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Full text of "Plants of Monroe County, New York, and adjacent territory"

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THE LuESTHER T. MERTZ LIBRARY 



THE MEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 



THE LuESTHER T. MERTZ LIBRARY 



THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN 

[Extracted from Proceedings of the Rochester Academy of Science, I 'ol. j.\ 



PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK, 
AND ADJACENT TERRITORY. 



By Florence Beckwith and Mary E. Macauley, 

Assisted by Joseph B. Fuller, 

As a Committee of the Botanical Section. 



Rochester, N. Y. 
Published by the Society. 

June, 1896. 



8 v32 



lotS^ 



[Extracted from the Proceedings of the Rochester Academy of Science, Volume J. 




PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK, AND ADJA- 
CENT TERRITORY. 

By Florence Beckwith and Mary E. Macauley, 

Assisted by Joseph B. Fuller, 

Under authority of the Section of Botany. 



CONTENTS: 

PAGE. 

Inception of the Work ; Authorship 2 

Scope of the List 3 

Territory included 3 

The Map 3 

Authorities and Collectors 3 

Early Botanists of the Region 3 

Recent Collectors 4 

Acknowledgements 6 

Localities of Special Interest ; The Lesser Floras 6 

Shore of Lake Ontario 6 

Irondequoit Bay 7 

Genesee River 8 

Mendon Ponds S 

Swamp at Adams Basin 9 

Bergen Swamp 10 

Ravine at Holley 11 

1, Pkoc. Roch. Acad, of Sc. Vol. 3, May, 1896. 



2 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

Introduction of Species 12 

Disappearance of Species 12 

Forest Trees 13 

Statistics of the Flora 14 

Systematic Distribution 14 

Leading Orders ^ 14 

Leading Genera 15 

Comparative Statistics 16 

Affinities of the Monroe Flora 17 

General Comparison 17 

Comparison with the Cayuga Flora 19 

Plants common to the Monroe and Cayuga Floras 19 

Comparison with the Buffalo Flora 20 

Plants common to the Monroe and Buffalo Floras 20 

Comparison of Cayuga and Buffalo Floras 22 

Plants common to the Cayuga and Buffalo Floras 22 

Lists of Plants peculiar to each of the three Floras .... 22 

Plants peculiar to the Monroe Flora 22 

Plants peculiar to the Cayuga Flora 24 

Plants peculiar to the Buffalo Flora 26 

Physical Characters of the Region, by H. L. Fairchild 28 

Geography and Hydrography. 28 

Topography and Altitudes. . . 28 

List of Elevations ... 29 

Geology 31 

Stratigraphy 31 

Pleistocene Drift 33 

Influence upon Plant-life 35 

Climatic Conditions 36 

Statistics of Climate at Rochester 36 

Date of earliest blossoming of Trees 38 

The Catalogue .... . .. . 39 

Explanation of Plan 39 

Authorities 39 

Typography and Reference Marks 40 

List of Phanerogams 41 

List of Vascular Acrogens 131 

Bibliography 135 

Corrections and Insertions 146 

Index to Orders and Genera 147 

Inception of the Work ; Authorship. 

The Botanical Section of the Rochester Academy of Science has 
for many years entertained the plan of eventually publishing the 
flora of this region, and the members of the Section have individually 
and collectively labored earnestly toward that end. About four years 
ago the Section appointed a Committee, consisting of the Chairman 
and Vice-Chairman, to compile and prepare for publication the flora 
of Monroe county and adjacent territory. The Committee have 
collated all the lists of plants of this vicinity which they have been 
able to obtain, have examined the specimens in the herbarium of the 
Academy, and have used all available sources of information. 



1 894-1 plants of monroe county. 3 

Scope of the List. 

The list aims to include the names of plants which grow without 
cultivation in Monroe and adjoining counties. While it is believed to 
be nearly complete as regards Monroe county, it is not claimed to be 
so for the adjacent counties. 

The list includes phanerogams a ular acrogens. Much 

care has been exercised in the deter of specimens, and all 

those concerning which there have been r« enable doubts have been 

excluded. 

Territory Included. 

The territory included, as seen by the accompanying map, com- 
prises the whole of Monroe county and parts of Genesee, Livingston, 
Orleans, Ontario and Wayne counties. The area in general is the 
lower drainage basin of the Genesee river, with that of Irondequoit 
creek and smaller streams upon the lake border. 

THE MAP. 

The map, Plate i, was drawn expressly to accompany this list, and 
is designed to be a guide to all parts of the region, locating as it does 
the roads and streams, and points of especial botanical interest. In 
lack of any definite geographic boundaries, the outlines of the map 
were fixed somewhat arbitrarily. 

Authorities and Collectors. 
early botanists of the regiox. 
The work and records of some of the early botanists have been of 
great assistance to us. Among these botanists Dr. Chester Dewey, 
whose work in Rochester extended from 1836 to 1867, is the most 
eminent. His great work on the Carices had been commenced in 1824, 
and he brought to Rochester an established reputation as a botanist. 
"Botany was a favored subject in the school curriculum, and it was 
seldom that a class was lacking to receive his instruction. Up to the 
year 1850 farming lands and the virgin forests occupied a large 
portion of the present area of the City of Rochester, and therefore 
the meadows and fields, woodlands and by-ways, were easy of access, 
and the native plants were gathered by many eager collectors. In 
this way Dr. Dewey examined and re-examined many times the 
greater portion of the flora of this region, while at the same time he 
was training up the youth to share his interest in botanical pursuits. 
The influence which he thus exerted is still perceived by some of the 



4 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

members of the Academy of Science, and it has passed out and 
onward over a great region, so that a large number of the younger 
botanists of the present time owe indirectly to Dr. Dewey the inter- 
est which they now possess for botanical studies."* 

He was the author of a paper entitled " Catalogue of Plants and 
Time of Flowering in and about the City of Rochester, for the year 
1841," published in the Fifty-fifth Annual Report of the Regents of 
the University of the State of New York, but unfortunately he did 
not publish a complete record of his work in this region. 

From 1825 to 1880 Dr. Samuel B. Bradley! did very thorough 
work along the lake shore and the inlets and ponds adjoining. Some 
of the plants which he reported have since become extinct, or, at 
least, have not been found by later botanists. 

The Rev. Lawrence Holzer was Rector of St. Joseph's Church, 
Rochester, from 1862 to 1865. He was an enthusiastic botanist, and 
collected quantities of specimens which he sent to societies and insti- 
tutions in Europe. A list of the plants found by him, comprising 766 
species, shows that he explored the city and vicinity very thoroughly. 
This list was kindly lent the Committee by Dr. C. M. Booth. 

The late Mr. Otto Betz, whose name frequently appears in the 
list, was a close and accurate observer, and reported many new locali- 
ties for plants, particularly in the towns adjoining Rochester on the 
east. 

It seems fitting in this place to mention the late Mrs. Mary E. 
Streeter, to whose enthusiasm and persistent labors the Botanical 
Section in a large measure owes its existence. She was an intense 
lover of nature, and possessed not only unusual powers of observation 
but also a mind of rare intelligence ; her loss is felt to be irreparable. 
The publication of a list of Monroe county plants was a work which 
she had planned to do, but failing health put an end to her labors. 

RECENT COLLECTORS. 

Dr. Charles M. Booth, one of the most indefatigable of our 
collectors and a particularly pains-taking and accurate botanist, still 
resides near Rochester. The record of his explorations in Monroe 
and Genesee counties has been of very great assistance to us. He 
has made especial study of the Graminecc. At present he is working 



♦From Biographical Sketch of Dr. Dewey, by C. W. Seelye, read before the Academy of 
Science June 24, 1895. 

tSee Biographical Sketch, Proc. Roch. Acad. Science, Vol. II. pp. 261-263, 1894. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 5 

on the mosses of this region, and it is hoped that the results of his 
labors upon these interesting plants will be given to the Academy 
for publication. 

Mr. Joseph B. Fuller, Curator in Botany to the Academy, is 
doing excellent work on our herbarium, to which he has generously 
added his own large collection. His extended list of plants, the 
result of many years' collecting, particularly along the banks of the 
Genesee river, added largely to our list of species. 

Mr. Charles W. Seelye, a fine general botanist, has of late 
confined his attention mostly to ferns. A list, with notes, of those 
indigenous to the vicinity of Rochester was furnished by him to the 
Academy in 1891,* which is the basis of our present list. 

Mr. George T. Fish, who has collected more around Sodus bay 
than any other of our local botanists, and who shares the honors of 
that locality with Mr. Hankenson, kindly lent to the compilers his 
valuable list, revised from his herbarium. 

Dr. Anna H. Searing has made a special study of the plants 
growing in the vicinity of Long Pond.f Her list has aided greatly, 
especially in the Carices. 

Mr. M. S. Baxter has extended our list by adding several plants 
never before reported in this region. Among these are Arceuthobiu?n 
pusillum and Epipactis Hellebortne. He has also given many addi- 
tional localities for rare plants. 

Professor W. H. Lennon, of the Brockport Normal School, has 
reported a number of plants not observed by others. To him and Mr. 
Baxter are due the credit of explorations in the western part of 
Monroe county, particularly near Adams Basin, and also near Holley, 
in Orleans county. Many rare plants have been reported by them 
from these localities. 

Miss Lucy Weld, of Lyndonville, has furnished a partial list of 
the plants of Orleans county. 

To Mr. E. L. Hankenson, of Newark, a Corresponding Member 
of the Academy, we are indebted not only for his extensive and valu- 
able list of Wayne county plants, but also for generous donations of 
specimens, representing the flora of other parts of our country, as 
well as that of our own immediate neighborhood. Where mention is 
made of Wayne county it will be understood that Mr. Hankenson is 
the authority, unless otherwise noted. 



*Proc. Roch. Acad. Science, Vol. I. pp. 186-197, 1891. 
tSee Proc. Roch. Acad. Science, Vol. II, pp. 297-300, 1895. 



6 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

A CKNOWLEDGEMENTS. 

The thanks of the compilers are also due to Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Streeter, Mr. A. M. Dumond, Mr. C. C. Laney, Mr. John 
Walton, Mr. John Dunbar, Mr. W. W. Parce, Mrs. J. H. Mc- 
Guire, Mrs. Geo. C. King, Miss Emma E. Iles, Mrs. E. L. Maguire, 
and Miss Josephine Hoffman, members of the Botanical Section ; 
their untiring zeal has added the names of many plants to the list. 
To Mr. Baxter and Mr. Walton we owe the description of Mendon 
Ponds ; to Professor Lennon the description of the ravine at Holley 
and the swamp at Bergen ; and to Mr. Baxter the description of the 
swamp at Adams Basin. 

To Professor W. W. Rowlee, of Cornell University, we are 
especially grateful for his review of the entire proof of the plant list, 
and for his examination of large numbers of doubtful specimens, 
particularly the Cyperacecz, with the assistance of Mr. K. McK. 
Wiegand upon the Carices. 

The assistance of Mr. J. B. Fuller in preparing this list, and 
in making the comparisons between the floras, has been invaluable. 
Without his pains-taking care and untiring labor the list would have 
been far less complete and accurate. 

To the President of the Academy, Professor H. L. Fairchild, 
the Committee are indebted not only for the chapter upon the phys- 
ical characters of the region, but for the help and encouragement 
which alone have made possible the publication of this list. 

Localities of Special Interest ; The Lesser Floras. 

The flora of the territory, as a whole, is not greatly varied, 
although there are localities of special interest. Among these are 
the shores of Lake Ontario and Irondequoit bay, the banks of the 
Genesee river, the Mendon ponds, the swamp at Adams Basin, the 
large swamp in Genesee county commonly called Bergen swamp, and 
the ravine at Holley, brief descriptions of which follow. 

SHORE OF LAKE ONTARIO. 

The shore of Lake Ontario is usually steep bluffs of "boulder 
clay." In some places the Medina sandstone is exposed, while in many 
places the new beach has cut off bays which are filling as marshes. 

The shore of the lake has been very thoroughly explored by Dr. 
S. B. Bradley, Dr. C. M. Booth, Dr. Anna M. Searing, Mr. J. B. Fuller, 
and Mr. George T. Fish. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 7 

The following plants are peculiar to the lake shore : Ranunculus 
flammula var. reptans, Cakile Americana, Polanisia graveolens, Lathyrus 

maritimus, Strophostyles angulosa, Potentilla sup in a, P. Anserina, Cot cop- 
sis discoidea, Artemisia caudala, Polygonella arliculata, Euphorbia po/yg- 
onifolia, /uncus Balticus var. littoralis, Cyperus Schweinitzii, Scirpus 
Smithii, Sporobolus cryptaudrus, Ammophila aruudinacea, Equisetum vari- 
egatum. Artemisia Canadensis occurs along the lake shore and on the 
bluffs of Irondequoit bay near the lake. 

IRONDEQUOIT RAY. 

The shores of Irondequoit bay and the slopes of the depression 
which continues several miles south of the water are high and steep 
bluffs of clays or sandy silts. Through this deposit the tributary 
streams have cut deep, narrow gullies. Isolated masses of the deposit, 
as "sugar loaves" and butte-like mounds, give a very picturesque 
character to the upper or southern part of the gorge. 

The flora of the shores of the bay is not in any degree distinctive, 
but is remarkable rather for the great variety of species of plants 
found here, some of which are mentioned as follows. The trees are 
principally oak and chestnut, with a few pignut hickory, birch, poplar, 
hemlock, witch hazel, and occasional specimens of white and pitch 
pine. Desmodiums, Lespedezas and Lupins are plentiful. Aquilegia 
Canadensis, Baptisia tinctoria, Viburnum acerifolium, Hieracium venosum, 
H. paniculatum, H. scabrum, Vaccineum stamineum, V. Pennsylranicum, 
Pyrola rolundi/'o/ia, P. elliplica, Gaultheria procumbens, Rhododendron 
nudiflorum, Gerardia flava, G. quercifolia, G. pedicularia and Cypripe- 
dium pubescens are common. Epigcea repens was formerly abundant, 
but is now scarce. Anemone cy/iudrica, Tephrosia Virginiana, Castil- 
leia cocci ne a, and Chamcelirium Caro/intanum, though scarce, are more 
frequently found here than elsewhere. Arenaria stricta, Hibncus 
Moschcutos, Poterium Canadense, Potentilla paluslns, Salix Candida and 
Polygonum Muhlenbergii are rare. Campanula roiunditolia var. arctica, 
Gentiana puberula, Fcstuca lenella, and Cyperus filiculmis have not been 
found elsewhere in our district. Of Pterospora Andromedea a single 
specimen has been found. 

The extremities of the bay are filled with beds of flags. All the 
forms of Typha are present, T. latifolia var. don gat a being the most 
plentiful. Extensive beds of Chara exist. Elodea, Myriophyllum 
spicatum and various species of Potamogeion are abundant. Wolffia 



8 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIEN T CE. [Oct. 8, 

and Lemna cover the stagnant waters in coves and in openings among 
the flags. Nymphaa rent for mis, Utricularia vulgaris and Valisneria 
are common. Naias marina is abundant in some of the coves on the 
west side. Sparganium minimum is found in our district only here. 

GENESEE RIVER. 

The walls of the ravine of the Genesee river below Rochester are 
vertical rock-walls of sandstone, shale and limestone, about 200 feet 
high, with heavy talus on the radial side of the river curves. In the 
southern part of the city the river flows in a shallow channel in the 
Niagara limestone. Above the city the river flows in a bed of drift 
with broad flood-plains. 

The river and its banks have been a peculiarly rich field for the 
botanist, including as they do plants belonging to the aquatic flora as 
well as those of upland growth. Mr. Joseph B. Fuller, who has prob- 
ably explored this region more thoroughly than any other collector, 
excepting Dr C. M. Booth, reports that in the territory between Vin- 
cent Place bridge and Hanford's Landing, a distance of two and a 
half miles, he has found five hundred species of plants. We doubt if 
a better record can be shown anywhere for the area covered. The 
growth of the city has undoubtedly destroyed some of the species, 
but the most of them can still be found. 

MEN DON PONDS. 

The Mendon ponds lie among a group of sand and gravel knolls* 
about twelve miles south-east from Rochester. They are five in num- 
ber, the smallest covering only a few acres, the largest having an area 
of over one hundred acres. Four are connected by creeks or marshes, 
and form the head of Irondequoit creek. A fifth is apparently with- 
out outlet. Some sphagnum bogs represent other former ponds. 
The margins of the ponds are generally low and marshy. Sphagnum 
grows here luxuriantly, forming a bed for large numbers of Sarra- 
cenia, Drosera, Calopogon, and many other species. The land adjoining 
is under cultivation, but some low borders and hillsides are covered 
with forests which contain nearly every species of tree found within 
the district. The tupelo is represented by several large, fine trees. 
Black spruce is reported within the county only at this point. A char- 
acteristic feature of this locality is the occurrence of thousands of 
plants of species which are elsewhere scarce. Acres of marsh are 



*See page 35. 



Proc. Roch. Acad. Science. 




1894 J PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 9 

yellow with Potentilla fruticosa. Cassandra calyculata has so over- 
grown one bog that it cannot be crossed except by treading down the 
shrub. Andromeda poll folia, Ledum latifolium, Vaccinium corymbosu?n, 
Gaylussacia resinosa. Nemopanthes fascicularis, Pyrus arbutifolia var. 
melanocarpa, and Aralia hispida are all present in great quantities. 
Sarracrnia purpurea, Drosera rotundifolia, Pogonia ophioglossoides, Calo- 
pogon pulchellus, Cypripedium spectabile, C. pubescens, C. parviflorum and 
C. acaule are exceedingly abundant ; and the same may be said of 
Woodwardia Virginica. Nymphaa odorala var. minor covers all the 
borders. Other plants which occur in more or less abundance are : 
Viola tricolor var. arvensis, Parnassia Caroliniana, Drosera intermedia 
var. America?ia, Decodon rerlicillatus, Rhus venenata, Viburnum cassin- 
oides, Valeriana sylvatica, Menyanthes trifoliata, Utricularia cornuta, 
U. gibba, U. resupinaia, Corjjfus A?nericana, Arceuthobium pusillum, Salix 
myrtilloides, Corallorhiza odontorhiza, Habenaria blephariglottis, H. lacera, 
Piparis Lxselii, Scheuchzeria paluslris, Dulichium spathaceum, Rhyn- 
chospora alba, Scleria verlicillaia, Aspleniiwi ebe?ieum, Botrychium matri- 
caria'folium, Wolffia, and various species of Carex. 

SIVA MP A T ADAMS BASIN. 

The swamp near Adams Basin has furnished many interesting 
species. It comprises several pieces of low land separated by culti- 
vated fields, and in extent, including the fields, is about half a mile 
from north to south, and nearly as far east and west. The land sur- 
rounding it is rolling, and on the east are low hills, the termination 
of the range which may be traced south-eastward to the Pinnacle 
hills at Rochester. Underlying, at a depth of fifteen feet, is the 
Medina sandstone. The water supply is from several small streams, 
which, passing through the swamp, finally empty into Salmon creek. 
Numerous springs also give a never-failing supply, especially to the 
lower swamp. Efforts have been made, with some success, to drain 
the land, and probably before many years this station will be entirely 
lost. A variety of forest trees — maple, ash, oak, birch and tamarack — 
formed a dense wood formerly, but, except in the lower swamp, few 
of the larger trees remain. Their space has been taken up in the 
middle swamp by a luxuriant growth of Myrica cerifera. The lower 
swamp rises slightly along the southern edge, and here beech, hickory 
and white pine are growing. North and east it is lower and covered 
with tamarack, birch, hemlock, and an abundant growth of Rhus vene- 
nata. The plants are those peculiar to cold bogs, and many arc not 

2, Pkoc. Koch. Acad. 01 Sc. Vol.. 3, June, i8y6. 



lO ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8 

found nearer than Bergen or Mendon. Among those found here, but 
rarely or not at all in adjacent forests, may be noted : Clematis Vir- 
giniana, Copiis trifolia, Drosera roiundifolia, Flozrkia proserpinacoides, 
Rhus venenata, Saxifraga Pennsylvanica, Cornus Canadensis, Viburnum 
Opulus, Solidago ulmifolia, Senecio aureus, Lobelia spicata, Gaylussacia 
resirwsa, Vaccinium corymbosum, Rhododendron nudiflonan, Ledum lalifo- 
lium, Trientilis Americana, Bartonia tenella, Menyanthes trifoliata, 
Myrica cerifera, Larix Americana, Habenaria tridentata, H. psy codes, 
Spiranthes latifolia, Calopogon pulchellus, Liparis La'selii, Cypripcdium 
spectabile, C. acaule, Smtlax hispida, Smilacina trifolia, Lilium Cana- 
dense, Eriophorum polystachyon, Carex polytrichoides, Triticum caninum, 
Ophioglossum vulgatu?n. 

Several other plants of the scarcer species occur near this station. 
The walking fern, Cauplosorus rhizophyllus, is quite abundant at two 
points within three or four miles. A square of twenty feet of the 
chain fern, Woodwardia Virginica, was found here in 1894. No other 
station for it except Mendon has been reported in the county. 
Cassandra calyculata is very abundant two miles south-east of the 
village. The eastern limit of the papaw, Asimina triloba, seems to be 
within Monroe county. Several groups are growing in Parma, north 
of Adams Basin, in Sweden, and thence westward. The trees spread 
by root sprouts, forming dense groups from three to twenty feet high, 
but all connected at the root. Seedlings seem to be scarce, although 
the trees are usually well fruited. 

BERGEX SWAMP. 

Bergen swamp has long been considered one of the most inter- 
esting botanical points in western New York. It lies in the north- 
eastern part of the town of Bergen, Genesee county, between the West 
Shore railroad and Black creek, about twenty miles from Rochester, 
and is one of a succession of swamps which occupy a depression 
extending from the Genesee river to the Niagara river. Through the 
western part of this valley flows Tonawanda creek ; Black creek 
drains the eastern portion. Bergen swamp lies upon the divide 
between these two streams. 

This swamp consists of an open portion containing one hundred 
or more acres, surrounded by a belt of woods from twenty to one 
hundred rods in width. The open part is mainly a marl bed covered 
with a variety of grass-like plants, chiefly sedges, with patches of 
Sphagnum and a few dwarf cedars {Thuja) and tamaracks. The sur- 



1894] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. II 

rounding belt of land is covered with a dense jungle of cedars and 
tamarack, with here and there on drier portions a few pines. Willows 
and other marsh-growing shrubs help to make up the dense under- 
growth. Farther to the north, near Black creek, the conifers give 
place to a heavy growth of elms and soft maple. On the southeast 
is a low, sandy ridge, known as Torpy Hill, one end of which is 
covered with ,k hard wood," mostly beech, and a few hemlocks. A 
similar rid.^e is found on the north-west. 

The flora of Bergen swamp is very different from that of the 
surrounding country, and is characteristically northern. Here are 
found many rare plants, some of which do not appear to occur else- 
where in western New York, and others which have been reported 
only at Bergen, Mendon and Adams Basin. Among those peculiar 
to Bergen are : Lonicera ccerulea, Solidago neglecta var. liuoides, S. 
Houghtonii) Senecio aureus var. Balsamiia\ Mierosiylis monopliyllos, Coral- 
lorrhiza Inna/a, Goody era repens, Arethusa bulbosa, Calypso boreal is, 
Cypr'ipedium candidum, Listera cordata, Clintonia borealls, Tofieldia 
glutinosa, Eleocharis roslellata, E. pauciflora, Scirpus ca'spitosus, Car ex 
filiformis, C. Crawel, C flava var. viridula, C. Saltuensis, C echinata 
var. microstachys, Dalibarda repens, Salix lucida var. ? 

RA VINE A T HOLLEY. 

A few rods east of the station at Holley the railroad crosses a 
narrow ravine, a hundred or more feet in depth and extending south 
about one-half mile. Further south the stream which traverses the 
ravine flows over the comparatively hard rocks of the Clinton lime- 
stone, but the gorge is cut through the Medina sandstone. There 
appears to be nothing in the soil or the topography which should 
make it particularly interesting to the botanist, yet it is doubtful if 
there is another locality in Western New York of equal size on which 
so great a variety of ferns has been found Within a radius of much 
less than a mile have been gathered thirty species of ferns (including 
Botrychiums). The following are some of the rare ones which have 
been found in this locality : Polypoaium vulgare, Phegopteris Dryoptcns, 
Aspleniuni Ebeticum, A. trichomanes y Camptosorus rhizophyllus (growing 
on sandstone), Aspidtum Goldianum, Dicksonia pilosiuscula, Botrychium 
lanceolatum, B matricaricefolium, and B. ternatum. 

Among flowering plants found at HolTey may be mentioned Jeffer- 
sonia dipliylla, Acer spicatum, Lobelia cardinalis, Diervilla /r/juia, and 
Taxus Canadensis 



12 rochester academy of science. [oct. 8, 

Introduction of Species. 

The number of introduced plants increases every year. In the 
Flora of the State of New York, published in 1843, the number of 
introduced plants for the whole State is given as 160. The number 
in this list is 263, of which seven are indigenous to the State, though 
they are introductions to Monroe county. Several of these newly 
introduced plants come from the West, and it has been noted that 
species new to this district are frequently found along railroad tracks 
and in lumber yards. Some species have increased so rapidly that 
they have already become a nuisance, and others threaten to become 
so. Among the former may be particularly mentioned Chrysanthemum 
Le-ucanthemum, Daucus caroia, and Planiago lanceolata. Melilotus offici- 
nalis and M. alba, which a few years ago were but rarely seen are 
becoming very plentiful along the roadsides and in waste places. 
Hieracium aurantiacum has been reported in but few localities thus 
far, but where it has become established it has multiplied with great 
rapidity. Lactuca Scariola was first noticed only a few years since, 
but is now very frequent and in some places abundant. Cichorium 
Intybus is a common weed. Cenchrus tribuloidcs is rapidly spreading 
eastward along the Central railroad. Trifolium hybridum is becoming 
quite as common in fields and along roadsides as T. repens. 

As Rochester has been for many years a center of the " nursery 
business", the frequent occurrence of exotic shrubs and trees through- 
out the city and its suburbs is a natural result. In the case of nurseries 
which have been abandoned on account of the growth of the city, 
these foreign trees and shrubs are sometimes left to grow as if spon- 
taneously. In many such cases it is difficult to draw the line between 
plants which should or should not be included in the list. For 
example, in abandoned nursery grounds on North Union, Prince and 
Augusta streets the following trees and shrubs are now growing : 
Tilia Europcza, Quercus Robur, Castanea sativa, Fagus sylvatica, Salix 
Caprea, Populus dilalata, and Juniperus Virginiana var. prosirata. 
Where these plants seem to have become so firmly established that 
they would doubtless propagate if undisturbed, they have been num- 
bered in the list. 

Disappearance of Species. 

Pinguicula vulgaris, reported by Dr. Chester Dewey and Dr. C. M. 
P>ooth as growing on the rocks near the Genesee Falls, is extinct. 



s 94 . 



PL \\ is OB MONROE COUNTY. 



'3 



The following species have not been reported of late years. It is 
hoped that some of our botanists will re-discover them: 

Buchnera Americana. (Bradlev ) 



Euonymus Americanus. (Sartwell.) 
Polygala sanguinea. (Bradley.) 
Baptisia australis. (Eaton.) 
Spir.ua tomentosa. (Holzer.) 
Ribes prostratum. (Holzer.) 
(Enothera fruticosa. (Booth.) 
Helianthus strumosus var. mollis. 

(Bradley.) 
Gentiana puberula. (Fish, Fuller.) 
Hydrophyllum appendic. (Bradley.) 
Mimulus alatus. (Bradley.) 



Polygonella articulata. (Bradley.) 
Ouercus ilicifolia. (Holzer.) 
Allies balsamea. (Holzer.) 
Limnobium spon^ia. (Bradley.) 
Habenaria ciliaris. (Booth, Fuller, 

Bunker.) 
Scleria pauciflora. (Bradley.) 
Carex Richardsonii. (Bradley.) 
Glyceria elongata. (Holzer.) 
Bromus racemosa. (Holzer.) 



Forest Trees. 

The trees of the Genesee region have been widely known and have 
received frequent mention from the very earliest settlement of the 
country. The elms and the oaks have been particularly noted. The 
" Big Tree", or "Wadsworth Oak", was an object of reverence to the 
Indians as well as a landmark to the white settlers, and this with the 
" Markham Elm" have been frequently mentioned as magnificent 
specimens of forest growth. The elms in and about Rochester have 
been said to far exceed in beauty the celebrated Pittsfield elms. The 
course of nature and the ruthless hand of man have robbed us of 
most of these forest kings, but many fine specimens are yet to be 
found within our territory. 

The primitive forest of the region was largely composed of 
maple, beech, ash, oak, elm, basswood, hickory, chestnut, cherry, 
pine, poplar, butternut, black walnut and sycamore. Other less 
abundant species were hemlock, tulip tree, birch, tamarack and 
spruce. Pine trees formerly covered the table land adjoining Ironde- 
quoit bay. and a sycamore swamp fringed the city on its western 
border, but only here and there a solitary specimen is now left to 
represent these once abundant species 

In the vestiges of forests which remain, maple, beech, ash, oak, 
elm, basswood, hickory, iron-wood, chestnut, witch-hazel and dog- 
wood are the most plentiful trees; while cherry, birch, poplar and 
butternut are less frequent. Sassafras is found on hills, river banks 
and in ravines. Hemlock occurs in low woods and along river banks. 
Arbor vitoe is common in swamps and frequent along the river banks. 
Larch is common in swamps. The tupelo is scarce, and the hack- 



14 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

berry, papaw and tulip-tree are rare. Red cedar is found on the hills 
and the river bank, but is rare. Black spruce is found occasionally in 
swamps, but is scarce. 

Statistics of the Flora. 

The important groups and species in our flora will appear in the 
following tables, which in all cases include only phanerogams. 

The .list includes several groups of specific and varietal names, 
which are tabulated as follows : 

Species native to the Monroe Flora 948 

Species introduced to the Monroe Flora 250 

Total number of species . 1198 

Varieties — native 1 03 

introduced 1 t, 



Total of numbered species and varieties. 1314 

Species spontaneous but not established 36 

The total number of species and varieties reported in Monroe 
county is 1208. In the other counties represented in the list, 106 
species are reported which, up to the present time, have not been 
found in Monroe county. 

In all the following tables the numbered forms only are included. 

5 ] 'S TEMA TIC DIS TRIE U TION. 

The native and introduced species and varieties in this flora may 

be tabulated as follows : 

r. Species and 

Genera - Varieties. 

Polypetalae 167 393 

Gamopetalre 158 385 

Apetalae 43 r 34 



Total Dicotyledones 368 912 

Monocotyledones 116 390 

Gymnospermce - - 8 12 



Total Phoenogamia 49 2 T 3*4 

LEADING ORDERS. 

The following table shows the number of genera, species and 
varieties in some of the most largely represented orders : 



iS 94 .] 



PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTS 



i ; 



Orders. Genera. 

Cyperaceae 9 

Composite 43 

Gramineoj.- . 44 

Rosacea?. 15 

Leguminosne 20 

Orchidacea: . ... 16 

Labiatre 22 

Scrophulariacere 15 

Liliacese - 20 

Cruciferre 15 

Ranunculacere 13 

Ericaceae 16 

Polygonacere _ _ . . . 4 

Salicacene 2 

Umbelliferae 18 

Cupuliferre. 8 

Caryophyllacerc 9 

Caprifoliacea: 7 

Naiadaceas 5 



>ecies. 


SP 

\ 


ecies and 
arieties. 


"5 




'43 


127 




140 


97 




107 


56 




62 


5 2 




55 


41 




4' 


37 




39 


33 




36 


34 




34 


3 1 




33 


26 




33 


3° 




3° 


26 




28 


2 5 




27 


24 




24 


22 




24 


21 




21 


r 9 




20 


18 




J 9 



LEADIXG G EX ERA. 

The following table is arranged according to the number of 
species and varieties. 
Genera. 

Carex 77 

Aster 22 

Salix 19 

Solidago t 8 

Polygonum 17 

J uncus 9 

Ranunculus 9 

Viola 9 

Potamogeton 13 

Desmodium 12 

Habenaria 12 

Galium 10 

Panicum 10 

Veronica. . 11 

Ouercus 10 

Potentilla. . _ . 9 



Soecies S P ecies and 
species. Varieties> 



02 
26 
21 
20 
19 
'5 
14 
14 
13 
12 

I 2 
1 2 
12 

I I 
1 1 

TO 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



| Oct. 8, 



COMPARA TIVE ST A TIS7 ICS. 

To Professor William R. Dudley's Catalogue of "The Cayuga 
Flora," published in 1886, we are indebted, in part, for the figures in 
the three following tables: 

Plants of Monroe County, etc 1314 

The Cayuga Flora 1278 

Plants of Buffalo, etc. (with addenda) 1 243 

Plants of Oneida County, etc 1390 

Plants of Dutchess County T067 

Plants of Suffolk County. 852 

Flora of Washington, D. C, etc. . _ 1 2 1 1 

Flora of Essex County . . . . 1257 

Flora of Vicinity of Yale College. 1238 

It should, perhaps, be said in explanation, that "Plants of Oneida 
County and Vicinity," by John E. Paine, Jr , 1864, in reality covered 
nearly the whole State, excepting the south-eastern and the Adiron- 
dack regions; and that the "Plants of Buffalo and Vicinity," by the 
Buffalo Society of Natural History, 1883, includes plants within a 
radius of fifty miles of Buffalo. 

The following is a comparison of the larger orders : 



Order. 



Cyperaceae 

Composite 

Gramineoe 

Rosacea; 

Leguminosa2 . . 
Ranunculaceae 

Orchidaceae 

Ericaceae 

Crucifera: 

Labiatae 







No. Species and Varieties. 




co 

D 
W 


0) 



u 

C 
O 


03 

U 


6 

m 


'53 
a 

O 


en 

G 

CD 


co 


357 


143 


151 


115 


187 


138 


79 


497 


I40 


125 


151 


141 


IO9 


119 


297 


107 


107 


95 


no 


92 




T04 


62 


69 


55 


62 


48 


35 


208 


55 


45 


47 


54 


34 


41 


80 


33 


36 


39 


36 


27 


17 


7i 


4i 


35 


35 


42 


30 


15 


89 


30 


35 


29 


29 


33 


28 


7° 


33 


34 


37 


32 


27 


32 


121 


39 


33 


43 


40 


27 


3i 



108 
149 

IIO 

46 

57 
27 
24 
26 

34 

42 



The above estimates for the eastern United States (E. U. S.) are 
taken from Lester F. Ward's "Flora of Washington." 

The following table gives a comparison of two of the larger 
genera, two of the representative Atlantic coast genera and a repre- 



1 894.1 



PLANTS OF \I<>\ ROl ( OUNTY 



entative northern species, in respect to the number of species in 
these different sections: 



Floras with the number of species and 
varieties in each. 



Genus. 



Carex ■/; 

Aster 25 



Eupatorium 
Utricularia 
Habenaria . 



to 
U 



I 12 
24 

4 

4 

12 



80 
24 

3 

3 

10 





</5 







c 





u 


03 


U 


a 


g 


"0 

2 


c 


PU 


in 


130 


102 


33 


2Q 


20 


20 


6 


4 


10 


6 


3 


9 


16 


9 


3 



be 
C 

IS 



70 

21 

12 

2 

4 



The number of woody plants, including woody vines such as 
Clematis and Menispermum, and excluding such as Chimaphila and 
Gaultheria, is given below. Only so-called species are considered, 
and these are compared with the numbers given in Sargent's Forest 
Trees of North America, Tenth Census, Vol. IX. 

Monroe Flora. United States. 
Total number of species 203 

Native species 171 

Introduced species 32 

Native arborescent species. 80 412 

Introduced " " __.._. 19 

Affinities of the Monroe Flora. 
genera l com pa rison. 

Fortunately for the comparative study of our flora two lists of 
plants have been published, covering territory both east and west 
of this area. 

The "Plants of Buffalo and Vicinity" was published by the 
Buffalo Society of Natural History under the authorship of Dr. 
David T. Day. The list was not confined to any particular territory, 
but was extended from Buffalo east and south so as to include fields 
of botanical interest which the Society had studied. For example, 
the swamp at Bergen, in the eastern edge of Genesee County, is 
included, although it is fifty miles from Buffalo. This swamp is only 
twenty miles from Rochester, not far from the line of Monroe County, 



3, Pkoc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, March, 1896. 



l8 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

and is properly included in our district. The Buffalo list also includes 
the plants of Portage, on the middle valley of the Genesee river, 
forty-five miles from Buffalo, in an air-line, and sixty-three miles by 
the Erie railway. 

As the area included in the Buffalo list overlaps the proper terri- 
tory of our Monroe flora, a just comparison cannot be drawn without 
making some explanations and eliminating some species. 

The total number of species enumerated in the Buffalo list is 
1289. Of these not less than 46 are credited to the Bergen swamp 
only, or to other localities within our Monroe flora territory. To 
make a proper comparison, all the species should be excluded from 
the Buffalo list which are credited simply to the far-removed locali- 
ties, like Bergen and Portage. 

The "Cayuga Flora" was published in 1886 by Professor W. R. 
Dudley, of the Botanical Department of Cornell University. The 
territory of this list has natural geographic boundaries, and is nom- 
inally the hydrographic basin or drainage area of Cayuga lake. It 
covers an area of nearly 1 200 square miles, and includes a considerable 
variety of topography and range of altitude, as well as deep east-west 
ravines and other features affecting the flora. The temptation to 
include the peculiar flora of the West Junius ponds, which are out- 
side of the limits of the Cayuga basin, was so strong that Professor 
Dudley yielded in so far as to include it with explanation. He also 
notes species and varieties in the Seneca lake basin, but with con- 
scientious and scientific spirit he does not give them standing by 
numbering them in the list. 

The total number of species and varieties in the Cayuga flora is 
1278. 

The region covered by the Monroe county list has but little 
topographic variety or other physical features to modify the flora and 
multiply species. The large total number, 1309, is due to the thor- 
ough explorations of so many collectors, extending over many years. 
Species are not included concerning which there are any serious 
doubts. The list would have been materially lengthened had we in- 
cluded all the species fairly reported, and all "escapes" which have 
been seen growing spontaneously. In these respects great care has 
been exercised, and the error has been rather in excluding species 
which might be entitled to recognition. 

In the following lists will be found the comparison of the three 
floras, the territory of the Buffalo list lying contiguous upon the west 



8 9 4- 



PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 



19 



and the Cayuga area not far removed upon the east. In these lists 
the plants of Bergen swamp, Portage, Avon and Caledonia, are not 
credited to the Buffalo list. 



COMPARISON WITH THE CAYUGA FLORA. 

Plants common to the Monroe and Cayuga Floras, not reported in the 

Buffalo List. 



Ranunculus septentrionalis, 

Nymphasa odorata var. minor, 

Xuphar Kalmianum, 

Nasturtium palustre var. hispidum, 

Lepidium ruderale, 

Lepidium campestre, 

Viola blanda var. renifolia, 

Stellaria graminea, 

Hypericum Canadense var. majus, 

Rhamnus cathartica, 

Negundo aceroides, 

Polygala verticillata var. ambigua, 

Trifolium agrarium, 

Tephrosia Virginiana, 

Prunus domestica, 

Primus pumila, 

Prunus avium, 

Fragaria Virginiana var. Illinoensis, 

Potentilla Canadensis var. simplex, 

Pyrus arbutifolia, 

Crataegus tomentosa var. pyrifolia, 

Crataegus punctata, 

Ribes rotundifolium, 

Ribes rubrum, 

Sedum ternatum, 

Drosera intermedia, 

Lythrum Salicaria, 

Thaspium aureum var. trifoliatum, 

Chaerophyllum procumbens, 

Houstonia purpurea var. longifolia, 

Galium trifidum var. pusillum, 

Valeriana sylvatica, 

Mikania scandens, 

Solidago uliginosa, 

Solidago neglecta, 

Solidago neglecta var. linoides, 

Solidago Ohioensis, 

Sericocarpus conyzoides, 



Aster corymbosus, 
Aster undulatus, 
Aster diffusus var. hirsuticaulis, 
Aster junceus, 

Aster puniceus,var.\vith purple stems, 
nearly smooth, and flowers pinkish. 
Polymnia Uvedalia, 
Coreopsis discoidea, 
Cnicus muticus, 
Cnicus arvensis var. albiflorus, 
Tragopogon porrifolius, 
Tragopogon pratensis, 
Hieracium aurantiacum, 
Kalmia latifolia, 
Kalmia angustifolia, 
Bartonia tenella, 
Veronica Buxbaumii, 
Pinguicula vulgaris, 
Pycnanthemum incanum, 
Thymus vulgaris, 
Monarda clinopodia, 
Monarda fistulosa var. rubra, 
Monarda fistulosa var. mollis, 
Amarantus paniculatus, 
Rumex crispus X R. obtusifolius, 
Polygonum dumetorum var. scandens, 
Celtis occidentalis, 
Carya sulcata, 
Carya microcarpa, 
Quercus Prinus, 
Salix amygdaloides, 

Salix lucida var. ? 

Salix alba var. vitellina X S. lucida, 

Salix Babylonica, 

Salix Candida, 

Salix cordata X S. sericea, 

Ceratophyllum demersum, 

Pinus ri« r ida, 



20 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



Habenaria tridentata, 
Habenaria ciliaris, 
Habenaria blephariglottis, 
Hypoxys erecta, 
Ornithogalum umbellatum, 
Trillium cernuum, 

Juncus tenuis var. — ? tall, with 

crowded glomerate heads, 
Juncus alpinus var. insignis, 
Typha latifolia var. elongata, 
Sagittaria variabilis var. obtusa, 
Sagittaria variabilis var. latifolia, 
Sagittaria variabilis var. angustifolia, 
Sagittaria variabilis var. diversifolia. 
Sagittaria variabilis var. gracilis, 
Sagittaria heterophylla, 
Sagittaria heterophylla var. elliptica, 
Potamogeton fluitans, 
Potamogeton amplifolius, 
Potamogeton praslongus, 
Potamogeton crispus, 
Naias marina var. recurvata, 
Cyperus aristatus, 
Eleocharis rostellata, 
Eleocharis intermedia, 
Eleocharis pauciflora, 
Scirpus Smithii, 

Eriophorum cyperinum var. laxum, 
Eriophorum alpinum, 
Eriophorum Virginicum var. album, 
Eriophorum polystachyon, 
Scleria verticillata, 
Carex lupulina var. pedunculata, 
Carex monile, 
Carex retrorsa var. Hartii, 
Carex lurida, 



Carex hystricina, 

Carex scabrata, 

Carex fusca, 

Carex glaucodea, 

Carex pallescens — the undulataform, 

Carex oligocarpa, 

Carex laxiflora var. latifolia, 

Carex Careyana, 

Carex tetanica, 

Carex umbellata, 

Carex Jamesii, 

Carex decomposita, 

Carex teretiuscula, 

Carex teretiuscula var. major, 

Carex alopecoidea, 

Carex rosea var. radiata, 

Carex echinata var. microstachys, 

Carex straminea, 

Carex straminea var. mirabilis, 

Panicum Crus-galli var. muticum, 

Anthoxanthum odoratum, 

Oryzopsis Canadensis. 

Muhlenbergia sobolifera, 

Alopecurus pratensis, 

Cinna pendula, 

Holcus lanatus, 

Deschampsia caespitosa, 

Trisetum palustre, 

Elusine Indica, 

Eatonia Dudleyi, 

Eragrostis reptans, 

Eragrostis capillaris, 

Poa debilis, 

Festuca ovina, 

Elymus Canadensis var. glaucifolius. 



COMPARISON WITH THE BUFFALO FLORA. 

Plants common to the Monroe and Buffalo Floras, not reported i?i the 

Cayuga List. 



Asimina triloba, 
Corydalis flavula, 
Nasturtium lacustre, 
Sisymbrium Thaliana, 
Brassica campestris, 
Brassica rapa, 



Thlaspi arvense, 
Lepidium intermedium, 
Cakile Americana, 
Lechea major, 
Viola tricolor var. arvensis, 
Saponaria Vaccaria, 



i8 94 .| 



I'l.ANTs 01 MONROE COUNTY 



2 I 



Silene Cucubalus, 

Lychnis coronaria, 

Malva crispa, 

Oxalis corniculata, 

Ptelea trifoliata, 

Euonymus atropurpureus, 

Euonymus Americanus, 

Euonymus Americanus var. obovatus, 

Polygala Senega var. latifolia, 

Trifolium arvense, 

Desmodium canescens, 

Lespedeza Steuvei var. intermedia, 

Lathyrus maritimus, 

Strophostyles angulosa, 

Cassia chamaecrista. 

Potentilla supina, 

Rosa nitida, 

Lythrum alatum, 

Thaspium barbinode, 

Coriandrum sativum, 

Symphoricarpus vulgaris, 

Houstonia purpurea var. ciliolata, 

Galium Mollugo, 

Valerianella chenopodifolia, 

Aster azureus, 

Aster multiflorus, 

Aster puniceus var. lucidulus, 

Aster ptarmicoides, 

Heliopsis scabra, 

Artemisia Canadensis, 

Artemisia vulgaris, 

Artemisia biennis, 

Senecio aureus var. Balsamitae, 

Cacalia atriplicifolia, 

Onopordon Acanthium, 

Silybum Marianum, 

Lampsana communis, 

Gaylussacia frondosa, 

Steironema lanceolatum, 

Asclepias verticillata, 

Vincetoxicum nigrum, 

Gentiana serrata, 

Gentiana puberula, 



Frasera Carolinensis, 

Lithospermum hirtum, 

Echium vulgare, 

Solanum Carolinensis, 

Physalis pubescens, 

Nicandra physaloides, 

Hyoscyamus niger, 

Atropa Belladona, 

Xicotiana rustica, 

Mimulus alatus, 

Veronica Chamasdrys, 

Hyssopus officinalis, 

Origanum vulgare, 

Scutellaria parvula, 

Stachys palustris, 

Amarantus hypochondriacus, 

Euphorbia polygonifolia, 

Euphorbia Helioscopia, 

Euphorbia Lathrys, 

Carya tomentosa, 

Betula papyrifera, 

Listera cordata, 

Epipactis Helleborine, 

Cypripedium candidum, 

Smilax rotundifolia, 

Allium cernuum, 

Erythronium albidum, 

Juncus Balticus var. littoralis, 

Juncus nodosus var. megacephalus, 

Juncus Canadensis var. coarctatus, 

Cyperus diandrus var. castaneus, 

Cyperus Schweinitzii, 

Scirpus sylvaticus, 

Carex triceps var. hirsuta, 

Carex Crawei, 

Carex Muhlenbergii, 

Setaria Italica, 

Cenchrus tribuloides, 

Sporobolus cryptandrus, 

Ammophila arundinacca, 

Arrhenatherum avenaceum, 

Brorrms mollis, 

Lolium temulentum. 



22 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



COMPARISON OF CAYUGA AND BUFFALO FLORAS. 

Plants common to the Cayuga and Buffalo Floras, not reported in the 

Monroe List. 



Thalictrum purpurascens, 

Ranunculus circinatus, 

Ranunculus bulbosus, 

Papaver Rhoeas, 

Fumaria officinalis, 

Dentaria maxima, 

Cardamine hirsuta var. sylvatica, 

Arabis confinis, 

Arabis lyrata, 

Draba incana var. arabisans, 

Draba verna, 

Sisymbrium canescens, 

Viola Selkerkii, 

Cerastium viscosum, 

Cerastium nutans, 

Oxalis Acetosella, 

Potentilla arguta, 

CEnothera biennis var. muricata, 

Mollugo verticillata, 

Lonicera sempervirens, 

Lonicera hirsuta, 

Valeriana officinalis, 

Bellis perennis, 

Aster Novi-belgii ? 

Coreopsis trichosperma, 

Tanacetum vulgare var. crispum, 

Artemisia Abrotanum, 

Centaurea Cyanus, 

Hieracium Gronovii, 

Lactuca integrifolia, 



Pyrola rotundifolia var. uliginosa, 

Phlox paniculata, 

Phlox maculata, 

Myosotis arvensis, 

Onosmodium Carolinianum, 

Ipomcea Nil, 

Cuscuta Epilinum, 

Cuscuta inflexa, 

Collinsia verna, 

Blephilia hirsuta, 

Lophanthus scrophulariaefolius, 

Physostegia Virginiana, 

Atriplex patulum var. littorale, 

Euphorbia Esula, 

Myrica asplenifolia, 

Habenaria fimbriata, 

Sisyrinchium anceps, 

Lilium superbum, 

Juncus acuminatus var. debilis, 

Juncus Canadensis vr. brachycephalus, 

Potamogeton marinus, 

Scirpus planifolius, 

Scirpus maritimus, 

CareK pauciflora, 

Carex folliculata, 

Carex laxiflora var. plantaginea, 

Carex canescens, 

Carex canescens var. alpicola, 

Alopecurus geniculatus, 

Glyceria Canadensis. 



LISTS OF PLANTS PECULIAR TO EACH OF THE THREE FLORAS. 

Plants peculiar to the Monroe Flora, not reported in either the Cayuga 

or Buffalo Lists. 

Ranunculus repens fl. pi. Barbarea prsecox, 
Ranunculus abortivus var. micranthus Viola tricolor, 

Ranunculus acris fl. pi. Silene Virginica, 

Delphinium Ajacis, Lychnis Chalcedonica, 

Nelumbo lutea, Arenaria Michauxii, 

Nuphar advena var. minus, Buda rubra, 

Nasturtium sylvestre, Geranium molle, 



'894-1 



P] AN rS OF MONROE COUNTY 



23 



Erodium cicutarium, 

Rhus copallina, 

Polygala polygama, 

Polygala sanguinea, 

Baptisia australis, 

Trifolium incarnatum, 

Trifolium reflexum, 

Trifolium procumbens var. minus, 

Amorpha fruticosa, 

Colutea arborescens, 

Coronilla varia, 

Desmodium pauciflorum, 

Desmodium ciliare, 

Spiraea tomentosa, 

Potentilla Pennsylvanica, 

Pyrus aucuparia, 

Ribes nigrum, 

Sedum reflexum, 

Drosera linearis, 

(Enothera fruticosa, 

Bupleurum rotundifolium, 

Apium graveolens, 

Lonicera ccerulea, 

Galium verum, 

Vernonia altissima, 

Solidago Houghtonii, 

Solidago tenuifolia, 

Aster dumosus, 

Xanthium strumarium, 

Echinacea angustifolia, 

Rudbeckia hirta — form with brown 

bands at base of rays, 
Helianthus strumosus var. mollis, 
Calendula officinalis, 
Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum var. 

tubuliflorum, 
Artemisia caudata, 
Cacalia suaveolens, 
Centaurea benedicta, 
Centaurea Jacea, 
Hieracium Marianum, 
Crepis biennis, 
Crepis tectorum, 
Lobelia spicata, 

Campanula rotundifolia var. arctica, 
Periploca Graeca, 
Hydrophyllum appendiculatum, 



Symphytum asperrimum, 

Lycopsis arvensis, 

Solanum rostratum, 

Physalis Alkekengi, 

Linaria Canadensis, 

Pentstemon laavigatus, 

Pentstemon laevigatas var. digitalis, 

Digitalis lanata, 

Veronica spicata, 

Buchnera Americana, 

Gerardia purpurea var. paupercula, 

Utricularia gibba, 

Utricularia resupinata, 

Mentha rotundifolia, 

Mentha sativa, 

Pycnanthemum muticum, 

Calamintha Nepeta, 

Blephilia ciliata, 

Phlomis tuberosa, 

Lamium album, 

Stachys lanata, 

Chenopodium Bonus-Henricus, 

Rumex sanguineus. 

Polyganum cilinode, 

Polygonella articulata, 

Arceuthobium pusillum, 

Euphorbia corollata, 

Urtica chamaedryoides, 

Betula populifolia, 

Betula pumila, 

Ouercus Robur var. pedunculata, 

Ouercus ilicifolia, 

Castanea sativa, 

Fagus sylvatica, 

Salix Caprea, 

Salix humilis X S. discolor, 

Juniperus Sabina var. procumbens, 

Jumperus Yirginiana var. prostrata, 

Limnobium Spongia, 

Calypso borealis, 

Tipularia discolor, 

Corallorhiza odontorhiza, 

Corallorhiza striata, 

Habenaria leucophaea, 

Cypripedium arictinum, 

Allium vineale, 

Trillium sessile, 



2 4 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 



Tofieldia glutinosa, 
Zygadenus elegans, 
Juncus filiformis, 
Juncus scirpoides, 
Spargarium minimum, 
Lemna perpusilla, 
Triglochin maritima, 
Eleocharis olivacea, 
Eleocharis compressa, 
Scirpus caespitosus, 
Scirpus subterminalis, 
Scleria triglomerata, 
Scleria pauciflora, 
Carex Schweinitzii, 
Carex Houghtonii, 
Carex trichocarpa var. aristata, 
Carex rigida var. Goodenovii, 



Carex longirostris, 

Carex conoidea, 

Carex Saltuensis, 

Carex Richardsonii, 

Carex gynocrates, 

Carex exilis, 

Carex siccata, 

Paspalum setaceum, 

Andropogon Virginicus, 

Hierochloa borealis, 

Trisetum subspicatum var. molle, 

Cynodon Dactylon, 

Bouteloua racemosa, 

Eragrostis pilosa, 

Festuca elatior var. pratensis, 

Bromus tectorum. 



Plants peculiar to the Cayuga Flora, not reported in either the Monroe 

or Buffalo Lists. 



Clematis verticillaris, 

Anemone Virginiana var. alba, 

Ranunculus Cymbalaria, 

Dicentra eximia, 

Corydalis aurea, 

Brassica alba, 

Brassica oler^cea, 

Lunaria biennis, 

Dianthus barbatus, 

Silene Pennsylvanica, 

Lychnis vespertina, 

yEsculus Hippocastaneum, 

Lotus corniculatus, 

Lespedeza procumbens, 

Lespedeza violacea — an open, loosely 

panicled form, with large flowers, 
Lespedeza violacea — form with thin 

leaves and slender stem, 
Lathyrus venosus, 
Gymnocladus Canadensis, 
Gleditschia monosperma, 
Prunus spinosa, 
Spiraea lobata, 
Fragaria vesca var. alba, 
Gillenia trifoliata, 
Rubus neglectus, 



Rubus villosus var. frondosus, 

Rubus villosus var. humifusus, 

Agrimonia parviflora, 

Rosa lucida, 

Rosa cinnamomea, 

Pyrus sambucifolia, 

Crataegus coccinea var. macrantha, 

Amelanchier — form agreeing partly 
with A. oligocarpa, 

Saxifraga aizoides, 

Ribes lacustre, 

Hippuris vulgaris, 

Callitriche heterophylla, 

Rhexia Virginica, 

Epilobium hirsutum, 

GEnothera biennis var. grandiflora, 

Levisticum officinale, 

Sium cicutaefolium, Gm.,vax. (S. line- 
are, Mx., var. intermedium, T.&>G.) 

Aralia spinosa, 

Lonicera Xylosteum, 

Lonicera glauca — form — possibly a 
var. — (part of L. parviflora var. 
Douglassii), 

Scabiosa australis, 

Eupatorium sessilifolium. 






S 9 4 J 



PLANTS OF MONROE COl N IV. 



25 



Aster Novae-Angliae, var. with light 
blue flowers, 

Aster diffusus var. thyrsoides, 

Aster puniceus var. laevicaulis, 

Zinnia elegans, 

Helianthus strumosus, a form with 
narrowly lanceolate leaves, (the 
same in herb. J. J. Thomas as H. 
tracheliifolius,) 

Bidens connata var. comosa, 

Arctium Lappa var. minus, 

Echinops Ritro, 

Centaurea nigra, 

Vaccinium Pennsylvanicum var. ni- 
grum, 

Yaccinium corymbosum vr. amcenum, 

Vaccinium corymb, var. atrococcum, 

Andromeda ligustrina, 

Pyrola secunda var. pumila, 

Primula Misstassinica, 

Lysimachia punctata, 

Asclepias incarnata var. pulchra, 

Gentiana linearis, 

Myosotis palustris, 

Myosotis collina, 

Borrago officinalis, 

Asperugo procumbens, 

Ipomcea coccinea, 

Convolvulus sepium— form, possibly 
var. repens, Gray, 

Cuscuta tenuifolia, 

Lycopersicum esculentum, 

Linaria Elatine, 

Utricularia minor, 

Catalpa bignonioides, 

Trichostema dichotomum, 

Mentha piperita var. subhirsuta, 

Calamintha Acinos, 

Lamium maculatum, 

Stachys aspera var. glabra, 

Plantago major var. minima, 

Plantago cordata, 

Plantago Media, 

Anychia dichotoma, 

Scleranthus annuus, 

Amarantus chlorostachys, 

Chenopodium rubrum, 



Rumex Patientia, 

Rumex conglomeratus, 

Polygonum lapathifolium, 

Polygonum lapathifolium var. incanum, 

Aristolochia clematitis, 

Parietaria Pennsylvanica, 

Salix alba var. argentea, 

Salix cordata x S. petiolaris, 

Salix incana X S. cordata, 

Pinus resinosa, 

Goodyera Menziesii, 

Pogonia verticillata, 

Habenaria Hookeri — a form approach- 
ing var. oblongifolia, 

Iris Pseudacorus, 

Muscari botryoides, 

Trillium erectum — a form near var. 
declinatum of Gr. Man. 

Juncus effusus var. conglomeratus, 

Juncus marginatus, 

Juncus Gerardi, 

Juncus articulatus var. obtusatus, 

Sparganium simplex vr. androcladum, 

Sagittaria heterophylla vr. angustifolia, 

Potamogeton natans var. prolixus, 

Potamogeton Pennsylvanicus, 

Potamogeton Spirillus, 

Potamogeton rufescens ? 

Potamogeton (spec, doubtful : possibly 
Illinoensis), 

Potamogeton Zizii, 

Potamogeton perfoliatus var. lanceo- 
latus, 

Potamogeton Hillii, 

Potamogeton obtusifolius, 

Potamogeton pusillus var. tenuissimus, 

Potamogeton mucronatus, 

Potamogeton pectinatus var. ? with 

slender elongated stems, 

Potamogeton pectinatus var. ? a 

gigantic form, 

Xaias marina, 

Naias marina var. gracilis, 

Cyperus Engelmanni, 

Eleocharis , form allied to E. ovata, 

Eleocharis palustris var. glaucifolius, 

Scirpus sylvaticus var. digynus, 



4, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, Jam u 



26 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



Carex Willdenovii, 

Carex scoparia var. intermedia, 

Carex lagopodioides var. moniliformis, 

Carex adusta, 

Carex straminea var. tenera f. erecta, 

Carex aquatilis — form corresponding 

to the C. xerocarpa form of C. an- 

gustata, 
Carex alata, 

Carex angustata var. /3, Boott, 
Carex angustata var. strictior, 
Carex angustata var. xerocarpa, 
Carex Magellanica, 
Carex granulans var. recta, 
Carex triceps — the form C. hirsuta 

var. pedunculata, S. &* T. 
Carex virescens var. elliptica, 

Carex platyphylla var. ? 

Carex laxiflora var. intermedia, 
Carex laxiflora var. blanda, and sub- 

var. minor, 
Carex Emmonsii var. elliptica, 
Carex debilis var. (3, Boott, 
Carex capillaris var. elongata, 
Carex flava — the form "var. andro- 

gyna," Olney, 
Carex (Ederi, 
Carex hirta, 

Carex comosa X C. tentaculata, 
Carex Pseudo-Cyperus X C. hystricina 
Carex lupulina — a large, robust form, 



Carex lupulina — a form with stalked 

and scattered fertile spikes, 
Carex lupulina X C. retrorsa, 
Carex utriculata var. minor, 
Carex ampullacea var. sparsiflora, 
Panicum xanthophysum, 
Panicum commutatum, 
Panicum microcarpon var. sphaero- 

carpon, 
Panicum dichotomum var. nitidum, 
Panicum dichotomum var. pubescens, 
Panicum miliaceum, 
Setaria viridis var. purpurascens, 
Muhlenbergia Mexicana var. filiformis, 
Brachyelytrum aristatum — the form 

" var. Engelmanni," 
Calamagrostis Porteri, 
Danthonia compressa, 
Diplachne fascicularis, 
Poa compressa var. sylvestris, 
Poa sylvestris var. palustris, 
Glyceria acutiflora, 
Bromus ciliatus var. , approaching 

some of the Rocky Mountain forms, 
Bromus sterilis, 
Agropyrum caninum, (Triticum cani- 

num,) — var. approaching T. viola- 

ceum, 
Hordeum murinum, 
Elymus striatus var. villosus, 
Secale cereale. 



Plants peculiar to the Buffalo Flora, not reported in either the Monroe 
or Cayuga Lists. 



Adonis autumnalis, 

Ranunculus ambigens, 

Helleborus viridis, 

Nigella Damascena, 

Argemone Mexicana, 

Dicentra Cucullaria X E>. Canadensis, 

Arabis dentata, 

Cleome integrifolia, 

Reseda odorata, 

Reseda alba, 

Viola Cucullata var. longipes, 

Silene Gallica, 



Silene nocturna, 
Portulaca grandirlora, 
Calandrinia Menziesii, 
Hypericum Kalmianum, 
Malva Alcea, 
Sida spinosa, 
Linum striatum, 
Geranium dissectum, 
Geranium columbinum, 
Ilex monticola, 
Polygala incarnata, 
Glycerrhiza lepidota, 



i8 9 4-] 



PLANTS OF MONKOK COUNTY 



27 



Onobrychis sativa, 

Lathyrus pratensis, 

Geum macrophyllum, 

Poterium Sanguisorba, 

Rosa micrantha, 

Rosa spinosissima, 

Hydrangea arborescens, 

Torilis Anthriscus, 

. Ethusa Cynapium, 

Anthriscus cerefolium, 

Berula angustifolia, 

Erigenia buJbosa, 

Lonicera parviflora var. Douglasii, 

Liatris cylindracea, 

Solidago bicolor var. concolor, 

Solidago sempervirens, 

Solidago rigida, 

Aster patens, 

Aster ericoides var. villosus, 

Silphium laciniatum, 

Silphium trifoliatum, 

Ambrosia trifida var. integrifolia, 

Ambrosia psilostachya, 

Xanthium spinosum, 

Echinacea purpurea, ( ?) possibly E. 

angustifolia, 
Helianthus petiolaris, 
Helianthus lenticularis, 
Helianthus giganteus, 
Coreopsis tinctoria, 
Coreopsis aristosa, 
Galinsoga parviflora, 
Dysodia chrysanthemoides, 
Matricaria Chamomilla, 
Matricaria inodora, 
Balsamita vulgaris, 
Arctium Lappa var. tomentosa, 
Cnicus altissimus, 
Leontodon autumnalis, 
Prenanthes crepidinea, 
Lactuca hirsuta, 
Kalmia glauca, 
Steironema longifolia, 
Syringa vulgaris, 
Gentiana Andrewsii var. albiflora, 
Polemonium reptans, 
Heliotropium Europium, 



Ipomcea pandurata, 

Physalis Philadelphica, 

\ r erbascum Lychnitis, 

Linaria Cymbalaria, 

Antirrhinum Orontium, 

Gerardia laevigata, 

Martynia proboscidea, 

Verbena angustifolia, 

Verbena stricta, 

Verbena bracteosa, 

Mentha Canadensis var. glabrata, 

Pycnanthemum linifolium, 

Calamintha Nuttallii, 

Salvia officinalis, 

Salvia glutinosa, 

Monarda fistulosa, 

Dracocephalum parviflorum, 

Ballota nigra, 

Lamium purpureum, 

Amarantus chlorostachys vr. hybridus, 

Amarantus, (n. sp.?) resembling A. bli- 

toides, 
Amarantus spinosus, 
Acnida tamariscina, 
Chenopodium murale, 
Chenopodium glaucum, 
Chenopodium ambrosoides, 
Chenopodium ambrosoides var. anthel- 

minticum, 
Corispermum hyssopifolium, 
Rumex altissimus, 
Rheum Rhaponticum, 
Euphorbia platyphylla, 
Quercus stellata, 
Quercus palustris, 
Salix tristis, 
Ceratophyllum demersum var. echi- 

natum, 
Habenaria blephariglottis, var. holo- 

p6tala, 
Dioscorea villosa, 
Allium cernuum, 
Clintonia umbellata, 
Tradescantia Virginica, 
Juncus Canadensis var. subcaudatus, 
Sagittaria heterophylla var. rigida, 
Potamogeton hybridus, 



28 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 

Potamogeton pauciflorus var. Niag- Carex tenuiflora, 

arensis, Panicum agrostoides, 

Eriocaulon septangulare, Panicum Xalapense ? 

Scirpus Clintonii, Triodia purpurea, 

Scirpus Torreyii, Eatonia obtusata, 

Carex oligosperma, Eragrostis Purshii. 



Physical Characters of the Region. 

by herman leroy fairchild. 

geography and hydrography. 

The territory covered by this list of plants has no natural bound- 
aries. It includes the county of Monroe and portions of each of the 
adjacent counties. The arbitrary limits of the map (Plate i) include 
the western part of Wayne county, the western half of Ontario, 
the northern part of Livingston and eastern parts of Genesee and 
Orleans counties. The northern boundary is Lake Ontario. The 
43d parallel of north latitude bisects this area, and the meridian of 
78 passes through the western portion. The breadth of the area 
north and south along the western border is 35 miles, and the length 
east and west is 44 miles. The total land surface is about 1400 
square miles. 

The drainage is wholly into Lake Ontario. The Genesee river 
traverses the area of the map in a direction N.N.E. and debouches 
into the lake near the middle of the north shore boundary. The area 
includes the hydrographic basin of the lower Genesee from the lake 
to a parallel five miles above Avon. In the last ten miles of its 
course the Genesee river occupies a new channel and has no valley or 
tributaries of consequence, all the northern part of the area draining 
by numerous streams directly into the lake. The south-eastern side 
of the area is drained by Mud creek and Canandaigua outlet, the 
water entering lake Ontario by Oswego river. 

TOPO GRA PHY A ND ALTI TUBES. 

The area is mostly a plain, sloping gently toward Lake Ontario. 
The total difference of elevation between the higher ground at the 
south and the northern edge of the plain at the lake is in general 300 
to 400 feet. The average altitude of the area is about 600 feet above 
tide. The middle portion through the whole east and west extent, as 
traversed by the West Shore and New York Central railroads, has an 



1894] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 29 

altitude of about 500 feet. The north border, traversed east and 
west by the Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg railroad, is about 350 
feet above tide and 100 feet above lake Ontario. South of the area 
lies the lofty table-land in which have been carved the valleys of 
lakes Conesus, Hemlock, Canadice, Honeoye and Canandaigua, the 
western members of the so-called "finger lakes". Some of the hills 
in this high region are 2000 feet above sea-level. 

The northern part of the area is a comparatively smooth plain 
drained directly into Lake Ontario by many small streams which, 
near the lake, have cut into the Iroquois lake-deposits and the subja- 
cent ice-drift. The continuity of the plain is entirely broken by the 
recently excavated ravine of the Genesee, 200 feet deep, and by the 
preglacial valley of Irondequoit bay. 

The eastern and southern portions of the area have a hilly 
topography, produced by the glacier rubbing the deep subglacial 
drift into elongated hills, parallel with the ice movement, known as 
"drumlins"or "drumloids". In the eastern part of Monroe county 
these drumloid ridges are very pronounced. They have a north and 
south trend, and culminate south of Fairport in the Turk hill drumloid 
mass. Through Henrietta and Rush, in the southern part of Monroe 
county, the drumloids have a direction some ten to fifteen degrees 
west of south, while along the Genesee river and in the south-west 
part of the territory these ridges have a trend more nearly south-west. 
In the north-west part of the area the drumloid character is merely 
discernible in the broad, smooth swells, with a north-east by south- 
west trend. 

List of Elevations above Ocean Level. 

lakes. Feet. 

Ontario 247 

Canandaigua.- _ 687 

Mendon Ponds 662-655 

ERIE CANAL— (WATER SURFACE). 

Between Lock 60, Macedon, and Lock 6t, Upper Macedon . . 454 

" 61 " " 62, Pittsford 461 

" 62 " " 63, Miller's 470 

" 63 " " 64, Sipple's _.. 479 

" " 64 " " 65, Reservoir _ 489 

" " 65 " " 66, first east of Rochester. 499 

Through Rochester and westward . _ 508 



30 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 



RAILROAD LINES— EAST AND WEST DIRECTIONS. 

Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg Railroad : 

Feet. 

Williamson 418 

Ontario 413 

Lakeside ...-__.. 426 

Union Hill 424 

Webster 406 

Forest Lawn 285 

Sea Breeze 268 

Windsor Beach 270 

New York Central and Hudson River Railroad, main line 



Feet. 

Charlotte 258 

Greece . __ 275 

Parma 278 

East Hamlin 290 

Hamlin 308 

East Kendall 324 

Kendall ... 326 



Palmyra 435 

Walworth 450 

Macedon 468 

Fairport 455 

Penfield 417 

Brighton 459 

East Rochester 482 

Batavia and Canandaigua Branch of 

Canandaigua 735 

East Bloomfield . 876 

Miller's Corners 889 

Honeoye Falls ... 664 

Lehigh Valley Railroad : 

Manchester 606 

Victor 567 

Mendon 572 

Rochester Junction 557 



Rochester 515 

Chili 564 

Churchville 568 

Bergen 603 

West Bergen 680 

Batavia 891 

N. Y. C. & H. R.R.: 
West Rush 555 

Genesee Valley Junct'n. 536 

Caledonia 65 2 

LeRoy 866 

East Rush 559 

Genesee river crossing. 563 

Caledonia .... 666 

North LeRoy 805 



RAILROAD LINES— NORTH AND SOUTH DIRECTIONS. 

Rochester and Ontario Branch of N. Y. C. & H. R. R. : 

Ontario Beach 250 Otis . 519 

Charlotte 251 Brown Street _. 522 

Barnard's Crossing ... 399 Rochester . 5T5 

New York, Lake Erie and Western Railroad : 

Rochester 510 Rush 541 

Red Creek 525 Avon. 586 

West Henrietta 564 Conesus Lake Junction 870 

Scottsville ._ 558 South Lima 901 



1894- I PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 31 

Western New York and Pennsylvania Railroad : 

Feet. Feet. 

Rochester,. 511 Honeoye Junction. . . . 537 

Rapids. -. -. 525 Avon 543 

Severance... 533 Fowlerville. 561 

Scottsville 541 York 561 

MISCELLANEOUS HEIGHTS. 

Feet. 

"Ridge Road" across Monroe county (Iroquois beach). 430 to 440 

Turk hill station U. S. Lake Survey 928 

Hart hill (town of Rush) station U. S. Lake Survey 792 

Pinnacle hill station U. S. Lake Survey . . 7 49 

Hopper hill (town of Victor, Ontario county) . (aneroid) 1 13 1 -f- 

" Pinnacle Hills:" 

Cobb's hill 663 

Pinnacle summit 749 

Mount Hope reservoir (water surface) 634 

Memorial Pavilion - 650 

Summits of Mount Hope cemetery 650 to 670 

Rochester : 

" Four Corners," Main and State streets 499 

East Main street and East avenue . 534 

Campus of University of Rochester. . 516 

geology. 

Stratigraphy. — The hard-rock geology of western New York was 
fully described over half a century ago by Dr. James Hall.* The 
section of strata in the region under immediate consideration has 
been recently published in these Proceedings,! while an excellent 
description of the strata above the Salina group may be found in the 
47th Report of the New York State Museum, 1894. \ 

The geological structure of the region is exceedingly simple. 
The strata lie nearly horizontal, without serious disturbance or visible 
faulting. While there has been some movement and warping of the 



*"The Natural History of New York. Part IV, Geology of the Fourth District." 

t"A Section of the Strata at Rochester, N. Y., as shown by a deep boring."' By H. L. Fair- 
child, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Science, Vol. I, pp. 182-186, 1891. 

"The Thickness of the Devonian and the Silurian Rocks of Western New York; approxi- 
mately along the line of the Genesee River." By Charles S. Prosser, Proc. Roch. Acad. Science, 
Vol. II, pp. 49-104, 1892. 

"The Geological History of Rochester, N. Y." By H. L. Fairchild, Proc. Roch. Acad. 
Science, Vol. II, pp. 215-223, 1893. 

$" Report on the Geology of the Livonia Salt Shaft," By D, D. Luther. 



32 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

region, the strata have not been conspicuously displaced. There is a 
slight inclination or dip east of south, amounting at Rochester to less 
than ioo feet per mile. This dip causes each rock formation to disap- 
pear southward beneath the successively superior formations. The 
strike of the strata is, therefore, nearly east and west, and the several 
kinds of rock outcrop at the surface as bands stretching east and west 
across the area. The width of these bands of outcropping rocks varies 
from a fraction of a mile to several miles, according to their thickness. 
Over most of the region, however, the rock is rarely seen, even in 
stream channels, on account of the thick sheet of glacial and lake- 
drift which overlies it. The finest exposure of strata, and one of the 
most beautiful in this country, is seen in the lower ravine of the 
Genesee river, where the river having lost its old preglacial valley 
has cut for itself a new channel, eight miles long, through the sand- 
stone, shales and limestones of the Niagara formation. The accom- 
panying map and diagram will indicate the succession of the several 
rocks which underlie the region. (See Plate 2.) 

The rocks of the whole of central and western New York are 
unaltered sedimentaries, of marine origin, consisting of sandstones, 
shales and limestones. They will be briefly referred to in the order 
of superposition, beginning with the lowest. The lowest visible rock 
is the Medina sandstone, which is at or near the surface in the north- 
western part of the area of the map, and is extensively quarried. 
This red Medina forms the rock bottom of the southern part, at least, 
of lake Ontario and the rock bluffs at all points along the south 
shore. Beneath Rochester the red Medina is over one thousand feet 
thick, but here and throughout the region, except the north-western 
portion of the lake border, it is buried under the shales and lime- 
stones of the Clinton group. The entire section of the Clinton is 
finely shown in the walls of the Genesee canyon at the lower falls in 
Rochester. Here it rests on the gray top of the Medina, and in 
ascending order consists of about 24 feet of the lower green shale; 
14 feet of lower limestone, containing a bed of hematite iron-ore one 
foot thick; 24 feet of upper green and purple shales; and 18 feet of 
upper limestone. 

The Niagara group rests upon the Clinton and consists of 80 feet 
of dark, gritty shales, exposed at the upper falls in Rochester, and 
80 feet of limestone, upon which the city of Rochester is mainly built 

A very few miles south of Rochester the Niagara limestone 
ceases to be the superficial rock, and well-borings through the glacial 



Proc. Roch. Acad. Science. 



CORNIFEROUS 



HAMILTON. 




AREAL MAP SHOWING Al 




DIAGRAM OF VERTICAL f 

(The inclination of straia is greatly exaggerated by the extreme dl 



STRATIGRAPHY OF MONROE CO 



Vol. 3, PI. 2. 




t LIMITS OK STRATA. 



ROCH E5T E 




LA KF <> TiTA H I <■ 




z^, e: v u jl, 



ND SOUTH SECTION. 

in srales. The true dip of strata is less than ioo feet per mile ) 



AND ADJACENT TERRITORY 



1894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 33 

drift encounter first the shales of the Salina formation. These shales, 
which contain the salt deposits and stretch from Syracuse to the 
Niagara river, form a belt across our area quite as wide as the whole 
Niagara formation, (Niagara, Clinton, and Medina groups). Upon 
this meridian the total thickness of the shales, with some calcareous 
beds, is about 600 feet. Passing southward to the lower border of 
Monroe county the next successively higher rock, the Corniferous 
limestone, appears. It is about 140 feet thick, of hard and enduring 
character, and characterized by abundance of flint nodules. It has 
resisted glaciation and weathering better than the Salina shales, and 
so forms usually a definite escarpment at its northern edge, producing 
cataracts or rapids in the streams. Upon this formation the drift is 
thin, and in some localities, particularly near Caledonia and LeRoy, in 
Genesee county, there are extensive superficial quarries. The lime- 
stone outcrops over a belt of territory two to five miles wide. 

The southern quarter of the area has the shales and sandstones 
of the Hamilton group as the superficial rock. These shales are dark 
and carbonaceous, and frequently yield rock-gas. With a capping of 
Portage sandstone they form the high table-land of the lake region 
south of the mapped area. 

Pleistocene Drift. — The superficial geology of the region has not 
been described in detail, and will be treated here only in a general 
way. During the millions of years following the deposition of the 
Devonian rocks the region was continuously exposed to destructive 
atmospheric agencies, and by atmospheric decay and stream erosion 
a great thickness of rocks had doubtless been removed from this 
area.* At the close of the Pliocene period the climate, which had 
been slowly growing colder, produced a great accumulation of snow 
and ice over Canada and the north-eastern United States, and the 
subaerial denudation was changed to subglacial. The superficial 
decomposed rocks were crushed and removed by the southward 
moving ice-sheet, the old drainage channels were largely filled with 
the debris, and the final removal of the ice left a sheet of glacial drift 
over the whole territory. 

The great glacier not only eroded the decomposed and exposed 
rocks of the region and spread the wreckage over the area to the 
south, but it brought in from the north, or north-east, the complex 
materials of the crystalline rocks of the Archean areas. Thus the 



*Proc. Roch. Acad. Science, Vol. II, p. 221. 
5, Proc. Roch. Acad, of So, Vol. 3, January, 



34 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

thick drift sheet which buries the region is of very heterogeneous 
composition and admirably adapted for sustaining vegetable growth. 

At the beginning of the Glacial period the northern part of the 
continent was much above the present height in relation to the sea. 
During at least the closing part of the Glacial period western New 
York was depressed far below its present level, and following and 
laving the retreating ice-front was a huge glacial lake, which buried 
most of Monroe county to a depth of 350 to 400 feet, having its outlet 
past the site of Chicago to the Mississippi. This lake, produced by 
the closing of the lower eastern outlets by the ice-sheet, is called 
Lake Warren.* Subsequently, as the ice retreated northward and 
eastward, so as to uncover the Mohawk valley, this became an outlet 
of the glacial waters, and the water-surface fell to the level of the 
" Ridge Road", which is simply the beach of the glacial lake Iroquois, f 
with its outlet at Rome, N. Y., to the Mohawk and Hudson valleys. 

Deposits of silts occur over the areas once covered by the glacial 
lakes. In some localities they form extensive flats, with clayey soil. 
In the depressions near Lake Ontario and in the valley of Irondequoit 
bay they constitute the soft deposits which by erosion have produced 
the conspicuous terraces and the mounds called "sugar loaves". 

The superficial geology of the region is thus a complex result of 
the action of atmospheric agencies, glacial ice, stream drainage of the 
glacier, lake action at the ice-front and subsequent to the removal of 
the ice ; and these followed by a resumption of the destructive forces 
of the atmosphere. 

Over the geological formations of harder rock, like the Niagara 
limestone and Corniferous limestone, the glacial drift (till or boulder- 
clay) is relatively thin, and sometimes leaves the rock almost bare, 
while over the softer Salina there is a greater depth of the drift, which 
is largely piled into the elongated parallel hills called drumlins or 
drumloids, already described. 

A frontal moraine, marking a pause in the recession of the ice- 
sheet, traverses the county from Brockport to Brighton. This is not 
strong, but well defined west of Rochester as an irregular ridge, cut 
by the main line of the New York Central railroad one mile north-east 
of Coldwater station. Along the Rapids road in the south-west part of 



*See numerous writings of J. W. Spencer and Warren Upham in Amer. Jour. Sci.; Bull. Geol. 
Soc. Am., and other journals ; Abstract by the writer in Bull. Geol. Soc. Am., Vol. 6, pp. 462-466. 

1" History of the Niagara River 1 ', by G. K. Gilbert, in 6th Ann. Rep. of the Commissioners 
of the State Reservation at Niagara, for 1889, pp. 61-84, with plates, (also in the Smithsonian 
A;in. Rep. for 1890 ) 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 35 

the city the moraine becomes more broken, but between the river and 
Brighton it forms the most conspicuous hills of the region, the famous 
" Pinnacle Hills". These are mainly sand and gravel, with some 
masses of till or unassorted glacial drift and many large boulders. 
The sand and gravel beds in these hills show remarkably complex 
structure. To glacialists the hills have been well known but very 
puzzling. They are probably part of the frontal moraine, of the 
nature known as " kame".* They consist chiefly of the materials 
washed out of the glacier by the drainage and accumulated at the 
front of the ice-wall in the deep water of the glacial Lake Warren. 
Three other similar kame deposits are found in Monroe county, but 
not directly connected with any morainic ridge. One is the group 
of remarkable sand and gravel hills enclosing the Mendon ponds, 
another the sand hills and plains extending from the head of Ironde- 
quoit bay past Pittsford into the north-west corner of Ontario county. 
Another immense deposit lies in the north-west part of Ontario county 
and the extreme south-east corner of Monroe county. An area of 
sand knolls also occurs south-west of Rochester, toward Chili Center, 
the summits of which bear large ice-rafted boulders. 

Glacial gravels are found in hundreds of localities over the 
county, and the lake silts are abundant, chiefly in depressions. 

Irondequoit bay probably represents a preglacial river valley 
modified by ice-erosion, and then more or less filled by serving as a 
catchment basin during the ice retreat and the episodes of lake 
Warren and the later lake Iroquois. The sand hills at the head of 
the bay are remnants of the lake deposits, and the present conspic- 
uous terraces at an elevation of about 400 feet on each side of the 
bay probably represent the Iroquois lake bottom. 

Influence upon Plant Life. — The influence of the geologic condi- 
tions upon the plant life should be considered. In regions beyond 
the limits of ice-drift, where soils are the result of decay of rock in 
place and consist of the insoluble residue of the rocks, the several 
kinds of rock and consequent different soils are marked by more or 
less differences in the flora. In the area here considered such differ- 
ences in the flora can scarcely be marked, because in the place of true 
soil there is the sheet of complex drift which masks the rocks and 



♦"The Kame-Moraine at Rochester, N. Y." By H. L. Fairchild, Amer. Geol., Vol. XVI, pp. 
39-51, July, 1895. 

"Eskers near Rochester, N. Y." By Warren Upham, Proc. Roch. Acad. Science, Vol. II, 
pp. 181-200. 



36 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

gives uniformity to the plant-bearing conditions. Exceptions may be 
found in the areas of the Niagara and Corniferous limestones where 
the drift is very thin or entirely wanting. It is true that the drift 
partakes largely of the character of the rock formation underlying 
immediately northward. But in this region the bands of different 
rocks are not many miles in width, the changes in kind are frequent, 
and the constituents of the drift are fairly distributed. Moreover, 
the drift contains the product of the grinding and disintegration of 
the crystalline Archean rocks, as well as the limestones and shales of 
the region between here and the St. Lawrence. 

Following the southward drifting of the material by the ice came 
the reversal and northward drifting of the finer material borne by 
streams pouring into lake Warren, then later into lake Iroquois, and 
now into the still lower lake Ontario. The Warren silts occur upon 
the till over the area south of the " Ridge Road" and below 900 feet 
altitude. The Iroquois silts occupy the surface between the present 
lake Ontario and the beach altitude of 435-440 feet. This work of 
stream and lake has thus helped to unify the flora of the region. 

The chief differentiation of the flora produced by differences 
in the geological characters of the surface will be found upon tracts 
that are washed sands or silts, such as the Chili sand knolls and the 
Pittsford or the Mendon sand and gravel hills, and upon the tracts of 
limestone above mentioned. 

The topographic relief of the surface is insufficient to greatly 
affect the flora. 

CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Statistics of Climate at Rochester. 

CONTRIBUTED BY MR. ORIN PARKER, WEATHER OBSERVER. 

The following statistics cover a period of twenty-five years, from 
January 1, 1871, to January 1, 1896, and are obtained from the accu- 
rate records of the Rochester Station of the United States Weather 
Bureau. 

TEMPERATURE. (DEGREES FAHRENHEIT,) 

Highest recorded temperature go (July 20, 1894). 

Lowest " " —12 (Jan. 30, 1873, and Feb. 9, 1875.) 

Average variation between day and night 16 

Highest annual temperature 50 (1881) 

Lowest " " 44 ( 1 872) 

Average " " 47 



t8 9 4- 



PLANTS OF MONROE COUX'l V. 



37 





Spring. 


Summer 


. Autumn. Winter. 


Highest seasonal 


temperature.. 49(1878) 


71 (1876) 


55(1881) 34(1889-90) 


Lowest 


.. 39(1883) 


66(1889) 


45(1873) 20 ( 


1874-75) 


Average 


••43 


68 


50 


26 






Jan. Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


Highest monthly 


temp... 36 ('80) 33 C82) 


40 (94) 


53 C70) 


63 ('80) 


7i (95) 


Lowest " 


" .. 17(93) 14C85) 


21 ('85) 


36 ("74) 


50 ('82) 


61 ('81) 


Average 


" ..25 24 


30 


44 


56 


66 




July. Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Highest monthly 


temp... 75 ('87) 72 ('81) 


72 C81) 


58 ('79) 


42 ('85) 


37 ('89) 


Lowest " 


" . . 65 ('84) 64 C85) 


56('7i) 


43 ('87) 


27 ('73) 


20 C76) 


Average " 


" ..70 68 


62 


50 


38 


28 



PRF.CIPITATIOX— RAINFALL, INCLUDING MELTED SNOW, (IN INCHES). 

Highest annual 53.86 (1874) 

Lowest " 16.93(1888) 

Average " 34.99 

Spring. Summer. Autumn. Winter. 

Highest seasonal. . . 15.25(1873) 14.14(1871) 14.88(1873) 14.64(1877) 

Lowest " ... 4.62(1889) 5.00(1887) 3.01(1887) 3.40(1874) 

Average " ... 8.68 9.25 8.31 8.72 

Jan. Feb. Mar. April. May. June. 

Highest monthly 8.05 ('77) 5.40 ('75) 7.02 ('73) 4.99 ('74) 6.87 (94) 6.68 (92) 

Lowest 0.94 ('82) 0.46 C76) 0.94 ('89) 0.94 ('84) 1. 12 (91) 0.94 (93) 

Average " 3.19 2.71 2.86 2.48 3.34 3.22 

July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

Highest monthly 5.44 ('73) 7.26 ('86) 5.69 ('76) 8.67 (*73) 5-46 ('77) 6.17 ('78) 

Lowest " 1.07 ('86) 0.70 (94) 0.51 ('71) 0.62 ('82) 0.80 ('87) 1.00 ('74) 

Average " 2.96 3.07 2.38 2.98 2.99 2.86 



RELATIVE HUMIDITY. (PERCENTAGE.) 

Highest yearly 80 (1885) 

Lowest " 70 (1895 

Average " 74 

Jan. Feb. Mar. April. May. June. 

Highest monthly 88 ('88) 84 ('89) 83 ('88) 76 ('86) 76 ('85) 77 ('85) 

Lowest " 73 ('72) 71 i'77) 72(95) 60 ('72) 54 ('79) 61 ('73) 

Average " 80 79 77 68 66 69 

July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

Highest monthly 79 ('85) 82 ('85) 81(90) 86 ('85) 83 ('85) 85 ('85) 

Lowest " 62 ('88) 61 ('76) 66 ('75) 67 ('79) 70 ('83 72(91) 

Average " 69 71 73 75 77 84 



3$ ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

CLOUDINESS, i Percentage.) 

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May. Jun. July. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec. 
Average 78 71 67 55 54 46 46 47 49 61 77 81 

WINDS. 

Direction— west and south-west prevailing. 

Velocity — 

Highest hourly, in miles 78 (March 31, 1882.) 

Highest monthly, in miles 11,714 (January, 1884.) 

Lowest " " 3,766 (August, 1888.) 

Average " " 6,972 

Highest yearly, " 98,799 (1884.) 

Lowest " " 71,294 (1894.) 

Average " 83,764 

Date of Earliest Blossoming of Trees. 

CONTRIBUTED BY DR. C M. BOOTH. 



Date. 


Maple. 


Cherry. 


Apple. 




Acer dasycarpum. 


May Bigarreau. 


Early Harvest 


1871 


March 


10 


April 


20 


May 16 


1872 


April 


10 


May 


7 




1873 


" 


10 


" 


16 


25 


1874 


March 


19 


<« 


12 


24 


1875 


April 


3 


" 


12 




1876 


March 


11 


" 


7 


24 


1877 


April 


2 


" 


8 


19 


1878 


March 


8 


April 


19 


April 28 


1879 


April 


10 


May 


5 


May 17 


1880 


March 


2 


April 


29 


9 


1881 


April 


13 


May 


3 


12 


1882 


March 


2 


" 


4 


Red Astrachan 


1883 


April 


11 


" 


8 


May 20 


1884 


March 28 


" 


5 


19 


1885 


April 


20 


<< 


13 


12 


1886 


March 


3i 


April 


23 


6 


1887 


April 


9 


May 


4 


14 


1888 


<< 


9 


" 


8 


26 


1889 


" 


7 


" 


3 


9 


1890 


«< 


5 


April 


26 


20 


1891 


March 28 


" 


20 


10 


1892 


April 


2 


May 


4 


20 


1893 


April 


10 


«( 


12 


20 


1894 


March 


10 


April 


21 


6 


verage 


March 29-30 


May 


4-5 


May 16-17 



i8 9 4- 



PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY 



59 



The Catalogue. 



EXPLANATION OF THE PLAN. 

Authorities. — In arrangement and nomenclature this list of plants 
follows, as its standard of authority, the sixth edition of Gray's 
Manual of Botany* The only exception in the general arrangement 
is the placing of the Gymnosperms after the Monocotyledons. Four 
names from the fifth edition of Gray's Mauual have been retained for 
the purpose of making comparison (see pages 19-27) between this 
flora and the Cayuga and the Buffalo floras ; these are as follows : 

Viola pubescens var. eriocarpa, Crataegus tomentosa var. pyrifolia, 

Potentilla Canadensis var. simplex, Polygonum dumetorum. 

The following names, mainly of introduced plants, do not occur 
in the Manual, but those designated by an asterisk (*) may be found 
in Gray's Field, Forest a?id Garden Botany. 



Ranunculus acris, double-flowered, 

*Brassica Rapa, 

*Lychnis Chalcedonica, 

*Lychnis coronaria, 

*Althaea rosea, 

*Tilia Europaea, 

*Trifolium incarnatum, 

*Colutea arborescens, 

*Prunus Persica, 

*Prunus domestica, 

*Pyrus Aucuparia, 

*Ribes rubrum, 

*Ribes nigrum, 

*Coriandrum sativum, 

Sanicula gregaria, 

Sanicula trifoliata, 



Cnicus arvensis var. albiflorus, 

Silybum Marianum, 

*Lactuca sativa, 

*Physahs Alkekengi, 

*Atropa Belladonna, 

"^Veronica spicata, 

Digitalis lanata, 

*Thymus vulgaris, 

*Stachys lanata, 

*Quercus Robur var. pedunculata, 

*Castanea sativa, 

*Fagus syivatica, 

*Salix Caprea, 

Juncus tenuis, tall, heads crowded 

Typha latifolia var. elongata, 

Carex gracillima X C. arctata, 



Aster puniceus, smooth sterns, pinkfls. Carex interior, 
Rudbeckia hirta — form with brown Carex sterilis excelsior 

bands at base of rays, 
Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum var 

tubuliflorum, 
*Calendula officinalis, 



Panicum Crus-galli var. muticum, 

Avena sativa, 

Cynosurus cristatus, 

Juniperus Yirginiana var. prostrata. 

In order to make this list accord with the "new nomenclature' 



♦While recognizing the claims of the "New Nomenclature", the Committee desire to make 
this paper immediately useful in the schools of western New York, and so feel compelled to adapt 
it to the only text-book in botany now in general use. However, by including, in bracket-, tl f 
names of the new system wherever they are different, it is hoped to make the publication up to 
date in botanical science and yet at once available to all students in botany. 



40 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

as given in "List of Pteridophyta and Spermatophyia groining without 
cultivation in Northeastern North Affierica", wherever the names of 
our plants as given in that publication are different from the names 
used in Gray's Manual the new nomenclature names are also given, 
in brackets. When only the author's name is changed, that also is 
given in brackets. In other words, all bracketed matter is upon the 
authority of the new nomenclature. 

In all cases where the catalogue name is different from the name 
of the same plant in the fifth edition of the Manual, the latter name 
is inserted, immediately following, in parenthesis. All special refer- 
ences to the Manual are to the fifth edition. 

All ordinal and generic names and synonyms will appear in the 
index. 

In the list of plants the names are included of a few which are 
not regarded as fully established, but such plants are not given a 
number. (See page 12.) 

In the cases of "rare" or " scarce" plants the localities are given 
and the names of the collectors. In a few instances no locality is 
given, on account of the absence of such record in the list of the 
collector, who is deceased or inaccessible. The other descriptive 
lerms and comments are self-explanatory. 

Typography and reference marks. — Each species, variety, or marked 
form regarded as an established member of our flora is given a cata- 
logue number. Those without numbers are not fully established. 

Heavy-faced type indicates species believed to be indigenous. 
Names of introduced species are printed in small capitals, as are also 
the popular names. 

Parentheses following catalogue names enclose the names used 
in Gray's fifth edition, as stated above. 

Brackets indicate that the enclosed matter is the designation 
given in the "new nomenclature", as explained above. 

Parentheses, within the brackets, are used in the "new nomen- 
clature" to cite the original authority for a species which has been 
transferred from one genus to another. The name following is that 
of the author of the new binomial. 

The name of the discoverer of a plant new to our district, or a 
new station of a rare or scarce plant, is given in italics. An exclama 
tion point after a name indicates that the compilers have verified the 
discovery. 



1894 I PLANTS "I MONROE COUNTY. 4> 

PHjENOGAMIA. [SPERMATOPHY7A.} 

DICOTYLEDONES. 

RAXUNXULACE.K. 

j. CLE MA TIS L. 

i. C. Virginiana L. Common Virgin's Bower. 

Banks of streams, thickets and swamps ; common. 

2. AX EM OX E Tourn. [L.] 

2. A. cylindrica Gray. Long-fruited Anemone. 

Sandy woods ; scarce. Irondequoit. Penfield, L. Holzer. 

3. A. Virginiana L. 

Dry banks of streams, hills, meadows ; common. 

4. A. Pennsylvania L. [A. Canadensis L.] 

Shores of hike Ontario and all our bays, borders of streams and 
ponds ; common. 

5. A. nemorosa L. [A. quinquefolia L.] Wind-flower. 

Copses and woods ; rare. Bank of Irondequoit creek, Brighton, 
Dr. C. M. Booth, Otto Bets, John Dimbar. Kendall, Orleans county, 
M. S. Baxter. 

6. A. nemorosa L. var. quinquefolia Gray. [A. quinquefolia L.| 

Rare. Brighton. 

3. HEPA TICA Dill. [Scop.] Liver-leaf. 

7. H triloba Chaix. [H. Hepatic a (L.) Karst.] 

Dry woods and ravines ; common. 

8. H. acutiloba DC. [77. acuta (Pursh) Britton.] 

Rich woods and ravines ; common. Forms with five-lobed leaves are 
not uncommon. 

4. AXEMOXELLA Spach. [Syndesmon Hoffmg.l 

9. A. thalictroides Spach. [Thalictrum anemonoidess\y..) [Syndesmon thal- 

ictroides (L.) Hoffmg.] Rue-Anemone. 

Frequent in rich woods around Irondequoit bay and along Irondequoit 
creek, and similar situations elsewhere. 

5. THALICTRUM Tourn. [L.] 

10. T. dioicum L. Early Meadow Rue. 

Rocky woods, banks of Genesee river and sides of ravines ; frequent. 

11. T. polygamum Muhl. {T. Comuti Man., p. 39.) Tall Meadow Kef. 

Wet meadows, low grounds, and along rivulets ; common. 

6. RANUNCULUS Tourn. [L.J 

12. R. aquatilis L. var. trichophyllus Gray. [Batrachium trichophyllum 

(Chaix) Bossch.| White Water Crowfoot. 

Frequent in shallow water and slow-flowing stream-. 

6, Proc. Roch. Acad, oi So, Vol . \ Ffi ■ > wy 



42 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

13. R. multifidus Pursh. [R. delphinifolius Torrey in Eaton.] Yellow 

Water Crowfoot. 

Ditches and shallow pools; scarce. Irondequoit. West Henrietta. 
Chili. Gates. Wayne county. 

14. R. Flammula L. var. interrnedius Hook. [R. reptans intermedins (Hook.) 

T. & G.] Smaller Spearwort. 

Rare. Long point, Sodus bay, Plants of Oneida Co., pp. 3, 131. 

15. R. Flammula L. var. reptans E. Meyer. [R. ?-epta?is L.] Creeping 

Spearwort. 

Rare. Sandy shore of lake Ontario at Sodus bay, G. T. Fish. 

[6. R. abortivus L. Small-flowered Crowfoot. 
Damp woods and wet places ; common. 

17. R. abortivus L. var. micranthus Gray. [R. micranthus Nutt.J Dr. A. 

H. Searing. 

18. R. sceleratus L. Cursed Crowfoot. 

Wet ditches, muddy ground ; not common. Abundant in some places 
along the borders of Irondequoit bay. 

19. R. recurvatus Poir. Hooked Crowfoot. 

Wet woods and ravines ; frequent. 

20. R. fascicularis Muhl. Early Crowfoot. 

Dry or moist hillsides and banks of streams ; frequent. More abund- 
ant in the eastern section of our district than in the western. 

21. R. septentrionalis Poir. {R. repens, of Manual, mainly.) 

Wet meadows, ditches and marshy places ; frequent. 

22. R. repens L. Trailing Crowfoot. 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

A double-flowered form occurs in a wet place by the roadside in the 
village of Bergen, Genesee county. Whether a spontaneous develop- 
ment or an escape from cultivation is not known. JQt/i N. V. Rep. 

23. R. Pennsylvanicus L. f. Bristly Crowfoot. 

Wet places ; frequent. 

24. R. acris L. Tall Buttercup. 

Fields and roadsides ; very common. 

25. A form with 7-20 petals, growing with the type by a roadside in the town of 

Brighton, 1885, 7- £• Fuller ; Aug. 1895, Miss F. Beckwith. Apparently a 
spontaneous development ; evidently not the cultivated double variety. 

7. CALTHA L. 

26. C. palustris L. Marsh Marigold. 

Swamps and wet meadows ; common. 

S. TROLLIUS L. 

27. T. laxus Salisb. American Globe-flower. 

Rare. Cold bog between Mt. Hope and Genesee River. 



,894-] 1M XN ' s '" MONRO! I 01 N I V. 43 

( j COPTIS Salisb. 

28. C, trifolia Salisb. [C. trifolia (L.) Salisb.] Three-LEAVED GOLDTHREAD. 

Cold, moist woods and swamps ; frequent. 
io. AQUILEGIA Tourn. [L.] 

29. A. Cinadensis L. Wild Columbine. 

Rocky banks and ravine sides ; also on sandy slopes ; common. 

— A. vulgaris L. Garden Columbine. 

Waste place, Central avenue, Rochester, 1892-4. 

DELPHI XI CM Tourn. [L.] 

— D. Consolida L. Field Larkspur. 

Occasionally escapes. G. T. Fish. Otto Betz. 

— I). Ajacis L. Rocket Larkspur. Escaped to roadside, Greece. 

11. Cl MIC l FUG A L. 

30. C racemosa Xutt. [C. racemosa (L.) Nutt] Black Snakeroot. Black 

Cohosh. 

Borders of woods and banks of streams ; infrequent. 

12. ACT.EA L. 

31. A. spicata L. var. rubra Ait. [A. rubra (Ait.) Willd.] Red Baneberry. 

Red Cohosh. 

Woods and wooded river banks and ravine sides ; frequent. 

32. A. alba Bigel. [A. alba (L.) Mill.] White Baneberry. White Cohosh. 

River banks and woods ; frequent. 

13. HYDRASTIS Ellis. [L.] 

33. H. Canadensis L. Orange-root. Golden Seal. 

Moist woods, wet meadows, ravines ; scarce. Near Rochester, Dr. C. 
.)/. Booth. Greece, Bradley. Gates, G. 7\ Fish. Rush, Miss Florence 
' Beckwith. Hamlin and Penfield, M. S. Baxter. Bergen, Prof. W. II. 
Lennon. Wayne county. 

MAGNOLIACE^E. 

14. MAGNOLIA L. 

34. M. acuminata L. Cucumber-tree. 

Woods, with Liriodendron ; rare. Parma, Monroe county, and 
Fisher's Station, Ontario county, M. S. Baxter. Galen, Wayne county. 

15. LIRIODENDRON L. 

35. L. Tulipifera L. Tulip-tree. 

Rich woods, hillsides, river banks; infrequent. 

AXON ACE.!. 

16. ASIM/XA Adans. 

36. A. triloba Dunal. [A. triloba (L.) Dunal.] Common Papaw. 

Rich woods, banks of streams ; rare. Greece, Bradley. Parma, /. B. 
Fuller. Brockport, Prof. //'. //. Lennon. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. 



44 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8 

MENISPERMACE/E. 

17 MENISPERMUM L. 

37. M. Canadense L. Moonseed. 

Woods, thickets, rocky river banks ; frequent. 

BERBERIDACE.E. 

iS. BERBER IS L. 

38. B. vulgaris L. Common Barberry. 

Scarce. Naturalized along the banks of Genesee river and elsewhere. 

19. CAULOPHYLLUM Michx. 

39. G thalictroides Michx. [C. thalictroides (L.) Michx.] Pappoose-root 

Blue Cohosh. 
Woods and ravines, in rich soil ; frequent. 

20. JEFFERSONIA Barton. 

40. J. diphylla Pers. \J. diphylla (L.) Pers.J Twin-leaf. 

Rich soil along streams and in woods ; rare. Brighton Dr Booth ' 
Pittsford, Rev. J. Walton. Near Brockport, Prof. Lennon. Clarendon 
Orleans county, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

21. PODOPHYLLUM L. 

41. P. peltatum L. May-apple. Mandrake. 

Rich woods, meadows, along streams ; common. 

nymph^ace^:. 

22. BRASEXIA Schreber. 

42. B. peltata Pursh. \B. purpurea (Michx.) Casp.] Water-shield. 

Ponds ; rare. Bushnell's Basm, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

43- NELUMBO Tourn. [Adans.] 

13- N. lutea Pers. [N. lutea (Willd.) Pers.] Yellow Nelumbo, or Water 
Chinquapin. 
Rare. Near the head of Big Sodus bay, Wayne county. 

24. NYMPII.EA Tourn. [Castalia Salisb.] 

44- N. odorata Ait. {Castalia odorata (Dryand.) Woodv. & Wood, inch var. 
minor Sims.] Sweet-scented Water-lily. 

Ponds; rare. Mendon ponds. Bushnell's Basin, M. S. Baxter. Wayne 
county, E. L. Hankenson. 
i^. N. odorata Ait. var minor Sims. 

Same stations as the preceding, in shallower water or mud along the 
margins of the ponds. 

46. N. reniformis DC. (N. tuberosa Paine.) {Castalia tuberosa (Paine) Greene.l 

Tuber-bearing Water-lily. 

Abundant in all our bays and ponds connecting with lake Ontario, 
and in the marshes at the mouth of Genesee river. 

25. NUPHAR Smith. [Nymih.ka L.] 

17- N. advena Ait. f. \Nymphcea advena Soland.] Yellow Pond-lily. 
Ponds, slow-flowing streams, ditches; common. 



lS94-] i'l ^NTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 45 

48. N. advena Ait. f. var. minus Morong. [N. luteum Manual, not Smith.) 

\Nymph<za rubrodisca (Morong) Greene.] Rare. Wayne county. 
40. N. kalmianum Ait. (.V. luteum var. pumilum Man.) \Nymphcea micro- 

p/iylla Pers. | Rare. Sodus Bay, G. T. Fish. 

SARRACENIACE.E. 

26. SARRACENIA Tourn. [L.] 

50. S. purpurea L. Side saddle Flower. Pitcher-plant. 

Frequent in the bogs at Mendon and Bergen. Wayne county. 

PAPAVERACE/E. 

27. SANGUINARIA Dill. [L.] 

51. S. Canadensis L. Blood-root. 

Open woods, thickets, sides of ravines ; common. 

28. CHELIDONIUM L. 

52. C. majus L. Celandine. 

Streets, waysides and waste places ; frequent. 

PA PAVER Tourn. [L.] 
— P. SOMNIFERUM L. COMMON POPPY. 

Escape. Roadside, G. T. Fish. Adams Basin, M . S. Baxter. 
FUMARIACErE. 

29. ADLUMIA Raf. 

53. A. cirrhosa Raf. [A. fungosa (Ait.) Greene.] Alleghany Vim.. 

Rich woods ; rare. Greece and Parma, Bradley. Lake woods, Ham- 
lin, Prof. IV. H. Lcnnon. 

30. DICENTRA Rorkh. [Bicuculla Adans.] 

54. D. Cucullaria DC. \Bicuculla Cucullaria (L.) Millsp.] Dutchman's 

Breeches. 

Moist rich woods and ravines ; common. 

55. D. Canadensis DC. yBicuculla Canadensis (Goldie) Millsp.] Sol'irrel 

Corn. 

Rich woods, ravine sides ; common. 

jr. CORYDALIS Vent. [Capnoides Adans.] 

56. C. glauca Pursh. [Capnoides semftcrvirens (L.) Borck.l Pale Cohvdalis. 

Rare. Prof. W. H. Lcnnon. Frederick Starr. 

57. C. flavula DC. [Caftnoides jlavutum (Raf.) Kuntze.] 

Rare. Lime Rock, Genesee county, Miss Florence Beckwith. 

CRUCIFER.E. 

32. DENTARJA Tourn. [L.] 

58. D. diphylla L. [Michx.] Pepper-root. 

Rich woods and ravines ; common. 

59. D. laciniata Muhl. Cut-leaved Pepper-root. 

Rich woods and ravines : common. 



46 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



33. CAR DA MINE Tourn. [L.] 

60. C. rhomboidea DC. [C. bulbosa (Schreb.) B. S. P.J Spring Cress. 

Woods, wet meadows and springy places ; common. 

61. C. rhomboidea DC. var. purpurea Torr. [C. Douglassi (Torr.) Britton.] 

Purple flowered Spring Cress. 

Low grounds along rivulets, wet places ; common. 

62. C. pratensis L. Cuckoo-flower. 

Wet meadows and bogs ; scarce. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
West Henrietta, J. B. Fuller. Penfield and Bergen, M. S. Baxter. 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

63. C. hirsuta L. Small Bitter Cress. 

Wet places ; common. 

34. ARABIS L. 

64. A. hirsuta Scop. [A. hirsuta (L.) Scop.] Rock Cress. 

Rare. Rocky bank of Genesee river below lower falls. 

65. A. laevigata Poir. {A. Icevigata (Muhl.) Poir.] Rock Cress. 

Rocky places ; frequent. 

66. A. Canadensis L. Sickle-pod. 

River banks and ravines ; not common. 

67. A. perfoliata Lam. [A. glabra L.] Tower Mustard. 

Rare. Brockport, M. S. Baxter. Dr. Searing. Wayne county. 

35. AL J 'SSUM Tourn. [L.] 

68. A. CALycinum L. {Alyssum alyssoidcs (L.) Gouan.] 

Rare. Roadside, Culver park, Rochester, with Crepis tec to nun, J. B. 
Fuller. Scottsville, Miss Florence Beckwith. Wayne county. 

36. CAMEL IN A Crantz. 

69. C. sativa Crantz. [C. saliva (L.) Crantz.] False Flax. 

Occasional in fields and waste places. Abundant in wheat fields near 
Bergen, Genesee county, JQth N. Y. Rep. Wayne county. 

37. NASTURTIUM R. Br. [Rorii>a Scop.] 

70. N. officinale R. Br. Roripa Nasturtium (L.) Rusby.] True Water 

Cress. Cold streams, ditches, springy places ; abundant. 

71. N. sylvestre R. Br. {Roripa sylvestris (L.) Bess.] Yellow Cress. 

Flats along Genesee river : below the upper landing; abundant near 
the mouth of Red creek ; in the town of Henrietta and near Scottsville, 
Miss Florence Beckwith. 

72. N. palustre DC. {Roripa palustris (L.) Bess.] Marsh Cress. 

Muddy shores, ditches, wet places ; common. 

73. N. palustre DC. var. hispidum Gray. {Roripa hispida (Desv.) Britton.] 

Rare. Long Pond, Dr. Anna H. Searing. Wayne county. 

74. N. lacustre Gray. {Roripa Americana (A. Gray) Britton.] Lake Cress. 

Common in bays and inlets along the shore of lake Ontario. Black 
creek, near Bergen, joth N. Y. Rep. 



I 894. I PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTS'. 47 

75. X. Akmokacia Fries. \Roripa Armoracia (L.) A. S. Hitchcock). Horse- 

radish. Wet places, ditches, waste places ; common. 

38. BARB A RE A R. Br. 

76. B. vulgaris R.Br. \B.Barbarea (L.) McM.] Common Winter Cress. 

Yellow Rocket. 

Wet grounds, ditches, roadsides ; common. 

77. B. prjECOX R.Br. \B.pracox (J. E. Smith) R.Br.] Early Winter 

Cress. Rare. Opposite the grove on Lake avenue, Rochester, L. 
Holzer. Brockport, Prof. //'. //. Lennon. 

3Q. HESPERIS Tourn. [L.] 

78. H. matronalis L. Dame's Violet. 

Rare. Bank of Allen's creek, Penfield, Rev. f. Walton. 

40. ERYSIMUM Tourn. [L.] 

79. E. cheiranthoides L. Worm-seed Mustard. 

Dry or moist soil ; infrequent ; most abundant in dry sandy land. 
Roadsides, north Goodman and Prince streets, Rochester. Sandy fields 
near Irondequoit bay, Penfield. Gates, G. T. Fish. 

41. SISYMBRIUM Tourn. [L.] 

80. S. officinale Scop. [S. officinale, (L.) Scop.] Hedge Mustard. 

Waste places and roadsides ; very common. 

81. S. Thaliana Gaud. \Stenophragma Thaliana (L.) Celak.] Mouse-ear 

Cress. 

Dry sterile soil ; rare. Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Wayne county. 

42. BRASS I CA Tourn. [L.] 

82. B. Sinapistrum Boiss. Yellow Mustard. English Charlock. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

— B. alba Boiss. [Sinapis alba L.] White Mustard. Escapes rarely. 

83. B. nigra Koch. [£. nigra (L.) Koch.] Black Mustard. 

Cultivated fields, waste places, along streams ; common. 

— B. campestris L. Ruta-baga. Occasionally spontaneous. 

— B. Rapa L. Turnip. Occasionally spontaneous. 

43. CAPSELLA Medic. [Bursa Weber.] 

84. C. Bursa-Pastoris Mcench. [Bursa Bursa-Pastoris (L.) Weber.) SHEP- 

HERD'S Purse. Everywhere abundant. 

44. THLASPI Tourn. [L.] 

i arvense L. Field Penny-cress. Mithridate Mustard. 
Rare. Roadside, Bergen, Genesee county, G. T. Fish. 

45. LEPIDIUM Tourn. [L.] 

86. L. Virginicum L. Wild Pepper-GRASS. 

Roadsides and waste grounds ; common. 

87. L intermedium Gray. 

Equally common with the preceding, which it resembles closely. 



4 S ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. | Oct. 8, 

83. L. RUDERALE L 

Rare. Rochester, H. C. Maine. 
89. L. campestre Br. [Z. ca?npcstrc (L.) R. Br. J 

Not common. First observed in the vicinity of Rochester in 1862, on 
Charlotte railroad track, Greece, a single plant, J. B. Fuller. Abundant 
in grain fields, Riga, 1891, Miss F. Beckwith. Mendon, M. S. Baxter. 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankcnson . 

46. C A KILE Tourn. [Gaertn.] 

go. C. Americana Nutt. [C. edentula (Bigel.) Hook.] American Sea-rocket. 
Frequent along the shore of lake Ontario. 

RAPHANUS Tourn. [L.] 

— R. sativus L. Garden Radish. Occasionally escapes to roadsides. 

CAPPARIDACE.E. 

47. POL A NISI A Raf. 

91. P. graveolens Raf. 

Lake shores ; rare. Shore lake Ontario : at Charlotte, C . M. Booth; 
mouth of Sandy creek, Monroe county, M. S. Baxter; Wayne county, 
E. L. Hankenson. Shores of Canandaigua lake, Miss M. E. Macaulcy. 

cistace^e. 

48. H ELI A NTH EMU M Tourn. [Pers.] 

92. H. Canadense Michx. [H. Canadense (L.) Michx.] Frost-weed. 

Dry sandy banks and fields; scarce . Irondequoit, C. M. Booth . Shore 
of Irondequoit bay, Miss M. E.Macauley. Greece, J. B. Fuller. Bank 
Genesee river, G.T.Fish, Dr. Searing. Penfield.Z. Holzer. Wayne Co. 

49. LECIIEA Kalm. [L.] 

93. L. major Michx. [L.villosa Ell.] Pinweed. 

Rare. Penfield, L. Holzer. Avon, Sartivell in Herb . Ham Colt. 

94. L. minor L. \L. intermedia Leggett.] Smaller Pinweed. 

Rare. Irondequoit, Dr. Anna H . Searing. 

VIOLACE.E. 

50. VIOLA Tourn. [L.] 

c;5. V. palmata L. ( V. cucullata var. palmata Gray.) Hand-leaved Violet. 

Dry wooded slopes and hillsides, especially around Irondequoit bay 
and along the creek ; not common. 
96. V. palmata L . var . cucullata Gray . ( V. palmata Ait . ) [ V. obliqua Hill . J 
Common Blue Violet. 

Woods, open thickets, meadows, swamps, waysides ; very common. 

A peculiar form in Bergen swamp. Leaves very small, about half 
an inch broad; peduncles elongated; lateral petals whitish at base. 
3Qth N. Y. Rep. 

A form in a swamp in Gates. Corolla pale blue, striped with white ; 
retains its character under cultivation. Miss Florence Beckwith. 



I 894. J PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 49 

97. V. sagittata Ait. Arrow-leaved Violet. 

Dry sandy grass lands ; frequent in the eastern part of our district, 
but has not been observed west of Rochester by any of our collectors. 

98. V. odorata L. Sweet Violet. English Violet. 

Escaped from gardens in various places about Rochester. Wayne Co. 

99. V. blanda Willd. Sweet White Violet. 

Everywhere common in wet places. 

100. V. blanda Willd. var. renifolia Gray. [V. blanda rcnifolia A. Gray.] 

Rare. Bergen swamp, J. B . Fuller . Riga, Miss Florence Beckwith . 

101. V. rotundifolia Michx. Round-leaved Violet. 

Cold rich woods; rare. Brighton, J. B. Fuller. Webster, M. S. 
Baxter. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

102. V. pubescens Ait. Downy Yellow Violet. 

Woods, ravines, river banks ; common. 

103. V. pubescens Ait. var. eriocarpa Nutt. Woolly-fruited Violet. 

Common. 

104. V. Canadensis L. Canadian Violet. 

Rich moist woods and ravines ; abundant in some places. 

105. V. striata Ait. Pale Violet. 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

106. V. rostrata Pursh. Long-spurred Violet. 

Woods and ravines ; common. 

107. V. canina L. var. Muhlenbergii Gray. {V.cani?ia var. sylvestris Regel.) 

[V. Labradorica Schrank.J Dog Violet. 
Damp woods, ravines and marshes ; common. 
— V. tricolor L. Pansy. Occasionally escapes ; not permanent. 

108. V. tricolor L. var. arvensis Ging. \_V.tenella Muhl.J 

Rare. In a field near Mendon ponds, M. S. Baxter. 

51. SOLE A Spreng. 

109. S. concolor Ging. [S. concolor (Forst.) Ging.] Green Violet. 

Rare. Gates, G. T. Fish! Dugway, Mrs. Mary F. Streeter. 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

CARYOPHYLLACEiE. 

52. DI A NTH US L. 

no. D. Armeria L. Deptford Pink. 

Rare. Penfield, Dr. C. M. Booth! Gates, G. T. Fish. 

53. SAPONARIA L. 

hi. S. officinalis L. Bouncing Bet. Common Soapwort. 

Waysides and waste places ; frequent. 
112. S. Vaccaria L. {Vaccaria vulgaris Host.) Cow-herb. 

Scarce. Rochester, Dr. ('. M . Booth. Along West Shore railroad, 
near Genesee Junction, Miss Florence Beckwith. Vick farm, Greece, 
J. B. Fuller. Along N.Y.C. railroad, G. T. Fish . Wayne county. 

7, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, February, 1896. 



I 



50 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

54- SILENE L. 

113. S. Cucubalus Wibel. (S. inflata Smith.) [S. vulgaris (Mcench) Garcke.] 

Bladder Campion. 
Rare. Roadside, east end Culver park, Rochester, J. B. Fuller. 

114. S. Virginica L. Fire Pink. 

Rare. L. Holzer. Prof. IV. H. Lennon. 

115. S. antirrhina L. Sleepy Catchfly. 

Rare. Brighton, Dr. C. M. Booth! Irondequoit, J. B. Fuller. 
Penfield, L. Holzer. 

116. S. Armeria L. Sweet-William Catchfly. 

Escape. Mount Hope. Rochester, Otto Betz . Wayne county. 

117. S. NOCTIFLORA L. NlGHT-FLOWERING CATCHFLY. 

Cultivated grounds and waste places ; frequent. 

55. LYCHNIS Tourn. [L.] 

— L. Chalcedonica L. Scarlet Lychnis. Escaped to roadside. 

118. L. Githago Lam. \Agrostemma Githagoh.] Corn Cockle. 

Grain fields ; frequent. 

119. L. coronaria Lam. [L. coronaria (L.) Desv.] Mullein Pink. 

Fields and roadsides ; infrequent. Well established on the bank of a 
small stream in Greece. 

56. AR EN ARIA L. 

120. A. SERPYLLIFOLIA L. THYME-LEAVED SANDWORT. 

Fields, sandy waste places, barren soil ; abundant. 

121. A. Michauxii Hook. f. [A. stricta Michx.) [A. stricta Michx.] 

Rare . Dry bank, Irondequoit bay, Webster . Woods, Penfield, Holzer. 

122. A. lateriflora L. 

Marshes; rare. Irondequoit, Dr. Booth. Mendon, G. T. Fish. 

57. STELLARIA L. [Alsine L.] 

123. S. media Smith. [Alsine media L.] Common Chickweed. 

A very common weed in damp grounds. 

124. S. longifolia Muhl. [Alsine longifolia (Muhl.) Britton.] Long-leaved 

Stitchwort. 

Meadows and grassy places along streams ; frequent. 

125. S. graminea L. [Alsine graminea (L.) Britton.] 

Rare. Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth. Brighton, Otto Betz . Holley, 
Orleans county, Prof. W . H . Lennon. 

126. S. borealis Bigel. [Alsine borealis (Bigel.) Britton.] Northern Star- 

wort. Moist soil ; scarce? Dr. C. M. Booth, who alone reports it in 
Monroe county, says it is frequent in Irondequoit. Wayne county. 

58. CERASriUM l. 

127. C. vulgatum L. {C. viscosuni Man.) Mouse-ear Chickweed. 

Fields, copses, waste places and roadsides ; common. 

128. C. arvense L. Field Chickweed. 

Abundant in a sandy field on the Whitney farm in Greece. 



1894] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 5 I 

5Q. BL'DA Adans. 

129. B. rubra Dumort. [SPergularia rubra Presl. var. ccuiipestris Gray.) 

[Tissa rubra (L.) Britton.] Sand-SPURRY. 

A weed in cultivated ground, Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Boot/if Rare. 

60. SPERGULARIA l. 

130. S. ARVENSIS L. CORX-SPURRY. 

Infrequent. Dr. Booth. L.Holzer. Caledonia, Miss F '. Beckwith . 
PORTULACACE^E. 

61. PORTULACA Tourn. [L.] 

131. P. OLERACEA L. COMMON PURSLANE. 

Cultivated grounds, roadsides, waste places ; common. 
6lS. CLAYTONIA Gronov. [L.] 

132. C. Virgin ica L. Narrow-leaved Spring-beauty. 

Moist open woods ; common. 

133. C. Caroliniana Michx. Broad-leaved Spring-beauty. 

Usually on higher ground and less common than the preceding. 

HYPERICACE/E. 

63. HYPERICUM Tourn. [L.] 

134. H. Ascyron L. {H. pyramidatum Ait.) Great St. John's-wort. 

Banks of streams ; scarce. Near upper falls, Rochester, and Ironde- 
quoit creek, Brighton, Dr. C . M. Booth. River road, near Mt. Hope, 
and town of Brighton, Mrs. J . H . McGuire. Penfield, near Ironde- 
quoit bay, Miss E. E. lies . Mendon ponds, G . T. Fish. 

135. H. perforatum L. Common St. John's-wort. 

Fields, pastures, roadsides, waste places ; very common. 

136. H. macu latum Walt. {H. corymbosum Muhl.) 

Frequent in damp places. 

137. H. mutilum L. Low ground ; frequent. 

138. H. Canadense L. Sandy soil ; frequent. 

139. H. Canadense L. var. majus Gray. \H.majiis (A. Gray) Britton.] 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

64. E LODES Adans. 

140. E. cam pan u lata Pursh. (E. Virginica Nutt.) [Hypericum Virgini- 

anum L.] Marsh St. John's-wort. 
Frequent in marshes. 

MALVACEAE. 

— Alth/EA rosea Cav., Common Hollyhock, occasionally appears along 
roadsides. 

65. MALV A L. 

141. M. ROTUNDIFOL1A L. COMMON MALLOW. 

Cultivated grounds, waysides, waste places ; common. 



5 2 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 



:45- A 



[46. H 



Abundant in places. 

) Rusby.] Velvet-leaf 



142. M. sylvestrIs L. High Mallow. An occasional escape . 

143. M. crispa L. \M . verticilldta crispa L.] Curled-leaved Mallow. 

Escapes to roadsides. Henrietta, Mrs. Mary E. Streeter. Hamlin, 
M. S. Baxter. 

144. M. moschata L. Musk Mallow. 

Frequent in fields and by roadsides. 

66. ABUTILON Tourn. [Gaertn.] 

Ayicenn^e Gaertn. [A. Abutilo?i (L, 
Waste places ; occasional. 

67. HIBISCUS L. 

Moscheutos L. Swamp Rose-mallow. 
Swamps and marshes ; scarce. Irondequoit bay, Dr. Booth and G . T. 
Fish. Long pond, Dr. Searing! Ogden. Bergen. Wayne county. 

147. H. Trionum L. Bladder Ketmia. Flower-of-an-hour. 

Occasional in neglected grounds. 

TILIACE.E. 

68. TILIA Tourn. [L.] 

148. T. Americana L. Bassw t ood. American Linden. 

In rich woods and ravines and along river banks ; common. 
— T. Europ^ea L. European Linden. 

Several specimens of var. microphylla in abandoned nursery grounds 
on Prince street, Rochester. Frequently planted for shade. 

LINACE.E. 

69. LINUM Tourn. [L.] 

149. L. Virginianum L. 

Scarce. Dry sandy woods, Irondequoit and Mendon. 

150. L. usitatissimum L. Common Flax. 

Frequent along railroads. 

GERANIACE.E. 

70. GERANIUM Tourn. [L-] 

151. Q. maculatum L. Wild Cranesbill. 

Moist woods, meadows, river banks, ravines ; common. 

152. Q. Robertianum L. Herb Robert. 

Moist woods and shaded river banks and ravines ; common. 

153. G. Carolinianum L. 

Rare. Pinnacle hill, Miss Mary E. Macauley . Adams Basin, 
M. S. Baxter. 

154. G. pusillum L. 

Rare. Corner Monroe avenue and Laburnum crescent, Rochester, 
Miss F. Beckwith. Neglected garden, Rochester, Mrs. J. J. Kempe. 
Gates, G . T. Fish! Sodus, Wayne county, 1885, Miss Coleman in check 
list E. L. Hankenson. 



1894-] plants of monroe county. 53 

i55. g. molle l. 

A form with purplish petals and smooth seeds is frequent in grass 
plots about the city of Rochester. First detected by Miss Mary E. 
Macauley in 1894. 

ERODIUM L'Her. 

— E. CICUTARIUM L'Her. [E. cicutarium (L.) L'Her.] Stork-bill. 
Roadside, East Rochester, C. M. Booth. 

71. FLCERKEA Willd. 

156. F. proserpinacoides Willd. False Mermaid. 

Marshes and rich woods; scarce. Gates, Dr. C. M. Booth. Chili, 
L. Holzer. Adams Basin, M. S . Baxter. Near Fairport, Miss Mary 

E. Macauley. Bergen, Genesee county . Wayne county . 

72. OX A LIS L. t 

157. O. CORNICULATA L. 

Rare. Roadside, Augusta street, near N. Y. C. railroad, Rochester, 
/. B. Fitller. The form with dark-colored leaves is frequent in culti- 
vated ground near greenhouses. 

158. O. corniculata L. var. stricta Sav. (O. stricta L.) [O. stricta L.] 

Yellow Wood-sorrel. 
Woods, fields, roadsides and waste places ; common. 

73. IMPA TIENS L. 

159. I. pallida Nutt. [/. aurea Muhl.] Pale Touch-me-not. 

Moist shady places and along streams ; infrequent. 

160. I. fulva Nutt. [I. biJloraWdilt.'] Spotted Touch-me-not. 

Wet shady woods, marshes, and along streams ; abundant. 

RUTACEvE. 

74. XANTHOXYLUM L. 

161. X. Americanum Mill. Northern Prickly Ash. 

Swampy or low rich woods and along streams ; occasionally on higher 
ground; infrequent. 

75. PTELEA L. 

162. P. trifoliata L. Hop-tree. 

Rare. Between the Genesee river and the Genesee Valley canal, 
Chili, Dr. C . M . Booth and Geo. T. Fish. Wayne county. 

SIMARUBACE.E. 

76. AILANTHUS Desf. 

163. A. glandulosus Desf. Tree-of-Heavex. 

Spontaneous in several places about Rochester ; also at Riga, Miss 

F. Beckwith ; Adams Basin, M . S. Baxter. 

ILICINEyE. [Aquifoliace/E.] 

77. ILEX L. 

164. I. verticillata Gray. [/. verticillata (L.) A. Gray.] Black Alder. 

Marshes and along streams; frequent. Abundant in the marshes 
along Irondequoit creek, Brighton, and at Mendon ponds. 






54 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

78. NEMOPANTHES Raf. [Ilicioides Dumont.] 

165. N. fascicularis Raf. [N. Canadensis DC.) [Ilicioides mucronata (L.) 

Britton.] 

Margin of Irondequoit bay, Penfleld. Frequent in the marshes about 
Mendon ponds. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

CELASTRACEyE. 

79. CELASTRUS L. 

166. C. scandens L. Climbing Bitter-sweet. 

River banks, along streams, and in thickets ; frequent. 

80. EUONYMUS Tourn. [L.] 

167. E. atropurpureus Jacq. Burning Bush. Waahoo. 

Scarce. Indigenous in Seneca park, G . T. Fish, and Genesee Valley 
park, C . C . Laney. Greece, Bradley. Penfield, Otto Betz. Bank of 
Genesee river at Rush Junction, C . C . Laney and John Dimbar. Near 
Scottsville, M . S . Baxter. Wayne county. 
— E. Americanus L. Strawberry-bush. 

Genesee river, Sartwell in Herb. Ham. Coll. Has not been observed 
by our collectors. 

168. E. Americanus L. var. obovatus Torr. & Gray. [E. obovatus Nutt.] 

Rare. North-east of Brockport, Prof. Lennon. 

RHAMNACE.E. 

81. RHAMNUS Tourn. [L.] 

169. R. alnifolia L'Her. Alder-leaved Buckthorn. 

Frequent in swamps and marshy places. 

170. R. CATHARTICA L. COMMON BUCKTHORN. 

Escapes from hedges occasionally. 

82. CE 'A NO THUS L. 

171. C. Americanus L. Red-root. New Jersey Tea. 

Dry open woods along river banks and ravines ; common. 

VITACE.E. 

83. VITIS Tourn. [L.] 

172. V. aestivalis Michx. Summer Grape. 

Dry woods and thickets, along river banks and ravines ; frequent. 

173. V. cordifolia Michx. Frost Grape. 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

174. V. riparia Michx. (V. cordifolia var. riparia Gray.) \V. vnlpina L.] 

Frost Grape. 

River banks and ravines ; more common than V. aestivalis . 

84. AMrELOPSIS Michx. [Pakthenocissus Planch.] 

175. A. quinquefolia Michaux. [Parihenocisstis qninqiiefolia (L.) Planchon.] 

Virginia Creeper. 

Moist woods, copses, river banks ; common. 



l894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 55 

SAPINDACE^E. 

85. ACER Tourn. [L.] 

176. A. Pennsylvanicum L. Striped Maple. 

Rare. Seneca park, C. C. Laney. Webster, M . S. Baxter. Bank 
of Sodus bay and at Lake Bluff, F. Williams in check list E. L. Hankenson. 

177. A. spicatum Lam. Mountain Maple. 

Banks of Genesee river and ravine sides ; frequent. 

178. A. saccharinum Wang. [A. Saccharum Marsh.] Sugar Maple. 

Woods, river banks and ravines ; one of the most common of our 
forest trees. 

179. A. saccharinum Wang. var. nigrum Torr. & Gr. [A. nigrum Michx. f.] 

Black Sugar Maple. 
Not uncommon ; frequently planted for street shade tree. 

180. A. dasycarpum Ehrh. {A. saccharinum L.] White or Silver Maple. 

River banks and ravine sides, low woods and along streams ; common. 

181. A. rubrum L. Red or Swamp Maple. 

Common in swamps and low woods ; frequent on the banks of the 
Genesee river and in ravines. 

86. NEGUNDO Moench. 

182. N. aceroides Mcench. [Acer Negundo L.] Box-Elder. 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, near Ballentine bridge, in the town of 
Chili, M . S. Baxter and C. C . Laney. Two large specimens, eighteen 
inches in diameter, in the town of Caledonia, Livingston county, a mile 
south of the N. Y. C. railroad bridge, C. C. Laney and John Dunbar. 

87. STAPHYLEA L. 

183. S. trifolia L. American Bladder Nut. 

Copses, thickets ; scarce. Chili, Dr. Booth . Riga, Miss Beckwith. 
Pittsford, Dr. Searing. Henrietta, G . T. Fish. Wayne county. 

ANACARDIACE.E. 

88. RHUS L. 

184. R. typhina L. [R. hirta (L.) Sudw.] Stagshorn Sumac. 

Rocky river banks, ravines, hillsides ; common. 

185. R. glabra L. Smooth Sumac. 

In situations similar to the preceding, but less frequent. 

186. R. copallina L. Dwarf Sumac. 

Rare. Bushnell's basin, M . S . Baxter. L. Holzer. Prof. Lennon . 

187. R. venenata DC. [B . Vernix L . ] Poison Sumac. 

Swamps; frequent. 

188. R. Toxicodendron L. [B . rarficans L .] Poison Ivy. Poison Oak. 

Woods, banks of streams, waysides, fences ; common. 

189. R. Canadensis Marsh. {B. aromatica Ait.) [B . aromatica Ait.] 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, foot of Ambrose street, Rochester, 
Fuller. Canandaigua Lake, Miss M. F. Macau ley. Wayne county. 



56 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

POLYGALACE^. 

89. POL VGA LA Tourn. [L.] 

190. P. paucifolia Willd. 

Moist woods ; not common. Chili and Riga, Miss Florence Beckwith. 
Bergen, Genesee county. 

191. P. polygama Walt. 

Sandy soil ; rare. Penfield, Dr. C . M. Booth. 

192. P. Senega L. Seneca Snake-root. 

Rocky soil, ravines, and in dry woods ; not uncommon. 

193. P. Senega L. var. latifolia Torr. & Gray. [P. Senega latifolia T. & G.] 

Rare . Shore of lake Ontario, Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

194. P. sanguinea L. \P. viridescens L.] 

Rare. Greece, Bradley. Ontario, Wayne county, Dr. Richards in 
check list E. L. Hankenson . 

195. P. verticillata L. 

Banks and ravine sides, in dry soil ; frequent. 

LEGUMINOS^. 

go. BAPTISIA Vent. 

196. B. tinctoria R. Br. [B. tinctoria (L.) R. Br.] Wild Indigo. 

Dry open woods, usually in sandy soil ; not common. Frequent on 
the banks of Genesee river and Irondequoit creek and bay. 

197. B. australis R. Br. [B. australis (L.) R. Br.] Blue False Indigo. 

Near Canandaigua, Prof. Eato?i, Flora of the State of New York . 

91. LUPINUS Tourn. [L.J 

198. L. perennis L. Wild Lupine. 

Common in sandy soil. A form with pink flowers occurs near the 
" sand cut " in Penfield. 

92. TRIFOLIUM Tourn. [L.] 

199. T. arvense L. Rabbit-foot Clover. 

Dry soil, in fields and by roadsides ; infrequent. 

200. T. pratense L. Red Clover. 

Common in fields, meadows, and by roadsides. 

201. T. reflexum L. Buffalo Clover. 

Macedon, Wayne county, 1883, E. L. Hankenson. 

202. T. repens L. White Clover. Common everywhere. 

203. T. HYBRIDUM L. ALSIKE CLOVER. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common in the vicinity of Rochester. 

T. incarnatum L., Crimson Clover, was observed in i860 in a vacant 

lot on South Union street. 

204. T. agrarium L. Yellow or Hop Clover. 

Rare. Rochester, Dr. Booth, Mrs. Mary E. Streeter. Mount Hope, 
Miss F. Beckwith. Orleans county, Miss Lucy Weld. Wayne county. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 57 

205. T. procumbens L. Low Hop Clover. 

Fields and roadsides ; rare. Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth. Greece, 
M. S. Baxter. Penfield, G. T. Fish. 

206. T. procumbens L. var. minus Gray. [T. dubium Sibth.] 

Rare. Point Lookout, Irondequoit bay, G. T. Fish. 

93. MELILOTUS Tourn. [Juss.] 

207. M. officinalis Willd. [M. officinalis (L.) Lam.] Yellow Sweet 

Clover. 

Fields, roadsides and waste places ; common. 

208. M. alba Lam. White Sweet Clover. 

More widely distributed and abundant than the foregoing. 

94. MEDICAGO Tourn. [L.] 

209. M. sativa L. Lucerne. Alfalfa. 

Roadsides ; frequent. 

210. M. lupulina L. Black Medick. 

Waysides, waste places, pastures, lawns ; common. 

95. AMORPHA L. 

211. A. FRUT1COSA L. FALSE INDIGO. 

Outcast from nursery grounds in Irondequoit. Well established near 
the head of the road to "float bridge", Dr. C. M. Booth! 

96. TEPHROSIA Pers. [Cracca L.] 

212. T. Virginiana Pers. [Cracca Virginiana L.] Goat's Rue. 

Dry sandy knolls and banks ; scarce. Bank of Genesee river, M. S. 
Baxter. Brighton, G. T. Fish. Greece, Bradley. East side Ironde- 
quoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth! Penfield, L. Holzer. Bushnell's Basin, 
M. S. Baxter. 

97. ROBINIA L. 

213. R. PSEUDACACIA L. COMMON LOCUST. 

Spontaneous along the banks of Genesee river and elsewhere ; not 
common. 

214. R. viscosa Vent. Clammy Locust. Escape. 

98. CO LUTE A L. 

215. C. ARBORESCENS L. COMMON BLADDER SENNA. 

Escape. Well established by a roadside in the town of Brighton. 

99. ASTRAGALUS Tourn. [L.] 

216. A. Canadensis L. [A. Carolinianus L.] 

Scarce. Banks of Genesee river. Long pond, Dr. Anna H. Searing. 
Wayne county. 

217. A. Cooperi Gray. [Phaca neglecta Torr. & Gray.] 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, below lower falls. 

100. CORONILLA L. 

218. C. varia L. Macedon, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

8, Proc. Roch. Acad, ok Sc, Vol. 3, March, 1896. 



58 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



219. 



XOI. DESMODIUM Desv. [Meibomia Adans.] 

D. nudiflorum DC. [Meibo?nia nudiflora (L.) Kuntze.] 



Dry open woods ; frequent. 

A form with white flowers occurs on the bank of Genesee river, near 
Hanford's Landing. 
220. D. acuminatum DC. [Meibomia grandifiora (Walt.) Kuntze.] 

Rich woods, river banks, ravines ; common. 
22i. D. pauciflorum DC. [Meibomia ft auciflora (Nutt.) Kuntze.] 

Rare. Woods on the bank of Irondequoit bay, Dr. Searing. 

222. D rotundifolium DC. [Meibomia rotundifolia (Michx.) Kuntze.] 

Dry woods, oak openings, copses, river banks ; frequent. 

223. D. canescens DC. [Meibomia canescens (L.) Kuntze.] 

Rare. Orleans county, Miss Lucy Weld. 

224. D. cuspidatum Torr. & Gray. [Meibomia bracteosa (Michx.) Kuntze.] 

Dry woods and along streams ; frequent. 

225. D. Dillenii Darl. [Meibo?nia Dillenii (Darl.) Kuntze.] 

Dry woods, banks, ravines ; not common. 

226. D. paniculatum DC. [Meibomia ft aniculata (L.) Kuntze.] 

River banks, ravines, woods, thickets ; frequent. 

227. D. Canadense DC. [Meibomia Canadensis (L.) Kuntze.] 

Woods and banks of streams ; common. 

228. D. rigidum DC. [Meibomia rigida (Ell.) Kuntze.] 

Rev. J. E. Baker. Dr. Searing. 

229. D. ciliare DC. [Meibomia obtusa (Muhl.) A. M. Vail.] 

Rare. Bank of Allen's creek, G. T. Fish. Mendon, M. S. Baxter. 

230. D. Marilandicum F. Boott. [Meibomia Mary landica (L.) Kuntze.] 

Rare. Bank of Irondequoit bay, Dr. C . M. Booth. Wayne county. 

102. LESPEDEZA Michx. 

231. L. violacea Pers. (L. violacea var. divei'gens Man.) [L.violacea (L.) Pers.] 

Dry banks, thickets, sandy woods ; frequent. 

232. L. Stuvei Nutt. 

Dry banks ; scarce . Along Genesee river and around Irondequoit bay. 

233. L. Stuvei Nutt. var. intermedia Watson. (Z. violacea var. sessiliflora 

Man., p. 137.) [L. frutescens (L.) Britton.] 
Same range as the two preceding, but more abundant. 

234. L. polystachya Michx. (L. hirta Ell.) [L. hirta (L.) Ell.] 

Dry banks and woods ; frequent. 

235. L. capitata Michx. 

Rare. Near Rochester, L. Holzer. Wayne county. 

103. VICIA Tourn. [L.] 

236. V. sativa L. Common Vetch. 

Roadsides and borders of fields ; scarce. 



1894] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 59 

A form with acuminate, mucronate leaves, occurs along the railroad 
near Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter; and by the roadside, Brockport, Prof. 
W. H. Lenn on. 

237. V. Cracca L. 

Rare. Roadside, East avenue, Rochester, near city line, f. B. Fuller. 
Fairport, near the railroad, Miss Mary E. Macauley. 

238. V. Caroliniana Walt. 

Ravines and banks, in dry or moist land ; common. 

239. V.Americana Muhl. 

Moist soil on shady banks ; not common. 

104. LA THYRUS Tourn. [L.] 

240. L. maritimus Bigelow. [L. maritimus (L.) Bigelow.] Beach Pea. 

Frequent along the sandy shore of lake Ontario. 

241. L. ochroleucus Hook. 

Frequent along the banks of the Genesee ; plentiful in Seneca park. 

242. L. palustris L . 

Shores and borders of streams and marshes ; frequent. 

243. L. palustris L. var. myrtifolius Gray. [L. myrtifolius Muhl.] 

Same range as the preceding, though less frequent. 

105. APIOS Boerhaave. [Moench.] 

244. A. tuberosa Moench. [A.Apios (L.) MacM.] Ground Nut. 

Low grounds, along streams, borders of ponds and bays ; common. 

106. STROPHOSTYLES Ell. [Phaseolis L.] 

245. S. angulosus Ell. (Phaseo/us diversifolius Pers.) [Phaseo/us helvolus L.] 

Rare. Lake shore between Irondequoit bay and Charlotte, G.T.Fish. 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. Oak Orchard creek, Orleans county, 
about two miles from lake Ontario, M. S. Baxter. 

107. AMPHICARPJEA Ell. [Falcata Gmel.] 

246. A. monoica Nutt. [Falcata comosa (L.) Kuntze.] Hog Peanut. 

Woods, thickets, river banks, shores ; common. 

108. CASSIA Tourn. |L-] ' 

247. C. Marilandica L. Wild Senna. 

Rare. Near Rochester, Mrs. Mary E. Streetcr. Wayne county, 
E. L. Hankenson. 

248. C. Cham/fcresta L. Partridge Pea. 

Introduced. Well established in uninclosed land on Grand avenue, 
Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. The station has been destroyed recently. 

109. GLEDITSCHIA L. 

249. G. TRIACANTHOS L. HONEY LOCUST. 

Roadsides, near Rochester ; seedlings from planted trees. Mendon, 
G. T. Fish. Orleans county, Miss Lucy Weld. 



6o 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 



ROSACEA. 

ixo. PRUNUS Tourn. [L.] 

250. P. Persica L. [Amygdahts Persica L.] Peach. 

Roadsides and waste places ; occasional. 

251. P. Americana Marshall. Wild Plum. 

River banks, thickets, and borders of woods ; frequent. 

252. P. domestica L. Garden Plum. Escaped ; frequent. 

253. P. Avium L. English Cherry. 

Occasionally escapes to thickets and woods. 

254. P. Cerasus L. Sour Cherry. Roadsides ; infrequent. 

255. P. pumila L. Dwarf Cherry. 

Rare. Penfield, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

256. P. Pennsylvanica L. f. Wild Red Cherry. 

Ravines and along the banks of the Genesee ; frequent. 

257. P. Virginiana L. Choke-cherry. 

Rocky banks of Genesee river, ravines, thickets ; common. 
258 P. serotina Ehrh. Wild Black Cherry. 
Woods ; widely distributed, but scarce. 

xxx. SPIRMA L. 

259. S. salicifolia L. Common Meadow-sweet. 

Borders of marshes ; not common. Brighton, Miss Mary E. Macauley. 
Mendon ponds, Geoi'ge T. Fish! Long pond, Dr. Searing. Hamlin, 
M. S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

260. S. tomentosa L. Hardhack. 

Norton and St. Joseph streets, L. Holzer. Probably introduced. 
1X2. PHYSOCARPUS Maxim. [Opulaster Medic] 

261. P. opulifolius Maxim. [Spircea opulifolia L.) \Opnlaster opulifolius (L.) 

Kuntze.] Nine-bark. Known only as an escape. 

113. RUBUS Tourn. [L.] 

262. R. odoratus L. Purple Flowering Raspberry. 

River banks and ravines ; common. 

263. R. triflorus Richardson. [B. Americanns (Pers.) Britton.] Dwarf 

Raspberry. 

Dry or moist woods ; frequent. 

264. R. strigosus Michx. Wild Red Raspberry. 

Borders of woods and fields ; abundant on clearings. 

265. R occidentalis L. Black Raspberry. 

Thickets, waysides, fences ; common. 

266. R. villosus Ait. Common High Blackberry. 

Rocky river banks, borders of woods, thickets, clearings ; common. 

267. R. Canadensis L. Dewberry. 

River banks, borders of woods, copses, fields ; frequent. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 6l 

268. R. hispidus L. Swamp Blackberry. 

Low woods, wet grass lands, borders of swamps ; frequent. 

114. DA LIB A RD A L. 

269. D. repens L. 

Rare. Damp woods bordering Bergen swamp. 

115. GEUM L. 

270. G. album Gmelin. [G. Canadense Jacq.] 

Damp woods and their borders ; common. Occasionally by roadsides. 

271. Q. Virginianum L. 

Low grounds and borders of woods ; common. 

272. Q. strictum Ait. 

Swamps, woods, low grass lands ; common. 

273. Q. rivale L. Purple Avens. 

Marshes and wet meadows ; frequent. 

116. WALDSTEINIA Willd. 

274. W. fragarioides Tratt. \W. fragarioides (Michx.) Tratt] Barren- 

Strawberry. 

Dry woods, ravines, thickets ; frequent. 

117. FRAG ARIA Tourn. [L.] 

275. F. Virginiana Mill. [Duchesne.] Wild Strawberry. 

Woods, pastures, meadows ; everywhere common. 

276. F. Virginiana Mill. var. Illinoensis Gray. [Prince.] 

River banks and in rich soil ; frequent. 

277. F. vesca L. Wood Strawberry. 

River banks and woods ; frequent. 

118. POT EX TILL A L. 

278. P. Norvegica L. [P. Monspeliensis L.] 

Roadsides, waste places, fields, pastures ; common. 

279. P. supina L. {P. paradoxa Xutt.) [P. paradoxa Nutt.] 

Rare. Sandbar, Irondequoit bay, G. T.Fish! Shore of lake Ontario 
near Braddock's bay, J . E. Paine ! Wayne county. 

280. P. Pennsylvania L. 

Rare. Long pond, Dr. Anna H. Searing. 

281. P. recta L. 

Rare. Genesee Valley park, Dr. C. M. Booth! East Rochester, Miss 
Mary E . Macauley . Scottsville, Miss Florence Beckwith. Brockport, 
Prof. IV. H. Lennon. 

282. P. argentea L. Silvery Cinque-foil. 

Dry fields and roadsides, in sandy or gravelly soil ; common. 

283. P. palustris Scop. [Comarum pa lustre L.] Marsh Five-Finger. 

Marshes; infrequent. Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth! Round 
pond, J. B. Fuller. Mendon, G. T. Fish! Hamlin, M. S. Baxter. 



62 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 



284. P. fruticosa L. Shrubby Cinque-foil. 

Wet fields and borders of cold swamps ; not common. Perinton, 
Mendon and Greece, Monroe county ; Caledonia and Avon, Livingston 
county ; Bergen, Genesee county ; Wayne county. 

285. P. Anserina L. Silver-weed. 

Frequent on the sandy shore of lake Ontario. Adams Basin. 

286. P. Canadensis L. Common Cinque-foil or Five-finger. 

Fields and roadsides, in dry soil ; common. 

287. P. Canadensis L. var. simplex Torr. & Gray. 

Same range as the preceding ; common. 

ng. AGRIMONIA Tourn. [L.] 

288. A. Eupatoria Walt. [A. striata Michx.] Agrimony. 

Borders of woods, ravines, fields, waysides ; common. 

120. POTERIUM L. [Sanguisorba L.] 

289. P. Canadense Benth. & Hook. [Sanguisorba Canadensis L.] Canadian 

Burnet. 

Swamps ; infrequent. Marsh at head of Irondequoit bay, Penfield, 
Dr. CM. Booth! Brighton, Otto Betz. Two miles east of Pittsford, 
Rev . J. Walton. One mile west of Fairport, Miss Mary E. Macauley. 
Fisher's Station, M. S. Baxter. 

121. ROSA Tourn. [L.] 

290. R. setigera Michx. Climbing or Prairie Rose. 

Woods and river banks ; rare. Culver's woods, East Rochester, 
Dr. C. M. Booth, G. T. Fish. Bank of Genesee river at upper falls, 
Rochester, woods in Brighton and in Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
Always in wild places and flowers always single. Wayne county. 

291. R. blanda Ait. Early Wild Rose. 

Infrequent. Banks of Genesee river and shore of lake Ontario. 

292. R. Carolina L. Swamp Rose. 

Borders of swamps and low grounds ; common. 

293. R. humilis Marsh. Dwarf Rose. 

Dry woods and rocky river banks. Our most common species. 

294. R. nitida Willd. 

Long pond, Dr. Aii7ia H. Searing. L. Holzer. 

295. R. rubiginosa L. Sweet-briar. Eglantine. 

Roadsides ; occasional. 

X22. PVR US L. 

296. P. Malus L. Apple. Frequent. 

297. P. communis L. Pear. Occasional. 

298. P. coronaria L. American Crab-Apple. 

Glades ; frequent. 

299. P. arbutifolia L. f. {Aronia arbutifolia (L.) Ell.] Choke-berry. 

Infrequent. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Bergen. Wayne county. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 63 

300. P. arbutifolia L.f. var. melanocarpa Hook. [Aroma nigra (Willd.) Britt.] 

Abundant in the marshes at Mendon ponds. 

301. P. Americana DC. \Sorbus Americana Marsh.] American Mountain 

Ash. Escaped from cultivation. 

302. P. Aucuparia Gaertn. European Mountain Ash. 

Several specimens in woods on the bank of Genesee river. 

123. CRA TAVGUS L. 

303. C. OXYACANTHA L. ENGLISH HAWTHORN. 

Infrequent. Bank Genesee river, below lower falls. Gates. Adams 
Basin. Wayne county. 

304. C. coccinea L. Scarlet Thorn. 

Thickets and hillsides ; frequent. Common along the banks of the 
Genesee river. 

305. C. tomentosa L. Black Thorn. 

Thickets along the river banks, old pastures, etc. ; scarce. 

306. C. tomentosa L. var. pyrifolia Gray. 

Same range as the preceding ; scarce. 

307. C. punctata Jacq. [C. tomentosa var. punctata Gray.) 

River banks and flats, fields, thickets, etc. ; common. Occasionally 
with yellow fruit. 

308. C. Crus=galli L. Cock-spur Thorn. 

River banks and flats; rare. A fine specimen in Genesee Valley park. 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

124. AMELANCHIER Medic. 

309. A. Canadensis Torr. & Gray. [A. Canadensis (L.) Medic] Shad-bush. 

River banks, ravines, thickets, woodlands ; common. 

310. A. Canadensis var. rotundifolia T. & G. [A. rotundifolia (Mx.) Rcem.] 

Plentiful on the banks of Genesee river and Irondequoit bay. 

311. A. Canadensis var. (?) oblongifolia T. & G. [A.Botryapium (L. f.) D.C.] 

Ravines and low grounds. 

SAXIFRAGACE/E. 

125. SAX I FRAG A L. 

312. S. Virginiensis Michx. Early Saxifrage. 

River banks, ravines, hillsides ; abundant, except in the western part 
of our district. 

313. S. Pennsylvania L. Swamp Saxifrage. 

Cold swamps; infrequent. Irondequoit, Dr. CM. Booth! Greece, 
Miss Beckwith and Miss Macau ley. Adams Basin, Prof. W.H. Lennon. 
Fisher's Station, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

126. TIARELLA L. 

314. T. cordifolia L. False Mitre-wort. 

Hilly woods, river banks and ravines ; common. 



6 4 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 



127. MITELLA Tourn. [L.] 

315. M. diphylla Tourn. [L.] Mitre-wort. Bishop's Cap. 

Rich woods, ravine sides, and shaded knolls ; common. 

316. M. nuda L. 

Borders of swamps, in damp moss and deep shade ; not common. 
Riga, Miss Florence Beckwith. Caledonia, Livingston county, Miss 
Mary E. Roberts. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

128. CHRYSOSPLENIUM Tourn. [L.] 

317. C. Americanum Schwein. Golden Saxifrage. 

Cold wet places, in shade ; frequent. 

129. PA RN A SSI A Tourn. [L.] 

318. P. Caroliniana Michx. Grass of Parnassus. 

Wet cliffs, swamps, and along streams; infrequent. Genesee river, 
west bank, above paper-mill dam, /. B . Fuller ; east bank, in Seneca 
park, M. S. Baxter. Penfield creek, L . Holzer. Mendon. Caledonia, 
Livingston county. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

130. RIBES L. 

R. Cynosbati L. Prickly Gooseberry. 

River banks and woods ; common. 
R. rotundifolium Michx. Orleans county, Miss Lucy Weld. 
R. oxyacanthoides L. (/?. hirte Hum Michx.) 

Low grounds ; not common. 
R. prostratum L'Her. Fetid Currant. Rare. L. Holzer. 
R. floridum L'Her. Wild Black Currant. 

Wet woods, river banks, and along streams ; frequent. 
R. nigrum L. Garden Black Currant. Escape, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
R. rubrum L. Garden Currant. 

Escaped to woods on the bank of Genesee river, in Seneca park. 

326. R. rubrum L. var. subglandulosum Maxim. [R. rubrum L.] 

Swamps and cold damp woods ; infrequent. Irondequoit. Greece. 
Gates. Wayne county. 

CRASSULACE^. 

131. PENTHORUM Gronov. [L.] 

327. P. sedoides L. Ditch Stone-crop. 

Open wet places, fields, ditches ; common. 

132. SEDUM Tourn. [L.] 

328. S. ternatum Michx. Monroe county, Dr. Searing. Wayne county. 

329. S. acre L. Golden Stone-crop. Escape. Infrequent. 

330. S. Telephium L. Live-for-ever. 

Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Roadside, Bergen, Genesee county, 
/. B. Fuller. Wayne county. 

331. S. reflexum L. Wayne county. 



3*9- 

320. 
321. 

322. 
323- 

3 2 4. 
325- 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 65 

DROSERACEyE. 

133. BROS ERA L. 

332. D. rotundifolia L. Round-leaved Sundew. 

Sphagnum swamps ; frequent. 

333. D. intermedia Hayne, var. Americana DC. {D. longifolia Manual.) 

[D. intermedia Hayne.] Long-leaved Sundew. 
Rare. Sphagnum swamps, Mendon. 
D. linearis was reported in the check list of Mr. E. L. Hankenson, from 
Newark, Wayne county, N. Y. 

HAMAMELIDE.E. 

134. HA MA MELTS L. 

334. H. Virginiana L. Witch-Hazel. 

River banks, ravines, woods, thickets ; common. 

HALORAGEyE. [HalorrhagidacetE.] 

135. MYRIOPHYLLUM Vaill. [L.] 

335. M. spicatum L. Common Water-Milfoil. 

Common in Irondequoit bay and other bays along lake Ontario. Lake 
marsh, Bald Eagle creek, Kendall, Orleans county. Wayne county. 

336. M. verticillatum L. 

Rare. Irondequoit bay, Dr. Booth, G . T. Fish. Wayne county. 

337. M. heterophyllum Michx. 

Rare. Irondequoit bay, Dr. C . M . Booth. Kendall, Orleans county, 
M. S. Baxter. Sodus bay, Wayne county, G. T. Fish. 

136. PROSERPINACA L. 

338. P. palustris L. Mermaid-weed. 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

137- CALLITRICHE L. 

339. C. verna L. [C '. palustris L.] Water Starwort. 

Rare. Muddy ground, overflowed early in the season. Charlotte, 
Dr. Booth ! Black creek, near Genesee river, M. S. Baxter. Wayne Co. 

138. LY THRUM L. 

340. L. alatum Pursh. 

Rare. Along railroad track, Adams Basin, M . S . Baxter. Probably 
introduced. 

341. L. Salicaria L. Spiked Loosestrife. 

Rare. Shore of Irondequoit bay, Dr. Searing. Near the Rapids, 
Mrs. M. E. Streeter . Clyde, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

139. DECODON Gmel. 

342. D. verticillatus Ell. [Nescea verticillata HBK.) {Dccodon vcrticillatus 

(L.) Ell.] Swamp Loosestrife. 

Swamps and borders of ponds ; infrequent. Common in the marches 
bordering Irondequoit bay. 

y, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, March, 1896. 



66 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



ONAGRACE.E. 

140. LUDWIGIA L. 

343. L. palustris Ell. {L . palustris (L.) Ell.] Water Purslane. 

Ditches and low grounds ; common. 

141. EPILOBIUM L. 

344. E. angustifolium L. [Cha?nce?ierion angustifolium (L .) Scop .] Great 

Willow-herb. Fire-weed. 
Copses and newly cleared lands ; common. 

345. E. lineare Muhl. 

Scarce. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Bank of Genesee river, 
Chili, Miss F. Beckwith. Wayne county. 

346. E. strictum Muhl. [E. ??iolle Torr.) 

Marshes and wet places ; not common. Near Rochester, Dr. Booth. 
Mendon. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

347. E. coloratum Muhl. 

Ravines, low grounds, along streams, etc. ; common. 

142. CENOTHERA L. 

348. O. biennis L. [Onagra biennis (L.) Scop.] Evening Primrose. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

349. O. pumila L. [Kneiffia pumila (L.) Spach.] 

Rare. Prof. IV. H. Lennon. 

350. O. f ruticosa L. {Kneiffia fruticosa (L.) Raimann.] Sundrops. 

Rare. Near Culver street bridge, Brighton, Dr. C . M . Booth. 

143. GAURA L. 

351. Q. biennis L. 

Dry banks and fields ; not common. River road, Chili, Mrs. J. H . 
Maguire and Miss F. Beckwith . Hanford's Landing . Parma, Bradley . 

144. CIRCLE A Tourn. [L.] 

352. C. Lutetiana L. Enchanter's Nightshade. 

Damp woods ; common. 

353. C. alpina L. 

Cool woods, ravine sides, swamps ; common. 

CUCURBITACEyE. 

145. SICYOS L. 

354. S. an 2; u I at us L. Bur-Cucumber. 

River banks ; not common. 

146. ECHINOCYSTIS Torr. & Gray. [Micrampelis Raf.] 

355. E. lobata Torr. & Gray. [Micramfle/is lobata (Michx.) Greene.] Wild 

Cucumber. 

River banks, waste places ; frequent. Often cultivated. 

UMBELLIFER.E. 

147. DAUCUS Tourn. [L.] 

356. D. Carota L. Wild Carrot. Abundant and troublesome. 



1894- I PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 67 

148. ANGELICA L. 

357. A. hirsuta Muhl. {Archangelica hirsuta Torr. & Gray.) [Angelica 

villosa (Walt.) B. S. P.] 

Dry banks, borders of woods ; frequent. 

358. A. atropurpurea L. {Archangelica atropiirpurea Hoffm.) 

River banks, borders of marshes ; frequent. 

149. CONIOSELINUM Fisch. [Hoffm.] 

359. C. Cinadense Torr. & Gray. [C . Chinense (L.) B.S.P.] Hemlock 

Parsley. 

Rare. Caledonia, Livingston county, G. W. Clinton in 17th N. Y. Rep. 
Bergen, Genesee county, Cat. Plants of Btiffalo . 

150. HERACLEUM L. 

360. H. lanatum Michx. Cow Parsnip. 

River flats and low grounds ; not common. 

151. PAS TINA CA L. 

361. P. sativa. Parsnip. 

Roadsides, waste places, banks of streams ; frequent. 

152. THASPIUM Nutt. 

362. T. barbinode Nutt. [T. barbinode (Michx.) Nutt.] 

Rare. River bank, Genesee Valley park, Dr. C . M . Booth! 

153- PIMPINELLA L. 

363. P. integerrima Benth. & Hook. [Zizia integerrima DC.) [Pimpinella 

integerrima (L.) A. Gray.] 

Dry banks, ravines, thickets ; common. 

154- BUPLEURUM L. 

364. B. ROTUNDIFOLIUM L. 

Rare. Ontario, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

155. CRYPTOTsENIA DC. [Deringa Adans.] 

365. C. Canadensis DC. [Deringa Canade?isis (L.) Kuntze.] Honewort. 

Moist woods and shaded places ; frequent. 

156. SIUM Tourn. [L.] 

366. S. cicutaefolium Gmelin. (S. lineare Michx.) Water Parsnip. 

Marshes ; frequent. 

157. ZIZIA Koch. 

367. Z. aurea Koch. {Thaspium aureum var. apterum Gray, Man.) [Zizia 

aurea (L.) Koch.] 

Dry woods and thickets, river banks, meadows, etc. ; common. 

368. Z. cordata DC. [Thaspium trifoliatum var. apterum Gray, Manual.) 

[Zizia cordata (Walt.) DC] 

Dry woods, thickets, meadows ; common. 

158. CARUM L. 

369. C. Carui L. Caraway. Naturalized in various places: Brighton, 

Penfield, Gates, Adams Basin, and elsewhere. 



68 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



37^- 
37i- 

372. 

373- 

374- 
375- 



3/6. 

377- 
378. 
379- 

380. 



APIUM L. 

A. graveolens L. Celery. Roadsides ; occasional. 

159. CICUTA L. 

C. maculata L. Water- Hemlock. 

Marshes, swamps, and meadows ; frequent. 
C. bulbifera L. 

Frequent in the marshes about Irondequoit bay and elsewhere. 

160. CONIUM L. 

C. MACULATUM L. POISON HEMLOCK. 

Roadsides and waste places ; common. 

161. CH&ROPHYLLUM L. 

C. procumbens Crantz. [C. procumbens (L.) Crantz.] 
Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

162. OSMORRHIZA Raf. 

O. brevistylis DC. [O. Claytoni (Michx.) B.S.P.] Hairy Sweet- 
cicely. Rich woods, ravines, thickets ; common. 

O. longistylis DC. [O. longistylis (Torr.) D.C.] Smooth Sweet- 
cicely. Same range as the last, but less frequent. 

CORIANDRUM L. 

C. sativum L. Coriander. Appears occasionally along the banks of 
the river and by roadsides. 

163. HYDROCOTYLE Tourn. [L.] 

H.Americana L. Water Pennywort. 

Moist and springy places; not common. Irondequoit, Dr. C. J/. 
Booth! Mendon, M . S. Baxter. 

164. SANICULA Tourn. [L.] 

S. Marylandica L. Black Snakeroot. 

Woods and thickets ; frequent. 
S. gregaria Bicknell, Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, XII, (1895), P- 35 1 

Woods and thickets ; frequent. 
S. trifoliata Bicknell, Bull. Torr. Bot. Club, XII, (1895), p. 351 . 

Rich woods ; infrequent. 

ARALIACE^. 

165. ARAL/A Tourn. [L.] 

A. racemosa L. Spikenard. 

River banks, ravines, rich woods ; frequent. 
A. hispida Vent. Bristly Sarsaparilla. 

Low ground corner Norton and St. Joseph streets, L. Holzer. Abund- 



3 ; ^- 



ant in some of the marshes at Mendon ponds, 
of Bergen swamp. Wayne county. 
A. nudicaulis L. Wild Sarsaparilla. 
Woods, river banks, ravines ; common. 



Dry knoll on the border 



1894] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 69 

383. A. quinquefolia Decsne. & Planch. [Panax quinquefolium L.) Ginseng. 

Rich cool woods ; rare. 

384. A. trifolia Decsne. & Planch. [Panax trifolium L.J Dwarf Ginseng. 

Rich woods and thickets ; common. 

CORXACE/E. 

166. CORNUS Tourn. [L.J 

385. C. Canadensis L. Dwarf Cornel. 

Damp woods and borders of swamps ; not uncommon. 

386. C. floridaL. Flowering Dogwood. 

Woods and river banks ; common. 

387. C. circinata L'Her. Round-leaved Cornel. 

River banks, ravines, borders of woods ; common. 

388. C. sericea L. [C.Amonum Mill.] Kinnikinnik. 

Low grounds, swamps, along streams, fences, etc.; very common. 

389. C. stolonifera Michx. Red Osier. 

Low ground ; common. 

390. C. paniculata L'Her. \C . candidissima Marsh.] Panicled Cornel. 

River banks, hillsides, and thickets ; common. 

391. C. alternifolia L.f. Alternate-leaved Cornel. 

River banks, ravines, woods ; common. 

167. NYSSA L. 

392. N. sylvatica Marsh. [N. multiflora Wang.) \N. aquatica L.] Tupelo. 

Pepperidge. 

Scarce. Hudson street. Near the corner of Clinton street and the 
Ridge road. Seneca park. Irondequoit. Gates. Chili. Mendon. 
From one to six specimens at each station. Wayne county. 

CAPRIFOLIACEyE. 

168. SAMBUCUS Tourn. [L.] 

393. S. Canadensis L. Common Elder. 

Roadsides, fences, fields, banks of streams ; common. 

394. S. racemosa L. [S. pubens Michx.) [S. pubens Michx.] Red-berried 

Elder. River banks and ravines ; frequent. 

169. VIBURNUM L. 

395. V. lantanoides Michx. [V. alnifolium Marsh.] Hobble-bush. 

Scarce. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Webster, G.l'. FzsA, 
M. S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

396. V. Opulus L. Cranberry-tree. 

Low ground and swamps ; not common. 

397. V. acerifolium L. Maple-leaved Arrow-wood. 

Dry hilly woods and river banks ; common. 

398. V. pubescens Pursh. [V. pubescens (Ait.) Pursh.] Downy Arrow- WOOD. 

Rocky banks and ravines ; frequent. 



70 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

399. V. dentatum L. Low grounds ; frequent. 

400. V. cassinoides L. {V. nudum var. cassinoides T. & G.) Withe-rod. 

Not common. Sphagnum swamps at Mendon. 

401. V. Lentago L. Sweet Viburnum. Sheep-berry. 

Open woods, low grounds ; frequent. 

170. TRIOS TEUM L. 

402. T. perfoliatum L. Horse Gentian. 

Rich deep soil ; somewhat scarce. Brighton. Penneld. Caledonia. 
Le Roy. Clarendon. 

171 LINNsEA Gronov. [L.] 

403. L. borealis Gronov. Twin-flower. 

Mossy woods and cold marshes. Riga, Miss F. Beckwith . Mendon, 
G. T. Fish. Caledonia, Livingston county. Frequent in the cold 
woods bordering Bergen swamp. Wayne county. 

172 SYMPHORICARPOS Dill. [Juss.] 

404. S. vulgaris Michx. [S. Symphoricarpos (L.) McM.] Indian Currant. 

Rare. L. Holzer. 

405. S. racemosus Michx. Snowberry. 

Rare. Bank Genesee river, near lower falls, J. B. Fuller; near 
Charlotte, M . S. Baxter. Bank of Oak Orchard creek, M . S. Baxter. 

406. S. racemosus Mx.var.pauciflorus Robbins. [S. pauciflorus (Robbins) 

Britton .] " The Gulf ", near Mumford, Genesee county, Miss Beckwith. 

173. LO NICER A L. 

407. L. Tartarica L. Tartarian Honeysuckle. 

Naturalized in several places. 

408. L. ciliata Muhl. Fly-Honeysuckle. 

River banks, ravines, and damp woods ; common. 

409. L. coerulea L. Mountain Fly-Honeysuckle. 

Bergen, Dr. Searing. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

410. L. oblongifolia Muhl. [L. oblongifolia (Goldie) Hook.] Swamp Fly- 

Honeysuckle. 

Swamps ; rare. Seneca park, C . C . Laney . Mendon, G. T. Fish. 
Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Caledonia. Bergen swamp. 

411. L. glauca Hill. (Z. parviflora\,?csx\.) [L. dioica L.] 

Rocky banks Genesee river, ravines, etc.; frequent. 

J74. DIERVILLA Tourn. [Mcench.] 

412. D. trifida Mcench. [B. Diervilla (L.) McM.] Bush Honeysuckle. 

River banks, ravines, dry woods ; frequent. 

RUBIACE/E. 

175. HO US TON I A L. 

413. H. coerulea L. Bluets. Innocence. 

Local. Abundant on the hills at Canandaigua lake. 



1894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 7 I 

414. H. purpurea L. var. ciliolata Gray. \H . ciliolata Torr.] 

Rare. Bank Genesee river, at upper falls, Rochester. Caledonia, 
Livingston county, Mrs. N. G . Mathews. 

415. H. purpurea L. var. longifolia Gray. \H . longifolia Gaertn.] 

Scarce. Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Mumford, M. S. Baxter. 
Caledonia, Miss Mary E . Roberts . 

176. CEPHALANTHUS L. 

416. C. occidentalis L. Button-bush. 

Swamps, borders of ponds and streams ; frequent. 

177. MITCH ELLA L. 

417. M. repens L. Partridge-berry. Woods; common. 

178. GALIUM L. 

418. G. verum L. Yellow Bedstraw. 

Neglected lawn, East ave., Rochester ; has been spreading since 1882. 
4IQ. G. Mollugo L. 

Along N. Y.C. railroad, Gates, Miss Florence Beckwith . 

420. Q. Aparine L. Cleavers. 

Swamps, damp thickets, shaded grounds ; abundant. 

421. G. pilosum Ait. 

Rare. Irondequoit, near Sea Breeze. Wayne county. 

422. G. circaezans Michx. Wild Liquorice. 

Woods, ravines, river banks ; frequent. 

423. G. lanceolatum Torr. Wild Liquorice. 

Same range as the last ; frequent. 

424. G. boreale L. Northern Bedstraw. 

River banks, sandy ridges, and occasionally in swamps ; frequent. 
Cliffs and banks of Genesee river. Penfield. Mendon. Bergen. 

425. G. trifidum L. [G. trifidum L., incl. var. pusillum Gray.] 

Marshes and wet places ; common. 

426. G. trifidum L. var. pusillum Gray. 

Marshes bordering Genesee river. 

427. G. trifidum L. var. latifolium Torr. \G . tinctorium L.] 

Rare ? Dr. Anna H . Searing. 

428. G. asprellum Michx. Rough Bedstraw. 

Swamps, wet meadows, low woods ; common. 

429. G. triflorum Michx. Sweet-scented Bedstraw. 

Woods ; common. 

YALERIANACEyE. 

179. VALERIA NA Tourn. I.. 

430. V. sylvatica Banks. 

Sphagnum swamps ; rare. Mendon swamp, G . T. Fish.' Bergen 
swamp, Genesee county . North of Newark, Wayne county . 



72 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

180. VALERIANELLA Tourn. [Pol!] 

431. V. olitoria Poll. {Fedia olitoria Vahl.) [V. Locusta (L.) Bettke.] 

Rare. Hanford's Landing, M. S.Baxter. Scottsville, L. Holzer . 
Dr. Searing. Prof. Lennon. 

432. V. chenopodifolia DC. {Fedia Fagopyriwi Torr. & Gray.) [V. cheno- 

podiifolia (Pursh) DC] Rare. Wayne county. 

DIPSACE/E. 

1S1. DIPSACUS Tourn. [L.] 

433. D. Sylvestris Mill. [Huds.] Wild Teasel. 

Fields and roadsides ; very common. 

COMPOSITE. 

VERNONIA Schreb. 

V. altissima Nutt. \V. gigantea (Walt.) Britton.] Appeared in a waste 

lot adjoining a poultry yard, Rochester, in 1867. 

182. MIKANIA Willd. [Willoughbya Neck.] 

434. M. scandens L. {Willoughbya scandens (L.) Kuntze.] Climbing Hemp- 

weed. Copses along streams ; rare. Red creek, Dr. C . M . Booth, 
G . T. Fish. River road, Mrs. y. H. McGuire. Wayne county. 

183. EUPATORIUM Tourn. [L.] 

435. E. purpureum L. Joe-Pye Weed. 

Low grounds ; common. 

436. E. perfoliatum L. Thorough wort. Boneset. 

Low grounds ; common. 

437. E. age rato ides L. White Snake-root. 

Rich woods, river banks and ravines ; common. 

184. SOL/DAGO L. Golden Rod. 

438. S. squarrosa Aluhl . 

Frequent along the banks of Genesee river and in ravines. Wayne 
county. 

439. S. csesia L . 

River banks, ravines, rich woods ; common. 

440. S. latifolia L. [S. ftexicaulis L.] 

Shaded banks and ravines ; frequent . 

441. S. bicolor L. 

Dry banks, hillsides and woods ; common. 

442. S. uliginosa Nutt. {S . stricta Man.) 

Swamps; rare. Caledonia, Livingston county. Bergen swamp, 
Genesee county, 40th N. Y. Rep. Wayne county. 

443. S. patula Muhl. Swamps; common. 

444. S. rugosa Mill. [S '. altissima Torr. & Gray.) 

Borders of woods, fields, copses ; frequent. 






I 894. J PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 73 

445. S. ulmifolia Muhl. 

Swamps; scarce. G. T. Fish. Adams Basin and Bergen swamp. 
M. S. Baxter. 

446. S. neglecta Torr. & Gray. 

Swamps; rare. Mendon. Caledonia,. Livingston county. Bergen, 
Genesee county . Wayne county. 

447. S. neglecta T. & G. var. linoides Gray. \S. uniligulata (DC) Porter.] 

Rare. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. 
44S. S. arguta Ait. [S. Muhlenbergii Torr. & Gray.) 
Fields, copses and moist woods ; frequent. 

449. S. juncea Ait. [S. arguta Torr. & Gray.) 

River banks, borders of woods and fields ; common. 

450. S. serotina Ait. (S. gigantea Man.) 

Borders of woods and copses ; frequent. 

451. S. serotina Ait. var. gigantea Gray. (S. serotina Man.) \S . serotina 

gigantea (Ait.) A. Gray.] 

Low grounds and along streams ; frequent. 

452. S. Canadensis L. 

Roadsides, fence-rows, fields ; common and abundant. 

453. S. nemoralis Ait. Dry fields ; common. 

454. S. Ohioensis Riddell. 

Swamps and along streams ; rare. Bank of Genesee river, near the 
lower falls, Rochester, J. B . Falter. Bergen swamp. Wayne county. 

455. S Houghtonii Torr. & Gray. 

Rare. Bergen swamp, Dr. C . M . Booth and G. T. Bis//.' 

456. S. lanceolata L. [Euthamia graminifolia (L.) Nutt.] 

Fields, in low wet or on high dry ground ; not common. Abundant 
along the Swamp road in Seneca park, and on dry knolls in Gates. 
Rochester. Brighton. Ogden. Hamlin. Wayne county. 

457. S. tenuifolia Pursh .- [Euthamia Caroliniana (L.) Greene.] 

Rare. Sand-bar, Irondequoit bay, G. T. Fish. Introduced. 

185. SERICOCARPUS Xees. 

458. S. conyzoides Nees. [S. asteroides (L.) B.S.P.] 

Copses, wooded hillsides, along river banks and ravines, in dry 
ground ; common. 

186. ASTER L. 

459. A. corymbosus Ait. [A. divaricatus L.] 

Borders of woods and thickets ; frequent. 

460. A. macrophyllus L. 

River banks, along streams, and in rich woods ; common. 

461. A Novae=Angliae L. 

Low grounds, along streams, roadsides, hillsides ; abundant. 
Form with flowers nearly white, roadside, Gates, Miss B. Beckivith. 

10, Proc. Roch. Acad, of So, Vol. 3, March, 1896. 



74 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

462. A. Novae= Anglian L. var. roseus Gray. [Aster Novce-Anglice roseus 

(Desf.) D.C.] Infrequent. 

463. A. azureus Lindl. Rare. Dr. Searing. 

464. A undulatus L. 

Dry copses and woodlands; common. Occasionally with many of 
the disk flowers ligulate — about forty ligulate flowers in each head. 

465. A. cordifolius L. 

Woods, fields, hillsides ; very common. 

466. A. sagittifolius Willd. [A. sagittifolius Wedem.] 

River banks, ravine sides, borders of woods ; common. 

467. A.lsevis L. 

Borders of woods, fields, hillsides; common. Very abundant in 
Seneca park from Maple grove to River Side avenue. 

468. A. ericoides L. L. Holzer. Prof. Lennon. 

469. A. multiflorus Ait. Rare. In a field in Gates, G. T. Fish. 

470. A. dumosus L. Prof '.' Lennon. Miss Lucy Weld. 

471. A. vimineus Lam. {A. Tradesca?iti Man.) 

Woods, low grounds, along streams and fences ; common. 

472. A. diffusus Ait. {A. miser Man.) [A. lateriflorus (L.) Britton.] 

Thickets and fields ; common. 

473. A. diffusus Ait. var. hirsuticaulis Gray. [A. lateriflorus hirsuticaulis 

(Lindl.) Porter.] 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, below lower falls, J. B . Fuller. 

474. A Tradescanti L. [A. tenuifolius Man.) 

Bergen swamp, Genesee county, Dr. Anna H . Searing . 

475. A. paniculatus Lam. {A. simplex Man.) 

Low grounds ; common. 

476. A. salicifolius Ait. [A. car?ieus Man.) 

Low grounds ; infrequent. 

477. A. junceus Ait. {A. cestivus Man.) 

Sphagnum swamp adjoining Harris pond, Mendon. Wayne county. 

478. A. prenanthoides Muhl. 

Rich woods, low grounds and swamps ; common . 

479. A. puniceus L. 

Marshes and low grounds ; common. 

Form with green stem and white flowers, Hamlin, Miss F. Beckwith. 

480. A. puniceus L. var. with purple stems, nearly smooth, flowers pinkish. 

Low ground near western " wide-waier", J . B. Fuller. 

481. A. puniceus L. var. lucidulus Gray. 

Low ground, border of woods, Greece, J . B . Fuller. 

482. A. umbellatus Mill. [Diplopappus umbellatus Torr. & Gray.) 

Swamps; abundant. 



I&94-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 75 

483. A. ptarmicoides Torr. & Gray. [A . ptannicoidcs (Nees.) Torr. & Gray.] 

Very rare. Rocky bank of Genesee river, below the lower falls, 
Dr. C. M . Booth. 

484. A. acuminatus Michx. 

Cool rich woods and ravines; scarce. Greece, Dr. A. H. Searing 
and Miss Beckuith. Brockport, Prof. Lennon. Sweden, M. S. Baxter. 

187. ERIGEROX L. 

485. E. Canadensis L. Horseweed. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

486. E. annuus Pers. [E. annuus (L.) Pers.] Daisy Fleabane. 

Fields and waste places ; common. 

487. E. strigosus Muhl. [E. ramosits (Walt.) B.S.P.J Daisy Fleap.ane. 

Fields ; common. 

488. E. bellidifolius Muhl. [E. pulchelliis Michx.] Robin's Plantain. 

Banks and hillsides ; frequent. 
489 E. Philadelphicus L. 

Moist ground, ravines, and grassy banks ; common, often abundant. 

188. AXTEXXARIA Gsrtn. 

490. A. plantaginifolia Hook. [A. plantaginifolia (L.) Richards.] Plan- 

tain-leaved Everlasting. 
Tops of river banks and ravines, sterile knolls, dry pastures; common. 

189. AXAPHALIS DC. 

491. A. margaritacea Benth. & Hook. {Antcmiaria margaritacea R. Br.) 

[Antennaria jnargaritacea (L.) Hook.] Pearly Everlasting. ■ 
Dry fields, hills, and woods ; common. 

I go. GXAPHALIUM L. 

492. Q. polycephalum Michx. [G. obtusifolium L.] Common Everlasting. 

Old fields and dry woods ; common. 

493. Q. decurrens Ives. Common Everlasting. 

Dry woods and old fields ; frequent. 

494. Q. uliginosum L. Low Cudweed. 

In leached soil, low grounds, roadsides, ditches ; common. 

191. IXULA L. 

495. I. Helenium L. Elecampane. 

Borders of woods, pastures, along streams and roadsides ; common. 

192. POLYMXIA L. 

496. P. Canadensis L. Leaf-cup. 

Abundant in woods near Cedar Swamp station, Henrietta ; rare else- 
where. Le Roy and Bergen, Genesee county. 

497. P. Uvedalia L. 

Rare. Ravine near Canandaigua lake, E . J. Durand, 



76 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

193. AMBROSIA Tourn. [L.] 

498. A. trifida L. Great Ragweed. 

Abundant along Honeoye creek, especially at Rush Junction, and at 
the mouth of Oatka creek, Scottsville ; occasional elsewhere. Canan- 
daigua lake, Miss Mary E. Macaulcy. 

499. A. artemisiaefolia L. Hogweed. Ragweed. 

Fields, roadsides, and waste places ; very common. 

194. XANTHIUM Tourn. [L.] 

500. X. STRUMARIUM L. COCKLE-BUR. 

Frequent about Rochester. Adams Basin. Wayne county. 

501. X. Canadense Mill. Cockle-bur. 

Along streams ; common. 

502. X. Canadense Mill. var. echinatum Gray. 

Same range as the preceding ; common. 

195. HE LI OPS IS Pers. 

503. H. lasvis Pers. \H . helianthoides (L.) B.S.P.] Ox-eye. 

River banks, ravines, and along streams ; common. 

504. H. scabra Dunal. [H . lavis var. scabra Torr. & Gray.) Rare. 

196. ECHIXA CEA Mcench. [Brauneria Neck.] 

505. E. angustifolia DC. [Brauneria pallida (Nutt.) Britton.] Purple 

Cone-flower. 

Introduced from the west. Railroad embankment, Adams Basin, 
M. S. Baxter. 

197. RUDBECKIA L. 

506. R. laciniata L. Cone-flower. 

River banks, ravine sides, along streams ; common. 

507. R. hirta L. Yellow Daisy. Cone-flower. 

Fields ; very common. 

508. R. hirta L. var. . A form with band of dark brown at base of ray 

flowers was found in the town of Gates, near Rochester, in 1891, by Miss 
Beckwith ; again in 1892 and 1893. See Proc. Roch. Acad. Sc, Vol. II, 
Broch. 2, pp. 170, 171 ; Broch. 3, p. 241. 

198. HELIANTHUS L. Sunflower. 

H. annuusL. Frequently spontaneous, but not permanent. 

509. H. divaricatus L. 

Dry woods, river banks, tops of ravines ; common. 

510. H. strumosus L. 

River banks, sides of ravines, copses, in rich and usually moist soil. 

511. H. strumosus L. var. mollis Torr. & Gray. \H . strumosus macro- 

phyllus (Willd.) Britton.] Rare. Greece, Bradley. 

512. H. decapetalus L. 

River banks and ravines ; not common. 



1894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNT V. 7 7 

513. H. tuberosus L. Jerusalem Artichoke. 

Alluvial soil; not common. 
igg. COREOPSIS L. 

514. C. discoidea Torr. & Gray. [Bidens discoidca (T. & G.) Britton. | 

Rare. Sandbar and lake shore, Irondequoit, /. />. Fuller. 

200. BIDENS L. 

515. B. frondosa L. Stick-tight. Beggar-ticks. 

Low ground and moist waste places ; common. 

516. B. connata Muhl. Swamp Beggar-ticks. 

Along ditches, brooks, etc. ; frequent. 

517. B. cernua L. 

Shores, swamps, ditches, wet places ; common. 

518. B. chrysanthemoides Michx. [B.lcevis (L.) B.S.P.] 

Borders of streams, marshes and ditches ; common. 

519. B. bipinnata L. Spanish Needles. 

Rare. Long pond, Dr. Anna H. Searing. 

520. B. Beckii Torr. Water Marigold. 

Rare. Sodus bay, G. T. Fish. 

201. HELENIUM L. 

521. H. autumnale L. Sneeze-weed. 

River flats, wet ground, along streams ; frequent. 

202. A NTH EM IS L. 

522. A. Cotula DC. [L.] {Maruta Cotula DC.) Mayweed. 

Roadsides and waste places ; abundant. 

523. A. arvensis L. Corn Chamomile. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

203. ACHILLEA L. 

524. A. Millefolium L. Yarrow. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places; common. The pink-flowered form 
frequent. 

204. CHRYSANTHEMUM Tourn. [L.] 

525. C. Leucanthemum L. [Leucanthemum vulgare Lam.) On-eye Daisy. 

Fields and meadows ; very abundant. 

526. C. Leucanthemum L. var. tubuliflorum Tenney. 

Greece, north of the Ridge road, Mrs. J. J. Kemfie. 

527. C. Parthenium Pers. {Leucanthemum Parthenium Godron.) [Chrys- 

anthemum, Parthenium (L.) Pers.] Feverfew. Escaped. 

205. TANACETUM L. 

528. T. vulgare L. Common Tansy. Roadsides; frequent. 

206. ARTEMISIA L. 

529. A. caudata Michx. 

Rare. Shore of lake Ontario, Webster, Dr. C. M. Booth. 



7§ 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. S, 



531. 

532. 
533- 

534. 



530. A. Canadensis Michx . 

Rare. Bluffs along lake Ontario and Irondequoit bay. 
A. vulgaris L. Common Mugwort. 

Waste places ; abundant in the south-eastern part of Rochester. 
A. biennis Willd. 

Rare. Recently introduced along N.Y. C. railroad, Miss Beckwith. 
A. Absinthium L. Common Wormwood. 

Occasional in fields and by roadsides. 

207. TUSSILAGO Tourn. [L.] 

T. FarfaraL. Colts-foot. 

Wet clay soil. Banks Genesee river, Rochester. Sweden. Cale- 
donia, Livingston county. Bergen, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

208. PETASITES Tourn. 

535. P. palmata Gray. (Nardosjnia palmata Hook.) \Tussilago palmata Ait.] 

Sweet Colt's-foot. 

Rare. Cleared swamp in Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

209. SENECIO Tourn. [L.] 

536. S. vulgaris L. Common Groundsel. 

Waste grounds and cultivated fields ; common about Rochester. 

537. S. aureus L. 

Common in wet ground. 

538. S. aureus L. var. Balsamitae Torr. & Gray. [S. Balsamitce Muhl.] 

Rare. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. 

210. CACALIA L. 

539. C. suaveolens L. Indian Plantain. 

Rare. Shore of Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth. Penfield, G. T. 
Fish. Bank of Genesee river, near the mouth of Black creek, M. S. 
Baxter. Avon, Livingston county, Dr. B. D. Gree?te in Buff. Cat. 

540. C. atriplicifolia L . 

Rare. Near Rochester, Z. H. Harris. Greece, Bradley. 

211. ERECHTITES Raf. 

541. E. hieracifolia Raf. \E. hieracifolia (L.) Raf. J Fire-weed. 

Moist woods and recent clearings ; common. 

CALENDULA L. 

— C. officinalis L. Pot or Cape Marigold. Escaped to roadside. 

2Z2. ARCTIUM L. 

542. A. Lappa L. {Lappa officinalis All.) Burdock. 

Waste places ; common. 

213. CNICUS Tourn. (Cirsium Tourn. of Man.) 

543. C. lanceolatus Hoffm. (Cirsium lanceolatum Scop.) \Carduus lance- 

olatus L.] Common Thistle. 

Pastures, roadsides and waste places ; common. 



I S 9 4 ■ J PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 79 

544. C. altissimus Willd. var. discolor Gray. [Cirsium discolor Spreng.) 

[Cardmis discolor (Muhl.) Xutt.] 
Borders of woods ; scarce. 

545. C. muticus Ph. {Cirsium muticum Mx.) [Cardials muticus (Mx.) Pers. ) 

Swamp Thistle. 

Swamps ; not common. Scottsville. Caledonia, Livington county. 
Bergen, Genesee county. 

546. C. pumilus Torr. {Cirsium pumilum Spreng.) [Cardials odoratus 

(Muhl.) Porter.] Pasture Thistle. 
Old fields ; infrequent. 

547. C. arvensis Hoff. {Cirsium arvense Scop.) [Cardials aruensis (L.) 

Robs.] Canada Thistle. 
Fields, roadsides, waste places ; very common. 

548. C. arvensis Hoff. var. albiflorus. Frequent. 

214- ONOPORDON Vaill. [L.] 

549. O. ACANTHIUM L. SCOTCH THISTLE. 

Roadsides and fields ; scarce. North Union street and Lake avenue, 
Rochester. Irondequoit. Chili. Bergen. Wayne county. 

SILYBUM Gaertn. 

— S. Marianum Gaertn. [S. Marian um (L.) Gaertn.] Milk Thistle. 
Neglected grounds, East avenue, Rochester, 1891-1894. 

215. CENTAUREA L. 

550. C. benedicta L. {Cnicus benedictus L.) [Cnicus be7iedictus L.] 

Kendall, Orleans county, Prof. IV. H. Lcnnon. 

551. C. Jacea L. Neglected lawn, East avenue, Rochester, 1882-1894. 

216. LAMPSANA Tourn. [Lapsana L.] 

552. L. COMMUNIS L. 

Roadsides and grass plats; rare. Near Rochester, Otto Bets. Brock- 
port, Prof. Lennon. Wayne county. 

217. CHICORIUM Tourn. [L.] 

553. C. Intybus L. Chicory. Succory. 

Fields and roadsides ; common. Abundant in many places. In the 
southern part of Ontario county it is known as Evan s Pink. 

218. TEA GOPOGON L. 

554. T. porrifolius L. Salsify. 

Fields ; frequent in the vicinity of Rochester. 

555. T. pratensis. L. Yellow Goat's-beard. 

Rare. Waste lot, State street, Rochester, /. B. Fuller. Along rail- 
road, G. P. Fish. Brockport, Prof. Lcnnon. L. Holzcr. 



8o 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



2ig. HI ERA CI UM Tourn. [L.] 

556. H. AURANTIACUM L. 

Riga, Miss F. Beckwith. Pavilion, Genesee county, /. B. Fuller. 
Holley, Orleans county, Prof. Lennon. Abundant at these places. 
Becoming a pest at Kendall, Orleans county. 

557. H. Canadense Michx. 

Dry woods and roadsides ; common. 

558. li. paniculatum L. 

Dry open woods ; frequent. 

559. H. venosum L. Rattlesnake-weed. 

Dry woods and copses ; frequent. 

560. H. Marianum Willd. 

Rare. Rochester, Mrs. Mary E. Streeter. 

561. H. scabrum Michx. 

Dry open woods ; frequent. 

220 C KEPIS L. 

562. C. BIENNIS L. 

Rare. School grounds, F airport, Miss Mary E. Macaulcy. 

563. C. TECTORUM L. 

Scnrce. Mount Hope, 1866, and roadside, Culver park, 1882, J. B. 
Fuller. Neglected lawn, East avenue. Brighton, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
Brockport, Prof. Pennon. 

221. PRENANTHES Vaill. [L.] 

564. P. alba L. {Nabalus albns Hook.) White Lettuce. 

Rich woods and river banks ; common. 

565. P. serpentaria Pursh. [Nabalus Fraseri DC.) Lion's-foot. 

Dry woods ; frequent, especially on the sandy ridges about Ironde- 
quoit bay and creek. 

566. P. altissima L. [Nabalus altissimus Hook.) 

Moist shaded soil along river banks and in ravines ; frequent. 

222. TARAXACUM Haller. 

567. T. officinale Weber. [P. Dens-leonis Desf.) \P. Taraxacum (L.) 

Karst] Dandelion. 
Very common everywhere in grass. 

223. LACTUCA Tourn. [L.] 

568. L. Scariola L. Prickly Lettuce. 

Waste grounds and roadsides. Abundant in several places in and 
near the city of Rochester. 

569. L. Canadensis L. Wild Lettuce. 

Borders of fields and woods ; common. 

570. L. leucopha^a Gray. [Mulgedium leucbphceum DC.) [Lactuca spicata 

(Lam.) A. S. Hitch.] Blue Lettuce. 
Borders of woods, low grounds ; common. 
— L. sativa L., Garden Lettuce, escapes to roadsides occasionally. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 8l 

224. SONCHUS L. 

571. S. OLERACEUS L. COMMON SOW-THISTLE. 

Roadsides and waste places ; common. 

572. S. asper Vill. [S. aspcr (L.) Vill.] Spiny leaved Sow thistle. 

With the last, but less frequent. 

573. S. arvensis L. Field Sow-thistle. 

Roadsides, waste places, and brooksides ; scarce. First detected in 
1864, on East Main street, Rochester, by Dr. C. M. Booth; again in 
1866, near the mouth of Deep Hollow creek, by J. B. Fuller. Ironde- 
quoitbay, 1895, Dr. C. M. Booth. Churchville, 1893, Miss F. Beckwith . 
G. T. Fish . Newark, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

LOBELIACE^. 

225. LOBELIA L. 

574. L. cardinalis L. Cardinal Flower. 

Low grounds, along streams and borders of woods ; frequent. 

575. L. syphilitica L. Great Lobelia. 

Low grounds and swampy places ; common. 

576. L. spicata Lam. 

Rare. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. " The Gulf ", Genesee county, 
Miss F. Beckwith. Mount Morris, Mrs. M. E. Streeter. 

577. L. Kalmii L. 

Wet rocks and cliffs, wet meadows, swamps ; frequent. 

578. L. inflata L. Indian Tobacco. 

Meadows and pastures ; frequent. 

CAMPANULACE^. 

226. SPECULARIA Heister. [Legouzia Durand.] 

579. S. perfoliata A. DC. [Legotizia perfoliata (L.) Britton.] Venus's Look- 

ing glass. Dry fields ; not common. 

227. CAMPANULA Tourn. [L.] 

580. C. RAPUNCULOIDES L. 

Roadsides ; infrequent. South avenue, Rochester. Rush. Gates. 
Adams Basin. 

581. C. rotundifolia L. Harebell. 

Rocky and sandy shaded banks ; common. 

582. C. rotundifolia L. var. arctica Lange. (C. rotundifolia var. linifolia Man.) 

[C. rotundifolia Langsdorfiana (A. D. C.) Britton.] 
Rare. Ridges west of Irondequoit bay, J. E. Paine. 

583. C. aparinoides Pursh. Marsh Bellflower. 

Shores and marshes ; frequent. In 1895 Miss F* Beckwith collected 
specimens on the sandy top of Sugar-loaf hill, on the Dugway road. 

584. C. Americana L. Tall Bellflower. 

Rare. "The Gulf", Miss F. Beckwith. Near Le Roy, Gcncsec 
county, Miss Mary E. Macauley. L. Holzer. 

11, Proc. Roch. Acad, of So, Vol. 3, March, 1896. 



82 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

ERICACE^. 

228. GAYLUSSACIA HBK. 

585. G. frondosa Torr. & Gray. [G. frondosa (L.) T. & G.] Blue Tangle. 

Orleans county, Miss Lucy Weld. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

586. Q. resinosa Torr. & Gray. [G. resinosa (Ait.) Torr. & Gray.] Black 

Huckleberry. 
Frequent on the dry banks of Genesee river and tops of ravines. 

229. VA CCINIUM L. 

587. V. stamineum L. Deerberry. 

Dry woods on river banks, ravines and hills ; common. 

588. V. Pennsylvanicum Lam. Dwarf Blueberry. 

Dry woods, banks, ravines, hillsides, fields ; common. 

589. V. Canadense Kalm. [V. Canadense Richards.] Downy Blueberry. 

Swamps and low woods ; scarce. 

590. V. vacillans Solander. \V.vacillans Kalm.] Low Blueberry. 

In same situations as V. Pennsylvanicum, but less frequent. 

591. V. corymbosum L. Swamp Blueberry. 

Open swampy woods and sphagnum marshes ; abundant. 

592. V. Oxy coccus L. [Sc/iollera Oxycoccus (L.) Roth.] Small Cranberry. 

Sphagnum marshes ; frequent. 

593. V. macrocarpon Ait. [Schollera macrocarpa (Ait.) Britton.] Large 

Cranberry. 

Sphagnum marshes ; rare. Mendon, Geo. T. Fish, M. S. Baxter. 
Bergen, Genesee county, Dr. Booth, Mrs. M. E. Streeter. Wayne county. 

230. CHIOGENES Salisb. 

594. C. serpyllifolia Salisb. (C. hispidula T. & G.) [C. hispidula (L.) T. & G.] 

Creeping Snowberry. 

Mossy knolls, under hemlocks and cedars ; rare. Bergen, Genesee 
county. Wayne county. 

231. ARCTOSTAPHYLOS Adans. 

595. A. Uva=ursi Spreng. [A. Uva-ursi (L.) Spreng.] Bear-berry. 

Rare. " The Gulf ", Genesee county, Miss F. Beckwith. 

232. EPIGsEA L. 

596. E. repens L. Trailing Arbutus. 

Dry banks of Genesee river, and on sandy hillsides ; common. 

233. GAULTHERIA Kalm. [L.] 

597. Q. procumbens L. Wintergreen. 

Woods ; common. 

234. ANDROMEDA L. 

598. A. polifolia L. 

Abundant in sphagnum bogs at Mendon ponds. Wayne county. 



l894-l PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 83 

235. CASSANDRA Don. [Chamjedaphne Moench.] 

599. C. calyculata Don. \Chamcedaphne calyculata (L.) M(unch.| Leather- 

leaf. Abundant in the bogs at Mendon. Adams Basin. Wayne Co. 

236. KALMIA L. 

600. K. latifolia L. Mountain Laurel. 

Sodus, yi mile west of Wallington, 1875, ^82, E. L. Hankenson. 

601. K. angustifolia L. Sheep Laurel. 

Salmon creek and Fly creek, Sodus, Wayne county, about 1850, Check 
list, E. L. Hankinson. 

237. RHODODENDRON L. 

602. R. nudiflorum Torr. {Azalia nudiflora L.) \Azalia nudifiora L.] Pinx- 

TER-FLOWER. 

Dry woods on banks and hillsides ; common. 

603. R. maximum L. Great Laurel. 

Rare. In a deep swamp in Webster, covering an area of about 400 
square yards. Detected by James H . Brown, in 1892. 

238. LEDUM L. 

604. L. lati folium Ait. [L. Gramlandica CEder.] Labrador Tea. 

Cold swamps; scarce. Riga, Miss F. Beckwith. Adams Basin, 
M.S.Baxter. Mendon. Caledonia, Miss Mary E. Roberts. Frequent 
in Bergen swamp. Wayne county. 

239. CHIMAPHILA Pursh. 

605. C. umbellata Nutt. [C. umbel lata (L.) Nutt.] Prince's Pine. 

Dry banks ; frequent. 

606. C. maculata Pursh. [C. maculata (L.) Ph.] Spotted Wintergreen. 

Dry woods ; rare. Gates, Miss F. Beckwith. Greece, J. B. Fuller. 
Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth and G. T. Fish. Wayne county. 

240. MONESES Salisb. 

607. M. grandiflora Salisb. {M . uniflora Gray.) [M . uniflora (L.) A. Gray.] 

Deep woods; rare. Greece, 1867, J. B. Fuller. Irondequoit, 1892, 
Warner Gilbert and Miss Mary E. Macauley. Penfield, 1895, Miss F. 
Beckwith. Bergen, Miss Mary E. Macauley. 

241. PYROLA Tourn. [L.] 

608. P. secunda L . 

Dry woods, banks, hillsides ; common. 
6:>9. P. chlorantha Swartz. 

Dry woods ; frequent. 

610. P. elliptica Nutt. Shin-leaf. 

Woods ; common. 

611. P. rotundifolia L. 

Woods; abundant. 



84 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

242. PTEROSPORA Nutt. 

612. P. Andromedea Nutt. Pine-drops. 

Dry slopes, bluffs ; rare. Bluff at the northern extremity of Ironde- 
quoit bay, Webster, Prof. Leiinon and M . S . Baxter. Seneca point, 
Canandaigua lake, Mrs. M . E. Streeter. 

243. MONOTROPA L. 

613. M. uniflora L. Indian Pipe. Corpse-plant. 

Deep rich woods ; frequent. 

614. M. Hypopitys L. {Hypopitys Hypopitys (L.) Small.] Pine-sap. 

Rich woods ; infrequent. 

PRIMULACEk. 

244. TRIENTALIS L. 

615. T. Americana Pursh. Star-flower. 

Cool woods and ravines ; common. 

245. STEIRONEMA Raf. 

616. S. ciliatum Raf. (Lysimac/iia ciliata L.) [Steironema ciliaiiim (L.) 

Baudo.] Low grounds and along streams ; common. 

617. S. lanceolatum Gray. {Lysimachia laiiceolata Walt.) [ Steironema lance- 

olatuvi (Walt.) A. Gray.] 

246. LYSIMACHIA Tourn. [L.] 

618. L. quadrifolia L. 

Woods, banks, slopes of ravines, etc.; frequent. 

619. L. stricta Ait. [L. terrestris (L.) B.S.P.] 

Marshy places ; frequent. 

620. L. NUMMULARIA L. MONEYWORT. 

Abundant on the flats along the Genesee river, in Seneca park. 

621. L. thyrsiflora L. [Naumbergia thyrsifiora (L.) Duby.] 

Wet meadows, marshes ; infrequent. 

247. ANAGALLIS Tourn. [L.] 

622. A. arvensis L. Common Pimpernel. 

Infrequent. Sandy fields, Greece. Alluvial soil, Irondequoit. Near 
Highland park. Rochester, Scottsville, Canandaigua, and elsewhere. 

248. SAMOLUS Tourn. [L.] 

623. S. Valerandi L. var. Americanus Gray. [S '. floribundus H.B.K.] 

Frequent in wet meadows and along rivulets. 

OLEACE^. 

249. FRAXINUS Tourn. [L.J 

624. F. Americana L. White Ash. 

Woods; common. 

625. F. pubescens Lam. \F. Pennsylvanica Marsh.] Red Ash. 

Low woods ; infrequent. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 85 

626. F. viridis Michx.f. \F. lanceolata Borck.] Green Ash. 

Rare. Low ground, Brighton. 

627. F. sambucifolia Lam. [F. ?iigra Marsh.] Black Ash. 

Low woods and swamps ; common. 

250. LIGUSTRUM Tourn. [L.] 

628. L. vulgaris L. Privet. Escaped. Infrequent. 

APOCYNACE^E. 

251. VINCA L. 

629. V. minor L. Periwinkle. Creeping Myrtle. Escaped. Frequent. 

252. APOCYNUM Tourn. [L.] 

630. A. androssemifolium L. Dog-bane. 

Banks of streams, borders of woods ; common. 

631. A. cannabinum L. Indian Hemp. 

Low grounds and shores ; common. 

ASCLEPIADACE^. 

25 3. ASCLEPIAS L. 

632. A. tuberosa L. Butterfly-weed. Pleurisy-root. 

Dry fields and banks; frequent. Common in the sandy soils of 
Greece and Irondequoit. 

633. A. incarnata L. Swamp Milkweed. 

Low grounds and shores ; common. 

634. A. Cornuti Decaisne. [A. Syriaca L.] Common Milkweed. 

Fields and roadsides ; common. 

635. A. phytolaccoides Pursh. [A. exaltata (L.) Muhl.] Poke Milkweed. 

Woods and shores ; frequent. 

636. A. quadrifolia L. [A . quadrifolia Jacq.] Four leaved Milkweed. 

Dry woods, ravines, and slopes ; common. 

637. A. verticillata L. Whorled-leaved Milkweed. 

Rare. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Penfield, L. Holzer. 
Perinton, Miss Mary E . Macau ley. Mrs . Mary E . Streeter. 

254. VINCETOXICUM Mcench. [Cynanchum L.] 

638. V. nigrum Mcench. [Synanckum nigrum (L.) Pers.] 

Rare. Pinnacle hills, Rochester. Wayne county. 

PERI PL OCA L. 

— P. GRjECA L . Naturalized near Rochester, Sartwell in Herb. Ha?n. Coll. 

GENTIANACEyE. 

255 GENTIAN A Tourn. [L.] 

639. Q crinita Frcel. Fringed Gentian. 

Wet places ; frequent. 

640. G. serrata Gunner. [G . detonsa Man.) 

Rare. Bluffs along Lake Ontario in the town of Irondequoit, Paine. 



86 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

641. Q. quinqueflora Lam. [G . quiiiquefolia L.] 

Common on the sides of hills and ridges. 

642. Q. puberula Michx. 

Rare. Dry sandy ridges, west side Irondequoit bay, Geo. T. Fish and 
J. B. Fuller. 

643. Q. Saponaria L. Soapwort Gentian. 

Rare . Greece, Bradley. 

644. G. Andrewsii Griesb. Closed Gentian. 

Moist or dry banks ; frequent. 

256. FRASERA Walt. 

645. F. Carolinensis Walt. American Columbo. 

Rare. Bank Genesee river. Penfield, Dr. C. M . Booth, L. Holzer. 
East Bloomfield, Ontario county, Sartwell . 

257- BARTON I A Muhl. 

646. B. tenella Muhl. [B. Virginica (L.) B.S.P.] 

Rare. Black creek, Dr. C. M . Booth. Adams Basin, M . S. Baxter. 
Wayne county. 

258. MENYANTHES Tourn. [L.] 

647. M. trifoliata L. Buck-bean. 

Swamps; scarce. Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth. Charlotte, 
J . B . Fuller. Long pond, Dr. A. H. Searing. Mendon, Geo. T. Fish! 
Adams Basin, M . S . Baxter. Bergen, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

POLEMONIACEtE. 

259. PHLOX L. 

648. P. divaricata L . 

Rich woods ; frequent. Occasionally with entire corolla lobes. 

64Q. P. subulata L. Moss Pink. 

Dry grassy banks; not common. Banks of Genesee river north of 
Rochester. Maxwell's Station, Caledonia, Livingston county, Miss F. 
Beckwith. Banks of Oatka creek, Le Roy, Genesee county. Flint 
Hill, Genesee county. Rarely with white flowers, J. B . Fuller. 

HYDROPHYLLACE^. 

260. HYDROPHYLLUM Tourn. [L.] Water-leaf. 

650. H. Virginicum L. 

Rich woods ; frequent. 

651. H. Canadense L. 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, near the lower falls. Brockport and 
Mendon, M . S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

652. H. appendiculatum Michx. 

Rare. Parma, Bradley. 



1894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 87 

BORRAGINACE^. 

261. CYNOGLOSSUM Tourn. [L.] 

653. C. OFFICINALE L. HOUND'S-TONGUE . 

Waste grounds, roadsides, pastures ; common. 

654. C. Virginicum L. Wild Comfrey. 

Rare. Rochester, 188 1, H. C. Maine. Greece, Bradley . L. Holzer. 

262. ECHINOSPERMUM Lehm. [Lappula Mcench.] 

655. E. Virginicum Lehm. {Cynoglossum Morisoni DC.) {Lappula Virgin- 

iana (L.) Greene.] Beggar's Lice. 

Borders of woods and thickets; frequent. 

656. E. Lappula Lehm. {Lappula Lappula (L.) Karst.] Stick-seed. 

Waste grounds, roadsides, fields ; common. 

26 3. MERTENSIA Roth. 

657. M. Virginica DC. Lung-wort. Blue-bells. 

Alluvial soil; not common. Brighton. Rich's Mills. Penfield. 
Rush. Scottsville. Wayne county. Ontario county. 

264. MYOSOTIS Dill. [L.] 

658. M. laxa Lehm. [M . palustris var. laxa Gray.) Forget-me-not. 

Marshes and borders of streams ; abundant. 

659. M. verna Nutt. 

Dry woods around Irondequoit bay ; rare. Webster, Geo. T. Fish. 
Penfield, Dr. C. M. Booth I 

265. LITHOSPERMUM Tourn. |L.] 

660. L. arvense L. Corn Gromwell. 

Fields and roadsides ; common. 

661. L. OFFICINALE L. COMMON GROMWELL. 

Rich soil ; infrequent. Dr. C. M. Booth. Scottsville, Miss Florence 
Beckivith . Adams Basin, M . S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

662. L. latifolium Michx. 

Rare. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Scottsville, L . Holzer. 

663. L. hirtum Lehm. [L. Gmelini (Michx.) A. S. Hitchcock.] 

Rare. Sandy hillsides, Penfield, near Irondequoit bay, Dr. Booth. 
Wilhelm's farm, Penfield, L. Holzer. Brighton, G. T. Fish. Near 
Fairport, Miss Mary E. Macauley. 

266. SYMPHYTUM Tourn. [L.] 

664. S. OFFICINALE L. COMMON COMFREY. 

Waysides and along streams ; not uncommon. 

665. S. asperrimum Sims. Prickly Comfrey. 

Rare. Roadside, Chili, Mrs. J. H. McGuire. 

267. LYCOPSIS L. 

666. L. arvensis L. Small Bugloss. 

Rare . Prof. Lennon . 



88 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

268. ECHIUM Tourn. [L.] 

667. E. vulgare L. Blue-weed. 

Rare. Dry pasture, Greece, J. B. Fuller. Seneca park. Brock- 
port, M . S. Baxter. Near Le Roy, Genesee county. 

CONVOLVULACE.E. 

269. IPOMCEA L. 

668. I. purpurea Lam. [I . purpurea (L.) Roth.] Morning Glory. 

Escaped to roadsides. 

270. CONVOLVULUS Tourn. [L.] 

669. C. spithama^us L. {Calystegia spitham&a Pursh.) 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, below the lower falls. Irondequoit, 
L. Holzer. 

670. C. sepium L. [Calystegia sepium R.Br.) Hedge Bind-weed. 

Moist banks ; common. 

671. C. arvensis L. Field Bind-weed. 

Old fields ; scarce. 

2 7 1. CU SCUTA Tourn. [L.] 

672. C. Gronovii Willd. 

Marshes and along streams ; frequent. 

SOLANACE,E. 

272. SOLANUM Tourn. [L.] 

673. S. Dulcamara L. Bittersweet. 

Swamps, along streams, waste places near dwellings ; common. 
A form with white flowers is abundant at Maxwell's Station, Caledonia, 
Livingston county, Miss Florence Beckwith . 

674. S. nigrum L. Common Nightshade. 

Fields, low ground along streams, waste ground ; frequent. 

675. S. Carolinense L. Horse-nettle. 

Rare. Macedon, Wayne county, 1883, E. L. Hankenson. Field near 
Mud pond, Wayne county, 1894, M . S. Baxter and Prof. Lennon. 

676. S. rostratum Dunal. 

Waste lot, Spencer street, Rochester ; a few plants in 1869, increased 
to a large number in 1881, /. B. Fuller. North St. Paul street, Roches- 
ter, 1893, J. Bishop . A single plant at railroad depot, Newark, Wayne 
county, 1884, D. van C. in check list E . L. Hankenson . 

273. PHYSALIS L. 

677. P. Alkekengi L. Winter Cherry. Strawberry Tomato. 

Rare. Grand avenue, Rochester, and' along N.Y.C.R. P , Brighton, 
Dr. CM. Booth. 

678. P. pubescens L . 

Rare. Rev. John E. Baker. 

679. P. Virginiana Mill. {P. viscosa Man.) 

Rare. Gates, G. T. Fish. 



1S94.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 89 

274. NICANDRA Adans. [Physalodbs Boehm.] 

680. N. physaloides Gaertn. \Physalodes Physalodes (L.) Britton.] 

Rare. Naturalized in Greece, Bradley. Hamlin, M. S. Baxter. 
Wayne county. 

275. A TROPA L. 

681. A. Belladonna L. 

Rare. Naturalized in Parma, Bradley. 

276. I. YCIUM L. 

682. L. vulgare Dunal. [L. vulgare (Ait.f.) Dunal.] Matrimony Vine. 

River banks and waste grounds ; not uncommon. 

277. HYOSCYAMUS Tourn. [L.] 

683. H.NIGER L . H EN B A N E . 

Rare. Waste place, Mrs. Mary E . Streeter. 

278. DA TURA L. 

684. D. Stramonium L. Jamestown-weed. Thorn-apple. 

Waste grounds ; frequent. 

685. D. Tatula L. Purple Thorn-apple. 

Rare. Near Clarissa street bridge, Rochester, M. S. Baxter. 
Hamlin, Miss F. Beckwith. 

279. NICOTIANA Tourn. [L.] 

686. N. rustica L. Wild Tobacco. 

Rare. L. Holzer. 

SCROPHULARIACK.i;. 
2S0. VERBASl I'M L. 

687. V. Thapsus L. Common Mullein. 

Dry fields and roadsides ; common. 
688 V. Blattaria L. Moth Mullein. 

Fields, pastures and roadsides ; frequent. 

281. LINARIA Tourn. [Juss.] 

689. L. Canadensis Dumont. 

Rare. Mumford, Mrs. X. G. Mathews. 

690. L. vulgaris Mill. [L. Linaria (L.) Karst.] Butter and Eggs. 

Fields, roadsides, waste grounds ; common. 

282. DIGITALIS L. 

691. D. LANATA L. 

Escaped to roadside near Canandaigua, Mrs. E. O . Cartwright . 

283. SCROPHULARIA Tourn. [L.] 

692. S. nodosa L. var. Marilandica Gray. [S. Marylandica L.] Figwort. 

River banks and ravines ; frequent. 

284. CHELONE Tourn. [L] 

.,,. C. glabra L. Turtle-head. Snake-head. 

Wet meadows, marshes and swamps ; common. 

12, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, April, 1896. 



9o ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

285. PENTSTEMO.N Mitchell. [Soland.] 

694. P. pubescens Solander. [P. hirsutus (L.) Willd.] 

Dry or rocky ground. Common on the banks of Genesee river and 
in oak openings. 

695. P. l.evigatus Solander. [P. Pentstemon (L.) Britton.]. 

Rare. In a pasture, near woods, Penfield, Rev. John Walton. 

696. P. l/evigatus Solander, var. Digitalis Gray. {P. Digitalis Nuttall.) 

[P. Digitalis (Sweet) Nutt.] 

Rare. Near Oak Orchard, Orleans county, Prof. IV. H. Lennon. 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankcnson. 

286. MIMULUS L. 

697. M. ringens L. Monkey-flower. 

Wet meadows and along streams ; frequent. 

698. M. alatus Ait. \M . alatns Solander.J 

Rare . Near Rochester, L . Holzer. Greece, Bradley. 

287. GRA TIOLA L. 

699. G. Virginiana L. Hedge-Hyssop. 

Muddy places, fields, and overflowed grounds ; frequent. 

288. ILYSANTHES Raf. 

700. I. riparia Raf. (/. gratioloides Benth.) [/. gratioloides (L.) Benth.] 

Rare. Brockport, Prof. Lennon. Kendall, Orleans county, M. S. 
Baxter. Sodus bay, Wayne county, G . T. Fish. 

289. VERONICA L. 

701. V. spicata L. Escaped. G. T. Fish. 

702. V. Virginica L. \Leptandra Virgmica (L.) Nutt.] Culver's Root. 

Rare. Rush, 1894, Miss Beckwith. Avon, Livingston Co., Sartwell. 

703. V. Anagallis L. [V. Anagallis-aqitatica L.] Water Speedwell. 

Rare. Caledonia, Livingston county, L. Holzer. Roadside ditch 
near Bergen swamp. Kendall, Orleans county, M . S. Baxter. 

704. V. Americana Schweinitz. Brook-lime. 

Brooks, ditches, marshes ; common. 

705. V. scutellata L. Marsh Speedwell. 

Wet meadows and swamps ; frequent. 

706. V. officinalis L. Common Speedwell. 

Dry woods, pastures, roadsides ; frequent. 
V. Cham/EDRYS L. Brockport, 1893, Prof. Lennon. 

707. V. serpyllifolia L. Thyme-leaved Speedwell. 

Fields and roadsides ; common. 

708. V. peregrina L. Purslane Speedwell. 

Waste and cultivated ground ; common. 

709. V. arvensis L. Corn Speedwell. 

Cultivated grounds ; common. 



1 894- J PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 9 I 

710. V. Buxbaumh Tenore. [V. Byzantina (Sibth. & Smith) B.S.P.] 

Rare. Gates, G. T. Fish. Perinton, Miss Mary E. Macauley. 

290. BUCHNERA L. [Buechnera L.] 

711. B.Americana L. [Buechnera Americana L.] Blue-hearts. 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, Greece, Bradley. 

291. GERARDIA L. 

712. G. pedicufaria L. [Dasysloma pedicularia (L.) Benth.] 

Dry woods along the banks of Genesee river, near ravines, and on 
hills ; frequent. 

713. G. flava L. [Dasystoma flava (L.) Wood.] Downy False Foxglove. 

Oak openings ; common. 

714. Q. quercifolia Pursh. \Dasystoma Virginica (L.) Britton.] Smooth 

False Foxglove. 
With G . flava ; frequent. 

715. Q. purpurea L. Purple Gerardia. 

Rare. Shore of lake Ontario, Greece and Irondequoit, Dr. Booth ; 
from Irondequoit bay eastward, L. Holzer. Mendon, M . S. Baxter. 

716. Q. purpurea L. var. paupercula Gray. [G . paupercula (A. Gray) Britton.] 

Sphagnum bogs ; rare. Border of Harris pond, Mendon, Miss M . E . 
Macaitley and Miss F. Beckwith. Bergen swamp, M . S . Baxter. 

717. G. tenuifolia Vahl. Slender Gerardia. 

In open woods, on low ground or on dry gravelly or sandy banks ; 
frequent. 

292. CASTILLEIA Mutis. 

718. C. coccinea Spreng. [C. coccinea (L.) Spreng.] Scarlet Painted-cup. 

Formerly frequent on the sandy ridges about Irondequoit bay and 
creek; becoming scarce. Greece, Bradley. Scottsville. Maxwell's 
Station, Caledonia, Livingston county, Miss F. Beckwith . 

293. PEDICULARIS Tourn. [L.] 

719. P. Canadensis L. Lousewort. 

Woods, ravines and river banks ; common. 

720. P. lanceolata Michx. 

Wet banks and marshy places ; rare. Bank of Genesee river, near 
the paper-mill dam, J. B. Fuller. Ravine near Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. 
M. Booth. Irondequoit creek, L. Holzer. Caledonia, Livingston Co. 

294. MELAMPYRUM Tourn. [L.] 

721. M. Americanum Michx. [M . lineare Lam] Cow-wheat. 

Dry woods ; common. 

OROBANCHACEyE. 

295. EPIPHEGUS Nutt. 

722. E. Virginiana Bart. [E . Virginiana (L.) Bart.] Beech-drops. 

Frequent in beech woods. 



92 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

296. CONOPHOLIS Wallroth. 

723. C. Americana Wallr. [C. Americana (L. f.) A.Wallr.] Cancer-root. 

Rich woods; scarce. Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth. Cobb's hill 
woods, Brighton. Dugway, Brighton. Greece, J. B. Fuller. Parma, 
Bradley. Sweden, /Vtf/. W.ff.Lennon. Wayne county. 

297. APHYLLON Mitchell. [Thalesia Raf.] 

724. A. uniflorum Gray. {Thalesia uniflora (L.) Britton.] One-flowered 

Cancer-root. 

Moist woods and wooded banks ; scarce. Glen Haven. Irondequoit. 
Brighton. Webster. Brockport. Adams Basin. Maxwell's Station, 
Livingston county. Wayne county. 

LENTIBULARIACEjE . 

298. UTRICULARIA L. 

725. U. vulgaris L. Common Bladderwort. 

Common in shallow water in the lower Genesee and in all the bays 
and ponds opening into lake Ontario. 

726. II. gibba L. 

Rare. Mendon ponds, G . T. Fish and /. B. Fiiller. 

727. U. intermedia Hayne. 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

728. U. resupinata B. D. Greene. 

Rare. Muddy margin of Mendon ponds, M. S. Baxter. 

729. U. cornuta Michx. 

Rare. Shallow water at Mendon ponds, G . T. Fish! Wayne county. 

299. PINGUICULA Tourn. [L.] 

730. P. vulgaris L. Butterwort. 

Wet rocks below Genesee falls, Dr. Dewey, Dr. Booth. (Exhausted.) 
Mount Morris, Livingston county, Mrs. Mary E . Streeter. 

ACANTHACE.E. 

300. DI A NTH ERA Gronov. [L.] 

731. D.Americana L. Water-Willow. 

Rare. Eastern wide-water, Erie canal, Otto Bets . Wayne county. 

VERBENACE/E. 

301. VERBENA Tourn. [L.] 

732. V. urtica^folia L. White Vervain. 

Waste places, roadsides, pastures ; common. 

733. V. hastata L. Blue Vervain. 

Low grounds and roadsides ; common. 

302. PHRYMA L. 

734. P. Leptostachya L. Lop-seed. 

Open woods, ravines, thickets ; frequent. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. t)j 

LABIATE. 

303. TEUCRIUM Tourn. [L.] 

735. T. Canadense L. Germander. 

Low grounds, margins of streams, marshes ; frequent. 

304. COLLJNSONIA L. 

736. C. Canadensis L. Horse-Balm. 

Rich woods, shaded river banks and ravines ; common. 

305. MENTHA Tourn. [L.] 

737. M. rotundifolia L. [M . ?'otundifo!ia (L.) Huds.] 

Rare. Between Newark and Lyons, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

738. M. viridis L. \M.spicata L.J Spearmint. 

Brooksides and roadsides ; common. 

739. M. piperita L. Peppermint. 

Brooks, ditches, springy places, etc. ; common. 

740. M. citrata Ehrh. Bergamot Mint. 

Lumber yard, East Rochester, J. B . Fuller. 

M. SATIVA L. Whorled Mint. 

Waste lot, Central avenue, Rochester, J. B . Fuller. 

741. M. Canadensis L. Wild Mint. 

Low ground and along streams ; common. 

306. LYCOPUS Tourn. [L.] 

742. L. Virginicus L. Bugle-weed. 

Shaded low grounds and moist banks ; common. 

743. L. sinuatus Ell. [Lycopus Europams var . sinuatus Gray .) 

Wet places ; very common. 

307. HYSSOPUS Tourn. [L.] 

744. H. officinalis L. Hyssop. 

Monroe avenue, near Pinnacle hill, Rochester, Miss F. Beckwith. 
Roadside, Gates, G . T. Fish. Penfield, L. Holzer. 

308. PYCNANTHEMUM Michx. [Kcellia Moench.] 

745. P. Ianceolatum Pursh. [Kcellia Virgi?iia?ia (L.) Britton.] 

Rare. Greece, Bradley. Near Canandaigua lake, Mrs. Geo. F. King. 

746. P. muticum Pers. [Kcellia mutica (Michx.) Britton.] 

Rare. Brighton, L. Holzer. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
Mend on, Geo. T.Fishf 

747. P. incanum Michx. 

Not common. Dry woods around Irondequoit bay. Greece, Bradley. 
30Q. ORIGANUM Tourn. [L.] 

748. O. vulgare L. Wild Marjoram. 

Roadside, Clyde, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

310. THYMUS Tourn. [L.] 

749. T. Serpyllum L. Wild Thyme. 

Roadside, L. Holzer. 



94 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

— T. vulgaris L. Common Thyme. 

Escaped. G . T. Fish. 

SA TUREIA Tourn. [L.] 

— S. hortensis L. Summer Savory. Escaped. 

311. CALAMINTHA Tourn. [Clinopodium L.] 

750. C. Nepeta Link. [Clinopodium Nepeta (L.) Kuntze.] Basil Thyme. 

Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

751. C. Clinopodium Benth. {Clinopodium vulgare L.] Basil. 

Copses, fields, pastures, roadsides ; common. 

312. MELISSA L. 

752. M. officinalis L. Common Balm. 

Roadsides; scarce. 

313. HEDEOMA Pers. 

753. H. pulegioides Pers. \H . pulegioides (L.) Pers.) Pennyroyal. 

Dry open woods and fields ; common. 

314. MONARDA L. 

754. M. didyma L. Bee Balm. 

Rare. Low ground along Irondequoit creek, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
L. Holzer. Wayne county. 

755. M. Clinopodia L. 

Rare. Ravine near foot of Lorimer street, Rochester, J . B . Fuller . 
Mary E . Macauley. 

756. M. fistulosa L. var. rubra Gray. [M. media Willd.] 

Scarce. Shores of Irondequoit bay. 

757. M. fistulosa L. var. mollis Benth. [M. fistulosa L.] Wild Bergamot. 

Dry woods, river banks, ravines ; common. 

315. BLEPHILIA Raf. 

758. B. ciliata Raf. [B . ciliata (L.) Raf.] 

Rare. Canandaigua, E. J . Durand. 

316. LOPHANTHUS Benth. [Vleckia Raf.] 

759. L. nepetoides Benth. [Vleckia nepetoides (L.) Raf.] Giant Hyssop. 

Rare . Bank of Genesee river, Geo. T. Fish . Le Roy, Mrs. S. T. 
Howard. Wayne county. 

317. NEPETA L. 

760. N. Cataria L. Catnip. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

761. N. Glechoma Benth. [Glechoma hedcracea L.] Ground Ivy. Gill- 

over-the-ground . 

Waste places and roadsides ; common. 

318. SCUTELLARIA L. 

762. S lateriflora L. Mad-dog Skull-cap. 

Low grounds and river banks ; common. 



1894-! PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 95 

763. S. parvula Michx. 

Rare. Sodus bay, G. T. Fish. Wayne county, if . L. Hankenson. 

764. S. galericulata L. 

Borders of streams and marshes ; frequent. 
3i(). BRUNELLA Tourn. [Pkunella L.] 

765. B. vulgaris L. [Prunella vulgaris L.] Heal-all. 

Woods, meadows, roadsides ; common. 

A form with pink flowers was found at the Dugway by Miss Bet kwith . 
White flowers, in Irondequoit, by Warner IV. Gilbert . 

320. MARRUBIUM Tourn. [L.] 

766. M. VULGARE L. HOREHOUND. 

Fields and waste places ; infrequent. 

PHLOMIS Tourn. [L.] 

— P. tuberosa L. Jerusalem Sage. 

Shore of lake Ontario. Introduced and somewhat naturalized, Chester 
Dewey in Herb. Sartwe//, Ham . Co//. 

321. LEON UR US L. 

767. L. Cardiaca L. Motherwort. 

Fields, waste places, and roadsides ; common. 

322. LAMIUM L. 

768. L. AMPLEX1CAULE L. DEAD-NETTLE . 

Fields ; infrequent. Abundant in some places. 

769. L. album. Escaped. Prof. W.H.Lennon. 

323. GALEOPSIS L. 

770. G. Tetrahit L. Hemp-Nettle. 

River banks and waste places ; scarce. 

324. STACHYS Tourn. [L.] 

771. S. palustris L. 

Along the lower Genesee ; scarce. 

772. S. aspera Michx. (S. pahistris L. var. aspera Gray.) 

Shores and wet grounds ; frequent. 

773. S. lanata Jacq. 

Escaped. Henrietta, J. B. Fu//er. Mendon, Geo. T. Fish. 

PLANTAGINACE^E. 

325. PLANTAGO Tourn. [L.] 

774. P.major L. Common Plantain. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; frequent. 

775. P. Rugelii Decaisne. 

Fields, dooryards, roadsides, waste places ; our most common species . 

776. P. LANCEOLATA L. RlBWORT. 

Fields, roadsides, dooryards ; very common. 



96 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8 

AMARANTACE.E. [Amaranthace^.] 

326. AMARANTHS Tourn. [Amaranthus L.] 

777. A. hypochondriacus L. [Amaranthus hybridus L.] 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

778. A. paniculatus L . [Amaranthus hybridus paniculatus (L.) Uline & Bray.] 

Roadsides ; rare . Geo. T. Fish . Prof. IV. H. Lennon . 

779. A. retroflexus L. [Amaranthus retroflexus L.] 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

780. A. albus L. [Amaranthus grcecizans L.] Tumble-weed. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

781. A. blitoides Watson. \Amaranthus blitoides S. Watson.] 

Central avenue, Rochester, 1885, Otto Betz. Goodman street, near 
the axle-works, 1891, J. B . Fuller. 

CHENOPODIACE.E. 

327. CIIENOPODIUM Tourn. [L.] 

782. C. album L. Pig-weed. 

Fields, gardens, waste grounds ; very common. 

783. C. urbicum L. var. rhombifolium. [C. urbicum L.] 

Rare. Rochester, 1864, D. F. Day, in 18 th N. Y. Rep.; G. T. Fish. 

784. C. hybridum L. Maple-leaved Goose-foot. 

Waste places and river banks; frequent. 

785. C. Bonus-Henricus L. Mercury. 

Escaped. Reilly lot, Central avenue, Rochester, Joseph B. Fuller. 
Newark, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

786. C. capitatum Watson. (Blitum capitatum L.) [Blitum capitatuvi L.] 

Straw t berry Blite. 
Fields ; scarce. 

787. C. Botrys L. Jerusalem Oak. 

Waysides and waste places ; infrequent. 

32S. A TRIPLEX Tourn. [L.J 

788. A. patulum L. var. hastatum Gray. [A . hastata L.] 

Streets and waste places ; frequent. 

PH YTOLACC ACEtE . 

329. PHYTOLACCA Tourn. [L.] 

789. P. decandra L. Common Poke-weed. Scoke-berry. Garget. 

Pastures and borders of woods ; frequent. 

POLYGONACE.E. 

330. RUM EX L. 

790. R. Britannica L. {R. orbieulatus Man.) Great Water-Dock. 

Marshes ; frequent. 

791. R. verticillatus L. Swamp Dock. 

Marshes ; common. 



1894.I PLANTS OF MONROE COU\T\. 97 

792. R. crispus L. Curled Dock. 

Fields and waste places ; common. 

793. R. OBTUSIFOLIUS L. BlTTER DOCK. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

794. R. crispus L. X R. obtusifolius L. 

Reilly lot, Central avenue, Rochester. 

795. R. SANGUINEUS L. 

Rare. Prof. W. H . Lemion . 

796. R. Acetosella L. Sheep-Sorrel. 

Fields ; common. Abundant in poor, sandy soils. 

331. POLYGONUM Tourn. [L.] 

797. P. aviculare L. Knot-grass. 

Common in door-yards, streets, waste places, and along foot-paths. 

798. P. erectum L. {P. aviculare L. var. erectum Roth.) 

Waysides and waste places ; common. 

799. P. lapathifolium L. var. incarnatum Watson. {P. incarnatum Ell.) 

[P. incarnatum. Ell.] 

Marshes ; not common. Frequent in the marshes around Irondequoit 
bay, Round pond, Long pond, etc. 

800. P. Pennsylvanicum L. 

In moist rich soil, brooksides, marshes, etc.; common. 

801. P. amphibium L. 

Aquatic ; rare . Kendall, Orleans county, M. S. Baxter. 

802. P. Muhienbergii Watson. {Polygonum amphibium var. terrestre Gray.) 

[P. emersujn (Michx.) Britton.] 

Muddy shores; not common. Irondequoit bay and other bays and 
ponds. 

803. P. Hartwrightii Gray. [P. Hartwrightii A Gray.] 

Rare . Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

804. P. orientale L. Prince's Feather. 

Waste places ; infrequent. 

805. P. Persicaria L. Lady's Thumb. 

Everywhere common. 

806. P. hydropiperoides Michx. Mild Water-pepper. 

Wet places, marshes ; infrequent. 

807. P. Hydropiper L. Smart-weed. 

Fields, ditches and wet places ; common. 

808. P. acre HBK. [P. punctatum Ell.] Water Smart-weed. 

Shores, marshes, ditches ; frequent. 

809. P. Virginianum L . 

Rich woods and along streams ; infrequent. 

810. P. arifolium L. Halberd-leaved Tear-thumb. 

Low grounds, marshes ; infrequent. 

13, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, April, 1896. 



98 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

811. P. sagittatum L. Arrow-leaved Tear-thumb. 

Low grounds and marshes ; common. A form with peduncles armed 
with fine saw-toothed prickles is frequent. 

812. P. Convolvulus L. Black Bind-wef.d. 

Cultivated and waste grounds ; common . 

813. P. cilinode Michx. 

Rare. Sodus bay, G. T. Fish, E . L. Hankenson . 

814. P. dumetorum L. Climbing False-Buckwheat. 

Marshes; frequent. 

815. P. dumetorum L. var. scandens Gray. [P. scandens L.] 

Marshes and banks of streams ; frequent. 

332. FAGOPYRUM Tourn. [Grertn.] 

816. F. esculentum Mcench. [F. Fagoftyrum 'L.) Karst.] Buckwheat. 

Borders of fields ; frequent. 

333. POLYGONELLA Michx. 

817. P. articulata Meisner. {Polygonum articnlatui?i Gray.) [Po/ygonella 

articulata (L.) Meisner.] 

Rare. Oak openings at Charlotte, Bradley. 

ARISTOLOCHIACEyE . 

334. ASA RUM Tourn. [L.] 

818. A. Canadense L. Wild Ginger. 

Sides of ravines and in rich woods ; frequent. 

PIPERACE^. [SAURURACEyE.] 
335- SAURURUS L. 

819. S. cernuus L. Lizard's-Tail. 

Swamps and borders of marshes ; frequent. 

LAURACE.E. 

336. SASSAFRAS Nees. [Nees & Eberm.] 

820. S. officinale Nees. [S. Sassafras (L.) Karst.] Sassafras. 

Rich woods, river banks, sides of ravines, hills ; common. 

337. LINDERA Thunb. [Benzoin Fabric] 

821. L. Benzoin Blume. [Benzoin Benzoin (L.) Coulter.] Spice bush. 

Damp copses, marshes ; frequent. 

THYMEL^ACE^E. 

338. DIRCA L. 

822. D. palustris L. Leather-wood. 

Rich woods, river banks, ravine sides ; infrequent. 

339. DAPHNE L. 

823. D. Mezerkum L. 

Introduced ; rare. Woods in Seneca park, //. B. Brown. Mt. Read, 
Greece, A\ J. Fleming. 



1 894.] PLANTS OK MONROE COUNTY. 99 

EL.EAGNACE/E. 

340. SHEPHERDIA Nutt. [Lei-akgyk.ka Raf.] 

824. S. Canadensis Nutt. \Lepargyraa Canadensis (L.) Greene. | 

Frequent on the banks of Genesee river, Pinnacle hills, and shores of 
Irondequoit bay. Banks of Oak Orchard creek, Kendall, Orleans Co. 

LORANTHACE^E . 

341. ARCEUTHOBIUM Bieb. 

825. A. pusillum Peck. {Razoumofskya pusilla (Peck) Kuntze.] 

Rare. Mendon, 1894, M. S. Baxter. 

SANTALACEiE. 

342. COMANDRA Nutt. 

826. C. umbellata Nutt. \C . umbellata (L.) Nutt.] 

Common on the dry banks of Genesee river, Oak Orchard creek, 
Canandaigua lake, etc., with Ceanothits and Shephcrdia. 

EUPHORBIACE/E. 

343. EUPHORBIA L. 

827. E. polygonifolia L. 

Frequent on the sandy shore of lake Ontario. 

828. E maculata L. 

Fields, roadsides, waste places ; common. 

829. E. Preslii Guss. (E. hypericifolia Man., not L.) [E. nutans Lag.] 

Fields and hillsides, in dry soil ; common. 

830. E. corollata L. Flowering Spurge. 

Rare. Brockport, Prof. Lennon. Mount Morris, Mrs. M. E. Streeier. 

831. E. Helioscopia L. 

Rare. G. T. Fish. Wayne county. 

832. E. Cyparissias L. Cypress Spurge. 

Roadsides, in sand or gravel ; infrequent. 

833. E. Peplus L. 

Frequent in the streets of Rochester. Wayne county. 
— E. Lathyris L. 

Roadside, Brighton, Dr. C. M. Booth. L. Holzer. 

344. ACALYPHA L. 

834. A. Virginica L. 

Moist ground in fields and by roadsides ; common. 

URTICACE/E. 

345- ULMUS L. 

835. U. fulva Michx. [ U. pubescens Walt.J Slippery Elm. Red Elm. 

River banks and ravines ; frequent. 

836. U.Americana L. White Elm. 

Low woods ; common. The form catalogued by nurserymen as the 
American Weeping Elm is frequent. 



IOO ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

837. U. racemosa Thomas. Corky Elm. 

Low rich grounds ; rare. Three specimens on the flats along Ironde- 
quoit creek, Brighton. Henrietta, M . S. Baxter. Brockport, Prof. IV. 
H. Lennon. Wayne county. 

346. CELTIS Tourn. [L.] 

838. C. occidentals L. Hackberry. 

Scarce. River flats, near Vincent st. bridge, Rochester, C. C. Laney . 
East shore of Irondequoit bay, Webster, G. T. Fish. Rush, P.O. 
Greene ! Wayne county. 

347. CANNABIS Tourn. [L.] 

839. C. sativa L. Hemp. 

Waste places ; infrequent. 

348. HUMULUS L. 

840. H. Lupulus L. Common Hop. 

Infrequent. Not known to be indigenous. 

34Q. MORUS Tourn. [L.] 

841. M. rubra L. Red Mulberry. 

Rich woods and ravines ; scarce. 

842. M. alba L. White Mulberry. 

River banks, hillsides, waysides ; scarce. 

350. URTICA Tourn. [L.] Nettle. 

843. U. gracilis Ait. 

Low places, fence rows, banks of streams; common. 

844. U. dioica L. 

Rare. Prof. Lennon. Wayne county. 
— U. cham,edryoides Pursh. Introduced. Dr. C. M. Booth. 

351. LAPORTEA Gaud. [Urticastrum Fabric] 

845. L. Canadensis Gaudichaud. [C/rticastrum divaricatum (L.) Kuntze.] 

Moist rich woods and ravines ; frequent. 

352. PILEA Lindl. [Adicea Raf.] 

846. P. pumila Gray. {Adicea pumila (L.) Raf.] Rich-weed. 

Moist shaded soil, springy places, and in shallow clear water; common. 

353. BCEHMERIA Jacq. 

847. B. cylindrica Willd. [B . cylindrica (L.) Willd.] False Nettle. 

Moist shaded soil and marshes ; frequent. 

PLATAN ACE.E. 

354. PL A TAN US L. 

848. P. occidentalis L. Sycamore. Button-wood. 

Woods and banks of streams ; infrequent. 

JUGLANDACE^E. 

555- JUGLANS L. 

849. J. cinerea L. Butternut. 

Rich woods, river banks and ravines ; frequent. 



1 894-j PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. IOI 

850. J. nigra L. Black Walnut. 

Fields and roadsides ; scarce. 

356. CARYA Nutt. [Hicokia Raf.] 

851. C. alba Nutt. [Hicoria ovata (Mill.) Britton.] Siiagbark Hickory. 

Woods ; common . 
852 C. sulcata Nutt. [Hicoria laeiniosa (Michx. f.) Sargent.] 

Rare. Rush, E. P. Clapp; also on the Budlong farm ! Caledonia, 
Livingston county, C. C.Laney and John Dunbar. Wayne county. 

853. C. tomentosa Nutt. [Hicoria alba (L.) Britton.] 

Rare. Mendon, G . T. Fish. 

854. C. microcarpa Nutt. [Hicoria microcarpa (Nutt.) Britton.] 

Not common. 

855. C. porcina Nutt. {Hicoria glabra (Mill.) Britton.] Pig-nut. 

Dry banks and upland woods ; common. 

856. C. amara Nutt. [Hicoria minima (Marsh.) Britton.] Bitter-nut. 

River banks, sides of ravines, low woods, along streams ; common. 

MYRICACEjE. 

357- MY RICA L. 

857. M. Gale L. Sweet Gale. 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

858. M. cerifera L. (in part.) [M. Carolinensis Mill.] Bay-berry. 

Swamps and their borders. Rochester, Dewey. Seneca park, east 
side, a single plant, C. C. Laney ! formerly abundant there, Dr. C . M . 
Booth. Parma, Bradley. Near Scottsville and Caledonia, Miss F. 
Beckwith. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Abundant in Bergen swamp. 
Wayne county . 

CUPULIFER/E. 

358. BETULA Tourn. [L.] 

85c;. B. lenta L. Black Birch. 

Woods, river banks and ravines ; frequent. 

860. B. lutea Michx. Yellow Birch. 

Rich moist woods and ravines ; frequent. 

861. B. populifolia Ait. (B. alba var. populifolia Spach.) [B. populifolia 

Marsh.] American White Birch. 
Rare. Near Brockport, Prof. Lennon. 

862. B. papyrifera Marsh. [B. papyracea Ait.) Paper or Canoe Birch. 

Infrequent. Webster, near the lake shore. Wayne county. 

863. B. pumila L. Dwarf Birch. 

Rare. Tonawanda swamp, near Albion, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

359. ALNUS Tourn. [Gaertn.] 

8^4. A. incana Willd. [A. incana (L.) Willd.] Speckled Alder. 

Borders of streams and swamps ; common. 
865. A. serrulata Willd. [A. rugosa (Ehrh.) Koch.] Smooth Alder. 

Rare. L. Holzer. 



102 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

360. CORYLUS Tourn. [L.] 

866. C. Americana Walt. Wild Hazel-nut. 

Not common. Frequent on the high land between Bushnell'-s Basin 
and Fisher's Station, M. S. Baxter. 

867. C. rostrata Ait. Beaked Hazel-Nut. 

Hillsides, river banks and ravines ; frequent. 

361. OS TRY A Micheli. [Scop.] 

868. O. Virginica Willd. [O. Virginiana (Mill.) Willd.] Hop-Hornbeam. 

Iron-wood. 
Woods, river banks and ravines ; common. 

362. CARPINUS L. 

869. C. Caroliniana Walt. {C.Americana Michx.) Hornbeam. Blue or 

Water Beech. Iron-wood. 

Swampy woods, river banks and ravine sides ; common. 

363. QUERCUS L. 

870. Q. Robur L. var. pedunculata. English Oak. 

Abandoned nursery grounds, Prince street, Rochester. Occasionally 
planted. 

871. Q. alba L. White Oak. 

Woods; common. 

872. Q. macrocarpa Michx. Bur Oak. 

Low grounds ; infrequent. 

873. Q. bicolor Willd. [Q. filatanoides (Lam.) Sudw.] Swamp White Oak. 

Low grounds ; frequent. 

874. Q. Prinus L. Rock Oak. Chestnut Oak. 

Banks of Genesee river, ravines and hillsides ; infrequent. 

875. Q. Muhlenbergii Engelmann. {Q. Prinus L.var. acuminata Michaux.) 

Yellow Oak. Chestnut Oak. 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, Seneca park, west side. Wayne Co. 

876. Q. prinoides Willd. 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, near the upper landing, Dr. CM. Booth. 

877. Q. rubra L. Red Oak. 

Dry woods, hills and river banks ; common. 

878. Q. coccinea W 7 ang. Scarlet Oak. 

Dry hills and river banks ; scarce. Seneca park and Genesee Valley 
park, Rochester. Oak Orchard creek, Kendall, Orl. Co. Wayne Co. 

879. Q. coccinea Wang. var. tinctoria Gray. (Q. tinctoria Bartram.) [Q. 

velutina Lam.] Black Oak. Yellow Oak. Quercitron Oak. 
Dry woods on hills and river banks ; common. 

880. Q. ilicifolia Wang. Black Scrub Oak. Rev . L. Holzer. 

364. CASTANEA Tourn. [Adans] 

— C. sativa Mill. European Chestnut. 

Abandoned nursery grounds, Prince street, Rochester. 



i8q4- J PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. IO3 

881. C. sativa Mill. var. Americana Wats. & Coult. [C. vesca var. of Man.) 

[C. dentata (Marsh.) Sudw.] American Chestnut. 
Woods, hills, river banks, sides of ravines ; common. 

365. FAGUS Tourn. [L.] 

882. F. ferruginea Ait. [F. atropunicca (Marsh.) Sudw.] American Beech. 

Woods ; common. 
— F. sylvatica L. European Beech. 

Abandoned nursery grounds, Prince street, Rochester. 

SALICACE/E. 

366. SALIX Tourn. [L.] 

883. S. nigra Marsh. Black Willow. 

Banks of streams, shores, etc.; common. 

884. S. amygdaloides Anders. Peach Willow. 

Low grounds and along streams ; more abundant than the preceding. 

885. S. lucida Muhl. Shining Willow. 

Low grounds, along streams and shores; frequent. Occasional on 
dry and rocky banks of the lower Genesee. 

886. S. lucida Muhl. var. ? 

In Bergen swamp. Flowers June 10-30 ; fruit last of Aug. to Sept. 

887. S. fragilis L. Brittle Willow. 

Reported by Rev. L. Holzer. Probably one of the many hybrids 
between S . fragilis and S . alba. 

888. S. alba L. var. vitellina Koch. [S alba vitellina (L.) Koch.] 

Common along streams and embankments. 

889. S. alba L. var. vitellina Koch, x S. lucida Muhl. (?) 

River flats, Hanford's Landing, J. B . Fuller. Tree 35 feet in height ; 
catkins, color of twigs, bark and habit of plant are like S . alba-vilellina, 
while the leaves resemble closely those of S. lucida. 

890. S. Babylonica Tourn. \S . Babvlouica L.] Weeping Willow. 

Escaped ; occasional . 

891. S. longifolia Muhl. Long-leaved Willow. 

In alluvial soil; infrequent. Shore of Red creek near confluence 
with Genesee river. Margin of Genesee river near the upper falls. 
Bank of Genesee river and shore of lake Ontario near Sea Breeze, E. L. 
Hankenson . Sodus point, Wayne county. 

892. S. rostrata Richardson . 

Frequent in ravines and on the borders of marshes ; often on dry 
hillsides. 

893. S. Caprea L. Goat Willow. 

Abandoned nursery grounds, Prince street, Rochester. 

894. S. discolor Muhl. GLAUCOUS Willow. 

Wet or dry places ; common. 

895. S. humilis Marsh. Prairie Willow. 

Dry river banks, hills, and ravine sides ; common. 



104 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

896. S. humilis Marsh. X S. discolor Muhl. (?) 

Dry bank of Genesee river. Twenty plants in one group. 

897. S. sericea Marsh. Silky Willow. 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

898. S. petiolaris J. E. Smith. 

Monroe county, Dr. C. Dewey. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

899. S. Candida Willd. [S. Candida Fliigge.] Hoary Willow. 

Cold swamps and sphagnum marshes; scarce. Marsh at head of 
Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth! Riga, Miss E. Beckwith. Adams 
Basin, M. S. Baxter. Mendon, G. T. Fish. Caledonia, Livingston 
county, Clinton. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

900. S. purpurea L. Purple Willow. 

Low grounds and along streams ; common . 

901. S. cordata Muhl. Heart-leaved Willow. 

In springy places on rocky river banks, ravine sides, low grounds and 
along streams ; very common. 

902. S. cordata Muhl. X S. sericea Marsh. (S. myricoides Muhl.) 

Reported only by G . T. Fish. 

903. S. myrtilloides L. Myrtle Willow. 

Rare. Mendon, G. F. Fish ; M . S. Baxter, 1895. Wayne county. 

367. POPULUS Tourn. [L.] 

904. P. alba L. White Poplar. Abele. 

Roadsides; occasional. Produced by suckers from the roots of 
planted trees. 

905. P. tremuloides Michx. American Aspen. 

River banks, ravines, hillsides ; common. 

906. P. grandidentata Michx. Large-toothed Aspen. 

Dry woods, river banks and hills ; common. 

907. P. balsamifera L. Balsam Poplar. 

Near the lake, in the town of Greece. Border of Bergen swamp. 

P. balsamifera L. var. candicans Gray. [F. balsamifera candicans 

(Ait.) A. Gray.] Balm of Gilead. 
Occasionally planted along roadsides. 

908. P. monilifera Ait. Cottonwood. 

Frequent along the banks of the Genesee river and about Irondequoit 
bay ; common along the shore of lake Ontario. Wayne county. 

909. P. dilatata Ait. [P. nigra L.] Lombardy Poplar. 

Bank of Genesee river, Greece. Frequently planted along roadsides. 

CERATOPHYLLACE/E. 

368. CERATOPHYLLUM L. 

910. C. demersum L. Hornwort. 

Frequent in all our bays and ponds. 



1894J PLANTS OF .MONROE COUMV. 105 



MONOCOTYLEDONES. 

HYDROCHARIDACE^E . [Hydrocharitace^:.] 

369. ELODEA Michx. [Udora Nutt.] 

911. E. Canadensis Michx. (Anacharis Canadensis Planchon.) [Udora Can- 

adensis (Michx.) Nutt.] Water-weed. 
Bays, ponds and slow streams ; common. 

370. VALLISNERIA L. 

912. V. spiralis L. Eel-grass. 

Common in all our bays and ponds along lake Ontario, and in the 
Erie canal. 

3 7 1. LIMNOBIUM L. C. Richard. 

913. L. Spongia L. C. Richard. American Frog's-bit. 

Braddock's bay, Bradley. Has not been seen for several years. 

ORCHIDACE^. 

372. MICROSTYLIS Nutt. [Achroanthes Raf.] 

914. M. monophyllos Lindl. [Achroanthes tnonophylla (L.) Greene.] 

Rare. Border of Bergen swamp, John E. Paine . Wayne county. 

373. LI PARIS Richard. [Leptorchis Du Petit Thouars.] 

915. L. liliifolia Richard. [Leptorchis liliifolia (L.) Kuntze.] 

Rich moist woods; infrequent. Greece, Dr. Anna H. Searing. 
Brighton, G. T. Fish. Penfield, M. S. Baxter. 

916. L. Lceselii Richard. [Leptorchis Loeselii (L.) MacM.] 

Swamps and marshes ; scarce. Irondequoit bay, G. T.Fish. Adams 
Basin, Prof. W. H. Lennon. Mendon, G. T. Fish and M. S. Baxter. 
West bank of Genesee river, below Rochester, and Fisher's Station, 
Ontario county, M. S. Baxter. Bergen swamp, Dr. C, M. Booth! 

374. CALYPSO Salisb. 

917. C. borealis Salisb. [C . bulbosa (L.) Oakes.] 

Local. Hemlock woods bordering Bergen swamp. Discovered by 
Dr. C. M . Booth in 1863. There were about forty plants at the station 
when visited last by Dr. Booth and Mr. Fuller. 

375. TIPULARIA Nutt. 

918. T. discolor Xutt. [T. nnifolia (Muhl.) B.S.P.] Crane-fly Orchis. 

Rare. Parma, Bradley. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Prof. Lennon. 

376. A PLECTRUM Nutt. 

919. A. hiemale Nutt. [A. spicatum (Walt.) B. S. P.] Adam and Eve. 

Putty-root. 

Damp woods, in rich soil; rare. Gates, J. B. Fuller. Penfield, 
Dr. C. M. Booth. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Troutburg, Prof. 1 1\ 
H. L^ennon. Macedon, Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

14, Pkoc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, April, 1896. 



Io6 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

377. CORALLORHIZA Haller. [R. Br.] 

920. C. innata R. Brown. [C. Corallorhiza (L.) Karst] 

Rare. Damp woods bordering Bergen swamp. 

921. C. odontorhiza Nutt. [C '. odontorhiza (Willd.) Nutt.] 

Rare. Shore of Irondequoit bay, G. T. Fish. 

922. C. multiflora Nutt. 

Dry woods ; common. 

923. C. striata Lindl. [C . Macrcei Gray.) 

Rare. Troutburg, Prof. W. H. Lennon and M. S . Baxter. 

378. LISTER A R. Br. 

924. L. cordata R. Br. [L. cor data (L.) R. Br.] Twayblade. 

Rare. Bergen swamp, in wet moss. 

379. SPIRANTHES Richard. [Gvrostachvs Pers.] Ladies' Tresses. 

925. S. latifolia Torr. [Gyrostachys latifolia (Torr.) Kuntze.] 

Rare. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M . Booth. Charlotte, J. B. Fuller. 
Adams Basin, M . S . Baxter. Wayne county. 

926. S. Romanzoffiana Cham. [Gyrostachys Romanzoffiana (Cham.) MacM.] 

Rare. Bergen swamp, G. T. Fish, Prof. W. H. Le?inon, M. S. Baxter. 
Wayne county. 

927. S. cernua Richard. [Gyrostachys cernua (L.) Kuntze.] 

Marshes and wet meadows ; abundant. 

928. S. gracilis Bigel. [Gyrostachys gracilis (Bigel.) Kuntze.] 

Hillsides and dry woods ; frequent. 

380. GOOD VERA R.Br. [Peramium Salisb.] 

929. Q. repens R. Br. [Peramium repens (L.) Salisb.] 

Rare. In cold woods bordering Bergen swamp. Wayne county. 

930. Q. pubescens R. Brown. [Peramium pubescens (Willd.) C. C. Curtiss.] 

Rattlesnake Plantain. 
In rich woods ; scarce. 

381. EPIPA CTIS Haller. [R. Br.] 

931. E. Helleborine Gray, Man., not Crantz. [E. viridiflora (Hoffm.) Reichb] 

Rare. Near Rochester, 1894, M. S . Baxter. Canandaigua, July 22, 
1 88 1, Canandaigua Botanical Club . 

382. ARETHUSA Gronov. [L.] 

932. A. bulbosa L. 

Rare. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

383. CALOPOGON R. Br. [Limodorum L.] 

933. C. pulchellus R. Br. [Limodorum tuberosum L.] 

Sphagnum swamps. West of Fairport. Mendon. Adams Basin. 
Frequent in Bergen swamp, where white flowers also occur. Wayne 
county. Ontario county. 



1 894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 107 

384. POGONIA Juss. 

934. P. ophioglossoides Nutt. [P. ophioglossoides (L.) Ker.] 

Sphagnum swamps, with Cafopogon pulchellus . Mendon. Bergen. 
Wayne county. 

935. P. pendula Lindl. [P. trianthophora (Sw.) B.S.P.] 

Rare. Woods east of Windsor beach, Irondequoit, Miss Mary E. 
Macauley. Gates, Miss F. Beckwith . Parma, Bra die y. Webster and 
Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Brockport, Prof. Lennon. Wayne Co. 

385. ORCHIS L. 

936. 0. spectabilis L. Showy Orchis. 

Rich moist woods ; frequent. 

386. HABENARIA Willd. 

937. H. tridentata Hook. \H. clavcllata (Michx.) Spreng.] 

Shady swamps ; rare. Mrs. Mary E. Streeter. Adams Basin, M. S. 
Baxter. Wayne county. 

938. H. virescens Spreng. \H . flava (L.) A. Gray.] 

Wet places ; frequent. 

939. H. bracteata R. Br. [H . viridis var. bracteata Reichenb.) [//. bracteata 

(Willd.) R. Br.] 

Damp woods ; scarce. Brighton, Dr. C . M . Booth. Near Coldwater, 
G.T.Fish. Troutburg, M. S. Baxter. Bergen, Genesee county. 

940. H. hyperborea R. Br. [H. hyperborea (L.) R. Br.] 

Cold swamps and marshy places ; frequent. 

941. H. dilatata Gray. [H. dilatata (Pursh) Hook.] 

Scarce. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. 

942. H. Hookeri Torr. [H. Hookeriana A. Gray.] 

Damp rich woods ; not uncommon. Gates. Greece. Irondequoit. 
Penfield. Perinton. Mendon. Rush. Troutburg. Bergen, Genesee 
county. Wayne county. Var. oblongifolia Paine occurs in the town of 
Penfield, M. S, Baxter. 

943. H. orbiculata Torr. \H . orbiculata (Pursh) Torr.] 

Rich damp woods; rare. Bergen, Genesee county, Prof. IV. H. 
Lennon. Ontario, Wayne county, G. T.Fish. E. L. Hankenson. 

944. H. ciliaris R. Br. [H. ciliaris (L.) R. Br.] Yellow Fringed Orchis. 

Rare. On an island in Irondequoit bay, J. B. Fuller. Woods north 
of the Ridge road, Robert Bunker. 

945. H. blephariglottis Torr. \H. blephariglottis (Willd.) Torr.] White 

Fringed Orchis. 
Rare. Mendon, M . S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

946. H. leucophaea Gray. [H. leucopheea (Xutt.) A. Gray.] 

Rare. Wayne county, E . L. Hankenson . 

947. H. lacera R. Br. \H. laecra (Michx.) R. Br.] 

Wet meadows and swamps ; rare. Gates, Dr. C. M . Booth and G.T. 
Fish. Barnard's Crossing, Greece, '}. B. Fuller, Miss M. E. Mdtauley. 
Mendon and Kendall, M . S . Baxter. Wayne county. 



I08 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

948. H. psycodes Gray. [H '. psycodes (L.) A.Gray.] Purple Fringed O. 

Wet meadows and swamps ; frequent. 

387. CYPRIPEDIUM L. 

949. C. arietinum R.Br. Ram's-head Lady's Slipper. 

Mud pond, Wayne county, Miss Weed and Miss Coleman, in check list 
E. L. Hankenson . 

950. C. candidum Muhl. [C. candidum Willd.] White Lady's Slipper. 

Rare. Bergen swamp, in the open mars]} and along the edges of the 
woods bordering. 

951. C. parviflorum Salisb. Small Yellow Lady's Slipper. 

Marshes and damp woods; infrequent. Gates. Riga. Mendon. 
Adams Basin. Caledonia. Bergen. Wayne county. 

952. C. pubescens Willd. [C. hirsuhim Mill.] Large Yellow Lady's 

Slipper. 

Woods and swamps ; common. 

953. C. spectabile Salisb. [C. regince Walt.] Showy Lady's Slipper. 

Swamps and wet meadows ; frequent. 

954. C. acaule Ait. Stemless Lady's Slipper. 

Dry or moist woods and swamps ; frequent. Abundant in a swamp 
at Mendon. 

IRIDACE^. 

388. IRIS Tourn. [L.] 

955. I. versicolor L. Large Blue Flag. 

Marshes and swamps ; frequent. 

389. SISYRINCHIUM L. 

956. S. angustifolium Mill. (S '. Burmndiana var. mucronatum Gray, excl. 

descr.) [S. Bermudiana L.] Blue-eyed Grass. 
Moist meadows ; scarce. 

AMARYLLIDACEvE. 

390. HYPOXIS L. 

957. H. erecta L. \H. hirsuta (L.) Coville.] Star-Grass. 

Damp meadows and grassy slopes ; frequent. 

LILIACE^. 

391. SMIL AX Tourn. [L.] 

958. S. herbacea L. Carrion-flower. 

Woods and shaded banks of streams ; frequent. 

959. S. rotundifolia L. 

Rare. Rochester, Dewey. Prof. W. H. Lennon. 

960. S. hispida Muhl. Green-brier. 

Moist thickets and swamps ; frequent. 

392. ALLIUM L. 

961. A. tricoccum Ait. Wild Leek. 

Rich woods ; infrequent. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. IO9 

962. A. Canadense Kalm. [A. Canadense L.] Wild Garlic. 

Ravines, moist meadows, and along streams ; scarce. Rich's mills, 
G. T. Fish. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Maxwell's Station, Liv- 
ingston Co., Miss F. Beckwith. Macedon, Wayne Co., M. S. Baxter. 

963. A. vineale L. Field Garlic. 

Rare. Scottsville, L. Holzcr! 

ORNITHOGALUM Tourn. [L.] 

— O. umbellatum L. Star of Bethlehem . Escaped. 

393. HEMEROCALLIS L. 

964. H. fulva L. Orange Day-Lily. 

Established by roadsides and on the banks of the Genesee river. 

394. POLYGON A Tl'M Tourn. [Adans.] 

965. P. biflorum Ell. [P. biflorum (Walt.) Ell.] Smaller Solomon's Seal. 

River banks, ravine sides, moist woods ; common. 

966. P. giganteum Dietrich. [P. biflorum commutation (R. & S.) Morong.] 

Great Solomon's Seal. 

Rare. Bank of Genesee River, Rochester, J. B. Fuller. G.T.Fish. 
Wayne county. 

395. ASPARAGUS Tourn. [L.] 

967. A. officinalis L. Fields; frequent. 

396. SMI LA CINA Desf. [Vagnera Adans.] 

968. S. racemosa Desf. [Vagnera racemosa (L.) Morong.] False Solo- 

mon's Seal. 

River banks, ravines, woods ; common. 

969. S. stellata Desf. [Vagnera ste I lata (L.) Morong.] 

River banks and rich woods ; frequent. 

970. S. trifolia Desf. [Vagnera trifolia (L.) Morong.] 

Rare. Adams Basin, M . S. Baxter. Bergen swamp. 

397. MAIANTHEMUM Wigg. [Unifolium Adans.] 

971. M. Canadense Desf. (Smilacina bifolia var. Canadensis Gray. [Unifo- 

lium Canadense (Desf.) Greene.] Two-leaved Solomon's Seal. 
Woods, ravines, and river banks ; common. 

398. STREPTOPUS Michx. 

972. S. roseus Michx. Twisted-stalk. 

Rich woods and ravines ; infrequent. 
399- DISPORUM Salisb. 

973. D. lanuginosum Benth. &H. {Prosartes lanuginosa Don.) [Disporum 

lanuginosum (Michx.) Britton.] 

Rich woods; rare. Clem's woods (now Glen Haven R.R. station), 
Dr. C . M . Booth. Greece, Bradley. Wayne county. 

400. CLIN TON I A Raf. 

974. C. borealis Raf. [C. borealis (Ait.) Raf 1 

Very rare. Bergen swamp, Dr. C. M . Booth! Wayne county. 



HO ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

401. UVULA Rl A L. 

975. U. perforata L. 

Rich woods and ravines ; frequent. 

976. U. grandiflora J. E. Smith. 

Rich woods and ravines ; frequent. 

402. OAKESIA S. Watson. 

977. O. sessilifolia Watson. [Uvularia sessilifolia L.) [U. sessilifolia L.] 

Ravines and low woods ; frequent. 

403. ERYTHRONIUM L. 

978. E. Americanum Ker. Yellow Adder-tongue . 

Ravines, woods, meadows ; very common. 

979. E. albidum Nutt. White Dog's-tooth Violet. 

Low rich woods and ravines; scarce. Rich's mills, Dr. C. M. 
Booth / Penfield, G. F. Fish, Otto Betz. Black creek, Chili, J. B. Fuller. 
Scottsville, Miss F. Beckwith. Frof. W. H. Lcnnon. Wayne county. 

404. LILIUM L. 

980. L. Philadelphicum L. Wild Orange-red Lily. 

Dry woods, river banks, and sandy ridges ; frequent. 

981. L. Canadense L. Wild Yellow Lily. 

Low woods, moist meadows, borders of swamps, etc. ; common. 

405. MEDEOLA Gronov. [L.] 

982. M. Virginiana L. Indian Cucumber-root. 

Rich moist woods ; common. 

406. TRILLIUM L. 

983. T. sessile L. 

Between Norton street and Ridge road, and Hudson street and North 
avenue, 1863, L. Holzer. Only one specimen. 

984. T. erectum L. Birthroot. 

Rich woods, ravines ; common . A white-flowered form is occasional . 

985. T. grandiflorum Salisb. [T. g rand iflo rum (Michx.) Salisb.] Large 

White Wake Robin. 

Woods, meadows, river banks, ravines ; very common. 

986. T. cernuum L. Nodding Trillium. 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankeusou . 

987. T. erythrocarpum Mx. [T. undulatum Willd.] Painted Trillium. 

Cool woods and swamps ; scarce. Shore of Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. 
M. Booth. Greece, 67. F. Fish. Chili, Miss F. Beckwith. Adams 
Basin, M . S . Baxter. Wayne county. 

407. CIIAALELIRIUM Willd. 

988. C. Carolinianum Willd. (C. luteum Gray.) [C. luteum (L.) A.Gray.] 

Blazing Star. 

Scarce. Woods on the sandy ridges about Irondequoit bay and else- 
where. Maxwell's Station, Caledonia, Livingston Co., Miss Beckwith, 



[894-J PLANTS o) MONROE COUNTY. Ill 

408. TOFIELDIA Huds. 

989. T. glutinosa Willd. \T.glutinosa Pers.] False Asphodel. 

Rare. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. 

409. VERA TRUM Tourn. [L.] 

990. V. viride Ait. 

Rare. Gates, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

410. ZYGADENUS Michx. 

991. Z. elegans Pursh. {Z. glaucus Xutt.) 

Swamps; rare. Mumford, Miss F. Beckivith . Caledonia, Livingston 
county. Bergen swamp. 

PONTEDERIACE.E. 

411. PONTEDERIA L. 

992. P. cordata L. Pickerel-weed. 

Borders of bays, ponds and inlets of lake Ontario ; frequent. 

412. HETERANTHERA Ruiz. & Pav. 

993. H. graminea Vahl. (Sehollera graminifolia, Willd.) \Heteranthera 
dubia (Jacq.) Morong.] Mud-Plantain. 

Frequent in the lower Genesee and the bays, ponds and inlets of lake 
Ontario. Adams Basin. Wayne county. When in mud, it blooms at 
a height of only two to four inches. 

JUNXACE/E. 
4x3. JUNCUS Tourn. [L.] Rush. 

994. J. effusus L. Bulrush. 

Marshy ground ; common. 

995. J. filiformis L. 

Rare. Shore of lake Ontario, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

996. J. Balticus Deth. var. littoralis Englm. [/. Balticus Uttoralis Englm.j 

Rare. Sandy shore of lake Ontario and muddy portions of Bergen 
swamp. Wayne county. 

997. J. tenuis Willd. 

Common in moist ground, fields, roadsides ; abundant along paths. 
99S. J. tenuis Willd. var. — - ? tall (20 to 30 inches) with crowded heads. 

Rare. Shore of lake Ontario, Dr. Anna H. Searing! 
999. J. bufonius L. 

Low grounds and by roadsides ; frequent. 

1000. J. articulatus L. 

Wet sandy soil, principally along or near the shore of lake Ontario. 

1001. J. alpinus Yillars, var. insignis Fries. [/. alpinus insignis Fries.] 

Near the mouth of Genesee river, J. B . Fuller. Long pond, Dr. A . 
H. Searing. Banks of Genesee river near Avon, Sartwell in Herb. 
Ham. Coll. Wayne county. 

1002. J acuminatus Michx. 

Borders of marshes ; not common. 



i 1 2 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1003. J. scirpoides Lam. 

Rare. Shore of lake Ontario, Monroe county, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
Sodus Point, Wayne county, Dr. S . H . Wright . 

1004. J. nodosus L. 

Low grounds and muddy shores ; common. 

1005. J- nodosus L.var. megacephalus Torr. \jf. nodosus megacephalus Torr.] 

Rare. Wet sandy soil near the shore of lake Ontario, L. Holzer! 
Long pond, Dr. Amia H. Searing. 

1006. J. Canadensis J. Gay, var. longicaudatus Engl. [/.Canadensis J. Gay.] 

Borders of swamps, marshes, etc. ; frequent. 

1007. J. Canadensis J. Gay, var. coarctatus Engelm. [/. Canadensis coarc- 

tatus Engelm.] Bergen swamp, M . S. Baxter. 

414. LUZULA DC. [Juncoides Adans.] 

1008. L. vernalis DC. {L. pilosa Willd.) [Juncoides pi/osu?n (L.) Kuntze.] 

Woods, banks, and moist grass land ; common. 

1009. L. campestris DC. [Juncoides campestre (L.) Kuntze.] 

Dry fields and woods ; common. 

TYPHACE.E. 

415. TYPHA Tourn. [L.] 

1010. T. latifolia L. Common Cat-tail Flag. 

Swamps and marshy places ; common, 
ion. T. latifolia L. var. elongata Dudley. 

Characterized in Cay. Fl. p. 102. The prevailing form on the exten- 
sive marshes at Irondequoit bay. 

1012. T. angustifolia L. 

Frequent on the marshes at Irondequoit bay, Long pond, etc. 

416. SPARGANIUM Tourn. [L.] 

1013. S. eurycarpum Engelm. 

Marshes on the borders of bays, ponds, etc. ; frequent. 

1014. S. simplex Huds. 

Marshes and borders of ponds, etc. ; frequent. 

1015. S. minimum Fries. 

Very rare. In a little pool, Irondequoit, Dr. C. M . Booth. 

ARACE^. 

417. ARISMMA Martius. 

1016. A. triphyllum Torr. [A. triphyllum (L.) Torr.] Indian Turnip. 

Rich woods and ravines ; common. 

1017. A. Dracontium Schott. [A. Dracontium (L.) Schott.] Green Dragon. 

Damp thickets; rare. Shore of Irondequoit bay, Irondequoit, and 
Black creek, Chili, Dr. Booth. Black creek, Otto Betz . Wayne county. 

418. PELTANDRA Raf. 

1018. P. undulata Raf. [P. Virginica Kunth.) [P. Virginica (L.)Kunth] 

Marshes along Genesee river and elsewhere ; not uncommon. 



1894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. II3 

419. CALL A L. 

1019. C. palustris L. Wild Calla. 

Borders of marshes and sphagnum bogs ; infrequent. Genesee river, 
near lake Ontario. Borders of marshes at Henrietta, Mendon, Hamlin, 
and elsewhere. Wayne county. 

420. SVMPLOCARPUS Salisb. [Si'athyema Raf.] 

1020. S. foetid us Salisb. [Spathyema fcetida (L.) Raf.] Skunk Cabbage. 

Marshes and wet ground ; common. 

421. ACORUS L. 

102 1. A. Calamus L. Sweet Flag. 

Marshes ; common. 

LEMNACE/E. 

422. SPIRODELA Schleiden. 

1022. S. polyrhiza Schleiden. {Lemna polyrhiza L.) [Spirodela polyrhiza 
(L.) Schleid.] 

Bays, ponds and marshes ; common. 

423. LEMNA L. Duck-weed. Duck's-meat. 

1023. L. trisulca L. 

Bays, ponds, marshes, etc. ; common. 

1024. L. minor L. 

Bays, ponds, pools, marshes, ditches ; abundant. 

424. WOLFFIA Horkel. 

1025. W. Columbiana Karsten. 

Abundant at Irondequoit bay and elsewhere. 

ALISMACEyE. 

425. ALISMA L. 

1026. A. Plantago L. {A. Plantago L.var. A ?nericanum Gray .) [A.Planlago- 
aquatica L.] Water Plantain. 

Marshes, ditches, and borders of streams ; common. 

426. SAGITTARIA L. Arrow-head. 

1027. 5. variabilis Engelm. (incl. vars. obtusa, latifolia, diversifolia, angusti- 
folia, and gracilis of Man. ed. 5). [S. latifolia Willd.] 

Aquatic or in wet places ; common. 

1028. S. heterophylla Pursh. [S. rigida Pursh, incl. var. elliptica Engelm.] 

Genesee river and elsewhere ; frequent. 

1029. S. heterophylla Pursh, var. elliptica Engelm. 

Frequent along the margin of Genesee river. 

NAIADACE.E. 

427. TRIGLOCHIN L. Arrow-grass. 

1030. T. palustris L. 

Abundant in Bergen swamp. 

is, Proc. Roch, Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, April, 1896. 



114 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1031. T. maritima L. 

Common in Bergen swamp. Wayne county. 

428. SCHEUCHZERIA L. 

1032. S. palustris L . 

Rare. In sphagnum bogs at Mendon. Wayne county. 

429. POTAMOGETON Tourn. [L.] Pond-weed. 

1033. P. natans L. 

Ponds and stagnant water ; common. 

1034. P. fluitans Roth. [P. lo7ichites Tuckerm.) [P. lo7ichites Tuckerm.] 

Genesee river, Irondequoit bay, Long pond, etc. 

1035. P. amplifolius Tuckerm. 

Irondequoit bay, Long pond, etc . Wayne county. 

1036. P. heterophyllus Schreb. [P. gramineus Fries.) 

Irondequoit bay, etc. ; common. 

1037. P. lucens L. 

Genesee river, Irondequoit bay, etc. ; frequent. 

1038. P. praelongus Wulf. 

Wayne county. 

1039. P. perfoliatus L . 

Bays, ponds and slow streams ; common. 

1040. P. crispus L . 

Long pond, Dr. Anna H. Searing . 

1041. P. zosteraefolius Schum. (P. compressus Man.) 

Frequent in Irondequoit bay, Long pond, etc. 

1042. P. pauciflorus Pursh. [P. foliosus Raf.] 

Near Rochester, Dr. C. M . Booth. Wayne county. 

1043. P. pusillus L. 

Irondequoit bay. Wayne county, E. L. Hanke?ison . 

1044. P. pectinatus L. 

Genesee river, bays, ponds, etc. ; common. 

1045. P- Robbinsii Oakes. 

Irondequoit bay, etc. ; common. 

4 30. ZANNICHELLIA Micheli. [L.] 

1046. Z. palustris L. 

Irondequoit bay, etc. ; not common. The var. pedwiculata occurs in 
Thomas's creek, Brighton, Dr. C. M. Booth. 

431. NAIAS L. Naiad. 

1047. N. marina L. var. recurvata (?) Dudley. 

Abundant in two of the coves and sparingly elsewhere in Ironde- 
quoit bay. 

1048. N. flexilis Rostk. & Schmidt. \N . flexilis (Willd.) Rostk. & Schmidt.] 

Bays, ponds, etc. ; common. 



1894-] Plants of Monroe county. ii$ 

CYPERACEjE. 

432. CYPERUS Tourn. [L.] Galingale. 

1049. C. diandrus Torr. 

Moist or wet ground ; frequent. 

1050. C. diandrus Torr. var. castaneus Torr. 

With the preceding. 

1051. C. aristatus Rottb. {C . inflexus Muhl.) 

Rare. Sodus bay, Wayne county, G. T. Fish. 

1052. C. Schweinitzii Torr. 

Scarce. Shore of lake Ontario, from Braddock's bay to Sodus. 

1053. C. filiculmis Vahl. 

Rare. Dry banks of Irondequoit bay : west side, Irondequoit, G. T. 
Fish ; east side, Penfield, L. Holzer ; Webster, Dr. Booth, M. S. Baxter. 

1054. C. esculentus L. (C . phymatodes Muhl.) 

Low grounds; not common. Center square, Rochester. In grass 
along Lake avenue, near the city line. Riverside avenue and vicinity. 
Wayne county. 

1055. C. strigosus L. 

Low grounds ; common. 

1056. C. speciosus Yahl. {C '. Michauxianus Man.) 

Frequent on the shore of lake Ontario. Mud creek flats, Wayne Co. 

433. DULICHIUM Pers. [L. C. Richard.] 

1057. D. spathaceum Pers. \D . arundinaceum (L.) Britton.] 

Frequent in marshes and on the borders of ponds. 

434. ELEOCHARIS R. Br. Spike-Rush. 

1058. E. ovata R.Br. {£. obtusa Schult.) [E. ovata (Roth) Roem. & Schult.] 

Low grounds and muddy shores ; common. 

1059. E. olivacea Torr. 

Monroe county, Dr. Searing . Wayne county, E . L. Hankenso?i . 

1060. E. palustris R. Br. [E.palustris (L.) Roem. & Schult.] 

Shallow water, muddy shores, marshes, etc. ; common. 

1061. E. rostellata Torr. 

Common in Bergen swamp. 

1062. E. intermedia Schult. [E . intermedia (Muhl.) Schult.J 

Shore of lake Ontario, ponds, etc. ; frequent. 

1063. E. tenuis Schult. \E. tenuis (Willd.) Schult.J 

Marshes; frequent. 

1064. E. compressa Sullivant. [E. acuminata (Muhl.) Nees.] 

Dr. A?ina H. Searing . 

1065. E. acicularis R. Br. [E . acicidaris (L.) Roem. & Schult.] 

Muddy shores ; common. 



Il6 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1066. E. pauciflora Link. {Scirpus pauciflorus Lightfoot.) {Scirpus pauci- 
florus Lightfoot.] 

Rare. Bergen swamp, Genesee county. Sodus bay, Geo .T. Fish. 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

435. SCIRPUS Tourn. [L.] 

1067. S. caespitosus L. 

Common in Bergen swamp. 

1068. S. subterminalis Torr. 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

1069. S. pungens Vahl. {S. Americanus Pers.] 

Shores and swamps ; frequent. A form with 3-cleft style is abundant 
along the margin of Genesee river a short distance below the lower falls. 

1070. S. lacustris L. (S. validus Vahl.) 

Genesee river, bays, ponds, marshes ; common. 

107 1. S. Smithii Gray. 

Rare. Shore of lake Ontario at the outlet of Braddock's bay, J. B . 
Fuller. Sodus bay, G. T. Fish . 

1072. S. f luviatilis Gray. [S '. fluviatilis (Torr.) A. Gray.] 

Common in Genesee river, Irondequoit bay, Long pond, etc. 

1073. S. sylvaticus L. var. digynus Boeck. (S. microcarpus Presl.) [S. mi- 

crocarpus Presl.] 

Low, wet grounds ; infrequent. 

1074. S. atrovirens Muhl. 

Low grounds and swamps ; common. 

436. ERIOPHORUM L. Cotton-Grass. 

1075. E. Hneatum Benth. & Hook. {Scirpus lineatus Michaux.) {Scirpus 
lineatus Michaux.] 

Low grounds ; not common. 

1076. E. cyperinum L. {Scirpus cyperinus (L.) Kunth.] Wool-grass. 

Low grounds ; common. 

1077. E. cyperinum L. var. laxum {Scirpus cyPerinus Eriophormn (Michx.) 

Britton.] 

Low grounds and marshes ; frequent. 

1078. E. alpinum L. 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

1079. E. vaginatum L. 

Wayne county, E . L. Hankenson. 

1080. E Virginicum L. 

Sphagnum swamps ; frequent. 

1081. E. Virginicum L. var. album Gray. {E. Virginicum album A. Gray.] 

Mendon, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

1082. E. polystachyon L. 

Sphagnum swamps ; common. 



1894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. I 1 7 

1083. E. gracile Koch. 

Sphagnum swamps ; rare. Mendon, y. B . Fuller. Wayne county. 

437. RHYNCHOSPORA Vahl. 

1084. R. alba Vahl. [R. alba (L.) Vahl.] 

Frequent in the sphagnum swamps at Mendon and Bergen. Wayne 
county. 

1085. R- capillacea Torr. 

Rare . Rocky bank of Genesee river, Rochester, J. B. Fuller. Bergen 
swamp, Genesee county. 

4 38. CLA DIUM P. Browne. 

1086. C. mariscoides Torr. [C. mariscoides (Muhl.) Torr.] 

Scarce. In the marshes at Mendon and Bergen. Wayne county. 

439. SCLERIA Berg. 

1087. S. triglomerata Michx. 

Rare. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M . Booth. 

1088. S. pauciflora Muhl. 

Rare . Greece, Bradley. 

1089. S. verticillata Muhl. 

Cold swamps . Mendon, M. S. Baxter. Bergen, Dr. Booth, G. T. Fish . 

440. CAREX Ruppius. [L.] Sedge. 

1090. C. intumescens Rudge. 

Wet meadows and swamps ; frequent. 

1091. C. Orayii Carey. [C. Asa-Grayi Bailey.] 

Rare. Near Rochester, Dr. C. Dewey, Dr. C. M . Booth, L. Holzer . 
Wayne county. 

1092. C. lupulina Muhl. 

Swamps; common. 

1093. C. lupulina Muhl. var.pedunculata Dew. (C.gigantea Rudge.) [C. lupu- 
lina gigantea (Rudge) Britton.J 

Rare . Monroe county, G. T. Fish . 

1094. C. lupulina Muhl. var. polystachya Schwein. & Torr. (C. lupuliformis 
Sartwell.) [C. lupulina polystachya Schwein. & Torr.] 

Monroe county, G. T. Fish. Wayne county, E. L. Ha?ikenson . 

1095. C. utriculata Boott. 

Swamps; frequent. 

1096. C. utriculata var. minor Boott. | C. utriculata minor Boott.] 

Swamps; frequent. 

1097. C. monile Tuckerm. 

Rare. L. Holzer. 

1098. C. Tuckermani Dewey. 

Infrequent. Near Charlotte, George T.Fish. Chili, M. S. Baxter. 
Wayne county. 



IlS ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1099. C. retrorsa Schw. 

Wet meadows and marshes ; frequent. 

1 100. C. retrorsa Schw. var. Hartii Gray. [C. retrorsa Hartii (Dew.) A . Gray.] 

Rare. E. L. Ha7ikenson . 

1101. C. lurida Wahl. {C '. tentaculata Muhl.) 

Marshy places and swamps ; common. 

1 102. C. hystricina Muhl. 

Swales and along streams ; frequent. 

1 103. C. Pseudo=Cyperus L. 

Frequent in marshes along the Genesee river, and elsewhere. 

1 104. C. Pseudo=Cyperus L. var. Americana Hochst. (C. co?nosa Boott.) 
[C . Pseudo-Cyperus America7ia Hochst.] 

Marshes; frequent. 
C. squarrosa L . is reported by L . Holzer. 

1 105. C. scabrata Schwein. 

Rare. Wet woods near Rich's dugway, M, S. Baxter. Bergen 
swamp, Dr. C. M . Booth and G. T. Fish. Wayne county. 

1 106. C. Houghtonii Torr. 

Rare. Long pond, Dr. Anna H. Searing. 

1 107. C. filiformis L. 

Bergen swamp, Genesee county. Sodus bay, Wayne county. 

1 108. C. filiformis L. var. latifolia Bceckl. (C. lanuginosa Michx.) [C. fili- 
formis lanuginosa (Michx.) B.S.P.] 

Marshes ; infrequent. Irondequoit bay, Round pond, etc. 

1 109. C. trichocarpa Muhl. 

Marshes; scarce. Margin of Genesee river, Greece, J . B . Fuller. 
Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth and G. T. Fish. Ontario county, 
E. L. Hankenson. 

1 1 10. C. trichocarpa Muhl. var. aristata Bailey. (C aristata R. Brown.) 
[C. trichocarpa aristata (R. Br.) Bailey.] 

Greece, eleven miles west of Rochester, six miles south of lake Ontario, 
Dr. Bradley, 1829 : Dewey in Sill. V. 38, p. 290.— /8th N. Y. Rep. 
mi. C. riparia Curtis. 

Marshes; frequent. 

1 1 12. C. fusca All. {C. Buxbaumii Wahl.) 

Rare . Bank of Genesee river, Bradley. Bergen swamp . 

1 1 13. C. rigida Good. var. Goodenovii Bailey. (C. vulgaris Fries.) [C. rigida 

Goodenovii (J. Gay) Bailey.] 
Rare. Monroe county, Dr. Anna H. Searing. Wayne county. 

1 1 14. C. stricta Lam. 

Marshes ; frequent. 

1 115. C. aquatilis Wahl. 

Marshes; scarce. Mendon, J. B. Fuller. Adams Basin, M. S. 
Baxter. Wayne county. 



1894.] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. II9 

1 1 16. C. torta Boott. 

Rare ? Dr. C. M. Booth. 

1 1 17. C. prasina Wahl. (C. miliacea Muhl.) 

Wet woods and meadows ; frequent. 

1 1 18. C. crinita Lam. [C . gynandra Schwein.) 

Low wet woods and swales ; common. 

1 1 19. C. limosa L. 

Scarce. Mendon, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

1 120. C. virescens Muhl. 

Woods ; infrequent. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth, L. Holzer . 
Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. 

1 121. C. virescens Muhl. var. costata Dewey. [C. virescens costata (Schw.) 

Dewey.] 

Woods ; infrequent. Monroe county. Wayne county. 

1 122. C. triceps Mx. var. hirsuta Bailey. [C. triceps hirsuta (Willd.) Bailey.] 

Rare. Vicinity of Rochester, Dr. C . M . Booth, L. Holzer. 

1 123. C. longirostris Torr. 

Rare. Western part of Monroe county, Prof. Lennon . Wayne Co. 

1 1 24. C. arctata Boott. 

Dry rich woods and shady banks ; infrequent. 

1 125. C. debilis Michx. var. Rudgei Bailey. {C. debilis Man.) [C. debilis 
Rudgei Bailey.] 

Rare. Near Rochester, Dr. C . M. Booth, Dr. Anna H. Searing. 

1 126. C. gracillima Schwein. 

Woods and low meadows ; common. 

1 127. C gracillima Schw. x C. arctata Boott. 

Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. 

1 1 28. C. grisea Wahl. 

Scarce. Vicinity of Rochester, Dr. Booth, L. Holzer. Wayne Co. 

1 129. C. granularis Muhl. 

Wet grassy places and along streams ; common. 

1 130. C. granularis Muhl. var. Haleana Porter. [C granularis Haleana 
(Olney) Porter.] 

Bergen swamp, J. B. Fuller. 

1 131. C. Crawei Dewey. 

Rare. On barren spots of marl in Bergen swamp. 

1132. C. flava L. 

Wet grassy meadows and swamps; not common. Frequent in low 
ground and wet woods bordering Bergen swamp. Wayne county. 

1 133. C. flava L. var. viridula Bailey. (C. (Ederi Man.) [C '. flava viridula 

(Michx.) Bailey.] 

Cold bogs; rare. Frequent in the marly soil of Bergen swamp. 
Sodus Point, Wayne county. 



120 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1 134. C. pallescens L. 

Scarce. In clayey soil, Seneca park, near Maple Grove, J. B. Fuller. 
L. Holzer. Wayne county. The form with lower bract transversely 
wavy-lined, C. undulata Kunze, occurs with the type in Seneca park. 

1 135. C. conoidea Schk. 

Long pond, Dr. Anna H . Searing. L. Holzer. 

1 136. C. oligocarpa Schk. 

Rare. Black creek, Dr. Anna H. Searing. 

1 137. C. Hitchcockiana Dewey. 

Scarce. Sandy grove, Irondequoit, L. Holzer. Abundant south of 
Rochester, Dewey. Murray, Orleans Co., M . S. Baxter. Wayne Co. 

1 138. C. Iaxiflora Lam. 

Dry or moist woods, ravines, meadows ; infrequent. 

1 139. C. Iaxiflora Lam. var. striatula Carey. [C. Iaxiflora blanda (Dewey) 

Boott.] 
Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

1 140. C. Iaxiflora Lam. var. latifolia Boott. [C. albursina Sheldon. J 

Rich woods and ravines ; frequent. 

1 141. C. Iaxiflora Lam. var. patulifolia Carey. [Carex Iaxiflora patulifolia 
(Dewey) Carey.] 

Dry or moist woods, meadows, ravines, hills ; common. 

1 142. C. digitalis Willd. 

River banks, ravines, etc. ; common. Wet meadows, Greece, Holzer. 

1 1 43. C. laxiculmis Schwein. (C. retrocurva Dewey.) 

Woods and copses ; common. 

1 144. C. platyphylla Carey. 

Rich shady woods, river banks, ravines ; common. 

1 145. C. Carey ana Torr. 

Rare. Woods near Genesee river, four or five miles above Rochester, 
W. Boott : Dr. C.Dewey. Copses in Henrietta, J. E. Paine . Wayne 
county, E.L. Hankenson. 

1 146. C. plantaginea Lam. 

Wet woods, river banks and ravines ; frequent. 

1147. C. Saltuensis Bailey. {C.vaginata Man.) 

Local. Moist banks, under evergreens, on the border of Bergen 
swamp, Genesee county. 

1148. C. tetanica Schk. 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

1 149. C. aurea Nutt. 

Wet rocks and banks; infrequent. Rocky banks of Genesee river, 
Rochester ; shores of Irondequoit bay ; and elsewhere. 

1 1 50. C. eburnea Boott. 

Frequent on dry cliffs of the Genesee river. Shady borders of 
Bergen swamp. 



1894- I PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTS 



12 1 



1 151. C. Richardson i R. Br. 

Rare . Dry woods, Farma, Bradley. 

1152. C. pedunculata Muhl. 

Low woods, ravines, etc.; common. 

1 1 53. C. varia Muhl. [C. Emmonsii Dew.) 

Dry woods, ravines, hillsides ; frequent. 
1 1 54 C Pennsylvania Lam. 

Dry woods and banks ; common. 

1 155. C. communis Bailey. (C. varia Man.) \C. pedicellata (Dew.) Britlon.) 

Dry wooded hills and ravine sides ; common. 

1 156. C. umbellata Schk. 

Sandy knolls and banks ; infrequent. 

1 157. C. pubescens Muhl. 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

1158. C Jamesii Schwein. {C. Steudelii Kunth.) 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

1159. C. polytrichoides Muhl. [C. leptalea Wahl.] 

Bogs and marshes ; abundant. 

1 160. C. chordorhiza Ehrh. [C. ehordorhiza L.f.] 

Wayne county: Sodus point, Mr. Baxter; Mud pond, Mr. Hankenson. 
1 [61. C. stipata Muhl. 

Wet meadows, etc. ; common. 

1162. C. decomposita Muhl. 

Rare. Livingston county, E. L. Hankenson. 

1 163. C. teretiuscula Gooden. 

Swamps; infrequent. Dr. C. Dewey. Dr. Searing. Wayne county. 

1 164. C. teretiuscula Gooden. var. ramosa Boott. [C. teretiuscula ramosa 

Boott.] Bergen swamp. 

1 165. C. alopecoidea Tuckerm. 

Monroe Co., Dr. Booth, L. Hotzer. Ontario Co., Mr. Hankenson . 

1166. C. vulpinoidea Michx. 

Low grounds ; common. 

1 167. C. Sartwellii Dewey. [C. disticha Huds.) 

Rare. Monroe county, Dr. C. M . Booth. Wayne county. 

1 168. C. tenella Schk. 

Rare. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Bergen swamp, (J. 7\ Fish and 
Dr. C. M. Booth . Wayne county. 

1 169. C. rosea Schk. 

Woods and banks ; common. 

1 170. C. rosea Schk. var. radiata Dewey. [ C. rosea radiata Dewey.] 

Scarce. Dr. Searing. Adams Basin, M . S. Baxter. 

1171. C. rosea Schk. var. retroflexa Torr. \C. retroflexa Muhl.) 

Vicinity of Rochester, Dr. Anna It. Searing. 

16, Proc. Roc 11. Acad. OF Sc„ Vm. 5, May, i 



122 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

72. C. sparganioides Muhl. 
Rich woods, wet meadows, etc. ; common. 

73. C. Muhlenbergii Schk. 
Rare. Dry sandy ridges near Irondequoit bay. Sandy knolls at 

Mendon ponds. Braddock's bay, Bradley. 
A form approaching var. enervis Boott occurs at Mendon, Mr. Baxter. 

74. C. cephalophora Muhl . 
Dry fields, knolls, etc. ; common. 

75- C. gynocrates Wormsk. [C. Redowskyana C. A. Meyer.] 

Rare. Springy banks a few miles south of Rochester, Dr. C. Dewey . 
Bergen swamp, Genesee county. 

76. C. exilis Dewey. 

Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

yj. C. interior Bailey, Bull. Torr. Club, 20: 426 (1893). 

Low ground, Adams Basin and Macedon, M . S . Baxter. 

78. C. echinata Murray, var. microstachys Bceckl. (C. scirpoides Schk. 
C. sterilis Willd.) [C sterilis Willd.] 

Frequent in sphagnum swamps. 

79. C. sterilis excelsior Bailey, Bull. Torr. Club, 20: 424 (1893). 
Bergen swamp, M. S. Baxter. 

80. C. trisperma Dewey. 
Swamps; scarce. Gates, Geo. T. Fish. Mendon, M. S. Baxter, 

Wayne county. 

81. C. Deweyana Schwein. 
Dry woods ; infrequent. Henrietta, Adams Basin, Brockport, Mace- 
don, and elsewhere . 

82. C. bromoides Schk. 
Swamps, marshes ; common. 

83. C. siccata Dewey. 
Rare. Dry hillsides, Penfield, M. S. Baxter. Bergen swamp, Clinton. 

84. C. tribuloides Wahl. [C. lagopodioides Schk.) 
Open marshes and low meadows ; common. 

85. C. tribuloides Wahl. var. Bebbii Bailey. [C. tribuloides Bebbii (Olney) 
Bailey.] 

Low grounds ; common. 

86. C. tribuloides Wahl. var. cristata Bailey. [C. cristata Schweinitz ) 
[C. tribuloides cristata (Schwein.) Bailey.] 

Low grounds and fields ; common. 

87. C. scoparia Schk. 
Wet grass lands ; common. 

88. C. straminea Willd. 
Moist copses and fields ; infrequent. 

89. C. straminea Willd. var. mirabilis Tuckerm. [ C. straminea mirab.ilis 
(Dewey) Tuckerm.] 

Wet meadows ; frequent. 



I S94. I PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 1:5 

iiqo. C. straminea Willd. var. brevior Dewey. [C. straminea festucacea 
(Willd.) Tuckerm.] 

Moist grass lands ; frequent. 

GRAMIXE.K. 

44 1. SPARTINA Schreber. 

1191. S. cynosuroides Willd. [S . cynosuroides (L.) Willd.] 

Frequent in the marshes bordering the Genesee river. 

442. PA SPA L I'M L. 

1192. P. setaceum Michx. Dr. Anna II. Searing. 

443. PA. XI cr. M L. 

1193. P. glabrum Gaudin. \P.lineare Krock.] 

Cultivated and waste grounds ; frequent. 
Ilg4. P. SANGUINALE L. CRAB GRASS . 

Cultivated and waste grounds, roadsides ; common. 

1 195. P. proliferum Lam. 

Sandy fields ; rare. Penfield, Dr. C. M. Booth . 

1 196. P. capillare L. Old-witch Grass. 

Cultivated fields and waste places ; common. 

1 197. P. virgatum L. 

Rare. Sandy soil, Penfield, Dr. C. M. Booth, G. T. Fish. 

1 198. P. latifolium L. [P. Walteri Poir.] 

Moist woods and banks of streams ; frequent. 

1 199. P. clandestinum L. 

Rare. Penfield, Dr. C. M. Booth. L.Holzer. A. B.Leckenby. 

1200. P. depauperatum Muhl. 

Dry woods and banks ; frequent. 

1201. P. dichotomum L. 

Dry woods and banks ; common and very variable. 

1202. P. Crus-Galli L. Barn-yard Grass. 

Waste places, ditches, marshes ; common. 

1203. P. Crus-Galli L. var. muticum Vasey. 

Low ground, near the eastern wide-water, Brighton. 

1204. P. Crus=galli L. var. hispidum Torr. [P. Crus-Galli hispidum (Muhl.) 
Torrey.J 

Marshes at Irondequoit bay and elsewhere. 

444. SETARIA Beauv. [Cham.kkathis R.Br.] Foxtail. 

1205. S. GLAUCA Beauv. \Chamaraphis glauca (L.) Kuntze.] 

Fields and waste grounds ; common. 

1206. S. vikidis Beauv. \Chamaraphis viridis (L.) Porter.] 

Cultivated fields ; common. 

1207. S. Italica Kunth. \Chamcc?-aphis Italica (L.) Kuntze. | 

Occasionally spontaneous. 



124 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

445- CENCHRUS L. 

1208. C. TRIBULOIDES L. 

Along the N. Y. C. railroad from East Rochester eastward. 

446. LEERSIA Swartz. [Homalocenchrus Mieg.] 

1209. L. Virginica Willd. {Homalocenchrus Virginicus (Willd.) Britton.] 

Rare. Shore of Irondequoit bay, Dr. C . M . Booth. Wayne county. 

1210. L. oryzoides Swartz. {Homalocenchrus oryzoides (L.) Poll.] Cut Grass. 

Marshes and wet ground along streams ; common. 

447. ZIZANIA Gronov. [L.] 

121 1. Z.aquatica L. Indian Rice. 

Frequent in all the bays, inlets and marshes along lake Ontario. 

448. ANDROPOGON Royen. [L.] 

1 2 12. A. furcatus Muhl. \A. provincialis Lam.] 

Dry banks ; frequent. 

121 3. A. scoparius Michx. 

Dry ground ; common. 

449. CHRYSOPOGON Trin. 

1 2 14. C. nutans Man. 6th ed. {Sorghum nutans Gray.) [Andropogon nutans 

avenaceus (Michx.) Hack.] 

Frequent on dry banks and shores. 

450. PHALARIS L. 

P. Canariensis L. Canary Grass. 

Frequent in waste places and door-yards. 

1215. P. arundinacea L. Reed Canary Grass. 

Abundant in marshes along the Genesee river. 

1216. P. ARUNDINACEA L.var.PICTA. RlBBON GRASS . 

Escaped and established along N.Y. C. R. R. in Chili, Miss Beckwith. 

451. ANTHOXANTHUM L. 

12 17. A. ODORATUM L. SWEET VERNAL GRASS . 

Roadsides and pastures; infrequent. Irondequoit. Gates. 

452. HIEROCHLOE Gmelin. [Savastana Schrank.] 

1218. H. borealis Roem. & Schultes. {Savastana odor ata (L.) Scribn.] 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

453. ORYZOPSIS Michx. 

121Q. O. melanocarpa Muhl. 

Rocky woods, banks and ravine sides ; frequent. 

1220. O. asperifolia Michx. Mountain Rice. 

Common in woods along river banks and ravines and on hillsides. 

1221. O. Canadensis Torr. [O. juncea (Michx.) B. S. P.] 

Rare. Sandy bank of Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth . 

454- MILIUM Tourn. [L.] 

1222. M. effusum L. Millet Grass. 

Wet places and swamps ; not common. 



1894- I PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY 125 

455. MUHLENBERGIA Schreber. 

1223. M. sobolifera Trin. \M . sobolifera (Muhl.) Trin.] 

Rare. L . Holzer. 

1224. M. glomerata Trin. \M. racemosa (Michx.) B. S. P.| 

Swamps and ravines. Abundant in Berg-en swamp. 

1225. M Mexicana Trin. [M. Mexicana (L.) Trin.] 

Low grounds ; common. 

1226. M. syivatica Torr. & Gray. [M. sylvatica (Torr.) A. Gray.] 

Moist soil, borders of woods and streams. Abundant on the flats of 
the Genesee river and on the banks of Irondequoit creek. 

1227. M. WiUdenovii Trin. \M. tenuiflora (Willd.) B. S. P.] 

Infrequent. Bank of Genesee river, below the lower falls. Sandy 
knolls at Mendon ponds. 

1228. M. diffusa Schreber. Nimble Will. 

Fields and roadsides ; frequent. 

456. BRACHYELYTRUM Beauv. 

122Q. B. aristatum Beauv. \B.erectum (Schreb.) Beauv.] 

Ravine sides and rocky banks of Genesee river ; frequent. 

45 7- PI ILEUM L. 

1230. P. pratense L. Timothy. 

Fields and waysides ; common. 

458. ALOFECCRUS L. Foxtail Grass. 

1231. A. PKATKN.sis L. Meadow Foxtail. 

Scarce. L. Holzer. Prof. IV. H. Lennon. 

1232. A. geniculatus L. var. aristulatus Torrey. (.-/. aristulatus Michaux.) 
[A. geniculatus fulvus (J. E. Smith.) Scribn.] 

Wet meadows ; frequent. 
459- SPOROBOLUS R. Br. 

1233. S. vagin«florus Vasey. [Vilfa vaginccflora Torr.) [Sporobo/us vagi- 

ncEflorus (Torr.) Wood.] 

Rare. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

1234. 5. cryptandrus Gray. [S. cryptandrus (Torr.) A.Gray.] 

Rare. Sandy shore of lake Ontario. 
460. AGROSTIS L. Bent-Gras-. 

1235. A. alba L. White Bent-Grass. 

Low grass lands ; common. 

1236. A. alba L . var. vulgaris Thurb. [A. vulgaris With.) [A. alia vul- 
garis (With.) Thurb.] Red-top. 

Meadows, helds, pastures ; common. 

1237. A. perennans Tuckerm. [A. perenhans (Walt.) Tuckerm.] 

Common in open woods about Irondequoit bay ; frequent elsewhere 

1238. A. scabra Willd. [A. hiemalis (Walt.) B. S. P.] Hair-Grass. 

Bluffs along lake Ontario and Irondequoit bay. 



126 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



461. CINNA L. 

1239. C. arundinacea L. 

Marshes and swampy woods ; frequent. 
124.0. C. pendula Trin. (C. arundinacea var. pendula Gray.) [C. latifolia 
(Trev.) Griesb.] 

Rare. Ravines, Irondequoit. Wayne county. 

462. CALAMAGROSTIS Adans. 

1241. C. Canadensis Beauv. [C. Canadensis (Michx.) Beauv.] Blue-Joint. 

Marshes; common. 

463. AMMOPHILA Host. 

1242. A. arundinacea Host. [Calamagrostis arena ria Roth.) \Anu110phila 
arenaria (L.) Link.] 

Common on the barren beach of lake Ontario. 

464. ARK HEX A THE RUM Beauv. 

1243. A. avenaceum Beauv. \A.elatius (L.) Beauv.] Oat Grass. 

Rochester, Dr. C . M. Booth. Dr. A . H. Searing . Wayne county. 

465. HOLCUS L. 

1244. H. lanatus L. Meadow Soft-Grass. Velvet-Grass. 

Meadows in Genesee Valley park, Rochester. L. Holzer. 

466. DESCHAMPSIA Beauv. 

1245. D. flexuosa Trinius. [Aira flexuosa L.) [D. flexuosa (L.) Trinius.] 

Common in dry woods along the banks of the Genesee river, below 
Rochester ; occasional on dry slopes elsewhere. 

1246. D. caespitosa Beauv. [Aira ccespitosa L.) [D. ea'spitosa (L.) Beauv.] 

Rare. Rocky bank of Genesee river, near foot of White street, 
Rochester, /. B . Fuller. Bergen swamp, J. E . Paine ! Sodus, Wayne 
county, E. L. Hankenson . 

467. TRISETUM Pens. 

1247. T. subspicatum Beauv. var. molle Gray. [T. subspicatwn molle (Mx.) 
A. Gray.] 

Rare. Dry sandy bank, Brighton, Dr. C . M . Booth! 

1248. T. palustre Torr. [T. palustre (Michx.) Torr.] 

Rare. Near Rochester, Dr. C . M. Booth. 

468. A I E.YA Tourn. [L.] 

1249. A. striata Michx. 

Monroe county, Dr. Anna H . Searing. G. T. Fish. 
A. sativa L., Common Oat, is frequently spontaneous. 

469. DANTHONIA DC. 

1250. D. spicata Beauv. [D . spieata (L.) Beauv.] Wild Oat-Grass. 

Dry banks and hills ; common. 

CYNODON Richard. [Capriola Adans.] 

C. Dactylon Pers. \Capriola Dactylon (L.) Kuntze.] Bermuda Grass. 

In mold brought from the woods, Dr. A . H . Searing . 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 1 27 

470. BOUTELOUA Lagasca. 

1251. B. racemosa Lagasca. (/>'. curtipendula Gray.) (/>'. curtipendula 
(Michx.) Torr.] Muskit Grass. 

Rare. Irondequoit, Prof. IV. H. Lennon and M. S. Baxter. 

471. ELUSINE Gx-rtn. 

1252. E. Indica Gaertn. [E. Indica (L.) Gaertn.] Crab Grass. 

Pittsford, Dr. C. M . Booth. Wayne county. 

472. PHRAGMITES Trin. 

1253. P. communis Trin. [P. Phragmites (L.) Karst.) Reed. 

Marshes ; scarce. Mendon and Hamlin, M. S. Baxter. Bergen 
swamp, Genesee county. Wayne county. 

473. EATON I A Raf. 

1254. E. Pennsylvania Gray. \E. Pennsylvanica (D. C.) A. Gray. J 

Moist banks and borders of marshes ; frequent. 

1255. E. Dudleyi Vasey. 

Moist bank of Genesee river, with E. Pennsylvanica, J. P. Fuller, 1862. 

474. ERAGROSTIS Beauv. 

1256. E. reptans Xees. [E. hypnoides (Lam.) B. S. P.] 

Frequent in wet sand on the shore of lake Ontario and along the 
Genesee river. 

1257. E. major Host. [E. poceoides var. viegastachya Gray.) 

Railroad yard, East Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth! Roadside, Central 
avenue, Rochester, /. B. Fuller. 

1258. E. Purshii Schrader. [E. Caroliniana (Spreng.) Scribn.j 

Railroad yard, East Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth.' 

1259. E. capillaris Xees. [PS. capillaris (L.) Xees.] 

Brockport, Prof. IV. H. Lennon, M. S. Baxter. 

475. DACTYLIS L. 

1260. U. glomerata L. Orchard Grass. 

Fields, door-yards, waysides ; common. 

CVXOSL-RLS L. 

C. cristatus L., Crested Dog's-tail Grass, is occasionally sponta- 
neous in the vicinity of Rochester. 

476. POA L. 

1261. P. annua L. Low Spear-Grass. 

Lawns, roadsides, fields ; common. 

1262. P. compressa L. Wire-Grass. 

Fields, waysides, waste places, dry banks; common. Sometimes 
called Canadian Blue Grass. 

1263. P. serotina Ehrh. [Poa flava L.] Fowl Meadow-Grass. 

Wet meadows, low banks of streams and springy places ; frequent. 

1264. P. pratensis L. June Grass. Kentucky Blue-Grass. 

Everywhere abundant. 



128 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1265. P. trivialis L. Rough-stalked Meadow-Grass. 

Low grass lands and marshes ; not common. 

1266. P. sylvestris Gray. 

Rare. Dr. C. M. Booth. 

1267. P. debilis Torr. 

Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth! Wayne county. 

1268. P. alsodes Gray. 

Woods on river banks and hillsides ; infrequent. 

477. GLYCERIA R. Br. [Panicularia Fabr.] 

1269. Q. elongata Trin. {Panicularia elongata (Torr.) Kuntze.J 

Rare. L. Holzer. 

1270. G. nervata Trin. {Panicularia nervata (Willd.) Kuntze.] Fowl 
Meadow-Grass. 

Moist meadows, brooksides, marshy ground ; common. 

1271. Q. pallida Trin. {Panicularia pallida (Torr.) Kuntze. | 

Monroe county, L. Holzer. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson. 

1272. G. grandis Watson. (67. aquatica J. E. Smith.) {Panicularia aquatic a 

(L.) Kuntze.] Reed Meadow-Grass. 
Low meadows and shallow slow streams ; common. 

1273. G. fluitans R. Br. {Panicularia fltiitans (L.) Kuntze.] 

Shallow water in slow streams, ditches, pools ; infrequent. 

478. FESTUCA L. Fescue Grass. 

1274. F. tenella Willd. {Festuca octoflora Walt.] 

Wooded bank of Irondequoit bay, Penfield, Dr. C. M. Booth! 
Wayne county. 

1275. F. ovina L. Sheep's Fescue. 

Bank of Genesee river, near the lower falls, and elsewhere. Occa- 
sionally on lawns. 

1276. F. ovina L. var. duriuscula Koch. {Festuca ovina duriuscula (L.) 
Hack.] Hard Fescue. 

Sandy fields near Irondequoit bay, Dr. C. M. Booth. Sandy bank of 
Irondequoit bay, near Sea Breeze, J. B. Fuller. L. Holzer.' G.T.Fish. 

1277. F. nutans Willd. 

Frequent in woods on the banks of Genesee river and elsewhere. 

1278. F. elatior L. Tall Meadow Fescue. 

Low, rich grass land ; common. 

1279. F. elatior L. var. pratensis Gr. {F. elatior pratensis (Huds.) Hack.] 
Meadow Fescue. 

Fields and waysides ; common. 

479. /I ROM US L. 

1280. B. Kalmii Gray. 

Not common. Copses along the banks of Genesee river. Mendon, 
G. T. Fish. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. I2Q 

1281. B. secalinus L. Chess or Cheat. 

Fields and waste lands ; common. 

1282. B. mollis L. [B . kordeaceus L.] 

L . Holzer. Prof. IV. II. Lennon . 

1283. B. racemosus L. L. Holzer. 

1284. B. ciliatus L. 

River banks and ravines ; common. 

1285. B. ciliatus L. var. purgans Gray. [B. ciliatus purgans (L.) A. Gray.] 

Common on rocky banks of the Genesee river. 

1286. B. tectorum L. 

Xot common. Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth! 

480. LOLIUM L. Darnel. 

1287. L. PERENNE L. 

Roadsides, Rochester. Wayne county. 

1288. L. ITALICUM A. Br. [L . perenne Italicum (A. Br.) Scribn.] 

Roadside, Rochester, J. B. Fuller. 

1289. L. TEMULENTUM L. POISONOUS DARNEL. 

Wayne county, E. L. Haiikenson . 

481. AGROPYRUM Gaertn. [Agropyron J. Gaertn.] 

i2go. A. repens Beauv. {Triticum repens L.) \Agropyro71 repens (L.) Beauv.] 
Couch, Quack, Quitch or Quick Grass. 
Fields, roadsides and waste places ; common. 

1 29 1. A. caninum Roem. & Schultes. {Triticum caninum L.) \Agropyro71 
caninum (L.) Roem. & Schultes.] 

River banks, dry ravine sides ; frequent. Occasionally in swamps. 

482. HORDEUM Tourn. [L.] 

1292. H. jubatum L. Squirrel-tail Grass. 

Fields and roadsides, Irondequoit, Dr. C. M. Booth . 

483. ELYMUS L. Wild Rye. 

1293. E. Virginicus L. 

River banks and ravines ; frequent. 

1294. E. Canadensis L. 

River banks afTd shores ; frequent. 

1295. E. Canadensis L. var. glaucifolius Gray. [E. Canadensis glaucifolius 

(Willd.) Torr.] 

Common on the banks of Genesee river, below Rochester. 

1296. E. striatus Willd. 

Monroe county, L. Holzer. Wayne county, E. L. Hankenson . 

484. ASPRELLA Willd. [Hystrix Moench.] 

1297. A. Hystrix Willd. {Gymnosticum Hystrix Schreb.) [Hystrix Hystrix 

(L.) Millsp.] 

River banks and ravine sides, borders of woods ; frequent. 

17, Pkoc. Rock. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, May, i8y6. 



130 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

GYMNOSPERM/E. 

CONIFERS. 

485. riNUS Tourn. [L.] 

1298. P. Strobus L. White Pine. 

Woods and hills ; frequent. 

1299. P. rigida Mill. Pitch Pine. 

Dry hills and sandy banks; infrequent. Irondequoit. Brighton. 
Penfield. Webster. 

486. PICEA Link. 

1300. P nigra Link. {Abies nigra Poir.) \Picea Mariana (Mill.) B. S. P.] 

Black Spruce. 
Scarce. Swamps at Mendon. 

487. TSUGA Carriere. 

1*301. T. Canadensis Carr. {Abies Canadensis Michx.) \Tsnga Canadensis 
(L.) Carr.] Hemlock. 

Swampy woods and river banks ; common. 

488. A B/ES Link. [Juss.] 

1302. A. balsamea Mill. [A . Balsamca (L.) Mill.] Balsam Fir. 

Reported only by L . Holzer. 

489. LARIX Tourn. [Adans.] 

1303. L. Americana Michaux. [L. laricina (Du Roi) Koch.] Tamarack. 
American Larch. 

Common in the larger swamps. 

490. THUYA Tourn. [Thuja L.] 

1304. T. occidentalis L. Arbor Vit^e. White Cedar. 

Rocky river banks, ravines and swamps ; common. 

491. JUNIPER US L. 

1305. J. communis L. Common Juniper. 

Rare. Bank of the Genesee river, below the lower falls. Bank of 
Irondequoit bay, G. T. Fish . 

1306. J. Sabina L. var. procumbens Pursh. [/. Sabina L.] 

Bank of the Genesee river, Bi'adley. Caledonia, Livingston county. 
Abundant in Bergen swamp, Genesee county. 

1307. J. Virginiana L. Red Cedar. 

Rare. Banks of Genesee river, Rochester. East bank of Ironde- 
quoit bay, Webster. Oak Orchard, Orleans county. 

1308. J. Virginiana L. var. prostrata. 

Abandoned nursery grounds on Prince street, Rochester. 

492. TAX US Tourn. [L.] 

1309. T. Canadensis Willd. {T. baccata L. var. Canadensis Gray.) [T. minor 

(Michx.) Britton.] American Yew. 

River banks, ravine sides, hemlock woods and cold swamps. 



[894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 1 3 I 

CRYPTOGAM/A. 

VASCULAR ACROGENS. [ PTERIDOPHYTA.I 

EOUISETACE.K. 

493- EQUISETUM L. 

1310. E. arvense L. Common Horsetail. 

Moist sandy or gravelly soil, railroad embankments, river banks and 
ravine sides; common. 

131 1. E sylvaticum L. 

Wet shady places ; infrequent. 

1312. E. palustre L. 

Rare. Margin of Genesee river, near lake Ontario, J. B. Fuller. 

1313. E. limosum L. [E. fluviatile L.] 

Infrequent. Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth, J. B. Fuller. Gates, G. T. 
Fish. Brockport, M. S. Baxter. Wayne county. 

1314. E. hyemale L. Scouring Rush. 

Moist or dry banks ; common. 

13 1 5. E. variegatum Schleicher. 

Frequent on the shore of lake Ontario. 

1 3 16. E. scirpoides Michx. 

Wooded hillsides ; not common. Mount Hope. Banks of Irondequoit 
creek and bay. Hopper's hill, Greece. Webster. Wayne county. 

FILICES. 

494. POLYPODIUM L. 

131 7. P. vulgare L. Common Polypody. 

On rocks and roots of trees ; infrequent. Four stations on the banks 
of Genesee river, between the lower falls and the rifle range. East side 
of Irondequoit bay, near the sand bar, C. IV. Seelye. "The Gulf", 
Genesee county, Miss F. Beckwith. Holley, Orleans county, Prof. W. 
H. Lennon. Oak Orchard, M. S. Baxter. Cliffs on the eastern shore 
of Canandaigua lake, C. IV. Seelye. Wayne county. 

495. ADIANTUM L. Maidenhair. 

1318. A. pedatum L. 

Rich moist woods, shady banks, ravine sides ; common. 

496. PTERIS L. 

1319. P. aquilina L. Common Brake. 

Thickets, hillsides, old fields ; common. 

497. WOODWARDIA J.E.Smith. Ciiain-Fekn. 

1320. W. Virginica Smith. [IV. Virginiea (L.) J. E. Smith.] 

Abundant in a swamp at Mendon ponds. Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. 



132 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

498. ASPLENIUM L. Spleenwort. 

132 1 . A. Trichomanes L. 

Shaded cliffs; rare. Glen east of Float bridge, Dr. C. M. Booth! 
" The Gulf ", Genesee county, Miss Beckwith. Holley, Prof. Lennon. 

1322. A. ebeneum Ait. [A. platy 'neuron (L.) Oakes.] 

Rare. Bank of Genesee river, M. S. Baxter. Near the Sea Breeze, 
Irondequoit, C. W. Seelye. Mendon, M. S. Baxter. Holley, Prof. Lennon, 

1323. A. angustifolium Michx. 

Rich woods and ravine bottoms ; not common. Woods, east of 
Rochester, C. IV. Seelye. Near Rochester, Dr. C. M. Booth. Dugway, 
Mrs. M. E. Streeter. Gates, Geo. T. Fish. Brockport, M. S. Baxter. 
Glen at Seneca point, Canandaigua lake, C. IV. Seelye. Wayne county. 

1324. A. thelypteroides Michx. [A. acrostic ho ides Swartz.] 

Rich woods ; common. 

1325. A. Filix=fcemina Bernh. [A. Filix-fos?nina (L.) Bernh.] 

Moist rich woods ; common. 

499. CAMPTOSORUS Link. 

1326. C. rhizophyllus Link. [C. rhizophyllus (L.) Link.] Walking-Leaf. 

Shaded rocks ; not common. Brighton, C. W. Seelye. Gates, G. T. 
Fish. Bank of Genesee river and glen east of Float bridge, Dr. C. M. 
Booth! Ogden, M. S. Baxter. "The Gulf", Genesee county, Miss M. 
E. Macauley, Miss F. Beckwith. Holley, M. S. Baxter. Glen at Seneca 
point, Canandaigua lake, G. T. Fish, C. IV. Seelye. Wayne county. 

500. PHEGOPTERIS Fee. Beech Fern. 

1327. P. polypodioides Fee. [P. Phegopteris (L.) Underw.] 

Rare. Irondequoit, C. IV. Seelye. L. Holzer. Wayne county. 

1328. P. hexagonoptera Fee. [P. hexagonoptera (Michx.) Fee.] 

Open woods ; common. 

1329. P. Dryopteris Fee. [P. Dryopteris (L.) Fee.] 

Scarce. Webster, Mendon, Hamlin, M. S. Baxter. Holley, Orleans 
county, Prof. Lennon. Wayne county. 

501. ASPIDIUM Swartz. [Dryopteris Adans.] Shield Fern. 

1330. A. Thelypteris Swartz. {Dryopteris Thelypteris (L.) A. Gray.] 

Moist or marshy ground ; common. 

1331. A. Noveboracense Swartz. {Dryopteris Noveboracensis (L.) A. Gray.] 

Moist woods and moist shady places ; common. 

1332. A. spinulosum Swartz. {Dryopteris spinulosa (Retz) Kuntze.] 

Dry or wet woods, and swamps ; not uncommon. 

1333. A. spinulosum Swartz var. intermedium D. C. Eaton. {Dryopteris 
spinulosa inter?nedia (Muhl.) Underw.] 

Woods ; common. 

1334. A. spinulosum Swartz var. dilatatum Hooker. {Dryopteris spinulosa 
dilatata (Hoffm.) Underw.] 

Charlotte, C. IV. Seelye. Dr. Anna H. Scaring. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 1 33 

1335. A. Boottii Tuckerm. [A. spinulosum var. Boottii Man.) \Dryopteris 

Boottii (Tuckerm.) Under w.] 

Rare. Swamp near Scottsville, M. S. Baxter. 

1336. A. cristatum Swartz. [Dryopteris cristata (L.) A.Gray.] 

Moist and marshy woods and thickets ; not uncommon. 

1337. A. cristatum Swartz var. Clintonianum D.C.Eaton. \Dryopteris cris- 
tata Clintoniana (D. C. Eaton) Underw.] 

Low rich woods ; not uncommon. 

1338. A. Goldianum Hook. [Dryopteris Goldieana (Hook.) A. Gray.] 

Rich moist woods and shady places ; scarce. 

1339. A. marginale Swartz. [Dryopteris marginalis (L.) A. Gray.] 

Dry woods and rocky banks and hillsides ; common. 

1340. A. acrostichoides Swartz. [Dryopteris acrostic hoides (Michx.) Kuntze.] 
Christmas Fern. 

Common in rocky woods. Var. incisum Gray is found in Webster by 
M. S. Baxter. 

502. CYSTOPTERIS Bernhardt Bladder Fern. 

1341. C. bulbifera Bernh. \C. bulbifera (L.) Bernh.] 

Rocky walls and bottoms of shaded ravines, shaded river banks and 
cold swampy woods ; abundant. 

1342. C. fragilis Bernh. [C. fragilis (L.) Bernh.] 

Common on shaded cliffs, rocky banks, shaded hillsides and banks of 
brooks. Var. dentata is at Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter ; also reported 
by Dr. Searing. Var. angustata occurs at Ogden, C. IV. See/ye. 

503. OXOCLEA L. 

1343. O. sensibilis L. 

Moist fields and thickets ; common. The so-called var. obtusilobata 
occurs in Webster, M. S. Baxter ; also reported by G. T. Fish 

1344. O. Struthiopteris Hoffm. (Struthiopteris Germanica Willd.) [Onoclea 

Struthiopteris (L.) Hoffm.] Ostrich Fern. 
Rich moist soil, in shaded places ; not rare. 

504. DICKSON I A L'Her. 

1345. D. pilosiuscula Willd. (D. punctilobula Kuntze.) [D. punctilobula 

(Mx.) A. Gray.] Hay-scexted Fern. 

Rare. Vicinity of Rochester, Dr. Booth. Brockport, M. S. Baxter. 
Holley, Prof. IV. H. Lennon. Ontario, Wayne county, Geo. T. Fish. 

505. OSMUND A L. 

1346. O. regalis L. Royal Flowering Fern. 

In dry or swampy ground, in the open or in light shade; not uncommon. 

1347. O. Claytoniana L. 

Low grounds, in the open or in shade ; common. 

1348. O. cinnamomea L. Cinnamon Fern. 

In similar situations and as common as the last mentioned. Var. 
frondosa is found at Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. 



( 34 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



349- 



1350- 



35i 



135- 



OPHIOGLOSSACE^E. 

506. BOTRYCHIUM Swartz. 

B. lanceolatum Angstroem. [B. lanceolatum (S. G. Gmel.) Angstroem.] 

Rare. Holley, Orleans county, Prof. W. H. Lennon. 
B. matricariaefolium A. Braun. 

Rare. Henrietta, J. B. Fuller. Webster, M. S. Baxter. Holley, 
Orleans county, Prof. W. H. Lennoji. Wayne county. 
B. ternatum Swartz. [B. tematum (Thunb.) Swartz.] 

Rare. Holley, Orleans county, Prof. IV. H. Lemion. 

Var. i?itermedium (B. lunarioides Man.), Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter 
Woods bordering Bergen swamp, Genesee county, Dr. C. M. Booth and 
G. T. Fish ! Wayne county. 

Var. obliqnum, Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. Dr. C. M. Booth. 

Var. dissectum, Webster, M. S. Baxter. 
B. Virginianum Swartz. [B. Virginianum (L.) Swartz.] 

Rich woods ; common. 



507. OPHIOGLOSSUM L. Adder's Tongue. 

1353. O. vulgatum L. 

Rare. Buck pond, Dr. A. H. Searing. Henrietta, Dr. C. M. Booth. 
Adams Basin, M. S. Baxter. 

LYCOPODIACE^. 

508. LYCOPODIUM L. Cluc Moss. 

1354. L. lucidulum Michx. 

Cold woods, ravine sides, shady margins of ponds, etc.; frequent. 

1355. L. obscurum L. var. dendroideum Man. (L. dendroideum Michaux.) 
\L. obscurum L.] 

Rare. Near Rich's mills, Penfield, Dr. CM. Booth! Gates, G. T. 
Fish. Webster, M. S. Baxter. 

1356. L. clavatum L. Common Club Moss. 

Dry woods ; common. 

1357. L. complanatum L. Ground Pine. 

Woods on sandy hills and slopes ; frequent. 

SELAGINELLACE/E. 

509. SELAGINELLA Beauv. 

1358. S. rupestris Spring. [S. rupestris (L.) Spring.] 

Rare. Dry exposed rock, Penfield, M. S. Baxter. 

SALVINIACE^E. 

510. AZOLLA Lam. 

1359. A. Caroliniana Willd. 

In all the side-waters of lake Ontario, throughout the northern border 
of our district. "Common near the shore, but not observed at any 
distance from the lake", fohn E. Paine. Gates, Geo. T. Fish. 



1894-] plants of monroe county. 135 

Bibliography. 

1687.— Denonville's Report of his Expedition to the Genesee Coun- 
try. Doc. Hist. State of New York, Vol. I. Albany, 1849. 
He describes the country, the forest growth, the orchards and the culti- 
vated fields, and gives details of the great quantity of corn destroyed. 

1715. — Account of the Expedition of Denonville as related by the 
Baron La Hontan in his ''Travels in America." Collec- 
tions of the New York Historical Society. Second Series, 
Part I. New York, 1848. 
Speaks of marching through immense forests of lofty trees, and of the 

woods abounding in oak, walnut and wild chestnut trees. 

1755. — Memoir upon the Late War in North America between the 

French and English. By M. Pouchot. Trans, by F. B. 

Hough. Roxbury, 1866. 

Describes the finding of ginseng by Father Lafitan, and says that it is 

most frequently found in the country of the Five Nations. Describes the 

oaks on the banks of the " Casconchiagon" (Genesee river). 

1785.— The North American Sylva. By F. A. Michaux. With Notes 
by J. J. Smith. Philadelphia, 1855. 
The author, who traveled through this country from 1785 to 1796, 
making a special study of the trees, makes numerous mention of the trees 
of the Genesee region. Of the iron-wood [Carpinns ostrya) he says : " I have 
nowhere seen it more common nor more vigorous than in Genesee, near Lake 
Ontario and Lake Erie." "The white elm (U/mus Americana) appears to 
be the most multiplied and of the loftiest height between the 42d and 46th 
degrees of latitude, which comprises the provinces of Lower Canada, New 
Brunswick and Nova Scotia, the north-eastern section of the United States 
and Genesee in the State of New York." " Basswood [Tz/z'a Americana) is 
most abundant in Genesee. In some districts, particularly between Batavia 
and New Amsterdam, it frequently constitutes two-thirds and sometimes the 
whole of the forests." "The mossy-cup oak [Quercus olzvaformzs) I have 
observed only in the State of New York, on the banks of the Hudson, above 
Albany, and in Genesee, where it is so rare that it has hitherto received no 
specific name." He says that Juglans porcina (pignut) is not found in the 
Genesee country, but our collectors have proved that assertion to be incorrect. 
He makes special mention of the sugar maple being common only in Genesee 
and the upper part of Pennsylvania. He calls particular attention to the fact 
that the black sugar maple {Acer nigrum) has hitherto been confounded by 
botanists with the sugar maple, and says that "it forms a large part of the 
forests of the Genesee. He mentions the coffee tree (Gymnocladus Cana- 
densis) as being found in that part of Genesee which borders on Lake Ontario 
and Lake Erie. Of Populus Canadensis, he speaks particularly of its growing 
on the banks of the Genesee, and that the trees are seventy or eighty feet 
in height and three or four feet in diameter. He mentions white ash, wild 



136 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

cherry, white beech, shellbark hickory and black walnut, as being- abundant 
in the Genesee country. 

1792. — Reflections offertes aux Capitalistes de l'Europe. By Capt. 
Van Pradelles. Amsterdam, 1792. 
This author gives a glowing- description of the Genesee country and its 
advantages, chief among which he places the forests of sugar maple trees, 
speaking of a process discovered two years previously by which it was 
possible to obtain, from the syrup ot the maple, sugar equal to that produced 
from the cane, and stating that maple trees were so abundant as to furnish all 
the sugar needed for home consumption in the United States and leave a 
surplus of thousands of tons for export. The pamphlet is accompanied by a 
map showing the position of the Genesee country and indicating the regions 
most abounding in sugar maples. 

1792. — Description of the Country between Albany and Niagara in 
1792. Doc. Hist. State of New York, Vol. II. Albany, 1849. 
The writer describes the famous Genesee flats, speaking of the remark- 
ably fertile soil, quite clear of trees, producing grass ten feet high. 

1795, — Historical, Geographical, Commercial and Philosophical View 
of the American United States, etc., etc. By W. Winter- 
botham. London, 1795. 

1795, — Travels through the United States of America, the Country 

of the Iroquois and Upper Canada, in the years 1795, x 796, 

and 1797. By the Duke de la Rochefoucault Liancourt. 

2 Vols. London, 1799. 

The author refers to the production of large quantities of maple sugar 

by the white settlers. He also speaks of the great fertility of the region, the 

great size of the trees, and the variety of shrubs and flowers. 

1.799. — Description of the Settlement of the Genesee Country in the 
State of New York. By Capt. Charles Williamson. Doc. 
Hist. State of New York, Vol. II. Albany, 1849. 
This writer speaks of the uplands as being timbered chiefly with hickory, 

oak and walnut, and the intervales with elm, basswood, sugar-tree, etc. He 

also speaks of the open Genesee flats, not even encumbered with a bush, but 

covered with extremely tall grass. 

l800- — " Holland Land Company West Geneseo Lands-Information." 
Holland Purchase. By O. Turner. Buffalo, 1849. 
A handbill describing the lands of the company, mentions trees growing 
near Geneseo : black and white oak, hickory, poplar, chestnut, wild cherry, 
butternut, dogwood, basswood or lynn, sugar tree, white ash, cucumber and 
black walnut. 

1800. — Visit to the Falls of Niagara in 1800. By John Maude. 
London, 1826. 
The author speaks of the Genesee flats being covered with grass ten 



94 J PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 137 



feet high, with no trees. Oak the principal timber near New Hartford (Cana- 
waugus.) Along the Genesee river above the falls at Rochester were thick 
woods of beech, basswood, sugar maple, tulip tree, oak, hickory, chestnut, 
butternut, black walnut, dogwood, ironwood, and two or three hemlock pines. 
He observed white pines on the east side of the river, and could see the tops 
of pines which lined the shores of lake Ontario. He speaks of the sugar 
maple abounding more than any other tree in the Genesee country. 

1800. — An Account of the Soil, Growing Timber, and other produc- 
tions of the land in the countries situated in the back parts 
of the States of New York and Pennsylvania, in North 
America ; and particularly the lands in the County of 
Ontario, known by the name of the Genesee Tract, lately 
located, and now in the progress of being settled. (Report 
of the Deputy Marshal of New York on the preemption 
lands in the County of Ontario, December, 1800.) Doc. 
Hist. State of New York, Vol. II. Albany, 1849. 
Among the peculiar advantages of this region the report claims : The 
uncommon excellence and fertility of the soil ; the superior quality of the 
timber, and the advantages of easy cultivation in consequence of being gener- 
ally free from underwood ; the abundance of grass for cattle, in the woods 
and on the extensive meadow grounds upon the lakes and rivers ; the vast 
quantities of the sugar maple tree in every part of the tract ; the great variety 
of other fine timber, such as oak, hickory, black walnut, chestnut, ash of 
different kinds, elm, butternut, basswood, poplar, pines, and also thorns of 
prodigious size ; the variety of fruit trees, and also smaller fruits, such as 
mulberries, grapes of different kinds, raspberries, blackberries, huckleberries, 
wild gooseberries and strawberries in vast quantities, also cranberries and 
black haws. 

The report also speaks of the extensive ranges of meadow grounds on 
the Genesee flats, on which there was little or no underwood and which are 
represented as being covered with a growth of coarse grass, luxuriant beyond 
description and very fit for hay. 

1803. — Le Pour et le Contre, on Avis a ceux qui se proposent de passer 

dans les Etats-Unis d'Amerique. Suivi d'une description 

du Kentucky et du Genesy, deux des nouveaux etablisse- 

mens les plus considerables de cette partie du nouveau 

monde. Par Louis Bridel. Paris, 1803. 

The writer describes the Genesee country, comparing it with Kentucky ; 

speaks of the fertility of the soil and the enormous size of the trees, one black 

walnut measuring 22 feet in circumference, and near it a sycamore measuring 

44 feet. Speaks of a bundle of grass, gathered by chance in the forest and 

sent to Amsterdam, which measured 4 l / 2 feet in height. He says the forests 

were made up of fir, oak, elm, birch, black walnut, chestnut, cherry, mulberry 

and apple trees. Says that the sugar maple was very common, and speaks of 

the sumac as being peculiar to this part of the country. 



18, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, May, 1896. 



138 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1804. — A Description of the Genesee Country in the State of New 
York. By Robert Munro. Doc. Hist State of New York, 
Vol. II. Albany, 1849. 
The author mentions the most common and the most useful of the 
forest trees, describing somewhat at length the characteristic features of the 
soil upon which particular species grow. He speaks of the hemlock, cucum- 
ber tree, white poplar, white and black birch, turmeric tree, spruce pine, locust 
tree, prickly ash, spice wood, hazelnut, willow and alder as being scarce. 
Among the plants mentioned are sassafras, ginseng, sarsaparilla, snakeroot, 
spikenard, mandrake, etc. The Genesee flats are mentioned as cleared of 
timber for several thousand acres, and covered with very high and thick grass. 

1804. — A View of the Present Situation of the Western Parts of the 
State of New York, called the Genesee Country, etc., etc. 
(Author unknown.) Fredericktown, 1804. 23 pp. 
This pamphlet mentions the most common forest trees and their indica- 
tion regarding character of the soil, and names a few of the noted shrubs and 
herbs used as food or medicine. 

1809. — Map of the Military Lands of the State of New York. Doc. 
Hist. State of New York, Vol. I. Albany, 1849. 
Gives location of the " Big Tree " on the Genesee river. 

1816. — Travels in Canada and the United States in 1816 and 1817. 
By Lieut. Francis Hall. London, 1818. 
The writer describes Rochester, saying that the vicinity is still an 
unbroken forest, consisting of oak, hickory, ash, beech, bass, elm and walnut. 
Speaks of a black walnut tree "betwixt the town and the great fall, 24 feet in 
its girth". Speaks of Allen's creek, near Caledonia, with its banks adorned 
with natural groves and copses, in which he observed the " candleberry 
myrtle" in great abundance. 

1816. — Travels through the Western Country in the Summer of 1816. 
By David Thomas. Auburn, 1819. 
This author mentions many of the trees and plants of this region, and 
notes the relations of the geological features to the distribution of the flora. 
We quote some of his observations. "As we approach the Genesee river oak 
and chestnut appear on the hills, but in the moist rich lands to the eastward 
the latter is very rare. Fences of considerable extent have been made from 
white cedar, which is procured in the swamps. It is not that of West Jersey 
{Ciipressus thyoides), which it greatly resembles in the grain of the wood, 
but the Thuya occidentalis ". " The road was bordered by many detached 
patches of poisonous hemlock {Cicuta i?iaculata) ". He speaks of the stunted 
white oaks growing on the limestone foundation between the Genesee river 
and Caledonia, and notes that two miles beyond the latter place beech and 
maple become the principal timber. He speaks of noticing the papaw 
{Annona triloba) eight miles from Erie, and says that he had not discovered it 
in any other part of the State of New York ; from which we suppose that he 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 139 

did not visit the towns of Greece and Parma, in this county, where it is foun 1. 
He speaks of first noticing the Colombo root [Frasera Walteri) on the oak 
plains west of the Genesee river. 

1818.— A Tour from the City of New York to Detroit in the Michi- 
gan Territory. By William Darby. New York, 1819. 
The writer describes the country between Canandaigua and Batavia, by 
way of Avon. He speaks of the great fertility of the soil, and mentions that 
oak was the prevalent timber after passing the Genesee flats. Also mentions 
sugar maple, linden, elm, white hickory, ash and hemlock. 

1820. — Remarks on the Environs of Carthage Bridge near the mouth 
of the Genesee River. By Dr. John I. Bigsby, of the Med- 
ical Staff of the British Army in Canada. Amer. Jour, of 
Science, Vol. II. New Haven, 1820. 
The writer speaks of the cedar, hemlock, pine, oak and beech trees on 

the banks of the river, near the bridge. 

1821. — Travels in New England and New York. By Timothy Dwight, 
S.T. D., LL. D. 4 Vols. New Haven, 1821. 
The author notes the growth of hemp, wheat, etc., and the maple and 
" oak plains", apparently on the corniferous limestone. 

1822. — Letters on the Natural History and Internal Resources of the 

State of New York. By Hibernicus (DeWitt Clinton). 

New York. 1822. 

Speaks of the curled or birdseye maple, black walnut and wild cherry 

as being plenty and valuable for the manufacture of furniture, and makes 

frequent reference to the trees of the region around Canandaigua. 

1823. — Observations on the Lake Fevers and other Diseases of the 

Genesee Country in the State of New York. By Edward 

G. Ludlow. New York, 1823. 

Describes the marshes of Braddock's and Irondequoit bays, and says : 

" Numerous medicinal plants, whose virtues have been tested, are found in 

this region, and are much used, especially in those parts of the country where 

the scarcity or high price of pharmaceutical preparations render it necessary 

to resort to the less expensive simples of nature." Speaks of the barks of the 

Liriodendro7i Tidipife?'a, Cornns florida and Pri?ius verticillata being used as 

substitutes for cinchona. 

1824. — Life of Mary Jemison. By James E. Seaver. Batavia, 1824. 
Speaks of the banks of the Genesee river being covered with white and 
Norway pines. Ginsing was plenty and commanded a high price. 

1830. — View taken from the Upper Falls of the Genesee River. By 
D. Wadsworth. Amer. Jour. Science, Vol. XVIII. New 
Haven, 1830. 
The writer speaks of the gigantic evergreens growing on the river 
banks at Portage. 



14-0 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1831. — Annals of Tryon County. By William W. Campbell. New 
York, 1849. 
The author makes frequent mention of the forest trees of the Genesee 
region. Describes the Genesee flats, with scarcely a tree to be seen over the 
whole extent and with grass ten feet high. Calls it the garden of the State. 
The forests beyond the flats were mostly white oak. 

1832. — The Sylva Americana. By D. J. Browne. Boston, 1832. 

The author makes numerous references to the trees of the Genesee 
region. 

1836-1850. — Annual Reports of the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York. Albany, 1836-1850. 
In every volume mention is made of the plants of this vicinity, under 
heads of "Progress of Vegetation", "Journal of Occurrences", "Catalogue of 
Plants and Time of Flowering", "Botanical Calendar", " Calendar of Flow- 
ering", etc. 

1837. — Second Annual Report of the Fourth Geological District of 
New York. By James Hall. Albany, 1837. 
Dr. Hall speaks of there being very little evergreen timber along the 
river banks between Moscow and Rochester, but in going south a short 
distance from the former place the pines and hemlocks and their associates 
are more frequent. He speaks of the trees growing in the swamps near the 
lake shore as being commonly black ash, tamarack and cedar, while those on 
the ridges near the lake are oak, elm, beech and buttonwood. Also of the 
sandy hills of Perinton being covered with a growth of shrub oak and whor- 
tleberries. 

1838 —Sketches of Rochester. By Henry O'Reilly. Rochester, 1838. 
The author speaks of the geological formations of Western New York, 
and of the native forests of the Genesee valley serving as almost unfailing 
indications of the soil beneath. He mentions the oak, elm, beech, maple, 
pine, hemlock and birch, and tells upon what kinds of soil they may be 
looked for. 

1838.— Life of Brant. By William L. Stone. Buffalo, 1838. 

Speaks of the fertility of the Genesee flats, which were cleared for miles 
at the time of Sullivan's raid, and covered with orchards and fields of corn. 
Mentions some of the trees of the region. 

1839. — Report of Dr. John Torrey, of the Botanical Department of 
the Geological Survey. Ann. Rept. of the State Geologist. 
Albany. 1839. 
Frequent mention of species of plants found in this vicinity, with names 
of collectors. 

1840. — Fourth Annual Report of the Survey of the Fourth Geological 
District. By James Hall. Albany, 1840. 
Mention is made of the forest growth in different parts of the county. 



1894-] PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 141 

1841. — Sketches of the Life and Adventures of Moses Van Campen. 
By John Niles Hubbard. Dansville, 1841. 
The writer describes the Genesee flats and country beyond, with here 
and there a beautiful grove, orchards of apple and peach trees, and wide and 
flourishing corn fields. 

1842 — Catalogue of Plants and their Time of Flowering in and 
about the City of Rochester, for the year 1841. By Dr. 
Chester Dewey. Fifty-fifth Ann. Rept. Regents of the 
University, State of New York. Albany, 1842. 

1843. — Flora of the State of New York. By John Torrey, M. D. 
Albany, 1843. 
Frequent mention is made of rare plants found in this vicinity, with 
names of the collectors, and other particulars. 

1843. — Botanical Calendar kept at Rochester by Dr. Chester Dewey. 
Fifty-sixth Ann. Rept. Regents of the University, State of 
New York. Albany, 1843. 

1843. — Natural History of New York, Part V. Agriculture, Vols. 
I, II. By E. Emmons. Albany, 1843. 

The author, describing Plate III, A View from Mt. Hope, says: "The 
city appears in the back part of the middle ground. In the open fields stand 
the superb elms of the deep and rich clay soil peculiar to this district. They 
are the only remains of the great and noble forests which have fallen before 
the axe of civilization in the last half century. They run up an unbroken 
shaft near one hundred feet, where they at once form a heavy dense head. 
They are in strict contrast with the elms of a second growth in the valleys of 
the Mohawk and Hudson, whose trunks are thickly covered with slender 
limbs, and their heads formed of long, pendulous branches. 

" For magnificent specimens of the elm the valleys of the Genesee and 
the Black river in Jefferson county are surpassed by no other parts of the 
world. Hundreds of elms may be seen in either of these sections of country 
exceeding by far the famous Pittsfield Elm in Berkshire, Mass." 

1848. — The Meadow Park at Geneseo. By A. J. Downing. The 
Horticulturist, Vol. Ill, No. 4. Albany, 1848. 
The writer describes the great oak, " Big Tree", under which the first 
treaty was signed between the Indians and the first settlers of Geneseo. At 
the time of writing, 1848, the old tree was healthy and green. He also speaks 
of other magnificent specimens of oak and elm trees to be seen in the Meadow 
Park, and of the remains of a former rival of the " Big Tree". Of the latter 
he says : " Not far from it stands the stump of a contemporary, destroyed a 
few seasons before by the elements. The annual rings of its trunk tell the 
story of nine hundred years' growth." 

1851. — Phelps and Gorham Purchase. By O. Turner. Rochester, 1851. 
The author speaks of the magnificent forest trees of the valley of the 



142 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 



Genesee, and of the oak openings and pine plains of the towns east of the 
river. In Rochester, in 1817, along where St. Paul street now is, there was a 
dense forest of hemlocks, spruce and cedar. Along the river and Honeoye 
creek were large patches of rushes. Mention is also made of apple trees, the 
seeds of which were planted by the Jesuit missionaries. 

1851. — Notice of some large Trees in Western New York. By S. B. 

Buckley. Amer. Jour, of So, Second Series, Vol. 13. New 

Haven, 1852. 
Describes some large trees on the Genesee flats, and speaks particularly 
of the " Big Tree" near Geneseo. 

1852. — Large Trees in the State of New York. The Horticulturist. 
Albany, 1852. 
The writer (name not given) describes some of the large trees of the 
Genesee valley, quoting the article by S. B. Buckley in the American Journal 
of Science, Second Series, Vol. 13, and also mentions some large sycamores 
in the township of Sodus, Wayne county, several of which were from 14 to 16 
feet in diameter. 

1852. — Forest Trees of America. By James H. Watts. The Horti- 
culturist, Vol. VII. Albany, 1852. 
The writer says : " I have ever regretted that so ruthless a disposition 
was made by the early settlers of Rochester of the beautiful forest trees which 
abounded here. The elm, maple, chestnut, oak, walnut and beech grew in 
abundance, and were mostly cut down by those whose province it was to clear 
away the forest." He mentions a large elm then standing on South Clinton 
street as being a very fine specimen, and expresses the hope that it may long 
be spared, but it has since his writing been cut down. 

1863. — Preliminary List of the Plants of Buffalo and Vicinity. By 
G. W. Clinton. Rept. of Regents. Albany, 1864. 
Plants found in Rochester, Caledonia and Bergen are mentioned. 

1864-1894. — Annual Reports of the New York State Museum of 
Natural History. Albany, 1864- 1894. 
Frequent mention is made of plants of this vicinity, with names of 
collectors, donors of specimens, etc., etc. 

1864. — Catalogue of Plants found in Oneida County and Vicinity. 
By John A. Paine, Jr. Rept. of Regents. Albany, 1865. 
Plants found in Monroe county are frequently mentioned. 

1867. — Gray's Manual of Botany. Fifth Edition. By Asa Gray. 

New York, 1867. 
Mention is made of plants in this vicinity, with names of collectors. 

1871. — Pioneer History of Orleans County, N. Y. By Arad Thomas. 
Albion, 1871. 
In the reminiscences of the early settlers frequent mention is made of 
the wild fruits of the Genesee region : strawberries, cranberries, gooseberries, 



1894J plants of monroe county. 143 

blackberries and raspberries. The mandrake is also mentioned. Butternut, 
chestnut, beech, walnut, hemlock, basswood, black ash and oak composed the 
primitive forest. Speaking - of the forest near Oak Orchard creek, one of the 
pioneers says : "The dense forest, composed of large, sturdy oaks, extended 
as far as the eye could see, east and west, on the south side of the Ridge road. 
On the north side the forest was still more dense, and was composed of a 
greater variety of timber." 

1871. — The Tourist's Guide through the Empire State. By Mrs. E. 
S. Colt. Albany, 1871. 
The author gives a description of the " Big Tree", and the date when it 
was swept away by a great flood, November, 1857. 

1873 — The Longevity of Trees. By Elias Lewis. Pop. Sc. Monthly, 
Vol. Ill, July, 1873. 
Speaking of noted trees, the writer says : " The Wadsworth Oak, at 
Geneseo, New York, is said to be five centuries old, and 27 feet in circumfer- 
ence at the base." 

1876. — A History of Livingston County, N. Y. By L. L. Doty. 
Geneseo, 1876. 
Reference is made to the elms and oaks on the banks of the Genesee 
river ; to the dense forests and impassable marshes ; and to the wild fruits — 
plums, grapes and cranberries. Quotes Col. Hubbard, describing the Genesee 
flats as containing not less than 6,000 acres, not having a bush standing, but 
filled with grass considerably higher than a man. Speaks of the "oak open- 
ings" near Caledonia, and the great oak near Geneseo. 

1877. — Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV. By Francis 
Parkman. Boston, 1878. 
Describing the expedition of Denonville against the Senecas, he speaks 
of the open forests of oaks, the tangled growth of beech trees, and the rank 
grass, waist-deep, of the intervales. 

1877.— History of Monroe County, N. Y. By W. H. Mcintosh. 
Contains many references to the early forest growth. 

1883.— A Catalogue of the Native and Naturalized Plants of the City 
of Buffalo and Vicinity. By David F. Day. Buffalo, 1883. 
Frequent mention is made of plants found in Rochester, Caledonia, 
Bergen, etc. 

1884. — Rochester, a Story Historical. By Jane Marsh Parker. Roch- 
ester, 1884. 
The author mentions oak, chestnut, hickory, black walnut and white- 
wood as the most common trees in the primitive forest where the city of 
Rochester now stands. Also mentions a grove of sycamores on an island in 
the river, near the present dam, and an old sycamore tree which served as a 
landmark to the helmsman in ferrying across the river. 



144 ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. [Oct. 8, 

1884. — History of the City of Rochester. By William F. Peck. 
Syracuse, 1884. 

Frequent mention is made of the primitive forest growth. George H. 
Harris, in one of the introductory chapters, says : " The town of Irondequoit, 
north of the ridge, was known as the ' pine barrens' to the early settlers, who 
cleared it of a heavy growth of pine trees, many of which stood upon the top 
of the bluff and over the ancient cemetery sixty years ago." 

1884. — Report on the Forests of North America. By Charles S. 
Sargent. Tenth Census of the United States, Vol. IX. 
Washington, 1884. 

Mentions trees grooving in this region, naming particularly Asimina 
triloba (pa paw) as being in Monroe county, and Qtiercus prinus (chestnut oak) 
in the valley of the Genesee. Speaks of the Wadsworth Oak, near Geneseo, 
as over three meters in diameter. 

1888. — An Historic Elm. The Story of the Great Elm on the Mark- 
ham Estate. By Geo. H. Harris. Rochester Democrat and 
Chronicle, May 13, 1888. 

The writer describes an old elm on the Markham estate in the town of 
Rush, Monroe county. Says it was for many years a conspicuous landmark 
in the Genesee valley, and an important natural feature well known to and 
venerated by the Indians. For nearly a hundred years it had been known as 
the Markham Elm. The trunk, at the smallest place below the branches, was 
a little over 11 feet in diameter; its circumference just below the branches 
was 38 feet ; three feet above the ground it measured 45 feet. At noon it 
shaded an acre of ground. The limbs were remarkably long and slender, the 
ends hanging down like ropes of trailing vines. 

1890-1896. — Silva of North America. By Charles Sprague Sargent. 
Boston, 1890-1896. 

Mentions trees of this region. Says of Acer barbatum, or black maple, 
that it was first noticed by the younger Michaux on the banks of the Genesee 
river, where it formed a forest of considerable size. Speaks of Hicoria lacin- 
iosa {Carya sulcata) as not rare in the valley of the Genesee river, and of the 
nuts being sold in the markets of Geneseo under the name of "king nut". 
Speaks of the " Wadsworth Oak", which grew on the bottom lands of the 
Genesee river, on the Wadsworth estate, a mile from Geneseo, as being the 
largest specimen of Quercus piatanoides (Q. bicolor) of which a record has 
been preserved, and says: "In 1851, the short trunk, which varied little in 
size between the ground and the branches, had an average circumference of 
27, with a minimum circumference of 24 feet." Mentions Quercus prinus as 
being found in the valley of the Genesee. 

1890. — Report of the Botanical Section of the Rochester Academy of 
Science for 1889. By Mrs. J. H. McGuire, Recorder. Proc. 
Roch. Acad, of Sci., Vol. I. pp. 26-28. 



I S94. I PLANTS OF MONROF, COUNTY. 145 

1890. — The Fungi of Western New York. By Charles E. Fairman. 
Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci., Vol. I, pp. 44~54- 

1891.-- Root-foods of the Seneca Indians. By George H. Harris. 
Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci., Vol. I, pp. 1 06-1 17. 

1891. — Report of the Botanical Section of the Rochester Academy of 
Science for 1890. By Mrs. J. H. McGuire, Recorder. Proc. 
Roch. Acad, of Sci, Vol. I, pp. 1 19-123. 

1891. — Jeffersonia diphylla, and its occurrence near Rochester. By 
Charles Wright Dodge. Pro. Roch. Acad. Sc, Vol. I, p. 175. 

1891.— A List of the Indigenous Ferns of the Vicinity of Rochester, 
with notes. By Charles W. Seelye. Proc. Roch. Acad. 
Sci., Vol. I, pp. 186-197. 

1892. — Notes on the Aboriginal Terminology of the Genesee River. 
By George H. Harris. Publications of the Rochester His- 
torical Society. Rochester, 1892. 

1892. — Rudbeckia hirta. Meehan's Monthly, Vol. II, pp. 165, 166. 
Philadelphia, 1892. 

1892. — Report of the Botanical Section of the Rochester Academy of 
Science for 1891. By Mrs. J. H. McGuire, Recorder. Proc. 
Roch. Acad, of Sci., Vol. II, pp. 44-48. 

1893. — Hymenomyceteae of Orleans County, New York. By Charles 
E. Fairman. Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci., Vol. II, pp. 154-167. 

1893, — Variations of Ray-flowers in Rudbeckia hirta. By Florence 
Beckwith. Proc. Roch. Acad. Sci., Vol. II, pp. 170, 171. 

1893. — Report of the Botanical Section of the Rochester Academy of 
Science for 1892. By Mrs. J. H. McGuire, Recorder. Proc. 
Roch. Acad, of Sci., Vol. If. pp. 176-180. 

1893. — Blephilia ciliata in Western New York. By Elias T. Durand. 
Torrey Bulletin, Vol. XX, 1893. 

1894. — Report of the Botanical Section of the Rochester Academy of 
Science for 1893. By Mrs. J. H. McGuire, Recorder. Proc. 
Roch. Acad, of Sci., Vol. II, pp. 237-243. 

1894.— Our Trees. By C. C. Taney. Roch. Dem. & Chron., J une. 1 894 . 

1895. — The Flora of Long Pond. By Anna H. Searing. Proc. Roch. 
Acad. Sci., Vol. II, pp. 297-300. 

1895. — A ^ jlst °f Trees and Shrubs growing spontaneously in Seneca 
Park. By J. B. Fuller. Roch. Dem. ,\: Chron., Aug. 31, 1895. 

19, Proc. Roch. Acad, of Sc, Vol. 3, June, 1896. 



i46 rochester academy of science. [oct. 8, 

Corrections and Insertions. 

Page 17. In comparative table, under head of Monroe, read Carex 102. 
Page 18. 10th line from bottom, for 1309 read 13 14. 

Page 19. Plants common to the Monroe and Cayuga Floras. Add Iris Pseud- 

acorus, Carex laxiflora var. striatula, C. utriculata var. minor, C. 

virescens var. costata. 

Page 20. Plants common to Monroe and Buffalo Floras. Add Eragrostis Purshii. 

Page 22. Plants common to the Cayuga and Buffalo Floras. Strike out Juncus 

Canadensis var. brachycephalus. 
Page 22. Plants peculiar to the Monroe Flora. Add Mentha citrata, Carex 
gracillima X C. arctata, C. granulans var. Haleana, C. tribuloides 
var. Bebbii. Strike out Lemna perpusilla, Andropogon Virginicus, 
Eragrostis pilosa. 
Page 24. Plants peculiar to the Cayuga Flora. Strike out Iris Pseudacorus, 
Carex laxiflora var. blanda, C. utriculata var. minor, C. virescens 
var. elliptica. 
Page 26. Plants peculiar to the Buffalo Flora. Strike out Eragrostis Purshii. 
Page 46. 67. For [A. glabra L] read [A. glabra (L.) Bernh.] 
Page 47. 76. For McM. read MacM. 
Page 48. Following 89 insert— 

— L. sativum L.. Garden Cress. In waste places occasionally. 
Page 48. 94. Read L. minor Man. ed. 6, in part ; not L. [Z. intermedia 

Leggett.] and omit Smaller Pinweed. 
Page 51. Genus 60. For spergularia read spergula. 
Page 56. Following 203, for — T. incarnatum, etc., read — 

203*?. T. incarnatum, etc., and add — Frequent, 1896. 
Page 61. 276. For [Prince.] read [F. Virginiana Illinoensis Prince.] 
Page 63. 313. S. Pennsylvanica. Add locality— Mendon ponds. 
Page 6c;. Before genus 138. lythrum l. insert Order— LYTHRACEvE. 
Page 68. 376. Add localities— ^Scottsville and Rich's mills. 
Page 70. 403. Read L. borealis Gronov. [Z. borealis L.] 
" " 404 and 412. For McM. read MacM. 
" " 413. H. ccerulea. Add locality — Hemlock lake. 
Page 72. 433. For D. Sylvestris read D. sylvestris. 
Page 74. 466. Read A., sagittifolius Willd. [A. sagittafolius Wedem.] 
Page 79. Genus 2 r 7. For chicqrium read cichorium. 
Page 81. 572. For [S. asper (L.) Vill.] read [S. asper (L.) All.] 
Page 83. 602. For Azalia read Azalea. 
Page 85. 638. For Synanchum read Cynanchum. 
Page 87. 654. C. Virginicum. Add locality— Mendon, Mrs. J. H. McGuire ! 

" 657. Read M. Virginica DC. [M. Virginica (L.) D. C] 
Page 89. 689. Read L. Canadensis Dumont. [Z. Canadensis (L.) Dumont] 
Page 90. Following 706, for — V. Cham^edrys, etc., read — 

706*2. V. Cham/edrys, etc., and add locality — East ave., Rochester. 
Page 92. 723. For A. Wallr. read Wallr. 
Page 93. 744. For Monroe avenue read South Clinton street. 

747. Read P. incanum Michx. [Kazllia incana (L.) Kuntze.] 
Page 108. Insert — 

955«. I. Pseudacorus L. European Yellow Iris. 

Well established near Shortsville, Ontario county, Mrs. E. 
O. Cartwright, Canandaigua. 
Page 112. Insert — 

1006a:. J. Canadensis J. Gay, var. brachycephalus Engelm. 
Bergen swamp, Genesee county, M. S. Baxter. 
Page 118. Insert — 

novz. C. Schweinitzii Dewey. 

Rare. Wayne county, E. Z. Hankenson. 
Page 127. Genus 471. For ELUSINE read ELEUSINE. 



894-] 



PLANTS OF MONROE COUNTY. 



147 



Index to Orders and Genera. 



Abies ISO, 130 

AbutiloD 52 

Acalypha 99 

Acanthaceae 92 

Acer 55, 55 

Achillea 77 

Achroanlhes 105 

A com s 113 

Actaea 43 

Adiantum 131 

Adicea 100 

Adlumia 45 

Agrimonia 62 

Agropyron 129 

Agropyrum — 1~9 

Ayrostemma 50 

Agrostis 125 

Ailanthus 53 

,li/(i 126 

Alisma. 113 

Alismaceae 113 

Allium 108 

Alnus 101 

Alopecurus 125 

AMr.e. 50 

Althaea 51 

Alyssum 46 

Amarantaceae 96 

Amaranthacece 90 

Amarattthus 96 

Amarantus 96 

Amaryllidaceae 108 

Ambrosia 76 

Amelanehier 03 

Ammophila 126 

Aruorpha 57 

Ampelopsis 54 

Amphicarpaea 59 

Amygdalm 60 

Anacardiaceae. 55 

Anacharte 105 

Anagallis 84 

Anaphalis 75 

Andromeda 82 

Andropogon.. . 124, 12k % 146 

Anemone 41 

Anemonella 41 

Angelica 67 

Anonaceas 43 

Antennaria 75, 75 

Anthemis 77 

Anthoxanthum 124 

Aphyllon 92 

Apios 59 

Apium 08 

A plectrum 105 

Apocynaceae 85 

Apocynum 85 

Aquifoliacece 53 

Aquilegia 13 

Aia bis 4^5. 146 

Araceae 112 

Aralia 68 

Araliaceae 68 

Arceuthobium 99 

A rehangelica 67 

Arctium 78 

Arctostaphylos 82 

Arenaria 50 

Arethusa 108 

Arisaema. 112 

Aristolochiacea' 98 

Amnio, 62 



Arrbenatherum 120 

Artemisia 77 

Asarum 98 

Asclepias 86 

Asclepiadaceae 85 

Asimina 43 

Asparagus 109 

Aspidium 132 

Asplenium 132 

Asprella 129 

Aster 73, 140 

Astragalus 57 

A triplex 90 

Atropa 89 

A vena 126 

Azalea 83, 140 

Azolla 134 

Baptisia 56 

Bartonia 80 

Barbarea 47, 140 

Batrochium 41 

Benzoin 98 

Berberidaceae 44 

Berberis 44 

Betula Id 

BicucuUa 45 

Bidens 77, 77 

Blephilia 94 

Blitum 96 

Boehmeria 100 

Borraginaceae 87 

Botrychium 134 

Bouteloua 127 

Brachyelytrum 125 

Brasenia 44 

Brassica 47 

Brauneria 76 

Bromus 128 

Brunella 95 

Buchnera 91 

Buda 51 

Buechnera 91 

Bupleurum. 07 

Bursa 47 

Cacalia 78 

Cakile 48 

Calamagrostis 120, 126 

Calamintha . 94 

Calendula 78 

Calla 113 

Callitriche 65 

Culopogon 100 

Oaltha 42 

Calypso 105 

Calystegia 88 

Camelina 46 

Campanula 81 

Campanulaceae 81 

Camptosorus 132 

Cannabis ino 

Capnoide8 45 

Capparidaceae 4K 

Caprifoliaceae 69 

Caprinla 120 

Capsella 47 

Cardamine 46 

Can I mix 78 

Carex 117, 140 

Carpinus 102 

Carum 07 

Carya 101 



Caryophyllaceae 49 

Cassandra 83 

Cassia 59 

Ca8talia 11 

Castanea 102 

('astilleia 91 

Caulophyllum 44 

Ceanothus 54 

Celastraeeae 54 

Celastrus 54 

Celtic 100 

Cenchrus 1-4 

Centaurea 79 

Cephalanthus 71 

Cerastium 50 

Ceratophyllaceae 104 

Ceratophyllum. 104 

Cha?rophyllum 08 

Chantcedaphne 83 

Chamselirium 110 

Chamcem rion 00 

ChamcBraphis 123 

Chelidonium 45 

Chelone 89 

Chenopodiaceae 96 

Chenopodium 96 

Chimaphila 83 

Chiogenes 82 

chrysanthemum 77 

Chrysopoyon 124 

Chrysosplenium. 64 

Cichorium 79, 140 

Cicuta 68 

Cimicifuga 43 

Cinna 120 

Circaea 66 

Cirsium 78 

Cistacea? 48 

Cladium 117 

Claytonia 51 

Clematis 41 

Clinopodium 94 

Clintonia 109 

Cnicus 78, 79 

Collinsonia 93 

Colutea 57 

Coraandra 99 

Comarum 61 

Compositaj 72 

Coniferae 130 

Conioselinum 67 

Conium 68 

Conopholis 92, 146 

Convolvulacea? 88 

Convolvulus 88 

Coptis 43 

Corallorhiza 10(5 

Coreopsis 77 

Coriandrum 68 

CornaCeae <i9 

Coronilla 57 

Cornus 09 

Corylus 102 

Corydalis 45 

Cnirca 57 

Oras8ulaceae 04 

Crataegus 0:5 

Crepis 80 

Cruciferae 45 

Cryptotasnia 67 

Cucurbitaceae 66 

Cupuli ferae 101 

Cuscuta...r ^ 



i 4 S 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 





. . . 85, 146 
126 




86 


Cynodon 


Fraxinus 


84 


Cynoglossum 


87, 67, 146 


Fumariacea? 


45 


Cynosurus 


127 






Cyperaceae 

Cyperus 


115 




95 


115 


Galium 


71 


Cypripedium . .. 


108 


G aultheria 


82 


Cystopteris 


133 


Gaura 


66 






Gaylussacia 


82 


Dactylis 


127 

61 

126 




. ... 85 




85 


Danthonia. 


Gerardia 


91 


Daphne 


98 


Geraniacea? 


52 


Dasijstoma 


91 


Geranium 


52 




89 

66 




61 


Daucus 


Gleclwma 


94 




65 


Gleditschia 

Glyceria 


. 59 


Delphinium 


43 


128 


Dentaria 


45 

67 


Gnaphalium 


75 


Deringa. 


Goodyera 


10t) 


Deschampsia 


126 


Gramineae 


123 


Desm odium 


58 


Gratiola 


90 


Dianthera 


92 


Giimnosticum .. . 


129 


Dianthus 


49 


Gyrostachys 


. ... 106 


Dicentra 


45 






Dicksonia 


133 


Habenaria 


... . 107 


Diervilla 


. . . . 70, 146 


Haloragea? 


... 65 


Digitalis. . .. 


89 


HaloD-hatjulacecB. . . 


... . 65 


Diplopappus 


74 


Hamamelidea? 


65 


Dipsaceae 


72 


Hamamelis 


65 


Di]>sacus 


. . . . 72, 146 


Hedeoma 


94 


Dirca 


98 


Helenium 

Helianrhemum 


77 


Disporum 


109 


... . 48 


Drosera 


65 


Helianthus 

Heliopsis 


76 


Droseraceae 


65 


76 


Dryopteris 


132 


Hemerocallis . ... 


109 


Dulichium. 


115 


Hepatica 


.... 41 






Hesperis 


47 


Eatonia 


127 

76 


Heracleum 


... . 67 


Echinacea 


Heteranthera 


Ill 




66 




52 


Eehinospermum 


87 


Hicoria 


101 




88 

99 




... . 80 


Eheagnacea? 


Hierochloe 


.... 124 


Fleocharis 


115 


Helens 


126 


Eleusine 


... 127, 146 


Homalocejichrus ... 


124 


Elodea 


105 


Hordeum 


.. .129 


Elodes 


51 


Houstonia 


. 70, 146 


Elymus 


129 


Humulus 


100 


Epigrea 


82 


Hydrastis 


. ... 43 


Epilobium 


66 


Hyd rocharidaceae. 


105 


Epipactis 


106 


HijdrocliavitacccB. . . 


105 


Epiphegus 


91 


Hydrocntyle 


. 68, 146 


Equisetaceas 


131 


Hydrophyllaceae . . . 


86 


Equisetum 


131 


Hydrophyllum 


86 


Eragrostis 


... 127, 146 


Hyoscyamus 


89 


Erechtites 


78 


Hypericaeea? 


51 


Ericaceae 


82 


Hypericum 


. 51, 51 


Erigeron 


75 


Hypopitijs 


84 


Eriophorum 


116 


Hvpoxys 


108 


Erodium. 


.... . 53 


Hyssopus 


. 93, 146 


Erysimum 


47 


Hijstrix 


129 


Erythrnnium . . 


110 






Euonymus 


54 


Ilex 


.... 53 


Eupatoriuni 


72 


Tlicinea? 


53 




fl9 




54 


Euphorbiaceae .. 


99 


Tlysanthes 


90 


Euthamia 


73 


Impatiens 


53 




98 


. 75 


Fagopyrum 


Ipomoea 


88 




. 103 


Iridaceae. 

Iris 


108 




59 


108 146 


Fedia 


72 






128 


Jeffcrsonia 

.Tugiandaeea- 


44 


Filices 


L3I 


100 


Flcerkea 


53 


Juglans 


100 


Fragaria 


... 61, l-lli 


Juncacea 1 


Ill 



Juneoides 112 

Juncus ill, 146 

Juniperus 130 

Kalmia 83 

Kneiffa 66 

Ku:riia 93, 146 

Labiat;e 93 

Lactuca 80 

Lamium ... 95 

Lamnsana 79 

Lapbrtea 100 

Lappa 78 

Lappula 87 

Lapmna 79 

Larix 130 

Lathyrus 59 

Lauracea^ 98 

Lechea 48, 146 

Ledum 83 

Leersia 124 

Legouzia 81 

Leguminosa:' 56 

Lemna 113, 113, 146 

Lemnacea^ 113 

Lentibulariacea? 92 

Leonurus 95 

Leparayrcea 99 

Lepidium 47, 146 

Lcptandra 90 

Leptorch is — 105 

Lespedeza 58 

Lciicanthcmum 77 

Ligustrum 85 

Liliacea? 108 

Lilium 110 

Limnobium 105 

Limodorum 106 

Linaceae 52 

Linaria 89, 146 

Lindera 98 

Linnaea 70, 146 

Linum 52 

Liparis 105 

Liriodendron 43 

Listera 106 

Lithospermum 87 

Lobelia 81 

Lobeliacea? 81 

Loiium 129 

Lonicera 70 

Lophanthus 94 

Loranthacea? 99 

Ludwigia 66 

Lupinus 56 

Luzula 112 

Lychnis 50 

Lycium 89 

Lycopodiacese 134 

Lycopodium 134 

Lycopsis 87 

Lycopus 93 

Lysimachia S4, 84 

Lythraceaa 65, 146 

Lythrum 65 

Magnolia 43 

Magnoliacese 43 

Maianthemum 109 

Malva 51 

Malvaceae 51 

Marrubium 95 

Marvta. 77 

Medeola 110 

Medicago 57 

Meibomia 58 



894- 



PLAN! S i 'I MONROl I OUNTY. 



149 



Melampyrum 91 

Molilotus ■>'. 

Melissa 94 

Menispermaceae 44 

Menispermum 44 

Mentha 93, 146 

.M.nyantlies 86 

Mertensia 87, 1 4»> 

Mierampelis 66 

Microstylis 105 

Mikania 72 

Milium 124 

Mimulus 90 

Minliella 71 

Mitella 64 

Monarda 94 

Moneses 83 

Monotropa 84 

Morns 100 

Muhlenbergia 125 

Mulgedium. 80 

Mvosotis 87 

Myrica 101 

Myricaceae .. 101 

MyriophyRum 65 

Xahalu* 80 

Naiadacea* 11:? 

Naias 114 

Nardosmia 78 

Nasturtium 46 

Naumbergia 84 

Negundo 55 

Nelumbo 44 

Nemopanthes. 54 

Nepeta 94 

2Vi scea 65 

Nicandra 89 

Nicotiana 89 

Nuphar 44 

Nymphaea 44, hh 

Nymphaeaceae 44 

Nyssa 69 

Oakesia 110 

(Enothera 66 

Oleaceae 84 

Onagra 66 

Onagracea? 66 

Onoclea 133 

Onopordon 79 

Ophioglossacea' 134 

Opbioglossum 134 

OjyvZasU r 60 

Orchidacea? 105 

Orchis 107 

Origanum 93 

Ornithogalum 109 

< ►robancnaceae 91 

Oryzopsis 124 

Osmorrhiza .. 68 

Osmunda 133 

Ostrya 102 

Oxalis 53 

Panax 69 

Panicularia 128 

Panicum 123 

Papaver 45 

Papaveraceae 45 

Parnassia 64 

Parthenocisms ">4 

Paspalum 123 

Pastinaca 67 

Pedicularis 91 

Peltandra 112 

Pentuorum 64 



Peatstemon 90 

Peramium 11 h; 

Petiploca 85 

Petasitea 78 

Phaca 57 

Phalaria 124 

Phaseolm 59 

Phegopteris 132 

Phleum 125 

Phlomia 95 

Phlox 86 

Pbragmites 127 

Phryma 92 

Phvsalis 88 

Physalndes 89 

Ptaysocarpus 60 

Phytolacca 96 

Phytolaccaceae 96 

Picea 130 

Pilea UK) 

Pimpinella 67 

Pinguicula 92 

Pinus 130 

Piperaceae 98 

Plantaginaceae 95 

Plantago .... 95 

Platanacea* 10<t 

Platan us 100 

Poa 127 

Podoi)hvllum 44 

Pogonia 107 

Polanisia 48 

Polemoniaceae 86 

Polygala 56 

Polygalaceae 56 

Polygonaceas 96 

Poiygonatum 109 

Polygonella 98 

Polygonum 97 , 98 

Polym nia 75 

Poly podium 131 

Pontederia. ill 

Pontederiaceae ill 

Populus 1(14 

Portulaca 51 

Portulacacea' 51 

Potamogeton 114 

Potentilla til 

Poterium 62 

Prenanthes 80 

Primulaceae 84 

Prosartes 109 

Proserpinaca 65 

PruneUa 95 

Prunus 60 

Ptelea ?tf 

Pteris 131 

Pterospora 84 

Pycnanthemum 93, 146 

Pyrola .. 83 

Pyrus 62 

Quercua 102 

Ranunculaceae 41 

Ranunculus 41 

Raphanus . 48 

Razoumof8kya 99 

Rhamnaceae 54 

Khamnus 54 

Ithododendron 83 

Rhus 55 

Rhynchospora 117 

Ribes 64 

Robinia 57 

Roripa 4 » '. 

Rosa ti2 



Rosacea' 60 

Rubiaceae 70 

Kuhus 60 

Rudbeckia 7f> 

Rumez 96 

Rutaceae 53 

Sagittaria 113 

Sabcaceae 103 

Salix 103 

Salviniaceae 134 

Pambucua 69 

Samolus 84 

Sanguinaria . 45 

Sanguteorba 62 

Sanicula 68 

Santalaceae 99 

Sapindaceae 55 

Saponaria 49 

Sarracenia 45 

Sarraceniaceas 45 

Sassafras 98 

Satureia 94 

SaururaeecB 98 

Saururus 98 

Sortistana 124 

Saxil'raga 63, 146 

Saxifragaceae 63 

Scheuchzeria 114 

SchoU&ra 82, HI 

Scirpus 116, 116, 116 

Scleria 117 

Scrophularia 89 

Scrophulariaceae 89 

Scutellaria 94 

Sedum 64 

Selaginella 134 

Selaginellacea 1 134 

Senecio 78 

Sericocarpus 73 

Setaria 123 

Shepherdia 99 

Sicyos 66 

Silene 50 

Silybum . 79 

Simarubacea? 53 

Sinapis 47 

Sisymbrium 47 

Sisyrinchium 108 

Sium 67 

Smilacina 109, 109 

Smilax 108 

Solanacea? 88 

Solanum 88 

Solea 49 

Solidago 72 

Sonchus 81, 146 

Sorbus 63 

Sorghum 124 

Sparganium 112 

Spartina 123 

Spathyema 113 

Specularia 81 

Spergula 51, 146 

Si» njulai'ia 51 

Spiraea 60, &) 

Spiranthes 1()6 

Spirodela 113 

Sporobolus 125 

Stachys 95 

Staphylea 55 

Steironema 84 

Stellaria 50 

Stenophragma 47 

Streptopus 109 

Strophostyles 59 

SbrutMopterte 133 



'5° 



ROCHESTER ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 



[Oct. 8, 



Symphoriearpos 70, 146 

Symplocarpus. 113 

Symphytum 87 

Syndesmon 41 

Tanacetum 77 

Taraxacum 80 

Taxus. 130 

Tephrosia 57 

Teucrium . . 93 

Thalesia 92 

Thlaspi 47 

Thalictrum LI, 41 

Tbaspium 67, 67 

Thuja ; 130 

Thuya 130 

Thy mekeacea? 98 

Thymus 9:? 

Tiarella 63 

I'ilia 52 

Tiliacea? 52 

Tipularia — 105 

Tissa 51 

Tofieldia Ill 

TratfopOjSfon 79 

Trientalis 84 

Trifolium 56, 146 

Triglochin 113 



Trillium 110 

Triosteum 70 

Trisetum . . 126 

Triticum ... 129 

Trollius 42 

Tsug-a 130 

Tussilago 78, 78 

Typha 112 

Typhacea? 112 

Udora 105 

Ulmus ... 99 

Umbellifene 66 

Uni folium 109 

Urtica , 100 

Urticacea?. . ., 99 

tfrtioastrum 100 

Utricularia 92 

Uvularia 110, 110 

Vaccnria 49 

Vaccinium 82 

Va<jnera. 109 

Valeriana 71 

Valerianacere 71 

Valerianella 72 

Vallisneria 105 

Veratrum. Ill 



Verbascum 89 

Verbena 92 

Verbenaceie 92 

Vernouia. 72 

Veronica 90, 146 

Viburnum 69 

Vicia 58 

Vilfa 125 

Vinca 85 

Vincetoxicum 85 

Viola 48 

Violacea?. 48 

Vitacea? 54 

Vitis 54 

VUckia 94 

Waldsteinia 61 

WiUoughbya 72 

Wolffia 113 

Woodwardia 131 

Xanthium 76 

Xanthoxylum 53 

Zannichellia 114 

Zizania 124 

Zizia 67, 67 

Zygadenus Ill 





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