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Full text of "1966-1967 plan toward the elimination of racial imbalance in the public schools"

P^3/B/G 


SD 





1966-1967 PLAN 

TOWARD THE ELIMINATION OF 

RACIAL IMBALANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
\ 



'—>'—,;—,;—"- 




BOSTON SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




„„„«f.— 



ft 



1966-196? PUN 

TOWARD THE ELIMINATIOK OF 

RACIAL IMBALANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
\ 

BOSTON SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Library 



1966-1967 PLAN 
TOWARD THE ELIMINATION OF 
RACIAL D'lBAL^NCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Submitted to 



The State Board of Education 

of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

WILLIM^ G, SALTOi.STALL, Chairman 

by the 



Boston School Committee 
JOHN J. Mcdonough, chairman 
THOMAS Sc EISENSTADT LOUISE DAY HICKS 
JOSEPH LEE WILLIAM E. O'CONNOR 

February, 1967 



DEC ! 3 1367 



f'.l 



OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL COi^'I^TTEE 



V/ILLIAil H. OHRENBERGER 
Superintendent of Public Schools 

WILLIAil G. TOBIN 
Deputy Superintendent 



Associate Superintendents 

WILLIAil J. CUNiJINGHAM 
LOUIS R. WELCH 
ThO'IAS F. liFAGHER 
14ARI E. VAUGHAN 
JOSEPH HcKENMEY 

STAFF CONSULTANTS 



ANTHOIW L. GALEOTA 
Chief Structural Engineer 

HERBERT C. HAiiBELTOIJ 
Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

PETER J. INGEi\!ERI 
Assistant Principal, Abraham Lincoln School 



PREFACE 

It is presently the declared policy of the Commonwealth ". . .to 
encourage all school committees to adopt as educational objectives 
the promotion of racial balance and the correction of existing racial 
imbalance in the public schools." As a legally constituted body of 
elected public officials^ the School Committee of the City of Boston 
has been sworn to uphold and obey the laws of thds sti.te and nation. 
The Committee has devoted countless hours and all the resources at 
its disposal to evolve a plan in full compliance with Chapter 64I of 
the Acts of 1965 J to the end that both the Boston Public Schools and 
the State Board of Education may point with satisfaction to reasonable 
progress in the implementation of the law. 

The State Racial Imbalance Law (Chapter 64I) dictates the ele- 
ments that must be included in any plan to racially balance public 
schools. The 1966-67 Plan of the Boston School Committee detailed 
on the following pages complies v;ith every element set forth. 

The pertinent elements of the law are presented in Section 37D 
and relate to: 

a. "„ . . changes in existing school attendance districts. . ." 
(See Section A, Part I, Boston School Committee Plan) 

b. "... the location of proposed school sites. . ." (See 
Part III of Plan) 

c. "... the proposed additions to existing scliool buildings. ." 
(See Part III of Plan) 

d. "... other methods for the elimination of racial imbalance.." 
(See Sections A^, D, C, and D, Part I of Plan) 



The law further states under Section 37D: 

"... Any plan to detail changes in existing school attendance 
districts, the locations of proposed nexr school sites and proposed 
additions to existing school sites and proposed additions to existing 
school buildinpjs with the intention of reducing or eliminating racial 
imbalance, must take into consideration on an equal basis with the 
above-mentioned intention, the safety of the children involved in 
travelling from home to school and school to home ," (underlining 
added) 

The State Board of Education may rest assured that the safety of 
children has received equal consideration in the formulation of the 
Boston School Committee's Plan. 

In any well-conceived plan to eliminate racial imbalance, one 

must be guided by a definition of what constitutes racial imbalance. 

Chapter 6I4I, Section 37D, provides two definitions of racial imbalance. 

The first, admittedly general, relates school racial compostions to 

the racial composition of the society they serve; 

"The term 'racial imbalance' refers to a ratio between 
non-^hite and other students in public schools which is 
sharpljr out of balance with the racial composition of the 
society in which non-white children study, serve, and work," 
(underlining added) 

The second defines imbalance in terms of specific, but arbitrarily - 

fixed, ratios betvjeen white and non-white pupils: 

"For the purpose of this section, racial imbalance shall be 
deemed to exist when the per cent of non-white students in any 
public school is in excess of fiftj'- per cent of the total 
number of students in such school," 



11 



It is our finn belief that one definition of racial imbalance 

should not be accepted to the complete exclusion of the other. The 

legislators who framed the Racial Imbalance Law must have attributed 

merit to both definitions. Therefore, consistent with this belief, 

the Boston School Committee Plan has been formulated so as to embrace 

both definitions t. Past programs have been designed, and the 1966-6? 

Plan has been formulated, to 

lo reduce the number of non-white children in imbalanced 
schools, 

2,. produce an educational environment for the overwhelming 
majority of the city's public school children that is 
"o.o not sharply out of balance with the racial compo- 
sition of the society in which non-ivhite children study, 
serve, and work," (underlining added) 

The I966-I967 Plan of the Boston School Committee contains 
complete and clear-cut short-term proposals, the approval and im- 
plementation of which will immediately remove a significant number 
of children fran racially imbalanced schools and locate them in 
racially balanced schools „ Furthermore, there are reviewed briefly 
in this Plan the continuing programs upon which leading educators 
look with such favor as a means of providing education of a higher 
quality to the disadvantaged youth of our cityo 

This Preface relating to Boston's Plans in the area of racial 
imbalance would not be complete without some description of the over- 
all present status of the Boston Public Schools, Pimphasis on racial 
ratios and widespread confusion in the use of the terms racial im- 
balance , racial isolation , and segregation has tended to obscure the 
indisputable fact that Boston's school system is an integrated systemX 

iii 



or 198 public school buildings, 178 or 90fo have a raciall7 mixed 
enrol lirieut. Of the remaining 20 public schools, I6 or fi^^ have a 1.00$ 
white enrollmento 

In I96U there were Ul schools in this category. Today, there 
are only 16 of a total of I98, a gain of 25 in the number of racially 
mixed schools. Of the 92,12? public school children, 85,685 or 9% 
attend schools which are, to varying degrees, integrated, 

Clea^v-y, while racial imbalance does exist in some public schools 
as a result of neighborhood racial patterns, the facts prove that it 
is both unfair and contrary to fact to apply the term racial isolation 
and segregation to the Boston Public Schools, 

The step v;hich al]. VS'.MI agree offers the strongest hope of a 
lasting solution to this most ccmplex problem is the immed iate co n- 
st'^uction and jud ici ous locat ion of new s choo l buildingSo In this 
connection^ the School Committee's Plan details, wherever practical, 
both the location and projected racial composition of each new schools, 
School building projects which have been designated a& acc e ptabl e or 
approvable by the State Board of Education, and which, for the most 
part, make a significant and immediate impact on racial imbalance, 
are presented as the First Stage of the School Construction Program, 

The Second and Third Stages of the School Construction Program 
will contain a list of the names of proposed new schools and the 
section of the city in which each will be constructedo Specific 
details relating to capacity, projected racial composition, and site 
designation of proposed nexii buildings will be developed in concert 
with "ohe Task Force designated by the State Department of Education 
to provide technical <::':3istance to the Boston School Committee, 



Also included in the I966-67 Plan is an outline of a tentative 
1967-68 Plan which provides for an extension of short-term proposals, 
Modification of continuing programs and of the School Construction 
Program will be dependent upon changing conditions and an evaluation 
of the impact of the present Plan* 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I. SHORT TERM IROPOSALS FOR IMMEDIATE REDUCTION OF 
RACIAL IMBALAircE 

Page 

^' Closing of Imbalanced Schools 

1. Closing of the Asa Gray School „ 1 

2. Closing of the Aaron Davis School 1 

3. Closing of the Lewis Colony 2 

^' Metropoli tan Council for Educational Opportunity (METCQl 

1. Evaluation of Present Participation [^ 

2. Suggestions for Expanded Participation 5 

C, Open Enrollment 

1. Introduction g 

2 . Operation Exodus -j.0 

3. Utilization of Open Enrollment Policy as of 

October 1, 1966 10 

h. Present Racial Status of all Boston Public Schools 

a. High Schools np 

b. Junior High Schools 13 

c . Elementary Schools ^.h 

d. Special Schools 23 

5. Summary of Open Enrollment 2U 

D. Establishment of Three Middle Schools 

1. Rationale for Middle-School Grade Organization 26 

2. Frank V. Thompson School 27 

3. Patrick T. Campbell School 28 

h» New I-Iiddle School in Columbia Point 29 



E. Impact of Short-Term Proposals 



30 



(Contd.) TABLE ^ COMTEMTS 

Page 

II. CONTBIUING FRCGRAMS 

A, Introduction ,. 3? 

B, Compensatory and Enrichment Programs 33 

C. Office of Program Development 

1 o Federal Aid to Education 35 

2 . Model Demonstration Subsystem 35 

D. Teachers for Urban Schools 

1, College-University Responsibility , ,..» ^6 

2 , In-service Training , o 36 



E. Inter-racial and Inter-cultural Exchange Visit 

Programs „... , ....»,., 37 



F« Multi-ethnic Texts 39 

III. SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION mOGRAM 

A . Introduction ....o., ,. I4O 

B . Listing of First Stage Pro.jects , ^Ob 

C , Description of First Stage Projects „ Ul 

D. Impact of First Stage Projects on Raci al ii:.ba.\anco c-.rr 59 

E, Listing of Second Stage Projects 61 

F , Listing of Third Stage Projects . , 62 



(Contd.) TABLE OF COI'J TENTS 

Page 

IV. TENTATIVE 1967-1968 PLMJ 

A, Short-Term Proposals for Immediate Reduction of 

Racial Imbalance 63 

1. School Closings 

2. Further Expansion of METCO 

3. Additional Middle-School Designation 

B , C ontinuing Programs 63 

C , Modifications of School Construction Program 63 

V. Appendix 



PART I 
SHORT -TERJ': mOPOSALS FOR BlfEDIATE REDUCTION 
OF RACIAL IMBALANCE 



(1) 



SHORT -TEM PROPOSaLS FOR Ii4MEDIATE REDUCTION OF R.1CIAL IiffiAUNCE 

A. Closing of Racially Imbalanced Schools 

There follows a detailing of the plan for the closing of certain 
schools in which racial imbalance is deemed to exist by the State 
Department of Education. Each such closing will immediately reduce 
the number of imbalanced schools by one. Within the limitations of 
the criteria jointly agreed to by the State Board of Education and 
the Boston School Committee, the children presently in schools to 
be closed will be relocated in or reassigned to racially balanced 
schools. For each school to be closed, there is clearly indicated 
the present racial composition, the number of non-white pupils in- 
volved, the receiving school or schools, and the present racial 
composition of each receiving school, 

1, Asa Gray School (K-U) 

The Asa Gray School located in Roxbury will be closed 
at the end of the current school year. It is presently 
98,8^ non-white and enrolls 2^0 non-white children and 3 white 
children. 

2. Aaron Davis School (k-2) 

The Aaron Davis School located in Roxbury will be 
closed at the end of the current school year. It is 
presently 91% non-white and enrolls 32U non-white chil- 
dren and 32 white children. 



(2) 



3. Lewis Junior High Colony (Gr.5) 

This is a class consisting of 2U non-white^ grade 
5 pupils from the Julia Ward Howe School, The Lewis 
Junior Hi^h School is 9^.7% non-white, and the Julia 
Ward Howe School is 98.5^ non^white. This colony of 
the Julia Ward Howe School will be eliminated. 

Present plans call for the relocation of the pupils of these 
three schools in schools that have an appreciable number of vacant 
seats, A substantial number of children from the Aaron Davis School 
will be reassigned to the William E, Russell School. With the 
opening of the new school in the Paul A. Dever District in the Fall 
of 1967, approximately 200 children residing in the Columbia Point 
area and presently in grades 7 and 8 at the V/illiam E, Russell 
School will be reassigned to the nev; school. This will make available 
vacant seats for a corresponding number of children from the Aaron 
Davis School. The remaining children from the Aaron Davis School 
(approximately 156) will be reassigned to the potential receiving 
schools listed on the following page together with children from the 
other schools to be closed. Each school listed is presently 
racially balanced and will not be permitted to become racially 
imbalanced as a result of the relocation. Therefore, in summary, a 
total of 598 non-white children x,rill be removed from a racially 
imbalanced situation, and relocated in a racially balanced 
educational environment. 



(3) 



Potential Receiving Schools 



Name 


Grades 


Vacant Seats* 


% Non-white 


Martin Milmore 


K-6 


61 


30^ 


Prince 


K-8 


5U 


\x\% 


Edmund P, Tiles ton 


K-6 


63 


29% 


Jefferson"'"^' 


K-6 


37 


yifo 


Ellis Mendell 


K-6 


25 


20^ 


Peter Fanueil 


K-6 


85 


37.6^ 


Samuel W, Mason 


K-6 


51i 


hk% 


John B. .O'Reilly 


K-3 


U6 


\M 


Oliver H. Perry 


K-6 


U9 


IM 


Eliot School 


K-6 


113 


0% 


James J. Storrow 


K-3 


63 


3% 


Washington Alls ton 


K-6 


Uo 


1.2% 


William H, Taft Colony 


K-6 


36 


\\% 


Mary Lyon 


K-6 


31 


$.1% 


Andrew Jackson 


K-6 


U2 


e,9% 


William E, Russell 


7-8 


200'""^ 


2C)% 



■""■ Vacant seats shown for grades K-U only. 

'" Ti-jo demountable buildings may be erected on this site to 
accommodate 60 additional children. 



See pages 1-2 of Plan. 



(U) 



E . The Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity (Metco) 

1, Evaluation of Present Participation 

Currently, the Boston Public Schools are participating 
actively in the implementation of Metco' s goals, Metco 
has a twofold purpose: 

a) to reduce racial imbalance in the Boston Public 
Schools . 

b) to promote integration in suburban school 
systems 

At the present time, 220 non-white children formerly 
attending Boston schools are enrolled in schools in the 
folloviing communities: 

a) Arlington d) Lexington 

b) Braintree e) Newton 

c) Brookline f) Wellesley 

The Metco experiment has been in operation since September of 
1966. Clearly, it makes a significant contribution toward resolving 
the problem of racial imbalance in Boston, 

In view of Metco' s proven potential, we enthusiastically sup- 
port Metco's request to expand operations. In addition to a request 
for a grant to continue the present program for 220 pupils, Metco 
is requesting a further grant of $299,000 to accommodate 280 ad- 
ditional pupils. Approval of the Metco request \iould result in the 
involvement of additional metropolitan communities with the problem 
of racial balancing of schools. 



(5) 



In this connecLionj we are heartened by the action taken by the 
School Committees of «\/e5tonj Lincoln^ and the Sudbury Regional High 
School to become involved and to assist in the resolution of tnis 
most pressing problem of our times. The School Committees of Sharon, 
Needham, and other communities are presently considering the feas- 
ability of participation in Metco, and there is a possibility that 
some non-white Boston pupils will be enrolled in the Concord- 
Carlisle High School in the coming school year. 

2. Suggestions for Expanded Participation 

a) In an attempt to stimulate greater awareness of the 
need for and desirability of active participation in the 
Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity, the letter 
shown on the following page has been sent by the Boston 
School Committee to the chairman of the school committee in 
62 suburban communities which are within reasonable commuting 
distance of Boston. 

The letter invites the participation of suburban commiinities 
in the Hetco plan and brings to their attention the general 
provisions of the Racial Imbalance Law (Chapter 6/+1 of the Acts 
of 1965). In addition, for those communities that may not find 
it feasible to become involved in Metco, the letter contains a 
reference to Chapter 506 of the Acts of 1966. This legislation 
provides technical, financial, and other assistance to communities 
proposing an acceptable plan of their own for educating non- 
resident pupils from racially imbalanced schools. 



(6) 



(Copy of the letter sent by the Boston School CGiranittee 
to the School Boards of suburban Boston communities,) 

February 10, I967 

Dear Chairman: 

By majority vote of the Boston School Committee, I am writing to 
invite you to consider the participation by your school system in the 
Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity program. As you know, 
the Metco plan enables non-white children to attend school in the 
suburbs, thereby contributing to the elimination of racial imbalance 
in the Boston Public Schools, while providing a desirable multi- 
racial school environment for the suburban children presently 
attending racially unmixed classes. At the present time, and with 
no added financial expense, the communities of Arlington, Brookline, 
Braintree, Lexington, Lincoln, Newton, and Wellesley are partici- 
pating ill Metco In addition, the towns of VJeston, and Sudbury 
have voted to join in September, 

Many other communities are anxious to become involved, not 
only for the invaluable experience that it provides white and non- 
vjhite children, but because they are aware that the so-called 
racial imbalance law is a State law and therefore applicable not 
only to the City of Boston but to every city and town in the 
Ccmmonwealtha This law. Chapter 6iil, calls for the elimination of 
racial imbalance, and defines it as: 

"a ratio between non-white and other students in public 
schools which is sharply out of balance with the racial 
composition of the society in which non-white children 
study, serve, and work," 

The State Legislature has recently adopted a provision to enable 
ccmmunities such as yours to comply with Chapter 6UI by means other 
than the Metco plan. Chapter ^06 of the Acts of 1966, offers finan- 
cial, technical, and other assistance to any city or town in the 
Commonwealth in the designing of a plan to educate non-resident 
pupils from racially imbalanced schools of other communities. 

In closing, I should like to quote from the April 1965 Report 
of the Advisory Committee on Racial Imbalance and Education of the 
State Board of Education (Kiernan Report): 

"The problem of racial imbalance is the responsi- 
bility of all citizens in the Commonwealth, Each of us, 
including the members of this committee, can do more 
than we are now doing to help heal this most serious 
wound in American Society," 

Very truly yours, 

/s/ John J, McDonough, Chairman 



(7) 



b) Within the present and proposed funding structure, 
there is a possibilit/ of increasing the number of non- 
■white children that could be served by Metco, It has 
been our suggestion in the past, and it continues to be 
our suggestion, that the per pupil allowance of $1,000 
be reduced to $600, Not only is this more in keeping 
with the present levels of per pupil expenditures, but 
in addition, it will permit a 66 2/% increase in the 
number of non-white children involved, 

c) It is our hope that the State Department of 
Education will exercise leadership in the development of a 
metropolitanistic approach to eliminating racial im- 
balance in public schools. Suburban communities must 
be impressed xdth the fact that they cannot, in con- 
science, divorce themselves fran the human problems of the 
core city. We urge the State Department of Education to 
implement the philosophy expressed in the Report of the 
Advisory Committee on Racial Imbalance (Kiernan Report): 

"The problem of racial imbalance is the 
responsibility of all citizens in the Canmon- 
wealth. Each of us, including the members of 
this ccmmittee, can do more than we are now 
doing to help heal this most serious wound in 
American society." 



(8) 



C. Boston's Open LnrolL.ient Policy 

1. Introduction 

lii coiinectioii \vith open enroliiaent, the follovdng is a sti-teaient 

of principles ciistributecl widel; throughout the Boston School System: 

"It continues to be the policj in Boston to have each 
pupil attena the school serving nis neit^hborhood coramunity 
unless the child's physical, uental, or educational needs 
require assignraent to specially organizi.ed classes or 
schools (e.g., a Braille class; or the Horace Mann School 
for the Deaf). Hovvever, it ia also the practice, at the 
recuest of the parent, to peri.d.t a child to attend ANY 
SCHOOL HiiVIi.iG Al , r.oPiilATi GL; LIS OR COUrj:^I.S - provided that 
particular school, after enrolling the children of its own 
locale, has adequate accomiiiodations for pupils frOia other 
districts, and providing the parent assumes cost of 
transportation to and from such school. 

Therefore, Head .asters arid I rincipals vd.ll continue 
to accept all applicants for admission to their schools 
provided space is available. COilTIiJUANCL OF SUCH FEKi'IISSION 
IS A PRIVIULGE Aim DKPLIJDS ON ATTLlMDAhCE, PUNCTUALITY, CON- 
DUCT, ANL SAFE TRANSPORT/ TIOIM." 

As presently constituted, Boston's Open Enrollment Policy is 

based on the following specifics: 

a) Open enrollment is applicable if the following 
three conditions are fulfilled: 

1) There is an available seat in the desired school. 

2) There is a suitable grade and/or course of study 
in that school. 

3) Traiisportction is providea bj the parent. 

b) THE HEAD MSTER AI\iD/OR PRINCIPAL WILL MKE ARRANGLilENTS 
FOR THE TRANSFER. 

c) If there is no seat and/or course available in the 
desired school, sijnilar arrangements shall be made 
by the Head Master and/or Principal for any other 
district at the request of the parent. 



(9) 



Tho Bostoii School ConriittLc, sensitive to thv. rtalitius cf 

living in dtprivud areas^ in particul:irj that aspect that deals with 

financial hardships, took st^^ps to rendt-r this policy uvcii more 

effective than in the past. The following motion w; s passed on 

Decc::ibtr 20, 1965: 

"ORDEItED, that the Boston School Conimittee request 
M:-yor Collins to provide funds derived from Sec. IB, 
Ch. 7 J of the General Lrws, to begin imraediatt. ly to 
provide fffiTA car checks to those children of Frinary, 
Elementary, and Junior High grades who attend school 
outside their home districts under the Op en En rollment 
pol icy , where such attendance serves to relieve ana 
ultir::r:t>,ly eliminate, racial imbalance, in compliance 
with the Stctu law. The amount of such request is to 
be determined by the Superintendent after investigation 
of the n-umbers of such children and the cost of their 
transportation. " 

The Boston School Committee is in favor of relieving the pc rents 
of the financic'l burden of participation in Open Enrollment. Further, 
the Comi.iittee is in favor of providing student car checks for all 
prim, ry, el^.mentary, and junior high school pupils vjho attend schools 
other th;.n thoir ntighborhood school provided tnrt the funds to finance 
tliis program come from r sourct. other than the regular school depart- 
ment budget. Funds from the current operating;: budget could not be 
diverted to absorb costs of this progrijn without seriously impairing 
the quality and cuantitj?- of educational programs and services. 

In keeping with the Boston School Committee's desire to make 
the Open Enrollment Policy more effective during tnt 1966-6? school 
year, a weekly sert count was conducted during each of the first four 
weeks of school and once each month thereafter in all public schoclF;. 



(10) 



This information has received and will continue to receive the widest 
dissemination through all communications media availeble to the 
Boston Schools for the purpose of keeping the parents of the city 
fully aware of all existing seat vacancies in the schools. 

2. Operation Exodus 

If any one program can be considered a testimonial to the 
effectiveness of Boston's Open Enrollment Policy, it is that program 
known as Operation Exodus. Exodus, privately initiated, operated, and 
financed through the extraordinary efforts of parents and interested 
citizens of Roxbury and North Dorchester, seeks to remove non-white 
children from racially imbalanced schools^ and relocate them in the 
predominantly white schools of outlying districts. During the present 
school year, Exodus has succeeded in so relocating more than 800 
boys and girls. Its smooth and effective operation is due in no 
small measure to the weekly count of vacant seats in the Boston 
Public Schools. 

3. Utilization of Open Enrollment Policy as of October 1, 1966 

The Open Enrollment Survey of October 1, 1966, showed the following 
numbers of children attending schools other than their neighborhood 
schools under the provisions of t.he Open Enrollment Policy: 

'lAJhitb xNon-iAfhite Total 
Junior High Schools 1,131 1,370 2,501 
Elementary Schools 2,545 2,900 5,445 

3,676 4,270 7,946 



(.n) 



A detailed breakdown of the distribution of participants in the 
Open Enrollment Policy in terms of white and non-white pupils, school 
level, and racial composition of the receiving school follows: 

^" Voluntary Enrollees in Four Junior High School s with 
Non -White Ma.jorities ~ 

^^ite Mo n- White Total 

^1 672 713 

^' Voluntary Enrollees in 1 3 Junior Hi ^h Schools with 
VJhite Majorities ~ 

^^ite Non-Wliite Total 
1.090 698 1,788 

c. Voluntary En rollees in Elementary School s with 
Non-VJhite Ma.jorities ~ 

White Non-Vifhite Total 
340 1,559 i^g99 

^- Voluntary Enrollees in Elementary Schools with 
li/hite Majorities ' 

Wiite Non-White Total 

2.205 1,341 3,546 

The figures shown under a and d present factually the utili- 
zation of the voluntary Open Enrollment Policy of the Boston Public 
Schools. An analysis and interpretation of this participation is 
presented under part 5 in this section of the Plan. 

On the following pages is shown the present racial composition of 
every public school in the city, resulting from the operation of Metco, 
Exodus, the Open Enrollment Policy, and normal neighborhood school 
feeder patterns. 



(12) 



PRESENT RACIAL COMPOSITION OF EVERY BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOL-:^ 



HIGH SCHOOLS 



Name of School 



v;hite 



Non-i/hite 



Total 



1, Boston Latin School 1938 

2, Girls' Latin School 1280 

3, Boston Technical High School 1763 
li. Boston Trade High School 598 

5. Boston Trade High School Annex 92 

6. Brighton High School 9I4I 

7. Charlestown High School 791 

8. Dorchester High School 81|8 

9. East Boston High School 1122 

10. English High (Main Building) 128o 

11. Theodore Roosevelt Bldg. Colony I 2U6 

12. Thomas Edison Bldg, Colony II 177 

13. Girls' High School 

lii.. Hyde Park High School 

15 • Jamaica Plain High School 

16, J. E. Burke High School 

17. Roslindale High School 
13, South Boston High School 
19. Trade High School for Girls 

TOTALS 171ii5 



88 

Uo-«* 

I61;li 

itU6 

532 
69-!<-«- 

136U 

1568 

318 



lUo 
115 
213 
285 

28 
U81 

11 
251 

11 
2i;3 
li;2 

61 
377 

71 
251 

6I4O 

33 


181 
353ii 



2078 

1395 

1976 

883 

120 

lii22 

802 

1099 

1133 

1523 

388 

238 

1;65 
UO 

1715 

697 

1172 
69 

1397 

1568 

i;99 
20679 



* There are two post-graduate public schools not included in this listing. They 
are the Boston Business School and the Boston Vocational Technical Institute, 
Inclusion of these two schools is not required in the State ordered racial 
census. 



1^ Of Chinese Origin 



{y.3) 



JUNICE HIGH SCHOOLS 



Name of School 



iiThite 



Non-v/hite 



1. Clarence R, Edwards Jimior High 562 

2. Grover Cleveland Junior High 1050 

3. James P. TiDiilty Junior High 25 
Ii, Joseph H, Barnes Junior High 602 

5. Lewis Junior High 7 

6. Mary E. Gurley Junior High 779 

7. Michelangelo Junior High 135 

8. Oliver Wendell Holmes Junior High 127 

9. Patrick F. Gavin Junior High 11 8U 

10. Patrick T, Campbell Junior High 16 

11, Robert Gould Shaw Junior High 860 

12, Solomon Lewenberg Junior High 736 

13. Thomas A, Sdison Junior High 526 
Ik, Washington Irving Junior High 1068 
15 • William Barton Rogers Junior High 1022 

16. William Howard Taft Junior High U07 

17. Woodrow V/ilson Junior High 1077 



15 

20 

682 
1 

527 

315 
9 

UL6 
23 

6U7 
5U 

381i 
91 
76 
68 

122 

U6 



577 

1070 
707 
603 
53U 

109ii 
Ihh 
Sk3 

1207 
663 
911; 

1120 
617 

lliii; 

1090 
529 

1123 



TOTALS 



10183 



3i;96 



13679 



(Ill) 



ELIin^SJITARY SCHOOLS 



Name of School 


\rti±te 


Non-lVhite 


Total 


Abraham Lincoln District 








1, Abraham Lincoln School 


122 

165** 


1U7 


269 
165 


2» Quincy School 


13 
132** 





13 
132 


Agassiz District 








3. Agassiz School 


315 


6 


321 


U, Old Agassiz School 


228 


7 


235 


5, Bow ditch School 


381 


6 


387 


6, Mary E. Curley Colony 


155 


1 


156 


7. Joseph P. Manning School 


217 





217 



Beethoven District 

8, Beethoven School 

9, Randall G. Morris 

10. Joyce Kilmer School 

Bennett District 

11, Alexander Hamilton School 

12, Harriet Baldwin School 

Bigelow District 

13. Bigelox-/ School 

lU. Choate Burnham School 

Blackinton-John Cheverus District 

15. John Cheverus School 

16. Curtis Guild School 

17. Manassah E. Bradley School 



506 

500 

266 

250 



596 

253 

267 
356 
326 



5 


511 


2 


hh5 





500 



68 
37 



25 
8 



33U 
287 



621 
261 






267 


1 


357 


11 


337 



(15) 



Name of School 
Ch apman District 

18. Chapman School 

19. Hugh Roe O'Donnell School 

Charles Sumner District 

20. Charles Sumner School 

21. George H. Conley School 

22. John D. Philbrick School 

23. Washington Irving Colony 

Christopher Gibson District 
2U, Christopher Gibson School 

25. Atherton School 

Dearborn District 

26, Dearborn School 

27. Dearborn Annex 

28, Aaron Davis School 
2?, Albert Palmer School 

D illaway District 
30 « Dillaway School 

31. Nathan Hale School 

> 

Donald McKay-Samuel Adams District 

32. Donald McKay School 

33. Samuel Adams School 



White 

291 

3U5 



91 
26 



18 
28 



U37 
300 



Non-White 






535 

173 



212 
265 



7 
6 



Total 
291 

3U5 



762 


11 


773 


U50 


2 


I452 


263 


2 


265 


151 


1 


152 



626 
199 



105 


523 


628 


30 


187 


217 


32 


32i| 


356 


26 


16U 


190 



230 

293 
306 



(16) 



Name of School 
Dudley District -?''- 
3lio Dudley School 

35. William Bacon School 

36, Asa Gray School 



White 


Mon -White 


Total 


21^ 


/ 

221 


2U5 


6 


259 


265 


3 


250 


253 



Dwight District 

37. Joseph J, Hurley School 

38. Joshua Bates School 

Edmund P. Tileston District 

39. Edmund P. Tileston School 
I4O. Charles Logue School 

m, IMartha A, Baker School 



175 
38 



237 
310 

102 



hk3 

118 



618 
156 



97 


33h 


1 


311 


3 


105 



Ed-ward Everett District 
k2» Edward Everett School 
U3» John L, Motley School 

Elihu Greenwood District 

I4U. Elihu Greenwood School 

U5. Fairmount School 

46, Franklin D, Roosevelt School 

1;7. Weld School 

Ellis Mendell District 
U8. Ellis Mendell School 
U9. Margaret Fuller School 
50» Theodore Roosevelt School 



523 

3U2 

766 

i;30 

395 

70 

298 

32U 
131 



17 

1 



510 

3U3 



6 


772 


13 


hh3 


21 


ia6 





70 



7h 


372 


39 


363 


80 


211 



•«-Since Renamed Dudley-Hyde-Everett District 



V-1-' I 



Name of School 
Emerson District -'"- 
51* Patrick J. Kennedy School 

52. Philip H. Sheridan School 

Emily A. Fifield District 

53. Emily A. Fifield School 
5U. John G. liThittier School 

55. Thomas F. Leen School 

Francis Parkman District 

56. Francis Parkman School 

57. Edwin P. Seaver School 

58. Henry Abrahams Schools 

Frank V. Thompson District 

59. Frank V. Thompson School 

Hart -Gas ton -Perry District 

60. Thomas N. Hart School 

61. Gaston School 

62* Oliver Hazard Perry School 
63 « Benjamin Dean School 
6U. Joseph Tuckerman School 

Harvard District 

65. Harvard School 

66. Kent School 

67. Bunker Hill School 



White 


Non-White 


Total 


37U 


1 


375 


319 





319 



636 


21 


657 


285 


iiO 


325 


101 





101 



501; 


SS 


^S9 


276 


11 


287 


165 


30 


195 



511 



2ii2 
171 
27U 



190 



701 



192 


119 


311 


220 


86 


306 


361 


29 


390 


2U2 


11 


253 


269 


10 


279 



5 


2ii7 


8 


179 





21\x 



if-Since Renamed Sheridan-Kennedy District 



(18) 



Name of School 
Henry Grew District 

68. Henry Grew School 

69. William E. Charming School 

70, Hemenway School 

Henry L. Higginson District 

71, Academy Hill School 

72, David A. Ellis School 

73. David A, Ellis Annex 

7U. Henry L, Higginson School 

Hugh O'Brien District 

75 • Ralph Waldo Emerson School 

76. Samuel W, Mason School 
James A. Garfield District 

77. James A. Garfield School 

78. Mary Lyon School 
79c Oak Square School 

80. Thomas A, Edison Colony 

81. Winship School 

James J. Chittick District 

82. James J. Chittick School 

83. Lowell tiason School 

Jefferson District 

8U. Jefferson School 

85. Charles Bulfinch School 



IfJhite 


Non-lfJhite 


Total 


10.1 


6 


U17 


ii70 


2ii 


h9k 


207 


12 


219 



29 


278 





528 





IIU 


7 


2iiO 



162 


203 


199 


159 


255 


12 


199 


12 


131 


2 


198 


7 


2h8 


91; 



651 
103 

33h 
159 



3 
k 

153 
201 



307 

528 

llU 
2U7 

365 
358 

267 

211 

133 
205 
3ii2 



65U 
107 

1;67 
360 



IVhite 


Non-^^hite 


Total 


3I46 


k 


3^0 


298 


5 


303 


388 


31 


in? 



610 


15 


625 


270 


172 


Wi2 


332 


20 


352 


21h 


91 


305 



(19) 



Name of School 
John A. Andrew District 

86, John A. Andrew School 

87, John B, O'Reilly School 

88, Michael J, Perkins School 

John Marshall District 
89 ♦ John Marshall School 
90» Champlain School 

91. Lucy Stone School 

92. Florence Nightingale School 

John Winthrop District 

93. John Winthrop School 
9U» Benedict Fenwick School 
95 « Nathaniel Hawthorne School 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy District 

96 „ John F. Kennedy School U52 273 725 

97, Wyman School I98 79 277 

Julia Ward Howe District 
980 Julia Ward Howe School 
99. Sarah J. Baker School 
100, Lewis Colony 



82 


hho 


522 


88 


317 


ii05 


92 


138 


230 



6 


U21 


ii27 


,8 


601 


619 





2I1 


2U 



(20) 



Name of School 
Longfellow District 

101. Longfellow School 

102. Phineas Bates School 

103. Mozart School 
lOli. Theodore Parker School 

Martin District 

105. Maurice J. Tobin School 2ii6 U87 733 

106. Farragut School 132 17U 306 

107. Ira Allen School 8 l67 175 

Mary Hemenway District 

108. Mary Hemenway School ii2ii 2 U26 



White 


N on -White 


Total 


683 


5 


688 


389 


11 


liOO 


352 





352 


89 





89 



ii2ii 


2 


355 


33 


Uoo 


2 



109. Rochambeau School 355 33 388 

110. Patrick O'Hearn School UOO 2 U02 

Mather District 

Ulc Benjamin Gushing School 265 h 269 

112. Mather School 968 9 977 

113. Edward Southworth School Ii57 2 ii59 

Michelangelo-Eliot-Hancock District 

llh.. Michelangelo School 25 6 31 

115. Eliot School 229 229 

Minot District 

116. Thomas J. Kenny School 323 99 il22 

117. Minot School 260 6 266 



118,. Ellen H. Richards School 259 19 278 

119. Gilbert Stuart School 238 92 330 



323 


99 


260 


6 


259 


19 


238 


92 



(21) 



Name of School 



Norcross District 



120. George F. Hoar School 



White 



556 



Non -White 



no 



Total 



596 



Patrick F. Lyndon District 
121, Patrick F, Lyndon School 
122» Robert Goiild Shaw C )lony 
123, Sophia W. Ripley School 



a5 

215 
h09 



h 


kl9 


6 


221 


1 


lao 



Paul A. Dever District 
12U, Paul A, Dever School 



39h 



7ia 



1135 



Phillips Brooks District 
125. Phillips Brooks School 
126-, Quincy Dickerman School 



6 

5 



li53 
U52 



U61 
i;57 



Prince District 



127, Prince School 



128, Charles C, Perkins School 



129, Martin Milmore School 



130, Peter Faneuil School 



191 

3l-;Ht 


100 


291 

31 


22 

12^^^ 


183 


205 
12 


100 
7-;h«- 


36 


136 
7 


88 

6-iHir 


hS 


133 
8 



Rice-Franklin District 



131, Charles E. Tlackey School 



132, George Bancroft School 



133 • John J, Williams School 



256 
133iH. 


322 


578 
133 


28 

6-»-"r 


160 


188 
6 


182 
68-;h!- 


31 


213 
68 



<<-!!■ Of Chinese Origin 



(22) 



Name of School 
Robert Treat Paine District 
131;. Robert T. Paine School 
13^4 Audubon School 



I'^ite 


Non-White 


Total 


187 


282 


U69 


lit2 


115 


257 



Roger v^olcott District 

136, Charles Taylor School 

137, William Bradford School 

138, Pauline A. Shaw School 
139» Roger Wolcott School 

Theodore Lyman District 
lUO. Theodore Lyman School 
lUl. James Otis School 
IU2, Dante Alighieri School 

Thomas Gardner District 
lU3o David L. Barrett School 
lUu, James J. Storrow School 
lUS, Thomas Gardner School 

Warren District 

ll;6, Warren-Prescott School 

lU7. Oliver Holden School 

Washington Allston District 

IU8, Andrew Jackson School 

1U9. Wm. H. Taft Colony 

150, Washington Allston School 

l5lo-. Commonwealth Project Bldg, Colony 

152« J, P, Kennedy Hospital Colony 



36ii 


12 


376 


2ia 


262 


Ul;3 


355 


168 


523 


265 


108 


37U 



258 


19 


277 


3U2 





3U2 


187 


lU 


201 



53 


20 


73 


68 


2 


70 


U77 


23 


500 



631 
106 








631 
106 



216 


15 


231 


289 


36 


325 


231 


18 


2U9 


28 


3 


31 


1|2 


2 


hh 



(23) 



Name of School 
William E, Endicott District 
153. Sarah Greenwood School 
l$k» William E, Endicott School 



White 


Non-White 


Total 


89 


931 


1020 


16 


393 


h09 



William E. Russell District 

155. Roger Clap School 

156, William E. Russell School 



51I1 
529 



3 

126 



517 
655 



William Lloyd Garrison District 
157 » William Lloyd Garrison School 
1^8. Williams School 
159. Wm, L, P. Boardman School 

TOTALS 



h 


798 


802 


?^ 


75 


75 


h 


181I 


186 



68,050 



2l;,077 



92,127 



SPECIAL SCHOOLS 



1, Horace Mann School for the Deaf 

2, Mc Gertrude Godvin School 

(Disciplinary School) 

3, Day School for Immigrants 



87 

19 
223 



13 

30 
8ii 



100 

h9 

307 



TOTALS 



329 



127 



U56 



(21;) 



5o Summary of Open Enrollment 

It has been stated that " ... Open enrollment does not appear to 
have had a substantial effect except where it has been funded, organized, 
and supervised with transportation provided by private groups,," An 
analysis of all the factual inforroation previously presented in this 
section contradicts this assertion. Any objective appraisal of the 
available evidence will reveal the substantial effect that the Open 
Enrollment Policy has had on the racial balancing and integration of 
the Boston Public schools „ 

a. There are voluntarily enrolled in racially im- 
balanc^ed schools 38I white pupils, contributing to a 
reduction of racial imbalance in these schools, 

be There are voluntarily enrolled in racially 
balance d schools 2^,039 non-white children~-another sub- 
stantial contribution toward racial balancing of schools, 
c, A total of 7.5 9U6 pupils are voluntarily enrolled 
in schools other than their neighborhood schools] testi- 
mony for the democratic organization and operation of the 
Boston Public Sc hools ^ 

d.. The number of schools with a lOOfo white enrollment 
were reduced from Ul in I96I1.J to 21 in 1965 j to 16 in I966. 
Interpreted another way, this means an increase of 25 in 
the number of schools with a racially mixed population 
for a total of I78 out of I98 public school buildings. 



(25) 



e. In terms of pupils, 85,685 of a total public 
school enrollment of 92,12? are attending schools with 
a racially miyed population — in keeping with the racial 
composition of the society in which non-white children 
study, serve, and work. 

From this analysis emerges one indisputable fact: 
THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEi"! IS AN INTEGRATED SCHOOL SYSTEMl 



(26) 

D. Establishment of Three liiddlo Schools 

1. Rati&nclt for l''Iiddlc School Grade Org. nization 

The adrainistr: tion of the Boston Public Schools is presently 
comnd-ttcd to the middle school concept cjid vdll continue to move 
toward a standardization of the follovdng grcd>. orgf niz:ti)n: 

a. Kindergarten through grade $ 

b. Grrdes 6 through 8 (middle school) 

c. Grfdes 9 through 12 

This standardization of grade org: nization will have numerous 
ramifications which will bear diroctli upon the problem of racial 
balancing of schools. The following are a few: 

a. The new primary and elementary schools constructed (K-5) 
will be of much greater pupil ccptcity than at present, thus 
enlarging the "neighborhood" from which they draw their enrollment 
and facilitating the racial balancing of such schools. 

b. The "new" middle sch-.uls (6-8) si:ailarly will have 
increased pupil capacities end will draw from wider geographic 
artas. The greater and m-re diverse the pupil population from 
which such schools can dr"w, the greater the possibility of 
their being racially balanced, 

c. The elimination of grade 9 from present junior high 
schools to be redesignated as middle schools (6-8) "will make 

it possible for pupils to leave one year e-rlier : ny such schools 
that are not or cannot be racially balanced. 



(27) 



d. The grade organization ox all high schools will 
eventually be standardized as 9 tnrough 12. At present 
a].l but two Boston high schools are racially balanced. Thus, 
the overwhelming majority of pupils leaving any racially 
iiabalanced middle schools mdll enter one year earlier a I'acially 
balanced high school. Suggestions presenteu elsewhere in the 
plan will touch upon the possible racial balancing of the 
only two high schools presently imbalanced. 

The designation and organization of the schools listed in 
Parts 2-h as middle schools are planned as of the start of 
classes in September, 196?: 

2. Frank V. Thompson Middle School 

With the completion of the Charles H. Taylor Addition, the 
approximately 300 kindergarten through grade 5 children presently 
housed in the Erank V. Thompson School, will be accommodated in the 
Taylor School. Of this 300, the approximately 60 children presently 
bused from the Christopher Gibson School and the Sarah Greenwood School 
to the Frank V. Thompson will be reassigned to the Charles H. Taylor 
School. With the completion of the planned construction of a school 
in the Christopher Gibson District, (see Project 2) the need for 
transporting these pupils will be eliminated. The approximately 100 
grade 5 '--nd grade 6 pupils presently in the T'.ylor School will be 
reassigned to the Thompson middle school. 

To fill the Thompson middle school to capacity will require the 
drrwing of approximately 250 children from the Oliver Wendell Holmes 



(28) 



Junior High School {11% non-white) and the Solomon Lewenberg Junior 
High School {l\x% non-white). This reassignment of non-white pupils 
will achieve the following desirable results; 

a. 100 non-white children will be removed from the racially 
iiP.balanced Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. High Schools, and reassigned 
to a racially balanced middle school, 

b. The percent of non-white pupils in the Solomon Lewenberg 
Junior High School increased from 25 percent to approximately 

35 percent in one year. In view of this, the school will shortly 
be listed among those racially imbalanced if nothing is done to 
halt this trend. Therefore, the reassignment of 150 non-white 
'pupils from this school will help insure its racially balanced 
composition. 

c. Establishment of a racially balanced middle school, 

d. Relief of overcrowding in two junior high schools. 

3. Patrick T. Campbell Middle School 

The reorganized Patrick T. Campbell Junior High School will encompass 
grades 6 through 8. This reorganization will accomplish txTO goals: 

a„ It will increase by one the number of schools reorganized 
in line with the expressed policy of grade standardization. 

b. It will enable IBU non-white children to leave a racially 
imbalanced school (98^ non-white) for racially balanced high 
schools one year earlier. 



(29) 



U. New Middle School in Coliambia Point 

Presently under construction and scheduled for completion in 
September, 196?, is a new school in the Columbia Point area which is 
designated as a middle school. However, in view of extremely over- 
crowded conditions in the nearby Paul Ao Dever School, it will temporarily 
accommodate some pupils from grades k and 5. 

When this school becomes operative, it will make possible the 
realizations of four desirable goals: 

a. It will increase by one the number of schools in the 
middle school category, 

b. It will contribute to the overall plan to racially 
balance schools (see page 2 of Plan), 

Cs It will eliminate the necessity of busing pupils out of 
the Columbia Point area, 

d. It will contribute to the reduction or elimination of 
racial imbalance in the present Paul A, Dever School, 



-30- 



E. Impact of Short-Term Proposals 

The following outline summarizes the number of children, presently 
in racially imbalanced schools, who will be relocated in racially 
balanced schools as a result of each phase of the short-term measures 
proposed in the Plan: 

1, School Closings 

ao Asa Gray 253 pupils 

b» Aaron Davis 356 pupils 

c . Lewis Colony 2li pupils 

Total 633 pupils 

2, Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity (ICTCO) 

a. I966-I967 participation „„-,.. 220 pupils 

b. proposed increase .„ 280 pupils 

Total 500 pupils 

3« Open Enrollment 

Total 2039 pupils-!!- 

k* Establisbjnent of I-iiddle Schools 

a, Frank V. Thompson 100 pupils-;HS- 

bo Patrick T, Campbell I8U pupils 

Total 28I4 pupils 



^ Non-white pupils transferring voluntarily to racially balanced 
schools a 

-;H'r Pupils from racially imbalanced Oliver Wendell Holmeg Junior High 
School, 



(31) 



THE TOTAL NUMBER OF PUPIIS , PRESENTLY IN RACIALLY IMBAUNCED 
SCHOOLS, VfflO WILL BE RELOCATED IN hACIALLY BAUNCED SCHOOLS AS A 
RESULT OF SHORT TERM IffiASURES IN SEPTEMBER 196?, WILL BE 

3.1456 J 



The impact upon school buildings and school organization as 
a result of the aforementioned short term measures is simmarized 
belows 

ae- The list of racially imbalanced schools reduced 

by three (Aaron Davis, Asa Gray, Lewis Colony), 

b. Two small, antiquated school buildings closed 
(Asa Gray and Aaron Davis) 

c. Three middle schools established (Frank V. 
Thompson, Patrick T. Campbell, and new school in Columbia 
Point area) 

d. Feeder schools for new middle schools redesig- 
nated as kindergarten through grade 5 schools o 



PART II 



CONTINUING ffiOGRAjyiS 



(32) 

CONTIl\fUING ?ROGRA:IS 

A. Introduction 

It is conced&d by rcasonr.blt mt_n the t rc.clc.l irabrlance cannot 
be immedic-tcly eliminated frora the Boston School Systun, Rcrsonable 
men may disagree on the methods for achieving racial balr.nce, but 
all will agree that the attainment of this goal will take tine^ funds^ 
and th^ 'untiring efforts of men and women of good v>rill. Until the 
goal of eliminction of racial irabalance has been attained, the 
Boston Public Schools will continue to provide disadvantaged 
children, regardless of school racial composition, end solely on 
the basis of need, educational enrichment and compensatory services, 
designed to raise aspirations, JMpi^ove self images, and compensate 
for social, economic, end enviromer^ntal disadvantages. 

In addition to compensatory and enrichmtnt services, the Boston 
Public Schools are providing programs of inter-racial and inter-cultural 
exchange visits, especially trained teachers, multi-ethnic textbooks, 
and progrc-ms of educational experimentation and innovation. These 
are but a part of the planned progrcjn to make schools in the 
disadvantage-d areas magnets to attract white and non-white pupils 
alike. 

A brief description of the enrichment, compensatory, and 
innov tive programs follows. Inasmuch as dt^tailed accounts of these 
programs are already on file v/ith the State Department of Education, 
there is no need for an elaboration of these programs in this report. 



(33) 



B, Comijensatory aad Enrichment Progra-Tis 

The Boston School Committee, realizing that the needs of 
children in the heart of disadvantaged areas are urgent and many, 
has implemented and vjill continue to implement programs of a compen- 
satory, enrichment, and innovative nature for these children. Not 
only are these programs designed to meet the immediate needs of 
disadvantaged children, but also to provide such superior educational 
programs and facilities as to attract children from surrounding 
suburban and urban families. 

The general objectives of these prcgraras are: 

1. To increase academic achievement 

2. To raise occupational and aspirational levels 

3. To provide assistance to low achievers 

U. To provide enrichment services for all pupils 
5. To retain pupils in school 

At the present time, although enrichment programs are concen- 
trated at the elementary level, they are in operation at the secondary 
level as well. These programs, originated and financed by the Boston 
School Com-nittoe in 1963, currently operate in 38 elementary school 
buildings, six junior high schools, and one senior high school, funded 
for the most part under provision of Title I of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965. 



(3U) 



In brief, the essential features of enrichment prograins are 
the following: 

1. Modified tean-teaching 

2. Continuous progress - non grading 

3. Special reading programs 

U. Special personi-cl in the areas of art, music, and science 
together with additional pupil adjustment counselors 

5. Research assistants (for individual and group testing) 

6. Psychiatrist (working in conjunction vjith adjustmi^nt 
counselors) 

7. Additional health and social services 

8. Additional pr^-kindi-rgarten and suiriintr enrichment classes 

9. Afternoon remediation and enrichment (junior high school) 

10. Afternoon recreational activities 

11, Summer remedial program (SEREL) (ASPIRE) 



(3$) 



C. Office of Program Development 

1. Federal Aid to Education 

This department is charged with the responsibility of preparing 
all proposals relating to federal and state funding of educational 
prograifis. In this connection, this Office is responsible for the 
analysis of the funding provisions of federal and state legislation 
with an eye to their applicability to the Boston Public Schools. It 
is further the responsibility of OPD to acquaint administrative per- 
sonnel in the different school departments both with the availability 
of funds and the requirements for obtaining such funds. 

2. Model Demonstration Subsystem 

An additional objective of OPD is the development of long-range 
programs of research and experimentation. In this connection, the 
W. L. P. Boardman School was organized as the elementary component 
of the model subsystem to serve as a laboratory for the stimulation 
of creativity in education. The Lewis Junior High School is presently 
functioning as the internediate co.;vonent of the subsystem. Starting 
in September, 196?, the Lewis School will contain the nucleus of a 
high school component embracing grades 9 and 10. 

The best of the experimental and innovative materials and pro- 
grams tested in the subsystem and found effective will gradually be 
introduced into schools at the appropriate level throughout the 
system. 



(36) 



D, Teachers for Urban Schools 

1. College-University Responsibility 

In an effort to improve the quality of teacher trainiag, and con- 
comitantly, the quality of education for Boston children, the Boston 
Public Schools have launched numerous programs in cooperation with the 
many institutions of higher learning located in and near Boston, These 
institutions, for too many years concerned solely iiith the preparation 
of teachers for affluent suburban schools, are now coming to grips with 
the need for training teachers for urban schools. With the urging and 
encouragement of the Boston Public Schools, these institutions of higher 
learning are now utilizing schools in the disadvantaged areas of the 
city as a training ground in which to gain practical experienct. of the 
type desperately needed by today's teachLrs, 

2. In-Service Training 

To ccxnpcnsate for the traditional deficitncies of the teachtr 
training program in schools of education, the Boston Public Schools 
have been conducting for the past three years, and are continuing this 
year, an in-service training program entitled, "Education in Disadvantaged 
Urban Areas." Prominent authorities in the field of behavioral sciences 
and race relations lectare to assembled Boston teachers and aaministrators. 

In addition, Boston's Title I programs provide for regular in-service 
training meetings for teachers, supervisors, and curriculum specialists 
who are called upon daily to cope with the problems related to the 
teaching of the disadvantaged child. 



-37- 



E Inte r-Racial And Inter-Cultiir al Bxchanr;es 

Durinr^ the school year I966-I967, the Boston Public Schools are 
continnTiir a pre ram of inter-school e::chanoes proven so effective 
during the previous school year. These exchan'e programs, together 
with shared field trips, will again pair schools in deprived neighbor- 
hoods xjith schools in more affluent districts. Because of increased 
funds, a considerable increase in the number of exchaaje visits and 
field trips is planned for the present school year. A further 
increase in both the nvunber of participating schools and exchanse 
visics among schools is anticipated for the next school 3^ear, 

On the next page is a listing of the districts paired in this 
inter-school exchange program. The hoped-for expansion of the 
program to include districts other than those listen' will continue to 
develop and strengthen understanding across inter-racial and inter- 
cultural lines. Wherever applicable, the per cent of non-white 
students for the district is indicated. The contemi^lated expansion 
will include more schools in the racially iribalanced category. 

The new schools and districts participating in expanded exchange- 
visit programs will \mdoubtedly coinci<"e, to a great extent, with nex^^ 
schools and districts to be serviced by the compensatory and enrichraent 
programs, which will continue to concentrate on serving the most 
disadvantaged areas of the city. 



-38. 



DISTRICTS PAIRED IN INTER-SCHOOL EXCHANGE PROGRAI>^ 





Name 


Per Cent 




of 


Non-iAThite 




District 


Pupils 


1, 


Christopher Gibson 


85.5 


2o 


Dearborn 


83.3 


3. 


Dill away 


92o2 


h. 


B-'idlsy 


90.2 


5. 


Dwight 


71.7 


6. 


Harvard 

Henry L„ Higginson 




7. 


97.1 


8, 


Hugh O'Brien 


55.6 


9. 


Jefferson 
John Winthrop 




10. 


8U.3 


11 o 


Julia W, Howe 


98.5 


12e 


Norcross 




13 c 


Paiol A. Dever 


65o2 



lU. Phillips Brooks 
l5o Theodore Lyman 
16, William Endicott 



98o3 



96.1 



Name of 
Paired 

District 



Agassiz 
Longfellow 

Francis Parkman 
Edward Everett 

John Marshall 
Chapman 

Patrick Lyndon 

Charles Sumner 

Thomas Gardner 

Emily A, Fifield 

Bennett 

Francis Parionan 

Minot 

Beethoven 

Mary Hemenway 

Roger Wolcott 
James Garfield 

Hart-Gaston-Perry 

Mather 

Warren Prescott 



(39) 



F, Multi -ethnic Textbooks 

There is pi?esently much justifiable concern and activity in the area 
of modernizing and modifying textbooks and other educational materials. 
Some of this activity relates to modernization and updating of content 
to help us meet the challenge of an exploding technology. There must 
be comparable concern and activity in the areas of human relations. Much 
has been done and much remains to be done in the area of equitable 
portrayal of minority groups in our multi-racial society. Justice 
demands that the contributions made by the Negro community and other 
minority groups to the culture and development of this nation be fairly 
represented in the textbooks of its schools. 

It is now and it will continue to be the policy of the Boston 
School Committee to purchase "multi-ethnic" editions of textbooks 
wherever such exist. The Administration of the Boston Public Schools 
has so informed the publishing world. Inasmuch as this policy is a 
matter of record as having been ordered by the School Committee , it 
should be interpreted as one more commitment in the overall plan of 
racially balancing the instructional program of Boston's schools a'S 
it relates to pupils and teaching materials. 



PART III 



SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM 



-uo- 

SCHCOL CONSTRUCT lOT PROGRAM 

A, Introduction 

It is our firm conviction that racially mbalanced schools cannot 
be eliminated in a large city school system by the application of any 
one n;ethod yet devised. Deep as the commitment may be to solve the 
problem of racial imbalance, the panacea is yet to be discovered. All 
will agree, however, that a carefully conceived plan of extensive 
school construction is one method that substantially contributes to 
the elimination of racial imbalance. Yet, it is clearly impossible 
to guarantee that a comprehensive construction program designed in 
February of 196? will meet the needs of this city and its poptilation 
in 197h — or even three years hence, Popxilation mobility, new home 
construction, and the changing racial composition of Boston's 
neighborhoods, are some of the factors that make long-range projections 
regarding racial compositions of proposed new schools, educated guesses 
at best. Nevertheless, since we place great faith in a school con- 
struction program as an important component of any plan, we have 
carefully addressed ourselves to the First Stage Projects presented 
in Part III of the 1966-196? Plan, 

The program of school construction described on the following 
pages carries out the oft-repeated concept of building larger 
elementary schools on the periphery of the non-white neighborhoods, 
to permit drawing pupils from a larger geographic area;- thus ensuring 
a racially balanced pupil population. The first five projects of the 
construction program are direct attempts to apply this principle. 



(>'-^0 



The construction program described on the following pages is 
divided into three stages. The First Stage, defining in great 
detail lit construction proposals, contains those projects for which 
there is urgent need and to which top priority has been assigned 
from the standp-^int of both capital improvement of physical plant 
and the elimination of racial imbalance as mandated by Chapter 6Ul» 
For maximum impact and effectiveness, the 1h First Stage Projects 
should be started and completed simultaneously. 

Upon notification of approval from the State Board of Educa- 
tion for this I966-I967 Plan, the Boston School Committee will 
request the immediate implementation of the First Stage of the School 
Construction Program by the Public Facilities Commission. Attaining 
the goal of completing some of the First Stage Projects by 1970 or 
earlier hinges upon early State Board approval and prompt action by 
the Public Facilities Cnramission and all agencies concerned with 
the construction of schools. 

The wSecond and Third Stages merely list building projects that 
will be developed with the assistance of the Task Force representa- 
tives of the State Department of Education during the months ahead. 



(40b) 



3CHC0L CGNSTRUCTIGiM ?ROGR;u>'i 
B. Listing of First Stage Pro.lects 
New Schools: 

1. Replacement for John Marshall School 

2. Replacement for Christopher Gibson and Atherton Schools 'Jl^vA 

3. Replacement for Champlain, John G. l/\fhittier, and Florence '3-<<- 
Nightingale Schools 

U. Replacement for Jefferson and Charles Bulfinch Schools 

5. Replacement for Norcross, George F. Hoar, and Joshua Bates 
Schools 

6. Humboldt Avenue School 

7. Madison Park High School 

8. Replacement for Thomas N. Hart and Benjamin Dean Schools 

9. Vocational High School and Technical Institute 

10. Replacement for William H. Kent School 

11. High Point Village School 

12. Replacement for Boston Business School 

Additions to Schools: 

1. English High School Addition 

2. Charles H. Taylor School Addition (presently under construction) 



(Ul) 



PROJECT 1 

A new kindergarten through grade $ school will be constructed to 
replace the 64 year old John Marshall School. This new building will 
have a capacity for 1,000 pupils and will be located in th«^ approximate 
area of the present school. 

The present John Marshall School contains 825 kindergarten through 
grade 6 pupils, 98 percent of whom art white. The neighboring Christophi-r 
Gibson School is 86 percent non-white. By revising the attendance lines 
of these two schools, we can achieve a much greater degree of racial 
balance at the new school and make possible the closing of the racially 
imbalanced Christopher Gibson School. 

The present John Marshall School contains the following numbers 

of pupils: 

Kindergarten 1 34 

Kindergcrtcn 2 ....... 40 

Grade 1 151 

Grade 2 Ill 

Grade 3 115 

Grade 4 » 103 

Grade 5 124 

678 

Grade 6 of the John Marshall School is not included in these figures 
since the proposed new school will contain K-5 only. Grade 6 will 
mmve into the Oliver Wendell Holmes, which will be redesignated as a 
middle school. 

Since there are 678 pupils in the John Marshall School to be 
accommodated in the new 1,000 pupil capacity school, and 98 percent of 



iU2) 
these children are white, it will be necessary to transfer 300 non-whitt 
pupils from the Christopher Gibson School to the new school. The racial 
composition of the new school will then be about 70 percent white and 
30 percent non-white. 

Present indications are that by adjusting the attendance- lines for 
the nev/ school to include the section known as Mt . Bowdoin Hill, Rosset^r 
Street, Mt . Bowdoin Terrace, Bcvv-doin Avenue, Mallon Road, Olney Street, 
Geneva Avenue, etc., about 300 non-white children will be affected. 
This area is prtsently included in the Christopher Gibson District. 

Rapidly changing neighborhood patterns may alter these projections; 
nevertheless, we will draw from the neighborhood surrounding the 
Christopher Gibson School sufficient numbers of non-white children to 
open a school whose racial composition will be 70 percent v;hite and 
30 percent non-white. The map found in the Appendix contains the pro- 
posed district lines for this new complex indicated in yellow. 

In summary, the completion of Project 1 will have achieved the 
following desirable results: 

1. 300 non-whitte pupils leave a racially imbalanced school to 
attend a racially balanced one. 

2. An antiquated school is replaced with a larger and more 
modern structure, 

3. The attendance lines of two districts are revised. 

k. The elimination of the racially imbalanced Christopher Gibson 
School and the relocation of its pupils in a racially balanced 
school. 

It is presently intended that the r.' cir. lly brlanced Lucy Stone 

School in the John Marshall L'istrict, with a present enrc'llment of 

352 pupils, will continue to serve approximately this same number of 

pupils from the area south of Lindsey Street. 



(U3) 



If ncccssarj'-, however, tht arcn served by the Lucy Stone School could 
be altered to mointnin a racial balance at both the Marshall and Stone 
Schools o The other two schools presently in the John Ilarshall District, 
the Champlain and the Nightingale Schools, will be considered under 
Project 3» 

PROJECT 2 

A new kindergarten through grade 5 school will be constructed to 
replace the Christopher Gibson and Atherton Schools, 72 and 9$ years 
old respectively. This new building xiill have a capacity for 1,000 
piipils and xjill be located sonewhere near the present boundary line 
dividing the Christopher Gibson and llather Districts,. 

The present Christopher Gibson and Atherton Schools contain 663 
kindergarten through grade 5 pupils, B6-o or 570 of whom are non-white. 
Appropriately 100 pupils v;ho normally would attend the Gibson School are 
being transported by the School Department to schools located in other 
sections of the city. Any new plan for the Christopher Gibson District 
should contain provision for these 100 pupils., 

Tlie district neighboring the predominantly non-white Christopher 
Gibson District to the east is the llather presently 99% white* By 
revising the attendance lines of these two districts (Gibson and Mather) 
plus the district revisions described in Project 1, it will be possible 
to have the new school racially balanced while closing two old school 
buildings both of which are racially imbalanced. 



-ilu- 



The enrollment figures of the present Gibson and Atherton Schools 
are as follows: 



Christ oph er Gibson School 

Kindergarten 1 20 pupils 

Kindergarten 2 15 pupils 

Jr. Grade 1 2U pupils 

Grade 1 108 pupila 

Grade 2 97 pupils 

Grade 3 70 pupils 

Grade k 102 pupils 

Grade 5 60 pupils 

it96 pupils (85.5/S non-white) 



Atherton School 

Kindergarten 30 pupils 

Grade 1 ...,.,.. 55 pupils 

Grade 2 . <, 39 pupils 

Grade 3 ^3 pupils 

167 pupils (66,9% non-white) 

Total of both schools 663 pupils (86^ or 570 non-white) 

Presently bused from Gibson , 100 pupils 

763 pupils 
From this total of 763 pupils, 300 non-white pupils would be assign- 
ed to the new school replacing the John Marshall (see project 1), leaving 
I1.63 pupils, nearly all of X'jhom are non-white, to attend the proposed new 
schoo].. We will assign approximately 537 white pupils from the acutely 
overcrowded Mather School and the Southworth School to the new school, 
creating a racial composition of approximately 60/'o white, kO% non-white. 



-kS- 



Rapidly changing neighborhood patterns may alter these projected 
figures; nevertheless, we will draw from the present prsdrminantly 
white Mather District enough white children to open a racially 
balanced replacement school for the Gibson-Atherton Schools. The 
map found in the Appendix shows in blue the proposed district lines 
for the new school „ 

In summary, the completion of Project 2 will have achieved the 
following desirable results: 

1» Approximately i460 non-white pupils will leave a racially 
imbalanced school to attend a racially balanced schools 

2, Two racially imbalanced schools are eliminated, 

3o Tti-jo antiquated schools are replaced with a larger and 
more modern complex, 

h„ The attendance lines of two districts would be revisedc 

5o The necessity of transporting pupils from the Gibson School 
would be ended, 

6„ Overcrowded conditions at the Mather School would be relieved: 



(46) 



PflOJECT 3 

A new kindergarten through grade 5 school will be constructed to 
replace three schools — ^the Charaplainj the VJhittier, and the Nightingale — 
U2, 62, and 53 years old respectivelyo The new school will have a pupil 
capacity of 1100 and will be located on the east side of Franklin Field 
in the Emily Fifield District, 

The present Champlain, Whittier, and Nightingale Schools contain 
the following numbers of pupils: 

Champlain School 

Kindergarten » ,o 30 pupils 

Grade 1 .o<, 8h pupils 

Grade 2 ,.,.., ■»« 72 pupils 

Grade 3 .oo.,.,c 66 pupils 

Grade h o..o.».. 6U pupils 

Grade 5 ...»...<, 52 pupils 

368 pupils (39% non-white) 

John G, Whittier School 

Kindergarten .,...,.. 25 pupils 

Grade 1 o 66 pupils 

Grade 2 53 pupils 

Grade 3 U8 pupils 

Grade h 36 pupils 

Grade 5 <> 32 pupils 

260 pupils (I25S non-white) 

Florence Nightingale School 

Kindergarten ..,,..., 26 pupils 

Grade 1 ........ 30 pupils 

Grade 2 60 pupils 

Grade 3 32 pupils 

Grade h »......< 31 pupils 

Grade 5 ........ _ U5 pupils 

22U pupils (30$? non-white) 



-hi- 



Inasmuch as the sixth grade of each of the three schools will 
not be housed in the new building, the approximately 120 children 
involved will be accommodated in the Oliver Wendell Holmes Jtmior 
High School which will have been reorganized as a middle school (6-8), 

The new school will accommodate the 852 pupils presently in 
Kindergarten through grade 5 of the three schools which will permit 
the accommodation of approximately 250 non-white children from the 
I'^illiam E. Endicott District, which is racially imbalanced (in excess 
of 9^% non-white). The overall racial composition of the new school 
will then be approximately 60$ white and kO% non -white. 

The Champlain School (capacity UOO) shall be used as an annex 
for the Oliver Wendell Holmes middle school to assist in reducing 
the present high degree of iiabalance in that school. The construction 
of the new school may also make possible the eventual closing of the 
Sarah Greenwood School presently in excess of 9^% non-white. 

To insure the balanced racial composition of the new schools, it 
m.ay be necessary to include a larger section of the Emily Fifield 
District and/or a portion of the Mary Hemenway District, The 
matter of balanced racial composition tirill again be studied as the 
new school construction nears completion and the attendance lines 
drawn accordingly. 

This school will be so constructed as to allow for an addition 
which will permit the maintenance of racial balance consistent with 



-1^8- 



changing neighborhood conditions. The map found in the Appendix 
contains the proposed district lines indicated in orange for the 
new school. 

In summary, the completion of Project 3 will have achieved the 
following desirable results: 

1. Approximately 2^0 non -white pupils, who new attend a 
racially imbalanced school (W, Eo Endicott District), 
will move into a racially balanced school. 

2. Two schools, which will become racially imbalanced in 
the near future, are eliminatede 

3o One larger and more modem building replaces two small, 
old schools. The third school is utilized asiilicated 

in 5 below. 

h. The attendance lines of three districts (Marshall, 

Endicott, and Fifield) are revised. There is a possi- 
bility of some slight revision in the attendance lines 
of the Kemanway District, 

5o The Champlain School would become an annex to the Oliver 
Wendell Holmes School, which will be reorganized as a 
mid.dle sch-jcl (grades 6, 7, 8) as a result of this Plan,, 
The Champlain School will adequately house the 30? sixth 
grade pupils from the Gibson, Marshall, Nightingale, 
Champlain, and Whittier Schools, 



(49) 



PROJECT 4 

A new kindergarten through grade $ school will be constructed 
to replace the Jefferson and Charles Bulfinch schools, 63 and 56 
years old respectively. This new school will have a capacity for 
1,000 pupils and will be located somewhere nef r the present boundary 
line dividing the Jefferson and Martin Districts. 

The IjOOO-pupil capacity and the judicious location of the new 
school would make possible the elimination of three racially imbalanced 
schools — the Charles Bulfinch, the Farragut, and the Maurice Tobin; 
and the closing of two antiquated schools — the Jefferson and the 
Bulfinch, 

The enrollment of the proposed new school would be drawn from 
the following sources: 

JEFFERSON SCHOOL 

Kindergr rten 1 17 

Kindergarten 2 17 

Jr. Grade 1 11 

Grade 1 79 

Grade 2 61 

Graae 3 ....... 61 

Grade 4 65 

Grade 5 57 

368 32% non-whitt 

CHARLES BULFINCH SCHOOL 

Kindergarten 1 23 

Kindergarten 2 18 

Grade 1 65 

(Jrade 2 56 

Grade 3 61 

Grade 4 47 

Grcde 5 35 

305 56;* non-white 



(50) 



From the Farragut School, presently 5? percent non-white, would 
be drawn 30 non-white children who reside on the southeast side of 
Huntington Avenue. This transfer will reap two benefits; the racial 
balancing of the Farragut School, and the elimination of a dangerous 
school crossing at Huntington Avenue for approximately 30 children. 

The new school would draw 13^ more non-white pupils from the 
Maurice Tobin School, which is presently 6? percent non-white and 
somewhat overcrowded. The transfer of 135 pupils to the new school 
would racially balance the Tobin and simultaneously establish a desir- 
able pupil-teacher ratio* This would make the racial composition of 
the new school 55 percent white and hS' percent non-white. 

Rapidly changing neighborhood patterns may alter these projected 
figures; nevertheless, we trill draw sufficient numbers of non-white 
children from the Martin District to open a racially balanced school 
replacing the Jefferson and Bulfinch Schools. The map found in the 
Appendix contains the proposed district lines for the new school, as 
indicated by cross-hatchingo 

In summary, the ccmpletion of Project h will have achieved the 
following desirable results: 

In Three racially imbalanced schools will be eliminated 
(Bulfinch, Farragut, Tobin) o 

2. Approximately 1|50 non-white pupils presently attending 
racially imbalanced schools will attend a larger, more 
modern, racially balanced school, 

3<» The attendance lines of two districts will be revisedo 
kr. Two antiquated school buildings will be closed, 

5.. Dangerous intersections at Huntington Avenue and Tremont 
Street will be eliminated for some childreno 



(51) 



PROJECT 5 

A nev; kindergarten through grade $ school will be constructed to 
replace the Norcross School destroyed by fire, the George F. Hoar 
School, and the Joshua Bates School;, 53 and 83 years old respectively. 
This new school vdll have a capacity of 1,000 pupils and be located 
in the approximate area of Braodway and B Street, South Boston. 

The enrollment of the proposed new school would be drawn from 
the following sources: 



GEORGE F. HOAR SCHOOL 
(includes pupils presently housed in demoimtables) 



Kindergarten 1 20 pupils 

Kindergarten 2 33 pupils 

Jr. Grade 1 „ 18 pupils 

Grade 1 129 pupils 

Grade 2 107 pupils 

Grade 3 101 pupils 

Grade 4 ....... 6? pupils 

Grade 5 ....... 26 pupils 

504 (93^ white) 



JOSHUA BATES SCHOOL 
(Dwight District) 



Kindergarten 23 pupils 

Grade 1 38 pupils 

Grade 2 37 pupils 

Grade 3 36 pupils 

134 (75% non-white) 



(52) 



The approid-jnctely 350 pupils rbquircd. to bring the enrollment 
of the new school up to 1,000 will be drawn from the following sources; 



a) Approximately 150 non-whito pupils from the Abraham Lincoln 
School presently about 72 percent non-v^hite. This vvill not 
only reduce appreciably the degree of racial imbalance in 
the Lincoln School, but will offset the overcrowding which 
is in immediate prospect for this school as a result of the 
infliix of new residents into the Castle Square' Housing 
Development, 

b) Approximately 100 non-white pupils from the Joseph J. Hurley 
School. T?iis school is presently 72 percent non-white and 
overcrov/ded. The transfer of the 100 non-white pupils will 
alleviate the racial imbalance in this schools 



The racial composition of the new school will be approximately 
60 percent v/hite and 40 percent non-white. 

In summary, the completion of Project 5 will have achieved the 

follovdng- desirable results: 

1. One racially imbalcnced school will have been eliminated. 

2„ 250 pupils will have been removed from two racially 

inbalanced schools and relocated in a racially balanced 
school. 

3. A larger, more modern builaing will ht~ve replaced two 
small old structures. 

h. The attendance lines for three districts will have been 
revised. 



(53) 



PROJECT 6 

Humboldt Avenue School - Roxbury 

(Center for innovation and experimentation with nevj and advanced 
educational procedures and equipment.) 

A new elementary- school (K-5) to accommodate 7U0 pupils, providing: 

2i; classrooms 1 library 

2 kindergartens 1 assembly hall 

2. pre-kindergartens 1 playroom 

k learning laboratories 1 cafeteria 
1 art room 

It is our hope to have this new school open in 1969 as a racially 

balanced school. However, the racial composition of the neighborhood 

from which the Humboldt Avenue School will draw the majority of its 

pupils seems to be overwhelmingly non-white. This fact will make it 

extremely difficult to carry out our desire to open this school with 

a racially balanced pupil composition. To compensate for this, however, 

we shall take a number of steps such as the following: 

1, White pupils from all over the city will be informed of 
this unique school and encouraged to attend. 

2, A large niimber of seats vjill be held available for a 
reasonable period of time to accommodate white transferees. 

3, ¥e will explore with the architects and other interested 
officials the possibility of increasing the capacity of 
this school by approximately 2^%. 

U» The services of Boston University will be solicited to assist 
in publicizing the superior facilities and the outstanding 
educational offerings which the new school will provide, and 
to recruit greater numbers of white pupils for this school. 

The proposed school is designed to operate as a "laboratory" school 

in cooperation with Boston University. There, the newest and most 

advanced educational procedures will be pioneered. Designed further to 



(53a) 



operate as a "lighted" school, it will operat-e afternoons and evenings 
for the educational and cultural advancement of the citizens in this 
disadvantaged area. 

It will replace the Williams School, built in 1892; this school 
has a current enrollment of 1^ , and is 100^ non-white. It will also 
replace the W.L,P« Boardman School, built in 1900; this school has a 
current enrollment of approximately 188, and is 98^ non-white. 

Approximately 100 pupils will be reassigned from the William L, 
Garrison School. This will substantially relieve over-crowding and help 
to reduce pupil-teacher ratio in the William L, Garrison School. In this 
school present pupil-teacher ratios in the critical kindergarten and 
first grade areas are in excess of 32 to 1. The over-all average for 
kindergarten through sixth grade is slightly in excess of 30 to 1, This 
school vras built in 1910, and presently is about 99^ non-white. 

Clearly, the success of this plan depends in large measure on the 
understanding and cooperation of the parents and pupils who live in 
the area designated as the location for this proposed school. In 
addition, we solicit both the technical and other assistance of the 
State Department of Education in implementing the plans outlined for 
this new schoolo 

The Boston School Committee has allocated $1,937,000 for this 
new schoolo 



(5U) 



PROJECT 7 
A hew High School (Grade 9-12) to accommodate a minimum of 3000 pupils- 
The site selected for this new high school is in the area commonl7 
referred to as Madison Park, This high school will draw its students 
from all areas of the City^ hopefully, resulting in a racially balanced 
school. It will provide educational, recreational, and cultural facili- 
ties and services for Boston's youth, second to none, and will revitalize 
the area in which it is to be situated. 

There is every reason to believe that the facilities and services 
of this institution would be made available to the adult citizens of 
the City, and it would continue present educational offerings for adult 
citizens J possibly, it would allow for e:rpansion to the end that their 
opportunities for employment and a better life would be enhanced. 

The Boston School Committee has allocated $11,U00,000 for this 
new high school. 

The new high school will permit the following actions: 

a. Relocation of 190 non-white pupils from the Jeremiah E. 
Burke High School to the new high school. The racial 
composition of the Jeremiah E. Burke will then be: 

5^32 white pupils and $19 non-white pupils 

The Jeremiah E. Burke High School will then be racially 
balanced. 

bo From Girls' High School, reassignment of 1^0 non-white 
pupils to the new high school. Although this will not 
racially balance Girls' High, it will remove 150 pupils 
from a racially imbalanced school and relocate them in a 
racially balanced school. 



(55) 



PROJECT 8 

In the Hg.rt-Geston-Perry District of South Boston there will be built 
a new elementciry school (K-$) to accommodate 900 pupils. It will provide: 

a) 2/+ classrooms 1 woodwork shop 

4 kindergartens 1 plr.yroom 

2 special classes 1 cafeteria 

1 sewing room 1 assembly hall 

This new elementary school will house in one building thu pupils 
normally attending the Thomas N. Hart School (1889) and the Benjamin 
Dean School (1899), The projected racial composition will be 10 percent 
non-white. This school has no direct effect on racial imbalance. 

b) The Bostcn School Coirmittee has allocated $2,000,000 for plans and 
construction of this new school. 

PROJECT 9 

A Vocational High School and Technical Institute (grades 9-14) is 
to be built to rcccramcdate approximately 2,500 students. Although the 
site, for this school has not been definitely selected, the proposed 
school will draw from all areas cf the City, hopefully resulting in a 
racially-balanced schccl. 

The Bostcn School Committee has allocated $9,000,000 for this 
neM high school. 



(56) 

PROJIlCT 10 
There will be built in the fbrvord District of Chjrlestown a nei: 
eleraentary school (K-5) to acconmodate 500 pupils, 

a. The new school viill consist of: 

12 classrooms 1 woodwork shop 

2 kindergartens 1 playroom 

1 sewing room 1 cafetorium 

b. It will replace the I/illiam H. Kent School , built in 1895, 
and the racial composition of the new school will not be 
in excess of % non-i.;hite. This school will have no 
direct effect on racial irabalance, 

c. The Boston School Committee has allocated $1,100,000 for 
this school. 

PROJECT 11 
High Point Village -West Roxbury/Roslindale 

a. A new elementary school to accorarfiodate IjSO pupils 

b. It will provide the following facilities: 

12 classrooms 1 woodwork shop 

2 kindercartens 1 playroom 

1 sewing room 1 cafetorium 

c. It makes provision for educational services for the 
residents in the new housing scheduled for the area. 

d. The Boston School Coriimittee has allocated $1,200,000 
for this school, 

PROJECT 12 

The construction of a new Boston Business School is envisioned in the 
i/fest End, to accommodate approximately 1,000 students. Lodern facilities 
to provide the latest in business education will be included. Although 
the site has not been definitely selected, this school will draw from 
all areas of the City, guaranteeing racial balance. 

The Boston School Committee has allocated $350,000 for land and plans. 



ADDITIONS TO SCHOOLS 
A, English High School Addition - Ave. Louis Pasteur, Boston 

a) Alterations to present building and construction of an addition 
to accommodate 560 pupils, providing l6 classrooms, 1 gymnasium, 
and 1 cafeteria. 

b) The completion of this project, with its many ramifications, will 
have a salutary effect on Boston education in many areas. It will 
permit the relocation of colonies presently housed in the 

Thomas A, Edison School (318) - 30% non-white 
Theodore Roosevelt School (USS) - 23^ non-white 

The present inadequate gymnasium ^d cafeteria facilities 
will provide additional instructional space, 

c) On the basis of a 32/1 pupil-teacher ratio, the student capacity 
will be 2000, The projected ratio of non -white students will 

be approximately 2l4^, While this project will not have reduced 
the number of racially imbalanced schools, it most certainly 
will have kept the Edison colony from becoming a racially-imbalanced 
school in the near future, 

d) The removal of the English High colony from the Edison School will 
make possible the initiation of a middle school (grades 6-8) in 
the Brighton area* As indicated in the statement on the rationale 
for the "middle school" concept on page 26 of this doc\iment, middle 
schools (grade 6-8) permit pupils to leave racially imbalanced 
junior high schools for racially balanced high schools one year 
earlier than they normally would. 



(58) 



e) The estim&ted cost of alteratii^ns to English High School 
is $200, 000 o- For the- new addition^ the Boston School 
Committee has allocated $1,686,000. (Total: $1,886,000) 

B. The Charles H. Taylor School Addition (K-$) 

This addition is schedulel for completion in Septenber, 
1967, and consists of completing the skeleton cf the present 
Charles H. Tayler School, thereby increasing the pupil capacity 
by 350. This increase in capacity will trigger the follcwing 
events: 

a) Approximately 2$0 elementary pupils presently housed in 
the Frank V. Thompson School will be accommodated in the 
expanded Charles Taylor Schccl, 

b) The increased capacity will help also to relieve cver- 
crcwding in the Emily Fifield District, Reassignment 
of 100 pupils will reduce pupil-teacher ratios to 
acceptable limits. 

c) With the removal cf elementary pupils from the Thompson 
School, the way will be cleared for implementing a mid- 
dle school program there as explained on page 27 cf this 
document , 

d) The effect on racial balancing will be in that the use 
of this Addition will facilitate the implementation of 
a middle school organization for the Frank V. Thompson 
School. 



(59) 



D» Impact of First Stage Projects on Racial Imbalance 

Projects 6 through 12 and the two school Additions do have an 
indirect Impact upon racial imbalance. However, it is difficult to 
assess with any degree of accuracy precisely what it will be» There- 
forej, the following summary concerns itself vith projects 1 through 5 
as they relate to n-umbers of pupils removed frcm racially imbalanced 
schools f, elimination of racially imbalanced schools, present district 
attendance lines revised, schools prevented from becaning imbalanced, 
and old school buildings replaced* 



Non»-whits pupils affected: 



1. Project 1 ► » . , o , 
? no 

3. " 3 . . 

U. " h 



p •- • » 



c a o 



« a « 



o 300 purils 

o 1;60 pupils 

. ZSO pupils 

, 1+50 pupils 

e 2S0 pupils 



total 1,710 pupils 



Racially imbalanced schools eliminated; 

le Christopher Gibson School 

2o Atherton 

3o Charles Buifinch 

ho Maurice J, Tobiu 

5 . Farragut 

6, Joshua Bates 



District attendance lines revised: 

1, John Marshall 

2, Christopher Gibson 

3 , Mather 

h» William E. Endis-ott 

5. Emily Fifield 

6. Jefferson 



7. Martin 

8. Norcross 

9. Abraham Lincoln 

10, Dwight 

11. Mary Hcmenway 

(possible) 



(6C) 



'i-pvention of racial imbalance: 



1. Champlain School 

2. Florence Nightingale School 



Old Gcljooi buildings replaced: 



1. John Marshall School 

2, Christopher Gibson School 
3- Atherton School 

A. Florence Nightingale School 

5. John G. IVhittier School 

6. Jefferson School 

7. Charles Bulfinch School 
^. George F. Hoar School 
9. Joshua Bates School 



(61) 



SCHOOL CCNSTKUCTIOi^ PHOGHAk 
E. Listing of Second Stage Pro.iects 

1. Dudley-Hyde-Everett Distract - Roxbury 

2. Dearborn District - Roxbury 

3. Henry L, Higginson District - Roxbury 

l+. Abraham Lincoln - Quincy District - South End 

5. Grover Cleveland Junior High School Addition 

6. Agassiz District - Jamaica Plain 

7. Hyde Park High School Addition 

8. John A. Andrew District - South Boston 

9. V.'ashington Allston District - Brighton 



-62- 

SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION ffiOCffiAM 
E. Listing _of Third Stage Projects 

1. Edmund P. Tileston District - Mattapan 

2. Edtfjard Everett District - Dorchester 

3. Emily Fifield District - Dorchester 
U, Hugh O'Brien District - Roxbury 

5. John Winthrop - Phillips Brooks Districts - Roxbury-Dor Chester 

6. Mary Hemenway District - Minot Districts - Dorchester 

7. Mather District - Dorchester 

8. Prince District - Dorchester 

9. Rice Franklin District - South End 

10. Roger Wolcott - E. P. Tileston Districts - Dorchester-Mattapan 

11. Beethoven - Henry Grew Districts - West Roxbury-Hyde Park 

12. Chapman - Sheridan-Kennedy Districts - East Boston 

13. Chariest ovm High School - Charlestown 

lU. Joseph H, Barnes Junior High School - East Boston 

l"^, Longfellow District - Roslindale 

16. Addition to Roslindale High School - Roslindale 

17, Addition to South Boston High School - South Boston 



PAHT IV 



TENTATIVE 1967-1968 PLAN 



(63) 



TENTATIVE PLM FOR 196? -1968 
(effective September I968) 

A. Short-Term Proposals for Iminediate Reduction of Racial Imbalance 
The implementation of anj proposed plan for I967-I968 will depend, 

in large measure, upon conditions existing in the Fall of I968. 

1. Demountable Buildings 

The possibility of using demountable buildings for the dual 
purpose of relieving overcrowding and eliminating racial 
imbalance will be investigated. 

2. Further Expansion of Metco 

As additional communities respond to the appeal for parti- 
cipation made this year by the Boston School Committee, and 
as increased funding becomes available, this effective 
program of racial balancing and integration of suburban 
schools will be expanded. 
3o Additional Middle School Designations 

So Solomon Lewenberg 

b, LsiJis Junior High School 

B , Continuing Programs 

The continuation and desirable expansion of these programs is 
dependent upon the availability of funds. 
C u M odifications of School Corstruction Program 

As previously indicated, school construction projects will be 
developed to meet changing conditions with the technical assistance 
of the Task Force assigned by the State Department of Education. 



V. APPENDIX 



7 12 12 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06315 302 5 



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