hardy. 
It has not been seen in the lowlands, but is grown at altitudes of 4,000 
to 5,000 feet where the climate is comparatively cool, but not cold 
enough to experience severe frosts. The plants produce abundantly. 
While not a fruit likely to become of great importance in the United 
States, it possesses sufficient interest and value to merit a trial. The 
regions in which it seems likely to succeed are Florida, southern Texas, 
and California." (Popenoe.) 



44 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45507. Castaxea crenata Sieb. and Zucc. Fagaceae. 

Japanese chestnut* 

From Felton, Del. Seeds purchased from Mr. J. W. Killen. Received 
November 16, 1917. 

"Seeds to be grown as stock on which to graft Chinese chestnuts and also 
Dr. Van Fleet's selected hybrids. The trees from which these nuts were gath- 
ered were interplanted about 20 years ago with American chestnuts, which 
have all been killed by the chestnut bark disease, while the Japanese trees are 
still thriving and bearing excellent crops of nuts. The blight has attacked 
some of the branches of the Japanese trees, but has not proved serious.** 
{Peter Biaaet.) 

45508 and 45509. 

From Paraguay. Seeds presented by Mr. Thomas R. Gwynn, Ck>ncepcion, 
Received November 19, 1917. 

45508. Cbcbopia adenopus Martins. Moracese. 

A tall tree which grows on river banks, both on the mainland and 
on the islands. The large leaves are whitish beneath, rough, and give 
the tree its name of Palo de lija (sharkskin wood). The leaves are con- 
sidered a remedy for coughs. It is native to Misiones, Corrientes, Ghaco, 
Formosa, and northern Argentina. (Adapted from Venturi and LillOr 
Contribucidti al Conoci/miento de loa Arholea de la Argentina^ p. 63.) 

45500. DiocLEA REFLEXA Hook. f. Fabacew. 

A climbing shrub, called in Paraguay Liana de florea nioradaa, with 
beautiful reddish purple flowers. It may be distinguished from the re- 
lated Dioclca violacea, which has straight, erect, violet-colored bracts, 
by its reflexed, reddish bracts. (Adapted from Hooker, Niger Flora, 
p. 306,) 

45510. Cajuputi leucadendra (Stickm.) Rusby. Myrtaceae. 
(Melaleuca levcadendron L.) Cajuput tree. 

From Madagascar. Seeds presented by Mr. E. Jaegl6, director. Agricul- 
tural Station of Ivoloina, through Mr. James 6. Carter, American consul, 
Tamatave. Received March 31, 1917. 

"The wood of this tree shows a most beautiful combination of light and 
darker shades, which may be compared in appearance to ripple marks. It is 
hard, heavy, and close grained, excellent for shipbuilding and for i>osts in 
damp ground ; it is said to be imperishable under ground. The papery bark 
also is worthy of notice for its great durability and for being Impervious to 
water, instances being known where it has been used for dam and drainage 
purposes in conjunction with timber, and it has been found that the bark was 
quite sound although the timber was decayed." {Maiden, Useful Native Plants 
of AuatraUa, p. 569.) 

45511. RiciNus COMMUNIS L. Euphorbiaceae. Castor^bean. 

From Montevideo. Uruguay. Seeds presented by Seilor Ricardo Salgueiro 
Silveira, for the secretary of the Asso<;iation of Agriculturists. Received 
November 22, 1917. 

Received as Ricinus aanguinaUa which is considered a horticultural form of 
R. communia. 



OCTOBER 1 to DECEMBER 31, 1U17. 45 

-45512. CiTKULLus VULGARIS Sclirad. Cucurbitacese. Citron. 

From Bell, Md. Presented by Dr. W. Van Fleet. Received November 
22, 1917. 

"A preserving citron, 6 to 8 inches long and 3 to 4 inches In diameter. Skin 
:green and smooth ; flesh white and solid ; seed in green fruit soft. May prove 
valuable for marmalades and preserves, also for cooking with fish or meat." 
(B. T. OaVoiaiy.) 

45513 to 45522. Saccharum officinarum L. Poacees. 

Sugar cane. 

From Mauritius. Presented by Mr. H. A. Tampany, Director of Agriculture, 
Redult, Mauritius. Received November 20, 1917. 

45513 and 45514. " Var. 31. P. 55. Foliage broad, canes stout and tall, 
inclined to trail, 10 to a stool; intemodes cylindrical, rather long, 
dark pnrpJe with waxy coating, no channel ; eye bud rather large, 
broad, and slightly bulging at base, apex flat and adhering." {Tam- 
pany.) 

A widely grown variety, exceeded only by White Tanna in area under 
cultivation in Mauritius. Of all the land devoted to sugar-cane raising 
12 per cent is occupied by this variety. In Mauritius this variety seems 
to prefer the lowlands, two-thirds of the area devoted to it being below 
600 feet in altitude. The origin of this variety is traced to Mr. G. Per- 
romat, manager of the Clemencia estate, Blacq, who began to grow canes 
from seed in 1891. M. P, 55 is the best of the varieties he succeeded in 
raising. (Adapted from Henri Robert j Sugar-Cane Varieties in Mauri- 
tius.) 

45513. "Cuttings." 45514. "Seeds." 

45515. "Cuttings of M. P. ISl. Foliage narrow; canes tall, inclined to 
trail, of medium size, 10 to 15 to a stool ; internodes zigzag, of medium 
length, dark violet, slightly waxy, the channel slightly marked in some 
cases. ai)parent in others ; eye bud broad, pentagonal, flat, base straight, 
sides perpendicular, apex adhering." {Tampany.) 

A variety of minor importance on the island of Mauritius, occupying 
only a small part of the land devoted to sugar cane. It is a variety 
which prefers the lowlands, most of it being growft below 600 feet 
altitude. This is one of the varieties grown from seed by Mr. G. 
Perromat, manager of the Clemencia estate, Flacq. It ranks second 
in value of all the varieties that he originated. (Adapted from Henri 
Robert, Sugar-Cane Varieties in Mauritius.) 

45516. "Cuttings of M. 1237. Foliage rather broad; canes erect, rather 
tall, of medium size, 10 to 12 to a stool ; internodes straight, of medium 
length; reddish purple, waxy, the channel deeply marked, running 
almost the entire length of the intemode; eye bud of medium size, 
pentagonal, bulging at the center, apex adhering." {Tampany.) 

45517 and 45518. "D. K. 74. Foliage broad; canes medium In size, 
fairly tall, inclined to trail, 11 to a stool; internodes cylindrical, of 
medium size, yellow, sunburns red, no channel; eye bud of medium 
size, triangular, slightly bulging at base, apex not quite adhering." 
{Tampany.) 

A variety of minor Importance on the island of Mauritius. It occu- 
pies 5.48 per cent of the land devoted to sugar-cane raising. It is a 



46 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45513 to 45522— Continued. 

variety which gnrows best on the lowlands, almost all of it being grown 
below 600 feet in altitude. This variety was introduced in 1905 by the 
Forest Department of Mauritius, from Barbadoes. Through an error 
at the time of introduction, this variety has been given the wrong name. 
It has been found that this is the well-known Demerara seedling prop- 
erly known as D.7-}. (Adapted from Henri Robert, Sugar-Cane Varieties 
in Mauritius.) 

46517. "Cuttings." 45518. "Seeds." 

45519 and 45520. ** White Tanna. Foliage broad; canes rather stout, 
erect, medium height, 10 to a stool; intemodes cylindrical, greenish 
red with characteristic cracks, medium size and height, no channel; 
eye bud of medium size, flat, circular, apex not quite adhering." (Tom- 
pany,) 

This is the widest grown of all the sugar-cane varieties on the island 
of Mauritius, occupying 47 per cent of all the land given over to sugar- 
cane raising. It is a variety which is grown equally well on the high- 
lands or lowlands. There are two sources from which this variety 
came: It arose as a sport on several estates of the colony, and has 
since been widely cultivated ; it was also received from the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture of New South Wales in 1895. The present variety 
is probably descended in part from each of the sources mentioned above. 
(Adapted from Henri Robert, Sugar-Cane Varieties in Mauritius,) 

45519. "Cuttings." 45520. "Seeds." 

45521. " Cuttings of 168<'*. Foliage broad ; canes stout, medium height^ 
. inclined to trail, seven to a stool; intemodes cylindrical, purple-black, 

rather short, slightly channeled; eye bud of medium size, slightly 
bulging, base about twice as long as the distance of the apex from the 
base." ( Twmpanp. ) 

45522. "Cuttings of Striped Tanna. Foliage broad; canes very stout 
and fairly tall, very erect, eight to a stool ; intemodes cylindrical, 
rather short, reddish black with light-red Rtrii)es and characteristic 
cracks, no channel; eye bud of medium size, bulging and prominent, 
apex blunt" (I'ampany.) 

Of all the land used for raising sugar cane in Mauritius, 8.76 per 
cent is devoted to the growing of this variety. It stands third in im- 
portance on the island of Mauritius, being exceeded in area planted 
only by the varieties White Tanna and M, P. 55, This variety will grow 
on high or low land, as much being grown about 600 feet as below. 
The Striped Tanna was received from Queensland in 1890. (Adapted 
from Henri Robert, Sugar-Cane Varieties in Mauritius.) 

45523. Priinus mttme Sieb. and Zucc. Amygdalaceac. 

Japanese apricot* 

From Yokohama, Japan. Seeds purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Co. 
Received November 28, 1017. 

I A tree with somewhat the appearance of the common apricot, but with green- 

! ish or gray bark and duller foliage. The leaves are relatively small, long 

pointed, light colored beneath; and the fragrant flowers are sessile or nearly 
I go. Various forms (such as the white, double white, double rose, and weeping) 

! are in cultivation. The double-flowered form is especially valuable in gardens 

for its early and profuse blooming. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 47 

The fruit is about an inch in diameter and is used in Japan as a pickle. 
The fruits are picked just before becoming ripe and soaked in water for 24 
hours; then they are mixed with salt and the leaves of the red-leaved variety 
of Perilla nankinensis and allowed to stand a week or less, depending on the 
temperature. After this, the fruits are spread in the sun to dry and while 
drying are sprinkled with the juice of the Perilla leaves. After three to five 
days ttey are put up in weak brine, in which they will keep indefinitely. The 
pickled fruit Is exceedingly sour; it often forms a part of the ration of the 
Japanese soldiers. For best results the trees should be gi*own in a shady place. 
(Adapted from notes of Frank N. Meyer,) 

45524. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Chenopodiaceae. 

From India. Seeds presented by Mr. H. 6. Carter, director, Botanical 
Survey of India, Calcutta. Received November 28, 1917. 

" Obtained from plants grown near Calcutta." (Carter.) 

Especially developed strains are said to afford a high percentage of an es- 
sential oil, to which tonic and antispasmodic properties are attributed. In 
Europe it has a reputation as a useful remedy in nervous affections, particu- 
larly chorea. (Adapted from The National Dispensatory, p. 1067.) 

45525 to 45534. 

From Hupeh Province, China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agri- 
cultural Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received Novem- 
ber 21, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Meyer. 

45525 and 45526. Lycoris aurea (L'Her.) Herbert. Aniaryllidaceie. 

45525. "(No. 1283. Chlenchingshan, near Kingmen. September 21, 
1917.) Seeds of a bulbous plant flowering in late summer, with 
large ocher-yellow flowers borne on stems often over 2 feet tall. 
The foliage dies down in summer, but comes up again in early 
spring or late winter where the climate la mild. Apparently 
withstands zero temperatures. Collected in pockets of humus 
soil beneath tall trees on a rocky, mountain slope at an altitude 
of more than 2,000 feet above sea level. May possibly be hardy 
at Washington, D. C." 

45526. "Bulbs of No. 1283 [S. P. I. No. 45525]." 

45527 and 45528. Lycoris radiata (L'Her.) Herbert. Amaryllidacese. 

45527. "(No. 1284. Kingmen. September 26, 1917.) Bulbs of a 
plant, with large masses of carmine- red flowers, which flowers 
in late summer and early autumn. The foliage dies down in 
spring, but the leaves sprout up again after flowering has ceased. 
It loves partial shade, does well on dry banks, debris, and beneath 
trees, but seems to withstand less frost than the preceding number. 
This ought to thrive throughout the whole southern United States, 
and possibly In California. Chinese name Lung chiao hnn (drag- 
on's-claw flower.) Obtained from the garden of Rev. J. S. John- 
son, Swedish American Missionary at Kingmen." 

45528. 'VNo. 1285. Kingmen. September 26, 1917.) Var. flave^ 
tens. Bulbs of a dragon lily, with pale-yellow flowers borne on 
«talks considerably taller than those of the preceding number 
[S. P. I. No, 45527], of which it seems to be a variety. This and 
the three preceding numbers [S. P. I. Nos. 45525 to 45527] can 



48 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45525 to 45534— Continued. 

possibly be grown for cut flowers in greenliouses in the northern 
United States, while in the South they might even become weeds, 
as they are -here and there in central China. They also deserve 
to be taken in liand by plant breeders, for they certainly are 
amenable to selection and possibly to hybridization, and they 
seem to suffer from very few natural enemies." 

45529 to 45531. Bhassica pekin«;nsis (Lour.) Oagn. Brassicace«e. 

Fai ts'aL 

45529. "(No. 2449a. Kingmen. September 13, 1917.) Tung pai 
t8*ai (winter white vegetable). A variety of pai ts'ai, said to 
grow into large solid heads when planted in the fall and given 
sufficient space in rich, moist soil. When sown thickly in beds 
in spring or fall and not transplanted, it is pulled up with the 
roots and eaten, chopped up and boiled like spinach. Can also 
be employed in sauerkraut making. To be tested especially in 
the southern sections of the United States." 

45530. "(No. 2450a. Kingmen. September 13, 1917.) Hei pai ts'ai 
(black-white vegetable). A variety of pai ts'ai with very dark 
green, bullate foliage, not making a closed head. Sown in the 
fall and transplanted at distances of half a foot or more in all 
directions. It needs a moist, muck soil to grow to perfection, and 
in mild climates it keeps on growing throughout the whole winter. 
It is eaten in soups, chopped up like si)inach. To be tested mainly 
in the southern United States." 

45631. "(No. 2451a. Kingmen. September 14 and 15, 1917.) A va- 
riety of pai ts'aiy said to resemble No. 2449a [S. P. I. No. 455291 
in most ways ; but it grows taller and larger. It is cultivated in 
the same manner. Chinese name Haiangyang pai ts^ai, apparently 
denoting that this variety originally came from the city of Hsiang- 
yang, 100 miles north of Kingmen." 

45632. Aesculus wilsonh Rehder. ^^sculacese. Horse-chestnut 

" (No. 2452a. Kingmen. September 24, 1917.) So lo shu. The 
interesting and beautiful Chinese horse-chestnut, a tree deserving to be- 
come widely planted in the southern United States. Not as cbarming as 
the European horse-chestnut, but better able to withstand hot mimmers 
and long periods of drought. To be planted in those sections of the 
United States where temperatures do not fall much below zero.'* 

For an illustration showing this horse-chestnut in its native habitat 
« see Plate III. 

45533. Allium sp. Liliacese. Onion. 

" (No. 143b. Anlu. August 28, 1917.) Bulbs of a small onion, piclded 
in vinegar and used as a relish with meals ; said to promote good health 
and to aid the digestion." 

45534. CiTBUS iCHANOENsis Swingle. Rutacese. Ichan^r lemon. 

" (No. 145b. Kingmen. September 26, 1917.) Fruits of a citrus 
species called Hsiang yuan (fragrant, round). It exists in many varie- 
ties and is able to withstand colder temperatures than the tangerine and 
kumquat, but is not as hardy as Poncirua trifoHata (Citrus trifoliata). 
The rind exhales a delightful fragrance, and the Chinese use the frnits 



The Chinese Horse-Chestnut in Its Native Habitat. (Aesculus wilbonii 
RehdER, S. p. I. No. 46632). 

Altlioagh Fnnk N. Meyer, the urkultural exptorei, did not find this tm bo chunnlng la ths 
Europaan honfrchatnut, he predicted thai it would prove better able lowithstsud hot summen 
Uid long period! of droogbt. It hss mtrrDwer leaves which do not appear to be whipped b; Um 
wind 90 (sslly u da those of the European species. Specimens am irowiug near Sokltle uid 
premlM lo be loaieeslul there, but It deserves a Irial In theparks of (he eastern United Statea. 
(Tree SO feet ttlgh, in Dower, pbotograpbed (No, 9e) by E. H^ Wilson, Hslnwenplng, aiecbnn. 



Invsntory 53, Ssedi and Planta Importsd. PLATE IV. 



t 



The Sweet Oranadilla of Guatemala. (Passiflora ligularis Ju8&., 
S. P. I. No. 46614). 

One ol tbe best ol tbe granadlllss. According to Hr. Wilson Popenoc, this plant grovs In parts of 
OUBlemala appBrently too cold tor the avocado. It IsstrllilnelyaiaereDt tram the conunoo spedas 
(P. tduiU), which la grown in CsUIomla anil cullivated citenslvely in Australia, baing ocance- 

Cow iDal«ad of dull purple inccilor, tfitharind so hard that it does not vrlnkle mit prolflOtB the 
t, so that it la (ransportiKl as much aa aliundred mllea over the mountalDs by native eurien. 
It brings ralalivBly hl^ prices on the marlteis. The aroma of the fruit Is dellghltiil.and the ttavor 
isnotseacldasthatofoUierapoclea. It deaerves lobe grown andcrossed with >.cdutiiand with th« 
sour meypop {P. ifi«rfiiiM), which is hardy aslar north as Washlnpon, D.C. (Ftaotccraphtd by 
WIISOD Popenoe, i^n Iy)reniodclCubo, Guatemala, October 19, 1916; PISSZ&FS.) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 49 

45525 to 45534— Continued. 

as room perfumers and carry them about instead of a perfumed hand- 
kerchief. Since they possess an abundant juice of good quality, foreign 
residents use these fruits for making lemonade. If it were not for the 
many very large seeds, this fruit could well be substituted for the 
ordinary lemon ; as it is, it may be grown considerably north of the true 
citrus belt to supply a home product from which to make refreshing 
drinks." 

45535 and 45536. 

From Mexico. Seeds presented by Mrs. Zelia Nuttall, Casa Alvarado, 
Coyacan, Oity of Mexico. Received December 5, 1917. 

45535. Amakanthus paniculatus L. Amaranthaceae. HuauhtlL 

An annual, with entire leaves, bearing the abundant grainlike edible 
seeds in dense panicles. Some plants produce white seeds, and some 
produce black. The white seeds are those chiefly used by the natives. 
Thfs plant is found both in cultivation and growing wild. The seeds 
are ground and cooked in the form of small cakes known as "alegria," 
these cakes being eaten in large quantities by the poorer classes, espe- 
cially during a time of scarcity of corn. This plant was cultivated by 
the Aztecs before the discovery of America. It occupied an important 
place in the fare of the people, and accounts show that every year 18 
granaries, each with a capacity of 9,000 bushels, were filled by Monte- 
zuma. Often the tribute exacted by the Aztecs from the people they 
conquered would take the form of a certain quantity of this grain. It 
was so closely connected with the life of the people that it figured in 
religious observances. Spanish histor:ans, writing in the first half of 
the seventeenth century, give accounts of how the ancient Mexicans 
made figures of their gods out of the flour obtained from the seed. The 
figures were carried In processions, and at the end of the ceremony were 
broken up and sen-ed to the i)eople as a form of communion. (Adapted 
from Saffordy Proceedings International Congress of Americanists, p, 
286, 1917.) 

45536. Ghenopodium nuttalliae Safford. Chenopodlacefle. 

Huauhtzontli. 
" Huauhtzontli combines the properties of a cereal and a vegetable, and 
furnishes a substantial meal. When fresh and the seeds are * in milk,* the 
food is, to me, delicious. I am told that it is almost as good when pre- 
pared from the dried inflorescence," {Mrs, Nuttall.) 

45537 to 45539. 

From Panama, Republic of Panama. Seeds presented by Sefior Ramon 
Arfas Fdraud. Received November 30, 1917. 

45537 and 45538. Cabica papaya L. Papayaceae. Papaya. 

" A fine oblong papaya, with tapering ends, about 12 to 18 Inches long 
and 5 to 6 inches in diameter." (Arias F^raud.) 

45537. Male. 45538. Female. 

45539. CucuBBrrA pepo L. Cucurbltaceie. Squash. 

'* An edible squash, which, when well mashed and mixed with olive oil 
and vinegar, makes a splendid salad." (Arias F4raud.) 

C5587- 22 4 



50 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45540 to 45553. 

From the city of Guatemala, Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Pope- 
noe, Agricultural Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Re- 
ceived November 24, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

45540 to 45546. Chatota edulis Jacq. Oucurbitacese. Chayote. 

(Sechium edule Swartz.) 

45540. "(No. 197a. November 7, 1917.) OiiUquil de Santa Maria. 
Locally considered one of the very best varieties. It Is a short, 
broad fruit, compressed on the sides, .and weighing 12 ounces to a 
pound. The surface Is smooth, free from corrugations, and pale to 
bright green In color. Green-fruited guisquUen are considered by 
the Guatemalans to have more flavor than the white-fruited 
varieties. 

"All smooth, small to medium-sized giiiftquiles are called pern- 
leros; the spiny or rough fruits are termed simply guisquU in most 
instances. Occasionally they have distinguishing names, such as 
Qui^qvU de Santa Maria" 

45541. "(No. 198a. November 7, 1917.) Large white perulero. Prob- 
ably the best of the perulero giiisquUes. A pear-shaped, waxy white 
fruit without prickles and with a surface free from wrinkles or 
corrugations. Wefght about 5 ounces. One of the rarest varieties 
in the market." 

45542. "(No. 199a. November 7, 1917.) QuisquU de Santa Maria. 
A large form similar to No. 197a [S. P. I. No. 45540], but somewhat 
more prickly. It is considered a very good variety. For cultiva- 
tion in the United States, however, varieties without prickles seem 
preferable, as they are more attractive in appearance and easier 
to handle. In Guatemala a large proportion of ff&Uquilea are 
prickly, but the presence of the prickles does not seem to make any 
difference to the natives when purchasing the fruits in the mar- 
ket." 

45543. "(No. 200a. November 7, 1917.) Large pale-green perulero. 
A pear-shaped fruit about 8 ounces in weight, with a smooth 
surface pale green In color. Somewhat larger than the large white 
perulero. No. 198a [S. P. I. No. 45641]. but said to be slightly 
inferior in flavor." 

45544. "(No. 201a. November 7, 1917.) Small white perulero. A 
popular ffuisquilf considered of good quality. It is pear shaped, 2 
to 3 ounces in weight, waxy white in color, with a smooth surface . 
free from spines." 

45545. "(No. 202a. November 7, 1917.) Small pale-green perulero. 
Practically identical' with the small white perulero, /So. 201a [S. 
P. I. No. 45t544], except in the color, which Is pale waxy green." 

45546. "(No. 203a.. November 7, 1917.) Small green perulero. A 
common variety In the markets, and apparently a favorite. Nearly 
round in form, about 2 ounces In weight, with a smooth surface 
deep green in color. Almost a miniature ffiiisquU de Santa Maria 
No. 197a [S. P. I. No. 45540]." 

45547. SoBRALiA MACRANTHA Llndl. OrchldacesB. 

"(No. 204a. November 7, 1917.) A terrestrial orchid found in the 
vicinity of the city of Guatemala, at altitudes of 4,000 to 5,000 feet The 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 51 

45540 to 45553— Continued. 

plants sent under this number are from the barranca near Chinautla, a 
few miles north of the city. 

"The fact that this handsome species grows in a cool climate sug- 
gests that it may be sufficiently hardy for open-air culture in California 
and Florida. Here in Guatemala it is often planted in gardens, where, 
during October, it makes a fine showing with its large flowers. The plant 
sends up several stems 3 to 4 feet in height. At the summit of each, two 
or three flowers are produced, only one opening at a time. In size and 
color the flowers resemble some of the fine cattleyiis; they are 2 to 3 
inches broad, deep lilac ip color, deepening to lilac purple in the throat.** 

45548. An NONA divebsifolia Salford. Annonaceie. llama. 

"(No. 205a. November 8, 1917.) The anona bianco, from Ohiquimula 
(altitude 1,400 feet). 

•* This species is not known in the highlands of Guatemala, nor have I 
seen it elsewhere except in the vicinity of Ghiquimula and Jocotan, both 
in the southeastern part of the republic, close to the border of Honduras. 

" The tree strongly suggests Annona squamosa in appearance, but is 
easily distinguished by the leaflike bracts at the bases of the branchleta 
The fruit is much larger than that of A. squamosa, resembling more 
closely that of A, reticulata. It Is generally heart shaped, up to 5 or 6 
inches in length, with the carpellary areas indicated by incised lines on 
the surface, which is pale glaucous green in color. The skin is nearly 
a quarter of an inch thick, the flesh is said to be tinged rose color when 
ripe, and the seeds are much larger than those of either A, squamosa or 
-4. reticulata. The season of ripening in southeastern Guatemala is Sep- 
tember. 

" While I have not been able to test this fruit thoroughly, it seems 
to be far superior to A. reticulata and to approach the cherimoya in 
quality. If it succeeds at low altitudes in the Tropics, as seems to be 
the case, it may prove to be a valuable species for cultivation in regions 
which are too hot for the cherimoya. It should certainly be given a 
careful trial in such regions as southern Florida, Cuba, and Porto Rico. 
I do not know how productive the tree may be, since I have seen only 
two specimens in fruit, and these were growing under rather unfavorable 
conditions. 

" The seeds forwarded under this number were taken from fruits pur- 
chased in the market of Ohiquimula by Mr. B. B. Williams, of the 
Friends' Mission." 

45549. Ckaniolaria annua L. Martyniacese. 

"(Xo. 206a. November 8, 1917.) Ufta dc gato (cat's-claw). A large 
herbaceous annual, common in central and eastern Guatemala at alti- 
tudes of about 2,(X)0 feet. The seeds forwarded under this number came 
from the valley of the Rio Motagua near La Canoa, on the Guatemala- 
Coban trail. 

" The plant grows about 4 feet high, with large, soft leaves. It pro- 
duces along the stem numerous gloxinialike flowers, white in color, with 
a purplish blotch in the throat." 

45550. ( Undetermined. ) 

"(No. 207a. November 8, 1917.) Seeds of a small, flowering tree from 
the mountains of Baja Vera Paz, between Salama and Purula. I have 



62 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45540 to 45553— Continued. 

seen it cultivated in Antigua and am told that it occurs wild in that 
region as well. 

"The wild trees, which grow on rocky, rather dry slopes, reach 20 
feet in height. In April and May they produce numerous flowers 2 
inches in diameter, white upon first opening, but later becoming bright 
pink. When in full bloom the tree is very decorative in appearance an<l 
worthy of a trial in the warmest sections of the United States.** 

45551. (Undetermined.) 

"(No. 208a. November 8, 1917.) A flowering vine from the summit 
of the Cachil Mountains, north of Salama, Baja Vera Paz; altitude 
5,250 feet. 

" This plant is occasionally seen climbing over shrubs and small trees. 
It does not make very luxuriant growth, but produces clusters of small 
red flowers which are very attractive. The flowers are followed by 
winged seed capsules. For trial in California and Florida." 

45552. Glihicidia meistophylla (Donn. Sm.) Pittier. Fabaceie. 

"(No. 209a. November 8, 1917.) Seeds of a leguminous shrub froni 
the mountains of northern Baja Vera Paz.** 

45553. Persea Americana Mill. Lauracese. Avocado. 
(P. gratisHma Gaertn. f.) 

**Avocado seeds to be grown for stocks." 

45554 to 45557. 

From Buitenzorg. Java. Seeds presented by the dirt»etor of the Botanic 
Gardens. Received November 30, 1917. 

45554. Pavetta zimmebmanniana Valet. Rubiacese. 

A small rublaceous tree or shrub, with opposite, nearly elliptic leaves 
and clusters of small, slender-tubed white flowers. 

" The remarkable researches of Zimmermann and Faber detailed In the 
Jahrbticher fiir Wissenschaftliche Botanik, vol. 51, p. 285. 1912, and 
vol. 54, p. 243, 1914, make this species of unqsual interest, Faber has 
proved that the leaves of this and of several other species of Pavetta, 
Psychotria, and possibly other genera of the Rubiaceffi contain colonies 
of a nonmotile, nitrogen-flxing bacterium which he names Myco-hacterium 
ruMO'Cearurn . The bacteria of this species almost invariably inhabit the 
mlcropyle of the young seed and, when the seed germinates, grow througti 
certain stomata of the very young leaves and into the intracellular spaces 
formed in the leaf tissues around these stomata. Cavities are formed 
through the growth of the epidermal cells, which later close entirely and 
make bacterial nodules wh'ch are deeply embedded in the leaf tissues. A. 
single leaf may have several dozen of these symbiotic bacterial nodules. 
Faber was able, by treating the seeds with hot water and a sublimate 
solution, to kill the inhabiting myco-bacteria and, later, to infect part ot 
the seedlings grown from these seeds with pure cultures of the bacterium. 
The artificially infected seedlings grown in soil free from combined nitro- 
gen grew well and remained healthy for four months, whereas those not 
so infected turned yellowish white and died in three or four weeks. The 
plants from unsterilized seeds produced leaves bearing many more bacterial 
nodules than did those from sterilized seeds which were later artiflcially 
inoculated. In view of the facts that these rublaceous plants with 



OCTOBER 1 TQ DECEMBER 31, 1917. 53 

45554 to 45557— Continued. 

bacterial nodule-bearing leaves occur in many parts of the Tropics and 
that in India, at least, the value of their leaves for manure has long 
been recognized, and considering the value of nitrogen-fixing legumes as 
fertilizers, the suggestion of Faber that we may have in these tropical 
trees and shrubs plants of positive agricultural value for the tropical 
planter is well worthy of consideration. The value of the mulch formed 
by the leaves of leguminous and other plants is keenly appreciated by 
the best cultivators, and it may be possible to find suitable small shrubs 
of Pavetta or other rubiaceous plants wh!ch will be worth while 
growing for their nitrogen-fixing leaf bacteria in the orchards of our semi- 
tropics or wherever else the climate will lierniit of their cultivation." 
(Fairchild.) 

45555. Macbozanonia macrocakpa (Blume) Cogn. Cucurbitaceae. 
(Zanonia macrocarpa Blume.) 

" This is one of the most retiiarkable climbing vines or lianas of Java ; 
remarkable because of the size of the fruits, which are as large as 
medium-sized pumpkins and are borne high in the tops of the forest trees. 
As the fruits ripen they open at the bottom, and through the triangular 
opening the great winged seeds fall out and, like flocks of aeroplanes, sail 
away in a most spectacular manner. No seed that I know of illustrates 
more perfectly the principles of the aeroplane than the seeds of this 
plant; and if for no other purpose than that of instructing the youth 
in our schools with regard to the principles of seed dissemination, this 
interesting plant is worthy of cultivation in our own tropical regions. 
It should be experimented with in Porto Rico and Hawaii ; and it 
might succeed in the hammocks of Florida." (Fairchild,) 

45556. Mangifeba odorata Griflith. Anacardiacese. 

"A large tree from Malacca, Java, and probably other islands in that 
region, where it is known as kuivini. The leaves are about the size of 
those of the common mango ; like the latter, the flower possesses but one 
or, at most, two fertile stamens. The fruit Is described by Griffith as 
oblong, yellow-green with yellow spots, ill-smelling, and filled with 
sticky gum; flesh yellow, fibrous, sweet, not turpentiny; stone com- 
pressed, fibrous. This species of Mangifera is little known in horti- 
culture and seems nowhere to be held in great esteem as a fruit. It is of 
interest in connection with studies of the cultivated mangos." (WUson 
Popcnoe. ) 

45557. Ceiba pentandba (L.) Gaertn. Bombacacese. Kapok. 
{Eriodendron anfractuosum DC.) 

A moderate-sized, quick-growing, upright thornless tree, indigenous 
to tropical Asia and Africa. A striking peculiarity is the manner in 
which the branches stretch out horizontally in whorls at right angles 
to the stem. Around the base of the tree are produced thin buttresses 
or flanges which sometimes extend for 30 feet or more from the base. 
The tree is deciduous in the dry season. January to April, the greenish 
white flowers being produced in clusters shortly after the leaves have 
dropped ; the fruit pods which follow are ripe about three months later. 
The latter contain a quantity of silky cotton (kapok), and when ripe 
burst open and disperse their contents. The pods should therefore be 
collected before they are quite dry and then dried in the sun. Kapok 



54 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45554 to 45557 — Continued. 

is largely used for stuffing pillows and mattresses and for upholstering, 
etc., both in the countries where it is grown and in those to which it is 
exported. The largest supply comes from Java, where the trees are 
grown as a secondary product. The wood is used to some extent in 
interior construction, but it is soft, white, and brittle. The tree is 
readily propagated from seed or cuttings and thrives from sea level up 
to 2,000 feet. (Adaptetl from Macmillan, Handbook of Tropical Garden^ 
ing and Planting, p. 518, and Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulturt, 
vol. 2, p. 70a.) 

45558 and 45559. 

From Berkeley, Calif. Seeds presented by Mr. E. B. Babcock, Division of 
Genetics, Department of Agriculture, University of California. Received 
November 30, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Babcock. 

45558. Aquileoia tracyi X ghbysantha. Ranunculaceee. Columbine; 

"Unguarded seed from Fi hybrids between AquHegia tracyi 9 and 
A. chryaantha $, Cross made in 1915. Parents and Fi plants now in 
plant-breeding garden of the Division of Genetics, Department of Agri- 
culture, University of CaUfomia. This seed may produce extremely 
variable offspring, some of which may be of greater ornamental value 
than either of the parents." 

45559. Delphinium CABDiN ALE X (?). Ranunculaceffi. Lctrkspur. 

" Unguarded seed from an Fi hybrid between DelphiniiMn cardindle (a 
red-flowered species from southern California] and a garden hybrid with 
deep-blue flowers. Cross made in 1915. Fi plants now in plant-breeding 
garden of Division of Genetics, Department of Agriculture, University of 
California. This seed may produce extremely variable offepring, some 
of which may be of greater ornamental value than either of the parents." 

45560 to 45564. Persea Americana Mill. Lauraceae. Avocado. 

{P. graiiaaima Gaertn. f.) 

From Guatemala. Collected by Mr. Wilson Popenoe, Agricultural Ex- 
plorer for the Department of Agriculture. Keceived November 24 to 
December 19, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Popenoe, 

45560. "(No. 212. Avocado No. 26. City of Guatemala. November 13, 
1917.) Manik. Bud wood of a productive and rather early variety 
of excellent quality. It is a medium-sized fruit of pleasing form ami 
clear yellow flesh of unusually rich flavor. 

"The parent tree is growing in the finca La Polvora, in Antigua. 
The altitude is about 5,100 feet. While it is growing among coffee 
bushes and grevilleas, the tree is not crowded and has developed to 
a large size. It stands about 50 feet high, with a rather slender 
trunk and a dense crown, the trunk b^ng 2 feet thick at the base and 
branching about 8 f^et from the ground. The age of the tree is prob- 
ably 30 years or more. It is badly attacked by leaf-gall, but in general 
has the appearance of a strong, vigorous variety, the branchlets being 
well formed, long, round, and stout The bud wood is good, having 
strongly developed eyes well placed for cutting. 

"Antigua does not experience severe frosts ; hence, it is impossible to 
determine in advance of a trial in the United States whether or not 
the variety is any hardier than the average of the Guatemalan race. 



fi 



OCTOBER 1 TO DHCEMBEB 31, 1917. 55 

45560 to 45564r--Contmued. 

"The flowering season is February and March.. The tree blooms 
profusely and in some years sets enormous crops of fruit. In 1917 
a very heavy crop was ripened. In general, the bearing habits of the 
tree give promise of being unusually good, there being a tendency for 
the fruits to develop in clusters. The season of ripening is pr(^erly 
from February to June, but fruits picked early in December develop 
fairly good flavor upon being ripened in the house. The season may be 
termed early to midseason. 

" The fruit is more variable in form tlian that of most other varie- 
ties. The range is from oval to slender pyriform, nearly all the fruits 
being of the latter shape, without, however, a well-defined neck. The 
weight varies from 8 to 12 ounces. The surface is slightly rough and 
green in color. The skin is moderately thick, the flesh rich yellow, quite 
free from all fiber or discoloration, and of very rich and pleasant flavor. 
The seed is a trifle large in some specimens, small in others, being 
medium sized or rather small on the average. It is tight in the seed 
cavity. 

The variety may be formally described as follows : 
Form oval to elliptic-pyriform ; size below medium to medium, 
weight 8i ounces to 12 ounces, length 3| to 4| inches, breadth 2f to 3} 
inches; base rounded to pointed, the stem inserted slightly to one side 
witliout depression ; apex rounded to broadly pointed ; surface sparsely 
pebbled, uniformly so, bright green in color, with comparatively few 
small yellowish dots ; skin not very thick for this race, one-sixteenth of 
an inch near the stem and slightly more toward the apex of the fruit, 
hard and coarsely granular; flesh rich cream yellow in color, free 
from fiber and with no discoloration, firm and unusually dry, of rich 
and pleasant flavor; quality very good; seed ovoid-conical, medium 
sized, weighing 1 ounce more or less, tight in its cavity, with t)oth seed 
coats adhering closely to the smooth cotyledons." 
45561. "(No. 211. City of Guatemala. November 13, 1917.) Kaguah. 
Bud wood of avocado No. 33 from the finca La Polvora, in Antigua. A 
promising variety in appearance, but since ripe fruits were not tested 
it should be held for limited distribution in California and Florida. 

"The parent tree is about 30 feet high, slender, the crown fairly 
dense but not broad. The trunk is 8 inches thick at the ground, branch- 
ing at a height of about 15 feet The crop this season is satisfactory, 
though not to be termed heavy. The growth seems to be vigorous and 
healthy, the branchlets being round and well formed, with the buds 
conveniently placed for cutting and of large size, indicating that the 
variety will probably be easy to propagate. The wood is not unusually 
brittle. 

"The location of the tree is in the flnca La Polvora, at Antigua, 
Guatemala. The altitude is about 5,100 feet. The tree stands among 
coffee bushes, but has room for good development. 

" The fruit, Judging from slightly immature specimens, will be about 
24 ounces in weight, long and slender in form, with a thick neck. The 
surface is rough and is said to be deep green at maturity. The flesh 
shows no flber nor discoloration, and its deep-yellow color indicates 
that it will be of good quality. The seed is medium sized and tight 
in the cavity. The season gives promise of being late." 



56 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45560 to 45564r-Continued. 

45562. "(No. 214. Avocado No. 34. November 20, 1917.) I shim. Cut- 
tings of a tree from the sitio of Ignacio Hernandez, at San Lorenzo del 
Cubo, near Antigua. 

"While most avocados In the Antigua region do not ripen their 
fruits until February or Mardi, this one matures its entire crop by the 
end of November. It can be considered, therefore, a very early variety, 
and as such Is worthy of a trial in California, where early varieties 
of the Guatemalan race are needed. Its only visible defect is its some- 
what large seed. The quality is good, and the fruit is attractive in 
appearance. 

" The parent tree is growing in a small coffee plantation belonging 
to Ignacio Hernandez, situated on the hillside above San Lorenzo del 
Cubo, a village some 3 miles from Antigua. The altitude is about 
5,500 feet. The tree is about 35 feet high, broad and spreading in 
habit, with a fairly dense crown 40 or 45 feet broad, slightly inclined 
to droop. The trunk is divided into two main branches, one about 1 
foot thick at the base, the other 9 Inches. The larger branch divides 
8 feet from the ground into two main limbs. The growth seems to be 
reasonably vigorous and the branchlets are well formed and stout 
The bud wood appears' to be quite satisfactory. 

"This location is not sufficiently high to exp*?rlence cold weather, 
hence the variety must be assumed to be of average hardiness for the 
Guatemalan race until it can be given a trial in the United States: 

" The productiveness of this variety is somewhat in doubt The crop 
harvested in 1917 was not large. The tree bloomed heavily in Decem- 
ber and was setting a good crop when last seen. The season of ripen- 
ing extends from October to the first of December. Probably the 
fruits would remain on the tree later than December if given an op- 
portunity to do so, but as avocados are very scarce at this season of 
the year they are picked as soon as mature. 

" The form of the fruits, i>ear shaped to obovoid, is attractive, as is 
the deep maroon color which they assume upon ripening. They are of 
convenient size, about 12 ounces, and the flesh is yellow and of good 
quality. The seed is larger than in the best late varieties, but not 
unreasonably large. It is tight in the cavity. 

" Following is a formal description of the fruit : 

" Form most commonly pyriform, but sometimes obovate ; size below 
medium to medium, weight 10 to 12^ ounces, length 4 to 5 inches, 
greatest breadth 2i to 3i inches; base narrow to rounded, the 
stem inserted obliquely almost without depression; apex rounded or 
obtusely pointed, somewhat flattened around the stigmatic point; 
surface almost smooth, sometimes pitted, deep dark maroon in color, 
with numerous small light-maroon dots; skin unusually thin for this 
race, slightly less than one-sixteenth of an inch, soft, tender, peeling 
fairly readily when the fruit is ripe, but leaving some purplish colora- 
tion on the flesh; flesh fine grained, buttery, cream yellow in color, 
with slight fiber discoloration in some specimens, but no actual fiber, 
the flavor moderately rich and nutty ; quality good ; seed large, broadly 
conical to nearly spherical in form, weighing 11 to 2i ounces, 
tight in the seed cavity." 

45563. "(No. 215. Avocado No. 35, November 20, 1917. ) Kanan, Prom 
the sitio of Ignacio Gonzales, at San Lorenzo del Cubo, near Antigua. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DEGEMBEK 31, 1917. 57 

455€fO to 45564— Continued. 

An early variety from the Antigua region, of rather large size, desir- 
able form, and excellent quality. Although a round avocado, the seed 
is not large in proportion to the size of the fruit, but on the contrary 
Is rather small. On the whole this seems a very promising variety. 

" The parent tree is growing in a small coffee plantation belonging 
to Ignacio Gonzales, situated on the road to San Lorenzo del Oubo. 
The altitude is approximately 5,d00 feet. The tree Is about 35 feet 
high, with a trunk 30 inches thick at the b^se, dividing 2 feet above 
the ground to form two main iimbs each 1 foot in diameter. These 
give off their first branches about 12 feet from the ground. The bud 
wood is excellent, the branchlets being stout and well formed, with 
vigorous buds conveniently placed. 

** The tree did not produce a heavy crop from the 1916-17 blooms, but 
is said to have borne heavily in past seasons. It flowers in De- 
cember and January and commences to mature its fruits the first of 
the following December. They are not at their best until January. 

''The climate of this location is not sufficiently cold to test the 
hardiness of the variety ; hence, it must be assumed, pending a trial in 
the United States, that it is of about average hardiness for the Guate- 
malan race. 

•' In form the fruit resembles the Trapp, of Florida, being round 
to oblate. It also resembles the Trapp in size and color, but the 
surface is somewhat rough and the skin thick and hard. The flesh 
is cream yellow, free from discoloration, and of a rich and pleasant 
flavor. The seed is small and tight in the cavity. 

" The variety may be formally described as follows : 

" Form nearly spherical, varying to slightly oblate and more rarely 
to broadly obovoid; size above medium to very large, weight 16 to 
20 ounces, length 3i to 4 J inches, greatest breadth Si to 4 inches; 
base rounded, the stem inserted very slightly to one side and almost 
without depreasion ; apex flattened ; surface pebbled, bright green in 
color with a few large yellowish dots; skin moderately thick, nearly 
one-eighth of an inch, coarsely granular,^ woody, and brittle ; flesh 
cream color, greenish close to the skin, free from fiber or discoloration, 
of rich and pleasant flavor; quality very good; seed rather small, 
weighing about 2 ounces, oblate in form, tight in the cavity, with 
both seed coats adhering closely to the smooth cotyledons." 

45564. "(No. 223. Avocado No. 36. December 10, 1917.) Chabil. A 
small, early variety of attractive appearance, desirable form, and 
excellent quality. It is similar to No. 6 [S. P. I. No. 43560] and is 
from the same region. 

"The parent tree is growing In a small coffee plantation belonging 
to Ignacjo Hernandez, situated on the hillside above San Lorenzo del 
Cubo, about 3 miles from Antigua. The altitude is approximately 
5,500 feet. The tree is 45 feet high, the crown round, of good form, 
45 feet broad, formed high above the ground. The trunk is 2 feet 
thick at the base, and the branches are 15 feet above the ground. 
The age of the tree is not known. 

"The altitude of this location Is not sufficient to show whether 
the variety is unusually hardy or not. It may be assumed to be of 
average hardiness for the Guatemalan race until it has been tested in 
the United States. 



58 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45560 to 45564^-Oontinued. 

"The crop ripened at the end of 1917 was a very large one, in- 
dicating that the productiveness of the variety is likely to prove 
satisfactory. The flowering season appears to be December and Janu- 
ary, the fruiting season November to March. 

** The fruit is round, weighs about 9 ounces, and is deep purple when 
fully ripe. The skin is thick and woody. The flesh is yellow. The 
seed is rather small for a round fruit, and is tight in the cavity. 

" Following is a formal description of the variety : 

"Form spherical or nearly so, usually slightly oblique; size below 
medium, weight averaging 9 ounces, length 3} inches, greatest breadth 
31 inches ; base slightly flattened, the stem inserted somewhat obliquely 
without depression; apex obliquely flattened, but not prominently so; 
surface practically smooth, deep dull purple in color when fully ripe, 
with scattering large yellowish dots ; skin thick, sometimes more than 
one-eighth of an inch, very coarsely granular, hard and woody, rather 
unusually so; flesh rich cream yellow in color, with a few fine and 
almost unobjectionable fibers running through it flavor rich and nutty : 
quality good ; seed medium sized, averaging about 1^ ounces in weight, 
oblate in form, tight in the cavity, with both seed coats adhering 
closely to the smooth cotyledons." 

45565 to 45567. 

From Paris, France. Presented by Vilraorln-Andrieux & Co. Received 
November 30, 1917. 
45565. AvENA SATivA L. Poaceie. Oats. 

** Hybride noir irH Miive [very early black hybrid]. This variety 
was obtained about 10 years ago at the experimental farm at Verrleres 
by crossing the Australia and Joanette varieties. It has been carefully 
selected and has proved itself to be a well-fixed variety which is vigorous, 
tillers well, and attains a height of 4 to 5 feet, according to cultural 
conditions. The panicle is well filled and jierfectly continuous, and the 
spikelets contain two and often three beautiful, black, full, faintly awned 
grains. 

*' In our comparative studies this variety has constantly ripened 8 or 
10 days in advance of the earliest, established varieties, giving a greater 
yield. Sown the first of March it heads early In June, and ripens about 
the 20th of July. In brief, it is highly profitable, uniting the best quali- 
ties — extreme earliness, abundant production, and resistance to rust and 
to shattering." (Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co,) 

45566 and 45567. Tbiticum aestivum L. Poaceae. Wheat. 

{T. vulgare Vill.) 

45566. "Aurore. The earliest and most productive of spring wheats. 
May be sow^n up to the 15th or 25th of March. The spike is pale 
reddish, and the grain is large and reddish.*' {Vilnwfin^Andrieujr 
d Co.) 

45567. " Hybnde des AlHes.'' This is a variety of wheat which was 
being planted in France to help relieve the food situation during 
the war. The following is an extract from a letter sent to the 
United States Department of Agriculture by M. Louis de Vilmorin : 
"We have been trying to help the farmers on "this side with our 
new wheat *B1^ des Allies' which is on its way to prove Itself a 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 59 

46666 to 46567— Continued. 

very valuable asset as a spring as well as a fall wheat. It cau 
be sown under our climate until the end of March, and its earli- 
ness and heavy yield reconunend It for war-time cultivation." 

45568. Albizzia welwitschii Oliver. Mimosacese. 

From Loanda, Angola, Africa. Seeds presented by Mr. John Gossweiler, 
Servicos de Agricultura. Received December 3, 1917. 

Tree of 40 to 50, occasionally 80, feet in height, with a spreading truncate 
crown. The flowers are yellowish green or from whitish to pale straw color, 
and the silky puberulous petals and sepals are almost entirely united. The 
tawny puberulous peduncles are 1 to 2 inches in length, and proceed from 
the upper axils, or form short leafless terminal corymbs, sometimes scarcely 
overtopped by the leaves. The wood Is durable, very light, and rather smooth. 
Reported from Upper Guinea, Lower Guinea, and Nile Land. (Adapted from 
Oliver, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol, 2, p. 362y and Hiem, Catalogue of Wel- 
witsclCa African Plants, pt. i, p. S17.) 

45569 to 45571. 

From Manila, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. Adn. Hernandez, 
Director of Agriculture. Received December 4, 1917. 

45569 and 45570. Liliuic philippinensb Baker. Liliacese. 

Bengruet lily. 

** This new white trumpet lily seems destined to become of very great 
value to both private and commercial growers. The short time necessary 
to flower it after potting surprises all who are growing it for the first 
time. We found last year that it was all the introducers claimed for it, 
and from a batch of small bulbs potted September 8 we cut flowers 
December 3 this year. These bulbs were grown in a coldf rame for nearly 
half that period, or they would have flowered earlier. 

" The long, pure-white, sweet-scented flowers arrange beautifully in 
vases. The stems are sufllciently strong, without be}ng too rigid, as 
is the case with other forcing Liliums, and the foliage is so much more 
graceful than that of other lilies that any flower lover would not 
hesitate a moment which variety to select when both were purchasable. 
For floral designs this lily Is superior to any other white variety, and 
we fully expect it will in a few years be as much a market necessity 
as Lilium harrisii and L. longiflorum now are. Six or seven bulbs may 
be grown In a 6-inch pot or pan, and a dozen or more in an 8-lnch pan 
for a good effect." (FlofHsfs Review^ December 13, 1917,) 

45569. "Seeds." 45570. "Bulbs." 

45571. Annona chebimola X squamosa. Annonacese. Atemoya. 

" Bud sticks of No. 12." This cross has produced a hybrid, the fruit 
of which is small and weighs on an average 175 grams, with a length 
of 65 millimeters and a transverse diameter of GO millimeters. The shape 
of the fruit is cordiform, regular, and the carpels end in a more or less 
pointeil protuberance. The surface is green with reddish dots on the 
sun-exposed side and covered by a white bloom. The skin is quite 
thick and tough. The pulp is white, juicy, sweet, faintly aromatic, and 
devoid of the cherimoya flavor, but It is of good quality. ( Adapted from 
Wester, Philippine Agricultural Revietc, third quarter, 1915.) 



60. SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45572. Pennisetum ptjrpureum Schum. Ppacese. Napier gprass. 

From Rhodesia. Seeds presented by Mr. J. Burtt Davy, Johannesburg. 
Union of South Africa. Received December 5, 1917. 

'' The great value of prolific and drought- resistant fodder plants, which are 
f!:enerally very difficult to procure, is well known to stock owners, and this 
species, which is but little known as yet, can be most highly recommended for 
both of these qualities. During the last season, which was very dry and 
most disastrous for stock, this grass grew to a height of nearly 11 feet and 
produced a large quantity of succulent, nutritious, and fattening fodder. This 
is greatly relished by the stock and is, according to analysis, much richer than 
green maize. A reliable official says : ' There is a consensus of opinion that in 
this plant we have found a fodder of great value and one which remains green 
even during such long periods as from six to eight months when other herbage 
is parched up or destroyed.' It grows rapidly to the height of 12 feet or 
more in favorable weather, thrives well in various soils, and resists both frost 
and drought to a remarkable extent. At a height of 7 feet it has produced 
12 tons of green fodder per acre, and a few months later 15 tons, making a 
total yield of 27 tons per acre. It is everlasting when once established, and 
the tufts or stools increase in size after each cutting or when grazed otf. It 
should prove of untold value to farmers in South Africa, who suffer much 
loss through frequent and protracted droughts, and. in the East Indies and 
other countries where light rainfall and semiarid conditions obtain. As a 
prolific and drought-resistant plant it promises to prove one of the verj' best 
brought into cultivation." {B, Harrison.) 

See S. P. I. No. 43241 for previous introduction. 

45573. Aralia chinensis mandshurica (Rupr.) Rehder. Ara- 

liaceae. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Plants presented by the Arnold Arboretum. 
Received December 5, 1917. 

This is a small hardy tree from Japan, resembling Aralia apinosa (Hercules*- 
club), but it is more treelike, has fewer spines, and does not sucker, which 
makes it a much more desirable lawn tree. It does not form many branches, 
but the large blpinnate leaves cast a good shade. The greenish white flowers 
are borne in large panicles. The berries are dark red when ripe, producing a 
very pleasing effect. Like all other aralias, A. mandfthurica grows freely from 
pieces of root. (Adapted from The Florists Exchange, November 6, 19tS,) 

45574. Medicago sativa L. Fabacese. Alfalfa. 

From Novelda, Alicante, Spain. Seeds presented by Mr. Ellas Rizo. Re- 
ceived December 11, 1917. 

45575 to 45578. 

From the city of Guatemala, Guatemala. Seeds collected by Mr. Wilson 
Popenoe, Agricultural Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Re- 
ceived December 15, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Popenoe. 

45575. Crataegus stiptjlosa (H. B. K.) Steud. Malacca ICanzanilla. 

"(No. 216a. November 20, 1917.) A native species of Crataegus, well 
known in the Guatemalan highlands where it occurs both wild and culti- 
vated. Seed previously sent in under No. 82a (S. P. I. No. 4d430). 

** The manzanilla is a large shrub or small, erect, slender tree about 20 
feet tall, sometimes having a thick trunk, a foot or more in diameter at 



OCTOBER 1 TO DBCEMBEE 31, 1917. 61 

45575 to 45578— Continued. 

the base, but never deyeloping to a great height. In spring it produces 
white flowers resembling apple blossoms. In early fall, commencing 
about October, the fruits ripen, and from this month are abundant in all 
the markets until after Christmas. They are much used for decorative 
purposes, after being strung on long threads. They are eaten in several 
ways, principally stewed and in the form of Jelly. For stewing they are 
first boiled with wood ashes, after which the skin is easily removed; 
they are then placed in hot sirup and boiled for a short time. Their 
flavor somewhat suggests that of the apple and is very pleasant. 

"The fruits look like small apples, being nearly spherical, yellow 
with russet dots and a blushed cheek, and having a slender stem. The 
largest ones are If inches in diameter. The ordinary size is about 1 inch. 
The thin skin surrounds a rather dry, yellowish, mealy pulp and three 
large seeds. The plant is easily grown and should succeed in California 
and Florida." 

46576. Annona chekimola Mill. Annonacese. Cherimoya. 

" (No. 217a. November 22, 1917.) . Seeds from exceptionally fine 
cherimoyas, the largest ones weighing more than 4 pounds. These were 
purchased at the market in the city of Guatemala. It seems worth 
while to grow these seeds and bring the trees into fruit, in the hope 
that choice varieties may be obtained. They should be tested in southern 
California." 

45577. BuRSEBA 8p. Balsameacece. Copal. 

*• (No. 218a. November 22, 1917.) One of several species which fur- 
nish the copal gum so extensively used in Guatemala as incense. The 
burning of this incense in religious ceremon'es is a custom which has 
come down from the earliest times and is still practiced, mainly by the 
Indians. The gum is obtained by making incisions in the bark of the 
tree, which is rather small in size and is common in the highlands, both 
wild and cultivated." 

45578. Dahlia popenovii Safford. Asteracese. Dahlia. 

"(219a. November 22, 1917.) Collected near Santa Maria de .Tesus, 
Department of Sacatepequez, at an altitude of about 6,800 feet. 

"This spec'es is common in the region around the city of Guatemala 
and as far north as the Chuacus Mountains. It has been seen as high 
as 7,000 feet and as low as 5,000, but is most common between 6,000 and 
6,500, frequently in open places along the roadsides and ravines. The 
plant grow^s about 4 feet high. It flowers abundantly during September 
and October, the flowers being 2 to 3 inches broad, with 8-ray florets. 
The latter are all infertile, long and slender in form, and orange-brown 
to crimson in color. This species is of interest to those engaged in 
breeding or studying the cultivated dahlias. Mr. W. E. Safford con- 
siders it the probable ancestor of the cultivated cactus dahlias." 

45579. PsiDirM friedrichsthalianum (Berg) Niedenzu. Myr- 
tacese. Costa Bican guava. 

From Matania el . Saff, Egypt. Seeds presented by Mr. Alfred Birclier, 
Middle Egypt Botanic Station. Received December 18, 1917. 

" This is a very sour but very aromatic guava which might be used in addi- 
tion to other fruits. It is medium sized, yellow, with yellow^ flesh. The glossy 



62 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

red-stalked leaves are in two rows on the pendulous twigs. This tree is & 
shy bearer in Egj-pt, probably on account of the heat and the drj- air.'* 
(Bircher.) 

45580. Persea Americana Mill. Lauracese. Avocado. 

(P. gratiSBima Gaertn. f.) 

From the city of Guatenmla, Guatemala. Seeds collected by Mr. Wilson 
Popenoe, Agricultural EJxplorer for the Department of Agriculture. 
Received December 19, 1917. 

Avocado seeds introduced for stock purposes. 

45581. Iris orientalis Mill. Iridaceae. Iris* 

(/. ochroleuca L.) 

From Bellingham, Wash. Bull>s presented by Mr. C. T. Canfleld. Received 
December 20, 1917. 

"A species from high table-lands of Turkestan. I admire it more for foliage 
effect. It delights in stiff clay loam." (Canfleld.) 

One of the largest of the irises. The plants grow in strong clumps ; the leaves 
are 2 to 3 feet long, 1 inch or more broad, and slightly glaucous. The stem is 
3 feet tall, stout, terete, about as long as the leaves, with two to three spicate 
clusters of flowers, the outer segments of which are obovate, 1 inch board, as 
long as the claw, yellow, paler or white toward the margin, and the inner seg- 
ments oblong, 1 inch broad, lemon yellow to whitish. It grows in almost any 
situation. Native to Asia Minor and Syria. (Adapted from Baileu, Standard 
Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 5, p. 1678.) 

Received as Iris gigantea, 

45582 and 45583. 

From Madrid, Spain. Seeds presented by the director of the Botanic 
Garden. Received December 11, 1917. 

45582. Convolvulus bcammonia L. Convolvulaceae. Scammony. 

The plant has a large, tapering, fleshy root, 3 to 4 feet long, 9 to 12 inches 
in circumference, and abounding in a milky juice. It is this Juice, in a 
concentrated form, which constitutes the drug called scammony. In 
its medicinal action scammony is a violent purgative and is therefore 
seldom used except along with other cathartics, by which Its action is 
mitigated and theirs promoted. Native to Syria and the Levant. 
(Adapted from Hogg, Vegetable Kingdom^ p. 5S6.) 

45588. Parietaria officinalis L. Urticaceffi. 

A bushy plant from 12 to 18 inches high, with reddish brittle stems, 
oblong-ovate dull-green leaves, and tufts of small greenish flowers in the 
axils of the upper leaves. It is sometimes used as a potherb. While the 
ashes of the plant are said to contain a quantity of niter, its medicinal 
properties are almost negligible. The proportion of potassium nitrate 
which it contains is really too inconsiderable to enter seriously into 
account; nevertheless, it passes for an emollient and diuretic and as 
such has sometimes been prescribed in diseases in which inflammation is 
to be reduced. (Adapted from Lindl^y, Treasury of Botany, p. 8^6; 
National Standard Dispensatory^ p. J61S; and Heraud, Dictionnaire des 
Plantes Medicinales, p. 458.) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1&17. 63 

45584. LiLiuM sp. Liliaceae. Iilly* 

From Soochow, Cbina. Seeds presented by Prof. N. Gist Gee, Soochow 
University. Received December 12, 1917. 

Introduced for bulb-culture experiments by Department of Agriculture 
officials. 

45585. ViTis viNiFERA L. Vitaceee. Grape* 

Prom Algiers, Algeria. Seeds presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received De- 
cember 18, 1917. 

A hybrid between the Cabernet and Cot varieties of the common Euroi)ean 
grape, pro<luced at the Botanical Station at Algiers. 

45586 and 45587. 

From Kingmen, Hupeh Province, China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, 
Agricultural Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received 
November 16, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Meyer. 

45586. Ptbus caixebyana Decaisne. Malacese. Fear. 

'*(No. 2446a. September 1 to 8, 1917.) About 20 pounds of seeds of 
a cultivated variety of Chinese pear, called Chia Vang li (domestic crab- 
apple pear). This variety exists in several forms, ranging in size from 
that of a cherry to a small-sized hen's egg; in shape from flattened 
globular to pyriform; in color from greenish yellow to russet brown; 
in taste from somewhat astringent sour to mealy sweet, while some 
have a decided Sorbus afterflavor. They are all covered with a multitude 
of small specks and have a deciduous calyx. The trees are very pro- 
ductive, some branches breaking under the load of small fruits which 
occur singly, in pairs* and in bunches of three to six. 

"They are almost all perpetuated by grafting upon the wild Caller- 
yana pear which occurs along edges of rice fields. It is said that seed- 
lings from this domestic Calleryana pear are not as vigorous and not 
as well suited for stock purposes as the real wild type. This, however, 
will have to be confirmed by actual experiment, as will its resistance 
- to blight. 

" Some groves of these pears should be planted for seed-bearing pur- 
poses in localities where no late spring frosts occur. All seedlings 
raised should be Inoculated, to weed out possible nonimmune types." 

45587. Pterocabya stenopti3a DC. Juglandacese. 

"(Xo. 2447a. September 5, 1917.) An ornamental tree, belonging to 
the walnut family,- growing to a large size. The foliage is pinnate and 
of fresh green color. In early spring, before the leaves are out, the 
trees are loaded with long greenish brown, staminate catkins which 
give them a festive appearance; these are followed by racemes of small 
winged fruits which persist on the trees until September. The young 
foliage is covered with small yellow-brown glands and when rubbed 
smells like sour apples. 

"The trees love moist situations, especially near running water and 
In porous soil; however, they also thrive on dry fields, but do not grow 
so fast nor so large as when near water. It is one of the best flowering 
trees in the foreign concessions at Hankow and Shanghai, and is called 
by foreigners the Chinese ash on account of its resemblance to a Frax- 



64 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45586 and 4558?— Continued. 

inus. Chinese name Ma liu ahu (fiber willow tree), often abbreviated 
to liu 8hU. 

" This is a very promising shade tree for streets, parks, and gardens 
in those sections of the United States where the summers are moist and 
warm and the winters but moderately cold. It does well where rice and 
cotton mature fully and where the large-leaved privet ilAgustrum luci- 
dum) and the tea olive (Osmanthua fragrana) remain out of doors the 
year round.' 



»» 



45588. AcnxiDiA chinensis Planch. Dilleniaceee. Tang^-tao. 

From Kuling, Kiangsi, China. Seeds presented by Uev. John Berkin, Re- 
ceived December 13, 1917. 

The yang-tao, as this deciduous climber is known in Szechwan Province 
where it is native, has attracted considerable attention from travelers and mis- 
sionaries in China, because of the high quality of its fruits and the ornamental 
value of the plant. Single plants often grow 30 feet in length, so that the vine 
will cover large areas of trellis. The leaves have a plushlike texture and an 
unusual dark-green color. The young shoots are bright pink and villous pubes- 
cent. The size and regular spacing of the leaves make this climber valuable 
where large areas of foliage are desired. The flowers are buff yellow to white, 
fragrant, and of large size, being from 1 to 1^ inches in diameter. The abun- 
dance of these flowers adds greatly to the beauty of this plant and enhances its 
value as an ornamental. 

Fruits abundantly produced, ovoid to globose, 1 to 2^ inches long, 1 to IJ 
inches across; epicarp membranous, russet brown, more or less clothed with 
villous hairs. Flesh green, of most excellent flavor, to my palate akin to that 
of the gooseberry, but tempered with a flavor peculiarly its own. 

The fruit is excellent when fresh and also makes very flne jam and sauce. 
Full information is lacking in regard to the fruit grown outside of China; 
some fruits receivetl from California, however, bear out the high praise given 
the fruit by travelers. While this plant Is not hardy in regions of severe 
winters, the rapid growth in the spring will make it a valuable ornamental, 
even in those regions where it is killed to the ground each winter. (Adapted 
from FairchUd, Some Aaiatic AotinidiM, Bureau of Plant Industry Circular No. 
110, Miscellaneous Poi^era.) 

45589 to 45591. Livistona spp. Phoenicaceai. Palm. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Seeds presented by the director of the Botanic 
Garden. Received November 30, 1917. 

45589. Livistona subolobosa (Hassk.) Mart. 

This pahn differs from Livistona oHvaefomiis in its longer, more 
graceful rachis and less deeply cut laclniations of the leaves. The 
fruits are solitary or in twos or threes, subglobose, blackish violet. 
(Adapted from Hasskarl, Tijdschrift voor Natuurlijke Oeschiedenis en 
Physiologic, vol, S, p. 111.) 

45500. Livistona altissima Zoll. 

A palia with graceful trunk two-thirds of a foot in diameter and 80 
feet or more tall, with globose fruits about the size of small cherries. 
The natives value the exceedingly hard wood very highly and use it espe- 
cially for rafters, which last for three generations. (Adapted from 
Zollinger, Natuurkundig TijdschHft voor Nederlandsch Indie, vol, H, 
p, 150.) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 65 

45689 to 46691— Continued. 

" An East Indian palm 20 to 90 feet in height,' with a thick, round 
crown, commonly met with throughout Assam, but most plentiful in tbe 
Nowgong District. The leaves are in universal use throughout Assam 
for covering the tops of doolees (palan(]tuln«) and the roofs of boats, also 
for making the peculiar umbrella hats (Jhapees) of the Assamese. For 
all these purposes the leaves are admirably adapted by their lightness^ 
toughness, and durability. The leaves are similarly employed by the 
Lepchas for thatching and umbrellas." (Wattj Dictionary of the 
Economic Products of India, p. 86,) 

45592 and 45593. 

From Kingmen, Hupeh Province, China. Seeds collected by Mr. Frank N. 
Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Re- 
ceived December 19, 1917. Quoted notes by Mr. Meyer. 

45592. Ptrus callebyana Decaisne. Malaceee. Peer. 

" (No. 2453a. October, 1917.) Over 100 pounds of seed of a smell- 
fruited wild pear which has proved to be highly resistant but not totally 
immune to fire-blight in the inoculation experiments of Prof. F. GL 
Reimer, at Talent, Oreg. This pear grows in a variety of habitats, as at 
edges of ponds, In dense thickets, on rocky mountain slopes, in crerice^ 
etc. It is used by the Chinese as a stock for improved pears and 
to make a good union. When left alone it grows into a large tree, 
ing an old age. Where this pear occurs around Kingmen, Pyrus hetulce' 
folia also is found, and since the latter resembles P. caUeryana to a 
striking degree, it is impossible when collecting a large number of 
fruits to keep out the first entirely. A certain percentage of seed of this 
pear therefore is mixed with the true P. calleryana pear. 

*'As P. betulaefolia is highly susceptible to blight, roguing in the 
beds or nursery plantings should be carefully done. 

'* To insure pure seeds for future stock purposes, groves should be 
out here and there away from other species and varieties of pears, so 
to minimize hybridization, and in localities where spring frosts are of 
rare occurrence. 

*' Where Pyrua caUeryana occurs wild, one finds it associated with 
(Agustrum lucidum, L. quihouif Pistacia chinensis, XyVosma racemoswmt 
Celtis sinensis, Vlmus parvifolia, Ziziphus jujuba, Pinus massoniana, 
Vitex negundOy Cudrania tricuspidata, Phyllostachys sp., Ponoirus tri- 
foliata, Zanthoxylum alatum, etc. In. gardens with it one finds cnltl- 
vated Citrus ichangensis, C, grandis, C. nohUis, Osmanthus fra4fran^ 
Meratia praecox, Prunus pseudo-cerasus, Hovenia dulcis, Eriohotrffa 
japonica, Pauloumda tomentosa, and others. 

'* The fruits of Pyrus calleryana when ripe become soft and assume a 
brown color, while those of P. betulaefoUa also become soft but tnni 
quite black. When not soft, however, the fruits of the two species can not 
be separated when once mixed unless there are leaves attached to them. 
Chinese name Teh Vang li (wild crab-apple pear)." 

45593. PisTACiA cHiNENSis Buuge. Anacardiacese. Chinese pistaehe. 

"(No. 2454a. October, 1917.) Over 200 pounds of seeds of the 
Chinese pistaehe, a very promising shade tree for those sections of the 

65587- 22 5 



66 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45592 and 45593— Continued. 

United States where tlie summers are warm and the winters bat moder- 
ately cold. The young leaves are carmine red and the fall foliage gor- 
geously scarlet and yellow. The wood, which is very heavy and not often 
attacked by insects, Is employed in the manufacture of furniture. From 
the seeds an oil is obtained which is used for illuminating purposes. 
The young expanded foliage buds are sparingly eaten boiled, like spinach. 
The staminate trees invariably grow larger and more symmetrical than 
the ones that bear the pistillate flowers. Chines^ name Huang lien shu,*' 

45594 and 45595. 

From Chi Kung Shan, Honan Province, China. Seeds collected by Mr. G. D. 
Schlosser and sent by Mr. Frank N. M^yer, Agricultural Explorer for the 
Department of Agriculture. Received December 19, 1917. 

45594. Pybus callebyana Decaisne. Malacese. Fear. 
For description, see S. P. I. No. 45592. 

45595. Amygdalus pbbsica L. Amygdalacea;. Peach. 
iPrunus perHca Stokea.) 

Seed of wild Chinese peaches introduced for experimental purposes. 

45596 and 45597. Litchi ohinensis Sonner. Sapindaceae. 

{Vephelium liichi Cambess.) Iiychee. 

From Canton, China. Purchased from Mr. C. O. Levine, Agricultural De- 
partment, Canton Christian College. Received December 19, 1917. 

45596. Variety Hak ip (black leaf). 

45597. Variety Kwai mi. 

45598 to 45604. 

From the British West Indies. Seeds presented by Dr. O. L. Fassig, 
Weather Bureau, United States Department of Agriculture. Received 
October 15, 1917. 

45598. Obyza sativa L. Poaceae. Bice. 
From St. Lucia. 

45599. Cabica papaya L. Papayacese. Papaya. 
From St. Lucia. 

45600 and 45601. Gosstpium babbadense L. Malvacese. Cotton. 

45600. Sea Island cotton from the experimental station at King's 
Mount, St Croix, developed by Dr. Longfleld Smith, director, who 
presented this seed to Dr. Fassig. 

45601. Anna*s Hope No, 1, Variety of Sea Island cotton developed 
at the exx)erlmental station at King's Mount, St. Croix, by Dr. 
Smith, who presented this seed to Dr. Fassig. 

45602. Phaseolus vuloasis L. Fabacese. Common bean. 

(Trinidad, British West Indies, July 31, 1917.) Seeds presented to Dr. 
Fassig by Mr. J. B. Rorer. 

**A very nice salad bean which is. commonly grown here and known 
as the * Seheult ' bean. It is a climber and is very prolific." {Rorer,) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 67 

45598 to 4S0O4— Continued. 

4560$ ftxiil 45604. Rheesia latebifloba L. Clusiaoece. 

(TriniOad, British West Indies, July 81, 1917. Seed presented to Dr. 
Fassigby Mr. J. B. Rorer.) 

"The hatstand tree is a name which is said to be given to RJieedia 
lateriflora. It is common in the woods of Trinidad and is noted for its 
regnlar branching character when young. A small tree of 8 or 10 feet 
will .often have as many as 20 or more branches of even size thrown out 
at regular and close intervals, at an angle of 45 degrees from the main 
stem. It is frequently cut, placed in a heavy base, and used as a hat- 
stand; and when shortened into a pyramidal form and nicely trimmed 
and polished, it serves exceedingly well for the purpose." {J, R. Jack- 
^oih The Garden, July 25 y 190S.) 

45605. Polygonum tinctorium Lour. Polygonacese, 

From China. Seeds collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Ex- 
plorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received October 6, 1917. 

"(No. jd443a. Hankow, China. June 14, 1917.) An annual herb, much cul- 
tivated throughout northern and central China for the blue dye it produces, 
which, however, fades easily. It is sown on rich lands toward the end of 
February, and the first cutting is made during June, and a much smaller one 
during August. Farther north the sowing takes place later and but one cutting 
emu. be obtained. To procure the dye material the plants are deposited in 
plastered pits, water is poured over them, and they are allowed to decay for 
several weeks; then the stems are taken out and the water is allowed to 
eraporat^. When at last the slimy mass in the pit has become sufficiently dry, 
quicklime to added and thoroughly mixed, and the material is allowed to dry 
out udjUI it can be well worked. It is then taken out and kept in tubs, barrels, 
and other vessels until needed for dyeing. The freshly dyed cloth possesses 
a most unpleasant odor which can often be detected for a considerable dis- 
tance. Gradually, however, the wind takes away the odor and the cloth can 
then be jo^de into garments. The dye seems to be used almost exclusively for 
the dyeing of coarse cotton cloth. Chinese name of the plant Liao Ian.** 
Ofcyer.) 

45606. Pyrus betulaefolia Bunge. Malaceae. Pear. 

From Jajnaica Plain, Mass. Seeds presented by the Arnold Arboretum. 
Received November 28, 1917. 

A slender, quick-growing, graceful tree, 20 to 30 feet high, with gray-f^ted 
young branches and round-ovate, long-pointed, coarsely toothed, lustrous leaves. 
The white flowers, three-fourths of an inch across, are borne in clusters of 8 
to 10 and are followed by grayish brown, white-dotted fruits the size of peas. 
The Chinese use this species as a stock for the larger fruited pears. (Adapted 
from Bean^ Trees and Shruba Hardy in the British Isles, vol. 2, p. 219,) 

460fn. SMQiAx sp. Smilacace^e. SarsapariUa. 

From Kingston, Jamaica. Roots presented by Mr. W. Harris, Hope Gar- 
dens, Department of Agriculture. Received December 20, 1917. 

This plant is used in Jamaica as a source of the sarsaparilla of commerce. 



68 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45608 and 45609. 

From Oi^ifaegos, Cuba. Seeds presented by Mr. R. M. Gray, Harvard Ex- 
periment Station. Keceived December 18, 1917. 

45606<i Oamosnsia ifAXTUA Welw. Fabacese. 

This vine, which adorns the tops of lofty trees in tropical Africa, 
bears probably the largest and most beautiful flowers of any plant in 
the world.' These deliciously fragrant flowers, sometimes 8 inches in 
length, have petals of pure white margined with gold which becomes 
darker with age ; they are borne In pendulous clusters of nearly a dozen 
individuals. The 3 to 4 seeded pod is 6 to 8 inches long, nearly straight, 
and clothed with ferruginous woolly tomentum. The leaves are digi- 
tately trifoliolate, the leaflets obovate-oblong, 5 to 6 inches long. One 
drawback to the cultivation of this plant is that it has been so extremely 
slow in coming into bloom, blooming only in hothouses of considerable 
size. Regarding the possibilities of this plant in the United States, ^ir. 
George W. Oliver states: "Very likely this plant will flower oftener 
and more profusely in this country than in Europe, particularly England, 
because of our higher summer temperature, which enables the plant to 
grow rapidly and ripen its wood." (Adapted from The Garden Magazine, 
vol 7, p. 229, and Oliver, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol. 2, p. 252,) 

45600. GossTPiuic babbadense L. Malvaceae. Cotton. 

"Native tree cotton, called purple cotton by the natives." (Oray.) 

45610. Ghbnopodium ambrosioides L. Chenopodiaceae. 

From Bahla, Brazil. Seeds procured by Mr. Edward Higgins, American 
consul at Bahia. Received December 20, 1917. 

Known in Brazil as herva de Santa Maria or Mastruz. A viscid glandular, 
rankly smelling perennial herb, native to tropical America, but widely nat- 
uralized and growing abundantly in North America, especially in the eastern 
United States, as a coarse weed of the roadside and waste places. Its me- 
dicinal importance is due to the volatile oil which it contains. A very active 
anthelmintic is obtained when the bruised fruit or the expressed juice of the 
plant is used. It is frequently employed for the expulsion of lumbricoid worms, 
especially in children. (Adapted from The National Standard Dispensatory, 

p. m,) 

45611. Sagcharum offioinarum L. Poace^. Sugar cane. 

From Trinidad, British West Indies. Seeds presented by the St, Clair 
Experiment Station, Department of Agriculture. Received December 21, 
1917. 

** LovUiana 511. One of the sugar-cane seedlings tested in 1908 at the 
Louisiana Sugar Experiment Station at Audubon Park, New Orleans; it is 
particularly noteworthy because of the unusually high sucrose content (16.3 
per cent) for Louisiana conditions. The parent cane was Trinidad 189.** (H. P. 
Agee, Louisiana Bulletin No, 127, May, 1911.) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 69 

45612. Pybus mamorensis Trabut. Malacese. Pear. 

From Rabat, Morocco. Seeds presented by Commandant de Beaucoudrey, 
Inspector of Forests, at the request of Dr. L. Trabut, Algiers, Algeria. 
Received December 22, 1917. 

" Seeds of a Moroccan pear which occurs with the cork oak- in the forest of 
Moroccan Mamora. It Is very resistant to dryness in the sandy noncalcareous 
soils. The vigorous tree will probably form a good stock. The fruit is rather 
large, and the seeds are very large." (Trabut,) 

45613 and 45614. Passiflora spp. Passifloraceae. Granadilla. 

From Caracas, Venezuela. Seeds presented by Mr. H. Pittier. Received 
December ^, 1917. 

45613. Passiflora sp. 

Possibly a hybrid between P<isBi/lora eduUs and P. malifomU9, as the 
seeds do not agree with either, although somewhat resembling each. 

45614. Pabsuxora ligulabib Juss. Sweet granadilla. 

*' Unquestionably one of the best of the granadillas. In Guatemala it 
is common at altitudes of 4,000 to 7,000 feet, but I have never seen It in 
the lowlands; it appears, therefore, that it is adapted to subtropical 
dimates and, Judging from its presence in portions of Guatemala almost 
too cold for the avocado, I feel that it ought to succeed in California. 
The behavior of other species, such as PiMBifiora edtUis^ in that State In- 
dicates that conditions in general are favorable to the paasifloras, and 
the question has generally been one of hardiness. Many species tested in 
' California have proved to be too tender. P. ligularU, with slight protec- 
tion during the first winter or two, certainly ought to thrive in the 
southern half of the State. 

"In Guatemala it is a rampant climber, scrambling over trees and 
buildings and covering them with a canopy of green. It goes to the tops 
of trees 35 or 40 feet in height. Its foliage is bold, the large cordate 
leaves being as much as 6 or 8 inches in length. 

"The ripening season commences in early fall and extends through 
the winter. Large plants bear abundantly, yet I have never seen a vine 
so laden with fruits as some of the plants of Passiflora edulis which 
^ow in California gardens. The fruits are commonly 2} inches in 
length and deep orange-yellow in color. Sometimes a purple-fruited 
variety is seen. The brittle outer shell or pericarp, when broken away at 
one end, exposes the small elliptic seeds individually inclosed in a Juicy, 
white aril. The aroma of the fruit is delightful; it may properly be 
termed perfumed. The flavor is equally pleasant and, unlike many 
other passifloras, is not unduly acid. The fruit is commonly eaten out 
of hand, for which mode of use it seems best adapted. One can consume 
a large number of them without any ill effects. 

**The fruits are often brought into the markets of Guatemala upon 
the backs of Indians from distances of a hundred miles. The pericarp 
is so tough that it is not easily bruised, hence the fruit can be trans- 
ported without difficulty. . It is attractive in appearance and so popular 
in .Guatemala that it realizes higher prices in the markets than most 
other fruits which compete with it. 

"The term granadilla (diminutive of granada, Spanish for pome- 
granate) is applied in tropical America to the fruits of various pass!- 



70 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45613 and 4S614^-Continued. 

floras. It is an attractive name, and it seems desirable to feCain it; buf 
an additional word is necessary to distinguish between the various 
species. The one under consideration might well be called the sweet 
granadilla." (Wilson Popenoe,) 

For an Illustration of a granadilla fruit, see Plate IV« 

45615 and 45616. 

From Manila, Philippine Islands. Seeds presented by Mr. Adn, Hernan- 
dez, Director of Agriculture. Received December 26, 1917. 

45615. Phasbolus lunatus L. Fabaceee. Lima bean, 

Patani. "A perennial twining vine of vigorous growth, commonly 
cultivated as an annual, of wide distribution, and in general cultivation ; 
grown on a trellis, arbor, or bamboo poles for support. Indigenous to 
tropical America. There are at least seven distinct 'native* forms, of 
which the white-seeded varieties are the best for culinary uses ; the col- 
ored or variegated beans should be boiled and the water changed two 
or three times to render them wholesome.*' (M'ester, Food Planig of 
the Philippines, p. J76. ) 

40616. Lanbiuk ooice8tictji£ Jack. Meliacee. Lan^satr 

"This, like the mangosteen, is a delicious oriental fruit not yet well 
established In America. While It Is not so famous as the* mangosteen. 
It is highly esteemed throughout the Malayan region and is praised by 
many travelers. To judge from our limited experience with it, the 
langsat is slightly hardier than the mangosteen, and there seems to be 
no reason why it should not succeed with us. A few plants have been 
grown in the West Indies and other parts of the American Tropics, b^t 
I have yet to hear of its fruiting outside the Orient. The langsat has 
two allies in America: One, the well-known umbrella tree (Melia azc- 
darach) of the United States; the other, the tropical mahogany iStcie- 
tenia mahagoni). The genus Lanslum, to which the langsat belongs^ 
is a small one; and this species is the only one cultivated for its fruit 
The duku, a fruit closely resembling the langsat, is commonly considered 
a botanical variety of Lansium domesticum, 

'* The tree is rather slender In habit, with a straight trunk and com- 
pound leaves composed of three or more pairs of elliptic to obovate 
leaflets three or four inches in length. The fruits, which ripen In the 
Straits Settlements from July to September, are pro4uced in small clus- 
ters ; In general appearance they suggest large loquats, the surface being 
straw colored and slightly downy. The skin Is thick and leathery and 
does not adhere to the white, translucent flesh which separates Into five 
segments. The flavor is highly aromatic, at times slightly pungent; 
each segment of the flesh normally contains an oval seed, but some of the 
segments In each fruit are usually seedless. The fruit is commonly 
eaten while fresh, but It Is said also to be utilized in various other ways. 

" The name lanzon is applied to this fruit in the Philippine IslandSr 
langsat or lanseh being the form used in the Malay Peninsula." (WU« 
9on Popenoe.) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917, 71 

45617 and 45618. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Seeds presented by Mr. P. J. S. Cramer, chief, 
Plant-Breeding Station. Received December 26, 1917. 

45617. Cbotalabia usabamoensis Baker f. Fabacese. 

An herbaceous plant used in Java for green manuring. Leaves com- 
pound, remote; leaflets narrow elliptical, apex subacuminate, base cune- 
ate, 4 to 6 crtitimetors long, 10 to 16 millimeters wide; stipules none. 
Flowers pedicillate, numerous, in elongate terminal racemes. (Adapted 
from Baker, Journal of the Linnean Society, p. S4S.) 

45618. Mimosa invisa Mart. Mimosacese. 

A plant which is used in Java for green manuring. The stems are 
prostrate or ascending, the foliage sensitive to the touch. The tiowera 
are described as rose colored. The species is distributed from Mexico 
to central Brazil. (Adapted from Micheli, Flore du Paraguay, p. 59.) 

45619 to 45622. 

From Concepclon, Paraguay. Seeds presented by Mr. Thomas R. Gwynn. 
Received December 27, 1917. 

45619. DiocLEA BEFLEXA Hook. f. Fabaceae. 

Ornamental, woody, climbing plant, up to 20 feet in length, with com- 
pound leaves composed of three thickish leaflets and rather dense 
racemes (4 to 6 inches long) of red flowers. The broad-oblong leathery 
pod, 3 to 4 inches long, is densely covered with yellowish gray silky 
hairs. (Adapted from Oliver, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol, 2, p. J 89.) 

45680. HovENiA DULCI8 Thunb. Rhamnacew. Baisin tree. 

An ornamental, deciduoos Japanese tree with leaves often 4 to 5 
inches long and white or greenish white flowers that make little dis- 
play. After flowering, the peduncles thicken and become edible, b^ng 
red, pulpy, and of sweetish taste. Strange as it may seem, the thickened 
reddish peduncles form the main attraction of the Inflorescence. Suc- 
CflfisfuUy propagated by cuttings of soft wood under glass. (Adapted 
from The Flori^Vn Exchange, January 22, 1916.) 

45621. ScHizoLOBiUM PARAHYBUM (Yell.) Blake. Gaesalpinlacete. 
{S. excelsum Vog.) 

A very large, quick-growing tree, up to 120 feet in height; native 
of Brazil. The fine leathery leaves are blpinnate. The bright-yellow 
flowers are borne in large erect racemesl during Februftry or March 
when the tree Is quite bare of leaves. The flowers are at once followed 
by beautiful young foliage. It thrives up to 1,500 feet altitude in the 
moist region of Ceylon, (Adapted from MacnUllan, Handbook of Trop- 
ical Gardening and Planting, 2d ed, p. 300.) 

45622. TiPUANA Tipu (Benth.) Lillo. Fabacese. Tipa. 
(T. specioaa Benth.) 

Ornamental, unarmed tree for the extreme southern United States. 
Flowers yellow, showy, In loosely branched terminal panicles; standard 
broadly orbicular, wings very broadly half-ovate, much longer than the 
keel ; leaves unevenly pinnately compound, leaflets 11 to 21, oblong, entire ; 
pod stipitate, indehlscent, 1 to 3 seeded, samaralike. (Adapted from 
Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 6, p. 3351.) 



72 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45623. Phaseolus GocciNEus L. Fabacee. Scarlet Sunner bean. 

From Deming, N. Mex. Seeds presented by Miss Ruth I. Grover. Received 
December 27, 1917. 

''These beans were found in an old Aztec Indian grave in old Mexico in 
1916. They are of the bush variety and I believe very hardy if irrigated/' 
(MiSB Cfrover.) 

A bean with a twining stem which, if supported, will rise to a height of 14 
feet. The leaves are smaller than those of the common kidney l)ean, and the 
flowers, which are in long spikes and of a deep scarlet color, are larger. The 
pods are large and rough, and the seeds are purple marked with black, 
although sometimes pure white. This bean was formerly cultivated for iu 
flowers only, and was first mentioned as being edible by the gardener, Philip 
Miller. (Adapted from MUler, Gardeners' and Botanists* Dictionary, 9th ed.) 

This is a white-seeded form. 

45624. LiTCHi CHiNENSis Sonner. Sapindacese. Lychee. 

(NepTieliuin litchi Cambess.) 

From Canton, China. Purchased from Mr. C. O. Levine, Agricultural De- 
partment, Canton Christian College. Received December 11, 1917. 

"Cuttings from trees of variety Wai Chie growing on the college campus/' 
(Levine.) 

46626 to 46668. Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. Rhamnaceae. 

iZ, jujuba Lam, not Mill.) 

From Port Louis, Mauritius. Seeds presented by Mr. G. llegnard. Re- 
ceived December 19, 1917. 

Thirty-four varieties received. The following Is an extract from a letter 
from Mr. Regnard : 

•* If the Ziziphus trees are not cultivated in the strict sense of the word, they 
are to be found in large numbers in the villages Inhabited by Indians and 
Africans in the warmer localities of the Island. The fruits are well appreciated, 
not only by these people but also by Europeans, and are sold in great quantities 
In the fruit markets during June, July, and August (the cold season). On 
having fruits gathered from different trees, I have noticed that there are many 
varieties, probably more than one hundred, of different size, shape, taste, and 
color. The fruits on ripening may be green, pink, red, or yellow. The majority 
is of a certain shade of yellow. When overripe, that is, when the fruit softens. 
fill the fruits have the same uniform yellowish brown color. 

" The fruits are eaten before they become what I call * overripe,* and except 
for some varieties have a very good taste. Usually those fruits which have 
the lower extremity slightly pointed are considered to be the best, but t\\\» is 

not always the case. 

" The tree rarely attains more than 20 feet In height, with a trunk 6 to 8 
Inches in diameter. It grows all around the island, from sea level to 500 or 
eOO feet altitude; but It appears, save a few exceptions, that the best proti- 
ucts are obtained from the regions where the heat is more regular, because they 
are sheltered from the winds which blow from the southeast during most of 
the year." 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 73 

45625 to 4565&~<:!ontinued. 

4561^. 1. 45632. 8. 

45626. 2. 45633. 9, 

45627. S. 45634. 10. 

45628. 4. 45635. 11, 

45629. 5. 45636. i^. 

45630. 6, 45637. i^. 

45631. 7. 45638. i^. 

45639. i5. " Seeds of a small fruit, long and pointed, excellent to eat." 
{Regnard,) 

45640. 16. "A variety with very large fruits, pointed at the lower end, 
and of most excellent flavor." (Regnard.) 

45641. 17. 45650. 26. 

45642. 18. 45651. 27. 

45643. 19. 45652. 28. 

45644. 20. 45653. 29. 

45645. Si. 45654. SO. 

45646. 2)?. 45655. 97. 

45647. 23. 45656. 32. I^rge-fruited variety. 

45648. 2J^. 45657. 33. Large-fruited variety. 

45649. 25. 45658. 3.1 Mixed varieties. 

45659. Casuarina sumatrana Jungh. Casuarinacese. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by the director of the Botanic Garden. 
Received December 31, 1917. 

** Introduced as a better form of Casuarina, forming a larger and more 
graceful tree than Casuarina equisetifoUa^ which is so commonly used as a 
street tree in Florida." (FairchUd.) 

45660. MiMusops kauki L. Sapotacea*. 

From Lawang, Java. Seeds presented by Mr. M. Buysman. Received 
December 29, 1917. 

The genus Mimusops is composed of handsome evergreen trees which are 
cultivated in the Tropics for perfumery, oil, rubber, and other products. This 
species grows 20 to 35 feet in height, is native to the Malay Peninsula, and is 
cultivated in the West Indies. The young branches are 'gummy; the long- 
petioled leaves, 4 inches in length, are crowded at the ends of the branches; 
the flowers are clustered on twin or solitary pedicels ; and the fruit is an obo- 
void, smooth berry, up to 1 inch in diameter, and usually four seeded. (Adapted 
from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. >}, p. 2056.) 

45661. Pruxus serrulata Lindl. Amygdalaceee. 

Flowering cherry. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Cuttings presented by the Arnold Arboretum. 
Received November 16, 1917. 

This cherry is well known in our gardens and nurseries in its double forms, 
which are grown under various names. These double-flowered forms vary in 
the size of the blossoms and in the depth of the rosy tints that suffuse the 



74 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

petals. Although 80 years have passed since the first plants were introduced* 
it would be diffiailt even now to name a more beautiful or desirable flowering 
tree. Perfectly hardy, easily accommodated, and never failing at tlie flowering 
time, the species combines in itself almost all the qualities that one asks for 
in an ornamental tree. 

Of the new single-flowere<l varieties not much can yet he said, but although 
so different from the big double blossoms to which we are so accustomed, the 
flowers possess all their charm and delicacy of color, and if they are not so 
large they have an even daintier gracefulness. (Adapted from The Garden, vol. 
56, p. 900,) 

This is apparently the variety Ochichima, a form with pale-pink, double 
flowers of large size. (See WUaon, Chenies of Japan, p, 5^.) 

45662. A3f YODALUs PERsiCA L. Aniygdalacefie. Peach. 

{Prunus peraica Stokes.) 

From (iuadeloi)e, French West Indies. Scions presented by Mrs. E. St, 
George rx)Ugh, .Trois Rivieres Plantation. Receivecl Decenil>er 31, 1917. 

Peach scions importe<l for experimental pun^oses. 

A freestone r»^ach described as somewhat resembling the peen-to peach in 
shape and flavor. It is rouml, however, not flattened, and is reported as being 
larger and having more " i)erfunie and savor " than the peen-to. It resists 
de^'ay well, even In the heat of the French West Indies. 

For a more comlpete description, see S. P. I. No. 34131. 

45663. Stadmannia oppositifolia Lam. Sapindaceae. 

From Port Louis, Mauritius. Seeds presented by Mr. G. Regnard. Re- 
ceived-December 7, 20. 22, and 31, 1917. 

" The fruits make an excellent jelly, very much like that of the quince. This 
tree grows in a wild state, and the pulp of its fruit, unless made into a jam 
or jelly, is only fit to be eaten by monkeys." {Regnard.) 

A large hardwoo<l tree, once frequent in the primeval forests of the island of 
Mauritius, but now becoming scarce. It has alternate pinnate leaves, dense 
panicles of Inconspicuous flowers, and hard spherical fruits nearly an Inch in 
diameter. (Adapted from Baker, Flora of Maurititts, p. GO.) 

45664 to 45669. 

From Zacuapam, Vera Cruz, Mexico. Pi*esented by Dr. C. A. Purpus. Re- 
ceived December 31, 1917. 

45664. Chayota edults Jacq. Cucurbitaceie. Chayote. 
(Sechium edule Swartz.) 

" The chayote Is becoming known in the TTnlte*! States as a useful vege- 
table belonging to the squash family. In some parts of tropical America 
it is eaten as commonly as are the potatoes in North America and is 
stewed with meat, creamed, and so on. in the same manner. It has not 
the food value of the potato, but is more c*omparable in this respect to 
the squash. In an effort to extend and improve its culture in this coun- 
try, varieties are being intro<luce<l from as many regions as possible." 
( WiJson Popenoe. ) 

45665. Capsicum annuitk L. Solanacete. Pimento. 

Var. gro88um. The pimento of tropical America. Dr. Purpus states 
that this variety is a plant for a hot country and should be planted in a 
sunny place in light soil. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 7& 

45664 to 4566&-Continued. 

45666. Lycopersicon esculbntum Mill. Solanacese. Cherry tomato^ 

Plants of the variety oeraHforme, It differs from the ordinary garden 
tomato in having small fruits, either red or yellow, and leaves which are 
smaller, grayer, and less dense. The fruits are used for pickles and con- 
serves. (Adapted from Bailey^ Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol 
4, p. 1991,) 

Introduced to test for wilt resistance. 

45667 and 45668. Vanilla planifolia Andrews. Orchidaceffi. Vanilla^ 

45667. " Cuttings of the true vanilla from Misantla, Mexico. Shouldf 
be planted at the foot of small trees or shrubs, in leaf mold."' 

(Purpus.) 

45668. "From Zacuapam." (Purpus,) 

45669. Vanilla pompon a Schiede. Orchidacese. Vanilla.. 

" Plants of wild vanilla, which grows in brush woods and half-shady 
places in the low country at the limits of the tierra caliente. Should be 
planted at the foot of small trees or large shrubs, in leaf mold.*'' 
(Purpus,) 

"A native of Mexico, yielding an inferior quality of vanilla known by 
the name of *Vanillon' and 'Vanilloes.* This is claimed to have ad- 
vantages over proper vanilla, its pods not having a tendency to wilt, a» 
well as being easily cure4* whilst the vines are said to flower and fruit 
three or foiir times during the year." (MacmUlan, Handbook of Tropical 
OardetHng and Planting, 2d ed., p. 2S2,) 

45670 to 45691. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by the Arkiold Arboretum. Received 
November 16, 1917. 

45670. Castanea henryi (Skan) Rehd. and Wilson. FagacesB. 

Chestnut, 

(Cuttings.). A tree, 75 to 100 feet in height, distributed through the 
valley of the Yangtze River as far west as. Mount Omei. It is common 
in woods on the mountains of western Hupeh and eastern Szechwan. The 
leaves are green on both surfaces, caudate-acuminate, and broadest below 
or at the middle. The shoots are dark colored and quite glabrous. The 
fruit is usually a solitary nut. (Adapted from Sargent, PUmtae WU- 
sonianae, vol. S, p. 196,) 

45671 and 45672. Cobtlus chinensis Franch. Betulacese. Haiselnut. 

(Cuttings.) A tree native to western China, which grows to a height 
of 120 feet The ovate-oblong leaves are cordate at the base, doubly 
serrate, and 4 to 7 inches long. The fruit is borne in clusters of four 
to six. The involucre is constricted above the nuts, with recurved and 
more or less forked lobes. (Adapted from Bailey , Standard Cyclopedia 
of Horticulture, vol. 2, p. 859.) 

45671. Vilmorin No. 1200. 45672. Wilson No. 1453. 

45673. CoBYLUs hetebophylla sutchuenensis Franch. Betulaeefle. 

Hazelnut. 

« 

(Cuttings.) A bush, 1 to 4 meters taU and widely distributed in China, 
having been reported from Szechwan, Hupeh, Kiangsi, and Hunan 
Provinces. The branches and petioles are sparsely pubescent. The 



76 SEEDS AKD PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45670 to 45691— Continued. 

Involucres are deeply cleft and shorter than the very finely pabescent 
nutlets. There is a large variation in the involucres and In the pubescence 
of the leaves, petioles, and branches. (Adapted from Sargent, Plantae 
WiUonAO/nae, vol 2, p. J^5.) 

45674. X Malus abnoldiana Rehder. Malaceee. 

(Roots.) A plant which is evidently a hybrid of MiUua floribunda ap- 
peared spontaneously in the Arboretum several years ago and has been 
named M. amoldiafia. This plant promises to remain a smaller tree 
than M. fioribunda, but its long, spreading, and arching branches are very 
graceful and the flowers produced on long stems are more than twice 
as large as those of its parent. The flowers of this interesting tree are 
considered by some persons more beautiful than those of any other crab 
apple. (Adapted from Arnold Arboretum Bulletins of Poimlar Informa- 
tion, Nos, S and 22,) 

45675. Malus baooata mandshubica (Maxim.) C. Schneld. Malacece. 

Crab apple. 

(Roots.) Malus baccata mandshurica Is the earliest of the crab apples 
to open Its flower buds In the Arboretum. A native of Manchuria, Chosen 
(Korea), and northern Japan, it is the eastern form of the better known 
M€Uu8 baeoata, the Siberian crab apple, which reached Burope more than 
a century ago and for a long time was one of only two Artatic crab 
apples known in western gardens. The Manchurian form as it grows 
in the Arboretum is a tree 12 to 15 feet tall and broad ; the flowers, which 
are produced In profusion, are pure white, rather more than an indi 
across, and more fragrant than those of any other Asiatic crab apple. 
The fruit is round, yellow or red, and not larger than a large pea. This 
crab apple, which Is still rare in this country, for the fragrance oiP the 
flowers alone should find a place in all collections. (Adapted from 
BaUey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture^ vol, 5, p. 2871.) 

45676. Malus fusca (Raf.) 0. Schneld. Malacese. Apple. 

(Roots.) A shrub or small tree, sometimes 80 to 40 feet tall, with 
ovate-lanceolate sharply serrate leaves. The white flowers, an Inch in 
diameter, are borne on slender pubescent pedicels, and appear when the 
leaves are nearly or quite full grown. The fruit is oblong, three-fourths 
of an inch or less long, and yellowish or greenish in color. According to 
Sargent, this tree "grows usually In deep, rich soil In the neighborhood 
of streams, often forming almost impenetrable thickets of considerable 
extent, and attains its greatest size in the valleys of Washington and 
Oregon." The range extends from northern California to Alaska. 
(Adapted from Bailey, Stcmdard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 5, p. 
2875.) 

45677. X Malus maodebubgensts Zimmerm. Malacese. Apple. 

(Roots.) Malus magdeburgensis is considered to be a hybrid betweoi 
M. spectabilis and M. da-syphylla, which was found among a collection of 
trees planted in the city gardens of Magdeburg and supposed to have been 
originally imported from Japan. (Adapted from MoUer, Deutsche 
Gdrtner-Zeitung, vol. 20, p. 254.) 



OOTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 77 

45670 to 45691— Continued. 

45678. Malus Niia>zwETZKTANA Dieck. Malacese. Apple. 

(Roots.) One of the most curious apple trees in the collection, 
M. niedzwetzkyana has deep purplish red flowers and fruit, even the flesh 
being purple, leaves purple (at least early in the season), and dark bark. 
It comes from central Asia and is probably a form of M, pumOa, one of 
the parents of the common apple tree, as seedlings raised in the Arboretum 
have sometimes purple but more often green leaves. (Adapted from 
lAmold Arboretum Bulletin of Popular Information No. 22. ) 

45679. MALrs pbttnifolia binki (Koidz.) R^der. Malacese. Apple. 

(Roots.) It Is a tree in its wild state with greenish yellow fruit, some- 
times with a reddish cheek, or rarely entirely red, rather longer than 
broad and not often more than li inches in diameter ; It is juicy and has 
an acid flavor. This tree was early introduced into Japan, where it was 
formerly cultivated in many forms as a fruit tree. Its cultivation in 
Japan was given up after the introduction of American and English 
apple trees and it is now a rare plant there. Judging by the climate 
where this tree grows na'turally in western China, it should prove as 
hardy as the Siberian Malus laccata, which is one of the parents of the 
hardy race of apples now much cultivated in the extreme north as 
Siberian crabs ; and it is not improbable that by crossing the Rinkl with 
some of these hybrid crabs or with the hardiest varieties of the common 
apple a race may be obtained more valuable for the cold parts of North 
America than any of the apples which can now be grown in some of the 
Northern States and in the northwestern Provinces of Canada. (Adapted 
from Arnold Arhoretum BuUetin of Popular Information No. 5. ) 

45680. Malus stlvestbis Mill. Malace«e. Apple. 

(Roots.) " A wild form of the cultivated apple secured in Turkestan.*' 
(Sargent.) 

45681. Malus theifera Rehder. Malacese. Apple. 

(Roots.) Malu8 theifera from central and western China is closely 
related to Hall's crab.. It is one of Wilson's introductions through seeds 
sent in 1900 to Veitch and in 1907 to the Arboretum, where it is now 
12 feet high. It has upright, spreading, rather zigzag branches which are 
densely studded with short spurs which bear numerous clusters of flow- 
ers rose red in the bud, becoming pale and almost white when fully ex- 

■ 

panded. In central China the peasants collect the leaves and from them 
prepare the palatable beverage which they call red tea. From this fact 
the specific name Is derived. (Adapted from Arnold Arboretum Bulletin 
of Popular Information No. ^) 

45682. Malus transitobia tobingoides Rehder. Malacese. Apple. 

(Roots.) This plant looks quite distinct from typical Malu^ transitoria 
with its larger, partly entire leaves and larger fruit and may turn out to 
be a distinct species, but as long as we do not know the mature fruits of 
the type and the flowers of this variety we must rely on the difference in 
the leaves, which is not sufliciept for specific separation, as intergrada- 
tions seem to exist. (Adapted from Sargent^ Plantae WiUonianae, vol 
2, p. 286.) 



78 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45670 to 45691— Continued. 

45683. Pbunus haacku Rupr. Amygdalaceee. 

(Cuttings.) A Mancburian bird cherry up to 40 or more feet higli in 
a wild state, very distinct through the bark of the trunk being smootli 
and of a striking brownish yellow color, and peeling like that of a birch. 
It is different from ordinary bird cherries in the racemes coming on tlie 
.year-old wood and from the laurels in being deciduous. (Adapted from 
Bean, Tree9 and Shrubs Hurdp in the British Isles, vol. 2, p. 241,) 

^6B&L Pbunus skbbulata Lindl. Amygdalacese. Flowering cherry. 

(Cuttings.) Forma rosea Wilson. Cultivated cherry which has been 
grown at the Arnold Arboretum. It was received from Spath in 1912 as 
P. pseudo-cerasus shidaresakura Koehne. 

" Flowers rather small, inodorous, pink, and very double, known to me 
«only as a cnltivated plant in this Arboretum. It is fortunate that 
Koehne*s name is a synonym, since in Japanese it signifies hanging 
cherry and in Japan is applied only to P. subhirtella var. pendula 
Tanaka." {Wilson, The Cherries of Japan, p. 27.) 

-45685. Pbuhus thibetica Franch. Amygdalacese. Plum. 

(Cuttings.) An ornamental tree 15 to 20 feet in height, bearing oblong 
convolute leaves which have crenate margins. The bluish pink flowers 
appear with the leaves on pedicels one-third to three-fourths of an inch 
long. Native to western China, where it commonly grows in thickets. 
(Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 5, p. 
2827.) 

45686 and 45687. Pybus calleryana Decaisne. Malaceae. Pear. 

(No. 55Ga Wilson.) This is a widely distributed species and, according 
to Wilson, is common in western Hupeh from river level up to 1,500 
meters altitude. It has comparatively small glabrous crenate leaves and 
small flowers with two, rarely three, styles. The fruit Is about 1 to 1.4 
<;entimeter8 in diameter. (Adapted from Sargent, Plantar Wilsonianae, 
vol. 2, p. 26J^) 

45686. Seeds. 45687. Fruits. 

See also S. P. I. No. 45586. 

45688. PTitu« SERBULATA Rehder. Malacese. Pear. 

(Fruits.) A tree native to western Hupeh at altitudes from 600 to 
1,600 meters. 

" This species seems to be most closely related to Pyrus serotina Reh- 
der, but differs chiefly in its serrulate, not setosely serrate, generally 
broader leaves and in the smaller flowers with usually three or four 
:styles and shorter sepals, and in the smaller fruit." (Sargent, Plantae 
WilsofiAanae, vol 2, p. 263.) 

45689. RiBEfl FAScicuLATUM CHiNENSE Maxlm. Grossulariaceie. Currant. 

(Plants ajid fruits.) ** In the shrub collection the leaves of two cur- 
rants are just turning scarlet [November 1, 1912], These are Ri^es 
curvatum and ""the Chinese form of Rihes fasciculatum. The beauty of 
the Chinese currant at this season is increased by the bright-red fruits 
which are still on the branches. It Is the only representative of the 
.'genus In the eollection with fruit which ripens in the autumn and Is 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. • 79 

45670 to 45691— Continued. 

well worth a place In every collection In which handsome autumn fruits 
are Talued." {Arnold Arboretum BulleUn of Popular Inform<ition No, 

45600 and 45691. Vitis vinifera L. Vltacese. Orape. 

45690. " Cuttings of a wild grape of the vinifera type from nortliern 
China." (C. S. Sargent.) 

"This Is a very hardy plant, enduring the winters of Boston, 
Mass., with little injury." (Peter BUset.) 

45691. ( Plants. ) " This grape is largely cultivated in Peking. There 
are white-fruited and purple-fruited varieties. In Peking the 
vines are laid down and covered in the winter ; at the Arboretum 
they have so far generally proved hardy and have occasionally 
produced fruit. This vine may prove valuable to cross with some 
of the hybrids or varieties of American grapes." {C. 8, Sargent.) 

45692 to 45704. 

From France. Scions presented by Mr. Edmoud Versin, St. Jean le Blanc, 
par Orleans, I-.oiret. Received November 28, 1917, 

45692 to 45701. Cobylus avellana L. Botulacese. Hazelnut. 

45692. D' Alger, This is a well-knoM'n hazelnut, and because of its 
many hundreds of years of cultivation it has received many dif- 
ferent names. The bush is of low, much-branching habit, spread- 
ing widely by means of suckers. It is a very prolific shrub and is 
one of the most fniltful of all the varieties of hazelnut. The 
leaves are of medium size, roundish or oval-elliptic. The nut is 
medium sized, 20 to 22 millimeters long, and very long pointed. 
It seldom grows singly, but is found in groups of three to five. 
The shell is dark brown, later even becoming brownish black. The 
upper half Is covered by a grayish woolly tomentum which be- 
comes stronger toward the tip. The kernel, which has a sweet 
almondlike taste, is oval and entirely fills the shell. Blooms in 
midspring; ripens early, from the middle to the end of August, 
depending on the climate. Older pomological workers state that 
this nut comes true to seed, but more recent workers state that 
only about one-fifth of the seed planted comes true to the variety. 
It is a nut to be universally recommended. (Adapted from 
Goeschke, Die HaselnusSt p, 78.) 

Received as Corylus macrocarpa, 
45698. Received as Corylus macrocarpa du Beam, 
45694. Received as Corylvs macrocarpa fertile. 
45695. Received as Corylus areUana f alius aureis (golden-leaved 
filbert). 

45696. Received as Corylus macrocarpa de Brunswick. 

45697. Received as Corylus macrocarpa d coque tendre, 

45698. Cob filbert. " Involucre nearly smooth, longer than the nut, 
and very slightly cut around the margin; nut large, oblong, and 
somewhat compressed; shell rather thick, brown; kernel full and 
of very rich fiavor. This is perhaps the best of all the filberts. 
The tree is a most abundant bearer. Some of the mits are upward 



80 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45692 to 45704^Continued. 

of an inch in length, and they have with care been kept for four 
years. It is only after being kept for some time that their full 
richness of flavor is obtained. Mr. Hogg says this nut was first 
brought to the notice of the Horticultural Society by A. B. Lambert 
about the year 1812. It is improperly called Kentish Cob, The 
true Cobs are roundish thick-shelled nuts." (Thomas^ The Afneri- 
can Fruit Culturist, p. i48.) 

45699. Emperor, This variety was grown in England by Richard 
Webb, breeder in the Calcot Garden at Reading. A prolific bush 
of low but strong growth, with small to medium leaves, 9 to lO 
centimeters long, round-oval, and narrowed toward the base. 
The nuts are conspicuously large, 20 to 22 millimeters long, of 
irregular shape, and grow singly or two or three together. The 
shell is light brown, with distinct dark-brown stripes, and is 
softly pubescent near the apex. The large kernel is broadly oval 
and of good flavor. Blooms rather late; ripens early, late August 
or early September. This is a very valuable nut which, because 
of its beauty and heavy bearing, is widely grown. (Adapted from 
Ooeschke, Die Haseinuss, p. €0,) 

Received as Corylus niacrocarpa. 

45700. Recevied" as Corylus macrocarpa d gros fruits, 

45701. Received as Corylus macrocarpa des Anglais. 

45702. Corylus colurna L. Betulacese. Turkish hazelnut. 

The nuts of this species are small and somewhat flattened, with the 
deeply cut roundish Involucre several times longer than the nut. The 
plant Is treelike, with upright branches which are corky when young. 
The leaves are shiny, becoming broad and pointed as they mature. 
(Adapted from Goeschke, Die Haselntiss, p. 41.) 

45703. CoBTLus MAXIMA Mill. Betulacefie. Hazelnut. 
Received as Corylus macrocarpa du Piemont. 

45704. PopuLus INCBASSATA Dode. Salicaceee. Poplar. 

A dense tree of irreguldr habit of growth, with short ascending 
branches. The appearance of some of the leaves suggests the fossil 
species Populus latior Heer. The prefoliation is ragged, as in the group 
Garoliniensis. Habitat the western portion of North America. This is 
a i^tecies of doubtful validity. (Adapted from L, A. Dode, Oenre PopuUis^ 



LNDEX OF COMMON AND SCIEiNTIFIC NAMES. 



Acroeomia total, 45483. 
Actinidia arguta, 45241. 

chinensiSf 45588. 
Aesculus tcilsoniij 45532. 
Albizzia W€luHt8Chii, 45508. 
Aleurites trisperma, 45480. 
Alfalfa, Medicago sativa, 45494, 45495, 

45574. 
Allium sp., 45533. 
AmaraDth, Amaranthus paniculaiuf, 

45535. 
Anmranthua paniculattis, 45535. 
Amygdalus persica, 45319, 46320, 45595. 

45662. 
Annona sp., 45486. 

cheHmola, 45327, 46487, 46576. 
X squamoaat 46571. 

diveraifolia, 45548. 

marcgra/viij 45231. 
Apple. See Malus 8pp. 
' Apricot, PrufiMB armeniaca, 46287, 
45238. 

Japanese, PrunU8 m/ume, 45623. 
AquUegia tracyi X chrymnthat 46568. 
Arachis hypogaea, 45482, 45490. 
Aralia chinensis mandshuriea, 45573. 
Areca catechu, 45478. 
Atemoya, Annona cherimola X squa- 
mosa, 45571. 
Attalea guaranitica, 45484. 
Avena sativa, 45491, 45565. 
Avocado, Persea am>ericana: 

Akbal, 45505. 

Chabil, 45564. 

(Guatemala), 45505, 45553, 45560- 
45564, 45580. 

Ishim. 4556:^ 

Kaguah. 45561. 

Kanan, 4.5563. 

Manik, 45560. 

^nrberry, BerleHs wilsonae X ag- 

gregata, 45477. 
Barley. See Hordeum spp. 

65687—22 6 



Bean, adsnki, Phn^teolus angularis, 
45298, 45299. 
broad, Vida faha, 45305-45307, 

45474-45476. 
conainon, PhaseoUts vulgaris, 

45296, 45297, 45344, 45602. 
Lima, Phaseolus lunaius, 45615. 
mung, Phaseolus aureus, 45300, 

45318. 
Scarlet Runner, Phaseolus coc- 

oineus, 45623. 
soy, Soja max, 45269-15295, 45470. 
tepary, Phaseolus acutifolius lati- 

folius, 45501. 
Yard Long, Vigna sesquipedalis, 
45345. 
See also Catjang and Cowpea. 
Benincasa cerifera. See Benincasa 
hispida, 
hispida, 45449. 
Berheris wilsonae X aggregata, 45477. 
(Berry, Andes, Rulus glaucus, 45365. 
Brassica spp., 45263. 45310. 

pekinensis, 45251-45254, 4552^ 
45531. 
Brunsfelsia hopcana, 45230. 
Buckwheat, Fagopyrum vulgarc, 45455. 
Bursera sp., 45577. 

Cajuput tree, Cajuputi leucadendra, 

45510. 
Cajuputi leucadendra, 45510. 
Cam^ensia maxima, 45608. 
Capsicum annuum, 45665. 
Carica papaya, 452,46, 45346, 45537^ 

45538, 45599. 
Ca-sta/nea alnifolia, 45358, 45359. 

crenata, 4.5255, 452.56, 45330^5337, 
45507. 

henryi, 45670. 

mollissima, 45338. 

neglecta, 45329. 

pumila X crenata, 45339-45342. 
Castancspermum au^trale, 45504. 

81 



82 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Castor-bean, Ricinua communis, 45487, 

45511. 
Casuarina aurnatratia, 45659. 
Catjang, Vigtia cylindrica, 45302. 
Cecropia adenopun, 45508. 
Cdha pentandra, 4.5557. 
Chamaedorea sp., 45349. 
Chayota eduliM, 45350. 45540-45546, 

45664. 
Chayote. See Chayota eduH8. 
Chenopodium ambrosioides, 4 5 52 4, 
45610. 
nuttalliae, 45536. 
Cherimoya, Annona cherimola, A3SSN, 

45487, 45576. 
Cherry, flowering, Prumis semtlaiOf 
45661. 45684. 
Sargent's, Prtmua serrulata saoha- 
linensU, 45248. 
Chestnut. See Castanea spp. 

Moreton Bay, Castanospermum 
australe, 45504. 
Citron, Citrullus vulgaris, 45512. 
Citrullus vulgaHs, 45450, 45451. 45512. 
Citrus spp.. 45311, 45312, 45315. 
decumana. See Citrus grandis. 
grandis. 45249, 45313, 45314. 
ichangensis, 45534. 
Claucena lansium, 45328. 

"icampi. See Claucena lansium. 
Cbix Uwryma-johi ma-yuen, 45452. 
Colocasia esculeyiia, 45481. 
Columbine, Aquilegia iracyi X chrys- 

antha, 455.58. 
Convolvulus scamm/ynia, 45582. 
Copal, Bursera sp., 45577. 
Corn, Zea mays, 45498, 45499. 
Corylus avellana, 45692-45701. 
chinetisis, 45671, 45672. 

u^luma, 45347, 45702. 
heterophylla sutchuenenHs, 46078. 

maxima, 45703. 

Cotton. See Qossypium spp. 

Cowpea, Vigna sinensis, 45301. 

Coy6, Perf<ea schicdeana, 45354. 

Crab apple, Malus baccata mandshur- 

ica, 45675. 
CraniolaHa annua, 45549. 
Crataegus stipulosa, 45575. 
Crotalaria usaranwensis, 45617. 
(Jryptotaenia canadensis. See Deringa 

canadensis. 



Cucumber, Cucumis sativus, 452>'>S. 

45343. 
Cucumis melo, 45257, 45453, 45454. 

sativus, 45258, 45343. 
Cucurbita pepo, 45259, 45539. 
Cudrania tricuspidata, 45448. 

triloba. See Cudrania tricuspi- 
data. 
Currant, Ribes fasciculatum ohinense, 

45689. 
Cynara hystrUt, 45240. 
Cyphomandra sp., 45362. 

Dahlia papenovii, 45578. 
Deguelia sp.. 45239. 
i)elphinium cardinale X (?). 45559. 
Deringa canadensis, 45247. 
Derris sp. See Deguelia sp. 
Dioclea reflexa, 45509, 45619. 
Diospyros kaki, 45503. 
Drosophyllum lusitanicum, 45602. 

Eriodendron anfractuosum. See Cdba 
pentandra. 

Fa^opyrum esculentum. See Fagopy- 
rum, vulgare. 
vulgare, 45455. 
Fern, Nephrolepis sp., 45228. 
Ficus palmata X carica, 45235. 
Fig, Ficus palmata X carica^ 45235. 
Flax, Linum usUatissimum, 45493. 

Oliriddia mreistophylla, 45552. 
Glycine hispida. See Soja max. 
Qossypium barbadense, 45600, 45601, 
45009. 
obtusifoUum, 45326. 
Gourd, wax, Benincasa hispida, 45449, 
Granadilla, Passiflora spp., 45228, 
45613. 
sweet, Passiflora Hgularis, 45614. 
Grape. See Vitis spp. 
Grass, Canary, PfuUaris canarieMis, 
45496. 
Napier, Peniiisetum purpureum, 

45572. 
Streptocha^ta spicata, 45488. 
Guava, Costa Rlcan, Psidium fried- 
rich sthalianum, 45579. 
Gttisquil. See Chayote. 

Hazelnut See Corylus spp. 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



83 



Henna, Latosonia inermis, 45250. 
Hibiscadelphus giffardianun, 45242. 

hualalaienHSy 45243. 
Holcus sorghum, 45317, 45348, 45456- 

45458. 
Hordeum intermedium cornutum, 
45366. 
vulgare coeleste, 4545^-45461. 

pallidum, 45462, 45463, 45482. 
Horse-chestnut, Aesoulus wilsonii, 

45532. 
Hovenia dulcis, 45620. 
iHuauhtll, Amaranthtts panUmMut^ 

45535. 
HuauhtyontU, Cfienopodium niuttatl4a€t 
loHum parahylmm. 

llama, Annona diversifolia, 45548. 
Indigo, Indigofera Hnctoria, 45300. 
Indigo f era sp., 45479. 

iinctoHa, 45309. 
Inga sp., 45351. 

Iris ochroleuca. See Iris orientalis. 
Iris orientalis, 45581. 

Juglans mollis, 45352. 
Jujube. See Ziziphus spp. 
Juniper, Juniperus cedrus, 45500. 
Juniperus cedrus, 45500. 

Kakl, Diospyros kaki, 45506. 
Kapok, Ceiba pentandra, 45557. 

Langsat, Lansium domesticum, 45616. 
Lansium domesticum, 45616. 
Lapeyrousia cruenta, 45321. 
L4xrk8pur, Delphinium cardinale X ( f), 

45559. 
Lawsonia inermis, 45250. 
Lemon, Ichang, Citrus ichwngensis, 

4.5534. 
Lens esculenta. See Lentilla lens. 
Lentil, Lentilla lens, 45308. 
Lentilla lem, 45308. 
Lilium sp., 45584. 
lAlium philippinense, 45569, 45570. 

rubellum, 45322. 
Lily. See LUium spp. 

Benguet, Lilium philippinense, 
45569, 45570. 
Linum usitatissimum, 45493. 
Litchi chinejisis, 45596, 45597, 45624. 
Liiistona altissima, 45590. 
jenkinsiana, 45591. 
suhglobosa. 45589. 



Lobelia fulgens, 45353. 

Lumbang, soft, Aleurites trisperma, 

45480. 
Lychee. See Litchi chinensis. 
Lycopersicon esculentum, 45232, 45666. 
Lycoris atirea, 45525. 45526. 
radiata, 45527, 45528. 

Macrozanonia macritcarpa, 45555. 
Malpighia sp., 45506. 
Malus arnoldiana, 45674. 

baccata mandshurica, 45675. 

fusca, 4567& 

magdeburgensis, 45677. 

niedztoetzkyana, 45678. 

prunifolia rinki, 45679. 

sylvestris, 45680. 

theifera, 45681. 

transitoria toringoides, 45682. 
Mangifera odorata, 45556. 
Manzanilla, Crataegus stipulosa, 45575. 
Ma-yuen, Coix lacryma-jobi ma-yuen, 

45452. 
Medieago satira, 45494. 45495, 45574. 
Melaleuca leucadendron. See Caju- 

puth leucadendra. 
Mimosa inrisa, 45618. 
Mimusops kaukiy 45660. 
Mistol, Ziziphus mistol, 45227. 
Mitsuba, Deringa canadensis, 45247. 
Muskmelon. Cucumis melo, 45257, 

45453, 45454. 
Mustard, Brasniva spp., 45263, 45310. 

Ncphelium litchi. See Litchi chinensis, 
Nephrol epis sp., 45228. 

Oats,- Avena sativa, 45491, 45565. 
Ohelo, Vaccinium ret icula turn, 45245. 
Onion, Allium sp.. 45533. 
Oryza satit^a, 45266-45268, 45316, 
45464-45466. 45598. 

Pacayito, Chamacftorca sp., 45349. 
Pal ts'al, BrasMca pekincnsis, 45251- 

45254, 45529-15531. 
Palm, betel nut, Areca catechu, 45478. 

Acrocomia totai, 45483. 

Attalea guaranitica, 45484. 

pacayito, Ch<imaedorea sp., 45349. 

Livistona spp., 45589-45591. 
Panicnm miliaceum, 45467. 
Papaya, Carica papaya, 45246, 45346, 
45537, 45538. 45599. 



84 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED, 



Par iet aria officinalis, 45583. 
Passiflora spp., 45226, 45613. 

ligulariSf 45614. 
Paveita zimfnermanniana, 45554. 
Pea, garden. Pisum sativum, 45308, 

45304, 45468. 
Peach, Amygdalus persica, 45319, 45320, 

4r)505, 45662. 
Peanut, Arachis hypogaea^ 45482, 

45490. 
Pear. See Pyrus spp. 
Pennisctum purpureum, 45572. 
Perilla argufa. See Perilla nankinen- 
sis. 

frutescenSy 45265. 

nankinensi^, 45264. 

ocymoides. See PerUla fnUewens, 
Pernea americana, 45505, 45553, 45560- 
45564, 45580. 

gratissinia. See Persea americana. 

schiedeana, 45354. 
Perulero, Chayota edulis, 45350, 45540- 

45546. 
Phalaris canariensis, 45496. 
Phaseolus acutifoHus latifoUus, 45501. 

avgularis, 45298, 45299. 

aureus, 45300. 45318. 

coccineus, 45623. 

lunatus, 45615. 

vulgaris, 45296, 45297, 46844, 
45602. 
Pimenta sp., 45355. 
Pimento, Capsicum annuumf 45065. 
Pistache, Chinese, Pistaoia chinensis, 

45593. 
Pistacia chinensiSy 45593. 
Ph^um sativum, 45303, 45304, 45468. 
Pittosporum hosmeri longifoUum, 

45244. 
Plum, Prunus nigra, 45229. 

Pmnus tfiibetica, 45685. 
Pogonopus speciosus, 45360. 
Polygonum tinctorium, 45605. 
Poplar, Populus incrassata, 45704. 
Pop u J us incrassata, 45704. 
Potato, Solanum chacoense, 45363. 
Proso. Panicum miUaceum, 45467. 
Prunns armeniaca, 45237, 45238. 

maackii, 45683. 

mil me, 45523. 

nigra, 45229. 

persica. See Amygdalus persica. 



Pru nussa rgentii. See Prunus serrula fa 
sachalinenHs. 
serrulata, 45661, 45684. 
sachaUnensis, 45248. 
thibetiea, 45685. 
Psidium friedrichsthalianum, 45579. 
Pterocarya stenoptera, 45587. 
Pterogyne nitens^ 45485. 
Pummelo, Citrus grandis, 45249, 45313, 

45314. 
Pyrus betulaefolia, 45606 

caileryana, 45586, 45582, 4559i. 

45686, 45687. 
maniorensis, 45612. 
serrulata, 45688. 

Radish, Raptumus sativus, 45260, 

45261, 45469. 
Raisin tree, Uovenia dulcis, 45620. 
Raphanus sativus, 45260, 45261, 45469. 
Rheedia lateriflora, 45603, 45604, 
Ribcs fasciculatum chinense, 45689. 
Rice, Oryza satii^a, 45266-45268, 

4.5316, 45464-45466, 45598. 
Ricinus conwvunis, 45497, 45511. 
Rubus bogotensis, 45365. 
urticaefoHus, 45356. 
Rye, Secale cereale, 45367. 

Saccharum offlcinarum,- 45518-45522, 
45611. 

Sarsaparilla, Smila-x sp., 45607. 

Scammony, Convolvulus scammonia, 
4.5582. 

Bchieolobium ewcelsum. See 8chi:ch 
loMum parahybum. 
parahybum, 45621. 

Secale cereale, 45367. 

Sechium cdule. See Chayota edulis. 

Smilax sp., 45C07. 

Sobralia sp., 45357. 
macrantha^, 45547. 

Soja max, 45269-45295, 45470. 

Solanum chacoense, 45363. 
t^iolac folium, 45364. 

Sorghunr, Holcus sorghum, 45317, 35348, 
45456-45458. 

Sorghum vulgare. See Holcus sor- 
ghum. 

Spinach. See Spinacia oleracea. 

Spinacia oleracea, 45262. 45471. 

Squash. Cucurbita pepo, 45259, 45539. 



OCTOBER 1. TO DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



85 



Stad/mannia oppositifolia, 45663. 
Streptochaeta spicata, 45488. 
Sugar cane, Saocfiarum offlcinarum: 

168**, 45521. 

D. K. 74, 45517, 45518. 

Louisiana 511, 45611. 

M. 1237, 45516. 

M. P. 55. 45513, 45514. 

M. P. 131. 45515. 

Striped Tanna, 45522. 

White Tanna, 45519, 4.5520. 

Taro, Colocaaia esculenta, 45481. 

' tipu, 45622. 

Tipuana speciosa. See Tipuana tipu. 

tipuy 45622. 
Tomato, Lycoperaicon esculentum, 

45232, 45666. 
Tree-tomato, Cypliomandra sp., 4536^ 
• Tritioum aestii>unh 45221-46225, 
45233, 45234, 4.^j323^5325, 45368- 
45440, 45472, 45473, 45566, 45567. 
durum, 45441-45446. 
turgidum, 45447. 
vulgare. See Triticum aeativum, 

Undetermined, 45560, 4666L 

yacciniiim reticulatum, 45245. 
Vanilla planifolin, 45667. 45668. 

pampona, 45669. 
Vioin faba, 45305-45307. 45474-45476. 
Vigna cylindrica, 45302. 

seaquipedaliSt 45345. 

sinensis, 45301. 
Vitis caHbaea. See Vitis tiUaefolia. 

tUiaefoUa, 45361. 

vinifera, 45236, 45585, 45600, 45691. 

Walnut, Juglans mollis, 45362. 
Wanipi, Claucena lansium^ 45328. 
Watermelon, Citrullus vulgaris, 46460, 

45451. 
Wax gourd, Befiincasa hispida, 46449. 
Wheat, Triticum spp. : 

Aka-komugi, 45284. 

Aurore, 46666. 

Australian, 45370. 

Baard koren, 46437. 

Barletta, 46226. 

Barletta (Pampa), 46221. 

Barletta 24, 45223. 

Barletta 44, 46224. 



iWheat, Triticum spp. — Continued. 

Barletta 77, 45222. 

Beard, 45373. 

Bengal^ 45444. 

Blue Beard, 45441. 

Bob*s, 45423. 

Bosjesveld, 45431. 

(China). 45472, 45473. 

Cilliers, 45377. 

Colony Red, 45380. 

Defiance. 45372, 45389. 

Delaware, 45427. 

durum, 45441-45446. 
I Du Toit*s, 46360. 

Early, 45438. 

Early Beard, 45368, 45387, 46388. 
45393, 45395, 45400, 45402, 45406. 
45428. 

Early Gluyas, 45408, 45432. 

Ekstein, 45421. 

Geluks koren. 45436. 

Gluyas, 45382. 

Golden Ball. 45446. 

Hybride des Allies. 45667. 

Iga-chikugo. 45233. 

Ijzerrark. 45426. 

Klein koren, 45886. 
•rooi koren, 45371. 

Louren's, 45447. 

Malan's, 45440. 

Media, 45445. 

(Orange Free State), 45368-45447. 

Ou baard, 45381, 45406. 

(Persia), 45323-45325. 

Poulard, 45447. 

Primrose. 45429. 

Red Egyptian. 45374, 45403, 45416. 

Rooi kaal koren, 45383. 
wolhaar, 45420. 

Sibies koren, 45384. 

Stromberg rooi. 45391. 
rooi koren, 45374. 

Talawair, 45376. 

Transvaal rooi wolhaar, 45396. 
wolhaar, 45375, 45398, 45399. 
45404, 45433, 45434. 

Unnamed, 45323-45325, 45379, 
45390, 45392, 45394, 45397, 45401, 
45407, 45409-45414, 45416-45419, 
45422, 45425, 45430, 45438, 46439, 
45442, 45443, 45472, 45473. 

White Australian, 45424. 

Wit baard koren, 45378. 



86 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Wheat, Triticum spp. — Continued. 
Wolhnter, 45386. 
Wol koren, 45435. 
Zwaart baard, 45444. 

Yang-tao, Aetinidia chmenstSy 45588. 
Yu t8*ai, Brasaica peJUnenaU, 4525% 
45264. 



Zanonia macrocarpa. See Macroza- 

nonia macrocarpa. 
Zea mays, 45498, 454d9. 
ZUiphus jujuba. See Ziziphus mav- 
ritiana, 
mauHHana, 45625-45658. 
misiol, 45227. 
Zomia diphylla gracilis, 45489. 



JUN 211922 

iMoad 11*7. 1032. 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
UiS .BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 
WnXIAH A. TAiaOR, CkitfifBw^ 

■i S O . S" 

"^ "" INVENTORY 

or 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PIANT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 1 

TO MARCH 31, 1918. 



(No. H; Nm. 46706 to 46071.) 



Issued MsT. 1D23. 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

WILLIAM A. TAYLOR. Ckit/ of Buriau. 



INVENTORY 

OF 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGK SEED ASD PLANT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROMJANUARY 1 

TO MARCH 31, 1918. 



(No. 54; Nm. 45705 to 45971.) 



BUBEAU OF PLANT INDUSTBY. 



Chief of Bureau, William A. Taylor. 

Aasocfate Chief of Bureau, Kabl F. Kxllebman. 

Officer in Charge of PublioaUone, J. B. Bockwsll. 

A99i9tant in Charge of Busineee Operatiofu, H. B. Allanson. 



FoRmoN Seed and Plant IntroddOtion. 

BCIENTinC STAFF. 

David FairchlM, Agricultural Ewplorer i» Charge. 

P. H. Dorsett, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Plant Introduction Gardens. 
B. T. Galloway, Plant Pathologist, Special Research Projects. 
Peter Bisset, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Etoperimenters* Service. 
WllBon Popenoe and J. F. Bock, Agricultural Ewplorers. 

B. A. YouDg, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Dasheen and Tropical 7am Investigations. 
H. C. Skeels, Botanist, in Charge of Collections. 

O. P. Van Eseltlne, Assistant Botanist, in Charge of Publications. 

L. G. Hoover, Assistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Chayote Investigations. 

C. C. Thomas, Assistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Jujube Investigations. 
B. L. Crandall, Assistant in Charge of Photographic Laboratory. 

P. G. Bussell and Patty Newbold, Scientific Assistants. 

D. A. "Biaaett Superintendent in Charge, Bell Plant Introduction Garden, Glenn Dale, ifd. 

Edward Goucher, Plant Propagator. 
J. E. Morrow, Superintendent in Charge, Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Calif. 

Henry Klopfer, Plant Propagator. 
Edward SimmondB, Superintendent in Charge, Plant Introduction Garden, Miami, Fla. 

Charles H. Steffani,. Plant Propagator. 
W. A. Patten, Superintendent, Plant IntroduaUon Cfarden, Brooksville, Fla. 
Henry Jnenemann^ Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Bellingham, WasK 

E. J. Bankln, Assistant in Charge, Plant Introduction Garden, Savannah, Ga. 
Collaborators: Thomas W. Brown and Bobert H. Forbes, Cairo, Egypt; A. C. Hartless, 

Seh&runpur, India; B. W. D. Holway, Faribault, Minn.; Barboar Lattarop, Chicago, 
III.; Dr. H. L. Lyon, Honolulu, Hawaii; Henry Nehrling, Gotha, Fla.; Charles T. 
Simpson,. Littleriver, Fla.; Dr. L. Trabut, Algiers, Algeria; Dr. William Treleaee. 
Urhana, III.; E. H. Wilson, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

II 



(J jN T E iN t s . 



Page. 

iDtroductory statement 1 

Inventory T 

Index of common and scientific names S 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Plate I. A handsome, fall-blooming, broad-leaved evergreen from south- 
ern China. (Gordania (ixiUaris (Roxb.) Szyszyl, S. P. I. 
No. 45718) 10 

11. Koum^ nuts from Zanzibar. {Telfairia pcdata (J. E. Smith) 

Hook., S. P. I. No. 45923) 10 

III. Fruiting branch of a new disease-resistant chinquapin from 

China. iCastanea seguMi Dode, S. P. I. No. 45949) 48 

IV. A windbreak of athel protecting a date garden at Indio, Calif. 

{Tamarix aphylla (L.) Karst., S. P. I. No. 45952) 48 

ni 



INVENTORY OF SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 
BY THE OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT 
INTRODUCTION DURING THE PERIOD FROM JAN- 
UARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918 (NO. 54; NOS. 45705 
TO 459T1). 



INTBODUCTOBY STATEMENT. 

This fifty-fourth inventory represents a war-time period and is 
small in numbers, but some very interesting and it is hoped valuable 
introductions are included in its pages. 

Perhaps the most notable collections included are those made by 
Prof. F. C. Eeimer, whose studies of pear-blight and whose search 
after a resistant species of Pyrus are among the most interesting oc- 
currences in the field of plant pathology. Prof. Keimer, at consider- 
able financial sacrifice and personal risk, made a thorough canvass of 
the pear situation in China and collected as a result of his work what 
is certainly the most comprehensive assortment of oriental forms and 
species of the genus Pyrus (Nos. 45821 to 45850) which has ever been 
introduced. He believes it includes the material from which in all 
probability will be produced, by selection and breeding with the Euro- 
pean pears, the varieties resistant to fire-blight which are adapted for 
stocks because of their freedom from this disease. He thinks from it 
will come the hardy varieties of pears which in time will be grown 
in the northern Great Plains region, where pear growing is now 
impossible, and he finds that a few varieties of these oriental pears 
are sufficiently good in quality to warrant their use without improve- 
ment in those regions where the fire-blight has hitherto made pear 
growing unprofitable. 

Pyrus hetvlaefolia X phaeocarpa he found growing on dry hill- 
sides, on the plains, and even in ponds where for a large part of the 
year water covered its roots a foot deep. This hybrid is found from 
extreme northern China to the Yangtze River. This may be useful 
in America as a stock, since it is used in this way in China. It is 
unfortunately not blight resistant, however, but since this disease does 
not exist, so far as known, in Europe it may be more valuable there. 

Pyrus caUeryana Prof. Reimer gathered from its northernmost 
limit, central Chosen (Korea). Pyrus phaeocarpa becomes a tree 

1 



2 SKEUS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

60 feet in height and 2J feet in diameter. Pyrua sernUata, a species 
from which, apparently, have originated some of the small-fniited 
cultivated varieties of central China and which has shown a marked 
degree of blight resistance, is represented. Pyrus usaurienHs is the 
species of which young trees (from seed which Mr. Frank N. Meyer 
collected) have shown a higher degree of resistance to blight than 
any other species yet tested. It is from this that have arisen some of 
the best cultivated pears of China such as the " Ya Kuang li," a large 
pear resembling the Bartlett, which compares well in flavor with the 
best European pears; the " Suan li," a small but very juicy pear 
of tart flavor; and the " Pai li," a medium -sized lemon-yellow pear of 
excellent flavor. 

The researches on crown-gall and the search for a stock for the 
stone fruits have revealed the fact that the Japanese mume {Prunu$ 
mitme, Nos. 45876 to 46881 ) is worthy of careful study, and through 
the kindness of Prof. Onda a collection of the most promising vari- 
eties has been obtained. These include the varieties which are most 
used by the Japanese for the production of their pickled mume, a 
kind of pickle which for sourness makes all other pickles seem sweet. 
There are said to be several hundred varieties of this species (which 
is classed as an apricot rather than a plum), and a thorough canvass 
of the various forms should be made. 

As the result of many years of plant breeding and selection. Dr. 
Van Fleet has produced some remarkable varieties of chestnuts of 
the species Castanea crenata and of the Chinese species which Mr. 
Meyer introduced {C. moUissima), which is resistant to the bark 
disease. He has produced some interesting hybrids between Cog- 
fan ea (renata and C. pumila^ the common chinquapin. These are 
for trial as orchard trees for the production of table chestnuts (Nos. 
45858 to 45866). 

In this connection Mr. Meyer's discovery of a shrubby chinquapin 
{Castanea seguinii^ No. 45949), which is found on the mountain 
slopes of central China and which appears to be immune to the bark 
disease and at the same time better adapted to moist locations, is 
worthy of mention. 

In 1898 Prof. Hansen introduced a Russian variety of quince 
{Cydonia ohlonga^ S. P. I. No. 1123), which at Murdock, Kans., has 
proved hardy and which bears excellent fruit, whereas the standard 
varieties do not fruit there. Budded plants of this variety are being 
again distributed under Nos. 45889 and 45890. 

During the winter of 1917-18, when Mr, Meyer was in Ichang, he 
made an investigation of the Ichang lemon, which, according to 
the researches of Swingle, is to be considered as a new species of the 
genus Citrus (C. ichang erms). He found that it was used by the 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 8 

Chinese largely as a " room perfumer," and he remarks in regard 
to their use of it that '' they carry them about to take an occasional 
smell of them, especially when passing malodorous places." But 
by the Europeans in Ichang the fruits of this lemon are preferred 
to the ordinary lemon for making lemonades. Since trees of it in 
the Changyang region have withstood temperatures of 19® F., it 
may have special value because of its hardiness. Mr. Meyer's intro- 
duction (No. 45931) is a large variety of this remarkable fruit. 

The yang-tao {Actinidia ckmeims) has so far established itself 
in this country that there are hundreds of plants of it scattered in 
private places from the southern Atlantic coast to Puget Sound. 
It has fruited sparingly, but its fruits have decided promise, being 
of excellent flavor and having good shipping qualities. The intro- 
duction .by Meyer of a smooth-skinned variety (No. 45946) from the 
Hupeh Province, which he says " combines the flavors of the goose- 
berry, strawberry, pineapple, guava, and rhubarb," is not without 
especial interest at this time. 

In the koum6 of Zanzibar {Telfairia pedata^ No. 46923) we may 
have a valuable addition to the list of tropical table nuts, providing 
it is a heavy bearer. Through the late Mr. Buysman, who con- 
ducted a private plant-introduction garden for many years at 
Lawang, Java, the first seeds of this curious cucurbit were received. 
It is a rank-growing tropical liana, covering the trees at the edge 
of the forests of East Africa. It produces fruits 3 feet long and 8 
inches in diameter, bearing over 250 large, flat, oily seeds the size 
of an almond and of good flavor. Reports on this species have also 
been sent in by Dr. H. L. Shantz, who saw it during his exploration 
of East Africa and formed a favorable impression of its qualities. 

Little has been done in the way of providing the Tropics with a 
good table grape, although there are species of Yitis which it would 
seem might easily be developed for this purpose. In Vitis sp. (No. 
45796), a wild species from the brushwood of the low country of 
Zacuapam, Mexico, which tastes like a Catawba, and in another small- 
fruited form (Vitis tUiaefolia^ No. 45797), both sent in by Dr. C. A. 
Purpus, we may have species which the plant breeder can use to 
advantage. 

From our collaborator, Dr. L. Trabut, whose remarkable work 
has won for him the Frank N. Meyer memorial medal for distinctive 
services in the field of plant introduction, we have received an inter- 
esting species of wild rice from West Africa* Unlike the true rice, 
it sends out rootstocks, and from its character of holding its foliage 
for several months it converts swampy lands into excellent pastures. 
It rises to 1^ meters in height and, like our own wild rices, scatters 
its seeds, making the collection of grain difficult. Chevalier has 



4 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

classed this Oryza harthU (No. 46717) as one of the very best for^ 
age plants of West Africa, and it is as such that it is being tried here. 

One of the most spectacular introductions of recent years into the 
Southwest is that of the athel, an African tamarisk {Tamwrix 
aphyUa^ No. 46962), which is considered the best of the Egyptian 
species both for timber and as a .windbreak by Dr. Trabut, from 
whom the plants originally came. They constitute one of the best of 
the many gifts of Dr. Trabut to this country. In the Coachella Val- 
ley its handsome form is already transforming the landscapes and 
adding great rows of beautifully shaped trees to the desert. Its 
rapid growth even exceeds that of the Eucalyptus, and the settlers 
there are most enthusiastic about its value. To Prof. J. J. Thomber 
belongs the credit for its introduction in this region, for the trees 
now in the valley were introduced by him, although in 1899 Mr. 
Walter T. Swingle secured and shipped in plants noted in our In- 
ventory No. 7 under the name Tamarix articvlata^ No. 3343. Un- 
fortunately, these plants died en route, owing to the recall to the 
port of departure of the ship on which they were placed and to a 
consequent delay of three months in reaching this country. The 
practical utilization of the plant is due to the prompt recognition 
of its value by Mr. Bruce Drummond, of the Indio Date Grarden. 

Whether it would be advisable to introduce the gall insect, which 
Dr. Trabut calls to our attention and which produces on this tamarisk 
large quantities of galls containing 46 per cent of tannin, is a ques- 
tion requiring careful study. 

Mrs. Zelia Nuttall, the noted archaeologist of Mexico, whose love 
for plants has led her to investigate the vegetables used by the Aztecs, 
calls our attention to three forms of a remarkable new vegetable, a 
species of Chenopodium named by Mr. Safford in her honor {Cheno- 
podium wattdUme^ Nos. 46721 to 46723). The large branching in- 
florescences of this rapid-growing plant, gathered before the seeds 
ripen, are cooked as a vegetable. According to Mrs. Nuttall, it 
forms a delicious potherb of peculiar delicacy. Since it grows rap- 
idly and can be cultivated in our Southwest, it deserves special con- 
sideration. 

The success of the roselle {Hibiscus sabdariffa) as a source of 
brilliant jelly-making material and an excellent substitute for cran- 
berry sauce makes Westerns two Philippine varieties of it of special 
interest (Nos. 46800 and 46801). 

Although the mulberry has hardly any real rank in America as an 
orchard fruit, to drop it out of our fence corners and yards and de- 
prive our children of the delights of coloring their faces and their 
clothes with its brilliant juice would be a pity. Morus acidosa (No. 
46708) is a bushy mulberry from the Provinces of Hupeh and 
Szechwan, which when I first saw it in the Arnold Arboretum was 



JANUABY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 5 

covered with quantities of berries with a tart flavor quite different 
from the supersweetness of the ordinary mulberries. It deserves a 
place in our dooryards where there is not room for a mulberry tree. 

Of new or little-known ornamentals the following seem to promise 
unusual interest : A gorgeous yellow-flowered shrub from New Zea- 
land (Pomaderfis elliptica^ No. 45892) ; a Chinese Grordonia from 
Hongkong {G, aanUaria, No. 45718) ; the beautiful AmygcUdths triloba 
(No. 45727), a flowering almond which ranks as one of the most 
beautiful of blooming shrubs; Rosa helenae (No. 45729) from western 
Hupeh, w^here it forms thickets 6 meters across and as many meters 
high, which are covered with masses of fragrant white blooms, ac- 
cording to its discoverer, Mr. E. H. Wilson; Hydrangea paniculata 
praecox (No. 45733), the seeds of which Prof. Sargent collected in 
Hokkaido, Japan, where it makes a growth of 20 feet in height ; and 
Acokamthera speetabilia (No. 45748), a flowering shrub from south- 
western Africa sent in by Mr. Walsingham, of Cairo, which has 
pure- white, scented flowers borne in short, dense cymes. 

The botanical determinations of seeds introduced have been made 
and the nomenclature determined by Mr. H. C. Skeels, while the de- 
scriptive and botanical notes have been arranged by Mr. G. P. Van 
Eseltine, who has had general supervision of this inventory. The 
manuscript has been prepared by Miss Esther A. Celander. 

David Fairchiu), 
Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. (7., At^ust 19, 1921. 



inventory; 



46706 to 46711. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by the Arnold Arboretum. Be- 
celved January 2, 1918. 

45705. CoTONEASTEB FaANCHETi Bols. Malaceffi. 

A very ornamental shrub from Yunnan Province, China, remarkable 
for its graceful form, persistent foliage, and brilliant red fruits. The 
ovate leaves, about 1| inches long, green above and silvery hairy beneath, 
persist almost throughout the winter. The drooping branches, clothed 
when young with white hairs which become brown with age, are abun- 
dantly covered with orange-red oblong fruits, half an inch in length, 
making the plant extremely beautiful for massing effects or as a bush. 
The white flowers are in corymbs of 5 or 10. The plant is easily culti- 
vated, will flourish in any soil, and requires only an airy exi)08ure for 
abundant fruitfulness. It can be multiplied easily by seeds or cuttings. 
(Adapted from Revue Horticolet vol. 79, p. 256,) 

45706. CoTONEASTEB iioRizoNTALis PERPusiLLA C. Schueld. Malaceao. 

This ornamental plant, a native of China, is one of the most charming 
and distinct of all hardy shrubs ; It has a marked flat-distidhous mode of 
growth. In open ground, it grows about 3 feet high, producing flat, table- 
like branches densely clothed with tiny, orbicular, deep lustrous-green 
deciduous leaves. The young wood is covered with a thick brown wooL 
The small, abundant flowers are pink-white, and although the plant la 
very pretty when In bloom, it attracts more notice when in fruit; the 
berries are small, very plentiful, and scarlet when ripe. This shrub 
is very pretty, growing on ledges of a rockery or at the foot of a wall 
where it will grow 6 or 7 feet high flat against the wall. It can be in- 
creased by both cuttings and seeds. (Adapted from the CUtrdenen^ 
Chronicle, vol S2, ser, 3, p. 91.) 

45707. CoTONEASTEB zABELi C. Schueld. Malaceffi. 

An ornamental bushy shrub up to 7 feet in height, with corymbs of 
pink or pinkish flowers which are followed by clusters of red fruits. 
This is the common cotoneaster of the thickets in western Hupeh. The 

> All introdactionB consist of seeds unless otherwise noted. 

It should be understood that the varietal names of fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other 
plants used In this inventory are those under which the material was received when intro- 
duced by the OfBce of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction and, further, that the print- 
ing of such names here does not constitute their official publication and adoption in this 
country. As the different varieties are studied, their identity fully established, their en- 
trance into the American trade forecast, and the use of varietal names for them in Ameri- 
can literature becomes neceseary, the foreign varietal designations appearing in this 
inventory will undoubtedly be changed in many cases by the specialists interested in the 
various groups of plants, to bring the forms of the names Into harmony with recognized 
American codes of nomenclature. 

7 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

oval-elliptic leaves are usually rounded and emarginate or mucronulate. 
but occasionally acute; often all fonns are found on the same shoot. 
(Adapted from Sargent, Plantae Wilaonianaey vol, 1, p. 166.) 

45708. Mori R acidosa (irlffith. Moraceie. Mulberry. 

Usually a broad shrub from 3 to 16 feet in height but occasionally 
forming a tree up to 25 feet in height. It is found in the Provinces of 
Hupeh and Szechwan, China. The leaves are very variable In size and 
shape and are not used for feeding silkworms. The fruits are dark red 
or shining black and palatable. (Adapted from Sargent, Plantae Wi7- 
sonianae, vol. 5, p. 300.) 

45700. Pri'nvs serrilata pvbesckns Wilson. Aniygdalaceae. 

Flowerinsr cherry. 

"At its best this variety te a tree of moderate size, from 13 to 16 
meters tall and from 1 to 2 meters in girth of trunk, but I saw very few- 
such large trees in Japan. In habit and in the size and color of the 
flowers It agrees closely w^ith var. spontanea (white or pink, from 1.5 
to 2.5 centimeters, usually 2 centimeters, in diameter). The bninch- 
lets as a rule remain gray for a longer period and do not assume the 
characteristic chestnut-brown color until after several years." (WW*o*i, 
The Cherries of Japan, p, 35.) 

45710. PRUNUS TOMKNTOSA Thuub. Amygdalacese. 

This shrub, 6 to 8 feet in height, appears perfectly hardy and vigorous; 
it flowers and fruits well at the Arnold Arboretum and withstands per- 
fectly the rigorous winters at Ames, Iowa ; Its fruit buds are hardy and 
its flowers endure severe frost without Injury. It forms a broad, spread- 
ing, twiggy bush of numerous branches rising from the ground and clothed 
with branches to the base. These lower branches, where they touch the 
moist ground, often send out roots and form independent plants. The 
bark is a gray or bronzy brown, smooth at first, but finally scaling off 
laterally in thin flakes like the bark of the yellow birch. The downy gray 
young branches are thickly covered with buds, from which a profusion 
of flowers and leaves appear simultaneously In early spring. The ses- 
sile flowers, crow*ded in the axi4s of the leaves, are smaller than those of 
the common cherry and are white or light rose in color. The leaves are 
ovate, serrate, sparingly hair>- above, densely and softly so l>eneath, with 
long, slender, persistent stipules. The red cherries, half an inch in diame- 
ter, are slightly covered with very short, inconspicuous hairs; the firm. 
Juicy, pleasantly acid flesh is without the noticeable staining qualities 
characteristic of some of the wild cherries and plums. With careful 
selection and cultivation this little cherry might prove of some economic 
value. Native to northern China. (Adapte<l from Garden and Forc$t^ 
vol. 5, p. 58.) 

45711. pRUNus TOMENTOSA ENDOTRicHA Koehue. Amygdulacesp. 

This variety differs from Prunus tomentosa in that the leaves are 
elliptic to oblong, with a very short petiole, and the fruit is dark red, 
about half an inch in diameter. 

46712. Carica papaya L. Papayaceap. Papaya* 

From the city of Panama, Panama. Presented by Mr. B. H. A. Groth. Re- 
ceived January 2, 1918. 

Papaya seeds imported for experimental purposes. 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 9 

" There are included both yellow and pink-fleshed varieties of many sizes and 
shapes/* (Oroth.) • • 

45713 to 45716. Prunus spp. Amygdalaceae. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andiieux & Co. Received 
January 2, 1918. 

Introduced for exiwrimental use by the Office of Horticultural and Pomo- 
loidcal Investigations. • 

45713. Pbunus avium L. Mazzard cherry. 

A common species often used as a stock and also, certain forms at 
least, as an ornamental. 

45714. Pbunus abmeniaca L. Apricot. 

45715. Pbunus cebasifeba myboralana (L.) C. Schneld. 

Myrobalan plum. 

The Myrobalan plum (a popular stock for domestioa plums) is now 
regarded as a culture form of Prunus cerasifera, though it is often 
held as a distinct species under the name of P. myrobalana. 

45716. Pbunus domestic a L. Plum. 

A variety called " Julian " by Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. It seems not 
to be the variety Juliana as understood in this country, however. 

45717. Oryza barthii Cheval. Poaceae. Bice. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received January 
3, 1918. 

An interesting African species, used for both human food and forage. In 
habit it differs markedly from the cultivated rices, throwing out rootstocks to 
a length of several decimeters, with scattering stems rising from them. The 
foliage remains green for two or three months and converts many swampy 
lands into excellent pastures. The stems rise to a height of 1 to li meters — 
even higher in deep water. The panicle is short; and the ripe grain, which 
is small, falls out of the husk very easily. For this reason it is impossible 
to cut the heads for thrashing without losing most of the grain. To obviate 
this difficulty, the aborigines, in those regions where the plant is common, 
paddle among the ripe grain in their canoes, shaking the panicles over a 
small calabash, or basket, held in one hand. Most of the grain falls into the 
basket and is saved. If It is late in the season, the ripe grain will float on 
the surface of the water and that which falls outside of the basket may be 
recovered. 

This species is not cultivated ; in fact, the grain has very limited use, owmg 
to the difficulty in harvesting it. It is sold at a very high price, however, 
and is considered a product of unusually choice quality. 

The grain is not so important, from an economic standpoint, as the forage 
which the plant furnishes. It is considered one of the verj' best forages of 
West Africa. (Adapted from Chevalier, Bulletin du Museum National d'Hia- 
toire Naturelle, 1910, No, 7, p. 406.) 

45718 to 45720. 

From Hongkong, China. Presented by Mr. W. J. Tutcher, Botanical and 
Forestry Department Received January 3, 1918. 



10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45718 to 45720— Continued. 

45718. GoBDONiA AXILLARIS (Roxb.) Szyszyl. Theacese. 
{Camellia axillaris Roxb.) 

A handsome evergreen shrub from China* which succeeds very well 
in a good conservatory [in England], but is rather more sensitive to 
cold than the other camellias. It bears large, yellowish white, axillary 
flowers, with obcordate, partly crumpled petals and many yellow 
stamens of unequal length, connected at the base, falling; ott with and 
holding the petals together. The leaves are a beautiful dark glossy 
green; the lower are serrate, the upper quite entire. (Adapted from 
Curtis' s Botanicea Magazine, pi. £0i7.) 

For an illustration of this tree in its native habitat, see Plate I. 

45719. Ptebocabfub iNDicrs Willd. Fabaceie. 

Padouk, A tall tree with ascending glabrous branches, compound leaves 
6 to 9 inches long, leaflets 2 to 4 inches long, yellowish flowers in large 
terminal or axillary panicles, and an orbicular pod 2 inches broad. It 
is distributed through the Malay Archipelago, the Philippines, and China. 
(Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, vol. 2, p. 2S9,) 

MacmiUan, in 'his "Handbook of Tropical Gardening and Planting,** 
lists this species as a shade tree suitable for low, moist regions (annual 
rainfall 70 inches or more). He also lists it as a tree the wood of which 
is valuable for timber. 

45720. TuTCHBRiA 8PECTABILIS (Champ.) Dunn. Theacese. 

A handsome, ornamental small tree or shrub, indigenous to the Island 
of Hongkong. The leaves are alternate, short petioled, coriaceous, and 
shining. The flowers are about 2^ inches in diameter, usually having 
seven white, roundish obovate petals. The fruit is the size of a small 
apple, retaining at the base the persistent sepals and containing several 
fairly large seeds. The plant flowers in May and fruits in Nov^nber. 
(Adapted from Champion, Transactions of the Linnean Society, vol. 
21, p. in.) 

m 

46721 to 45723. Chenopodium nuttaujae Safford. Chenopo- 

. diacese. Huauhtzonfli. 

From Mexico. Presented by Mrs. Zelia Nuttall, (3asa Alvarado, Ooyacan. 
City of Mexico. Received January 4, 1918. Quoted notes by W. E. 
Safford. 

45721. " Xochihuauhtli (flowering huauhtli). A plant cultivated near 
the city of Mexico for the sake of its prolific branching inflorescences, 
which are gathered before they are quite mature, while the seeds are 
still soft, and cooked with other Ingredients as a vegetable. This 
variety, with yellowish or pale-brown, discoid seeds, is the most popular. 
The inflorescences are known by the Aztec name huwuhtzontU, signify- 
ing " huauhtli heads." Botanically the plant is closely allied to Cheno 
podium paganum Reichenb. and C. alhum L. It is quite distinct from 
C, quinoa Willd., the celebrated food staple of the Peruvian highlands ; 
and it must not be confused with the plant called miohihuauhtli (fish- 
egg huauhtli). which is a white-seeded Amaran thus, not a Chenopo- 
dium." 



A Handsome Fall-Bloominq, Broad- leaved Evergreen from 
Southern China. (Gordonia axillaris iroxb.) Szvszyl, S. P. r. 
No. 46718.) 

TUB Urge-flowered avergTHn shrub or smsJltrpflsul particular value, sliwe so lew trees blonm ill 
late siUDmer ind tail. The lai^, shining, dark«r^ii leaves aod creamy white llowers, 2 to 
,1 Inches across, are very attractive and should be a welcome addition to the t^rdens of ibe 

There are only 18 known species of Oordorii. 2o[urhU.'h b'b native toaJUtboastern North 
America and Eheothers native id soulheaslern Asia and the Malay Archipelanj. rPhoto- 
pnvphHi by E. H. Wilson, No. 391, near Klattng, Sieph«an. China, October 5, ISOK.) 



ThesPnuisarppnidiU'fd in alarECKDurdUkPfruilSfoptlonniiiiclfllooliinliametcr. Emch gourd 
contBiiis Ma ol thi-s? svfds. The iliio which bears Ihcm is a tnipiral. rank-gniwiiie mrurbti 

li; ii:iirD|ieans as tahle nu)a and for Hat-oriiir rakes, and aswpet, plea^ut-UsliiifMUbleailii 
r,t traf ttni iVmn thi^m. They hat'c Iwen serinusljr cansidcrpd as a sourre of v«s«Iable oil, but 



(he liitlor inner skin sumiuiicllnii thr nli- kcriieli 
to be overcome bfUrr liiey arc eligible (or (ll^pnll 
thPi>'If!<: uCthe roTfsl and hocause nr its edible niil 



JAKUABY 1 TO MABCH 31, 1918. II 

45721 to 45723— Continued. 

45728. '*TlilhuauhiH (black hnauhtli). A plant used by the Mexicans 
as a potherb, possibly the original form from which the pale-seeded 
woohihuaUhtU has been developed by cultivation. Like the latter, the 
Immature Inflorescence {huauhtzimtU, or huauhtli heads) is used for 
food. The seeds of this variety, discoid in form with the periphery 
crenated, resemble very closely those of Chenopodium alhum and C. 
paganum. The plant should not be confused with the common forms 
of Amaranthus, which are used when young by the Mexicans as pot- 
herbs and which have jet black, very highly polished seeds.** 

45728. '* Tlapalhuauhtli (red huauhtli). A variety of xoohihuauhiU 
having reddish or rose-colored seeds. Like the yellow or pale-brown 
variety, they are in the form of disks with the periphery distinctly 
crenulate and differ decidedly from Chenopodium quinoa, of the Peru- 
vian highlands, to which they are botanically related. The prolific, 
branching inflorescences are gathered before the seeds are mature 
and cooked with other ingredients as a vegetable. This plant must not 
be confused with the sacred michihuauhtli of the Aztecs, which is not 
a Ghenopodium, but a white-seeded Amaranthus.** 

46724 to 46726. 

Prom Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. F. G. Walsingham, Horticultural 
Section, Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. I^eceived January 5. 
1918. 

45724. Acacia scobpioides (L.) W. F. Wight. Mimosaceae. 
(A. arabica Willd.) 

A tree which varies greatly in size in different districts. The leaves 
are compound, consisting of 10 to 80 pairs of linear-oblong leaflets 5 to 6 
centimeters long. The flowers are borne in clusters of two to six in each 
upper axil ; the petals are almost entirely united and twice as long as the 
calyx. The pod is linear, straight, or slightly curved. (Adapted from 
Muschlerj A Manual Flora of Egypt, p. 460.) 

The gum which exudes from the branches of this tree is used as a 
local application, being soothing to irritated or inflamed mucous mem- 
branes. It possesses, however, little medicinal value of its own, its 
principal use being as a vehicle for more powerful remedies. (Adapted 
from the National Standard Dispensatory, p. 6.) 

45725. Cbotaxaria sp. Fabacese. 

These were sent in as blue flowered. They agree closely with C. juncea 
L., which is yellow flowered. 

45726. DoDONAEA viscosA (L.) Jacq. Sapindacese. 

" A very interesting hedge plant which is beautifully dense and green, 
responds to the shears perfectly, and when taken in hand early makes 
a perfectly compact wall clear to the ground. The seedling plants form 
a rather deep taproot and must be transplanted with some care on that 
account. This is one of the most perfect tropical hedge plants I have 
ever seen. The shrub is called tatta by the natives.** {Prof, S, C, 
Mason.) 



12 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46727 to 46729. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by the Arnold Arboretum. Re- 
ceived January 8, 1918. 

45727. Amygdalus triloba (Liudl.) Kicker. Amygdalaceie. 

(Prunus triloba Lindl.) Flowerinsr almond. 

One of the most beautiful of all hardy flowering shrubs; it is covereil 
with a profusion of pink and white flowers and will thrive in almost any 
good garden soil, either as a bush in the open or trained to a wall. It 
may be planted at any time during the winter, and once it has filled Its 
allotted sptfce it should be closely pruned each spring immediately after 
blooming. The flowers are borne on the young wood; hence, by re- 
moving this promptly at the time stated, vigorous new shoots are pro- 
duced for flowering the following year. (Adapted from The Garden, vol 
79, p. 17,) 

45728. CoTONEASTEB FOVEOLATA Relid. and Wils. Malaeese. 

" Cotoneaster foveolata is a tall shrub with black fruit and leavfs 
which late in the autumn turn to brilliant shades of orange and scarlet. 
For its autumn foliage this plant might well find a place in every 
garden." {Arnold Arboretum Bulletin of Popular Information No. 50.) 

45729. Rosa helenae Rehd. and Wils. Rosacea. Bose. 

** Rosa helenae is very abundant in rocky places from river level to 
1,500 meters everywhere in western Hupeh and eastern Szechwan, but 
it has not yet been reported from farther west. In wayside thickets and 
by the banks of streams it forms tangled masses often 6 meters tall and 
as much through, and in the margins of woods it rambles over small 
trees. When covered with masses of its white fragrant flowers thi.s 
rose is very beautiful. It has proved quite hardy and has flowered pro- 
fusely at the Arnold Arboretum.** {Sargent, Plantae Wilaonianae, rol. 
2, pt. 2, p. Sll.) 

46730 and 45731. 

From the city of Panama, Panama. Plants presented by Sr. Ramon Arias- 
Feraud. Received January 9, 1918. 

45730. Cephaelis sp. Rubiaceflp. 

"Obtained in the Chiriqui Mountains." {Arias-Feraud,) 

" RaiciUa, or ipecacttana. A shrub 8 to 16 inches high, with ascending 
or erect simple stem and somewhat creeping root. It is one of the sources 
of the medicinal ipecacuana. The typical plant grows in Peru, but 
specimens of closely allied or identical species from Central Amo-lca 
are in the economic collection of the United States Department of Agri- 
culture. 

" Roots and stems only were received, so that it is impossible to iden- 
tify this plant with certainty." {W. E. Safford.) 

45731. Smilax officinalis H. B. K. Smilacacese. SaxsaparUla. 

"Obtained in the Chiriqui Mountains." {Arias-Feraud.) 

" ChiriqtU zarzaparilla. A climbing plant with square stem, armed 
along the angles with triangular prickles resembling those of a rose. 
Leaves glabrous, often a foot long, variable in form, often triangular or 
oblong, acute at the apex, cordate or somewhat auriculate at the base, 
with two or three longitudinal nerves on each side of the midrib ; petioles 



JANUAKY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 13 

45780 and 45731— Continued. 

bearing a pair of long tendrils some distance from the base. Flowers in 
stalked umbels. This species has been collected in Honduras. It bears 
a certain resemblance to the Mexican Smilax medica Schlecht. et Cham, 
in its much larger leaves, distinctly angled stems, and stouter spines. 
It is very distinct from the species of smilax recently received from 
Jamaica. The roots are of a cinnamon-brown color and are said to be 
more amylaceous than the 'Jamaica sarsaparilla * of commerce. It is 
one of the principal sources of sarsaparilla." (W, E. Safford,) 

45732. Oryza sativa L. Poaceae. Bice. 

From Nanhsuchou, Anhwei Province, China. Presented by Mr. J. Lossing 
Buck, Nanhsuchou Agricultural Experiment Station. Received January 
10, 1918. 

"A bearded variety called 'fragrant rice* by the Chinese. It brings three 
times the price of other xrice on the market It is grown in a restricted area 
about 20 miles north of Nanhsuchou." {Buck.) 

45733. Hydrangea paniculata praecox Rehder. Hydrangeaceae. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by the Arnold Arboretum. Re- 
ceived January 11, 1918. 

'There are two forms of this hydrangea with perfect and ray flowers, and 
one of these, variety prascox, is Just coming into flower [July 5] ; and the 
other, variety tardiva, will not be in flower for several weeks. There are three 
plants of the variety praecox in the collection, differing in the size of the 
flower clusters and in the size of the ray flowers. The handsomest and the 
earliest of these was raised from seeds collected by Prof. Sargent in Hok- 
kaido, where it grows into a small tree sometimes 20 or 80 feet tall.*' {Arnold 
Arboretum Bulletin of Popular Information No, 28.) 

45734 to 45745. Zea mays L. Poacese. Com. 

From Peru. Received through Mr. William F. Montavon, American com- 
mercial attach^, Lima. Received January 4, 1918. Quoted notes by 
Mr. E. B. Brown, of the Office of Com Investigations. 

''Varieties of the flour type introduced for experimental and breeding work." 

45734. No. 1. Rosa subido, Sapallanga. "A purple-tinged variety." 

45735. No. 17. Colorado Jaspeado, Churcampa. "A strawberry-coloxed 
or calico-colored variety." 

45736. No. 22. Guindo, Marcaballe. "A red variety." 

45737. No. 23. Plomo Jaspeado, Sicaya. "A mottled-purple variety." 

45788. No. 11. Encamado, Paucarbamba. "A strawberry-colored or 
calico-colored variety." 

45789. No. 3. Beata, Sicaya. "A mottled-purple variety." 

45740. No. 25. Negro, Huanchos. "A dark reddish purple variety. 

45741. No. 24. Polvo de Oro, Colcabamba. "A golden-brown variety." 

45742. No. 28. Blanco Perlas de la Reina, Acobamba. "A white variety." 

45743. No. 16. Colorado Oscuro, Acostambo. "A red variety." 

45744. No. 10. Sangre de Toro, Surcubamba. "A dark-red variety." 

45745. No. 41. Flor de Retrama, Chongos. "A yellow variety." 
68805—22 2 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBTBD. 

46746 and 4B747. Ptrus spp. Malaceae. Fear. 

From Stotts Station, D. C. Presented by Mr. Bernard F. Joy. Received 
January 15, 1918. 

45746. Pybub Bp. 

"A seedling pear of the oriental type, with small, hard, roundlsti 
fruit, found on the place of Mr. Bernard F. Joy, Stotts Station, D. C, 
near the Eastern Star Home. Foliage glossy and leathery ;• wood clean, 
smooth, and bright; growth vigorous; tree very fruitful and has never 
blighted; fruit about the size of a walnut, hard and gritty, practically 
worthless; may be valuable as a resistant stock. According to Mr. Joy, 
this tree came with a lot of varieties he purchased about 8 or 10 years 
ago. More than likely it was a budded or grafted tree, and the bud 
or graft failed to grow." (B. T, Oalloioay,) 

45747. Pybus sp. 

"A seedling pear of the oriental type, tvith large, roundish, apple- 
shaped fruit ; found on the place of Mr. Bernard F. Joy, Stotts Station, 
D. C, not far from the Eastern Star Home. A vigorous tree which so 
far has not been subject to blight. The fruit is woody and gritty, but 
quite sweet. The tree has a clean habit and may prove valuable as a 
stock." (B, T. Galloway,) 

45748. AooKANTHERA SPECTABIIJ8 (Sond.) Beiith. Apocynacefie. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. F. G. Walslngham, Horticultural 
Section, Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received January 5, 
1918. 

A large shrub, native to the western districts of South Africa from Albany to 
Port Natal, growing on wooded sand hills near the sea. The glabrous branches 
are stout, green, and obscurely angled. The coriaceous, elliptic leaves are 
8 to 5 inches long and narrowed into a very short petiole. The pure white, 
sweet-scented flowers borne on very short pedicels in densely fascicled short 
cymes make the plant very beautiful at flowering time. In fact, so dense does 
the inflorescence become that it often appears as a globose head near the top of 
the branch. Some of the natives are said to consider this plant poisonous. 
(Adapted from CurtU!'^ Botanical Magazine, pi. 6S59,) 

45 749. CoLOCAsiA EscuiiENTA (L.) Schott. Aracese. Taro» 

From Okitsu, Japan. Tubers received from Prof. T. Onda, of the Imperial 
Agricultural College. Received Janpary 15, 1918. 

" Kinu-katsugi {Tego^mo), A Japanese taro of the dasheen type, the tubers 
of which are similar in appearance to most other varieties received from that 
country. In comparison with the Trinidad dasheen the cormels, or lateral 
tubers, are small, moist when cooked, and lacking in flavor. However, this 
variety is considered one of the best grown in Japan." '{R, A. Young.) 

4B7B0 to 45764. 

From Lavras, Mlnas Geraes, Brazil. Presented by Dr. Benjamin H. Hunni- 

cutt, Director da Escola Agricola de Lavras. Received January 7, 19184 

45750. Mysciabia cauiiflora (Mart) Berg. Myrtace«e. Jaboticaba. 

" One of the best indigenous fruits of Brazil and, at the same time, one 
of the most curious and interesting, owing to its habit of producing its 
fruits directly upon the trunk and larger branches (cauliflory). Several 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 15 

45750 to 45754— Continued. 

species are grown under the name of jaboticaba; they are still somewhat 
confused botanlcally, but it appears ,that most of the plants common In 
cultivation belong either to Myrciaria cauliflora or M. jaboticaba, fruits 
of the latter being distinguishable from those of the former by the pres- 
ence of a slender stem. 

" The jaboticaba occurs in southern Brazil, both wild and cultivated. It 
is a very handsome tree, reaching a height of 35 or 40 feet, with a dense 
dome-shaped crown. The leaves are small, lanceolate, and light green in 
color ; flowers white, with four petals and a conspicuous tuft of stamens. 
The fruits are produced in the greatest abundance and are the size of 
large grapes, with a tough leathery skin, juicy white pulp of rather aci^ 
aromatic flavor, and two to four flattened oval seeds. The resemblance 
between the jaboticaba and some of the grapes of the Muscadine group, 
e. g., James, is very striking, not only in general appearance but also 
in flavor. 

" The jaboticaba prefers a soil that is rich and deep ; it is rather slow 
of growth, coming into bearing after six or eight years. It withstands 
slight frosts and gives promise of being successful in southern Florida 
and perhaps also in sheltered locations throughout southern California. 
At the present time seed propagation is the only means of multiplication 
which is commonly employed, but inarching or some other means of 
propagation should be utilized to perpetuate good varieties." {Wilsork 
Popenoe, ) 

45751. SoLANUM BULLA Ti'M Veil. Solauacefp. 

Capoeira branca. An interesting plant which grows on the rolling 
prairies of the State of Minas Geraes, Brazil, and which is said to have 
unusual value for feeding live stock, especially horses. 

Analyses made by the Bureau of Chemistry, United States Department 
of Agriculture, show that this plant contains an unusual quantity of 
protein. The percentages shown by these analyses are as follows : Mois- 
ture — Cleaves, 8.36 ; branches, 7.04. Ether extract — leaves, 2.29 ; branches, 
0.59. Protein — leaves, 20.88 ; branches, 14.06. Crude fiber— leaves, 28.03 ; 
branches, 37.45. 

45752. STRYPHN0DENDB05 BAHBATiMAM Mart. Mimosaceff. 

"A small leguminous tree which occurs commonly on the plains of 
the State of Minas Geraes and is said by Plo Correa to be distributed 
from Para in northern Brazil to Sao Paulo In the southern part of the 
country. The bark contains a high percentage of tannin and is known as 
casca da virgiMa4e ; the seeds are said to be poisonous and the lea'ves to 
have medicinal qualities. It is the bark, however, that seems to have 
economic interest, being considered of value for use in tanning. Accord- 
ing to Brazilian authorities it contains as high as 40 per cent of tannin ; 
an analysis made by the Bureau of Chemistry, United States Department 
of Agriculture, gave the following i)ercentage8 : Total dissolved solids, 
81.6; soluble solids in cold water, 28.6; nontannins, 6.7; tannins, 20.1." 
{WiUon Popenoe,) 

45753 and 45754. Zea mays L. Poaceee. Gars. 

45753. Typical yeUow flint from Brazil. 

I 45754. A white variety of the flour type. 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46766. Zea mays L. Poacese. CSotil 

From Caracas, Venezuela. Presented by Mr. Preston McGoodwin, American 
Minister. Received January 8, 1918. 

A native white corn of tlie flour type. Tliis corn is planted widely In 
Venezuela and is exported in large quantities. 

46766. Chayota edulis Jacq. Cucurbitaceae. Chayote. 

{Sechium edule Swartz.) 

From Zacuapam, Mexico. Fruits presented by Dr. C. A. Purpus. Received 
January 3, 1918. 

** The chayote is becoming known in tiie United States as a useful vegetable 
belonging to the squash family. In some parts of tropical America it is eaten 
as commonly as are potatoes in North America and in the same manner : Stewed 
with meat, creamed, and so on. It has not the food value of the potato, but i? 
more comparable in this respect to the squash. In an effort to extend afid 
improve its culture in this country, varieties are being introduced from as 
many regions as possible.'* (Wilaon Popehoe.) 

46757 to 46766. Zea mays L. Poaceae. CoriL 

From Peru. Procured by Mr. William F. Montavon, American- commercial 
attach^, Lima. Received January 10, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. E. B. 
Brown, of the Office of Corn Investigations. 

" Varieties of the flour type introduced for experimental and breeding work. " 

45757. Xo. 20. Punso, Huarnancaca. "A dark-red variety." 

45758. No. 33. Flor de Granada, Pucara. "A pui-ple variety." 

45759. No. 21. CaM con Lecher Huayuca. "A coffee-witli-milk colored 
variety." 

45760. No. 6. Rosa Bajo, Sapallanga. "A purple variety.*' 

45761. No. 2. CremOn Chonpos. "A yellow variety." 

45762. No. 32. Granada, Salcabamba. "A purple variety." 

45763. No. 13. Mixto, Huarnancaca. "A variegated variety." 

45764. No. 8. Pecho de Paloma, Ghupaca. "A purplish and mottle*! 
variety." 

45765. No native name. "A purple and yellow variety." 



45766. Elaeis guineensis Jacq. Phoenicacero. Oil palm. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Mr. P. J. S. Cramer, chief. Plant 
Breeding Station. Received January 23. 1918. 

This palm is very iniiwrtant econom'cally. The fruit is used by the native? 
for food ; an intoxicating drink Is made from the Juice of the stem ; the leaf- 
stalks and leaves are use<i for thatching the native houses; and the fleshy outer 
layer and the kernels of the fruit each yield a commercial oil — that from the 
fleshy part being the ordinary palm oil used in the manufacture of soap and 
candles and that from the kernels being the white or nut oil used for making 
margarine or artiflcial butter. It is a native of tropical West Africa and. 
both wild and in cultivation, occurs over immense areas. (Adapted from 
MacmUlan, Handbook of Tropical Gardetiing and Planting , p. 538.) 

Messrs. Dorsett, Shamelt and Popenoe, in Department of Agriculture Bulle- 
tin No. 445, mention the uses of this tree in Brazil. In regard to the oil from 
the pulp they say : " Dende oil [as it is there called] is an important food prod- 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 17 

uct, entering into the preparation of a number of dishes, some of which, Bucb 
as yatap&, are considered peculiar to the region. While utilized by all classes 
of people, its greatest popularity is among the negroes, long familiarity having 
made dend6 oil almost as indispensable to them as olive oil is to the Spaniard/' 

45767. Coix LACRTMA-joBi MA-YTJEN (Rom.) Stapf. Poacese. 

lla-yuen. 

From Soochow, China. Presented by Prof. N. Gist Gee, Soochow University. 
Received January 10, 1918. 

This variety might be called the cultivated edible JoVM-tears and includes 
many forms, all of which are characterized by having a thin, loose, easily 
broken shell. They are oftoi longitudinally striated and in many examples 
are constricted at the base into what is called an annulus. In the central 
provinces of India, among the aboriginal tribes, this grain forms an important 
article of food. In Japan, where the plant has been introduced, the seeds are 
pounded in a moftar and eaten as meal. (Adapted from The Agricultural 
Ledger, No. IS, p. 217.) 

45768. JuGiiANs CATHAYENsis Dodc. Juglandacese. 

From Rochester, N. Y. Presented by Mr. John Dunbar, Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Parks. Received January 22, 1918. 

A deciduous tree, native to central, western, and southwestern China. At 
low altitudes it forms a bushy tree 15 to 90 feet high, flowering and fruiting 
when 8 to 10 feet high. In the woods and forests it occasionally makes a tree 
40 to 70 feet high. The leaves on young plants are often a yard long, rivaling 
those of Ailanthus and Cedrela. The fruits are produced in clusters of 6 to 
10 and are 1^ to If inches long. The seeds are sweet and pleasantly flavored. 
(Adapted from Gardeners' Chronicle, Sd ed,, vol. 50, p. 189.) 

45769. X Eucalyptus trabuti Vilm. Myrtaceie. Eucalyptus. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received January 
21, 1918. 

"A hybrid between Eucalyptus hotryoides and E. rostraia found in sowing 
seeds from a tree of the former species which stood near one of the latter. 
Always tends to revert to the male parent. It is the first undoubted Eucalyptus 
hybrid, and the existence of hybrids in this genus has been denied by Baron 
Ferdinand Mueller. This hybrid is one of the most vigorous trees of the genus, 
and in a nursery row at the Mustapha Experiment Station it has crowded out 
the pure species. The beautiful red wood is suitable for furniture." (Trabut.) 

45770 to 45773. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. W. Carl McQuiston. Received 
January 24, 1918. 

45770 and 45771. Cuctjmis melo L. Cucurbitace». Melon. 

Introduced for varietal studies. 

45770. De Cavillon. 45771. Egyptian sweet. 

45778. CucuBBiTA pepo L. Cucurbitaceae. Vegetable marrow. 

A garden product much prized in Europe, although little known in 
this country. It thrives well, however, when grown here. The following 
account of the culture and uses of the plant, taken from Gardening lUus- 
trated, is quoted in Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, p. 2960 : 



18 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45770 to 45773— Continued. 

" Vegetable marrawa should be eaten young — say when about one- 
fourth to one-si xteentli their full size. Cut In this state, and boiled 
quickly until quite tender in plenty of water, carefully strained, and 
served with luelted butter, they are second to no vegetable that comes 
to the table, not even excepting green pea^ or asparagus. Early cutting, 
careful cooking, and serving are the chief points to which attention 
sliould be paid; but there are others, one of the principal being rapid 
growth. Grow vegetable marrows quickly and they are almost sure to 
be good; grow them slowly and you will find them often tough and 
bitter. Hence, the soil or place in which they are grown can hardly be 
too rich for them. Not but what they do fairly well in any good garden 
'soil, but the richer it is the better. On a rubbish heap, for instance, 
vegetable marrows grow with wonderful vigor and fruit abundantly." 

45773. Hor.cus SORGHUM jsuDANCNsis (Piper) Hitchc. Poaceae. 
] Sudan grass. 

Introduced about 10 years ago, this grass has become very popular as 
a forage crop. It is easily cured, easily handled as hay, and very 
drought resistant. It Is much superior to ordinary sorghum in the above 
qualities, and in yield, drought resistance, and palatability It appears 
distinctly to outclass Johnson grass. It does best in the South, but has 
been grown in some of the Northern States, Sudan grass is probably 
best adapted to the drier portions of Texas, Oklahoma, and E^ansas ; and 
it seems well adapted for growing with cowpeas for hay and silage. 
(Adapted from the Yearbook of the United States DeparimerU of Agri- 
culture for 1912, p. i95,) 

4B774 and 4577B. Juglans reoia L. Juglandaceae. Walnut 

From Srinagar, Kashmir, India. Nuts presented by Mr. R. K. Koul, KouVs 
Gardens. Received January 24, 1918. 

45774. " This walnut compares favorably in size with the best varietie> 
cultfvated in the United States. Its sheU, however, is rather thick 
and hard. The form of the nut is broadly oblong-oval, the length 
1| inches. Its quality has not been tested, but Judging from its 
external appearance this would appear in most respects to be a good 
variety." {Wilson Popenoe,) 

45775. "A slightly smaller nut than the preceding [S. P. I. No. 45774]. 
and differing markedly in shape. It is slender and tapers slightly 
toward both ends. The outline is almost elliptical. The surface is 
not so heavily wrinkled as in the above variety and in most of those 
grown in the United States. The shell appears to be quite hard. Tlie 
quality of this variety has not been tested." {WUson Popenoe.) 

45776 to 45783. Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott. Aracea. 

Tare. 

From Sienku. Chekiang Province, China. Tubers presented by Mrs. A. O. 
Loosley Reoeived January ?5, 1918. Quoted notes by Mrs. Loosley, 
except as otherwise indicated. 

•• Yii-na. This vegetable, if need should arise, might help out the potato 
crop, as it comes between the potato and the artichoke. The natives call the 



JANUAKY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1^18. 19 

latter ' foreign yd.* I think these are a little more solid than the artichoke. 
Ttiey are like the potato in substance, but more glutinous and quite different 
in flavor. They are a substantial addition to a n^eal. The * sprouts* are 
separated In the fields excepting in the * ginger variety,* and it is these sprouts 
which are planted for the new crop. In suitable soil and conditions the vege- 
table is prolific. The crop is harvested in the autumn in the district of Taichow 
Sienku, Chekiang Province, whence these specimens came." 

45770. " Ong-yUy or red yu, is a little red on the point, cooks a trifle 
glutinous. The natives prefer these, and I have sent more of this kind. 
It is a local variety."" 

46777. " Ong-liwa'yUf or red floury yu, is very pink and cooks mealy. 
It Is a local variety.". 

45778. "TsHh yu; also called Tsia/ng-yu or ginger yu because the *na,' 
or shoots and head, are more like the ginger root and do not divide 
easily ; this sort is the only one of which I am sending the ' head,* as 
the Chinese call it. The other specimens all have a head like this, but 
more clearly separated from the root and easily broken off; whereas 
this one must be divided by cutting. The natives say this particular 
one will divide in five pieces for planting. The ginger yu cooks 
mealy.*' 

45779. " TsHng yii, or blue yii, is a little bluish on the i)oint and stalks 
and has a large leaf. This variety also cooks mealy, but is said to 
be better to eat after keeping a few months. It keeps well.'* 

45780. " Ta-yUy or large j/w, has a large head and few sprouts ; also 
mealy.** 

" This taro roughly resembles the Trinidad dasheen in leaf char- 
acters, though the petioles have lighter markings, like those of the 
*anmdumbe* [S. P. I. No. 36057] from Rhodesia. When cooked the 
corms and cormels (lateral tubers) are slightly yellowish and of 
smooth texture. Both are rather moist, and yet the corms are some- 
what mealy and very pleasing to the taste. They improve in quality 
after being dug. The corms are elongated and regular In form and 
weigh about a pound each. The tubers are small, weighing only from 
1 to 3 ounces each.'* {R, A. Young.) 

45781. "Wong-yu, or yellow yii; point a little yellow; glutinous." 

"The leaf' stems of the yellow yii are blackish maroon. The corm 
is roundish and when cooked is moist, soft, and li^ht colored with a 
tinge of violet at top. The cormels are rather small and when cooked 
are moist and soft Both corms and cormels lack flavor.'* (R, A. 
Young,) 

45782. " U-ken-yii, or black-stalked yii; the stalk is black and more 
nearly round. This is the earliest variety and is glutinous.** 

" The corms of this variety are tough when cooked and unfit for table 
use. The cormels, or tubers, are of fair size but are soft, pasty, and 
flavorless. The plant is small growing and the leaf stems blackish 
maroon." (R. A, Young.) 

45783. " Ong-hwa-yii, or red floury yii, is a variety having the same name 
as S. P. I. No. 45777, but the sprouts come out in a different way.'* 

"trpon being grown, the tubers listed as S. P. I. No. 45777 proved to be a variety of 
Colocaaia antiquorum (L.) Schott. 



20 SBBDS ARD PULNTS IMPOBTED. 

46784. Segale CEiosAiiB L. Poaceae. Bye. 

From Pampas Centrale, Argentina. Presented by Mr. Juan Willianreon. 
Received January 2D, 1918. 

"A yellow variety of rye which was found in a neglected field in Argentina 
among plants of the ordinary green color. The yellow plants were transplanted 
and fertilized by ordinary green plants. The seed produced from this fer- 
tilization, when grown the next year, produced all green plants. The seed of 
these plants the following year produced both yellow and green plants in the 
proportion of one yellow to three fi^reen ones. It was also found that when yellow 
plants are fertilized by pollen from yellow plants the offspring are all yellow. 
It is thought that the yellow color is due to the wider spacing of the chlorophyll 
plastids." {Williamson.) 

46785 to 45788. Zea mays L. Poacese. Com. 

From Peru. Procured by Mr. William F. Montavon, American commercial 
attach^, Lima. Received January 29, 1918. 

45785. No. 5. Rosa (No. £), Pilcomayo. Rose-colored com from Pilco- 
mayo. 

45786. No. 12. Amarillo Bajo, Chupaca. Short yellowish com from Chu- 
paca. 

45787. No. 9. AnaranjadOj Colca. Orange-colored com from Colca. 

45788. No. 14. Plomo Oscuro, Chupaca. Dark lead-colored com from 
Chupaca. 

46789 to 46791. 

From Summer Hill, New South Wales, Australia. Presented by Mr. Hugh 
Dizson. Received January 29, 1918. 

45789. Elabocabpus cyaneus Alt. Elseocarpaceie. 

"Grows naturally in a sandy i)eaty soil, although it will stand a 
stronger one. Should stand 10** F. if not continuous." (Dixson.) 

Usually a small glabrous tree, although sometimes attaining a height of 
60 feet or more. The elliptic-oblong to oblong-lanceolate leaves are 3 to 4 
inches long, acute at the base, coriaceous, and very conspicuously reticu- 
late. The flowers are borne in loose racemes which are shorter than 
the leaves. The hard globular drupe is usually one seeded and blue in 
color. Found in Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria. (Adapted 
from Bentham, Flora Australiensis, vol. i, p. 281.) ' 

45790 and 45791. Kennedya spp. Fabaceje. 

"Grow well in my garden in rather stiff soil. Should stand 10* F. 
if not continuous." {Dixson.) 

45790. Kennedya monophylla Vent. 

(Hardenbergia monophylla Benth.) 

** Kennedya monophylla is a mass of royal blue when in flower. 
It is better to cut it half, back after flowering or after the seed is ripe. 
It does well in a sunny hedge, untrimmed in winter." {Dixson.) 

An Australian plant with solitary, ovate or lanceolate, coriaceous, 
strongly reticulate leaflets which are 2 to 4 inches in length. The 
numerous flowers occur in pairs or rarely three together on pedicels 
rather longer than the calyx. (Adapted from Bentham, Flora Aus- 
traliensis, vol. 2, p. 246.) 



JANUABY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 21 

45788 to 45791— Continued. 

45791. Kennedta nigbicans Lindl. 

A large twining vine from Western Australia. The broad, ovate 
leaflets are 2 to 8 inches long, and very often only one to each leaf. 
The deep violet-purple flowers are about 1 inch in length and are 
borne in racemes which are shorter than the leaves. (Adapted from 
Bentham, Flora Australiensis, voU 2, p. 249.) 

46792 to 4B797. 

From Zacuapam, Mexico. Presented by Dr. C. A. Purpus. Received Janu- 
ary 3, 1918, 

45792. Acacia sfhaebocephala Cham, and Schlecht. Mimosaceae. 

Bull-horn, acacia* 

" One of k group of acacias remarkable for their large, stipular, inflated 
spines, which closely resemble the horns of a buffalo. This particular 
species is a shrub or small tree. The leaves are bipinnate and have 
remarkable glands on the rachis and leaflets. The flowers are borne in 
globose heads on long thick peduncles, clustered in the axils of the long 
•forklike spines. The seeds, when ripe, are surrounded by a sweetish 
yellow or orange-colored pulp which causes the fallen pods to be eagerly 
sought after by pigs and other animals." (W. E. Saifard,) 

45793. Lycopebsicon esculeivtum Mill. Solanacese. Tomato. 
"The common tomato of Mexico." (Purpus.) 

45794. Phabeolub lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 

"Frijol tnajarK This bean is adapted to a hot country and should be 
planted in a rocky or gravelly soil. It is often planted as a flller between 
banana trees." {Purpus,) 

45795. Vignasesquipedai.18 (L.) Fruwirth. Fabace«. Yard-Long bean. 

" Tripa de Gallina, An excellent bean for salad or for cooking like 
string beans. It is adapted to a hot country. These seeds were pro- 
duced near Misantla, Vera Cruz." (Purpus.) 

45796. ViTis sp. Vitaceffi. Grape. 

" CailuUos. A large grape which has the taste of a Catawba and 
is used for making a fine Jelly. It grows in the brushwoods in the low 
country." {Purpus.) 

45797. Vms tiliaefolia Humb. and Bonpl. Vitacese. Grape. 
(F. caribctea DC.) 

"A small-fruited wild grape excellent for Jelly. This is essentially 
a tropical grape." (Purpus,) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45361. 

45798. Aknoka senegalensis Pers. Aimonaceae. 

From Loanda, Angola, Africa. Presented by Mr. Antonio d'Oliveira-M., 
Inspector of Agriculture. Received February 15, 1918. 

" Variety amhacends. The plant from which this seed was obtained, grow- 
ing at an altitude of 2,500 feet, came into full fruit about the middle of 
December." (D'Oliveira-M.) 

Annona senegalensis varies greatly in size, sometimes being a low shrub 
up to 2 or 3 feet in height and again a tree 20 feet in height. The young 
branches are rusty or tawny tomentose. The coriaceous leaves have a 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

rounded apex and broadly rounded base, and the upper surface is glabrescent 
while the lower is usually, pale and more or less pubescent. The solitary 
flowers are borne on spreading or decurved peduncles, one-third of an inch 
to 11 inches long. The edible fruit is erect or pendent, yellow or orange 
when ripe, and 1^ inches or more in diameter. This plant has been found in 
Upper Guinea, Lower Guinea, north-central Bomu, Nile Land, and Mozam- 
bique District. (Adapted from Oliver, Flora of Ttopical Africa, vol, 1, p. 16.) 

46799. JuoLANS REGiA L. Juglandacese. Walnut. 

From India. Nuts presented by Mr. C. C. Calder, Curator of the Herba- 
rium, Royal Botanic Gardens, Sibpur, near Calcutta, who obtained them 
from Mr. Green, Cinchona Plantation, Munsong. Received January 26, 
1918. 

"No. 2. The large-leaved, large-seeded walnut. The trees of this kind 
are more spreading than and not so lofty as those of the common kind. It 
attains a very large size." (Oreen.). 

45800 and 45801. Hibiscus sabdakiffa L. Malvaceae. Boselle. 

From Manila, Philippine Islands. Presented by the Bureau of Agricul- 
ture. Received January 30, 1918. 

45800. Archer, "Plant robust, frequently exceeding 1.60 meters in 
height, branching freely, all parts of the plant being greenish or 
whitish; stems nearly smooth; leaf lobes rather narrow; flowers 
smaller than those of the red types ; eye yellowish ; pollen pale yellow ; 
stigma gn^een; full-grown calyx greenish white, sparsely covered with 
short stiff bristles; average length of calyx 45 mm., width 26 mm., 
including epicalyz 82 mm. 

" The Archer is very prolific, the fruit is somewhat less acid than 
that of the red types, and the products made from it are whitish 
or amber colored. In the West Indies a wine is made from this 
variety which is said to resemble champagne In taste and appearance. 

" Seed of the above-described variety was received from Mr. A, S. 
Archer, Antigua, British West Indies, by the writer early in 1913, 
and it was tested at the Lamao Experiment Station the same year. It 
has been named in honor of Mr. Archer." (Wester, Philippine Agricul- 
tural Review, June, 1914,) 

45801. Rico. " The young plants of the Rico retain their unifollate leaf 
characters longer than the Victor, and the leaves later are mostly 
tripartite instead of five parted. The stems and calyces are dark 
red and the leaves dark green with reddish veins. The pollen is 
golden yellow. The calyx is of about the same length as that of the 
Victor [45 to 50 mm.], but of greater equatorial diameter [28 mm.] ; 
the fleshy spines subtending the calyx lobes are stout and stand at 
nearly a straight angle from the axis of the fruit; the apex of the 
calyx lobes is frequently incurved. 

** The Rico has been named and described from plants grown from 
seed obtained by the writer in 1911 from Mr. J. E. Higgins, horticul- 
turist of the Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, and has prob- 
ably descended from a variety grown in 1902 in the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Mayaguez, Porto Rico, by Mr. O. W. Barrett, 
now chief of the division of experiment stations of this Bureau." 
(Wester, Philippine Agricultural Review, March, 1912,) 



JANUAKY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 23 

45802. Triticum speltoides (Tausch) Gre^ier. Poaceee. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received January 30, 
1918. 

A bushy grass, branching from the base, with slender, erect stems bearing 
rough narrow leaves and stiff, ratlier loose, spikes of long-awned flowers. It 
is a native of western Asia, being found especially in Syria, and is considered one 
of the species from which the cultivated wheats were derived. (Adapted from 
Ascherson and Graehner, Synopsis der Mitteleuropdischen Flora, vol. 2, p. 711,) 

45803. Gi^orrsiA sinensis Lam. Ciesalpiniacese. Honey locust. 

From Yihsien, Shantung Province, China. Presented by Rev. R. G. CJoon- 
radt. Received February 5, 1918. 

A tree up to 60 feet in height, with a trunk girth of 3 to 9 feet, found in the 
dry valleys of western Sasechwan at altitudes ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 feet 
It grows to a very large size, with a massive bole clean of branches for 9 
to 30 feet from the ground and a wide-spreading head of thick branches. The 
bark is quite smooth and pale gray in color. In degree of spinescence the 
trees vary considerably, and some are quite thornless. The wood is nearly 
white and of little value, but the flattened pods are rich in saponin andi are 
valued as a substitute for soap; they are also used in the process of tanning 
hides. (Adapted from Sargent, Plantae WUsonianae, vol, 2, p. 91.) 

45804 and 45805. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. J. C. Konlngsberger, director 
of the Botanic Gardens. Received February 6, 1918. 

45804. Gabcinia mangobtana L. Olusiacese. Mangosteen. 

A medium-sized Malayan tree, with large feathery leaves and globular, 
purplish brown fruit, about the size of an apple. It is one of the most 
delicious fruits of the Tropics. The delicate, white, Juicy pulp, surround- 
ing and adhering to the seed, is the part eaten. The dense, thick, red- 
dish rind contains tannin and a dye. The tree is a slow grower and 
does not usually bear until it is 9 or 10 years old. The essential con- 
ditions are a hot, moist climate and a deep, rich, well-drained soil. It 
thrives up to 1,500 feet and is propagated usually by seed, but also 
by layering. (Adapted from Maomillan, Handbook of Tropical Garden^ 
ing and Planting, p. 164.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45180. 

45805. Nephelium: lappaceum L. Sapindacesc. Bambutan. 

A large, handsome, spreading tree, up to 40 feet in height; common 
in the low country of Ceylon and the vicinity of Malakka Strait, ascend- 
ing to 2,000 feet altitude. The terminal clusters of bright crimson 
fruits, about the size of hen*s eggs, are produced on every branch, each 
fruit being covered with long soft spines. The large seed is surrounded 
by a layer of white, opaque pulp, which is of a very agreeable acid taste. 
The tree is readily propagated by grafting or "gootees" (layering). 
(Adapted from Macmillan, Handbook of Tropical Gardening and Plant' 
ing, p. 176.) 



24 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46806 to 46808. Zea mats L. Poaceee. Com. 

From Peru. Procured by Mr. William F. Montavon, American commercial 
attach^, Lima. Received February 7, 1918. 

45806. No. 27. Balmonf Iscucbaca. Salmon-colored com. 

45807. No. 30. AmariUo SuMdo, Cbongos. Yellow gold-tinged com of 
the flour type. 

45808. No. 31. AynariUo Melchocha, Punta. Yellow-paste com of the 
flour type. 

45809. CoRCHORUs cafsularis L. Tiliacese. Jute. 

From Calcutta, India. Obtained by Mr. James A. Smith, American consul 
general, from Ralli Bros. Received Febmary 11, 1918. 

"The leaves of both Corchonm capsularis and C. olitoriiU are commonly 
eaten as a vegetable when the plants are young, and the practice apparently 
extends to the wild plant both in India and in other parts of southern Asia; 
also in Egypt and the Levant, where C. olitofius is said to be an important 
potherb." (RalU Bros.) 

Thjis species and the closely allied Corchorus oUtorius are the chief sources 
of the Jute fiber of commerce. Corchorus capsularis is annual, attaining a 
height of 8 to 12 feet, with a long, thin stem branched only at the top. The 
flowers are small and yellow. The young shoots of some varieties are com- 
monly used as a potherb, especially in Egypt The flber is obtained by means 
of retting in stagnant pools. Retting consists in steeping the stems in water 
until they soften sufficiently to allow the fibro-vascular bundles to be extracted 
from the softer material around them. The fiber is extensively used in the 
manufacture of cordage, coarse cloth, fishing nets, gunny bags, etc. The 
plant requires a hot, moist climate followed by a dry season. The method 
of propagation consists either in broadcasting the seed or transplanting into 
rows the seedlings raised in a nursery. This plant is indigenous to Ceylon. 
India, and the Malay Peninsula. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia 
of Horticulture, voh i, p. 841, and Ma^mvdJan, Handbook of Tropical Oardening 
and Planting, p. 642.) 

45810. ScHOBNOCATJLON OFFICINALE (Schlecht.) A. Gray. Melan- 

thiacese. Sabadilla. 

From Caracas, Venezuela. Presented by Mr. H. Pittier. Received Feb- 
ruary 11, 1918. 

This plant is also known as Asagrtiea olUdnaUs Lindl., Yeratrum offldnaU 
Schlecht., and Sabadilla Oj^/cincrrMm. Brandt. It is a bulbous plant, growing in 
grassy places on the eastern declivities of the volcanic range of the Cofre de 
Perote and Orizaba, near Teocelo, Huatusco, and Zacuapam, down to the 
seashore in Mexico; also in Guatemala. It has been cultivated near Vera 
Cruz, Alvarado, and Tlacotalpan. on the Gulf of Mexico.' 

The fruit consists of three follicles about half an inch long, united at the 
base. These are light brown in color and papery in texture. Each follicle 
usually contains two narrow, pointed, black seeds. The testa incloses an oily, 
albuminous interior. The seed Is inodorous and has an acid bitter taste. 

Sabadilla (CebadUla) is used principally as a source of veratrin, which is a 
powerful irritant and counterirrltant. In Mexico the bulb of the plant is used 
as an anthelmintic under the name of cebolleja, but is said to be very danger- 
ous in its action. (Adapted from Pltarmacographia^ A History of Drugs, 
Fhickigcr and Hanbury, p. 697.) 



JANUABY 1 TO MABCH 31, 1AL8. 25 

46811. Amaranthus FANicuLATus L. AmaranthacesB. Gtiate. 

From Ouliacan, Sinaloa, Mexico. Procured by Mr. W. E. Chapman, 
American consul, Mazatlan, from Mr. Frank G. Leeke, Culiacan. Re- 
ceived February 12, 1918. 

" Chiate is an ancient Aztec foodstuff modemly used (popped) witb sugar 
and milk as a breakfast food; also ground into meal after popping. Possible 
production, one-half ton per acre. It grows semiwild amid com, as a second- 
ary crop. The present production is very small, but can be stimulated if a 
market is opened." (Leeke.) 

45812 to 46814. Solanum muricatum Ait. Solanacese. Fepino. 

From Ecuador. Obtained by the American consul general, Dr. F. W. 
Coding, Guayaquil. Received February 13, 1918. 

" During a recent trip to the interior I saw thousands of the plants grow- 
ing near Huigra on a farm owned by Mr. Edward Morley. 

"There are three varieties of the fruits: The green, the green striped with 
purple, and the dark purple. 

" This fruit forms a part of the diet of the people of the interior, being 
eaten raw or cooked in various ways ; but foreigners prefer them in a salad as 
the common cucumber is prepared; served in this way they are delicloua" 
(Ooding,) 

45812. Morado oscurOf purple pepino. 

45813. Blanco, white or green pepino. 

45814. Marado claro, light green striped with purple. 

45816. Zea mats L. Poaceae. Com. 

From Gnelph, Canada. Presented by Mr. J. A. Nellson, of the Ontario 
Agricultural College. Received February 13, 1918. 

** Squaw corn, which was grown during the season of 1917, near Pine River, 
in the Province of Manitoba. Pine River is north of 52** north latitude and is 
about 228 miles northwest of Winnipeg. The man who grew this corn said 
that he did not have any difficulty in getting it to grow in this section. The 
stalks are rather low growing and will produce ears in a comparatively short 
time. 

" This may not be of any particular value to you in the United States, as you 
now have many excellent varieties, but it may be of interest to you to know 
til at well-ripened corn can be grown even as far north as the above-mentioned 
place." (Neilson.) 

45816 and 45817. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. J. C. Konlngsberger, director, 
Botanic Garden. Received February 15, 1918. 

45816. Garcinia mangostana L. Clusiacese. Mangosteen. 
For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 45804. 

45817. Lanshtm domesticum Jack. Meliacese. Langrsat. 

"This, like the mangosteen, is a delicious oriental fruit not yet well 
established in America but esteemed throughout the Malayan region. 
Judging from our limited experience with it, the langsat is slightly 
hardier than the mangosteen, and there seems to be no reason why it 
should not succeed with us. A few plants have been grown in the West 



26 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45816 and 45817— Continued. 

Indies and otlier parts of the American Tropics. The tree is rather 
Blender in habit, with a straight trunk and compound leaves composed of 
three or more pairs of elliptic to obovate leaflets 3 or 4 inches in length. 
The fruits are produced in small clusters; in general appearance thej 
suggest large loquats, the surface being straw colored and slightly downy. 
The skin is thick and leathery and does not adhere to the white trans- 
lucent flesh, which separates into five segments. Each segment normally 
contains an oval seed, but some of the segments in each fruit are usually 
seedless. The flavor is highly aromatic, at times slightly pungent The 
fruit is commonly eaten while fresh, but it is said also to be utilized in 
various other ways." {WUsim Popenoe,) 

46818. Crataegus mexicaxa Moc. and Sesse. Malacese. 

Hawthorn. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. F. G. Walsingham, Horticultural 
Section, Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received February 15, 
1918. 

This seed is from a tree which flowered in Egypt. The tree is bushy, 8 to 10 
feet in height with glabrous, olive-colored branches. The leaves are oblong, at- 
tenuated at the base, and 2 to 3 inches in length. The abundant flowers are 
borne in terminal corymbs. The fruit is larger than is usual among the haw- 
thorns. The color when ripe is pale yellow, dotted with brown. It is a native 
of the table-lands of Mexico and has been found quite hardy in England. 
(Adapted from The British Flower Garden, p. 300.) 

46819. Rosa gextiwana Lev. and Van. Bosaceae. Sose. 

From Kew, England. Presented by the director of the Royal Botanic 
Gardens. Received February 15, 1918. 

A rose which is abundant in the mountainous regions of western Hupeh and 
eastern Szechwan, where it forms tangled masses 6 meters or more in height 
It grows best In rocky situations from river level to 1,400 feet altitude. The 
numerous large white flowers are very fragrant, and the anthers are golden 
yellow. This species is easily distingui.«ihed by its glabrous, pale-gray shoots 
and 3 to 5 foliolate leaves, which are shining green above and very pallid be- 
neath. (Adapted from Sargent, Plantae Wilsonianae, vol, 2, p. S12,) 

Received as Rosa cerasocarpa Rolfe, which is referred to R. gentUiana in 
Plantae Wilsonianae. 

46820 to 468S8. 

From Prof. F. C. Reimer, superintendent, Southern Oregon Experiment 

Station, Talent, Oreg. Received February 15, 1918. 

Obtained by Prof. Reimer during his recent trip, in cooperation with the 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, to find blight-resistant stocks 

for commercial varieties of pears and for crossing with American varieties, 

in an effort to produce blight-resistant hybrids. Quoted notes by Prof. Reimer. 

45820. Cbataequs pinnatifida Bunge. Malacea. Hawthorn. 

"No. 65. From the Chien Shan Mountains, near Lishan, Manchuria. 

This is the large-fruited hawthorn found wild and widely cultivated in 

Manchuria, northern China, and eastern Siberia. It has been introduced 



JANUABY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1&18. 27 

45820 to 45838— Continued. 

at various times during, the past and often described. It should be 
tested for blight resistance and as a stock for pears." 

45821. Pybxts betulaefolia X phaeocabpa. Malacese. Pear. 

" No. 61. Seeds obtained from wild trees at Hsia Ying and Panshan, 
China. This species produces an abundance of small brown fruit about 
as large as good-sized peas and of very poor flavor. The trees are very 
vigorous and attain a height of 50 feet and a trunk diameter of 20 to 
80 Inches. More often, however, it is a tree from 30 to 40 feet high, 
with a trunk about 1 foot in diameter. It is a widely distributed species, 
and I found it from extreme northern China to the Yangtze River. This 
Efpecies is certainly a marvel in its ability to adapt itself to all sorts 
of conditions. It is common on dry hillsides, on the plains, along edges 
of ponds, and I often saw it growing well in ponds where the water 
around the tree, for at least a large part of the year, was a foot deep. 
It is used extensively throughout northern and eastern China as a stock 
for all their cultivated varieties and seems to be admirably suited for 
this purpose. What a pity that this species is so susceptible to pear- 
blight! Where root-blight is not troublesome this should prove a valu- 
able pear stock in this country." 

45822. Pybus betulaefolia Bunge. Malacese. Fear. 

"No. 66. From Kingmen, Hupeh Province, China. These seeds were 
collected from typical trees of this species growing near trees of Pyrus 
caUeryana, A careful study will be made of the seedling to determine 
whether or not these two species have hybridized. The trees are very 
vigorous and often attain very large size in this region." 

45828 to 45828. Ptbub callertana Decaisne. Malaceie. Pear. 

45823. " No. 18. Collected at Hadzmura, Ise Province, Japan. Tree 
30 feet high with a trunk 12 inches in diameter, growing along 
the edge of a rice field about a foot above an irrigation ditch. A 
very vigorous specimen and bearing large quantities of small fruit." 

45824. "No. 24. Collected near the village of Kono, Ise Province, 
Japan. About 50 trees growing on a mountain side. These trees 
were small, looking more like large bushes than trees, being only 
3 to 8 feet high and with trunks from 1 to 5 inches in diameter.' 
They had evidently been cut off for fuel, which accounted for their 
small size. The trees were loaded with small brown fruits from 
onenfourth to half an inch in diameter." 

45825. " No. 80. Collected 5 miles south of Suigen, Chosen (Korea), 
in the Kwasan Mountains. These were the largest trees of this 
species that I saw in Korea, being 15 feet taU and from 6 to 6 
inches in diameter. They are of especial interest and value, be- 
cause central Chosen is the northern limit of this species, and the 
winters are quite cold ; hence, these trees may prove considerably 
hardier than those from central China and southern Japan; and, 
if so, can be used as a stock in colder regions in this country." 

45826. "No. 31. Collected 2 miles west of Suigen, Chosen. This 
is the type which has been named Pyrus faurei by Schneider. It 
Is very similar to P. calleryana, but the trees and leaves are 
usuaUy much smaller. I regard this as simply a dwarf form of 
P. callerycMa, the dwarf habit being due to the fact that this is 



28 SEEDS AND PIAiq-TS IMPORTED. 

45820 to 45838^Continued. 

the northern limit of the species and the trees or bashes are 
asnally growing on very poor soil. The northernmost region ic 
which I found this type was from 75 to 100 miles north of 
Seoul, Chosen." 

458S7. "No. 64. Collected from typical trees at Kingmen, Hnpeh 
ProTince, China. The trees are very vigorous and often reach a 
height of 00 feet and a trunk diameter of 2 feet. Pymi 
hetulaefolia is abundant in the same region and grows under ibe 
same conditions.*' 

45828. '' No. 103. Obtained in the Chien Kang Mountains, northw^ 
of Ichang, China, at an altitude of 2,900 feet The tree from 
which this seed was taken was SO feet high with a trunk diameter 
of 18 inches and bore an enormous crop of fruit. The species U 
very common in the mountains north and south of Ichang." 

45820 and 45830. Ptbus phaeocarpa Rehder. Malaceee. Pear. 

45820. " No. 47. Collected near Tan Che Tse temple, about 30 miles 
southwest of Peking, China. Tree wild, about 35 feet high, with 
trunk 1 foot in diameter. The fruit, which is borne in clusters 
of from one to five, is roundish, of russet color, from one-half 
to three-fourths ot an inch in diameter, two to three celled, and 
has a deciduous calyx! Near Yangfan I saw trees of this species 
from 50 to 00 feet high, with trunks 2^ feet in diameter and 
an enormous spread of branches. Young trees of this spedes, from 
earlier introductions, when inoculated with pear-blight have proved 
quite susceptible to the disease. It should be tested further, 
to determine its resistance or susceptibility to blight and as a stock 
for other pears." 

45830. " Collected 20 miles west of Peking, China. This form is simi- 
lar to No. 47 [S. P. I. No. 45829], and the notes under that num- 
ber will also apply to this." 

45831 and 45832. Pybus sebbulata Rehder. Malacese. Pear. 

45831. "No. 100. Collected in the, Chien Kang Mountains. 15 miles 
northwest of Ichang, China, at an altitude of 3,700 feet. The 
tree is of medium size and moderately vigorous. The fruit Is 
round, russet color, from half an Inch to an Inch in diameter, 
three or sometimes two celled, and has a deciduous calyx. The 
leaves are a very rich dark green and remain on the trees very 
late in the fall. This type should be tested very thoroughly as a 
stock for cultivated varieties. It has shown a marked degree of 
resistance to pear-blight in our work at Talent. This type prob- 
ably has given rise to some of the small cultivated varieties in 
Central China." 

45832. ** No. 105. Obtained at an altitude of 3,275 feet in the moun- 
tains 15 miles northwest of Ichang, China. It is very similar to 
No. 100 [S. P. I. No. 45831], except the shape of the fruit, which is 
obovoid. To be tested for blight resistance and as a stock for 
other pears." 

45833. Pybus ussuriensis Maxim. Malacete. Pear. 

" No. 60. Collected from wild trees at Shinglungshan, China. Trees of 
this species were formerly very abundant in this region, but as it has been 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 29 

« 

4S820 to 45838— Continued. 

opened up for settlement daring the past five years and as the soil Is well 
snited to agricalture, most of the trees have been destroyed. However, 
many trees are still left, especially along the margins of the valley, in 
the canyons, and along the streftms. These trees attain a very large size, 
often reaching 75 feet in height and 2^ feet in diameter. The fruit Is 
roundish or«slightly flattened, from 1 to li inches in diameter, greenish 
in color, with gritty flesh and sour flavor. Earlier introductions of this 
fifpecies made by Mr. Frank N. Meyer have shown greater resistance to 
pear-blight than any other species in the experiments at the Oregon sta- 
tion. It appears to be very promising as a stocls for cultivated pears in 
very cold regions in this country, in regions where blight attacks the roots 
and trunks of the trees, and in breeding hardy and blight-resistant vari- 
eties. It has given rise to some of the best cultivated varieties of north- 
em China." 

45834. Ptbus sp. Malacese. Pear. 

" No. 46. Pin M, or Ping li. Very similar to small Suan U [S. P. I. Nos. 
45846 and 45847]. These seeds were obtained from fruit grown near the 
Ghien Shan Mountains, near Llshan, Manchuria. This is a very popular 
cultivated variety In the Chien Shan region and seems to be well adapted 
to the conditions there. The fruit is small, varying from li to 1^ inches 
in diameter, roundish or slightly flattened in shape, and greenish yellow 
in color, with often a blush on one side. It ripens during September and 
possesses a very agreeable and refreshing tart flavor. This variety un- 
doubtedly has been derived from P. ussurienHs, which it resembles in tree, 
leaf, and fruit character. While the fruit has the tart flavor of that 
species, it is of very much better flavor, and the flesh is softer than in the 
wild forms. The calyx Is always persistent, open, and with distinctly 
spreading lobes. This variety will be thoroughly tested for blight resist- 
ance, and if it shows the marked degree of resistance characteristic of 
P. U89urien8ia It should prove of great value, especially in breeding work." 

45835. PntuB sp. Malacese. Pear. 

" No. 112. Pin li. From Mukden, Manchuria. Identical with No. 46 
[S. P. I. No. 45834]." 



45886. Pybus sp. MalacesB. Pear. 

** No. 109. Shampa li, A cultivated variety grown in the Chien Shan 
Mountains, near Lishan, Mcmchurla. The fruit is small, yellowish when 
ripe, with a persistent calyx. It probably belongs to P. u»9urien8is and 
for this reason should be thoroughly tested as a stock.* 



»> 



45837. Pybus sp. Malacete. Pear. 
" No. 111. Shaanpa U. From Mukden, Manchuria. Identical with No. 

109 [S. P. I. No. 45886]," 

45838. Ptbus sp. Malacese. Fear. 
"No. no. Sim li. Another cultivated variety from Llaoyang, Man- 
churia. Similar to Shampa U. Undoubtedly a cultivated form of £,. 
uasurienHsJ* 

68805—22 3 



30 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

468S9 to 46860. Pyrus spp. Malaceae. Fear. 

From China. Collected by Prof. F. C. Relmer, superintendent, Sonthem 
Oregon Exiierinient Station, Talent, Oreg. Received February 16^ 1918. 
Scions of Chinese pears collected by Prof. Reimer during his recent trip, in 
cooperation with the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, to obtahi 
blight-resistant stoclcs for the commercial varieties of pears and for crossini^ 
with American varieties, in an effort to produce bligfat-resistant hybrids. Quoted 
notes by Prof. Reimer. 

45^9. Pntus CALLKBTANA Decaisue. 

"Scions from Suigen, Chosen (Korea), of the dwarf form that grows 
in central Chosen. Fruit of no value. May prove valuable as a stock." 

45840 to 45844. Ptrus ussubiensis Maxim. 

" Scions of five different trees of the wild P. ussuriensia from Shlng- 
lungshan." 

45845. Pybus sp. 

" Ta kua/ng H. From Maton, China. A large pear, shaped somewhat 
like a Bartlett, but thicker toward the base end. It Is very juicy and of 
very good flavor, comparing favorably with the better European pears. I 
regard this as an extremely promising pear. It certainly posseases con- 
siderable Pyrus ussuriensis blood, and for this reason we anticipate that 
it will show a marked degree of resistance to i)ear-blight. If this proves 
to be the case, this will be one of the most valuable pears ever Introduced 
Into America. It should prove to be of the very greatest value fbr 
breeding work." 

45846 and 45847. Pybus sp. 

" 8uan H, A small roundish or slightly flattened pear, greenish yellow 
in color, with often a slight blush on one side. It is very juicy and 
possesses a very agreeable tart flavor. * While too small for the general 
market it should prove valuable for. the home orchard, local market, and 
for breeding work. This variety undoubtedly belongs to P. ussuriensU. 
Hence its gretrt value for breeding work." 

45846. " 8uan li from Lohuallng Pass, Chhia." 

45847. " Suan H from Matow, China." 

45848. Pybus sp. 

** Pai li. From Chenganssz, near Peking. A medium-sized pear of 
lemon-yellow color, with soft, juicy, sweet flesh of excellent flavor. This 
is regarded as one of the very best Chinese pears by both the Chinese 
and foreigners. It is an excellent keeper and can be obtained on the 
Peking market from October until March. This variety also shows some 
of the characteristics of P. ussuriensis, and I believe that that species 
was one of its parents. 

" These three varieties [S. P. I. Nos. 45846 to 45848] are far superior 
to any of the other numerous oriental pears, at least as judged by the 
tastes of Americans. They are the first and only oriental varietieB that 
I have ever seen or eaten which I could pronounce as really good In 
quality. These varieties constitute by far the best material that I have 
ever seen for breeding hardy pears for the cold Plains region.*' 

45849. Pybus sp. 

"Huang hsau IL From Chenganssz, near Peking. A medium-sized 
roundish pear, yellowish with a bright-red cheek; flesh firm but of very 
poor quality." 



JAKUABY 1 TO MABCH 31, 1918. 31 

45839 to 45850— Continued. 

45850. Ptbus sp. 

**Pan chin tse. From Ohenganssz, near Peking. A very large green- 
iBh pear with a ];)er8istent calyx. Flavor tart ; quality not higli. May be 
of value in breeding work." 

46851. Trichoscypha sp. Anacardiaceae. 

From Lambarene, Gabon, Africa. Presented by Rev. Edward A. Ford. 
Received February 16, 1918. 

"I am sending you some seeds of a native fruit called tiwut, of whicb there 
are two principal varieties, with the sarcocarp red and white, respectively; 
the former I think is the more common, the latter is larger and less pung^it; 
it is the latter variety which I send." (Ford.) 

46862 to 46856. Zea hats L. Poacese. Conu 

From Peru. Procured by Mr. William F. Montavon, American commer- 
cial attach^, Lima. Received February 18, 1918. 

Samples of flour com introduced for experimental and breeding purposes of 
the Office of Com Investigations. 

45852. No. 18. Paaas, Locroja. A type with irr^iular, ^ongated kernels 
of a brownish yellow color. 

45853. No. 19. Chancaca, Pncara. A type with kernels of a brownish 
yellow color. 

45854. No. 7. Matiz Blanco Colorado^ Pariahuanco. A type with red- 
dish kernels. 

45855. No. 29. Colorado Claro, Nahuinpuquio. A type with reddish 
kernels. 

45856. No. 26. Canela, Puncha. A type of a light brownish yellow color. 

46857. Chenofodium ambrosioiobs L. ChenopodiacesB. 

From Santos, Brazil. Presented by Mr. Oarl F. Deichman, American 
consul. Received February 19, 1918. 

Herva de Santa Maria. A native of Mexico, but now naturalized in Brazil, 
j'n the southern provinces of Brazil it is known by the above name, but in the 
northern provinces as m<itrttz, mentruz, and mOMiruoo. In Lisbon and the 
Azores it is called Iterva tormiguera. 

The plant is an annual, but has an almost woody stem, 1 to 2 meters in 
height, with alternate lanceolate leaves. The inflorescence consists of sfinple 
leafy spikes of very small greenish flowers. The seeds are very small and of 
a black color. The whole plant has a powerful aromatic odor. An infusion 
of this plant has been used with good results in Europe as a cure for nervous 
affections. (Adapted ffom The Pharmaceutical Journal and TransadionB, p. 
lis.) 

46868 to 46866. Castanea spp. Fagacese. Chestnut. 

From Bell, Md. Cuttings presented by Dr. W. Van Fleet, of the Bureau 
of Plant Industry. Received February 23, 1918. Quoted notes by Dr. 
Van Fleet 
45858 to 45861. Castanea crenata Sieb. and Zuec. 

45858. *'BellNo. 1. Fourth generation by straight selection. Started 
by a variety cross between two early, proliflc types of C, crenata. 



32 SEEDS Ajsny plants imported. 

45858 to 45866— Continued. 

Very large nut, with good cooking qualitleB, but poor eatliiiir 
qualities when raw. The tree has a good habit, with thin, hand- 
some branches. The trunk is dean and bright. Leaves very 
narrow." 

See S. P. I. No. 45334 for previous introduction. 

45859. " Bell No. 2. Fourth generation by selection. It is a prolific 
bearer. The fruit is very large and good for cooking, but not good 
for eating when raw. It is more bitter than BeU No. 1.** 

See S. P. I. No. 45335 for previous introduction. 

45860. *'BeU No. 3. Fourth generation. Much like Bell No. 2. 
Worth consideration for dissemination." 

See S. P. I. No. 45836 for previous introduction. 

45861. '* Bell No. 4. Fourth generation by selection. The trees have 
very much the same habit as the previous numbers, and the 
nuts are about the same size. The nuts have good eating quali- 
ties and are better than the above numbers." 

See S. P. I. No. 45337 for previous introduction, 

45862. Gastanba moixjssima Blume. 

This is the common chestnut of Chinas it is distributed from the 
neighborhood of Peking in the northeast to the extreme limits of 
Szechwan and Yunnan in the west and southwest. Near villages and 
towns, where the wood is continually cut down to furnish fuel, this 
chestnut is met with as a bush or low shrub; but in thinly populated 
areas it is a tree from 15 to 20 meters tall, with a trunk from 1 to 2 meters 
in girth. The Chinese name is Fan li, and the nuts are a valued 
article of food. (Adapted from Sargent, Plcmtas WiU(mianae, p. 194.) 

See S. P. I. No. 45338 for previous Introduction. 
45863 to 45866. Oastakea pumila X obenata. H7liiid cliestttiit. 

45863. *' Bell No. 5. A very attractive nut of fair quality, which 
looks as though It would be. a good oommercial nut." 

See S. P. I. No. 45340 for previous introduction. 

45864. **Bell No. 6. Second <F») generation from self or chance 
fertilized seeds; Arlington, Va., 1916." 

45865. " Bell No. 7. Second (Fa) generation from self or (ihance 
fertilized seeds ; Arlington, Va., 1916." 

45866. " Bell No. 8. Second generation. A very prolific tree, about 
7 feet high, and yielding from 3 to 4 pounds of nuts this season 
(1916). The nuts are of very good flavor and of good size for 
a chinquapin, but small for a chestnut." 

See S. P. I. No. 45341 for previous introduction. 

46867 to 46869. 

From Bichmond^ Australia. Presented by Mr. F. H. Baker. Kecelved 
February 25, 1918. 

45867. AoAciA pycnantha Benth. Mimosaceffi. Golden wattle. 

A rapid-growing tree, attaining a height of about 30 feet, the bark of 
which ia used for tanning. The flowers, which are borne in clusters, 
are yellow ; hence the name golden wattle. The tree has no soil prefer- 



JANUABT 1 TO MABOH 31^ 1&L8. 88 

45867 to 4586&-€ontmued. 

enoe, bat Is usually found on the poor sandy soil near the sea coast; 
here it serves also as a sand binder. The wood is tough and close 
grained, having a specific gravity of 0^. The bark contains as high 
as 33.5 per cent of tannin, and the dried leaves have yielded as much 
as 15.16 per cent of tannic acid. The range is South Australia, Vic- 
toria, and southern New South Wales. (Adapted from Maiden, Useftii 
Native FUmts of Australia, pp. 312 and S65,) 

45868. Hakka. bostrata F. Muell. Proteaceee. 

An erect shrub, several feet in height, with glabrous branches. The 
terete leaves are smooth and rigid. The flowers are borne in sessile 
axillary clusters. The rugose fruit la 1 to 1^ inches long and three- 
fourths of an inch broad, recurved at the base, incurved from the 
middle, with a closely inflexed, conical beak. Found in Victoria and 
South Australia. (Adapted from Bentham, Flora AustralienHs, voh 5, 
p. 508.) 

45860. iNDiGOFERA sp. FabacesB. 

A beautiful native shrub.*' {Baker.) 



M 



46870« Annoka sp. Annonacese. 

From Cairo, Bgypt. Presented by Mr. F. G. WaUdngham, Horticultural 
Section, Giseh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Rec^ved February 26, 

iwa 

A species of Annona, originally from Colombia, the seeds of which, according 
to Mr. Saflbrd, resemble those of Annona serieea. 

46871 to 46881. 

From Japan. Cuttings presented by Prof. T. Onda, Bureau of Horticul- 
ture, Imperial Agricultural Experiment Station, Okitsu, Shiznokaken, 
Japan. Received February 27, 1918. Quoted notes by Prof. Onda. 

45871 to 45876. Diospybos kaki L. f. Dlospyracese. XakL 

45871. " 1.' Go9ho. 'Medium-sized, rather flattened, yellowish red 
fruit with a pointed apex. Stamlnate flowers abundant Not very 
fruitful In a wet climate." 

45872. " 2. TenjitirOosho. Large, rather square, round-pointed fruit 
with a beautiful crimson skin. No stamlnate flowers. Not very 
productive." 

45878. "3. OkU'Oosho. {OJcu means Mate,' but this variety is not 
so late in ripening.) Large, depressed-globose, crimson fruit, 
which often splits a little at the apex. Stamlnate flowers very 
few, but a very productive variety." 

45874. **4. Hana-Oo8ho, Fruit a1)ove medium size, broadly ovate 
with a pointed apex ; skin yellowish red. Stamlnate flowers very 
few, but fruit plentiful." 

45875. " 5. Jiro. Large, depressed-globose, crimson fruit, with four 
longitudinal grooves. This variety has no stamlnate flowers, but 
is quite productive. 

" These varieties of the Qo$ho daas usually have no black spots 
in their fliesh ; very scarce, if any." 

45876 to 46881. PatrirtTS mume Sieb. and Zucc. Amygdalaceie. 

. Japanese aprloot. 



84 SBEDS AKD PIAKTS IMPOETBD. 

45871 to 45881— Continued. 

45876. " 1. Rinshu. Medium-sized flowers with a light green calyic 
and white petals; large fruits with thick flesh; not very pro- 
ductive." 

45877. " 2. Toro, Medium-sized flowers with a reddish brown calys:: 
and light-red petals; bears large fruits with thick flesh and is 
very productive." 

45878. *'3. Bungo. Large flowers with reddish brown calyx an<I 
light-red petals ; fruit of medium size with rather thick flesh ; not 
very productive." 

45879. "4. Hana-kormi. (Meaning 'good in flowers, aroma, and 
fruits.*) Medium-sized light-red double flowers, having from 20 
to 25 petals; fruits small, with medium-thick flesh; very pro- 
ductive." 

45880. " 5. 8hiro-Kaga. Medium-sized flowers with reddish brown 
calyx and white petals ; fruit small with medium-thick flesh ; very- 
productive." 

45881. "6. KO'tnume. Medium-sized flowers with brownish red 
calyx and white petals ; fruits very small, about the size of large 
peas, but with rather thick flesh; a very productive variety. 

" As regards your inquiry about the fertilization of mume trees, 
we have not noticed any Insects, as we have very few at the flow- 
ering time of mum€; but as to what assists their fertilization we 
have not yet Investigated. We do not think mume Is self-sterile, 
as it commonly fruits very well, even when it stands singly.' 



>» 



46882 to 45885. 

From Natal, Brazil. Presented by Mr. E. C. Green. Received February 
27, 1918. 
45882 to 45884. Ricinus communis L. Euphorbiaceie. Castor-bean 

Introduced for studies in the oil content of the various varieties of the 
castor-bean. 

45882. A small seed with a light ground color and dark splotches. 

45883. A medium-sized seed with a dark ground color and lines and 
splotches of darker color. 

45884. A large seed, nearly white, with a few reddish brown mark- 
ings. 

45885. Stizolobium aterrimum Piper and Tracy. Fabacete. 

Mauritius bean. 

"Enormous quantities of this seed are said to be produced on v^lld 
plants growing in the woods In Brazil." {Oreen.) 

This is a very widely cultivated species and has been introduced into 
the United States from Brazil, New South Wales, Australia, Cochin 
China, Barbados, Mauritius, Java, and Ceylon. In our Southern States 
this plant grows to a very large size, but is so late that the pods barely 
mature. The extreme lateness prevents the wide cultivation of this 
species in the United States. 

The vines are very strong and vigorous, with striate softly pubescent 
stems. The leaflets are very large, with sparely appressed-pubescent 
surfaces. The purple flowers are borne in many-flowered, pendent 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1»18. 35 

45882 to 45885— Continued. 

racemes, 18 to 30 inches long. The black, sickle-shaped pods are about 
4 Inches long. The seeds, four or five in number, are oblong, black, and 
very shiny. (Adapted from Bureau of Plant Industry Bulletin No. 179, 
p. 18.) 

45886« RiciNus communis L. Euphorbiaceae. Castor-bean. 

From Guatemala. Purchased by Mr. Herbert S. Austin at the request of 
Mr. Wilson Popenoe, of this ofllce. Received March 2, 1918. 

Secured for the purpose of testing ttte oil content of various varieties. 

46887 and 46888. 

From the city of Panama, Panama. Presented by Dr. Ramon Arias-Feraud. 
Received March 5, 1918. 

45887. Ipomoea sp. Convolvulaceie. Morning-glory. 

"Seeds of morning-glories that keep open the whole day." {ArUis- 
Feraud. ) 

45888. Opebculina txtberosa (L.) Meisn. Convolvulacese. 
(Ipomoea tuberosa L.) 

A perennial, stout-stemmed herbaceous vine, climbing to tlie tops of 
the tallest trees. The leaves are large and compound, with seven oblong 
leaflets; and three to six yellow flowers are borne on a long peduncle. 
The fruit is a membranous round capsule, about an inch long, contain- 
ing two to four large seeds which are covered with short black hairs. It 
is a native of Brazil. (Adapted from De Lanessan, Les Plantes Utiles des 
Colonies Francaises, pp. 398 and 567.) 

46889 and 46890. Cydonia oblonoa Mill. Malaceae. Quince. 

From Murdock, Kans. Grafts presented by Mr. J. W. Riggs, of the Ex- 
periment Grounds. Received March 6, 1918. 

Scions from trees of a variety sent to the Ofllce of Foreign Seed and Plant 
Introduction by Prof. N. E. Hansen, from Samarkand, Russian Turkestan, May 
24, 1898, and numbered S. P. I. 1123. . Mr. Riggs states that this variety has 
yielded fine fruit at Murdock, while trees of standard quince varieties have 
not borne any fruit. The tree is hardy, not being injured in that section of 
Kansas by drought and heat. 

45889. Scions grafted on apple stocks. 
45800. Scions grafted on Japanese pear stocks. 

45891. RuBus MACROCARPus Benth. Eosacese. Blackberry. 

From Colombia. Presented by Hermano Apolinar-Maria, Instituto de 
la Salle, Bogota, at the request of Mr. F. M. Chapman, Washington, D. C. 
Received March 7, 1918. 

"In April, 1913, while on a visit to Colombia, I found this variety growing 
in a little posada called El Pefion in the Temperate Zone at an altitude of 
9,600 feet, on the trail from Bogota to Fusagasuga. El Peilon is exceedingly 
wet, and this giant blackberry may be found only under the conditions which 
prevail there. It is not the mora de CastiUa, a cylindrical berry which grows 
in profusion at 5,000 to 7,500 feet; but this berry is much larger, more nearly 
round, and shaped more like a strawberry. These berries are often 3 Inches 
in length." {Chapman.) 



86 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBTED. 

46892 to 46898. 

From Auckland, New Zealaod. Presented by Mr. H. R. Wrlgiit, Avondale. 
Received March 7» 1918. 

45892. PoHADEBBis ELUPTiCA Labill. Rbamnacese. 

"Kumarahou. A rare dwarf shrub belonging to the Auckland Pror- 
ince. This plant is difficult to transplant, but is easily raised from seed. 
It flowers when 2 years old and if kept well pinched back makes a 
glorious specimen, being covered in spring with a mass of yellow flowers. 
It grows on some of our poor clay lands of a close nature, similar to that 
where the heather grows/' iWri§^t) 

A branching shrub, 4 to 8 feet high, with the young branches^ leaTes* 
and flower clusters covered with white or buff-colored stellate hairs^ 
The ovate to oblong leaves are 2 to 3 inches long; and the cymes of 
yellow flowers, with crisp-margined petals, are clustered into large 
many-branched panicles. Native name Kumarahou, from kumara (a 
tuberlike root) and hou (growing deeply or strongly). (Adapted from 
Cheeseman, Manual of New Zealand Flora, p. 93, and from Laing mnd 
Blackwell, Plants of Neto Zealand, p. 236.) 

45893 and 45894. X Vebonica andebsonii Lind. and Paxt. Scrophu- 
lariaceffi. 

45893. A hybrid between Veronica salicifolia and K speciosa. An 
ornamental shrub, with drooping, entire, * thick, pale-green leaves, 
somewhat like those of phlox, and brilliant violet-blue flowers, 
sometimes whitened toward the base of certain racemes. This 
plant is an interesting combination of grace and majesty, elegance 
and hardiness. The handsome racemes are dense, erect, slightly 
nodding at the tip, and somewhat longer than the leaves. (Adapteil 
from Flore des Serres et des Jardins de Europe, vol, 7, p. S5» ) 

45894. Variety variegata, A handsome ornamental shrub, with blue- 
purple flowers in long, slender, semierect racemes. For 30 or 40 
years this Veronica has been largely propagated and used as a 
bedding plant for the sake of Its clear variegation, the leaves 
having a broad, creamy white margin. Under this system of 
treatment the plant seldom or never flowered but produced an 
abundance of shoots and foliage, which was really what the 
flower-bedding gardener desired. By cultivating it In a pot, 
however, until the stems get fairly woody and the pot filled 
with roots, it flowers beautifully, making a handsome subject for 
the greenhouse or conservatory in winter. (Adapted from The 
Gardening World, vol, 2S, p. 820.) 

45895. Veronica salicttolia Foi*st. Scrophulariace«e. Speedwell 

A very useful, gracefully ornamental species, forming a large bush 
5 to 8 feet high, clothed with willow-shaped leaves up to 5 inches in 
length. During summer it bears profusely slender, pendulous racemes, 
often 6 inches or more long, of white, pink, or lilac-tinged flowers. 
(Adapted from Gardening Illustrated^ vol, S7, p. S08,) 

45896 and 45897. Vesonica speciosa R. Cunn. Scrophulariacese. 

Speedwell 

45896. One of the best of all the veronicas, for It is of vigorous habit, 
3 to 5 feet high, forms a wide and shapely bush, and blooms well 
in autumn and early winter. It bears erect, dense racemes of 



JAKTTABT 1 TO MABOH 31, 1018. 37 

45892 to 45886— Contimied. 

purple or reddiflh purple flowers, but there are varieties with white, 
lilac, pink, blue, and red blossoms. As the racemes are some 8 
inches long and borne from nearly every leaf axil on the upper 
parts of the shoots, the effect is very fine. (Adapted from Oar- 
dentng Illustrated, vol. 57, p. S08,) 

Received as Veronica imperialism which seems to be a garden 
name for T'. speciosa. 

45807. Variety kermisina. A handsome dark form, the plants blos- 
soming when in a young state, which is not often the case with 
Veronica speciosa. (Adapted from Loudon, Encyclopedia of 
Plants, p. 1546.) 

45898. Veronica sp. Scrophularlacese. Spee'dwell. 

Received as Verotiica loheHaffora, for which nanre a place of publica- 
tion has not been found. 

46899. Stizolobixim PBUKrrnM officinaub Piper. Fabacess. 

From Chinandepa, Nicaragua. Presented by Mr. C. B. Sibley, Escnela de 
Agricultura. Received March 8, 1918. 

" Pica-pica. From what I have observed of this plant it must be very much 
like the velvet bean of the Florida orchards. I have noticed that it is a very 
heavy producer of nitrogen nodules. They are very numerous and also quite 
large. This fact has been taken advantage of by the natives, so that they 
welcome the plant into the com fields that lie fallow or resting. One other 
point in its favor is that the stem of the plant during the growing season does 
not become hard and woody, so that, used as a green manure, it would soon 
decay in the soil after being plowed under." (Sibley.) 

45900. CoNDAWA LiNEATA A. Gray. Rhamnaceae. Fiquillin. 

From Oran, Argentina. Presented by Mr. S. W. Damon. Received March 
9, 1918. 

"The fruit from which I took these seeds was bought in the market of 
Jujuy. I have never seen it growing, but as bought it resembles a ^mall-sized 
inferior grade of cherry." (Damon.) • ' i\ \ ' 

A spiny, much-branched shrub with alternate, spatulate to oblong-oyate, 
sharply pointed, leathery leaves about half an inch long. The flowers have a 6- 
parted whitish calyx, but no petals. The oblong, l-seeded fruits are borne 
singly or in pairs on short pedicels in the axils of the leaves. (Adapted from 
A. Gray, in Botany of the U. S. Exploring Expedition, vol. 1, p. 275.) 

45901« Ptrtts COMMX7KIS L. Malaceae. Fear. 

From Columbia, Mo. Cuttings presented by Dr. J. C. Whitten, College of 
Agriculture. Received March 12, 1918. 

*' The Surprise pear forwarded by Dr. Whitten, of the College of Agriculture, 
Columbia, Mo., is one of the most promising as a blight-resistant pear and may 
prove of economic importance as a stock for commercial varieties. As grown 
by Prof. Rehner at Talent, Oreg., it was one of the most vigorous of stocks and 
seemed to transmit this vegetative character to nearly all varieties of pears 
which were grafted or budded upon it. Its congeniality, in other words, is to 
be commended. Dr. Whitten says that the Surprise pear is apparently a pure 



38 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. ^ 

Pyms communis. This variety is a large, vigorous grower. It early begins the 

• 

formation of short, dpurlike branches, which spread horizontally, with few of 
the upright rank shoots customary to Kieffer and other hybrids. The fruit is 
small, not much larger than Seckel. It is moderately late, ripening only a 
little ahead of KieflPer, and is of poor quality. The variety bears profusely, 
however. Dr. Whitten says that he does not remember having seen a trace of 
blight in any of the Surprise trees on his grounds, though they are growing in 
a pear orchard in which numerous susceptible varieties have died out entirely 
from blight and other varieties have blighted more or less everj* year." {B. T. 
Oalloway,) 

45902. Abukdinaria falcata Nees. Poacese. Bamboo. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Be- 
' ceived March 12, 1918. 

A slender bamboo growing to a height of 20 feet but not exceeding half an 
inch in diameter, having the young stems covered with a bluish white waxy 
coating soon turning yellowish green. The light-green striate-veined leaves are 
4 to 6 inches long by one-third of an inch wide, with downy sheatha The 
H)ecies is not very hardy, being a native of the lower slopes of the Himalayas 
in northwestern India. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horti- 
culture, vol, 1, p, 448.) 

Received as Arundinaria gracilis, which is now referred to A. falcata. 

45903. Zea mays L. Poaceae. Com. 

From Argentina. Purchased from H. H. Marini & Co., Buenos Aires, 
through the American consul general. Received March 13, 191& 

An amber-colored variety of com, obtained for experimental tests. 

45904. Lagenaria vuiiOARis Seringa. Cucurbitacete. Gourd. 

From Japan. Presented by Dr. L. H. Bailey, Ithaca, N. Y., who obtained 
them from Gov. H. Hiratsuka, Utsunomya, Japan. Received March 14. 
1918. 

" The largest gourd utensils I ever saw were at Utsunomya, Japan. I ask«l 
for seeds of them and have received a packet from Gov. H. Hiratsuka, of the 
prefecture. I am sending you some of these seeds, thinking that possibly you 
would like to have them grown at your Maryland or Florida stations, where 
the season will probably allow them to mature. Some of the gourds I saw in 
the market in Japan would hold, I should think, at least a peck.*' {Baiiey.) 

45905 to 45912. 

From Venezuela and the West Indies. Collected by Mr. H. M. Curran, 
Laurel, Md., during an exploring trip made by him in 1917. Received 
March 14, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Curran unless otherwise noted. 

45905. Acacia sp. Mimosacese. 

" From La Vela de Coro, Venezuela. A shrub or small tree, with orna- 
mental red or purple wood." 

45906. AcANTHOBHiZA ACULEATA (Liebm.) Wendl. Phoenlcacea. Palm. 

"From Venezuela." 

" A palm with a trunk 6 to 9 feet tall and 4 to 6 inches in diameter, 
armed with spiniform roots 3 to 4 inches in length. The leaves, forming 
a dense crown, are fan shaped, green above and silvery below, and about 



JANUABY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1W8. 39 

45905 to 45012— Continued. 

3 feet in diameter on petioles 18 inches long. The leaf bases are densely 
covered with woolly scurf, which splits into many strong fibers ; and the 
branch inflorescence, about 2 feet long, is also densely covered with white 
woolly scurf. The smooth fruit, three-fourths of an inch long by five- 
eighths of an inch in- diameter, is not edible." (C. B. Doyle.) 

45907. AcHBAS ZAPOTA L. Sapotacete. Sapodilla. 
(A. sapota L.) 

** From Curagao, Dutch West Indies. A choice variety." 

A small, symmetrical tree, 25 to 90 feet high, with leathery, dark-green, 
shiny Jeaves and round or oblong fruit which resemble in outward 
appearance a smooth-skinned brown potato. It is a native of tropical 
America, although cultivated in the Asiatic Tropics as well. When 
thoroughly ripe, the fruit is fine for eating, having a very thin skin 
inclosing a pale-brown. Juicy pulp of delicious flavor. It is best propa- 
gated by cuttings, although it may be raised from seeds. (Adapted from 
Macmilkui, Handbook of Tropical Oardening and Planting, p. 13S.) 

See S. P. I. No. 44866 for previous introduction. 

45908. An NONA mubicata L. Annonacese. Soursop. 

" From Curacao, Dutch West Indies." 

"A small, evergreen, tropical American tree, about the size of a peach 
tree, with leathery, ill-smelling, glossy leaves; large flowers with fleshy 
exterior petals; and very large, fleshy, green fruits with white, Juicy, 
pleasantly subacid pulp. It is commonly cultivated in the Tropics of the 
Old World. A flne drink is made ft-om the Juice and excellent Jelly and 
preserves from the pulp. It is easily propagated from seeds or by bud- 
ding." (W. E, Safford.) 

See S. P. I. No. 44453 for previous introduction. 

4S{909. Bauhinia sp. desalplniaceap. 

"From Trinidad, British West Indies. Ornamental." 

45910. CERcmiUM vibide (Karst.) Taub. Ctesalplniaceie. 

" Indjoe fino or Llaro. From La Vela de Coro, Venezuela. Tree used 
as an ornamental * golden flowers. Suitable for planting in dry sections 
of the southern United States." 

A thorny shrub or small tree, with compound opposite leaves, each 
divided into one or two pinnae, which in turn are divided into five to 
eight pairs of oblong or somewhat ovate-oblong short-stalked notched 
leaflets ; the orange-yellow flowers gro^y in short, loosely flowered clusters 
hidden in a tuft of leaves ; the pod is oblong-linear, flatly pressed together, 
and membranous or somewhat leathery in texture. Ceroidium viride is 
found in the hot steppes of Venezuela and New Granada, where the tree 
is called Qvdca by the natives. It is also called hrea on account of the 
resinous substance which covers the trunk and branches and which is 
used as a substitute for pitch. (Adapted from Karaten, Florae Columhiae, 
vol. 2, p. 25, pi. lis.) 

45911. Lagebstroemia speciosa (Muenchh.) Pers. Lythracese. 
(L. ftos-reffinae Retz.) 

*' From Trinidad, British West Indies. Ornamental." 

A magnificent fiowering plant which in the Tropics affords one of the 
most brilliant fioral displays imaginable and which is made much use of 



40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IUCPO&TBD. 

45905 to 45012— Continued. 

in the gardens of Indian potentates and other places in the Bast The 
flowers appear on axillary peduncles, usually forming panicles at the tips 
of the branches. The leaves are c^poslte and entire, oblong, glabrous, 
and dark green. The flowers are a beautiful shade of rose in the morn- 
ing, deepening during the day until they become purple In the evening. 
It is a plant of large growth and is found from Malay to China. (Adapted 
from Gardeners* Chronicle, Sd «er., vol, 15, p. 77.) 

45912. ToLUiFERA sp. Fabaceee. 

"An ornamental leguminous tree from Trinidad, British West Indies." 



45913. Zea mats L. Poacese. Com. 

From Peru. Procured by Mr. William E. Montavon, United States com- 
mercial* attach^ at Lima. Received March 15, 1918. 

"No. 15. Ojo8 de Lechuga, Matlbamba.** (Mowtavwi.) 

A peculiarly marked variety, having a dull-yellow ground color overlaid with 
brown lines so as to resemble the grain on a panel of wood. Introduced for the 
experimental and breeding work of the Office of Com Investigations. 

46914. PiNus ARMANDi Franch. Pinacese. Pine. 

From Formosa. Presented by Mr. G. Takata, director. Department of 
Productive Industries, Taihoku. Received March 16, 1918. 

"A pine producing very large cones full of large, edible seeds which are eagerly 
collected by the priests In the temples; the cones supply an excellent fuel." 
(F. N. Meyer.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 88468. 

45016 to 45918. 

From Panama. Presented by Sr. Ramon Arias-Feraud. Received March 
16, 1918. Quoted notes by Sr. Arias-Feraud. Descriptions adapted from 
CJook and Collins, Economic Plants of Porto Rico. 

" I am sending you a package containing seeds from different plants grown 
on my own plantation." 

45915. Anacabdium occidentale h. Anacardiacese. Cashew. 

" Red cashew. Trees about 20 feet high, bearing fruits the third year." 

A handsome quick-growing tree reaching a height of 40 feet, with large, 
entire, oval leaves; the wood is close grained, strong, and durable and 
is used for boat building. The cashew, like the poison ivy, possesses an 
acrid substance which is strongly Irritant to the ^idermis and the 
mucous membranes of human beings. The poisonous material, how- 
ever, is not spread throughout the plant, but is mostly concentrated In 
the rather soft shell of the nut, which is borne upon a pear-shaped red 
or yellow fleshy receptacle 2 to 4 inches long. This receptacle is edible 
and quite harmless when ripe, having a very agreeable subacid taste In 
the raw state. It is also very good when cooked. The nut is kidney 
shaped or distinctly curved near the middle and contains a single large 
kernel of quite firm flesh, of fine texture and of delicate, very pleasant 
nutty flavor. No attempt should be made, however, to eat it in the raw 
state, on account of the poisonous juice of the shell, which must bel 
driven off by the heat, so that roasting is an ab8(dute neoessity. 



JABTUAKY 1 TO MAKCH 31, 1918. 41 

15915 to 45918— Continued. 

45916. Abtogaspus commxtnis Forst. Moraces. Breadfruit.. 

"Chestnut breadfruit. The large fruit contains about 40 chestnuts^ 
which are fine to eat after being boiled in salted water." 

45017. Blighia sapida Koen. Sapindaceae. Akee^ 

"Akee fruit from India. Should not be used until the fruit, opens, 
showing the seeds and the yellow edible portion. It is dangerous to eat 
the closed fruit, as it contains a poison which produces uncontrollable- 
vomiting." 

Valued in Jamaica as a highly flavored, wholesome food, the bright 
yellow, fleshy arillus being the part eaten. The arillus is prepared in 
various ways, often stewed in milk, and afterwards browned in a frying 
pan with butter. It is also boiled and mixed with salt flsh, onions, and 
tomatoes as a brealcfast food. 

45018. Chbysophyllum cainito L. Sapotaceje. Caimito.. 

" Silk star-apple. Green color." 

A tree up to 45 feet in height and a foot in diameter, bearing an 
edible fruit about the size of an apple. The wood is dark violet in color 
and is rather coarse, but is suitable for shingles and bowls and for 
general carpenter work. 

46919. EtTBTTS sp. RosacesB. Blackberry. 

From Colombia. Presented by Hermano Apolinar-Maria, Instituto de 
la Salle, Bogota, at the request of Mr. F. M. Chapman. Received March<k 
19, 1918, 

45920 and 45921. Syringa spp. Oleaceae. Lilac. 

From Rocheeteri N. Y. Presented by Mr. John Dunbar, ABSlstant Superln* 
tendent of Parka. Received February 19, 1918. 

45020. Stbitvga reflexa C Schneid. 

A bush, 6 to 9 feet in height, growing at altitudes of 4,500 to 7,500 feet 
The reddish flowers are borne in long pendulous inflorescences which give 
the species a distinct appearance quite different from that of all other- 
lilacs. Found at Fanghsien, western Hupeh, China. (Adapted from 
Sargent, Plantae Wilsonianae, pt. i, j). 2B7.) 

45921. Syringa tomentella Bur. and Franch. 

A bush, 11 to 5 meters in height, forming thickets at altitudes of 9,000 
to 10,000 feet. The flowers are white to rose-pink in color. Collected in. 
western Szechwan, China. (Adapted from Sargent, Plantae WiUonianae, 
pt, i, p. SOI,) 

45922. JuoiiANS HBGiA L. Juglandaceae. Walnut. 

From New York. Presented by Dr. Robert T. Morris, New York, N. Y. 
Received March 20, 1918. 

Scions from a walnut tree sent to Dr. Morris by the Oflice of Foreign Seed 
and Plant Introduction under S. P. I. No. 17946. Mr. Frank N. Meyer, who col- 
lected this walnut in China, described it as a genuine paper-shelled walnut 
which sells for three times as much money as the hard-shelled varieties. The 
nuts can be shelled like peanuts. 



42 SBEDS AND PLANTS IMFOBTED. 

45923. Telfairia pedata (J. E. Smith) Hook. Cucurbitacese. 

From East Africa. Presented by Mr. M. Bnysman, Lawanir, Java. ReceiTed 
March 20, 1918. 

Mr. Charles Telfair, for whom the plant Is named, says of it : " It is di(Bcioii& 
The fruit is 3 feet long, 8 or 10 Inches in diameter, and full of seeds as lar^ 
as chestnuts (264 in one fruit), which are as excellent as almonds and have t 
very agreeable flavor ; when pressed they yield an abundance of oil equal to 
that of the finest olives. It is a perennial plant and grows at the margins of 
forests, enveloping the trees with its branches, while its trunk is frequentlj 
seen with a circumference of 18 inches." Its name among the Indians of 
Zanzibar is koum4. (Adapted from Curtis" s Botanical Magazine, pH. 2751 
and 2752.) 

For an illustration of the so-called " nuts " of this cucurbit, see Plate IL 

45924. Ceratonia siliqua L. Caesalpiniaceae. CSarob. 

From Valetta, Malta. Scions procured by Mr. Wilbur Keblinger, American 
consul. Received February 13, 1918. 

"The carob tree, or St.-John's-bread, is a handsome, slow-growing, legumi- 
nous tree with evergreen, glossy, dark-green pinnate leaves, forming a rounded 
top and attaining a great size. It grows well in the semiarld hills all around 
the Mediterranean, preferring limestone soils; it is sensitive to cold and do« 
not succeed north of the orange-growing regions. The staminate and pistillate 
flowers are borne on different trees, and it is necessary, in order to insure 
a crop of pods, to have a considerable proportion of staminate trees in the 
plantation. The large pods, which are chocolate colored when ripe, are usually 
borne in great quantities and contain an abundance of saccharine matter 
around the smooth, hard seeds. Italian analyses show the pods to contain 
more than 40 per cent of sugar and some 8 per cent of protein, more than 75 
per cent of the total weight being digestible. Unusually large trees may reach 
a height of 00 feet, with a crown 75 feet in diameter, and they may produce 
as high as 8,(X)0 i)ounds of pods. These pods are a concentrated feed for borsei. 
milk cows, and fattening stock ; to a certain extent they replace oats for horse 
feed. Sirups and various sweetmeats are sometimes pr^mred from the carob 
pods; they are relished by most children and are sometimes offered for salt 
by fruit dealers in America." (TT. 7. Swingle.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 8112. 

46925. Ao:cTRYON sitbcinebeum (A. Gray) Radlk. Sapindaceae. 
{Nepheliwn leiocarpum F. Muell.) 

From Nice, France, Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Kfr 
ceived March 21, 1918. 

A shrub or small tree, native to New South Wales, Australia, which has 
•compound leaves composed of one to three pairs of shining, coarsely serrate, 
oblong leaflets 2 to 4 Inches long and very small flowers in short axillar; 
panicles; the two to three lobed capsules inclose globose seeds with fleshj 
arils. (Adapted from A. Gray, U. S, Exploring fJxpedition, vol, 15, Botany, 
p. 258, as Cupania suhcinerea,) 

See S. P. I. No. 44520 for previous introduction. 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 43 

45926. PiTHEOOLOBiuM BiGEMiNUM (L.) Mait. MimosacesB. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by the director, Horticultural Section, 
Gixeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received March 25, 1918. 

A medium-sized tree found on the lower slopes of the Himalayas up to an 
altitude of 3,000 feet and eastward to the Philippines. The bipinnate leaves 
are divided into two to four pinnae, each bearing four to six coriaceous leaflets 
4 to 6 inches long. The small heads of cream-colored flowers are borne In 
large axillary and terminal panicles, and the spirally twisted reddish pods are 
3 to 6 inches long. (Adapted from Cooke, Flora of Bombay , vol, /, p. J^5.) 

Received as Inga higevfiAnum, which is now referred to Pithecolohium. 

4B927. Lathyrus SATivirs L. Fabacese. Bitter vetch. 

From North Bend, Wash. Presented by Mr*. J. E. Erdmand. Received 
March 25, 1918. 

"Wedge peas obtained from local Indians. I have found these peas when 
dry are excellent for cooking. The foliage is long and grasslike, and th« 
flowers are white. Very hardy and productive." {Erdmand.) 

46928 and 45929. Botor tetragonoloba (L.) Kuntze. Fabaceae. 

{PsophocarpuB tetragonolohus DC.) Gh>a bean. 

From the Philippine Islands. Presented by the College of Agriculture, 
LoB Banoe. Received March 25, 1918. 

"When these square green pods with *fHlki' at each comer are 'strung' 
(just as snap beans are treated) and cooked in the same way, they make an 
excellent vegetable. At Brooksville, Fla., the season may be too short for their 
profitable culture, but the plant deserves a wider test in southern Florida. 
Its flowers are very attractive and would almost pass for sweet peas." 
(FairchUd.) 

4590a Big Calamismu*, 207-F-5. 

45928. Ilooano Pal-lang. 6387-F. 

46930 to 45939. CirRus spp. Rutacese. 

From China. Scions collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Ex- 
plorer of the Department of Agriculture. Received February 25, 1918. 
Quoted notes by Mr. Meyer. 

45930. CiTBUS NOBiLiB Lour. Xing orangre. 

"(No. 1287. Ghaingyang, Hupeh, China. December 10, 1917.) Ttung 
pi gan (furrow slcin orange.) A mandarin of medium size, with wrinkled 
skin and of a beautiful deep-orange color ; very Juicy, of slightly bitterish 
flavor, and containing few seeds. In general, a good mandarin of the 
tonic class.*' • 

45931. Crraus ichangensis Swingle. Ichangr lemon. 

"(No. 1288. ChangjMing, Hupeh, China. December 10, 1917.) Hsiang 
yuan, A large variety of Ichang lemon, mostly shiK)ed to Shasi, a run 
of a few days down the river. The fruits sell wholesale at 1 cent (Mexi- 
can) apiece and retail at 2 to 8 cents (Mexican), according to size and 
supply. The CJhinese, with their great dislike to sour fruits, never use 
these lemons in beverages, but employ them only as room perfumers or 
carry them about to take an occasional smell at them, especially when 
passing malodorous places. Locally the rind is candled in a limited way 



44 SBEDS AND FIANTS IMPORTED. 

45d30 to 45939--Contmued. 

and resembles orange peel in flavor and appearance. The fmitB ripa 
during tide month of October; since they do not poasesa long-keeping 
qualities, they disappear very quickly. In fruit stores in Ichang titer 
all have disappeared during December. The trees grow to medium large 
size and resemble puuunelOB in general appearance, though they are less 
massive in outline and tbe foliage is of a lighter hue of green. The trees 
are densely branched and have large spines on the main branches and 
small ones even on the bearing branchlets. The foliage suffers a good 
deal from caterpillars, the trunks are attacked by borers, and maggots 
are occasionally found in the fruit Foreign residents in and around 
Ichang make from these lemons a very fine lemonade, which is of a more 
refreshing quality than the ordinary kind; they are also used in pastry, 
sauces, and preserves. On the whole it seems that this Ichang lemon 
is a very desirable home fruit for those sections of the United States 
that are adapted to its culture, especially die South Atlantic and Gulf 
States. It may also prove to be hardier than any other citms fruit of 
economic importance. Around Ichang trees have withstood temperatures 
of 19** F." 

4503d. Citrus nobilis Lour. Kin^ orange. 

"(No. 1289. Changyang, Hupeh, China. December 10, 1917.) Chun 
pan (spring orange) and Lciba gan (turnip orange). A large mandarin 
of a fine light-orange color, with a corrugated ridn ; it contains few seeds 
and has a sweet refreshing flavor." 
45033. CmttJs nobilis delictosa (Ten.) Swingle. Tangrerine. 

"(No. 1290. Changyang, Hupeh, China. December 10, 1917.) Chuan 
chu tze (Szechwan orange). A large flat tangerine of bright reddish 
color, with very loose skin. Very sweet but somewhat flat in taste. It 
is a poor keeper and shipper, but on account of its attractive appearance 
is very much in demand. It is supposed to have originated in 
Szechwan." 

45934. Crraus sp. 

"(No. 1291. Changyang, Hupeh, China* December 10, 1917.) Ba chr 
gan (handle orange). An orange with the color and shape of a lemon, 
of fresh, sweet taste, and containing many seeds." 

45935. Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck. Orange. 

"(No. 1292. Changyang, Hupeh, China. December 10, 1917.) Esiang 
gan (frftgrant orange). An orange of medium size, golden-orange color, 
firm flesh, and fresh, sweet taste, and containing, as a rule, a fair number 
of small seeds." 
45036 and 45037. Crraus ichangensis Swingle. . Ichanir lemon. 

45036. "(No. 1293. Ichang, China. December 20, 1917.) A coarse 
variety of Ichang lemon, with a thick, dark-yellow skin, and con- 
taining very many large seeds. Posrtbly a hybrid with a pum- 
melo. Obtained from the garden of the Britlsli Consulate at 
Ichang."' 

45037. "(No. 1294. Ichang, Hupeh, China. December 30, 1917.) 
An especially fine variety of Ichang lemon, very Juicy and having 
a delightful fragrance. It makes a superior lemonade. The tret- 
is of a somewhat drooping habit, and the foliage is very dense. 
Obtained from the garden of the British Consulate at Ichang." 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 45 

45930 to 4593&— Continued. 

45038. CiTBUS NOBiLis Lour. King orange. 

"(No. 1295. Ichang, Hupeh, China. December 28, 1917.) Pao gan 
(sijongy, inflated, or vesicular orange). A medium large mandrfrin with 
a very wrinkled skin of beautiful deep-orange color ; very juicy, and of 
an agreeably bitter flavor; seeds few. A fruit well worth cultivating 
in the United States as a tonic mandarin. Obtained from the garden ol 
the Church of Scotland Mission." 

45939. Citrus ichangbnsis Swingle. Ichang lemon. 

"(No. 1296. Ichang, China. December 28, 1917.) A large variety of 
Ichang lemon, said to be a very heavy bearer; fruits medium large. 
Obtained from the garden of the Church of Scotland Mission." 

45940. Stizolubium niveum (Boxb.) Kuntze. Fabaceie. 

Lyon bean. 

From Rhodesia, Africa. Presented by Mr. .1. O. S. Walters, Director of 
Agriculture, Salisbury. . Received March 25, 1918. 

" Lyon or Dedman*s bean. One of the principal advantages that th4s variety 
has over the Florida velvet bean is the absence of the fine prickly hairs on 
the stem and leaves, which make the curing of the latter plant for hay a diffi- 
cult operation. It also seems to be more resistant to frost. For these reasons 
Dedman*s bean, or as it is more commonly known here, stingless velvet bean, 
is gradually replacing the Florida variety." (Walters,) 

45941 to 45951. 

From China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer of 
the Deimrtment of Agriculture. Received February 25, 1918. Quoted 
notes by Mr. Meyer. 

45941. CiTBTJS AURANTiun L. Rutaccffi. Sour orange. 

••(No. 1297. Tsentze, near Ichang, China. December 22, 1917.) A 
large prange with the shape and color of a lemon ; quite Juicy but having 
a bitter aftertaste. The fruits are said to acquire their best flavor in 
spring. Possibly a hybrid between ap orange and a pummelo. Obtained 
from the garden of the R. C. Boys' Training School, across the Yangtse 
River." 

45942. ScHizoPHBAOMA 8p. Hydrangeaceffi. 

"(No. 1299. Tsungchiatsui, Hupeh, China. Altitude 3,000 feet. De- 
cember 14, 1917.) An evergreen vine found trailing over rocks and 
bowlders in a semishady place. The foliage is medium small and 
leathery, like that of a daphne. Apparently quite rare. To be tested 
under protection from extremes of sun and frost." 

45943. Ulmus sp. Ulmacess. Elm. 

"(No. 1300. Totzewan, Hupeh, China. December 12, 1917.) An un- 
common elm growing to a large size and found in mountain districts at 
low altitudes. Young branches often corky, bark of old trunks grayish 
brown and fissured. Possibly a desirable shade and avenue tree for mild- 
wintered regions." 

45044. Pbunus glandulosa Thunb. Amygdalacese. Plum. 

"(No. 1301. Ichang, China. December, 1917.) A shrubby flowering 
plum growing to a height of 3 to 5 feet. It can be trained to one stem, 

68805—22 4 



46 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOETED. 

45941 to 45951— Continued. 

but grows uaturally into a densely branched bush. It bears masses oi 
double rose-colored flowers in May and is a fine little shrub for bordffs 
and' near door entrances in those regions where it is perfectly hardj. 
Obtained from the garden of the Customs Compound." 

45045. Citrus. ICH A NGEN SIS Swingle. Rutacese. Ichang lemoE. 

"(No. 2455a. Santsako, Hupeh, China. November 24, 1917.) A verj 
spiny wild tree, found in a field on a mountain slope at an altitude of 
about 4,000 feet above sea level. Height 18 feet; foliage dense, but in- 
dividual leaves small ; winged petioles quite minute. Fruits fairly jui(7. 
the size and shape of tangerines ; rind of bright-yellow color and corro- 
gated, but not excessively so ; odor very pleasing. Seeds large but not 
very numerous. In regions where this wild Ichang lemon occurs ooe 
also finds coir palm, loquats, bamboos, large-leaved evergreen privets. 
and Cunningliamia lanceoUUa. Temperatures probably never go lover 
than 10** F. The local name of this wild lemon was given me as Chu g» 
tze, meaning * maggot orange,* since maggots are said to be attracted by 
the very sour Juice. No other cultivated citrus fruits occurred near-by. 
though a few hundred feet lower down several large pummelo tree 
were seen. The natives have little use for the fruit ; they keep a few 
in the room to perfume the air, and occasionally they use the dried risd 
in a medicinal tea. In breeding experiments it may be of value, since it 
seems to be the hardiest of all the true species of citrus (Poncirus tri- 
foliata not being a true citrus).'* 
45946. AcTiNiDiA CHiNENSis Planch. Dllleniacefe. Yang-tao. 

"(No. 2456a. Near Lungtoping, Hupeh, China. November 23, 1917.) 
A variety of yang-tao bearing smooth fruits of various si^es ranging froD 
that of a gooseberry to a good-sized plum. It possesses a good flavor, 
though setting one*s teeth on edge, as does the use of nonselect pineapples 
and some wild blueberries. This fruit really is of high promise for the 
United States and especially so for the mild-wintered sections. It shoiiW 
preferably be grown as an arbor vine. In its native habitat one finds it 
bearing most heavily when climbing over low scrub and rocks on northeast 
exposures, where the plants are subjected occasionally to strong twistinf 
winds, which seem to ch6ck their tendency to excessive vegetative growth. 
Where this yang-tao occurs one also finds around the farmsteads coir 
palms, loquats, bamboo clumps, tea plants, tung-oil trees, etc. The fruits 
when properly handled keep fresh for a long time ; they ship and keep 
especially well after having been subjected to a slight frost. As to their 
uses, they can be eaten out of hand or as a dessert when skinned, sliced^ 
and sprinkled over with sugar ; excellent preserves can also be made from 
them. The Chinese, with their extensive vegetable diet and tlieir ab 
horrence of sour fruits, do not care for this fruit and let it waste mostly: 
Caucasians, however, seem universally to enjoy highly this unique berry, 
which combines the flavor of the gooseberry, strawberry, pineapple, guava. 
and rhubarb. Possibly In some of the Southern States new industries 
could be built up by cultivating this fruit for the northern city markets. 
The meaning of yang-tao Is ' male peachj which is as inappropriate as 
our name pineapple is for the ananas.*' 

45947 and 45948. Casta nea moixissima Blume. Fagacese. Chestnut 

45947. "(No. 2457a. Ichang, Hupeh, China. December, 1917.) T^ 
pan li tze (large board oak seeds), a classical name for the chest- 



JANUABY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 47 

45941 to 45051— Continued. 

nut. Large Chinese chestnuts from trees cultivated in neighboring 
mountain districts." 

45048. "(No. 2458a. Wantiaoshan, Hupeh, China. November 30, 
1917.) Wa li tze (bean chestnut). Chestnuts from wild trees 
occurring at altitudes between 3,000 and 6,000 feet above sea level. 
There is considerable variation among the trees and bushes from 
which these seeds were collected, and perhaps there is more than 
one species among them. If so, there may be the chinquapin, 
Castanea seguinii, which seems to be wholly resistant to the chest- 
nut blight, Endothia parasitica. Purchased from a local collector." 

45049. Gastanea SEGUiNn Dode. Fagacese. Chinquapin. 

"(No. 2459a. Ichang, Hupeh, China. November 16, 1917.) Moh pan li 
(hairy board oak). A shrubby chinquapin, occasionally growing into a 
tree 25 to 40 feet high ; it occurs on mountain slopes here and there in 
Central China, often in great quantities. Sprouts only 2 feet high often 
produce seeds. It appears to be totally resistant to the bark fungus, 
Endothia paralitica, and may be of considerable value in breeding ex- 
periments such as Dr. Walter Van Fleet has been conducting for several 
years. This species seems to be more moisture loving than Caatanea mol- 
lissima, but it grows well on the most barren mountain slopes." 

For an illustration of a fruiting branch of this shrub, see Plate III. 

45050. EucoMMiA ULM0IDE8 Oliver. Trochodendraceffi. 

"(No. 2460a. Suilokua, Hupeh, China. November 13, 1917.) Tu chung 
Shu (ease of heart tree) and Sheh mien shu (floss silk tree). The so- 
called CJhinese rubber tree, which has proved to be more hardy and more 
drought resistant in the United States than was at first expected. In 
China tli^ bark, with its silky threads (when broken), is used as a high- 
class drug." 

45051. CiTBUS iCHANOENsis Swiugle. Rutacese. Ichang lemon. 

"(No. 2461a. Ichang, Hupeh, China. December, 1917.) Cultivated 
strains of Ichang lemons. To be sown to obtain bearing trees for all- 
round purposes. There is considerable variation in the Ichang lemon, 
and some seedlings might produce remarkably good fruits. 



»» 



45952. Tamarix aphylla (L.) Karst. Tamaricaceae. Athel. 

(T. articulata Vahl.) 

From Tucson, Ariz. Cuttings presented by Prof. J. J. Thornber, University 
of Arizona. Received March 26, 1918. 

" The athel or evergreen tamarisk of northern Africa. Trees with erect habit 

and ascending branches. Branchlets numerous, threadlike, drooping, bluish 
green, and appearing as If Jointed or segmented on account of the character of 
the small leaves. The plants grow readily from cuttings, which may be made 
at almost any season. Cuttings often develop into trees 6 to 10 feet tall in a 
year, while trees 4 to 6 years old under favorable conditions attain heights of 
40 to 50 feet. Thrives in sandy and calcareous soils and in those with consider- 
able alkali and is very drought and heat resistant. Young trees with well- 
matured wood were only slightly injured with a temperature of 6** F. Excellent 
for windbreaks and very i)opular on account of its rapid growth, symmetrical 
form, and evergreen foliage." (/. J. Thomher.) 



48 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOETED. 

" In March, 1917, Prof. J. J. Thornber, a collaborator of the Office of Cr^p 
Physiology and Breeding Investigations, sent to Mr. Bruce Drummond, superin- 
tendent of the date gardens at Indio and Mecca, Calif., a few unrooted cuttings 
about 1 foot long and one-fourth to one-half inch in diameter, of Tamarix articu- 
lata, received in March, 1909, by Prof. Thornber froni Dr. L. Trabut, Goveni- 
ment botanist of Algiers. These cuttings made phenomenal growth and by the 
fall of 1918 were attracting attention all over the Coachella Valley, the original 
cuttings then being, some of them, more than 20 feet high. This species, called 
athel by the Arabs, is an excellent windbreak provided the lower branches are 
not cut off. It grows so rapidly that it makes effective windbreaks inside of 
two years. After a growth of five years the original trees are several of them 
well over 50 feet high, having a maximum diameter at the ground of 14 to 17 
Inches. Without question this is one of the most important windbreaks ever 
found for use in the great irrigated valleys of the Southwest. 

**^Thi8 species, unlike many other species of Tamarix, is gray-green in color, 
evergreen, and pyramidal in shape, making a very handsome ornamental tree, 
especially when young. 

" The athel not only grows very rapidly, but has hard wood which when dry 
makes excellent fuel. Prof. S. O. Mason reports that in Egypt this wood is 
prized by the Arabs for construction purposes, as it Is not attacked by borers 
such as so greatly damage acacia and other hardwoods in Egypt. Dr. Trabnt 
informed me in 1899 that it was the largest and most important tree of the 
Sahara Desert, frequently attaining a circumference of 6 feet and rarely as much 
as 17 feet. 

" To Mr. Bruce Drummond belongs the credit for having discovered the great 
value of this species for windbreaks and for ornamental plantings hi the hot. 
irrigated valleys of the Southwest. The original plantings of this species at 
Tucson, Ariz., made much slower growth and had not made obvious the extraor- 
dinary value of this species as a windbreak in the date-growing regions of the 
Southwest. Because of Mr. Drummond's prompt recognition of the .value of 
this species and active dissemination of cuttings, it is estimated that 25,000 
trees are now growing in the Coachella Valley alone, all propagated from leas 
than a dozen original cuttings sent to Mr. Drummond by Prof. Thornber in 1917. 

" In March, 1809, when I had the good fortune to make the acquaintance of 
Dr. L. Trabut, the eminent physician, botanist, and agriculturist of Algeria, he 
called my attention to this important tree and gave me cuttings from the tre€$ 
growing in the botanical garden at the University of Algiers, together with in- 
formation which w^as published in Inventory No. 7, under No. 8343. Unfbrtu- 
nately, the steamship Strathlever^ on which I shipped this material on March 6, 
1899, did not proceed directly from Algiers to New York, as the captain ex- 
pected, but was ordered back to Smyrna and spent nearly three months in mak- 
ing the trip from Algeria to New York. As a result, many of the plants, among 
them Tamarix articulata, died on the way to this country, 

" The spectacular character of this extraordinary plant and its rapid utiliza- 
tion in a practical way is a proof of the value of thorough botanical studies such 
as Prof. Thornber has been making on Tamarix for some years past Doubtless 
most of the species are of little practical value, but among numerous unteste*l 
species which Prof. Thornber obtained was the athel, which promises to be 
worth millions to the farmers of the southwestern United States." (WiUter T. 
SwmgJe,) 

For an illustriition showing the use of the athel tree as a windbreak, see 
Plate IV. 



fantory 54. Saeds and Plants Importat). 



Threrin]portanl(Bctsha\cbei;ti fsiah1i»h«l inregaid to the ehfiiiiiiH barkdlscTiao: First, [halnll 
sperirs or Caslaiira arc nbl equully susippliblr lo ihv limeus; sn-nnd, that hyliriils bctwooi Ihr 
dJ tlerenl species arelprtlle:atid,ihlid, that ihPfiidor»lilrnprodiit*simmaiiliy, what ev tribal is, 
appeals tabv herltoblo and bylirenlineand^lnliDTiFanbolnnirpDrBted with other rharartct^ 
such ttsslieandquaUlyotlheiiiit.slif oftheitM.Ktf. Thl5ChliifacthJiic|iiaplii, oofurritiEiirar 
Ichaiig, is a shrubby spcrlfs. invinnBllv KroHini to Mien in helKhl. Frank >I. Meyer, who dis- 
covered Ihe chestnut bark fungus, KnAJUto ()afsi«(eB,iiit'hinn.teporisthLsspecicsasapparentl>- 
(otally reslsiani to the disease. 1 1 grovs n ell on barren mountain shipes bul appears to be mare 
moisture Icninn than thechesiiiul, CaUanta moUltilma. lutrodueed primarily Ibr breedinf pur- 
poies. (Fhotographed by Frank N. Ueyer, Tiewnhsien, Shensl. China, September I. IV14; 
PIZ2MFS.) 



vefitory M, Seeds ana Plant 






^ II Mil 



< Sfet*-| 



liii 



JANUABY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 49 

45963. SoLAis'DRA LONOiFLORA Tussac. Solanacese. 

From Sydney, New South Wales. Plants presented by Mr. J. H. Maiden, 
director, Botanic Gardens. Received March 26, 1918. 

A West Indian evergreen shrubby vine, with ovate to obovate sharply 
pointed leaves on purplish petioles and yellow fragrant flowers usually a foot 
long. If left un trimmed it is a rampant climber, bu^ it can be grown as a 
dwarf shrub by constant pruning. It is an adaptive plant, as it grows well 
in the driest and poorest places and does not appear to object to gross feeding. 
The foliage of this plant produces a valuable drug called solandrin, which 
has the same active principles as atropin derived from the leaves and roots of 
Atropa belladonna L. The best method of propagation is by cuttings, which 
should be taken from the flowering branches Just after the flowering season 
IS over and planted in a well-drained light sandy soil. (Adapted from The 
Afpicultural Gazette of New South Wales, vol, 28 j p. 670,) 

45954. Acacia catechu (L. f.) Willd. Mimosaceee. Catecliu. 

From Cairo, Eg>'pt. Presented by the director, Horticultural Section, 
Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received March 26, 1918. 

A medium-sized tree, with opposite, recurved spines and biplnnate leaves made 
up of 10 to 40 pairs of pinnae, each bearing 30 to 50 pairs of linear leaflets about 
one-fourth of an inch long. The spikes of yellow flowers are solitary or 
fascicled, and the flat rich brown pods are reticulate veined. A powerful astrin- 
gent extract prepared from the wood is the catechu of medicine and the cutch of 
tanning. (Adapted from Bailev, Standard Cyclopedia of HortiCttliure, vol, 1, 
p. 189, and Lyons, Plant Names, Scientifle and Popular, p. 9.) 

45955. Annona reticulata L. Annonaceae. Custard-apple. 

From Colombia. Presented by Mr. W. O. Wolcott, MedelUn. Received 
March 27, 1918. 

"The tree grows about 15 feet high, is very thrifty, thriving best in a hot 
<'liniate from sea level to about 3,000 feet altitude, and apparently wants rich 
soil and plenty of moisture. The fruit is about the siase and shape of a 
bullock's heart and has a thin, light greenish yellow skin. It is cut open 
and eaten with a spoon, there being no core, though many seeds. The flavor 
is very sugary and fine." (Wolcott,) 

45956 to 45964. 

From Peradeniya, Ceylon. Presented by Mr. George F. Mitchell, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and procured (except No. 45964) at the Botanical gardens, 
near Kandy, Ceylon. Received March 18, 1918. 

45956. Abeca tbiandba Roxb. Pho^nicacefe. Palm. 

A medium-sized palm, native to India, reaching a height of 25 feet, 
usually having several trunks and sending out basal offshoots. The 
trunks are cylindrical, and each bears a crown of pinnate leaves 4 to 6 
feet long. The orange-scarlet fruits are about the size of an olive. 
(Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol, 1, p. 
988,) 
45057. Calyptkocalyx spicatus (Lara.) Blume. PhcenicacesB. Palm. 

This stately palm, native to Amboina and other islands of the Molucca 
group, attains a height of 40 feet. The pinnate leaves have valvate 
leaflets with reflexed margins, and the flowers, arranged on long spike 



50 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45056 to 45964r-Continued. 

like spadices, produce orange-colored l-seeded fruits. The wood is u^ 
for timber, and the seeds serve as a substitute for betel nata (Adaptei 
from' Gardeners' Chronicle, June, 1870, p. 7615.) 

45958. Dtpsis madaqascaiiiensis W. Wats. Phcenicaceie. Paha. 

A graceful Madagascar palm, about 15 feet high, with leaves 10 fes 
long. The pinnate leaves, with 18-inch segments arranged in fascicles of 
six or eight, seem to be arranged on the stem in threes, giving it & 
triangular appearance. This arrangement of the leaves and the Casdded 
arrangement of the leaflets is peculiar to the genus Dypsis, not beine 
found in any other pinnate-leaved palms. (Adapted from Onrdeneri 
Chronicle, new ser., vol, Z4, p. 59^) 

45059. Elaeis guinebnsis Jacq. Phoenicaces. Oil -paXoL 

The fleshy outer layer and the kernels of the fruit each yield a com- 
mercial oil. Palm oil, that from the fleshy outer layer, is used in tbe 
manufacture of soap and candles ; white or nut oil, that from the kernels. 
is used for making margarine or artificial butter. Palm oil is an im- 
I>ortant food product which is utilized in Brazil by all classes of people 
(Adapted from note of Dorsett, Shamel, and Popenoe.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45766. 

45960. Latania coMMSBSONn Qmel. Phoenlcacete. Palm. 

An unarmed palm from Mauritius, 40 feet high, having leaves with 
petioles 4 to 6 feet long, the fan-shaped blades being about 5 feet in 
diameter and divided into lanceolate-acuminate segments 2 feet long by 
8 inches wide. It Is a particularly striking palm, the long, smooth petioles 
and the ribs of the fanlike leaves being colored a bright crimson, whicb 
is espeoially brilliant in the young foliage. (Adapted from Baker, Flora 
of Mauritiut and the Seychelles, p. S81,) 

45961. Oncosperha fascicttlatuh Th waiter Phoenicac^se. Palm. 

A spiny palm, 40 feet or more in height and 6 inches in diameter. Tbe 
leaves, 18 feet in length, are made up of lanceolate long-pointed leaflets 
18 inches long by 2 inches broad. The paniculately branched spadisc, 2 
feet long, bears large numbers of black-purple fruits about half aji inch 
in diameter. This palm is a native of the Central Province of Geyl(xi. 
where it grows from sea level to an altitude of 5,000 feet. (Adapted 
from Hooker, Flora of British India, vol. 6, p. 415,) 

45062. Oncosfebma filamentosuh BlUme. Ph(pnicaces. Falxn. 

A stoloniferous palm with a trunk 80 to 40 feet high, armed with loDg 
black spines. The drooping pinnate leaves are 10 to 12 feet long, witb 
narrow acuminate, coriaceous leaflets 2 feet long. The pendulous red- 
purple fruiting spadix is about 2 feet long and bears small globose fruits 
one-third of an inch in diameter. This species is found in swamps in the 
Malay Peninsula and also in Borneo and Cochin China. .(Adapted from 
Booker, Flora of British India, vol. 6, p. ^i5.) 

45963. Dendbocalamus giganteus Munro. Poacese. Bamboo. 

One of the largest of the bamboos, growing to a height of 100 feet, 
with a stem diameter of 8 inches, the stem walls being half an inch thick. 
It is probably indigenous in the hills of Martaban and is cultivated in 
Burma and also in most tropical countries. The stems are used for 
posts and rafters and for piping water. (Adapted from Brandis, Indian 
Trees, p. ^78.) 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. . 51 

45956 to 45964— Continued. 

45964. Magnolia globosa Hook. f. and Thorns. Maguoliacete. 

"From Lloyd Botanical Garden, Darjillng. I obtained seed of 
MaffnoUa glohoaa, which is found at 10,000 feet elevation and requires a 
moist climate." (MUcheU,) 

A small tree with brown branches and ovate leaves 9 inches long by 
6 inches wide. The globose flower buds, which appear with the young 
leaves, are about 2 inches in diameter and open into fragrant white 
flowers 5 inches across. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, 
vol. i, p, 41.) 

45965. Nephrospbrma vAN-HOtJTTEANUM (Wendl.) Balf. f. Phoeni- 
cace^. Palm. 

From Ivoloina, Madagascar. Presented by Mr. Eugene Jaegi6, director, 
Madagascar Agricultural Experiment Station, through Mr. James G. 
Carter, American consul, Tananarivo. Received March 23, 1918. 

A palm about 35 feet tall with a trunk 6 Inches in diameter, found in open 
places and along streams up to an altitude of 1,000 feet in the Seychelles 
Islands. The leaves, 5 to 7 feet long, are divided into pinnate segments 3 to 
4 feet long, broad segments alternating Irregularly with narrow ones, the ter- 
minal segments being joined together. The orange-red fruits are borne in clus- 
ters 3 to 4 feet long. (Adapted from Baker, Flora of Mauritius and the 
Seychelles f p. S86.) 

46966 and 46967. Ctkbopooon martini (Roxb.) Stapl Poacese. 

(Andropogon martini Roxb.) Busa-oU ^ass. 

From India. Presented by Mr. R. S. Hole, Forest Botanist, Forest Re- 
search Institute and Gollege, Dehra Dun. Received March 28 and 29, 
1918. 

A stout perennial grass found in northern India. It* grows to a height of 6 
feet and has long, perfectly smooth leaves of a soft delicate texture and rich 
green color. The slender panicles, 6 to 12 inches long, turn to a bright reddish 
brown color in ripening. 

The distinction between the two kinds of Rusa oil procured from this grass, 
viz, motia and sufia, which the distillers of Khandesh and the neighboring dis- 
tricts recognize, apparently depends on similar conditions, although the ac- 
counts concerning them are to some extent conflicting. The authors of the 
Pharmacographia Indica (vol. ill, p. 558) say : " The oil distillers in Khandesh 
call the grass motiya when the inflorescence is young and of a bluish white 
color; after it has ripened and become red it is called suflya. The oil ob- 
tained from it in the first condition has a more delicate odor than that obtained 
from the ripened grass." 

On the other hand, Mr. E. G. Fernandez reports in a letter to Kew : " The 
motia species (or variety) is usually confined to the higher slopes, while the 
sufia grass is more common on the plains and on the plateau land In the hills ; 
but they are not infrequently found growing together. The sufla is much more 
strongly scented, but the odor of motia is preferred, and this latter commands 
double the price of the former." The samples of both forms supplied by Mr. 
Fernandez do not show any morphological differences, and as to age, some of 
the motia samples are in a more advanced stage than the sufla, (Adapted from 
8tapf, The Oil Grasses of India and Ceylon, in The Kew Bulletin of MisceH- 
laneoui Information, 1906, p, SU-) 



52 . SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

The letter accompanying these seeds stated that both «u/!a'and motia were 
being sent but the packets were not labeled. 

46968. Vins vinifera L. Vitaceae. Grape. 

From Tokio, Japan. Cuttings purchased from the Tokio Plant, Seed, & 
Implement Co. Received March 29, 1918. 

"Koshu, A very sweet variety of grape which seems to be especially suite-^ 
to the Tokio climate." (F. A^. Meyer.) 

46969. Brassica pekinensis (Lour.) Gagn. Brassicaceae. 

Paits'aL 

From Peking, China. Procured by Dr. Yamei Kin. Received March 2, 19b. 
A selection of a northern strain. 

46970 and 46971. 

From Tolga, Queensland, Australia. Presented by Mr. J. A. Hamilton. 
Received March 80, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Hamilton. 

45970. Abachis HYPonxEA L. Fabaceffi. Peanut 

''Chinese peanuts. They grow quite a large upright leafy top and 
could be cut with a mowing machine for fodder. The nuts are produced 
closely clustered around the base of the stem." 

45971. Ipomoea batatas (L.) Poir. Convolvulacese. Sweet potato. 

"Oeneral Grant sweet potato which, to our fancy. Is absolutely the 
best variety for the table. As a rule, the vines do not run very much." 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Acacia, bull-horn. Acacia Bphaerooeph- 

ala, 45792. 
A cacia sp., 45905. 

arabica. See Acacia scorpioides, 
catechu^ 45954. 
pycnantha, 45867. 
scorpioides, 45724. 
sphaerocepha^Wy 45792. 
Acanthorhiza aculea4af 45906. 
Achras sapota. See Achras zapota. 

zapota, 45907. 
Acokanthera spectabiUs, 45748. 
Actinidia chinensiSj 45946. 
Akee, BUghia sapida, 45917. 
Alectryon suhcinereum, 45925. 
Almond, flowering, Amygdalus triloba, 

45727. 
Amaranthus parUculatua, 45811. 
Amygdalus triloba, 45727. 
Anacardium ocddentale, 45915. 
Andropogon martini. See Cymbopogon 

martini. 
Annona sp., 45870. 
muricata, 45008. 
reticulata, 45955. 
senegalensis, 45798. 
Apricot, Prunus armeniaca, 45714. 
Japanese, Prunus mume: 
Bungo, 45878. 
Hana-ka-ml, 46879. 
Ko*mume, 45881. 
Rinshu, 45876. 
ShirO'Kaga, 45880. 
Yoro, 45877. 
Arachis hypogaea, 45970. 
Areca triandra, 45956. 
Artocarpus communis, 45916. 
Aru7idinaria falcata, 45902. 
Athel, Tamarix aphylla, 45952. 

Bamboo, Arundinaria falcata, 45902. 
Dendrocalam/us giganteus, 45968. 
Bauhinia sp., 45909. 

68805—22 5 



Bean, Goa, Botor tetragonoloba, 45928, 
45929. 

Lima, Ph^iseohts lunatus, 45794. 
Lyon, Stizolobium niveum, 45940. 
Mauritius, Stizolobium aterrimum, 
45885. 

Yard-Long. Vigna sesquipedaUs, 
45795. 

Blackberry. See Rubus spp. 
BUghia sapida, 45917. 
Botor tetragonoloba, 46928, 46929. 
BrassUsa pehinensis, 45969. 
Breadfruit, Artocarpus communis, 
45916. 

Oaimito, Chrysophyllum cainito, 45918. 
GalluUos, Vitis sp., 45796. 
Calyptrocalyw spicatus, 46957. 
Camellia aaUlari$. See Qordonia 

axillaris. 
Capoelra branca. See Solanum buU 

latum. 

Carica papaya, 45712. 
Carob, Ceratonia siUqua, 45924. 
Cashew, Anacardium ocddentale, 
45915. 

Castanea crenata, '45858-45861. 

mollissima, 45862, 45947, 45948. 

pumUa X crenata, 4586&-45866. 

seguinii, 45949. 
Castor-bean, Ridnus communis, 45882- 

45884, 45886. 
Catechu, Acacia catechu, 45954. 
Cebadilla, Schoenocaulon officinale. 

See Sabadilla. 
Cephaelis sp., 45730. 
Ceratonia sUiqua, 45924. 
Cercidium viride, 45910. 
Chayota edulis, 45756. 
Chayote, Chayota edulis, 45756. 
' Chenopodium ambrosioides, 45857. 

nuttalliae, 45721-45723. 

53 



54 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Oherry, flowering, Prunu$ aerrulata 
pubescens, 45709. 

Mazzard, PrunuM avium, 45713. 
Ohestnut, Cctstanea Qpp., 45858-45866, 

45947, 45948. 
Chinquapin, Castanea seguinUy 45949. 
Chryaophyllum oainito, 45918. 
Citrus sp., 45934. 

aurantium, 45941. 

iohanffensis, 45931, 45936, 45937, 
45939, 45945, 45951. 

nobilis, 45930, 45932, 45938. 
delici08a, 45933. 

sinensUf 45935. 
Coix laorymorjoM ma-yuen, 45767. 
CoXocaaia antiquorunit 45777. 

esculenta, 45749, 45776, 45778- 
45783. 
Condalia lineata, 45900. 
OorcJiorus capsulariSt 45809. 
Com, Zea may«: 

Amarillo Bajo, 45786. 

Amarillo Melchocha, 45808. 

Amarillo Subldo, 45807. 

Anaranjado, 45787. 

(Argentina), 45003. 

Beata, 45739. 

Blanco Perlas de la Relna, 45742. 

(Brazil), 45753, 45754. 

Caf^ con Leche, 45759. 

Canela, 45856. 

Chancaca, 45853. 

(Colorado Glaro, 45855. 
Jaspeado, 45785. 
Oscuro, 45743. 

Grema, 45761. 

Encarnado, 45788. 

Flor de Qranada, 45758. 

Flor de Retrama, 45745. 

Granada, 45762. 

Ouindo, 45736. 

Matiz Blanco Colorado, 45854. 

Mixto, 45763. 

Negro, 45740. 

OJos de Lechuga, 45918. 

Pasas, 45852. 

Pecho de Paloma, 45764. 

(Peru), 45765. 

Plomo Jaspeado, 45737. 

Plomo Oscuro, 45788. 

Polvo de Oro, 45741. 

Punso, 45757. 

Rosa Bajo, 45700. 



Com, Zea mays — Continued. 

Rosa (No. 2), 45785. 

Rosa subido, 45734. 

Salmon, 45806. 

Sangre de Toro, 45744. 

Squaw, 45815. 

(Venezuela), 45755. 
Cotoneaster foveolata^ 45728. 

francheti, 45705. 

horizontaUs perpusiUa, 45706. 

zabeli, 45707. 
Crataegus mexicana, 45818. 

pinnatiflda, 45820. 
Crotalaria sp., 45725. 
Cuoumds m^lo, 45770, 45771. 
Cucurbita pepo, 45772. 
Custard-apple, Annona reticulata 

45955. 
Cydonia oblonga, 45889, 45890. 
Cymbopogon martini, 45966. 45967. 

Dendrocalamus giganteus, 45963. 
Diospyros kaki, 45871-45875. 
Dodonaea viscosa, 45726. 
Dypsis madagascariensis, 45958. 

Elaeis guineensis, 45766, 45950. 
Elaeocarpus cyaneus, 45789. 
Elm, Ulmus sp., 45943. 
Eucalyptus trabuti, 45769. 
Eucommia ulmoideSf 45950. 

Frijol majan, Phaseolus lunatus, 45794. 

Oarcinia mangostana, 45804, 45816. 
Qleditsia sinensis, 45803. 
Oordonia axillaris, 45718. 
€k)urd, Lagenana vulguris, 40904. 
Grape, VUis spp., 45796, 45797, 46Q6S, 
Grass, Rusa-oil, Cymbopogon martUU, 

45966, 46967. 
Sudan, Holaus sorghum sudanen- 

sis, 45773. 
Guate, Am^iranthus paniculaPus, 45S11. 
Gum arable, Aoaoia scorpioides, 45721 

Bakea rostrata, 45868. 
Hardenbergia monophylla. See Ken- 

nedya monophylla. 
Hawthorn, Crataegus spp., 45818, 45820. 
Hibiscus sabdariffa, 45800, 45801. 
Holcus sorghum sudanensis, 45773. 
Honey locust, Oleditsia sinensis, 45803. 
Huauhtzontli, Chenopodium nuttaliae, 

45721-45723. 
Hydrangea panieulata praecox, 45733. 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1918. 



55 



Jndigofera sp., 45869. 
Jponioea sp., 45887. 

batatas, 45971. 

tuberosa. See Operculina tuberosa. 

Jaboticaba, Myrciaria oauliflora, 45750. 
J^ufflans cathayensis, 45768. 

regia, 45774, 45775, 45799, 45922. 
Jute, Corchorus capsularis, 45809. 

Kaki, Diospyros kaki: 

Gosho, 45871. 

Hana-GoBho, 45874. 

Jiro, 45875. 

Oku-Gosho, 45873. 

Tenjin-Goaho, 45872. 
Ivennedya monophylla, 45790. 

nigricans, 45791. 
Koumg. Bee Telfairia pedata, ^ 
Kumarahou, Pomaderris elHptica, 45892. 

I^agenaria vulgaris, 45904. 
Ijagerstroemia fios-reginae. See Lager- 
stroenUa speolosa. 
speciosa, 45911. 
Langsat, Lansium domesticum, 45817. 
Lansium domesticum, 45817. 
Latania commersonii, 45960. 
Lfathyrus sativus, 45927. 
Lemon, Ichang, Citrus iohangensis, 

45931, 45936, 45937, 45939, 45945, 

45951. 
Lilac. See Syringa spp. 
Lycopersicon esculentum, 45793. 

Magnolia globosa, 45964. 

Mangosteen, Oaroinia mangostana, 

45804, 45816. 
Ma-yuen, Coix lacryma-jobi moryuen, 

45767. 
Melon, Cuoumis melo: 

De Ca Villon, 45770. 

£^gyptian sweet, 45771. 
Morning-glory, Ipomoea sp., 45887. 
Moms aoidosa, 45708. 
Mulberry, Morus acidosa, 45708. 
Myrdaria cauliflora, 45750. 

KepheUum lappaceum, 45805. 

leiocarpum. See Alectryon suboi- 
nereum, 
Nephrosperma van-lumtteanum, 46965. 

Oncosperma fasoUmlatum, 45961. 

fllamentosumy 45962. 
Operculina tuberosa, 45888. 



Orange, Citrus sinensis, 45985. 

King, Citrus nobUis, 45930, 45982, 
45938. 

sour. Citrus aurantium, 45941. 
Oryza barthU, 45717. 

sativa, 45732. 

Pal ts*al, Brassica pekinensis, 45969. 
Palm, Acanthorhiza aculeata, 45906. 

Areca triandra, 45956. 

Calyptrocalyx spicatus, 45957. 

Dypsis madagascariensis, 45958. 

Latania commersonii, 45960. 

Nephrosperma van- houtteanum, 
45965. 

on, Maeis guineensis, 45766, 45959. 

Oncosperma fasoiculatum, 45961. 
fllam^entosum, 45962. 
Papaya, Carica papaya, 45712. 
Peanut, Arachis hypogaea, 45970. 
Pear. See Pyrus spp. 
Pepino, Solanum m^ricatum: 

Blanco, 45813. 

Morado claro, 45814. 

Morado oscuro, 45812. 
Phaseolus lunatus, 45794. 
Pica-pica, Stizolobium pruritum of- 
ficinale, 45899. 
Pine, Pinwt armandi, 45914. 
Pinus armandi, 45914. 
Piquillin, Condalia lineata, 45900. 
Pithecolobvum bigeminum, 45926. 
Plum, Myrobalan, Prunus cerasifera 
myrobaUma, 45715. 

Prunus domestica, 45716. 
glandulosa, 45944. 
Pomaderris elliptioa, 45892. 
Prunus armeniaca, 45714. 

avhim, 45713. 

cerasifera myrobaUma, 45715. 

domestica, 45716. 

glamdulosa, 45944. 

mume, 45876-45881. 

serrulata puhescens, 45709. 

tomentosa, 45710. 

endotricha, 45711. 

triloba. See Amygdalus triloba. 
Psophooarpus tetragonolobus. See 

Botor tetragonoloba. 
Pterocarpus indicus, 45719. 
Pyrus spp., 45746, 45747, 45834-45838, 
45845-45850. 

betulaefolia, 45822. 

betulaefolia X phaeocarpa, 45821. 



56 



SEEDS Al!fD FIANXS IMPORTED. 



Pyru8 spp. — Continued. 

calleryana, 45823-45828, 45839. 
oommunii, 45901. 
pTiaeocarpa, 45829, 45830. 
aemdata, 45881, 45832. 
us9uriensi$, 45833, 45840-45844. 

Quince, Oydonia ohlimga, 45889, 46890. 

Ranibutan, Nephelium lappctceum, 

45805. 
Rice. See Oryza spp. 
Ricinus communis, 45882-15884, 45886. 
Rosa gentiliaiia, 45819. 

helenae, 45729. 
Roselle, Bihisous sabdariffa: 

Archer, 458P0. 

Rico, 45801. 
Rubus sp.^ 45919. 

macrooarptu, 45891. 
Rye, Secale cereale, 45784. 

Sabadllla, Schoenooaulon ofJUMnale, 

45810. 
SapodlUa, Achras sapota, 45907. 
Sarsaparilla, SmUax officinalis, 46731. 
Schizophragma sp., 45942. 
Schoenoccuuion officinale, 45810. 
Secale cereale, 45784. 
Seohium edule. See Cha^foia ediUis^ 
SmUax offi^dnaUs, 45781. 
Solandra longiflora, 45958. 
Solanum buUatum, 45751. 

murioaium, 45812-45814. 
Soursop, Annona murioata, 45908. 
Speedwell. See Veronica spp. 
Star-apple, silk. See Calmito. 
Stizolobium aierrimum, 45886. 

niveum, 45940. 

pruritum officinale, 45899. 
Stryphnodendron barbatimamy 45752. 
Sweet potato, Ipom^ea batatas, 45971. 
Syringa reflexa, 45920. 

tomentella, 45921. 

Tamarisk, Tamarix aphylla, 45952. 



Tamarix aphylla, 45952. 

articulata. See Tamarix aplty^/fi. 
Tangerine, Citrus nobilis deHcioH. 

45983. 
Taro, Colocasia esoulenta, 45749, 4577$- 

45783. 
Telfairia pedata, 45923. 
Tlapalhuauhtli. See CAenopodtiim fi«i- 

talliae, 45723. 
Tlilhuauhtll. See Cftenopodimn nvi- 

talliae, 45722. 
Toluifera sp., 45912. 
Tomato, Z/vcof>er«icon % 6«ctfZ0iif«A. 

45798. 
Trichoscypha sp., .45851. 
Tri^'cum speltoides, 45802. 
7u<c7ier(a «pectoMH«, 46720. 

UlnMS sp., 45943. 

» 

Vegetable marrow, CucwiMa pepo, 

45772. 
Fcronica sp., 46898. 

andersonii, 45893, 45894. 

salioifolia, 45896. 

speciosa, 45896, 45897. 
Vetch, bitter, Lathyrus sativus, 4582T. 
Vi^a sesquipedaUs, 45796. 
yit<« sp., 45796. 

caribaea. See Fi^it ^Oio^folio^ 

tiliaefolia, 45797. 

vinifera, 45968. 

Walnut, </tfataw« re^ria, 46774, 45775, 

45799, 45922. 
Wattle, golden, Aoada pycmanXU^ 

45867. 

Xochihuauhtli. See CAenopodiuni fit^ 
taUiae, 45721. 

Yang-tao, Actimdia cMnensis, 45946. 

iJea may*, 45734-45745, 45753-45755, 
45757-45765, 45785-45788, 4580^ 
45808, 45815, 4585^-45856, 45908, 
46913. 



O 



IWMd Har, 1»S2. 

U. S. ^DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 
Hy! ' ^ BUREAU OF PI,ANT INDUSTRY. 

^ WnXIAK A. TAVbOR, CkM^BwiMm. 



IKVENTORY 

SEEDS AND PUNTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PUNT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 

TO JUNE 30, IttlB 



(No. 56; Hm. tf»7S to 4680S.) 




VASanraxoir: 
eomMunfT PBrnmia omox. 

1S23, 



|sj?li !« 

3 |i;*i8ss-=< 
iinilpi 

2 5 5«i£" - = "t- 

li Mils IK; 

|lllsi?5:ii 

iliiii 
iiiiiliKi 

I 



lMa«d Mar. 11 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

A. TAYLOR, ChufafBHmu. 



INVENTORY 

OP 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 

TO JUNE 30, 191S 



(No. 55; Noa. 46972 to 46302.) 



WA8HIM0T0K; 
GOTKBNMBMT FBIMTINQ OriTOK. 

1922. 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



Chief of Bttreau, William A. Tatlob. 
A§90eiate Chief of Bureau, Karl F. Kbllcbman. 
Officer in Charge of PuhUeatiane, J. B. Rockwbll. 
Ateietant in Charge of Bu$ine»9 Operations, H. B. Allanbon. 



PosnoN Bbh> and Plant Iktboddctiov. 

8CIBNTIPIC STAFF. 

Dafld Faircblld, Agriouliurat Bwptarer in Charge, 

P. H. Dorsett, Plant introduoer, in Charge of Plant Introduction Oardene. 

B. T. Galloway, Plant Pathologiet, Special Reeearch Projects. 

Peter Binet, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Ewperimenters' Btrrlce. 

Wilson Popenoe and J. F. Rock, Agricultural Bwplorere. 

R. A. Young, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Daeheen and Tropical Yam InveetigmtionB, 

H. C. Skeels, Botatiiet, in Charge of Collectione. 

O. P. Van Eseltlne, Aeeistant Botaniat, in Cheerge of Puhlioatione. 

L. G. HooTer, Aeeietant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Chayoie InveetigatUma. 

Cedl C. Thomas, Aeeiatant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Jufuhe Inveetigatione. 

B. L. Crandall, Aaeietant, in Charge of Photographic Laboratorg. 

P. G. Russell and Patty Newbold, ScientiAo Aeaietanta, 

DsTid A. Bisaet, Superintendent, Bell Plant Introduction Garden, Glenn Dale, Md. 

Edward Goucber, Plant Propagator, 
J. E. Morrow, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, CaUf. 

Henry Klopfer, Plant Propagator. 
Edward Slmmonds, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Miami, Fla. 

Charles H. SteffanI, Plant Propagator. 
Henry B. Juenemann, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, BelUngham, Wmeh, 
Wilbur A. Patten, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, BrookevUle, Pin, 
E. J. Rankin, Aeeiatant in Charge, Plant Introduction Garden, Savannah, Go. 
Collahoratora : Thomas W. Brown and Robert H. Forbes, Cairo, Egypt; A. C. Hartley. 

Scharunpur, India; Barbour Ijathrop, Chicago, III.; Dr. H. L. Lyon, Honolulu, Havceki: 

Henry Nehrllng, Gptha, Fla.; Charles T. Simpson, lAttleriver, Fla.; Dr. L. Trsbat. 

Algiera, Algeria; E. H. Wilson, Jamaica Plain, Maaa.; E. W. D. Holway, Faribawlt, 

Minn.; Dr. William Trelease, Vrbana, III, 

II 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 
Introductory statement 1 

Inventory 7 

Index of common and scientific names 45 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Pace. 
Plate I. Foreign-plant introduction medal Frontispiece. 

II. A liandsome red-berried slirub from eastern Asia. ( Vibumum 

dilatatum Tliunb., S. P. I. No. 45974) 8 

III. A field of genge clover In eastern China. {Astragalus sinicvs L., 

S. P. I. No. 45995) 8 

IV. Tbe genge clover grown as a vegetable in China. {Astragalus 

sinicus L., S. P. I. No. 45995) 12 

V. The Chinese quince tree. {Chacnonheles sinensis (Tliouin) 

Koehne^ S. P. I. No. 46130) 12 

Fiijurel. Map of Russia and Turlsestan, showing the agricultural ex- 
plorations of Frank N. Meyer — 2 

2. Map of eastern Asia, showing the agricultural explorations of 

Frank N. Meyer 3 

III 



IM'ENTORY OF SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED BY 
THE OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PUNT 
INTRODUCTION DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 
1 TO JUNE 30) 1918 (NO. 55; NOS. 45972 TO 46302). 



INTBODXrCTOBT STATEMENT. 

It seems appropriate in this inventory in which ai'e described in 
his own words the last of Mr. Frank N. Meyer's introductions from 
China, to give a brief statement regarding his agricultural explora- 
tions. These inventories have been the chief medium of publicity 
tlirough which his discoveries have been made known to the horticul- 
tural world. All the plants which he found and imported he de- 
scribed, and the descriptions have appeared in the volumes of this 
serial publication. These descriptions are not long, but in almost 
e\'ery case they characterize very well the plants and point out the 
particular value which they are likely to have in America. In this 
respect they are remarkable and deserve the study of agricultural 
explorers who may come after him. 

Mr. Meyer's first expedition to China covered the period from 
July, 1905, to July, 1908, and included explorations in Manchuria, 
Chosen (Korea), and the Chinese Provinces of Chihli, Shansi, Shan- 
tung, Honan, Hupeh, and Kiangsi. This period is represented by the 
introductions which will be found scattered between the numbers 
16909 and 24596. His second expedition was from August, 1909, to 
April, 1912, and numbers between 26131 to 34183 give the descrip- 
tions of his collections in England, Belgium, France, Germany, Rus- 
sia, Crimea, Caucasus, Eui^sian Turkestan, Chinese Turkestan, and 
S^iberia. His third expedition was in Siberia and in the Chinese 
Provinces of Shantung, Shansi, Shensi, Kansu to the borders of 
Tibet, Honan, Kiangsu, Anhwei, and Chekiang during the period 
from November, 1912, to December, 1915, and he describes his in- 
troductions under numbers to be found between 35253 and 43022. 
His fourth trip included Japan and the Chinese Provinces of Shan- 
tung, Kiangsu, Honan, Hupeh, Himan, and Anhwei during the pe- 
riod from October, 1916, until his death in June, 1918, and the 

1 



2 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

descriptions appear between numbers 45022 and 46718. An outlirje 
map has been prepared giving Mr. Meyer's routes of travel during tk 
13 years of his work as an agricultural explorer (figs. 1 and 2) . In ad- 
dition to the living plant material which Mr. Meyer collected, thert 
are to his credit in the collection of this office 1,740 photographs, whit L 
constitute a unique set of ilhistrations of the agriculture of the Chinese, 
in particular portraying the crop plants upon which this remark- 
sible people has lived for 40 centuries. Those of them which illii^ 



£3rfiLAWr7TO>f 







B'lG. 1. — Map of Rassia and Turkestan, showing^ tbe a^J cultural explorations of Franc X 
Meyer. Between 190!) and 1912 Mr. Meyer traveled extensively in thew* countrif?' 
hunting for new fruits, forage plants, and other crops for trial in the tTnited Static 
His second Journey to this region, between 1913 and 1915, was lens extensive: on tb> 
trip only the northern portion of the region above shown was covered. 

trate plants destined to become widely used in this country will 
doubtless come to be published as historic evidences of their first dis 
covery. As accounts of Mr. Meyer's life have been published else- 
where (see Asia for January, 1921; The Journal of Heredity for 
June, 1919, and April, 1920 ; The National Geographic Magazine for 
July, 1919 ; and De Aarde en haar Volken, January to April, and 
July and August, 1919), and as plants which he introduced will 
record better than words can his accomplishments, it would hanllj 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 



8 



seem appropriate here to more than record the fact that his death 
occurred on the night of June 2, 1918. He was lost from a river 
steamer on the Yangtze near the little town of Wuhu. His body 
was later recovered and buried in the cemetery in Shanghai. 

Mr. Meyer left a bequest of $1,000 to his associates in the Office of 
Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, which they have used in the 
striking of a medal to be known as the Frank N. Meyer Memorial 







Fig. 2. — ^Map of eastern Asia, showing the agricultural explorations of Frank N. Meyer. 
Between tbe years 1905 and 1919 Mr. Meyer made four trips into eastern Asia In 
search of new fruits, vegetables, and othter economic plants for introduction into the 
United States. Because of the small size of the map it has been impossible to show 
each trip entirely and clearly ; therefore,, after the first trip only such portions of his 
route are shown as inyolve territory not traversed previously. This map is shown on a 
somewhat larger scale than that used for figure 1. 

Medal to be awarded under the auspices of the American Genetic 
Association for distinguished services in the field of foreign-plant in- 
troduction (PL I). In this way it is hoped to emphasize the impor- 
tance of this kind of exploration, a work which yields not only ideas 
but concrete living things that enrich our lives, change our foods, and 
make more beautiful our surroundings. May it encourage young men 
with the mental and physical equipment for such work to enter the 
field and enrich the agriculture of the country by bringing into it the 



4 SEEDS AXD PLAXTa IMPORTED. 

thousands of new plants which the man of the coming centuries b 
going to need and use. 

A number of valuable plant introductions are described in this io- 
ventory. In his remarkable work, "Farmers of Forty Centuries^ 
King calls attention to the fact that the Chinese pay 28 cents a 
pound for the young shoots of a certain species of clover, or six 
times as much as they do for any other vegetable. It is not onlj 
eaten fresh but dried and used in soups. In view of the value placed 
upon the fat soluble vitamine which occurs in green leafy vegetables 
it has seemed worth while to introduce this species {Astragalus sim- 
cus^ No. 45995) for experimental purposes. 

Mr. Barbour Lathrop, during his last trip to Japan, discovered 
that among the Japanese of all social classes the mitsuba {Dermga 
canadensis^ No. 46137) was a common and universally appreciated 
vegetable. It is a strange circumstance that, although this species 
is found wild in the woods of the Atlantic coast and as far west as 
the Mississippi and has for a century or more been cultivated en- 
tensively in Japan, no attempt has ever been made to utilize it in 
America until Mr. Lathrop called attention to it. It is more easily 
grown than celery, has a characteristic flavor of its own, and would 
doubtless fit easily into the menu of those who once become familiar 
with its taste. 

In the hammock lands of southern Florida, where every year 
hundreds of acres are devoted to the raising of early potatoes for 
the northern market, February frosts or flooding from unusually 
heavy rains make potatoes a precarious crop. On these lands the 
tropical yautia grows and produces amazingly, not being affected 
by flooding and recovering quickly from frost injuries. The tubers 
when properly prepared form a delicate vegetable, comparing in 
this respect with the beet potatoes. The introduction of a new 
variety (No. 46030) whose tubers have yellow flesh instead of 
white and a more mealy character, which make it preferred to all 
others in Porto Rico, is worthy of special mention. It is known in 
Guadeloupe as the malanga color6. 

The Australian casaba (No. 46029), which produces fruits the 
size of a cucumber that are esteemed very highly in Australia for 
pies and are eaten there fresh with sugar, might be worth testing 
in our own casaba-melon areaa 

The Puget Sound region seems to be one in America where 
Himalayan plants are most at home, and Dr. Cavers collection of 
seeds from Darjiling has in it several unusually interesting species. 
The giant lily {LUium giffonteum, No. 46086), whidi grows to 12 
feet in height and bears fragrant yellow-throated blooms ; the Nepal 
lily (Z, nepalense^ No. 46086) with deep maroon-purple, almost 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 5 

black-throated flowers which, if it were hardier in England, would 
be, it is reported, the most popular of all the oriental lilies; the 
large mountain-cherry tree {Prunvs cerasoides^ No. 46093), which 
makes a briUiant show with its rose-red flowers and may have 
value because of its acid fruits; the remarkable P. napaulensis (No. 
46094), a small tree which bears racemes of flowers 10 inches long 
that produce dierries an inch in diameter and which should appeal 
strongly to the cherry breeder; an edible Pyrularia with fruit 2 
inches long {Pyrularia edulis^ No. 46095) ; the Javanese sumach 
{Eku8 javardcaj No. 46096), which colors up beautifully in our 
autumn and is much hardier than its name would indicate; and a 
large- fruited Solanum (Solarw/m khasianum^ No. 46103) ; these form 
part of this remarkable collection by Dr. Cave. 

Through Dr. Safford's investigations the sacred earflower of the 
ancient Mexicans {Oymbopetalv/m pendtdiflarutn^ No. 46206) has 
been, so to speak, rediseovered, and it can not fail to be of interest to 
grow in Florida this remarkable plant, the fragrant flowers of wliich 
were dried and used by thd ancient Mexicans in flavoring their cocoa 
and other foods before the advent of cinnamon and the other East 
Indian spices. 

Mr. P. J. S. Cramer has sent in from Buitenzorg a collection of 
seeds of leguminous plants (Nos. 46243 to 46248) which are grown 
for forage purposes in Java and ean scarcely fail to be of value in 
southern Florida. 

What the behavior in America wUl be of the Transvaal yellow 
peach (No. 46289), which Mr. Pole Evans says is peculiarly free 
from the diseases of that region, remains to be seen, but peach grow- 
ers can hardly fail to be interested in it. 

The possibility that some day the delicious lychee may be com- 
mercially grown in Florida is still alluring, though its behavior has 
not been entirely satisfactory there. Possibly its near relative, 
Alectryon sicbcinereum (No. 46299), which its sender, Dr. Proschow- 
sky, has fruited at Nice, may be a suitable stock upon which to 
grow it." 

The great interest in the avocado and the occurrence of natural 
hybrids between the Guatemalan, Mexican, and West Indian forms, 
which are growing side by side in our Miami garden, have made it 
seem worth while to gather together all the species of the genus 
Persea for study. Per sea asorica (No. 45997) from Ponta Delgada is 
one of these. 

That the fruiting and early spring-flowering shrubby cherry 
{Prunus glandulosa, No. 46003) from Ichang may prove its useful- 
ness and finally find a place in the dooryards of the Atlantic coast 
region, where its flowers and its purple-black cherries will be appre- 
ciated, was one of Mr. Meyer's last wishes. 

70906—22 2 



6 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBTED. 

The Feijoa from Paraguay has been a successful introduction anJ 
has established itself in thousands of our gardens. Possibly th« 
" Nyandti-aphisd *' (Britoa seUowicma^ No. 46024), a fruiting shrub 
from the same region, may be equally successful. 

The common habit of budding all species of East Indian mangos 
upon seedlings of the common turpentine mango may prove to be 
inadvisable. It is possible even that the relatives of the mango, such 
as Mangifera longipes (No. 46022) from Malakka, may have value 
for stock purposes. 

If Sabinea carinalis (No. 46026) has not been already tested in 
California it should be, according to Mr. Jones, of the island of 
Dominica, for it has showy scarlet flowers and is particularly suited 
to the dry, hot hillsides which abound in California. How much 
frost it will stand is yet in question. 

The botanical determinations of Feeds introduced have been made 
and the nomenclature determined by Mr. H. C. Skeels, while the de- 
scriptive and botanical notes have been arranged by Mr. G. P. Van 
Eseltine, who has had general supervision of this inventory. The 
manuscript has been prepared by Miss Esther A. Celander. 

David FAiKCHiii), 
Agficvlturdl Emplarer m Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. C, September 17, 19iL 



IKVEKTORY/ 



45972. Edgeworthia chbysai^tha Lindl. Thymelaeacese. 
(E. papyrifera Zucc.) 

From China. Plants presented by Mrs. L. J. Doollttle, Washington, D. -C. 
Received April 4, 1918. 

^'Uitsumata, From Kiangsi Province, South China. A rare tree with very 
fragrant yellow flowers appearing in April." (i/r«. DooHttle.) 

46973 and 46974. 

From Batmn, Russia. Presented by the superintendent of the Botanic ("Jar- 
dens. Received April 9, 1918. 

45973. Bebberis japonica bealei (Fortune) Skeels. Berberidacese. 

Barberry. 

A stiff evergreen shrub native to China, often 10 feet in height, with 
tliicli, unbranched stems. The pinnate leaves, 1 to 2 feet long, are made up 
of 7 to 13 obliquely ovate, darl< dull-green letiflets 8 inches long and 6 
inches wide, having four to six large spiny teeth along each margin. 
The delightfully fragrant lemon-yellow flowers are borne in a cluster 
of several slender erect racemes 6 to 9 inches long and are followed by 
oblong purple berries half an inch long. (Adapted from Bean, Trees and 
Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles, vol. i, p. 2^.) 

45974. ViBUBNUK DULATATUK Thuub. Caprifoliacese. 

"This Is one of the best hardy shrubs for the garden.. It grows to 
only 4 or 5 feet in height and is certain to turn out a full display of 
bloom every year. The flowers are white, produced in dense corymbs, 
and are followed by an abundance of bright coral-red berries. The 
foliage is fine and so far has not been troubled with any insects or 
fungous enemies." {The American Florist, vot 15, p. 12S,) 

For an Illustration of this shrub in fruit, see Plate II. 

^All Introductions conaljit of seeds unless otherwise noted. 

It should be understood that the varietal names of fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other 
plants used in this inventory are those under which the material was received when intro- 
duced by the OiBce of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction and, further, that the printing 
of such names here does not constitute their official publication and adoption in this coun- 
trjr. As the different varieties are studied, their identity fully established, their entrance 
into the American trade forecast, and the use of varietal names for them in American 
literature becomes necessary, the foreign varietal designations appearing In this inventory 
vUl undoubtedly be changed In many cases by the specialists Interested In the various 
croups of plants, to bring the forms of the names Into harmony with recognised American 
codes of BomeDclaturs. 

7 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46976. Elaeis guineensis Jacq. Phoenioacese. Oil palm. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. P. J. S. Cramer, chief. Plant 
Breeding Station. Received April 10, 1918. 

" Tlie oil palms I introduced here commenced to fruit when I had not yet m 
own garden in Sumatra at my disposition. I have planted in several Govern- 
ment rubber estates, where no other oil palms are in the neighborhood, pUr^ 
of 5 to 10 palms, each plat descending from one seed bearer. I send you witli 
this mail some seeds of Bundi D, tree No. 13. You will notice that this variety 
has a very thin shell, ^so that you may crack it with the teeth." {Cramer.'t 

46976 to 46979. 

From India. Seeds presented by Mr. George F. Mitchell^ WasdiiB^ton, D. C. 
who obtained them from Dr. G. H. Cave, curator, Lloyd Botanic Ganiea 
Darjiling, India. Received April 10, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. MiteheU 

45976. CoRYLUS ferox Wall. Betulacese. Filbert 

*' This nut comes from Sikklm and is like a hazelnut. Dr. Cave think? 
it will take about 10 years to bear. The natives of Sikklm praise i: 
very highly." 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 41812. 

45977. Decaisnea inbignib (Griffith) Hook. f. and Thorns. Lardiza- 

balaceae. 

" A bush from northern Sikkim that bears wonderful fruit about as 
big as one*s thumb and about 4 inches long. Dr. Cave sent a man to Sik- 
klm specially to procure the seed of this fruit." 

This is one of the most remarkable of Indian botanical discoveries, 
both in structure and appearance, and is further notable as yielding an 
edible sweet-fleshed fruit. It Is a native of the humid forests of Sikkiis 
and Bhutan at altitudes of 7,000 to 9,000 feet above the sea. The truck 
or trunks, for sometimes several spring from the ground from a common 
root, are 6 to 10 feet high, as thick as one's arm, and very brittle : the 
pale bark is covered with lenticels; the pith is very large; the branche^^ 
are few, subtermlnal, and erect ; the compound leaves are terminal ao'l 
axillary; ; the many-flowered horizontal racemes are a foot long^ and the 
drooping, green flowers are 1 inch long, on slender pedicels as long a^; 
tliemselvps. (Adapted from CurtWs Uotanical Magazine, pi. 6731,) 

46978. HoLBOELLiA LATiFOLiA Wall. LardizabalaceiB. 

" Grows in Darjiling, and is a vine bearing a nice fruit, purple in color, 
the size of a man's thumb, with subacid pulp. The flower is also ver? 
showy. The native name of this fruit is pophila.'* 

45979. Magnolia campbeliji Hook. f. and Thorns. Magnoliaceae. 

Xairnoli&. 

" Indigenous to the eastern Hininlnyas. but grows at 8,000 feet altitude 
Requires a moist, cool climate." 

A deciduous tree, occasionally 150 feet in height found in the Him- 
alayas in India at altitudes of 8,000 to 10,000 feet. The oval leave?. 
6 to 10 Inches long, are smooth above and covered beneath witV. 
appreseed hairs. The fragrant cup-shaped flowers, 6 to 10 incht*^ 
across and varj'ing in color from rose to deep crimson, are produce) 
in the spring before the leaves. (Adapted from Bean, Tree* an-i 
8hruh8 Hardy in the Britiah Isles, vol. 2, p. 67.) 



lip 



ffl =-Sl* 



III 



§111 

III! 

! 16 = 

m 



illS 
i ill:- 



APRIL 1 TO JUKE 30, 1918. 9 

46980 and 46981. 

From Adelaide, South Australia. Prcsentetl by Mr. J. F. Bailey, director, 
Botanic Garden. Received April 1, 1918. 

•' These seeds were obtuined from the Maedonnell Range through Dr. 
£2. Ang:us Johnson, of this city." {Bailey.) 

45980. LivisTONA mabiae F. Muell. Phoenicacese. Palm. 

An erect palm with fan-sliaped leaves divided into narrow plicate 
segments. This palm was found in the Glen of Palms in the Maedonnell 
Range, and seems to be very little known. (Adapted from Bentham, Flora 
Australiensis, vol. 7, p. 146.) 

45881. Mackozamia magdonnelui F. Muell. Cycadacese. 

An erect palmlike plant with pinnate leaves 2 to 4 feet long having 
linear segments inserted at a very oblique angle, sometimes almost 
transverse. 

This species is referred to M, fraseri >Iiq. in Bentham, Flora 
Australiensis, vol. 6, p. 253, but at the Adelaide Botanic Garden is con- 
sidered to be distinct. 

46982 to 46987. 

From Cartagena, Colombia. Procured by A. J. Lespinasse, American 
consul. Received April 12, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Ixvplnasae. 

45982. Cajan indicuu Spreng. Fabacese. Tigeon-ptA, 

** Huandul. Grown in the Departments of Bolivar and Atlantico.'* 

"The pigeon-pea, or gnandul, supposed to be a native of India, is 
cultivated widely for food in the Tropics and Subtropica It is perennial 
in frostless regions, but is usually cultivated as an annual. AlKmt ten 
months are required to mature the seed. Frost kills the plants. There 
are many varieties of pigeon-peas, some suitable for food and some not. 
Being a legume, the crop is valuable for soil Improvement as well as 
for the seed. The plant develops into a large, semiwoody bush 
reaching the height of from 5 to 10 feet. When grown for seed, plant two 
or three seeds in each hill, in 4-foot rows, and 8 feet apart in the row, 
tliinning later to one plant in a hill. Pigeon-peas are resistant to excessive 
rains in the Tropics, and the seed does not rot when planted, as is 
the tendency with some other leguminous crops. Although the skin of 
the pigeon*pea is a little tough, the flavor is good. The peas are cooked 
like ordinary shelled beans, that is, soaked over night and then parboiled 
10 to 15 minutes with a little soda in the water; boiling for one hour 
or a little more after this usually cooks them completely." (R. A. Young.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 43646. 
45983 and 45984. Phaseolvs lunatus L. Fabacete. Lima bean. 

45983. ** Zaraffora (white). Grown in the Departments of Bolivar 
and Atlantico." 

45984. ** Zaragoza (red). Grown in the Departments of Bolivar 
and Atlantico." 

46985. Phabbolus vulgaris L. Fabaceie. Common bean. 

"White and red beans (Iarj;e). Grown in tlie Deimrtments of Tolima 
and Huila." 



10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

45982 to 45987— Continued. 

45986. PisxjM SATIVUM L. Fabacese. Garden pea. 
'^Arbejas, Grown in the Departments of Tollma and Huila." 

45987. YiGNA SINSN8I8 (Tomer) Savi. Fabaces. Cowpei. 

*' Frijol Pequeno (cabeea negra). Grown In the Departments of Boli- 
var and Atlantlco." 

46988. JnoLANS sp. Juglandacese. Walnut 

From Ecuador. Obtained by Dr. Frederic W. Godlng, American con^ii. 
£^eral at Guayaquil. Received April 12, 1918. 

"Nuts from a native walnut of Ecuador. This tree is fairly common in tl- 
valleys among the Andes, usually where the cinchona trees are to be fuun<~ 
iOoding.) 

46989. Amygdalus persica L. Amygdalaceae. Peach. 
(Prunui per$ica Stokes.) 

From Spain. Procured by the American consul at Bilbao. Received Apr.: 
13. 1918. 

Peach seeds introduced for breeding experiments being carried on in ihi- 
Department. 

46990. Dioscx)R£A alata L. Dioscoreaceae. Tain. 

From Trinidad, British West Indies. Tubers presented by Mr. J. B. Rorer, 
Board of Agriculture, Port of Spain. Received April 20, 1918. 

"A large white yam of good quality. When boiled and mashed it can scarcely 
be distinguished from good white potatoes similarly prepared. Indlvida&l 
tubers are said often to exceed 20 pounds in weight, where the season is Ion? 
enough." {R, A. Young,) 

46991 to 46994. Dioscx)rea spp. Dioscoreacese. Tarn. 

From Mayaguez, Porto Rico. Tubers presented by Mr. C. F. Kinman, horti- 
culturist, Porto Rico Agricultural Experiment Station. Received April 
20, 1918. Identified by Mr. O. W. Barrett, of this Bureau. Description- 
prepared by Mr. R. A. Young, of this Office. 

45991. DioscoREA escihanta (Lour.) BurkiU. Yam. 

"A rather small, smooth-skinned yam, called in Porto Rico * potato yam.' 
Said by Mr. C. F. Kinman to have come from Africa. The tubers, wheo 
well grown, average about 12 ounces in weight The skin somewhat i^ 
sembles that of the white potato. The flesh is usually white, slightlj 
mealy when cooked and mashed, and Is sweet. These qualities appear to 
be variable, and while the yam is sometimes very good it is occasionally 
very poor. Of possible value for central and southern Florida." 

45992. DiosooREA tbifida L. f. Tampl 

"A root-covered, white, sweetish yampi. Usually of very good qualitj. 
though somewhat fibrous. The tubers are said to average about three- 
quarters of a pound each when well grown. This yampi may prove of 
value on the peninsula of Florida." 

45993. DioscoBEA botundata Poir. L. Tarn. 



«4 



Guinea, A popular, white-fleshed yam said to commonly reach a 
weight of 6 pounds or more in Porto Rico and to be of good quality. It 
thrives there In heavy clay soil and with a rather smaU amount of raiiL** 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 11 

45981 to 46894— Continued. 

45994. DioscoBEA bulbifeba L. Yam. 

** The aerial tubers of this yam are somewhat better for food than the 
ground tubers, according to Mr. C. F. Klnman. The flesh is yeUow and 
rather strong flavored, often practically inedible. The aerial tubers are 
very tough skinned and keep for a long time.*' 

45996. Astragalus sinicus L. Fabacese. Oenge clover. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Co. 
Received April 15, 1918. 

Late Giami variety. A field crop very extensively grown for human food 
and partly as a source of soil nitrogen ; it is closely allied to our alfalfa. Tender 
tips of the stems are gathered before the stage of blossoming is reached and 
served as food after boiling or steaming. It is known among foreigners as 
* Chinese clover.' The stems are also cooked and then dried for use when the 
crop is out of season. Wealthy Chinese families pay an extra high price for the 
tender shoots w^hen picked very young, sometimes as much as 20 to 28 cents 
per ix)und in our currency. (Adapted from King^ Farmer % of Forty Centuries, 
p. 128.) 

For illustrations of a field of this clover and of a single plant, see Plates III 
and IV. 

46996. Zea mats L. Poacese. Com. 

From Torreon, Coahuila, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Carlos Gonzales. Re- 
ceived April 16, 1918. 

" Maiz de tiempOf or maiz pepitilla,** 

Introduced for the breeding experiments of the Bureau of Plant Industry. 

45997. Persea azorica Seubert. Lauraceae. 

From Ponta Delgada, Azores. Presented by the American consul Re- 
ceived April 16, 1918. 

A medium-sized tree found in the forests of all the islands of the Azores, 
especially in the island of Pico, at altitudes of 1,000 to 2,500 feet. The leaves 
are oval, with wedge-shai)ed bases and hairy margins. The fruits are quite 
small and egg shaped. (Adapted from Seubert ^ Flora Azorica, p. 29,) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 43480. 

46998. Erythrina arboresceks Eoxb. Fabacese. Coral tree. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. Thomas W. Brown, director. Horti- 
cultural Section, Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received 
April 19, 1918. 

A low tree found in northern India, from Kumaon to Sikkim and in the 
Khasi Hills, up to an altitude of 7,000 feet. The light-green pinnate leaves are 
made up of three leaflets 5 to 7 inches long and nearly as broad. The racemes 
of vivid scarlet flowers, sometimes 15 inches long, appear during the hot season 
while the tree is still leafless. The lanceolate, curved, brownish pubescent 
pods contain 2 to 10 large dull-black seeds. The wood is white, soft, and 
light and is used for making boxes and toys. (Adapted from Brandia, Indian 
Trees, p. «i87.) 



12 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBT£D. 

46999 to 46001. 

From Richmond, Jamaica. Presented by Rev. H. B- Wolcott. Reteiie^? 
April 20, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Woloott 
45990 and 46000. Gaxica papaya L. Papayacee. P^payA 

45999. *' Large, oval; good quality." 

46000. " Small, round ; good quality.*' 

46001. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Malvaceie. Boselle. 

" The red sorrel with us fruits in November and December and at c^ 
other time, no matter when sown. Seeds sown in April and tranai>hintp«i 
in June make good-sized shrubs in good soil." 

46002 and 46003. 

From Ichang, Hupeh, China. Roots and cuttings collected by Mr. Frank N 
Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for the Departmipnt of Agriculture. Re- 
ceived April 25, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Meyer. 

46009. Ro8A sp. Rosacece. Bose. 

"'(No. 1802. Marcb 4, 1918.) A shrubby rose with small foUage, seiMl 
ing up many stems of bright-green color, which are very spiny. Said r«> 
bear single, medium-.sized flowers of flesh color. Grows to a he^hc of 
about 6 feet ; thrives well in stiff clay soil, and resists great humidity arid 
high tenii>eratures. Of value possibly in breeding experiments and as v 
stock for roses in warm climates. Obtained from the garden of the R^Hoan 
Catholic Convent at Ichang." 

46003. Pbunus glandulosa Thunb. Amygdalacese. Cherry. 

"(No. 1303. March 4, 1918.) Gai puen too. A spreading shrub, witb 
many slender twigs, growing to a height of 3 to 5 feet ; flowering early 
in spring, with a multitude of small, rosy white flowers which are fol- 
lowed by an abundance of small fruits of purple-black color and of fresh 
sour taste. These tiny cherries lend themselves well to be made Int^ 
excellent preserves and are so utilized by the Roman Catholic inlsBi<m- 
aries in the southwest part of Hupeh, where this bush cherry is foiiD<! 
very frequently in gardens. Since this species of Prunus thrives in 
regions with high summer temperatures and great humidity it probably 
will succeed in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. By selection aoi] 
liybridlzation larger fruited forms should be developed and a new fruit- 
ing shrub for the home garden would be the result Obtained from t\w 
garden of the Roman Catholic Convent at Ichang." 

46004. JuGLAXs REGiA L. Juglaiidacese. Walnut 

From Seharunpur, India. I>resented by Mr. A. C. Hartless, superintendent. 
Government Botanical Gardens. Received April 23, 1918. 

Kashmir walnuts introduced for breeding experiments being carried on by 
tho Bureau of Plant Industry. 

f 

46005. Aphloia theaeformis (Vahl) Bennett. Flaconrtiacea. 

Fi'om Madagascar. Presented by Mr. Eugene Jaegl6, director, Agricultural 
Experiment Station at Ivoloina, Tamatave. Received April 25, 1918. 

An erect, much-branched shrub native to Madagascar, Mauritius, and the 
Seychelles Islands. The alternate leaves are deeply pinnatifid on the youn^ 
shoots, with one to three pairs of obtuse ascending lobes; on the mature 



I nvenCory 55, S«adi i 



(Astragalus 



King, in his Farmera o( Forty Cenlurlea, draws Biieniion to iho 
doret DM oniy as b source dI soli nilrison but lor Iniman fowl 
Vila It In specially prepared beds and gather the shoots bel 
reacbed and prepare Ibem by boUliiK or steaming them. The s 
lor winter u»o. When picked very jounR those clover shoots 
vuetaUe, aa much as X cents gold per pound. The reason loi 
^lian bv pbyaioliHlst]. ( Pbolograpbed by Frank N. Meyer. 
AprllaiSis; PsSrS.) 



milurv. now miich gmwii on tbc Uivivni. The I roc jho»n U in t 
Emkoiuyi In Toliyo, ll U alDnK-livBl sjieclcs dC 

nTo. - - „ , _- 

Ihfre u room porlumets ana sufemU Ine tree b« iriod as a sLock [or pan in ibi 

- ■' ■'---^■-.- „„y be usofijl (or breeding '"" '"■ 

iptombor II, ]8[3; PI£l5jF^ 



7 iDches In Icnctli vith a very wbtv bighlv scented skiu. Fttmk N' 

!<eeds dT S. l-.l. No. MI30 In Ichnng, Chlm, remried [bat the In. 

porlumets uul sugieaU Ine tree b« iriod »l ^ - 

jbly 11 m«y be usoiul (or breeding piirposK also. (Pbolocnpbed hj 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 13 

f branches they are oblong, entire or crenate, 1 to 4 inches long. The yellowish 

• flowers, half an inch broad, are borne singly or in small fascicles in the axils 

of the leaves. (Adapted from Baker, Flora of Mauritius and the SeycheHleSt 

I 46006. LivisTONA HooGBNDORPii Andre. Phoenicaceee. Palm. 

; From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by the director of the Botanic Garden. 

\ Received April 12, 1918. 

lAvistona hoogendorpii is quite distinct from its allies, L. chinensis and L, 
' rotundifoUa, It is more dwarf in stature, with leafstalks covered with stout 
i brown spines and the leaf blade dividetl almost from Its base. (Adapted from 
The Garden, vol, 25, p. 392.) 

f 46007 to 46018. 

From Colombia. Purchased by Mr. Claude E. Guyant, American consul 
at Barranquilla. Received April 12, 1918. 

A collection of various kinds of legumes introduced for experimental pur- 
poses. Quoted notes by Mr. Gu^^ant. 

46007. Cajan indicum Spreng. Fabaceae. Pigreon-pea. 

" Quanduir 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45982. 

46006. CiciEB ASiETiNUH L. FabaceflB. Chick-pea. 

" Oarbanzo (de Honda), Chick-pea from Honda." 

46000. Lentilla lens (L.) W. F. Wight Fabaceie. LentlL 

{Lens esctUenta Moench.) 

'* Lentejas. Lentils." 

46010 to 46012. Phabeolus lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 

46010. '' Zaraf/oza (blancu). White." 

46011. " Zaragoza (caraotas)." 

46012. "Habaa (blancas). Horse beans, white." [Note. — These 
were I^inia l)ean8, not hors^e beans, Vicia faha.] 

46013 to 46016. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Fabaceie. Common bean. 

46013. *'*Zaragoza (blanca). White." 

46014. '' Frisol (bolon). Kidney bean, round." 

46015. ''Frisol (rojo). Kidney bean, red." 

46016. *'Frisol (de Santander). Kidney bean from Santander." 

46017. Vicia faba L. Fabacese. Broad bean. 
** Habaa (negras). Horse bean, black." 

46018. ViQNA SINENSIS (Tomer) Savl. Fabacese. Cowpea. 
** Frisol (ojos negros). Kidney bean, black eye." 

46019 to 46023. 

From Buitenzorg. Java. Presented by the director of the Botanic (Jarden. 
Received April 16, 1918. 

46019. Bbgt'ELIa tbifoliata (Lour.) Taub. Fabaceie. 
(Derria vliginosa Berith.) 

A robu.st climbing shrub with glabrous brancblets and leaves, found 
from India to China and throughout the Malayan Archi{)elago to Aus- 

70308—22 3 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46019 to 46023— Continued. 

tralia. Tbe compound leaves are made up of three to five somewhat 
coriaceous, ovate leaflets 2 to 4 inches long, and the rose-red flowers ar« 
produced In branched racemes 4 inches long. (Adapted from Hooker, 
Flora of British India, vol, 2, p. 242,) 

46020 and 46021. Lansium domesticum Jack. Meliaceie. Langsat 

" The tree is rather slender in habit, with a straight trunk and compou&i 
leaves composed of three or more pairs of elliptic to obovate leaflets 3 or 4 
Inches in length. The fruits, which ripen in the Straits Settlements from 
July to September, are produced in small clusters ; in general appearan«.v 
they suggest large loquats, the surface being straw colored and sUghtlj 
downy. The skin is thick and leathery and does not adhere to the whit--. 
translucent flesh. The flavor is highly aromatic, at times slightly pungeot. 
Each of the flve segments of the flesh normally contains an oval seed. l>ii: 
some of the segments in each fruit are usually seedless. The fruit is com- 
monly eaten fresh, but is also said to be utilized in various other ways.' 
(Wilson Popenoe,) 

46022. Manoifera longipes Qriffith. Anacardiacese. 

A large evergreen tree from the Malay Peninsula, related to the mangn. 
The lanceolate, coriaceous leaves are 6 to 10 inches long and 1 to 3 inches 
wide. The panicles of white flowers with yellow veins are branched and 
longer than the leaves. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, 
VOL 2, p. 15.) 

46023. Pangium edule Keinw. Flacourtiacese. Pangi 

A quick-growing, spreading tree with very large heart-shaped leaves, 
found on the Malay Peninsula. The large rusty-brown woody fruits are 
the size of small coconuts and contain numerous large seeds. The seeds are 
said to be poisonous until boiled and macerated In water, when they bo- 
come edible. (Adapted from MacmUlan, Handbook of Tropical Gardening 
and Planting, p. 578.) 

46024 and 46026. 

From Puerto Bertoni, Paraguay. Presented by Dr. M. S. BertonL Re- 
ceived April 17, 1918. Quoted notes by Dr. Bertoni. 

46024. Britoa sellowiana Berg. Myrtacees. 

" NvandH-aphiad, A shrub growing to a height of 2 to 4 meters. Tbe 
edible fruits are sweet, but slightly acid. The plant has withstood a 
temperature of —4° C." 

46025. GuASEA OBANDiroLiA DC. Meliace^ 

"A small or medium-sized tree of rapid growth. It is a good shade 
plant for coffee and is ornamental because of its dense crown of largt> 
leaves." 

46026. Sabinea carinalis Griseb. Fabaceae. 

From Dominica, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. Joseph Jont-s, 
curator of the Botanic Gardens. Received April 19, 1918. 

"This small tree is known locally as Bois Charibe and is one of the most 
showy of our native plants. It Is a very fine flowering tree, and I have seen 
nothUig in the Tropics to surpass It as a mass of color. If grown on fairlj 



APBH. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1»18. 15 

good land it will not make a good show, but if planted on a dry, rocky bill- 
side, where it will be scorched by the sun for a period of three or four months 
each year, it makes a marvelous display of flowers. It would probably succeed 
in the hot parts of California." (Jone^.) 

A shrub or small tree with abruptly pinnate leaves having six to eight pairs 
of oblong leaflets. The large bright-scarlet flowers are borne in fascicles of 
three to five and appear before the leaves. (Adapted from Ori^ebach, Flora 
of the Britigh We9i Indian Islands, p. 183.) 

46027. Chenopodium bonus-henricus L. Chenopodiaceae. 

Good King Henry. 

From Ireland. Presented by the director of the Dublin Royal Botanic 
Gku^den. Reoeived April 22, X91& 

An herbaceous perennial, 2 to 8 feet tall, often cultivated for the large 
triangular leaves, which are used like spinach. 

46028. SoLANUM ACuuEATissiMnM Jacq. Solanacese. 

From San Jose, Oosta Rica. Fruits presented by Mr. A. Tonduz, Minis- 
terio de Hacienda y Ck>mercio. Received April 80, 1918. 

A spiny undershrub 1 to 2 f^t high, widely distributed in the Tropics. The 
few-flowered nxillary Qvmes of snow-white flowers 1 inch across are followed 
by globose orange or yellow fruits often 2 inches in diameter. (Adapted from 
Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Sorticuliurey vol. 6, p. S1S4^) 

46029. CucuMis m£lo L. Cncurbitacese. Australian casaba. 

From Burringbar, Australia. Presented by Mr. B. Harrison. Received 
April 30, 1918. 

" I am inclosing seeds of the Australian casaba, the correct name of which 
I do not know, but which I believe originally came from India* It is a most 
prolific plant, bearing cream-colored fruit about the size of a cucumber. It is 
sometimes called the ' apple melon ' and is quite popular here, being very pal- 
atable when eaten with sugar or made up into pies. It is hardy, prolific, and 
early, and should thrive well throughout the United States." (Harrison.) 

46030. Xanthosoma sp. Araceae. Yautia. 

From San Juan, Porto Rico. Tubers presented by Mr. W. J. McGee, chief, 
Bureau of Chemistry, Eacperiment Station. Received May 2, 1918. 

"A small-growing yautia which produces edible, yellow-fleshed corius; they 
jire mealy and dry and rich In flavor when cooked. The corniels or lateral 
tubers, are usually too small for table use. The very young leaves are often 
used for greens, called calalou in the French West Indies. The leaves are acrid 
and require parboiling with a little baking soda or cooking with fat meat. The 
plant seldom exceeds 3 feet In height. The leaf blade is narrowly sagittate, 
with a broad sinus ; basal veins naked for one-fourth of an inch ; marginal vein 
one-eighth of an inch or less from edge of blade. Petiole green; sinus wings 
glaucous, tinged with purple, with an irregular greenish white stripe next to 
the margin; margin of wing pink. The prominent whitish stripe on the wing 
of the petlolar sinus Is an easy distinguishing character. In Guadeloupe this 
yellow variety is called makpnga colord, or colored eddo, and is said to be more 
highly esteemed than the white-fleshed yautias. It is eaten baked, boiled, fried, 
etc." {R. A. Young.) 



16 SEEDS AKD PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46031 to 46046. 

Prom Caracas, Venezuela. Presented by Dr. H. Plttier. Received AiH-il 
23, 1918. 
46031 to 46087. Riginus communis L. Euphorbiacee. Castor-bean. 

" These varieties have not as yet been generally distinguished by the 
people at large here, so they have no distinctive names." iPUtier,) 

46031. No. 1. Seed three-fourths of an inch long by half an izx^ 
broad; light gray with irregular dark-brown longitudlosl 
markings. 

46030. No. 2. Seed three-eighths of an inch long by one-fourth of 
an inch broad ; dark gray with brown markings. 

46033. No. 3. Seed half an inch long by one-fourth of an indi 
broad; dark gray with dark-brown, rather regular markings. 

46034. No. 4. Seed three-eighths of an inch long by one-fourth of an 
inch broad; light gray with few, narrow, irregular, brownish 
markings. 

46036. No. 5. Seed half an inch long by three-eighths of an icdi 
broad; dark gray with numerous irregular dark-brown markinp. 

46036. No. 6. Seed five-eighths of an inch long by three-eighths ot 
an inch broad ; reddish gray with narrow streaks of reddish brown. 

46037. No. 7. Seed three-eighths of an inch long by one-fourth of an 
inch broad ; dark gray with nearly black markings. 

46038 to 46046. Triticum aestivum L. Poaceae. Wheat 

(T. vulgare VUl.) 

"A collection of the native varieties of wheat with their common names. 
They come from the State of Trujillo in the Venezuelan Andes, whers 
they are extensively cultivated from 1,000 meters upwards." iPittier.' 

46038. "Blanco. Cultlvo del Distrito Bocono." 
46089. *'Cariaco. Cultlvo del Distrito Booono." 

46040. "CaHaoo. Distrito Urdaneta." 

46041. "Macarrdn. Cultlvo del Distrito Bocono." 

46042. '*Nortero, Cultlvo del Distrito Bocono." 

46043. ** Peldn. Distrito Urdaneta." 

46044. " Raspudo or Caha morada. Distrito Urdaneta.** 

46045. " ScUynerdn. Cultlvo del Distrito Bocona" 

46046. *' Salmerdn, Cultivado en la ' Cristalina,' Distrito Trujillo.^ 

46047 and 46048. 

From San Lorenzo, Tolima, Colombia. Presented by Mr. M. T, Dawc. 
Estacion Agrononiica Tropical. Received May 1, 1918. 

46047. Attalea sp. Phoenicacese. Croqulto palin. 
Introduced for tests of oil-producing seeds of various kinds. 

46048. Elaehs melanococca Gaertn. Phoenicaceae. Koli palm 

*'A palm with practically no stem, the leaves, 8 to 10 feet long, beis: 
borne within 2 to 3 feet of the ground. The fruits, which are com- 
pressetl, irregular, and orange-red in color when ripe, are borne in denst 
clusters. Two classes of oil are obtained — red oil from the coating o: 
the seeds and a clear oil from the kernels. The latter is very much prism- 
as a cooking oil. The palm is common in the low lands among floodtif 
nreas under conditions similar to those of our flooded bottom laiid:^ 
along the Mississippi and other Gulf coast rivers," (H. Jf. Curran.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 43001. 



APBQi 1 TO JUNE 30, IfflB. 17 

46049. AcAGiA MELUFBSA (Vahl) Benth. Mimosacen. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. T. W. Brown, director, Horticnltural 
Section, Oizeh Branch, Ministry of Agricnltnre. Received May 4, 1918. 

A shrub or small tree, native to the Niger and Upper Nile valleys and said to 
yield a gum like gum arable. The smooth leaves, as broad as long, not exceeding 
1 to 2 inches, are made up of two pairs of pinnse, each having a pair of obliquely 
obovate-oblong entire leaflets. The fascicled spikes of yellow flowers are longer 
than the leaves and produce pale sinuous pods 1 to 2 inches long. (Adapted 
from Oliver, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol. 2, p. $40.) 

46060. Cajan indicum Spreng. Fabaceae. Pigeon-pea. 

From New York, N. Y. Purchased from S. Rosen. Received May 11 and 
17, 1918. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 46982. 

46051 to 46056. Cucurbita pepo L. Cucurbitaceae. Squash. 

From China. Presented by Mr. F. J. White, Shanghai Baptist College. Re- 
ceived April 27, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. White. 

" The seeds that I had myself were all lost while I was in America, so that I 
am unable to vouch for the authenticity of these seeds, but they are probably all 
right. I think you will hnd some of them very good if any are like the ones that 
I had. The large, round, flat squash is very prolific, very hardy, and very good in 
quality.'* 

46051. "Squash; long, round." 

46052. ** Squash ; round, bell shaped." 

46053. "Squash; round, flat. No. 1." 

46054. "Squash; round, fiat. No. 2.** 
46056. "Squash; round, fiat, No. 3." 

46066. Zea mats L. Poaceae. Com. 

From Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Presented by the estate of Diego 
Moreno. Received May 4, 1918. 

*' Maiz pepitilla. For sowing It Is necessary to have grain which produces 
many shoots, and for this reason It Is sown here In two ways — one at a distance 
of 1 meter (39.37 inches) apart, three grains in a hill ; the other, one grain for 
every 25 cm. (9.84 Inches), the latter being the better method. In both 
cases the furrows are a distance of 84 cm. (33 Inches) apart. On coming up, 
the plant is very slender, but after reaching a height of 25 cm., It becomes very 
graceful and robust. In hot lands or along the coast It yields In three months, In 
moderate temperature In six months, and In cooler lands from seven to eight 
months. It is very well adapted to lands where the rainfall Is not abundant, for 
it is more drought- resistant than any other variety. The stalk grows more than 
that of other corn, and generally each stalk bears two ears if the land is ordinary 
and three and more ears when the land is very good. Another of the advantages 
which it has is that the ear rots less than that of any other variety, because the 
leaves inclose it perfectly at the end and do not permit water to enter when it is 
mature. The cob of the ear is very slender and the corn very high, for which 
reasons it yields much. When the yield is good it generally weighs 70 kilo- 
grams to the hectoliter (about 55 pounds to the bushel) and even 72 kilograms 
(56.5 pounds) when the yield is very good. This corn is appreciated because it 
contains much starch ; when made Into meal for use In the preparation of tortillas 



18 SEEDS AJfJy PLANTS IMPOBTED, 

it swells and gives better results than any other kind, thus it has a gre&Ur 
value than other varieties. Aa it contains less oil than other varieties, it is not 
good for fattening hogs, but is suitable for other animals." (Morerio,) 

46057. LtjpiNrs cruckshanksii Hook. Fabacese. Lupine. 

From London, England. Purchased from Messrs. Watkins & Simpson. 
Ltd., Covent Garden. Received May 4, 1918. 

Obtained for the experiments of the Office of Forage-Crop Investigations. 

A somewhat woody perennial, up to 5 feet high, native to the Andes of Chile. 
The seven to nine leaflets are lanceolate, obtuse, and glaucous underneath. The 
large fragrant flowers are whjte with a yellow standard, turning violet with 
age. (Adapted from Curtis* » Botanical Magazine, pi S056.) 

46068. BosA cHiNENsis J.acq. Rosace®. Sose. 

From Hertford, England. Plants purchased from Paul & Sons, Cheshunt 
Nurseries. Received May 16, 1918. 

** Ard*8 Rover. A semlcllmbing rose of the Rosa chinen^is type. Flowers 
very large, dark red, abundantly produced. Useful for breeding red varieties.'' 
(Dr. Walter Van Fleet,) 

46069 and 46060. 

From London, England. Purchased from Messrs. Watkins & Simpson, 
Ltd., Covent Garden. Received May 4, 1918. 

Obtained for the experiments of the Office of Forage-Crop Investigations. 

46059. LupiNus douglash Agardh. Fabaceffi. I#apine. 

An herbaceous perennial from a slightly woody base, found along tbe 
coast of California from San Francisco to Los Angeles. The pubescent 
leaves have seven to nine oblanceolate leaflets 1 to 2 Inches long. The 
large blue or purple flowers are scattered or subverticIUate on long- 
peduncled terminal racemes. (Adapted from Brewer and Watson, Botany 
of California, vol i, p. 117,) 

46060. LupiNus POLYPHYLLUS Lludl. Fabacese. Lnpine. 

Variety moerheiniii- This handsome and useful lupine differs from 
the true polyphyllus forms in its manner of growth, this being very much 
more compact and erect One other point of difference worthy of note 
is that the lower flowers, which are the first to open, are very long li^ 
and remain fresh until practically all the blooms have expanded. In 
Lupinus polyphyllus the lower flowers begin to fade some time before the 
topmost flowers have opened. L. moerheimU is very free flowering and of 
a beautiful bright-pink hue. (Adapted from The Gardeners* Maga:ine, 
vol, 51, p, 613,) 

46061. Euco:MMrAULMOiDES Oliver. Trochodendracea3. Tu-chung. 

From China. Procured by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for 
the Department of Agriculture. Received May 9, 1918. 

"A Chinese caoutchouc tree, found wild on densely forested mountain slopes 
in southwestern Shensi and southeastern Kansu ; also much cultivated in gar- 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 19 

dens and planted here and there along roadsides. This tree has the peculiar 
property of exhibiting nihberlike threads of shining whitish color when pieces 
of barl£ or leaf are snapped across, but it shows this peculiarity more strongly 
in its wingetl fruits. On this account it is called Shih tnien aim, meaning 
• stone-cotton tree,' reference beiuff made apparently to the resemblance of this 
caoutchouc or rubber to asbestos. This tree reaches a height of 80 feet and 
seems to grow best when sheltered by other trees. It nii^lit prove of value as a 
quick-growing ornamental tree for parks in tliose sections of the Unitetl States 
where the winters are not 'too severe." {Meyer.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 40028. 

46062 and 46063. 

From China. Collected in Klhsien, Honan Province, by Mr. G. D. Schlosser, 
at the request of Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural FJxplorer for the 
Department of Agriculture. Received May 9, 1918. 

46062. Celtis sinensis Pers. Ulmacese. Hackberry. 

A tree, native to China and .Japan, growing to a height of 30 feet 
The broadly ovate leaves, 2 to 4 inches long, are cordate at the base and 
acuminate at the apex, with a serrate-dentate margin. The dull orange- 
red fruits are borne on stout pe<licels. This tree has proved hardy at 
the Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mass. (Adapteil from Bailey, 
Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 2, p. 710.) 

46063. Pyeus callebyana Decnisne. Malacese. Fear. 

Introduced for experiments in producing a blight-resistant stock for 
cultivated varieties of pear and for hybridizing, in an effort 'to produce 
blight-resistant varieties. 

46064 to 46073.^ 

From Santos, Brazil. Procured by Mr. C. F. Deichman, American consul. 
Received May 9, 1913. Quoted notes by Mr. Deichman. 
46064 to 46072. Phaseolus \a'XGARTS L, Fabaceffi. Common bean. 

46064. "No. 1. Mulatinho claro (brown bean; light color)." 

46065. "No. 2. Mulatinho oscuro (brown bean; dark color.) 

46066. "No. 4. Vermelho (red bean)." 

46067. "No. 5. Amarello (yellow bean).' 

46068. "No. 6. Preio (black bean)." 

46069. "No. 7. Branco grande (white bean; large)." 

46070. "No. 8. Branco miudo (white bean; small)." 

46071. "No. 9. Manteiga (butter bean)." 

46072. "No. 10. Pintado (spotted bean)." 

46073. VioNA SINENSIS (Torner) Savi. Fabacese. Cowpea. 

"No. 8. Fradino (dwarf or French bean)." 

^ Introduced for use in a large seriee of expi'riinents in testing and breeding varietiefl 
of South American legumes for the purpose of selecting or developing superior strains 
suited to the various conditions obtaining in difTerent parts of the United States. 



*) 



»f 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46074 and 46076. 

From Brisbane, Australia. Presented by Mr. L. G. CJorrie. Receiyed May 
2, 1918. 

46074. GossTPiuM babbadense X hibsutum. MalvacesB. Cotton. 

"Jones's hybrid. This variety was first observed in nmnerotts fields 
of cotton in 1906. and, as far as can be surmised, is a sport originating 
from a Sea Island variety /Seabrook) and an Upland type (Russell's Big 
Boll)." (Quoted from an article by Mr, Dt Jones in the QueeMlani 
Agricultural Journal for March, 1916, p. 15S^) 

46075. RiciNus communis L. Euphorblaceie. Castor-bean. 

"Bancroft's hybrid," Seed an inch long by five-eighths of an ind 
broad; light gray with irregular reddish brown markings. Introduc?d 
for experiments in testing the oil content of various forms. 

46076. SoLANUM TUBEROSUM L. SolanaceBB. Potato. 

From Bogota, Ck)lombia. Tubers presented by Mr. Jorge Ancizar. Re 
ceived May 7, 1918. 

" PafMi crioUa>, Tubers shaped like the common potato, but only abont an 
Inch in shortest diameter. The Creole potatoes come out in. three months and 
are delicious fried with their skins." (Ancizar.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44580. 

46077 to 46079. 

From Oheshunt, Hertford, England. Plants purchased from Paul & Sons. 
Received May 9, 1918. Quoted notes by Dr. Walter Van Fleet. 

46077. Rosa foetida Herrmann. Rosacese. Eos*. 
{R, lutea Mill.) 

''Austrian Brier, Single bloom. Supposed to be a garden represent'. 
tive of Rosa foetida, probably very near the type. Shrub 5 to 6 feet tal\ 
branches slender, arching, and armed with short prickles, flowers 2 o: 
more inches in diameter, bright golden yellow, in sparse clusters, l^ 
sirable for breeding yellow-flowered varieties." 

46078. Rosa chinensis Jacq. Rosacece. Eose. 
'* Rcd-Leticr Day. Garden form of Rosa chinensis. Dwarf shnji- 

with erect stems growing about 2 feet high. Flowers single or semi 
double, intense scarlet-crim.son, best of its color. Desirable for breeding.* 

46070. Rosa sp. Rosacece. Bose 

'* Mrs. Emily Gray. Jersey Beauty X Rosa pemetiana. Jersey Beauty 
has for parents Rosa wichuraiana and Perle 4e Jardines, the latter i 
yellow-flowered form of R. odorata. Mrs. Emily Gi^ay is said to be tii^ 
best yellow-flowered form of the wichuraiana type that has been ^l-^ 
veloped. Desirable for breeding." 

46080 to 46110. 

F>om Darjilinp. India. Presented by Dr. G. H. Cave, director, IM 
Botanic Garden. Received May 11, 1918. 

46080. Rokhmfkia macbopiiylla D. Don. Urticace«. 

A pretty shrub with narrow, dentate leaves 6 to 12 inches in lenirt' 
and very louj?, drooping flower spikes. It is a native of Upper Bun.i- 
and northeastern India, where it ascends to an altitude of 4,000 feet 
The wood is light reddish brown and moderately hard, and the barfe 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 81 

46080 to 46 1 1 0— Continued. 

yields a gooci fiber which is used for ropes and fishins: lines. (Adapted 
from J, S. Gamble, Manual of Indian Tinibers, p. 658, 1902.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44860. 

^6081. Oallicabpa bubella Lindl. Verbenacese. 

An erect, single-stemmed shrub up to 20 feet in height, native of north- 
ern India and China. The branches and leaves are horizontal, the latter 
being cordate-oblong, softly pubescent above and tomentose beneath, with 
crenate-serrate margins. The small cymes. 2 inches across, of pink 
flowers are followed by small purple berries. (Adapted from Hook^ft 
Flora of British India, vol 4, p. 569.) 

46082. Gbacca Candida (DC.) Kuntze. Fabaceee. 
(Tephroaia oandida DC.). 

A shrubby perennial, 4 to 7 feet high, with soft pubescent leaves and white 
flowers, native to the northern part of India up to an altitude of 3.000 feet. 
It is used as a cover crop and n^ a green manure. (Adapted from MaO' 
millan, Handbook of Tropical Gardening and Planting, td ed., p. 39.) 

46083. Fbaxinus flobibunda Wall. 01eace». Ash. 

" This is a large deciduous tree found growing in the Himalayas from 
Indus to Sikkim, between 5,000 and 8,500 feet. A concrete, saccharine 
exudation called manna is obtained from the stem of this tree and is 
employed as a substitute for the officinal manna. The sugar mannlte, 
contained in this exudation, differs from cane and grape sugar in not 
being readily fermentable, although under certain conditions it does 
ferment and yields a quantity of alcohol varying in strength from 13 to 
33 per cent. Like the officinal manna, this is used for its sweetening and 
slightly laxative properties. The wood is white with a reddish tinge 
and soft to moderately hard in structure, resembling in some respects 
the European ash. This tree is very valuable and is used in the manu- 
facture of oars, sampan poles, plows, platters, spinning wheels, and for 
many other purposes." {Watt, Dictionary of the Economic Producti of 
India, vol. S, p. 44^.) 

46084. Laurocebasus acuminata (Wall.) Roemer. Amygdalace». 

( Pnimts acum inn ta Hook . ) Cherry laurel. 

A tree, 30 to 40 feet high, found in the temperate portions of the cen- 
tral and eastern Himalayas, at altitudes of 4,000 to 7,000 feet. The 
branches are slender, with flat, smooth leaves 4 to 7 Inches long, and 
yellowish white flowers one-fourth to one-third of an Inch across in 
many-flowered racemes. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, 
vol. 2, p. S17.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44092. 

46065. LiLiUM GiGANTEUM Wall. Liliacese. Lily. 

A tall lily, up to 12 feet in height, found in the Himalaya Mountains 
from Kumaon and Gurhwal to Khasl and Sikkim in India. The 12 to 20 
scattered, deep-green leaves are 12 to 18 Inches in diameter on petioles a 
foot long at the base of the stem, reducing in size toward the top. The 
6 to 12 delidously fragrant flowers are 6 inches long and nearly as broad. 
The waxy segments of the perianth are purplish green outside, citron 
yellow changing to white inside, with purple midribs. The stamens are 
yellow. (Adapted from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture, 
vol, 4, p. 1877.) 

70908—22 4 



fi2 SEEDS AND PIANTS IMPORTED. 

46080 to 46110— Continued. 

40086. LiLiUK NEPAicirsB D. Don. LUiacee. UOj, 

The beautiful reflezed flowers are very striking in appearance, bong dt- 
ron yellow toward the edge and deep maroon-purple or almost black 
within. If L. nepalen%e were only a little hardier it would doubtless be 
the most popular of all the oriental lilies. It is a native to the Himalayan 
region. (Adapted from The Garden, vol. 78, p. 159,) 

40087. MicHELiA CATHCABTn Hook. f. and Thorns. Magnoliaceee. 

*' This is a large tree which is found In the temperate forests of the Sik- 
kirn Himalayas at altitudes of 5,000 to 6,000 feet. The sapwood is large and 
white in color, while the heartwood, which is moderately hard, is a dark 
olive brown. The wood of this species is used for planking and would 
do well for tea boxes." {Watt, Dictionary of the Boonomio ProdncU of 
India, vol, 6, p. 241.) 

For previous Introduction, see S. P. I. No. 41814. 

46088. MicHELiA EXCKLSA Blume. Magnoliacese. 

A tali tree found at an altitude of 5,000 feet on the Himalayas and in the 
Khasl Hills in India. The twigs, the under sides of the leaves, and 
the flower buds are covered with soft, silky, brown pubescence. The 
leaves are oblong and acute, and the white flowers are 5 inches across, 
with about 12 segments to the perianth. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of 
British India, vol. 1, p. |5.) 

46069. MicHEXiA LANiraiNOSA Wall. Magnoliaceee. 

A medium-Sized tree with grayish white, tomentose twigs, native to India 
on the temperate slopes of the Himalayas up to an altitude of 7,000 ftet 
The oblong or lanceolate leaves, 10 Inches long and 8 inches wide, on short 
petioles, are glabrous above and white tomentose underneath. The white 
flowers, 4 inches across, have about 18 perianth segments varying from 
obovate and obtuse outside to lanceolate and acute near the center. The 
fruit is densely woolly. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, 
vol. 1, p. 4S.) 

46000. MucuNA MACBOCABPA Wall. Fabaceae. 

A woody climber found on the lower slopes of the Himalayas and in th« 
Khasi Hills up to an altitude of 6,000 feet The leaves are made up of 
three subcoriaceous, ovate leaflets, 6 to 8 inches long. The fascicled 
racemes of purple flowers, 8 inches long and 2 inches wide, are fOUowed 
by pods li feet long by 2 inches wide, containing 8 to 12 flattened-orbicnlar 
seeds. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, vol. 2, p. 186.) 

46001. Ntssa sEsaxLTFLosA Hook. f. and Thorns. Ck>macese. 

This is a large tree found in the forests of the Sikkim Himalayas 
Above 5,000 feet; also in Martaban between 4,000 and 6,000 feet The 
wood is gray, soft, and even grained, and is used for house building and 
other purposes about Darjiling. (Adapted from Watt, Dictionary of the 
Economic Products of India, vol. 5, p. 4S8.) 

46002. PoDOPHTixuM BHODi Wall. Berberidaceffi. Maj-apple. 

This plant is herbaceous, about a foot in height, with only two leaves, 
which are alternate on long stalks, palmately three to five lobed, pnnde 
spotted, and glabrous. The flower is solitary, axillary, or raised above 
the axil, nodding, cup shaped, white or pale rose colored. The berry Is 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 90y 1»18. S8 

46080 to 46 1 1 0— Cent inued. 

de^ red in color and tbough described as tasteless Is, it is said, sometimes 
eaten. (Adapted from O^rdenerB* Chronicle^ 2d ser^ vol. 1&, pl. 2^1.) 

40093. Pruwus cerasoides P. Don. Amygdalaceie. 
(P. puddunt Roxb.) 

A large tree, making a brilliant appearance when In flower, native to 
northern India at altitudes of 3,000 to 8,000 feet. The leaves are ovate to 
lanceolate, 3 to 5 inches long, with doubly serrate margins. The flowers, 
which appear before the leaves, are either .^solitary or in umbels and are 
rose-red or white. Tlie acid fruits, on prominently thickened pedicels, are 
oblong and have a thin yellowish or reddish flesh. (Adapted from Hooker, 
Flora of British India, vol. 2, p. Slh) 

40094. pRUNus NAPAULBNsis (Seringe) Steud. Amygdalacen. Chexry. 

A small tree native to the temperate Himalayas at altitudes of 6,000 to 
10,000 feet. The leaves are 4 to 6 inches long, broadly lanceolate with a 
sharp point, and crenate on the margins. The racemes, often 10 inches 
long, of white flowers, 'are followed by globose fruits nearly three-fourths 
of an inch in diameter with smooth, thick-walled stones. (Adapted from 
Hooker, Flora of British India, vol. 2, p. S16.) 

40095. Pyrulakia edulis (Wall.) DC. Santalacese. 

A medium-sized thorny tree native to the tropical slopes of the Hima- 
layas up to an altitude of 5,0(X) feet. The leaves are 3 to 7 inches long, 
rather fleshy, oblong, with entire margins. The staminate flowers are in 
racemes, and the pistillate are solitary, producing edible pear-shaped 
drupes, 2 inches long. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, 
vol. 5, p. 230.) 

40090. RHT78 JAVANicA L. Anscardiaceie. Sumac. 

{R. senUalata Murray.) 

"A sumac, found on stony mountain slopes, in ravines, and in wild 
places; growing into a tall shrub or a small tree. Leaves large, light 
green, pubescent, winged. Fruits borne in large spikes ; berries coated with 
a sticky whitish wax which bums readily. The Chinese do not seem to 
utilize this wax in any way. Of value as an ornamental park shrub for 
the mild- wintered sections of the United States." (F. N. Meyer.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 40716. 

40097. Rosa macrophylla Lindl. Rosacea. Bose. 

A shrub native to the Himalayas and western China, becoming 8 feet 
or more in height, with erect stems and arching branches usually fur- 
niBhed with straight prickles up to half an inch in length. The leaves, 
whidi are compoBed of 5 to 11 leaflets, are up to 8 inches in length. The 
dsep-plnk or red flowers are up to 8 inches in width and are produced 
singly or In clusters of varying number. The elongated, pear-shaped 
fruits are bright red. (Adapted from Bean, Trees a/nd Shrubs Hardy 
in the BrUUh Isles^ vol. 2, p. tSS.) 

For previouB introduction, see S. P. I. No. 48900. 

40098. Rosa sericea Lindl. Rosacese. Bose. 

The flowers are slightly cupped, pale pink or blush, almost white in the 
<)enter, and the leaflets are small, with several deep serratures at the 
apex. (Adapted from Journal of Horticulture, vol. iS, p. 7.) 



24 SEEDS AND PIANTS IMPORTED. 

46080 to 46110— Continued. 

46089. RuBiA coBDiFOLiA L. Rttbiaceie. Xaddtt. 

An liertMiceotiB creeper wiUi perennial roots, which is met with in the 
hilly districta of India from the northwestern Himalayas eastward and 
southward to Ceylon. The Manjit root or East Indian madder is ob- 
tained for the most part from this species and is much employed by tbe 
natives of India for dyeing coarse cotton fabric or the threads froa 
which it is woven various shades of scarlet, coffee brown, or manre. 
The Bast Indian madder of commerce consists of a short stalk from 
which numerous cylindrical roots, about the size of a quill, diverge. 
These are covered with a thin brownish pulp which peels off in flakes, 
disclosing a red-brown bark marked by longitudinal furrows. Many 
different methods are used for dyeing with this madder, a short accoont 
of which may be found in Watt, Dictionary of the Ekx>nomic Prodncti of 
India, from which this description is adapted. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 88656. 

46100. Sambucts adnata Wall. Oaprifoliacee. Elder. 

An ornamental perennial allied to the elderberry, with cymes of fra- 
grant white flowers, 10 inches across, followed by bright-red fruits. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 41696. 

46101. Sambucus javanica Reinw. CaprifoUaceee. Eider. 

'* Thi.s is a very widely distributed species ranging from the Malaytn 
Archipelago to central Japan and western China and also found in eastern 
Africa. It is characterized by the slender- pediceled flowers, the presence 
of conspicuous abortive flowers, and the very wide and loose inflorescence 
with the lonpor rays subthyrsoid. It has red fruits and shows a tendency 
to have tlie upper leaflets more or less adnate to the rachis and sometimes 
decurrent." {Sarffcnt, Plantae Wilsonianae, vol, 1, p. SOI.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 89671. 

46102. Saurauja napaulensis DC. DiUenlacea. 

A me<liuni-s zed tree found at altitudes of 5,000 to 7,000 feet in the 
Himalayas. The young parts of the tree are covered with scurfy tomen- 
tum mixed with brown scales. The leaves, 10 inches long and 4 inches 
wide, are grouped at the ends of the branches and are oblong-elliptic in 
outline with deeply serrate margins. The pink flowers, half an inch 
across, occur in axillary panicles and are followed by green, edible, sweet 
fruits with mealy flesh. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British /iuUs» 
vol U p. 286.) 

46103. SoLANUM KHASiANUM C. B. Clarke. Solanaceee. 

An herbaceous perennial from the Khasi Hills in India, witjh stoat 
stems densely covered with yellow hairs and having straight prickles two- 
thirds of an inch long. The leaves, 7 Inches long by 5 inches wide, are 
deeply lobed, hirsute, and prickly on both surfaces. The flowers, nearly 
an inch broad, are borne in lateral 1 to 4 flowered racemes, and tlie 
globose fruits are an inch in diameter. (Adapted from Hooker, Flors of 
British India, vol. 4, p. 2S4*) 

46104. SoBBUS cuspiDATA (Spsch) Hedl. Malacese. 
(Pyrus vestita Wall.) 

A deciduous tree which is a native of the eastern Himalayas and may 
be found growing from Gurhwal to Sikkira. at altitudes between 9.000 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 26 

46080 to 46110— Continued. 

an4 10,000 feet. The fruit is edible and is sometimes used as food. 
(Adapted from Wait, Dictionary of the Economic Products of India, voL 
G, pt. i, p. 377.) 
For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 89188. 

46106. SoRBUs FOLioLOSA (Wall.) Spach. Malacese. Mountain ash. 

{PyruB foUolosa Wall.) 
A small tree with densely woolly young shoots, found on the temperate 
slopes of the Himalayas. The pinnatoly compound lesives, 4 to 6 inches 
long, are made up of five to nine pairs of linear-lanceolate, obscurely 
serrate, coriaceous leaflets. The compound, tomentose corymbs of white 
flowers are followed by very small ovoid fruits. (Adapted from Hooker, 
Flora of British India, vol, 2, p, S76.) 

46106. SoBBus iNSioNis (Hook, f.) Hedl. Malacese. Mountain ash. 
{Pprus insiffnis Hook, f.) 

"A small very robust tree, native of the Sikkim* Himalayas at alti- 
tudes ranging from 8,000 to 11,000 feet. The branchlets are nearly as 
thick as the little finger, and the bud scales are rigid, chestnut brown 
in color, and shining. The younger parts are clothed with long, rather 
silky, rusty-brown wool, while the older parts are glabrous." (Hooker, 
Flora of British India, vol 2, p. 577.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 39134. 

46107. Styrax hooivERi C. B. Carke. Styracacese. 

"This is a small tree frequently met with in Sikkim and Bhutan at 
altitudes between 6,000 and 7,000 feet. The wood is white, close grained, 
and moderately hard." {Watt, Dictionary of the Economic Products of 
India, vol, 6, pt. S, p. S85.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 41815. 

46108. Symplocos theaefoija D. Don. Symplocaceje. 

An erect tree of the eastern Himalayas, from Nepal to Bhutan, oc- 
curring at altitudes between 4,000 and 6,000 feet. It is common also 
in the Khasi Hills and In Martaban. The leaves of this species are 
used as an auxiliary with Morinda tinctoria and lac in dyeing. The 
wood is white and soft and is used for fuel and for rough house posts. 
(Adapted from Watt, Dictionary of the Econonvic Products of India, vol. 
6, pt, 3, p. J^OO.) 

46109. Viburnum ebubescens Wall. Oprifoliacese. 

A tall shrub or small tree common on the Himalayas up to an alti- 
tude of 10,000 feet. It has small ovate leaves. 3 inches long and 1 inch 
wide, and small pendulous corymbs of white flowers. The red, ellipsoid 
fruits are one-fourth of an Inch long. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of 
British India, vol, S, p. 7.) 

46110. Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum Edgeworth. liutacece. 

An alternate-leaved shrub, with hooked prickles, native to the tem- 
perate and subtnvpical slopes of the Himalayas at altitudes of 4,000 
to 9,(XX) feet. The pinna tely compound leaves, about a foot long, have 
3 to 10 pairs of ovate to elliptic leaflets with crenate-serrate margins, 
The flowers occur in many-branched umbellate cymes ; and the tubercled 
fruits, the size of a pea, open transversely, showing the black seeds. 
(Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, vol. i, p. 29 Jf.) 



26 BEEDS A^D PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46111 to 46118. SoLANUM tuberosum L. Solanacese. Potato. 

From Reading, EnglaDd. Tubers presented by Sutton & Sons. ReceiTfti 
April 20. 1918. 

46111. Sutton's if arWni^er. 

46112. Sutton's Gladiator. 

46113. Sutton's Early Ashleaf, 

46114. Sutton's Drurrwiond Castle, 

46115. Sutton's Edinburgh Castle. 

46116. Sutton's Berwick Castle. 

46117. Sutton's Carrisbrooke Castle. 

46118. Sutton's Dunnottar Castle. 

46119. Eucx)MMiA uLMOiDEs Oliver. Trochodendrace«e. 

Tu-chung. 

From Suilokuo, Hupeh, CJhina. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Moyer, Agri- 
cultural Exi^lorer for the Department of Asrieulture. Kec*eived Febniarv 
25, 1918. 

An interestinj; deciduous tree somewhat resembling an ehu in habit aud 
foliage. The leaves and bark contain a remarkable substance resend)liiij; nibb«*r. 

For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 46061. 

46120. AcTiNiDiA cHiNENsis Plauich. Dilleniaceae. TTang^-tao. 

From Ichang, Hupeh, China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Mejer, Agi-icultun:! 
Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received Fel»ruar>' 2n. 
1918. f 

The yang-tao, as this deciduous climber Is known in Szechwan ProYince, 
where it is native, has attracted considerable attention from travelers and mis- 
sionaries in China, because of the high quality of its fruits and the ornamental 
value of the plant. Single plants often grow 30 feet in length, so that the vine 
will cover large areas of trellis. The leaves have a plushlike texture and an 
unusual dark-green color. The young shoots are bright pink and villous pubes- 
cent. The size and regular spacing of the leaves make this climber valuable 
where large areas of foliage are desired. The flowers are buff yellow to white, 
fragrant, and large size, being from 1 to li inches In diameter. The abun- 
dance of these flowers adds greatly to tlu» beauty of this plant and enhances its 
value as an ornamental. The following account of the fruit was written by Mr. 
Wilson while in China : 

** Fruits abundantly produced, ovoid to globose, russet brown, nuire or less 
clothed with villous hairs. Flesh green, of most excellent flavor, to my palate 
akin to that of the gooseberry, but tempered with a flavor peculiarly its owii." 

The fruit is excellent when fresh, and it also makes very fine jam and 
sauce. Full information is lacking in regard to the fruit grown outside 
of China ; some fruits receivi»d from California, how-ever, bear out the high 
praise given the fruit by travelers. While this plant is not hardy in regions 
of severe winters, the rapid growth in the spring will make it a valuable 
ornamental, even in those regions where it is killed to the ground each winter. 
Vines have lived and made excellent growth near Washington during the 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 27 

past eight years, but have not fruited. As an ornamental alone it is a very 
valuable vine. See David Fairchlld, " Some Asiatic Actinidias," in Bureau of 
Plant Industry Circular No, 110, pp. 7-12. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45588. 

46121. Citrus ORANDI8 (L.) Osbeck. Rutaceae. Fummelo. 

From China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for 
the Department of Agriculture. Received February 25, 1918. 

"(No. 146b. Hingshanhslen, Hupeh, China. December 27, 1917.) A large 
specimen fruit. Used as perfumers; also to give flavor to alcoholic drinks." 
(Meyer.) 

46122. CuouRBiTA PEPO L. Cucurbitaceae. Squash. 

From Concepcion, Paraguay. Presented by Mr. T. R. Gwynn. Received 
June 15, 1918. 

" Seeds of a squash which the Indians grow in this country. The plant is 
identical with the ' white bush scallop ' squash ; the fruit is somewhat smaller, 
of the same shape, and yellowish when mature." (Chcyrm^) 

46123. Citrus medica L. Rutacese. Citron. 

From China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for 
the Department of Agriculture. Received February 25, 1918. 

"(No. 148b. Ichang, Hupeh, China. December 21, 1917.) Foo-tao or Foo- 
sohtao. Used as perfumers; also to give flavor to alcoholic drinks." (Meyer,) 

46124. AcTiNiDiA CHiNENSis Planch, Dilleniaceae. Yang-tao. 

Grafted plants grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Ohico, Calif. 
Numbered for convenience in recording distribution. 

A perfect-flowered variety which was grown from seed received under S, P. I. 
No. 21781. The original plant of this introduction was sent to Mr. William 
Hertrich, San Gabriel, Calif. Scions from this plant were presented by him 

(luring the summer of 1917. 

For description, see No. 46120. 

46125 to 46130. 

From China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer 
for the Department of Agriculture. Received February 25, 1918. 
Numbered May, 1918. 

46125. Citrus sp. Rutaceae. 

**(155b. Ichang, Hupeh, China. December 21, 1917.) A hybrid of 
punimelo HHang gan tze and sweet orange (?) said to have come from 
Szechwan." 

46126. CrrBTJS AUBANTruM L. Rutace^. 

**(156b. Across the Yangtze near Ichang, Hupeh, China. December 
22, 1917.) A bitterish orange resembling a large lemon called Tsen tze. 
Scions sent under No. 1297 [S. P. I. No. 45941.] " 



28 SEEDS AKD PIANTS IMPORTED. 

46125 to 46130— Continued. 

46127. OiTBus Bp. Rutaceae. 

"(157b. Changyanghslen, Hupeh, China. December 9, 1917.) A? 
orange resembling a lemon. Chinese name Ba ehr ffon, Sdons ae& 
under No. 1291 [S. P. I. No. 45934]." 

46128. Citrus ichanoensis Swingle. Rutaceie. Ichmng lemor. 
" 158b. Various types from divers localities." 

46129. Chaenombles lagenabia cathayenbis (HemsL) Rehder. Malacca. 
(Pyrus cathayenais Hemsl.) 

"(159b. Ichang, Hupeh, China. December 21, 1917.) Mu hua. Used as 

a room perfumer." 

46130. Chaenomeles siztensib (Thouin) Koehne. Malaceie. 

{Pyrua HnenHs Poir.) Chinese qnince. 

"(100b. Ichaiig Hupeh. China. December 31, 1917.) Mu W. It misrLr 
possibly prove a good stock for loquats and pears in the Gulf States. 
Used as a room perfumer." 

For an Illustration of a full-sized tree, see Plate V. 

46131. AcTiNiDTA CHINENSI8 Planch. Dilleniacese. Tang-tao. 

Plants grown from the seed of S. P. I. No. 21781 sent to the Plant In- 
troduction Field Station, Chico, Calif., by Mr. William Hertrich, San 
Gabriel, Calif., in the summer of 1917. Numbered for conveniemv 
in recording distribution. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 46124. 

46132. Citrus sp. Rutacese. 

From Ichang,. Hupeh, China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer. Agricul- 
tural Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received Februarr 
25, 1918. 

"Large fruit, about 4 inches in diameter." (W, T, SvAngle.) 

46133 to 46135. 

From New South Wales, Australia. Presented by Mr. B. Harrison, Bnr- 
ringbar. Received June 15, 1918. 

46133. Chaetociiloa niorirostrts (Nees) Skeels. Poacea>. Grass. 
{Setaria nif/rlrosfris Dur. and Schinz.) 

A liardy tufte<l grass which has made good growth. Although th^ 
leaves are a little hard, there is a very large quantity in proportion to th.^ 
stem; appears to bo a quick succulent grower; carries a good quantity "f 
seed: and grows well in New South Wales. (Adapted from an article by 
FJ. Breakirell, in ApriciiUural Gazette, New Swith Wales, Feb. 2, 191S.^ 

46134. GossYPiuM sp. Malvacejv. Cotton. 
" Harrison's .Hybrid. A most prolific variety hybridized by myself from 

Caravonica and Indian Burhi. The cotton is of splendid quality. Fnmi a 
3-year-old tree." (Harrison.) 

46135. Opuntia sp. Cactaceje. Cactus. 
"A spineless and sctnlless cactus which has been produced by me aft^r 

several year*? of careful cultivation and which should prove of real valuv 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 29 

46133 to 46136— Continued. 

in the semiarid sections of the United States. Stock eat It with great 
avidity even when grass is abundant; and as It is closely related to the 
sweet-leaf cactus (Opuniia cochinelifera) , its feeding value Is much 
greater than the other varieties commonly used for fodder." (Harrison.) 

46 1 S6. PifiTAciA GHINENSI8 Bunge. Anacardiaceae. 

Chinese pistache. 

From Changsha, Hunan, China. Purchased from Mr. J. H. Reisner, Uni- 
versity of Nanking, Nanking, through Mr. Nelson T. Johnson* American 
consul. Received at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Ohico, Calif., 
June 20, 1918. 

**Huang lien s?im. A very promising shade tree for those sections of the 
United States where the summers are warm and the winters but moderately 
cold. The young leaves are carmine red and the faU foliage gorgeously scarlet 
and yellow. The wood, which is very heavy and not often attacked by insects, 
is employed in the manufacture of furniture. From the seeds an oil is ob- 
t€dned which is used for illuminating purposes. The young, partly expanded 
foliage buds are sparingly eaten when boiled, like spinach. The staminate 
trees invariably grow larger and more synmietrical than the ones that bear the 
pistiUate flowers." (F. N. Meyer.) 

For previous Introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45598. 

46137. Deringa canadensis (L.) Kuntze. Apiacese. Mitsuba. 
{Cryptotaenia canadensis DO.) 

Prom Yokohama, Japan. Presented by Mr. Barbour Lathrop. Received 
June 20, 1018. 

This plant, which is allied to celery, parsnips, and carrots, has been culti- 
vated by the Japanese for many generations. Mr. Lathrop, in sending in seed 
purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Co., says: " Mitsuba, they say, costs less 
than ndo, and far more of it is consumed by the poor. Every part of the plant 
is eaten, and its leaves, stems, and roots are cooked as desirable edibles. They 
say also that the stems, besides being cooked, are eaten as celery is with us. 
Like udo, It grows in light, rather poor soil; is planted from seed, but requires 
less care in growing, and reaches the market at far less expense. To use their 
own expression, 'Mitsuba is popular with everybody from the highest rank 
to the lowest.* *' Mr. lathrop also procured the following statement from the 
Yokohama Nursery Go. on its culture and uses : 

" Sow the seed any time from September to about the middle of April in rows 
about 11 to 2 feet apart, somewhat thickly in bands 5 to 6 inches wide, and 
cover lightly with soil. After the seedlings are an inch or so tall, thin out to 2 
to 3 inches apart; they grow best in partially sheltered moist places. In cen- 
tral Japan, where the climate is mild, the seed is usually sown in spring, from 
about March until May, between the furrows of wheat, barley, or beans, which 
give enough shade to the young seedlings; if the seed be sown in full exposure 
after May it will not germinate, so it is essential to sow the seed before the 
weather gets too warm. After wheat, barley, or beans are harvested the ground 
should be hoed and manured with liquid oil cake or bone meal, to invigorate 
the roots. After the leaves and stalks die, from about December, the roots 
can be dug and brought into the forcing frame or malt bed; or they can be 
left alone in the field, and just before the new growth begins to show early 
In spring, heap up 5 to 6 inches of soil, in the same manner as asparagus is cul- 



30 SEEDS AND PLAKTS IMPORTED. 

tivated. They are fit for market when the young sprouts begin to break 
through the surface of the soil. The roots, being perennial, can be used over 
and over again for two to three years after the stalks are cut off, but, a« 
the roots are also edible, it is usual to dig up the whole plant; moreover, the 
young stalks keep better with the roots on. 

" In cold regions, like Hokkaido or northern Hondo, the roots must be well 
covered with earth In winter. The seeds collected from 1-year-old plants are 
considered to ^ worthless, as they give rise to plants which run to flowering 
shoots the first year. Properly, the seed should be collected from 2-year-oM 
plants. The seed keeps its vitality for three years. Twenty pounds are re- 
quired per acre. The average crop of last two seasons realized about $200 per 
acre in Japan. 

"As to soil, loam with plenty of moisture is preferable, but light black soil 
or any other light soil, provided the ground is not too dry, serves very well. 

"Cooking methods: (1) The green leaves and stalks are eaten raw, with 
vinegar and sauce as a salad ; also they are used as an Ingredient in soui^ 
imparting a good flavor. (2> The young blanched stalk is eaten raw like 
celery; or, after boiling, is eaten like asparagus, with sauce. Either way it 
is edible, skin and all. (3) The roots, after the young blanched stalks are cm 
off, are chopped into pieces about 1^ Inches long and parched in a pan with 
lard or butter until they get quite tender; then sugar and soy is added ac- 
cording to taste. There are several other methods of cooking, but the above 
will be found the most suitable for the foreign palate." 

Received as Cryptotaema japonica. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45247. 

46 188. Hibiscus macrofhyllus Roxb. Malvaceae. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by the director, Horticultural Section, 
Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received June 22, 1018. 

A tree or shrub of eastern Bengal and the Eastern Peninsula, the bark of 
which yields a strong cordage fiber valued by the Burmans. (Adapted from 
Wait, Dictionary of the Economic Products of India, vol. 4, p. 242.) 

46139. Citrus sp. Rutaceae. 

From Ichang, Hupeh, China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricul- 
tural Explorer for the Department of Agriculture. Received February 
25, 1918. 
The fruit was decomposed and the label accompanying it illegible. 

46140. Cassia grandis L. f. CaBsalpiniaceee. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by the director, Horticultural Section, 
Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received June 25, 1918. 

"A small wing-leaved tree of the legume family, producing an abundance of 
yellow flowers native to the East Indies and now common in most tropicsl 
countries. It produces a smooth cylindrical pod twice the thickness of the 
flnper and sometimes 2 feet in length. The interior is divided into numerous 
transverse portions, each containing a seed embedded in pulp of a sweet taste, 
which forms an important laxative medicine. The leaves, as also those of 
C. alata, are used as a cure for ringworm." (Smith, Bictionary of Popular 
Names of Economic Plants,) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. S3781. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 31 

46141 to 46145.^ Piiaseolus coccineus L. Fabacese. 

Scarlet Bunner bean. 

46141. No. 1. Dark brown, mottled with white and light brown. 

46142. No. 2. Deep livid" or vinaccous brown, mottled with black. 

46143. No. 8. Livid brown, not mottled. 

46144. No. 4. Cinnamon or avellaneons, not mottled. 

46145. No. 5. Cinnamon or avellaneous, mottled. 

46146. Salvia iiispakica L. MenthacesB. 

From Coyoacan, Mexico. Presented by Mrs. Zelia Nuttall. lieceived May 

14, 1918. 

An herbaceous perennial with ovate, serrate leaves and quadrangular spikes 
of blue flowers. The muc^ilaginous seed,s are used in making the Mexican 
drink called " chia." 

46147. AsTiMK'ARYUM i-oLYSTACHYi'M Wcndl. Phopnicacese. Palm. 

P^roni San Jose, Costa Kica. Presented by Mr. Ad. Tonduz, Adniinistracion 
General de la Tributacion Directa. Rerelved May 16, 1918. 

Coyolillo. '^Palm fruits collected in the Barra del Colorado, Atlantic coast 
of Costa Ricu." {Tonduz,) 

"A palm, 6 to 10 feet in height, with irregularly divided leaves. The round 
fruits, covered with bristles, are clustered in peduncled cones. From the hot 
<listricts of both coasts. * Coyolillo ' is perhaps applied to other species." 
(Pittier, Plantas Vsuales dc Costa Rica, p. 85.) 

46148 to 46150. 

From the city of Panama, Panama. Presented by Sr. Ramon Arias- 
Feraud. Received May 17, 1018. Quoted notes by Sr. Arias-Feraud. 

46148. AcHBAS ZAPOTA L. Sapotacese. Sapodilla. 
(.1. sapota L.) 

" Nisberry seeds. This tree grows al>out 20 feet high and produces one 
of the best tropical fruits." 

For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 44890. 

46149. Annona squamosa L. Annonacese. Suerar-apple. 
" Yellow anona seeds. Nice fruits." 

46150. Chrysophyllum cainito Ia Sjipotaceir. Caimito. 

** Purple star-apple seeds." 

A handsome tropical American fruit and ornamental tree, evergreen, 
up to 50 feet high, with beautiful broad leaves, smooth and green above 
and silky and golden yellow on the under surface. Fruit the size of an 
apple with star-shaped core and purple flesh and skin. The pulp is 
said to be delicious if the fruit is left on the tree until ripe. Will not 
stand frost. 



See footnote on page 19. 

The names of colors accord with Ridgway's Color Standards and Nomcnclatnrc. 



32 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46161 to 46160.' 

From Pern. Presented by Luis Roos & Go., of Callao, Peru, through Mr. 
W. W. Handley, American consul. Received May 17, 1018. Quoted notes 
by Mr. Roos. 

46151. CiCEB ABiETiNUM L. Fabaceffi. Chick-pea. 
** No. 1. Garbanzos, These are grown at Pacasmayo and Chincha.*' 

46152. Lentilla leitb (L.) W. F. Wight. Fabaceee. LentiL 
(Lens esculent a Moench.) 

" Nt). 3. Lentejas. These are grown at Trujlllo." 
46158. Phabbolus lunatub L. B^bacefle. Lima bean. 

" No. 7. Pallares. These are from Chincha." 

46154 to 46157. Phaseolus vufxiaris L. Fabaceffi. Common bean. 

46164. " No. 2. Panamitos. These are from Pacasmayo, the same 
kind of bean as grown at Chlncha, but of a much better quality.'' 

46155. " No. 5. Negros. These are from Chincha.** 

46156. "No. 6. Bay OS. These are grown In the northern part of 
Peru, the principal market being San Pedro and Guadalupe 
(Pacasmiiyo)." 

46157. " No. 9. Cocachos, These are from Chlncha." 

46158 and 46159. Pisum batiyum L. Fabacee. Oarden pea. 

46158. " No. 10. Alverja verde. These are grown at Trujlllo.** 

46159. "No. 4. Alverja amarilla. These are grown all over the 
northern part of Peru. Principal market, Pacasmayo." 

46160. ViGNA SINENSIS (Torner) Savl. Fabacese. Cowpea. 
** No. 8. Costilla. These are grown at Casma." 

46161 to 46163.' 

From Buenos Aires, Argentina. Procured by Mr. W. Henry UolH*rts<ui. 
American consul general. Received May 18, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. 
Robertson. 

46161. Phaseolus lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 
** Parotos manteca.^ 

46162. Phaseolus vulgaris Ia Fabacese. Common bean. 
'* Porotos saltenos." 

46163. VioNA sinensis (Torner) Savi. Fabacese. Cowi>ea. 
"Porotos tapes,* 



If 



46164 to 46166.' 

From Montevideo, Uruguay. Presented by Mr. Domingo Basso, thr<>u$:h 
Mr. William Dawson, American consul. Received May 18, 1918. Quottil 
notCK by Mr. Basso. 



* See footnote on page 19. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 3S 

46 1 64 to 46 1 66— Continued. 

46164 and 46165. Phaseolus vulgaris L. F^alxaceae. Common bean. 

46164. '* Reyna. This seed is said to have been grown locally from 
imported Italian seed, and the variety is known locally as ' Poroto 
(bean) de la Reyna.' " 

46165. "AguUa. This seed is said to have been grown locally from 
imported Italian seed, and the variety is known locally as ' Porotjo 
(bean) AguiW 

46166. ViciA FABA L. Fabaceie. Broad bean. 

" Sevilla, This seed is said to have been grown locally from imported 
Italian seed, and the variety is known locally as ' Haba (bean) SevUlaJ *' 

46167 to 46177.^ 

From Puerto Cabello, Venesnela. Procured by Mr. Frank A. Henry, Ameri- 
can consul. Received May 21, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Henry. 

46167 and 46168. Gajan hvdtcttk Spreng. Fabaceffi. Pigeon-pea. 

46167. *• Quinchonchos,** 46168. ** Quinchonchos mulatos,"* 

46169 to 46171. Phaseoltjs lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 

46169. ''Tafdramos blanquineta,'* 46171. " Tapiramo$ hia$ioo9r 

46170. " Tapiramoa cocineras.'' 

46172 and 46178. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Fabacese. Common bean. 

46172. " Caraotas negras."^ 46173. " CarikoUM rosodaa,*' 

46174. PisuM SATIVUM L. Fabaceie. Garden pea. 
" Chicharosr 

46175. ViGNA CYUNUBJCA (Stlckm) Skeels. Fabaceie. Catjang. 
" Frijoles blancos.'* 

46176 and 46177. Viona sinensis (Tomer) Savi. Fabacee. Cowpea. 
46176. *'Fnfoles bayos," 46177. *' Frijolea moradosr 

46178 to 46183.' 

From Maracaibo, Venezuela. Purchased by Mr. Emil Sauer, American 
consul. Received May 21, 1918. Quoted notes by ^Ir. Sauer. 

46178. Phaseolus lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 

" Caraaidi coloradas." 

46179 to 46181. Phaseolus vuloabis L. Fabaceffi. Common bean. 

46179. " Caraotaa negras:* 46181. '* Caraotas pintadtts:* 

46180. "Caraotas bayasj' 

46182 and 46183. Vigna sinensis (Torner) Savi. Fabaceie. Cowpea. 

46184 to 46191.' 

From Georgetown, British Ouiaua. Purchasod by Mr. (J. E. Chamberlin, 
American consul. Received May 21, 1918. 

46184. Gajan indicum Spreng. Fabaceie. Pigeon-pea. 

46185. DoLicHos lablab L. Fabacefe. Purple bonaylst bean. 

^ See footnote on page 10. 



84 SEBD8 AND PLANTS IMPOBTED. 

46184 to 46191— Continued. 

46186. DoLicHOB LABLAB L. Fabaceic. Bonavist beaL. 
Variety unknown. 

46187. Phasbolus lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima beas. 

46188. PHASE0LT7B LUNATUS L. FabacecB. lima besiL 

46189. PHABB0LU8 TUL6ABIS L. Fabaoese. Common bean. 

46190. Phasbolus TULaABis L. Fabacese. Common bets. 

46191. VioNA SINENSIS (Torner) Savi. Fabacese. Cowpea. 
Also known as " Black-eyed bean." 

46192. Hibiscus macrophyllus Roxb. Malvaceae. 

From Cairo, Epypt. Presented by the director, Horticultural Sectinr.. 
Gizeh Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received May 22, 1918. 

A shrub or small tree, native to India, sparsely covered with brown, villou?. 
tufted hairs. The orbicular-cordate leaves, about 6 inches across, with petioles S 
inches long, are usually entire and are covered underneath with dense hains. 
The many-flowered terminal cymes are made up of purple flowers 4 inches ir. 
diameter. (Adapted from Hooker, Flora of British India, vol. i, p. SS7,) 

46193 to 46203.' 

From Antofagasta, Chile. Procured by Mr. Thomas W. Voetter, American 
consul. Received May 22, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Voetter. 

46198^ Phaseolits coccinitus L. Fabacese. Scarlet Bunner bean. 

" No. 8. Panares," 
46194. Phabeolus lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 

•* No. 9. Panares achatados. Probably from Peru." 
46195 to 46202. Phaseolus vtjlqabis L. Fabacese. Common bean. 

46195. " No. 1. Bayosr 46200. " No. 6. Frutaias (straw- 

46196. "No. 2. Burritosr berry).'' 

46197. "No. 3. Cahallerosr 46201. "No. 7. OvalUot:' 

46198. "No. 4. Cananosr 46202. "No. 10. Triguitosr 

46199. "No. 5. Coscorroncsr 

46203. Zea mays L. Poacese. Com. 

" Province of Tacna, Chile. Used for toasting and for making ' chicba.* 
a fermented beverage." 

46204. Garcinia mangostana L. Clusiaceee. Mangosteen. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by the director. Botanic GardeiL 
Received May 25, 1918. 

"This delicious fruit is about the size of a madarin orange, round and 
slightly flattened at each end, with a smooth, thick rind, rich red-purple in 
color with here and there a bright, hardened drop of the yellow juice, which 
marks some injury to the rind when it was young. As these mangosteens aiv 
sold in the Dutch East Indies, heaped up on fruit baskets, or are made into 
long, regular bunches with thin strips of braided bamboo, they are as strik- 
ingly handsome as anything of the kind can well be; but it is only when the 
fruit is opened that Its real beauty is seen. The rind is thick and tough and 



^ See footnote on page 10. 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 85 

in order to get at the pu]p ioBlde it requires a circular cut with a sharp knife 
to lift the top half off like a cup, exposing the white segments, five, f:ix, or 
seven in number, lying loose in the cup. The cut sur^ce of the rind is of 
fi most delicate pink color and Is studded with small yellow points formed by 
the drops of exuding juice. As you lift out of this cup, one by one, the delicate 
segments, which are the size and shape of those of a mandarin orange, the light 
pink sides of the ci)p and the veins of white and yellow embedded in it are 
visible. The separate segments are between snow white and ivory in color 
and are covered with a delicate network of fibers, and the side of each segment 
where it presses against Its neighbor is translucent and slightly tinged with 
pale green. As one poises the dainty bit of snowy fruit on his fork and looks 
at the empty pink cup from which it has been taken, he hardly knows whether 
the delicate flavor or the beautiful coloring of the fruit pleases hlra the more, 
and he invariably stops to admire the rapidly deepening color of the cut rind 
as it changes on exposure to the air from light pink to deep brown. The texture 
of the raangosteen pulp much resembles that of a well-ripened plum, only it is 
so delicate that it melts in your mouth like a bit of ice cream. The flavor is 
quite indescribably delicious and resembles nothing you know of; and yet it 
reminds you, with a long aftertaste, of all sorts of creams and ices. There 
in nothing to mar the perfection of this fruit, unless it be that the juice from 
the rind forms an indelible stain on a white napkin. Even the seeds are partly 
or wholly lacking, and when present they are so thin and small that they are 
roally no trouble to get rid of. Where cheap and abundant, as In Java, one 
eats these fruits by the half peck and is never tired of them ; they produce no 
feeling of satiety, such as the banana and the mango do, for there is little sub- 
'stance to the delicate pulp." (David Fairchild.) 

46206. PhyIaLOStachts sp. Poaceae. Bamboo. 

From Indio, Calif. Plants presented by Mr. Bruce Drummond, Govern- 
ment Date Garden. Received May 3, 1918. 

"A package of the rhizomes from the giant bamboo that we have here at the 
garden. This is the bamboo growing on Mr. W. S. Tevis's place at Bakersfield, 
Calif. Plants were obtained by Mr. Rixford and sent to us in 1913. It is doing 
fine, and is the only bamboo we have here that is making a rapid spread. 

" I have great hopes of the future use for this bamboo, even though it does 
not get higher than 20 or 25 feet. I think that we can utilize the canes in 
holding up the clusters of dates, which will be very necessary as our palms 
get older. It makes its growth in the early part of April." (Dnimmond.) 

46206. Ctmbopetalitm PENorLiFLORUM (Diinal.) Baill. Annona- 
0688. Sacred earflower. 

From Coban, Guatemala. Purchased from Mr. R. S. Anderson. Received 
May 3, 1918. 

"A shrub or small tree with distichous, subsessile, oblanceolate leaves, soU- 
tar>' flowers borne on long slender peduncles issuing from the intemodes of 
the smaller branches; sepals broadly ovate or suborbicular, cuspidate, reflexed 
at length; outer petals similar to the sepals but much larger; inner petals 
thick and fleshy, their margin involute, causing them to resemble a human ear. 
The pungently aromatic flowers when fresh are greenish yellow, with the Inner 
surface of the inner petals inclining to orange color, at length turning brownish 
purple or maroon, breaking with a bright orange-colored fracture. The tree 
IS planted for the sake of Its fragrant flowers, the petals of which are dried 
aud are used medicinally as well as for imparting a spicy flavor to food. They 



36 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPOBTED. 

were used by the ancient Mexicans, before the introduction of cinnamoD uti 
other spices from the Blast Indies, for flavoring their chocolate. This ^)ecMs 
is native to the moyntains of southern Mexico and Quatemala." (W. £ 
Safford.) 

46207 to 46217.' 

From Sao Paulo, Brazil. Procured by Mr. R. L. I\eiser, American cons-iL 
from the Industrlas Reunidas F. Matarazzo. Received May 25, 1918. 

46207 to 46216. Phaseolus vulgabis L. Fabaces. Common bean. 

46907. Branoo€. 46212. Mantdga. 

46006. CanaHo. 46213. MuIatiHrho. 

46200. Cavallo brancos. 46214. Pretos, 

46210. CavaUo marrdo. 46215. Riscados. 

46211. Cavallo mulatinho. 46216. Roxo. 

46217. ViQNA sinensis (Torner) Savl. Fabaoee. Cowpea. 

Frade. 

" The seed transmitted Is that known as feijao secca, or dry beans. Th? 
State of Sao Paulo produces two crops of beans annually, these heinz 
distinjETulshed as wet and dry according to the season of growth. Tlv 
feijdo fnutaiinho produces three crops annually, maturing rapidly. Tbf 
transportation for any considerable distance or the storage of the wet 
crop is difficult, owing to its tendency to damage by worms. The dry iT«>f' 
is practically free from this defect." {Keiaer,) 

46218. DioscoREA bulbifera L. Dioscoreacew. Yam. 

From Honolulu. Hawaii. Tubers presented by Mr. J. E. Higgins, HawtiU 
Agricultural Station. Received May 27, 1918. 

Obtained for testing at various points In the South. Mr. Higgins states that 
it is not generally grown in Hawaii. 

46218. Ifomoea batatas (L.) Poir. Convolvulacese. 

S^^eet potata 

From Mayaguez, Porto Rico. Cuttings pi-esented by Mr. T. B. McClellanil 
Agricultural Experiment Station. Received May 27, 1918. 

" I am sending you cuttings of the sweet potato known locally as *Mameya/" 

{McClelland.) 

46220. Lansium domesticum Jack. Meliacea?. I«angsat 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by the Botanic Garden. Received Ma} 
27, 1918. 
A moderate-sized ornamental tree, native to the Malay Peninsula. It be^rs 
long pendent clusters of closely imcked berries which have a thin tough skia 
Inclosing opaque aromatic Juicy pulp. The berries are pale yellow when rip 
and are said to be much relished in their native country, being "eaten fresh 
or variously prepared." It has been described as one of the finest fruits of i\-^ 
Malay Peninsula. (Adapted from Maanillatu Handbook of Tropical Gardvmng 
and Planting, 2d ed,, p. 168.) 



* See footnote on page 10. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1^18. S7 

46221. Annona squamosa L. Annonacese. Sugar-apple. 

From Lawang, Java. Presented by Mr. M. Buysman* Eh:periment Station. 
Received May 27, 1918. 

*' I have Just sent you some seeds of a very good variety of Annona squamosa. 
Whether this will prove to come true from seed I do not know, but I think it 
Diight be tried." (Buysman,) 

46222. Cassia hirsuta L. Csesalpiniacefie. 

From Cairo, Egj^pt. Presented by the director, Hortlailtural Section, Glzeh 
Branch, Ministry of Agriculture. Received May 28, 1918. 

An ornamental shrubby or subshrubby plant. The finely cut pinnate leaves 
and short racemes of yellow flowers are quite attractive. 

46223. Oryzopsis miliacea (L.) Benth. Poaceae. Orass. 

From Adelaide, South Australia. Purchased from E. & W. Hackett, Ltd. 
Received May 29, 1918. 

**A tufted perennial with loose, open panicles with spreading branches. A 
form witli numerous sterile lower branches of the panicle Is sometimes culti- 
vated for ornament.** (-4. ►S'. Hiichooek,) 

46224. CoRiARiA THTMiFOLiA Humb. and Bonpl. Coriariaceae. 

From Auckland, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. G. J. Olapbam, Kc^n 
Kohu. Received May 29, 1918. 

A South American plant, the bark and roots of which are rich in tannin ; the 
fruit is said to be rather poisonous. 

For previous Introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 42817. 

46226. Papaver somniferum L. Papaveracece. ^oppy* 

From Yokohama, Japan. Presented by Mr. Barbour Lathrop. Received 
June 3, 1918. 

Introduced for the experiments of the Office of Drug-Plant and Poisonous* 
Plant Investigations and not for general dlstribation. 

46226 to 46234.' 

From Valparaiso, Chile. Presented by Mr. L. J. Kenna, American consul 
general. Received June 5, 1918. 

46226. CicER ABisTiNUH L. Fabaceie. Chick-pea. 
Garhanzo. (1917 crop,) 

46227. Lbnthxa lests (L.) W. F. Wight. Fabaceai. Lentil. 
(Lens etculenia Moench.) 

Lentejas de Chilian. (Crop of 1917.) 

46228. Phaseoltts coccineus L. Fabaceae. Scarlet Runner bean. 
Pallares. (Crop of 1917.) 

46229 to 46232. Phaseolus tuloabzs L. Fabaceie. Gonunon bean. 

46229. Baya9. (Crop of 1917.) 
46280. Cahalleros, (Crop of 1917.) 

46231. Coscorones. (Crop of 1917.) 

46232. Zurritos. (Crop of 1917.) 

* See footnote on page 19. 



38 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46226 to 46234— Continued. 

46238 and 46284. Pistrii batituic L. Fabacen. Oarden p«s. 

46233. Arvejas hlancas, (Crop of 1917.) 

46234. Petit pois, (1917 crop,) 

46235. Cacara erosa (L.) Kuntze. Fabacese. Tain beaiL 
(Pachyrhizus angulatu8 Rich.) 

From Kingston, Jamaica. Presented by Mr. William Harris, GoveruDteL*. 
botanist and superintendent of Public Gardens, Hope Gardens. Reoeive>! 
June 6, 1918. 

A twining tuberous-rooted vine cultivated throughout the Tropics for i'> 
edible roots, which are very palatable and are prepared for use in a nuro^*' 
of different ways. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44916. 

■ 

46236. AcHRADELPHA MAMMOSA (L.) O. F. Cook. Sapotace®. 

(Lucuma mammosa Gaertn. f.) Sapote. 

From the city of Panama, Panama. Presented by Sr. Ramon Arias- 
Feraud. Received June 8, 1918. 

" The most important member of the genus is without doubt the sapote, or 
mamey sapote, a common fruit in Cuba, and not infrequently seen on the Oer. 
tral American mainland. It is said to prefer a deep, rich soil and a rainfall of 
about 70 inches per annum. The fruit is commonly elliptical and is about *> 
inches in length. Within the thick woody skin, somewhat rough and rusty 
brown on the surface, is the soft melting flesh, of a beautiful reddish salmoo 
color and of about the same consistency as a ripe cantaloupe. The large ellip- 
tical seed can be lifted out of the fruit as easily as that of an avocado: it is 
hard, brown, and shiny, except on the ventral surface, which is whitish aii«i 
somewhat rough. To one unaccustomed to tropical fruits the flavor of the 
mamey sapote is at first somewhat cloying, because of its utter lack of acidity : 
when made into a sherbet, however, as is done in Havana, it is delicious and 
sure to be relished at first trial. Although natives of tropical countries ci>Qi- 
monly eat the fruit while fresh, it is also made into marmalade or used as a 
• filler ' in making guava cheese. The Cubans prepare from it a thick jam 
known as crema de mamey Colorado, which is delicious. The fruits are picked 
when mature and laid away in a cool place to ripen, which takes about a week 
If shipped as soon as picked from the tree they can be sent to northern markef< 
without dlfliculty and are occasionally exported from Cuba and Mexico to tli^ 
United States. The season of ripening is during the summer; in Costa Rica 
the tree is said to lose its foliage in the dry season, flowering at the same tiice. 
The seed contains a large oily kernel which has a strong smell and a bitter 
taste. According to Pittier, it is used in Costa Rica, after being Unely ground, 
to prepare an exquisite confection ; the same authority states that it is s^^me* 
times used by the Indians, after being boiled, roasted, and ground, to mis \«'ith 
cacao, imparting a bitter taste to the beverage. The foliage of the mamey sap<.»te 
resembles that of the loquat (Eriobotrya japonica), except in its lighter color 
and entire margins. Propagation is by seed, young trees coming into l^ear- 
ing at the age of 5 to 7 years. Before planting it is well to remove the hard 
outer husk from the seed; it is then easily germinateii by planting In llgb? 
sandy loam, barely covering it with s<nl.*' {WiUton Popenoe,) 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 39 

46237. AcHRAS zapota L. Sapotacese. Sapodilla. 

{A, iapota L.) 

From the city of Panama, Panama. Presented by Sr. Ramon Arias- 
Feraud. Received Jnne 8, 1918. 

46238. Mangifera indica L. Anacardiaceee. Mango. 
From the city of Panama, Panama. Presented by Sr. Ramon Arias- 

Feraud. Received June 8, 1918. 

" Seeds of the best kind of mangos which we have here, called ' Calidad * 
(quality) mangos." (Ariaa-Feraud.) 

46239. Amygdalus persica L. Amygdalacese. Peach. 
(Prunus peraica Stokes.) 

From Pretoria, Union of South Africa. Presented by Mr. I. B. Pole Evans, 
chief. Division of Botany, Department of Agriculture. Received June 8, 
1918. 

'*Tran8va<U yellow. This variety is one of the hardiest we have in this 
country and the most immune to the more common fungous pests of the peach.'* 
(Evans,) 

46240. LiTCHi cHiNExsis Sonner. Sapindaceae. Lychee. 
(Nephelium litcki Camhess.) 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Procured from Mr. Chang Chong, through Mr. 
J. E. Higgins, horticulturist, Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Received June 17, 1918. 

The lychee is a small tree, native to China, with dense foliage of rich green 
shiny leaves, racemes of greenish flowers, and clusters of spherical fruit about 
1 inch in diameter. Each fruit contains one seed in a firm jellylike whitish 
pulp or aril of delicious flavor. In China the production of dried lychee fruit 
Is a large industry. (Adapted from Wilcox^ Tropical Agriculture, p. 125,) 

Excellent results are now being obtained in rooting the cuttings In a moist 
chamber. 

For previous introductions, see S. P. I. Nos. 40916 and 40973. 

46241. La WS019IA INER3IIS L. Lythraceee. Henna* 
(L. alba Lam.) 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Received 
March 21, 1918. Numbered June, 1918. 

An interesting shrub commonly known as henna, camphire, cypress shrub, 
or Egyptian privet, grown throughout India, Persia, Syria, and northern 
Africa, where its powdered leaves are used as a hair dye and as a cosmetic. 
It imparts a reddish orange color. Plants attain a height of 8 or 10 feet and 
bear smooth oval or lance-shaped entire leaves and panicles of small white 
sweetly scented flowers, which are used in perfumery. This spedes is reported 
as being a very useful and ornamental hedge plant (Adapted from Watt^ 
Dictionary of the Economic Products of India, vol. 4, p, 597.) 

46242. Chayota edulis Jacq. CucurbitacecB. Chayote. 
(fifeoMtfffi edule Swartz.) 

Fruits received in the autumn of 1916 from Mr. H. S. ZoUer, Brooksville, 
Fla. Numbered, for convenience in distribution, June, 1918. 



40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

Zotter. A medium-sized, dark-green chayote; flat and broad pear shaped, 
noncorrugated, and almost free from spines. 

46243 to 46248. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. P. J. S. Cramer, chief, Plani 
Breeding Station. Received May 21, 1918. 

Legumes grown for green manure. Introduced for experimentation by the 
Office of Forage-Crop investigations. 

46243. Cassia patellabia DC. Ciesalpiniacese. 

A low, herbaceous i>erennial with somewhat the appearance of our 
common sensitive plant, Casaia tUctitana, 

46844. Cassia puhila Lam. Csesalplnlacefle. 

A spreading, subshrubby forage plant with numerous spreading stems 
about 1 foot long, distributed throughout tropical Asia and Australia. 

46845. Cbotalaeia alata Buch.-Ham. Fabaceie. 

A suberect undershrub, 1 to 2 feet high, with the stem and undersice 
of the leaves covered with a short, silky pubescence. (Adapted fi^ic 
Hooker, Flora of British India, vol 2j p. 69,) 

46846. Cbotalabia usabamoknsis Baker f. Fabacese. 

A spreading, hert)aceous forage plant from Usaramo, Qerman Tay 
Africa, closely allied to C. lanceolata, (Adapted from Journal of tht 
Linnean Society, vol. Jf2, p. SJ^6,) 

46847. INDIGOFXBA 8UMATBANA Oacrtn. Fabaceffi. Indiga 

This is the form of Indigofera tinctorUi that was introduced fh)m tlK 
East into the West Indies, and is the /. tinctoria of Lunan. If, therefor?, 
it be deemed necessary to give this plant a separate name and to remoTe 
it from being one of the cultivated states of /. tinetoria L., then it ^ 
have to be called /. 9umatr(ma Qaertn. In addition to India (where it is 
largely in use in the north from Bihar and Tirhut westward by north tt> 
the Punjab) it also occurs in tropical Africa and Formosa. It may be ^ 
tlnguished from the southern form of /. tinctoria by its leaflets, wbicfc 
are larger and ovate-oblong or oblong, instead of obovate or BUborbieolai 
The pods in /. sumatra/na are also shorter, thicker, and bluiter at tk 
ai>ex, and are usually more numerous and stralghter than in the Madn^ 
form. (Adapted from Watt, Commercial Products of India^ p. 6$Z.) 

46248. Indigofeba suffbuticosa Mill. Fabace«e. 
(/. anil L.) 

A copiously branched shrub, 3 to 5 feet high, with yellow pealiit 
flowers, commonly cultivated as a dye plant throughout the Tropica Salu 
to be a native of tropical America. (Adapted from OUver, Flora of Tro^^- 
cat Africa^ vol, 2^ p. 98.) 

46249 to 46269.' 

From Sao Paulo, Brazil. Presented by Mr. Robert L. Keiser, Americas 
consul. Received May 23,' 1918. 

* See footnote on iMige Id. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 



41 



46248 to 46269— Continued. 

46M9 to 46258. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Faboccie. 



Common bean. 



46864. Manteiffa. 

46255. Mulatinho. 

46256. Preto. 

46257. Riscado, 



465348. Branco. 
46250. Canario. 

46251. CavaUo branco. 

46252. CavaUo marrdo. 

46253. CavaUo mulatinho. 46258. Roxo. 

46259. VioNA SINENSIS (Torner) Savi. Fabace.'e. Cowpea. 
Frade, 

46260 to 46281.' 

From Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Presented by Mr. R. l\ Moinsen, American 
vice consul, who obtained them from the Pan-America Hide Co. Received 
June 13, 1918. 

46260. DoLicHos lablab L. Fabacese. Bonavist bean. 
Mangalo, 

46261. Phaseolus caloabatus Roxb. Fabaces. . Bioe bean. 
Anao de China. 

46262. Prasbolus coocireus L. Fabaceie. Scarlet Bunner bean. 
De trepar da Hespanha, 

46263 to 46280. Phabeolus vulgaris L. Fabacese. Common bean. 



46263. AndoamareUo. 

46264. De scgar preto, 

46265. Ando flageolet (green). 

46266. Ando flageolet. 

46267. De trepar manteiga preto, 

46268. De trepar anao grande. 

46269. Manteiga atnarello. 

46270. Andocavallo», 

46271. De trepar D.Carlos, 



46273. De trepar branro sem flla- 

mento. 

46274. De trepar mont 'odor, 

46275. Mulatinho. 

46276. Manteiga, 

46277. liranoo. 

46278. Preto, 

46279. De trepar mangestan t. 

46280. Ando flageolet (marron). 



Gowpea. 



46272. De treparmarmoreado, 

46281. yiGNA«6iNENSi6 (Tomer) Savl. Fabacese. 
Chioote nojens grandes, 

46282 to 46298. Zea mays L. Poacese. Corn. 

From Panama. Presented by Mr. A. H. Verrill. Received Jane 18, 1918. 

" While In the unexplored portion of the Darien district in Panama, I 
found the 'wild* Indiatis of the 'forbidden' country raising a number of 
interesting yarleties of corn. These are all 'fixed' among the Indians and 
come true to seed, and several are used as sweet com. These Indians consider 
com as sacred and use great care in keeping the various kinds separate." 

46282. Brown. 46288. Round, light orange. 

46283. White, purple spotted. 46289. Pure white. 



46284. YeUow. 

46285. Deep orange. 

46286. Deep red. 

46287. Black. 



46290. White, red striped. 

46291. Pink. 

46292. Yellow and red barred. 
46298. Freckled, brown. 



"f^ 



^ 8e« footnote on page 19. 



42 SEEDS AND PIAKTS IMPORTED. 

46294. Merrillia caloxylon (Ridley) Swingle. Butaceae. 

(Murray a cahoscylon Ridley.) Katlnga. 

From Manila, Philippine Islanda Presented by Mr. E. D. MerrilL P^ 
celved June 25, 1918. 

" A short time ago I received two fruits of this species from Mr. Burkill ii 
Singapore. I am sending you seeds from one of these fruits and I trust tbs: 
they may reach you in a viable condition." {MerriU,) 

A nieiliuni-sized tree with pale flaky bark, native to Siani. The couiiHiUD'! 
leaves are made up of IS oblanceolate leaflets on a winged rachis^. The rai^ 
yellowish green flowers are followed by yellow citronlike fruits, 4 inches b 
diameter, with a thick skin and green, tasteless flesh. The tree is known as tlie 
katinga and is famous in the Malay region for its beautiful wood, which i^ of 
a light-yellow color with dark-brown streaks. It is fairly hard and takes a 
good polish. (Adapted from the Journal of the States Branch, Royal Amt^ 
Society, vol 50, p. IIS.) 

46296. Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn. Poacese. Sagl millet 

From Beira, Mozambique. Presented by Mr. William Humphreys, acTb; 
director of agriculture. Received June 25, 1918. 

**Ragl millet is the only variety grown in this territory. It is grown onl^ 
by natives for food purposes and, with the exception of pearl millet (Pennisetu^ 
gl^ucum), is practically the only millet grown here." (Humphreys.) 

46296. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Chenopodiacese. 

From Rio Grande, Brazil. Purchased from Mr. Samuel T. Lee, Amerir.tr. 
consul. Received June 28, 1918. 

Known in Brazil as " herva de Santa Maria " or " Mastruz." A viscid 
glandular, rank-smelling, perennial herb, native to tropical America, but widely 
naturalized and growing abundantly in North America, especially In Uk 
eastern United States, as a coarse weed of the roadside and waste places- 
Its medicinal Importance Is due to the volatile oil which it contains. A very 
active anthelmintic is obtained when the bruised fruit or the expressed Ju^* 
of the plant is used. It is frequently employed for the expulsion of lumbricoM 
worms, especially In children. (Adapted from The National Dispensatory, f. 
402.) 

See S. P. I. No. 45610 for previous introduction. * 

46297. Elaeis ouineensis Jacq. Phoenicacese. Oil palm- 

From Buitenzorg, Java, Presented by Dr. P. J. S. Cramer, chief, Divisi^ 
of Plant Breeding, Department of Agriculture. Received June 28, 191S. 

" We received this variety from the Belgian Kongo in 1914 under the name f' 
Ksombo B. The imported seeds were taken from one seed bearer. The plane? 
grown from these seeds were planted in May, 1915, on a rubber estate, wheiv 
no other oil palms were near, so that they could only fertilize each other. Tbej 
are now commencing to bear fruit. We can not yet determine the value of tif 
new variety from a commercial point of view." (Cramer.) 

46298. Carex pendula Huds. Cyperaceie. Sedge^ 
(C. maxima Scop.) 

Grown at the Plant Introduction Field Station, Chlco, Calif., from see^ 
received from Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky, Nice, France. Nambewc 
for convenience in recording distribution. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 43 

" This is an everpreen plant and an interesting one. It has very attractive 
<ieep-green leaves 1 to 2 feet long and li to 2 Inches wide." (Proschowsky.) 

46299. Alectryon subcinereum (A. Gray) Radlk. Sapindaceae. 

(Nephelium leiocaa'pum F. Muell.) 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Received 
June 28, 1918. 

*' Seeds from a young tree in my garden. It Is the first time this species haa 
flowered. The seeds are surrounded by a juicy, red-colored aril which is edible 
and of a pleasant sweet taste, only It is very small. If my young tree should 
floxver again and produce seed. I shall, of course, be pleased to send more. It 
18 an ornamental plant, like so many tropical evergreens, and absolutely hardy 
here. As I stated in my former letter, it may serve eventually as stock on which 
to i^raft 'SepheUum longanum or Litchi chinen%i9** {Proschowsky,) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44520. 

46300. Attalea sp. Phoenicaceo^. Coquito palm. 

From the City of Mexico, Mexico. Presented by Mr. A. L. Herrera. Re- 
ceived June 5, 1918. 

**An undescribed species, closely related to the cohune or corozo palm {Atta- 
lea cohune) of the Caribbean coast region of Central America ; it differs from the 
<-ohune palm in the smaller and more rounded fruits and the thinner and more 
brittle shell of the seed. The seed contains a single kernel, smaller than that 
of the cohune palm. The kernels contain a high percentage of oil, said to be 
the equal of coconut oil, and suitable for the manufacture of similar products. 
The palm is said to grow in great abundance in the vicinity of Miazatlan, 
Sinoloa. The kernels are exported in considerable quantities from Mazatlan 
to Pacific ports of the United States for oil extraction." (C. B. Doyle.) 

46301. AcROcoMiA TOTAi Mart. Phcenicacea?. Palm. 

From Asuncion, Paraguay. Presented by Mr. Henry H. Balch, American 
consul. Received June 19, 1918. 

A small palm, rarely over 1 meter (39 inches) in height, with fruit clustered 
at the base. 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45483. 

46302. BiciNus communis L. Euphorbiaceoe. Castor-bean. 

From Asuncion, Paraguay. Presented by Mr. Henry H. Balch, American 
consul. Received June 19, 1918. 

Large black seed with a few Ught-gray markings. Introduced for experi- 
ments to determine the oil content of different varieties of castor-beans. 



liiDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Acacia melHfera, 46049. 
Achradelpha mammosa, 46236. 
Achras aapota. See Achras zapota. 

zapota, 46148, 46237. 
Acrocomia foiai, 46301. 
Actinidia chinen»is, 46120, 46124, 

46131. 
Alectryon subcinereumt 46299. 
AmygdalU9 perHca, 45989, 46239. 
Anntma s^amo^a, 46149, 46221. 
Aphloia theaeformis, 46005. 
Ash, Prawinus floribunda, 46083. 
Astragalus sinicus, 45995. 
Astrocaryum polyetachyum, 46147. 
Attalea spp., 46047, 46900. 

BaDiboo, Phyllo9tachy8 sp., 46205. 
Barberry, BerberU japonica bealeit 

45973. 
Bean bonavlst, DolichoB lablab, 46185, 
46186, 46260. 

broad, Vicia faba, 46017, 46166. 

oatjang, Vigna cylindricay 46175. 

common. See Phaseolus vulgaris. 

Lima. See Phaseolus lunatus. 

rice, Phaseolus calcaratus, 46261. 

Scarlet Runner. See Phaseolus 
coccineus. 

yam, Cacara erosa, 46235. 
Berberis japoniea bealei, 45978. 
Boehmeria macrophylla, 46080. 
Britoa sellotoiana, 46024. 

Cacara erosa, 46235. 
Cactus, Opuntia sp., 46135. 
Caimito, ChrysophyUum cairUto, 46150. 
Ca;an indlcum, 45982, 46007, 46050, 

46167, 46168, 46184. 
CaUicarpa rubella, 46081. 
Carex maxima. See Oarex pendula. 

pendula, 46298. 
Carica papaya, 450G9, 46000. 
Casaba, Australian, Cucumis melo, 

46029. 



Cassia grandts, 46140. 

;^tr«ttla, 46222. 

patellaria, 46243. 

jmrntla, 46244. 
Castor-bean, Ricinus communis^ 46081- 

46037, 46075, ^302. 
Gatjang, Vigna eyUndrica, 46175. 
Celtis sinensis, 46062. 
Chaenomeles lagenaria oathayensis, 
46129. 

sinmisis, 46180. 
Chaetoohloa nigrirostris, 46133. 
Chayota eduUs, 46242. 
Chayote, Chayota eduUs, 46242: 
Chenopodium ambrosioides, 46296. 

&onf««-^enrictttf, 46027. 
Cherry, Prunus glandutosa, 46003. 

Prunua napcMil0n«i«, 46094. 
Cherry laurel, Laurooerasus acumi- 
nata, 46lOSi. 
Chick-pea, Cicer arieiin/um, 46008, 

46151, 46226. 
ChrysophyUum cainitOi 46160. 
Cicer arietinum, 46008, 46151, 46226. 
Citron, Citrus medioa, 46123. 
Citrus spp., 46125» 46127, 46132, 
46139. 

aurantium, 46126. 

grand/is, 46121. 

iehangensis, 46128. 

medica, 46123. 
Clover, genge, Astragalus sMous, 

45995. 
Coral tree, Erythrina arboresoens, 

45998. 
Coriaria thymifoUa, 40224, 
Corn, Zea moi^, 45996, 46056, 46208, 
46282-^46298. 

Malz de tiempo, 45996. 
p^itlUa, 45996» 46056. 
Corylus ferox, 45976. 
Cotton. See Qossyp^wn spp. 
Cowpea. See Vigna sUnensis, 
Oracca Candida, 46082. 

45 



46 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Crotalaria alaia, 40245. 
usaramoenshf 46246. 
Cryptotaenia canadensin. See Dvr- 

inga canadentis, 
Cucumit mdOf 46029. 
Cucurbita pepo, 46061-46055, 46122. 

Cymbopeialum penduUflorumt 46206. 

« 

Decaisnea ingignis, 45977. 

Deguelia trifoUata, 46019. 

Deringa canadengis, 46137. 

Derris uligino$a. See Deguelia M- 

foliata, 
Dioscorea alata, 46600. 

buibifera, 46094, 46218. 

esculeiita, 46091. 

rotundata, 46098. 

tHflda, 46092. 
Dolichos lablab, 46186, 46186, 46260. 

Earflower, sacred. Cpntbopetalum pen- 

duUflorum, 46206. 
Edgetoorthia chrygantha, 46972. 

papyrifera. See EdgetofHrthia 
chrygantha, 
Elaein guineenHa, 46975, 46297. 

fnelanococca, 46048. 
Elder. See 8ambucu8 app. 
El€U$ine caracena, 46296. 
Erythrina orboreMcens, 46008. 
Eucommia uimoides, 46061. 46119. 

Filbert. Corylm ferox, 45076. 
Fraoiinm floribunda, 46088. 

Oarbanzo. See Obick-pea. 

GarcifUa mango8tana, 46204. 

Good King Henry, Chenopodium bonus- 

henricus, 46027. 
Oossffpium ap., 46184. 

barbadense X hirsutum, 46074. 
Ora88, ChaetochJoa nigriroatris, 46183. 

OryzopHs nUliacea, 46223. 
Ouandul. Cajan indicum. 45982, 46007. 
Guarea grandifoUa. 46025. 
Hackberry. Celtia sinen^U, 46062. 
Henna, Ijiicaania inermis, 46241. 
Hibiseus macrophyllus, 46138. 46192. 

ftabdariffa, 46001. 
Holboellia latifolia, 45978. 
Huandul, Cajan indieum, 45982. 



Indigo. See Indigofera spp. 
Indigofera anil. See Indigofera ti? 
fruticosa, 

suffruticoM, 46248. 

numatrana, 46247. 
Ipomoea batatas^ 46219. 

Juglans gp., 45988. 
regia, 46004. 

Katinga, MerriUia calory Ion, 46294. 

I^ugsat, lAxtisium dotnesHcum, 4&M 

46021, 46220. 
Lansium dome$ticum, 46020. 460^. 

46220. 
lABuroceragus atmminata, 46084. 
Lawnonia alba. See LawBonia inermif. 

inermU, 46241. 
I^mon, Ichang, CitruM ichangenti'. 

46128. 
Lens esculenta. See LentiUa lenM. 
I^entil. See LentiUa lens. 
UntWa lenn, 46000, 46152, 46227. 
IMium gigatUeum, 46085. 

nepalense, 46086. 
Lily. See LUium spp. 
Litchi vhinesMiB, 46240. 
JAviiiona hoogendorpii, 46006. 

mariae, 46980. 
Lucuma tnammosa. See Achradelpha 

mammosa. 
Lupine. See Lupinus spp. 
Lupinus cruck9hank9ii, 46057. 
douglasO, 46069. 
polyphyllvs, 46060. 
Lychee, LUehi chinenMs, 46240. 
Macrozamia macdonneUii^ 45981. 
Madder, Rubia cordifolia, 46099. 
Magnolia campbelUi. 45979. 
Mangifera in4ica, 46238. 

longipea, 46022. 
Mango, Mangifera indica^ 46238. 
Mangosteen, Garcinia mangoftm*i 

46204. 
May-apple. Podophyllum etnodi. 4&^^ 
MerriUia raloxyion, 46294. 
Michrlia caUicartii, 46087. 
exeelsa, 46088. 
lanuginosa, 46089. 
Millet, ragi, EleuHne coracana, i^' 



APBIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1918. 



47 



Mitsuba, DeHnga canadensUy 46137. 
Mftsumata, Edgeworthia chrysanthat 

4o972. 
.Mountain ash. Sorbua spp., 46105, 

46106. 
Mucuna macrocarpa, 46090. 
Murraya caloxylon. See MerHUia cala- 

ryUm, 

SepheJium leiocarpum. See Alectryan 
9uboinereum. 
litchL See Litchi chinensU. 
Syssa sesHliflora, 46091. 

Opvntia sp., 46135. 
Oilfzopsis mUiacea, 46223. 

Pachyrhizus angulatus. See Cacara 

crosa. 
Palm, Acrocomia totaiy 46301. 

Astrocarpum poly»tachyum, 46147. 
Attalea spp., 46047, 46300. 
LivUtona hoogendorpii, 46006. 

mariae, 45060. 
c*oquito, Attalea spp., 46017, 46800. 
noli, Elaein melanacocca, 46048. 
oil, ^kie<< guineenHs, 45975, 
46297. 
Pangi, Pangiutn edule, 46023. 
Patigiutn edule, 46028. 
Paparer nomniferum, 46225. 
Papaya, Carico papaya, 45999, 46000. 
Pea, garden. See JPfoiim sativum. 
Peach. Amygdalus persica, 45989, 46239. 
Pear. See PyrtM spp. 
Per^ca asrorica, 45997. 
Phaseolua calcaratU8, 46261. 

corc?inei«, 46141-4614,5, 46193, 

46228, 46262. 
Innatu9, 45983, 45984, 46010-46012, 
4615a 46161, 46169-46171, 46178, 
46187, 46188, 46194. 
vulgaris, 45985, 46013-46016, 46064- 
46072. 46154-46157, 46162, 46164, 
46165, 46172, 46173, 46179-46181, 
46189, 46190, 46195-46202, 46207- 
46216, 46229-46232. 46249^6258, 
46263-46280. 
PhiiHoHtachys sp., 46205. 
Piffeon-pea. See Cajan indicum. 
IMstache, Chinese, Pistada chinensis, 

46136. 
f'Mada chinensis, 46136. 



Pisum sativum, 45986, 46158, 46159, 

46174. 46233, 46234. 
Podophyllum emodi, 46092. 
Poppy, Papaver sofnniferum, 46225. 
Potato, Solanum tuberosum, 46076. 

46111-46118. 
Prunus acuminata. See Laurocerasus 
acuminata, 
cerasoides, 46098. 
glandulosa, 46008. 
napaulensis, 46094. 
persica. See Amygdalus peraica, 
puddum. See Prunus cerasoides. 
Pummelo, Citrus grandis, 46121. 
Pyrularia edulis, 46095. 
P|frv« ooUeryofia, 46068. 

oathayenHs. See ChaenomeUs 

lagenaria caihayensis, 
foliolosa. See Sorbus foUolosa. 
insignis. See Sorbus insignis, 
sinensis. See Chaenomeles sinen- 
sis, 
vestita. See Horbus cuspidata. 

Quince, Chinese, Chaenomeles sinen- 
sis, 46130. 

Rhus javanica, 46096. 

semialata. See Rhus javanica. 
Ricinus communis, 46031-46037, 46075, 

46302. 
Rosa spp., 46002, 46079. 

chinensis, 46058, 46078. 

foetida, 46077. 

lutea* See Rosa foetida. 

macrophylla, 46097. 

serieca, 46098. 
Rose, jRo«a spp. : 

Ard's Rover, Rosa chinensis, 46058. 

Austrian Brier, Rosa foetida, 
46077. 

Mrs. Emily Gray, Rosa sp., 46079. 

Red-Letter Day, Rosa chinensis, 
46078. 
Roselle, Hibiscus sabdariffa, 46001. 
Rubin cordi folia, 46099. 

i^abinea rarinalis, 46026. 
Salvia hispanica, 46146. 
Sambucus adnata, 46100. 

javanica, 46101. 
Sapoililla. Achras zapota, 46148, 46237. 
Sapote, Achradelpha mammosa, 46236. 



48 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTteD. 



Saurauja napatUensit, 46102. 
Sechium edule. See Chayota ednlis. 
Sedge, Carex pendula^ 46298. 
iSctaria niffriroHtriB. See Chaetachloa 

nigrirostrU, 
i^oltinum aculeatissimum, 46628. 

khaaianum, 46106. 

tubeivaum, 46076, 46111-46118. 
Surbus cuspidatat 46104. 

foliolosaj 46106. 

i '1 8 ignis, 46106. 
Squash, Cucurtiia pepo, 46051-46055, 

46122. 
Star-apple. See Calmlto. 
Styrax hookeri, 46107. 
Sugar-apple, Annonm iqwimo$a, 40149, 

46221. 
Sumac, Rhus javaniea, 46696. 
Sweet potato, Ipamoea bololnff, 46219. 
SymplocoB theaefolia, 46108. 

Tephrosia Candida. See Cracoa oanh 

dida, 
Triticum aesHvum, 46038-46046. 

'vulffare. See Triticum aesHvum. 
Tu-chung, Eucommia ulmoides, 46061, 

46119. 

Viburnum dilataiumf 45974. 
erubeaeena, 46109. 



Vicia faba, 46017. 46106. 
Vigna cylindrica, 46175. 

ainaisia, 45987, 46018, 46073. 4616' 

46163, 46176, 46177. 46182, 46:9. 

46191, 46217, 46259, 46281. 

Walnut. See Juglans spp. 
Wheat, Triticum aeativum: 

Blanco, 46038. 

Cafia morada, 46044, 

Carlaco, 46039, 46040. 

Macarr^n, 4G041. 

Nortero, 46042. 

Pel6n, 46043. 

Raspudo, 46044. 

Salmer6n, 46045, 46046. 

Xanthoaoma sp., 46030. 

Tarn. See Dtoacarea spp. 
Yampl, Diawwea triftda^ 46992. 
Yang-tao, AcUnidia chinensis, 461 i^ 

46124, 46131. 
Yautia, Xanihoa(ma sp., 46030. 

ZoHthoxylum <MPVP*i/UtcfK, 46110. 
Zea maya, 45996, 46066, 46203, 4(r>: 
46293. 



I 



o 



» */ 7 



Inoad.lCfty 6, m^ 



^. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

^ ' ' BUREAU OP PLANT INDUSTRY. 

WILUAM A. TAYIX>B, CM<r <f £«f«aM. 



INVENTORY 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

BY THS 

OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 

TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 



(<No. 66; NO0. 46808 to 46587.) 



WAtmKOTOK : 
QOVnUflOIMT PBINTINQ OITIC% 



luunl liij S, inn 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 
BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

WILUAM A. TAYU)It, Ckii/ a/ Siirfni. 



INVENTORY 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PLANT INTRODUCTION 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 

TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 



{No. 56; Nos. 46303 to 46587.) 



WASHINGTON: 
OOVERNUEST PRINTING OFFICE. 

ies2. 



BUREAU OF PLANT 1N1>USTRY, 



ChieS 0/ Bureau, William A. Taylob. 
A8»ociut€ Chief of Bureau, Kabl F. Kellerman. 
O0cer in Charge of Publicationa, J. E. Rockwell. 
Aasietant in Charge of Buaineta Operations, H. E. Allanson. 



FoBEiON Seed and Plant Intboduction. 

SCIENTIFIC STAFF. 

David Fairchlld, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

P. H. Dorsett, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Plant Introduction Oardene. 

B. T. Galloway, Plant Ptahologiat, Special Research Profectt,. 
Peter Blsset, Plant Introducer, in Charge of Eafperimentere' Service. 
Wilson Popenoe and J. F. Rock, Agricultural Explorere. 

R. A. Young, AsBiBtant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Dasheen and Tropical Yam /srf* 

tigationB. 
H. C. Skeels, Botanist, in Charge of Collections, 
O. P. Van Eseltine, Assistant Botanist, in Charge of Publications. 
L. G. Hoover, Assistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Chayote Investigatione. 

C. C. Thomas, Assistant Plant Introducer, in Charge of Jujube Investigations. 
K. L. Crandall, Assistant, in Charge of Photographic Laboratory. 

P. G. Russell and Patty Newbold, Soientiflc Assistants. 

David A. Bisset, Superintendent, Bell Plant Introduction Garden, Glenn Dale, Md, 

Edward Goucber, Plant Propagator, 
J. E. Morrow, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Oarden, Chico, Calif. 

Henry Klopfer, Plant Propagator. 
Edward Slmmonds, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Miami, Fla. 

Ctiarles H. Steffanl, Plant Propagator, 
Henry E, Juenemann, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Bellingham, Wash, 
Wilbur A. Patten, Superintendent, Plant Introduction Garden, Brooksville, Fla, 
E. J. Rankin, Assistant in Charge, Plant Introduction CHirden, Sa/vannah, Ga. 
Collaborators: Tbomas W. Brown and Robert H. Forbes, Cairo, Egypt; A. C. Hartl^. 
Soharunpur India; Barbour Latbrop, Chicago, III.; Dr. H. L. Lyon, Honolulu, Hattw: 
Henry Nehrling, Gotha, Fla.; Cbarles T. Simpson, lAttleriver, Fla.; Dr. L. Tnbm. 
Algiers, Algeria; B. H. Wilson, Jamaica Plain, Mass.; B. W. D. Holway, FaribanU. 
Minn.; Dr. William Trelease. Urbana, III, 
II 



CONTENTS. 



Pace. 

fitroductory statement 1 

aventory 5 

idex of common and scientific names 31 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



LATE I. Tbe white sapote as it grows in Costa Rica. {Catimiroa eduUs 

La Llave, S. P. I. No. 46375) 12 

ir. The chuck mei, an ornamental Chinese shrub for the South. 

{Loropetalum chinense (R. Br.) Oliver, S. P. I. No. 46424) 12 

III. The downy bush cherry of North China. {Prnnus tomentosa 

Thunb., S. P. I. No. 46634) 24 

IV. Fruiting branches of the downy bush cherry. {Prunus tomenr 

torn Thunb., S. P. I. No. 46634) 24 

V. An old tree of the yang nu*l in Shanghai. (Myrira rubra Sieb. 

and Zucc, S. P. I. No. 46571) 28 

VI. Fruits, seeds, and leaves of an improve<l variety of the yang 

mei. (Afyrica rubra Sieb. and Zucc, S. P. I. No. 46571) 28 

III 



INVENTORY OF SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED BY 
THE OFFICE OF FOREIGN SEED AND PUNT IN- 
TRODUCTION DURING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 
TO SEPTEMBER 80, 1918 (NO. 56; NOS. 46303 TO 
46587). 



INTBODUCTOBY STATEMENT. 

Although this inventory is a small one and falls within the period 
affected by the war, it describes an unusual number of interesting 
plant immigrants, which, if they succeed, can scarcely fail to make a 
lasting impression on our horticulture. 

Xo. 46310 {Amaranthy^ panicul^tus) is the "huauhtli" of the 
Aztecs, an amaranth whose seeds are used in the making of a delicate 
sweetmeat resembling pop-corn balls. This "huauhtli" was culti- 
vated by the Aztecs before the discovery of America. It figured in 
their religious ceremonies and their commerce. Quantities of this 
" grain " were exacted by them as tribute from conquered tribes. 
Dr. Safford has found that Montezuma had 18 granaries, each with 
a capacity of 9,000 bushels, filled with its seeds. The flour, made into 
small cakes called alegrfa by the Spaniards, was eaten in large quan- 
tities by the lower classes. The ability of this plant to grow and bear 
in regions too dry for com makes it worthy of close study. 

Some one in the Southwest should experiment with the " huauht- 
zontli" {Chenopodium 7tuttalliae ; No. 46311) and determine whether 
its delicate inflorescences when cooked as the Mexicans cook them are 
not worth putting on our menu. A new vegetable such as this should 
be most interesting for experiment. 

Carma edvUs (No. 46313), the edible canna or Queensland arrow- 
root, has been grown for years for arrowroot production in Queens- 
land, because there it yields heavily and is easier to cultivate than the 
Bermuda arrowroot {Maranta arundinacea) . Few root vegetables 
are more brilliantly colored than the tubers of this canna, and its 
behavior in Florida makes it worthy of special study as a possible 
crop in the Everglades. 



2 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

In Nos. 46316 to 46320 we have a collection of strikinirlv oma 
mental trees and shrubs from New Zealand, sent in by our cori^ 
spondent, Mr. H. K. Wright. Freycinetia hankaii (No. 46317) wit. 
its striking fruit, Meryta sinclairii (No. 46318) with its immeib^ 
leaves, Pitto8poru7n ralphii (No. 46319) with bell-shaped, dark-crim 
son flowers, and Sideroxylon coHtatum (No. 46320), a handsonk 
shade tree, should all find a place somewhere in America. 

Mr. John Gossweiler has sent in from Loanda, Angola, a species 
of Solanum {S. maci^ocarpon; No. 46330) bearing fruits the a» 
of an apple, and also a brilliant violet -purple flowered species of 
sesame (Sesamum angolense; No. 46332) that may possibly be use*! 
to advantage in the improvement of the oil-producing sesame, whH 
has the defect of scattering its seeds, thus making mechanical har 
vesting impossible. 

A red-fleshed piunmelo {Gitrua grandis; No. 46336) from Shen 
chowfu, which its sender, Mr. N. T, Johnson, says ripens two months 
earlier than' other varieties, may prove valuable in Florida. 

The collections of l)eans and closely allied plants, accessioned i'l 
this inventory, may be cited to show how the machinery of plan 
introduction works when a plant breeder wants to get together a? 
many varieties of a certain plant as possible for experimental pur- 
poses. Nos. 46338 to 46354, from Guayaquil, Ecuador; Nos. •^^'^^ 
to 46373, from Caracas, Venezuela; Nos. 46490 to 46499, from R* 
sario, Argentina; Nos. 46502 to 46521, from Para, Brazil; and Nu^ 
46525 to 46530. from Punta Arenas, Chile, will put in his hands ^ 
total of 63 probable strains, including, of course, some duplicates^. 

Whether or not there would be any distinct advantages to truck 
growers in grafting eggplants on the root of the susumber {Solanur^ 
7na?runo8n7n) ^ which is closely related to it, remains to be shown 
The idea is interesting, and seeds of the tree have been obtaine^J 
(No. 46374). 

The white sapote, which is much hardier than the avocado, :^ 
gradually winning adherents, at least the large-fruited varieties n^ 
it. A new one from Guadalajara {Ca^miroa edulis; No. 4637"» 
with pear-shaped fruits, is welcome, and Mr. Furnivall may have sen: 
a sort superior to any we now have. 

The large-fruited Mexican oaks {Quercus sp. ; No. 46383) are j* 
strikingly interesting that it is to be hoped they will withstand our 
winters in the South and, like Lithocai^vs cornea from Hongkoiu:. 
will find a congenial home along the Gulf coast. 

Could the kauri pine {Dammara australis; No. 46387), stateliest 
of all the giant forest trees of the world because of its perfectly 
columnar trunk, bo grown anywhere in the western hemisphere, i' 
ought to be, for disquieting stories of its threatened extinction in Nev 
Zealand are rife. We are protecting our redwoods and sequoias, and 



JULY 1 TO SEPTBMBEB 30, 1918. 3 

it is to be presumed, of coui*se, that New Zealand, too, will safeguard 
her wonderful trees from extinction. 

It is so seldom that a tree from Madagascar comes to this country 
that the arrival of the Aphloia {A. theaeforrrds; No. 46389) is worthy 
of special mention. This is said to be a low tree found on mountain 
slopes and when in fruit it is covered with small white wholesome 
berries. 

Nos. 46390 to 46456 record as names only a collection of seeds found 
by the American consul in Explorer Frank N. Meyer's baggage 
which was taken off the steamer in China from which he disappeared. 
No descriptions were attached, and it is evident he had planned to 
write these up when he reached a region more congenial than was 
Ichang, from which he had just escaped. 

The perennial vetch {Swainsona sp. ; No. 46457) sent in by Mr. 
Hamilton, which thrives in porous soils in semitropical regions and 
holds its own among the native grasses, will attract at once the atten- 
tion of citrus growers as a promising cover crop for Florida orchards. 

Macadamia youngiana (No. 46463), with thin-shelled nuts, if it 
grows as well in Florida and Hawaii as its relative M, temifolia^ 
will be a valuable nut tree for the Subtropics. The behavior of the 
macadamia in southern Florida has alreadv beffun to attract the 
attention of nut growers. 

South African shrubs grow so well in southern Florida that the 
introduction of a new sweet-scented one (Brabejum stellatifolhim; 
No. 46474) , which also has edible fruits, is worthy of emphasis. 

A citrus fruit which has a concentrated peach flavor might be useful 
in the ice-cream business. The bel fruit of India {Belou inarmelos: 
Nos. 46477 and 46500) has enthusiastic admirers and may be worthy 
of serious study by our citrus growers. 

Plants whose leaves or fruits are powerful fish poisons have been 
used by the natives of many countries. They always have an interest 
in that they may contain valuable new alkaloids. Mr. John Ogilvie 
has sent in five (Nos. 46482 to 46486) from British Guiana, three of 
which are still undetermined. 

The search for a blight-proof pear has interested many people, 
and when eight trees of a different habit from the rest remain un- 
attacked by the disease in a badly blighted orchard in Louisiana their 
bud wood should be tested further to find out whether the varietv 
remains free from blight {Pyrus communis X serotina; No. 46566). 

The fact that the "yang mei," a most attractive Chinese fruit 
tree, has fruited at Del Monte and that young trees of it are estab- 
lished at Chico, Calif., and at Brooksvilfe, Fla., make worthy of 
mention the introduction by Mr. Groff of this species {Myrica rubra; 
No. 46571) from Canton. Though it is a discouragingly slow grower, 



4 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

the beauty of its fruits is so great that some enthusiast ought to deTot^ 
his spare time for a score of years to its dissemination. 

The neem tree of India {Azadirdchta indica; No. 46573), which 
Mr. Lane sends, is related to the Chinaberry tree, but bears dark 
purple fruits. It should interest foresters if it grows anything Ei 
as fast as its relative, for its wood is reported to resemble mahogany. 
Its fruits furnish a medicinal oil and its sap is made into a cooling 
drink. 

The New Zealand rimu {Dacrydium cupressinum; No. 46575), seeds 
of which Mr. Wright sends from Auckland, must be a most striking 
conifer, resembling, it would seem, a drooping yew, with beautiful 
red-cupped berries. 

Nos. 46576 to 46586 describe eleven named varieties of orienu! 
pears {Pyrus spp.) which were personally selected by Prof. F. C 
Beimer, the p6ar expert of the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, during his recent exploration of eastern Asia. Should pear- 
blight ever stop the profitable culture of the European pear in Amer- 
ica, these oriental varieties and the hybrids between them and th* 
European forms would probably take their place. They are, there- 
fore, of great interest and deserve the widest trial over the couDtn. 

The botanical determinations of seeds introduced have been made 
and the nomenclature determined by Mr. H. C. Skeels, while the 
descriptive and botanical notes have been arranged by Mr. G. P 
Van Eseltine, who has had general supervision of this inventory. 
The manuscript has been prepared by Miss Esther A. Celander. 

DAvm FAmcHiii), 
Agricultural Explorer m Charge, 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington^ D. C, September 26 ^ 19S1. 



INVENTORY. 



46303. Papav^er somniferum L. Papaveracese. Poppy. 

From Calcutta, India. Purchased from Mr. James A. Smith, American 
consul general. Received July 1, 1918. 

" Seed of last season's crop from the economic botanist to the Government of 
India at Oawnpore. It is the best seed he could procure at this season of the 
year and is viable, but it is not pure and contains a mixture of United Prov- 
inces poppies." ( StnUh. ) 

Introduced for the experiments of the Office of Drug-Plant and Poisonous- 
Plant Investigations and not for general distribution. 

46304 and 46306. 

Prom Concepcion, Paraguay. Presented bj* Mr. Thomas R. Gwynn. Re- 
ceived July 1, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Gwynn. 

46304. Phaseolus lunatus lu Fabacese. Lima bean. 

"The Linconia butter bean is the very finest that I have ever come 
across. It yields In full blast for at least eight months and with a good 
season will give, in a climate lljke this, a year or more in superabundance 
continually, day after day. The plant is extraordinarily hardy and 
thrifty, as neither the extreme drought nor the hard frosts of last year 
put it out of business. When I pulled the plants on September 1 they 
were still bearing (not a great deal). I planted this year on September 
15, and as we had a splendid year the plants are extra fine and are 
loaded with fruit of all sizes and flowers to the very tip ends. I have 
them planted along a wire fence with poles 12 feet high stuck in about 
1 yard apart" 

46305. Pi SUM sativum L. Fabacese. Garden pea. 

" Peas that are ready for the table inside of two months and are still 
bearing and in flower — ^now something over six weeks.'* 

^All Introductions consist of seeds unless otherwise noted. 

It should be understood that the varietal names of fruits, vetretables, cereals, and other 
plants used in these inventories are those which the material bore when received by this 
office, and, further, that the printing of such names here does not constitute their official 
Pnbllcatloa and adoption In this country. As the different varieties are studied, their 
l<lentlt7 fully established, their entrance Into the American trade forecast, and the use of 
varietal namet for them In American literature becomes necessary, the foreign varietal 
deiignationB appearing in these Inventories will in many cases undoubtedly be changed 
^y the specialists interested In the various groups of plants, and the forms of the names 
^"1 be brought into harmony with recognized American codes of nomenclature. 

74480—22 2 5 



6 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46306. Garcinia mangostana L. Clusiacese. Mangosteea 

From Bultenzorg. Java. Presented by the Department of Ag^iculrvl^ 
Received July 3, 1918. 
For previous Introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 46204. 

46307. Bicinus communis L. Eupliorbiacee?. Castor-bean 

From Carorn, Venezuela. l*reHente<l by Mr. Jul'o Marmol Herrera. U^ 
celvwl July 3, 1918. 

Me(]jum-8lze<l, li^ht-Kruy seed with reddish brown mottlings. 

46308 and 46309. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Chenopodiaceje- 

From Bultenzorg, Java. Presented by the Botanic Garden. Reoeivwl J'.i'- 
3, 1918. 

The plant is an annunl, but has an almost, woody stem from 1 to 2 meter* is 
height with alternate lanceolate leaves. The inflorescence consists of siuii-l" 
leafy spikes of very small greenish flowers. The seeils are very small and Maci^ 
The whole plant has a pronounced aromatic odor. An infusion of this \ibt 
has been used in Europe with good rei»ults us a cure for nervous aif<M:ti<»nN 
(Adapted from the PtiarmaccutUnl Jouniat and TramaciionH, 3d «cr.. ati. ^ 
I). 713.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 46524. 

46308. From Botanic Garden. 46309. From Kwala I^mpur. 

46310 and 46311. 

From Coyacan, Mexico. Presenteil by Mrs. Zelia Nuttall. Received Jub 
3, 1918. 

46310. AMARANTHirs PANicvLATUs L. Amaranthace«p. Huauhtli 

"Seeds of Amaranthus panU'nlatus, l?nown as ' alegrfa.' Mucli us<^ 
by Mexican Indians for making sweetmeats. They are first roasle«l. tliei 
mixed with sirup made of honey or of sugar and water, rolled into bnIK 
and eaten like sugared iK)p corn.*' (Xuttall.) 

An annual, with entire leaver, l>earing the abundant grainlike etllMt 
seed in dense panicles. Some plants produce white seeds and some 
produce black. The white seeds are those chiefly used by the native* 
This plant is found both in cultivation and growing wild. The seeds are 
ground and cooketl in tho form of small cakes known as alegria, tht^t: 
cakes being eaten in large quantities by the poorer classes, especially vior 
ing a time of scarcity of corn. Huauhtli was cultivated by the Aztecs b^ 
fore, the discovery of America. It occupied an Important place In the farf 
of the people, and accounts show that every year 18 granaries, each witb 
a capacity of 9,000 bushels, were filled by Montezuma. Often the triluitr 
exactjwl by the Aztecs from the i)eoi)le they conquered would take tb*" 
form of a certain quantity of this grain. It was so closely connt?<tifHi 
with the life of the people that it figured in religious observances. Si>:^n 
ish historians, writing in the first half of the seventeenth century, c^^ 
accounts of how the ancient Mexicans made figures of their ^oiis out o* 
the flour obtained from the seed. The figures were carried In processiaa* 
and at the end of the ceremony they were broken up and servetl to tte 
people as a form of comnumion. (Adapted from Safford, A Forpott^ 
Cereal of Ancient America, Proceedings of the Nineteenth Interfmtionn' 
Congress of Americanists, p. 286, 1911.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 7 

46810 to 46311— Continued. 

Huauhtzontli. 
46311. Chenopodium nuttalliae Safforil. Chenoiwdlaeere. 

" Seeds of * huauhtzontli/ the unripe Inflorescence of which Is a favorite 
vejretuhle of the Mexican Imlians. It is boile<l or frietl In butter, stem 
and all, small flowering tips being selected and tied together. Much 
used in Lent. Is verj- nourishing and palatable. The seeds must be 
soaked in milk (like com, half ripe)." iNuttall) 

'* Native name xovhihuauhtli (flowering huauhtli). A plant cultivated 
near the City of Mexico for the sake of its prolific branching inflores- 
cences, which are gathered before they are quite mature and while the 
seeds are still soft and cooked as a vegetable with other ingredients. 
This variety, with yellowish or pale-brown discoid seeds, is the most 
popular. The inflorescences are known by the Atzec name huauhtzontli, 
signifying ' huauhtli-heads.' Hotanically, the plant is closely allied to 
Chenopodium payanum Ueichenb. and V, album L. It is quite distinct 
from C\ quinoa Willd., the celebrated food staple of the Peruvian high- 
lands; and it must not be confused with the plant called michihuauhtli 
(flsh-egg huauhtli), which is a white-see<led Amaranthus, not a Chenopo- 
dium.'' (W. E. iSa/To/'d.) 

46312. ViGNA SINENSIS (Tomer) Savi. Fabaceae, Cowpea. 

From Vereeniglng, South Africa. Presented by Mr. J. Bui'tt Davy. Re- 
ceived August 14, 1918. 

A small lot of mixed varieties of cowpeas introduced for exi)erimental pur- 
poses. 

46313. Canna EDtLis Ker. Cannaceac*. Edible canna. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Tubers presented by Mr. J. M. Westgate, Hawaii 
Agricultural Experiment Station. Received July 9, 1918. 

In Queensland the edible canna, or '* Queensland arrowroot," as it is called 
there, has been cultivated for years because its heavy yields and easy cultiva- 
tion have made it more profitable than the Bermuda arrowroot, Maranta arundi- 
naeeu. The stems and leaves are used for forage, and the tuber makes a 
imlatable vegetable when cooked, somewhat resembling the turnip. 

46314. Zea mays L. Poaceae. Com. 

From (lUadulajara, Mexico. I*resented by Arnulfo Ballesteros, I^ Barc.i, 
Jali.sco, J^Iexico. at the request of Mr. John R. Silliman, American consul. 
Received July 10, 1918. 

"Early Pipitillo corn which is cultivated in the swampy lands of Chapala. 
This corn is early in this region only when sown in the months of January, 
February, and the early part of March. It is then jiossible for the harvesting 
and drying to be completed four months afterward. Sown in May or June, 
the time required for it to mature is six months." {Ballesteron.) 

46315. Papaver somniferum L. Papaveracea?. Poppy. 

From Yokoluuna, Japan. Presented by the Yokohama Nursery Co. Re- 
ceived July 10, 1918. 
*' Variety album. An erect annual with handsome white flowers, which is 
<tiltivjite*l in the Orient for opium manufacture. It was introduced into the 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

United States for the tuie of its palatable seeds in confectioner^' and tbe pn>^ 
aratlon of morphia for medicinal purposes. The seeds yield a comestible oil I: 
is of comparatively easy culture." (fif. C. Stuntz.) 

46316 to 46320. 

From Auckland, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. H. R. Wright Rwivf 
July 12. 1918. 

4fiS16. Clianthus puniceus (Don) Soland. Fabacete. ParrotVbiH 

A white-flowered form of the kotchai, which in its scarlet-flowered for 
is one of the most gorgeous of New Zealand flowering plants. With b 
flowers 2 inches in length in long pendulous racemes and its heavy, dirt 
green, glossy, pinnate leaves, it should prove a desirable addition to tt^ 
drooping shrubs suitable for growing in regions having but slight fro^i* 
The flowers of this plant in its native haunts are said to be pollinated br 
birds. (Adapted from Lainff and BlachtoeU, Plants of Neic Zealand, f 
210.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 34716. 

46317. Freycinetia banksii A. Cunn. Pandanace«. 

*' The fruit proper does not ripen until many months after the r\i*em 
of the white bracts. In size and shape it is almost identical with \k 
Mons^a deUciosa.*' (Wripht) 

A vine which climbs to the tops of the tallest trees along the banks • ' 
rivers in the North Island of New Zealand. Tlie linear-lanceolate lea^-* 
are borne in clusters along the stem, and the flowers appear in the i-ent*? 
of these leaf clusters. It is called Lon marrar by the natives, who eat tte 
white fleshy bracts of the flowers for their sugary Juice. (Adapted im 
Hooker^ Companion to the Botanical Magazine, voL 2, p. ^77.) 

46318. Mebtta sinclaibii (Hook, f.) Seem. Arallacese. 

" It makes a beautiful tree with immense leaves ; an ideal specimen fv- 
a lawn, but very tender to frost." (Wright.) 

A handsome New Zealand tree, 12 to 24 feet hiffh, with glossy Uav»< 
20 inches lonpr and 10 inches wide. The erect panicles of greenish yello« 
flowers are followed by oblonp, shining black fruits. (.\dapte<l fri-: 
Laing and BJackveV, Plavts of yew Zealand, p. S12.) 

46319. PiTTospoRUM RALPHii Kirk. Pitto.sporace«». 

A laxly branched shrub 15 to 20 feet high, found in the central distrit 
of the North Island of New Zealand. The shoots, sepals, and under 
surface of the coriaceous leaves are covered with close white hairs. Tb^ 
fascicles of small, bell-shaped, dark-crimson flowers, with protrudin; 
yellow anthers resting on the downy white young leaves, make it a v^rr 
attractive ornamental shrub. (Adapted from Laing and BlacW*i 
PlantH of "Neio Zealand ^ p. 195.) 

46320. SiDEBoxYLON cosTATUM (Endl.) F. Muell. Sapotacete. 

A handsome, closely branched tree 40 feet high and 3 feet in diameter 
native to the coasts of the North Island and of Norfalls Island in N^ 
Zealand. The obovate, entire leaves, 2 to 4 inches long, are coriaceous 
and shining. The flowers are found one or two together in the axib' ''• 
the leaves and the fruits are 1 inch in diameter with one to four ^^ 
The wood is hard, white, and durable, and the bony seeds were forni«*rlJ 
used for necklaces. (Adapted from Cheeseman, Manual of the Xac 7/^'- 
land Flora, p. 4S5.) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1&18. 9 

46321. Carica sp. Papayaceee. 

From Tamplco, ^Mexico. Presented by Mr. Harry Hummel. Received July 
13, 1918. 

** Papaya 5ronc7ia. This Is the everbloomlng papaya; It produces a fruit 
about 3 inches long and 2 Inches in diameter. The trees grow wild In the 
woods, can be transplanted at any time of the year, require no attention except 
water, and I believe if cultivated will produce a larger fruit." {Hummel,) 

46322 to 46328. 

From Rio Grande, Brazil. Obtained by Mr. Samuel T. Lee, American con- 
sul. Received July 13, 1918. 

These legumes have been introduced for use in a series of experiments in test- 
ing; and breeding varieties of South American beanlike plants, for the purpose 
of selecting or developing strains suited to the various conditions obtaining in 
different imrtsof the United States. 

46322 to 46326. Phaseolus vujxsarts L. Fabacese. Common bean. 

46322. Feijdo carico. 46325. Feijao da praia, 

46323. Feijao tupi. 46326. Feijdo preto, 

46324. Feijdo hranco, 

46327 and 46328. Vigna sinensis (Torner) Savi. Fabacese. Cowpea. 
46327. Feijdo mindo hranco. 46328. Feijdo mindo oscuro. 

46329 to 46332. 

F'rom Loanda, Angola, Africa. Presented by Mr. John Gossweiler, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Received July 16, 1918. 

46329. Raphia gaertneri Mann and Wendl. Phoenicacese. 

A tropical African palm with a simple erect stpm and a crown of 
pinnately compound leaves made up of linear-lanceolate, acuminate seg- 
ments with the margins recurved at the base. The scaly chestnut-brown 
fruits, 2 to 3 inches long, are borne in pendent clusters. (Adapted from 
Thiselton-Dyer, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol. 8, p. 105.) 

46330. SoLANUH macrocarpon L. Solanaceie. 

A stout undershrub with a much-branched smooth stem and ovate, 
sinuate-margined leaves 8 Inches long. The racemose cymes, opposite 
the leaves, bear blue-purple flowers, 1 to 2 inches broad, which are fol- 
lowed by globose, yellow fruits the size of an apple. (Adapted from 
Thiselton-Dyer, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol. 4, nee. 2, p. 214,) 

46331. Gladiolus sp. Irldacete. Gladiolus. 
Received without description. 

46832. Sesamum angolense Welw. Pedaliacese. 

An erect herb, often 8 feet high, native to tropical Africa. The square 
stems are clothed with numerous oblong to ovate wavy margined leaves 
2 to 4 inches long. The solitary, axillary flowers have brilliant violet- 
purple, obliquely campanula te corolla.s, 2 to 3 inches long. (Adapted 
from TMselton-Dyer, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol. 4. sec. 2, p. 555.) 



10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IiyiPORTED. 

46333. RiciNTs communis L. Euphorbiace». Castor-bean 

From Colombia. Presented by Mr. Hernando Villa. Girardot. Rw-eit-: 
July 16, 1918. 

Seed five-eighths of an inch long and three-eighths of an Inch wide: lifcht .rrat 
ground with stripes and blotiiies of reddish brown. Introduced for exi>er;niH • 
to determine the oil content of different varieties of castor-beans. 

46334. Carica papaya L. Papayacea?. Papaya. 

From Tampico, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Harry H annuel. Ileceiveil JlI. 
16, 1918. 

** J*apaya real. Tlie fruit from which these set^s were taken was 14 m\^ 
long and 6 iuclies in diameter. It is the very best papaya that grows In x> 
Tampico district and is a delicious fruit equal to any niuskraelon. The tiv^ 
grow in sandy loam in a climate whicli very seldom goes below 40** F. and reac.v* 
as high as 110"." {Hummel.) 

46335. Virola sp. Myristicaceae. 

From Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. I'resented by Mr. R. P. Momsen. Anieric-j 
vice consul. Received July 17, 1918. 
" Bicuhyha nut. A common ornamental and timber tree of large size, nii- 
brown, medium-hard wood, well known on the Brazilian market The seel .* 
said to yield an oil used in medicine and for soap making.'' {K, 3/. Curran.\ 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 41945. 

46336. Citrus orandis (L.) Osbeck. Butacea?. Pummdo, 
(C. deeutnana Murray.) 

From Shenchowfu, Hunan, China. Presented by Mr. N. T. John.son, \iu*^- 
can consul at ('hangsha, who received them from Rev. J. F. Bucher. Re- 
ceived July 24, 1918. 

" Red-fleshed pummelo. Ripens earliest of any pummelos ou our compound. I* 
at least two nioiitlis earlier than other varieties." {Bucher.) 

46337. Persea Americana Mill. Lauracea*. Avocado- 

(P. gratUsima Gaertn. f.) 

Plants grown at the Plant Introduction Fiehl Station, Miami, Fla. Nun 
bered for convenience in recording distribution. 

(lOttftied variety. A Mexican avocado which has proved quite frost resi'^t.r' 
This variety is a seedling grown from seed received under S. P. I. No. VM^ 
The fruit ripens at Miami during the months of August, September, and OctoV' 
It is pear shaped and of a purplish maroon color ; weighs 11 to 12 ounces and i^('^ 
fair quality. 

46338 to 46364. 

From Guayaquil, Ecuador. Presented by Dr. Frederic W. Goding, Ameri*- 
consul general. Received July 24, 1018. Descriptive notes by Dr. iU**'^ - 

These legumes have been introduced for use in a series of exi^eriraents in r»^ 
ing and breeding varieties of South American plants which bear beanlike >t^'' 
for the purpose of selecting or developing strains suited to the various condition* 
obtaining in different parts of the United States. 



JUtiY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 



11 



46338 to 46354^Continued. 

40338. Lentilla lens (L.) W. F. Wight. Fabacew. 
{Lens esculenta Moench.) 

** Peas, I^entejas." 
46339. PHA8E0LU8 LUNATUs L. Fabaceae. 

" Beans, Pallares." 
46340 to 46351. Phaseoli-s vulgaris L. Fabacete.. 



IidntlL 



Lima bean. 



Common bean. 



46340. ^'Bailor 

46341. ''Burror 

46342. '* Panamitor 

46343. '*Canarior 

46344. **CiHoUor 



46346. ''Misturiador 

46347. '' Panamito reforzado.*' 

46348. ** Burro amarillo:' 
46340. ''Cahalleror 

46350. ''Chalosr 

46351. "Caciquer 



46345. ''Overoy 

46352. PisuM SATIVUM L. Fabaceie. 
''Alherjasr 

46353. ViciA FABA L. Fabacea*. 
" Habasr 

46354. VioNA SINENSIS (Tomer) Savi. Fabaceae. 
** Fum'be%" 



Qarden pea. 

Broad bean. 

Cowpea. 



46355 to 46357. 

From Richmond, Australia. Presented by Mr. F. H. Baker. Received .Tidy 
24, 1918. 

46355. Acacia diffusa Lindl. Mimosacese. 

A straj?gling shrub, native to New Soutli Wales, with loosely scattered 
sessile, linear leaves about an inch long and yellow flowers In axillary 
heads about the size of a pea. (Adapted from The Botanical Register, 
vol. 8, pi. 63^,) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44320. 

46356. Acacia junipebina WiUd. Mimosacete. Prickly wattle. 

" The common prlckl>- wattle of the coastal and mountain districts. 
A prickly scrambling shrub, usually with white or cream-colored flowers. 
Very common in New South Wales." (Maiden, Wattles and Wattlebarks, 
Sd ed., p. 77.) 

46357. Hake A bostbata F. Muell. Proteacece. 

An erect shrub several feet in height with glabrous branches. Thu 
terete leaves are smooth and rigid. The flowers are borne in sessil« 
axillary clusters. The rugose fruit is 1 to 2 inches long by three- 
fourths of an inch broad, recurved at the base, incurved from the middle, 
with a closely inflexed conical t)eak. Found In Victoria and southern 
Australia. (Adapted from Benthanu Flora Australiensis, vol. 5, p, 
508.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 45868. 

46358 to 46373. 

l-^rom Caracas, Venezuela. Presented by Mr. H. Pittier, through mx. 

Homer Brett, American consul, La Guaira. Received July 24, 1918. 

Quoted notes by Mr. Pittier. 

These legumes have been introduceii for use in a series of experiments in 

testing a^^ breeding varieties of South American plants which bear beanlike 



12 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

seeds, for the purpose of selecting or developing strains suited to the various 
conditions obtaining in different parts of the United States. 

46358. DoucHOs lablab L. Fabaceie. Bonavist bean. 

" No. 14. Frijol tapirucfute." 

46350 to 46361. Phaseolus ltjnatus L. Fabaceie. Uma bean. 

46359. "No. 9. Guaracaro hlunco.** 

46360. " No. 11. Guaracaro cafe con leche." 
*P 46361. "No. 15. Guaracaro peine.'* 

46362 to 46370. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Fabacese. ' Common bean. 

46362. " No. 7. Poncha rosada,** 

46363. "No. 6. Caraota blanca," 

46364. " No. 5. Huero de paloma:* 

46365. " No. 3. " Guaracaro rcdondo pintado,** 

46366. " No. 8. Caraota negnir 

46367. " No. 16. Poncha rosada jatpeada,** 

46368. "No. 1. Guacamaya,** 

46369. " No. 13. Caraota indiecita pequena:* 

46370. " No. 12. Guaracaro Colorado/* 

46371 to 46373. Viona sinensis (Tomer) Savi. Fabaceee. Cowpea. 
46371. " No. 10. Frijol Colorado.** 

46372. " No. 2. Frijol bianco de sopar 

46373. " No. 4. FHjol bayo.* 



»» 



46374. SoLANUM MAMMosuM L. SolanacBse. Susumber. 

From Porto Rico. Presented by Prof, C. S. Sargent, Arnold Arboretum, 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. Collected by Mr. Sylvester Baxter. Received July 
25, 1918. 

" In Jamaica difficulties in bringing eggplants to a healthy maturity have been 
met by grafting them on Solan/um mammosum, the so-called ' susumber tree,* a 
ranlc, tropical weed, closely related botanically to the eggplant The grafts are 
said to produce fruits of large size and fine flavor, and as the stock is peren- 
nial bearing is continual." (Cook and ColUns, Economic Plants of Porto Rico. 
Contributions from the U. S, National Herbarium, vol. 8, p. 242.) • 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 27713. 

46375. Casimiroa edulis La Llave. Rutaceae. White sapote. 

From Guadalajara, Mexico. Presented by Mr. F. S. Fumivall, through Mr. 
J. R. Silliman, American consul. Received July 26, 1918. 

"A pear-shaped variety of the white sapote. The fruits were healthy, of good 
size, ripe, and of a bright-yellow color." (FurnivaU.) 

For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 39583. 

For an illustration of the white sapote tree, see Plate I. 

46376 and 46377. Barosma spp. Butacese. 

From Transvaal, South Africa. l*resented by Mr. J. F. Jewell, American 
consul at Lourenco Marques, Portuguese East Africa, who obtained them 
from the Director of Agriculture, through the Division of Botany, Trans 
vaal Department of Agriculture, Pretoria. Received July 29, 1918. 



y 56, Seeds and PIsnt 



This frull-bsarlng tree Is commonly culilvBli'i tti Mexico and Ceiiiral 

ps^wmHl by the Inhabitant!! of Uciicn. In recent years it has Ih... ^ 

Florida, where it auctoeds admlraWy. There Is miich dllTprpiife amoiiK scpillii 

characterof Ihelrfrult; that ol name isexrcllciit, while thai ot( 

flavor. Superior varieties are now bein^! iwjpagatei by binlt 
hy Wibion Popeilnp, ('artugo, Coslu Rim, IMay 2U, llUil; P]'! 



Sf" 



nt parilriilt 



d Plants Importsd. 



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,JIJLY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 13 

46376 and 46377— Continued. 

46376. BlBOSMA betulina (Thunb.) Bartl. and Wendl. Buchu. 

A much-branched shrub with rodlike branches, found on the slopes of 
the Roodesand Mountains in South Africa. The opposite, cuneate-obovate 
leaves, about three-fourths of an inch long and half an inch wide, are 
sharply and closely denticulate on the margin. (Adapted from Harvey 
and Sonder, Flora CopensiSy vol. 1, p. 393.) 

This and the following species are two of the sources of the buchu 
leaves used in medicine. 

46377. Babosma bekbatifolia (Curt.) Willd. Long-leaf buchu. 

An erect South African shrub with angular twigs bearing linear-lance- 
olate sharply serrulate leaves 1^ inches long and one-fourth of an inch 
wide. This species has the same metlicinal properties as B. betulina, but 
Is said to contain less of the essential oil. (Adapted from Harvey a7id 
Bonder, Flora Capensis, vol. J, p. 393.) 

46378. CucuKBiTA pepo L. Cucurbitaceae. Pumpkin. 

Prom San Jose, Costa Rica. Presented by Sr. Carlos Volio, through Mr. 
a Werckl^. Received July 29, 1918. 

Seeds of an exc^tionally valuable pumpkin introduced for experimental 
parpoBBS. 

46379 to 46381. 

From Zamboanga, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. P. J. Wester. 
Received July 80, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Wester. 

46870. Coix LACBTMA-JOBi MA-YUEN (Rom.) Stapf. PoaceiB. Ma-yuen. 

**Adlay. An edible variety." 

46380. Parkia timobiana (DC.) Merr. Mimosaceffi. Cupang. 

(P. roxburghii Don.) 

A very large tree found in Timor and the Philippines, often 115 feet 
high, with a widespreading crown. The femlike, bipinnate leaves are 
made up of a large number of very small leaflets. The small white and 
yellow flowers are borne in dense pear-shaped panicles, and the pen- 
dulous black pods are 18 inches long. (Adapted from Badley, Standard 
Cyclopedia of Horticulture, vol. 5, p. 2474.) 

46881. Phasbolus lxtkatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 

"The Lamao Lima. Given the right conditions this variety is very 
prolific." 

46382. Ampelodesma bicolor (Poir.) Kimth. PoacesB. Grass. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut. Received August 2, 
1918. 

A bunch grass with long tough leaves of possible use in paper making. 

For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 33654. 

46S8S. QuERCussp. Fagaceae. Oak. 

From Guatemala. Presented by Mr. E. Reeves, Finca el Tambor, San 
Felipe, Retalhulen, at the request of Dr. William Trelease, of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. Received August 8, 1918. 

74480—22 3 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

" Fruits of a large-fruited oak that grows a few miles from here, and wliicf; 
Dr. Trelease has done me the honor to [name for mel." {Reeves.) 

"1 am glad that Mr. Reeves got to you viable 8ee<is of hid fine oak, whi.t I 
thought you would like. It is between Quercus corrugata and Q. cyclohalanotda 
in characters, but very distinct from both. The name is a manuscript one a- 
yet." {Trelease.) 

46384. Pandorea australis (R. Br.) Spach. Bignoniacese. 

{Tecoma australis R. Br.) 
From Sawtelle, Calif. Presented by Mr. P. D. Barnhart. Received Augo? 
10, 1918. 

**The most wonderful of all climbing plants grown on this coast It is i 
rampant grower with dark, shining green foliage. When in bloom the flowed 
are as the sands of the sea, so abundant are they. The color is a light creaa 
spotted with chocolate, and the whole show is over In about two weeks." 
{Barnhart). 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44961. 

46386. Calydorea speciosa (Hook.) Herbert. Iridacece. 

From Santiago, Chile. Presented by Dr. Carlos Camacho, director, Servici-* 
de Policia Sanitaria Vegetal. Received August 14. 1918. 

" Bulbs known in Chile as lahui. This plant is not cultivated and is foand 
only in the hills of certain regions in the central and southern parts of the 
country." {Camacho.) 

For previous introductions, see S. P. I. Nos. 30074, 30075, and 36134. 

46386. MoRixGA OLEiFERA Lam. Moringaceae. Horse-radish tree. 

{M. pterygosperma Gaertn.) 

From Managua, Nicaragua. Presented by the American Legation. Re- 
ceived August 14, 1918. 

'*A. small tree, cultivated as an ornamental in Cuba, usually about 16 or 3) 
feet in height, erect, with compound leaves nearly a foot long. The wtiit? 
flowers are borne in panicles, and the slender pods are often a foot long^* 
{Wilson Popenoe.) 

For previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 40913. 

46387 and 46388. 

From Palmerston North, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. J. W, Poyntou. 
Received .July 26, 1918. 

46387. Dammara acstralis Lambert. Pinacese. Sauri piac 

{Agathis australis Steud.) 

This magnificent tree, native to New Zealand, sometimes measures l^ 
feet in height and 17 feet in diameter, the estimated age of such a tree 
being 700 to 800 years. It furnishes an excellent, straight-grained, re- 
markably durable timber which is much used in boat building, bridge 
building, wagon making, and for furniture. This tree also yi^ds tbe 
kauri resin, from which an almost colorless varnish is made. (Adapted 
from Mueller, Select Extra-Tropical Plants, 9th ed., p. 161>) 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 15 

46387 and 46388— Continued. 

46388. Phobmium teivax Forst Liliacese. New Zealand flax. 

" The yield is about 1 ton of fiber from S ions of fn*een leaves. The 
nonflbrous part of the leaves, strippe<l from the fiber, has a lot of proteld 
material in it and some sugar and starch. Cattle eat the cut-up leaves 
greedily, and if the waste were dried it would probably make a good 
cattle feed. When decayed it makes an excellent fertilizer. Analyses 
have shown a high percentage of potassium salts in the ash." 

1. " From plants cut two or three times." 

2. " From plants not previously cut." 

3. " From plants cut once only." (Poj/nton.) 

46389. Aphloia theaeformis (Vahl) Bennett. Flacoiirtiacea\ 

From Tamatave, Madagascar. Presente<l by the Envoi de la Station Ex- 
perimentale d*Agriculture du Government Ivoloina. Received August 8, 
1918. 

A low tree found on the slopes of the mountains in Madagascar. The small 
white berries, which literally cover the tree, are edible and very wholesome, 
although slightly bitter. The leaves are t^ald to possess medicinal virtues. 
'Adapts from Heckel, Plant es Utiles de Madagascar, p. 256,) 

46390 to 46466. 

From China. Collected by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer for 
the Department of Agriculture. Received August 12, 1918. 

" This Is the last collection of plant material to be made by the late Frank 
X. Meyer, our agricultural explorer, who was drowned in the Yangtze River 
en June 1, 1918. The seeds were found In Mr. Meyer's baggage and forwarded 
from Shanghai by the American consul. 

" In view of Mr. Meyer's usual practice of giving a careful description of every 
seed and plant which he sent in, it seems appropriate to explain that the rea- 
son these few last lots received must be published without notes is that Mr. 
Meyer evidently bad not had time since their collection to arrange the notes 
to go with them. It is with the same sad reluctance which a traveler feels 
when he leaves his comrade burie<l somewhere along the route and pushes on 
that I write these few words regarding Mr. Meyer's last plant introductions 
into America." (David Fairchild.) 

46390. Amebimnon sp. Fabacese. 

"Altitude 3,000 feet. Shrub 4 feet tall." 
46301. Amygdalus uavidiana (Carr.) Zabel. Amygdulaoea*. Peach. 

(Prunus davidiana Franch.) 

46302 and 46303. Amygdalvs pebsica L. Amygdalacese. Peach. 

{Prunus persica Stokes.) 

" Chikungshan, Honan, China, August 7, 1917. Wild peaches. Altitude 
abont 2,000 feet." 

46304. Abalia sp. Araliaceie. 

46305. Abaua sp. Araliacese. 

46306. A8PABAGT7S sp. CoDvallariacefle. Asparagus. 

46307. Begonia sp. Begoniacese. Begonia. 

46308. Bebbebis sp. Berberidacese. Barberry. 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46390 to 46456— Continued. 

46399. Bbassica pekinensis (Lour.) Gagn. Brasslcacese. Paits'ai 

46400. Brassica pe^inensfs (TjOiir.) Gagu. Brassicacefe. Paits'al 
" Yo pal t8*al (oil white vegetable).*' 

46401. Brassica sp. Brassicaceae. 

" Changj^ang, Hupeh, December 9, 1917. Cubing ts'ai and p^ tsii 
mixed.*' 

46402. Brassica sp. Brasslcacese. 
" Ta pal ts'ai." 

46403. Capsicum annuum L. Solanaceae. Pepper. 

46404. Carthamus tinctorius L. Asteracese. Safflower. 
" Sample of bong hua, red flower seed ; plant for coloring silk red.** 

46405. Clematis sp. Ranunculaceae. Clematis. 

46406. CoRYLUs TiBETiCA Batal. Betulaceie. 

46407. Ck)TONEASTEB sp. Malaceffi. 

46408. OyroNEASTER sp. Malacen. 

46409. CoTONEASTER sp. Malaces. 

46410. CoTONEASTER sp. MalacesB. 

46411. Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge. Malaees. Hawthoni 
"From Sbinglungshan.*' 

46412. Crataegus pinnatifida Bange. Malaces. HawthonL 

46413. CucuMis SATivus L. Cucurbitaceae. Cacumber. 

46414. DiosPTROS lotus L. Diospyraceae. Persimman. 

46415. Erbmochloa sp. Poaceee. QnA 

46416. Fagoptrum vulgare Hill. Polygonaceae. Backwheat 
(F. esculentum Afoench.) 

46417. JuoLANs MANDSRURiCA Maxim. Juglandacefe. Walnut 

46418. KoELREUTERiA sp. Saplndaceflg. 

46410. LiLiuM sp. laliacefl?. Idly. 
*• Near Suilokua, Hupeh, Novenil)er 13. 1917. Altitude. 2,000 feet" 

46420. LiLiuM sp. Liliacefe. Lily. 
" Near Tsayanpoo. Altitude 5,300 feet. December 2, 1917." 

46421. LiLiuM sp. Liliacese. Idly. 

46422. LiLiuM sp. LiUacese. Idly. 

46423. T^LiuM sp. IJliacese. Idly. 

46424. LoKOPETALUM cHiNENHE ( R. Br.) Oliver. Haniamelidaces. 

For an illustration of this shrub, as photographed by Mr. Meyer, see 
Plate II. 

46425. Paliurus spina-christi Mill. Rhamnaceae. tf 

46426. Peucedanum sp. Apiaceie. 

46427. Phaseolus calcaratus Roxb. Fabaceie. Sioe bcaa. 

"Patuhg. Cliina, December 5, 1917. Man doh (savage bean). Eata 
in soups.'' 

46428. Physalis alkekbnqi L. Solanacese. Alkekengi 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 17 

46390 to 46456— Continued. 

46429. PiBUM SATIVUM L. Fabacese. Garden pea. 
"Changyang, Hupeh, December 9, 1917. Wah doh. A large variety 

eaten boiled, steamed, and roasted as human food. A winter crop." 

46430. PouPABTiA AXILLARIS (Roxb.) King and Prain. Anacardiacese.. 

46431. PBunrus sp. Amygdalacese. Plum. 

46432. PsxTNUs sp. Amygdalacese. Cherry. 

46433. Pteboceltis tatabinowh Maxim. Ulmacese. 

46434. Pybub betulaefolia Bonge. Malacese. Fear. 

46435 to 46437. Pybus callebtana Decalsne. Malacese. Fear. 

46435. " Kingmen, Hupeh, October 10, 1017. An intermediate type 
between the cultivated form and the wild one.** 

46436. " 2453a. Kingmen, Hupeh, October, 1917. Teh Tang M.** 

46437. (No descriptive note attached.) 

46438. Pybus sp. Malaceffi. Fear. 
" Mixed varieties from various localities.*' 

46439. Quebcus sp. Fagacese. j Oak. 

46440. Rhtnghosia volubilis Lour. Fabaceee. ^ 

46441. RiciNUs communis L. Euphorfoiacese. Castor-bean. 

46442. Sacchabum abundinaceum Retz. Poaceee. Orass 

'*Near Hsiaochita, 5 miles northeast of Ichang, Hupeh. A grass 
growing from 3 to 10 feet tall, found in sandy and pebbly river beds, 
subject to annual overflow. A most excellent binder of loose sand for 
Columbia River regions.*' 

46443. So J A MAX (L.) Piper. Fabacese. Soy bean. 
Medium-sized, yellowish green seed. 

46444. SoJA MAX (L.) Piper. Fabacese. Soy bean. 
Small, flat, black seed. 

46445. SojAMAX (L.) Piper. Fabacese. Soybean. 
Small, round, yellow seed. 

46446. SoPHOBA tomentosa L. Fabacese. 

46447. Stillikgia bebifeba (L.) Michx. Euphorbiacese. Tallow tree. 
iSaiHuin aebiferum Roxb.) 

46448. Stizolobium DEEBiNGiANUM Bort. Fabacese. Florida velvet bean. 
" For hilly land." 

46449. Stizolobium NivEUM (Roxb.) Kuntze. Fabacese. I«yon bean. 

46450. Stmplooos sp. Symplocacese. 

46451. Toon A sinensis (Juss.) Roemer. Meliacese. 
(Cedrela sinemis Juss.) 

46452. Tbachtcabpus excelsus (Thunb.) Wendl. Phoenicacese. Falm. 

46453. Tbapa natans L. Trapacese. Water-chestnut. 

46454. ViBUBNUM sp. Gaprifoliacese. 

46455. ViBUBNUM sp. Gaprifoliacese. 

46456. ViTis sp. Vitacese. Grape. 

"Tahungshan, August 23, 1917. Altitude, 4,000 feet. Medium-strong 
growth; leaves very woolly underneath." 



18 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46457. SwAiNSONA sp. Fabaceap. 

From Tolga, Queensland, Australia. Presented by Mr. J. A. Hamilioo. 
Received August 14, 1918. 

" Seeds of a perennial vetch. The plant seems very drought resistant, as it 
is green nil the time. It holds its own among the native grasses and is green 
when they are dried up, so it must root very deeply. This ought to prove a 
valuable fodder crop in semitropical areas, especially in the drier partEi Ii 
grows in a very porous, well-drained soil." (Hamilton.) 

46468 to 46464. 

From Burringbar, New South Wales. Presented by Mr. R Harrison. R^ 
celved August 16, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Harrison. 

46458. DiANELLA sp. Liliacece. 

"A native lily growing on the beach here, with insignificant purple 
flowers and berries. Stock eat the foliage." 

46459. Hibiscus sp. Malvaceae. 

"A native hibiscus growing on the coast here. Height 10 to 12 feet 
Yellow flowers with purple center. Large leathery foliage which is eatea 
by stock. It Requires a, few years to grow from seed to flower." 

46460. Ipomoea sp. Oonvolvulacese. 

" Native Ipomoea with large purple flowers and handsome ladDJaiel 
foliage. Would make a good ornamental. A perennial vine with tuber- 
ous root." 

46461. IscHAEMUM TBiTicEUM R. Br. Poacese. 

" Giant Ischaemum, growing to the length of several feet." 

46462. Panicvm parvift-orttm R. Br. Poace». 

** Height 3 to 4 feet A very heavy ylelder ; nutritious and relished by 
stock. One of our best native grasses." 

46463. Macadam lA youngiana F. Muell. Proteacew. Macadamia. 

" The thin-shelled Queensland nut. Very rare here." 

A shrub 8 to 10 feet high with oblong leaves in whorls of three or four 
and with nuts resembling those of M, tertUfolia, but with thinner shells. 
(Adapted from Bentham, Flora Auatraliensis, vol 5, p. J^06.) 

46464. Ntmphaea gioantea Hook. Nymphseaces. Water lily- 

" The large, beautiful blue water lily of the nbrthem rivers of New 
South Wales." 

46466 to 46472. 

From Rio Grande, Brazil. Presented by Mr. Samuel T. Lee, American 
consul. Received August 17, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Lee. 

These legumes have been introduced for use in a series of experiments in 
testing and breeding plants which bear beanlike seeds, for the purpose of 
selecting or developing strains suited to the various conditions obtaining In 
different parts of the United States. 

46465 to 46470. Phasbolus vulgaris L. Fabacece. Common betn- 

46465. '*Feijao hranco (white)." 

46466. ** Feijdo enxofre (sulphur).' 

46467. ''Feijao mulatinho." 

46468. "FeijSo manteiga (butter).' 
46460. " Feijao mulata gorda:' 
46470. '* Feijao preto (black)." 



»f 



f» 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 19 

46471 and 46472. Viona sinensis (Tomer) Savl. Fabaceae. CkiwpeA. 
46471. " Feijdo fradinho:' 46472. " Feijdo macacar 

46473. Prunus mume Sieb. and Zucc. Amygdalacece. 

Japanese apricot. 

From Yuba City, Calif. Presented by Mrs. J. H. Barr. Received August 
22, 1918. 

** Seeds from a tree of the so-called pluracot. Since this species has shown 
promise as a stoclc resistant to crown-gall, the seeds from this plumcot are to i>e 
distributed for testing for resistance to this disease.*' {David FairchUd.) 

46474. Brabejum stellatifolium L. Proteaceee. 

From Pretoria, South Africa. Presented by Mr. I. B. Pole Evans, Division 
of Botany, Department of Agriculture. Received August 22, 1918. 

A shrub or small tree 8 to 10 feet high, found in the western part of South 
Africa. The purplish twigs bear lanceolate, serrate, coriaceous leaves In whorls 
of six. The white sweet-scented flowers are borne in dense axillary racemes 
3 to 6 inches long and are followed by ovoid, densely velvety fruits 1 to 2 inches 
long, each containing a single seed. The seed may be eaten after prolonged 
soaking in water. The red reticulated wood is used for Joiners' and turners' 
ornamental work. (Adapted from ThiseltottrDyer, , Flora Capensia, vol, 5, 
p. 50^,) 

46475. Brassica oleracea viridis L. Brassicaceae 

Jersey tree kale. 

From St. John, Jersey, Channel Islands, England. Presented by Mr. D. R. 
Bisson. Received August 24, 1918. 

" In this section Jersey kale Is sown at the end of summer, then transplanted 
to 2 to 3 feet apart about November. It must be protected to stand severe frost. 
Its stalk attains a height of 8 to 12 feet. The leaves of the growing plant are 
used for feeding cattle and pigs." (Bisaon.) 

VoT previous introduction, see S. P. I. No. 44829. 

46476. Ortza sativa L. Poaceae. Sice. 

From Acapulco, Mexico. Presented by Mr. John A. Ganion, American 
consul. Received August 29, 1918. 

"Purple rice (arroz morado). From the neighborhood of Tecpan, State of 
Guerrero." {Gamon,) 

Introduced for the variety tests being carried on by the Office of Cereal 
Investigations and for trial by other cooperators. 

46477. Belou marmelos (L.) Lyons. Rutacece. Bel. 

{Aegle marmelos CJorrea.) 

From Shahjehanpur, India. Presented by Mr. N. L. Rockey, district super- 
intendent, Methodist Episcopal Church. Received Septen)ber 3, 1918. 

"The bel fruit grows plentifully in India. It is prized as a fruit from 
which to make sherbet Some of the fruits are very fine; others are useless. 
It has the flavor of concentrated peaches. The fruit is extremely valuable in 
the treatment of dysentery, as It is a mild astringent. At the same time it is 
a food." {Hockey.) 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46478 and 46479. 

From Calcutta, India. Presented by Mr. Humphrey G. Carter, eamoii 
botanist, Indian Museum. Received July 1, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr 
Carter. 

** From Hslpaw in the Shah States in the north of Burma, I have received i 
packet of mixed seeds." 

46478. BsABSiCA chinbnsis Jusl. Brassicacen. Husttii 
" The seeds are extremely fine." 

46479. Brabsica buooba (Roxb.) Prain. Brassicacese. Hnstaii 
" The seeds have a rugose testa." 

46480 and 46481. 

From Zacuapam, Mexico. Presented by Dr. C. A- Purpu& ReceiTf' 
August 24, 1918. Quoted native names by Dr. Purpus. 

46480. Cajan zndiouk Spreng. Fabacese. Figeon-p«i 

"FrijoUto garhanzo," 

" The pigeon-pea, or guandu, supposed to be a native of India, » 
cultivated widely for food in the Tropics and Subtropics. It Is perennttl 
in frostless regions, but is usually cultivated as an annual. The pUt^ 
develops into a large, semiwoody bush reaching a height of 5 to 10 M 
Although the skin of the pigeon-pea is a little tough, the flavor is 
good." {R, A. Young.) 

For previous introduction and fuller description, see S. P. I. No. 46051 

46481. Cbataegub Mexican a Moc. and Sesse. Malaceie. HawthoiC' 

" Tcjocoter 

A bushy tree 8 to 10 feet high, with oblong leaves and lar^e, ligl"- 
yellow fruits, native of the table-lands of Mexico. 

For previous introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 45818. 

46482 to 46486. 

From British Guiana. Presented by Mr. John Ogilvie. Rupununy Rivrf 
Received August 27, 1918. Quoted notes by Mr. Ogilvie. 

South American shrubs used as fish poisons. 

46482. Sesban sp. Fabacess. 

" No. 1. Hairry or Ai. A small shrub planted by natives around tb^ir 
houses or in the fields. It grows easily and matures quickly. The leavt? 
and small twigs are pounded and thrown into the pool." 

46483. (Undetermined.) 

" No. 2. A shrub planted as above. The leaves and fruits are pif^^ 
while green and rubbed to a pulp on a grater, then mixed with grated 
roots of the bitter or poisonous cassava. It keeps if not allowed to milde*. 
Pellets the size of a marble are thrown into the creek." 

46484. (Undetermined.) 

** No. 3. Found wild in the forest and grows rapidly on old abandon** 
oh»a rings. It becomes a tree 60 to 100 feet high and 2 feet in diaineter, 
with soft white wood. The leaves, seeds, and twigs are pounded En<! 
thrown into the water." 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 21 

46482 to 46486— Continued. 

46485. Gabtogab sp. Caryocaraceie. 

" No. 4. Kowar. Grows plentifully along banks of all creeks and rivers 
in the interior. It reaches a height of 100 feet and over and a diameter 
of 2 or 3 feet. The heartwood is tough and exceedingly cross-grained ; 
makes good native corrals. The fruit is pounded in a small hole in the 
ground and thrown Into the pool. The Juice which collects while pounding 
the fruit is carefully scooped up and thrown in with the pounded fruit. 
The leaves are seldom used, as they are not nearly so powerful. The 
juice is exceedingly painful if it gets in the eyes, and severe headacho 
and vomiting are caused to Europeans by inhaling the fumes when 
pounding the fruit." 

46486. (Undetermined.) 

** No. 5. Inyak. Grows abundantly on the open prairie only on the 
higher sterile ridges and mountains, on soil consisting of hard red 
decomposed diorite. It is a small stunted shrub not more than 20 feet 
high. The pounded leaves are used." 

46487 to 46489. 

From Los Banos, Laguna, Philippine Islands. Collected by Mr. N. Catalan, 
College of Agriculture. Received September 3, 1918. Quoted notes by 
Mr. Catalan. 

46487. Canabixjm luzonicum (Blume) A. Gray. Balsameacese. 

• **Pili. From Mount Maqulling, Los Banos. The tree is a source of the 

* brea blanca * of commerce. The stone of the fruit contains an oily 
endosperm which Is very good to eat. The plant grows in the forest at 
low altitudes." 

46488. Pahudia bhomboidea (Blanco) Prain. Ceesalpiniacefle. 
{Afzelia rhomhoidea Vidal.) 

**Tindalo. From Mount Maqulling, Los Banos. A tree that Is usually 
found in somewhat open situations at low altitudes. The wood is very 
durable and beautifully colored ; used for finer constructions ; one of the 
best Philippine woods." 

46489. KooRDEBSiobENDBON piNNATUM (Blauco) Merr. Anacardiacese. 
(K. celehicum Engl.) 

''Amuguis. From Mount Maqulling, Los Banos. A medium to large 
tree, growing In the forest at low altitudes. According to the Phlllppino 
standard of classification, the wood falls under the third class." 

46480 to 46489. 

From Rosario, Argentina. Purchased in the markets by Mr. Wilbert L. 
Bonney, American consul. Received September 4, 1918. Quoted notes 
by Mr. Bonney. 

These legumes have been introduced for use in a series of experiments In 
testing and breeding varieties of South American plants bearing beanlike seeds 
for the purpose of selecting or developing strains suited to the various condi- 
tions obtaining in different parts of the United States. 

46490. Phaseolus lunatus L. Fabacese. Lima bean. 
" From the Province of Buenos Aires." 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

46480 to 46499— Continued. 

46491 to 46495. Phaheoli^s vi^lciaris L. Fabaeea?. Common beuu 

46491. ** Porofos coloradoa (Arroyo Seoo). From the Provino- •' 
Santa Fe." 

46492. "IniiHirted from Chile." 

46493. ** Sanjuanhu). From the Province of San Juan." 

46494. *' PorotoM mcndoHnoa. From the Province of Mendoza/' 

46495. " Saltet'to. Fmm the I'rovince of Salta." 

46496 to 46498. Victa faba Ia Fabacete. Broad beac. 

46496. •• Habas enterrianns. From the Province of Entre Rios." 

46497. ** Habai de HCviUe. From Santa Fe Province." 

46498. " Hahan Haltenas. From the Province of Salta." 

46499. ViGNA SINENSIS (Torner) Savi. Fabaceie. Co^sp*- 

" From the Province of Mendoza." 

46600. Belou marmelos (L.) Lyons. Rutacese. BeL 

(Aeffle marmelos Correa.) 

From Peradenlya, Ceylon. Presented by Mr. H. F. Macmillan, superin- 
tendent of the Royal Botanic Gardens. Received September 5. 191S. 

For previous Introduction and description, see S. P. I. No. 46477. 

46601. Eruca 8ATIVA Hill. Brassicaceie. Soquette. 

From Imiln. Presented by Mr. A. T. Ga&re, director of the Royal Botanic 
Gardens at Sibpur, near Calcutta. Received September 6, 1918. 

l^oquette, or rocket-salad, is a low-growing plant from southern Europe, it? 
leaves of which resemble those of radish and turnip. It is much used by th^ 
French as a spring and autumn salad and potherb. The flavor of the youu:: 
tender leaves bears a strong resemblance to that of horse-radish. (Adapted 
from Bailey, Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture^ vol, 5, p. 2981.) 

46602 to 46521. 

From Para, Brazil. Presented by Mr. Andr^ Goeldl through the Araerif.in 
consul. Received September 9, 1918. Quoted notes by the consul. 

These legumes have been Introduced for use in a series of experiments :r 
testing and breeding varieties (»f South American plants bearing beanlike see*!* 
for the purpose of selecting or developing strains suited to the various comli- 
tlons obtaining in different parts of the United States. 

46502 to 46508. Phaskolvs lunatus L. Fabaceae. Lima bean- 

** No. 0. Fa ran HoriUUiH,"' This package containe<l six varieties, whk! 
were separated ns follows: 

46502. A. Medium-sized beans, nearly white, with black specks on 
the edge. 

46503. B. Small white heans. 

46504. C. Large white beans. 

46505. D. Large white beans with black spots and lines. 

46506. E. Medium-sized grayish beans with dark-brown eye. 

46507. F. Medium-sized reddish brown beans. 

46508. "No. 18. /V/rr/ iniiu (black l)eau)." 

46509 to 46518. Piiaskolvs vrujARis L. Fabaceie. Common bean 

46509. **No. 1. Unjailo i striped bean)." 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1918. 23 

16502 to 46521— Continued. 

46510. "No. 2. Fcijao ttalmao (salmon beau)." 

46511. "No. 4. Feijdo riuva alegre (merry widow bean)/' 

46512. "No. 5. Mulatinho (mulatto)." 

46513. "No. 7. Feijao prcto (black bean)." 

46514. "No. 8. Feijao favinha (little bean)." 

46515. "No. 10. Feijao carrapaio (tick bean)." 

46516. "No. 12. Feijao hranco (white bean)." 

46517. "No. 14. Feijdo enxofre (sulphur bean)." 

46518. "No. 15. Feijao rermelho (red bean)." 

46519. VioNA CTLiNDRiCA (Stickm.) Skeeb;. Fabaceje. Catjang. 

" No. 9. Feijdo manteiga (butter bean)." 
46520 and 46521. Viqna sinensis (Torner) Savi. Fabaceae. Cowpea. 

46520. "No. 3. Frade (friar be&)." 

46521. "No. 11. Feijdo hocca preta (black-mouth bean)." 

46522. Ceiba pentandra (L.) Gaertn. Bombacaceee. Kapok. 

(Eriodendron anfractuomim DC) 

From Guadalajara, Mexico. Presented by Mr. John R. Silliman, American 
consul. Recei\ed September 10, 1918. 

" The kapok tree, native in the American Tropics, is widely distributed in the 
Tropics of both hemispheres. It attains a height of 75 to 100 feet, with wide- 
Kpreading horizontal branches, making an attractive ornamental or shade tree. 
It is often planted along the borders of fields for fence posts. It begins to bear 
seed pods containing kapok down when about 5 years old, and the yield of 
pods increases with the age of the tree. Well-developed trees under favorable 
conditions yield about 7,(X)0 pounds per acre. Kapok can not be spun, but it is 
an excellent material for pillows, mattresses, life preservers, etc., and its use 
Is rapidly Increasing." (L. H. Dewey.) 

For previous Introd