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Schlesinger Library 
Radcliffe College 



Culinary CoUection 



Hh/f:3^- 



THE^ 



Pleasantville Cook-Book 



PUBLISHED BT THE 



Lais of tlie MMooo Assoclain 



COMPILED BY 



BERTHA M. ROBBINS, • 

Mes. J. H. GRIFFIN, 

LEWIS O. CLARK. 



Sold at the " Feast of Days," August 1 , 1 894. 



NEW YORK: 

KAY PRINTING HOUSE, 

149-153 Leonard St. 

1894. 






PIERSOM'S 



" dhoiGef BlectioD^ iq ^eed^ and ^M%" 

JUST ISSUED FROM THE PRESS, 

will be naiied tree Id all nbo cequeK It. It it a Urge, tiandiomelr illustrated book, and ii 



The Choicest Selections and the Most Valuable 
Novelties in Seeds and Plants. 

We carry large stocks od our Scuborougb place of RbododendroDS, HardyRoua, PKoalti, 
Shrubbery of all kind*, Ornaraealal and Fruit Trees, Ever|reeiM, Grapei, etc, etc., and 
furojsh everythiuE requiaite tor fittiae out a gentleman's country seat. 

F. R. PIERSOM CO., 

Florists and Seedsmen, 
*!•. o. BO. 444. TARRYTOWN-ON-HUDSON, N. Y. 

Our Celebrated Emerald Green Lawn Grass Seed 

it Ibe best Miitare made lor American Lawn*. If yon want a green, velTcCy lawn, use this 



PREFACE. 



" We may live without poetry, music and art ; 
We may live without conscience, may live without heart; 
We may live without friends, may live without books; 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 

— Owen Meredith. 

This, our first attempt, has been compiled with great care 
and thoughtfulness. Although we have selected a few re- 
ceipts from famous cooks, still the majority are the favorites 
of the housekeepers of our village. 

True, the same receipts in other hands maj'^ not be as 
suxessful, but by remembering the three particulars, 

CAREFULNESS, 

WANT OF WASTE, 

AND GOOD TASTE, 

we trust they will prove delicious. 

Hoping our book will be a comfort into whatever home 
it may enter, we sink silently into the 

Signature, 

COMMITTEE. 



PET OF THE HOUSEHOLD, 



SOUPS. 

aOUFF]feS BOUILLON, or stock for any soup.— Three 
pounds beef, one pound bone, five and one-half quarts clear 
cold water, two ounces salt, two carrots, two large onions with 
two cloves stuck in them, six leeks, one head celery, two 
turnips, one parsnip. Boil until all are tender, set aside to cool, 
next day remove the fat ; in using be careful not to disturb 
the settlings. It is now ready for any garnishing, such as 
croutons, dice of fried bread, vermicelli, etc. 

SOUP JULIENNE WITH POACHED EGGS.— Two 
medium sized carrots, one medium sized turnip, one piece of 
•celery, one core of a lettuce head, one onion; cut them into 
pieces an inch long. Fry the onion in butter, not allowing it to 
brown ; add carrots, turnips, celery (raw if tender, if not boil 
them separately a few minutes). After frying all slowly for a 
few moments, season with a little salt and teaspoonful powdered 
sugar. Moisten them with a gill of broth, boil until reduced 
quite a good deal. ^ Now add two quarts of soup stock which 
has been strained ; remove the stew-pan to back of the stove 
so that the soup will boil partially. This soup is quite good 
enough without eggs, yet they are a pleasant addition ; poach 
them in salted water, turn them, and drop into soup-tureen 
just as it goes to table. — Dubois. 

TOMATO BISQUE.— One quart stewed tomatoes, heat, 
strain, add one-quarter teaspoonful baking soda, one quart 
boiling milk, butter the size of hen's egg^ salt and pepper to 
taste. — Mrs, Geo. B. Rohhins. 

OX-TAIL SOUP. — One ox-tail, two pounds lean beef , four 
carrots, 3 onions, thyme. Cut the tail into several pieces and 
fry brown in butter ; slice the onions and carrots, and when 



you remove the ox- tail from the frying-pan put in these and 
brown also. When done, tie them in a bag with a bunch of 
thyme and drop into the soup-pot. Lay the pieces of ox- tail in 
tlie same ; then the meat cut into small slices. Grate over 
them the two whole carrots, and add four quarts of cold water 
with pepper and salt. Boil from four to six hours in proportion 
to the size of the tail ; strain fifteen minutes before serving it, 
and thicken with two tablespoonf uls of browned flour. Boil 
ten minutes longer. — Marion Harland. 

GREEN PEA SOUP.— Cover a quart of green peas with 
hot water, boil with an onion until they mash easily ; mash, 
add a pint of stock or water, then add two tablespoonfuls of 
butter and one of flour, which have been cooked together, but 
not browned. — Maria Parloa. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP.— One pint milk, one table- 
spoonful flour, one tablespoonful butter, one head of celery, a 
large slice of onion, a small piece of mace. Boil celery in a 
pint of water, from thirty to forty-five minutes ; boil mace, 
onions, and milk together. Mix flour with two tablespoonfuls 
of cold milk, and add to boiling milk ; cook ten minutes ; mash 
celery in water in which it has been cooked, stir into boiling 
milk, add butter, season with salt and pepper, strain, and serve 
immediately. Flavor is improved by adding cup of whipped 
cream when soup is in tureen. — Maria Parloa. 

TOMATO SOUP.— One and a half pound lean beef with 
good sized marrow bone. Boil slowly six hours, cool and skim 
off all grease, add one quart tomatoes, one small onion, two 
tablespoonfuls flour, boil one hour, strain through colander, 
add pepper, salt and squares of bread fried in butter. — Esther 
Underhill. 

TOMATO SOUP, No. 2.— Take two quarts of soup 
stock, strain, let cool, remove the fat; put it in a kettle 
with two quarts of tomatoes, reduced to a pulp by strain- 
ing through a sieve ; thicken with one tablespoonful of corn- 






Orders by Mail 
Promptly attended to. 



^?^. S. REEID, 




MANUFACTURER OF 



Awnings, Tents, Flags, Wagon Covers, 
Hay Covers, Horse Covers, 



YACHT SAILS, and TARPAULINS. 



AWNINGS 
Stored for the Wlnteri 

Repalredf and 
Replaced in the Summer. 



Window Shades made to order. 



MOUNT KI8CO, 



N. Y, 



Use Meed's Spring^Moller Awnings* They Are the Best, 



THE. 



J. M. HORTON 



t^ 



^ Ice Cream Co 



DEPOTS : 



no East 135th Street, 
142 West 125th Street, 



NEW YORK. 



8 

starch, season to the taste. Boil half an hour. — Mrs. William 
Foster, 

POTATO SOUP.— Boil four medium sized potatoes and 
one onion, in water to cover ; when very soft mash 
thoroughly in kettle, then put through colander, add large lump 
of butter, salt and pepper ; strain through sieve. Boil three 
pints of milk, have one egg beaten in tureen, and when ready 
to serve stir milk in potatoes and pour all on egg ; add chopped 
parsley and stir thoroughl3\ 

PUMPKIN SOUP.— Two pounds of pumpkin ; take out 
seeds and pare off the rind, cut into small pieces and put into a 
stew-pan with half a pint of water ; simmer slowly one hour 
and a half, then rub through a sieve and put back on the fire 
with one and a half pints of boiling milk, butter the size of an 
^gg^ one teaspoonful of sugar, salt and pepper to taste, and 
three slices of stale bread cut into small squares. Stir occasion, 
ally, and when it boils serve. — Miss Parloa, 

CREAM SOUP.— Boil all kinds of vegetables, when soft 
mash and strain ; add boiling milk according to number to 
serve, a little butter, salt, pepper and parslej^, small table- 
spoon cornstarch dissolved in milk. — Mrs. J. H. Griffin. 

RICE SOUP. — Put to boil one-half cup of rice in one 
quart of water, when tender press through a sieve, add the 
yolks of three eggs, a cup cream, two tablespoonfuls butter, 
salt and pepper to taste. — Mrs. E. P. Swift. 

CLAM SOUP. — Twenty-five clams opened raw, add three 
quarts of water, boil one-half hour ; one tablespoonful of flour 
stirred with one pint of milk and three beaten eggs ; remove 
from the fire just before boiling. — C. J. B. 

ASPARAGUS SOUP.— A bunch of asparagus cut into 
small pieces and cooked until very tender, strain and add 
seasoning ; add milk and also water to the quantity of soup 
desired ; a little cornstarch blended and put in milk makes 
it better. Save out some of . the small asparagus tips to 



^'■yXTRETCHED cooking makes weary sickness " is a warn- 
ing endorsed by 

Dr. E. P. SWIFT, 

who kindly donates this page. 



10 

add to the soup as a garnish when boiled for the table. — 
Mrs. G. W. Y. 

SPINACH SOUP.— Two quarts spinach leaves boiled 
until tender, add seasoning and milk with cornstarch as above. 
—Mrs. G.W. Y. 



FISH AND SHELL FISH. 

TO BOIL FISH— All fish but salmon (which is put into 
hot water to preserve its color) should be placed in salted, cold 
water, with little vinegar or lemon juice in it, to boil. 

Professionals never boil fish in anything but water satu- 
rated with vegetables, called '^ court bouillon." 

Mince a carrot, onion, piece of celery ; fry them in butter ; 
add some parsley, pepper-corns, and four cloves. Pour on two 
quarts of hot water, one pint of vinegar, let it boil half an hour, 
skim, salt, and use it to boil fish in. Save this, for it can be 
used several times. 

Let the fish only simmer, not boil hard ; serve the fish on a 
napkin, surrounded with parsley ; serve caper, or any kind of 
fish sauce, in sauce-boat. — Dubois. 

TO FRY FISH, it should always be immersed in hot lard 
or drippings, always fat enough to cover the fish. If fat is very 
hot, fish will not absorb any. 

TO BROIL FISH, it should be well greased all over, then 
it will not stick to the broiler. As soon as done, sprinkle salt 
and pepper, and spread with butter, placing platter in oven a 
few moments, so that the butter will soak into the fish. 

BAKED FISH. — When cleaning the fish do not remove 
head or tail. Stuff it, winding cord several times around fish. 
Lay several pieces of pork, cut in strips, across the top. 
Sprinkle pepper, salt, water, and bread crumbs, put hot water 
in the pan, bake in hot oven, basting very often, or fish will 
be very dry. Stuffing, pare three raw potatoes, chop fine one 



'WJtoBatoHi. 



ind CHOCOLATE 

'HIS COUNTRY, 

received Imaa tbe Judges of tbe 

WORLD'S 
MBIAN EXPOSITION 

lighest Awards 

(Uedala >Dd DIplomaB) 
lach of the following a ttlcles, 
namelj: 

BKEAEFA8T COCOA, . . 
Premium Ko. 1, Chocolate, 
Oennaii Sweet Chocolate, 
Vaailla Chocolate, . . . 
Cocoa Butter. 



even eoiupuslcloo," 
SOLD BY CB OCERS E VERYWHERE. 

VValter Baker & Co., 

DORCHESTER, MASS. 



12 

good sized onion, two crackers rolled fine, butter size of hen's 
^SS} pepper and salt to taste. 

BAKED BLUEFISH.— Take a blueflsh weighing about 
three pounds and wash and prepare for cooking. Take one- 
half cupful of bread crumbs, one egg, 2b little melted butter, 
season with salt and pepper, mix all together, and spread over 
the fish after it has been put into a dripping-pan. Place around 
the fish pieces of suet or pork, pour half a cupful of water in 
the pan and bake — basting often. — Esther C. Foster. 

STEAMED SALMON.—One can of salmon, two crackers 
pulverized, four eggs, salt, Cayenne pepper. Drain juice from 
salmon, remove bones and skin, and mash with fork, then add 
other ingredients. Steam one hour, then serve with sauce 
made as follows : One cup milk, juice from the salmon, one 
tablespoonful cornstarch, sallf and little celery seed. Boil, 
then add one beaten egg, and remove from stove. 

The salmon maj^ be baked, if more convenient than steam- 
ing. — May A. Stoutenburgh, 

CODFISH CAKES.— To make a dozen cakes. One-half 
pound salt fish, six potatoes boiled and chopped fine, butter 
size of a hen's eggy pepper to taste. Fish must be soaked and 
picked very fine. — Mrs. Bobbins. 

CLAM CHOWDER.— Three slices of salt pork, cut in 
small dice, put in the bottom of kettle and let fry slowly until 
brown, then add one quart of water, five medium sized pota- 
toes and four onions (chopped), let boil until tender, then add 
a half peck of clams (chopped) with all the liquor, one can of 
tomatoes, large cupful of oyster crackers (whole), season 
with red pepper and a little thyme ; salt if necessary. Boil 
two or three hours, if too thick add water. — Mrs. Hoyt. 

WASHINGTON PAN ROAST OYSTERS.— Take some 
slices of bread and toast them. Put the toasted bread in 
small pans about four inches in diameter, then put 03^sters 
enough in to cover the toast. Pepper and salt, and a lump of 
butter size of a nut into each pan. Cover with about two or 
three tablespoonfuls of the oyster liquor. The oysters should 



13 



QOMPLIMENTS OF :: :: :: 



~N 



Kensico Cemetery 



TOWNSEND MATHEWS, 

MANUFACTURER OF AND DEALER IN 

CARRIAGES, SPINDLES, SPRING WAGONS 

Carts, Trucks, and Harness. 



HORSE CLOTHING AND STABLE SUPPLIES, 

BUCKEYE MOWERS, and HARROWS. 



MOUNT KISCO, . . . . N. Y. 
CARRIAGE REPOSITORY AHD RESIDEHCE, on Kisco Aienne. 

MANUFACTORY, on Railroad Avenne. 



14 

not be cooked too much, only heated through. — Mrs, Thos. C. 
Bell. 

PICKLED OYSTERS.— One quart vinegar, one ounce 
allspice, one ounce cloves, one ounce mace, one-half ounce cin- 
namon. Scald the spioes in the vinegar, and when cold add 
the oysters. The next day scald all together. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 
One quart of sweet cream, fifty oysters in shell; 
Butter, pepper, and salt to season them well. 
Let the oysters in just their own liquor get hot, 
But the cream you must heat in a separate pot. 
When sufficiently cooked, skim, then carefully fish 
Out each succulent oyster, and la.y in a dish 
To keep hot. Then the liquor and sweet cream combine. 
And thicken with cracker crumbs powdered quite fine ; 
Add the oysters and season, then taste, and you'll feel, 
I am sure, that this recipe is worth a great deal. 

— Cleveland Cook-Book, 

PLAIN LOBSTER.— One good-sized lobster cut into 
small pieces or chopped fine, as one wishes, place in frying pan, 
with a little cream and butter ; after browning serve on but- 
tered toast. — Mrs. Bobbins, 

OYSTER PATTIES.— Line patty-pans with thin pastry, 
pressing it well to the tin. Line with paper, brush them over 
with the white of an egg. Cut an inch square of thin pastry, 
place on centre of each ; brush this also with egg, and bake 
about twenty minutes. When nearly cold, remove paper. 
Scald oysters (allowing three for each patty) in their liquor. 
Cut each in four and strain liquor. Cook two tablespoonfuls 
of butter and two of flour in a sauce-pan, then pour half a pint 
of oyster liquor and half a pint of milk or cream into this mixt- 
ure. Stir until it is a thick, smooth sauce, put the oysters in 
and let cook, beat yolks of two eggs, remove the oysters from 
fire for one minute, and stir eggs in until the sauce looks like 
thick custard. Fill the patties with this fricasse, taking care to 
have patty cases hot before you fill them. — Mrs, J, H, Griffin. 





15 

< wiiiiiniiiimi..iii....-TfiiiiiiiimiLii.TrTTin..iiiiiiin.Liiiinnnmmiii.p 

A ?ST»Ti.i.^.H.l.liMinilITIiA^ffiii.;.;,AL,lJiitJUI^lWimrtMHIHWllWHfllH,1 

4«a.50 CAST 43-?? ST.. 

on uumo ccntrai ocfor. 

fVe are always pleased to have visitors in 
the city call in to see us before going home. Our 
location opposite the Grand Central Station 
making it convenient for them to do so. 

We would particularly mention our Candy Depart- 
ment, in which you would find attractive packages of 
confectionery, among which are 

Charles & Co.'s Cream Peppermints, 

Chocolate Peppermint Pralines, 

Superior Bonbons and Chocolates, 
Jordan Burnt and Smooth Almonds, 
Extra Large Cream Almonds, 

Superfine Marshmallows, Etc., Etc. 

These candies are manufactured under our direc- 
tion and are packed under our supervision. All mail 
orders promptly attended to. Goods carefully packed 
for shipment. 



Office, AS East 4:3ca Street, 
Telephone, 401 38th St., NH^W YORK CITY. 



16 



MEATS. 

For roasting beef allow ten minutes to the pound. 

The best cuts for roast beef are the sirloin and tenderloin* 

BEEFSTEAK AND MUSHROOMS.— Broil your steak, 
not too well done ; have ready a gravy made as follows : pour 
into a hot frying-pan some flour and water mixed, be sure it is 
not lumpy, add a tablespoonful of beef extract or stock, pepper 
and salt, then add a half cup of sherrj" wine and as many 
mushrooms as desired, and heat all thoroughly through; when 
serving garnish your dish with mushrooms, parsley, and the 
gravy poured over the steak. — Mrs, Thos. C. Bell, 

TO ROAST VEAL.— Take a fillet of veal weighing six or 
eight pounds. Put in pan, dredge with pepper and salt, then 
cover with a pint of sour cream, baste often and serve with the 
sauce made by the sour cream ; garnish with fried potatoes 
and parsley. — Minnie Choate. 

RAGOUT OF BEEF.— Round of beef cut in small pieces 
each as large as an egg. Put pieces in pot with butter, stir 
until brown, pour on water, add onions, pepper, salt, and 
parsley ; cook three hours. When meat is cooked take it out ; 
add one egg beaten with as much water as egg, thickened with 
a teaspoonful flour. If gravy is too thick, before putting in 
eggf thin with hot water, pour over the meat and serve. — Mrs, 
J. 0. H. 

HAM AND VEAL LOAF.— Chop equal quantities of cold 
boiled ham and veal separately, but fine ; six eggs boiled hard 
also chop fine. Place in baking-dish layer of veal, sprinkle 
salt and pepper, moisten with water, another layer of ham, 
then layer of eggs with pepper and salt over them. Keep on 
until dish is full. If the ham has no fat on it add some butter 
melted and poured through, cover the dish and bake four hours; 



17 

CHARTERBD X854. 

The Sing 5inq Savings Bank 

OR SINQ SINO, N. Y. 



STATEMENT, JANUARY i, 1894. 



}• PAR YAUJE. MARKXT VAL. 

United States Bonds, 4s $80,000 00 $88,800 00 

New York City Bonds, 3s, 6e, 88. Ts 1*^,000 00 1«3,5«) 00 

Brooiclyn City Bonds, fis and 7s 16,000 00 21,860 00 

Albany City Bonds, 4s and 7s 70,000 00 84,500 00 

Syracuse 1 ity Bonds, 7s 20,000 00 27,600 00 

Yonkers City Bonds, 7s 8,000 00 12,000 00 

Long Island City Bonds, 68 and Ts. 5,500 00 6,825 00 

Kingston City Bonds, 68 12,000 00 15,600 00 

Saratoga Town Bonds, 4^s 15,000 00 16,b00 00 

Newtown Town Bonds, fis 2a000 00 23,600 00 

Seneca Falls Town Bonds. 68 28,000 00 32,200 00 

Town of New Loto Bonds, 58 10.000 00 11,800 00 

Town of Chautauqua Bonds, 58 19.000 00 21,400 00 

Lansingburgh Village Bonds, 48 20 000 00 21,200 00 

OatoUll Village Bonds, 48 20.000 00 21,200 00 

Irvington VilUM[e Bonds, 48 10,000 00 10,400 00 

Ossining Town Bonds, 4^8 5,000 00 5,000 00 

Westchester County Bonds 50,000 00 50,000 00 

District of Columbia 10,ao 00 10,300 00 

BealEstate 8,000 00 6,000 00 

Bonds and Mortgages 875.925 00 875925 00 

Cash on hand and m Trust Companies 45,340 70 45,340 70 

Accrued Interest on Bonds to January 1, 1894 31,205 64 31,295 64 

I«IABII«ITIES, $1,508,061 34 $1,602,206 34 

Principal due Depositors January 1, 1894 $1,352,589 40 

Interest due Depositors January 1, 1894 26,657 1 1 $1 ,378,1 46 51 $1,378,146 51 

Surplus $139,914 83 $224,050 83 

JAMES WILLIAMSON, Premdent S. M. SHERWOOD, Vice-President. 

ISAAC B. NOXON, Secretary, SAMUEL WATSON, Attorney. 

Sing Sing, January 1, 1894. 

E. T. JAMES, 

JEWELER, OPTICIAN, WATCHES, 

Diamoncis and Silverware. 

My optical department is a specialty, and glasses are care- 
fully fitted to correct all visual defects. 



. T. J" A TVTES, 

153 Main Street,  SING SIJiQ, N.5Y. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 
TVILLE, - - N. Y. 



18 

set aside to cool, so as to cut in slices ; makes a nice relish 
for tea. 

BALTIMORE FRIED CHICKEN.— Boil chicken which 
has been cut into nice pieces, or rather disjointed, until tender 
but not so the meat leaves the bone. Remove from kettle, sav- 
ing the broth for soup stock ; when cold and dry, place in 
frying-pan half full of hot fat until a delicate brown. Serve 
on biscuits, not raised, which have been split open, and cover 
the platter ; then pour over all the gravy made of a portion of 
the broth thickened with a little flour just mixed in a little 
water, with lumps all pressed out, and salt to taste ; garnish 
with parsley. — Mrs, G. B. Bobbins, 

BEEF MOSAIC— Mince fine cold roast or boiled beef. 
Roll some bread into coarse crumbs and pack in layers in a 
baking-dish, just a layer of meat, then one of bread crumbs, 
then one of stewed tomatoes, dotting it over with small bits of 
butter; salt and pepper to taste. Repeat this until all the 
meat is used up ; moisten with a half cup of soup stock or 
gravy, cover with a last layer of bread crumbs, and bake in a 
quick oven. Makes a nice luncheon or tea dish. — Mrs. Thos, 
C. Bell. 

BEEF RISSOLES.— Cut the meat from the roasted joint 

*or beef steak left from breakfast, chop it fine, picking out all 

bits of gristle. If salt pork is liked, chop a bit of it with the 

meat, add one tea cup chopped bread to one tea cup meat ; if 

bread is stale moisten with milk. — Mrs. J. H. Griffin. 

SWEET BREADS FRIED.— Par boil them as soon as you 
get them. Remove the tough parts carefully. Let them lie in 
cold water a short time before using, then roll in cracker 
crumbs. Season with salt and pepper and fry ; serve with to- 
mato sauce. Stew six tomatoes one-half hour with two cloves, 
a sprig of parsley, pepper and salt; press this through a sieve, 
put a little butter into a sauce-pan over the fire ; when it 
bubbles add a heaping teaspoonful of flour; mix and cook well; 
add tomato pulp, stirring until smooth. — Mrs. Bobbins. 



CRANE & CLARK, 

Lirnikr and Timber 

DEALERS, 
Foot of 30th Street, North River, 

NEW YORK. 



20 

'' PORK AND CANDLES," BAKED HAM.— Cover a 
harn with cold water and simmer slowly, just long enough to 
loosen the skin so that it can be pulled off ; probably for two or 
three hours ; when skinned, put into dripping-pan in the oven 
and pour over it one teacupful of vinegar, one of hot water, in 
which dissolve one teaspoonful mustard. Bake slowly, basting 
with the liquid frequently for two hours ; then cover the ham 
all over to the depth of one inch with brown sugar, press firmly 
with the hand; let it remain after covering with the sugar 
until it becomes a rich brown. When done, put in a dish to 
cool ; when cool, not cold, press by turning another flat dish on 
top, with weight over it. To be served with sauce made as 
follows : A stick with wicking doubled on, a kettle of hot tallow, 
dip the wicks into tallow, allow to cool, dip again, and cool 
again ; dip and cool until the desired size is obtained ; to be 
served as candles in candelabra to enlighten the pork and 
carver. — C. J, B. 

CRUST FOR POT-PIE.— To one quart flour take one 
tablespoonf ul butter, one teaspoonful salt, three even teaspoon- 
fuls Royal baking-powder, and milk enough to mix dough 
right to make into balls, using care not to get too stiff. Boil 
about twenty minutes. — Mrs, Griffin^s ^^Annie,'^ 

CORNED BEEF HASH.— Two-thirds corned beef, one- 
third potatoes, chopped fine ; butter size of two hen's eggs, 
handful bread crumbs, one Qgg well beaten ; thoroughly mix ; 
try until a little brown, but must be moist ; if too dry, add a 
little hot water, a few tablespoonf uls. Let the lower side brown, 
turn into platter, a poached egg for each individual upon the 
top. — Mrs, Bobbins. 

FRICASSEE CHICKEN.— Cut up the chicken and boil 
with one cup of butter in sufficient water to cover until quite 
tender. Brown each piece in a well-buttered frying-pan. To 
make the gravy : To two teacupfuls of the drippings add one 
tablespoonful of flour stirred evenly m one cup of cold water. 
Boil a few minutes. — C, J. B, 



81 



T> USSELL S. WALKER cheerfully donates this page for 
extra receipts. 



oo 



VEGETABLES. 

TIME TO COOK, 

CABBAGE should be boiled three hours, and three miles 
from the house. 

POTATOES.— Boiled, thirty minutes. 

*^ Baked, forty-five minutes. 

SWEET POTATOES.—Baked, forty-flve minutes. 

*^ ** Boiled, one hour. 

SQUASH. — Boiled, twenty-five minutes. 

" Baked, forty-five minutes. 

GREEN PEAS.— Boiled, twenty minutes. 

SHELL BEANS '' one hour. 

STRING BEANS '' three to four hours. 

GREEN CORN.— Thirty minutes. 

ASPARAGUS 

SPINACH.— Forty-five minutes. 

TOMATOES, STEWED.— Twenty minutes. 

CAULIFLOWER.— One to two hours. 

DANDELIONS 

BEET GREENS.— One hour. 
ONIONS.— One to two hours. 

BEETS.— One to two hours. 

TURNIPS.— One to two hours. 

PARSNIPS.— One to two hours. 

CARROTS —One to two hours. 



23 



A GOOD FIRE 

is the essential to success in cooking. 

Tlie undersigned will supply the best of 
COAL at reasonable pricest 

S. WOOD CORNELL, 

Pleasantville, N. Y. 



24 

Vegetables are very much improved to have a piece of 
pork boiled with them. 

BOSTON BAKED POTATOES.— Take a deep baking- 
dish, pare the potatoes, and slice them ; put in a dish a layer 
of potatoes, and sprinkle with salt, pepper, and a little butter, 
then another layer of potatoes, etc., until the dish is nearly 
full; then fill with milk or cream ; takes one hour and a half. 
— Cleveland Cook-Book. 

SCALLOPED POTATOES.— In baking-dish place layer 
of potatoes cut \&ry thin, sprinkle with salt and pjpper, small 
pieces of butter, and a little flour; another laj'er of potatoes, and 
so on, until dish is full. When full fill with milk until all po- 
tatoes are covei-ed, place cover over dish, and bake in steady 
oven for one hour, and perhaps more; when done, take cover 
off, and let the top brown. — Mrs. Thos. Pierce. 

POTATOES A LA CREAM.— Peel potatoes, and slice 
very thin; put a layer of potatoes, then salt and pepper; an- 
other layer of potatoes, and so on, until you have sufficient. 
Cover with milk in which is dissolved one tablespoonful of flour. 
Bake in earthen dish one hour or more. — Mrs. Swift. 

SARATOGA CHIPS.— Take four good-sized tomatoes, 
pare, slice with potato-slicer very thin, let them stand in bowl 
of cold water until starch is removed; lay each separate upon 
a cloth so as to absorb all moisture, have kettle of boiling hot 
fat, a handful of slices in wire basket plunged in fat ; remain 
«ntil a delicate brown; let them drain in oven, sprinkle a little 
salt, and serve hot; this quantity of potatoes will be sufficient 
for several meals, as they keep very nicely. — Mrs, Bobbins. v 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES.— Scald and peel the toma- 
toes, cut in thin slices, and put in a buttered baking-dish a la^^er , 
of tomatoes and a layer of bread crumbs ; season with salt, *' 
pepper, and bits of butter; have the last layer of crumbs. Bake 
about one hour. 

BAKED CORN. — One can corn, or one dozen ears corn, 
one pint of milk, two eggs well beaten, one tablespoonful sugar. 



XINGSFORD'S; 

OSWEGO STARCH 

FOR FOOD. 



XiDgsford's Com Starcb 

lstb("ORlGIHlL"ultlieBeST 

FOR THE LAUNDRY 



'''Silver Oloss" is a giant in Elrenglb, incomparable for laces and line ilnen. 

'Killgsford'S " Pure " Stareh is well adapted to economical liousekeepeti. 
IClllKsford'S "Launilro" the perfect cold water starch. TRY tT 1 
T. KINGSFORD A SON. 0>wcoo. W. V. 

The Wonderful Weber Tone is found 
ONLY "i '"E 

^ CO* 

iy o 



,^ 



WAREROOMS : 

Fifth Avenue and I6th Street, NEW YORK. 



26 

one teaspoonful salt, pepper to taste, small piece butter, one- 
tablespoonf ul flour. — H. G. 

BAKED PUMPKIN.— Cut the pumpkin flrst in halves,, 
then in quarters, remove the seeds, but not the rind; place in 
a baking-pan with the rind downward, and bake in a slow oven 
until tender. When done, serve in rind, help it out by spoon- 
fuls as you would mashed potatoes, serve with cream sauce. — 
Mrs. Oriffin. 

BOSTON BAKED BE ANS.— Parboil one quart of baking 
beans, one-half pound salt pork in baking-bean pot, one table- 
spoonful molasses, one-quarter teaspoonful baking soda ; now 
put beans in baking- pot, fill pot up with hot water; take from^ 
twelve to fifteen hours in slow oven ; add hot water once in the- 
time. — Mrs. Eobbins, 

ONIONS, WITH CREAM.— Boil the onions, putting 
them into boiling salted water, with a little milk added, until 
tender; drain, and put them into a stew-pan, with a white^ 
sauce made as directed for cauliflowers. Let them simmer a 
few moments. Serve with the sauce poured over. — Mrs. Rob- 
bins. 

GERMAN MACARONI.— For a famUy of six persons- 
take four eggs, four cups of flour, one teaspoonful of salt, and 
enough milk to make a dough of the same consistency as pie 
dough; divide in four parts, and roll each part out to the thin- 
ness of pasteboard ; then let it dry for one hour ; afterwards 
roll it up after the manner of jelly rolls, and cut in very thin 
slices; spread them out to dry thoroughly, put in boiling salt 
water, and let boil for twenty minutes ; brown some cracker 
dust in butter, and pour over it. — Mrs. Crolly. 

FRIED TOMATOES.— Take large ripe tomatoes and cut 
in slices one-half inch thick, rejecting the first and last slice. 
Roll them in egg and cracker dust, and slowly fry brown and 
in plenty of butter ; sprinkle pepper and salt over them, serve 
on a hot dish ; scald the sliced tomatoes in the salt water before 
frying. — Mrs. J. H. Oriffin. 



•>7 



POLAND 

A pure "water, medicated by nature. 

Give Nature a fair chance and she will 
cure troubles of kidneys, bladder or di- 
gestive organs without need of resorting 
to drugs, and without danger of bad 
after- effects. First discovered and only 
known solvent of calculi in the kidneys 
or bladder, and received the highest 
and only award at the World's Fair for 
''great purity, and as a natural me- 
dicinal water." 

For circulars containing physicians' 
indorsements, etc., address 

POLAND WATEB, 8 Park Place, y. Y. 



28 

FRIED EGG PLANT.— Slice the egg plant without par- 
ing into five or six pieces, omitting the end parings. Boil in 
salted water five minutes to extract the strong taste; drain, dip 
•each slice in beaten egg, and then in bread crumbs. Fry a 
light brown on both sides in butter or dripping. 



ENTREES. 

PANCAKES. — Six eggs, a pint of milk, one heaping tea- 
spoonful salt, one cupful flour, one tablespoonful sugar, one of 
melted butter or of salad oil. Beat the eggs very light and 
add the milk. Pour one-third of this mixture on the flour, and 
beat until perfectly smooth and light ; then add the remainder 
and the other ingredients. Heat and butter an omelet-pan; 
pour into it a thin layer of the mixture. When brown on one 
side, tui^n and brown the other. Roll up, sprinkle with sugar, 
and serve hot, or cover with a thin layer of jelly and roll. A 
number of them should be served on one dish. — Maria Parloa. 

PILAFF. — Two cups water, one cup rice, put on the water 
with a little salt, and add the juice of one or two tomatoes to 
the water, or sufficient to color it. When the water boils put 
in the rice and boil until all the water is soaked up, then add 
melted butter to taste, covet* and keep in a warm place, but not 
on the fire, until dinner is served. — Cleveland Cook-Book. 

SALMON CROQUETTES.— To one can salmon, picked 
fine, allow one-half as much grated bread crumbs and cracker 
dust together, juice of half large lemon, little weak vinegar, 
tablespoonful melted butter, salt and pepper. Make into pear- 
shaped balls, roll in egg and cracker dust, and fry. — M, (7. 
Griffin. 

PEACH FRITTERS.— Put a heaping cupful of flour into 
a bowl; add two yolks of eggs, a tablespoonful of olive oil, 
which is better than melted butter, and one or two tablespoon- 
f uls brandy wine or lemon juice. Stir it well, adding, little by 



29 

John F. Miluer. J. Hevby Holden. 

MILLER Sc HOLDEN, 

DEALERS IN 

WOOD nsr«r COAL 

All Coal Screened and Clean. 



^irOOD IN ANY SHAPE OR QUANTITY. 



Agents for Bradley's Fertilizers, also Land Plaster. 

OPPICB AMD YARDS s 

No. I MAIN STREET, SING SING, N. Y. 

NO NEED TO NEGLECT YOUR TEETH BECAUSE OF HARD TIMES. 

I^OOK AX XHI8 X] 

A good substantial Plate of Teeth - $5.00 
Cement Fillings . - - - 50c. 

Gold Crowns $5.00 

^WORIC DONE BY ELECTRIC LIGHT, 

141 Main Street, Sing Sing, N. Y. 

iWM, M, FANOHER, Dentist, 

KatabUrilied x87s« 

o. h:. 



DEALER IN 



Diamonds, Watches, SilYeriare, Jewelrl, Clocks, &c., 

Between Third and Lexington Avenues, :NH'W Y0RK» 

CRYSTAL SPECTACLES A SPECIALTY. 



Orders for Repairing Promptly Attended to at my Residence In PleasantTtllo. 



30 

little, water enough to give it the thickness of ordinary batter. 
This may be-used at once; but it is better to put it away for a 
day, or even for a week. At the moment of cooking stir in 
well the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Add a pint 
of peaches cut into small pieces. When done> sprinkle sugar 
over the tops. 

TOMATO OMELET.— Three eggs, half cup milk, two ripe 
tomatoes, peeled and cut up. Beat eggs very light. After 
putting butter in the omelet- pan add milk and a little salt to 
eggs ; turn in pan ; then add pieces of tomato. When done, 
double together, and tomatoes are in the centre. 

BALTIMORE SME ARK ASE.— Make a thin covered 
bag of cheese-cloth with hem at longest side for draw-string. 
Pour 3^our sour milk in and hang it to a tree in the shade until 
<xll of the whey has dripped out. Then mix a good -sized piece 
of butter with the curd, and salt to taste. Form in cakes and 
put in cool place. Delicious eaten with a little cream. — Mrs. 
Thos. C. Bell. 

OYSTER OMELET.— Four eggs, chop six large oysters, 
one-half cup flour, one-half pint milk, a little salt, stir well 
together, and fry on a hot griddle. — C. J. B. 

SWEET OMELET,— Add a little sugar to the eggs in- 
stead of pepper and salt, make it thin as a plain omelet, en- 
closing in the centre any kind of preserves, marmalade or jam. 
When it is turned on to the dish sprinkle sugar over the top. 
— Mrs. Bobbins, 

BAKED EGGS. — Separate whites and yolks of egg. 
Beat whites to a stiff froth and put in individual dishes. Drop 
one unbroken yolk in centre of each dish, sprinkle with salt and 
pepper, and bake three minutes. — Mrs. Cornell. 

OMELET. — One heaping tablespoonful flour, one cup milk, 
a little salt, six eggs ; beat yolks first, put in milk, then beat 
whites. Butter pan, heat it hot ; while it is heating mix the 
whites with the other. Bake fifteen minutes. — Mrs. Smith. 



31 



THE WHITE PLAINS BANK, 



White Plains, N. Y. 



iOAVID CROMWELL, President. IRVING W. YOUNG, Vice-Pres, 

CHARLES PROPHET. Cashier, 

DIRECTORS: 

H. T. MONTGOMERY, MOSES W. TAYLOR, M. G. HART, CHARLES P. SHER- 
WOOD, JOHN HOAG, JAMES H. MORAN, IRVING W. YOUNG, 
F. H. NOWILL, DAVID CROMWELL. 

Open for the transaction of business from 9 A.M. to 

3 P.M. every business day. 

It offers depositors every facility which their business, balances, and 
responsibility justify ; accepts checks on all points on deposit ; collects cou- 
pons and drafts, makes prompt returns on collections^^ and Is as liberal with all 
its customers as Is consistent with conservative banking. 

Your Account Solicited. 



THE HOME SAVINGS BANK 

OR 

White Plains, N. Y. 

'Open every business day from 9 A.M. to 8 P.M. and 

Monday evenings from 6 to 8. 

Pays 4 per cents Interest to Depositors. 

JDAVID CROMWELL. President. WILLIAM B. TIBBITS, \st Vice-Pres, 
E. C. SNIFFEN. 2d Vice-Pres. H. S. HAMILTON, Secretary. 

M. G. HART, Attorney and Counsel. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON BOND AND MORTGAGE. 



32 

MRS. USHER'S OMELET— Four eg^s, yolks and whites:^ 
beaten separately; scant half cup milk and little salt. 

OMELET. — Beat the yolks of eight eggs very light, add 
sixteen tablespoonfuls milk, one saltspoonful salt. Place- 
greased frying-pan on stove ; when pan is hot pour in the above.. 
Let it remain until it simmers, then add the whites of the eggs,, 
beaten very light, stirring them in as gently as possible. 
Bake in a very hot oven twenty minutes. — Mrs, Charles JBT^ 
Hall. 



SALADS. 

SALADS. — To make a perfect salad, there should be a. 
miser for oil, a spendthrift for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and 
a madcap to stir the ingredients and mix them up together,, 
— Spanish Proverb. 

BEET AND POTATO SALAD.— One quart of beets and 
potatoes, one small white onion, one-half cup weak vinegars- 
two teaspoonfuls oil, pepper, and salt, add parsley, cook pota- 
toes with skins on, and cool before cutting up with beets. — Jf. 
C. G. 

CABBAGE SALAD.— Part of ahead of cabbage, cut fine,, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper, and set in the oven to wilt while 
the dressing is getting ready. 

DRESSING.— One-half teaspoonful mustard, one table- 
spoonful sugar, one-half cup vinegar, yolk of one egg, butter,, 
half the size of an egg. Put on the stove until the butter is^ 
melted, stir in one-half cup cream. Let it simmer, not boil,, 
then throw over cabbage. 

SALAD DRESSING WITHOUT OIL.— Six tablespoon^ 
fuls melted butter, six tablespoonfuls milk, one teaspoonful 
salt, one teaspoonful mustard, two teaspoonfuls sugar, one- 
fourth teaspoonful black pepper, one cup vinegar, put all on 
stove to boil, then pour in two well-beaten eggs. Beat five- 
minutes with egg-beater. — Mrs. Oscar Griffin. 



33 



'T'HIS page IS paid for by 

Dr. JAMES WILSON OASSELL, 

who recommends the patrons of this book to let appetite yield 
to reason. 



34 

FRENCH DRESSING.— One tablespoonful vinegar, three 
tablespoonfuls oil, one saltspoonful salt, one saltspoonful pep- 
per, a little scraped onion. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING.— Beat the yolk of an egg 
very light with an egg-beater, then add a saltspoonful of salt, 
half a teaspoonf ul mustard, and beat again. Add olive oil drop 
by drop until it begins to thicken, then juice of one-half a lemon. 
Keep adding oil until a gill has been absorbed. Beat until 
thick and add a pinch of cayenne pepper. Place in ice-box to 
stiffen. — Mrs. J. H. Griffin. 

SALAD DRESSING.— The yolk of three eggs, thoroughly 
beaten, one teaspoonf ul mustard, two teaspoonf uls salt, a little 
cayenne pepper, two tablespoonfuls sugar, two tablespoon- 
fuls melted butter, one cup cream, one-half cup hot vinegar. 
Cook in double boiler until thick, add whites of eggs well beat- 
en, when cool. — Minnie Choate. 

SALMON SALAD, especially nice in winter time. — One 
can salmon, one-half can green peas without juice, mix well ; 
add more salt and pepper than is used in the Mayonnaise dress- 
ing, two hard-boiled eggs, chopped fine, serve with lettuce 
and the one-half can peas as garnish, pour over all the dress- 
ing. 

MAYONNAISE.— One uncooked yolk in cold dish, beat 
well with silver fork, add two saltspoonfuls salt, one saltspoon- 
ful mustard, work them together well ; add a few drops of oil, 
slowly at first, then few drops of lemon juice, alternating oil 
and lemon juice until it has absorbed a gill of oil ; finish by add- 
ing a pinch of cayenne pepper. — Mrs. Bobbins. 

POTATO SALAD.— Cut while hot as many boiled pota- 
toes as are required, and pour on them slowly a cup of very 
hot broth made from Liebig's beef; drain oflf what they will not 
absorb, and set in a cold place until needed; then garnish with 
lettuce leaves and mix thoroughly with the potatoes the follow- 
ing dressing: 



35 



Who Fills 

Your Prescriptions O 
And Family Recipes • 

We make a Specialty of this Department. 

We are not simply " Dealers in Drugs," but we arc all 

Registered Pharmacists. 

FOUR LICENSED PHARMACISTS AT HARTS DRUG STORE. 

All Prescriptions called off, and rechecked by two of them. 
At our Soda Fountain, Ice Cream, with Natural Fruit Flavors, 
will be the^ Leading Feature. 

TAQ A HAPT drugs and stationery, 

Undi Ai Oilll 1 J 148 KAIK 8TBKST, SUTO BUTG. 

T F YOU want a cup of delicious Cocoa, of superior flavor, try 

Hurlburt's Pure Soluble Cocoa. 

i lb. cans, 40 cents ; by mail, 52 cents. 

Note-Book of 40 pages of useful information on Homoeo- 
pathic Medicines sent gratis by 

C. T. HURLBURT & CO., 3 East 19th St., N. Y. 

J. R. DECATUR. CHAS. T. KNAPP. 

DECATUR & KNAPP, 

DEALERS IN 

-^FINE FOOTWBAR,^ 

170 Main Street, Sing Sing, N. Y. 

CUSTOM WORK AND REPAIRING. 



36 

Cream Dressing without Oil. — One egg, one tablespoonf ul 
made mustard, three tablespoons vinegar, one-half tablespoon 
of butter, four tablespoons finely chopped onion (green ones), 
tops and all preferred, one teaspoon salt, one-half teaspoon 
celery seed, one large cup cream. Beat e^gg very light ; add 
all ingredients but cream ; place on stove in boiling water, and 
stir constantly until quite thick, then add the cream slowly and 
when thick as heavy cream move from fire to cool. — May A. 
Stoutenburgh. 

POTATO SALAD.— Boil six potatoes, when perfectly 
cold cut in small pieces; chop four small onions, mix with pota- 
toes. Six lettuce leaves cut in long strips put with potatoes 
and onions. 

Dressing. — Yolks of two eggs, saltspoon of salt, pinch of 
white pepper, then drop the best sweet oil into the yolks, stir- 
ring all the time until thick, then add one t^iblespoonful of vin- 
egar. Before putting this on the salad, pour one tablespoonful 
of sweet oil on the potatoes, onions, and lettuce ; then mix the 
dressing with all. — Mrs. Wheeler. 

POTATO SALAD.— Twelve potatoes boiled, one-half 
teaspoonful mustard, one-half teaspoonful sugar, one-half tea- 
spoonful salt, one teaspoonful butter, two eggs, beat well; two 
tablespoonfuls condensed milk, mix with two of water to make 
equal parts of milk and water, one-half cup vinegar, mix all to- 
gether, beat slowly, not boil; take off stove, stir until cold, if 
condensed milk is used no sugar is required, sweet milk can be 
used, an onion can be used. Dress with parsley and lettuce. — 
Mrs. Sylvester See. 

CHICKEN SALAD.— The white meat of a cold boiled or 
roasted chicken, three-quarters the same bulk of chopped 
celery, two hard-boiled eggs, one raw egg, well beaten, one 
teaspoonful salt, one teaspoonful pepper, one teaspoonful made 
mustard, three teaspoonfuls salad oil, two teaspoonfuls white 
sugar, one-half teacupful vinegar. Mince the meat well, re- 
moving every scrap of fat gristle and skin ; cut the celery into 



■:btablisbbd tan, 

i3.i.[Li®iiEia&e®., 

£V£BT ARTICLE 



B7«0JRiTSr.,l,r. 



38 

bitSy half an inch long, or less, mix them and set aside in a cool 
place while you prepare the dressing. Rub the yolks of the 
eggs to a fine powder, add the salt, pepper, and sugar, then 
the oil, grinding hard, and putting in but a few drops at a 
time. The mustard comes next, and let all stand together while 
you whip the raw egg to a froth. Beat this into the dressing, 
and pour in the vinegar, spoonful by spoonful, whipping the 
dressing well as you do it. Sprinkle a little dry salt over the 
meat and celery ; toss it up lightly with a silver fork ; pour the 
dressing over, tossing and mixing until the bottom of the mass 
is as well saturated as the top ; turn into the salad-bowl and 
garnish with white of eggs (boiled) cut into rings or flowers, 
and sprigs of bleached celery tops. Turkey makes even better 
salad than chicken. — Mrs. John W. Palmer. 



SAUCES. 

DRAWN BUTTER SAUCE.— Three ounces butter, one 
ounce flour, one-half pint water, salt and pepper to taste. 
Chopped eggs, capers, anchovy, shrimps, parslej^ make a 
variety of sauces for meats. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE.— Separate the bottom part from 
the stalk, then peel them with a sharp knife, cutting off merely 
the skin Put them into a stewpan with a tablespoonful lemon 
juice, and two tablespoonfuls water. Toss them well to im- 
pregnate them with the liquid. Object of lemon juice, to keep 
them white. Then put them on a brisk fire in boiling water 
with some butter added. Boil until tender. 

LEMON SAUCE. — Cream, one cup powdered sugar, one- 
half cup butter, add one egg well beaten, three tablespoonfuls 
boiling water, grated rind and juice of one lemon ; beat all well 
together, boil in double boiler fifteen to twenty minutes; do not 
stir after putting in boiler. — I. H. Miller. 



39 



npHIS page IS given by 

ALFRED ROMER, 

who kindly leaves it blank for purchasers to use for any new 
receipts tkey may procure. 



i 



40 

HARD SAUCE. — One cup sugar, powdered, one-half cup 
butter, beat them together to a cream, add vanilla or lemon ac- 
cording to taste. 

HOT SAUCE. — One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one 
egg, juice of one lemon. Beat all together, set on tea-kettle to 
steam. 

CARAMEL SAUCE. — One cup of granulated sugar, one 
cup of water. Put the sugar into an iron saucepan, stir with a 
wooden spoon over a quick fire until the sugar melts and turns 
an amber color, then add the water ; let boil two minutes and 
turn out to cool. 

MINT SAUCE.— Four tablespoonfuls chopped mint, two 
tablespoonfuls sugar, one-quarter pint vinegar, an hour before 
dinner put into the sauce-boat, so that the vinegar is impreg- 
nated with the mint. 



PUDDINGS. 

PRUNE PUDDING.— Take one pound tart prunes, pit be- 
fore cooking, stew rather soft in water to cover, sweeten and 
cool. Beat whites of two eggs very light, add a little sugar, 
spread on cop of prunes and brown in oven ; when ready to 
serve, whip scant pint of cream and pour over. — Mrs. J. H. 
Oriffin. 

CREAM TAPIOCA PUDDING.— Soak three tablespoon- 
fuls of tapioca in water three hours, then stir into one quart 
boiling milk. Let it boil ten minutes, then add yolks of four 
eggs, beaten with one cup sugar and two tablespoonfuls cocoa- 
nut, boil five minutes more, then into the pudding dish beat the 
whites of the eggs with three tablespoonfuls sugar and pour 
over the top; put in the oven and brown. — Mrs, Oscar Griffin, 

CRACKER PUDDING.— Five soda crackers rolled fine, 
one quart milk warmed just to the boiling point. Pour over 



41 



Central M of Westcbester County 

W^HITE PL,AINS, N. Y. 

Established 1867. Capital and Surplus, $160,000. 

Special facilities are afforded cus- 
tomers of this institution along the Har- 
lem Railroad for sending their deposits by 
express without expense. The Bank has 
a yearly contract with the American Ex- 
press Company^ and customers find it a 
great convenience to send deposits in this 
way. Accounts of merchants and indi- 
viduals respectfully solicited. 



WM. H. ALBRO, President. 
CHAS. HORTON, Vice-President. 
HOWARD E. FOSTER, Cashier. 



42 

the crackers three eggs well beaten and mixed together, after 
it is a little cool^ salt. Sauce of butter and sugar. Grease the 
dish. 

INDIAN PUDDING (Simple).— Three dessert spoonfuls 
common meat, three pints scalded milk in which the meat has 
been thoroughly mixed, one cup molasses (never sugar), salt 
and ginger to taste. Bake for an hour or more. Should be like 
a curd with whey. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING.— Wash and drain three 
pints berries, mix in one quart flour, stir a teaspoonful soda in 
one pint molasses until it foams, add to the berries and flour. 
Bake in cake tins, serve with sauce. — Miss Mulford. 

LEMON JELLY PUDDING.— One-half box gelatine dis- 
solved in a little cold milk one-half hour, yolks of four eggs, and 
one cup sugar, beaten well, grated rind of one lemon and juice 
of two added to the eggs and sugar. Boil one pint of milk, pour 
over gelatine, and, when cool, add the other mixture, stirring 
as little as possible, heart the whites of eggs to froth, and add 
one cup of sugar, then spread over the top and bake a few min- 
utes. Better eaten the next day. — Mrs, Charles Bard. 

ORANGE PUDDING.— Pare six sweet oranges, cut in 
small pieces, sweeten with powdered sugar, put in pudding 
dish. Boil one pint of miik, add while boiling the yolks of three 
eggs, one tablespoonful of corn starch, which has been dis- 
solved in a little cold milk, stir this until it thickens like cus- 
tard, then pour over the oranges when cool. Beat the whites 
of eggs to a froth, add a tablespoonful powdered sugar, and put 
over custard. Set in the oven and brown. — E. H. Sutton. 

COTTAGE PUDDING.— Bake a common cake in a flat- 
bottom pudding-dish, when ready for use, cut in six or eight 
pieces, split and spread with butter and return them to the 
dish, make a custard with four eggs to a quart of milk, flavor 
and sweeten to the taste. Pour over the cake and bake one- 
half hour, the cake will swell and fill the custard. — Margaret 
Bosell. 



43 



T^ANIEL P. HAYS donates this page, quoting from Seneca; 
" That it is the bounty of nature that we live, but of 
philosophy that we live well." 



44 

COCOANUT PUDDING.— One pint fine bread crumbs, 
without crust, one quart milk, two-third cup sugar, four eggs, 
yolks only, one-half tablespoonful butter, one cup dessicated 
cocoanut (not the shredded). Soak the cocoanut in the boiling 
milk for half an hour, then add to the other ingredients. The 
yolks should be beaten very light and the sugar beaten with 
them. Bake. Make a meringue of the whites, whipping them 
very stiflf, and adding the sugar a little at a time so they wDl 
keep light. When the pudding is done, remove from oven and 
drop the meringue a spoonful at a time upon the top, leaving 
the fantastic shape it takes. Spread thickly with dry cocoanut 
and brown lightly. — May A. Stoutenburgh. 

GRAHAM PUDDING.— Four cups Graham flour, one and 
one-half cups molasses, two -third cup sweet milk, one tea- 
spoonful soda, one j^easpoonful cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful 
cloves, one cup raisins. Steam one and one-half hours, or if 
preferred, bake in a slow oven. 

Sauce. — Three-quarter pint water, three tablespoonfuls 
sugar, onfi tablespoonful butter, one teaspoonful flour. Stir 
butter and sugar to a cream, add to the boiling water, then add 
the flour stirred into a little cold water. Boil for a few minutes, 
remove from flre and flavor with vanjlla. — Miss Stoutenburgh. 

STEAMED APPLE PUDDING.— One egg well beaten, 
one cup sugar, one cup milk, two cups flour, two teaspoonfuls 
baking-powder, a pinch of salt. Quarter the apples, put them 
into a baking-dish, then pour the mixture over them. Steam 
one hour. Serve hot with sauce. — Mrs. Hoyt. 

APPLE PUDDING.— One and one-half teaspoonful pow- 
der sifted through one pint flour, salt ; one-half tablespoonful 
lard, scant tea cup milk. Pare and quarter four or flve apples 
and put in pan with a little water and sugar, place crust over, 
cover tight and steam fifteen minutes; serve with liquid sauce. 
—M. 0. G. 

BREAD PUDDING.— One generous pint of milk, one 
pint bread crumbs, two eggs, small cup sugar, heaping tea- 



45 



Published Every Thursday at PleasanivilUy N. Y, 



-»■«- 



W. H. MOORE, Editor and Proprietor. 



-•-•- 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE. 



■♦-•- 



A Clean Family Newspaper. Breezy, Newsy, and Enter- 
taining. 

Rev. Dr. Talmage's Sermon and Sunday-School Lesson every 
week. 



-*-*- 



SAMPLE COPIES MAILED FREE. 



Few Persons are Aware of the Fact 

that the condition of their health 
depends very much on the con- 
dition of their sight ; that nervous 
headaches, neuralgia of the head, 
disorganized stomach, dizziness, 
and a feeling of exhaustion after 
reading, sewing, or looking intently at objects, either near or far, are most 
always caused by defective eyesight. 

Our Ocalfst Opticians, J. and W. Moses, have made this a 
life-long study, and will give your eyes a thorough scientific test, thereby 
determining their condition, and then, if necessary, furnish you with glasses 
to relieve these troubles, giving you perfect vision and comfort. 




THE AXIS OUT PEBBLE CO., 

327 Fulton Street, 

Opposite Pierrepont Street, BROOKLYN, N. Y 

Rear Entrance, 30s 'W^asfalniirtoii Street, nearly 

oppoalte Poat-Offlce. 



46 

spoonful butter, little grated nutmeg ; mix till soft, and steam 
three quarters of an hour. To be eaten with hard sauce. — 

THE QUEEN OF PUDDINGS.— One pint of fine bread 
crumbs to one quart of milk, cup of sugar, the yolks of four 
eggs beaten, the grated rind of one lemon, a piece of butter 
size of an egg. Bake until done, but not watery. Whip the 
whites of the eggs stiff and put in a cup of sugar, in which 
has been stirred the juice of the lemon. Spread over the pud- 
ding a layer of jelly or any sweet meats you may prefer. Pour 
the whites of the eggs over this. Replace in oven, brown 
slightly. To be eaten cold with cream or milk. — Jlfr^. Stephen 
Smith. 

PUFF PUDDING.— Yolks of six well-beaten eggs, six- 
teen tablespoonf uls of flour, one quart milk, one saltspoonful 
salt. Mix flour and eggs carefully together to avoid lumps, 
add salt, milk, and the whites of eggs beaten to a stifl' froth, 
pour into a well-greased pudding-dish, bake in a hot oven half 
an hour, serve with strawberry sauce. 

Sauce. — Stir butter and powdered sugar to a light cream, 
and add one cupful of partly crushed strawberries. — Mrs. 
Charles H. Hall. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING.- Two pounds of raisins, 
seeded, two pounds currants, one-half pound sliced citron, two 
pounds bread crumbs (break up bread in pieces and put in the 
oven to brown), two pounds of chopped suet, juice and grated 
rind of three lemons, six eggs well beaten, two pounds brown 
sugar, one teaspoonful cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful each of 
cloves, mace, and half a grated nutmeg, two teaspoonfuls of 
salt. Mix all together, and add milk or brandy enough to 
make it stick together, but not wet. Fill moulds and cover 
with cloths and tie down tightly ; boil eight hours. Will keep 
all winter, and when wanted for use, boil in a kettle of water 
one hour. — Mrs. 0. M. Lane. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING No. 2.-0ne pound suet, one 
pound sugar, two and one-half pounds flour, two pounds raisins 



47 



ESTABLISHED 1841. 



GeorgeW.Yerks&Co., 



ALBANY, N. Y. 



. . . IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF , . . 

Fancy Groceries 

HERMETICALLY'SEALED GOODS. 

FARINACEOUS and FOOD PRODUCTS^ 

OF ALL KINDS, SUITED TO 

EPICUREAN TASTES. 



We Cater to the Trade Only^ No Goods at Retail. 



48 

seeded and chopped, two pounds currants, one -half pint 
citron shredded fine, one pound bread crumbs, one pint 
molasses, one cup brandy, twelve eggs, nutmeg, cinnamon, 
and cloves. Mix all the dry things together, then add the eggs,, 
molasses and brandy. If this is too thick to stir, add water 
until it will stir quit« easily. Pour into a mould and boil all 
day the day before it is wanted, then put on the next day and 
boil until needed. The longer it is boiled the darker and richer 
it becomes. It may be boiled in two moulds if preferred, or 
only half the quantity used. Before serving pour alcohol over 
it and set it on fire. Serve with wine sauce. — Mrs. George B. 
Wray, Yonkers, N. Y. 

MOUNTAIN DEW PUDDING.— One pint milk, yolks of 
two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of cocoanut, half a cup rolled 
crackers, one teaspoonful lemon or vanilla extract. Bake half 
an hour or until done, then beat the whites of two eggs with 
one cup of sugar and spread over the top and brown in the 
oven. — Mrs. J. C. H, 



PIES. 

PIE CRUST. — Three and one-half cups flour, one cup 
lard, one teaspoonful salt, one-half cup ice water; butter after 
rolling out. 

PUMPKIN PIE (the Minister's Favorite).— Prepare the 
pumpkin by cutting into very small pieces. Place in the 
saucepan with a little hot water and cook rapidly for about 
one hour. Turn off any water which may not have cooked out 
and strain pumpkin through a sieve. For two pies take of 
this pumpkin one cupful ; stir into it two-thirds cup of sugar, 
one-third teaspoonful cinnamon, one-third teaspoonful ginger, 
one-third ^aspoonful nutmeg; add milk enough to make a 
thin custard, and three well-beaten eggs. — Mary Gilbert Wray. 

CRANBERRY PIE.— Line a dish with plain paste, then 
fill it with uncooked cranberries ; add a half cup of molasses. 



49 



"rj'NOUGH is as good as a feast." 

H. W. BELL 

donates this blank page for further receipts, if you can im- 
prove upon those already printed. 



60 

and four tablespoonfuls of sugar ; cover with an upper crust, 
and bake in a quick oven for thirty minutes. 

LEMON PIE. — Prepare and bake a rich crust for one pie. 
Mix and bring to a boil two cups sugar^ two cups water and 
the juice and rind of two or three large lemons ; then add four 
tablespoonfuls flour moistened with water, the yolks of four 
eggs ; stir till thick, then remove from fire and let cool, pour 
on crust and frost with the whites of eggs beaten stiff, one 
tablespoonful powdered sugar, flavor with lemon, set in oven 
and brown lightly ; if one likes cocoanut, grate thickly over 
top before sending to table. — K IT, S. 

LEMON PIE No. 2. — Juice and grated rind of one lemon, 
one teacupful sugar, two eggs, one teaspoonful butter, one tea- 
spoonful cornstarch, one cupful sweet milk. Beat the lemon, 
sugar, and eggs together for ten minutes. Rub the butter 
and cornstarch ; mix thoroughly with the other ingredients ; 
add the milk, water can be used if milk is not convenient ; stir 
until well mixqd, pour into a deep pie-pan lined with paste and 
cover with a top crust ; wet the edges of the paste and press 
tightly together. Bake quickly. — Eachel A. Guion. 

MOCK MINCE PIES. — One cup chopped raisins, one 
chopped lemon, one cup molasses, one teaspoonful each of 
cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg; three cups water and three 
crackers rolled fine ; boil together. — C. J. B. 

MINCE MEAT. — Eight pounds meat, two pounds suet, 
four pounds raisins, four pounds currants, four pounds light 
brown sugar, one pound citron, one-half pound candied orange 
peel, one cup molasses, one quart brandy, one quart sherry, 
and a little cider. To each bowl chopped meat use two chopped 
apples. — Mrs, B. C. Maclntyre, 

RIPE CURRANT PIE.—One large cup of currants, one 
cup sugar, one egg. Mix all together. This makes filling 
enough for one medium-sized pie. Nice. Try it; 

SQUASH PIE. — One pint boiled dry squash, one cupful 
brown sugar, three eggs, two tablespoonfuls molasses, one 



51 



HUFF'S HOTEL. 



/^ 



Pleasantville Station, 



JOSEPH H. HUFF, Proprietor, 



NEmr YORK. 



HOnZT TO LOAN OV 
SEAL ESTATE. 



ESTABLISHED 
1886. 



INSUBAHCE OX ALL 
EDTDS OF PBOPESTT. 



M 

o 

o . 
P 
H 
H 

g I 

<=> «a 
H 

m 

o 



CHAS. C. SMITH, 



Office, RAILROAD AVENUE, 



, - » 



e 

m 



titf S 
H O 

OB 

H 

I 

H 

OB 



LIFE IVSUBANGE ON 
aU the LATEST PLANS. 



Benowftli Carefallj 
Looked After. 



Loitei Promptly and 
Satiifketoriiy A^juited. 



Puritan Hotel, 

3 DELANCEY STREET, - - - NEW YORK. 

Booms 50 and 35 CerUs per Night, $8.00 
and $2.25 per Week. 

This hotel is newly and elegantly furnished and is supplied with all 
the modern improvements. For gentlemen only. Open aU night. 

TIMBERMAN & TURNER, Proprietors. 



52 

tablespoon! ul melted butter, one tablespoonful ginger, one tea- 
spoonful cinnamon, a pinch of salt, and one pint of milk. This 
makes two pies or one large deep one. 

DAMSON PLUM PIE.— Stew the damsons whole, in 
water only sufficient to prevent their burning ; when tender, 
and while hot, sweeten them .with sugar and let them stand 
until they become cold, then pour them into pie-dishes lined 
with paste, dredge flour upon them, cover them with the same 
paste, wet and pinch together the edges of the paste, cut a slit 
in the centre of the cover through which the vapor may escape, 
and bake twenty minutes. 

PAQININI TARTLETS. — Line patty-pans with puff 
paste, and bake them fifteen minutes in a quck oven ; when 
done take them out, put a half teaspoonf ul of orange marma- 
lade on each patty, cover with a meringue, and put back in 
the oven a few minutes to brown. 

GREEN GOOSEBERRY TART.— Remove the ends of 
the gooseberries, put into a porcelain kettle with enough 
water to prevent burning, and stew slowly until they break. 
Take them off, sweeten well, and set aside to cool ; when cold 
pour into pastry shells, and bake with a top crust of putf 
paste. Brush all over with beaten egg while hot, set back in 
the oven to glaze for three minutes. Eat cold. 



DESSERTS. 

CARAMEL ICE-CREAM.— One cup granulated sugar, 
one generous pint milk, two tablespoonfuls flour, two eggs. 
Let the milk come to a boil, beat sugar, eggs, and flour to- 
gether; stir into the boiling milk, let boil twenty minutes, stir- 
ring often. Put a small cupful sugar in a frying-pan, and stir 
over a hot fire until the sugar turns liquid and begins to 
smoke ; turn into the boiling mixture, stir well and put away 
to cool. When ready to freeze add one quart cream and strain 



53 

Hstabllsbed 1859. 

JOHN W. YOUNG, MEMBERS OFTHE 

ALBERT J. YOUNG, NEW YORK 

IRVING W. YOUNG. PRODUCE EXCHANGE. 



JOHN W. YOUNG & SONS, 

DEALERS IN 

Building Materials and Fuel. 

FLOUR, 
FEED. 

GRAIN, 
HAY, 
STRAW, 

GRASS SEEDS, 

AND 

FERTILIZERS. 



WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 



54 

the mixture into the freezer. The flavor of this cream can be 
varied by browning the sugar more or less. — Mrs, Behre, 

BOSTON ICE-CREAM.— Soak half box Knox's sparkling 
gelatine in one cup cold milk one hour; scald two quarts cream 
(if thick add one pint milk), melt two cups sugar in it, add the 
gelatine ; when cool flavor with two tablespoonf uls vanilla, and 
freeze. — Mrs. Carrie Foster, 

LEMON WATER ICE.— Juice six lemons, two teaspoon- 
fuls extract lemon, one quart water, one pound powdered 
sugar, one gill sweet cream, add together and strain, freeze as 
ice-cream. — E. B, 

CHARLOTTE RUS8E.— Take one and a half pints cream, 
whip to stiff froth, skim the froth into a dish set on ice. When 
all is whipped stir in two- thirds of cup powdered sugar, one tea- 
spoonful vanilla, half box gelatine which has been soaked in 
enough cold water to cover for two hours ; then pour on half 
cup boiling water to dissolve it. Stir all together until it be- 
gins to grow stiff, then pour into moulds that have been lined 
with lady fingers or sponge cake. — Mrs. Boyd. 

BLANC-MANGE. — Wash sea-moss thoroughly. A small 
handful of moss, boiled in one quart milk, until moss is nearly 
dissolved, strain into molds, set in a cool place ; to be served 
with cream, flavored and sweetened to taste. — Mrs. Bobbins, 

SPANISH CREAM.— One half box gelatine, one quart 
milk, yolks of three eggs, one cup sugar. Stir gelatine, eggs 
and sugar in boiling milk ; flavor with vanilla ; take from the 
fire, stir in the beaten whites of eggs, and turn into mold. To 
be eaten w^ith whipped cream. — Mrs, Cornell. 

ITALIAN CREAM. — Dissolve one- third box gelatine in 
one pint milk, letting the milk come to a boil, stirring constantly 
to prevent burning; turn into one pint cream which has been 
beaten to a stiff froth, then turn into molds. A teaspoonful 
vanilla may also be added, or omitted if a sauce of crushed fruit 
be preferred. — Mrs, Bobbins. 



55 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Dr. L. W. JONES. 



C. D. BERTINE. 



- I 



56 

BAVARIAN CREAM WITH CHOCOLATE.— Whip 
one pint cream to a stiff froth, lajnng it on a sieve. Boil an- 
other pint of cream or rich milk with a vanilla bean and two 
tablespoonf uls of sugar until it is well flavored ; then take it off 
the fire and add half a box gelatine soaked for an hour in half 
a cupful of water in a warm place near the range; when 
slightly cooled stir in the yolks of four eggs well beaten, to 
which has been added two sticks of chocolate soaked and 
smoothed. When it has become quite cold and begins to thick- 
en stir it without ceasing a few minutes until it is very smooth, 
then stir in the whipped cream lightly until it is well mixed. 
Put into a mold or molds and set it on ice, or in some cool place. 
— Mrs. Bobbins. 

TO FILL ORANGES.— One-half box gelatine, juice of 
six oranges, half cup sugar and one lemon. Dissolve gelatine 
in one pint cold water, cut the oranges in halves, remove pulp, 
add juice to gelatine, sweeten, then add lemon juice, All the 
halves and let stiffen. Serve with whipped cream on top. — 
Mrs. J. II. Griffin. 

COFFEE JELLY.— Nearly one-half box gelatine, one pint 
strong coffee, one cup sugar, pour the coffee over the gelatine. 
When dissolved stir in the sugar, add one-half pint of boiling 
water, strain into molds, and serve with whipped cream. 

ORANGE SOUFFLE.— One quart milk, two eggs, three- 
quarters cup sugar, two tablespoonf uls cornstarch, quarter 
teaspoonf ul salt Put milk and sugar to boil in double boiler; 
when very hot add eggs and cornstarch beaten together with a 
little cold milk, flavor with vanilla ; when cold pour the mixt- 
ure over four or five oranges which have been cut in small 
pieces, and sweetened with powdered sugar. — tl. H. M. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE.— One pint sweet milk, 
butter size of an ^^^^ one teaspoonf ul salt, two heaping teaspoon- 
fuls baking-powder; roll as soft as can be handled, bake in shal- 
low tin, and split open with a warm carving-knife; butter this ; 
have berries previously prepared with sugar and spread over 



5 



i~ 



The Art of Good Living. 



How necessary it is that our modern hotels should be exponents of the 

true art of living ! The St. Denis is a practical exemplification of thi$ great 

principle, for here one can find not only the choicest viands the market 

•affords, but also prepared and served in the most tempting and delicious 

manner. 

Its enlargement during the past two years by a commodious and hand- 
some addition, in which no pains and expense were spared, is evidence of the 
:growing popularity of this well-known house. In its appointments, decora- 
tions, and modern equipments it is par excellence one of the leading hotels of 
the metropolis, while the service and attendance are most admirable in every 
detail and particular. 

THE ST. DENIS HOTEL, 

Broadway and BleTcntli Street, - NBl^ YORK. 

(Opposite Grace Church.) 

A. G. JOHNSON, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

150 Main Street, - - • Sing Sing, N Y. 

O. "Vr. & S. C. KIPP, Jr., 

Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Furniture and Upholstery. 

We have Bedroom Suits at $14.00 ; Sideboards, $8.50; Piazza Roclcers at 
90 cents; Baby Carriages, $4.50; Adjustable Window Screens, 35 cents; 
Floor Rugs, 50 cents. 

Numerous other goods at equally low prices. 



58 

each layer. This amount of crust requires one quart of berries, 
— Mrs. Landon. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE No. 2.— One heaping table- 
spoonful butter, two of sugar, one Qgg, three teaspoonf uls bak- 
ing-powder, sifted through small cup flour, one cup sweet milk ; 
bake in flat tins in a quick oven ; when done split, butter, and 
spread the layers with the fruit sugared ; serve with cream and 
sugar. Grape, strawberry, or peach can be used. — Cleveland 
Cook' Book ^ Mrs. J. H. Gtriffin. 




BREAD & BREAKFAST CAKES 

BREAD SIMPLY MADE.— One quart warm milk ; one 
large tablespoonful lard, one tablespoonful salt, one table- 
spoonful sugar, one cake of compressed yeast dissolved in a 
little lukewarm water. After stirring, mix in enough sifted 
flour to thicken sufficiently to make a good sponge ; let it rise 
over night in warm place. Next morning knead one-half hour, 
using only flour enough not to stick to board or hands ; cut in 
loafs, place in greased pans, letting it rise again until it rises 
to top of pan ; bake in an oven of even heat. — Mrs. Bohhins. 

RUSK. — At noon mix two cups of milk, one cup of butter, 
one-half cup yeast and flour to make a batter like bread sponge ; 
at dusk add two cups sugar and three eggs, beaten at night, 
add one-half teaspoonf ul of soda, knead it ; in the morning roll 
out in cakes and when raised bake. Five minutes before they 
are done wet the tops with sugar dissolved in milk. 

BROWN BREAD.— One bowl of sponge, one Qup of 
molasses, one-half cup wheat flour, two tablespoonfuls Indian 
meal scalded, little soda in one-half cup warm water, graham 
flour to stiffen. — H. J. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD.— Four cups corn meal, two 
cups graham flour, one cup molasses, one quart milk, one table- 
spoonful soda, two tablespoonf uls vinegar ; to be baked in a 



WM. FOWLER. 



TITLAR & FOWLER, 



DEALERS IN 



Bee( Pork, Lamli, Nulton, Hams, 



LARD, 
SAUSAGES, 
VE6ETABLES, 



PflOLTRY, 
AND 



GAME. 



No. 154 IVIaln Street, 
SING SING, N. Y. 



60 

covered dish until nearly done, then remove cover to brown 
over the top. — Mrs. Landon. 

GRAHAM BREAD.— Two cups graham flour, one-half 
cup corn meal, one-half cup wheat flour, one-half cup brown 
sugar, one tablespoonful of sweet or sour cream, sufficient sour 
milk to make a batter thicker than griddle cakes; level 
teaspoonful of saleratus dissolved in the milk ; stand in the 
oven with open door until light, usually about two hours, then 
close and bake moderatel3\ 

HUCKLEBERRY BREAD.— One pint sour milk, two 
cups brown sugar, one teaspoonful of saleratus and salt, flour 
to make it quite stiff, put in huckleberries, the more the better, 
and bake in a square tin. Eat hot for breakfast or supper. 
Cut in slices and spread with butter. — Mrs, J. C. Hunt. 

RAISED BISCUIT.— One large cup butter, two eggs, 
one tablespoonful sugar, one teaspoonful salt, one quart 
milk, one compressed yeast cake. Mix at one o'clock, having 
the milk warm, keep in warm place ; at four o'clock roll out 
and cut in shape, put them on buttered paper; at six o'clock 
they are ready to bake twenty minutes in hot oven. — Mrs, 
Thos. Pierce. 

SODA BISCUIT.— One quart of flour sifted with two 
teaspoonfuls of soda, and five of cream of tartar; rub in a piece 
of butter the size of a hickory nut, add a little salt, and milk 
•enough to make a very soft dough. — Mrs, Sarah Brouwer, 

FLUFF BISCUIT.— Two cups sweet milk, one-half dry 
yeast cake, flour to make stiff as bread sponge ; set this sponge 
over night. In the morning add one-quarter cup of sugar, 
one-half cup of melted butter, one cup of milk, little salt. 
Heat the milk ; add the butter and the sugar, and when it is 
dissolved stir into the sponge and mix all together with as 
little flour as is possible to handle well. Let stand until light, 
then make out with as little flour as possible, using only 
enough to keep from sticking to the board. Put in pan, let 



61 




FISH BROTHERS, 



MOUNT KISCO, 



NEW YORK. 



Funeral Directors, Embalmers, &c. 




62 

stand half an hour, and then bake in hot oven. — May A, 
Stoutenburgh. 

FRENCH ROLLS— One quart boiling milk, add good 
half teacupful butter, one-half teacupful sugar, salt. Put 
these in milk, let it come to a boil, then cool lukewarm, dissolve 
one compressed yeast cake in water, stir in flour enough to 
make a stiff sponge, let rise ; then mix in a little more flour 
and let rise in a loaf ; when light, roll out and cut, butter, and 
fold half over ; let rise again and bake in a quick oven. — Mrs. 
LeBoy Clark: 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS.— Scald one pint milk in the 
morning, at night, taking two quarts of flour, make a hole in 
the centre, put in a piece of lard as large as a hen's Qgg, two 
tablespoonfuls sugar, a little salt, one cup of yeast, and the 
scalded milk ; do not stir it. The next morning stir it up and 
let it rise until noon; then take out, cut with tumbler, put a 
small piece of butter on one edge and turn the other over it, 
put in pans, letting it rise until half an hour before supper. 
Bake quickly. — Mrs. J. C. H. 

BUTTERMILK ROLLS.— Two cups buttermilk, one quart 
flour, one teaspoonful R. B. powder, one-quarter teaspoonful 
baking soda, a little salt ; roll out about one-half inch thick, cut- 
ting with square cutter, roll half over. — Mrs. Bobbins " Mary.^^ 

WAFFLES. — One pound flour, three-quarter pound 
sugar, four eggs, one-half pound butter, one cup milk, one and 
one-half teaspoonfuls baking-powder. — Mrs. Jorden. 

MUFFINS. — ^Two and one-half cupfuls flour, three heap- 
ing teaspoonfuls baking-powder, one tablespoonful butter, one 
teaspoonful salt, three large tablespoonfuls sugar, one pint 
milk, two eggs. Sift together flour, sugar, salt, and baking- 
powder, rub in butter cold, add beaten eggs and milk, mix into 
smooth batter, muffin-pans to be well greased and cold, fill two- 
thirds full. Bake in hot oven. — Mrs. Charles H. Hall. 

BREAKFAST MUFFINS.— One cup milk, one quarter 
cup sugar, one tablespoonful melted butter, one ^ggy two cups 



63 



/^HARLES T. SUTTON generously gives this page, assur- 
ing its readers that " The proof of the pudding is in the 
mating.** 



64 

flour, two teaspoonfuls baking-powder, a little salt. — Mrs. D^ 
Haight. 

GEMS. — One pint flour, one egg beaten light, one and a 
quarter pint milk, salt. Put in gem-pans which have been 
heated very hot in the oven. Success depends almost entirely 
on the baking ; if the oven is not hot enough they will fail to- 
be as light and delicate as they should be ; if too hot, they puff 
up so quickly that they are hollow within. These gems are 
also very nice made with Graham or Entire wheat flour, but 
not so much flour is needed for the same quantity of milk as 
with the wheat gems. Alwaj's have the batter thin. Bake 
from twenty minutes to half an hour. — Mattie F. drowning, 

WHEATEN GEMS.— Mix one teaspoonful baking-powder 
and a little salt into a pint of flour, add to the beaten yolks of 
two eggs one cup of sweet milk or cream, melted butter the- 
size of an egg, the flour with baking-powder and salt mixed, 
and the well-beaten whites of two eggs. — IL J. 

WHEAT CAKES.— One pint of milk, scalded; pour, 
over one cup of bread crumbs, soak ten minutes, a piece of 
butter the size of a walnut, salt and pepper, one spoonful 
soda, one egg, wheat chopped very fine, more or less of it, as 
you have it. Mix all together and bake like griddle cakes. — 
Mrs. J. C. Hunt, f 

CORN BREAD.— Two large cups wheat flour, one large 
cup corn meal, two tablespoonfuls melted butter, two cups 
milk, one tablespoonful sugar, two eggs, three teaspoonfuls- 
baking-powder and a little salt. Mix flour, corn meal, sugar, 
salt, and baking-powder together dry, then add the eggs, well 
beaten, with the milk and butter. If sweet cream is used do 
not use butter.— i/r5. H, B. White, 

CORN BREAD No. 2.— Two cups Indian meal, one cup 
flour, two cups milk, one tablespoonful lard, two tablespoonfuls- 
white sugar, one teaspoonful salt, three eggs, two teaspoonfuls 
baking-powder.Jl^Melt the lard. Beat j-olks separately. — J, M^ 



65 



PHILLIPS' DIGESTIBLE COCOA. 

Unequalled for Delicacy of Aroma and Nutritious Properties. Easily 
Digested. A cocoa retaining: all tlie nutritious and 
fat-producing properties^ yet not distressing to 
the most delicate. The only Cocoa with rich Chocolate 
Flavor. Different from all other Cocoas, i lb. and 5 lb. tins. 

THE CHAS. H. PHILLIPS CHEMICAL CO., 77 Pine St., New York. 





$5.00 PER GAL. SENT FREE OF CHARGE. 



Guaranteed a 50 per cent. Emulsion of Oil of 
Standard Purity, and flavored with wintergreen, 
almond, or wild cherry, as preferred. 



G. B. WRAY, Pharmacist, 

VONKERS, - - NEW YORK. 

Endorsed by E. J. STOUTENBURQH. 

WM. MOSS, 

I5©©TS and SH©£S^ 

Beekman Ave., near Washington St., 

NORTH XARRVTOl^l^, N. Y» 

FINE CUSTOM WORK. REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



f 

66 

JOHNNY CAKE. — One cupful meal, one cupful flour, one 
and a half tablespoonful butter, three teaspoonsful baking- 
powder, one egg, three tablespoonfuls sugar, sweet milk 
enough to make like soft ginger bread. — Mrs. E. P. Swift. 

GREEN CORN GRIDDLE CAKES.— One quart grated 
corn, one quart buttermilk, one and a half pint flour, one pint 
fine bread crumbs, two teaspoonf uls soda, one tablespoonful 
butter (melted), two tablespoonfuls sugar, three eggs, salt and 
pepper. Corn that is a little too old for table use is just right 
for grating. Sweet milk may be substituted for buttermilk and 
baking-powder used.— ifaj/ A. Stoutenburgh. 



CAKES. 

TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Two cups of sifted flour one pound. 

One pint '' " '' '' 

One pint of closely packed butter " *' 

Two tablespoonfuls of liquid one ounce. 

One )vineglassf ul two ounces. 

Two cupfuls one pint. 

Butter the size of an egg about two ounces. 

SPONGE CAKE.— Three eggs, one and one-half cupfuls 
flour, one and one-half cupfuls sugar, one and one-half 
teaspoonf uls baking powder, two teaspoonf uls lemon or vanilla 
extract, one-half cupful boiling water. Beat the whites and 
yolks of the eggs separately until light, then place them 
together and beat again. Sift in the sugar a little at a 
time, add the flavoring and the flour with the Royal baking 
powder stirred into it. Beat all well together and at the very 
last stir in the hot water. — Mrs. Bailey. 

SPONGE CAKE.— Beaten yolks of six eggs, two cups of 
powdered sugar, six tablespoons of cold water ,Jtwo cups of 
flour (sifted), one teaspoonf ul of Royal baking-powder, salt and 



American Boiler Company's 

CEI.SBRA.TBO 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATERS. 

« 

No Modern Residence, Church, 
or School complete without our 
Apparatus. 



■FLOillOA-- STIAM HEATER. 

18 
w STYLES. 

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SIZES. 

The Heaters mkoufactured by ui are 
the most exieoslvely uaed fn Ihe world. 
Adapted to all clasiea ol Bulldlngi. The 
true [eit of efficiency a ad economy of 

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actual u«n for their resnli!. Beware of ""«" hot water heatcb. 
miileading repreieniailooa made by makera of so-called laieit improved Heal- 
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Advice, estlmaiea of cost, and full Information, free to all inquiiers. 



American ^Oi/er Company 

04 CENTRE ST., HEW YOBK. 




6S 

essence to suit the taste, and whites of six eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth. This cake is best baked in a Turk's head, as it can then 
rest on the tube until the cake falls out. — Lillian I, Willis, 

HOT WATER SPONGE CAKE.— Two even cups of 
sugar (one-half pint cup is best), two unsifted cups of flour, one 
cup of quite warm water, one teaspoonful of salt sifted in the 
flour, six eggs, flavor. Beat the whites of the eggs and set aside; 
then put yolks and warm water together and beat until stiff and 
foaming ; next beat the sugar into the yolks gradually, one cup 
at a time, keeping them foaming all the time, then add one-half 
of the flour, also one-half of the whites gradually and finall3'^ the 
rest of whites and flour. Do not stir much after all is put to- 
gether. Bake in ungreased tins forty minutes in a moderate 
oven and let the cake steam out of the tin by inverting it. — 
Mrs. Atwood, 

POUND CAKE. — Three-quarter pound butter, one pound 
sugar, one pound flour, eight eggs, yolks and whites beaten 
separately. Bake in moderate oven. — Mrs. Usher. 

ORANGE CAKE. — One and one-half cups sugar, three 
eggs beaten separately, one-half cup butter, one half cup milk, 
two cups flour, two small teaspoons Roj'^al baking powder, 
flavor to taste makes four layers. 

Filling. — Grated rind and juice of two large oranges, they 
want to be fine flavor, and if very sweet, add the juice of one 
small lemon, one scant cup sugar, one egg, one-half cup water, 
one heaping teaspoonful butter, one heaping tablespoon flour 
dissolved in a little water, stir together and boil carefully until 
thick enough to spread on cake. — Mrs. E. H, Sutton, 

CREAM CAKE' — One tablespoonful of butter, one cup of 
sugar, two eggs, one-half cup of milk, one and one-half cups of 
flour, with two teaspoonf uls of Royal baking-powder sifted in 
it. This makes three layers, or it may be baked in a tube pan 
as a large cake. 

Cream for Filling. — One-half pint of milk, one-half cup of 
sugar, one tablespoonful of flour, one Qgg, a little salt, vanilla. 



% 



69 



GEO. WASHBURN, 



DEALER IN 



Fancy ^ Staple Groceries, 



^ FLOUR AND FEED.^ 



Fresb Bleat, Crockery, Boots, Slioes, etc. 



PLEASANTVILLE STATION, N. Y. 



THE BKST RECEIPT 
IN THE BOOK. 

Oood at any season of the year. 

Can be used at breakfast, dinner or 

supper, and does not cost much. 

Our Clothing and FurDishings. 

TOWNSEND YOUNG'S SON, 

SING SING. TARRYTOWN. 



70 

Mix flour and sugar, beat eggs and stir into them, add it to the 
heated milk, let boil, then cool and spread the cakes with it. — 
Mrs. B. W. G. 

WHITE CAKE.— Whites of six eggs, three-quarter cup 
butter, one and one-quarter cups powdered sugar, two cups 
flour, juice of one-half lemon, one teaspoonful Royal baking- 
powder. Beat, butter to light cream, add flour mixed thor- 
oughly with baking-powder, stirring in gradually, until smooth 
paste ; eggs beaten to stiff froth, mix with powdered sugar ; 
eggs and sugar gradually stir into the flour and butter, add the 
lemon juice, stirring until all is smooth; the heat of oven moder- 
ate at flrst. Frosting must be put on when cake is warm. 

ANGEL CAKE. — Whites of nine large or ten small eggs, 
one and one-quarter cups sifted granulated sugar, one cup 
sifted flour, one-half teaspoonful cream-tartar, one pinch salt 
added to eggs before beating. After sifting flour four or five 
times in a sieve, set aside one cup, then sift and measure sugar, 
beat white of eggs about half, add cream of tartar and beat 
until very stiff ; stir in sugar, then flour very lightly. Bake in 
moderate oven. — Mrs. J. H. Griffin. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI CAKE.— One-half cup butter, two cups 
sugar, yolks of four eggs, cup sweet milk. When well beaten 
add whites of two eggs, three teaspoonfuls of Royal baking- 
powder sifted with the flour. Bake in jelly cake tins. 

Filling. — Whites of two eggs beaten stiff, sugar to make 
a soft icing, one-half cup raisins chopped fine, two tablespoons 
currants, two tablespoons orange marmalade. — Mrs. Cornell. 

HABRISON CAKE. — Four cups flour, one cup sugar, 
two cups molasses, one cup strong tea, cool; one-half cup 
butter, four eggs, two teaspoonfuls baking soda, one table- 
sponful cinnamon, one tablespoonful cloves, one pound cur- 
rants, one-half pound citron. — Mrs. Geo. B. Bobbins. 

FRUIT CAKE. — One pound sugar, one-half pound butter, 
five eggs, one pound fiour, one pound raisins, one pound cur- 
rants ; add one-half pound more if desired of raisins and cur- 



71 
JOHN HOAG* donates this page for extra receipts. 






rants and one pound of citron. One teacup cream, one nutmeg, 
little cloves, little soda. Bake about three and one-half hours. 
Citron to be sliced very thin and put in cake as in layer cake. 
— Mrs. Rowell. 

EGGLESS FRUIT CAKE —One cup sugar, one-half cup 
butter, two cups flour, one cup chopped raisins, one teaspoon- 
ful soda, one of cloves, one of cinnamon, little nutmeg. 

KOLL JELLY CAKE.— Three eggs, the yolks beaten 
with one cup of sugar, two tablespoonfuls sweet milk ; beat 
the whites to a froth, then thoroughly with the yolks and 
sugar ; mix one heaping teaspoonf ul baking-powder with one 
cup flour, add to the other ingredients, flavor with lemon, and 
bake in flat pan in a moderately hot oven ; while hot lay on a 
cloth wet with cold water, spread with jelly and roll quickly, 
sprinkle with powdered sugar. — Cleveland Cook- Book. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE.— One cup sugar, three eggs, one 
cup flour, one-half teaspoonful soda, one teaspoonful cream of 
tartar ; stir together as quickly as possible and bake ; when 
cold split once 

Filling. — One-half pint of milk, one-half cup grated choco- 
late boiled together; add to it one Qgg, one cup sugar, one 
tablespoonful flour, one teaspoonful vanilla. Boil a long time 
to thicken before flavDring. — Mrs, Chas. Bard. 

SOUR MILK CAKE.— Butter size of an egg, one cup 
sugar, one cup sour milk, three-fourths teas^onful soda, two 
scant cups flour, one cup raisins, spices to taste. 

CARAMEL CAKE. — One cup sugar, quarter cup butter, 
half cup grated chocolate, half cup milk, one heaping cup flour, 
one teaspoonful baking-powder, two eggs. Stir chocoJate in 
before putting in the milk. 

Frosting. — One and a half cups powdered sugar, half cup 
milk, butter size of an egg. Boil ten minutes and stir until 
cold. Flavor with vanilla. — Mrs. Greig. 

LEMON CAKE. — One cup sugar, one-half cupful of butter. 



73 



Whoe'er thou art, O reader know. 
That Washburne is the Druggist, Oh ! 

And there in Sing Sing, you can get 
Stationery also. 

S. OLIN WASHBURNE, 

Cor. Main and Spring Streets, 

SING SING, N. Y. 



ALEXANDER McCONNELL, 



KLORIST, 



Corner 45TH Street, P9BW YORK. 



K. B. SHERWOOD, 

DENTI5T, ^ 

Oor. High.land -A.ve. and Church. St., 

SING SING, N. Y. 



74 

two cupfuls of flour, one-half cupful of sweet milk, three eggs, 
two teaspoonf uls baking-powder. 

Filling. — The juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup 
v^ of water, one cup of sugar, one egg, one tablespoonful of flour. 
Cook slowly until thickened into jelly. — Swift 

BUTTERMILK CAKE.— One and a half cups of brown 
sugar, half cup of butter, one egg, and a scant pint of flour, 
one teaspoonful of soda spice, a cup of raisins, one cup of but- 
termilk. — Choate. 

COCOANUT LAYER CAKE.— One tablespoonful butter, 
one cup sugar, two eggs, half cup imilk, one and a half cups 
flour, two teaspoonfuls baking-powder sifted with the flour. 
This makes three layers. 

Filling. — Take one- half grated cocoanut and add the whites 
of three eggs beaten to a froth, and one cup of powdered sugar. 
Lay this between the layers. Mix the other half of cocoanut 
with four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, and strew thickly 
on top of cake. — Mrs. Atwood. 

WALNUT CAKE.— One cup sugar, half cup milk, scant 
half cup butter, three eggs — reserving white of one for filling — 
one and three-quarter cups flour, one and a half teaspoonfuls 
Royal baking-powder. 

Filling. — One cup sour cream, one cup chopped walnut 
meats, white of one egg, beaten thick, half cup powdered sug- 
ar. Beat all together, put in double boiler and cook until thick 
enough to spread. Cool before spreading on cake. Bake in 
two layers, filling between, and frost the top. — Mrs. Manville. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE.— One and a half cups sugar, half 
cup butter, whites of four eggs, two teaspoonsful Royal bak- 
ing-powder, two cups flour, one large cup meats broken in small 
pieces, flavor to taste. — Mrs. Sutton. 

SOFT FROSTING.— One cup sugar with just enough cold 
water to dissolve, beat well, flavor. 

BOILED FROSTING.— Boil one-half cup water, one cup 
sugar until it strings, take off stove, have white of one egg 




CARPETS 

Great Clearingf Sale. 

Broken lots, single pieces and 
patterns of every description, 
comprising Wiltons, Axmin- 
sters. Velvets, Body and Tap- 
estry Brussels, and Extra Super 
Ingrains, all this season's styles, 
to close out quickly. 

NO LOWER PRICE5 IN THE CITY. 

.'. Some we have made into .*. 



RUGS 



of various sizes, 
suitable for 
hotels, cottages 
and summer resorts 

At Remnant Prices. 

New importation of Japanese 
Rugs, special sizes, not to be 
found elsewhere. 

SHEPARD, KNAPP & CO., 

5ixth Avenue, 13th and 14th Streets, N. Y. 



beaten, and after standing a few moments stir it in, a little at a 
time. — F. G. 

APPLE FROSTING.— Pare sound, firm apples which are 
not too tart; care should be taken not to grate the apple until 
near the time cake is needed, or it will become dark. After 
the apple is spread sprinkle with powdered sugar, not too 
thickly. — Mrs. Bohhins. 

CREAM PUFFS.— One cup of hot water, two and one- 
half tablespoons of butter, boil together and while boiling stir 
in one cup of sifted flour, dry. Take from the stove and stir to 
smooth paste. When cool stir in three unbeaten eggs, stir five 
minutes, drop in tablespoonfuls in a buttered tin and bake 
for twenty-five minutes in a quick oven. Do not let them touch 
each other in the pan and do not open the oven door oftener 
than is absolutely necessary. 

For Cream Filling — One cup of milk, one-half of sugar, one 
egg, three tablespoons of flour or two of cornstarch. Dissolve 
cornstarch in a little milk, put rest of milk on stove, when hot 
stir in sugar, and Qgg beaten, and cornstarch. Cook until 
thick. Flavor with vanilla. When both cream and puffs are 
cool open one side of puff and fill with cream. This makes 
fifteen puffs. — Mrs. Meld. 

CRULLERS. — Two cups sugar, one cup butter, three 
€ggs beaten separately, one pint milk, one-half nutmeg, one 
teaspoonf ul lemon extract, three heaping teaspoonfuls baking- 
powder, mix moderately stiff. — Mrs, E. H. Sutton. 

CRULLERS. — Two teacups sugar, two teacups milk, one 
eggy a piece of butter size of an egg, two teaspoons soda dis- 
solved in hot water, four teaspoons cream of tartar if sweet 
milk is used; if sour milk is preferred omit the cream of tartar; 
nutmeg if you like. — Mrs. RowelL 

DOUGHNUTS.— One pint boiled milk, three pounds flour, 
three-fourths pound sugar, four eggs, one-half pound lard and 
butter mixed, one pint potato yeast, salt, one nutmeg; mix 



7 



»v 



SHERMAN PARK. 

The Host Beantifiil Home Site in the Vicinity of New York. 

Accessible from Three Stations 

ON HARLENI R, R. 

Tivo Colleges, Xwo Public Schools 
and Numerous Improvements. 



RAPID TRANSIT REAL ESTATE CO, 

167 Broad'way, - - NB^V VORK. 



DO YOU DRINK TEA?. 

If you do you ought to try ours. If we don't give you a 
better TEA for the price paid than you get elsewhere, we give 
your money back. 

LANE BROS., 

Pleasantville Station, iKenv York. 

CARPENTER & PELTON, 

INSURANCE ^ RKAL ESTATE. 

Leading Companies Represented. Loans Negotiated. 

MOUNT KISOO, N. Y. 



78 

over night. In the morning make them out^ let them get light 
again and fry. — Mrs. 0, 

WALNUT MACAROONS. — Two cups nuts chopped 
fine, one cup sugar, two tablespoons flour, whites of three eggs 
beaten stiff. Beat eggs stiff, add sugar and flour, then meats, 
and drop in buttered tins. — Mrs. F. Griffin. 

COFFEE CAKES.— One pint flour, two teaspoonfuls Eoyal 
baking-powder, one cup sweet milk, one-fourth cup sugar, one 
eggy salt. Bake in small pans. Makes twelve small cakes ; 
nice to be eaten hot for breakfast. — Mrs. Geo. Wheeler. 

SOFT MOLASSES CAKE.— One-half cup each sugar and 
butter, one cup molasses, one egg, one teaspoonful each ginger, 
cinnamon, and cloves, two teaspoonfuls soda dissolved in one- 
half cup hot water, two cups flour. 

ENTIRE WHEAT COOKIES.— One cup sugar, one-half 
butter, one-half sour cream or buttermilk, one egg, one tea- 
spoon soda {scant). A little cinnamon. Stir all together thor- 
oughly, then add enough Entire wheat flour to roll out very 
thin. Bake a light brown. — Ma^ A. Stoutenburgh. 

SUGAR COOKIES.— Four eggs, two cups sugar, one cup 
butter, roll as soft as can be handled, bake in quick oven. — 
Mrs. Landon. 

CRISP COOKIES.— Two cups sugar, one and a half but- 
ter, two eggs, three tablespoonfuls cream, one-half teaspoonful 
soda. Add flour to make stiff enough to roll thin. 

BOLIVARS. — One cup shortening, one cup sugar, two 
cups molasses, one cup tepid water, one tablespoonful soda, 
one teasponful salt, one teaspoonful ginger, just flour enough 
to roll out, and cut thick. — Cornell. 

HICKORY NUT COOKIES.— Two cups sugar, one-half 
cup butter, six tablespoonfuls milk, one-half teaspoonful soda, 
one teaspoonful cream of tartar, one cup chopped meats, two 
eggs. Flour to thicken. — Thome. 



79 



XJENRY BARROW kindly leaves this page blank for 
future memoranda. 



80 

FAIRY GINGERBREAD.— One cup butter, two cup& 
sugar, one cup sweet milk, four cups flour, three-quarter tea- 
spoonful soda, two teaspoonfuls ginger. Beat butter and sugar 
to a cream. When very light, add ginger and milk in which 
the soda has been dissolved; finally the flour. Turn dripping- 
pans upside down, grease the bottom of them, and spread the 
mixture very thin on them. Bake in a moderate oven until 
brown. While hot cut into squares, and slip from the pan as- 
thin as a wafer, and cut the moment it comes from the oven. 
Keep in a tin box. — Miss Parloa. 

CRISP GINGERBREAD.— Two cups butter, two cupa 
molasses, one cup sugar, one teaspoonful soda dissolved in one 
cup of milk, two tablespoonfuls ginger, flour to make the 
dough stiff enough to roll; cut in forms with cake-cutter; bake 
in moderate oven. — Mrs. H. White, 

GINGER SNAPS.— Two cups molasses, one cup brown 
sugar, one cup shortening, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
lard, three pints flour, mixed well with the shortening; twa 
teaspoonfuls baking soda in one-quarter cup hot water, three* 
quarters teaspoonful of ginger, a little cinnamon and cloves^ 
added. — Mrs. Elliot Lee. 



PRESERVES AND JELLIES. 

CURRANT JELLY. —Wash and cook currants soft; 
drain and squeeze juice out; strain and measure. Let boil 
just twenty minutes ; add the sugar, and when this comes ta 
a boil fill glasses. Use one pound of granulated sugar to one 
pint of juice. — Mrs, J, H. Oriffin, 

TO PRESERVE STRAWBERRIES, BLACKBERRIES, 
OR RASPBERRIES.— Take scant three-fourths pound sugar 
to one pound berries. Prepare fruit and lay on platters; 
sprinkle sugar over and let stand over night. Drain syrup- 









J. T. LOCKWOOO, 

Cabinet Furniture aon 

Funeral Director, 

WHITE PLAINS, N. V. 



HULL &C0., 



MANUFACTU; 



HARNESS m 

 AND 

^SADDLERY. 

Everything for Horse and Stable. 
Largest Stock of Trunks and Bags in County. 

I^" Special Attention Given to Repairing of All Kinds. "^^ 

Pleasant Square, SINO SINS, H. T. 



A^d-n^co-i-n.- 



/ 



IP Xj O I?, I S T, 

James Street, cor. Edward, SING SING, N. Y. 

Greenhouse, Bedding, and Miscel/aneaus Plants. Flowers and Floral 

Decorations for Parties, Weddings, and Funerals 

Furnished and Arranged to Order. 



82 

through colaDder and let boil twenty minutes, then put in the 
berries and heat through. Put in jars the same as canned 
fruit.— Mrs. Taxter. 

CANNED STRAWBERRIES, RASPBERRIES OR 
ANY MELLOW FRUIT —Wash fruit and fill cans even 
full, make a syrup allowing one large cup of water and the 
same of granulated sugar to each quart can. Boil syrup about 
twenty minutes, then fill cans and seal. Have ready boiler of 
boihng water ; remove from stove, set cans in on slats and 
leave until water is cold. — Mrs. Landon. 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. — To one jfound of 
berries use three-fourths of a pound of sugar in layers (no 
water); place in a kettle on back of stove until the sugar is 
dissolved, then let come to a boil, shaking from bottom; spread 
fruit on platters and pour sj'rup over and set in the hot sun 
until syrup thickens; it may take two or three days. Keep in 
tumblers or bowls, like jelly. Strawberries done in this way 
are delicious, retaining their color and fiavor. — Mrs. J. H. 
Qriffin. 

ORANGE MARMALADE.-- Weigh your Seville oranges 
whole ; to every pound allow one and one-half pounds sugar 
and one pint water. Cut the oranges in half and squeeze out 
the juice ; chop the peel as fine as possible. Place the juice, 
water and chopped peel in a porcelain kettle and let it come to 
a boil, and then simmer gently until tender, which will take 
from one and a half to two hours, then add the sugar and boil 
about an hour longer or until it jellies. When done put in jelly 
glasses or small glass jars. — May A. Stoutenburgh, from 
Marian Harland. 

RASPBERRY JAM.— Three-fourths pound of sugar to a 
pound of berries. Rinse thejfruit and put in the preserving 
kettle ; stir constantly until part of the juice is evaporated, 
then add the sugar and simmer to a fine jam ; this will be 
found better than putting the sugar in first. Add one pint of 




83 

REUBEN BRUNDAGE, 

ESTIMATES CHEERFCTIiIiY FURNISHED. 

Shops at Fleasantville and Sherman Park. 

p. O. Addrdss, Pleasantville Station^ N. Y* 

E. M. LYON, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 
ITnlonvllle (Neperan P. 0.)» N* Y. 

\S^ Plana and Speeiflcationa Fumiahed, 

CHRISTIAN HEUSER, 

Saher an& Confectioner, 

UNIONVILLE, N. Y. 

Wagon runa Daily through UnionviUe, Sherman Park, 

PleaaantviUe, and Chappaqua, 

KIPP & BULLOCK, " 

Successors to KIPP & 1¥AS0BURN, 

CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS. 

UMIONiril^I^B AMP CHAPPAQUA. 

Plans* Specifications and Estimates Furnished. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

BAILET KIPP, Keporan, K. Y. W. W. BULLOCK, GhappAqua, K. T. 



84 

currant juice to every four pounds of raspberries. This rule 
applies to blackberry, currant, and strawberry, omitting the 
currant juice in strawberry. — O, H. 

CANDIED FRUITS.— Boil peaches, plums, pears, apri- 
cots, cherries or almost any fruit, dressed in a thick syrup 
made with a teacupful of water to each pound of sugar until 
tender no longer. Let them remain two days in sj^rup, then 
take them out, drain them, and sprinkle sugar over each piece 
separately. Dry them slowly in the sun or in an oven not too 
warm. 



PICKLES. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES.— Put cucumbers in salt water 
(that will bear an Qgg) for twenty-four hours ; then put them 
in cold alum water in brass kettle (alum size of an egg), set on 
stove and heat slowly until you can hardly bear hand in water ; 
set back on stove. Heat in this way several times for a day 
and a half, leaving them in kettle over night. Take from alum 
water ; clean kettle thoroughly, put in pickles covering with 
moderately strong vinegar, alum size of small egg, some red 
peppers, horseradish and a little sugar. — Mrs. E. Onderdonk. 

PICKLED ONIONS.— Select small silver-skmned onions. 
After taking off the outside skin remove with a knife one more 
skin, when each onion should look quite clear. Put them into 
strong brine for three days. Bring vinegar to a boil, with one 
or two blades of mace and some whole red peppers ; pour it 
hot over the onions well drained from the brine. 

PICKLES, PEARS OR PEACHES.— Three and one-half 
pounds sugar dissolved in one and one-half pints of vinegar. 
Boil pears in syrup until soft ; then take them out and boil the 
syrup to a proper consistency. Tie spices in a thin bag and 
boil in syrup; one-half ounce cloves, one ounce cinnamon, a 
little mace. 



WESTERFIELD'S 

Range I Establishment 



478 sixth Ave., New York. 



Ranges, Furnaces, 
Heatei^j and 
Parlor Grates. 

■• •• *. AEAO .■ .- .* 

Plumbing, Gas Fitting, and 
Roofing. 

SMOKY CKIIHEYS CLUMED AND GUIED. 

Everything Done In the Above Line with Promptness, 
Neatly, and at a Low Figure. 

Orders by Mall Promptly Attended To. 

GSTABLIBVeO 1835- 



86 

CURBANT CATSUP.— Four pounds currants, two pounds 
sugar, one pint vinegar^ one tablespoonful each of cinnamon 
and allspice, one teaspoonful each of cloves and pepper ; boil 
until soft and strain through a sieve. Boil down until thick or 
so it will run from a bottle. — Mrs. Reed. 

CHOW - CHOW. — One • half peck green tomatoes, three 
large heads cabbage, one dozen onions, one-half pound white 
mustard seed, one ounce celery seed^ one-half teacup ground 
black pepper, one-half teacup ground cinnamon. Cut toma- 
toes, onions and cabbage in small pieces, chop quite fine. Put 
in one pint of salt. Let drain over night or squeeze out with 
the hand as dry as possible. In the morning boil one gallon of 
vinegar with two pounds of sugar and pour over the whole. 
Repeat three mornings. If vinegar does not cover add another 
half gallon. — Mrs. Onderdonk. 

CHOW-CHOW. — One peck green tomatoes, six onions, six 
green peppers. Chop all finely together and sprinkle over one- 
half pint of salt. Let stand over night, then strain off the 
brine and cover with vinegar and cook slowly one hour. Drain 
and put in jars. Take one-half pound sugar, one tablespoonful 
cinnamon, one-half tablespoonful cloves, one-half tablespoonful 
allspice, one-half tablespoonful pepper, two ounces mustard 
seed and five cents worth of celery seed and vinegar enough to 
cover them, and when boiling hot pour over the contents of 
jars and cover tight. — Margaret J. RoselL 

CHILLI SAUCE. — Eighteen ripe tomatoes, six chopped 
onions, three red peppers, four tablespoonfuls sugar, three 
tablespoonfuls salt, two cups vinegar. Boil all one hour and 
seal tight. — Miss Fierce. 

GLEANINGS PICKLE.— At night slice thin green toma- 
toes, sprinkle a little salt over each layer, and let stand in a 
dish all. night. The next afternoon drain the water off the 
tomatoes (two gallons tomatoes when drained) and put in an- 
other pan. Peel four or five large cucumbers, slice them ; 



87 



HENRY MEIER, 



AGENT POR 



SHERMAN PARK, 



WILL SELL 



Choice LotSy 2^ x 100, for $150 to $200. 
Payable Monthly. 10 per cent. Discount 
for Cash. Titles Guaranteedy German- 
American Title Guarantee Co. 



Office in Park, opposite Station, and 

339 East 86th Street, New York, 



Can be seen evenings at Residence on Sherman Avenue. 



FREE PASSES AND MAPS. 



88 

slice six green or red peppers and drop them in ; then add to 
the tomatoes. Next add a large head of cabbage shredded and 
chopped, six large onions chopped fine and added with a hand- 
ful of grated horseradish ; two ounces whole black peppers 
and two ounces whole cloves, each tied in muslin bags, stir all 
together and put in the jar. A gallon of vinegar put in a 
porcelain or granite kettle above the fire, when scalding hot 
add a teacupful of fine white sugar, two ounces white mustard 
seed, two ounces ground ginger, and two ounces ground mus- 
tard. The mustard and ginger were first mixed with a little 
cold vinegar. As soon as the vinegar boils pour over the mix- 
ture. — Mrs. J. C. H. 



BEVERAGES. 

CREAM SODA. — One pound granulated sugar, white of 
one eggy beaten together thoroughly; one quart* water, one 
tablespoonful essence of sassafras, one ounce tartaric acid. 
Keep in glass jar in cool place. Use two tablespoonfuls to one 
glass of water and as much soda as you can hold on a ten-cent 
piece, added just before drinking.— Jfrs. W. T. Guion, 

GRAPE WINE.— Pick stems off grapes, wash in bowl, let 
stand until it works, probably one night will be long enough. 
Then put through colander, put weights on to press juice. * To 
three quarts juice add one quart of cold water, three pounds 
sugar, stir thoroughly. Put in stone jars to work ; in about 
two weeks fill bottles and cork.— Mrs, Sarah Brouiver. 

KOUMISS. — Dissolve one tablespoonful sugar in two table- 
spoonfuls boiling water, take one quart new milk, dissolve one- 
fourth of a compressed yeast cake in a little of the milk. 
Shake all together thoroughly and put in beer bottles ; let 
them stand uncorked in a warm place five hours. Cork and 
put in a cool place twenty-four hours.— i>r. Carlton, 



89 



QOMPLIMENTS OF 

L. N. HERSHFIELD. 



90 

RASPBEBBY VINEGAB.— Pour one quart vinegar over 
three quarts ripe black raspberries, in a china bowl. Let it 
stand twenty -four hours, then strain ; pour liquor oyer three 
quarts fresh raspberries and let it infuse again for twenty-four 
hours; strain again ; add one pound white sugar to one pint 
juice. Boil twenty minutes^ skimming well. Bottle when 
cold. When it is to be drank, add one part raspberry vinegar 
to four parts ice water. 

LEMON AD B.—Put loaf sugar over the peels of the lemons 
to absorb the oil, add to the lemon juice sugar to taste. Two 
lemons will make three glasses full of lemonade, the remainder 
of the ingredients being water and plenty of ice chopped fine. 

RUSSIAN TEA.— FiU tumblers with cracked ice, put into 
each tumbler two lumps of sugar, two thin slices of lemon, tea 
freshly made, rather strong ; when cool, fill up the glasses. It 
is very refreshing on a warm day. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Two teaspoonfuls finely powdered charcoal in half a glass 
of water cures sick-headache, as it destroys the acid in the 
stomach. 

CANDLES. — Purchase at a country store eight balls of 
candle- wicking, gather from the roadside a bundle of alders, 
peel the bark, and cut the sticks about thirty inches in length, 
about fifty sticks; cut the wicks into strips of twenty- four 
inches in length. The day before you propose to make candles 
put the wicks on the candle-rods, doubled and twisted a little ; 
place six inches on each rod ; procure four long poles and place 
them in rows on chairs in the kitchen; heat the tallow in a large 
kettle, set off the stove, and dip all the wicks in the hot tallow 
two rods at a time, then return to the poles ; repeat the work 
of^dipping until candles are of sufficient size. It will take all 



The best baking powder made is, as 
shown by analysis, the "Royal." 



Com'r of Health, New - York City. 




I regard the Royal Baking Powder as 
the best manufactured. 

Author of ^'Common Sense in ike Household." 



noVAL BAKINO POWDER CO., 1 



L ST., NEW-YORK. 



92 

day. When finished you will have about three hundred can- 
dles, enough to last a whole year. The little bits of nearly 
burned candles should be saved for the children's lights on 
going to bed. This is the genuine receipt of Revolutionary times, 
and was rescued from oblivion by the oldest inhabitant. — C, «/". 
Benedict. 

BEEF TEA.— A pound of beef, chopped fine and freed from 
fat and gristle, is allowed to stand two hours in a pint of cold 
water. It should then simmer on the stove for three hours, but 
not be allowed to boil. Make up the loss by evaporation by the 
addition of cold water ; strain and extract the beef. Season 
lightly with salt.— Dr. E. P. Swift. 

MUTTON BROTH. — Lean loin of mutton, one pound, exclu- 
sive of bone ; water, three pints. Boil very gently till tender, 
throwing in a little salt and onion, according to taste. Pour 
out the broth into a basin, and, when it is cold, skim off all the 
fat. It can be warmed up as wanted. — Dr, E. P, Swift. 

COUGH REMEDY. — Two ounces boneset, put in one quart 
of cold water, steep slowly down to one pint and strain while 
hot in one cup molasses ; add one-half pint Jamaica rum, one 
tablespoonf ul oil of tar ; bottle, and dose is one tablespoonful 
three or four times a day. — Mrs, Yerks 

For hoarseness beat the white of one ^gg very stiff, add 
the juice of one lemon, sweeten to taste ; take one teaspoonful 
■every half hour. 

CARAMELS. — Two cups molasses, one cup sugar, one cup 
milk, butter size of an egg, vanilla to flavor to taste, one-half 
<5ake of chocolate. Boil until it hardens in water ; put vanilla 
in just before taking it off. — Ethel See. 

CRYSTAL CANDY.— Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, 
four tablespoonfuls molasses, two tablespoonfuls vinegar, two 
tablespoonf uls water. Boil fifteen minutes ; pour into shallow 
tins ; when cold, ready for use. — Mrs. Landon. 



93 
smmoTum, L^ I L-( f I L^ I f V call bills. 

AiroUllOIATOBS . I V I ^ L/ V-> i IV 1 V-> vJ TZLL-TALM. 

Batteries and Battery Parts Furnished. 
HOne MEDICAL BATTERY, Complete, at $7.50. 

ESTIMATES GIVEN UPON APPLICATION. 

Address H. W. BULLOCK, Box 87, Chappaqua, N. Y. 

C. C. CROLLY, 

Fancy and Dry Goods ^ Drugs and 

Confectionery, 

LEONARD A. BALLABD. HENRY C. LEWIS. 

BALLARD & LEWIS, 

DEALERS IN 

Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods, 

RIBBONS, LACES, HOSIERY, GLOVES, ETC., 
159 main street, SING 8I]KG» 

" JAMES H. ARNOLD, 

Boarding and Exchange Stable. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

HORSE FEED OF ALL KINDS. 

New Nos. 146, 148, and 150 West 29th Street (bet. 6th and 7th Aves.). 

Brandt at Babylon, l«. I. 



FOR SALE! 

Choice Lots on Marble Avenue. 



Apply WILLIAM H. ROSELL, 

PLEASANTVUXE, N. Y. 



94 

HARD SOAP.— Four and one-half pounds grease, one can 
Babbitt's potash, one quarter pound borax, one quart cold 
water. Dissolve the fat in a pan until free from lumps, but 
not boiling hot. Dissolve potash and borax in the quart of cold 
water ; when this is cold, stir it into the grease ; stir slowly 
until it is thick. Line a dripping-pan with a piece of wet mus- 
lin, pour the soap in it ; when stiff, cut with a knife into small 
pieces. The next morning lift cloth out and the soap will be 
ready to use. — Mrs. S. Brouwer. 

KNITTING BABY'S SACQUE.— Oast on sixty stitches for 
back-knit forty-two ribs, cast on forty stitches for sleeves, knit 
nineteen ribs; knit fifty-six stitches, bind off twenty-eight 
stitches for neck, leaving fifty-six on the other side ; knit nine- 
teen ribs, bind off, leaving thirty-two stitches for front ; knit 
forty -two ribs ; put on border of a different color, knitting 
twelve ribs for cuffs ; border around bottom and front, eight 
ribs; take up stitches for neck, knit across once, making 
holes by knitting two stitches, putting yarn twice over the 
needle and taking two stitches in one ; knit eleven ribs from 
holes. Use Saxony yarn. 



THINGS WORTH KNOWING. 

Alcohol removes grass stains if simply rubbed before put- 
ting into water. 

Bust can be removed by generously using kerosene oil. 

Lemons will keep good for months if sliced when sound and 
packed in glass jars, with a thick layer of white sugar between 
slices. 

Remedy for Buffalo moths: two ounces benzine, six ounces 
carbolic acid, three pints turpentine. Sprinkle around under 
edge of carpets. 

You can loosen a rusty screw by pouring kerosene oil 
over it. 



The 19th Century Woman 

iserted her right to 
pursuit of health, 
:alth and happiness, 
nd knows how to 
go to work to ob- 
tain them. She 
begins with her 
health. When an 
ache or a pain 
warns her of over- 
work ; when a 
cold, sore throat 
or indigestion 
tells of coming 
danger, instead of 
waiting to be laid 
ip from either work 
 pleasure, she at 
ice applies an 
-lcock's Porous 
-ASTER and goes 
it on with her duties, 
ing that she can 
saieiy rely upon the 
Allcock's to take care of the trouble. 

And when she asks for an Allcock's Porous 
Plaster, and the druggist tries to sell her 
something "just as good as Allcock's," she 
goes elsewhere, for she wants only the best 
and will have none but ALLCOCK'S. 



96 

ONE OF THE H. T. 

-]yy|R. A. L. BABCOCK cheerfully donates this page for 

further memoranda. 



97 

THE OTHER H. T. 

A^R. H. C. WESTLAKE accordingly does the same. 



98 

To relieve corns or any inflammation, make poultice of 
bread crumbs moistened with witch hazel. 

For chapped hands, equal portions glycerine, alcohol, and 
rose water. 

Chloroform removes grease spots from colored clothing. 

French chalk sprinkled on thickly will remove grease or 
oil from furniture or carpets ; leave it on 12 hours or more, then 
sweep ojff. 

For removing stains from white goods: dissolve two pounds 
washing soda in one gallon of water ; pour this water on one 
pound of chloride of lime in a stone pot, stirring the mixture 
while pouring in. When settled it is ready for use. Keep in 
tightly corked bottles ; will not answer for flannels. — Mrs, (w. 
W. Yerks. 




99 



VICTOR SEAMAN, 

MANAGER OF ESTATES, 

157 East lOSth St., ... NEW TORE. 

Mesidenee, PleatmntviUe, X^ F. 



Over 40 Years' Practical Experience in Handling 

Real Estate. 

Has for Sale Several Choice Properties, including two of the 
best Corners near the Station at Pleasantville. Also Farms and 
Country Homes at Unionville, Pleasantville, and Chappaqua. 

Farms and Small Places, Cheap for Cash, Wanted. 

Jlents Collected and Full Charge Taken of Property in 

New York and Brooklyn. 



TheBookletoftheS.P.S.W. 

Contains hints valuable to all wearers of spectacles and 
9^ ' ' J ^1 T> eye-glasseci. Write for one. 

t meces" ^- ^- MEYROWITZ, Manufg Optician, 

'^>P 104 Eaat SSd Street, - NEW YORK. 





Livei>^, I ^ale, I aqd I Boai<iIiqg I fStable^, 

Pleasantville Station, 

Opposite Depot. • • NS'W VORK. 



100 
HERBERT GRIFFIN desires to have his name placed 



here. 



" Sweets to the sweet." — Shakespeare. 



101 

THE 




rovident l^tfe 



AND 



Ti^ust ^Softifiani)^ 



OF PHILADELPHIA. 



Low Death Rate. 



Low Expense Rate. 

Safe Investments. 



Issues Life, Endowment, Term, Combined Term and 
Endowmeni:, Partnership, and Joint Policies, combining 
new, liberal and attractive features. Especial attention 
is directed to the liberal provisions for acting as Trustee 
for the proceeds of policies made payable by death. 

In everything which contributes to the Security and 
Cheapness of Life Insurance, the Provident stands un- 
rivalled. 

Write for particulars as to what we can do for you. 



New York Office, 409 Broadway. 

ROBERT I. MURRAY, Gen'l Agent. 



102 



LINDEN PARK NURSERY. 

LOUIS C. PILAT, Prop. 

Cor. Linden & Glen Aves., Sing Sing, N. Y. 



Fruit Trees, Ornamental Trees 

Grape Vines, and Shrubs. 

Cut Flowers. 

Bedding Plants of all Varieties. Palms and 
Ferns of Every Description. 

Decorations for Weddings, etc., artistically 

arranged. 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

FRANKLIN HOUSE. 

GEO. S. T. ALEXANDER & CO., 

Proprietor, 
TARRYTOWN-ON-HUDSON. 

W. T. BAILEY, 

Pleasantvllle Station. N. Y. 

STOVES AND STOVE FIXTURES. 

STOVES REPAIRED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

HameBS Making an^d ^Repairing, Oilf Lamps, Lamp Fix- 

tures, Lanterns, Putty, Olass, Etc. 



103 



JOHN I. THORN, 



PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y., 



Funeral Diiectoi 



and EmMmei, 



FLOWERS AND GAMP CHAIRS FURNISHED. 



Undertaking Materials 



CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 



Horses and Carriages Furnished on Livery. 



ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



104 



T EWIS E. HARKER. 

" No life worth naming ever comes to good, 
If always nourished on the self-same food." 

— Oliver Wendell Holmes. 



105 

* (^NE act does not make a habit," nor one receipt a cook- 
book; therefore 

LEWIS O. OLARK 

wishes the housewives to write upon this page the receipts thjey 
may wish to remember. 



106 

EDW. MITCHBLL BBRRIBN, JOS. BAYLEY HALSEY. 

BERRIEN & HALSEY, 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE, 

88 Washington Place, • Near 0th Avenue, New York. 

UPTOWN OFFICE: 

1761 JvIADISON AVENUE. 



Houses i:«et and Mento Collected. Money obtained on BonA 
and Mortaraffe* Bntire Cbarve taken of Butatea. 

GRIFFIN BROS., 

DEALEB8IN 

Dry Goods and Carpets. 

CARPETS MADE AND LAID AT SHORT NOTICE. 



lOa BCain Street, - - Slntf^ Slnfl*, N^. TT^ 

NOAH T. BABNES. ELBERT O. SECOR* 

BA-EISTES & SECOE. 

GROCERS, 

160 Jvlaln Street, Sing Sing, N. Y^ 



TELEPHONE CALL No. 79. 



Fx-uL±-b Gb Si>eo±aiX-by- 



COMPUMENTS OF 

C. VANDBRBILT. 

Xai?rvto"wii, - - INT. Y. 



107 

JOHN E. BARLOW, 

DBALBR IN 

Hardware, Stoves, Ranges, House FnrnisliiDg Goods, Etc. 



ROOFING DONE AT SHORT NOTICE. 



Special Attention given to the Introduction of Water 
from the Sing Sing Water Works, 

iSi MAIN STREET, . . SING SING, N. Y. 

C. H. STEVENS, 

LIVERY, BOARDING & SALE STABLES. 

No. 16 Spring Street, Sing Sing, N. T. 



Agent far CdumbuH Buggy Company and MUburn 
Team and Light Moad Wagons and Harness. 



Carriages for Funerals, Weddings, Balls, Etc., at any hour. 
All calls between 9 and 10.30 P.M., $1; after, S2. 

Sunday Calls, $1 to $2. 

WASHBURNE & TODD, 

DEALERS IN 

LUMBER AND COAL. 



ALL KINDS OF MILL WORK DONE PROMPTLY. 



SING SING, N. Y. 



108 



MACKEOWN'S 

EYESIGHT TESTING ROOMS 
FOR SPECTACLES, 

24 East 42cl St., New York. 

An Article of Permanency Must Have Merit for its Foyndation. 

ESTABLISHED 1863. 

BELDINQ BROS & CO., 

The Largest Manufacturers IN THE WORLD of 

Sewing Silk and MacliiDe Twist. 

ALSO MANUFACTURBRS OF 

BELDING'S Superior Silk Hosiery (in black and all the popu- 
lar shades, both in regular and Opera lengths). 

BELDING'S •'Phoenician Dye'' Wash Silks, in Twist, 
Etching, Rope, Kilo, and Royal Floss. 

BELDING'S Crochet and Knitting Silks. 

ALL FULL WEIGHT AND FAST COLOR. 

IF YOU WOULD HAVE THE BEST, USE BELDINQ'S SILKS. 

455 and 457 Broadway, New York. 



5. WOOD CORMELL. 

pleasantvUle Station, 1R. 1^. 



AGENT FOR 




Also Defllere in 



THE MOST RENOWNED. 
NONS BETTBB C AIT BE MADE. 

AotuBl CoBi leee than $1. 25 per Gallon. 
Siiteen yei'S sale in nearly every City, Town 



FOR SALE AT OUR AGENCY. 



§. Wood ©opnell, 



PleaBant:Vllle Siailoq, 



lOJ 



Lake Pleasant Ice and Cider Go. 

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS 
AND FAMILIES SUPPLIED. 



THE ICE FROM PURE SPRING WATER. 
THE CIDER ABSOLUTELY APPLE JUICE. 



T^HIS establishment has been \but a few 
short years in existence and has already 

attained an almost national reputation for 

the excellence of its products. 

IVe are now supplying families with our 

Russet Cider in pint and quart bottles by 

the case. 

PINTS, $2.50; QUARTS, $2.00. 

« 

Your order is earnestly solicited. 

Respectfully^ 

E. M. DUNN, Proprietor. 
JOHN DURNEY, Manager. 



110 

S. MOFFIT, Tailor, 

CLEAKINQ AND RBPAIRING 

DONE IN THE NEATEST MANNER, 

and Promptly Attended To. 

GENTS OWN MATERIAL MADE UP. 
Pleasantville Station, N. Y. 

GEORGE GREIG, 

DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Toilet and Fancy Articles, 

Blank Books, Stationery and Suodries. 
PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y. 

DRY, FANCY and FURNISHING GOODS 

FOB LADIES, GENT8, and CHILDREN. 
'Watclies, Je'welry, and Sporting: Goods* 

Is3:?a©l HI. IBCei±gli.'b3 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Provisions, Flour, Fruits, 
Confectionery, Notions, etc. 

OVHR 93 YKARS IVT BVSINBSS! 

AND 

E. H. SEE IS STILL ON DECK 

with a FULL LINE of 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Etc. 



Ill 



W. H. VAN WART, 

FORMOSA, HYSON. AND JAPAN TEAS. 

nRST-GIiSS FAULT GROCERIES. FLOUR AID FEED. 

Oil Cloths, Canned Ooods, Fresh Fruits in 

their Season. 

PLEASANTVILLE. 

H. E. WASHBURN, 

CARPENTER and BUILDER, 

Pleasantville Station, N. Y. 

PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS FURNISHED. 

SAMUKI. A. XITLAR, 

-DEALER IN— 

Plain and Fancy Crockery and Glassware, 

LAMPS, LAMP FIXTURES, ETC. 

Table Cutlery. Plated Ware, Etc. 167 MAIN ST., 

8INC 8INC, N. Y. 

Edward C. Haines, 



-#F^#BIBT«i^ 



9 

Bedford Station, N. Y. 



112 



INDEX TO RECIPES. 



PAOK 

Soups : 5 

Fish 10 

Meats 16 

Vegetables \ -22 

Entrees 2S 

Salads 32 

Sauces 40 

Puddings 4^ 

Pies 50 

Desserts 54 

Bread and Breakfast Cakes 60 

Cakes ^% 

Preserves 82 

Pickles 86 

Beverages 90 

Miscellaneous .9 .;. r. .'::.. .T .::. Q 92 

Things Worth Knowing 96