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Full text of "Police and peace officers' journal of the State of California"

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AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 




NEW COMMISSION AND CHIEF FOR SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Left to rigt: H. C. Maginn, J. Warnoch Walsh, President, Washington I. Kohnke. 
Standing is Chief Michael E. I. Mitchell. 



JANUARY 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATIOr 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 




y r 



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If it's 

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Phone TE. 2-7168 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 


PAGE 

Judge Robinson San Francisco's New Mayor 3 


San Francisco's New Police Commissioners 


4 


S.F.P.D. Has New Commission and Chief . . 


6 


Address by President J. Warnock Walsh . . 


8 


Michael E. L Mitchell New Chief of S.F.P.D. 


9 


Capt. M. E. Fit-patrick, Department Secretary 


7 


Bakersfield and Its New Chief 


11 


S.F.P.D. Aid Association Installs Officers . . 


12 


Sheriff Hogin of Stanislaus County .... 


13 


How Officers Killers were Caught .... 
B>' The Ed.\toy 


14 


The Story, In Part, of a "Bad Boy" .... 
By B. S. {Sand^y) ZarxAers 


16 


The Present Task of Law Enforcement . . . 
By H. C. Van Peit. V&l 


17 


Sheriff Long Has Best In Radio 

By George Ardwna 


18 


Editorial Page — The Candid Friend .... 
hy Opie L. Warner 


20 


Pistol Pointing 


21 


By /. Ross Dunmgan 


Oakdale, and Other Mother Lode Towns . . 


26 


Crime Trends of California 

By Chief George H. Brereton 


32 


Exeter — Tulare County 


34 


Inspector Jack Cannon Answers Last Roll Call 


35 


Modesto's Police Department 


36 


Traffic Officers' Training at U. C 


49 


Some are True and Some are False 

Rate Yourself 


50 
56 


All Law Enforcement Officials 

By Chief Earl Djer\ing 


Tulare's Chief Kinder 


62 


No. Cal. Peace Officers Meet 


76 



Directory 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
'vents. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020- 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Monday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

J. Warnock Walsh, President 160 Montgomery Street 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery Street 

Washington I. Kohnke 686 Sacramento Street 

Deputy Chief Michael Gaffey, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quigley 

Dept. Sec" y.... Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRiCK....Hall of Justice 
District Captains 

Central Edward Donahue 635 Washington Street 

Southern A. I. O'Brien Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission .' Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Northern Jack Eker ,..841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park Leo Tackney Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond George M. Healy 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside... .Michael Gaffey.. ..Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval John J. Wade 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero John Sullivan 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Michael Riordan 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors James L. English Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

OF Districts Alexander McDaniell Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel It. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk. ...Capt. Patrick J. Murray. ...Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control... .Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 



When In Trouble Call SUtteY VZO^ZO 

When In Uoubt 



Alwavs At Your Service 



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Oakland, Calif. 

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Office Tel. A Nd over 1-3948 
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Season's 
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Member of 

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SHERWIN 

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COMPANY 



Oakland, California 



San Francisco; 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922} 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyright) 



Vol. XXIII 



JANUARY, 1948 



No. 10 



Judge Robinson San Francisco^s New Mayor 



It's been a long time and it will be a long time in the 
future when there will be colorful ceremonies such as 
marked the swearing in of Mayor Elmer Robinson in the 
rotunda of the City Hall at noon on January 6. Long 
before Mayor and Mrs. Robinson came walking down 




Mayor Elmer E. Robinson 

the stairs from the second floor to the first, one could 
hardly get into the City Hall let alone get a place where 
he could witness the ceremonies. 

Supervisor Dan Gallagher acted as master of cere- 
monies and the municipal band furnished appropriate 
music before and during the big political event. There 
was a profusion of flowers, and when former Mayor 
Roger Lapham made his farewell address and other no- 
tables presented to the huge audience, Judge Robinson was 
sworn in by his close and long time friend, Superior Judge 
Thomas M. Foley. Then the new Mayor made a speech 
which serves as a guide as to what he intends to under- 
take to make his native city a better place in • which 
to live. 

Mayor Robinson, born in this city on October 3, 1894 
has come a long way in his busy life. Of pioneer stock, 
he nevertheless was not born with a silver spoon in his 
mouth and he got his education the hard way and which 
ended in 1917 by his being admitted to the practice of law. 



He served on the staff of two district attorneys, the late 
Charles M. Fickert and Judge Matthev^' Brady. After the 
latter political job he took up private practice, but on 
January 1, 1935, former Governor Merriam appointed 
him to the municipal judge bench. In September of the 
same year he appointed Judge Robinson to the superior 
court bench following the resignation of Judge Michael 
Roche who was appointed to the Federal Judgeship. 

Mayor Robmson is a deep student of the history of 
California and he has presented some valuable works to 
the Stanford Hoover library. 

As to how deeply he is impressed by the traditions of 
San Francisco one can judge by his act in digging out 
of the basement an oil painting of the late colorful Mayor 
James Rolph and has ordered it hung once again in the 
outer office from whence it was moved four years ago. 

Mayor Robinson has many ideas which are aimed for 
the betterment of San Francisco and his appointment of 
men and women to help him bring these ideas into being 
speaks well for the future of the city by the Golden Gate. 



BAILIFF McKEEVER WITH 
MAYOR ROBINSON 

It is necessary, and has been a custom for years, that 
the Mayor of a city the size of San Francisco, have regu- 
larly appointed peace officers to serve with the city's 
chief executive. In San Francisco these officers of the law 
have been members of the Police Department. Their 
duties have been to see that the Mayor is not bothered 
by a lot of people having no official or important business 
with that official and to see that all who have actual busi- 
ness get in to see the Mayor. 

When Mayor Elmer Robinson took over the duties of 
managing the affairs of San Francisco, he selected, as the 
man to meet the public in the reception room his trusted 
bailiff for over 12 years, when he served as a superior 
judge. That man was Bailiff George P. McKeever. 
Sheriff Daniel C. Murphy made the assignment at the 
Mayor's request. 

The appointment has met with general approval. For 
Bailiff McKeever, who joined the Sheriff's force back in 
(Continued on Page 25) 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1 948 



San Francisco^s New Police Commissioners 



J. Warnock Walsh, Henry C. Maginn and Washington 
I. Kohnke, the three men Mayor Elmer Robinson selected 
as members of the Board of Police Commissioners are 
men who have been a success in their respective business 
endeavors. They have demonstrated their interest in civic 
affairs and their readiness to give their time to public 
service by serving on the Police Commission show them 
to be public spirited men for the pay is very small and 
the responsibilities are very great. But from the success 
that they have achieved in their present calling assures 
the city of a Police Department which will continue to 
enforce the laws as it has done so well for the past 3^ 
years and more. 

Following are biographical sketches of the three men 
who will guide the destinies of the Police Department 
for the next four years : 

Commission President J. Warnock Walsh 

J. Warnock Walsh was born in San Francisco on Janu- 
ary 18, 1900. He attended parochial grammar and high 




Commissioner J. Warnock Walsh 

schools of his native city and upon graduating from the 
latter entered Santa Clara University. He graduated from 
this anci2nt college in 1921. 

His education along academic lines completed he entered 
the real estate business and after a successful career in this 
endeavor he joined the E. F. Hutton (i Company, stock 
brokers, in 1927. He has been an important stock broker 
ever since. 

He has always maintained a keen interest in civic affairs 
and has been active in the welfare of his alma mater. He 
served on the 1937 grand jury on which Marshall Dill 
was the foreman. 

President Walsh has constructive ideas about the con- 
duct of the Police Department which were set forth in 
his statement of policy on the occasion of the first meeting 



of the new Commission. He maintains the first thing all 
public officials must keep in mind is that they are serving 
the people of their respective communities and he insists 
that the Police Department members shall always bear 
this in mind. 

In 1927 he married Miss Marian Reimers and the 
couple have one son Jay, who at 19 years of age, is at' 
tending the University of San Francisco. 

The family home is at 130 Pacheco avenue. 
* * * 

Commissioner H. C. Maginn 

Henry C. Maginn was born in Colfax, Calif., in 1887, 
and was the son of P. H. and Esther Maginn. 

He got his education in the local grammar and high 




Commissioner Henry C. Maginn 

schools and spent two years at college, when he quit to 
enter the engineering department of the Southern Pa- 
cific Company. 

Following this first job he has been connected with the 
Southern Nevada Telephone and Telegraph Co., con- 
struction and operation, in Tonopah; the Yuba Consoli- 
dated Goldfield Dredge Co., Hammonton, Cahf. 

From 1909 to 19H he was associated with Frank C. 
Miller in charge of construction of the Central California 
Traction from Sacramento to Lodi and the California 
and Oakland, Antioch Eastern Railroad. 

He served from 1911 to 1916 as deputy county sur- 
veyor of Sacramento county. 

He jias been in the cement manufacturing business since 
1916 and became identified with the Calvaras Cement 
Company in 1927. He is now vice president and chair- 
man of the operating committee as well as a director. 

Commissioner Maginn is also a director of the Associ- 
ated General Contractors of America and the Clear Lake 
Water Company, in Yolo county. 



January. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 5 



He is a member of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, Olympic Club, Stock Exchange Club, California 
Club of Los Angeles and the Sutter Club of Sacramento. 

He was foreman of the 1946 Grand Jury. 

The Maginn family home is at 2200 Leavenworth street 

where he and his wife reside. 

* * * 

Commissioner W. I. Kohnke 

Washington I. Kohnke was born in San Fnincisco in 
April, 1881. 

Getting his education in the grammar and high schools 
of his native city he took up the printing business and in 




Commissioner W.ashinoton I. Kohnke 

1910 formed the present Kohnke Printing Co.. located at 
686 Sacramento Street. 

He has never held public oiEce before though he served 
as a member of the 1928 grand jury. 

However, Commissioner Kohnke has been very much 
interested in fraternal aifairs and is a past master of two 
Masonic lodges, Paul Revere and Veritas. He is and has 
been for many years an inspector of the 47th district of 
the Grand Lodge of Masons. 

He was Potentate of Islam Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine, and has had deep interest in the Shriner Children's 
hospital ever since it was established on 19th Avenue. 

Commissioner Kohnke was married some forty years 
ago to Miss Edith Leonhart a San Francisco girl. The 
couple have three children, Mrs. Ethel Muchison of Los 
Angeles, Mrs. Virginia DeVoto of San Francisco and 
Irving J. Kohnke who lives in San Mateo and a member 
of the Kohnke Printing Co. There are also seven grand 
children in the family. 

He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

At the present time Commissioner Kohnke is at Mt. 
Zion hospital for a minor operation and last reports are 
that he is making good progress to recovery. 



dan to head the Traffic Bureau, was in recognition of 
the fine work Captain Riordan accomplished when he 
had over all conduct of that important unit of the San 
Francisco Police Department during the last year and 
a half. 

Captain Riordan, through study and with the assistance 
of commissioned and non-commissioned officers and the 
rank and file members established a record of traffic con- 
trol that placed San Francisco in the lead in reduction of 
deaths from traffic accidents and the reduction of injuries 
from the same source. 

During 1947 94 people met their deaths from automo- 
biles. In 1946 the number was 131, a higher percentage 
of reduction than in 194^, during a part of which Captain 
Riordan served the Traffic Bureau. 

Personal injuries for 1947 was 3547 against 3810 
for 1946. 

One of the principal causes for the great showing has 
been law enforcement. Over i 2 2, 000 traffic citations were 
issued during the past year. In 1946 there were 466,554. 
Fines collected amounted to $1,243,000, the year previous 
they were $1,185,000. 

During the Christmas holidays the road block, used 
sparingly in the past was revived and as a result there 
wasn't a single death reported in San Francisco from 
December 24 to December 31. The year before several 
met their deaths and in most cases the drivers of automo- 




The act of the new Police Commission and Chief 
Michael Mitchell in assigning former Chief Michael Rior- 



C.\PT.\IX MlCH.\F.L RlORD.\N 

biles had been drinking too much. This year all who 
showed signs of over indulgence were yanked out of 
circulation, thus reducing the hazards the drunken drivers 
present. 

Mayor Robinson has announced himself in favor of 
making the head of the Traffic Bureau a Director of 
Traffic with salar>' same as Deputy Chief. He favors 
Captain Riordan for the job when it is created. 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



S F P D Has New Commission and Chief 



San Francisco's Police Department, consisting of some 
1400 men and women, has a new Police Commission and 
a complete turnover of heads of all key positions in the 
great law enforcement organizations of the city. 

Shortly after his inauguration as chief executive of 
San Francisco, Mayor Elmer Robinson announced the 
names of the three men he had selected as members of 



of police officers, and with no reflection upon any one 
thus moved. 

On the night of January 13 the new Commissioners 
held their first meeting and after being sworn in proceeded 
to elect Commissioner Walsh as president. Then a reso- 
lution was presented declaring the office of Chief of 
Police vacant and a motion, unanimously carried, named 




Police Commission President J. Warnock Walsh congratulates newly appointed Chief of Police Michael Mitchell and first meeting 

of new Commission. Commissioner Henry C. Maginn at far right. 



his Police Commission to succeed J. Wesley Howell, E. L. 
Turkington and Edward V. Mills, who had submitted 
their resignations after the voters decided who their next 
Mayor would be. The new Commissioners are J. Warnock 
Walsh, stock broker, Henry C. Maginn, official of the 
Calavaras Cement Company and Washington I. Kohnke, 
printing firm executive. Commissioners Maginn and 
Kohnke have been foremen of past grand juries. 

With the announcement of his selection for the three 
men who will guide, at least for the next four years, the 
destinies of the Police Department, Mayor Robinson stated 
he would ask the new Commissioners to appoint Captain 
Michael E. I. Mitchell as Chief of Police to succeed Chief 
Michael Riordan. 

He also said that men holding high posts in the Police 
Department would be replaced by an entirely new set 



Captain Mitchell as the new Chief effective at midnight 
of January 13. 

The new Chief was immediately sworn in and the 
crowd of men and women who filled the meeting room 
to its utmost and overflowed into the corridors greeted 
the selection of Captain Mitchell as head of the Police 
Department with hearty applause. 

Then President Walsh addressed the great audience 
setting forth the aims of the Mayor and the Commission, 
a full account of which will be found on another page 
of this edition of The Police and Peace Officers' 

JOURN.\L. 

Then with an indication of how humane and considerate 
the new Commissioners are they adjourned out of respect 
to the memory of Inspector John J. Cannon who had 
passed away the day before. 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Chief Mitchell, with the Commissioners present, held a 
press conference in which he set forth the policies that 
will be the guide he will follow as Chief, notable was his 
declaration that San Francisco will not relax from the 
clamp down on vice that has characterized the adminis- 
tration of former Chiefs Charles W. Dullea and Riordan. 
He said he was aware of the word that was going around 
that San Francisco would be opened up, and in unmistak- 
able terms he said the city would remain tight — no gam- 
bling, no lotteries, no prostitution and no after hours 
drinking, these as all other unlawful activities would be 
given the strictest law enforcement. Those who know 
Chief Mitchell knows he was serving notice that the "lid" 
would be kept clamped tight. 

Then the new Chief announced the appointments of 
men to fill key positions, only three remained after the 
clean sweep, that of Captain Alexander McDaniel who 
remains as supervising Captain, Lieutenant George 
Hippely, Director of Criminal Information, and Director 
of Criminology Francis Latulipe. 

The new Chief's orders made Captain James Quigley 
Deputy Chief in place of Captain Michael Gaffey, who 
goes to Ingleside station. 

Captain James English became Captain of Inspectors, 
in place of Captain Bernard McDonald, who was detailed 
to the city prison. 

Captain John Engler, Department Secretary, was sent 
to the Police Academy, while Lieutenant Michael Fitz- 
patrick of Southern Station took over the secretarial job. 

Lieutenant Alvin Nicholini was assigned to head the 
Special Services Bureau, in place of Inspector Percy 
(Pete) Kenealy, sent to the Inspectors" Bureau for as- 
signment. 

Captain Aloysius O'Brien transferred from Ingleside 
station to Southern. 

Captain George Healy transferred from Southern to 
Richmond. Captain John Eker, night Chief of Police, 
transferred to Northern Station — uith the job of night 
Chief declared vacant. 

Regarding the appointment of former Chief Riordan 
his intention to move to have the position designated as 
to head the Traffic Bureau, Mayor Robinson said it was 
Director of Traffic with the same salary of that of Deputy 
Chief — $8940 annually. To do this it will be necessary 
to submit the question to the voters. 

The Mayor declared : 

"I consider that the man in charge of traffic is second 
in importance only to the Chief. Captains have been 
reluctant to take over the heavy responsibilities of the 
Traffic Bureau. Captain Riordan, with his background, 
his lawyer's training and his experience with the Traffic 
Department, provides all the qualifications I have in mind 
for the head of the Traffic Department." 

Former Chief Riordan who drops to the rank of Cap- 
tain stated he would accept any assignment made by Chief 
Mitchell, and give that assignment the best of his ability. 

While the changes in all important posts of the Police 
Department from Commissioners down, amounted to an 
almost clean sweep the rank and file not affected by the 



overhaul generally commented on the fact that the De- 
partment has plenty of efficient and capable men who can 
take the place of other good men who served before them. 
It's a certainty that the Department will continue to make 
it mighty uncomfortable for the evil doers as they have 
been doing for over 35 years that this writer has worked 
with the Police Department as a newspaperman. They 
will give the Police Commissioners, Chief Mitchell and 
his top flight assistants the same loyal support they have 
rendered through the years and which has resulted in 
San Francisco being recognized as a City which enjoys 
a high place for law enforcement. 



CAPTAIN M. F. FITZPATRICK 
DEPARTMENT SECRETARY 

The new San Francisco Police Department Secretary, 
Lieutenant Michael F. Fitzpatrick, comes to the Hall of 
Justice well versed in the police routine of correspondence, 
accounting, segregation of crimes, etc. — in fact on all 
the book work that is handled at police headquarters, 




Capt.mn Michael F. Fitzpatrick 

from the files in the basement to the City Prison on the 
top floor, for the simple reason that he spent many arduous 
days in various offices in the Hall of Justice before he 
became a lieutenant and was assigned to station duty. 

Fifteen years ago our present Chief Clerk was a 
patrolman. Today he is, by Civil Service rank, a lieuten- 
ant of the San Francisco Police Department holding a 
brevet captain rank as Department Secretary. 

Captain Fitzpatrick is a 'World Was No L veteran, 
who, as a radio operator, on the "S. S. Evelyn", made 
many trips between Norfolk, Va., and Le Havre, France. 

As a member of the Police Department he is well and 
favorably known, by all ranks, for his unfailing integrity, 
his unquestioned ability and courage — and, above and be- 
yond all, his thorough and kindly understanding of people. 

OPERATING ENGINEERS 

No. 3 
Sati Francisco, California 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



Address By President J. Warnock Walsh 

At First Meeting of the Newly Formed Board of Police Commissioners 



Before we adjourn I should like to say to our new 
Chief of Police and to the Captains and other officers 
of the Department who are present, on behalf of my 
fellow Commissioners, Washington Kohnke and Pat 
Maginn, as well as myself, that we are very proud to be 
associated with the San Francisco Police Department. 




Captain James L. Quigley gets the glad hand from President 

Walsh on his appointment as Deputy Chief. Chief Mitchell and 

Commissioners Maginn and Kohnke look on. 

The three of us were born in San Francisco. We are 
new to police work and have very much to learn — and 
we want you to help us in that particular — nevertheless 
we know personally many of the men of the Department 
and we look forward to making our Department one 
happy family in which all will cooperate for the common 
good. 

We know the high reputation which this organization 
has gained through years of public service, and in our 
humble way we want to contribute to that good reputa- 
tion and to preserve the high standards of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department during the time that we may 
serve as members of the Police Commission. 

The most important function of city government is 
the direct exercise of police power. All other municipal 
agencies arc necessarily dependent on proper police law 
enforcement. The police force i,s the direct link between 
the people and their government and that is why it is 
vitally important that our Department maintain the con- 
fidence of the people and that the members of the De- 
partment, in return, exercise their duties with forbearance 
and courtesy toward the honest citizen who occasionally 



runs foul of the law and, on the other hand, with unre- 
lenting vigor toward the gangster and the racketeer. 

Mayor Robinson has made it very plain that he will 
not tolerate the presence of gangsters or racketeers in 
our city. The policy of this Commission is to back up 
the Mayor 100 per cent. We ask for the cooperation of 
the Chief and of you captains and leaders of the Depart- 
ment as well as all its membership, and we are confident 
that we will have your earnest cooperation. 

We cannot succeed in law enforcement, however, unless 
wc have the moral support of the people. The good citi- 
zen who sometimes disobeys the law that he does not like 
encourages other people to disobey laws that he does not 
like and which must be enforced for his protection. That 
is where crime prevention plays such an important part. 

It is generally understood that the most efficient and 
controversial part of police work is the necessary enforce- 
ment of purely statutory regulations such as traffic laws. 
This responsibility involves questions of policy and of tact 
and of course also depends to a great extent on public 
opinion and support. 

It is the policy of this administration to do everything 
humanly possible to help solve our very serious traffic 
problems. That necessarily involves a strict although 
courteous enforcement of the traffic laws. It will be our 
immediate object to bring about improved traffic condi- 
tions and the members of the Commission ask for the 
cooperation not only of the Chief of Police and of the 
Captain of Traffic, but of every ranking officer and mem- 
ber of the Department as well. 

We propose to keep in mind at all times that the San 
Francisco Police Department belongs to the people. We 
are the servants of the people and we must work for the 
greatest good of the greatest number. 

May I remind everyone present that we are all on the 
same team and that with harmony and good will toward 
each other we can accomplish our objective and render 
a high degree of service to the people of San Francisco. 
We want all members of the Department to understand 
th.it we look upon them as friends and co-workers. 

In conclusion may I congratulate Chief Mitchell and 
the other ranking officers of the Department and, on 
behalf of my fellow Commissioners, I wish them every 
success in their new duties. The changes that have been 
made arc not intended as a reflection on anyone. We 
realize, of course, that reasonable rotation in office is a 
good thing under our form of government. 




January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Michael E. I. Mitchell New Police Chief of SFPD 



Chief Michael E. I. Mitchell has been a member of and file — and the commissioned and non-commissioned 

the San Francisco Police Department under five police officers, too — are his ex-pupils. The new Deputy Chief 

chiefs since the date of his appointment, January 1, 1908. encouraged hundreds of virile young men to join the San 

From his first day as a patrolman the succession of Francisco Police Department, always pointing out to them 

heads of the department recognized him as a "natural"— that wearing a police uniform proclaimed the fact that 

you belonged to an ancient and most honorable profes- 
sion, viz: standing resolutely between the good people 
and the bad or would-be bad. He also pointed out to 
such men that there was plenty of room at the top for 
those who had ambition to better themselves in the de- 
partment. Hundreds of our today police department 
members are patrolmen, also of the higher ranks because 
of the advice and police instruction received from Deputy 
Chief James L. Quigley. 




Chief Michael E. I. Mitchell 

a thorough going police officer who could handle any 
police exigency. 

Down through the years the present chief might have 
had one or two equals in the department; but nobody to 
put him in second place. In the matter of bringing to 
justice the cleverest and most daring law violators he 
seemed almost uncanny. 

To secure what is called, in police department par- 
lance, "Meritorious Public Service" citations from the 
police commissioners, the case in point must reveal to the 
Meritorious Conduct Board that the candidate risked his 
life with full knowledge of the danger involved and 
assumed and actually accomplishes the undertaking by 
arrest or by saving human life under dire circumstances. 

The new chief has received several such official com- 
mendations from various police commission groups. In 
a later issue of this journal we will set forth the San 
Francisco Police history of some famous cases in which he 
brought honor to our San Francisco Police Department. 

Always a thorough gentleman, with a kindly smile, the 
new chief has yearly added to his friends and admirers 
both within and without the San Francisco Police De- 
partment. 

From one and all we hear only praise for Chief 
Mitchell and the expressed belief that our San Francisco 
Police Department could have no better man at its helm. 



DEPUTY CHIEF JAMES L. QUIGLEY 

Captain James L. Quigley, the newly appointed Deputy 
Chief of the San Francisco Police Department is prob- 
ably the best known member of the department's heads, 
both within and without the department. 

In the department at least ninety per cent of the rank 




Deputy Chief James L. Quigley 

The new Deputy Chief has had excellent, outside of 
the police department, police experience. In 1928 he 
resigned from the Police Department and was elected an 
Assemblyman to Sacramento, for two terms, by a large 
majority. 

Returning to the department in 1931, he topped a Civil 
Service list of eligibles. 

A man of unusually keen intellect he rose in the de- 
partment from patrolman in 1931 to captain in 1947. 
In 1941 he was selected to represent the San Francisco 
Police Department as a student in a traffic course at the 
Northwestern University, on his graduation from which 
he was assigned to the Traffic Bureau of the department, 
in which bureau he was most efficiently active for three 
years. 

Deputy Chief Quigley has always been a champion of 
Police Department betterment conditions for the rank 
and file of the department and thus holds the love of the 
men who wear the blue uniform. 

In a later issue will appear more details concerning 
the present competent and popular deputy chief. 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1 948 



CAPTAIN OF INSPECTORS 
JAMES L. ENGLISH 

The newly appointed Captain of Inspectors of the San 
Francisco PoHce Department is Captain James L. English, 
who, in less than twenty years in the department, has, 
through sheer ability, risen to the executive group in the 
Hall of Justice. 




Captain of Inspectors James L. English 

Always an alert and courageous officer it was only 
natural that he should have come face to face with death 
on more than one occasion — on one of which occasion 
he was the target for the bullets of an ex-convict in 
which shots from the cornered police inspector took 
fatal effect. For this and other outstanding police experi- 
ences against mighty odds Captain English was voted the 
much coveted police department distinction of "Merito- 
rious Service" by the Police Commissioners. 

Captain English is one of the most studious men in the 
police department. 

Coming up from patrolman through the ranks of cor- 
poral, sergeant and lieutenant, to the rank of captain, 
means endless hours of study of the many subjects pre- 
scribed by the Civil Service Commission. The present 
Captain of Inspectors, in each examination was tops and 
finished his scries of such examinations by heading the 
eligibk list of captains. 

For his many years of excellent work in the Bureau 
of Inspectors he has the respect and admiration of the 
fine group of men over whom he has been placed in charge. 

Captain English has always given only his very best 
efforts to the San Francisco Police Department and his 
appointment to his present position, does not at all augur 
well for the peace and happiness of cither present or 
professional evil dtKrs in San Francisco. 



A. J. NICOLINI, DIRECTOR OF 
SPECIAL SERVICES 

Director of Special Services, Alvin J. Nicolini, was a 
patrolman in the San Francisco Police Department thirteen 



years ago. Today we find a lieutenant with the additional 
title of Director, Bureau of Special Services, which means 
his job is to prevent would-be gangsters and their like 
from providing themselves with the wherewith to spend 
a life of ease and leisure at the expense of our citizens 
and the strangers within our gates. 

Director Nicolini has received many official recommenda- 
tions from our San Francisco Police Department heads 
during his short police career. In World War No 1 he 
was a machine gun instructor at Chateau Thierry and 
other vital French posts. 

His undoubted mental ability is shown by his passing 
our local Civil Service promotion tests in the police de- 




LlEUTENANT ALVIN J. NlCOLrNl 

partment and being graded as a result of such examina- 
tions from the rank of patrolman in 1934 to the rank 
of lieutenant in 1947 — and topping the 1947 list of de- 
partment eligible lieutenants. 

Lieutenant Nicolini is a firm believer in work and more 
work. Throughout the department he is known as cour- 
ageous and tireless. 

Keeping the lid on organized crime in a city like San 
Francisco is an all day job. The new Director has always 
liked arduous work. For him we prophesy unqualified 
success — especially when he has such a fine staff, each 
of whom is of high standing as members of "San Fran- 
cisco's Finest." 

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January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 11 



BAKERSFIELD AND ITS POLICE CHIEF 



Bakersfield, the county seat of Kern county, is the 
center of as varied line of farming products and the 
greatest oil bearing fields of any count>' in the state of 
California. 

From its crop raising area, of which some 200 different 




Chief Horace V. Grayson 

kinds are produced commercially 1 3 of these crops produce 
alone a million dollars worth annually. 

The oil producting fields bring in 90,000,000 barrels a 
year for which the producers get over $100,000,000. 

Bakersfield was first settled in 1 862 by a Colonel Thomas 
Baker and from that day it has grown to a city of nearly 
a hundred thousand people, who enjoy the fine homes, 
wide palm and tree lined streets, fine stores, good theaters 
and the best in churches and schools. 

Situated at the southern end of the San Joaquin valley 
on route 99 it handles a vast flow of auto traffic each 
year, and many are those who stop over longer for a cup 
of coffee. There are things to see in and around Bakers- 
field that are worth tarrj'ing to see. 

Bakersfield has a fine Police Department of 75 mem- 
bers. They are well trained for their duties and well 
equipped implements of law enforcement. It is under the 
direction of Chief Horace V. Grayson, 

Chief Grayson was born in Texas in the year 1903. His 
career as a law enforcement officer started when he was 
but 19 years of age in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where he 
served for three years on the Police Department in that 
city. Chief Grayson came to Bakersfield, Calif., in 1926. 
He entered the department there as a motorcycle officer 
and in 1932 was made a detective. Chief Grayson's devo- 
tion to his duties was outstanding, and in 1935' he was 



made a Lieutenant. Two years later, in 1937, he was 
made Assistant Chief. In 1940 the Chief, who was a 
member of U. S. N. R. (United States Naval Reserve), 
was called to active duty in the U. S. Navy. 

Among his first assignments, he was detailed with the 
Naval Intelligence within the boundaries of the conti- 
nental United States and at the time of the infamous attack 
on Pearl Harbor by the Japs, Chief Grayson held the rank 
in the Navy of Lieutenant Senior Grade. He was finally 
sent to the South Pacific and served directly under the 
fabulous Admiral William Halsey. He covered the entire 
South Pacific theatre via airplane. He had charge of aerial 
fire defense, which included, among other things, seeing 
that the incredible stocks of ammunition stored on islands, 
hundreds and sometimes thousands of miles apart, would 
be available when needed. These ammunition dumps as 
touchy as a bomb and the records of the Navy Depart- 
ment show that there were far fewer explosions of am- 
munition depots than the Naval Department itself would 
consider normal. Let it be noted that Chief Grayson's 
efficiency as a Naval Officer could not but have something 
to do with this. 

In 194^ Chief Grayson, who was now a full Com- 
mander in the U. S. Navy, was put on inactive duty. 
He is, of course, still a Reserve Officer in the Navy. At 
this time the position of Chief of Police in Bakersfield 
was open and the citizens of that City were happy to 
welcome back their former Assistant Chief and he was 
made Chief of Police. 

Chief Grayson and his wife. Marguerite, have one 
daughter whose name is Donna. 



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Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January. 1948 



S F P D Aid Association Installs Officers 



At the December meeting of the San Francisco Police 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association the election of 
officers to serve during 1948 was held and the following 
were selected: 

President — Lieutenant John P. Meehan. 
Vice President — Inspector Edward P. Murphy. 
Financial Secretary — Officer Owen M. Fogarty. 
Recording Secretary — Inspector Thomas F. Fitzpatrick. 
Treasurer — Assistant Inspector Gerald J. Flynn. 



source for this beneficial purpose is the annual show put 
on by the Department members it is at once apparent that 
there must be a record sale of tickets this year. 

The sale of tickets will be conducted, as in the past, by 
members of the Police Department and the cost as usual 
will be $1 each, this being one thing that has not been 
increased in this age of rising prices. Those who purchase 
tickets will get their money's worth. A band concert will 
open the festivities, then a worth while show in which 
artists from the stage, radio and movies will be presented. 







Lt. John Meehan Captain 

Trustees — Officer Arthur Garratt, Sergeant Joseph 
Perry, Officer Frank Woods, Officer William McCarthy 
and Inspector Emmett Cotrill. 

These officers were installed into their new offices at 
ceremonies held in the Commissioner's room at the Hall 
of Justice on January 10. Captain John Engler was the 
installing officer. 

There was a large turnout of members present for the 
installation. Also on January 10 the membership set the 
date for the annual Police concert and ball. The date for 
this outstanding event was placed for the night of April 17, 
and as usual will be held in the Civic Auditorium. 

Captain John Eker was selected as chairman of the 
general committee that will handle this year's great bene- 
fit show. 

It was pointed out at the meeting that every member 
of the Police Department will have to put in every bit 
of effort he possesses to make this a big paying event. 
It was made known that the death of members for the 
year 1947 was 42. This is the largest number of deaths 
for many years. The average deaths each year over a 
period of years is 33 and some years there has been a 
low of 2') who have answered the last summons. 

With the payment of $3000, to the widow and ophans 
of a deceased member, the drain on the Association's 
treasury amounts to $126,000 for 1947. As the main 



Jack Eker Secretary Owen M. Focarty 

and then the grand ball usually led by the Governor and 
his wife and, this year, with Mayor and Mrs. Elmer 
Robinson. 

Officer James J. McGovern, last year's president has an 
important part in the coming show and he will be pre- 
sented with proper gifts for his worth while service. 

Officer Garratt starts his 26th year as a director and 
line officer of the Association. 

Financial Secretary Fogarty has held this office for 12 
years and like Director Garratt has contributed much 
to the success of the Association. 



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January, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page i: 



Sheriff Hogin of Stanislaus County 



Sheriff Grattan M. Hogin has been chief enforcement 
officer for the county of Stanislaus for 25 years as of 
January 8, 1948. A mighty long time for a peace officer 
to hold down such an important job and testimony to 
his sterling character and proven ability for enforcing the 
laws of the land. 

Sheriff Hogin was born in the county he has presided 



but left to go with the Youth Authority where he re- 
mained for a year, returning to his first love. He was 
formerly with the Turlock Police Department, and his 
father was a Justice of the Peace in that valley city. 

F. M. Welch and A. H. Hansen are Superior Court 
bailiffs and they have been with Sheriff Hogin for some 
thirteen years. 




SHERIFF GRATTAN M. HOGIN AND PART OF HIS FORCE OF DEPUTIES 
Front row, left to right: John Moorehead, Mrs. Margaret Gastineiu, Mrs. Lorraine Smee. Edith Guinn. Sheriff Hogin. Second row: 
Charles Abernathy, Cope Hartley, Cecil Kilroy, Durwood Simm;, Jack Hammett, Ralph Crow. Third row: Ernest Hawley, Joe 
Osterman, Olen Renfro, Hersh Bayes. William Cowan, back row: G. K. Matteson, E. M. Welch, Charles Coffee. 



over for a quarter of a century, a county that now num- 
bers nearly 115,000 population. In the sheriff's office are 
two deputies who have served for twenty years, they 
being Chief Criminal Deputy John Moorehead and In- 
vestigator Jack Hammett. Both are able officers, natives 
of the county and popularly and well known through- 
out the area. 

Undersheriff Ralph Crow has been with Sheriff Hogin 
for some three years. Prior to entering law enforcement 
work he was engaged in wheat ranching. He too is a 
native son. 

Deputy Cecil Kilroy, an able investigator, was formerly 
superintendent of the Sheriff's Bureau of Investigation 



Sheriff Hogin maintains a night patrol and the men 
assigned to this important duty are Deputies Ernest 
Hawley and Olen Renfro. 

Deputy Joseph Osterman is superintendent of the Bu- 
reau of Identification and since he took charge two years 
ago has brought it up to a high state of efficiency. 

Cope Hartley is known as the "deputy of the insane." 
He has charge of all psychiatric cases. Before coming to 
Modesto to take his present position some five years ago, 
he was on the editorial staff of the Oakland Trihune. 

Other members of Sheriff Hogin's force of 31 men 
and women are as follows: 

i Continued on page 59 j 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



How Officer's Killers Were Caught 



B\ The Editor 



"Juvenile parolees, the apprentice graduates of the re- 
form schools — these are the ones that keep us on the 
jump." The speaker was one of the oldest members of 
the Bureau of Inspectors at the Hall of Justice. 

He went on to show that, down through the years, 
groups of penitentiary-bent juveniles committeed every 



their unvarying stupidity quickly has them in the guilty 
class, with another trip to the reform school or the peni- 
tentiary facing them. 

The police department then breathes a sigh of relief. 
But the reform schools' graduation days are occurring at 
very regular intervals — and these vicious young ones do 




THEY CLEANED UP THE HAIGHT-FILLMORE GANG 

Back row, left to right —Inspector George Heeg, Officer Eugene McCann. In.spectors James Hayes. Martin Lee and James O'Neill 
and Officer Robert Casiciana. Front row — Officers George Brown and Thomas Fogarty, Lieutenant Timothy Burke and Inspector 
James John.son. Inspectors Max Resnik, Fred Butj and George O'Leary, of the Robbery Detail, who worked on the case are not 

in this picture. 

variety of crime, sometimes for whole weeks at a time, 



before being brought to a sudden stop by wholesale arrests 
of the moronic group. 

Clever cx-convicts trust no green youths; and rarely 
trust more than one gocxl ex-convict in cracking safes, in 
bank holdups, burglaries, robberies, or well-planned kid- 
naps; and such veterans use guns or physical force on 
their victims only when cornered, he said. 

When it comes to wanton cruelty to their victims or 
wanton destruction of property the police always look 
for depraved juveniles like the White Gang — or the more 
recent Haight-Fillmore Gang. 



seem to he always able to get together. 

After committing hundreds of assorted crimes the 
Haight-Fillmore Gang went out of business when its 
leader was sentenced to death for the murder of a Special 
Police Officer. 

Let us look individually and collectively at the top 
members of the Haight-Fillmore Gang. We will take 
them alphabetically, and, as in football programs, list 
them, as to their chronological progress to the penitentiary : 

Carl Vaugh Babcock, now 2?. years old, was found 
guilty of burglary in Fresno in 1938. On being given 
probation he was again charged with burglaries in Sacra- 



Usually a few blatant, masculine, minor girls are part mcnto and TurlcKk in 1943. In this present year he was 

of the gang — and pride thcmselve" on being libertines. sent to San Quentin on a robbery charge. 

When rounded up — which, from a police standpoint, Thomas Edward Foakes, now 18 years old, became a 

is a most difficult problem — their individual egotism plus ward of the Juvenile Court at the age of sixteen, for 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 15 



burglary and automobile thefts. In 1946 he was charged 
under the Gun Law and for automobile thefts, and sent 
to the Lancaster School. In 1947, under a charge of 
murder, he was placed under the charge of the California 
Youth Authority. 

William Orval McNamara, charged with burglaries in 
San Mateo and Redwood City and San Bruno in 1946, 
and convicted of robbery in San Francisco, in 1947, is 
now in the Lancaster School. 

Harold Mitchell, alias R. O. Henderson, was found 
guilty of automobile thefts in San Francisco in 1940. 
In 1941 he was arrested for bad checks in Eureka and 
again in San Francisco for bad checks, and automobile 
theft and was given one year in the County Jail and 
three years probation. For automobile theft in San Fran- 
cisco he was sent to the County Jail for one year. He 
is now in San Quentin, on a one to fifteen years sentence 
on a burglary charge from San Mateo. 

Ernest Phillip Woodmansee, was born in Bingham, 
Utah, in 1928, and when only 15 years old, was found 
guilty of burglary in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1944, in 
Salt Lake City, he wms a ward of the Salt Lake City 
Delinquency Court. 

In San Francisco, in 1947, he was arrested on charges 
of robbery, burglary, and assault with a deadly weapon, 
and turned over to the Juvenile Court. On April 25, 
1947, he was indicted for murder and on December 3rd, 
1947, was sentenced to life at San Quentin. 

Jose Roberto Trujillo, now 29 years old, was born in 
Durango, Colorado, and served eight months in Golden, 
Colorado, on a grand larceny charge, in 1934. In 1936 he 
was paroled on a grand larceny charge in Buena Vista, 
Colorado. In 1937, in Carson City, Colorado, he was 
sentenced to six years for grand larceny and burglary; 
and in 1941, in Canon City, was sentenced to one year 
for grand larceny. On vagrancy charges he was arrested 
in San Francisco in 1945 and 1946. In San Bruno, in 
1947, he was arrested on a charge of burglary. In San 
FrancisccS, in 1947, he was arrested on charges of robbery, 
violation of Section 503, California Vehicle Code and the 
Gun Law, and sent to San Quentin. While in San Quen- 
tin he was indicted on a murder charge, found guilty of 
murder, first degree, and on October 10th, 1947, sentenced 
to death in San Quentin. 

Well, that is the team, at least the seniors who gradu- 
ated with honors. As a team ''hey had everything in 
their favor. They did not look like the tough, reckless 
lawbreakers they were. They had good cooperation as a 
gang — their look-outs being perfect, as to age and ap- 
pearance, and being entirely unsuspected by inspectors on 
the prowl for experienced burglars and holdup operators. 
They knew their San Francisco thoroughly, while the 
average high class thug and his partners or his lookouts 
are virtual strangers here. Such high class lawbreakers, too, 
can pull off only one or two jobs here before moving to 
new and greener fields of action because they know their 
pictures are on file — and do violently hate to risk another 
penitentiary term for even being found in the possession 
of a murderous weapon, or caught unarmed in the act of 



committing crime. 

In addition to youth, a knowledge of San Francisco 
and moronic daring, our local bad gangs, when individually 
quizzed on suspicious charges are able, through their under- 
ground, and through extra curricula training in our reform 
schools, to appear blameless. 

A juvenile bad gang gets a genuine pleasure from 
reading of their exploits of holdups of grocery stores, gas 
f Continued on Page 40} 

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Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January. 1948 



The Story, In Part, of a 'Bad Boy' 

Who In Later Years As Chief of Police of Berkeley, Professor of Criminology and Police 
Administration, Gained World-Wide Fame — August Vollmer, 'Still a Copper' 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders WideJNi Known Police Reporter, Editor, Writer 



In those far-ofF days they were considered "had boys."" 

Sure, they were kids and mischievous. 

They were the bane of Patrolman Jack Welsh who 
patrolled that unpredictable Western Addition in the 
seething, beligerent part of San Francisco, rising from the 
Embarcadero to the heights of Pine, California, Clay, 
Jackson streets. 



They were the "really bad boys" of the Western 
Addition. 

Officer Jack Welsh passed out of the picture and a new 
copper, Billy Woods appeared on the beat. 

Beginning of a Police Life 

Officer Woods said: 

"Listen, kids. You're not really bad. You want some- 





MEET THE "DADDY" OF MODERN POLICE METHODS IN BATTLING CRIME 
August Vollmer, retired Professor of Criminology and Police Admini.'itration. Univcrpity of California, former Chief of the Berkeley 
Police Department, 71 year.'; young but still a copper in hh own words, who follows every newest development in police administra- 
tion, in identification methods, in identification, detection and conviction of criminals. The cameraman caught him in this study flanked 
by tomes of books dealing with wayward youth and adults and learned treatises dealing with every type of crime, its cause', its cure. 



They'd dump over apple carts, kick over fruit, vege- 
table and knicknack sidewalk stands, pester the peanut 
and popcorn vender, manage to snitch a small article 
now and then "just for the fun of it." 

And they would sing an Irish ditty (not a lullaby) 
which made Officer Jack Welsh see "red" where the 
sheen of the grass of his native Emerald Isle should have 
gleamed. It ended with a "bow. wow, wow for you 
Welsh." 

Five of those kids made Jack Welsh's life more or less 
a "hell on earth" as he often said in after years. 

But the kids? Listen, brothers! 

They were: August (Gus) Vollmer. perhaps the 
world's outstanding authority in police administration, 
retired professor of criminology. University of California, 
and former Chief of Police in Berkeley, the university city. 

The late D. A. White, long Chief of San Francisco's 
far-flung police department and the later-day veterans of 
the force: Captain John Cronin, Inspector Charlie Gal- 
hvan and Officer Tom Larkin. 



thing more to do than twist that wire around the apple 
cart, spill the load, nip a fruit or two and scoot down 
the street. You'd like to play baseball. You'd like a little 
exercise on a football field. I know kids, I've got a 
couple of my own." 

It was not long after that Billy Woods had found a 
vacant lot, large enough for catchball, an undersized 
diamond which could also be used as a f(xitball field. He 
found goal posts for the latter and sandbags for the 
b:iseball field and he found a shack for gymnasium work- 
outs, some boxing gloves and other essentials. 

At 71, Chief Gus Vollmer, retired to his home, high 
on Euclid avenue, Berkeley, covered with honors, a retired 
professor of criminology and police administration of the 
University of California, though he "never finished high 
school," holding honorary degrees from other great uni- 
versities, surrounded by a mighty library of books on 
crime, it's cause, it's cure, looks back over the years 
and says: 

(Contimied on Page 68) 



January, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 17 



THE PRESENT TASK OF LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Address by Assistant Special Agent H. C. Van Pelt, San Francisco, to the Northern 
California Peace Officers Association at Chico 



It is a distinct pleasure to be with you, gentlemen, 
and I am particularly gratified for the opportunity to 
talk to you regarding the present task of law enforcement. 

Causes of Post-War Crime 

Our rising wave of post-war crime is not imaginary or 
hypothetical, but instead it is startlingly realistic and 
tragic. Like a tidal wave, crime is sweeping the countr>' 
today, gathering momentum throughout the entire nation. 
It is mounting in intensity. It is growing in severity. It 
is not isolated nor confined to any particular community 
or locality, but it is nationwide. Like a pestilence, law- 
lessness stalks the land today, more deadly than the bubonic 
plagues of old. 

The emotional shock of four years of war has left its 
tragic aspects mirrored on the police blotters of the entire 
nation. The tremendous concentration of war-time effort, 
the disruption of entire communities, the congested hous- 
ing situation, rising prices, and the loss of some of those 
normal restraints which ordinarily result in conformance 
with the rules of organized society, have all played their 
parts in bringing about a general moral letdown. Our 
weakened social structure, and the softening of the atti- 
tude and behavior of so many of our people, are clearly 
manifested today in the rising post-war crime wave. 

Since V-J Day, over eleven and one-half million serv- 
icemen, trained for total warfare, have been demobilized 
to return to normal peacetime pursuits. Women who 
have been in the armed forces as Waves, Wacs, Spars 
and Marines have been discharged to return to a more 
tranquil life. Hundreds of thousands of so-called "souvenir 
weapons" have been brought into the country', and, 
because of lack of effective control of these weapons, 
many have found their way into the wrong hands and 
are being used in crimes against society. 

Many communities, particularly here in California, 
swollen with wartime populations, have been flooded with 
even more people despite inadequate housing facilities. 
This has caused congestion, irritation, restlessness, and 
bad living conditions. These things result in poor social 
standards, which spawn delinquency and crime. 

Skyrocketing prices have also provided a stimulus to 
weak wills to violate the law. In many places, the ac- 
cumulation of loose money in corner grocery stores and 
filling stations has added temptations, and has made burg- 
lary and robbery' profitable enough to warrant the risk 
of being caught. 

In some instances, men and women have been un- 
willing to relinquish their jobs to returning veterans. Un- 
employment has resulted in the reconversion from wartime 
to peacetime economy. Labor disputes and strikes in key 
industries throughout the entire nation have retarded 
progress. Treacherous subverters and ruthless propagan- 
dists have intensified their efforts to incite class against 



class, race against race, and creed against creed. Disre- 
spect for law enforcement has been manifested by the 
youngsters accustomed to high wartime wages. The nation 
is burdened with paralyzing debts, and legislative bodies 
are endeavoring to reduce the expense of government. 
Our people cry for relief from tax burdens, and law 
enforcement today finds itself just another agency of 
government striving to improve its own condition. 

Extent of Post-War Crime 

Although V-J Day climaxed the defeat of our fighting 
foes abroad, the vast army of crime has gone steadily 
marching on. The cunning minds of America's criminals 
have not been idle. They have been devising new methods 
of victimizing the public and escaping punishment. Some 
are fiendishly clever, and many are embittered and 
treacherous. 

Into our pnsons, penitentiaries and other penal insti- 
tutions today, there flows a constant and ever-increasing 
stream of humanity, while out of the pockets of America's 
taxpayers there flows a constant and ever-increasing stream 
of dollars in payment of the nation's crime bill, which 
has already reached the staggering sum of 17 billion 
dollars annually. To this appalling cost must be added 
the tragedy, the misery and unhappiness, and the shat- 
tered ambitions, careers and lives as a more important 
result of crime. 

Each day's register of offenses, the bulletins from our 
teletype machines, our correspondence, telephone calls, 
interviews, and investigations develop new tragedies — 
not imaginary, but startlingly realistic and shocking. The 
steady increases in bank robberies, highjackings, murders, 
kidnapings, and thefts are indicative of the return of a 
major wave of criminality. Such cases as the ruthless 
kidnap-slaying of fourteen-year-old Thora Chamberlain 
of San Jose by Tom McMonigle, who is now fighting a 
last-minute appeal at San Quentin to escape execution 
in the gas chamber, the murder of an Oakland police 
inspector by an East Bay burglar, the assaulting and 
killing of Alcatraz guards by hardened, life-term convicts 
in an attempted escape, the shooting of the Acting Chief 
of Police at San Bruno by two stick-up men fleeing from 
a San Francisco murder, the coldblooded slaying of two 
persons at Chico by a young boy, the murder of two 
persons at Live Oak by two more boys who fled with a 
twelve-year-old girl, the 14-year-old honor student at Elk 
Grove — a girl receiving all A's in the Sacramento County 
scholastic examinations — one of but five persons obtaining 
such high grades in the last ?6 years — strangling her best 
girl friend and beating her to death with a sledge hammer, 
the brutal kidnap-murder of six-year-old Suzanne Degnan 
of Chicago, the fiendish "Black Dahlia" killing, and the 
"Bugsy" Siegel and "Nick" de John slayings are but 
(Continued on page ^2) 



Page 18 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

Sheriff Long Has Best of Radio 

By George Archinal, Richmond Independent 



January, 1948 



Martinez. — Probably no Sheriff's radio station in the 
state can match the phenomenal, 10-year growth of Contra 
Costa County's KQEC, rated as one of the most modern 
and efficient in California and holder of some enviable 
"firsts" in police radio. 

Matching the strides of a county that has leaped into 
fifth place in population in California, KQEC takes no 
back seat to the police and Sheriff's systems of the metro- 



In addition, the station is serving eight fire depart- 
ments which cover the major portion of the county. 

KQCE as it functions today it the handiwork of Radio 
Engineer George K. Burton, who established W6XOR 
in 1937. 

Burton has been in radio since the "good old" battery 
set days. Operator and announcer on Richmond's first 
radio station, KFCM, established in 1922, the owner of 




Sheriff James N", Long (ritjht), and Radio Engineer George K. Burton with Contra Costa Sheriff's mobile two-way unit of modern 

police radio system. 



politan counties of San Francisco and Alameda, nor 
any other. 

KQCE squeaked onto the air as Station W6XOR in 
1937, a "powerful" 25-watter that had to strain to reach 
a range of 10 miles to serve all of six sheriff's cars. 

Today this station punches out with 500 watts, has a 
workable range of 225 miles, a consistent range of 75 
miles and serves 75 sheriff's highway patrol, police and 
constable's cars, along with ambulance and vehicles main- 
tained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the 
office of the District Attorney. 



his own "ham" station, W6AJX, he joined the sheriff's 
office in 1935. 

He served two years as superintendent of the bureau 
of identification and then set up W6XOR. Sheriff's 
radio was then a one-man job, but it since has developed 
into a communications division with a total personnel of 

Op;n I I to 2 A.M. Weekdays I I to 4 A.M. Saturdays 

SUN SUN CAFE 

CHOW MEIN AND NOODLES 
Specially: ALL KINDS OF CHINESE DISHES TO TAKE HOME 

107 J STREET Phon.- Main 155 1 SACRAMENTO 



January, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 19 



nine, including Burton. 

Power of W6XOR was stepped up to 'iO watts in the 
following year, 1938, and in 19J9 the sheriff's office re- 
ceived its present call letters of KQCE. At the same time, 
power was increased to 500 watts. 

The modernization and expansion of KQCE is largely 
due to the foresight of Sheriff James N. Long, who took 
office in 1942, and who has yet to turn down a progressive 
idea for the improvement of police communications and 
other enforcement work. 

Sheriff Long, onetime county supervisor, took hold 
during the critical war years in a county jammed with 
choice military targets. Six months after they pinned on 
his badge the Port Chicago naval ammunition explosion, 
which claimed several hundred lives, took place. 

The value of police communications was highlighted 
with stark clarity. 

A population that had mushroomed more than 100 
per cent and the ever-present possibility of major disaster 
took Contra Costa out of the "cow countr)'" class 
overnight. 

The sheriff's office expanded without delay, and com- 
munications occupied a top spot. 

Under Burton's direction KQCE in 19.39 developed 
and installed the first automatic repeater station in the 
world, and the first ever licensed by the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. 

While the idea was new at the time it was developed 
by the engineering personnel of the sheriff's office, it was 
soon widely adopted and is now used around the world. 
The repeater idea was particularly helpful during the 
war, and served with outstanding success at the time of 
the Battle of the Bulge in Europe. 

The repeater system was born as the result of Contra 
Costa's mountainous terrain, which blocked communica- 
tions from one section of the county to the other. 

The home station in Martinez, because of its power, 
could reach mobile units, but they could not reach the 
home station. To overcome this, an automatic repeater 
was set up on Mt. Diablo, which picked up messages 
from the mobile units and automatically "repeated" or 
relayed them to the home station. 

Three frequencies are involved in the contact, with the 
car-to-repeater and repeater-to-home station channels being 
of high frequency. 

The sheriff's office started with amplitude modulation, 
or AM, but made some changes when the FCC changed 
the station's frequency. As a result, KQCE installed the 
first permanent frequency modulation radio station on the 
Pacific Coast, on Mt. Diablo. 

The repeater technique has ironed out so many kinks 
in communications that two additional repeaters are to be 
installed for use by fire apparatus and for point to point 
communications. These will supplement repeaters already 
operating for KQCE and for highway patrol cars. 

The tie-in with fire departments has been in operation 
for more than a year, but the eventual duplication of 
repeater facilities will give the various fire departments 
a frequency of their own. 



The new frequency has already been approved by the 
FCC. This development will permit two-way communi- 
cation between fire houses and fire engines. Now in the 
process of installation in the various fire departments 
served are five-watt portable transmitters and receivers. 

This service has been extended to the Martinez, Con- 
cord, Walnut Creek, Lafayette, Orinda, San Pablo, El 
Sobrante, Mt. View and East Bay Municipal Utility Dis- 
trict fire departments and to the county prison farm 
in Clayton Valley. 

All are in current operation, with the exception of the 
El Sobrante department. In addition, the San Pablo, Mt. 
Diablo and the Central Contra Costa County Fire Dis- 
trict are equipping their fire chief's cars with duplicate 
receivers which will permit, not only car-to-station com- 
munication, but car-to-car communication. 

KQCE will soon come up with another "first," with the 
establishment of a carrier current multiple channel trans- 
mission system on Mt. Diablo which will allow trans- 

f Continued on page 661 



HIgate 4-9376 



Open 6 A.M. to 2:30 A.M. 



ANCHOR INN 



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Orders Prepared to Take Out 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 



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Phone KEIlog 2-98 17 

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1550 EAST 12th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

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INTERIOR DECORATORS 
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322 1 E. TWELFTH. Cor. Fruitvale Ave. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



GUY SMITH 



USED CARS 

1700 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



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132 1 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



EAST BAY RESTAURANT SUPPLY CO. 

Telephone TEmplebar 2-2354 

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CLAYTON VAN WAGNER 

ARCHITECT 

Telephone TWinoaks 3-7366 
FINANCIAL CENTER BUILDING OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 




(Copyrifht, 1931. 2-0 PublUhini Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 



An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
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NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

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IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. ) 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

By Opie L. W\rner 

Some recent recruits to our police department are very 
personal friends of mine and are young men of whom 
I expect fine reports as members of our San Francisco 
Police Department. 

They know how very closely I have been connected 
with the San Francisco Police Department for over 35 
years and more than once have asked for an appoint' 
ment with me to get personal hints for success in their 
chosen profession. 

Well, a week ago I met a high ranking police member, 
and, as we both had a half hour or more leisure, I asked 
him, as a friend, to give me some pointers to relay to my 
new police recruits. He agreed. 

With note book ready, I waited while, in accordance 
with his kindly promise of instant assistance and the re- 
quest that I should not quote him. he sat back, and with 
closed eyes, dictated what he called "random shots," as 
follows: 

1. Don"t advertise yourself as to your family or edu- 
cation or politicial or lodge connections, or as to the good 
jobs you have had. Remember, to your audiences, you 
are just a rookie cop who was not drafted. 

2. As to questions of your nationality, your one and 



only correct answer is: "I am an American." This answer 
is final — and very convincing, too. 

3. To kidding and even annoying tricks played by 
older members, a good natural grin is the best offset. 

4. They will know you are Iving, but, when quizzed 
about religion or politics, your one and only safe answer 
IS you practice neither and thu« have no opinions of 
either. 

5. Your fellow officers argue, from time to time, on 
any and all subjects and, when asked your decision, your 
100 per cent answer is: "Search me fellows." You could 
add strength to this assertion by turning up the palms 
of your hands, wrinkling your forehead and looking at 
the ceiling. This acting dumb stuff is a sure friend maker. 

6. Keep your eyes open, but, if you value your popu- 
larity with your fellow workers and your superiors, defi- 
nitely do not be a cement maker: the windbags do that 
to their detriment. 

7. You hurt your department standing when you 
either praise or censure superiors for the reason that 
your audience may not see eye to eye with you. As to 
superiors your iron rule should be : Don't talk about them. 

8. Be a good listener to men of all ranks, and, as 
.superiors are human, remember it costs nothing to make 
an effort to show them respect. 

9. Be hasty to get to the scene of police trouble, and, 
no matter how trivial the problem is, pitch in and give 
your best. 

10. Sometimes you may sneak a few minutes to your- 
self, but remember this little respite must be possible of 
terminating by more than one exit. 

11. Be absolute boss on your beat for in this way the 
good citizens and the good bosses are on your side while 
the other kind will give you a wide berth which, in itself, 
will tend much to your peace of mind. 

12. Free drinks have strings attached to them — some- 
times these strings are very strong indeed, and, in any 
case our innate pride is blunted by making a practice of 
taking something for nothing. 

13. No matter how much you like your assigned part- 
ner it is your duty to yourself and your family to secure 
a transfer the moment you find he is a liquor addict. Such 
people are generally known as "good fellows" and have 
political pull. When the inevitable blow off comes you 
are liable to find yourself worse off than your gay pal; 
and you are almost sure to be blamed for not "taking 
care" of him. 

14. The salary is good, but not at all sufficient for 
crap games. Many a fine officer has to make monthly 
trips to money lenders because they thought they were 
top notch poker players or were close to certain fellows 
who had some way to get inside tips on the ponies. 

15. Top jobs are good in any line of business. Civil 
service has opened the top jobs to all officers. There is 
no need to belong to the lowest rank. Go after promo- 
tion with all your might. There is lots of room on the 
top, but there is no elevator to them; and the Commis- 
sioners rule the climbing must be definitely a personal 
effort. 



January. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 

By J. Ross DUNNIGAN 

THE S. F. POLICE MONTHLY TOURNAMENT 



Page 21 



Up bright and early Sunday morning, November 16, 
oiling the firearms and checking over the ammunition in 
preparation for the day's shooting at the Police Range 
alongside of Lake Merced. Evidently 160 other gun- 
slingers had the same idea in mind, or at least that's how 
many of them were on hand to start the day's activities. 
The good, old alibi of too much sunlight on the targets 
soon turned to too much fog to see through — you just 
can't fool those pistol pointers because no matter what 
happens, be it climatic, organic or just plain accident 
that's the excuse they have for that alibi. And so be it. 
Bob Chow had a good night's rest and a good breakfast 
because he finished up the day as top man with a 1064. 




Something new has been added at the range in the 
form of a gate prize. This '"Beautiful Prize" will be 
awarded to the person with the lucky competitor number. 
The drawing will be held at the conclusion of the De- 
cember match and the winner must be present to collect. 



Phone 332-08 

MISSION AUTO COURT 

IN THE WEST 
ONE OF THE BEST 

60 UNITS ON U. S. 66 
Thomas I. Proctor, Prop. 

1150 Mt. Vernon Avenue 
SAN BERNARDINO. CALIF 



It has been announced that in all future matches the 
muzzle brake on the .45 cannon is definitely no go. That's 
not so tough because the gun either breaks your arm or 
cripples you for months after shooting the darn thing 
and we have yet to see any gizmo that will make it nice 
and gentle. * * * 

Wonders will never cease and miracles will always 
happen — especially on a pistol range. Right at our own 
range, and with our own eyes we saw it. Not only did 
we see this phenomena but there were others who saw 
and remarked about it. Was the man insane? Sick? Or 
just plain wacky? For years and years this pistol pointer 
has defied shooting conventions and broked all the social 
rules of pistoleering but to-day he finally got into line. 
Yep, we mean that Pete Pompa was actually seen shooting 
single action through a whole match. If that ain't a 
miracle then we don't know one when it whizzes by. 

* 4c 4: 

Then there is that gang from Bakersfield who drive up 
to our matches very often during the year so they can 
get in on the fun. That Sunday was an off day for this 
sterling delegation as only Dick Dodson and George 
Riggs arrived for the occasion. Dick isn't kicking as he 
managed to tote home three first place medals. It should 
have been called "Dodson Day." Good work, Dick, 
come again. * * * 

■"Skip Harris, Navy Chief Petty Ossifer, is stationed at 
the Alameda Air Base and runs the pistol range for 
that place. Skip lives in Modesto, however, and we can't 
seem to figure out why he moved down thataway which 
as you can readily see is not too close to Alameda. He 

doesn't commute, though. 

* * * 

And, perhaps, you, too, noticed the heavy overcoats, 
sweaters, jackets and blankets that are beginning to ap- 
pear at the range during the last two matches. We may 
not be very bright but we bet it's because the weather is 
getting colder. 



UNITED LUMBER YARDS 
*TALIF.'' 

Al Corrig.an, Manager 

Lumber - Roofing - Millwork 

Paint - Hardware 

Anything for the Builder 

Phone J631 

Sierra Avenue 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



Harvey ■"Pete" Peters, major'domo of the Tamalpais 
Revolver Club, kindly consented to put hisself on the 
spot one Sunday and took over the duties of Official 
Referee. Pete got along famously and not many of the 
gang tried to pull any fast ones on him as he has been 
in the pistol racket too long and knows all the answers. 
In fact Pete was pretty good at fast ones himself in days 
gone by, huh, Pete? 

Jewell Ross, Berkeley Police Department, garnered his 
first medal in S. F. Sunday, November 16, and promises 
to do better as time comes along. With those big, black 
stogies he smokes all day we can't figure how he is still 
on his feet after puffing them for a few minutes. 

* * * 

Fred "Wolf" Pexiotto, that mighty midget with the 
femme, became a fulbfledged member of the "Siesta Club" 
Sunday all because on account of several women. Fred, 
the Wolf, was in the coffee shoppe telling his admiring 
femmes (that's poor French for "dame") some tales about 
himself and completely forgot to get out on the line for 
the timed fire match. Freddy, we're surprised at you. 

Or are we? 

* * * 

Al Narvaes, the Sacramento hot-shot and US Revolver 
Association champion, was tagged with a case of pneu- 
monia and downed on the ten-yard line for some weeks 
now. Al is feeling much better at this writing but it 
will be some little time before he will be able to play 

cowboys with the rest of the gang. 

* * * 

Charley Woodall, from over the bay side, nearly had 
a wing-ding that Sunday as he felt sure on a couple of 
occasions he had won a medal in one or two of the matches 
and while its true he came close he didn't quite make it. 
Better shooting next year, Chas. 



EV6E I 
MAVBE 





Marshall Graham was up from Beverley Hills Sunday, 
November 16, attending the Realtors Convention here in 
SF and dropped in for a few shots while idling around the 
week-end (we mean pistol shots). He even tossed a coin 
in the ccntcr-fire match with Gloria Norton for first place 
and you know how those real estate operators can oper- 
ate. Well, Gloria lost! Marsh enjoys coming up here 
once in a while to get a breath of that good SF fog. 



Looking along the lines Sunday we took particular 
notice of the number of .22 revolvers being used in the 
matches. The boys seem to like the revolver because they 
don't jam like the automatics, will shoot any type and 
kind of ammunition and are easy to clean and handle. 

* * * 

We are contemplating a Roll of Honor for this column 
but was wondering as to what corner we will put it in. 
This particular Roll of Honor is for the stalwart shooting 
sons who protest that their scores are too high. As we 
stated in the past, and reiterate, that any man in the 
shooting game who protests when he is given more points 
than he deserves might be classed a novice, a crack-pot 
or an escaped inmate from one of the Nut Hospitals. 
The first gent we will put in the corner is Fred Leber, 
that big Highway Patrolman. Fred protested his score 
was 10 points too high. 

* * * 

Lynn Freel, from Alameda, is one blue guy just now — 
and he has a right to be. He remembers the week when 
his house was burned down, his best girl threw him over 
and his pet dog died but it didn't make him feel so badly 
as when he discovered some *)fs'%$*###@! sofePso 
stole all his shooting irons just before he was ready to 
come to the matches. Lynn came over to the shoot but 
didn't do nuttin but sit around all day and groan. 
Sympathies, Lynn, sympathies. 

* * * 

Sgt. Harry Brown of the SF Police Reserves, had his 
cohorts out on the lines Sunday, November 16, giving 
them the old trigger squeeze treatment. Ellis Udall, that 
little 300 pounder, spent most of his time running back 
and forth to window 3 hoping that he'd see his name up 
on the hoard for a medal. The closest he came was a 
fourth place in the .22 National. Closeness is a virtue. 
El, but don't despair. 

* * * 

Speaking of alibi's the best one for many months to 
come is otfcrcd by Hal Lisetor, that house-hunting guy, 
who was in a real auto wreck last month while on a 
fishing trip. He and his partner were shoved right through 
the door on the driver's side of the car by a guy who 
didn't know that making a left hand turn was illegal. 
Both men were badly shaken up and bruised. Hal is still 
walking around with a crick in his back, a halt in his 
walk and one of the best alibis on the lot. 

Must have been Gloria's off day. In another match 
bouncing Bob Marlow, the marksman 1st, didn't like his 
target so started to shoot on the one assigned to her. Was 
she surprised to find 10 shots on her target after she had 
only fired five? Was Bob's face red? What did Gloria 
say? Ask both Bob and Gloria. 



Autos Bought and Sold 



Phone TEmplebar 2-4924 



MICKAELS BROTHERS 

USED CARS 

348 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



Janvuiry, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



Scores 



22 T^lational Match 

Master Quentin Brooks 

Expert Bill Hancock 

Sharpshooter K. Eastman 

Marksman 1st Jewell Ross 

Marksman 2nd Evar Roseberg 

Marksman 3rd A. Bullfinch 

C. F. Times Match 

Master Marshall Graham 

Expert C. Boomhower 

Sharpshooter Art Treadwell 

Marksman 1st C. R. Kober 

Marksman 2nd Dick Dodson 

Marksman 3rd E. J Mole 



'A" Division 



San Francisco Police Team #1 



Jack Ahem 


289 


Joe Hallisy 


284 


Grif Thompson 


297 


Jack Chaney 


292 



C. F, 7<lational Match 



Camp Perry Match 



293 


Bob Chow 


285 


Grit Thompson 


297 


287 


Paul Wormser 


286 


Mack Garr 


293 


286 


Fred Gomea 


276 


Fred Gomea 


287 


263 


Paul O'Leary 


261 


Jewell Ross 


276 


261 


Dick Dodson 


251 


Dick Dodson 


270 


243 


A. Bullfinch 


217 


A. Bullfinch 


243 




.4 J T^ational Match 






199 


Quentin Brooks 


282 






194 


Henr>' Jacobs 


272 






194 


Doc Bilafer 


282 






185 


S. E. Spriggel 


272 






178 










162 











Team Matches 



1162 

Aggregate Scores 

Master Bob Chow 

Expert Bill Hancock 

Sharpshooter F. Gome: 

Marksman 1st C. R. Kober 

Marksman 2nd Hal Lisetor 

Marksman 3rd H. Bullfinch 



"B" Division 
Alameda Police Team 



S. N. Kemp 
J. Fink 
W. Hutt 
R. G. Doven 



258 
284 
266 
249 

1057 



1064 

1049 

1021 

967 

910 

855 



THE OAKLAND MATCHES 



The trip over the Bay Bndge from San Francisco was 
one of delight and great pleasure Sunday, November 2, as 
the day was just perfect for the trip, in fact it was so 
nice we had a guilty feeling that we should have stayed 
at home and taken the wife and kids out to the park or 
the beach. A nice crowd of about 140 shooters were 
gathered at the field and about half as many of the families 
were gathered with them to enjoy the weather as only 
Oakland can put it out. It was one of the nicest days 
we have ever seen at the range. Considering the heavy 
rain they had there Saturday the amount of mud left on 
the lot wasn't so bad after all. If you had a high pair 
of boots, heavy sox and old clothes on you were all set 
— but we felt sorry for those who slopped around in the 
low-cut oxfords and light colored outfits. 



George Baldi, that tall Oakland police officer, learned 
the hard way that it's easy to lose 10 points before the 
command "fire" is given. In the Camp Perr>' match 
George pulled the trigger of his gun before the targets 
were ready so George was out just 10 points to start. 
Lotsa fun, huh, George? 

* * * 

George Dovan, of the Alameda Police Force, must 
have had the whole APD out there on Sunday. Ever>'- 
where you turned you bumped into one of the boys. At 
least it seemed that every time we came on the line we 
had one of the Alamedians along side of us — and some 
times on both sides. After the men were squadded and 
ready to shoot they suddenly discovered they had no 
ammunition for the bunch and had to be jerked off the 



INDUSTRIAL INDEMNITY CO. 



155 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA jAN FRANCISCO 



TAVERN BAKERY 

Haight Street 



CALIFORNIA 



fage J4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January. 1948 



lines leaving many blank spaces. It's no fun trying to 
shoot with no bullets for your gun so a radio emergency 
call was sent out and in jig time the ammo arrived. The 
range officers were in a dither over this but their good 
nature came to the fore and they ver>' obligingly re- 
squadded the whole bunch. 

* * * 

A prediction of things to come : O'Leary from Marks- 
man Second to Marksman First — or Expert. 



That right and left handed match is full of surprises 
for many of the boys who think they are pretty good 
shots. The expression on many faces when they check 
their left-handed scores is really fun to watch. Quite 
a few who have right hand scores of 80 to 90 wind up 
with a left hand score of 50 to 60 and some completely 
miss the target. Try it yourself some time and you'll see 
just what we mean. 



Scores 



C F. T^ational Match 

Master Elliott Murphy 284 

Expert Sim Reingard 279 

Sharpshooter George Risso 267 

Marksman 1st Steve Jochums 269 

Marksman 2nd Paul O'Leary 264 

Marksman 3rd W. C. Taylor 242 



Camp Perry Course 

Karl Schaugaard 292 

M. McVey 287 

Herb Reid 286 

C. R. Korber 278 

O. L. Freel, Jr. 272 

Gill Prescott 256 



.22 T^ational Match 

Quentin Brooks 29 J 

Bob OToole 284 

Bill Constant 278 

Steve Jochums 280 

Paul 0'Lear>' 271 

Walt Forrister 252 



.22 Right arid Left 
Handed Match 

Master Bob Chow 

Expert Russ Smith 

Sharpshooter Phil Sheehan 

Marksman 1st Steve Jochums 

Marksman 2nd Glenn Lym 

Marksman Jrd Ed Hunter 

Aggregate Scores 

Master Sim Rcinhard 

Expert Quentin Brooks 

Sharpshooter J. Richardson 

Marksman 1st Steve Jochums 

Marksman 2nd Paul O'Leary 

Marksman 3rd W. C. Taylor 

Sim Reinhard 279 



187 
173 
180 
176 
172 
150 



.45 T^ational 
Match 



Bob Chow 
Al Heath 
Major Smith 
J. Richardson 
C. R. Kober 
F. P. Harris 



280 
283 
274 
260 
250 
231 



840 


1st 


860 


2nd 


820 


3rd 


826 




802 




726 





Team Match 



S. F. Police Revolver Club #2 1 142 
S. F. Police Revolver Club #1 1136 
Olympic Club 1132 



Sim Reingard 



840 





Best Wishes 




* 


SAM'S PLACE 

Sam Becked, Prop. 


• 


• 


Beer Wines Liquors 


• 


* 


Phone Chino 5486 
Carbon Canyoti and Garvey Road 

Chino, California 


* 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



BAILIFF McKEEVER 

(Continued from Page 3) 

1921, when the late beloved Thomas Finn was in charge 
of that important office, has become recognized as a 
mighty capable and friendly officer. 

After serving as jailer for some five years he was as 
signed as bailiff to the court of Judge Michael J. Roche, 
now federal judge. He endeared himself to all those 
around the Hall of Justice, and made many friends by his 
kindly and patient service among the multitude of people 
having business in Judge Roche's court. 

Twelve years and more ago when Judge Robinson was 
elevated to the Superior Court from the Municipal Court 
he just naturally kept Bailiif McKeever in the spot he had 
so well handled. 

Bailiif McKeever is a native San Franciscan, born in 
1889. He got his education through grammar and high 
schools at St. Joseph's school. 

He married Mary Butler, another native of this city, 
and there are five children, three boys and two girls. And 
most proud of all his heirs is a ten-months-old grandson. 



A. L. Pedro, Prop. 



Phone 9369 



MOTHER LODE RIDING ACADEMY 

2 Miles North of Sonora on Columbia Road 

COLUMBIA. CALIFORNIA (Tuolumne County) 



MOUNTAIN VIEW DAIRY 

Alvin J. Sylva 

Serving all Mono Highway Resorts with 

THAT GOOD GUERNSEY MILK 

and all Dairy Products 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



COLUMBIA WAY HOSPITAL 

Cleta M. Marsh 
EMERGENCY SERVICE 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone KEUog 2-7332 

LA MOTHE PLASTIC NOVELTY 

Hand-Carved Flowers Embedded in 
BOUDOIR AND NIGHT LAMPS 

1829 E. 14th STREET OAKLAND 6 

KEIIog 4-4934 

FERNANDES MARKET 

GROCERIES - WINES - BEERS 
1815-10 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone KEIIosr 4-3303 



Les Cave 



EXCELSWELD 



A PERMANENT REPAIR ON 
CRACKED MOTOR BLOCKS and DIESEL HEADS 
90-Day Money Back Guarantee -:: No Heal Used 

1540 E. 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Carl A. Burkhart 



KEIIog 2-0070 



MARIA'S PHARMACY 

RELIABLE PRESCRIPTIONS 

1246 E. 14th St. at 13th Ave. OAKLAND. CALIF. 



COSLET'S TRUCKING 

Phone 7281 410 Third Avenue 

OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 



ADAMS LUMBER MILL 

KNOTTY PINE & LOG RUSTIC 

7 Miles on Mono Highway 
TWAIN HARTE. CALIFORNIA 



Edward Sachau, Prop. 



Phone 161 



4 9 CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS 

LIQUORS OF ALL KINDS 

We Specialize in Spanish and American Dinners 



JAMESTOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



VISIT 

PIONEER CAFE 

WHILE IN JAMESTOWN 
LEE CONKLIN, Prop. 



JAMESTOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



DRINKS 

FOR ALL THE FAMILY 

The Finest Acme Beer Ever Brewed for the Grown-ups 

Mission Sodas in all Flavors for the Children 

DURHAM'S BOTTLING WORKS 



THE MOUNTAIN CLUB 

Chas. R. McKibbin 

COCKTAIL BAR 
See The Rare Gold Collection 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



BAKER'S CANDY KITCHEN 

FAMOUS FOR HIGH QUALITY CANDY 



JAMESTOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



JAMESTOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



LONG BARN LODGE 

ALWAYS OPEN. Mile high pine forest. SKY TOP HOTEL, Steam 
Heated Cottages, good food, dancing, ski tow, toboggan slide, 
skating rink, equipment rented. Near SONORA. Phone or write: 
LONG BARN LODGE 

LONG BARN. CALIFORNIA 



Phone Mission 7-4423 

ROTHSCHILD JEWELRY CO. 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - JEWELRY - PAYMENT PLAN 
BRANCHES NAPA - MONTEREY 

25 78 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1 948 



Oakdale, and Other Mother Lode Towns 



Chief Clay Dorroh is head of the four-man Police 
Department of Oakdale, and it is a rare occasion when 
any news of upper brackets occur in that "Gateway to 
the Yosemite," via the Big Oak Flat Road. 

The Chief who was born in Angels Camp in 1890, 
came to Oakdale 30 years ago and after engaging in 




Chief Clay Dorroh 

various business endeavors joined the Police Department 
seven years ago. He sets well with the people of this 
4000 population little farming city, and when Chief Daniel 
Kelly left the Department Officer Dorroh was unanimously 
selected as his successor. Former Chief Kelly is now Chief 
of Police of Patterson. 

Oakdale is the center of a vast farming empire. In 
the surrounding country there are 40,000 acres of landino 
clover, thousands of cattle, sheep and other live stock. A 
big live stock market is a big feature of the city of Oakdale. 

Deciduous fruits flourish in that sector and nuts of 
various kinds afford a big market, leading in these are 
almonds. 

During the summer thousands of cars pass through and 
stop in Oakdale on their way or returning from Yosemite 
Valley. Even normally a lot of people from the sur- 
rounding country converge on Oakdale, creating a traffic 
problem which Chief Dorroh hopes to solve by the installa- 
tion of parking meters. 

Beside Chief Dorroh the Department is made up of 
Officers Ted Nason, Richard Bichtlcy and Floyd Pomes. 

The City Hall has been remodelled and that portion 
assigned to the Police Department has been fitted up in a 
manner that meets the highest standards and has been 
well equipped throughout. 

For those making the trip to the Mother Lode one leaves 
Oakdale for Jamestown and here arc found many treasured 
landmarks of the old days of the Gold rush. The law 



here is preserved by Constable Bert Mann, who is a most 
efficient peace officer. 

From Jamestown one goes on to Sonora, that pioneer 
city in the foothills of the great Sierras. Here, maintain- 
ing its old time atmosphere it is the meeting place of the 
rich man and the poor man, and is growing each year as 
people become acquainted with the fine character of the 
people who have lived there for decades. 

You will find cowboys, gold miners and just plain 
sightseers walking through the streets of the little side hill 
city. Today, with mining not what it used to be, farming 
and raising livestock give the city a big income and to 
serve the people who buy, there are fine stores, stocked 
with everything a person might need in the way of food, 
clothing, furniture and other necessities and pleasures 
of life. 

Leaving Sonora are many interesting resorts, opened 
both summer and winter, and these are strung along the 
Mono highway, and each offering something new and 
different for a week-end outing or a long vacation. In 
fact this area of the state forms a playground in the near 
back country of Oakland and San Francisco. It's worth 
a trip at any time of the year. 



WILKINSON ICE & FUEL CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS A-B-C BEER 
P. O. Box 254 Phone 6631 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKDALE SODA WORKS 

Don Reynolds, Prop. 
When in Season Oyster and Shrimp Cocktails 

Phone 358! or 4331 for Your Favorite Beverages 
P O. Box 356 OAKDALE, CALIF. 



Phone 5632. Oakdale 



P. O. Box 531 



Giambanco Wine Vinegar Plant 



p. GIAMBANCO, Owner 



CLARIBEL STATION 



OAKDALE. CALIF. 



OAKDALE CAFE 

EVERY MEAL A PLEASANT MEMORY 
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED 



Telephone 4011 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



C. PASTINA & M. GOTELLI 

WHOLESALE FLORISTS 
Home Night: Bayview 1-9918 Store 612 8th Street 

SWeetwood 8-2630 San Francisco TWinoaks 3-1S61 

OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



OAKDALE 
LIVESTOCK AUCTION 

J. V. IRELAND Owner and Auctioneer 



SALE EVERY THURSDAY 

Where Buyer and Seller Meet 

All Consignments Appreciated 

We also handle farm auctions 



Phone 7173 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 7431 



Home 3661 



OAKDALE 
POULTRY COMPANY 

D. PETRONI, Owner 



Sierra Avenue 8C G Street 
OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 898 



WAGON WHEEL 



MOST UNIQUE SPOT 
IN THE SOUTHERN MINES 



Al Devoto, Proprietor 
SONORA, CALIFORNIA 



Page 2S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1 948 



MONO INN 

Bud and Al Ca\alieri, Props. 



ITALIAN DINNERS 

Chicken, Steaks and Raviolis 

Mixed Drinks of All Kinds 



Phone 9017 

Four Miles East of Sonora 
on Mono Highway 



KIMBALL'S CAFE 



CAMP SUNSHINE 

CHICKEN AND STEAK 
DINNERS 



Imported Wines and Liquors 



Phone 9011 

SONORA, CALIFORNIA 



-» *■ 



•» ♦^ 



You will find 

the gang O. K. 

in Jamestown'e 

Favorite Rendezvous 

HAP COLLARD'S 
SMOKE CAFE 



JAMESTOWN, CALIFORNIA 



SONORA LUMBER 
COMPANY 



Where 

PRICE 

and 

QUALITY 

Meet 

Call on us for 
Your Building Needs 



Mono Highway 
SONORA, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



FAMILY LIQUOR & 
SPORTING GOODS STORE 



The Place to Stop 
on Your Way to Mountains 



P. O. Box 537 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 



MONO CABINS 

R. R. COLEY 

Hotel - Restaurant - Gas Station 
Reliable Snow Information 

Call Mono Pines No. 1 , via Sonora 
16 Miles East of Sonora — Mono Highway 



SLIDE-INN 

Has Everything for Winter Sports; 

Skiis, Toboggans and Boots for Rent 

Modern Cabins 

Meals and Other Refreshments 

20 Miles East of Sonora 
Mono Highway 

Phone througK Sonora 



-» r- 



Herman Hubbs 



James D. H.adley 



SIERRA MOTOR SALES 

P N T I A C 

G. M. C. 

F R I G I D A I R E 



Phone 6771 

Fourth and F Street 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNL\ 



^ ^^^.^ 



SIERRA LAUNDERERS 
and CLEANERS 

Tuolumne County's only 

HOME OWNED and 
HOME OPERATED 

Complete 

Laundry and Cleaning Service 

Phone 641 

SONORA, CALIFORNIA 



TWAIN HARTE LODGE 

Mr. and Mrs. John Rocca 

DINING ROOM 

COFFEE SHOP 

FOUNTAIN 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Hotel Cabins 



Twain Harte, Tuolumne County, California 
Ten Miles East of Sonora 



Page iO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



SONORA 



RIEDEL MOTOR SALES 

PONTIAC - CROSLEY CARS 
WHITE TRUCKS 



HALES & SYMONS 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS. BUTANE-PROPANE, 

FUEL OILS. HOME APPLIANCES, 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES, FEED 



Phone 649 



CALIFORNIA SONORA 



CALIFORNIA ' 



PANERO'S SERVICE 

James A. Panero, Jr. 

Union Oil Products 



CARTER'S DONUT SHOP 
AND FOUNTAIN 

Dick and Mary 



317 WASHINGTON STREET 



SONORA. CALIF. SONORA 



5 Snell Street 



Phone 809 



CALIFORNIA 



SONORA 



PAUL R. HALE 

"YOUR REAL ESTATE BROKER 
FOR THIS DISTRICT" 



SONORA INN 



CALIFORNIA 



J. S. WEST & CO. 

A Home Institution 
TIRES - FUELS - APPLIANCES 



E. C. Cronwell Jr., Manager 

404 WASHINGTON STREET SONORA, CALIF. 

Everything in Hardware 
RADIOS - CUTLERY - TOOLS 
SPORTSMEN'S SUPPLY STATION 

OLIVER HARDWARE 

Franklin G. Oliver 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



J. C. Garaventa 



J. W. Martin 



C. H. BURDEN UNDERTAKING CO. 

Established 1830 
CARRIE BURDEN WARNE, Mgr. 



PALACE MEAT MARKET 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL BUTCHERS 
Phone 491 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



CURLEE SUITS 



ADAMS HATS 



GEORGE H. FORBES 



NO 



FURNITURE STORE 



RENT 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone: 451 



F. C. Holman. Prop. 



THE MUNDORF MERCANTILE CO. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
POWDER - PAINTS and OILS - HARDWARE - CROCKERY 
Mining Supplies - Cement - Agricultural Implements - Stoves 



WENZEL'S MEN'S WEAR 

F. E. Wenzel. Prop. 
NATIONALLY KNOWN LINES OF MERCHANDISE 



SONORA 



Phone 682 



CALIFORNIA 



GOOD HEALTH 

and a 

PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR 

to all 

from REXALL 

O. J. MOURON 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



SONORA 



MACBETH & SONS— Furniture 



HORSE SHOE CLUB 

"PAT" PATTON 



Phone 2110 



Ne«l to Post Office 



SONORA. CALIFORNIA 



WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 

STEAM CLEANING 

MOTOR . CHASSIS 

321 TENTH STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 1-0298 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



Farmers' Rice Growers Cooperative 

503 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



January. 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL Page 31 



CITY APPLIANCE 8c ELECTRIC 
BRANDIS CONFECTIONERY 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
LIGHT LUNCHES - SANDWICHES 

HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 

Phone 6551 

310 WASHINGTON STREET SONORA. CALIF. 74 7 SECOND AVE. OAKDALE, CALIF. 



MILLARD'S A. L. GILBERT COMPANY 

FLORAL SHOP - GARDEN SHOP - NURSERY GRAIN - FEED - INSURANCE 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 

OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 659 



Q-D TRANSIT MIX CONCRETE LIVE OAK INN 

(Que.rolo-Day ) 

North Gate to Yosem^te 
SOLD BY WEIGHT Mr. and Mrs. Claude Turnbow, Managers 

MONO ROAD SONORA. CALIF. Tel:phone 6511 
OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 



O. E. Salyer, Owner E. O. Edwards, Manager 

FAY'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 



ROAD SERVICE 

JCH KJ^JOU^^ 

GRAIN - FEED 



FOUNTAIN AND LUNCH OAKDALE FEED COMPANY 



Phone 3S70 
ROUTE NO. 2 SONORA. CALIF. Telephone 4341 



OAKDALE CALIF07.NIA 

T.lephone Oakdale 7175 Rt. 2, Box 139 A 

ARCHIE L. ALBERS OAKDALE AUTO PARTS 

BOX SHOOK & CLEATS AUTO PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 

OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 732 Yosemlte Avenue 

Phone 7,7 7 Res. Phone 4 I 67 ^Ji^^U^ P. O. Bo. 4U 

HolHs' Harper. Owner HOPE'S MEAT MARKET 

BUTANE & PROPANE AND LOCKER PLANT 

HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 

P. O. Box 1109 Third Avenue and E Street Phone 4241 

EAST SONORA HIGHWAY OAKDALE, CALIF. OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3033 Fred E. Heggie 



SAVE YOUR 
OAKDALE BUILDERS SUPPLY ^^^ BONDS 



LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 
Best Grades — Competitive Prices 

OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 

P. O. Box 7 Phone 741 I 



OAKDALE DEHYDRATORS 

WILLIAM F. KAUFMAN 

4th AVENUE AND H STREET 



Oakdale, California 



BEER — the Best — Plenty of it — and ICE COLD 

PARK CAFE 

WINE - BEER - LUNCHES - SANDWICHES 

CIGARS - CANDY - TOBACCO - CIGARETTES 

Mr. and Mrs A. Pedretti. Props. 

Phone 4121 



DEW DROP INN 
EASY WASHING MACHINE home cooked meals - home made pies 

COLD BEER - GAS AND OIL 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA Highway 99. 4^4 Miles East of REDLANDS 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

CRIME TRENDS IN CALIFORNIA 

By Chief George H. Brereton 
Division of Criminal Identification and Investigation, State Department of Justice 



January, 1948 



During the first half of 1947 (and prior to August 15) 
a total of 34,114 felonies were reported to the Division 
of Criminal Identification and Investigation. This figure 
is 57 per cent of the total 66,732 felonies reported for the 
year 1946, indicating a probable increase of 14 per cent 
in the felony "work-load" of the Division. 

This does not include supplemental or "follow-up" 




Chief George H. Brereton 

reports, nor does it include reports on misdemeanors. 
This data, however, cannot be considered as having very 
much significance, with respect to the crime problem in 
California, when one notes the apparent omissions among 
the reports forwarded to the Division. 

For example: One large sheriff's department reported 
no homicides or assaults during the first six months of 
1947, while a police department of a city having nearly 
100,000 population, forwarded only one burglary report 
during the same period. In two other fairly large sheriff's 
offices the only crime reports forwarded to the Division 
concerned fraudulent and fictitious checks while a police 
department in a city having nearly 60,000 population 
forwarded only four crime reports — all being reports 
on bad check cases. 

In addition to those departments who are reporting 
only at irregular intervals, and then only concerning cer- 
tain types of felonies, examples may be cited of law 
enforcement agencies who do not forward any reports 
to the Division. In this group are found four sheriff's 
departments having jurisdiction over unincorporated areas 
containing respectively, 65,000, 59,000, 30,000, and 
26,000 population. Among the cities whose police de- 
partments are not reporting crimes occurring in their 
areas is one with a population between 90,000 and 95,000, 



a second city with 24,000, a third with 23,000, and a 
fourth with 18,000 population. When we note such 
omissions as those just cited, about the only thing that 
we should say is that based upon information presently 
obtainable, there will probably be at least a "14 per cent 
increase in the felony work load of the Division" in 1947, 
as compared to that in 1946. 

Although it has been indicated that one of the reasons 
complete statistical information on "Offenses Known to 
the Police" is not available in the division, is due to the 
fact that crime reports on all felonies are not being for- 
warded by all city and county law enforcement agencies, 
we have not discussed the reasons why the reports are 
not being forwarded. 

Probably there are many reasons which might be of- 
fered. One answer to the question would be that, in the 
past, the Division of Criminal Identification and Investi- 
gation, because of inadequate equipment and personnel, 
did not provide the contributing law enforcement agencies 
with the information on crime and criminals which should 
have been developed by a careful analysis of the crime 
reports which were received from the contributor. Na- 
turally if the contributing law enforcement agency re- 
ceived little or nothing in return for the crime reports 
forwarded to the Division, it soon lost hope of any assist- 
ance, became careless as to the forwarding of reports, 
and sometimes ceased sending them entirely. 

Another reason probably can be found in the fact that 
during the past fifteen or twenty years, many personnel, 
changes have occurred in the police and sheriff's depart- 
ments. Not only have former heads of departments been 
replaced by new officials, the "rank and file" have changed 
as the department has grown and during the past few 
years, men have been called to military service. Since, 
as has been stated, the Division was inadequately staffed 



WINSLOW ENGINEERING COMPANY 

OIL AND AIR PURIFYING EQUIPMENT SINCE 1923 
AUTOMOTIVE - INDUSTRIAL - MARINE 

Phont OLymp:c 2-0288 

406<) MOLLIS STREET OAKLAND 8. CALIFORNIA 



S. J. Var 



TEmplebar 2-0S58 



THE BANK 

OAKLAND'S NEWEST LIQUOR 
AND FOOD BAR 



701 WASHINGTON 



OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN-CALIFORNIA FISH CO. 

FRESH. SALT AND SMOKED FISH 

Phone TEmplebar 2-4900 

425 HARRISON STREET OAKLAND 



January, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3i 



and equipped before the war for the job it was to per- 
form, contact with respect to proper crime reporting was 
not maintained with local law enforcement agencies. For 
this reason, in a considerable number of instances, the 
local departments did not realise that they were required 
to forward copies of all felony reports to the Division, 
and neither had the standard report forms, nor any in- 
formation as to how them were to be compiled, available 
in their departments. 

There is still another reason "which certainly 
explains the reluctance of some police forces to 
compile and publish reports showing the number 
of crimes committed. It is derived from the ten- 
dency to charge the crime rate against the police 
rather than against the community, and the temp- 
tation to draw from such statistics broad general- 
izations concerning the relative efficiency of various 
police forces. ... It springs also from a profound 
distruct, frequently expressed, of the practical 
value of many statistical compilations. These 
police officers . . . are reluctant to accept statis- 
tical demonstrations of an increase or decrease in 
crime and police efficiency when measured by the 
number of arrests, convictions or prisoners in 
penal institutions." (Committee on Uniform Crime 
Records, International Association of Chiefs of 
Police, Uniform Crime Reporting, 1929, p. 2.) 
It is realized that the facts just mentioned have in the 
past discouraged many police departments and sheriffs' 
offices from forwarding copies of their crime reports to 
the State Division. However, the time has now come 
to impress upon all law enforcement agencies the absolute 
need for complying with the law requiring that "copies 
of all felony reports" be forwarded to the Division. 

I do not wish to emphasize that crime reports be for- 
warded just because the law states that every sheriff or 
chief of police shall do so. If this were the only reason, 
and there were no practical benefits to be derived from 
such reporting, then I would say that the law should be 
abolished — but this is not true. The local department will 
reap innumerable benefits in its own community by main- 
taining good reporting and record systems. All depart- 
ments throughout the State will benefit if each depart- 
ment promptly forwards copies of all crime reports for 
analysis and correlation. 

Although in the past lack of personnel and equipment 
prevented the Division from properly processing the crime 
reports, fingerprint cards, pawned and stolen property 
reports, and other types of reports and information re- 
ceived from local law enforcement agencies, on July 1 of 
this year, the Legislature provided the necessary money 
to remedy this situation. Most of the new personnel have 
already been employed and it is hoped, within the next 
three months, that International Business Machine equip- 
ment will be delivered. At that time we expect to greatly 
increase our efficiency, but in the meantime we hope that 
the local departments will do their part by promptly for- 
warding copies of reports concerning crimes committed 

in their areas. zcr n i~> *• j i 

f To Be Continued) 



CHESLEY M. WALTER 

Attorney at Law 

1 41 9 Broadway HIgate 4445 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



KIPPLEY & LEE 

Phone KEIlog 2-80)2 
ISlh Ave. & E. Twelfth Street 

OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 



JOSEPHS BROTHERS 

BUILT-IN CABINETS - SASH DOORS - SCREENS 
SPECIAL MILLWORK 

8941 San Leandro Street SW. S-2864 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



S. KULCHAR & CO. 



731 East Tenth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



SERVANTS 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 

Furn'ture Show Rooms Main Ottics & Appliance Store 

2400 Grove Street 2401 Telegraph Avenue 

HIgate 4-6S48 HIgate 4-8123 

OAKLAND 12, CALIFORNIA 



PIEDMONT LUMBER & MILL CO. 



350 Fortieth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



JACK'S CAFE 

We Serve 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 

We Welcome the Working Men 

REASONABLE PRICES 



621 EAST EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



CENTRAL BUFFET 



412 Fourteenth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



COX-WELLMAN CO. 

Twenty-third and Grove Streets 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL January, 1948 

EXETER -TULARE COUNTY 



A lot of people traveling on the valley route between 
the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles miss the 
thriving little inland city of Exeter. Exeter lies midway 
between San Francisco and Los Angeles, and nestles near 
the foothills in Tulare county. It has a population of 
upward of 4000, and within its confines are some of the 
finest homes, schools, churches and packing houses. These 




Chief Joseph J. Borgman 

latter run ten months of the year preparing both citrus 
and deciduous fruits, grapes and other products raised 
on the fertile soil of the adjacent country. 

Exeter was incorporated in 1911 and since that time 
has provided for its residents fine playgrounds and parks. 
It has its own municipally owned water system and its 
streets are wide and laid out to furnish home owners 
with the incentive to carry out the plants of the founders 
to make an attractive city. 

The Santa Fe and Southern Pacific railways reach 
Exeter to handle the rich crops of the farms and ranches 
and an electric line runs from Visalia maintaining its 
shops in Exeter. 

Beside fruits, grapes and vegetables the Exeter district 
is justly noted for its dairy farms and dariy stock as well 
as for the breeding of saddle horses. Of the grapes the 
Red Emperor grape has brought fame to the region and 
it makes up a big part of the hundreds of cars of grapes 
shipped annually from Exeter. 

Like all municipalities, large or small, it is necessar>' 
to have a Police Department. Exeter has one and though 
a small one it is a very effective one. It is headed by 
Chief Joseph J. Borgman, who was born and reared in 
Exeter, joined the Police Department in September 1939, 
and eight years later, in 1940, was made Chief. For 2? 



TORRES POOL PARLOR 

SOFT DRINKS - CIGARETTES - CIGARS 



739 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



years he has been married, his wife being a native of 
Naylor, Missouri. 

Chief Borgman has a force of three officers — Zester 
Bolen, C. Gaines and Daniel Nations. 



NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS 

BAY CITY SANITARY RAG CO. 



230 Castro Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS 

BECKETT 8C FEDERIGHI 



GENERAL CONSTRUCTION 
1441 Franklin Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



PARK INN BUFFET 



lis Ward Street 



SAN LEANDRO 



CALIFORNIA 



WINSTON 8C ALBERT SALES CO. 

JOBBERS AND BROKERS 



1007 Clay Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



L. D. Roulund 



Telephone ANdover 1-55S7 



GENERAL GRINDING COMPANY 



PRECISION GRINDING 
METALLIZING 



2917 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND I. CALIFORNIA 



THE COLONY CLUB 

We Spec'laTze in 

SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN 

We Cater to 

BANQUETS, LUNCHEONS AND PARTIES 



Eishth and Kirkham Streets 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



L. T. BOTH 

FOOD DISTRIBUTON 
1212 47th Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



3J20 FOOTHILL BLVD. 



BOB INN CAFE 

TED MILLER 



OAKLAND 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Inspector Jack Cannon Answers Last Roll Call 



Inspector John J. Cannon, who retired from the San 
Francisco Police Department less than a year ago, died at 
St. Francis Hospital on January 1 1 . Though ailing for 
many months his death was unexpected as he was receiv- 
ing visits from many of his friends since the holidays. 

Of the many colorful members of the Police Depart- 
ment, Jack Cannon also known as "The Dasher" was 
among the highest. 

He was born in Stockton and was a locomotive engineer 
previous to joining the San Francisco police force in 1912, 
after a short term of service with the Emergency Hospital 
force in this city. 

After joining the Department it did not take long 
for him to establish himself as a good "copper." He did 
not have to walk a beat very long until he was given 
special assignments. Among those who craved his services 
was the late Mayor James Rolph, and it was on one of 
the many occasions he was assigned to the Mayor that 
"The Dasher" walked in and saw His Honor laboriously 
signing bond certificates, each bond had to be signed by 
the mayor with pen and ink. Jack Cannon watched as 
Mayor Rolph signed the documents. He remarked there 
must be some way that the work could be done more 
rapidly. 

The Mayor said "can you figure any such way?" 

Then the Inspector had a bright idea. The bonds were 
six to a sheet. "Why" he exclaimed, "can't you have six 
pens made so you can make six signatures at one time 
on each sheet?" 

The mayor was impressed and called in some experts 
to work out the idea and they came up with a hook-up 
of six pens that saved a lot of time. 

He was brought into the Inspectors Bureau in 1920 
and teamed up with the late Inspector Thomas Curtis 
on the Bunco Squad dealing with illegal stock manip- 
ulators. His work took him to China, South America, 
Mexico and other foreign countries and on each trip he 
gained much knowledge and this magazine has printed 
many stories written by Cannon and his old partner. He 
also took part in many big cases involving robberies and 
burglaries and was an important member of the force that 
captured the fabulous Big Bill O'Connor, big time 
hold-up man. 

But where he was at his best was opera first nights, 
and at social events in the city and down the peninsula 
where the wealthy needed some wise officer to see that 
guests went home with the furs and jewelry they wore 
to the social events. In full dress he was an imposing 
man, and his experience as a champion amateur wrestler 
gave him a poise that set him in with any class of our 
people he had occasion to mingle during his official duties. 

England's Duke of Manchester in token of appreciation 
of services rendered, presented Inspector Cannon with a 
gold plated pistol, a work of art. 

Jack Cannon's star No. 666 was well known in this 



city and in setting forth the colorful career of the owner 
of that police badge a stage play "Officer 666" written 
by a San Franciscan was brought into being. 

Inspector Cannon lost his wife two years ago and is 
survived by four brothers who live in Stockton. 

The funeral, on January 14, was held from Gantner, 
Felder and Kenny, 1945 Market Street, and a high 
requiem mass was celebrated Old St. Mary's church, and 
brought out a large gathering of his many friends. 



EAST LAKE FLORISTS 

W. G. Ford and K. H. Hartman 
Eastl4th Street, Near Fifth Avenue 



TWinoaks 3-7900 

OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA 
Phon.-: ANdover 1-8962 



Thomson 8C Young Motor Sales 

C. J. Thomson and L. Young, Proprietors 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 



I 158 East 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



ROBERT'S USED CARS 

A- 1 CARS 

1624 East 17th Street 
OAKLAND ANdover 1-8418 



J. D. ROBERTS 
201 Isl^ton Avenue 
SWeetwood 8-5247 



DEPENDABLE SAW WORKS 

COMPLETE SAW SHARPENING 

KNIFE GRINDING 

PRECISION LAWN MOWER SHARPENING 

Pickup and Delivery Service 



Phone KEIlog 4-1827 



1643 East 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Proprietor C. W. Kahl 



Phone ANdover 1-6276 



Wes. Kahl's House of 1000 Bargains 

NEW AND USED PLUMBING AND HEATING 
TOOLS and ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 



2227 East Fourteenth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



FINO PRODUCTS CO. 

Specializing in 

MEAT RAVIOLIS MADE FRESH DAILY 

Ask for Them at Your Neighborhood Delicatessen 



1613 East Fourteenth Street 
OAKLAND 



Phone KEIlog 2-7647 

CALIFORNIA 



DICK'S INN 

1111 Stanford Avenue 
OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



MODESTO'S POLICE DEPARTMENT 



When you come to Modesto, county seat of Stanislaus 
county, you'll not find a finer city along U. S. Route 99. 
It is a municipality that offers everything in the way of 
beauty, and into its busy life there comes endless loads of 
fruits, vegetables, grapes, melons, dairy products and 
grains. It is a community of law abiding people, and they 




Chief U. H. Pickering 

aim to keep it that way and the are doing just that for 
they have provided a fine Police Department, numbering 
.H officers. 

The personnel of the Department is made up of men 
who, by training and experience in their field of endeavor, 
have proven a potential weapon against any would'be 
law breaker. They don't have any heavy crime in Modesto, 
all because the members of the Police Department are 
alert and onto the ways of the transgressor. 

The Department is equipped with all the latest means 
of combatting crime and the prevention of crime. 

It is the county's central office of the state teletype 
system and handles messages for the Sheriff's office, the 
California Highway Patrol and other cities of the county. 

The Department has its radio station KQDQ, and 
Modesto is the second city in this part of the country to 
adopt two-way radio, that was back in 1933. The radio 
station serves five 2 -way equipped patrol cars, one com- 
bination patrol and ambulance; two three-wheel cycles, 
one with a public address system; four motorcycles with 
receivers, a pound wagon. There is an auxiliary standby 
transmitter for emergencies. 

The Department is furnished with the latest in gas and 
gas guns, and an arsenal of small weapons and sub- 
machine guns with ammunition are kept on hand and in 
first rate shape. 

There are also two portable public address systems that 



are necessary on occasions where large numbers of people 
assemble or some accident or fire calls for such equipment. 
The Police Department is under Police Chief U. H. 
Pickering. Chief Pickering, who as all know, was formerly 
with the American League Boston Red Sox baseball team, 
joined the Department on July 3, 1934. He liked his 
new job and took advantage of the opportunity for ad- 
vancement by paying close attention to his duties and 




Shirley Kettler 
Clerk 



Police Comm. 
C. J. Stangy 



Viola Rumsey 
Secretary 



Studying the many angles of law enforcement. He pro- 
gressed through the two ranks of the department, being 
made a Sergeant on August 1, 1937, and a Captain on 
March 16, 1941. When the death of Chief E. E. Aring- 
ton in 1945 caused a vacancy in the top position he was 
appointed to take over the duties on March 7, 1945. 
Under his direction the Department has been increased 

SAN FRANCISCO MARKET 

M. E. Angelo, Prop. 
MODESTO'S FINEST FOOD MARKET 



NINTH AND H STREETS 



MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO MATTRESS CO. 



MODESTO 



1210 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4683W 



Charles Harvey, Prop. 



ARCH HOTEL 



MODESTO 



918'/2 I Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



4 9 CLUB 

824 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



JOE ALLEN'S EMBASSY CLUB 



GOOD STOCK OF WHISKIES 
RESTAURANT 



716 H STREET 



MODESTO, CALIF. 



Phone 253 



MODESTO 



ECONOMY LAUNDRY 



1424 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



J. S. WEST AND CO. 

A HOME INSTITUTION 
"Since 1909" 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



January. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 37 



from its war time number of 26, and it might be stated 
here that of those 26, nine became members of our armed 
forces during the late war, and fortunately none lost 
their lives in the service of their country'. 

The present Captain of the Department is Robert H. 



William J. Coulson (traffic), appointed May 6, 1940, 
promoted November 16, 1947. 

Following is the rest of the roster of the Modesto 
Police Department: Officers David C. Cole, Thomas H. 
McCumber, Roy E. Livingston, Harry C. Fleming, Leon J. 
Livingston, John W. Blake, Lelane U. Murphy, William 




RoBT. H. Morton 
Captain 



John Meier 
Sergeant 



Joseph Smith 
Sergeant 




A. N. Adams 
Sergeant 



T. H. MaClmber 
Patrolman 



M. T. Coulson 
Patrolman 




David Cole 
Patrolman 



Eric Larson 
Patrolman 



Harry Fleming 
Patrolman 




Norman Sturm 
Traffic 



PeTer Demott Abraham Lamport 
Traffic Traffic 





F \V. Pittman 

Traffic 



J. W. Woods 
Patrolman 



P. Siner. Lawrence L. Jones, Eugene W. Thompson, 
Robert H. Cox. Edward E. McKinsey. Eric C. Larsen, 
Joseph D. Drcwry, George T. Bruton and Norman L. 
Freeman. 

Detectives Elmer F. Horan, Harr>' R. Gorman and 
Abraham Lamport. 

Traffic Officers W. Faye Pittman, Peter E. Demott, 
Donald H. Russell and Norman A. Sturm. 

Viola G. Rumsey, secretary and Shirlee E. Kettler, clerk. 

Officer McCumber handles the maintenance of parking 
meters and Traffic Officer DeMott looks after the Junior 
Traffic Patrol. 



Phone 925 

QUALITY FOOD STORE No. 1 

MEATS AND GROCERIES 
FIFTH and H STREET MODESTO. CALIF. 

RODSY REELS C. L. (Chuck) BURING 

MODESTO ROD AND GUN SHOP 



Phone 1682 



714 H STREET 



MODESTO. CALIF. 



Phona 3890M 



NUNEZ-ROBBINS RADIO 



626 H STREET 



RADIO 

PHILCO-ZENITH DEALERS 

SALES - SERVICE 



MODESTO. CALIF. 



HOTEL UNION 

702 u SEVENTH STREET 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Morton, who joined on September 12, 1935, and made a 
Sergeant the same day. He was appointed to a Captaincy 
on May 16, 1945. 

There are now four sergeants — John W. Smith, joined 
January 13, 1942, promoted to Sergeant May 16, 1945; 
John P. Meier, appointed October 15, 1942, promoted to 
present rank March 5, 1947; Armstrong M. Adams, ap- 
pointed October 22, 1942, promoted November 16, 1947; 



Phone 3226 Joseph A. Mengelt, Prop. 

ACME GLASS COMPANY 

710 G Street 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



DANIA CLUB & BAR-B-Q PIT 

Jack Crouch Owner 418 Eye Street 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



GOODFELLOW'S GRILL 

CHINESE DISHES ALSO SERVED AT ALL HOURS 



512 M Street, Corner State Highway 



MERCED 



CALIFORNIA 



Page i8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



HEMLER 
MOYLE HOTEL 

C. C. Hemler, Owner 

Modern Rooms and Apartments 

917V2 Jay Street 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



WES CLAYTON 

SEASIDE SERVICE 

Lubrication and General Auto Repairs 

Specialists on Chrysler Products 

Phone 2884 
8th and H Streets 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 17 
• 

B AND T MARKET 

Tom Giahos - Bill Poulos 
• 

Corner 8th and H Streets 
MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL COVELL 

COMFORT 

and 

COURTESY 
MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 

A favored hotel for those who want the 
greatest value. 

Our new buffet and dining room will please you. 

Meet your friends at the Covell. 
It's the thing to do. 




WALKIES MINT 

BONA VIA and BONA VIA 

Liquors and Cards 

804 Ninth Street 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



*■- ■ ----- 



Phone 528 FREE DELIVERY 

"The Best For Less" 

LEE SANG 
MEAT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fresh, Salt and Smoked Meats 

1004 H Street 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



TEmplebar 2.4MI 

HARRY A. KEY 

KEY PIPE AND SUPPLY CO. 
Pipe-Fit tings- Valves-Supplies 

1362 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 

MEL HARRIS' MACHINE SHOP 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK and LIGHT MANUFACTURING 

Phone ANdover 1-7044 

1357 E. I4lh STREET. Cor. Mth Ave. OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



TERESA'S MARKET 
Eureka 



HIgate 4-3208 



Harry Whitman 



STANDARD IRON & METALS CO. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF SCRAP 

THIRD AND MYRTLE STREETS OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone HIgate 4-2479 



Carl Bersch & Sons 



BAY CITY CABINET COMPANY 

Since 19t0 - Manufacturers of 

BANK, STORE AND OFFICE FIXTURES 

High-Grade Cabinet and Church Work. Etc. 

1076 FIFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



H I N C H ' S 
COFFEE CAFE 

ICE CREAM 

OPEN 7 A. M. to MIDNITE 

531 Fifth Street Phone 387 

EUREKA. CALIFORNIA 



January. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 



Page 39 



M. J. Souza, Prop. 



Farmer's Inn 

716- 9th Street 
MODESTO. CALIF. 



Schreiber's Club 

101 Weit Main 
TURLOCK. CALIF. 



Phone 3018 

DUMONT WINE AND LIQUORS 

611 H Street 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



J. F. DICKINSON COMPANY 

RADIO - RECORDS - HOME APPLIANCES 



Phone 4648 



MODESTO 



716 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



R. B. ASBILL 

RADIOS - REFRIGERATORS - AIR CONDITIONERS 

WASHERS - IRONERS - APPLIANCES 

14th AND D STREETS MODESTO. CALIFORNIA 

KNOX SEED COMPANY 

■EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN" 
STOCKTON AND MODESTO 



WALTER'S VARIETY 

Ed Walter, Owner 



605 H STREET 
Phone 114S 



5c, 10c, 25c and up 



.MODESTO. CALIF. 



CHOP SUEY 



CENTER COFFEE CLUB 



710 Folsom Street 



NEW CANTON GRILL 

EXCELLENT CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES « 

WE PUT UP ORDERS TO TAKE OUT ^,, .^ 

I OCS TENTH STREET .MODESTO. CALIF. 

Phone 4466 

PERCY L. MARSH 

HARNESS - RIDING EQUIPMENT - SADDLES 

NOVELTY LEATHER GOODS ^.,,^ 

918 H STREET .MODESTO. CALIF. 



MAJESTIC FURNITURE CO. 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

OWL RESTAURANT 

STEAKS AND CHOPS 
820 Ninth Street 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL BALDWIN 

In the Heart of Shopping, Theatre and Business District 

MODERATE RATES 

Geo. H. Stiles, Manager 

321 GRANT AVENUE, Near Sutter SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone SUtter 1-6133 



Phone Modesto 2074 

SING LEE LAUNDRY 

716 Seventh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO ^_^_ 

Phone 25 15 For Appointments 

Daily Office Hours 10:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. 

LAP LAP CHINESE HERBS CO. 

729 FIFTH STREET. Corner H MODESTO. CALIF. 



The Christmas Treasure Club 

AND SAVE FOR A 

fUcrriJ Christmas in 1948 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS IncorporaledFeb.lO.lSeS ■ Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. TRUST 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Seven Offices . . . Each a Complete Bank 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



HOW OFFICER'S KILLERS 
WERE CAUGHT 

(Continued from page >^ ) 
stations, purse snatching from women waiting for street 
cars, or the bludgeoning of some male who would not 
hold up his hands to a couple of boyish hyenas. The 
Haight-Fillmore Gang were so well organized they even 
had a club crest for their left arm. 

They also had a coach, one of the best, most heartless 
and most egotistical in the United States; but, we will 
have more to say about this coach later. 

A Special Peace Officer was shot and brutally killed. 

The large screw driver, the shon crow bar, the drift pin 
punch, the two chisels, the small sledge hammer, the pliers, 
:he flash-light, the leather gloves and the table scarf merely 
showed the burglars left in a hurry; but the gun was 
missing — and San Francisco is an immense city. 

The members of the homicide and burglary details 
studied their problems from everv' angle and decided that 
ex-convicts would hardly use both a gun and a crowbar 
on a watchman who surprised them. They figured the 
job had an amateurish look as had many jobs perpetrated 
by hoodlum gangs such as the White Gang. Number 315 
Sanchez Street is not far from Haight and Fillmore Streets. 

For three or four years the Haight-Fillmore Gang had 
given the members of the auto-theft detail and the burglary 
detail a merry time. Those youthful criminals were daring 
and clever — and their school age appearance was quite 
an aid in their successful lawbreaking. 

Well, as far as the Haight-Fillmore Gang was concerned, 
an intensive investigation drive was on. Those perverse 
youngsters had never realized that, individually and col- 
lectively they were known in the Hall of Justice to mem- 
bers of the check detail, the burglary detail, and the 
homicide detail. 

The young lawbreakers lied plenty — and their friends 
and the friends of their friends lied and alibied plenty. 



Palmer C. Mendelson 



Edward M. Zeller 



PALMER C. MENDELSON CO. 

Distributors of 
CALIFORNIA FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

NUMBER I DRUMM STREET SAN FRANCISCO II, CALIF. 

Telephone CArfitId I 5 946 - L. D GArfield I 876'1 • Teletype S. F. 2 I 

THE SPERRY & HUTCHINSON CO. 

Serving Nationally Since 1896 
GENERAL OFFICES AND WAREHOUSES 

M46 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone HEmlock 1-2 742 



HOTEL HALE 



9J9 MISSION STREEI 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Holiday Greetings 
T. W. G. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Phone JU 5-9646 



Res. OV 1-9437 



EXCELSIOR PRODUCTS CO. 



K. J. Shaddy 



47 12 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



GOLDEN STATE CLEANERS 8c PRESSERS 



333 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



EX 2-5553 



CALIFORNIA 



WEst 1-1552 



SIDNEY MIRON 



Positively Pays the Highest Prices for Ladies and Gents 

SECOND-HAND GOWNS, DRESSES AND SUITS 

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF NEW FURS 

1750 Geary Street, bet. Fillmore and Webster SAN FRANCISCO 



SALTER BROS. 



PHOTO ENGRAVERS 

S-AN FRANCISCO 



suiter 1-0428 
655 COMMERCIAL STREET 



E. J. LAND 



Authorized Watch Inspector for 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. - WESTERN PACIFIC R. R. 

Watch Repairing with Care and Precision 

Phone EX. 2-4898 Res. Orinda 3621 

745 THIRD STREET (Opp. Depot) SAN FRANCISCO 7 



OPEN 24 HOURS 



ORdway 3-50S7 



GEARY GARAGE 

MONTHLY AND TRANSIENT STORAGE 
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

855 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 



H. G. WALTERS CO. 

Phones: EXbrook 2-7542 - EXbrook 2-4590 

1301 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANICSCO II. CALIF. 



DOuglas 2-1194 



L. M. Fernandez, Prop. 



BANTAYAN SANITARY CLEANERS 

FIRST CLASS LAUNDRY AGENCY 

HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 

605 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



G. H. Harvey 



UNderhill 1-5161 



PAL'S RENDEZVOUS 



COCKTAILS AND FINE FOODS 
San Francisco Distributor for "Tumac Water," bottled in Seattle 

298 DIVISADERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 17 

UNITED PAPER BOX CO. 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

PAPER BOXES 

Folding - Set-up - Cartons 

Telephone: GArfield 1-2575 

460 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 7. CALIF. 



HEGGBLADE MARGULEAS CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



405 Montgomery Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

CRESCENT PACIFIC OIL CO. 



Distributor of Standard Heating Oils 



Phone UN. 1-3461 



2065 THIRD STREET 



RATHJEN BROS., Inc. 

wholesale Liquor Dealer 

We Recommend EARLY VINES Whiskey 

Kentucky Straight Bourbon — 86 Proof 

San Francisco Establ'shed Oakland 

135 Berry Street 1882 401 Alice Street 

Phone EX. 2-3430 



HOTEL RITZ 

3972 San Pablo Avenue 



EMERYVILLE 



CHINESE VILLAGE 

Edwin S. C. Lee, Manager 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



702 Grant Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



.January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 41 



In following up statements made and alibis given by the ♦" 
numerous members of the gang many private citizens as 
well as the draft board agencies, victims of automobile 
thefts, and burglaries and holdups, were investigated. 
Even members of the gang in reform schools and in San 
Quentin were quizzed. 

The questioning turned on the whereabouts of each of 
them on the night of September 9th, 1946, and on a crow- 
bar, a black jack and a U. S. .38 calibre revolver found 
in Daly City, which was stolen from the display room 
of the "S 6? C" Motors Company, 2001 Market Street, on 
October 14th, 1946. 

Gradually the lesser lights of the Haight-Fillmore Gang 
were eliminated as not being in on the Dan's Creamery 
case or as knowing nothing about it; and the light was 
now being turned on the top flight members of the gang 
on account of the truths and partial truths obtained 
through questioning the convicted ones such as: Babcock, 
Foakes, McNamara, Henderson, Renal, Trujillo and 
Woodmansee — and friends, such as Dorothy Corder, 
Patricia Baldwin, Sandora Noonan, Vivian Soria, and 
William Koche. 

Gangs are "pals to the end" when things are going well 
with them; but when things look bad, they are poor sports, 
indeed. They tell just enough truth to save their own skin. 
It was thus in this case. Both the principals and the partial 
principals and even their good and true friends put the 
revolver found in the stolen Ford, side by side with the 
burglar tools and the scarf and the flashlight found beside 



SOULE 

STEEL 

COMPANY 



1750 Army Street 

San Francisco 



J. H. BAXTER CO. 



WOOD PRESERVING 



333 Montgomery 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Season's 
Greetings 



LANGENDORF 
BAKERIES 



San Francisco 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



janxxary, J 948. 



the murdered Special Police Officer Charles Odom, in Joe 
Trujillo's hands. 

Of the dozen big shot members and their friends men- 
tioned above not one shielded anyone only himself or her- 
self — what pals! Thus the fine investigative work and the 
arrests made by Inspectors James O'Neill, James Hayes 
and Emmet Cottrell of the burglary detail, Officers George 
Browne and Eugene McCann of the Mission Police Sta- 
tion, and Inspectors Max Reznik, Valentine and Keyworth 
of the Juvenile Bureau, Officer Robert Casiciani of the 
Northern Station, Special Police Officer Bob Watson of 
the Taraval Station, Inspectors George O'Leary, and Fred 
Butz of the Robbery Detail and Inspector James Johnston 
of the burglary detail and Inspectors George Heeg, Martin 
Lee, Thomas Fogarty and Lieutenant Timothy J. Burke 
of the Homicide Detail, the Police Department put the 
needed parts of the jig-saw puznle together, out of the 
very mouths of the principals to the hundreds of crimes 
culminating in the brutal murder of a decent man, working 
his last week before retiring to enioy rest and leisure after 
/cars of honest toil. 

The gun was definitely a pare of the actual murder, 
but was tied in on a burglary near Haight and Fillmore 
Streets, by actual identification of the gang members them- 
selves and by a lady friend of the gang who tried to file 
off its numbers. It was the same in the case of the table 
scarf recovered at the murder scene, and the crowbar in 



A Happy New Year 
from 

Judge Albert C. Wollenberg 



Holiday Best Wishes 
Enterprise Engine and Foundry Company 

Manufacturers of 

DIESEL ENGINES, OIL BURNERS 

AND PROCESS MACHINERY 

For 6 I Years 



:8lh AND FLORIDA STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO 10. CALIF. 



Season's Greetings 
WIELAND'S BREWING CO. 



1€2 Guerrero Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Happy New Year 
GLADDING-McBEAN 8C CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GRAFEN MACHINE WORKS 

Harry Grafen, Owner 

COMPLETE MACHINE SHOP SERVICE 

PRECISION WORK 

PRODUCTION WORK 



UN. 1-9591 
5 74 NATOMA STREET 



Res. DE. 3-80S9 

SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 



O. A. Schille 



Phone MArket 1-7711 



PACIFIC GLOVE CO. 

Manufacturers of 
LEATHER WORK GLOVES 



ISO EiKhth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Al Cohn 



MArket I 0925 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 

NEWS ROOM BAR 



HOWARD HARDWARE CO. 

Distributors of 
MORWEAR PAINT PRODUCTS 



68 Fourth Street 



1262 Howard Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



L. J. Mile 



UNderhill 1-2328 



CARNATION CLUB 

Guy - Lee - Betty 
1561 ELLIS SAN FRANCISCO 



MILES RADIATOR SERVICE, Inc. 



264 Ninth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 

CALIFORNIA HOTEL 



Taylor at O'Farrell Street 



MARTINOLICH SHIPBUILDING CO. I 

REPAIRERS — DESIGNERS — BUILDERS ' 



Pier S2 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone UNderhill I ■6<)48 

THOR CORPORATION 

THOR WASHERS - IRONERS 
FACTORY BRANCH 

1 434 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



CHEVRON GAS STATION 



JUniper 7-2688 



JACK ESHE'S SERVICE 

WASHING - POLISHING - LUBRICATION 

MISSION AND MORSE SAN FRANCISCO 



January. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 4i 



the stolen Ford coupe. The moment each one of the now- 
guilty ones saw the gun, et cetera, they told all they 
knew about them. 

One of the big shots — Henderson — in connecting the 
ownership of the murder gun with the leader of the gang, 
Trujillo, really brings something of the humorous into the 
tale culminating, after hundreds of crimes, both petty 
and grave, in a brutal murder. 

But, we will commence on the morning of October 1, 
1947, and set down the investigation of the Charles 
Odom murder case as reported by Inspectors Martin Lee 
and George Heeg of the Homicide Bureau : 

On the morning of September 10, 1946, at 510 A.M., 
a garbage man found the body of Special Police Officer 
Charles Odom in a near hallway of Dan's Creamery at 
315 Sanchez Street. 

The only physical evidence left at the scene by the per- 
petrators, and found near the body, were the following 
tools: One large screwdriver, one short crowbar, one drift 
pin punch, two chisels, a small sledge hammer, a pair of 



FIRESTONE STORES 

JOrdan 7-2828 

BUSH AND FRANKLIN STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 9 

WESTERN STORES 

WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY CO. 
Sterlinir E. Downes, Manager 

MArket 1-0138 39 
154 VAN NESS AVE. SO SAN FRANCISCO ). CALIF. 

THE PASTIME POOL ROOM 

Knight Prior, Prop. 
POOL AND SNOOKER 



295S Twenty-fourth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



OSTLUND AND JOHNSON 

1901 Bryant Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



California Portrait Processing Co. 



OLD PRINTS ENLARGED 
AND RESTORED 



5515 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Jess Daviton, Prop. 



Phon3 overland 1-0741 



ELITE MACHINE WORKS 



Phone UN. 1-8976 
SAN FRANCISCO 



227 Seventh Street 

CALIFORNIA 



DA VITON'S 

DELUXE DRY CLEANING 

THE NAME IS YOUR GUARANTEE 

ONE-DAY SERVICE 



447 IRVING STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



Phon; VAlencia 4 8704 



AARON GOLDBERG THEATRES 

PEERLESS THEATRE — Third Street Near Mission Street 

NEWSREEL THEATRE — Next to Warfield 

SILVER PLACE THEATRE — Market Street Opposite Grant Avenue 

REGAL THEATRE — Market Street Near Paramount Theatre 

NEW NEWSREEL THEATRE — 1118 Broadway, Oakland. Calif. 



CRUCIBLE BRASS FOUNDRY 

BRASS, BRONZE AND ALUMINUM 
CASTINGS 



22 5 3 FOLSOM STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



MONTE CARLO CAFE 



298 Pacific Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



UNION OIL COMPANY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL WOODEN BOX 
ASSOCIATION 



55 New Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Reasonable Prices Custom Built 

PALACE UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

CHESTERFIELDS RECOVERED 

NEW SETS MADE TO ORDER 

FREE ESTIMATES 

5791 MISSION STREET JUNIPER 4-247 1 



PAULIST FATHERS 



6€0 California Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone JUnper 7-2558 



Rose and Ed. Volkerding, Props. 



OLIVER TAILORS AND CLEANERS 

LAUNDRY SERVICE 



I 1 OLIVER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1 948 



pliers, one flashlight and a pair of leather gloves. 

Wrapped about the neck of the dead officer was a 
fringed, silver colored table scarf. 

The deceased had also been evidently beaten about the 
head and face with the crow-bar, as blood still adhered 
to the crowbar. 

Entrance to the creamery by the suspects had been 
through a storeroom under alterations. An unsuccessful 
entrance to the creamery office where the safe was kept, 
was no doubt, interrupted by Officer Odom's appearance 
on the scene. The lock of the office door had been pried 
off and the wooden door jams removed. 

Police photographs and fingerprints were taken by 
members of the Bureau of Identification. 

The neighborhood was thoroughly canvassed for any 
information in relation to the shooting, but no new in- 
formation resulted. 

The body was taken to the morgue where it showed 
that Officer Odom was shot at close range, resulting in 
powder burns of clothing and flesh, and also that he had 
been beaten about the head and face with a sharp instru- 
ment, inflicting thirteen different deep lacerations. 
(To Be Continued) 



VAN ETTA MOTORS 

LINCOLN and MERCURY 



Telephone ORdway 3-8800 

1101-53 Van Ness Ave. at Geary 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



McINTYRE 
ENGINEERING CO. 

REFRIGERATION AND AIR 
CONDITIONING ENGINEERS 

Telephone ATw.^ter 2-6700 
3221 TWENTIETH STREET 

San Francisco 10, California 



Tel. EXbrook 2 0064 



Cable Address "Hftvisideco" 



HAVISIDE COMPANY 

Established \»T> 

SALVAGE AND DERRICK BARGES — SHIP CHANDLERS 
SAIL MAKERS — SHIP RIGGERS 



juniper 5-2371 



G. MAZZERA CO. 



BUILDING MATERIALS 
Rock, Sand, Gravel, Cement 

Office 
4277 MISSION STREET 



Warehouse 
321-33 1 SILVER AVENUE 



Frank Bacollni 



Aldo Menconi 



HOLLY PARK - Sporting Goods 

ATwater 2-9097 

3418 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



ATwater 2-1 958 



Clyde W. Gilbert, Prop. 



SPORTSMAN SPECIALTY CO. 

ROD, REEL AND GUN REPAIRING 

3583 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 10, CALIF. 



Phones Mission 7-4049 
MIss'on 7-4050 






Yard 


McFARLANE 

LUMBER- 

3650 MISSION STREET 


AND 

MILL 


BROWN 

WORK 

SAN FRANCISCO 


Phono VAlencJa 4-7579 




Oscar Goebel 




OSCAR'S Missioti Hill Delicatessen 

WINE - BEER - GROCERIES 


3703 


MISSION STREET 




SAN FRANCISCO 



"Courteous Service" 



No. 1 

3354 Mission Street 

VAIencia 4-2861 



POWELL JR. PHARMACY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



No. 2 

3715 Mission Street 

VAIencia 4-5302 



SUPERIOR TRUCK & 
BODY CO., Inc. 

SUPERIOR BODIES 

Truck and Trailer Bodies of all Types 
Painting, Trimming and Repairing 

4175 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

JUniper 4-9731 



Expert . 



Phone JUniper 7-3077 



GUNSMITHING 



PISTOLS ; 
REVOLVERS 



-on- 

RIFLES 



SHOTGUNS 



Prompt service on mail orders. 

Guaranteed workmanship by 

MICRO SIGHT CO. 

^81? Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



40 SPEAR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



ITALIAN SWISS COLONY 



FINE CALIFORNIA WINES 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



VAlencia 4-9102 



VAIencia 4-2884 



MISSION CARPET 8c FURNITURE CO. 

A. Eugene Pagano, Manager 
FASHIONERS OF HOME COMFORT 

2301 MISSION ST., at 19th SAN FRANCISCO 10 

TIP TOP SERVICE STATION 

B. W. ROBERTS, Proprietor 
Phone VAlencia 4-70SO 

3700 Mission Street, at Highland Avenue 

Phons WAlnut 1-4324 

FAMOUS CONEY ISLAND 

RESTAURANT 

2077 CHESTNUT SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Fillmore 6-8047 

SIG MENDEL CLOTHING STORE 



JUniper 4-S415 John Watso, Prop. 

DALY CITY SPORT SHOP 

MODEL SUPPLIES - PHOTO AND MOVIE EQUIPMENT 
SPORTING GOODS 

5867 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



FREE DELIVERY 



ATwater 2-830O 



John Costantine, Prop. 



Successor to 
COHEN'S 



SERVICE FOOD CENTER 

John Young. Prop. 

MEATS - POULTRY - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - FRUITS 

WINES AND BEER 

2950 24th STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

Phone Mission 7-4992 

COSTANTINE HARDWARE 

APPLIANCES - HOUSEWARE - PAINTS 
GIFTS - TOYS 

3000 24th STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CA LIF. 

O'DONNELL'S VARIETY STORE 

CANDIES - SOFT DRINKS - SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
MAGAZINES - CIGARETTES 



12 72 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 2989 24th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



MANGRUM HOLBROOK & ELKUS 

Daniel G. Rosenblat, Operating Manager 

Store. Office & Bar Fixtures; Equ'pment & Supplies For 

Restaurants. Bars, Hotels, Hospitals & Institutions 

HEmlock 1-8118 

FELL & COUCH STS. SAN FRANCISCO 2 



Phone GRaystone 4-4047 



George Kay, Manager 



Phone VAlencia 4-5506 

ST. FRANCIS FOUNTAIN 

HOME MADE CANDY - ICE CREAM - LIGHT LUNCHES 

2801 24th STREET SAN F RANCISCO 

VAlancia 4-2727 



Hans C. Hansen, Prop. 



THE BROILER GRILL 

RESTAURANT OF DISTINCTION 



WHITE CLEANERS 

CALL AND DELIVERY SERVICE 



1 18 JONES STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



2829 24th STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MORGAN AND SAMPSON 



SAN FRANCISCO 



8S9 Folsom Street 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



STELLING'S MARKET 

GROCERIES, FRUITS, VEGETABLES 

MEATS AND POULTRY 

2799 Twenty-Fourth Street, Corner York 



CALIFORNIA 



DAD'S AND SARG'S GROCERY 

QUALITY GROCERIES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
BEER AND WINE - CIGARS AND CIGARETTES 



1223 SCOTT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



FILM ROW CIGAR STORE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



243 Hyde Street 



CALIFORNIA 



George Lazeneo 



Mike Balovich 



John Balovich 



GOOD EATS RESTAURANT 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
1180 Potrero Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



Angelo Fregosi 



Mission 7-3655 



Francis F. Holm 



FREGOSI'S FLORIST 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

3282 Mission Street, at 29th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN TRUCK LINES, LTD. 
In The West — Ship Western 



SCHIRMER STEVEDORING CO. 



Telephone MArket 1-8261 

75 COLUMBIA SQUARE SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 




"With Heart 

to God and 

Hand to Man" 



Sincere Thanks for your 
Support in 1947. 

SALVATION ARMY 



PHIL LYNCH 
Sporting Goods Company 

ATHLETIC GOODS 

Wholesale and Retail 

Complete Line of 

FISHING SUPPLIES 

623 Mission Street 

sutler 1-3198 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 46 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL January, 1948 



ARROW Truck & Auto Rental Service SPEEDWAY CAFE 

D. O'KANE, Superintendent FRANK DA VALLl 

MArket 1-0192 98 Bayshore Boulevard 

38 EIGHTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3 sAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Mission 7-5803 Ryan & Magulre Bob laylor Anton Tedson Bill Terrell 

MODERN GROCETERIA ^"ftS-oR? b?Jr aS. ™s^^ 

FRESH FRUITS - VEGETABLES - WINES AND BEER « p^^_^; ^^.^^^ ^ ^3^^ 

•<789 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 1893 FOLSOM STREET, cor of IS.h and Folsom, SAN FRANCISCO 

MISSION PRIDE MARKET ctcdnt a, /-dttdd 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES S 1 EKi>J «. VjKUff 

JUniper S-7292 Mi. Is Bu Iding 

•>90l MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 10. CALIF. SANFUANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



T T M T o M r A P P BORELLO'S CLEANING & DYEING CO. 

UlNlUrM l^Ahb CLEANERS OF QUALITY 

2014 Third Streat Phones: JUniper 5-8535 - 5-8533 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 2695 SAN BRUNO AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 



KOFNin I T 7MRFR Cd manufacturers agents and brokers 

ivv^EiMvj n-jiviociv \^yj. food products 

LUMBER :: PLYWOOD :: MOULDINGS Telephone DOuglas 2 5122 



'Unipsr 5-9843 TEXACO PRODUCTS 

VIADUCT SERVICE GOVERNOR GRILL 

FIRESTONE TIRES AND ACCESSORIES 210 Jones Streil 
4060 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

M. F. Conklin, Manager Phone MOntrose 4-0516 

COOK & HARMS 

ACTURERS AGENTS AND BH 

"OOD product; 

Telephone DOuglas 2 5122 

1 701-09 JUDAH STREET. Cor. 22nd Ave. SAN FRANCISCO 40 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO II. CALIFORNIA 

Emil Ziegter Jacob Schmidt 

QUALITY PORK AND SAUSAGE CO. 

THE YOUNG CHINA Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS SAUSAGE AND MEAT SPECIALTIES 
881 Clay Street Factory and Store Phone MArket 1-7432 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA """ DIVISADERO STREET, cor. Oak Street SAN FRANCISCO 

Fhono GArfie'.d I-181S Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Etchevers 

MARTN MOTFT HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN 

ivirtivii-"! I-IKJ 1 EL p^[(,j. SUNNY ROOMS 

143 Embarcadero FREE BATHS AND SHOWER 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 6T I BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. HEmlock 1-6774 

^ L'EMPORIO LUCCHESE 

WILLIAM J. FORSTER AND SONS, Inc. gents' and boys- furnishings 

PLUMBING 132S Stockton Street EXbrook 2-979S 
340 HARRIETT STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Office ATwater 2-4626 BARTZ SALES & SERVICE 

ir\c r\CT cT:inr^n\ vacuum cleaners, new and used 

jyJS. UtLL OCK^y^yJ Sold and Repaired 

appraising - financing ■ REAL ESTATE LOCK AND KEY WORK 

loans - INSURANCE ORdway 3-1832 

3435 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 1904-06 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 

4 4 1 CLUB MOBILGAS SERVICE STATION 

"Chuck" Kelso, P'anlst 
•I4I1 inMF«i ^TRFTT Pacific and Powell Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO ^ ■ KEL I CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SUttLT 1 106 3 

MASON STREET SMOKE SHOP R. MATTEUCCI & CO. 

AND LIQUOR STORE MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 
Ordwav l.B7P-» 229-231 Columbus Avenue 
145 MASON STREET '^ ^ " SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF . SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

U. S. STUDIO PORTRAITS 
STONE'S LINEN SUPPLY CO. p „»oTo G^n'-ArA'E r 

1124 Harrison Street Phone MArket 1-6262 1 y,-, a i. c. . i«/ai . . o'lao 

147 Buchanan Street WAlnut 1-8398 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA Corner Sutter San Francisco. Calif. 



C E R C I A T 
French Laundry and Dry Cleaner 



MISSION BELL WINE CO. 



1025 McAllister Street 
•JAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



- San Francisco Sausage Factory 

COLUMBUS BRAND 
G. MATTEUCCI and DEVINCENZI BROS. 



Phone HE 1-1045 



M. (Ginger) Ellis 



447 BROADWAY 



Tel. DOuglas 2-8495 - 2-8496 



SAN FRANCISCO II, CALIF. 



GOLDEN GATE NURSERY 

LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS AND GARDENERS 
Frank F. Mettam, Owner 
5726 Geary Boulevard MAIN NURSERY 

at 31st Avenue 5 16-42nd Ave. at Geary 

SKyline 1-8141 BAyview 1283 7 



THE PROCESS COMPANY 

Designers and Producers of 

FINE PRINTING 

1045 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



McBLAIN'S KIDDIE SHOP 



SAN FRANCISCO 



3041 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FRANK KARP 



Phone Ml. 7-7142 



APPRAISER 

DIAMONDS AND PRECIOUS STONES 

EXbrook 2-8143 

133 KEARNY STREET ROOM 20! SAN FRANCISCO 



LOUIE'S CAFE 



DREAM 



DOWN-ONE 



GOODY ROOT BEER 



CITY BOTTLING COMPANY 



CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

CHINESE FOOD TO TAKE OUT 

Open 11 A.M. - 2 A.M. - Closed on Monday 

33 19 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



COLUMBUS BAKERY 



1705 CHURCH STREET 
Anthony Lugliani 



SAN FRANCISCO 

VAIencia 4-5095 



Phone MI. 7-6324 

SAN FRANCISCO 



3312 Mission Street 

CALIFORNIA 



GROCERIES THAT ARE FRESH AND AT 
REASONABLE PRICES ALWAYS 

ETALO MARKET 

PARODI BROTHERS 

Meats - Fish - Poultry - Fruits - Vegetables 

2714 SAN BRUNO AVE. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

JOSEPH C. FLETCHER 

Factory Representative 
HIGH GRADE TOOLS 



VITTORI BROS. 

GROCERY 
3820 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



1415 FOLSOM STREET 



Phone UNderhill 1-2991 



SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 



DAWSON'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

LUBRICATION - WASHING - POLISHING 

TIRES AND TUBES 

RICHFIELD PRODUCTS 

SUtter 1-9704 201 MISSION STREET 



G. Ben Miller, Manager 



Telephone SUfler 1-4530 



HOTEL STATLER 



"IN THE CENTER OF THE CITY" 

154 ELLIS STREET, Near Powell SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIF. 

VAIencia 4-8609 

MISSION AUTO WORKS 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRING 
AUTHORIZED DUCO REFINISHING 

3730 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



THE MAIL BOX 

21 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone MArket 1-1213 

L. GALTIE 

FRENCH CLEANING AND DYEING WORKS 
339-347 Eighth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone ORdway 3-4884 



M. J. Pope, Mgr. 



HOTEL SHAWMUT 

ATTRACTIVE RATES TO PERMANENT GUESTS 

$1.50 With Bath 

516 OFARRELL STREET, Corner Jones SAN FRANCISCO 



WILLIAMS- WALLACE COMPANY 



Phone DOuglas 2-9720 John Amin, Prop. 

KING HOTEL 



44 THIRD STREET 
Just Off Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



UNderhill 1-9679 



Mr. and Mrs. C. Jorge. Prop. 



LA NATIONAL GROCERY 



HE. 1-0378 

SAN FRANCISCO 7 



160 Hooper Street 



381 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



TEmplebar HEmlock 1-6700 



Since 1857 



LOUIS FERRARI 
San Francisco 



Established 1902 Nerii Bros. 

GRANUCCI HARDWARE COMPANY, Inc. 

214 California Street (Nerli Bldg.) San Francisco 

William "Bill" Nerli President. Telephone: DOufflas 2-5290 



THE MONTAGUE COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
HEAVY DUTY RANGES AND OVENS 

360 NINTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

FORD TRACTOR WITH HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 
SALES AND SERVICE 

OWEN EQUIPMENT CO. 

Phone KLondike 2-1533 

5 75 TENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



RAY W. CHANDLER 



SAN FRANCISCO 



65 Market Street 



AVANSINO, MORTENSEN 8C CO. 

WHOLESALE FLORIST 
175 Fifth Street 

CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



FRANK'S MOTORS 

GENERAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 



STEINER INN 



JUniper S-1046 
4420 Mission Street 



1696 Ellis Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 50 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL January. 1948 

Some Are True and Some Are False — Rate Yourself 



In the last issue of this journal under the heading: 
TRUE or FALSE," the following questions were TRUE: 



10. 
11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15 
16. 

17. 



19. 

20. 

21. 

22. 

23. 



9 10 12 18 

26(1) 27(2) 28(4) 31 
36 41 43 47 



54 
62 
82 
95 
95 



57 
64 
83 
99 
99 



58 
73 
84 



59 
74 
90 



24 
33 
50 
60 
75 
92 



25(2) 

35 
51 
61 
81 
93 



Parts of the Penal Code are never retroactive. 
Penal statutes are not to be strictly construed. 
Failure of the penal code to specify penalties does 
not affect any right to enforce same in any civil 
action. 

Punishment for military offenses may be made with- 
out regard to the provisions of the penal code. 
The punishment for misdemeanors may exceed six 
months in the County Jail. 

Commitment for misdemeanors to state institutions 
may exceed one year. 

A crime ordinarily classified as a felony may not be 
considered such if committed by a drunken person. 
Lack of criminal intent is not always sufficient to 
disprove the commission of crime. 
Married women acting under the coercion of their 
husbands are incapable of committing crimes. 
Betting on the results of an election is a crime. 
It is lawful for a municipal employee of this city to 
accept a gratuity for doing an official act. 
Every offense declared to be a felony is punishable 
by fine and imprisonment in the State Prison. 
A person who advises another to commit any crime 
is termed an accessory. 

Every public officer who arrests any person without 
lawful authority is guilty of a misdemeanor. 
.Every person known to be a pickpocket is a vagrant. 
A warrant of arrest must be executed by an officer. 
Homicide is justifiable when necessarily committed by 
policemen in arresting persons charged with crime. 
A charge of seduction under the promise of marriage 
will not hold if the parties marry subsequent to the 
finding of an indictment or filing of the charge. 
Two persons may commit a riot. 

If one wilfully destroys by fire the dwelling of an- 
other, he commits arson. 

Petit larceny cannot be charged if the property 
taken is valued over $50. 

When an arrest is being made on a warrant, if the 
person to be arrested flees, the officer may use all 
necessary means to effect the arrest. 
If a person arrested escapes, the person from whose 
custody he escaped may take him at any place in 
this state. 



24. An indictment cannot be found without the con- 
currence of at least 12 grand jurors. 

25. The word "wilfully," when applied to the intent 
with which an act is done or omitted implies a will- 
ingness to commit the act. 

26. Removal from office is one of the punishments for 
the commission of a cnme. 

27. In every crime there must exist a union of act and 
intent or criminal negligence. 

28. The jury may take into consideration the fact that 
the accused was intoxicated when the crime charged 
was committed. 

29. All persons who, after knowledge that a crime has 
been committed conceal it from the magistrate, are 
accessories. 

30. The jurisdiction dies in either county when a public 
offense is committed partly in one county and partly 
in another. 

31. Whenever no specific punishment is prescribed for a 
felony, such felony is punishable by imprisonment in 
a state institution not exceeding five years. 

32. In every crime or public offense there must exist a 
union, or joint operation of act and intent. 

33. In order to prove a person is not of sound mind, it 
is required that he be proved either an idiot or a 
lunatic or affected with insanity. 

34. Any person who advises and encourages a crime is 
a principal to such crime. 

35. An affiant may be penalized for attempting to in- 
fluence a juror even if he does so in the interest 
of justice. 



GREEN SPOT CAFE 



BEER -::- WINE 
GOOD, REAL MEXICAN FOOD 



2 36 FIRST STREET 



CALEXICO. CALIF. 



DICK'S ADOBE 

BRAWLEY'S FINEST COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

and 
DELICIOUS FOOD COOKED BY EXPERTS 



538 E STREET 



BRAWLEY, CALIF. 



SARATOGA CAFE, 935 E. Main 



935 East Main Street 



THE WHITE HOUSE CAFE 



924 Eaat Main Street 



BRAWLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



Gas and Oil Phone 151 

MURRIETA ASSOCIATED SERVICE 



Gordon Knott, Owner 
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 



We Try to Pleaae 



Highway 395 



/ativwrv, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



56. An unqualified statement of that which one does 
not know to be false is equivalent to a statement of 
that which one knows to he true. 

.^7. A police ofiicer who beats a person is subject to 
criminal action. 

38. In order to constitute murder, malice must he ex- 
pressed. 

.■>9. Involuntary manslaughter means the same as acci- 
dental homicide. 

40. An assault is an attempt, coupled with the present 
afcility to commit a violent injury on the person of 
another. 

4L An assault is not punishable unless accompanied 
by batter>'. 

42. Embezzlement is the fraudulent appropriation of 
property. 

Jo= Del Real Res. Phone 8S4-J 

JOE'S CAFE & POOL HALL 

Bus. Phone 630 9S8 Man Street 

BRAWLEY CALIFORNIA 



MOM'S PLACE 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 

and 

REAL HOME COOKING 

Give Us a Try. 



896 E. MAIN STREET 



BRAWLEY. CALIF. 



BOGGUST-PETERSON 

CIGARS - TOBACCO - FOUNTAIN 
625 Main Street 



BRAWLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



BRAWLEY QUALITY BAKERY 

Specializing in 
CAKES, DOUGHNUTS and FANCY PASTRIES 



144 South Sixth Street 



BRAWLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes From 
SOUTH GATE CAFE 

Rae and Ralph Riddell, Props. 

Specializing in 

STEAKS -FRIED CHICKEN 

AND SEA FOOD 

EL CENTRO HY. 99 BRAWLEY. CALIF. 



AMERICAN CLUB 

On Broadway 
Westmoreland, Calif. 






GEORGE'S 
FOOD MARKET 

A Full Line of 
FRESH MEATS & VEGETABLES 




158 Main Street 

Brawley, California 



TOWER CAFE 
and Drive In 

Breakfast, Lunches, Dinners 

Steaks, Chops, Fried Chicken 

and all kinds of Short Orders 



• 



157 North Plaza 

BRAWLEY, CALIFORNIA 



CLUB 49 

HAMBURGERS - BEER 

SOFT DRINKS 

and good 

MISSOURI CHILI 



Brawley (imperial Valley), Calif. 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



43. No person can be punished for a public offense, 
except upon a legal conviction in a court. 

44. The proceeding by which a person charged with a 
public offense is brought to trial and punished is 
known as an indictment. 

4^. Any officer who neglects or refuses to obey the 
command of a writ of habeas corpus directed to him 
is guilty of a misdemeanor. 

46. The taking of any person from the lawful custody 
of any peace officer by means of a riot constitutes 
a lynching. 

47. Any person who enters any house with the intent 
to commit a misdemeanor is guilty of burglary even 
though the act is not carried out. 

48. A burglary committed in the day time can constitute 
burglary in the first degree. 

49. Only when the property taken exceeds $200 can theft 
be considered grand theft. 

50. Any criminal action involving a felony may be tried 
by a jury. 

THE PRESENT TASK OF LAW 
ENFORCEMENT 

{Contmued from Page 17 ) 
isolated examples of the seriousness of some of the crimes 
being committed today. Some of these cases caught the 
nation's attention because of a certain amount of spectaC' 
ular color about them, but we of law enforcement fully 
recognize and appreciate that daily scores of other cases, 
perhaps not quite so colorful but every bit as serious, 
are being enacted. 

The 1946 crime rate increase of 7-6 per cent has 



COURTESY MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 
FRUIT and SOFT DRINKS 



6 19 WEST SIXTH STREET 



CORONA, CALIF. 



MAVA ICE CREAM CO. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY 
III) WEST SIXTH STREET CORONA. CALIF. 

THE BEST IN TOWN 

DOC'S PLACE 

Geo. F. Von Nordeck, Prop. 
3 15 WEST SIXTH CORONA. CALIF. 

LA ESPERANZA MARKET 

GROCERIES, MEATS AND ALL MEXICAN FOODS 
224 NORTH MAIN STREET CORONA. CALIF. 

DUCK POND 

BEER. WINE. SOFT DRINKS. SHORT ORDERS 
SANDWICHES AND TOBACCO 



13527 MAGNOLIA AVE. 



CORONA, CALIF. 



Clarence Campbell 



^uH>i Place 



Jim Hughes 



HAMBURGERS 
HOT DOGS 
Ice Cold Beer 
Pool and Billiards 
Sandwiches 

• 

Phone 452 
615 MAIN STREET 

Corona, California 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page Ji 



brought the nation's crime figures to an all-time record 
high. The figures of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
compiled from reports submitted by your departments and 
other police agencies and sheriff's offices throughout the 
entire country, show that a total of 1,685,203 serious 
offenses were committed last year, or a major crime every 
18.7 seconds. Each day on the average, 254 persons were 
killed, assaulted or raped; 172 persons were robbed; 630 
cars were stolen; 981 places were burglarized, and 2,580 
thefts were committed. The vast army of criminals today 
is over ten times the number of students in our colleges 
and universities, and for every school teacher there are 
seven criminals. Over 54 per cent of the persons arrested 
last year were repeaters — second, third and fourth 
offenders! 

America's law enforcement, and particularly here in 
California because of migration westward, is facing one 
of the most severe crises in history. It is a real test of 
our courage and devotion to duty, but law enforcement 
has not proved weak of heart in the face of past crises, 
and we will meet our responsibilities with renewed cour- 
age and vigor, understanding of mutual problems, and 
enthusiastic cooperation. 

(To Be Continued ) 



R. A. (Red) HARTER 

We Do Our Best 

LIQUORS 

THE BEST BRANDS AND FINEST FLAVORS 

Phone 110 

110 East Sixth Street 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



733 



B L A N D I ' S 

COMPLETE FOOD MARKET 

MEATS - VEGETABLES - FRUITS - GROCERIES 

BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 



3 16 NORTH MAIN STREET 



CORONA, CALIF. 



HOME BAKERY 

Specializing in 
HOME AND WEDDING CAKES 

and all types Bread and Pastries 



614 MAIN STREET 



CORONA. CALIF. 



Phone 450 



SCHMIDT'S O. K. MARKET 



A-B-C EMBLEM & PENNANT CO. 



702 Main Street 



Market 
1251 MARKET STREET 



-2808 - 1-2809 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



ANTONELLI HOTEL 

ITALIAN DINNERS EVERY DAY 

Spaghetti and Raviolis to Take Out- — Bring Container 

Cater to Parties and Banquets 

29 Front Street Pete Locatelli, Owner 



CORONA 



CALIFORNIA 



LEO'S CAFE 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 
AND DELICIOUS FOOD 



195 EAST J STREET 



COLTON. CALIF. 



H. R. Burton 


The Owl Cafe 

GOOD EATS 

RECREATION 

REFRESHMENTS 

* 

325 - 327 WEST SIXTH STREET 

Corona, California 


-------------1 

Earl Sandifer ] 
...J 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



Phone 394 

R & S MOTOR SUPPLY 

Vance B. Rhudy and M. Orton Schafer, Jr. 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 
ACCESSORIES - SUPPLIES 

511 Main Street 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes From 

LA TAPATIA MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, Fresh Vegetables 
Beer Wine and Soft Drinks 

403 North Main Street 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL SPRINGBORG 

Meet Your Friends at The Chalet for a 
Sociable Cocktail 

Delicious Dinners at the Cafe 

Visit Glen Ivy Hot Springs 

. . . Teniescal Canyon . . . 

Swimming . . . Horseback Riding 

119 East Sixth Street 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 



CLUB 99 

Where Good Friends Meet 

Our Specialty 

Chicken - Steaks and Fried Shrimp 

DELICIOUS COCKTAILS 

made of highest grade liquor 

On Highway 99 

Between COLTON and REDLANDS 



TERMINAL CAFE 

C. D. Odgers, Prop. 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 

and Short Orders 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

Open 24 Hours Daily 

266 W. I Street 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



r— -~ 



Colton Coffee Shop 

• 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 

and Short Orders 

• 

24 Hour Service 

Eighth and J Streets 
COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



Flo's Coffee & Malt Shop 

Home Cooked Meals 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 
and Short Orders 

Also Complete Fountain Service 
1043 Mt. Vernon Avenue 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



Clyde and Nellie Bowlen's 

MONTEREY CAFE 

Beer, Wine, Soft Drinks 
and Good Food 

We specialize in Delicious Chili 
Made by Us 

1300 Mt. Vernon Avenue 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



BUENA PARK BAKERY 

Robert F. Rittenhouse 



Bread - Pies - Cakes - Pastries 



Phone Buena Park 5156 
819 So. Grand Avenue 

BUENA PARK, CALIFORNIA 






THOMAS STRINGHAM 

HAPPY HOURS CAFE 

Hospitality Supreme 

Home of Good Steaks, Beer, Wine 

and Soft Drinks of Quality 

Hours: 8 a. m. to 12 Midnight 

Manchester at Eighth Street 

BUENA PARK, CALIFORNIA 



EL GRINGO CAFE 

Pearl Webster and Richard Hanby, Props. 
We Specialize in 

SPANISH and AMERICAN FOOD 

We Still Sell the Highest Quality 

BEER, WINE and SOFT DRINKS 

Hours 8 a. m. to 2 a. m. 
234 North Grand Avenue 

BUENA PARK, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 291 J 



24-Hour Service 



SPIC & SPAN 

TRUCK SERVICE AND GARAGE 

9 Fuels 

W Tire Repairs 

V Lubrication 

Truck Accessories 

Horse Trailers Made to Order 

2 Miles East of Colton on Hi-way 99 
Mail Address: Rt. 1, Box 505 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



J & H SPORT CLUB 



POCKET BILLIARDS 
AND SNOOKER 



Phone 1470-W 

151 East "J" Street 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



MINEO'S LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic 

LIQUORS, BEER, WINE 
AND TOBACCO 



Phone 1290 

1349 Mt. Vernon Ave. 
COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



OLE'S CAFE 

Best in Yorba Linda 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 



AIRPORT CAFE 

Celin? Duane, Prop. 

BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 

ALSO DELICIOUS FOOD 



YORBA LINDA (Orange County). CALIFORNIA 



VENTURE INN 

BREAKFAST -::- LUNCH -::- DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

5972 So. GRAND AVE. BUENA PARK, CALIF. 



LOS ALAMITOS 



CALIFORNIA 



YERMO FOOD MARKET 

Baker and Perillord 
Phone 3492 

YERMO. CALIFORNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



Phone 394 



R & S MOTOR SUPPLY 

Vance B. Rhudy and M. Orton Schafer. Jr. 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 
ACCESSORIES - SUPPLIES 



511 Main Street 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes From 

LA TAPATIA MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, Fresh Vegetables 
Beer Wine and Soft Drinks 



403 North Main Street 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL SPRINGBORG 

Meet Your Friends at The Chalet for a 
Sociable Cocktail 

Delicious Dinners at the Cafe 

Visit Glen Ivy Hot Springs 

. . . Temescal Canyon . . . 

Swimming . . . Horseback Riding 

119 East Sixth Street 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 



CLUB 99 

Where Good Friends Meet 

Our Specialty 

Chicken - Steaks and Fried Shrimp 

DELICIOUS COCKTAILS 
made of highest grade liquor 

On Highway 99 

Between COLTON and REDLANDS 



TERMINAL CAFE 

C. D. Odcers, Prop. 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 

and Short Orders 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

Open 24 Hours Daily 
266 W. I Street 



COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



! I. 



Eighth and J Streets 
COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



Flo's Coffee & Malt Shop 

Home Cooked Meals 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 
and Short Orders 

Also Complete Fountain Service 
1043 Mt. Vernon Avenue 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



Colton Coffee Shop | 

• 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 
and Short Orders 

• 

24 Hour Service 



Clyde and Nellie Bowien's 

MONTEREY CAFE 

Beer, Wine, Soft Drinks 
and Good Food 

We specialize in Delicious Chili 
Made by Us 

1300 Mt. Vernon Avenue 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 






BUENA PARK BAKERY 

Robert F. Ritten house 



Bread - Pies - Cakes - Pastries 



Phone Buena Park 5156 
819 So. Grand Avenue 

BUENA PARK, CALIFORNIA 



THOMAS STRINGHAM 

HAPPY HOURS CAFE 

Hospitality Supreme 

Home of Good Steaks, Beer, Wine 

and Soft Drinks of Quality 

Hours: 8 a. m. to 12 Midnight 

Manchester at Eighth Street 

BUENA PARK, CALIFORNIA 



EL GRINGO CAFE 

Pearl Webster and Richard Hanby, Props. 
We Specialize in 

SPANISH and AMERICAN FOOD 

We Still Sell the Highest Quality 

BEER, WINE and SOFT DRINKS 

Hours 8 a. m. to 2 a. m. 
234 North Grand Avenue 

BUENA PARK, CALIFORNIA 




Telephone 291] 



24-Hour Service 



SPIC & SPAN 

TRUCK SERVICE AND GARAGE 

9 Fuels 

9 Tire Repairs 

W Lubrication 

9 Truck Accessories 

Horse Trailers Made to Order 

2 Miles East of Colton on Hi-way 99 
Mail Address: Rt. 1, Box 505 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



J & H SPORT CLUB 



POCKET BILLIARDS 
AND SNOOKER 



Phone 1470-W 

151 East "J" Street 
COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



MINEO'S LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic 

LIQUORS, BEER, WINE 
AND TOBACCO 



Phone 1290 

1349 Mt. Vernon Ave. 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



OLE'S CAFE 

Best in Yorba Linda 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 



AIRPORT CAFE 

Celin^ Duane, Prop. 

BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 

ALSO DELICIOUS FOOD 



YORBA LINDA (Orange County). CALIFORNIA 



5972 


So. 


VENTURE INN 

BREAKFAST -::- LUNCH -::- DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

GRAND AVE. BUENA PARK. 


CALIF. 



LOS ALAMITOS 



CALIFORN'IA 



YERMO FOOD MARKET 

Baker and Perillord 

Phone 3492 

YERMO. CALIFORNIA 



Page 56 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 

All Law Enforcement Officials 

An Appeal bv Chief Earl Dier}{ing of Vallejo 



January, 1 948 



A very serious problem is facing agencies charged with 
the protection of Hfe and property. Commercial interests 
are attempting to encroach on the few radio frequencies 
assigned to the Emergency Services that embrace the 
Police, Fire and Forestr>' Services. 

The jurisdiction of Emergency Services as well as "non- 




Chief Earl Dierkino 

governmental" agencies is under the immediate super- 
vision of Federal Communications Commission. It has 
recently corrected many crippling restrictions imposed on 
the Emergency Services but the limitations of that body 
prevent it from giving any special considerations to the 
Emergency Services while they are classed as a "non- 
governmental" agency. 

Under the present conditions, Police, Fire and Forestry 
Services arc compelled to compete with taxicabs, truck 
and bus companies, railroads, mining concerns, etc. Just 
why the Emergency Services are classed with "non-gov- 
ernmental" agencies and constantly forced to compete with 
commercial interests in order to retain the few inade- 
quate frequencies allocated, is not clear nor considered in 
the best interests of our national government. 

One solution to correct the above mentioned situation 
would be to introduce legislation through the proper 
channels to have the Emergency Services removed from 
the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commis- 
sion and placed in the group known as the Interdepartment 
Radio Advisory Committee. This committee is a govern- 
mental group consisting of Army, Navy, Air Force, Na- 
tional Forestry, Federal Communications Commission and 
other organizations charged with the protection of life 
and property. 

I therefore strongly recommend that immediate and 
forceful action be taken to have the Emergency Services, 



including State, County and Municipal Police, Fire and 
Forestry Services, taken out of the category of "non- 
governmental" services, and as such under the jurisdiction 
of the Federal Communications Commission; and placed 
on the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee. 

Earl Dierking, 
Chief of Police. 



VICTORY LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

415 East Valley Blvd., Hy. 99 
BLOOMINGTO.N. CALIFORNIA 



BRUCE'S MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 
BEER WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



408 East Valley Blvd., Hy. 99 

BLOOMINCTON. CALIFORNIA 

MEADOR FURNITURE 

IN THE HEART OF STEEL INDUSTRY 

Exclusive Distributors for 

ZENITH. ADMIRAL. HOFFMAN and SPARTAN RADIOS 

ADMIRAL and COOLERATOR REFRIGERATORS 

SPEED QUEEN WASHERS 

BUDGET TERMS 

- 5 SOUTH SIERRA AVE Phone 646 FONTANA. CALIF. 



BOOTHES GROCERY 

Phones 316-390 
Fifth Avenue at Highway 66 

UPLAND. CALIFORNIA 



FRITZ & MARY'S 

Fred Allen, Prop. 

RECREATION PARLOR AND CAFE 

WE SERVE BEER 

167 N. Second Avenue 
UPLAND. CALIFORNIA 



FOOD SPOT 

FOX & REIM'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES, MEATS & VEGETABLES 
116 S. SIERRA AVE. FONTANA. CALIF. 

MEADE'S CAFE 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 
AND SHORT ORDERS 

Hours 7 A. M. to 7 P. M. 
130 No. SIERRA AVE. FONTANA. CALIF. 

CHINO RANCH MARKET 

GROCERIES. MEATS, VEGETABLES 
SOFT DRINKS AND POULTRY FEEDS 



1447 CENTRAL 



CHINO. CALIF. 



January. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



FONTANA JEWELERS 

For 

BULOVA, ELGIN, GRUEN 
HAMILTON WATCHES 

Exclusive Representatives for 

Registered Keepsake Diamond Rings j 

Telephone 5016 138 South Sierra 

FONTANA, CALIFORNIA 



JOE - JULIE 

-VAN'S- 

To Enjoy Western Hospitality 
COCKTAILS • FOOD 



i i SPUD'S CAFE 



Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 
and Cocktails 

• 

286 Valley Blvd., Highway 99 

BLOOMINGTON, CALIFORNIA 



HOME APPLIANCE 

MAYTAG, CROSLEY and THOR WASHERS, 
IRONERS, RADIOS. REFRIGERATORS 

Sales and Service 

Free Pick Up and Delivery 



l_ 



497 South Sierra at Merrill 
FONTANA, CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 617-192 



Res. Phone 62 3-1 ^"2 



A. E. JOHNSTON 
FURNITURE COMPANY 

OF ONTARIO 

New and Used 
Complete Home Furnishers 

Corner B and Laurel 

ONTARIO, CALIFORNL\ 



ONTARIO 
FURNITURE COMPANY 

GOLDMAN BROTHERS 

Complete Home Furnishers 

Phone Ontario 617-181 
109-111 S. Euclid Avenue 

ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 315236 
151 North Second Avenue 

UPLAND, CALIFORNL\ 



FOOTHILL MARKET 

L. Martinez, Prop 

* 

General Merchandise, Groceries 

Cigars, Tobacco, Soft Drinks, etc. 

• 

Phone UPLAND 316-172 

680 East Foothill 

UPLAND, CALIFORNIA 



BRACEWELL'S CAFE 

Good Home Cooking 

FRIED CHICKEN 

BEER AND WINE 



339 Third Street 

SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



ONTARIO PLUMBING 
COMPANY 



CONTRACTING AND 
GAS APPLIANCES 



228 N. Euclid Avenue 
ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 

Ontario 614-151 



r--' 



THE COCKATOO 

THE FINEST NITE CLUB 
IN CENTINELLA VALLEY 

DANCING 
NIGHTLY 




Phone OR. 7-3?69 
4334 W. IMPERIAL HIGHWAY 

INGLEWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



CHECKERBOARD CAFE 

Serving Delicious Food 
Breakfast - Lunch - Dinners 

Complete Short Orders 

QUICK SERVICE 

105 Main Street 

ELSINORE, CALIFORNIA 

On the Lake 

SOUTH EUCLID AUTO SERVICE 

OF ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 

GOLDEN EAGLE GAS 

COMPLETE SERVICE 

AUTO REPAIRING BY EXPERTS 

1431 South Euclid Avenue 

ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 

BROWN GROCERY 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 

AND SOFT DRINKS 

Always a Family Atmosphere 

1431 South Euclid Avenue 
ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 

KENNEY'S FOOD MARKET 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Phone 3492 

YERMO. CALIFORNIA 



ALBA GROCERY 

GROCERIES. MEATS. FRESH VEGETABLES 
BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



Dine at 

The Half Way House 

3 Miles West of Redlands 

STEAKS - HAM - DINNERS 

Popular Prices 

Sandwiches, Cold Beer and Good Coffee 

Plenty Parking Space 

TED A. SMITH, Owner 

Hours 8 A. M. to 2 A. M. 

Highway 99 at Mountain View 
Phone 9319 LOMA LINDA, CALIFORNIA 



W'm. Fi NtH, Prop. 



Phune 372 



SAM'S CAFE 

Only The Best Foods Served 

at Our Lunch Room 

QUALITY FOODS - CHILI AND BEANS 

153 West ! Street 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



LITTLE CHEF 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

188 West I Street 
COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



502 So. SULTAN 



ONTARIO, CALIF. 



BUD & BOB'S 

COLTON LIQUOR STORE 

Phone 900 
225 North Eighth Street 

COLTON, CALIFORNIA 



TREACY 8C WALT 

HAMBURGERS, CHILI AND 
BEST BEER IN TOWN 



301 WEST FOOTHILL BLVD 



FONTANA. CALIF. 



JOE AND JOE 

43 East J Street 
COLTON, CALIF. 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



SHERIFF HOGIN 

( Continued from Page 1 3 ) 

Jailors, Deputies William Cowan, Charles Ridgeway 
and O. M. Gastineau, George Matteson and Harsch 
Bayes; Investigator Charles Ahernathy, Civil Deputy 
Durvvood Simms and Special Deputy Charles Coffee. 

Of the feminine employees the following are noted, all 
appearing in the picture on the pages of this issue of the 
Police and Peace Officers" Journal uith the excep- 
tion of two: 

Mrs. Lorraine Smee in the criminal department; and 
Mrs. Elinor McArthur (not in picture) , Bertha Cessna 
(not in picture), in the civil department; Mrs. Margaret 
Gastineau, identification secretary, and Miss Edith Quinn 
in charge of the "wants'" in the Identification Bureau. 
The following were unable to get in the photograph: 
Matrons. Mrs. Nova Davis, who is a real old timer, 
having entered the service under former Sheriff George 
T. Davis in 1914; and Mrs. Lucy Outland. 

Deputy Jim Elliott, identification deputy, who took the 
picture. He is a recent appointee after doing a long hitch 
in the U. S. Army and has developed into a fine finger- 
print expert. 

Sheriff Hogin has resident deputies stationed around 
various districts of Stanislaus count)' — Lee Wharhurton 
at Salida; Ned Sullivan at Waterford; C. J. Crawford, 
formerly of the Stockton Sheriff's Office, at Wesley, and 
Riley Morse, Modesto District Airport. 

The Sheriff's office has a fine two-way radio broadcast- 
ing set-up. It is under the direction of Technician Ray 
Gada. who built it us from the early days when that form 
of communications was in the same category' as the auto- 
mobile some fifty years ago. "Just a fad," they said. 

Ray Gada is a young man who knows all there is to 
know of this method of communication and he occupies 
a high place among the members of the Northern Cali- 
fornia Police Communications Association of which he 
i; a charter member. He services all the Sheriff cars and 
police cars. 

Stanislaus is a county of some liOO square miles and 
like many of the others of the i^8 counties most of it is 
unincorporated and it is the duty of the Sheriff and his 
force of deputies to maintain the law. Sheriff Hogin has 
done this for 2 ^ years in a manner that has kept his native 
county free from any crime outbreaks. Such crimes that 
do occur are cleared up by arrests and convictions. 

Phone 2271 



CONRAD BODY SHOP 

RADIATOR, FENDER AND BODY WORK.S 
AUTOMOBILE REFINISHES - EXPERT WORKMANSHIP 



718 1 Ith STREET 



MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4 758 



A. B. TAYLOR 



GRANT PISTON RINGS - MOTOR PARTS - PISTON EXPANSION 

SERVICE - AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE WORK 
711 ELEVENTH STREET MODESTO, CALIF. 



THE CORNER STORE 

Emery L. Chapman, Proprietor 

FOUNTAIN - LUNCHES 

and SUNDRIES 

• 

GREYHOUND BUS DEPOT 

Telephone 374 
402 East Sixth Street 

BEAUMONT, CALIFORNIA 



BEAUMONT 

LIQUOR HOUSE 

• 

LIQUORS • WINES • BEER 

• 

163 East Sixth Street 

BEAUMONT. CALIFORNIA 



DESERT OUTPOST 

Route 70-99- Junction 60 Tel. Beaumont 214 

Mr. and Mrs. John Birch, Jr., Owners 

Motel - Restaurant 
Cocktail Lounge - '49 Museum 



P. O. Box 487 

BEAUMONT, CALIFORNIA 



Yon are 

Always Welcome 

at 

ONE-ONE-0 CAFE 



110 Santa Fe 

PLACENTIA. CALIFORNIA 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



YOU NEED 

BETTER WIRING 

for Today's 

ELECTRILIVING 

Maybe you still call your electric bill 
a light bill! But when you think 
about it that isn't so. This is the day 
of electriliving. Every hour of the 
day and night, electricity is at work in 
your home. The refrigerator and the 
clocks are always plugged in. Your 
washing machine, iron, mixer, vacuum 
cleaner, lamps, radios, heaters and 
small appliances all in turn put more 
electricity to work. Ordinary house 
wiring designed for lighting cannot 
deliver full electric power for these 
many electric servants in the home. 
Modern electriliving calls for Ade- 
quate wiring . . . and that means larger 
size wire (at least number 12), and 
plenty of circuits and switches to carry 
the working load. Insist on Adequate 
Wiring when you remodel or build a 
new home. 

See Your Electrical 
Contractor or 




PJ 101148 



MODESTO JUNK COMPANY 

Dealer in 

SCRAP IRON, METAL, SACKS, WOOL 

A:1 Types of GOVERNMENT SURPLUS for sale, including Pipe, 

Belting, Hardware, Anvils, Vises, Sleeping 

Bags, Hooks, Cable, etc. 



1425 NINTH STREET 



Phone 546 



MODESTO. CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3404 



TIOGA CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 
QUALITY BEERS - SOFT DRINKS 



1012 "H" STREET 



MODESTO. CALIFORNIA 



C. A. Tornell Edgar E. Tornell 

TORNELL CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Office and Plant 45 East S'x'h Street 
Phone 185 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 23 50 



RAY'S 
Laundry and Dry Cleaning 



18-20 MAPLE AVENUE 



WATSONVILLE. CALIF. 



SHOP AT 

HOLLEN'S GROCERY 

Howard and Bertha Ho!len 

Post Office — Greyhound Bus Depot 

COLD MEATS - GROCERIES - FROZEN FOODS 

DRUG SUNDRIES - BEER & WINE 



Phone B.C. 426 



BROOKDALE. CALIF. 



JOHNNIE'S CASH STORE 

J. B. Montanari 

ITALIAN AND DOMESTIC FANCY GOODS - GROCERIES 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND LIQUOR 



BOULDER CREEK 



CALIFORNIA 



PLAY AND RELAX ai . . . 

PLAYLAND 
at the BEACH 

Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks 

Home of Thrill - Provoking Rides . . . Unique Restaurants /^ 
Fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 

Owned and Operated by 

GEO. K. WHITNEY 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



"l 



F. A. BURNHAM 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



MURRIETA, CALIFORNIA 



APPLIANCES 



FIXTURES 



EISLEY and KRAFT 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Residential, Commercial and Power 

Phone Covina 532-24 
107 East Main Street 

PUENTE, CALIFORNIA 



Bill and Thelma Cafe 

American Legion and D. A. V. Members Welcome 

Brea's Finest 

Specializing in SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN 

and FRENCH FRIED SHRIMP 

We also Serve 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS and 

SHORT ORDERS - TABLE SERVICE 

Open 6:30 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

108 No. Pomona Avenue 
BREA, CALIFORNIA 



LEE'S CAFE 

On and Off Sale Liquors 

of the Best Quality 

Beer, Soft Drinks and Tobaccos 

GOOD FOOD 

Yermo (San Bernardino Co.), Calif. 



BEN'S LIQUOR STORE 

J. E. Kellison and Jim Cokley, Props. 
Imported and Domestic 

LIQUORS and WINES 

Also BEER, TOBACCOS, CANDIES 

and SOFT DRINKS 

170 Arbor Vitae Street 

INGLEWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



GLENN M. WHITMER 



ORchard 7-9738 



THE BIG CANDLE CAFE 

• 

FOOD BEER 
SOFT DRINKS 

• 

608 S. REDONDO BLVD. 
Inglewood, California 



Visit 

THE SUNSET CAFE 

For Good Food with Good Service 
GAS, OIL and WATER 

On the momitain between San Bernardino 
and Victorville on Highway 66 at 

PHELAN, CALIFORNIA 



RAYMOND E. BURNS 

GROCERY 

Meats, Groceries, Fresh Vegetables 
Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 

7361 Westminster Blvd. 

WESTMINSTER, CALIFORNIA 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

TULARE'S CHIEF KINDER 



January, 1948 



Chief Carlton S. Kinder was born in Springfield, 
Missouri, June 29th, 1910, and attended school in that 
city until his folks moved to Coalinga, California in 1917. 
After living there for a time the family moved to Tulare 
in 1922. The Chief continued his schoolmg in Tulare 



in March of this year and let it be pointed out that he 
needs these e.\tra men badly. 

The Department has two motorcycles and two patrol 
cars on duty at all times. The radio station call letters 
are WPDA and the station is hooked up with Sheriff 







•>«. 








Chief C. S. Kinder 



C.\PT. Leon Epps 



ScT. Ivor Stubbs 



and after graduating from high school entered the radio 
business, until he joined the police force in June, 1940, 
as a patrolman. Chief Kinder has held all ranks in the De- 
partment and was promoted to his present position April 
1, 1945. He was married to the former Alta Coffelt of 
Exeter, on March 17, 19.^2. The couple have three lovely 
girls named Louise, Marlene and Sharon. The oldest girl. 
Louise, will enter high school this year. 

At the present time there arc fifteen men on the De- 
partment, although the city budget calls for seventeen 
officers. The Chief will have his full complement of men 



Ben Guar's office of Tulare county and the Highway 
Patrol. The Patrol cars are equipped with two-way radio 
but the motorcycles have only receiving sets at this time. 

There is also a very efficient Juvenile Department organ- 
ized in 194? and headed by Captain Epps. 

Ten of the Chief's men have served with the U. S. 
armed forces such as Sgt. Ivar Stubbs who served in the 
Navy as a non-com and was an instructor at the San 
Diego Radar school from 1942 until his discharge in 1945. 

Chief Kinder has a wide variety of interests, among 
them aviation. He owns and pilots his own airplane. 




TULARE'S POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Back row, left to right; Officers Travis Montgomery, Bill Bailey. Alvcrn E. Woolman (motorcycle), Marvin Aldridge, Captain Leon 

Epps, Chief Kinder. Front row: Investigator Ro.s.<; Cochran, Sgt. Ivor Stubhs, Officers Ben Barnett, and R. L. Ray, Sgt. Karl Krell, 

Lt. Lcland J. Green. Officer Clyde West, Sgt. E. D. Honk. Officers J. B. Allen and Timothy Perkins. 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 



Page 63 



SHAFTER BILLIARDS 



COCKTAILS 

and 
GOOD FOOD 



SHAFTER (Kern County), CALIF. 



LA ECONOMIC GROCERY 

GROCERIES, MEATS, FRESH VEGETABLES 

BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 

TOBACCOS 

7th and E Street WASCO, CALIF. 



BERTHA'S PLACE 

SERVING REAL MEXICAN FOOD 
BEER. WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



749 SOUTH P STREET 



TULARE. CALIF. 



PILARS PLACE 

POOL A.ND CLUB ROOM 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 



762 SOUTH P STREET 



TULARE. CALIF. 



Phone 289 



MANUEL'S PLACE 

BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 
COOL SPOT 



714 FIRST STREET 



BENICI.A. CALIF. 



F R A Z I E R'S 

FURNITURE AND APPLIANCE STORE 

Zenith Radios, Hot Point and O'Keefe & Merritt Ranges 

Beautyrest Mattresses 



Telephone 586 



WASCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Tulare 365 

NIELSEN'S CREAMERY 

DAIRY PRODUCTS & ICE CREAM 

Milk - Cream - Buttermilk - In "One Trip Containers" 

WHOLESALE DELIVERY — All Refrigerated Trucks 



NIELSEN'S ICE CREAM 

"The Test is in The Taste" 

FOUNTAIN AND DRIVE-IN SERVICE 



147 SOUTH -M- STREET 



TULARE, CALIF. 



LLOYD'S 
COCKTAIL BAR 

FINE FOODS 

Phone 7181 

914 Seventh Street 

WASCO, CALIFORNIA 






GREETINGS 

To The 

STATE POLICE & PEACE 

OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

THE BRUNSWICK 

841 Seventh Street 
WASCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cecil and Mildred Berkley 
/'// Meet You at 



Phone 482 -J j 
I 



THE ROYAL 
GARDEN CAFE 

The Finest J^egro AJight Spot 
In the San Joaquin Vallev 

Featuring 

SOUTHERN STYLE FOODS 
Drinks — Air-Cooled Club Room 



734 South P Street 



TULARE, CALIF. 



WHITE FRONT CAFE 

BAR A.ND CLUB ROOM 

THE FINEST BETWEEN FRESNO 

AND BAKERSFIELD 



156 SOUTH J STREET 



TULARE. CALIF. 



A. Renteria, Prop. 



Phone 1398R 



AL'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 
BEER AND WINE 



SPUD CAFE 



701 SOUTH P STREET 



TULARE, CALIF. 



SHAFTER 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



SHERIFF LONG HAS BEST OF RADIO 

f Continued from Page 1 9) 

mission of four mobile channels on one repeater transmitter 
with the abihty to select any one channel. 

This idea is new in the police field, but has been used 
for some time by the military services and the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

A major problem caused by hilly terrain, particularly 
in the Richmond district, center of the county's popula- 
tion, was also overcome by means of the repeater system. 

Early operation of the station quickly disclosed a 
"shadow" area in the Richmond-San Pablo district, which 
prevented mobile units from reaching the Martinez home 
station through the Mt. Diablo repeater because of the 
intervention of the Berkeley Hills and El Sobrante Ridge. 

As a result, a repeater was placed on Nichol Knob in 
Richmond, which picks up mobile communications, repeats 
them to equipment on Tank Farm Hill on Highway 40 
near Pinole, where they are picked up and relayed by 
telephone line to Martinez. 

KQCE also has a standby station in cases of failure 
and a mobile emergency truck transmitter. The standby 
station, which is entirely independent of the parent sta- 
tion, has the call letters of KRBS, which uses either com- 
mercial or emergency power, the latter provided by a 
gasoline engine driven generator. The same power plant 
is equipped to supply emergency lights to the county jail. 

The mobile transmitter truck, only recently placed in 
operation, has a seven and one-half killowatt power 
plant and carries the call letters KNHL The truck, with 
a trailer carrying the power plant, is also equipped with 
flood lights and a public address system. 

The sheriffs office has complete shop facilities and lists 
on its technical staff Leon Pate and Carrol Messier. Pate, 
a member of the Naval Reserve, served communications 

KEllog 4-1825 

S. B. L. SPANGGORD & CO. 

Electric Concrete Mixer for Rent - Cement - Lime and Sand 

Garden Seed - Fertilizer - Feed and Fuel 

loot EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 

Phone 2009 Frank Chittenden, Prop. 

HOME CAFE AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

HOME OF GOOD FOOD AND DRINKS 

1725 N'.AIN STREET WALNUT CREEK. CALIF 



JAMES WALKER 

BRICK CONTRACTOR 



Telephone Richmond 314 
3001 Barrett Avenue 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



BENNY WAGNER 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Bartenders and Culinary 

Workers Union 

Local 822 



A.F.L. Labor Temple 

355 Cumberland Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



Duplex Percolator Co. 

SONOMA ROCK SPRING WATER 

A Full Line of Leading Brands 

Imported and Domestic Whiskeys 

Phone 408 
49 East Second Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



E. P. THILGEN 



] 

Phone 985 t 



THE REX CLUB 

sportsman's Center 

LUNCHES 
LIQUORS • WINES * BEER 

75 East Third Street j 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA } 



January. J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 67 



aboard the submarine Flying Fish, which operated in 
Japanese waters during the war. He is the owner of 
"ham" station W6JUN in Martinen, while Messier op- 
erate W6WJN. 

Other members of the operating staff are: Mrs. Helen 
Hobson of Concord, Steve Rossi of Pittsburg, and Walter 
Trawick, Jim French, Wilfred O'Neill and Monroe Stin- 
son of Martinez. 

The services of the station, in addition to regular police 
work, include city police, highway patrol and fire, weather 
reports during the fire season and ambulance service. 

The latter permits an ambulance driver to radio ahead 
for special hospital services a patient may need. This, in 
the opinion of the Concord Ambulance Service, has been 
responsible for saving several lives within recent months. 

Also on the KQCE beam is the county poundmaster, 
who has two-way equipment and receives frequent emer- 
gency calls. 

Earliest records on station traffic go only as far back 
as 1938. In December of that year the station handled a 
total of 2,241 calls. 

The daily average is now 550 calls per every 24 hours, 
with 33,337 transmissions being made during the months 
of last August and September. The station hit its peak 
in October of 1946 with more than 19,000 transmissions. 

The exact number is not known — the black line ran off 
the graph before reaching that number. 



CLUB OAKLAND 

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SPOT IN TOWN 

Formerly Shanghai Terrace Bowl 

Phone HI. 4-3767 - After 5 P. M. TW. 3-7794 



42 5 TENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



Phone GLencourt 1-0298 



WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 



STEAM CLEANl 
Motor - Chassis 
32 1 TENTH STREET 



N G 
OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 



Motor Fuels: 

Gasoline, Butane, Diesel 

Lubrication Service 



Tire Sales and Service 

Auto Supplies and 

Accessories 



Commercial Truck and Auto Service 



Phone HIgate 4-4214 
44 1 EAST EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



NORMAN'S— Cocktails 



171 TWELFTH STREET 



Norman Manha, Prop. 
Phone HIgate 4-9164 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 

RALPH W. SINRAY 

JEWELER - DIAMOND RINGS 

Manufacturing - Designing - Repairing - Remodeling 

TWinoaks 3-2979 

1428 ALICE STREET OAKLAND 12. CALIF. 

Furniture Repairing, Refinishing, Remodeling, Polishing, Upholstering 
Piano and Furniture Polishing. Estimates Cheerfully Submitted 

E. R. HATHERLY COMPANY 

HEAT-RESISTING FINISH FOR TABLE TOPS 

Telephone HIgate 4-5871 

120 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



KAY JEWELRY CO. 



1308 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND 



Phone 8317 



Chas. Silva, Jr 



ACE CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS 

Our Specialty Chicken and Steak Sandwiches 

CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS BY RESERVATION 

WILLOW PASS at GRANT ST. CONCORD, CALIF. 



M A C'S PLACE 

WINE - LIQUOR BEER 

SALVIO STREET CONCORD. CALIF. 

Phone 2281 

PAUL BRUNELLE— ConcorJ Electric Co. 

WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 

CONCORD CALIFOR NIA 

Phone Benicia 284 W 

STAR LAUNDRY 

FIRST CLASS WORK 



BENICIA 



CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE WOLFF 

CITY DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST 
Phone 34 BENICIA. CALIF. 

Phone 417 

THE LANTERN CAFE 

CHOP SUEY - FINEST CHINESE DISHES 
268 RAILROAD AVE. PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

Phone 1065 

HALF MOON CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 

207 BLACK DIAMOND STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

NATIONAL DOLLAR STORE 

HIGHEST IN QUALITY 

LOWEST IN PRICE 

329 RAILROAD AVE. PITTSBURG, CALIF. 



Pho 



1387 



BLUE BIRD CAFE 

SOFT DRINKS - BEER - WINE - MEXICAN DISHES 
Maria Hernandez 

46 E. SECOND STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 



M. Vasques - Pete Vasques, Props. 



Phone Pittsburg 983 



EL GALLO CAFE 

SPECIALIZING IN MEXICAN FOOD 
BEER AND WINE 

52 E. SECOND STREET PITTSBURG, CALIF. 

GOLDEN GATE CLUB 

FINE LIQUORS, WINES AND BEERS 

COURTEOUS SERVICE 

51 E. THIRD STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

CLUB SHANGRI-LA 

PITTSBURG'S FINEST NIGHT CLUB 

DANCING EVERY NIGHT 

STEAKS AND CHICKEN SOUTHERN FRIED 

PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 

Stationery - Greeting Cards - Gifts - Toys - Novelties 

CALIFORNIA VARIETY STORE 

Phone SWeetwood 8-177S 
155 7 EAST 14th STREET SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 



Tony Correa 



Phone Hayward 3468 



OUR PLACE 

FINE WINES - BEER - POOL 
16401 EAST 14th ST., Ashland District. SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 



S. Ha 



HANZEL AUTO BODY WORKS 



Res. Phone HIgate 4-6089 ^arl H. Pence 



TRinidad 2-4474 



Telephone GLencourt 1-1889 

Tops - Pa'nting - Towing - Radiators - Fenders 

A COMPLETE COLL'S'ON SERVICE 

456 23rd Street, bet. Broadway and Telegraph OAKLAND 



EARL H. PENCE AND CO. 

GARDEN TRACTORS SALES AND SERVICE 

2 150 WASHINGTON A\E. SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



SHERIFF LONG HAS BEST OF RADIO 

{ Continued from Page 19 1 
mission of four mobile channels on one repeater transmitter 
with the ability to select any one channel. 

This idea is new in the police field, but has been used 
for some time by the military services and the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

A major problem caused by hilly terrain, particularly 
in the Richmond district, center of the county's popula- 
tion, was also overcome by means of the repeater system. 

Early operation of the station quickly disclosed a 
"shadow" area in the Richmond-San Pablo district, which 
prevented mobile units from reaching the Martinez home 
station through the Mt. Diablo repeater because of the 
intervention of the Berkeley Hills and El Sobrante Ridge. 

As a result, a repeater was placed on Nichol Knob in 
Richmond, which picks up mobile communications, repeats 
them to equipment on Tank Farm Hill on Highway 40 
near Pinole, where they are picked up and relayed by 
telephone line to Martinez. 

KQCE also has a standby station in cases of failure 
and a mobile emergency truck transmitter. The standby 
station, which is entirely independent of the parent sta- 
tion, has the call letters of KRBS, which uses either com- 
mercial or emergency power, the latter provided by a 
gasoline engine driven generator. The same power plant 
is equipped to supply emergency lights to the county jail. 

The mobile transmitter truck, only recently placed in 
operation, has a seven and one-half killowatt power 
plant and carries the call letters KNHI. The truck, with 
a trailer carrying the power plant, is also equipped with 
flood lights and a public address system. 

The sheriff's office has complete shop facilities and lists 
on its technical staff Leon Pate and Carrol Messier. Pate, 
a member of the Naval Reserve, served communications 

KEIIoK 4.1823 

S. B. L. SPANGGORD & CO. 

Electric Concrete Mixer for Rent - Cement - Lime and Sand 
Garden Seed - Fertilizer - Feed and Fuel 

I90I EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Phone 2009 



Frank Chittenden, Prop. 



HOME CAFE AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

HOME OF GOOD FOOD AND DRINKS 

1725 MAIN STREET WALNUT CREEK. CALIF 



JAMES WALKER 

BRICK CONTRACTOR 



Telephone Richmond 314 
3001 Barrett Avenue 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



BENNY WAGNER 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Bartenders and Culinary 

Workers Union 

Local 822 



A.F.L. Labor Temple 

355 Cumberland Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



Duplex Percolator Co. 

SONOMA ROCK SPRING WATER 

A Full Line of Leading Brands 

Imported and Domestic Whiskeys 

Phone 408 
49 East Second Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



E. P. THILGEN 



Phone 985 • 



THE REX CLUB 

sportsman's Center 

LUNCHES 
LIQUORS • WINES * BEER 

75 East Third Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



....—4 



J 



January, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



aboard the submarine Flying Fish, which operated in 
Japanese waters during the war. He is the owner of 
"ham" station W6JUN in Martinez, while Messier op- 
erate W6WJN. 

Other members of the operating staff are: Mrs. Helen 
Hobson of Concord, Steve Rossi of Pittsburg, and Walter 
Trawick, Jim French, Wilfred O'Neill and Monroe Stin- 
son of Martinez. 

The services of the station, in addition to regular police 
work, include city police, highway patrol and fire, weather 
reports during the fire season and ambulance service. 

The latter permits an ambulance driver to radio ahead 
for special hospital services a patient may need. This, in 
the opinion of the Concord Ambulance Service, has been 
responsible for saving several lives within recent months. 

Also on the KQCE beam is the county poundmaster, 
who has two-way equipment and receives frequent emer- 
gency calls. 

Earliest records on station traffic go only as far back 
as 19J8. In December of that year the station handled a 
total of 2,241 calls. 

The daily average is now 5 50 calls per every 24 hours, 
with 33,337 transmissions being made during the months 
of last August and September. The station hit its peak 
in October of 1946 with more than 19,000 transmissions. 

The exact number is not known — the black line ran off 
the graph before reaching that number. 



CLUB OAKLAND 

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SPOT IN TOWN 

Formerly Shanghai Terrace Bowl 

Phone HI. 4-3767 - After 5 P. M. TW. 3-7794 



425 TENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



Phone GLencourt 1.0298 



WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 



STEAM clean: 
Motor - Chassis 
321 TENTH STREET 



N G 
OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



Motor Fuels: 

Gasoline. Butane, Diesel 

Lubrication Service 



Tire Sates and Service 

Auto Supplies and 

Accessories 



Commercial Truck and Auto Service 



Phone Hlgate 4-4214 
441 EAST EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



NORMAlSi'S— Cocktails 



279 TWELFTH STREET 



Norman Manha, Prop. 
Phone HIgate 4-9164 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 

RALPH W. SINRAY 

JEWELER - DIAMOND RINGS 

Manufacturing - Designing - Repairing - Remodeling 

TWinoaks 3-2979 

1428 ALICE STREET OAKLAND 12. CALIF. 

Furniture Repairing, Refinishing, Remodeling, Polishing, Upholstering 
Piano and Furniture Polishing. Estimates Cheerfully Submitted 

E. R. HATHERLY COMPANY 

HEAT-RESISTING FINISH FOR TABLE TOPS 

Telephone HIgate 4-5871 

120 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



KAY JEWELRY CO. 



1308 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND 



S. Hanzel Res. Phone HIgate 4-6089 

HANZEL AUTO BODY WORKS 

Telephone GLencourt 1-1889 

Tops - Painting - Towing - Radiators - Fenders 

A COMPLETE COLLISION SERVICE 

456 2 3rd Street, bet. Broadway and Telegraph OAKLAND 



Phone 8317 



ACE CLUB 



Chas. Sllva, Jr. 



MIXED DRINKS 

Our Specialty Chicken and Steak Sandwiches 

CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS BY RESERVATION 

WILLOW PASS at GRANT ST. CONCORD. CALIF. 



MAC'S PLACE 

WINE - LIQUOR BEER 

SALVIO STREET CONCORD. CALIf. 

Phone 2281 

PAUL BRUNELLE— Co«corJ Electric Co. 

WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 
CONCORD CALIFORNIA 

Phone Benicia 284 W 



BENICIA 



STAR LAUNDRY 

FIRST CLASS WORK 



CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE WOLFF 

CITY DRUG STORE 

FRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST 
Phone 34 BENICIA. CALIF. 

Phone 4 I 7 

THE LANTERN CAFE 

CHOP SUEY - FINEST CHINESE DISHES 

268 RAILROAD AVE. PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

Phone 1065 

HALF MOON CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 



207 BLACK DIAMOND STREET 



PITTSBURG. CALIF. 



NATIONAL DOLLAR STORE 

HIGHEST IN QUALITY 

LOWEST IN PRICE 

329 RAILROAD AVE. PITTSBURG. CALIF. 



Pho 



1387 



BLUE BIRD CAFE 



SOFT DRINKS - BEER - WINE - MEXICAN DISHES 
Maria Hernandez 

46 E. SECOND STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 



M. Vasques - Pete Vasques, Props. 



Phone Pittsburg 983 



EL GALLO CAFE 

SPECIALIZING IN MEXICAN FOOD 
BEER AND WINE 

52 E. SECOND STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

GOLDEN GATE CLUB 

FINE LIQUORS, WINES AND BEERS 
COURTEOUS SERVICE 

5 1 E. THIRD STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

CLUB SHANGRI-LA 

PITTSBURG'S FINEST NIGHT CLUB 

DANCING EVERY NIGHT 

STEAKS AND CHICKEN SOUTHERN FRIED 

PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 

Stationery - Greeting Cards - Gifts - Toys - Novelties 

CALIFORNIA VARIETY STORE 

Phone SWectwood 8-1775 

1357 EAST 14th STREET SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 



Tony Correa 



Phone Hayward 3468 



OUR PLACE 

FINE WINES - BEER - POOL 

16401 EAST 14th ST.. Ashland District. SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 



Earl H. Pe 



TRinidad 2-4474 



EARL H. PENCE AND CO. 

GARDEN TRACTORS SALES AND SERVICE 

2150 WASHINGTON AVE. SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1948 



AUGUST VOLMER 

(Continued from Page 16) 
"Billy Woods was our friend. We figured that if a 
copper was that good, we ought to be policemen. We 
did — all five of us — in later years." 

Vollmer's Story 

But this story concerns only Gus Vollmer, called by 
many eminent police officials, by countless police officers, 
by high educational authorities "the real daddy of our 
police administration set up, of being first to recognize 
the signal light for policemen covering the beat, of a 
mobile police force, of radio's swiftness in meeting police 
needs." 

But perhaps the greatest contribution Gus Vollmer 
has made to poHce departments everywhere is the recogni- 
tion of police work as a profession, the need of educated 
men — college men — scientifically trained men in analysing 
crime, in tracking down criminals, in bringing them to 
full and complete justice. 

Vollmer first appeared in Berkeley as a mailman. Early 
in the 1900"s he was elected town marshal. He com- 
manded a force of six men, three on the night shift, three 
at work during the daylight hours. Foot soldiers these 
with a sprawling, yet rapidly growing community to 
police and protect ."^0,000 citizens. 

Introduces Signal Lights, Bicycles 

One of the first forward steps taken by Vollmer after 
a struggle with the city fathers, loath to spend ta.xpayers" 
dollars for an innovation suggested by the Police Chief, 
was the installation of signal lights located throughout 
the city where the patrolman on the beat could see the 
red light flashing, meaning there "was trouble on his 
heat and to get to the police box quickly and check in." 
That system is now universal. 



WE DELIVER 



Phone THornwall 3-0633 



Lucky Dog Pet Shop and Poultry Feeds 

LARRO, ALBERS, TAYLORS, CALIF. & GLOBE 
INSECTICIDES, GARDEN, POULTRY & PETS SUPPLY 

2 154 SAN PABLO AVE BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 

Ray T. Heine, Prop. Phone BErUeley 7-S8I7 

BERKELEY MATTRESS CO. 

Home of the Famous 

RAY REST INNER SPRING MATTRESS 

RAY REST BOX SPRINGS 

3 167 ADELINE STREET SOUTH BERKELEY 



TRIANGLE PAINT CO. 

Manufacturers of 

PAINTS - VARNISHES 
ENAMELS 



2222 Third Etreet 

Berkeley, California 
Phone BErkeley 7-6931 



NEILSON BROS., Inc. 

• 

METAL STAMPING 
• 

773 University Avenue 

BERKELEY 2, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone BErkeley 7-2336 



FRANK SPENGER CO. 

RESTAURANT and SEA FOOD MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

CRABS - SHRIMPS - FISH 

1919 Fourth Street near University Avenue 

Berkeley, California 
Day Phone: BErkeley 7-7745 



.„»,.■* 



ARMCO DRAINAGE & 
METAL PRODUCTS, Inc. 

CALCO DIVISION 

Seventh and Parker Streets 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

HINDS BOAT SUPPLY 

(To Serve the Boat Owner) 

Fastenings - Hardware 

Rope - Woolsey and Z Spar 

Paints - Chrysler Engines 

Scott Atwater Outboard Motors 

Batteries 

BErkeley 7-1969 

801 University Ave., Berkeley Calif. 




January, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



And Vollmer figuring that a foot patrolman at best 
could only cover three miles an hour, in a few more years 
had his force mounted on bicycles, where 10-miles an 
hour was an easy trek on the more level streets. 

Then Came the Motorcycle Cops 

It was lean, now white-haired, rangy, quiet-spoken 
Chief Vollmer who saw the greater possibilities of the 
slowly developing police force on motorcycles which had 
just begun to appear. Berkeley was the first to adopt 
this mounted, fastest moving police force in the nation. 

Then came the motor car which permitted two men 
to ride in a speeding vehicle in place of one. That, too, 
was a Vollmer innovation in police work. 

Came the Radio 

It was under Chief Vollmer that the first radio- 
equipped motor car in the nation was put in operation. 
Radio appeared to Vollmer to be overtaking the telephone 
and fast. This was the one-way radio where the patrol- 
man could call the station and report any crime that called 
for reinforcements and where, or give other information 
quickly to the Chief. The two-way radio followed with 
which all modern police departments are now equipped. 

Educated "Cops" 

And during all these years Chief Vollmer was bringing 
into the Berkeley police department graduates of the Uni- 
versity of California, students keenly interested in crim- 
inology, the causes of crime, the causes of delinquency 
in children, and the detection of the criminal. He called 
upon the University of California to keep him informed 



N. B. LESHER & SON 

40 Years Experience 

BRICK AND STONE 
CONTRACTORS 



FLAGSTONE 
CUT STONE 

WALLS 
BARBECUES 



741 Delaware Street 
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

LAndscape 6-0418 



A. G. COELHO 
Lathing Contractor 

METAL FURRING 

Estimates Given 



Phone: THornwall 3-9595 

755 Folger Avenue 

BERKELEY 2, CALIFORNIA 



ROLLAWAY 

WINDOW SCREENS 

The Perfect Screen for 
Every Type of Window 

Keeps Insects Out 

Keeps Curtains In 

Rolls out of sight when 
window is closed 



RUDIGER-LANG CO. 

Eighth and Carlton Streets 
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone TH. 3-0340 
Successors to Rollaway Window Screen Co. 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1 948 



of scientific facts needed in police work. He found time 
to do a great deal of studying himself. It was this study, 
this recognition of the worth of the educated, profession- 
ally-trained police officer that found him in later years 
as professor of criminology and police administration at 
the University of California and at the University of 
Chicago. 

More than 18 years ago, VoUmer said: 

"The scientific approach to criminal investigation is 
here to stay. We confidently look forward to the rapid 
development of scientific investigation in all Police De- 
partment of the large cities." 

Today we are only at the beginning of the professional, 
scientific approach to crime and criminals. 

Develops "Lie Detector" 

The polygraph, better known as "the lie detector" was 
first given impetus toward its present place in criminal 
investigation by Gus Vollmer. Two retired Berkeley police 
ofiicers under Vollmer were the earliest experimenters 
with the polygraph under Chief Vollmer and University 
of California scientists. They were: John Larson, now 
superintendent of the Arizona State Hospital and Jack 
(correct) Fisher. 

This device makes a graphic chart of reactions and 
emotions of those under questioning and has been used 
in hundreds of cases to convict a suspect. 

John and Jack Caught in "Lies" 

Chief Vollmer chuckles when he tells how the young 
Berkeley police officers were nailed on their own poinard 



E. C. BRAUN CO. 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

AIR CONDITIONING 

INDUSTRIAL PIPING 



2115 Fourth Street 
BERKELEY 2, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone BErkeley 7-12356 



L 

r- 



WOLF 

CREEK 

TIMBER 

COMPANY 



American Trust Building 



BERKELEY 



AVENUE AUTO 
WRECKING CO. 



3120 San Pablo Avenue 
OAKLAND 



.4 

-t 



FOX TILE COMPANY 



3247 East 14th Street 

ANdover 1-0431 

OAKLAND 



January, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 71 



— the polygraph. 

One night VoHmer, checking on his men discovered 
John Larson "off his beat," enjoying as Vollmer says: 
"One of Barney's finest hotdog sandwiches." 

And then around Christmas time Jack Fisher had im- 
bibed too freely of the cup that cheers and had been 
"tipped off" by his sergeant that he'd better go home. 

Came the day a revised and revamped polygraph was 
to be tested in solving a series of burglaries in a univer- 
sity student home for girls. 

Chief Vollmer suggested that before the actual tests 
of the girls were made that Larson and Fisher sit down 
for a bit of questioning. The Chief took over after the 
blood-pressure belt had been attached and other appurten- 
ances properly set. After a few innocuous questions the 
Chief popped to Larson : 

"Were you off your beat on such and such a date." 

A moment's hesitation then John answered : "No" but 
'the "lie detector" caught the fib. 

Came Jack Fisher's turn. 



Telephone: Shop - BErkeley /-UPJ: Res. - BErkeley 7-2261 



KOWAL MANUFACTURING CO. 

TOOLS, DIES, SPECIAL MACHINERY 



24 14 SIXTH STREET 



BERKELEY, CALIF. 



IRWIN PAINT COMPANY 

Makers of 
QUALITY PAINT 



BErkeley 7-3440 
FOURTH & ADDISON STREETS 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



American Bag and Union Hide Co. 

BAGS - BURLAP - ROPE - TWINE 
HIDES - WOOL - SALT - LIME 

Telephone GLencourt I-I28S 

THIRD AND HARRISON STREETS 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



V. Etchegorry 



Phone BErkeley 7-0300 



SUENDERMANN CO. 

PLUMBERS SUPPLIES 
Since 1902 



Shop Fhone BErkeley 7-7744 



92 1 UNIVERSITY AVE. 



BERKELEY 2, CALIF. 



BERKELEY FRENCH LAUNDRY 

STRICTLY HIGH GRADE WORK 

2576-2578 SHATTUCK AVENUE 
BERKELE-l'. CALIFORNIA 



FOLGER LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER - MILLWORK 

BErkeley 7-7S43 
940 FOLGER AVENUE BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 

DEPENDABLE WELDING SERVICE 

Specialized Welding of 
ALLOY STEELS - FERROUS AND NON-FERROUS ALLOYS 



BERKELEY SHEET METAL WORKS 

SHEET METAL JOBBING 

AND 

MANUFACTURING 

Phone THornwall 3-1852 

3045 HOLLIS STREET. Between 67th & Folger Streets 
BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



HUMMEL FURNITURE MFG. CO. 



LAndscape 6-2171 Phone TH. 3-2992 

1439 FIFTH STREET BERKELEY 2, CALIF, SEVENTH and CARLTON STREETS BERKELEY 2, CALIF. 



GEORGE E. SLEEPER CO. 

Manufacturers 
RIEPLING UNIVERSAL FIRE HOSE NOZZLE 



BERKELEY AUTO EXPRESS 
& DRAYAGE CO. 



2608 NINTH STREET 



BErkeley 7-6513 

BARKELEY 2. CALIFORNIA 



Phone BErk_.|ey 7-8623 



Phone BErkeley 7-5497 



1909 SEVENTH STREET 



BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 



SCHILT'S NURSERY 

Grower and Distributor of 
BEDDING AND DECORATIVE PLANTS 
TUBEROUS BEGONIAS A SPECIALTY 

Closed Saturdays 



DWIGHT WAY and NINTH STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



THornwall 3-6024 



R. C. Kimball 



HYGENIC DOG FOOD COMPANY 



1000 MURRAY STREET 



BERKELEY, CALIF, 



LE STRANGE'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



BErkeley 794 I 4 
1084 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Phone LA. 5-6202 



A. Simont, Prop. 



BERKELEY POULTRY MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail Poultry 

FRESH RANCH EGGS - LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

14 11 SAN PABLO AVE. BERKELEY, CALIF. 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]anMui.ry, 1948 



"Ever drink while on the beat?" queried Vollmer. "No, 
never, said Jack, but again the polygraph registered the 
untruth. Chief Vollmer then explained how he knew even 
before the machine spoke. He had given the tip to the 
sergeant about Jack's imbibing and had seen Larson munch- 
ing the hotdog. 

Vollmer, Police Administration Expert 

Chief Vollmer long ago gained world-wide fame for 
his knowledge of proper police administration. He has 
reorganized police departments in several large cities. He 
was recently asked to go to China to reorganize police 
departments in the Republic's greatest cities. 

Many present-day leaders in police work received their 
training under Vollmer. Among them Eliot Ness, director 
of public safety in Cleveland; Chief O. W. Wilson of 
Wichita; Leonarde Keeler of Northwestern University 
who has carried on in developing the "lie detector"; Dr. 
John B. Dalton, St. Paul, Minnesota, famed criminologist. 

Chief Vollmer is also widely known for his under- 
standing of the delinquency problem and his encourage- 
ment to develop specially trained men and women to 
handle this problem. 

And so, the policeman, who never finished high school 
but who became a university professor, still maintains 
that "Police work is a profession" and has proven it. 

Phone LAndscape 5-3523 

Our Specialty Cabinets 

H. AND H. BUILDING SUPPLIES 



1325 SAN PABLO AVE. 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



NU BOX LUNCH CO. 



549 ADELINE STREET 



OAKLAND 



David G. Robbins TWinoaks 3-6955 

ROBBINS METAL CO. 

METALS. STRUCTURAL SHAPES 

MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

701 THIRD STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Season's Greetings 
NORTHRUP KING & CO. 



Eighth and Parker Streets 



BERKELEY 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone: THomwall 3-5975 



J. W. HARVEY 

Distributor 
WATKINS PRODUCTS 



2447 SAN PABLO AVE. 



BERKELEY. CALIF 



TE. 4-8477 



CASH FOR CARS 



SANTONl & CHASE. Formerly 



BALLARD AUTO PARTS 

STARTER & GENERATOR EXCHANGE 

NEW AND USED PARTS 

GLASS INSTALLED 

823 EAST TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA 



FOSTER'S CLUB 



and 



Liquor Mart 



Wm. Foster 



RIO VISTA, CALIFORNIA 



THE REPUBLIC 

SUPPLY COMPANY 

of California 



Piedmont 5-7320 

1401 Park Avenue 

EMERYVILLE 8, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



NEWSOM & BECHTEL 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



Vhone Olympic 2-5572 

5760 Shellmound Street 

EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



SELMA 



SACRAMENTO 



REDDING 



RANSOME COMPANY 

CONSTRUCTION and PAVING 
DRAINAGE and SEWERS 

Distributors of 
BU. GAS and PRO. GAS 

Manufacturers of 

FOSTER BURNERS and TORCHES 



Phone Olympic 2-3600 

4030 Hollis Street 

EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



JUDSON 

PACIFIC-MURPHY 

CORPORATION 



EMERYVILLE, 
CALIFORNIA 






Season's Greetings 

CONTAINER 

CORPORATION 

of 

AMERICA 

California Division 



EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, J 948 



PACIFIC COAST 
DISTRIBUTORS 

JOHN J. O'CONNOR 
PAUL CLEN, JR. 



VULCAN STEEL 
FOUNDRY CO. 

2934 Ford Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



VICTORY JEWELRY CO. 

WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 

if • i! 

Phone: TWitwaks 3-0749 
469 Tenth Street 

OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN IRON AND 
BODY WORKS 

STEEL TANK TRUCK BODIES 
INDUSTRIAL STEEL PRODUCTS 

Phone HUntboldt 3-7830 ■ 3-78}l 
1165 Sixty-Seventh Street 

OAKLAND 8, CALIFORNIA 



PATTERSON BROTHERS 

PAINTING • DECORATING 

Commercial Spraying and 
Sand Blasting 

Telephone HUmboldt 3-2460 
1130 Sixty-Seventh Street 

OAKLAND 8, CALIFORNIA 



HERMAN GOELITZ 

Manufacturing Confectioner 

CANDY CORN AND 
SPECIALTIES 



943 Sixty-First Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Tel. OLynipic 2-2168 



Pink & Clark Auto System 

Complete Automobile Reconditioning 

Engines Rebuilt 
Auto Parts and Service 
Paint and Metal Work 

Seat Covers 
Washing and Polishing 

Olympic 2-1539 
856 Sixtieth Street 

OAKLAND 8, CALIFORNIA 



PAPERBOX 
CORPORATION 

SET-UP BAXES 
FOLDING BOXES 

63rd and Lowell Streets 

OAKLAND 8 ,CALIFORNIA 

Telephones: OLympic 2-6655 - ENterprise 10955 



January, 1948 



X^LICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page. 75 



Fredrickson 

& 

Watson 

• 

Oakland, Calif. 



YERINGTON 
PACKERS 



TE. 3-0872 
563 Fifth Street 

OAKLAND 



PHOENIX IRON WORKS 



CLARIDGE HOTEL 

A PERMANENT HOME 

MONTHLY RATES ONLY 



N. Weisgerber 634 15th Street 

Assistant Manager OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Res. Phone, KE. 4-1627 TEmplebar 2-8213 



I I 



t 
t 
t 
I 



I 



Second and Castro Streets 

OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 

Templebar 2-6390 



Cannery Warehousemen, 

Food Processors, Drivers 

and Helpers Local 750 

A. F. of L. 



1 



OAKLAND 



NEW OAKS HOTEL 

K. Rhoads, Managmg Owner 

100 ROOMS 
BATHS 8C SHOWERS 

15th -Clay & Jefferson 

Oakland, California 

Telephone TEmplebar 2-0792 



SIMPLEX MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers and Distributors 

Commercial Refrigeration Equipment 



1135 Third Strret, 7 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

TWinoaks 3-0557 



OLD PERK RESTAURANT 

"In the Heart of Fruitvale" 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



1416 Fruitvale Avenue 
KEllog 2-9409 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1 948 



NO. CAL. PEACE OFFICERS MEET 

The last meeting of 1947 of the Northern CaHfornia 
Peace Officers' Association was held in Chico at noon 
on December 1 1 . The luncheon was ser\'ed in Memorial 
Hall and some 125 peace officers of the upper Sacramento 
Valley were present. 

Chief Anson Crutcher of the State Capitol Police, 
presided. Chief of Police James R. Evans appointed last 
July to head the Chico Police Department was the host 
of the meeting. Chief Evans is a graduate of the F. B. I. 
Police Academy at Washington, D. C. 

He presented Mayor E. R. Bevms, City Manager H. H. 
Hume, Supervisors Scott Lawton, Fred S. Byerly, Frank 
L. Patty and John N. Billie, Fire Chief Charles E. Tovee, 
who until last July had served Chico as Chief of Police 
for over 25 years. 

Other prominent law enforcement officials introduced 
were Warden Robert A. Heinzc, of Folsom State Prison; 
Shentf W. H. (Herb) Forward, of Butte County; Chief 
James B. Hicks and Chief of Detectives Joseph Rooney 
of Sacramento and several other Northern California law 
enforcement officers were present. 

The regular business being transacted the hosts and 
guests listened to an address by Assistant Chief Special 
Agent H. C. Van Pelt of the San Francisco F. B. I. office. 
His address appears on another page of this issue of the 

JOURN.^-L. 




QUONG 
TAI 

SHRIMP 
COMPANY 

Wholesale and Retail 
Since 1919 

438 Harrison St. 

OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone TEmplebar 2-2360 



iusfsoy... 'GOUGH AT MARKET" 

and you're there 

Shop the easy way. Streetcars J. K. L. M, N. 6, 7 and 17 stop 

in front of our door. 

Get a fine FIcecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur* 

ing store. Airflex. experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 

you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 

If you drive we have a large free parking lot adjoining our store. 

Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 

United States. 

AIRFLEX 



K 



DWARD McROSKIY 

l«a7 MARKKT STREET ■ 
Oppecit* Oeush Str*«t 



MATTRESS CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Fr*« Parltlnc 



F. A. B. 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 

Incorporated 



General Office and Factories 

1249 67th Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Compliment 

of a 

Friend 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Triumph Venetian Blinds 

Made In Our Own Modern Oakland Factory 

FASTEST SERVICE 



Check these PLUS features: 

1^ INSTALLED WITHIN FIVE DAYS 

• PERFECT TAILORED FIT 

• FLEXTEEL BAKED ENAMEL SLATS 

• UP TO THREE YEARS TO PAY 

A phone call will bring a trained X^enettan specialist 
to your home ivho will offer helpful suggestions on 
your requirements and give an estimate. 

Phone Today GL 1-3123 

"A TRIUMPH blind 
is the best you'll find" 

TRIUMPH MFG. CO. 

OF OAKLAND 

208 Madison Street 



THE SHERRAT CO. 

GENERAL 
CONSTRUCTION 

BRICK 

STEEL 

CONCRETE 

FRAME 

1231 Thirteenth Avenue 
OAKLAND 5, CALIFORNIA 

Residence: LAkehurst 2-2988 
KEllog 3-0282 



BELFAST 
BEVERAGE CO. 



PEPSI-COLA 

BOTTLING COMPANY 

OF OAKLAND 

3521 Chestnut Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



T. W. BANFORD CO. 

Builders' Hardware Specialists 

Distributors of 

LOCKWOOD HARDWARE 



209 Twelfth Street 
OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 

Telephones 
Office TWinoaks 3-5 377 
Res. THornwall 3-9335 



Sec 


. 562. P. 


L i R. 1 


U 


S. POSTAGE 1 




PA 1 


D 


San 


Francisco. Calif. | 




Perrr-H 3 


172 



Rstum Postage Guaranteed 



Laura Murphy Araiia and 
E. D. and J. L. Blankcnship. DBA 

SHAMROCK CAFE 

a ti d 

MURPHY BROS. 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 

DE LUXE COTTAGES 

HOTEL AND CAFE 

HERCULES POWDER 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



U. S. Highway 66 
LUDLOW, CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes From 



I GREEN SPOT CAFE 

Good Food - Beer 
and Soft Drinks 



BROADWAY 

Westmoreland, California 



270 Claramonf Blvd 
5«n Franciseo, C«l 



SYNTHETIC 
BAKED ENAMEL 
I TRAFFIC 





m anuFacturinsYlo. 



812 61st Street 
Oakland 8, Calif. 



Quality Signs In Quantity 



~t *•- 



DEL LINGO HOTEL 

MODERN ROOMS 

With and Without Baths 
Daily and Weekly Rates 

Visit Our 

Cocktail Lounge Cafe 
and Club Room 

For the Best in 

FOOD, DRINKS and 
HOSPITALITY 

Calipatria, Imperial County, Calif. I 



AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 



CONCERT- SHOW -GRAND BALL 

OF THE 

WIDOWS AND ORPHANS AID ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

APRIL 17th AT CIVIC AUDITORIUM 



Program of outstanding acts from stage, radio and movies 

followed by the traditional Grand March led 

by Governor and Mrs. Earl Warren and 

Mayor and Mrs. Elmer E. Robinson 

A BIG EVENING'S ENTERTAINMENT FOR $1.00 

GET YOUR TICKETS FROM THE POLICEMAN ON YOUR BEAT 



Ihe A%%oc\a\\on paid out over 5125,000 to Widows and 
Orphans of 42 members who passed away during 1947. 



MARCH 



1941 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATIOf 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 







SAN LORENZO 




LUMBER CO. 




LUMBER -MILLWORK 




and 




BUILDING SUPPLIES 




• 




Phone 246 




474 Soquel Avenue 




Santa Cruz, California 









LAUREL PLUMBING 



LUIGI CiMARELLI 

Phone 1169 



ESTIMATES GIVEN 



I 



9 Laurel Street 
Santa Cruz, California 



HEBBRON-NIGH 
LUMBER CO. 




491 Pacific Avenue 

Telephone 25 

Santa Cruz, California 



CAROTHERS 

AND SONS 

SHEET METAL 
HEATING - PLUMBING 




Telephone 673 

59-61 Front Street 

Santa Cruz, California 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page ) 



Featured in This Issue 

PACE 

FCC Hears From Peace Officers 3 

Bv Commxssiorxer T>onaXdL S. Leonard 

Sheriff Devitt of Santa Cru: County .... 5 

Under Able Guidance of Chief Robert Tracy, 
Oakland Stands Out in Nation for Crime Pre- 
vention and Juvenile Delinquency .... 6 
Bv B. S. Sanders 

Sheriff John R. Dower of Yuba County ... 7 

Bay Counties" Peace Officers" Association Meet 8 
Northern CaHfomia Communication Officers" 
Association Monthly Meeting 9 

Social Security for Police Officers 10' 

Bv Charles H. Shreve 

Professional Police Service 12 

Bv H. C. Bridges 

Chief AI Huntsman of Santa Cruz .... 13 

How Officer's Killers Were Caught . . 14 

Present Task of Law Enforcement . 15 

Bv H. C. Van Pelt 
Securit)' Details" Second Annual Meet ... 16 

Crime Prevention 17 

By Chief Special Agent Harry M. Kimball 

Bureau of Inspectors Honor Two Captains 18 

Inspector Wall Takes CK-er Stock and Bond 
Detail 19 

Editorial Page 20 

Pistol Pointing 21 

By J. Ross Dunnigan 

Watsonville"s New Chief Is Newspaperman . 25 

Chief BasU W. Gregory of Eureka .... 27 

Crime Trends in CaHfomia 32 

By Chief George H. Brereton, State B of I and I 

Former Officer Fitzgerald in New Job . . 34 

It"s Now Chief Thatcher of Western Pacific . 36 

Some Are True and ScHne Are False — Rate 

Yourself 50 



Directory 



'I"hc Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable tor publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be sigr.ed with a 
"nom de plume." but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which wUl be treated with the strictest conndence. The Editos 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of oincers and of interesting 
•merits. Litters should be addressed to the Erircs. 



S.\N FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice. Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020- 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Tuesday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

J. Wamock Walsh, President 160 Montgomery Street 

Henr>- C. Maginn 315 Montgomery Street 

Washington I. Kohnke 686 Sacramento Street 

Deputy Chief Michael Gaffey, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Mich.^el E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE J.ames L. Qligley 

Dept. Sec"v..-.C.\pt.\in- Mich.\el F. Fitzp.\trick... .Hall of Justice 
District Captains 

CENTR.M. Edward Donahue 65 5 Wasbington S'.rest 

SoLTHERN" A. I. O'Brien Fourth and Gara Scrects 

Mission Joseph Walsh 1057 17th Street 

Northern. Jack Eker. 841 EU-S Street 

G. G. Park Leo Tackney Stanyan opp. Wal'er 

Richmond George M. He.\ly 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside-.-Michael Gaffey.. ..Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval John J. W.\de 2348 24th Avenue 

PoTRERO John Sullivan 2J00 Third Street 

City Prison Bern.\rd J. McDonald.. .r. Hall of Justice 

Traffic Blre.\u Michael Riordan 6J5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors James L. English Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Alex.\nder McDaniell Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Engler. Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Specl-u, Services Lt. Al\in J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bure.\u John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Inform.ation George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk....Capt. Patrick J. Murray.. ..Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

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Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, i948 



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Vol. XXIII 



MARCH, 1948 



No. 11 



FCC Hears From Peace Officers 

Commissioner Donald S. Leonard, of Michigan State Police appears before Commission 



The following is a copy of the testimony of Commis- 
sioner Donald S. Leonard of the Michigan State Police 
and a past president of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, given at a hearing before the Federal 
Communications Commission in Washington, D. C. The 
hearing was held on the allocation of frequencies for 
two-way radio in which law enforcement is most vitally 
interested, because the entrance into this field by com- 
mercial interests is posing a grave problem, and the peace 
officers who have pioneered the use of this most modern 
method of communications can see that channels necessary 
to transmit information to their members in cases of emer- 
gencies or in their combat with crime are in danger of 
being seriously handicapped. Commissioner Leonard in 
the following gives a very graphic picture of the situation. 
— The Editor. 

The Witness: My name is Donald S. Leonard, Com- 
missioner of the Michigan State Police, Chairman of the 
Communications Committee of the International Associa- 
tion of the Chiefs of Police: Chairman of the Communica- 
tions Committee of the State Police of the I. A. C. P., 
one of the sponsors of the Radio Technical Planning Board 
through the I. A. C. P. membership, and a member of 
Committee I of Panel 13 of R. T. P. B. 

At the outset, I would like to say that we realize the 
normal laws of supply and demand do not apply to this 
situation. When you have increased demand and limited 
supply there are very few solutions unless you can increase 
the supply. If the supply is not increasable then the only 
practical solution that can be worked out is either to cur- 
tail the demand or ration the supply of it, and we are 
fully appreciative of that condition which confronts the 
Commission. 

Mr. Justice Cordova once stated: "When confronted 
with two objects of desire, both of which you cannot have, 
you must of necessity choose between them." 

I do not think it necessary to call the Commission's 
attention to the rather simple and elementary facts that 
there are in the field of communications, many, many 
desirable objectives, all of which are not possible of at- 
tainment insofar as the efforts of the Commission and the 
various services under its jurisdiction are concerned. 



If, then, the only alternative is to choose between them, 
this decision must be a function of the Commission rather 
than a prerogative of services competing with one another 
for Channel space. 

We, in the police service, are most sympathetic with 
the complexity of the problem confronting the Commis- 
sion. We are also appreciative of the generally cooperative 
attitude of the members of the Commission in protecting 
the public service facilities from the ever-increasing as- 
saults of profit-inspired commercial services. Nor do we 
criticize those services for seeking to further their own 
interests which, in most instances, not only reflect profit 
to the service but value to the public itself. 

We in the public police service regret that safeguards 
to our service must be maintained at times at the sacrifice 
of curtailing the efficiency or development of other desir- 
able but less needed services. But we are not responsible 
for the unenviable position in which we find ourselves, 
nor can we escape the fact that representatives of police 
departments throughout the country are being continually 
summoned to Washington to defend a service whose sole 
function is to safeguard the life and property of our 
people. 

Personally, I h.ive been appearing before the Commis- 
sion and its predecessor, the Federal Radio Commission, 
for the past 20 years. Other police representatives have 
been in the same position. 

In most of these hearings the police services have had 
to fight not alone for development and expansion but for 
the very existence of this vital service. 

This game of chess should not go on forever. There 
must be some stabilizing decisions upon which the course 
of the future may be planned. 

Now, we in the service of the State and local govern- 
ments, charged as we are with the responsibility of the 
chief objective for which government, itself, came into 
being — protection of life and property — cannot be placed 
in the position of bartering with commercial interests. 
We have no authority to surrender governmental interests. 
After all, it must be borne in mind there are 3,000 land 
stations and 2^,000 mobile stations in the United States. 

We respectfully request to call your attention to the 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



fact that millions of dollars spent in the purchase of 
municipal and State police radio units throughout the 
country is an investment of poUce funds which in most 
instances were raised in communities operating under ver>- 
definite tax limitations. There are no profits resulting 
from the operations of police radio, except in the form 
of service to the public itself. 

Frankly, it is at the least disconcerting, tiring, and 
maybe needless for police ser\'ices to give repetitious testi- 
mony and statements merely for the purpose of justif>Tng 
the importance of our service in comparison to others. 

We feel that the Commission, in addition to determin- 
ing the merits of this controversy with respect to alloca- 
tion of frequencies, should make a determination of rela- 
tive standing of the services with respect to the overall 
needs of the services in the public interest. That is the 
duty of the Commission. It is only to be expected that 
each service evaluates itself as most important in the public 
interest. Basically, we would all be better off if the Com- 
mission, itself, evaluated the various services from the 
standpoint of the public need. 

We would like to know where we stand. If the Com- 
mission feels that television should receive top priority' 
and the public safety' services be given secondary consid- 
eration, then, if you please, let is be forthright enough 
to say so. This, then, would resolve our allocation problem 
into relatively simple ones. 

If, as the television people have asserted on the record 
this morning, it is of greater import to the public to have 
televised broadcast of such a momentous occasion as the 
Hughes investigation, the moving picture investigation, and 
other Congressional hearings, when there are many who 
question the propriety of such broadcasts on the same 
grounds as the American Bar Association has condemned 
the public broadcasting of criminal trials — if, as tele\nsion 
suggested today, that additional channels are so vitally 
important to the welfare of this nation that there must be 
provision for broadcasting in foreign languages to Ameri- 
cans of foreign tongue in our metropolitan areas at a 
time when they should be as soon as possible assimilated 
to our speech habits and philosophies; if the Federal 
Communications Commission believes that such broadcast- 
ing service the public to a greater and more necessary 
extent than the emergency services which dispatch police 
fire, and emergency vehicles and services, then let it make 
a decision along this line. 

But if the Federal Communications Commission feels 
that the dti::en being held up at pistol point; the house- 
wife attempting to repel a rapist or more concerned in 
the prompt service of poUce and the e£Bciency of their 
service than they are in some of the refinements of public 
entertainment programs, then let that recognition be made 
by the Commission. 

I have a tender feeling in my heart for the members of 
the Commission. You have an extremely difficult task. 
While you would like to accommodate the many services 
which have a legitimate need for frequencies, you are 
limited in jurisdiction and your action is circumscribed by 
another federal agency. I refer to the Interdepartmental 




Radio Advisory Committee of the Federal Government. 
This committee has been set up to allocate radio space to 
the federal agencies. It is an advisory committee to the 
President of the United States who, acting upon its recom- 
mendations, determines the amount of space to be set 
aside for Federal Governmental purposes. 

The F. C. C. take what is left and tries its best to 
satisfy the needs of the important — but nevertheless the so 
classified — non-governmental services. 

All of us under the jurisdiction of the Federal Com- 
munications Commission are having a most trying time to 
nourish and develop our bodies when the only food we 
have consists of the crumbs from the IRAC banquet table. 
We in the so-called non- governmental services not only 
have to meet every demand in justifying an original as- 
signment of frequencies, but must show that the ones we 
have are utilized to the fullest extent and in many in- 
stances, on a sharing basis where interference is inevitable. 
And while thus engaged, IRAC — with 50 per cent of 
the entire spectrum — feels that it is not obliged to justify 
their assignments or use of the spectrum. This might be 
true in a limited sense insofar as actual military needs are 
concerned, but by no means should it apply by any 
stretch of the federal imagination so as to justify them in 
failing to account for the utilization of frequencies they 
now hold. 

There are some of us who think that many IRAC 
channels should be and could be released outright to this 
Commission now for assignment to non-governmental serv- 
ices, or at least be placed on a sharing basis. 

I see in the future if there is not a remedy to this situa- 
tion a clash of conflicting federal and State interests. It 
also is inevitable. There are some solutions that might be 
proposed. Either this Commission must recognize the | 
equal importance of State and local governments so that 
their needs are fully protected as the requirements of the 
IRAC groups, or State and local governments will have 
to be recognized by the Federal Government as a part of 
IRAC so that our needs may be considered on a parity 
v«th theirs, so that we may bask in the same warm sun 
that they do. 

Or, all of the non-governmental services — and I will say 
all in this room and the other non-government services, 
and the police, and State and local governments, are classi- 
fied by the Federal Government as nongovernment — 
should join forces, descend upon the Congress of the 
United States and demand an amendment to the Com- 
munications Act of 1954 which \yi\\ broaden the control 
which the Federal Communications Commission will have 
over many of those frequencies now under the control of 
the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee. 

I, for one, feel it is time for us to discontinue pursuing 
the shadow while the substance is allowed to escape. 

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March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page y 



Sheriff Devitt of Santa Cruz County 



Santa Cruz County the vacation mecca of the northern 
portion of the state, otfering as it does the finest of ever>' 
attraction for vacationeers in both mountain camps and 
ocean beach pleasures, has grown as have other areas of 
Cahfomia, since the late war. 

Too, the county is noted for its farming, for in its con- 
fines there grow great apple orchards producing train 




Sheriff J, R. Devitt 

loads of this fine fruit. Vegetables and other fruits abound, 
and when it comes to floriculture Santa Cruz takes second 
place to no other county. 

Naturally with the good people who come to enjoy 
annual outings and week-end trips, and many who have 
settled in the county there is a small percentage of the 
newcomers bent on criminal efforts. However this ele- 
ment has not met with any great success for the law en- 
forcement ofiicers are well able to cope with their attempted 
deprecations. Sure there is crime going on, more than 
before the war, but not in proportion to the increase in 
population. This crime is confined mostly to petty thefts, 
house breaking and an occasional hold up. But if one 
traces the records of the Sheriff's ofiice or the Police 
Departments of the county one will find most of these 
crimes have been cleared by arrests, conviction and im- 
prisonment of the offenders. 

Santa Cruz has as its Sheriff a man born within its 
confines. He is J. R. Devitt, who first saw the light of 
day at Felton, the bustling mountain community some 
ten miles out of the city. After getting his education 
he entered the engineering department of the count>' 
in 19n remaining in that work until 1928 when he be- 
came a deputy sheriff and served as such until 1931 when 
a new sheriff was elected. Deputy Devitt went out with 
his boss, and returned to the engineering department. 
Four years later, having demonstrated his ability as 
a law enforcement officer, he was persuaded to run for 
the office of Sheriff and he beat the incumbent and has 
been reelected ever since each four years. 

When he took over the duties of the chief law enforce- 
ment officer of his native county he had but five men. 
Today he has 9. He has seen the population grow since 



1935 from 35,000 to an estimated 75,000, yet with his 
undermanned force of deputies he has done a mighty fine 
job of enforcing the laws. 

He has as undersheriff W. A. Hendricks an outstanding 
officer. Three men are detailed to criminal work they being 
Deputies L. F. Ramsey, Jerry Smith and Thomas Glass. 

Deputy Robert Mondelle, Jr., is the court bailiff. 

Deputy M. D. Worth handles the civil business. 

Deputy J. D. Kenney and his wife, Opal, are the jailors, 
occupying quarters in the courthouse annex. 

The Sheriff maintains a patrol, the men assigned to 
this detail in two-way radio equipped cars are H. D. 
Haight and Warren Berrut. 

Stanley Wightman is the file clerk. 

Mrs. Alice Von Linden, a capable office worker, handles 
the book work. 

Deputy A. J. Skelton helps out with the jailor job. 

There are five radio equipped cars assigned to the Sher- 
iff's office and the call letters arc KGDT serviced by the 
Santa Cruz Police Department. 

The Identification Bureau as well as the filing system 
used by Sheriff Devitt is up to date and was installed 
by the FBI. 

Sheriff Devitt was married in 1922 to Olga Fryklunde, 
a nurse from the Black Hills of North Dakota. Dining 
World War I he served in the nav>'. ''^feW 

Santa Cruz County has a retirement pension for its 
employees and it appears to us that Sheriff Devitt does 
not have to go many years more to earn his, for he is now 
rounding out 3 3 years in the service of this commonwealth 
noted as the playground of northern California, and which 
attracts thousands of people from all sections of the state 
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McFARLAND. CALIFORNIA 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



Under Able, Alert Guidance of Chief of Police Robert P. Tracy, 
Oakland Stands Out In Nation Where Crime Prevention, 
Juvenile Delinquency Stand Foremost In Prosressive Prosram. 



By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders 
Veteran Police Reporter, Editor, V/riter. 



Oakland's police department, now comprising 706 of- 
ficers, continues to stand out as one of the most ably con- 
ducted in the nation. 

Chief of Police Robert P. (Bob) Tracy is rounding-out 
his fifth year as head of the department. 




Chief Robert T. Tracy talking things over with Officer Paul A. 
Jones, in charge of Juvenile and Missing Persons Bureau. 

Under his able, understanding, capable guidance, the 
department has kept pace with the city's tremendous 
population growth in giving citizens proper police pro- 
tection, in holding down traffic fatalities, in crime preven- 
tion activities, in tackHng the juvenile delinquency prob- 
lem where crime usually starts, in a broad, vigorous way. 

Let's look at a few statistics: 

The population of Oakland in 1940 was 316,000. 

In 1947, covering the war period with hundreds of 
thousands of new comers, shipyard and industrial workers, 
army and navy personnel, it conservatively rose to 
425,000. This population is still expanding. 

Justice Building In Making 

To meet this expansion of growth in population, ex- 
pansion of a police personnel, regular officers of 432 in 
1940 to 706 in 1947; taxpayers and voters have voted 
$2,700,000 for a Justice Building, housing police and 
municipal courts — the three police courts. 

Looking ahead, experts, according to Chief Tracy, have 
figured that Oakland will have a population of 600,000 



or more in the 64-square miles under the jurisdiction of 
the police depactment in the next few years. 

"It is to look ahead and meet this need for an expand- 
ing city and an expanding Police Department that we 
are bending our efforts today to keep crime in check, to 
solve crimes, to bring into the department only the finest 
young men who plan to make police work their career," 
says Chief Tracy. 

Juvenile Delinquency 

"And we have, as a preliminary step, today inaugurated 
a more intensive program for the control of juvenile de- 
linquency and crime prevention — a program that got a 
good start in 1947. By the time our new building is 
ready for occupancy we will have a juvenile department 
unexcelled in the nation. Crime usually starts with the 
Vv'ayward boys and girls, the delinquents at school, the 
product of broken homes. 

' Junior Baseball League 

"It is encouraging to know that under the direction of 
Officer Paul A, Jones, in charge of the juvenile and miss- 
ing persons bureau, juvenile delinquency in the past year 
has shown a decrease. We are mighty proud of that 
record. Officer Jones is doing a good, capable, worth- 
As an essential part of the police program to keep the 
youngsters, under 16 years of age, off the streets, junior 
baseball leagues, under the direction of the various dis- 
trict Captains have been organized. 

"When a youngster has a place to play baseball he's 
not interested in other activities much," comments Chief 
Tracy. "In this baseball league movement we are co- 
(Continned on page 70) 



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March. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Sheriff John R. Dower, Jr. — Yuba County 



One of the young California Sheriffs to watch is John 
Dower of Yuba County. Perhaps he lacks some of the 
attributes that come only with long years of experience, 
but he has an abundance of fine law^-enforcement blood 
in his veins, and what is more important — doing some- 
thing about it. 

Young old-timers in the San Francisco Police Depart- 




Sheriff John R. Doufr 

ment will long remember his good father. Sergeant John 
Dower's thirty-five-year contribution to peace and order 
in his native city of San Francisco. He served with the 
late Daniel J. O'Brien, and those who know the record 
know how close they were to each other, and what fine 
work was done by them both during that period. He 
was treasurer for the S. F. P. D. Widow's and Orphan's 
Aid Association for 18 years. But it takes an old old- 
timer to recall his grandfather, Michael Dower, and 
Mike's two brothers, who patrolled the Mission in the 
early days of San Francisco police history. Their records 
are in the archives for all to see, and fine records they 
are. So, I repeat, there is an abundance of law enforce- 
ment blood in the Sheriff's veins — but let's get on with 
our subject. 

In the writer's interview with Sheriff Dower he was 
reluctant to make any statement at all except: "That I 
don't go in for publicity — do the daily routine work of 
every Sheriff in the State — treat all our people alike, 
which unavoidably results in some people liking me and 
some not." 

It was like pulling teeth to get any more out of him, 
so your reporter moved in on some of the more substantial 
citizens that he has known for some years for the real 
picture, which, incidentally, is always a better one. One 
expressed it well when he said, "I didn't vote for Dower 
but if he runs again I will do so." Let it be said here, his 



predecessor Sheriff McCoy is much beloved in this coun- 
ty, and had given years of highly competent service. 
Well, that's life — move over and make room for the kids." 

John Dower isn't exactly a kid, but being born in the 
Mission April 4th, 1912, doesn't make him an old man 
either. He attended James Lick grammar school. Mission 
High and went on to San Francisco State College where 
he graduated in Education. 

In 1937 he was appointed to a principalship in the rural 
schools of Yuba County, and presently fell in love with 
a native coleen by the name of Merle, and they are now 
the proud parents of two lovely daughters. 

In 1944 he was appointed probation ofiicer and moved 
into the historic old court house, built in 1853. It is the 
writer's guess that, that was all that was necessary to 
get that blood we were talking about to "circulating good." 
At any rate he ran for sheriff in 1946 and was elected. 

In no time at all it wasn't necessary to remind him 
that he was in the law-enforcement business. Accom- 
panied by Marysville Police Officer Lyle Prothers he went 
out to nearby Camp Beale in an endeavor to pick up 
two car thieves who might be heading that way. His 
hunch was right but what he didn't know was that the 
car contained three desperadoes, who, just ten minuteo 
previously, had held up the Bank of America at Wheat- 
land and were heading east with $14,000 of the bank's 

(Continued on page 75 I 



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Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, J 948 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers^ Association 



z MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief Melvin Flohr, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The annual installation meeting of the Bay Counties He ended his address with a plea for amending the law 

Peace Officers' Association, held on January 30 in the which allows pleas in traffic violations to he mentioned 

swank setting of the Burlingame Country Club, drew the in civil suits. 

characteristically large gathering of peace officers, and "If we want to push the people around and make crim- 
guests, from the bay area. They witnessed the installation 
of Chief Walter J. Wisnom, of Hillsborough Police De- 




Cliief Wisnom at the microphone, and Chief Earl Dierking 
new vice president. 

partment as the president for the current year, together 
with the placing of Chief Earl Dierking of Vallejo as 
vice president and perenially reelected Captain Bernard 
J. McDonald as secretary-treasure. 

The installation ceremonies were conducted by Sheriff 
Daniel J. Murphy of San Francisco, and he did a mighty 
fine job, as is his custom. 

Chief Wisnom took over the duties of Chief Melvin 
Flohr, Santa Rosa, the retiring president who was unable 
to attend. Following a very sumptuous lunch Chief 
Wisnom presented the official family of Hillsborough — 
Mayor Ernest Ingold, City Manager Earl P. Wilsey, City 
Judge J. F. Trabucca, Fire Chief William Palin and Coun- 
cilmen Sydney Miller, Bernard Ford and Kenneth Mon- 
teagle. Mayor Ingold made a short speech welcoming the 
visitors and called attention to the fact that this was the 
second time the Association had met in the Burlingame 
club since its formation nearly 20 years ago. 

Deputy District Attorney Fred WycofF of San Mateo 
County was the principal speaker of the meet. 

Wyckoff touched briefly on the trial of Jadwiga Curtin, 
Polish girl, who he convicted of a manslaughter charge, 
and praised local officers for their alertness in "appre- 
hending hoodlums from Los Angeles to San Francisco and 
running them out of the county." 




Captain Bernard McDonald 
Re-elected Secretary-Treasurer 

inals of them all, we should keep the law which makes 
a man liable for thousands of dollars damages in a civil 
suit if he pleads guilty to a minor traffic violation such as 
running a red light," he said. 

Chief Michael E. Mitchell made his first appearance 
as Chief of Police for San Francisco and made a nice talk 
and was given a big hand. He said his Etepartment would 
continue to give all state peace departments and sheriffs' 
offices the assistance it has given in the past. 

President Wisnom announced the appointment of the 
following committees: 

Executive — Chief Howard A. Zink, Palo Alto, Chair- 
man; Chief Robert P. Tracy, Oakland; Chief Mitchell, 
San Francisco; Chief L. E. Jones, Richmond; Sheriff H. 
(Contmued on f^age 621 





KINGWELL 


BROS., 


Ltd. 






4S7 


Minna Street 


sutler 


1-0514 




SAN 


FRANCISCO 








CALIFORNIA 






HOTEL 


OPERA 










14S Fel 


Street 






SAN 


FRANCISCO 








CALIFORNIA 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Ray Meyers, President 
A. R. Tacgart, Secretary-Treasurer 



Minutes of the meeting held in Santa Rosa, Cahfornia, 
on Januar>' 8, 1948. The regular monthly meeting of the 
Northern California Police Communication Officers' As- 
sociation was held in Santa Rosa. The host was John 
Maybee. 

Minutes of the previous meeting were read, also finan- 
cial statement submitted, both approved. 




New. President of NCPCOA Ray Meyers of X'dueju 
Police Department. 

George Burton and Ray Meyers opened the discussion 
regarding this Association changing its name to more 
truly represent the various agencies that are members. A 
committee will be selected at our next meeting. 

Meeting recessed for lunch. 

After an excellent lunch we heard from the various 
committees. '^ 

Interference Committee. Ray Meyers reported that the 
Solano County Office of the P. G. and E. has eliminated 
the interference on eleven miles of lines by replacing 
necessary e.quipment. 

The engineering and Frequency Committee reported the 
folldwng clearances-: The Cit>' of Woodland was granted 
clearance on 39.38 MCS. South San Francisco was 
granted clearance on 39.26 MCS. The CaHfomia High- 
way Patrol' requested clearance for Lake County to use 
39.78 MCS. This request was objected to by several 
members. The principle reason was the frequency is 
loaded with traffic and it may establish a precedent for 



other agencies to leave their present operating frequency 
which is coordinated with adjacent agencies. This Asso- 
ciation is cognizant of purpose of various agencies re- 
questing use of the CHP frequency because the bulk of 
their traffic involves CHP Units, also they are located in 
remote or rural areas. It is not the desire of a municipal 
or county agency to disturb their present coordinated 
inter-city or inter-county communications system, but in 
several cases it is obvious that operating on the CHP 
frequency serves the majority of people in that particular 
area. The matter was referred to the Engineering and 
Frequency Committee for further study and to submit a 
report at the next meeting. 

Brov.er McMurphy reported en the Eastern Engineer 
and Mfgs. meeting regarding the 30-40 MC and the 150 
to 160 MC bands. 

George Burton suggested we act at once on the FCC 
30-40 allocation program as approved at the National 
APCO Conference. This allocation plan is being studied 
by the Engineering and Frequency Committee, however, 
it is impossible to proceed further until the FCC formally 
approves the plan and all necessary information from 
the agencies effected for this area has been submitted to 
the committee. 

The Engineering and Frequency Committee will mail 

information forms to all agencies to determine who intends 

to operate in the 30 MC band. 

The foUowng men were 

year 1948: 

President — Ray Meyers 

Vice President — Charles Simpson 

(Continued on page 68 ) 



elected to office for the 



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Phone MArket 1-0829 



S.AN FR..\NCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GOTHAM INSTRUMENT CO., Inc. 



591 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone sutler 1-460O 

INCANDESCENT SUPPLY CO. 

BETTER LIGHT— BETTER SIGHT 

LIGHTING FIXTURES AND LAMPS 

647 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone WEst 1-2050 

DILWORTH AUTO SERVICE 

FENDER AND BODY WORK - WXLDING 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 

1339 BUCHANAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page W POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL March, i948 

Social Security For Peace Officers 

Written for the Police and Peace Officers" Journal by Charles H. Shreve. 
Manager. San Francisco Field Office. Social Security Administration 



Peace officers are divided into two groups as far as 
Social Security is concerned, i.e., those who have at some 
time been in other work in which they contributed to a 
Social Security account, and those who have always been 




Charles H. Shrfvf 

city, county or State employees and therefore have never 
established any Social Security credits for themselves. 
Both groups know something of the value of Social Secur- 
ity, both as retirement income and as protection for their 
■families in case of death, so that the facts regarding their 
present or potential future Social Security protection 
should be of interest to all peace officers. 

Those who formerly worked in "covered" employment 
and are now government employees and exempt from 
Social Security, may have heard that the money they put 
in their Social Security account is lost. This is not neces- 
sarily true. They may not have contributed for a sufficient 
length of time to be assured of Social Security protection 
for life, but the money is not lost and they may yet 
acquire lifetime protection if they fully understand their 
rights. They have also had, and may still have, insurance 
protection similar to a term life insurance policy. 

A person whose employment was covered by Social 
Security on January 1, 1937, when the Social Security 
Act became operative, and who continued in such employ- 
ment for a period of time before leaving to accept exempt 
employment with a municipality, county, or State, is still 
insured after leaving covered employment for a length 
of time equal to the period in which he made Social 
Security contributions. If he should reach 6'^ or die during 
the additional period of time, he or his survivors will have 
Social Security rights and will receive benefits based on 
the contributions, even though ,-it the time of attaining 
65 or death the individual was no longer making contribu- 



tions. For instance, an individual who worked in a "cov- 
ered" job from January 1, 1937, through the end of the 
year 1944 has credit for eight full years of employment 
or 32 "quarters of coverage." That person is fully insured 
for an additional eight years, or until the close of the 
year 19^2. If he should reach 6'i by that time he would 
be entitled to Social Security payments for the rest of 
his life. If he should die from a.ny cause prior to Decem- 
ber 31, 1952, his survivors would be entitled to Social 
Security benefits. 

The great majority of peace officers who had former 
employment in jobs covered by social security will not 
reach 65 or die by the time their existing social security 
rights expire. They will be interested to know that they 
may continue their social security accounts in an active 
status by earning $50.00 in a "covered" job in every 
alternate calendar quarter-year. Fully insured status de- 
pends upon earning at least $50.00 per quarter-year in 
half the quarter-years that elapse, so that those who had 
made contributions may keep their accounts fully paid 
up by taking part-time employment in "covered" jobs 
sufficient to bring them $50.00 or more in earnings once 
every six months, if the earnings fall entirely within a 
calendar quarter-year. 

Even the peace officer who had only a few years of 
social security coverage prior to taking his present employ- 
ment can reinstate his social security account in good 
standing by a slightly greater amount of part-time work 
in "covered" jobs. So long as the over-all picture results 
in his having one "quarter of coverage," i.e., a calendar 
quarter-year in which he has earned $50.00 or more in a 
"covered" job, for each two quarter-years which have 
elapsed after January 1, 1937, he is fully insured and he 
and his survivors are protected. 

The situation in regards to peace officers who have 
always been in exempt employment since Social Security 
became effective, is not so simple. Their hopes of receiving 
any Social Security benefits will depend upon action of 
Congress in removing the present exemptions from the 
Social Security law. 

The principal groups not now covered by Social Secur- 
ity are employees of city, county. State and the Federal 
governments, agricultural laborers, employees of certain 
religious and charitable organisations, domestic workers 
in private homes, and the self-employed. The Social Secur- 
ity Administration has recommended to Congress for sev- 
eral years that all of these groups be included under 
Social Security and there is a strong possibility that Con- 
gress will so amend the Social Security Act in the reason- 
ably near future. All of these groups were exempted from 
the original Social Security law as passed in 1935 for one 
of two reasons. Either it was felt to be administratively 
impractical to administer the law for the group, or repre- 
sentatives of the group asked for exemption. Agricultural 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page II 



workers are a typical example of the first case, while peace 
officers are a fair example of the second. 

The Social Security Adminstration feels that eleven 
years of experience has qualified it to solve the adminis- 
trative problems which may arise by virtue of including the 
presently exempt groups. Most of the foreign social secur- 
ity systems include agricultural workers, and the admin- 
istrative problems which seemed so great thirteen years 
ago can now be solved even in the difficult case of migra- 
tory farm labor. 

Back in 1935, when Congress was first considering pass- 
ing a Social Security Act, representatives of some muni- 
cipal workers and some peace officer's organizations ap- 
peared before Congress and asked that such employees be 
exempted. The fact that their municipalities had fine 
pension plays does not offset the fact that most communities 
do not have any pension plan at all, and the majority of 
counties and states have little or no protection for the 
officer who has outlived his usefulness. The peace officers 
who appeared before Congress were alarmed lest the fine 
pension plans prevalent in their localities should be junked 
in favor of a new and untried system, and they rightfully 
did not wish the money which had been collected for their 
plans to be dissipated. Furthermore, there was some seri- 
ous legal question as to the right of the Federal Govern- 
ment to tax municipalities, counties or States and exemp- 
tion of their employees seemed the simplest answer to the 
problem at that time. 

Extensive study of this problem, both by the Social 
Security Administration and groups of peace officers who 
do not enjoy adequate pension protection, has developed 
a suggestion for a solution which may be added to the 
law by the present Congress. The Social Security Ad- 
ministration recommendation is that a provision be added 
to the law permitting municipalities, states and other po- 
litical subdivisions to make voluntary compacts with the 
Social Security Administration to provide coverage for 
their employees. Thus a city which had a fine retirement 
pension plan might not choose to make such compact, 
while another city or county that had a poor plan or none 
at all would readily arrange to make one. There seems 
to be no objection to such a voluntary plan and the present 
study of Social Security needs being conducted by a special 
committee of the United States Senate may recommend, 
as the Social Security Administration has already done, 
that this be enacted into law. 

If such a provision is added, then peace officers who 
have never contributed to Social Security will be enabled 
to do so as soon as their employer makes the necessary 
compact with the Social Security Administration. It seems 
reasonable to expect that special provisions will be made 
for such cases so that no penalty will fall upon these indi- 
viduals for not having contributed during the first eleven 
years of the system. 

Obviously, those peace officers who have partial social 
security protection by virtue of former contributions in 
other jobs would likewise begin to add again to the same 
accounts already established for them, if their present 
employment was put under Social Security by reason of 



a change of the law such as is outlined above. Thus both 
groups would be in a better position to perpetuate their 
Social Security rights than has ever been the case before. 
It is reasonable to assume that, with the unanimous en- 
dorsement of both major political parties and the active 
support of both branches of organized labor and most of 
the groups who once asked exemptions, Congress will in 
the reasonably near future make substantial changes in 
the Social Security Act to provide broader coverage for 
the presently exempt groups. 

Any discussion of the possibility of Social Security pro- 
tection for peace officers would be incomplete if it did 
not outline the present scale of benefits and the future 
possibilities in that regard. It is extremely difficult to do 
this, because Congress is at this time considering an in- 
crease in the amount of present benefits based on the 
economic changes since 1935, the increased cost of Hving 
and the present excess of funds collected over the amount 
needed for the scale of payments set up by the original 
Social Security Act. 

At the end of September, 1947, there were 2,162068 
persons in the country entitled to monthly benefits. 
977,768 of these were workers who had reached the age 
of 65 and retired. The remainder were wives 65 years 
of age or older, children under the age of 18, widows of 
insured workers who had died and who were over 65 or 
had children under 18 in their care, and some dependent 
parents. 

The maximum payable to a retired worker at this time, 
if he has earned $3,000.00 or more each year since Social 
Security started, is slightly under $45.00 per month. Pay- 
ment to his wife when she reaches 65 is 50 per cent of 
worker's benefit, making the joint payment to the hus- 
band and wife a little less than $68.00 per month. The 
maximum paid to any family, such as four minor children 
left by a deceased worker, is $85.00 per month. Of course, 
this amounts to about $1,000,000 a year and when the 
four children are quite young, payments made on a 
worker's account may run from $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 
without considering the further payments the widow can 
receive after reaching 65 if she does not remarry. 

At the end of 1947, about $38,100,000 a month was 
actually being paid to beneficiaries under Social Security. 
Another five million dollars was not paid because pay- 
ments were suspended in cases of retired men who had 
returned to work, children working for a period and sus- 
pending their payments, etc. Better than 50,000 monthly 
benefits are being awarded each month at this time, and 
the average amount of payments is gradually increasing in 
all categories. 

Here in San Francisco, 16,065 benefits were in force 
December 31, 1947, for $35 3,273.29 per month. The 
16,000 beneficiaries are made up of 9,927 retired workers, 
1705 wives of such workers who are 65 or over, and 
1044 widows aged 65 or more, for a total of 12,676 
persons over age 65. The other 3400 cases cover children 
of deceased workers, young widows and a few dependent 
parents. It is interesting to note that for the first time, 

(Continued on page 61 ) 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. J 948 



PROFESSIONAL POLICE SERVICE 

By B. C. Bridges, Supt. Bureau of Identification Alameda Police Dept. 



As the combined result of many causes, crime in 
America has reached an all-time high. This is no small 
nor temporary matter. The malady is serious and deep- 
seated. It has infected the whole country, and no mild 
medicine will cure it. To furnish relief, the remedy must 




Superintendent B. C. Bridges 

include an over-all program conducted on a long-range 
basis. 

Those of us who are a part of the police organization 
are well aware of this; but since we must depend, to a 
large extent, upon public cooperation in such emergencies, 
it is most important that we furnish the general public 
with a clear picture of the entire prospect. Therefore, 
this short summary is presented not primarily to the 
enforcement field, but rather for popular publication. 

The situation's gravity can be best illustrated by these 
statistics from the National Uniform Crime Report for 
1946, compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 
During the year, major felonies were committed in the 
United States at the rate of one every 20 seconds, and 
somewhere in America some person was the victim of 
criminal homicide, rape, or assault to murder, every 5.7 
minutes of the day and night.. This means that by this 
time tomorrow 25 J persons will have been the victims 
of the above crimes. It also means that well over 7,000,000 
persons in America, now alive and unsuspecting, are 
doomed by criminal violence. 

Furthermore, during 1945, there were 28,600 persons 
killed and 1,000,000 others injured in traffic accidents 
throughout the United States, That was bad enough; 
but figures for 1946 show 35,500 persons killed and 
1 ,1 50,000 injured, and with a co6t in property damage well 
over $750,000,000. Although many of the basic causes 
for this frightful toll are known, increasing fatalities and 



damage indicate that those in charge of the situation are 
not succeeding in their efforts to reduce accidents. 

In addition to the direct impact of crime, there are 
many other tragic and costly consequences in the form of 
lost manpower, wasted lives, sickness, want, privation, 
wrecked homes, and causes for future delinquency. Fur- 
thermore, apart from death, injury and misfortune caused 
by crime, there are the more obvious factors of crime's 
enormous cost in dollars and cents. This, of course, in- 
cludes not only the direct and indirect cost of actual 
criminal depredation, but also the cost of maintaining all 
municipal, state and federal bodies, forces and institutions 
directly or indirectly involved or engaged in law enforce- 
ment, or in caring for criminals or crime's victims. At 
this time, we are paying ever-increasing sums to a socially 
destructive force which already costs far more than all of 
the educational institutions in the country combined. 

With such a staggering outlay of national resources, the 
American taxpayer should be entitled to some return for 
his money. However, we are sorry to inform him that 
his investment isn't "paying off." He's "in the red" — 
and he's . in good and deep. Instead of showing any 
marked improvement, even with this huge expenditure, we 
are losing our fight against crime! The same National 
Crime Report shows the crime rate for 1946 with an 
alarming increase in major offenses. Murder made the 
biggest jump with a gain of 16.3 per cent. Robbery was 
next, with an increase of 15.6 per cent, with aggravated 
assault 11.4 per cent. Negligent manslaughter went up 
6.4 per cent, and rape 4.5 per cent. Also, in this critical 
pericxl of post-war readjustment, the crime problem con- 
stitutes a growing threat to both internal and international 
security. These are not the forces of any aggressor nation 
which menace us; they are the criminals in our own ranks, 
awaiting only the opportunity to take our property and 
our lives, while countless psychopathic "firebrands" are 
eager to furnish the leadership for those who are bent 
upon all forms of social damage and destruction. 

^CoritiTiued on page 46) 



STE I N A U 

& 
G L A S E R 

300 Mission Street 
San Francisco, California 



March, 194S POUCE AND PE.ACE OFFICERS' JKXTIXWL 

Chief Al Huntsman of Santa C 



Pj<Sr ]> 



ruz 



TV dt>' of Sann Orui wTih iis fine Kradv ns c\. 
s»k wAU-r ftj^ing, its giivxi c3>roaro and its hi-iS3psi«Ne jvoplc 
has gT\wn to a hu5«hns: cir\' of Scmx- 2i\000 Kafifty 
rpsijfnts, 

SituAJifd t\n XliWKjvY Bav « ofltrs much w xhctx- ieci 




mg in ounni; — for a day or a miwiii — jind each wjir 
the mtlux of those seetiixg a place to relax has inerejised 
until now it is tKX unconin^on to find a hundjvvl iJtousand 
p.>unns: >nto the e«y limitSv TV K-j»cVs ai>f C3\>\v\3e>d 
with happy folks fjvwn nejtr and far, and the aniens of 
^ntj Cru; haw kept pace w-ith the inerej»j>ed pi-^ulation 
ind the increased populanrv- of the atv as a recn-aiKwal 
center that they haw- left nt><hins: undojv that \vow)d c\>n 
trjhute to the happiness of the thixisands of vTSJiiors who 
ictfxn into its attracnve coniniunity. 

Of course law enforcement is neciessarx' to see that all 
Uw abiding people arc aNe to enpy jhemseKies and in 
Santa Cm; tV enhwii^ tV law^s of tV land is in 
capaNe hands. 



has heoj head of 

since 



- ^— T'. Cm: in 192 ji, 
smor W55 and 

-■ r.xii 

^^^' . - -.^-. -c ... ..._ r>ji i: 

MS Kuw. Tdiav ihe n'UHj>er has }>e«i iiv-n-jtsed 

to :~. .A 

Pc^llce Ac- , .._ 

TV Bureau of I3c 
mctiwids of as> ^ . jj cjorjed 

out *k*K: ihi- .-.,■, ...^ ,..,^ .._. ...^ anw, AB 

inanKns haw atTe3^>d o-ainiiK achivJs 



auo ap- 



TV DeriMtineiN K-* 

prehesvfaw; thciac who c, ^ .,,-., 

iV sunaner vsjators which at m»es ; . . 
Kssv wwk-end. 

Tl^oxii^h Svanra One is hid cm in Ty|<Kil OtUomia 
sryHle prevalent an many aaaO csowv Ksg>^ctn^ ancc^ 
tTa£c IS rc^nibned so wxll that fatal aocadenis an nrc 
indeed,'" 

Juwnde dehn-iueivry is at a low <H> an Suiu Qna:. 
Radi m H^? wVn duet Humsnan was put in cikai;j!e 
of ihe IVihof Department he ionned a Kwres' duK. and «t 
the ei>d of its fira year juvenile dchnqjueivy tdl of 90 
per ctmt. With jtaoous «)uanei^ in the EDs hoUii^. 
wiiich us furnished for the rocimtMn c* hcujs under 1$ 
wars of agv, and w^uch indludes pocJ and Mliud tables. 
pmt^ P^^g oeuns. ruding loon, Kisfeet kail and xdky 
hall counsv a well o<)u>f>fied gymaswmy ai«d other «<a- 
tuivs anracnw^ to vewhs he found the fcwflps toiscc tv> 
$:et out of hne. He and has o£oeis oiisaniaed haid and 
soft haschall reams and b«s^ haU tcans. and Acw w«w 
jsuny games hervwcn the chaih's teams aitd with outadcrs. 
At <>ne time therxc wtc 1^ Ka^icet haB teaas oisaiustd 
amo«^ du^ memK-rs, four hai\3 haselvaD vean^ and tiwee 
soft hall ti-jims TV Chi^ has for many wars nuintained 
a memheiship of +cV K^vs^ and while « hecame ivwgniged 
as a way tv> fcoep the K>ys on the i«T*^ht and nanvwv path. 
« also hecaov patent that it was Tyx> h^ a »oh tor the 
Mkv Depanment to handle and ifv»s.>r, si* rvw wars 
4 Ot^wriiitaaAJ ."•! rusi^f ^-^ 





i>! \ Kr) 



O.vi-T E- \V t"5s\jji 



t^M-T IViX l\NV 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



How Officer^s Killers Were Caught 



By the Editor 



The investigation of this case was assigned to Inspectors 
James O'Neill and James Hayes of the burglary detail, 
who worked in conjunction with Officers George Brown 
and Eugene McCann of the Mission Police Station. This 
combined investigation of numerous likely suspects led 
them to the vicinity of Church and Market Streets, where 



from Dorothy Conder and she stated that upon the arrest 
of Joseph Trujillo she recovered the revolver from TrU' 
jillo's home at 1 1 Laussett Street and took the gun to 
her house where she filed the rifling off the barrel. She 
was in company with Carol Babcock who is presently 
confined to San Quentin on robbery charges. 






Inspector Fred Butz Inspector George O'Leary Inspector M.ax Resnick 

These Three Inspectors Had a Prominent Part in Capture of Haight-Fillmore Street Gang. 



they investigated the possibility of the Haight-Fillmore 
Gang as being involved. 

On October 18, 1946, Tommy Foakes, age sixteen, was 
arrested by Inspectors Valentine and Keyworth of the 
Juvenile Bureau and was confined in the City Prison as 
an escapee from the Juvenile Home. Officers Brown and 
McCann interviewed him, feeling he might be able to 
help out in the matter of connecting the Haight-Fillmore 
Gang with the murder of Officer Odom. 

On the strength of the small scraps of information 
recei'ved. Officer Brown and Inspector Max Reznik later 
interviewed Foakes at Lancaster concerning the Dan's 
Creamery job. 

On November 1, 1946, a Ford convertible coupe was 
recovered by the Daly City Police in the vicinity of 223 
Vista Grande Avenue, Daly City. This car was stolen 
on October 14, 1946, from the display room of the 
"S &? C" Motors, 2001 Market Street, San Francisco. 
Inspectors Hayes and O'Neill and Officer Brown, in 
making a search of the recovered car, found a large crow- 
bar and a leather covered blackjack. 

On November 15, 1946, Dorothy Conder, 223 Vista 
Grande Avenue, Daly City, was taken into custody by 
Inspectors Hayes and Cottrell ;md Officer Brown. A 
search of her premises disclosed a .38 Caliber U. S. re- 
volver with the numbers filed off. A statement was taken 



Joseph Trujillo was arrested by Inspectors Hayes, 
O'Neill and Cottrell, as well a.« Officers Brown and 
McCann. At that time he was questioned relative to the 
murder of Special Officer Odom. He denied any knowl- 
edge of the crime, and he also denied ownership of the 
tools and gloves. 

Trujillo was subsequently given thirty days in the 
County Jail and during that time he was questioned by 
the officers assigned to the case, and he stated that the 
night of Odom's murder he had been in Oakland to see 
a movie where he had seen "Monsieur Beaucaire," starring 
Boh Hope. He again denied participation in the "Dan's 
Creamery" job. 

On January 23, 1947, Officer Robert Casiciani, Com- 
pany E, brought a member of the Haight-Fillmore Gang, 
Richard Henderson, into the Homicide Detail. A state- 
ment was taken by Inspectors James Johnson and Hayes. 
Henderson was shown the gun and identified it as Tru- 
jillo's, the same gun which Joe Trujillo had loaned him 
to go on a hunting trip to Scotia, California. 

Henderson stated that on the hunting trip to Scotia, 
he had shot a dog with Trujillo's gun, and that the trip 
had been made previous to the time Dorothy Conder had 
filed the barrel of the gun. 

Realizing that if we recovered a spent bullet from the 
(Continued on page 40) 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



THE PRESENT TASK OF LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Address by Assistant Special Agent H. C. Van Pelt, San Francisco, to the Northern 
California Peace Officers' Association at Chico 



Enforcement of the law is a profession, not just a job, 
and it is daily requiring more and more intelligence and 
skill, and everlasting study and training. Peace officers 
cannot allow themselves to stagnate and get in a rut while 
science makes progressive strides into new fields of crim- 
inology. The days of the "hitching post" type of law 
enforcement are long past. The guardians of the law 
must be thoroughly trained in modern methods of crime 
detection and crime prevention. The peace officer's ob- 
jective of honest, intelligent fulfillment of duty, designed 
to provide better protection to the citizens of the com- 
munity, must be accomplished by raising his own stand- 
ards in the police profession. With it comes a sense of 
accomplishment, a higher morale, a greater satisfaction, 
renewed courage, wholesome respect for the effort and 
just reward. 

In Northern California, during the last fiscal year, the 
FBI conducted 58 training schools for local law enforce- 
ment agencies, affording 1789 hours of instruction to 2230 
officers in attendance. Twenty-eight of these schools were 
of the In-Service type; 21 were Firearms Schools: six 
were Recruit Schools; two were Fingerprinting Schools, 
and one was the Annual Administrative School for Law 
Enforcement Executives. It has been most gratifying and 
encouraging to observe how enthusiastically the peace 
officers in this area have received these diversified training 
programs in a sincere effort to progress in the police pro- 
fession and provide better protection and service to their 
respective communities. The FBI will continue to make 
its training facilities, its scientific crime detection labora- 
tory, its widespread identification service, and its other 
cooperative functions available to you. 

Phone KE. 2-4026 

F. B. JORGENSEN MFG. CO. 

Designers and Makers of 

BOX-PRINTING PLATES 

Brass and Steel Stamps and Types 

Embossing' Dies, Soap Dies, Stencils 

Name Plates, Burning Brands, Etc. 

4321 EAST 12th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

HIgate 4-4684 

FULTON LUNCH 

Jack Arnold, Owner-Manager 

SERVING BREAKFAST AND LUNCH 

Open 7:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M. 

1528 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

RILEY'S CORNED BEEF 

"Since 1903" 

TENTH STREET MARKET 

OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 



Juvenile and Crime Prevention Work 

In combatting post-war crime, law enforcement agencies 
should carefully consider the advancement of their juvenile 
and crime prevention work. One of the most tragic con- 
sequences of the war has been its effect upon our youth. 
Juvenile delinquency has resulted from insecurity and a 
breakdown of moral fibre. The records of the FBI show 
that during the wartime emergency the arrests of girls 
under eighteen years of age increased 375 per cent for 
prostitution alone, 357 per cent for disorderly conduct, 
and 175 per cent for drunkenness and driving while 
intoxicated, and during the same period the arrests of 
boys under eighteen years of age increased 48 per cent 
tor homicide, 70 per cent for rape, 39 per cent for robbery, 
72 per cent for assault, 55 per cent for automobile thefts, 
and 101 per cent for drunkenness and driving while in- 
toxicated. The youngsters who prior to the war were 
stealing bicycles and committing other minor offenses are 
now the ones who are stealing automobiles, perpetrating 
armed robberies, and committing the more serious crimes. 
Arrest records today show that one out of every five of 
our criminals are but little beyond mere childhood. 

Too much has been said, and too little has been done to 
effectively combat juvenile delinquency. Constructive 
outlets must be provided for the boundless energies, 
enthusiasm and desires of youth. Having playgrounds, 
gymnasiums, swimming pools, skating rinks and other 
recreational and sports facilities available to our young 
boys and girls helps build good, wholesome and red- 
blooded Americans. It's a major constribution to the 
future welfare of youth and pays dividends in health, 
happiness and good citizenship. 

f Continued on page 58 ) 



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SAN LEANDRO UPHOLSTERY 

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Phone SWeetwood 8-6332 



271 DAVIS STREET 



SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 



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KITT'S CACTUS GARDENS 

ALL KINDS OF 
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965 MacARTHUR BLVD. 



SAN LEANDRO. CALIF. 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1948 



Security Detairs Second Annual Meet 



When the United Nations conference was held in San 
Francisco nearly three years ago to formulate plans for 
world-wide peace. Chief Charles Dullea assigned 71 
members of the San Francisco Police Department to act 
as security officers during the weeks the conference was 
in session. 

Chief Dullea named Captain Michael E. Mitchell, now 
Chief of Police, as the man to have charge of this im- 




Chief Michael E. I. Mitchell 

portant detail. Captain Mitchell, Captain Michael Gaffey 
and other top members of the Police Department went 
through the roster of the Police Force and selected the 
members who would serve on the Security Detail. The 
men selected were men who by their experience, deport- 
ment and appearance would reflect most creditably to the 
Police Department and to the city of San Francisco. The 
selelction was, in fact, the pick of the Department. 

The Security Company was formed with headquarters 
in the Civic Center; the members were addressed by the 
Chief and Captain Mitchell and told their duties, and 
wede impressed with the necessity of allowing nothing to 
transpire that would endanger the delegates from nations 
scattered over this earth. They were told that they must 
carry out their duties with firmness and at the same time 
with courtesy. 

Lieutenant Jack Eker, now a Captain, and Lieutenant 
Wm. Danahy were commissioned officers on the Detail. 

How well this Security Council worked and carried out 
their duties is now bright history and the members re- 
ceived glowing praise for the outstanding job they per- 
formed during the time the United Nations were in 
session. 

After the conference adjourned the Security Detail was 
demobilized, getting from the Police Commission and 
Chief Dullea high commendation for the swell manner 
they had carried on their duties of policing the great inter- 
national event. 

However, the men who made up this detail decided 
that in view of the friendships formed among them during 
their many weeks of close association should form an 



organization of the personnel and hold a reunion each 
year, thus keeping alive the fond memories of their great 
experience. 

The second annual meeting of this body was held on the 
evening of February 4, at Bimbo's, 2299 Powell Street. 
Over 5 menibers of the original 71 officers who served 
on the Security Detail showed up. They had a swell steak 
dinner prepared in Bimbo's well-known style. They were 
presented a program of entertainment provided by Lieu- 
tenant Alvin Nicolini who had charge of this year's fes- 
tivities. 

Chief Mitchell was there as was Captain Jack Eker, 
Captain Gaffey, Sergeants Joseph Perry, Charles Radford, 
Charles Lyons, Walter Meyers and Richard Hanlon, all 
seated at the speakers table. 

Mike Lawley, the town's best master of ceremonies, was 
on hand and because he knows all the boys of the Police 
Department, and was raised with most of the top men he 
did an outstanding job. 

Tommy Harris, San Francisco's well known radio artist 
and owner of the city's well known night spot, the House 
of Harris, was present and he brought two featured acts, 
Myrus, a mind reader who had the boys mystified and 
Guy Taylor with a number of solos, the lead of which was 
a medley of San Francisco songs. Both these artists got a 
round of genuine applause. 

Then James Farlely and J. Higgins gave with some 
mighty fine singing and John Borlo, the basketball impres- 
sario knocked them dead with his baseball monologue and 
Joe McCarthy's monologue about joining the army was a 
real big time act. 

Then Master of Ceremonies Lawley called on the speak- 
ers. They all gave short but sincere talks. 

Captain Gaffey recited the way the Security Council 
was selected three years ago. He said the men picked for 
the important work had done a good and loyal job. "You 
helped our new Chief do a good job when he was the com- 
mander of your Security company and I know you will 
continue to give him the same loyal support in his new 
post," were his closing remarks. 

Capt.iin Jack Eker,, who was a Lieutenant on the De- 
tail, recalled how members of the Detail have advanced 
since they did their stint at the United Nations meet. Cap- 
tain Mitchell is now chief, (all know Captain Eker is now 
in the top ranks of commissioned officers) and many have 
moved from patrolmen to .sergeants and some from ser- 
geants to lieutenant and he prophesized that many more 
will advance in future promotional examinations, because 
they are all men blessed with ambition and intelligence and 
a thorough knowledge of police work. 

Lieutenant Nicolini said this was a select group and 
it is surprising how many outside of this body of men 
wanted to come to the meeting. He told how every man 
carried out his assignment and the patrolmen, the ser- 
geants, the Lieutenants all worked in harmony under their 
(Continued on page 44) 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

CRIME PREVENTION 



Page 17 



Paper Delivered at Annual Convention of State Peace Officers at Hoberg's Last September 
By Chief Special Agent Harry M. Kimball, F.B.I. 



Crime prevention, now recognized as one of the primary 
functions of law enforcement, was never more important 
than today. 

The January', 1947, issue of the Uniform Crime Re- 
portsii reflecting statistics on arrests for 1946, shows that 
for the first time since 194J, the age of 17 years did not 




Chief Special Agent Harry M. Kimball 

predominate the number of arrests. During the year 1946 
the age of 21 years predominated. The thought occurs 
that these figures, rather than revealing a decrease in 
juvenile delinquency, may he an indication that the 
juvenile delinquent — the 17-year-old — of the war years is 
becoming the hardened criminal of today. Thus, we do 
not have to look far to see that the problem of juvenile 
delinquency has become one of our worst post-war head- 
aches. For us in law enforcement, it is a problem in 
crime prevention. 

Of course, it is ordinarily recognized that the protection 
of society is the first aim of a law enforcement agency, 
and in the handling of offenders of all ages, first considera- 
tion is given to the interests of the community, and 
second to the welfare of the individual involved. While 
this approach might possibly contrast in some instances 
with that of social welfare workers, probation officers, 
psychiatrists, clerg^'men, teachers, and others who are 
primarily dealing with the individual, still the aim — 
crime prevention — is the same, and it is up to law enforce- 
ment to take an active part in — and possibly lead — com- 
munity programs designed to curb and stamp out juvenile 
delinquency. 

Many local law enforcement agencies have, in the ab- 
sence of youth-serving organizations in the community, 
set up programs of their own, such as the organization 



of crime-prevention bureaus within the department, adopt' 
ing "big brother" programs, and setting up their own 
youth organizations, variously called junior patrols, junior 
police corps, junior sheriff leagues, police athletic leagues 
— all, by whatever name called, designed not only to 
afford youngsters a wholesome outlet for their energy 
through sports, camping, traffic handling schools, and 
handcraft groups, but also to make them law-enforcement- 
minded, to teach them to look up to the officer as a hero, 
rather than as a hoodlum or racketeer. 

Today in many communities, coordinating councils 
have been set up with law enforcement cooperating with 
schools, churches, and civic and social organizations, as 
well as welfare agencies, clinics, and other community 
groups in an effort to pool all the community resources to 
meet the problem. 

The local law enforcement agency may well take the 
lead in inspiring individuals and organizations to take 
action. A survey of the local problem should be made 
which would include the extent of lawlessness in the 
area, the types of crime, their locations, and the reasons 
for them, and any particular breeding places, such as 
neighborhoods where the offenders reside and shady estab- 
lishments where they hang out. Thereafter officials and 
leaders of the community's civic, social, and professional 
organizations, its schools and churches, its welfare groups, 
and the publishers and editors of the local press may be 
called in. The problem would then be outlined, the facih- 
ties in each of the various groups analyzed, and a com- 
munity program adopted. Each group represented would 
be given a definite job to do in the over-all program. 

Participation by the local law enforcement agency in 
any such program is desirable, and, in fact, necessary, if 
the program is to be successful. In the first place, such 
participation is desirable, since it affords the local police 
agency an excellent opportunity to do a public relations 
job in that it is enabled to bring its activities to the atten- 
tion of the other participating groups, whose members 
will include a large segment of the substantial citizens of 
the community. In addition, resultant newspaper and 
radio publicity will serve to acquaint the entire community 
with the work and activities of the local law enforce- 
ment agency. 

If the community' program is to be successful, the co- 
operation of the local law enforcement agency is neces- 
sary, since 

(1) it is best acquainted with the location of points 
of infection, locations contributing to the delinquency of 
youngsters in the community; 

(2) the very nature of its work and operations keeps 
it best informed as to the methods employed by law vio- 
lators, regardless of age; 

(Continued on page 67) 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



S.F. Bureau of Inspectors Honor Two Captains 



On the night of February 2, at Blanches", there was 
held a celebration that was tops in enthusiasm and enjoy- 
ment. It was the occasion of a testimonial dinner given 
in honor of retiring Captain of Inspectors Bernard J. 





Captain of Inspectors James L. English 

McDonald and his successor Captain James L. English of 
the San Francisco Police Department. 

The affair was under the direction of Lieutenant Sam 
Miller, in charge; of the Pawn Shop Detail, Inspector Frank 
Lucey in charge of the General Works Detail and In- 
spector, Jess Ayes of the Robbery Detail. 

Every member of the Bureau of Inspectors was present 
with Police Commissioner J. Warnock Walsh, Former 
Chief Charles W. Dullea, Judges Preston Devine, Twain 
Michelsen, and Wallenberg, District Attorney Pat Brown, 
special agents from many business firms of the city, At- 
torney Les Gillen, J. W. Ehrlich, and newspaper men, like 
Herb Caen and Freddie Francisco, the number who sat 
down to a steak dinner that was out of this world, 
totalled 27^). 

Attorney Lou Ashe, who can give a lot of high paid 
radio comedians cards and spades and still take time out 
to cat his dinner, was master of ceremonies and he did 
one swell job. 

A fine program of acts from the Bal Tabarin, Lido 
and 36^ Club presented entertainment to suit all tastes. 

Speakers included Former Chief Dullea, Commissioner 
Walsh, Judge Devine, and District Attorney Brown. 

The latter stated that both Captain McDonald and 
EtigFish were a credit to the department and Chief Dullea 
recalled how faithfully Captain McDonald had served 
the city under him as Captain of Inspectors for nearly 
erght "years. Chief Dullea on behalf of the Bureau members 
presented Oaiptain McDonald with a fine gold pen and 
pencil set. 

Lieutenant Miller had the pleasure of presenting the 



new Captain of Inspectors with a swell desk set, and it 
gave Sam Miller much pleasure for, as head of the Pawn- 
shop Detail, he had occasion to see Captain English, then 
just a plain Inspector and on the detail, display his quali- 
fications as a police officer. For it was during his service 
with the Pawnshop unit he demonstrated his ability to 




• Captain Bernard J. McDonald 

meet up with any police problem, when he shot it out 
with a desperate ex-con holdup man at Third and Mission 
Streets, contributing the same to the village morgue. On 
this detail he also showed the result of his experience as 
a capable officer in bringing in many a badly wanted crook. 

One of the most interested guests at the affair was 
Frank English, the father of Captain English. 

It has been decided by the members of the Inspectors 
Bureau that there will be an annual gathering of the mem- 
bership, a mighty good idea we should siy. 

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March. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page,,.i9 



Inspector Wall Takes Over Stock and Bond Detail 



Inspector George F. Wall has been given charge of the 
Stock and Bond Detail by Captain of Inspectors James 
L. English. He takes the place made vacant by the retire- 
ment and later the death of Inspector Jack J. Cannon. 

Few members of the San Francisco Police Department, 




Inspector George Wall When He Was Pounding a Beat. 

or any other for that matter, have had as varied a career 
and participated in the capture of so many desperate and 
daring criminals, than Inspector Wall. 

Through his 34 years as member of the Department, 
29 of which have been in the Bureau of Inspectors, he has 
acquired a lot of experience which combined with the 
traditional courage of a fearless officer, has enabled him 
to outsmart many a crook. 

He has done commendable service on the Robbery, 
Automobile and Hotel Details, and before being placed 
in charge of the Stock and Bond Detail he has worked for 
years with Inspector Fred Bohr of the Hotel Detail. 

George Wall joined the Department on April 13, 1914. 
His lirst station was Golden Gate Park, where he was on 
the Special Duty Detail until January 15, 191 f, being 
then sent to Central Station where he worked until De- 
cember 2, 1919. On that date he was transferred to the 
Inspectors' Bureau. A well set up man, over six feet tall, 
with a smile that comes easy, he soon demonstrated his 
ability to meet any assignment. 

During his membership in the Bureau of Inspectors he 
has acted as body guard for many dignitaries visiting San 
Francisco. Among the most illustrious were President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Hopkins, Roosevelt's main 
aide, Jesse Jones of the cabinet of the late president; 
Crown Prince Frederick and his Princess wife, of Den- 
mark, Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison, Secretary of 
the Interior Robert Hinkley, Governor Thomas Dewey, 
the late Mayor Jimmy Walker of New York, Trygve Lie, 



secretary of the United Nations Conference and many 
Mayors who have called on the Mayors of this city. All let 
it be known to Inspector Wall and his superior how much 
they appreciated his outstanding service. 

Inspector Wall took part in the arrest of many crooks 
who made front pages during their brief careers. He was 
a principal in taking Buck Kelly, the wanton and brutal 
murderer, who was hanged in San Quentin. Others were 
the capture of four men who burglarized the Julian Hart 
and Fred McNear mansion in Menlo Park, and held the 
maid, the butler and children of the family prisoners for 
14 hours while they broke into the concrete vault and 
removed two trucks of liquor in the probation. The .liquor 
was all recovered. .'i.;»-ilie«iy)"i' 

He was active in the arrest and conviction of Lloyd 
Sampsell and Ethan McNabb, the Yacht Bandits, v^'ho 
held up many banks on this coasts. ' 

He had a lot to do with the arrest of Big Bill O'Connor 
the head of the gang of Daylight Robbers, One of the 
gang's jobs was the $50,000 robbery of Houston Gillmore's 
jewelry store in this city. ' 

He participated in bringing in two gangs who ran wil(p 
for a few weeks at different times — the Twin Peaks Bandt 
its and the White Masked Bandits. 

Inspector Wall is an ardent sportsman, and he has 
hunted and fished from the Mexican,,b-Or4exsjtt©'|KeT%*ithr 
ern areas of Canada. 

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Beer and Soft Drinks 

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t^:: 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, J 948 




(Copyricht, 1931, 2-0 Publlshins Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7H0 



An Official Polica Newa and Educational Macazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFHCERS' ASSOQATION 
PENINSULA POUCE OFFKERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE CARDA REVIEW Jt Crow St, Dublin, Ireland 

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SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable In advance; 26c 
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IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. ' 



HELP THE RED CROSS 

To the thousands of Americans who suffer in the wake 
of tragic disaster each year, to the handicapped veterans, 
to the war wounded servicemen still on the long road to 
recovery — "You are their hope." 

This slogan keynotes the appeal of Red Cross in seeking 
the support of the people of San Francisco during its 
annual fund campaign in the month of March, 

It is a reminder that through Red Cross the citizens of 
this and every community maintain the nation's greatest 
mercy agency in war or peace. 

The Red Cross fund drive will be conducted throughout 
the country during March. The national goal is 
$75,000,000, with San Francisco's share set at $1,059,000. 
Headquarters for the local drive is in the Red Cross build- 
ing, 450 Cough Street. 

Chairman of the campaign in San Francisco is Sheldon 
G. Cooper, attorney and prominent civic leader, who was 
appointed by Garret McEnerney II, chapter chairman. 
Serving as campaign vice-chairman is John Parks Davis, 
San Francisco attorney. 

"Red Cross must continue to receive the wholehearted 
suppiort of every one of us in order to carry out its tre- 
mendous responsibilities," Cooper declared. 

"We look to Red Cross at all times to serve us during 
any national disaster. We ask that organization to carry 



on its fine work in military and veterans hospitals, giving 
daily comfort to the thousands of war wounded who are 
confined to years of convalescence. We seek its excellent 
health and safety services to help provide well-ordered 
living in our community. 

"Now the Red Cross comes to us, as it does once a year, 
to obtain funds essential to its continued operation. Every 
San Franciscan may well feel proud to add his share to one 
of humanity's strongest forces by contributing this month 
to Red Cross," Cooper said. 

During the past year, Cooper pointed out, 300,000 men, 
women and children throughout the country were stricken 
by a disastrous series of floods, fires, tornadoes, and ex- 
plosions. To relieve immediate suffering, and to help re- 
establish the disrupted lives of families. Red Cross ex- 
pended $11,000,000 in this vital function alone. 

The full record of the national organization's work in 
1947 is truly an inspiring story of humanitarian service, 
Cooper said. 



FORGER WANTED 

Lieutenant Maurice Reardon of the Check Detail of 
San Francisco's Bureau of Inspectors is looking for 
Robert Owen Summers, and has sent out "readers" 
throughout the state for this man who is wanted on a 
charge of forgery. 

He was a member of the Ship Painters Union, and 
while there cashed a check for $500.00, forging the names 
of that union's officials. The circulars state Summers has 
several aliases, using the names in the past such as James 
L. Lewis, Robert Owen Clark, John Buff and Murrel 
Summer. He has been registered at the Huntsville, Texas, 
state penitentiary' and has been arrested in Salt Lake City, 
Clarinda, Iowa, Fort Worth, Texas and Los Angeles. 

He is described as white, American, 40 years of age, 
190 pounds in weight and 5 feet 2 inches tall. Has brown 
hair and blue eyes. Besides doing painting he follows 
truck driving as a means to get an extra dollar. 

His fingerprints are 20 1 Rr 12 
1 1 R 10 

There is a cashier's check for the arrest and appre- 
hension of this fugitive, and it is in the San Francisco 
Police Property Clerk's office and has an expiration date 
of January 1, 1949. 



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March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 

By J. Ross DUNNIGAN 



Page 21 



On Sunday, January 18th, 1948 we had the extreme 
pleasure of watching Quentin Brooks, that shootin' pre' 
medical student from the University of California, crack 
a world's record in the individual Camp Perry course for 
civilians. Quent shot 298 as against the old 297. Then he 
comes along and ties the record for the .22 timed fire 
course with two possibilities but in the final shoot-off 
for a new world's record the jitters got him and he blew 
his chances. Just imagine a guy shooting a near perfect 
score in the Camp Perr>' match! Why its uh-uh-m-m-m-ah 
er, well, its nearly perfect, thats what it is! Then he 




QUE.STI.N BROOKS 

steps up to the platform after the matches and receives 
the annual award from the Call-Bulletin for the 1947 out- 
standing shot — and was the trophy a honey! It was almost 
as tall as Brooks himself and made of gold, all shined up. 
Oh boy, what the rest of those gunslingers would have 
given to be in Quent's place. Ah me, but it shall never be. 

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The weather was too darn good for shooting but it at- 
racted about 180 of the lads and lassies to try their hand 
at hitting that elusive black spot! 

* * * 

We have been puzzling over the landscape of Ed Ros- 
ing ever since we saw him Sunday shooting under the 
colors, and the guise, of a San Mateo Sheriff. Decked out 
in his uniform he made quite a picture alongside of Con- 
stant, Buck and Jerry Monheim — all of the same ilk. 

* * * 

Jim Middleton was at his first shoot and while he only 
shot in the .22 matches we thought that as soon as he 
gets over his nervousness he will be a good gunslinger. 
There were many other first timers with us numbering 
quite a few. Alvin and Meta Chase from Pasadena, L. 
Gambucci and Walter Muller from S. F., Carol and Joe 
Lange from Oakland, R. A. Petty from Mountain View, 
J. C. Rudhrmand from Treasure Island, Ed Slavin from 
Monrovia and Charley Young from King City. In all 

possibilities there were a few morer but we missed them. 

* * * 

■ Speaking of new shooters, Steve Jochums had his wife, 
Ramona, out on the lines for her first attempt at "paper 
punching." Steve sez that maybe now they'll be able to 
gather in a few medals — and maybe his daughter will be 

over soon to help out the family medal case. 

* * * 

The Fort Baker Revolver fe? Pistol Club has gotten 
under way and they are building an indoor Range over 
that way with 50-yard indoor firing points. Membership is 
for GI's and civilian employees working at the C. A. 
School. Teams are in making to challenge the S. F. and 
Oakland hot-shots and much stiff competition is expected. 
General Wm. Lawton was elected president. Colonel 
Englehart as executive vice president and Sergeant C. E. 
Nelson, secretary. Hope the Club pans out as expected 
because we know of a few good shooters in the group and 

they promise to give the local boys a run for their bullets. 

* * * 

And just what do you think? Margaret and Frank Finn 
are cleaning up the spare room and dusting oflF the crib. 
Yep, that's right — and their second one, too — along about 
March or April the Stork tells us. 

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Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March. J 948 



Some of the die-hards were complaining about upping 
the registration fee two-bits but the extra cash helps de- 
fray NRA expenses and keeps our entry fees down to 
four-bits instead of 75c. Another gripe some of the boys 
have is that you must sign up for matches BEFORE 9 
o'clock on match days. Some of the pistol pointers failed to 
do so and being their first offense — and the ranges first 
day with the new rule — they were allowed to register and 
shoot BUT never again. It's a good rule as it helps the 
men in the squadding office get their books in order. Many 
ranges close entries a week or a few days before the 
matches but the S. F. Range can handle entries at any time 

but the morning closing is the best. 

* * * 

Glenn Lym, Berkeley Police Reserve, was at his first 
shoot in S. F. and was rated as an expert. His hat suddenly 
became smaller — until after the first match when he 
placed down about 50th. After being chopped down to 
size his hat also came back to normal but Glen said any- 
how, he was an Expert. 

* * * 

Homer Bishop drove up from Modesto with "Skip" 
Harris Sunday and was a first timer with the gang at the 
range. "Skip" is in charge of the pistol range at the Ala- 
meda Air Base and grabs anyone he can to break 'em in 
as shooters. As it was his first try. Homer was put in the 
Expert class and aside from that diflScult 50-yard shooting, 

he did very well. How about "Skip"? 

* * * 

We always knew that the general run of shooters were 
nuts and each shoot we attend it is brought home more 
forcibly to us. Take f'instance the sad case of Fred Leber, 
the State Hi-way copper. Fred has a bad habit of protest- 
ing his scores at times — now don't get us wrong — but 
Fred protests even when he is given more points than he 
thinks he shot. The guys nuts, we tell you and that applies 
to the guy from Oakland, Frank Lipoid who protested 
that "how the hell could a guy shoot a 93 when there were 
only 9 shots on the target?" You tell 'em, Frank^ — we 
couldn't. 



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The matches for the day would not be complete without 
our usual morning's lecture by Karl Schaugaard on the 
rules and regulations that must be adhered to by us 
shooters. Do this, don't do that, stop this or stop that and 
so on into the morning. But Karl is improving and we 
inwardly feel that he has been going to a public speaking 
class of late. However, it's good for the shooters to be 
warned and told these things over and over again as a 
loaded gun is a darn dangerous thing in a man's hand — 
especially if he is a bit careless. 



NO'5,DONT'5, 
CANV'S. 




The Calexico Gun Club is holding their annual Desert 

Cavalcade International Shoot on March 6th, 7th and 8th 

in Calexico. They arc expecting about 300 pistol pointers 

down their way but we can't for the life of us figure how, 

or where they will be able to accommodate such a mob. 

It is our present intention to make the trip but we just 

can't see sleeping out on the desert with the rattlesnakes 

and scorpions and will be doubly sure of a house before 

we go. At the same time, or a week earlier wc should 

say, the Los Angeles boys are holding their annual shoot 

on February 27th, 28th and 29th, so it is expected the 

real gun nuts will make the two shoots at the same time. 
* * * 

Jack Reidy, of the Crocker Bank guard detail, made 
his belated appearance Sunday after an absence of several 



Where Friends Meet 



ELGIN and FAGAN 



COCKTAILS 



336 Highland Avenue 
SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. 



March. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



months due to the fact he had no transportation to and 
from the range. 

We were glad to see "Shorty" Methot with us again 

Sunday, thus making the second set of matches he has 

attended. Shorty expects to be with us quite regular from 

now on but it seems he is only shooting on the .22 matches 

for the time being and in due course of events expects to 

expand his gun-locker to contain all the deadly weapons 

that make up a shooters kit. Good luck, my little man — 

but if"n you're smart you'll quit now before the gun bug 

bites you too hard. 

* * * 

Harr>' Plummer, the Mill Valley floriculturist, brought 
over with him Elwood Johnson to try his skill for the first 
time on any range. Harry ss: the boy has promise and 
Elwood showed it in the matches during the day. 



In the .22 timed match Jack Chaney, one of the San 

Francisco Police force's finest, found 5 extra tens on his 

target for a total of 1? shots. Now Jack is by nature 

a mild mannered gent but this time he really blew his 

top at the poor guy standing near him — well, anyhow, 

he finished with a 192 and all was forgiven as he suddenly 

remembered that he has done that to other shooters himself. 
* * * 

The Siesta Club handed out two new memberships on 
Sunday. One to Ed de Mello, of the Oakland Police De- 
partment, as Ed slept thru most of the Camp Perry 
match. The other went to Vern Clayton (who just finished 
giving one of the shooters warning about getting on the 
lines on time) who started off with a 92 slow fire and 
slept thru the timed and rapid stages of the match. Ho 
hum, fellows, this catching up on sleep ain't good for the 
scores. 



Scores for Sunday, January 18th, 1948 



.22 National Match 

Master. Bob Chow 294 

Expert Joe Hallisy 291 

Sharpshooter Harry Stipp 276 

Mar\sman 1st Gibby Gibson 273 

Mar\sman L. Lawrence 268 

Tyro George Baldi 212 

.22 Timed Fire Match 

Master Quentin Brooks 200 

Expert M. D. Mc"Vey 198 

Sharpshooter Bill Constant 194 

Mar\sman 1st Chas. Young 194 

Marksman R. Suey 183 

Tyro George Baldi 165 



C. F, National Match 

Quent Brooks 291 

Jack Chaney 281 

Steve Jochums 273 

N. M. Hansen 262 

D. J. Clark 260 

George Baldi 224 

.45 National Match 

B. DowHng 278 

Art Lindauer 280 

Ralph KHne 270 

S. Spriglle 271 

Chas. Young 258 



Camp Perry Match 

Quent Brooks 298 

Dud Harkelroad 291 

Clayton Kober 287 

Charley Young 279 

D. J. Clark 264 

George Baldi 241 

Grand Aggregate 

Quent Brooks 1078 

Joe Hallisy 1054 

Chas. Barnett 1010 

Chas. Young 970 

Louis 'Wells 928 

Bill Mahood 769 



Team Scores 

Class "A" 

1. S. F. Police Revolver Club Red Team 1169 

2. S. F. Police Revolver Club Blue Team 1164 

CL.^ss "B" 
1. Pittsburg Revolver and Pistol Club 1065 

Remodeling Reblueing 

RIFLE - PISTOL - REVOLVER 

JAMES E. FIELDS 

GUNSMITH 

1014 7th Avenue :: TEmplebar 2-1311 

Expert Action Work Repairing 

OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA 

EMERYVILLE RECREATION CENTER 

POOL AND SNOOKER 
4120 SAN PABLO AVE. EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 

COOK 8C HARMS 

40 California Street 



SCORES— for July to December, 1947 

Grand Aggregate Score for the period: 

1. Quentin Brooks (Call-Pulletin Champ. Trophy) 6954 

2. Bob Chow 6895 

3. Jack Ahern (S. F. P. D.) 6895 

RAYL MANUFACTURING CO. 

Mechanical 
STANDARD SIGNALS 

Electrical 



TRinidad 2-3916 

7501 SAN LEANDRO STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone 1 6 



TRACY 



PETERSON COFFEE SHOP 



Helen Stone and Mary Stewart, Props. 
80 W. Eleventh 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 505 

TONG'S INN 

"ENJOY A REAL CHOW MEIN" 

CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS 

ORDERS PREPARED TO TAKE HOME 

118 E. I 1th STREET on the Highway TRACY. CALIFORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March, ]948 



Classification Scores 

Master _ Quentin Brooks 4277 

Expert Joe Hallisy (SFPD) 4168 

Sharpshooter Donald George 4033 

Mar\sman 1st W. F. Martens 3936 

MarXsman 2nd Paul O'Leary (SFPD).... 3835 

Mar\sman 3rd. Jack Riddel ...- 3409 

Team Matches 

Class "A" 
S. F. Police Team #1 Trophy and 4 gold medals 

Class "B" 
S. F. Police Team #? Trophy and 4 silver medals 

Liaison Officers Teams 

1. S. F. Police Reserve, Co. "I" .4 gold medals 

2. S. F. Police Re5en.-e Motorcycle Unit .4 silver medals 

Individual Liaison Officers Medal Awards 

(8 out of 10 Camp Perrj' Police Course Matches) 
1 Lou Wilkes Grt>ld medal 

2. E. Simmons Gold medal 

3. 'Tex" Wells Gold medal 

4. Bill Markel Silver medal 

5. J. Gibbons Silver medal 

6. L. Lawrence Silver medal 

Scores for Oakland and San Francisco for 1947 

This month we have compiled the scores for both the 
Oakland and the San Francisco ranges to see who was the 
outstanding champ of champs between the t\\'o ranges. 
There is no trophy or glor>' attached to this compilation 
but just our own whim for comparison's sake. 

.22 Caliber 

Highest 
Course Name Score 

T^ationa] Match Quentin Brooks 295 

Short Tvjatl. Course Quentin Brooks 296 

Camp Perry Quentin Brooks 299 

Timed'fiTe G. Elliott Murphy 199 

Rapid-fire Quentin Brooks 199 

Western Police Quentin Brooks 296 

.38 Caliber 

J^ational Match Quentin Brooks 294 

Short T^ational Quentin Brooks 290 

Timed-fire „ Bob Chov.' 200 

R^pid-:^re Grif Thompson (SFPD) ... 197 

Camp Perry Insp. Jack Ahern (SFPD) . . 298 

20 shots sloit; yire 

reduced target, 

25 yds Insp. Jack Ahern (SFPD) . . 191 

20 shots slow fire 



50 yds Grif Thompson (SFPD) . . . IS-! 

Western Police 

Match.... Quentin Brooks 197 

Inspector Ahem 197 

.45 Caliber 

J^atiorvil Match Quentin Brooks 287 

Short JsJationaJ Bob Chow 2^7 

Camp Perry Roy Kay 283 

Western Police A! Heath 280 

Cap & Ball 

12 shots at 25 yds Bill Dowling 115 

COLUMBIA COFFEE SHOP 

301 Eddy Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

HEALTH FIRST! PURITY SPRING WATER - From the Mountains 
of Marin County Caiifornia. Delveries Throughout the Bay Area- 

PURITY SPRING WATER COMPANY 

Office 2050 Kearny Street, Phone EXbrook 2-6464, San Franc-.sco 
Oakland Phone HIsate 9798 

i ] 

HEmlock 1-9624— Day or Night 



G. W. THOMAS 
Draying and Rigging Co. 

Incorporated 

GENERAL DRAYING 



SAFE AND MACHINERY MOVING 

LONG DISTANCE HAULING 

RIGGING 



1 14 Fourteenth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



FiREMANS Fund Group 

Firemaris Fund Insurance Company 

Fireman's Fund Indemnity Company 

Home Fire & Marine Insurance Company 

Western National Insurance Company 

Western National Indemnity Company 



JWl'MMJ. 



NEW YORK 



HSi^^Z 



BOSTON 



ATLANTA 



M«rdi. 1948 



POUCE .\ND PEACE OFFICERS* JOURNAL 



P*ee25 



Watsonville New Chief a Newspaperman 



We like to write aixut aewsfsapenoen getnng up in 
wofld in odKT hnes c4 endeainar than by tfadr woA as 
news gatbereis and writecs. When Sbeciff H. P. (Jack) 
Gkasoo was appcinted SheiiS^ of Alameda Cowtty we 
stated he was the fiist new^apennan in this neck of the 
woods to get a top job in law enfotcement. Now we aie 




^ 



ChlEF F^uvs: ' 7- - • 

happy to present another oe«.~~ -^ 

die grade in law enfoccement. 

He is dief Frank J. Ofeooer :: W i: 
Onef ]ames M. Giaws of diat dty. becaise of illness 
stepped out as Qiief of Police last October, after serving 
die dty so well for so many years, the dty ooundl picked 
Spc«ts Editor O^mer to fiD die vacant i^ce. Mr. C^ner 
had never been a member <d any pabce dqnrtment prior 
to the appointment as head of die WatsonviDe Pabce 
Department. However, bring a WatsonviOe bom boy, a 
graduate (rf Santa Qara Universty and a workii^ news- 
paper man on dke Register-I^jarcxan covering all ass^- 
ments until made ^xxts editor, he had demoostrated his 
abiHty to handle anydiing diat came his way. He was 
mighty popular in his home town and die people liked 
him and they aD said he would make good, and that b<e 
is doing. 

Chief O^ooer was bom m 1921, aitd after getong 
grammar and hi^ school traming entered Sania Clara 
Un ive rs i t y , graduatii^ in ISH?. Enlisting immediately 
in the army he served duee years, most of k overseas and 
came out a Captain of ArtiDery. Returning to his home 
room with Im wife, the farmer Norine ifirphy, \chom be 
married before going over to Europe, he got himsdf a 
job on die town s paper, one of die oldest in die state. 
Like all cub reporters he covered aD stories^ and among 
diese he was brought in contact with the police dqnrt- 
ment. That is aD die experience he has ever had widi a 
Pblice Department. He was put at the head of ^'atson- 
villc's Police Force on October S. last year. 

His college education, his experience as an army man 



wfaidi Cook him to a captaincy, made it easy tor htm to 
grasp the detail of running the city's Polics Depart- 
ment, of 18. 

He fbond his predecesBor had left a well or^niaed 
body of men and tfaRB has tasls were eaaer, though he 
has plans for fotose onprovemenCs that wiD give the dty's 
8s,300 people the bea in the enforcement of Ae. law. 

Already tfaioi^ his efforts diere are to be tnstaBrd 
3S stop I^it s^nak at the intersections oo die main 
street of the town, wfaidi is properly named Main. 

He has five Bien ^"s^^ne^ to trafic, mder O&cer C. E. 
H^w?. who B a graduate of the Coast Tra£c Ingtitiite 
at the U mve r aty of Cahlamia. 

There e one oommisaQned officer, Ljentmant £. H. 
Dids and two sergeants, KGIo Cooper and Sam Vocinidi. 

The Department has its own radio station handlpd by 
Tedundian Harry Harrison, and aD police cars are out- 
fitted widi diree-way radio sets. 

Odier members ai the fca\3e are: 

J. E. Mil^ianidi, W. S. James, Ben Jacobeotu Pat Rooney. 
J. G. Brandon- W. L Jessup. F. J. Martin, R C Anton, 
C E. H3wt. F. C Enaainger. R- C Mock. J. C Wright. 
Ned A. Gluiiin. R R Shion. Qerk Elma Bttske. 

Chief and Mis^ Oteier hav« two children i boy and 
1 girl 

WatsooviDe's mayor is C. R Baker, and as tar as we 
can kam he has die lecocd for continuous service as a 
municipal chief csecutive, wtth 2 1 years of excellent serv- 
ice to the dty. He is recognized for his fund of knowledge 
c£ municipal affairs and las to hs cz^^iit the enactment 
by the legisiatnre of dke act which returrs to cities and 
counties a portion of die funds collected on the gasoliDe 
tax. Ife has for years been a meet successful busness man 
in the great appk and produce area in and anMmd Wat- 
soavilk, and is yet pfominent in die deep ficeeae business 
diat has m recent years changed the mediod of preparing 
food for die people duou^nat die natiocL 

like all CaHfomia aaaHoanities and cities crime is oa 
the increase in Watsonvflle since die end of the war. 
but like many other dties WatsonviHc fe keeping its crtme 
inaease less than die tocrease of its populatiQCi. Chief 
Corner and his men veiD stiD contribute its quota of of- 
fenders to San Quentin and other penal institutions of 
the state when they try dieir hand at getting somediing 
for nothii^, as the saying goes. 

We are m:^ty glad to see a newspaper reporter as a 
Qiief of Pbbce and we feel certain that Chief Oteier 
will justify our pleasure, by giving WatsonviDe a good 
police administration. 



MORINO BROS. 

QL',AU"n' GROCERIES A.ND ME-XTS 
CEXER-*L JUERCH-OTDISE - BEER .VM) WTSE 

'$<?« SCTTER 5~r;££T SAN r^ANClSCC :' CAUF. 



r.ijjf :^ 



l\>LlOK AND TbAOF OFFICERS JOIRNAL 



Manh. l'^4S. 



H L 


L 


A N 1) E R ' 


S 




Jewelers 








• 




5«T»ni<; Humholdt Counts •i/fc iht 
jimcst in Jcvclry for 4S ^■car^ 








• 




FIR I 


S20 
K A 


Fifth Street 1 
. C A 1 1 K O R M A 1 



V. M. BALDOCR 
S T r D E B A K E R 

Sales and Service 



Telephomc 157 
>04 Sixth Street 

El REKA. CALIFORNIA 



"Eurckas Ohm" 

YELLOW CAB 

Ox»ncd And OjvratcJ bv Enroka Capital 

PHONE 532 



H G GlLMORF 

EliREKA, CALIFORNIA 



ROOSEVELT 
GARDENS 



» * * 



'}h'hcrc You Meet Your Frietids' 



» * * 



410 Fifth Street 
EL REKA. CALIFORNIA 



A. LEAT & 
J. ZENTNER CO. 

Fruit and Veiretables 
Polar Frozen Foods 



ODORLESS CLEANERS 



^■. ]. Martin 



EL REKA. CALIFORNIA 



COTTAGE CANDY SHOP i 
Fountain - Lunch i 



L. C. Prestn'ood 



ELT^EKA. CALIFORNIA 



2237 California Street 
ELTREKA. CALIFORNIA 



ANDREW ROSAIA 



j I Wholesale Liquors 



Eureka, California i 



Msrth. t'MH 



VCJUCt AND VtACt OfnCOUS^ yjiM96AL 

Chief Basil W. Gresory, Eureka 



fs^TJ 



Af-^rr -.OT' ;•.'■■■-:■■:: ;'.,•- ,'■ ';-,'-.-Ji(jj jtrKc* acu Site t*- 

Omi fi Poliae m 194f . Ha* -^f^Mtmem, hy Ua^jr 
Rr»a, tame tStet at maSf dmit tktmifii ike lamk* - - 



pedki, *r.ri aidii* -j-' i^-JUi'^vUer -yjsr't <»u-jk: 3Mtv(C fSim^ 
' i rjistrv^ Ksiat •,', ■Hit 'j'jtwriFsr •::',■ -a<rv-j^ anvie ''^e 

^^ ewe, ivr £ tiyrvsi ■'.arc w^rt is/i rxt '.r x, v. 




Seak svm„ hA ■tin ■ . 
CasBy, Gkarf Gs!?: . 

tm «p SB (WD 4bcada^ Tkse asc a» ^^r^' ^ '■ - 
Gs^arr and aC 1^ fine taae iit aB«^ he aKT 

» aro wiatatBtig for ^igMrao Bce- '.ii-rue && aod ^osfe^ 5^ 

Ik Gbef s a 'WdUiHC,'" ita«B^ hssa Sxeis as Me> v.-:zyet^as: f iun fa tflfe !t%r 
£tja4. Ote^BBL mamg <o EaEE&a ae a f«B&. Tftae waaai e 
«sa%^ aadi of a A a a ge . far paqptfaadfr vataat ftmnr 
htMt asmatfheaaHtAt f&gaBsl neKaaftfaoBz tt» aoat «f 



...m: 



at s» 






I 



-^ an tan 

'*' TMBttr 'JBK. wi Bt fogtB VBe sett <m ok 
' itwUt iBr iHi^^'iinim 



vataa: 






Psge 2S 



POUCE AND PEACE OFnCERS^ JOURNAL 



MarA. ISMS 



Eonda, nbe ana wtatedy dly ia die Umted Stares, 
is tiie home pact erf die Coast Guaid in lias area, -sdndi 
has a. iBcacd of aax^ dwiifag xBases on die perilous 
and j»>^ »faj'i ^1 oocdi coast. 

Pardao me, readers, far gettang off of pniiring (sonmik 
more Hke a Qumher of Ckxamcrce boost) bat Ac wdlsei 

has made treqasoL trips to this del^aful owMiy far 
same tidrty years and eadi time it seoss mote rwirimg — 
but back to tiie subject. 

Qaef Gregory has a weD knit force of twenty rtffirfT? 
and dependable Mrs. Matlhevs, matraa. Captain Peder- 
son is in chai^ at nis^ The deparnment is 'wefl pcovided 
widi ladio cats and moccrcydes. The mXalKng <d paA- 
ing meseis has redoced some of tne f cnner tiafic probleias 



I KL\H TAXI CAB CO. 
Phone 36W 

DINK BEAN^ER. Mgr. 

Taxi Service to Anv Section 



10" North Slaae Street 

UKL\H. CALIFORNIA 



EUREKA BEM:RAGE CO. 

• 

Bacders oj 
NEHI 

P A R - T - P A K 
R. C. COLA 

Frank Craney - Frank Sikaoc 

EUREK-A. C.ALIFORNLA 



I i 



A. BRIZARD. Inc. j 
General Merchandise! 



Hoopa - ^eitchp>ec - Willow Creek 



Klamath - Areata - Eureka 



NORTHERN 
>LVRINE HARDWARE 

Commercial Fishermen's Supplies 
Sporting Goods 

Frank Breeden. Jr. 

• 
Seoood and E Streets 

ELTIEKLA. C.AIIFORNXA 



Welcome to the 

PALACE 



307 Second Street 

Eureka 



FUN CLUB 

Buck and Chuck 




EUREKA 



B E N Z I N G E R 

Radio Sales & SerWce 



426 H Street 

Eureka 



Mofdk J9«8 

OK OCf tXtSSKtf. 

As Ins Iseea dbe iaK ni 

■ tfiiy^j nss BBa uk —™t»w podt vav vdbb^k ok 

iHiilBanMaed ionz^ aoiil at gffiidJ o^^iEHHg op of 



POIJCE AND PEACE OfWKESS JDOUCAL 

^MW® ™ grmwr aa ? — ~ ■ — — 



Page 29 



a^ \ TEX ^^TSDOW \\TLLL\3I: 

ias. ' ,^^ 



inr Chi^ ~Gbz^ fruit a 



uSflB IBE ^ i WPtr ? 



of 



Job of 



^rJK . Mi i i i iii I' T r i 



F. Pu >L\THES 

Diamonds 

Watches 

J e ^v e 1 r y 

ELTUEKA. CALIFORNLA 



L A Z I (J • S 
S E A F D S 



Credit Jeweler 



Cjocncjr I And aad & Sonet 
EX.~REK.A- CALIFORMA 



: 

8 
8 

-4 



i 

I The Bohmansson Drug: Co. i 
^ ♦ 8 






! 



PHARMACY 



I I Prescription Specialists 8 



P J". Xe.»il£. ?r:c. ! 

t 
- ■ ' ' i < 



D A \ I E L S N • S 8 



QUALITY MEVS WEAR 



Eureka 



■ci F Sciccts 
ELTiEKA. CALIFWINIA 



RITCHIE WOODS 
D R r G S 



n 
ii 



B and G 

L I Q U R S 



I Eureka, California 






Ai M^^: 
ELTIEKA- CALIFOKVLA 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS .,OURNAL 



Mjrcli. 1948 



CALIFORNIA 
CAB COMPANY 



Eureka 



HARVEY M. HARPER CO. 

Harvey G. Harper. Manager 

Authorized Dealers 

Ford 
Mercury 

Phone 3040 6th and B Streets 

EUREKA. CALIFORNIA 



OLIVER'S 

Manufacturing 

Jewelers 

and 

Watchmakers 

Telephone 278 
600-602 Fourth Street (Corner of G) 

EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



I I 



MODERN 
CAKE SHOP 

Complete Line 

Pastries 



524 Fifth Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



EXCELSIOR 
FOOD MARKET 

Free Delivery 



502 A Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNL\ 



It has to be good 
It's the 

VICTORY CLUB 

Revere Hotel 



EUREKA, CALIFORNL\ 



-4 



HOTEL VANCE 

Coffee Shop Dining Rooms 

Log Cabin 
Cocktails 

Second and F Streets 
EUREKA, CALIFORNL^ 



HALLMARK 
FISHERIES 



Foot of F Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNL\ 



hLndi, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFHCERS" JOURNAL 



Page 31 



VULCAN 

FOUNDRY 
C M P A N Y 




4401 San Leandro Street 
OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



APPAREL and 
SHOES 

For \X'oinen and Children 

The Fruitvale Toggery 

E. 14th at 38th Ave. 
OAKLAND - FRUrrV'ALE 



« i 



i ! 

I ' 
I 



I-L\NSON NLACHIXE and SUPPLY CO. 

DRAG SAWS - REPAIR SERMCE 



SEVENTH an; 



ELREK.A. CALIF 



PETERSONS MENS XTEAR 

Cliff Petersoa 
FINE APPAREL FOR MEN 



GEORGE B.AKER 
Eureka 



SPOT LUNCH 



STEAKS 
Frank and Yvone 



t 



MERCER-FR.\SER CO. 



General Contractors 



Eureka. California 



To OUT law enforcement officers 

Monte Carlo 
G L ROOM 

Our Bar came around the Horn in '65. 
The Palace Hotel's Original Bar. 



101 D Street 
EUREK-A. CALIFORNIA 



Day Phone l-Wl 



Nlfbt Phone S43 



MILES 
Eureka's Florist 

SI7 Fiftk Stmt 

ELREICA. CAUFORNIA 



K. B. McC.ARThri" 

DODGE-PLY. MOUTH 
SALES ANT) SERVICE 



SEV'ENTH AND H STREET; 



ELREK.V CALJFORNLA 



10 THIRD STREET 



£L-RE:<.4. CALtF 



BON BONIERE 

C.\XDY - FOUVrATN - LL"NCH 

ELREfCA. CALIFQRNLA 



r'age 



i2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



CRIME TRENDS IN CALIFORNIA 

By Chief George H. Brereton 
Division of Criminal Ideyitification and Investigation, State Department of justice 



(Continued from last issue) 

It has been said previously that good reporting and 
record systems benefit the individual department. Much 
time could be devoted to a discussion of this subject, but it 
will suffice for our purpose to mention only a very 
few reasons. 

In all departments one of the major responsibilities of 
the chief administrator is to obtain adequate finances 




Chh F GFORCii: H. Brereton 

for the necessary personnel and equipment. There is no 
better way to justify a request for an increased budget 
than by complete and accurate statistical reports. If the 
police chief or sheriff can point out to the City, County, 
to the Board of Supervisors, or, if necessary, to the com- 
munity as a whole, through the local newspapers, the 
number of crimes being committed, the increase over 
previous years, and the increased work load placed on 
his department which is preventing adequate protection 
to the citizen, he will usually have little trouble in ob- 
taining what he needs. But his records must be accurate 
and they must be complete. 

A second value of good reports and records to the 
department, and particularly to the chief administrator, 
is that he can use the information contained therein to 
determine his crime problem generally and also specifically 
with respect to types of crimes and location, and distribute 
his force accordingly. In other words, by analyzing his 
problem from a study of his reports and records he can, 
if necessary, apply the principle of selective enforcement 
arid' possibly gain a little more efficiency from a police 
force which is inadequate to meet an existing situation. 

Finally the forwarding of' reports by all local depart- 
ments on all felonies, on all stolen and pawned property, 
and the fingerprint cards and photographs of all persons 



arrested, to the State Division of Criminal Identification 
and investigation, assures the department of state-wide 
coverage and the assistance of more than four hundred 
California law enforcement agencies. In these days of 
rapid transportation the burglar may have committed 
crimes in San Diego yesterday, operate in Fresno today, 
and burglarize a safe in Yreka tomorrow. Check men, 
"bunco" operators, and robbers may quickly travel from 
one part of the state to the other, hut they will leave in 
each community in which they operate, some information 
as to their physical description or their Modus Operandi. 
They may also pawn or sell property in one community 
which they have stolen in another part of the State. 

Although is it not impossible for one department to 
send copies of its crime reports, stolen and pawned prop- 
erty reports, fingerprint cards and photographs to every 
other law enforcement agency in the State, it would be 
inefficient and uneconomical. Also it would be unneces- 
sary, since the same results can be obtained by sending 
reports to the State Division of Criminal Identification 
and Investigation. 

Too much emphasis cannot be placed on the importance 
of promptly forwarding all crime reports, fingerprint 
cards, photographs, stolen and pawned property reports 
to the State Division. In order to give the maximum 
amount of information or assistance to local law enforce- 
ment agencies it is necessary for them, in turn, to furnish 
complete information concerning crime and criminal activi- 
ties. The files of the Division of Criminal Identification 
and Investigation can be compared to a bank. Before 
money can be withdrawn it is necessary that there be 
money deposited in the bank; before information can be 
obtained it is necessar)' that information be placed in the 
files of the Division. 

Another comparison can be made — this time v.'ith re- 
spect to a criminal's activities. Crime reports, and the 



p. O. Box 476 



Phone 5 P. O. 



HOTEL RIVER VIEW 

Nite Club 



Manuel Lira, Prop. 



RIO VISTA 



CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN STATE RADIATOR WORKS 

Manufacturing, Cleaning and Repairing of Radiators and Gas Tanks 

Authorized Harrison and National Heavy Duty Flat Tube 

Radiator Cores for Passenger, Truck and Tractor 

Phones: KEIiog 4-5788 - 4-5721 

Pickup and Delivery Service 

3529 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 

THE PARADISE CLUB 

Austin and Borden, Proprietors 

BEER. WINE AND A VARIETY OF FOODS 

Phone TE. 2-9443 

4A5 SEVENTH STREF.T OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 33 



information contained therein, are similar to the parts 
of a jig-saw puzzle. If you have all the parts there is 
no difficulty in completing the puzzle and recognizing the 
picture: in the case of a criminal, if all of his crimes are 
carefully reported, usually he can finally be identified 
and apprehended. 

You are probably thinking that I have gone far afield 
from subject of Crime Trends in California. I have done 
this deliberately as I believe it is far more important at 
this moment that you realize the great value of reporting 
and that all law enforcement agencies of the State now 
begin forv^-arding all felony reports to the State Division, 
than it is to know the percentage of increase in crime. 
That, of course, is also important but it is of even greater 
importance that we take some positive action towards 
decreasing the acti\'ities of criminals. Prompt reporting 
will make possible more identifications, more apprehen- 
sions, and a consequent discouragement of criminal 
activities. 

In spite of the unsatisfactory picture that we have 
indicated with respect to crime reporting and criminal 
statistics, we do have some figures, based on the reports 
of certain departments which are fairly consistent in their 
reporting, that indicate crime as a whole has increased 
in California. Some of these figures have been compiled 
from an actual count of the crime reports (that is a copy 
of the officer's investigation report) which have been 
received by our Division. As has been said pre\'iously 
these reports are analyzed in our Modus Operandi Section 
primarily for the purpose of identifying an unknown 
criminal and connecting a crime, or crimes, reported as 
having been committed in one community, with crimes 
which have been reported by the law enforcement official 
of another community'. The statistical information is a 
"by-product" although a verv- important "by-product" 
obtained when the crime reports are processed in the 
Modus Operandi Secrion. 

/ To Be Continued ) 



Seasons Greetings 
from 

GUS KROESEN 



•»50 12 th Street 



OAKL.AND 



DON HUCKE 

504 Tenth Street 
O.AKLAND 7. CALIF. 



District Manager 

Atlas and Power King 



METAL AND WOODWORKING HOME WORK SHOP TOOLS 



Pinball Games 



Automatic Phono^aphs 



OAKLAND AUTOMATIC SALES CO. 



CIGARETTE MACHINES 

Telephone GLencourt 1-8833 
125 TENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



Phone .ANdover |.07<)3 



SONIA ANDERSON 
Convalescents Home 



1806 TENTH A\ENLE 



OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



THE WNE that everybody is TALKING about 

Fopp'cno California Sweet and Dry Wines 

Sold in all the best places 

DA VI WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTOR 



HELLO. FROM VIC AND DAVE 



HIgate 4-3971 
355 EIGHTH STREET 



GLencourt 1-3371 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



Phone GLencourt 1-0258 



SIM'S EQUIPMENT CO. 

Distributors of 

COO.X. CHA!N D.=11VES 

PAGE & PAGE LOGGING TRAILERS 



416 EAST EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



Phone TEmplebar 2-8776 



Lady Attendant 



BAKER MORTUARY 

Call Day or Night 

BURIAL INSURANCE CARRIED 

Charles Baker, Deputy Coroner Alameda County 



1214 EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



R. F. Reld, Jr. 



TWinoaks 5-6745 



Season's Greetings 
SIMPSON SCREEN CO. 



REID &: CO.. Lumber and Supplies 

Wholesale 
LUMBER DISTRIBUTORS AND MILL REPRESENTATIVES 



401 TENTH .A\ENUE 



OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA 



TEmplebar 2-1402 

Deslauriers Column Mould Co.. Inc. 



Warehouses: 

Chicago, Illinois 
St. Paul, Minnesota 
Oakland. Califom'a 
Los Angeles, California 
1766 ELE\ENTH STREET 



Branches: 
Chicago, IH'nois 
St. Paul. Minnesota 
Oakland. California 
Los Angeles, Csltfornia 
O.AKL.AND, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone TEmplebar 2-7300 

1050 EAST EIGHTH STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA 



W. (Red) Beck 



Phone TWinoaks 3-9634 



Beck Refrigeration Engineering 

COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION SERVICE 
SALES - SERVICE - INSTALLATION 



2203 EIGHTH ANENUE 



OAKLAND 2. CALIF. 



WE PICK UP AND DELIVER 
LIBERAL CASH AND CARRY DISCOUNTS 

MORTENSEN'S RUG CLEANING CO. 

I0I2I SAN LE.ANDRO BL\D.. Phone SW. 8-3201 
1081 THIRD STREET. Phone GLencourt 1-9878 ' 



Page i4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



Former Officer Fitzgerald in New Job 



The San Francisco Police Department lost a mighty 
good man when Officer Frederick Fitzgerald resigned to 
accept the position of director of law enforcement at San 
Francisco's Junior College, taking over his new job on 
September 17. 

Born in this city hy the Golden Gate on October 12, 




Frederick Fitzgerald 

1908, he finished his primary schooling at Columbia 
Grammar School, graduating in 1923, and then gradu- 
ated from Mission Hogh School in June 1927. At this 
school he was a star football player, being an all city full- 
back in 1926. He also starred on the track and was captain 
of track in 1927 and a sprinter on the All City Team. 

After finishing High School he entered Columbia Uni- 
versity, Portland, Oregon, in 1927, where he played 
guard on the College team. He attended Columbia for 
one year and returning joined the Y. M. I. football team 
in the fall of 1926. This team, under Coach Fred Swan, 
defeated Stanford 7 to 0. He then joined the Hibernia 
Bank working as a bookkeeper, remaining at this institu- 
tion until the fall of 1929 when he entered, in August, 
1929. the University of San Francisco. He graduated from 
this college in 193.3 with a B.S. degree in political science. 

At the University of San Francisco he again was a big 
factor on the football team coached by Jimmy Needles. 
He played fullback on the team that in 1931 defeated 
Santa Clara 7 to 0, the first time the San Francisco Uni- 
versity had ever defeated its southern neighboring college. 

He was also captain of the USF track team coached by 
Charles Hunter and Bud Spencer. 

After finishing his course at the USF he continued his 
studies at the University of California from 1924 to 193'i 
and got his credentials as a teacher in physical education 
and political science. 

He then was again employed by the Hibernia bank. 

JULIO'S RESTAURANT 



1335 Grant Avenue 



He took and passed several civil service examinations, 
hut in passing the one for the Police Department, he 
decided this was the job for him and he was appointed a 
member on May 2, 1938. 

After three months at the Police Academy he served 
four years on radio car and foot patrol and was then 
assigned to the Police Academy as instructor in police 
procedure and physical education. During the war he was 
detailed to Civilian Defense duty as instructor of the 
Auxiliary Police and in the personnel unit of the Air 
Raid Wardens under Chief Gene Broderick of ARWS, 
also instructor for the Army Military Police under 
Colonel Edward Penaat. 

He brushed up on his police training by taking a FBI 
course at the USF in administration, fingerprinting and 
juvenile delinquency. 

While with the Police Academy he pursued his studies 
at the University of California in Police Administration 
and received a Master of Arts degree in 1944. 

When veteran Sergeant George Dunsan retired from 
the Police Department Officer Fitzgerald in December, 
1944, was made instructor in charge of the Police 
Academy. 

In this important branch of the Police Department he 
made a study of San Francisco patrolmen's jobs, in analy- 
sis form, recommending a program of study for recruit 
training and accepted by the then Director James English 
and with but few changes adopted by former Chief 

LEO MORAN MACHINE WORKS 



6565 San Pablo Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



McGRATH STEEL CO. 

131 Harrison Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Res. LAndscape 5-5208 



877 60th STREET 



FRED H. WERNER 

CONCRETE PRODUCTS 
OLympic 2-9587 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



T. E. Lemasncy 



Telephone OLympic 2-6167 



.SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



LEMASNEY BROS. COMPANY 

PIANO and FURNITURE REFINISHING and REPAIRING 

References; Any of the Best Piano or Furniture Houses 

047 SIXTY. FIRST STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

RADIOS - REFRIGERATORS - WASHING MACHINES 

MODERN MUSIC & ELECTRIC CO 

ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 
TEmplebar 2-1966 

1639 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 

Phone: Hlgate 4 <)6I8 

BOB BURNETTE 

CIGAR STORE AND SHINE PARLOR 
Full Line of Cosmetics -::- Local and National Newspapers 

1170 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 



SLIM JENKINS CAFE 

FINE FOODS - IMPORTED WINES AND LIQUORS 
ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY - FREE PARKING 

1748 SE\'ENTII ST. Ph, GL- I 0122 OAKLAND 



March. J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Charles Dullea; ran a 16-week program based on job 
analysis and was continued as instructor in charge by 
Director James Quigley in 1947. 

So well known was his ability in all these important 
tasks that he was offered an appointment at Washington 
State College in its Police School as an instructor in 
PoUce Science and also as head of San Jose State College 
Police School. 

Finally he accepted an offer from the Junior College 
of his native city. 

This school provides for professional training for the 
student who had a definite interest and adaptability to a 
police career. It is not planned to develop speciahsts in 
any of the more highly technical field, but rather to train 
the police student so that he may be able to enter the 
ser\'ice of a police department as a well qualified police- 
man, thoroughly familiar with the fundamentals of law 
enforcement procedure. Those who have had previous 
police training and experience, will find an opportunity 
in this program for future study in order to improve 
their qualifications for advancement. 

The law enforcement program is a two-year course, 
leading to the Associate of Arts degree. 

The program does not replace recruit training or the 
police training probationary' period. It is not a civil service 
coaching school for police examinations. 

Its purpose is to offer to government a pool of academic 
men basically trained in enforcing the laws, and who 
intend to make a career of law enforcement work, and 
who will be oriented and appreciative of the problems 
to be encountered in the field of law enforcement. 

Former Ofiicer Fitzgerald has crammed a lot of prac- 
tical learning in that head of his, and it has paid off as it 
always does for a young man with ambition and a 
will to study. 



Gwiree Itil-wU. Prop. Thonf Rich. n4: 

THE CALIFORNIA 

BOTTLED BEER - BOTTLED & BULK WINES 
LUNCH - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

1716 Mac DONALD A\ E. RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 6840 

NEW CHINA 

CHOP SUEY CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

Orders to Take Home Our Specialtv - Private Booths for Parties 

232 McDonald ave. Richmond, calif. 



B. A. Rosebrook, Owner 

LEO'S 501 CLUB 

BEER - WINE - CHAMPAGNE 



Richmond 3230 



501 CUTTING BLVD. 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



We Never Close 

THE ALLEY CAT CARD ROOM 

LADIES INVITED 
Glen & Mac 

Phone Rich. 1972-M . , , 

1988 TWENTY-THIRD STREET SAN PABLO. CALIFORNl.- 



CORN BEEF RILEY'S 

IN THE TENTH STREET MARKET 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



ALLEN GROCERY 



OAKLAND 



1410 Adeline Street 



GL. 1-3550 



CALIFORNIA 



DINING CAR COOKS &. 

WAITERS' UNION 

Local No. 456 



THE UNION CAFE 

1250 SEVENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

MARDI GRAS 

429 NINETEENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



FONG'S MARKET 



353 E. 12th Street 



TE. 2-9433 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Manuel Pascoal, Prop. Phone Hlgale 4-9052 

VICTORY CLUB 

FINE LIQUORS. BEER, WINE, AMERICAN FOOD 



AND BARBECUE 



1533 PERALTA STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Al Ferreri 



THE CLIPPER 

PAY CHECKS CASHED 



1808 E. 12th STREET 



KEIIo: 2-9938 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BAY CITIES SAND BLASTING CO. 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



SAM CLAR. Phoae TWinoaks 3-4696 
Ret. GLencourt 1-6319 

SAM CLAR CO. 

DEALER IN USED MACHINERY AND METALS 

495 Third Street, Comer Washington 

OAKLAND 7. C.ALIFORNl.A 

KEIlog 2-3351 

COAST CASKET 8C METAL CO. 

DEALERS OF ALL KINDS SCRAP IRON AND METALS 

433 29th ANENUE OAKLAND I, CALIF, 

AUTO TRIMMING UPHOLSTERING 

L. D. McCLELLAND 

AUTOMOBILE TOPS 

HIgate 4-7227 

435 EAST 12th STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Phone LAkehurst 2-851 S C. V. Davier 

Official Brake Station 141 

ALAMEDA WHEEL & BRAKE SERVICE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE BRAKE SERVICE 

Expert Steering and Front End Correction 

Dynamic and Static Wheel Balancing 

22 17 CENTRAL AVE. ALAMEDA. CALIF, 



2620 SAN PABLO 



SQUEEZE IN CAFE 

EAT HERE AND ENJOY THE BEST IN FOOD 

Open 7 A, M, to 8 P. M. cv.covx it i ir 

SAN PABLO. CALIF. EMERYVILLE 



MICHEL AND PELTON CO. 

5743 Landregan Street 



KEY AUTO SUPPLY 

363 7 SAN PABLO .AVE, EMERYVILLE. CALIF, 



CALIFORNIA 



M & T CAFE 

JUST FINE FOOD 

Phone Piedmont 5-9108 

3990 SAN PABLO ,A\E. EMERYVILLE. CALIF, 



P&ge 56 



POUCE .^ND PE.-\CE OFFICERS" TOLTINAL 



JAardi, i94S 



It Is Now Chief Thatcher of Western Pacific 



Promodan of Ardiiir D. Thaicher of San Frandsco t 
he diief special agent and genera] claim agent of the 
Western Pacific Raflroad. effective Wednesday, October 
1, was announced recently by Harry A. Mitchell, vice- 
president and general manager of the company. Mr. 
Thatdier succeeds Mr. Walter R. Groom \jrho retired 
September 50. 

Mr. Thatcher -was bom in Los Angeles in 1906 and 




ChIEJ AUTHVi D. THATCaiOl 

was educated m tiie public schools of Los Angeles and 
of Cdton, California, where be worked as a lifeguard 
in the Ccfcjn plunge to help pay his \iray through schocd- 
Mr. ThaTrhrr also studied finger printing while getting 
an educanon and so, in 1925. he landed his first job as a 
sergeant on rise Colton police force in diarge of its finger- 
printing and identtficatioD bureau. 

Subsequently he was given an opportunity, via tiie 
"hard way." to add to his police training by being made 
an "outside man,'' and to "learn tlie ropes" by pgarii-iarinn 
on varioas cases with noted law-enforcement officers of 
the SJuHswent. One of these -sn-as EhJce Dye, former 
United States Martial, at that Trmc with the Umon 
Pacific, and anctiier was Ralph Young, who had been a 
Texas Ranger captain and who also had been dnef of 
ietecnves, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.. 

SHOPRYTE GROCERY 

1-A.keiinrs'. Z-S9e7 



1»1 


» PACinc 


A\" 


^ 




-— ^.V.EDA. 


CAUF- 




TON^-'S 


BOD^i 


&. 


FENDER WORKS 


45' 


PAQFIC 








ALAMEDA. 


CALIF 



MINGO-ATS BILLLAJID P.A.RLOR 



LINXRMORE 



1119 W. FirM Street 



Mr. Thatcher entered the special agent's department 
of the Western Pacific in November, 1S27, later beconung 
special agent, and in August, 1942, he was appointed 
assistant chief special agent and claim agent. 

He IS a member of the IntemationaJ Footprint Assoda- 
tioQ, the San Francisco Bay Counties Peace Officers' 
Association, and the Peace Officers Associatian of the 
State of Caliiorma. 

Mr. Thatcher is married, and has a son, Arthur D. 
Thatcher, Jr., who is news editor of the "Red and Kuc," 
St. Ignaoous high school, San Frandsco, and a daughter, 
Jeanette, student at Notre Dame high schooL also San 
Franciscci. 



Phone SWeetwood &-2SO0 



T. R. Bai 



ST.AJST).\RD TR.AILER CO. 



SEMl-TRAU-EJeS 



- FVIJ. TRATIFRS - LOGGLNG DOULIES 
6- WHEEL ATTACHME.VTS 



•4 15 SAN LEANDRO BOL'LEX .ARD 



5AV LEANDRO 



CALIFORNIA 



MiUer &md *m-r 



Phone LOcUaveB 6-061 T 



.AID TO HEALTH 

Steam Baths. Massage and Colonics 
For Men arid ^ omen 

2049 EAST 14ti STREET SAN LEANDRD. CALIF. 

HURLER P.ALVTLVG SERMCE 

IVTESJOR OR EXTERIOR 
PAINTING - PAPERLNG - TEXTURING 



Telephone TWinoaks 

152 EICHTH STREET 



OA>a-AND /. CALIF 



From 

Max Belling and Eugene Murphy 
of Belling's 



14th and CLAY 



OAKLA?>a). CALIF 



Georce CbristaB Mu atad — G- Ratis 

MCTORY INN C.\FE 



Phone LAkefaurst 2-9603 



15 1» BUEKA \T5TA A\X 



ALAMEDA, CALIF 



Jo&e Totonc* 



PARTi' FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 



FRESH - TASTE - QUALm' 
POTATO CHIPS 



23 le aXME-VT A\XNVE 



i.L-AMEDA, CAUF 



CALIFORNIA 



^nroBjr* FlDorrteo LAkehurKt 2-9922 

"LA FIESTA" COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

153B "S-EBSTER STREET ALAMEDA. CAUFORNOA 

Western Merchamdice Mart, Market Street at Tenth 
5an FmuMco. Calif. UNderhill 1-Z727 

Gall Furniture Manufacturing Co. 

FacWrr ami OAce 4«M Saa Leaadra Street 

lt.1 



Mcrdk. 1948 



POUCE AND 



.\MERIC\N BR.ASS and 
IRON FOUNDRY 



:rs jol'rn.al 



IV^17 



BEST ^^_ SIC COMPANY 



-*:; 5A_S 



MILLER BROS. SERMCE 



EXFEKT Aim) REPAID 



LsTH STREET 



-■0»0 1. CA^ 



CCA: 



ANTRS 



1- ,_ .- 



COCK O" THE WALK DINLNG ROOM 



WA\T MILLER i CO. 



r5>4 BROADWAY 



VND CAUF. 



M A L O N E • S 

'• - - I ? ' - ;-;::- i-LUUCET 



SALADS 



K-i 



Grcc". ':.•;<-{ 

to 

Peace Officers 

C-ALIFORNTA SEWING ^L\CHIN•E 



715 SE\E>TH STREET 



-AJSi.V>«0 



P.ARSONS MEAT CO. 
Jobbing Butchers 

I MI EKHTH AX^MJE. 



L-ANE-DW'B CO. 



En 



gineers 



OXIDIZING 



i£\E>TH WD OAlv 5' 



BAY -AREA DELIN'ERY 

MOVING AND STORAGE 
DELIVERY SERVICE 

nil SE\E^TK AVXNLX 

O AKL.A^ND CAL'f 0= N » 



H.ARRYS .ARM\ i NA\"\ SURPLUS 

WHOLESALE AND ■ETAU. 



iij SE\ENTM STREET 



H. F. X^ALKER CO. 



OAKLANT) SCA\ENGER CO. 
2601 Peralta Street. Oakland 



CD 



^ CO^!^a■VT-^v" GARAGE 



s - 

SI.-' 



FREE 



- -ON 



'*■; 5£\ENTr- 



:>Ak;LAVD. C.AUF 



ROSE-'^'ATFR>!AN TRIG CO. 



BLUM BERGS 
MEAT JOBBERS 

-^JLALirt AND SERVICE • 
i«« aXTH STREET OAKL-AM? '. CALIFORNIA 

H. B. SC\RBOROL GH 

F<naKK-> McOcaaW^ MMts. In^ . 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



*^- SXSTH STREET 



OAKLAND r. CALtFCRNLA 



Psgc }8 



POUCE ASD PEACE OFFICERS" lOURNAL 



March. 1948 



NATIONAL ICE & 
COLD STORAGE CO. 



134 Market Street 
OAKLAND. CALI¥ORNL\ 

TOBEXKLN PHARMACY 

i:;^E^- H TOBESKJN 
HLmboldl 3-1 1 II 



HIGHWAY INN 

Beer - Wine - Soft Drinks 

Good Food and 

Exp>ert Auto Repairing 

P. O. Box 13 
MT. EDEN. CALIFORNLA 



i'.nh and S.W PABLO 



EMER'iAlLlX 6 



BARTZ SALES &: SERN'ICE 

VACLXTk* Cl-EANERS — All Makes S»U aMi Repaired 

Lock asd Key Wor^ ami Ctmtnl ■ipihwi 

Phone ORdway »-IS3e 

l»»t Polk Street, near Jackson SAN FFLANOSCO 9. CALIF 

Season's Greetings 
FONG MEAT MARKET 



OAiCLAVD. CALIF 



KL.i ~i-l: Re<. THorsvall S-7e76 

B. M. GORDON. Automobiles 

BOLiCHT - SOLD - FINANCED - INSURED 
I BCY YOL-R CAR 

2«»9 EAST rsCELFTH STREET OAKLAVD I. CALIF 

HENRYS SUPER SERMCE 

Ptuwe UC 3-3442 

Ford and Lincoln Specialist 

COifPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
1812 Park Strec*. alM armmmd cmrmtr as Ea.«le Ave.. ALAMEDA 



THE .\NCHOR 

1013 UlLversity Avenue 

BERJCELEY. CALIFORNLA 



Peter Tira 



Res. OLr 



TIR-\ FURNITURE CO. 



Phone OLvmpic 2-2&3I 

COMPLETE HOME FLTtNlSHERS 

Easy Pavment Plan 

4 920 TELEGRAPH .AN E OAja_A.VD 9. CALIF- 



ROBERTSON RUG \S ORKS 

Phone HUmboldt 3-«262 

'032 5(itfa STREET CAKl-A.SD 6. CALIF 



CALIFORNIA MOTOR EXPRESS, Ltd. 

1081 Twenty-Second Street 



O.AKL.A.ND 



CALIFOR.\LA 



Phone Hl^ate 4-TT5T 



F. .Aaton. Prop. 



O.AKL.AND UMBRELLA FACTORY 

-The Umbrella Hospital" 
UMBRELLAS. H.A.VDLES & C.A.VES - REPAIRLNG & RECONXRLNG 

KEYS MADE WTilLE VOL" W.AIT 
1617 S.AN PABLO ANn OAKJ_A.ND. CALIF. 



PARIS LIQUOR STORE 



TOS Fourteenth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALl FORNIA 



\X-. L. -\nTCHENER CO.. Realtors 

TEaplebar 2^6239 

IVRTEEVTH STREET OAKLAND 12. CALIF. 



MILLER & \S-.ARN'ECKE. Architects 

FiaaBcial Center Bids- 



OAKLAND 



CALIFOR-NIA 



FIANSENS ICE DELRTRY 

1925 Lafayette Street 



-ALAMEDA 



CAUF. 



NORTHGATE PHARALACY 

OL>-mpjc 2-3656 
3064 CLAREMOST .A\E BERKELEY. CALIF. 



TOM'S MARKET 

WINE 

OAKLAND- CALIF- 



GROCERIES - BEER 

204 1 LINDEN STREET 



JOYS CAFE 



BREAKFAST - LUNCH 

901 EAST TVIELFTH STREET 



DINNER 

OAKLAND. CALIF- 



AUTOMOTI\X PARTS A.ND EQUIPMENT 

STANDARD AUTO PARTS 

Vi.ACH!SE SHOP SER\"1CE 

TE- 4-9250 

926 EAST T«ELFTH STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Season's Greetings 
from 

Bvron F. McDonald - Abe Rubin 



Ideal Market Sunnyside Grocery 

2036 Market 650 20tll Street 

Oakland 



Mcrcfc, 1948 



POUCE AND PEACE OmCERS JOL^NAL 



fm^ 39 



L. J. -I-»rry- 



Pboof AN^sver 1-1083 



C\LIFORNL^ STERILIZING PL.ANT MILPITAS VARIE-nL' A: HARD^XARE 



BELN SOOCEitS 



Phone BalUrd 3a2-J-3 



ll'i-Z* E. 



:.-VLIF vnLPITAj 



CALIFORNI4 



■-hnnir TE. ■* t : 



CARDENAS BROS. 



AL\TS NLSlRKET 

gWITFBIFS - .Vf£ATS - VXGETABI.E5 
plune Bailard 243SM 



OAKLAND 



Cy-IFORMA 



MiLPrrAS 



CAUFORNLA 



W. J. 



OLrmpu: S26a 



REFRIGERATION SPECLALISTS. Ltd. 

EVESYTHnC Bf BEFKKEXATIOK 
IIM EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND K CAOFQRSLA -(SDiJ S HFI . t I M OCND STREET 



McGUIRE St CO. 

WOOD BASSffiLS :: STEEL DRUMS 
Since 1880" 



Z\tESi\'\\\ [,E 8, CAUF. 



B d: M 



SA>(I>IW1CBES 

-T_TRY 



OAX CLUB ROOM 



409T San Pxhla Avenue 



: AKLA.ND 



CAOFOR-NLA QAK1_-VND 



CALIF<«iaA 



1249 CLUB 

JOBI>CSIE 
: SEBVE XfS. BEST CHILI IN TTE VkXST 
ALL KIMtS BEES AXD VkTNE 



Buy . . . U. S. SWINGS BONDS 



IXtSEast T w iMlfc SbK* 



OAKLAND 



r.AJLIFORNXA 




Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



HOW OFFICER'S KILLERS 
WERE CAUGHT 

(Continued from page 14) 

gun before it was filed, we could make a ballistic com- 
parison with the fatal bullet, we went to Scotia with 
Richard Henderson and Officer Casiciani. 

On February 1, 1947, we went to Scotia, and at the 
time we brought with us a spent .38 caliber bullet slug for 
substitution purposes should we fail to recover the real slug 
which killed the dog. After a day of digging and screening 
the soil we found the dog but did not find the slug which 
killed the dog. The substitute slug was then dropped into 
the hole by us, unnoticed by Henderson, and the slug was 
later found by Henderson. 

It was our belief that Henderson would relay the in- 
formation that the real slug was found to the gang; and 
that our subsequent interviews with the other members 
of the gang would thus be more successful, as the gang 
members would be afraid of involving themselves. 

We took a statement from William Koche, age sixteen. 
He said that he thought Joe Trujillo was with him in 
Oakland on the night of the murder of Special Officer 
Odom. He also said that Joe Trujillo told him that the 
night he and Trujillo and Douglas Walker were at an all- 
night show in Oakland and had seen Bob Hope in "Mon- 
sieur Beaucaire," was the night the murder was committed. 
Our subsequent investigation disclosed that they had been 
there on August 29, twelve days previous to the murder, 
thereby discounting Trujillo's prepared alibi. 

It was found, after a check was made of the files of 
the burglary detail, that a burglary had taken place at 



BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 

MUFFIN PAN COFFEE SHOP 

HOME COOKED FOOD 
1362 NINTH AVE. ^ *''^' '° ^ ^'*^' SAN FRANCISCO 

Chuck Broga - Jim Dunn MOntrose 4-10136 

BROGA 8C DUNN SERVICE 

WASHING - POLISHING 
EXPERT LUBRICATION 

I 0th and JUDAH STREETS SAN FRANCISCO 



COLE CLEANERS 



SANTA ROSA MARKET 

Especiales Articulos Mexicanos 
Importados Y del Paris 

1200 E. STREET WASCO. CALIFORNIA 



LA PLAZA CAFE 

COMIDAS MEXICANAS AND CEROVEZA 

132 S. J STREET TULARE. CALIF. 

WHITE FRONT CAAFE 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH , DINNERS AND SHORT ORDERS 

Open 24 Hours Daily 

KERN ST. and HY. 99 TULARE. CALIF. 

Harry Crowe Hardware & Electric Works 

MERLE TAYLOR, General Banager 

99 Highway at Kern Street 

TULARE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1018 E. Johnson 

TULARE APPLIANCE STORE 

RADIOS • SERVICE 
120 W. Inyo Street 



TULARE 



CALIFORNIA 



CARL'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES - FEED 

Phone 1I49-J 

3 15 W. INYO TULARE. CALIF. 

FOX TAVERN 

BEER, WINE, SOFT DRINKS 
AND TOBACCOS 

101 EASr TULARE STREET TULARE. CALIFORNIA 

ROSE CAFE 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS - SHORT ORDERS 

SOFT DRINKS AND TOBACCOS 

Hours 5:30 A.M. to 8 P.M. week days; Sundays 7 A.M. to 12 Noon 

308 NORTH J STREET TULARE. CALIF. 



SHELHOUP'S DEPT. STORE 

VISTAL CALIFORNIA 

MOORE BROTHERS CAFE 

POOL - COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND 
FIRST CLASS LUNCH COUNTER 

EXETER (Tulare County). CALIFORNIA 



MAX'S PALACE 



947 Cole Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhill 1-7799 



BEER, WINE. SOFT DRINKS 
AND GOOD FOOD 



CALIFORNIA 860 SECOND STREET 



BOSTONIA, CALIF. 



Kyono Bros. Pho"" MOntrose 4-9732 

KEZAR COFFEE SHOP 

Open 7:30 A.M. — Close 8:00 P.M. 
Home Cooking - BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 

CHOW MEIN. CHOP SUEY. SUKIYAKI ,^.,,,. 
594 FREDERICK STREET SAN FRANCISCO 17. CALIl. 



THE WHITE SWAN 

Well known for fine cooking 

FINEST CALIFORNIA WINES AND BEER 

Mr. and Mrs. Featherstone, Props. 

144 WEST MAIN STREET EL CAJON, CALIF. 



VAIencitt 4-9 116 

HOME APPLIANCES - RADIOS - REPAIRS 

NIN'S AUTO SUPPLY & SERVICE 

Richfield Products - Auto Accessaries 
2415 24lh STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



ABELE MOTOR CO. 

BUICK-PONTIAC 

333 Main Street 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 

PACIFIC CAN CO. 

290 Division 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



1418 CAFE 

Carado and Garzilli 

HOME COOKING - SANDWICHES 
BEER AND WINES 



1418 GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



March. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICEr^S' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



718 Fourteenth Street, in a place called the "718 Club." 
This burglary took place on the night of August 19, 1946. 
Whiskey, nickels, and a revolver were taken. This club 
or tavern is located one block from their poolroom 
hangout. 

We interviewed the proprietor of the club, Carl Hohlen, 
and he identified the revolver as his own. 

We then took the screwdriver found on hte 
murder scene and fitted them in with the screwdriver 
marks left by the suspects in breaking into the "718 
Club." The marks were identical. We then took the 
crowbar which was found in the Ford convertible coupe, 
stolen by Trujillo, and fitted it into the jimmy marks 
left on the front door and found them identical. Photo- 
graphs and moulage impressions were made by Criminolo- 
gist Frank Latuhpe. 

On April 23, 1947, Tommy Foakes, Dorothy Conder, 
Frank Latulipe, Dr. Jean Miller and ourselves testified 
before the Grand Jury and indictments were returned 
against Joseph Trujillo and Ernest Woodmansee. 

On March 19, 1947, Joseph Trujillo, who had been 
confined in the County Jail on a robbery charge as the 
result of an arrest by Special Officer Bob Watson, was 
brought to the Homicide Detail. He denied any knowl- 
edge of the tools and revolver. He also made the state- 
ment that on the night of the Odom murder he was in 
Oakland with Koche and Douglas Walker, described by 
Joe as a "kid who was going into the Army the next day." 



REX THEATRE 

823 Kearny Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



WOODS AUTO RECONSTRUCTION 



400 Fulton Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



TOSCA CAFE 



242 Columbus Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



WEST HOLLIDAY CO. 

INCORPORATED 
625 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



H & D CO-OPERATIVE DELIVERY 



41 Tehama Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CONTINENTAL BARTENDING SCHOOL 



8 Leavenworth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL PRESIDENT 

935 Geary Street 



S.4N FR.ANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



FAMOUS CONEY ISLAND CAFE 



2077 Chestnut Street 



HOTEL NEW CONTINENTAL 



127 Ellis Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



VAN NESS SOUTH GROCERY 

601 South Van Ness 
SAN FRANCISCO 10, CALIF. 



Tel. CHina 5-0625 



Cable Address: Wing Duck 



WING DUCK CO. 

Importers and Exporters 
LIQUORS, WINES AND GROCERIES - HAWAIIAN FRESH POI 

960 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

HOTEL HALE 



939 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



FASHION CLOTHING 



POLICE UNIFORMS 
2304 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HARRY R. MYGRANT 

GLASS AND GLAZING 
678 Eddy Street Phone OR. 3-2396 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



L. KOSLOFF 

IMPORTER 

Shreve Building 



CALIFORNIA 



U. S. STUDIOS 

1747 Buchanan Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



UNCLE ROGER'S 

HOBBY AND PET SUPPLIES 
Archery, Tennis, Fishing Tackle - Custom Made Bows and Arrows 

2117 TARAVAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO 15. CALIF. 



RED POPPY 

CANDIES 
1549 Polk Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone GArfield 1-8417 - 1-8418 



Established 190S 



GENERAL FURNITURE CO. 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 

RESTAURANT AND BAR SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT - COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS 

953 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Headquarters: 
MARITIME HALL BLDG., 57-59 CLAY STREET 



HUNKEN'S ELK MARKET 



1183 O' Farrell Street Phone ORdway 3-3012 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



P^ge 42 



POLICE AND PE-^CE OFFICERS- lOlRNAL 



March. 1948 



A check with rfic Adiutant Gcncrxl's Oficc ^'ashington, 
D. XH., disdcecd that Douglas Wdker was induirtcd into 
ttic Army on August .>0, 1946. 

In an attempt to apprehend Exnest W'oodmanscc, In- 
^>eaar Hayes and Officers BroviTi and McCann went to 
his home and learned that he had left for parts unknown 
presumahly gone to sea. On investigaDon tiey found 
that he was aK'vard the freighter "^Tiirlwind," since 
Riiruarx' 2, 1947. He stayed aboard the ship until Xlay 
4, 1947, at which time he was arrested in Norfolk. Va., 
on ihe Grand Jury indictment. 

^XTule returning to San Francisco Woodmanscc ad- 
mitted knowing Trujilla also that he had burglarised 
the "71 S Qub," with TruHllo and that they got a nickle 
plated revoK'er aK'^ut sixrv- doUai? in ruckeJs and dimes. 
also four quarts of "Three Feathers." 

On August 2S. 194~, Tommy Foakes was returned to 
San Francisco for the trial. He made the statement thai 
he was on the burglary with Trujillo and Woodmansee 
the night Officer Odom was killed, and that he drove 
the get-away car, which was stolen from the WaDer 
Strea Garage by Tru-jillo. He went into detail as to the 
planning of the "Dan's Creamery" }ofc, the purchase of 
and the smoking of marihuana cigarettes, the burglary 
of the creamery and the heated discussion of TrujiHo 
and ^'oodmansee after they ran frmn the building after 
kilhng Officer Odo- 

JESS LANNESG. Inc. 

CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 

Direct Factory Dealer 

?0J« MISSION STREET PHONE MISSION 7-3256 



RetaZI-VMiolesBle Cbrysler 

Califomia^s most nudiju Sernce De^sBrt^enS 

Auto Sales and Sen-ice Terms 

Phone Mission 7-lf.'f 

GOLDEN FOOD ^L\RKET 

MEATS - FISH - POULTRY - GROCERIES 
FRUITS - \-EGET.ABLES 



2776 Missiim Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone MO. 4-989S 



Joe Croaan, Punt . 



NINTH AX'ENUE UQUOR STORE 



CALL OJ FX)R DELIVERS 
Ninth Avenne and Judah 



SAN FRANCISCi 



C.AUFORMA 



MOntrose 4-6325 



FREE I^Lrv'ER'^ 



STANT>-BI MARKET 

GHOCERIES - N-EGETABLES - FRUITS 
UQUORS - WTNES - BEER 



1400 EIGHTH A\E 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Missi 



BREAKF.AST . L1.TNCH . DINNER 

J &: E RESTAUR.AXT 

STEA K S - CHOPS 
2SS7 Twentj-- Fourth Stret-l 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ttusiness 
B.A\"\-ie^fc ; -^7^ 



Res SICylint l-TOfiS 



ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Rrflslered CortrEctors 

COOPER BROS- 

PLUMBING . ROOFLNG 
HEATING • SHEET METAL 

M7 - 2 Is-: AXEN-UE near Ge£r> SAN FRANHSCO 2 1 



DAILEVS BARBER SHOP 



II OS Market Street 



SAN FRANaSCD 



CALIFORNIA 



SH-\\Sf LANT 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFQRraA 



PURITi" STORES. Ltd. 

Keamy and Francisco Streets 
Phone SUtter ]-&%» P. O. Box 2309 

5.AN FRANCISCO 2t- CALIFORNU 



DOngias ;- ij;: 

PHOTOSTAT OFFERS TRUE REPRODUCTIONS OF ARM>' 

AND NA\"Y" DISCHARGES AND OTHER DOCUMENTS 

Discharges. Wallet Sixe, Set in Piastic Our St>ecialtT 

24 Hours Ser»-ice - Welcome Home 

Estahhsbed Over 40 Years 

PACIFIC COAST BELT PRLNT CO. 

MDnadnock Buildinr 
t>«l M.ARKX7 STREE" SAN FRANCISCO. C.AUF 

ON'erlatic b'-' 

OLDE ENGLISH ICE CREAM CO., Inc. 

LUNCHEON - DINNER - FROZEN DESSJITS 

f.if IR\-!N.C STREET SAN FRANCISCO 22 



GUARANTEE INS. CO. 

HARRY V. STARKS 
249 Pme Street 



SAN FR.ANaSCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MArket 1-1 127 CJ_ARE MLTTL Pro|». 

SANCHEZ GROCERY 

FRUITS - VEGETABLES - TfcTNE AND BEER 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Telephone UNaetUD l-«7»6 



Exnannal Sta^nam 



RI\ A IT ALLAN REST.AUR.\NT 



FINE FOODS 
180 Church Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURKAL 



Page 43 



Cnminologut LatiiUpe testified that the fatal bulkt 
carried the same characteristic markii^ as d>e test bulkts 
filed from the tevdver taken from the **718 Club** 
bur^btry; and that the jimmy marks from the took found 
at the scene of the Odom murder were idoidcal in fit and 
measurement u-ith the jimmy marks found on the scene 
of the "*718 Club" bur^ry. 

Dr. Paul Kirk, pcofeasor of Biodiemiatr>' and Crunmol' 
<jgy at the University of Cahfonua, testified that die fatal 
hulkt slug contained microscopic fibers from the unifonr 
of the deceawd Odom, and that similar microEcopic fibers 
were found on the dothii^ we iscovered from Trujillo's 
room, which subsequenriy woe identified as the dodies 
worn by Trujillo on the ni^it of tbe murder. 

William Koche {Jaced Trujillo and Woodmansee on 
the "718 Club" bur^^ary and in posEession of die fatal 
revolver. He also broke down Trujillo's theatre aiSyL 

The wrecking of the Hai^it-Fillmoce Gai^ and the 
murder trial resulting in the coovictioa of Trujillo and 
Woodmansee were the result of wholfhearted cooperatioa 
and the poding of information by bi^Kctofs James 
O'Neill, James Hayes, Emmett Cottiell, James Johnson, 
Officers Robert Casiciani, George Btowil Ei^ene Mc 
Cann, Officer Thomas Fogarty and Lieutenant Timothy 
Burke. We also received valuable cnc ye ration and in- 
formation from Cas Rc^^ers and William Egui of the 
Juvenile Probation Depart— er.t 

GEORGE E. LALER 

MELROSE SHEET METAL CO. 
J'iO CHAPMAN STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORMA 



NE\S- FRLIT\'.\LE INN 

BEER - WPiE - UQL'OR - COCKTAILS 

ALL KIXDS OF DRINKS AND 
LL7«CH - MEALS - SA.N"DVMCHES 



1255 FRLITX'ALE AVE. 



O.AKLAND. CALIF- 



T.ALK OF THE TO^N T.A\ERN 

Vs-E 5£R\-E GOOD MEAi_5 AT .ALL T1-VCE5 

GOOD SERVICE 

BEER - WTNE - UQUORS - MIXED DRINICS - COCKTAILS 



KEBos i.. 



B.ABES PLAY HA\TN 

D I .H E 



«>2} EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAWO I, CAUF. 



S U L L I \' A N • S 

Sireetvaod «-9»@ Barmer * Jack 

FOR THE BEST DRINK IN EAST OAKLAXD 

<»34 F««<-rl »»>~>?r4 



'.-^^—'.r^': ^i...-. J £-y?:; 



Sfenty Perry 



BRADS COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

ON SALE OFF 5ALE 

iBcBere It Or Not) 

COVERS A WHOLE CUT BLOCK 



«»•• BONT) STREET 



JAKLAND. CAUF. 



Artfcnr G. .». -^.'. :■■.-. ^ .- -. - ; v^ -. 

GURO NLACHLN'E d; STA_MPLNG CO. 

PRODUCTION STAMPDCC & DRAWINC 
PERFORATDCC 

2913 FORO STREET -.^-.: '^_iF 



. H. SnacE KEOac 3-3171 

SaJsi Revnsolatfrc HEN'RY DISSTOK A SOPS. DBC 

EAST BAY SA^ i KNIFE WORKS 

SAW REPADUMC - KXIFE GRCtDCCG 

PLANING MILL SUPPLIES 

; ; - 1- -'-^_\~ OAKLAND. CALIF. 



•14^5 LAS! 



OAKLANT? 



KEJUs 4->133 rm^ SvMaa- 

PRODUCTION P.ATTERN SHOP 

WOOD AND ICTAL ?A-T£--N5 
X2XX EAST TKELFTH STREET OA'_--: ;-_iF- 

NT^^' .ART ROOFING CO. 

£:_ RZV GE-N'-^INZ '""ES-VJ-IVT iL.ATE: 

iL"R5ACE3 5.-~V0:_5;i 

v5?H-iLT .AND G^^A'."EL ?.C-;F5 

--- - -_I i.Z : A <_AND. C»IJF. 



HOME ICE CO. 



zdia^ Ave 



ALA-UEDA 



CAUFORNIA 



TVxmIo S-2S52 



GE.VER_AL CONTRACTORS 



CH.-\S. PASSO^X' .AND SONS 
BiLLLARD Aj.; .= :::<zT 5:ll:a.^d -abl-lj 

rW.A.N SIMONIS BO-LLARD CLOTH - H^'.ATT 3:_^Li..^-3 BALLS 
STREAMLIXED BOWXING ALFYS .AND E ; _ : ? '.(X NT 

i-- EDDY STREET 5 a -. "- ■• : ;:: casf 



ALOHA CLUB 

MERRTTT k. .AGRELLA 
KEii.(is 2-92S0 



•52 FRLTTV.ALE .A\X 



OAKLAND. CAUF- 



-TUNFOR ALL - ALL FOR FIW 

THE OPER.A CLL'B 



«I GOCGH STREET 



i Jack Paiatis 

SAN FRANCISCQ. CAUF- 



Pjge 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' lOLUNAL 



March. J 948 



SECURITY COMPANY MEET 

(Conunued from page 16) 

captain, each member conducted himself as a gentleman 
and reflected great credit on the Pohce Department as well 
as our dtj'. He pledged Chief Mitchell the heartiest sup- 
port and said each member was ready to face any task, no 
matter how difficult it might be. 

In presenting Chief Mitchell. Lawly said Chief Mitchell 
is true to his faith, his dty, state and countrj^ and said 
he would pro\"e equal to any task assigned to him. He 
would always be found lo^'al and right. 

Chief Mitchell, after explaining that Deput>- Chief 
James Quigle>' had to fill another appointment and there- 
fore was unable to be present, then thanked the committee 
for the men w^ho assisted him three years age. He com- 
plimented the members of the committee for the fine and 
clean entertainment provided. He declared this the best 
of social organisations in the Department. 

He called attention to the fact that but one member 
has passed on. He being 

He said at this meeting that many of the members have 
met for the first time since the last gathering — ^the first 
annual session, and he trusted all may meet again a year 
hence. 

Edward Hall was thanked for the part he had played 
m getting up this year's gathering. 

This ■w.Titer. who was a guest at the second annual 
meeting of the Secunty Detail, can truthfully say it was 
the best arranged event of its kind he has e\-er witnessed 
and the deportment of those present and their apprec'a- 
tion of the acts presented was mc»t wholesome. They car- 
ried out the splendid traditions of the Police Department. 

Members of the Security Company, of whom some fifty 
showed up at the second annual banquet, are as follows: 

Captain Michael Mitchell (now Chief). 

Lieut. Wm. L. Danahy, Jack Eker (now Captain). 

Sergeants Walter Mej'er. A]\Tn Nicolini (no\^' a Lieu- 
tenant), Charles Lyons, Raj-mond Freeman, Richard L. 
Hanlon, Chas. Radford, Joseph Perry, Ray Freeman, 
John Leahy. 

Patrolmen Chris Bahr, Ferd Bork. Denis Bradley. 
Albeit Bagot, Cedl Benson. George Biddleman, John 
Clasby, Weston Cross, Thomas Cronin. Matthew Duffy. 
Charles Dickow. Frank Dunphy, Robert Dickman, Zan 
Fabian. Ehno Fortina. Ed Franee. Benjamin Garrett, Wm. 
Griffin. Edward Hall, Jos. Hicke>', Maurice Higgins. 
George Haskett, Leo Keenan. Stanley' Kelly, Theodore 
King. John Kwartz, Peter Larsen. William Leahy, Arthur 
Markgraf, George Millstead, Mario Marino, John Mc- 
Carthy. James Molinari. Edward Nevin. John Nyland. 
Wm. Osterloh, Bamaby O'Leary. Edward O'Day. Edward 
Oliva, Frank Pierce, John Rosberg, Frank Ryan, Frank 
Sturken, George Sully, Chas. Schroth, Geo. Stdl, Geo. 
Sturken, Dan Sullivan. John Surges, Karl Schaugaard, 
Eugene Short, William Sparks, Julius Von Nostitz, 
Veston Williams, Edward Woods. William Bard, Jack 
CountrvTnan 



LANSDALE HOTEL 



619 Larkin Street 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



2736 CLUB 

Joe Harvey, Proprietor 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
AND LUNCH 



MISSION 7-9'>08 

2736 20th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



.rL^NiPER '5-4118 Joe Stafford 


CRAZY COX 


FINE AUTOMOBILES 


* 


4151 Mission Street 


SAN FRANCISCO 





E. E. RICHTER & SON 

Pacific Coast Factory Representatives 

Wisconsin Motor Corp. 

Lip>e-RolIway Corp. 

Yates American Machine Co. 

Piedmont 5-6116 
5725 Hollis Street 

EMERYVILLE. CALIFORNIA 



■Lardc. XXS 



45 



IMMONS COMPANY 



295 Bar Scnn 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNLA 



Midlers of the F, 



' Beautvrest Mattress 



and odkcr 



Si 



Sleep Eqmpmtent 




BASALT ROCK 
COMPANY. Inc. 



READ^'MK CONCRETE 



iirus 



UGHTVTOGHT CONOIETE 
BUILD BLOCKS 



UNITED 

ENGINEERING 

COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFQRNIA 5^- FR-ANdSCO. CALJFORNXA 

: • 



8 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March. 1948 



PROFESSIONAL POLICE SERVICE 

(Continued from page 12) 

Very naturally, the American taxpayer asks, "Why 
is this so? Why are the police unable to furnish better 
service? We pay plenty of taxes; *vhy don't we get 100 
p)er cent efficiency in law enforcement?" 

Let us consider these questions. With the march of 
time, certain adjustments are essential to the welfare of 
society. This is especially important in law enforcement. 
No longer is the protection of property and life a simple 
task, assuming that it ever was. In the past, the criminal 
group consisted of the defective and the unintelligent. 
Today's law-breakers include many dangerous super-gang- 
sters who do not hesitate to employ every modern devel- 
opment known to science. When confronted with such 

Wc Call and Deliver Phone BAyview 1-202C 

4-HOUR SERVICE 

SEA CLIFF CLEANERS 

Marguerite Partndge, Prop. 

ALTERATIONS 
LAUNDRY SERVICE 

San-l-System Odorless Plant 

28th Ave. & Geary Blvd. 

San Francisco, California 



EVergreen 6-9601 



Nick Crombach, Prop. 



NICK'S SUPER SERVICE 

Signal Products - Accessories 

Lubrication - Washitig - Polishing 

Motor Tune-Up 

GENERATOR 8c STARTER OVERHAULING 

Stanyan 8C Waller Streets 
San Francisco, California 



Three Mills Creamery 

Light Lunches - Hamburgers 

\V c Feature Our 

Own Made Ice Cream 



836 Irving Street 
San Francisco, California 

MONTROSE 4-8762 



M A R T I N'S 

HOLE IN THE WALL 



Where A Good Drink Can Be 
Had At All Times 



2048 Mission Street, Between 16th and 17th 
San Francisco, California 



FLOWERS 
for all occasions 

Telephone CHina 5-1329 
When In Chinatown Visit 

Canton Flower Shoppe 

12 Ross Alley 
San Francisco, California 



I 



ATwater 2-5625 



VAIencia 4-9705 



EDY'S COFFEE SHOP 



Edith Harrington 



2200 Bryant Street, Corner 20th and Bryant Streets 
San Francisco, California 



I 
I 



Is Your Money 

WORKING 

To Gi\e You 

THE HIGHEST INTEREST? 

California Savings and 
Loan Company 

Since 1887 

673 Market Street 
San Francisco, California 

Phone DO 2-.V>i2 



I 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' lOURNAL 



Page 47 



adN-ersaries, the police oflBcer should he at least equally 
as intelligent, trained, and well-equipped, in sheer self- 
defense, if for no other reason. Our failure to check the 
rising tide of crime has shown where the present balance 
of power hes. 

To repeat, this condition is both common and acute, 
and it springs from primary' evils. Overshadowing all 
other causes is the factor of inddequatelv qualified per- 
sonnel. It has been well proven that the maximum per- 
formance of any police department can never rise above 
the level of the intelligence and training of the individuals 
composing it. Over a considerable period of time, public 
indifference and dangerous pKjlitical domination have seri- 
ously hampered and retarded the American police system. 

Some years ago, a large majority' of the American people 
led the so-called "simple life." Police problems were un- 
heard of. But all that has been changed. Now, in our 
complex social system, the American public follows a way 
oi li\nng that is fast and furious. Almost ever>-thing has 
been "streamlined" for speed and flexibility. This is what 
we have chosen to call "progress," and in many respects 
the term is justified. But what about the police officer of 
today? Has he kept abreast of the procession? Fnmkly. 
he has not. Nor is this altogether the police officer's fault. 
In the rank and file of American police, there is a goodly 
percentage of men who are doing their honest best to 
maintain a high standard of service, and to fulfill the sworn 
obligations of their office. But even the sincere officer's 
best may fall woefully short of the desired level in some 
of our "high-pressure" modem requirements. Neverthe- 
less, we must not be over-hasty to condemn him. It is 
probable that he has not been suitably trained for' the 
job, and \\'e should not blame him when he fails. Instead, 
we should criticize those who expect inexperienced [vr 
sons to function as well-trained professionals. 

It has always been a common reaction among us human 
beings to resent the truth, especially as it applies to our- 
selves: and more especially if the trutli happens to K: 
unpleasant. We equivocate and "alibi" with flimsy and 
far-fetched excuses rather than face the facts. Thus, the 
average citizen assumes the illogical attitude (an attitude 
shared by many policemen) that all police officers, regard- 
less of their background, in some mysterious fashion auto- 
matically acquire all the knowledge and experience neces- 



ADOLPH'S PLACE 

Telephone 201 S 
69 FRONT STREET SANT.A CRUZ. CALIFORNIA 

SANTA CRUZ 

French Laundry 8C Dry Cleaning 

DESTAIllATS BROS.. Prop. 

Phone 1S30 

440 PACIFIC .AN'ENUE SANTA CRL'Z, CALIF. 



SANTA CRUZ 
LUMBER COMPANY 

PE.\LER IN 

! BUILDING MATERIALS 

Manufacturers and Wholesalers of Redwood 
Limiber, Sa«h, Mouldings and Millwork 



2 2 "^ River Street Telephone •♦»■- 

Santa Cruz, California 

CREIGHTON'S I 
AUTO BODY SHOP 

MvRiON Creiuhton. Owner 

SANTA CRUZ' MOST 
COMPLETE SHOP 

Telephone 3874 
• 



126-130 River Street 

Santa Cruz, California 



Phone l>'^-2 



Res. 2^-11 W 



K A L A R ' S 

R \v K..\L.JiR, Owner 

Blacksmith and Welding Shop 

TRUCK BODIES - ^X OOD ■« ORK 

ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 

128 Soquel Avenue 

Santa Cruz, California 




:^=" 



KEYS 
MADE 



BOSSO BROS. 

HARDWARE-PAINTS 

Mission at Center Phone 977 

Santa Cruz, California 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March. 1948 



sary for competent performance from the moment of their 
appointment. Although he may be a bit hazy on some 
of the details, the average citizen still cherishes the behef 
that, somewhere and somehow, policemen will be prop- 
erly conditioned for their job of protecting the average 
citizen, and with no inconvenience or added expense to 
him as a taxpayer, or so he hopes. And when some officer's 
lack of knowledge in police science is cited, how often do 
we hear the stupid protest, "Why, he's supposed to \now 
those things! He's a policeman, ain't he?" Those of us 
who are policemen know only too well that it isn't as 
simple as that. 

The folly of such a policy would be more apparent were 
we to insist that doctors, attorneys, pharmacists, certified 
accountants, and all other specialized professionals, could 
be selected at random from the rank and file of average, 
untrained individuals, and with the wave of a magic wand, 
be endowed with adequate qualifications. The average 
citizen demands trained professionals to perform his sur- 
gical operations, to protect his legal interests, to fill his 
prescriptions, and to adjust his financial accounts, and even 
to repair his automobile, while at the same time he is 
willing to entrust the protection of his property and his 
life to persons with ?io specialized training whatever! 

This condition, to a large extent, is the result of what 
may be termed "traditional apathy." The myth of as- 
sumed infallibility in all police officers is a figment of 
national folklore, still cherished by the untaught, together 
with the alleged good fortune to be had from horse shoes 
and four-leaf clovers, and the dangerous influence of "Fri- 
day the Thirteenth." 

Moreover, the superstition endures, strangely enough, 
in the present of the national pastime, common in fiction, 
drama, journalism and popular conversation, of "booing" 
the police. Vindictively recalling his latest traffic citation, 
the average individual revels in written or enacted situa- 
tions wherein the police officer is represented as a crude 



Phone 507 



THE ARTICHOKE INN 



V. J. Cornaggia, Prop. 



ARTICHOKE CROQUETTE 

Served No Place Else in the World 

18 PORTER DRIVE WATSO.NVILLE. CALIF. 

Phone 1871 

CHINA CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

Open from 11 A. M. to 2 A. M. 

15 1 MAIN STREET WATSONVILLE. CALIF. 



Cement Building Blocks 

Hollow Tile 

Mixers 6f Machines for Rent 

HELEN L BURCHER 

p. O. Box 61 Phone 51] 

Felton, California 



Car-Truck-Tractor Service 

WORLEY'S GARAGE 

Welding, Painting, Body Repair 

• 

Telephone Felton 13 7- J 

FELTON, CALIFORNIA 



FELTON 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 



Felton, California 



ROY'S MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS 

VEGETABLES 

DRUG SUNDRIES 

• 

Telephone 52 

Felton, California 



NICK'S 

Telephone Felton 10 
Eugene E. Nelson 

Felton, California 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Puge 49 



bungler who blunders aimlessly while some lurid crime 
is neatly solved by a clever young newspaper man, or an 
amateur investigator. The police officer is the perennial 
target for disparagement and burlesque, and should some 
member of the law-enforcement group be discovered in 
actual misconduct, however trivial, then does righteous 
wrath blaze with fine frenzy, and public indignation rise 
to lofty levels. And in spite of this, the delucion persists 
that "anybody can be a good policeman!" 
(To Be Continued) 



Losing Money Since '36! 
CACTUS SPORTLANDS 



15 NORTH MARKET STREET 
SAN JOSE 



261 MAIN STREET 
WATSONVILLE 



UNIVERSAL HOTEL 

Frenchie and Cursi, Props. 

FINE WINES - LIQUORS 

RESTAURANT IN CONNECTION 



Phone 541 



205 MAIN STREET 



WATSONVILLE, CALIF. 



Phone 1913 Ben Talabers, Prop. 

RUMMY CLUB 

BEER AND SODA 

219 MAIN STREET WATSONVILLE. CALIF. 

STREAMLINE POOL ROOM 

BEER • SOFT DRINKS 
• CIGARS • CIGARETTES 



142 MAIN STREET 



WATSONVILLE, CALIF. 



RECREATION CENTER 

GOOD EATS ■ BEER AND WINE 

BILLIARDS and AMUSEMENTS 
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Huntington, Props. 

WATSONVILLE. CALIF. 



2 72 MAIN STREET 



""I 



Phone 180 



John H. Chapin 



Paf s Plumbing Supplies 

PLUMBING 8c HEATING CONTRACTORS 

APPLIANCES 



112 Van Ness Avenue 
Watsonville, California 



N. P. SCURICH 

Watsonville Phone 0166 

COLD STORAGE 

GROWER, PACKER 
AND SHIPPER 




Watsonville, California 



PACIFIC CRATE 
COMPANY 

OF EL CENTRO 

CALIFORNIA WHITE PINE 

Stitched Covers - Building Materials 

Car Strips - Nails - Excelsior 



WALL 8C WALKER - Phone 1620 

P. O. Box 383 
WATSONVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



We Specialize in 

Fruit and Vegetable Crates 
of all descriptions 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



Some Are True and Some Are False — Rate Yourself 



5.V 

54 
^5 



^Continued from last issue) 

51. A pnvate person can under some circumstances arrest 
a person for a misdemeanor. 

52. A police officer is not justified in breaking open a 
door or window of a house in order to make an 
arrest when the offense is a misdemeanor. 
A person arrested for any felony is eligible for re- 
lease on bail. 

A warrant of arrest is addressed to a peace officer. 
The element of force in the taking of property from 
the person of another is nccessar>' to the crime 
of robbery. 

56. In order to constitute burglary, it is not necessary to 
show that the premises were entered for the purpose 
of stealing property. 

57. Knowledge of the court need not be substantiated by 
testimony of witnesses before it may be consid- 
ered evidence. 

58. The law of evidence requires such a degree of proof 
that the possibility of error is partially eliminated. 
Prima facie evidence is that which the law permits 
to be contradicted. 

Corroborative evidence is additional evidence of a 
similar character, to the same point. 
A witness may testify to all pertinent facts which 
he knows of his own knowledge. 
All allegations must be proved 

The organic law and the unwritten law are sy- 
nonymous. 

64. A presumption is a deduction which the law expressly 
directs to be made from any facts. 
The burden of proof lies on the party who would 
be defeated if no evidence were given on either side. 
Evidence may be presented in a criminal action by 
oral examination. 

A witness is allowed to refresh his memory respect- 
ing a fact by referring to notes written by himself. 
It is the right of a witness to be protected from cross 
questioning. 

Questions of law are decided by the jury in some cases. 
The juo' »>■«-' til'-" judges of the effect and value of 
all evidence addressed to them. 

Two or more persons may assemble and so act as to 
create a riot. 

If two persons assemble for the purpose of disturbing 
the peace and do not disburse upon being commended 
so to do by a policeman, they are guilty of a crime. 
Any person who wilfully sets fire to or burns any 
goods, wares or merchandise, the property of an- 
other, is guilty of a felony. 
The theft of an automobile constitutes grand theft. 

76. The obtaining of property from another under color 
of official right is known as embezzlement. 

77. Every beggar is a vagrant. 

78. Ever>' associate of thieves is a vagrant. 

79. Every drug addict is a vagrant. 



59. 
60. 

61. 
62. 

6:>. 



65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 

69. 

70. 

72. 
73. 



74. 



75. 



80. When an offense is committed in one county and 
near another county, the jurisdiction lies in either 
county. 

81. A prosecution for murder may be commenced as 
many as twenty years after its commission. 

82. If the offense charged in a warrant is a felony, the 
defendant must be taken only before the magistrate 
who issued the warrant. 

83. A policeman may make an arrest without a warrant 
for any public offense committed to his knowledge. 

84. Warrants must always be shown, in making an arrest, 
if the person making the arrest is acting under the 
authority of a warrant. 

85. To make an arrest, a peace officer may break open 
the door or window of the house in which the person 
to be arrested is. 

86. Weapons taken from an arrested person must be 
delivered to a magistrate. 

87. » An accessory to the commission of a felony may not 
be prosecuted until after the principal has been 
brought to trial. 

In a trial for seduction the defendant cannot be 
convicted upon the testimony of the woman alone. 
Neither husband nor wife is a competent witness 
against the other in certain cases. 
Homicide, when committed by a woman in defense 
of her person is justifiable. 

Robbery which is perpertated by a person armed 
with a deadly weapon is robbery in the first degree. 
Kidnaping for blackmail is punishable by death in 
Cahfornia. 



88. 



89. 



90. 



91. 



92. 



JOE AND WINNIE'S 



GOOD FOOD 
BEER. WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 

99 SOUTH INU'LKIAL A\ t LEMON GROVE. CALIF. 



WILMINGTON 



SEVEN SEAS CAFE 

330 North Avalon Blvd. 



CLUB 65 

Phone 487 

FINEST COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND 

BEST FOOD ON HY. 6S 

Dancing 6 Nites Each Week 

1.. Mile South of LINDSAY. CALIh 



CALIFORNIA 



HERB'S CAFE 

COCKTAIL BAR AND CAFE 



641 M STREET 



SANGER. CALIF. 



CARLSON'S MARKET 

A. CARLSON. Prop. 

Phone 32210 

1)47 N. Mt. Vernon Avenue SAN BERNARDINO. CALIF. 



COLBERT'S 

BEER AND WINE 
South Santa Fe Ave. 
VISTA. CALIFORNIA 



I 



March, 1948 



PCttJCE AND PEACE OFHCERS lOURNAL 



P«ge 51 



Unian of attempt and physkal afcdky aie neoesBuy 
to fmiBlfttMUi Tdbbay. 

y4. The pbyii^ of faio or roulette is piaiijbated in San 
Franckoo. 

~\ Any tlueat lo use foKz or violence unbwfuDjr, b^ 

two or moR persons adii^ tagetfaer, is a lioc 
\ Usii^ profanily in the pvraenoe of a lady or a dnld 
ooasdtates diabufcii^ the peace. 
Every peisan vdio enteis a house wdfaout intent to 
iTwimif rape is guihy of buigiaiy. 
Eveiy bur^Ury oommtfted in the n^it tsrae i; 
burglary ot the first degiee. 

The phrase ''m^t time," as used in tmnnpirrinn with 
buiglaiy means the period b ettiwaai sunset and suniise. 

Havii^ pcesesion of deadly weapons wflh iment 

to oommit an assault is a felony. 

1 . The fdonious takii^ of domestic forals may some- 
times be dassed as a misdeBieanar. 

2. The theft of 5Qc oonstitutes petty theft gisneraOy. 

?. A prinapal in some cases is one who was ahsatt 
when the ciime was conumitted, but who aided or 
abetted the actual doer of the crime to oonmiit dL 

4. VahnHaxy maiKiat^tter is d>e intentional killing of 
a human beii^ and without maKry 

'. Loud cursii^ and threats of bodily injury are suf- 
£cient to ouurtilute asault if die viddim is put 
[ in fear. 

106. A larceny mua be serrct 



08. 



"A 



r- 

I 

« 

I 

I 

I 

• 

I 

I 

« 

I 

i 

• 

I 

I 

• 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

• 

I 

• 
I 
I 
I 
t 



\ 
I 
t 
I 

1. 



^ A L L E Y CAFE 

Cocktails 

B e e r - W i n e s 

Delicious Food 



RESED.\. C.\LIFORNTA 



NTLL.AGE TAXTRN 



CICAKETTES 



&; 



_0»"SHIP 



I'-t. EA5T rTVT"»_-si 



Schulte"5 Cafe S. Cocktail Lounge 



5411 ORAVGE ;-= 



S.\\TA FE CAFE 

BE.ST rOOD - 5.E.5T 5>£.R"»^Ci 
Fifth ud C«tni 



5«E3>LAXDS 



C.VL!^™»viA 



CLYDE S CORNER 

CLYDE MAV_£'. - :: 
MjOBBTA. CAUFOKNIA 



MIDWAY HIDEOUT 



Gasoline Oils 



Delicious Food in Our Restaurant 

Class .A Grocer^- in Connection 

Also Beer and Wine 
on and off sale 

R. R. So. 2, Box 143 

N alley Blvd. and Midway 

ESCOXDIDO. C.ALIFORNLA 



V ff 

J I. 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March. 1948 



107. Compounding a crime is committed where one who 
knows that a crime has been committed agrees for a 
consideration not to prosecute it. 

108. If a mortal wound is inflicted in one state and the 
party dies in another state the slayer may be tried 
in either state. 

109. A statute is a law passed by a legislative body — 
the legislature or the city council. 

1 10. The mjured person may legally consent to an assault 
and batter>' which does not disturb the public peace. 

111. Condensation of crime, or settlement with the in- 
jured person will not exempt the wrongdoer. 

112. When a shenff is ordered to hang a person, it is an 
illustration of excusable homicide. 

11.^. The ma.\imum sentence for rape is: (1) Life in 
prison, (2) 20 years in prison, (?) 1 year in county 
jail, (4) 50 years in prison, (5) 6 months in jail. 

114. Driving an auto so as to force another off the road 
might make the driver guilty of (1) Malfeasance, 
(2) Mayhem, (.>) Batter>', (4) Duress, (5) Rout. 

115. The penalty for train wrecking may be as much as 
(1) Life. (2) Death, (3) 50 years imprisonment, 
(4) ,>0 years imprisonment. 

116. In most cases a person is considered legally dead 
who has not been heard from in: (1) .> years, 

(2) 5 years, (.?) 7 years, (4) 10 years. 

117. All crimes are classified as (1) Misdemeanors and 
felonies, (2) Principal and accessor^'. (,?) Crimes 
of adults and crimes of children, (4) Major crimes 
and minor crimes, (5) High and Low. 

1 1 S. The one of the following who is not legally capable 
of committing a crime is: (1) A female, (2) An 
alien, (?>) a married woman, (4) A child under 16 
years of age, (5) An idiot. 

Phone EXbrook 2 4862 

GARTNER MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



507 HOWAF^D STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 5. CALIF 



INTERNATIONAL SUPPLY CO. 



GILLALAND BIKE SHOP 

WHERE ALL BOYS GET THEIR BIKES FIXED 
With POP and Forty Years Experience 

1162 E. MAIN STREET BRAW LEY. CALIF. 



BECKY'S CHICKEN SHACK 

REAL SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

ON BROADWAY W ESTMORELAND. CALIF. 

ANITA'S CAFE 

ALWAYS THE BEST OF EVERYTHING 
FIFTH and BROADWA'i' WEST.MORELAND. CALIF. 

RUBEN'S POOL HALL 

BROADWAY 
WESTMORELAND. CALIFORNIA 

LU FOY CAFE 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH. DINNERS AND SHORT ORDERS 

170 West Cotton Avenue 

LO.MA LINDA. CALIFORNIA 

PARKER AND STICE 
Yorba Linda, Calif. 

PALM TREE CAFE 

BEER - WINE - GOOD FOOD - SOFT DRINKS 

LOS ALAMITOS. CALIF. 

HANDLEY'S HAPPY DAZE 

10S21 Prairie Avenue 
INGLEW'OOD. CALIFORNIA 



FRANK'S CAFE 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 
AND GOOD FOOD 



•1-445 WEST IMPERIAL BLVD. 



INCLEWOOD. CALIF. 



SKY LARK CAFE 

MODERN RESTAURANT AND 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



5550 W IMPERIAL HIGHWA'i 



LOS ANGELES. CALIF. . 



CALCrxiCO 



222 Second Street 



CALIFORNIA 



M. Chambers, Prop. 

TACKPOT CAFE 

TASTY SANDWICHES CHILI AND SANDWICHES BEER 

COLD DRINKS :: SHORT ORDERS 

54-»2 W. IMPERIAL HIGHWA'l' LOS ANGELES 45. CALIF. 



WILLIAMS CAFE 

LIQUORS - WINES - BEER 

GOOD HOME COOKED FOOD 

I.ALEXICO (Imperial County), CALIFORNIA 



CHINOS BARBER SHOP 

THE PLACE OF COURTESY 

CALIPATRIA (Imperial County), CALIFORNIA 



RAY DAUSM^.NN, Men's Wear 

QUAUTY MERCHANDISE ONLY 
456 BasrI'ne Phone 815-160 



29 PALMS MOTOR PARTS 

at the Plaza 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS & ACCESSORIES 

Wholesale - Retail 



Phone 44 1 



TWENT-iNINE PALMS. CALIF. 



Phone: 2472 



SID POWELL'S 

TOWN APPLIANCE CO. 

El-ctric Ranges - Refrigerators - Radios 

Water Heaters - Washing Machines 

VICTOR\ILLE. CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box iieJ 



SAN BERNARDINO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3729 AIR CONDITIONED| 

Open 11:00 A.M. to 1:00 A.M. 

FOODS PREPARED TO TAKE HOME 

CHUNKING CAFE 

"The House of Quality Chinese Food" 
i6l7 MARKET STREET RIVERSIDE. CALlFORNIAl 



March. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFHCERS" IOL"RKAL 



Page 53 



SANTA CRUZ POLICE 
(Continued from page 1 3 / 
ago the dtj- authorities changed the Tesponalnlities of 
expense and management over to the cit>' lecreatioD de- 
partment. The Police Department still lends important 
assistance. 

Chief Huntsman's Department has three captains, all 
FBI Police Academy graduates. Thej' are : 

Ben Krupp, E. W. Gej'er, and Don Lynn. 

There are three Sergeants — Ray Carney. Thomas Valine 
and Buck Dahlman. 

Captain Krupp is in charge of Traffic and Captain 
Ge>'er has the day watch and Captain Lynn the first night 
watch. Captain Geyer is also in charge of the teletype 
di\"iaon and the Bureau of Identification. This and the 
filing systems are all in keeping with the FBI methods. 



GENE'S TE\5i'ELRY 

WATCHES - BRACELETS - RLVGS - DIAMONDS 
AND ALL KINDS REPAIRLNG WATCHES, ETC. 

FARMERS\ ILLX. CALIFORNIA 
Three Miles from Hxeler. Calif. 



Phone Hilldal? 4-3S18 



Cafe Open 24 Hours Daily 



THE BRIGHT SPOT CAFE 
and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Malii? J. Hammond 
GOOD EATS A.ND DR1NK5 
215 MAIN STREET EL CA.'OS CAL 



^.^HITE 0\\ L CAFE 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DLNNERS 
ANT) SHORT ORDERS 

Where the Truckers Stop 

Open 24 Hours Daily - Closed McMiday 

Phone Main 61 

16 East Central - Hy 99 

Redlands. California 



CHITA'S CAFE AND T.\XI 

GOOD FOOD 
Beer. Wine and Soft Drinks 



Phone >S9 
469 Holt Avenue 

HOLTVTLLE. CALIFONRIA 



BUCK'S LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic 

LIQUORS ANT) WINTS 
BEER &; SOFT DRINKS 

314 Orange Street 

Redlands. California 



H U D L \\ S 

Highway 99 at Fourth Street 
Redlands. California 



SHINGLE INN 

401 ^S'est Anaheim Blvd. 

WILMINGTON. CALIF. 



THE TAP INN 

304 Avalon Boulevard 

WILMINGTON. CALIF. 



FREE ESTIMATES 

Home Craft Venetian 
Blind Company 

N'ENFTIAN BLINDS 

Lifetime Steel - Cool. Rust-Proof .Aluminum - Cedar Wood 

NO DOWN PA\^IENT 

as lo»' as SI. 00 per week 

lackson 08"4 Phone "64-62 

431" Florida .^ve. 2144 Blake 

San Diego San Bernardino 

POMON.\ 1149 RIXTRSIDE 6941 



p*«t >N 



1\>UCE AND rE.\CE OFFICERS" KXTINAI 



M«tA. 1<>4S 



The l\iboc rVcpamncni is housed m the dtv^s pic 
txiTK^K- cjr\- K«ll. Ai»d in tJ>e hascmcm is the shivoang 
rarfcie t\->r the Pohoe TVp.. id this KvJv- cut law 

cntc«rceincnt oftccrs h«$ t. . .: some miirhr\- hijih 
siKVibng exfyrts w'ith small side arms. 

The iV-parnnent maintains a radio station, xvnth \\'ah«r 
KcJler in chat^e. It services the State High\ikT»y Patrol, 
the ShcnCs cars and se\'en cars t\v the Santa Cm; Pobcc 
rVfwrrmcnt, All these cars which patrol the enure 11 
sqxiare miks ot the cir\' hmiis. are eqvnpped xn-ith the 
lares? in three wav radio— trom station to car, \icc versa 
atvi trom car to car. The s^tion call letters arc KGDT. 
t.\K wav radio was irrsn xtsed by Chict Huntssman m 1*3 >4 

Santa Cnc has SiX'' parknni; meters which have met 
with general apprvA"al ot Kxh the pohcc and the puhhc. 

Two women haw Seen added to the Department sance 
O^iet Huntsroan tcvJc ov-cr. They are Matron Mabel 
I\otv and Pohcex».viman Ehnow WiDiams. TScv have dime 
a tine Ki> m tJieir respecri\'c xxvirf;. 

Chief Huntsman is mamed, his 'sx'ite K-inj: the former 
Mane Walsh and the couple hax-e a son, Pcrrv-, who 
serx-ed in tiie Air Corps dunng World War II tatmg 

-section. He IS now hack and 

Santa Cnu is rcadvins teir ancdicr bis; sannmcr, when 
Tt IS -\m an even larger number of 

peop,^ - ...h was a record. "Hie toviktis 

people and the pohor assure all tiiev wTl be w^-lcfwned 
and well cared fo' 

»^' --...- , 

« 

MOORE'S CAFE \ 

BREAKFAST - LL'NCH - DINNERS } 
AND SHORT ORDERS J 

Beer, Wme and Soft Drinks } 

« 
S-5SLaMesa Blwi. j 

LaMesa, California • 



MINT LIQUOR STORE 

Df'TOC.'Cw cn^. Jyr.T'r-rcr. 

LIQL^ORS ANT> WDCES 

B<«r, Tobaccos and vour 
Cboior ofMixsers 



S5 Emat 



i 



•-W (San RJBgB Gooot^) 
GroxTC Calif omia 



« « 
« « 



ii 

« 
« 

« 



ROYAL ANNE CAFE 

DELICIOUS FOOD and 
HIGHEST Ql ALITi UQL OR 

scrx-rd at all rinies 
Where Best FrienJf Met* 

•^ North Imperial Awtiw 
LaMesa. California 



NEAUS CAFE & 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Merchants Lunch - Steak and 
Chicken Dinners Served Dailv 

«502 LaMcsa Bhd. 

LaMesa. California 



K & L LIQUOR STORE 

Fmt lynpcnred Mmd DcmtesCK 

LIQUORS 
Beer. Vine and Soft 

82S2 LaMesa Bk^. 
LaMesa. California 



Meet } OUT Fnends Here 

BAMBOO CAFE 

S P E C I A L I Z I NG 
IN THE BEST 

\'ista. California 



■4arch, VJ4H 



KJiLICfc AH\y PEACE tm'lCfMS fifL:MSAt 



fi^ff 99 



HAROLD'S 

DINNER KKLL CAFP: 

Good Fcxxl and Your Favr^te 
Brand of Ice O^Id Beer 



II 



SAMPSON MARKL'i 

Where Quality m Ontttandlm^ 

in (fur 

CjftOCl^iES, MEATS AND 

FPfcSH WECjETWAJES 



HAItOfX) VALTrflN. /'r*;> 



-A^ 



t 



\Ti So. E Street 

San Bernardino, California 



TA< Fam^*! ilftftel «mI C«f er 5iiwf 



On U. &. H%^maf 66 mJ 19$ 
ai 2140 Ml Vchmm Avcawe 

San Bernardino. California 



BRACEWELL'S C.AEE 

339- 341 md 343 

POOL HALL 

Good Food - Beer - Vine 
Sojt Drinks and Good Pool JabUi 

San Bernardino. California 



1 i 



i I 



.MI. VERNON MOTEL 

AND COFFEE SHOP 



! I 



II 



( • 

< I 
i • 



Plume 4111 
Calipatria (Imperial County). Calif. 



When in Calexico Viiit 

The Mi--ouri Hotel 
and Cafe 

GOOD KOO.VIS GOOD FOOD 

<i»^ COURTESY SERVICE 

A Decent Place - Decent Food 

at Decent Price* 

• 

Ift? Second Street 
CALEXICO. CALIFOPNTA 



Vkxsxf. ~j 



ELK H R N 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



TdeffaoK 

2228< 
RICHMONT). CALIFORNLA 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March. 1948 



Telephone 525-78 



Orders Put Up to Take Out 



THE RICE BOWL 



Visit the Best Place to Dine -::- Now Serving Merchant's Lunch 
Fried Shrimp - Chow Mein - Chinese Style Combination Dinner 

Chop Suey - American Dishes - Short Orders 
608 THIRD STREET SAN BERNARDINO. CALIFORNIA 

EVANS CAFE 

Highland and Mt. Vernon 
SAN BERNARDINO CALIFORNIA 



BASELINE BILLIARDS 




428 Baseline Street 




SAN BERNARDINO 


CALIFORNIA 


OWENS MARKET 




b5 1 East Baseline Street 




SAN BERNARDINO 


CALIFORNIA 



Phone 'i41i6 


------------------t 


Bill and 


Lou's 


P A LM'S 


CAFE 


Cocktail Bar - 


Good Foods 


644 Third Street 


SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. 



Good Things to Eat at 

THE JUNCTION CAFE 

Kendall Drive and Highway 66 
Open 24 Hours Daily 



Phone 309-11 
Highway 66 — 9 Miles North of 

SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. 



THE V CAFE 

Maude E. Mankin 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinners 
Short Orders 

Also Home Cooked Food 
AMERICAN AND SPANISH 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

Foothill and 5th 

SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. 



Jim's Charcoal Broiler 

We Specialize in 

CHARCOAL BROILED STEAKS 

457 Highland Avenue 

SAN BERNARDINO, CALIF. 





Visit the 






¥ 


PASTIME 


CAFE 


M 




For Fun and Food * 


Pool and Snooker 






350 "D" Street 








SAN BERNARDINO, 


CALIF. 





I 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



SCOTT'S CAFE 
and Cocktail Lounge 

ENTERTAINMENT 

and 

DANCING 



516 D Street on Highway 99 
VICTORVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



COTTAGE CAFE 

Edna and Bill, Owners 

We Serve the Best Food 
in This Part of the Country 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 
and Short Orders 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

Hours 11 A. M. to 2 A. M. 
Seven Days a Week 

7732 Orange Thorpe 
So. West Corner of Grand Avenue 

BUENA PARK, CALIFORNIA 



POW'S CHOW HOUSE 

HAMBURGERS 

CHEESEBURGERS 

GOOD COFFEE 

Beer, Wine, Candy, Cigarettes 
and Soft Drinks 



Highway 66 and Campus Street 

UPLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 311-64 



-t *■ 



HAROLD'S 

CHARCOAL BROILER 

and Cocktail Lounge 

THE FINEST 
IN THE VALLEY 



Harold Powell, Prop. 
328 West Foothill Blvd. 

Fontana, CaUfornia 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



AGENT H. C. VAN PELT 

(Continued from page 15) 

Some communities have passed ordinances making it a 
misdemeanor for motor vehicle operators to leave car 
keys in their parked automobiles, thus penalizing failures 
to safeguard these expensive, hard-to-get vehicles, reduc- 
ing one of the greatest contributing causes of juvenile 
delinquency, and alleviating some of the terrific burden 
on lav,' enforcement agencies in tracking down stolen cars, 
which so often lead to stickups, bank robberies, rapes and 
other crimes, and are used as a means of get-a-way and 
transportation in the perpetuation of lawlessness. Scarcely 
a day passes without car thieves, youthful joy-riders and 
confirmed criminals, telling the same old story to the 
arresting officers: "We walked down the street until we 
found a car parked with the keys in it." 

There were 229,920 cars stolen throughout the nation 
last year, and the monetary value of such larcenies 
amounted to over 146 million dollars. Although the re- 
lentless efforts of law enforcement agencies resulted in the 



MONARCH CAFE 
and Liquor Store 

FINEST FOOD, LIQUORS, 
BEER and WINES 

Trade Where Other 
Wise People Do 



905 Front Street 

NEEDLES, CALIFORNIA 

Where All Trains Stop 



G. W. OAKES 
Barstow Richfield Service 

Where the Las Vegas Highway Meets Route 66 
in the Center of Barstow 

Home Clean Rest Rooms 



24 Hour Service 

BARSTOW, CALIFORNIA 



Carl and Victor's 
CUCAMONGA MARKET 

Quality Groceries, Meats Fresh 

Vegetables, Beer, Wine, Liquor and 

Fancy Delicatessen Food 

Open Sundays 

111 West Foothill Blvd. 

On Highway 66 

CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA 

San Bernardino County 



STANTON MARKET 

WONG ii QUON, Props 



Quality Meats, Groceries 

Fresh Vegetables 

Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 



10752 So. Stanton Blvd. 

STANTON, CALIFORNIA 



IMPERIAL CAFE AND 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Brea's Finest 

We Serve Nothing 

but the finest 

LIQUORS, BEER, WINES 

AND FOOD 

Both On and Off Sale 

* 

223 S. Pomona Avenue 

BREA, CALIFORNIA 



March. J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" lOURNAL 



Page 59 



recovery of almost 95 per cent of these vehicles, the un- 
recovered 5 per cent represents a loss of approximately 
seven million dollars in the value of the cars alone, plus 
the expense of the investigations, the increased insurance 
rates, and the financial, social and moral factors resulting 
from the continuing criminal activities of these car thieves 
— all of which must be absorbed by the American public. 

Possibly the more widespread adoption of such ordi- 
nances may be effective. By penalising failures to lock 
cars and remove the keys, it may tend toward keeping 
these costly, difficult to legitimately obtain vehicles, out 
of the repair shop or junk yard, stopping some youngsters 
from going to jail, and preventing injury and death to 
innocent persons. 

We of law enforcement must be as interested in pre- 
venting delinquency and crime as we are in the apprehen- 
sion of criminals. No better results can be accomplished 
than through the intelligent leadership of law enforcement 
in the handUng of youth problems and crime prevention. 
There is no better qualified group to coordinate the activi- 
ties of the social, welfare, vocational and other com- 
munity agencies having responsibilities concerning juve- 
niles. Because of the many disturbing influences affecting 
home life, all information regarding blighted areas, un- 
wholesome conditions, neglected children, etc., should be 
promptly inquired into by trained investigators and con- 
structive action taken. 

Police sponsorship of Boy Scout Troops, its supervision 
of athletic leagues, its interest in Schoolboy Patrols and 
Junior Safety Groups, the vigorous enforcement of the 

Phone UNdcrhill 1-0438 

ANSEL T. SCHLOSS. Inc. 

STUDEBAKER 

49 South Van Ness Ave., between Market and Mission Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

THE RICE BOWL 

CHOP SUEY - CHOW MEIN - FRIED SHRIMP 

All Kinds Chinese and American Dishes 

3564 EIGHTH STREET R1\ERSIDE. CALIF. 

AIRLINE CAFE 

DELICIOUS HOME COOKED FOOD 
The Kind Mother Tried to Cook 

Open 7 A. M. to 6 P. M. 
EDGEMONT. RI\ ERSIDE. CALIFORNIA 

ERNIE'S GRILL 

754 WEST THIRD STREET 
SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA 



OASIS 

Cocktail Lounge 

and Cafe 

DINING and DANCING 

753 Front Street 

NEEDLES, CALIFORNIA 



WHEN IN BARSTOW 

i t s 

HAROLD'S CAFE 

H.\ROLD R. Ll SE 



Phone 288 
145 West Main 

BARSTOW, CALIFORNIA 



PURDY'S POOL HALL 

POOL TABLES - CLUB ROOM 
Beer, Soft Drinks and Tobaccos 

125 East Main Street 

BARSTOW, CALIFORNIA 



IRVING'S PLACE 

BREAKFAST . LUNCH . DINNER 

SHORT ORDERS 

Hours 6 A.M. to 12 Midnight 



IRVINGTON 



CALIFORNIA 



OSCAR'S— Cocktails 

Phone 5 12 1 

IN RICHMOND 

AT 1047 TWENTY-THIRD STREET 



BARSTOW BAKERY 

Wedding Birthday and Anniversary 

CAKES 

and all types of fancy pastry 

101 North First Street 

BARSTOW, CALIFORNIA 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



laws covering the sales of liquor and tobacco to minors, 
the suppression of obscene literature, and the conducting 
of educational work to prevent the public from getting 
into habits which make crime easy for the criminal, con- 
tribute immeasurably to the effective combatting of our 
rising post-war crime problem. 

Our people must be frequently reminded that the 
preservation of our home front requires something more 
than mere law enforcement — that the full support and 
cooperation of all public-spirited citizens is imperative if 
the officers are to do a capable job. Our business and 
professional men and women, farmers, laborers and house- 
wives must be awakened to the grim realization that the 
ugly spectre of crime is something which affects each and 
every one of them individually. 

Unfortunately, we still have with us today some of 
those easy-going persons who are too busy to vote, too 
tired to participate in community activities, and too in- 
different to take a real interest in matters of public im- 
portance. All too many of our people are shirking their 
own individual responsibilities as citizens through avoid- 
ing jury service, refusing to willingly serve as witnesses, 
and neglecting to report to the proper authorities informa- 
tion coming to their attention involving possible violations 
of the law. Some offenses today are not only condoned 
but are actually encouraged by persons who are otherwise 
strictly law-abiding citizens. Dealers in hot merchandise 
and black market operators could be eliminated over night 
if a nationwide public boycott were initiated against 
stolen property and over-ceiling prices. 
(To Be Continued) 



VICTOR'S 
ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

Distributor 

MAYTAG WASHING MACHINES 

RANGES - FREEZERS 

WIZZAR BICYCLE MOTORS 

SCHWINN BICYCLES 

1 39 Second Street 

CALEXICO, CALIFORNIA 



Garden Empire Market 



Where Courtesy Prevails 

Highest Grade Groceries, Meats, Fresh 

Vegetables, Fruits and Soft Drinks 

Calipatria (Imperial County), Calif. 



Blondie 

FOUR CORNERS CAFE 

Food Never to Forget and 
all Truckers Remember 

Open 24 Hours Daily 
Intersection of Highway 99 and Highway 80 

EL CENTRO, CALIFORNIA 



CURLEY'S 
SUPER SERVICE 

RICHFIELD PRODUCTS 

40 Foot Public Scales 

GOODYEAR TIRES 

Phone 1497 
1497 Adams Street 

El Centro, California 



When In El Centro 
visit the 

GREYHOUND CAFE 

In Greyhound Bus Station 
ELMER OIEN, Prop. 



475 MAIN STREET 
EL CENTRO, CALIFORNIA 



SAN ANTONIO SPOT 



Finest Liquors, Cocktails, Beer, Wine, 
Soft Drinks - Delicious Food 

8:00 A.M. to Midnight 

Phone 1395 
457 Main Street 

EL CENTRO, CALIFORNIA 



-* 



>--4 



I 



March, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



SOCIAL SECURITY 

(Continued from page 11 ) 

the number of Social Security beneficiaries exceeds the 
number receiving State Old-Age pensions. Figures re- 
ported by the State Department of Social Welfare at the 
end of 1947 indicated that 10,725 aged persons in San 
Francisco were receiving the State Old-Age Pension. One 
of the principal purposes of the Social Security Act was ' 
to reduce the need for Old-Age Assistance by substituting 
a pay-as-you-go insurance plan in which workers would 
prepay annuities for their old age. 

The first Social Security benefits were paid in 1940, 
so that in eight years Social Security payments have finally 
reached the point where the number of beneficiaries on 
the rolls have exceeded the number applying for and re- 
ceiving State Aid. The other goal of exceeding the amount 
in dollars and cents paid to State pensioners is still to be 
attained, but as the system matures, insurance payments 
v.-ill steadily mount. Inclusion by Congress of any of the 
excepted groups will give an added impetus to this move- 
ment and will thu- speed the day when public funds for 
assistance will be materially reduced. 



Phone 5439 



Simtnie and Mini, Props. 



WELCOME HOME COURT 

OUR TWELFTH YEAR 

Inland Route. Three Miles South of Vista 



VISTA 



CALIFORNIA 



Open 9 A.M. Daily Phone 55 I -J 

LAURA'S CAFE 

HOME COOKING 

Specializ'ng in 

SPAGHETTI AND SHRIMP DINNERS 

Thank you 
Mrs. L. Scardino 

913 So. San Diego Blvd. ESCONDIDO. CALIF. 



LAKESIDE LIQUOR STORE 

SELECT WHISKIES. BEER, WINES 
AND MIXERS 



LAKESIDE (San Diego County). CALIFORNIA 



H. C. Beck, Proprietor 



Phone 12S6-W 



CALIFORNIA AUTO WRECKERS 

WE BUY THEM RUNNING OR WRECKED 

NEW AND USED AUTO PARTS 

I 19 WEST INYO STREET TULARE. CALIF. 



Phone 29 



P. O. Box 1012 



Tulare Plumbing & Sheet Metal Shop 

TONY L. ROCHA, JR. 



140 SO. J STREET AND 99 



TULARE. CALIF. 



SAVAGE WAR 
SURPLUS STORES 



Exeter (Tulare County), California 



RITZ CAFE 

Cocktail Lounge and Card Room 
Delicious Food - Drinks 



116 South J Street 
Tulare, California 



.4 



Souza Brothers Cafe 

Highest ^twlitv 

LIQUORS, WINES AND FOOD 
served at all times 

226 South J Street 
Tulare (Tulare County), California 



GROCERIES 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE 

HILL'S GROCERY 

Cold Drinks, Fresh Vegetables 
Fresh Meats 

316 North J Phone 1299-M 

Tulare, California 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

(Continued from page 8) 
P. Gleason and Chief Division Deputy John J. Greening, 
Alameda; Chief John D. Holstrom, Berkeley; Sheriff 
Murphy; Chief Melvin Flohr, Santa Rosa; Chief Special 
Agent Harry I. Kimball, F. B. I. 

Radio Communications — Chief Division Deputy Green- 
ing, Chairman; Chief Donald Wood, San Anselmo; Di- 
rector George Hippely, San Francisco; Chief Zink, Sheriff 
Walter Sellmen, M.irin County; Chief Raymond J. Black- 
more, San Jose; Chief Tracy; Sheriff J. A. Long, Contra 
Costa County; Inspector E. Steinmeyer, CHP, Oakland; 
Chief Jones and Chief Dierking. 

The following sat down to a swell luncheon prepared 
by the Burlingame Country Club: 

Hillsborough — City Manager E. P. Wiusey, Council- 
men Kenneth Monteagle and Bernard W. Ford, Chief 
Wisnom, Fire Chief W. C. Oalin, City Judge J. E. 
Trabucco and Sergeant Al Funke. 

Burlingame — Chief R. C. (Jack) Theuer, Captain John 
J. Hartnett, Police Commissioners Allan Hunt and Peter 
Dahl, Retired Chief John J. Harper, William M. Tener, 
United Air Lines, John Montgomery of the Burlingame 
Advance, City Judge J. A. Branson. 

San Mateo — Chief Robert O'Brien and Assistant Chief 
Martin C. McDonnell, City Manager Arthur Sullivan. 

San Carlos — Chief Edward J. Wheeler and Councilman 
Edward Burton. 

Redwood City — Chief C. L. Collins. Councilman 
George McNulty, Deputy Sheriff Milton Minehan and 
Assistant District Attorney Wycoff. 

San Bruno — Chief William Maher, Sergeants Henry 
W. North and Adolph Fernandez, Tom Chapman. 

South San Francisco — Louis Belloni, Leighton J. Peat- 
man, United Air Lines' Special Agent; E. J. Smith. 

San Francisco — Chief Michael E. Mitchell, Sheriff 
Daniel Murphy. Captain of Inspectors James English, 
Director George Hippely, Captain McDonald, Harry C. 
Van Pelt and O. A. Ezell, FBI; Chief Special Agent J. L. 
Creighton and Special Agent Ray Aatherton. Standard 
Oil Co.; Chief Douglas Hayden and Agents Charles 
Moore, Thomas Murphy and A. O. Lewis, Pacific Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co.; Chief A. M. McKenna and 
Dennis P. Sullivan of the Southern Pacific Co. ; Former 
Police Commissioners W. P. Wobber and Ward G. 
Walkup: William P. Golden. Joseph Murphy, Major H. 
A. Machesney, Jr., U. S. Army; Don Marshall and Arthur 
Williams of State Board of Equalization; Chief F. J. 
O'Ferrall, State Narcotic Division; Special Agent Walter 

KEllog 2.9388 

GRAZER'S 

CANDIES - TOBACCOS - MAGAZINES 



FRUITVALE AVE.. Cor. E 2 7th Ave. 



OAKLAND I, CALIF. 



BAY WELDING 

ELECTRIC AND ACETYLENE PORTABLE MACHINES 

Starter Teeth and Aluminum Cylinder Heads Repaired 

GLencouri 1-8414 

148 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



CENTRAL MOTOR CO. 

"YOU WILL BE AHEAD WITH A NASH" 

College & Bush Streets 

WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 



JOE'S CORNER 

DONALD FEELEY - N. F. SMITH 
Pappy and Smitty 

Phone KE!log 2-9697 
Corner 47th Avenue - E. 14th Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



FRUITVALE NURSING HOME 



3124 Fruitvale Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



EXCHANGE LINEN SERVICE 

A COMPLETE RENTAL LINEN SUPPLY SERVICE 

Phone TEmplebar 2-6377 
2 101 UNION STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Air Conditioning 



Gas, Coal and Oil Furnaces 



L. F. WITHARM 

SHEET METAL 

WARM AIR HEATING 

STAINLESS STEEL 

Phone ANdover I-168S 

1718 E. 12th STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



J. FALSETTI ROOFING CO. 

Phone LOchhaven 9-6133 

MEMBER ROOFING ASSOCIATION 

COMPOSITION SHINGLES - GUTTERS 

TAR AND GRAVEL - TILE 

ALL REPAIR WORK 



6 107 HAYES STREET 



OAKLAND 3, CALIFORNIA 



CULY TRANSPORTATION CO. 



MOTOR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM 



OAKLAND 



LONG BEACH 



SAN DIEGO 



RELIABLE 



RESPONSIBLE 



PAUL W. NORDSTROM 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 



OFFICE 

1414 E. 14th Street 

Oakland 6. Calif. 

Call AN. I- 1 872 

Eve. LA. 2-2478 



SHOP 

1408 E. 14th Street 

Oakland 5, Calif. 

AN. I-I87I 



CLencourt 1-3826 



UNION PAPER CO. 



)73 FOURTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



March. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 6i 



J. Vervais, State Automobile Association; Investigator 
Ignatius H. McCarthy, R. H. Appling, U. S. Treasury 
Department; Albert A. Rhine, Walter Duane, George 
Austin, Ron Gemmell, director of Golden Gate Fields 
race track; Emmett F. McCarthy, security service. Bay 
Meadows race track; J. L. Farrell, Capt. M. C. Heine, 
U. S. Navy; Investigator Milton Pilhashy, J. C. Meinbress, barstow 



3442 



KELLY MOTEL . . . Air Conditioned 

Mrs. Harry Kelly Prop. 



Pinkerton Detective Agency; A. E. Duane, H. S. Love, phone 215 
Dan Danziger, J. A. Gritsch, H. L. Knowles, H. A. Kern, 
Earl Sisson, C. R. Danielson, M. J. Feak, R. Rackerby, 
O. M. Grolla, Peter Craelanti, Karl Wolbach, Inspector 
John W. Schilling, Opie L. Warner. 

Oakland — Sheriff H. P. Gleason, Division Chief Deputy 



BARSTOW 



Highway 91 — at White Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL DRUMM 

Mr. and Mrs. Max S. Gleason, Props. 
STEAM HEAT - AIR COOLED 



CALIFORNIA 



ELSINORE RECREATION CENTER 



BOWLING 
FOOD AND COCKTAILS 



Phone 1160 
ELSINORE, CALIFORNIA 



BLUE ROOM CAFE 

939 Front Street 

Needles, Calif. 



SUNSHINE RANCH MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 
BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



R. R. #2 Box E9 

ELSINORE, CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA COFFEE SHOP 

Opan 24 Hours Daily 

BREAKFAST. LUNCH, DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 



NEEDLES 



941 Front Street 



CALIFORNIA 



VANDERSALLS 
P. D. Q. SERVICE STATION 

195 East Sixth Street I 

BEAUMONT, CALIFORNIA 



LUDLOW 



LUDLOW MOTEL 

H. E. Pendergast, Prop. 
On Highway 66 



CALIFORNIA 



STANTON 



STANTON CAFE 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

Hours 7 A. M. to 9 P. M. 

Stanton Avenue and Highway 39 



CALIFORNIA 



LUDLOW CAFE 

BREAKFAST, LLINCH, DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 



LUDLOW (San Bernardino County, on Highway 66). CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Phone 



Res. Phone 
Hawthorne 1 182-W 



GATEWOOD MERCANTILE 

THE RED & WHITE STORES 

The Sign of a Dependable Store 

GROCERIES - MEATS - LIQUORS 

Genuine Cudahy Baby Beef 



Phone Placentia 408 



ATWOOD, CALIF. 



BOB'S MARKET 

R. B. Irwin Prop. 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 

BEER, WINE and SOFT DRINKS 

of the Highest Quality 



NORTH GRAND AVE. 



BUENA PARK, CALIF. 



CLIFFORD HAUGE 

STEAM CLEANING AND COMPLETE GARAGE SERVICE 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

Open Seven Days a Week 



5420 West Imperial Highway 



Los Angeles 45. California 



KIRK BROS. CAFE 

AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

John and Obic Kirk, Props. 

HIGHEST QUALITY FOOD AND 

LIQUORS SERVED 

469 Third Street 

SAN BERNARDINO 



CALIFORNIA 



JORDAN'S RECREATION 

219 W. Fifth Street 
BEAUMONT. CALIF. 



HITCHING POST 

13 1 East J Street 
COLTON. CALIF. 



Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



John J. Greening, Chief Deputy Leon V. Palmer, Director 
E. Steinmeyer and Officer J. R. Frank, CHP.; H. E. Rad- 
bruch and Arthur H. Sherry of the District Attorney's 
office; Fred P. Dartt. 

Berkeley — Officers E. M. Parker and Walter J. Johnson; 
George F. (Jimmie) Cake, Rollin King. 

Alameda — William F. Murray. 

Emeryville — Chief Frank Farina and former Chief 
Louis Mann. 

Vallejo — Chief Earl Dierking, Captain Edward C. 
Beck, Lieutenant Harry L. Oliver, Communications Officer 
Ray Meyers, also president of Northern California Com- 
munication Officers' Association. 

San Anselmo — Chief Donald Wood, Councilman 
Arthur W. Smith. 

Sausalito — Fred Perry, Sr., Fred Perry, Jr., Henry 
Meyer. 

Los Gatos — Constable E. O. Woods. 

Woodside — Deputy Sheriff Edward A. Michel. 

Hamilton Field — Donald L. Springer. 



UNION MACHINE WORKS 

534 Second Street 

OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 



Res. Piedmont 3986-M 



Bus. KEIIog 3-3787 



L. & N. BUILDERS SUPPLY CO. 

John Nimmo 

EVERYTHING FOR THE BUILDER 
DOORS - PLYWOOD - SASH 



4700 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-3 15 1 



CALIFORNIA FRAME SHOP 

Steven M. Casey, Prop. 
CASEY DOORS 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 



NOTARY PUBLIC 



VERNON McCALLA 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
INSURANCE 



Telephone GLencourt 1-8968 



1226 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 



'TOWN CRAFT' 
Coats 

SAN FRANCISCO 



'TOWNE DEB" 
Fashions 

OAKLAND 



Season's Greetings 
HAGSTROM'S FOOD STORES 



Oakland, Calif. 



ZERIKOTES 

LAKE MERRITT DINING ROOM 



1520 OAK STREET 



OAKLAND 



5 101 E. 12th STREET 



OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 



Northern California Refrigeration Parts and 
Equipment Wholesalers 

WM. WURZBACK CO. 



ANdover 1-0217 
195 1 EAST Uih STREET OAKLAND 5. CALIF. 



ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT CO. 

R. J. Peterson 
% 

363 TENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Office Residence 

HIgate 4-0732 KEIIog 2-8486 

Manufacturers of Rotex Quick Change Punch Presses 

p u N c H^ Company 

4726 EAST I2TH STREET ^ OUMAND I. CALIFORNIA 




Earl O. A. Pearson, Owner 
Formerly BOLLAERT PUNCH CO. 
Phones: ANdover 1-4300 
Res. KEIIog 3-1476 



KEIIog 2-9625 



FRANK RELVA, Prop. L. M. Cakebread 



TEmplebar 4-9140 



SHAMROCK CAFE 



GOOD FOOD 



CAKEBREAD'S GARAGE 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE OF ALL KINDS 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRS 

OFFICIAL BRAKE STATION 



1910 EAST Mth STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Robert O. Baldwin 



TEmplebar 2-5894 



HOUSE OF STAMPS 

We Buy, Sell or Trade Used and Mine Stamp Collections, 
Old Coins, Buttons 



404 13th STREET 



OAKLAND 12. CALIF 



802 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Compliments from 

THE MOCAMBO 

DISTINCTIVE COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



13th AND BROADWAY 



TEmplebar 2-6810 



IN OAKLAND 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



Phone GLencourl 1-15 12 



MILLS BROS. TAILORS & CLEANERS 

USED CLOTHES BOUGHT AND SOLD 



COLUMBIA MEAT MARKET 

Shing Sang Hing Kee Co. 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL BUTCHERS 



TWinoaks 3-7478 



941 TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 461-467 NINTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



THE OWL BAIT SHOP 



TRinidad 2-8151 



8870 FOOTHILL BLVD. 



SHOES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 

D. SNIDE 

BUYER OF GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
WHOLESALE JOBBERS 

Telephone HIgate 4-9321 
5 15 SEVENTH STREET 
OAKLAND Southside between Washington & Clay OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



SWeetwood 8-8120 



C. GIORGETTl, Proprietor 



GIORGETTI PRODUCTS CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF PURE FOOD PRODUCTS 



GLENN'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



COMPLETE 

AUTOMOBILE 

SERVICE 



9507 EDES AVENUE 



OAKLAND 3, CALIF. I 100 EAST EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



H. C. "Curly" Bums 



Frank H. Hart Los Angeles 



San Francisco 



Oakland 



B & H AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Specialists COLSON EQUIPMENT 8C SUPPLY CO. 



DIESEL AND BUTANE EQUIPMENT 
Complete Service All Makes of Trucks 

HIgate 4-2302 
363 THIRD STREET OAKLAND 7, CALIF. ''" TENTH STREET 



TE. 2-3556 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



A L'S CAFE 

HAMBURGERS - CHEESEBURGERS - HOT DOGS 

Phone TWinoaks 3-1386 

298 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Season's Greetings 

from 

Floyd L. JACOBS 8C SONS 

in SWAN'S TENTH STREET MARKET 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



A. E. KLOPFER 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 

STEAM HOT WATER HEATING 

COOLING - PIPING - REPAIRING 

ANdover 1-2501 
3419 EAST TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



APPROVED FOR G. I. TRAINING 

ISOCONIC DRAFTING is the only method of making 3 -Dimensional 

Engineering Drawings, in scale, of any object. 
Though taught in several public high schools, it is taught in only 
one college in the country. For full information call or write the 

California College of Engineering Sciences 



ANdover 1-3466 



Authorized Sales and Service of Lauson Engines 

FRED C. SPINDLER 

AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE WORKS 

HIgate 4-8078 

215 TWTLFTH STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 



USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 



VAN BISHOP 

Authorized 
USED CAR DEALER 



KEIlog 4-5830 



1743 FOOTHILL BLVD. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 1208 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 



SQUARE FOUR MOTOR SERVICE 



KEIlog 3- 1 1 13 



4418 E. 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 



Bob Raymond, Mgr. 



Phone TRinidad 2-2012 



GEORGE'S DRUG STORE 



PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 
Cor. DUTTON 8c BANCROFT SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 3227 EAST T^S•ELFTH 



E. M. PEET MFG. CO. 

Phone: KEIlog 4-0460 

1238 THIRTEENTH AVENUE OAKLAND 8. CALIF. 

FABRIX RUBBER MAT CO. 

RUBBER MATS 

Residential - Commercial - Industrial 

Standard or Custom Built 



KE. 2-1512 



P*ee66 



PCXJCE .^XD PEACE OFHCERS" JOLTIN.^L 



March. 1948 



DU.\RTE'S REX-AJ.L PH.AR^LACY 

RELIABLE ? : : R I P T I O N S 

cosacmcs - drugs i"-" tneky - sundries 

KODAKS - FTLKS - BEAK PHOTO SERMCE 



UNION .\L\CHINE \\'ORKS 



534 SitirnmA Street 



X?J*C>R^. C-!iLIF OAKL-WI 



:AL:rcRNLA 



KELSON, Jenelers 



MORRIE K-\NTOR 



We Bay «^ StM 
MAMOmS. OLD GOLD. SILVEK 



*S2 TEVTH 5TREZT 



LAKESIDE JUNK DEALERS 
TekepkoK* Hlgate *-i*6e 

OAKL-AVD. CALIFORNIA 412 5AAD150N 5TREZT OAKLAND 7. CALIF 



H.\LF B.\RREL C\B-\RET 



A- R. L.\PH.\M i SON 

CONTRACTORS 



4144 C«efid«e Ave- KEUc? 2-S255 



jAXLASD. CALIFORSU OAKI-A'- 



;-J-IFORMA 



H. E. PECKH-\M 

?A?ER RULING 



LEOGR-ANDE BROS. 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 



rElC^-SrSi-- 2-^iS^ 



1M3 Bria«e Arc 



ii3 TESTr-. 5~-; 



IP.NLA OAKLASD 



CAUFORNIA 



Ptottv AS=.i 



.\LS SPORTSSL\NS CLUB 

SUIT PRESSING 
SHOE SHINING 



BAY CIT\' PATTERN CO. 

WOOD AND METAL PATTEBJtS 



innate 4-Se22 



11*4 SE^XNTH STREET 



OAKLANX) MM - Mti A\'ENU"E 



OAKLAND. CALIF 



TV. »-7S5« 



PBTVATE BAJSQUET BOOM 



\ ILLA de la PAIX 

- DLVNERS - COCKTAILS 
BUCElXatT FSENCH ANT) IT ALLAN CUISINE 



M^NT^flNG & WHITAKER 

lacvrporated 
ELECTKICAL CONTKACTOSS 



KEBoc 4-4013 



251 SDCTH SntEE- 



CkAKLAM). CAUFORMA |229 IMfc AVENL^ 



OAKLAND «. CALIF 



Season's Greetings 
JOE BUDHIS PLACE 

FOR FINE FOOD 



BETTER BUILT HOMES 

R. J. MASSONGILL 

GENXRAL CONTRACTOR 

No. ssaea 



3-Z73S 



374 MKTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF 1 1 b« EAST I4ti. STREET 



OAKLAND 5 C^ 



l«»>S Ubin I i>ir 
PUKE LEAD AMD OIL 



Cc- ; 



BELL 3l bell 

Sttr ^td City Lirf llJ 



AS Waft 

I7]» «■«« EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CAUTOftMA 



W. E. WESSBERG GLASS CO. 

Pt'^E.* KE:.i,t «-j33: 

o - •' - •- :, '_i_; .• 

'«23 EAST Mik STREET. Vnr i«ti. S-.re>^ »z^ I4tl> A-re 



GOUNS PRODUCTS CO. 

HELENS CAKE MIXERS 



KEHos 2-»7t>i 

BABES PLAY HAVEN 

D I N E - D A N C E 

SPORTSMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

4325 EAST 1«ti STP-ZL~ OAKLAND I. CALIF 



Uantk, IMS FOUCE ASD PEACE OfFKERST JOUKSAL Ta^ «r 



CRIME PRE\-EN~nON 

Cbrtrirc^ f-m ra« :7 ^ ^^STEiTcELS DOOR ft SASH GOiMPANY 

:-) t&e pertormsri'p ■:•£ is r^:."sr 3:r:V5 feers i cc 

-.- Dsenrr-fciir feDcr5 i cs.— e-ji;rT ii-. 

j-encT an dse part :f ma— r iilcr^r. -vhirse icn-rines -se"*" •--i.ij •; ii?zz~-NCS 

O X asaaUr has die irst z.caCL wrcfc. ~e u-r^.r^e _ ^^•' J" TURNER. D.V JM. 



<6) ««Hig^b»dbr»Httd=adl9-<]k&«dkplfo«r cSmi-I: SP^^S'^^^ 

and asdoisy to talK acBsn! — ^a<=-^ 



(S) ic bas «HB» tt» sam Bi ib «f losiEJiis Sfpes w&k& *-A DL c i hCHNTCAL INSTTTTJTE 

2re Willi lll| dond WJ M HItf »■ «■<« W l^ of lailJ l B agBBck£ A<i<r>rtis«-s awlaui^ - 3Z4 Tlnr-(-T rr !i StrsEt: 



f l(if» SDK rf Ae i^i«fe «frfciffii-ii i ^ «ii Ekcdbk HL-._- - . -; - 1 I- AlN STORE 



D c :* E »- j »A » c E STEF.ANTS GROCERY 

HALF >KX^S COCKTAIL LOL'NGE *>d meat DeFA«TsiE»T 



jA-tLAJoD, ;aI_:F ■'•*22 EDES ,i"-T^'-~ "AiCLJCW 



S i E FACTliRING CO. 

- >sE woKK HARRY FORD 



E 5TlBtEET «MKL«>«Bi *ffi2 ELSIE AVE>L'E SA> LEAJHJHQ. CAOF. 



KFi" AL~TO SUPPLY AID TO HE^^^TH 5 7=^31 BATHS 

ecRiG iE?'.-.:z 5-:l-:v '?lR^s^^A ' ~ 1- 

1U<(S East : *C3 icr-5er -'une ^0 3— ISTt 



SAN PABLO AUTO WRECKING CO. \TrrORI BROS 




jaLxrs. vsGE XAi" ' ^^ Asm ?c'- 



FOODLASD SiARKFT TTVOU LL^CH 



DR. E- A - ::ER BREITERY CLUB 

BOCABB :-" ^iT U^DOBS - WHHES - BEEBS - UCnCH 

j5t ~"rc — - :__ ;^ 7 - ~ r>— ~ * ^EV"E>TH STHEKT Morass rmm '~tTifn-n dtiw Slilw^xji 



HKmTAY BiARKET G. XLARCLCCI GROCERY 

ITM VM met M-ATF^SREK 343Z Sm Liamin StnsC 

J=I : SA.'V IHABSBMM* & ' »Bfcfc. ' ti QAJOLOD-, CALIF OAKLASJB CALJPOH.NIA 



JAOCS BLTTE C\FE *^ EDS aL TO PARTS 






- . ^. . .,.-__ ^ __ _o^-^ ^^ OAiOAND FISHERIES 

\ 0^_ NL^XLTACTX^ING CO. ^ ^^dccebs - whol^.^.-.^5 






Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1948 



NO. CALIF. RADIO OFFICERS 

(Continued from page 9) 

Secretary-Treasurer — Al Taggart 

Board of Directors — Art Sowle, Merrill LeBouef, John 
Maybee, George Burton, B. McMurphy. 

Preslweut Merrill LeBouef relinquished the gaval to the 
new President, Ray Meyers. It is useless to attempt to 
put into words the appreciation the members of this asso- 
ciation feel for Merrill LeBouef for his sincerity and 
effort on behalf of this organization as President during 
the trying year of 1947. We will simply say, Thanks, 
Merrill. 

Your Secretary will not attempt to introduce our new 
President, Ray Meyers. He has been associated with radio 
since its inception, both commercial and in amateur activi- 
ties, and is known by thousands, however, even Ray admits 
he has a big job ahead of him to keep up with Merril 
LeBouef's record. President Ray Meyers has an abundance 
of energy and has the necessary interest of this associa- 
tion to better communications in our respective fields. 
Good luck, Ray, and we all know you will do a real job. 

President Ray Meyers" first official act was to re-appoint 
Brower McMurphy as Chairman of the Engineering and 
Frequency Committee, a job that Mac has done to per- 
fection for several years. 

Art Reese (Motorola) offered his services plus the 
Tele-Com. news service which his organization supplies 
to its numerous representatives to assist this association 
in having first hand news of communication hearings held 
in Washington. 



ACME PLASTER 
CONTRACTORS 

210 San Leandro Boulevard 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

SWeetwood 8-4302 



L. B. DUFFIN 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

EXCAVATING & GRADING 

210 San Leandro Boulevard 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

SWeetwood 8-4302 



ROETHLIN'S CAFE 
and TRUCK SHOP 



DELICIOUS FOOD 

COCKTAILS - BEER - WINE 

and SOFT DRINKS 



Phone Irvington 63 

225 San Jose Avenue 

IRVINGTON, CALIFORNIA 



VILELA'S 
PLAY HAVEN 

Tony Vilela, Prop. 



RESTAURANT 

and 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

DANCING 



We Cater to Parties 



Phone 82 

IRVINGTON, CALIFORNIA 



March, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



FRIDEN 

CALCULATING 

MACHINE 

CO., Inc. 



2350 Washington Avenue 
SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 8-0700 



ESTUDILLO CHAPEL 

OF 

Santos and Robinson 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
George B. Santos and Guy O. Robinson 

Lady Attendant 



160 Estudillo Avenue 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone TRinidad 2-8278 





RIDGE 


FOUNDRY 


/. D. Grain 


Gray Iron Castings 


• 


688 Williams Street 


SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 


SWeetwood 8-5546 


, 4 






WILLY DELLY'S 

Fine Liquors 
Cocktails 

and lots of 

Hospitality 



599 MacArthur Boulevard 
SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



CHIEF TRACY 

I Continued from page 6) 

operating wholeheartedly with the recreation and park 
departments of the city. We have assigned police officers, 
a lot of them ex-professional and semi-pro players, to 
key spots in the organization program. There are really 
no had boys to start with. They are just full of life and 
enthusiasm. Direct them in manly sports and no one need 
worry about their future. They learn honesty, fair-play, 
understanding, good clean sportsmanship. I'm proud the 
way the department Captains have taken hold and or- 
ganized the 'sand-lot" youngsters." 

Traffic Deaths at a Low 

Oakland's traffic deaths reached its lowest point since 



1948 Greetings 

RUDY'S PLACE 



McDonald Avenue 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



Livermore Service Company 

Electrical Contracting and Appliances 

RADIOS - STANDARD MAKES 
Also GAS APPLIANCES 

Phone 251-W 
1112 W. First Street 

Livermore, California 



John Da Silva's Place 



Phone TRinidad 2-9996 

1182 E. Fourteenth Street 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



( ( 



Incomparable" 






OAKLAND - SAN FRANCISCO - BERKELEY 






.4 



M.Friedman Paint Co. Inc. 

Distributors of 

Oakland - Alameda - Berkeley 

Fruitvale - Sacramento - San Jose 

San Mateo - Palo Alto 



KElloc. 2-fi';6'; 



KEllog 2-6S:66 



INDEPENDENT 
ICE COMPANY 

"Crystal Clear Ice 
and Ice Cubes" 

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED 

630 Twenty-Ninth Avenue 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



GRAY'S AUTO PARTS 

Lloyd Reynolds - Bert Joseph 

CARS BOUGHT FOR WRECKING 

Auto Glass Installed 

New and Used Parts 

Guaranteed Rebuilt Transmissions 

KEllog 4-4374 
1020 High Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



March, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



1921, this in the face of increased population, plus more 
than double the number of registered automobiles in 
this area. 

During 1947 the police department made 29,075 arrests, 
exclusive of traffic, and investigated 48,841 complaints. 
During the same period police ambulances and police cars 
took 7,128 persons to the hospitals. 

Recruit Training 

Abreast of the most modern police techniques, Chief 
Tracy reveals that in order to keep the police personnel 
up to date more than 26,865 man hours of recruit train- 
ing were given members during the past year. 

During this same period there was continued a day 



FURNITURE OUTLET 



Phone 2976 



333 MacDonald 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



G. C. Merrill 



Telephone HIgate 4-3877 



OAKLAND BATTERY CO. 



STORAGE BATTERY 
MANUFACTURER 



113S East Twelfth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



TOM SLATER MOTORS 

USED CARS 

Reconditioned in our own shop 

SMALL DOWN - LOW PAYMENTS 



2446 East Twelfth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



EASTERLING MOTOR COMPANY 

AUTOMOBILES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
BEST DEAL IN TOWN 



Telephon: HIgate 4-8256 



5 18 EAST TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC & MARINE 
REFRIGERATION CO. 

REFRIGERATION REPAIRS 

MAINTENANCE - SALES 

Alsxa Johnston 

After 6 p.m. Call PRospect 5-9237, San Francisco 

1044 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



TEmplebar 2-1691 or 2-4 I 3<) 



Res. Phone: ANdover 1-2619 



PERK'S AUTO MART 



95 7 East Twelfth Street 



TE. 2-7449 



CALIFORNIA 



ACME SCALE COMPANY 

L. J. Nesb!t, Proprietor 

All Kinds of 

SCALES REPAIRED AND SOLD 



OAKLAND AUTO PARTS 



640 East Twelfth Street 



564 TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



EDWARD T. FOULKES 
A rchitect 



3S7 Twelfth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



HOBART SALES & SERVICE 

HOBART FOOD MACHINES - DAYTON SCALES 

334 Twelfth Street GLencourt I-58S7 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



E. C. Swingle 



KEIlog 2-1833 KEIlog 4-4242 



Res. Piedmont 5-7086J 



ED'S AUTO PARTS 



AND WRECKING COMPANY 



BAKERS VAN & STORAGE CO. 



2274 East Twelfth Street 



752 HIGH STREET 



OAKLAND 1. CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



Phone KEIlog 2-1539 



CALIFORNIA 



J. A. BOYER TIRE SERVICE 

TIRES NEW AND USED 

RECAPPING - REPAIRING 

Auto Painting - Body and Fender Work 



CENTURY CLUB 

Irene Knox and Billy Knox, Jr. 
125 East Twelfth Street 



4509 EAST TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND 1. CALIF. OAKLAND 



Phone Mission 7-5988 



WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS 



]■ T. O'CONNOR, Florist 

SPECIALISTS IN FUNERAL DESIGNS AND WEDDINGS 

FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD FLORIST SINCE 1903 

Fred H. Daniel, Proprietor 

2901 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 10, CALIF. 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Richmond 1542 S. Lico, Prop. 

STEGE GROCERY 

GROCERIES - FRESH FRUIT - VEGETABLES 
FRESH MEATS - OLIVE OIL - BEER AND WINE 

990 SOUTH 47th STREET RICHMOND. CALIF. 



P<Jg« 72 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOLTRNAL 



March, 194S 



after day prograxn of target practice on the Police shooting 
range and course in police instructicMi, local, state and 
federal laws, an interpretation of the pro\-isions of the 
city charter which bnng the law enforcement officer into 
the picture. ■ 

Under Chief Trac>-. Oakland's police force, indj\-idually 
and collectively, are undergoing advanced education everj' 
day of the year. 

Largest Class of Recruits 

Last November, Chief Tracy sv^-orc in 166 patrolmen 
frMn the dvil service ehgible list, the largest group of 
pcJicemen ever to be sv^'om in at any c»ie time in the his- 
tor>' of Oakland. The event v^tis staged in the Cir>' 
Council chambers through the cooperation of the Cit\- 
Council and the Civil Service Board. 

"That was a proud moment," cc«nments Chief Bob 
Trac>'. In the past patrolmen off the dx-il serxice hst ne\-er 
numbered more than 25 at c«ie time. In putting 166 new 
officers to work. Oakland took a mighty- forward step in 
bringing the department up to full man-power strength. 

Six Captains on Job 

There are now six Captains in the Oakland police 
department, directly under Chief Tracj\ 

These include: 

Ora E. Rhodes, central di\-ision, who entered the de- 
partment Februarj' 7, 1925, and has held the rank of 
Captain since November 1, 1943. 

Fred R. Barbeau, Eastern division, appointed patrolman, 
April 1, 1922, named Captain August 4, 1.941. 

Lester J. Divine, Captain of traffic divisicMi, who joined 
the force July 2, 1928, and has held the rank of Captain 
since February- 16, 1946. 

Arthur W. Anderson, Captain of Service division, who 
became a patrolman, July 10. 1924, and was appointed 
Captain November 7, 1944. 

Jesse Jackson, Captain of Personnel and Training, an 
officer since January 26, 192>, appointed Captain Au- 
gust 1, 1945. 

David C. Minney, Captain Northern division, who 
entered department September 1, 1933 and has held the 
rank of Captain since July 1, 1946. 

William Barkis, Captain of the Inspectors division. 

Phone IKhigUi 2-9875 

ORIGINAL OLD GLORY CAFE 

COURTESY-SERVICE 

HOME COOKING - AMER1CA.N DISHES 

BEER AND WINES 



:!: 2 64 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone VAiencia 4-9421 S. DeZordo, Prop. 

DOUBLE ROCK GROCERY 

FRESH FRUITS A.ND NXGETABLES 

GROCERIES. WINE AND BEER 

2830 ING.ALLS SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ROYAL AMBER BREWING CO. 



675 Treat Av 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



924 BILLIARD CLUB 

Directors: 
Welker Cochran, V. L. Zimmerman, WeUcer Cochran, Jr. 



924 M.ARICET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone PRospect 5-0926 

SUPERIOR FURNITURE COMPANY 

COMPLETE HOME FUR.NISHINGS 
MODERN OUR SPECL^LTY 



701-705 LARKIN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIf 



WILLIAMS and PETERSEN 

wholesale 
JEWELERS' SUPPLIES 



150 Post Street 



SAN FR.ANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN TRUCK LINES, Ltd. 

— IN THE WEST- 
SHIP WESTERN 

Telephone MArliet 1-8261 
75 COLUMBIA SQUARE SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF 



CALIFORNIA BARREL CO., Ltd. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



WA. 9763 



MORSE PATROL SERVICE 



602 California Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DINO CLUB No. 2 

NORMAN PAINE. A War Veteran 



CALIFORNIA 103 3 FILLMORE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ARNKE IRON WORKS 



ORNAMENTAL AN^D STRUCTUTIAL 
IRON AN-D METALS 



MARINA BOWL 

I72S rabert Street 



7»e BRANNAN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Mardi, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFHCERS" JOURNAL 



P-gc73 



r.sd the pcikx force Septemba 26, 1921. and was ap' 
pointed Capcain November 1, 1942. 
] It is under diese distrkt and divisKn cofmnanders tiiat 
the far-flung aiea of Oakland is k^ under law-llMding 
control. 

Fifteen in^eoors were appointed in 1947, ficm aux. 
ci the sergeant ranks and during tlie same period 10 
sergeants and fourteen patrolinen weie Lenipuiarily named 
as sergeants of pcrfice. 

Youth Program 

Oakland's youth probiem centering about dte juvenile 
detail out of the In^sectofs' Bureau, is under the direct 
charge of Officer Paul Jooes, who has Aavn a rartimbr 
aptitude for this type of pabce service. Has bureau ako 
YantJL^ missing persons reports. 



PAYLESS DRUG STORES 



H-\RRY S. HOOPER 



Phone 236 

210 D Street 

Marys\-ille, California 



HOTEL 
M A R Y S V I L L E 

Lx>uis M. Rossi 



HIST BROTHERS 

AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY 

Phon« 3180 
•TA* Start of a Million Parts" 

3rd and E Streets 

Marvs\Tlle, California 



THE BROSWTCK 

Goodznar ; - - 

NLARYSMLLES OLDEST 
RECRE.ATION CENTER 

218 D Street 

Marys\'iUe, Calilomia 
Phou* 900 



PAGO PAGO 

COCKTAILS 
FISE FOOD 



GEO. DOERSCH 



EASO-HAKE 



22- C Street 

MarysviJle, California 



C.E.Hatfacock 



C-RSfciifa 



RED TOP T.\XI 
Phone 815 

PROMPT -\ND COLTiTEOLS SERNTCE 

120 D Street 
Marvsv-ille, California 



PHONE 2392 
Black & Wliite Cab Co. 

A. L- CiiAnCicr 

317 Third Street 
Marvs\-ille. California 



■•< 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



Under Jones are 10 investigating police officers and the 
city's only police woman, Nauriene Wilson Flores, who 
has been a member of the "force" for sLx years. At the 
secretary's desk, handhng countless details, is Teresa 
Wastell who has been in the juvenile division for the past 
six years. Jones, himself, has been a member of the police 
department for eleven years. 

Altogether Oakland's police department is on the move 
to greater accomplishments. 

Hats off to quiet-spoken, efficient Chief of Police Robert 
P. (Bob) Tracy! 

Try HELEN'S COFFEE SHOP 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 
Finest of Home Cooking :-: Delicious Pastry 

3265 22nd STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



M A L L R Y'S 

MORWEAR PAINT STORE 

Imperial Washable Wallpapers 

Phone 1816 

414 Fourth Street 

Marysville, California 



BUD'S CASINO 

R. F. CAMPER 

One of the oldest 
Bars in Marysville 

FOOD & DRINK 



224 C Street 






Marysville } 



DRAGON SEED CAFE 

Phone 1601 

CHINESE AND 
AMERICAN DISHES 

219 D Street 
Marysville, California 



ROBERT McGEE 
Business Agent - Financial Secretary 

L. E. (Lonnie) McGOWAN 
President 

Hotel and Restaurant Employees 

Bartenders International Union 

Local 715 

American Federation of Labor 

409 Second Street 

Marysville, California 



RANDOLPH 
MACHINERY CO. 

Dealers 

ALLIS-CHALMERS 
MASSEY-HARRIS 

Third and F Streets 
Marysville, California 



Triangle Refrigeration 
Company 

H. S. McNALLY, Sales Engineer 

Meat Cases - Walk in Boxes - Frozen Food 

Cabinets - Soda Fountains - Bottle Coolers 

Reach In Boxes - Ice Makers 

Bar Equipment 

314 G Street 

Marysville, California 

Phone 717 



John C. Bayes Co.Jnc. 

YOUR YUBA-SUTTER FORD DEALER 

There's a FORD in Your Future 

SALES ■ SERVICE - PARTS - REPAIRS 

420 E Street 
Marysville, California 

Telephone 1505 



March. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 



Page 75 



SHERIFF DOWER 

(Continued from page 7) 

cash. Instead of slowing down at Dower's signal, the trio 
opened up with a barrage of Tommy-gun fire. Two of 
the gunmen's slugs hit Dower — one ereasing his right rihs, 
and the other entering his right upper arm, severing the 
argc nerve. They made their get-a-way for the moment. 
One of the gangsters was killed shortly in ;i gun duel 



BUD & ROY'S 

TEXACO SERVICE STATIOIV 
Sth and D Street Phone 912 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



TWIN CITIES DELICATESSEN 

AND VEGETABLE MARKET 
"Everything from Soup to Nuts" 
424 Third Street 
MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



HANSON BROS. 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 
Sales and Service 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES - LUBRICATION 

JIM'S MOBIL SERVICE 



MARYSVILLE 



JAMES G. VRANAS 
6th and B Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



RED LION INN 

COCKTAILS AND CLUB ROOM 
217 D Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



! MARYSVILLE TRACTOR 
& EQUIPMENT CO. 

Distributor 

"Caterpillar" and John Deere 

TRACTORS FARM IMPLEMENTS 

EARTH MOVING EQUIPMENT 



Marysville, Calif. 



Robbins, Calif. 



De Soto 



Packard Plymouth 



FRANK H. WITTEN 

SALES AND SERVICE 
• 

513 Third Street 
Marysville, California 



EL REY THEATER 

WALNUT CREEK 
CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 371 

Oldsmobile Sales and Service 

DONALD OWENS 

UNION OIL DEALER 



1334 PARK AVENUE 
CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



f 

t 



B S S E N 

BROTHERS 

LAUNDRY 

"LAUNDRY AT ITS BEST" 

221 B Street 
Marysville, California 



mdm 



BOTTLING COMPANY 

Distribt4tors for 

YUBA AND SUTTER COUNTIES 



Yuba City 



Marysville 



I 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1948 



with Sheriff Richard W. Hoskins of Nevada County and 
$13,999.90 of the $14,000 loot recovered. Net gain— 10c, 
the price of a bag of peanuts. Net loss, one death, and 
40 years on McNeil Island for the other two. Ask them 
if crime pays. 

Sheriff Dower has a group of top men in his organ- 
ization, all but one with meritorious service in the late war. 
They include Undersheriff Arch McFariane (F. B. I. 
Academy graduate) and deputies Murphy, Barrett, Mar- 
tin, Gibson, Reginald and Kerhoulas. What a fine green 
flag they could fly with a big gold harp up in the corner 
if it was for Nick Kerhoulas, but Dower says he's as 
good as any Irishman in the outfit, so we'll have to take 
his word for it, but it dees seem too bad. 

The radio cars are tuned in to KADS — a nice arrange- 
ment which co-ordinates the Marysville Police Depart- 
ment, the Highway Patrol and just across the beautiful 
Feather River, the Yuba City Police Department, and 
Sheriff G. W. Carpenter's ofiice in Sutter County. Inci- 
dentally Mar>'sville is the "home port" of the new Presi- 
dent of our Northern California Police Communication 
Officers Association — Merrill Le Boeuf, who we hope to 
salute in a coming issue. 

It's a fine, up-and-coming, century-old community that 
the Sheriff has selected for his career, the rich bottom 
lands of this area produce over half of the world's canning 
peaches, in addition to an abundance of other varied 
crops and livestock. Our Journal wishes him the best of 
success in his chosen work. 



H YT ' S 

"The Doughnut King" 
STEAK DINNERS - LUNCH 



Highway 99E 

SEVENTEENTH AND PARK 

CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



Jusf soy... "GOUGH AT MARKEF 

and you're there 

Shop the easy way. Streetcars J, K, L, M, N, 6, 7 aad 17 stop 
ia front of our door. 

Get a fine Fleecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur- 
ing store. Airflex, experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 
you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 
If you drive wc have a large free parking lot adjoining our score. 
Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 
United States. 

AIBFLEX 



\ 



EDWARD McROSKEY 

1«S7 MARKET STREET 
Opposite Qeush Str««t 



MATTRESS CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Fr*. Parfclnc 



THE CHEMICAL 

and 

PIGMENT COMPANY 



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Division of the Glidden Co. 
OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 



BRICK 

STEEL 

CONCRETE 

FRAME 

CONCRETE BLOCK 

SHERRATT CO 

GENERAL CONSTRUCTION 



1231 - 13th Avenue 

KEIIog 3-0282 

OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 




TO THE MEN 

BEHIND THESE 

EMBLEMS OF 

A PEOPLE'S 

TRUST 



Our Thanks 

For A Job Being 

Well Done! 



STANDARD OIL COMPANY 
OF CALIFORNIA 




Betty Lou 
Foods 



I 



380 Fifth Street 
OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 

Phone TEmpIebar 2-5080 



Phone GLencourt 1-5040 



M. R. O. 

We specialize in Maintenance, Re- 
pair and Operating Supplies for 
every purpose. Replacement parts 
for Automobiles, Trucks, Tractors 
and Marine Engines. Tools, Shop 
equipment, and Heavy Hardware. 



GEO. A, KREPLIN CO. 

2330 Webster Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Sec. 562, P. L. & R. 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Cailf. 
Permit 3172 



Sfohl, Nell S 

270 Claremont Wvd 
San Franciico, C«l 



Return Postage Guaranteed 
465 10th Street, San Francisco 5 



Visit 
World Famous 

BROOKDALE LODGE 

Home of the Dining Room with the 
Brook Running Through It 



Brookdale, California 



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BAKED ENAMEL 
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Quality Signs In Quantity 



Our compliments to the excellent law enforcement of Yuba and Sutter Counties 

H. EARL PARKER 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
Responsibility 




Skill {M^iri!^li%] Integrity 

f/ 

EXCAVATING GRADING 

12th & F Streets -:- Phone 1738 
MARYSVILLE. CALIFORNIA 



Sm Francisco 




AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 






CHIEF MICHAEL E. MITCHELL 
San Francisco Police Department 




APRIL 



1948 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



JOHNSON, DRAKE 
& PIPER 



INCORPORATED 



General Contractors 

BAKER BUILDING 

MINNEAPOLIS 



700 California Building 
1736 Franklin Street 

OAKLAND 12, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone GLencourt 1-8011 



INTERNATIONAL 
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Battery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



HOW HOME USERS 
CAN SAVE THE OUTPUT OF 

A BIG POWERHOUSE 

(90,000) kilowatts 

Every bit of electricity saved reduces 
power output and helps water conserva- 
tion, a vital need in drought-stricken 
California today. 

A small amount of electric current 
saved in one home becomes a big saving 
when multiplied in thousands of other 
homes throughout Northern and Cen- 
tral California. 

HERE IS HOW IT CAN BE DONE 

If tonight in every home just one light 
hulh of 100 watts were turned off and 
left off, then more than 90,000 \{lowatts 
of electricity would he saved. 

This 90.000 \xlowatts saved (especial- 
ly during the pea\ load between 4 and 
8 p. m.) would add up to the output of 
a BIG electric powerhouse. 

Why not start a "Save 100 watts" 
program in your home tonight? Practice 
this and all other possible conservation 
measures until the drought and power 
emergencies are over. 




EVERY KILOWATT OF ELECTRICITY SAVED 
CONTRIBUTES TO THE GENERAL WELFARE 

PJ 4.X-448 



Apnl, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 



Pagel 



Featured in This Issue 

PACE 

Inspector George O'Leary Heads Chinatown Squad 3 

B.\ Opie L. Warner 

E. R. Pootel, New Traffic Captain 4 

California State Police 5 

Training and Educational Committee, 

Special FBI Agent Richard Hood, Chairman . 6 

Sheriff John Claussen of Napa County .... 7 

Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association .... 8 

San Mateo County May Get New Jail .... 9 

Highlights of Uniform Crime Reports for 1947 10 

Lt. Wesley Murray, FBI Police Academy Graduate . 1 1 

Professional Police Service 12 

Bv Slperistekdent B. C. Bridges 

Chief Hydie of Merced — Gateway to Yosenute 13 

Four Short Words Trap Black Glove Rapist ... 14 

Present Task of Law Enforcement 15 

Bv Speclil Agent H. C. Van Pelt, of FBI 

San Mateo Has Recruit School 16 

Chief for 29 Years— C. L. Collins of 

Redwood City 17 

Daly City Has Good Pohce Force 18 

Chief Jack Theuer in Burlingame's P.D., 30 Years 19 
Editorial Page — Sheriff Gleason Heads 

Sheriff's Association 20 

Pistol Pointing 21 

By J. Ross DUNNIGAN 

Menlo Park's New Chief of PoUce 25 

Chief Belloni to Have New Police Building ... 26 

Hillsborough's Police Department 31 

Crime Trends in California 32 

By Chief George Brereton. 
State B. o/ I. & I. 

Dan O'Connell— A Great Police Official .... 36 

By William H. Stone 

Atherton's Annual Police Report 38 

Some Are True and Some Are False — Rate Yourself 50 

The Candid Friend 60 

By Opie L. Warner 

Peninsula Peace Officers" New Officers 71 

New Police Building for San Bruno 76 

San Carlos P.D. to Have New Quarters .... 79 

Coalinga — California Oil City 82 

Reedley Has Young Chief of Pohce 84 

Taft's Chief Harley Stumbaugh 86 

Chief H. L. Martin of Delano 88 

J. E. Gerhardt, Secretary-Treasurer 

N. C. P. O. Association 91 

Chief Raymond Pruitt of Dinuba 94 

Ex-Con Nabbed for Attempted Robbery .... 100 

Chief Botto of Belmont 102 

Changes in Bureau of Inspectors 106 

Good Will Judge— Theresa Meikle 108 

These Things You Must Know if You 

Want Promotion 109 



The Editoi i> alwiyi pleated to consider article! luiuble for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where thii it not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributiont may be sifced with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the ttrictest confidence. The Eoirot 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Lettert should be addressed to the EDiToa. 



Directory 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020- 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Tuesday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

J. Warnock Walsh, President 160 Montgomery Street 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery Street 

Washington I. Kohnke 686 Sacramento Street 

Deput>' Chief Michael GafFey, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Mich.\el E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Qlicley 

Dept. Sec'y.... Captain Michael F. Fitzpatrick... Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Edward Donah le 635 Washington Street 

Southern A. I. O'Brien Fourth and Qara Streets 

Mission Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Northern Jack Eker 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park Leo Tackney Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond George M. Healy 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside... .Michael Gaffey.... Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval John J. Wade 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero John Sullivan 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Michael Riordan 635 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors James L. English Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Alexander McDaniell Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Encler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bure.\u of 

Speclm. Ser\tces Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bure.\u John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Crimin.\l 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk....Capt. Patrick J. MuRR-\Y....HalI of Justice 

Insp. of Schools TR.^FFIC Control....Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latuupe Hall of Justice 



WKen In TrotiWe Call SUtter h20'20 

When In Doubt 



Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



UNITED 

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COMPANY 



500 Beale Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



HUBBARD 

and 
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Oakland 8, California 



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Chicago 50, Illinois 



PHONE ORDWAY 3-3040 
DAY - NIGHT OR SUNDAY 

DEVINE 

NATIONAL DETECTIVE 
AGENCY 

PAUL H. DEVINE, Principal 

LICENSED BY 
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BONDED 

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Member of 

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1200 34th Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

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RALPH CAMPBELL 
CLEANERS 

4476 Emery Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

HUMBOLDT 3-2842 



I San Franc 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

I Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyrtght) 



Vol. XXIII 



APRIL, 1948 



No. 12 



Inspector George 0*Leary Heads Chinatown Squad 



By Opie L. Warner 



On January 14th, 1948, Chief Mitchell placed In- 
spector George O'Leary in charge of the Chinatown 
Squad. In taking over the Chinatown Squad Inspector 
O'Leary is coming back to his police stamping ground of 
twenty-five years ago. 

The present police head of Chinatown became a member 
of the San Francisco Police Department on June 14th, 




Inspector George 0"Leary 

1920. He was assigned to the Park Police Station as a 
patrolman, and, showing marked ability as a young patrol- 
man, he was soon selected as a member of the Chinatown 
Squad under Inspector John Manion. 

The Chinatown detail, in the early Uventies, was not 
a sinecure by any computation. Chinese, in any sphere 
of endeavor, are philosophical, meticulous, and damnitably 
silent. Time and unlimited patience are necessary when 
it comes to handling police situations in which Chinese 
are involved; and Chinatown, during Inspector 0"Lear>' s 
term in that Celestial Empire which is "the greatest piece 
of China Outside of China itself," was, for the first year 
or two, anything but smooth routine for the young officer. 

During the San Francisco tong war of 1923-1924, a 
day-in-and-day-out watch of fourteen or fifteen hours was 



the steady lot of the members of the Chinatown squad; 
otherwise murders of marked merchants, and others, 
would be a common occurrence. 

In 1926, when Inspector O'Leary was transferred to 
the Auto Theft Detail, the veteran head of the China- 
town Squad, stated, in no uncertain terms, that he was 
losing one of the most competent officers he ever had 
on the squad. 

During the decade he spent in the Auto Theft Detail 
the inspector was one of the main cogs in the San Fran- 
cisco police machine which thwarted the best laid plans 
of automobile thieves, both amateur and highly profes- 
sional. 

As a partner of the late Inspector Charles McGreevy 
Inspector O'Leary took a main part in crushing the no- 
torious White Gang of San Francisco hoodlums who 
featured stealing and stripping automobiles and staging 
brutal holdups of pedestrians in suburban districts of 
the city. 

While on the Auto Theft Detail the inspector, in co- 
operation with Deputy Sheriff F. J. Maloney of Redwood 
City, San Mateo County, solved the murder of Ida 
French of Woodside, San Mateo. 

The murdered lady disappeared from her pretty villa. 
Ther€ were no clues: and the mystery of her disappear- 
ance was beginning to fade. But, routine tracing of an 
automobile led to the arrest and final conviction of the 
so-called "laughing killer," Jerome Van Bonn Selz, who 
fiendishly laughed, when pointing out the shallow grave 
of his victim to Inspector O'Leary and the Deputy SheriflF, 
in the undergrowth of the San Mateo hills. Selz escaped 
after conviction. After a long search he was located in 
the Canadian Army where he held the rank of corporal. 
He is now in Folsom prison. 

In 1937 the inspector was transferred to the Robbery 
Detail, with Inspector Fred Butz of that detail as his 
partner. As a team they have been very busy for the 
past ten years sending men who want to make a living 
by violence to think over their deeds of daring behind the 
walls of San Quentin or Folsom. 

Outstanding among the men who tried robberies in 
a big way. and whom Inspector O'Leary and his co- 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



workers of the Robbery Detail sent to our state prison 
are Howard Mays and Richard L. Manhurst, the former 
for the holdup of a loan shop and the latter for a bank 
holdup. 

Mays secured over $20,000 in cash and jewelry from 
the Pioneer Loan on Kearny Street and escaped leaving 
no clues. Manhurst, unsuccessfully, tried to hold up the 
Bank of America at Powell and Market streets. His hat, 
which fell to the hank floor while escaping, was the 
only clue. 

Inspectors But: and O'Leary were assigned to the 
Pioneer Loan robbery case. Circulars, giving descriptions 
of the bandits and the jewelry poured from the Hall of 
Justice. The replies showed the jewelry was being pawned 
in eastern and midwest cities. Inspector O'Leary per- 
sonally trailed his man from Cincinnati to Covington, 
Kentucky, and thence to Dayton, Ohio. By this time he 
know the ex-convict by name and carried his pictures. 
The Dayton police had to shoot it out with Mays. By 
the way, Mr. Mays, while in County Jail No. 1, here in 
San Francisco, sawed the bars of his cell but luckily was 
caught on his way down the building to Washington 
street. 

In the Manhurst case Inspector Edmond Murphy was 
teamed with Inspector O'Leary. They had a hat as tan- 
gible evidence. They also learned the bank robber made 
his get-a-way in a Packard sedan car showing it be- 
longed to the W. A. A. 

It would take hours to tell, in detail, of the inter- 
viewing of persons, the checking of the books of the 
thousand and one cleaning places and hat stores — whole- 
sale and second hand — done by Inspectors O'Leary, Ed- 
ward Murphy, Roy Dougherty and Lieutenant Daniel 
McKlem of the Robbery Detail, which finally resulted 
in having the very handsome Richard L. Manhurst extra- 
dited from Elbow, Canada, to stand trial and be convicted 
for his gun play and holdup of the Bank of America at 
Powell and Market streets, San Francisco, on the after- 
noon of July 2.Vd, 1947. 

Mr. Manhurst was hack in San Francisco on August 
16th, 1947, thanks to the intelligent and untiring efforts 
of Lieutenant McKlem and the aforementioned members 
of his robbery detail. 

Inspector O'Leary is a quiet spoken man of fine physique 
who has for years easly held him own in the South End 
Rowing Club handball courts, and who does not at all 
appear to have twenty-eight years of service in the San 
Francisco Police Department to his credit. 



E. R. POOTEL NEW TRAFFIC CAPTAIN 

Lieutenant Edward R. Pootcl was appointed last month 
as Captain of Traffic for the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment. He takes over the important post with many years 
of experience in traffic. 

Born in Germany in 1887, he came to this country in 
1904, locating in New York for two years and in 1906, 
shortly after the earthquake and fire he landed in San 
Francisco. 

He joined the Police Department in June, 1914, and 



after serving his apprenticeship at Mission Station was 
assigned to the Panama-Pacific Worids Fair. He built 
up a fine reputation for ability and courteousness and 
when the Fair closed he was sent to Traffic, doing fixed 
post duty. In 1923 he was made a Corporal and was 
detailed to the Southern Station under the late Captain 
Goff. He served there two years and was transferred 
to Central station where he served six months and again 
was sent to traffic where he held forth until 1926 when 
he was promoted to Sergeant. And once more he went 
to Southern staying there until 1929. In 1933 he was 




C.M'TAIN EnWARll R. PoOTIiL 

made a Lieutenant and for the next three years he served 
in the Bureau of Inspectors, Northern and Taraval sta- 
tions. In 1936 he was back in Traffic again serving there 
hir eight years when he was once more transferred to 
Southern. Last year he was brought hack to Traffic and 
has had a prominent part in the record for reducing 
fatalities from traffic accidents, during the year of 1937 

While with the Traffic Bureau after 1936 he helped 
organise the Traffic Officers Pistol Team, which preceded 
the formation of the San Francisco Shooting Range and 
its outstanding plant out on the shores of Lake Merced. 
This well organized team of officers turned out some noted 
shooters and among them was Officer Emil Dutil, now 
range master for the SFPD. 

Captain Pootel has command of some 23? men. Of 
these '>4 are on foot detail, 6? solo motorcycle riders; 37 
on three-wheelers, and 7? on the Accident Prevention 
Detail. 

WE RECOMMEND 

THE BUSY BEE 

QUALITY GROCERIES - FRESH FRUIT 
AND VEGETABLES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



18th and Valencia Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page S 



California State Police 



The California State Police came into being in 1869, at 
which time it was known as the State Capitol Police, func- 
tioning only on State property of the Capitol in Sacra- 
mento. But as the State acquired more property and 
erected more buildings throughout the state to house the 




Captain J. C. Beard 

growing departments it became more obvious that this or- 
ganization would have to be increased and branches set up 
in cities that had important state buildings. So in 1921 the 
Legislature created the State Police and for administrative 
purposes, placed it under the Department of Finance. Since 
that time a Unit has been established in San Francisco and 
one in Los Angeles. 

Today this Department has 79 members, consisting of 70 



state police officers, seven sergeants, one captain and one 
state police chief. Anson H. Crutcher holds the latter high 
■ office. 

The Sacramento unit consists of platoons 1, 2 and 3 and 
is under the direct command of Captain J. C. Beard, of 
2775 13th Street, who has been a state policeman for 37 
years. 

San Francisco's unit. Platoon No. 4 consists of six offi- 
cers under command of Sergeant R. E. McKoy, 628 Lyons 
Street. 

The Los Angeles unit, platoon No. 5, consists of 11 offi- 
cers under the command of Sergeant R. A. Haskell, 1950 
East 74th Street. 

The Legislative Act creating the Department of State 
Police confers the power of peace officers anywhere within 
the State on all members of the State Police Force, for pur- 
poses of policing and protecting State buildings and 
grounds, and other State property. All members of the 
Department are Civil Service employees. 

It will be observed by all who visit the Sacramento, San 
Francisco and Los Angeles State properties that the mem- 
bers of the California State Police are neatly uniformed 
and exercise the utmost in courtesy to all approaching them 
for information or other matters that they may present. 



CHIEF CRUTCHER OF STATE POLICE 

Chief Anson H. Crutcher of the California State Police 
has had a varied career as a law enforcement officer. 

He was born in Williams, Colusa County, on August 
24, 1913. He attended the elementary schools and gradu- 
ated from the Williams" High School. 

Chief Crutcher entered law enforcement work as a Dep- 
(Continued on page 112) 




SACRAMENTO PLATOONS OF STATE POLICE 
Front Row. Left to Right — Officers J. DeRiso, R. Reason, T. Reynolds. L. Hensiek. R. Bandy, A. Johnson, Chief Anson H. 
Crutcher, Department Secretary Dorothy McCoy. Captain Joe C. Beard, Officers J. Meyers, E. Aubert. A. Sparks, C. Debolt. 
Middle Row — Sergeant H. Henderson, Sergeant V. Strei. Officers H. Sprinkle, P. Mannobich, W. Funk, A. Quintana, D. Evans 
R. Harrity, H. Whipple, E. Patterson, J. Waters, F. Kyne, J. Ficlden, C. Burnett, H. Myers. Back Row — Officer C. Penny, 
Sergeant E. Riordan, Officers F. Larimer, D. Lutz, E. Holloway, Sergeant P. Shcehan, Officers S. Liswood, C. Wilson, M. Lorigan, 
P. Stearns, E. Leahy, W. Donaldson, W. Spencer. P. Kukura, R. Ries, J. Dunn. 



Page 6 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, J 948 

Training and Education Committee 

Paper Delivered by FBI Chief Special Agent, Richard Hood of Los Angeles, at Last Year's 

State Peace Officers Convention 



In this report of the Training and Education Committee 
I wish to summarize some of the activities that have not 
previously been reviewed by John Pepper, Chief Vernon 
Rasmussen, and the other officers on this portion of the 
program. 

On March 17, 1947, the Committee met in Sacramento 
with representatives of the CaHfornia State Department 
of Education and discussed the general police training 
program, particularly insofar as the plans of John Pepper, 
Supervisor of Peace Officers' Training, Bureau of Trade 
and Industrial Education, and of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation for police training were concerned. Detailed 
plans were made for the California Peace Officers' Insti' 
tutes of Technical Training, which were later held in 
Pasadena and Berkeley in August and September of 1947. 
During the year frequent meetings were had with John 
Pepper to discuss matters of mutual interest in the train- 
ing program. 

The Committee's representatives in Los Angeles met 
with a committee formed by the Los Angeles County 
Peace Officers' Association and as a result a Rookie School 
was instituted in the County and it is believed that this 
School deserves further mention in this report. The 
School is sponsored by the Los Angeles County Peace 
Officers' Association and classes are conducted by in- 
structors furnished by the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and other qualified instructors from local agencies. The 
school is held at a central location and at periodic inter- 
vals. It was designed primarily to train newly selected 
officers and it is scheduled to begin on dates which conform 
with the employment schedules of the surrounding de- 
partments. As soon as possible after new men are em- 
ployed, they report to this School for a period of two 
weeks of full-time training, after which they return to 
their respective departments and in this way the rookie 
officer receives detailed, specialized training prior to be- 
ginning his active service or immediately thereafter. With 
the School operating under regular schedule the heads of 
the departments can arrange recruiting program, taking 
advantage of the beginning of the School. The frequency 
of the schools is determined by the number of men em- 
ployed by the departments in the County. 

The course of instruction afforded these men deals 
primarily with fundamentals and, to a considerable degree, 
it affords a uniformity in training. 

I would like to make a brief report on the number and 
type of schools in which the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion has participated in cooperation with the various law 
enforcement agencies throughout the State. The period 
covered extends from the date of the California State 
Peace Officers' Convention in 1946 up to the present 
time, and represents the combined efforts of the San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles and San Diego offices. There have 



been 155 schools conducted, with 497 law enforcement 
agencies being represented; this included a total of 4,223 
hours of instruction and 5,105 officers attended these 
schools. The above figures are represented by the following 
types of schools: 

54 In-Service Schools 
48 Firearms Schools 
41 Rookie Schools 
4 Fingerprint Schools 
3 Photographic Schools 
2 Administrative Schools 
2 Advanced Schools, including 
a Sergeants' School. 

In addition to this there was participation with the 
other State agencies in conducting the California Peace 
Officers' Institutes of Technical Training at the Pasadena 
Junior College and the University of California at 
Berkeley. 

All of the Bureau training has been made available to 
the peace officers of this State at no cost to any of the 
departments or individuals attending and the only restric- 
tion placed upon it is that the officers attending be full- 
time employees of a duly constituted law enforcement 
agency. 

The Bureau's facilities will continue to be available to 
the peace officers of this State. The training schools are 
tailored to fit the needs of the individual departments 
and we welcome the opportunity to discuss the training 
problems with heads of the various agencies or those 
individuals who are in charge of the. training programs. 
Specialized schools will continue to be furnished as the 
needs require and in this connection the special Firearms 
Schools have met with the most success and there is prob- 
ably no type of training for which there is more need 
than this. 

It is believed that the California Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation should continue to play a dominant role in the 
training field and its leadership should continue in spon- 
soring an organized and adequate training program, such 
as is in effect at the present time. The various training 
programs in the State should come under the sponsorship 
of the Association; which is the most representative agency 
of its type in the State and is best qualified to direct activi- 
ties in this field. 

The Association should be particularly concerned with 
efforts which have been made by individuals, who have 
no connection with any law enforcement agency, or 
recognized educational institution, to institute courses of 
training for those presently engaged in or those seeking 
employment in the field of law enforcement. Training 
courses offered by such individuals and organizations 
usually include activities which may be detrimental to the 

(Continued on page 92) 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Sheriff John Claussen of Napa County 



Sheriff Claussen was elected Napa's chief enforcement 
officer in 1946 after serving out the term of former Sherilf 
John Steckter who resigned, and under whom he had 
served for eight years as Undersheriff. Prior to joining the 
Sheriff's office he was on the Napa City Police force, where 
he made an enviable record. 

He was one of the pioneers in the use of two-way radio 




Sheriff John Claussen 

for law enforcement work, and was a very active member 
before becoming Sheriff of the Northern California Com- 
munications Officers' Association. 

Napa's Sheriff office operates a 500 watt police radio 
station, assigned call letters are KNCO. It ties in with the 
California Highway Patrol, operates five mobile units for 
the Sheriff's office and two radio-equipped cars for two 
Fish and Game Wardens. 

In a north bay police radio setup Napa County works 
with Marin, Sonoma and Lake Counties, and all stations 
and cars operate on the same frequency which makes an 
effective blockade in event of an emergency. 

Napa County also operates a high frequency repeater 
station located on top of Mt. St. Helena, in the northern 
part of the county. Mt. St. Helena has an elevation of 
4,443 feet. The Sonoma County Sheriff's office shares in 
this installation. 

All of this is due to Sheriff Clausen's understanding of 
what radio means to peace officers and his ability to sell 
the idea to the county fathers. 

The Sheriff has 1 1 men on his force and one woman, 
Mrs. Alma Trailer who is the office bookkeeper. 

The male personnel is made up of the following: 

Undersheriff Felix Tonascia, a Napa business man for 
many years and a past commander of Napa Post, Ameri- 
can Legion. 



Chief Deputy Wesley Gardner, who served seven and 
a half years with the Napa City Police Department before 
becoming a Deputy Sheriff. 

Deputy Walter Martinelli, who has charge of finger- 
printing and identification, and has a modern and up-to- 
date bureau. 

Deputy A. J. LaBel in charge of civil work. He also is 
a past commander of the American Legion. 

Court Bailif George Black, who has held the job for 
over 35 years. 

Deputies George Gordon and Paul Amen handle the 
night patrol maintained by Sheriff Claussen. Deputy 
Amen was a former Napa Policeman and served in World 
War II and was wounded in the Battle of the Bulge. 

Radio Dispatcher Arthur Ramsford, who also handles 
the visitors at the Sheriff's counter. He was formerly with 
the Mare Island Navy Yard Police Force. 

Night Dispatchers Paul Hartman and Felton L. Allen. 

Deputy Edward Light in charge of Northern Napa 
County. He was formerly Chief of Police of Calistoga, 
a position he held for 1 3 years. 

All these men are proven peace officers and all have 
taken courses in the various schools for improving their 
knowledge in all phases of their hazardous calling. 

Sheriff Claussen himself will take the next course open- 
ing this month at the FBI National Police Academy. 



COLMA BOX 
COMPANY 

Boxes and Crates 



40 Rainier Street 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 

Phone DElaware 3-4981 
P. O. Box 205, Rt. 1 

San Jose Branch 
Seventh and Taylor Streets 

Phone Columbia 7041 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief Walter I. Wisnom, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, SecretaryTreasurer 



Minutes of the Meeting of the Bay Counties Peace 
Officers Association, held at Guidotti's Res- 
taurant, Santa Rosa, California, on Thursday, 

April 1, 1948. 

The meeting was called to order by the President, Chief 

Walter Wisnom. 

A motion was made, seconded, arfd carried that the 
minutes of the last meeting be accepted without reading. 




District Attorney Edmunp Brown 

A report was given by J. A. Greening, Sheriff's De- 
partment, Alameda, California, Chairman of the Radio 
Communications Committee, relative to telegrams being 
sent to Congress protesting the granting of frequencies 
between 44,000 and 50,000 M.C. to frequency modulation 
broadcasts. Over eight hundred telegrams have been re- 
ceived by members of Congress. Unfortunately, however, 
90 per cent were received from the State of California. 

There were no other reports from committees. 

There was no unfinished business. 

Chief Flohr of Santa Rosa made a statement to the 
effect than on April 8, 1948, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
the Northern California Police Communication Officers 
will hold their regular monthly meeting. Members of the 
Bay Counties Peace Officers Association and their friends 
are invited to attend this meeting and to visit an exhibi- 
tion that shows the progress in radio communication from 
its origin to the present time. 

A motion was made, seconded, and carried that the 
following named persons be accepted as members: 

Wallace W. Cox, Police Judge, 1305 Sacramento St., 



Vallejo; sponsored by Earl Dierking, Chief of Police, 
Vallejo. 

Harvey Crane, Truck Manager, 1709 UUoa St., San 
Francisco; sponsored by Royal E. Hondloo, San Francisco. 

Otto Meyer, Lieutenant of Police, 184 Yerba Bueana 
Ave., San Francisco; sponsored by George W. Hippely, 
Director, Police, San Francisco. 

S. W. Benepe, PoHce Officer, 320 Bayview Street, San 
Rafael; sponsored by Frank Kellye, Chief of Police, San 
Rafael. 

George Potter, Chief of Police, Menlo Park ; sponsored 
by John E. Farrell, Chief of Police, Atherton. 

Nick Vojvodich, Deputy Sheriff, Court House, San 
Jose; sponsored by Howard Hornbuckle, Sheriff, Santa 
Clara County. 

George Potter, Chief of Police of Menlo Park, one of 
the new members, gave a talk on behalf of the new group 
to the effect that it was an honor and a privilege to be a 
member. 

The speaker of the day, District Attorney Edmund G. 
Brown of San Francisco, gave a very interesting talk on 
the subject: "Are we making progress in law enforce- 
ment?" 

District Attorney Brown gave several statistics in his 
speech to show that our fight against crime was just about 
holding its own. This is in spite of better police officers, 
stricter law enforcement. However, we have just come 
through a war and the population of our state has been 
steadily increasing. Whenever there is a large increase 
in population without adequate housing, crime will in- 
crease. 

He discussed the part of the Negro in crime, his bad 
housing facilities, health and working conditions. The 
amount of Negroes arrested is way out of proportion to 
other defendants. 

He also discussed the effect on juvenile delinquency of 
broken homes. The District Attorney stated that this was 
not only homes broken up by divorce. Some parent may 
be deceased or away for a time. 

Mr. Brown stated that a great majority of persons sent 
to Preston Reformatory had no religious training. He 
said that the Bible should be a part of every home. Until 
there is a return to the church, we are not going to be 
able to do very much about the rising crime rate in the 
United States. 

Chief Donald T. Wood of San Anselmo stated that 
Dr. Leo L. Stanley had issued an invitation to the Asso- 
ciation to hold its next meeting at his estate in Fairfax. 
The invitation was accepted by the members. 



Apnl, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



San Mateo County May Get New Jail 



While several Police Departments of San Mateo County 
are housed in new headquarters and others are sure of 
the same in the near future, Sheriff James J. McGrath, 
the county's veteran chief law enforcement officer has to 
get along within a building erected over 30 years ago, 
that is in 1916. This ancient building which has long 
fell short of the needs of a growing county and its in- 




but few exceptions all crimes have been cleared, with 
arrests, convictions and court judgments. 

Sheriff McGrath has been able to get the needed money 
for installing an up-to-date record and filing system, and 
when it is completed, with a competent man to handle 
the details, it will be second to none in this state. 

Sheriff McGrath is still the president of the San Mateo 
Police Executives' Association, which was organized dur- 
ing the war years, and to which 14 Chiefs of Police in 
the county. Chief Howard Zink, of Palo Alto, and E. P. 
Cassell head of the CHP of the county' are members. At 
their monthly meeting this organization exchange ideas, 
adopt plans for the closest cooperation and coordination, 
and promote other important features of law enforcement. 

One of the latest is the promotion of a school for officers 
of the law now in session in San Mateo, and being at- 
tended by every officer of the 15 Police Departments 
included in the Association. 

With San Mateo County nearing the quarter million 
mark in population: with its many resources, principal 
among which is the production of artichokes, and the 
growing of more and different species of flowers, with 
its great boom in residential and business buildings, and 
with various industries coming into the county, it must 
be admited law enforcement officials and their depart- 
ments, including the Sheriff's office is doing a magnificent 
job of protecting the law abiding. 



Sheriff James J. McGrath 

creased crime problems owing to an increase in population, 
is crowded for the personnel which now numbers 39 
and for the prisoners being brought in by his deputies 
and the police departments of the county. Originally 
designed to house 60 law violators and later increased to 
accommodate 75, there is an average of 85 men and 
women charged with crime, lodged within its cells. 

However, the men having charge of expansions of 
county buildings are doing something about it. At a recent 
election the voters turned down a proposal for funds to 
erect a new sheriff's building and jail. The Supervisors, 
however, being impressed with the urgent needs for a 
place for Sheriff McGrath and his active force to work 
from and for adequate jail facilities are setting aside each 
year funds for the erection of such a building. Last year 
$100,000 was set aside. This year additional funds will 
be put into the fund and soon there wU be enough to 
get the necessary land and build a much needed structure. 

In the meantime the Sheriff and his deputies are doing 
a good job of law enforcement, even under handicaps re- 
ferred to above. Robberies, burglaries and grand thefts 
and even murders have occurred in San Mateo count)' s 
unincorporated areas, the former two show.ing a slight 
increase, which is natural with the great boost in new- 
comers. Yet a perusal of the records will show that with 



Phone sutler 1-9622 



Walter Bibms, Mgr. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SANTA C.R U Z 

BILLIARDS AND SMOKE SHOP 
347 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA CANNING PEACH 
ASSOCIATION 



244 California Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GEO. W. CASWELL CO. 



642 Harrison Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone JUniper 4-9941 

WILLIE KEANE'S 

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YOUR FAVORITE SPOT 

4663 Mission Street, Opposite Ocean Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



Highlights of UniForm Crime Reports 

For 1947 



In releasing the annual bulletin, Uniform Crime Re- 
ports, for 1947, J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, pointed out the following perti- 
nent facts: * * * 

A serious crime occurred every 18.9 seconds in 1947. 
The year witnessed an estimated 1,665,1 10 crimes of felon- 




DiRECTOR J. Edgar Hoover 

ious homicide, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, 
larceny and auto theft! In addition, lesser offenses not tab- 
ulated in Uniform Crime Reports accounted for several 
million additional law violations. 

The extent of crime followed for the most part crime 
rates in 1946, which reached a high peak since national 
crime statistics were first tabluated in 1930. 

Crimes in rural areas increased 7.1% over 1946, with 
the crimes of rape increasing 15.7%, burglary 13.7%, 
aggravated assault 10.9%, larceny 10.6% and robbery 
1.9%. The following rural crimes showed declines: 15.1% 
for auto theft, 3.7% for murder and 0.9% for negligent 
manslaughter. * m, * 

Crimes in urban areas declined 5.1% with decreases be- 
ing recorded for the crimes of auto theft 20.7%, negligent 
manslaughter 8.9%, murder 5.9%, robbery 5.5%, bur- 
glary 3.7%, and larceny 2.3%. In urban areas the crimes 
of aggravated assault increased 3.3% and rape 2.9%. 
* * * 

Cities with 100,000 inhabitants or more, however, re- 
ported a higher ratio of crime than smaller communities 
in 1947. , ^ ^ 

Compared with the pre-war averages of 1938-41. in 



1947 murder increased 15.4%, burglary 15.3%, robbery 
14.6%, larceny 2.6%, negligent manslaughter 2.1% and 
auto theft 1.9% in urban areas. 

The 1947 Uniform Crime Reports disclosed a national 
average of 6.12 felonious homicides for each 100,000 in- 
habitants, while there were 59.6 robberies, 72.2 aggravated 
assaults, 389.8 burglaries, 961.2 larcenies and 182.1 auto 
thefts for each 100,000 inhabitants in the reporting areas. 

A total for 5,552 agencies contributed crime reports to 
the FBI in 1947. * * * 

More persons were arrested and fingerprinted in 1947 
than in any other year on record. The FBI received and 
recorded 734,041 arrest records in 1947, representing an 
increase of 13.7% over 1946. 

The arrests of women accounted for 75,391 of the rec- 
ords tabulated, or an increase of 9.7% over 1946. 

The arrests of males increased from 576,689 in 1946 to 

658,650 in 1947, or 14.2%. 

* * * 

Boys and girls under 21 accounted for 16.1% of all 
arrests. Arrests of boys under 21 increased 16.5% of all 
arrests. Arrests of boys under 21 increased 10.5% over 
1946, while arrests of girls under 21 declined 6.6%. The 
arrests of girls in 1947 exceeded by 30% such arrests in 
1941. - * * * 

Of the total number of persons arrested 55.4% had 
records of prior arrests. 

The 734,041 arrest records revealed that 536,695 were 
white; 187,781 were negroes; 6,040 were Indians; 423 
were Chinese; 154 Japanese; and others totaled 2,948. 

* * * 

Mr. Hoover attributes present-day high crime rates to 
numerous factors: 

A failure on the part of too many citizens to assume the 
responsibilities of citizenship. Too frequently, law enforce- 
ment agencies are not provided with adequate facilities, 
funds and trained officers. 

The juvenile delinquent of the war years is becoming 
the hardened criminal of today. They provide the recruits 
for the formation of gangs following in many respects the 
pattern of the early twenties. 

Home life has deteriorated and in too many instances 
homes arc merely places of living and not places of learn- 
ing. 

Real reduction in present-day crime rates will not come 
until every adult recognizes his responsibility to youth and 
his responsibility as a citizen. In these days of uncertainty 
the American people must realize that if we are going to 
be strong internally every effort muts be directed toward 
the goal of making the people of this nation more law- 
abiding. 



Apnl, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Lt. Wesley Murray F. B. I. Police Academy Graduate 



Fifty-eight selected law enforcement officers from widely 
separated points in the United States graduated from the 
FBI National Academy in exercises held in the Depart' 
mental Auditorium in Washington, D. C, on March 25, 
1948, according to an announcement made today by John 
Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation. 

The graduation was highlighted by addresses delivered 
by the Honorable Brien McMahon, Senator from Connec- 




LlEUTENANT Wesley F. MURRAY, San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment, graduate of the Thirty-Seventh Session of the FBI National 
Academy, examining specimen of the Spectograph in the FBI 
Laboratory, Washington, D. C. 

ticut, and the Honorable Karl Stefan, Congressman from 
Nebraska. 

Special Agent in Charge Harry M. Kimball of the San 
Francisco Division of the FBI stated that the following six 
officers from Northern California graduated today: 

Sheriff W. D. Johnson of the Sierra County Sheriff's 
Office at Downieville. 

Undersheriff Michael N. Canlis of the San Joaquin 
County Sheriff's Office at Stockton. 

Captain Kenneth C. Johnson of the Sacramento Police 
Department. 

Lieutenant Wesley F. Murray of the San Francisco 
{Police Department. 
. Patrolman Thomas E. Marnoch of the Stockton Police 
Department. 

■ Traffic Officer Arden F. Keith of the Woodland Police 
Department. 



The officers comprising the 37th Session of the Academy 
came from JO states, Puerto Rico, Canada and Egypt. The 
graduate from Egypt was Lieutenant Colonel Ahmed Ah- 
med Kamel, Police of H. M. King Farouk of Egypt. Can- 
ada was represented by Sergeant of Detectives George S. 
Blow of the Winnipeg City Police Department, Manitoba, 
Canada. 

Director Hoover noted that with the graduation of the 
37th Session the total number of graduates has passed the 
1800 mark. Established in 1935, the Academy was created 
to train police instructors and administrators in order to 
raise the level of all law enforcement to a professional 
status. 

The course of the Academy lasts 12 weeks and includes 
such matters as police ^organization and administration, 
traffic control, investigative techniques, laboratory matters 
and fingerprinting. 

Invitations have been issued by Director Hoover to the 
following six Northern California officers to attend the 
38th Session of the FBI National Academy commencing 
April 5, 1948: 

Sheriff John Clausscn of the Napa County Sheriff's Of- 
fice at Napa. 

Chief Anson H. Crutcher of the State Capitol Police at 
Sacramento. He is also President of the Northern Califor- 
nia Peace Officers' Association. 

Chief James V. Hicks of the Sacramento Police Depart- 
ment. 

Lieutenant Stanley D. Wood of the Redwood City Po- 
lice Department. 

Patrolman Eugene M. Tryon of the Piedmont Police 
Department. 

Officer Neil H. Tremaine of the Santa Clara Police De- 
partment. 

Among the 73 Northern California graduates of the 
FBI National Academy are the following other officers 
from the San Francisco Police Department : 

Captain of Inspectors James L. English. 

Director of Personnel John A. Engler. 

Criminologist Francis X. Latulipe. 

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Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 194; 



PROFESSIONAL POLICE SERVICE 

By B. C. Bridges, Supt. Bureau of Identification, Alameda Police Department 



In the past, few persons have dared to tell the absolute 
truth about the police, and fewer policemen have dared 
to criticise their own group. Such frank audacity has been 
known to incite bitter resentment from the police officer 
of questionable character who is "riding the gravy train," 
and who is prepared to defend his seat at any cost. How 




Superintendent B. C. Bridges 

ever, when we are inflicted with conditions such as now 
exist, those evils arc not likely to improve by being banned 
from public discussion any more than an epidemic of 
cholera could be expected to subside merely if no one were 
permitted to talk about it. The time is here when the 
defects in our law enforcement program can be ignored 
no longer. Wc must face the facts squarely, and submit 
the entire unfortunate situation to critical and impartial 
analysis if we can ever hope to accomplish any improve- 
ment, of which our American police system stands so 
desperately in need. 

The rational remedy for the foregoing ills, evils and 
obstacles is the placing of law enforcement on a strictly 
professional basis. This promises to be a sizeable under- 
taking. However, it is encouraging to know that the 
job has been started. Wc have been blessed with at least 
some few far-sighted scientists who realize the need for 
improvement in American police service. These pioneers 
have carried on the good work despite the opposition of 
scofTers to whom the mere thought of an "educated" 
policeman was both absurd and distasteful. Nevertheless, 
the principles of scientific police service are sound, and 
have withstood the test; and now, at long last, we have 
been showathe way to better law enforcement. 

At present, there are full-time, four-year college 
courses in police science being offered in California at 
Fresno and San Jose State College, and at the University 
of California in Berkeley, with two-year courses at 



Visalia, Los Angeles and San Francisco Junior College 
Four-year programs are given also in the state college 
of Washington and Michigan, and the University o 
Indiana, and shorter "police-institute" courses, lastin; 
from a few days to several weeks or longer, are bein; 
offered in many universities and colleges throughout th' 
entire country. Included in these training programs o 
the several colleges, are courses dealing with the technica 
aspects of law enforcement which have stood the test o 
years of experience on the police firing line. 

In addition to educational training, more effectiv 
methods of coordination and communication must be em 
ployed in the law-enforcement field. At present, th 
various enforcement groups are sadly lacking in unity 
They are inhibited by territorial boundaries and jurisdic 
tional "must-nots," and by jealous and petty bickerini; 
among themselves. As a result, there is much duplicatioi 
of effort, and vital tasks are poorly done, or not done a 
all. Information, important to all, is not made general 
Dangerous fugitives escape, or elude detection. Undc 
present conditions, some homicidal maniac could safcb 
drive into a strange city, park his car in front of the loc 
police station, and remain there, unmolested, although 
full description of his vehicle and himself might be knowi 
elsewhere. 

Were America's naval and military forces as poorb 
organized and coordinated as are the American police, ou 
country would be at the mercy of any chance invader 
just as we now are an easy prey for the armies of crime 
In these more-or-less united forty-eight states, we hav 
some three thousand counties, twenty-thousand towns ani. 
townships, and about forty thousand separate police agen 
cies in the form of "departments," numbering but one o< 
two men, to metropolitan forces several thousand stroni: 
But among these various enforcement groups, coordin 
tion and cooperation are at the option of local convenience 
whims and impulses. Usually, if some troublesome crimina 
can be driven out of town, the prevaihng policy is t 
"let somebody else worry about him," This dangerous ane 
(Contimied on page 46) 

T. E. MOREHOUSE 

WOOD CABINET SHOP 
Office, Bar and Restaurant Fixtures 

Telephone SWeetwood 8-6477 

2166 Washington Avenue 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page li 



Chief Hydie of Merced — Gateway To Yosemite 



Chief William A. Hydie was born in Berkeley during 
the year of 1912, where he grew to manhood and where he 
obtained most of his education which he completed by 
three years at St. Mar>'"s College and one at the University 
of CaUfornia. 





i'i ,. 



Chief William A. Hydie 

After leaving college he chose the field of law enforce- 
ment as his chosen profession and entered the Albany Po- 
lice Department in 1938, under the Chief of Police Lloyd 
Jester. He served with the Albany Police Department for 
over nine years, rising to the rank of sergeant, when he 
resigned on November, 15, 1947, to become Chief of Po- 
lice of the Merced Police Department, having won the 
position in a highly competitive examination against 14 
applicants. 

He has three certificates from educational departments 



in the enforcement field : the State Department of Educa- 
tion; California Institute of Technical Training; and Law 
Enforcement Officers' Training School of the FBI, held at 
Merced. He has also attended the University of California 
Extension Division and the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police Safety' Division. 

The Chief also attended the ten days FBI gunnery school 
in Piedmont, and all these extra activities have given him 
the necessary qualifications to ably fill the responsible job 
he now occupies. 

Besides the Chief, the Merced Police Department has 16 
members. There are three patrol cars, the Chief's car and 
three motorcycles all equipped with the most modern two- 
way radio communications. The call letters of the Depart- 
ment are KCDP and is hooked up with the Sheriff's office, 
and the Highway Patrol. 

The roster of officers of the Merced Police Department 
is made up of the following : 

Chief Hydie, Captain M. Stanley, Sergeants D. L. 
Weeks and W. S. Kincaid and Inspector A. E. McCully. 

Officers Cecil Robertson, assigned to traffic; Gordon 
Melcher, Frank Holthaus, W. V. Parr, James Hamm, Roy 
V. Nichols Floyd Oxford, E. W. Maybry, Robert Kelleher, 
Robert Salazar, Joseph C. Howard and E. L. Asher, the 
latter three motorcycle men. 

Chief Hydie is married, and he and his wife Gail, who is 
a native of Glendale, have a two and half year old 
daughter. 

Merced with its over 10,000 population, and which at- 
tract added thousands from neighboring farming areas and 
many thousands more who yearly pass through to and from 
Yosemite over the great all-year highway into that en- 
chanted spot of this state, has a Police Department well 
equipped with man power, modern methods and appliances 
to cope with any attacks from the criminal elements who 
(Continued on page 78) 




MERCED POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Standing, Left to Right — Officer Kellerer. Traffic Officers Howard and Sahar. Chief Hydie, Captain Stanley, Traffic Officers 
Robertson and Asher, Officer Holthaus and Inspector McCully. Front Row — Officers Kincaid and Miller, Sergeant Kincaid, Of- 
ficer Hamm. Sergeant Weeks, Officers Oxford, Maybry and Parr. 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948. \ 



Four Short Words Trap Black Glove Rapist 



By the Editor 



Under date of July 16, 1947, Chief of Police, Charles 
W. Dullea, in a department "General Order," congratu' 
lated the members of the department for their combined 
and successful efforts resulting in the arrest of one of the 
worst criminals in San Francisco — an ex-convict who, for 
months, through his daring and uncanny cunningness, had 




Inspectors John Brehn (right) and Frank Baroni 
They led chase for Black Glove Rapist 



committed the crimes of burglary, robbery and rape in the 
best residential San Francisco police districts west of Twin 
Peaks. Writing on behalf of the Police Commission, under 
same date. President J. W. Howell, of the Police Commis- 
sion, stated: "On behalf of the Police Commission, I would 
like to extend its thanks and its pride to all those who lent 
a hand in accomplishing this most satisfactory arrest." 

At the regular meetings of the captains and police de- 
parment heads the triple rape-robbery-burglary crime situ- 
ation had been seriously considered, and plans made to 
secure an arrest, just as carefully and thoroughly and as 
comprehensibly as they had been made for the arrest and 
conviction of the notorious "Green Rapist" of yesteryear. 
Yet, week after week, this one-man scourge opierated in 
San Francisco's best home districts. 

Hundreds of police members spent thousands of hours 
and rode thousands of miles and interviewed hundreds of 
persons with a view of capturing an almost fabulous arch 
criminal. W cck after week of this perfectly police planned 
crusade seemed fruitless — the one-man triple threat crimi- 
nal team was one hundred per cent victorious. 

The Accident Prevention Bureau cars and motorcycle 
officers were constantly speeding through the Taraval, 
Golden Gate Park, and Richmond police districts in re- 
sponse to "prowler calls" — the men in each vehicle hoping 



ardently to have the honor of bringing in San Francisco's 
worst prowler — the Black Glove Rapist. 

To insure the capture of the rapist an order was put in 
force that, in response to "prowler calls," police sirens were 
not to be used. As a result of this order it was truly an in- 
spiring sight to see motorcycles, radio cars of the Accident 
Prevention Bureau, Bureau of Inspectors cars and the sta- 
tion radio cars and those of the reserve police officers of the \ 
company concerned, speedily and silently arrive and take 
up vantage points around the block from whence a "prowl- 
er call" originated. Never, in San Francisco Police De- 
partment history, had more consistent cooperation been 
noted. 

The members of the Bureau of Inspectors assigned to 
the cases charged to the Black Glove Rapist checked 
through thousands of "pictures" of burglars, robbers and 
degenerates in the department Bureau of Identification. In' 
spector John Breen of the General Works Detail was 
placed in charge of the Bureau's activities on this case and 
devoted much of the tiresome work of all units of the de- 
partment.. 

As an instance of the thoroughness of such attacks we 
will take, for instance, one of his attacks which occurred at 
6.1 3 Eighth Avenue. The Inspectors interviewed the resi- 
dents on the east side of Eighth Avenue between Balboa 
and Cabrillo Streets; the south side of Balboa and the north 
side of Cabrillo and the south side of Cabrillo between 
Eighth and Ninth Avenues. All these persons were inter- 
rogated as to having seen any suspicious character loitering 
around any building, alley, lot, yard — or loitering in a 
parked automobile in the vicinity. The process of elimina- 
tion at the address in question also extended to' anyone 
who came to the address socially, or in a commercial guise, 
such as: the baker, milkman, laundryman, letter carrier, 
parcel post, telephone man, gas or electric repair man, wa- 
ter meter reader. Wells Fargo, Merchants' Delivery, or 
groceryman. 

Many anonymous tips were telephoned to the depart- 
ment, and several letters were received, naming or describ- 
ing suspects, or giving license numbers of automobiles sup- 
posed to have been used by the suspect. Each anonymous 
tip and each piece of written information was checked 
instantly and thoroughly. This checking meant trips to all 
parts of the city at all hours of the day and night — but the 
men were so anxious to round up the rapist there was no 
complaining and all tips were received with great welcome. 

The suspected age of the suspect led the inspectors to the 
belief he would be found in one of the many places of 
amusement in San Francisco. For this reason the various 
victims were induced by the inspectors to go out on differ- 
ent nights in the police cars and visit dance halls, skating 
rinks, and bowling alleys — in other words, to every place 
where such a suspect might go. 

(Continued on page 41) 



April. 1948 



'POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



THE PRESENT TASK OF LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Address by Assistant Special Agent H. C. Van Pelt, San Francisco, to the Northern 
California Peace Officers' Association at Chico 



Through our crime prevention and educational work 
we should strive to develop a public psychology which 
ends its support to our laws with less sentimentalism, 
sob-sister nonsense, and the petting of youthful despera' 
does. Our people must not lose sight of the fact that the 
goal of our law enforcement and judicial system is the 
protection of society. Private citizens should be so intelli- 
gently informed that they will quickly discount the ravings 
of sob-sisters who cry "Shame on you!" to the officers when 
a gangster is shot to death in a gun battle and the rantings 
of subversive agitators who shout "Capitalist oppression!" 
or "Racial prejudice!" when the violator of the law is 
of a minority group. The sob-sister and subversive agi' 
tator are menaces to decent law enforcement all over the 
nation. Some of our people have been taken in by these 
persons and duped. They have been hoodwinked, flim- 
flammed and have become soft and gullible, some even 
to the extent of being mushy. There are too many on 
the sob squad and too few on the fighting squad. It 
can be corrected if we of law enforcement take the time 
and effort to further and advance our crime prevention 
and educational programs. 

Reforms in Laws Needed 

It is through such programs that reforms in the laws 
may be secured making it impossible for shyster lawyers, 
the mouthpieces of the underworld, to effect delays by 
quibbling over mere words and technicalities. Our laws 
and tribunals were designed to administer justice and not 
provide a maze of demurrers, pleas in abatement, and 
other dilatory tactics, loopholes and legal absurdities per- 
mitting the guilty to escape punishment. If this rising 
post-war crime wave is to be successfully combatted, the 
handcuffs must be taken off law enforcement. Our laws 
have given criminals too many breaks. It's high time that 
law enforcement had a few. 

For example, a criminal lawyer may take depositions 
m some jurisdictions from witnesses for a defendant, but 
the prosecution in a criminal case is prohibited from 
t.iking a deposition from even a dying witness. When 
officers obtain a search warrant in some jurisdictions, they 
must list everything they are seeking, even though the 
search desired covers the hideout of dangerous criminals. 
They may be looking for an automatic pistol, a rifle, a 
shotgun or a machine gun with which an armed robbery 
was committed, and instead find only the jewels from 
another robbery. However, if the jewels are not specifically 
listed in the search warrant, the officers cannot touch 
them. By the time another warrant is obtained, the jewels 
may have vanished. A ten-year-old child could recognize 
that this is ridiculous. Our laws are shot through and 
through with such absurdities. They can be corrected 
only if public-spirited citizens are properly informed in 
our educational programs and rally to the support of the 
change necessary. 



Chief of Police Michael Riordan of the San Francisco 
Police Department made a very interesting and construc- 
tive observation during the last administrative school for 
police executives conducted by the FBI in San Francisco 
in April of this year. He suggested that law enforcement 
take a more affirmative stand concerning legislation, that 
we meet together more frequently for discussion of our 
mutual problems, and propose practical legislation which 
would be of actual assistance and benefit to society in 
our work, rather than maintaining our present defensive 
position in mere opposition to unsound legislation pro- 
posed by pressure groups and others having personal and 
selfish interests at stake. There's considerable merit to the 
idea and I pass it on to you for further consideration. 
Improved Pardon and Parole System Required 

Law enforcement should adopt a firmer stand against 
the taking of chances with desperadoes and press for the 
development of a more practical system of pardons and 
paroles, one which will permit the release of persons 
capable of reformation and still tend to insure the safety 
and protection of society. There are perennial sob-sisters 
of both sexes who would give every criminal another 
chance after another chance, and we must constantly 
guard against these misty-eyed theorists. 

If this rising post-war crime wave is to be successfully 
combatted, why should law enforcement be put to the 
added task and the increased responsibility and hazard of 
fighting dangerous persons already caught, convicted and 
confined? Let them stay in prison so their potential 
victims may live! Why should they be released to rejoin 
the fight against society? 

(Continued on page S8) 



GALLAND MERCANTILE LAUNDRY 



331 Eighth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



RAGGO REED 8c COMPANY 

1501 Russ Building 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL 

Hayes and Stanyan Street - 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1948 



San Mateo Has Police Recruit School 



A course of instruction in a Recruit School sponsored 
by the Peninsula Police Executives' Association is in session 
now in the auditorium of the San Mateo High School. 




Chief Robert O'Brien 

It opened on April 5 and will end on the 26th of the 
month. 

There are over sixty peace officers, members of the 
various Police Departments of San Mateo county who 



have less than two years of experience as law enforcement 
officers. It is to give these an opportunity to have an 
intensive brushing up on their duties, in every phase of 
their calling that the Recruit School was instigated. 

President James J. McGrath of the Executives' Associa' 
tion and his committee composed of Chiefs Robert O'Brien, 
San Mateo, John E. Farrell of Atherton, Louis Belloni of 
South San Francisco, and William Maher of San Bruno, 
with the assistance of Charles G. Campbell, special FBI 
agent assigned to the county, have prepared a splendid 
program for the occasion. It is the aim of the Executives 
that this will be the forerunner of a state and county 
backed police academy established in the county for the 
training of all officers entering the service of law enforce- 
ment. It is pointed out that the San Mateo High School 
can be had for this purpose and with Chief O'Brien's 
rebuilt headquarters there will be a pistol shooting range 
to meet all regulations. 

In addition to the regular appointed peace officers of 
the county, there are 18 members of the San Francisco 
Airport Police force, taking the course. 

April 19 to 26 will be devoted to firearms training, 
Agent Campbell and another FBI expert, Special Agent 
Eugene S. Jones, will give instructions in the use of fire- 
arms and of gas. This feature will be held in the San 
Mateo Police Range. 

Following is the schedule of meetings and subjects 
presented : 



Date 


Hour 


Subject 


April 5 


1-2 6? 7-8 P.M. 


Law Enforcement as a Profession 


April 5 


2-3 fe? 8-9 P.M. 


Public Relations 


April 6 


1-3 6? 7-9 P.M. 


Report Writing 


April 7 


1-3 fe? 7-9 P.M. 


Report Writing 


April 8 


1-3 & 7-9 P.M. 


Report Writing 


April 9 


1-2 fe? 7-8 P.M. 


Public Relations 


April 9 


2-3 fe? 8-9 P.M. 


Testifying in Court 


April 12 


1-3 fe? 7-9 P.M. 


Observing and PatroHng 


April 1.^ 


1-3 &? 7-9 P.M. 


Use of Firearms in Law Enforcer 



April 14 1-3 &? 7-9 P.M. 
April H 1-3 &? 7-9 P.M. 
April 16 1-3 &? 7-9 P.M. 



April 19 



April 26 



10 A.M. to 

4 P.M. 
(Day Class) 
10 A.M. to 

4 P.M. 
(Day Class) 



(not actual firearms training) 



Scientific Aids in Law Enforcement 



Scientific Aids in Law Enforcement 



Investigations Required of the Patrolmen 



Firearms Training and Gas Instruction, 
San Mateo PD Range 

Firearms Training and Gas Instruction, 
San Mateo PD Range 



Instructor 

D. Ray Quinn, FBI 

D. Ray Quinn, FBI 

T. P. Hunter, 

Division of Criminal Identi- 
fication and Investigation 

D. Ray Quinn, FBI 

D. Ray Quinn, FBI 

Francis Harrington 
San Francisco Academy 

Charles G. Campbell, FBI 
D. Ray Quinn and 
Charles G. Campbell, FBI 

D. Ray Quinn and 
Charles G. Campbell, FBI 
Bud Thorpe, Municipal 

Court Judge, Redwood 

City, California 



Eugene S. Jones and 
'Charles G. Campbell, FBI 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Chief For 29 Years ""C. L. Collins, Redwood City 



On October 1, 1913, Redwood City had about 1600 
people living within its less than six square miles of area. 
On that date a young man named Clement L. Collins, 
who had been employed by the Gas and Electric Com- 
pany joined the Police Force, which with his advent 
totalled three men. Included in the trio was the Town 
Marshal Joseph Coleman. Today Redwood City has 




Chief C. L. Collins 

grown in population — now roundly 20,000 — and in area, 
over seven square miles. 

Thousands more people from adjacent territory pour 
daily into the pioneer town for shopping and to enjoy 
the recreational attractions. 

Less than six months after pinning a poUce star on his 
uniform coat, after working seven days a week, 12 hours 
a shift for $100 per month, he was made Chief of Police 
on March 1, 1919. With 29 years of honorable and effi' 
cient service behind him, Chief Collins is today the oldest 
Chief of Police in point of service in California. Few 
have in the state's history served as long. 

Chief Collins has seen many changes in law enforce- 
ment. Most communities of this state are similar to Red' 
wood City. When he joined the Police Department there 
were no automobiles for the police; no motorcycles, or 
even a bicycle. 

Today Redwood City has a fleet of six high powered 
patrol cars and three motorcycles. 

Thirty-five years ago there were no radio. We now 
find Redwood City amply provided with this means of 
communication, the development of which Chief Collins 
has had no small part, and all his motor equipment is 
fitted with the latest in two- and three-way sets. 



The teletype was something never heard of for police 
work in 1913. Today its network covers the entire state, 
rendering incalculable aid to peace officers. 

Co-operation among other law enforcement agencies was 
at a low ebb in 1913. But today all of them are giving 
the utmost in cooperation, and through association and 
close contact, in an instant every agency in California 
can be brought into action when some emergency war- 
rants a call. 

Chief Collins declares that the help bigger Police De- 
partments render the smaller ones is something to be 
mighty proud of. He cites the assistance in apprehending 
criminals in San Francisco. Oakland, Sacramento, Los 
Angeles and San Diego Departments have extended him, 
day or night, when called upon to jerk out of circulation 
some law violator. It is well known that the smaller 
Departments reply in kind. 

Chief Collins has .seen his department grow from three 
in 1913 to 22 today, and he has seen the members de- 
veloped into as fine a body of law enforcement officers to 
be found in any part of these United States. Men, who 
beside possessing the necessary moral and physical cour- 
age, have taken advantage of every opportunity by at- 
tending special courses provided by the State, FBI and 
Colleges, to improve themselves in the enforcement of 
the laws. 

When he joined the Department the force was housed 
(Continued on page 68 ) 

DAVE'S MARKET 

2137 El Camino Real 
REDWOOD CITY 

Phone R. C. 33 Jess Larrecon, Prop 

JESS' PLACE 

85 7 MAIN STREET REDWOOD CITY 



CLOVER CLUB 

M. H. Megginson 
REDVt'OOD CITY 
Thos. Tuite & Sons 



Phone 84 



PALACE MARKET 



Established 1903 
MEATS - GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 

82 5 MAIN STREET REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 

Phone EMerson 6-6233 

VAILLANCOURT'S WELDING 

PORTABLE ELECTRIC AND ACETYLENE WELDING 

2801 MIDDLEFIELD ROAD REDWOOD CITY, CALIF. 

CENTRAL CAFE 

LIQUORS • ITALIAN DINNERS 
WE SERVE GOOD FOOD 

1628 EL CAMINO REAL REDWOOD CITY 



J. B. PERRY CO. 



FEED MANUFACTURERS 
FEED AND FUEL DEALERS 

1401 MAIN STREET REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Page 18 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, 1948 

Daly City Has Good Police Force 



Daly City located in San Mateo County just over the 
south county Hne of San Francisco is still grov-ing. Today 
with a population of 13,000 every lot available for home 
building is being covered by homes for people who like 
to live in Daly City. Superintendent of Public Works, 
Arthur J. Bodien, predicts there won't be a single lot for 
erecting any kind of a building in the city limits of the 
hill top little city, within the next two years. 

Daly City has no industry' of any kind, but it does 
have attraction for home owners and the city has the 
best of stores, moving picture theatres, newspapers, two 
banks, two postoffices, churches, and schools all for the 
benefit of the thousands of happy home owners. In 
speaking of schools the Jefferson district High School 
erected 22 years ago now has 802 students from the area 
around Daly City, has four buses transporting students, 
and has a faculty of 35 well trained taechers carrying 
out the educational program of the institution. 

Daly City has its own water supply, and the rates for 
water for domestic use and for the gardens is the lowest 
to be found in this part of the state, a flat rate around 
a dollar a month is the cost to all users of the municipally 
owned water plant. 



Too, Daly City is noted for its low tax rate, one dollar 
per hundred with 29 cents for bond redemption. And 
here is something you seldom hear anything to equal- — • 
the collection of garbage is done for free. 

Small wonder that the people making up the population 
of Daly City are a happy lot. 

All city departments have kept up with the growth 
of the community and this goes for the Police Department. 
This important municipal agency is now headed by Chief 
of Police William W. Sunderland. 

Chief Sunderland has seen his adopted home progress 
to its present eminence. For it was in 1929 that he quit 
a job with the- firm of C. W. Worth, big drayage com- 
pany of San Francisco to join the Daly City Police De- 
partment. The Chief then was the late Jack Doyle. The 
Department numbered five men at the time, including the 
Chief of Police. Today there are 16 men enforcing the 

laws in Daly City. /r^ ^- j .. .7-, > 

(^Continued on page 12) 

GELSI'S CAVERN and LIQUOR STORE 



Proprietors 

v. Merlo 

O. F. Federighi 



62 78 MISSION STREET 



Phone JU. 4 9981 
DALY CITY. CALIF. 




MEMBERS OF DALY CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Front Row, Left to right — Motorcycle Officer E. Bcechcr, Officer Roy Bccchcr, Sergeant Roland Petrocchi, Chief Sunderland, 
Sergeants Rocco Benedctti and William Bolger, Motorcycle Officer H. Sunderman. Second Row — Officers Dean Wood, Edward 
■ ~ — . - Officers Arthur Linhares J. Welsh, C. Munday. Back Row — Officers D. 



Heim, George Savage, A 
Johnstone and J. Walsh 



Bcnassini. Third Row- 



April, 1948 



polic:e and peace officers' journal 



Page 19 



Chief Jack Theuer In Burlingame*s P. D. 30 Years 



On March 1 Chief R. C. (Jack) Theuer completed 30 
years as a member of the BurHngame PoHce Department. 
On that same date he also ended three years as Chief 
of the Police Department. 

When he joined the police force Edward Oliphant, 
long time retired, was Chief and Officer Theuer shared 




Chief R. C. Theuer 

the duties with L. A. Cavaelier as the entire Police De- 
partment, guarding the 4500 people residing in Burlin- 
game's city limits at the time. Today Burlingame has 
over 20,000 population and the Police Department is 
made up of 24 men and three women. 

Within the past year two new men were added to the 
force, they being Michael Disson, Jr., whose father was 
a former Fire Chief, and Harry Emrick. 

Two new women employes have been added, Matron 
Enga La Boda and Patricia Carr, typist-clerk. The latter 
served for some four years of the war as a member of 
San Francisco's woman motorcycle corps. She moved to 
Burlingame when that corps was inactivated and liking 
police work she applied for a job with the adopted town's 
Police Department. 

Chief Theuer has been given a third sergeant, and the 
,man appointed for that rank was Thomas Price, who is a 
mighty energetic officer for his department and the Penin- 
sula Police Officers Association as well. Price is desig- 
nated as Traffic Sergeant and looks after that important 
problem of the town. The other Sergeants are Edward 
Hallett and Louis Todd, who handle the night watches 
of the office. Lieutenant Louis Furio, one of the most 
efficient and courteous officers you could ever meet, is in 
charge of the day desk and handling of records. 

Captain J. J. Hartnett is as he has been for years in 
charge of investigations and attending all court hearings. 
No city has a more able man for such important work, 
and he has solved all of the crimes, which are not too 
many, occurring in Burlingame. 

J. H. BAXTER CO. 

WOOD PRESERVING 



On El Camino Real through the efforts of Chief Theuer 
the State Motor Vehicle Department has installed 1 1 light 
signals at as many important crossings. This has re 
duced the accident rate and slowed down the speedy boys. 

Too, he is busy bringing the Junior Traffic Patrol to 
full strength, and on April 10 when the annual review 
was held he and all the boys and girls doing important 
(Continued on page 66) 



Burlingame Sash & Door 

We Are Manufacturers of 

Top Quality Ponderosa Pine Doors, 

Sash and Windows 

960 Carolan Avenue 

BURLINGAME, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-9^04 



NELSON & SHIRKEY 
PLANING MILL 

QUALITY MILLWORK 

204 East Lane 

BURLINGAME, CALIFORNL\ 

Phone: 4-1749 



SAN FRANCISCO 



333 Montgomery Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HARRY LEE 
PLUMBING & HEATING 

Plumbing - Heating - Utilities 
Radiant Panel Heating 

145 Rollins Road : P. O. Box No. 629 

BURLINGAME, CALIFORNIA 

DU'L 3- 1 891 
TRANSPORT MOTOR CO. 

California State Distributors 
WILLYS MOTOR CARS AND JEEPS 

301 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 




(Copyricht, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 



An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW i Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioia, 666, Buenos Aires, Republic of Argentine. S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

POLICE JOURNAL Wellin gton, New Zealand 

Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Business Manager and Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS— $3 a year, payable in advance; 2Sc 
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by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
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IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. >u 



SHERIFF GLEASON HEADS SHERIFF'S 
ASSOCIATION 

Being the head of the second Sheriff's organization in the 
State of California dciesn't seem to deter Sheriff H. P. 
(Jack) Gleason from taking on more responsibilities. He 
is the current President of the State Peace Officers' Asso' 
ciation and last month at the annual meeting of the Sher- 
iff's Association held in Santa Barbara he was elected presi- 
dent of that organization. 

However, Sheriff Gleason who is on his third term as 
chief law enforcement officer of Alameda County seems to 
thrive on work and more work. Alameda's Sheriff's de- 
partment is second to none in these United States for effi- 
ciency and achievements. The great experiment of a prison 
farm produced by Sheriff Gleason when he prevailed upon 
the county supervisors to lease for almost free unused parts 
of Camp Shoemaker for rehabilitating prisoners sentenced 
to jail terms is something that has attracted the attention 
of all men and women interested in penology. The men 
sentenced are engaged in useful and healthful labors, pro- 
ducing crops of vegetables and other produce used by the 
county, and they, for the most part come out in better 
health and with a better outlook in life. 

As presiding officer of two of the states leading peace 
officers' associations (and he is also past president of the 
Bay County Peace Officers) he has brought many ideas for 



bettering law enforcement. A quick thinking officer, he is 
a good parliamentarian, good speaker and has a sense of 
humor that is clean and infectious. 

He has the finest in organization, the best in radio, and 
his jail and headquarters in Alameda's County Court 
House are maintained in the highest degree of orderliness. 



FORMER CHIEF RIORDAN RETIRES 

FROM SAN FRANCISO POLICE 

DEPARTMENT 

Former Chief Michael Riordan retired on pension, from 
the San Francisco Police Department, on March 15. Thus 
ends a career of 35 years as a police officer, during which 
time he rose from patrolman to, the rank of Captain, 
establishing a fast record for advancement under civil 
service examination. Then he went on to become Deputy 
Chief of Police under former Chief Charles W. Dullea, 
•ind when the latter retired last October was appointed 
Chief, relinquishing this top post on January 6, 1948. 

A self-made scholar he studied not only police subjects 
but every other subject whereby he might improve his 
mind and he was nearly 30 years ago admitted to practice 
law, and in this profession he has demonstrated great 
ability, taking part in many cases having to do with the 
police department. 

He is to engage in the practice of law and all who know 
him, know he will make as great a success in this calling 
ns he did as a police officer and official. 

Arch Bishop Mitty has appointed him to an important 
post to head a committee for displaced European persons, 
and he will give this matter serious and constructive 
service. 



"KNOCKERS" ARE NOT SO GOOD 

Pick out the folks you like the least and watch them 

for a while; 
They never waste a kindly word ; they never waste a smile; 
They criticize their fellow-men at every chance they get; 
They never found a human just to suit their fancy yet. 

From them I guess you'd learn some things if they were 

pointed out — 
Some things that every one of us should know a lot about. 
When someone "knocks" a brother, pass 'round the 

loving cup — 
Say something good about him if you have to make it up! 

It's safe to say that every man God made holds trace 

of good 
That he would fain exhibit to his fellows if he could; 
The kindly deeds in many a soul are hibernating there. 
Awaiting the encouragement of other souls that dare. 

To show the best that's in them; and a universal move 
Would start the whole world running in a hopeful, 

helpful groove. 
Say something sweet to paralyze the "knocker" on 

the spot — 
Speak kindly of his victim, if you know the man or not. 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



PISTOL POINTING 



By J. Ross DUNNIGAN 



The S. F. Police Monthly Matches 

The second monthly match of 1948 found 180 rugged 
pistol pointers out by the placid Lake Merced range all 
eager to sling lead at those elusive bulls-eyes — and we do 
mean elusive. It was one of those days when the long- 
handled undies felt pretty good around the underpinnings 
and the overcoat and heavy sox were a joy to be wearing. 
Aside from a bit of a mist during the Camp Perry match 
weather observations were e.xcellent with visibility the 
same. There were plenty of new faces on the lines during 
the day, some were old timers just in for a day's shoot 
while others were just breaking into the game — the hard 
way. Take, f'instance, Cash Gustin, State Highway 
Patrolman from Modesto, who paid us a visit for the first 
time in many months, who won a fourth place in the .22 
timed-fire match. Otto Steen from Seattle is another rare 
visitor while R. A. Schaefer, from Seattle way, dropped 
in and walked off with a third place medal in the .22 
rapid-fire master class, and a third place medal in the 
master class aggregate. And, as usual, Quentin Brooks 
took top honors for the day with Bob Chow a close 
second. All in all, it was a good shoot from early morning 

'till late in the afternoon. 

* if * 

The Saturday before the matches Rangemaster "Pop" 
Dutil just arrived from the Director's Meeting of the 
N.R.A. in Washington, D. C, and gave us a lot of in- 
teresting information on what's happening with that out- 
fit. A few new rules and regulations will be in order for 
1948 but there will be no classification books this year due 
to the new system of reclassifying shooters as they 
progress either upward or downward. The next issue of 
the "American Rifleman" should contain the pistol rules 
and regulations as well as other information the shooters 

are waiting for. 

* * * 

We have taken great delight in our column in pointing 
out the weaknesses of the shooters and of course, all in 
fun, we take a shot at those fellows who do not get on 
the lines and forget they are shooting. When a fellow 
pistol-pointer forgets a string, he qualifies for the famous 
"Siesta Club" — an organisation which has for its members 

PATRONIZE 

SHUMATES PHARMACY 

Stores Conveniently Located Throughout San Francisco 

Look for your nearest SHUMATE STORE 

SPECIAL PRICES TO MEMBERS S. F. P. D. 




the finest and poorest pistol pointers all over this good land 
of ours. Sunday, while looking over the shooters, we 
noticed target 8 in the second relay of the rapid-fire 
match was vacant so we amusingly said to ovirselves 
"what's the matter with these dumb so-and-so's that they 
can't remember they should be shooting." Clayton Kober, 
standing next to us, told us that he had been out in the 
back and forgot to get on the lines and was sitting this 
match out. Ha, ha! sez we — another members of the 
Siesta Club! Just then something clicked in our feeble 
brain and we suddenly remembered that target 8 should 
have had our noble carcass behind the bench. I now take 
back all I've said about those members who forget to 
get on the lines, as we can readily see how easy it can be 
done — but we never figured we would be counted as one 
of those "dumb so-and-so's." Doc Baix also slept through 
one of the matches, did we say "slept"? That's what 
he said. 

Sgt. Bellera, the Fort Ord hot-shot, must have had a 
busy month rounding up that gang of "brass hats" he 
had at the shoot with him Sunday. Sgt. Ray Fleetwood 
brought his wife and two sons along to see the old man 
do his stuff. Lts. Ed Pickett, Bob 'Veach and Ralph 
Anthony were there in the expert class and Major Alonzo 
Pierce was also given the trial by fire spot in the Ex- 
pert Class. 

* * * 

Our usual little Valentine from Butte, Montana, was 
with us for the regular February match in the personage 
of Phil Judd. Phil is in the hardware and sporting goods 
business in that cold, cold town and gets out each Febru- 
ary when the thermometer gets down to somewheres 
around 50 below. Here he thaws out and renews old 
friendships. 

Then on the Bulletin Board we spotted that sale being 
held by our old pal from Oakland, Joe Davis. He was 
selling all his guns, reloading tooks, oil, primers, glasses 
and any other thing pertaining to shooting. We can't 
figure out whether Joe is gonna quit shootin' before he 
goes completely bugs or whether he is in one of those "sell 
or trade" moods that usually hit him. 

ERNIE'S 

847 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL UTAH 



504 Fourth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



But the best one on the lot for the day was the one 
that Harr>' Plummer, the San Anselmo floriculturist and 
pistol expert, tells on himself. Harry acquired a big keg 
of No. 5 pistol powder so proceeded to spend a whole 
week-end in loading up a thousand .45 shells for himself 
which would last him for a month or two. Imagine his 
chagrin when he shoots the stuff and finds it hasn't the 
strength to even move back the slike on his cannon. 
Imagine what Harry said! Y'see, Harry had been using 
^Vz grains of Bullseye Powder and did not know that No. 
5 takes almost twice as much to do the same as the Bulls- 
eye. Now Harry is looking around for someone with a 
.45 revolver so they can shoot all the stuff he can't use in 
his automatic. That's about 25 pounds of good lead and 
about a pound of powder plus a hell of a lot of work to 
reload the stuff. And all that time friend H could have 
been putting in those new begonia bulbs that had just 
arrived from the grower. Such is the life of a shooter. 

"... ? 




The 274 shot in the .45 match by Gloria Norton seems 
to be a new NRA record for women. At least we under- 
stand that papers have been forwarded to the NRA 
claiming it as such and we only await the return news as 
to the validity of the claim. The record book for 1947, 
with records for 1946, Hst no ladies record under the .45 
National Match so unless some other woman shot better 
than Gloria's mark in all probabilities her record will 

stand. 

* * * 

Glancing down the line Sunday we happened to notice 
that on the inside of Stuart Simms' shooting box cover were 
tacked row upon row of pretty red and blue ribbons with 
nice silver and gold lettering thereon. We never really 
got a chance to see them up close but we have been told 
they were ribbons he won for shooting the pistol — and all 
along we thought he had won them in a dog or cattle show 

for shooting the bull. 

* ip Hf 

Our Honor Roll tacked another name to its slowly 
growing list and this time Dud Harkelroad, Olympic Club 
shooter, protested that he was given ten points too many 
in the Camp Perr>' match. It still puzzles us how a guy, 
and especially a pistol shooter, can do such silly things. 
The usual pistol philosophy is to take all you can get, and 
then howl for more. Dud is one of those too damn honest 
shooters that spoil the game for us chiselers. 



Scores 



.22 T^ational Match 

Master Quentin Brooks 296 

Expert Stewart Simms 291 

Sharpshooters Ed Rosing 276 

Marksman 1st Evar Roseberg 267 

Marksman Louis Wells 254 

Tyro D. E. Anderson 249 



Center-fire Match 

Jack Ahern 289 

Bob Fortini 285 

Clapton Kober 272 

B. Armstrong 254 

D. J. Clark 247 

D. E. Aamson 233 



Camp Perry Match 



Quentin Brooks 
Mack Garr 
J. Fink 
Jewell Ross 
Ellis Udall 
D. E. Adamson 



297 
292 
288 
273 
271 
242 



CLUB JOAQUIN 

San Joaquin Valley's Gayest Spot 

Entertainment and Dancing Nightly 

Genuine Italian Spaghetti 

and Select Sea Foods 



South of Highway 99 

In MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



GARAGE 
CAFE 

CABINS 

THE E L R D'S 

CACTUS CITY, CALIFORNIA 

First Class Garage - Cafe 
BEER and SOFT DRINKS 

17 Miles East of Indio, Highway 60 and 70 
Riverside County, California 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



.22 Rapid'fie Match 

Master G. Elliott Murphy 

Expert Bill Hancock 

Sharpshooters Steve Jochums 

Marksman 1st A. Excell 

Marksman Herb Williams 

Tyro D. E. Adamson 

Aggregate Scores 

Master Quentin Books 1069 

Expert Wesley Lim 1037 

Sharpshooters Steve Jochums 1037 



.45' 'H.ational Match 



198 


Quentin Brooks 


282 


196 


Fred Peixotto 


274 


190 


Jerry Monheim 


276 


188 


Gloria Norton 


274 


178 


H. Pollock 


252 


175 







Page 23 



Marksman 1st Jewell Ross 

Marksman D. J. Clark 

Tyro D. E. Adamson 



955 
934 
899 



First Place 
San Francisco Police Department Blue Team 

Joe Hallisey 290 

Jack Ahem 292 

Karl Schaugaard 291 

Grif Thompson 293 



Team Scores 

Class "A" 

Second Place 
San Francisco Police Revolver Club White Team 

G. Elliott Murphy 289 

Ralph Kline 284 

Quentin Brooks 297 

Bob Chow 289 



1166 Trophy 

Class "B" 



First Place 
Pittsburg Rifle & Pistol Club 

Charley Barnett 266 

Stuart Simms 269 

C. R. McCallum 254 

Chas. Smith 262 



Second Place 
California Hiway Patrol 



Ken Kolb 

Henry Jacobs 

C. E. Boomhower 
Dave Menary 



II59 



196 
290 

282 
274 



1051 Trophy 



1042 



The 1947 pistol averages and the 1948 classifications 
have been issued by the Western Revolver Association 
showing that a total of 344 competitors fired at Oakland 
during 1947. In computing the average for each indi- 
vidual shooter the scores of all matches were used — 
exclusive of the .45 caliber scores which were used to 
compute the .45 scores only. Sub normal scores were 



The Yearly Match Summary of 
The Oakland Range 

not used in any classification. From the scores listed below 
it shows that the gang will have plenty to do this coming 
season to tie, or better, the new records and those that 
have been standing for some time. High man for the year 
was Quentin Brooks, a comparative newcomer to Cali- 
fornia but so far has made shooting history for himself. 



Phc.ne GArfield 1-7695 

THE MANDARIN ART COMPANY 

Importers of 
EARLY CHINESE ARTS 

564-S66 Grant Avenue, Comer California Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



JADE PALACE 



842 Grant Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



UNITED TEXTILE CO. 



Telephone VA 4-0063 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2450 Harrison Street 

CALIFORNIA 



SWETT AND CRAWFORD 



100 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



The pistol classification averages that will be followed 

in 1948 are: 

.22 and .38 caliber .45 caliber 

273 and over Master 267 and over 

264 to 273 Expert 255 to 267 

249 to 264 Sharpshooter 237 to 255 

234 to 249 Marksman 1st 220 to 237 

219 to 234 Marksman 2nd 200 to 220 

Below 219 Marksman 3rd Below 200 

Champions in each classification: 

Slow'fire champion Quentin Brooks 92.30% 

Rapid-fire champion Quentin Brooks 97.61% 

Time-fire champion Bob Chow 95.99% 

.22 caliber champion Quentin Brooks 290.87 



.38 caliber champion Jack Wilson 287.40 

.45 caliber champion Bob Chow ' 279.41 

Teams firing in the Camp Perry team matches were 
divided into three groups, class "A", "B" and "C" with 
the following winners in each class : 



Average 



Class "A" 
San Francisco Police Revolver 

Club Team No. 1 1155.8 

(Chow-Murphy-Brooks- Ahem) 

Class "B" 
San Francisco Police Revolver 

Club Team No. 3 1115.1 

(Freeman-Baix-Peixotto-Flesher) 




SHOOTERS AT CALEXICO 
Pictured are members of Seventh-seventh Street Division gun club who walked off with plenty of medals at the Desert Cavalcade 
International open shooters" tournament at Calexico March 6, 7, and 8. Back row, left to right — Doc Seecord, Leroy Carman, 
Charles Logsdon, winner of four medals; E. Seller. G. Conrad, Abbott Williams, C. Jensen, T. Formes. Front row, left to right 
— Norman Eppstein, youngest registered shooter in the United States, Club President Jack Moore, who took home nine 
medals, including four firsts, A. Eppstein, Walter Hendricks, Walter Stark, total grand aggregate winner with a score of 2550, E. 
Spiegel, G. Kiel, R. O'Connell, and P. Jorgensen. Five other members, not pictured, attended the shoot. 



CATHAY HOUSE 



California at Grant Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



G. H. McCALLUM COMPANY 

Creators and Printers of Distinctive 

MENUS 

Daily Service -::- Commercial Printinf 

Operators of the Hotel Menu House 

330 JACKSON STREET EXBROOK 2-6327 



Class "C" 
Oakland Police Department Team No. 2 . . , 1042.0 
(Richardson-Fellows-Hatch-Grahn) 
Annual aggregate scores fired in five or more aggregate 
matches with a total for the five highest matches for the 
aggregate award a competitor retained his classification for 
the entire year irregardless of his classification in the last, 
or any matches: 

Master Quentin Brooks 4336 trophy 

Expert Sim Reinhard 4216 trophy 

(Continued on page 111) 



April, 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Menio Park's New Police Chief 



Page 2S 



Five years ago a young man by the name of George 
Potter with his bride came out to Menlo Park from 
Boston, Mass. He got a job with the telephone company, 
took a course in the San Jose State College Police School 
and soon after his arrival in this state he joined the Menlo 




Chief George Potter 

Police Department. Today he is Chief of that law en- 
forcement agency. 

Chief Potter, who was born in Boston in 1917, had 
made up his mind that police work was the job for him, 
for prior to meeting, in 1942, Miss Eileen Judge, a native 
of Menlo Park, who was in the East on a visit, he had 
taken the examination to join the Boston Police Depart- 
ment. Shortly after he was married to Miss Judge he 
was notified to report for duty. But his new bride didn't 
fancy settling down in the City that was the cradle of 
this Republic. No siree, she wanted to be back in Menlo 
Park, which outside of being the headquarters for a 
large number of soldiers during World War 1, has no 
great history such as Boston, Mass. But the new Mrs. 
Potter knew she would not have to shovel snow off the 
sidewalks in the winter or feel the oppressive heat of the 
East coast in the summer, once she was back in her 
native city. 

So some five years ago they came to Menlo Park, and 
be it said Chief Potter agrees with his Missus that this 
part of the state is a mighty good place to live in, and 
no Native Son is more pleased with his lot than Menlo 
Park's Police Chief. 

Chief Potter continued his education along police lines. 
He attended a session of the San Francisco Academy, and 
three police schools in his county. 

So efiicient has he become in his chosen profession that 
last December when Chief Jack Yount announced he 
was going to retire to go into the real estate business, 
City Manager Cecil Logan called for an examination to 



fill the proposed vacancy, the office of Chief of Police being 
a civil service one. Officer Potter filed for the examina- 
tion, and former Chief John J. Harper of Burlingame held 
the same. Officer Potter topped the list and on January 
16 he was given the permanent appointment for the 
high post. 

Chief Potter has a force of six men under his com- 
mand, and another one promised for July, His force is 
made up of Sergeant Joseph Ferreria, Officer Bud Roach, 
Tony DeCampo, Bert Herring, James Oliver, and Eugene 
Clark. 

He also has charge of four special officers assigned to 
Stanford Village which houses some 700 or more students 
and their families. These specials are M. B. McColley, 
Buryl v. Cornell, William C. Quinn and William Jorey. 

Officer Roach is a veteran of the Department, having 
been made a member 15 years ago, when Chief Thomas 
Kearny was the Department's head. Chief Kearny was 
in charge when Officer Potter joined up. Officer and 
Mrs. Roach have two children, a boy and a girl. 

The Department has two 2 -way radio equipped patrol 
cars, with a third one expected in July, and one 
motorcycle. 

Though traffic is pretty congested at peak hours in the 
city limits of Menlo Park, there were no traffic deaths 
last year. 

Chief Potter is the father of two sons and one daughter. 
He expects to see Menlo Park grow from its present 
8000 population to over 10,000 within the coming year. 



Phone P. A. 8659 



J. Harvey J. Brown, Mgr. 



G C LIQUOR STORE 

[mpurtcd and Domestic 

BEERS :: WINES :: LIQUORS 

El Camino Real, between Spruce and Cedar - MENLO PARK. CALIF. 

Phones: ORdway 3-4242-3-4243 

SPECIAL RATES ON LONG DISTANCE TOWING 

ATLAS TOW SERVICE 



632 ELLIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



STOVES 

GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER CO. 

MISSION STREET AT 18th SAN FRANCISCO 

Refrigerators - Washers - Ironers - Linoleum- Water Heaters 
L. A. Gernhardt Phone Mission 7-0236 

R. L. Hinshaw HEmlock 1-2376 

HINSHAW SUPPLY COMPANY 

Refrigeration - Air Conditioning - Butane-Oil Heating 
Parts - Tools - Supplies 

169 Eleventh Street 

SAN FRANCISCO SACRAMENTO 



BAUER COOPERAGE CO. 

2345 Keith 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MINNEAPOLIS ARTIFICIAL LIMB CO. 



142 McAllister Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



Chief Belloni to Have New Police Building 



Twenty-seven years ago Officer Louis Belloni, a mem- 
ber of the three-man police force of South San Francisco, 
was appointed Chief of Police. With 27 years of honor- 
able, efficient and progressive law enforcement back of 
him he is second only to Chief C. L. Collins of Redwood 
City for continuous holding a top police job in this state. 




Chief Louis Belloni 

Chief Belloni has seen South City grow from a little 
town of 3700 population to a bristling industrial and 
commercial little city of over 16,000 contented people. 
This is nearly 10,000 more than the town had in 1940 
when the U. S. Census showed 6629. He has seen in- 
dustrial and commercial plants some into South San Fran- 
cisco by the scores, and during the past year twenty large 
concerns have established themselves in this desirable 
community. 

That the people like Chief Belloni and the way he and 
his force of officers have carried out their enforcement 
of the law, is stressed by the fact that this summer there 
will be started on a Civic Center lot and the corner of 
Maple and Miller avenue a $150,000 building to house 
only the Police Department, which now numbers 15 and 
the Chief, and when the building is completed some six 
months later five more men will be added. 

The men and women of South San Francisco voted this 
sum last fall and the plans call for the most modern 
building, equipped with the latest things tried and proven 
for law enforcement officers. The building will have a 
100-foot frontage and extend back some 60 or more feet. 
It will be constructed of reinforced concrete, and will 
have a spacious squad room, lockers for the men, tables 
and desks for their use, and lockers for their personal 
effects and their police equipment. 

There will be an up-to-date photograph gallery, a com- 
pletely modern Identification Bureau with the latest in 



filing cabinets, fingerprinting equipment and other features 
so necessary in keeping records of men taken in custody 
for violation of the laws. 

There will be prison cells some for men, some for 
women and some for juveniles, and these cells will be 
roomy, airy and furnished in a manner far from the 
custom of such places of detention, especially those found 
in many small cities, which are stuffy and with the barest 
of necessities. 

There will be a room for the Chief and another for 
Captain August Terragno and space set out for the 

Ju. 5-6061 

UNIVERSAL CONTAINER CO. 

CORRUGATED CONTAINERS AND BOXES 

539 RAILROAD AVE. SO. SAN FRANCISCO 

SWING CLUB 

JUno 8-9960 

DANCING - ENTERTAINMENT 

A Hearty Welcome to All 

751 BAYSHOR E BLVD. SO. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone J 8-1981 FREE DELIVERY 

Ted & Archie's Grocery & Delicatessen 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
MEATS AND FROZEN FRUITS 

615 LINDEN AVENUE SO. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 

RESTAURANT HOTEL 

BEER & WINE 

701 BAYSHORE BLVD. SO. SAN FRANCISCO 

So. S. F. 1760 

JOE'S BLUE ROOM 

IMPORTED COFFEE EXPRESS 



CAPPUCINO 



419 CYPRESS AVE. 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



R. Castiglioni 



B. Sacilotto 



MAY MARKET 

MEATS ■ GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - FRUITS 
COAL • FREE DELIVERY 

Phone JUno 8-6406 S2I Linden Ave. 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



ERCOLIS' MARKET 

J. and V. ERCOLI 



713 Linden Avenue 



SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SWIFT 8c CO. 



Apni, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



traffic bureau and a reception room where one can get 
information, make complaints or give account of what 
one knows of a crime they have witnessed. 

There will be a sound proof radio room. 

When the new headquarters are occupied South San 
Francisco will have as fine a place for its police officers 
to work as can be found in any other city on the coast. 

Another evidence that the Police Department sets well 
with the people of South San Francisco, is that they have 
by elections made the office of Chief of Police a civil 
service one, that was back in 1941. In 1945 the electorate 
voted its Police Department pensions under the state plan. 

Further indications of their popularity with the residents 
is that since the first of the year the salary of every mem' 



UNITED PACKING 
COMPANY, Inc. 



POETSCH 

& 
PETERSON 

300 Huntington Ave. East 

South San Francisco, California 



SOUTH CITY 

LUMBER AND 

SUPPLY CO. 




JUno 8-5711 

Railroad and Spruce Aves. 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

San Mateo County 



A. C. FREEMAN 
President 



South San Francisco 



A. W. SORICH BUCKET 
AND DRUM CO. 

Drums and Containers 
Bought and Sold 

Estimates Given 

INCINERATORS 

All Sizes 

501 Railroad Avenue 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

JUno 8-3300 Res: Millbic^'E 2351 



I I 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1948 



ber of the Police Department has been raised. The Chief 
now gets $400 per month, Captain $350, Sergeant Vincent 
Biachini $300 and patrolmen $275. 

Like all peninsula cities South San Francisco has its 
traffic problem. Through the Bayshore Highway flows 
25000 automobiles a day into San Francisco, and the same 
number comes back, and on El Camino Real some 12,000 
more travel that ancient highway, twice a day. Yet the 
traffic accidents are small in comparison to the large 
volume of cars passing through. This is due to stringent 
law enforcement. There were 4200 arrests and citations 
issued for traffic violations during 1947. So far this year 
there has been but one death from a traffic accident. 

Since Chief Belloni took over 27 years ago South San 
Francisco has grown in area. At that time there were a 
little more than five square miles, today it spreads to the 
west as far as the extension of Junipero Serra boulevard 
and is today easily over ten square miles. In this area 
hundreds of new homes have been erected and more are 
going up and it is well that the people of the city have 
given their Police Department a modern police head- 
quarters, so that they are able to give the best in enforcing 
the laws, something that the SSFPD has been doing for 
over a quarter of a century under the direction of Louis 
Belloni, a fine Chief of Police. 

AL'S MERCHANT LUNCH with Drink 50c 

HAMBURGERS - CHEESEBURGERS - COLD DRINKS 
CIGARS - CIGARETTES - CANDY 



298 TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



TINY'S HUT 

"Elmer" Hansen 
WALNUT CREEK, CALIF. 



The Corner Pool Hall 

Good Food, Beer, Wine, Soft Drinks 

559 Main Street 

The Yellow Front 

Mexican Food - Specializing in Enchiladas, Tacos 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

Vincent .^nd Connie Navarro 

659 Main Street 

COLUSA, CALIFORNIA 



KEN ROYCE, Inc. 

Building Material Division 
READY MIXED CONCRETE 

205 So. Linden Avenue 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone JUno 8-8212 



SOUTH CITY 
SHEET METAL WORKS 

J.AS. O. W.^LL.ACE, Prop. 

HEATING and VENTILATING 

617 Linden Avenue 

South San Francisco, California 

Telephone JU. 8-4102 



Duplex Percolator Co. 

Sonoma Rock Spring Water 

A Full Line of Leading Brands 
Imported and Domestic Whiskeys 



49 East Second Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 408 



Argentina Club and 
Restaurant 

Fine Wines - Beer - Liquors 
DANCING EVERY NIGHT 

303 Black Diamond Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 

- ------ .....m.mmmm..t 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Ideal Cabinet & Fixture Co. 

Joaquin Ferry, Owner 

BUILT-IN FIXTURES 
STORE FIXTURES 

When thm\ing of anything m our line thm\ 
of IDEAL first 

1010 38th Avenue 

OAKLAND 1, CALIFORNIA 

Phone KEllog 3-1432 



The Fruitvale Toggery 

J. MALNICK 8c CO. 

East 14th St. at 38th Avenue 

Apparel and Shoes for 
Women and Children 



LIBERTY MARKET 

Fruits, Vegetables, Groceries, Meats 
Ham and Bacon, Fish on Friday 

3431 East Fourteenth Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

KEllog 2-9756 



ED'S 
COCKTAILS 

So Refreshing 

5517 Foothill Blvd. 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

KEllog 2-9279 



KNUTE PALMQUIST 

Brass, Bronze and Aluminum Foundry 
Production Patterns - Pattern Castings 

4933 San Leandro Street 

OAKLAND 1, CALIFORNIA 

ANdover 1-0951 



Meet Yoru Friends Here 

ALOHA CLUB 

Merritt 8C Agrella 

952 Fruitvale Avenue 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

KEllog 2-9280 



MONTEREY COUNTY 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

Plumbing - Heating - Sheet 
Metal Utilities 

8275 San Leandro Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Frederickson & Watson 
Construction Company 

General - Engineering Contractors 

873 81st Avenue 
Oakland 3, California 

SWeetvvood 8-1264 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



SIMPSON SCREEN CO. 

Telephone TEmplebar 4-3565 
1050 EAST EIGHTH STREET OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



Phone HI 4-9978 



HARRY McKINNEY'S 

RIO GRANDE SERVICE STATION 

FliUs Picked Up aitd Delkercd 
1600 PERALTA STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone TEmplebar 4-8688 

CARDENAS BROS. 

GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE WORK 
AUTO ELECTRICAL REPAIRS 

928 EAST I2lh STREET (rear) OAKLAND. CALIF. 



CITY FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Phone GLencourt 1-8583 



2801 LINDEN STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



APEX PAINT COMPANY, Manufacturers 

Landscape 5-7336 
AN APEX PAINT FOR EVERY PURPOSE 

1201 SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



THOS. CARTER GLASS CO. 

Phones Hlgate 4-7753 - 4-7754 

ART GLASS - MIRRORS - GLAZING 

COPPER STORE FRONTS - DESK TOPS 

333 NINTH STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



Y. L. CHAN HERB CO. 

GLencourt 1-0420 
2340 TELEGRAPH AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

L. W. Miller Telephone GLencourt 1-6606 

Enterprise Plating and Enameling Co. 

PLATING OF ALL KINDS 



780 TWENTY-SECOND STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



T & H MARKET 

FRESH MEAT - FRESH VEGETABLES - GROCERIES 

BEER - WINE 

165 1 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



C. F. Fr 



ANdover 1-2200 



DANA-FRANE MOTOR CO. 



STORAGE 



PARKING OILING • GREASING 

CANTON GARAGE 

Ti-l.'i)l[,,ii,> TEiiipli-har 2-(i:;iil 

GUARANTEED AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 

All Repairings Under Personal Supervision of BILLY CHU 

I 1 1 SIXTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BLUE FLAME CAFE 



Telephone Piedmont 5-9283 
I 159 32nd STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



The Scotch Caiulynuiker 
Telephone TWinoaks 3-4294 

AWFUL FRESH MacFARLANE 

415 24th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

C_ V^ Wilcox Phone Piedmont 5-4371 

Spec-al Fried Chicken 

FRIED TO YOUR ORDER IN 10 MINUTES 

THE CHICKEN SHACK 

Open 10 A.M. 'Til 2 A.M. 

3500 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND 8, CALIF. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

DODGE BROTHERS TRUCKS 

PLYMOUTH MOTOR CARS 

2901 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

LAKE VIEW RESTAURANT 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN LUNCHEON AND DINNER 

ORDERS PUT UP TO TAKE OUT 

Phone Hlgate 4-2308 

32 I i GR AND AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

GILLARD 8C GILLARD 

Glencourt 1-65 10 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

1404 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

L. A. Meucci, Prop. Phone TRinidad 2-2257 

PIPI RESTAURANT 

SPECIALIZING IN ITALIAN DINNERS 

I 050 98th AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone Hlgate 4-0871 



Res. Phone OLympic 3-8429 



Phone KE. 4-2442 Terry W. Anderson, Prop. 

GOLDEN WEST FLORIST & NURSERY 

TREES. SHRUBS AND POTTED PLANTS 
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

5537 FOOTHILL BLVD. OAKLAND I. CALIF. 

MIKE'S COFFEE SHOP 

THE CLEANEST AND BEST PLACE TO EAT 



PAVLIGER LABORATORIES 

X-RAY 
Suite 327 Wakefield Building - 426 Seventeenth Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

KEllog 2-7661 

MUELLER BROS. 

PACKERS • SAUSAGE MANUFACTURERS 

4537-4559 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND I, CALIF. 

THE KINGS FOOD MARKET 



1768 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. OAKLAND 



3421 San Pablo Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



FOOD MART DELICATESSEN 

AL SACK'S 

SIXTH AND MARKET STREETS 



Phone Andover 1-3762 



Frank Houte, Brake Specialist 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



C. W. Kahl, Prop. 



Phone ANdover 1-6276 KEllog 4-4242 



SAFETY LANE BRAKE SERVICE 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
WHEEL ALIGNMENT SERVICE 

4425 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Res. Piedmont 5-7086 



WES. KAHL'S HOUSE OF 1000 BARGAINS 

NEW AND USED PLUMBING AND STOVES 

WE HAVE IT - OR WE'LL GET IT 

2227 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

FOR A GOOD, NEAT PAINT JOB 

GUARANTEEING YOUR SATISFACTION 

Call 

PAUL W. NORDSTROM 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

Office: ANdover 1-1871 -::- Eve.: UA. 2-2478 

1414 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND 



BAKERS VAN 8C STORAGE CO. 



22 74 EAST TWELFTH STREET 



OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION 



6655 Foothill Blvd. 



TRinidad 2-0300 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Hillsborough^s Police Department 



Page il 



Though Hillsborough poses no problems found in other 
cities and towns of this state in the matter of protecting 
business firms, banks and other marts of trade — Hills- 
borough has none of these — it nevertheless offers to the 
larcenous inclined a fertile field among the wealthy folks 
who occupy many of the 764 homes within its city limits. 




Chief Wisnom welcomes Chief Michael E. Mitchell to Bay 
Counties OfEcers Meet in Hillsborough. 

In the past year there has been added by annexation, 
additional area and the Police Department has some five 
miles more of streets through the new subdivision lines 
with classy homes, to watch. 

Chief Walter J. Wisnom, who on May 30 will have 
completed 28 years as a member of the Hillsborough Police 
Department, seven of those years as Chief of Police, has 
given the population of this exclusive scenic area the most 
excellent in police protection. 

Through 1947 there were but four burglaries, a fine 
record for a town of some 2500 population, and the prop- 
erty lost was minor. The radio .patrol cars give the most 
thorough check on all homes, and when a resident leaves 
for either a day or a three months outing, Hillsborough 
oflScers are checking the place at frequent intervals. This 
year Chief Wisnom has introduced another innovation, 
which besides being very effective is one that can't help 
but generate a big measure of good will. His patrolmen 
are noting something wrong with a house, and seeing no 



one was around, fix up that trouble. It might be an open 
window, a broken porch post, or a fallen screen, or maybe 
the folks forgot to close a door. Well the officer who 
discovers any of these things proceeds to fix it up if pos- 
sible and leaves a blank provided for the purpose setting 
forth the thing found wrong and that he had made such 
temporary repairs as possible. He gives his name, star 
number and the time and date of the occurrence. 

The following letter, one from many, tells most strongly 
how this goodwill service hits the house owner. 

It is from Mrs. Roy C. Lemoge of 1931 Black Point 
Road, date March 31, and reads: 

"Last week during one of our storms I returned home 
quite late, and found a note from Officer No. 3 of the 
Police Force to the effect he had come earlier in the night 
and closed a window blown open by this storm. I am 
certain if the officer had not discovered the open window 
our floor, draperies and other furnishings would have 
surely been ruined. We are very grateful for the effort 
and attention. It is indeed gratifying to know that during 
our absence our property is so capably protected." 

To give protection to the school children of Hills- 
borough's public schools Chief Wisnom has had installed 
automatic crossing signals. 

Too, he is equipping 100 bicycles used by school chil- 
dren with the new Scotch lite red tape to permit the bikes 
being seen by autoists at night. This move is sponsored 
by the Parent-Teachers Association. 

There has been but one traffic accident death in the 
past five years in Hillsborough, that one being in 1946. 

Chief Wisnom is replacing all old delapidated and out- 
dated street signs with new ones of the latest type. 

The latter part of April an examination will be held 
for the promotion of one patrolman to sergeant. There 
is a vacancy in this rank as Sergeant E. P. Funke has 
been elevated to a captaincy. Four members of the force 
will take the examination. 

The Hillsborough Police Department is not going to 
take a back seat to others of its San Mateo County sister 
Departments. Plans are ready to start work this summer 
for a Police Building in the civic center. It will be the 
remodelling of one of the buildings now used as a dormi- 
tory for housing members of the fire department. 

It will give the Police Department separate headquarters 
free from the present overcrowded space they now occupy. 
Officer Arthur Binder will move his recently equipped 
photograph gallery along with the Department's up-to-date 
radio system, which monitors the Burlingame and San 
Mateo police and Fire Department and the numerous 
trouble shooting cars of the Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany, and many other agencies around the Peninsula. 

Chief Wisnom is the 1948 president of the Bay Coun- 
ties Peace Officers Association, and a past president of 
the Peninsula Police Officers' association. And he has had 
a most prominent part in developing two-way radio for 
law enforcement as a member of the California Com- 
munication Officers' Association for some ten years. 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1948 



CRIME TRENDS IN CALIFORNIA 

By Chief George H. Brereton 
Division of Criminal Identification and Investigation, State Department of Justice 



(Continued from last issue) 

As I previously stated, a total of 38,149 felonies were 
reported to the Division during the first half of 1947. 
30,471 of these felonies were reported by thirteen cities. 
These were Los Angeles, San Francisco, South Gate, 
Oakland, Berkeley, Bakerfield, Santa Ana, San Diego, 
San Jose, Sacramento, Fresno, and Modesto. 

In order to arrive at some figures for purposes of com- 




ClUliF GeORCI; H. BRtRLTON 

parison, the population of the thirteen cities were tabu- 
lated for 1940 and 1945 or 1946 from United States 
Census Bureau figures. Only one of the thirteen cities. 
South Gate did not have a special census taken, in either 
1945 or 1946, but the absence of that figure will not mate- 
rially affect our comparisons. However, it might be a 
matter of interest to note that the population of South 
Gate increased from 26,945 on April 1, 1940 to 48,820 
when a special census was taken on July 28, 1947. This 
represents an increase of 18,875 persons or 70.1 per cent 
in seven years. 

During the five, or in some cases jhe six year period, 
the population of the thirteen cities increased from 
3,232,000 to 4,115,000 which represents a 27 per cent 
increase. On the other hand when the number of felony 
reports received during 1941 are compared with those 
received during the first half of 1947, covering a period 
of time approximately the same as that used to show the 
increase in population, an expected increase of 110 per 
cent is indicated. During 1941, 29,029 felony reports 
were received from the thirteen cities whereas in the first 
half of 1947 the Division received a total of 30,471 
reports. 

The comparisons just made might indicate only that 
the thirteen cities used as examples were doing better 



reporting and sending more crime reports to the Division. 
Although we can say, on the basis of past experience that 
this is true in some respects, it by no means explains 
the large percentage of increase. We must assume that 
there has been an increase in crime as well as in population. 

Another analysis has been made in order to determine 
what the situation is in California with respect to crime. 
This analysis is based on the reports made by the law 
enforcement ofiicials of twenty-five California cities for 
the year 1946 as compared to their reports concerning the 
same crimes in 1941. Only four crimes have been con- 
sidered in this comparison: Murder and non-negligent 
manslaughter, robbery, aggravated assault and burglary. 

In 1946 there were 266 murder and non-negligent man- 
slaughters reported whereas in 1941 there were only 
149. Robberies increased from 3,519 in 1941 to 8,186 
in 1946; aggravated assaults increased from 1,379 to 
4,292 and burglaries increased from 19,863 to 26,233. 
The percentages of increase for the five year period is 
79 per cent in murders and non-negligent manslaughters, 
133 per cent in robbery, 211 per cent in aggravated 
assault and 32 per cent in burglary. If, however, these 
percentages are adjusted with respect to estimated popu- 
lation increase in 1946, and assuming that the percentage 
of increase in the twenty-five reporting cities was the 
same as that for the entire State of California, the actual 
per cent change at the end of the five-year period would 
be a 29 per cent increase in murders and non-negligent 
manslaughters, 68 per cent increase in robbery, 124 per 
cent increase in aggravated assault and 5 per cent decrease 
in burglary. The only thing that the adjusted figures 
indicate is that assuming 1941 to have been a normal year, 
on the basis of the estimated population in 1946, there 
were 29 per cent more murders and non-negligent man- 
slaughters, 68 per cent more robberies, 124 per cent more 

KEIJog 4-1266 Cecil C. Woodruff 

HIGH SERVICE Union Oil Dealer 

FIRESTONE DEALER 
Corner High and East Fourteenth Streets 



EAST OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



NORTON W. FAUST 

ELECTRICAL AUTO PARTS 
ANdover 1-8502 



5104 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND I, CALIF. 



WEARTEX RUG COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

WEARTEX RUSH, BRAND and WOVEN COTTON RUGS 

Tel. Hlgate 4-4523 

2533 MAGNOLIA STREET OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



aggravated assaults and 5 per cent less burglaries than 
might have been expected. 

When comparisons are made between the number of 
crimes reported by California cities during the first half 
of 1947 and crimes reported during 1946 about the same 
unpleasant picture is disclosed. Although the reports 
indicate that particular types of crime may vary in dif- 
ferent communities, and although in general the reports 
indicate that there is a slight decrease in burglary and 
aggravated assault, robbery, theft and murder are still 
increasing. In individual cities this general statement 
might not apply. For example, one of the larger cities 
forwarded reports to the Division, during the first half 
of 1947, on 78 murders and non-negligent manslaughters, 
2,303 robbery reports, 2088 reports on aggravated as- 
saults, 7,755 burglary reports and 2,828 reports on grand 
theft. This same department reported for the entire 
calendar year of 1946, 141 murders and non-negligent 
manslaughters, 4,043 robberies, 3,890 aggravated assaults, 
13,629 burglaries, and 4,754 grand thefts. If the crimes 
reported for the first half of 1947 are compared to one- 
half of the total crimes reported in 1946 simple arithmetic 
will disclose that, in the case of this particular city, all 
five types of crime increased. Murders and non-negligent 
manslaughters increased 7.5, robberies increased 281.5, 
aggravated assaults increased 1943, burglaries increased 
842, and grand thefts increased 451. 

On the other hand an examination of the reports re- 
ceived from three other cities, which are consistently 
good "reporters" disclose that murder and non-negligent 
manslaughter increased in the first half of 1947 as com- 
pared to half of the total crimes reported in 1946, that 
in all three cities robberies and aggravated assaults de- 
creased, in two cities burglaries decreased and in one city 
burglaries increased. 

i believe enough statistical information has been cited 
to prove that during the past five years crime has been 
almost constantly increasing in California. However, be- 
fore closing this discussion I wish to compare, for six 

PAPE'S MARKET 

PAPE'S FOR THE BEST MEATS 
4568 E. 14th KE. 4-377S 

9615 E. 14th TR. 2-9666 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW YORK DELICATESSEN 

1324 Fruitvale Avenue KE. 2-9742 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Al Robinson ANdover 1-1015 

"If It's Refrigeration, We Have It" 

AMERICAN REFRIGERATION SALES 

SALES - SERVICE 



East Lake Manufacturing Jewelers 

JEWELRY REPAIRING 

JOBBING AND SPECIAL ORDER WORK 

WHOLESALE 

3120 East 14th Street. 3 Doors East of Fruitvale Avenue 

Phone AN. 1-3509 OAKLAND I.CALIFORNIA 



REPLACEMENT PARTS ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

Fruitvale Motor Parts Service 

FRuitvale 4611 - 4612 

4 153 E. 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone ANdover 1-8700 



Carl Discher 



MORRISON AUTO PARTS 

COMPLETE MACHINE SHOP SERVICE 

AMERICAN HAMMERED RINGS 

KOETHERIZING 



3872 E. 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 



Phone AN. 1.2010 

MARKET SPOT 

Complete On?-Stop Market 
QUALITY MEATS - GROCERIES - FRESH FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
4814 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phont; KE. 2-9793 

MELROSE PRODUCE MARKET 

Koupas Bros., Props. 

4568 E. Mth STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

ANdover 1-5470 HU. 3-2584 

W. 8c L . Refrigeration Service 

J. E. McCune 

COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC INSTALLATIONS AND 
REPAIRS - WALK IN AND DEEP FREEZE 



4412 EAST Mth STREET 



OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



Phone KE 3-7070 



MELROSE SURPLUS CO. 

"We Sell to the Surplusers" 
TOOLS - CLOTHING - SPORTS EQUIPMENT 



473 7 EAST Mth STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



FRESH BAIT DAILY 



A. M. RAMOS, Pro.p 



Monterey Fish Market 8C Bait Shop 

FRESH SEA FOODS 

ANdover 1-5562 Res. TRinidad 2-9642 

4715 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Office Phone 
TEmpIebar 2-2990 



Residence Phone 
TWinoaks 3-3975 



1399 MACARTHUR BLDG. 



OAKLAND 2. CALIF. 



Bruehl's Metal Manufacturing Co. 

Established in 1932 

TOOLS • DIES • STAMPINGS 

525 MARKET STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



n 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



specific crimes, the crime rate per 100,000 population in 
California with the national average. The figures which 
I cite are taken from the 1947 semi-annual bulletin on 
Uniform Crime Reporting, issued by the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation. The original figures have also been 
adjusted on the basis of an estimated 40 per cent increase 
in California's population and an estimated increase of 7 
per cent in our national population. 

As will be noted from the figures just cited the increase 
in California's population does make considerable dif' 
ference in our crime rate per 100,000. However, it will 
also be noted that the only place our rate is below the 
national average is in murder and non-negligent man- 
slaughter. In all other crimes our crime rate is above the 
national average — certainly not a record to be proud of. 

Possibly the only crime where a fairly good excuse 
might be offered for our high crime rate would be auto 
theft. I offer this possible excuse since California has 
registered 250,000 more passenger cars and 100,000 more 
trucks than any other state and has a total registration 
of 3,489,000 units of all types. 

In closing allow me to summarize what has previously 
been said. First, that in order to accurately determine 
crime trends we must have as complete reporting as 
possible. Second, that although we as yet do not receive 
crime reports from all sheriffs and all chiefs of police on 
all crimes, we receive enough to say that in general crime 
has increased during the past five years in California and 
certain crimes continue to increase. Third, that better 
reporting is necessary, and all sheriffs and chiefs of police 
should see that their felony reports are promptly for- 
warded to the Division of Criminal Identification and 
Investigation. Pawned and stolen property reports, finger- 
prints and photographs of persons arrested should be 
treated in the same manner. Fourth, California's crime 
rate, as compared to that of the nation is nothing of 
which wc can be proud. 

Let us all bend every effort towards the solving of our 
problem. You are assured that we in the State Division 
of Criminal Identification and Investigation will do every- 
thing possible to make your task easier on the "Front 
Line" — fighting crime. 

J. E. WOODBRIDGE CO., Inc. 

ASSOCIATED INSURANCE AGENCIES 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE PROTECTION 

AUTO - FIRE - COMPENSATION - LIFE - LIABILITY 



3124 East 14th Street 
ANdover 1.3782 



146') MncArthur Blvd. 
KEllog 3-6595 



KEl'.og 4-4 172 

DOMNICK'S SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

DYEING AND SHINING ANY COLOR 

3228 East 14th Street, near Fruitvale Avenue 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



L. D. Ferrell 



Phone KEllog 3-6131 



GOLDEN GRAPE 

WINES - LIQUORS - BEER 
ITALIAN-AMERICAN DELICATESSEN 



3920 E. MtK STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Charles Trampetti 

LO. 8 4293 



Joe Manifesto 

LO. 8-8917 



CHARLIE 8C JOE 



USED CARS 
SWeetwood 8-4325 

6200 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-171 I 

DR. E. S. FREITAS 

VETERINARIAN 

DOG AND CAT SPECIALIST 

Modern Veterinary Hospital 

4231 East Fourteenth Street, near High Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Phone KEllog 3-2143 



Joe Gonsalves, Prop. 



THREE PIGS 

BEER - WINES - SANDWICHES - SHORT ORDERS 

3860 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 

GERSON'S DELICATESSEN 

Featuring 
HOME-MADE SALADS 



6447 E. 14th Street 



LO. 8-8433. 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



SUMMERBELL ROOF STRUCTURES 

of Northern California 

TWinoaks 3-3622 

IN OAKLAND AT 1746 THIRTEENTH STREET 



1 



USED CARS 



Phone KEllog 4-4923 ANdover I 8321 



LUCKY MOTORS 

CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 
Paul 



2521 EAST Mth STREET 



TURNER TRIM SHOP 

Wallace Jack, Mgr. 
AUTOMOBILE UPHOLSTERING 

OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 4027 EAST I4fh STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



COLONIAL CAFETERIA 

OAKLAND HEADQUARTERS FOR GOOD FOOD 

1504 FRANKLIN STREET 



Pitta & Araujo 



I'll Meet You at The 

KALICO KAT 

MIXED DRINKS - 
OAKLAND. CALIF. 9701 EAST 14ih STREET 



Phone TRinidad 2-9750 



FINE FOODS 

OAKLAND 3. CALIF. 



' 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Vic-Roxie- Johnny 



TE. 4-9377 



VICTOR'S AND ROXIE'S 

551 EAST 12th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

NORTHRUP, KING 8c CO. 

WHOLESALE SEEDSMEN 
Established 1884 

PIONEER ALFALFA SEED 
WESTLAND FARM SEEDS 

BERKELEY 1, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone THornwall 3-9722 

G. F. HICKOK 

Manufacturer 
FINE PRUNING SHEARS 



SENTINEL CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Guardian of Quality and Service 

Special Cleaners and Cleansers • Deodorants 

Disinfectants and Sterilizers • Insecticides 

Polishes * Soaps, Etc. 

1790 llth ST. Telephone T\V. 3-3434 OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE PARTS, SERVICE, 
ACCESSORIES AND MACHINE WORK 

East Oakland Motor Parts Co. 

4129 East Fourteenth Street 

KEIIog 4-5020 

OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



Phone ANdover 1-8500 

S. STUART ISHAM 

OAKLAND'S CLEANEST USED AUTOMOBILES 



2 111 FOURTH STREET 



BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 



4224 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 



Phone KEIlog 2-0198 



QUINCY COMPRESSOR SERVICE 

FACTORY AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE 
J. C. CLne, Service Engineer 



Phone AN. 1-2238 

GREETINGS EXTENDED TO OUR PEACE OFFICERS 

Bried's Prescription Pharmacy 



3024 East Fourteenth Street 



500 29th AVENUE 



OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



KEIlog 3-4122 



Jimmie Newby 



STUDIO MUSIC SHOP 



WALLY'S MOTOR SALES 



BUYS AND SELLS CLEAN USED CARS 



ALL INSTRUMENTS TALK IN A 
PROFESSIONAL MANNER 



Phone TR. 2-30S3 



3850 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. ^608 EAST I4lh STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Emile Bouhaben 



Phone Hlgate 4-3342 



Phone KE. 2-3647 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Union Pacific Linen 8C Towel Supply 

Established 1896 

We Rent — TOWELS - LINENS - APRONS - GARMENTS 

(White or Colors) 



830 28th STREET 



OAKLAND 8, CALIF. 



LANE-DAVIS COMPANY 

METAL FINISHERS 
92 Seventh Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Founded in 1907 



State Accredited 



California College of Arts and Crafts 

Spencer Macky, President 



VAN BUREN OIL CO. 

Distributor of 
RIO GRANDE PRODUCTS 

4614 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

BARROW'S BICYCLE SHOP 

451 East Fourteenth Street 
OAKLAND 1, CALIF. 

ALL SIZES OF WHEELS AND TIRES FOR 

TRICYCLES - WAGONS - SCOOTERS - ALSO TOYS 

SHOP WHERE YOU ARE 

ALWAYS WELCOME 

Greetings Extended to the Peace Officers from 

M & M MOTORS, Phone KE. 2-1766 

5620 East 1 4th Street OAKLAND. CALIF. 



HUGH L. McLaughlin motor co., phone p. s-ssss 

6360 Telegraph Ave. OAKLAND, CALIF. 



BROADWAY at COLLEGE AVENUE, OAKLAND 11, CALIFORNIA ^^^j Broadway 



BAY MOTORS, TW. 3-6980 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Office Phone Piedmont 5-3626 



EAST BAY MEMORIAL CO. 

Designers and Builders of 
MONUMENTS 



4435 PIEDMONT AVENUE 



OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



Telephone KEIlog 2-1223 

TIP the TOP 

Whalin & Whalin, Owners 
QUALITY LIQUORS - LIQUEURS 

4320 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



DAN O'CONNELL- A Great Police Official 



By William H. Stone 



Daniel O'Connell, retired Chief Special Agent of the 
Southern Pacific Company, and one of the West's out- 
standing peace officers, whose exploits in the field of crime 
detection brought him international fame, died January 3, 
1948, following a brief illness. He is survived by his 




Chief Dan O'Ojnnkll 

widow, Mrs. Helen O'Connell and two sons, Daniel, Jr., 
and Kevin. 

During his long career, Dan O'Connell had many thrill' 
ing experiences and his success bringing criminals to justice 
made him one of the outstanding railroad detectives of all 
time. Several years ago O'Connell wrote a very interest- 
ing series of articles for "20," now The Police and Peace 
Officers" Journal dealing with train robberies. He per- 
sonally took a leading part in the investigation of many of 
these cases. 

Dan O'Connell was born in Ireland, in September, 1 S74, 
and came to the United States as a young man. A few 
years afterward, in 1901 to be exact, he commenced his 
long career with the Southern Pacific, entering their em- 
ployment in the Maintenance of Way Department where 
he soon rose to the positions of Extra Gang Foreman and 
Acting Roadmaster. After some time at this phase of rail- 
road work. O'Connell decided that being a policeman was 
more to his liking and he transferred to the railroad's police 
department, under the late Chief Kindelon. Here, O'Con- 
nell's talents came to the fore and his rise was rapid. After 
several promotions he was appointed Assistant Chief Spe- 
cial Agent in 19H and succeeded Mr. Kindelon as Chief 
Special Agent, following the hitter's death, in 1919. He 
continued in this position, with marked success, until his 
retirement in September, 1944. 

It was soon after Dan O'Connell was installed as Chief 
that Roy Gardner commenced the career of mail train rob- 
bery and ecapcs from custody that frequently brought his 
name to the newspaper headlines. However daring a 

Phone LA. 2-5717 

MODERN LAUNDRY CO. 

ALL WORK DONE BY UNION LABOR 

l<)26 PARK STREET ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



robber and escape artist Roy Gardner was, he made no 
move to reach for the gun he was carr>'ing when Dan 
O'Connell captured him, in a gambling hall at Roseville, 
Calif., after one of Gardner's sensational escapes. When 
O'Connell thrust his own pistol into Gardner's ribs, as 
Gardner was playing cards, Gardner looked up, recognized 
his captor and surrendered quietly. 

Among the numerous other noted cases in which Dan 
O'Connell took a leading part was the world-wide search 
for the DeAutremont brothers, who dynamited the mail 
car of Southern Pacific Train No. 13 and cold-bloodedly 
murdered the mail clerk, a brakeman, the engineer and the 
fireman of the train, October 11, 1923. The youngest of 
the three DeAutremont brothers, Hugh, was arrested in the 
Philippines, and Roy and Ray DeAutremont, twins, were 
arrested in Steuhenville, Ohio; all three arrests occurring in 
1928, climaxing a four and a half year manhunt. Incident- 
ally, the DeAutremonts are still confined in the Oregon 
State Penitentiary, where they are serving life terms. 

Though he could be blunt and stern when dealing with 
criminals, Dan O'Connell's friendships with law enforcc- 

Phone KEllog 2-1922 

BARON PIANO CO. 

THOROUGHLY RECONDITIONED AND GUARANTEED 

CASH PIANOS TERMS 

2 M!Ies from Downtown BUT 2 Miles from High Prices, loo 



2328 East Fourteenth Street, near 23rd Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



HANSEN FEED and FUEL 

GARDEN SUPPLIES 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

Phone TRinidad 2-0358 
9)17 MacARTHUR BLVD. OAKLAND 3, CALIF. 

FAYE'S GLASS CO. 

MIRRORS - PLATE GLASS - TABLE TOPS 

AUTO GLASS INSTALLED 

GLAZING 



Phone KEllog 3-3742 



2245 EAST Mih STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



JOHNNY VIERRA'S CABARET 

HAWAIIAN MUSIC 
DANCING FRIDAY and SATURDAY NIGHTS 9-1 



8421 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



i'hone HI. 4-9270 



"MILO," Mgr. 



MEXICALI ROSE RESTAURANT 

GENUINE MEXICAN DINNERS 
AND ATMOSPHERE 



Corner Clay and Seventh Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 37 



merit officials throughout the United States and Canada 

were widespread. He w-as a long time member of the Peace insurance 

Officers' Association of the State of California, the Inter- FRED A. WELLS 

national Association of Chiefs of PoHce, the Bay Counties' public accountant 

Peace Officers' Association, the Protective Section of the 

Association of American Railroads, the Elks and the ANdover 1-2411 

Knights of Columbus. Following his death many messages ^''-' east Mth street Oakland, calif. 

of condolence and of tribute to Mr. O'Connell were re- 

ceived by his family from his legion of friends throughout KEiiog 4-3823 

the countr>^ JESS S. WIGGINS 

CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 
CALIFORNIA METALS COMPANY -BuUder of QualUy Homes- 

2310 PERALTA STREET OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 3,34 easT Mth STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Tallent Ransome Lynn A. Schloss 

RANSOME COMPANY 

construction engineers 
butane gas 

Main Office and Plant 4030 Mollis Street 
Telephone OLympic 3600 EMERYVILLE. CALIFORNIA 



TOP PRICES PAID FOR USED CARS 

LOUIS MOSCHETTI 

RELIABLE USED CARS 
Phone KEIlog 3-2941 

2138 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Phone KE. 3-2288 

RUTH'S PASTRY SHOP 

BIRTHDAY AND WEDDING CAKES OUR SPECL\LTY j^^j^ y^j,,, 

Applesauce Cake - French Cream - Chocolate Eclair 

Napoleons - Banana Cake - Layer Cakes STEAK M A K E R 

Open Sundays 9:00 A. M. - 4:30 P. M. 
3281 E. Mth STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



A New Meat Delicacy 
TENDER-KNIT STEAKS 



4201 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND 



Phone KE. 2-9866 P'^°"'= "'■ ■'-^'^^ 

DUCK INN GEORGE'S SERVICE 

Mac & Duffy GAS - OIL - TIRES - BATTERIES 

BEER AND WINE WASHING AND LUBRICATION 



EXCELLENT FOOD 

2102 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone KEUog 3-42 60 



Conveniently Located from Oakland City Hall 
WEBSTER AT 13th STREET OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Leonard Hansen Phone KEUog 3-4406 

^^_^^_^.'^"^^_J'^^^.^™^ UNIVERSAL GLASS & MIRROR CO. 

STRUCTURAL GLASS STORE FRONTS 
MIRRORS, PLATE GLASS AND GLAZING 



FRYERS - ROASTERS - FRICASEE 
RABBITS - EGGS 



Open Every Day Except Sunday and Monday 

2259 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. I''23 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND 6, CALIF 



Hours 9:30 - 5:30 ANdover 1-3670 KEllog 4-565 1 Res. KElIog 3-1046 

ROLAND S. KADONAGA WILL BREITENBUCHER 

OPTOMETRIST 

IT K » • . . T J .-Til o o « "SED CARS AND TRUCKS 

Eves by Appointment. Tuesday Till 9 P. M. 

2311 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. ^5 18 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 

Nites KEllog 4-S83S John Magram 

Veterans' Furniture Exchange 

4242 EAST FOURTEENTH NEW AND USED FURNITURE 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA EVERYTHING FOR THE HOUSEHOLD 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 
Don H. Smith Fred Scheberies 3942 EAST Mth STREET OAKL.AND 1. CALIF. 



Mrs. M. J. Robak Phone TRinidad 2-0933 

ORIGINAL KASPER'S HOT DOGS ROBAK'S LIQUOR STORE 

4521 TELEGRAPH «c SHATTUCK FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 

Telephone HU. 3-6610 9340 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND 3, CALIF. 



Page i8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1948 



Atherton*s Annual Police Report 



In his annual report to the Mayor and City Council 
of Atherton, Chief of Police John E. Farrell, shows that 
in spite of the great increase in population of this noted 
home of the wealthy, major crimes have decreased. 

Herewith are excerpts of his report for 1947 : 

Crime and Crime Prevention 

Major Crime, robberies, burglaries, thefts, assaults, and 




Chief John E. Farrell 

sex crimes during 1947 were 25 per cent less than that 
of 1946. This was despite the increase of our population, 
new construction, increased traffic and other factors which 
are potential crime hazards. 
Traffic 

Traffic accidents for 1947 were 15 per cent less than 
1946. The El Camino Real Highway accidents decreased 
21 per cent. Included in the attached Summary of Ac- 
cidents Reports, are three accidents, involving motor 
vehicles, occurring on private property. 

Arrests for traffic violations increased approximately 
83 per cent above the National Safety Council Standard. 
The reduced accident rate, particularly on the El Camino 
Real, resulted because of the increased enforcement. 

Fines and forfeitures from this enforcing program, 
amounted to approximately $2,800 for the calendar year 
of 1947. 

All the parking problems presented during the year 
appear to be nearer solution, thanks to the efforts of the 
City Council. 

We have had one change in the personnel of the De- 
partment, during 1947. Carl Gielitz left because he was 
dissatisfied, and Forrest S. Paull was appointed. He is 
on one year's probation. 

Our present roster is: Officers L. A. Hubbard, David 
Silva, and Forrest Paull. 



The department's activities on the whole, increased for 
1947, approximately 43 per cent, over that of 1946. Fully 
60 per cent, consists of miscellaneous petty complaints and 
requests for minor services, which,, though time consum- 
ing, are essential to the well-being of the community. 
Should the same ratio of increase continue for 1948, we 
wjll have to curtail these minor services, unless these is an 
increase of personnel. 

There was but one robbery during the year and only 
eight burglaries and two attempts at burglary. 

KE. 2-4568 

Pacific Coast Insulation Contractors, Inc. 

SAVE FUEL— ROCK WOOL INSLnLATION 

FOR HOMES AND BUILDINGS 

L. E. Wootten, Prop. 



2439 EAST Mth STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



WILLIAM McINTOSH 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTING SERVICE 

Office KEIlog 2-8935 
3124 EAST 14th STREET. Room 210 OAKLAND, CALIF. 

COMMERCIAL CARPET & 
UPHOLSTERY CLEANERS 

DIRT AND LIQUIDS REMOVED BY POSITIVE 
SUCTION — PATENTS APPLIED FOR 



TWinoaks 3-8878 



439 23rd STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



MOSCHETTI BROS. 

Nick and Tony 
ALL TYPES OF USED CARS 



Phones: KEIlog 3-1066 and ANdover 1-8937 

2506-9 E- Uth STREET OAKLAND 



Compliments of 

MARTSOLF FURNITURE CO. 

KEIlog 2-3822 J. H. Martsolf 

3545 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



Dean Easterling 



Telephone TE. 4-9021 



EASTERLING MOTOR COMPANY 

AUTOMOBILES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
Best Deal In Town 

518 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



April, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



There were 49 traffic accidents and no fatalities. 

The four-man Atherton force was kept mighty busy 
in many ways other than arresting offenders. The patrol 
cars travelled 78,279 miles; 8600 telephone calls were 
received by the department and 4300 sent out. Over 
1200 persons were interviewed concerning crimes and 
2100 radio calls were received. Suspicious parked cars 
investigated called for looking into 437 such vehicles; 
two hundred homes were given police observation service 
while the tenants were away, a mighty good way to dis- 
courage burglars. Other activities ran from seven to four 
hundred, and all were given the closest attention. 

Twelve hundred letters were received and 740 sent 
out; police circulars received amounted to 988 and the 
Department dispatched 300. All point bulletins segre- 
gated and checked totalled 43,000, and entries in the 
daily bulletin were 6828, miscellaneous investigations 
amounted to over 1200 and 558 traffic citations were issued 
during the year. 

Compliments of 

KRAMER'S RESTAURANT 

WE NEVER CLOSE 

3301 EL CAMINO REAL ATHERTON. CALIF. 

MO'S CLAM POT 

Phone JU. 8-4753 
LOMITA PARK. CALIF. 



Ed Frederick 



KEUog 4-0206 



FREDERICK'S FURNITURE 



4120 MacARTHUR BLVD. 



OAKLAND 2. CALIF. 



TREASURE ISLAND 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

1793 Twelfth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



THE MASTERCRAFT COMPANY 

BUILDING REPAIRS 

Residences - Stores - Industrial Plants - Ranches 
Reconditionins - Alterations 

GENERAL HOME IMPROVEMENTS 



GLencourt 1-5951 
Cor. 4th Avenue & E 1 0th Street 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone GLencourt 1-6345 - 1-6346 



ANDKER-PETERSEN 

"The Home Chapel" 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



1443 FIFTH AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



WALTER W. ANDERSON CO. 



HUDSON DEALER 



ANdover 1-1313 



2901 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



Mike Quinn 



ANdover 1-9818 



QUINN'S GADGET SHOP 

SURPLUS EQUIPMENT 
MECHANICAL - ELECTRICAL - RADIO 

Have you a workshop? — Drop in and browse around 
Open Thursday evenings. 



2253 E. 14th STREET 



OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



Golden Highways to Wealth 
... a subject of conversation 
during the Centennial Year. 

1^ Start building your own 
Golden Highway by opening 
an account today with The 
San Francisco Bank. 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Incorporated Feb. 10, 1868 TRUST 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

SEVEJV OFFICES . . . EACH A COMPLETE BANK 




Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, J 948 



LOckhaven 9-6332 Res. LO. 8-8237 

GEORGE THOMAS AUTO SERVICE 

MOTOR REBUILDING - GENERAL REPAIRING 

5801 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2-9808 

DICK'S SHELL SERVICE 

WASHING - POLISHING - SHELL LUBRICATION 

MOTOR TUNE UP 

4300 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone LO. 8-4414 

ROY'S SEA FOODS 

FRESH FISH - SHELL FISH 

Direct from Fishermen to You 

FRESH KILLED POULTRY DAILY 

6524 FOOTHILL BLVD. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone LO. 9-63 77 

SEMINARY RECREATION 

CIGARS - CIGARETTES - BEER - SOFT DRINKS 
POOL AND SNOOKER 

5930 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Telephone HIgate 4-8311 1308 Broadway 

KAY JEWELRY COMPANY 

AMERICA'S LARGEST JEWELRY ORGANIZATION 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Telephone LOckhaven 8-0242 Sal Prunetti, Prop. 

PEACOCK CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE - GOOD FOOD 
9414 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone OLympic 2 8332 

L. J. KRUSE CO. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 



6247 COLLEGE AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



KRUGER & SONS 

Manufacturers of the Famous Silver Thread Brand Sauerkraut 

PICKLES - SYRUP - TOMATO PRODUCTS 

Telephone: HUmboldt 3-9116 

4053 EMERY STREET EMERYVILLE, CALIF. 



Telephone Piedmont 5-0258 



Al C. Weber 



PARAMOUNT ELECTRIC CO. . 

LIGHTING FIXTURES - REPAIR WORK 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 

4216 TELEGRAPH AVENUE OAKLAND 9, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 4-0115 

FRUITVALE SWEET SHOP 

FINE CANDY AND FOUNTAIN LUNCH 
3724 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2-9962 

PANDA ROOM 

for 
COCKTAILS 

327 1 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

GOLDEN WEST TAMALE PACKERS 

OLympic 3 4976 
3869 TELEGRAPH AVE. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

BOB INN 

EXCELLENT FOOD 
KEllog 3-1060 



John Milton 



JOHN MILTON 



KEllog 3-S42S 



"Serving You Since 1924" 

THIS TIME IT'S HUDSON 

3019 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND I, CALIFORNIA 

Phone AN. 1-0456 

FORTY-EIGHTH AVE. LIQUOR STORE 



LIQUOR 

4724 EAST 14th STREET 



WINE - BEER 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



LEE'S FINE FOODS 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE 



3710 EAST 14th ST 



Phone .\N. 1-S660 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



S. H. Sayre Phone KEllog 2-6821 

MELROSE DRUG STORE 



4584 EAST I4th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEllog 2-4944 

FRED R. BAMMANN 

BUILDERS AND GENERAL HARDWARE 
PAINTS - OILS - GLASS - FISHING TACKLE AND AMMUNITION 



4626-4632 EAST 14th STREET 



MELROSE (Oakland). CALIF. 



OAKLAND 



Compliments of 

B-B CLOTHIERS 

2297 East Foui^eenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone KEllog 2-6878 Established 1918 

E. W. BECKER 

JEWELRY AND WATCHES 

Authorized Watch Inspector Southern Pacific Lines 

Western Pacific Lines 

33 15 E. FOURTEENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Res. LAkehursl 2-2562 



Bus. Phone KEllog 4. 4892 



GOODMAN CATERING SERVICE 

RALPH GOODMAN 

Catering to Parties, Banquets and Barbecues 

Lodge and Church Dinners a Specialty 

1407 46th AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



DOCTOR FRANK LEIDT, D. C. 

Kflllog 4-0244 

3 700 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 

Phone KEllog 2 9748 

FRED'S DINER 

"THE BEST PLACE TO EAT" 
Open 24 Hours Daily 



2431 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Fruitvale's One-Stop Party Store 

We Carry the Finest Imported and Domestic Italian Delicacies 

WINE - BEER - WHISKEY 

NOVAK & FARRARI 



J242 EAST 14th STREET 



Phone KEllog 4-2020 



OAKLAND, CALIF, 



Chief of All Cleaners 
WEST COAST SOAP CO. 

OAKLAND 7, CALIFORNIA 



CRIM'S CABARET & DINER 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



3320 FOOTHILL BLVD. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 7315 MacARTHUR BLVD. 



TRinidad 2-9922 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Tel. Piedmont 5-9334 



HOGAN LUMBER CO. 

MILLWORK - SASH AND DOORS 

Wholesale and Retail 

Second and Alice Streets 
OAKLAND 4. CALIFORNIA 



MIDWAY INN 

HOME OF CHOICE LIQUOR AND FOODS 



3607 MARKET STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



THE BLACK GLOVE RAPIST 

(Continued from page 14) 

As one or more of the descriptions received indicated 
the suspect might be a Latin type, the inspectors visited at 
various times all Filipino, Spanish, Mexican and Italian 
restaurants and dancehalls throughout the city. 

Hospitals near which the suspect had operated were 
carefully checked, the Inspectors feeling he might have 
some minor employment in one or other of these institu- 
tions, and possibly be an exArmy or Navy disabled veteran. 

The seven day a week sure fire conversation in penitenti- 

GLENN'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



W. H. GLENN 
1100 EAST EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



William E. McGrath Phone Piedmont S-7262 

McGRATH STEEL COMPANY 

REINFORCING STEEL • WIRE MESH 
665 5 HOLLIS STREET EMERYVILLE 8. CALIF. 



EMERSON'S EAGLE PHARMACY 

"The Drug Store of Friendly Service" 

Phone KEIIog 2-7202 

4701 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

LITTLE GRASS SHACK 



John Jeep 



5860 FOOTHILL BLVD. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone TRinidad 2-9964 Rodriguez, Prop. 

EL RANCHO MARKET 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - WINE - BEER 
9818 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone LAkehurst 2-0696 POTATO CHIPS 

PARTY FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

FRESH - TASTE - QUALITY 

Jose Totorica 

2318 CLE.MENT .A\ ENLE OAKLAND. CALIF. 

RAMBLE INN 

HOME COOKING -::- SANDWICHES 
QUICK LUNCHES 

8101 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND 



PARSONS MEAT CO. 

TEmplebar 4-9313 
1003 EIGHTH A\ ENLE OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



Lee Thrapp 



SWeetwood 8-6332 



SAN LEANDRO UPHOLSTERY 



271 DAS'IS STREET 



SAN LE.ANDRO 



Come to the 

COOLIDGE RESTAURANT 

For GOOD FOOD 
3260 FOOTHILL OAKLAND, CALIF. 



John R. Torchio 



GLencourt 1-3272 



BRAKE LINING SERVICE COMPANY 

■Oakland's Ptor.cer Brake Shop" 
BRAKES - BRAKE LINING - WHEEL ALIGNING ' 
2344 \S-EBSTER STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



MOOR E'S 

THE SPORTSMAN CLUB 



1194 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 



A. L. Warmington 



SWeetwood 8-1600 



STAR MARINE ENGINE WORKS 



851 98th AVENUE 



OAKLAND 3. CALIF. 



HENRY E. SPITZ 

JEWELER 

WATCH REPAIRING 

Telephone KEIIog 2-8572 

3236 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 

Phone LO. 8-8085 



Ernest Manning 



TRUCKS FOR RENT— ^4.00 per day 



/40I EAST Mth STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



SUPERIOR FRENCH LAUNDRY 

HIgate 4-0645 

MENDING DONE. SOCKS DARNED. BUTTONS SEWED ON 

FREE OF CHARGE ON FINISHED AND 

POUND FINISHED WORK 



ALLEN GROCERY 

1410 ADELINE STREET 



OAKLAND 



BENGOR— Candies 



5351-53-55 BOND STREET 



OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



SWAN PHARMACY 

SPECIALISTS IN HERBS AND HERB 
REMEDIES FOR SO YEARS 

4 7 EIGHTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

NEW AND USED OAK BARRELS - CORKS - CROCKS 
MALT SYRUPS - WINE MAKING SUPPLIES 

J & J LIQUOR STORE & CIDER SHOP 



12 04 FRUITVALE A\ENL"E 



The Depot of All Wines 
Phone KEIIog 2-8024 



OAKLAND 1, CALIF. 



Telephone LAkehurst 2-2388 Wm. G. Stage, Prop. 

STAGE HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE, HOUSEHOLD AND 

SPORTING GOODS 

1334 PARK STREET ALAMEDA. CALIFORNIA 



Bill Davis 



Phone LAkehurst 2-8721 



Foster Davis 



PARK LIQUORS 

ALAMEDA'S FRIENDLY LIQUOR STORE 
1508 4 PARK STREET .ALAMEDA. CALIF. 

J. A. Sabatte Telephone OLympic 2-9924 

SOUTH BERKELEY CREAMERY 

SERVING EAST BAY SINCE 1910 
4;th AND SAN PABLO O.AKL.AND 8. CALIFORNIA 

GLencourt 1-8008 

ACME MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 
QUALITY MEATS AND POULTRY 

902 WASHINGTON STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

Phone TW'inoaks 3-9634 

Beck Refrigeration Engineering 

COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION SERVICE 
SALES • SERVICE • INSTALLATION 



2212 POPLAR STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



2203 EIGHTH ANENUE 



OAKLAND 2. CALIF. 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



ary institutions concerns bigger and better and more care- 
fully planned crimes on being free again; our state records 
do show a very large percentage of so-called "repeaters." 
First-time convicts blame their initial incarceration on their 
own carelessness or on the stupidity or disloyalty of their 
pal or pals; but next time things will be entirely different — 
no pals, and, of course, a quite different routine! This fact 
was our San Francisco Police Department's great break in 
the case of our Black Glove Rapist. 

His M. O. indicated he was eminently "con wise" — but 
his own words did betray him, as we shall see. 

The author of the saying about there being many a slip 
twixt the cup and the lip really had something. Had the 
entire group of the inmates of our California penitentiaries 
been born dumb and had they not learned to write, one 
small penitentiary would suffice for this great state. Yes, 
criminals, no matter how clever, do talk, and do say the 
wrong thing — just as our Black Glove Rapist did. He said 
just four words. These four words started a forest fire 
around him from which he was gleefully taken alive by the 
San Francisco Police Department. 

Our Inspectors pounced on the information he gave in 
four words to the last of his outraged victims. Hardly had 
the lady finished the short four-word sentence before one 
of our state penitentiary photo files was being raced 
through for a parolee that would fit the description of our 
local master criminal. 

Actually while prison photographs were being checked 
for parolees of the type of the rapist his victim gave a 
description of him which virtually tallied with the one the 
inspectors had just brought from the state prison: "Maroon 
eyes, jet black hair, dark complexion, 160 lbs., 6 ft., 2 in." 

The all-out Police Department hunt for the rapist was 
now at top tension. Each and every amusement resort, 
creameries, all pool halls and taverns, was again combed 
for the much wanted bad man. An address on 24th street 
was said to be his residence, if the man the Inspectors sus- 
pected was the culprit. 

The Inspectors went to that address and a young woman 
stated her husband's name was Frank Alvarez; that he had 

MELROSE FOOD SHOP 



BEER - WINES - GROCERIES 



43 1 I EAST Ulh STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Phone KEIlog 3-7462 



George Stinger, Prop. 



ACME PIANO SHOP 



(F.iriiurly with rlilrk.Tlug, Kiial).*, 

TUNING - REPAIRING - 

1545 EAST 14th STREET 



Ma^c.n ii )ln>iillnl 
REFINISHING 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BUNGALOW FIXTURE CO. 



5230 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



HlKote 4.0975: 4-0976 

OAKLAND DISTRIBUTING CO. 

LIQUORS - CIGARS - TOBACCO 

120 ELEVENTH STREET OAKLAND 



MANHATTAN CLUB 



Jimmie Dugan 



3332 GRAND AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Telephone OLympic 2-7887 

THE WAXINATE COMPANY 

(A California Corporation) 

For All Types of Floors 

Use "WAXINATE", Self Polishing, Waterproof, Liquid Wax 

1525 POWELL STREET OAKLAND 8. CALIF. 

GLencourl 1-1889; Res. Hlgate 4-5089 S. Hanzel 

HANZEL AUTO BODY WORKS 

TOPS - PAINTING - TOWING - RADIATORS - FENDERS 
A COMPLETE COLLISION SERVICE 

456 23rd St.. Bet. Broadway and Telegraph OAKLAND, CALIF. 



O. MAZURETTE 

ENGINEERING COMPANY 



5 76 FIFTH STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



Always a Friendly Welcome 

AL AND ED'S LUNCH 

KEllog 4-5922 

SANDWICHES -::- HAMBURGERS 

2141 23rd AVENUE OAKLAND, CALIF. 

STONE BROS. 

HOME FURNISHINGS 
Telephone AShberry 3-7113 

2484 SHATTUCK AVENUE BERKELEY 4. CALIFORNIA 

MILLER & WARNECKE 

ARCHITECTS 

1700 Financial Center Building OAKLAND 12, CALIF. 

GEO. V. ARTH AND SON 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE AND PAINTING 

Fender, Radiator Work, Repairing and Reconditioning Wrecked Cart 

Telephone TEmplebar 4-9622 

1025 EAST 12th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Receivers and Distributors 

FARMERS' PRODUCE CORPORATION 

WHOLESALE FRUITS AND PRODUCE 
Telephone Hlgate 4-6305 

423 SECOND STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

M. J. Vayssie, Manager Phone Hlgate 4-3080 

HOTEL ROYAL 



SAN PABLO AT 2 0th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



B. R. Smout 



B. L. Smout 



WESTERN CASKET COMPANY 



3300 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND 1 I. CALIFORNIA 



Oakland's Oldest and Largest Factory to You 

KAY CHESTERFIELD MFG. CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DESIGNERS 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 

Phone KEllog 3-5565 

5424 34 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND 1. CALIF. 



FRESHWAY NUT CO. 



Phone KEllog 4-5366 



5 107 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Vitamins Minerals Endocrines Special Formulae 

John M. Henderson Company, Inc. 

HAVE YOU SEEN YOUR 
CHIROPRACTIC DOCTOR? 

Virgil Suttman LOckhaven 9-6923 

6005 E. 14th STREET OAKLAND 3. CALIF. 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 43 



not yet returned from work. While the Inspectors were 
asking questions of the young lady someone in the rear of 
the house asked her who was visiting her, and on she rC' 
plying — "the police" — there was an instant scurrying of 
feet down the back stairs. Frank Alvarez was gone! 

The young lady then informed the Inspectors that she 
knew he had had some trouble with the police; that about 
February 4th, he had come home with a bullet wound in 
his left ankle; that she personally took care of that wound. 

For blocks, in the vicinity of the 24th street address the 
basements, stairs, roofs, shrubs, trees and garages were 
searched for Alvarez, and at 8:50 A. M., the following day 
he was found by officers Moran, Hess and Demartini hid- 
ing under an automobile at 1008 Treat Avenue. 

At the Hall of Justice, inside of a couple of hours, no 
less than seven of his women victims positively identified 
him. Sergeant Leen Davis, of the Auxiliary Police Re- 
serve, also identified him as the man whom he had shot, 
at the scene of a "prowler call," from 3434 Sacramento 
Street, on February 3rd, 1947, when he and Reserve Offi- 
cer Al Weil responded to a case on that date. 

For their eminently successful efforts in bringing to jus- 
tice one of San Francisco's most hateful criminals, and 
presenting enough definite evidence against him to secure 
his conviction on several crimes, for which he received a 
maximum penitentiary sentence of four hundred and forty 
years, the Police Commissioners awarded Meritorious 
Public Service to: Lloyd Kelly, Eugene Atkinson, Frank 
Baroni and John W. Breen of the Inspectors" Bureau, un- 
der the Rules and Regulations of the police department. 

To his last victim he mentioned Chino. The Inspectors 
pounced on that information. They had their man! 

Now, Chino, California, is a state penal institution. A 
"repeater,"" the detail surmised — and evidently a pyscho- 
pathic case, too; they were correct! He had been a sex case 
and was on parole from Chino. 

In the home of his last victim he remarked, pointing to 
a framed picture: "That looks like Chino."" These four 
words casually spoken by this clever archfiend, sealed his 
fate. His tireless pursuers were instantly ready for the kill. 
■ His very latest victim, to whom he had made the remark 
about the picture on the wall, positively identified pictures 
of her brutal attacker, whose careless remark was the cause 
of ending forever his ruthless criminal career. 

Yes, it is true indeed — our penal institutions are crowd- 
ed with people who "talked" themselves behind those mas- 
sive stone and concrete walls. 



BILL and AILEEN 



Phone KEllos 2-9964 



JIMMIE'S COFFEE SHOP 

THE BEST STEAKS AND CHOPS IN TOWN 

3801 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



TEmplebar 2-6704 



OAKLAND 



HARRY MILLER 

TAILOR 
300 Thirteenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



KEIlog 4-S977 Bert De Lowe 

MELROSE DEPARTMENT STORE 

DRESSES - UNGERIE - HOSIERY - MEN'S WEAR 
4578 EAST i4th STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



CLencourt 1-5 128 



Res. TEmplebar 2-9026 



PARKER AND SCOTT 



REALTORS 

42 7 GRAND AVE., Grand Lake District 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



KEIlog 2-6061 

A R T H U R'S 

ENCHILADAS, CHILI CON CARNE. SPANISH BEANS 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



4533 EAST 14th STREET 



Phone ANdover 1-0763 Codiga Brothers 

MELROSE SAW WORKS 

LOCKSMITH AND KEY WORK 

Lawn Mowers and Tools Sharpened - Filing and Grinding 

All Work Guaranteed at Reasonable Prices 

4430 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



INSURANCE 



FRANCES BEARDEN 



INCOME TAX 



REALTOR 

ANdover 1-1171 :: Res. TR. 2-5688 

4428 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND 1. CALIFORNIA 

BOB'S AUTO SERVICE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIR - MOTOR REBUILDING 

Phone ANdover 1-98S4 

3 105 EAST 14th STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 

MRS. J. NOGUE FRENCH LAUNDRY 



Phone KEIlog 2-0 738 



3018 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 



OAKLAND I, CALIF. 



MEET 

THE MUG 

Carrara & Adragna, Props. 
WHERE GOOD FRIENDS GATHER 

7th and Washington, N. E. Corner OAKLAND, CALIF. 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 

JAMES H. SMITH 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
SEWER CONTRACTING 



HIgate 4-1286 



612 ALICE STREET 



OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 



EAST BAY BLUE PRINT & SUPPLY CO. 

Authorized Distributor for 

KEUFFEL & ESSER CO., of N. Y. 

Complete Reproduction Service - Architects* and Engineers* Supplies 

Phone HIgate 4-8001 1723 Franklin Street, Oakland 12, Calif. 



BARR BROS. CO. 



Established 1873 
MAKERS OF EDGED TOOLS - DROP FORGINGS - CUTLERY 

Rear 540 FALLON STREET OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 

TEmplebar 2-3020 

HUBBARD AUTO PARTS 

GATKE BRAKE LINING - DIT2XER PAINTS - PEDRICK RINGS 
BORG WARNER PRODUCTS 

282 2 GROVE STREET OAKLAND 9. CALIF. 



ROBERTS' USED CARS 

A-l CARS 



PARAMOUNT 
BUILT-IN FIXTURE CO. 



J. D. ROBERTS 

201 Isleton Ave. 
SWeetwood 8-524 7 



9772 EDES AVE. 
OAKLAND 
LO. 8-4121 



5107 BROADWAY 



Phone Piedmont 5-8400 

OAKLAND II. CALIF. 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



BRADY 8C DOWLING 

2737 Mission Street 



STERLING ENGRAVING CO. 



1025 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



THE FLY TRAP 



73 Sutter Street 



THE VALLEY PACKING ASSOCIATION 



64 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



WAInut 1-9987 Henry Y. Fong, Prop. 

SANI-WAY MARKET 

GROCERIES • VEGETABLES 

BEER • WINE 

1862 DIVIS ADERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

RUTH'S FOUNTAIN LUNCH 



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 



JOrdan 7-9985 



601 DIVISADERO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WAInut 1-9873 Open 10 A.M. 'Til 11:45 P.M. 

Ko-Ket Sweet Shop and Fountain Lunch 

Perry E. Danley, Prop. 

SANDWICHES THAT YOU WILL LIKE 

624 DIVISADERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 17. CALIF. 

Phone WAlnul 1-9896 

KENNEL CLUB 

YOU ARE A STRANGER BUT ONCE 



Ralph Fasano 

and 
John Busterno 



800 Divisadero Street 
Corner Fulton 
San Francisco 



WEst 1-3975 D. Belcasto, Prop. 

HOME CASH MARKET 

groceries - meats - vegetables 

beer- wines - liquors 

1901 McAllister street san francisco 

Phone WAInut I-7747 

NORMAN'S FOOD SHOP 

groceries - meats - liquors 

1700 HAYES street SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone EVergreen 6-9790 Joseph Dingman, Prop. 

FULTON FOOD SHOP 

1801 FULTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Fillmore 6-5634 L. C. Davidson, Owner 

RITZ CLEANERS & DYERS 

ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS 
CALL and DELIVER 

1480 FULTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

"FOOD YOU'LL ENJOY'" 

HARRY'S WAGON 

(Open All Night) 
192! POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Les Matsumura WAInut 1-9702 

LES' MOBILGAS STATION 

WASHING • GREASING - POLISHING - REPAIRS 

BUSH AND STEINER STREETS SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

LAMBERT REALTY CO. 



BETH PAYNE 
GRayslone 4-5448 
Residence Phone 



343 O'Farrell Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

ORdway 3-9705 



ZINKE'S SHOE REPAIRING 



50 Geary Street 



162 I Telegraph Ave. 
OAKLAND 



I 183 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



I 1 05 K Street 
SACRAMENTO 



263 7 Mission Street 



296 S. 2nd Street 
SAN JOSE 



EXbrook 2-0682 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE SCHOONER 

Geo. Karavas Bros. 
233 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



WEST COAST LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



605 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



UNderhill I -7 16 I 



R. J. LEAHY CO. 



BRASS, COPPER, BRONZE AND NICKEL SILVER PRODUCTS 
SHEET, ROD, WIRE, TUBE, RIVETS, WIRE CLOTH, ETC. 



468 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SPOKANE INN 



348 Drumm Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone ORdway 3-S636 REASONABLE RATES 

HOTEL ELM 

ATTRACTIVE HOME LIKE - LARGE LOBBY 

DOWN TOWN LOCATION 

364 EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



EXbrook 2-8143 



FRANK KARP 



APPRAISER 
DIAMONDS AND PRECIOUS STONES 

133 KEARNY STREET. Room 20! SAN FRANCISCO 



Nerii Brothers 



DOuglas 2-5290 



GRANUCCI HARDWARE COMPANY, Inc. 

Established 1902 



2 14 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO II. CALIF. 



WM. F. ROSE 

ATTORNEY 
220 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



T. W. G. 



Phone HEmlock 1-6484 

FAIRWAY FOOD CENTER 

GROCERIES - FRUITS- VEGETABLES - MEATS - POULTRY 

WINES AND BEER 

2905 SIXTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone VAIencia 4-9620 

BLUE BIRD CAFE 

ITALIAN DINNERS AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
TASTY FOODS 

3 149 TWENTY-SECOND ST. SAN FRANCISC O, CALIF. 

Announcing Our New Location 

BEDINI BROS. 

Phone VAIencia 4-5154 

Reconditioning of 

DRUMS - PAILS - CONTAINERS 

BOUGHT AND SOLD 

1212 THOMAS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 24, CALIF. 



April, 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 4S 



HOWARD'S SEARLE'S CORNER 

FOR SMARTEST CLOTHES NiCK SEARLE, Mgr. 

No Extra Charges on Howard's 10 Pay Plan _ „ c 

920 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



r>r.TryAr.r^ * -VTr^ xt-z-vt tivt/^ Telephone SUtter 1-2861 

BRIZARD AND YOUNG FIDELITY AND DEPOSIT COMPANY 

SHEET METAL PRODUCTS OF MARYLAND 

FIDELITY AND SURETY BONDS 
72 Tehama Street BURGLARY AND GLASS INSURANCE 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA Financial Center Building SAN FRANCISCO 4, CALIF. 



CHRISTOPHE'S SOLARIS GRILL 

RECORDS - RADIOS - MUSIC ,^^ _ .. , 

AND REPAIRS ^^ ^"•>' ^"■"' 

2388 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

WAYNE R. MILLINGTON ™'''°"' "''"""AnxTno at ctcu r^r^ 

GENERAL FISH CO. 

703 Market Street PRODUCERS - WHOLESALERS 

535 Washington Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA P.O.Box 2143 SAN FRANCISCO 26. CALIf. 



Compliments of STARLIGHT FURNITURE COMPANY 

■^ . FOR YOUR FURNITURE NEEDS 

C. C. S. 2211 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



GLENDALE HOTEL SOMERTON HOTEL 

183 Valencia Street " 440 Geary Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



NEW VICTORY COFFEE SHOP '"^^ ^^^'^ "^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^ 

88 Seventh Street FINEST AMERICAN AND CHINESE FOOD 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 35,7 jOth STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

FULTON INN HOTEL AUBURN 

ALWAYS A FRIENDLY WELCOME 

481 Minna Street 
1751 Fulton Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



VENETIAN BAKING CO. ^"""^ ''^'■''^' ''"" ■ ^- ''""' 

HOTEL ODEON 

2200 Powell Street „ , „ ... . „ ,^ 

40 Seventh Street, near Market, opposite Postomce 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA sAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ST. JULIEN RESTAURANT MOLONY'S PHARMACY 

140 Battery Street WILLIAM M. HERBANK 

„ . ,_ Sixteenth and Guerrero Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA sAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ST. JOHN APTS. MARINA BOWL 

BUFFET LUNCH 
John D. Cordoni, Prop. 



1625 Polk Street 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA ^^^^ FILBERT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



KING HOTEL PARIS HOTEL 

44 Third Street 348 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA sAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



MANITOBEAN SOCIAL CLUB ^^""^ ''°"^'^' ^-'^'^ ""• BurHngame 34335 

,,««MAnt <;. t DAVID B. HILL SEED CO. 

1188 McAllister Street 

DAVID B. HILL 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 535 DAVIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO II, CALIF. 



LATEST MODEL TRUCKS AND CARS FOR RENT 
Pickups - Stakes - Vans - Station Wagons - Semi-Trailers 
^, — » .-^.».-.. -r.^ -w -.^^^■^■rr^ . t * Passenger Cars — LOW RENTAL RATES 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL Hour - Day . Week - Month - Year 

Telephone MArket 1-1008 
3700 California Street 

California Truck Rental Company 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 1127 Mission Street, between 7th and 8th Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

(. 
J 

i 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



PROFESSIONAL POLICE SERVICE 

( Continued from page 1 2) 

costly "buck-passing" goes on not only between neighbor- 
ing cities, but also between counties and states in a patch- 
work sieve of inefficiency through which the criminal 
slips, easily. 

Occasional and unrelated "clean-up drives" are con- 
ducted in various municipalities, which only serve to dis- 
perse the undesirables elsewhere, like the slovenly house- 
keeper who "tidies-up" the kitchen by sweeping the dirt 
into the dining room. Integration here is much needed 
in the shape of state legislation, and at least some form 
of over-all control which will serve to unite all of these 
divided groups into closer harmony. As far as communi- 
cations systems are concerned, many of those necessary 
for adequate coverage already exist, only requiring to be 
amplified, coordinated, and administered through a more 
effective chain of command. But all this, too, will re- 
quire education. 

Furthermore, in spite of the obvious excellence of a 
scientific police system, there are many who have yet to 
be converted. The ill-informed cling to their out-moded 
methods, and in many cities it still is the wholly-matter- 
of-fact custom to choose men for the police service at 
random. Even when stipulations do exist, they will, in 
all probability, specify only that the applicant be over 25 
and under 35 years of age, stand over 5 feet 9 inches, 
and weigh at least 150 pounds. He may or may not be 
expected to have a high school education. These "qual- 
ifications" may differ slightly in various localities, but 
with even the most "discriminating," they are considered 
ample, usually. 

After being chosen, this promising young "Nemesis of 
Crime" here is officially made a member of the force in an 
"induction ceremony" that is beautiful in its simplicity. 
He is furnished with a badge, and a key to the "call 
boxes" — he will have been required to buy his own re- 
volver and uniform, and even his own handcuffs, possibly. 
He will be informed as to where he will be expected to 
patrol, and finally loosed upon an unsuspecting public, 
with no more pre-service instruction than possibly a sage 
warning from the broad wisdom of some superior, to 
"Take it easy, and keep out of trouble until you learn 
your way around!" 

Phone sutler I- 1847 

MAC NICOL AND CO. 

SERVICE CONTRACTORS - CERTIFIED PUBLIC WEIGHMASTERS 

WEIGHING - STRAPPING - STENCILING - RECONDITIONING 

LABELING - FORWARDING 

PIER NO. 5 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

DOuglas 2-3880 CArfield 1-9374 

THE PLAZA FLORISTS 



Avansino Bros, and Co. 
•SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 



404 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



EXbrook 2 0805 



suiter 1-5274 



CALIFORNIA VULCAN MACARONI CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



44S Drumm Streel at Paci6c 



SAN FRANCISCO DUPLICATING CO. 

Incorporated 



26 OTARRELL STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone CArfield 1-8332 

DEANS AND HOMER 

INSURANCE GENERAL AGENTS 

340 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 4. CALIF. 

LANDIS AND COTTLE 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 
Telephone DOuglas 2-6947 - 2-694« 



369 PINE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone CArfield 1-0306 

BEIER AND GUNDERSON CO. 

NEW AND USED OFFICE FURNITURE 
7 7 BATTERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

ST. JULIEN RESTAURANT 



140 Battery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAINT MORITZ 

530 Broadway 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Tel. ORdway 3-4230 PENINSULA SERVICE 

HIGH GRADE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Bourdet and Castagne, Prop. 
LACES AND LACES CURTAINS A SPECIALTY 

1558 BUSH ST.. near Van Ness Ave. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

ROSSI AND COMPANY 



627 Vallejo Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



1790 JACKSON APARTMENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone MArket 1-4422 

MISSION HOTEL 

300 MODERN, SUNNY ROOMS 
520 Van Ness Ave. South 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone PR. 5-0355 



THE CLARK HOTEL 



ISO NEWLY FURNISHED ROOMS 
ALL BATHS OR CONNECTION 



217 EDDY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE TRAP 

COCKTAILS 
133 Turk Street 



CALIFORNIA 



WAInut 1-875 7 



SAN FRANCISCO 



KARL'S SHOE STORE 

1527 Fillmore Street 



CALIFORNIA 



PALACE GARDEN 

LUNCH AND SHORT ORDERS 
CRYSTAL MARKET 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 47 



Now, Mr. Taxpaying Citizen, be honest with yourself. 
Would you be perfectly satisfied to have such a tragically 
unfitted and unprepared person as your sole dependence 
in some emergency when it might be that your life was 
at stake? At best, the police officer might be an acquaint- 
ance — he could be a close friend, who would do all in his 
power to help you. But even his supreme effort might not 
be good enough. He might not he trained to furnish the 
kind of help you most needed. 

At least for the moment, let us forget the assumed 
"infallibility" of all police officers. Let us consider this 
matter fairly and logically. If he were not a good surgeon, 
you would not blindly trust your acquaintance, or even 
your closest friend, to perform an operation for the re- 
moval of your appendix; and common sense insists that 
no more could you expect the same wholly-unfitted ac- 
quaintance or friend to serve you well in some other 
grave crisis demanding the ultimate skill of a highly 
trained specialist. And in addition, the chances are that 
the callow rookie patrolman would be a total stranger. 

The position of law enforcement in the United States 
today is curious, to say the least, in view of what is ex- 
pected of peace officers, and the unreason of such expecta- 
tions. The credulity of popular opinion in this matter 
is amazing. 

In our complex social system, it is plain that efficiently 
conducted law enforcement is a highly specialized pro- 
fession. But, unfortunately, at the present time, there 
are but few highly specialized professionals enforcing the 
law. This is regrettable, but by no means hopeless. When 
the American public has been made to realize that com- 
petent performance can be expected only from competent 
persons, popular demand will raise the standards for 
selectees in police service. This, however, is not the only 
requirement. As already pointed out, many more educa- 
tional programs must be set up which will provide enough 
suitable men when they are needed. Police education 
must be placed on a nation-wide basis; full-time courses 
in police-science training must be made a part of all up- 
to-date teaching programs in America. 

It is probable that no enterprise exists with more diversi- 
fied demands than those in police work. During today's 
routine of law-enforcement activities, the police officer, at 
one time or another, will be expected to perform duties 
in every department of human effort. Obviously, the 

BAY SHELL CO- 

S03 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BEAR PHOTO SERVICE 



330 Grove Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL GOVERNOR 



Turk at Jones Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 

ROMA MACARONI CO. 



199 Francisco Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC SHOE CO. 



451 Washington Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone ORdway 3-2265 

DI MAGGIO'S RESTAURANT 

FISHERMAN'S WHARF 
LUNCH AND DINNERS DAILY 

POTTERY CLASSES OUTSIDE FIRING 

NIXON CRAFT STUDIOS 

Phone EXbrook 2-3474 
531 DAVIS ST. at PACIFIC SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

General Insurance Co. of America 



206 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



VENETIAN BAKING CO. 



Powell Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



EX. 2-1534 HOT WATER - SHOWERS 

ALBION HOTEL 

WORKINGMEN - SEAMEN 
25 CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

NEWBERRY'S 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

GRAYSON'S 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



FRANKLIN HOTEL 



Fourteenth and .Noe 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN GATE SAUSAGE CO. 



3 04 Davis Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ROBINS HOTEL 



71 I Post Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GLENDALE GUEST HOUSE 

$14.50 WEEK, MEALS, RECREATION HALL INCLUDED 

960 Haight Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO. 

MORCK BRUSH DIVISION 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



efficiency with which these duties are discharged, and 
the consequent quahty of service rendered, will depend 
upon the officer's ability and training. And this fact gains 
added importance, since the final issue frequently will be 
a matter of life or death. 

To be successful, the police scientist, like any other, 
must understand crime's factors, causes, symptoms and 
solutions. Such competence is not acquired casually. 
Furthermore, despite his qualifications, even the trained 
expert is confronted with a public which does not under- 
stand his problems nor share his enthusiasms. Obviously, 
in order to effect any general improvement, it will be 
necessary not only to educate the police officer, but also to 
educate the public as well. To many peace officers, all 
this is an old story, and we ponder the solution. It re- 
quires a deal of crusading to arouse public consciousness 
from its habitual lethargy. Nevertheless, such a crusade 
is being conducted by many of the more dynamic leaders 
in our field, especially in California, and it is possible to 
report considerable progress. 

Primarily, however, our program of education must be 
directed at the police officer. An educated person has 
been described as one who knows everything about some- 
thing, and something about everything. This is especially 
desirable in police service, as well attested by the highly 
specialized demands now made on the officer in police 
science. Foreign and domestic research in delinquenc>i 
has long since proven that effective crime prevention must 
start with the juvenile. "Behavior problems" are far 
more difficult than the most puzzling cases encountered in 
the medical field. Coordinating councils, child-guidance 
centers, parental schools, adult education, public-relations 
work, and many other excellent measures can be made 
to play a vital part in crime prevention. Yet, with little 
or no scientific training in the fundamentals of crime con- 
trol, the peace officer, even with the best of intentions, 
can do little more than falter when faced with this prob- 
lem—a problem that concerns every person in America. 

Narcotics, gambling, prostitution and all other forms of 
vice are a large and constant source of difficulty, and 
any attempt at suppression or removal must be intelligent 
and scientific if it hopes to succeed. 

Industrial and social friction in the form of labor 
troubles, race riots, and all similar disturbances, which 
have become more common during the current conditions 
of unrest, are a high responsibility on those who are sworn 
to the protection of life and property, and the preserva- 
tion of the peace. In the past, incipient bickerings have 
flared into large and bloody conflict as a result of some 
over-zealous or ill-timed act on the part of the police. 
Many such tragedies could have been averted, or mini- 
mized, by more tactful and suitably trained personnel. 

The educated and trained officer will note and evaluate 
both major and minor details. He will recognize, classify, 
and employ that which the uninitiated may not even see, 
nor could appreciate if he did. The uninformed indi- 
vidual could not be expected to realize the importance 
of all the specialized or less obvious factors of a situation. 



M. Barasch ^ MilUrd 

B & M AUTO SEAT COVERS 



400 So. Van Ness at 15th 
Phone UNderhill 1-9744 



READY TO INSTALL - TAILORED 
Wholesale and Retail 



13 54 Post Street 
PRospect 5-4512 



WEst 1-0828 Established 1898 

PIERCE-RODOLPH STORAGE CO., Ltd. 

UNITED VAN LINES, Inc. YELLOW VAN CO. 

John S. Currie, General Manager 

1450 EDDY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone: ORdway 3-5124 - 3-5 125 

JACK RANIS AUTO METAL 'WORKS 

RADIATOR, FENDER AND BODY REPAIRING 
LACQUER REFINISHING 

163 4-1644 PINE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone ORdway 3-1261 

A. RAMAZZOTTI 

REGISTERED PLUMBER - JOBBING AND CONTRACTING 
ESTIMATES GIVEN - ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

1473 Vallejo Street, Between Polk and Larkin ^„„,. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



KUNST BROTHERS 



419 Bayshore Blvd. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1033 Mission Street 

CALIFORNIA 



PAGE'S CLUBS 



800 So. Van Ness Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



2531 24th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone HEmlock 1-5567 

GRANZ AND ERMANN 

FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY AND APPLIANCES 
228 Fillmore Street, near Haight Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

PATRONIZE 

SHUMATE'S PHARMACY, Inc. 

Stores Conveniently Located Throughout San Francisco. 

Look For Your Nearest Shumate Store. 

SPECIAL PRICES TO MEMBERS S. F. P. D. 



Phone VA 4-5506 

ST. FRANCIS FOUNTAIN 

HOME MADE CANDY - ICE CREAM - LIGHT LUNCHES 
2801 Twenty-fourth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

BILTMORE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

3469-71 Eighteenth Street, between Mission and Valencia 
Phone MArket 1-1672 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone ATwater 2-5737 

JOSEPH'S 

MEN'S SMART FURNISHINGS 
SLACKS AND SPORTWEAR - PHOENIX HOSIERY 

2 3 76 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

R. MOHR AND SONS 

883 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

O. CASPERSON AND SONS 

BUTTERCUP BUTTER CASPERSON EGGS 

TOPS IN QUALITY 

340 NINTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



THE MOTH 8C FLAME 

1400 California Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



whereas the man who knows the science of his profession 
builds upon his knowledge for success. 

These are some of the reasons why the requirements in 
police work demand scientific training. With considera- 
tion of only a few of the many duties in modern law en- 
forcement, it is self-evident that the American police 
service is in urgent need of professionals. However, little 
betterment can be expected until radical changes have 
been made in our present police system. To be competent, 
the future police officer must be trained and educated; nor 
must that training and education be left to hit-or-miss 
lessons from experience. It must be formal, pre-employ- 
ment, college training in police science, for, like the ig- 
noramus attempting an appendix operation, the untrained 
officer will be certain to fail disastrously in high require- 
ment. Lacking aptitude, he will be irresolute when a 
second's delay spells calamity. Untrained as an investi- 
gator, he will overlook, damage, or even destroy vital 
CMdeace. And with human life in peril, his tragic bungling 
luay cause death. 

Let us suppose, for the sake of argument, that all of 
the physicians and surgeons in America were replaced 
by ordinary persons with no medical training, and with 
no promise of improvement save the hope of developing 
the needful skill through "experience." The utter chaos 
which would result has its counterpart in the American 
police service as it is today, wherein the only training ever 
acquired by a large majority of police officers is their own 
experience after appointment. 

True, it would be unfair to belittle the virtues of prac- 
tical experience, but it still is plain that few policemen, 
regardless of their length of service, could expect to come 
into informative contact with all of the experience neces- 
sary to provide a liberal education in every phase of law 
enforcement. 

These are some of the reasons why the criminal is still 
victorious in America — why crime costs are soaring to 
fantastic heights — and why you and I, and all other 
American citizens, are in danger of being numbered 
among crime's victims. Obviously, the solution of a 
problem so complex will require several lines of action; 
but it also is plain that no other single strategy could 
have such a profound effect upon crime reduction as 
that of elevating the American police to a recognized 
profession ; but in order to do this, as earlier pointed out, 
an important job will be to "sell" the general public on 
the idea. In this connection, there need be no concern 
about the possibility of added expense in taxes. On the 
contrary, with professionals enforcing the law, the saving 
in crime-cost reduction promises ample margin for this 
and for many other constructive purposes, as logic can 
readily understand. 

In simple terms, the problem can be solved by a three- 
point program: (1) education of the general public to 
demand better law enforcement; (2) suitable state and 
national legislation fixing higher requirements and sal- 
aries, coordinating law enforcement, and standardizing the 
requirements for all selectees in the law-enforcement field; 
(3) and finally, amplification of the educational facilities. 



WILKINS LIQUOR STORE 



3273 Sacramento Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



West 1-3124 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone WEst 1-9952 

CALIFORNIA WINES - GOLD BEER 

LEXINGTON MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - CHICKENS 
VEGETABLES - FRUITS IN SEASON 

2 79 1 BUSH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone WE 1-3952 



RELIANCE MARKET 

1919 McAllister Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone EVergreen 6-9723 G. C. Thomasson, MgT. 

HOTEL CLEMENT 

OUTSIDE ROOMS - REASONABLE PRICES 

524 CLEMENT STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone BA 1-5S17 P. A. Garcia, Prop. 

INDEPENDENT MEXICO CITY CAFE 

WE SPECIALIZE IN MEXICAN DISHES 
Op?n 11:30 A.M. to 8 P.M. Closed Mondays 

1792 Haight Street SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phon; MArket 1-2377 

THE CHERRY BLOSSOM BAKERY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1573 Haight Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Etnil Ziegler 



Jacob Schmidt 



QUALITY PORK AND SAUSAGE CO. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH CLASS SAUSAGE AND MEAT SFEC'ALTIEb 

Factory and Store Pho-.e: MArket 1-7432 

401 Div.sadero Street. Cor. Oak Street SAN FRANCISCO. CA'.'l-. 



MERRILL DRESS SHOP 



129 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



S & W BRANDS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GLADDING McBEAN & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO -::- LOS ANGELES 
CALIFORNIA 

SE. 1-9842 Harry Pomin, Prop. 

PARK GATE ASSOCIATED 



19th Avenue and Lincoln Way 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Alterations and Repairing 



Call and Delivery Service 



PERFECTION CLEANERS 

3339 Steiner Street, Next to New Marina Postoffice 
WAlnut 1-4124 



ALTA ROOFING COMPANY 



OCDEN. UTAH 
97 7 Binford 



976 Indiana Street 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



and unification of their methods, to provide the highest 
possible type of selectee for police work. 

These are the steps to be taken, and promptly, as the 
only logical defense against the increasing onset of crime. 
If we expect to win, we must be superior to our enemies. 
But that supremacy can be gained only through educa- 
tional strategy. And not until such time as these measures 
are put into practice can we hope to be successful in the 
continuous battle for law and order. 



Page JO POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April. 1948 

Some Are True and Some Are False — Rate Yourself 



L The bulletin "Uniform Crime Reports" is published 
by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

2. Among the crimes most commonly and consistently 
reported to the police are murder, robber>', burglary 
and auto theft. 

3. The Uniform Crime Reports show that the crime class- 
ified "Auto Thefts" consistently is numerically larger 
than other classes of crime reported to the police. 

4. The offenses classified under Part 1 "Offenses Known 
to the Police," include the crimes: Criminal Homicide, 
Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, Lar- 
ceny and Auto Theft. 

Ihe F. B. I. has jurisdiction in the following cases: 

5. All cases involving interstate transportation. 

o. All cases of counterfeiting of currency and other negO' 

tiable instruments of the United States. 
7. All acts of wrongful use of U. S. Postal facilities. 
9. All cases invloving traflic in drugs. 
10. The patrol force is the backbone of the poHce depart- 
ment. 
H. It is the function of the police sergeant to see that the 
men under him perform their duties properly. 

12. The satisfactory control of vice and gambling is a dif- 
ficult police problem. 

13. It is generally agreed that police patrol on foot is un- 
necessary in large cities since the inception of the mo- 
torized patrol system. 

14. Most complaints to the police originate by telephone. 

15. Police records are a means of supervision and control 
over police officers. 

16. All "Police Records" are included in the following 
three classes: Complaint records, arrest records and 
personnel records. 

17. Arrest records originate at the time of hooking. 

1 8. A correct written record should be made immediately 
of all significant events in police work. 

19. Case records are not required in actions initiated by 
the police. 

20. A police communication system enables the supervis- 
ing officers to maintain contact with the personnel at 
their command and translate into action those mea- 
sures necessary to protect the lives and property of 
the community. 

2 1 . Modern police commynications such as radio and tele- 
type have made the patrol box an obsolete device. 

23. The teletype is not essential in an organization equip- 
ped with modern radio apparatus. 

24. The purpose of modus operandi file is to have a record 
whereby criminals can be quickly located by the names 
they go by. 

25. The purpose of co-ordinating councils is to secure the 
co-operation of various public and private agencies in 
combating delinquency problems. 

26. An effective program of traffic control includes the 
elements of Engineering, Education and Enforcement. 

27. The police department is concerned with only the 



function of "Enforcement" insofar as traffic control 
is concerned. 

28. There can be no efficient control of the accident prob- 
lems without adequate facts regarding accidents oc- 
curing. 

29. Accident investigation serves as a basis for intelligent, 
effective traffic law enforcement. 

30. The teletype produces a written record at the receiv- 
ing end automatically. 

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 

31. Suggestive questions are generally agreed to be the 
recommended form for investigators to use when ques- 
tioning persons about a crime. 

32. Before the suspect is questioned the investigator should 
be in possession of as many facts regarding the case as 
possible. 

33. Scars, moles, tatooing are considered more valuable 
than fingerprints. 

34. It is possible for two different persons to have identical 
fingerprints. 

3i. Fingerprints may enlarge due to growth, but no 
changes take place in the number or arrangement of 
the friction ridges. 

36. The firing pin of a pistol leaves an impression in the 
percussion cap which is sometimes characteristic of the 
arm but often varies according to the hardness of the 
metal in the cap. 

37. Marks from the breach block of an automatic cannot 
be depended upon in determining whether or not a 
particular shell was fired from a particular automatic. 

38. Shells from revolvers are more likely to be found at 

Phone Mission 7-0322 

BOYSON'S PHARMACY 

VIRGIL G. PRATHER, Prop. 



198 VALENCIA STREET 
Corner Twenty-firsl Street 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone VAlencia 4-3573 

PAUL'S TAVERN 

Paul and Marie, Props. 
3346 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phono Mission 7-9318 Open II A.M. to 2 A.M. 

LAN WAH CAFE 

CHOP SUEY - AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

2 32 3 MISSION STREET, near l<)lh St. SAN FRANCISCO 

GRAYSON'S LADIES WEAR 



2630 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Mission 7-4263 



Steve Kristovich, Prop. 



MISSION GRILL AND RESTAURANT 

First Class Service- Popular Prices - Banquet Rooms for All 
Occasions - Our Specialty: Sea Food 

2834 MISSION ST.. near 24th SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone EXbrook 2-5864 

IRWIN FRIEDMAN 

AUCTIONEER - LIQUIDATOR - APPRAISER 

764 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF. 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



the scene of a crime than are shells from an automatic. 
39. A bullet usually is fired from the same side of a win- 
dow from which the flakes of glass are missing. 

41. Comparison hairs from the scalp of living persons, 
dead bodies and furs should not be cut, but pulled out 
with the aid of forceps so that the roots may come out 
with them. 

42. Indentification by means of hairs is one of the most 
easily accomplished methods of identifying the perpe- 
trators of crimes. 

43. When a tool is placed against plastic materials such as 
paint, the characteristic ridges of the tool will be mold- 
ed into the paint leaving a more or less perfect cast 
of such tool. 

44. All modern revolvers and pistols have rifled bores. 

45. Due to various movements in walking, footprints are 
seldom exactly the size of the shoe which made them. 

46. A motor car traveling in a straight line usually leaves 
only traces of its rear tires. 

47. Photographs of original teeth and tooth markings are 
far more accurate means of identification than casts. 

48. It is easier to determine that blood originates from a 
certain individual than it is to prove that it does not 
originate from a certain individual. 

49. Alphonse Bertillion is noted for developing the system 
of identification through fingerprints. 

50. Sketching the scene of a crime is no longer done in 
criminal investigation since the rapid strides made in 
photography. 

(To be continued) 

ALTTHOWE & CO. 

PRINTERS 

ADVERTISING AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 

Telephones EXbrook 2-3504 - 3505 

344-346 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

2 1 CLUB 

201 Valencia Street 



Telephone Fillmore 6-9734 LES and AL 

CHESTER'S CAFE 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

WINE - BEER - LIQUORS 

3136 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

ALL NATION'S CAFE 

"FOOD THAT HITS THE SPOT" 
168-170 Fourth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone sutler 1.6993 

THE WINE BARN GROCERY 

WINE - LIQUORS - AND GROCERIES 

225 SIXTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

LOOP BOWLING ALLEY 

1031 Kearny Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



HON YUEN CAFE 

850 Kearny Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MICKEY'S BILLIARD PARLOR 

POOL AND BILLIARDS - CIGARS AND CIGARETTES 
SOFT DRINKS 

944 COLUMBUS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE GOLD SPIKE 

RESTAURANT 
527 Columbus Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



BOND CLOTHES 

Post and Kearny Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DOuslas 2-1194 L. M. Fernandez, Prop. 

BANTAYAN SANITARY CLEANERS 

DRY CLEANING - PRESSING - DYEING - FIRST CLASS LAUNDRY 

AGENCY - HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 
605 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

THE LITTLE COFFEE SHOP 

L. D. ALLEN, Proprietor 
41 California Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ANTHONY'S 

CALIF. FASHIONS -::- SPORTSWEAR 
MADE IN CALIFORNIA 

1130 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO I.CALIF. 



Telephone WEst 1-3073 



Complete Insurance Protection 



A. C. HARDWOOD FLOOR CO. 

FOR RESIDENCE AND BUILDING 

2071 UNION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Telephone ORdway 3- 1600 

HOTEL PENZANCE 

ROBERT W. HEAGY, Manager 



We Call and Deliver 



EXbrook 2-9970 



ELVIN HOLLAND CLEANERS 



BETTER CLEANING 
PROMPT DELIVERY SERVICE 



179 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 67 FRESNO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



CRANE CO. 



ROOMS — REASONABLE RATES -::- CHILDREN ACCEPTED 
COMMUNITY KITCHEN FREE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SUN SET HOTEL 



CALIFORNIA 



153 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA CANNING 
PEACH ASSOCIATION 



WILLIAM H. STREHLE CO. 

AUTOMOTIVE PAINTING AND LETTERING SERVICE 
TO THE DISCRIMINATE AT 



494 THIRTY-SIXTH SRREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA Piedmont 5- 1497 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



JAI-ALAI CAFE 

761 Broadway 



SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhill 1-3807 

LEWIS LIQUOR STORE 

THE BEST BRANDS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



CALIFORNIA 1699 HAICHT STREET 



COLYEAR MOTOR SALES 



Fillmore 6-6429 



OLSON'S DELICATESSEN 



1250 Van Ness Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



FROZEN FOODS 

537 DIVISADERO STREET 



ICE CREAM 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



UNderhill 1-9246 

GEORGE'S MARKET 

FRIENDLY SERVICE 

2100 MARKE T STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

THE ST. DANIEL HOTEL 



THE BROADMOOR 

A HOTEL OF DISTINCTION 

SUTTER AT COUCH SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 



PRospect 5-9532 



THE 49'ER CLUB 



SAN FRANCISCO 



259 Sixth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Walter Zabel and Hugh Dunlap 

014 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 



You Are A Stranger Here But Once 

GREEN LANTERN GARDEN 

2302 Market Street, Comer 16th UNderhill 1-9288 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SUNICAL LAND & LIVESTOCK 

HEARST MAGAZINES, INC. 
Telephone KL. 2-3335 

KUSTER LABORATORIES, Inc. 



S71 Seventh Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DWIGHT LUMBER AND BOX CO. 

Manufacturers and Distributors 

PONDEROSA PINE LUMBER 

BOX SHOOKS, VENEER PRODUCTS 

Home Office 461 Market Street SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 



Phone DOuglas 2-7023 



Nick Finocchio, Prop. 



NEW TIVOLI RESTAURANT 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR SPECIAL PARTIES AND BANQUETS 

1438 Grant Avenue, between Green and Union Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CRANE CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Fillmore 6-9702 Bonnie & Al 

FRED'S LIQUOR 

liquor - beer - wine - delicatessen 

800 McAllister streei san francisco. calif. 



suiter 1-9512 



G. Benedetli, Prop 



PRIVATE BOOTHS 



NEW PISA RESTAURANT 

CHOICE ITALIAN FOODS 

Lunch, Dinner, Special Chicken and Steak Dinners 

Favorite Brands Beer, Wines and Liquors 

1268 GRANT AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

REPUBLIC MARKET 

Californ-a and Divisadcro Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Phone Fillmore 6-2421 Chas. Sullivan 

SULLIVAN LIQUORS 

1623 Post Street, between Buchanan and Laguna Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone SE 1-9500 

SUNSET SERVICE STATION 

PONTIAC MOTOR CARS 
COMPLETE PONTIAC SERVICE 

IRVING ST. at 16th AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 22, CALIF. 

LUCCA FOOD SHOP 

GROCERIES - WINES - LIQUORS 

1899 IRVING STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

WEst 1-5686 

FILLMORE THRIFT MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES - FRUITS 
BEER AND WINE 

102 7 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone WAlnut 1-5227 

CATHAY KITCHEN 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 
FOOD PREPARED TO TAKE OUT 

1198 Golden Gate Avenue SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

WEst 1-0513 Mr. and Mrs. T. Boyd 

Let Us Help You Look Your Best 

HOLLYWOOD CLEANERS-TAILORS 

CLEANING - PRESSING - ALTERING 

1715 BUCHANAN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone SUlter 1-0613 

MANNING MITCHELL PAINT CO. 

Manufacturers of 
QUALITY PAINTS AND VARNISHES 

i2S SACRAMENTO STREET SAN FRANCISCO II. CALIF. 

Bohemia Atop Telegraph Hill 

THE SHADOWS 

Easy to Find — Drive up Union and Turn Left 

on Montgomery 

PHONE EXBROOK 2-9823 

GArfield 1-3923 George J. Schriefer, Prop. 

POPPY BUFFET 

BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 
CIGARS AND CIGARETTES 

101 SIXTH STREET. Cor. Mission Street SAN FRANCISCO 



CARMEN'S UNION 
Division 1380 ofA.F. of L. 

1179 Market Street Room 605 - 606 

Telephone UNderhill 1-4363 



PACIFIC VEGETABLE 
OIL CORPORATION 



Phone DOuglos 2-3114 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Townsend Street 

CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 53 



ANNUAL I. A.C.P. SET FOR NEW YORK 
FOR OCTOBER 11-14 

The 55th annual conference of the International Asso- 
ciation of Chiefs of Police will be held October 10 to 14 
at the Hotel Pennsylvania, New York City. Former Chief 
Charles Dullea of the Sa'n Francisco Police Department, 
and now a member of the Adult Authonty of the State 
of California, will preside, as he is the president of the 
Association for 1948. 

BURGERMEISTER — A Truly Fine Pale Beer 

GOLDEN BRAND PRODUCTS 

Phone TEmplebar 2-0280 - 2-0281 
SECOND and JACKSON STS. O.AKLAND. CALIF. 



HE 1-6450 



F. J. BURNS DRAY AGE CO. 



516 Townsend Street 



S.AN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



FREE DELIVERY 



KEllos 2-9820 



CONSOLIDATED LIQUOR STORE 

M. G. CORREIA, Mgr. 

On the Corner -23rd Avenue and East 14th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

RENON BAKING CO. 

UP-TO-DATE - SANITARY 
80 VARIETIES - BREAD AND ROLLS 

Office and Factory: 1330 Howard Street. San Francisco 
Phone HEmlock 1-9264 

SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIFORNI.A 



California Cut Stone and Granite Works 

CONTRACTORS FOR MASONRY 

STONE MANTELS OUR SPECIALTY 

Railroad Avenue at Magnolia 

SOLTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Mission 7-9221 T. M. Torres, Prop. 

LA FORTUNA GROCERY 

STAPLE GROCERIES - BEER AND WINE 

3001 - 20th STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone WEst 1-6331 

IDEAL PAINT AND WALLPAPER CO- 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
22 00 LOMBARD STREET SAN FR.ANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone Fillmore 6-77'^3 

COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

Makers of 

"FINE CUSTOM FURNITURE" 

2228 LOMBARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 23, CALIF. 

Yukon 6-2905 

LANTERN FOOD PRODUCTS 

Manufacturer of 

SOY SAUCE AND MEE JING SEASONING 

246 FRONT STREET SAN FR.ANCISCO. CALIF. 



A. I. Pi- 



PIER 23 



Phone SU 1-9950 

SPEED LUNCH 

EXCELLENT FOOD 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



HOTEL CLAY 



1736 Polk Street 



SAN FR.ANCISCO 



CALIFORNI.A 



HEmlock 1-9438 Ray Cipolla 

VIRGINIA TAVERN 

THIS IS IT 
1098 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



We Have Sold Over $1,000,000 Worth of Homes and Farms 

P. TESLUCK 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE BROKERS 

Phone WE 1-1100 

2076 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 15, CALIF. 

Phone PRospect 5-7234 

RETRY AND BRANDT 

STUDEBAKER SPECIALISTS 

Equipped to Handle Anything from the Slightest Adjustment 

to the Rebuilding of a Studebaker 

1625 P.ACIFIC .A\E.. near \an Ness SAN FR.ANCISCO. CALIF. 



GRACES GROTTO 

531 Octavia Street 



SAN FR.ANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



"Since 1896" 



Phone HE 1-6750 



GOLDEN WEST PLATING WORKS 

60 Juniper Street, between 10th and 1 1th, off Folsom 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



J. H. POME ROY & CO. 



METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE 

85 McAllister Street Phone UNderhill 1-8464 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

McDUCKSTON AND GIESCH 



1133 Mariposa Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOE SAI GAI RESTAURANT 

DISTINCTIVE CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 

Open from 11 A.M. to 4 A.M. 

Call Pete or Paul Phone ORdway 3-7566 

472 Turk Street, between Larkin and Hyde Streets 



GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER CO. 

Eighteenth and Mission Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



JULIO'S RESTAURANT 



1335 Grant Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ROBINS HOTEL 



711 Post Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone sutler 1-0860 

PHILIPPINE PRODUCTS CO. 

Importers and Exporters 

RATTAN FURNITURE - CURIOS - PINA CLOTH, ETC. 

LUNCHEON SETS - LADIES' HAND BAGS 

Wholesale and Retail 

6 12 KEARNY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



M. B. Perez 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PRospect 5-9740 

THE MIRROR 

65 Taylor Street 



Leo Quilici Mme. J. P. Bourdet, Prop. 



Phone Mission 7-4720 



THE LACE HOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 



CALIFORNIA sAN FRANCISCO 



CASH AND CARRY 
3036 Twenty-Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



THE CLEVELAND TWIST DRILL CO. 



654 Howard Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BILL BARKER'S 

EL BUHO COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

GRaystone 4-9811 

883 SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 9 



WAInut 1-2147 



Luis Jara, Prop. 



HERNANDEZ JEWELRY 

Specialist in 
WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING 

1609 ELLIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone WAlnul 1-5425 

PALACE CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES - CHOP SUEY 
Orders Put Up to Take Out 

184 3 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Ttkphone Fillmore 6-9393 

REINERT & RILEY 

HOME FURNISHINGS 



1833 FILLMORE STREET 
Between Sutter and Bush 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WAlnul 1-2408 

QUEEN ANNE UPHOLSTERING CO. 

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • CHESTERFIELD SETS RECOVERED 

"We Guarantee to Satisfy You" 
2304 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 15. CALIF. 



C. J. HENDRY CO. 

27 Main Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MARTINOLICH SHIP REPAIR CO. 

DESIGNERS - BUILDERS - REPAIRERS 

Five Marine Railways- Pier 52 - Plant Phone EX 2-7580 

REFRIGERATION A SPECIALTY 

PIER 52 SAN FRANCISCO 7. CALIF. 



SANITARY CLEANERS 



605 Kearny Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DO 2-1194 



CALIFORNIA 



PhonL-: suiter 1.4148: Res. Redwood City 1381 
Compliments of 

A. S. DUTRA 

DREDGING, DITCHING AND CONTRACTING 

255 CALIFORNIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



COLE 8C JOHNSON 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 
I I Battery Street 



CALIFORNIA 



OLIVER PAINT CO 



Les. Oliver, Prop. 

PAINT - WALL PAPER PAINTERS SUPPLIES 

3059 MISSION STREET 725 IRVING STREET 

Phone VAlencio 4-6912 Phone SEabright 1-3212 

SAN FRANCISCO 10 SAN FRANCISCO 22 



TUNING A SPECIALTY ZENITH RADIOS 

MARTIN'S 

PIANO AND RADIO SHOP 
L. M. Martin, Prop. WA. 1-4388 

63 1 DIVISADERO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 17, CALIF. 



JOE' 



:'S FRUIT MARKET 

Valsco Baldacci - J. G. Giuffria, Props. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLE AT LOWEST PRICES ALWAYS 

Phone HEmlock 1-1836 

910 COLE STREET, near Carl SAN FRANCISCO 

22nd and POTRERO PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 
Phone VAIencia 4-6495 
1000 POTRERO AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 10 

VAIencia 4-1026 

POTRERO AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Angelo Del Carlo - Jos. L. Quartaroli, Props. 
TIRES - TUBES - BATTERIES - TUNE-UP 
AUTO SERVICE - PICK-UP AND DELIVER 

998 POTRERO, corner 22nd Street SAN FRANCISCO 

DWIGHT LUMBER 8C BOX CO. 

461 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JACK &. GEN'S CREAMERY 

SANDWICHES - SHORT ORDERS - ICE CREAM 

716 Irving Street, between Eighth and Ninth Avenues 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Lombard 6-7442 OPEN SUNDAYS 

8TH & IRVING MARKET 

AARSTAD BROS. 
FREE DELIVERY SERVICE 

654 IRVING STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

MOntrose 4-8836 

WOLSKY FURNITURE EXCHANGE 

BUYING - SELLING 

ANTIQUE AND ART CHINA 

1224 NINTH AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 22. CALIF. 



Phone overland 1-5926 



S. R. Gay, Prop. 



O'BRIEN'S CLEANERS 

LET US CARE FOR ALL YOUR CLOTHES 

De Luxe Cleaning • Expert Alterations • Remodeling 

Repairing • Laundry Service 

408 IRNING STREET SAN FRANCISCO 22. CALIF. 

Phone Fillmore 6-9926 Paul M. Sugawara, Prop. 

HOTEL ANNEX 

EVERY ROOM PRIVATE BATH and STEAM HEAT 

1612 FILLMORE STREET 
Cor. Fillmore and Geary Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO 15. CALIF. 



A. Vayssie 



HEmlock 1-9221 



E. Lafon 



HOTEL GRAND SOUTHERN 



(Opposite Main Post Office) 

FIRST CLASS ROOMS AT REASONABLE RATES 

100 ROOMS — SO WITH PRIVATE BATHS 

1095 Mission St . S.E Cor 7th St SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF- 



J. M. SAHLEIN MUSIC STORE 



718 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



TASSANO'S 

DRY GOODS 
1458 Grant Avenue 



Phone PRospect 5-6464 



E. Lekich 



GOVERNOR GRILL 8c 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA sAN FRANCISCO 



210-214 Jones Street 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



GOLDEN WEST PLATING WORKS 



60 Juniper Street 



i SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



FERRARI BROS. NURSERY 



202 University 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW FORUM RESTAURANT 



QUALITY FOODS 
2799 Sixteenth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



LENORA DRESS COMPANY 

THE HOUSE OF LUCKY BRIDAL DRESSES 

VAIencia 4-8547 and 4-8548 
Apparel City - 2 I 76 Palau Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 24, CALIFORNIA 



FERNBACHER LOBE 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MONTEVERDE 8C PARODI 

IMPORTERS 
100 Broadway 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MASON STREET LIQUOR STORE 



145 Mason Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CAITO'- 



Hercules Equipment and Rubber Co., Inc. 

435 Brannan Street YUkon 6-2770 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



AMOROSO GROCERY 



601 Tompkins 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



JOSEPH BUCHWALD 8C SONS, Inc. 

Wholesale 

FOOD PROCESSORS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

Fillmore 6-3340 

855 McAllister street san francisco i. calif. 

MUTUAL REALTY SYSTEM 



434 Clement Street 



san FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HROMADA CANDY CO. 



1206 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



THE GANG PLANK 

150 Harlan Place 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



For An Evening OR A Lifetime 

ELINOR ARNOLD. San Francjscos First Lady of Introduction 

Off.;rs personal introductions, and attractive escorts 

for Ladies and Gentlemen. 



450 GEARY STREET. 



SUITE 401 



GRaystone 4-8181 



SEabright I-757J 

SAN FRANCISCO REAL ESTATE CO. 

REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE 
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



1342 NINTH AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Hhone WEst :-7614 



Goods Called for and Delivered 



DIAMOND FRENCH LAUNDRY CO. 

LACES AND LACE CURTAINS A SPECIALTY 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED FIRST CLASS 



2872-78 CALIFORNIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Studio 

545 Sutter St. 



LINCOLN BATCHELDER 

CONCERT PIANIST 
TEACHER 



Phone 
SUtter 1-4970 



PAUL RIEGER 8C CO. 

Established 1872 
MAKERS OF HIGH GRADE PERFUMES 

220-230 COMMERCIAL STREET SAN FRANCISCO II 



Joseph Pearlman 



YUkon 6-5911 



Herman Bauer 



MENDELSON 8C BAUER 



Office Address 
2 1 MORRIS AVENUE 



Dealers in 
IRON, METAL & MACHINERY 



Yard Address 
967 HARRISON STREET 



OCCIDENTAL LIFE INS. CO. 



300 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Henry G. Mills 



MILLS & HINZ 



Roy H. Hinz 



TILE COMPANY 

Office and Showroom 

5945 MISSION STREET DELAWARE 3-7474 - 3-7015 

SAN FRANCISCO 25 

Phone DOuglas 2-8459 

SPIELLER'S APPAREL MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of 
GIRLS, BOYS AND INFANTS COATS 



5 15 HOWARD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LE PAGE'S, Inc. 

489 Sixth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DOuglas 2-8648 



Charles P. Low, Mgr. 



FORBIDDEN CITY Supper Club 

DINNER DANCING - ALL STAR CHINESE SHOW 



363 SUTTER STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Emil Hansen, Manager Telephone DOuglas 2-6808 

J. M. SAHLEIN MUSIC COMPANY 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND ACCESSORIES 

Exclusively Wholesale 

718 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3 

Phone JUniper 5-4445 

ROSSI HARDWARE 

HARDWARE - HOUSEHOLD - ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
TOOLS - PAINTS AND OILS - SPORTING GOODS 

5 196 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



YATES & SMART PAINT CO. 



SOULE STEEL COMPANY 



450 Fifth Street 



1750 Army Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 3AN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1948 



AGENT H. C. VAN PELT 

(Continued from page 15 ) 

There should be a chance, of course, for the criminal 
who has shown a capacity for reformation to rejoin society 
on trial, but law enforcement should take the time and 
the effort to vigorously protest and act against the ill- 
advised releases of dangerous criminals returning to prey 
upon society. 

Improved Public Relations 

Combatting post-war crime requires improved public 
relations. With wholehearted assistance and support 
earned by honest, efficient, and progressive law enforce- 
ment from aroused public citizens, reduction of our 
rising crime wave may be more effectively accomplished. 

Expansion of city areas and shifts in population have 
left many departments with unsuitable locations and ob- 
solete buildings. Some agencies have found their record 
systems and quarters, their communications facilities, fire- 
arms and patrol cars inadequate to enable them to properly 
handle their ever-insreasing responsibilities. Their work 
has expanded and new types of service which have been 
developed cannot be placed into operation because of 
outmoded equipment. Many departments cannot recruit 
desirable personnel or retain their efficient, faithful and 
experienced officers because of ridiculously low salary 
limitations. 

Some top-ranking police officials are at salary levels 
beneath those of subordinate officers in other nearby 
departments of comparable size. The pay of many pohce 
officers is such that they must work at side jobs on off 
hours in order to make both ends meet financially. No 
man can serve two masters, and no police officer can be 
faithful and loyal to two employers. It is false economy 
and wishful thinking to expect a high degree of service 
from guardians of the law who are not paid in accordance 
with the hazards of their profession. 

The securing of these sorely needed law enforcement 
facilities and the improvement of police wages, hours, 
and working conditions depends upon the extent to which 
we, through our efficiency and honesty in law enforcement 
service, and our public relations work, keep our people 
informed as to our problems and our needs. 

The majority of newspapers are definitely on the side 
of law and order. Most of them recognize that a partner- 



DOYLE'S 


TAVERN 


* 


1199 Church Street 


SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



B 



G 



Foods Incorporated 

130 Bush Street 

San Francisco 



Why Not Get a 

Personal Photo I. D. Card 

Application - Passport Photos 

Discharges - Birth Certificates - Marriage Licenses, 
etc., reduced to wallet size and sealed in plastic. 

Identification Photo Service 

North End Ferry Building YU. 6-0559 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Gantner-Felder-Kenny 

Phone HEmlock 1-0131 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



1965 Market Street at Duboce Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 



RUSS 
BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIFORNIA 



J 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



ship between law enforcement and the press is a prime 
requisite of a decent society. Their cooperation and serv' 
ices should be developed today more than ever before in 
educating the public along the lines of law-abiding citizen- 
ship and engendering the public's good will toward law 
enforcement. 

The present task of law enforcement is demanding more 
and more energy and ability. Through intelligent applica- 
tion of the latest techniques presented in progressive train- 
ing schools, by intensifying and expanding our juvenile 
and crime prevention programs, and through the effective 
molding and crystallization of public opinion in support 
of good, clean, wholesome and fearless law enforcement, 
our objective will be gained, our work will become less 
burdensome and society will receive the maximum of 
benefits to which it is entitled. 



PAY LESS GRCX:ERY 



1901 Telegraph Avenue 



O.AKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



ED KRANTZ 



TEmplebar 2-5520 

COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION 

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 



563-565 SIXTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



1 PLAY AND RELAX at . . . j 


PLAYLAND 


at the BEACH 


7 Located at Ocean Beach near the historic \ 


{ Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks \ 

11 » 


A Home of Thrill - Provoking Rides . . . Unique Resfauranfs K 


'} Fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! y 


') Owned and Operated by 


|^^^^^^GEO^<^VJHI7>J^^ 



iusf say../ GOUGH AT MARKET' 

and you're there 

Shop the easy way. Streetcars J, K, L, M, N, 6, 7 and 17 stop 
in front of our door. 

Get a fine Fleecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur- 
ing store. Airflex, experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 
you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 
If you drive we have a large free parking lot adjoining our store. 
Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 
United States. 

AIRFLEX 



EDWARD McROSKEY 

ieS7 MARKET STREET ' 
Opposite Gou^ Street 



MATTRESS CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Free Parking 



El Cortola Restaurant 

R. O. CURTOLA 

510 17th Street 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Phone GLencourt 1-2887 



Pacific Tool & Supply Co. 

C. H. Peterson, Vice-President 
and General Manager 



TOOLS AND SHOP SUPPLIES 

Phone TEmplebar 2-3240 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Meet Me at 

HERB'S PLACE 

DAN and TONY 
Phone KEUog 2-9899 

COCKTAILS 

Closed Mondays 

2331 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



RIO VISTA HOTEL 



Telephone 28 

Rio Vista, California 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



THE CANDID FRIEND 



Bv Opie L. Warner 



The words "training" and "preparedness" bring no 
joy to young or old. But this is an age of efficiency. If 
you are not efficient you are out. 

So-called "big business," as a factor of our social struc' 
tore, is not very popular with the average voter. In fact 
"big business" is popularly blamed for many inconven- 
iences the common people have to endure. 

If I were speaking on the "big business" side I could 
show that it has its good points — and that they are not 
few. I will take just one phase of the good group of 
items to the credit of "big business" — the educational 
end. True, its educational factor for its employees may 
have as its reason a selfish end — to make the employees 
more productive and to lessen causes of lost time and, so 
on, through accidents or unnecessary idleness. But such 
education nevertheless eventually results also to the 
benefit of the employee. Increased efficiency makes his 
work lighter and even makes it possible that he may 
earn more. 

To be specific: Big Business definitely does not believe 
in what is commonly known as "Learning the hard way." 

Once in a while I hear a fine specimen of our old police 
regime criticize our present police school training system 
and stating in no uncertain terms that the only way to 
become a good police officer, is, to do as he did — "learn 
the hard way." 

I do not argue with such fine members with their ex- 
cellent police record to hack up their statement about 
liaving learned the hard way. In such cases I remember 
about silence being golden. But my silence is mere 
courtesy on such occasions. 

Policing, as of today, is strictly a mental job. Changes 
in living conditions have forced it to be so. Common 
sense was all right in any line of business a half century 
ago. A person with only common sense as his asset today 
may easily be found in itinerant labor camps. He is the 
one who is now "learning the hard way" — trying to figure 
out whether he will follow the crops in the cast, the 
middle west, or on the Pacific Slope. 

Even in the smaller communities we find police per- 
sonnel today taking refresher courses on police technique. 

This is a long step from swearing a healthy, husky man 
in as a police officer, presenting him with a club, gun, 
star, handcuffs, a book of traffic tags and turning him 
loose to maintain law and order — -and incidentally, to 
learn to be a good police officer "the hard way." 

Those of us who enjoy detective stories realize how 
much our story writers overstress the dumbness of the 
ordinary police officer. Writers of either prose or poetry 
are generally allowed quite a lot of leeway, in the matter 
of truth; but our fiction writers do take reckless liberties 
with truth when a police officer is one of the dramatis 
personae. Twenty years from now, due to present day 
police training, current magazine stories depicting police 



officers as dumb yokels, will appear corny indeed even to 
children of grammar school age. 

When this great United States was young, and every- 
one was in his shirt sleeves, policemen were, in a manner, 
glorified watchmen. But America has skipped over about 
five European centuries, even since the discovery of gold 
California, and today, right here in San Francisco, we 
find members of our "City's Finest" with one month's 
experience, outside of our San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment Police Academy, able to give a one-hundred per cent 
account of the fact that they are top notch police officers 



BLUE BIRD CAFE 

BEER - GOOD FOOD 

SOFT DRINKS AND 

CLUB ROOM 

Fifth and Broadway 
Westmoreland, California 






MEXICALI CAFE 

MEXICAN AND HINDU DISHES 

• 

Phone 971 

443 Broadway 

EL CENTRO, CALIFORNIA 



ROBIN CAFE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 
Lunch, Dinners, Short Orders 

1033 North 13th Street 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



April, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 61 



without have become so through trial and error as their 
predecessors of not so long ago did. 

The personnel of our present day police departments, 
like the personnel of the outstanding big business groups 
throughout the nation, is giving top bracket service be- 
cause of intensive training. Common sense can never 
be sold short. But learning the hard way, as a public 
servant, in addition to being trying on the individual 
concerned, is unnecessarily expensive to the taxpayers. 

Today, the chief e.xecutives of police departments, great 
or small, who, openly or covertly, place common sense 
ahead of careful police training, are definitely on the way 
out for the simple reason that the day of "learning the 
hard way" has gone forever. 



RANCHO CARRILLO RESTAURANT 

MEXICAN DISHES 
STEAKS AND FRIED CHICKEN 

Monroe Avenue Off Palm Springs Highway 
INDIO CALIFORNIA 

SPORTS CLUB CAFE 

AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Spud Moorman, Manager 

THE BEST IN EVERYTHING 



Leif E. Vibe, Pr 



Phone 2-6018 



VIBE'S MARKET 

ROSEDALE'S FINEST IN 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



ROSEDALE HIGHWAY 



BAKERSFIELD. CALIF. 



BACONS GROCERY AND BAR 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 

VISIT OUR BAR AND SOFT DRINK 
BAR IN CONNECTION 



On Highway 399 

BAKERSFIELD 



R. R. 4. Box 317 



CALIFORNIA 



SCHMIDT'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 

GAS • OIL • BEER • WINES 

SOFT DRINKS 



R. R. No. I, Hub Station Highway 41 and 198 

LATON CALIFORNIA 



CHICKEN INN 

BEER, WINE, GOOD FOOD 
AND SOFT DRINKS 



On Highway 41 Easton, California 

R. R. No. 6 Fresno, California 



1528 CRAVENS 



TORRANCE. CALIF. 



CENTRAL LIQUOR STORE 

Thomas Muir 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED WINES AND 
LIQUORS, BEER, MIXERS AND SOFT DRINKS 



BREAKFAST • LUNCHES • DINNERS 

HOME COOKING • DELICIOUS COFFEE 

AND QUICK SERVICE 

Hours 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

SAN JOAQUIN (Frssno County). CALIFORNIA 



128 East Central Avenue 



REDLANDS 



CALIFORNIA 



"It Pays to Play" 

PRATT BROS. 

SPORTING GOODS 
EXPERT BICYCLE REPAIRING 



551 EAST CITRUS STREET 



REDLANDS. CALIF. 



Phone 562-10 



Mark Jenkins, Prop. 



JENKINS AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 
GENERAL REPAIRING 



124 EAST BASELINE ST. 



SAN BERNARDINO. CALIF. 



Phone 4721 



Irene Purvis, Mgr. 



THE COURT HOTEL 

AIR-CONDITIONED 
BATH OR SHOWER 



364 ARROWHEAD AVE. 



SAN BERNARDINO. CALIF. 



PEOPLES FOOD MARKET 

GROCERIES • PRODUCE • MEATS 
At Right Prices 

BEER AND WINE DEPARTMENT NEXT DOOR 



WINTERHAVEN 



CALIFORNIA 



TEX'S CAFE 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
SHORT ORDERS 

We Cater to Private Parties and Lodge Groups 
1010 West Valley Blvd. 



PUENTE 



CALIFORNIA 



PESSANO'S GROCERY 

.A Complete Line of 
GROCERIES. MEATS AND VEGETABLES 

AND PESSANO'S INN 
Beer. Wine and Good Food 



Ventura and Academy Aves. 



SANGER. CALIF. 



INSURANCE SECURITIES. INC, 

2033 Franklin Street 
OAKLAND 12. CALIFORNIA 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



BAY CITIES BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



JULIA HOTEL 



Pine Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIF. 



EL CAMINO CLUB 



4541 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIF. 



SKYSCRAPER TAVERN 

3326 Twenty. fourth Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 



HOTEL REIMS 

Columbus Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 



HELVITIA HOTEL 

641 California Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 



A. 8i J. LEVIN 

Luggage - Leather Goods - Trunks 

566 Market Street Phone EX. 2-9636 

CASTRO PORK STORE 

468 Castro Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 

BACKYARD 

Regular Dinners 5 to 1 1 Week Days 
1024 Kearny Street San Francisco. Calif. 

Pavliger X-Ray Laboratories 

Wakefield Building 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

VACAVILLE LAUNDRY 

AND CLEANING SERVICE 

VACAVILLE CALIFORNIA 

HARRY KAHAN 

JEWELER 

Room 306 - 477 15th St. ■ OAKLAND 

A. MARTIN 

LADIES AND GENTS TAILOR 
PRospect 5-3722 611 Post Si. 

BLOU SLIP CO. 

341 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 

JOE POHEIM, Inc. 

TAILORING TO ORDER 

32 Powell St., CA. 1-9417 - San Francisco 2 

HOTEL HARVARD 

685 Ellis - Near Larkin 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 

JOE LEVIN 8C SONS 

SCRAP IRON AND METALS 

2225 Third Street San Francisco 7 

HOTEL VALENCIA 

5 04 Valencia Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIF. 

MODERN AUTO REPAIR 

1743 Divisadero Street 
San Francisco California 



NEW SYSTEM LAUNDRY 

420 Turk Street 
San Francisco California 

ST. JAMES HOTEL 

87 Third Street 
San Francisco California 

NEW COLUMBIAN HOTEL 

32 Sacramento Street 
San Francisco California 

CARLSEN'S AUTO WORKS 

1423 Ellis Street 
San Francisco California 

UNIVERSITY CREAMERY 

13S6 Polk Street 
San Francisco California 

THE FAMOUS COFFEE SHOP 

462 Bush Street 
San Francisco California 

COLISEUM CAFE 

1498 Mission Street 
San Francisco California 

MICHAEL A. GORB 

JEWELRY 
5345 Geary Street San Francisco 

] dc E COFFEE SHOP 

2S37 24th Street 
San Francisco California 

HILL HAVEN FOR GIRLS 

3841 19th Street 
San Francisco California 

GENOVA CLUB 

1062 Valencia Street 
San Francisco California 



Phone Juniper 5-0766 OFF SALE 

THREE ACES CLUB 

FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 

V. Maeario - J. llloKgi - G. Chcsin 
4708 Mission Street San Francisco. Cali/. 

Phone TUxedo .'•-0"il2 Eugene Lum. Prop. 

SELECT CAFE 

QUALITY FOODS - AMERICAN AND CHINESE 

712 Geary Stieet San Francisco. Calif. 

Phone UXilerhlll l.n4S4 

CLUB DAN-DEB 

AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

409 Fulton St. Cei. Oclavla San Francisco 

SANITARY CLEANERS 

60S Kearny Street 
San Francisco California 

HOTEL ST. PAUL 

935 Kearny Street 



San Francisco 



California 



201 CLUB 

201 Valencia Street 
San Francisco California 



VAL-MAC CLUB 

Valencia and McCoppin 
San Francisco California 



199 EDDY 

GROCERY 
San Francisco California 

ART DAVIS 

AUTO REPAIRS 
1177 Howard Street San Francisco 

KAM WAH SAUSAGE FCTY. 

428 Pacific Street 
San Francisco California 

DURO BRUSH MFG. CO. 

1528 Divisadero Street 
San Francisco California 




IMPORTANT 

Perfection in planning and conducting funeral 
services is achieved only through arduous 
training, long experience. 

HALSTED & CO.'s large, permanent staflF 
exemplifiess the highest attainments of an ex- 
acting profession. The result: beautiful mem- 
ories, always. 



NO BRANCHES 



HALSTED 



&C0. 



1 123 SUTTKR • ORHway .JOOO 

Free l*iirkin^ ■ Irora^e Next Door 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



QUALITY 



SERVICE Private Banquet Room 



TW. 3-7SS6 



OAKLAND CASKET CO. 

Phone Templebar 2-8139 
if no answer call ANdover 1-S874 



VILLA de la PAIX 

Dewey and Josephine Bargiacchi 

LUNCHEONS • DINNERS • COCKTAILS 
EXCELLENT FRENCH AND ITALIAN CUISINE 



2842 ADELINE STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



E. C. Swingle 



KEIlog 2-1833 



25 1 SIXTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



ED'S AUTO PARTS 

AUTOMOBILE GLASS INSTALLED 

REBUILT PARTS EXCHANGE 

NEW and USED PARTS 



MONZO ELECTRIC 

Telephones: KEIlog 4-5764 - ANdover 1-S311 



752 HIGH STREET 



OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



Telephone TWinoaks 3-2406 

ZERIKOTES Lake Merritt Dining Room 

"The Most Beautiful Spot in Oakland" 

WE ALSO CATER TO PRIVATE 
PARTIES AND BANQUETS 

152 OAK STREET. AT THE BOAT HOUSE 



HOHENER PACKING COMPANY 

Phone LO. 8-72 74 
QUALITY MEATS 



2500 Davis Street 



SAN LEANDRO 



CALIFORNIA 



Cocktail Lounge In Connection 



Also Entrance at 1132 Broadway 



SEA CAVE 



Telephone TEmplebar 2-9588 

SEA FOODS 
BANQUET ROOMS • PRIVATE BOOTHS 

Free Parking at 13th and Franklin Streets 

441 TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



3301 SCHOOL STREET 



OAKLAND 2. CALIF. 



PACIFIC HOMES 

Specialists for 

Oakland Real Estate 



Phone KEIlog 3-7557 
3455 HIGH STREET BRANCH OFFICES 

Phone TEmplebar 2-8776 LADY ATTENDANT 



BAKER MORTUARY 

Call Day or Night 
BURIAL INSURANCE CARRIED 



Charles Baker 
Dep. Coroner Alameda County 



12 14 EIGHTH STREET 
OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



INSULATION PRODUCTS COMPANY 

INSULATION • CONTRACTORS • WEATHERSTRIP 



257 Fourth Street 



OAKLAND 



TEmplebar 2-273S 

CALIFORNIA 



TEmplebar 2-0587 



TEmplebar 2-7884 KE. 4-9363 



KE. 4-9364 



PROGRESSIVE PLATING 8c 
ENAMELING WORKS, Inc. 

PRECISION PLATING 

Licensed by United Chromium Corporation 

80 27th STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 



R. F. Reid, Jr. 



TWinoaks 3-6745 



REID 8C COMPANY 
LUMBER AND SUPPLIES 

WHOLESALE LUMBER DISTRIBUTORS 
AND MILL REPRESENTATIVES 



BAY AREA DELIVERY 

MOVING AND STORAGE 
DELIVERY SERVICE 



Paul V. Bottenfield 
Paul Lemke 



1321 EAST 2 3rd STREET 
O.AKLAND 



Complete Line of 

ALBRIGHT'S VARIETY STORE 

KITCHEN WARE - DISHES - POTTERY - KNIFE SETS - CARVING 
SETS - COOKING UTENSILS - GLASSWARE - RELIGIOUS 
GOODS - TOYS - LAMPS - HUMMEL REPRO- 
DUCTIONS AND BRIC-A-BRAC 



If You Can't Find it Elsewhere 
WE HAVE IT 



401 TENTH AVENUE 



OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA 3250 E. 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Phone sutler 1-7058 



Phone JU. 5-8535 



Harry Greenberg 



ALFRED'S 

Alfred and Secondo 



Borello's Cleaning 8C Dyeing Co. 

CLEANERS OF QUALITY 



GOOD FOOD 



PALATABLE DRINKS 



2695 San Bruno Avenue 



886 BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Tim Hershal BErkeley 7-6370 

THE BERKELEY INN 

ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS 
HASTE AT TELEGRAPH 



BERKELEY 



E. O. Corson, Mgr. Telephone: THornwall 3-1632 

ACTEEN CHEMICAL SERVICE CO. 

Complete Service For 

AGRICULTURAL (Garden) and STRUCTURAL PEST CONTROL 

SOIL IMPROVEMENT • WEED CONTROL 

Second and Addison Streets BERKELEY 2. CALIFORNIA 



Page 64 



POUCE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



ITALIAN DINNERS 



WALDORF BUFFET 

NEVER A DULL MOMENT 



215 SECOND AVENLE 



SAN M-ATEO. CALIF. 



Telephone 3-9566 Residence 3-6903 

ROLLADIUM 

SMOOTH SKATING 

Ed». W. (Ted I Stollery. 0»iier-Manager 

363 N BA-SSHORE BL\ D. SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



Mr. and Mrs. Kratft, Owners 



Phone S. M. 3-9774 



SAN MATEO MOTOR INN 

STRICTLY MODERN 

Bayrhore Highway at Ninth .Avenue S.AN .M.ATEO. CALIF. 

hbone S. M. 4-0213 AI. Gaddini, Prop. 

PIONEER AUTO PARTS 

NEW AND USED PARTS 

24 BAYSHORE BL\ D SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



T. O. Foley 



C. W. Boettcher 



FOLEY 8C BOETTCHER LUMBER CO. 



Phone 3-224S 
Bayshore Highway & Cypress .Ave. 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



AH SAM FLORAL CO. 

WHERE FLOWERS ARE FOREVER BEAUTIFUL 



Telephone 5. 162 I or 5.1b22 
2645 SO. EL CAMINO 



SAN MATEO 



Telephone 4-3cOI Mrs. H. Pamplin, Owner & Mgr. 

MOTEL AVALON 

50 MODERN COTTAGES 
220 NO. BAYSHORE BL\ D. SAN M.ATEO. CALIF. 

Phone S. M. 3-9916 INGERSOLL 

HOLLYWOOD AUTO COURT 

ADJOINING SAN MATEO GOLF COURSE 

20 MINUTES FROM SAN FRA.NCISCO 

U. S. HIWAY 101 BYPASS SAN MATEO. CALIF. 

GFVTNS" COCKTAILS 

ESPECIALLY FOR YOU 
ROY aVENS 
19th AVE AT BAYSHORE 



SAN MATEO 



SAN BRUNO COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



695 SAN MATEO 



ST. JAMES HOTEL 



27) RAILROAD AVE 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



SAN MATEO and BURLINGAME 
BUS AND TRANSIT O. 



14 14 EAST THIRD STREET 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



COCKTAILS 



THE FRIENDLY CORNER CAFE 

•THE PLACE TO MEET YOUR FRIENDS" 



Joe Selmi 
John Lucia 
Guido B.anchina 



203 South Delaware 

Corner Second Avenue 

SAN MATEO 

Phone S. M. 3-9775 



A. Soletti 



J. Wessa 



Cbas. P. Berr7»»a Phone 3-2320 

ALADDIN RUG CLEANING CO. 

MATTRESSES RENOVATED - UPHOLSTERING 
508 SIXTH A\ENLE SAN MATEO. CALIF. 

BAY MEADOWS COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Phone S M 3 '>'>28 

2128 El Camino Real - Corner 21st Avenue 
SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



SAN MATEO ARTISTIC 
IRON WORKS 



317 SIXTH A\ENUE 



Telephone 3-8746 

SAN MATEO. CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-8395 



GLEN LOCKE REFRIGERATION 

COMMERCIAL and HOUSEHOLD SALES and SERVICE 
AUTHORIZED BENDIX SERVICE 



12 U EL CAMINO REAL 



SAN MATEO. CALIF 



Frank Fernandez, Prop. 



Phone 4-3694 



PIEDMONT HOTEL 

BLUE ROOM CAFE AND HOTEL 
CHOICE LIQUORS 



300 SECOND A\ E. 



SAN MATEO. CALIF. 



PERL^T & SONS 

DESOTO-PLYMOUTH 
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS 



Phone 3-4543 



1320 EL CAMINO 



S.AN M.ATEO 



HARRY W. OVERSON and CO. 

Plumbing and Heating 

GLIDDEN PAINTS • LIGHT HARDWARE 



4070 EL CAMINO REAL 



DIAL SAN MATEO 5-1705 



Telephone San Mateo 3-2417 



BURLINGAME FRENCH LAUNDRY 



CASH AND CARRY 
B. H. Jacohberner. Owner 



704 SAN MATEO DRIVE 



SAN MATEO. CALIFORNIA 



NITE HAWK CAFE 

OPEN ALL NIGHT • MEALS AT ALL HOURS 
ALSO SHORT ORDERS AND LIQUORS 



1 BAYSHORE HlCHVtA'i 



SAN MATEO 



Henry MitvaUky, Prop. Telephone S. M. 5-9934 

HENRYS SUPER SERVICE GARAGE 

TOWING • AUTOMOBILE REBUILDING 

19lh Avenue and Bayshore Blvd. SAN MATEO. CALIF, 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



t—^ 



CONWAY 

and 
CULLIGAN 

HOME BUILDERS 
CONTRACTORS 

Established 23 Years 



37th Avenue at El Camino Real 
SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone San Mateo 5-1645 



CASA MATEO INN 

J. Emmet Jones, Mgr. 

Hotel Accommodations 
Dining Room 
Coffee Shop 

Cocktail Lounge 



350 N. Bayshore 
SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone San Mateo 4-1373 or 36042 



T *~ 



SAN MATEO 

AUTOMOTIVE 

SERVICE 

BUY SELL 

BRITISH AUSTIN 

DESOTO - PLYMOUTH 

EXPERTS 



Telephone 4-2435 
501 B Street at Fifth Ave. 

SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 



HILLSDALE 

BUILDERS SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

Complete Line of 

LUMBER 

SHINGLES 
HARDWARE 

BUILDING 
MATERIALS 



Telephone San Mateo 5-1565 
3011 El Comino Real 

SAN MATEO, CALIFORNL\ 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



BURLINGAME POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(ConUnued from page 19) 
school traffic work take part in the parade. The annual 
review was witnessed by a big crowd of interested citi- 
zens including all municipal officers. 

Four hundred new homes in the Ray track and a hun- 
dred more contemplated in Burlingame Manor on the Sky 
line, has posed a police problem for Chief Theuer. He 
is in hopes of getting two more men and a patrol car 
to cover this newly acquired territory. 

Autoists, claim Chief Theuer, have adjusted them- 
selves to the parking meter, and the number of violations 
have made a very material drop over the first months the 
meters were installed and parkers forgot to properly feed 
the gadgets. 

Crime in Burlingame has not increased with the growth 
of the population during the past year, and most of that 
which occurs is of a petty nature. 



B. Hansen 



Phone 3-1926 



AUTO BODY RECONSTRUCTION 

COLLISION DAMAGE REPAIRED 
AUTO PAINTING 



1045 CALIFORNIA DRIVE 



BURLINGAME, CALIF. 



Phone: Burlingame 3-2159 



A. H. DITTMANN 



PLUMBING 



HEATING 



JOBBING A SPECIALTY 
SERVICING 



1109 CALIFORNIA DRIVE 



BURLINGAME. CALIF. 



Lloyd B. Bcrnhard 



Phone 4-2436 



MASONRY SUPPLY CO., INC. 

EVERYTHING FOR MASONRY CONTRUCTION 



INDUSTRIAL WAY 



BURLINGAME 



WATER HEATERS WATER SOFTENERS 

W. E. ALLEN 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 



Phone Burlingame 3-6610 



1229 CALIFORNIA DRIVE 



BURLINGAME. CALIF. 



Phone 3-7068 



W. C. PALAMOUNTAIN 

PLUMBING, REPAIRING AND HEATING 
WATER HEATERS - STOVES CONNECTED 



929 CALIFORNIA DRIVE 



BURLINGAME. CALIF. 



David M. Garvey 



Phone Burlingame 3-2414 



GARVEY SHEET METAL 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 
AIR CONDITIONING 



1212 DONNELLY AVENUE 



BURLINGAME. CALIF. 



HIGHLAND 
CLEANERS 

New Modern Plant 

Drive In Service For 
Cash and Carry Customers 

Pick Up and Delivery Service 

Quality — Prompt and Efficient Service 



Cash and Carry Laundry 

475 EI Camino Real— Millbrae 2800 
Burlingame 4-1294 



ANYTHING IN 
SHEET METAL 

BROADWAY HEATING 

and 
SHEET METAL WORKS 

Phone 4-3641 

Furnaces - Blower Type Furnaces 

Air Conditioning - Ventilating 

Jobbing - Contractors 

No Job Too Small 
or Too Large 



1025 California Drive 

BURLINGAME, CALIFORNL\ 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



BAYSHORE PLUMBING 
AND SUPPLY CO. 

Successor to Fr.^nk J. Regan" 

PLUMBING and HEATING 
CONTRACTOR 

Floor Furnaces and Gas-Fired Heating Appliances 
Water Heaters 

865 Bayshore Blvd. 

BURLINGAME, CALIFORNIA 

Phone BuRLiNGAME 3-1887 or 3-1888 
y ... ......................... .,....,_.. 

Hors D'Oeuvres Served Every 
Afternoon and Night 

COLONIAL CLUB 

Joe and Marie Welte 
269 Primrose Road 

BURLINGAME, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 31157 ' 



UNITED MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEAT 
BEER AND WINE 



338 Main Street 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Woodland 927 



V. Gould, Owner N. P. Burns, Mgr. 

Agent: UNITED VAN LINES. Inc. 

RELIABLE VAN LINES 

Local and Nationwide Service 

Insurance Coverage - Fireproof Storage 

SAN MATEO OFFICE 
1745 El Camino Real 

San Mateo 5-1688 



CHICAGO RESTAURANT 

American and Chinese Dishes 
Chinese Food to Take Out 

411 Main Street 

WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Woodland 520 



MIDLAND 
CHEVROLET CO. 

TOWING 

Day Phone 111 

NiTE AND Sunday Phone 1227 

168 Main Street 

WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



DUTCHER BROS. 

THE WOODLAND 
CLEANERS AND DYERS 

W. M. CoUGLE, Proprietor 

413 Third Street 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Phones: 383 and 384 

CANTON CAFE 

Chop Suey - Chow Mein 

Noodles 

We Serve the Best Chinese and American Dishes 

Open 5 A.M. to 2 A.M. 

Orders to Take Out 

417 Main Street 

WOODLAND, CALIFORNL\ 

Phone 1152 



-•t 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



CHIEF C. L. COLLINS 

(Continued from page 1 7) 

in a 10 foot by 10 foot room on a building on the site 
of the present City Hall, in which the Police Department 
new has fine headquarters. 

How well the law is enforced and how law abiding are 
the people of Redwood City, can be gauged by the fact 
that there has been only one murder in 25 years, and that 
one was a Mexican. 

Not since Chief Collins joined the Department has 
there been a bank robbery. But there was ahnost one. 
Back in the early 1920's a down and outer appealed to 
Chief Collins for a meal. He said he was hungry. Chief 
Collins, noted for his kindness and sympathy for the un- 
fortunates, took him into a restaurant in the Sequoia Hotel 

Phone EMerson 6-6695 

D A R R E L L 
AUTO UPHOLSTERY CO. 

AUTO BODY PAI>mNG - AUTO TOPS 



Call For and Delivery Service 
Telephone: Redwood 3803-J 

ANDREW'S CLEANERS 



TAILORING 



HEGELHEIMER BROS. 
Owners and Operators 



ALTERATIONS 



878 JEFFERSON AVENUE 

Opp. U. S. Post Office 
REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



REDWOOD CITY 



2504 SI Camino Real 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW OCEANA INN 



LIQUORS • WINES 

2635 El Camino Real 
REDWOOD CITY 



BEER 



Phone 2859 



CALIFORNIA 



REDWOOD CITY 



CLUB TONGA 

Cocktail Lounge 

Phone EMerson 6-9895 
2545 El Camino Real 



CALIFORNIA 



"Hap" E. Belardi Owen Smith, "Porp" 

DRINK and SING • DINE and DANCE 

WHO CARES 

2907 El Camino Phone EM. 6-9920 

REDWOOD CITY CALIFORNIA 

MAGNANI'S MARKET 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND GROCERIES 
BEER AND WINE 

Phone Redwood 46 

El Camino Reab and Whipple Ave. 

REDWOOD CITY CALIFORNIA 



CLEMENT HOTEL 



524 Clement Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BALBOA CLUB 

3707 Balboa Street 



HULL BROTHERS, Inc. 
Washers - Radios - Refrigerators 

Occidental Ranges - Dinnerware and Glassware 

A Complete Line of General Hardware 

Dutch Boy Paints 

Phone Redwood City EM 6-6694 

MAIN AT BROADWAY REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



Pho 



e: San Carlos 3 7 



ATLAS LUMBER 8C SUPPLY CO. 

BUILDING SUPPLIES -::- ALBRITE PAINTS 
WE HAUL ANYTHING 



1381 OLD COUNTY ROAD 



REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 



GRAY THORNING LUMBER CO. 

EMerson 6-6693 

All Kinds of 

BUILDING MATERIAL 



REDWOOD CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Redwood 12 53 



BLOMQUIST OIL SERVICE 

ROAD OILS • HEATING OILS 
EMULSIFIED ASPHALT 

Plant Chestnut and Bayshore Blvd. 
REDWOOD CITY CALIFORNIA 

HERB'S SMOKE SHOP 

CIGARS AND SOFT DRINKS 
SNOOKER POOL 



REDWOOD CITY 



Telephone Redwood 243 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone EMerson 6-6817 



BOURQUIN MOTORS 

Hudson Sales and Service 
THIS — TIME — IT'S HUDSON 

Harry Bourquin, Dealer 
<>23 JEFFERSON AVENUE REDWOOD CITY. CALIF. 

HI-WAY DRIVE IN MARKET 

2280 El Camino Real, at Corner of Hazel Phone EMerson 6-9842 

VEGETABLES • MEATS • GROCERIES 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in all Seasons 

Meats and Poultry • Fresh Fish on Friday 

All Types of Imported and Domestic Groceries 

FREE DELIVERY 

WINES • LIQUORS • BEER 

REDWOOD CITY CALIFORNIA 



EL CAMINO GROCERY 

Florence L. Alford, Owner 
1034 EL CAMINO REAL BELMONT, CALIF. 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 69 



and told the proprietor to give the man a meal and put 
him up for the night, the Chief paying for the same. 

The dovvn-and-outer was so grateful for this kindly act, 
that when he learned his benefactor as the Pohce Chief 
he told Chief Collins there was going to be a bank stick 
up, which of the town's two banks was to be the victim, 
he was unable to say. The holdup would take place the 
following Monday or Wednesday, Tuesday being Wash- 
ington's birthday, and the banks close on such holidays. 

Chief Collins at once made provision to cover both 
banks on the days given him, as well as before the earlier 
date. He sure was ready for the men who planned the 
job. But it wasn't necessary'. On Monday, February' 21, 
four men went into the bank at Alvarado, in Alameda 



'1 



"A-1" GLASS COMPANY 



1802 El Camino Real 
REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA I 

PJione EM. 6-2212 



S & F Woodwork Shop, Inc. \ 

2261 Spring Street 

Redwood City, California 

Phone EMerson 6-5664 



General and Detailed Milhvork - Expert Formica 

and Cabinet Work - Expert Bar and Fi-xture Work 

and Stairwork - Lumber, Mouldings and Rustic 



FREE ESTIMATES 



PROGRESS 
LUMBER COMPANY 

LUMBER - MILLWORK 
PAINTS - HARDWARE 

Home of 
MERNER-BILT GREENHOUSES 

2425 EI Camino Real 
REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Phones EM. 6-4^12 - P.A. 2-3700 



MISSION CARPET HOUSE 



665 El Camino Real 



REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNL^ I 



Rugs - Linoleum - Asphalt Tile - Rubber Tile 

Venetion Blinds and Window Shades 

Electric Appliances - Refrigerators - Stoves 

Radios - Rental Cervice 

Floor Sanders - Polishers and Vacuum Cleaners 



Call EMerson 6-4947 for Free Estimates 
Special attention to City and County Employees 



EDWIN H. SMITH 

CIVIL ENGINEER 

Chestnut and Bay Streets 

REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNL\ 

Telephone Redwood 1722 
P. O. Box 980 



PENINSULA METAL 
MOULDINGS CO. 



Metal Trims 
Formica Fabrications 
Weatherstripping 
General Millwork 



Plastic Sink Tops 

Builders Hardware 

Screens and Doors 

Dinette Sets 



EICHROME PRODUCTS 

2955 Middlefield Road 

REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNL\ 

Telephone EM. 6-0118 



R. W. POLLEX 

Automotive and Furniture 
Upholstering 

2659 Middlefield Road 

REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Pho7ie EM. 6-265 5 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April 1948 



county, stuck it up, took several thousands of dollars and 
shot and killed one man. They were soon rounded up. 
They admitted to Sheriff Barnett of Alameda that they 
intended to hold up a Redwood City bank the following 
Wednesday. 

The few burglaries of major proportion are quickly 
solved by arrests and convictions. 

Chief Collins cruises in his police car, every section of 
his town every day in the week, and he is popular with 
all, old and young. 

He is a firm believer in educational courses having to 
do with police service, and he last year assigned Sergeant 
Cole Stafford to take a course in juvenile problems at the 
University of Southern California, and currently he has 
Lieutenant Stanley Wood attending the present session 
of the FBI Police Academy in Washington, D. C. 

PENINSULA TAMALE PARLOR 

TAMALES - ENCHILADAS - BEANS - RICE - BEER 
GOOD SERVICE 



1112 EI Camino 



REDWOOD CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



ROY'S CLEANERS 



1100 EI Camino Real 



REDWOOD CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



The 

HEDAHL-MARTIN 

COMPANY 

General Contractors 

Members of A.G.C. 

COMMERCIAL 

and 

RESIDENTIAL 

CONSTRUCTION 

501 Standish Street 
REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 

EMerson 6-13.^6 



T »■* 



ROCK Y S 

709 El Camino Real 

Redwood City 



LINOLEUM 
AWNINGS 
SHADES 
VENETIAN BLINDS 
RUGS 
CARPETS 
DRAPERIES 
FURNITURE 

CURRIE 

MANUFACTURING 

COMPANY 

2426 El Camino Real 

REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone EMerson 6-4670 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 71 



Peninsula Peace Officers' New Officers 

Sergeant Russell Cunningham, of the San Bruno Police Treasurer — Officer Leroy Hubbard. 
Department, is the 1948 president of the Peninsula Police New Trustee — Sergeant Cole Stafford, junior past 

Officers' Association. As this Association starts on its president. 
22nd year it does so with the largest membership in its Sergeant-at-Arms — Officer Edward Pence. 

history, and those who know the current president are 

well satisfied that he and his corps of officers will con- 

BRISBANE ENN 




Sergeant Russell Clnnincham 

tinue the organization's welfare and social activities that 
have become so outstanding since formed back in 1927. 

Sergeant Cunningham is a native of San Bruno, though 
he was bom in a San Francisco hospital on August 13, 
1915. There were no matemit>' hospitals around San 
Bruno in that Panama-Pacific World Fair year. 

He attended grammar school in San Bruno and gradu- 
ated from the Burlingame High School, after which he 
went to work for the Bethlehem Steel Co. On October 1 , 
1938 he joined his home town Police Department and 
as a member of Chief William Maher's force he has 
proven his merit in many ways. Particularly in February' 
1946 when he was shot by Bandit Winchell who ■w.nth a 
companion had held up the Albatross Tavern. The brave 
officer was shot through the stomach and one wrist. He 
was in the hospital for one month and off duty four months 
as the result of this shooting affair. Winchell and his 
pal were arrested and the former is now in Folsom, the 
latter, who sang, got off with a jail sentence. 

In November last year Officer Cunningham was pro- 
moted to sergeant, and takes his turn on the office watch, 
which rotates every three months. 

He was married on February' 2, 1937, and he and his 
wife, Rosa, have two daughters, Rosanna, 7 years and 
Suzanne, 3 years of age. 

Other officers of the Peninsula Officers' Association are : 

First Vice President — Sergeant John Price. 

Second Vice President — Officer Donald Lowe. 

Secretary — Captain John J. Hartnett, who has held 
the job since 1928. 



50 VlSiTACIO.N AVE. 



BRISBANE 



CALIFORNIT 



THE BRISBANE DRUG STORE 



BRISBANE 



CALIFORNIT 



FRANK FERNANDEZ 

FURNITURE REFINISHING • REDECORATING 
ANTIQUES A SPECIALTY 



2800 Middlefield Road 
REDWOOD CITY 



EM. 6-4416 



CALIFORNIA 



REDWOOD ICE DELIVERY 



GOOD SERVICE 



S5 Perry Street 



REDWOOD CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



SCHOENFELD 
FURNITURE CO. 

"FOR BETTER FURNITURE" 

1808 El Camino Real 

REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone EMerson 6-1672 



NORTH REDWOOD 
CABINET SHOP 

E. S.ANDBERG cr Sd.ns 
GENERAL MILL WORK 

See Us for Estimates 
Old County Road and Center Street 

REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNL\ 

Telephone S.an Carlos One Nine 



Page 72 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



DALY CITY 

( Continued from page 1 8) 

Daly City was the first to go after civil service for its 
police officers, starting the movement in 1936 when an 
act made effective civil service for cities of the sixth class. 
But while it was the leader in this move it was the last 
to get the benefit of this act, for a suit was introduced 
into the courts to prevent Daly City from enjoying the 
change and not until the supreme court had passed on 
the legality of the matter was it possible for the town to 
go under this act. 

Chief Sunderland, who was given a temporary appoint' 
ment a year ago this month took the civil service exami- 
nation for the office of Chief and passed and last February 
was given permanent status. 

He has done much to improve his force of well trained 
and experienced men. He gives the city a 24'hour a day 
patrol service. Three automobiles with two-way radio 
and two motorcycles — the second one of these machines 
has been added since Chief Sunderland took over, cover 
the 31 miles of streets and two major highways that go 
through the city. 



Jones Sheet Metal and Plumbing 

A. E. Jones, Prop. 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 
"If It's Made of Sheet Metal, We Make It" 



Phone DEIaware 3-38S2 — Day or Night 



6726 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY 



Deputy Coroner 
Lady Attendant 



JUniper 7-0670 
JUniper 5-0610 



W. C. LASSWELL & COMPANY 

Morticians 



6154 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY, CALIF. 



FRANK GIGLI 

JOBBING AND CONTRACTING 
PLUMBING HEATING 



Estimates Given 



All Work Guaranteed 



Telephones DEIaware 3-6249 - 3-54S0 

6842 - 44 Mission Street 

DALY CITY 25. CALIFORNIA 



ASSOCIATED POULTRY CO. 

DRESSED MILK FED POULTRY 
Wholesale and Retail 



JUniper 4-7429 

JUniper 4-7430 

Res. JUniper 5-2919 



7339 MISSION STREET 
DALY CITY, CALIF. 



HILL TOP LODGE 

A CONGENIAL SPOT 
YOU'LL LIKE A LOT 



DANCING 

22 HILLCREST DR. 



COCKTAILS 



DALY CITY 



NEW GLOBE 



JUniper 7-9996 



MOTORVILLE AUTO COURT 

STRICTLY MODERN 

7500 Mission Street, on U. S. Highway 101 

Mailing; Address 

Rl, Box 219-A. COLMA, CALIFORNIA 

Fifteen Minutes Drive to San Francisco Civic Center 

Phone JUniper 7-9882 



101 ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

G. Bollentini and E. Giannini, Props. 
LUNCHES - CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS 



7332 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY. CALIF. 



BaBe & Deno 



7399 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone: JUniper 4-9069 

SILVER MOON TAVERN 

Ratto and Giovacchini 

"A GOOD PLACE TO MEET A FRIEND" 

212 SCHOOL STREET. DALY CITY (San Mateo County), CALIF. 
65 12 Mission Street JUniper 4-4469 



PINE GROVE HOG CO. 



JU. 7-7445 



44 BISMARK STREET 



DALY CITY, CALIF. 



Russell H. Papenhausen Peter C. Bello 

PLYWOOD - GLASS - MOULDING 

VISTA GRANDE SUPPLY 

UNFINISHED AND GARDEN FURNITURE 
HARDWARE - BUILDING SUPPLIES - HOMEWARES 



DALY CITY SHEET METAL WORKS 

Frank C. Neumann 

AIR CONDITIONING • GAS FURNACES 

SKY LIGHTS • GENERAL REPAIRING 

WATER HEATERS • ALL TYPES 



HILLSIDE FISH GROTTO 

FRIED SEA FOOD • SALADS 

COCKTAILS • CHOWDERS • CIOPPINO 

SANDWICHES 



2123 JUNIPERO SERRA 



Phone: DE. 30300 



JU. 7 9906 



CENTRAL CLUB 

WINES, BEER AND LIQUORS 

"U'hffv Good FeUoivs Meet" 



ANDY SARDI 



6282 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY, CALIF. 



6644 MISSION STREET 



DALY CITY 



MILLBRAE CREAMERY 



325 EL CAMINO REAL 



MILLBRAE 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 73 



The policing areas near schools is unique in Daly City. 
There isn't much in the way of junior traffic patrols. As a 
result the hours of the men of the Police Deparement 
have been arranged so that the members of the Depart- 
ment can take over the work of seeing the school children 
get to and from the schools of the district. 

The first watch starts at 00 a. m. and ends at 5 p. m. 
The men on this watch give up their noon lunch hour 
to work around and at the schools, and they are on duty 
at the opening and the closing of the schools. The second 
shift goes on at 5 p. m. and works until 1 a. m. and the 
1 a. m. shift ends at 9 a. m. 

As is the case in most small Departments there is no 
special details to handle different crimes. When a burg- 
lary, a robbery or any other crime comes up the case 
is assigned to the men on duty at the time, and they 
are all well able to give a good account of themselves 
in any and all manner of crimes, misdemeanors or felonies. 
You will find the records show that they maintain a mighty- 
high percentage of arrests for all crimes committed within 
their jurisdiction. 

Traffic of course is very heavy through Daly City but 



L. BOCCI & SONS 

MEMORIALS 

COLMA (San Mateo County), CALIF. 

HUGHES CAFE 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

Hours 6 A.M. to 10 P.M. 

101 North Euclid Avenue 



ONTARIO 



CALIFORNIA 



PEDESTA AND SON 

ALL KINDS OF PLANTS AND FLOWERS 



COLMA 



C.ALIFORM.A 



PAGNI'S PLACE 

WHERE WE EAT, DRINK AND DANCE 



7335 MISSION STREET 



COLMA 



WITT AND SON 



DAIRY 



COLMA 



CALIFORNIA 



Ric Bollentini 



Nat Zanini 



Phone RAndolph 9850 

RIC'S PLACE 

BANQUETS AND DINNERS SERVED BY APPOINTMENT 

BEERS - WINES - LIQUORS - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

BELLI BLDG., Opp. BANK COLMA. CALIF. 

Res. Phone DElaware 3-2714 Bus. Phone DEIaware 3-7438 

BOUQUET FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



MISSION ROAD 



COLMA, CALIF. 



BANQUET AND DINNER PARTIES A SPECIALTY 

ESTRADA'S SPANISH KITCHEN 

SPANISH DISHES A SPECIALTY 

WE MAKE UP ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

JU. 7-7686 7440 Mission Road 

COLMA. CALIF., Also at FRESNO AND VISALIA 



A. Pantaleoni 



J. Picchi 



A. Craviotto 



COLOMBO BOX CO. 



BOX 425 



JU. 7-3544 
ALL KINDS OF BOXES AND CRATES 

COLMA 25. CALIF. 



JLniper 7-9902 



STUMBLE IN 

COCKTAILS AND DANCING 
Hillside Boulevard at Castle Street 



COLMA 



CALIFORNIA 



OIL INDUSTRY INSTALLATIONS AND MAINTENANCE 

COMPETENT WELDING SERVICE 

SHOP AND FIELD CONCRETE 

CUTTING AND AIR COMPRESSOR WORK 



HUNTER-WORKS 
General Contractors 



7480 MISSION STREET 



JUniper 4-3865 



COL.MA. CALIF. 



JUnipsr 7-9169 



overland 1.4401 



PAPPAS BROTHERS 

GREENHOUSES AND NURSERIES 
CUT FLOWERS, PLANTS, SHRUBS 

Flowers Shipped to All Points 
PROMPT EFFICIENT SERVICE 



COLMA 



CALIFORNIA 



G. Poletti & v. Vanni 



Phone RAndolph 2557 



HILLTOP NURSERY 



HILLSIDE BOULEVARD 



COLMA, CALIFORNIA 



R. SARTON TAVERN 



LIQUOR 



MILLBRAE 



CALIFORNIA 



In COLMA It's 

puccmrs place 

COCKTAILS 

Lunch, 11 to 2 
Italian Dinners, 5 to 9 

Joe Borelli, Mgr. 

17 SAN PEDRO ROAD 

COLMA, CALIFORNL\ 



Junipero Serra Hospital 

Phone JU. 4-9856 

COLMA, CALIFORNIA 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



it is a tribute to the men charged with enforcing the 
traffic laws that the death rate is surprisingly low when 
compared with the thousands upon thousands of cars 
that go through Daly City. There has been but four 
fatalities to date this year. 

Since Chief Sunderland assumed the top job of the 
Department he has been given five new men, and they 
are all war vetearns. 

The oldest man in point of service on the PoHce force 
is Edmund Heim, who was appointed June 17, 1929, a 
few months before Chief Sunderland joined. 

There are four sergeants in the Department — William 
Bolger, a member since August 1, 1933. He has charge 
of the office during the day watch, keeping the records, 
attending the radio calls and collecting city Ucenses. 

Margo Benedetti, who became a patrolman on Janu' 
ary 1, 1937. 

Roland Petrocchi who joined on October 1, 1941 and 
Roy Beecher a member since August 4, 1943. 

Officer Dean Wood, a policeman since June 21, 1944, 
is on office duty from 5 p. m. to 1 a. m., while Officer 
George Savage who, on June 14, ended 10 years as a 
Daly City policeman, has the 1 a. m. to 9 a. m. office 
watch. 

These assignments are all made under the rules of 
seniority, the oldest man getting his pick of the watch 
he desires to have. 

The motorcycle detail is made up a Officer Henrj' 
Sutherland, appointed February 16, 1941, and Officer 
Edward Beecher appointed July 18, 1944. 



Compliments 

Lake Merced Golf 

and 

Country Club 



i 



MISSION 
AUTO COURT 

A good place to stay while yisiting 

SAN FRANCISCO 



110 COTTAGES 
70 KITCHENETTES 



15 Minutes 
From Civic Center 



6843 Mission Street 

(U. S. Highway 101) 

Daly City, California 

Phone JUxiper 7o"8i8 



MARTIRE 

& 
McKINNEY 

General Contractors 

ALTERATIONS 

NEW or OLD 

GENERAL 
CONSTRUCTION 



J.^CK CuRRY 6235 Mission Street 

Supt. and Engineer JU. 6-1186 

DALY CITY, CALIFORNL^ 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 75 



The rest of the personnel is made up of Officers George 

I Hopman, August Benassini, David Johnstone, James 

i Welsh, Arthur Linares and John Walsh. 

[ The salaries of police officers has climbed since Chief 

i Sunderland first pinned a star to his police jacket. At 

I that time the pay was $170 per month, now it is $265 

and in addition to that they have a good pension setup, 

being in on the state plan, when a man with 20 years 

service can retire at the age of 55 on half salary. Most 

other cities the age is 60 years. 

Pete Makris Phone LA. 2-9933 

STEP INN CLUB 

BROILED STEAKS AND CHICKEN 

DANCING EVERY NIGHT 

1313 PARK STREET ALAMEDA, CALIF. 

CLEMENT LAUNDRY 

Telephone LAkehurst 2-7587 
2412 CLEMENT AVENUE ALAMEDA, CALIF. 

PARISIAN LAUNDRY 

ONE HUNDRED PER CENT UNION 
2319 LINCOLN AVENUE Telephone LAkehurst 3-0626 

Builder of Artistic Homes 

CHRIS OMMUNDSON 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

LAkehurst 2-2152 
1630 NINTH STREET ALAMEDA. CALIF. 





DUFFY'S 


CORNER 


FRANCIS E. DUFFY, Prop. 


JUN. 4-9922 


6398 Mission Street 


Daly City 



DALY CITY 
AMUSEMENT CENTER 

Ken B.assler, Prop. 

SNOOKER and BILLIARDS 



.—_ » *•- 



BALBOA 

BUILDING 

MATERIALS 

MURPHY PAINTS 

Materials and Tools 

for 

Cement and Plaster Work 

Office 

101 France Avenue 

San Francisco 

1831 Junipero Serra Blvd. 

DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone JUniper 7-8288 



DALY CITY MILL 
& LUMBER CO. 



t 



1859 Junipero Serra Blvd. 

DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone JUniper 5-2816 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



New Police Building For San Bruno 



It looks like San Bruno is going to have new police 
headquarters, thus falling in line with so many other 
San Mateo County Police Departments. The city treas- 
ury has the money for erecting a modern office building, 
and on April 13 the voters are to pick out one of two 
sites on the El Camino Real. We hope to tell where the 




Chief William Maker 

site will be if the vote is made known before this edition 
goes to press. 

Chief William Maher, veteran head of the Department 
has been cramped for space for many years, and so tough 
had become his problem of insufficient space that he was 
moved from the lower floor of the City Hall to a spot 
in front of the Hall on the El Camino Real. This new 
place while more desirable lacks much in giving the police 
officers room to carry out their work. 

The plans for the new building will include all the 
latest in arrangement and equipment and will have an 
adequate jail to house prisoners. 

No Police Department has had as tragic experiences as 
has Sa-n Bruno's I2-man force. Within the past two years 
two of its members, Sergeant Cunningham and Deputy 
Chief Bedford, have been shot by bandits. Deputy Chief 
Bedford is now able to do a short shift each day. Also 
Officer Frank Bottari was the victim of a bad automobile 
accident, while chasing a suspect and is laid up to this 
day with two broken legs. 

During the past year two new officers have been added 
to the force. They arc Dee Barker and John Kain. 

Between the Bayshorc Freeway and the El Camino 
Real are some mighty heavily travelled cross roads and 
streets, and all these thoroughfares pose a problem that 
calls for continuous watching. However, through strict 
law enforcement, and alert men in patrol cars and motor- 
cycle riders the death rate from traffic accidents has been 
kept to one since a year ago in January. For 1946 three 



were killed in San Bruno's city limits. 

Chief Maher has organized a Junior Traffic Patrol, 
and now has 60 boys and girls well trained, doing traffic 
duty in front of the City's two schools, North Brae and 
Edgemont. This organization is under the direction of 
Motorcycle Officer Fred Gomes and his young charges 
have developed into a swell body of boys and girls who 
guard the school children of the two educational insti- 
tutions. 

Like its northern sister city, South San Francisco, San 

FRANK A. POIRIER 

REAL ESTATE 
INSURANCE - BUILDER 



487 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO. CALIFORNIA 



Telephone JUno 8-0952 



RICHARD DELUCCHI 

RICHARD DELUCCHI & CO., Builders 



420 SAN MATEO AVENUE 



SAN BRUNO. CALIFORNIA 



Telephone JUno. 8-44<)9 

WILLIAM K. WEAVER 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTING 
JOBBING AND WATER HEATERS 

1059 SAN MATEO A\ E. SAN BRUNO. CALIF. 



r—— 



"Don't Monkey Around" 
Call Juno 8-6442 

EDWARD J. NAGEL 

PLUMBING 

and 

HEATING 

APPLIANCES 



912 San Mateo Avenue 

SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA 



I 
1 



Apnl, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 77 



Bruno is becoming a favored sector of the Peninsula for 
business companies. There is now under construction a 
big plant being erected by the H. S. Crocker Company, 
of San Francisco, printers and stationers. This concern 
will move all its facilities to San Bruno and will employ 
^"0 people, most of whom, of course, vAW take up resi' 
Jcnce in that city. The building is on San Mateo avenue, 
]ust over the city line from South San Francisco, and 
c ivers many acres of area. 

Its industries such as this that increases the population 
''t cities like San Bruno, and with each new one there is 
I call for more police to look after the peace of those 
working for it. San Bruno officials do not hesitate to give 
Chief Maher additional men as the demand appears. 



CROCKER CLEANERS 

8-Hour Cleaning Service 
Call and Deliver 



t 

1, 



6215 Mission Street 

DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone: JUNIPER 7-5738 



190-192 El Camino Real - (Opposite Lomita Park) 

Phone JUxo 8->-247 

KIRKPATRICK'S 

W. H. KiRKP.ATRICK 

Complete Home Furnishers 

"Let Us Make a HOME 
Out of Your House" 



[_ 



440-A and 441 San Mateo Avenue 

SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone JUno 8-3025 



K A R P ' S 

M. K.ARP .\ND Sons 
Cleaning and Dyeing Works 

10 Dixon Court } 

DALY CITY 25, CALIFORNL\ } 

Phones; JUniper 4-3072 - 4-3073 



FOR RELIABLE 

PLUMBING 

—Call— 

A. M. HARRISON 



Water Heaters - Heating Systems - Stoves 
Sewers and Drains - Fully Insured 

DElaware 3-1991 

If no answer call JUniper 7-8333 

No Job Too Large or Too Small 
6236 Mission Street, San Francisco 



H. A. Je.^ns, Pro[>. 



Economy Food Market 



ARBUCKLE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2521 



Quality Meats and Groceries j 



I VILLA SANITARIUM 

{ Joseph L. S.^rto, Manager 

I 

Vale and Werner Streets 

DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

Westlake Apt. -Motel 

6800 Mission Street 
DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 



Page 78 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1948 



MERCED POLICE DEPARTMENT 

f Continued from page 13) 

might try their hand at some illegal endeavors. There isn't 
much crime in Merced and those who have sought to en- 
rich themselves by unlawful acts have been quickly round- 
ed up and sent to the state's penal institutions by the alert 
members of the Police Department. 

To those who might not he aware of the wonderful re- 
sources of Merced city and county it is interesting to know 
the county rates high in the country for its production of 
farm and range. 

In 1946 $83,359,680 were garnered from 100 crops, and 
with 3,000 counties of the nation surveyed Merced came 
out as follows: 

First in turkeys produced, third in alfalfa marketed, 
sixth in cattle raised, seventh in milk production and ninth 
in peaches picked, and the country ranks 20th in the 
United States for all farm products which beside those 
crops above mentioned includes nursery stock, vegetables, 
fruits and nuts, honey, chickens, sheep and hogs. 

And for the sportsmen theer is in season good sport 
fishing for trout, bass ahd catfish and upland game bird 
hunting as well as duck and geese preserves that attract 
mnay a gun bearer. 

Three members of Chief Hydic's department are training 
in a Merced airfield to secure pilot licenses, and they will, 
when qualified, give to the Merced Police Department 
their services in an aerial patrol. The officers are Melcher, 
Mabrey and Hamm. 



Bear Creek Service 

Groceries - Meats - Fresh Vegetables 
Notions - Gas and Oil 

Visit Our Cocktail Bar in Connection 

Cocktails - Beer - Wine - Soft Drinks 
and Delicious Home Cooked Food 

Highway 140 and Yosemite Highway 

Southeast of Merced, California 



HOTEL MERCED 

M. L. Si:i)i), Manager-Proprietor 

AIR-CONDITIONED 
THROUGHOUT 

POPULAR RATES 
Gateway to Yosemite 

17th and M. Streets 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Merced 491 



MONTY'S BAR-B-Q 
and Douglas Motor Inn 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinners 

Complete Fountain and Tray Service 

Moderate Priced Cabins 

Open 6:30 A.M. to 2:30 A.M. 

161 East 16th Street 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



k-— 



MERCED SERVICE 

"Russ ' Ed" 

"Signal Products" 

EXPERT LUBRICATION SERVICE 

MOTOR TUNE-UP - BRAKE SERVICE 

AUTO SUPPLIES 

16th and V Streets 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



NICK'S PLACE 

Beer, Wine, Soft Drinks 

Delicious Food and the Most 
Courteous Service in California 



Elm and Mt. View 

Caruthers (Fresno County), California 



W A T R Y 
your JEWELER 

Next to Bank of America 

511 Seventeenth Street 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 79 



San Carlos P. D- to Have New Quarters 



Chief Edward Wheeler, who has been head of the 
Police Department of San Carlos ever since the city was 
incorporated nearly 25 years ago is not going to take a 
back seat to any other Police Official in San Mateo county 
as far as having new headquarters for his force of ten men. 

Workmen are putting the finishing touches on remodel- 



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m^J 


HR|. ' ^^^' '^ M 




1 



siderably. During 1947 there were but three deaths from 
traffic accidents in the city limits. In 1946 there were six. 
His four patrol cars and their crews added their assistance 
of watching for the fast and reckless drivers. 

This year promises to be a lighter one as far as major 
crimes are concerned. Last year San Carlos had more 
than its share of robberies and burglars, all of which by 
the way have been cleared up by arrests and convictions. 
This year so far there has been but one robbery, that of a 
garden store and the suspect arrested. He is Thomas 
Clairborne. A grand theft kick in which $1200 in jewelry 
was clouted brought about the arrest of Robert Gibree. 

Chief Wheeler expects to have a house warming on the 
opening of his new headquarters sometime in May. 



LAURAL BAR 

WE SERVE FOOD AND ALL 
KIND OF DRINKS 

540 Laural Street 



Chief Edward Wheeler 

ling the picturesque city hall and the northern part has 
been assigned to the Police Department. 

There will be an ample sized assembly room, a recep- 
tion room with counter, a Chief room, a good size room 
for taking photographs and filing them, a radio room and 
another for the Identification Bureau. All will be fur- 
nished in the latest in lockers, furniture, filing cabinets, 
and other equipment. 

In the rear of the City Hall a garage for the police 
cars has been erected. It has space for five cars, each 
with individual doors and at one end there is a large room 
for storing recovered property. 

During the past year the Police Department has been 
placed under civil service and the members have since 
the first of 1947 been given a $40 a month increase in 
salary. Chief Wheeler comes under the civil service pro- 
visions as a Captain. 

The Chief has had one additional man. Sterling Thomas, 
appointed within the year and hopes to get another 
one soon. 

He has also added a three-wheel motorcycle officer, 
Charley Blake, to look after the enforcement of the one- 
hour parking law, as San Carlos has no parking meters, 
and the big stores that have sprung up in the fast growing 
city attracts thousands of people each day to do their 
shopping. 

With the large number of automobiles percolating along 
the El Camino Real his three motorcycle officers under 
Sergeant J. A. Edling, have slowed the boys down con- 



SAN CARLOS 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 555 



BAYSIDE OIL CORP. 

SUPPLYING MOTOR OILS AND 
GREASES FOR ALL NEEDS 



BRANSTEN ROAD 



SAN CARLOS, CALIF. 



SIERRA ELECTRONIC 
CORPORATION 



SAN CARLOS 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 

SAN CARLOS LUMBER 
COMPANY 



PACIFIC BUILDERS' SUPPLY 

"BUY RIGHT — BUILD RIGHT" 



Telephone SC 837-J 
Mailing Address: P. O. Box 99 

<)47 BRANSTEN ROAD 



SAN CARLOS, CALIF. 



BUY U. S. 



SAVINGS BONDS 



Page 80 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Apri], 1948 



Distributors for 

West Coast Forest Products 

O'NEILL LUMBER CO. 

"For a Square Deal - Call O'Neill' 



San Carlos 2427 

SAN CARLOS YARD 

966 Bransten Road 



Phone San Carlos il 



Joe Casaretto, Prop. 






SAN CARLOS 
SHEET METAL WORKS 

Gutters - Leaders - Repair Work - Skylights 

Warm Air Heating - Ventilating 

Air Conditioning 

779 Old County Road 

SAN CARLOS, CALIFORNIA 



Lenkurt Electric Co. 

Telephone and Telegraph 
Carrier Equipment 



Trancor Products, Inc. 

Powdered Metal Products 
and Specialty Transformers 



1105 County Road 
SAN CARLOS, CALIFORNIA 

Phone San Carlos 2430 



MATHEWS 

CONVEYOR 

COMPANY 

WEST COAST 

ROLLER and WHEEL TYPE 
GRAVITY CONVEYORS 

BELT-LINE ROLLER and CHAIN 
POWER CONVEYORS 

PORTABLE UNITS 

ENGINEERED SYSTEMS 

SAN CARLOS, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2007 



WESTERN 

PUMISTONE 

PRODUCTS CO. 

LIGHTWEIGHT 
CONCRETE 
PRODUCTS 



COMMERCIAL ROAD 

San Carlos, California 

San Carlos Phone 1202 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 81 



Service to His Majesty 
THE BABY 

Sanitary Diaper Service 

Exclusive Baby Laundry 

748-752 El Camino Real 

SAN CARLOS, CALIFORNIA 



D, A. Clark 



C. R. Brockman 



GLASS ENGINEERING 
LABORATORIES 

San Carlos I'iSt 

Scientific - Industrial 
Glass Products 

601 O'Neill 

BELMONT, CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC NEWS 

Gene Hartnett 
336 Third Avenue 

SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA 



EL REY THEATRE 
RAMONA THEATRE 

Elwoods Laws, Prop. 
WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA 






Indio War Surplus Co. 

Retail -:- Wholesale 
All Types Surplus Merchandise 

1173-1177 Highway 99 

INDIO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 7407 



>4 



Adeline and Ralph's 

KNOBBY PINE CAFE 

Finest Food, Wines and 
Champagne in City 



Phone 4516 

CATHEDRAL CITY, CALIF. 

( Riverside County ) 



Martinez Beverage Agency 

Blanche Glacosa, Prop. 

RAINIER - GLOW - SICKS SELECT 
BEER -::- MISSION ORANGE 

2039 Grant Street 

CONCORD, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 8166 



BERRY'S SERVICE 

TOWING 

Body and Fender Repairing 
Painting and Radiator Shop 

2089 Galindo Street 

CONCORD, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 8166 



Page 82 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



COALINGA- CALIFORNIA OIL CITY 



Chief Albert C. Griffith was born in Bakersfield in 1917, 
grew to manhood and had his schooHng in that city. He 
came to Coahnga in 1937 and entered the Pohce Depart- 
ment in May of 1939 as a patrolman and was made Cap- 
tain in 1942. His efficient work and faithful service to his 
community was a major reason for his appointment as 




Ciiir.F Albhrt C. Griffith 

Chief of the Coalinga Police Department in 1946. 

The Chief and his wife Louise, a Coalinga girl, have 
two children, a boy and a girl. 

There are six other officers and three radio operators on 
the department: 

Tom Quinney, Captain; Ben Fronaberger, R. J. Rose, 
Keith Holden, Don Phillips, Bob Carroll. Radio: Glen 
Sprague, Jim Cain, Nelta Benton, Thelma Hensley, day- 
time operator and personnel clerk and Inez Mize, relief 
operator. 

Coalinga is located in the extreme western portion of 
Fresno County, near the northern tip of Kettleman Hills, 
and is surrounded by a forest of oil derricks and many 
acres of irrigated farm land. It is the second largest city in 
Fresno County, with a population of 6,370; in addition to 
the population within the incorporated city, there are ap- 
proximately 6000 persons living within a radius of 25 
miles, an area of which Coalinga is the market center. It 
is the commercial, industrial, educational and agricultural 
center of the Western Empire of the San Joaquin Valley, 
and is the terminus of the Coalinga branch of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad. It is also served by Southwest Airways, 
which make four flights daily into Coalinga. 

Coalinga is the cross-roads for State Secondary High- 
way 33, north and south, and State Secondary Highway 
198, east and west. It is also the hub of the Airline High- 
way, the shortest route between Los Angeles and San Fran- 
cisco. 

Although the principal industry of the Coalinga district 
has always been the production of oil. in recent years agri- 
culture has taken an important place in the district. Ap- 



proximately 300,000 acres of irrigated land are under agri- 
cultural development; this includes the territory from the 
Boston Land Company and Huron to the east, and north to 
Five Points. Cotton, flax, grain, alfalfa, watermelons, 
Cantaloups, persian and honey dew melons, carrots, broc- 
coli, lettuce and peas constitute the main products. 

Livestock is also a major industry in Coalinga. The home 
of Weeth's Hog Ranch is near Coalinga, and has the most 
modern and best equipped hog pens in the West. 

A revival of early oil boom days struck the Coalinga 
area when, on June 30, 1938, the Petroleum-Securities 
Company brought in the Gatchell No. 2 well on what is 
known as Coalinga Nose, six miles northeast of the city, 
with a potential production of this one well estimated at 
15,000 to 20,000 barrels daily. This is rated as one of the 
biggest discoveries in California during the last 25 years. 
The Jacalitos Field, near Coalinga, was the major oil dis- 
covery in California in 1944; the Pleasant Valley Field 
has also been opened. Oil production in the Coalinga area 
during 1946 totaled 45,962,293 barrels at a market value 
of $60,210,630.00. 

The Coalinga Mineral Springs are located in the Coast 
Range Mountains 18 miles west of Coalinga, at an eleva- 
tion of 2500 feet. The Springs are reached by an all-year 
road branching off Highway 198. The hotel accommodates 
50 guests and is a splendid place for relaxation and rest. 

The Coalinga District Library has a well-rounded col- 
lection of 34,266 volumes, and 150 periodicals. The Li- 
brary's holdings in the fields of petroleum and geology are 
Particularly noteworthy. Visitors to Coalinga are always 
impressed by this modern, well equipped institution which 
is one of the best in the State. 

Coalinga enjoys the distinction of having one of the out- 
standing public school systems in the State, covering the 
grades from Kindergarten to Junior College, with a com- 
bined enrollment of 1600. 

The Community Youth Center was established in Coal- 
inga in 1940, with properly supervised games, reading 
rooms and playgrounds. The Center was the first in the 
State to be dedicated as a living memorial to the youth 
in the service of our Country. 

Coalinga "s annu.il ct)mmunity celebration is centered 



Where Good Friends Meet 

BEACON 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

MoLLiE - Grady - Mable 
145 E. ELM STREET 

COALINGA, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 579 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 83 



around the racing of horned toads. This is the CaUfornia 
Horned Toad Derby. The history of the celebration dates 
back to 1931, when it was started at a Chamber of Com- 
merce gathering at the Coalinga Mineral Springs. From 
there the celebration moved to the community picnic 
grounds in Warthan Canyon : for the past eight years this 
event has been staged in the main business district of the 
city. The racing arena is a large 16-foot canvas circle on a 
platform. Each horned toad is numbered and painted with 
distinctive markings for identification. The toads are 
placed in the center of the circle, and the first to reach the 
outside of the circle is the winner. 

Coalinga also celebrates Armistice Day on November 
11th, in observance of the ending of World War I and 
World War II. This community celebration is always 
sponsored by Coalinga Post No. 2, American Legion, and 
all the nearby towns enter floats in the parade. 

One of the points of interest near Coalinga is Doughnut 
Rock. This is approximately llj/z miles from town over 
county and mountain roads. The rock is approximately 
30 feet in diameter, and stands as a clear-shaped doughnut 
on the top of a ridge. The trip to Doughnut Rock makes 
an ideal Spring or Fall hiking trip. 

For another Spring or Fall outing, the famous Joaquin 
Rocks (Tres Piedras) is recommended. The Rocks are 
reached by the same road to Doughnut Rock, and are lo- 
cated 4 miles to the north, by trail. 

Joaquin Rocks are composed of three pinnacles of mas- 
sive, wind carved sandstone, set close together at the top 
of a mountain ridge and stand about 200 feet above the 
floor of the small hidden valley. 

This State Historic Landmark was used by the famous 
bandit, Joaquin Murrieta as a lookout point. From these 
rocks he sent his raiding parties down into the valley. A 
large cistern is on top of the center rock and after a good 
rainy season a substantial supply of drinking water is 
available from this natural storage tank. 

Joaquin Rocks area is rich in historic background. It has 
an abundant supply of trees, shrubs and many species of 
wildflowers. It is rich in native animal and bird life, and is 
unrivaled in geologic interest. 

Coalinga is the fourth most important fossil area in the 
United States. It owes its uniqueness to the fact that the 
territory sediments have been uplifted from the valley floor 
and formed an incline foothill range on the west side. 

The history of Coalinga, as a place of residence, may be 
traced to a homestead entry by M. L. Curtiss in 1882, cov- 
ering the site of the present city. The district was included 
in the original land grant to the Southern Pacific Railroad, 
a railroad was completed to Huron in 1877. 

Coalinga's early history is barren of picturesque inci- 
dent. It was first the home of the homesteader, living in 
rude cabins and eking out an existence on blue beans, bacon 
fContinued ori page 110) 

AL HASTINGS SERVICE 

R. R. No. I. Box U 
I H Miles from Lemoore 

41 and 198 Highway 
LEMOORE. CALIFORNIA 



ROGER'S CAFE 



AVENAL 



CALIFORNIA 



JOE & TED'S 

DEPOT IN CAFE 
Phone 166 



CLOVIS 



CALIFORNIA 



DOT'S DRIVE IN 

STEAKS, SHRIMPS AND CHICKEN 

also 

COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



Lemoore and D Street 



LEMOORE 



CALIFORNIA 



CHUCK'S DRIVE IN 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



Hours 5:30 A.M. to II P.M. 



22 1 EAST ELM STREET 



COALINGA. CALIF. 



STATE MARKET 

Young Brothers 
GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



325 North Fifth Street 



Phone 263 



COALINGA 



CALIFORNIA 



Air-cooled 



Telephone 386-W 



Parking Space 



CLUB CAFE 

"WHERE THE LIGHTS ARE BRIGHT 
AND THE FOOD JUST RIGHT" 



308 North Filth Street 



COALINGA 

B. MOTTE 
J. MOTTE 



CALIFORNIA 



F. A. MOTTE 
V. J. MOTTE 



B. M. FOOD MARKET 

Established 1920 

405 North Fifth Street Telephone 571 

COALINGA CALIFORNIA 

Joe Perry, Prop. 



Phone 3701 



KERMAN CLUB 

LIQUOR • BEER • WINE 

MIXED DRINKS 

MEALS SERVED 



KERMAN 



CALIFORNIA 



RENO POOL HALL 

AND LUNCH ROOM 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

George and Bill, Props. 

CARUTHERS (Fresno County). CALIF. 



Page 84 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, 1948 

Reedley Has Young Chief of Police 



When in 1942 Emmet L. Remy was appointed Chief 
or Pohce, he was one of the youngest men ever to be placed 
at the head of a Cah'fornia PoHce Department. He was 23 
years of age at that time. 

Chief Remy was horn in Calexico in 1919, and when 
but a year old, he, with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William 




REEDLEVS POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Left to right — Arthur Living.ston, now retired. Chief Remy, Of- 
ficer James Quist, Assistant Chief J. S. Miller, Sr., and Officer 
John Krueker. 

J. Remy, moved to Fresno. In turn they moved to Kings- 
bury, Hanford, and finally settled down in Reedley. They 
liked the San Joaquin Valley and found the spot that they 
sought. The Chief was a youngster of seven at that time, 
and he entered and finished in the Reedley public schools. 

As he reached manhood's estate, he joined the Police 
Department of Reedley in 1940. Two years later he was 
appointed Chief. 

In 1944 he took a leave of absence and joined the Navy, 
where he served two years, part of the time in the hot 
Pacific battle areas. 

He left the navy service and again tix)k up his duties as 
Chief of Police. 

He attended the April, May and June class of the FBI 
National Police Academy in Washington, D. C, and 
after graduating he again took up his duties of guiding the 
Reedley Police Department. 

Chief Remy has a force of five people under him. They 
are: 

Assistant Chief J. S. Miller, Sr. 

Officers James Quist, John Kroeker and J. S. Miller, Jr. 

Police Matron is Ila Henderson. 

Special Officer Louis Blair and the township's two Con- 
stables, Eugene Hunter and Paul Young work out of the 
Police Station. 

Officer Ralph Kennedy, of the CHP also has the station 
as his headquarters. 

The Department has its own radio station, call letters 
KRCP and two radio experts man that installation, they 
being Justin Shicblcy who formerly served with the Reed- 
ley Police Department for 25 years, and Daniel Perry. 



On September, 1940, shortly after entering the PoHcc 
Department, Chief Remy married Phyllis Hughes, a Reed- 
ley girl. 

Reedley (about 5000 population), Fresno County, lies 
southeast of the city of Fresno and is in the center of the 
great fruit belt of the great San Joaquin Valley, and with 
plenty of water from the Kings River it produces prolific 
vine, tree and vegetable crops. 

Grape growing and the growing and processing of the 
tree crops, peaches, apricots and plums play a major role 
in the agricultural life of the city. Citrus fruits, oranges, 
lemons, and grapefruit are grown in large quantity. In 
recent years the growing of truck garden crops has soared. 
A great deal of dairying is to be found in the district and 
many progressive ranchers raise hogs, cattle, turkeys and 
poultry. 

This City, by virtue of its location, is truly the gateway 
to the playground of the west. The nearby Sierra Nevada 
mountains afford the finest of all California sports, hunt- 
ing, and the Kings River is noted for its many knds of 
game fish. 

In recent years more than one hundred new homes have 
been constructed, and the beauty of the tree-lined streets 
has been enhanced by the construction of many new public 
buildings, among which are the new $100,000 United 
States Fostoffice, and the new Reedley Hospital. 




Chief Emmet Remy, as a member of FBI Police Academy 
Class in Washington, D. C. 

Foremost in the industrial life are the many packing 
houses which annually ship a great number of cars of fresh 
fruit. The recent addition of the Pcloian Packing Co., 
packers and marketers of raisins, supplements the large 
local plant of the California Prune and Apricot Growers 
Association. A sixty car capacity cold storage plant com- 
pleted this season will insure better prices to the growers 
and packers of this district. 

Influencing the community life and insuring a Progress- 
ivcness on the part of the merchants of the city are an 
active Chamber of Commerce, two service clubs, the Ki- 
wanis and Lions, many fraternal and patriotic orders, and 
the women's Reedley Study and Civic club. 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 85 



Meet Your Friends at The 

VALLEY CAFE 

AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

"John and Elmer" 

Beer, Wine and Liquors 
HOME LIKE MEALS 

1154 G Street 

REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 921 



JUSTESEN'S DRY 
GOODS STORE 

Quality and Right Prices 

On G Street 

REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 41 



JOSE'S CAFE 

Beer, Wine, Soft Drinks 

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinners 
and Short Orders 



10:'> G STREET 
REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 197 Fred T. Isaac 

DIAMOND ELECTRIC SERVICE 

LIGHTING FIXTURES -::- RADIO REPAIRING AND SERVICING 

APPLIANCES AND SUPPLIES -::- SPORTING GOODS 
1023 G STREET REEDLEY. CALIFORNIA 

BLACK AND WHITE MARKET 

Phone 248 1146 G Street 

REEDLEY. CALIFORNIA 

HOUSE OF CHUNG 

CHINESE FOOD SERVED FAMILY STYLE 
For Reservation Phone 236-W 



1401 1 STREET 



REEDLEY. CALIF. 



When in Reedley, Stop at 

J A D O O N'S 

"WHERE DRINKS ARE BEST" 
Cor. I3th and "C' Street REEDLEY. CALIF. 



MOORE'S CLUB 

Reedley's Finest 

Cocktail Lounge 
and Cafe 



I I 



I. 



1041 G Street 

REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 



BARSOOM & 
NELSON 

Dodge and Plymouth 

Sales and Service 



905 G Street 

REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 306 



321 E Street 

LEMOORE, CALIFORNIA 



Tharp Marlow's Cafe 
and Cocktail Lounge 

Where Friends Meet 



Page 86 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



TAFFS CHIEF HARLEY STUMBAUGH 



Taft, the center of the greatest oil producing area of 
California, contributes much to the economic welfare of 
Kern County as well as the State of California and the 
nation. Its wells produce trainloads of petroleum annually 
from its forests of derricks. 

In peace or war these wells are pumping needed oil and 




Chief Harley Stumbauch 

it t^kes many men to operate them and more to sink wells 
that go thousands of feet into the earth to hit a pixil of 
crude oil. 

Today Taft has a population of some 4000, the men 
the men folks hcing gainfully employed and the merchants 
furnishing everything the populace might need, including 
the necessities and luxuries. 

In bygone days a Police Department had its hands full 
as a rough and ready class of workers converged on the 
little city. Though not criminally inclined they had their 
own concept of law enforcement, and they made it mighty 
tough on the law enforcement officers. All this is now past 
and you will not find a more law abiding community in 
this state. 

Taft's Chief of Police is Harley Stumbaugh, born in 
Duncan, Nebraska JO years ago. With his parents he 
came to Taft in 1921. He attended the public schools and 
graduated from the High School, in 193^. 

In 1941 he entered the Police Department, whose Chief 
then was H. R. Higgins, and who retired last year after 
serving as head of the Police Department for 21 years. 
Former Chief Higgins now lives on a ranch in Caspar, 
some six miles south of Fort Bragg. 

Young Officer Stumbaugh was getting to know his way 
'round in his chosen profession of law enforcement. Then 
came Pearl Harbor. 

He joined the Coast Guard and served for three years, 
from 1942 to the end of 194^. When he was discharged 
from the Navy he had the rating of Coxswain. He re- 



OAKLAND BRASS FOUNDRY 



turned to Taft and resumed his duties with the Police De- 
partment. In April a year ago he took the examination for 
Chief, to fill the vacancy created by the retirement of 
Chief Higgins. In a field of several other applicants, he 
topped the list. The Chief's job in Taft is civil Service as i^ 
all the ofiicers in the Department. 

There are seven members, besides the Chief, in the Taft 
Police Department. They are: 

Ofiicers Terrill Blair, John Barer, Robert Jaggers, Wal 
ter McKee, Richard Gervais, James Haven and Kathryn 
Williams, policewoman. 

Mayor John Perryman, manager of the Pioneer Mercan- 
tile Co., is also the Police Commissioner, and he takes grc.u 
pride in his Police Department. 

Judge Murray Filand is not only the Police Judge, but 
serves as township Justice of the Peace. 

Before entering the service of his country. Chief Stum 
haugh married a Taft young lady and the couple have t\\ ^ > 
children, a son and a daughter. 



PITTMAN'S CLUB 

BEER, GOOD FOOD AND SOFT DRINKS 

8 Miles East of Taft on Bakersfield Higway 399 
R. R. #1, Box 103B (Kern County), California 



Snowden's Hatchery and Feed Store 

Telephone 847-J 



BABY CHICKS 
POULTRY SUPPLIES 



TURKEY POULTS 
CUSTOM HATCHING 



TAFT 



Lincoln and F Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



THE WINGS 

BREAKFAST AND FULL LINE OF SANDWICHES 

In Theater Building 
520 CENTER STREET TAFT. CALIFORNIA 



2319 CLEMENT AVENUE 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Taft's Finest 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
AIR COOLED 

DINING ROOM 
STEAM HEAT 

THE 

HOTEL 

TAFT 

Forrest Ellison, Mgr. Owner 
TAFT, CALIFORNIA 



April. J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 87 



JACK'S PLACE 

Edna Moore 



521 MAIN STREET 



COLUSA. CALIF. 



COLUSA LIQUOR STORE 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

ROBERT'S MARKET 

FRESH VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS 
ALSO FINE CHOICE OF FROZEN FOOD 



518 Center Street 



TAFT 



CALIFORNIA 



FLOWERS 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

When in Chinatown Visit 

Canton Flower Shop 

Telephone China 5-1329 

12 Ross Alley 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Block 
Sportswear 

Made in California 

t 

By 

H. and L. BLOCK 

1563 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNL\ 



"Where Ma Saves Pa's Dough" 

G. C. BROWN 

CHOICE MEATS 
QUALITY GROCERIES 

801 Wood Street 

TAFT, CALIFORNL\ 

Phone 426 J 



STAR COFFEE SHOP 

Jim \Villi.\ms, Prop. 
Next Door to Western Union 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner 

Short Orders 

Waffles at all Hours 

Broiled Steaks - Barbecue Sandwiches - Italian 
Spaghetti - All Types of Sandwiches 

Open 24 Hours Except Monday 

II? Fourth Street Where, oh, where 



OASIS CAFE 
and Cocktail Lounge 

GOOD FOOD AND THE 

FINEST LIQUORS 

and Courtesy Our Motto 



418 Center Street 
TAFT, CALIFORNIA 



Page 88 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



CHIEF H. L. MARTIN OF DELANO 

Chief H. L. Martin, head of the Delano Pohce Depart- 
ment, was horn in Pennsylvania a few years before the turn 
of the centur)'. Upon coming to California he first settled 
in Ducor, which is south of Porterville in Tulare County. 




Chief H. L. Martin 

He entered law enforcement in 1926 as Constable of Ducor 
Township. He held this position for seven years, leaving to 
take the position as Chief of Police at Porterville. He was 
at the head of the Porterville Police Department for an- 
other seven years at which time he resigned to accept the 
Chief's job at Delano, which position he now holds. 

Chief Martin has broken all records of staying on the 
job in Delano, as this city formerly had a terrific police 
problem. The Chief and his wife, Naomi have three girls 
and one boy, all of whom arc married. Two daughters and 
one boy have children of their own which makes the Chief 
a proud and happy grandfather. 

In addition to the Chief, the other officers on the Delano 
Police Department are as follows: 

Desk Sergeant Sam Lancaster, Patrolman Charles Mc- 
Nutt, Desk Sergeant Lornc Lewis, Patrolman Merle Scott, 
Patrolman Lome Fote, Patrolman James Singer, Patrolman 
Ray Brittain, Patrolman Robert McClaim and Patrolman 
Alvin Brower. 



HOTEL KERN 

Albert M. Knowles, Proprietor 

A Real Home for the Traveler 

DELANO, CALIFORNIA 

On Highway 99, 1 1 J2 High Street 
Telephone 6911 

NEW- MODERN 

RATES ^1.50, BATH ^4.00 
Cafe in Connection 



UNITED CIGAR STORE 



1011 Main Street 



DELANO 



CALIFORNIA 



HIGHWAY LUNCH 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

Highway 99 in Heart of Delano 

1115 HIGH STREET DELANO. CALIF. 

H. B. MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEAT- FISH - VEGETABLES - FRUITS 
Phone 4031 



909 GLENWOOD STREET 



DELANO. CALIF. 



Agustin R. Lopez P. O. Box 803 

PEOPLE'S MARKET 

FOURTH AND GLENWOOD STREETS DELANO. CALIF. 



BERT'S CAFE 

622 High Street 
DELANO, CALIFORNIA 



OWL CAFE 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 
AND SHORT ORDERS 

1019 MAIN STREET DELANO. CALIF. 

For Taxi Call 

Delano 2201. CITY TAXI 

DELANO. CALIFORNIA 



W. J. (Bill) Elkins 



Phone 4«21 



DELANO TIRE SHOP 

TIRE HEADQUARTERS 
KELLY SPRINGFIELD TIRES 

1100 MAIN STREET DELANO, CALIF. 

STRADLEY'S MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • FRESH VEGETABLES 
BEER. WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



1017 MAIN STREET 



DLANO. CALIF. 



Fred Juhrden 



Phone 7167 



COLBERT'S JEWELERS 



lOIS Main Street 



DELANO 



CALIFORNIA 



J. AND M. BILLIARDS 

POOL • SNOOKER • CLUB ROOM 

BEER • SOFT DRINKS 
AND TOBACCOS 



1005 MAIN STREET 



DELANO, CALIF. 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 89 



Phone S90 



Phone 175 



American Chinese Store 



HOTEL DEL MAR 



SUITES FOR FAMILIES 



Opposite Yolo County's Beautiful Courthouse 



CHUNG SUN GROCERY CO. 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA cOLUSA 



FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
FREE DELIVERY 



Seventh and Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



B R E I T ' S 



JOHNSTON BROS. 

BILLIARD PARLOR 
BEER, CIGARS AND CIGARETTES 



422 "D" Street 
MARYSVILLE. CALIF. 



607 Main Street 
WOODLAND, CALIF. 



1392 Main Street 



WALNUT CREEK 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 1156 



Orvil Long, Mgr. Phone 1210- 144S-J 



Res. Phone 844 



LONG'S TEXACO SERVICE 

Knight's Landing Highway 
GAS -::- OIL -::- USED CARS 



Route 2, Box 5 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



MAC'S PLACE 

WINE - LIQUORS - BEER 

SALVIO STREET CONCORD, CALIF. 



PAULDEN'S 
LIQUOR STORE 

Liquors, Wines, Beer 
and Mixers 

1115 Main Street 

DELANO, CALIFORNIA 



FORD • MERCURY • LINCOLN 

RAGUSA'S SALES AND SERVICE 

J. V. RAGUSA, Prop. 

Third and Cumberland Streets 
PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2281 

PAUL BRUNELLE 

CONCORD ELECTRIC COMPANY 
WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 



CONCORD 



CALIFORNIA 



SHEEHAN 

& 
GROSECLOS 

Open 24 Hours 

101 High Street 

DELANO, CALIFORNIA 



Pete's Cocktail Lounge 
and Cafe 

Delano's Finest Cocktail Lounge 
Chicken and Steak Dinners 



818 Tenth Avenue 

DELANO, CALIFORNIA 



A & U MARKET 

WHERE QUALITY 

and 
SERVICE PREVAILS 



1 108 Main Street 

Delano, California 

Phone 2411 



Page 90 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April 1948 



CHIEF HERMAN DISCH OF BLYTHE 

Chief Disch was born in Monroe, Wisconsin, Decem- 
ber 16th, 1904 and graduated from high school there. The 
Chief first entered law enforcement work in Wisconsin in 
1932 at which time he was appointed a Special Deputy. 

He came to Blythe, California, in 1938 and entered the 
hotel business. The Chief decided that law enforcement 
should be his career and entered the Blythe Police Depart- 
ment as a Patrolman in 1940, one year after he was mar- 
ried to Miss Laurine Wallace. He was appointed Chief in 
1942. 

Chief Disch has six men in addition to himself to keep 
law and order in his domain. They are: 

L. Strickland, C. Peoples, C. Sandin, W. Parker, E. 
Davidson and A. Stewart. 

The Department has two patrol cars, one of which is 
always on duty. The radio station call letters are KIOD 
and the station has a hookup with the Sheriff's office of 
Riverside. 

Delano is a city of 9,500 population. It serves a trade 
area having more than 30,000 persons. Surrounding the 
city is some of the finest farming land in the entire country. 
The Delano district's farm products are known and famous 
from coast to coast. 

The area produces 37 varieties of perishable farm prod- 
ucts, including tomatoes, potatoes, cauliflower, wine and 
table grapes, lettuce, garlic, cantaloupes, watermelons, broc- 
coli, cabbage, peas, olives, oranges, onions and others. In 
addition, there are 12,000 acres of cotton, 10,000 acres of 
alfalfa, 20,000 acres of wheat, 6,000 acres of sugar beets. 
In 1946 Delano was the largest shipper of perishable 
farm products in California. The total carload shipments 
reached the staggering total of more than 4,400 cars, sur- 
passing Brawley by some 200 cars. This did not take into 
account hundreds of truck loads shipped out. 

From the district was shipped wine with a total valuation 
of $14,000,000. 

The figures quoted do not include the southern part of 
Tulare county, the agricultural fame of which is as great 
as Northern Kern county's. 

To give you an idea of the agricultural activity the 
Southern Pacific railroad has an annual income from 
freight shipments, totaling $1,500,000, and a passenger 
ticket income of $25,000. Total receipts of the Delano 
post office reached $57,358 in 1946. Included was more 
than a million pieces of outgoing first class mail. 

Delano was the first city in the nation to go over the top 
on its quota in three consecutive war bond drives, having 
the money in the bank the day before. There is one bank 
in Delano, the First National, capitalized at $150,000, with 
more than $10,000,00 deposits. 

The Delano people feel that they should have an air mail 
and passenger service to help complete the development of 
a community which still has many acres of fertile land to 
be made productive. 

The city has an airport with a runway over 6,000 feet 
long, located less than a mile from the center of town. 

During harvest many large eastern produce and commis- 
sion firms send men here to buy farm products. 



Phone 373 G. Hing. Prop. 

WOODLAND PRODUCE CO. 

MEATS, GROCERIES, VEGETABLES AND FRUITS 
Wholesale and Retail 

405 MAIN STREET WOODLAND, CALIF. 



Phone 985 Forrest Sealy, Prop. 

SEALY ELECTRONIC CO. 

RADIO SALES AND SERVICE 
415 FIRST STREET WOODLAND, CALIF. 



Phone 64 

Woodland Plumbing and Hardware Co. 

PLUMBING - SHEET METAL - HEATING 

WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1394 

MOBILGAS SERVICE 

EXPERT BRAKE SERVICE 

L. L. Archer and H. G. Swigert 

127 MAIN STREET WOODLAND, CALIF. 

Phone 193-M 



R. V. Paul, Prop. 

YOLO TAMALE PARLOR 

SPECIALIZING IN TAMALES AND ENCHILADAS 

715 M AIN STREET WOODLAND, CALIF. 

Phone 1208 John R. Bielar, Prop. 

BELAR'S BRAKE SERVICE 

■GIVE YOUR CAR A BRAKE AT BIELARS" 

80 WEST M AIN STREET WOODLAND, CALIF. 

FRED SHAFFER AND SON 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 

701 MAIN STREET WOODLAND. CALIF. 



Compliments to 

CHIEF BAILEY AND FORCE 
for a job well done. 

A. E. Arthur Les Arthur 

WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



FRANK E. KING 

Contractor 

Land Leveling 
Equipment Hauling 

814 Main Street 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



April, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 91 



J. E. GERHARDT, SECRETARY- 
TREASURER, NCPO ASSOCIATION 

Jules S. Gerhardt, secretary-treasurer of the Northern 
California Peace Officers' Association, is a part time Dep- 
uty Sheriff of Butte County, and he lives in Chico. He is 




Secretary J. E. Gerhardt 

deeply interested in all phases of law enforcement, espe- 
cially the problems which face peace officers today — 
juvenile delinquency. He is a deep student of all scientific 
matters pertaining to the enforcing of the laws. 

Deputy Sheriff Gerhardt was born in San Francisco in 
1894 and has been in the automobile business for over 34 
years. Some years ago he was appointed a Deputy Sheriff 
of Butte County and has served as such ever since, his in- 
terest in this side line of his life mad him a logical man for 
the important position of secretary-treasurer of the North- 
ern California Peace Officers' Association. 

He is married and the couple have three children. One 
son who is manager of the Monarch Iron Works in San 
Francisco, another son who is in the United States Army 
Air Force in Weisbaden, Germany, and a daughter who is 
attending college in Chico. 

The Northern California Peace Officers' Association 
meets monthly, the date being the third Thursday of each 
month. Because of the meeting of the Sheriff's Association 
in Santa Barbaara March 18, 19 and 20 the meeting for 
last month was cancelled. President Crutcher will be ab- 
sent in Washington, D. C, attending the National Police 
Academy during April, May and June and Sheriff Dewey 
Johnson of Sierra County, vice president, will act as the 
presiding officer. 

Phone 1196 

GOSSETT'S PLACE 

CHOICE WINES, BEER AND LIQUORS 
10 West Main Street 







STOLTE INC. 


General 


Contractors 


8451 San 


Leandro Street 


OAKLAND 


3, CALIFORNIA 



Pastime Club 
BILLIARDS 

BEER - WINE - LUNCH 



417 First Street 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



LONG'S 
Used Car Lot 



GAS - OIL 
LUBRICATION 



WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



r--- 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Wm. D. Clark, Opt. D. 

optometrist - Optician 



Hotel Woodland Building 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Page 92 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



TRAINING AND EDUCATION 

(Continued from page 6) 

advancement of police training. Tuition is usually charged 
by such organizations, and this is entirely unnecessary, for 
training can be and is furnished to law enforcement 
officers free of charge. Usually the organizations and 
individuals offering such courses are more interested in 
personal advancement and aggrandizement than in the 
improvement of police services. Sometimes individuals 
with purely educational backgrounds endeavor to expand 
into the field of police training when they are not actually 
qualified to teach on police subjects. Ill-advised attempts 
to participate in police training can hinder the develop- 
ment of such training as a means of raising the standards 
of the law enforcement profession. In view of the recent 
increase in the attempts of individuals and organizations 
to enter the field of peace officers training where it should 



NONPAREIL CLEANERS and DYERS 



419 Main Street 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



LORANGER'S 

PAINT - GLASS - MIRRORS 
AUTO GLASS - WINDOW GLASS 

617 MAIN SIREET WOODLAND, CALIF. 



Phone 2266 



JOHN F. FOUCH AND SON 



PHARMACISTS 



WILLIAMS 



CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAMS MEAT COMPANY 



Coleman and Murphy 



WILLIAMS 



CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



199 



V. L. MILES 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK - ADVANCE PUMPS 

90 WEST MAIN STREET WOODLAND. CALIF. 

THE NUT BOWL 

"Good Food and Friendly Service" 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

SODA FOUNTAIN • CANDY • ICE CREAM 

1532 MAIN STREET WALNUT CREEK. CALIF. 



RIVERSIDE HOTEL 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND COFFEE SHOP 
IN CONNECTION 



Phone 2 791 



WILLIAMS 



H. A. ATWOOD 

INSURANCE - REAL ESTATE 



CALIFORNIA 



DART MOTOR COMPANY 

Harry A. Dart 
CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 



WILLIAMS 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 1 151 



Harry Shellhamtner, Prop. 



SHELLY'S STATION 

SHELL PRODUCTS 
GAS - OIL- CAR WASHING - LUBRICATION - TIRES 



COLUSA 



CALIFORNIA WOODLAND 



Sixth and Main 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN DIEGO CAFE 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - GOOD FOOD 
Frank M. Quintana 

539 MAIN STREET COLUSA, CALIF. 

Phone 2i6R 

DIGGS RADIO SHOP 

NEW AND USED RADIOS - ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 
SALES AND SERVICE 

4 34 JAY STREET COLUSA, CALIF. 

BILL'S PLACE 

POOL 

SOFT DRINKS - TOBACCOS - CIGARETTES 

GENTLEMEN'S CLUB ROOM 

525 MAIN STREET COLUSA, CALIF. 



BOOKMAN LUMBER CO. 

Jack D. Bookman, President 
9009 San Leandro Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

OSicz TRINIDAD 2-6000 



STORKMAN'S 
Tobaccos - Cigars - Liquors 

506 Main Street 
WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 



THE NUGGET MARKET 

STILLE & SON 

WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 

WOODLAND ICE & 
BOTTLING WORKS 



Pepsi-Cola 

WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 



DEL MAR HOTEL 

REASONABLE RATES 
Opposite the Court House 



WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 93 



not be done, it is recommended that this Association take 
the following action: 

1 — Departmental heads refuse to permit members of 
their organizations to participate in such schools as 
instructors representing the department, unless the 
schools are approved by this Association. 

2 — The Veterans Bureau be contacted and informed 
that attendance at such schools is not a necessary 
prerequisite to obtaining employment as peace of- 
ficers and advise the Veterans Bureau that peace 
officers training is available when persons have en- 
tered employment as peace officers. 

3 — Advise the Better Business Bureaus of the activities 
of such groups, particularly when there is any indi- 
cation of fraud or false representation concerning 
the accomplishments of the school. 

4 — Advise all prospective departmental applicants, by 
correspondence and personal interview, that no such 
training is required in advance of employment ", that 
if they desire to attend a school, they enroll at a 
recognized established educational institution. 

5 — Department heads advise the men within their re- 
spective departments that such training courses have 
little to offer and point out more desirable schools 
that are available. 

6 — That there be no advertising in police journals, pub- 
lications, etc., of any nature for police training 
courses unless approved by this Association. 

It is felt that by the adoption of the above recommenda- 
tions this Association is fulfilling its duty to the peace 
officers of this .State and insuring for them a proper and 
well-rounded program of training. 



Telephone THornwall 3-5603 
If no answer call GLencourt 1-7400 



Branch Offices 
SAN JOSE - SANTA ROSA 



GILRAIN-KEEFE INC. 

GENERAL PAINTING CONTRACTORS 

3012 ADELINE STREET BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



PUBLIC MARKET 



Full Line of 

GROCERIES - MEAT - FRUIT - VEGETABLES 

BErkeley 7-8776 

1601-1603 ASHBY AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

G. Ottino & Son Thornwall 3-4647 

OTTINO'S MARKET 8C DELICATESSEN 

COMPLETE FOOD STORE 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 

2082 SAN PABLO BERKELEY, CALIF. 

M. L. DIEVENDORF 

PHYSICAL MEDICINE 



OLympic 3-424S 



3 02 7 COLLEGE AVE. 



BERKELEY 5. CALIF. 



Telephone AShberry 3-6226 

A & L PATTERN WORKS 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 



V. F. Andre 



845 CARLETON AVENUE 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Ray B. Cox, President 



THornwall 3-0620 



PEERLESS BUILT-IN FIXTURE CO. 

2608 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

CHATTERTON BAKERY 

PIES, CAKES, BREAD, ROLLS 

DANISH AND FRENCH PASTRIES 

BErkeley 7-4262 

2930 COLLEGE AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Telephone BR. 3038 J. S. Choy, Prop. 

SUNWAY MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - WINES - BEERS - VEGETABLES 



3 120 SACRAMENTO STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIF. 



EDWARD MILLER 

President 
HARVEY PURDIN 

Manager 



Telephone 

BErkeley 7-7721 

Cable Address: "MILPRO" 

Code: BENTLEY'S 



MILLER WOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

Manufacturers of 
STORAGE BATTERY SEPARATORS 



1335 SIXTH STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 

THE RITEX COMPANY 



1821 Fifth Street 



BERKELEY 



CALIFORNIA 



BERKELEY 



POLLY ANN BAKERY 

Under New Management 

PAUL C. and PAUL H. DOBBINS 

Specializing in 

FANCY CAKE • PASTRY 

ALSO GOOD BREAK 

THornwall 3-0318 



BERKELEY AUTO EXPRESS 
& DRAY AGE COMPANY 

DRAYING AND HEAVY HAULING 

Phone BErkeley 7-S497 

lOOa SEVENTH STREET BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



R. W. Hummel 



Phone THornwall 3-2992-3 



HUMMEL FURNITURE 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 



CALIFORNIA 2 703 SEVENTH STREET 



BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 



BERKELEY 



JOS. G. PRETTI 

Machine Shop 

1614 Sixth Street 



HANSEN MOTOR TUNE-UP 

SPEEDOMETER , CARBURETOR, ELECTRICAL AND 
MOTOR TUNE-UP SPECIALISTS 



CALIFORNIA l''^' ADDISON STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



Page 92 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



TRAINING AND EDUCATION 

(Continued from page 6) 

advancement of police training. Tuition is usually charged 
by such organizations, and this is entirely unnecessary, for 
training can be and is furnished to law enforcement 
officers free of charge. Usually the organizations and 
individuals offering such courses are more interested in 
personal advancement and aggrandizement than in the 
improvement of police services. Sometimes individuals 
with purely educational backgrounds endeavor to expand 
into the field of police training when they are not actually 
qualified to teach on police subjects. Ill'advised attempts 
to participate in police training can hinder the develop- 
ment of such training as a means of raising the standards 
of the law enforcement profession. In view of the recent 
increase in the attempts of individuals and organizations 
to enter the field of peace officers training where it should 

Phone 199 

V. L. MILES 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK - ADVANCE PUMPS 

90 WEST MAIN STREET WOODLAND. CALIF. 

THE NUT BOWL 

"Good Food and Friendly Service" 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

SODA FOUNTAIN • CANDY • ICE CREAM 

1532 MAIN STREET WALNUT CREEK, CALIF. 



RIVERSIDE HOTEL 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND COFFEE SHOP 

IN CONNECTION 



NONPAREIL CLEANERS and DYERS 



419 Main Street 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



LORANGER'S 

PAINT - GLASS - MIRRORS 
AUTO GLASS - WINDOW GLASS 

617 MAIN STREET WOODLAND. CALIF. 



Phone 2266 



JOHN F. FOUCH AND SON 



PHARMACISTS 



WILLIAMS 



CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAMS MEAT COMPANY 



Coleman and Murphy 



WILLIAMS 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2 791 



WILLIAMS 



H. A. ATWOOD 

INSURANCE - REAL ESTATE 



CALIFORNIA 



DART MOTOR COMPANY 

Harry A. Dart 
CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 

V^ILLIAMS CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 1151 



Harry Shellhammer, Prop. 



SHELLY'S STATION 

SHELL PRODUCTS 
GAS - OIL- CAR WASHING - LUBRICATION - TIRES 



COLUSA 



CALIFORNIA WOODLAND 



Sixth and Main 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN DIEGO CAFE 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - GOOD FOOD 
Frank M. Quintana 

539 MAIN STREET COLUSA. CALIF. 

Phone 236R 

DIGGS RADIO SHOP 

NEW AND USED RADIOS - ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 
SALES AND SERVICE 

434 JAY STREET COLUSA. CALIF. 



BILL'S PLACE 



POOL 

SOFT DRINKS - TOBACCOS - CIGARETTES 

GENTLEMEN'S CLUB ROOM 

525 MAIN STREET COLUSA. CALIF. 



BOOKMAN LUMBER CO. 

Jack D. Bcxjrman, President 
9009 San Leandro Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Office TRiNiDAD 2-6000 



STORKMAN'S 
Tobaccos - Cigars - Liquors 

506 Main Street 

WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 



THE NUGGET MARKET 

STILLE & SON 

WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 

WOODLAND ICE & 
BOTTLING WORKS 

Pepsi-Cola 

WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 

DEL MAR HOTEL 

REASONABLE RATES 
Opposite the Court House 

WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 93 



not be done, it is recommended that this Association take 
the following action : 

1 — Departmental heads refuse to permit members of 
their organizations to participate in such schools as 
instructors representing the department, unless the 
schools are approved by this Association. 

2 — The Veterans Bureau be contacted and informed 
that attendance at such schools is not a necessary 
prerequisite to obtaining employment as peace of- 
ficers and advise the Veterans Bureau that peace 
officers training is available when persons have en- 
tered employment as peace officers. 

3 — Advise the Better Business Bureaus of the activities 
of such groups, particularly when there is any indi- 
cation of fraud or false representation concerning 
the accomplishments of the school. 

4 — Advise all prospective departmental applicants, by 
correspondence and personal interview, that no such 
training is required in advance of employment; that 
if they desire to attend a school, they enroll at a 
recognized established educational institution. 

5 — Department heads advise the men within their re- 
spective departments that such training courses have 
little to offer and point out more desirable schools 
that are available. 

6 — That there be no advertising in police journals, pub- 
lications, etc., of any nature for police training 
courses unless approved by this Association. 

It is felt that by the adoption of the above recommenda- 
tions this Association is fulfilling its duty to the peace 
officers of this .State and insuring for them a proper and 
well-rounded program of training. 



Telephone THornwall 3-5605 
If no answer call GLencourt 1-7400 



Branch Offices 
SAN JOSE - SANTA ROSA 



GILRAIN-KEEFE INC. 

GENERAL PAINTING CONTRACTORS 

3012 ADELINE STREET BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 

Compliments 

THE RITEX COMPANY 



1821 Fifth Street 



BERKELEY 



CALIFORNIA 



POLLY ANN BAKERY 

Under New Management 

PAUL C. and PAUL H. DOBBINS 

Specializing in 

FANCY CAKE • PASTRY 

ALSO GOOD BREAK 



PUBLIC MARKET 

Full Line of 

GROCERIES - MEAT - FRUIT - VEGETABLES 

BErkeley 7-8776 

1501-1603 ASHBY AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 



G. Ottino «< Son Thornwall 3-4647 

OTTINO'S MARKET & DELICATESSEN 

COMPLETE FOOD STORE 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 

2082 SAN PABLO BERKELEY. CALIF. 



M. L. DIEVENDORF 

PHYSICAL MEDICINE 

OLympic 3-4248 
3027 COLLEGE AVE. BERKELEY 5. CALIF. 



Telephone AShberry 3-6226 



V. F. Andre 



A & L PATTERN WORKS 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 
645 CARLETON AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 



Ray B. Cox, President 



THornwall 3-0620 



PEERLESS BUILT-IN FIXTURE CO. 

2608 SAN PABLO AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



CHATTERTON BAKERY 

PIES. CAKES, BREAD, ROLLS 

DANISH AND FRENCH PASTRIES 

BErkeley 7-4262 

2930 COLLEGE AVENUE BERKELEY. CALIF. 

Telephone BR. 3038 J. S. Choy, Prop. 

SUNWAY MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - WINES - BEERS - VEGETABLES 

3 120 SACRAMENTO STREET BERKELEY. CALIF. 



EDWARD MILLER 

President 
HARVEY PURDIN 

Manager 



Telephone 

BErkeley 7-7721 

Cable Address: "MILPRO" 

Code: BENTLEY'S 



MILLER WOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

Manufacturers of 
STORAGE BATTERY SEPARATORS 



1335 SIXTH STREET 



BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 



BERKELEY AUTO EXPRESS 
8C DRAYAGE COMPANY 

DRAYING AND HEAVY HAULING 



Phone BErkeley 7-S497 



190') SEVENTH STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



R. W. Hummel 



Phone THornwall 3-2992-3 



HUMMEL FURNITURE 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 



BERKELEY 



THornwall 3-0318 



CALIFORNIA 2 703 SEVENTH STREET 



BERKELEY 2. CALIF. 



BERKELEY 



JOS. G. PRETTI 
Machine Shop 

1614 Sixth Street 



HANSEN MOTOR TUNE-UP 

SPEEDOMETER , CARBURETOR. ELECTRICAL AND 
MOTOR TUNE-UP SPECIALISTS 



CALIFORNIA 1939 ADDISON STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



Page 94 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

CHIEF RAYMOND PRUITT OF DINUBA 



Apnl, 1948 



Chief Raymond Pruitt was horn in Prescott, Kansas, 
February 21st, 191 J. He finished grammar school and high 
school in the middlewest. After graduating from high 



The Chief and his wife, Wilma, have one boy, Raymond 
Pruitt Junior. There are four officers on the Department as 
follows : 

Sergeant Ben H. Web, Officer Roy Moore. Officer Phil- 
lip Sanders and Officer Floyd Hulsey. 




MEMBERS OF DINUBA'S POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Left to right — Officers Floyd Hulsey and Phillip Sanders. Chief Raymond Pruitt, Officer Roy Moore and Sergeant Benn H. Webb. 

school he went to Tulsa, Okla., and was employed as a A new station is being built for the Dinuba Police De- 
fireman on the Frisco Railroad. He held this position for partment which was ready for occupancy the latter part of 
three years. He came to Dinuba in the early part of 1947 February. This station is modern in every respect. All 
and entered the Dinuba Police Department as a night equipment is new, including the Department's own radio 
patrolman. He was appointed Chief of the Dinuba Depart- station. Call letters KAAT, and a hookup with the Sher- 
ment September 3rd, 1947. iff's OSicc at Visalia. 



NATIONAL MARKET 

Wholosale and Retail 
MEATS • GROCERIES • VEGETABLES 



Telephone 399 



C. A. Walding, Prop. 



142 Eaiil Tulare Street 



Phone 260 



DINUB.A 



DINUBA CLEANERS 

QUALITY CLEANING 
TAILORED CLOTHING 



331 East Tulare Street 



CALIFORNIA DINUBA 



CALIFORNIA 



Lavern Groening 



Phone 74-F-lI 



SILVA'S CAFE 

BEER AND WINE 
Spanish and American 

133 W. Tulare 



GROENING 8C SON 

GROCERIES - MEATS - PRODUCE 
GAS - OILS - TIRES 



DINUBA 



CALIFORNIA ROUTE I. BOX 22i 



DINUBA, CALIF. 



April, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9S 



SAM'S STORE 
General Merchandise 

OPEN EVERY DAY 



T ♦^ 



400 West Tulare Street 

DINUBA, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 427 



SAM'S LIQUORS 
Smoke House Cafe 

Service and Quality 
Our Motto 



LAMONT, CALIFORNIA 

(Kern County) 



TOWN CLUB 

Phone Mt. View 242 ■; 

MIXED DRINKS 
On and Off Sale 

We handle the finest and serve 
the best food in the city 

George, Al and Fred 

180 Castro Street 
MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF. 



EASTON FRUIT 
MARKET 

All Kinds 

FRESH FRUITS - VEGETABLES 

Meats - Notions - Bakery Goods 

Candy and Soft Drinks 



On Highway 41 (Fresno County) 
Corner of Elm and Lincoln 

EASTON, CALIFORNIA 



NEIGHBORHOOD 
GROCERY 

H. R. Bankston, Prop. 

GROCERIES - MEATS 
VEGETABLES 

Notions and Drugs 



Highway 41, South of Fresno 
at 

EASTON, CALIFORNIA 



MORENO'S 

COCKTAIL 

LOUNGE 

Alex and Joe Moreno, Props. 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
DINE and DANCE 

Phone 817 
129 Castro Street 

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF. 

Santa Clara County 



Page 96 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



SAVE-MOR-MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, Fresh Vegetables 
Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 

750 L Street 

SANGER, CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL SANGER 

Rooms with and without bath 

Reasonable Rates - 7th and L Street 
and TOP'S 

Sanger's Finest 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND CAFE 

649 M Street 

SANGER, CALIFORNIA 



r- " 



HUB STORE 

Groceries - Meats - Fresh Vegetables 
Beer and Soft Drinks 

Ice Cream to Take Out 



R. R. No. 1. HUB STORE 

LATON, CALIFORNIA 



>--■ 



Happy Days Are Here Again 

THE CANTEEN 

DINING-DANCING 

Meet Your Friends Here 

93 Highway, South 

TULARE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 463 



MARIE'S CAFE 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 
DELICIOUS SANDWICHES 

3909 Edison Highway - 5 miles from 

Bakersfield (Kern County), California 



ATLAS IMPERIAL 
DIESEL ENGINE CO. 

1000 Nineteenth Avenue 
OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 



PATTERSON BROTHERS 

PAINTING :: DECORATING 

Commercial Spraying and 
Sand Blasting 

1 1 30 Sixty-Seventh Street 

OAKLAND 8, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone HUmboldt .V2460 



TOWN CLUB 
Cocktail Lounge and Cafe 

Elmhr Juachin, Prop. 
Where Strangers Become Friends 

246 Evelyn Street 

SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2040 



April. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 97 



1 ♦" 



LOTTIE'S 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

GOOD FOOD 

MIXED DRINKS 



Entertainment Nightly 



Phone YUMA 1135W 

Highway 80, Just Outside 

Yuma 

Winterhaven, California 



ANAHEIM 
POOL PARLOR 

AND CARD ROOM 

Come in and say hello to 
EARL CAFFEE, Prop. 



122 No. Lemon 

ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA 



^ r 



WEST SIDE CAFE 



COCKTAILS 

BEER -::- WINE 

and 

SOFT DRINKS 



GOOD FOOD 

and 

ENTERTAINMENT 



SAN JOAQUIN, CALIFORNIA 

(Fresno County) 



KERN CLUB 

Bar 

Lunch Counter 
Card Room 



McFARLAND, CALIFORNIA 



>4 



Page 98 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



You Will Like the 



G. I. CAVERN 

Alfred Barboza, Prop. 

MEXICAN DISHES 
HOT CHILI 



Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 



403 D Street 
CHINO, CALIFORNIA 



r-' " 



MENTONE 
LIQUOR STORE 

Jack R. Reese, Prop. 

IMPORTED 

and 

DOMESTIC 

LIQUORS 

WINES - BEER 

SOFT DRINKS 

TOBACCOS 

and courteous service 



Mentone, California 

(San Bernardino County) 



Best Regards to all Peace Officers 
from 

ARLINGTON 
CAFE 

BREAKFAST 

LUNCH 

DINNERS 

and Short Orders 



9488 Magnolia Avenue 
ARLINGTON, CALIFORNIA 



HENRY'S PLACE 

One-Half Mile East of Corona 
at Corona Airport 

Featuring 

COCKTAILS 

CHICKEN 

and 

STEAK 



Corona, California 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 99 



MISSION AUTO COURT IS TOPS 

The Mission Auto Court, 6842 Mission street, out in 
Daly City, and 15 minutes from the center of San Fran- 
cisco, is the oldest such institution in this part of the 
state, and if it is not the largest in the country is it well 
up on the list. 

With 110 cottages, in which there are 70 kitchenettes, 
it is furnished in the most comfortable style and every 
motorist who stops for an over night stay or a month 
or more residence there is given the most courteous treat' 
ment and everything is done to give him the best in 
service. 

The buildings are of stucco, and are maintained in the 
most cleanly manner. A high class grocery is there to 
accommodate the tourists and all garages have locks. 

The man who runs this big instituation is H. H. Smith, 
who besides being mighty busy in building up the Mission 
Auto Court to its present highly desirable reputation, has 
served Daly City as mayor for 18 years, and as a member 
of the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors was the 
board's president for four years. He is very civic-minded 
and takes active interest in any movement designed for 
the betterment of the city in which his Mission Auto 
Court is located and the county of San Mateo. 

The Mission Auto Court has housed many notables 
and all classes who have stopped there spread the word 
of how complete are the efforts of Manager Smith and 
his corps of assistants to render the utmost in friendly 
service. Its close proximity to San Francisco offers an- 
other attraction that is not overlooked by the motorist 
seeking a place to stop on his tour throughout the country, 
and the view afforded the midwesterners who have never 
seen the ocean draws much favorable praise for this pioneer 
haven for the wandering tourist. 



Phone TWinoaks 3-3848 



L. N. Miller 



WAVE MILLER & COMPANY 



188 TWEXFTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 



H & C CLEANERS 



CLEANING • ALTERATIONS • PRESSING WHILE-U-WAIT 

HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 

326 EAST TULARE STREET DINUBA. CALIF. 

Phone 20 Geo. A. Eaton, Prop. Res. Phone 385 

EATON TRUCKING CO. 

COMMERCIAL HAULING 

Interstate and Intrastate Permits 

Office 240 E. Tulare Street 

DINUBA. CALIFORNIA 



CLARK-ASHTON FURNITURE 

NEW AND USED FURNITURE OF 
THE HIGHEST QUALITY 



109-113 East Tulare Street 



TULARE 



CALIFORNIA 



A FINE PLACE TO DINE 

MEI LING CAFE 

Hours 11 A.M. to 12 P.M. 
189 L Street Phone 171 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Gilroy 234 

SANDELL HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE, PAINTS, SPORTING GOODS 
HOUSEHOLD AND GIFT DEPARTMENT 



GILROY 



141 N. Monterey Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 299 



Romeo Paganucci, Prop. 



PACHECO PASS GARAGE 

REPAIRING • PAINTING • TOWING 
AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL 



GILROY 



128 S. Monterey Street 



CALIFORNIA 



EAST BAY IRON & METAL CO. 

Dealers in all 

SALVAGE MATERIALS 

Industrial Plants our Specialty 

S. HILLMAN & SONS 

Phone TRinidad 2-9133 

801 69th Ave., Oakland 3, Calif. 



PEERLESS LAUNDRY COMPANY 

Piedmont 5-01 8S 
JOHN F. SNOW DYEING AND CLEANING 



AR-GO PUMP CO. 

TRinidad 2-4075 
"A PUMP FOR EVERY SERVICE" 



4 701 GROVE STREET 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



OAKLAND 



10007 San Leandro Street 



CALIFORMIA 



UNITED STATIONERS 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

ARTISTS AND DRAFTING MATERIALS 

GREETING CARDS • GIFTS 



DIAMOND DAIRY 
Home Delivery 



ANdover 1-6323 47O6 Grove Street OLymplc 2-2619 

3525 EAST Mth STREET OAKLAND I, CALIF. OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



RAY N. CANN 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRING 

437 TWENTY-FIFTH STREET 



ATLAS Heating and Ventilating Co., Ltd. 

"EVERYTHING IN HEATING" 



Phone TWinoaks 3-1343 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 1451 THIRTY-SECOND STREET OAKLAND 8. CALIF. 



Page 100 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



EX-CON NABBED FOR ATTEMPTED 

ROBBERY BY CLEVER WORK OF 

S. F. P. D. INSPECTORS 

Robert LaMarr, ex-convict out of San Quentin and a 
Federal Prison, the latter for counterfeiting U. S. money 
while an inmate of the former penitentiary, is in the 
"bucket" again. LaMarr "s latest incarceration was brought 
about by his attempted holdup of a Polk Street hotel. 
Flashing a gun, which turned out to be a toy pistol of his 
young son, he demanded of the clerk, Mabel Mahan, the 
cash on hand. The clerk was slow in complying with the 
demand and so Mr. LaMarr leaped over the counter to 
get at the cash box. The heel of one shoe hit the top of 
the counter, and this was a clincher to his identity when 
he was later apprehended. He got no money. 

LaMarr used a Packard car and when the police were 
advised of the wouldbe holdup Inspectors Joseph Norton, 
James Brown and Edward F. McLaughlin answered the 
radio broadcast. They started checking rental agencies 
and found one of them had rented a car to a "Mr. Folk," 
whose address was given as a Pawell Stress address. Going 
there they found "Mr. Folk," who denied any attempted 
robbery, so he was taken to the place he tried to stickup 
and the inspectors found the heel of one of his shoes 
fitted the print left on the counter. 

"Mr. Folk," seeing the jig was up through the clever 
and fast work of the three inspectors readily admitted 
he was the man being sought. He was locked up. 

In 1936, while serving time in San Quentin, he con' 
fessed his part in counterfeiting $10 bills in the prison's 
engraving shop. He was sent up for that crime after 
serving his state charge. He also has ser\'ed time in 
Texas, Georgia and Washington. 

Inspectors Norton, Brown and McLaughlin gave a 
fine demonstration of the training they have received 
since becoming policemen, especially in that which stressed 
not overlooking any possible clew, no matter how insig' 
nificant it might appear. 



FREDERICKSON BROTHERS 



12S9 eSth Street 



EMERYVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



REGGIE'S DELICATESSEN 

SIXTH STREET MARKET 



6th and Washinfton Streets 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN-CALIFORNIA FISH CO. 

FRESH, SALT AND SMOKED FISH 



Second and >X*eb8lcr Streets 



Phone TEmplebar 2-4900 



H. C. "Curly" Burns 



Frank H. Hart 



B & H AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

HIgate 4-2302 

Specialits 

DIESEL AND BUTANE EQUIPMENT 

Complete Service All Makes of Trucks 



362 THIRD STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



TEmplebar 4-9241 



Fred W. Harmon 



HARMON SHEET METAL WORKS 

HEATING • VENTILATING • SKYUGHTS 
General Sheet Metal Fabrication and Installation 



1030 EAST EIGHTH STREET 



OAKLAND 6. CALIF. 



P. & N . PRODUCE CO. 

Telephone TWinoaks 3-23S3 
WHOLESALE FRUIT AND PRODUCE 

301 FRANKLIN STREET OAKLAND. CALIF. 

PACIFIC FOOD MARKET 

Phone TRinidad 2-9820 

GROCERIES - FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

AND MEATS 



873 1 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



John T. Weisbart 



Phone SWeetwood 8-6740 



WEISBART PAINTING CO. 

PAINTING • DECORATING 
RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL 



7026 HILLMONT DRIVE 



OAKLAND 3. CALIF. 



Phone KElIog 2-764 7 



FINO PRODUCTS CO. 

FINE RAVIOLI 
FINEST FOR TASTE 



1613 EAST Mth STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



KEIIog 4-5 140 



N.nht Calls LO. 8-1839 



REFRIGERATION SPECIALISTS, Ltd. 

REFRIGERATION ENGINEERS 
SALES AND SERVICE 



2264 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



You always SAVE at PAY LESS on Drugs, Sundries, Camera 
Supplies, Tobaccos, Liquors, Candies, Toiletries! 

It Will Pay you to shop at PAY LESS — the worlds 
largest self-service Drug Store! 

PAY LESS DRUG STORE 

1901 TELEGRAPH AVE OAKLAND 

Deslauriers Column Mould Company, Inc. 

1766 WEST ELEVENTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 101 



FURNITURE A BLOCK LONG 

TRADEWAY STORES 

THINGS FOR THE HOME 

1230 SAN PABLO AVENUE 
EL CERRITO. CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA BUILDERS 
SUPPLY COMPONY 

TEmplebar 4-83S3 
700 SIXTH AVENUE OAKLAND 4. CALIF. 



SUNSET TEA & COFFEE CO. 



GLencourt 1-5637 
RESTAURANT SUPPLIES 



33 1 WASHINGTON STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



OUR SPECIALTIES 

MAYONNAISE - SYRUP - HORSE RADISH - MUSTARD 

MEXICAN HOT - CATSUP - VINEGAR - SALAD OIL 

PICKLES - OLIVES - EXTRACTS - SPICES 

SALAD DRESSING - CHEESE 



H. F. WALKER 



Quality and Service 



186 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



ROLL-RITE CORPORATION 

MATERIALS HANDLING 
EQUIPMENT 



801 JEFFERSON STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



McGUIRE AND HESTER 

PIPE LINE CONTRACTORS 
Telephone TRinidad 2-7676 



796 66th AVENUE 



OAKLAND 3. CALIFORNIA 



CLAY NINE BAR 

and 
LIQUOR STORE 

910 Clay Street 



DAHL CHEVROLET COMPANY 

Telephone TWinoaks 3-2611 

BROADWAY at TWENTY-SEVENTH STREET 
OAKLAND 12. CALIFORNIA 



Alta Building Material Company 



ROCK 
CEMENT 



SAND • GRAVEL 
PLASTER • LIME 



Telephone HIgate 4-2490 
2857 HANNAH STREET OAKLAND 8. CALIFORNIA 

Phone Piedmont 5-4700 

VAL STROUGH CHEVROLET CO. 

CHEVROLET 
SALES • SERVICE 

3330 Broadway at Piedmont 

OAKLAND 11. CALIFORNIA 



E. L. PRICE PUMP CO. 

PRYCO AND CALIFORNIA 

PUMPS 

GLencourt 1-073S 

576 Fifth Street 
OAKLAND. CALIF. 



JOHN R. Ober • Hugo P. Correll 
Redmond C. StaatSt Jr. 

Inheritance Tax Appraisers 

Representing 

THOMAS H. KUCHEL 

STATE CONTROLLER 
Bank of America Building 




OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 12 12 BROADWAY 



OAKLAND 1 2 



Frank Boulter, Prop. 



Phone HIgate 4-9369 Phone ANdover 1-4638 



FORTY-NINER CAFE 

WINES • WHISKEY • BEER 
CHOICE HOME COOKED MEALS 



HANDY ANDY LIQUORS 

Ritchie and Holloway, Props. 

ALL POPULAR BRANDS STOCKED 
Open Sun.-Thur. — 10:30 A.M. to 12:30 A.M. 
Fri.-Sat. — 10:30 A.M. to 2:00 A.M. 



1686 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 3073 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



COCHRAN AND CELLI 

CHEVROLET BLOCK 
HIgate 4-00S5 



Ed Yarick's Physical Culture Studio 

Ed Yarick, Instructor 
BODY BUILDING • WEIGHT REDUCING 

Monday, Wednesday. Friday — 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday — 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. 



TWELFTH AND HARRISON STS. 



OAKLAND 4. CALIF. 33.. pqoTHILL BLVD. 



KEllog 2-963 1 



OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



JOHN HANSEN & SONS 

Since 1894 
COFFEE 



Phone KEIIog 4-3303 Les Cave 

L E S CAVE 

A PERMANENT REPAIR ON 
CRACKED MOTOR BLOCKS AND DIESEL HEADS 



FOURTH AND CLAY 



OAKLAND. CALIF. i640 EAST 14th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



Page 102 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



CHIEF BOTTO OF BELMONT 



A year ago next month Belmont was given a new 
Chief of Pohce when the City Council appointed Stanley 
H. Botto, who had been a member of the Belmont Police 
Department for some nine years. 

Born in Belmont in 1910 and getting his education in 
the schools of that city, he engaged in various work before 
entering the Department in 1938. 

Chief Botto is right up among the other San Mateo 
County Police Chiefs in the matter of new and modern 
police headquarters. For last January he moved into 
quarters provided for the Police in the new city hall 
located at Broadway and Fifth Streets, one block west 
of El Camino Real. He has three rooms assigned to him 
and his force of five officers. The latter comprise the 
following : 

Sergeant Williams, Officers George Doyle, James 
Moore, James Lyle and Wally Nugent. 

Belmont, with a population of 4500 people, covers 
some six square miles of area, and this territory is given 
a complete 24-hour'a-day patrol. There are a lot of auto- 



mobiles passing through Belmont and the two patrol cars 
and motorcycle officers are tough on traffic law violators, 
as a result that since January 1, 1947, there hasn't been 
a single fatal traffic accident. 

Chief Botto has his automotive equipment fitted out 
with two-way radio and he has had his men given extra 
training and instruction by neighboring Police Depart- 
ments are all are taking the course provided currently by 
the San Mateo Police Executives Association, being held 
in San Mateo. 

He is married and has one son. 



TWIN PINES 

ALBERT T. VORIS, M. D., Medical Director 
Phone Belmont 111 



RALSTON AVENUE 



BELMONT. CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 
San Carlos 2258 



Res. Phone 
San Carlos 1018 



HARDING MEAT MARKET 

Telephone Mountain View 3080 

PROMPT SERVICE ■ FREE DELIVERY 

124 Castro Street 



MOUNTAIN VIEW 



CALIFORNIA 



FAMILY SHOE STORE 

Shoes - Fitted - By - X-Ray 
RED GOOSE SHOES FOR CHILDREN 



Phone LA. 2-6118 



1507 WEBSTER STREET 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Bob Rotelli Mike Guidoni 

NATIONAL MEAT MARKET 



LAkehurst 2-SlOO 



1203 PARK STREET 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



RUSSO'S MARKET 

Wholesale - Retail 

FRUIT - VEGETABLES 

Fresh from the Country 

A(() middle man's (Profit 
7v(o long storage period 

We.st Side Junipero Serra - JUniper 7-9940 
602 Burrows Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



BAKER CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CONTRACTING AND BUILDING 

1495 EL CAMINO REAL BELMONT. CALIF. 



t 



BOOTS and SADDLE 
Range Riders' Bar 

Presents 

VERNON at the Piano 

ARMANDO and MACK 

CARL and His Fiddle 



WHERE THERE'S FUN FOR ONE 
THERE'S FUN FOR ALL. 



Phone 794 
1428 El Camino Real 

BELMONT, CALIFORNIA 

On the Highway 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 103 



HOTEL UTAH 



S04 Fourth Street 



JORGENSON & CO. 

500 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



KELLOGG EXPRESS 



235 Spear Street 



FAMOUS FEATURES 
SYNDICATE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



828 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



THEO SCHMIDT 

957 Market Street 



OPERATING ENGINEERS UNION 



Local 3 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MArket | -8242 



Stanley Michelsen, Prop. 



STANLEY'S RADIO SERVICE 

RADIOS • APPLIANCES 



FIELD ERNST ENVELOPE CO. 



245 Fifth Street 



3033 16th Street. Near Mission SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



THE FINK & SCHINDLER CO. 

STORE EQUIPMENT 
552 BRANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone Mission 7-9335 

SKYSCRAP ER 

NICK and LEE 
You Are A Stranger Here But Once 

3336 24lh STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

BINNS MACHINE & TOOL WORKS 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

Office Phone HEmlock 1-3570 

Factory and Office 1072 Bryant Street and 87 McLea Court 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



NEWBERRY'S 

2664 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



WARFIELD LUGGAGE SHOP 



1009 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DAMES & MOORE 



CIVIL ENGINEERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BUENA 

CAMPBELL 

SANITARIUM 



Phone Belmont 49 
Res. Burl. 3-3780 

Mrs. Buena V. Campbell 
P. O. Box 696 

BELMONT, CALIFORNIA 



MARSHALL-ADAMS 
Printing Corporation 



~t *■ 




523 Sansome Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 104 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



PENALTIES INCREASED FOR DRUNK, 
NEGLIGENT DRIVERS 

Penalties for drunken driving and for negligent driving 
were made more severe by the 1947 session of the State 
Legislature in response to the public demand for in- 
creased safety on the highways. As analyzed by the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association, the law now re- 
quires that the license of any person convicted of drunken 
driving shall be suspended for 90 days for the first offense, 
instead of 30 days as previously provided. For a second 
offense, the period of license suspension is set at one year, 
instead of 90 days, as previously. The license of an_y 
person convicted of drunken driving will be taken up 
the court and forwarded to the Department of Motor 
Vehicles for immediate action. 

Other amendments to the Vehicle Code authorize the 
Department of Motor Vehicles to refuse issuance of a 
license to a negligent driver, who is defined as an habitual 
violator of the traffic laws, or to a driver who is deemed 
incompetent to operate a motor vehicle. The penalty for 
conviction of driving when the operator's license has 
been revoked was increased to imprisonment in the county 
jail for not more than one year, or by a fine of $1,000, 
or both. 



Phone UNderhill 1-9283 



EL CAMINO 



Mary E. Saulovich 



Steve N. Habich, Manager 

WHISKEY - BEER - WINE - LIQUORS TO TAKE OUT 

SANDWICHES - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

3192 l6tK Street, near Guerrero St. SAN FRANCISCO 



E. C. BRAUN CO. 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

AIR CONDITIONING 

INDUSTRIAL PIPING 



2115 Fourth Street 

BERKELEY 2, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Berkeley 7-2356 



PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 

East Bay Division 




17th and Clay Streets 

OAKLAND 12, CALIFORNIA 

W. H. P.ARK, Division Manager 



S. A. ROUSE, 
DISTRIBUTOR 



360 Seventh Avenue 

Oakland, California 

TWinoaks 3-4022 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 105 



UNderhill I -4 12 I 

BEAR PHOTO SERVICE 

DEVELOPING - PRINTING - COPYING - ENLARGING 

330 GROVE STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

HOTEL SAINT MORITZ 



Phone 1266 Mario Lucido, Prop. 

MARIO'S SERVICE 

OLDSMOBILE AND G.M.C. TRUCKS 

410 BLACK DIAMOND STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

Phone 1412J 



EL NAVIO CLUB 



S. C. MijareSp Prop. 



530 Broadway 



ICE COLD BEER 
Service With a Smile 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 40 E. SECOND STREET 



PITTSBURG, CALIF. 



F. T. BURNS DRAY AGE CO. 



516 Townsend Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone HEmlock 1-6450 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone OR. 3-9174 



Res. MOntrose 4-4296 



MOLANDER MOTOR SALES 

NEARLY NEW USED CARS 

724-730 Van Ness Ave. bet. Turk and Eddy Streets. Also 

MOLANDER BIG LOT, 701 Eddy St. Phone TU. 5-6289 

SAN FRANCISCO Geo. Harris, Mgr CALIFORNIA 

DEBS DEPARTMENT STORE 

FOUR STORES FOR VALUES 



1641 Fillmore, Near Post 
2062 Mission, Near 17th 



2430 Mission, bet. 20th & 21st 
1318 Stockton, Near Broadway 



BERESFORD DINING ROOM 



637 Sutter Street 



Phone 950 Louis Strusis 

CALIFORNIA CONFECTIONERY 

FRESH HOMEMADE CANDIES AND ICE CREAM 

LIGHT LUNCHES - FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

Our Motto: We Aim to Please 

379 RAILROAD AVE. PITTSBURG, CALIF. 

BUNGALOW GRILL 

IT'S THE TASTE THAT TELLS 

We Specialize in 

BROILED STEAKS AND CHOPS - DELICIOUS SEA FOODS 

Telephone 493 
152 EAST THIRD STREET PITTSBURG, CALIF. 

Phone 1065 

HALF MOON CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 

207 BLACK DIAMOND STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 

Phone 1387 Maria Hernandez 

BLUE BIRD CAFE 

SOFT DRINKS - BEER - WINE - MEXICAN DISHES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 46 EAST SECOND STREET 



PITTSBURG, CALIF. 



Phone AShberry 3-4949 

GOLD STAR MARKET 

MEAT - GROCERIES - FRUIT - VEGETABLES 

BEER AND WINE 

2725 DOHR ST., Corner Ward BERKELEY, CALIF. 

Phone TEmpIebar 2-1402 Home: GLencourt 1-4202 

FAMOUS CONEY ISLAND 

2077 Chestnut Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone MArket 1-2547 

NEW POTRERO GROCERY and MARKET 

FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES AND COLD MEATS 
Complete Line of Beer and Wines - Also Frozen Foods 

1310 18th STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Phone VAIencia 4-1030 



R. Tejada, Prop. 



I PUERTO RICO CAFE 

MEXICAN AND AMERICAN DISHES 

COURTESY SERVICE 

4218 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone MArket 1-2910 

BETTER VALUE MARKET 

GROCERIES - FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
Corner 18th and Connecticut St. 



M. Vasques - Pete Vasques, Props Phone 963 

EL GALLO CAFE 

SPECIALIZING IN MEXICAN FOOD 
BEER AND WINE 

52 EAST SECOND STREET PITTSBURG, CALIF. 

Phone 4 I 7 

THE LANTERN CAFE 

CHOP SUEY - FINEST CHINESE DISHES 

268 RAILROAD AVENUE PITTSBURG, CALIF. 

CLUB SHANGRI LA 

Pittsburg's Finest Night Club 

DINING AND FLOOR SHOW EVERY NIGHT 

FEATURING CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOODS 

380 E. 10th STREET Phone 926 PITTSBURG, CALIF. 

Phone UNderhill 1-0800 Res. JU. 5-4173 

PIONEER PIPE COMPANY 

RECONDITIONED AND NEW PIPE CASING 



634 TOWNSEND STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SHEAN'S DEPOT CAFE 



699 Third Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



VISV ALLEY SOCIAL CLUB, Inc. 



107 Visitacion Avenue 



BRISBANE 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 

BAY CITIES ICE & COLD STORAGE CO. 

Wm. E. Meyers, Office Manager 
HEmlock 1-4222 

715 B RANNAN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 

LUNCH DINNER 

SIL AND ED'S 

FINE FOODS 

1419 HAIGHT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 17, CALIF. 



BRISBANE 



DICK'S TAVERN 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN DeMARCO 



23 CLUB 
DANCING 



JUniper S-9989 



23 Visitacion 



BRISBANE 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 106 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



CHANGES IN SAN FRANCISCO 
BUREAU OF INSPECTORS 

On February 17 Captain of Inspectors James English 
made some reassignments in the San Francisco Bureau 
of Inspectors. With several details short of men, and all 
needing more owing to the upswing of crime throughout 
the nation, his move tends to fill these vacancies and give 
more needed men to the units needing them. 

Inspector Percy Kenealy who headed the Special Ser- 
vice Detail until Mayor Elmer Robinson took over the 
iffairs of San Francisco, was reassigned to his old spot on 
the Federal Detail. 

Inspector William Mudd, who during his long tenure 
in the Department, and over 25 years in the Bureau, 
during which he has worked on the Auto and Burglary 
Detail, doing a fine job in each, was moved from Inspector 
James Johnson's Burglary Detail to Inspector Charles 
Iredale's Pickpocket and Bunco Detail. He teams up with 
Inspector Louis Lenss. 

Inspector Edgar Paul was transferred from the Burg- 
lary Detail to Lieutenant Samuel Miller's Pawnshop De- 
tail. He's a good man in any spot he is sent. He is quite a 
linguist, speaking French and Spanish fluently. 

Inspectors Elbert Ryan and Sydney Waugh, who have 
fine records with Inspector William Gillmore"s Auto De- 
tail were assigned to the Missing People's Bureau. 

Officer John Curtin was detailed from the Juvenile 
Bureau to the Burglary Detail and Officer Edward Hall 
was sent from the office crew to the Juvenile Bureau under 
Lieutenant John Meehan. Observers declare Officer Hall 
will go far in the Department. 

Old reliable Assistant Inspector David Dillon has 
finished his stint with the office crew and now gets his 
mail at the Auto Detail, fourth floor headquarters. 

Assistant Inspector Melvin Jorgensen, who has built 
up a fine reputation since he joined the Police Department 
graduates from the office crew and is now with the Burg- 
lary Detail. 

Two members of the Bureau of Identification: Officer 
Thomas Brodmerkle and Donald Luce, w^ere transferred 
to the office crew. They will be found hitting the ball as 
both are able and ambitious. 

Inspector Frank Murphy is in temporary charge of 
the Missing Persons Bureau, having been put in charge 
with the retirement of Inspector Marvin Dowell, of 
whom we will have a story when he is given a banquet 
following the Lenten season. 

Phone UNderhlll 1-4310 Established 1906 



KEllog 2-9388 



GRAZER'S 

CANDIES - TOBACCOS - MAGAZINES 



FRUITVALE AVE.. Cor. E. 2 7th AVE. 



OAKLAND I. CALIF 



Phone SWeetwood 8-2800 



STANDARD TRAILER COMPANY 

HEAVY DUTY TRAILERS 
HEAVY DUTY FARM IMPLEMENTS 



415 SAN LEANDRO BLVD. 



SAN LEANDRO, CALIF 



Sacramento Store 



1328 7th Street 



Phone Capitol I63li 



L. PIAZZA 

Wholesale Florists 
SHIPPERS AND GROWERS 

Telephone TWinoaks 3-1100; Night, LAkehu.st 2-58fi4 

821 JEFFERSON STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



Marvin R. Mento 



Frank Gniadek 



BAY CITY PATTERN CO. 

Phone ANdover 1-8920 
WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 



114 14lh AVENUE 



OAKLAND, CALIF. 



ANdover 1-8498 



Andy Leonhardt 



LEONHARDT'S 
Fine Motor Cars 



2500 EAST 12th STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



WE BUILD THE BEST AND REPAIR THE REST 



G. PAOLETTI & CO. 

COMMERCIAL BODIES 
BUILT TO ORDER 



Telephone OLympic 2-1914 
4529 SHATTUCK AVENUE OAKLAND 9. CALIFORNIA 



ALAMEDA COUNTY-EAST BAY 
TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 

In business continuously since 1861 
14th and Franklin Streets 



TWinoaks 3-8100 



OAKLAND 12. CALIFOWNIA 



Telephone; TWinoaks 3-7400 



OCEAN SHORE IRON WORKS 

BOILERS — NEW AND REBUILT - A COMPLETE STOCK 

Wc Can Quote Any Sire Boilers, Tanks or Other Steam 
Plant Equipment Repair and Installations 



RICHARDS &: PRINGLE 

WHOLESALE MEATS - JOBBING 



550 EIGHTH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 216 SEVENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 



MArket 1-9346 



Paul Maryannis, Prop. 



14th AND VALENCIA GROCERY 

FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES - BEER AND WINE 



Compliments of 

ETALO MARKET 



Phone DEIaware 3-1689 



304 VALENCIA STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO 



2714 San Bruno Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL Page 107 



Phone UNderhill 1-4433 



DEL MONICA HAT CO. DUGGAN'S FUNERAL SERVICE 



109 Geary Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



3434 Seventeenth Street, Near Valencia Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Mission 7-9508 Joe Harvey, Prop. 



RICHMOND 7 7 :i f. r 1 \i R 

BODY AND FENDER SERVICE, Inc. ^ / ^ o 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE • LUNCH 



385 21st Ave. at Geary Street 



2736 Twentieth Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA ^^^ FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Telephone YUkon 6-0110 



JOBBING • REPAIRING • INDUSTRIAL • HOME WIRING 

MALM & WELTER JUILLARD, INC. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS LiqUOT DistHbutOrS 



3 10 TOWNSEND STREET SAN FRANCISCO 7. CALIF. 



GRaystone 4-7424 and 4-7969 

622 LARKIN STREET SAN FRANCISCO 2 

WA. 1-9771 Radio Station KFI PRospect 5-0444 

PALACE BEE CLUB EARLE C. ANTHONY, Inc. 

Since 1904 

BEER • LIQUORS • WINES _ ... . r. . k ,„, 

California Distributor 

PACKARD MOTOR CARS 
1535 Steiner St., near Geary 

^.. .r-^nKTt* 901 Van Ness Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 5^^ FRANCISCO LOS ANGEJ-ES 



Phone WEst 1-6866 



F. BAYLACQ ELK'S CLUB 



FRENCH LAUNDRY AND CLEANING SERVICE 

Laces, Lace Curtains, Silks and Flannels 

Washing Called for and Delivered 



456 Post Street 



1861 - 1863 O'Farrell Street SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

B. E. Emery Phone WEst 1-9887 Jim Williams 

Our Compliments to 

NEW FILLMORE SERVICE '""'^ francisco s finest- 

chevron gas station BELL BROOK DAIRIES, Inc. 

night lubrication a specialty 

B.,,L 1 ir;»i„ ^ c*,-««.= 1198 Howard Street 
USD and rillmore otreets ,r-rt,..kTi » 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN F RANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ORdway 3-2660 COURTESY SERVICE phone UNderhill 1-7878 

ACE CAFE BEACHLEY AND MARTIN 

Tom S. Tun? - Johney S. Wong 

"Too« i„ Fv.rvthin^' CHEVRON GAS STATION • ATLAS PRODUCTS 

Tops in Everything- RADIO SERVICE • MOTOR TUNE-UP 

BEST IN FOODS AUTO ELECTRIC 

Open Every Day 6 A.M. to 2 A.M. 

Duboce and Sanchez 
5 79 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

J. W. ALLEN COMPANY J- A. HERZOG 

DESOTO AND PLYMOUTH MOTOR CARS COMPLETE AUTO REPAIRS - BODY METAL PAINTING 

SALES AND SERVICE 

601 Valencia Street Phone MArket 1-3040 

Phone VAIencia 4-1401 ic-/-.DkiiA 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 
3(35 Twenty-Fourth Street SAN FRANCISCO 10. CALIF. 



~ Telephone TUxedo S-S162 ALL PRIVATE BATHS 

BRIDGE CAFE HOTEL PALOMAR 

Fourth and Folsom Streets 3g4 O'Farrell Street between Mason and Taylor 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 108 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April. 1948 



GOOD WILL JUDGE 

In the March issue of the national magazine Look, there 
appeared a splendid illustrated and well deserved sketch 
of San Francisco's first and only Superior Court Judge — 
Theresa Meikle. Following is a copy of the article: 




Judge Theresa Meikle 

San Franciscans all the way from Nob Hill to the water- 
front come to Judge Theresa Meikle with their personal 
troubles. Helping wayward girls, the jobless and bewil- 
dered isn't a part of the kindly lady's duties as presiding 
judge of the city's Human Relations Court. But each 
day, after court is recessed, Judge Meikle conducts a 
Good Will Hour for all seeking advice. Especially inter- 
ested in children, she has been instrumental in building 
the Log Cabin Ranch for delinquent boys. Ocean View 
School for delinquent girls and Laguna Honda Home for 
Babies. In recognition of her long service, Breakjast in 
HoUywood radio show will honor Judge Meikle on 
March 1?. 

OREGON-NEVADA-CALIFORNIA 
FAST FREIGHT, Inc. 



675 Brannan Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Leo Mayer 



R. Colon 



EL QUENEPO 
Spanish, Mexican ahd American Dinners 

1420 Turk Street, Near Fillmore 
Phone Fillmore 6-9969 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

E. F. LANE AND SON 



32 Beale Street 



SIGNAL OIL 

COMPANY 

of 

CALIFORNIA 



KENNEDY 
ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 

W. T. (Bill) Kennedy 

Industrial - Commercial 
Domestic Wiring 

MOTORS 

FIXTURES 



6239 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

JUNIPER 7- 12.^7 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 109 



These Things You Must Know If You Want Promotion 



1. An officer is not justified in killing a person charged 
with a misdemeanor, even though such person is fleeing 
in an attempt to escape. 

2. Homicide is justifiable when committed by a woman 
in defense of her person against the commission of a 
felony. 

3. According to the Penal Code, riot and rout mean the 
same thing. 

4. Every burglary committed in the night time is burglary 
in the first degree. 

5. Having possession of deadly weapons with intent to 
commit an assault is a felony. 

6. No person may be convicted of a felony unless by ver- 
dict of a jury. 

7. A warrant of arrest must be executed by a peace of- 
ficer. 

8. In most cases a defendant charged with a felony is 
taken before the magistrate who issued the warrant. 

9. A policeman may make an arrest without a warrant 
for any public offense committed in his district. 

10. In a misdemeanor case, an arrest cannot be made on a 
warrant at night. 

11. A police officer is justified in forcibly breaking into a 
dwelling to make an arrest only in felony cases. 

12. A police officer may without a warrant arrest a person 
for any public offense committed although not in his 
presence. 

13. Any kidnapping in California for the purpose of ob- 
taining any ransom or reward is punishable by death. 

14. The crime "Solicitation to Commit Felony" must be 
proved by the testimony of at least two witnesses. 

1 ^ . A subpoena is the process by which the attendance of 
a witness before a court or magistrate is required. 

16. Perjury is punishable by imprisonment in the State 
Prison not less than one nor more than fourteen years. 

17. An officer who wilfully refuses to arrest any person 
charged with a criminal act is punishable by fine not 
exceeding five thousand dollars and imprisonment in 
the county jail not exceeding five years. 

18. A police officer having arrested a person upon a crimi- 
nal charge, who wilfully delays to take such person 
before a magistrate having jurisdiction, is guilty of a 
felony. 

19. A person who maliciously and without probable cause 
procures a warrant of arrest to be executed is guilty 
of a misdemeanor. 

20. At least three persons are required to constitute a con- 
spiracy. 

2 1 . Any murder perpetrated by wilful, deliberate and pre- 
meditated killing is murder in the first degree. 

22. Involuntary manslaughter is the unlawful killing of a 
human being, without malice, upon a sudden quarrel 
or heat of passion. 

23. A charge of rape will not hold in any case where it is 
proved the female did not resist. 

24. In order for the crime of seduction to hold, it must be 



proved that the act was accomplished under promise of 
marriage. 

25. It is against the law to sell tobacco to persons under 
the age of eighteen years. 

26. It is against the law to play any card game for money. 

27. The taking by means of a riot of any person from the 
lawful custody of any peace officer is a lynching. 

28. Two persons may constitute any unlawful assembly. 
28. An offense of petty theft committed after a person has 

been convicted of a previous offense for petty theft 
constitutes grand theft. 
30. Ever>' public offense must be prosecuted by indictment 
or information. 



Del Monte Electric Co. 

8275 San Leandro Street 
OAKLAND 3, CALIFORNIA 

Office: TRINID.^D 2-3173 
Res. SWeetwood 8-8875 



Call Pete or Paul 
ORdway 3-7566 

HOE SAI GAI 
RESTAURANT 

Authentic Chinese and 
American Food 

Facilities For Special Parties 
Open 11 A.M. to 3 A.M. 



472 TURK STREET 

Bet. Larkin and Hyde 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Page no 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS^ JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



COALINGA 

(Continued from page 83^ 
and jack rabbitt meat. Then came the railroad, and next the 
saloon as the "inevitable harbinger of civilizing influences." 

In 1900 Coalinga was a collection of about 20 houses 
scattered along Front Street, facing the railroad tracks. 
The town was a trading point for the cattle and sheep men 
and for the coal mining colony in the nearby hills. The 
output of this mine was meager and the market was slow. 
The coal was shipped out on the little railroad to Han- 
ford, which was the nearest accessible point. This mine 
was soon abandoned, however. 

The town's progress was retarded by remoteness of loca- 
tion, lack of a water supply, wretched transportation facil- 
ities, and unpromising business conditions. However, in 
1910 a rich, proven oil field was discovered and Coalinga 
blossomed into a modernized city of 5^00 people. It was 
a bustling business community, supported by one of the 
greatest and latest proven oil fields in the world. A few 
years before, the name of Coalinga stood for a wretched 
village in the crudest form, little more than a hurriedly 
thrown-together mining settlement, surrounded by black 
oil rigs, many on land of doubtful productive value. It was 
a settlement overrun by reckless men and worse women, 
gambling resorts, saloons wild with money, excitement, and 
the smell of petroleum pervading everything. 

There was little about Coalinga or its surroundings to 
attract new, permanent residents. Drinking water was 
brought from Hanford in rail tanks, and for years was sold 
by the bucket or barrel. Oil supplies were brought from 
Los Angeles or San Francisco, and oil transportation was 
by horse or mule to the railroad shipping point. Until the 
coming of the railroad to Coalinga, this primitive method 
of transporation cut deeply into the profits of the oil com- 
panies. By 1902 conditions had improved slightly, and 3 
years later the boom was on. In 1907 the price of oil had 
risen from 18 cents per barrel to 40 cents. The rush came 
in 1909 when the price rose to 61 cents. The oil fever 
had hit Coalinga. 

It is said that the town grew by leaps and bounds over 
night. A collection of shacks was thrown together because 
the people were too busy making money to build anything 
more substantial. Along Front Street, or Whiskey Row as 
it was known, congregated the fortune hunters. The faro 
table was never idle and the hum of the roulette was inces- 
sant. Twenty-dollar gold pieces were used as stakes; money 
came easily and went even more easily. Coalinga was the 
typical western mining camp; instead of gold or silver, it 
was oil. The saloon was as much a fortune maker as the 
oil gu.^hcr. The spirit of the gold rush of '49 hovered over 
the mushroom settlement. The first comers had the same 
adventurous spirit that marked those who rushed to the 
Klondike and to the gold fields of California and Nevada. 

With the great profits of 1907-09 came also a greater 
stability, for throughout the days of the fever substantial 
men and corporations had been at work. Development of 
the oil field had proven its worth; permanent improvements 
in the town began with the construction of better homes 
and neat blocks of business firms. It was about this time 



that Whiskey Row burned to the ground. The shack era 
had passed and a city of brick, steel and concrete buildings, 
with sidewalks and paved streets, was developing. In 1907 
the population of the town and fields was 2,400; in 1910 
it was 10,000. 

Chief Griffith, with his small force of ofiicers has given 
Coalinga a splendid police service. His men are all well 
trained, courteous to all law abiding people and they keep 
the bustling little oil city free from criminal depredations 

You won't find any city in this western country better 
policed by a Department that is modern in every way ti • 
make a law abiding community. 

Compliments 

THE HUB LIQUOR STORE 

WINTERHAVEN. CALIF. 



PAT HART'S DOG HOUSE 

Phone San Bruno 1351 
401 El Camino Real 



LOMITA PARK 



CALIFORNIA 



G. Bigglo 



C. Manincor 



EL MONTE CAFE 

All Kinds of 
WINE, LIQUORS AND BEER 

UNderhill 1-5535 597 Hayes Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



HOUGH & EGBERT CO. 



311 California Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



K - P L A S T I X 



580 Natoma Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SALCO IRON AND METAL CO., Inc. 



1150 Twenty-Fifth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Phone EXbrook 2-2962 



Anna Buie, Prop. 



ELINOR HOTEL 

COURTESY SERVICE 
TRANSIT ROOMS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



392 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



April. 1948 POLICE AND PEACE 

PISTOL POINTING 

(Continued from page 24) 

Sharpshooter Hal Reynolds 4101 trophy 

Marksman 1st S. E. Spriggle 4133 trophy 

Marksman 2nd Phil Sheehan 4025 trophy 

Marksman 3rd Wesley Lim 4104 trophy 

1947 Western Revolver Association Annual Records 

.22 caliber 

National Match course Quentin Brooks 295N 

Short National Match course Quentin Brooks 296N 

Camp Perry course Quentin Brooks 299 T 

Western Police Match Quentin Brooks 296N 

.38 caliber 
20 shots slow fire, re- 
duced target at 

25 yards Jack Ahern (SFPD) 191N 

20 shots slow fire 

50 yards Grif Thompson (SFPD) 185 

Camp Perry Course Jack Ahern 297 

National Match 

Course Jack Wilson 292N 

Short National 

Match Course Quentin Brooks 290N 

Western Police 

Course Quentin Brooks 197N 

Jack Ahern 197T 

Camp Perry Four 

Man Team S. F. Police 

Revolver Cluh 1166N 

.45 caliber 

National Match course Bob Chow 283N 

Short National 

Match course Bob Chow 288N 

Camp Perry course Roy Kay 283 

Western Police course Al Heath 280N 

Cap & Ball 

12 shots at 25 yeards Bill Dowling 115 

N indicates new record 
T indicates old record tied. 

BIGELOW'S JEWELERS 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 

1636 L Street 
MERCED CALIFORNIA 



HIGHWAY HOTEL 

LOS ALTOS de JALISCO RESTAURANT 
SPANISH AND AMERICAN DISHES 



OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 1 1 



DR. H. GROTH 

2680 So. El Camino Real San Mateo, Calif. 

Best Wishes From 

U and I CAFE 

1 1 I EAST FOREST COALINCA. CALIF. 

CLUB MEXICO 

BEER, WINE AND MEXICAN FOOD 



CLOVIS 



CALIFORNIA 



NORTHERN CALIFORNIA WINERIES 



2507 Bryant Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MacDUCKSTON & GIESCH 



1133 Mariposa Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



COLONIAL INSURANCE CO. 



20O Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MAR-BUD FOOD PRODUCTS 

Distributors 
"LADY ANNE PRODUCTS" 



1200 SANCHEZ STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ENTERPRISE ENGINE & FOUNDRY 



18th and Florida Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HYSTER CO 



233 Ninth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SCOTT RESIDENCE CLUB 



2820 Scott Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



TESLUCK REAL ESTATE CO. 

2076 Sutter Street Phone WEst 1-1100 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC EMPLOYERS INSURANCE CO. 

300 Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

RENT-A-CAR— DRIVE YOURSELF 
SPECIAL RATES FOR TRIPS 

ARROW Truck 8C Auto Rental Service 

Full Insurance Protection 
38 EIGHTH STREET MArkel 10 I 92 SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Fillmore 6-3S3S 



A. H. Szeghy 



YCRE FRENCH BAKERY 



325 16th Street 



Phone 18S1-W 



MERCED 



CALIFORNIA 1923-25 FILLMORE STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 15. CALIF. 



UNITED ARTISTS 

COLLEGE OF BEAUTY CULTURE 

1069 MARKET STREET • ENTIRE FOURTH FLOOR 

Phone KLondike 2-0653 

SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIFORNIA 



Leonard Davey, Owner LAkehurst 2-1040 

WILTON'S DRUGS 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS 

1901 ENCINAL AVE., at Lafayette ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



Page 112 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1948 



STATE POLICE 

(Continued from page 5) 

uty Sheriff of Colusa County in 1937. After serving a 
year he became traffic officer for his native city, serving but 
a short time on that assignment when he was made Chief 
of Police in the latter part of 1938 serving until 1942 when 
he joined the United States Coast Guard. 

He became officer in charge of the dangerous cargo con- 
trol section for the San Francisco Bay area, under the Cap- 
tain of the Port. The dangerous cargo section consisted of 
approximately nOO men and S^ officers, concerned mainly 
with enforcing federal laws and regulations in the handling 
and loading of explosives and other dangerous cargo under 
the Port Security Program of the U. S. Coast Guard. 

The Chief went on inactive duty, United States Coast 
Guard Reserve, with the rank of Lieutenant on March, 
1946. 

He returned to civil life as Chief of Police of the city 
of Williams but on September 10, 1946, having passed the 
civil service examinations was made Chief of the Califor- 
nia State Police. 

Chief Crutcher is President of the Northern California 
Peace Officers' Association, and is now in Washington, 
D. C, attending the FBI National PoHce Academy. He 
is married and he and his wife, Reine, have two children, 
a girl, Karen, 8 years of age and a boy, Anson H., Jr., six 
months old. 



In the story about the Odom murder, the names of 
two men whose work had much to do with the solving 
of this baffling mystery, were omitted among those being 
given meritorious service awards. The ones inadvertently 
left out are Inspector Martin Lee and George Heeg of 
the Homicide Detail. No police department has two 
young men more capable, studious and courageous than 
these two inspectors, who since their appointment to the 
important Homicide Detail have demonstrated an uncanny 
ability to unravel many crimes and bring in and obtain 
evidence against suspected murderers. This Journal would 
be the last to deprive them of the honors they so justly 
deserve. — The Editor. 

THE BEST BREAD, CAKES, PIES, ROLLS 

Baked BY HECK 

VERSAILLES BAKERY 



1)06 VERSAILLES AVE. 



I. A. 2 0344 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 



REMODELING 



REBLUEINC 



JAMES E. FIELDS 

GUNSMITH 



1014 7lh Avenue. Rear TEmplebar 4-8816 

OAKLAND 6. CALIFORNIA 

STOCK BENDING REPAIRING 



Visit 

EDY'S COFFEE SHOP 

Home Cooking 

Cigars - Tobacco - Cigarettes - Beer and 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner 

Hours 6 A.M. 'til 8 P.M. 

2200 Bryant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone VAlencu 4-970'> 



DINE AND DANCE AT 

VENUS CLUB 

Mrs. Alex.andr.^, Prop. 

Greek-American Cuisine 

BANQUETS - PRIVATE PARTIES 

303 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 7 

Phone: GArfield 1-9834 



Sales - Service - Repairs 

Pacific Heights Rod 
& Gun Store 

Jim Rice, Owner and Manager 

"Custom-Built Guns - Ammunition" 
and Rod Repairs 

Gunsmithing - Blueing 
2213 Fillmore Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone JOrdan 7-0061 



Eix V. CoNROY Emil J. Weber 

WEBER & CONROY 

30 Eric Street - SAN FRANCISCO 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Industrial - Commercial - Residential 
No Job Too Large, and None Too Small 

ELECTRICAL FIXTURES 

Telephones UNderhill 1-2200 
AND HEMLOCK 1-6961 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Ontario's "OASIS" 

! 2>CUUd^0A^lS COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

I RIGHT IN THE HEART OF TOWN 

I CONVENIENT DELIGHTFUL 

j Featuring 

GOOD DRINKS 



! 

} SERVIED IN OUR BEAUTIFUL OASIS ROOM 

j FINEST LIQUORS EXPERTLY PREPARED 



"The Friendliest Spot in Town" 

The Oasis Cocktail Lounge 



I 115-117 WEST A STREET ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 



I 



Phone 


7031 


1017 Glen wood 




B. 0. 


MARKET 

1 




"We Buy For Less -We Sell for Less" | 




DELANO 


1 
, CALIFORNIA [ 



THE CLUB CAFE 

COCKTAILS • CARD ROOM 

AND DELICIOUS FOOD 

WHERE FRIENDS MEET 

and Courtesy is Our Motto 

1007 Main Street 

Delano, California 



Sfohl. N«li S 

270 Claremonf Blvd 
San Francisco, C«1 



Return Postage Guaranteed 
465 lOlh Street, San Francisco 5 



i»H.j 




BENNY WAGNER 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Bartenders and Culinary 
Workers Union 




LOCAL 822 
A. F. L. 

Labor Temple 

405 East 
Tenth Street 

PITTSBURG 
CALIF. 



m 


1 


h 


W- 


1 


1 


iii3»M 


1 ] 


^ 


k 


Bi 


..^ 



SYNTHETIC 
BAKED ENAMEL 
% TRAFFIC 




in anuFacturing^a 




812 61st Street 
Oakland 8, Calif. 



Quality Signs In Quantity 






CACTUS CAFE and CLUB 

Finest Cocktails and Entertainment on the 
Arizona and California Border 




Phone 085R5 



on Highway 80 at 
WINTERHAVEN, CALIFORNIA 





[FKl^KKgDgg® 




AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 




S. F. P. D. DETECTIVE BUREAU OF 45 YEARS AGO 

Back row left to right: Detectives Harry Braig, Duncan Matheson, Edward Gibson, Jeremiah Dinan. Timothy Bailey 

(killed in performance of duty). George Mulcahy and Charles Taylor. Middle row: Detectives George McMahon. Edward 
Wren. Raymond Silvey, Edward O'Deo, Thomas Gibson and Ross Whittoker. Front row: Detectives Harry Reynolds. 
Thomas Ryan. Edward Bryamsk. Captain of Detectives Joseph Burnett. Detectives Robert Hogon, Augustus Harper 
and Timothy Boinbridge. Most of these efficient officers hove passed on. Among those now living is Inspector Dinan, 
(retired), former Chief of Police. 



MAY. 1 948 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATIO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



ALLIED 

EQUIPMENT 

COMPANY 



International Farm Equipment 
Industrial Tractors and Equipment , 
Refrigeration and Dairy Equipment 



Phone 2-3107 :: 1824 Santa Clara Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 782 :: 109 W. Yosemite :: Madera 
Phone 25 :: 1230 G Street :: Reedley 



Compliments 
of 

FEDERAL MOGUL 
CORPORATION 



Manufacturing Division 



1830 H Street 



Phone 4-5061 



Service Store 

1228 Broadway Phone 2-5811 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



BISCEGLIA 

BROTHERS 

WINE COMPANY 

Producers of 

Paradise Wines 



P.O. Box 1149 

Fresno, California 



CALDOW PAINT 
COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

QUALITY PAINTS AND 
ENAMELS 

WALL PAPER - SHADES 
BLINDS 



1401 East Fourteenth Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

KEllog 4-4343 

• 

BERKELEY— 2585 Shattuck Avenue 
THornwall 3-5323 



OAKLAND— 2074 Broadway 
GLencourt 1-0978 



Mav, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 

PAGE 

The Candid Fnend J 

By Opie L. Warner 

That We Shall Not Forget S. F. P. D. Honored Dead 4 

S. F. P. D. Pawnshop Detail 5 

By the Eiilor 

Alameda Police Department Forges Ahead .... 6 
B> B. S. (Sia.nd.y) S>a-ndiers 

Evan James, New President of S. F. P. D. Officers' 
Association 7 

New Look of CHP Described 8 

City of Richmond Police Get Pay Raise 9 

Mayor DeVore Proposes Record Budget for Fresno 

Police Department 10 

By Donald S>\\n\aii. 

Fresno's Chief Raymond T. Wallace 11 

Sergeant McCoy Heads Busy Juvenile Bureau ... 12 

Fresno County Peace Officers' Association . . . 13 

Fresno State College Police Training Course ... 14 

Don't Leave Ignition Keys in Your Car 1? 

Sheriff George J. Overholt of Fresno 16 

1948 S. F. P. Widows" and Orphans' Aid Association 



Make Record 



17 



Central Beats Northern in S. F. P. D. Ball Tickets 

Sales 18 

Northern Company in Annual Get-to-Gether ... 19 

Editorial Page 20 

Pistol Pointing 21 

By J. Ro.« Duitnigan 

Monument in Golden Gate Park Honoring Only 

San Francisco Canine Cop 25 

Northern California Police Communication Officers" 

Association 26 

Oceanside — San Diego County 28 

Warden J. A. Johnston of Alcatraz Retires .... 32 

Some Are True and Some Are False — Rate Yourself 50 

Barstow Has_ Its First Police Chief 69 

Police Phone Calls From Lady Citizens 7T 

Something for Police to Consider 78 

Livermorc and Its Police Department 82 

These Things You Must Know If You Want 



Promotion 



86 



Directory 



The Editoh is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume." but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will he treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the EniroR. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020- 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Tuesday, 8:00 p. m Hall of Justice 

J. Warnock Walsh, President 160 Montgomery Street 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery Street 

■Washington I. Kohnke 686 Sacramento Street 

Sergeant John D. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quigley 

Dept. Sec" y.... Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRiCK....Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Edward Donahue 63 5 Washington Street 

Southern A. I. 0"Brien Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Northern Jack Eker 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park Leo Tackney Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond George M. Healy 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside... .Michael Gaffey... Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval John J. Wade 2348 24th Avenue 

PoTRERO John Sullivan 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Edward R. Pootel 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors James L. English Hal! of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Alexander McDaniell Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureali John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk. ...Capt. Patrick J. Murray.. ..Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Jusucc 



When In Trouble Call SUttCY h20'20 

When In Doubt 



Ahvavs .A.t Your Ser\ice 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Ma.v, 1948 



CITY 

F 
PARIS 



I 



Geary at Stockton Street 

San Francisco, California 



HOLLENBECK-BUSH 
PLANING MILL CO. 



WINDOWS • DOORS 

MOULDINGS 

and 

GENERAL MILL WORK 

Wholesale and Retail 



2206 So. Van Ness Avenue 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



PHONE ORDWAY 3-3040 
DAY - NIGHT OR SUNDAY 

DEYINE 

NATIONAL DETECTIVE 
AGENCY 

PAUL H. DEVINE, Principal 

LICENSED BY 
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

BONDED 

RELIABLE C0NFIDENTL4L 
INVESTIGATIONS 

1286 California Street 

Member of 

INTERNATIONAL SECRET SERVICE 

ASSOCIATION 

24-hour Service to All Cities in the 
United States 



SUN 


MAID 


RAISIN 


GROWERS 


OF 


CALIFORNIA 


■ 


FRESNO 


. 



I San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

I Established 1922) 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyright i 



Vol. XXrV 



MAY, 1948 



No. 1 



THE CANDID FRIEND 



Bv Opie L. Warner 



To enjoy his job and to be worth his salar>% a police 
officer must be a man of courage — sterling courage. 

Once in a while we find ourselves completely at a loss 
to define something. Wc thoroughly understand the 
meaning of the word but we find we cannot well express 
our meaning in so many words. To me the word courage 
comes into this class. 

Courage is an outstanding must in the necessary- mental 
setup of a police officer. In a quiet, suburban town or 
in a cit>' of teeming thousands, a day or a night will 
certainly come when any man who wears a police uniform 
will suddenly find he needs abounding and unqualified 
courage — when it is a case of courage or consequences, 
yes, usually dire consequences. 

Recently I congratulated a good friend of mine who 
returned to San Francisco with a magnificent eight- 
pointer. Good hunter and good fellow that he is, he 
received my congratulations with heartiness, but. as if 
talking to himself, said: "'Too bad we so often have to 
take the bitter with the sweet." 

He then went on to tell me all about his trip in the 
northern part of the state and how he got the buck that 
at least a hundred good hunters had missed during the 
past couple of seasons. Just as the dawn was breaking 
he was seated on an immense boulder at the head of a 
deep, narrow canyon, when, right between him and the 
rising sun was the distinct outline of an immense buck. 
He took careful aim and the buck instantly fell into the 
canyon. His pri:e winning dog was after the fallen 
buck instantly. 

By the time my friend got to the scene the forest 
monarch lay still, at full length, in a cramped space 
between fallen boulders. The dog was all excitement. 

As if by magic, the buck raised its head, sensed the 
situation, and viciously attacked the dog and had him 
virtually crushed to death in the space of seconds. He 
was on his way in a flash, but was dropped immediately 
by my friend who is one of the best shots in the state. 
It seems the first shot had only stunned the buck. 

Not being a hunter I asked my friend how it came 
that the deer attacked the big airdale, adding that I always 
thought deer were timid and ready to run from the least 
sign of trouble. From my friend I learned much about 



bucks: that they are canny, cagey and ultra careful — 
but definitely not cowards. That buck certainly acted the 
part of an alert and courageous human. 

As a result of my friend's talk I came away with an 
entirely new slant on the meaning of the word courage. 

In addition to giving much thought to acts that are 
commonly classed as courageous — but, which, on due 
consideration, are not — I finally arrived at the conclusion 
that courage is definitely akin to good, old common 
sense: and has nothing whatever to do \xith foolhardi- 
ness or recklessness. 

When it comes to analyzing courage we find it is really 
a mathematical problem, containing definite factors. 

After a cursory look at Websters and the thesaurus, 
I decided a large percentage of what passes for courage 
is really just hysteria. 

Certainly a police officer must have courage — physical 
courage — the courage of a rugged healthy man; but there 
IS a lot more to it. Out is his power to arrest, his hand- 
cuffs, his police whistle, his night stick, and even his 
revolver. True, all these are, more or less, adjuncts to 
his stand in an urgency — but. to a really courageous 
officer, there their worth terminates. 

After due consideration I feel the word "Imiits" is the 
proper name of the prime factor in the matter of police 
courage as such. The courageous police officer is the one 
who knows his "limits" — as to legal powers and as to his 
physical powers and possibilities: the officer who is con- 
servative and calm under the direst pressure. 

An officer may be physically a mar\'el. but, if he 
cannot swim it is really suicide for him to jump into deep 
water to save someone: or to enter a' dark warehouse to 
arrest armed bandits, alone, and without a flashlight, or 
in company with fellow officers, so equipped. 

The courageous police officer has a truly composite 
appraisement of himself, this appraisement including 
mainly his thorough knowledge of his duties and powers 
as a peace officer, as well as his physical limits in the 
matter of strength, skill and endurance. 

I have known many fine men who, to all appearances 
were the ideal type for police duty but who, after a very 
short period, resigned from the force. Probably each had 
/Continued on page S8) 



Page 4 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL May. J 948 



That We Shall Never Forget! 

Honor roll of those who have made the supreme sacrifice as members of the San 
Francisco Police Department. Each contributed his costly share to the grand tradi- 
tions of the department: 

Officer JOHN COOTS, June 12, 1878. Killed by John Runk. 

Officer JOHN NICHOLSON, February 16, 1884. Stabbed by unknown assassin. 

Officer EDGAR OSGOOD, December 13, 1886. Stabbed by unknown assassin. 

Officer ALEXANDER GRANT, September 11, 1891. Shot by Samuel of Posen. 

Lieutenant WILLIAM BURKE. March 23, 1898. Shot by Theo. Haines. 

Officer EUGENE ROBINSON, January 20, 1903. Shot by thugs. 

Officer MAX FENNER, April 18, 1906. Killed by falling walls. 

Officer lAMES S. COOK, August 26, 1936. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer GEORGE O'CONNELL, November 16, 1906. Shot by John Burns. 

Officer HARRY L. SAUER, May 7, 1907. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer EDWARD T. McCARTNEY, September 3, 1907. Shot by John Tansey. 

Officer WILLIAM H. HEINS, June 4, 1908. Shot by Young brothers. 

Officer WILLIAM O'SHAUGHNESSY, June 10, 1908. Beaten by C. Ritchie. 

Sergeant ANTONE NOLTING, January 9, 1909. Shot by Thos. Jordan. 

Officer CHARLES P. CASTOR, November 26, 191 1. Shot by P. Prantikos. 

Officer THOMAS FINNELLY, November 26, 1911. Shot by P. Prantikos. 

Officer JOHN J. NOLAN, March 19, 1912. Killed by fall chasing thug. 

Officer CHARLES H. BATES, July 26, 1912. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer BYRON C. WOOD, May 4, 1913. Shot by W. Thompson. 

Officer EDWARD MALONEY, April 19, 1915. Shot by Felker and Walker. 

Officer PETER HAMMOND, September 12, 1915. Shot by George Nelson. 

Corporal FREDERICK COOK, November 24, 1915. Shot by Harry Wilson. 

Officer THOMAS DEASY, January' 8, 1916. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer MARTIN JUDGE, December 12, 1916. Hit by street car. 

Officer WILLIAM F. SHEEHAN, June 25, 1917. Shot by Thos. Sheehan. 

Officer JOHN B. HURD, January 27, 1918. Killed by street car. 

Sergeant JOHN J. MORIARITY, May 26, 1919. Shot by V. Osakin. 

Detective Sergeant ANTONE SCHOEMBS, Nov. 19. 1919. Shot by bandits. 

Officer JAMES W. HORTON, September 19, 1920. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Detective Sergeant MILES JACKSON, December 5, 1920. Shot by gangsters. 

Detective LESTER DORMAN, December 5. 1920. Shot by gangsters. 

(Officer THOMAS HANNA, January 15, 1921. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer THOMAS WALSH. July 4, 1922. Shot by auto bandits. 

Detective Sergeant TIMOTHY BAILY, Aug. 3, 1922. Shot by Walter Castor. 

Corporal THOMAS KELLY, June 4, 1923. Shot by John Paris. 

Officer JOSEPH CONROY. November 3. 1923. Killed by automobile. 

Sergeant MICHAEL J. BRADY, October 5. 1924. Shot by William Rhinehart. 

(Officer (^.EORGE CAMPBELL. April 9, 1925. Shot by Felix Sloper. 

Officer BENJAMIN G. ROOT, April 1, 1926. Killed by unknown assassin. 

Officer JOHN J. DRISCOLL, June 28, 1927. Shot by bandits. 

C^fficer FREDERICK N. SPOONCER. Nov. 24, 1928. Killed by automobile. 

Officer JOHN MALCOLM, April 29, 1930. Shot by bandits. 

Officer CHARLES ROGERSON, November 23. 1930. Killed by automobile. 

Officer CHARLES W. KING, June 7. 1931. Killed by automobile. 

("Ifficer ELMER C. THONEY. JX-cember 31, 1931. Killed by street car. 

C")fficcr WILLIAM E. MANNING, January 2, 1932. Shot by George Rankin. 

Officer MERVYN A. REARDON. Juno 9. 1932. Shot by Glenn Johnson. 

Officer MICHAEL J. McDONALD, August 26, 19.3 3. Shot by James Kirk. 

Officer JAMES H. MANN, February 26, 1934. Killed by James Jacobs. 

Officer EDWARD F. FLAGLER, February 8. 1937. Hit-run driver. 

Officer ALBERT W. ARGENS. February 21, 1937. Shot by Elliot Ambrose. 

(Officer CORNELIUS BROSNAN. November 15, 1937. Killed by auto. 

Officer WALDEMAR L. JENTZSCH. Dec. 25. 1937. Killed chasing speeder. 

Officer WALTER SALISBURY. Jan. 1, 1939. Shot by George Dally. 

(Officer VINCENT 1'. LYNCH. August 30, 1941. Killed by auto. 

Officer TIMOTHY RYAN, February 1 1, 1943 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page y 



S-F.P.D- — The Pawnshop Detail 



By Opie L. Warner 



A city of the size of San Francisco will always have 
its quota of burglars and sneak thieves. Now, this army 
of evildoers secure other people's property not because 
they are hungry or because they have starving children 
but merely to eat, drink, and enjoy themselves without 
having to remain on any payroll, or conduct any business. 

The value of property stolen here annually runs into 
immense figures. The thieves have to turn their illgotten 
goods into cash and have roughly two sources — so-called 
■■fences," and pawnshops and second hand stores. 

The fences may he local but more frequently they are 



noticing the same signature in different pawnshops, in 
cases where the cautious thiet was trying to dispose of 
his stolen wares piecemeal. 

Yearly the number of parked automobiles is on the 
increase and thus yearly we find a new class of thief on 
the increase — the auto property theft thief. His partner 
in crimes of this class — the hop head — is also becoming 
more numerous. For this reason some of Lieutenant 
Miller's Booster Detail, under Inspector Jerry Smith, are 
definitely detailed to bring to justice this cheap class of 
sneaks who ply their trade out at the Ocean Beach, the 




MEMBERS OF THE PAWNSHOP AND SHOPPING DETAILS 
Front row, left to right: Inspectors Joseph Engler, Clifford Dunleavy, Eugene R. McDonnell, Lieutenant Samuel Miller, Inspectors 
Robert Rauer and Louis Lang. Back row: Inspectors Charles Hennessy, James Mitchell, Raymond O'Brien. John O'Keefe, Edgar 
Paul, James O'Neill and John Ahern. 



located in some city many miles from here — in eastern 
or middle west states. 

Naturally our San Francisco thieves will try to get 
rid of their wares in pawnshops or second-hand stores 
here or in Oakland. That is the reason why pawnshops 
are, according to the provisions of local ordinances, 
under the direct supervision of the Police Department, 
and their books, records, and the property taken in 
pledge or for sale, is always subject to police inspection. 

Members of the Pawnshop Detail, under the super- 
vision of Lieutenant Sam Miller, are constantly check- 
ing every pawnship and second-hand store, junk yard, 
et cetera. In addition to checking the records in these 
places they carefully examine the goods taken in and the 
signatures and description of the parties bringing in such 
goods or articles. Some fine arrests have been made by 



Fleishhacker Zoo, in the golden Gate Park, as well as 
down town. These sneak thieves cause almost as much 
woe to our good citizens as the army of law breakers who 
rifle homes for a living. 

The fact that arrests of burglars and sneak thieves 
reveal a constant stream of first offenders speaks well 
indeed for the department Burglary Detail, under In- 
spector James Johnson, and the Pawnshop Detail. To 
give an idea of the work accomplished, in the matter of 
the recovery of stolen property and the arrests in con- 
nection therewith, it is only necessary to state that the 
value of property recovered during the past year was 
97,607.00, while the arrests for burglary and petty and 
grand theft were: Burglary, 409; Grand Theft, 207; 
Petty Theft, 1206. 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



Alameda Police Department Forges Ahead With 

Chief George R. Doran, In Charge, And 24 Years 

Experience Standing Him In Good Stead 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders, Veteran Police Reporter, editor and Writer. 



Coming up through the ranks, starting as a "rookie cop" 
24 years ago. Chief George R. Doran of the Alameda 
Pohce Department, still finds police work, exciting, exact- 
ing, and very much worth while. 

This year. Chief Doran is rounding out six years as head 




(>lii<.l (jeorge Duran checks over reports witli Lieutiiiaiit 
Floyd Drake. 

of the Alameda Police DepartiiiL-nt and says with pride: 
"I've under me a fine group of men -alert, earnest, able, 
honest. A lot of these men have come up the hard way, 
entering the department as almost juveniles in the begin- 
ning, ending up at this writing with officers' stripes. 

"Police work is exacting but it has its rewards in the 
friends we make, in the understanding we get of our fel- 
low citizens, of the wrong-doers, of our ability to cope with 
any type of crime without malice, without pre-dawn con- 
clusions as to the guilt or innocence of the person or per- 
sons involved and held for investigation. 

"Never have I or any members of the Alameda Police 
Department found our job too exacting. I'm mighty proud 
of the fellows who are still wearing the uniforms and the 
stars today. While we have a number of youngsters, just 
starting out with an earnest desire to make police work 
their career, I'm backing the veterans who keep the new- 



comers in line, who give them friendly, kindly advice, who 
point out the right way to handle every police problem. 
We're forging ahead here in Alameda. 

"The World War II years, were strenuous. We had 
outsiders in our midst who didn't grasp the fact that Ala- 
meda is essentially a home city, that it never has laid claim 
to be a Bohemian municipality where the law is lenient 
with evil-doers in a friendly sort-of-way. The result has 
been that Alameda todays stands out as a white spot in the 
nation as to crime — major crimes particularly. And this 
because we have an able, alert, on-the-toes department of 
officers and patrolmen. 

"Were passing through the post-war period. There are 
many hangovers from the days of big pay in the shipyards, 
in the armed services, along Alameda's waterfront which 
embraces sections on San Francisco Bay and along the Oak- 
land-Alameda estuary. Yet taking it all in all, Alameda has 
been remarkably free from vicious crime. Sure the kids 
give us a bit of trouble, but we have a juvenile department 
that knows where it's headed and the youngsters soon know 




The Alameda police department's, communication room is 
recogniied as one of the most compact yet most efficient in Cali- 
fornia. Here Lieut. Floyd Drake listens in to a broadcast over the 
two-way radio system given out by Patrolman John Weber. 

that the law is the law and that minor delinquencies can 
lead into major crimes." 

Chief Doran is a mechanical engineer by profession, he's 
a University of California graduate and he served with 
distinction in World War I in the European area for 
about four years. Yes, with the United States Army. 
Who's Who in the Dep.^rtment 

Backing Chief Doran in his efforts to keep Alameda out 
in front as a law-abiding municipality are these outstanding 
police officials: 

(Continued on page 66^ 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Evan James New President S F P O Association 



The new officers of the San Francisco PoHce Officers' 
Association have been installed for the year 1948. 

They are: 
President — Officer Evan D. James, Traffic. 

First Vice President — Officer Eddie Nevin, Northern 

Second Vice President — Officer Theodore Dolan, In- 
gleside 




Officer Evan J.ames 
New President of S. F Police Officers" Association. 

Secretary — Officer James Haggerty, Northern 

Treasurer — Officer Paul L. Zgraggen, Southern. 

In the new president, the Association has a college 
trained member of the Police Department. 

He was born in Butte, Mont., in 1898, but when six 
years of age he was brought to San Francisco where he 
grew up, got his education and graduated from the Uni- 
versity of San Francisco in 1930, coming out with a 
law degree. 

In 1933 he joined the Police Department, and was 
assigned to the Morals Detail out of the office of former 
^hief William J. Quinn. During 1935 he was assigned 
to the newly formed radio car patrol, serving in that 
capacity for some three years. Then he was assigned 
to the Traffic Bureau and during the late war he was 
transferred to Traffic. He served here on foot patrol, 
radio cars and is now riding a three-wheeler out of the 
Motorcycle headquarters down on Fourth street. His 
assignment is around the City Hall and vicinity. 



President James was married 22 years ago and there 
is a daughter, Mary, in the family who is a second year 
student at City College. 

The new president, with his legal training is well 
equipped to carry out the ideals and policies of the Police 
Officers' Association. 

He states that it will be his earnest aim to maintain 
the harmony among the members of the Police Depart- 
ment; work for bettering working conditions, principal 
of which is to see what can be done about getting a 
40-hour week for the department. Los Angeles and other 
California cities work on the 40-hour week, while San 
Francisco works on the 44 -hour week. 

The most important objective of the Association is to 
prepare, and they are preparing, a measure to be sub- 
mitted to the electorate this coming November, for im- 
proving pensions for Police Officers. In this move it is 
their intention to try and get pensions continued to the 
wives and dependents of officers who die. 

The new President has appointed a public relations 
and grievance committee, new ones for the Association, 
and v»ith the Legislative Committee the work of carrying 
out the policies will be distributed to more active members. 

President James takes over after the term of Sergeant 
Joseph Perry as presiding officer. Sergeant Perry lived 
up to the prediction this magazine made when he was 
installed in the high office more than a year ago. 

He increase the membership, provided for more enter- 
tainment, leading was the Christmas party in Civic 
Auditorium, managed by Officer L. D. Sevenau. Over 
800 children were present, and successfully led the winning 
fight for a monthly increase of $25 across the board. 
Also he introduced the innovation for the Association 
of having two alternates to serve with each member of 
the board of directors, made up of one representative 
from each station and bureau. He called the directors 
into meeting each month before the regular monthly 
meeting of the membership, and here all matters that 
might be of interest to all the Association were presented, 
debated and those that were considered good were made 
ready to present at the regular meeting. Those adverse 
were discarded. If a station's regular appointed director 
was unable to appear at the Directors' meet, one of his 
alternates would show up. While he had no vote, he 
could present anything that his station members desired 
presented. It worked out most successfully. 

The Directors meetings were held on the second Tues- 
day each month and the membership meetings on the 
third Tuesday. 

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Coining or Going on the Mission Road Stop at the 

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4370 Mission Street (Comer of Theresa) 
Phone JUniper 4-9888 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



NEW LOOK OF C H P DESCRIBED 



The Monterey County Peace Officers" Association, 
headed by Chief Joseph Corby, of King City, president, 
and Chief George Weight of Salinas as secretary-treas- 
urer is a most progressive organization, and its monthly 
meetings bring out a big attendance of law enforcement 




Chief George Weight 
with a speaker, who is recognised for his understanding of 
the problems of peace officers, and is able to present them 
intelligently and interestingly. Entertainment is also pro- 
vided and for the June meeting Chief Corby is planning 
.1 barbecue to be held in his home town. 

The Monterey Association has an unique feature in 
scheduling their meetings. It is well known that if a meet- 
ing is set for a definite date there are many who can not 
attend. So this live association has solved this problem by 
the simple means of progressing the dates. Starting with 
Monday of the second week of the month the next meeting 
is scheduled for Tuesday and so on until all week days are 
used up, then it starts over again with a Monday date. 
That way every peace officer of the county is able to attend 
one or more meetings during the year. 

At the April meeting held in Salinas, with Chief Weight 
as host the featured speaker was Commissioner Clifford E. 
Peterson, of the CHP. The following account is from the 
story appearing in the Salinas Ddilv Calif ornian: 

Patrol activity of the California Highway Patrol is 
scheduled to be increased 2^ per cent in the near future, 
Clifford E. Peterson, CHP commissioner, stated last night. 
Speaking before 81 members and guests of the Monterey 
County Peace Officers' Association at Walker's Cafe in 



Salinas, Commissioner Peterson outlined the growth and 
functions of his law enforcement agency. In addition to 
stressing patrol activity, he announced the newest develop- 
ments of the CHP training program and presented his view 
of the "new look" acquired by the CHP under his super- 



officers of Monterey County. Each meeting is featured sion. 




Chief Joseph Corby 

Leading the training program is the new CHP academy 
set up two weeks ago at McCleilan field at Sacramento, he 
stated. The new academy now is being used to train a 
select group of patrolmen, he said. Later it will be utilized 
in retraining men already in the patrol. Fifty men are 
under intensive training now for a nine weeks' period. Fol- 
lowing their course other classes will be recruited until a 
basic group of .^00 men are trained, the commissioner 
stated. 

The "new look" which has been given patrol cars is the 
result of long study, the commissioner pointed out, and its 
effectiveness has been measured statistically. He stated 
that patrol cars so painted and marked that motorists can 
observe them, are twice as effective as unmarked patrol 
(Continued on page 30) 






TYNAN 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 

SALINAS 
CALIFORNIA 



May, 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

Richmond Police Get Pay Raise 



Page 9 



With the end ot World War II many prophets said 
the City of Richmond, which during the war years con- 
tributed so much in sea going vessels and other necessary 
equipment and supplies necessary for winning the war, 
would lose its population of some 100,000, many of whom 




Chief Emmett L. Jones 
were drawn to the biggest city in Contra Costa by work 
in the various plants. But the war is over for some three 
years, and Richmond has not lost its new population. 
Try to rent a place to live; try to buy a place anywhere 
near prewar costs. You'll meet with many disappoint- 
ments. Today the population of Richmond's .^1.7 square 
miles of area is 110,000. In 1940 the census placed the 
figure at 2i,000. 

There is no more shipbuilding, but there are many 
other industries booming and calling for skilled and un- 
skilled labor. Many who were working in Richmond dur- 
ing the war years, got a place to live and are well satisfied 
to reside in the city, though their work may be in San 
Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and other bay area com- 
munities. 

To police this big population Chief Emmett L. Jones, 
who has been a member of the Police Department since 
191 1, and chief for 15 years this month, gets along 
mighty well with a force of 102 officers and three 
civilian employees. 

As in other prosperous cities, robberies and burglaries 
involving sizeable sums of money have showed some in- 
crease, but lesser crimes have shown a decrease. Homi- 
cides have lessened during the past year. 

Chief Jones has lost one of his veteran Captains. A. J. 
Cundy, who was in charge of the uniformed unit of the 
Department, and who retired on May 1. His place has 
been filled with the promotion of Lieutenant E. E. Phipps 
to a Captaincy. 

Captain Phipps, who was born in Almy, Wyoming, fifty 
years ago, came to Richmond in 1924 and was a motor- 
man for the electric railway. On February 16, 1928, he 



joined the Richmond Police Department, He was pro- 
moted to Sergeant in 1939 and placed in charge of the 
record station. Later he was raised to the rank of In- 
spector and then to Lieutenant. He is a well set up man 
with a fine disposition and makes friends with all with 




Captain of Inspectors George Benc.ley 

whom he comes in contact. 

In addition to his attending all of the "in-service" 
schools conducted by the local department, Phipps has 
attended a special FBI school in San Francisco, the State 
Teachers" Training School in Martine: and El Cerrito, 
FBI conducted conferences and, most important of all, 
he is a graduate of the FBI National Academy in Wash- 
ington. D. C. On his return from the capital the Captain 
was placed in charge of the training program of the local 
department. 

^Continued on page 61 ) 

The Shamrock Cafe and Fountain 

FEATURING MERCHANTS' PLATE 
STEAKS AND CHOPS 

620 Macdonald Avenue 
Phone Richmond 3256 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



GIAUQUE AND VON DOHLEN 

BODY AND FENDER WORKS 
"U WRECK 'EM - WE FIX 'EM" 



NAPA 



1700 Yajone Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL CARQUINEZ 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



Mayor DcVore Proposes Record Budget for Fresno P. D. 

Two New Precincts and Pistol Range on Tentative Plans — More Police Officers, New 

Autos and Radio Transmitters Asked For 

Bv Donald Slinkard. Fresno State College, Class of Journalism, 



Despite the reluctance of the public to appropriate 
additional funds to allow police departments to keep in 
line with growing cities, Mayor Glenn M. DeVole, com- 
missioner of public safety and welfare, recently proposed 
a record tentative budget for the Fresno Police Depart- 




Mayor Glenn M. De\'ore 

ment, under Chief Raymond T. Wallace, for the next 
fiscal year totaling $689,120. The total includes funds 
for two new precinct stations and a pistol range. The 
new budget is an increase of $121,8J? over last year. 
To man the new stations in the northern and eastern 
parts of the city on a two-shift basis, 20 additional officers 
and six clerks, at a cost of $^^,S00 are included in the 
request. The estimate for the cost of the pistol range 
is $.^5,000. This is the third year the department has 
requested it. 

The Mayor also asked for $28,800 for 16 new cars 
and $19,840 to equip the new cars and 12 motorcycles 



Industrial - Commercial - Residential 

REFRIGERATION 

AIR CONDITIONING 

and HEATING 

* 

YORK DISTRIBUTOR 

W. C. BRADSHAW CO. 



with two-way radios. Funds are also asked to replace 
obsolete transmitter equipment. Mayor DeVore proposes 
the new precinct stations on the basis of the success of 
the West Fresno precinct established last year. He con- 
tends precinct stations in the growing northern and 
eastern parts of the city will provide quicker response to 
calls and all around better police protection in those 
thickly populated areas. 

Corresponding with the growth of the Fresno Depart- 
ment, Captain Joseph E. Brady, head of the Traffic Bu- 
reau, now has 43 men, 20 motorcycles, and six patrol 
cars in his division. One of his men. Motorcycle Officer 
Don Jensen, is attending the Kemper Foundation Schol- 
arship traffic control school at Northwestern University. 
The course is four and one-half months in duration. 

Parking conditions in Fresno, seemingly growing worse 
every day due to increased population and larger vehicle 
registration, has been alleviated somewhat with the recent 
addition of several hundred more parking meters. Upheld 
in last year's referendum, the meters paid for themselves 
in less than a year and were so successful that the recent 
addition was made. 



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LUMBER COMPANY 

EVERYTHING FOR BUILDING 
All Electrical Appliances 

19 Fresno Street, at California Avenue 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



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Chinese and American Dishes 
Wine - Beer 



420 Broadway 



Fresno, Calif. 



Phone 3-5873 
931 G Street Fresno, Calif. 



May. 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

Fresno*s Chief Raymond T.Wallace 



Page 1 1 



Fresno, with its present population of 90,000 persons 
and an area of about 12 square miles, has for its Chief of 
Police, a man who has held that position longer than 
any other chief in Fresno's history, Raymond T. Wallace. 
For 16 years following its incorporation in ISSf, Fresno 



He joined the Fresno Police Department in August, 
1921, as a patrolman on the night desk. In November, 
192^, he was made acting detective sergeant and that title 
was made permanent a few months later in May, 1926. 
He was promoted to lieutenant on September 16, 1926. 







Chief Raymond T. Wallace Assistant Chief A. E. Chapin 

had a City Marshal as head of its Police Department. 
The title was changed to Chief of Police, and Chief 
Wallace is the eighth of these. He has been chief through 
the administrations of three mayors, Frank A. Homan, 
who appointed him chief in 1939, Z. S. Leymel, and the 



Detective Captain Daniel Lung 
Named Chief in 19.39, Wallace succeeded the retiring 
Chief, Frank P. Traux. The present Chief is married 
and is the father of a hoy and a girl. 

Chief Wallace is fraternally associated with the Fresno 
Lodge, No. 4.39, B. P. O. E.; Manianita Camp No. 160, 







Captain Joseph E. Brady 
present mayor, Glenn M. DeVore. 

Chief Wallace was born in 1894 in Goshen, Tulare 
County. After education in the Tulare and Fresno schools, 
he became a carrier for the old Fresno Republican in 
1910. He held the position of city circulation manager 
when his career with the paper ended in 1920. 



Lieut. S. A. Meek Liei t W. E. Ellis 

Woodmen of the World; and the San Joaquin Valley 
Rod and Gun Club. 

Wallace's assistant is A. E. (Bert) Chapin, with the 
Fresno Police Department for 33 years. Taking over 
"temporarily" in 191' the job of driving the police gaso- 
(Continued on page i6) 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Mav.I948 



Sergeant McCoy Heads Busy Juvenile Bureau 



Established on February 1, 1940, by Chief Raymond 
T, Wallace, the Bureau of Special Service of the Fresno 
Police Department seeks to curb juvenile delinquency 
through prevention. Sergeant J. H. McCoy, head of 
the bureau, has found that the largest single cause for 




Sergeant J. H McCoy 

the delinquency of juveniles is the widowed home. But, 
not to be overlooked as a major contributor to juvenile 
crime in Sergeant McCoy's opinion, is automobile theft. 
Not only is auto theft the third highest offense committed 
by juveniles, but it also leads, the bureau feels, to further 
crime. The stolen car, usually traveling at an excessive 
speed, promotes further delinquency, as it is a motivating 
factor in scores of serious traffic accidents. Burglaries, 
robberies, and morals cases often can be directly attributed 
to the car stolen by the juvenile for a brief joy-ride. 

Since the war, McCoy has found the number of cases 
coming to his office indicate a leveling off of juvenile 
cases. A trend does exist, however, towards group or 
gang activities. Usually two or more juveniles were in- 
volved in the offenses committed. These groups, the 
bureau finds, are generally in .';earcli of adventure. There 
were 151 cases of gang activity in Fresno last year. 

The cases involving juveniles occuring most frequently 
in Fresno last year were runaways located 86, juveniles 
out of control 77, morals 22, petit theft 126, drunkenness 
23, vagrancy 64, malicious mischief 2?. disturbing the 
peace 1 .3, grand auto theft (S, and burglary 14. 

Sergeant McCoy, father of four children himself, is a 
friendly, reassuring man who quickly puts people at ease 
and is probably ideally suited for his work with youngsters. 
His bureau last year investigated 1,^17 juveniles with 
action being taken in 528 cases. The age frequently en- 
countered by the bureau was 15 with a total of lO.i cases. 
Age 17 was second with 99 cases. The month of greatest 
activity was June with 71 cases. 

Homes in which one or both parents were deceased 
contributed 152 juvenile cases to the bureau last year. 
Working parents or parents was .second with ''5, and 
parents separated or divorced was third with .3 5. The 
bureau found that 88 children got into trouble because 
of a desire for adventure or employment. Six youths 
were in trouble because of adult influence, three because 



of the influence of a leader, and HI, gang activity. 

Of the 528 juveniles apprehended last year by the 
B. S. S., 137 were high school students, 83 were not in 
school, 214 were non-resident, two were college students, 
and one a parochial school pupil. Of the total of 401 
males and 127 females, 362 claimed some church affiliation 
while 166 did not. Native white children were most 
frequently encountered with a total of 321. Native 
Mexican children were second with 144. 

The bureau also handles juveniles apprehended for 
"rolling traffic" violations. After a review of the case 
^Continued on page i4 I 



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May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page n 



Fresno County Peace Officer's Association 

The Fresno County Peace Officers" Association has a you may remember against the Japanese navy which 

new president — James C. Strattan of the California wasn't much of a navy after Admiral Nimits and his boys 

Highway Patrol, serving the great raisin county. The got through with it. Too, Governor Earl Warren was 

Association under its new president is starting its 12 th an honored invited guest and Mayor DeVore a member 

year with some mighty important activities. Most im- of the Association, was on hand to give all a welcome, 
portant is the nearly completed pistol range. This range Jhe officers for 1948 of the Association are: 




Miss Helen Stephanish 
Fresno P. D. Secretary and Secretary Fresno Association 

is located at the corner of Braky and Shave avenues four 
miles outside the Fresno city limits. It is on H acres of 
land, and when finished will have a range of 25 targets 
of 50 and 25 national and police courses. There will be 
three FBI practical police courses which provide for de- 
fense shooting of over 50 yards. 

The cost of this project has been met by the members, 
some 350, and they will have 400 by the end of this year. 
Every member has contributed cash and many of them 
labor and needed supplies. When it is completed it will 
represent an investment of $10,000. 

The time for the opening of the Range is tentatively 
set for September 1. By that time in addition to the place 
for the slug slingers it is hoped barbecue equipment will 
have been installed, trees planted and the place made at- 
tractive as a picnic ground for the members and their 
families. 

President Strattan has worked hard for this needed 
range that the members of the law enforcement agencies 
of Fresno county can get the practice so urgently needed 
by those who fight for law and order. 

Probably what is the biggest attraction the Association 
has ever had and one that it will be hard to excel in the 
future was the annual picnic held on May 11. This 
celebration, which took place in the Italian Amusement 
Park was hmited to 1000 specially invited guests and 
members of the Association. The guest of honor was 
Admiral Chester Nimitz, who did a little sea fighting 




President J.\mes C. Stratton 

President — James C. Strattan. 

First Vice President — Constable Eugene Hunter, 
Reedley. 

Second Vice President — Jack Christian, State Board of 
Equalization. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Helen Stefanish, secretary. Chief 
Fresno Police Department. 

President Strattan was born in Bunker Hill, Kansas, 
in 1908. With his parents he migrated to Fresno in 1914. 
He got his education in the schools of Fresno and in 1938 
he joined the California Highway Patrol, being assigned 
to Tulare county. 

He was transferred to Fresno county in 1942. 

The new president was married to Naomi Harlan and 
the couple have two children, a daughter, Dorothy, and 
a son, Henry. 



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Phone 2-2512 

EGGS WHOLXSALE 

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Res. Phone 2.')I86 

AL DREITH, JR. 

District Manager 

VICTOR EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

Welding Equipment Division 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



Phone 4-5542 



25 1 NORTH H STREET 



FRESNO 12. CALIF. 



Curtis C. Ballard P^"'"^ 2-8516 

GOODMAN'S 

HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX CLOTHES 



FRESNO 



Broadway at Mariposa 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1948 



Fresno State College Police Training Course 



Emphasizing the importance of practical training and 
a sound educHtional foundation plus a belief that punish- 
ment alone does not seem to prevent or deter the criminal 
from acting, William Dienstein, coordinator of the crim- 
inology curriculum and assistant professor of criminology 
at the Fresno State College, has set out to provide trained 
men and women to give to public administration those 
qualities now required of teachers, engineers, public health 
officials, and accountants. 

At FSC only two years, Dienstein now offers his stu- 
dents professional training in the field of the general 
administration of justice which includes such specifics as 
police, probation, parole, prisons, school attendance, social 
work, and law. 

Graduated from Stanford University with a bachelor 
of arts degree in 1931 and the Stanford Law School in 
1932, Professor Dienstein received his master of arts 
degree from the University of California in 1939. He 
was for seven years a public school teacher. He was an 



tenant of police with the Manila Police Department. 

Because all persons employed in the field of the admin- 
istration of justice are directly or indirectly charged with 
the responsibility of preventing crime, apprehending the 
criminal, and rehabilitating the offender, Dienstein em- 
phasizes the factors that contribute to behavior, namely, 
the biological, physiological, psychological, and socio- 
logical fields. 

His students of criminology study the origin, growth, 
and development of the thinking, feeling, and acting 
processes of the individual from birth up to and includ- 
ing senility. Knowledge is sought of what makes indi- 
viduals behave as they do, and for this reason, majors 
in criminology are advised to minor in psychology. 

Along with the basic subjects, Dienstein makes com- 
pulsory certain "tool" subjects, as for example, English 
composition and report writing, which will teach the 
students to write, report, and describe accurately, clearly, 
and briefly. Courses in criminology are offered in Ad- 




The Fresno State Ojllcge Police Force, left to right, front row: Frank W. Thoma.«. president of FSC: Robert Winter. Eugene Lar- 
yon. Stanley Barnes, Irving Ivner, Arthur Suddjian, R. W. West, Edward Larabee, and John Kiraly. Middle row: Frederick Rut- 
ledge. Student Lieutenant; Ted Slinhard, Arthur Ward, Arthur Tablcr, Charles Bailey, John C. Evans. Vernon Goyctte, Tsu Sing 
Cheng, and William Dienstein, coordinator of the FSC criminology curriculum. Back row: Ellsworth Lovcrin. Herman Ziegler. Sam 
Eggers, Richard Johnson, Darrell Gotthardt. Glynn Smith, Richard Berkebile, Howard D. Sutlitf. and Ralph Mann. 



instructor in the Bakcrsfield Police School and a detective 
sergeant on the Taft Police Department before he entered 
the army in 1941. As a captain in the corps of military 
police, Dienstein was an instructor in the provost marshal 
general's schixil, and for two years was with the Depart- 
ment of Criminal Investigation. 

An MP with the First Cavalry Division, he was crim- 



ministration of Justice, Police Organization .ind Admin- 
istration, Police Records, Traffic Control, Crimin.il In- 
vestigation and Identification, Detection of Deception, 
Criminology, Psychology of the Criminal, Practice in 
Youth Supervision, Crime Prevention, and Police Patrol 
and Communication. Dienstein teaches most of the courses 



inal investigation officer for 18 months. Before going to himself although some traffic courses are handled by 
Fresno State College in August, 1946, the educator was members of the Fresno Police Department. Conducting 
chief of the criminal investigation laboratory and a lieu- /Continued on page 41 ) 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



Don^t Leave Ignition Keys In Your Car 

Sergeant Scott of Fresno P. D. Has Bill Before the Legislature to Curb This Practice Which 

Accounts for 90% of Auto Thefts 

By the relatively simple method of requiring motorists Sergeant Scott, with the Fresno Department almost 25 

to remove the ignition keys from their cars when they years, and head of the auto theft bureau, is not only 
park them, Detective Sergeant John A. Scott of the enthusiastic and determined to see his idea made law, 
Fresno Police Department believes law enforcement agen- but he has the figures and facts to point out conclusively 
cies can reduce considerably the number of automobile why it should be law. First, he points out that law en- 
thefts occuring each year in California. A bill, the brain forcement agencies have grouped car thefts into three 

classes. One is the joy riding group in which 100 per 
cent of those involved are juveniles and young adults. 
Another is transportation in which haft are juveniles and 
the last, commercial theft in which the cars are stolen 
for the purpose of stripping, changing motor numbers 
and bodies, and forged titles and certiiicates. 

In Fresno in 1946, of the 147 arrests made for car 
theft, 122 of the stolen cars had the keys in them or 
had faulty ignition locks. Of those arrested, 53 per cent 
were under 21 years of age and 77 per cent under 25. 
Sergeant Scott attributes 93 per cent of all car theft to 
keys being left in the ignition and 98 per cent of the 
thefts to the keys being made available such as under 
floor mats, over sun visors, in glove compartments, or to 
broken ignition locks. Figures published by the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation show automobile theft to be the 
third most frequent major crime committed in this coun- 
try. Only burglary and larceny exceeded it in 1947, as 
184.7.^0 cars, one every 2.8^ minutes, were stolen last 
year. The FBI also shows that, while burglary has in- 
creased only 10 per cent, automobile thefts have risen 
70 per cent. 

Sergeant Scott's main contention is, therefore, that a 
law forcing motorists to remove the keys from their cars 
I Continued on page 5 5 I 




Sergeant John A. Scott 

child of Sergeant Scott, has, in fact, been introduced to 
the Cahfornia Legislature by Assemblyman J. G. Crichton 
which would make it a misdemeanor to leave unattended 
cars with keys in them. 

Believing that auto theft not only leads to millions of 
dollars lost annually in unrecovered cars, damage, incon- 
venience, and police costs. Sergeant Scott also states that 
stolen cars are a major factor in leading to juvenile de- 
linquency and later to a life of crime. 

Before such organizations as County Peace Officers' 
Associations, the American Legion, women's clubs, civic 
bodies, and various fraternal, and business clubs. Sergeant 
Scott, in less than a year, has given 35 talks promoting 
his idea in Fresno and adjoining counties. In addition 
he has made several radio broadcasts and inaugurated a 
plan whereby stickers reading, "Don't Invite Theft 
Lock Your Car— Remove Keys" were pasted on all of 
Fresno's parking meters, and a banner with a similar 
warning hung across a main street. 



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AND CONFECTIONERY 

A. G. Christopouls, Prop. 

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FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



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So. 99 Highway at Jensen Ave. 
Phone 4-5642 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

STORES .ALSO .XT TUL.ARE .AND H.AKFORD 



Page J 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 194.1 



Sheriff George J. Overholt of Fresno 



With 30 years of unbrokim service in the sheriff's office. 
Sheriff George J. Overholt is now in his fifth term and 
18th year as sheriff of Fresno County. As undersheriff 
for 12 years from 1919 until he was first elected sheriff 
in 1930, he served as assistant to Sheriff W. F. Jones. 




/ 




Shf.riff Gforce J. Overholt 

His long experience has naturally seen many changes in 
the office, the greatest of which was undoubtedly the new 
jail which was built in 1942 and first occupied in March 
1943. Modeled after some of the best equipped and most 
modern jails in the country, the new Fresno institution 
has beds for a capacity of 300, although due to the rapid 
growth of the county, the average daily population of the 
jail tor last year was 350. It serves as lock-up for both the 
county and City of Fresno. The first jail in Fresno was 
located in the Court House, but nuie years later a separate 
building was ctnistructed to quarter prisoners. This tiny 
structure, ridiculously small for the needs of Fresno Coun- 
toy, was finally replaced with the present building in 1943. 
Radio equipment, one way at first, was provided in 
1940. The sheriff's 16 cars, operating out of KGZA, 
control 2, have been equipped with two-way radio since 
June, 1943. 

Assisting Sheriff Overholt in policing the rural areas 
of Fresno County with its 5,950 square miles and popu- 
lation of 286,500, is Undersheriff John W. Ford who 
has held that position since Overh(jlt took office in 1931. 
Harold E. Emmick, chief criminal deputy, has been with 
Overholt for 12 years, from 1931 to 1936 and again 
trom 1941 to the present. In his position, Emmick assigns 
the deputies to specific duties and handles all reports 
coming into the leaving the sheriff's office. Fred KoU is 
chief civil deputy. In charge of the bureau of identifi- 
cation is J. Ed Martin who handles photographs, finger- 
prints, handwriting, etc. Overholt's head jailer is Lee 
Johnson. 



Overholt has a total of 49 men and women in his de- 
partment or one employee for every 6,000 persons in the 
county. Since 1940 the population of Fresno County 
has increased tremendously — by 60.45 per cent or 107,935 
persons. The sheriff is responsible for the 160,000 people 
who reside outside of incorporated areas in Fresno County. 
Approximately 110,000 live within the limits of the cities 
of the county. 

Sheriff Overholt, who was born at Clark's Valley, 
Fresno County, in 1883, has lived all of his life in Fresno 
County. His parents were pioneer residents of the county 
and were some of the original homesteaders there. 

Overholt's office was recently praised when Attorney 
General Fred N. Houser declared Fresno County an 
"unhealthy place for racketeers." 



I 



P. O. Box 849 Phone 3-4221 


GROWERS 


SERVICE 


COMPANY 


Packers and Distributors 


FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


• 


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Fresno, California 



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FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 

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COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Telephone 4-2229 

BROADWAY AT MARIPOSA FRESNO. CALIF. 



i May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 17 



1948 S F P Widows* and Orphans Aid Association 

Makes Record 



The San Francisco Police Widows" and Orphans" Aid 
Association"s annual concert and ball for 1948 is over, 
and for the event, held in the Civic Auditorium on the 
night of April 17, the members of the Police Department 
hung up a new record for ticket sales. The total number 
of tickets disposed of was more than ever sold for this 
annual event. 

The money netted, after the income take is deducted, 
will go a long way in helping out the Association's 
treasury which was greatly reduced during 1947 when 42 
members passed away. This called for the distribution 
of more^than a quarter of a million dollars to surviving 
widows and orphans. 

Captain Jack Ekcr the general chairman and his com- 
mittees" have received lavish praise for the show they put 
on and the energetic manner the sale of ticket was 
conducted. 

The officers of the general committee for this year's 
show who gave such great assistance to Captain Eker, 
were Deputy Chief James Quigley, first vice president; 
Lieutenant Walter Ames, second vice president: Director 
Alexander McDaniell, ticket chairman; Officer Henry 
Schutzer, treasurer, and Inspector Thomas Fitspatrick. 
secretary. 

The committee of arrangements, numbering 143, pitched 
m and did a swell job in the respective activities they 
were assigned. 

The reception committee, headed by Captain Pootel, 
numbered 36 men, and they all showed up in their best 
bib and tucker, shedding great credit to the Police 
Department. 

Inspector Herman Wobckc headed the Floor Com- 
mittee of 12 members, and they sent the grand march 
going off with flying colors and every one who tripped 
the light fantastic can attest to their efficiency. 

The Police Veterans Committee of which Retired Of- 
ficer John J. McCarte was chairman, had 23 of the old 
timers help carry on in Larkins hall where old time dances 
were the order of the day, and mighty nice to watch. 

Following the concert which started at 7 p. m., the 
Bud Moore Agency put on a splendid program of singing 
and numerous specialties. Officer John T. Kane was fea- 
tured with a solo and he went over big with the huge 
audience. 

Chairman Ekcr then presented Chief Michael Mitchell 
who in turn presented Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, who 
made one of his characteristic wholesome speeches, and 
then the Mayor, through Officer Bernard Shea, who last 
year through the most extreme demonstration of courage 
and hraver>' brought down a stickup man who shot him, 
and who was selected as the 91 Division American 
Legion"s recipient of the annual medal given for out- 
standing valor in police work — presented meritorious cita- 
tions to 75 members of the SFPD for extraordinary service 
during 1947. 



Then Chief Mitchell introduced Governor Warren, 
who hasn"t missed the annual concert and ball since he 
has been Governor; Police Commissioners J. Warnock 
Walsh, Henry C. McGinn and Washington I. Kohnke 
and Chief Administrative Officer of the City, Thomas 
A. Brooks. 

With the presentation of the customary' gold star to 
the 1847 president of the Association, Officer James J. 
McGovern, the grand march was formed with Governor 
and Mrs. Warren, Mayor and Mrs. Robinson leading, 
and from then on until the wee hours of the following 
morning the ball room floor was a mass of floating couples 
dancing to the music of Gary Nottingham and his band. 

Thus ended the 70th year of the formation of the 
Widows" and Orphans" Aid Association, and all who 
participated in making it the greatest financial success in 
the Association's history deserve a hearty thank you. 

Phones: TUxedo S-2030 - GRaystonc 4-5280 

GRAND MARKET 

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Imported and Domestic Groceries - Fruits Vegetables 

CHOICE MEATS 

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HOME OFFICE 
605 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



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1175 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SWEDISH MASSAGE PARLOR 

Telephone UNderhMI 1-S399 

ELECTRIC CABINET BATHS 

EXCELLENT SERVICE - HOURS II A.M. to 7 P. M. 



618 Mth STREET, at Market 



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170 HOOPER STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

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420 Bryant Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



sutler 1-5830 



E. F. LANE 8C SON 



Manufacturers - Distributors 

HONEY - BEESWAX - MAPLE PRODUCTS 

PEANUTS - PEANUT BUTTER - OIL 

32 BEALE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

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Electric Dishwashers - Peelers - Food Cutters - Mixers - Meat 

Choppers - Coffee M lis - Scales - Sliccrs - Air Whippers - Meal Saws 

Telephone GArfield 1-6738 
<)21 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



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Phone >X'aInut Grove 3 361 
P. O. Box 195 



WALNUT GROVE 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mav. 1948 



Central Beats Northern In S F P D Ball Tickets Sales 



Captain Jack Eker announced at the first meeting of 
the Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association Concert and 
Ball Committee that his Northern station was going to 
lead the rest of the police stations in the sale of tickets 
this year. Whereupon he got a rise out of Captain 
Edward Donohue of Central, which has for years been 



possum, garnished with sweet potato and yams, and 
hominy with corn bread, and as dessert he offered a 
choice of plum duff pudding or boiled raisins. He said 
it was possible to get some corn squeezings which would 
serve to pep the boys up. 

As Captain Donohue and Captain Eker had never 






Captain Edward Donohue 



Captain Alexander McDaniell 



Captain Jack Ekpr 



the top winners in this event. After some spirited claims 
and proclamations they settled on a dinner. The dinner 
was to he paid for by the losing Captain and would be 
for the winning Captain and eight members heading the 
ticket sale drive in his district. 

If the two Captains could not agree on the menu to be 
provided for the big event. Supervising Captain Alexander 
McDaniell said he would be pleased to submit a com- 
promise menu. 

Well, sir, old Central upheld its record, and came in 
ahead of all contenders with the sale of 27,800 ducats, 
and Northern showed 24,^00 tickets sold, so Captain 
Donohue was declared the winner. 

He at once submitted his menu plan, starting in with 
green turtle soup, the finest of salads, pheasant breasts, 
the best of New York cut steaks, with side dishes pre- 
pared by the most artistic cuisine experts, topped off 
with strawberry short cake and ambrosia. Of course he 
made provisions for a sufficient amount of liquid refeesh- 
ments, and it did not include beer. 

Captain Eker presented his menu, which was naturally 
a little less elaborate, and not so expensive as Captain 
Donohue's. He provided for liquid refreshments and 
included some beer. 

Here is where Captain McDaniell, head of the ticket 
committee took over with his offer. 

He would start the feed with potluck and mustard 
greens, black eyed Susan beans cooked southern style, 
pork cracklings with the piece-de-resistance — baked 



heard of the eating offered in the deep .south, neither of 
which had ever been farther than Los Angeles to the 
southward, they balked at Director McDaniell's offer 
and mutually agreed to let Captain Eker present what 
he thought a loser should offer in the way of a San 
Francisco feed. 

Captain Eker decided a good old Italian dinner, famous 
in this city, would be the proper thing so he invited 
Captain Donohue and the following of his company to 
join with the annual get-to-gether of the Northern Sta- 
tion on April 28, an account of which will be found on 
another page of this issue of The Police .^nd Peace 
Officers' Journal. 

Joseph Higgins, John O'Connell, Emmett Ried, John 
McCoglan, John Carponetti, George Young and John 
Thomas, the latter is the station clerk, and checked in all 
ticket sales during the campaign. 

JOHN NAVONI MEN'S LUNCH 



1624 Sixth Strrrl 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



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BREAKFAST -°LUNCH - DINNER 
BEER AND WINE 



2014 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



PATRONIZE 

SHUMATES PHARMACY 

Stores Conven'ently Located Throughout San Francisco 

Look for your nearest Shumate Store 

SPECIAL PRICES TO MEMBERS S. F. P. D. 



Mdv, (948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Northern Co. In Annual Get-to-Gether 



The third annual Get-to-Gether luncheon of the 
Northern Police Station was held at noon on April 28, 
at the Italian-American Club, 25 Russia Avenue. 

More than 100 police officers were present, including 
eight members of the Central District headed by Captain 
Edward P. Donahue and half a dozen from Richmond 
station. Supervising Captain Alexander McDaniel, Cap- 
tain Michael GafFey and this writer, of the Northern's 
personnel of 141 some 90 members were able to get 
away for this great yearly gathering, which has become 
such a worthwhile affair that it is looked forward to 
eagerly by every one who is of the Northern Station. 

Captain Jack Eker, Lieutenants Jerry Coughlan, Walter 
Ames, Daniel ONeiil and Hugh Conroy, who with 
Officers Phil Lindecker, Howard Rose, and Randolph 
Civierri planned this year's festivities, were on hand to 
welcome all as they came in. 

All present were seated at the tables in the large ban- 
quet room and there was presented a meal prepared by 
the boss of the club who has made this spot one of the 
places all lovers of good Italian cooked food gravitate to. 

After the meal Mike Lawley, of whom there is no 
better, here or anywhere else, took over as master of 
ceremonies after being presented by Captain Eker. 

M. C. Lawley presented all the members on the pro- 
gram and the speakers, who were short in their talks, 
with his characteristic kindly and humorous manner. 

The program consisted of numbers by the Eastman 
trio which was made up of instrumental and vocal selec- 
tions; solos by Officers John Kane and Thomas Cleary 
of Mission, both are tenors who could well fit in on radio 
or the stage; Ray Cameron, Roily Case and Wilbur 
Stump, the latter a piano player who knows his business. 

Officer David Flamm of the Northern, rendered several 
solos, and he is equal to many professionals. He also 
told some dialect stories that had the audience in stitches. 

Then Lawley called upon the following for a few 
remarks: 

Captain Gaffey, commander of Ingleside and Police 
Commission Secretary who thoroughly endorsed the get- 
to-gether meeting of the Northern station — 

Captain McDaniel, who complimented all members of 
the Police Deparement for the wonderful job they did 
in selling over 130,000 tickets for the annual concert 
and ball — 

Captain Donohue, who on behalf of himself and his 
ticket selling force from Central, thanked Captain Eker 
for being such a good loser and generous host — 

Captain Eker, who started this annual affair when he 
was a Lieutenant in the Northern. He stated that when 
he took over the chairmanship of this year's show he 
felt that last year's ticket sales would stand as an all-time 
record, and he was greatly surprised and highly elated 
by the numbers of tickets the members of the department 
sold this year. 

He said it was not of an individual effort, but the 



combined teamwork of every member of the Department, 
who recognises the great good this annual show produces 
for widows and orphans of deceased members. He pointed 
out that many members of his command, while doing 
good police duty on patrol, disposed of from 100 to 500 
tickets. That they did not neglect their work as police 
officers he said was indicated by the fact that since the 
first of the year the crime chart has showed a continual 
decrease of criminal activities and where a crime was com- 
mitted the records show the perpetrator was brought in. 

He said because of this annual meeting of all the mem- 
bers of the district there was a closer relationship built 
up and he thanked his Lieutenants, and Sergeants for 
their leadership and supervision and the excellent police 
job the patrolmen are doing. 

Then Lawley presented the Lieutenants, Sergeant Ralph 
Atkinson, veteran of the old Bush now the Northern 
district, Officer James Haggerty, secretary of the San 
Francisco Police Officers' Association, old timer Officer 
James Maloney, Boh Best of the Water Department, who 
took pictures of the guests and Opie L. Warner. 

Following these presentations drawing for prizes was 
conducted and many lucky ones went away with pleas- 
ing gifts. 

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The WHITEHOUSE CLEANERS &. DYERS 

Telephone HEmlock 1-0475 

174 FOURTEENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



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UNderhill 1-0285 



Peter Pialorst 



GOLDEN GATE POULTRY CO. 

Wholesale 

LIVE AND DRESSED FOULTRY AND EGGS 

2254 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

Phone ATwaler 2 1638 

NEW LUCCA GROCERY 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES - OLIVE OILS 

4938 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



CLEVELAND GROCERY 



736 Brazil Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



DEIaware 3-6447 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone MOntrosc 4-1634 

TOULOUSE LAUNDRY 

A FRENCH LAUNDRY WITH ALL LAUNDRY SERVICES 
Simon Toulouse. Member Sunset Optimist Club 

82 1 LINCOLN WAY SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 

Phone CArfield 13670 

BANQUET ROOM - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

REX RESTAURANT 

TASTEFUL. WELL-PREPARED ITALIAN DINNERS 
401 BROADWAY' SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

GEORGE'S FRUIT MARKET 

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1086 VALENCIA STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



MUNY BAIT SHOP 



3098 Polk Street Phone ORdway 3-9815 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



fSaiiFrnncrsco 




(Copyrlfht, 1931. 2-0 Publlshinc Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 7110 



An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
' to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASSOCIATION 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFRZERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers* Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

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a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
or by Postage Stamps oi 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stati oner y. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 3u 



GEORGE O'BRIEN HONORED 

It's been a long time since George O'Brien, eldest son 
of the late Chief Daniel J. O'Brien, has heen hack in 
the town where he was born and raised and from which 
he went forth to win fame as a movie actor. The duties 
of the later activities were .suspended as George O'Brien 
entered the service of his country in the late war. But 
during the week of May 10 George came hack to San 
Francisco to make an appearance at the picture in which 
he has an important role. He had no more than landed 
in the city when Chief Michael E. Mitchell, who started 
his career with the late Chief O'Brien .sent word that he 
wanted to see the latter's son. 

So George, accompanied by Movie Actor John Agar, 
husband of Shirley Temple, and Jack Parr, radio comedian, 
called at Chief Mitchell's office. He was gteatly surprised 
and highly elated when the Chief drew forth a plaque 
which he presented to his distinguished visitor. The con- 
tents of the plaque, which follows, tells the story of why 
it was presented: 

"Award of merit to George O'Brien by the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department. San Francisco gave you to the 
motion picture industry and to the service of your country'. 

"We arc more than delighted to greet you upon your 
return to your native city and the resumption of your 
career in motion pictures." 



IN-SERVICE TRAINING PROGRAM SFPD 

Chief Michael E. Mitchell of the San Francisco Police 
Department announced that starting on the 19th of last 
month, an in-service training program was started. Ever>' 
patrolman of the department must attend this course. The 
session runs from 9 A. M. to ^ P. M., from Monday 
through Friday each week. 

The sessions are being held in the Police Academy out 
in Golden Gate Park off Fulton Street and it is expected 
the course can be completed in 1 2 weeks. 

Director of Personnel John Engler and his corps of as- 
sistant officers asked that each day's session he held to 50 
men, but every eligible patrolman will have done his stint 
at this refresher course, even if it takes longer than 12 
weeks. 



San 
is a 
FBI 



HARRY KIMBALL, SPECIAL AGENT IN 
CHARGE, FBI IN SAN FRANCISCO 

Harry M. Kimball, Special Agent in Charge, 
Francisco Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
native of Massachusetts and has been with the 
since 193^. 

He is a graduate of the National LIniversity Law School 
in Washington, D. C, with an LLB Degree and a mem- 
ber of the Washington (D. C.) Bar. 

He served directly under Director John Edgar Hoover 
for four years and has been Assistant Special Agent in 
Charge at New York and Baltimore, as well as Special 
Agent in Charge at Norfolk and Richmond, Virginia. 

He has been Special Agent in Charge at San Francisco 
s^ince September, 1946. 



OFFICER WM. H. DUVENECK 
ON THE JOB 

Officer William H. Duvcneck, whose father. William 
H. Duvcneck, Sr., is an elevator operator at the Hall of 
Justice, is making good as a member of the San Francisco 
Police Department. Officer Duveneck, after serving two 
years in the Department went into the Army and for five 
years gave a good account of himself. Being discharged 
early last year he took up his police duties again, and 
made a hit when, with Officer Sam Quinn and Sergeant 
R. Freeman, he captured a hotel robber who was also 
wanted for some bank jobs back in Tennessee. 

With the formation of the Flying Squadron he was 
transferred from station patrol assignment to the newly 
formed unit of the Burueau of Inspectors. He has figured 
in the capture of several desperate crooks, and it isn't 
hard to imagine that he is destined for higher place in 
the Police Department. 



On April 19, the following assignments were made in 
the S. F. Police Department : 

Raymond W. Albrccht, Charles A. Capwell. Leo J. 
CorscUo, Elmer W. Cuadro, Joseph M. Daly, Stamati G. 
Davanis, James J. Diggins, Earl D. Jorgensen, William 
McDonald. Jr., Donald J. Murphy, George L. Olsen, Don- 
ald M. Schmidt, and Robert N. Torbensen from the Police 
Academy to Traffic Co. K. 



Mav. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



PISTOL POINTING 



By J. Ross DUNNIGAN 



The San Francisco Monthly Matches 

Sunday, March 20th, 1948, ushered in the second day 
oi Spring with a total registration of 193 shooters at the 
Range and don't let anyone tell you that that is not a 
mob to handle! But to handle them Range Master Emil 
Dutil and his men did , and a swell job of it, too. The 
morning started a bit dull, that is speaking in a meteor- 
ological sense, but by 10 A, M. good, old Sol was gradu- 
ally winning his way through the clouds so that by noon 
the place was all bathed in sunshine and smiles. Previous 
to that the boys were comparing their long handled under- 
things and seeing who had 'em on and who didn't. It 
turned out that all had 'em on and none didn't — that 
is, none of the smart ones. While the sun is warm outside 
the shooting area, the spot under the roof can sure get 
to a freezing temperature in a hurry, but then what is a 
bit of cold weather to a shooter? Yep, it's just another 
cold day. * * * 

During the matches that little lady from Woodland, 
Gloria Norton, broke two more records for ladies. The 
first was during the Camp Perr>- Match in which she 
shot a 297 for a new woman's record. Incidently, Gloria 
had broken her previous record in the same event a week 
before in Calexico. Then in the center-fire timed-fire 
match Gloria shoots a 197 and estabhshes another wo- 
man's record. 

* * * 

The male contingent at the Range were pretty much 
chagrined at Gloria's march to glory so all got together 
and chose Al Heath to try for a record in the Camp 
Perr>' Match with a .45. Well, my good readers, Al did 
just what he said he was gonna do. He set a new civilian 
record for the .45 with a score of 290. The male shooters 
ar^ once again strutting about the place and are firmly 
convinced that the male is the stronger of the uvo sexes. 

4: * 4: 

Our shooting master, Quentin Brooks, again took first 
place in the aggregate match although he was hotly pur- 
sued by Inspector Jack Ahern of the S. F. PoUce depart- 
ment, who finished in second place. Gloria Norrton 
romi>ed in in third place just one point behind Jack. 
It might be noted that Brooks took a medal in ever>- 

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Building Material Drivers Union, Local 216 

Office Phones HEmlock 1-3I3I - MArket 1-1806 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 




match, being the first time he has done that in many 

months. 

* * * 

And the Siesta Club garnered two nice little boys into 
the clan on Sunday. First was Gene Jones of the F.B.I., 
who was standing in the spectators gallery calling someone 
a wooden-head for not getting on the lines in time. It 
finally dawned on him that "Wooden-Head" Jones was 
cussing himself. Then comes the .38 timed-fire match 
so Duane Harper, of the Oakland Police Department, 
had a soft seat in the sun — well you know the rest of 
the yarn. And was Duane put out? You tell 'em, Duane! 
Incidently, at the Calexico matches the week before. 
Bob Chow fell asleep under that Mexican sun and when 
he awoke he found he was a member in good standing 
of the Siesta Club. The membership drive is certainly 
getting results this season. Have you joined yet? Don't 
worry, you will. 



After the matches the Winchester-Western Cartridge 
Company and the S. F. Police Department sponsored the 
appearance of the Shooting Linds, Ernie and Dotty. Boy, 
oh boy, and can they shot! One of the finest exhibitions 
of pistol, rifle and shotguns was put on by these people 
we have ever had the pleasure of seeing. The crowd 
got a big kick out of their performance and our advice 
to you is that if they ever get an>'\vhere where you can 
go and see their show by all means don't miss it. 



The California Highway Patrol sent two pistol teams 
to the International Pistol Matches at Calexico last month 
who did themselves credibly. The shooters were C. F. 
Boomhowcr, Cash Gustin, Ken Kolb, Cap Jacobs, Dave 
Menar>', Elton White, Del Fletcher, J. D. Mulhcan and 
F. D. Milkman. All the shooting gents said they had 
a swell time and would be glad to go again — and soon! 




MICRO SIGHT CO. 

5813 MISSION ST. SAN FRANCISCO 25, CALIF. 

PISTOL AND REVOLVER SPECIALISTS 

SHORT .ACTIONS - OFFSET and ^TDE H.AMMERS 
ACCUR.\CY JOBS - T\SO WEEKS SERNTCE 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1948 



Many nice things have been said about the range per- 
sonnel but this 'time we would like to say a few nice 
words about the boys who have been doing a behind- the- 
scene job. These men have been detailed from the various 
stations for the past four years and their work is most 
important to the shooters who are interested in their 
percentages and scores. The Statistical Office has Tim 
O'Riordan from the Bureau of Inspectors, Ted Dolan 
from Ingleside, the brothers, Tim and Tom Leahy, and 
John Gehring from Traffic. Potrero sends Charley Yeager 
as a Range Officer and Lou Lecau on the phones. Mission 
has Joe Broggi while Ingleside had John Creamer and 



John Reed on the phones. Traffic again has Alex Gris- 
wird as Pit Officer and Lou Sevenau as scorer. Theirs 
is a most necessary job — and one requiring lots of work. 
We salute these worthy gentlemen and want them to 
know that their efforts are really appreciated by the 
shooting gentry. 

* * if 

The Mountain View Police Department sent up two 
worthy representatives last Sunday in the personages of 
Ed Miller and L. A. Grille. Being as how it was their 
first attempt they were accordingly handicapped by being 
placed in the Expert class. However, they did very well 
and soon will be in that class by their own pistol pointing. 



Scores 



22 J^ational Match 



.38 Center-Fire Match 



Camp Perry Match 



Master Quentin Brooks 

Expert Joe Hallisy 

Sharpshooter Ed Rosing 

Marksman 1st B. Armstrong 

Marksman Jim Middleton 

Tyro Bill Case 

M Center -Fire 
Timed Fire Match 

Master Quentin Brooks 

Expert Bill Deyl 

Sharpshooter Peter Pompa 

Marksman 1st Bill Kohler 

Marksman Ed Murray 

Tyro Ramona Pochums 

Team Matches 

Cl.\«s "A" 

1st place San Francisco Police Revolver Club 1172 

2nd place San Francisco Team No. 1 1152 

-Vd place California Highway Patrol 1150 

Class "B" 

1st place Coast Guard League Gun Club 1076 

2nd place Pittsburg Rifle &? Pistol Club 1065 

-Vd place Oakland Police Team No. 2 1065 



293 


Quentin Brooks 


287 


Gloria Norton 


297 


288 


Mack Garr 


286 


Mack Garr 


292 


285 


Steve Jochums 


276 


Jack Fink 


280 


268 


D. E. Anderson 


262 


Jerry Gallagher 


270 


263 


John Bellera 


256 


Frank Harris 


269 


209 


Bill Case 

.45 CaUher 
Match 


80 


Ed Klingerman 

Grand 
Aggregate 


238 


198 


Frank Borneman 


281 


Quentin Brooks 


1074 


195 


Al Health 


282 


Mack Garr 


1049 


191 


Harry O'Dell 


275 


Steve Jochums 


999 


185 


Bill Albrecht 


262 


D. Adamson 


964 


180 


S. E. Spriggle 


267 


Ed Murray 


921 


137 











Garrett Hardware and Plumbing Co. 

HARDWARE - SHEET METAL - PLUMBING - GLAZING 
PAINTS AND OIL 



Phone 2MW 



HEALDSBURG. CALIF. 



Have Your Car 

Washed and Polished * Chassis and 
Motor Steam Cleaned 

LEE'S SERVICE 
STATION 

St.an Schwerin 

Ninth Avenue and Lincoln Way 
SEabriglit 1-9805 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Napa 823R Orders Put Up lu Take Out 

A-1 CAFE 

CHOP SUEY AND CHOW MEIN 

CHINESE DISHES A SPECIALTY 

Open II A.M. to 1 A.M. Saturday 11 A.M. to 3 A.M. 

1014 MAIN STREET NAPA. CALIF. 



J. C. PENNEY CO. 
NAPA, CALIFORNIA 



PORTLOCK HARDWARE 
General Hardware 

Paints - Electrical and Plumbing Supplies 
Sporting Goods 



Phone 104 

107 South State Street 
UKIAH, CALIFORNIA 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



Oakland Monthly Matches 

Up bright and early Sunday morning, March 7th ready 
for our first trek over the bridge to the Oakland range — 
and what a day it was! These Oakland boys surely had 
something to brag about and don't you think for a minute 
they didn't! There were about 160 shooters, eighty million 
women, seven hundred youngsters and forty-two dogs. 
Never in all our visitants to pistol tournaments did we 
see such a turnout of families — complete families. Mrs. 
Don Nelson had a fine time as she brought over the baby's 
play- pen and the youngster had a good day's outing in 
the sun and mama didn't have to worry about the kid 
wandering down to the zoo and climbing in with the hons 
or tigers. Stuart Simms had his family over and was 
teaching the baby to swipe .45 brass from the other 
shooters — at least that's what he told but we can't believe 
it. Yep, there were certainly many new shooters on the 
line and we still are having a heck of a time trying to 
match the various faces with all the new names. Vem 
Clayton had his brother, Loren, from Redding, at the 
match but Loren said he would "ruther" have his old 
30-30 along and let Vern do all the handgunning. 



Never saw so many cops in all our life — that is, cops 
from Alameda. They swarmed all over the lot. Many 
of the San Francisco police were too busy studying for the 
sergeants exam to be held soon so skipped this match. 

* « * 

Lieutenants Veech and Anthony, from Fort Ord, 
showed up on the scene with shooting boxes, the likes 
of which haven't been seen on any shooting range. They 
were as big as a foot locker, built like a fortress and 
had gun space to carry eight handguns, a sub-machine 
gun, two howitzers and a French .75. Holy Smoke, how 
did these guys ever lug 'em around? 

Walt Forrister, from San Mateo Junior College, was 
shooting with his gun in one hand and a Spanish book 
in the other and between strings was buried deep in 
tamales and chili- peppers. Our guess is that the mid- 
term exams must be just around the corner and Walt 
didn't want to miss a shoot nor lose time studying. 



CITY ICE DELIVERY CO. 
UNION ICE COMPANY 

Modern 

Refrigeration 

Service 



354 Pine Street 



EX. 2-2340 



San Francisco, California 



That the boys over in Oakland have been busy during 
the winter was evinced by all the benches on the lower 
range being rebuilt, numbered and a neat paint job ap- 
plied. It didn't help the shooters any as the scores were 
just as terrible. 

Speaking of terrible scores we might add that during 
the firing of the timed fire string in the Camp Perry 
match a lady deer started to run up the hill behind the 
backstops and many a hunter in the crowd just naturally 
raised his sights, followed the animal, missed a couple 
of tens on the target and cursed himself for trying to 
shoot deer out of season. 

Hamilton Henshaw, also had mama and the baby out 

Sunday, and we noted that his shooting box was all fixed 

up with end ventilators. Couldn't figure why the vents 

should be there unless they were to cool ofi^ those hot 

rods after the rapid-fire strings. 

* * * 

Elliott Lipman didn't bring the family out with him 
but only shot in the first two matches and then ducked 
for home. He said it was his baby's birthday and he had 
to be on hand for the celebration — or else! 

Paul Jegmeier was at his first shoot and accordingly 
placed in the Expert class. Paul was standing ne.xt to 
us and not being used to the methods of competition we 
decided to help him out with a few pointers but after 
seeing our slow-fire string we asked him to help us. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

TARGET RANGE 

Firing All Calibers 
50c per hour 

Free Use of Range Guns 

We Buy and Sell all 
Types of Arms 

625 Polk Street (California Hall) TUxedo 5-2977 



SEALS STADIUM CAFE 
and DOUBLE PLAY 

St.anfels, Prop. 

Cocktail Lounge 

I6th and Bryant Street 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. ]948 



Ed Preston, San Francisco Policecopper, was quite elated 
with himself Sunday as he won his first medal in the 
Expert division, a third place medal in the Camp Perry 
Match. He borrowed a .45 cannon for that match and 
discovered it had an 8-pound trigger pull. He managed 
to get it off a couple of times hut his strength failed him 
the last minute and he brought up the rear of the gang. 

* * * 

Did you ever stand behind the lines during the .45 
match and think it was raining .45 empties? Then after 
the match the mob starts looking for their empties and 
occasionally obtaining a few that they know weren't 
theirs. Our guess is that they figure someone else will 
get someone else's and so in the long run it all comes 
out even. Like heck, it does! 

* * * 

Skip Harris is a mighty man at home — or at least that's 
what he tells us and this story will illustrate his might. 



We saw Mrs. Harris on the firing line and couldn't be- 
lieve our eyes as she never shot before. We buzzed Skip 
who tells us that he is teaching the good woman to shoot 
so they both can enjoy a day's outing together. Otherwise 
Skip stays home and cleans house. 

"Butch" Flocchini, the San Mateo Sheriff's right hand 
man, was at his first shoot in over a year as he has been 
giving a lot of time to the Boy Scout movement and is 
getting a big drive out of it as well as giving the growing 
generation the finer points of citizenship. Congratula- 
tions, Butch, it's a swell job you're doing. 
* * * 

Top aggregate score went to that Berkeley shooting 
Demon, Quentin Brooks, with a score of 876. Then 
followed G. Elliott Murphy with an 858 and Ralph 
Kline took third place with an 854. The last trigger was 
jerked at 1:20 p. m. and final scores posted around 1:45 
(Continued on page 93 j 



Scores 

Center Fire Short T^ational Match 



Center Fire Camp Perry Match 



Master 

Expert 

Sharpshooter 

Marksman 1st... 
Marksman 2nd.. 
Marksman 3rd.. 



Master 

Expert 

Sharpshooter 
Marksman 1st... 
Marksman 2nd. 
Marksman 3rd.. 

Master 

Expert 

Sharpshooter 

Marksman 1st... 
Marksman 2nd. 
Marksman 3rd.. 



Ralph Kline 


290 


Quentin Brooks 


296 


Geo. Silvestri 


278 


Major Chas. Smith 


287 


Brian Moore 


275 


Wm. Koehler 


286 


Pete Boulton 


257 


ClifF Hatch 


275 


E. A. Hunter 


250 


Herb Williams 


268 


M. A. Metzner 


237 


M. A. Heindel 


261 


.22 J^ational Match 




Center Fire Western Police 


Match 


Jack Ahern 


293 


Paul Wormser 


296 


Bill Deyl 


279 


Frank Finn 


291 


L. Friend 


277 


A. Grahn 


286 


Charley Barnett 


271 


Pete Boulton 


275 


Dwight Wood 


255 


E. A. Hunter 


255 


Ralph Anthony 


257 


Wallace Ince 


' 249 


.45 Short T^ational Match Co 


me 


Aggregate Scores 




Quentin Brooks 


280 


Quentin Brooks 


876 


Ralph Kline 


276 


Fred Pexiotto 


835 


Chas. Barnett 


268 


A. Grahn 


809 


Phil Lander 


255 


Pete Boulton 


797 


R. L. Suey 


251 


Ed Hunter 


767 


Ralph Anthony 


250 


Carl Riegelman 


707 



Team Scores — Match Number 2 

1st Place San Francisco Police Revolver Club Team No. 1 1166 

2nd Place „ San Francisco Police Revolver Club Team No. 2 1147 

3rd Place Oakland Police and Fireman Team No. 1 1129 

4th Place San Francisco Police Revolver Club Team No. 3 1128 



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EDDIE'S CAFE 

Edward Kuhn, Owner 
Third and Main Streets, un thv Highway 



CARUSO'S 

FINE ITALIAN FOODS - COCKTAILS 

Remo Durighello, Managing Owner 

Prospect 5-9867 

I i6 TAYLOR STREKl SAN FRANCISCO 2 



M. F. Conklin, Manager 



Phone MOntrose 4-0516 



KOENIG LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER PLYWOOD MOULDINGS 



NAPA 



CALIFORNIA 1701 O") JUDAH STREET. Cor. 22nd Ave. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



"Eslabi shed 1900" Phone 773 

lOHN CARBONE 

FAMILY LIQUOR STORE 

King and Graner, Props. 

CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS 

1102 PEARL STREET NAPA. CALM 



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Telephone UNderhill 1-4824 
UNIFORMS 

171 Grove St.. At Van Ness. opp. City Hall 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Mdv, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2J 



Monument in G. G. Park Honoring S. F. Only Canine Cop 



(From Daily Pacific Builder I 



M. F. Fitzpatrick tells the story of Officer Schultz in 
the poem on this page. There isn't much more to add, 
except that the people in the Haight, Ashbury and Sunset 
districts still miss him. 

Folks around there got to love the dog in the two years 
he was a member of the Park station, Larrie M. Driscoll, 
the officer who first found Schults. said. In fact, in a 
fund to erect a suitable monument, they contributed sev- 
eral hundred dollars, with the kids in the neighborhood 
bringing in their nickels and dimes to the station. 

Fountain Erected 

Driscoll reported that "Schultz is buried between two 
beautiful trees in front of the Park station. With the 
money that was collected, a drinking fountain has been 
erected for humans to quench their thirst; at the bottom 
of the fountain there's a place for Schultz's dog pals to 
get a drink of fresh, clear water." 

A specially built bird bath is included, Driscoll said, 
and the surroundings are beautifully landscaped with col- 
ored concrete walks circling the fountain. 

Telling of Schultz's police career, Driscoll said: "Schultz 
immediately took over the station. He rode the rear 
end of the patrol wagon — always liked to go on fast rides 
in the radio car, especially when the boys found it neces- 
sary to use the siren. 

Patroled His Beat 

"Every night for two years without a day off Schultz 
patroled a beat for eight hours and sometimes worked a 
double shift. He investigated back yards, alleys and 
tradesmen's entrances for suspicious persons and knew he 
was performing police duty. 

"Three times Schultz assisted in the capture of burglars. 
For this he was presented with a regulation seven-point 
silver star on a special harness made for him as a present 
from the boys at the Park station." 

Police Chief Michael Mitchell dedicated the monument 
to Officer Schultz April 2f. 

NAPA GROCERY 

wholesale and Retail 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - FRESH FISH and 

POULTRY - FRESH and CURED MEATS 

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1343 MAIN STREET Phone <) 3 NAPA. CALIF. 



H. D. ROBERTS 

Jewelry 

Hearing Aids 



106 West Standley Street 

Ukiah, California 



SCHULTZ" 



One night when the darkness mantled the Park, 
Through his headlights did Driscoll espy 
A dog lying prostrate there on the road 
Which was maimed by a car that went by. 

Larry picked the dog up in a litter with care 
And sent it away to the Pound. 
His home we didn't know wither or where 
For no clue to his owner was found. 

We awaited with patience some word of his fate. 
For we thought he most surely would die. 
When all of a sudden one night at our gate 
That same dog wc did sec there to lie. 

We made no attempt to detain our new friend 
But he stayed with us nevertheless. 
And no teasing or coaxing that doggie could wend 
From the home he had chosen to bless. 

We bought him a harness all shining and new 
And a star trimmed with filigree gold. 
But a name for the doggie perplexed the whole crew 
'Till our Chief did the puzzle unfold. 

For then he was Captain out there at the Park, 
Why he hit upon Schultz we don't know. 
At first we treated it just as a lark. 
But oh how that dog's fame did grow. 

Now Schultz remembered the kindness he'd seen 
From Larr>', his friend, that first night 
And he stayed at his heel, now matter how mean 
Was the weather abroad, or how bright. 

But alas! Poor Schultz got some poisonous chuck. 
And we took him forthwith to a Vet. 
He'd sought out Larry in cranny and nook; 
He was dying, but he didn't forget. 

We laid him away 'neath the Sunset fog. 
And we placed a plaque o'er his grave 
To remind us of that faithful dog 
And the foul cruel work of a Knave. 

— M. F. Fitzpatrick. 



Open 6 A.M. 



Frank Barbieri, M^. 



POTRERO CAFE 

BREAKFAST AND LUNCH 



Phone HEmlock 1-9347 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2001 16th St. at Utah 

CALIFORNIA 



DR. L. P. PLAYER 

384 Post Street 



•---- « 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Mdv, 1948 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Ray Meyers, President 
A. R. TaggA'RT, SecretaryTreasurer 



The regular monthly meeting of the Northern Califor- 
nia Police Communication Officers' Association was held 
on February 12, 1948, in Napa, Calif., at the Valley Inn. 
Our host was Marvin Landers and Sheriff John Clauson of 
Napa County. 

Minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved 
also bill for nineteen dollars and thirty-seven cents for a 
new brief case for the secretary. Brower McMurphy, En- 
gineering and Frequency Committe reported the requests 
for clearances of frequncies: 

Hawthorne, Nevada. Main Station frequency of 16M 
MCS. Mobile frequency of 39,380 KCS. These frequen- 
cies will enable the Hawthorne to co-ordinate their commu- 
nication activities with adjacent Law Enforcement Agen- 
cies in this area. Motion by Geo. Burton, seconded by Tom 
Bailey. 

City of Davis, Police Dept. Request shift of frequency 
from .35.1 MCS to 37.02 MCS. This shift would allow 
the City of Davis Police Dept. to coordinate their commu- 
nication activities with the Solano County Sheriffs Office 
and allow them to utilize the present Solano County Sher- 
iff's Office Repeaters which is necessary for this area. The 
City of Hillsborough requested a shift from their present 
frequency of 33.22 MCS. because of interference from 
Eastern Utilities which renders their mobile units to a point 
of uselessness. They request a clearance on any frequency 
above 3'). 00 MCS. McMurphy will monitor what remain- 
ing channels we have left in an effort to clear some 30 MC. 
frequency to alleviate their present difficulties. This inter- 
ference has been very aggravated in this peninsula area 
and every effort will be made to correct it. A solution will 
be forthcoming at our next meeting. Chief Wisnom, of 
Hillsborough and President of the Bay Counties Peace 
Officers' Association is willing to accept a frequency in the 
30 MC. band on a temporary basis pending the final de- 
cision by the Federal Communications Commission on their 
new allocation plan for this band. Monterey County Sher- 
iff's Office requested a clearance in the 1^0 MC. band for 
both Land and Mobile operation. On recommendation of 
the Engineering Committee, I'll. 73 MCS. was proposed. 
Motion by Bill Koch and seconded by Ralph Pence. 

Solano County Sheriff's Office: Clearance for five 100 
watt mobile units for the Fire Department ; same to utilize 
the present main station sheriff's office for dispatching. Mo- 
tion by George Burton, seconded by Edward Measchner. 
(The mobile fire frequency of l'>4.07 MCS. was cleared.) 

President Ray Meyers appointed the following com- 
mittees: 



State: Bud Hossack and Stewart Naschke. 

County: Geo. Burton and Jim Lewis. 

City : Al Taggart and Henry Bogardus. 

Operations Committee: George Burton, 70 MC. point 
to point. 

QPO Net Committee : Bud Hossack. 

Interference Committee: Merrill LeBoeuf. 

Membership Committee: George Hippely. 

Entertainment Committee: Bill Koch. 

Guest Speaker Committee: Stew. Naschke. 

Resolution Committee: Jim Lewis. 

Inter-City Relations: Tom Bailey. 

Dealer Relations: Rox Penlon. 

Sergeant-of-Arms: The prevailing host at each meeting. 

Special Committee: Geo. Burton, Merrill LeBoeuf, Stew 
Naschke. 

During luncheon President Meyers introduced Chief 
W. J. Wisnom, of the Hillsborough Police Department, 
who is President of the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation, which includes many of our bosses. Chief Wisnom 
who is quite a radio technician in his own right spoke on 
the activities of the organization which he heads and com- 
mended the efforts of our Association for its contributions 
to the battermcnt of Police Communications. Chief Wis- 
nom then introduced Chief Earl Dierking, Vallejo Police 
Department, Vice President of the Bay Counties' Peace 
Officers' Ass(X-iation. Chief Dierking needs no introduc- 
tion, being President Ray Meyers' boss and having spon- 
sored many progressive ideas to better Police Communica- 
tion in Northern California. These two men with their 
experience as law enforcement executives and their techni- 
cal knowledge have, can and will do much toward co- 
ordinating and improving Police Communications in this 
area. 

Chief Don Wcxid, San Ansclmo Police Department, was 
next to speak. Chief Wcxid, a recruit in law enforcement 
work, having been working at it for the past 36 years, and 
a charter member of that Asstxiation gave us a brief his- 
tory- of the problems of introducing radio communications 
to law enforcement agencies during its infancy. Chief 
Wo<x] finally rendered one of his technical masterpieces 
which he generally saves for our regular technical discus- 
,?ions. 

All members present showed considerable interest and 
I am sure that several system will show improvement after 
this technical dissertation. Chief E. C. Riordan, Napa 
Police Department, welcomed all members and guests and 
introduced Jack Cinnamond, Mayor of the City of Napa. 



I 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



Mayor Cinnamond gave us a brief history of the City of 
Napa and went all out in his praise for the fine job Martin 
Landers, Chief Radio Technician, has done for this area. 

Next, was John Clauson, Jr., Sheriff of Napa County, 
who has gained wide repute as a box specialist in this area. 
Sheriff Clauson introduced his guest. Chief Deputy Wesly 
Gardner. President Meyers introduced Commander Bob 
Miller of the Pacific Gas 6? Electric Co. Bob feels that cer- 
tain that certain utilities now classified under Industrial 
Service with the Federal Communications Commission 
should be classified with Public Safety Agencies due to the 
nature of their work. This is a subject that all members of 
APCO and its various chapters have been giving serious 
thought during the past few months. 

Rox Penlon introduced his guest, Jack Cunningham. 
Rox insists on flying his own plane to all of our meetings 
whether they be two miles from his office or JOO, and he is 
consistently late in arriving at all of them. Rox, who is 
the topflight Aerial Engineer in this end of the state, has 
not learned that the shortest distance between two points 
is a straight line. Director George Hippely, San Francisco 
Police Department, introduced his guest, A. L. Lamb. 

Stewart Naschke, Chairman of the Guest Speaker Com- 
mittee came up with a grand surprise. Through the cour- 
tesy of the General Electric Co. and Fred Dectkin Stewart 
has as our guest speaker, Frank Barnes, Engineer, G. E. Co. 
Frank needs no introduction after the excellent technical 
talk he gave for this Association on Frequency Modula- 
tion. His talk on Television was appreciated by all. A few 
more speakers of Frank's caliber and we would have stand- 
ing room only at our meetings. 

The frequency clearance for Lake County was tabled 
until next meeting due to all Agencies affected not being 
present. 

Jim Lewis requested additional information on our 70 
MC. point to point network. McMurphy stated the Board 
has petitioned the Commission to rush action. Mt. Diablo 
Repeater deal is beginning to show signs of progress. Our 
State Teletype System is installing perforators in all sta- 
tions toi speed up this vital form of communications. 

President Meyers reported on the last W.A.A. Surplus 
Deal. Ray has been very active and well informed on this 
phase of activities. 

McMurphy read the last report of the R.T.P.B. from 
Zellon Audritsch. 

George Burton spoke on the new classification regarding 
emergency services as set up by the F.C.C. 

Once again the all-important subject of changing our 
name and amending our Charter to include other services 
under Public Safety was opened for discussion. At the 
National Conference in Los Angeles this subject was given 
number one place on the agenda for consideration and 
study. 

Your secretary was directed to obtain all information 
possible from APCO regarding this subject. Unfortunately, 
Art Sowle, President of APCO was unable to attend this 
meeting. Art has been working hard on this problem and 
we hope he will be able to give us some additional informa- 
tion at our'next meeting. 



The following commercial members spoke on their prod- 
ucts and conditions in general related to their activities. 
Herb. Watson (Link) ; Sam Combs (RCA) ; Rox Penlon 
(Aerial Eng.) ; Clyde Davenport (Leece-Neville) ; Fred 
Deetkin (GE) ; Bill Kellog (Motorola) ; A. L. Lamb (Joes. 
Pierson & Inc.) ; Fred Dine (F. E. Dine Co.) Radio Mfgr. 

It certainly as gratifying to see so many law enforcement 
and administrative officials attend our meetings. Their 
keen interest in our problem which in the final analysis is 
their responsibility has made it possible for the members of 
this Association to install and maintain some of the finest 
Communication Systems in the country. 

The next meeting will be held in Sacramento, Calif. 
The host will be Stewart Naschke, CHP. 

A. R. Taggart, Secretary-Treasurer. 



Best Wishes 
from 

SECURITY WINES 
& SPIRITS, Inc. 

598 Potrero Avenue 

San Francisco, California 



UNITED 

ENGINEERING 

COMPANY 

500 Beale Street 
San Francisco, California 



H. MOFFAT CO. 
Packers 

Livestock Growers 
Dealers 

Plant and Offices 
Third Street at Arthur Ave. 



San Francisco 



Page 28 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

OCEANSIDE-SAN DIEGO COUNTY 



Mav, J 948 



Oceanside, San Diego County, is one of the nicest spots 
on the coast Hne of California, and a lot of people coming 
down from Los Angeles, 90 miles to the north or coming 
from San Diego, 28 miles to the south, with no intent 
to pause at this historic and picturesque little coast city, 
stop over and many of them remain for days. It is 
stopping for, for Oceanside offers many attractions, as 




Chief Guy B. Woodward 
Taken White in the Army. 

this writer so well knows, as he spent many happy days 
there when he lived in San Bernardino nearly 40 years 
ago. Oceanside has a most equitable climate; ocean fishing 
is unsurpassed, and the city has erected a 1900 foot 
pleasure pier where anglers can cast their lines, and from 
which fishing boats take men and women on successful 
trips where various species of fish arc brought to hook; 
its homes are all well kept and surrounded by gardens, 
for here all fruits, flowers and shrubbery thrive; and the 
expansive, clean beach draws thousands of bathers, and 
Oceanside is noted as one of the safest surfs of the coast. 

But besides these attractions Oceanside is noted for its 
proximity to Mission San Luis Rey, four miles to the 
East, and which was erected by the Franciscan Fathers 
in 1798 and after being almost destroyed in the middle 
of last century is today splendidly rebuilt, and is a show 
place for all tourists. It is now used to house many valu- 
able historical relics of the early days of the Mission 
Fathers. In the yards, surrounded by the big buildings 
created by the Indians who hewed the lumber and 
brought it from Pala mountains 20 miles away, is the 
first pepper tree planted in this part of the world. It is 
now over 110 years old. 

There, too, is Camp Pendleton, which during the war 
turned out thousands of Marines who received their 
training at this great Mexican Grant, known formerly as 
Rancho St. Margarita, and dedicated in 1942 by the 



President of the United States as a permanent training 
station for the Leathernecks. The Camp comprises 
152,000 acres and in its expanses has some of the most 
beautiful scenery to be found anywhere on this earth. 
It is now known as the home of the Third Marine Brigade 
and also of the Home Training and Replacement Com- 
mand, and several other enlisted men's schools also call 
it their headquarters. On an attractive lake the Naval 
hospital is situated, and during the war 2000 beds were 
kept fully occupied by injured Marines. 

Within an hour and a half drive Palomar Observatory, 
with the Worlds largest telescope, can be reached, and 
while that great instrument is not yet completely in- 
stalled, the beautiful observatory is well worth a trip to see. 

During the war other branches of the national services 

Phone 1335 1 

ROBERTS FUR STUDIO 



3 17 W. FOOTHILL BLVD. 



Aztec Hotel Bldg. 



MONROVIA, CALIFORNIA 



CURVE IN CAFE 

CHOP SUEY . SHRIMP . STEAKS 
CHOPS. ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 



84 i WEST MANCHESTER 



INGLEWOOD. CALIF. 



A Retired Officer 

THE C & M CAFE 

228 West Grand Avenue 
EL SEGUNDO. CALIFORNIA 



J. M. Canfield Daily 9 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. 

JACK & RENEES 

CHICKEN COOP 

POULTRY AND FRESH EGGS 

Phone S. M. 79107 

1262 I W. Washington Blvd CULVER CITY. CALIF. 

3314 BAR-B-O 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

Featuring Barbecue you will like and Shoi^ Orders 

On Rosecrans West of Crenshaw 



33 13 ROSECRANS 



LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



FRANK'S GROCERY 

SELECT GROCERIES. MEATS AND MAGAZINES 

SELECT GROCERIES, MEATS 

AND MAGAZINES 

IMPERIAL (Imperial County) CALIFORNIA 



KOFF'S MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS 
BEER. WINE AND LIQUORS 



3245 ROSECRANS 



HAWTHORNE. CALIF. 



Culligan Soft \X'aler 



Open 7 A.M. to 8 P.M. 



PORTER'S SELF SERVING LAUNDRY 

"DO YOUR OWN LAUNDRY AND SAVE" 

1035 North Mt. Vernon Ave., at Marketville 

COLTON CALIFORNIA 



MAC'S CAFE 

SMALL PLACE - BUT THE BEST FOOD 
GOOD COFFEE 

SEELEY (Imperial County). CALIFORNIA 

HONG SUN CO. 

P. O. Box 736 
SEELEY (Imperial County). CALIFORNIA 



May, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



were located near Oceanside and that town was the center 
of activity for tens of thousands of men getting ready 
for the big battles in the Pacific. 

Oceanside is a city of 9.21 square miles and a population 
of over 12,000, and it is the shopping center of 55,000 
people, who are engaged in raising citrus fruits, avocados, 
tomatoes, poultry, eggs and other products of the soil, 
in the surrounding area. 

To police this thriving little city the town has an able 
and experienced Chief of Police, whose training at the 
FBI National Police Academy during the first of this 
year, has made him more invaluable. He is Guy B. 
Woodward, born in Ramona, north of San Diego, on 
March 12, 1907. 

The Chief entered law enforcement in 1934 when he 
joined the Oceanside Police Department. In the follow- 
ing years, and particularly during the war years, he was 
engaged in every type of police work. By his close atten- 
tion to duty, his courage, both physical and moral, he 
advanced to the rating of Captain in 1939. He was made 
Chief in March, 1947. 

Returning from Washington, after attending the Police 
Academy he resumed his position as Chief. Chief Wood- 
ward and his wife, who was formerly Geneva Wade of 
Campbellsburg, Indiana, have two sons — Richard Dean 
Woodward, who served 19 months in the Air Corps, and 
Kenneth Paul, an Oceanside High School student. 

There are 18 members and two full time clerks in the 
Oceanside Police Department. 

Oceanside's Mayor, Harry Witman, was formerly man- 
ager for the vast Santa Margarita Ranch before it was 
turned into Camp Pendleton, the largest Marine Base in 
the United States. He has had much to do with the 
progress of Oceanside as a fine place to live and a fine 
place to vacation, and he is deeply interested in the suc- 
cess of the Police Department and gives it all his oflBcial 
and personal assistance. 

Besides Chief Woodward the personnel of the Ocean- 
(Continued on page 46) 



r— — " 



The LAST ROUND-UP 
CAFE 

STEAK, CHICKEN AND 
SEA FOOD DINNERS 



Box 1349, El Centre, California 

Phone: Holtville 8738-J-3 

BETWEEN HOLTVILLE AND EL CENTRO 



ITALIAN SWISS COLONY 



FINE CALIFORNIA WINES 



DUGGAN'S FUNERAL SERVICE 

UNd«rhill 1-4.433 

•434 - 17th Street, near Valencia 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 






Good Things to Eat 

ROSE'S CAFE 

Open 24 Hours 



The Biseest Little Business in Town 



414 West California Boulevard 
ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 



OTTO'S INN 

550 Main Street 
and 

THE CLUB 

476 Main Street 



Highest Grade 

LIQUORS - COCKTAILS 

BEER - WINE 

SOFT DRINKS 

and 

GOOD FOOD SERVED 

EL CENTRO, CALIFORNIA 



Page iO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 1943 



NEW LOOK OF CHP 

f Continued from page 8) 

cars which cannot be distinguished from other vehicles in 
traffic. 

The commissioner also commented on the effectiveness 
of cooperation between law enforcement agencies, as it has 
been developed, in the last few years. As an illustration 
of practical cooperation, he pointed out the example of the 
solution of the murder here Sunday by the Monterey 
County Sheritf's Office and other law enforcement agen- 
cies. 

In closing, he made a plea for improved methods and 
training for all agencies. 

Mr. Peterson is the first commissioner appointed to head 
the CHP as an independent agency responsible to the gov- 
ernor. He was nominated for the position when the CHP 
became autonomous October 1, 1947. Prior to then he was 
Chief of Police in San Diego. Previously, he had served 

5 2 6 CLUB 
Salinas, California 

Telephone 8604 I. Golde, Prop. 

FOX JEWELERS 

DIAMONDS • WATCHES • JEWELRY 

243 MAIN STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 

BELMONT CLUB 

101 MAIN STREET 
SALINAS. CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 7693 

EL CAMINO PRESS 

QUALITY PRINTING - LITHOGRAPHING 

3)6 MONTEREY STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 

CHAS. M. CHILDERS 

CHEVRON GASOLINE DEALER 

Phone 8763 
1 REMONT AND BROADWAY 



Phone 23 14 



ARBUCKLE 



GEORGE ARENS 

HARDWARE 



CALIFORNIA 



BERRY'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 

R. R. #1, Box 9IA 
CARUTHERS CALIFORNIA 



Phone 8383 



VICTORY CAFE 

FINE EATS 



12 W. MARKET STREET 



SALINAS, CALIF. 



Phone 3742 

CHINA HERB CO. 

SPECIAL HERBS PREPARED 
FOR EACH AILMENT 

Cor. of JOHN and PAJARO STREETS SALINAS, CALIF. 

GAUDIN MOTOR CO. 

FORD - MERCURY - LINCOLN 

"Salinas Valleys's Largest Service Station" 

SALINAS. CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 7471 Walt Bisschop 

BISSCHOP'S BRASS RAIL 

THE BRIGHT SPOT OF SALINAS 
VAT 69 - BAR SCOTCH - WHISKIES - ALES - WINE 

171 MAIN STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 

Be WISE - BUY WISE - ECONOMIZE AT 

RUBEN-REITZ FOOD STORE 

where Smiling Service Welcomes You 

GROCERIES - FRUITS VEGETABLES 

MEATS - POULTRY - FISH 

So. Main and Johns Streets Phone 6443 SALINAS CALIF. 



Pho 



8322 



HORSE SHOE INN 

MIXED DRINKS - BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 

44 W. MARKET STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 

Phone 8447 

BUCKAROO CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS - LUNCH COUNTER - CLUB ROOM 

li W. MARKET SALINAS, CALIF. 



Telephone 8264 



James Berdell 



S. F. KOFFEE SHOP AND TAP ROOM 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



SEASIDE, CALIF. i | (, MAIN STREET 



SALINAS, CALIF. 



THOMPSON PAINT CO. 

37 1 MAIN STREET 
SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 5968 



H. E. Silva 



SALINAS GLASS SHOP 



225 SALINAS STREET 



SALINAS, CALIF. 



Phone 4881 



BERRY'S FLOWERS 



FLOWERS WIRED — WORLDWIDE 

422 SALINAS SIREET SALINAS, CALIF 



Phone 5138 Maria Chavez Fernandez 

GOLDEN EAGLE CAFE 

SPANISH DISHES - ENCHILADAS - TAMALES - TACOS 
MEXICAN DISHES 

40 MAIN SIREET SALINA, CALIF. 

Phon.; 5842 Gus and Gus 

VICTORY TAP ROOM 

"WHERE OLD FRIENDS MEET" 

126 MAIN STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 



SALINAS VALLEY ICE CO., Ltd. 



J. J. NEWBERRY CO. 

5-10-25 CENT STORES 
Dependable Merchandise at a Saving 



LAURITSON 8C DODA 

AMUSEMENT GAMES - CIGARETTE MACHINES 
WHOLESALE CANDY AND TOBACCO 



233 Salinas Street 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3 J 



with the Long Beach Pohce Department for 17 years. Com- 
missioner Peterson is at present president of the National 
Pohce Academy Association of the United States. 

Chief of Pohce Joe Corby of King City, presiding at last 
night's dinner meeting, announced that the next meeting 
of the association would be held May 26. Place of meet- 
ing will be announced. 

BOND CLOTHES 



Post A. Kearny Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



U. S. STUDIO PORTRAITS 

Herman C. Lompot, Photographer 
WAlnut 1-8398 



174 7 BUCHANAN ST.. Corner Sutter 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WEsl 1-1552 



SIDNEY MIRON 



Positively Pays the Highest Prices for Ladies and Gents 

SECOND-HAND GOWNS, DRESSES AND SUITS 

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF NEW FURS 

1750 Geary Street, bet. Fillmore and Webster SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN'S SPOT 

ITALIAN DINNERS 
BEST SPAGHETTI - SERVED ANY TIME 



2604 Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone VA. 4-2668 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL RIO VISTA 



Telephone 28 



RIO VISTA 



CALIFORNIA 



FARMERS 

MERCANTILE 

COMPANY 

INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 

TRACTORS AND FARM 

IMPLEMENTS 

INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

FARM AND INDUSTRIAL 
HARDWARE 



Service Shops at 
All Four Locations 



SALINAS 
HOLLISTER 



WATSONVILLE 
KING CITY 



L E I D I G ' S 

Finest Groceries and Beverages 

Monterey, 314 Dei Monte Ave. and 
585 Lighthouse Ave. 

South Main and Romie Lane and 

516 E. Alisal Street 

SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 5625 



Res. Phone 3637 



S. L. WEBER 

Electrical Appliances 
Plumbing and Heating Supplies 

223 Salinas Street 

SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS VALLEY 
VEGETABLE EXCHANGE 

GROWERS - PACKERS - SHIPPERS 
California and Arizona Vegetables 

"Lettuce The Year 'Round" 
SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



El Centro, Calif. 



Phoenix, Ariz. 



-.'* 



Johnson Radio & Electronic 

Phone 6459 

Radios - Refrigerators - Washing Machines 

Phonograph Records - Stoves - Ironers 

Table Appliances - Phonographs 

For Your Convenience 

Radio Service at Both Our Locations 

412 MAIN STREET, SALINAS, CALIF. 
207 SALINAS STREET, SALINAS, CALIF. 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mav, iy4S 



Warden J- A- Johnston of Alcatraz Retires 



Warden James A. Johnston is no longer in charge of 
Alcatraz Federal Prison. He has reached the age of re- 
tirement, but so important is he in matters of penology 
that he won't be allowed to while away his remaining 
years, which may, we hope, be many, rocking on the 
front porch of the place he and Mrs. Johnston will take 
up residence. For when he stepped out as Warden of 
Alcatraz he was appointed assistant to Director James 
V. Bennett, of the Federal Prisons. Assistant Director 




WARrihN J. A. Johnston 

Johnston has already taken up his office in the Post Office 
Building at Seventh and Mission Streets. 

Among his new duties: to handle Pacific Coast prison 
matters, help train personnel, interview officers for pro- 
motion, examine prisoners applying for parole, inspect 
institutions, interpret bureau policies to the public and 
advise — when called upon — Federal, State, Army and 
Navy officials in prison problems. 

Warden Johnston recognized by all county, state and 
federal authorities is one of the greatest penologists of 
this age. 

Out of a clear sky back when the great Hiram Johnson 
was governor of Californa, the chief executive announced 
to James Johnson who was serving in another capacity 
that he wanted him to take over the management of Folsom 
State Prison, then in a turmoil of unrest and mismanage 
inent. James Johnson took the job, though he had never 
had much to do with prisons or jails, but he had a honesty 
of purpose and mind that could fathom what was wrong 
and what to do to right that wrong. He clicked from the 
first and later was put in charge of San Quentin, where 
he introduced many innovations that have been adopted 
throughout the nation. He played up the idea that there 
w-as some good in all men, and when they reached a 



penitentiary if properly treated and properly studied the 
good traits could be developed. He insisted each inmate 
be treated as an individual and not as a member of a mob 
of misfits. He salvaged many a man, and he knew how 
to treat those who would not yield to his kindly but 
firm treatment. 

He finally left San Quentin and became a bank's vice 
president. But when the Federal Government decided 
Alcatraz was the place to house its worst criminals they 
needed a man who could handle the Rock, to which were 
toughest felons from over the nation. They settled on 
former State Prison Warden Johnston and he took over 
in 19?4. How perfect was the selection can be summed 
up by the observation that not a man escaped from that 
prison, though two drowned in trying to make a getaway. 
And last year he battled successfully a prison break that 
brought death to some inmates and some guards. He 
himself was set upon one time in a dining room uprising, 
but with it all he has not become embittered and still 
clings to the theory that you will get better results by 
treating those sent to prison with firm kindness and 
understanding. 

He'll do a good job in his new post as he has always 
done a good job in any duty assigned him. 



BUILDING MATERIAL 
DEALERS' CLUB 



so. CITY LUMBER CO. and 
KEN ROYCE CO. 

BURLINGAME BLDG. MAT. CO. 

SAN MATEO FEED AND FUEL CO. 

H. E. CASEY CO. 

BUILDING PRODUCTS, Inc. 

REDWOOD MATERIAL CO. 

PENINSULA BLDG. MAI. CO. 

URBAN BROS. 

MERNER LUMBER CO. 

PALO ALTO MATERIALS CO. 

CARL E. ANDERSON QO. 

BORCHERS BROS. 

WILLIAMS and RUSSO 

PACIFIC COAST AGGREGATES CO. 

FAIRBANKS BUILDING SUPPLY 

THOENY BROS. 

WESTERN GRAVEL CO. 



May, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 




Pumps, Job Welding 

and Machine Work 

Brush Shredding 

2909 East 
Kern Street 

FRESNO, 
CALIF. 



Compliments 


of 


RO OS 


BROTHERS 


Fresno 



WALTER BYDE CO. 

GIFTS 

Fine China - Crystal ' Hardware 

Sporting Goods ' Paints ' Refrigerators 

Radios ' Appliances 

1321-1331 Fulton St. 861 Olive Ave. 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



For FINE FOODS 
and Delicious Fountain Specialties 



visit 



THE BULLDOG 

Featuruig 

"THE BULLDOGGER" 

A Neif and Satisfying Hamburger 
PLATE LUNCHES SANDWICHES 

Immediate Tray Service 

Phone 2-1554 

Opposite Fresno State College Stadium 

on Blackstone 



T T 



KEN ROYCE, INC. 

CONCRETE READY MIX 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

* 

205 So. Linden Ave. 
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone: JUno 8-8212 



Los Angeles 



Fresno 



San Francisco 



PACIFIC MILL & MINE 
SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

Since 1907 

Belting, Packing, Hose, Tools, Paints 
Industrial Hardware 

Phone 4-';92i 
530 Van Ness Avenue 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



~k l—^-^rn^ 




905 R Street 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



tOTTlED UNOII «UIMO>ITT Of 'M« COOCOK C0M»«MY It 



Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Fresno 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1948 



SERGEANT McCOY OF FRESNO 

(ConUrwed from page 12) 

with the parents, these juveniles are placed on voluntary 
probation. While on probation with the bureau, these 
juveniles are assisted in becoming more familiar with the 
state traffic laws, and after successfully completing a test 
which closely follows the state vehicle code, the youth 
is released from his probation. A total of 216 boys and 
four girls were handled by the bureau for violation of 
the vehicle code last year. 

The third and last department of the Fresno Bureau 
of Special Service is the bicycle registry department. 
Registration of ail bicycles is carried on annually by the 
bureau and it handles cases involving stolen bicycles. 

McCoy's objective in running the bureau, "To assist 
a boy or girl through life without a court record," is 
indeed an admirable one. He believes each case must be 
handled on an individual basis since the different condi- 
tions, stresses, circumstances, and tensions playing upon 
each youngster bring forth unique results. While there 
is no national blueprint which will provide an all-inclusive 
summary of the various causes of juvenile delinquency, 
McCoy realizes there are as many causes of deviant be- 
havior as there are evils and errors in the world. 

Plant and Residence Phone 3-3750 

LOPOPOLO OLIVE OIL CO. 

wholesale and Reta-'l Shippers of 

PURE CALIFORNIA OLIVE OIL AND GREEK STYLE OLIVES 

We Pay Top Cash Prices for Your Olives 

Route 10. Box 21 FRESNO. CALIF. 

NEGUS POULTRY 



2 119 Belmont 



FRESNO 



Phone 2-3563 



Arthur Bradford 



FRESNO GARAGE 

AUTOMOBILE - REPAIRING - TRUCK 



340 No. H. STREET 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



JOHNNY'S UNION SERVICE 

Phone 3 7863 

TIRES - TUBES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 

EXPERT LUBRICATION 

FULTON at BELMONT FRF,SNO, CALIFORNIA 



N. M. Dulcich 



Phone 2-5821 



LIBERTY FISH & POULTRY CO. 

FRESH FISH -::- SEA FOOD IN SEASON 
2023 BELMONT AVE. FRESNO. CALIF. 

PALACE HOTEL 

Two blocks from S. P. Depot 



KERN STREET at BROADWAY 



E. Gloss, Proprietor 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



H. Waxman, Prop. 



Phone 2-0223 



PACIFIC FURNITURE CO. 



1417 FULTON STREET 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



FARETTA'S 

DRAUGHT BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 
1301 FRESNO STREET FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

Ted J. Felles Phone 3-3421 

FELLES PLANING MILL 

WINDOW SASH, DOORS, GENERAL MILL 
AND CABINET WORKS 

2108 McKINLEY AVENUE FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

H. C. ASHER 

FREIGHT TRAFFIC SERVICE : INSURANCE : BONDS 



FRESNO 



Phone 4-5338 



Rowell Buildinf 



CALIFORNIA 



BRUNO FRUIT CO. 

AND TERMINI OLIVE OIL CO. 

Packers and shippeds of Fruits, Vegetables and Mfg. of Olive Oil 

Greek Style and Green Brine Olives 

Phon- 4-1289 P.O. Box 28 FRESNO 7. CALIF. 



H. J. Tolladay 



A. G. Beck 



BLACKSTONE PLANING MILL 

PERFECTION MILLWORK 

Blackstone and McKinley Avenues 

Phone 3-7526 FRESNO. CALIF. 



CLANCY, DUDLEY dC CO. 

COTTON 



FRESNO 



2144 Merced Street 



CALIFORNIA 



A. B. McDonell 



Telephone 5-1568 



CIGARETTE SERVICE CO. 

"MODERN MERCHANDISING" 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



CALIFORN'IA 



FRESNO BEAUTY & 
BARBER SUPPLY CO. 

Telephone 4-4703 



Phono 4 5 160 



Res. 2-8704 



JAKE'S AUTO BODY WORKS 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE RECONSTRUCTION 
Jake Mirigian, Prop. 

19 12 SANTA CLARA FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

HOLGER JENSEN 

INSURANCE -:: REAL ESTATE 

220 No. FRESNO STREET Phone 2 5780 



DeLuca Bros. 



Phone 2-3832 



JOHNNY'S POULTRY MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

WE BUY AND SELL TURKEYS 

1516 MERCED at Cor. F. St FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRESNO 



POLLY ANNA BAKERY 

THE HOME OF FINE BREAD, PASTRY AND CAKES 
523-25 Blackstone Ave. 



Phone 3-1322 

CALIFORNIA 



HANEY'S JEWELERS 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - JEWELRY 
FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



2015 FRESNO 



PHONE 3-1414 



J. T. COWAN 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
Telephone 2-3332 



COLUMBIA FURNITURE CO. 

THE HOME OF THOUSANDS OF FRIENDS 



Telephone 2-0918 



BRIX BUILDING 



FRESNO. CALIF. 921 BROADWAY 



FRESNO I. CALIFORNIA 



May. J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Musacchio Bros. Phone 2-9737 

SUBWAY SERVICE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
Painting - Body and Fender Work - Welding Specialists 



15 35 FRESNO STREET 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



BAIRDS SHEET METAL WORKS 



1338 H Street 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



CHARLES RINES PRINTERY 

BUSINESS PRINTING 

Telephone 4-6332 
164') HAMMOND AVE. FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

Good Wishes from 

George S. Petersen and Associates 

Dependable Real Estate and Insurance Service Since 1908 

Phone 3-1157 2133 Fresno Street 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



HARRIS CONSTRUCTION CO. 



264 Palm 



CALIFORMIA 



HALEY'S FLOWER SHOP 

SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 



Tm WEST BELMONT 



Phone 2-9740 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



Phone 2-641 I 



Res. Phone 20437 



DR. CHAS. E. PHILLIPS 

DENTIST 
GENERAL PRACTICE 

507 ROWELL BLDG. FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



DR. A. M. ALEXANDER, D.D.S. 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

FURRIERS FOR OVER FOUR GENERATIONS 

WALTER'S— F«r5 

1340 Fulton Street Phone 8913 



FRESNO 



Office Phone 4-341 I Residence 3- 1 748 

GEO. VAN VLEET 

REAL ESTATE - LOANS - INSURANCE 
Office, 426 Rowell BIdg. 

Residence 242 North Fulton Street FRESNO. CALIF. 



Johnny and Vic Volpa. Props. 



Phone 2-5404 



VOLPA GARAGE & BODY WORKS 

Special'z'ng in General Repairing Cars, Truck Motors 

and Tune-ups, Welding 

Wash. Steam-Clean, Polish and Painting - Free Estimates 

294 1 VENTURA AVE. FRESNO. CALIF. 



A. R. (Art) Haire 



Phone 3-2367 



Ralph Murray 



HAIRE-MURRAY COMPANY 

SALES AND SERVICE 

SERVICE STATION - GARAGE - BULK PLANT 

SPRAY PAINTING EQUIPMENT 

3061 EAST TULARE STREET FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Business Telephone 3-9784 

MARSTON'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

GENERAL REPAIRING 
Glen Marston, Prop- 

393 1 BELMONT FRESNO 3. CALIFORNIA 



HANOIAN'S MARKET 

•THE BEST FOR LESS" 
2702 S. R. R. Ave. 



CALIFORNIA 



GRUVER MACHINERY COMPANY 

A'r Compressors - Multiplex Radial Saws - Portable Electrical 
Tools - Woodworking Machinery - Mil Supplies 



FRESNO 



Inyo and M 



Phone 4-3844 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



M A T T'S 

EXCLUSIVE PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 
Prescriptions and Biologicals 

202S Mariposa Street Phone 4 3546 



CALIFORNIA 



CIGARS - PIPES - CANDIES - SMOKER'S ARTICLES 

FRANK MARKOVITS 

TWO STORES — FRESNO 



1221 FULTON 
Office Phone 3-6493 



RESIDENCE 
Phone 4-55 14 



1365 FULTON 
Phone 3-3826 



RAY L. OBENSHAIN & SON 

AUTO TOPS AND UPHOLSTERING 
Seat Covers - Truck and Tractors Cushions Made 



FRESNO 



112 Echo 



Phone 2-8200 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO MOTOR INN 

55 air cooled cottages. North end of city at Subway and Roeding 
Park Circle. On U. S. Highway 99 

Closest to shopping district. Phone 2-6427 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Fresno's Busiest and Best 



HOLT & VAN 

BODY AND FENDER WORKS 



4 18 N. FRESNO STREET 



PHONE 2-9912 



Phone 3-6274 



1804 H STREET 



Res. 2-6094 



M. G. PONSART 

Manager 
VALLEY TRUCK & TIRE CO. 



MADRID CAFE 



2312 Tulare Street 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



F U G A T E'S 

CAMP GOODS AND CANVAS 



FRESNO 



1823 Kern Street 



Phone 3-0232 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



Telephone 2-8629 

J. J. FISHER 

Manufacturing 
JEWELRY REPAIRING - DIAMOND SETTING - ENGRAVING 



2 16 HELM BUILDING 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



Telephone 4-3015 



MARKS FURNITURE 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS 
1340 Fulton Street Phone 3-8913 



CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL CALIFORNIA ICE CO. 



2003 Cherry Ave. 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



CANALES BROS. 



CAPITOL CLEANERS AND DYERS 

THE HOME OF ODORLESS CLEANING 



540 BELMONT. Cor. of ECHO 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



RESTAURANT 

Specializing in Spanish and Mexican Dishes 

Tamales - Tacos - Enchiladas - Chicken - Chili Con Came 

COMPLETE MEXICAN MEALS TO TAKE OUT 



FRESNO 



104S F Street 



Fresno 3-1893 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Mav, 1948 



FRESNO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from page 11 I 

line-driven patrol wagon, Chapin has been a member of 
the force ever since. Chief Wallace made him Assistant 
Chief in 1940. Prior to that appointment, he had been a 
Lieutenant for 14 years. 

The Captains on the Fresno Department are Dan Lung, 
Captain of Detectives, and Joseph E. Brady, head of the 
Traffic Bureau. Both men have nearly completed 25 
years of service. 

Lieutenant W. E. Ellis, 4 p. m. to midnight, and 
Lieutenant S. A. Meek, midnight to 8 a. m., handle the 




Sergeant W. J. Mortland 

night shifts. Lt. Ellis, with 30 years of service, is recog- 
nized as an expert on police organization. Lt. Meek has 
been with the department for over 2 1 years. 

Handling the special bureaus are Sergeant J. H. Mc- 
Coy, head of the bureau of special service which has 
jurisdiction over all juvenile cases, Sergeant John A. 
Scott, in charge of the auto theft bureau, and Sergeant 
WilHam J. Mortland, head of the department of indenti- 
fication. All three men are detective sergeants. 

At the annual convention of the State Peace Officers 
of California, to be held in Santa Monica next Fall, Chief 
Wallace, now first vice president, will be elevated to the 
Presidency, to serve for the year 1949. 

He has contributed much to the success of the state 
association, and has had the members as his guests on 
two occasions. He will continue the fine record of achieve- 
ments that has marked the Association through its nearly 
.^0 years of existence. 



Palm Olive Cocktail Lounge 

(Open Fireplace — Visible from All Sides) 

Fresno's Newest and Most Beautiful. Devoted to 
Gracious Gaiety &? Satisfaction of Fastidious Tastes. 

OUR DINING ROOM FEATURES: 
Delicious Steaks: New York Cut; Fillet; Club; 
Prime Rib • Chicken - Baked Ham - Turkey 

Palm Olive Tavern 



228 Olive 



FRESNO 



FRESNO 



CHIMO-OLIVER 

for Flowers 

2123 Fresno Street 3204 Van Ness 



CALIFORNIA 



D. A. PARRISH & SONS 

SANITATION ENGINEERS 



FRESNO 



740 North Maple Ave. 



Telephone 5-3041 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-9642 

PACIFIC PIPELINE & ENGINEERS, Ltd. 

PIPE LINE CONSTRUCTION 
Recondition;ng - Ditching - Welding - Pipeline Take Up 

3000 RAILROAD AVE. FRESNO, CALIF. 

Phonr: 2-742 1 Open Sundays and Holidays 

ORIENTAL DRY GOODS CO. 

LADIES', GENTLEMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S WEAR 



1502 TULARE STREET 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



GLENN B. THOMPSON, Inc. 

INSURANCE - ALL LINES 



FRESNO 



1303 Van Ness 



Phone 3-7327 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



DR. D. A. FIELD, D. C. 

GENERAL PRACTICE 
ELECTRO THERAPY 

Suite 314-315 T. W. Patterson BIdg. 



CALIFORNIA 



Sporting Goods 



Phone 2-8450 



ARTHUR'S TOY SHOP 

"Everything in Toys" 

DOLL FURNITURE OUR SPECIALTY 

Toys - Dolls - Novelties - Games - Wheel Goods 

911.915 BROADWAY FRESNO I . CALIF. 



GEO. H. BALL 

INSURANCE - REAL ESTATE 
503 Mason Building 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-6767 Phone 4-1253 

DEWHIRST REST HOMES 

USS S Street 2823 Fresno Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

WE KILL PESTS 

DELK PEST CONTROL 



FRESNO 



Phone 4-5043 



3405 East Tulare 



CALIFORNIA 



LIBERTY FRENCH BAKING CO. 

SPECIAL FRENCH, AMERICAN AND ITALIAN BREAD 

Phone HUmboldt 3-00S5 

491 43rd Street, Corner Telegraph Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



BILL and SON 

TEXACO SUPER SERVICE 

General Auto Repairing - Ignition - Brakes - Tune-up - Electrical 

Body and Fender Work - Auto Painting 

Phone TRinidad 2-9823 10151 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND i. CALIFORNIA 



Office TRinidad 2-8405 



Res. TRinidad 2-5422 



RAY HUNT CO., REALTORS 

TO BUY - SELL OR TRADE, SEE US 

AUTO AND FIRE INSURANCE 

925 1 EAST I4lh STREET OAKLAND }, CALIFORNIA 



RAY D. NICHOLS 



REALTOR 



BUILDER 



SW. 8-6644 



76 14 MacARthur Blvd. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



Pat Bond N. E. Jarratt 

CURVE MARKET 

GROCERIES, VEGETABLES AND MEATS 



SWeetwood 8-9340 



Victor H. Rosen 



FRESNO 



1859 Van Ness 



Phone 3-6265 



VIC'S LIQUORS 

"THE BEST IN BOTTLES" 



CALIFORNIA 10623 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET 



OAKLAND 3, CALIF. 



Phone 3 4 144 



BERBERIAN BROS., Inc. 

wholesale — Domestic and Imported 
LIQUORS AND WINES 



EMERSON PHOTOGRAPHS 

HIGH IN QUALITY — LOW IN COST 



333 VAN NESS 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



8515 East FouHeenth 



SWeetwood 8-1714 

CALIFORNIA 



F. C. Stalley 



Phone 3-5261 



AUTOMOTIVE PARTS COMPANY 

"MOTOR REPLACEMENT PARTS" 



LOGAN DRUG CO. 

REGISTERED DRUGGISTS 



13 17 VAN NESS AVE. 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



Phone TRinidad 2-1910 
OAKLAND 



9601 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



GLENN W. LANDES 

IMPERIAL WALL PAPER STORES 
FINE OLD COLONY PAINTS 

Phone 2-9952 2045 Broadway 



LAURENCE H. CORNETT 



OPTOMETRIST 



CALIFORNIA ''3 18 EAST 14th STREET 



SWeetwood 8-8450 



OAKLAND 3, CALIF. 



Willie YicIc, Manager Telephone 2-0811 

OLD SHANGHAI CAFE 

REAL CHINESE DISHE3 
CHOW MEIN -::- CHOP SUEY 
DAILY LUNCHES AND DINNER 

1405 KERN STREET FRESNO. CALIF. 



Phone 3 3431 



Res. 5-3617 



SMART SHOES SHOP 

ART RENNER, Manager 

1435 FULTON STREET FRESNO, CALIF. 

REX MARKET 

1512 Tulare Street Phone 3-5164 



FULLER'S 

ELMHURST PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 
9124 East Fourteenth Street, Cor. 92nd Avenue 

Phone SWeetwood 8-132 1 OAKLAND, CALIF. 

DIMOND PET SHOPS 



OAKLAND 



ELMHURST 



WALNUT CREEK 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



t 



DAN'S CAFE 

WE SELL BEER AND WINE, ALSO SOFT DRINKS 
Specializing in Italian Style Spaghetti While You Wait 



1357 G STREET 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



CENTRAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES 



Phone Templebar 2-085 6 

STANDARD SAW WORKS 

GENERAL SAW REPAIRING AND GRINDING SHOP 

Planer, Paper and Shear Knives Ground and Balanced 

Lawn Mowers Sharpened 

177 TENTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 



MALTBY & VAN NOY HARDWARE 

5601 College Ave. OLympic 2-1216 

OAKLAND II. CALIFORNIA 

GRANBERG CORPORATION 



FRESNO 



Phone 3-0243 



2448 Tulare Street 



1308 Sixty-seventh Street 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



ESTRADA'S SPANISH KITCHEN 

FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 



OLYMPIC HOTEL 



FRESNO 



Telephone 2-0516 



MR. and MRS. BUCKMAN 



370 Blackstone Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



EAST 12th ST. and 2nd AVE. 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BROADWAY MARKET 

914 Broadway 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



HENRY A. PLEITNER CO 

REAL ESTATE LOANS and INSURANCE 
NOTARY PUBLIC 
4021 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND 



Office: KEIlog 2-6771 

CALIFORNIA 



Ted Becker Gene Anderson 

OLYMPIA HOUSE 

MIXED DRINKS, CAFE AND CLUB ROOM 



Shop Phone 3-5661 



Home Phone 3-9449 



Jack Smith 



1141 Broadway 



Phone 2-2611 



Jack Norris FRESNO 



WESTCO PUMP SERVICE 

E. L. MARTINA, Owner 
2105 McKinley Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



REAL ESTATE 



LOANS 



RENTALS 



SURETY BONDS 



DRENTH & DRENTH 

Phone 3-0943 Ben Drerith 

INSURANCE 

2142 TULARE STREET FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRESNO 



MORRIS 8c SON 

WELL DRILING 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Phone 5-0309 5755 Nevada 



CALIFORNIA 



TRUCKS FOR RENT 

FRESNO U-DRIVE 

E. R. HUGHES, Manager 
Phone 3-9916; Night Phone 4-0447 

$10,000 P. D. and $50,000 and $100,000 P. L. Insurance 
For Your Protection 



344 SOUTH BROADWAY 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



J. Vincent Mon Pere, D.M.D. 

1201-1202 Pacific Southwest Building 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, J 948 



FRESNO 



BROADWAY CYCLERY 

REPAIRING DONE BY EXPERTS 

NEW AND USED BICYCLES 

REASONABLE PRICES 

833 Broadway Phone 3-5621 



CALIFORNIA 



Special Attention Given Orders for All Occasions 

TACCHINO PASTRY SHOP 

WEDDING AND BIRTHDAY CAKES OUR SPECIALTY 
1464 Fresno Street Phone 3-S952 

FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



CITY VULCANIZING CO. 

TIRES AND AUTO SUPPLIES 



FRESNO 



745 Broadway 



Phone 2-8511 



CALIFORNIA 



C & C FOOD MARKET 



548 Blackston.- 



Phone 3341 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



Phone 4-762 1 

C. E. COUCH 

WELL DRILLING - ANY SIZE 

PUMP WORKS - LARGE RIG 

Maple Avenue one-quarter Mile South of 99 Highway 

Rt. 4. Box 162-F FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

CHERRY AVENUE AUCTION YARDS 

4'.. Miles South of Fresno, on Cherry 

AUCTION EVERY TUESDAY 

Owner — G. L. HARLAN 

Phone 2-7621 

HORN PHOTO SHOP 

CAMERAS - PHOTO SUPPLIES - PHOTO FINISHING 

AUTHORIZED KODAK DEALER 

69 Belmont Ave. Phone 4-1601 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

VISTA PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS 

4233 East Tulare Street Telephone 5-3071 

CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



Specializing in . . . WESTERN APPAREL 

MAURICE KROESEN 

CUSTOM TAILORED SHIRTS and PANTS 
210 Olive Ave. Phone 4-1934 



A. N. GOFF AND SON 

UPHOLSTERING WORKS 
Repair Work of All Kinds - Antique Work Our Specialty 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



307 N. Broadway Phone 3-1840 



CALIFORNIA 



NO. BROADWAY GROCERY 

CHARLES TUTUNJIAN 



FRESNO 



Phone 2-0419 



204 North Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



SAM NEDLER 
United Finance Co. 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



1052 BROADWAY 



Enterprise Family Service Laundry 

•FRESNO'S FINEST LAUNDRY SERVICE"' 

620 No. FRESNO STREET PHONE 2-7189 



TRANSIENT WEEKLY RATES 

KENILWORTH HOTEL ( 

>/58 BROADWAY FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO BEVERAGE CO., Inc. 

HIRES ROOT BEER -::- MISSION ORANGE 



MODEL ROOMS 



FRESNO 



204 L Street 



Phone 3-0481 



$1.25 and up. Weekly Rates 

CALIFORNIA 844 BROADWA'i' FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-6710 



Res- Phone 2 5377 



DR. JULIUS YEE, JR. 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



HARRY F. WHITE 

ALL LINES OF INSURANCE 
1311 Broadway 



CITY AUTO PAINT SHOP 

Dan Mencerelli. Prop. 

PAINTING, BODY AND FENDER WORK 

Authorized "Duco" Re-Finishing Station 

810 BROADWAY (Up Stairs) FRESNO. CALIF. 



THE GLOBE ROOMS 



1017 Broadway 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4-2440 



WOO'S CAFE 



SENSIBLE PRICES 



In the Heart of the Business and Theatre District 
GENUINE CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOODS 

1428-37 FULTON STREET FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

POLLARD BROTHERS, Ltd. 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



PALACE SANDWICH SHOP 

SANDWICHES OF ALL KINDS 
Open Day and Night to Service You 



001 BROADWAY 



FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



CHESTER HOTEL 

Phone 3-8231 

CATERING TO WORKING MEN 

Pleasant Surroundings -::- Reasonable Rates 

84) BROADWAY FRESNO. CALIF. 



Phone 3-2510 



WAH YOUNG CO. 



Office Phone 2-5319 
Residence Phone 3-2S42 



Residence 
445 Brown 



WHISKEY, WINE AND BEER 

We carry all th? best liquors - Thoroughly Aged 

9)7 F STREET FRESNO. CALIF. 

HOCKETT-COWAN MUSIC CO. 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS - HOME APPLIANCES 

1254 FULTON STREET FRESNO. CALIF. 

Compliments of 

ELMER J. SCHMIDT, M. D. 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



DR. H. A. TARPINIAN 



PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

Comer Fulton and Tulare (Over Owl Drug Co.) 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

BYLES-JAMISON LUMBER COMPANY 

Miinfuacturers of 

California Timber Products 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



James F. Streit 



Phone 3-6149 



STREIT'S DRAPERY SHOPPE 

UPHOLSTERING DRAPERIES 

85) FULTON STREET FRESNO, CALIF. 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



11-HI BOTTLING CO. 

John Soldorian, Prop. 

Carbonated Beverages 

Manufacturing All Kinds of Soft Drinks 
Dealer in Carbon Dioxide Gas 

Telephone 4-5 56J 
1335 F Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



K. SIMONIAN 


PACKING CO. 


• 


FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Cadillac 



Oldsmobile 



FRESNO MOTOR SALES 

Jim Phela'N 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 
SERVICE 



Van Ness and Ventura 

FRESNO, CALIFORNL\ 

Phone 2-4151 



ROBINSON ELECTRIC 



Phone 3-6627 

136 N. VAN NESS AVE. 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Thomas Trailer Company 

Fresno 4-2744 

Dealers of 

FEATHER RIDE and 

CUSHION RIDE TRAILERS 



Commercial Trailer Manufacture 



DR. C. A. ANDERSON 

Chiropractor 

Radionics • Vitamin Therapy 
Gland Treatments 



Phone 2-8323 

202 Bank of America Building 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Rosenberg & Browns 

GOOD USED CARS 
Where Customers Send Their Friends 



743 Blackstone 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



EXPERT AUTO REPAIRS 

EASY TERMS 

We Repair All Makes of Cars 

"The Plymouth Corner" 

CROCKET BROS. 

DeSoto-Plymouth 
• 

1501 Broadway 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mav. 1948 



Fresno Gas and 

Electric Appliance 

Society 



CHANNEL BAKERS 

Good Things to Eat 



MORGAN MUSIC CO. 

PHONOGRAPHS 
GAMES 

"Don't Cuss— Phone Us" 

Office 5-2763 Res. 3-5342 
170-174 N. MAPLE STREET 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Why Not Try 

Pancho's Spanish Dinners 

also American Food 

Open Between 5:00 to 11:00 P. M. 

FOOD TO TAKE OUT 

1715 Blackstone 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-8862 



FEDERAL 


FRUIT 


DISTRIBUTORS 


• 


3120 EAST TULARE 


FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



320 O Street 

Fresno, California 



Phone 4-1901 



Res. 2-9498 



California Olive Oil 
Manufacturing Co. 

Pantell.\' Brothers 

Manufacturers of 
PURE OLIVE OIL 

Route 7 - Box 3A 
California and Fruit Avenue 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 




PRODUCT 

OF 

CELLA 

VINEYARDS 

REEDLEY 
CALIF. 



p. O. Box 1087 

FRESNO 

Phone: Reedley 310 



Md> 



1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



FRESNO STATE COLLEGE 

f Continued from page 14) 

the Criminal Law class this semester is Fresno's mayor 
and former district attorney of Fresno County, Glenn 
M. DeVore. 

Probably one of the most important phases of Dienstein's 
program is the practical training he offers his students. 
Those majoring in criminology must agree to participate 
in the activities of the FSC Police which polices athletic 
events, campus activities, and regulates traffic on and 
near the campus. In cooperation with the Fresno Police 
Department and Chief Ray T. Wallace, students investi- 
gate all unlawful acts committed on the campus. The 
student police, deputized as special officers by the City of 
Fresno, when on duty, the FSC Police uniform and insignia 
which is furnished by the student association. 

On special occasions the campus police are employed 
by the City of Fresno. During the Christmas season, ten 
students were employed to direct downtown traffic, and 
five on Fresno's Christmas Tree Lane. Several students 
are hired to police school crossings, while two have 
worked with the Tulare County Sheriff, and one with the 
Clovis Police Department. Four have been placed in full 
time jobs with the California Youth Authority. The stu- 
dents are paid for their part-time police duty except field 
work for classes. Dienstein's student assistant, Fred Rut- 
ladge, was also a criminal investigator in the army. 

Before Dienstein accepts new students in the crimin- 
ology division, the student must complete a personal 



LEONARDO MARKET 

Pat and Louis Leonardo 
A Complete One-Stop Food Market 



4546 Belmont Phone 5-3573 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



The Photo Record Room 

Fresno's Unique Photo Supply and 
Phonograph Record Shop 



144 Olive 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-0891 



STEVE POTZERNITZ 

HARNESS and SADDLE SHOP 

HOLSTERS MADE AND REPAIRED 

Custom Made Saddles - Belts - Harness 

Silver Engraving 

JOE POTZERNITZ, Silversmith 
1836 Kern Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-9414 






Repossession - Investigations 
Adjustments 

CALIFORNIA AUTO 
RECOVERY BUREAU 

operated bv H. A. Siint/i Defectit'e Agciicv 
Licensed and Bonded 

State of California No. 1073 
Phone 5-0875 

4765 Tyler Ave. Fresno, Calif. 



Compliments 
of 

FRED D. ALEXANDER 
General Contractor 



330 Fifteenth Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone TWinoaks 3-1768 



WATER WATER 
WELLS AND PUMPS 

NOTHING DOWN— THREE YEARS TO PAY 
3 YEARS TO PAY 

Wc Specialize in Domestic Wells and Pumps 

Free Estimates 

HOUDASHELT 

Well Drilling Company 

Phone 5-0376 
THREE MILES EAST ON VENTURA 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, J 948 



questionnaire, present several letters of character refer- 
ence, and obtain a police clearance from the chief of 
police or sheriff of the community of residence. All of 
the potential criminologists are given an appraisal of 
aptitudes and abilities to determine their fitness for 
police work. 

Believing that professionally trained enforcement per- 
sonnel are essential, the criminologist declares that "six 
million children in our schools today are destined to take 
the place of the six million criminals now operating in 
the United States. It is essential that we give more 
thought to the preventive aspects of crime control, al- 
though this does not mean that punitive work should 
be neglected." 

Dienstein adds that the program at FSC does not 
propose to replace the in-service training or the police 
probationary period. "It's purpose," he explains, "is to 
offer to government a pool of academic men and women 
basically trained in law enforcement who will bring 
professional standards to the general field of the admin- 
istration of justice." 

Thirty-eight men and one woman are majors in the 
FSC division of criminology which Dienstein heads. 
Three of these are Chinese students and are inspectors in 
the Nationalist Police Force in Nanking, China. 

DIKRAN'S— Candies and Nuts 

DELICIOUS HOME MADE CANDIES (No Limit) 
Open 9:30 A.M. to 6:30 P.M. 



536 BERMONT <at Echo) 



FRESNO, CALIF 



THE FOURSOME CLUB 

Joe and Howard 

The Finest Cocktail Lounge 
on Ventura Blvd. 

Also Delicious Food 

Four Miles East of Fresno Calif, on Hy. 180 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 






FRESNO KOFFEE KUP 

Optimo Club & 
Optimo Liquor Store 

2029 - 33 - 37 Fresno 



»•« 



Buckner Manufacturing Co. 

Pioneers and Leaders in the Manufacture of all 

Types of Portable and Underground 

Sprinkling Equipment 

The Buckner "Perfect Curtain of Water" 



General Offices and Factory 
1615 Blackstone Avenue 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



PRODUCERS FRESNO GIN 

ED FISCHER, MANAGER 



North and Clovis Ave. 
Rt. 3, Box 513 Phone 2-1773 



Chicago Furniture Co. 

COMPLETE 
HOME FURNISHERS 



1357 Van Ness, Corner Tuolumne 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-2197 



Phone 3-3720 Res. Phone 2-9946 

LOUIS MEYERS & SON 

DEALERS IN JUNK 

We Buy All Kinds of Junk and Rags 

Cars Wanted to Wreck - Parts Sold 

• 

Divisadero and Tehama 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Mailing Address: Rt. 9, Box 636 



i 



Ma\. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



FRESNO TITLE 

GUARANTY 

COMPANY 



Phone 3-2274 
2040 Fresno Street 



I 



Serving 
Central 
California 

KFRE 

"A Rodman Radio Station 



DANISH CREAMERY 
ASSOCIATION 

Manufacturers of 

Butter, Evaporated Milk, Whole Milk 

Powder, and Dry Milk Solids 

E and Inyo 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



ELECTRIC 

CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

L. G. Jeffrey fe? Sons 
CONTRACTORS 

Telephone 3-2208 
1835 Lamona Ave. FRESNO, CALIF. 



Mathews & De Haven, Inc. 

Wholesale 

LUMBER AND BUILDING 
MATERIAL 



Blackstone and Home Avenues 
Post Office Box 9 

FRESNO 7, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-12H 



Malaga Well Drilling Co. 

I\AN GiRTZ 

Welded Steel Casing for 
Sanitary Wells 



One-Half Mile South of Malaga 
on Hiway 99 

Phone 4-7762 Route 3, Box 'tR^ 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



WINTROATH PUMPS, Inc. 

DEEP-WELL TURBINE PUMPS 

Service and Repairs 
on all makes 



1927 Broadway Fresno, Calif 

Phone 2-1741 



KRUZIE & MARTIN 

General Contracting 

"Builders of Finer Homes" 
• 

1707 Fulton Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-7173 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Max. 1948 



r- 
t 



THE 

CUDAHY 

PACKING 

COMPANY 



Church and Fruit Ave. 

Fresno, Calif. 



Box 866 



CENTRAL VALLEY 
PIPE COMPANY 



R. V. COBB, General Manager 



99 Highway at Shaw Ave. 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-2697 



K A R M 


^ 


Radio Station 


* 


Fresno 
■-.-. .-——..-. ....... — , 



----- 1 ♦■ 



COMMERCIAL 
BODY BUILDERS 

Fred Gerhardt 

BUILDING 

and 
REPAIRING 



430 Broadway 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 4-4020 



May. J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



WASHINGTON 
MARKET 

A. C. ZENGEL, Prop. 

Fresh and Cured Meats 

Wholesale and Retail 



1153 Van Ness Avenue 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



L CORCORAN, Opt. D. 

and Associates 
OPTOMETRIST 

EYE GLASSES FITTED 
Scientific Eye Examinations 

BILL LANG 

Optician 

S. SHVIE, JR. 

Optometrist 
1922 Mariposa Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-5321 



Ji 



DR. TYNER'S 

DIAGNOSTIC 

OFFICES 

DR. J. C. TYNER, D. C. 



FRESNO: 

Corner Tulare .and "U" Streets 
Phcne 45982 



VISALIA: 

120 W. School Street 
Phone 347 



VALLEY 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 

Established in 1883 

Building Material 
Merchants 

Yards at 

Fresno Selma Kingsburg Hanford Lemoore 
H 8C Mono Streets Phone 2-7141 

Dean Prescott, Genl. Mgr. 
W. K. Kendrick, Sales Mgr. 

P. O. Box 1946 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. i94S 



OCEANSIDE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Contnued from page 29) 

side Police Department consists of the following ; 

Harold B. Davis, Captain. 

Roger Gates, Sergeant (Investigator). 

Charles L. Giles, Tech., Sergeant (Radio). 

Chester Troan, Tech., Sergeant (Identification). 

Clark J. Larson, Desk Sergeant (in charge of Jail) . 

James M. Anderson, Sergeant (night shift). 

Paul Ricotta, Sergeant (night shift). 

Hubert C. Russell, Sergeant (Traffic). 

Edmond E. Way, Patrolman (Parking). 

Harold F. O'Brien, Patrolman. 

Preston Thompson, Patrolman. 

Jack W. Hunton, Patrolman. 

Lowell B. Settle, Patrolman. 

Raymond McClelland, Patrolman. 

William G. Claydon, Traffic Officer. 

Allen H. Dreyer, Patrolman. 

Pauline Lail, Matron and Police Clerk. 

Mary B. Todd, Matron and Police Clerk. 

Tony Telebar, Patrolman. 

Phone Fillmore 6- 1224 

AUTO SPRING AND WHEEL SERVICE 

MILT MORRIS 

Brake Lining, Brake Parts, Mufflers, Clutch Facing, Bearings, 
Clutches, Springs, Wheels, Cylinder Honing, Drum Turning 

701 OCTAVIA ST.. Corner Fulton SAN FRANCISCO 2. CALIF. 



California - Arizona - Nevada 
New Mexico - Texas 

WESTERN 

TRUCK LINES 

LTD . 

Ralph M. Heflin, Agoit 

In The West— 
—Ship Western 

247(1 Taylor Avenue 

FRESNO 2, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 41923 




k 



1 




Horsepower 
Steam Turbine 

Unit Now in 
Service at Kern 

Steann Plant 

New 101,000- 



i 



'iTf 



^^ 




The first steam turbine unit of the 
new 2? million dollar Kern Steam Plant, 
near Bakersfield, was recently connected 
into service and is now delivering 
101,000 new and additional horsepower 
to the lines of the Pacific Gas and Elec 
trie Company. Though first started in 
1941, work on the Kern Plant was de- 
layed by war until 1945, when com' 
pletion of the giant plant was rushed 
through by every modern means of con' 
struction. When the second steam unit 
is installed in the spring of 1950, Kern 
Steam Plant will generate 235,000 
horsepower of electricity. 




PJ 105.548 



May. 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 47 



Office Phone 31 157 Res. Phone 2-6895 PLUMBING SUPPLIES BUILDERS HARDWARE 



CLARENCE K. BARTON 

GENERAL INSURANCE • BONDS 
Over 25 Years Experience in Specialized Insurance Service 

2IJ3 FRESNO STREET FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



CORNER O AND VENTURA X X^PHONE 4 2951 
FRESNO California 



FARM MACHINERY ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

Office Phone 3-S177 Res. Phone 4-4336 

GLOBE AUTO SUPPLY CO. CURRIE BROS. 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTO" Distributor. 

MOTOR OILS • LUBRICANTS • GASOLINE 



Phone 3-6271 617 Broadway 

FRESNO ' CALIFORNIA 



3217 LORENA STREET FRESNO, CALIF. 



Crown Printing & Engraving Co. BROWN BROTHERS ADJUSTERS 

Jackson Bros. BONDED AND LICENSED INSURANCE ADJUSTERS 

AUTOMOBILE - INLAND MARINE - AVIATION 
ENGRAVERS - PRINTERS - BOOKBINDERS - PUBLISHERS 

Fresno Stockton Oakland San Francisco 

FRESNO. CALIFORNIA Bakersfield Sacramento Chico San Jose 



F. M. Gibson Phone 3-7S92 



P. O. Box 428 Telephone 3-4101 



Fresno Republican Printery Co. 

JACK GIBSON Leon H. Camy, President 

.■■•..«..«„....,. PRINTING • BOOKBINDING 

AUTOMOBILES 

Y & E Filinf Systems • Loose Leaf Devices 
747 BLACKSTONE AVENUE FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 2 130 KERN STREET FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



ROOFING BUILDING MATERIALS INSUUVTION 

McCLUNG ROOFING CO. CHRISMAN'S PHARMACY 

Office 428 So. Recreation Street - Phone 5-14S9 DRUGS AND FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

Store and Warehouse 5087 Ventura Avenue 

2448 Stanislaus Street Phone 2-3510 

FRESNO 2. CALIFORNIA 
Milton C. McClung Fred M. McClung FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5-1459 Phone 5-0835 



L. H. HANSEN & SON JAS. W. McALLISTER CO., Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS r-L t Ttl xL 

C nrysler Flymoutn 

313 Palm Ave. Phone 4-6586 

2412 Fresno Street 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



GROWDON BROS. PAPER CO. 

"Paper Specialists" 



Phone 2-95 76 



DUNBAR BROS. ELECTRIC 



STATIONERY - WRAPPING PAPERS - SCHOOL SUPPLIES POWER AND LIGHT INSTALLATIONS 

JANITORIAL SUPPLIES - SUNDRIES - NOTIONS SERVICING • REPAIRS 

710 BROADWAY FRFSNO CAI IFOHNIA 164 Blackstone Avenue 

BKUAL.WAT h KtbNU, LALIhUKNlA pR£SNO CALIFORNIA 



Paul T. Albin Roy D. Stancoff 

ALSTAN ELECTRIC CO. BRAY FLOORCRAFT CO. 

LIGHTING FIXTURES LINOLEUM :: ASPHALT TILE 

APPLIANCES ' 

741 Divisadero Street Telephone 3-8341 

192S Merced Street Phone 2-7228 .-or-ovi,-^ r-Ai lc■r^DMl a 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



CTI \/CD rDr\XIT IDEAL HOUSE CLEANING— ALL TYPES 

aiLVtK rKUfN i BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL 

DINNERS AND COCKTAILS 

Phone 3-3871 W. A. CLAPP 

475 No. FIRST STREET FRESNO. CALIF. Phone 2-6784 2031 HAMMOND 



Page 48 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL May. 1943 



WELL DRILLING & REPAIRING 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



EAGLE CAFE 

HOME COOKING - ALWAYS PLEASES 



W. E. PANNETT 8c SONS 

North Ave. - First House East of Cherry Dii/Isadero near Broadway 

Rt. 5. Box 1S9-B Phone 4-8689 FRESNO CALlFOPvNlA 



TRESNO CALIFORNIA 



FINK FURNITURE CO. BLACKBURN AUTO PARTS CO. 

NEW AND USED FURNITURE TRUCKS :: AUTOMOBILES :: TRAILERS 

,,-,. Q . Phone 4-2817 

1134 Broadway 

f^f7^^.■Q CALIFORNIA HIGH\VAY 99 at OVERPASS FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



YOSEMITE CAFE BILL'S LIQUOR STORE 



Ope.1 Day and Night 

BREAKFASf • LUNCHEON • DINNER • and A LA CARTE 

STEAKS • CHOPS • WAFFLES • CHOICE FOODS 

GOOD SERVICE • REASONABLE PRICES 

1151 Broadway Phone 3-27S9 

IKESNO CALIFORNIA 

G no R chard.; Home 215 West Clinton 

Telephone 3-2771 



WE ARE IN THE BEST 
OF SPIRITS 

First Street at Olive Ave. , Phone 3-3395 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



RICHARDS FRESNO AUTO PARTS CO. 



TRUCKING - EXCAVATING - PAVING - SHOVELS 
DUMP TRUCKS - DRAGLINES - ROCK - SAND 

383 Thome Phone 3-4008 

I RESNO CALIFORNIA 



COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES 
560 Broadway Phone 3-3246 



Hug!tes Hotel BIdg. Earl Martin 



WESTERN SURPLUS STORES MARTIN'S 

District Stores in Western Communities Since I^>2U 

FRESNO DISTRICT STORE Phone 4-4540 



1135 Broadway Street Fresno 4-8210 

I UESNO ( ALIFORNIA 

lies. Phone 4-1324 Bus. Phone 3-1765 

LEON S. VARDEMAN 



FRESNO'S FINEST ARMENIAN FOODS 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

EVERYTHING FOR THE SPORTSMAN 

MID VALLEY 



USED CARS SPORTS CENTER 



Lot No. I Lot No. 2 

1710 Broadway 1739 Oivisadero 



1302 Van Ness 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA I RESNO CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Plione 2-7131 Res. Phone 50539 

THOMPSON 8C DUCEY 



FRESNO LUMBER CO. 

AND WRECKING 



CHRIS-CRAFT BOATS - SPORTING GOODS - HARDWARE PLUMBING, ELECTRICAL, HARDWARE and BUILDING MATERIAL 

SEIBERLING TIRES - PLANING MILL - SASH AND DOORS 

A Name You Can Trust in Ruhber 

Highway 99 at Malaga Phone 3-2139 

19SS Broadway FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Frederick S. Siebert Lloyd W. Gleim 

JOHNNIE'S SANDWICHES SIEBERT PUMP and MACHINE CO. 

PREMIER PUMPS 
FINE FOODS SALES AND SERVICE 

., „, J -r r- . . o DEEP WELL TURBINES 

Al X KI.eae. and Tom Con.t.ntmo. Prop.. ^^^^^ PRESSURE SYSTEMS 

II4« Bro>dw>v 2>32 Elm Avenue Phone 3-6625 

"^ -■■--— rursMn CALIFORNIA 



Wong S. Chin, Manager Phone 2-8618 Hugh M. Burns Earl L. Blair 

NEW SHANGHAI CAFE SULLIVAN-BURNS-BLAIR 

CHOW MEIN - CHOP SUEY FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

CHINESE DISHES pho„e 2-4188 

15 38 TULARE STREET FRESNO. CALIFORNIA Van Ness al San Joaquin FRESNO. CALIF. 



Mav, 194S 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



Dr. J. E. Van Sant 



Telephone 2-5231 Bus. Phone 3.4525 



VAN SANT LABORATORY 

LIVESTOCK MINERALS AND VACCINES 



FORREST NOEL GARAGE 



2229 FRESNO STREET FRESNO I. CALIFORNIA 

Experimental Farm: Telephone 3-0568. Whilesbridge and 

Marks Avenue. Fresno. California 2422 KERN 



GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 
CADILLAC-OLDS SPECIALISTS 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



ALSTROM 8C WIEBE'S 

COLLEGE PHARMACY 

1414 North Van Ness Phone 3-2127 



O. W. PEARSON COMPANY 

REALTORS 
REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE • LOANS 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phona 3-41SI 



122 5 BROADWAY 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



FRANK J. SANDERS CO. 

D. F. (Woody) Woodruff, Sales Manager 
"YOUR DEPENDABLE CAR DEALER" 



TIRES— NEW, USED AND RECAPPED 

Wholesale and Retail 

ALL SIZES, PASSENGER AND TRUCK 

The Largest Passenger Tire Recapping Plant in Fresno 

COMMERCIAL TIRE SALES 



3000 East Tulare Phone 2-369S Telephone Fresno 3-7S18 

1325 "L" STREET FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



C. J. "Cal" Nephew 



BUSINESSES 

Any size, any kind, anywhere. Whether you wish to buy. sell or PORTABLE BRAKE SERVICE 



trade, this office can- serve you promptly and efficiently. 

HARRY SEYMOUR 



LET A SPECIALIST REPAIR YOUR 
HYDRAULIC BRAKE SYSTEM 



LICENSED BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY BROKER 

1911 Merced Street Phone 3-220S 2211 Merced Street 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



Phone 2-1621 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

BOHEMIAN DISTRIBUTING CO. 



Harry Moradian 



Henry Moradian 



MORADIAN INSURANCE AGENCY 



1229 F. Street 



Phone 2-7113 



Phone 4-6544 Res. S-2269 

209-211 Fulton Fresno Bldg. 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



A. L. MARTIN 

REAL ESTA T E 
INSURANCE - LOANS - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



MARION NINE LUMBER CO. 

COMPLETE BUILDING MATERIALS 



Clovis & Ventura Ave. 



Phone 5-0421 



Phones: Office 2-7173; Res. 5-2281 FRESNO 

1707 FULTON STREET FRESNO I. CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



WM. P. (Bill) STEITZ 

USED CARS 

(Formerly New Car Dealer) 



LLOYD MOLLER LIQUOR STORE 

2240 Blackstone. Corner Vassar 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED WINES AND LIQUORS 
HUNTING AND FISHING GOODS 



L Street at Tuolumne Telephone 3-0241 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA FREE DELIVERY 



Phone 2-5600 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



MERCANTILE ACCEPTANCE CO. 



Langendorf United Bakeries, Inc." 

CAKE AND COOKIE DIVISION 



1406 Broadway Phone 4-3548 



2422 Kern Street 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-33 15 

STRAUB SEED STORE & NURSERY 
PRODUCERS DAIRY DELIVERY, Inc. 

DISTRIBUTORS OF HIGH GRADE DAIRY PRODUCTS >F IT GROWS WE HAVE IT 

717 VOORMAN AVE., near Broadway FRESNO. CALIF. 4823 EAST TULARE FRESNO. CALIF. 



Page JO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1948 



Some Arc True and Some Are False — Rate Yourself 



(Continued from last issue) 

51. Photography represents one of the most important 
sides to criminal investigation, whether it concerns the 
exact production of the scene of the crime or the nu- 
merous laboratory methods in which it plays an im- 
portant role. 

52. Latent fingerprints are impressions of the fingers made 
with colorless substances from the skin which make it 
impossible to be seen with the naked eye. 

5 3. Both powder and iodine fumes are used to develop 
latent fingerprints. 

54. Generally footprints should he photographed before 
making casts. 

55. Fingernails should be carefully examined in cases of 
criminal investigation, especially in case of sex crimes. 

56. Many burglaries, robberies and larcenies are prear- 
ranged and fraudulent. 

57. A knowledge of the methods of operation of criminals 
is essential to conduct successful investigations. 

58. It is easy to determine the age of chromatic ink in 
questioned documents. 

59. It is easier to detect an erasure on a document when 
accomplished with ink eradicator than it is if the 
erasure was made with a knife. 

It is impossible to determine accurately that a certain 
typewriter was used in the preparation of a typed 
document. 

SUPERVISION 
Supervision in police work, besides determining 
whether the man is actually on duty, includes the 
manner in which he performs his duty, his attitude 
and his competence. 

A sergeant must expect to stand or fall through results 
achieved by those under his supervision. 

63. A competent supervisor will come to know the mental 
and physical habits and limitations of his men. 

64. Every individual in a group has the right to act ac- 
cording to what he thinks is right. 
A subordinate would be justified in showing disrespect 
to a superior who, he feels, shows partiality. 
Most men will welcome constructive criticism of their 
work or actions from their supervisor. 

67. Any policeman thoroughly familiar with the work of 
the department would make gocxl officer material. 

68. It is the responsibility of the sergeant to see that his 
orders are carried out. 

6V. Ixiyalty is strengthened in an organization when sub- 
ordinates feel that their sergeant will support them 
daily in the face of criticism by their superiors and 
others. 

70. Courtesy diminishes the effectiveness of reprimand. 

71. Self confidence is a strong factor in the sergeant's abil- 
ity to handle the men under him. 

72. Justice in a superior means that he must be a severe 
disciplinarian. 

7.3. Suppression of the humorous instinct in men is neces- 
sary for a sergeant to maintain his dignity. 



6(J 



61 



62 



65 



66 



74. Enforcement of discipHne, to be effective, must be 
entirely impersonal. 

75. A sergeant will obtain better results in supervision 
when he takes a friendly interest in his men. 

76. Any rule that is instituted for a good purpose is cer- 
tain to be a popular rule or regulation. 

77. Each new man needs instruction in the proper conduct 
of his duties regardless of his personal ability. 



VALLEY PIPE 8C SUPPLY CO. 

PLUMBING - HEATING - INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES 

507 Broadway Telephone 3-721 S 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



STRAUSS' 



909 Fulton Street 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Frank Kandarian 
and Bob Hovey 



Phone 2-0514 



MASTER RADIATOR WORKS 

UNITED MOTORS SERVICE 

REPAIRING - RECORING - CLEANING 

NEW AND USED RADIATORS 



616 BROADWAY 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



NEW ENGLAND 
SHEET METAL WORKS 



400 Broadway Phone 3-6422 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



ARAN JOSEPH 



1 90S Kern Phone 3-4447 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO NEON SIGN CO. 



JOHN McKENZIE, Mfr. 



31 1 Broadway 2-4679 



FRESNO 



Telephone 2-4679 

CALIFORNIA 



Geo. A. Fisher Ernest Cochrane 

ERNEST COCHRANE 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

SEE US FOR INSURANCE 



620 Fulton-Fretno BIdg. 



FRESNO 



Phone 3-5269 

CALIFORNIA 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page SI 



78. A good sergeant wall gain the respect of his men with- 
out demanding it. 

79. Regularity' in inspection by a sergeant is unnecessar>' 
if he has a good force of men under him. 

80. Subordinates interest in routine duties is increased by 
pointing out the relationship of each task to the work 
as a whole. 

81. A sergeant who has a wavering will, but outstanding 
initiative, would be highly successful. 

82. Because your department performs functions control- 
ling the activities of a large portion of the public, you 
should try to impress a person with the fact that your 
department is more important than an individual who 
is affected by its actions. 

83. An effective method of developing good morale is to 
make certain that employees understand the whys and 
wherefore of their duties. 

84. A superior who generally deliberates at length before 
rendering his decision thereby gains great respect of 
his subordinates. 



BOYAJIAN and CHITJIAN 

REAL ESTATE BROKERS 



FRESNO 



916 Broadway 



CALIFORNI.A 



Phone Bus. 4-3447 p^^g j 7452 

SHEPPARD RUG COMPANY 

PAT SHEPPARD. .Manager 
Onsntal and DDme5t:c Rugs Cleaned and Repaired by Native Experts 
.„, 5!K'.^r>T,*, " Upholstered Furniture Cleaned - Moth Proofing 



401 BROADWAY 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



SUN VALLEY PIES 

D. C. Welch & L. A. Bachman, Props. 
226 No. H Street Phone 2-7223 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNI.A 



HARDYS FRESNO THEATRES 



M A Y F A I R 

Maple at Butler 

LYCEUM 
1019 "F" Street 



HARDY'S 
944 Van Ness Ave. 

FULTON 
1139 Fulton Street 



COMFORT 



COURTESY 



SERVICE 



INLAND 
Showcase 8C Fixture Co. 

DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS 
1473 Thesta Street Phone 3-5313 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



!M6 TEHEMA STREET 



PETERMAN 8C McCOY 

WELL DRILLING :: PUMP SALES 

Phone 4-2308 or 4-9472 

"CASING FREE" 

FRESNO. CALIF 



GLEN C. STATER CO. 

HUDSON DISTRIBUTOR 
J462 roadway Phone 2-5101 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



J. A. Brown 



Yard 2-6284 
Home 2-7S12 



FRESNO HOUSE MOVERS 

Yard at 
WHITESBRIDGE BETWEEN FRUIT AND TIELMAN 



Res. 4 58 THESTA 



P. SCHWABENLAND 

FORD TRACTOR 
DEARBORN FARM EQUIPMENT 



1940 H Street 



FRESNO 



Phone 4-4673 



Dr. F. L. R. Burks and Staff 



701 T. W. Patterson BIdg. 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



DR. DORIS H. HICKS 

DENTIST 

Phone 3-3197 
New Address 1941 Fresno Street 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



CALIFORNI.A 



Telephone 3-8325 



Res. S-2S26 



Dr. DeVan A. Denny 

CHIROPRACTOR 
315 North Van Ness Avenue 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Willow and Harvey Corner 



Phone 5-13«l 



ED SEVERIN, Well Drilling 



DR. P. S. CHING, M.D. 



AT YOUR SERVICE 



5585 Harvey Avenue 



3100 Tulare 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Herb Sanders Byron Curlee 

THE FRONTIER 

COCKTAILS -::- DINNERS 
1350 Blackstone Phone 3-9732 



REX THEATRE 

PICTURES IN SPANISH 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 909 F STREET 



FRESNO I. CALIF. 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



.May, 194S 



85. A newly appointed superior should proceed aggres- 
sively to dominate an employee who appears insubordi- 
nate, 

86. An order should be phrased in clear unambiguous 
language. 

87. A well conducted organization should provide direct 
and well understood channels for handHng grievances 
of the entire personnel. 

88. A sergeant by criticizing a delinquent patrolman he- 
fore his fellow patrolman, will impress the fault upon 
the entire group and secure more efficient service from 
the group as a whole, as well as stimulate the delin- 
quent to perform his job more efficiently. 

89. Orders put in the form of a request will get less co- 
operation from the men than if they were made in the 
form of a command. 

90. To hesitate or partially carry out orders is as unde- 
sirable as disobedience. 

PENAL CODE 

91. Lack of criminal intent is sufficient to disprove the 
commission of crime. 

92. A crime ordinarily classified as a felony may or may 
not be considered such if committed by a drunken 
person. 

93. Parties to a crime are either principals or accessories. 

94. A person may be prosecuted for perjury even though 
he was not competent to give the testimony, deposition, 
or certificate of which falsehocxl is alleged. 

95. A person who wilfully prevents a witness from at- 

Telrphone 2-9511 E. H. McNabb 

FRESNO GLASS COMPANY 

MIRRORS -:: GLASS FOR ALL PURPOSES 



ni4 liROADWAY 



FRESNO. CALIK. 



GRAYSON'S 

BEAUTIFUL DRESSES - COATS and SUITS 

LINGERIE - HOSIERY 

Will Be Pleased to Serve You 

Telephone Fresno 2-7259 

022 FULTON STRLET FRESNO I. CALIF. 

Your Friend, the Friendly Grocery Clerk 

\'ou will find him or her in your Grocery Store wearing a 

R. C 1. A. button. A. F. of L. 

GEORGE KISLINC, Secretary 

R. C. I, A., Local 1288 FRESNO. CALIF. 



DOTTY DEAN 



Smart DRESSES - COATS - SUITS - SPORTSWEAR 

1053 and 1057 FULTON SIREET FRESNO I.CALIF. 



lel.phonr ) 1154 



Nite Phon.- 2 249! 



ELECTRIC MOTOR SHOP 

MOTORS SOLD, REPAIRED. REWOUND 
ELECTRICAL WIRING 

l'>28 KFRN SIKEET FRESNO. CALIF. 



M. GUYNN 



Phone 4-2123 



FRESNO AUTO TRIMMING 

TAILOR-MADE SEAT COVERS 



2420 W..\SIIINGTON SI REE I 



FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



JOSEPHINE FURNITURE CO. 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 
922 Van Ne«« Phone 4-6595 



1625 BROADWAY 



LeMOSS-SMITH TIRE CO. 

Distributors GENERAL TIRES 
KRAFT SYSTEM RECAPPING 
Sales and Service 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



DR. NORMAN C. SMITH 

CHIROPODIST -::- FOOT SURGEON 



Phone 3-7724 

T. W. PATTERSON BLDG. 



Res. 2-4826 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



F. P. SCHUTZ PAINT CO. 

CONTRACTORS 
PAINTING - PAPER HANGING 



Phone 3-2277 
2427 STANISLAUS STREET 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



Phone 4-4326 

RELIABLE APPLIANCE SERVICE 

WASHING MACHINES, SEWING MACHINES AND ALL 

SMALL APPLIANCES REPAIRED 

2 16 N. 1st STREET FRESNO, CALIF. 



Meivin Bomprezzi, Mgr. 



Phone J -2800 



VILLA D'lTALIA 

CAFE AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



ON THE CIRCLE opp. Roeding Park 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



GEO. M. McINTYRE 

1041 Fulton Street 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



NELSON'S ODDITY SHOP 

ANTIQUES — PERIOD AND PROVINCIAL FURNITURE 

REFINISHING AND RESTORING 

2027 San Joaquin Phone 4-1988 

ALLEY ENTRANCE FRESNO, CALIF. 

Gatha Coppin, Prop. Phone 2-4801 

PARAMOUNT BEAUTY SALON 

WHERE BEAUTY SERVICE IS PERSONALIZED 

203 1 KERN STREET FRESNO, CALIF. 



JAKE'S CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS -::- BEER AND WINE 



FRESNO 



1043 Broadway 



Phone 2-8324 



CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY CLOTHING STORE 



908 Broadway Phone 3-2853 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 34963 



Res. Phone 4 I 176 



PELL MOTORS 



H. Foster Pell, Owner 
SALES AND SERVICE - USED CARS - AUTO ACCESSORIES 

1526 FULTON STREET FRESNO I, CALIF. 

JOE CARDINALE 

Electronic Engineering Service 
AUTO. HOME AND AIRCRAFT RADIOS 



1555 FULTON STREET 



Telephone 4-6372 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



Phone 3-0213 FREE DELIVERY 

GOLDEN STATE MARKET 

Macgiore Bros. 
We Carry a Complete Line of 

GROCERIES. MEATS AND FEED 

106 WHITES BRIDGE ROAD FRESNO. CALIF. 



BYRON JACKSON CO. 

PUMPS 
356 No. H Street 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Mdv, J 948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page ?i 



tending a trial is guilty of subornation of perjury. 

96. A police officer is restricted by law from treating any 
prisoner in his custody in an inhuman manner. 

97. The law provides that any public officer who under 
color of authority, without legal necessity, assaults or 
beats any person shall be removed from office. 

98. Crimes may never be compromised. 

99. When no penalty is prescribed by any statute for a 
public offense, the act or commission is punishable as a 
misdemeanor. 

100. To prove a charge of manslaughter the party must 
die within six months after the cause of death is ad- 
ministered. 



Leon Saffatelian 



Phone 4-4014 



THE OLD FRESNO BAR & STEAK HOUSE 

Th- Best In Food and Dr'nks 
IF YOU MUST DRINK, SEE LEON; HE HAS THE BEST 

1825 MARIP OSA STREET FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

PLEASONTON CAFE and 
COFFEE SHOPPE 

SERVING GOOD FOOD ALWAYS 
lOIS Broadway Telephone 2-5816 



FRESNO 



CALIFCNIA 



FRESNO 



R. S. BROWNE 
Good Used Cars 

444 445 Blackstone Phone 4-1440 



CALIFORNIA 



D. M. Madsen 



L. A. John 



BLACKSTONE LUMBER CO. 

QUALITY LUMBER 
HARDWARE, PAINTS, BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 



ruESNO 



1333 Blackstone 



Phone 3-8002 



CALIFORNIA 



CETTFS IGA STORE 

GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS 
WINES AND LIQUORS 



Corner Fresno and C Streets 



FRESNO 



Phone 3-4327 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone: Shop 5-3663 



N'ght 4-8553 



CHILSON MOTOR SHOP 

24 HOUa SERVICE ON ALL REWINDS 

UP 10 125 H.P. 

ALL KINDS OF MOTOR REWINDING 

AND REPAIRING 



Merv Otteson, Own>-r 

El:ctrical Contractor 

and Supplies 



Dave Hurst. Mgr. 
3^105 Ventura Ave. 
FRESNO, CALIF. 



PAINT WITH TREASURE TONES 
WALL PAPER • WINDOW SHADES 

JACK LUCEY 

PA'NT DISTRIBUTOR 
Fhones: 4-5903-4; 4-0182 



1463 NO. VAN NESS 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



PAUL'S SHOE STORE 



BENGSTON-HOLT LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER, BUILDING MATERIALS. ETC. 
Phone 3-3291 



355 FULTON STREET 



FRESNO 14. CALIFORNIA 



Harry Miktarian 



Phone 2-2208 



Johnny Oberti 



CLUB BRAZIL 

FINEST COCKTAIL LOUNGE IN FRESNO 

1055 BROADWAY FRESNO, CALIF. 

OIL FILTER SERVICE CO. 

Factory Representatives 

ROL-PAK OIL FILTERS 

LINCOLN LUBRICATING EQUIPMENT 

ENSIGN PRODUCTS 



2490 Railroad Ave. 



Phone 2-6811 



BUCK'S MARKET 

COMPLETE LINE 
Blackstone and Indianapolis Phone 3-1497 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



STEITZ MARKET 

UNITED GROCERS 

GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS 

We Specialize in Homemade Sausages 

2138 California Ave. Telephone 4.284 1 FRESNO. CALIF. 



2020 Tulare Phone 2 5723 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



SCHEDLER 6c DENSMORE 

MOTOR REBUILDERS 
AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE WORK 



624 Broadway Phone 2 7592 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



WALTER SMITH 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING 
Tulare and Broadway 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL CITY GARAGE 

AUTOMOTIVE RECONSTRUCTION 
24-HOUR SERVICE 



P33 Broadway Phone 2-2451 



FRF.SMO 



CALIFO-^NIA 



AMERICAN &. PARISIAN LAUNDRIES 

Francis Bernad'cou, Manager 

721 B ackstone Ave. Branch 3221 E. Tulare 

Phones 3-4264 • 2-8214 - 2-9605 FRESNO 3. CALIF. 



Page 54 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL May. 1948 



Bus. Phone 3-0543 Res. Phone 3-7428 

Ambrose Bros. Tavern Tjr\j^r: 

,02. Broadway O. L. WILLHOITE 

also GORDON PRESSURE SYSTEMS, MOTORS AND PUMPS 

REPAIR SERVICE FOR ALL MAKES 
nrtip RltZ C^Oclctail LoUnCC Electric and Plumb^n? Supplies - Pipe and Fittings 

Day and Night Water Heaters 
2025 Fresno Street 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 440 NORTH H STREET FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 

PIERSON 8C PIERSON jg^j^Y C. FARRAR 

INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 

cAics . <:FRVirF CONSTRUCTION :: AGGREGATE PRODUCTION 

SALts .. stKVii-E. LAND DEVELOPMENT :: GRADING 

Phone 2-5615 1333 Broadway 

Shields, near 99 Highway 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA Clovis Hi-way, Between Ventura and Tulare 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



PARKER-CALIFORNIA AGENCY ANDREW D. WHELCHEL 

Earle V. Parker, Manager 

QUALITY USED CARS 
THE MINNESOTA MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. CASH. TERMS OR TRADE 

All Makes and Models Bought and Sold 

Phone: 3-4157 

, ^„.,„ , ^.,,^„„.,.. 922 Blackstonc Phone 4-3335 

358, )i9 BRIX BLDG. FRESNO I. CALIFORNIA FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 3-1617 Emergency 2-4420 

VERNE H. SANDERS CO. ^^ ^ CHEFFINS CO. 

Used L^ars commercial air conditioning, wine cooling 

AND HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT 

„ ^ , Day and Night Service 

2939 East Tulare 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 22 iR TULARE STREET FRESNO. CALIF. 



R. S. GIBSON, Automobiles BUSSEY WELL PIPE WORKS 

Haig Davidian, Manager 

1860 Broadway Phone 2-2200 p|a„, chestnut at Grant 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5-0536 

Sno t.RANT AVENUE I RESNO 2. CALIF. 



REAL ESTATE LOANS 



PUMPS HARDWARE 

Specializing in 
HIGH CLASS VINEYARDS 

^''c?T^^R^5p|^Tms" FRESNO AGRICULTURAL WORKS 

O. S. FASSETT TULARE and L STS.. FRESNO 

Res. Phone 5-2S28 Phone 2-7177 

1)15 BROADWAY FRESNO. CALIFORNIA FARM IMPLEMENTS SADDLERY 



Coniplinionts 

TOLEDO SCALES 

Baker & Johnson, Agents N. NIELSEN, JcWelcrS 

SALES AND SERVICE 

1236 Fulton Street 
915 "L" Street Phone: 2-8110 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



^''=^™'5.1LAV.^!J:'^'*'' '"'• THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL 

ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES AND APPLIANCES ■•■""""■ ""'' """■ ^"'" 

LIGHTING FIXTURES AND LAMPS 

WELCOME SOUTHERN PACIFIC MEN 

Telephone 4-4715 

2 MO KERN STREET FRESNO I. CALIFORNIA 1105 BROADWA"!' FRESNO 



C. E. Johnson Phone 4-2953 

Compliments of 

JOHNSON BROTHERS, Inc. 
RUDY'S STORES fairbanks-morse products 

POMONA PUMPS 
CALIFORNIA BROADVl'AY and DINISADERO FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



TRAFFIC SERGEANT SCOTT 

(Continued from page 1 5 ) 
will reduce theft and subsequently bring about a propor- 
tionate reduction in juvenile delinquency. 

In a seven-year survey, the sergeant points out that 
the average value of the stolen car in the United States 
was $7.VV In the first half of 1946 the total loss in stolen 
property was $60, i^ 12,8 H. There are 12 million insur- 
ance policies insuring cars against theft, fire, and other 
potentials, and if increased protection against theft ac- 
complishes a reduction of even $1 per policy, he argues, the 
over-all annual saving to auto owners and the reduced 
expenditure of tax money because of the rduced number 
of investigations and prosecutions would run into millions 
of dollars annually. 

FBI reports which show 662 cars were stolen every 
day in the United States last year move Sergeant Scott 
to ask, "How many of the cars were stolen by youths 
who were never arrested? Have some of these young 
people found auto stealing so easy that it has started 
them on careers of habitual crime? How many of these 
cars chasing at madcap speeds and with total disregard 
of traffic rules, operated for the most part by immature, 
inexperienced, thrill-seeking youths, are responsible for 
highway deaths and stupenduous costs in damages to 
automobiles?" 

Ver>' much in line with the sergeant's campaign is an 
editorial from the Fresno Bee of December 21, 1945 : 

"Help yourself." Without condoning the activities of 
a group of 13- to 17-year-old Fresno boys who stole 18 
automobiles, it is fitting to say the car owners got exactly 
the inconvenience they deserved. 

"The youths" explanation, in fact, borders on the ac- 
ceptable. They told officers. 'If the keys were in them. 



G. A. HART, Well Drilling 

WORK GUARANTEED 
1824 N. Calaveras Phone 3-8447 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Phone 4-4797 Res. Phone S-1906 

Member Sheriff's Posse 



WERNER'S MARKET 

GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 
Lewis Werner. Rt. 3. Box 280 



SEVENTH AND VENTURA AVE. 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



Valley Electric Motor Service 

COMPLETE ELECTRIC MOTOR SERVICE 
MOTORS REPAIRED and REWOUND 

Authorized D'stributor For 
DELCO and SUNLIGHT MOTORS nnd PARTS 



Mono and S 



Phone 3-1796 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



BLACK AND WHITE CAB CO. 



1861 Broadway Phone 4-5045 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-7842 



OPEN SUNDAYS 



FINE GENERAL STORE 

GROCERY - MEATS - FEED - HARDWARE 
Ray Massm'nster & Chas. Pollock 



CHESTrOUT & FRONT STREET 



MALAGA. CALIF. 



J & J SERVICE 



GROCERIES 
GAS 



FRESNO 



FRESH MEATS AND VEGETABLES 
OIL • BEER • WINES 



Phone 47600 
Corner Elm and Manning 



CHARLES KLINT & CO. 

HINMAN MILKING MACHINES 

INTERNATIONAL ELECTRIC FENCERS 

ACME STEAM GENERATORS 



CALIFORNIA ''41 SANTA FE AVE 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRESNO 



FRESNO 



SANS SOUCI 

FOR BETTER EATING AND DRINKING 



310 Belmont 



Phone 3-S620 



CALIFORNIA 



LAYNE & BOWLER 

DEEP WELL PUMPS 



I960 H STREET 



Phone 3-3214 



CALIFORNIA 



Phom 5-2488 



NEW YORK CLUB 

Corner of Kern and Broadway 
MIXED DRINKS AND EATS 

MUSIC BY FORD LEWIS 
The Wonder Valley Cowboy 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



C. "POP" LAVAL 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 
Established 1912 



314 No. Van Ness 



P. O. Box 387 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



YEE PHARMACY 

1534 Tulare Street Phone 4-4218 



VIRGINIA HOTEL 

2125 Kern 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



we would just get in and drive away.' And they further 
said they could have joy-ridden in a number of others, 
all parked unlocked and with the ignition keys in them. 

"That none of the cars were damaged or stripped is 
the owner's good fortune. The city police officers and 
highway patrolmen, along with other agencies, insurance 
concerns, auto clubs, etc., were unavoidably imposed upon 
was unfortunate. 

"Despite their mischief, the six boys should be credited 
for setting two examples. 

"Their arrest is a warning to other youngsters to forego 
the temptation occasioned by grown-ups" carelessness and 
emphasizes the risk taken by a motorist who leaves a 
virtual 'Help Yourself sign in his car." 

State laws which prohibit leaving keys in cars are now 
in effect in Colorado, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Wyo- 
ming, and the District of Columbia. Sergeant Scott's 
plan is to amend Section 595 of the California Vehicle 
Code as follows: 

"No person driving, or in control ot, or in charge of, 
or in ch.irge of, a motor vehicle shall permit it to stand 
unattended without first effectively setting the brakes 
thereon, stopping the motor thereof, loc\fng the ignition 
viechanism thereof, and removing the ignition }{eys there 
from, except that commercial vehicles, while actually en- 
gaged in making deliveries, shall he required only to 
have the hral{es effectively set thereon when left un- 
attended." 

The bill. Assembly Bill 76, introduced to the state 
assembly on March 1 ^th this year and postponed for 
further action until the next session of the legislature be- 
cause it was not considered an emergency measure, says 
further: 

"The State is experiencing a sudden and unprecedented 
growth in the crime rate, particularly with respect to 
the offense of motor vehicle theft. A large number of 
the perpetrators of this crime are juvenile persons who 
are led into infractions by the negligent practice of motor 
vehicle operators leaving automobiles unattended with the 
ignition mechanism in a condition for ready use. Juvenile 
delinquency is now of such proportions as to be a matter 
of grave concern to the State; and therefore, this act is 
urgently needed in the interest of the public peace and 
s:ifety as a measure tending to reduce the crime rate and 
ameliorate the problem of juvenile delinquency." 

It is Sergeant Scott's hope that all California peace 
officers realize the need for the law and will support its 
passage at the coming session of the legislature. 



Paul Oaxaca, Prop 



Phone 4-3677 



PAUL'S AUTO WRECKING 

Wh t;'s Bridge Road, Opp. Air Port 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR WRECKED CARS 
USED TIRES AND PARTS 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



PACKARD FRESNO CO. 

1117 N Street 
ASK THE MAN WHO OWNS ONE 



Compliments of 

R I C H T E R S 



701 Broadway 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



BRUGETTI ICE CO. 

Margaret Brugetti, Manager 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL ICE DEALERS 

Lockers for Rent, Available at All Times 
Larger Storage If Desired 



1618 B Street 



Phone 2-0102 



CALIFORNIA 



ZIVANICH AUTO SERVICE 

"Complete Automotive Service" 

SPECIAL RATES ON GASOLINE AND 
REPAIRS TO ASSOCIATION MEMBERS 



FRESNO 



First and lll'nois 



Phone 3-2818 



CALIFORNIA 



PORTABLE ELECTRIC WELDER 

Service Welding and Boiler Shop 

WILL GO ANYWHERE ANY TIME 
Phone 2-9926 



i 



Fred Graham, Phone 5 0827 
250 I'ROADWA'l 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



VOLPA BROTHERS 

TOP AND FILL DIRT 

Truck Mounted Cranes - Decomposed Granite - Excavating and 
Grading - Concrete, Sand and Gravel 



549 So. Frul 



FRESNO 



Phones 3-4542 - 3-1316 

CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



SHEPPARD-KNAPP-APPLETON, Inc. 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
1301 Broadway Phone 2-7151 



CALIIORNIA 



NICK RICCI 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTOR 



Phone 4-1882 
^120 DIVISADERO STREET 



FRESNO i. CAI.IF. 



fRESNO 



TRAVELER HOTEL 

STEAM HEAT . WEEKLY RATES 
1812 Tulare Phone 3 3171 



( IIOWCIIILLA 



THE HOME OF 

FETER'S SHOES 

FOR THE FAMILY 

WASEMILLER'S 

f|(, r .STREET • FRESNO 
AVENAL 



RI\ERDALE 



McSHERRY 8c COMPANY 

GENERAL INSURANCE 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



Patterson BIdg. 



Phone 2-4821 



CALIFORNIA 



Mav, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



MAYFAIR CAFE 

FINE QUALITY FOODS SERVED DAY AND NIGHT 
1137 Broadway Phone 3-1310 



PHILIP S. BUCKINGHAM 

Architect 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



1922 Clinton 



CALIFORNIA 



SERVICE PHARMACY 

Elgin and Harley Foulke 
PROFESSIONAL PHARMACISTS 



148 North First Street Phone 3-7154 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



STATE CENTER WAREHOUSE 

AND 

COLD STORAGE CO., Inc. 

GENERAL STORAGE :: DISTRIBUTORS 
747 R Street Phooe 4-2889 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



SERVICE AMUSEMENTS, Inc. 



457 N. Fresno Street 



Phone 3-7037 



SMITH PHOTO SERVICE 

WHOLESALE PHOTO FINISHING 
ONE DAY SERVICE 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



312 Blackstone 



Phone 2-9757 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC COAST AGGREGATES, Inc. 

TRANSITMIX CONCRETE - ROCK - SAND - GRAVEL 
BUILDING MATERIALS 



FRESNO 



2150 "G" Street 
Ph. 3-5168 



414 "P" Street 
Ph. 4-3065 

CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



SWING CLUB 

presents continuous 

FLOOR SHOW 

8 P. M. to 2 A. M. 
TRY OUR LUNCHES AND DINNERS 

Phone 2-8169 • 1041 Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



John and Tommy Halagan 



Phone 3-2820 



FRESNO 



HALAGAN'S TROPICS 

NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT 
1130 Broadway 



FORTIER TRANSPORTATION CO. 

Telephone 4-4773 



East and Jensen Avenue 



CALIFORNI.A 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



In Fresno It's 

DANTE'S RESTAURANT 

ITALIAN DINNERS UNSURPASSED 

Catering to 
BANQUETS AND DINNER PARTIES 



RAGLE'S PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTIONS -:: ETHICAL PHARMACIST 

Sick Room Supplies - Drugs - Sundries 

Fountain Service - Cigars 



FRESNO 



1205 Fresno Street 



Phone 3-3873 



CALIFORNI.A 



FRESNO 



3141 Palm 



Phone 2-6327 



CALIFORNIA 



PINE LOGGING CO. OF CALIF. 

SUGAR AND PONDEROSA PINE 
FIR AND CEDAR 

Maple Avenue and Floradora 



GOLDEN STATE BAKING CO. 



104 Belmont 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Tom Bonnetti Owner 



Phone 3-3146 



San Joaquin Battery and Electric Co. 

Zenith, Carter and Stromberg Carburetors - Motor Tune-up 

Delco-Remy and Auto Lite Generators and Starters 

Magneto Sales and Service - Auto Lite Batteries 



RIDGE MOTOR SHOP 

ELECTRIC MOTORS REWOUND AND REPAIRED 
WE BUY USED MOTORS 



14.44 WAN NESS 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRESNO 



1440 Van Ness 



Phone 3-3536 



CALIFORNIA 



1121 VAN NESS 



Compliments of 

MRS. DILLENS BAKERY 

Phone 3-6552 



FRESNO, CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



DR. P. A. SUFFICOOL. D.C. 

Formerly Health Director California Hot Springs 

Successor to Dr. Millman 

125 So. Angus Phone 2-2735 



CALIFORNIA 



Page S8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mav, 1948 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

^Continued from page i) 
his own definite reason for quitting the force — but, in 
the main, we find the underlying reason is lack of courage 
to walk dark streets and alleys in uniform. 

The average citizen has deep respect for a police of- 
ficer, and resents quips about these fine representatives 
of law and order because he feels that he personally 
lacks the courage hidden behind the uniform and star 
of the man who walks a beat — yes, walks a beat, friend- 
less and alone. 

I personally know many ex-police officers and from 
them have learned that their main reason for returning 
to civil life was their sense of the latent danger in policing. 
Only recently a wealthy ex-police officer friend of mine 
of one of our southern cities placed his exit from police 
rank thusly: "On the dark streets, night after night, as 
a rookie cop, I said to myself: 'Where do you get this 
idea that you are a one-man army.' " 

Yes, a police officer is a one-man army. He is alone, 
as to the illegal killers, alone as to maniacs. 

Courage may be difficult of definition; but, in my book, 
a good police officer is a courageous man. 



Geo. C. Maness 



Telephone 6-6731 



COLONIAL MOTOR HOTEL 



60S Union Avenue 



BAKERSFIF.LD 



CALIFORNIA 



JACK 8C J. H. SANDERS 

ALWAYS A GOOD SELECTION OF CARS 
USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 



29SS E. Tulare St. 



Phone 4-2319 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN TORIK 

COMPLETE 
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



FRESNO 



430 Broadway 



Phone 3-1963 



CALIFORNIA 



ROCKOLA & SEEBURG 
Electric Coin Phonographs 



PACKARD PLAY-MOR BOXES 
Music and Amusement Games 



TOWER MUSIC COMPANY 

W. D. Tanner and Son 

COIN OPERATED PHONOGRAPHS 

Phone 3-8941 or 2-4426 1632 Belmont Avenue 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY HOME INSULATION CO. 



PORTERVILLE TULARE 

MERCED 



VISALIA HANFORD 

FRESNO 



Joe L. Daiiiiani 



John A. Mastro Vincent J. Damiani 



JOE L. DAMIANI CO. 

COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICE 
Specializing in Insurance Analysis. Notary Public 



Phones: 4-1019; 4-3037; 3-0977 
7 18 MERCED STREET FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRESNO MEAT PACKING CO. 



LIVESTOCK BUYERS 
WHOLESALE MEATS DEALERS 

Fig and North Ave. Phone 2-61 95 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



FISHER-McNULTY 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



HERMAN 8c TRODESIC 



use Paralell Street 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



FARRIS GARAGE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 
CHRYSLER FLUID DRIVE SPECIALIST 



461 No. H. Street 



Phone 3-1 S30 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4-5897 



FRESNO 



G A R O 

SHOWCASE AND FIXTURE CO. 



307-309 BHmont Ave. 



Phone 2-1331 



CALIFORNIA 



Res 2-7741 Louie Mendicta, Prop 



Phone 3-3810 



BROADWAY MOTORS 

( o r 
FINE USED CARS 



FRESNO 



1635 Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



SERVICE PATTERN & FOUNDRY CO. 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 
Aluminum. Brass and Bronze Castings 

ANdover 1-36333 
2870 CHAPMAN STREET OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



HUGHES SERVICE STATION 

GAS - TIRES - LUBRICATION - BATTERIES 
Open Day and Night 



1822 KERN STREET 



FRESNO I. CALIFORNIA 



J. M. Patton 



Phone 2-5822 



PATTON SHEET METAL WORKS 

HEATING AND VENTILATING CONTRACTOR 

ALL KINDS OF SHEET METAL WORK 

272 PALM AVENUE FRESNO. FARIFORNIA 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page S9 



STANLISLAUS COUNTY HAS SHERIFF'S 
AERIAL SQUADRON 

The first regular meeting of the Sheriff's Aerial Squad- 
ron of Stanislaus county was held at the Hotel Covell_in 
Modesto on Wednesday evening, May 5. 

The meeting was conducted by Archie Taylor, of 
Modesto, who introduced the speakers of the evening : 
Dr. George Chappel, president of the California State 
Federation of Sheriffs Aerial Squadrons and Wilson Mc- 
Cay, secretary of the Federation. 

The Stanislaus county squadron is under the direct 
supervision of Deputy Sheriff Cecil Kilroy. 

Stanislaus County Sheriff Grattan Hogin was present 
and gave an interesting talk. Also in attendance was 
M. Emenegger of the Fresno Aerial Squadron. 

About 20 members of the Stanislaus Aerial Squadron 
was present. 

The Stanislaus County Aerial Squadron is composed 
of licensed pilots and plane owners residing in Turlock, 
Modesto, Patterson, Hughson, Oakdale and La Grande 
districts who have been deputised for duty by Sheriff 
Hogin. They serve without pay and like others through- 
out the State of California they give of their time and 
talents as flyers in the perfection of their work in assist- 
ing the peace officers of the state in law enforcement, 
assuring trained flying personnel and equipment to be 
used in emergency and disaster work. 

The preliminary meeting of the Squadron was held 
last month at the home of Roger Brown of Turlock when 
final plans for the organization were made and a decision 
to affiliate with the State Aerial Posse. 



D. E. (Dusty) Miller H. H. (Chico) Miller 

MILLER BROS. SERVICE 

GAS - OIL - LUBRICATION 

EXPERT AUTO REPAIRS - REBUILT TRANSMISSIONS 

Phone TEmpIebar 4-9636 

639 EAST TENTH STREET OAKLAND 6, CALIF. 



R. W. READE & COMPANY 

PAINTING CONTRACTORS 



BERKELEY 



AShberry 3-1616 



2019 Blake Street 



CALIFORNIA 



TAYLOR and WHEELER 



BUILDERS 



245 Clinton 



Phone 3-7373 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



JORGENSEN CATERING CO. 

WE COOK AND SERVE ALL KINDS OF FOOD TO ANY 
SIZE GATHERING ANYWHERE 

FALS • DISHES, TABLES, CHAIRS, SILVERWARE. Etc. 
ESTIMATES FURNISHED 



2809 Ventura Ave. 



Phone 2-2614 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



JONES AMBULANCE SERVICE 

Owners: Ernie R. Jones - Fred J. Jones 

NO MORTUARY CONNECTION 

It Costs No More to Use the Best 

Phones 3-4136 or 3-4131 

THREE AMBULANCES, OXYGEN EQUIPPED 

Sick Room Rental Service • Oxygen Tent Rental Service 

245 No. BROADWAY FRESNO. CALIF. 



P. O. Box 1867 



Phone 3-1749 



DAVID & SONS 

Roasters and Packers 

PEANUTS. SEEDS, NUTS AND RAISINS 

David Der Hairbedian 



RAILROAD AVENUE. South ol Orange 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRANK C. ANDREWS 

LOCKSMITH 
GUN - SAFE REPAIR AND SERVICE 



1360 Broadway 



Phone 2-8316 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE 



GERALD DIAMOND 



Fulton-Fresno BIdg. 



Phone 2-6491 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNI.A 



CALIFORNIA PRODUCTS CO. 

p. O. Box 311 Phone 3-5147 

Butler and O Street 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



H. E. Scott 



BAY-VALLEY LAND CO. 

Notary Public 

REAL ESTATE • BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 
INSURANCE ■ LOANS 

"Own Your Own" 



FRESNO 



1209 Broadway 



Phone 2-0913 



CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY EXPRESS CO. 
Valley Motor Lines 

STATEWIDE SERVICE 



FRANK E. BECKETT CO. 

Distributor 

DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

TRUCKS • BUSES • MOTOR COACHES 



FRESNO 



FRESNO 



1107 D Street 



SILAS CHINN, M. D. 

Rowell Building 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



701 Van Ness Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



47 Years Experience 



Phone 3-2604 



KASPER'S 



LADIES' and GENTS' TAILORING and ALTERATIONS 
DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 



CALIFORNIA 1916 MARIPOSA 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mav, 1948 



FRESNO 



EAGLE RESTAURANT 

AMERICAN AND ARMENIAN DISHES ' 
842 Van Ness 



LEWIS ELECTRIC CO. 

WIRING • FIXTURES • APPLIANCES 
RADIOS • SUPPLIES 



1917 Fresno Street Phone 2-9914 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



2112 Church 



"Bill" Legler 



SCHROEDER'S 

Bill Steinhaver, Mgr. 

DRINKS 

THE BEST LUNCH IN TOWN 



LEGLER SHEET METAL WORKS 

GENERAL SHEET METAL 

HEATING AND COOLING • AIR CONDITIONING 
KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 



1229 VAN NESS 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



Phone: 30747 



FRESNO. CALIF. 



FRESNO STEAM LAUNDRY 

LIBERTY TOWEL AND LINEN 
SUPPLY COMPANY 



JACOBS & STUCKERT 

GARAGE 

TUNE UP - FRONT WHEEL - ALIGNMENT - MOTOR REBUILDING 
BODY AND FENDER WORK - PAINTING 



3-2171 2-4714 



FRESNO 



750 H. STREET 



FRESNO, CALIF. 



FRESNO 



FRESNO 



Compliments of 

S. H. KRESS 8C CO. 

5-10 AND 25 CENT STORES 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESNO 



CHINA MARKET 

POULTRY EGGS 
1416 Tulare Street Phone 4-2121 



732 Van Ness Phone 2-7262 



CALIFORNIA 



LION PACKING CO. 

Packers and Shippers 
CALIFORNIA RAISINS 



CALIFORNIA 



BELDEN ELECTRIC 

INDUSTRIAL - CONTRACTORS - COMMERCIAL 
APPLIANCES AND SUPPLIES 



CALIFORNIA FRESNO 



3709 Belmont Phone 4-4548 

Emergency 5-0626 



CALIFORNIA 



Branch at Corcoran 



Telephone 2-7I2S 



FRESNO 



MAC'S DOG HOUSE 

HOME COOKING COCKTAILS 

2534 Tulare Street 



JOURDAN CONCRETE PIPE CO. 

IRRIGATION PIPE AND APPLIANCES - CULVERT, 
DRAIN AND SEWER PIPE 



CALIFORNIA 



P. O. BOX 152 



FRESNO. CALIFORNIA 



FREEMAN NOVELTY CO. 



INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION CO. 

CONTRACTORS - MACHINISTS - ENGINEERS 
AI. F. Kennedy. Mgr. 



2SI3 McKenzie Phone 2-1592 

2069 Tyler Ave. Phone 4-4444 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



R. J. Thomas 



L. R. Jeffords 



THOMAS 8C JEFFORDS 

GENERAL INSURANCE 



Compliments of 

CLOVER CLUB 



Phone 3-3430 2039 Kern Street 
204 Brix Building Telephone 2-S31S FRESNO CALIFORNIA 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



CODY BROS. 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES CONTRACTING 



Phone 2. 1686 



Res. Phone 3-4 7 75 



S. L. CHONG 



REPAIRING 



FRESNO 



MFRRAI 1ST 

CHINESE HERBS AND REMEDIES FOR ALL DISEASES 

542 N. Fresno Phone 3-1416 Hours 9 A.M. to 7 P.M. 

CALIFORNIA M02 TULARE STREET FRSNO, CALIF. 



Ma\, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



RICHMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from page 9) 

Captain and Mrs. Phipps reside at 2379 Brooks Avenue. 
Both are ver>' ardent fishermen. Each week-end, weather 
permitting, they can be found at Big Breaks, Dutch Slough, 
trying their luck. 

The head of another important unit of Chief Jones" 
Department is captain George Bengley who commands 
the lO-man Inspectors Bureau. 

Captain Bengley joined the Police Department on July 
1, 1921. He had selected Richmond as his future home 
after service with the Army during World War I and 
then doing a hitch in the U. S. Navy. He made rapid 
progress through the ranks, being made a sergeant on 
November 1, 1927, and Inspector H days later and a 
Captain September 1, 1938. He has done a fine job of 
handling all felony investigations. 

The following from the Richmond Independent gives 
a little insight of the career of Captain Bengley as a 
police officer: 

'The career of Captain Bengley as a law enforcement 
officer has been very colorful. During the late Sheriff R. R. 
Veale's tenure of office, he participated in many investiga- 



SUNNYSIDE AUTO PARTS 

GOOD WORKMANSHIP 
NO JOB TOO SMALL 



17SS 13th Street 



SAN PABLO 



CALIFORNIA 



CROWN FOOD CENTER 

A. H. HARSTON 

1096 San Pablo Avenue 



SAN PABLO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phon3 Landscape 5-3272 



Phone Richmnd 148 



GRIFFIN LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER - DOORS - SASH - PIPE 
WALLBOARD - PLUMBING SUPPLIES 



EL CERRITO 



1322 San Pablo Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



20th CENTURY MARKET, Ltd. 

A ONE-STOP MARKET 
13,000 Square Feet of Shopping 



BLAKE BROTHERS CO. 



RODEO 



Parker Avenue at Third 



CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box 1002 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



P. & W. LIQUORS 

200 MacDonald Avenue 



THE PINE— Cocktail Lounge 

Marcello - Dias 

Phone: Richmond 1814 18 Standard Avenue 

POINT RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND 



P. & W.'s VAGABOND 

DELICIOUS SANDWICHES • DRAUGHT BEER 
206 MacDonald Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 



OSCAR'S^Cocktails 



Hub Cafe 



Luiz's Liquor Store 



COCKTAILS Rich. 8769-W 

Rich. 1113 619 Macdonald 3708 Wall Ave. 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



IN RICHMOND 
at 10.47 Twenty-third Street 



ROMA HOTEL 



Telephone Rich. 6416 



Owner Tena Jourdain 



GRAND CLEANERS 



125 Standard Avenue 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



TAILORING AND ALTERATIONS 
Main Plant 1087 Twenty-third Street 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Richmond 237 (In Business Since 1919) 

STANDARDIZED PLUMBING REPAIR SERVICE 



CROWE RECREATION 

Phon? Rich 3216 612 Macdonald Ave. 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 



R. W. TIMMONS 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
No Connection with any other Firm of this Name 



RICHMOND 



Corner Seventh and Nevin 



CALIFORNIA 



Phon- 2113; 



LICK PHARMACY 



"The Apoth°carv" 

PROFESSIONAL PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

TRUSSES and SURGICAL GOODS 

933 NAN NESS A\ E FRESNO. CALIF. 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



tions throughout the county This included major crimes 
such as murder, train robberies, etc. 

"One particular incident which will always remain in 
the memor>' of Captain Benglcy is when he, himself, had 
a close brush with death. A man had shot and killed an- 
other man He fled Richmond, through Oakland, and 
drove along the Tunnel Road. Captain Bengley partici- 
pated in the hunt for this killer and his pursuit carried 
him out onto the old Tunnel Road. The two met. A gun 
battle ensued and the Captain was shot in the head. 
Despite his own serious wound, however, Captain Bengley 
returned fire and fatally wounded the criminal. 

""Another time, in 1929, Captain Bengley was detailed 
with Inspector Wylie and Sergeant Mahnke to bring in 
a man who had shot and killed his wife. They eventually 
located the man, barricaded in a room at the old Santa 
Fc Hotel at First and Ohio. They called to him to sur- 
render and were answered by a volley of gun shots, most 
of them being aimed at Sergeant Mahnke. Luckily, he 
escaped injury but the murderer was killed by bullets 
from the guns of the officers. Captain Bengley and the 



Phone Richmond 3698-W 



Alex Daher 



RICHMOND RECREATION CENTER 

SNOOKER POOL AND BEER 



327 MACDONALD AVENUE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



**Virg" Jerry Dan Leslie 

SIMONI MOTOR SERVICE 

SATISFACTION GUAP.ANTEED 

Phon^ Richmond 167 
864 23rd STREET RICHMOND. CALIF 



WONDERSHEEN 
PRODUCTS, Inc. 

• 

1500 San Pablo Avenue 

Richmond, California 

Richmond 6020 

GRAND MARKET 

We Carry the Best in All Lines 
Wc Serve Wtih A Smile 

1100 23rd Street. 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



John P. C.\merl(i 



R.\Y T. HOLL.-KND 



GRAND HARDWARE 
and APPLIANCES 

House Wares 

Plumbing and Electrical Goods 

Sporting Goods * Garden Supplies 

Variety Paints 

1183-1185 23rd Street 

Telephone Rich. 5455-W 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Where Coiute.'iv Dwells and Service Excels 



TOWER MARKET 

Thom.n.s E. Green .and W. W. K.vufman 
Projprietors 

Grocery Department 

1050 23rd Street 

Richmond, California 



for 

Metal Fasteners - Bolts 
Screws, etc. 

Call 

PAN PACIFIC 

METAL PRODUCTS, 

Inc. 

201 Nevin Avenue 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



You Can Enjoy 

"Automatic Water" 

with a 

Pump and Water System 
JACUZZI BROS., INC. 



Richmond, Calif. 



St. Louis, Mo. 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



others were highly commended for this display of bravery 
and courage. 

"Other vital statistics on this veteran police officer are 
as follows: Past President of the International Foot- 
printers Association, Past Toparch of the Richmond Pyra- 
mid of Sciots, Past President of the Richmond Shrine 
Club, Past President of the Richmond Police Fund Asso- 
ciation. He is also a graduate of all FBI courses given 
in the Bay Area." 

The people, of Richmond and their city officials must 
be mighty pleased with the service of Chief Jones and his 
over 100-man Police Department, for they last month 
made permanent a $.^0 per month cost of living boost 
granted some time ago. The pay for the members now 
run as following: 

Chief, $5 30; Captain of Inspector, $4.10; Captains, 
$405; Lieutenants, $J60; Inspectors, $345; Sergeants, 
$330 and Patrolmen from $285 to $310. 

Lieutenant Harry C. Donnelly is acting Captain. In- 
spector Jennings has charge of the Identification Bureau. 

The Department has 41 patrol cars, three 2 -wheel and 
two 3-wheeled motorcycles all equipped with 2-way radio: 

Richmond is a well policed city and its Chief of Police 
is well recognized for his ability to enforce the laws. 

"LA FIESTA" COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



1S38 Webster Street 



ALAMEDA 



LAkehurst 2-9932 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephones: Richmond 477 - 8440 

E. C. CRANE 

LINOLEUM - WINDOW SHADES - VENETIAN BLINDS 

Electric Appliances - Stoves - Carpets - Rugs 

House Furnishings - Refrigerators 

435 - 23rd STREET RICHMOND. CALIF. 



r----- 



RICHMOND 

MOTOR DEALERS' 

ASSOCIATION 



2500 MACDONALD AVENUE 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 



WE STOCK: 

High Speed Drills - Reamers - Taps 

Starrett & Lufkin Tools 

Plomb Tools - Household Supplies 

Garden Supplies - Electrical Supplies 

Shop Supplies - Machinery 



ATALIC HARDWARE 

Martin J. Atalic 
4920 McBryde Avenue 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone: 4614M 






Over 40 Years of 

Complete Banking Facilities 

Serving 

Contra Costa and Alameda Counties 

Your 
Personal Loan Headquarters 



THE MECHANICS BANK 

Albany * Richmond * El Cerrito 



MEMBER F.D.I.C. 



Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



Tel. R.ch. 6544 



Oakford Hedges, Prop. 



OAK'S LIQUOR STORE 

Most Complete Line of 

LIQUORS AND WINES 

911 SAN PABLO A\ E. RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Rich 1699-W 

SUNNYSIDE MARKET 

GROCERIES - FRESH FRUITS 
VEGEIABLES - MEATS 

1665 THIRTEENTH STREET SAN PABLO, CALIF. 



NEW CHINA CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 
Orders to Take Home our Specialty 

232 McDonald a\e. Richmond, calif. 



LIBERTY CAFE 



BEER - WINE - LIQUOR 
WE ALSO SERVE FOOD 



344 MACDONALD AVE. 



PT. RICHMOND. CALIF. 



SEASIDE AUTO PARTS 

Donald A. McRoy 



1756 THIRTEENTH STREET 



SAN PABLO. CALIF. 



Richmond 2406 



SHIP CAFE 

COCKTAILS - BEER - WINE 

339 STANDARD AVE. POINT RICHMOND 

BANK CLUB 

Bill Bacon, Prop. 
POOL - BEER - CANDIES - TOBACCOS 



POINT RICHMOND 



201 West Richmond Ave. 



CALIFORNIA 



STANDARD POOL HALL 



POINT RICHMOND 



Antone Petta, Prop. 
12 Standard Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



RAINBOW PAINT STORE 

W'm. T, Donahue. Owner 

THE HOUSE OF QUALITY 

Featuring Premier Paints the Practical Painters Line 

WALL PAPER PAINTS 

316 - I Ith STREET Telephone*)' I 7 RICHMOND. CALIF. 



Phono Richmond 884 



Overhauling Our Specialty 



WOOD'S SERVICE STATION 

EXPERT AUTO REPAIRS 

All Work Guaranteed 

113 MACDONALD AVENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 



GROCERIES 



BEER - WINE 



BAKERY 



EASTSHORE MARKET 

1036 South Forty-seventh Street 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Richmond 2484 



Joe Kovacevich 



ALVARADO GARDEN 

ITALIAN AND AMERICAN DINNERS 

LIQUOR - BEER - WINES 

995 SAN PABLO .A\ E RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Clark P. Welch LA. 5-9929 

BOULEVARD COFFEE SHOP 

RESTAURANT 
1629 East Shore Road 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



MERIT HOTEL 

Phone Richmond 437-W 

STEAM HEATED AND SHOWERS 

Weekly or Monthly 

315 Eighth Street, Comer 8th and MacDonald Ave. 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

W. F. ERASER. O.D. - VICTOR P. YOST, O.D. 

OPTOMETRISTS 

Phone Richmond 274 
''19 MACDONALD A\ ENUE RICHMOND. CALIF. 

Phone Richmond 1421 

TRAVELERS HOTEL 

STEAM HEAT - BATH AND SHOWERS 
TRANSIENT - MONTHLY RATES 



521 MacDONALD A\ENLE 



RICHMOND. CALIF. 



MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING - SHIPPING 



EAST RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS - DELICATESSEN - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
Joe Sind:cich - Phone Rich. 238 



RICHMOND 



McBrydc and San Pablo Ave. 



CALIFORNIA 



Alex Daher 



Phone Rich. 3898-W 



RICHMOND RECREATION CENTER 



SNOOKER POOL AND BEER 
327 Macdonald Avenue 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



ART'S Moving and Storage 

Geo. P. Newcomb 

2010- 12 San Pablo Avenue 4724 Bissell Avenue 

El Cerrito Phone Richmond 569 Richmond 



VISTA — Drive-in Market 

A COMPLETE FOOD STORE 
DELIVERY SERVICE 



500 San Pablo Avenue 



Phone 3807 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



BLUE BELL AUTO COURT 

NOTED FOR CLEANLINESS AND HOME COMFORTS 
M. T. Swenion - Phone Richmond 3217 

732 San Pablo Avenue, on Highway 40 RODFO 
RICHMOND CALIFORNI A 

Joe Costa, Prop. 



Phone II 



ANTLER'S TAVERN 

MIXED DRINKS 

SPORTSMAN'S CENTER 

COORS ON TAP 



PASTIME CLUB 

BEER AND WINE 
401 First Street Phone Rodeo 4760 



CALIFOR 



NIA 



THE NUT CLUB 

DINE - DANCE 

DANCING EVERY NIGHT - FINE FOOD AND DRINKS 

"You Gotta Be Nuts To Come Here" 



PINOLE 



CALIFORNIA RICHMOND 



527 MacDonald Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



May, 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 6J 



SAVE 

YOUR 

WAR 

BONDS 



Joseph Kiezer - Wade P. Faffle 
Henry Trumpower, owners 

BARREL CLUB 

* 

1015 Fourth Street 
NAPA, CALIFORNIA 



RUSS BUILDING 
COMPANY 



DESOTO - PLYMOUTH 

Sales - Service 

24-Hour Service 

PIONEER GARAGE 

Harold Doughty 

Automobile Repair - AH Types 
Body and Fender Shop 

718 Main Street 

NAPA, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Garage 2246 



235 Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



CARD ROOM - DRAW POKER 
LOW BALL 

CENTRAL CLUB 

SAN PABLO, CALIFORNIA 

(Across from The Broiler Inn) 

Yellow Cab Co. 

Telephone Richmond 5428 2737 San Pablo Ave. 



HOEPPEL'S PRODUCE 

FRUITS 
VEGETABLES 

"Fresh Daily" 
704 San Pablo Avenue 

Corner of Clinton 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Richmond 4718 



Phone: Richmond 1411 

Richmond Produce Co. 

Incorporated 

Commission Merchants 

Wholesale Fruit, Produce 

* 

394 17th Street 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



-4 



THE SPOT 

On and Off Sale 
LIQUORS 

1 Standard Avenue 

Pt. Richmond, Calif. 

Phone 1139 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May. 1948 



ALAMEDA POLICE DEPARTMENT 

( Continued from page 6) 

Lieutenants Floyd E. Drake and Lloyd R. Wenland. 

Inspectors William A. Tulloch, Martin S. O'Keefe, the 
latter a veteran of more than 25 years; William C. (Bill) 
Johnson, another veteran and Jack T. Sutherland. 

Burton C. Bridges, Superintendent of the Identification 
Bureau, an expert whose services are often sought by the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

Herbert Fairfield, Chief Radio Operator, in charge of 
the communication room switchboard with its FM setup, 
the latest development in police two-way radio. 

Record Clerk Gerald J. Nordling whose statistical re- 
ports over the past several years have given impetus to the 
work of the Alameda Police Department. 

Sergeants Milton Buhl, Robert C. Carroll, Hanford D. 
Manhert, Robert D. Allen, Joseph E. Bertrand, Roland 
G. Dowen, Court Bailiff, Harold F. SchmaU, and then 
these three outstanding members of the Juvenile Depart- 
ment: William H. Hansen, Mrs. Cecelia Robinson, Mrs. 
Florence Drummond. 

There are 45 regular patrolmen, covering a total popu- 
lation of approximately 80,n00, fifty thousand more than 
2 decades ago. 

"Yet we do the job," says Chief Doran, "chiefly be- 
cause we have a personnel always on its toes." 
Two- Way Radio System 

Alameda was one of the first of Alameda County mu- 
nicipalities to install the two-way police radio system. It 
began in 1936 and has proven its worth over the years. 

During the past year the Police Department has inaugu 
rated a voice call system throughout the City Hall, Oak 
and Santa Clara Avenue. This also includes the main jail. 
The loudspeaker is heard throughout the building. 

Another development of the past year, under Chief 
Doran's direction, is the fact that the Alameda Police De- 
partment has become a very vital part of the statewide tele- 



L I S T O 

Pencil Corporation 



Phone LAkehtirst 2-2911 



1716 PARK STREET 



ALAMEDA, CALIFORNIA 



ALAMEDA DISTRIBUTORS 

SHIPPING ROOM SUPPLIES 
MATERIAL HANDLING EQUIPMENT 

JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 



l')26 EVERETT STREET 



ALAMEDA. CALIF. 



CompllmentB 

ALAMEDA CITY GARBAGE 
ASSOCIATION 



PEERLESS IRON 
WORKS, INC. 



Fabricators and 
Erectors of Structural Steel 



P. O. Box No. 378 

Alameda, Califronia 



ALAMEDA 



2435 Blanding Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



UNITED STATES 

STEEL PRODUCTS 

COMPANY 



United States Steel Corporation 
Subsidiary 



Boyle Manufacturing Division 
1849 Oak Street 

Alameda, California 



Lakehurst 2-5511 



May. 1948 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



type system, sharing honors with the metropohtan centers 
of the Pacific Coast in this efficient pohce service. 

"Everything comes across the automatic teletype," says 
Chief Doran. "We know who is wanted by municipal, 
county, state or federal authorities. And the lads study 
each teletype message assidiously. We've picked a few 
wanted men through this service and have skipped no one." 

Five D.^y Week 

Alameda police officers work on a five-day week with 
an annual vacation of 14 days with pay and half-pay pen- 
sion at the end of 25 years of service. That provision m 
the municipal charter and municipal ordinances measures 
up to the biggest police departments in the nation, accord- 
ing to Chief Doran. 

There is a total personnel of 67 in the police department 
proper, two of whom are stenographers. Patrol officers 
number 45. 

The communication room with radio and switchboard 
is a model for compactness and efficiency. All police cars 
are equipped with two-way radio. 

There are no motorcycle traffic officers in Alameda. The 
single bikes have been replaced with 3 -wheelers just to 
watch the parkers. 

Ten new patrol cars were recently purchased by the city. 
None of the patrol cars are more than 2 years old. Chief 
Doran is proud of the automotive equipment and the fel- 
lows on the force and behind the wheel are as proud as 
their Chief in keeping the motor vehicles in tiptop condi- 
tion at all times. 



JAMES Q. LEAVITT CO. 

FOOD PROCESSING 
ENGINEERS 

3310 Broadway 

Oakland 11, California 
Phone TWinoaks 3-9964 






MONTEREY COUNTY 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

Plumbing - Heating - Sheet Metal 
Utilities 

8275 San Leandro Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Morris Landy Motors 

ALAMEDA 

FORD DEALER 

SALES :: SERVICE :: PARTS 



1650 Park St. 



Lake. 3-2745 



OTZEN BROTHERS 
BOTTLING CO. 

2314 Santa Clara Avenue 
ALAMEDA, CALIFORNIA 



Henry's Super Service 

Ford and Lincoln Specialist 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 

SERVICE 

Autolite Batteries 

Wholesale and Retail 

1812 PARK STREET 

ALAMEDA, CALIFORNIA 

Also Around Corner on Eagle Ave. 

Phone LA. 3-3442 



CANTON 


CAFE 


* 


CHINESE and 


AMERICAN DISHES 


* 


417 Main Street 


WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1948 



Two ambulances are available 24-hours a day. While 
Alameda does not maintain an emergency hospital, it does 
have a first-aid station. By arrangement with the county, 
serious cases are taken to Highland Hospital. 

During the past year more than 17,076 persons — men, 
women and juveniles — came under observation or faced 
charges by the Alameda Police Department. Of this num- 
ber 9461 involved parking violations. Only 82 'drunken 
drivers were involved and only 1 1 auto thefts reported. 
Burglary complaints only numbered 102, mostly traced to 
juveniles. Altogether, under the able direction of Chief 
Doran, crime has been held at a minimum in Alameda. 

"It's the fine men with whom I work," says the Chief. 
"I'm mighty proud of the Alameda Police Department. 

LOOP LUMBER & MILL CO. 



Broadway at the Estuary 



ALAMEDA 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC COAST ENGINEERING CO. 

ENGINEERS • MACHINISTS • FABRICATORS 
LAkehurst 2-6100 Cable Address: Paceco 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



CACTUS CAFE 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNERS 
AND SHORT ORDERS 

Beer and Soft Drinks 



YERMO, CALIFORNIA 

(San Bernardino County) on Highway 91 



Telephone 45 



P. O. Box 696 



Abel Chevrolet Company 

Chevrolet and Biiick Automobiles 

COMPLETE GARAGE SERVICE 

John F. Abel 
RIO VISTA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 282-W 

BAKER'S HATCHERY & 
FEED STORE 

Ask Us . . . We have the best in 
Feeds for Your Chickens 

Route No. 2 Box 251-A 

ESCONDIDO, CALIFORNIA 



SAM'S PLACE 

Dave Newhouse and Lorenzo Ch.mns 

BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 
GOOD FOOD 



Carbon Canyon, Garvey Road 

CHINO, CALIFORNIA 



THE SHAMROCK CAFE 

The Finest Cocktail Lounge 

in 

COSTA MESA, CALIFORNIA 



■ ■»-t 



B & B CAFE 



Bertha Mariin 



Bud We.wer 



Specializing in 
Hamburgers and Chili 
Beer and Soft Drinks 

106 W. Calif. Blvd. 
ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 



May. 1948 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Barstow Has Its First Police Chief 



Page 69 



Barstow, which since its inception some 75 years ago 
has operated as an unincorporated township, was incor- 
porated into a city last September, when a set of municipal 
officers were elected and installed into office. 

The town of Barstow since its formation has sen.ed as 
an important desert division point of the Santa Fe Com- 
pany and for some 50 years has been as equally important 
to the Union Pacific. Mining, cattle raising and alfalfa 
growing has added many more to the railroad people 
who take up their residence in this desert spot. As a 
town it had grown, with a business section that has stores 
carrying up-to-date lines of goods and restaurants and 
cafes and hotels equal to any found in other inland places. 

Barstow has an estimated population of some 3000 
people, and the transients who pass through on the trans- 
continental highway swell that number by many thou- 
sands more each year. 

The first Chief of Police of Barstow is V. C. Beaver. 

Chief Beaver was born in Montague, Texas, in 1901. 
He started his police career in 1927 with the Amarillo 
Police Department. He left the Amarillo Department in 
1942 after serving for fifteen years and the citizens there 
still wonder what became of one of the finest Peace 
Officers that the Lone tSar State ever produced. From 
there he went to the bomb loading plant at Pantex, Texas, 
near Amarillo as an Identification Chief. He held this 



position until the 12th of February, 1944. After that he 
came to California. Still in Police work, he was at Camp 
Pinedale in the Fresno area as fingerprint expert and 
investigator. From there the Chief went to the Santa Fe 
railroad as special officer. 

The war being over and things became normal again, 
the Chief went to work in San Bernardino under Sheriff 
James Stocker, whose reputation as chief enforcement 
officer of the largest county in these United States is well 
known out on the desert and in this desert city. 

When the City of Barstow started looking around for 



PURDY'S POOL HALL 

Pool Tables and Club Ro