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Full text of "Police and peace officers' journal of the State of California"

SAN 



FRANCESCO HISTORY ROO^A 




SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 




REFERENCE BOOK 

■^oi to be taken from the Library 



SAM FRANCISCO 




CAPTAIN MICHAEL GAFFEY BEING SWORN IN AS CHIEF OF SFPD 

Administering the oath of office Police Commission President H. C. Maginn; back of Crief Gaffev 

Commissioner Washington I. Kohnke; to extreme right Commissioner J. Warnock Walsh, who has 

been selected as president of the Commission for 1951. 

JANUARY, 1951 



POLICR AND PEACE OFFICERS' JO -RNAL 



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Member 

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2066 Bird 
OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



January. 1 9 ''I 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 



S. F. New Chief of Police — Michael Gaffey 3 

B) Opie L. Warner 
Inspectors Ahern and Cahill With U. S. Crime 

Commission I 

Governor Warren Elected for Third Term . . "> 

Peace Officers in Marin Count)' 6 

Farl Whitmore. San Mateo's New Sheriff . . 8 

Juvenile Delinquency Committee RefX)rt ... '.» 

B) Former Chief M. E. Mitchell 

The Sign of the Red Hand 10 

6v B. C. Bridges 

Monterey's New Chief — C. E. Simpson ... 11 

The Path of Dut)' — By James E. Cniile ... 12 

Chief Farina Nabs Policeman Murderer ... 13 

S. F. Police Academy 14 

Chief Riordan and Napa's Police Department 1 "i 

By the Editm 
New Developments in Richmond Police Depart- 
ment— B> ChieJ E. r. Phipps 16 

Prisons and Prisoners in National Defense . . 17 

6) Former Chief Charles \\" . Diillea 

Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association . . 18 

Thomas Lynch, New S. F. District Attorney 19 
Editorial Page — S. F. P. D. Brings Happiness 

to Many 20 

It Will Be Attorney-General Brown for Next 

Four Years 21 

Salinas to Have New Police Chief 22 

Sheriff McCoy, Monterey County, Starts Second 

Term 23 

Chief John L. Delucchi of Pleasanton .... 2-1 

Associated Public Communication Officers 26 

Chief Kenneth Hill of Eureka 29 

Police Promotion Examination Questions ... 47 

Excerpts From S. F. Police Ordinances .... ^6 

I'ormcr Chief Bodie Wallman Dies 'J9 

Death of Former Chief Dinan ... . . 66 

Chief Oliver's First Year at Turlock .... 69 

Pistol Pointing — By J. Ross Dunnigati ... 70 
Wm. T. Stanford and State's First Peace Officers' 

Association 72 

S. F. Footprinters in New Quarters .... 74 

.Sergeant Lindenau, S. F. P. D. Vehicle Inspector 7'> 



Directory 



Ihc KniToR i% always picawd to coniiidcr articles suitable for publication 
Conirihutinns should preferably be typewritten, but when- this is not pos 
tiblc. copy should be clearly written. Contributions may ^^ siKncd with i 
nam dc plume, but all articles must bear the name and address of thi 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The FniTiii 
will also be pleased lo consider phntofcraphs of officirs jiul of intrrrsiinf 
events. letters should be addressed to the FniT»R, 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KM438 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 2:00 p.m.. Hall of Justfce 

Henry C. Maginn, President 315 Montgomery 

Washington L Kohnke 686 Sacramento St. 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery St. 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIKF OF POLICE .Mich.ael Caffiv 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quicley 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic Jack Eker 

Dept. Sec"t.. .Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRiCK....HaII of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Edward P. Donohue 635 Washington Street 

Southern Daniel McKlem Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Ai.oysius O'Brien 3057 - 17th Street 

Northern Walter Ames 841 Ellis Street 

c;. «.;. Park Peter Conroy Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond Ted Terlau 451 Sixth Avenue 

I NGELSIDE.... George M. Healy. ..Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Leo Tackney 2348 - 24th Avenue 

PoTRERO John M. Sullivan 2300 Third Street 

Propertt Clerk and 

City Prison Bernard McDonald Hall of Justin- 

Relief Captain James Carrio 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

PER.sf)s\Ei John A. Enoi.er Hall of Jusli.. 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hill of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

SptciAi. Servicks Orro Meyer Hall of Jusilr. 

Director of Juvenile Bureau 2745 Greenwich Street 

JlllIN Meehan 

Director - Bureau or Criminal 

lvn)RM\Tios Lieut. (;k)R<:k Hippei.y Mali of |u»ii.i 

Insp. of Schools 

Traffic Control Insp. Thomas B. Tract 

Supervising Captaih 

or Districts Jeremiah J. Coughlin Hall of Jusiii ■ 

("iiinatown Detaii Hall .if Jusli. 

I.inr II vRoiD .AsomsoN 



When In Trouble Qall SUtteV h20'20 

When In UOUbt AImvs a. V,ur service 



Pdge 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jantiary. 19^1 



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Feather River Country 

HOTEL QUINCY 

E. W. AiiSTiN, MiDhigiiig Owner 

Phone 100 

Quincy, California 



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PHONE ORDWAY 3-3040 
DAY - NIGHT OR SUNDAY 

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National Detective Agency 

Paul H. Devine, Principal 

LICENSED BY 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

BO ND HDD 

RELIABLE CONFIDENTIAL 

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Member of 

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±25 PEACE OFFICERS' 



Vol. XXIV 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 



I Trade Maik Copyright! 



JANUARY. 1951 



\".i. 1 



S.F's New Chief of Police -Michael Gaffey 



B) Opii: L. Warnir 



At 2 p. m., Januar)- 2, 1931, Captain Michael Gaffey 
was sworn in as Chief of Police for the city of San Francisco. 
Thus he becomes the 28th man to head the SFPD during 
Its 100 years and five months histor)-, counting the ten 
days tenure of the late Sergeant Thomas P. Walsh at the 
end of 1929, a gesture of appreciation on the part of the 
late Mayor James Rolph. 

In brief ceremonies before an assemblage that crowded 





(.mi 1 Mrc ii.\Fi Gau i ^ 

ever)- toot of spaic in the Police Commissions meeting place 
and overflowed into the corridors of the lower floor of the 
Hall of Justice, Police Commission Secretar)- John T. Butler 
read a letter from the Retirement Board stating that the 
oflicc of Chief of Police was vacant as of December 31, 
because Chief Michael E. Mitchell had reached the com- 
pulsory age of retirement — 65 years. 

President H. C. Maginn of the Police Commission de- 
clared the position vacant and Commissioner Washington 
I. Kohnke moved that Captain Michael Gaffc)- be ap- 
pomted as Police Chief. Commissioner J. Warnock Walsh 
seconded it and with the vote of President Maginn the 
motion was voted unanimous. 

Then President Maginn called the new Chief to the 



gratulated him saying that the commissioners felt greatly 
pleased that they were able to have such a competent mem- 
ber of the PD take over the responsible duties of Chief 
of Police. 

The lull corps of Captains, present in full dress uniform, 
were invited by President Maginn to file past the new 
Chief and congratulate him on his new honors. This was 
followed by presenting Mrs. Gafl^ey and four of the five 
children of the family — Mar)-, 22 years, a student at San 
Francisco College for Women; Dennis, 20, student at the 
University of San Francisco; Kevin, 19, who is studying 
for the priesthood at St. Joseph's College, in Mountain 
View; Brendan, 17, St. Ignatius high school, and William, 
13, who attends St. Paul's grammar school. 

Chief GaflFey, led a procession into his oflices in the north- 
west corner of the Hall of Justice, where for the next two 
hours citizens from every walk of life came to wish 
him well. 

When Mayor Elmer E. Robinson announced last month 
that Captain GaflFey would be elevated to the office of Chief 
of the Police Department there was general rejoicing among 
the citizenr)' interested in good law enforcement. They 
saw in the selection of Captain Gaffey. who climaxed his 
29 years and six months ser\ice as a police officer by taking 
over the top position, a continuance of the splendid record 
attained by the men who have scr\ed in a like capacity 
during the past 35 years. His immediate predecessors have 
gained nationwide reputations for keeping San Francisco a 
"white spot, " as far as crime was conterned. Chief Gaffey 
rs well able to continue this desirable reputation and he 
will. As the late Captain Duncan Matheson used to say 
about anything definite, "make no mistake about thai.' 

Chief Gaffe)' was born in Ballinasloe, Ireland. As a 19- 
year-old lad he migrated to the United States, landing 
finally in San Francisco. His first job was as a freight clerk 
with the Southern Pacific. Later he was conductor on 
the old Market Street Railway. Then World War came 
along and Michael Gaffe)- enlisted. He went over to France, 
rose to the rank of sergeant and when he returned to his 
adopted city he had a Croix de Guerre awarded by the 
French Government for outstanding courageous scrviic in 
the bloody battle of Cantigney. He also had been awarded 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PHAGE OEFICERS JOURNAL 



Juiiiuirj. 79 5/ 



that same battlefield while carrying a wounded comrade 
through enemy tire, to safety. 

Not only does Chief Gaffey possess courage to the high- 
est degree, but he has an alert mind, unlimited patience 
and a kindly Irish heart. His long police experience has 
dulled none of these. 

On his return from war he again entered the employ- 
ment of the Southern Pacific, serving as a member of the 
late Chief Special Agent Dan O'Connell's competent force 
of special officers. Here he won high praise for efficiency. 
On May 16, 1921, he joined the San Francisco Police 
Department, and from the start he quickly appraised the 
opportunity for advancement. Though a retiring man, he 
nevertheless progressed through all ranks without a break 
until March, 1942, when he topped the list of eligibles 
for Captain and he was sworn in as of that rank on 
May 11, 1942. 

World War II was on. The old Potrero station, six 
years out of action, was reactivated and former Chief 
Charles Dullea selected Captain Gaffey to take over com- 
mand of this great district. The Bethlehem Shipyards and 
other booming war industries drew tens of thousands of 
workers to the area. Captain Gaffey handled the busy situ- 
ation in a manner that drew high commendations from the 
leaders of these plants, the heads of various unions of 
workers, the army, the navy, and just plain citizens. 

From the day he paced his first beat out in the Mission 
he went about his duties, seeking no headlines. He was 
recognized as a good dependable and honest policeman, as 
he stepped up the ladder of success. He first attracted 
official attention by the splendid manner he served under 
the late Captain John J. O'Meara— in charge of policing 
Treasure Island during the expositions of 1939 and 1940. 
Captain Gaffey was then a lieutenant and had charge of 
carrying out all orders from Captain O'Meara. When the 
final night of these great international fairs closed there 
had been no pockets picked, no one fiad been otherwise 
deprived of his money or possessions, and despite the fact 
that millions of people took in the expositions, crime was 
something that never happened during its two years of 
wonderful existence. Lieutenant Gaffey and his men saw 
to that. 

On March 29, 1944, there was a vacancy in the position 
of supervising Captain. Chief Dullea looked no further 
among his top ranking officers than Michael Gaffey. How 
wise was his selection of the mild-mannered Gaffey was 
soon manifest by the manner he tackled his job. 

Some of his achievements in that job was the surveying 
the city and realigning bound.iries for the diverse police 
districts; laying out beats for the better police protection; 
a daily report of where and when crimes occurred, and kept 
up to date on a special map; and giving his advice on how 
better to patrol all of the city. 

As a reward for his consistent and successful application 
of his knowledge and experience to the office of supervising 
captain he was selected by the Police Commission to be 
its secretary, and during the short term of Chief Michael 
Riordan he was Deputy Chief in addition to being secretary 



In 1948, with the appointment of Chief Mitchell and 
Deputy Chief James Quigley, he sought release from the 
secretary job, desiring station duty. He was assigned to 
Ingleside, Taraval, thence to Richmond, where he was 
serving up to the time he became Chief. In these three 
police districts he made his long experience as a police 
officer not only well known to the residents of these respective 
communities, but to the officers detailed to these three sec- 
tors. He is a strict disciplinarian, though not of the old 
army sergeant type. 

We know of no member of the SFPD who enjoys more 
of the esteem and respect of every membr of the depart- 
ment, that the new Chief. 

In 1926 Chief Gaffey married, his wife, Mary, lived in 
the Mission District where they have resided ever since. 
Their home is at 3920 Twenty-sixth Street, where they 
have a family of four boys and a daughter. These are all 
getting an education in our schools and colleges, something 
Michael Gaffey was denied. No matter what their success 
may be in future years, none will exceed the success of 
their father, nor the sincere affection in which he is held 
by all law abiding citizens of San Francisco and who won 
these by the "hard way." 

In the dark days ahead for this nation, San Francisco can 
feel sure its San Francisco Police Department under the 
leadership of Chief Gaffey will meet any emergency, no 
matter how serious it may be. 



INSPECTORS AHERN AND CAHILL 
LOANED TO U. S. CRIME INVESTI- 
GATING COMMITTEE 

When the United States Senate committee headed by 
Senator Kefauver was out on the coast investigating the 
national gambling and crime syndicate operators they spent 
a couple of days in San Francisco. Called before the com- 
mittee were two San Francisco Police Department members, 
Inspector Frank Ahern, head of the Homicide Detail of 
the Inspectors Bureau and one of his top assistants. Inspector 
Thomas CahiU. 

The testimony these two experienced officers gave to the 
committee about the ramifications of the Mafia gangsters 
which included the inglorious death of member Dejohn in 
1948, had the committee members spellbound. 

When these two Inspectors completed their testimony 
Senator Kefauver stated nowhere had he or his fellow 
members had such an illuminating picture of the mobsters 
engaged in murder, race booking, other forms of gambling, 
narcotics and prostitution. 

So impressed were the members of the committee that 
they petitioned Chief Michael E. Mitchell to have Inspectors 
Ahern and CahiU detailed to the senatorial body working 
to get at the bottom of the nationwide crime racket, which 
has seeped to the West Coast, without geting even a toenail 
hold in San Francisco. 

The request was granted and for weeks Inspectors Ahern 
and Cahill have been east working on many leads they 
were unable to follow while confined to their city. They 
will do a good job before they return to San Francisco, 
just as they have done on many a murder case as members 



Jmih.iv). 1<)^1 



POLICE AND PI-ACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e ^ 



Governor Warren Elected For Third Term 



The election of Governor Earl Warren to an unprece- 
dented third term as the chief executive of the State of 
California by such an overwhelming majority', was a great 
tribute to the splendid manner he has conducted the affairs 
of the state during the past eight years. This native Cali- 




Covernor Earl Warran 

fornian, whose record for honesty, ability, fortitude and 
vision has ser\'ed well in public life and in every office he 
has held from assistant city attorney of Oakland, assistant 
district attorney of Alameda County, as attorney-general 
and governor of California, has achieved success that has 
not only brought support from his own part)' — Republican 
— but from those of the opposition party — Democrat. By 
his forthright approach to ever)- problem affecting govern- 
ment, municipal county or state — he has always done the 
right things. 

He has appointed men and women to responsible posi- 
tions who have measured up to his standards — that of 
serving efficiently the people well, the high and the low, 
the poor or the rich, the small business man and the bigger 
industrialists. He has never displayed any liking for intol- 
erance, he has always insisted on honesty, he is an unrelent- 
ing foe of corruption, he has no use for those with criminal 
prcklivities and he is always a leader for law and order. 

He has done more for the education of our youths in 
the eight years he has held the office of Governor than any 
other state has done in many years more. More schools 
have been, and are, being built. Higher education has been 
greatly enlarged. 

He has taken care of the old folks, the needy and the 
blind, so that today with old age pensions of $7*i per 
month the state leads all others of the nation in the mone- 
tary welfore of its people. It was $40 a month when 
he took over. 

The unfortunate whose mental condition cause them to 
be placed under care have found state hospitals — nearly a 
dozen of them -equipped and conducted in a manner .so 
successfully that no other state can approach the treatment, 
care and the good results as are obtained in California. 



Where in the nation can more and better highways be 
found than in this state .^ 

Our penal institutions are better manned than those of 
any other commonwealth, and more is being done for the 
rehabilitation of the inmates of these prisons who justify 
the effort, than ever before. Many a man is turned out who 
becomes a good citizen. The law of averages holds in this 
activity and there are those for whom nothing can be done. 

With a 10,000,000 population, nearly doubled in the 
past ten years. Governor Warren has the capacity to meet 
the great surge of people who came west to make their 
homes. His vision is such that he has kept pace with the 
great increase and his plans for the next four years may 
well be for preparation for many more hundreds of thou- 
sands of newcomers. 

This state is on a sound basis, financially, thanks to the 
understanding of our present Governor. He wastes no 
dollars and he succeeded in keeping taxes down in spite 
of the natural national demand for more tax money. 

He has done more in the past two years to thwart the 
plans of organized crime, including gambling in all forms, 
than any former governor. His getting favorable legislative 
action for the formation of the State Crime Commission 
which finished its term last June 30, brought to light many 
instances of the designs of powerful underworld characters 
to take over California. The commission told of the rami- 
fications of this great criminal syndicate and of their efforts 
at corruption of established law enforcement officials. The 
work of this Crime Commission killed the plans so ex- 
travagantly laid and has driven the rats to cover. 

The final report of the commission, filed last month, 
was further brought to the attention of the honest people 
of the state how the racketcer-gajnbler, the narcotic dealer, 
the white slaver and other crooked crimes, how this formid- 
able organization of lawless nun operate; the report alerted 
ever)' peace officer of California as to what he is up against 
and how important it is that each officer meet the challenge 
of this devastation prepared by the scum of this earth. The 
people of California have a lot of thanks to give to Earl 
Warren for the hou.se cleaning his crime commission has 
accomplished. 

To all law enforcement officers there is great rejoicing 
for his reelection. There has never been a more loyal 
member of the State Peace Officers' Association, The Bay 
Counties Peace Officers' Association, the State District 
Attorney's Association and other peace officers organizations 
than Governor Warren. They feel that he will be- steering 
California through the prosix-ctivc turbulent years lh.it his 
coming term may see develop from the present world-wide 
emergency facing mankind. 

All peace officers as well as all the good (xople of the 
Nation, irrespective of party, race, treed or color, have 
rejoiced that Nina, the youngest daughter of Governor and 
Mrs. Warren, who was stricken with polio on the morning 
of eltxtion day, is recovering from that awful disease and 
is assured of full recovery. 



PiiSe 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Peace Officers of Marin County 



] till liar y. I9'<1 






SHERIFF WALTER SELLMER 
OF MARIN COUNTY 

Twenty years ago this month Walter 
Sellmer took office as Sheriff of Marin 
County. On January 8 he started on 
another term of four years. During his 
tenure as the county's chief law en- 
forcement officer he has increased his 
force of deputies; obtained the latest 
in office equipment and under the di- 
rection of James M. Lewis has devel- 
oped radio to a high degree of profi- 
ciency for the sake of his department 
and the other law agencies of Marin; 
and he has given the people a service 
unexcelled by any other peace officer 
of the state. His department has grown 
from three to nearly twenty-five men 
and women. 



WARDEN CLINTON T. DUFFY 

No prison in this country has a war- 
den so able and so highly thought of 
as Warden Duffy of San Quentin. 
Through his long tenure as boss of the 
world's largest penitentiary he has 
done more than any other to rehabili- 
tate men sentenced to serve prison 
terms in San Quentin. He runs no 
pleasure prison, but if a man shows 
any prospect for a better life he gets 
a chance. Those who do not, get well 
cared for. Good working conditions, 
good lock-up quarters, good food and 
a sensible approach to conditions which 
brought men to do penal servitude, 
are the chief factors for the great rec- 
ord Warden Duffy has established for 
himself. No warden is better known. 



JUDGE JOHN R. FLOR 

Over in Larkspur there is a man who 
has been police judge for the past 
twelve years — John R. Flor. For nearly 
ten years of that time he has also been 
secretary-treasurer of the Marin County 
Peace Officers' Association, and the 
time, energy and savvy he has applied 
to this job is something that has made 
that organization the success it is today. 
He will be found active in any project 
designed for the welfare of the coun- 
ty's residents, like Community Chest, 
Red Cross or the March of Dimes. He 
has been called to sit in by every magis- 
trate, city and county, in Marin, and 
both sides of any controversy likes the 
way he handles all cases. 



H. C. LITTLE 
BURNER CO., Inc. 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 



San Rafael Glass Works 

STRUCTURAL GLASS 

"Glass for all Purposes" 

Window Plate - Obscure - Mirror - Wire Glass 

Furniture Tops Made to Order 

Safety Automobile Glass 

Estimates Given 

Phone S.R. 1412 - 1115 Third Street 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 



I.i>!ittir\. /<;'■/ 



POLKt AND PI;ACR OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 7 




CHIEF JAMES F. DOYLE 

Chief Doyle has headed the Sausa- 
hto PD for the past ten years. He has 
been a member of the SPD for five 
years longer. His police administration 
through the war years brought him 
high commendations, and the ser\'ice 
he has given to the bustling town of 
some ^000 population has been of a 
high order. When a crime does occur 
Chief Doyle and his men get the guy 
who committed it. The SPD has a 
great record. 



^^^^^^^m 




(11 1 IF DONALD WOOD 

S.in Anselmo with its nearly 10,000 
population in Donald Wood has a po- 
lice chief who has held this important 
office for two decades. Last year he 
( CniiliimeJ on page (^'< j 



CHIEF FRANK KELLY 

In Chief Frank Kelly San Rafael 
(pop. 13,830) county seat of Marin 
County, the people have a top police 
execoitive who for nearly eight years 
has proven the wisdom of the voters 
in selecting him to this important post. 
He will come up again for re-election 
this spring and it is a sure bet he will 
be held in office for four more years. 
He has been a member of the SRPD 
for some 18 years, and has demon- 
strated his ability in every emergency 
with which he has been confronted. 
During the last year he has been presi- 
dent of the Bay Counties Peace Offi- 
cers' Association, and a good one. He 
is highly respected by peace officers 
throughout the state. 

CHIEF FRANK L. NELSON 

Chief Nelson has been head of the 
Cortc Madera PD since July 1, 1913, 
and he and his small force of officers 
have given that residential and attract- 
ive community tops in law enforce- 
ment. There is hardly any crime in 
the little Marin County city. 



r 






Cnnlr'ihiitc li> the 

MAR {. H () F DIMES 

//<//; /•/■;'/)/ Polio 




CHIEF JAMES McGOWAN 

Nowhere will you find a better po- 
liced city than Mill Valley. Its more 
than 7000 people have sencd the pic- 
turesque city in a splendid manner. 
There are no headline crimes. Chief 
James McGowan and his force of ten 
officers see to that. Chief McGowan 
has headed the MVPD for over six- 
teen years. He is highly respected by 
the citizens of Mill Valley for whom 
he has done a fine job. 




CHIEF HOW ARD (LARK 

Larkspur, with its 3000 contented 
people hasn't got a big police depart- 
ment, but it has a good one. One that 
makes crime a scarce article in that 
little municipality. Chief Howard 
(C.niiiiiiued on page 0^ ) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



J III! lull y. 19^1 



EARL WHITMORE... SAN MATEO'S NEW SHERIFF 



San Mateo has a new Sheriff. At last November's elec- 
tion, Sergeant Earl B. Whitmore of the Redwood City Po- 
lice Department, was chosen by the voters of the county, by 
an overwhelming majority, to succeed Sheriff James J. Mc- 
Grath, who had held the office for 24 years. 




Sheru-f Earl B. Whitmore 

On January 8 Sheriff Whitmore took his duties as the 
county's chief law enforcement officer, and the people of 
San Mateo may rest asured they are going to get the best in 
the enforcement of the laws. Besides being physically and 
mentally fit, the new sheriff has had experience in law en- 
forcement that eminently qualifies him for the responsible 
position he has assumed. 

Born in Caswell County, Illinois, 33 years ago, he came 
to Redwood City with his family when he was six years ot 
age. Getting his grammar and high school education in the 
public schools of his adopted city he finally decided police 
v/ork was what he wanted to follow. In 1941 he joined the 
Redwood City Police Department and in January, 1950, 
took a leave of absence to continue his study of law. 'When 
he took his leave he had risen to the rank of sergeant. Dur- 
ing World War I he joined the Army Air Force, and be- 
cause of his police experience he was assigned to investiga- 
tions for the Provost Marshal's office, and won commenda- 
tions for his excellent service. 

As a member of the RCPD he took every course provided 
by the FBI in this section of the state and was able to and 
did fill many important assignments under former Chief 
C. L. Collins and his successor Chief Stanley Wood. 

He attracted people from every walk of life and endeavor 
to his constructive campaign for election. 

His platform was built up on the promise to enforce the 
laws fairly and equally; to cooperate with all law enforce- 
ment agencies of the cities, state and federal; to see that 



their aims at crime detection and suppression are coordi- 
nated to the highest degree; to see that the sheriff's patrol 
shall cover every part of the unincorporated area of the 
county; to keep abreast of any and all progress in equip- 
ment and manpower; to see that every member of his staff 
is duly trained, and lives up to demands that they be good, 
honest and loyal men and women; to conduct the office on 
the basis of giving a dollar's worth of service for every dol- 
lar of taxpayer's money; to hold the confidence of the people 
by his fair and equal enforcement of all laws. 

During his campaign he announced his aim for better jail 
facilities; promised that no one v/ho had business with him 
or his deputies would be denied a chance to see the sheriff 
or any of the men or women working with him. 

San Mateo is a county of over 235,000 population, of 
which some 100,000 live in unincorporated areas of the 500 
square miles of territory, which extends from the southern 
limits of San Francisco to the northern limits of Santa Clara 
County, from the Bay to the Pacific Ocean. In this area is 
a range of law altitude mountains sloping on either side to 
fertile valleys and on the bay side homes ranging from the 
palatial to just small and attractive cottages. 

Nowhere in this land will you find 500 square miles pro- 
ducing such a versatility of commerce, agriculture and indus- 
try activities. It has many fruit and nut orchards; vast 
acreages planted to every sort of vegetables; it has many 
acres on which flourishes the flower industry that raises mil- 
lions of dollars worth of blooms annually to be shipped to 
various points in the United States; it has its cattle and 
dairy ranches; its poultry and turkey ranches, and it has 
many industries running from big plants to a two- or three- 
man job; it has good climate, good highways, good bus and 
train transportation and fast is every desirable piece of land 
being built with homes for the thousands of people who 
desire living in such an enchanted place. 

It is to see that those who reside out of incorporated mu- 
nicipalities are made happy by reducing crime to a mini- 
mum; to see that no criminal element gets a foothold in the 
county and to enforce all laws fairly and impartially. 

Sheriff Whitmore will meet these demands for he is a 
well built man, prepossesing in appearance, a good family 
man and his reputation for honesty and loyalty have been 
well proven by his years as a peace officer. 

Ten years ago Sheriff Whitmore married Miss Meredith 
Clattenburg, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. H. A. Clattenberg, 
of Redwood City. The couple has three daughters. Mrs. 
Whitmore did much in the campaign months for her hus- 
band, for she, like the new sheriff, is one who people like 
on first sight. They are just good, honest, and wholesome 
folks. 

Sheriff Whitmore is a member of the American Legion, 
San Mateo lodge of Elks, San Mateo County horseman's 
Association and the Peninsula Police Officers' Association, 
not only a member but an active one. 

(Continued on page 3f>) 



I.wihir). IVil 



POUCH AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Juvenile Delinquency Committee Report 

B) roriiier Chiej Miihatl L. Mihhell lo Slate Peace Uljicen Conteniinii in PasaJetia. 



As indicated in our report to the Association at its 1919 
tonvcntion, irime preieiilioii remained hij;h on all estab- 
lished and recognized lists of police res|-)onsibilities and 
obligations, and was deemed to be one of the five basic 
(unctions of law enforcement. We felt then that effective 




Former CHini M. E. Mnciii ii 

l^crtormance of this function was best accomplished tiirough 
a positive and constructive influence among the youth of the 
community, and we have not changed our position. We 
pointed out in our report that successful delinquency pre- 
vention came about only through full cooperation of all 
agencies, public and private, working with youth, plus the 
full support of all citizens. The cooperative approach is 
still the most effective, and we in law enforcement should 
not forget that. 

Law enforcement administrators, too often in the past, 
have emphasized the crime repressive aspcxts of police 
work, as contrasted to true delinquency prevention. It was 
K'lieved that mere control of criminal activity and appre- 
hension of law violators was sufl'icient. Not so many years 
.igo, law enforcement officers were trained merely to appre- 
hend adult offenders, and were called "thief takers," an 
old English term, and little concern was directed toward 
youth and delinquency prevention. Today, particTjIarly in 
California, more and more emphasis is being placed on 
removal of temptations and causes of delinquency and upon 
the proper prcxessing and referral of youthful law violators, 
in order to effect tnic delinquency prevention. 

We note with much concern the lack of vision of our 
generation. As a people, we have prospered materially. We 
have achieved the optimum in industrial leadership. We 
have made great advances in the field of .siicnce. We can 



boast of a standard of living which is unequaled the world 
over, and have more leisure time and opportunities for rec- 
reation than people in any civilized land in the world. BUT 
we are sadly neglecting our most precious asset — our youth 
— tomorrow's citizen. 

We note with much concern the increase in the number 
of parents reported for crimes of neglect, cruelty and aban- 
donment of their children. We see a gradual disintegration 
of family life, and deterioration of the traditional Ameri- 
can home. 

The American home has too frequently become merely a 
place to eat and sleep instead of moral development and 
spiritual growth. Law enforcement officers should attempt, 
as early as possible, to discover any delinquent causal factors 
in the home, and u.se every legal means at their disposal to 
remove or remedy them. 

In our 1949 report to the Association, we outlined in 
detail the functions and responsibilities of a law enforce- 
ment agency in working with youth. Those functions and 
responsibilities still remain. The principal objectives are, 
briefly: % 

(1) Early discovery; (2) Investigation; (3) Disposition 
and/or proper referral; (-4) Protation. 

It is the purpose of your committee in this report to give 
you an accurate account of what the delinquency picture is 
in California, and bring you up to date on what the most 
recent efforts of law enforcement agencies in California 
have to counteract delinquency. Based on figures compiled 
by the California Youth Authority, we find that law en- 
forcement agencies in California, during the year 1949, 
contacted 90,395 youths under the age of 18 years, of whom 
-10,536 were placed in custody. For the calendar year 1948, 
there were 111,689 youths contacted, of whom 36.931 were 
placed in custody. We therefore note that there has been a 
slight increase, but we can say that it is not alarming. Some 
of this increase can be attributed, we feel, to California's 
great growth in population; but your committee belicA'cs 
that the greater part of this increase can be attributed to 
the "stepped-up" activity of police juvenile bureaus through- 
out the State. As indicated, later in this report, juvenile 
units in police and sheriff's departments have nearly doubled 
in number since our last report; moreover, the juvenile 
units in our larger departments in the urban areas have in- 
crea.sed their staffs, broadened their hours of sen-ice for 
availability to the public. The San Francisco Police Juxcnile 
Bureau made KWr more arrests, both adult and juvenile 
in 1949 than in the year 19(8, and similar results are indi- 
cated in other urban areas. Why do wc want to latili law 
violators? Is it to take revenge on them? No! Modern 
criminal law and juvenile court law in particular, repudiate 
revenge as their pur|iose. Rather, it is O'.f puic>osc to dis- 
cover and remove the lauses of delinquency at the earliest 
possible moment, show that crime will not be tolerated, and 
(CotiiininJ till ptigt 2^ } 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

THE SIGN OF THE RED HAND 

By B. C. Bridges 



January, 1951 



*Tb/.< dil'nh' udi uiilten for the Police and Peace Officers' 
journal by B. C. Bridges, internalionally-recognized author- 
ity in police science. Retired from active duty, after tiventy- 
fire yean' service as police executive and university in- 
structor. Mr. Bridges devotes his time to tvritiiig in the 




B. C. Bridges 

hitv enforcement field, and is the author of num^erous works, 
including the world's leading textbook on personal identifi- 
cation, "Practical Fingerprinting." published by Funk & 
Wagnalls Company. — Editor. 

There is an old proverb about "not being able to see the 
forest because of the trees," and this is often the case with 
those of us who work with fingerprints. It is quite possible 
to become so preoccupied with the set routine of our daily 
duties that we lose sight of the wider and more colorful 
fields, both past and present, wherein fingerprints and hand- 
prints have played such important roles. Rather than a 
utility of recent origin, as many still believe, fingerprints 
have touched and moulded the affairs of mankind from 
the dawn of civilization up to the present day; they have 
been impressed upon the humble marriage bonds of 
peasants, and they have sealed the international treaties of 
kings and emperors — "The moving finger writes, and hav- 
ing writ, moves on — " 

There is a fascination in the evolution of recorded 
thought. It is generally agreed that picture-writing pre- 
ceded and generated the graphic systems in Egypt, Assyria, 
Babylonia, and China, and also in the American Continents, 
especially in North America, where it still is in use with 
the surviving Indian tribes. A potent urge has ever im- 
pelled men of all countries and all eras to transcribe their 
emotions; successive artists have scrived beneath palm and 
pine, each in his turn, modifying, altering, and simplifying 
the medium of expression. Writing traces back through 



its many stages to a primitive age when all records were 
pictures of the things or events expressed, but these "idea- 
pictures" were later to become "sound-pictures," in which 
phonetic symbols indicated the words and syllables of 
spokc-n languages. 

Numerous and diversified have been the designs and 
objects selected to describe and symbolize the subject matter 
throughout this long procession of chirography; and 
through the lasting and scrivened symphony of human urge 
and inspiration has ever merged the theme of hands and 
fingerprints. In stone-age traceries, archaic hieroglyphics, 
and primitive ideographs, man has set down his records, 
when smooth stone lured the artist's maul and chisel; but 
aborigines lacked modernized equipment for refined ex- 
pression, and thus their narratives of conquest, occupation 
and exodus were frankly and boldly executed, extensively 
involving the versatile hand that stood for both beneficence 
and fateful warning. 

More frequently than any other symbol, carvings and 
paintings of the human hand have appeared in the Ameri- 
can continents. From the frozen north to mysterious Old 
Mexico, the "Sign of the Red Hand" has always been one 
of prime importance, and usually of sinister implication. 
The high and colorful civilization of equatorial America 
also employed it ominously. 

From Cromagnon times, red is known to have been the 
representative and royal color of death. Cave-tombs of 
Europe have disclosed human remains stained scarlet; one 
famous burial, discovered in Wales by Dr. Buckland, re- 
vealed a woman's body enveloped in red oxide of iron 
that had dyed the figure and surrounding rubble; archeolo- 
gists dubbed her "The Red Lady of Paviland." In lands 
both old and new, the color of red has always held pro- 
found importance and found portent uses in the symbols 
of both life and death. 

From enduring evidence, conjecture may surmise what 
ominous sacrificial rites were once solemnized in Assyria, 
Egypt, Peru and Yucatan; in the dark mausoleums of the 
cave-occupants of the Balearic Isles, and in the pagan 
dolmens of all the world. In harsh idolatry, mankind has 
tendered an inordinate baptism of blood and votive offer- 
ings of countless lives in the barbaric centers of earlier 
religious cults; but the treasure of nobler metals and 
precious gems that garnished maleficent temples awakened 
the cupidity of rapacious invaders who were better armed 
for spilling blood in the cause of the great god Mars, and 
the cruel and glittering rituals frequently were halted in 
conquest no less sanguinary. 

The pages of history are encrimsoned with the rivers of 
that royal color poured from living veins in the baneful 
Sign of the Red Hand. It was the habit of Timur the Lame 
(or Tamburlane, as he was later called), after adding a 
few more tons of human heads to the towering mountain 
(Continued on page 58 j 



January. 1 9 ''I 



POLICE AND PEACE OPFICERS |OURNAI. 



Pjgc II 



Monterey's New Chief, C. E. Simpson 



Historic Monterey has a new Chief ol Pohce. Last Oc- 
tober, following the retirement of veteran Chief Fred 
Moore, the city council appointed Sergeant Charles E. 
Simpson to the top municipal position. 

In the selection of Sergeant Simpson as the new Chief, 
the council was motivated entirely by the splendid record 
of the appointee, not only as a police officer but as an out- 
standing citizen, interested in many civic activities. 

Chief Simpson, who was born in Grand Rapids, Michi- 
gan, 37 years ago thus, becomes one of the youngest police 
chiefs of cities of comparable size and larger. It is a well 
merited reward for loyal and efficient police service, and 
recognition of the young chiefs personal career, which has 
found him tilling many positions of trust. 

Getting his elementar)' education in Grand Rapids, he 
went to the New Trier high school in Winnetka, 111., where 
has family had moved. Later they came to California, set- 
tling in Berkeley where he finished his high school educa- 
tion and went to the University of California for two years. 
Early in his life he aimed his ambitions at police service. 
After leaving college he engaged in radio engineering, de- 
signs and sales. He was prominent in his assistance in de- 
sign construction and maintenance of the radio-telephone 
system employed during the construction of the San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Following this work he joined 
the radio division of the Berkeley Police Department in the 
early stages of police two-way radio. He contributed much 
to the success of this invention for law enforcement. 

In September, 1949, he went to Monterey and was em- 
ployed in sales and installation of radios. 

On April 1, 1942, he was engaged by the City of Mon- 
terey to complete installation of the police two-way radio 
system. Completing this job he, having become a member 
of the police department, was assigned to the night desk at 
headquarters and later in the year was shifted to the day- 
time desk. On July 16, 1947, he was promoted to Desk 
Sergeant, a position he has held ever since until his eleva- 
tion to the Chiefship. 

In addition to developing police radio, servicing the 
police cars of the Monterey Police Department, and moni- 
toring departments of neighboring citizens, and taking tare 
of the manifold duties of a desk sergeant he had time to 
perfect his polite knowledge in such activities as identitita- 
tion, operations planning, office organization and installa- 
tion of rc-cords for the department. He has been in thargc 
of all these various operations, and no police department 
has a better set of records, of B. of I., and his work in plan- 
ning and organization was a big factor in his being selected 
as the successor of Chief Moore. 

He has been a most valuable member of the Associated 
Public Communication Officers, and is a past president of 
that organization, and is at the present time the treasurer. 
He is also a member of the Monterey County Peace Officers' 
Association. 

He is the tliiril iiicmlur nt' iIk A]'( C) who has Ix-en ele- 



vated to top law enforcement offices in Northern California. 
Chief Walter Wisnom, of Hillsborough, was the first, Sher 
iff John Claussen was the second and now Chief Simpson 
finished the triumvirate. 

He is also president of the Monterey Lions Club, and a 
member of the Psi Upsilon college fraternity. 

Chief Simpsons principal hobbies are golf, music and 
amateur radio, and he is good at them all. 

Chief Simpson is married, and the couple have a ten-year- 
old daughter. Their home is at 1176 Harrison Street, 
Monterey. 

Former Chief Moore served with the Monterey Police 
Department since July 1, 1929, was chief since June 23. 
1932. He kept Monterey a white spot as far as crime was 
concerned, and through the war years he kept the city clean, 
with gambling and prostitution something that could get 
no foothold in his dt)\ He reduced juvenile delincjuency 
to a negligible point by his formation of the Monterey Boys 
Club with a center that furnished every opportunity for the 
youths of the city to have clean recreation and constructive 
supervision. 

Telephone 3789 R. M. SHARPE 

UNITED AUTO SERVICE 



MONTtRt.V 



177 Webster Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Central Grocery and 
Meat Market 

Phone 2-5829 

FRIENDLY SERVICE 
FREE DELIVER ^' 

663 Lighthouse Avenue 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



PALACE DRUG STORE 

DEPENDABLE SERVICF 

Phone SS47 
101 AL\ ARADO STREET 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



i. ......... , 



P^ige 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 19'>J 



THE PATH OF DUTY 

By Rktirhd DiiTi'CTiVE Serc-.hant James E. Cottle 



It was, if nicniory serves me rightfully, in the tuneful 
comic opera of some two decades ago, "The Pirates of 
Penzance," that a song was sung and echoed by the 
chorus "A Policeman's Life Is Not a Happy One." 

Gilbert and Sulli\an, the 5z;ifted English authors, spoke 




James E. Cottle 
Retired S. F. P. D. Detective Sergeant 

currently — yea, a mouthful, when they compiled those 
swinging lyrics in the fore part of this century. You 
know — and I know it. 

The old refrain which was once so popular struck me 
with a peculiar force one day, where Post street intersects 
the Rue De Fillmore. 

A young officer, in the discharge of his duty at that 
point, had reminded a fair young pedestrian that she 
was violating the traffic rules pertaining to street crossings 
and had politely sent her to the sidewalk with an admoni- 
tion to be more careful. 

The officer was right. 

The girl was wholly in the wrong. 

A gentleman, proudly proclaiming himself as from 
the middle west (and there are many of his locale within 
our gates at the present time) became at once the lady's 
champion, and censured the officer for obeying orders, 
directing his criticism to her though. Oh ! not to the 
Officer, dear no ! Not to him. Discretion is ever the 
better part of valor ! 

The lady's feeliiig had been hurt! He, the Officer, 
should have let her cross, traffic rules notwithstanding. 
Show of authority; they get their salaries easy, etc., 
etc., etc. 

My sympathies went out to the young officer. As an 
old campaigner of many years of active service in the 
ranks of the police myself, I knew what the officer was 
up against, and that he had more than earned his salary. 
Let those, who in their guileness innocence proclaim the 
lioiiceman's life is a lazy and easy one, don the officer's 



uniform for one brief day; yes, half a day, in any cit\' 
of San Francisco's size, and they will change their minds 
before the time is up to quit. 

\'ou know it, and I know it. 

While life, in any calling, is a lottery and a gamble 
with the Reaper, I think after serving on the force for 
more than a quarter of a century that I can speak with 
some accurate degree of certainty when I say that a 
policeman's life goes neck and neck, and fifty-fifty with 
a fireman's for risk. Neither knows, with certainty, when 
they put on their respective uniforms if their own hands 
will ever take them off again. 

Theirs is a path of duty, and along its divers ways are 
many happenings, comic, serious and otherwise to test the 
patience and courage of the best of men. 

I recall an incident in my own career which exemplifies 
this statement, and which to my knowledge I have never 
told before for publication. 

In 1903, while a member of the San Francisco Police 
Department, Dr. A. P. O'Brien, being then city health 
officer here, I was detailed with the Board of Health, 
for duty. 

An old house, at what was then No. 110 Morton 
street, (now poetically re-christened Maiden Lane) and 
near the corner of Grant avenue (Dupont street) had 
been condemned by the Board, and I was sent there to 
tack up a poster to that effect; giving the occupants their 
notice to move out, evacuate. Living in the house at the 
time was a man named Doran, who had taken possession 
of, and who claimed the property in question as his own, 
and who had boasted openly that any officer who should 
dare to enter his premises would be carried away in a 
morgue wagon. 

This threat or challenge had been published in one of 
the city's papers of the time, that any one craving excite- 
ment would probably get full measure by being at the 
address when the officer called the next day. 

The notice bore fruit in abundance. I arrived at the 
seat of action next day about 2 p. m. As I alighted from 
my buggy (Rolls Royces not then being so numerous), 
I was accosted by a young reporter on one of the city's 
papers, who asked if he might accompany me. Replying 
in the affirmative, we started for the house. I found a 
motley crowd of over 100 persons, who made way for 
me as I went toward the house. As I reached the front, 
Doran appeared on the balcony abo\e the door, a levelled 
pistol in his hand. 

The crowd was ^-isibly impressed, likewise myself. They 
scattered. With me, the time for both action and discre- 
tion was at hand. Like June sentences they ran, so to 
speak, concurrenth'. 

Doran was speaking. His words are still fresh, very 
fresh, in my memory. He said (and I quote verbatim): 
(CoiUnuwcl on page .^S) 



jiwiiitry, 19'>1 



POLICE AND PEACE OEI'KERS JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Chief Farina Nabs Policeman Murderer 

By Opie L. Warni k 



It is c-ntcrtainin^ rcuiiiig stories of the Sherlock Holmes 
format, and otlier detective thrillers whiih tell how tictional 
sleuths solve crimes and bring to lx)ok the smartest of 
crooks. These stories, mostly well written, go into great 
detail of how the hero of the tales resort to many scientific 




Chii 1 Frank Fakina 
Emeryville- P. D. 

gimmicks. A lot of these gimmicks are very plausible and 
some are used in the course of working on a crime, by 
regularly constituted law enforcement officers throughout 
the land. But the solution of any crime generally falls back 
on at least four essentials — hard work, breaks, cooperation, 
and experience. 

Hardly a week goes by when some one accused of a big 
robbery, burglary or murder is yanked out of circulation 
and placed in a place where the neighbor's dogs won't 
bother him. And you will hear a lot of people remark in 
substance: "How in the world did the police bring that guy 
to book?" Especially is this c|uery produced when a suspect 
is rounded up in sfjcedy fashion. 

This brings us to one of the most brutal murders, in 
which a San Jose police olTuer was ruthlessly shot down by 
a burglar, surprised during his unlawful undertaking. 

This happened on the early morning of November 14. 
The victim was 34-ycar-old Officer John J. Covalesk, six 
months on the force after serving for some time in Chief 
R. M. Phillip's Los Gatos Police Department. 

The way Chief Raymond Blackmore and Detective Cap- 
tain Bart Collins, of the San Jose Police Department, recon- 
structed the crime was that Officer Covalesk found the door 
of the Mercantile Acceptance Corporation open and en- 
tered to investigate. He surprised some one who was rifling 
the safe of the concern. There were shots and around 5 
a.m. that morning Officer Covalcsk's body was slumped by 
a desk -dead. 



Chief Blatkmore and Ca|->tain Collins and Sheriff Howard 
Hornbuikle went to work to gather in the man who had 
committed this murder. They got a newsboy who saw .some- 
one leave the building in an automobile. Other witnesses 
(urnished fragmentary information about a man and a car. 
Nothing very promising in the way of evidence. But the 
intormation obtained was assembled and on that every 
peace officer in California was broadcast what the San Jose 
police had. Radio, teletype, the press and telephones were 
used in disseminating what had so far been gathered about 
the shooting and killing of a fearless policeman. 

In less than 48 hours the man who did the shooting was 
in custody and had made a full confession of his guilt. 

As an answer to the cjuestion of the average layman 
"how did they ever get that guy, with so little to work on," 
we give you what Chief of Police Frank Farina of Emery- 
ville and one of his officers, Frank Cebellcro, did in re- 
sponding to a call from a fellow Chief. They went to work, 
not for their eight-hour shift, but without regards to the 
time clock. They visited many places where a man might 
visit if he wanted to hide himself. They finally came to a 
card room in the industrial city across the bay. There they 
noted a young man "betting "em high." Frank Farino has 
been a policeman for many years, he has solved many 
baffling crimes and he has by his experience developed an 
extra sense, that of settling on a subject without too much 
to go on. He never makes a mistake, and in this instance 
he maintained his high batting average. He was struck 
by the similarity of the card player to the thin description 
sent out from San Jose. He and Officer Cebollero ap- 
proached the young man, told him to cash in his chips and 
come with them. Naturally the youth complied. 

He said his name was Clifford Denham, of 146 Eldridge 
street, Oakland. It developed he was out on probation for 
a series of burglaries and robberies. 

He was advised of the suspicion of the Emeryville officers 
that he had killed the San Jo.se |X)liccman. He denied it. 
Chief Farina gave him a frisk. This revealed the clincher, 
and dissipated any doubt the EPD head might have li.ul that 
he was dealing with the much wanted man. 

There was a bullet fired from the gun of Officer Covalesk 
in his gun duel with the burglar. Later Denham said he 
was keeping it as a souvenir. There was a roll of $20 bills 
with a bullet hole through it. The bundle of bills un- 
iloubtedly saved the thief's life. There were blood stains 
on the suspects clothing and further examination revealed 
a superficial wound on the chest and abdomen skin burns, 
from another missile from Officer Covalcsk's pistol. 

Then young Denham laid it on the line. Excused his 
ait by saying the officer fired first. Said he didn't know 
he had killed him when he fled the scene of the crime. 
Said he gambled the proceeds from the illf.iii.l burd.irv 
at various spots. 

fCiiilnin.J oil page (il I 



P'lge J' 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

TEACHING POLICEMEN 



]a>!iiary. 19^ J 



The San F"rancisco Police Academy of today, one of the 
most smoothly functioning units of the San Francisco 
Police Department, is what John A. Engler has had much 
to do in its present high status. 

The Academy was in its eleventh year of service in 




Captain John A. Engler 
Director of Personnel 

January, 1948, when Lieutenant Engler was named to the 
post of Director of Personnel by Chief of Police Michael 
E. Mitchell. 

In selecting Johnny Engler for the position, Mitchell 
picked a man who didn't need to be told what to do. 
Supervision of recruit training is one of his principal 
responsibilities, and he has handled it with authority 
and ability. 

Engler proved himself to be an expediter as Department 
Secretary during the administration of Chief Charles 
W. Duilea. 

He succeeded Lieutenant Wesley Murray as head of 
the Police Academy. Murray, now attached to the Head- 
quarters Company, is a legal adviser to Chief Mitchell. 

A detailed program for training recruits is relatively 
new in police procedure, and the San Francisco depart- 
ment has not fallen behind in this field. Not too long ago, 
police officers learned their work from bitter experience 
and the advice of older oflicers. Quite often, unfortunately, 
the experience was too late — or the advice inappropriate. 

When police administrators throughout the nation be- 
gan thinking of better qualified law enforcement officers, 
police work ceased to be an occupation and became a 
profession. 

Perhaps the trend was occasioned by two forces, among 
others. 1 ) A policeman needed to learn ways of protecting 
himself from the unpredictable attacks of society. His job, 
at best, exposed him to many physical hazards. With a 



little training in modern techniques, some lives might well 
be saved. (2) The people were realizing more and more 
how precious a document the Constitution of the United 
States was. That instrument said that a policeman couldn't 
make the mistakes the ordinary human being is entitled to. 
A carpenter can drive another nail, and a bricklayer can 
lay another brick — but if a policeman errs in executing 
an arrest, he may be dead. Or he might be burdened with 
payment of civil damages for the rest of his life. 

Close on the heels of the reorganization of the S.F.P.D. 
in 1937, Chief of Police William J. Quinn recommended 
the establishment of a Police Academy. Approved by the 
Board of Police Commissioners and the Board of Super- 
visors, the Academy opened its doors October 18, 1937, to 
the first class of recruits. 

Its motto — "Enter here to learn ... go forth to 
serve" — pretty well explained the purpose behind the 
Academy's creation. 

The late Captain Arthur D. Layne, one of the city's 
best remembered police officials, became the first Direc- 
tor of Personnel and took over the job of running the 
Academy. 

Captain Layne's first class of ten officers was graduated 
January 24, 1938. The class included the following 
officers : 

James P. Donohue, now at Southern Station ; Sergeant 
Thomas W. Cassidy, Ingleside; Bernard G. Dowd, Bu- 
reau of Communications; Niles M. Driver, no longer 
with the department ; Sergeant Hazelton French, Traffic 
Bureau; August J. Palmieri, pistol range; Arnold D. 
Schaffer, Northern Station ; Raymond P. Seyden, Accident 
Investigation Bureau; Inspector AVilliam T. Valentine, 
Burglary Detail ; and the late John D. Thornley. 

The present 45-man class, one of the largest groups to 
train at the Academy, is the sixty-fourth class since the 
Academy's start. The largest class was the fifty-seventh 
with 49 men, according to Director Engler. 

The eight hard working policewomen of the S.F.P.D., 
graduated from the Academy in June, 1948, are the only 
members of their sex to take the course. 

Principles of law and order are older than the Ten 
Commandments, and society for centuries found ways of 
enforcing its demands. The police system, as such, is 
relatively new, however ; and its development has been 
rapid. The first police department in the United States 
was created as late as 1820 in the city of Philadelphia. 
Changing times changed the complexion of crime. Law 
enforcement had to change, also. 

With the passing of time the policeman became a more 
essential part of the community, because his duties came 
to include service to the people, in addition to the suppres- 
sion of crime. His training needed to be more diversified 
and detailed to qualify him for his highly responsible 
position. 

(ConlDined on page 44) 



jaiiliitry. 19'^f 



POLICE AND F'HACi; OI IK HRS JOURNAL 



P.tf^e r 



Chief Riordan and Napa^s Police Dept. 



Napa is one of the oldest towns in California witii an 
historical background running back to the earliest days of 
the white man on the Pacific Coast. The legends of the days 
before the white man came arc interesting, and the old 
landmarks, springs, geysers and Mt. St. Helena nearby, com- 
bined with natural scenic beauties in a modern, metropoli- 
tan environment make Napa an ideal place to live. 

Napa is on the Napa River 46 miles northeast of San 
Francisco, an hour and a half drive from Berkeley, seat of 
the University of California, and two hours drive from 
Sacramento, the capital of the state. The population for the 
City of Napa in the 1950 census is l.?.'i42. Napa County 
population is 46,373. 

Napa residents are keenly alert to their cultural, social 
and fraternal obligations. There are appro.ximately one 
hundred and nineteen organizations in the city including 
farm organizations, and service clubs. There are fourteen 
church denominations. Suffice it to say, the civic, fraternal 
and social life of Napa runs the whole gamut of human 
activities. 



between agriculture, industry, and retail commerce. 

The fertility of the soil and the climate advantages of 
Napa County make for an unusually fine ijuality of wine 
grapes, of which there are over 15,000 acres under cultiva- 
tion producing from six to ten tons per acre. Napa wines 
are famed the country over. The largest bonded wine cellar 
in the world is located in Napa County. 

Located in and around Napa are industries whose prod- 
ucts are: leather, gloves, shirts, pants, athletic equipment, 
paper boxes, dried fruits. Basalt Paving and Basalite Build- 
ing Products, quarried stone, cheese, ice cream, mineral 
waters, grape juice and important wineries. 

Diversified agriculture is divided into main classifications: 
(1) fruit and nuts, (2) alfalfa and hay and (3) field crops 
such as barley, wheat and vegetables. In addition the hills 
provide feed and range for stock raising, while the poultry 
industry is an important factor in the lower levels surround- 
ing the towns and cities. The farm area comprises 293,925 
acres, of which 180,385 acres are tillable for orchards, vine- 
yards, field crops, vegetables, tomatoes, etc. 




NAPA POI.ICR DKPARTMI-NT 
I.ift m ri^hl: Otfiicrs Anjy Blytla-. Howard \X'cstcndorf, limil ImbnJcn. VC'illi.im Hill, StTj;f.int J.uk Jdhnson, Officer Dcwcy Hurnsc-d. 
Capt.un Omstanif Madakna. City Manager Charles Martin, Matron 01>;a Kornailiiin. Chief Eupcne Riordan, Officers Delph Rexroth, 
Arthur Corbctt, Lawrence Antoni. Inspector Sherwood Munk, Officers jule Ojeda, Walter Nichols. Henry Andersen, Ser>;t. laik Blair. 
Officers VC'ertz Hemphill, Jesse Crowell, Meter Officer W. Morrow. Officers Owen Roberts and William Thornton are not in picture. 



Educational facilities are the best. Napa County has 
three modern union high schools, located in Napa, St. Hel- 
ena, and Calistoga; fifty-six grammar schools, practically 
new and modern. Pacific Union College; St. Helena Sani 
tarium, with its accredited nursing .school; a modern busi- 
ness college; two convents; parochial and private schools, 
also Mt. LaSalle novitiate; city and county libraries. The 
State Agricultural Colege is one and a quarter hours, and 
the University one hour by auto from Napa. 

The climate of Napa is healthful and invigorating aver 
aging eighty-four degrees in the summer and forty degrees 
in the winter. 

Napa is convenient to San Francisco, Sacramento and 
Oakland and is served by modern, paved highways. Napa 
River is one of the three natural navigable rivers in tin 
State of California. 

A desirable place in which to live, to work or to engage 
in business or in the professions is, obviously, a prosperous 
community; a community that is balanced in its prosperity 



Napa is the center of an area endowed with natural recre- 
ational advantages — fishing, boating, hunting, sports. 
Closely connected by radiatiiig highways Napa is in close 
( Colli iiiiH'il oil page iO ) 





H. 


SCHWARZ CO. 

HslAlillsllll) 1870 




PAIN rS • OILS • PUIMBINC, 


II 


irclu .irc- 


.iiul Ai;iiciiliiir.i! ImpiciiKiU.s 
918 Main Street 




NAPA, CAI.IIORNIA 






Telephone 1 A 



16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 19^1 



New Developments in Richmond, CaL, P. D. 



By E. F. Phipps, Chief of Police 



This article will be coiuerned with three subject matters 
— a new personnel plan recently adopted by the City of 
Richmond, the Police Department's Criminology Lab and 
the new innovation in police radio communication — the 
selective calling feature. 

Approximately two years ago, a small group of Richmond 




Chii;f E. F. Phipps 
police officers, along with members of the Richmond Fire 
Department, began devising a new personnel plan for mem- 
bers of their respective departments. Members of these 
groups attended special meetings in Sacramento, consulted 
legal advisors and worked long hours on their own time to 
bring about development of a plan which would render 
mutual benefits to the departments concerned. About a year 
later, interest of other city departments was aroused and, 
therefore, representatives from those departments entered 
into the planning, in the hopes of outlining a system which 
would encompass all city employees and be of equal value 
to them. Success was recently realized when the completed 
personnel plan was formally adopted. 

To go into detail on this plan would not be possible in 
this article. Therefore, discussion will be limited only to its 
purpose and basic requirements. From this plan, rules and 
regulations governing the various city departments will be 
adopted. 

Its purpose is to provide a modern system of personnel 
administration for the City of Richmond, whereby effective- 
ness in the personal service rendered to the city and fair- 
ness and equity to the employees and the tax payer, alike, 
may be promoted. 

All appointments to and within the classified service of 
the city shall be based upon efficiency and fitness which shall 
be ascertained by means of recognized personnel selection 
techniques such as written tests, aptitude tests, personal in- 
terview, performances tests, records of daily work perform- 



ances, work samples, professional achievement, or any com- 
bination of these. The personal interview by itself may not 
be considered a promotional examination. 

Fair and equitable rates of pay shall be provided, with 
due consideration both of the employees and the tax payer 
and with due observance of the principle of like pay for 
like work and suitable differences in pay for differences in 
kind of work. 

Full consideration shall be given to the interests and de- 
sires of the employee insofar as it is consistent with interests 
of the city and the public it serves. The establishment and 
maintenance of working conditions and morale shall be 
such that the city service is attractive as a career and that 
each employee is encouraged to render his best service. 

The second subject for discussion is the Police Labora- 
tory. In February, 1950, the first equipment was received 
for the setting up of a crime detection laboratory. It is 
planned to .secure additional equipment to do all types of 
work normally encountered. A very definite start has been 
made and fully equipping o'l the laboratory is anticipated 
during the next year. 

The laboratory is presently equipped to do the following 
types of work. 

1. Chemical microscopy. 

2. Blood detection and identification. 

3. Physical examinations (specific gravity, etc.). 

4. Ultra-violet analyses. 

5. Hair and textile fiber comparisons. 

6. Identification of physiological fluids. 

7. Moulage casting. 

The laboratory is working on a limited basis and has 
already proved valuable in several cases by aiding in a con- 
viction or by clearing suspected persons. In one period of 
a month, twenty-two crime scenes were visited by our 
criminologist. He worked on forty-five separate cases, rang- 
ing from murder, hit-run, burglary, etc., to Peeping Tom. 
Evidence examined consisted, in part, of glass, bullets, fin- 
gerprints, paint comparisons and soil comparisons were 
made. 

Even though the Criminology Lab of the Richmond 
Police Department is in its infancy stage, we feel that there 
is no limit to the possibilities for advancement in this par- 
ticular phase of law enforcement work. 

The third and la.st subject on which we will dwell is 
Selective Calling. In the field of communication, our se- 
lective-calling feature has attracted widespread attention 
and we have received many requests for information con- 
cerning it. Therefore, although we are repetitious, an ex- 
planation of the general principles of selective calling will 
be presented. The following is quoted from an article on 
our department which appeared in the 30th Annual Pro- 
gram Magazine, Peace Officers' Association of the State 
of California. 

(Continued on page '^ 1 j 



] ail nary. 1 9'' I 



POLICIZ AND PEACE OEEICERS' JOURNAL 



Page i: 



Prisons and Prisoners in National Defense 



Address by jnriiwr S. P. Chief Charles 11". Diillea. iioii of 
iheir annual coiireiilion 

National defense is lundamentally tomerned with the 
problem of how to use manpower most efficiently and ef- 
fectively. The creation of modern fighting forces, the pro- 
vision of \vea[->ons and material, the organization of civil 
defense are all essentially dependent upon the skill, iiioralc, 
and resourcefulness of our citizens. 

As government agencies and citizen groups we are organ- 




FoRMER Chief Charles W. Di li.ea 



izing to assure the maximum material strength in the inter- 
ests of democracy and the preservation of world peace; wc 
must explore the productive potential of all government 
agencies and citizen groups. We must draw upon our expe- 
rience in our national defense planning, particularly our 
experience of World War II. But we must also be willing 
to embrace new ideas and concepts in our planning. Fortu- 
nately, our country has always been replete with the pioneer 
spirit. Our willingness and ability to meet new challenges 
has assured our growth and endurance as a great nation. 

My topic is concerned with the utilization of prisons and 
prisoners for national defense. It is often a surprise to 
many people to learn that prisons and prison inmates have 
played an important part in our war effort. It is likewise a 
surprising fact that prisons and prisoners have a large and 
varied potential in a scheme of national defense. What is 
needed is a willingness to u.se this potential. 

Prisons arc essentially small communities. If we think 
of them as such, we can better understand them. These 
institutions, like all communities, usually have the follow- 
ing: 

A working population of varied skills made up of the 
civilians who operate the prison plus the inmates usually 
a ratio of about 10 to I. 

Hospital 

Agriiultural productivity 

Manufacturing f.icilities 

Power plant 

I'atilities for the storage and preparation of food 

Educational opportunities both academic and vocational 



Stale Adiill Aiilhonly. /;./,„, //,, Slale I'a.,. Ojjud^ al 
last Otliiber in Pasaden.i 

Expandable living cjuarters 
Places of worship 
Water supply 

Most prisons are in or adjacent to one or more regular, 
civilian communities. It is [wssible to coordinate the activi- 
ties of the prison community with that of the large commu- 
nity or communities "outside." 

During the past war, great and wise use was made of the 
many prison communities of our land. In 1942 the War 
Production Board established a Prison War Program Branch 
to swing prison industry into the war effort. Surveys of 
prison manufacturing capacity were made and Federal pro- 
curement agencies advised as to what prisons could and 
would produce in articles needed for the war effort. The 
Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard, Army Engineers, and 
Army Ordinance were among the important procurement 
agencies that made use of prison production. 

Most prison industries operate under legislation that 
limits sale of the product to tax supported agencies. This 
wise provision is to prevent exploitation of prison labor 
and unfair competition with outside manufacturers and em- 
ployes. This legal framework was no obstacle to war pro- 
duction for war agencies, nor will it be a barrier to work 
lor government agencies concerned with national defense. 

Some of the items manufactured by prison industries in 
World War II were garments, blankets, office furniture, 
assault boats, shell casings, submarine nets, cargo slings, 
flags, bomb crates and tarpaulins. In addition various insti- 
tutions rendered such services as pump repair, salvage of 
valuable metal, and laundering of dothing for Army and 
Navy units. 

The same general practices observed in the mobilization 
of prison industry for World War II can be adoj^ted for 
present needs in national defense. Indeed, prison industry 
is already swinging into line. For example, at San Qucntin 
the prison's largest industry is already completely dedicated 
to defense production. The prison jute mill, which nor- 
mally manufactures burlap b.igs for agricultural products, 
is now under contract to the U. S. Army to produce sand 
bags. 

In the realm of .igriiullure, the prison communities have 
developed their productive capacity and potential. Our 
penal and corrcxtional institutions have more than half a 
million acres of land under their control. Grain, vegetables, 
fruit, dairy products, beef and pork arc among those items 
raised. 

Under the pressure of wartime needs, prison agriculture 
expanded. Prison diet was improved and many saved. Al- 
though a negligible c]uanlity of food was produced for the 
armed forces ($2^0,<)()() worth from a tot-.' of j58,00'VOti;' 
worth in I9i.S) prison .igriculture made an indirect contri- 
bution to the war effort. Prisons dei^cndcd less on outside 
(C. ■,:!■>:!„. I .; <'ao ".=; / 



PclS^i' IH 



POLICE AND PEACE OEFICERS' JOURNAL 



January. 19^1 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers^ Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief Frank Khi.i.v, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



Tlie bi-monthly meeting of the Bay Counties Peace 
Olilicers' Association, held on November 30 at the Country 
Golf Club in Richmond drew a big crowd of peace officers 
from this region. Chief E. F. Phipps, the host of the occa- 
sion saw that all who were present had an enjoyable time. 




Chief Walter Creighton 
A fine luncheon was served and the speaker of the meeting, 
Walter Creignton, chief of the Division of Narcotics for 
California, gave a talk that was right down the alley of all 
law enforcement officers. 

Chief Frank Kelly, of San Rafael, president of the Asso- 
ciation called the meeting to order as the last of the dessert 
had been taken care of. 

He thanked Chief Phipps for the wonderful meeting 
and asked the host to present his special guests, officials 
of the city of Richmond. Among them was Mayor D. M. 
Bradley, Councilmen R. H. Miller, Gay G. Vargas and 
James P. Kenny, and members of his Police Department: 
Captain Earl Fitch, Charles E. Brown, Willard T. Smith, 
K. C. Perkins and Lieutenant George Jones. 

He invited all the gutsts to visit the Richmond Police 
headquarters which are about the best you will find in this 
state, or in any other state. 

President Kelly then prestiUcd .1 number of prominent 
members present. Included in his li\t was Warden Clinton 
T. Duffy, who invited the members !o hold their January 
meeting at San Quentin, a bid that was joyously and unani- 
mously accepted. For years the mcxtin^s at San Quentin 
have been outstanding, and all realize Warden Duffy will 
sec that his fellow peace officers have a sui tessful gathering. 



Others asked to take a bow were the following Chiefs: V. E. 
Warren, Benicia, Michael E. Mitchell, San Francisco, Frank 
Farina of Emeryville, and veteran retired Chief Louis 
Mann; S. E. Williams, Albany; George Potter, Menlo Park; 
LeRoy Hubbard, Atherton; R. C. (Jack) Theuer with his 
Police Commissioner, Allan Hunt, Burlingame; Sheriff Dan 
Murphy, San Francisco, past president; Constable Earl 
Dierking, junior vice president, Vallejo; Chief Special 
Agents J. L. Creighton of the Standard Oil Company, and 
A. M. Kenna of the Southern Pacific Railway; Major R. D. 
Callaw, Air Provost Marshal, Travis A. F. air base; Jimmy 
Cake of the George E. Cake Co., and Captain Walter 
Johnson, Berkeley; D. N. Key, chief. National Auto Theft 
Bureau; Deputy Chief J. M. Carter, San Jose; Deputy 
Sheriff J. M. Joseph, Crockett; Divisional Deputy Sheriff 
Jack Greening, Oakland, and Mayor Owen Seavey, Napa. 

Captain Bernard McDonald, secretary-treasurer of the 
Association had to read the minutes of the preceding 
meeting, something which is usually dispensed with. His 
financial report showed there is a nice little account in 
the bank. 

President Kelly then announced the presentation of a 
gold star with diamonds to Chief Donald Wood, who last 
month completed 20 years as head of the San Anselmo 
Police Department. The Reserve Officers' Association of 
the scenic little Marin county city chipped in to show their 
appreciation for the splendid work Chief Wood has done 
for the town of a generation. 

Jack Greening was called upon and in his talk told of 
what has been done to furnish some entertainment for the 
police officers sent to the Santa Rita Prison farm Training 
School conducted through the generosity of Sheriff H. P. 
(Jack) Gleason, and under the auspices of the State Peace 
Officers' Association. 

He also reported on the progress for the point to point 
radio program, that is being developed in view of the 
necessity created by the present unsettled world condition. 

Ray Meyer, radio technician for the Vallejo Police De- 
partment, expanded on this point to point subject, and 
further stated there has developed some trouble in getting 
material for police radio stations, and urged all members 
to join in getting priority for this needed activity. 

President Kelly then announced his nominating com- 
mittee which will present a list of candidates to be voted 
on at the January meeting. The officers appointed are: 

Sheriff Daniel C. Murphy, Chief Donald Wood and 
Walter Wisnom, Hillsborough, and John Greening. 

Major Callow, Captain Fitch and Elmer C. Pieper, chief, 
(Cniiliniied nii page !^Ci ) 



JiWiiary. 19'' I 



POLICF AND PHACn OrrimRS lOURNAI. 



Piif^e I') 



Thomas C. Lynch, New S.F. District Attorney 



During his three years as thief executive of the city of 
San Francisco, Mayor Elmer E. Robinson has done much 
for the benefit of this metropolis. He has also appointed 
men to key positions in the municipal government who are 
outstanding, men from various activities, industr)-, labor, 
industrial, merchants, commerce and others who contribute 




Federal JuJj;t; Ldward P. Murphy swearing in Distritt Attorney 
Thomas C. Lynch. 

to the prosperity and welfare of the community. He has 
also selected some equally c]uaified women for imjwrtant 
posts. However we will deal with the people he has chosen 
to lead those engaged in law enforcement. 

First he selected three men to serve as Police Commis- 
sioners — H. C. Maginn, J. Warnock Walsh and Wash- 
ington I. Kohnke. They have done a top job. 

This trio of commissioners appointed Captain Michael E. 
Mitchell, the Mayor's choice to head the Police Department. 
When that capable official had to step out on arriving at the 
age limit of 6^ years, set by the city charter, Mayor Robin- 
son had the Commissioners ap|X)int Captain Michael Gaffcy 
as Chief Mitchell's successor. We deal with this in another 
article. 

On January 4 there was inducted into the ofiicc of Dis- 
trict Attorney another San Francisco man, Thomas C. Lynch. 

When District Attorney Edmund G. Brown was swept 
into the office of attorney general for California there 
Occurred a vacancy in the San l-'rancisco office. When the 
official count of the state vote was announced by Secretary 
of State I'rank Jordan, Mayor Robinson cjuickly made the 
announcement that the man to fill that vacancy would be 
Thomas C. Lynch, Chief Deputy under District Attorney 
Brown. 

When Pat Brown became district attorney in I9M he 
appointed Tom Lynch to his staff. They were boyhood 
friends. The new District Attorney was then working as a 
deputy with United States Attorney Frank Hennessc)', being 
in that office for the past ten years. In Kith these- positions 



he made good in every way. He knows the law; he has 
the personality that goes with such highly responsible jobs; 
he is honest and loyal; a good public speaker; mixes well 
with all classes of respectable people, and is not a prosecutor. 

Tom Lynch was born in San Francisco on May 20, 1904. 
He went through the grade schools in the Mission and at 
St. Ignatius grammar school. He took his "prep" at Bellar- 
minc, Santa Clara, latter entering Santa Clara University, 
and finishing up his law studies at the University of San 
Francisco, graduating in 1930, and being admitted to the 
practice of the law at the same time. 

After his higher education he became associated with 
the Fireman's Fund Insurance Co., and worked there for 
ten years, later becoming a deputy U. S. Attorney. 

In 1932 he was married to Miss Virginia Summers and 
tiic couple have two sons, Michael, 1 3, and Kevin, 8. 

District Attorney Lynch is a nephew of the late Attorney 
Thomas O'Connor, who prior to his death 30 years ago 
was rated as the outstanding attorney, both in civil and 
criminal cases in the state. He was defender of many men 
charged with serious offenses and he seldom lost a case. 
At a great sacrifice he took up the defense of Israel Wein- 
berg, Mrs. Thomas Mooney, and three other defendants, 
charged with the killing of ten people in the preparedness 
parade explosion in July, 1916. His great ability and his 
courtroom eloquence won acquittals for each. 

Another uncle is Attorney Richard O'Connor, practicing 
law here. 

At the ceremonies swearing him in as chief prosecutor 
for S.F., in the city hall, newly appointed Federal Judge 
Edward P. Murphy, another lifelong friend, administered 
the oatli. 

There were a lot of people present at this event. All the 
superior and municipal judges. Police Chief Michael Gaffe)', 
Fire Chief Edward P. Walsh, a lot of attorneys, labor 
leaders, assemblymen and other city and state officials and 
war veterans groups; civic, fraternal organizations, and 
many citizens. 



HOUSTON'S Wulih & jvuilry Service 

HOUSTON HARMONSON 



119 E»l Main StrFcl 



CALIFORNIA 



PRESLIKS MARKET 

ON THE WAY TO SEQUOIA 



CALIFORNIA 



WALTS CAFE 

FAMOUS FOODS AND LIQUORS 
ON HIGHWAY 101 



CALIFORNIA 



Dny Phonr I4HI Ni„(,, ph„nr «4 i 

MILES EUREKAS FLORIST 

GROSS DUII.DINC 
S\l I liril STKI IT LUREKA. CALIFOR.NIA 



POLICE AND PliACL OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jdiindi). 19^1 




(Copyright. 1931. 20 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco 3, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 

An Official Police Ne«s .ind Educational Magazine Devoted to 
the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 
THE GARDA REVIEW .... 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA 

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CONSTABULARY GAZETTE Belfast, Ireland 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance: 25c 
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IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or who 
cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 c^gFs^ 



S. F. P. D. BRINGS HAPPINESS TO MANY 

There were a lot of families with more children, who 
would have had a dismal Christmas last month if it had not 
been for the thoughtfulness of Chief Michael E. Mitchell. 
Years ago when he was first assigned to the Park district, 
his first station as top commissioned officer he made it his 
business to scout around as the Yuletide approached, to 
locate any needy families, who might be overlooked by the 
many sincere agencies in bringing Christmas happiness to 
the unfortunate. 

He located some in the Park district, some who would 
have had nothing to be joyous about on the morning of 
December 25. From his own funds he provided for some 
25 of these families. Saw that they had a turkey and all the 
trimmings, and plenty of toys and candy, fruits and nuts for 
the children of these destitute families. All the time he was 
out at the Park Station he continued this custom each year, 
going into his pocket to purchase the necessary things that 
would make these who were recipients of his largess, really 
enjoy the day. 

When he became Chief three years ago he continued his 
kindly custom, but he had a lot of help from members of 
the Police Department, who felt they would like to take a 
hand in this great work. So each year since 1948 the num- 
ber of families receiving this generous remembrance at 
Christmas time has increased. 



Last Christmas was the biggest in the number of those on 
the police list for special attention. There were over 300 
families taken care of. For months toys were stored in a 
side room of the Chief's office, and there was plenty of 
candy and fruit and nuts, all divided up and taken by police 
Santa Claus' together with something for the Christmas din- 
ner table. The San Francisco Chronicle donated 25 turkeys 
for this occasion, and others outside the Police Department 
insisted on adding their share of gifts that would make some 
of the unfortunate in San Francisco happy. 

With the $5.00 given to many children to the extent of 
$12,000 divided from the San Francisco Police Department 
and the Fire Department baseball game last fall, the men 
and women who guard the property and lives of the city's 
population sure gave a lot of people, especially young peo- 
ple, a good reason to say "Merry Christmas" on the 25th 
of last month. 

Try to thank these men and women and you will get a 
shrug of the shoulder. They don't do these things to be 
thanked; they do them because they like to do them, and 
who knows better than a policeman or a fireman what want 
means to some of our citizens. However, we will say 
"thanks a lot" to them for their good work. 



POLICE AND FIREMEN WIN AT 
NOVEMBER ELECTION 

The San Francisco Fire and Police Departments were 
successful at the November election in their efforts to get 
an increase in a living-cost boost in their monthly salaries. 
The vote was one that gave the charter amendment an 
imposing majority, a majority well deserved and well 
earned. 

The pay of members of the SFPD is now on a basis 
with other large metropolitan cities and the citizens of the 
city can rest assured they will be given the best of police 
service as has been the case for decades past. 

It is regrettable, however, that the increase of pensions 
of some 300 retired members of the Police Department, 
who stepped out before the advent of the present pension 
set up, was defeated. 

The small number of former municipal workers are 
getting pensions that in many cases are less than they 
could get from the state's old age provisions. They de- 
served better treatment from the voters than they received, 
and it is sincerely hoped that at a coming election their 
pensions will be increased to that of those who are enjoying 
retirement under the present pension plan. 

J. J. (Phil) PHILIPPE 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 
600 West Mineral King Avenue Phone 4-4S76 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

VISALIA MOTOR LODGE 

Cleo S. & Lorelta Clinton, Owner-Mgr. 
2415 West Mineral King Phone 4-3S85 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

CHICK'S LIQUOR STORE 

C. p. MARTON 
Rt. 4, Box 241 West Sierra Blvd. 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



j.iiiuiiry. 19'' I 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



P,ige 21 



IT WILL BE ATTORNEY GENERAL 
BROW N FOR NEXT FOUR YEARS 

On Januar)- 8. California had installed a new attorney 
general. At the November election Edmund G. (Pat) 
Brown was swept into the office over the present Attorney 
General, Frederick N. Howser. This elevation of San Fran- 
cisco's district attorney to the second highest office in the 




many other units to meet various matters that lead to the 
criminal courts. 

Attorney General-Elect Brown was born in San Francisco. 
As he grew up he went through the elementary schools, 
earning his way selling papers and doing part time jobs. 
He graduated from Lowell High School. Then he started 
the study of law. It was a hard struggle. He worked by day 
and attended the University Extension Division at night, 
but he got along successfully and after attending the San 
Francisco Law School was admitted to the bar in 1927. 

He has two brothers, Harold and Frank who arc attor- 
neys-at-law, and practicing in their native city. 

In 1930 he married Miss Bernice Layne, daughter of the 
late Police Captain Arthur D. Layne, whose sterling record 
for police efficiency will ever be remembered. 

The Attorney General to be has been a member of the 
Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District, of the Califor- 
nia Code Commission and in 1940, 1944 and 1948 he was 
a delegate to the Democratic National Conventions. He is 
a past president of the District Attorney Association of Cali- 
fornia. 

He has pledged support to Governor Warren in his fight 
against the well organized criminal elements who have been 
slithering into this state and it is a mighty good thing when 
the two top officials of California team up to wage war on 
.ill that is c\il .md criminal. 



Attornev-Generai Edmi'.nd G. Brown 



state, is a commendable recognition on the part of the voters 
of this commonwealth of the splendid record "Pat" Brown 
has achieved during his eight yeais as chief prosecutor for 
the Golden Gate City. 

From the north to the south, the hamlets, the towns and 
cities of California came the winning votes. The majority 
ballots stamped approval of the program District Attorney 
Brown has followed since his election to his present office 
nearly a dc-cade ago. 

He has done his part to keep San Francisco the white 
spot of the nation as far as organized crime is concerned. 
Like his predecessors he has no use whatever for racketeers 
and gangsters and he has made this tendency felt among 
the easy winners of the land who would fasten their claws 
on this rich sector, and ply their nefarious operations. 

He has successfully prosc-cuted a big majority of the 
criminal cases that reached the superior court, and in the 
municipal courts he has seen that every defendant received 
the proper attention. 

He has streamlined his office and has surrounded himsell 
with capable assistants, and no one coming to his headquar- 
ters at Clay and Montgomery Streets gets anything but the 
most courteous attention and they go away with the neces- 
sary information sought or assured of the proper actions 
their cause might rec|uire. 

He has given constructive assistance to the alcoholic, to 
juvenile delinquency, minority groups problems, traffic, 
housing and other activities in which the public is vilallv 
interested. 

He has created a bureau to handle crinu-s involving war 
veterans; he has formed a (rime prevention bureau and 



REO HOTEL 

507 East Main Strp«t 



CALIFORNIA 



Courtesy^ Comfort 

Cleanliness 

in downtown 

LOS ANGELES 



• Friandly strvic* plul • ti minutts to bccxKci 

• SSi rooms end lult.s """^ °" ~'*<''»' "P**^ 

• Cntrol lotollon • °'"'"« ,'~^' '^"** ••»»» 

Cockfail loung« 
EnMHoiimMM 




Modcrat* RcriM 



HOTELHAYWARD 

SIXTH AND SPRING, LOS ANGELES 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PI'ACH OFl'ICERS' JOURNAL 

Salinas To Have New Police Chief 



](i)iihiry, 19>1 ' 



On October 1 last year George C. Weight, who had been 
Chief of PoHce of Salinas for over eight years, stepped out 
of office. Since that time the police department has operated 
under a temporary chief. He is Captain Raymond J. Mc- 
Intyrc, who was .selected by City Manager Ted B. Adsit, 




Captain Raymond J. McIntvre 

who took over the management of municipal aff^airs for the 
center for Monterey's county seat in March, 1950. 

This temporary arrangement will end when a permanent 
chief is determined by an examination being held on Janu- 
ary 19 in Salinas. 

City Manager Adsit broadcast an invitation to all com- 
petent peace officers throughout the state to take this test. 
There were 56 men who replied to the invitation. After 
screening these prospects, twenty were eliminated for justi- 
fiable cause. The 36 who are taking the exams are equally 
divided, half from the Salinas Police Department and the 
other half from various police departments outside the city. 

As the City Manager stated his sole eff^ort is to get the 
best man possible for the important post to head the Police 
Department, which he emphatically emphasizes to be made 
up of fine men and women, who have served Salinas in a 
most commendable and efficient manner. 

Among those taking the examinations is Acting Chief 
Mclntyre. His many friends are pulling for him to be the 
successful candidate. He is a native of the Salinas Valley, 
having been born in ancient Castroville in 1913. He comes 
from a pioneer family that has had much to do with the de- 
velopment of that rich area of the state. His father and 
retired Lieutenant JamcN Malloy of the SFPD were school 
mates in their youth. 

He got his grammar schooling in Castroville, was gradu- 
ated from the Monterey High .School, and then finished his 
education at the Salinas Junior College, now Harlnell Col- 



After leaving the latter he went to work for the Seaside 
Oil Company, and after five years joined the Salinas Polite 
Department, on March 15, 193H. Eoriiur Chief M. A. 
Lapierre was their boss of the SPD. 

He was promoted to Lieutenant in April, 19 i6, and 
made a captain three months later. 

He joined the Army Air Force in October, 19 i2, and was 
mustered out in December, 1945. 

Captain Mclntyre in 1936 married Doris Schiil, a native 
of Wisconsin. They have a 13-year-old son. 

In less than a year. City Manager Adsit has done many 
things to improve the conduct of all departments of the city 
government, but we will refer here briefly what good he has 
done for the SPD. (A more comprehensive account will 
appear when a permanent Chief of Police is appointed. — 
Editor.) 

He has gotten the police personnel a raise in their pay. 
The base salaries for patrolmen starts at $273 per month, 
increasing by added service to $288, $305, $322 and a top 
of $341. The salary of most of the members of the SPD is 
in the $305 class. Though five new men put on during 
recent weeks they will get the starting salary. The Chief's 
salary has been increased from the present $503 monthly to 
$450 to $653. Al other ranks are likewise raised. It is the 
highest pay for police officers in the county. 

The five new officers selected from 34 applicants were all 
from outside cities with one exception. 

The City Manager has provided for a new position, that 
of Assistant Chief. 

Also for two more sergeants. Examinations for these new 
jobs were held this month and 14 members of the depart- 
ment took them. 

The present sergeants are: J. B. Wright and H. L. 
Duncan. 

There are three Lieutenants — M. E. Roberts, F. E. Fowles 
and E. L. Ashton. One more will be added who with Cap- 
tain Mclntyre constitute the commissioned officers. 

The City Manager has set up a plan that calls for divid- 
ing the work of the police department into divisions. 
(Conrnvied on page 43) 



TYNAN LUMBER 
COMPANY 

Salinas, California 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 



Pa^^e 2i 



Sheriff McCoy ~" Monterey Co. ~ Starts 2ncl Term 



Monterey Count)' voters evidently like the way Sheriff 
Jack McCoy has conducted his office during the past four 
years, for they elected him without any serious opposition 
at the primary election last June. On January 8 he took over 
for his second term. 




Sheriff Jack McCoy 

Sheriff McCoy well merits the confidence of the people 
of this historic Monterey County, for since he became sher- 
iff, by appointment on the death of Alexander Borges prior 
to the election of 1946, he having been successful at the 
earlier primary election, he has'done a swell job. 

He has given the county superb law enforcement. He 
has a fine force of 64 men and women serving under him, 
and they are well prepared to take successful action against 
any crime committed in their jurisdiction, and it may well 
be said that they have given outside peace officers a lot of 
help in rounding up wanted men. 

Sheriff McCoy has solved every major crime committed 
in the peninsula area, and there have been some important 
ones, ranging from murders to prison breaks at the Soledad 
State Prison. 

There are three substations in the county, and Sheriff 
McCoy is arranging to add another one at Fort Ord. He 
now has nine men a.ssigned to this big Army post, and with 
defense programs for more men to get training, and a great 
number sent to Fort Ord, he will have a have more of his 
men helping the military authorities. 

He has charge of civilian defense in the unincorporated 
area of the county, and he has been on the job in that line 
of endeavor. He has civilian defen.sc well organized, and 
has the use of his mounted posse of 68 members, his jeep 
squad of eight skilled drivers and his motoriyile scjuad of 
12 ecjually skilled riders in this im|-)orlant work. 

These two latter volunteer units of the sheriffs office 
have done a magnificent job in helping out in searches for 
missing people, in the mountaineous regions of the county 



and the ocean shoreline. The motorcycle boys are always on 
hand when there is any congestion of traffic during celebra- 
tions and parades throughout the area. 

There is one thing that plea.ses a lot of people, and is a 
source of much pleasure to the sheriff. That is the prison 
farm of 300 acres over which he was given complete control 
three years ago. 

On this farm in the fertile Natividad district he has had 
erected fine living quarters for the prisoners sent there to 
serve their time for misdemeanor offenses. They are well 
fed and they are humanely treated. So successful has this 
farm been from the standpoint of giving prisoners some- 
thing to do, that but few repeaters return. 

Equally succesful is this farm for what it produces. 

There was a big crop of beans, peas, cabbage, corn, po- 
tatoes, carrots and other vegetables. All these are used for 
the county hospital, juvenile home, county jail and for 
workers on the farm. What is not used as they are harvested 
is put in the deep freeze plant on the farm. 

In addition he raised enough alfalfa and grain for feed 
for his live stock, and a lot of sugar beets, the surplus turned 
over to the sugar factory, for cash. 

There are now 300 blooded hogs, 70 cows and over 2000 
laying hens. The hogs furnish meat for the above named 
institutions. The milk from the dairy herd and the eggs 
from the hens go to the same places. 

Last year the production totalled a 530,000 profit. 

That with the good results in rehabilitating unfortunate 
men found guilty of minor offenses makes the project one 
worthwhile. 

Sheriff McCoy has obtained additional grazing land and 
hopes to meet the high price of beef by raising some of his 
own steers. With stew meat selling for 9^ cents a pound 
that will be a worthwhile aim, we would say. 

The sheriff has 12 patrol cars for use in covering every 
section of the unincorporated part of Monterey County. 

During the past year there was no increase in crime m 
Sheriff McCoy's jurisdiction and what did occur has been 
well cleared by arrests. 

Last year a salary raise of 52") a month was given the 
members of the sheriffs staff but the pay is way below what 
it ought to be. 

In taking over for another four-year term Sheriff McCoy 
announced the lollowing assignments and promotions. 

Lieutenant Phillip G. Crocker, who has been serving as 
captain since Captain N. D. Witcher took a 60-day le.ivc of 
absence and failed to return on its termination, was made a 
permanent taptain, and placed in charge of criminal investi- 
gation. The other laptain, Carl Joy remains in charge of 
civil matters. 

Sergeant Thomas S. Martin was promoted to fill the va- 
cancy left by Captain Crocker, and as a lieutenant will lon 
tinue as the juvenile officer. 

Deputy Requil Holt was made a night sergeant. All the 
latter had been aiting in these capacities during the abscnic 
of Captain Witcher. 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



] Ml nary, 19''! 



CHIEF JOHN L. DELUCCHI OF PLEASANTON 



Pleasantoii, located in the northeastern part of Alameda 
county, on the Livermore-San Jose Highway, is an old 
town, steeped in historic importance and for years a 
great recreational center and noted for its livestock 
ranches, farms on which every sort of vegetables, flowers, 
fruits and nuts are produced in abundance and for its 
race track, one of the oldest in the State of California. 
On this track each year Alameda county holds its annual 
fair with racing meet, which draws big crowds to see 
leading jockeys and horses vie for sizeable purses. It is 
a race track that was brought into being during the last 
century by Senator George Hearst, the father of William 
Randolph Hearst, who is recognized as one of the greatest 
newspaper publishers this country has ever produced. The 
racing plant is used the year round for training race horses. 

Pleasanton is a town of 2245 people, an increase of over 
75 per cent over the 1940 census. Around the surrounding 
country great acreages are devoted to producing sugar 
beets, tomatoes, hay, grain, nuts, and many other diversi- 
fied crops. Dairying is a leading industry. On many acres 
wine grapes are grown on vineyards that produce the 
best of wine grapes and large wineries to process these 
grapes dot the area around the bustling little city. 

Live stock contributes much to the town's economy. 

The Jackson & Perkins company has a vast acreage 
devoted to growing roses. 

The large gravel deposits furnish labor to many people 
and brings a lot of dollars into Pleasanton. The H. J. 
Kaiser company operate one of the biggest plants and the 
P.C.A. has another one representing an investment of 
$3,500,000. 

There is an abundance of water for the area which is 
responsible for all the successful agricultural endeavors. 

Nearby is Santa Rita Prison farm, which Sheriff H. P. 
Gleason has developed into an outstanding place to re- 
habilitate those who fall by the wayside. 

The Old Hearst Ranch is a scenic attraction that 
brings in as high as 4500 people a day to wander around 
this big place, designed, planted and developed by the 
late Senator Hearst, and his son, William Randolph 
Hearst. There are provisions to entertain the visitors 
either for a day or for a vacation of a week end or a 
month or more. 

With all these things to attract visitors and producing 
wealth for the community there is but little crime in 
Pleasanton, and such a desirable condition has prevailed 
for many many years. The reason is a small but good 
police department. 

There are four men who look after law and order in 
Pleasanton. The department is headed by Chief John J. 

Phone: Pleasanton 5907 James VouHsides. Prop. 

STANDARD CHEESE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF CHEESE 
ported and Domestic Type 



Delucchi. Chief Delucchi has twenty years service with 
the PPD, 18 of which he has been its chief. His patrol- 
men are Manuel Amario, with 10 years service, Martin 
Donovan with three years and Ernest Parcale appointed 
seven months ago. 

Chief Delucchi has one patrol car with 2-way radio, 
serviced by the Alameda county sheriff's radio station. 

The present chief was appointed after the resignation 
of William Davis who served as Chief for a number of 
years, and is now a successful newspaperman. 

Phone 4453 

JOHN MULLINS . . . Plumbing 

JOBBING AND REPAIRING 

Sales and Service 

PLEASANTON. CALIF. 
5 

Phone 2242 

"MY STORE " 

J. E. BAIROS 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

719 MAIN STREET PLEASANTON, CALIF. 

Phone 2320 

PAT DIXON 

DRESS SHOPPE 

420 MAIN STREET PLEASANTON, CALIF. 



Pastime Billiard Parlor 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - POOL 
SNOOKER - CARD GAMES 

Modern - Air-Conditioned 

Old-Time Horsemen's Rendezvous 

Justin Repose, Oivner and Prop. 

511 Main Street 

PLEASANTON, CALIFORNIA 



192 



PLEASANTON. CALIF. 



Pleasanton Coffee Shop 

AND FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

Hatuburgers a Specialty 

Johnny and Millie Rochford 

711 Main Street 
PLEASANTON, CALIFORNIA 



jiiiiiiary, 19^1 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e 21 



JUVENILE DELINQUENCY COMMITTEE 
REPORT 

(Cn)iiiiiinJ jidiii [itige 9) 
so by vigilance and by example deter would-be wrongdoers 
from carrying out their wrongful desires. 

There is one influence that can achieve the desired result. 
It is the power of public sentiment. Only through publicity 
can the necessary support of public opinion be aroused. 
Local newspapers should feature the activities of representa- 
tive groups. But the newspaper that is merely out to print 
a "good storj'" on delincjuency may inadvertently stir up 
community- controversy. Your committee noticed that the 
press during the last twelve months has manifested a keen 
interest in the problem of juvenile delinquency. The press 
in general, we feel, is to be commended for dcglamourizing 
hoodlumism and gangsterism and supporting programs of 
delinquency prevention; however, their accounts of so- 
called "rat packs," "wolf packs," "punks," "belt-buckle 
gangs," "chain gangs," and gang assaults on innocent citi- 
zens leaves some doubt in our minds as to their efficacy and 
affect on public opinion. 

Nevertheless, such reports cause the citizens of the com- 
munity much concern and speculation. They ask, "What 
arc young people coming to.'" "Are their unlawful acts 
becoming more aggravated and violent.'" "We didn't act 
that way when we were young." We hasten to say that 
juvenile delinquency is not new nor is it of recent develop- 
ment. Parents for centuries have been worr)'ing about the 
youth of their times: but we do concede that the delinquen- 
cies of the present generation seem to be more vicious and 
flagrant. But remember that two World Wars during the 
last few decades have not helped matters much. 
(To Be Contniiieii) 



UNITED FILIFNS GROCERY CO. 



Olgn Wrb.- 



MOM'S PLACE 



HOME COOKING . . . COMPLETE MEALS 
Beer and Wine 



465 MAIN STREET 



PLEASANTON. CALir. 



LLOYDS BARGAIN TRADING 
CENTER 

New and Used Furniture, Washers, Refrigerators. Sewin( Machin* 
Radios, Gas Stoves, Mattresses. Baby Cribs, Playpens, Bu((ii 



I WILL TRADE 



720 MAIN STREET 



PLEASANTON. CALIF. 



"Always at Your Service" 

PLEASANTON FEED AND FUEL 

HAY - GRAIN - POULTRY SUPPLIES 
NURSERY STOCK 

Charles G. Bubics - Joseph S. Coporusso 

BO I MAIN STREEr PLEASANTON. CAL IK. 

QUALITY AUTO PARTS 

Pete Cerruti 



1171 WEST FIRST ST. 

Phone 163 
LIVERMORE. CALIF. 



320 MAIN STREET 

Phone 22S0 

PLEASANTON, CALIF. 



Phone 9966 



443 MAIN STREET 



HAP'S PLACE 

COCKTAILS 
DINE AND DANCE 



PLEASANTON. CALIF. 



MEXIC:0 LINDO 



WALNUT GROVE 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



P. O. Box 834 



PLEASANTON. CALIF. 



CALIFORNIA 



WALNUT GROVE HOTEL 

Leo J, Silva, Prop. 

SPORTSMAN'S CENTER - FISHING 
HUNTING IN SEASON 



WALNUT CiROVE 



Phone 2351 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 9981 Otto Emil 

TURF C; L U B 

BEER - WINE - SHUFFLEBOARD 

"Where Good Fellows Meet" 

MO MAIN STREET PLEASANTON. CALIF 

EARL PINARD 

JEWELER - WATCHMAKER 
65i MAIN STREET PLEASANTON. CALIF. 

Phone S620 

CENTRAL MEAT MARKET 

FRESH MEATS AND POULTRY 
D. Deni, Prop. 

56) MAIN STREET PLEASANTON, CALIF 



Office Phone 7YI2 Renidenc 

ADRIANOPLE CHEESE CO. 

FETA CHEESE. ROMAN CHEESE 
KASSERI AND GRATED CHEESE 
K. Bertalis, Prop. 



P. O. BOX 62 



PLEASANTON. CALIF 



Phone 5904 

PLEASANTON FRENCH LAUNDRY 
AND DRY CLEANERS 

FIREPROOF - MODERN - SANITARY 
Bob nnd Lrr, Prop*. 



560 MAIN STREET 



PLEASANTON. CALIF 



FIORIO'S MARKET 



COMPLETE FOOD STORE AND FOOD LOCKERS 
n ROSE STREET PLEASANTON. CALIF 



Phone 225 7 

IDEAL DRY C.OODS AND VARIETY 

Ben Friedman, Prop. 
409 MAIN STREEI PLEASANTON. CALIF 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1951 



ASSOCIATED PUBLIC 
COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

Walter Keller, President 
John Atkinson, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular monthly meeting of the Associated Public- 
Communication Officers, Inc., was held at San Quentin 
State Prison on November 9, 1950. Our hosts being War- 
den Duffy and Mr. Jim Lewis of Marin County. 

The meeting was called to order at 11:10 A. M. by the 
president, Walter Keller, with 35 members and guests in 
attendance. 

President Keller stated that nominations of officers would 
take place during our December meeting and also that our 
treasurer, Charles Simpson, was appointed as the Chief of 
Police of the City of Monterey. 

The treasurer's report showed a balance of $240.70 to 
date. 

Ray Myers then spoke on the advertising in the new di- 
rectory. So far $250 worth of ads have been sold by this 
organization. 

Chairman McMurphy of the Frequency and Engineering 
Committee had no request for frequency clearance at this 
time. 

A discussion on the point-to-point then followed. Robert 
Mason, Santa Clara County, stated that they were on the air 
and Tom Bailey, Solano County, said he would be on next 
week. Jim Lewis stated that they had just received a CP 
for a repeater for Mt. Barnaby for 73-98 Mcs. McMurphy 
then informed the membership that a decision on the Mt. 
Diablo repeater should be forthcoming by the 27th of this 
month, and he believed it would be approved. 

Ray Myers then started a discussion on the critical short- 
age of tubes. On a motion by Bailey, seconded by Moore, 
Ray Myers and Brower McMurphy were instructed to con- 
tact the National Production Authority in an effort to as- 
certain if an Electronics DO number would be available for 
the Public Safety Radio Services. 

President Keller then called for the commercial members 
reports. The following spoke briefly: Ruby Poucher and 
Jack Ingersall, Neely Enterprises; Ralph Celestre, Electric 
Supply; E. H. Robertson, W. D. Brill; Barney Olsen and 
Robert Kranhold, Motorola, Inc.; and Rox Penlon, Aerial 
Engineering. 

Capt. McMurphy brought up the need for additional 
code numbers for the Fire Services. It was the opinion of 
the membership that our 900 code needed revising and 
President Keller appointed Mac as chairman with Mason 
and Myers as the members of the Codes Committee. 

Associate Warden Teets then spoke on the afternoon's 
program. 

VISALIA DRIVE INN 

REMEMBER 
AT THE SIGN OF THE BIG V — DRIVE INN 

Mooney Boulevard 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



Mac invited the Association to the Santa Rita Jail Farm 
for our December meeting and Charlie Simpson requested 
the January meeting in Monterey. These were approved on 
a motion by Mason, seconded by Landers. 

As there was no further business the meeting was ad- 
journed and the members had a very interesting trip through 
the prison. 



The regular monthly meeting of the Associated Public 
Communications Officers, Inc., was held in Santa Rita on 
December 14, 1950. Our host being Capt. C. B. McMurphy 
of the Alameda County Sheriff's Department. 

The meeting was called to order by the president Walter 
Keller at 11:10 A. M. with 35 members and guests in at- 
tendance. 

The minutes of the November meeting were read and 
approved. 

The treasurer, Charles Simpson, stated there has been no 
change in our account since the last meeting. 

President Keller next called for the Frequency and Engi- 
neering Committee report. Chairman McMurphy presented 
the following requests: 

County of Monterey — 158.85 Mcs — Base only to coordi- 
nate motion its system with that of the City of Salinas. Ap- 
proved on a motion by McMurphy. Seconded by Simpson. 

City of Vallejo — City of Napa — County of Solano — 
158.97 Mcs — Additional frequency to eliminate overload- 
ing of present frequencies. The above requests were ap- 
proved pending an OK from Oakland that they would not 
need the frequency which had been set aside for them. 
Motion by Myers. Seconded by Bailey. 

Ray Myers then reported on the progress of the Adver- 
tising Committee. He suggested that the Association take 
a half page in the Directory. No action was taken on his 
suggestion at this time. 

The Secretary then told the membership about the prog- 
ress on the code revision and explained the questionnaire 
that they received. 

Myers and McMurphy then told of their work with the 
NPA. It was felt by the membership that they should keep 
on the project. 

The meeting then adjourned for lunch. 

The meeting was again called to order and President 
Keller opened nominations for officers for 1951. The fol- 
lowing were nominated. 

President — Robert Mason by McMurphy. 

■Vice-President — John Atkinson by Myers (Declined). 
George Hippely by Atkinson. 

Secretary — John Atkinson by Myers. 

Treasurer — Charles Simpson by Bailey. 



January, 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



Board of Directors — George Maki by Myers. 
Henri Kirby by Simpson. 
Art McDole by Bailey. 
Jim Lewis by Bailey. 
John Maybee by Simpson. 
Martin Landers (Declined). 
Nominations were then closed until the January meeting. 
Membership applications for Arthur Ha^epian and 
George Johnston were presented to the Board of Directors 
and were approved on a motion by Myers. Seconded by 
Mason. 

McMurphy nominated John Pepper of the State Office of 
Civilian Defense for Honorary Membership. Approved. 

President Keller then called for the Commercial Members 
reports from Fred Deetkin. General Electric; E. H. Robert- 
son, W. D. Brill; Barney Olson, Motorola; and Bob Kran- 
hold. Motorola. 

The next joint meeting was discussed but no action was 
taken. 



Martin Landers offered Napa for the January meeting and 
Charles Simpson offered Monterey for a Ladies' Night in 
February. Accepted. 

In closing Mac spoke on the need for more agencies to 
get on the point-to-|ioint and on Air Raid Warning Infor- 
mation. 

JciHN II. AlKI.NsON, .W(»f/.«»7. 

VISALIA REFRIGERATION 



Now Located 



for H 
Mooncy Blvd. One Mil 



lercial Refrigeration 
and Air Conditionin 
d Commercial Appli. 



South of College 



P. O. Box 871 



CALIFORNIA 



Pho 


ne 45 

EEL 


RIVER 


SALES 


Burrill Keatinif 

AND SALVAGE 


HOME FURNISHINGS — NEW AND USED 
Plumbing Supplies - Paints - Machinery 
GARBERMLLE C 


ALIFORNIA 



DOLBEER AND CARSON 
Lumber Company 

EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 

(Humboldt Couiity) 



HOLMES EUREKA 

Lumber Company 

• 

Eureka, California 

(Humboldt Countv) 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]d)i/iar\. 19^1 



Cottage Candy Shop 
and Fountain Lunch 

L. C. Prestwood, Prop. 



415 "G" Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



CHARLES Mcdonough 



Cigar Store 



320 "F" Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



O. H. Bass, Otvner 

Paradise Cocktail Lounge 
and Steak House 

Din u e r s 
FOOD AND DRINK . . . At Its Best 

416 Fifth Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



Riley & Williams, Inc. 

Logging and Mill Supplies 
and Equipment 

Highway 101 At Y 
CRESCENT CITY 

Broadway and Clark 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 278 

OLIVER'S - Mfg. Jewelers 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - JEWELRY 

Albert Oliver, Pco/j. 

Credit of Course 

Maiiujactiirers of Exclusive Jewelry 

Watches Repaired and Perfected 

600 Fourth Street, Corner "G" 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



Wellman Peck Company 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



WELLMAN PECK FLAVOR FOODS 



Foot of "D" Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 

(Humboldt County) 



Harry Mario, Harry ????, Owners 

CLUB CALPELLA 

Nothing But the Best of 
LIQUORS, BEER AND WINE SERVED 

Enjoy Our Shuffleboard 

Package Goods 

On Highway 101, Six Miles North of Ukiah 

CALPELLA, CALIFORNIA 

(Mendocino County) 



Sherwood Forest Resort 

QUIET - SECLUDED 

Entrance in Center of Garberville 

FORD DEALER 

Two Doors North 

Telephone 126 

GARBERVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



J.iii/ury. nj-il POI.K F. AND Pl-ACH OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Chief Kenneth Hill of Eurek. 



Page 29 



Eureka, the largest city on the northern coast of Califor- 
nia along the Redwood Highway has prospered and grown 
as have all municipalities of the state. Its wide variety of 
industry, commerce, and farming, with its great attractions 
of scenic wonders and the center of a sportsmen's paradise 




Cmii KiNNt III Hn i 

where hunting and sport draws thousands of visitors to the 
area annually, continues to furnish work for the laborer and 
financial income to many people. 

Lumber is still the leading industry, followed by fishing. 

With the growth of the city the police department has 
kept pace. 

When Kenneth M. Hill became chief of police o\cr three 
years ago the department had 22 members. Now there are 
thirty of whom two are women, Minnie Christensen, ma- 
tron, and Julia Smith, clerk. 

Chief Hill has streamlined his force, following his return 
last year from Washington, D. C, after graduating from 
the FBI National Police Academy. 

He has installed the latest in filing systems, and all rec- 
ords, such as daily work sheets, fingerprints, photographs, 
reports of crime, results obtained in solving all cases and 
other necessary details of a successful police department, are 
now kept up to date in modern cabinets. 

Chief Hill has revamped his patrolling system and every 
officer takes regular in-service training courses and are well 
trained in their many duties. 

He now has five patrol cars, two three-wheelers and one 
motorcycle, all equipped with two-way radio, serviced by 
the PD radio station, with call letters and numbers 
3MA^23. The entire city limits is given a continuous 24 
hours patrol service. 

The crime situation is one that gives the people of Eu- 
reka great pride. The number of robberies arc way below 
for 19^0 over the preceding year. Burglaries are of the sort 
designated as nuisance offenses, where the loot was small, 
and the number fewer than in former years. 

There were three murders during the year, all cxiurring 
during December, and all of them were cleared by arrests. 



There were two traffic deaths during 1950, which is a re- 
markable record for a city the size of Eureka, with its nar- 
row winding streets. 

There is juvenile delinc]uency in Eureka as in other cities 
throughout the country, but Chief Hill and his officers have 
the problem well under control. 

The EPD is well advanced on its civilian defense pro- 
gram, and the people of the city are becoming more im- 
pressed with the necessity of rallying to this great national 
effort. 

The department's Captain now is James Sargent, who 
until his promotion some two years ago was traffic sergeant. 

The present traffic sergeant is Don Jones. 

There have been added three more sergeants to the de- 
partment since Chief Hill took over. The new men are 
Sergeants Emmett Shay, Arthur Morris and Robert Starkey. 
Sergeant James Carey has held that rank for the past three 
years and more. 

Officer Larry McGrath looks after the parking meters of 
which there are 730 in Eureka. Herman Carmine has 
charge of meter repairs. 

The department got a SI 0.00 a month raise in salary last 
year, and Chief Hill was able to get S9.00 a month for each 
member for the purchase of uniforms and keeping them 
presentable. This is something new, and could well be 
copied by other poice departments. 

Chief Hill who was born and reared in Eureka has been 
a member of the PD since 1938. He has worked in all 
phases of law enforcement, but served longer as a traffic 
officer, being Traffic Sergeant at the time of his appointment 
as Chief. 



MORROW'S DRIVE INN 



nnrH and broadway 



(Humboldt County) 



CALIFORNIA 



THE SHANTY 



THE BIGGEST NIGHT SPOT IN TOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



BlICKSPORT GROCERY 



3S4fl Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



PARTRICK'S . . . Candy Mann fact tan- 

D. I. Partiick. Proprirlor 



SIXTH AND F STRRHTS 



FL'RLK \. ( ALII 



Pdge 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jdiuiiiry. /' 



LUCKY STAR CIGAR STORE 
AND CLUBROOM 



312 F STREET 



EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



(Humboldt County) 



PHONE 344 



FRANK BREEDEN, Jr 



NORTHERN MARINE HARDWARE 

SPORTING GOODS 

COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN'S SUPPLIES 

BOATS AND TRAILERS 



SECOND AND E STREETS 



CALIFORNIA 



PHILLIPS & JOHNSTON 

SHEET METAL WORKS 
INDUSTRIAL AND RESIDENTIAL 



TOWN CLUB 

924 BROADWAY 

(Humboldt County) 



CALIFORNIA 



CLASS A CAFE 

ITALIAN AND AMERICAN DISHES 
BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 

2 19 SECOND STREET 



CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 25 15 



ALWAYS OPEN 



EUREKA'S LEADING CAFE 



CALIFORNIA GRILL AND ANNEX 



WILLIAM LARCUS, Owi 
THE RENDEZVOUS 



DOuglas 7-5730 



57 St. Joseph Street 

CALIFORNIA 



316 E STREET 



EUREKA. CALIFORNIA 



GOODY CAFE 

BREAKFAST — LUNCH — DINNERS 
AND SHORT ORDERS 

(Humboldt County) CALIFORNIA 



RITCHIE WOODS 

DRUGS 
THE REXALL STORE 



5TH AND G STREETS 



CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 2200 

LAST CHANCE SERVICE STATION 

LIQUORS 

GINO SPADONI 

2200 Fourth Streeet 
;REKA CALIFORNIA 

Telephone — 242 and 243 

POST OFFICE MARKET 

GROCERIES, MEATS AND BEVERAGES 

5 09 H STREET 



GUSTAFSON TRACTOR CO. 

INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT • FARM EQUIPMENT 
CLETRAC TRACTORS • DISSTON CHAIN SAWS 

4th and Commercial Streets Telephone 807 \ 

EUREKA CALIFORNIA' 

PHONE 726 

EXCELSIOR FOOD MARKET 

FREE DELIVERY 

502 A STREET 
EUREKA CALIFORNIA 

PIERCE MORTUARY 

ERNEST C. McWHINNEY 

707 H Street 
EUREKA CALIFORNIA 



MODERN CAKE SHOP 

COMPLETE LINE 
PASTRIES 

524 FIFTH STREET 



CALIFORNIA EUREKA 



CALIFORNIA 



STOP AND SAY HELLO TO 

BABE 

at the 

RENO CLUB 

THIRD AND D STREET 
(Humboldt County) 



CALIFORNIA EUREKA 



PHONE 638 

JACK'S COFFEE SHOP 

SERVING BREAKFAST — LUNCH — DINNERS 
Also Featuring Our 
CHICKEN DINNERS 

on Highway 101, Fifty Feet South of City Limits 

3 790 BROADWAY 



CALIFORNIA 



ERNEST BURGER 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES — MEATS 
Wine, Beer and Liquor 

CALIFORNIA AND HARRIS STREETS 
EUREKA CALIFORNIA 



FOOD CENTER MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRUITS 



j.ui/Liry I')''! 



I'OI.K 1 AM) l'I.A( I (,)l I l( I KS JOl KiNAl 



Deck and Pat Nicholson, Oiiinrs 

EEL RIVER CAFE 

OS BEAUTIFUL REDWOOD HIGHWAY 

Open 24 Hours a Day 

Featuring . . . Calerhig Service 

Foods to Take Out 

Fish and C^hips - Fresh Fried Prawns 

Box Lunches - Ocean Trout - Fried (thicken 

GARBERVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



SEQUOIA GROCERY 
COMPANY 

Evert Feekes 

Feed and Seed - Beer - Wine 
Liquor - Fresh Meats 

Free Delivery 






ARCATA, CALIFORNIA 



FOREST CLUB 

Where All Sportsmen Meet 

Cocktails and Select Food 



239 North State Street 
UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 



Fred Mosely 



Amos Branscomb 



THE KLAMATH KLUB 

and 

STEELHEAD CAFE 

• 

Highway 101 - Telephone K-21 
KLAMATH, CALIFORNIA 



DOUBLE AA CAFE 

Fureka's Finest and Friendliest 
Cocktail Lounge 

Dan Chiaroni and Arne Sundberg, Props. 
(On the Redwood Highway - 101) 

610 Fourth Street 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



...—.....— 4 



LOMA VISTA CAFE 

Breakfast - In nib - Dinners 

Sljorl Ortlen ami 
(OMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



On and Off Sale of Liquors 
(On Migh\\a\ South of I urcka) 

W ion. CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 19^1 



Phone 292-W W. M. McCooty, Owner 

B &M 
AUTO WRECKERS 

One-Half Mile North of Areata on Highway 101 

New and Used Auto Parts 
Used Cars Bought and Sold 

Route 1 - Box 14 
ARCATA, CALIFORNIA 



Goldie Burgess 

THE BLUE OX 

Across from Fluhrer's Bakery 

Enlarged Dining Room 
and Counter Space 

FEATURING . . . FINE FOODS 
Plenty of Room for Parking 

Between Third and Fourth on A St. 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



WEST COAST 
SAW MILLS, INC. 

S. L. Wheaton 



Garberville, California 



Pat Murphy and John Menary's 

7 7 7 CLUB 

THE SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE 

• 

In the Heart of the Beautiful Redwoods 
Where You Are a Stranger But Once 



On Highway 101 

KLAMATH, CALIFORNIA 

(Del Norte County) 



jitinittry. / 9 W 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

At official t;atherings ot peace officials duriiiy; recent 
years a great ileal of time is spent discussing the proper 
training of police officers. It is no reflection whatever on 
the older members of police organizations throughout 
the state to admit that our young officers of today are more 
competetnt in many ways than the officers of even ten or 
fifteen years ago. This is an age in which competence is a 
must; and I realize every line of endeavor has quite an 
increased tempo over that of a decade or more ago. But, 
is competency the only factor towards successful func- 
tioning? Well. I will let a veteran, and most successful, 
police official answer that question. 

We were returning from a meeting of the Bay Coun- 
ties Peace Officers' Association, at which meeting several 
phases of police training had been gone into by selected 
speakers, each one of whom had stressed the necessity 
of intensive training for police recruits in addition to 
the refresher courses for the older members. Turning to 
my vetetran friend, a man of well known reticence, I 
asked him what he thought of all this training in police 
technique. He said training never did hurt anybody, in 
either work or play. He added, however, that years of 
training would he time wasted if the main thing were 
lacking. After quite a pause he said: "Material is the 
only thing that counts." He went on to show that, in pro- 
fessions, in business, and in the athletic field the man him- 
self is what counts — for even moderate success. Today, 
he said, there is entirely too much attention paid to train- 
ing and entirely too little attention given to selection — or 
securing the proper material to be trained. 

Because a young man is physically, athletically and aca- 
demically qualified is no sane reason wl\v he should be 
accepted as a police officer; and the principal reason why 
we see men in police departments who do not at all belong, 
he stated. Today, according to our veteran, char- 
acter, background, know how, common sense, demeanor, 
courage, appearance and general personality count nothing 
when it comes to selecting our police officers. In the keen 
business world men and women are thoroughly screened 
then why should not the same method be followed when 
securing men to guard our lives and property, he asked. 

He suggested that this screening be done by a board. 
\\'hen asked how he would proceed to pick out candidate'< 
from a group sent to him, as a board member, he answered 
our question by putting this problem before us: 

We are in business. We have a cafe, clothes cleaniiiL' 
establishment, grocery store, garace, or parking lot. We 
have to go away for two weeks. What class of man will 
we put in our place. 

In different words, of course, the three of us who made 
his audience told our friend that, of course, we wanted 
to find on our return that we were still in business, that 
our help h.nd not quit, and that we had lost neither our 
revenue nor our customers. 

Our craftv friend smiled and said. "Kellows, vou sliniil.l 
be on a screening board with me. ^^^^af swell material 
we would pick for our police department! Yes, sir, every 
one with a head on his shoulders — and every one a man!" 



John and Hardy's Big Oak 

DININC. ROOM ■ (.(KKIAIL LOl N(.L 
Dancing . . . Saturday Sight 

ON hic;h\xay 101 

Six Miles North of Ukiah 

CALIFORNIA 

(Mendocino County) 
Phone 355 

MARINO'S CLUB 

Marino Orlandi, Pro|> 
PACKAGE GOODS 

865 Ninth Street 
ARCATA, CALIFORNIA 





] 

BILL OSTINI'S 




• 




Cigars - Drinks - Hats 




• 




UKIAH, CALIFORNIA 

1 


i 


t 



BRIZARI) MATHEWS 
MACHINERY CO. 

Sales and Scri'uf oj 
CAIERPILLAR • DM , SI I. IQIIPMIM 

Tractors - Graders • E.irih Movinj; l'i|ui|Mnen( 

I.ojjging l'!(|uipnicn( and .Sujiplies - [ohn Deere 

and De L.i\,i! I'.irm llquipment 

Fiircka: 3950 Broad w;jy 

Phone *>: 

Areata: On the Pla/a 

Phone HI 



Piige 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]aiiticiry, 19'>1 



CRESCENT CHEVROLET 

BUICK AND CHEVROLET 
SALES AND SERVICE 



ALPHA HARDWARE CO. 

STORES AT 

NEVADA CITY, CALIFORNIA 
GRASS VALLEY. CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2643 



In The Heart of Crescent City 



EMPIRE MOTEL 

COMPLETE ULTRA-MODERN 
ELECTRIC HEATED 

CARPETED FROM WALL TO WALL 



Second Street Between L & M 
on Redwood Highway, U. S. 101 



WILLIAM HOME 

MEN'S SHOP 
Phone 146 



CRESCENT CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



NEVADA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



R. E. LEDFORD 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
Phone 246-J 



FOR THOSE WHO ARE FUSSY ABOUT THEIR FOOD- 



STAFFORD'S CAFE 

FOOD COOKED AS YOU LIKE IT 



CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box 261 fVLO-ne II 

CENTRAL GROCERY STORE 

JOHN VIEGAS. Prop. 

FRESH MEAT DEPARTMENT 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

BEER AND WINES 

GOODS DELIVERED FREE 

RIO DELL, CALIF. SCOTIA, CALIF. 



1291/2 Broad Street 
NEVADA CITY 



Phone 60S-W 

CALIFORNIA 



O. W. HOGAN 

GROCERIES, COLD MEATS AND BEVERAGES 
WINES AND BEER 



Phone — 17-W 



CALIFORNIA 



SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 

"ON THE REDWOOD HIGHWAY" 

DONALD H. SMITH, Proprietor 



CALIFORNIA 



PAOLI BROS. 

DE SOTO • PLYMOUTH 

FOURTH AND EYE STREETS 



CALIFORNIA 



Nevada City Upholstering Shop 

UPHOLSTERING SERVICE 
OF ALL KINDS 



230V2 C 

NEVADA CITY 



Phone 781 -J 

CALIFORNIA 



HOLMES FUNERAL HOME 

J. PAUL BERGEMAN, Owner 
AMBULANCE SERVICE 



248 Sacramento Street 
NEVADA CITY 



Telephone 203 

CALIFORNIA 



CUSH AND GRACE 
WELCOME YOU 

OLD BREWERY INN 



NEVADA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



BRET HARTE DAIRY 

IRVIN J. HEIDE 
DAIRY PRODUCTS • ICE CREAM 

NEVADA CITY GRASS VALLEY 

CALIFORNIA 



SEVEN-UP BOTTLING CO. 

MISSION ORANGE 



RAMSEY'S COCKTAIL BAR 



VERNE and SCOTTY 



17 WEST SECOND STREET 



Phone N. C. 34 



CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



GERALDINE'S 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 
Chili and Sandwiches 

17TH AND C STREET ARCATA. CALIF. 



PHONE NEVADA CITY 232J 

WILDWOOD MOTEL 

SCENIC BEAUTY AND RESTFUL ATMOSPHERE 
"Among the Tall Pines" 

Tahoe-Ukiah Highway 20 Nevada City, Calif. 



jaiiiutry 19''1 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFFCERS JOURNAL 



P.tHc 



Valley I I96VI' 



HOOVER BROS 



GRASS VALLEY MEAT CO. 



MOBIL SERVICE 

CORNER ALTA STREET AND RIDGE ROAD 

CRASS VALLt^ I \LIKORMA 



Pho 



I 12 



UNION ICE DELIVERY 

. . . Distributors for . . . 
COCA-COLA . ACME BEER • SEVEN-UP 



BEEF - PORK - VEAL - LAMB 

Country Road Phone 976 
CRASS \ ALLK1 CALIFORNIA 

■JOE" "JACK- 

BARNEY'S PLUMBING SERVICE 

PROMPT SERVICE - GUARANTEED WORK 
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN 



Office: 208 NORTH AUBURN STREET 
CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

CLIFF SHEPHERD S PAINT STORE 



240 Mill Street 



116 E. Main Street 



CRASS \ ALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY LAUNDRY AND 
DRY CLEANERS 



111 Bennett Street 



GRASS \ ALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



HUGHES INN AND CAFE 

BEER • WINE . MIXED DRINKS • GOOD FOOD 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



CRASS VALLE1 



NOB HILL GROCERY 

W. F. ARGALL 
617 no High Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY MOTEL 

Lt. Colonel and Mrs. Archie Littlejohn 
626 So. Auburn Street 



CALIFORNIA 



The Post Office is Opposite 

McCLARD . . . The Druggist 

Sterl K. Boothby. Proprietor 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST 

Phone 90 or 91 Auburn Street 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFO RNIA 

MERCURY OUTBOARD MOTORS 

BOATS AND BOAT KITS 



GRASS VALLEY 



451 Mill Street 



ALUCJRNIA 



CARTERS SPECIALTY SHOP 



NEVADA CITY 



316 Broad Street 



CALIFORNIA 



For Those Who Are Fussy About Their Food 

STAFFORD'S CAFE 



FOOD COOKED AS YOU LIKE IT 



NEVADA CITY 



IZ9< I Broad Street 



Phone 605 W 



CALIFORNIA 



TAMBLYNS INSURANCE AGENCY 

ROBERT L TAMIJLYN 

COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICE 

20S Main Street Phone 440 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 

NEVADA CITY FEED AND FUEL 

POULTRY - DAIRY FEEDS AND SUPPLIES 
DislHbutors for Coors and Buffalo Beers 

201 E Spring Phone •,(,! J 

NEVADA Cmr CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



TEDS MARKET 

NEVADA CITY 
CALIFORNIA 



DUFFY'S SUCCESS CAFE 

TASTY FOODS AND GOOD DRINKS 

Ladies Invited 

309 Broad Slrei-t Phone 280 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 

NAPA LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANERS 



1307 Main Street 



NAPA 



CALIFORNIA 



DELS CAFE 

HOME STYLE COOKING 

DRAUGHT BEER ON TAP - CHILLED WINES 

I302 Main Street Phone 1280-J 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 

Phone 6.997) Ray and Bob Brown, Owners 

MARIES ICE CREAM PARLOR 

SANDWICHES AND COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 

JUMBO HAMBURGERS 

1100 Mam Street NAPA. CALIFORNIA 

KING AND GRANER 

•■K>labli5hfd |900- 

FAMILY LIUOR STORE 

CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS 

1102 Pearl Street Phone 773 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 



LOMBARDO HOTEL 



819 First Street 



CALIFORNIA 



VALLEJO: 317 Marin Street. Phone 2-03O2 

NELSON BETTENCOURT 

HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTORS - SALES - SERVICE 
SCHWINN BICYCLES - SALES AND SERVICE 



I>h..ne 6 7 194 



NAPA. CALIFORNIA 



SAM KEE LAUNDRY 

Poy Lim, Owner 

1245 Main Street Phone 784-J 

DEPOT LAUNDRY— 717 Main Street. Phone I 131 

NAPA tALIH)RNIA 

2 Stans and Russell 

OTTONS 
r'nie Mixed Drinks 

2360 Polk Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



JOPINA GUEST HOUSE 

Olivr McMahon. Manadnc Owner 

Phone PRospecl S-9914 1114 Pine 

.SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jdimary. !9'>1 



SHERIFF WHITMORE 

( Continued jroni page S) 

The new sheriff started his term by streamlining the 
office. He has divided the work of his staff into six depart- 
ments, as follows, with his deputy in charge: 

Chief Deputy Walter Moore to remain in that rank and 
have charge of the office under Sheriff Whitmore. He will 
also head the criminal department and his assistants will be 
Deputies Frank Marlowe, Milton Minehan and Jack 
O'Brien. 

Sergeant Ted Moudakas, who worked with the sherilf 
when he was with the Redwood Police Department has left 
that department and been made a deputy sheriff in charge 
of special services, having Deputy Paul Jensen to work with 
him in handling all confidential investigations, particularly 
gambling. 

Walter Harrington will continue as head of the communi- 
cations department, a position he has efficiently filled for 
many years. He has five men under him. 

Deputy Louis Lodi, veteran and able member, will con- 
tinue as chief jailor. It is the order of Sheriff Whitmore 
that patrol deputies serve three months on jail duty. 

Deputy Nickolas Zampolis will have charge of the civil 
department and Delbert Creeks will head the civilian de- 
fense department. 

Mrs. Dorothy Coll wil be head matron of the county jail. 



BAY COUNTIES' ASSOCIATION 

(Continued from page 18) 
Security Branch, Benicia Arsenal, made applications for 
membership and their names will be voted on at the 
next meeting. 

Then the speaker of the day. Chief Creighton, was in- 
troduced and he gave an illuminating talk of the nar- 
cotic problem. 

Phone LOckhaven 9-9874 

JOHNNY'S PLACE 

BEER and WINE 
FRANK and BERNICE CORREC 



1107 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 



SAN LEANDRO 



George Brothers Automobile Company 

DODGE - PLYMOUTH - DODGE TRUCKS 
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 



EAST MAIN 



GRASS VALLEY. CALIFORNIA 



SIERRA MOTOR SERVICE 

Dal. Ebaugh, Prop. 



AUTO REPAIR SERVICE 



MERCED AUTO TOP SHOP 

BLAINE ft SIMAS. I'rops. 

CONVERTIBLE TOPS A SPECIALTY 

FURNITURE UPHOLSTERING AND AWNINGS 

1720 "H" Street Phone 1103 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 

Phono 280-J HARRY IIEIL, Prop. 

GRADE GROCERY 

GROCERIES - GAS - OIL - BEER 

26TH AND ■■G" STREETS MERCED. CALIFORNIA 

CEREGHINO'S GROCERY 

913 "J" STREET 
MERCED CALIFORNIA 

SAN FRANCISCO MARKET 



534 Seventeenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CHINESE DISHES — SERVED AT ALL HOURS 

GOODFELLOWS GRILL 



512 M Street, Co 



State Highway 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL MERCED 



V. A. Peterson, Manager-Proprietor 

AIR-CONDITIONED THROUGHOUT 

POPULAR RATES . GATEWAY TO YOSEMITE 

Seventeenth and "M" Streets Phone Merced 491 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 



MOTEL MERCED 



H. O. Zilke, Owner 

MERCED'S OUTSTANDING MOTEL 

COMPLETE HOTEL SERVICE • GATEWAY TO YOSEMITE 

North Arch. Highway No. 99 Phone 1188 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 



LA PALOMA CAFE 



Mr. and Mrs. Palomino. Owners 

GENUINE MEXICAN DISHES — TAMALES AND ENCHILADAS 

ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

1621 "L" Street Phone 2154 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



1821 



Frank and Bob 



TURF CLUB 

CAFE • COCKTAILS 
1613 "M" Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



T. E. KENDRICK Phone 1549 F. J. ONETO, Phone 959 

SERVICE OIL AND BUTANE CO. 

STOVE AND DIESEL OIL 

BUTANE — TANKS — APPLIANCES 

17th Street and Bennett Road • Phone 1559 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 

MONTY'S BAR-B-Q 
AND DOUGLAS MOTOR INN 

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinners • Complete Fountain & Tray Service 
MODERATE PRICED CABINS — Open 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. 

161 East 16th St. MERCED Phone 1222 

ART'S CHICKEN SHOP 

LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY 

Wholesale and Retail 

2350 North "G" Street Telephone 286 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 

QUALITY FOOD STORE 

C. VV. KENNEDY. Owner 

FRESH MEATS — VEGETABLES 

437 Eighteenth Street Phone 773 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CLUB 



216 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ALUMINUM BOATS 

Rentals Sales 

MERCURY OUTBOARD 
TRAILORBOAT ENG. CO., 609 Francisco 
Phone — SAN RAFAEL — 5675 



January. 19'>l 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 37 



CLUB JOAQLUN 



MERCED PAINT & WALLPAPER CO. 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY'S GAYEST SPOT 

ENTERTAINMENT AND DANCING NIGHTLY 

GENUINE ITALIAN SPAGHETTI AND SELECT SEA FOODS 

Telephone Merced 24I7-J 
CALIFORNIA MLRCED 



MORWEAR PAINTS 
IMPERIAL WASHABLE WALLPAPERS 



South of Hichway 99 



332 Seventeenth Street 

CALIFORNIA 



IHEIS AND WHIl L 

FAIRBANKS MORSE • POMONA PUMPS 



1722 "Q" Street 



Phone 2051 -W 



COZY MOTEL 

John H. D'Alonzo, Manager 
•REST AND SLEEP OFF THE NOISY HIGHWAY- 
KITCHEN PRIVILEGES 
Hichway 140 East Telephone 2251 -J 



CALIFORNIA MERCED 



FALCON LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER • BUILDING MATERIALS * CEMENT 

Wholesale and Retail 

ESTIMATES GIVEN ON CONSTRUCTION 



East 21st Street 



Telephone 1864 



CALIFORNIA 



B. B. McGINNIS CO. 

EVERYTHING IN UNIFORMS 
MEN'S WEAR 

547 Seventeenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MILES AND SONS 



TRUCKING SERVICE 



Hifhway 99 North Phone 1451 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 



TWO-WAY RADIO EQUIPPED CABS 

MERCED TAXI 

Phone 173 

•PROMPT AND COURTEOUS SERVICE " 

Glen T. Gaines. Manager 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Joe Brizzolara, Pr 



■■AIR COOLED" 



JOE B'S 



"THE FRIENDLIEST SPOT IN TOWN" 

FINEST IN MIXED DRINKS - MEALS 

BOOTHS FOR THE LADIES 

1730 "L" Street Phone 3141 



Office Phone 1S17-W 



CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box 1449 



ELI & NICK'S CONCRETE PIPE CO. 

Puflizzevich Bros. 

IRRIGATION PIPE - SUPPLIES - SEPTIC TANKS - DRAINS 

1 Mile South, Los Banos Hifhway 



CALIFORNIA 



MERCED DAIRY & ICE CO. 



LOCAL DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers of 
MODERN MAID ICE CREAM 



CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE E. DRAY 



MASONRY CONTRACTOR 



721 East 21 St Street Telephone 2442- W 



CALIFORNIA 



"Fred" BARD I NFS "Angelo" 

PLUMBING - HARDWARE - WINDMILLS - APPLIANCES 

WATER SYSTEMS - WATER HEATERS - BUILDERS SUPPLIES 

HEA-nNG EQUIPMENT - SERVICE STATION EQUIPMENT 



1 301 "M" Street 



Phone 1543 



CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box 133 



A. W. POLZINE 



Phone 1606 



FEEDS • SEEDS • FERTILIZER 

Manufacturers of 
FIGSWEET DAIRY FEED 

Merced Industrial Center 



WHITE'S TRANSPORTATION 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE 

TRUCKING 

Route 2, Box 3« 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



LEONARD TANK LINES 



625 ■■J^' Street 



fAMFORNIA MF.RCin 



PURESTEST BRAND POULTRY AND DAIRY FEEDS 
GARDEN AND FIELD SEEDS 

MANTECA WAREHOUSE 

Wholesale and Retail 

Office Phone 34 Warehouse Phone 23 

MANTECA CALIFORNIA 

GENE, THE FLORIST 

Gene Descalso - Le R. Hunt 

Phone 137 Nifhl Phones 2I39.J; 243S.M 

510 Seventeenth Street 



•VLIFOHNIA 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]dii/hir)'. 791/ 



THE PATH OF DUTY 

(Continued jrom page 12) 
"You go near that door and you are a dead man." He 
spoke as though he meant it. I think the reporter was 
also visibly impressed. I fancy I can hear his teeth chat- 
tering. Yet — 

Strange, how suddenly religious a man becomes when 
he looks into the muzzle of a gun when some one's finger 
is on the trigger, and the barrel looks you meaningly 
in the eye. 

My friend, the reporter, had evidently forgotten some- 
thing. He beat it back along the path of DUTY . . . 
Doran and I held the stage. There came to me the 
memory of Pickett's charge at Gettysburg, "I must go 
forward." 

Taking the bull by the horns I parleyed with the man 
for the time, telling him I merely wished him to accept 
the service of the paper according to the law. Still cover- 
ing me with his gun, he told me to put the paper under- 
neath the door. I informed him that the law required 
me to place the paper in his hand, and even said, you take 
the paper, have a cigar with me, and I'll go about my 
business. 

Whether he was suspicious of the brand I smoked, he 
refused most rudely, and again repeated his threat to 
shoot if I advanced. 

While talking to the man I had advanced to the alley 
leading to the rear of the house, darting suddenly through 
this alley, but as I reached the rear, Doran appeared on 
the upper veranda. I neglected to state that the door 
leading off this veranda to the house I had removed a 
few days previously when no one was about, and had then 
thrown it into a yard adjacent, but Doran had nailed a 
board perpendicularly from the good frame above to a 
cleat below the floor. 

TELEPHONE 26-W 

SMITH AND HANSEN, Inc. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 
Main Office: Stockton, California 



P. O. BOX 743 



I5TH AND "H" STREETS 



MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 1532 FOR APPOINTMENT 



DR. RUTH X. COPE 



OPTOMETRIST 

930 SEVENTEENTH STREET 



MERCED. CALIF. 



PHONE I493-W 

N. P. BLAKEMAN & SON 

BRICK MASON CONTRACTORS 

299 EAST 17TH STREET MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



TURF CLUB 



TOPPER JEWELRY 

Thoughtfully, Lovingly Yours 

DIAMONDS 

AT SPECTACULAR SAVINGS 
Use Your Credit 

533 Seventeenth Street 
MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



MERCED MOTOR SALES 

Geo. L. Johnson and Son 

We Service All Makes of Cars 

Oldsmobile - Cadillac 

Telephone 2323 
335 SIXTEENTH STREET 

Merced, California 



FERRERO'S 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 

PACIFIC PUMPS • G. E. APPLIANCES 

WHIRLPOOOL WASHERS 



235 SEVENTEENTH STREET 



MERCED. CALIFORNIA 



MERCED LAUNDRY AND 
MODERN CLEANERS 



160 Seventeenth Street 



Phone 1312 

CALIFORNIA 



VISALIA ICE COMPANY 

SMOKING AND CURING 
BACON • HAM • TURKEY • FISH 

Have You Tried Our Smoked Turkey? 

Phone 4-6843 501 North Willis 



CALIFORNIA 



VANCE E. CARTER 

MERCED FROZEN FOOD LOCKERS 

MEAT - WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

CURING - CUTTING - QUICK FREEZE 

543 Sixteenth Street Telephone 1390 



CALIFORNIA 



MACK'S PLACE 

GROCERIES. MEATS AND PRODUCE 



Phone 1821 



1613 "M" Street 



CALIFORNIA MERCED 



1729 "K" Street 



Telephone 2153 



CALIFORNIA 



jaiiHiiry. 19^1 



POLICE AND PEACI-. OI-I-ICERS' JOURNAL 



Ptige 39 



Looting up I was again confronted by liini, gun in 
hand, and again I was ordered off the place. I here made 
my last entreaty. I said, "Look here, my frieiul, I have 
a great deal of work to do, take this paper and cigar 
and let me go about my business. He squeezed in behind 
the perperxlicular board. I kept walking up the stairs. 
As I reached the veranda he put his right arm through 
the opening and said, "Cji\e me the paper here." As he 
reached to get it I grabbed him by the wrist and pulled 
him out with all my strength, knocking down the board, 
but still holding him. We were out now on the little 
veranda, atid I was struggling to get possession of the 
gun. I caught the hand that held it. Still struggling and 
fighting we entered the hall along same, to the top of the 
stairs leading to the front door below. He suddenly 
slipped, and as he did so I struck him with my right 
hand under the chin, knocking him down the stairs, 
myself on top. We both reached the bottom. I pulled 
aside a scantling that he had placed from the stairs to 
the front door. 

1 opened the door, threw him out, and nearly into 
the arms of George W. Wittman, the Chief of Police, 
who happened to be passing at the time, and seeing the 
commotion and the crowd, and hearing of the occurence, 
was about to knock the door down to lend me a helping 
hand, as I opened it. He smiled. I nearly dropped dead 
in m\ tracks. 

•DORAN'S GUN WAS UNLOADKD." 

However, I often thought in those few moments, I 
earned m\ month's salary — and MORE. 



P. M. QUIEN 

AUTO PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 
Main Street 

CALIFORNIA 



LOMBARDI HOTEL 



8I'> First Sirert 



Napa, Califor 



Phone LOckhaven 8-78U 

MAY'S PLACE 

Specializing in 

HOME COOKING 

1462} EAST I4TII STREET SAN LEANDRO. CALII 



PERDUE SERVICE STATION 



SUSANVILLE 



t ALIFOHNIA 



HOTEL MARYLAND 



SUSANVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



SIERRA HOTEL 

849 Gay Street 



SUSANVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



SPALDING DRUG CO. 

Established 1865 
RELIABLE PRESCRIPTIONS 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

LAUNDERETTE 



908-910 Cay Street 
SUSANVILLE 



126-W 
CALIFORNIA 



ART MATHES 

UNION SERVICE 
Main and Harbison 



CALIFORNIA 



GIFT AND FLOWER SHOP 



Q U I N C Y 
CALIFORNIA 



O. C. COTTRELL 

FEED AND EGGS 
MANTECA CALIFORNL\ 

MANTECA VARIETY STORE 



GEO. LAURITSON. Prop. 



CALIFORNLA 



PETES MARKET 

PETE ARIACURF.N. Owner 

GROCERIES THAT ARE FRESH 

AND AT REASONABLE PRICES ALWAYS 

905 West Yosemite Phone 39 

MANTECA CALIFORNIA 

VICTOR BEER PARLOR 

BEER - WINES - TOBACCOS 
Same Location Since Repeal of Prohibition 

MAIN SIRF.ET. \'IC lOR. CAl.lhORNIA 



SUNRISE BAKERY 

920 MAIN STREET 
Phona 21-13 



SUSANVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



SOULE MOTORS 

DODGE - PLYMOUTH 



SOS Main Streeet 
SUSANVILLE 



IS9-B 

CALIFORNIA 



ST FRANCIS HOTEL 

JANE GONI. Prop. 

BATH AND SHOWERS 

LOUNGE AND CAFE IN CONNECTION 



830 Main 
SL'.SANVILLE 



Sir 



Pbo 



138-B 

CALIFORNIA 



BRONSON & DOYLE 

SUSANVILLE • ALTURAS • LITCHFIELD 

FEED — SEED — FARM MACHINERY 

JOHN DEERE • CATERPILLAR 

AutholHiad Daalara 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]iuuiary, I9'^l ' 



CHIEF RIORDAN AND NAPA P. D. 

(Coulhuu'il jynm pd^e 1 '> ) 
proximity to such health resorts and watering places as 
White Sulphur Springs, Samuels Springs, Aetna Springs 
and its golf course; St. Helena Sanitarium, Calistoga, hot 
mud and water baths, mecca of hundreds of health seekers, 

The city of Napa with nearly 14,000 people residin;; 
within its municipal limits, and many more from adjacent 
areas, is a well policed community. There has not been a 
bank robbery in the town for years and years, murders an: 
something equally rare and few, too, are burglaries where 
any considerable amount of loot has been taken. Tens o!' 
thousands automobiles pass through Napa annually to and 
from the many recreational points north of the city, yet the 
record of traffic accidents is very low, and deaths from such 
mishaps also small. 

There is a reason for this desirable state of affairs. Napa 
has as its Police Chief, Eugene C. Riordan. Chief Riordan 
has a long service in the Napa Police Department. He first 
joined as a patrolman in 1926, served until 1930 when he 
became a member of the California Highway Patrol, remain- 
ing with this law enforcement unit for three years, when he- 
returned to Napa to become its Chief of Police. This wa; 
on February 1, 1933. So we see he has had 22 years with 
the police department, 18 of which he has headed that 
organization. 

In 1926 when he first became a Napa policeman the force 
was made up of a Chief, a Captain and five patrolmen. 
Today Chief Riordan has one Captain, two Sergeants, one 
Inspector and 16 patrolmen,one clerk and matron. 

When he first joined the Napa Police Department calls 
were made by bicycles or taxicabs. Today he has four patrol 
cars, four motorcycles, and one three-wheeler to take care ot 
the parking meters of the city. They are all equipped with 
three-way radio receiving and sending sets. All these mobile 
units are serviced by Martin Landers in charge of electronics 
for the City and County of Napa He is well schooled for 
this important work for he served in the U. S. Navy for 22 
years specializing in radio. 

The oldest member in point of service of the Napa Police 
Department is Captain Constance Ivladalena who has com- 
pleted 25 years with the department. Officer Henry Ander- 
son, with 24 years is runner-up for the seniority honors, 
with Officer Jules Ojeda, 22 years, sharing the record of 
Chief Riordan. 

Inspector Sherwood Munk has been with the department 
for 14 years. 

The two Sergeants, Jack Johnson and Jack Blair, have 
eight years and six years respectively. 

Olga Fornachon, four years with the department is the 
clerk and matron. 

Others of the police personnel, with their years of service 
are: 

Officers Andy Blythe, 6; Emil Imboden, 2; Willis Hill, 
2; Dewey Burnsed, 2; Helph Rexroth, 5; Arthur Corbett, 3; 
Lawrence Antonini, 2; Walter Nichols, 2; Owen Roberts, 



SHOP AT THE 

DAYLITE MARKET 

Finest Meats - Quality Groceries 
Fresh Vegetables 

TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



Sun Valley Creamery 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

The Finest hi Dairy Products 

42 West Tenth Street 
TRACY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone - Tracy 98 



"Fine Foods and Liquors" 

WEST SIDE MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables 
LIQUORS 

729 Central Avenue 
TRACY,CALIFORNIA 

Phone 601 



Phone TWiNOAKS 3-9964 

JAMES Q. LEAVITT CO. 

Cannery - Dairy - Brewery 
Machinery 

410 TWENTY-FIFTH STREET 

Oaklandl2, California 



January. 19'' I 



POLICH AND PEACE OI-FICERS' JOURNAL 



Paj^e 41 



8; Wcrtz Hemphill and Jess Crowell, 2; and Meter Ofiner 
W. Morrow, 1. 

Last year the cit)' council put a -iO-hoiir per work week 
into effect for the police department. 

Charles Martin is city manager, and he has given all hi: 
official assistance to seeing that the police department was 
provided with ail the equipment necessarj' to carry on its 
work to give the people of Napa the best in police serviie. 
Napa has a well organized police body and its identification 
bureau, its record system and its radio department is ex- 
celed by no other city of its size. 

Each and every member of the department is a well 
trained law enforcement officer, and well able to successful!) 
meet any challenge from crooks of any sort. The records 
of the organization will bear this out. Chief Riordan sees 
that every member of his force keeps abreast of all phases 
ot their work by giving inser\'ice courses to the personnel. 

Napa is not only a nice place to visit or reside in but it 
is a safe place for any and all law abiding people. Chief 
Riordan and his men ably see to that. 



HOMER ALLEN 

Phono 8 
102 Central Av 



DRUGS 



CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 775 

TRACY GRILL 

ilr. and Mrs. James D. Andrews, Proprietors 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON - DINNER 

Also Fountain Service - Sandwiches 
EXCELLENT COFFEE AND PASTRIES 



On Highway SO 

18 EAST ELEVENTH STREET 



THAC-l', CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 540 



JIGGS FOUNTAIN CREAMERY 

SERVING 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH AND SANDWICHES 

WE SERVE VALLEY MAID ICE CREAM 



RECIA E. LOWERY 
203 West Eleventh Strec 



CALIFORNIA 



BERT WILLIAMS & SON 

AUTO PARTS - SUPPLIES 
AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE SHOP 

83 1 First Street Napa. California 

NAPA RECREATION 

BILLIARDS and FOUNTAIN 
I HO Second Street Napa, California 

HELENS CAFE 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER AND SHORT ORDERS 
Hours 6 A.M. 'til 3 A.M. 

828 Main Street 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 

SOUTH SIDE GROCERY 

PETE ALBANO. Prop 

GROCERIES • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 

WINE • BEER • TOBACCO AND CANDY 

Phone 425 27 West Third Street 

TRACY CALIFORNIA 

WESTERN HOTEL 

TRACY 
CALIFORNIA 

BERVERDOR, INC. 



48 West Eleventh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



UNION OIL STATION 

01,IMF>10 BOR(.rS 

OILS - TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES - LUBRICATION 

Phone I587W, Grant Line 

TRACY CALIFORNIA 

DOWDS MOVING AND STORAGE 

MOVING — Local and Lon( Distanr - ■ Packinf ■ Cralinf ■ Shippini 

Afency lor Nation-Wide Movinc 

C. I. DOWD Telephones : 

1S7 Throckmorton Ave. Office . . liUnlap 8-2646 

Residence DUnlap 8-0492 



MILL VALLEY. CALIF. 
Phone 1435 

PETALUMA LIQUOR STORE 

PACKAGE LIQUORS - WINES - BEERS - SOFT DRINKS 
108 KENTUCKY STRFF.T PETALUMA. CALIF. 



BLAKE BROTHERS CO. 

CRUSHED ROCK & RIP RAP 

Ready Mixed Concrete - Asphaltic Mixes 



BEacon 2-5193 



P. O. Box 1002 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



CROSS LUMBER CO. 

COMPLETE LINE OF 
BUILDING MATERIALS 



CALIFORNIA 



ARTHUR ABRAM 



19 West Seventh St 



CAl.ll ORNIA 



THE STAGG 



A. Costa and I. J. Maranise, Props. 

COCKTAILS AND MIXED DRINKS • CHOICE WINES. BEER 

LIQUORS . WHERE OLD TIMERS MEET 

15 West Sixth Street 

TRACY CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



Store 124; Res. 1861 Ben Dorselt, Store Manager 

FIRESTONE STORES 



Tenth and Central 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Tracy 1928 



TONGS INN 



Mun Tong Proprietor 



CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS 

ORDERS PREPARED TO TAKE HOME 

■•ENJOY REAL CHOW MEIN" 

118 E llthSTRKI.1 TRACY. CALIFORNIA 

PASTIME POOL HALL 

Laurent Fichrmrndy 

LIQUORS AND MIXED DRINKS 

I Central Avenue Phone 636 

TRACY CALIFORNIA 



B & E CLUB 



728 Central 



CALIFORNIA 



P^ge 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January. 19''1 



Sausalito Shipbuilding Co. 

BARGES :: WORK BOATS 
FISH BOATS :: REPAIRS 

1702 Bridgeway Blvd. 

SAUSALITO, CALIFORNIA 

Sausalito 70 



QUALITY MEATS - GROCERIES - FANCY 
AND STAPLE AT THE LOWEST PRICES 

Walnut Grove Meat and 
Grocery Market 

H. J. Oda, Proprietor 

Telephone 2116 P. O. Box 656 

WALNUT GROVE, CALIFORNIA 



Valley Electric Company 

Connuercial avd Residential Wiring 

REPAIRS 

914 Gay Street 
SUSANVILLE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 126-R 



Don's Richfield Service 

Don Turner, Operator 



Opposite Post Office 
OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1243 



BRITT TRAILER SUPPLY 
& SERVICE 

Everything for the Trailer Home 

15608 East Fourteenth Street 

SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 

LOckhaven 9-4134 



Wunder Cafe & Bar 

Liquors On or Off Sale 
Drinks and Fine Foods 

Phone 4-4557 

VISALIA, CALIFORNIA 



Milk Producers 
Association 



OF 




Central California v i'^ 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



HOUSEWARE • HARDWARE 
TOYS • SPORTS GOODS • PAINTS 



~4iiMSM 



STOCKTON 

MODESTO • LODI • MANTECA 
OAKDALE • TRACV • ESCALON 



January. 19^1 



POLICE- AND PHAGE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



SALINAS POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from page 22) 

His plan calls for a Training and Investigation Division; 
Patrol Division; and Service Division. Each will be in 
charge of a Lieutenant, except the Patrol, which will be 
under the Captain with two Lieutenants assigned as aides. 

The first will, in addition to training and investigations, 
handles juvenile matters. There will be an officer detailed 
exclusively to the latter activity. Also have charge of the 
Police Reserve. 

The stxond will have supervision over the uniformed 
force, traffic, parking (there are over 600 parking meters in 
the city) and jail supervision. 

The Service Division will handle the desk, communica- 
tions, records, identification and clerical, and the three 
women who sers'c as matrons and do the clerical work, and 
the court bailiff will work under the lieutenant in charge. 

Also he has provided for an animal shelter with a regu- 
larly appointed poundmaster. 

He has his civilian defense program well advanced and 
the PD has a well organized body, which will be increased. 
Members volunteering for this service are paid an hourly 
wage while they are training and for the time they .served 
after being appointed. They have uniforms, that eventually 
the city pays for. 

City Manager Adsit intends to have regular training 
courses for new men as well as the older members of the 
force. The first of this series of training courses was held 
early this month, and is under the direction of an instructor, 
John Pepper, who heads the State Law Enforcement Educa- 
tion. 

He intends to see that the department's 33 men and three 
women members, are provided with the best of ecjuipment. 
and have adequate quarters in which to operate. The pres- 
ent headquarters are being enlarged and each division will 
have its own place to work. 

One thing the new city manager has done that makes a 
big hit with the personnel is that officers will not have to 
work overtime in making reports. That work will hence- 
forth be done during their eight-hour shift. And it is the 
hope of C. M. Adsit to get a forty-hour week from the 
voters. 

In all these changes for the betterment of law enforce- 
ment of the city, and for the members of the PD the City 
Manager has had the fullest cooperation of the city council, 
nd of Mayor E. J. RafTetto, and old Stanford football star. 

Mr. Adsit was born in Cherokee, Iowa. He came west 
vhen a youth, finally settling in Pasadena, where he was for 
ears tity planning director. He graduated from the Uni- 
crsity of California as a civil engineer in 19-11. 

During the war he was a civilian engineer having charge 
)f sanitation in the entire Pacific War Area. Before coming 
o Salinas in March, 19^0, he was city manager of Mill 
C'allcy, where he did a splendid job for two years. 

He is married and there are two ilaughtcrs in the family. 

JOES FOOD (ENTER 



GROCERIES * FRESH MEATS 
Phonr 36F21 E«.l Vo. 



GROCERIES 



SOUTH SIDE GROCERY 

Mary Albano, Prop. 

GROCERIES * FRUITS • VEGETABLES 

WINE • BEER > TOBACCO AND CANDY 

Phone 425 27 WrsI Third Strcrt 



CAl-IFORMA 



TRACY INN 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

COFFEE SHOP 

26 West Eleventh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MOYER'S REXALL PHARMACY 



Formerly HOMER ALLEN. Drugs 



702 Central Ave 



CALIFORNIA 



CHIP'S 2211 CLUB 
— Cockt litis — 

2211 Polk Street CRaystone 4-9802 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

New y ear's Greet iti^s 

FROM 

SAN FRANCISCO SHOPPING NEWS 



851 Howard Street 



.SAN IKANCIStO 



CALIFORNIA 



Neic y ear's Creeth/(^s 



MATHEWS & LIVINGSTON 



317 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



AUTHORIZED FORD DEALERS 

JOHN PHILIP SOUSA 



WILLIAMSON ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 
Claude Williamton 



^( RE FRENCH BAKERY 

23rd and York Street 

SAN IKANCLSII) (-MIFOMNIA 



ORTECiA \ EMIGH 



CALIFORNIA 



4fll Market Street 

.SAN FRANCISCO < AI.IFORNIA 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jctiiiidry. 19^1 



S. F. POLICE ACADEMY 

(Continued from page 1-t) 

Captain Lawne was one of the most vigorous pro- 
ponents of an Academy for the City of San Francisco. 
Better service to the public could be rendered, he said, by 
more skillful officers. 

"The courts have decreed that words are force when 
uttered by a police officer," Captain Layne once wrote. 
He insisted that the public deserved better training for 
men "whose words are force and whose actions are law." 

An Academy would promote the qualities of "observa- 
tion, suspicion, and curiosity" . . . "the advance guards of 
an efficient policeman." 

Golden Gate Park Police Station formerly operated 
from the Academy building. It is located inside the north- 
ern boundary of Golden Gate Park, opposite Thirty-Sev- 
enth Avenue. The facilities there have served adequately 
for the department training program ; but a move is said 
to be underway to construct a new Academy at the loca- 
tion of the Police Range, on the shores of Lake Merced. 

The building contains three classrooms, a gymnasium, 
and faculty rooms. Drill grounds lie to the rear, and the 
front, facing Fulton Street, is landscaped attractively. 
Kezar Stadium is quickly accessible for athletic training 
and practice, as is the Police Range for firearms instruction 
and Fleshhacker Pool for swimming and lifesaving drill. 

Police recruits must pursue a twelve weeks' course of 
study at the Academy before they are given regular assign- 
ments. The rookie officer's first year on the force is a 
probationary period. After that, he is "in." 

The faculty launches a course by familiarizing the new 
men with police organization and administration, as well 
as department rules and regulations. The ensuing course 
covers the following subjects: 

DAILY'S BARBER SHOP 



WESTWOOD PARK FRENCH LAUNDRY 

J. J. Sokholik, Prop. 

QUALITY DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

1031 Ocean Avenue Phone JUniper S-3422 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

PEOPLE'S DAIRY PRODUCTS, INC. 

MILK AND DAIRY PRODUCTS 

DELIVERED TO HOMES 

3745 Mission Street Mission 8-3S00 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MAURICE LAFAYETTE 

CAST STONE - FIREPLACE MANTELS - WASTE MOLDS 

ORNAMENTAL PLASTERING 

4190 Mission Street JUniper 7-8831 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JODAR'S KARMELKORN SHOP 

POP CORN. KARMELKORN 
FINE HOME MADE CANDIES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



2529 Mission, Near 21s 



CALIFORNIA 



JACK & BILL 



AUTO AND TRUCK SALES 

677 Valencia Street UNderhill 1-5574 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ATwater 2-3242 



BAYVIEW BAIT SHOP 



A. Bii 



SPORTING GOODS • FISHING TACKLE 

FISHING PARTIES ARRANGED 

Phone Your Order to Be Sure of Bait 

4408 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



GEORGE M. PHILPOTT CO. 



lOSO Bryant Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



H. & M. GROCERY 

499 Douglas Street Mission 8-9726 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SIDNEY MIRON 

Pos-.tivelv Pays the Highest Prices for Ladies and Gents 

Second-Hand Gowns. Dresses and SuUs 

We Carry a Full Line of New Furs 

17S0 Geary Street, Bet. Fillmore and Webster 

WEST 11 552 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



1108 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PEZZOLA MARKET 



2292 Greenwich Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL REIMS 



36 Columbus Av 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DINO'S PHARMACY 

4601 Mission Street JUn'per 7-2032 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Evergreen 6-9665 

JONES' TEXACO STATION 

CALIFORNIA AND ARGUELLO BOULEVARD 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SIMPLEX 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

1135 Third Street 
Telephone: TWinoaks 3-0556 

OAKLAND 20, CALIFORNIA 



LANDSDALE HOTEL 



619 Larkin Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DAVIS TRUCK REPAIRS 



1177 Howard Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



EL CAMINO CLUB 



4541 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL SHA'WMUT 



516 O'Farrell Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



JUniper 4-8047 Herb Cook. Prop. 

HIGHLAND LIGHTING CO. 

MAKERS OF CUSTOM LIGHTING FIXTURES 

See Our Showroom of Pleasing Lighting 
Fixtures and Fireplace Equipment 



42 18 MISSION STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 12. CALIF. 



JMiHiiry. /9W 



POLK F. AND PHACH Ori-IC HRS' JOURNAL 



Page 4') 



Public relations, criminal iiucstigatioii, criminal identi- 
fication, crime laboratory, patrol procedure, station pro- 
cedure, firearms, reports and records, communications, and 
criminal law and procedure. 

Traffic regulation, first aid, juvenile delinquency, pin- 
sical education, riot formations, military training, trying, 
and operations and jurisdiction of related agencies. 

Only one man — -Sergeant Edward A. Hahn — is per- 
manently detailed to aid Engler at the Academy. He has 
ah\e assistance, however, from department officers who arc 
qualified in various fields. Patrolman Charles G. Fo\vIie, 
in charge of the Mechanical Defects Bureau (housed in 
the Academy building), turns to for Engler also. 

Patrolman Edward h. Epting serves as physical educa- 
tion instructor and also leads classes in rules and regula- 
tions. 

TTiree qualified attorneys, attached to Headquarters 
Company, instruct on the laws of arrest — I.,ieutenant 
Wesley F. Mm-ray, Inspector Alfred G. Arnaud, and 
Sergeant Joseph A. Murray. 

Other faculty members and subjects the\ teach arc 
as follows: 

Discipline, Deputy Chief James L. Quigle\' ; Traffic, 
Captain Ralph E. Olstad, Lieutenant Arthur P. Williams, 
and Sergeant Edward J. Mood\ ; Reports, Sergeant 
Francis P. Harrington. 

Minorit>- Groups, Lieutenant Henry C. Atkinson; 
Homicide, Inspectors Francis J. Alicrn ami Thomas J. 
Cahill ; Robbery. Lieutenant Martin M. Lee; Burglary. 
Inspector James P. Johnson. 

Missing Persons, Inspector James M. Fales; Sex 
Crimes, Inspector Frank P. Murphy; Subversive Groups, 
Inspector Thomas F. Fit/patriclc ; Vice and Gambling, 
Lieutenant Alvin J. Nicolini; Station and Patrol Pro- 
cedure. Lieutenant Leo M. Hayes. 

Scientific Crime Detection, Inspector Francis X. La- 
tulipe; Motor Vehicles, Inspector Frank L. Gaddini; Riot 
Control, Inspector Joseph P. Curtain; and Juvenile Prob- 
lems, Lieutenant John P. Meehan. 

More emphasis is given to visual aid and pane! dis- 
cussion methods of training under Engler's program at the 
Academy. These syst-ems, proven successful in wartime 
military traiiung, are equally effective in police traiiu'ng. 

Motion pictures used include Army, Treasury Depart- 
ment, and F.B.I, films on search and seizure, preservation 

YUKON HOTEL 



237 Third Sir 



.SAN FRANCISCO 



( Al II f)HNIA 



THEO. SCHMIDT 



CORSET AND SURGICAL Al'PI.IANCF. HOUSE 

Phonpn: GArrirld 1-1504: CArfipid I -'194 

957-959 Murfc'f Str-pl. Bel. Sll iind 6th Sirrel* 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



DOVLES TAVERN 



I 199 Church Si 



METHODIST PUBLISHING CO. 



83 McAllister Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



STEMPEL QUALITY DOUGHNUTS 



320 Fell Street 



SAN FRANCLSCO 



AI.IFr)RMA 



ARTHUR A. HYMAN 

ATTORNEY- AT-LAW 
300 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



I'hone SKyline 1-3070 FREE DELIVERY 

DENHARD'S MARKET 

QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES 

701 Tenth Avenue. Corner Cabrillo 

SAN FKANCISrO CALIFORNIA 

MARSHALL-ADAMS PRINTING 
CORPORATION 



523 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone SEabright 1 9500 Jack Coldjworthy 

SUNSET SERVICE 

AUTOMOBILE SALES 

I6TII AVENUF: at IRVING SAN FRANCLSCO . CALIF. 

A & H AUTO PARTS 

AL FLAUM 

738 Larkin Street Graystone 4-8233 

3818 Geary Boulevard SKyline 1-1134 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DOLORES CREAMERY 

Sam Cccilio. Proprietor 

501 Dolores Street HEmlock 1-9306 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SOLARI AND RFGHETTI BROS. 

Dealers in WINES AND LIQUORS 

Phone Mission 7-5904 4404 Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

COLONIAL INSURANCE CO. 



238 San<om? Street 



.SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BARREL INN 



139 Ellis Street 



\l IFORN'A SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' |OURNAL 



jtiiinary, 1 9'^ I 



of evidence, and anest procedure. One of fhe most pop- 
ular is the March of Time production, "The American 
Cop." 

In connection with a Pacific Telephone & Telegraph 
Company film, "Courtesy," student officers' voices are re- 
corded on wire and then played back to them. When a 
man listens to what he considers a normal conversation, 
he is often amazed to see how justified a citizen might be 
in taking offense at his tone and demeanor. 

A regular "In Service Training" course is maintained 
by the Academy, under which veteran patrolmen and ser- 
geants may return for refresher study. This type of train- 
ing, due to receive more attention in the future, has pro- 
vided the department with an invaluable morale builder, 
according to Engler. The veterans are familiarized with 
changes in police procedure and learn how to enforce the 
law with uniformity throughout the department. 

Capable and personable John Engler comes by his pop- 
ularity naturally and with ease. It requires no work on his 
part. He is recognized by fellow officers and private citi- 
zens alike as an expert on police procedure with a broad- 
minded and farsighted view of police administration 
problems. 

"Johnny Engler just can't do a poor job," a commis- 
sioned officer observed recently. 

January 2, 1929, immediately after becoming Chief of 
Police, William J. Quinn administered the police oath to 
John Engler — the first patrolman to face Quinn for an 
assignment. The same night Charles W. Dulles was pro- 
moted to the rank of captain of police. 

John and Helen Engler are parents of three daughters 
— Mrs. Doris Masio, Barbara and Marjorie. A son, John 
Paul Engler, lost his life while serving as a navy flier dur- 
ing World War II. Director Engler's brother. Inspector 
Joseph B., is in charge of the Pawnshop Detail of the Bu- 
reau of Inspectors. Another brother, George, a former 
police officer, is now in the restaurant business in San 
Francisco. 

Following his appointment to the department, Engler 
was detailed to labor disputes work. In 1931 he was 
assigned to Central Station. When he was promoted to 
corporal January 4, 1932, he was assigned to the former 
Harbor Station. 

In September of the same year Captain of Inspectors 
Dulles assigned Engler to the "Communist Detail." He 
then worked in the General Works Detail until February, 
1940, when Dullea, newly appointed Chief of Police, 
named him his department secretary. He held that posi- 
tion until January 8, 1948. Engler was promoted to 
sergeant in 1937, to lieutenant in 1942, and is now knock- 
ing on the door for his captaincy. 

All in all, his has been a well rounded police career thus 
far . . . the desirable combination of an officer who can 
make good arrests and be a capable administrator as well. 

Engler enjoys training "the kids" at the Academy. And 
it is generally conceded that for the recruits' first real look 
at a policeman, the department couldn't have provided a 
nicer fellow. 



ALLEN'S 
LITTLE COFFEE SHOP 



SAN FRANCISCO 



( ALirORNIA 



GARRETT M. GOLDBERG PAINT CO. 

MANUFACTURERS SINCE 1906 

1019 Mission Street Telephone UNderhill 1-0192 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC FELT COMPANY, Inc. 

W. A. Ladley, President 

COTTON AND WOOL BATTING - COMFORTERS 

700 York Street Mission 7-0112 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

LUCKY SMOKE SHOP 

Wayne Carroll, Prop. 

CIGARS - CIGARETTES - MAGAZINES - CANDIES 

1408 Polk Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HENRY WONG 

WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING 
1712 Polk Street near Clay Telephone ORdway 3-8717 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Ray Velasco Sam Corritore 

ROYAL MART GROCERY 

WINES - BEERS - FROZEN FOODS - OPEN SUNDAYS 
1760 Polk Street PRospect 5-2833 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CHINA TAMPICO CAFE 

(Between Washington and Jackson Streets) 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE FOODS 

FOOD TO TAKE OUT 

1808 Polk Street Phone GRaystone 4-9828 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORM\ 

OCCIDENTAL PLATING WORKS, INC. 

Alumilite Process - Chromium - Plating - Polishing 
Oxidizing - Spraying 

2259 Folsom Street Phone Mission 7-3604 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Mme. J. P. Bourdet WE CALL AND DELIVER 

The LACE HOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

3036 - 24th Street Mission 7-4720 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BINNS MACHINE & TOOL WORKS 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING 
1072 Bryant Street HEmlock 1-3570 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EDWARD CAMY 



381 Bush Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CRITERION COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

576 Geary Street Phone TUxedo 5-9730 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DEANS & HOMER 

INSURANCE GENERAL AGENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



340 Pine Street 



CALIFORNIA 



VARIETY SAUSAGE COMPANY, INC. 



3030 - 20th Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



jciti/iary, / 9 •> / 



POLICR AND PUACl- Ori-ICnRS JOURNAL 



Page 47 



POLICE PROMOTION EXAMINATION 
QUESTIONS 

As part of the subject "Knowledge of Duties," and 
under the heading RULES OF EVIDENCE, the follow- 
ing True-False statements were set forth by the Civil 
Ser\ice examiners in a San Francisco Police promotion 
test: 

1. The declaration of a djing person made under a 
sense of impending death is not admissible respecting the 
cause of his death. 

2. In a trial for bigamy it is not necessar\- to prove 
either of the marriages by certificate. 

3. In a trial for abortion, the defendant cannot be 
convicted on the sole testimotn of the woman upon whom 
the offense was committed. 

4. Whatever is established by law must be proven 
like any other fact. 

5. When a signature is made by a mark, it must be 
witnessed by two persons if it is to serve as a signature 
to a sworn statement. 

6. No person can be compelled to be a witness against 
himself in a criminal action. 

7. 1 he trial judge may discharge one of several de- 
fendants, before trial, that he may be a witness. 

8. Upon a trial for setting up a lottery, it is not nec- 
essary to prove the existence of a lottery, but proof of 
the sale of ticket is evidence of the issue of the ticket. 

9. A witness who is about to leave the state may be 
subpoenaed and his testimony taken before a magistrate. 

10. Oral evidence of the contents of an affidavit is as 
good evidence as the affidavit itself. 

11. A public officer cannot be e.vamined as to commu- 
nications made to him in official confidence, when the 
public interest would suffer by the disclosure. 

12. Corroborative evidence is additional evidence of 
the same character to the same point. 

13. One witness is usually sufficient for the proof of 
any fact except perjury and treason. 

14. I nwritten law constitutes a part of the law of 
California and is administered in our courts. 

15. The law of evidence requires proof equivalent to a 
demonstration. 

16. Children must be 12 years old to be cr)mpetent as 
witnesses. 

17. A malicious intent is conclusively presumed from 
the deliberate commission of an unlawful act for the 
purpose of injuring another. 

18. An affidavit to be u,sed before a court must be 
sworn to before a judge or notary. 

19. A witness false iti one part of his testimony is 
to be distrusted in others. 

20. The testimony of an accomplice ought to be 
.'icwed with distrust. 

21. A defendant cannot be convicted of "false pre- 



THE ARTICHOKE INN 

V. J. Corn.ni.. Prop. 

ARTICHOKE CROQUETTE - SERVED NO PLACE 

ELSE IN THE WORLD 

18 Porlrr Drive Phonr SOT 

VAT.SONVII.LF. CALIFORNIA 



Pop Ernest's Sea Food Restaurant 

"Originators of Abalone Sea Fooda" 

Opposite the Old Cualom House at Monterey 

TRADITIONALLY FAMOUS FOR SEA FOODS SINCE 1907 

Wo Serve Fine Wines and Liquors 



Phone 6218 



ALU OK Nl A 



Phone 5-3593 Re,, phone S-S063 

G. W. WATKINS 

Distributor 
REGAL PALE -::- COORS BEER 



582 Fremont Street 



CALIFORNIA 



"In The Center o( Monterey" 

CASA MUNRAS HOTEL 
AND COTTAGES 

DINING AND DANCING . COCKTAILS 
Jack Dougherty, Manager 



CALIFORNIA 



ED C. BROWN AND CO. 

Chrysler and Plymouth 



CALIFORNIA 



J. J. NEWBERRY CO. 

5-10-25 Cent Stores 

DEPENDABLE MERCHANDISE 
AT A SAVING 



CALIFORNIA 



LAURITSON AND DODA 

AMUSEMENT GAMES . CIGARETTE MACHINES 
WHOLESALE CANDY AND TOBACCO 

233 Salinas Street 

SALINAS CALIFORNI A 

Phono 4-9870 Joe Leon. Prop. A Owner 

STREAMLINE POOL ROOM 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - CIGARS 
CIGARETTES 

142 Main Street 
WATSONVILLI^. CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL DWAINE 

DOWNTOWN FIREPROOF - SOUNDPROOF 
160 MODERN ROOMS - THE FRIENDLY FAMILY HOTEL 



ORdway 3-7642 242 TiirU Street 



.SAN FRANC ISC O 



CALIFORNIA 



CHINA CAFE 

CHINESE DISHES 

Open from 4 P.M. to 2 A.M. 

ISI Main Street Phone IS7! 

WATSONVIIIK CALIFORNIA 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jail nary. 19'' I 



tense' unless such pretense is in writing. 

22. A subpoena is served by delivering the original 
to the defendant personally. 

23. If a defendant in a criminal action offers him- 
self as a witness, he may be cross examined as to all mat- 
ters having any bearing on the trial. 

24. The clerk of the court must issue without charge 
as many subpoenas as the defendant may require. 

25. Only a police officer may serve a subpoena in the 
county in which it is issued. 

26. Only a magistrate or clerk of the court can issue 
a subpoena. 

27. All the rules of evidence in civil actions apply tn 
criminal actions. 

28. The testimony of one reliable witness is suffi- 
cient for the proof of the commission of a misdemeanoi'. 

29. In the course of a criminal trial many things are 
taken as true without proof. 

30. The law does not permit conclusive law to be 
contradicted. 

31. A witness who is an accessory is not presumed to 
speak the truth. 

32. The judge himself may be called as a witness by 
either party. 

33. Perjury can be proved only by the direct testimony 
of two or more witnesses. 

34. Unless otherwise expressly provided by statute, 
every citizen has a right to take a copy of any public 
writing. 

35. No woman can be required to testify against her 
husband in a trial for a crime he has committed against 
her. 

TRAILER SPACE 

CAMERA MOTEL 

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Montgomery, Owners 

1422 168th Avenue at East Fourteenth Street 

Between Hayward and San Leandro 

Phone LUcerne 1-9976 

SPUR INN 

STEAK DINNERS • BAR SERVICE 

Jack Long, Owner 

101 Highway Phone 2 



BERRY'S FLOWERS 

FLOWERS WIRED— WORLDWIDE 



VICTORY CAFE 



12 W. Market Street Phone 8383 

SALINAS CALIFORNIA 

S. F. COFFEE SHOP 

Manuel Psomas 
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

116 Main Street Telephone 8264 

SALINAS CALIFORNIA 

SALINAS GLASS SHOP 

H. E. Silva 

Telephone 59S8 225 Salinas Street 

SALINAS CALIFORNIA 

HORSE SHOE INN 

MIXED DRIN.KS - BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 



BUCKAROO CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS - LUNCH COUNTER - CLUB ROOMS 



V. CRACCHIOLO 

POOL ROOM AND BARBER SHOP 
279 Alvarado Street 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



One of Monterey's Historic Adobes with Modern Comfort 

MISSION INN 

B. V. McMenamin, Prop. 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND DINING ROOM 

456 Tyler Street Phone 4164 

MONTEREY CALIFORNIA 



SPROUSE-REITZ CO., No. 705 

SAVE THE SPROUSE WAY 



MONTEREY 



475 Alvarado Street 



CALIFORNIA 



THE ALVARADO 



271 Alvarado Street 



GREENFIELD 



CALIFORNIA MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



SOLEDAD 



THE HOME DEPT. STORE 

CLOTHING FOR THE FAMILY 

FURNITURE FOR THE HOME 

237 Front Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MONTEREY 



SIESTA INN 



402 Washington Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Ray Lanini OPEN 24 HOURS 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 

COMPLETE AUTO AND TRUCK SERVICE 
EAT AT OUR CHUCK WAGON 

KING CITY CALIFORNIA 

WHOLESALE . RETAIL . FREE DELIVERY 

DAYLIGHT MEAT CO. 

FRESH. SMOKED AND SALT MEATS 

FISH. POULTRY AND GROCERIES 

227 Main Street Telephone 2127 

WATSONVILLE CALIFORNIA 

DAvenport 3-1138 

STANFORD UPHOLSTERING 
& FURNITURE STORE 

K. RICHTER, OWNER 
RE-UPHOLSTERING AND CUSTOM-BUILT FURNITURE 

630 RAMONA STKEET PALO ALTO. CALIF. 



MEN'S, LADIES', BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S SHOES 

I. W. LOEWEN CLOTHING STORE 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING 

Open Sundays — Closed Saturdays 

Phone 1241 517 South Central Avenue 

LODI CALIFORNIA 

THE OPEN MARKET 

QUONG LOW 
FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES . GROCERIES AND MEATS 



MONTEREY GARAGE 

Phone 5-4175 
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



jaiiHiiry. /9W 



POLICE AND PEACH OEEICERS' lOURNAL 



Page }9 



Town House Restaurant 
and Cocktail Lounge 

SPANISH FOOD 

Telephone 2-5543 

332 Alvarado Street 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



JOCKEY CLUB 

Frank Napoli, Prop. 
Phone 2-9769 

BEER - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 
ENJOY YOURSELF 

137 Franklin Street 
J MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Monterey Transfer 
and Storage 

Phone 5-4163 - 5-4164 

I.ociil tnid Long Distance Hauling 
Since 1918 

AGENTS FOR BEKINS VAN LINES 
PRIVATE LDCKER ROOMS 
CRATING AND PACiKING 

■^35 Del Monte Avenue 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



CANNED FOODS 
DISTRIBUTION CENTER 

1350 FOLSOM STREET 

Featuring 
Valley Bloom Food Products 

Buv a Can or a Case and Reduce the 
High Cost of Living 

Look for Our Big Ad in Sunday's Examiner. 
Thursday's S. F. iSetis and Call-Bulletin 

Our Only Location . . . So Branches 

Hours 9 til 5:15 Every Day Except Sunday 



COFA CABANA 


Montirefs Neiiest Supper Cluh 


F(X)u AT Its Best 


• 


590 Fremont Street 



TYNAN 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 

Salinas 
California 



A. L. RUSO, Inc. 

FROZEN 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Phone 4-6381 - Teletype W'/F. 91 
Plant 241 Walker Street - P. O. Box 109 

WATSONVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



SILVA BLOOM 
RANCH - DAIRY 

OLEMA, CALIFORNIA 



50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]ivu/ary. /yW 



J. S. WEST AND CO. 

A HOME INSTITUTION 



MODESTO LIQUOR STORE 

Maurice R. Murphy, Prop. 

IMPORTED AND DOMES! IC LIQUORS 

WINES AND BEERS 

Phone 101 814 -Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



KNOX SEED COMPANY 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN" 

STOCKTON and MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL DOLLAR STORE 

WHERE YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE 
926 Tenth Street 



CASAZZA BROTHERS 

DELICATESSEN 
311 H Street Phone 473- W 



FLOR DE MEXICO CAFE 

M. Fortado, Prop. 

MEXICAN DINNERS • BEER AND WINE 

608 Seventh Street Phone 5622 



PECK'S BAIT AND SPORTSHOP 

Ray Peck, Prop. 



SING LEE LAUNDRY 

Phone Modesto 2074 716 Seventh Street 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

NEW DEAL MARKET 

WE SELL FOR LESS AT ALL TIMES 



402 Fourteenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Bill Hartlett Roy Whipple 

Dania Club & Bar-B-Q Dinners 



418 Eye Street 



CALIFORNIA 



B. ZEFF WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 



ARCH HOTEL 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



Mrs. W. L. Stite 
918y2 Eye Street 



Prop. 



CALIFORNIA 



SHOOB'S CAMERA SHOP 

THOMAS SHOOB 

Cameras - Projectors - Films - Motion Picture Equip. - Photographic 

Supplies and Chemicals - Photo Finishing - Enlarging 

Copying - Fine Grain Developing 

1024 Tenth Street MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 

NEW CANTON GRILL 

EXCELLENT CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

WE PUT UP ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

1008 Tenth Street Phone SS82 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

MODESTO CHINESE HERBS CO. 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



1602 "H" Street, Cor. 16th 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA POULTRY MARKET 

L. Hagarty. Prop. 
Phone 1206 502 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO ROD AND GUN CLUB 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



714 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ARCH CLUB 



826 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GRAYSTONE TILE PLANT 

Peter Jandpaul, Prop. 
MANUFACTURERS OF HI-TEST BUILDING BLOCKS 
River Road, West of 99 Highway Phone 3108-W 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

SAN FRANCISCO MARKET 

M. E. Angelo, Prop. 

MODESTO'S FINEST FOOD MARKET 

Ninth and H Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



BENSON AND ZIMMERMAN 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 



11th and H Street 



Phone 2600 



CALIFORNIA 



WALTER'S VARIETY 



JOHN N. ROCHA 

LIVESTOCK TRANSPORTATION — Night and Day 
Route No. 6, Box 1062 Phone 5434 



J. F. DICKINSON COMPANY 

RADIO - RECORDS - HOME APPLIANCES 



716 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FOR OVER 87 YEARS 
DEPENDABILITY IN QUALITY AND SERVICE 

BORDEN'S ICE CREAM 



FRESH PASTEURIZED MILK 



605 "H" Street 



CALIFORNIA 



WALTZ INN 

Walt Barton, Owner 

MIXED DRINKS. BEER AND WINES 

Phone 5630 313 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FARMER'S INN 



W. M. Capen, Prop. 



716 Ninth Street 



Phone 5617 



CALIFORNIA 



PUTNAM SAND & GRAVEL CO. 

CONCRETE MIX 

PLASTER SAND - ROOFING GRAVEL 

SCREENINGS - CONCRETE SAND 



200 Santa Ro 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



Phone 2323 

CALIFORNIA 



]iviiiitry, 19'>1 



POI.ICR AND PI.ACn OmCFRS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



CHIEF PHIPPS OF RICHMOND 

(Conlinued jroni page l(') 

"Selective calling is a modification of the telephone dial 
system. Numbers arc assigned to each patrol car. When an 
outside beat patrolman has left his car for the purpose of 
going on an assignment, he can be contacted by the radio 
dispatcher without the use of the radio. The dispatcher 
merely dials the number of the car with which contact is 
desired. When dialing is completed, the car horn com- 
mcnses honking and continues until the otficer returns to 
his car and answers his radio. It might be added, however, 
that the dispatcher has complete control over tiic icngtii of 
time a horn sounds. 

Very often in the past, officers have not been available for 
new .issignments because of another which they have not 
completed. With the inception of the selective calling, fea- 
ture, however, it was found that we could more easily make 
full use of our available manpower. 

Consideration was also given to the "nuisame" value ot 
selective calling. It was recognized that the sound of a 
honking horn would be irritating to citizens, particularly 
during the night time hours when they were aslecep. This 
possibility was eliminated by the installation of a red light 
on the dash of each car. This light can be caused to blink 
by the radio dispatcher, in exactly the same manner as the 
horn is caused to sound. The only difference is that the red 
light continues to blink until the offiier on the outside rc- 



NEEDHAM LIQUORS 

DUMONT WINES AND LIQUORS 

I2th and Ncedham Ave Phone 6778 

611 "H" Street Phone 3018 



CALIFORNIA 



B. AND T. MARKET 



Bill Poulos 
BEST IN TOWN 



HOTEL UNION 



702 </i Seventh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



DANNY'S 

FINE FOODS • COCKTAILS 



Phone 5610 



415 H Street 



ALIFORNIA 



THE COBBLES MOTEL 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hernandez, Owners 

P. O. Box 1162 Phone 3204 

South on Highway 99 



CALIFORNIA 



ACME GLASS COMPANY 

Joseph A. Mcngelt. Prop. 
710 G Street Phone 3226 



CALIFORNIA 



EL CAPITAL 

913 J. Street Phone 5659 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

SONOMA FRUIT MARKET 

Bob Williams, Owner and Manager 

PRODUCE— WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

703 So. 99 Highway Phone 3788-W 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



TIOGA CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

QUALITY BEERS • SOFT DRINKS 

1012 "H" Street Phone 34<M 

MODESTCJ CALIFORNIA 

STANISLAUS IMPLEMENT & 
HARDWARE COMPANY 

LEADING LINES OF FARM EQUIPMENT 
Tenth and F Streets Phone 401 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO JUNK COMPANY 

Dealers in 
Scrap Iron - Metal - Sacks - Wool - All Types of Government Sur- 
plus for Sale, including Pipe. Belting. Hardware. Anvils, 
Vises. Sleeping Bags. Hooks. Cables. Etc. 
1425 Ninth Street Phone 546 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Modesto Livestock 
Commission Co. 

( I INT THOMPSON - HAROLD ViA"il.ANI) - Itl'l) (.KIMP 

AUCTION EVERY MONDAY 

CATTLi; HORSIS HOCIS - SHHKP 

One Mile South of Modesto on Old Highway W 
Route 4 - Phone 1H6() - Box ^l','> 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



HOME MARKET 

Everything in 

MEATS AND GROCERIES 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



CALIFORNIA 



HEMLER MOYLE HOTEL 

i. (.. HiMi.iK, Oiiinr 

MODERN ROOMS AND 
APARTMENTS 

9171/2 Jay Street 
MODESTO. CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 19'^1 



EAST RICHMOND GROCERY 

GROCERIES • FRUITS * VEGETABLES 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



999 San Pablo Av 



RICHMOND 



Phone BE 4-9808 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone BE 4-9887 



"Meet Your Friends He 



THE DINER 

(Truck Drivers Paradise) 

BREAKFAST - DINNERS - SHORT ORDERS 

OPEN 24 HOURS - CLOSED SUNDAYS 



960 San Pablo Av 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



RED ROBIN 

Thos. H. McNeely, Owner 

SERVING GOOD FOOD AND DRINKS 

HOTEL AND POOL PARLOR IN CONNECTION 



Phone BE 2-9853 



400 Pulln 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



ROYAL RECREATION PARLOR 

POOL - SNOOKER - BILLIARDS - TOBACCO - CIGARETTES 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 



612 MacDonald Avenue 

RICHMOND 



Phone BE 2-9949 

CALIFORNIA 



ALWAYS A FRIENDLY WELCOME 

TED AND WALT'S 

BEER - GOOD EATS - 3019 Cutting Blvd. - Phone BE 2-3598 
ALSO VISIT 

Hole In The Wall 

DRAUGHT BEER - EATS AND HOSPITALITY 
3045 Cutting Blvd. 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Mastercraft Tile and Roofing Company 



1 Twentieth Street 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Richmond 9461 Joe Kovacevich 

ALVARADO GARDEN 

ITALIAN AND AMERICAN DINNERS 
LIQUOR - BEER - WINES 

095 SAN PABLO AVENUE RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

MIRA VISTA MARKET 



BUY SAVINGS BONDS 

afid 

KEEP AMERICA STRONG 

F. Marcello 



THE PINE 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



18 Standard Ave 

POINT RICHMOND 



BE 2-9856 

CALIFORNIA 



NEW CHINA CHOP SUEY CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

PRIVATE BOOTHS FOR PARTIES 

We Specialize in Orders to Take Home 

Open Every Day 12 Noon to 1:00 A.M.; Saturday 'til 2;00 A.M. 



232 MacDonald Av 

RICHMOND 



Pho 



BE 4-2167 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone BE 3219 (In Business Since 191! 

STANDARDIZED PLUMBING REPAIR SERVICE 

R. W. TIMMONS 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

NO CONNECTION WITH ANY OTHER FIRM OF THIS NAME 

Corner Seventh and Nevin 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



John P. Camerlo R^V T. Holland I 

Grand Hardware and Appliances 

HOUSEWARES - PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL GOODS 

SPORTING GOODS - GARDEN SUPPLIES - VARIETY PAINTS 

WHERE COURTESY DWELLS AND SERVICE EXCELS 



1183-1185 23rd Str 



Phone BE 2-916 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



BLAKE BROTHERS COMPANY 

ROAD OIL AND ASPHALTIC MIXTURES 

READY MIXED CONCRETE 

CRUSHED ROCK 



RICHMOND 



P. O. Box 1002 

CALIFORNIA 



LIBERTY CAFE 



4S10 Barrett Ave 



Phone BE 5-0854 

CALIFORNIA 



BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 

SHORT ORDERS - BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

6 A.M. to 3 A.M. Daily 334 MacDonald Avenui 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

UNCLE SAM'S CLUB 

DANCING FRIDAY. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 
425 Cutting Blvd. 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



P. & W.'S VAGABOND 

DELICIOUS SANDWICHES - DRAUGHT BEER 
20S MacDonald Avenue 



Forest and Joe of 

THE PINE INN 

SEND GREETINGS TO ALL PEACE OFFICERS 
No. 19 Standard Avenue 

RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



WESTGATE LIQUORS 



200 MacDonald Av 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW CANTON CAFE 

Chinese and AmeHcan Dishes • Chop Suev and Chow Mein 

ORDERS TO TAKE HOME 

Open Daily II A.M. to 10 P.M. 

440 San Pablo Avenue BEacon 4-9835 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 



]aiiHitry, 19^1 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 55 



spends by radio. 'I'Ik- dispatihcr laiinot lontrol its opera- 
tion as he can the horn." 

Many interested persons have asked for proof ol tlic 
value of selective calling. A few specific examples will be 
related. 

Routine checking of the doors of business houses and 
protective policing of residential areas have long been 
"musts" among the duties of the police officer. In order 
that this be systematically done, officers have been assigned 
to foot patrol. By virtue of the fact that they were afoot, 
the activities of the men were limited. Once their job of 
checking doors, windows, etc., was completed, their useful- 
ness in law enforcement work was more or less exhausted. 
Outside of regular hourly "call ins" to headquarters, men 
in the radio room had no contact with them and they were 
not immediately available in the event of emergency. 

When selective calling was put into effect, these same 
men were assigned police cars. Their duties of checking 
business establishments and homes were substantially the 
same but they accomplished more in a relatively short period 
of time. Even though they were absent from their car while 
performing these duties, they were still available, at a 
minute's notice, for any emergency assignment which niiglit 
arise. 

Because of past shortages in manpower, officers were 
forced to assume double responsibility in the patroling of 
their beats. Before selective calling was in use, officers, of 
necessity, had to let pass innumerable minor incidents which 
ordinarily would have been given police attention. Now, 
confident in the knowledge that they can be contacted even 
[ though they are away from their car, officers give citizens 
more thorough protection and render more efficient and 
useful services. 

One specific instance of the value of selective calling has 
been related many times but it will bear repeating. In one 
section of the city, a robbery was committed. The persons 
[responsible made good their escape from the crime scene. 
I In another section of the city, an automobile accident had 
occurred. The officer assigned to investigate it was out of 
his car obtaining information and directing traffic. While 
he was thus engaged, the horn on his police car sounded. 
I Knowing an emergency existed, he immediately responded 
on his radio. He was informed of the robbery and given a 
description of the getaway car and its occupants. The story 
[ends, of course, with this officer's apprehension of the rob- 
bers. Had he not been alerted by selective calling, his at- 
tention would have been given routing traffic around the 
accident scene and he wold have permitted the getaway car 
ro pass, totally unaware of the crime committed by its 
occupants. 

So — we have presented a few endorsements for this new 
innovation in radio communications— SELECTIVE CALL- 
ING. Now that we have it in use, it is difficult to recall how 
' r managed without it. If other departments ihrough- 
' ilifornia and the United States adopt it as a part of 
ommunications system, we will feel great pride in 
ing we have encouraged them in their progress and. 
. luLinly so. bc-cause it was pioneered in Riiliinond 



BARRI-TT AVENUE STORE 

MEATS - GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 



1910 Barrett Avrnii 
RR IIMOND 



Phone BEacon 2-989S 

CALIFORNIA 



NEVIN STREET GROCERY 



611 Ni-vin Street 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



ROBERTS AND MINTON 



RICHMOND 



23rd and Rhe 



BE 2-0560 



CALIFORNIA 



SIMONI MOTOR SERVICE 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



RICHMOND 



864 23rd Sir 



Phone BE 2-2526 



CALIFORNIA 



REFINISHING WAXING 

JOHNS FENDER & BODY WORKS 

John Vidulich 

FENDER AND BODY REPAIRING - AUTO PAINTING 

262 1 4th Street Phone BE 2-4054 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

NEW MacDONALD MARKET 



WOODS SERVICE GARAGE 

TOWING AND AUTO WRECKING 



Phone BE 3-1207 Wm. Imboden, Prop. 

BILLS KEY SHOP 

Expert Lock-^m th - Keys Made - Safe Combinations Repaired 

Locks Fitted - Saw F ling - Lawn Mower Grinding 

All Kinds of Auto Locks 

4tl' and MacDonald Av_nuc RICHMOND. CALIFORNIA 

workingmans market 

C.impl te Lin- of 

COMPLETE LINE OF GROCERIES. BEER AND WINE 

ALSO COMPLETE LINE OF DRUGS AND SUNDRIES 

533 Ciittinir Blvd. Phone BE 4-3149 

UK HMOND CALIFORNIA 



POLKA DOT INN 



ICE COLD BEER 

Spec'aliz'ng in . . . HOME COOKED FOOD 

DELICIOUS FRIED CHICKEN 

1240 Wright Ave. Phone Richmond 9173 

Kli HMOND CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL POOL HALL 



RK HMOND 



Herb Palton • Hclb Clark 
49 Washington Street 



CALIFOI^NIA 



SAN PABLO AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY 

4919 MrBryd,- Richmond S70SR 

liltHMi-M) CALIFORNIA 

Va el Masloras Phone 3-6778 

STATE CENTER CHEESE CO. 

Manufacturers 

ICE CREAM ■ CHEESE 

Rt. 12. Box 21 (E!m Ave. near North). Highway 41 

FRESNO c'aLIFORNIA 

For the best 

REPAIRING - CLEANING 

DYEING - SHININt; 

KLVNE'S SHOE SERVICE 

ZOIC Polk St., Nr. Broadway ORdway 3-4665 

S.\N rilA\( I.S(n , Al II IIRNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jdiiliiiry. 19 'I 



Richmond Produce Company 

INCORPORATED 
Phone BE 4-2460 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
WHOLESALE FRUIT - PRODUCE 

394 Seventeenth Street 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



You Can Enjoy 

"AUTOMATIC WATER" 

W^i/h A Jacuzzi 

Pump and Water System 

JACUZZI BROS., Inc. 

Richmond, Calif. St. Louis, Mo. 



Pan Pacific 
Screw and Bolt Company 

F. E. KosER 



201 Nevin Avenue 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone LAndscape 5-2642 - BErkeley 2-6836 



BOIES AND SOULE 

CHOICE CONTRA COSTA 
COUNTY PROPERTIES 

Orinda Crossroads 

ORINDA, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Orinda 6511 



ORINDA MOTORS 

A. W. "A" Ebi;rlin, Prol>. 

OFFICIAL 3-A STATION 
AUTO REPAIRS 

Opposite Golf Course 

ORINDA, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Orinda 2013 



EL REY THEATRE 

WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA 
Also 

PARK THEATRE 

LAFAYETTE, CALIFORNIA 



LEMONVILLE MARKET 

Groceries - Meats - Vegetables 

Visit our Club, and enjoy life at its best 

R. R. No. 2, P. O. Box 92 
Floral and Fowler Avenue 

SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



RALF MAKI 

AUTOMOBILES OF QUALITY 
USED, BUT NOT ABUSED 

3600 Mt. Diablo Blvd. 

LAFAYETTE, CALIFORNIA 

Lafayette 3400 



l:'.';/ary. lO'il 



POLICE AND PFACn OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page .5,5 



HISTORIC ITALIAN SWISS COLONY 

PRESERVES OLD-WORLD CHARM, 

WINE-MAKING TRADITIONS 

Rich in 1 raditioii and old-world romance is the historic 
Italian Swiss Colony at Asti, California. Here, amidst 
: oiling vineyards in the heart of the famed Sonoma 
L'luinty wine region, the idyllic little settlement is devoted 

l.iy — as it has been since 1887 — solely to the growing 

1 making of choice California wines. 

Located bct\vcen Hcaldsburg and Cloverdale on High- 

\\ .i\ 101, the Italian Swiss Colony — so named for the 

linriielands of its founding families — is still populated 

pi iiicipally by their descendants. Third-generation work- 

- in the 1800 acres of vineyards and at the winery are 

ninonplace. Now in his 70's, W^inemaster Bartholmeo 

;'po has, since 191 1, been practicing the art he learned 

in his father in Italy, and is teaching his sons to follow 
in his foot-steps. 

As much a part of Colony tradition as its wineniaking 
is the warmth of its hospitality. The "Visitors Welcome" 
sign is out every day in summer, and every day except 
Sundays all year long. Guests are received at the Ad- 
ministration Building, where they are invited to sample 
any wine of their choice. Every few minutes, pleasant, 
well-informed guides conduct visitors on tours through 
the historic winery. 

They see every phase of wineniaking from crushing and 
fermenting to aging and bottling. 

In addition, visitors are privileged to inspect the 
fragrant champagne storage rooms, and to watch the 
sparkling wines being bottled. They are also shown the 
distillery where brandy is made, to use for arresting 
fermentation in sweet wines. They are guided through 
the famous "Redwood Forest," where millions of gallons 
of wine are stored in oak and redwood containers, until 
properly aged and ready for blending with other "fin- 
ished" wine. 

At first glance, one gets the impression that time has 
Stood still at Asti since the turn of the century. Almost 
oblivious to the teeming world that surrounds them, the 
Colony workers take special pride in carrying on traditions 
established nearly 70 years ago. Although modern ma- 
chinery and methods have replaced the laborious processes 
employed by the pioneer families, the original winery 
building and several cellars built during the last century 
are still in use. And the dance held inside giant 500,000- 
gallon wine storage vat — to dedicate it in the early 1900's 
— is still a widely discussed social event at Asti. 

P'or a glimpse of rural European life just 80 miles 
from the (jolden Gate, and a refreshing tour through 
one of California's most famous wineries, plan a weekend 
trip or vacation stop at the Italian Swiss Colony — Asti, 
California. 



INTERNATIONAL MARKET 

GROCERIES 

MEAT, FRESH VEGETABLES. BEER A^fD WINE 

Phon» HI(al> •4-40II 1334 Pcr.lt. Slrr»l 

[i OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



TIP TOP CAFE 

Foot Hill and Santa Rosa 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



EASLEV & CAUDLE 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 
LUBRICATION SPECIALISTS 
Adams and U. S. 99 Highway 



FARMERS MARKET 

Route 10. Box -tW 
Phone 47289 Hi-Way City 



CALIfOHNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



CALlr OKNIA 



SMITHS CAFE 



KETTI.r.MAN C'lT'i- 



CALIFORNIA 



PEREIRAS PLACE 

P O Box 550 



COYUCOS 



CALIFORNIA 



CUNNINGHAM GROCERY 



MORRO BAY 



CALIFORNIA 



House of Friendship Gordon - Jackie - S.r 

BROWN'S 

BEER - COLD DRINKS - ICE CREAM 



MORRO BAY 



1 '/i Miles No. - Hwy 



Phone 2872 



CALIFORNIA 



AL AND CARL'S AIRPORT INN 

DANCING FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS 

EVERYONE WELCOME 

R. R. 3, P. O. Box 760 Phone 3-3834 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

A. M. Thompson p yy Maxwell 

Gordon-Hill Nursery & Flower Shop 

FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION 
Broadway at Bright Avenue Phone 234-W 

J-^^KSON ^ CALIFORNIA 

CLUB FEATURES DANCING 

BANK CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS OF ALL KINDS 

Phone 673 

JACKSON 

A. M. Lucot 



C A L I FOR N I A 

C. J. Casafrande 

BRISCOES CITY PHARMACY 

THE REXALL STORE 

45 Main Street Phone 127 

i^'-^SOH CALIFORNIA 

LINDA VISTA MOTEL 

D. B. Mengod. Prop. 

MODERN ROOMS WITH KITCHENS 

Phone Jackson 397 Box 6 

JACKSON CALIFORNIA 



J. J. DANERI & SON 
Mortuary 



CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Bos 281 



C. B. WOOD WORTH 



General Black. mithing .nd Repairing Acetylene .nd Electric 

Welding - L.wn Mowers Sharpened and Repaired 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED . PRICES RESAONABLE 

WATI.R STRIll.r JACKSdN ( Al IFORNIA 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]anihiry, W^l 



EXCERPTS FROM SAN FRANCISCO 
POLICE ORDINANCES 

(Continued from previous issue) 
Sec. 168: Obscene language. Mechanical contrivances. 
No matter how such repeat, utter, or reproduce 
such language as may be classed as obscene, in- 
decent, vulgar, or lewd, there is a violation. 
Sec. 169: Indecent Pictures. 

( 1 ) To violate this section the picture or ex- 
hibition must be obscene, indecent, vulgar 
or lewd. 

(2) The party who makes, sells, uses or has 
such pictures, machines or objects in his 
possession, or who presents same is also 
a violator. 

(3) Witnesses at such presentations also vio- 
late this section. 

(4) Any person concerned in the presentation 
of so-called sex plays or dramas or is pres- 
ent at such lewd plays, dramas or present- 
ations is also a violator. 

Sec. 182: Lewd and Indecent Advertising: 

(1) Whether by bills, cards, circulars or 
through the press, lewd or indecent adver- 
tising is carried on, it is a violation. 

(2) Proof of the fact that such circulars, etc., 
have been issued — or that such advertising 
has been conducted is sufficient evidence of 
the violation of the ordinance. 

Sec. 183: Lewd Posters: 

( 1 ) Unlawful to affix same. 

(2) It is also a violation to allow them to 
remain ins position. 

(3) This section also includes posters tending 
to incite crime. 

Sec. 199: Lewd Advertising: 

( 1 ) For the purpose of advertising any pro- 
fession, business or trade, sex displays con- 
stitute a violation of this section. 

(2) Advertising the cure of sex diseases is also 
forbidden. 

Sec. 205 : Obscene Language in Public Places : 

( 1 ) Such language, if uttered in the hearing 
of two (2) or more persons, in a public 
place or highway, is a violation. 
Sec. 210: Obscene Language in Telephone Conversations. 
( 1 ) To use such language, or to permit such 
in telephone conversations on his premises, 
on in premises controlled by him, is a vio- 
lation by the party in authority to pre- 
vent same. 
Sec. 215: Indecent Acts. To solicit, or to be a party to 

same, constitutes the violation. 
Sec. 220: Visitors, Inmates, etc. (Sees. 220-225-231-236). 
Both visitors, inmates, solicitors and the owner 
or owners or lessees of buildings concerned vio- 
late sections in their respective capacities. 
Sec. 260: Poker. Public Places. (Games of Chance 
260-341). 



POPP'S FOUNTAIN GRILL 



1236 S. Baldv 



CALIFORNIA 



VINCE SHOE REPAIR 



670 West Duarte 



CALIFORNIA 



BROEMMEL'S 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 



2nd Floor, Fitzhugh Bldg. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



384 Post Street 

CALIFORNIA 



CHIOTRA'S GROCERY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



858 Rhode Island Street 



CALIFORNIA 



COLYEAR MOTOR SALES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1250 Van Ness Av 



CALIFORNIA 



TILT CAFE 

BREAKFAST STARTS AT 3:00 A. M. 

LUNCH CLOSES AT 3:00 P. M. 

421 Davis Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

STAR CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

Phone GArfield 4-9441 

700 Post Street, Corner Jones 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



RIVA ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

EMANUEL STAGNARA 
180 Church Street UNderhill 1-0796 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



TONG LEE LAUNDRY 

943 Howard Street DOuglas 2-7748 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORTJIA 

WONG'S CAFE 

SERVING THE BEST OF 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOODS 

494 Haight Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



JACKSON MARKET 

M. C. Barulick & Co., Props. 

GROCERIES - DELICATESSEN 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES, POULTRY AND FRESH MEAT 

1201 Jackson Street, Corner Jones Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CROWN FOOD CENTER 



SAN PABLO 



R. L. Johnston and H. R. Stephe 
1096 San Pablo Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



A. L. STUDEBAKER 

REAL ESTATE 



VALLEY PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

YOUR DRUGGIST 



THE POTTERS WHEEL 

CERAMIC SUPPLIES. ETC. • GLAZES • FIRING 
Route I. Box 595 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



j.iiiiiary. 19^1 



POLICE AND PEACK OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page V 



(1) Poker — in a banooiu or public place and 

a) for money, or 

b) a representative of \alucs, makes the 
player a violator. 

(2) The person in charge or control of such 
place who permits the game is also guilty. 

Sec. 265 : Automatic Quotation Exhibitors : 

( 1 ) Ihe "goods" must not actually exist. 

(2) Ihe results must depend upon chance. 

(3) The winnings may be money, chips, check, 
credit, or any representative of value. 

(5) The visitor or player is also a violator. 
Sec. 270: Bucket Shops: 

(2) Both the keeper and the visitor or player 
settle on a numerical contingency, this 
contingency being based on market quo- 
tations, et cetera. 

(2) It being understood that no ownership of 
goods, shares, et cetera, will take place, 
the so-called "contract" is merely wager- 
ing, hence both the keeper and the player 
are violators — as is also the owner who 
knowingly permits his own premises for 
such use. 
Sec. 277; Dice Throwing: 

( 1 ) A game of chance, to be unlawful, must: 

a) Be played in a public place, or in a 
place open to public view, or where 
the same may be seen by persons on or 
passing along the public street, or in 
the presence or view of two (2) or 
more persons (including those engaged 
therein). 

b) It must be for money, choses in action, 
property or valuables or some descrip- 
tion. 

The Kxccption : Cube or poker dice may be thrown 
lor merchandise where such merchandise is ordinarily sold, 
by persons other than the proprietor of such business and 
ihe cmplo>ees of such proprietor. 



Special PricM to Members S.F.P.D. 

The JACKET SHOP 

CIONEER LEATHER CLEANERS 
Sprcializinc in Cleaning & Refinishing 

Zippers and Lininns Installed 

1795 Market Street - MArket 1-6672 

SAN hKANCIStO ). CAIJKOKMA 




JENNIES PLACE 



SAN FRANl ISro 



1341 Evans Av 



CAMIORNIA 



MILT MORRIS 

AUTO SPRING AN > WHEEL SERVICE 
Lining ■ Brake Parts - Mufflers ■ Clutch Facing - Baarinfa 
Clutches ■ Snrings - Wheels - Cylinder Honing 
Drum Turning - Knee Action Parts 

re (> 1224 • 701 Ocliivin St . (or Fult..n • SAN KRANCISfO 



NEW Yl.ARS (iREETINCS 
I rom 

PHIL LYNCH, Sportings Goods 

62) Ml, .ion Sirerl 
SAN TRANCISro ( AMI OMNIA 



C E R C I A T 

French Laundry and Dry Cleaner 



ll)2j McAllisti-r .Sir 



SAN I KANllSCO 



fALllOKNIA 



INTERNATIONAL FREIGHTWAYS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone MArket 1-5656 

PACIFIC TELECOIN CORPORATION 

COIN-OPERATED COMMERCIAL 
BENDIX WASHERS 

133 7 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Neil' Year's Greeting 

FROM 

CASWELL COFFEE COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



642 Harrison Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BRODHEAD STEEL PRODUCTS 

17TH AND WISCONSIN STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



LEADER DAIRY LUNCH, INC 

52 SIXTH STREET :-: 63 FIFTH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



THE 
METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE 

83 McAllister street 
san francisco. california 

Phone BAyview 10798 

THRIFTY LAUNDRY CO. 

DRY CLEANING 
784 STANYAN street SAN FRANCISCO 17. CALIF 

TROCADERO FRENCH RESTAURANT 

609 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANt IS( d 

Phone 1245 

HUNT AND BEHRENS. INC. 

hay - grain - feed and poultry supplies 

1 uridcf: siref.t petai.uma. iai.'. 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



JiViiiiiry. 19') 1 



Sec. 282: Gambling. Rarricaded Rooms. 
( 1 ) To breach this section : 

a) Gambling implements must be exposed. 

b) Place must be difficult of entry or 
access by police officers — or, of course, 
actually barricaded. 

(These conditions make the "keeper" or person in 
charge guilty.) "Visitors" are also liable when found in 
such barricaded places. 
Sec. 288: Visiting Gambling Places. 

( 1 ) The visitor or the supporter is a violator. 

(2) The person who maintains, owns or sub- 
lets such premises for gambling purposes 
is also guilty. 

Sec. 293: Gambling Implements. 

( 1 ) Unless it can be proved that possession of 
implements for banking games, faro laj'- 
outs, et cetera, is lawful. 

(2) Any person found in a room or premises 
with such implements is presumed to be in 
possession of same. (The possession of 
such implements by a manufacturer there- 
of is presumed to be "lawful".) 



B. C. BRIDGES 

(Continued jrom page 10) 
of skulls which he had already accumulated, to bestow upon 
his army leaders new commissions in recognition of their 
malevolent enterprises; and, following an old Tartar custom, 
the honorary sheepskin bearing the royal mandate was 
signed publicly with his own fingerprints, wet with the 
blood of a slaughtered captive — the sinister Symbol of the 
Red Hand. 

This vermilion device is found among the ruins of Petra. 
The doors of new buildings in Persia are thus marked, 
perhaps as a token of the time when a living person was 
sealed within the newly finished walls, to placate the malign 
gods who held dominion over architecture. It is still found 
among the Arabs, and also in the Holy City of Jerusalem. 
In many of the temples of India, the devotee, in giving his 
piacular entrance fee, identifies himself by furnishing his 
fingerprints in red, which are likewise imprinted upon his 
breast; henceforth he is admitted upon the payment of a 
much smaller offering. 

(To Be Conlinued ) 
PRISONERS IN WAR WORK 

(Continued from page 17 ) 
food supply and thus competed less with the wartime de- 
mands of the armed services and civilians. 

A strong prison agriculture is an important asset to na- 
tional defense for the same reason that made it an asset to 
the war effort. 

(To Be Continued ) 

HYSTER COMPANY 



R. L. Golden, Manage 
4445 Third Street Mlssic 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



QUALITY PORK AND SAUSAGE CO. 





ST. FRANCIS 


DELICATESSEN 






GROCERIES • 


FROZEN FOODS 






SAN 


1579 Sanchez Street 

FRANCISCO 


Phone VAlcncia 4 


-2286 

CALIFORNIA 


DOl 


glas 2-3680 

THE PLAZA FLORISTS 


iArfield 


1-9374 


iOA 


Avanslno Bros. & Co. 
-SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 
J. Bab Pagano - Louis J. Capurro - Norine M. Dun 

SUrjfclR STREET SAN FRANCISCO. 


CALIF. 



REASONABLE PRICES 



CUSTOM BUILT 



PALACE UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

CHESTERFIELDS RECOVERED - NEW SETS MADE TO ORDER 

FREE ESTIMATES 

5791 Mission Street JUniper 4-2471 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

HEGGBLADE-MARGULEAS CO. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

SHIPPERS • DISTRIBUTORS • EXPORTERS 

405 Montgomery Street GArfield 1-8077 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SPICE ISLANDS COMPANY 

610 Folsom Street YUkon 6-1375 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MUNY BAIT SHOP 

3098 Polk Street ORdway 3-9815 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOSEPH C. FLETCHER, The Tool Crib 

1415 Folsom Street Phone UNderhill 1-2991 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



MONARCH HOTEL 



Carl V. Jonasson. Mgr. & Owner 

NEWLY FURNISHED - SOME TWIN BEDS 

722 Golden Gate Ave. Phone TUxedo 5-9676 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



L. J. LAZARUS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC TEA PACKING COMPANY 

INDIVIDUAL TEA BAG PACKING 

COFFEE URN BAGS - FLANNEL FILTER PADS 

1663 Mission Street HEmlock 1-1755 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BARRETT & HILP 

918 Harrison Street 



CALIFORNIA 



DIAMOND FRENCH LAUNDRY CO. 

Telephone WEsl 1-7614 
2872-78 California Street, Bet. Divisadero and Broderick 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

THE SNOWHITE LAUNDERETTE 

CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Hours: Week Days 8:0O A.M. to 9:00 P.M. 

Sundays 9:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. 

2237 Polk Street (Near Green Street) Phone TU S-209I 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ELECTROLUX CORPORATION 



417 Montgomery Street 



401 Di' 

SAN FRANCISCO 



MArket 1-7432 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



/,' 7.;»V. /9W 



POLKH AND PI;AC;H 0I'FIC1:RS- JOURNAL 



Page 59 



FORMER CHIEF BODIE WALLMAN DIES 

In the death January 1, ot former Cliiet Bodie A. Wall- 
m.m ot Oakland, law ent'orcemcnt, not only in Oakland, 
ln:i in Alameda county, the State of California and the 
I'.iiitii. Coast, lost a man who contributed much to the ad- 
\.iiHcment of law and order. He served over nine years 
.IS ( hiet of Police for Oakland, longer than any other Chief 
111 I lie city's history. 

lie was a leader, as head of the OPD, and in all peace 
■'•" ■ rs associations of which he was a vital and active 
i.r. He was a past president of the Internationa! 
Lition of Chiefs of Police; the State Peace Officers' 
•ition, the Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association, 
ternational Footprint Association and the Pacific Coast 
i.ition of Police Officials. 
.M'ln in Livermore, he finished his education at the 
I ni\(.Tsity of California and the University of Santa Clara. 
Ik successfully passed the examinations for the Oakland 
I'lli.c and Fire Departments, but in 1911 became a police 
'": lt. From then on he progressed through the ranks 
iMiig every one of them as top man on the eligible list. 
' '.IS an Assistant Inspector in 191-1, an Inspector in 
Captain in 1920 and Captain of Inspectors in 1926. 
■■ 1 v^.is made Chief in 1936 and retired on March 30, 1943. 
I !(. built up a great record in solving many major crimes, 
IK- of his outstanding accomplishments was when he 
< liiel, when he started a city-wide educational cam- 
to curb traffic accidents. In 19-10 he reduced deaths 
raffic by 50 per cent over the record for 1939. 
- funeral, held on January 3, under the auspices of 
.rd Lodge F. & A. M., at the Grant D. Miller chapel, 
ifgely attended by people from every walk of life, 
officers who knew him so well during his long police 
gathered to pay him their final respects. 
IS survived by his widow, Marie, a noted singer and 
licr, Austin, of Livermore. 



Ciriclhi^s to /he Police Depiirlmeiil 

TRACY BAKERY 

FRESH BREAD, PIES and CAKES 
EVERY DAY 

126 Central Avenue 
TRACY, CALIFORNIA 
'*"**'''**"* " ■•'-■■--■-'■■■■-'---■-■< 

"I Mr \ Mr. I< HURC. Ownri 

TRACY MOTEL 

On Highway SO 

NITS . SOME WITH KITCHENS - Al.l. AIR CONDITIONED 
AND THERMOSTAT CONTROLLED HEAT - GARAGES. 
TILE SHOWERS THROUGHOUT 



Dr. H. D. Vo.burth 



Harold D. Voaburgh 



SPONSLER'S NURSERY 

Established 1925 

I'/l Miles West ol Visalia on Sierra Blvd. 
Telephone 4-4674 



CALIFORNIA 



Shop Phone 4-6203 Res. Phone 4-6084 

FRENCHY'S BRAKE SHOP 

so; East Main Street 
VISALIA. CALIFORNIA 

BRAKE SYSTEMS REBUILT - REPAIRED 



D. L'HEUREUX 



Trucks 
I. W. KEGLER 



P. O. Box 421 



HUTHS' WEST VISALIA NURSERY 



Phone 40 J 12 Route 4, Box 63 

Second Avenue West and West Sierra Boulevard 
VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



VISALIA HARDWARE COMPANY 

211 West Main Street 
Phono 4-7365 

•'^11^ i:Ai.iroRNiA 

MODEL DEPARTMENT STORE 

118 South Court Street 
Phone 4-7210 

AI-IA CALIFORNIA 



REITZ FURNITURE COMPANY 

611 West Main Street 
Phone 2-0796 
''^'-'A CALIFORNIA 

JOHANSON & STARK 

MACHINE SHOP • WELDING • BLACKSMITHING 

721 E. Acequia Telephone 4-6547 
•^LIA I ALIFOHNIA 

RALPH a WILLIAMS 

TRACTOR AND EQUIPMENT RENTAL 
910 East Main St, Phone 4-4521 

^1 1^ ( AI.IFOKMA 



CRANE CO. 

San Francisco, California 



I Al II ORNIA 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jaiiiidry, 19^1 



J. L. LUCAS 

STUDEBAKER CARS 

"The Car Worthy of Your Home" 

Also Good Stock of Used Trucks Ranging 
from 1/2 Ton to 2 Tons 

2196 Diablo Boulevard 
WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 4438 



THE OASIS CLUB 



Pete and Elmo Martinelli 



Mixed Drinks . . . Package Goods 



CRESCENT CITY, CALIFORNIA 



UKIAH PINE 
LUMBER COMPANY 



UKIAH, CALIFORNIA 



TONY'S 

A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

Phone 709 

On the Highway 
TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



PINK'S AUTO SERVICE 

EVERYTHING FOR THE CAR 

HUmboldt 3-471 1 OLympic 2-1539 

856 Sixtieth Street 
OAKLAND 8, CALIFORNIA 



EL CURTOLA 

FINEST DINNERS 
Dine in Luxurious Comfort in our 

MODERN DINING ROOM 

Excellent Accommodations for 

Banquets and Wedding Parties 

512 Seventeenth Street GLencourt 1-2887 

Oakland, California 



CALIFORNIA 
CHIROPRACTIC COLLEGE 

R. O. McClintock, D. C, Pres. 

CHIROPRACTIC 
INSTRUCTIONS 

FOUR-YEAR COURSE 
1916 Broadway 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



INDEPENDENT 
ELEVATOR CO., Inc. 

ELEVATOR CONTRACTORS 

Service - Repairs - Modernization 

471 Jessie Street 
YUKON 6-4963 - YUkon 6-4964 
San Francisco 3, California 



I...::t.,ry, I9'>1 



POLICE AND PHAGE 0I-FIC;LRS' JOURNAL 



Ptif;e 61 



CHIEF FARINA NABS MURDERER 

i(CoiiliiiiieJ jroiii page 13) 
He is married and has three children. Last January lie 
jiurrendercd and tontessed to committing ten robberies and 
burglaries in Oakland. He pleaded guilty to three burglaries 
d was given probation. 

The Santa Clara County authorities won't waste much 

ime in sending this murderer to San Qucntin where he 

nay well sit in the gas chamber. 

To Chief Farina and his department there is a lot of 

gh compliments for the readiness he displayed to do his 

in bringing the killer to justice. You will find the 

I readiness, the same ability and the same good results 

rt\alcnt in every hamlet, city and county in this state The 

in.iller cities today are policed by able, trained and fearless 

XII. as much so as those of the larger incorporated munci- 

iliiics. Cooperation is a grand word and it works to 

xrUvtion among the peace officers of California, whether 

': \ are from small or big communities, from the south or 

lorth, they all pitch in when a call comes from a fellow 

L department for any crime that help is needed. 

rderer Denham is now in the San Jose jail after 

iig a confession to District Attorney Frank Coakley of 

[Mameda County, who had it taken down by a shorthand 

leporter. We hope there wont be any slip whereby Mur- 

ilerer Denham may escape his just dues — the gas chamber. 

i It is regrettable that because of his short tenure in the 

iiJPD the dead officer had not become a member of tiie 

X'idows' and Orphans' Aid Association. His wife, who 

s an expectant mother, has no financial assistance from that 

body, but if we know the nature of the people of the Santa 

Ilara Valley, and we do, they will correct that matter. 



bAKL 



SHOES — Quality (or Less — SHOES 

D. SNIDE 

SIS Scvrnth Street, Southside Between Washington and Clay 
Phone HIgate 4-9321 



AND 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC FURNITURE CO. 

QUALITY HOME FURNISHINGS - APPLIANCES 

413 Ferry Street, Opposite S. P. Depot 
MAR MM./ CALIFORNIA 

LYLES TIRE SERVICE 

SEIBERLING TIRES 
AUTO UPHOLSTERING 

600 Estudillo Street Phone 115 

MARTIVrZ ( ALIFORNIA 

FELIX DRY CLEANERS 

612 Estudillo Street 



MAR riNLZ 



ALIFORNIA 



ALHAMBRA ELECTRIC SHOP 

A. J. PISTOCHINI, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

FIXTURES - REPAIRING 

Telephone 2203 836 Alhambra Avenue 

martinet; CALIFORNIA 

TRAVELERS HOTEL and 
SPORTSMAN'S BAR 

Joseph Savit. Manager 

APARTMENTS AND COFFEE SHOP 

Phone 680 



MAUI INLZ 



CALIFORNIA 



MILLER'S SALES AND SERVICE 

••WE ARE EASY TO DEAL WITH" 
Alhambra at Ward Phone 667 



martini:? 



>1icltey Scozzafa 



CALIFORNIA 



Otto Zurkii 



MICKEY'S INN 



TWinoaks 32910 14lh and Center St. 

l»AKLANr) CALIFORNIA 



CRT CHICAGO 



THE CUE BALL 

H. W. Riedemann, Prop. 

POOL - SNOOKER - BEER 
TOBACCOS 

126 Main Street 



MYERS BARREL COMPANY 

G. W, Myers, Mannger 

DRUMS ALL SIZES 

(l.ilU Sun I'uhio Av.-inn- Phiinr Olympic i-ti»t1 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Dave Romagnolo Phone YO 7-9832 

10 1 INN 

MiXrD DrInKs 



101 M ghwny al Min. View Jiinclion 
CALIFORNIA MOUNTAIN VIKNH' CALIFORNIA 



SANITARY LAUNDRY 

GOLDEN WEST CLEANERS 
HUmboldl 3-9828 3815 Broadway 



Phone TEmpIebnr 2 6704 

HARR^' MIF.I.HK . . . Ijilnr 



lAI.IIORNIA 1 MIHri.LNTII SIRLLI 



OAKLAND CAi 



Page 62 POLICE AND PEACH OFFICERS' JOURNAL l<iii//arj. 19^1 



VAN DER MAELEN ^^^ ^^^ 

Cleaning and Dyeine Works 

O J O 921 B Street Phone San Rafael I9I9 

2 138 Kourlh Street 
SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 

GRIDDES RESTAURANT L. H. LEONARDI 

ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO. 

803 Fourth Street 717 Francisco Blvd. 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA gAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



Victor Regalia, Prop. Res. Phone 4093-J 

WORK WITH WILLIE 

VICTOR'S MACHINE SHOP DAVIS EQUIPMENT CO. 

Designer and builder of Special Machinery. Model Work - All Makes 

of Compressors Repaired - Ornamental Iron Work DAVIS RENTS EQUIPMENT 

1209 Third Street Telephone 1550 424 Irwin Street Phone 6394 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA g^N RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



Bertrand Trigoin Robert Gas 

LUCAS VALLEY DAIRY 



R. B. Grady, Mgr 



PARISIAN BAKERY 



A HOME-OWNED BUSINESS Specialists in 

GENUINE FRENCH BREAD AND ROLLS 

Phone S.R. 6340 33 Ida St., West End 

Telephone 226 811 B Street 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA g^N RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



100 PER CENT FOOD VALUE FOR THOSE WHO 

ARE FUSSY ABOUT CHOOSING THEIR BAKERY AMERICAN- FRENCH LAUNDRY 

SAN RAFAEL BAKERY ^.„„.^ ^„, 3,^_ 3,^^^,^ 

F. Bordenave, Prop. 
Phone San Rafael 97 1553 Fourth Street Phone — San Rafael 900 

^ .,^^„.„, SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA ^ 



P. Cabrol A. D. Boudo 



TRAVFTFRS INN 

SAN RAFAEL FRENCH CLEANERS 

Where Excellence of meal service, accommodation for Special 

Parties, French and Italian Dinners may be found to suit the „, .... ,,,_ 

most particular. Choice Wines and Liquors . . . Phones: 1414-1413 

Plant 1852 Fourth Street 
306 Third Street, Corner Tamalpais 

Branch Store: 919 Lincoln Avenue 

Phone 282 SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA , 



SAN RAFAEL 



TAMALPAIS INN MARIN UPHOLSTERY 

Ghiringhelli & Co.. Props. joe Robinson 

FIRST CLASS MEALS SERVED FABRICE - PLASTICS 

Fourth Street and Tamalpais Avenue ,?., c- ■ oi j du cic-j 

511 Francisco Blvd. Phone 6167 

Phone: 1260 and 1067 



CALIFORNIA SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA BAKERY FRANK'S LIQUORS 

DELICIOUS CAKES AND PASTRIES Imported and Domestic 

FOR EVERY OCCASION ^jp^j-g . LIQUORS - BEER 

Chas. and Mimi Fracchia ^^ ^,^ .^q PLEASE 

919 Fourth Street Phone 139 810 "B" Street Phone 3349 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



SHORTY & JIM'S ^^^ CRICKET CLUB 

} COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

OFF SALE LIQUOR TIL 2 A. M. 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE and MOTEL ,«^, ,^^^,^^ ,^ ^,^, 

931 Fourth Street San Rafael 926 

2 Miles North of SAN RAFAEL on Highway 101 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



LA TORRE MOTEL 

MODERN CABINS 
with Beautyrest Mattress, Kitchenette 

Reasonable Rates 

Phone 68I{)-J 
Half Mile North of San Rafael, Hiway 101 



STAR LITE 



101 Hi-Way, IV2 Miles North of 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

Phone San Rafael 6127 



J. G. MacPHEE CO. 

Wholesale Plumbing and 
Heating Supplies 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

Phone S.R. 7062 - 2798 



MARIN COUNTY 
LUMBER COMPANY 

San Qucntin Wye 

and 101 Highway 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 1670-J 



KETNER NEWS AGENCY 



p. O. Box 420 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

San Rafael 757 



Ralph E. Murphy & Sons 
BUILDERS 

428 Irwin Street 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 7811 



When you're oul for a siiiick sluj) ,tl 

ANDY'S SHACK 

/InJy aiitl Rote are here In welcome yon 

REAL HOME COOKING 

FOOI LONC; HOI DOGS 
TENDER STEAKS AND C:H0PS 

5018 Geary Blvd. 

Nr. I ilh A\f. p)ini; towanls the Bc.uh 

SAN FRANCISCO 18, CALIFORNIA 

B A) view 1-1580 



EMIL J. 


WEBER 


Electrical Contractor 


258 Dorl 


ind Street 


San Francisco 


14, California 


HE 1-6961 


L;N 1-2200 



Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January. 1 9'' I 



ERNEST ONGARO 

Erni'.st ONciARO, Owner 

PLUMBING CONTRACTOR 

Plumbing, Heating, Sheet Metal 
and Home Appliances 

243 San Anselmo Avenue 

SAN ANSELMO, CALIFORNIA 

Phones: 4600 - 4601 - 4602 



Tiburon-Belvedere Laundry 



BELVEDERE (Marin Co.), CALIF. 



Phone GEneva 5-4545 



GHILOTTI BROS. 

CONCRETE - CONTRACTORS - EXCAVATING 

"III Marin Since 191 I" 
Our New Mailing Atlilress is 

629 FRANCISCO BLVD. 
SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

EQUIPMENT RENTALS 
All Types of Excavating and Grading 

CONCRETE OUR SPECIALTY 

Free Estimates Gladly Giveti 

Bus. Phone 'S3'^0-W Res. Phone 1662 



E s p s T rs 

EXCELLENT DINNERS 
LUNCHES 

ITALIAN FOODS A SPECIALTY 

Fountain Service - Ice Cream 
Delicatessen - Candies 

127 Throckmorton Avenue 
Dunlap 8-0224 



DEER PARK VILLA 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

On Bolinas Road 
One Half Mile From 

FAIRFAX, CALIFORNIA 



CIELO RANCHO MOTEL 

AND COFFEE SHOP 

19 MODERN UNITS 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Witmer 
Owners and Managers 

Telephone Ignacio 44 
U. S. 101 HIGHWAY 

Opp. Hamilton Airforce Base 



RECLAMATION 
RANCH - DAIRY 

BLACK POINT, CALIFORNIA 

(Marin County) 



SHELL PRODUCTS 



GATES TIRES 



SUNBEAM MOTOR CO. 

AUTO REPAIRING 

BODY AND FENDER WORK 

PAINTING 

Point Reyes Station, California 

Telephone 49-J 



POLICE AND F^I-.ACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 





CHIEF ANDREW PERI 

liiL-t Andrew Pun is bLiikiin^ up a 
record towards being the oldest — in 
point of service — police chief in the 
tate. Last November 1 he completed 
his 26th year as boss of Fairfax's small 
PD. He is the only Chief the little city 
(pop. 4065) has ever had, taking 
over the responsible job when he reach- 
ed 21 years of age. With three officers 
he keeps Fairfax free from crime. He 
is mighty highly esteemed in the town. 



CHIEF CLARK 

(Coiiliuiieil jroni pitgf 7 ) 
Clark, a FBI National Police Academy 
graduate, has been a member of the 
I'D for nearly 12 years and its chief 
lor some four years. The people Chief 
( lark .serves are law abiding and he 
^ces to it that they remain that way. 

CHIEF WOOD 

(CoiiiniiieJ jrom j>iige 7 j 
lompletcd twenty years in the office, 
and was honored by the citizens of his 
adopted city, and presented with a gold 
badge by his well organized and train- 
ed reserve officers. The San Anselmo 
Police Department has eleven officers. 

CHIEF OLIVER OATFIELD 

Belvedere has only 671 people resid- 
ing on its Eden-like area, but it has a 
Chief of Police who has been on the 
job for 29 years. He is Oliver Oatfield, 
who with one police officer, has not 
had a crime of any kind that took him 
into court, for nearly three decades. 
There have been no serious traffic acci- 
dents. Chief Oatfield and the people 
of Belvedere get along tine. 



Contribute 
to the 

MARCH 

OF 
DIMES 

Help Fight Polio 



ROUSSEAU- 
TORNELL CO. 

(A CORPORATION) 

• 

DEVELOPERS 

and 

BUILDERS 

• 

STRAWBERRY 
PROPERTIES 

• 

Mill Valley, 
California 



»-..--.---------.----------»--..■..-----■.- . 


B R D E N S 


DAIRY 


DELIVERY 


COMPANY 


^ ^ 


803 Fourth Street 


San Rafael, California 





Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jii>iuriry. 19^! 



DEATH OF FORMER CHIEF DINAN 

With the death last October of Jeremiah F. (Jere) 
Dinan the San Francisco Pohce Department lost one of its 
oldest members. It too lost a former member, who during 
his 44 years as a police officer rose to the top office, that of 
Chief, serving during the trying days of the 1906 fire-earth- 
quake period. He was appointed head of the SFPD on 
April 5, 1906 and resigned on August 22, 1907, reverting 
to his former rank of detective sergeant which he was given 
in 1898 and continued as such until his retirement in 1932. 

During his membership in the department he became 
recognized as an extraordinary detective. He brought in 
many wanted men and women accused of murder, robbery, 
bank holdups or big burglaries. He had an uncanny way of 
nabbing men he sought, for no member of the SFPD had 
a wider and more dependable list of "contacts." 

The late Chief Patrick Crowley was in charge of the 
police department when Jere Dinan joined the police force 
of his native city, where he was born 92 years ago. No liv- 
ing man served under more chiefs of police in San Francisco 
than did the big, likeable Chief Dinan. He served under 
12 men who headed law enforcement in San Francisco. 

At the time of his retirement he was with the Pawnshop 
Detail, where he worked with the same efficiency that 
marked his career in other assignments. He brought in many 
a man wanted for crimes, who sought to "fence" their loot 
in various pawnshops and secondhand places of business. 
His death followed that of former Chief George Wittman, 
who was chief from 1901 to 1905. 

He bought the first automobile for the Police Department 
and inaugurated the first motorcycle for police work in the 
city. 

His funeral was largely attended by former and present 
members of the SFPD as well as a large concourse of citi- 
zens who knew and respected him as a man and as a public 
servant. 

His only surviving relative is Sergeant William Y. Dinan 
of the California Highway Patrol, a nephew. 



ANCHOR CAFE 

Sam Vella 

CHIOPPINO AND DINNERS 

Belvedere 106-72 



CALIFORNIA 



hhone BE 5-0013 



Res. Phone S.R. 5468-W 



JOE'S PLUMBING SHOP 

Joe Ramalici 



ALL PLUMBING SERVICE 



CALIFORNIA 



BENNETT'S BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

COMPLETE VARIETY MERCHANDISE 
19 Throckmorton Avenue 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



MILL VALLEY 



GOHEEN-TRAVIS 
CORPORATION 

Highway and Sy( 



CALIFORNIA 



ALTO WYE MARKET 



QUALITY MEATS - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES 

AT LOWEST PRICES 

2 Camino Alto 

MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



PASTIME CLUB 



Tamalpais Valley Juncti. 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 





Greater Protection 

for Your Savings Deposits 

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Now Insures Your Deposits up to 

»1 0,000 
THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

Savings inc. Feb. 10, 1868 • Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. TrUSt 
526 California Street • 405 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 

Porlcer S. Maddux, President 





795/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



ROBERTS DRY CLEANERS 

FOR CLEANING UNSURPASSED 
LAUNDRY . ALTERATIONS 



SAUSALITO 
DRY CLEANING WORKS 



686 Castro Slrrrt. 
LUcern 



icxt to Firr Ho 
2-1121 



2 18 Caicdonjii Str 



CALIFORNIA 



SPINETTI BROTHERS 

HARDWARE - STEEL - BUILDING MATERIALS 
HOME APPLIANCES - WELDING EQUIPMENT 

MINING - LOGGING - SAW MILL SUPPLIES 
Plumbing. Shrrt Metal and Electrical Contractors 

JACKSON (Amndor County). CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL HOTEL 

John F. Vicini. Ownor 

IN THE HEART OF THE MOTHER LODE 

MSIT OUR COFFEE SHOP AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



Phone Main 2 



CALIFORNIA 



TOM'S VILLAGE 

TRAILER COURT AND CABINS 
A. M .Depperschmidt. Prop. 

Phone Jackson 409 
2 Milr. West of Jackson. Junction of Highwa ys Nos. 88 and 49 

DUFFY BROS. GARAGES 

AUTO RECONSTRUCTION - PAINTING - WELDING 

TIRES AND TUBES 

OXYGEN - ACETYLENE - MOTOR REPAIR - TOWING 

)1-II Third Jos. Rossi, Mgr. 9|S Lincoln 

'hone 305 SAN RAFAEL Phone 252 

REDHILL LIQUOR STORE 



■7 Throckmorton Street 

: LE'i- 



Phone DUnlap 8-1626 

CALIFORNIA 



THE PARADISE CAFE 



CALIFORNIA 



A. VON ROTZ 

CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 
e: Office 4080 40 Greenfield Av 



SAUSALITO 



CALIFORNIA 



LA BLANCHE LAUNDRY 

ALL PACKAGES C. O. D. UNLESS ARRANGEMENTS 
ARE MADE AT THE OFFICE 



109 Second Street 



SAUSALITO 



alito 107 

CALIFORNIA 



Manuel Pasquinucci Silvio Tenc 

CALEDONIA MARKET 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
BEER - WINE - LIQUORS 

46 Caledonia Street 



SAUSALITO 



Telephone 



CALIFORNIA 



FERRY INN 

FEATURING HAMBURGERS AND CHILI 
YOUR FAVORITE BEER - SANDWICHES 

Telephone S. R. 6179 
Arch'e B. B:I1. Proprietor PT SAN QUENTIN. CALIF. 

HARRISONS MARKET 



p. O. Box 346 



CALIFORNIA 



MUSSOS BAKERY 



Phone G.E. 5-4648 



CALIFORNIA 



JOES PLACE 



CALIFORNIA 



SUNNYSIDE NURSERY 

Rnn.ilH C rVrry 
I30 Sir Francis Drake Boulevard 
Telephone - San Anselmo 5686 
SAN AN.SLl.MO. (ALIFORNIA 

' ^'•'** OSCAR MONTGOMERY 

CAIN \ MONTCiOMERY 

TIRES RECAPPED 
20 Greenfield Avenue Phone S060 

' '-^^O CALIFORNIA 

Meet TuF. QCINNS 

MILL VALLEY'S POPULAR RENDEZVOUS 
BAR SERVICE - WINES AND LIQUORS 
"' 7<0 Phone 717 

Umorton Ave. 2^Corte Madrra Ave. 

CRIVELLIS 

DAVE and EVELYN 
Formerly Hillside Dairy 
Phone Pt. Reyei 34 
■ REYES STATION 



Phone Olema 1 On Slate Highway No. 1 

OLEMA (Mann County). CALIFORNIA 
E. Puharich j. m. Parsley 

Sausalito Hardware & Plumbing Co. 

Phone 185 721 Bridgeway Street 

SAUSALITO CALIFORNIA 

MARIN FRUIT AND GROCERY CO. 

FRUIT, VEGETABLES and GROCERIES 

WINES and LIQUORS 
Telephones 888 - 889 605 Bridleway 

SAUSALITO CALIFORNIA 

MADDEN & LEWIS CO. 

DESIGNERS AND BOAT BUILDERS 

MARINE WAYS - REPAIRS - OVERHAULING 

MACHINE SHOP— Specializinc in Repairs on Diesel and Gas Enfines 

lelrph.Mie Sou-.-ili lo \SS SAUSALITO. ( ALIfORNIA 

SAUSALITO FURNITURE STORE 

HOME FURNISHERS 
STOVES - RUGS - LINOLEUM - REFRIGERATORS 



1417 Bridleway 



Telephone 458 



CALIFORNIA 



MARIN HARDWARE STORE 



684 Bridleway Phone 149 



CALIFORNIA .SAISAI ITO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jaiuiary. I9'^l 



BURTON'S MARKET 

R. O. Burton, Prop. 

GROCERIES - MEAT - BEER - WINE 
AND SOFT DRINKS 

R. R. No. 2; P. O. Box 80 
Fowler and Nebraska Aven 



CALIFORNIA 



LAFAYETTE AUTO PARTS 

Jim Knott. Prop. 



103 Mt. Diablo Blvd. 

LAFAYETTE 



Telephone Lafayette 3S12 

CALIFORNIA. 



RANCHOTEL 

A. F. Farrow Managing Owi 
Telephone 2333 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



WISEMAN'S APPLIANCES 

FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES 
Phone Lafayette 4453 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



FORBRAG & GILBERT 



SUN VALLEY LUMBER CO. 



REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE 
1350 Main Street Phone Walnut Creek 9383 

WALNUT CREEK 



PANELS . DOORS • SHEETROCK 
Phone Lafayette 2262 



CALIFORNIA LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



Open from 11:00 A.M. to 3:00 A.M. 

LUCKY'S DRAGON RESTAURANT 

Lucky Baldwin 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE FOODS 

2475 North Ma n Stre;t (Concord Highway) 

WALNUT CREEK CALIFORNIA 

BRIDWELL REAL ESTATE 

Specializing in 

ORINDA AND COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTIES 

DISTINCTIVE HOMES AND BUILDING SITES 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

In ORINDA VILLAGE — Phone Orinda 2241 
ORINDA HIGHWAY — Phone Orinda 4791 



HOTEL VALLEY 



Mrs. E. M. Modry, Prop. 



First and L Streets 



Phone 43 



LIVERMORE 



CALIFORNIA 



"IF WE CAN'T FIX IT JUNK IT" 

McFADDEN MOTORS 

PONTIAC SALES AND SERVICE 
168 West First Street 



Phone Lafayette 4681 

HAPPY VALLEY NURSERY 

Dave Calderon, Prop. 

"HOME OF QUALITY" 

GARDEN COUNSELORS - ASSORTED GARDEN SUPPLIES 



BOEVERS ANIMAL HOSPITAL 

Phone Lafayette 4722 
Mt. Diablo Boulevard at Stuart Street 

LAFAYETTE CALIFORNIA 

THE HUB 

Joseph E. Duarte, Owner 

BAR AND CAFE 

WINE * LIQUOR • BEER 

1050 FIRST STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 

SHORTY'S TIRE EXCHANGE 

RECAPPING AND U. S. ROYAL - 24-HOUR RECAPPING SERVICE 



LIVERMORE 



CALIFORNIA 



LIVERMORE 



1154 West Second Street 



Phone 110 



CALIFORNIA 



YIN-YIN CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOODS 

ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

1201 W. First Street Phone 124-W 

LIVERMORE CALIFORNIA 



LIVERMORE 



F. W. TRETZEL 

PLUMBING 

PUMP AND WINDMILL WORK 

1155 Second Street 



P. O. Box 45 



CALIFORNM 



LIVERMORE 



VALLEY MOTORS 

C. A. Raboli 
1391 W. First Street Phone 



CALIFORNIA VALLEJO 



JAY'S PLACE 

Jack T. Fry 

HAMBURGERS -::- CHILI 

THE BEST IN THE WEST 

405 Wilson Avenue 



CALIFORNI.'S 



Telephone 127 E. G. Wente 

INDEPENDENT WAREHOUSE CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

HAY, GRAIN. ROLLED BARLEY. POULTRY FEED. INSURANCE 

WAREHOUSING. SULPHUR, INSECTICIDES 

LIVERMORE CALIFORNIA 

LIVERMORE VALLEY MOTORS 



1368 West First Street 



Phone 744 



LIVERMORE 



CALIFORNIA 



M. J. Gemello Bonded Winery No. 403C 

GEMELLO 'WINERY 

Producers of 

MOUNTAIN VIEW WINES 

Phone M.V. 3923 Route 2, Box 209 

MOUNTAIN VIEW CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-9931 Phone 2-76If 

MAYFLOWER CLUB & COFFEE SHOP 

H. F. SATHOFF, BMC. U. S. N. 

BEST OF FOOD AND DRINKS 

Television and Shuffleboard • Fun for the Family 

335 Tennessee Street 

VALLEJO CALIFORNIA 



mtiary, 7 9 ■> / 



POLICH AND P1;ACE OFI-KHRS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



Chief Oliver's First Year At Turlock 



On December 1, 19-19, Lieutenant Harry L. Oliver \vlio 
id served long as a law enfortement otlkcr of liis native 
jiano County, and for over seven years with the Vallejo 
olicc Department, was appointed Chief of Police of Tur- 
K.k, the rich farming area of Stanislaus County. 

Today more than a year after he assumed his present im- 




Chief Harry L. Oliver 

)rtant post he has raised his department to 15 men and he 
IS, during the past 13 months or more given the little city 
Turlock — population 6700, with a fringe area contribut- 
g some 2500 more — a high order of law enforcement. 
] He has improved the police headcjuarters, has brought the 
jiotograph gallery, fingerprint and identification bureau up 
\ date in every manner. He is well able to propose and 
itain the necessary apparatus to make these necessary units 

1a police department one to measure up to the highest 
ndards. He is not only a graduate from the FBI National 
lice Academy, but for most of his service with the Vallejo 
lice Department he was in charge of these activities, and 
records and equipment have long been recognized as 

He hasthe best in reportingand recording records, and all 
his personnel has been schooled to keep them up to date, 
d handy of access. 

He has seen that every member of his force gets regular 
ining in the use of all firearms, instruction from compe- 
it men on first aid and the handling of all sorts of emer- 
ncy ecjuipment. They are all rec|uired to take refresher 
urscs in investigation, re|X)rt writing, assembling evidence 
id all must have a comprehensive knowledge of the laws 
municipal, county, state and federal. 
During the past year his men had three training courses, 
; hiding firearms. Turlock has a splendid pistol range, 
nsidcrcd one of the best in the San Joac]uin Valley. It wi ; 



built by [he members of the department on their own time, 
with the aid of many public spirited and friendly citizens, 
who donated labor and materials to make the range what 
it is today. 

Chief Oliver has brought the Junior Traffic Patrol to a 
high state of efficiency, and his officers instruct and super- 
vise the school children who protect crossings nears the 
three grade schools and one highschool, which are attended 
by 3800 pupils. 

Another thing that Chief Oliver takes great pride in is 
his police reserves. Today he has a well trained force of 25 
patriotic citizens on this unit of his department. They have 
all gone through the .same training as regular officers, and 
devote three hours a week to inservice duties. So interested 
are the men who make up this reserve that none miss an 
assignment of a meeting. 

How well the Turlock Police Department has been or- 
ganized under its present chief and how efficient it has 
become is reflected by the record of crime established dur- 
ing the past years. All crimes, major and minor are lower 
than the average for cities of similar size. The residents 
of Turlock are very law abidin/; and have given support to 
every plan for crime prevention. 

Juvenile delinquency is very low in the little city, due to 
the cIo.se association existing between the members of the 
police department and the young people of Turlock, and the 
cooperation existing between civic, service, fraternal organi- 
zations and the churches of the town. Recreational pro- 
grams throughout the year helps a lot to keep kids out of 
trouble. 

Traffic is well controlled in the city. There are an aver- 
age of some 25 accidents per month, most of them no more 
than bent fenders. For the year but two traffic deaths have 
occurred, and one of those was a man who died from a 
heart attack while in his automobile. 

Turlock police have a 44-hour week, and the city is pre- 
paring to give them a retirement pension. 



HOTEL GREYSTONE 

REASONABLE RATES 

EXbrook 2-4885 



6G Geary Si 

SAN FRANC ISrO 



t AI II (1RNIA 



MISSION PRIDE MARKET 



GROCERIES 
3901 Mix' 
SAN IRAN; IS( O 



VEGETABLES 
nipcr 5-7292 



AI.IKIUNIA 



HENRY M ZAIS FURNITURE COMPANY 

COMP< ETE HOVE FURNISHERS 

CUSTOM BUI" T IJPHOI STFRED FURNITURE 

EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT 

MR Mill on StrprI F.Xhronk 2-6512 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

HOWARDS CLOTHING 

"FIRST IN FASHIONS" 

TrIrphonr SUlIrr I • 1 539 



920 Market St 

SAN FRANC ISrn 



Al II 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



fillllhll). I'J^! 



BURTON'S MARKET 

R. O. Burton, Prop. 

GROCERIES - MEAT - BEER - WINE 
AND SOFT DRINKS 

R. R. No. 2; P. O. Box 80 
Fowler and Nebraska Avenue 



LAFAYETTE AUTO PARTS 



Jim Knott, Prop. 



BATTERIES 



CALIFORNIA 



103 Mt. Diablo Blvd. 

LAFAYETTE 



Telephone Lafayette 3SI2 

CALIFORNIA 



RANCHOTEL 

A. F. Farrow Managing Owi 
Telephone 2333 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



WISEMAN'S APPLIANCES 



FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES 



Phone Lafayette 4453 



LAFA1ETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



FORBRAG & GILBERT 



SUN VALLEY LUMBER CO. 



REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE 
I3S0 Main Street Fhone Walnut Creek 9383 

WALNUT CREEK 



PANELS • DOORS • SHEETROCK 
Phone Lafayette 2262 



CALIFORNIA LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



Open from U :00 A.M. to 3:00 A.M. 

LUCKY'S DRAGON RESTAURANT 

Lucky Baldwin 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE FOODS 

2475 North Ma n Stre.-t (Concord Highway) 



WALNUT CREEK 



CALIFORNIA 



BRIDWELL REAL ESTATE 

Specializing in 

ORINDA AND COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTIES 

DISTINCTIVE HOMES AND BUILDING SITES 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

In ORINDA VILLAGE — Phone Orinda 2241 
ORINDA HIGHWAY — Phone Orinda 4791 



LIVERMORE 



HOTEL VALLEY 

Mrs. E. M. Modry, Prop. 
First and L Streets Phone 



CALIFORNIA 



LIVERMORE 



■IF WE CAN'T FIX IT JUNK IT" 

McFADDEN MOTORS 

PONTIAC SALES AND SERVICE 
168 West First Street 



CALIFORNIA 



YIN-YIN CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOODS 

ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

1201 W. First Street Phone 124-W 

LIVERMORE CALIFORNIA 



LIVERMORE 



VALLEY MOTORS 

C. A. Raboli 
1391 W. First Street Phone : 



Phone Lafayette 4681 

HAPPY VALLEY NURSERY 

Dave Calderon, Prop. 

"HOME OF QUALITY" 

GARDEN COUNSELORS - ASSORTED GARDEN SUPPLIES 



BOEVERS ANIMAL HOSPITAL 

Phone Lafayette 4722 
Mt. Diablo Boulevard at Stuart Street 

LAFAYETTE CALIFORNIA 

THE HUB 

Joseph E. Duarte, Owner 

BAR AND CAFE 

WINE . LIQUOR * BEER 

1050 FIRST STREET LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 

SHORTY'S TIRE EXCHANGE 

RECAPPING AND U. S. ROYAL - 24-HOUR RECAPPING SERVICE 



LIVERMORE 



1154 West Second Street 



CALIFORNIA 



F. W. TRETZEL 



p. O. Box 43 



CALIFORNIA VALLEJO 



PLUMBING 

PUMP AND WINDMILL WORK 

IISS Second Street 

LIVERMORE CALIFORNIA 

JAY'S PLACE 

Jack T. Fry 

HAMBURGERS -::- CHILI 

THE BEST IN THE WEST 

405 Wilson Avenue 



ALIFORMA 



Telephone 127 E. G. Wente 

INDEPENDENT WAREHOUSE CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

HAY, GRAIN. ROLLED BARLEY. POULTRY FEED. INSURANCE 

WAREHOUSING, SULPHUR, INSECTICIDES 

LIVERMORE CALIFORNIA 

LIVERMORE VALLEY MOTORS 



1368 West First Str 



LIVERMORE 



CALIFORNIA 



M. J. Gemello Bonded Winery No. 4030 

GEMELLO WINERY 

Producers of 

MOUNTAIN VIEW WINES 

Phone M.V. 3923 Route 2, Box 209 

MOUNTAIN VIEW CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-9931 Phone 2-7616 

MAYFLOWER CLUB & COFFEE SHOP 

H F. SATHOFF. BMC. U. S. N. 

BEST OF FOOD AND DRINKS 

Television and Shuffleboard • Fun for the Family 

335 Tennessee Street 

VALLEJO CALIFORNIA 



]aiiii.try. /9W 



POLICi: AND pi: ACE OFFIfl-RS lOURNAI. 



Pa^e 69 



Chief Oliver*s First Year At Turlock 



On December I, 1949, Lieutenant Harrj' L. Oliver who 
had served long as a law enforcement officer ot his native 
Solano County, and for over seven years with the Vallcjo 
Police Department, was ap[X)inted Chief of Police of Tur- 
lock. the rich farming area of Stanislaus County. 

Today more than a year after he assumed his present im- 




Chief Harry L. OLrvER 

portant post he has raised his department to 1 5 men and he- 
has, during the past 13 months or more given the little city 
of Turlock — population 6700, with a fringe area contribut- 
ing some 2"iOO more — a high order of law enforcement. 

He has improved the police headquarters, has brought the 
photograph gallery, fingerprint and identification bureau up 
lo date in ever)' manner. He is well able to propose and 
ibtain the necessary apparatus to make these necessary units 
jf a police department one to measure up to the highest 
standards. He is not only a graduate from the FBI National 
Poliic Academy, but for most of his service with the Vallejo 
'dice Department he was in charge of these activities, and 
lis records and equipment have long been recognized as 
ops. 

He hasthc best in reportingand recording records, and all 
ill his personnel has been schooled to keep them up to date, 
ind handy of access. 

He has seen that every member of his force gets regula.- 
raining in the use of all firearms, instruction from compe- 
cnt men on first aid and the handling of all sorts of cmer- 
;ency ecjuipmcnt. They are all rc-quired to take refresher 
curses in investigation, report writing, assembling evidence 
.nd all must have a comprehensive knowledge of the laws 

municipal, county, state and federal. 

During the past year his men had three training courses, 
ntluding firearms. Turlock has a splendiil pistol range, 
onsidcred one of the best in the San joaijuin Valley. It wis 



built by the members of the department on their own time, 
with the aid of many public spirited and friendly citizens, 
who donated labor and materials to make the range what 
it is today. 

Chief Oliver has brought the Junior Traffic Patrol to a 
high state of efficiency, and his officers instruct and super- 
vise the school children who protect crossings nears the 
three grade schools and one highschool, which are attended 
by 3800 pupils. 

Another thing that Chief Oliver takes great pride in is 
his police reserves. Today he has a well trained force ot 2") 
patriotic citizens on this unit of his department. They have 
all gone through the same training as regular officers, and 
devote three hours a week to inser\ice duties. So interested 
are the men who make up this reserve that none miss an 
assignment of a .meeting. 

How well the Turlock Police Department has been or- 
ganized under its present chief and how efficient it has 
become is reflected by the record of crime established dur- 
ing the past years. All crimes, major and minor are lower 
than the average for cities of similar size. The residents 
of Turlock are ver)- law abidin^j; and have given support to 
every plan for crime prevention. 

Juvenile delinquency is very low in the little city, due to 
the close association existing between the members of the 
police department and the young people of Turlock, and the 
cooperation existing between civic, service, fraternal organi- 
zations and the churches of the town. Recreational pro- 
gr.ims throughout the year helps a lot to keep kids out of 
trouble. 

Traffic is well controlled in the city. There arc an aver- 
age of some 25 accidents per month, most of them no more 
than bent fenders. For the year but two traffic deaths have 
occurred, and one of those was a man who died from a 
heart attack while in his automobile. 

Turlock police have a H-hour week, and the city is pre- 
paring to give them a retirement pension. 



HOTEL CIREYSTONE 

REASONABLE RATES 

EXbrook 2-488S 



60 Ciary Strrrt 
.SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MISSION PRIDE MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 
on Slrrrl JUniprr S-7292 



3901 Mi 

.SAN tran; isro 



I Al 



HENRY M ZAIS Fl RNITURE COMPANY 

COMPI FTE HOMF. FlIRNISHFRS 

CUSTOM BUI' T UrHOI "STFRFD FURNITURE 

EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT 

R4f> MUi nn Sirvrl EXhrook 2-6512 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

HOW ARDS CLOTHING 

"FIRST IN FASHIONS" 
920 Mirkrt StrrrI Trlrphonr SUlIrr I-IS39 



SAN I HANC ISC <> 



CAI.IFOMMA 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 



jaiuiiiry. l^J'>l 



By J. Ross DUNXIGAN 



The Fifth Annual Inter-Dcpartmcntal Championship Re- 
volver Tournament is now a matter of history — and what a 
history. The pep and enthusiasm shown in this tournament 
far outstripped any of the others which all adds to a de- 
cided upsweep in pistol competition. The various teams, 




Sergeant Karl Schaugaard 

and individuals, put their very all into the matches and the 
good natured feeling of sportsmanship was evident through- 
out the three matches. 

Just to outline, quickly, the dope on the tournaments. 
The program outlines the conditions of the shoot with any 
member of the forces shooting as an individual and also as 
a team member. National Rifle Association rules prevailed 
with only the .38 caliber gun allowed with any sights, no 
barrel over six inches in length and a trigger pull of not less 
than two and one-half pounds. The scores fired in the 1949 
inter-departmental matches were averaged to establish each 
classification and the unclassified hooters were classed as 
experts for the first two matches. There was the usual six 
classifications: Master 1st Class, Master, Expert, Sharp- 
shooter, Marksman 1st and Marksman. These classifications 
were for both individual and the team shooters. Medals and 
prizes were awarded in the team and individual Champion- 
ship Aggregate Match. 

A trophy and four medals went to each class team winner 
and medals to the individual winners plus a $25 Govern- 
ment Bond. And while on the subject of the bonds we 
would like to print here a page taken from the 1950 pro- 
gram which will explain more about the bonds and how they 
came to be a part of the prizes. The article was written by 
Emil "Pop" Dutil, the popular rangemaster at the Police 
Pistol Range. 

Opie L. Warner, Editor and Publisher of the PoLicn and 
Peace Officers' Journal has announced he will gi\e six 



$2") Government Bonds to be awarded to the winner in each 
of the six classes of the Inter-Departmental Pistol Matches 
to be held this year. We are very grateful to Opie for this 
incentive for those who participate in this annual event. He 
has been giving bonds to each winner of each class for many 




•■V* 




Inspector Edward Preston 

years, and these prizes have been responsible for the very 
large participation of department members in the matches, 
and it is Opie's earnest hope that this year's prizes will again 
be an incentive to all officers of the department to enter the 
matches so that they may further improve their proficiency 
in marksmanship. Opie Warner has done a lot for the San 
Francisco Police Department during the more than 35 years 
he has worked as a reporter on our daily papers and as editor 
of the Journal. 

The first match was held on Thursday, September 28th 
with some 129 individual shooters and 33 teams lined up 
for the glory of their respective stations or bureaus or what- 
ever they represented. The individual winner for this match 
was Inspector Ed Preston from the Bureau of Inspectors. 
Ed, you might recall, was last year's grand aggregate winner. 
Jack Ahem, also of the Bureau was second while Joe Hallis\ 
of the Central Station placed third. 

The Bureau of Inspectors Team No. 1 finished in the top 
spot and was followed by Central Teams No. 4 and in the 
third place was Traffic Team No. 1. These were just the 
Master Class winners. If there had been an open class indi- 
vidual then Hal Reynolds, of the Range, would have Creed- 
moored Preston with a higher rapid fire. As it stands i lure- 
is no open individual class as each shooter stays in his own 
classification regardless of his score. 

The second match was fired on Thursday, October 29th 
with 141 individual shooters and 35 teams (even though all 
the teams did not ha\'e four men). The winner of this 



January. 19^1 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 71 



hassel was Sergeant Karl S<.haugaard of Inglcsidc, who, as 
you might retail was the winner of the aggregate prize in 
1948. There was a three-way tie for the top score in this 
match between Schaugaard, Joe Hillisy and Jack Ahern, all 
with a 298. Karl's 100 in the rapid fire string proved too 
much for Hallisy's 98 and Ahern's 97 so that's the way they 
finished via the Creedmoor route. 

Ahern started with a possible slow and a possible timed 
but had the "buck " in the rapid and thus dropped to his 97. 
The teams have a lot of fun among themselves and when the 
smoke cleared away the Bureau of Inspectors again headed 
the teams. Central No. 1 finished second and Traffic No. 1 
finished in the third spot. 

The last match was fired on Thursday, November 16th 
with 129 individuals and 32 teams lined up to go. A couple 
of the teams did not fire in this last match. Once more Karl 
Schaugard showed his class to the boys by taking the top 
spot for the day, one point over Joe Hallisy and two points 
over Ed Preston. It might be noted in passing that Karl only 
fired in the last two matches and had to shoot like hell to 
make up for the first one. This he did for Karl won the 
Grand Aggregate Match with his steady shooting. The Traf- 
fic Team won top spot for the day nosing out the Bureau of 
Insjx-ctors as Lieutenant M. Lee was unable to finish out the 
match due to gun trouble. This put the Bureau in third spot 
for the third match but nevertheless it wasn't too bad as the 
Bureau of Inspectors finished tops in the Aggregate Match. 
Thus the individual champion for 1950 is Sergeant Karl 
Schaugaard while the Bureau of Insjsectors Team No. I are 
the team victors for 1950. 

A(.<iRE(.ATi: ScoRi:s (First Thrhe Places) 

Individual 

Master First Class 

1. Karl Schaugaard 596 

Joe Hallisy 595 

3 Ed Preston 59-4 

Master Class 

1. Hal Reynolds 592 

2. Jack Chaney '^^)\ 

E. Flynn ^S6 

Expert Class 

Jack McNamara "iH? 

Al Lauro "iHO 

E. Cassidv SIH 



Sharpshooter Class 

1. Jerry Kennedy 569 

2. C. Smith S"S j 

3. F. Stranzl s 19 

Mar ki mail I si Class 

1. Joe Broggi 579 

2. W. Davis V^7 

3. J. Reed V^6 

Marksman 

1. E. Simmons '^2^) 

2. I.. C;.uu.i -178 



vISAI 


SEQUOIA 


VENETIAN BLIND 

Complimrnl* lo 
ALL PEACE OFFICERS 
309 North Cardrn Strrrt 


CO. 

( AI.IFOKN 


A 



3. F. Buckley .\(-,\ 

Teams 
Open Class 

1. Bureau of Inspc-ctors No. 1 2326 

2. Traffic Bureau No. 1 2301 

3. Bureau of Inspectors No. 2 2192 

Expert Class 

1. Ingleside No. I 2270 

2. Southern No. 1 2259 

3. Mission No. 1 2192 

Sharpshooter Class 

1. Traffic No. 2 2136 

2. Southern No. 3 2099 

3. Richmond No. 1 2094 

/Marksman 1st Class 

1. Southern No. 4 1974 

2. Mission No. 2 1773 

Marksman Class 

1. Southern No. ^ \''^\ 



C E R C I A T 

French Laundry and Dry Cleaners 



102s McAllister Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



THOMPSON AUTO PARTS 

Phone Market 1-6696 

NEW AND USED AUTO PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 

CARS WANTED FOR WRECKING 

50 13th Street, near Harrison Si SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone VALENCIA 4-4 14 1 



S U L E 

STEEL 

COMPANY 



1750 ARMY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jituf/iiry. 19'' I 



Wm. T. Stanford and State's First P.O. Ass'n. 



It is not generally known, but the first statewide peace 
officers' association, in this state, was formed 48 years ago 
shortly after George Wittman became Chief of Police of 
San Francisco in 1901. The present State Peace Officers' 
Association of California was organized in 1921. Like the 
latter the first mentioned was brought into being in San 
Francisco. It was given the name of "California Peace Offi- 
cers' Association. " 

At the first meeting of this body of law enforcement offi- 
cers there were present 1 1 chiefs of police and one sergeant, 
the late Henry Gleason. They met in the Police Commission 
office at the old Hall of Justice, and they came mostly from 
the bay area, though there was the Chief of Police from Los 
Angeles, Fresno, Sacramento and Stockton. Chief John 
Reynolds of Butte, Montana, who happened to be in the city 
at the time was invited to sit in with his fellow California 
officers and was made an honorary member of the associa- 
tion. 

The men who sat in at this first organizing metting were: 
Chief Wittman, Chief St. Clair Hopkins, Oakland; James 
Kidward, San Jose; J. D. Rawle, Santa Cruz; John Conrad, 
Alameda; John Morgan, Fresno; Charles Elton, Los An- 
geles; William T. Stanford, 'Vallejo; John Sullivan, Sacra- 
mento; Frank Briare, Stockton and Sergeant Henry Gleeson 

MILL VALLEY LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER - BUILDING MATERIALS - MILL WORK 



Agents for Celotex, Schumache 

Roofing - Doors, Sash, Windov 

Stock - Mail or Ph 



MILL VALLEY 



Wall Board, Pabco Shingle 
and Built-in Fixtures Carr 
ne Us Your Estimates 



CALIFORNIA 



PALACE FOOD MARKET 



GROCERIES - FRUITS and VEGETABLES - MEATS 
FISH and POULTRY WINES AND LIQUOR 



POINT REYES STATION 



CALIFORNIA 



2 A. M. CLUB 



Bill - Bres - Frances Greyerbiehl 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



HAYASHI COMPANY 

Ralph T. Sugimoto 

SPECIALIZING IN FISH 

Phone W. G. 2081 P. O. Box 366 

WALNUT GROVE CALIFORNIA 



SUEY KEE CO. 



GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - MEATS 

FISH AND POULTRY 

41 Throckmorton Avenue 

MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



(later captain) San Francisco Police Department, who was 
elected secretary of the association. 

During the incumbency of Chief Wittman, who was 
selected as its president, frequent meetings were held, all 
at the call of the presiding officer The association went out 
of existence in 1905 when Chief Wittman stepped out as 
Chief of Police of San Francisco. 

Yet during its some three years the body accomplished 
much in the way of bringing the men charged with enforc- 
ing the laws of the state into closer association. It is true 
there were no radios, teletypes, automobiles, motorcycles, 
recording machines, or any of the other modern inventions 
so well used today in law enforcement. But these pioneers 
recognized that by organizing they could do more with 
what implements and methods available at the time, and by 
exchanging ideas and discussing plans for aid to each other, 
they could and did much to speed actions against the 
criminal. 

It was 20 years later that the present State Association, 
which for 30 years has raised law enforcement to a high 
level, was organized. Like the first there was present, at 
the latter, Chief William T. Stanford of Vallejo. It is to 
him we are indebted for the picture that accompanies this 
story. He was appointed head of the Vallejo Police De- 
partment in April, 1900, its first Chief of Police. He served 
until January, 1936, and with 36 years of continuous effi- 



HOTEL RIO 
VISTA 

Gordon Stewart, Manager 



Coffee Shop 

Pharmacy - Toggery 

Club Rooms 

Banquet Service 



Phone 28 

RIO VISTA, CALIFORNIA 

Box 789 



795/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 73 




CALIFORMAS l-lRSl FOLICU OFl ICLRi ASSOCIATION 

Chief Gciirj-c >X'. Wittman. head of table, (o his ri^ht, Scr>;tant-Sei retary Henry Gleason, Cliicf St. Clair Hodj»kins, Oakland; Chief 
Kidward, San Jose; Chief J. D. Rawles. Santa Cruz; Chief John Conrad, Alameda; Chief John Morhan, Fresno. To Chief Wittmans 
left C;hief Charles Elton. Los Angeles; Chief John Sullivan, Sairainento; Chief James Reynolds. Butte, Mont.; Chief VCilliam T. Stan- 
ford, Vallejo; and Chief Frank Briarc. Stmkton. This picture was furnished by Chief Stanford, and was taken in 1902. 

sightly operations were running tlu- town, then of some- 
7000 people. But when Chief Stanford took over he 
changed that. He sent out word that they had all better seek 
other localities to continue their disgraceful undertakings. 
He was given the laugh, but the smiles on the faces of this 
ilk soon faded when they realized this was no idle gesture 
from the new Chief. They tried to "get" him by various 
ways, but it wasn't long until the ea.sy winners lit out for 
newer fields. Through World War I he kept the "big 
shots" of crime from Vallejo, 

There were no brutal murders or bank robberies and 
other so-called major crimes were few and far between once 
he got his force organized, 'Year after year he was able to 
get more men, and when he stepped out after weathering 
every attempt to oust him, and through many changes in 
municipal orticers, he had over 20 members in his depart- 
ment, Vallejo was a booming city of over -lO.OOO people 
when he retired. 

He was a pioneer in dealing with juveniles, and through 
his counsel and understanding he turned many a youth into 
the right path. 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 19"^ 1 



S. F. Footprinters In New Headquarters 



Never since it was organized 2 1 years ago, has San Fran- 
cisco Chapter No. 1, of the International Footprint Associa- 
tion been so prosperous, not only in finances but in its work 
of providing entertainment for its members and rendering 
aid to worthwhile people and the needy, particularly young 
folks. 

Much of this success has been due to Chief Michael E. 
Mitchell, who stepped out as head of the SFPD this month. 
Chief Mitchell was elected to the office of president in 1949, 
and last July was re-elected to another term. 

When he took over the leadership of the organization its 
finances were very low, and the membership had dropped 
to a discouraging number. However, as soon as he took 
over things began to happen. He introduced many innova- 
tions, principal of which was to see that each monthly meet- 
ing was one calling for a good feed, plenty of refreshments 
and good entertainment. He recruited members of the 
police department who were Footprinters to help prepare 
the feeds. He started a campaign to get new members — 
desirable ones — who would contribute to the success of the 
Chapter. Today there is a goodly sum in the bank and the 
membership has grown to nearly 500. He has a fund of 
1500 for the international convention in Las Vegas this 
year, and the delegation from San Francisco will be one for 
this outstanding event. 

One of the prominent things he has brought about is the 
securing of a meeting place for the monthly get-togethers. 
The first meeting at the new headquarters was held last 
November, and close to 200 members showed up at the 
Sandunes at 46th and Taraval in the Sunset district, on this 
first meeting. 

A fine feed was provided by a crew under the direction 
of Inspectors George O'Leary and Edward Murphy and 
everyone present gave a hearty okeh to the new spot which 
is operated by John Crevani and Elias Lieder. 

Then on December 19 the annual ladies' night and 
Christmas party was held. So successful was the 1949 party 
for the wives, sisters, mothers and sweethearts that this 
event will be held each year, and the one last month ex- 
ceeded the success of the one held the year previous. Nice 
presents for the womenfolk and each of the special guests 
received a worthwhile gift. The celebration opened with a 
turkey dinner prepared in the special kitchen by the mem- 
bers of the SFPD. 

Of course Chief Mitchell could not have accomplished 
all these good things without the assistance of his corps of 
officers, principal of which is the live wire secretary-treasurer 
Ralph Keyes, engineer for the Hartford Fire Insurance 
Company. W. V. A. (Jimmy) Ingold, of the Ingold Co., 
Thomas Cheetham, of the Golden Gate Bridge force, Dep- 
uty Chief James Quigley, Ignatius McCarthy, well known 
investigator and Thomas Murphy of the Telephone Com- 
pany, vice presidents, have done their part in the successful 
achievements of Chapter No. 1. Inspector George Stanton, 
as sereeant-at-arms also does his share in keeping things 



going smoothly. District Attorney Thomas Lynch is the 
counsel for the Chapter and is on hand at every meeting. 

And there is a live wire board of directors, made up of 
the following: 

Walter Vervias, Robert Schaefer, Phil Geauque, Michael 
Fitzpatrick, Charles Fox, William Gilmore, Ben Hiller, 
John Kane, Charles Kunst, Jerry Coughlin, Harry Madison, 
Al Magner, George Monroe, Bill Murphy and George 
Langley. 



WILLIAM T. STANFORD 

(Continued jrom page 73) 

He got a new jail to supplant the dungeon-like structure 
he found when he became chief. 

He organized the first identification bureau of the city. 

He was quick to motorize his department when the auto- 
mobile became available. 

He made many contributions to law enforcement and 
served on law and legislative committees that went before 
the state legislature in behalf of law enforcement. 

He saw a lot of police chiefs come and go in Oakland 
and San Francisco while he served Vallejo so well, and each 
and everyone of them held Chief Stanford in the highest 
esteem, because he never skipped a call for assistance from 
any of them and never turned a deaf ear to any appeal for 
aid. He was a No. 1 co-operator when it came to rounding 
up any man or woman wanted for breaking the laws. 

The sort of a man such as William T. Stanford, come 
along at rare intervals. It is too bad for the world can use 
more such men — men who are good loyal citizens; able and 
honest police officials, and true and inspirational friends. 
It's good that his legion of friends scattered over the whole 
of the U. S. A. are able to meet him, well and hearty, at 
meetings of peace officers. 



SAN 


GINA & JOES RESTAURANT 

SERVING FINE ITALIAN FOOD 
1617 Polk Street PRospect 6-4945 
FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 


Phone 4881 

BE R R Y ' S 

FLOWERS WIRED 


FLOWERS 

. . . WORLDWIDE 


422 


SALINAS STREET 




SALINAS. CALIFORNIA 



San 

Francisco 

* 

746 

Brannan 

Street 




January. 795/ 



POUCX. AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Paj^e 75 



Serg. Lindenau^ S. F. P. D. Vehicle Inspector 



When Lieutenant Nels S. Stohl took his retirement pen- 
sion last June 1, there was a vacancy created in the Vehicle 
Inspection Detail, which he had been in charge of since 
1927. 

This detail is one bereft of any spectacular activities that 
make (he- headlines in the city's newspapers. It is .i dct.iil 




ierjtcant Ernest Lindenau at the microphone burning; the mortga>;c 
>n Traffic Officer Bart Sullivan's home, at Palace Hotel List Fall. 
Mrs. Sullivan is back of her husband. 

laving to do with seeing that taxi companies keep up their 
icenses for various spots in town, that the sightseeing buses, 
he other mobile transportation concerns coming into San 
'lancisco, jitney bus operators, sightseeing buses and thofe 
ransporting passengers to the airport, rental limousine driv- 
rs do likewise. The detail conducts continual checks on all 
hese activities. 
There are some 2000 taxicabs in San Francisco, 136 jit- 
eys and 80 rental limousines. 

Also there will be found the head of the detail or his 

ssistant present at any big gathering, like the opera, or 

vents at the civic auditorium which calls for the use of a 

3t of motor vehicles to transport patrons. 

With the fine record Lieutenant Stohl had accomplished 

uring the 23 years he had charge of this important imit of 

ie police department. Chief Michael E. Mitchell desired 

man who would measure up to the accomplishments of 

e retired lieutenant. He settled on Sergeant Ernest H. 

jndenau, who had been with Lieutenant Stohl for some 

•ecks previous to the latter's retirement. 

~ .cant Lindenau is a veteran of the police department, 

J been a member for over a quarter of a century, hav- 

t inmed on August 26, 1924. He was promoted to ser- 

' in September, 19-40. He was assigned to Northern 

:: for most of his tenure in the department until 19 i'' 

he was transferred to the Traffic Bureau. 

V^'liile at Northern Station he was the first officer detailed 

I the first one-w.ay streets — Bush and Pine. He also has 

ic- >listinction of wearing the first open collar (Kilicc uni- 

rii of a traffic officer. He had occasion to appear as a wit- 

cfore the Police Commission, and he announced his 

ion of wearing the open collar coat. 

was advised by fellow officers that he would get in 

' ith the higher ups if he did so. However, he ignored 

Ivicc and was highly plea.scd when the commission dc- 

! on their first look, that it was just the thing for this 



branch of the }X)lice department. 

His first fixed traffic po.st was at Post and Fillmore Streets. 

Last September 17 Sergeant and Mrs. Lindenau cele- 
brated their silver wedding anniversary. They were married 
2'i years ago in this city Mrs. Lindenau an attractive woman 
whose maiden name was Margaret Strehl, was a native of 
Vallejo. 

There was a big celebration of this anniversary of their 
marriage, and a lot of their friends gathered to participate 
in the celebration. 

Phone 185 

TORNELL CONSTRUCTION CO. 



C. A. Tornel 
Offic 

•15 KASr SI.\TI{ STREET 



EdKor E Torni-ll 
ind Plant: 

TRACY. CALIFORNIA 



3-J CLUB 

John Tambornini. Prop. 
OFF SALE and COCKTAILS 

983 Third Str.rt Napa. California 

SAM KEE LAUNDRY 

POV LIM. Owner 

1245 Main Street - Phone 6-3571 

DEPOT LAUNDRY: 717 Main Street - Phone 4-0497 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 

THE HAGUE JEWELERS 

The Name Speaks (or Hospitality. Courtesy and Workmanship 

8J8 Main Street Napa. California 

EDDIES CAFE 

RIC:iARD MOTZ. Owner 

Third and Main Streets on the Hichway 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 

A-I CAFE 

CHOP SUEY and CHOW MEIN 

Chinese Dishes a Specialty 

Orders Put Up to Take Out 



101 4 Main Streel 



Napa. Califn 



Phone 4 I46> -Lowest Prices in Town" 

NAPA GROCERY 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 

Crocm-ies - Fruits - Vefetables - Fresh Fish and Poultry 

Fresh and Cured Meats - Beer and Wine 

1345 MAIN STREET NAPA. CALIFORNIA 

H. SHWARZ CO. 

HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 



KNOTTY PINE DRIVE-IN 

SANDWICHES - FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

On Jefferson Street opposite Napa High School 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 

RANDYS FROZEN STEAKS 

BEEF • PORK • VEAL 

RANDALL WARNER 

IHSS Washinlton St. LOckhaven 8-3221 

SAN LEANDRO. CALIFORNIA 



Ho 



Cnsh for Eqult 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



L B. M( RAE 



L. B McRne, Licenced Broker I'h .SW S M2) SW 8 6IM 
SAN LEANDRO. I AI.IFORNIA 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jiiiiiidry. 19') I 



California 

Oregon 

Washington 

Idaho 

British Columbia 

* 

LOS ANGELES- 
SEATTLE MOTOR 
EXPRESS, INC. 

EDWARD W. ELLIOT 

District Manager 
* 

3rd and Arthur Streets 

San Francisco, California 

Mission 7-4742 



Phone BE 2-7484 

TOWER MARKET 
Grocery Department 

W. W. KAUFMAN, OWNER 

1050 23rd Street 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



— - - - - - f 



THE WHITE HOUSE 


Santa Rosa 




CROWLEY'S.. 


. Vallejo 


C ARITHERS'.. 


. Petaluma 


CARITHERS'. 


. . Napa 


W. R. CARITHERS & Sons, Inc. 



Telephone MISSION 7-1104 

PACIFIC METALS 
COMPANY, LTD. 

PACIFIC FOUNDRY 
COMPANY, LTD. 

3100 NINETEENTH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



VALDA'S COCKTAIL BAR 

DINING ROOM OPEN 24 

HOURS EVERY DAY 

Mixed Drinks as You Like Them 

1601 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



PHONE 334 

WABASH MARKET 

GROCERIES AND MEATS 

WABASH AVENUE AND B STREET 



BETTER BAKING 

OLD MISSION BAKERY 

50 W. :Oth Telephone 707 

TRACY. CALIFORNIA 



POI.ICi; AND PV.ACll Ol riCI-RS' lOURNAL 



/;/ Cttlijoniiit 
US IHi; 

George T. Thompson Hotels 



RANCHO RAFAEL 



nny Marin County . . . only oni-h.ilf hour fr<ini 
scenic Golden Gace Bridge and Highway 101 
ion Slyle Rancho buill in 1M9 . . . Koriy (juesc r 
Aimminf: pool . . . cocktail lounge . . . dining t' 

SOiNOMA MISSION INiN 



In bcaufiful Valley of the Moon ai B< 
from San Francisco via Golden Gate 
One hundred deluxe guest rooms . . 
lounge . . . private swimming pool . 
course . . . tennis . . . riding. 



.'S Springs . . only one hour 
ridge and Highway tOI . . . 
dining room . . . cocktail 
. 18-holc championship gotf 



SHASTA SPRINGS MOTEL 



liles 



lodge 

p<K)l 



in cottages 



n magnificent Mt. Shasta area . 

on Highway 99 . . . scvcnty-fivc 
. dining room . . . cocktail lounge 

fishing . . . riding . . . hiking. Perfect place for vaci 
■laxation in Shasta-Cascade Mountains. 



EUREKA INN 



In the heart of the Redwood Empire on Humboldt Bay at Eureka 
. . . 150 deluxe rooms . . . dining room specializing in famous 
Humboldi crabs and other seafood . . . cocktail lounge . . . 
bojting . . . fishing . . . riding . . . golf. 



lonahlt European plan rales at ait places. Telephone 
or write for folders and complete information. 



George T. Thompson Hotels 

505 Geary Street, San Francisco 2, Cai.if. 

Telephones: PRospcci 6-203} or GRaystone 4-?600 



Telephone 3-3445 

VALLEJO BAIL BOND 
AGENCY 

BONDS DAY AND NIGHT 

F. B. WIBLE 

737 MARIN STREET 
VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 



E. REYES 

LABOR 
SUPPLY 



Phone 8139 
18 SUN STREET 

Salinas, California 



SERVING 

NORTHEAST BAY HOMES 

AND INDUSTRY SINCE 

1907 



THE 

MECHANICS 

BANK 

Riiliiiioncl - El (."crrito - Alban\ 



MIMBIR FiniRAL OIPOSIT INSURANC I 
CORPORATION 



i ......—................— ...^... 



Sec. 34.66 P. L. & R. 


U. S. POSTAGE 


PAID 


San Francisco, Calif. 


Permit No. 3172 



Return Postage C 
465 Tenth Street, Sa 



Saofranc.scoZ/. 



MARIN COUNTY MOTOR CAR DEALERS 

WHO CARES HOW YOUR CAR OR TRUCK PERFORMS? 

None Other Than One of These Marin County Motor Car Dealers Listed Below 



W. J. BELL 

STUDEBAKER 

1826 4th Street, San Rafael— Phone S.R. 1430 

BIANCO'S GARAGE 

PONTIAC - CADILLAC - GMC 

Fourth and E Streets, San Rafael — Phone S.R. 56 

ART BOATES 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 

275 Miller Ave., Mill Valley— Phone Dtinlap 8-1772 
If No answer, Dunlap 8-1001 

CASTRO'S GARAGE 

USED CARS 

718 Fourth Street, San Rafael — Phone S.R. 501 

CEBALO'S GARAGE 

PACKARD - BRITISH AUSTIN 

831 Fourth Street— Phone San Rafael 2017 

de BEAUBIEN PONTIAC CO. 

PONTIAC 

374 Miller Ave., Mill Valley— Phone Dunlap 8-2653 

DE LONG CHEVROLET CO., Inc. 

CHEVROLET 

719 Francisco Blvd. — San Rafael 4126 

DOHEMANN MOTOR CO. 

FORD 

866 Fourth Street— San Rafael 734 

J. E. FRENCH CO. 

DODGE - PLYMOUTH 

1542 Fourth Street — San Rafael 1061 

JACK HUNT 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 

Fourth aiul F Streets — San Rafael 522 

MAR VISTA MOTORS 

LINCOLxN MERCURY 

519 Fourth Streei— San Rafael 6900 



MCMILLAN BUICK CO. 

BUICK 

356 Miller Ave., Mill Valley— Dunlap 8-3375 

NORTH BAY MOTORS 

PACKARD 

18 E. Blithedale Ave., Mill Valley— Dunlap 8-3027 

HIL PROBERT MOTORS 

KAISER-FRAZER 

Third and D Streets, San Rafael 1777; 
234 Magnolia, Larkspur 650 

RAFAEL MOTORS 

HUDSON 

Third and Lincoln, San Rafael 2210 

R & R MOTORS 

DODGE - PLYMOUTH 

25 Cone Madera Ave., Mill Valley — Dunlap 8-0642 

RHODES NASH 

NASH 
1531 Fourth Street, San Rafael— 7503 

ROSSI'S GARAGE 

DeSOTO - PLYMOUTH 

622 Fourth Street, San Rafael 840 

STENSTROM BUICK CO. 

BUICK 

501 Francisco Blvd., San Rafael— S.R. 5330 

TAMALPAIS MOTOR SALES 

FORD 

Blithedale and Sycamore, Mill Valley — Dunlap 8-2241 

VOGUE MOTOR CO. 

OLDSMOBILE 

1566 Fourth Street, San Rafael— S.R. 1038 

WILLYS SALES CO. 

WILLYS 

1522 Fourth Street, San Rafael— S.R. 2018 



BUY IN MARIN WHERE YOU GET THE BEST TRADE-IN 
VALUE, AND GET SERVICE AT THE LOWEST PRICES 



SAN FRANCISCO 





TOP CITY OFFICIALS WERE AT CHIEF GAFFEY'S BIG DINNER 
Seated, left to right: Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, Chief GafPey, Police Commission President J. War- 
nock Walsh; (standing) Police Commissioner H. C. Maginn, District Attorney Thomas Lynch, Police 
Commissioner Washington I. Kohnke and Superior Judge Preston Devine. 



MARCH. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Greetings 

to the 

Police and Peace Officers 

GERALD D. KENNEDY 



Stockton, California 



Telephone 4-4657 

R VIS & 
CLINGE R 

• 

Wholesale Butchers 
Frozen Meat Lockers 
Custom Slaughtering 



Linden Road at Diverting Canal 
POST OFFICE BOX 82 

Stockton, California 



American Federation 
of Labor 

CANNERY 

WORKER'S 

UNION 

Local No. 601 



. . . Office . . . 
425 EAST MINER AVENUE 

Stockton 2, California 

Telephone 2-4355 



MONTGOMERY 
WARD 



20 - 34 N. AMERICAN STREET 



Stockton 17, California 

Telephone 4-4675 



Mfinh. lOfil 



POLICE AND PEACE OFI-ICERS' JOURNAL 



Featured in This Issue 



Hay Counties' Peace Officers' Assocation 
\V'arn!ng on Commies by Sheriff Glcasoii 

Traffic Director Kker on Television 
Lieut. Anderson Boss of Chinatown Detail 
Lieut. Mooily Heads Missing Persons Bureau 
San Luis Obispo's Chief Heidorn a Police 

Veteran 

Associated Public Communication Officers 

I hev Have Atiswered Their Last Roll Call 
Santa Maria — A Prosperous City 
Chief Morehouse of Paso Robles 
Radio Procurement ALide Kasier 
Petaluma's Police Chief — Melvin Del Maestro 
Reedley's Chief Miller Is a Native of That Cit\ 
Kids Knot Hole Club for Seals Stadium 
Hrak'n<r Tests by 'WIlow Cab Compan\- . 

Selma Is a Well Policed City 

Mothers' March of Dimes Aided by SFPD 

Pistol Pointing 

Hy I. Rosf DunniKi"! 

1 ehama Co.'s New Sheriff — \\'ayne Krain'g 
Sesnon Is New CSAA President .... 

Shore Patrol Reunion 

Four More V'ears for Sheriff Mayfield 
Bay Police Nab Duo of Store Holdups 
30- Year Police Have Reunion 



PACE 

^ 

5 
6 
8 




Mayor Robinson on the Atom Bomb . 
Testimonial Dinner for Chief Gaffey 
Sheriff Sousa, San Joaquin Co., Fine Record 
Dr. Leo Stanlev, San Quentin, Retires . 
Juvenile Delinquency Committee Report 

By Former Chief sMiclunl E. Milchcll 
The Sign of the Red Hand 

By B. C. Bridges 
Chico Meeting of No. Calif. Peace Officers 
Stockton's New Chief of Police — J. A. O'Keefe 12 
Peninsula Police Officers' A.ssociation ... 14 
Sergeant Fernandez Heads Peninsula Police 

Officers' Association 15 

Santa Cruz Tops in Civilian Defense ... 16 
Prisons and Prisoners in National Defense . 1 7 

By Former S. F. Police Chief Charles IF. Dullea 



Directory 



18 
20 
21 
22 
2i 

24 
2o 
28 
30 
32 
35 
36 
38 
40 
41 
42 
4') 
70 

72 
84 
85 
87 
89 
92 



The hi>rTii« II aluMyi plciicd in cnniidcr irticlci luilihlc for puhlicaiiiin. 
Conirihutioni should preferably be lypewrtiien. hul where lhi» i\ niii poj- 
»ible. copy ihiiuld be clearly written. Contrlhutlnns may he iiKned with a 
"nom de plume." but all articles must bear the tiame and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Forron 
will also be pleased In consider phntofiraphs of officirs and "f inlerestinK 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Foitoh 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KMA-438 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 2:00 p.m., Hall of Justfce 

Henry C. Maginn, President 315 Montgomery 

Washington I. Kohnke 686 Sacramento St. 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery St. 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael G.-xpfey 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quicley 

Chief of Inspectors Jambs English 

Director of Traffic J:\ck Eker 

Dept. Sec't... Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRicK....Hall of Justice 
District Captains 

Centrai Edward P. Donohue 635 Washington Street 

Southern Daniel McKlem Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Ai.oysius O'Brien 3057 - 17th Street 

Northern Walter Ames 841 Ellis Street 

G. c;. Park Peter Conroy Stanyan opp. Walkr 

Richmond Ted Teri.au 451 Sixth Avenue 

Incei.side....Georce M. Healy. ...Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Tar.wal Leo Tackney 2348 - 24th Avenue 

Potrero John M. Sullivan 2300 Third Street 

Property Clerk and 

City Prison Bernard McDonald Hall of Justice 

Relief Captain James Carric 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Pkrsonsei John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Criminoloct Francis X. Latulipi Hill of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Servicrs Otto Meyer Hall of Justice 

Director of Juvenile Bureau 2745 Greenwich Street 

John Meehan 

Director - Bureau or Criminal 

Kn)K.\i\TioN LiKUT. (iKiiRt.K llu'i'tMV Hall of Justice 

1n«p. of Schools 

Traffic Controi Insp. Thomas B. Tract 

Supervising Captain 

OF Districts Jeremiah J. Coughlin Hall of Justice 

Chinatown Drtaii Hall of lustire 

I.iFtiT. llARntn .Anderson 



When hiDouht'' ^^^^ SUtter h20'20 



Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



SURF 



Mission's Most Unusual Cocktail Lounge 
"Windy " at the Hammond Organ 

2777 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



S C H L A G E 

LOCK 
COMPANY 

2201 Bayshore Boulevard 

San Francisco, California 



LEO J . 
M E Y B E R G 
COMPANY 

Incorporated 



33 Gough Street 
San Francisco 



PHONE ORDWAY 3-3040 
DAY - NIGHT OR SUNDAY 

D E V I N E 

National Detective Agency 

Paul H. Devine, Princifidl 

LICENSED BY 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

B O ND E D D 

RELIABLE CONFIDENTIAL 

INVESTIGATIONS 

1286 CALIFORNIA STREET 

Member of 

INTERNATIONAL SECRET SERVICE 

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Phone HEmlock 1-1480 

Brodhead Steel Products 
Company 

REINFORCING STEEL BARS 
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Office and Warehouse: 

17th and Wisconsin Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone SUtter 1-3090 

Diamond Shirt Company 

Shirts Made to Your Order 

Specializing in 

WOOL GABARDINE - SPORT SHIRTS 

WESTERN COWBOY SHIRTS 

GAUCHO SHIRTS 

Also a Smart Line of Dress Shirts 

240 Columbus Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



: San Francisco; 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

I Established 1922 1 




±Ei PEACE OFFICERS* 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

I Trade Matk Copyright) 



Vol. XXV 



MARCH. 1951 



Mayor Robinson on the Atom Bomb 



A lot of people ot Sail Francisco, as well as those of 
every section of the Uniteil States, are not aware of what 
will happen if the Commies succeed in dropping an atomic 
bomb on congested cities. It's time all people were brought 
face to face with the awfiilness of such an attack, and 




MXVOR El.MER E. ROBINSOX 

made to realize that everyone — man, woman and child — 
has a duty to perform in preparing some defense for this 
awful possibility. 

We have come across nothing more enlightening on the 
subject of atomic bf)mbing and other modern war weapons, 
than the speech made on February 2, by Mayor Klmer K. 
Robinson before the Commonwealth Club. 

.Mayor Robinson pulls no punches and by reading his 
speech which we will print in its entirety through the next 
few issues, one can get a picture of the dreadful things 
that would happen from a bomb attack. He covers what 
the national and state authorities are doing to perfect civil- 
ian defense and what must be done following a bomb blast. 
Read every word of the following address — TiiK Editor. 

1 am very grateful for the privilege of appearing on the 
ilistinguished platform of the Commonwealth Club of 
California. There is no more celebrated forum in the 
I'nited States than this, and from this platform questions 
of the gravest import to our country and our people have 
been authoritatively discussed. Today, my subject — Civil 



Defense — is of paramount, direct, immediate and per- 
sonnel importance to every man, woman and child in the 
L'nited States. 

It is deplorable that we must now look to the defense 
of the innocent, of the helpless, of the very old and of the 
very young, who are, in the modern concept of war, legiti- 
mate targets for any and every missile of destruction. 

Every man who is sensitive to the times in which he lives 
must recognize now that man's impressive technical prog- 
ress has provided him with horrifying technique of mass 
destruction of human life, but, at the same time, his moral 
sense, controlling the use of these weapons, seems to have 
become atrophied. 

'Fhe American people are now under a great burden of 
anxiety and of apprehension that the rain of fire, pesti- 
lence, destruction and death may be loosed upon us at any 
time because our enemy possesses techniques of mass de- 
struction and operates upon the undisciplined impulses of 
moral barbarism. 

It remains now for us to prepare for the civil defense, 
specifically of San Francisco, but generally of every city, 
of every town, of every village in the I'nited States, for 
all are within reach of enemy attack. 

San Francisco, for example, is only 2700 miles — about 
seven hours flying time — over the Great Circle Route 
from Soviet Air Bases at Cape Anadyr. Civil Defense 
must not be for any of us simply a subject of discussion. 
It must not become a mere view, critical or otherwise, of 
plans made or of measures taken. This subject cannot be- 
come and it must not become an impcr.sonal. abstract and 
academic topic of oratory or of conversation. 

It is my intention to place before you the dimensions and 
the scope of the problem that faces every living American. 

Just last month 1 received a copy of a book called 
"Health Services and Special Weapons Defense," pub- 
lished in Deceniber, 1950, and transmitted by the Execu- 
tive Office of the President through the Federal Civil De- 
fense Administration. With almost clinical clarity the 
problem we face is there set forth, and I present to you 
practically varbatim some of the niaterial therein con- 
tained. 

Let me begin by telling you what the latest recommen- 
dations of the Federal Ciovernment are with regard to so 
commonplace and necessary n facility as a first aid station. 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



It is recommended that all first aid stations should be 
mobile — a requirement that can be met by the use of 
trucks and large tractor-trailer units or moving vans. 
These vehicles would carry personnel and supplies to the 
disaster area and would give protection from the weather 
to the personnel, equipment and casualties using that sta- 
tion. 

Do you know how many mobile first aid stations we are 
asked to set up on the perimeter of this city? To begin 
with, we are asked to have fifty-seven mobile units on the 
perimeter. These are to be moved inward to within one 
and one-half miles of Ground Zero — that spot directly be- 
neath the point of atomic explosion. They are to be ar- 
ranged in a large circle spaced one-sixth of a mile apart. 
Keep that figure — fifty-seven — in mind, and then let me 
tell you the personnel requirements for round-the-clock 
operation of each of those fifty-seven stations: Two psy- 
sicians, three dentists, three nurses, two pharmacists, fif- 
teen first aid workers and nurses' aides, six clerical assist- 
ants, one hundred fifty litter bearers, two four-stretcher 
ambulances with two attendants each, and four automo- 
biles with one attendant each. These figures means that 
we require one hundred eighty-one persons for each of the 
first fifty-seven stations, or a total of 10,317 persons. 

But that isn't the whole story. The fifty-seven first aid 
stations, of which I have spoken, are only those to be 
moved in one and one-half miles from Ground Zero. 

A secondary and supporting ring of mobile first aid sta- 
tions is to be spotted one-half mile behind the first ring. 
There are to be thirty-nine of these supporting units, 
spaced at one-third mile intervals, and, using the same 
method of calculation as I have just used, these secondary 
units would require a total personnel of 7,059. In other 
words, the overall Federal recommendations comprise 
ninety-six first aid stations in concentric rings at one and 
one-half and two miles from Ground Zero, with one hun- 
dred eighty-one persons attached to each station for round- 
the-clock operation. 

The cost of supplies for each of the ninety-six stations 
is estimated at about $3000. 

These figures, I think, tell their own story, but they do 
not actually tell you the staggering casualty forecast in 
event of attack. 

In the figures which I am about to give the average 
American city with a population density of about 13,000 
persons per square mile is assumed. The population density 
of San Francisco per square mile is 17,022 plus persons. 

A surprise daylight attack, that is, an attack without 
warning and in which the enemy uses only the outmoded 
Hiroshima type bomb, would produce a total of about 
120,000 casualties. 

Of this total, approximately one-third, that is 40,000 
persons, would either be killed outright or die on the first 
day. 80,000 casualties would survive the first twenty- 
four hours. 

And here is the tabulation of their injuries, remember- 
ing that the same person may suffer from one or more types 
of injury: 48,000 would be suffering from burns; 40,000 



would be suffering from mechanical injuries; and 16,000 
would be suffering chiefly from radiation injuries. 

It would be an insult to your intelligence for me to add 
any interpretation or any elaboration to this picture which 
I have given you of the central and the basic problem that 
faces us. 

Several months ago, I asked the people of San Francisco 
to volunteer for service in our civil defense forces. It was 
on September 7, 1950, that I asked the men of San Fran- 
cisco to volunteer specifically for service as auxiliary police- 
men and as auxiliary firemen. I have repeatedly asked that 
at least one person in every home take a course in first aid. 

The results, I felt, were disheartening, and I discover 
now that Governor Earl Warren also is repeating his call 
for volunteers on a statewide basis. I do not interpret the 
failure of our people to respond to these pleas as apathy or 
indifference. 

I prefer to believe that our people have not been alerted 
in cold-blooded but factual terms to the realities of inter- 
national life in this year of grace nineteen hundred and 
fifty-one ; nor have they looked squarely at the monstrous 
possibilities that face men. In my judgment, thus far, our 
people have thought of civil defense in terms of plans or 
as something which wouldn't affect them personally. The 
estimates of casualties which I have just recited for you, 
and which, emanating from official and responsible sources, 
must be accepted as reliable, certainly indicate that every 
man and woman in this city has a function to perform in 
the organized self-defense which is called Civil Defense. 

Let me now develop the depth of the problem with 
which we are attempting to cope. We must prepare radio- 
logical defenses, and we must include in our plans defenses 
against biological and chemical warfare. 

Biological warfare means exactly what it says : The in- 
troduction of organisms which can induce disease of epi- 
demic proportions among our people. Biological warfare 
could be brought home against us through the creation of 
aerosol clouds containing aggregates of pathogenic agents 
over urban areas, other massed populations or important 
military targets. 

These areasols could be produced by bombs dropped 
from aircraft or released from submarines approaching 
port cities, or possibly through guided missiles. A saboteur 
could introduce any of a wide selection of these agents into 
the water, food and milk supplies or into the air of local- 
ized but strategically important communities, buildings or 
other places where people congregate. This warfare, of 
course, can be carried on against humans, against animals 
and against plants. 

Another aspect of Civil Defense deals with the rcMilts 
of chemical warfare. The most likely chemical weapmi — 
nerve gas — acts quickly, is detected with difficulty and may 
cause death in a few minutes to an hour. It does not affect 
large areas, but it may contaminate an area for anywhePl 
from hov.rs to days. There is an effective treatment fori 
victims if applied quickly. The nerve gases are more toxic 
than any previously known war gases and are nearh- color- 
less and odorless. They may be absorbed into the body 
(Continued on page 23) i 



M,irrh. 1051 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



TESTIMONIAL DINNER FOR CHIEF GAFFEY 

Nearly 800 people gathered in the Ciold Room oi the "1 know that with \oiir support, your sympathy, your 

Fairmont Hotel on the night ot February 1 to show how prayers and God's help, I will be able to do a job that will 
glad they were that Michael Gaffey had been appointed reflect credit upon the administration, the mayor, the po- 



Chief of Police of San Francisco less than a month before. 
There were dignitaries from every city department, labor 




Chief .Michael (.;.\ffey 

federations, civic leaders, the judiciary, other just ordinary 
citizens, all friends of the affable and capable guest of 
honor. 

Mayor and Mrs. Elmer Robinson were present as were 
Police Commissioners J. W'arnock Walsh. H. C. Maginn 
and Washington I. Kohnke and their families. District 
Attorney Thomas C. Lynch, all the top ranking officers 
of the SF'PD and lots of those of lesser rank. Merchants, 
bankers, clergymen, and leading men and women from 
various organizations and as.sociations of the municipality 
were on hand to do honor to the new Chief of Police. 
There were speeches and each and every speaker reflected 
how high Chief Gaftey is held in the affection of his fel- 
low citizens. 

Superior Judge Preston Devine served as toastmastcr. 
and he did a splendid job. Attorney Robert McCarthy 
was the chairman of the dinner. 

Mayor Robinson in his adilress said he had e\ery con- 
fidence that Chief Gafley would carry on the splendid 
record established by the splendid chiefs of former years. 

Charles Scully, counsel tor the American Federation 
of I>abor. the principal speaker of the occasion, told of 
the important position of the police departmetit as a unit 
of civil government and maintained that Michael Gaffev 
has the qualifications and is equal to the challenge of ob- 
taining from the public, the cooperation which is para- 
mount to the maintenance of an efficient police department. 

To all of the laudatory remarks made about him, Chief 
Gaflfey hvimbly expresse<l his thanks for the confidence ex- 
pressed in his ability and concluded by declaring: 



lice commissioners and the department." 

Mrs. Gafifey shared the honors with her husband at the 
testimonial dinner, as did his fi\e children. 

On the night of February 21 Chief Gafifey was again 
honored by his fellow members of Woodrow Wilson 
Chapter 15, Military Order of the Purple Heart. It was 
a dinner at Di.Maggio's Restaurant at Fisherman's Wharf. 

Guests of honor included Lt. Gen. Albert C. Wede- 
meyer, commanding general of the Sixth Army; Judge 
Thomas M. F'oley, Municipal Judge Charles Perry and 
Dean .Maddox. 

George Washington founded the order of the Purple 
Heart honoring American soldiers wounded in battle. 
Chief Gai?e\ won the Purple Heart during his service in 
the armv in World War I. on the fields of France. 



SEVEN GRADUATES RECEIVE TRAFFIC 
AWARDS 

liy Mrs. Allkn B. Ct)\R()V, Publicity Choinnan. 
Parkside Parent Teacher Assocation. 

When the new term commenced at Parkside School on 
Monday, F"ebruary 5, seven members of the Traffic Patrol 
were missing from their usual posts, having been gradu- 
ated. 

Gerald Almlie. Richard Chackerian, Da\ id Lanum, 
Merritt Peck, Edward Eisenstark, John Sommers and 
David Kenney, received merit awards from the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department for outstanding service. Inspector 
Thomas B. Tracy, Inspector of Schools Traffic Control, 
S.F.P.D., visited Parkside on Thursday, January 25, 
when the party for the traffic boys was given. Inspector 
C. L. ^\'^alker (Star 535), who resides at lb82 Thirty- 
third Avenue, presented the awards and exhibited three 
motion picture films to the youngsters, including a film on 
bicycle safety. 

Miss Esther Lewis, Vice-principal at Parkside, who su- 
pervises the boys, together with Miss Gertrude Whiteside. 
Principal, were the recipients of gifts presented to them 
by Squad Two of the Junior Traffic Patrol, in gratitude 
for the patient and tireless guidance which has enabled the 
Parkside boys to maintain the high standard which has 
brought praise to San FVancisco's Junior Traffic Patrols 
for the past several years. 

The outfits worn by boys of the Junior Traffic Patrol, 
whose presence at corners adjacent to the school protects 
the safety of all children crossing streets, are provided by 
funds raised through efforts of members of Parkside Par- 
ent Teacher Association. The annual part\ for the traffic 
boys is also held under the sponsorship of P.T..A. members. 

Telephone 6 <)262 

TREADWAY FUNERAL CHAPEL 



l.ndv Atlrn.ln 



62J COOMBS STRK.KT 



NAI'A. CAl.lfORMA 



P,ioe 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Manh. 1051 



Sheriff Sousa^ San Joaquin Co., Fine Record 

At the election in November, 1946, Carlos A. Sousa area at anytime during the 24 hours of the day. 
was swept into the office of Sheriff-Coroner of San Joa- Acquired 360 acres of county owned fertile land for his 

quin County. At last year's primary election he was again prison honor farm, and has completed the erection of a 
re-elected, with scant opposition, for another four-year modern kitchen and dining room, which furnish accommo- 
term. A timely recognition for the splendid manner he has dations for 400 men; dormitory buildings with all up-to- 
date arrangements, where men sentenced for misdemeanors 
are given the best of housing and recreation ; dairy build- 
ings ; processing plant to take care of the vast crops of all 
sorts of vegetables raised on the farm; clean and sanitary 
pens and corrals for the over 100 blooded hogs and more 
than 200 head of dairy cattle; a smokehouse for curing 
pork for various county institutions. 

Provided a machine shop will all necessary equipment 
which is capable of handling most any machinery job : 

There are no fences aroimd the farm, and escapes are 
rare. 




Sheriff Carlos A. Sousa 

conducted the office of chief enforcement officer of the 
county. 

Sheriff Sousa has accomplished many things for the wel- 
fare of his law-abiding constituency, since he assumed office 
on January 1, 1947. During the past four years some of 
his most important achievements are : 

The placing of his entire personnel under civil service 
regulations, and giving them a shorter work week. 

Increasing the salaries of all his force. Deputies now 
get a high of $320 a month. Another raise is scheduled 
for April 1. 

Having all deputies dressed in serviceable and natty uni- 
forms. They all have to take refresher training courses of 
two weeks each year. These courses include instructions in 
all phases of police fundamentals and a rundown of new 
laws. 

Established headquarters for the county's tie-in with the 
statewide teletype system, which he introduced early in his 
first term. 

Perfected a record filling system unsurpassed by any 
other law enforcement agency, for which Undersheriff 
Michael Canlis was sent to the FBI National Police Acad- 
emy to learn how to bring it up-to-date, along with other 
important ideas for the Sheriff's office. 

Constructed a pistol range, modern in every respect, on 
the Honor Farm, and which is now about completed. 

Made honesty and efficiency the only yardstick for ad- 
vancement of the men and women of his office. 

All of the hundreds of square miles if the county's unin- 
corporated area is well covered by deputies — certain squads 
are ready at all times to go to the Lodi, Tracy or IVIanteca 




Undersheriff Michael Canlis 

The honor farm is the pride of Sheriff Soust, and justly 
so, for there are none that excel it. Not only for the re- 
habilitation of those sent there by the courts, but for the 
great quantity of vegetable and grain crops, dairy products 
and hams and bacon, the farm produces each year. It is 
almost a self-supporting propect. 



Telephone 7-7158 

Valley Construction Co. 

General Building Contractors 

Home Construction, Repairs and 
Additions . . . New Foundations 

2748 East Fremont Street 
STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



March. l<J5l 



POLICH AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 7 





^. 



li%*l 



'?,v^. 






^^'s 



San Joaiiuin Shrnn > Kiui >r|iia<l — s|nciall> trainid in all pliasuv nt iimli conirnj and iim- ot rmt (iiiiipmcr 
Shtriffs Tichvitza, Small, Bniwn, Collins, Williamson, Lyons, Stewart and Mcncloza. 



iht : l)t|nil> 



Lieutenant Louis G. Sala is in charge of the farm. He 
has a civilian machinist, a cook and a gardener to oversee 
these endeavors. Eight jailers and a bookiceeper completes 
his staft of assistants. 

There was a top of 155 men at the farm in February. 
and the highest number for 1950 was 318 at any one time. 

Crime in San Joaquin County has not been up to the 
national average, and not in keeping with the increased 
population which is now over 200,000. The clearance of 
crimes committed in Sheriff Sousa's jurisdiction during 
1950, as well as the other three years he has been in office, 
is a flattering one. 'I'he list of unsolved crimes is, indeed, 
a short one. 

This is due to the personal leadership of the Sheriff and 
the training, energy and ability of the men serving under 
him, particularly of the criminal division. This activity iN 
imder the direction of Undersheriflf Canlis. Me has Cap- 
tain Denzel L. Troute, in charge of criminal investiga- 
tions, an able investigator. There are 29 patrolmen, one 
sergeant, six lieutenants and four radio dispatchers in the 
criminal division. 

Nowhere will there be found a better bureau of identi- 
fication. Undersheriff Canlis built that up prior to the 
election of the present Sheriff. The bureau is now in charge 
of Lieutenant P. M. Morton who keejis it up to the 

minute. 



The county jail is located in Stockton, though an old 
building it is clean and modern in every detail. A great 
number of men and women arrested on various criminal 
offenses are incarcerated there annually. It is well mai\- 
aged, in keeping witii all other units of the Sheriff's office. 

Lieutenant Joseph Hagengruber is in charge of the jail 
and he has as his assistants eight jailers, four matrons, a 
bookkeeper, a cook and a physician. 

The civil department is competentK maintained with 
one deput\, two stenographers, a secretary ami a hook- 
keeper. 

((Utnliniiiil on page 59) 



Telephone (i-6836 


STOCKTON GUARANTY 


TITLE COMPANY 


A PROMP'I TITLE AND 


FSCROW SHRVICE 


KiNNFlli (i. Poll F, Prisithiil iiiiil M,in,it;ir 


40 South San J<)ac|uiii Street 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mnrrh. 1951 



Dr. Leo Stanley^ San Quentin Retires 



Dr. Leo L. Stanley, who next month retires as chief 
medical officer of San Quentin state prison after 38 years 
at that, the world's largest penitentiary, leaves a record of 
achievement that may never be equalled in his profession. 

Charged with seeing that every man sent to San Quen- 
tin was given the best medical attention possible, he did a 




Dr. Leo Stanley 

magnificent job in the health well being of those doing 
time. 

When in 1913 he took a job at San Quentin in the 
small, makeshift hospital of the day, he was paid $75 per 
month and found. He was assistant to the chief surgeon, 
and the two composed the medical staff. A few months 
after he went to work the chief medical officer left and Dr. 
Stanley was elevated to the top job, one he has held ever 
since. When he stepped out there were 14 medical men on 
the staff, covering every phase of medicine and surgery. 

In 1913 the late John Hoyle was warden of San Quen- 
tin. Dr. Stanley has seen nearly a half dozen wardens as- 
signed to that prison with present Warden Clinton Duffy 
serving the longest and best. The highest number of pris- 
oners confined there during his long tenure was 6500 dur- 
ing the year of 1934 

From the start he has always given to each prisoner who 
came under his care for examination and treatment the 
utmost attention. No matter whether the inmate was suf- 
fering from physical or mental ills he got the best treat- 
ment possible. 

Dr. Stanley kept abreast of all progress in medical 
science and he developed some ideas of his own that proved 
beneficial. No one can set the number he cured of their 
ailments and of how many went a better way when they 
left the prison, for in many cases some disease was the 
cause for their misdeeds. 

There have been no epidemics since he went to work at 
San Quentin. 



When he first took over as chief medical officer. Dr. 
Stanley aimed for a good hospital. Today you will find no 
better hospital, one equipped with every facility to meet 
the myriads of ailments that have channeled through his 
well kept and well manned hospital. He took qualified 
prisoners and trained them in the important work of nurs- 
ing, and under his direction these men, paying for their 
crimes, matched the ministrations of those in outside hospi- 
tals, when it came to caring for the ill or injured. 

Dr. Stanley was born in the AVillamette Valley, Ore- 
gon. His father was a successful country doctor, a native 
of Indiana, who migrated to California, and after teach- 
ing school in the Mother Lode country, took a medical 
course in the old Toland Medical School in San Francisco. 

He married while teaching school and the Stanleys had 
four sons. In 1893 the family moved out of Oregon and 
landed at the old town of San Miguel at the lower end of 
the Salinas Valley. Here young Stanley grew up, finally 
going to Stanford for his premedical education and finish- 
ing at the Old Cooper College, now under the manage- 
ment of Stanford L'niversity. 

From there he went to San Quentin where he has de- 
voted his life to helping the unfortunates serving time in 
that prison, and everyone who knows Dr. Stanley well 
knows how successful he has been. He is a credit to the 
medical profession and a forthright citizen of Marin 
County, and in San Rafael, where he and his wife have 
resided for years, he is highly esteemed. 

During the last world war he took time out to serve 
with the U. S. Navy. He went in in 1941 and did a four- 
year hitch serving in navy hospitals and navy ships in the 
Pacific. He came out with the rank of Captain. 

Dr. Justin K. Fuller will take over Dr. Stanley's duties 
when he takes his retirement. 

TRinidad 2-2257 A. L. Meucci 

PI PI RESTAURANT 

Specializing i 



;050 - QSTH AVENUE 



TAUAN DINNERS 

OAKLAND. CALIF. 



8400 E. I4lh Street 

OAKLAND 



MAX COX 

ONE STOP SERVICE 

Phone LOckhaven S-1966 

CALIFORNIA 



BAY CITY PATTERN CO. 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 



OAKLAND 



1114 - 14th Avenue 



ANdover 1-8920 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHNNIE'S AUTO WRECKING 

REBUILT - EXCHANGE 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

NEW AND USED PARTS 

4951 San Leandro Street ANdover 1-87S4 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

FRUIT ORCHARD MARKET 



4332 Broadv 



Piedmont 5-3537 



CALIFORNIA 



March. I'^5l 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



JUVENILE DELINQUENCy COMMITTEE REPORT 

Hy I'oriiii r ('.liul Muhiul E. Miti lull to State I'liici Officers' (Jonfi iilion in I'tiuitlcri/i. 



The present generation o( youthtul offenders, as just 
pointed out, may be said to have been affected by two wars 
and their resultant social and economic upheavals. Among 
the older delinquents are the children of veterans of World 




Former Chief M. E. Mitchell 

War I whose families were directly touched by the "boom ' 
and "depression" years subsequent to it. Many attempts 
have been made to correlate the changes in socio-economic 
climitc with fluctuations in the amount of juvenile delin- 
quency. 

It is consistent that violence and destruction, robber)- and 
treachery on an individual level, should increase in the wake 
of mass lawlessness, such as war, on an international level. 
The radical change in moral evaluation en masse soon re- 
sults in the breakdown of the imposed regulation that gov- 
erns the individual in his relation to other individuals. 
Horror at brutality gradually gives way to the acceptance 
of such behavior as normal, necessary or even heroic, and 
youth will always emulate its elders. 

The change in mass psycholog)' could alone account for 
much of the increase in juvenile delinquency in wartime. 
Inadequate staff of schools could account for such. Indis- 
criminate hero worship another by-product of the war, is a 
great source of aggressive behavior in the young. Rejection 
by, or inabilit)' to merge into the armed forces because of 
physical defect or youth, results in feelings of inadequacy. 
These felings of inadequacy have been compensated for by 
increased aggression or in manifestations of adolescent 
neurosis. 

Conspicuous in the latter group, and comparable to to- 
day's so-called "rat packs" and "punks," were the so-called 
"zoot-suitcrs" of the 1942 to 1946 era, who expressed their 
defiance of society by assuming a distinctive and erratic at- 
tire. The zoot-suiter is merely a youth of confused sexuality. 



poorly integrated, with a feeling of being rejected by the 
older groups whose lives he could not understand or share. 

All ot us are deeply interested in the problem of juvenile 
delinquency. We cannot ignore it. We recognize that wi 
do not change the world by giant strides or overnight revo- 
lutions. But until we recognize that this is a social as well 
as a legal problem, and that it requires the help of all 
people working in the community for the betterment of 
conditions tor all children, we will be wasting our time. 

We are all familiar with the physically handicapped child. 
The one with the crutches or in the wheel chair, or who 
has some physical defect. We are familiar with the men- 
tally handicapped child. The one with less normal intelli- 
gence, or who may have suffered a brain injury of some 
kind. These two groups we not only are familiar with, but 
we have great sympathy toward them and a tolerant under- 
st.inding of them and their individual problems. 

But in the "socially maladjusted " group, we have not 
tound the capacity within ourselves at all times to recognize 
them as such. We go still farther and steel ourselves against 
that thinking. And yet, can we continue to ignore them, 

(Continutd on fidgc 61 ) 



RAGGIO REED & CO. 

1501 RUSS BUILDING 
SAN FRACISCO, CALIFORNIA 



RUSS 
BUILDING 



235 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Alarih. 1951 



THE SIGN OF THE RED HAND 

By B. C. Bridg];s 



*Th/s article was uiilten jor the Police and Peace Officers' 
journal by B. C. Bridges, internationally-recognized author- 
ity in police science. Retired from active duty, after twenty- 
fire years' service as police executive and university in- 
structor. Mr. Bridges devotes his time to writing in the 




law enforcement field, and is the author of numerous works, 
including the world's leading textbook on personal identifi- 
cation, "Practical Fingerprinting," published by Funk & 
W agnails Company. — Editor. 

The Bibiioteca Nazionale in Florence holds a relic of 
Old Mexico that indicates a somewhat different signifi- 
cance of hands. This is the figure of a deceased Mexican 
warrior, wearing the ornate insignia of the honored dead. 
He is garbed with a headband and plate of turquoise mosaic, 
a penacho of brilliant feather plumes and tye banners of 
the patron god of warriors, Huitzilopochtli. A blue and 
hairless dog has shared the warrior's fate, probably sacri- 
ficed at his master's death. Here also are the gifts for 
Mictlantecutli, Lord of the Dead, and above is painted the 
likeness of a human hand. This symbol was intended to 
represent the hand of a woman who had died in child- 
birth; through obscure and mystic theology, it was believed 
to blazon with spectral radiance, and light the pathway for 
the warrior's soul on its journey outward to a happier 
world beyond. 

The superstition of a dead hand's giving light has existed 
in comparatively recent times. Footpads and other plun- 
derers of Ireland once popularly carried a hand severed 
from some despoiled corpse. This gruesome object they 
would thrust before the fearful eyes of their intended 
victim, in firm belief that it gave out a baneful and unholy 
light that paralyzed the beholder with dread and made him 
easier prey. It is probable that effluvium rather than efful- 



gence caused the repellent effect of what, with true Celtic 
irony, was called the "Hand of Glory." 

The source of this morbid superstition is not known; 
however, it suggests the possible debasement of a tale of 
Irish glory, and of the hero "Red Hugh" O'Neill. An 
open red hand figures prominently in the heraldry of his 
descendants, and is explained poetically. Tradition avows 
that Hugh O'Neill, a bold adventurer of several hundred 
years ago, and the early forebear of one of the five royal 
families of Ireland, once sailed toward certain unclaimed 
territory on the Irish coast. He carried a sealed commission 
from his sovereign ruler to possess these lands for his 
people and his king, but with the express stipulation that 
to acquire the grant, his hand must be the first to touch 
the shore. O'Neill was not alone in this important enter- 
prise, and others vied to gain the valued heritage. With 
goal in sight, O'Neill's vessel had fallen from the lead, 
and although quite near the land, he saw that only drastic 
measures could prevent a rival victory. Undaunted, the 
valorous Irish pioneer seized a heavy battle axe and struck 
off his own hand to fling it with a mighty cast upon the 
waiting shore. He thus kept faith and gained possession 
for his king and his people in an epic gesture of glorious 
audacity. 

Through succeeding centuries, the "Red Hand of Ulster" 
has blazoned on the O'Neill family crest in commemora- 
tion of a valiant deed. In later years, the division of Irish 
Ulster Lands by the English crown created two hundred 
baronets, who were permitted to emplace upon their arms 
the scarlet hand. Certain other British escutcheons also 
bear red-hand signs, but for less salutary reasons. However, 
the symbol of the Red Hand of Ulster still hynms of Hugh 
O'Neill, and of his gallant sacrifice. 

More ambiguously than those of other countries are 
Ireland's historic dramas wrapped in a cloud of fable. Ac- 
cording to the ancient Celtic chronicles, Erin was peopled 
in the fourth century following the Deluge by the Partho- 
lanians, "of the stock of Japhet," led by the parricide, 
Partholan, who is said to have fled from his native Greece 
"in the 60th year of the age of Abraham." 

Subsequent pioneers are recognized in the Nemedians, 
the Fomorians, the Firbolgs, and the Tuatha De Dananna. 
Also, there persists the romance of Queen Ceasair, who is 
said to have landed on the Emerald Shore from eastern 
Europe in the year 2379 B. C, accompanied by fifty women 
and three men, Bith, Ladra, and Fintan. 

The Irish bards and story-tellers of long ago were ever 
prone to recount the marvelous and colorful, and many 
are the curious traditions which have survived to amaze 
posterity. On the sea coast near to Ballysadare in County 
Sligo, Eocha, last king of the Firbolgs, is said to lie buried 
in an ocean cavern from which the tides are mysteriously 
withheld. And Ireland's pagan name, Inisfail, or "Isle of 

(Continued on page 64) 



\f,irrh. /'/</ 



POLK E AND PEACE OFFICERS' lOURNAL 



Prf^f // 



Chico Meeting of No. Cal. Peace Officers 

When the Cit\ ot Chico aiiiiouiiccs it is yoing to be the Sherift CjillicL calleil the meetint; to order and he ami 

host of a meeting ot any group ot peace officers there is Chief Kvans presented numerous guests. The Sheriff 

always a huge turnout. I here is a cause for this desirable said Chief Kvans sure deserved a lot of praise for the nice 

state of aflfairs. That cause is Chief of Police James Kvans dinner, refreshments and program provided for the occa- 

who completes four years as head of the Police Depart- sion. 




Chief James Evans 
Ho$t of Meeting 





I'SDERSHERIFF 

He Gave a H 



ment this coming July. Besides running a fine department, 
giving the city of more than 12,000 prosperous residents 
the best of law enforcement, he has achieved a splendid 
reputation for entertaining his fellow law enforcement 
officers when they gather in the pioneer city of the upper 
Sacramento Valley on numerous occasions. 

So when the Northern California Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation scheduled their January meeting for Chico there 
was a great turnout of Sheriffs, Police Chiefs and mem- 
bers of their respective staffs. They came from every 
county in the area, from Sacramento to the far reaches of 
Quincy. Acting as co-host was Sheriff Larry Gillick of 
Butte County, who came to the meeting with a goodly 
number of his force, and who was elected to the chief law 
enforcement office of the county last November. 

The notice called for those attending to gather at 11:15 
A. \l. in N'etcran's Memorial flail, a beautiful edifice in 
downtown Chico. There were a lot of officers there at 
that hour for cocktails. 

Then shortly after noon over 1 50 men and women sat 
down to the tables in the banquet hall, and were served 
a luncheon rarely enjoyed in these days. I he meal was 
prepared by the Ladies' Guild of the Kpiscopal Church 
under the direction of Mrs. Lydia McWhorter, and the 
piece de resistance was a venison stew. How those ladies 
prepared this great game meat furnished by Game War- 
dens Gene Mercer and A. Wraith, was nothing less than 
perfection. They had a lot of side dishes that were equally 
perfect and the way the hungry horde ilipped into the hot 
biscuits was something to see. 



Sheriff Larry Gillick 
Co- Host 

He called on former Sheriff W. H. Forward of Butte 
County, who he defeated in last year's election for the 
Sheriff's Office. He stated he and Forward were good 
friends and paid tribute to the manner the former sheriff 
had served the county during his long term of office. Sher- 
iff Forward returned with an assurance of the same good- 
will. 

Chief Kvans thanked all those who helped make the oc- 
casion such a success and welcomed all to Chico and told 
(('ontiniic/l on f<nf;r "Aj 

A. J. BORADORI 



819-831 Main Strcr 



(. ALIIUHMA 



Hooper Home Appliances and Refrigerators 

REFRIGERATION SPECIALISTS - COMMERCIAL - INDUSTRIAL 

DOMESTIC - SALES AND SERVICE - EXPERIENCED MECHANICS 

QUALITY PRODUCTS - ASSURED SATISFACTION 

I 230 Bidwclr Avr. Phonrr I 08SW 

CHICO CALIII1RMA 

ART KUHNEN PRECISION SHOP 

CUTOM ENGINE BUILDING 
WE GRIND CRANKSHAKTS IN THE CAR 
2106 Park Avenue Phone 



CALIFORNIA 



REAL ESTATE 



MARKS AND BYRNE 

"INSURANCE ADVISORS- 
MO Weal Second StrrrI Phone 1957 



CALIFORNIA 



POLLAC K STEEL SUPPLY 

STRUCTURAL STEEL ■ PIPE FITTING ■ VALVES 

CASINGS - MACHINERY 

Telephone 1012 and 63«-J 23rd and Park Avenui 



CALIFORNIA 



P.ige 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



Stockton's New Police Chief -J. A. O'Keefe 



Last October City Manager Raymond V. Carey, who 
took over the management of Stockton's municipal govern- 
ment in IVIay, 1950, made a major change in the Police 
Department in naming Sergeant Jack A. O'Keefe as Chief 
of Police, succeeding Chief Richard McHugh who had 
served from April 1, 1949. 




Chief Jalk A. t) Kllh 

Under the local laws of Stockton, if a Police Chief is 
removed, he reverts to the rank held when appointed to 
the top position, so it is now Lieutenant McHugh and he 
is detailed to the robbery division under former Chief Rex 
Parker, and now Captain of Detectives. 

There are now three ex-chiefs in the SPD, besides Cap- 
tain Parker and Lieutenant McHugh there is Lieutenant 
Harold Vogelsang, who served longer than any other po- 
lice chief during the past fifty years for his native city. 

Under City Manager Carey's administration there has 
been a complete change in the police setup in the rich and 
ancient city, the county seat of San Joaquin County. 

Captain Mervin J. Garribotto is now head of the Police 
Training Division. He was formerly in charge of the 
Detective Division. 

In his place in the Detective Division Captain Parker 
was moved from the Record Division, which was filled by 
Lieutenant V. J. Voit, who for years was secretary to the 
Chief of Police. Adele Nigro is the present chief's secre- 
tary. 

Veteran Samuel K. King, formerly of the Traffic Divi- 
sion, is the present head of the Patrol Division, and has 
charge of the day watch. He has two lieutenants on the 
night watches : Lieutenant R. L. Phillips from 5 p. m. to 
1 a. m., and Lieutenant F. A. Grantzow from 1 a. m. to 
8 a. m. 

Lieutenant Vogelsang still handles the juvenile delin- 
quency problems which he has done so well for many years. 



Captain C. A. Monk who for years has been in the 
training and personnel division has been put in charge of 
the Traffic Division. 

Despite the shakeup of the PD it is noteworthy that the 
members all speak well of the present city manager and of 
Mayor Dan W. Morrison and the eight other city coun- 
cilmen. 

Chief O'Keefe was born in Stockton on January 2(J, 
1908. He completed his education in the local schools and 
then went to St. Mary's College, where he graduated in 
1929. During his college days he was a star baseball 
pitcher and outfielder as well as a noted football player, 
and tried out for the Coast League with the Seals, but 
gave up to later become a member of the SPD which he 
joined in 1936. He was promoted to sergeant in 1943. 

He is a rabid baseball fan and is very much interested in 
Stockton's team in the California Baseball League. 

During his 15 years with the Police Department he has 
made a fine record for himself as a law enforcement officer. 

While a patrolman cruising in a prowl car he captured 
a badly wanted robber. He was with the robbery division 
for five years and broke up a gang that was cashing gov- 
ernment checks that had been stolen. He was responsible 
for the arrest of 14. 

Another case was when in 1948 he brought in a major 
buncoman who had worked the old "pigeon drop" many a 



All Rooms 
Completely Air-Conditioned 

HOTEL STOCKTON 

GOLDEN NUGGET ROOM 

DINING ROOM 

SNACK BAR 

• 

COMPLETE CATERING 
SERVICE 

Stockton, California 



Mnrrh. IQ^il 



POLICE AND PKACE OFFICERS lOURNAI. 



?e 13 






C'M'TAis Rex Parker 
In Charge of Detective Division 



Captain Mervin J. Cjarribotto 
Of Police Training Division 



Captain Samuel K. King 
Head of Patrol Division 



time throughout the country. He was incarcerated before 
the "sucker" could get his money from the bank. Sergeant 
O'Keefe got wind ot the attempted bunco game and 
quickly rounded up James Huff. 

Stockton is now a city of some 75,000 people, who are 
made prosperous bv the great variety of crops of vege- 
tables, grains, fruits, asparagus, dairy farms, vineyards and 
wineries, sheep, hogs, poultry and cattle raised on its vast 
fertile acres and which brings in close to $175,000,000 a 




With a city of this size with so many attractions — com- 
mercial, industrial, educational and recreational — there 
must be a good police department. Stockton, in spite of 
frequent changes of its Police Chiefs, has good police pro- 
tection. 

There are 98 regular members of the force and 7 civil- 
ians. All are properly and continually trained in their 
profession. 'Ihey are pretty well paid. 

Patrolmen start with a $297 per month salary and after 
five years it goes to $332. 

Motorcycle riders start at $332 and rises to $352. 

Sergeant's salaries are $371; Lieutenants $41(); Cap- 
tains $464. 

Captain of l)etecti\es Parker has 16 men working with 
him of which three are lieutenants and 10 sergeants. The 
(Cuntinmd on pti);i- 52) 

John Biv.ind» N. Bulum 

M. J. B. c:onstru(:tion co. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Yard and Asphalt Plant, South McKinlry Avenue 

322 Elks BuildlnR Ttlrphonr 2-1520 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Captain C. A. Monk 
Of Traffic Divi«i<.n 

year to the growers and owners. San Joaquin is the fourth 
richest farming county in the I'nited States. From the 
I'ort of Stockton from which ocean going vessels sail there 
is carried from or brought in a large tonnage to and from 
all points of the world. I^ast January the tonnage was 
60,538 outbound cargoes antl 5S,0S0 inbound. 'Ihe total 
is 27 percent over Januar\- of 1 950. 



PAINTING • DECORATING • SPRAY PAINTING 
PAHERHANGING • SIGNS 

J. F. ECKER 

GENERAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

Phonr 3-2479 418 E. Lnfayrllr SirrrI 

STOCKTON CALIIORNIA 

(;ec;il bell 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 

Standard Oil Prodiicis - Allan Tiro and Baltrrir* - Lubrication 

Auto Wathing - Tirr and Ballrry Service 

Phonr 2-9783 12SO N. Wilion Way 

ST(X K ION TALIKORNIA 

VALLEY SHOWCASE AND FIXTL'RE CO. 

STORE FIXTURES - CHURCH FIXTURES - OFFICE FIXTURES 

SPECIAL CABINET WORK 

OHice and Factory <)2I FrrmonI SirrrI 

TEI.EPIIONK 1 t»»2 Slot KVdN. I ALIIOHNIA 



Srot KTON 



HOTEL TERRY 



19 N. American Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



M^irch. 1951 



Peninsula Police Officers Association January Meeting 



The first 1951 meeting of the Peninsula Police Officers 
Association was held on the evening of January 25, at 
Uncle Tom's Cabin in San Bruno. There was a large 
turnout of members, every city in San Mateo County and 
Mountain View and Sunnyvale was represented by their 
respective police officers. 




At Annual Installation of Officers of Peninsula Police Associa- 
tion, Judge Edmund Scott congratulates President Fernandez 
whom he swore in. Retiring President Donald Lowe at left. 

It was also the first meeting presided over by the officers 
elected for this year. 

At 7:00 P. M. some 50 officers and their guests sat 
down to the table for an excellent steak dinner, and it was 
tops as are all meals served at Uncle Tom's Cabin. Mov- 
ing into their new place of business has not lessened the 
quality of its food or the service. 

The meal concluded, outgoing President Donald Lowe, 
San Carlos Police Department, called the meeting to 
order. He announced the new officers elected for the pres- 
ent year would be : 

President — Sergeant Adolph Fernandez, San Bruno 
Police Department. 

First Vice President — Officer Fred Caviglia, Burlin- 
game Police Department. 

Second Vice President — Officer Phillip Bray, Redwood 
City's Police Department, 3-wheeler engineer. 

Recording Secretary — Lieutenant Lawrence Furio, 
Burlingame Police Department. 

Financial Secretary — Captain John J. Hartnett, Bur- 
lingame Police Department, who has served more than 
22 years as secretary of the Association. 

Treasurer — Chief Leroy Hubbard, Athertoii Police 
Department. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Officer Robert Hintermann, Bur- 
lingame Police Department. 

During his term President Lowe has had one of the 
most successful years of any of its more than 23 years' 
existence. 

The membership grew to an all time high of 205. 



The annual ball last fall was the biggest ever held dur- 
ing the history of the Association, and inore money was 
derived from this annual show for the benefit of widows 
and orphans of police officers and the health and hospital 
plan now in effect, than any previous event. 

Officer Lowe thanked every member for the fine sup- 
port he had received, and was particularly grateful for the 
work of each committee serving during his term of office. 
He said it was a grand example of teamwork. 

Judge Edmund Scott, who was the special guest of the 
occasion was presented. Judge Scott, who served 24 years 
as assistant district attorney before becoming a superior 
judge pointed out that since the time he first started public 
service in San Mateo County there have been many changes 
in law enforcement. He pointed out that then there were 
but few automobiles used by peace officers, and that they 
had no teletypes, no two- or three-way radio for patrol 
cars, and the personnel was not trained as the members are 
today in every forward looking police department. He 
claimed that by the actions and the unselfish manner each 
police officer performs his duty today, he has made their 
vocation one that designates it as a profession. 

The new officers were then installed. Judge Scott in- 
ducted Sergeant Fernandez. 

New President Fernandez made a neat speech, thank- 
ing the members for electing him to the high post. 

He then presented Mayor Leslie C. White and Dr. J. 
D. Livington. 

A pleasurable surprise was sprung on the assemblage 
when Harry Marquard, the well known drive-in restau- 
rant operator and an honorary member of the Association, 
presented on behalf of himself and his wife, a check for 
$2500 to be used by the Association for charitable work. 
It is needless to say it was gratefully received and the 
donors thanked for such a substantial demonstration on 
the part of the well liked Marquards. 

This writer was called upon for a few remarks. 

By a mail vote of the entire membership it was decided 
not to change the by-laws so that members of the San 
Mateo Sheriff's Office could join the Police Association. 

President Fernandez announced the following would 
serve with Officer Lowe as members of the board of di- 
rectors : 

Chief R. C. Theuer, Burlingame; Officer Sterling 
Thomas, San Carlos ; Sergeant Russell Cunningham, San 
Bruno and Officer George McLean, San Mateo. 

Burlingame will be host for the February daytime meet- 
ing. 

THE CALIFORNIA 

George Russell. Prop. 
BEER ON AND OFF SALE - WINES - LUNCH 

CIGARS - CIGARETTES 
1716 MacDonald Ave. Phone B 

RICHMOND 

INSURANCE SECURITIES, INC. 



OAKLAND 



2063 Franklin Street 



CALIFORNIA 



March. 1051 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page n 



Sergt. Fernandez Heads Peninsula Police Officers Assn.' 



Sergoant Ailolph, Fernandez, of the San Hruno Police 
Department, who is the current President of the Penin- 
sula Police Officers' Association has come a long way in 
law enforcement since he joined the San Bruno P. I), in 
1942. He has justly earned the respect, of not only his 
fellow police officers in the S. B.P.I)., but to all those in 




Sergeant .Adoi.I'H Fernandez 

the Bay Area having to do with enforcing the law of the 
land. He is niightly highly esteemed by the people resid- 
ing in San Bruno where he first showed up in 1935 as a 
carpenter. 

Born in Ma/.atlan, Mexico, on April 10, 1900, became 
with his parents to San Francisco when he was 2 years 
old. 'Fhe family settled in Butchertown. Here young Fer- 
nandez got his grammar school education finishing up b\ 
graduating from Mission High School. He took up car- 
pentering as his trade and followed that line so success- 
fully that he was soon made a foreman and for eight years 
worked on many building projects in San Francisco. In 
1935, with the building boom hitting San Bruno he trans- 
ferred his activities to that outstanding little peninsula 
city, commuting to his work. 

Finally he decided law enforcement as a good thing for 
a young man and so he joined the S. B.P.I), under the 
present Chief William Maher. 

He served well in this new endeavor, so well that when, 
in 1947, the city council decided to enlarge the number of 
sergeants from one to three, he was one of those appointeil 
to the newly created posts. 

He has seen a lot of tragedies among the S. B.P.I), and 
has participated in one that nearly cost him his life. 

.\ couple of punk kids, in 1947, stole a car over in San 
Rafael, went over to San Leandro and held up a Japanese 
service station, came across the San Mateo Bridge and 
pulled another holdup in Burlingame. The license number 
of the car was obtained and it was broadcast to all penin- 



sula police departments. Officer Fernandez got the num- 
ber of the car over his car's radio, and suddenly the car 
flashed by. Officer F'ernandez was alone in his automobile 
but he gave chase and the chase led to the Southworth 
Tract in South San Fraticisco. The fleeing bandits turned 
into the wide driveway entrance and were somewhat sur- 
prised to find themselves in a circular drive, and they 
started for the place they came in. Officer Fernandez who 
was hot on their trail came into the Southworth entrance 
just as the two youths were getting ready to leave. The 
cars came together headon. 

Though momentarily knocked unconscious Officer Fer- 
nandez came to his senses and found he had one of the 
bandits in custody. The other was so badly injured he 
could hardly move. Soon help arrived and all three of 
the injured were taken to the hospital. 

The bums eventually went to prison where they be- 
longed, but Officer FVrnandez, after motitbs in the hospi- 
tal, was two and a half years getting on his feet again. 
He also lost five teeth. 

He, too, worked on the case of the two men who mur- 
dered a San Francisco used car dealer, and who were cor- 
nered in San Bruno, shooting Officer Bedford. One got 
away and the other was captured a short time after the 
shooting. The one who escaped was later captured and 
brought to justice. 

In 1935 Sergeant Fernandez married Miss .Nina Ries- 
wig of Lodi. The couple have three children, Adolph, 15, 
attending high school ; Ronald, 8, and Barbara Ann, b. 

He is a member of the Bay Comities' Peace Officers' 
Association, the State Peace Officers' Association, Bay 
Counties' Identification Association, California Division 
of the National Association of Identification and, of 
course, the Peninsula Police Officers' Association. 

In addition to his other police duties he is now head of 
the communication division of the Civilian Defense of 
San Bruno, 



THE BARREL MARKET 



4079 Et Camino Way 



PALO ALTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Anne Lippi, Prop. Res. Phone 24 10 

SHORT'S FLOWER SHOP 



Geno Gatlaviini. M(r 



1210 Fin! Sir 



NAPA 



I ALIFORNIA 



Phone 15 71 

REIF AND BRODY 

POULTRY DEALERS 
715 MAIN STREET PETALUMA. CALIF 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



Santa Cruz Tops in Civilian Defense 

By Peter Heller, Police Reporter, Niws-Sintinil 



During the fateful days of December, 1941, the San 
Francisco Chronicle ran a lengthy feature in its This 
ll'orld section, entitled "They Can't Invade Santa Cruz." 
The story was prompted by the amazing civil defense 
organization that had been diligently and thoroughly pre- 




Chief Al Huntsman 

pared in the beautiful resort city on Monterey Bay, and 
which sprung into being at a moment's notice when war 
came. 

Hero of the story was the man principally responsible 
for the setup which made Santa Cruz a pattern and exam- 
ple for civil defense during World War II. He was Al 
Huntsman, then as now Chief of Police of Santa Cruz, 
whose vision and organizing ability not only caused the 
Chronicle's feature story, but also came to the attention 
of the man who then was attorney general of California: 
Earl Warren. Warren requested and got an outline of 
Huntsman's system which was later used in formulation 
of statewide plans. 

With war blazing in Korea, and the international pic- 
ture becoming steadily darker, civil defense has once again 
become the watchword throughout the land, and particu- 
larly along our Western sea frontier. And once again. 
Chief Al Huntsman stands ready to help Santa Cruz at- 
tain the highest possible standards in civil defense organi- 
zation. 

One of the projects closest to his heart is the formation 
and thorough training of a police reserve capable of assum- 
ing uniformed duty at a moment's notice. To this end. 
Huntsman order his officers to bring in personal recruits 
who were screened as candidates for the reserve force. 
Thus, the 30 men finally chosen already have ties with 
members of the active police department, thereby insuring 
conformance, and facilitating the best collaboration in the 
future. 



L'niforms and equipment have been purchased by au- 
thorization of the city council, but they will only be issued 
after the reservists have passed through a full 40-hour 
basic police training course conducted under Chief Hunts- 
man's personal supervision. Characteristically, the group 
was so enthusiastic at its first meeting that it turned down 
the proposal to hold training classes once a week, and 
asked that classes be taught twice a week, in view of the 
urgency of civil defense. This cuts the basic course from 
20 to 10 weeks, at which time uniforms and equipment 
will be issued. 

It is visualized that the basic training course will be fol- 
lowed by first aid courses, as well as special disaster train- 
ing. The police reser\c, howe\cr, is only the nucleus for 




Sergeant .'\nthonv M. Valine 

the police force that must be available if and when disas- 
ter strikes. Once the reservists are trained, every member 
of the group will be asked to recruit a number of men as 
"auxiliary police." Each reservist will be responsible for 
"his" auxiliaries, which are to be used to direct evacuation 
traffic and similar duties. 

Similar programs are being conducted in other phases 
of the disaster organization, whose over-all director is 
veteran Police Sergeant Anthony M. Valine, a Huntsman 
nominee. "Duke" Valine gained fame as Ail-American 
guard on the Santa Clara football team in 1927, and has 
made a name for himself locally by his efficient direction 
of the police department's traffic bureau during the past 
few years. He is now "on loan" to the city manager as full 
time defense director. 

Valine's major problem now is to recruit a sufficient 
number of qualified men to staff the higher echelons in the 
warden service and other branches of the organization. 
The many contacts developed during his performance of 
his police duties now pay off in recruitment. 

While still in its early stages, the Santa Cruz Ci\ il De- 
fense Organization nevertheless is radily growing, thanks 
(Continued on page 23) 



Mrinh. 1051 



POLICE AND PEACi: OEEICERS' lOURNAL 



Page 17 



Prisons and Prisoners in National Defense 

AJJress b) former S. I'. C'/'vi / Ci'.'.irU' 11 '. DnlU.i. iioir of Sl.i/e AJull Aiilhmtly. before ihe Slate I'eiiie Ojjuers ill 
iheir annutil coiiteiilion tail Otioher in Pasadena. 



I have stated that the prison tommunity usually has op- 
portunities tor vocational and educational training. Educa- 
tion, like medicine, social \vork, and other professions has 
been introduced into prison as a means of improving the 
personalities and economic abilities of the inmates. All of 
this, of course, in the hope that they will be encouraged 
to live law abiding and productive lives. 




Former Chikk Ch ari es W. Dui.i.ea 

World War II saw a tremendous increase in prison 
education, particularly vocational training. Men and women 
were trained for a variety of skills and occupations. Among 
these were machine shop, welding, drafting, plumbing, 
construction trades, cooking for Merchant Marine, aircraft 
production and maintenance. 

Men and women so trained were an added asset to prison 
war work, and to the needs of civilian war plants. 

As our country faces the task of arming ourselves and our 
allies to preserve peace, prison education continues to be 
concerned with the improvement of the minds and skills of 
future workers in industry and agriculture. 

Our experience in World War II gives us another ex- 
ample in which prisoners have helped national defense. 
Historically prisoners and ex-prisoners have been banned 
from ser\ing with the armed forces of our country. In 
19-<1 Federal legislations were provided to permit the Set- 
retary of War to admit prior felons into the armed forces. 
Selective Ser\'ice regulations were adjusted to permit some 
induction, and eventually not only ex-prisoners but actual 
prisoners (carefully screened and sckxted) were inducted. 

More than 100,()()() men with criminal records saw serv- 
ice during World War II. Their military careers, in the 
whole, compared favorably with that of the general popu- 
lation. 

I have outlined briefly some area in which prisons and 
prisoners have already demonstrated their value to national 
defense, particularly during World War II. Now I would 
like to mention some ways in which prisons and prisoners 



might function in meeting current and future national de- 
fense needs. 

One important example is the work accomplished by 
prisoners in camps. Among the most promising aspects of 
modern correctional work has been the increased use of 
camps. Federal, State and County governments have made 
splendid progress in this field. The placement of carefully 
selected adult and youthful offenders into camps has proven 
to be of benefit to both the men so placed and to society. 

From these camps the prisoners have done such work as 
road building, re-forcstation, fire prevention and fire fight- 
ing, as well as the expansion of public parks. 

The worth of such camps in the realm of national defense 
is obvious. Here are able bodied, trained men operating 
under regular forest rangers to form crews skilled at fight- 
ing and preventing forest fires. In our State, camps oper- 
ated by the Department of Corrections, the Youth Author- 
ity, as well as individual counties, have over a period of 
years compiled a splendid record in fire suppression. 
Prisoner fire fighters have been on firelines from the Oregon 
border to San Diego County. 

Certainly our vast forest resources are in danger from 
incendiary attack by airborne enemy or even saboteurs. Our 
prison camps stand as a line of protection against such 
disaster and can be expanded to meet greater demands in 
their proven capacity. 

Much of the planning for civilian defense against pos- 
sible atomic attack recognizes that a bombed city will have 
to depend upon assistance from nearby communities that 
are themselves unscathed. The actual experience of Hiro- 
shima and Nagasaki was such that much of these cities' 
ability to help themselves was destroyed or crippled by 
atomic blast and fire. 

A prison, with its facilities and population properh 
mobilized, could do much to assist a disaster strickenc.l 
community. 

For example, groups of prisoners might be used to fight 
(ire or dear away <langerous debris. The prison hospital, 
( C'inliriKid on page 50) 



Phone PRospect 5-S.^2.S 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON 
MOTORCYCLES 

Dudley Perkins Co. 

.SVz/f.v tiuii Sen ice 
655 ELLIS STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIFORNIA 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 19"^ I 



= BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chikf R. C. Theuer, BmliiiKamc P. D., Pnnhlcni Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



All bi-monthly meetings of the Bay Counties' Peace It was a meeting noted for an instructive and construct- 

Ofificers' Association are gatherings of law enforcement ive demonstration in traffic safety provided by Warden 

officers that bring a lot of members to each meeting, and Duffy in cooperation with the Yellow Cab Company of 

these meetings do much to promote closer cooperation and San Francisco, 

act as spearheads for various programs affecting the peace As in all former sessions at the prison a luncheon was 




Chief R. C. (Jack) Theuer Captain Bern 

and security of the Bay Area. But there are two fixed 
meetings each year that have become recognized as the 
best of them all. They are the barbecue held at Coyote 
Point started by the late Chief Thomas Burke of San 
Mateo and continued after his death by the Chief of Police 
of that town, Martin C. McDonnell, assisted by Burlin- 
game and Hillsborough Police Chiefs R. C. Theuer and 
Walter Wisnom in late summer, and the meeting hosted 
by Warden Clinton T. Duffy at San Quentin held during 
January each year. 

The session of the Association held last month at San 
Quentin was one of the largest in attendance that the 
Association has ever had. 

^Varden Duffy and his assistants went all out to make 
it one of the best in the organization's history. 

It was also the annual election of officers meeting, and 
a new corps of officers were elected and installed. 

It was also the occasion for honoring a member who has 
been with the Association since its inception and has served 
as medical offier for the biggest prison in the world for 38 
years, Dr. Leo L. Stanley, who is retiring in March as 
Chief medical officer for the institution. 



ARD McDonald Warden Clinton T. Duffy 

served in the officers quarters that was perfect in all de- 
tails, a fine menu, well served by inmate waiters, and 
nicely decorated tables to which some 200 peace officers 
sat down. An orchestra of prison inmates played music 
and there were some songs and all were given big applause. 

Chief Frank Kelly of San Rafael, who has served so 
efficiently during the year 1950, called the meeting to 
order after the diners had finished their desserts. 

With introductions of various members and guests pres- 
ent, by Chief Kelly and Warden Duffy — the latter pre- 
senting former Chief Charles Dullea and Walter Gordon 
of the Adult Authority, Dr. Stanley, Assistant ^Varden 
Harry Teets, Chaplain Rudolph I. Coffee, Dr. D. C. 
Schmidt, Secretary E. A. Burkhardt, Dr. J. K. Fuller, 
who succeeds Dr. Stanley, and others of his official staff — 
the President called for the reading of the minutes of the 
November meeting, by Secretary Bernard McDonald. 

There were 23 applicants for membership and five were 
voted from the last meeting's applicants. The 23 made at 
the January session will be voted on at the next meeting. 

The nominating committee was called to present the 
names of members proposed to fill the offices for the com- 



At„rrl,. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' lOURNAL 



Page 19 



ing year. Sheritt Daniel .Murphy, Chief Donald Wood, 
San Ansehno and Chief Walter Wisnom, Hillsborough, 
submitted the following as the committee's nominees: 

President — Chief R. C. Theuer, Burlingame. 

\'ice President — Chief Lester Divine, Oaklaml. 

Secretary- 1 reasurer — Captain Bernard McDonald, 
San Francisco. 

All were unanimously elected, and were duly installed. 

Chief Wisnom installed the new president, and in his 
preliminary speech said it was indeed a pleasure to have 
such an assignment. He recounted he had known Chief 
* Theuer for over 30 years and ever since he and the new 
President had been in police work he had found Chief 
Theuer giving the utmost in aid and assistance to all fel- 
low officers. He told how Burlingame's Chief had taken 
a leading part in law enforcement in San Mateo County 
and has had much to do with the high perfection of police 
service for the county. 

Then occurred an incident that has never happened be- 
fore in the over 20 years history of the Association. City 
Councilman (J. S. Simonds, Jr., and Police Commissioner 
for Burlingame approached the chair. In a sincere talk 
he said that his fellow councilmen. Mayor Dan R. Love, 
Jr.. Allan Hunt, Andrew C. Byrd and H. Kent Atwatcr 
were so highly pleased with the selection of their Police 
Chief as President of the Association that they desired to 
show their appreciation. He said he was pleased that Chief 
Theuer had been given such significant recognition for his 
service as a peace officer, by his fellow members, because 
through his long tenure with the BPD and years as Chief 
he had served his city in an excellent manner. 

He then presented the new president with a fine gavel, 
the first of its kind ever given to the Association. 

Chief Theuer thanked the Association, Chief Wisnom 
and Police Commissioner Simonds for their kind consider- 
ation. 

Captain Bernard McDonald who so ably has filled his 
important office since his election in 1940 starts his 12th 
year in that office and he certainly got a big hand with 
his installation. 

Chief Divine is also second vice president of the State 
Peace Officers' Association. He knows the score and will 
do a good job when he steps into the top spot next Janu- 
ary. 

President Theuer expressed the thanks of the Associa- 
tion for the splendid administration of Chief Kelly and 
Chief Kelly replied by saying he was very grateful for the 
support he had received from every officer in the organiza- 
tion. 

Divisional Deputy John Greening of Alameda's County 
Sheriff II. P. Gleason's staff and secretary-treasurer of 
the State Peace Officers' Association was called upon, and 
he urged all heads of law enforcement agencies in this 
area to have as many of their personnel sent to the Police 
Training Course conducted at Alameda's Prison i'arm at 
Santa Rita, and starting in early February. 

He also gave some information on the status of police 
ra<lio. 

The new president then called on Waidcn Duff\ who 



was to present Dr. Stanley. The Warden s.nd that during 
nearly four decades Dr. Stanley had servetl the prison in a 
manner unsurpassed by any other institution, penal or 
otherwise. He had had the opportunity of watching Dr. 
Stanley's progress from the time of his appointment 38 
years ago to the time of his retirement as Chief Surgeon 
of the prison, because the Warden was born on the San 
Quentin reservation and has lived there ever since his 
birth. He declared the Doctor had done a wonderful job. 

In replying Dr. Stanley said after his graduating as an 
-M.D. he came to San Quentin to serve in the hospital at 
the princely salary of $75.00 per month. 

He told some stories of prisoners who tried to escape 
and with humor entertained his audience with various 
phases of prison life which he observed during his long 
tenure at the penitentiary. He has seen a lot of men come 
and go during those 38 years, and he has done a lot to 
bring thousands back to good health. 

He served four years with the U. S. Navy seeing duty 
in the Pacific war area. He will engage in private practice 
and will enjoy his fine 10-acre ranch back of Fairfax. 

Prior to the meeting of the Yellow Cab had a demon- 
stration cab ready to demonstrate one phase of the course 
of training each driver has to take before he gets a job 
piloting a taxicab. The demonstration was under the di- 
rection of Clifford Randall, C. L. Srack and John Brooks. 
What they showed was something worth seeing. Srack 
also gave a fine talk about the subject. A separate story 
will be found on another page of this fine exhibition. 

The following Chiefs were present at this meeting : 
Michael Gaffey, San Francisco; Chief Divine, Chief Kelly, 
V. E. ^Varren, Benicia ; S. C. ^Villiams, Albany; Frank 
Farina and former Chief Louis .Mann, Emeryville, James 
W. Lyall, Belmont: William L. Maher, San Bruno; Louis 
Belloni, South San Francisco ; Chief Wisnom, Chief 
Theuer, Leroy Hubbard, Atherton ; George Potter, Menlo 
Park; Donald Wood, San Anselmo; James Doyle, Sausa- 
lito; Jack E. Stiltz, Vallejo; E. F. Phipps, Richmond. 

Lieutenant George Seely was with Chief Edward 
Wheeler of San Carlos, and Assistant Chief J. M. Carter 
pinchhit for Chief J. R. Blackmore of San Jose. 
(Continued on f'S'' -f^) 



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Phonr HUmboldt 3-2500 

lALIFORNIA 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



^^ ^^^^ ^ San Francisco = 



5== PEACE OFFICERS' 



(Copyright, 1931. 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco 3, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted to 
the Interests of 
SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 
THE GARDA REVIEW .... 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

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IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or who 
cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 .a 



SHERIFF H. P. GLEASON WARNS ON 
COMMIES 

When Sheriff H. P. (Jack) Gleason of Alameda Coun- 
ty gives a picture of the menace of Communism, particu- 
larly to the State of California and the Bay Area, the 
people had better pay attention to what he says, and get 
into action to stop various means that Communists have to 
promote their ungodly idealism. 

As Sheriff of Alameda County for many years, a past 
president of the State Peace Officers' Association, the Cali- 
fornia Sheriff's Association and the Bay County Peace 
Officers' Association, Jack Gleason has become recognized 
among law enforcement officers as an outstanding author- 
ity on communism, its purposes, its modus operandi, its 
aims to be attained by sabotage, infiltration, with all 
groups, and efforts to get government secrets of every 
usable kind. 

Not only has he acquired a comprehensive mass of infor- 
mation about these destroyers of democratic government, 
but he is a forceful speaker, able to impart his vast knowl- 
edge. 

As head of the civilian defense program for the Bay 
Area counties, and as a coordinator of the various police 
agencies, he has embarked on the patriotic duty he has as- 
sumed in addition to running the second largest sheriff's 
office in the state, with a will and vim that is unsurpassed 



by an\' other chief peace officer in this state or countr\'. 

Referring to the opening paragraph, and to illustrate 
how important it is to hearken to his warnings we call 
attention to an address Sheriff Gleason made during Feb- 
ruary to the American League Service Club at a luncheon 
meeting in Oakland. 

He declared members of the Communist party are try- 
ing to infiltrate Alameda County's civilian defense and 
auxiliary police organizations for the purpose of destroy- 
ing its effectiveness. 




Sheriff H. P. (Jack) Gleason 

He said there were about 1500 communists in the Bay 
Area and they carry more weight than their numbers indi- 
cate. He told of how they endeavored to extend their evil 
influence through movies, radio, schools and minor racial 
groups. 

He stated the orders to members to get into civilian de- 
fense organizations and auxiliary police departments were 
given at secret meetings held in Oakland and Richmond 
in January. He warned it was up to constituted police 
officials to screen all joining for civilian defense to see that 
no marauders of Moscow get a foothold in the defense 
plan. 

Subversives he said don cloaks of respectability, and their 
fellow travelers and wouldbe intellectuals are more dan- 
gerous than soap box agitators. 

With this passel on warning it is imperative that all 
leaders throughout the state, handling civlian defense get 
on their horses and see that these soulless destructors of 
liberty are thwarted in their nefarious program which calls 
for the destruction of the United States by any and ever\- 
foul means. 

The Sheriff said so far no Commies have gotten into 
any organization for civilian defense. Let us be sure to 
keep it that way. 

HARVEY M. BERGLUND 



338-340 Se 

SANTA ROSA 



Telephone 358 



CALIFORNIA 



March. I'J5I 



POLICE AND PEACE OEEICERS JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Director of Traffic Eker on Radio Program 



Captain Jack Kker, San Francisco I'olicc Dcpaitnii-nt 
Director of Traffic, aired his views on the Sutter Street 
congestion problem to a large number of San Franciscans, 
January lb, when he was the guest of Jane Todd's radio 
show on station KCBS at 5:15 p.m. 




Jiinf Ii'cld, KCIJS Wiitmii's OinimcntatDr, and Dirictor of 

TraHic Jack Eker, SFPD, during a recent interview cm the C'ol- 

uinhia Broadcastiti); Sy>tetn's Bay Area >tation. 

Jane Todd's woman's show on the Columbia Broad- 
casting System's key station in the Hay Area is the most 
popular woman's program in San Francisco according to 
Pulse radio surveys, so Fker was heard by many people. 

Captain Jack appeared to help in the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce's publicity drive to help increase 
the flow of traffic on Sutter Street. 

He started his remarks by pointing out that 250,000 
automobiles come into the downtown area of San Fran- 
cisco every weekday between 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. 
While lots and garages ha\e parking space for approxi- 
mately 35,000, and take care of 100,000 cars during the 
day. that still leaves 150,000 cars roaming. 

Mrs. 'I'odd interjected to point out that the traffic on 
the 400 block on Sutter was very annoying to her as a 
driver. 

Kker replied: "The crowiled condition of Sutter is 
typified by that block. The Sir Francis Drake garage and 
the 450 Sutter garage across the street create a tremen- 
dous traffic problem because of the number of motorists 
who use them throughout the da>-. We are, however, 
changing the bus zone locations which will help." 

I he balatice of the interview in question and answer 
form was as follows: 



1 (xlil : "What are \()ur oM-rall plans to ease this 
congestion ? " 

Kker: "1 am going to recommend that more one-way 
streets be set aside as they can handle 60 or 70 percent 
more traffic, and work for more synchronization of signals. 
When we can modernize Market, replacing the Wiley 
signals with more recent types, traffic will speed up." 

Todd : "Why is there so much more traffic when it is 
raitung?" 

Kker: "Monday and Friilay are the hea\ iest traffic 
da\s ami w hen it is raiin'ng there are about 10 per cent 
more cars dountowii. Add to that the fact that people 
(iri\e slower in the rain and you have more congestion — 
especially on Monday and Friday." 

Todd: "Sometimes it's hard to see an officer in the 
rain. What are you doing about that?" 

I'.ker: "We'\e found that yellow is the most visible 
color in the rain. Therefore all traffic officers will wear 
Nciiow overlays over their raincoats." 

1 odd : "What causes most of your traffic accidents?" 

I'.ker: ".Most accidents are caused by violations of the 
right of way. If motorists and pedestrians would yield the 
right-of-way more often, many accidents would be pre- 
vented." 

1 odd: "What can we women and mothers do to help 
>ou ?" 

l-.ker: "Mothers can help immeasureably by continuing 
to educate their children to cross streets in the lanes and 
watch out whenever they are in the street. We haven't 
liad an\ youngster hurt when crossing with the Junior 
School Patrols in San Francisco, but last year 263 chil- 
dren under four years of age, 450 in the 5-9 year group 
and 195 from 10-14 years were injured in traffic accidents 
on the streets. Proper training is essential." 

I odd: "'IVll me >our main piece of advice for motor- 
ists and pedestrians." 

Kker: "( )bser\e the f lolden Rule." 



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Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



LIEUTENANT ANDERSON BOSS OF 
CHINATOWN DETAIL 

When Chief Michael Gaffey, on talving o\er his high 
job, decided to put a commissioned officer in charge of the 
Chinatown Detail, he selected Lieutenant Harold E. An- 
derson, who has been a member of the SFPD for over 22 
years, to succeed Inspector George O'Leary who has been 
in charge of the detail for the past three years. 

During his more than a generation as a police officer 




March. I'J'il 



maintain the 



Lieutenant Anderson and his detail 
splendid record of Inspector Manion. 

He was born in San Francisco and after finishing his 
schooling became a motorman on the old Market Street 
Railway. He joined the police department on October 
29, 1928, became a sergeant on May 11, 1940, and a lieu- 
tenant on March 11, 1949. 



Lieutenant Harold F. Anderson 
Lieutenant Anderson has worked in nearly every police 
district in the city, and at headquarters and in the Traffic 
Bureau as well. In every assignment he has faced his vari- 
ous details with intelligence and understanding. He has 
long been classed as a mighty able and good officer. He will 
do a good job on the tough Chinatown assignment. 

For more than the past 50 years the Chinatown Detail 
has been under non-commissioned officers and for the past 
nearly 33 years under an Inspector. Prior to 1916 a cor- 
poral was selected to handle the problems of the Chinese 
sector, which has more people of that race than any city 
outside of China itself. 

Up until 1915 there was much more than gambling to 
attract the attention of the police department. There was 
narcotics, continual fatal tong wars, and slave girls smug- 
gled into the country and bartered to powerful interests. 
A corporal usually served three or four months and his 
term was a lively one indeed. 

Then the late Chief White decided to put a detective 
sergeant in charge, and they served for short periods too, 
until when the late Chief Daniel O'Brien took over he 
selected Inspector John J. Manion, a decent, honest and 
capable policeman, to take charge of the Chinatown 
Squad. Inspector Manion assumed his new duties on 
March 21, 1921, and he stayed on the job until April 1, 
1946 when he took his pension. He stopped tong wars ; he 
stopped the opium dens and traffic ; he stopped gambling, 
except the sneak kind ; and he left after his long and honor- 
able hitch in Chinatown, the most beloved man ever to 
come into the Chinese people's lives. 



KING HOTEL 



44 Third Str 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



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778 Brannan Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ST. JAMES HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



87 Third Str 



CALIFORNIA 



MARTEX FRENCH LAUNDRY 

HOME OF THE DE LUXE FINISH WORKS 
1163 Geneva Ave. Phone DElaware 3-9498 

SAN FRANCISCO 



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CALIFORNIA 



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RAY DUCA - Liquors 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



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PURDY'S UNION SERVICE 



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WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 

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MERCHANDISING - REPAIRING - CONTRACTING 



Phone 13 and 14 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



962 Monterey Street 



CALIFORNIA 



M,;,rl,. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFEICERS' JOURNAL 



Pctge 23 



LIEUTENANT MOODY HEADS MISSING 
PERSONS BUREAU 

Liciirenaiit Kilwanl J. Moo(l\. who has scr\C(l 14 of liis 
16 yt-ars as a member of the SFIM) in the Traffic Mureaii, 
was called on by Chief Michael Gafifey and Chief of In- 
spectors James P^nglish to take over command of the Miss- 
ing Persons Bureau of 1 1 inspectors. Lieutenant Moody 
fills the vacancN' as head of the Bureau occasioned by the 
sudden death of Lieutenant Timothy Burke, early this 
vcar. 



1 he three officers won meritorious service awards, for 
their alertness. 




LiEUTESAST Edward J. Moody 

Lieutenant Moody was born in Monterey, February 
19, 1909, but came to San Francisco while a boy where he 
got his education. 

After following bookkeeping for a time he joined the 
SFPI) on March 4, 1935. He was assigned to headquar- 
ters, thence to the old Bayview Station, where he served 
until July 21, 1937, when he was assigned to the traffic 
bureau. Being good with figures he became an important 
member of that unit, preparing statistics on all traffic mat- 
ters and keeping track of all problems that called for rec- 
ords. In 1944 he won a scholarship in the Northwestern 
L'lu'versity Traffic Institute and took the 12 weeks course. 

He won his sergeant's stripes on January 1, 1944. and 
was inade a lieutenant on July 1, 1950. 

While working the Bayview district in a radio patrol 
car with Officers Ray Cooper and Thomas Brodmerkel, 
during the brutal escapades of the so-called "Baby Ban- 
dits," wanted for nuirder and a series of robberies. Officer 
M'Kxly took part in the capture of the two holdup men. 
1 he suspects took it in high when they observeil the police 
car coming after them. .Moody and his companions thf)ught 
they were the Baby Bandits and intended to find out for 
sure. When the suspects spee(le<l up the police car was also 
speeded up, and a shotgun blast from Officer .Moody 
brought the speeding car to a halt. Ihe two men in the 
car were not the Baby Bandits, but were two bandits who 
earlier had held up a man downtown, forced them into 
their automobile and took him to an isolated spot on Twin 
Peaks and robbed him of his mniie\ and je«elr\. 



MAYOR ROBINSON ON ATOM BOMBS 

( ('.'jnlliilKtl Irani piKjc 4) 
through the lungs by inhalation, through the skin and mu- 
cous membranes, such as those of the eye. 

I ha\e recited these dangers to you, first because at all 
costs wc must be realists; but secondly, they need no em- 
bellishments of mine, or indeed of any man's, to convince 
you and to convince every person of the dimensions and the 
scope of the problem of Civil Defense. 
(To Re Continued) 



SANTA CRUZ TOPS IN CIVILIAN 
DEFENSE 

( Continiitd Iroin f>iige 16) 
to the a\ailability of experienced personnel and successful 
application of the "Huntsman Plan." Again, the Police 
Department has taken over the leadership in this effort, 
and Santa Cruz is confident that the old headline of 1941 
still holds true, anil tliat the conimunit\ will be prepared 
for all e\enrualities. 

NEW AND USED OAK BARRELS. CORKS. CROCKS 

J. & J. Liquor Store and Cider Shop 

THE DEPOT OF ALL WINES 

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Phone KEIlog 2-8024 1204 Fruitvair Av?nue 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

S. KULCHAR & CO. 

Eighth Avenue and East Tenth Street 

OAKLAND CALIKORNIA 



WEST C:OAST SOAP CO. 

Phone HIgate 4 0445 
ffice and Factory 26th and Poplar Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



DR. E. A. RODIER 

DOG AND CAT SPECIALIST 
Hospital K£ 2-9172 Res. KE 4-5202 



)56l FOOTHILL BLVD. 



OAKLAND I, CALIF 



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Phone 202 PSA Monterey Strefl 

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/'"A" 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



San Luis Obispo*s Chief Heidorn a Police Veteran 



Chief Ru.lolph llcidorn, who is known to his legion ot 
friends as "Rudy." can U)ok back with pride on his 22 years 
of active service with the San Luis Obispo Police Depart- 
ment. He has been a good officer. 

He has been a permanent resident since \^\7 of the pros- 




Chief Rudolph Heidorn 

perous little city of over 14,100, nearly double the popu- 
lation of 1940. 

Upon the resignation of Chief Ralph Files early in 
1950, the then Assistant Chief Heidorn was immediateh" 
given the permanent position of Chief of Police, a well 
merited promotion. 

Chief Heidorn is married to the former Buela Ford, 
who not only finds time to care for her family of a hus- 
band and three sons, but is actively associated with various 
civic organizations. During World War II Mrs. Heidorn 
devoted much of her time to transporting blood donors to 
San Francisco and back to San Luis Obispo. She also has 
to her credit 500 hours as an aircraft spotter. She has been 
a source of inspiration to Chief Heidorn as he came up 
through the ranks of the Police Department. 

Their eldest son is Richard, 19 years of age, who will 
soon complete his hitch in the Navy. He has been sta- 
tioned on Guam, as radio, radar and other communications 
work. 

James, the second son is an honor student of the San 
Luis Obispo Junior High School, and was recenth pro- 
moted to the rank of second lieutenant in the California 
Cadets Corps. 

The youngest son, Do\iglas, is a txpical American boy, 
interested in sports and scholastic honors as well. A stu- 
dent in the Emerson Grammar School, he is a member of 
the Cub Scouts and has been active in that worldwide 
organization ever since his initiation into the Scouts. 

There have been no major crimes committed in San Luis 
Obispo since 1947. 



The cit\ council has provided many parks and play- 
grounds for the youngsters, and with supervised sports by 
athletic coaches, has resulted in a low ebb of juveiule de- 
linquency in the city. 

A farsighted council has granted a $15 per month wage 
increase for all city employees. 

Mayor Timothy O'Reilly ably assisted by the city coun- 
cil has seen that the Police Department has the necessary 
tools to give the best in law enforcement. Councilman 
Frank Vernon AVoods is Police Commission as well as 
Public Health and Safety Commissioner. 
Other councilmen are: 

Douglas M. Carpenter, AVilliam O. Hall and Clinc 
Williams. 

The Police Department will soon have a new pistol 
range, and ammunition for target practice will be furnish- 
ed by the city. 

Chief Heindon is a graduate from the FBI National 
Police Academy, and has finished courses in other training 
schools given in his area. 

The entire system of card filing, records, finger printing 
and photographs has been constantly improveil under 
Chief Heidorn and all crime data are easily accessible. 

Beside Chief Heidorn there are 18 officers and a matron 
and clerk. 

The roster is as follows : 
Chief — Rudolph Heidorn. 
Assistant Chief — James B. Vaught. 
Investigator — ^^^ E. Reeves. 

Sergeants — Lawrence Elsca, Frank J. Garzoli and 
Frank Payton. 

Patrolmen — W. B. Babcock, Muril Bickell, Courtney 
J. Bond, Aubie D. Cooper, Clayton E. Fluitt, Sherley B. 
Kiger, Aaron R. Lokey, M. A. ^McGowan, Erwin L. 
Rodgers, Frank T. Vargas, E. C. Warren and Wilford 
Ryan. 

Matron and Secretary — Mrs. Jean D. Boroski. 
The department has four 3-way radio patrol cars, two 
3-way radio motorcycles and one 3-way three-wheeler. 

You can rest assured law and order is of a high rating 
in San Luis Obispo. The picturesque community is o\er 
170 years old, having been reached on September 7, 1769, 
by an Portola expedition. Since then it has grown and 
prospered. Now it is the center of one of the most success- 
ful and richest sections of this country as far as agriculture 
is concerned. From the county's ranches in 1949, $10,- 
277,500 worth of beef cattle was raised. Cows brought in 
an addtional $2,686,000 and turkeys and other meat 
brought in $1,407,600. 

Field crops, almonds, lettuce, cauliHower and broccoli 
added thousands of dollars to the area economy. 

The California State Polytechnic College, with an en- 
rollment of o\er 2500 students drawn from every section 
of the world, has every modern facility to prepare young 
men for the important industry of farming in its e\cv\ 
phase. 



M„nh. 1051 



POLICE AND PEACE Ol-EICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e 2^ 



Telephone 2507-W 

Brown & Doyle 

CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS 

Compliments to All Peace Officers 

1026 Morro Street 
SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA 



SMILE INN 

CHICKEN AND DUMPLINGS 

We Serve only The Best 
Truck Stop - Open 24 Hours 

I Mile South on Old 101 Hi-Way 
SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 2I3-W 



j Telephone 99 or 3020 

Madonna Construction 
Company 

BULLDOZERS - SHOVELS 
DUMP TRUCKS - MATERIALS 

Mailing Address: P. O. Box 910 

399 Freeway 
SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIF. 

E. C. LOOMIS & SON 

San Luis Obispo and Arroyo Grande 

FLOUR AND FEEDS 

HAY - GRAIN - MILL FEED - POULTRY SUPPLIES 

SEEDS - FERTILIZERS - INSECTICIDES 



CALIFORNIA SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



CITY NEON 

Carlos Moerman. Proprietor 

LIGHTING • ADVERTISING 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

PLANT 

28S Hifuera Street Phone 312 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

WESTWAY MARKET 

Owned by BiU Mathison and John Carscaden 

A complete Line of 

BEER AND DOMESTIC WINES 

The finer brands of 

BOURBON. SCOTCH AND CANADIAN WHISKEY 

Open 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.. Sunday included 

Open I 1 :00 P.M. Saturday Nights 

447 Higuera Phone 491 -W 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



John Fitzpatrick 



Mac Weatherbee 



J & M LIQUOR STORE 



1118 M 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



LIQUORS. WINES AND BEER 

Street Phone 1458 



CALIFORNIA 



10 2 3 CLUB 



1023 Morro Street Phone 1170 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



BEECHW'OOD AUTO-O-TEL 

E. S. Hamilton, Managing Owner 

On the Highway, South Edge of City 

Telephone 911 74 Higuera Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

PACKARD SALES & SERVICE 

VIRGIL NEGRANTI 

563-565 Higuera Street Aelephone 525 

SAN LUIS OBI.SPO CALIFORNIA 

WARDENS MACHINE SHOP 

II I Li:w IS 

MOTOR REBUILDING - PRECISION GRINDING 

424 Higuera Street Telephone 271 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

C A R V A O • S 

FINE DRINKS AND FOOD 

Come in and See Us and Leave With a Smile 

Phone 1866 1022 Morro Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

NEHI BEVERAGE CO. 

Bottlers of NEHI. PAR-T-PAK and R. C. COLA 
120 Higuera Street Phone 2115 



HOTEL OBISPO 

Agnes M. Hughes. Owner 

ROOMS BY DAY. WEEK OR MONTH 

RATES REASONABLE 



1025 Court Street 
SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Telephone 600-J 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN LUIS TRUCK SERVICE 



Phone 2343 
SAN LUIS OBISPO 



P. O. Box 211 



CALIFORNIA 



BAKER & ROBERTS 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



FOOD MARKET 
839 Marsh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BAYS LIQUOR STORE 

Jess J. Vallely. Prop. 

ALL THE BEST BRANDS 

728 Marsh Street Phone 1539 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



C. R. STRADER 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNtA 



1131 Garden Str 
SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 984-W 



( ALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1951 



ASSOCIATED PUBLIC 
COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 



The January meeting of the Associated Public Commu- 
nications Officers, Inc., was held in Napa on the 11th. Our 
host being Martin Landers of the City of Napa. 

The meeting was called to order at 11:40 A. AL by 
the president, Walter Keller v\'ith 29 members and guests 
in attendance. 

The minutes of the December meeting were read and 
approved. 

George Burton of the Frequency and Engineering Com- 
mittee gave the following Frequency Clearances : 

City of Dunsmuir — 155.01 Base and Mobile. 

City of Belmont— 39.26 Mobile. 

County of Tuolumne — 1-5.66 Base and Mobile. 

County of Alameda — 455.98 Base and Mobile. 

County of Contra Costa — 45.58 Base and Mobile. 

These clearances were granted on a motion by Myers, 
seconded by Kellogg. 

President Keller next called on Bob Mason for a report 
on the Codes Committee. He stated that McMurphy is 
complying the information from the questionnaire. It was 
felt that a short code is desirable however to give complete 
coverage for all services a master code should be drawn up 
and each agency use that part of it that meets their needs. 

A discussion on the joint-meeting followed. Bill Kel- 
logg offered Stockton for the meeting place and on a mo- 
tion by Burton, seconded by Mason it was carried that the 
meeting be held in Stockton on March 30th and 31st. 

Captain Rogers then stated that Mare Island Naval 
Shipyard is in need of Electronic Mechanics, Technicians, 
and Engineers, and anyone interested should contact him 
at the yard. 

George Burton then requested the floor and spoke on 
the need for a suitable code number for radio use to signify 
a Yellow Air Raid Alert. A lengthy discussion then fol- 
lowed and the membership felt that the lack of Civilian 
Defense Communications information from the state was 
inadequate and slow in coming. It was also felt that the 
information that has been received could not be used to 
good advantage since it was more for landwire transmis- 
sion. The opinion of the membership was that the Com- 
munications Civilian Defense Planning should be turned 
over to the State Division of Communications as Disaster 
Planning was one of the reasons that the Division was 
organized. 

On a motion by Myers, seconded by LaRouef ; a Civil- 
ian Defense Communications Coordinating Committee 
was appointed with Robert Mason as Chairman and 
George Burton and Tom Baile\' as members to contact the 
State Civilian Defense Office in Sacramento to ascertain 
if they have any suggested coding for a Yellow Air Raid 
^Varning to be used on a statewide basis and coordinate 
anv other matters necessarv. 



Robert Mason, President 
John Atkinson, Secretary-Treasurer 

On a motion by Mason, seconded by Burton, it was de- 
cided that the present 900 Radio Code number 981 which 
was assigned to Air Raid Warning Yellow would not be 
used and if the state could not provide a suitable code num- 
ber, then the code number 1310 be used. 

President Keller then opened a discussion on the uses 
that amateur radio operators were being put to by the 
various agencies in their CD planning. 

Next the president called on George Maki to report on 
the point-to-point. Mr. Maki brought out the following 
points: 

1 — The Engineering Staff of the FCC had approved the 
Diablo Repeater and the application was now in the 
hands of the Commission for final hearing within a 
week. 
2 — The power of the proposed repeater would be about 
10 watts and therefore some changes would be neces- 
sary at some receiver locations. 
3 — The Micro-wave link to Sacramento has been shipped 
from the manufacturer. 

He also stated that the Division is building a new equip- 
ment vault on Mt. Diablo to house all the radio equipment 
and a 5 KW generator would also be installed. 

On a motion by Burton, seconded by Myers, the secre- 
tary was instructed to write to Preston Allen of the State 
Division of Communications and advise him of the very 
excellent job being done by Mr. Maki on the point-to- 
point. 

President Keller next reopened nominations for officers. 
The following have been nominated for officers : President, 
Robert Mason; Vice President, George Hippley; Secre- 
tary, John Atkinson ; Treasiner, Charles Simpson ; Board 
of Directors, Merrill LeBouef, John Maybee, Jim Lewis, 
Art McDole, George Maki and Henri Kirby. 

On a motion by Hudson, seconded by Burton the nomi- 
nations were closed. 

On a motion by Myers, seconded by Burton, the nomi- 
nees for president, vice president, secretary and treasurer 
were elected on a white ballot. 

The election for the board of directors was then held. 
I\an Hudson, George Burton, and Bill Kellogg were ap- 
pointed as tallymen. The results of the election was an- 
nounced for the board of directors: LeBouef, Maybee, 
Lewis, ^IcDole and Maki. 

An application for active membership for Elmer Free- 
man, Chief Internal Security Communication's Engineer 
for the Twelfth Naval District was presented to the board 
of directors and was appro\ed on a motion by Bailey, sec- 
onded by Myers. 

The president then called for the commercial members 
reports from E. H. Robertson, W. D. Brill ; Barney Olson 



M,irfli. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OI'l'ICERS lOURNAl, 



Page 27 



and Bob KranholJ, Motorola; aiul C"l\<lc Davenport, 
Morse & Coinpatn. 

Outgoirijj Prt'siilcnt Kfllcr then spoke brieHy to tlie 
members, expressing his appreciation tor the cooperation 
shown to him during the last \ear by the membership. 

On a motion b>- McDole, seconded by Myers, the secre- 
tary was instructed to inform President Kellers' superiors 
of the excellent job which was done by him during the last 
year. 

President Keller then turned the meeting o\er to the 
new president, Bob Mason, who spoke on the coming year 
and then installed his officers for 1951. 

President Mason then called for the discussion on the 
Ladies' Night Meeting in February. The following was 
decided : 
1 — The Ladies' Night wouKl be held in Monterey C'ount\ 

on February 15. 
2 — The members would bear the cost of the dinner with 
the commercial members furnishing the entertainment. 
3 — Barney Olsen was appointed to coordinate the com- 
mercial members. 

As there was no further business the meeting was ad- 
journed. 

The regular Februar\' meeting and the annual Ladies' 
Night was held in the San Carlos Hotel in Monterey on 
February 10th. Our hosts being Police Chief Charles 
Simpson of Monterey and Art McDole of Monterey 
County. 

The meeting was called to order by President Robert 
ALnson after a very delicious dinner. Attendance showed 
39 members and guests. President \Lason then introduced 
Charles Simpson as the new Chief of Police of Monterey. 
Charlie then introduced to the membership Sheriff Jack 
McCoy, of Monterey County, and his wife. He also in- 
troduced the "Voice of the West," Ray Myers. 

The minutes of the January meeting were dispetised 
with. 

President .\Lison then spoke on the State Civilian De- 
fense OfHce and his trip there. He stated that the tests 
of the Air Raid Warning Network would start next Fri- 
day. On a suggestion by the president, moved by McDole, 
ami seconded by I hurmati the secretary was instructed to 
address a letter to .Major General Robinson and invite 
.Mr. Kelly and Mr. Crabtree of the Communications Di- 
vision of the State CD Office to our joint meeting to be 
helrl in Stockton. 

Ray Myers next reported on his progress on the D( ) 
numbers and in obtaim'ng scarce materials. 

On the recommendation of the FrequencN and i'Jigi- 
neering Committee, the City of Colma was granted clear- 
ance on 39.26 Mcs mobile. Frequency re<iuests for the 
City of Fortuna on IblO base and 39.78 m<ibile, and the 
N'alley of the Moon Fire Department on I 54.«S9 Mcs were 
iliscussed and tabled until our next nieeting where a de- 
tailed technical discussion could be held. 

The president next invited the membership to San Jose 
for its .\LTrch 8th meeting. Motion by Simpson, second- 
ed bv McDole. Carried. 



Tile radio was given to Mrs. McDole, .md the Weller 
soliler gun to Hill Kellogg. 

I he commercial members wer<- next called upon to re- 
port. 'I'hese being Craig Belk, RCA ; Bob Kranhold, .Mo- 
torola ; F. H. Robertson, W. D. Brill, and C. R. Parmcn- 
ter, Alpar Mfg. Co. 

Sheriff .McCoy then spoke on the .Monterey Ba\ Coun- 
ties' Ci\ ilian Defense setup. 

The president inquired if anvone was cop\ing the Di- 
ablo tests. Negative. 

As there was no further business the meeting was ad- 
journed. 

RespectfulK submitted. 
.\rT McDoi.i:. S,( n hiry I'ro-tan 



JOS. M. VASCONCELOS 

JEWELER 



OAKLAND 



( Al.KORNIA 



Enterprise Plating and Enameling Co. 

PLATING OF ALL KINDS 



780 W. Grand Avenu 

OAKLAND 



Phone GLencourt 1-6606 

CALItORNIA 



T.L TW:noaks 3-6200 Cable "WEARTEX. Oakland" 

WEARTEX RUG COMPANY 

"The Wear is in the Texture!" 

Manufacturers of WEARTEX BRAIDED COTTON RUGS 

Office and Mi.l: 2533 Magnola Street OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 

TIRA FURNITURE CO. 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 

EASY PAYMENT PLAN 

Phone OLympic 2-2831 4920 Telegraph Ave. 

OAKLAND CALIIORNIA 

FRED BAM MANN 

HARDWARE 
PAINTS AND OILS 



LOGAN DRUG CO. 

REGiSTERED DRUGGISTS 
9S0I East I4lh Street Phone TRinldad 2-1910 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Phone TEmplebar 2-6239 



Established 30 Year 



W. L. MITCHENER & COMPANY 

REALTORS 
Night C:ubs - Cocktail Loung.-s - Liquor Stores 

J4( TIIIRTKF.Nril STRl-.l.r OAKLAND, CALIF 

S. & E. MANUFACTURING C:0. 

MACHINE WORK 

Production • Precision 

3103 Adeline Street Telephone HUmboldl 3-3224 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



R A M B L E INN 

8101 E. Mth Strrrt 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

SIMPSON sc:reen CO. 

lOSO E. 8lh Strrvl Phone TEmplebar 4-9585 

OAKLAND I ALIFORNIA 

ATLAS ESTATES C:0. 

REAL ESTATE - BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

Phon* LOckhavvn 9-6820 - Evvnlng Piedmont 5-8770 

9859 MacArthur Boulevard 
OAKLAND (AllFORNIV 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



THEY HAVE ANSWERED THEIR LAST ROLL CALL 



SUPERVISING CAPTAIN J. M. WALSH 

On January 20 retired Captain Joseph M. Walsh of 
the SFPD passed away after a lingering illness. 

One of the biggest — physically — men of the department, 
Captain \Valsh became a police officer in May, 1919. He 
reached the rank of Captain in 1936, and after serving 
faithfully and efficiently in various police districts he was 
made supervising captain on March 4, 1949, and held that 
rank until his retirement for illness in August last year. 

He won a citation for meritorious service for the cap- 
ture of two bandits. 

He was a native of Banty County, Cork, Ireland, and 
has ever been identified with any movement beneficial to 
those of his Irish race. 

He was a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, 
Rebel Cork Benevolent Association, P. P.O. Elks, and the 
Widows' and Orphans Aid Association of the S.F.P.D. 

In his day he was quite an athlete, and for years served 
as anchor man on the police tug-of-war. 

He leaves his widow, Mary, two sons, Edward and 
Joseph, Jr., and a daughter, Mrs. Mary Oilman. All re- 
side in San Francisco. 

Another good Irishman, a member of the SFPD, has 
passed on, but the memory of his 31 year's sterling service 
and his loyalty to the people of his adopted city as a police 
officer will linger long in the memory of all good citizens 
of this great municipality. 



ways handing out a little siher here and there for one who 
needed it. 

He left a place in this world that will be might>' hard to 
fill. No more kindlier man ever lived nor none more hon- 
est and decent. He was a credit to the profession of law 
enforcement. 



LIEUTENANT TIMOTHY BURKE 

Lieutenant Timothy J. Burke, head of the Missing 
Persons Bureau of the SFPD, died suddenly January 14, 
at his home, 277 Miramar Street. He was 62 years of age. 

An authority on fingerprints he was for years in charge 
of the Bureau of Identification and after that was head of 
the Homicide Detail. In all these responsible positions he 
discharged his duties faithfully and ably, as he has done 
since his appointment to have charge of the Missing Per- 
sons Bureau. 

Born in Newmarket, County Cork, Ireland, he came to 
San Francisco when a small lad. He joined the police de- 
partment on May 16, 1921, and passed through the ranks 
to lieutenant which he reached in 1944. He was an in- 
spector from 1942 to 1944. He was the oldest man in 
point of service in the Bureau of Inspectors. 

He was a veteran of World War I and was awarded 
the Croix de Guerre and the Military Purple Heart for 
services in France. 

He was a member of the American Legion and the Dis- 
abled \Var Veterans. 

Besides his widow. Lieutenant Burke is survived by two 
sons, John P., and Robert E. 

This writer has known Lieutenant Burke for nearly 30 
years. Never was he ever to utter a profane word or un- 
kind remarks about any person. He would in his quiet way 
go to the defense of anyone being berated, and he was al- 



INSPECTOR FRED BUTZ 

Death took Inspector Fred Butz, on January 28, with 
the passing of this inspector the San Francisco Police De- 
partment lost not only a colorful officer but a mighty good 
one. He was 49 years of age. 

Born in San Francisco, he joined the Police Department 
in 1927. Few have made the Inspectors Bureau in as short 
a time as Fred Butz. He wasn't on a beat but a few 
months when he came upon a bunch of bandits wanted for 
a "job." He engaged in a gun battle and aided in the cap- 
ture of every one of the gang. This was enough to bring 
him into the bureau. He won for this fine act a citation 
for meritorious service, the first of four that were to come 
to him during his long and honorable service. He was in 
on the capture of the prison breaking bank bandits, Clyde 
Stevens and Albert Kissell. In 1936 he was awarded the 
91st Division Medal of Honor for the outstanding mem- 
ber of the police department. He wore all his honors 
lightly. 

Detailed to the robbery detail he devoted not only his 
time on duty but his own personal time in an unrelenting 
war on robbers of all sorts. He was not of the scientific 
type of sleuth, but he sure had plenty under his noggin 
when it came to figuring out who did a job, and where he 
was apt to be. He brought in many a wanted man, and he 
always had the goods on him. 

From the day he entered the department Fred Butz 
never stopped being a policeman, night or day. There are 
a lot of oldtimers of the force who can recall when they 
were in need of a helping hand looked around and saw In- 
spector Butz ready to pitch in. It might be out in the Mis- 
sion district, or the Sunset district, he got around the 
whole town. 

It was amazing to note the many times he happened to 



Phone 5-4617 

El Camino Liquor Store 

Compliments to All Peace Officers 

612 West Main Street 
SANTA MARIA, CALIFORNIA 



Manh. 10.^1 



POLICE AND PEACn OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



be around or at the scene of some crime, and brother itid 
he wade in to get the offenders. 

He had an uncanny memory of faces, names and records 
ot crooks, which he utilized to the sorrow of many a thug 
or holdup j;uy. 

Fred But/, was a good man, a lo\al friend and an crti- 
cient police officer. There are too few men like him. 



JOSEPH A. MURPHY 

When death suddenly took Joseph A. .Murphy, vice 
president of the American Trust Company, the SFPD 
lost a friend who did more than any one civilian to make 
the department what it is today. 

Back in 1Q13 the late Chief David A. White had a po- 
lice department without any system of keeping account of 
what each unit was doing. The records kept were meager 
and outmoded, the different police stations and the de- 
tective bureau were run almost as separate and independ- 
ent parts of the department. There were no forms for any 
branch of the department and it was quite a task for any- 
one, e\en in the department to know what was doing day 
from day. 

Chief White got the consent of Ma\or James Rolph 
and his Police Commission headed at that time by Attor- 
ney Theodore J. Roche to get a civilian secretary to help 
bring order out of what amounted to chaos. 'The Chief 
engaged young Joe Murphy, a graduate of St. Ignatius 
College, now the L'niversity of San Francisco. 

From the day Joe Murphy took his job things began to 
happen to the police department. System was applied to 
every activity of the police organization. Forms which to- 
day are used by law enforcement agencies throughout the 
nation, were prepared for the use of men in the various 
units. 

It wasn't long before anyone could determine what each 
of the three watches of the day had done. The men were 
soon impressed with the idea that they had to keep a record 
of each and everything they did during their hours of duty. 
'I hey were also told they worked for the people of San 
Francisco and to get off the dime. 'They did. 

Following this helpful work he was engaged as a sales 
manager for various automobile agencies. Over 25 years 
ago he took a job with the American 'Trust Company and 
rose to a vice presidency in charge of the Mission Branch 
on V'alencia Street. During his long service it is recorded 
he never lost a cent by atn bad loan or lost a friend for 
hi> company. 

During the last war he headed the organization of de- 

STANDARD IRON & METALS CO. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF SCRAI- 



fense against invasion for San F'rancisco and was called 
upon to assist neighboring counties with their program. 

He was a director of the Ohmpic Club, a member ot 
the State Peace Officers' Association, the Bay Comities' 
Peace Officers' Association, and a past president of the 
L'm'versity of San Francisco Alumni. He was a football 
and baseball player during his college days. 

He leaves his wiilow, Charlotte, and two sons, Leo and 
Charles. 



FORMER POLICE COMMISSIONER 
HOWELL 

John Wesley Howell,, who served as Police Commis- 
sioner for the San Francisco Police Department during 
the term of Mayor Roger Lapham — 19+4 to 1948 — and 
was a most energetic and capable commissioner, died last 
month, following a long illness. He was 61. 

He was born in Bisbee, Ariz., but came to California 
when he was five, with his parents, locating in Los An- 
geles. He graduated from Stanford as an attorney at law 
but he never was a practicising attorney. Instead he joined 
the Haslett AVarehouse Company of which he became gen- 
eral manager, a position he held until his death. 

He was married and the father of a son and a daughter. 

He was President of the Chamber of Commerce for 
two years, 1937-38, and president of the National Ware- 
house Association. He was always active in civic affairs, 
and when he became Police Commissioner with Jerd Sulli- 
can and E. L. Turkington, he devoted a lot of time to 
studying the department's history and made many recom- 
mendations for improving law enforcement in San Fran- 
cisco. 



INDEPENDENT COSTRUCTION CO. 

741 - SOTH AVENUE 
OAKLAND 



C. M. W ALTER 



Bro.ndwny Biiildinn 



CALIFORNIA 



3rd and Myrllr Sircrli 



Hlfatc 4-320S 

CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OXYGEN COMPANY 



2205 Mxinolia StrrrI 



CALIFORNIA 



M. TABER CO. 



2619 School Strrrt 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA BUILDERS SUPPLY 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

OAKLAND nnd SACRAMENTO. CALIFORNIA 



P,,ge 30 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Santa Maria — a Prosperous City 



March. 1951 



Santa Maria, located along Highway 101 in the north- 
ern part of Santa Barbara County, is a little city of 
10,403 satisfied residents. It was in 1840 that the first 
white people came into the rich valley, giving the place 
which is now Santa Maria the name Central City. In 




Santa Maria's Nev 



City Hall. It is so perfect that Liff Maga- 
ive it a big illustrated writeup. 



1882 the name was changed to its present title and on 
September 20, 1905, the little town was incorporated. 
More than 20,0000 more people from surrounding terri- 
tory used the attractive municipality as a trading center. 

Since 1905 Santa Maria has grown, not only in popula- 
tion but in importance in many things that means prosper- 
ity to any community. 

In 1902 oil was discovered in the Santa Maria Valley 
and today nearly 20,000,000 barrels of this necessary fluid 
is shipped to oil refineries in the Los Angeles and San 
Francisco regions. Some oil is also handled by refineries 
near Santa Maria. 

During 1947 the oil fields paid out $4,800,000 in wages 
and $3,000,000 more was paid landowners for oil and gas 
royalties. The valley is truly one of the greatest of oil 
producing areas on the coast. 

Cattle ranching is another major business and over 50,- 
000 head of cattle are fed at the world's largest feeding 
yards located at Betteravia, west of Santa Maria. 

Also at Betteravia is the Union Sugar Co. factory, one 
of the world's largest sugar beet factories. This project 
brings in close to $11,000,000 a year to the growers and 
processors. 

The raising of flower seeds is also a big industry in the 
valley and bring in an estimated $1,000,000 yearly. 

Dairying is also important in this region. Over 50,000,- 
000 pounds of milk is furnished by the great number of 
milk cows, under the mo.st sanitary management of the 
dairymen of the sector. 

You will find everything that makes up a progressive 
city, large or small. There are fine schools, hospitals, 14 
churches, good hotels to meet every pocketbook, motels, 
service clubs, fraternal orders and two excellent news- 
papers — The Santa Maria Times, a daily paper, and the 
Advertiser, a weekly. The city has good theaters and the 



youth program is handled by the Boy Scouts, Camp Fire 
Girls, the Y.M.C.A. and not the least in importance the 
Police Boys' Club, which is a huge success, and has kept 
juvenile delinquency at a very low level under the direc- 
tion of the Police Department. 

A lot of people pass through Santa Maria on their way 
to or from northern and southern California. Yet traffic 
accidents are exceptionally few and fatalities the lowest in 
the state for cities of like size. 

This is due to excellent police service, which also sees to 
it that but little crime of major proportions occur in the 
incorporated limits. 

To Chief W. T. Feland and the 20 members of tlie 
Santa Maria Police Department, credit for this pleasinsj 
condition is due. 

The police department is located in a new city hall that 
rated a story in Life magazine last year which noted its 
beauty and arrangements for accommodating the various 
municipal departments and all who have seen it are quick 
to agree it is one of the finest in the state. 

The SMPD has six 3-way radio equipped automobiles, 
three motorcycles, one of them a three-wheeler, also 3-way. 

Chief Feland who has headed the Police Department 
since 1944 has installed a complete and modern finger 
printing and filing system, and all his men have taken 
courses in all regional police training schools. He has a 
good photograph gallery. 

Just how thorough are the officers who served under 
Chief Feland we recount a tragic incident which happened 
last year. 

One evening at about 7 o'clock during the last part of 
October Officer Charles Denniun was called to the scene 
of an accident. He found an injured woman lying on the 
street. 

TECATE CAFE 



I 



611 West Ma 



SANTA MARIA 



CALIFORNIA 



"Where Hundreds Shop and Save" 

F. C. B. A. MARKET, INC. 

MEATS - GROCERIES - FISH - FRESH FRUITS - VEGETABLES 

DRY GOODS - BEER AND WINE - Wholesale - Retail 

605 West Main Phone 5-9086 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 

WEST MAIN STREET MARKET 

Frank L. Andrade, Proprietor 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

BEER AND WINES 

822 W. Main Phone 5-4602 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 

HOME FOOD BASKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - FRESH VEGETABLES 



1000 W. Main Street 

SANTA MARIA 

Phone 5-1301 



Guadalupe Stre 

GUADALUPE 

Phone 2 735 



Hernandez, Prop. 

LA CASITA CAFE 



Miles South of SANTA MARIA 



March. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



On his car radio he called tor an ambulance and pro- 
ceeded to take care of the injured person. Parking his car 
in the center of the street, and with red lights blinking 
front and rear he gave first aid treatment, i'lacing a pil- 
low under the head of the victim of the accident he then 
waited for the ambulance waving his flashlight to divert 
oncoming cars. 

At about 7:10 p. m. a car containing two drunken farm 
workers came rushing from the rear of the police car. Dis- 
regarding the flashing red lights and the frantic waving 
of the flashlight of Officer Denmun. the drunken driver 
kept right on. 

Officer Denmun would not lea\c the prostrate woman, 
hoping against hope that the car would serve from its path. 
He waited too long, for the next thing that happened was 
the brave ofl'icer was hit and struck down, sustaining be- 
side other injuries, two fractured legs. The car kept on its 
way, the front and rear wheels rolled over the injured 
and helpless woman. She was killed instantly. 

After a chase the two drunks were captured, the driver 
put in jail, charged with manslaughter, was found guilty 
and sent to San Quentin. 

Officer Denmun spent many weeks in the hospital and 
is still unable to resume his duties as a police officer. All 
good people of Santa Maria are pulling for his complete 
recovery, for the country can ill afford to lose the services 
of such a courageous officer, one who might have saved 
himself, but for the determination to do all he could to 
save the unfortunate woman King on the street, whom he 
had given such careful care. 



ASSOCIATED DRUG CO. 

L. A. Ramry, Prop. 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 

Phone 5-4119 201 So. Broadway 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 



Big Boy's Sport Shop & Liquor Store 

John Clark. Jr., Prop. 

215 North Broadway Phone 5-1852 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 



ALOHA MARKET 

"Sells For Less" 

GROCERIES - BEER - WINE - FRESH AND CURED MEATS 

FRESH FRUITS - VEGETABLES - FROZEN FOODS 

900 West Main Street Phone S-9012 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 



MISSION MOTEL 

1640 North Broadway - On Highway 101 
Jack and Marie Tarbron 



SANTA MARIA 



Phone 5-4380 



CALIFORNIA 



GARDEN CITY BUTANE SERVICE CO. 

WEDGEWOOD RANGES 
SERVEL REFRIGERATORS 



RANCHOTEL 



A. F. FARROW, Managing Owner 

1900 Monterey Telephone 2333 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

DIESEL TRUCK SERVICE 

DAN-DEE MOTORS 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Telephone S-1719 North Broadway 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 

HARDY STREET MARKET 



SANTA MARIA 



13 Hardy Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ENCHILADA SHOPPE 

Mieaela Gallrgoi. Prop. 
GENUINE MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOOD 
ICE COLD BEER - ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 



Phone 5-9116 



CALIFORNIA 



1330 North Broadway 
I SANTA MARIA 



MOTEL KEYSTONE 

EIGHT UNITS - DAILY RATES 

Phone 5-3621 



Al IFORNIA 



BUCKS VALLEY PIPE AND SALVAGE CO. 

SCRAP IRON AND METALS ■ WASTE PAPER 

YOUR BEST MARKET 

714 West Main St. Phone. 5-357» or S-35M 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 



Phone 5-5019 1621 North Broadway 
SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 

EGYPTIAN MOTEL 

1618 North Broadway (U. S. 101) Phone 5-S2I4 

A 12-unit, fully modem, carpeted motel with lull tile ihoweri, 

radios, garages, and thermostatic controlled panMray heal. 

Good Restaurants nearby. 



SANTA MARIA 



CALIFORNIA 



DEL MONTE MARKET 

Ned and Sue Leyton 

BEER - WINE - FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Route 2, Box 24S Phone 63437 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 



FRANKS CAFE 

"REAL GOOD FOOD 

SERVED WITH WESTERN HOSPITALITY" 

THE BEST IN MIXED DRINKS 



-SAN LUIS OBISPO 



645 HIguern Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ROSE AUTO COURT 



FIFTEEN UNITS. ALL WITH KFTCHENS 

1300 No Broadway Phone S-224S 

SANTA MARIA CALIFORNIA 



P.ige .?2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Manh. /'y5/ 



Chief Elmer W. Morehouse of Paso Robles 



Hv 1 . H. GRm-NK 



With its present population of over 5000 people, in the 
tenter of a township claiming 9000 more and a trading 
area boasting 16,000, Paso Robles continues to maintain 
its rightful reputation of being a progressive community. 




>^ 



PASO ROBLES POLICE DEPARIMENT 

Top — Chief W. Morehouse. Second row from top — Captain 

John Rude, Mr>i. Joy Carell, Lieutenant Tom Flowers. Next 

row — Sergeant James Blanks, Officers Orval Weber and Jr.hn 

Dutra. Bottom row — L. L. Wilson and B. C. Long. 

Situated on Highway 101 halfway between San Francisco 
and Los Angeles this ancient city has worldwide recogni- 
tion for its fine climate, big almond orchards, great cattle 
ranches and other agricultural activities. Not the least 
of the attractions offered by Paso Robles is its natural hot 
sulphur springs which brings thousands of people to the 
area for health and relaxation. Here at these springs will 
be found e\ery facilitiy for treating many hmnan ailments, 
and there are excellenr acconiniodations for every class of 
visitor. 

\Vith all these different projects there is a need for a 
good police department to see that every one, residents and 
the numberless hordes that pour into the city annually, 
ha\e good law enforcement. Paso Robles has a good police 
department headed by Chief Elmer W. Morehouse. Chief 
Morehouse became the city's head law enforcement officer 
following the sudden death of Chief Jardine Millard, in 
March, 1950, and which caused great sorrow to the people 
of the city. The present chief worked under Chief Mil- 
lard, with distinction, and his promotion to the job was in 



recognition of his fine service as a police officer. He fin- 
ishes his first year this March, and has done a good job. 

He was born in Paso Robles and has been a member of 
the police Department for over ten years. 

Every decision and the various changes which he has 
made has had the solid backing of the city council whose 
members unanimously selected him for his present high 
office. 

Among the urgently needed changes he achieved was a 
substantial pay raise for his entire force. 

Second the creation of two new posts, that of lieutenant 
and sergeant. Tom Flowers holds the first as well as full 
time criminal investigator. James Blanks is abh' handling 
the last named position. 

Both of these two men selected for these newly created 
posts are highly qualified, due to their years of police work, 
as well as advanced training in various law enforcement 
and FBI training schools. 

Another advancement promoted by Chief Morehouse 
was the installation of a complete finger printing and card 
filing system, plus three-way radio in all police cars and 
the department's motorcycle. 

Two new high-speed patrol cars are being added, mak- 
ing the number of radio equipped automobiles four. 

He has been promised two more officers to add to his 
force of the following: 

Captain John Rude, Lieutenant Flowers, Sergeant 
Blank, Patrolmen Orval Weber, Claude Jacques, John 
Dutra, L. L. AV^ilson and B. C. Long. Mrs. Joy Carelli 
has charge of the desk. 

Chief Morehouse has been highl\- praised for the fine 
work he has done with juvenile delinquency. He has es- 
tablished a 12-man panel of laymen, made up of the clergy 
and business men, who assist the police and juveniles in 
solving their problems. 

An outstanding case of how Chief Morehouse and his 
guidance committee works was demonstrated recently. A 
boy of 14 years was brought before the juvenile panel, 
charged with car theft. The Chief, convinced the youth 
had good qualities to make a desirable citizen, if given a 
chance, decided to investigate the boy's home life. 

His investigation brought to light the fact that there 
had been a divorce, and that the mother frequented bars, 
and was seldom home, so the boy was left on his own re- 
sources. 

T he mother was brought before the jmenile committee 
where she received a stern lecture from the panel and a 
warning from Chief Morehouse that she provide a home 
and wholesome environment for her son, or he would be 
placed in an institution. 

Result being that the mother now has turned over a new 
leaf and has won the respect of her son. Both are now- 
working and very happy at the turn of events. 



M,ir.h. W'il 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 



Chief Morehouse ami his juvenile panel rate a big cheer 
and their plan couM well be tollowed b\ other police de- 
partments. 

On the 10th of last October the Chief and his capable 
force of officers quickly cleared up an armed robbery and 
car theft. At 12:35 p. m. of that date a call was received 
by Mrs. Carclli, via teletype from Sheriff Jack McCoy's 
office in Salinas, that two youths had committeil an armed 
robbery and stolen an automobile in Salinas and were 
headed on Route 101 toward Paso Robles. Chief More- 
house and Lieutenant Flowers immediately sped to the 
northern limits of Paso Robles to intercept the two rob- 
bers. 

At 1 :00 p. m. the description of the two wanted men 
and of the 1936 Ford coupe was relayed to Chief More- 
house and Lieutenant Flowers. At 1 :10 p. m. the getawa\- 
car was spotted and the two officers gave chase. The two 
robbers noticed the police car speeding behind them and 
tried to outrun the police car, but a short burst from Lieu- 
tenant Flowers' submachine gun discouraged all thought 
of further flight. The bandit who was driving, without 
slowing down, pulled out a pistol and committed suicide. 
The bandits' car swerved off the highway and crashed into 
a large oak tree. It narrowly missed a power pole and 
stopped just short of a forty-foot drop, onto the railroad 
tracks below. 

T he two officers, with drawn guns walked toward the 
wrecked car and opened the door on the righthand side. 
As they did so the dazed youth beside the dead driver 
reached for a .25 automatic. After a brief struggle he was 
disarmed and handcuffed, then taken to the hospital to be 
patched up. His companion who had shot himself through 
the head was D.O.A. 

An inspection of the bandits car disclosed that the first 
burst sent out by Lieutenant Flowers had punctured the 
gasoline tank and that all five shots he fired were grouped 
in an area of 3 x 6 inches. This feat performed at a speed 
of 85 miles per hour is certainly a splendid example of 
good marksmanship, and anyone foolish enough to invite 
a similar burst from I^ieutenant Flowers is just tired of 
living. 

Both bandits were youths 10 and 20 years, and each had 
been inmated at Preston reform school. Together they 
plotted their latest crime and were wanted for armed rob- 
beries in Sacramento, West Sacramento. P^ureka and San 
Jose. 

The survivor of the duet was sent to San (Jueiitin for 
five years to life. 

Paso Robles has its civilian defense program completed 
and is ready for any emergency. 

Chief Morehouse is happily married. He and his wife 
Naomi have a three and a half years old daughter, who has 
learned young to share her toys and playthings with less 
fortunate children. 

The Morehouse home is the scene for many gatherings 
of friends and neighbors, for they all know their host and 
hostess for they were "brought up" right in Paso Robles. 



PASO ROBLF.S 



PASO ROBLES BAKERY 

Leon V. Robinson, Proprietor 
Phone 228 



CALIFORNIA 



TRUMAN A. HARRIS AND SON 

Aulhorizrd Dealers 
SALES -FORD- SERVICE 



Located Downtown Near the City Park 

PASO ROBLES HOT SPRINGS 

Owner-Manager. Dr. Leslie Wilkinson, Chiropractor 

Open Daily 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. - Sunday 9 A. M. to 2 P.M. 

Corner Uth and Pine Streets Khone 619 

PASO ROBLES CALIFORNIA 



SWISS ITALIAN CAFE 



PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA 



PASO ROBLES 



PARK PHARMACY 

FOR QUALITY 
801 Twelfth Street Phone 3 



CALIFORNIA 



ERIC LUNDGREN 



PASO ROBLES 



1326 Park Street 



Phone 470 



CALIFORNIA 



I X L HO T E L 

M. Green, Manager 

MODERN AND RESTFUL 

14th and Park Slreetii Phone 269 

PASO ROBLES CALIFORNIA 

NEWEST IN CITY Phone 1408-J 

FREE RADIOS IN EVERY ROOM 

MOTEL SCHWANK 

•JUST GOOD BEDS" 

2730 Spring St., Highway 101 at 28th St. 

PASO ROBLES CALIFORNIA 



CANARY COTTAGE CAFE 



12th and Spring Sis 



PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA 



PASO ROBLES YELLOW C:AB CO. 

Frank Stockalprr - Al. Chrislensen, Proprietors 
24-HOUR SERVICE 



HOTEL NORTON 



PASO ROBLES 



FORTY HOME-LIKE ROOMS (Air. Cooled) 

1227 Spring Street. Highway No. 101 

Phone 149 

( Al IFORNIA 



WILSONS DRIVE IN 

REGULAR MEALS ■ SANDWICHES - HOME MADE PIES 
BEER - FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

2748 Sprint. Hwy. ICl Phone 492 

PASO ROBLF.S ( ALIIORNIA 



PEDERSEN AUTO PARTS 



PASO ROBl. 



NEW AND USED TIRES 
3647 Spring Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MICHELS SERVICE GARAGE 



917 Twelfth Street 

PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mtirch. 19.^1 



JOHNNY'S 

PASO ROBLES LIQUOR STORE 

Next to Pioneer Garage - 1240 Spring St. 
Phone 197 



Coiiiplele Line of 

BEER — WINES — LIQUORS 

a>id 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Dining and Dancing 

1216 Spring St. - Phone 85 



PASO ROBLES 



HOOSIER LODGE MOTEL 

Charles Andolino, Manager 
APARTMENTS 
Telephone 99IM 101 Highway 



Telephone 304 

TRAVELODGE 

One of California's Really Fine 
Stop-Overs for the Tired Traveler 

2701 Spring Street 
PASO ROBLES, CALIFORNIA 



Dean C. Mclntii 



Don J. Peter 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 170-W 



CAMERON'S 

BRAKE AND WHEEL ALIGNING SERVICE 
30th and Spring 



Paso Robles Farm Supply Center 

12th and Railroad Street Phone 230 

PASO ROBLES CALIFORNIA 

Key Smith Phone 40-W or 18 

C. S. Smith Sporting Goods Co. 

Member of the Sporting Goods Dealer 50- Year Club 

SCHWINN BICYCLES 

PARTS AND SERVICE 



1225 Park Str 



Phone 40-W 



PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA 



TREES MOTOR LODGE 

COMFORTABLE • CLEAN • REASONABLE 

Telephone 334-W 

2841 Spring Street North End - Highway 101 

PASO ROBLES CALIFORNIA 



SMITH'S DRIVE IN RESTAURANT 



THE PASO ROBLES PHARMACY 



THE REXALL STORE 
719 12lh Street Phoni 



PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA 



C. P. Stoddard, Ov 



Twenty-fourth and Spring 



B. H. DAVIS TIRE SERVICE 

"Invite Us to Your Next Blowout" 
1233 Spring Street 



PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA PASO ROBLES 



CALIFORNIA 



WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 

SUPERIOR FRENCH LAUNDRY 

DRIVE IN AND SAVE 



LIBERTY FRENCH BAKING CO. 



491 - 43rd Street Phone HUmboldt 3-0055 



1284 W. Grand Av 



HIgate 4-0S4S 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



P. & N. PRODUCE CO. 

WHOLESALE FRUIT AND PRODUCE 
301 Franklin Street 



STANDARD TRAILER CO. 



415 San Leandro Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA SAN LEANDRO 



CALIFORNIA 



CASH OR TERMS George Budlong, Co-Owner G. Ottino & Son THornwall 3-4647 

BOBS AUTO SERVICE OTTINO'S MARKET AND DELICATESSEN 

No Rcoair - o b^To'^o'^La r^/el^r ?„ 's'^'^M^^^l w^'l r . .. COMPLETE FOOD STORE 

''° "^ s'l^OS Ea'st'^r^h "s.^r^eT ^'"' pT^ne" ANiZ^^.'^SirA""'''' IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 2082 SAN PABLO BERKELE"!', CALIFORNIA 



Mfinh. U>5I 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 3 5 



Radio Procurement Made Easier 



'I'heie is no organisation in law I'ntorcnni'nt wlio woiic 
with more energj-, umlcrstandinf; and competency than 
the Assm'iateii Pubh'c Communication Officers and its 
national affiliate, the Associated i'olice Communication 
Officers. The former, celebrating its 13th anniversary 
this February has long been recognized as a body of young 
men devoted to radio for the benetir of the peace officers 
of Northern California. 

These members, equipped with the knowledge of tech- 
nical skills in this fast moving invention, imbued with a 
spirit of cooperation, eminently able to give to their em- 
ployers and the public their plans for installing every fea- 
ture of radio, from erecting broadcasting stations, equip- 
ping cars with the latest of radio equipment and taking 
charge of its operation, have through the years demon- 
strated a willingness to help any law enforcement agency 
to take full advantage of the opportunities of radio, which 
has done so much to make the way of the transgressor a 
short one. 

Our Northern California As.soication, as has others 
throughout the nation, have competent members who can 
go before any governmental body, a town or municipal 
council, a state legislative committee or of the national 
congress and put forth their ideas. They are highly 
thought of by the FCC. They don't always win every- 
thing they go after, but they lay the groundwork for fur- 
ther favorable consideration. 

Over the years such members .-is Captain Brower Mc- 
Murphy of the Alameda Sherifif's office; George Burton 
of Contra Costa Sheriff's office ; Walter Harrington of San 
Mateo Sherifil's office: Chief Charlie K. Simpson, Mon- 
terey; Art Sowles, of the Reno Police Department ; Robert 
Mason and John Atkinson, of Santa Clara; Captain 
Ralph Moore, Piedmont Police Department; Ray Mey- 
ers, \'allejo Police Department; Henry Kirby, San Jose; 
Director George Hippeley, San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment; James Mansfield Lewis, of Marin Sheriff's office, 
and others have accomplished results for police depart- 
ments and sherifif's offices in this section of the state, that 
will be long remembered. 

I hrough the efforts of the national association and the 
Associated Public Communication Officers, there has been 
accomplished something for police radio that has cut red 
tape for making procurement of maintenance for commu- 
nication systems. 

After an interim method of procurement during Febru- 
ary official relief was assured the fore part of March, and 
getting necessary equipment has become a routine matter. 

Superintendent of Commimications Ray Meyers, who 
is in addition to being a member of the APCO has for two 
years been a member of the Communications Committee 
of the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association. 

He has been on this procurement problem and gives a 
rundown on just how the plan now in operation works. 
I he National Production Authority (.NPA) met with 



radio manufacturers during the middle of February and as 
a result the NPA wrote up an MRO, in which the pro- 
cedure for procurement of government maintenance of 
radio systems (including federal, state and municipal) 
was outlined. 

This MRO does not provide for defense order (DO) 
numbers for the public safety agencies, but a few days fol- 
lowing the release of this MRO, another section was re- 
leased to cover police, fire and health departments and 
NPA stated by gentlemen's agreement the manufacturers 
and NPA have agreed to the following as an interim pro- 
cedure for procurement. 

Agencies should submit an affidavit with their purchase 
orders on wholesalers or dealers, certifying that the items 
requested are for maintenance of public safety systems, and 
request the dealer take immediate action to forward the 
order and affidavit to the manufacturer, u'ho in turn will 
make immediate shipment as though it were a defense 
order, and any such shipment of parts, tubes, etc., will be 
over and abo\e the dealer's allocation. 



WISEMAN'S MARKET 



GROCERIES AND MEAT 



3138 Thirteenth Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



ACME ROOFING CO. 

HUmb^ldt 3-3S78 3429 San Pablo Avenue 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



405 Fourteenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



PEA BODY MOTORS 



DESOTO- PLYMOUTH 



3435 Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



TRAILER SPACE 

CAM BRA MOTEL 

Mr. and Mr». B. L. Montffomvry, Owners 

1422 I68lh Avenue at Eai>t Fourteenth Street 

Between Havward and San Leandro 

Phone LUcerne I 9976 



P,ige 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OEFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mrirrh. 1951 



Petaluma's Police Chief — Melvin Del Maestro 



Chiet AIt'l\in Ui'I -Mafstro on j;inuar\- 1 i-oniplftcd 
his first year as head of the Petaliima Police Department, 
and he has during his incumbency continued the splendid 
record of his two predecessors, the late Marcus (Mike) 
Flohr. and retired Chief Robert Peters, who is enjoying 
his pension after 20 years as chief of police. 




Chief Melvin Del Maestro when attending FBI Natiimal 
Police Academy. 

Petaluma now has a city manager, efficient James L. 
Krause, who appointed the chief of police. Heretofore it 
was an elective office. The appointment of Chief Del 
Maestro met with the unanimous approval of Mayor Jas- 
per S. ^Voodson and the six city councilmen. 

The new chief was born in Humboldt County in 1904. 
When he was three years of age his parents moved to 
Petaluma, and young Del Maestro grew up in the famed 
egg center city. He completed his education by graduating 
from the Petaluma High School, after which he became 
a fireman on the oldtime ferry, plying between his city and 
San Francisco, and which was operated b\' the Northwest- 



ern Railway Co., and long since abandoned. In September, 
1933, he joined the PPD. At the time he became a mem- 
ber there were seven men on the force. Today there are 16 
policemen, a matron and secretary, a school crossing officer 
and one to look after parking meters. 

For nine years after becoming a policeman the present 
chief was a motorcycle officer, then for four years he was 
on prowl car duty, followed by one year on office duty, 
then to the rank of inspector, a position he held when ap- 
pointed chief. 

To further complete his training as a police executive. 
Chief Del Maestro was sent to the FBI National Police 
Academy last year and graduated with the 45th class in 
September. He has applied much he learned at the acad- 
emy to his police department. 

He has set up a good bureau of identification with a 
photograph gallery in which he has placed Officer Albert 
Rigelow in charge. A high-speed camera and all necessary 
equipment have been provided including a dark room, 
where Officer Bigelow finishes his prints. 

For the first time the department has a police matron. 
She is Mary Gow, who also serves as secretary. 

Another change made under Chief Del Maestro is the 
abandonment of the rank of Captain and substituting that 
of Deputy Chief. Captain Delbert Cole was selected for 
the new post. Deputy Chief Cole has been a member of 
the PPD 15 years the coming July, and has been a captain 
for the past four years. He was born at Casadero, famed 
resort of Sonoma County, and is another member of the 
department who has completed a course in the FBI Na- 
tional Police Academy, graduating with the class of April, 
1949. 

Petaluma with a population of nearly 1 1 ,000 is the 
center of a great poultry area and the eggs and fowls, con- 
tribute, with a large income from dairying and cattle rais- 
ing, millions of dollars a year to the economy of the city 
of Petaluma. These people are gi\en good law enforce- 




PETALl;M.■\■s^ I'OIHE DEPARTMENT 
Front row, left to right— Assistant Chief Delbert Cole, Chiif D.-l Maestro, Inspector Einin Matsmi, S^-rgeam Donald Noriel ; sec- 
ond row — Officers Harold Vallier, George Wagner, Nathan Jones; third row — Dale Moore, Karl Kohl, Edward Gilmore, :\\ 
Bigelow; fourth row — Rodney Crump, no longer with the department; Rudy Schienkel, Sergeant Herbert Vail; top row — Henrv 
Eslick and Howard Boom. Officer Harvey Parks is not in the picture. 



M,inh. lOril 



POLICU AND PHACH OIFItI:RS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



ment. For over 20 years there has not been a murder in 
the city; not any big robberies or holdups. Burglaries arc- 
not numerous and criminal offenses of a lesser nature arc 
well handled by the members of the police department. 
The records will show that there is not more than three 
cases of reported felonies unsolved for the past 20 years. 
That's a record very rare indeed. 

There is a reason for this. 'I'he four miles square area 
of the city is well patrolled, not onlv by the department's 
three i-way radio patrol cars but by foot patrol. This 
latter is something that Chief Del Maestro has de\ eloped 
to a high state of proficiency. 

He maintains that foot patrol officers can come onto 
more crimes than cruising around in an automobile. 

To justify this attitude one has but to refer to two re- 
cent instances where a beatman broke up two burgiario 
and brought in the burglars. 

One was last February 22. Officer Harvey E. Parks, 
newly appointed, was patrolling his beat when around 
3:05 a. m. he heard some sounds maile with a hammer. 
He found the back door of a hardware store had been 
tampered with. Hailing a passing motorist he asked that 
he summon police reinforcements while he remained on 
guard. With the addetl officers, young Parks went inside 
the store and found two men hiding behind a barrel. They 
also found a complete set of burglar tools lying nearby. 
The two men were locked up in the city jail and it was 
found they were wanted for a job in San Anselmo an<l 
other bay cities. See story of Officer Parks' report. 

Last \ear another officer covering his beat heard the 
breaking of some glass and located a burglar in another 
store, and he likewise was taken to the town bastile. 

Besides the three automobiles the PPD has two ^■ 
wheelers and one motorc\cle. They are all hooked up with 
the department's radio station K.MA-399. The radio 
system is in charge of 'lechnician Arthur Hogatian. a 
mighty good man in this line of police work. 

1 here appears no reason why Chief Del .Maestro can 
not equal the tenure record of former Chief Peters for he 
is a capable police officer and has a good and well trained 
body of men serving under him. 

The roster of the PPD is made up of the following: 

Chief Del Maestro. 

Deputy Chief Cole. 

Inspector FCinor Matson. 

Sergeants Donald Noricl. Herhcrt \'ail and H.irold 
Vallier. 

Patrolman Nathan Jones, Cleorge Wagner, Dale 
Moore, Karl Kohl, Kdward Gilmore, Albert Hfgelow, 
Rudy Schienkel. Henry F.slick, Howard Boom and Har- 
\ey E. Parks. 

Matron Mary Ciow. 

Radio Technician Arthur Hogatian. 

Chief Del Maestro was married on March 26, 1026 to 
Miss Gladys Martin, a resident of Petaluma, and iluring 
their 25 years of marriage they have been active in all ac- 
tivities aimed at the betterment of their ailopted city, and 
the couple are very popular in and around the "World's 
Egg Basket" city. 



INLAND EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 

liiiorporiitiit 

INTERNATIONAL - INDUSTRIAL 

TRACTORS AND LQl iPMLNT 

MOTOR TRICKS 

McCORMICK-DITRING TRACTORS 

FARM MACHINERY 

126 S. MAIN ST., LOni, CALIF. - Tcltphone 808 
ii)(i b. WILSON WAY, STOCKTON, CALIF. 
1. O. Box lOP - Telephone S-59S3 
I i:. Uih STRKET, TRACY, CALIF. - Telephone UiS 

AiUlrcss All Lomniiniii.ilioiii lo Slock toti Offuc 



Phone 976 

Poehlmann Hatchery 

Hatchers of 

BABY CHICKS ami TURKEY PULLETS 

WHITE LEGHORNS, NEW HAMPSHIRES 

RED ROCK CROSS, AUSTRA WHITES 

Salt Lake City Branch 
W. H. Warner, Manager 

620 MAIN STREET 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 
HUNT AND BEHRENS, INC. 



Pi-VIAl.UM A 



HAY - GRAIN - FEED AND POULTRY SUPPLIES 
3 Bridge Street Phone 1243 



\LIFORNIA 



R. O. SHELLING - Grain and Feed 

GRAIN AND FEED 

i hone: Office 928; Resid-nce 1143 

North Main Street 

PKTALUMA lALinViMA 

PETALUMA MILLING COMPANY 

POULTRY FEEDS - HAY - GRAIN - DAIRY TEEDS 

242 Main Slr.el T.lephone 38 

PETAl.LMA CALIFORNIN 

STARLIGHT LAUNDRY 

Mr. and Mr.. John F:lhe. 

WE SPECIALIZE IN BLANKETS AND CURTAINS 

29 Killer Street Phone 2103 

PliTALUMA CALIFORNIA 

INDEPENDENT ICE AND FUEL CO. 



FUEL AND ICE 



10 Third Stre.-t 



CAI.U ORMA 



HARRY PITTS NURSERIES 



HF.AI DS1URG 



ORCHARD SPECIALISTS 
Henld.biirg Phone MB 



I Al II ORS' 



llt^A'.DSnURG 



SCHWAB BROS. 



I 13 Powell Street 



I M II tJHMA 



TOMMY'S TAP ROOM 



SAN FRANCISt O 



T. E. (Tommy) LU/ADER 
DBS Crnvva Avenue 



CALIIORNIA 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mtirrh. lO'il 



Reedley's Chief Miller is a Native of that City 



Chief Joseph S. Miller, who was born in Reedley, en- 
tered law enforcement in August, 1942, under former 
Chief Kmmett L. Remy. 

He worked up to assistant chief in 1944, when Chief 
Remy entered the Navy. In 1946 Rcniy returned to Reed- 




Chief Joseph S. Miller 

ley and assumed his place as head of the Police Depart- 
ment, a post he held until his retirement in September, 
1949. 

Joseph Miller was immediately appointed as Chief and 
has held the position in a manner that has won the high 
esteem of all the people in and around Reedley. This little 
San Joaquin city of upwards of 5000 population, is the 
center of a rich agricultural area. Every form of vege- 
tables, fruits, berries, nuts, and field crops, flourish. Too, 
there are nearby, dairying, cattle raising and poultry farms 
all pouring hundreds of thousands of dollars into the city 
of Reedley. 

In addition to Chief Miller there are four regular offi- 
cers as follows : 

Assistant Chief John D. Kroeker, Officers Roy Hinter- 
gardt, Glenn Webb and Joseph Rhodes. 

There are three special officers — Elmer Rodie, James 
Marin and William Fetinak. 

The Police Department has two radio equipped cars. 
The station call letters are KMA490. 

In case of an emergency Constable Paul Yount, and 
Chief Melvin Clancy of Orange Cove stand by to render 
any aid needed by the Reedley department. 

Under Chief Miller's able direction the civilian defense 
program has been set up for Reedley and the following are 
the departments and personnel of the setup: 

Police Protection — Chief Miller. 

Fire and Disaster — Fire Chief J. A. Stewart. 

Transportation and Evacuation — Lorin Peck and Don 
Fair. 



Relief and Guidance — Fred Kurtz. 

Health and Immunization — Mrs. J. Isaak. 

Air Raid Warden — James Browning. 

Rationing — Stanley Nelson. 

Advisory Committee — Former Police Chief Remy and 
Arvie Nevemi. 

Mayor F. M. Hammach heads the defense program and 
is given all assistance by City Manager S. Smith. 

Chief Miller and his wife Stella have three sons, Joseph 
S. Jr., Charles and David Miller. Joseph, junior, was a 
member of the Reedley P. D. for a time until he joined the 
U. S. Navy as a radio operator in World War II. He 
took part in the Okinawa invasion aboard a L.S.T. 

Chief Miller served in the Navy in World War I as 
a gunner's mate on the cruiser San Diego which was sunk 
by a mine in July, 1918. He was transferred after this 
disaster to transport duty aboard the S.S. Platshurg, where 
he served until the Armistice on November 11, 1918. 



Telephone 424 



FARMERS SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

DEALERS IN 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 
Compliments to All Peace Officers 

955 Eye Street 
REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 



REEDLEY SHEET METAL WORKS 



REEDLEY 



Phone 2181 



1049 "G" Street 



CALIFORNIA 



PARIS GARDEN 

ing "TEXAS MOM" - COCKTAILS - MEALS - DANCING 
WESTERN BAND MUSIC 
Gena and Georgia Phone Fowler 3803 

n 302-B FOWLER, CALIFORNIA 

CASA DOME CAFE 

SERVICE STATION - MEALS - SANDWICHES 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 

Phone 44R-3 Selma 



Rt. 1. Box 347 SELMA, CALIFORNIA 


THE DOLLAR HOTEL 


1317 Spring Street - "On the Highway" 


Telephone 102J 


PASO ROBLES 


CALIFORNIA 


ARMY SUPPLY 




110 No. H Street 122 1 Spring 
LOMPOC PASO ROBLES 
Phone 3542 Phone 1502 


113 E. Main 
SANTA MARIA 
Phone 5-590 



March. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



REEDLEY FEED & SEED CO. 

POULTRY AND DAIRY FEEDS AND SUPPLIES 
POULTRY REMEDIES - COVER CROP SEEDS 



TSUTOMU TOM SASAKI 



GENERAL INSURANCE 
LIFE • AUTO • FIRE • MARINE 

1355 I Strcrt Phone 53S-J 

CALIFORNIA 



1011 G Street Telephone 272 

REEDLII CALIFORNIA 

MILLER'S GARAGE 

Phones: 
Day 292-W Nijht 247-R 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1656 Tenth Street 
REEDLEY CALIFORNIA 

KENMOR JEWELERS 

nth and C Streets 
REEDLEY. CALIFORNIA 

KENMOR JEWELERS 

7lh and O Street 

SANGER. CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY CAFE 

GOOD FOOD AND 
YOUR FAVORITE DRINK 

1154 "G" Street 

CALIFORNIA 



PUNCH & JUDY 

"A Darn Good Place to Eat" 

REEDLEY'S NEWEST AND FINEST 
FOUNTAIN LUNCH 



1117 G Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CHAS. B. LEE 

TRUCK AND AUTO SERVICE 
nth and I Phone 774 



CALIFORNIA 



I Office Phone 19fi 



KIM BROS. 

PACKERS AND NURSERYMEN 
REEDLEY NURSERY 



Yard Phone 126 



UNITED COMPANY 

1427 Eye Street 



CALIFORNIA 



REEDLEY STEAM LAUNDRY 



1319 G Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Eighth and Eye Streets 



P. O. Box 587 



Reedley Cab Co. and Green Lantern Cafe 

Open 6 A. M. to 2 A. M. 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 

1210 G Street Phone 400 

RF.EDLEY CALIFORNIA 

DONS & SHORTY'S OPTIMO CLUB 



1022 G Street 



Phone 184-W 



CALIFORNIA 



SANTA FE MARKET 

H. D. Hagopian, Prop. 
GROCERIES. MEATS AND VEGETABLES 



1201 G Street 



CALIFORNIA 



661 C Street 



HIGH SCHOOL SERVICE 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 



CALIFORNIA 



REEDLEY ELECTRICAL SUPPLY 



1616 East nth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAM JORGENSEN PUMP CO. 

IRRIGATION PUMPS - DOMESTIC PUMPS - REPAIRS 

1129 F Street Phone 108 
LF.Y CALIFORNIA 

RELIABLE SHOE STORE 

A. K. Tomajan 

RED GOOSE SHOES 

•Half the Fun of Having Feet" 

1136 G Street Phone 485 

LEY CALIFORNIA 

HERSCHEL'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

GAS - OIL - BATTERIES ■ TIRES 
AND TIRE RECAPPING 
900 G Street Phone 925 

-FY CALIFORNIA 



MANDARIN CAFE 



CALIFORNIA REEDLEY 



1040 G Street 



DAVID RADIO SHOP 

RADIOS - REFRIGERATORS - SPORTING GOODS 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES HARDWARE 

GIFT ITEMS • PAINTS 



C ALIFORNIA 



RADIATORS CLEANED . REPAIRED - RECORED 
Specialists in Cars. Trucks. Tractors. Stationary Enfin 
We Pick Up and Deliver 

REEDLEY RADIATOR SHOP 

Phone Z42-W 



1142 G Street 



C AI-MORNIA 



ERWINS SERVICE 



1603 nth Street 



Phone 139 



HASHIMOTO SHOE REPAIR 

ALL TYPES OF SHOE REPAIRS 
1721 1 Ith Street 



CALIFORNIA HF.KDI.EY 



CALIFORNIA 



Pttge 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mnnh. IQ'il 



Kids Knot Hole Club for Seals Stadium 



The San Francisco Police Uepartnient has been well 
treated by KPIX, the city's first television station. From 
its inception KPIX has given time on Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings to broadcasts of wanted people and missing 
persons. Inspector Edward Comber first handled these 
programs and when he took over duties connected with 




Cai'Tain John P. Meehan 

civilian defense his assistant, Inspector John Kane, as- 
sumed charge. He has continued the splendid record of his 
partner. 

This month a new feature has been introduced. It is 
on every other Monday for 15 minutes, and the program 
is logged as Police Call Letters — KI\IA 438. This is the 
SFPD radio call letters and numbers. 

The first program was February 12th and featured Di- 
rector of Traffic Jack Eker, who under the able question- 




Inspectors John Kanf (left), and Edward Comlier. They have 
made history on Television Station KPIX. 



ing of Inspector Kane gave a graphic picture of the prob- 
lems of traffic as affecting the city. 

On the evening of F'ebruary 26 Inspector Kane had as 
his guest Captain John P. Meehan, of the Juvenile Bu- 
reau, who has served all of his tenure with the Police De- 
partment, excepting nine years on a beat in the Mission 
District, with the Big Brother Bureau and has been in 
charge since the retirement of the late Lieutenant Harry 
Reilly. With Captain Meehan was Paul Fagan, president 
and owner of the Seals baseball club. With well placed 
queries by Inspector Kane the Captain gave a rundown of 
the duties of the Juvenile Bureau and its scope of activi- 
ties, and he stressed the necessity of providing clean and 
interesting recreational outlets for juveniles. He referred 
to the many organizations for boys and girls and how they 
had contributed to the steering of the young folks into the 
right paths. Then he told how the Juvenile Bureau had 
been invited by Mr. Fagan to organize a Knothole Club to 
which every young boy or girl could see free baseball games 
played at Seals Stadium by the home team on Wednesday 
and Saturday afternoons. He declared this was a notable 
instance of a man prominent not only in baseball, but in 
various business concerns, doing something worthwhile for 
the future citizens of San Francisso. 

Paul Fagan said he was glad to be able to do this kind 
and public service act. That he has provided seats for the 
youngsters in the rightfield stands and had added 2000 
more seats in the centerfield stands. He and Captain Mee- 
han stated there would be issued 20,000 knothole tickets 
which would entitle the holders to attend every game on 
the two specified davs when the Seals were playing. 

Tickets ma>' be obtained at any of the district stations, 
the Juvenile Bureau, Police Academy, and other imits of 
the PD making a total of 13 places where the specially 
printed ducats may be had. 

Inspector Kane, who is a swell baritone singer, is equal- 
1\' efficient at the microphone. He has a striking person- 
ality, knows how to handle the King's English and his 
voice that comes in over the television sets is a pleasing 
and sincere one. 



Mohr & Sons Division, American Optical Co. 

Wholesale, Manufacluring and Importing 

OPTICIANS 

Telephone GArfield 1-8515 - Mohr Building - 883 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE'S MARKET 

2100 Market Street UNderhill 1-9248 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

GENERAL FISH CO. 

535 Washington Street YUkon 6-0340 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



\r,irch. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e 41 



Braking Tests By Yellow Cab Company 



The tcatiirf of thr program prepared b\ Wanlen Clin- 
ton T. Duffy, of San Quentin, for the January meeting 
of the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association, is some- 
thing of which there should be a lot more. Not only for 
peace officers but for every man or woman driving an 
automobile. 

Warden Duffy had arranged with the Yellow Cab 
Company of San Francisco to pur on a demonstration of a 
special feature each driver has to undergo before he is 
given a job jockeying a taxicab. 

The Cab Company sent over an old taxicab with 150.- 
000 miles on its speedometer and with it C. D. Randall, 
in charge of the safety work of the company, and a.ssistant 
John Brooks as well as Director of Safety C. L. Srack, a 
man who knows his mathematics and how to apply this 
knowledge to see how much time it takes and how far a 
car goes to bring it to a stop at various speeds. 

The car brought to the San Quentin groimds was pro- 
vided with a metal detonator with two barrels holding 
blank cartridges loaded with chalk capsules. 

Under Randall's direction several peace officers were 
asked to step into the car and take the driver's seat. They 
were told when reaching a designated speed to step on the 
brake. When they did so one of the cartridges was dis- 
charged leaving a large chalk mark on the pavement, and 
as the driver depresses the brake the other cartridge is set 
off, leaving another chalk mark. 

UNITED AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

CoUman Shapiro 

PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 

24O0 Broadway TEmplebar 2-4613 



OAKLAND 



rAl.lFORNIA 



MAYS PLACE 

Specializint in 

HOME COOKING 

Phone LOckhavcn 8-7834 14623 Eait 14th Street 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

OJEDA MOTOR SERVICE 

(Formerly Shand^ lun^ Lp S-rvire) 

LATEST TESTING EQUIPMENT 

Veltex Ca> and Oil 

14285 Ea»t t4th Street LOckhavcn 9-3983 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

I. C. UNRUH. Prop. TWinoak> 3-2472 

OAKLAND WELDING SUPPLY 

ACETYLENE A ELECTRIC RODS. SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 
ARC WELDERS - REPAIR SERVICE on all Make* ol Equipment 



ISO TVIFLFTH srRFFI 



lAKI.AND. ( AIIFdRMA 



MASSAGE COLONICS 

AID TO HEALTH STEAM BATHS 



FOR MEN AND WOMEN 
2049 Eaat I4lh Street Phonr LOckh.i' 

SAN LEANDRO 



8-0871 

( AI.IFORNIA 



RANDY'S FROZEN STEAKS 

BEEF • PORK • VEAL 
I8SS Waihinilon Avenue LOckhavrn H-3a2l 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN LF.ANDRO 



THOS. CARTER CiLASS CO. 



333 Ninth Street 



Phone HIcate 4-77S3 

CALIFORNIA 



\Vhcre the ordinary driver would estimate he could stop 
a car going 30 mph in around ten or twelve feet, several 
tests made at this demonstration showed that the driver 
had gone some 75 feet before bringing the car to a stop, 
45 feet which was the "braking distance" made on each 
test. 

After the luncheon Director Srack gave a most interest- 
ing and informative talk on the demonstrations, punctuat- 
ing his remarks with timely humor. He pointed out that 
since the Yellow Cab Company adopted this course of 
training the accidents have been reduced each year and 
the costs of accidents have decreased to a level that means 
profits instead of losses in big cities. 

The first year, 1947, taxi accidents decreased ]5^r and 
the loss from accidents fell off more than $100,000. 

Everyone of the large attendance of law enforcement 
officers stayed to watch the demonstration, and many were 
the words of commendations for the thoughtfulness of 
\Varden Duffy for providing it and the \'ellow Cab Com- 
pany for pro\iding the men and equipment for the tests. 



Telephone 485 



Residence 705-\\X 



Selma Trailer 
Manufacturing, Inc. 

Designers tnid Matin jactnrers 

Builders of the Famous SELMA Trailer 
E. G. (Ernie) Jacobsen, President 

U. S. 99 at Highland 
SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



SELMA SERVICE SHOP 



Phone I02e-W 



1922 E. Front Street 



CALIFORNIA 



AVENUE AUTO PARTS 

NEW AND USED PARTS 

CLASS INSTALLED 

•WE BUY. SELL OR EXCHANGE CARS " 



3120 San Pablo Av 



HUmholdl 3 0728 

I ALII (1RNI \ 



BAY CITY CABINET CO. 



1076 Fifth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



REFRKiERATION SPECIALISTS. Ltd. 

COMMERCIAL ■ HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATION 

ENGINEERS - SALES AND SERVICE 

KEIIoi 4-5140 Nilhl Calli LO 8 1839 

2264 Ea>l Twelllh Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



P,,ge 42 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Selma is a Well Policed City 



Mrirrh. 1951 



Selma, with over bOOO cotitented people living within 
its incorporated limits, is another of those rich agricultural 
and stock raising areas of the San Joaquin Valley. Located 
200 miles from San Francisco, along Route 99, it has built 
up a fine reputation during its 70 years of existence for its 
diversified crops. Cotton, hay, dairy products, melons, 
poultry and turkeys, apricots, figs, plums, berries and other 
fruits are grown in abundance. Peaches, which has caused 
the Selma district to be known as the "Home of the 
Peach" and raisin grapes which has won for the area a 



The people are all friendly and welcome all visitors 
whether for a short stop over on a trip north or south on 
Route 99, or for a longer period. Many such visitors find 
the little farming and industrial city a good place to make 
their future home. 

Selma, as do all cities in California, large or small, has 
a Police Department, as do all other of these cities, it has 
a good one. It is headed by Chief O. L. Richardson, and 
is made up of six more officers. They have all been gradu- 
ated from local FBI training schools. 



CITY HALL 




Peace Officers frorr 
to right is Assistar 



CONFERENCE OF PEACE OFFICERS 

many San Joatiuin towns met last Fall in Selma for instruction from FBI agent instructo 

t Chief E. O. Summerville, fourth from end; fifth is Chief Richardson. Two men on extn 

front row are FBI agents. 



In hack row, Icftl 
right and left off 



top place in this farming endeavor as has its meat packing 
plant, which is well known, not only throughout this 
state, but from many other points within the United 
States. Around Selma will be found the largest herds of 
Aberdeen-Angus cattle, which continually win first prize 
ribbons at all livestock shows on this coast. 

The people of Selma are well housed. The streets of 
the town are tree lined, and all homes are well kept with 
nice lawns and a variety of flowers and ^hrubs which 
thrive there. 



All members of the SPD are \ eterans of A\'orl(l War II| 
with the exception of the Chief. 

Chief Richardson, a native of California has been in 
law enforcement work for over ten years, eight years of 
which he has been on the Selma force. 

The Assistnt Chief is E. O. Sommerville. 

There are three patrol cars with three-way radio, and 
the entire city is given a continuous patrol. On numerous 
occasions the SPD has assisted the Sheriff's office in pur- 
suing and capturing wanted criminals. 



Miirrh. I(J>1 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page -1? 



Phone yo 



Turkey Growers 
Cooperative 

of Central Ctdijoniici 

P. O. BOX 7 

SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4S2 



A. W. Merrel 



Selma Plumbing Shop 

CONTRACTING 
PAINTS - WALL PAPER 

1952 EAST FRONT STREET 

SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 31 1 

Valley Lumber Company 

O. V. (\'ic) Martin, Local Manager 

BUILDING MATERIAL 
MERCHANTS 

Lumber, Hardwood Flooring, Built-l'p and Readv 

; Roofing, Vi'all Board, Lath, Plaster, Lime and (ic- 

i ment. Cedar Shingles, Millwork, Paint, Hardware. 

Yiinh LociiltfJ tit 

^elma - Kingsburg - Hanford - Lemoore - Fresno 

Seiniti Yards and Office 

East Front and North Street 

SELMA. CALIFORNIA 



1 



Telephone 650 

W. C. KRAFT 

BLACKSMITHING mid WELDING 

Civiwriil Rclniir Work 

2035 Arrants Street 
SELMA. C: A L I F O R N I A 



Oflice Phone "6 j 1 



C. 0. BROSE 



Guanniteed Well Drillin ^ 

We have drilled more than 4,000 wells in this 

district carefuly recording all formations. 

C. O. Brose, Res. Phone 76 R I 

Ale.x- VC'inter, Jr., Res. Phone 76 J 2 

29 Years of Well Drilling Experience in this 

Territory ! 

One-half Mile South of Selnia on the 

Golden Stale Hij^hiiiiy 

SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 109 

Selma Feed & Seed Store 

J. B. Hill Co., Inc. 

FERTILIZER - SULPHUR - PAPER TRAYS 
POULTRY - EGGS 

Every Feed a Superior Feed 

2051 WEST FRONT STREET 

SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



McDonald's Cafes 

Harry Beck - Ben McDonald - Bob Beck 
CENTER AND FLORAL 

VISALIA, CALIFORNIA 



HIGHWAY 99 

SELMA, CALIFORNIA 
I _, 

^ , 



Adkins Richfield Service 



COMPLIMENTS TO ALL PEACE OFFICERS 



Highway 99 and Dc Wolf 
SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



P^tge 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



M/irrh. 1951 



Phone 549 



BURT'S PLACE 

99 CAFE 

Mixed Drinks 

Limp in . . . Leap Out 



SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



W. DAN SHARP 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 

LAYNE AND BOWLER 
PUMPS AND PUMP REPAIRING 



Phone 1-W and 1-R 



202S W. Front Street 

CALIFORNIA 



WEST FRONT INN 

Manuel and Alex, Props. 

SANDWICHES - BEER - SOFT DRINKS 

Open from 9:00 A.M. 'til 2:00 A.M. 

I6I3 West Front 



CALIFORNIA 



A. KIMBRELL'S PLACE 

MEALS - SHORT ORDERS - BEER - SOFT DRINKS 
GAS - OIL - SUNLAND PRODUCTS 

Selma, General Delivery Phone 203-W 

CALIFORNIA 



ITO'S CHOP SUEY 

CHINESE FOOD 

BEER SERVED 

Open 11:00 A.M. 'til 11:00 P.M. 



161S West Front 



Phone 603-W 



Telephone 166 



Selma Steam Laundry and 
Dry Cleaning Works 



W. F. Mason, Prop. 



1724 Tucker Street 
SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



SELMA BEAUTY SALON 

Virginia Outzen, Prop. 
2040 High Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SLAVENS RADIATOR SERVICE 



One Mile North of Sein 
P. O. BOX 188 



Highway 99 

SELMA. CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



JANIAN CLEANERS & DYERS 

DEPENDABLE PRESSING SERVICE 

Office, Selma Theatre Building 

Plant, Cor. Nebraska & Third Phone 98-W 

SELMA CALIFORNIA 

SELMA POULTRY YARD 

James Sagor, Prop. 

FRYERS. HENS, TURKEYS AND EGGS 

We Cater to Hotels and Restaurants - Live or dressed 

Phone 707-W 2166 E. Front Street 

SELMA CALIFORNIA 

Roy Katsura Tech Komoto 

MID VALLEY APPLIANCE 

SALES AND SERVICE - PHILCO and R.C.A. RADIOS 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES OF ALL TYPES 

Telephone 53-J 1958 E. Front Street 

SELMA CALIFORNIA 

FREDERICK'S FEED AND HATCHERY 

SEEDS and FEEDS 
1931 FIRST STREET Phone 130-W 

SELMA CALIFORNIA 

SIERRA MOTEL 

Owned and Operated by C. L. Bingham 

NEW - MODERN - AIR CONDITIONED 

U. S. Highway 99 at Branch St. Phone: Selma 584 

SELMA CALIFORNIA 



M,ir,h. t')=<l 



POLICl- AND PEACE OIFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



BAY COUNTIES PEACE OFFICERS 

(Continued from page I'J) 

Sheriff Karl Whitniore of San Mateo was conlincil in .1 
hospital tollowing an operation and his office sent C'liict 
Deputy Walter H. Moore to the nieetinji. 

Chief I'rban Pickeririg of Modesto came up to the 
gathering and had as his guest Stanislaus County's new 
sheriff, Dan Kelsay. • » » 

Sheriff Howard Honibuckle. Santa Clara Count\, en- 
joyed every feature of the ilay's program. 

♦ » * 

William Pflaum, Piedmont, was unable to attend but 
Captain Dan W. James was present at the festivities, llic 
same was the case of Chief A. H. Excell, Mountain V'iew. 
In his stead were Officers Henry E. Henderson and Law- 
rence A. Grilli. Chief Melvin Flohr, Santa Rosa, could 
not be present so Lieutenant \V. W. Clark, substituted. 

Officer Charles Palmer was there for the Martinez 
Police Departnient. • • * 

Former Chief Michael IC. Mitchell, SFPI), was among 
a delegation of other members of the department. Director 
of Traffic Jack Kker, Director of Personnel John Fngler, 
Chief of Inspectors James English, Captain Otto Meyer, 
Director of Information George Hippely, Inspector John 
Schilling, Officer Robert G. Sullivan, driver of the Chief's 
automobile and Officer Ernest M. Carli. 

• • • 

San Mateo's able District Attorne\ Louis U. Dematteis 
was al.so among those present. He is highh' esteemed b\ 

the members of the association. 

» • » 

Former Chief William ']". Stanford, who headed the 
X'allejo Police Department for over 35 years was up from 
Los Angeles to be present at the San Quentin meeting. He 
was given a rousing reception when he was called upon to 
take a bow. • « ♦ 

Chief George Brereton and August Mister of the State 
Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation came 
down from Sacramento to enjoy the meeting. 

SIERRA BOULEVARD GROCERY 

A. C. Jacques and Sons 

CAFE - BEER AND WINES 

GAS AND OIL 

Opposite Airport Phone 4-6030 

VISALIA (AI.IIORNIA 



Phone 548 



The Best Liquors 

Cocklctils - Mixed Drinks 

"Servinj; the Hcst I'ood in I'own" 
Hours H til 2 A. ^L 

SELMA, CALIFORNIA 

i 



Attorne.N William 1*. CJoldcn, Ignatin^ McCarty, ex- 
pert investigator, Albert Rhine, magician ami realtor, 
Larry Barrett, former member of the SP'PD, now a big 
time garage operator and tire dealer, Don Cameron, Pub- 
lic Utilities Commissioner, Ernest 'Forregano, Planning 
Commissioner, 'Fhomas Cusick from District Attorney 
Thomas L\iich"s office and Attorney Walter Duane were 
others from San Irancisco. 

a • ♦ 

Daniel .Murphy, Jr., son (if Sheriff Daniel Murphy, 
made his first appearance at a meeting of the Association 

and he filed ,in application for membership. 

Constables who signed luncheon cards were I'rancis T. 
Merriman and Albert Bauman of Vallejo and C. Ray 
Willett, Martine/. Deputy Sheriff J. .M. Joseph repre- 
sented Crockett. 

In .iildition to Deputy Greening, Deputies Leon V. 
Palmer and S. B. Fontaine were others from Sheriff H. P. 
Gleason's Alameda County office. 
* * m 

Chief State Parole Officer Fred Finslcy was another 
state officer from Sacramento noted at the meeting. 

V * *■ 

Ra\ Meyers, Superintendent of Communications for the 
V'allejo Police Department; 'Fhomas A. Bayley, County 
Radio Commum'cations Superintendent; ami Deputy L. 
L. Headlee were others from Solano Count\ taking in the 
day's e\ents. 

1 he FBI was well represented — from their San Fran- 
cisco offices were James Neel, Richard Godfrey, Warren 
W. Richmond and William J. Slattery who resides in San 
Raf:iel. « ♦ « 

Judge John R. Flor, of Larkspur, took a seat at the 
festi\e ho.ud. He has missed but few meetings of the As- 
sociation. Another oldtimer was former Councilman 
George W. McNulty of Redwood City. 

An important guest was Chief James D. Turner of Air 
Police Division, A.P.M., Hamilton Field. 

GIAQUE AND VON DOHLEN 

BODY AND FENDER WORKS 

■U WRECK 'EM — WE FIX EM" 

1700 Yajonr Strrel Nnpi.. CnHfornlii 



Phone 54 




Selma Auto 


Electric Co. 


La I'ontaine 


- (r.nciro 


Distiih//lor of 


c:mrysli:r - 


PI.YMOnil 


(darcncc (!ra\cir< 


- Phone 63 I- 15 


! SKLMA, CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



Herb Edcll Prop CALL and DELIVER SERVICE 

SEABREEZE RADIO SERVICE 

T.V. SALES AND SERVICE - GUARANTEED RADIO REPAIRS 
3614 Taraval treel LOmbard 4-8282 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Mrs. D. O'Connor, Proprietor Telephone HEmlock 1-2725 

O'CONNOR CLEANERS 

"ALTERATIONS OF ALL KINDS" 
4243 Eighteenth Street, near Diamond St. 

SAN F RANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone UN 3-2483 Res- VA 4-2729 

McGRAW MOVING CO. 

LOCAL AND HIGHWAY DELIVERIES 
3470 19th Street, near Valen< 



DOLORES CREAMERY 

501 Dolores Street HEmlock 1-9306 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

STEMPEL QUALITY DOUGHNUTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



320 Fell Street 



CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY LIQUOR STORE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



25 LeIand Street 



CALIFORNIA 



C. LETIN & SON 

CABINET MAKERS & CARPENTERS 

STORE AND OFFICE FIXTURES 

1328 Valencia St., Near 24th Tel. VAIencia 4-6184 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CHINATOWN CHARLIE'S 

Chas. Y. CHU, Prop. 

FOR THOSE WHO ARE FUSSY ABOUT THEIR FOOD 

American and Chinese Dishes and Food to Take Out 

2615 Mission Street Phone VAIencia 6-9866 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Nick Kobseff Glenn M. Kerch 

NIN'S RICHFIELD STATION 



ANCHORAGE TAVERN 



SAN FRANCISCO 



2276 Chestnut 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MIRRON CLOTHING 

1750 Geary Street 



CALIFORNIA 



2401 - 24th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



VAIencia 4-2386 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



COZY COVE 

SID & ED 
130 Clement Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SIXTH STREET LIQUOR STORE 



143 Sixth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA ■ SAN FRANCISCO 



ALASKAN CAFE 



3137 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Gunar & Mark, Props. MOntrose 4-9881 

REX GARAGE 

MOTOR TUNE-UP - GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS - ACCESSORIES 

MOHAWK GAS AND OIL 

2120 Taraval Street at 31st Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

TWIN JACK'S CAFE 

FINEST FOOD SERVED AT ALL TIMES 
705 Divisadero Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LYON CLEANERS 



1597 Fulton Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA sAN FRANCISCO 



PEZZOLO GROCERY 

2292 Greenwich 



CALIFORNIA \ 
1 



CALIFORNIA ' 



PARODI FLORAL CO. 



Phone Fllln 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1215 McAllister Street 

CALIFORNIA 



WAInut 1-8502 B. Silverman, Prop. 

ALLIED SMOKE SHOP 



SAN FRANCISCO 



WINES - LIQUORS 
1399 Fillmore Street 



H. AND M. GROCERY 

499 Douglass Street Mission 8-9726 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

STAR CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

Phone GArfield 4-9441 

700 Post Street, Comer Jones 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



J. FOX FUR CO. 



INDEPENDENT MEXICO CITY CAFE 



2341 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



7-9871 

CALIFORNIA 



1792 Haight Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CRESCENT PACIFIC OIL CO. 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



2065 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FAIRWAY FOOD CENTER 

MEATS - POULTRY - GROCERIES 

FRUITS - VEGETABLES - WINES AND BEER 

Phone UNderhill 1-7936 - 1-7937 2905 - 16th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



VISIT CHINATOWN'S 



LOTUS BOWL 

FOR DELICIOUS CHINESE FOOD 



. . . BU Y . . . 
U. S. SAVINGS BONDS 



626 Grant Avenu 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



.Urtr</;. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



POLICE PROMOTION EXAMINATION 
QUESTIONS 

1. You are a lieutenant. A sergeant who has just been 
promoted from the rank of patrolman is turned over to 
you for instructions as to his new duties. Set forth, in 
not more than 300 words the points you would stress for 
his guidance. Number your sentences. 

2. Define two felonies and two misdemeanors, and give 
examples of each. 



1. In making an arrest doors cannot be broken until the 
purpose of admittance is explained. 

2. A person may be guilty of a crime although he can 
prove he had no criminal intent in doing the act consti- 
tuting the crime. 

3. A person found guilty of assault to commit murder may 
be punished by one year in prison. 

4. A second prosecution for the same offense is illegal. 

5. Bribing a witness is a felony. 

6. Bigamy is a felony. 

7. When a husband is fined for nonsupport of his wife the 
entire fine may be given to the wife. 

8. No juvenile under the age of 18 may be placed in any 
prison, in company with adults convicted of crime, ex- 
cept in the presence of a proper official. 

9. Wilfully submitting to an abortion is a felony. 

10. In court, the charge of keeping a disorderly house, may 
be proved by its common reputation. 

11. It is unlawful for a pawnbroker to charge in excess of 
ten per cent per annum. 

12 Spitting upon any part of a public building is a misde- 
meanor. 

13. Three persons must be present to constitute an unlawful 
assembly. 

14. It is illegal to buy mechanical tools from persons under 
the age of 18. 

15. The phrase "night time" has two legal meanings in this 
state. 

16. Indispensable evidence is that without which a particu- 
lar fact cannot be proved. 

17. The declaration of a dying person made under a sense 
of impending death is not admissible respecting the 
cause of his death. 

18. A malicious intent is conclusively presumed from the 
deliberate commission of an unlawful act for the pur- 
pose of injuring another. 

19. Unless otherwise expressly provided by statute every 
citizen has a right to take a copy of any public record. 

20. If a defendant in a criminal action offers himself as a 
witness he may be cross-examined as to all matters hav- 
ing any bearing on his trial. 

21. The knowledge of the court is evidence. 

22. The trial judge may discharge one of the several de- 
fendants before trial that he may be a witness. 

GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 



LAURITSON AND DODA 

AMUSEMENT GAMES - CIGARETTE MACHINES 
WHOLESALE CANDY AND TOBACCO 



233 Salinas Sir 



( ALIKOKMA 



T. W. G. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SOPAC SHIP MAINTENACE CO. 



1168 Battery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone sutler 1-5890 

CALIFORNIA 



M. SCHUSSLER & CO., Incorporated 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PAUL'S TAVERN 



Paul and Marie, Props. 
3346 Mission Street VAIencta 4-9775 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



F. BAREIS H. CIALLWITZ 

F. & G. PORK STORE, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE SAUSAGES AND CORNED MEATS 

2770 Mission Street Mission 7-4003 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOHN F. O'SULLIVAN, Attorney at Lau 

1500 Central Tower 708 Market Street GArfield 1-209O 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ORTON MACHINE CO. 

Mantif.icturers of 

WOODWORKING MACHINERY - ENDLESS BED SURFACES 

CUTTER HEADS - SPECIAL MACHINERY 

390 Fremont Street Phone SUlter 1-1631 

SAN FRANC LSI O CALIFORNIA 



PARIS: 34 Rue La Boeli< 



SHANGHAI: 61 Nankint Road 



L. KOSLOFF 

CHINESE ANTIQUES 
Shreve BIdg. 204 - 210 Post Street Phone YUkon 6-1691 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

FRANK KARP 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

DIAMONDS • WATCHES • JEWELRY 

133 Kearny Street, Room 201 EXbrook 2-8143 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ALBERT PICARD 

40S Montgomery Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



E. J. LAND 

Authorized Watch Inspector (or 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. - WESTERN PACIFIC R. R. 

Watch Repairing with Care and Precision 

745 Third Street fOpp. Depot) EXbrook 2-4898 

SAN FRANC I.SCI) (ALIIoRNIA 

IDEAL PAINT AND WALLPAPER CO. 

Wholesale— DUPONT— Retail 

PAINTERS" AND PAPERHANCVERS' SUPPLIES 

Phone WEst 1-6331 2200 Lombard St. (Corner Steiner) 

SAN FRANCIS(C> ( ALIFORMA 



...BUY... 
U. S. SAVINGS BONDS 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



jMtinh. 19^1 



23. Unwritten law is administered in California courts. 

24. If the jury receives evidence out of court other than that 
resulting from a view of the premises a new trial may 
be granted. 

25. Oral evidence of the contents of an affidavit is as good 
evidence as the affidavit itself. 

26. Two witnesses are necessar)' to prove perjury. 

27. If a juror becomes a witness a new jury must be drawn. 

28. Proof equivalent to a demonstration is not demanded by 
the law of evidence. 

29. A malicious intent is conclusively presumed from the 
deliberate commission of an unlawful act for purpose of 
injuring another. 

30. Upon a trial for bigamy both marriages may be proved 
by such evidence as is admissible to prove a marriage 
in other cases. 

FAIRWAY FOOD CENTER 

MEATS • POULTRY • GROCERIES 
FRUITS • VEGETABLES • WINES AND BEER 



Phone: UNderhill 1-7936- 1-7937 

SAN FRANCISCO 



16th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



John Bresolin Gido Lera Italo Pietri 

NEW REX RESTAURANT 

ITALIAN DINNERS 
401 Broadway Tel. GArfield 1-3670 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

WILLIAM J. FORSTER SONS, Ltd. 

PLUMBING 
340 Harriet Street Telephone HEmlock 1-6774 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SALES - SERVICE - PARTS Telephone 4-2362 

SAN JOAQUIN TRACTOR & IMPLEMENT 

Your Ferguson Dealer 

A COMPLETE LINE OF FARM MACHINERY 

I7I8 Mariposa Road. I Miles South o( Fairgrounds on 99 Hiway 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



ROYAL PINE MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS -VEGETABLES 
1018 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone ORdway 3-4230 



J. B. Bourdet 



HIGH - GRADE FRENCH LAUNDRY 



1558 Bush Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Van Ness Ave 



CALIFORNIA 



LEXINGTON MARKET 



2791 Bush Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone WEst 1-9951 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHNNIE'S RESTAURANT COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

MARINA BOWL 

"THAT FRIENDLY, COZY BOWLING ALLEY" 
1725 Filbert Street GRaystone 4-9937 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JACKSON MARKET 



1201 Jackson Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GEORGES FRUIT MARKET 

BEER, WINES AND LIQUORS 
1086 Valencia Street Phone VAIencia 4-3996 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE M. PHILPOTT CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1060 Bryant Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GALATOIRE'S 

Mission 8-9932 



4744 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CLAY FRENCH LAUNDRY 

CASH AND CARRY 
WAlnut 1-4115 2045 Divisadero Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

FINNISH BATHS 

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
Open Daily 11 A.M. to 10 P.M. 

1834 Divisadero Street WEst 1-6625 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



HI - LO CAFE 



HALE HOTEL 

939 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



RITE -SPOT FOOD CENTER 

Morten Holm, Prop. 
"THE COMPLETE FOOD MARKET" 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1025 Taraval Street 



CALIFORNIA 



RUGS AND CARPETS HOME APPLIANCES 

TARAVAL FURNITURE CO. 

"MODERN FOR YOUNG BUDGETS" 
800 Taraval Street, Cor. 18th Ave. Phone SE. 1-6010 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SEABREEZE PHARMACY 

Ralph Kattge, Owner 

QUALITY - SERVICE - COURTESY 

3600 Taraval Street LOmbard 4-270O 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNI/ 

HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN 



1686 O'Fa 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JOrdan 7-1914 



CALIFORNIA 



691 Broadway GArfield 1-1815 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



FLORENCE RAVIOLI FACTORY 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES 
1412 Stockton Street GArfield 1-7718 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CHESTER'S CAFE 



3138 Fillmore Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL WOODEN 
BOX ASSOCIATION 

PACIFIC DIVISION 
55 New Montgomery Street 



PURITY STORES, Ltd. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



.\r„r,h. 1Q51 



POLICE AND PEACE OFEICERS' lOURNAL 



I'dfjc 4') 



J. A. HERZOG, INC. 

COMPLETE AUTO REPAIRS 
BODY METAL PAINTING 



SAN KRANCiStO 



I M II ORMA 



BROEMMEL PHARMACEUTICALS 

Established 1876 
FITZHUGH BUILDING 

GArficId 1-4417 



384 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SIMONDS MACHINERY CO. 



Representing 

AMERICAN MARSH PUMPS. INC. - THE DEMING CO. 

MILTON ROY PUMPS - LEIMAN BROS. 

and other Leading Pump Manufacturers 



P. RAVAZZINI, . . . Clothiers 



1301 Stockton Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC FELT COMPANY 



910 York Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



JUD WHITEHEAD HEATER CO. 



4111 Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



ERKSON'S CHEVRON STATION 

George and Al 
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 
Open Every Day from 7:00 A.M. 'til 9:00 P.M. 
Street • JUniper 4-9966 



4801 M 
SAN FRANl ISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DUGGAN'S FUNERAL SERVICE 

CENTRALLY LOCATED 

3434 - 17lh Street, Near Valencia Street 

Phone UNderhill 1-4433 



SAN FRANCISCO 



fAI.IIOHNIA 



MUTUAL LOAN OFFICE 



l»S Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone EXbrook 2-SI78 

CALIFORNIA 



MOTHERS' MARCH OF DIMES AIDED BY 
SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Ih .Mrs. Ai.i.in H. Cdnron 
I'lihlirily (Jluiir/nnii, I'arksidi I'/l'..!. 

On the night of Tuesday, January 30, Mis. I'. H. 
V'aiuler Steric, 2234 29th Avenuf, rt-maincd in her home 
to receive the money which hail been collected by her 
fjroup of marchinj; motlurs. When the amount of Three 
Thousaiul Dollars had been counted, .Mrs. Vander Sterre 
decided to use a wash boiler as a container, but how to 
get the money to the lirehouse on l.Sth Avenue near Quin- 
tara became a problem. 

The problem was quickly solved by a telephone call to 
Taraval Police Station. After hearing her story, the 
officer in charge sent a squad car with two of his men, 
who lost no time getting the boiler full of money and 
.Mrs. Vander Sterre safely to her destination. 

In telling of the experience Mrs. Vander Sterre, a past 
president of Parkside P.-T.A., remarked about how often 
services of this type are performed by the police, and she 
felt public praise was called for. 

The children of Parkside are very familiar with the 
officers from Taraval Station who protect their safety on 
the busy intersections near the school. While it is true 
that the performance of such duties is more or less routine, 
these officers who patrol in the vicinity of our schools 
seem to possess an outstanding abilit\- to create friendly 
atmosphere for their young charges. Even as I shall 
always remember the kind and friendly men who watched 
over us as we crossed streets near schools, in our child- 
hood, the children up at Parkside consider it a high point 
of any day when they've exchanged a friendly greeting 
with the police officer on duty. 

CURRYS SHELL SERVICE 

SHELL AUTHORIZED DEALER 
20S0 E. Main Street 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



CLAUDS SERVICE 

GENERAL REPAIR - ALL MAKES - MODELS 
S333 E. Washington Street Phone 8-88S3 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



CEC; S SERVICE 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



JACK COOPER 



TEXACO SERVICE - MOTOR TUNE-UP 

TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 

WASHING - LUBRICATING - SIMONIZINC 

1632 Pacific Avenue Phone 2-9400 

.STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

STOCKTON ELECTRIC MOTOR REPAIR 

MOTOR REWINDING AND REPAIRS 

Telephone 4-4913 1324 E. Miner Ave. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

The Stockton Rug & Mattress Works 

MATTRESS RENOVATING 

1345 South Center Street 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1<J5I 



FORMER CHIEF CHARLES W. DULLEA 

((continued from page 17) 
operating at a 24-hour emergency schedule could handle 
the seriously injured through the staff doctors and inmate 
assistants. First aid teams could operate beyond the hos- 
pital into those areas which needed assistance. 

Prison cars and trucks could render whatever service 
was needed, such as ambulance, evacuation of citizens, 
hauling supplies or work crews. 

The prison kitchen and food storage area could act as an 
emergency field kitchen for nearby communities. Prison 
staff and inmates engaged in food preparation are usually 
skilled in feeding large groups of men. By operating on a 
24-hour basis it would be possible to expand the cooking 
and serving potential. 

Prison firefighting apparatus would supplement that of 
other communities in curtailing fires. Prison construction 
equipment such as bulldozers, power shovels and lifts 
could assist in firefighting or make emergency repairs to 
buildings and roads. 

One of the tasks of civilian defense is to prepare for the 
evacuation of large portions of civilian populations. In 
any such plans, wide use will be made of secondary roads. 
Small groups of prisoners, under the leadership of prison 
personnel, could assist the flow of traffic by road repair, 
emergency vehicle repair, and acting as traffic directors. 

California was among those states making great use of 
prisons and prisoners during World War II. Our experi- 
ence has encouraged us to include these institutions and 
their populations in our present planning for national 
defense. 

Acting under orders of the Governor, our Department 
of Corrections, like all State agencies, is marshalling its 
institutions and men. Surveys of specialized equipment and 
occupations have been made. Each prison is proceeding 
with its own organizations of civilian defense with partic- 
ular emphasis on the help it can render nearby communi- 
ties. Existing administrative structure is being examined 
and organized toward that goal. 

One might raise a skeptical question concerning the 
willingness or dependability of prisoners for assignments 
of vital importance to national defense. An examination 
of the World War II record of the inmates of American 
prisons reveals that their patriotism was of the highest. 

Prison communities contributed a high per capita 
amount of blood to the Red Cross. In 1943 the Federal 
government estimated that prisoners might be expected to 
purchase war bonds in the amount of $250,000. Actually 
the men and women of our prisons purchased $960,000 of 
bonds in this particular drive. These were purchased by 
prisoners at considerable saciifice. 

Prisoners volunteered in laige numbers for active mili- 
tary service, and welcomed the opportunity for induction. 
In those institutions where men and women were asked to 
act as "guinea pigs" for essential medical research, the re- 
sponse was always beyond the quota. 

Recently, at San Quentin, where men were asked to 
work extra hours to produce sand bags for Korea, the re- 
sponse was prompt and sufficient. Many men gave up pre- 



ferred assignments to return to the noise and hard work 
of the Jute Mill loom. 

Naturally, the part that prisoners play in civilian de- 
fense will be subject to the control and direction of prison 
administration. Sound and alert penal administration usu- 
ally produces high inmate morale. Those of us engaged in 
prison work are aware of our responsibility in helping our 
inmates to assume their share of our defense efforts. 

Because our way of life recognizes the right and dignity 
of the individual in society, we have increasingly recog- 
nized that humanity and reformation should be the guid- 
ing principles in prison management. Our great majority 
of prisoners, like ail good Americans, will respond to what- 
ever is asked of them in a manner that will do credit to 
themselves and their country. iTo Be CuniinuedJ 

TUXEDO DRY GOODS 

YARDAGE - PATTERNS - NOTIONS - HOSIERY 

BEE HIVE AND RED HEART YARNS 

TOWELS and LINENS - GIFTS 

2ai8 Pacific Avenue Phone 2-6613 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CONNELL MOTOR TRUCK CO., Inc. 

2211 North 99 Highway Telephone 8-8984 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

BOB'S SPEED SHOP 

SPEED EQUIPMENT FOR RACE CARS, 

BOATS AND ROADSTERS 
2601 N. Wilson Way Phone 2-9395 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DAVE CHALMERS 

GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 

CADILLAC • LA SALLE • OLDSMOBILE 

HYDROMATIC TRANSMISSION SERVICE 

1543 E. Oak Street Phone 3-3969 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DR. A. C. KLEPPINGER - Optometrist 

Telephone 9-9312 
346 E. Main Street - Offices on Main Floor 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER CO. 

R. H. Intemann, Branch Manager 
Cash Registers - Accounting Machines - Adding Machines 

SALES - SUPPLIES - SERVICE 

STOCKTON OFFICE MODESTO OFFICE 

230 N. Sutter St. - Phone 7-7418 816- 13th St. - Phone 3155 



J. FILIPPI CO. 



"Since 1933" 

INSURANCE - REAL ESTATE 

19 S. San Joaquin Street Telephone 7-7031 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

GOODYEAR SERVICE 

Retail Division of 

THE GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY, INC. 

W. W. Ayres, Store Manager 

130 N. El Dorado Street Phone: 5-5834 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

MALLETT'S 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

RADIOS - RANGES 

Phone 2-6767 30 North Sutter Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

SAM'S AUTO SERVICE 



When You Are Out Driving, Talking Trash and Drinking Mash 
and Have A Smash-up, Don't Cuss — Call Us. 



3220 San Pablo Av 
OAKLAND 



Phone OLymplc 3-4317 

CALIFORNIA 



M>inh. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



Phone l--'i\H 

DOWNING & BROWN 
PAINT COMPANY 

Distributors of 
MORW'EAR PAINT PRODUCTS 

135 North California Street 
STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-4855 

HESCO MFG. CO. 

FRANK CARPIiN'O 

MANUFACTURERS - ENGINEERS 

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS - MACHINISTS 

METAL STAMPING 

2020 Stewart Street 
STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-8590 

DANA MOTORS 

Motor Rebuilders uiicl Distributors 
Builders of Over 35,000 Engines 

j \ iulory — 1731 "K"' Street, Sacramento, (California 

338 North El Dorado Street 
S r O C K T O N, C A L I F O R N I A 

r — ......—... — .— . ^ 

Holly Sugar Corporation 

FINE GRANULATED SUGAR 

GROWN AND MANUFACTURED 
IN CALIFORNIA 

STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Walnut Gro\e 34 1 1 

YUEN CHONG & CO. 

CENERAI. MF.RCIIANDISE 

MEATS. POULTRY AND GROCERIES 

P. O. BOX 46 
LOCKE, CALIFORNIA 



— _j *• — 



Phone 2-9759 

MAR'S CAFE 

"Food of Quality" 
CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 

Open 2-i Hours Daily 

9 North Wilson Way 
STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 4-4679 

PARISIAN LAUNDRY 
AND DRY CLEANERS 

Our W'urkiiitinshili Is of I lie Higbfst Oiialily 

820 North El Dorado Street 
STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



65c CHICKEN KITCHEN 

Ilwy W Between Stockton and Lodi 

"BFST CHICKEN IN 
IHE COrNTRV 

Stockton 3-6()75 



— ■>— — .J 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



STOCKTON S POLICE DEPARTMENT 

((yonlinin/l from f'df/c /.' j 

tii\ision is divided into details, one to ser\e warrants; 
others petty theft, forgery, hotel and stores, burglary and 
auto theft, homicide and robbery, all headed by a commis- 
sioned or non-commissioned officer. While crime is about 
the same as the state level the clearance of crimes is much 
over the state average. 




Lieutenant Harold Vogelsang 

Captain Monk has a goodly detail of men handling traf- 
fic and looking after the city's more than 2000 parking 
meters. 

Captain Garibotto has come up with a training manual 
for new police officers as well as intraining for regular 
members of the department. 

He got his material from the (^aklanil, Milwaukee, Los 
Angeles and other police departments and has compiled a 
sizeable and easily to comprehend manual. It covers every 
kind of subject a police officer must have knowledge of. 

It stresses courtesy, courage, appearances in court, how 
to make and write reports and every phase of law enforce- 
ment. Captain Garibotto made good use of the experience 
he achieved during his nearly 20 years as a member of the 
Stockton Police Department. 

The manual is a text book any and all police depart- 
ments might well use in their organizations. 

How rapidh- the SPD works in matters of crime is ex- 
(Continucd un payc 54) 



CHENEY & BRAZEAU 



SUPPLIES 



LABORATORY 



Medico-Dental Building 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



UNION GARAGE 

T. N. McCarty, Proprietor 

AUTOMOBILE, FENDER AND BODY REPAIRING 

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 

Storage - Washing - Greasing - Auto Painting 

Gas and Oil - Tires and Tubes 

232 S. Sutter Street Telephone 4-4789 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



AUTOMOBILE MECHANICAL SPECIALISTS 
BATTERY AND IGNITION SERVICE 

LATEER SPIRO MOTOR CO. 

AUTOMOTIVE SUPER SPECIALTY SHOP 
WHEEL • AXLE • BRAKE SPECIALISTS 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



JIM'S RICHMOND SERVICE 



WASHING • POLISHING 



Suiter and Charter Way 



Phone 2-9515 

CALIFORNIA 



FRANKENHEIMER SUPPLY CO. 



BUILDING ACCESSORIES AND PAINTS 



West Weber Av 



Phone 8-8603 

CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL SHERMAN 



Wm. and Marie Murray 
32 So. Sutter Street Telephone 8-8501 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA' 



R. R. Martii 



Phone 2-9642 



HOTEL DELTA 



241 North San Joaquin St. 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL LORRAINE 

STEAM HEATED FOR COMFORT 
18 So. Center Street Phone 2-9139 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



VICK' S INN 



14 S. Center Street Phone 2-9939 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



M/.rch. 1951 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL P^ge 55 



QUALITY DISTRIBUTING CO. COOK BROS. MEAT MARKETS 



Distributor of Fmnzi Wine 



Store No. I — lOOS N. YosrmitF Phone 2-2694 

Store No. 2 — 3200 Pacific Ave. Phone 2-8949 
BLATZ BEER Store No. 3 — 1416 Country Club Blvd. 

Store No. 4—1308 N. El Dorado Phone 3-0992 

31 South Aurora Street Phone 2-4293 Store No. S — 301 S. Wilson Way Phone 3-4973 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA sTOlKTON ( ALII ORNIA 



Res. Ph. 4-4935 Office Phone 4-7711 

HOOSIER CAFE 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS r. * t r»T ¥ r.iTvrr'TT i 'r' /• 

We Never Close RALPH PANELLA - TrUckw^ 

QUALITY FOODS • COURTEOUS SERVICE 

1537 North Wilson Way Phone 3-0271 '30 S. Union Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



COMBINING QUALITY WITH ECONOMY 
TO BUILD BEAUTIFUL HOMES 

ELVA CRUDELI - Dcwce Studio 
GOLDEN GATE REALTY CO. 

231 1 N. California Slrcel Phone 9-9226 

Phone 8-8619 4225 N. El Dorado Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Telephone 2-0494 Res. Telephone 3. 0131 

^^^^^^^o^,„^Jp3^5whi!! ^^^^^ REFRIGERATION SPECIALTY SERVICE 

rrtMvrMirMT . r-r>i«irr.DTA m r KELVINATOR • DISPLAY CASES 

CONVENIENT • COMFORTABLE , REFRIGERATORS • WALKIN BOXES 

REASONABLE • ELECTRIC RANGES • CONDENSING UNITS 

• HOME FREEZERS • COILS - PARTS 

1446 Mariposa Road , TYPHOON AIR CONDITIONING 
'j Mile So. on 99 Highway Phone 2-9219 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 1 338 - 1340 E. Miner Avenue ^^lIFORNIA 



W. E. McGILLVRAY CAPPS BROS. 

^_,, . J J rfc I Manufacturers of 

W holescile Produce harvester parts • special equipment 

MILLER ALMOND HULLERS 

109 E. Weber Avenue _ , . 

STOCKTON (ALIFORNIA Telephone 6-6889 435 South Aurora Street 



J. W. Cooney A. N. Schenone G. A. Cooney STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

COONEY-SCHENONE-COONEY TWENTIETH CENTURY MOTORS 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

FINEST SELECTED CARS 

10 East Channel Street Phone 4-3232 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA ^^""^ ''"" "■"• "^ """'"■ 

Maurice D. Scare. Earle W. Pl.ut. ^"^"^"^^"^ CALIFORNIA 



CHAPEL OF THE PALMS HOBBS-PARSONS COMPANY 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Wholesale Produce 



202 S. California Street Phone 8-8525 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



THE GOLD RUSH RESTAURANT charles cunningham 

ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY FEDERAL TIRES. BATTERIES AND ACCESSORIES 

LUBRICATION SPECIALISTS 
26 S. Suiter Street 

1273 N. Wllron Way Phone 2-9987 

ICKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CAI IFORMA 



Telephone 2-5S8B Res. Phone 2-3164 

PHILIP K. CODDINCiTON, D.D.S. The Frt.ndly store 

A. M. (ORREN 

810 Bank of America BIdf Phone 2-7144 CLOTHING • GENTS" FURNISHINGS - SHOES 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 18 N F.L DORADO SIRFFT .STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1951 



STOCKTONS POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Clnntinucd from page 52) 

(Miiplificd by a shooting that took place in the city during 
the earh parr of Febniary this year. 

Highway Patrolman Victor Zappetini, cruising with 
two other fellow patrolmen, had occasion to stop and enter 
a drug store. He walked into a holdup. There was a shot 




Lieutenant V. J. Voit 

and Patrolman Zappetini fell to the floor. Two bandits 
took it on the lam. Shots from the patrolmen in the High- 
way Patrol car felled one of them. He was dead when he 
got to the hospital. His name was Pete Norris, the man 
who shot the officer. The second man got away, but for 
only a short time. It was quickly settled that he was 
Pete Norris' brother Don Q. 

Captain of Detectives Rex Parker, who has built up as 
fine a record for solving crimes during his long tenure with 
the SPD, went into action. He located relatives of the 
dead man, and through them he located the wanted bandit. 
Less than 48 hours after the tragic crime he was found 
near Winton, many miles from Stockton, Captain Parker 
and other members of the Detective Division took the 22- 
year-old youth into custody and he was lodged in the coun- 
ty jail of Stockton. There he is charged with two robbery 
counts and assault to kill, and if Patrolman Zappetini who 
was taken to Franklin Hospital in San Francisco with 
three bullet holes in his chest, one of which have cut the 
spinal cord, dies, he will be charged with murder as well 
as robbery, though he did not fire the pistol that killed the 
officer. It's a good state law that makes this possible. 

FRIEDMAN BAG COMPANY, INC. 

Manufacturers and Importers 

BURLAP BAGS - TWINE - COTTON BAGS 

130 W. Channel Street 

Phone: 4-3438 TWX: SK 28-X 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



LUCKY CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 
218 S. El Dorado Street Phone 7-7444 



Members of American Society of Travel Agents 

CHARLES TRAVEL SERVICE 

d Tickets - - - Tours, Cruises. Hotels, I 



St 



hips, Railr 
133 Bridge Plac 



ad, Pla 



Pho 



CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN FINANCE COMPANY 

Locally Owned and Operated 
Wm. J. (Bill) Bergman, President 

AUTOMOBILE - FURNITURE - SALARY AND 
TRUCK LOANS AND REFINANCING 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 





SERVICE CAB CO. 




PHONE 7-7045 




LOCALLY OWNED BY VETERANS 




RADIO DISPATCHED 




"If you can't reach your party by phone — 
let us carry the message to them." 


STOCKTON 


448 East Miner Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



HELEN'S DONUT SHOP 



COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 
SPECIAL ORDERS FOR PARTIES 



125 N. Calfior 



CALIFORNIA 



BALKWILL & SON 



WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING 



Trust Building 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



AL'S WAFFLE SHOP 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

1107 East Main Street Phone 2-8769 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA TRACTOR AND 
EQUIPMENT CORP. 

Phone 2-8742 1247 S. Wilson Way 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA" 

Night 2-68S4 Day 3-3919 

ANDERSON REFRIGERATION CO. 

SALES • SERVICE • INSTALLATION 
814 S. Monroe Street 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Licensed - Bonded Phone 2-9816 

HENRY BAUMGARTNER 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



FARM LABOR CONTRACTOR 
WORK GUARANTEED 

Residence 2201 S. B St. 



CALIFORNIA 



Mrirch. 1951 POLICE AND PKACE OFFICERS JOURNAL Page 55 



Jack and Emma DeatOB, Prap>. 

MANDARIN MARKET ''"'"'"^M.kT word^Cli "m.?"^"' 

Wholesale and Retail Fi.hel'. Balanced Do» Food - Fre.h Hor.e Meal - Pet.' Supplies 

MEAT - FRUIT - GROCERIES - SEAFOOD ^ _, ,. „ . j c j 

rrcc Ucliverv Mondav and rndav 
VEGETABLES - BEER - WINE ee e e y mono y « r oay 

For Meal — Phone 2-2S02 -::- For Groceries — Phone 3-S6I5 S C O T T Y 

no <;„,.>h r.-f.r ■S.r-,! Telephone S-5391 506 S. San Joaquin Street 
STOCKTON 139 South Center Street ^vl.lKORMA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Cottiplinieiits of 
BENJAMIN WINICK, M.D. 



GOLD & SON 

Dealers in 

ALL KINDS OF JUNK - SECOND HAND 

MACHINERY - PIPE - PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

AND FIXTURES 



THE H. C. SHAW CO. FARMERS FEED CO. 



Since 1854 
WHOLESALE FARM MACHINERY 



STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



PURINA CHOWS 



Phone 6-6559 1302 E. Miner Ave. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



TACK RFNTON DOLLAR FOR DOLLAR 

JAV^lS. DtlNlVJlN THERE ARE NO BETTER HOMES 



than 



Petroleum Marketing Equipment 

* ^ ^ COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES 

Phone 3-4266 1204 East Main Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Dale Cooper Lee Cooper 

STOCKTON FRUIT JUICE CO. 
PATIO AND BARBECUE SHOP 

FRESH LEMON JUICE 
MEXICAN LIMES 

Phone 2-3181 503 E. Jackson Street 

Telephone 3-4925 1520 Pacific Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



ATA TIRE SERVICE uc^mv^ i: r^n.^mT a^ t> 

HENRY F. QUINN, M.D. 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

"Our Treads Are Miles Ahead" 

301 Stockton Savings & Loan Bank Bldg. 
1705 S. El Dorado Dial 4-4578 STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

HOME WIRING CO. E^^C E. ROSENBERG, M.D. 

Cofltrnctors diseases of the skin 

Medico-Dental Building 
615 W. Fremont Street Phone 3-0262 

ITOCKTON lALIIORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 5-5689 

MIRACLE DRIVE-INN 

ERNEST C. GRINER, M.D. 

2520 Pacific 405 Medico-Dental Building 

■TOCKTON (ALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



„. ,. . „ Office Phone 2-1401 R*>. Phone 3-1590 

BUD S LIQUOR STORE BILLS USED ( ARS 

CHOICE WINE. BEER. LIQUOR — FREE DELIVERY . ^ " k u r h n •• 

•r»h and Frcnten Fish Bait - Fishing Supplies - Candy - Ice Cream Bill Joseph. Proprietor 

News Stand - Notions - Sundries 819 East Charter Way 

TOCKTON (ALIFORNIA STOCKTON (ALIFORNIA 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



EXCERPTS FROM SAN FRANCISCO 
POLICE ORDINANCES 

( ('.(irliniud iriiin lasl issue) 
Sees. 510-550: Minors: Barrooms, Books, Firearms Ve- 
hicles, Hotels, Street Selling, Curfew Law, Dance 
Halls— 
Sec. 510: Barrooms, Billiard Parlors. 

1. The party in charge of such places as well as of 
public places and places open to public view, is guilty if 
he allows a minor under eighteen (18) to be present at 
or to play such games in such places. 

2. The minor under eighteen (18) who plays or en- 
gages in such games is also guilty. 

3. The minor is guilty even if only present. 
Sec. 515: Circulating Libraries. 

1. If the minor is under twenty-one (21 ) he must have 
received a membership card in such library. 

2. This card must have the approval, in signature, of 
the parent or legal guardian of such minor, made in the 
presence of such librarian. 

3. This section applies to private, profit-run libraries. 

4. Non-profit United States and City and County li- 
braries are exceptions. 

Sec. 521: Firearms. Explosive Cartridges. Sale of 
>ame. 

1. Ihe minor must be under seventeen (17). 

2. The seller is guilty if he sells any kind of cap, powder 
or explosive to such minor, or any kind of pistol or fire- 
arm — to such minor. 

3. The minor is guilty if he either uses or has in his 
possession any such firearms, cap, or cartridge or explo- 
sive. 

Sec. 527: Moving Vehicles. 

1. If the minor is under sixteen (16) he is guilty if he 
attempts to get on or off any streetcar, train or vehicle 
which is moving along any public street. 
Sec. 533 : Hotels to Report Minors. 

1. Such reports will be immediately made to the Chief 
of Police if minors under eighteen (18) go to a hotel — 
and shall be complete as to name, age, et cetera. 

2. They need not be made: 

(a) If the presence of the minor is only temporary 

and in the daytime, or — 

(b) If in the presence of a parent or guardian. 
Sec. 538: Public Streets. At night. 

1. The hours are 8 o'clock P. M. to daylight of the fol- 
lowing morning. 

2. There must be three (3) or more minors. 

3. They must make or attempt to make a disturbance 
on a public street, or they must engage in some sport or 
exercise or be congregated on such public street — and 

4. They must be under twenty-one (21). 
Sec. 539: Curfew Law. 

1. If the minor under eighteen (18) is engaged in some 
legitimate business or is accompanied by a parent or guard- 
ian during the hours mentioned he does not come under the 
provisions of this law. 

2. If the minor (under eighteen) is on the street or pub- 



TeUphone 2-3255 F. J. Garavano 

INDEPENDENT TRUCKING CO. 

CONTRACT HAULING 
401 South Lincoln 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



GARROW AND BOWMAN 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

Save on Your Insurance 

SEE TED BUNN 

Telephone 8-8671 632 North California 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



RICHARDS HOTEL 



ALICE RICHARDS. Manager 

Phone 6-6440 18 So. El Dorado 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

HAVING CAR TROUBLE? 

LOUIE'S GARAGE 



283S E. Mai'ket Street Phone 2-9655 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON DELIVERY CO. 

J. p. SPAENHOWER 
35 S. Grant Street Phone 2-6432 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE WALLACE 

UNION OIL DEALER 
QUALITY SERVICE 

636 E. Charter Way Phone 2-9114 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



RALPH WILSON'S SERVICE STATION 



2498 E. Main Street Phone 2-9367 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Dial 7-7889 



Jesse J. Inman 



I N M A N ' S INC. 

REALTORS, INSURANCE, LOANS, NOTARY 

Agents for 
BEAUTIFUL PACIFIC GARDENS 



STOCKTON 



307 East Weber Av 



CALIFORNIA 



W. F. BREMER CABINS 



March. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS lOURNAL 



Page 



lie place bet\veen 11 o'clock at night and 6 o'clock in the 
morning of the following day — except as in No. 1, above 
— he is guilty. 

3. Those who aid, abet, or encourage a minor to \iolate' 
this section are guilty under the section. 

4. \Vhen a minor is found violating this law the pre- 
sumption is that the parent or guardian aided and abetted 
such violation. 

5. Such minors are taken to the Juvenile Detention 
Home when arrested. 

6. 1 he parents or guardians are called to hearings at 
court in the Juvenile Detention Home. 

7. The District Attorney shall be the prosecutor in 
cases of parents or guardians failing to respond for hear- 
ings on notice. 

Sec. 551: Selling Goods. Liquor Places. Working In. 
Entering. 

1. Alcoholic beverage places may not be: 

(a) Entered; 

(b) \Vorked in, or — 

(c) Used as a place of selling goods by minors under 
18, except that such entry, work, or sale is done 
by such minors at football or baseball games, or 
like gatherings, although liquor is sold there. 

2. The manager or proprietor who allows such minors 
in above list to commit violations on his premises is also 
guilty. 

Sec. 558: Dance Halls. 

1. The minor under eighteen (18) who visits any pub- 
lic dance hall — and — 

2. The proprietor or manager of such hall who allows 
such visit are guilty — unless the minor is accompanied by a 
parent or guardian. 

Sec. 485: Entrapping or Killing Birds. 

1. Such entrapping or killing is a violation only when 
it is done in a public square or on a public street. 



DELTA DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 

BEERS: LUCKY LAGER 

MILLER HI LIFE 

GRAPE GOLD WINE 



DON S MARKET 

D and Main Street Phone 2-7410 
STOCKTON CALIFGRM V 

THE PURITY MILK CO. 

Manufacturers of 
MELBA'S ICE CREAM 



Phone 5-S93S S30 East Cha 



CALIFORNIA 



KYLE AND COMPANY 

STEEL - MERCHANT TRADE PRODUCTS 
SCHRAMM AIR COMPRESSORS 

STOCKTON, CALIF, and FRESNO. ( ALIF 



RAY'S PLACE 
Good Food and Drink 

Where Good Fellows Get Together 

Phone 2-9591 24 E. Weber Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



99 MARKET 

MEATS. GROCERIES AND VEGETABLES 



2031 McKinley Av 



Phone 2-4763 



CALIFORNIA 



ROY LUCKEN 

Washing Machine Sales and Sen ice 

EASY - MAYTAG - MAYTAG AUTOMATIC - BENDIX 

LITTLE GIANT— Parts and Repairs 

WASHING MACHINES - IRONERS - DRYERS 

All Work Guaranteed 



Telephone 2-1239 



STOCKTON 



332 E. Channel Street 

CALIFORNIA 



JOHN MORENO, Jr. 



GENERAL HAULING 



104! W. Weber Av 



5279 Cherokee Road 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-2163 



John Ratio, Jr 



Ray Wella 



AMERICAN AMBULANCE SERVICE 



CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND AWNING & VENETIAN 
BLIND COMPANY 

"Manufacturers Since 1916" 

DRAPERIES AND BEMBOR PULL DRAPES 

Dial Office 7-7364 127 E. Channel Street 

STOCKTON CAIIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



SERVICE - SALES - RENTALS - PARTS 

GM Diesel Eng nrs - ln(erso|.Rand Tools - Koehrinf Shovels 

Kwik-MIx M'sers - Quonsel Siran Steel Bu Idlngs 

Allis-Chalmrrs Farm Machinery 

MOORE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, Inc. 

North 99 Highway Phone 8-8SS6 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

JACKS WASHING MACHINE 
SERVICE 

Factory Allthnrlled Sales and Service 

MAYTAG - EASY ■ WHIRI POOL ALITOMATIC - SPEED QUEEN 

PHILCO AND INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER REFRIGERATORS 

Parts and Repairs for All Makee 

148 So. California Street Phone 3-2465 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



p^,^^ ^8 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Mnrrh. 1951 



Phone 3 0,52 THE HIDEWAY INN 

RISSO & NELSON . beer - soft drinks - SANDWICHES 

Wholesale (Virginia's Place) 
FRUIT AND PRODUCE 

CITRUS FRUITS A SPECIALTY Phone 2-9396 2415 Waterloo Road 

1626 EAST CHANNEL STREET STOCKTON. CALIF. STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

R. L. BERVE TRACTOR CO. WM. ABRIGHT 

DEARBORN FARM EQUIPMENT Ford Engineered for Faster, Better GCfieral DraWaPe 

Farming - Ford Hydraulic Control. <-> 

A QUALITY LINE OF BASIC IMPLEMENTS CLAMSHELL - TRENCH HOE - DRAGLINE - WEED FORK 

FORD TRACTORS 1024 N. Center Street Phone 6-6S61 

1681 EAST CHARTER WAY STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA STOCKTON ^'^^"^""'"^ 

Telephone S-SOl 1 

Telephone Stockton 259 

AWNINGS TENTS TARPAULINS - CANVAS GOODS PIONEER TAMALE FACTORY 

P. and J. Costanza, Props. 
Made to Order 

VENETIAN BLINDS - WINDOW SHADES ,3 ^^^^^ California Street 

420 NO. CALIFORNI A ST STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Phone 4-2582 or 8-8377 

THE T AFT - Clothiers 
TACK HANNA - Music Studio 

J Joe Larranage - B. Aldunate, Proprietors 

PIANIST • TEACHER • BANDLEADER 

35-37 South Hunter Street 

24 SO. CALIFORNIA ST. STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALlFORNl/i 



''"""^ ' "" BALES - YOUNG GRAIN CO. 

SACKS - GRAIN - TWINE 

WHITEHOUSE insurance 

Phone 5-5743 36 W. Weber Ave. 

2132 MARIPOSA ROAD STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-0593 Residence 4-5731 

Sinox and Di-Nitro Distributor EMPIRE BEVERAGE CO. 

Valor Brand 
DUSTING sulphurs - WETTABLE SULPHURS EASTSIDE BEER - PABST BLUE RIBBON BEER 

insecticides • SPRAY MATERIALS GALLO WINES - GIBSON FRUIT WINES 



FLOYD BROOKS 

STOCKTON CALlFORNh 



Telephone 2-5730 1030 East Church Street 

P. O. Box 1362 Weber Avenue at Commerce 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Service Since 1918 O. L. Ferretti 

BRUNS & WIGLEY 
MOUNTAIN MOTOR LINES Phone 4-024, 



PETROLEUM PRODUCTS • LUMBER 
GENERAL HAULING 



1602 East Ninth Street Phone 2-7680 



MANUFACTURING JEWELERS - DIAMOND SETTERS 
514 Stockton Savings and Loan Bank Building 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Ask for 

M.P. A. Butter and Evaporated Milk GOLDEN GATE GRILL 

Manufactured by 

-..^•ii T» 1 A 5 r /" -^ 1 r^^fC 119 S. El Dorado Street Phone 3-7345 

Milk Producers Ass n.of Central Calil. 

STOCKTON MODESTO STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

" Res. Phone 8-8124; 45 W. Fourth St. Office Phone 2-4779 

PEACOCK GROCERY Colony Furniture & Restaurant Supplies 

CHICKEN FEED - MEATS - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES New and Used • Bought and Sold 

WINE AND BEER COUNTERS • STOOLS • REFRIGERATORS • RANGES 

Ph„n. ? 7Vi7 lOl South Center CASH REGISTERS • DEEP FRYERS • GRIDDLES 

STOCKTON »^ "<'"<' 2-2 J57 JUI sout CALIFORNIA 1620 S. EL DORADO STREET STOCKTON. CALIF. 



Afarch. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page yj 



SHERIFF CARLOS SOUSA 

1 ((JoFilinuid from Pat/c 7 ) 

The heads of the various other units are: 

Coroner's work — Lieutenant Andrew Tickvitza. 

Robbery, homicide and assaults — [lieutenant William 
H. Kates. 

\'ice and narcotics — Lieutenant P'lnuT Htiscoe. 

Forgery and checks — Lieutenant Loren L. Hrown. 

Burglary and other thefts — Lieutenant Allison John- 
son. 

.Missing persons and moral crimes — Lieutenant I'rank 
E. Esau. 

Radio Techiu'cian Al Gilbeau is in charjre of the radio 
broadcasting station and radio cars. 

SherifT Soiisa has been selected by the county's police 
chiefs as the coordinator for civil defense and disaster, and 
' has as well been chosen as regional coordinator for the 14 
adjacent counties of San Joaquin County. He has his civil- 
ian defense program well advanced and would be able to 
effectively take o\er when and if any disaster befell the 
rich area over which he presides. 

As Coroner, Sheriff Sousa had 611 cases of death to in- 
vestigate during 1950. 63 less than 1949. Of these 18 were 
homicides, 102 traffic deaths, 41 suicides, 107 from mis- 
cellaneous accidents. There were 338 deaths from natural 
causes. 

Sheriff Sousa has gone all out to keep every section of 
his jurisdiction free from all forms of vice. When anyone 
with the temerity to open up a gambling joint, to try to 
maintain a house of prostitution or take a chance at book- 
ing racetrack bets, his men are on those fostering these 
illegal operations, in short order. Vou hear no unfavorable 
references, by either the state or federal crime commission 
investigators, on activities of the wouldbe eas\- winners, in 
the unincorporated sections of San Joaquin County. 

Yes sir. we aver without any hesitation that Sheriff 
Sousa has done a magnificent job of law enforcement for 
his native county. In view of the fact that before becom- 
ing Sheriff, he had never worn the badge of any peace 
officer organization, having been working for the recre- 
ation department of Stockton, when his friends prevailed 
upon him to run for the office, following the death of the 
late Sheriff \Lartin Anshro, his achie\ements are all the 
more remarkable. 

THE MASSEY - HARRIS CO. 

314 S. Aurora 



STOCKTON 



AMI ORMA 



S. A. Nichir 



Nichlry 



John Nichlrv 

NICHLEY & SONS 

SEAS'DE SERVICE STATION 

Caiol'nr - Lubrication - Batlrrv Service 

Motor Tunr-Up - Car Wa»hin( 

Phona 2 2788 244 W MnrdinK Wnv .SIOCKTON. ( Al II 



CANACHER & SOUCIE MEAT MARKETS 

Located in Scgarini Stares 

2320 N. El Dorado and SOS W. Harding 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CLAYS ASSOCIATED SERVICE 



40S N. California Street 



STOCKTON 



Phone 4 7117 

r'ALIKORNIA 



Leoia Nickerson Al Farnant 

BEST CLEANERS 

70S Ea'st Main Street I'hone 3-2152 

COUNTRY CLUB CLEANERS 



STOCKTON 



1900 Country Club Blvd. 



CURTIS electric: CO. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 



301 West Fr 

STOCKTON 



Telephone 4-4735 

CALIFORNIA 



Hubbard's Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 

SALES - SERVICE - INSTALLATION 



STOCKTON 



11 E. Channc 



Phone 2-3421 



CALIFORNIA 



CROSETTI'S PHARMACY 



STOCKTON 



947 N. El Dorado 



Phone 3-054S 



CALIFORNIA 



LOUIE'S Radio at/d Television Service 



Phone 7-7689 



310 W. Harding Way 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



E. H. GROGAN 



Elk's Building 



CALIFORNIA 



DON'S REPAIR SHOP 

Don Bartles 

CLOCKS - TEWE'.RY - WATCH REPAIRING 

AND RONSON LIGHTER REPAIRS 

921 E. Ma n Street Phone 2-7878 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



ED. SPIEKERMAN CONCRETE PIPE CO. 

Stockton Office: P. O. Box 534; Phone 4-4052 
LODI STOl KTON 



Coml)Himnls of iiti M. D. 



BEACON DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Impo'trm - Wholr-alers 

FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 

Phone G-G787 229 We.l Wrber Ave. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Al Your Local Grocer 

BORDEN'S FRESH MILK AND (REAM 

. . . STOCKTON . . . 



UNION MACHINE WORKS 



534 Second Street 



BAROSSO & KELLY 

GROWERS • PACKERS • SHIPPERS 



CALIFORNIA STCX-KTON 



Phones; 7-7877 7-7878 

Mall ng Address: P. O. Box 43 

Magnol'a and F Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



P„ge 60 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL March. 19fil 



Office Phone 2-4844 



HAPPYHOLME DAIRY PRODUCTS Frank's Plumbing and Sheet Metal Shop 

FRANK VACCAREZZA 
1147 N. El Dorado 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 2556 EAST MAIN STREET STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



Leonard Torlai, Prop. Best Se 

DROP IN CLUB FRED GRILLO . . . Grocer 

WINES • LIQUOR • BEER • SHORT ORDERS GROCERY AND VEGETABLE MARKET 

39-43 S. El Dorado St. Phone 2-9480 Jackson and Center Street Phone 2-6353 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Joseph Rossi, Owner Telephone 2-9548 

DRS. MERCHANT AND HALLEY nVJLv™ IJedTnd rSS™ 

MEDICAL BUILDING °'i'X,*« •^!u''?'' V" <:.° .^r^''''' *^;^S, ^T' .^P 

103 South Center Street, Corner of Market 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



BROADWAY HOTEL °'-'°Z%.''I-ri^^I£^'^ 

CONVENIENT - COMFORTABLE - REASONABLE RATES SIZZLING STEAKS 

113 East Main Phone 2-9930 Phone 2-951 1 336 East Weber Ave. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON . CALIFORNIA 



Phone 6-6711 Established 1906 

LACOSTA HOTEL ^xhS^^^f^ ? ^?^-^ 

The Friendly Furniture Store 
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS AND COMPLETE 
41 So. Hunter Phone 7-7428 HOME APPLIANCES 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 1 20- 148 S. San Joaquin Street STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-4431 Hours 10-12 a.m., 1-6 p.m. 

^ ^ ^ CHIROPRACTIC FOR HEALTH CONCRETE BUILDING BLOCK PRODUCTS 
Dr. C. E. Bramwell and Dr. J. R. Iruscott portable block casting machines 

CHIROPRACTOR • X-RAY Pl,„„„ x ^^itn r„r„,r p,kI, ,n^ ll,„„„ <;.= 

1348 N. Center Phone 3-5480 Corner Park and Union Sts. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



C. L. BALL PESCE ON THE 99 . . . Credit Jetielers 

general CONTRACTOR Emilio C. Pesce, Prop. 

1565 E. Seventh Phone 4-4380 2604 N. Wilson Way Phone 5-5312 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN BRAKE BLOK • B-K VACUUM POWER BRAKES 

COLEMAN'S BRAKE SERVICE J- CLICK & SON - Jewelers 



WHEEL AND AXLE ALIGNING 

LOCKHEED HYDRAULIC PARTS 

Telephone 3-1753 223 N. El Dorado Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



328 E. Main Phone 3-0725 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Pickup and Delivery 6-Hour Service if in by 9 A.M. 

C. HERB NEWLON & SON K & D CLEANERS AND DYERS 



2302 Pacific Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



WE PRESS WHILE YOU WAIT 

HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 

37 So. California St. Phone 8-8763 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



ROLAND C. DONEUX VALLEY FLORAL CO. 

GRAIN - BEANS - RICE WALTER C. CHAMPREUX, SR. 

Phone 8-8603 P. O. Box 469 109 N. Sutter Street Phone 4-4613 

18 WEST WEBER AVENUE STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFOR 



NIA 



Henry Nickols Stockton 5-5634 

DR. NELSON CONOVER, Deutht NICKOLS TRANSPORTATION CO. 

Phone 9-9893 FREIGHT HAULING 

2319 Pacific Avenue, On The Miracle Mile ^''" ""ji^West We^beT A Jenue'^"'^ 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



STAR MARKET CHARLIE WORSHAM'S 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES COFFEE SHOP AND FOUNTAIN 

8th at So. Madison 2184 E. Main Phone 2-8147 

CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



A GOOD PLACE TO SPEND THE EVENING Office Phone 2-7213 Residence 8-8194 

beeML^. g^od eats ^^- JAMES H. PETRAY 

=)49 S. Wilson Way 212 East Main Street, above Rialto Theatre 

CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



CHAS. F. RICH BOND AND RUSHING 

H. P. FISHER TILE AND MARBLE CO. LAND LEVELING • SUBSOILING 

AND STOCKTON TILE COMPANY BULLDOZING • LAND PLANNING 

4780 E. Fremont Street Phone 3-0636 2138 W. Acacia Street Phone 3-4758 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Mn.rh. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



FORMER CHIEF M. E. MITCHELL 

( Conlinmd jram page 'J ) 
since they, too, are children with problems. Can we in 
this year 19'iO, instead, resolves to give the same study, 
care, understanding and protection to the socially malad- 
justed child, the juvenile delinquent, in order that he may 
take his rightful place as a future adult, equipped to meet 
the problems of a changing world. 

We are extremely pleased to report that members of 
juvenile units in police and sheriff's departments through- 
out the State of California are learning more and more the 
deep significance in conduct problems of social, physical, 
mental, and emotional irregularities, and we wish to com- 
mend the fuie work of The Delinquency Control Institute 
of the University- of Southern California in training our 
officers for specialized juvenile work. We urge ail depart- 
ments that possibly can do so, to send officers to this fine 
training school to reap its benefits. 

We should also like to make mention of the fine series 
of schools on juvenile crime control, jointly sponsored by 
the California Youth Authority and the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation. The schools were conducted in San 
Francisco, Sacramento, San Bernardino, Visalia, Santa Mon- 
ica and San Diego. There were registrations in these schools 
of over 3*^0 law enforcement officers, probation officers and 
school people. It is encouraging to note that there were 132 
police and sheriff's departments which participated in these 
schools. 

Plans are being developed for the continuation of the 
schools in the fall and winter of the coming year, by the 
Youth Authority and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 
We reported to you last year that there were 59 police 
and sheriff's departments in this State, with juvenile units. 
We can repwrt to you this year that there now are 110 
departments in this State with recognized Juvenile units. 
We know that most of the large departments have had 
juvenile units for some time; however, we arc happy to 
welcome to the fold, you in the smaller departments who 
have recognized the importance of proper working with 
youth by officers in your department. 

To what can we attribute this increased interest in 
juvenile work by our law enforcement agencies? Perhaps, 
first and foremost, we should give credit to the law enforce- 
ment administrators in California who were quick to recog- 
nize the full import of this vexing problem and who after 
isuih cognizance gave unstinting support to juvenile delin- 
I quency programs inaugurated within their respective de- 
I partmcnts. The juvenile officers themselves are to be com- 
i mended highly for the leadership they have taken in 
; furthering this worthwhile work. We re|X)rted last year 
that there were three Juvenile Officers' Associations in the 
State: Northern, Central and Southern. In April of this 
year, the three Associations joined hands and formed the 
Gilifornia State Juvenile Officers' Association, to present a 
united front for law enforcement agencies in the control 
and prevention of delinquency in this great State. The Cali- 
fornia State Juvenile Officers' Association has among its 
objectives: improvement of ethical standards, standardiza- 
tion ol prcxedures for "processing" young transgressors, and 



to maintain a keep interest in proposed legislation which 
may affect law enforcement in its relation to youth welfare. 
In conclusion we should like to report that rapid strides 
are being made by the law enforcement agencies in Cali- 
fornia, in the matter of combatting juvenile delinquency. 
I am sure it is safe to say that we ir» California have as- 
sumed the leadership in this broad field of juvenile control 
and delinquency prevention, and will maintain that leader- 
ship, I am confident. But let us remember that there is no 
cure-all or panacea for juvenile delinquency. It is a team 
problem and only through cooperation and coordination of 
the efforts of all agencies, private and public, dealing with 
youth, can we hope to have true delinquency prevention in 
this great State of California and make our youth of today 
a better citizen of tomorrow. 



PETER'S MARKETS 

THREE STORES TO SERVE YOU 
STORE NO. 1—300 W. Park Stre?t, Stockton. Calif. 

STORE NO. 2— Highway SO and Mathews Road, French Camp. Cal:f. 
STORE NO. 3 — Highway 50 and Klo Avenu ■. Lathrop. Calif. 



NEGRETES MARKET 

LIQUORS • MEATS • GROCERIES 



PEERLESS MILLING CO. 



Phone 8-8991 



1040 E. Church Street 



STOCKTON 



rALIFORMA 



WARD TYLERS SPORT SHOP 

■•EVERYTHING FOR EVERY SPORT" 
Hotel Stockton Bui:ding 



STOCKTON 



CAlll ORMA 



Kappy Nahig an Carl Nah:gian 

EL TEHRAN RESTAURANT 

EPECIALIZ'NG IN BROILED FOOD 

SHISH KEBAB. CHOPS. STEAKS. CHICKEN 

Faciltes for Private ("arties and Banquets in Our Gold Room 

Phone 8-8796 • 333 East Market St. • STOCKTON, CALIF. 

BASCOU RED CHERRY BAKERY 



522 East Weber Av 



STOCKTON 



Telephone 2-684S 

CALIFORNIA 



REGAL INN AND CAFE 

Elmer and Rufe. Owners 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 

Li <uors and M'XL-d Drinks 

317 N. VViloon Way Phone 2 9448 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



SHERWOOD HOTEL 



Mrs. Grac- Knyon Owner 

CLEAN ROOMS - HOT AND COLD WATER 

Daily and Weekly Reasonnh > Rales 

129 Bridge Place Phone 3-8190 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

NEW FROG INN 

SPECIALIZING IN FINE DINNERS AND DRINKS 

Charl7> R sso. Proprietor 

944 W.ilerloo Road Phone 3-1 953 

CALIFORNIA 



STO( KTON 



Mor-Pak Preserving (Corporation 

Packers nl the Famous 

AUNT MARY'S FANCY ELBERTA PEACHES 

FANCY KADOTA FIGS 

FANCY WHOLE PEELED APRICOTS 



STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Miirch. 1951 



Res Phone 2-3722 
Office Phone 5-5993 "^"^"^ 

Stockton Armature and Motor Works 

R. GLENN JONES, Sales Manager „^„.,„ 



LOGAN CAMERA SHOP 

••EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC" 
Fred and George Schneider 

20 N. SAN JOAQUIN STREET STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



AZTECA CAFE 



Phone 2-9262 131 So. Hunter Street^^^^^^^^l^ 

STOCKTON 



SANOWICHES nho jJjfl^^^|^^ CURB SERVICE 

..OCKTO N -'- -" "" " ""°" " -CA_UFORN^ 

" ^ ' Business 4-4022 

Residence 7-7504 r. ^ • • 

HARRY BOAZ - Auto Repairing 

MOTOR TUNE-^U^P^and ELECTRICM^^WORK -^N^^^^^^^^ REBUILT 
STOCKTON ■^■SE.Fre.on. Street ,,,,,o,,,, 

SQUARE DEAL LIQUOR STORE 

YOUR FAVORITE BRANDS 



CURTIS ICE & FUEL CO. 

MILL BLOCKS - OAK - COAL 

WE DELIVER 

Phone 2-8882 321 E. Charter Way 

STOC KTON ^^^ 

BROTHERTON'S CAFE 



746 E. Main Street 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



LOS ANGELES HOTEL 

STEAM HEAT 
HOT AND COLD WATER IN EVERY ROOM 
' PS Sn Center Phone 2-9758 

STOCKTON '" ' ^'^^'^"'^^■^ 

Res Phone 2-1255 Amedeo Sattui Shop Phone 2-5886 

SATTUrS SADDLE SHOP 



STOCKTON 



245 So. Hunter Telephone 2-9574 (-^^IFORNIA 807 EAST MAIN STREET 



HARNESS AND RIDING EQUIPMENT - LEATHER JACKETS 
BOOTS - SHIRTS - PAINTS - ETC. - REPAIKINL. 



STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



\ 



C. E. STABLER, D.D.S. 

Telephone 7-7623 
Suite 1003 Medico-Dental Building ^,^ 

STOCKTON LALlfUKiMrt 

ACME AUTO WRECKING CO. 

Telephone 7-7021 324 S. Center Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

AURORA BODY WORKS 

AUTO GLASS . AUTO PAINTING 
All Work Guaranteed 

44fi N Aurora Street Phone 2-0309 
STOCKTON ^-^'^ ■"■ ^"■-°--'' ^' CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2853 P- Malanca, Proprietor 

BI-RITE MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 

BEER AND WINE 

California and Jefferson Streets 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

"Babe" Curnow Owner Open at 4:30 A.M. 

MIKES BAIT SHOP 

FRESH MONTEREY SARDINES - LIVE MINNOWS 
FISHING TACKLE 
12 E. Weber Ave. Telephone 7-7531 ,^^„.,,. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

JIM CASCIAROS MARKET 

WINE • BEER • GROCERIES 
1823 N. California 



CHARTER WAY FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

FREE DELIVERY 

Dial 4-2713 236 East Charter Way 

STOCKTON ^ CALimKiMM 

HOTEL WHITE 

HOT AND COLD WATER 

REASONABLE RATES 

STOCKTON ""-""" 307 south Center ^^^,^^^^,^ 

LOPEZ CAFE 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - SANDWICHES 



STOCKTON 



512 So. Fresno Av 



Phone 2-9457 



CALIFORNIA 



REDWING NOVELTY CO. 

VENDING AND AMUSEMENT GAMES 
7 So California Street Service Phones: 8-8289 - 2-9614 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

STOCKTON POULTRY MARKET 

LIVE AND DRESSED ^POULTRY AND EGGS „,^„„ 
WHOLESALE and" RETAIL - FREE WHOLESALE DELIVERY 

STOCKTON^'""''' ^- ' "^^'^""""^ '^•"CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



FRED J. CONZELMAN, M.D. 

NEUROPSYCHIATRY 

Specialist Certified by American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology 

By Appoinment Only • 251 N. Hunter Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

ARMAND MICHELOTTI 

GRAIN - CORN SHELLING - BEAN HARVESTING 
19 S. Harrison 



STOCKTON 



CALJI-ORNIA 



FLOTILL PRODUCTS INCORPORATED 



STOCKTON 



CANNERS OF QUALITY FOODS 
Plants — Stockton and Modesto 

— General Offices — 



C. R. ECCLES & CO., Inc. 

Central California Distributors 

COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION - AIR CONDITIONING 

HOME APPLIANCES 

STOCKTOn"^^ McKinley Avenue Telephone 4-62^^^^^^^^,^ 

SIMPSON JEWELRY CO. 

Telephone 9-9228 324 E. Main Street 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL TAFT 

124 S. Center St. Phone 2-9208 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



OTTO ALLGOEWER 



FARM LABOR CONTRACTOR 



22 South Mo 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Mtinh. I'f5l 



POLICE AND PEACE OFEICERS' JOURNAL 



Piii^e fi.i 



Phone 3-2172 Rp«. Phonr 2-S393 

COMPLETE WAREHOUSING DISTRIBUTION 

('alifornia Fireproof Storage &: Transfer Co. 

H. F. REILLEY, Mgr. 
72 1 N UNION STREET STOCKTON, CALIIORNIA 

PAT'S SPORTING GOODS 

FRESH BAITS - LIVE MINNOWS 



STOCKTON 



COOL CORNER 

AS THE NAME IMPLIES 
703 So. Center Plione 2-9426 



CALIhORNIA 



1440 E. Main St. 



Phone 3-4328 



CALIFORNIA STOCKION 



Office Phonr 4-4998 Res. Phone 3-0553 

MACARIO D. BAUTISTA, M.D. 

Office Hours by Appointment 
215 Bank of America Building 



ALII ORNIA 



YOUR MARKET 

FOR TOP QUALITY GROCERIES 

MEATS - VEGETABLES - LIQUORS 

VISIT OUR ADJOINING VARIETY STORE 

1255 Buena Vista Phone 9-9143 

STOCKTON CALiPORNIA 

ARTS CLEANERS AND DYERS 

LAUNDRY AGENCY 

OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY 

2714 Waterloo Road Phone 2-3465 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



ALPINE PACKING CO. 

SAUSAC;E MANUFACTURERS 
Joe Kaeslin. Prop. 



NATALE G. BRUNETTA, M.D. 



MISSOURI CLUB 



MIXED DRINKS 



HOME-COOKED MEALS 



STOCKION 



22 South El Dorado 



Phone 2-9428 



CALIKJKNIA 



<>0\ F. MINER AVENUE 



STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



SAN JOAQUIN RESEARCH LABORATORY 

Don K. Proffil and Roger Loh, Chemists 

ASSAYING - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTS - RESEARCH 

CHEMISTS - CONSULTING CHEMISTS 

8 West Weber Avenue Phone 3-1551 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



HOTEL BRONX 

L. Warner, Mgr. 

MODERATE RATES 

640 E. Main Street Telephone 6-6701 



T. W. THOMAS 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



N S U R O R 
527 E. Channel 



NOTARY 



WEBBS BAKERY and DELICATESSEN 



VETTER PLUMBING CO. 

PLUMBING - HEATING - AIR CONDITIONING 
JOB WORK A SPECIALTY 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA -STOCKTON 



Phone 3-0193 



CALIFORNIA 



HARBOR INN 



REID M. VAN NOATE, D.D.S. 



ORTHODONTICS EXCLUSIVELY 



2 East Main at Ce 



Phone 2-9004 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA -STOCKTON 



333 North Sutte 



Telephone 2-4411 



CALIFORNIA 



AERO CLUB AND FOUNTAIN 



436 E. Webe 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



TONY BORELLI - Mens Clothier 

READY MADE AND MADE TO ORDER 
43 N. California Street Telephone 4-1812 

CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON STATIONERY & TOY CO. 

VARIETY STORE MERCHANDISE 

NOTIONS - STATIONERY - SCHOOL SUPPLIES - TOYS 

Phones: 7-7897 : 7-7898 132 S. Aurora Street 

STOCKION CALIFORNIA 



ALFREDS 



1016 West Acacia Street 
STOCKTON 



4-0280 

CALIFORNIA 



A. A. MARKET 

Mr. Simon 

BEER - WINE - COLD MEATS - GROCERIES 

Open Every Day 'Til 10:30 P. M. 

1405 E. Harding Way Phone 2-9528 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

STEPHENS BROTHERS, INC. 

BOAT BUILDERS AND MARINE SUPPLIES 
345 N. Yosemite Street 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Stockton Auto Wrecking and Supply House 

LARGE STOCK OF ARMY TRUCK PARTS 
Phone 4-4691 
420 S CENTER STREET 



P. O. Box 2033 

STO( KTON, CALIFORNIA 



.siO( KTON 



CARLS PHIL-UP CAFE 

PARKING SPACE 

BEER AND HAMBURGERS 

Phone 2-9882 1201 E. Main Stre 



DR. P. M. LAWRENCE 

(B.A.. M.A., D.C., N.D.) 

NATURE HEALER 

NATURE CURE INSTITUTE 

845 West Oak Street Phone 2-0591 

STOCKION CALIFORNIA 

OUR STUDIOS OFFER "EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC" 

Portrsllt el Dlillnctlun snil Artlttry ■ Glsmoiir Photoi . Weddlna Spfelsllll« 



BOBS STUDIO 



CALIFORNIA 



Graduation - Aerial - Panorami 
Phone 34111 East Main Str 

STOCKTON 



I ALII ORNIA 



COSTA B K O S 

Growers and Shippers 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Office: Union and Lafayette Streets 



KINSER MOTOR SUPPLY 

TIMKEN BEARINGS • SPICER UNIVERSAL JOINTS 
AMERICAN BRAKE BLOCK • MOTOR PARTS 



CAI MORNIA 



216 E. Cha 

STOCKTON 



Telephones 7-7033 • 7-7034 



Piige 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Manh. 10^1 



THE SIGN OF THE RED HAND 

(Conlhtucd from pngr 10) 
Destiny," was allegedly taken from the magie stone Lie 
I'ail. brought from Greece by the conquering Dananns 
who professed occult arts in forging invincible weapons, 
curing malignant ills, and in bringing the dead to life. 

Harpers still chant that during a final and victorious con- 
flict against the Firbolgs, Nuada, the Tuatha De Dananns' 
king, had his right hand smitten off by a sword stroke. The 
tale relates that grievous as was this hurt, Nuada in con- 
sequence was threatened with loss of kingship as well, 
since his warlike people refused to tolerate a mutilated 
sovereign. But legend asserts that the monarch in his ex- 
tremity applied for aid to Cert, his cunning artificer, widely- 
famed for wondrous craftsmanship, who cannily fashioned 
for the king a perfect hand of shining metal, which crea- 
tion, Cert, by sorcery, infused with feeling and with motion 
in its every joint. Thus was Nuada's prestige reestablished 
so that he again ruled staunchly over his approving sub- 
jects, among whom he was thereafter known as "Nuada 
of the Silver Hand." 

Thus the belief of men in mystic powers of the human 
hand to guide, to gleam, to lighten darkened pathways, and 
as a symbol of devout laudation, has spanned the oceans 
and the ages, from the Old 'World to the New — a gulf of 
three thousand miles and thirty centuries. The chance that 
people of two eras of such remote separation would have 
invented an Irish "hand of glory" is too fantastic for con- 
sideration. It is more probable that the cryptic "Fair God," 
who landed on the shores of Mexico to impress its people 
with the surviving tradition of his beneficent sway, also 
brought those salient beliefs in the Cult of Hands, to 
which all Europe then had long paid homage. 

Red has ever been a color of warning and of grim asso- 
ciation, and has consistently held a vital part in rituals of 
the ancient Cult of Hands. The motive for dj'eing bodies 
scarlet and for decorating temple walls with ruddy hand- 
prints, in some instances, resulted from the desire to re- 
place the pallor of death with the hues of vitality, pointing 

FIRST CALIFORNIA COMPANY 



STOCKTON 



Phone 2-5575 
Room 926, Bank of Ameri< 



CALIFORNIA 



PARAMOUNT MANUFACTURING CO. 

POTATO. ONION AND CARROT MACHINERY 
Washers - Presizers - Grading Tables - Waxers 

Baggers - Conveyors - Elevators 

581 E. Lerdo St., Phone 332. SHAFTER. CALIF. 

1615 E. Main Street, Phone 2-7539, STOCKTON. CALIF. 

DR. JOHN F. BLINN 
DR. JOHN F. BLINN, Jr. 



STOCKTON 



Medico-Dental Building 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA FRAME SHOP 

STEPHEN M. CASEY 



5101 East Twelfth Str 

OAKLAND 



Telephone KEIlog 2-3151 

CALIFORNIA 



Custom Bu.lt Furniture Draperies and Slip Cov 

BOUNDS & Mcdonald 

UPHOLSTERING 
238 W. Harding Way Phone 3-4307 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 2-2382 



Residence 3-7475 



J. WARNER SMALLEY, D.O. 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 



5 12 BELDINC BUILDING 



STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



ANNIE'S INN 

Joe Figueredo, Prop. 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

2539 E. Man Phone 2-9338 



CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



GRUNSKY PHARMACY 

Ernest W. Grunsky 

SUNDRIES AND FOUNTAIN 

2149 East Main Street Dial 3-0431 



CALIFORNIA 



DR. U. S. IVES, Optometrist 

Office Hours: 9:00 to 5:00 | 

Saturday: 9:00 to 12:00 | 

Phone 2-5119 36 N. San Joaquin Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



BRIGHT SPOT ELECTRIC CO. 

APPLIANCES AND RADIOS 



STOCKTON 



30.3 E. Weber Av 



Phone 9-9769 



CALIFORNIA 



GIANNINI MARKET 



STOCKTON 



GROCERIES - PICNIC SUPPLIES 
BEER AND WINE 

Phone 2-915S 

CALIFORNIA 



1103 East Harding Way 



MARION M. GREEN, M.D. 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 

Telephone: Office 3-4512; Residence 3-7682 

Suite 1107 Medico-Dental Bldg. 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



NOBLE HOTEL 

REASONABLE DAILY AND WEEKLY RATES 
19 No. Hunter Phone 2-9094 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL BRYANT 



REASONABLE ROOM RATES - STEAM HEATED 

WEEKLY - MONTHLY RATES 

25 So. Commerce Phone 2-9279 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

GROUND FLOOR REASONABLES RATES 

KELLY ROOMS 

ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS WITH PRIVATE ENTRANCE 
126 So. El Dorado St. Phone 2-9224 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

GEO. HIGHIET AUTO WRECKING CO. 

NEW AND USED PARTS 

GLASS INSTALLED FOR ALL MAKES - SAFETY - PLAIN 

Phone 2-0226 126 South Wilson Way 



STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 


X-RAY 


Phone 2-8363 


DR. 


A. L. GREENBERG, De>itist 


STOCKTON 


7 S. El Dorado Street, corner of Main 

CALIFORNIA 




Q U I N N ' S for 




OFFICE SUPPLIES 




120 E. Main Dial 7-7712 


STOCKTON 


CALIFORNIA 







Mtirrh. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



POOR FOOD AND ROTTEN SERVICE 

MURPHY S CAFE 

ICE COLD BEER - SOFT DRINKS - SANDWICHES 

SIEAK AND CHOI* DINNERS 

IS62 So. El Dorado Phone 2-9971 

STOCKTON Open All N.le CALIFORNIA 



DUKE S MARKET 



CALIFORNIA 



FREE DELIVERY 



Deluxe liquors 



AnIhoDyr Zeiler 



(Your Friendly Neighborhood Sto 
QUAUTY BRANDS - LIQUORS - WINES - BEERS 
2436 E. Main Street Phone 2-93SI 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

"subway ringlette beauty'shop "" 

COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICE 

TREAT YOURSELF TO THE BEST AVAILABLE 

Phone 2-0874 848 E. Miner Ave. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



FRANK fisher LUMBER COMPANY 



3440 East Ma:n Street. Opposite Roosevelt School 
Telephone I'liil STOCK ION. CALIIORNIA 

HARRIS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

FARM AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 

Main Office and Factory: 702 North Wilson Way 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

AUman Painting and Decorating Co. 

2204 North Wilson Way Telephone 3-1801 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

FORTY-NINE DRUG CO. 



CHARLES P. MICHELOTTI 



901 N. Yo 
STOCKTON 



lite St.. cor. PopU 



Phone 2-5143 

CALIFORNIA 



Office 2-7255 



STOCKTON 



DARTER & LEONARD 

REAL ESTATE AND I.NSURANCE 

We Write All Lines of Insurance 

124 N. El Dorado Street 



Residence 2-0114 



DR. WARREN T. McNEIL 



242 Sutter Street 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Com l)intie Ills of 

MAXWELL M. WILLENS 

DONALD D. BOSCOE 



ART PEHL - Signs 



LOUIE'S MARKET 



Wholesale - Retail 
.MEAT - GROCERIES - POULTRY - EGGS FRESH PRODUCE 
3-1604 Center and Washington 

CALIFORNIA 



KTON 



J J. Devincenzi 

DEVINCENZI WHOLESALE PRODUCE 



A COMPLETE SIG.N SERVICE 

TRUCK PAINTING 

1616 Cherokee Lane Telephone 7-7652 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

THIEL BROS. 

Licensed Contractors 

STRUCTURAL STEEL - PIPE 

MACHINERY AND PIPE INSTALLATION 

ALL TYPES OF WELDING 

Phone 8-8775 2501 Mariposa Road 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

GOLD MEDAL ICE CREAM CO. 



Phone 2-4577 



1037 E. Lafayette Str 



"TOP QUALITY- 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-7415 



DR. DONALD L. FARRELL 



C ALII OKNIA 



MERTON W. QUIC;K 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 



Office Dial 2-9147 Res. Dial 6-6658 

"BILLS" GARAGE 

W. J. Rundle and Son 

CHRYSLER AND GENERAL MOTORS 

MOTOR TUNE UP and ELECTRICAL WORK 

>24 N. PILGRIM SI STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



BENTLEYS TRAILER PARK 



ephone 2-7197 



738 S. Wagner Av 



CALIFORNIA 



2189 E. Taylor 



Registered Pharmacist 
24 Hours a Day 

DAY AND NIGHT DRUG STORE 

SEE YOUR DOCTOR FOR ILLNESS THEN YOU ARE SURE 

SPECIALIZING IN BABY EQUIPMENT 

145 E. Weber Ave. - Phone 8-8601 STOCKTON. CALIF 

9-11 CLUB 

WHISKEY • WINE • BEER 

The Place to Meet Your Friends 

9 So. El Dorado St. Phone 4-6219 



CALIFORNIA 



FRY BROS. DELIVERY SERVICE 



FURNITURE 
502 N. Hunter 



PACKAGES 
Phone 4-2283 



CALIFORNIA 



FRED M. BOLLINGER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK ION 



Attorney at Law 
204 American Trust Co. Building Telephone 6-68S9 

CALIFORNIA 



YEAGER FURNITURE CO. 

FOR DISTINCTIVE HOME FURNISHINGS 
317 N. Grant 



Anderson Cartage and Warehouse ('o. 



419 S. Aurora Street 



Phone 2-6502 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA AUTO SITPLY CO. 

Wm. J. Dunlap. Prop. 



HOTEL MAIN 

MOST CENTRALLY LOCATED 
AIR CONDITIONED 



222 No. El Dorado 



Phone S-S9S9 



11 North California St 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



■ 5-5686 

CALIKIRNI \ 



Piige 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Manli. 1<J5I 



to universal hope for resurrection as part of the incompre- 
hensible cosmic plan. This impulse may also have inspired 
the out-pouring of life-fluid upon many ancient altars as a 
supreme sacrifice to ruthless deities. 

It is ironical to note that tyrannic greed, unchanged 
down through the milleniums, has ever hastened with 
fanatic zeal to open the veins of the world's finest youth 
upon the altar of Mars, while shuddering in righteous ab- 
horrence at the mention of human sacrifice to other pagan 
idols. Man still cherishes his fallacies and fetishes, and 
whether it be in olden time or in our modern world, he 
has set up his brazen images and bowed down before them. 

Among those who long ago were the means of promul- 
gating the Cult of Red Hands, were many innocent vic- 
tims of "man's inhumanity to man" in the twin continents 
before the coming of Amerigo Vespucci. And here again 
the story theme winds back to dim and shifting shadows 
of antiquity. At least a thousand years before a master- 
thinker planned the Great Pyramid beside the Nile, the 
city of Cuicuilco thrived. Its old site is but twelve miles 
from the modern Mexican capital. Here, many years ago, 
perhaps even as early as 5,000 B.C., a flow of flaming lava 
swept down from Xitli to engulf dwelling and temple, 
ending the "singing and dancing" ceremonials from which 
its name derived. 

Though Cuicuilco's day pre-dated the erection of the 
Great Pyramid, it is thought that, like the Pharaoh-archi- 
tect, a chieftain of Old Mexico also employed an army of 
slaves to create his palaces and towering temple buildings 
which provided a pattern for succeeding similar structures. 
It may be that the men of old Cuicuilco were the "For- 
gotten People," fearfully mentioned by present-day Mexi- 
cans as "La Gente Olvidada" when bartering their tiny 
clay figurines with almond-shaped eyes, and the diminutive 
Demon Fire Gods, fashioned after those found amid the 
venerable ruins. 

Driven by volcanic destruction from their first and fa- 
mous settlement, the undaunted builders created anew 
their pyramidal temples beneath the eternal vigil of Popo- 
catepetl, "The Smoke Mountain," and Ixtaccihuatl, "The 
Sleeping Woman," whose lofty, snow-crowned peaks still 
guard the extinct remains of Teotihuacan, Sacred City of 
the Toltecs, now synonymous with antiquity among the 
inhabitants of Modern Mexico. 

Thus the pathway of romance wends southward to the 
Golden Land of Coronado where still blossoms the mystic 
"Tree of Little Red Hands." This curious growth with 
its strangely shaped blooms has played a scarlet role in 
history. Held in high religious esteem by the people of its 
domain, the tree was once an object of devout and fearful 
adoration. Its blossoms closely resemble small bloody 
hands with sharp claws and fingers inward curled. For 
this reason, no doubt, it first was chosen as a fetish, since 
red hand-prints featured so importantly in Aztec sacrifi- 

M A T A R 

Joseph Matar, Prop. 

WINES - LIQUORS - BEER - SOFT DRINKS - TOBACCO 

339 E. Lafayette Street Phone 2-9166 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



FRED'S AUTO WRECKING 

USED CARS WITH MANY UNUSED MILES 

REPAIRING - WRECKING 
Phone 2-99S3 3339 So. McKinley Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

STOCKTON SCAVENGERS ASSOCIATION 
Inc. 

424 E. Weber Ave. Phone 2-3876 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-0679 Res., 35 S. Sierra Nevada 

NAT GOGNA 



Office, 17 N. Wilson Way 



STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



M. DELARM 

UPHOLSTERING - FURNITURE REPAIRING 

Phons 2-2677 1100 E. Market Slre-t 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DELTA ICE CREAM CO. 



1928 Pacific Av 



Phone 7-7095 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



DACLAN'S GROCERY 

845 S. Lincoln Phons 4-1568 

'STOCK TON CALIFORNIA 

Office Phone 3-4273 Res. Phone 3-3563 

If No Answer Call 6-6727 

EDWARD A. ANDERSON, M.D. 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 
36 W. Willow Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



FRANK'S MARKET 



1304 E. Hazelto 



Phone 2-9903 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN JOAQUIN MORTUARY 

AND BURIAL INSURANCE j 

Clifton Crawford, Prop. M 

Telephone 3-6434 544 South California Street ^ 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



GETSEY'S MARKET 



15S3 S. San Joaqu!n Phone 2-9824 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

JIM AND JOHN'S PLACE 



210 E. Market 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



DEAN'S MARKET 

2301 E. Vine Phone 2-9738 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS CO. 

244-48 N. Hunter St. Phone 7-7968 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

MACK TRUCKS 
Sales - Service - Parts 

CASTLES' TRUCK SERVICE 

ONE-STOP SERVICE 

Henry A. Castles, General Manager 

Phone 4-4881 304 West Weber Ave. 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNliS 



March. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



cial rituals. Also, at the time ot its prc-eniincnci- it was 
believed that only one specimen of the strange tree existed 
— a superstition promoted and encouraged by the religious 
leaders, very probably. 

At any rate, the tree gained such prestige that it e\ entu- 
ally became a national symbol, still appearing proliHcally 
in Maya picture-writings, where it is depicted with its 
branches extended toward the east and the land of its 
legendary origin, Atlantis, from whence it was allegedly 
transported by the "fair God." 

.Many arc the strange tales told of this weird symbol ; 
and one account relates that during the glorious days of 
his regal reign, Montezuma himself sent an imperial requi- 
sition for some of the foliage and Howers from the sacred 
tree. For reasons unknown, his request was denied. It is 
possible that the ruler may have anticipated refusal, which 
he thus employed as a ruse to instigate hostilities. In any 
event, the gilded emperor then deployed his armies down 
upon the city in wrath an<l bloodshed that was long and 
fearfully remembered ; but the Tree of Little Red Hands 
and its legend have outlived the mighty .Montezuma and 
his conquerors, in lowly survival despite imperial force, 
and well it guards the secret of its remote importance as it 
burgeons today amid the ancient desolation of broken 
courts and fallen temples. The sonorous throbbing drums 
of festival now are silent, and through quiet ruins only the 
tropic fireflies flash and dance, like dying sparks of old and 
splendrous glories. 

Still linking the passing civilizations and their cults of 
changing deities are the mute hands of an older and more 
enduring worship. The first ruler of the Itzaes, later 
deified as the foremost god of Itzaes and Mayas, was 
Itzamma. He was known as "Kabul," "The Omnipotent 
Hand.* He is said to have come to this land "from the 
east," arriving "immediately after the Flood." He is 
famed as the son of Hunab-Ku, "God Behind All Gods," 
the superior and first cause of all existence. He is believed 
to have in\ented the art of writing, as used by his subjects 
and their many beneficent gifts. He relieved the sick, and 
is said to have even been able to raise the dead. His carven 
and painted likeness is still seen on many stone surfaces at 
Copan. Palenque, Kabah, Uxmal, Chichen-Itza, and other 
places throughout this region. 

I '"'•"•'7, /;' J;'"'"," , •■•■"' Si'inKwl f.„i.|ur»l. I.y Fr, Ilcrn.ir.1., ,l<- 

»n alt.ir a...l .i...,thrr icmple to lhr.r k.nif ..r k'kI. Ii/.im..iI i.l (lliiinima). 
•here ihry put the figure of a haml. which wr»r<l lh<-n. n, a memorial. 
Ami ihcy M.,1 that ihcv carrinl the .Iki.I a..<l ihr »iik ihrrr. a.iit ihry 
WCTc rrviyr.1 .iml cured hy lourhiuK ihcm with ihc hanil— in the wrV 
Coi.|.lc which Ihcy i.amr<I Kahul. which mean. Sk.lful haml.' There ihr 



IW'l'le iiHere)! large aim*, carrieil pre«ent«. ami ...a.lc .lilgrimages from 
all pari., (nr which ihev had made four road, to the four wiii.N. an.l 
irr.vr<l alkali end« of the country, and paixrd Tol.awn. (iualemaln and 
M> today may lie .een in »ectioii» 



ny 



(To Be Cunliniiid) 



ATLAS GLASS COMPANY 

Manufacturer! and Dealer. 

MIRRORS ■ RE3ILVERINC - WINDOW GLASS 

PLATE - GLAZING CONTRACTORS 



Home Phone 8-82IO 

DOLPH GOMAS 

BETTER BUY USED CARS 
430 North El Dorado Street Telephone 5-S73S 

CALII (JKNIA 



srot KTON 



ROBERT F. GORDON 

SHELL AUTHORIZED DEALER 
304 E. M.ncr Avenue 



t ALirOHMA 



For Prompt and Courteous Service Call 

W. T. GIBSON 

PLUMBING AND HEAT.NG APPLIANCES 



123 S. Grant Street 



Dial 2-1744 



CALII OKMA 



KNOTTY PINE MOTEL 

John C. Dyer 

MODERN - AIR COOLED - KITCHENS 

2160 N. Wilson Way (Hiway 99) Phone 3-1403 

STOCKTON CALIIORMA 



ELVIN KOOKEN GARAGE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIR 



STOi. kroN 



Phone 3-8389 



23IZ Waterloo Road 



CALIF-ORMA 



KRAFT SERVICE 

GOODYEAR TIRES - EXIDE BATTERIES - UNION OIL PRODUCTS 



STOCKTON 



El Doiado ot Paik St. 



RALPH D. CRAMER - jeueler 

WATCHES - DIAMONDS - REl-AIR.NG 

Tel.phonc 4-4203 2032 Pacific Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

ELLIS GARAGE 

TRUCKS - TRACTORS - AUTOMOBILES - ALL TYPES 

DAYTON TIRES 

For Complete Motor Service. Telephone 4-4909 

New Address: 2226 North Wilson Way 

STOCKTON tALIIOKMA 



DR. BILL DASLER 



1122 W. Fremont 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



LILLY L. a>ni C. W. SAVAGE 



IH57 So. San Joaquin Street 



CALIFORNIA 



LEWIS B. SASLAW, M.D. 

STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA 



Bert Ru>s Don Harding Frank Ru 

HARDINC; & RUSS LUMBER CO. 

REDWOOD • DOUGLAS FIR AND PINE 



2465 Walrilao Road 



Phone 3-9415 



CALIFORNIA 



COUNTRY ( LUB MARKET 

You. Nr ghhorhood Grocrr 

C:«OCERIES . FRESH FRUITS and VEGE fABI ES - FRESH MEATS 

Complete Line of Froten Fond.. Plenty of Free Partiing 

■"- * ■ ".'ovanni and Ted S mrnon. 

.slix kroN, I ALII OUNIA 



STOCKTON 



(AIIIORMA STOCKTON 



HOMTS RHFKICKRATION 

:■« HOUR SERVICE 
COLD SPOT - IB Month Guarantee . NORGE 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 68 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL ]\Ir,rch. 1951 



LINCOLN CAFE R- H. WONG 

CHINESE FINE ARTS AND GIFTS 
448 W Weber Phone 2-9551 2009 Pacific Avenue Telephone 4-3184 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Bus Phone 3-3773 Res. Phone 9-9918 

PORT STOCKTON SUPER SERVICE ACE ROOMS 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE Telephone 2-9922 

PERSONALIZED SALES AND SERVICE "^ 

USED CARS AND TRUCKS 15 E. Washington Street 

502 W WASHINGTON ST. STOCKTON. CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



DERBY CLUB STAR FISH CO. 

ERNIE AND JOE 

311 S. EI Dorado Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODERN AUTO TOP THORNTON AUTO TOP 

FIBER - PLASTIC - NYLON COVERS 
TRUCK and TRACTOR CUSHIONS REPAIRED 

QUALITY - SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
Phone Stockton 3-4256 245 W. Charter Way 621 E. Market Street Phone 9-9994 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

BOSWORTH UNION SERVICE ^Artozqu, Prop. 

STOCKMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 
BAR AND DINING ROOM 
101 E. Charter Way Phone 2-7932 Phone 2-9743 124 West Main St. 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



W. p. FULLER CO. R- ^J'^A^^T 

PAINT DEPARTMENT POULTRY PRODUCERS OF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA ' 

21R S„ Aurora Street Phone 7 7838 EGGS • POULTRY • FEED 

218 So. Aurora St>eet Phone 7-7838 Phone S-5861 1 North Madison Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 4-4569 Residence 7-7741 

NEW CAVOUR HOTEL 

Tony Banchero 

Practice Limited to Orthopedic Surgery 
306 S. Union Street Suite 807 Medico-Dental Building 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



FRANK G. VIEIRA, M.D. 



PIELS AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE ^- «* ^".^^"^^^ ^^, , rr^-rtr^^r CT:u\T,nt' '"' 

CRAMER COLLECTION SERVICE 

Bonded and Licensed - Collections and Adjustments 
Phone 2-7768 640 E. Market Street Made Everywhere - Cash for Old Accounts 

cTriri^Tn\i ' CAI IFORNIA Room 318, Bank of America BIdg. Phone 2-8308 

SIOCKION LALlfUKINlA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Dial 6-6392 

A. F. TOCCOLI UNION ICE AND STORAGE CO. [ 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR A G (Bert) Viets Assistant Manaeer 

COMMERCIAL WORK - QUALITY HOMES ^- ^ ""''^" ''"'"■ A"'^'^"' Manager 

Weber and Pershing Avenues 

CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON BLUE PRINT COMPANY SAN FRANCISCO FLORAL CO. 

512 East Channel Street Telephone 4-4041 Telephones: Office 8-8527 - Res. 2-5307 

600 East Main Street 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



ALL INVALID SERVICE „„. r^r^r^r^ /"r>«^'r'r/~v 

SEA FOOD GROTTO 

, ,,,„ Phone 2-9084 15 N. California Street 

Phone 7-7570 

CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Meet Your Friends at 



THF DFTTA TAVERN BERGS MOTEL 

1 nr, Ljr.1^ l /V l /\ V HIVI-N Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Glass, Proprietors 

COCKTAILS - DANCING NIGHTLY KITCHEN OR BED ROOM UNITS 

CHICKEN. STEAK DINNERS— NIGHTLY EXCEPT TUESDAY o V", .^ " " ., ^ u I =« 

8 Miles West on Borden Highway No. 4, Stockton '505 S. EI Dorado St.. on U. S. Highway 50 

Fred, Mary and Joe Ramos Phone 2-4964 STOCKTON . CALIFORNIA 



HOLLYWOOD HOTEL NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

ROOMS DA-i', WEEK OR MONTH D°" "•'" "»'':*'. Manager, Stockton Branch 

419 Bank of America BIdg. Phone S-6944 

lOS East Main Phone 2-9803 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON CITY AUTO COURT L E S ' 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



MODERN CABINS WITH KITCHENS 
TRAILER COURTS 



DINING AND DANCING 



1022 So. Wilson Way Phone 2-9708 ^302 E. Main Phone 2-9413 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



M>inii. /'/•;/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Puj^e Cy9 



Phone 2-7340 NiRhl Phone 4-4264 

BROUWER MOTOR CO. 



STOCKTON 



John J. Brouwer, Own.r 
NEW AND USED CARS 
520 No. El Dorado Street 



TALIFORNIA 



R>s. Phone 2-0696 John Boccoli, Prop. 

TRAVELERS GARAGE 

Specialiing in Chrysler Products - Chevrolet - CMC Truclfs - General 

Auto and Truck Repairing - Towing and Accessories 

Shop Phone 7-7242 I8S1 E. Main Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

QUALITY UPHOLSTERING 

By Chas. Bertuccrlli 

RECOVERING • REPAIRING] • RESTYLING 

624' . W. Fremont Phone 3-9564 

STOCKION CALIFORNIA 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND EQUIPMENT 

Phone Stockton 9-9011 421 North Hunter 

S rot K I ON CALIFORNIA 

BENS PLACE 

CABINS AND BOATS 

ON THE SAN JOAQUIN RIVER 

BETWEEN TRACY AND STOCKTON 

HAHN & iMEHRTEN 

BUILDERS OF FARM MACHINERY 

Designing - Machine Work - Welding 

Repair Work 

411 S. Aurora Street Telephone 2-0211 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

THE BROWN HOUSE 

Telephone 9-9034 1700 Pacific Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 5-5927 Long Distance 8-8466 Night Phone 2-1452 

FOREST L. BOYER 

Broker and D'stribulor 

CALIFORNIA FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

419 American Trust Building 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



T E M M E • S 

Wholesale and Retail 

SALADS. RAVIOLI AND TAMALES 

DELICATESEN 

130S E. Main Street Phones 2-9173 : 3-S5I0 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CHANNEL SHEET METAL WORKS 

Specializing in 
BAR AND RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT 

Phone 3 5048 II E. Channel St. 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



CHARLEYS SQUEEZE INN 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
SQUEEZE IN FOR QUALITY 



.•^TtJCKTON 



1242 E. Harding Wa 



Phone 3-2103 



STOCKTON ROOFING CO. 



N ght Calls Phone 2-0890 
73S North Hun 

STOCKTON 



Established 1912 
Phone 3-0932 

CALIFORNIA 



.SICX K ION 



POMEROY SINOCK 

CONTRACTOR 

147 West Scotts Avenue 



( ALII ORMA 



Conij)linients of 
ROBERT F. ZELLER, M.D. 



WATER FRONT INN 

E. J. Cuneo 
MIXED DRINKS 



STOCKTON 



< ALII (iRMA 



Stockton Armature and Motor Works 



GROVER ARMSTRONG 



COSTANZAS CAFE 

John Costanza and Sons 
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



STOCKTON 



2353 N. CaLforni, 



( ALHORNIA STOCKTON 



125 N. Sutter Street 



Phone 2-9607 



EMIL'S . . . Fin Shof)/?e 

FINE FURS - DESIGNING AND REMODELING 

1247 North Monroe Street Phone 3-0533 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CARANDO MACHINE WORKS 

Designers - Manufacturers of Special M.Tchinery 

General Machine Work and Engine Rcbu Iding 

Telephone 2-3644 420 N. Madison Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORN" 



F. J. Dieir ch K. J. Dietrich. Jr , MA I. 

F. (. DIETRICH \ CO. 

REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 

Telephone 4-4547 23S E. Weber Avenue 

3TO<KTON CALIFORNIA 

CASTANZAS RESTAURANT 

125 N. Sutl-r Sir-el 

PACIFIC COFFEE SHOP 

2043 Pacific 
arOtKfON 1 AI.IFORNIA. 



ERA M. CASSIDY. DBA. 
WM. H. CASSIDY 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

26 South Calif. Si Phon- 2 5717 STOCKTON. CALIF. 

CLAYTONS FINISHINC; SHOP 

FURNITURE AND APPLIANCES 

RE-FINISHED 

Phone 4-1572 131 N. Slanisl.ius Street 

STOt KIMN CALIFORNIA 

KROH S BODY AND FENDER SHOP ' 

G-o B. Kroh Prop. 

BOOY ANO FFNIF"? PP.PA'BING 

WELO'NG - TOUCH-UP WORK 

220 N. Pilgrim Street Phone S-8802 

STOCKTON CAl IIORNIA 

ETS-HOKIN \ CiALVAN 

ELECTRICIANS 

F'RF "RF.VF.NTiON EOIIIPMFNT 

WESTINGHOtlSE APPLIANCES 

233 N. San Joaquin St. Telephone 5-S621 

SIOtKTON (ALIIDRMA 



DICK'S DRIVE INN 



1301 East Harding Wa 

STO( KTON 



Phone 2-0540 

( AI.IFORNIA 



FULLER PAINTS - they lasi 

WM. E. BAHRENFUSS 



PAINTING CONTRACTOR 



4814 E. Washington St. 



Phone 7-7101 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFEICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 



March. 1951 



By J. Ross DUNNIGAN 



A^'hcther you knew it or not there has been a welling 
up among the ranks of the shooters on the West Coast 
against the National RiHe Association to such an extent 
that the NRA decided to do something about it and sent 
out their secretary, Frank Wyman, to make the rounds 
of the various shooting clubs and find out what the trouble 
was. Frank (as he insists on being called) has been around 
to many of the clubs, found out their gripes, offered his 
suggestions and in general, we think, did a lot of good to 
create a better feeling toward the NRA. Let's back track 
here a moment and start closer to the beginning and fol- 
low through, briefl\'. 




Captain Strohm 

It fell to our lot and Emil Dutil, rangemaster at the 
S. F. Police Range, to escort Lee Echols, the field repre- 
sentatixc of the NRA for the West Coast, and Frank 
Wyman to the meeting in Oakland, which meeting was 
presided over by Cap Strohm, the Secretary of the West- 
ern Revolver Association. Cap Strohm had a four-page 
speech prepared shot through with barbs and praise for the 
NRA, pistol shooting and shooters in general. Many of 
the Bay Area clubs were represented at this meeting and 
among the guests were Captain Henry Jacobs of the Cali- 
fornia Highway Patrol who is a director in the NRA. 
And as you know, Emil Dutil is also on the Pistol Panel 
of the NRA and we might add right now that the shooters 
are mighty lucky to have these two men from the Coast on 
the NRA panel. Both know shooting and the shooters 
problems and we feel that their presence at the NRA meet- 
ings will greatly help us here in the West. 

It's true that we here on the West Coast have just a 
local point of view of the shooting situation all over the 
United States while the NRA has the national view and 
often the two are quite different so it was the major point 
of the meeting to try and adjust our local viewpoint to tie 
in with the national viewpoint of the NRA. This, we feel, 
was pretty well done. The big bone of contention was the 
national rules as applied to local matches and by local 
matches we mean matches all over the country and not just 
here on the West Coast and it is stated that the local spon- 



sor of a match should be given more leeway in some of the 
shooting rules and other requirements usually imposed be- 
cause the matches are registered. Some of the NRA rules 
have stopped many from shooting and the main rule, 
which we of the West oppose, is the alibi rule which is not 
only out of line with the shooting but lengthens the 
matches to such an extent the attendance at the S. F. 
Range has dropped from over 200 to around 135 shooters 
a match. This we have checked and believe it to be true. 
The sponsor knows local conditions better than the NRA 
and should be allowed to conduct his matches according to 
local wishes. Oakland does not use the alibi rule nor have 
registered matches and their average attendance ran about 
235 shooters a match. We also checked and found that 
the shooters do not like the alibi rule nor the idea that in 
order to shoot the shooter must join the NRA. In Oak- 
land there is no club to join, no registration fee nor a time 
limit to register. Come any time, pay for the match and 
shoot to your heart's content. 

These, and many more such items, were handed to 
Frank Wyman and he came off with flying colors and es- 
tablished for himself a niche in the hall of shooting as a 
swell guy and one who knows his business. In that we 
concur. As to the sponsor using his own judgment as to 
the type of matches he is to conduct Frank assures us that 
the NRA rules will take care of that in the very near 
future. As to the alibi rule Frank said that these rules DO 
NOT originate from the officials of the NRA but from 
various clubs or individuals and then they are taken under 
consideration by the Pistol Committee who either pass, 
modify or reject the proposed new rule and that's that — 
so do not blame the NRA but your pistol committee. 
Sounds reasonable, NO? 

As to participants shooting in a registered match who do 
not belong to the NRA the answer was to take the exam- 
ple of a national, or local fraternity or social club. When 
they sponsor a dinner dance, for example, it is customary 
to allow the members to participate by paying for the din- 
ner but any outsider is not allowed to pay for the dinner 
and enjoy the party if he does not support the organization 
during the year by paying dues. The dues paid by the 
members is used to run the NRA and fight anti-gun and | 
shooting legislation. AVe know for a fact that the NRA has 
done marvelous work along these lines and is one of the 
many jobs they do that the average shooter does not take 
into consideration when paying his dues. The NRA mag- 
azine The American Rifleman is worth the four bucks a 
year for its timely articles on many facets of the shooting 
business from the latest dope on wildcat cartridges to pol- 
ishing gun stocks. 

Indignation arose in the fact that the classification book 
is not published each year as in the past. Within the last 
year or so the NRA decided to reclassify a shooter as soon 
as his scores warranted an advancement which in many 



Mnnh. 1051 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 71 



cases is a couple ot times a year. ()bvioiisl\, a book ot 
classirications published on January 1st would be as obso- 
lete as the dodo bird by mid-March. The explanation, we 
think, fits well. 

This year in San Francisco we arc holdiii}; the National 
Pistol Championships and the big NRA meetings and then 
the boys from this section of the country can attend the 
various functions and panel discussions and see for them- 
selves just how the units operate. In many of the section 
meetings any member may state his case publicly and have 
it discussed before the committee. Plan to attend the big 
convention around late September and see for jourself just 
how things are going. 

Our impression of the whole m'ght's meeting was that 
the various club secretaries and guests were satisfied with 
the way things were presented and answered and have a 
better feeling toward the NRA. We hope that other clubs 
in other parts of California feel the same. If not then at 
the big convention is the time to get on their feet and howl 
to the high heavens and have their viewpoints aired in the 
open. 



The San Francisco Public Monthly Matches 
"Oh, what a beautiful morning, oh, what a beautiful 
day" is one of the hit songs from "Oklahoma" and it was 
certainly applicable to Sunday, February 18th when 143 
eager beavers pistoleers bedecked themselves out in their 
finest shooting array and tripped to the Lake Merced 
range. The attendance is still a way off the usual beam 
by some 60 shooters each match and we have a sneaking 
hunch the new alibi rule has a lot to do with it as it pro- 
longs the matches until late in the afternoon and many of 
the shooters do not like long Sundays — maybe mama 
doesn't like 'em to last all day, either. .Many just shoot 
the first couple of matches in the morning and then duck 
for home while many just don't come at all. There is an- 
other phase of this, too, that might add some casualties and 
that is the price of shooting. Primers at around $7 a car- 
ton and .22 shells about the same hits the poor shooter 
pretty hard, this plus lead and tin being hard to get and 
high in price are a few more of the trials and tribulations 
the pistolmen have to contend with. But to get back to 
the matches. The scores were hot and the boys tried their 
best but it wasn't good enuf for our fair lady from Wood- 
land, Gloria Norton, who walked ofl with top honors of 
the day by a good margin over the shooting policeman, 
Karl Schaugaard. Gloria hasn't been down for a few 
matches which made some of the boys happy as it gave 
them a better chance but Sunday she arrived and took the 
boys to the cleaners. God bless the ladies, all of 'em! 



Rotund Dick Thomas, owner of the Public Target 
Range, is around town throwing his weight about (and 
that's some weight. Dick was just made the father of a 
son and is so damn up in the air he didn't dare come out 
and shoot Sunday for fear of not doing the right time at 
the wrong time. We didn't get any stogies, either, Dick. 
» • • 

Rotund Dick can't touch F'atso Gus Corneer for weight 
by about 60 pounds. Gus hits the beam at 276 on the hoof. 
Anyhow, Gus always allowed he'd like to shoot his .Man- 
gum in a match so started the slow-fire string in the center- 
fire match with the cannon. His first shot just about 
knocked everybody in the place on their fanny and all were 
looking who had the 29 mm gun on the line. Gus finished 
the five shots, mopped his brow and dragged out his regu- 
lar .38 and, sore arm and all, finished the match. 
« • • 

Bob Mahoney, coi?ee merchant and hot-air expert, 
claimed an alibi in the rapid-fire string of the center-fire 
match and then when he found he had to use more shells 
and lead so lost his composure at the extra drain on his lead 
supply he just couldn't hit a thing. Bob is cured from ask- 
ing for any more alibis. 

• • « 

Earl Dinsmoor, immigration expert, was shooting along- 
side Gloria Norton and spent so much time watching her 
making all those tens he completely missed his own target 
tvviec and landed on some guys target about four number 
away. He thought he'd learn a few things abou the busi- 
ness anil he did. First — mind your own business!! 
» » » 

Bill Markel, the kodak nut, has the damdest pair of 
shooting glasses we ever saw. A funny gadget that covers 
the lens of his left eye glass with some kind of a blinder 
on the side to keep out the light from the eye. On the right 
lens he has another peep sight affair that is supposed to 
brighten the target on dull days and dull it on bright days. 
It takes him 10 minutes to get 'em on after clicking up the 
left blinder, two clicks to the right for the eye cover, ad- 
justing the peep sight to the weather conditions and finding 
the right way to shoot after the gear is on. He still hasn't 
found the correct eye piece that shows how to plug a hole 
through the 10 ring. 

« • • 

Another proud guy is Comman<ler Harry Krupa of the 
U. S. Navy. It's a bit early to strut but never-the-less 
Harry's already hit his stride. His daughter .Mary (who 
used to shoot here with us) is about to make him a grand- 
pop in a month or so. Our guess is that there isn't a bat- 
tleship big enuf for Harry now so what will it be like 
when the grandchild arrives? 



Speaking of high prices we even noticed that cafeteria 
prices at the range are going to the dogs, too. We do mean 
the dogs — the hotdog variety. Meat, as you know, is high 
and as the dogs are made of meat (at least that's what the 

I manufacturer tells us) they advance in price to a quarter 
a throw — which means there ain't much throwing. Woof, 

1 woof ! 



Captain Wadman. of Marin County, has the greatest 
record for the Siesta Club we know of. In the last year 
he has joined it at least once every match — much to the 
ruination of his scores at the end of the year. Sure enuf 
Sunday he was in great shape and missed a string. Bob 
O'Toole and McV'ey, of the Olympic Club were giving 
(Continued on page 78) 



Page 72 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Miirch, 1951 



Tehama Co*s New Sheriff —Wayne Kranig 



Tehama County has a new Sheriff. He is Wayne 
Kranig, who for four years and more was Chief of Police 
of the thriving farming area of Corning. He took over 
his new duties on January 8. 

He is now located at Red Bluff where he is well pre- 
pared to give the 36,000 people of the unincorporated area 




Sheriff Wayne Kranig 

of Tehama's 45 by 125 miles terrain some fine law en- 
forcement. There are over 50,000 people living within 
the confines of the county. 

Of a family of peace officers, his father Henry Kranig 
was with the Chico Police Department and retired after 
years of faithful service last year. Another brother, Ben 
Kranig, is Chief of Police of Orland, Glenn County. 
Sheriff Kranig is eminently fitted by nature, ability and 
experience to fulfill the demands of chief law enforcement 
officer of Tehama County. 

He has a force of 11 deputies and a matron, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Girder to start with. He has a new and modern jail 
for housing prisoners, with quarters for juveniles and 
women on the top floor. His headquarters are on the first 



TODD L. McGINNIS 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 



2075 Montgomery Street 
OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



floor of the three-story building, which was erected with 
every modern convenience and the latest for the proper 
operation of a Sheriff's office. 

There are two radio-equipped cars for patrol duty. 

A complete reorganization of the deparement is being 
completed under the new Sheriff. 

He has selected as his Undersheriff Lyle Williams, who 
also handles all criminal matters for the office. 

Deputy C. D. Moller is in charge of civil affairs. 

Deputy John Hewitt is in charge of the jails and court 
bailiff. 

The Bureau of Identification is under Deputy M. C. 
McGlynn. 

Sheriff Kranig has added an officer of the law with a lot 
of experience to his staff. He is Walter Williams, who for 
17 years was Chief of Police of Red Bluff. 

Sheriff Kranig was born in O'Neill, Nebraska, and 
came to Tehama County nearly 15 years ago. He was 
made Chief of Police for Corning shortly after his return 
from World War II in which he served three years as a 
member of the U. S. Military Police, with the 342 M.P. 
Detachment, Fourth Service Command. 

He is married, his wife being the former Mildred 
Turner of Bakersfield. There are three sons in the family, 
Larry, 10, Thomas, 8, and David, 3. 



Phone 700 

When In Redding It's the 

GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 

S. N. and A. H. Gronwoldt, Owners 
C. John Sedy, Jr., Manager 

COFFEE SHOP :-: TAVERN 

LOUGHLIN 

CALIFORNIA GIFT SHOP 

100 Rooms - Year 'Round Comfort 

"The Gateivay to the Shasta-Cascade 
Wonderland" 

1449 Yuba 
REDDING, CALIFORNIA 



March. IQ51 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL Png,- 73 



JOHN F. FOUCH AND SON BFSS ALBRIGHT'S SALON OF BEAUTY 

PHARMACISTS PERSONAL SERVICE FOR THE WOMEN WHO CARE 

Phone 2266 '9*3 Montgomery Street Phone 1029 

WILLIAMS CALIFORNIA OKO\ ILLK CALIFORNIA 



N. Goont Wong L. D. Hong N. G. Hong Lin PACKAGE LIQUORS DRINKS AND EATS 

PALM BATH RESTEL CAFE ROYS FEATHER RIVER INN 

WE SERVE EXCELLENT FOOD AND oov kTAFI IPJ 

HAVE A FRIENDLY PLACE TO EAT "^"^ iw\c.i.ii> 

437 S. Teham. on Highway 99W — Open 24 Hour. « Day 2227 Montgomery Street Phone 1220 

WILLOWS CALIFORNIA ORO\ILLF. CALIFORNIA 



POOL'S TEXACO SERVICE Mirnnr<: c/ / r rl 

MARFAX LUBRICATION - MOTOR TUNE-UP IN 1 C H O L 3 - ^porting KtOOOS 

We Carry a Full Line of United Motors Service Parts GUN AND LOCKSMITH 

Phone 98 2020 Montgomery Street Phone 714 

CALIFORNIA ORO\'ILLE CALIFORNIA 



WILSON'S Caje and Cocktail Lounge JOHNIE McCRACKEN 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS *" UNION OIL SERVICE 

The Sportsman's and Truck Drivers' Headquarters Body Work, Brakes and Motor Tune-Ups a Specialty 

H' h 99 W '^'^ Montgomery Street Phone 866 

ARBUCKLE " *""' ' CALIFORNIA OROVILLt CALIFORNIA 



MOORE'S HARDWARE AND PAINTS 

r^FORr^F ARFNJS H^r/iu'/irp Elmer L. Moore, Proprietor 

yjL,\Ji\.\ji^ /-vrvi-i-<(0 . . , ituiiiuaic HOUSEWARES - BUILDING MATERIALS - SPORTING GOODS 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES - SHERWIN WILLIAMS PAINTS 
Phone 2314 2111 Myers Street 

ARBUCKLE CALIFORNIA OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



BLUEBIRD CAFE PALERMO GROCERY 

Phone 23-F-15 
ARBUCKLE CALIFORNIA PALERMO CALIFORNIA 



ARBUCKLE HOTEL 

Frank J. Basili, Prop. 
COFFEE SHOP - DINING ROOM - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



JIMS MARKET 



On Highway 99-W Phone 328-J 48S5 Palermo Road 

ARBLCKLL CALIFORNIA OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Cut Flowers - Potted Plants - Funeral Piece 
Corsages, Etc. - Flowers Telegraphed Anywhe 

SWEENS FLOWER SHOP JOHNSON'S SECOND HAND STORE 

„„„ ^ 2273 Fori Wayne Street 4990 Palermo Road Phone 32S-R 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Hours: 12 Noon to 1 A.M. Sunday 4 P.M. to 1 AM. 

To'nG TONg'lOW dr. a. T. DIETLE - Opton^etrist 

"CHARLES RESTAURANT" Phone S06 STATE THEATRE BUILDING 

Lee You and Sun Gee. Proprietors Telephone ISO 1461 Myers Street 

205 1 ROBINSON STREET OROVILLE. CALIF. OROVILLE '•"»""'"•'«' '^CALIFORNIA 



D. Moretti, Prop. Phone 118 

MONEY BACK JACK GENOVA MARKET 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED GROCERIES 
1937 Bird Street FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

CALIFORNIA SUISUN CALIFORNIA 



CYXINDER GRINDING - WELDING - GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

JAMES MACHINE SHOP 

Thos. P. James, Prop. 
2421 Myers Street Phone 144 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA SAN I.EANDRO CALIFORNIA 



FORREST LAM 

Formerly FRUITAS MARKET 
398 MacArthur Blvd. TRinldad 2-93«4 



o o oo*.^,^ T^ J W. HARVEY 

B. R. BRAKE - Veterinarian distributor of watkins ouali 



26S0 Myers Street Phone 381 -J 



DISTRIBUTOR OF WATKINS QUALITY PRODUCTS 
Phone: THornwall 2-5975 2447 San Pablo Avenue 

CALIFORNIA BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



•IF IT GROWS. AND YOU WANT IT, SEE US" McGRATH STEEL C:OMPANY 

WALTER A. KINNEY . . . Nursery reinforcing sTEEr^'wrRE mesh 

3665 Myers Street Phone Piedmont 5-7262 6655 Hollls Street 

ILl.l, ( ALIFORNIA EMERYVILLE CALIFORNIA 



IH A T T ' c TA D ^ ^ 1F/A-. c/ WALNUT GROVF 

HALL b ... I he Red and white Store -Ktr k't a ts.tt> rnr^r-m-^.r 

MEAT AND GROCERY 

T. ODA 
GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 

BEER • FISH • WINE 

Phone 2311 Phone 2116 P. O. Box 344 

XnjRTLAND CALIFORNIA WALNUT GROVE CALIFORNIA 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



niarch. 1951 



Phone Courtland 2121 

MILLER & JACKSON 

General Merchandise 
COURTLAND, CALIFORNIA 



212 CLUB 

Under Neiv Management 
Pat Unger, Prop. 

Seafood and Steaks 
Cocktails and Mixed Drinks 

212 Main Street 
CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



WENTZ'S MARKET 

"Where the Workingman Saves" 

CHICO'S MOST MODERN 
MARKET 

340 W, Church - 1406 Boucher 
CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



M U L K Y ' S 
Family Liquor Store 

Open Daily 10:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. 
Saturday— 10:00 A.M. to Midnight 

1710 Park Avenue 
CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



RALPH S. 


WATKINS CO. 


DODGE 


- PLYMOUTH 


Second and Flume Streets 


CHICO, 


CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 2632 

Freeberg's Furniture Co. 

Charles L. Freeberg - Stuart M. Corrie 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 
CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



Don's Richfield Service 

Don Turner, Operator 



Opposite Post Office 
OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



IN OROVILLE 
Gateway to the Feather River Wonderland 

KING'S MOTEL 

"Castle on the Hill Is the Place to Stay" 

All Cabins Are Modern, Fireproof, Air Cooled 

With Bedroom, Bath— 6 With Kitchens 

Phone Oroville II68W 

One Mile East of Oroville 
On Feather River Highway 24 



Mfirrh. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 75 



p. O. Box SIZ 

BUTTE CREEK ROCK CO. 



READYMIX CONCRETE - CRUSHED ROCK PRODUCTS 

ASPHALT PAVING MIXES - CONCRETE MIX 

PLASTER SAND PAVING - GRADING - SURFACING 



New Paradise Road, 2 Miles S.E. 



CALIFORNIA ( IIH 



BEHR'S MARKET 

MEATS - VEGETABLES - GROCERIES 

*'For Every Day Buying Power, 
Your Dollar Buy. More." 

S90 Eaat Eighth Street 



( ALII OKMA 



Port 
Or 



KILPATRIC FOOD STORES 

FOOD AND APPLIANCES 
A NORTHERN CALIFORNIA INSTITUTION 

ola - Durham - Sterling City - Chico - Red BlufT - Willows 
ass Valley - Marysville - Redding - Westwood - Quincy 

VALLEY CONCRETE PIPE PRODUCTS 
COMPANY 

Concrete Pipe Engineered and Manufactured for 

IRRIGATION, SEWERS. CULVERTS and PRESSURE LINES 

Colusa HiRhway Park Avenue 

YUBA CITY. CALIFORNIA CIIICO. CALIFORNIA 

Telephone J.927i Telephone 2870 



CONTINENTAL NUT CO. 

East Eleventh and Esplanade 
rilICO CALIFORNIA 

CHICO CREAMERY 

Home of 

KEN'S COUNTRY CLUB FOUNTAIN 

Wholesale - Retail 



222 West Third Street Phone 277 



( AIJl ORNIA 



QUALITY DAIRY 

"Let Your Grocer Be Your Milk Man' 
ICE CREAM - RICH AND SMOOTH 

738 W. Sth Phone 1265 



CALIFORNIA 



CHICO MOTORS 

LINCOLN-MERCURY 
SALES AND SERVICE 

1344 Park Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



WELCOME TO CHICO . . . AND WHEN DINING OUT 
ALWAYS REMEMBER THE 



PARK CAFETERIA 



BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 

SENSIBLE PRICES 

Park Hotel Building 116 W. Fourth Street 

CALIFORNIA 



KING'S PLACE 

REAL CHINESE FOODS 
SERVED OR TO TAKE OUT 

■ 62 East Third Street 



King Lew, 0« 



( ALIFORNIA 



BAIR'S DRUG STORE 

W. T. HEBERLIE 

805 Main Street Phone 500 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

THE RADIO TOWER 

DRIVE IN RESTAURANT AND FOUNTAIN- 
GOOD FOOD AND FOUNTAIN SPECIALTIES 
•P. G." and Howard. Managers 



COLLIER HARDWARE 

FEATURING NATIONALLY KNOWN BRANDS 

First and Broadway Phone 57 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

C. E. MEYER CO. 

"NATIONALLY ADVERTISED" FURNITURE 
Friendly Dealers in Finer Merchandise 



210 Broadway 



Phone Chico 818 



CALIFORNIA 



YORK PACIFIC COMPANY 

ENGINEERS - DISTRIBUTORS 

AIR CONDITIONING 
YORK AND McGRAY EQUIPMENT 



1345 Park Av 



Telephone 1130 



CALIFORNIA ClllfO 



FRENf:H AMERICAN LAUNDRY 

ONE-DAY SERVICE 
920 Oroville Avenu* 



BURKES MARKET 



FINE MEATS AND GROCERIES 



1538 Park Avenu 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



MILS WAFFLE SHOP 

DELICIOUS LUNCHEONS AND DINNERS 

STEAKS AND CHOPS 

5:30 A.M. to 10 P.M. East Third and Main SirMis 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



NORTHERN CALIF. PEACE OFFICERS 

(Cnntinucd from fage H ) 
those present, when he presented Chief James Hicks of 
Sacramento, the Junior Past President of the Association, 
that Chief Hicks was due to go back into the armed serv- 
ices. Chief Hicks verified this by saying he expected to be 
in service in May. 

Sheriff Wayne Kranig who became Sheriff of Tehama 
County on January 8 was called upon to take a bow; so 
were Sheriff Max J. Mayfield of Colusa who was elected 
last November to continue in his office to which he was 
appointed in 1948 ; Sheriff Harold AVilson, Trinity Coun- 
ty, who was re-elected at last November's election; Sheriff 
Wayne Brown of Nevada County; Constable Gerald A. 
Russell of Durham, and many other chief law enforcement 
officers. 

President Chief Lewis A. Duncan, of Yuba City, took 
over and with the secretary skipping the minutes, disposed 
of routine business. 

Several officials delivered short speeches on civilian de- 
fense and from their remarks it was evident that all of 
them have been wide awake to the necessity of this im- 
portant planning. 

The speaker of the day was Captain T. G. Richey, 
U. S. Navy. His talk was off the record, but he gave his 
listeners a lot of very valuable information about the atom 
bomb and its effects. He told them that the peace officers 
of the state were being given a set of instructions on what 
to do in case an atom bomb fell in any of their cities or 
counties. He said one of the greatest things peace officers 
could do was to control the populace and direct them in 
what to do. Panic he averred would cause as much tragedy 
as the bomb itself. He was given a great hand, for his ex- 
cellent speech. It was a good one. 



— UNITED GROCERS — 

FREEPORT MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • WINES 
BEER • ICE CREAM 



Phone Courtland 3682 

FREEPORT 



Route 8, Box 1460 

CALIFORNIA 



DON HOBBIE 

CHEVROLET - CADILLAC 
Bird and Oliver Phone 82 



CALIFORNIA 



CRESCENT MILK COMPANY 

GRADE A PASTEURIZED DAIRY PRODUCTS 
Phone 181 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



BUTTE CITY TITLE COMPANY 

Established 1877 

W. G. McADAMS, Vice President 

D. W. BALDWIN, President 



1427 Huntoon Street 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



PARK GROCERY and MEAT MARKET 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

513 "B" Street (Across from Cortez Square) 
Phone 3-6272 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL MARYSVILLE 

Direction 

NEWCOMB HOTEL INTERESTS 

Rader Crooks, Manager 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN C. BAYES CO., INC. 

rou Can Pay More, But YOU CAN'T BUY BETTER! 

YOUR YUBA-SUTTER FORD DEALER 

SALES - SERVICE - PARTS - REPAIRS 



Telephone 3-7302 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



R. B. SHAVER 



W. J. MEADE 



WAKEFIELD AUTO - GLASS CO. 



E. M. BARTH CO., INC. 



FORD TRACTORS - DEARBORN EQUIPMENT 



185 Humboldt 



525 "F" Street 



Phone 3-6519 



CHICO 



CALIFORNIA MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Telepho 



BARCLAY R. OLIVER 



HAMILTON AND RILEY 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



BOB ELGAAEN 



Wholesale Distributor 

CANDY - TOBACCO - "BETTY LOU" POTATO CHIPS 

DELRICH OLEOMARGARINE 



1454 Montgomery Street 



310 Eye Street 



CALIFORNIA MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



CHICO BOOK AND STATIONERY STORE 

BOOKS, STATIONERY. OFFICE FURNITURE 

BOOKKEEPING SUPPLIES 

GIFTS AND GREETING CARDS 

434 Broadway Telephone 1615 

;H1C0 CALIFORNIA 



J. E. GERHARDT CO. 

Established 1923 

DESOTO - PLYMOUTH 

1051 Park Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



March. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OITICERS' JOURNAL 



Page n 



Telephone 90 Quick Deli\cr\ 

The Service Pharmacy 

Prescription Phtirniacisti 
Second and Main Streets - H. L. Vanatta, Prop. 

CHICO, CALIFORNIA 

Tree Delivery Telephone 261 

Medical Pharmacy 

Broadway at Fourth H. L. Vanatta, Prop. 

CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



Pepsi Cola Bottling Co. 

Distrihulors for 

YUBA AND SUTTER 
COUNTIES 



Yuba City 



Marysville 



Phone 1621 

CHICO AUTO COURT 

Francis Woolley, Manager 

1717 Park Avenue - Highway 99E 
CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2121 



Miller and Jackson 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
COURTLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 1469 

LEO'S GRILL 

Open Night and Day ... 7 Days a Week 
Owned and Operated hy 
LEO GARRETT 

510 Broadway 

Across from Post Office 

CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 868-W 



Res. 868-R 



Earl S. Ward, Consignee 

Wholesale Distribution of 

UNION OIL PRODUCTS 

1560 Marysville Road 
OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 





Phone 2-2477 


HUST BROTHERS 


AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY 


• 


Fourth and "E" Streets 


MARYSVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Mission 7 3989 

GUNS AND AMMUNITION 
SHOOTERS SUPPLIES 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Kcl...ulmK I....!, ..lul l>|.Mpnunl-(,un < r..nk Tc.U .in.l Spc.ulcirJ 
llulUlv P..«.l.r. I'nm.r,. 1.1, ,1 .\ (■ ,>,!,> r..i.l,. (,un»iKh<,. Hum. 
inu 4ml TjrcK S..ip.,. M i(. Ii I .niipni. iii, T.ick.iv (,un < jwv 
<.uim.>.kv I'iMi.l (Til... < li,. k.ridi; I. ...I,. I|,.l,(,r,. HluriiiR Kilv 
Imn ( lumiiK .in.l M.iim..Mmr .Supplicv H..hh> Tool, 

Driver Equipment Company 



( 1 IS2 N'.iic'iui.i .Street 



S.in 1 r.iiuisici. < .ilif. 



.—--....« t.— -•—----- —.—...— ...—...........4 



Page 78 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mtirch. 1951 



PISTOL POINTING 

(Continued from pngc 11) 

him a good going over for his folly and — well, you know 
the rest. Bob and Mac missed their own string and again 
qualified for the mythical club. 

* •* » 

SCORES 



Master . . 
Expert . . . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



.22 National Match 
. . Gloria Norton . 
. . M. D. McVey . 

Jerry Kennedy . 
. . R. Honon . . 

Nello Lazzeri . 

Center Fire National 

Karl Schaugaard 
Harry Plummer 
. Wells Irving 
Ray Bennett 
. . W. C. l^aylor . 

(Jamp Perry Match 

Karl Schaugaard 
I. Krch . . . 
Wells Irving . 
Joe Broggi . . 
Sam Corneer 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



Center Fire — Rapid Fire 

Charley Waterman 
Harry Krupa . 
Elwood Johnson . 
R. McClenaghan . 
Phil Atkinson . . 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



.45 National Match 

Wells Irving . 
Ed Boomhower 
Frank Carrick . 
L. Erbes . . . 
R. McClenaghan 

Aggregate Match 

Gloria Norton 
I. Krch . . . 
Pete Alfonso . 
Cap Byas . 
Wayne Harper 



Team Scores — Class A 
First Place — San Francisco Police Team No. 1 
Second Place — San Francisco Police 

Revolver Club Team No. 1 

Third Place — Olympic Club Team A . . . 

Class B 
First Place — Oakland Police Team No. 1 . 
Second Place — San Francisco Police 

Revolver Club Team No. 3 

Third Place^ — Coast Guard League Gun Club 



291 
283 
281 
282 

245 



290 

279 
272 
275 
242 



296 
290 
286 
282 
248 



193 
189 
184 
185 
162 

282 
276 
265 
258 
223 



1057 
1020 
976 
966 
848 



1130 



1100 
1091 



1023 



1020 
1007 



STOCKTON GARAGE 

Henry Bruvick, Manager 

DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 

Telephone 2-4463 130 North Hunter Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 
DR. E. G. HERMOSILLO 



THE MOLAR RANCH 

99 Highway and 8-Mile Road 
"CAL-RHIZ" LEGUME BACTERIA 

NELSON LABORATORIES 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTS AND CONSULTANTS 
Phone 2-7393 1 145 West Fremont St. 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



STEVE'S HOTEL 



Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Healy, Mgrs. j 

CLEAN, COMFORTABLE STEAM HEATED ROOMS ] 

REASONABLE RATES 
440 East Weber Phone 4-0633 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN STATE CO., LTD. 



640 North Union Street 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



1724 East Main Phone 2-5324 

(Party Orders Taken) 

SPUDNUT SHOP & SPUDNUT BAR 

HOT LUNCHES - FOUNTAIN - SANDWICHES 
SPUDNUTS TO TAKE HOME 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



WOLF DRUG CO. 



FOUNTAIN • PRESCRIPTIONS 

COSMETICS • SUNDRIES 

SO South Sutter St. at Market Phone 4-255S 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

WILSHIRE CAFE 

FINE FOOD SERVED 

Steaks - Chops - Fried Chicken - Wilshire Special Blend Coffee 

FRESH STRAWBERRY WAFFLES 

Breakfast, Luncheon and Complete Evening Dinners 

721 East Charier Way - Hwy. 4 Phone 3-8254 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



YOSEMITE RADIO 



STOCKTON 



Phone 4-4853 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN KESSEL - Realty - Builder 



3208 Pacific Av 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



HEMORRHOIDS — PROTRUDING OR BLEEDING PILES 
Painless - No Drugs - No Surgery - No Loss of Time 

DR. G. L. FREEMAN, D.C. 

220 Elks Bidg. Phone 2-4689 

CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON 



Bill's Musical Instrument Repair Shop 

RECONDITIONING ALL MAKES OF INSTRUMENTS 
Bill Magellan, Graduate of Conn Instrument Repair School 



STOCKTON 



1137 E. Harding Way 



CALIFORNIA 



HAROLD DOUGHTY MOTORS 

DE SOTO - PLYMOUTH . . . SALES AND SERVICE 
Automobile Repair - All Types - Body and Fender Ship 



718 MAIN STREET 



NAPA. CALIFORNIA 



Marrh. 1951 



POLICE AND PFACF OI'I-KHRS lOURNAL 



Pitge 79 



Telephone THmplebar 6-4696 

FRED D. ALEXANDER 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

1501 Harrison Street 
OAKLAND 12, CALIFORNIA 



IF IT'S BORDEN'S 

It's Got To Be Good 

BORDEN'S DAIRY 
DELIVERY COMPANY 

2743 San Pablo Avenue 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



1. 



ATLAS IMPERIAL 
DIESEL CO. 

Hayward, California 



Well Lighted Streets Are 
Safer— Easier to Patrol 

HUBBARD and Company Offers (;omplete 

Pole Line Equipment for Street Lighting. 

CALL IN Experienced Engineers of General 

Electric Supply Corp. or Graybar Electric for 

Complete Details. 

* 

Hubbard and Company 

1250 - 45th Street, Emeryville, Calif. 
Pittsburgh - (Chicago - Oakland 



The Orii^ifial 

Bertola's Italian Style 
Restaurants 

Four Convenient Locations 

'4601 Telegraph Avenue, Oakland, California 

Piedmont 5-8618 

4116 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, California 

KEllog 2-9937 

4618 Castro Valley Blvd., (Jastro Valley, California 

LUcerne 2-3150 

No. 9 San Pablo Avenue, Richmond, California 



Frederickson & Watson 
Construction Company 

General - Engineering Contractors 

873 81st AVENUE 

Oakland 3, California 

SWeetwood 8-1264 



CONTINENTAL CASUALTY 
COMPANY 

CONTINENTAL ASSURANCE 
COMPANY 

TRANSPORTATION INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

Accident and Health - Insurance - Bonds 
Life Contracts - Marine 

San Francisco Branch Office 
465 (California Sireei - YL'kon 2-3420 

SAN FRANCISCO 

COCHRAN & CELLI 

"c:,ili fornix's Ohlcsl ( Inimlil Dtnltr" 



S ii I e 



^K^HF 



•S" e I f i cc 



Parts and Servui: Departments 

Open 7:30 A.M. — Midnight, MondayEriday 

CHEVROLET BLOCK 

I 2th A: Harrison Oakland HIgatc 4-()05S 



Page 80 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL M<,rch. 1951 



D. SOREN GRAIN AND FEED CO. '^°°''^''r'^°CLEANEm'' '^^'^ 

POULTRY AND DAIRY FEEDS 
HAY — GRAIN — SPECIAL MIXTURES 

315 College Street Telephone 2-2857 

256 N. MAIN STREET WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 

„^^,,,,^,, CALIFORNIA WOODLAND 

P'^T^^^"^'^ ^ Frank E. Heard °- O" ^otroni 

MOTRONI LUMBER COMPANY 

REIF AND BROUY lumber and building materials 

POULTRY DEALERS DUPONT PAINTS AND VARNISHES 

1038 Beamer Street Telephone 2-4696 

715 Main Street Phone 1573 wnoni AMD CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA WOODLAND 



MERLE SMITH GAS SERVICE NUGGET MARKET 

FOR COUNTRY HOMES ^P^Te^^^J^c/eT SE^l^C^ 



HEALDSBURG 



CITY GAS 

157 Main Street Phone 2-5479 
Phone 473 508 West Street CALIFORNIA WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 



BROWN'S MARKET 

GRAESER REALTY COMPANY 

OPEN SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS WM. GRAESER 



PLENTY OF COLD DRINKS 



523 Main Street Telephone 2-5407 



461 West Street Phone 92 .pnRNIA WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 

HEALDSBURG CALlfUKiMrt ^ 

DUPLEX PERCOLATOR CO. CENTRAL MOTOR CO. 

SONOMA ROCK SPRING WATER "VOU WILL BE AHEAD WITH NASH" 

. ,r „ . ■ .1 A- „ Rr»nrf^ SERVICE HEADQUARTERS FOR 

A Full Lme of Leadmg Brands ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC WHISKIES 

Phone 2-6912 College and Bush Streets 

Phone 408 49 East Second Street „^,,p_p^.. WOODLAND CALIFORNIA ' 

PITTSBURG LALlt-UKMlA . . 

TRADEWAY WOODLAND FURNITURE CO. 

THINGS FOR THE HOME ^^^ ^^^^^ 
Robert S. Cannon, Credit Manager 

Telephone: Richmond 505; LAndscape 5-2379 ^^.^^ ^^^ ^^.^ Streets Phone 2-4240 

...„.,.. 1230 San Pahio Avenue CALIFORNIA ^°°°^^^" CALIFORN^ 



CHUNG SUN GROCERY CO. 

CLEAR LAKE WATER CO. 

American Chinese Store 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

FREE DELIVERY Phone 2-6193 227 Porter Building 

COLUSA Seventh and Main Streets ''''°"' '^CALIFORNIA WOODLAND ^ 



BILL'S PLACE AND JACK'S PLACE WOODLAND TRANSIT CONCRETE 

King Lindale - Robert McCoy - Tom McCoy 
SOFT DRINKS - TOBACCOS - CIGARETTES - POOL ^^^^ LINDALE CO. 

GENTLEMEN'S CLUB ROOM 

Phone 2-6765 Race Track Road 

525 Main Street „.,,^^„x,,. ^v•r^r^^^TAMn CALIFORNl-" 



CALIFORNIA WOODLAND 



Telephone TRinidad 2-1228 WE BUY AND SELL ^„^ ATXT^ADAT-./-* 

uADUv UATC RAPriATM <;TnRF THE ALVAKAUU 



HARRY HALS BARGAIN STORE 

"We Sell at Rock Bottom Prices" 
INITURE - LINOLEUM - MATTRESSES - GAS 
STOVES - HOUSEHOLD GOODS - ETC. ^„„.„. ..^mxckcv 

7804 E. I4TH STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA MONTEREY 



"We Sell at Rock Bottom Prices" __, Alvarado Street 

FURNITURE - LINOLEUM - MATTRESSES - GAS ^" «'varaoo ^t 



March. 1951 



POLICl: AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 81 



Phone 2-9952 



PASTIME CLUB 

George Dur.<;AN 



POOL - BILLIARDS 
BEER - WINE - LUNCH 



417 First Street 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-9904 

CANTON CAFE 

CHOP SUEY - CHOW MEIN 
NOODLES 

We Serve the Best Americtni and 
Chinese Dishes 

ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

Open SiOO A.M. to 2:00 A.M. 

417 MAIN STREET 
WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 



owvc AT rosrers' 




Eitdlish IDuffins 



NORMANDY CAFE 

Mr. and Mrs. McNaughton and Son, Props. 

Greyhound Bus Depot 

GOOD FOOD, BEER AND 
SOFT DRINKS 

Hours: S:00 A.M. till 12:00 P.M. 

DIXON, CALIFORNIA 
(Solano County) 



Page 82 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mnrrh. 1951 



TRUCK INN 

FRIENDLY ASSOCIATED SERVICE 
HAVE US SERVICE YOUR CAR REGULARLY 



FABRIX RUBBER MAT CO. 



21/2 Miles North 
FAIRFIELD 



1 Highway No. 40 



ne 4R2 

CALIFORNIA 



3227 E. Twelfth Sir 



KEIIog 2-1512 



CALIFORNIA 



A. C. Chantlas 



CHATEAU CAFE 



FREE PARKING 



AMERICAN REFRIGERATION SALES 



BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 

SHORT ORDERS - BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

Telephone 1181 423 Texas Street 

FAIRFIELD (Solano County) CALIFORNIA 



SALES AND SERVICE 
1399 MacArthur Boulevar 



CALIFORNIA 



Gregory Ballo 



PALACE GRILL 



Theodo 



' Auda 



FULL COURSE MEALS - FINEST FOODS 

BEER AND WINES 
829 Texas Street - Open 20 Hours a Day 



MAYFIELD HOTEL 

STYLES WILLIAMS, Prop. 



Bus. GLencourt 1-6345 Res. TWinoaks 3-9927 

ANDKER - PETERSEN 

"The Home Chapel" 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

M45 FIFTH AVENUE OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 

B I G L E R ' S - Store for Men 

8-4336 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone LOckh 

SAN LEANDRO 



143S3 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



SUISUN STEAM LAUNDRY 



J. ARIZA, Prop. 
Telephone 314 



MRS. J. NOGUE FRENCH LAUNDRY 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone KEIIog 2-0738 

OAKLAND 



3018 Foothill Boulevard 

CALIFORNIA 



BEER • WINE • SOFT DRINKS 

WILLOW PASS INN 

CABINS • TRAILER SPACE 
Willow Pass Road Telephone 9920 



Pho 

CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



RITCHIE HOLLOWAY 

"IT'S HANDY TO CALL" 

HANDY ANDY LIQUOR STORE 

FREE DELIVERY 
ANdover 1-4638 3073 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



COFFEE CUP COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

DON DeROSA, Manager 
WATCH FOR OUR NEWLY REMODELED 

LOUNGE AND DINING ROOM 

Phone Concord 9918 2125 Salvio Street 

CONCORD CALIFORNIA 

DIABLO DRIVE IN 

SPECIALIZING IN MEAT BALLS AND SPAGHETTI 
FRIED CHICKEN - DELUXE HAMBURGERS 



"AN APEX PAINT FOR EVERY PURPOSE" 

APEX PAINT COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS - JOBBERS 
1257 So. San Pablo Ave. Phone: LA. 5-7336 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

GORDON'S GROCERY 



1551 Alice Street 



TWinoaks 3-1715 



CALIFORNIA 



SCOTT SHEPPARD 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 



KRUGER AND SONS 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



Manufacturers of the Famous Silver Thread Brand Sauerkraut 
PICKLES • SYRUP • TOMATO PRODUCTS 

4053 Emery Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone HUmboldt 3-9116 

EMERYVILLE 



LAFAYETTE FOOD CENTER FOUNTAIN 

W. J. ROCHA. Proprietor 

SERVING BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER - ALSO SHORT 

ORDERS - COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



JAMES CLOCK MANUFACTURING CO. 



5307 East 14th Street 



KEIIog 2-7836 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



LAFAYETTE FOOD CENTER 

WINES, BEERS AND LIQUORS 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



EVERYTHING FOR YOUR PET DRINK 

B AND L LIQUORS 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC LIQUORS AND WINES 
Phone 131-M 718 Third Street 



WALTER K. KNOX 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 
Telephone: Office TRinidad 2-8660 

57 11 EAST MTH STREET OAKLAND 3. CALIFORNIA 

ED'S AUTO PARTS 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



KEIIog 2-1833 



752 High Street 



CALIFORNIA 



3789 R. M. SHARPE 

UNITED AUTO SERVICE 



MONTEREY 



177 Webster Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FARLEY'S PHARMACY 

R. W. Meredith 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

Phone OLympic 2-1454 5511 College Ave. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



ANTIOCH FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Bernard Taillefer, Prop. 

FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST 

OUR AIM IS TO PLEASE 
Telephone 118 820 Second Street 



GAMERSTON & GREEN LUMBER CO. 



San Francisco Office and Yard 
FOOT OF TUNNEL AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO 24, CALIF. 

JUniper 5-6083 



Oakland Office and "lard 

2001 LIVINGSTON STREET 

OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 

KEIIog 4-6464 



CALIFORNIA 



Manli. I05I 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 83 



VACAVILLE LIQUOR STORE 

Earle N. Austin 

CIGARS - CIGARETTES - WINES - LIQUORS 
BEER - SOFT DRINKS 



355 Main Street 



Phone 2044 



AIJIORMA 



LLOYD CHANDLER 

FURNITURE COMPANY 

Lloyd Chandler. Prop. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC APPLIANCES - WEDGEWOOD GAS RANGES 

LINOLEUM LAYING A SPECIALTY 



VACAVILLE 



Phone 6885 



(. ALIFORMA 



VELIZ POOL HALL 

Julia G. Veliz. Prop. 
CERVEZA - REFRESCOS 



NEW AND USED BOTTLES OF ALL KINDS 
CORKS • KEGS • STERILIZED WIPING RAGS 

BAY CITY BOTTLE SUPPLY ^oul 
SANITARY RAG COMPANY 

230 Castro Street TEmplebar 2-7843 

OAKl AND CALIFORNIA 

Sales & Service 
LAUSON . BRIGGS & STRATTON ENGINES 

FRED C. SPINDLER 
Automotive Aluchine Works 

215 Twelfth Street Highlatc 4-8078 

OAKLAND CALIIORNIA 

John R. Ober 

Redman C. Staals. Jr. 

HuRO P. Correll 

THOS. H. KUTCHEL 



STATE CONTROLLER 



201 Dobbins Street 



Phone 2382 



VACAVILLE 



tALIIORNIA OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



DOBBAS AND CLEGG 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

Phone 570 611 High Street 

AUBURN CALIFORNIA 



RILEY'S CORNED BEEF 

"Since 1903" 

Tenth Street Market 

OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 



FREEMAN HOTEL 

THE HOUSE OF COMFORT - A HOME AWAY FROM HOME 
V. Bellurot. Manager 

Phone 780 



AUBURN 


CALIFORNIA 




SULLIVAN TIRE SHOP 




RECAPPING - VULCANIZING 




Phone 104 800 Lincoln Way 



McCALL MOTOR SALES 

NEW AND NEARLY NEW USED CARS 
BUY - SELL - TRADE 



2546 E. 14lh Street Kellog 2-9604 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



MODERN VETERINARY HOSPITAL 



Phone KEIIog 2-1711 



DR. E. S. FREITAS 
Veteritiariati 

DOC * CAT SPECIALIST 



kuBLRN 



( AI.IFOKNIA ■'^'1 li I'X'i ■'" 



OAKLAND. CALI 



1 

I. 



HOTEL RIVER VIEW 

Manuel Lira, Prop. 

SPORTSMAN'S HEADQUARTERS 
MOKELUMNE RIVER FISHING RESORT 



FENTON'S CREAMERY 



195 41st Street 



Piedmont 5-0O64 



P. O. Box 476 



Phone 5 P.O. 



(AI.IIORNIA OAKLAND 



CAIIIORNIA 



VALLEY CONCRETE PIPE 
PRODUCTS COMPANY 

Concrete Pipe Encineered and Manufactured lor 
IRRIGATION, SEWERS. CULVERTS AND PRESSURE LINES 



^,_ Colusa IliKhway 

UBA CITY, CALIFORNIA 
Phone i 02 7) 



Park Avenue 
CIIICO. CALIFORNIA 

Phone imn 



R. L. (Bob) HUBBARD 

BRANCH SAIXS MANAGER 

Phone GLrncourt 2-4588 1101 Grove Street 

OAKLAND, I ALIFORNIA 

SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION 
General Office: Phone Newcastle 6000 



6)2) AVONDAI.I. ASLNLI. 



( IIK A(,0 II. ILLINOIS 



FERRITIS FINE FOODS 



232 East Main Street 



CALIFORNIA STOCKTON 



Phone 2-7482— Res. Phone 2-4«82 Paul Zaremba, Prop. 

DELUXE BAKERY 

BREAD • CAKES • PASTRY 

Wrddinc and Birthday Cake, to Order 

329 S. San Joaquin Street 

I Al II OKNI \ 



Page 84 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



M/irch, 1951 



SESNON IS ELECTED NEW CSAA 
PRESIDENT 

Porter Sesnon, president of the B. F. Porter Estate 
Company of San Francisco, which operates extensive agri- 
cultural and ranching properties in California and Ne- 
vada, is the new president of the California State Auto- 
mobile Association. He was elected by the Association 
Board of Directors at its annual meeting on January 18, 




Porter Sesnon 

in San Francisco. He represents his home county, San 
Mateo, on the CSAA board. 

Sesnon is also president of the board of directors of Dis- 
trict Agricultural Association No. 1-A which operates the 
Cow Palace and stages the annual Grand National Live- 
stock Exposition. A leader in civic affairs and traffic safety 
activities, Sesnon was one of the organizers of the San 
Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce, served as its first 
president and was also a director of the senior chamber. 

CSAA membership at the close of 1950 totaled 238, 
467, highest in the 43-year history of the motorists' organ- 
ization, according to the annual report of J. J. Krohn of 
Areata, retiring president. 

Other officers elected for 1951 were Harold J. Mc- 
Curry, Sacramento, first vice-president ; Edward H. Pet- 
erson, San Francisco, second vice-president ; Charles G. 
Bird, Stockton, third vice-president ; E. B. DeGolla, San 
Francisco, treasurer; D. E. Watkins, secretary and gen- 
eral manager ; and George Chalmers, assistant secretary 
and general manager. 

Seven directors were elected at the Association member- 
ship meeting to new three-year terms on the CSAA board. 
They are: Obert Pedersen, Santa Rosa; J. E. O'Neill, 
Fresno; Fred J. Oehler, San Jose; Charles G. Bird, 
Stockton ; and Dr. Guido E. Caglieri, E. B. DeGolia and 
Edward H. Peterson of San Francisco. 



HELVETIA HOTEL AND BAR 

MARTIN FUCHSLIN, Manager 
637-641 California Street Telephone SUtter 1-9804 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CULY TRANSPORTATION CO. 



600 High Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



KIPPLEY & LEE | 

18th Ave. & E. 12th Street Kellog 2-8012 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

BERKELEY POULTRY CO. 



Wholesale and Retail Poultry 

FRESH RANCH EGGS - LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



1411 San Pablo Av 



BERKELEY 



LA 5-6202 

CALIFORNIA 



MILLER WOOD PRODUCTS CO. 



Producers of 
REDWOOD AND DOUGLAS FIR LUMBER 



1335 Sixth Street 



LAndscape 5-5309 



CALIFORNIA 



ASSOCIATED DRY CLEANERS 

1200 - 34lh Street OLympic 2-2110 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

WEST COAST WELDING COMPANY 

461 Twenty-Fifth Street Telephone HIgate 4-1311 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

DIXON LUMBER COMPANY 

AUBURN LUMBER COMPANY 

WOODLAND LUMBER COMPANY 

DAVIS LUMBER COMPANY 

CENTRAL CALIF. FEDERAL SAVINGS 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

DIXON CALIFORNIA 

HILL-MACE MEAT COMPANY 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 



CALIFORNl;* 



FRED A. WELLS 

INSURANCE 



M.r.h. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 85 



SHORE PATROL REUNION 

I)!. Howard .McKinlc\, Commamlcr, I'.S.N.R., for- 
Director of Welfare and District Shore Patrol Offi- 
I the 12th Naval District gave a graphic description 
■nditions in Europe as observed on a recent trip 

;.pii[;h practically every country but Russia when he 



i 


IBL 




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p 


J» ' '**»J^ J 




^^3 




-sr^ 






( 




\ 


1 


w'^V' 


' ^^''^ ■ 



Dr. Howard McKisi.ey 

poke at the Market Street Commando meeting at Hunt- 
t's Point Officers' Club on December 12th. 

Dr. McKinley, xvho established San Francisco's famed 
-fospitality House tor servicemen was instrumental in for- 
narion of the wartime Shore Patrol and related many of 
lis experiences in overcoming red tape. 

I here was a considerable number of former patrolmen 
nd officers present including Judge Jack Kahey, South 
San Francisco; Captain Miller (former Shore Patrol Offi- 
cr) ; Commander Ray Kimball and Lt. Joe Smith. High 
ribute was paid by all present to Commander Paul I)c- 
ine who could not attend, due to illness. 
The next meeting of the Commandos has been set for 
une 12th at either Hunter's Point or Treasure Island 
)fficers' Club. 



Ur»h C. Pine Grorgc W. Sicbbin. 

LEE PHARMACY - Pre$cript\o,n 



3rd and Broadway - Odd Frllowi BIdi. 



NATIONAL DOLLAR STORE 



CALIFORNIA 



( M IIORMA 



GARRISON SPORTINC; CJOODS 

EII>worlh G. CarrUon 

GUNS - AMMUNITION FISHING TACKLE - GENERAL 

SPORTING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

w.,^- <30 W. Siith Slrerl Trlrphonr 677 

H"^0 ( ALIFORNIA 



FORREST MEYERS 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
S49I Collfff Avrniir 



DAVIS LAUNDRY ami DRY CLEANERS 

CARRERE BROS. 



Telephone 557 



Third and G Streets 



CALII ORMA 



STERLING'S TAVERN 

S. Robinson, Prop. 
DRINKS TO SATISFY A QUEEN 

Serving thr Best in 
MIXED DRINKS 



CALIKORNIA 



THE OASIS 

Mrs. A. Dreith, Owner-Manag 

BEER, FINE WINES 
AND LIQUORS 



< ALIFORNIA 



BEEDE'S BEN FRANKLIN STORE 



2002 Salvio Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



QUALITY 
GUERNSEYS 

Produce 

QUALITY MILK 

HAPPYHOLME MILK atid CREAM 

at Your Grocers or Delivered 

to Your Home 



HAPPYHOLME 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

LODI AND STOCKTON 

Pbone 
2.^6 6-6709 



Page S6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1951 



NEW GRAND OFFICERS OF NATIONAL 
FOOTPRINT ASSOCIATION 

With the passing of Phillip E. Geauque, who formed 
the International Footprint Association nearly 25 years 
ago and has heen its grand secretary ever since, law en- 
forcement in this country lost a man who wrote many 
bright pages in the history of the United States Secret 
Service. For many years until his retirement some years 
ago he worked on many important cases involving counter- 
feiting and other crimes the Secret Service deal with. His 
record for arresting offenders is an amazing one. 

With his death there was a vacancy in the office of 
grand secretary, so the officers of the Grand Chapter se- 
lected Walter Vervias to fill that vacancy and former 
Chief Michael E. Mitchell, president of San Francisco 
Chapter No. I, takes the position of grand treasurer, a 
post held by Vervais. 

Walter Vervais has for years been chief investigator 
for the California State Automobile Association and with 
Phil Geauque was one of the founders of the Footprint 
Association. He has elected to various offices in the local 
chapter as well as the grand chapter. He is highly regard- 
ed, not only by the members of the automobile association 
but by peace officers throughout the state. 

He and Grand Treasurer will come up for election at 
the annual convention of the Footprinters to be held this 
summer in Las Vegas. 

VALLEY CAFE 



559 Main Street 



VACAVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN WEST MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH GARDEN VEGETABLES 
BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 



VACAVILLE 



525 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN GATE COAL CO. 

Wood and Coal - Presto Logs - Charcoal - Blacksmith Coal 

Stoker Coal - Mill Ends - Kindling - City Wide Delivery 

425 DeHaro Street UNderhill 1-3917 

Residence Phone Fillmore 6-7574 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

BAYVIEW BAIT AND TACKLE SHOP 

SPORTING GOODS - FISHING TACKLE 

FISHING PARTIES ARRANGED 

Phone Your Order To Be Sure of Bait 

ATwater 2-3242 4408 Third Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PITTSBURG 



THE LANTERN CAFE 

CHOP SUEY - FINEST CHINESE DISHES 
le 417 268 Railroad Av 



CALIFORNIA 



ARGENTINA CLUB AND RESTAURANT 



PITTSBURG 



303 Black Dii 



CALIFORNIA 



EL GALLO CAFE 



M. Vasques - Pete Vasques, Proprietors 
SPECIALIZING IN MEXICAN FOOD - BEER AND WINE 



PITTSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



THE REX CLUB - Sportsman's Center 

E. P. Thilgen 
LUNCHES - LIQUORS - WINES - BEER 
le 985 75 East Third Street 



PITTSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



BLUE BIRD CAFE 



SOFT DRINKS - BEER - WINE - MEXICAN DISHES 



PITTSBURG 



46 East Second Street 



CALIFORNIA I 



NOVIO POOL HALL 



PITTSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



VISTA GRILL 

Mr. and Mrs. Marcel Catti 

EXCELLENT FOOD AND THE BEST COFFEE IN TOWN 

Highway 24, Bella Vista District Phone 1981 

PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 

Visit LARRY'S 

AND BE HAPPY AND CONTENT 
Railroad and Second Street Phone 2-9834 

PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 

NATIONAL DOLLAR STORE 



PITTSBURG 



329 Railroad Av 



CALIFORNIA 



HAMON BROS. 



CALIFORNIA COLUSA 



CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 

SALES AND SERVICE 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

DIGGS RADIO SHOP 

NEW AND USED ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

SALES AND SERVICE 

434 Jay Street Phone 236-R 



CALIFORNIA 



TWIN JACK'S CAFE 

FINEST FOOD SERVED AT ALL TIMES 



RIVERSIDE HOTEL 
PLAM MOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



5 2 6 CLUB 



526 E. Alisal 



Phone 6643 



CALIFORNIA AUBURN 



WALLACE AUTO ELECTRIC 



EXIDE BATTERIES 
851 High Street Phon 



CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS DRESSED BEEF CO., INC. 



Jack Errinston. Manager 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 

U. S. Inspection No. 867 



Griffin Street 



epho 



CALIFORNIA MONTEREY 



MONTEREY GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Miinras. Fremont and Abrego Streets 
Phone 4175 



CALIFORNIA 



11 



M,:r,h. 1051 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 87 



Four More Years For Sheriff MayField^ Colusa County 



Sheriff Max A. MayHeld was electfii last \ear to heail 
Colusa County law enforcement after serving over two 
years under an appointment in October, 1*)48, by the 
board of supervisors following the death of Sheriff George 
R. Houx. He served so well under the appointment that 
he had no opposition when election day came up. 

Sheriff Mayfield is not only popular with the people of 
his jurisdiction, but with peace officers of the Sacramento 
Valley, has had 13 years of law enforcement. He has been 
with the Sheriff's office all this time and for three years 
he was undersheriff. 

He was born in Sutter County and came to Colusa 
County 20 years ago. 

Colusa County is small as population goes, there being 
some 15,000 people living within its boundaries. But it is 
a rich county in farming — rice and other grain crops pre- 



CASA ADOBE 

The management has done its utmost to 
restore the historic adobe, built by Don 
Salvio Pacheos, to its original condition for 
the comfort and enjoyment of all visitors. 
We serve the Finest of Foods available. 

Our Dinners Start at $2.00 
Lunches From 85c 

Our Beverages are of the Best 
and our Patio is unique. 

CONCORD, CALIFORNIA 

(Contra (^osta County) 



Tilcphonc Pittsburj; 663 



Residence 43VVC' 



BENNY WAGNER 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Bartenders and Culinary 
Workers Union 

Local 822 

Affiliated uith 

American Federation of Labor 

Office Hours: 9:00 to 5:00 

405 E. Tenth Street 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



vail in large acreages. Stock raising and dairying bring in 
a lot of money to the county, and fruits and vegetables con- 
tribute added thousands of dollars more. 

There is not nuich of the so-called higher crimes in the 
county, though Sheriff Mayfield since talcing over his im- 
portant post had two murders on his hands. He solved 
them and put the murderers in prison where they belonged. 

Beside the Sheriff there are seven full time deputies and 
three part time officers. 

Allyn Walker is the undersheriff' and in charge of the 
criminal activities. 

Deputy Herman Shroeder is in charge of civil matters. 

The jailer is Deputy Carter Brown. 

A.\\ are experienced hands at their business. 

Sheriff .Ma>field has eight 2-way radio cars patrolling 
the unincorporated area of his county and they give this 
area a complete coverage. 

ZIMMERMAN'S ACCORDION SCHOOL 



Instructions, Repairs. Acccssori 
Sheet music and Albums 
For All Occasions, Full Line of Accordi< 

400 E. Locust— Phone li-J 



Stock New and Used 
LODI. CALIFORNIA 



Phone 1068 

CLAUDE E. WHITTLETON 

WINES AND LIQUORS 
10 N. CHURCH STREET LODI. CALIFO RNIA 

FOOD CENTER 

FISH — POULTRY 
MEATS — VEGETABLES and GROCERIES 

Corner Elm and School Streets 

Phone 1421 for Free Delivery 

LODi CALIFORNIA 



M 



Z E L V E R 



20 WEST ELM ST 



HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS 



LODI. CALIF. 



KROLLS JEWELRY STORE 

SILVERWARE: 1847 Rogers Bros.. Community; 

Wm. Rolers and Tudor Plate 

Watches - Jewelry - Gifts for All Occasions ■ Clocks 

5 N. SACRAMENTO ST. LODI. CALIFORNIA 

American Standard G. E. Crane 

BENTZ PLUMBING AND HEATING 



"Call Us fo 

Trlrphonr 224 1 J 
Plumbing A Heating ContracK 



! Estimates" 
225 So Stockton St 

LODI. CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL MARKET 



GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 

FREE DELIVERY 

Phona 923 616 So. Cantral 

CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



25 



JOE 



LIMA S PLACE 

RETAIL LIQUORS (OIT Sale and On Sale) 
TOBACCOS • CARD ROOMS 

25 N. Sacramento Street I. GDI. CALIFORNIA 

fhonr 122 tlatk W Smith. Mut 

HOTEL LODI 



7 So School Str 



COFFEE SHOP ■ DINING ROOM 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



SFPD PERSONNEL CHANGES 

Since he assumed leadership of the San Francisco Police 
Department early last month, Chief Michael Gaffey has 
made comparatively few changes in personnel, those that 
have been made are for the most part in line with the 
policy of the Police Commissioners to rotate members of 
the force, especially those of higher rank. 

Among some of the transfers he announced shortly after 
being sworn into his present post were the changing of the 
following captains, the rotating of these top ranking offi- 
cers annually has been a custom followed since the present 
Board took over three years ago : 

Captain Edward Donahue from Southern to Central. 

Captain John AL Sullivan from Central to Potrero. 

Captain Peter Conroy from Potrero to Park. 

Captain Aloysius O'Brien from Park to Mission. 

Captain Daniel McKlem from Mission to Southern. 

Captain Leo Tackney from Ingleside to Taraval. 

Captain George IVL Healy from Taraval to Ingleside. 

Captain Ted Terlau to Richmond. 

Captain Walter Atnes stays at Northern. 

Captain James Carrig newly appointed relief captain. 

Other changes : 

Lieutenant Martin Spellman from Richmond to Cen- 
tral. 

Lieutenant ^Valter Meyer from Special Service to Rich- 
mond. 

Some other lieutenants, several sergeants and a number 
of patrolmen were re-assigned. 

7 

Branches at Stockton, Tracy, Brentwood, Oakley 

DAY -LITE MARKET 

Wholesale - Retail 

MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Mahj Office 

107 - 109 South Center Street 
STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-3782 



THE WONDER 

SMART FASHIONS 

for 

WOMEN and CHILDREN 

340 East Main Street 
STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



FRED R. McGREW 

PLUMBING AND JOBBING 



432 First Street 



Phone 2-4687 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



SCHWARZGRUBER & SONS 

SAND AND GRAVEL 
WASHED AND SCREENED 



28 West Main Street 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 2-S497 Residence Phone 2-279S 

WEGGERS AIRPLANE SEEDING 
AND DUSTING CO. 

M. B. WATTS - H. WEGGERS, Operators 

Yolo Fliers Club Airport 

P. O. Box 491 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



BRUCIA AND COMPANY 

OLIVES FOR EVERY OCCASION 
Wholesale and Retail 

Madison Highway Phone 2-2480 

WOODLAND CALIFORNIA! 



LAVENDER'S DRIVE-INN MARKET 



GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 



Phone 2-4213 



WOODLAND 



WOODLAND FOREST & NURSERY 

FLOWERS BY WIRE 
Ernest and Bea Manhart 

US Walnut Street Phone 2-2843 I 

WOODLAND CALIFORNI/ 



WOODLAND TRACTOR CO. 

FORD TRACTOR 
DEARBORN FARM EQUIPMENT 



WOODLAND 



West Main Street 



CALIFORNI 



KNAGGS MOTOR CO. 

DODGE 

PLYMOUTH 

DODGE TRUCKS 



WOODLAND 



310 Main Street 



Phone 2-5476 



CALIFORNI 



WOODLAND 



BELARS BRAKE SERVICE 

JOHN R. BIELAR, Prop. 

'•GIVE YOUR CAR A BRAKE AT BIELAR'S" 

80 West Main Street 



Mnrch. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACH OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Pa^e S9 



BAY POLICE ROUND UP DUO OF STORE BANDITS 



Berkeley, San Francisto, and Oakland police teamed up 
late in September to write an end to a long holdup career 
of two young members of San Francisco's old >X'hite Gang. 

The day following the September 25 capture, Joe "The 
Duke" Noisat, 24, 296 Thirtieth Street, San Francisco, and 
Robert Manuel Leon, 24, 228 Brentwood Avenue, South 
San Francisco, laid it on the line to Oakland Inspectors. It 
was the end of a two-year robbery spree that had perplexed 
Bay Area police, not to mention Safeway Stores. 

Guesses on proceeds the two suspects had reaped ran from 
$50,000 to $100,000. 

First setting of the story was at a Safeway Store located 
at Camden Street and Seminary Avenue in Oakland, across 
the street from Nfills College. Final scene was at the toll 
pla2a of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge when Leon 
was captured in a San Francisco bound taxicab. His pal, 
Noisat, had already been shot in the leg at the scene of the 
holdup. 

The two men had been picked as probable suspects in the 
series of robberies some time previous, according to Lieu- 
tenant Martin M. Lee, head of the SFPD Robbery Detail. 
Two months previous police officials of the three cities had 
conferred on plans to break up the part)-. Noisat and Leon 
were placed under a round the clock surveillance. 

Early during the morning of September 25 Lieutenant 
Lee received a phone call from Inspectors Max Reznik and 
Charles Sutton who reported that Leon had left his home 
and seemed to be headed toward Noisat's home. The two 
then climbed into Noisat's machine and headed toward 
Oakland. 

Lee telephoned Oakland police and suggested they spread 
the word — they were happy to. In a matter of minutes 80 
Oakland officers and 18 Berkeley officers were posted at 
more than 50 East Bay Safeway Stores. Inspectors Kenneth 
Jackson and Leonard Fake of Oakland drew the winning 
number. 

Shortly after 11 a. m. the two suspects parked their Mer- 
cury sedan in front of the Camden Street store . . . care- 
fully donned white masks and gloves, hustled into the store. 
Training their weapons on August Knodt, cashier, they 
ordered him to put available receipts into a paper bag. 
Knodt, gloating, complied. Then Noisat and Leon turned 
to leave, apparently convinced the)' had "it in the bag " in 
more ways than one. 

Guards from a Loomis armored car drove up as Jaik-son 
and Fake waited outside for the robbers to reach the front 
door. The guards saw the armed detectives, pulled their 
guns. Inspector Fake and Inspector Jackson ran into the 
store in an attempt to decrease the danger to the guards and 
other passersby. 

Jackson fired first and hit Noisat in the leg; but Leon ran 
to a rear exit. Fake ran out the front door of the store and 
fired at the fugitive as he went over a fence. Leon then 
mixed with an already curious crowd. 



Walking casually into a delicatessen at 2828 Seminary 
Avenue, he ordered a soft drink and called a taxi. The 
driver, Joseph R. Ciccola, 547 East Twelfth Street, was 
ordered first to drive to the Key System Terminal then 
straight to San Francisco. 

A score of autos loaded with police covered the scene 
within seconds, soon located the delicatessen propcrittor 
who identified a photo of Leon and recalled that he had 
ordered a cab from the Oakland Cab Company. 

Things were breaking right for the fKjIice. Officers of the 
California Highway Patrol were alerted and began watch- 
ing for the taxi. Radio messages to the San Francisco Police 
Department resulted in another blockade on the San Fran- 
cisco end of the bridge by Robbery Inspectors Jules Zimmer- 
lin and George Heeg. Leon surrendered to the highway 
patrolmen without a struggle. 

To all officers involved "it was all in a day's work . . ." 
but they deserve the thanks and respect expressed by many 
Bay Area businessmen. 



WOODLAND TITLE GUARANTY CO. 

H. I. SHEARER, President 

S19 Main Street Phone 2-5439 

WOODLAND CAl IFORNIA 



TRACY MOTOR CO. 

SALES AND SERVICE 
Clarence J. Tracy, Owner 



WOODLAND 



346 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SCARLETT INSURANCE AGENCY 

ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE 
Halel A. Scarlett - Wm. E. Scarlett 

352 Collete Street Phone Z-4964 

WOODLAND (.AlllDHNIA 

K.M.A. 259 Phone 2-4A66 

TADLOCK'S RADIO DLSPATCH 

TWO-WAV RADIO SERVICE 
430 Colleie Street 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



KRAMER'S KONSIGNED KARS 

"WOODLAND-S ONLY CONSIGNED DEALER" 
Melvin Kramer - Wayne Oliver 

Phone 2-6492 1016 Main Street 

WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 



Page 90 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March. 1951 



Rates $2.50, Bath $3.50 



COFFEE SHOP 



WOODLAND 



HOTEL DEL MAR 

Opposite Yolo County's Beautiful Court He 
SUITES FOR FAMILIES 
Phone 2-2801 



TONY MERCURIO 

WATCHMAKER 



CALIFORNIA 12 1 EAST PINE STREET 



LODI, CALIFORNIA 



RAY C. TOLSON 



RICE • GRAIN 



Box 967 Phone 2-4669 

WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 



W. C. McNARY 



Phone 2-5411 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



WEAVER TRACTOR CO. 

ALLIED 

FARMING- LOGGING - CONTRACTING EQUIPMENT 

CATERPILLAR - JOHN DEERE 

Phone 2-4637 

SACRAMENTO AND WOODLAND. CALIFORNIA 



V. SANTONI AND COMPANY 

OLIVE OIL - PICKLED OLIVES - GREEK STYLE OLIVES 
SANTONPS PURE GRAPE WINES 

1003 North Street Telephone 2-5489 

WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 

WOODLAND MOTEL 

A. H. Weston, Prop. 

COOLED BY REFRIGERATION 

SIMMONS BEDS 



WOODLAND 



Highway 99 W 



Phone 2-4681 



CALIFORNIA 



SHELLY'S STATION 



SHELL PRODUCTS 
GAS - OIL - CAR WASHING - LUBRICATION - TIRES 



Sixth and Main Streets 



Phone 2-9973 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



HEmlock 1-7941 

DAILEY'S BARBER SHOP 

MANICURE :-: SHINE 
HAIR CUT - $1.00 • SHAVE 75 CENTS 

7 A. M. to 10 P. M... • .Sundays - Holidays 7 to 8 

1108 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

WOODLAND PRODUCE CO. 

G. HING. Prop. 

MEATS - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - FRUITS 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

405 Main Street Phone 2-422S 

WOODLAND CALIFORNIA 



NASH - DE CAMP COMPANY 

HOWARD H. MASON, Agent 
315 North Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 94 

G I L B E A U ' S 

HARDWARE • FURNITURE 
BOYSEN PAINTS 

106 North Sacramento Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SUPER MOLD CORPORATION 

Manufacturers of 
L O D I MOLDS 



420 North Sacramento 



LODI 



CALIFORNIA 



C. M. CURRY D. B. CURRY 

CURRY'S STATIONERY 

STATIONERY • GIFTS 
20 South School Street — Phone 60 



CALIFORNIA 



LOOK TO OLDS FOR ALL THAT'S NEW 

L. G. BROWN 

OLDSMOBILE • GMC TRUCKS 



Phone 1337 



216 South Sacramento 

CALIFORNIA 



LOEWEN AUTO COMPANY 
SALES and SERVICE 

FOR ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION 
9 West Locust Street 



CALIFORNIA 



R. S. FULLER 



EARL H. BOTTS 



Valley Lumber Company of Lodi 



200 E. ELM STREET 



LODI, CALIFORNIA 



One of Monterey's Historic Adobes with Modern Comfort 

MISSION INN 

B. V. McMenamin, Prop. 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND DINING ROOM 

456 Tyler Street Phone 5-4165 

MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



M„nh. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e 91 



ED POOTEL HONORED 

More than 400 people gatlicrcd in tlic Gold Room ot tiic 
Fairmont Hotel, one ni^ht last October to honor former 
Director of Traffic Edward Pootel of the San Francisco 
Police Department, following his retirement on pension, 
after 36 years of police service. 

During his long tenure with the police department he 
sen'ed in the traffic bureau. Passing through the ranks he 
was finally made a Lieutenant, and made Captain of Traffic 
in 1948, and in February, 1949, was appointed to fill the 
newly created position of Director of Trafific. 

It was because of his fidelity to all assignments given him, 
and by his courteous manner toward all people with whom 
he came in contact, that this big celebration was given. 
Prominent citizens, as well as just common folks were 
present. 

Deputy Chief James Quigley was chairman of the com- 
mittee on arrangements. Sergeant Ernest Lindenau head of 
the publicity committee. Max Kirshbaum chairman of the 
ticket committee and Dean Mattox the entertainment com- 
mittee. 

A good program of entertainment was provided and a 
swell dinner served at the banquet. 

The speakers called up to address the assemblage stressed 
the manner in which Director Pootel had served the people 
and at the end of the speechmaking the guest of honor was 
presented with many presents, principal of which was a 
big television set. Mrs. Pootel was present and shared in 
the honors bestowed on her husband. 

Director Pootel is now associated with the Moskovitz 
Realty Company of '5032 Geary Boulevard, and is doing 
mighty well according to his friends. 



LONGS USED CAR LOT AND 
WRECKING YARD 



WOODLAND 



615 Ea 



CALIFORNIA 



2-21 35 :: P. O. Box 239 J. A. "Al" Fortna, Own 

Fortna Super Service Truck Terminal 

Sriberling Tire. - Norwalk Oil Products - Diesel Fuel 
Cyclone Filter Elements - Valvoline Motor Oil 
On Kni(ht Landing Highway 



WOODLAND 



Accessories 



CALIFORNIA 



KRAFT BROS. 

FUNERAL SERVICE 

Phone Day and Night 2-4658 

Second at North Street 



( ALII OKNIA 



BUCKEYE CAVERN 



MIXED DRINKS • LIQUORS 
31 West Main Street Pho 



• WINES 
le 2-99S3 



FRED SHAFFER AND SON 

REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE • LOANS 



701 Main Sir 



GOSSETTS PLACE 

CHOICE WINES, BEER AND LIQUORS 



ABELE MOTOR C:0. 

BUICK-PONTIAC 



TEXHOMA CAB CO. 



Phone S707 



CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS ICE CO. 



FONC;S MARKET 



TEmplcbar 2-9433 353 East I 2th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

americ;an meat market 

GROCERIES • MEATS • POULTRY • FRUITS 



BUC;KAR00 CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS - LUNCH COUNTER - CLUB ROOM 



13 W. Market Str 



Phone 2-1444 



Al.ll ORNIA 



THOMPSON PAINT CO. 



371 Main Street 



ALI FORMA 



SALINAS GLASS SHOP 



H. E. SILVA 



HORSE SHOE INN 

MIXED DRINKS - BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 



Phone HIgate 4-0871 Res. Phone OLympic 3-8429 

PAVLIGER LABORATORIES 

X-RAY 

Suite 327 Wakefield Building, 426 I7lh Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

EL CAMINO PRESS 

QUALITY PRINTING • LITHOGRAPHING 



CALIFORNIA SALINAS 



336 Monterey Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA MONTIRKY 



FRIENDLY INN CAFE 

ANY FAVORITE LIQUORS 

WINE AND BEER - HOME COOKED MEALS 

794 Lighthouse Avenue Phone 2-39«3 



C Al II ORNIA 



MARVIN LAND PLANES 

SET THE STANDARD FOR LEVELING EFFICIENCY 

Field Tested and Proven Since 19.36 

Manufactured al WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 

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pe 92 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



March, 1951 



30-YEAR POLICE HAVE A MEETING 

A banquet was held at Bimbo's Club, 365 Market 
Street, on the evening of January 17, bringing together 
ten or fifteen young men, who on January 17, 1921, be- 
came members of the San Francisco Police Department. 
Five of the original fifteen have passed on. The late 
Daniel J. O'Brien was Chief of Police at the time the fif- 
teen were appointed police officers. 

Inspector John \W. Breen of the Sex Crime Detail was 
the one who got the boys together, and it was a big time 
for them all. There was no formal speechmaking, but the 
stories each one present had to tell of his experience with 
the department for the past 30 years was something that 
kept every one up until a late hour. 

It was decided that from now on the 1921 members will 
gather for a banquet each January 17. 

Those present were: 

Inspector John W. Breen, attached Sex Crimes Detail. 

Inspector James Hayes, attached Burglary Detail. 

Sergeant Joseph Perry, attached Traffic Bureau. 

Officer Oliver Lundborg, attached Southern Station. 

Officer Joseph Pinnick, attached Central Station. 

Officer Thomas Stack, attached Mission Station. 

Officer Frank Gau, attached Taraval Station. 

Officer Melvin Gottung, attached San Francisco Police 
Range. 

Inspector Cornelius Desmond, pensioned. 

Sergeant Alexander Smith, pensioned. 

The following members are deceased : 

Inspector William McMahon, Sergeant Joseph Tre- 
genza. Officer Larry O'Connell, Officer George Stanton, 
and Officer Timothy O'Leary. 



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POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



RICHMOND-CHASE 
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Oudlity Packers of 

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Fruit Nectars 



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GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Responsibility 

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Phone 1738 

Twelfth and "F' Streets 

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EQUIPMENT HEADQUARTERS 

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Air Compressors Ingersoll-Rand 

Scrapers and Dozers Garwood 

Trenchliners Buckeye 

Shovels and Draglines Koehring and Quickway 

Pumps Gorman-Rupp 

Fork Lift Trucks Transitier and Westcoast 

Diesel Power General Motors 

Mixers Kwix-Mix 

Pulverizers Seaman 

Rock Crushers Universal 

Buckets Page-Hendrix 

Logging Equipment Carco 

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Phone 6782 



Most Popular Place in Town 

THE BUCKHORN 



FINE LIQUORS 
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VACAVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-4447 



UNITED MARKET 



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Parker S. Maddux, President 



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San Francisco Police Department 



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Edouard Thys, President 

Manufacturers Engineers 
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Sacramento, California 



April. 1051 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 



PAGE 

Mayor Robinson on ihe Atom Bomb 3 

Sheriff H. P. Cilra»on, Alameda County, Sets Pattern 

for Civilian Defense in State 5 

By B. S. Sanders 

Sheriff Don Cox, Sacramento County 6 

Chief Hicks, Sacramento, Now in U. S. Air Force . . 7 

Fritz Kaminsky New Sacramento Police Chief . . 8 

.■\sssilant Chief Rooney of Sacramento P. D. . . . 9 

Detective Chief Lofquist, Sacramento 10 

Sacramento's Police Traffic Chief Bennett .... 13 

Captain Strazzo and Sergeant Kune a CJood Team . 13 

Chief Wilson, North Sacramento, Helps Save City 14 

Captain of Detectives "Con" Murphy 15 

From a Man Who Knows the Score 16 

By Dircilor J. EJgar Hoo^'er 

Captain Mclntyre Wins Out as Salinas P. D. Chief 17 

The Sign of the Red Hand— By B. C. Bridges ... 18 

Captain Sked in Charge of SPI) Civilian Defense 19 
Editorial Page — Promotion Examinations — Key 

Subjects of Study 2(1 

Four More Years on Adult Authority for 

C. W. Dullea 21 

Scratch <.)ne Bank Robber 21 

Dick Tracy, in Real Life Is Coming's Police Chief . 22 

Murderers All "Fall" in Monterey County .... 23 

S. F. P. D. Meritorious Service Awards 24 

Pistol Pointing — By J. Ross Dunnigan 25 

No. California Graduates From FBI National 

Academy 26 

Captain Ogle, Sacramento Sheriff Captain Killed in 

Auto Accident 28 

Associated Public Communications Officers .... 30 

The Village — North Sacramento 41 

Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association 46 

Death Takes Chief Merrill, C.S.S.S 53 

Sacramento PD Ha« Fine B. of 1 55 

It's Captain Pre«sey of Sacramento Police Department 59 

Captain CJessner and SPD Juvenile Division ... 62 

Former Chief Dierking in New Job 65 

Police Promotion Examination Questions 7il 

Dinuba's Police Chief Raymond Pruitt 76 

By Thomas II. Greene 

Chief Bruce Spurgeon of Clovis 7S 

By T. II. Greene 

Fowler s Police Chief S. W. Johansen Ho 

Chief Scott Two Years as Head of Delano P. D. . . 82 



Directory 



pi>i- 



The hniTim i* j!wjv\ plrj%cd lo coniidcr article* tuiiablr for puhli< 
Contribution* ihould preferably be typewritten, but where thi» i» m: 
lible. copy should be clearly written. Coniribution« may be iignrd • 
"nom dc plume. " hut all articles muit bear the name and addrc»« of ihe 
wndcr. which will be treated with the iirictrtt confidence. Ihe FniToR 
Will alw) be plrax-d to consider phnio|traphi of ofTicrrv and of inrrrr^tini: 
trenn. Letter* ihould be addrc**cd tn the FruTim 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KMA-438 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson' 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wedtiesday, 2:00 p.m., Hall of Justrce 

J. Warsock W.alsh, President 160 Montgomery Street 

WASHtNCTON I. KoiiNKE 686 Sacramento Street 

Hesrv C. MAr.iNV 315 Montgomery Street 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michaki. G.affkv 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quicley 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic _ Jack Eker 

Dept. Sec't... Captain Michael F. Fitzpatrick... Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Edward P. Donohue 635 Washington Street 

Southern Daniel McKlem Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Ai.oysius O'Brien 3057 - 17th Street 

NdliTHERN 'Walter Ames 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park Peter Conroy Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond Ted Teri.au 451 Sixth Avenue 

Incelside... George M. Heai.y. Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

TaravAL Leo Tackney 2348 - 24th Avenue 

PoTRERO John M. Sui.i.ivan 2300 Third Street 

Property Clerk and 

City Prison Bernard McDonald Hall of Justice 

Relief Captain James Carrk; 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Persosnei John A. Encler Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipr Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Otto Meyer Hall of Justice 

Director of Juvesii.e Bureau 2745 Greenwich Street 

John Meehan 

Director - Buriau of Criminal 
Information Lieut. George IIippei.y 



Insp. or ScHoou 
Traffic Control.. 



Hall of Justice 
Insp. Thomas B. Tract 



Supervising Captain 

of Districts Jeremiah J. Couohiin 



Hall of Justice 



Chinatoun Detaii Hall of Justice 

Ltitrr. Harold Anderson 

Rwi.fMAsTFR Pistol Range, Lake Merced 

FmII I')tTII 



When In Douk ' ^^^^ SUtteV l-ZO-ZO 



.Mwavs At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Atyril. 1951 



J. R. REEVES 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



GRADING - EXCAVATING 
ROADS 



p. O. BOX 1072 

l6th at American River Bridge 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



FARMER'S RICE 
GROWERS COOPERATIVE 



Phone Gilbert 2-5880 
1531 FRONT STREET 

Sacramento, California 



PHONE ORDWAY 3-3040 
DAY - NIGHT OR SUNDAY 

D E V IN E 

National Detective Agency 

Paul H. Devine, PnncipaJ 

LICENSED BY 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

B O ND E D D 

RELIABLE CONFIDENTIAL 

INVESTIGATIONS 

1286 CALIFORNIA STREET 

Member of 

INTERNATIONAL SECRET SERVICE 

ASSOCIATION 

24-hour Service to All Cities in the United States 



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A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyrighli 



Vol. XXV 



Aprii., 1'»S| 



Mayor Robinson on the Atom Bomb 



(Continued from last month) 
We must have volunteers for every phase of the Ci\il 
Defense program. I have said, and I repeat now, that one 
reason why appeals for volunteers may have been less than 
successful is because our people were not impressed with 
the reality of the need for their services. 

I sincerely and earnestly hope that my recital of rlic 




trained and conipleteI> manned Civil Defense force is 
a\ailable to swing into action immediately. 

Every man, every woman and every child above the age 
of fourteen years must play a part in our civil defense 
program. 

As I see the picture, men and women in the downtown 
districts, men and women at their place of work, must 
ha\e duties assigned to them in the area in which they 
work for the period during which they work, and be pre- 
pared to take on other duties when they are at their homes, 
presumably in other parts of the city. I believe that just 
as school children arc trained to act as junior traffic con- 
trol officers, so, too, they must be trained to perform cer- 
tain specific duties of a similar nature in event of a day- 
light attack upon this or any other American city. 

How has San Francisco approached the question of es- 
tablishing a civil defense organization ? 

Four days after my inauguration as Mayor, I instructed 
the Public Service Director in my office to keep abreast 
of developments in the field of disaster relief and civil de- 
fense planning and to report directly to me developments 
in these fields. Hypothetical disaster problems were con- 
ducted under the auspices of the San Francisco Red Cross, 
and the San Francisco Police, Fire, Public Health and 
Public AWIfarc departments cooperated in the solution of 
such problems. In 1948 alone, my Public Service Director 
attended eleven meetings on Civil Defense in San Fran- 
cisco, Sacramento, Chicago, New ^'ork ami Washington, 
D. C. Meetings and conferences were held through 1*)48 
with representatives of the military, with the Fxecutive 
Director of the [,eague of California Cities, and contact 
was maintained with the Federal Office of Civil Defense. 
The Public Service Director and I attendeil the National 
Conference of the Americafi Municipal .Association in 
Washington, and as a result of these activities, it began to 
become apparent that this -iubject. freighted with such tre- 
mendous and such foreboding |V)ssibilities, presenteil a pic- 
ture of groping at the local level, reflecting the inertia, 
confusion and indecision at the top federal level. 

Through \^A^, while waiting for the Federal Govern- 
ment to hand down its blueprints for a civil defense or- 
ganization, the Reil Cross again conducted hypothetical 
disaster problems and again all our mimicipal departments 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



.hril. 1951 



cooperated in the problem. It wasn't until December 1, 

1949, that the National Security Resources Board Bulle- 
tin No. 1 was issued and the gist of the long-awaited bulle- 
tin was that the Federal Government would disseminate 
its information on Civil Defense to the states, whence the 
information would filter down to local communities. In 
the meantime, local commimities should take an inventory 
of their supplies and equipment necessary to combat a natu- 
ral disaster and should bring these facilities to peak effi- 
ciency. You may readily recognize that so far as San 
Francisco was concerned, these bulletins were possibly in- 
teresting, but certainly irrelevant so far as establishing a 
Civil Defense organization geared to cope with the effects 
of an atomic explosion was concerned. 

Through early 1950 meetings were held at the local 
level with local military representatives, as well as with 
state and military officials at Sacramento. 

On April 1, 1950, it was a relief and a pleasure to have 
our Director of Public Health attend a one month course 
at the University of California at Los Angeles, dealing 
with the radiation effects of an atomic explosion. In that 
same month, I gladly accepted an invitation to appear be- 
fore the Joint Congressional Committee on Atomic Energy 
because to me it was inconceivable that Civil Defense, 
touching so closely as it does and so directly the lives of 
our people, should be little more than a protracted paper- 
shuffling operation in Washington. 

I testified before Senator Brien McMahon's Joint Com- 
mittee, and I regret to say that even the Committee itself 
exhibited little sense of urgency in this matter, although 
I pointed out during my testimony that unidentified sub- 
marines had been reported both sighted and contacted off 
the coast of California. At one stage of my testimony, 
when I deplored the lack of any affirmative official infor- 
mation, I was informed by a member of the Committee 
that some Aery informative and interesting articles were 
available to me through the columns of the Saturday Eve- 
ning Post. 

At that point, I decided to carry the whole story of this 
division of irresponsibility to the people of San Francisco 
by a special radio broadcast, which I made on April 25, 

1950, two months to the day before the outbreak of war 
in Korea, and at that time I announced that I was inviting 
the mayors of every primary target city on the Pacific 
Coast and the top civil defense planners for the states of 
Washington, Oregon and California to a brass tacks re- 
gional conference on Civil Defense. I made it plain that 
we were going to go along on our own, even though the 
Federal Government had up to that time given us no spe- 
cific guidance on dealing with the actual effects of an 
atomic explosion, and the Federal Governmetit, of course, 
was the only agency with reliable information on that 
matter. 

Paul J. Larsen, then in charge of civil defense planning 
for the National Security Resources Board, attended that 
conference, and in talks both on and off the record indi- 
cated to the group for the first time precisely what we were 
up against and some of the steps being taken by the Federal 



Go\ernment to cope with the problem. He promised that 
in September of last year American cities would receive 
the master plan for civil defense. The conference, as you 
know, was held on June 12 and June 13, two weeks before 
the outbreak of war in Korea, and it energized our Ci\il 
Defense planning for our front line damage control forces, 
which are the Police, Fire, Public Health, Public ^\^orks. 
Public Utilities and Public \Velfare departments. 

San Francisco was officially represented at the atom 
bomb critique in Seattle where two hypothetical enemy 
bombings had taken place, and the results were translated 
into terms applicable to San Francisco. 

On August 1, selected members of the San Francisco 
Fire Department were admitted to the excellent Radio- 
logical Defense School conducted by the Navy at Treasure 
Island. Upon completion of that course, these men initi- 
ated the indoctrination of other members of the Fire De- 
partment. 

On August 13, General Wedemeyer granted my re- 
quest to permit thirty-four top staff members of various 
city departments to attend the Army's course on the effects 
of the atom bomb. 

On August 22, 1950, selected members of the Police 
Department were admitted to the Na\>'s Radiological 
Defense School. 

On September 19, selected members of the Public 
Works Department — charged with heavy rescue work — 
and of the Public Utilities Department were admitted to 
that Navy School. 

On October 2, the San Francisco Police Department 
inaugurated a fifteen hour departmental course in atomic 
indoctrination for all personnel with Sergeants Osterloh 
and Comber, both University of California graduates and 
both of whom had completed the Navy's Radiological De- 
fense Course, as instructors of our Police Department. 

In October, 1950, further members of the Public ^Vorks 
and Public Utilities departments attended the Navy School. 

We were very fortunate, indeed, to obtain the services 
of Rear Admiral Albert G. Cook, USN (Retired) as Di- 
rector of Civil Defense for San Francisco, because as Chief 
of Staff of this Naval District, the Admiral is thoroughly 
informed of the plans of the military for defense of this 
entire area and his knowledge and experience are a tre- 
mendous asset in our Civil Defense preparations. 

I cannot express with any degree of adequacy my thanks 
to the women's groups of San Francisco who have so gen- 
erously volunteered their services in our Civil Defense 
organization. 

The Fire College has already trained classes of fire re- 
servists and the Police Academ>' on Fulton Street has like- 
wise trained reservists. 

I must also thank at this time the Advisor\' Committee 
on Medical IVLitters, of which Dr. \VilIiani ]\I. Bender is 
Chairman. 

The willing response of all those connected with the 
medical aspects of civil defense is heartening, indeed. 

Only two weeks ago, in response to a plea to the parents 
f Continued on pat/e S4) 



Jfiril. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 5 



SHERIFF H. P. (JACK) GLEASON OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 
SETS PATTERN FOR CIVILIAN DEFENSE IN STATE 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders, ntind vttiran police rcporlcr. editor and liriter. in conjunction uith Janice Anderson 

Mclver. pithlic relations expert. 



Sheriff H. P. (Jack) (ileason ot Alanicila County rec- 
ognized as one of the toreinost peace officers in the nation, 
has again set a pattern for other coniniunities and counties 
to follow during these war-torn days. Or for any major 
disaster for that matter. 

It is Sheriff Gleason's ci\ ilian defense program in Ala- 




Sheriff H. V. (Jack) c;i.e.\son 

1 County. It is the major phase of this outstanding 
'• officer's plan for getting ready for any emergency. 
• centers about the training of a Sheriff's Reser\e 
;'N as a supplementary law enforcement group. It also 

iliraces a Volunteer Air Squadron set into the civilian 

■tense program. 

400 I" N ROLL I'D 

Some 400 Southerti Alameda County resiilents — farm- 
ers, business and professional men — are now studying in 
Sheriff's classes being conducted at Santa Rita Rehabilita- 
tion Center, Centervillc, and Hayward. 

I hree-hour classes are held one night a week in each 
of the three locales, under leadership of Lt. rio\<l H<'rtron 
of the Alameda County Sheriff's department. 

On completion of the course students will have studied 
10 classroom hours, completing the same end(K'rination re- 
quired of regular deputy sheriff's on Sheriff CJIeason's staff. 

I raining, according to Sheriff Cileason, consists of class- 
room work in notetaking, f)rgani/,ation and orientation, 
rides of the department, care ami use of eijuipment. public 
relations, and other related subjects. 

Advanckd Classes I'lawid 
For those wishing more advanced training beyoml the 
"rookie" stage, advanced classes are planned by Sheriff 



C.leason for the fall of 1951. 

Participating in the training classes are the three South- 
ern Alameda County School districts, providing materials 
and equipment under their adult \ocational traim'ng pro- 
grams. 

In addition to the Sheriff's Reserve I'orce, being trained 
tor work in the unincorporated areas of Alameda County, 
Sheriff' Gleason's office is training % civil defense auxiliary 
police for the cities of Hayward, Livermore and Pleasan- 
ton. 

RooKli; SlUDKNTS 

Supplementing the classroom lectures, "rookie" students 
ha\e now ad\anced to the stage where they may travel as 
observers in the Sheriff's patrol cars policing the unincor- 
porated areas and towns. Watching experienced deputies 
in action. Sheriff' Gleason believes, will pro\e of iiiest'm- 
able value to the volunteer trainees. 

Another phase of the Sheriff's civil defense program is 
sponsorship of adequate plant protection measures in Ala- 
meda County industrial areas. 

Industrial Plant Protpxtion 

In cooperation with the Oakland Chamber of Cor.i- 
merce and its manufacturers' division, Gleason recently 
staged a mass briefing in plant protection in the Auditor- 
ium Theater attended by some 500 East Bay industrialists. 

At this session, safeguards against plant sabotage, espion- 
age, fires and atomic bombings were blueprinted by author- 
ities, incKuling Worth Kidd, plant protection director for 
the State Office of Civil Defense. 

At this session, special emphasis was placed upon the im- 
portance of plant guards, and setting up elaborate screen- 
ing systems in their selection. Even the most highly intri- 
cate and apparently foolproof plant protection devices 
break down in the face of carelessness or subversive activ- 
it\' or by poorly chosen watchmen and guards. Kidd and 
Sheriff Gleason pointed out to the assembled manufac- 
t\irers. 

Volunteer Air Squadron 

Tieing in to the overall civilian defense program is 
Sheriff ( ileason 's Volunteer Air Squadron, comprising 13 
members, 

'Fhe first job just complete<l by this volunteer group has 
been the locating of 20 emergency landing strips through- 
out Alameda County for possible wartime vise. 

These landing fields, surveyed by the group, are spH)tteil 
on wide stretches of highway, city boulevards and in open 
country (ields. 

Civil Dikinsi: CuNrRoi. M ai- 

Deputy Sheriff I^ex Jensen, liaison officer for the patrol 
sa>s the results of the aerial survey will be translated on a 
large civil defense control map of the county. 

Detailed maps will be gixen to each member of the \ol- 
(Conliniied on page '73) 



P.iSf ^ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



///.r/7, 1951 



SHERIFF DON COX, SACRAMENTO COUNTY 



Sheriff Don Cox of Sacramento Count\ , an old hand 
at civilian defense, has been called on again to pla.\' a major 
role in the county's defense setup. 

The Sheriff is a member of the county defense council, 
and has been given the job of organizing and training an 




Sheriff Hem C'lix and three impiirtant memliers of his staff — left, 

Deputy Rcihert rhnmas, right of the Sheriff, Deputy E. I'. Hums 

and to his right Deputy J. E. McVeigh. 

auxiliary police force to help out with enforcement prob- 
lems in the rural areas in the event of a bombing or other 
disaster. 

This is the same work Sheriff Cox did with distinction 
dining World War II. 

And Sacramento County, he reports, will have an alert, 
well trained and disciplined auxiliary force if an emer- 
gency arises. 

Cox chose J. E. McVeigh, the head of his fingerprint 
bureau, and Deputies Robert Thomas, George Munizich 
and E. P. Burns to aid him in the defense work. They 
took a course of instruction in how to teach laymen to be 
police officers, which was sponsored by the sheriff and the 
state office of civilian defense. 

Now the four officers are busy teaching the rudiments 
of police work to the members of the volunteer force. Cox 
is no believer in giving out badges and authority indiscrimi- 
nately. 

He handpicked 10 men in each of the rural fire districts 
in the couiity, inen who have the confidence of the fire de- 
partments. They will work closely with the firemen in the 
event of an emergency, keeping roads clear, preventing 
looting, and doing other such work. 

But these volunteers are not the only ovitside helpers the 
sheriff will have if a disaster occurs. He has his sheriff's 
mounted posse of 40 men, and an air squadron of 53 pilots. 
These men can be called on in just a few minutes if their 
services are needed. Nearlv all of the men in the air 



squadron ha\c their own airplanes and most arc former 
Army pilots. 

These groups, working with Sheriff Cox's regular force 
of 72 men, will form a hard hitting, efficient corps of en- 
forcement officers if the need for emergency work arises. 

There have been few changes in the sheriff's department 
during the last year. One important one was the elevation 
of Deputy Tom Howard to a supervising deputy's rank. 
The sheriff promoted Howard in recognition of outstand- 
ing work. For years, even before he became an officer, 
Howard worked hard at spotting stolen cars. 

And since he joined the sheriff's staff he has established 
an outstanding record for recovering stolen automobiles. 
He has a photographic memory, and he spends a lot of 
time studying the hot car sheets. On the average, he re- 
covers three stolen vehicles a week, the year around. 

Sacramento's Undersheriff, who is .second in command 
to Cox, is Harry Knoll, a veteran investigator and deputy, 
who formerly was the county detective. 

Captain T. Charles Wearn is in charge of the criminal 
division. He is assisted by Supervising Officers Charles 
Ogle, Ray Logomarsino and Howard. 

The sheriff is proud of his staff and especially' of his 
four plainsclothes investigators, George L. Louderback, 
(Continued on page 34) 



Phone Hickory 9-7182 

Vincent Market 

Complete Line of 

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Beer - Wine 

3945 Marysville Road 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS, CALIF. 



Hickory 9-8786 

Farmers Meat 
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3810 Marysville Road 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS, CALIF. 



//./•//, 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Chief Hicks, Sacramento, Now in U. S. Air Force 



The S.-icraiiu'iito PohVi- Departiiu-iit has lost for at It-ast 
the next 21 months the services of Chief James V. Hicks, 
whose progressive administration for the past four _\ears 
has won public acclaim. 

Chief flicks, a Colonel in the Air Force Reser\e, is con- 




("lu James Hicks 
On leave of absence. 

manding officer of the 22nd Air Material Area Command 
and he received his induction into active service orders 
eflFective .March 16. 

Earlier the entire personnel of the unit — one the largest 
reserve groups in this section — went on active duty for five 
days. This was for physical tests and other screening pro- 
cesses. Then after a 30-day layoflf the command was put 
into active service. This date was March 16. 

City Manager Hartley VV. Cavanaugh, faced with the 
loss of so valuable an e.xecutivc immediately appointed As- 
sistant Fritz Kaminsky to take over the Chief's duties dur- 
ing the absence of Chief Hicks, which will not be for less 
than 21 months. When he has finished his duties to the 
United States Government he will find his old job open 
for him to resume. 

Life in the army is nothing new for Colonel HiVks. lie 
was a National Guardsman for years before entering the 
Air force as a Lieutenant early in 1941. His progress was 
rapid and he was a Colonel when discharged in 1045. 

In the meantime he took part in the campaigns in 
Morocco, Tunis, Italy and France. His job entailed the 
supplying of materials for the Air Force Units on a major 
scale for the big World War II offensives. 

In his new Army job he will he chief of pcrvinnel and 
administration on the staff of ^^ajor General Junius W. 
Jom-s, commanding officer of the McClellan Air F'orce 
Base. 

And the people of Sacramento as well as the members 



of the police force will miss Chief Hicks, for the depart- 
ment has made major strides since he took over in March 
1947. 

The department has nearly doubled in size since he be- 
came chief, and now numbers more than 230 persons. 'l"he 
crime rate has decreased and traffic accidents — always a 
major problem in the Capital City, are down. On the 
other hand, the number of major crimes solved by arrest 
IS up. Last year the department solved 1,030 major crimes 
and lockeil up the criminals who staged them. 

Under Hicks the department has obtained the finest 
equipment in use ami through close cooperation a good 
many crimes have been solved before the perpetrators had a 
chance to get away. An example of this is the fact that last 
>ear $i^,b'iQ worth of stolen property was recovered. 

Hicks and his subordinates have seen to it that Sacra- 
mento is free from organized gangsterism, and crimes ol 
violence have been kept at a minimum. 

The officers of the department are thankful to Chief 
Hicks, too, for helping to improve their working condi- 
tions. Salaries have been raised and the work week cut 
from 4 to 44 hours. 

The department has worked closely with state, federal 
and other law enforcement agencies. 

Since the national emergency the police force has taken 
the lead in civilian defense work, and is beginning to train 
an auxiliary force of 200 men to help out in the event of 
any kind of disaster. 

Chief Hicks says a major share of the credit for the pro- 
gressive strides in the police department belong to the cit.\- 
council and to City Manager Hartley W. Cavanaugh. 

Training also has been a major item, and Chief Hicks 
and present Chief Kaminsky, Detective Chief Joseph F:. 
Rooney ami Captains George Lofquist and Kenneth John- 
son have graduated from the FBI National Academy in 
Washington, D. C. 

Two other members of the department are in Hicks' air 
force command, and left with him. They are Ralph Haley, 
head of the Record Bureau, and Traffic Officer Walter 
Soski. Chief Deputy District Attorney V.U'm V. Sheehy 
and former Deputy District Attorneys Milton L. Schwartz 
and John M. Sapunor also are members. 

fanc:y cleaners 

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SAtRAMLNTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



.^/.W/, 1951 



Fritz Kaminsky New Sacramento Police Chief 



Assistant Chief Fritz Kaminsky has been made Chief of 
the Sacramento Police Department for the duration of the 
national emergency. City Manager Bartley W. Cava- 
naugh announced the appointment following the leave of 
absence granted to Chief James V. Hicks when he entered 




Chief Fritz Kaminsky 

active duty with the U. S. Air Force as chief of personnel 
and administration on the staff of Major General Junius 
W. Jones, commanding officer of the McClellan Air Force 
Base at Sacramento. 

The promotion was well earned and justly merited, and 
is recognition and a reward for the 27 years of outstanding 
service to the City of Sacramento as a police officer, during 
which the new chief had much to do with making the Po- 
lice Department of the Capital City the potential organi- 
zation it is today. 

Chief Kaminsky is a policeman's policeman. He has 
handled practically every major job in the department 
since he joined the force in 1923. 

^Vhen he joined the PD, Kaminsky was secretary to the 
division chief of the Southern Pacific Railroad. He left 
that job to become secretary to Police Chief Bernard Mc- 
Shane. In 1925 when McShane left he stayed on as secre- 
tary to the new chief, Theodore Koening. 

In 1927 he took the police test and was appointed a 
patrolman. Four years later in recognition of his ability, 
he was promoted to a captaincy and placed in charge of the 
Traffic Division. 

During the years which followed he also headed the 
Juvenile and Detective Divisions. In the latter capacity 
he rang up an outstanding record in successfully handling 
some of the most difficult abduction and arson cases the de- 
partment ever faced. 

In 1935 he was promoted again, this time to the posi- 



tion of assistant chief. Since then he has served with dis- 
tinction as the right arm of the chief of police. 

Kaminsky not only does general supervision work — he 
has direct charge of police training and the record system, 
and when the really hot ones break he takes an active per- 
sonal part in the work of the detective division. 

Under his direction the Sacramento force has established 
a training course, both for newcomers and old hands in the 
department, which is recognized as one of the best in the 
West. This covers a wide range of subjects, ranging from 
the best ways to handle modern firearms, to testifying in 
court cases. 

Last September Chief Kaminsky lost the services of 
Captain Kenneth Johnson, who was called back into the 
Navy. Johnson, now communications officer of the 12th 
Naval District, had charge of police training under 
Kaminsky's supervision. Captain AValter C. Sked has 
taken over Johnson's duties. 

Chief Kaminsky has taken many training courses him- 
self, and graduated from the FBI National Academy in 
1936, the second year it was in existence. 

One of the chief problems he will face will be keeping 
up the numerical strength of the department in the face 
of a growing list of policemen who are being tapped on 
the shoulder by Uncle Sam. 

The department has reverted to the World ^Var II 
emergency manpower setup to meet the problem. Six men 
have left for the armed services and these have been re- 
placed by temporary appointments from the civil service 
list. 

The appointees serve on a temporary basis only, until 
there is a regular vacancy caused by death or retirement. 
AVhen a permanent vacancy occurs the temporary men get 
the jobs. 

The following men in addition to Captain Johnson, 
have been called into the service: Donald Blair, Leonard 
Chatoian, Benjamin Morse, Herbert Hoover and George 
Kaminsky, Jr. Blair, Chatoian and Morse were patrolmen 
and Hoover and Kaminsky were fingerprint men. George 
Kaminsky, Jr., is Fritz' nephew. 



Mailing Address 
P. O. BOX 1205 



Plant 
6661 Easten 



UNION PLANING MILL 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



NIGHTLY 

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SPARE RIBS • STEAKS . CHICKEN 

BANQUET ROOM AVAILABLE 

Folsom Blvd. at 66th Street 

DANCING EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



April. /</.■)/ 



HULICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAf. 



Page 9 



Assistant Chief Rooney of the Sacramento P. D. 



The Detective Division of the Sacramento Police De- 
partment has a reason to be especially proud ot the way its 
members started the year 1951. 

During February, the detectives, in cooperation with 
other members of the department, solved 125 burglaries 




.Assistant C'hiek J. F„ Rooskv 

one of the largest amounts for any month in the liisrory 
of the department. 

And what the people of Sacramento like particularly is 
the fact that setting records for catching criminals is noth- 
ing new to the plainclothesmen. Last year was another in 
which there was only a small increase in the number ot 
major crimes committed, despite the fact that the jump in 
population was large. And also, the detectives continued 
their record of recent years, in again increasing the per- 
centage of major crimes solved by arrests. 

With the departure of Chief James Hicks for a stint 
with the V. S. Airforce, and Assistant Chief Frit/ Kani- 
insky put in charge of the police department. City .Man- 
ager Hartley Cavanaugh elevated. Detective Chief Joseph 
E. Rooney, who has headed the division since March, 
1947, as a reward for the splendid job he and his men have 
l»ccn doing, to the ,i5sistant chief spot. 

The man to take over Rooney *s job is George Lofcpnst. 
me of the uniform platoon captains, and a veteran officer 
[vith a fine record of accomplishment. 

-fore his promotion to the Assistant Chiefship, De- 
■ Rooney could well be proud of the eflforts of his 
liitting, alert staff, and there had been few recent 
'> in its personnel. The two important ones were 
loss of Ray Oehner and Otis Feil, two of the city's 
blest dectectives, who won promotions and became Ser- 
:eants in the uniform platoons. Their places were taken 
j^ two energetic young officers — Arthur Stanley an<l 
leorge Clanc\. 
Captain Harry Trimble, who learned every inch of the 



.i'Hvntown and the old tenderloin district as a beat man in 
>ears gone b> has been and will continue as second in com- 
mand in the Detective Division. 

The sergeants in .lirect charge of the plainclothesmen 
arc John J. Gabrielli and John P. Kenealy. 

Other members of the division include Detectives Jack 
CJreenlaw, Robert E. Doyle, Arnold Gamble, Henri War- 
'<•», Glenn Ticknor, Otto Dahl, Vic Weber, fames Lyons 
Robert R. Rauschert, \Villiam Oaks, \\'alter Foord and 
I e.l R. Hossman. Detectives Oaks, Ford, Lyons and P'ox 
took leading roles in the sensational cleanup record 
achieved by the division in February. Detectives Oaks and 
Ford, with the aid of uniformed Officer A. J. McCormick, 
arrested a man who admitted staging 25 burglaries. De- 
tectives Lyons, Fox and Juvenile Officer Charles Leuthy 
picked up three young thugs who cleared 30 other bur- 
glaries. 

'Fhe year 1950 also added considerable to the record of 
Detective .Greenlaw, who every year turns in an impressive 
record as head of the pawnshop detail, by running down 
crooks through the painstaking checking of stolen goods 
uliich turn up in local pawnshops. 

I'ndcr Detective Chief Rooney for the past four years 
the Detective Division has written some bright pages in 
the history of the Sacramento Police Department. The 
men recognize the competent leadership of their boss and 
reacted favorably by bringing in persons who .seek, ill- 
gotten gains. The term of freedom for such is very short 
in Sacramento. 

Assistant Chief Rooney is a native of Sacramento, who 
won quite a reputation as a PaciHc Coast League first base- 
man some years ago. He is a graduate of St. Mary's Col- 
lege, and also graduated from the FBI National Police 
Academy some three years ago. He is a World War H 
veteran of the Army. 

He joined the SPD some 15 years ago an,l his advance- 
ment through the ranks has been rapid and justly so. 



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Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



Detective Chief Lofquist, Sacramento 



The recent changes in the high command of the Sacra- 
mento Police Department resulted in deserved promotions 
for two veteran uniformed officers. 

Captain George Lofquist, the longtime head of a uni- 
formed platoon was promoted to the position of Chief of 




Chief of Detectives George Lofquist 

Detectives, to take the place of Joseph E. Rooney, who 
became Assistant Chief. 

Sergeant A. J. (Chick) Taylor was promoted to a cap- 
taincy in Lofquist's place. 

Lofquist joined the force April 16, 1930, and has han- 
dled many of the department's important assignments. At 
first he was a beat man, but after a comparatively short 
period he was switched to the Detective Bureau. 

In the plainclothes ranks he won a reputation as an 
alert, hard working officer. He headed the shoplifting and 
check details, and for several years was on the major crime 
squad. 

When the department was reorganized under former 
chief Austin J. Roche, in July, 1947, Lofquist was pro- 
moted to a captaincy, and for nearly 14 years he has head- 
ed a uniformed platoon. AVhile serving as a captain he 
took the civil service test for sergeant and passed first on 
the list. 

He is a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
National Police Academy in Washington, D. C. 

The big cases Lofquist has handled during his long 
career are legion, but he is remembered particularly for 
the remarkable job he did in handling a tenderloin district 
murder case years ago. In 1936 a man was found mur- 
dered in a rooming house. There were few clues, none of 
which worked out at the time. However, Lofquist, in 
searching the room, found a small snapshot of a man. 

The chances, he figured, were that the man in the pic- 



ture might be the murderer. So he had the identification 
bureau "blow up" the picture to a large size. He studied 
and studied it until he knew every detail of the face in the 
picture. It was three years later that his painstaking work 
resulted in the solving of the murder. He was looking 
over a group of men picked up on suspicion, when he saw 
the man whose picture he had found. 

He accused the man, who finally admitted having been 
involved in the crime. The suspect was sent to San 
Quentin. 

Captain Taylor has been on the Sacramento force for 
29 years. He worked the lower end beats for the first 
few years of his service, and in 1925 was assigned to the 
City Jail. He saw service in various other jobs, and in 
1930 won his sergeant's stripes. 

For six years he was former Captain Lee Parker's ser- 
geant. When Parker retired and C. N. LaDue was made 
a captain, Taylor was assigned to help LaDue. 

Of all the big cases he has worked on Taylor remembers 
best the famous chase after big time bandits Tanko and 
Hall in 1925. Tanko and Hall, a pair of bloodthirsty and 
gun happy stickup men, were the object of a search 
throughout Northern California. 

They had killed a Sacramento clothing merchant, a 
Santa Rosa merchant and San Bruno Police Chief Arthur 
Meehan. One night Taylor and his partner, Clyde Nunn, 
were on their way home, in plain clothes, when Tanko 
and Hall breezed into town, robbed a grocer, and fled 
with the grocer in a stolen car. 

Taylor and Nunn gave chase in separate cars. They did 
not know at first who they were chasing, but they soon 
found out. Taylor was right behind their speeding car, 
when Nunn came upon the bandits from an intersecting 
street. Tanko let loose with a 30-30 rifle, seriously wound- 
ing Nunn, who since retired and died. 

The bandits escaped at that time. Later, however. Hall 
was captured in Sacramento and sent to prison for life. 
Tanko was killed during a gunfight with San Francisco 
officers. 

Taylor undoubtedly never will come nearer to death 
without meeting it. The captured grocer told him later 
that Tanko ripped open the canvas top of the car and took 
dead aim at Taylor just as Nunn came on the scene. When 
Nunn was shot Taylor abandoned the chase to take care of 
the wounded officer. If he had rounded just one more 
corner he would have practically run right into the muzzle 
of the 30-30. 



Office; IV <)-2043 



Home: IV 9- M44 



Melvin M. Morse 

MORSE REALTY 

COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICE 



ROUTE I :, BOX 5084 



SACRAMENTO. CALIF 



April. l')51 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' lOURNAL 



Page II 



Sacramento's Police Traffic Chief Bennett 



Last year was one of the best in liistoiy lor the Iraffic 
Division of the Sacramento Police Department and its 
chief, Patrick J. Bennett. 

I'cdestrian fatalities, which are the ih\ ision's Number I 
headache, were cut by more than Jb per cent, new stream- 




Chief of Traffic ]'. J. Bessett 

lined procedures resulted in a saving of about 5,500 man 
hours of work annually, a statistical analyst was added, 
the record system improved and other modern imiovations 
were added. 

Experts consider the drop in pedestrian deaths really 

remarkable, because Sacramento's per capita automobile 

•'ration ratio already is the highest in the world and 

Hues to grow at the rate of about 8,000 more cars a 

■ •■ ir. Also, the reduction coidd hardly be expected, because 

many one-way streets have been established recently, and 

I the confusion resulting from the change does not at first 

tend toward a reduction in the number of accidents. 

Sacramentans give much of the credit to the program 
... T-Icctive enforcement used by Bennett and his staff and 
lose cooperation between the unit and the city council 
l."ity Manager Hartley W. Cavanaugh. 
I lie city officials, realizing the tremendous proportions 
Traffic situation wnidd reach because of the terrific 
■ fh of the Sacramento area have gone along with Ben- 
nett on nearly all of his recommendations. 

One of the main reasons fewer walkers have been killeil 
by cars is because Bennett realized a long time ago that 
pedestrians and motorists alike hail to be educated to the 
langers of violating the pedestrian right of way law. 

He and his men concentrated first on an educational 

drive, then t™>k up an enforcement program with vigor, 

citing motorists for not stopping for pedestrians in the 

rosswalks and citing walkers for jaywalking. 

During \0'>() Bennett spent five months at Northwest- 



ern University studying the latest wrinkles in traffic law 
enforcement, and came back with some fine ideas. 

One of these is expected to give the division 5,500 more 
man hours of work a year for no more expense. Formerly 
traffic officers went into the division office following an ac- 
cident and typed up the accident report. Including travel 
time this involved about an hour for each accident. 

Under Bennett's new system they merely take a short 
form report at the scene and go back about their business 
without going to the division office. At the end of their 
shift the officers drop the short form report in a box and a 
stenographer types up the official report later. 

When he returned from Northwestern Bennett also de- 
cided he needed a full time man to keep his h'ngers at all 
times on the accident statistics so the selective enforcement 
of whatever problem was foremost could be carried out 
more speedih. For this job he chose Benny Shiro, a vet- 
eran traffic officer with a Hair for statistics. 

Officer Shiro's capable work has prove<l of great help to 
the division. 

Traffic Chief Bennett at present is engaged in anoth?r 
enforcement job that threatens to become even more 
troublesome for the violators as time goes on. 

It is the habit of motorists of speeding, cutting in and 
out and making improper turns on one-way streets. 

Because the one-way thorofares are fairly new to Sacra- 
mento the program at present is concerned chiefly with 
warnings and educational work. But when the erring 
drivers have been given enough time to mend their ways 
a rigid enforcement drive will be started. 

Captain A. L. (Les) White became Bennett's second in 
command during the year and William Kinney and Tom 
Richer, veterans of the Traffic Division, were made ser- 
geants. As part of the department's in-service training 
program they attended the Northwestern University insti- 
tute on traffic supervision at the University of California 
in Berkeley. 

An indication of the terrific job the Traffic Division is 
doing is the number of citations and arrests during IQ50. 

A total of 22,513 persons were cited or arrested for 
moving violations, compared with 15,427 in 194'^. Noti- 
moving violation citations totalleil 56,55.? for 1050 against 
48.71 I the pre\ ious year. 

Phone: HI •) 1407 ~ 

H. J. "JEFF* PINNEO 




GIVEN MANUFACTURING CO. 

2)S IMRI IKI D ROAD NORTH SACRAMENTO. CAI.IF 

NELSON'S PIANO SFRVKE 

FROM GRANDS TO SIMNETS 



Phonr HI 9-727B 
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1729 Notnln Slr»l 



TALI FOR MA 



Page 12 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL .'Ipril. 1951 

IMPORTANT COMMISSIONED AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF SPD 





Capt. Frank Gessner 
Story on page 62 



Capt. Larry Trimble 
Story on page 9 







Capt. Walter Sked 
Story on page 19 



Capt. Zel Pressy 
Story on page 52 




Capt. A. J. Taylor 
Story (in page 10 



Capt. H. L. (Les) White 
Story on page 11 







f 




>. 



Sergt. Tom Richer 



Sergt. John P. Kenealy Sergt. Gunnar Hasseli. 



Sergt. Wm. Kinny 



.^f•ril. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Captain Strazzo And Sergeant Kunz a Good Team 



Captain Michael j. Stiaz/.o ami Si'ijjeaiit Ka\ Kunz 
art" aiiiiiiig to the record they have established as one of the 
finest teams of officers in the history of the Sacramento 
Police Department. 

Strazzo heads a Unifornu-ii ni\ision ami Serfjcant 




Captms Michael J. Strazzo 

Kunz is his assistant. They direct a group of well trame<i, 
able officers, and with the help of their men, have solved 
some of the most notorious crimes in recent Sacramento 
history. 

Outside of the Sacramento area Strazzo is best known 
as the only man who ever ser\-ed two terms as president 
of the International Footprint Association. He served dur- 



Skr(:f.a\t R w Kunz 



inji 1040 and I 'HI. Previously he had been presiilent of 
the Sacramento chapter of the organization. 

Strazzo and Kunz have been close personal friends since 
they joined the force within a month of each other in 1^30. 

During his early years on the force the Captain spent 
most of his time in the uniformed ranks, although he saw 
some service as a detective. In 10.?5 he became a sergeant 
and si\ viMr< Liter his ability was further recognized when 



lie uas appointed to a captaincN. 

Kunz served in the uniformed ranks as a beat man and 
a patrol car officer for a year, and then joined the Detective 
l)i\ision. For the next 12 years he added steadily to a rep- 
utation as a keen, efficient investigator, handling many 
major crimes. 

When Kunz cniisteil in the Army in 104.^ he was as- 
signed to the intelligence corps and worked on secret in- 
vestigations. In 1046 he was honorably discharged. Not 
long after he returned to the force he was promoted to a 
sergeancy. 

Since then Strazzo anil Kunz have worked together. 

Kunz has also been active in Footprint work and is a 
past president of the Sacramento chapter. 
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P^ge U 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



Chief Wilson, North Sacramento Helps Save City 



■When the surging American River threatened to break 
through its levees and inundate the City of North Sacra- 
mento last December, the people were more than glad to 
have Police Chief William Wilson and his officers on 
hand. 

It was one of the most serious emergencies in the city's 




Chief Wii.i.iam Wilson 

history. The levees were crumbling and for several da\'s 
nobody knew from one hour to the next whether just about 
the whole city would be under water soon. 

Chief Wilson and his men went on a ceaseless vigil, pa- 
trolling levees, directing sandbagging operations and doing 
the thousand and one other things the threatened disaster 
called for. For an entire night and day the entire se\en 
man force stood by, working valiantly, without any sleep 
at all. 

Finally, the river subsided, the reinforced levees held, 
and the city was saved from a catastrophe. And when the 
emergency was over the more than 5,000 people of the 
city unanimously were thankful for a real job of work 
on the part of the North Sacramento Police Department. 

But this is only one of the chores well done for which 
Wilson and his men have received the people's thanks. 

In his four years as Chief, Wilson has instituted many 
needed reforms in a city that is one of the fastest growing 
municipalities in Northern California. 

The traffic problem is a never ending headache to Wil- 
son and his crew. Traffic is nearly always heavy along 
Del Paso Boulevard, the main street, because of the tre- 
mendous growth of the city and the surrounding area be- 
cause of the influ-v of workers to defense installations and 
other places during recent years. 

Just one example: During the flood period bridges 
across the Sacramento and American Rivers had to be 
closed because of the high water, and in one case, because 



of the danger of collapse. This meant that many thousands 
of workers had to route their way across the North Sacra- 
mento from the north and east. For several days cars were 
lined up, bumper to bumper, for more than a mile during 
the morning and evening rush hours. At times the jam 
was so bad that emergency crews, repairing levees and 
rescuing flood victims had no end of trouble getting 
through. A good share of the work of straightening out 
the mess went to the North Sacramento officers, who did a 
commendable job. 

AVilson has concentrated during recent years particu- 
larly on the Del Paso Boulevard and other traffic situa- 
tions, with the result that accidents, violations and traffic 
jams are kept at an absolute minimum. 

Crime also has been kept down through a rigid and alert 
law enforcement campaign. 

Wilson is a modern minded officer. He is a leader in 
aviation circles in the Sacramento area, has his own pilot's 
license and airplane. Frequently he uses his plane in con- 
nection with his work. 

(Continued on page 48) 



Phone Hickory 9-0280 

LEE RISLEY'S 

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"Keep Those Dry Flys Dry" 

One Application Does It - Favored From Coast 
to Coast 

AQUA - PROBA PAINTS 

The Waterproof Paint That Breathes . . . Masonry, 

Stucco and Concrete Blocks for Alkali, Chalking, 

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NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Gilbert 2-6634 



Hickory 9-5264 



ANDERSON'S CLEANERS 

Howard Anderson, Prop. 

1723 JAY STREET 
SACRAMENTO 



1124 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



April. IV51 



POLICE AND PEACE OEEICERS' JOURNAL 



Page i: 



CAPTAIN OF DETECTIVES "CON" MURPHY 



In nearly 20 years with the San Francisco I'olicc De- 
partment Captain Cornelius Patrick Murphy — who will 
be known hereafter as "Con" — has learneil his way around. 
Duty in six units of the department has made him the type 
of officer qualified to hold a position of leadership. 

Now alviut the nuddle of his first year as Captain of 




C vpTKis Cornelius L. Muri-hv 

Inspectors, Con has succeeded in rounding off the rout;h 
; edges of disfKisitions that naturally become a little ragged 
, at times. Men of the Bureau of Inspectors like the Cap- 
i lain ; because in addition to being their second in command, 
I he is a friend to them all. As he strolls from detail to de- 
1 tail on the fourth floor of the Hall of Justice, there's no 
change in the ilegree of the welcome he receives. 
I Rugged and raw-boned at 51 years of age. Captain 
I Murphy would lofik right at home in a group of Hum- 
Iboldt County loggers. 

I Con's immediate superior is Chief of Inspectors James 
L. English, whose father, P'rank Knglish, then an execu- 
tive with the Pacific Gas and Klectric Company, gave Con 
his first job. Murphy was a young man, just turned 22, 
and straight out of Hallyvourney, County Cork. Ireland, 
when he landed the job. The elder Knglish retired a year 

I That mention of Erin necessitates a series of inevitable 

irks. In this respect Captain Murphy is quite blimt. 

\\'as I born in Ireland? And where else!" 
Where was I born in Ireland? I can't stand many 
ill. re of these insults . . . why, where all the real Irishmen 
re born — in County Cork of course." 

But. Captain — there are other places in Ireland. I ake 
Chief Michael CJaffey ; he was born in Mallinasloe, County 
loscommon. 
"Anybody born outside of Cork is a flat-lander!" 
So Con was born in Cork, June I, 1800, and aged 22 



years xvhcri he came t<i San Francisco in 1V22. He appar- 
ently carried on gru<Iges against flat-landers, because he 
married .\ora Elizabeth Smith in 1924. Nora was born 
in County Galway. They are parents of three — two sons 
and a daughter. Mary, 25, is now .Mrs. Carey. Dan is a 
patrolman at Central Station under Captain Edward Don- 
ahue. Cornelius Patrick, Jr., is a Sergeant in the Army 
Air Force. 

The rambunctious young Irishman (Con) joined the 
Police Department October 15, 1928. Four years later 
he was a corporal. Lender a charter amendment, he and 
all other police corporals became sergeants May 1, 1937. 

Murphy was promoted to Lieutenant June 16, 1945, 
and on July 1, 1949, he became a Captain. His a.ssignment 
as Captain of Inspectors came October 3, 1950, when he 
was named to succeed Captain Otto Meyer, present Di- 
rector of the Bureau of Special Services. 

Con's seasoned experience came from duty at Northern 
Station, Richmond Station, 'Fraffic Bureau, City Prison, 
Motorcycle Detail, and night Supervising Captain. 



SOME NEW SHERIFFS IN THE STATE 

Around Northern California there have been some new 
sheriffs in the various counties, and in many of the others 
the chief law enforcement officers were re-elected, cither 
at the primaries last summer or at the November election. 

Among the latter are Sheriffs Howard Hornbuckle, 
Santa Clara County; Jack McCoy, Monterey County; 
J. R. McDevitt. Santa Cruz County; A. G. Fruits, San 
Benito County; O. H. Clyde, Kings County; H. P. 
(Jack) Gleason, Alameda County; Donald Cox, Sacra- 
mento County; Carlos Sousa, San Joaquin County; Wal- 
ter Sellmer, .Marin County: Harry L. Patterson, Sonora 
County; Beverly G. Broaddus. .Mendcx-ino County; O. 
M. \Vhitley, Mariposa County ; John I>. Claussen, Napa 

County; Melvin H. Schooler County; 

Murray C. Hathway, San Luis Obispo County; Forrest 
I). Monroe, ^'olo County; John R. Dower, ^'uba Coun- 
ty; C. A. Aiitram, Lake County; Rowland M. Morris. 
Eldorado Couiit>-; James N. Long. Contra Costa Coun- 
ty. Among the new Sheriffs are Earl W'hitmore, Redwoo«l 
City Police Sergeant, who defeated Sheriff James Mc- 
(irath who had served San Mateo County for a quarter 
of a century. 

Chief Dan Kelsey of Patterson who ileleated Sheriff 
Jack Hammett, who hail served since Sheriff (irattan Ho- 
gin retired over a year ago. 

California Highway Patrolman Thomas Joyce who was 
elected to (ill the vacancy created by the announcement of 
Sheriff J. R. Thornton that he would not seek office again, 
after over 25 year's service. 

C'hief Wayne A. Kranig of Corning won out over in- 
cumbent Sheriff James N. Froome of 'I'ehama Comity. 
Sheriff Kranig is the son of Officer Henry Kranig of the 
(Continued nn fingr 66) 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1951 



From a Man Who Knows The Score 



Statciiunt of J. Edgar Hoot 



Director of FBI, Before Senatorial Coininittc 
Interstate Commerce, March 26. 



to Investigate Organized (Jrinie in 



(The U. S. Senate Crime Commission which has finish- 
ed a year's investigation of crime conditions throughout 
the country, was in San Francisco in early March for a 
two days' hearing that was put on television. While there 
were some revelations of serious wrong doings in connec- 
tion with organized rackets, Senator Estes Kefauver, 




Director J. Edgar Hoover 

Chairman of the Committee, gave the peace officers of 
California a good reputation, with but a minor few which 
he said was a little rough. He praised the SFPD and 
Chief Michael Gaffey in particular for their honesty and 
efficiency. District Attorney Thomas Lynch who sat in 
with the committee during its hearings, also won commen- 
dations for his war on criminals of all sorts. Some big 
shot gamblers are very sorry the commission came to San 
Francisco as they are having to hire some high-priced 
lawyers. — The Editor.) 

The members of this Special Committee of the United 
States Senate can take pride in its accomplishments during 
the past few months. You have developed facts which 
brought out into the open entaglements between the under- 
world and the upperworld, and unholy alliances between 
the criminal element and officialdom which established a 
shocking disregard for law and order. 

I know of no other force in American life that can 
render such a salutary service as a Congressional investiga- 
tive committee in exposing conditions which are inherently 
evil. The broad powers vested in such committees give 
them opportunities not available to the usual investigative 
process. The very nature of these powers also places upon 
such committees a responsibility of considerable import. 



Apart from securing information to aid in the legislative 
process. Congressional committees make their greatest con- 
tribution by focusing the spotlight of public opinion upon 
those forces hostile to the best interests of our country. 

The work of this Committee to date has made great 
progress in awakening a public interest in the widespread 
ramifications of the underworld. Your hearings have been 
observed by millions of Americans on television screens 
and they have seen for themselves the arrogant defiance of 
those who conceal their endeavors and hide behind the pro- 
tection of the Constitution for which they have so little 
regard. This awakened interest augurs well for the future. 
I hope it will result in increased zeal for civic responsibil- 
ity. May I also express the hope that this Committee will 
continue its unbiased non-political exposure of the criminal 
element which has polluted all too many communities of 
our nation. 

There is nothing pleasant in any discussion on the sub- 
ject of crime. Crime exists because of failures — failure to 
prevent delinquency and failure to correct delinquency. 
Beyond that, there is a failure to prevent crime, a failure 
to detect crime, a failure to prosecute crime, a failure to 
properly deal with crime and a failure to take the profit 
out of crime. 

Since 1940 the population of the United States has in- 
creased 14.3% while serious crimes increased 18%. Last 
year, a total of 1,790,030 serious crimes were committed, 
or an average of one serious crime every 18 seconds. In an 
average day last year 301 persons were feloniously killed 
or assaulted; 146 robberies were perpetrated; 1,129 places 
were burglarized; 468 cars were stolen; and, in addition, 
2861 thefts of other types were committed. Those figures 
reflect that the American people, day after day, are paying 
a bitter toll in death, personal sorrow, and financial loss, 
to the criminal. In 1950 every major classification of 
crime, except robbery, showed an increase. 

The experience of observing the growth of crime in the 
prohibition era, its sharp decline in the mid-thirties and 
now its gradual rise convinces me that crime is a problem 
to be met and solved in each city, town and hamlet. In 
facing this task one thing is certain — in those communities 
where public opinion is enlightened and aroused, crime is 
at a minimum. In such communities, crime has not be- 
come entrenched, it does enjoy unholy alliances w-ith those 
in public office, it does not have the protection of the xery 
forces who have a sworn duty to exterminate it and it is 
unable to seciuT recruits from established incubators of 
crime. 

The American system of law enforcement is based on 
the mutual cooperation of national, state and local agen- 
cies, each working within the democratic framework of 
(Continued on page 56) 



.Ifril. l')?l 



POLICE AND PEACE OEFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 17 



CAPT. MclNTYRE WINS AS SALINAS P. D. CHIEF 



Captain RaMiioiul J. McIiUnh- ot tlu- Salinas Polici- 
Department has been named Chief of Police for the famed 
lettuce center city. The announcement was matle by Cit>' 
^L^nager Ted B. Adsit following an examination for the 
important police job, which was nationwide in scope. Cap- 




C'HIEF R\VMl)N.I) J. NklsrvKf 

tain Mclntyre had been serving as Acting Cliict since the 
retirement of Chief George Weight last fall. 

The new chief joined the SPD on March 15, 1938, as 
a patrolman and with the e.xception of service with the 
Army Air Force during \\'orld AVar II has served con- 
tinuously ever since. 

Chief Mclntyre headed 31 other applicants from vari- 
ous cities from coast to coast. The e.\amination was a rigiil 
and competitive one, covering all phases of law eiiforce- 
i| ment. 

A San Francisco firm of personnel consultants prepared 
the tests. From the 31 who entered the tests 16 were ruled 
out, and in the remaining 15 was Captain Mclntyre. 

I en of the remaiinng 15 from out of Salinas were elimi- 
nated because they were from cities smaller than Salinas, 
or had reached the ages of close to 60 years, and would 
have to step out in a few years. 

Of the five outside men only one ijualilied and his ciuali- 
jcations for ability, personality and service were matched 
by Captain Mclntyre's atid the city council and City 
Manager .Adsit voted in favor of the local officer. 

All applicants living in California were intervieweil 
personally and given every opportunity to make the grade 
before the final selection was made. 

Chief Mclntyre was born in Castroville, attended 
jgrammar school there, high school in Monterey and junior 
college in Salinas. He joined the Army Air Force on 
September 2*), 1942. and got his discharge on December 4, 
1945, as a technical sergeant. He returned to the police 
department after doing his stint for his countrv. Three 



months after he was promoted to lieutenant and three more 
months later was made a captain. 

He comes from a pioneer family of the Salinas Valley, 
his father and mother were long time residents of Castro- 
ville. His mother, .Mrs. Margaret .Mclntyre, now resides 
in Salinas. 

Chief Mclntyre is a member of the State Peace Officers' 
Association, the Monterey County Peace Officers' As,socia- 
tion, The American Legion, the 1912 Club and the Sa- 
linas .Municipal Employees Association. He is highly re- 
spected, by not only his fellow officers of the Salitias Val- 
ley area but by all good people, and his appointment as 
Police Chief has brought a lot of gladness to his legion 
of friends. 

On April I Chief Mclntyre promoted three members 
of his force. 

Lieutenant Eldon F. Fowlcs, who joined the SPD in 
October, 1944, was made a captain filling the vacancy 
created when the new chief took over. 

Lieutenant Earl L. Duncan was named senior lieuten- 
ant. 

Sergeant Harold L. Duncan was ele\atcd to a lieuten- 
ancy. 

Captain Fowles was born in Hollister 41 \ears ago. He 
got his schooling there and has resided in Salinas for 20 
years. Prior to joining the police department he was for 14 
years manager of a grocery store in Salinas. He was made 
a lieutenant April 15, 1946. 

.As second in command of the SIM) he will ha\e charge 
of the patrol division. 

Lieutenant Ashton, third in command of the depart- 
ment, was born in Arkansas 30 years ago, but came to Sa- 
linas eight and a half years ago. He served for three and 
a half years in the army as a military policeman over 30 
months of which he was stationed at nearby Fort Ord. 

He joined the SPD on March 1, 1946, was promoted 
to sergeant September 1, 1948 and elevated to the rank of 
lieutenant on November I, 1948. 

He is married to Miss Bonnie Stacy of Soledad and they 
(ContiniiriJ on page 73) 



The First National Bank 
of Monterey 

A BANK OF SHRVICE 
AND SI ABILITY 

Member I'.D.I.C!. and I'edcral Reserve S\stcn) 

439 Alvarado Street 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Afril. 1951 



THE SIGN OF THE RED HAND 

By B. C. Bridges 



*This article iciis UTiltcn for the Police and Peace Offi- 
cers Journal by B. C. Bridges, internationally recognized 
authority in police science. Retired from active duty, after 
twenty-five years' service as police executive and university 
instructor. Mr. Bridges devotes his time to ivriting in the 




B. C. Bridges 

law enforcement field, and is the author of numerous 
ivorks, including the world's leading textbook on personal 
identification, "Practical Fingerprinting," published by 
Funk y H'agnalls Company. — Editor. 

It has been a common practice of archaeologists and his- 
torians alike to refer to all early inhabitants of this color- 
ful land as "Mayas." This is misleading, since the people 
were not known as "Mayas" until shortly after 1000 A.D. 
when Mayapan was founded as a new seat of government. 
As capital it united the various nations, including the 
Itzaes, Tutul Xius, Toltecs, and others in the "League of 
Mayapan." The name of "Mayas" was then arbitrarily 
applied to all subjects by their ruler, Kukulcan. He was 
the "Bearded Conqueror," another outland overlord who 
reigned for many years as warrior, statesman, builder, and 
object of adoration, finally departing for his mysterious 
homeland. Unlike the benign Itzamma, Kukulcan was 
the instigator of barbarity, and during his sway human 
sacrifices were offered in abundant and ghastly fashion at 
the altars of Quetzalcoatl, "The Feathered Serpent." 
Also, at certain seasons of the year, criminals were crushed 
to death between huge mortar-and-pestle stones before his 
temples to do him homage. Nor was it evil-doers alone 
who paid the supreme penalty in the reddened annals of 
scarlet hands. Furthermore, after his departure, all of the 
dreadful customs were continued, and even amplified, as a 
placation to his mythical son, Tescat — a pure figment of 
invention by the greedy and scheming priests, since Kukal- 
can had no offspring. 



In the long and cncrimsoned history of Old Mexico, the 
trail of the Feathered Serpent is dyed with the blood of 
youth and beauty in what is perhaps the most recent 
wholesale offering of human lives. Among the Aztecs, 
prisoners taken in war were often given as slaves to the 
officers responsible for their capture. The hapless victims 
were required to place their fingerprints upon the door- 
posts of their prisons and of their captors' dwellings, and 
later to submit to horrible death in public ceremonial that 
made an Aztec religious holiday. Although the impress- 
ing of fingerprints ritually preceded the final gruesome act 
of human sacrifice, details varied somewhat with the 
locale. In addition, it vvas a popular practice for many 
deluded devotees to volunteer as sacrificial martyrs, in 
which event their fingerprints on the temple wall indicated 
tacit acceptance of their chosen fate — a death-warrant 
signature. 

Sacrifice was celebrated upon a date predetermined by 
occult scanning of the stars for signs and portents, but on 
the day of destiny it was a blazing sun that shone down 
upon the broad avenue — the Sacred Way — that threaded 
through the city, flanked by multitudes who watched mu- 
sicians, priests in barbaric dress, and the legion of the con- 
demned that formed a vast processional pageant. Flutes, 
soon to be broken and discarded by the doomed players, 
wailed plaintive music, while throbbing tunkul drums and 
sharp-noted sacatans set a slow tempo for the death march. 
A shining and massive coronet, the painted temple rose 
above its huge pyramid of stone stairways, cloud-wreathed 
with the incense of burning copal. Warn and flower- 
scented were the winds, bestowing a farewell caress to each 
victim as he halted in the moving file of initiates, while 
the fierce and fanatic priests above performed their dread 
rites. Reaching the final step in their last journey, each 
martyr submitted to the supreme sacrifice — the tearing of 
his living heart from his breast in honor of the pagan god. 

Through reclamation, certain of the fallen structures 
in this romantic region may now be viewed as they appear- 
ed at the time of Mayan dominance, and pre-eminent 
among these restorations are those at Chichen-Itza in 
northeastern Yucatan. Here stands the mighty pyramid 
of Kukulcan — a temple-topped mountain of stone, whose 
ominus bulk has defied the centuries to symbolize the grim 
memorial of a vanished empire. At some distance in a 
northeasterly direction are stone enclosures bearing the 
significant names of "The Place of Skulls," and "The 
Terrace of Fire." Here re-assembled stones now form a 
six-foot wall as it originally appeared, surrounding a space 
that measures one hundred sixty-five feet long by thirty- 
six feet wide. The outer surface of the wall is covered 
with rows of carven and grinning skulls. This charnel 
once held the bones of countless victims. Adjoining "The 
Place of Skulls" is the smaller enclosure, "The Fire Ter- 
f Continued on page 44) 



April. 1951 



POLICE AND PHAGE OFFICERS' lOURNAL 



Pa^e 19 



CAPTAIN SKED IN CHARCJH OF SPD 
CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

Ilu- Sacramento Police Department is looking to Cap- 
tain Walter C. Sked to haiuiie the nil important job ot 
civilian licfense as it applies to the police force. 

Sked is a veteran traffic officer who also is an all around 
policeman. 

His chief job at the moment is in recruiting and training 
an auxiliary police force of 200 men who will be called on 
to assist the regular policemen in the event of any emer- 
genc.v. 

And although he has been on the job only a few months. 
Captain Sked has lined up almost a full complement of 
auxiliary officers and has begun training them. 

This force will be integrated into the overall civilian 
defense program in Sacramento and will play a vital role 
if the need for civilian defense arises. 

Captain Sked's rise in the ranks has been rapid since 
he returned from the service in August, 1945. 

He joined the force in June, 1936, and was assigned to 
the Traffic Division. In November, 1942, he joined the 
Seabees and served in Australia, New Gin'riea and other 
South Pacific spots during the ensuing three years. He had 
an important job handling traffic matters for the Na\ \ in 
Australia during his term of service. 

This experience served him well wlien he returned to 
the department in 1945. 

Soon after he returned Officer Sked took the sergeants' 
e.xamination, and a year later he reecived his sergeant's 
stripes. A mere four years later he was appointed a Cap- 
tain of the Traffic Division. 

Last year, when Traffic Chief Patrick J. Bennett was 
attending a traffic institute at Northwestern University he 
was acting chief of the division for five months. 

Then, last September, when the Navy called Captain 
Kenneth Johnson, Captain Sked took over Johnson's duties. 

This job not only entails handling civilian defense, but 
also requires Captain Sked to direct police training under 
Chief Fritz Kaminsky, and to supervise matters relating 
to automotive equipment for the entire department. He 
also has charge of training new officers in the use of fire- 
arms. 



CAKfWISr And 



»•———————»—, 




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UNION 

Local 750 - A. F. of L. 
266- 17th Street • Oakland 



SAM GOTTARDO 

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Under New Management - Formerly at St. George Lunch 

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1225 Fillmore Street 



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CALIFORNIA 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1951 



SanFranctsco = 




^2. PEACE OFFICERS' 



(Copyright, 1931. 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco 3, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted to 
the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 
THE GARDA REVIEW .... 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA. A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico. D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA . . . . 

Rioia, 666, Buenos Aires, Republic of Argentine. ». A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE Belfast. Ireland 

POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 25c 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made by 
Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, or by 
Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or who 
cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 <^^^t. 



PROMOTION EXAMINATIONS— KEY 
SUBJECTS OF STUDY 

Recently we have received an unusual number of re- 
quests concerning the compulsory course of study neces- 
sary for promotion examinations in the San Francisco 
Police Department, both from members of our local de- 
partment and from heads and individual members of police 
departments in other jurisdictions. 

In the San Francisco Police Department recent Charter 
amendments requesting the compulsory and optional ages 
for retirement make for a very much increased turn over 
in the upper ranks. Of recent years police department 
salaries in even the smallest communities have been raised 
to a scale commensurate with the duties and the working 
conditions of men whose sworn duty is to protect life and 
property. This common sense treatment of peace officers 
draws to police departments an excellent type of recruits 
who are proud of being permanent and respected members 
of their particular law enforcement units. 

Today policing is definitely a profession demanding 
various abilities and a thorough academic course. 

A casual glance at questions which have been part of 
recent police promotion tests reveals the fact that candi- 
dates are expected to have a comprehensive and very defi- 
nite knowledge of law enforcement in all matters concern- 
ing a police department. 



A memorandum from the Civil Service Commissioners 
in San Francisco to the San Francisco Police Department, 
in connection with an approaching test, was as follows: 

"The following list of bibliographical authoritative ref- 
erences will be used in determining the propriety of key 
answers to questions dealing with pertinent subjects in the 
forthcoming examinations for lieutenants and captains of 
police: 

Municipal Police Administration, by the Institute of 
Training in Municipal Administration ; 

Modern Crime Investigation, by Soderman and O'Con- 
nell ; 

Police Records, Their Installation and Use, by O. W. 
Wilson ; 

Distribution of Police Patrol Force, by O. W. Wilson ; 

Elements of Police Science, by R. N. Perkins; 

Police Systems in the United States, by Bruce Smith ; 

The Art of Leadership, by Ordway Tead ; 

New Lights on Delinquency and Its Treatment , by 
Healy and Bronner; 

Accident Prevention Manual, by Northwestern Univer- 
sity Traffic Institute; 

Reprints and Excerpts From the FBI Lav.' Enforce- 
ment, by Federal Bureau of Investigation ; 

Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook, by Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation ; 

Uniform Crime Reports, by Federal Bureau of Inves- 
tigation ; 

Charter of the City and County of San Francisco ; Rules 
and Regulations of the San Francisco Police Department; 
Penal Code of California; Municipal Police Code of San 
Francisco; Traffic Code of San Francisco; Vehicle Code 
of the State of California; Code of Civil Procedure. 



CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL 1950 
ARRESTS RECORD 

The California Highay Patrol last year made 318,913 
arrests and issued 230,304 warning citations for various 
traffic violations. Of the totals, 259,332 arrests and 194,- 
705 warnings involved private vehicles. There were 59,- 
581 arrests made for commercial vehicle violations and 
35,599 such warnings issued. 

Moving violations accounted for 258,670, or 81 percent 
of the total arrests made for both private and commercial 
vehicle infractions. 

Commercial vehicle enforcement during the year re- 
sulted in the removal of 45,000,146 pounds of cargo in 
excess of legal weight limits. 

RANCHO CAFE 

Located on Edison Highway, 7 Miles East of Bakersfield 

Phone 68106 P. O. Box 7 

EDISON CALIFORNIA 

PANAMA POTTERY CO. 

POTS • POTS • POTS 

P. O. Box 668 Phone HI S-4948 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



April. 19:^1 



POLICE AND PEACn OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Ze 21 



FOUR MORE YEARS ON ADULT 
AUTHORITY FOR (.. W. DULLEA 

Governor Larl Warren rliis month annoinKcd the re- 
appointment ot former Chief of Police Charles \V. Dul- 
lea of San Francisco, and Attorney Walter Gordon, for- 
mer Berkeley police officer, as members of the State Adult 
Authorit\. Their terms will run until 1053. 




C'H \RI.E> \\ . Dl'I IK A 



There ha\e been niight\ few chiefs of police who have 
matched the popularity and fine record of Charley Dullea. 
Not only in his native city but throughout the entire na- 
tion. From the time he started as a rookie police officer 
nearly 40 years ago, he began making a name for himself 
as a fearless and capable police officer. During his years in 
the Bureau of Inspectors where he served on many details 
and was head of the Homici<le Detail, and later as Cap- 
tain of Inspectors, from which post he stepped up to the 
topmost position of chief of the police department, he was 
responsible for solving many crimes. 

As a police executive he continued the splendid record 
he achieved in lesser posts. He became president of the 
Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association, the State Peace 
Officers' Association and the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police. In all these important honors he con- 
tributed nuich to the success of their respective aims for 
making law enforcement a united c-ffort to combat and 
prevent crimes. 

Three years ago last October he decided to take his well 
rarned retirement pension, and no sooner was the an- 
jiouncenicnt known that Governor ^V^^rren offered him a 
place on the Adult Authority, to (ill a vacancy. Charley 
Dullea accepted it and ever since has has been in the em- 
iplo\ of the state in the important duties of looking after 
the state prisons of the state and fixing terms of sentences 



and granting paroles to incarcerated men, he has pursued 
his work with the same intelligence ami fidelity he did as 
a wearer of a police officer's star. 

W^alter Gordon who is the setn'or members of the Adult 
Authority is a former university football star and a high 
type of public official. He is president of the Authority 
and a recogtnzed authority of penology. The third mem- 
ber is Ervie W. Lester of Oakland. The three work har- 
moniously together on prison afifairs 



SCRATCH ONE BANK ROBBER 

James H. Wheelock, 21 -year-old Army corporal, tried 
to rob the branch of the Bank of America at Nineteenth 
Avenue and Geary Boulevard last .March 16. 

A series of amateurish mistakes, the newspapers said, 
prevented his escape with $2100. Heroic action by two 
policemen was responsible, somewhat, for the failure also, 
the press reckoned. 

How many professional bank robbers are there roaming 
through the country? The professional boys, if any exist, 
are talking over their mistakes in Alcatraz. McNeil Island, 
Leavenworth, and assorted federal prisons. 

^ oung Wheelock was as professional as bank robbers 
come when Patrolman .Alfred Thorington of Richmond 
Station and Motorcycle Patrolman James .Mahoney tan- 
gled with him. Wheelock, gun waving and all, was sub- 
dued and jailed b\- the officers. 

Lntering the bank, Wheelock stated his desire to negoti- 
ate a loan, and was taken to the office of Assistant Cashier 
^\^ R. Rost. Pulling a .38 caliber revolver, he ordered 
Rost to bring him $5,000 (for financing a marriage, he 
said later). Thomas 1'. Lain, a bank examiner, would be 
shot if Rost didn't return with the money, Wheelock 
vowed. 

\\'hen the robber left the bank, he took Teller Joe 
Rogers with him as hostage. \\'hile he was trying to locate 
his getaway car. Patrolman Thorington was on the way. 

Thorington jumped from his radio car, gun in hand, 
but tackled the bandit, fearing passersby would be hurt. 
When Officer Mahoney arrived and came to Thorington's 
aid, the fight was soon over. AVheelock, no amateur, was 
relieved of his loot. 

Tuesday, March 20, Officers Thorington and Mahoney 
heard praise from their Chief Michael GafTe\ and Police 
Commissioners J. Warnock ^\'alsh, Henry C. Maginn, 
and Washington I. Kohnke. To make the commendations 
more substantial the Commissioners and Chief GafTey told 
the officers they had been auiirded a Meritorious Service 
citation and its $100 anil 40 examination promotion points 
for each of them. 

Wednesday. March 21. the San Francisco federal grand 
jur\ indicted James H. Wheelock for bank robbery. 

Fmnk Hrnof, Prop. Phon. Clld. 2331 

HER/OC;S CJARAGE 

REPAIRING AUTOMOnil.K. TRUCK AND TRACTOR 

MOTOR TUNF. DP WELDING AND MACHINE 

WORK - PARTS - TIRES 

COURTl.ANn rALIKORMA 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April 1951 



DICK TRACY, IN REAL LIFE, IS 
CORNING'S POLICE CHIEF 

Dick. Tracy is a name that has (ielighted countless mil- 
lions through the cartoon strip appearing in hundreds of 
newspapers throughout the country. In San Francisco the 
Chronicle has given Dick Tracy top space, in portraying 
his numerous crime solutions. Well, up in Corning, Te- 




C'HIEF Dick I'kacy 

hama County, they have a Dick Tracy in real life, identi- 
fied with law enforcement. He is Dick Tracy the new 
Chief of Police of this famed olive center. 

Chief Dick Tracy got his present job when Chief 
Wayne Kranig became Sheriff of the county last Janu- 
ary 8. 

He was born in Idaho on July 10, 1918. Eleven years 
later with his parents he moved to Corning where he has 
lived ever since. He went through the grammar and high 
schools in Corning, and was very active in all major sports. 

After graduating from high school in 1937 he followed 
several jobs and operated a ranch for a few years. 

On August 1, 1946, he joined the Corning Police De- 
partment, to which Wayne Kranig had been made chief 
two weeks previous. 

The police department had a bad situation at that time. 
No police station, no automobile for police work, no police 
records or a recording system, no radio nor other equip- 
ment necessary for a police department to function. 

Chief Kranig and Officer Tracy went about to remedy 
these shortcomings. Through the cooperation of city offi- 
cials and public spirited citizens, the department soon had 
a station and a patrol car. Today the CPD has a good set 
of records and modern filing system, which have been de- 
veloped by Chief Tracy, who was assigned to that duty 
from the beginning. 

Corning, with a fine history for agricultural develop- 
ment, is today a city of 2525 population. Like most of its 
counterparts there have been no prominent crimes commit- 
ted during the past five years. Despite the heavy flow of 
automobiles along Highway 99, which goes through Corn- 



ing, the traffic record is one of which any city could be 
proud. In the past two years only one person has been 
killed in a traffic accident and that was last year. 

Besides Chief Tracy the CPD has two other officers. 
They are Jerry Rowe, and Ferdinand Hunter. 

The CPD is interested in boys' welfare. Each of the 
members of the force heads a particular organization of 
youths. Officer Hunter has a Junior Riflemen's Club, 
made up of 25 boys. 

Officer Rowe has formed a Junior Camera Club of 20 
youths. 

Chief Tracy is secretary-treasurer of Iroop 5 of the 
Boy Scouts. He is also vice president of the Tehama 
County Peace Officers' Association. 

In 1939 the chief married Miss Dorothy Delay of Red 
Bluff, and there are four children in the family now: 
Gary, 11 ; Marion, 9; Roy, 7; and John, 6. 



CHEERS TO TED ANDRUS 

Retired 60-year-old Ted Andrus, one of the deans of 
the Traffic Bureau of the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment, was honored by a large number of his former com- 
rades and friends on March 29. 

Patrolman Andrus was guest of honor at a testimonial 
dinner at the New Tivoli Restaurant on that date. The 
large group honored Ted for his 28 years of faithful police 
service. 

Following Ted's retirement on February 19, Chief of 
Police Michael Gaffey stated the department had bene- 
fited greatly from the service of the experienced officer. 
The people of San Francisco and the men of the police 
department will long be in his debt, Chief Gaffey said. 

Andrus was born in San Francisco September 12, 1891, 
and was in a family circle of ten — father, George, and his 
mother, Mary. There were five brothers — James, Jean, 
Charles, William, and George ; and two sisters — Gladys 
and Olive. 

He was appointed to the police department on Febru- 
ary 19, 1923. His first duty assignment was to Park Sta- 
tion. The following year (March 3, 1924) he was as- 
signed to the Traffic Bureau, and never left it. 

Ted became as much a part of the Fourth and Market 
Streets intersection as the buildings themselves. Then 
later he added to his popularity by cruising through down- 
town streets in the Traffic Bureau's loud speaker car. 
Many a motorist and pedestrian blushed at the friendly 
dressings down Andrus provided ; but none of them be- 
came angry. 

Ted's hosts of friends who had learneil to start their 
working days with a few cheery and witty words from 
him were sorry when he decided to put Star No. 1005 on 
the retired list. Though no man should be content to rest 
on his laurels, they agree that Ted Andrus can come 
pretr\' close. 



L. J. KRUSE CO. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
OLympic 2-8332 6247 College Av 



CALIFORNIA 



.^/>r/7. /'/i/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



ee 23 



MURDERERS ALL TALL' IN MONTEREY 
COUNTY 

Sheritt Jack McCoy of .Monterey County has had some 
gruesome murders in his jurisdiction since he became chief 
law enforcement officer for the county. He has been mighty 
successful in cleaning them all up. 

One that he sohed h\ unrelentinsz work was the killiri); 




Sheriff Jack McCoy 

of five Filipinos in a clubhouse situated on a road in a 
lonely canyon below Salinas. The five bodies were scat- 
tered around a card table and there was no clew on which 
the sheriff and his deputies could work, l^hat is at first. 
But by tireless investigation, in which many natives of the 
Philippines were questioned, it was rightfully decided just 
who did this killing, evidently the result of a violent quar- 
rel over a card game. 

The job was to find the suspect, and for weeks Sheriff 
McCoy and his deputies assigned to the case followed 
every lead. They all petered out and it was not until six 
months after the crime that the man was finally located. 
He was picked up in Contra Costa County by Sheriff 
James Long's officers. His name was Augustus K. Lain'm'o 
and he was brought back to Salinxs and locked up in the 
i county jail of that city. 

He was tried on five charges of first degree murder, and 
was convicted on four of the charges and one of man- 
slaughter. The sentences to run consecutively. 

The other was of a .Mexican laborer working on a ranch 
along the Kspinosa Road, four miles from Salinas. His 
boiiy had been buried in a shallow grave on the ranch. Scv- 
ral days later another worker <liscovered the grave. I he 
body was dug up and identified. Sheriff McCoy and his 
men went to work on the case. Hv painstaking efforts, in 



ROLLER CHEVROLET CO. 



which they interviewed many other natives of Mexico, 
they finally had their efforts rewarded by arresting three 
suspects. So well did the sheriff and his staff gather and 
prepare evidence that the trio arrested for the crime were 
found guilty and sent to San Quentin for first degree 
murder. 



•IN THE CENTER OF MONTEREY" 

CASA MUNDRAS HOTEL AND 
COTTAGES 

DINING AND DANCING - COCKTAILS 

Jack Dougherty, Manager 

MONTEREY CALIFORNIA 

WATSON and DOW 

ORDWAY PHARMACY 

A BETTER DRUG STORE 



Phone 5-3348 



398 Alvarado Street 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



ED. C. BROWN AND CO. 

CHRYSLER AND PLYMOUTH 



ALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON'S MARKET 

COMPLETE FOOD MARKET 
OFF SALE BEER and WINE 



Palmdale 87I6-J2 



PALMDALE 



I. Box 50 

t ALIFORNIA 



VINING'S MARKET AND GROCERY 



MONTEREY 



423 Alvarado Street 



CALIFORNIA 



TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT 
AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

SPANISH KITCHEN 

Telephone 2-5543 332 Alvarado Street 

MONTEREY (ALIFORNIA 



WALNUT GROVE 



BRING TIIL I AMILI 

FUJI CAFE 

COLD BEER AND WINE 
On Fimt Street 



CALIFORNIA 



OLD ELK GROVE 



ROUTE I. BOX 540 



ELK GROSE 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



BAKER S SERVICE AND CIROCERY 

Glen Hakrr. Owner 

MEATS - VEGETABLES - BEER A SOFT DRINKS 

TIDE WATER PRODUCTS 

P. O. Boa: Route 1. Bo« 341 Phone 2788 

LATON CALIIORNIA 

P O Peliy. Ownrr P. O. Box JO 

Riverside Grocery and Service Station 

CABINS AND TRAILER SPACE - GROCERIES. MEATS AND 
VEGETABIXS ■ WII.SHIRE PRODUCTS 

I ATON I Al II ORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



S. F. P. D. MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARDS 



Thirty-six members of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment will receive recognition for heroic duty at the 
Annual Policemen's Ball on May 11. 

Twenty-one of the men will receive first grade meritori- 
ous citations, which include a $100 award and allowance 
of up to 40 points on future promotional examinations. 
The remaining fifteen men receiving second grade cita- 
tions, will receive $50 each, and an allowance of up to 
20 points on future promotional examinations. 

Elements of first grade meritorious must indicate the 
officer has shown "outstanding bravery under gunfire or 
attack by deadly weapons with full knowledge of danger 
involved, and ends the criminal activity of the transgressor, 
or risks his life to save others in treacherous water, dan- 
gerous fire, explosion, etc." 

For second grade meritorious an officer must show "out- 
standing bravery in the apprehension of a felon, or suffer 
injury in the attempt, or cause the arrest of a dangerous 
felon through diligent and painstaking investigation." 

First grade meritorious awards will be given as follows : 

Assistant Inspectors Milton O'Brien and Max Girard, 
Patrolmen Eugene Messerschmidt, Milton Hansen, Ken- 
neth Barton, Charles Wilson, Emmett Kelly, and John 
Johnson— for service at the scene of a robbery, 901 How- 
ard Street, October 20, 1949. Ex-convicts Frank Leonard, 
Leo Boster, and Tom Walsh were interrupted in the act 
of the crime. In the gun battle that followed, Leonard 
was killed, Officers Messerschmidt and Hansen were 
wounded, and Boster was wounded. Both Walsh and 
Boster were sentenced to terms that will mean life in 
Folsom Prison. 

Officers Arthur Litt and Leo Osuna: An armed robber, 
moments after having held up the Cecil Hotel November 
16, 1949, fired two shots at Litt and Osuna at point blank 
range. Because area was crowded with pedestrians the 
officers held their fire, forcibly subduing the bandit, Frank 
Waldron. 

Officers Fred E. Fegan and John McSweeney: Shortly 
after a hotel robbery, the officers stopped Dwaine W. Les- 
sen of Pontiac, Michigan, for questioning. Lassen fired 
one shot at them at close range and fled into parking lot. 
In the gun battle that followed Lassen was killed. This 
crime took place January 30, 1950. Officer McSweeney 
is now serving with the United States Army, on leave 
from the SFPD. His former partner. Officer Fegan, is 
still with the Accident Prevention Bureau. 

Officers Arvo W. Kannisto and William E. Taylor: 
Tune 16, 1950, the officers had to swim 150 feet into the 
bay to rescue a woman and bring her back to safety. 

Officer Francis J. Miles: Following an accident on 
April 22, 1950, the automobile in which Professor Dmitry 
Grigorieff, lecturer on Slavic languages at the University 
of California, and Miss Marina Kozloff were riding burst 
into flames. Both persons, trapped in the flames, were res- 
cued by Officer Miles. 

Officers Frank D. Hanrahan, Eugene S. Caldwell, and 



George J. Engler : In the dark of early morning, May 9, 
1950, these officers swam 75 feet out into the bay to rescue 
a man. The officers, as well as the rescued man, required 
hospital treatment. Officer Engler is now a member of the 
U. S. Army. 

Sergeant Patrick Conroy and Officer George Langley: 
Accompanying two deputy sheriffs sent to a residence to 
repossess an item of furniture, the officers subdued a man 
who fired on them. 

Officer Carl Christiansen: As he was arresting two bur- 
glary suspects on July 30, 1950, Christiansen was attacked 
by one of the suspects with a tire iron. To protect himself 
Christiansen was forced to shoot and kill the suspect. 

Second grade meritorious awards will be given as fol- 
lows: 

Officer John F. Long: November 17, 1949. Oflicer 
Long was forced to disarm a suspect who moments before 
had held up a beauty parlor. 

Officer (now Sergeant) Barnaby O'Leary: Surprised 
in the commission of a burglary on November 25, 1949, a 
suspect who attempted to draw an automatic pistol on the 
officers. He was subdued and disarmed by the alert officer. 

OflScers John Keating and Frank Van Devort: For 
services rendered December 31, 1949, in the arrest of 
three suspects on charges of armed robbery and assault 
with intent to commit murder. 

Officers William "Trigger" Tregoning and James 
Solden: For services rendered July 30, 1950, in the arrest 
of two suspects for suspicion of burglary. Tregoning is 
now in the U. S. Army. 

Sergeant William J. Grant and OflBcers Daniel How- 
ard and Frank J. Kennedy: To effect the arrest of two 
armed robbery suspects August 6, 1950, the officers were 
forced to chase and disarm the suspects. 

Officers William E. Betger and Albert E. Birdsall, Jr.: 
For services rendered April 23, 1950, in the arrest of a 
suspect who had held up five San Francisco taxicab driv- 
ers. To make the arrest the officers had to disarm the 
suspect. 

Officers Arthur H. Litt and George T. Bremner: For 
their arrest on May 13, 1950, of a suspect who had held 
up a number of taxicab drivers. 

Officers Ted Lusher and Gordon D. McNair : Their 
investigative work was responsible for the arrest of a gang 
of burglars who had committed approximately 50 bur- 
glaries in scattered areas of the city. Their efforts cul- 
minated in their arrests on September 8, 1950. 



A. B. C. DOLL HOSPITAL 

Alice B. Copeland 

HOME OF THE A. B.C. MARIONETTES 
Closed Mondays 

Ave. HI. 9-3914 



620 W. El C 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Atril. 1951 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 



Page 25 



By J. Ross DUWIGAN 



The San Francisco Matches 

The day dawned brijjht, dear and beautiful. 1 he day 
was Sunday, March 18th, 1951, and the place was the S.F. 
Police Pistol Range for its regular monthly civilian pistol 
competition. Some 114 gents — and ladies — were on hand 
to keep the thing going and pay for the rare concessions of 
punching little holes in a target. And speaking of the 
ladies — God Bless 'em all — we might inform you that the 
little lady from Woodland again took the top aggregate 
award from all those big, strong and brave men. Need we 
tell you the ladies name? Well, if you insist we give you 
the initials and see if you can figure it out G(loria) N 
(orton). But the boys from S. F. had an alibi, as weak as 
it was it was an alibi. The night before was St. Patrick's 
Day and the S. F. Police Revolver Club threw a big wing- 
' ding for the members with food, entertainment and coca- 
cola so the gang was a bit low on Sunday. Anyhow, that's 
I their alibi, and to throw in an old cliche, they arc stuck 
I with it. But they ain't foolin' nobody — you got to hand it 
I to Gloria — she can shoot that cap pistol along with the best 
I of them. There are something like twelve world's records 
i for women in existence and, if we remember rightly, she 
1 holds eleven of them. Don Q. Jackson (we never did find 
I out what the "Q" stands for) was the official referee for 
the day but Don didn't have much to do and only gathered 
in about a dollar in complaints. Hut considering that Don 
is a rifle shooter he didn't do too badly. 

• • • 

A couple of more practical jokers do not live than Harry 
Plummer and Klwood Johnson of Marin County. Tired 
of having all their brass swiped during the .45 matches 
these two pranksters sat up for two nights polishing the 
steel issue .45 shell cases until they glistened and gleamed 
like a locomotive headlight and resembled those choice 
nickle ca.ses they boys like. Nonchalantly letting the shells 
fall where they may, they walked out of the shooting area 
leaving the scintillating tid-bits resting where they fell. 
Then the mad rush began and the boys had a good lafF and 
at the same time thinking how some guys were gonna have 
a ruff time reloading the "nickle" shells. 
1 . . « 

The Oakland influence permeates even into the range at 
jSan Francisco. 

.As you probably know, in Oakland, you shoot your ten 
shots slow fire all at the same time and not in five shot 
strings as they do in S. F. It's a bad habit to forget 
whether you are shooting in S. F. or Oakland. Dwight 
Wood was one who forgot Sunday and shot his ten shots 
in the five shot time with the result he got the bounce for 
the remainder of the match. \Ve suggest a sign on the back 
top to the effect that the gang is now in San Francisco and 
'Slot across the bay. 

• • • 

And who showed up Sunday? Corny Herb from Sacra- 



mento, after an absence of two years — two years of not 
hearing Corny spout about his pet peeve of classifications 
and its pitfalls. Corny (his real name is Cornelius) wants 
to shoot at the regional matches in Bakersfield and has to 
be reclassified after so long a lay-off so joined the merry 
crowd and was reclassified so he can go to the regionals. 
Corny is also a director in the United States Revolver As- 
sociation and we hope he is on the Classifications Com- 
"I'ttt-e- . , . 

Ed Booth is a bright chap but he refused to take our 
advice about shooting the hand gun. He knows better 
now and is looking up all our friendly advice ( ?) and 
guidance ( ?) to help him over the hard road that lies 
ahead. \Vithout our council many have gone down to 
despair and destruction while those who have failed to 
read our efforts herein printed from time to time are better 
off. Anyhow Ed had five lO's in the first string and of the 
slow fire. 38 National Match and against our advice peek- 
ed thru his 'scope. That did it! Scopeitis set in and the 
ne,\t two shots were in the magic 5 circle and then he fell 
completely apart. Our article on 'scopes states they are 
nice to look "at" but not "through" during a match. 

• * « 

George Plummer (not to be confused with Joker Plum- 
mer of Marin County — no brothers and no relation) is 
rapidly developing into a first rate pistoleer. He is rapidly 
acquiring all the habits of good shooters and adding a 
score of knowledge to his collection of "do's" and "don'ts." 
After reading Georgie boy's sad tale we dare and defy you 
to laugh at him and his plight. To make a short story 
short little Georgie Porgie placed five shots on his neigh- 
bor's target and thus earned the neighbors undying bless- 
ings. Dare ye to laugh ? 

• • • 

But the choice morsel of the day as on the Sacramento 
ace pistol shot, Les Narvaez, who has been shooting since 
Father Time was a boy. Les knows all the answers and a 
few of the big questions of pistoleering. but Sunday he be- 
came a member of the Siesta Club for the first time in his 
career. That, to us, was the prize member and if you know 
Les you know how his prestige has dropped in his home 
town and the mlt;ht\ blow to his pride. 







SCORES 






.22 


Xtitiorui/ Match 




Master . . 




(iloria Norton . 


. 288 


Expert . . . 




Frank Carrick . . . 


. 280 


Sharpshooter . 




Tom Elton . . . . 


. 279 


Marksman 1st 




Lewis Erbes 


. 274 


Marksman 2n(l 




Charley Hundoble 


. 2.?2 




JS 


Xnliontil A [fitch 




Master . . 




Kenneth Kolb . 


. 286 




(Continued on pagr 74) 





Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



///.r/7, 1951 



No. California Graduates From F. B. I. National Academy 



J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, announced today that Lieut. Leslie C. 
Dolan, of the San Francisco, California, Police Depart- 
ment, and Criminal Deputy Sheriff Andrew C. Johansen, 
of the Sonoma Count> Sheriff's OfKce, Santa Rosa, Cali- 



in Washington, D. C, on January 8, 1951. 

The primary purpose of the Academy, which was found- 
ed in 1935, is to give local law enforcement officers 
training as police administrators. 

The graduates of this class will bring the total number 




Lieutenant Leslie C. Dolan 

Of the S. F. P. D., a graduate of the 46th Session of the FBI 

National Academy, fires the Thompson sub-machine gun on the 

FBI ranges located at Quantico, Virginia. 

fornia, graduated from the 46th Session of the FBI Na- 
tional Academy. The exercises were held at the Depart- 
mental Auditorium in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Hoover stated that the graduates were addressed 
by the Honorable Everett M. Dirksen, Senator from Illi- 
nois, and the Honorable Jennings Randolph, Assistant to 
the President of Capital Airlines. 

Director Hoover also pointed out that the 46th Session 
was composed of fifty-nine officers from thirty states, the 
District of Cohmibia and Puerto Rico. Two of the gradu- 
ates were from the United States Marine Corps. 

Mr. Harry M. Kimball, Special Agent in Charge of the 
San Francisco Division of the FBI, stated that Lieut. 
Dolan and Deputy Johansen began a twelve-week study 

Telephone Hlgate 4-4415 

DR. ROBERT F. THAYER 

EXODONTIA AND ORAL SURGERY 

. 301 CALIFORNIA BUILDING - 1736 FRANKLIN STREET 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

SKIPPY'S PLACE 



Fourteenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MILLS AND ANDERSON 

GAS APPLIANCE SERVICE 

INSTALLATION • REPAIR 

233 Seventh Street TWinoaks 3-6120 



CALIFORNIA 



TWinoaks 3-3434 D. R. Mclvor. Partner 

SENTINEL CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Manufacturers . . . INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS 

Distributors . . . SANITATION AND MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES 

1790 ELEVENTH STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIF. 



Andrew C. Johansen 
Criminal Deputy Sheriff of Sonoma County Sheriff's Office, Santa 
Rosa, a graduate of the 46th Session of the FBI National Acad- 
emy, watches an examiner in the FBI Laboratory type blood 
stains on clothing. 

of graduates to 2,311. Officers attending the Academy 
received their training at FBI Headquarters in ^Vashing- 
ton, D. C., and at the FBI Academy located at Quantico, 
Virginia. 

Training in Washington included classroom work cov- 
ering various subjects such as police administration and 
organization, traffic control, scientific crime detection, ju- 
venile delinquency, fingerprinting and laboratory aids. At 
Quantico the graduates took part in work which was on a 
practical level such as crime scene searches, photography, 
raid planning and investigation of hit-and-run cases. 

The faculty of the Academy is composed of Special 
Agents of the FBI and prominent men in the various spe- 
cialized fields related to law enforcement. 

Phone Hlgate 4-7757 F. Anton, Sr.. Prop. 

OAKLAND UMBRELLA FACTORY 

Our Umbrellas Guaranteed and Kept in Repair 2 Years Free of Charge 
HANDLES & CANES • REPAIRING & RECOVERING 

1611 SAN PABLO AVE. OAKLAND, CALIF. 

A & L PATTERN WORKS 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 
845 Carleton Avenue Telephone AShberry 3-6226 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

THREE LITTLE PIGS 

J. Gonsalves 

ENCHILADAS - BEER & WINE 

3860 East 14th Street KEIlog 3-2143 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Stan Stout 
MODERN ALLEN EQUIPMENT 

TOM'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

VALVES GROUND • A-1 BRAKE WORK 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

800 MacArthur Blvd. LO 8-9574 



SAN LEANDRO 



CALIFORNIA 



April. IQ5I 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



"Dependable Electrical Contractors Since 1923" 

HILL ELECTRIC CO. 

HOT POINT APPLIANCES 

COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL 

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS 

KREE ESTIMATES 



616 Eleanor Avei 
NORTH SACRAMKNTO 



Telephone Hickory 9-0S46 

CALIFORNIA 



PIONEER CLUB AND CAFE 

G. H. (Fred) Beierle 



NEW — TRAILERS— USED 
. WEST CRAFT • WESTWOOD 

CONSOLIDATED SALES CO. 

Auburn Blvd. near Watt Ave. 
Phone Hickory 9-1468 Rt. 7, Box 1237 

NOR 111 SAtRAMKNTO CALIFORNIA 

For TILE WORK 

JOE DANKO RAICH 

TILE CONTRACTOR 



Phone HI 9-9984 1400 E. EI Camino 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



FINEST IN FOODS 



MIXED DRINKS 



11-99 CLUB 



DINING AND DANCING 
PARTIES AND BANQUETS OUR SPECIALTY 

Residence Telephone: 9-1031 

For Reservations Dial 9-0948 

AUBURN BOLLt\ ARD I I MILES FROM SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-861 I 

Auburn Blvd. Route 7, Box 1284 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORN'A 

You Are Always Welcome at 

FREEWAY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

TUNE-UP • BRAKE SERVICE 
Open Saturday • We Give Cash Checks 

HI 9-9412 Marconi & Howe Avcs. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO tAM'" 



STANLEY HOME PRODUCTS 

CALL FOR INFORMATION HOW TO OBTAIN FREE GIFTS 

Hrl.n Gerwick. Unil Manager 



1712 Orange Street 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



Dial HI 9-9457 



CALIFORNIA 



A. M. TWIGG 

PAINTING • PAPERING 
DECORATING 



1120 El Monte Av 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone 9-3249 



SIEFER & MILLER 



AUTO MACHINISTS 



Phone HI 9-0191 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



I 10 Linden Av 



CALIFORNIA 



CONWAY TRUCKING CO. 



LOCAL AND DISTANCE HAULING 



I ALIFORNIA 



Phone HI 9-9588 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



261 Birch Ave 



CALIFORNIA 



ACME MUSIC CO. 



COIN OPERATED PHONOGRAPHS 



2554 North 13th Street 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CLE PRO-JANSER JANITORIAL CO. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

NO JOB TOO LARGE OR TOO SMALL 

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL 

CLEANING AND WAXING 

GUARANTEED SERVICE 



CALIFORNIA 



2927 20th Street 



ALIFORNIA 



F. E. ERICKSON & CO. 



SCHEFFLER'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

"Scientific Motor Tune-Up" 
COMPLETE AUTO REPAIRS 



(.1 NIHAI OFPK.IS 

204 - 6th Street 



IVanhoe 9-5441 



Fair Oaks Blvd. 
NORTH CARMICHAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



KITCHENETTES 



AIR CONDITIONED 



GEM AUTO COURT 

Dewry and Marie Gunlher. Proprietors 

Phone Hickory 9-9975 

99E and 40 Business Routes 

Auburn Blvd., 1 Mile North o( NORTH SACRAMENTO 

SHEPLER AUTO REPAIR 

Harold E. Shepler 

AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALIST 

112 South 8lh Street Dial HI 9-6536 

III .SA(RAMFNIO CALIFORNIA 



ETHAN BROWNING 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 

Phons HI 9-7061 - HI 9-1744 
I04S Sonoma Avenue 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



B. R. BURGESS AND SON 

SHEET METAL WORK AIR CONDITIONING - HEATING 



Telephone HI 9-0573 

NORTH .SA( MAMI.NK) 



10-112 North Sixth Street 

t ALIFORNIA 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jf>ril. 1951 



CAPTAIN OGLE, SACRAMENTO SHERIFF'S 
OFFICE, KILLED IN AUTO ACCIDENT 

Sheriff's Captain Charles Ogle, one of the best known 
and most respected Sacramento area peace officers, was 
killed in a traffic accident. 

He was hurt in a collision between his patrol car and a 




Sheriff Captain Chari.es 0<;i,e 

taxicab March 12th on the outskirts of Sacramento and 
died a few hours later without regaining consciousness. 

The tragic mishap removed from the Sacramento police 
scene a man who had earned a widespread reputation in 
Northern California as a brilliant investigator during a 
28 year career as a deputy sheriff. 

Ogle started with the sheriff's office as a young man- — 
he was only 50 when he died — and soon established a repu- 
tation as a hard working, intelligent detective. 

During his long career he handled many of the most 
sensational crimes committed in the rural areas of Sacra- 
mento County, and a large number of criminals who other- 
wise might have gone free still are behind prison bars be- 
cause of his capable and untiring work. Murder cases 
were his specialty and he solved some of the most famous 
ones in Sacramento County's history. 

Ten years ago Sheriff Don Cox recognized his outstand- 
ing ability and made him a captain. Afterwards Ogle was 
in charge of the sheriff's office on the 4 p. m. to midnight 
shift. 

He is survived by his widow, Clarice, and a stepson. 

Telephone 3593 Residence Telephone 5063 

MONTEREY COUNTY TRUST 

AND SAVINGS BANK 

Eight Offices to Serve You in The County 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



USED CARS 



HOWARD M. McAULAY 

GENERAL INSURANCE 



680 Del Monte Avenue 



P. O. Box 891 



DO DROP INN 



MIXED DRINKS - BEER 

WINES - LIQUORS 

Best Brands and Finest Flavor 



MONTEREY 



ROTEX PUNCH CO. 

Earl O. A. Pearson, Owner 

Manufacturers of 
ROTEX PUNCHES 



4726 East 12th Street 



1-4300 

CALIFORNIA 



PERKINS SERVICE STATION 



AND TAVERN 



AND MEALS SERVED 



CALIFORNIA 



FREEPORT MARKET UNITED 
GROCERS 

GROCERIES - MEAT - WINES - BEER - ICE CREAM 



FREE PORT 



CALIFORNIA 



SPANISH VILLA MOTEL 

DELUXE CABINS 
MODERN KITCHENETTES • COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

Rte. 7, Box 1228 Phone 9-7273 

Hwys. 40 and 99-E, 6 Miles North of 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CHARLEY & KAYS 

BEER • SNACKS AND LUNCH 



Phone HI 9-3413 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



1089 Auburn Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



UNION TRANSPORTATION CO., Inc. 

CONTRACT CARRIER 



325 North 16th Street 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone GI 3-1761 



CALIFORNIA 



FORMOSA CAF'E 



2424 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-8532 

CALIFORNIA 



VISINTAINERS BUSHERS CLUB 



3040 Auburn Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9948 



CALIFORNIA 



FRED E. BARNETT CO. 

LOGGING AND MILL SUPPLIES 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



1121 E. Bassett Av 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-0265 

CALIFORNIA 



.ipril. 1951 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 29 



DANDY MARKET TONY'S CLUB 

J.ck - Ivan - Norm Johnny Btierle, Prop. 

GROCERIES • MEATS • LIQUORS COCKTAILS • DINNERS • CARD GAMES 

Auburn Blvd. at Fulton Ave. Phone HI. 9-9993 2113 Del Paao Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA NORTH S.ACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

FREEWAY MARKET ALICE'S BEAUTY SALON 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 



OPEN EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT 



and Howe Phone HI 9-8780 



Phone HI 9-3143 2126 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALlFORv ■ - ^.QR-p^ SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

MAIN LINE TRAILER PARK Acme Pipe and Supply Company 

J. S. Steinberg 

TRAILER SPACE • MODERATE RATES 

RENTALS AVAILABLE PIPE AND MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS 

Phone HI 9-9812 Route 7. Box 1104C lOSl East El Camino Ave. Phone HI 9-3076 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

VILLA GRANDE TRAILER PARK J^^ ^^fll?^..^:^"'"^"' 

TRAILER COURT AND APARTMENTS 

Phone HI 9-1907 Route 6. Box 3I8S 

Auburn Blvd. at Manzanita 3264 Mirysvllle Road Hickory 9-0817 

NORTH SACRAMENTO ( ^' "^O'! v A NORTH SACRAMFNTO CALIFORNIA 



BUNGALOW CLUB 

Now Available for 
PRIVATE BANQUETS - PARTIES - GATHERINGS 



MODEL OIL CO. 



1340 Del Paso Blvd. 



Auburn Blvd. Phone HI 9-9861 

NORTH SACRAMENTO < ALIFO • NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



ERICKSON CONSTRUCTION CO. Hasbrouck Texaco Service Station 

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION MARFAK LUBRICATION 

TIRES - ACCESSORIES 



Telephone HI 9-2792 1119 E. Bassetllaw Ave. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



ISOO Del Paso Blvd. Phone HI 9-9902 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SIERRA SERVICE STATION BEN ALI CABINET SHOP 

SHELL PRODUCTS 

Specializing in 
AUBURN BLVD.. 3 MILES EAST OF WILLS POINT CUSTOM BUILT CABINETS 

Phone 9-5937 Rt. 6. Box 3178 Phone Hickory 9-8880 3019 Ben Ali Ave. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO ( AllFORNlA 



NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Pboiu HI 9-3839 AT THE Y MOTEL 

GUSSIE'S Beauty Shop NATIONAL STEEL AND 

SPECIAUZINC IN PERMANENTS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

HOURS 9 to S :: Open Eves, by Appointment J. F. McGEOUGH. Manager 

Aub'im Blvd. and Fulton Ave. 2980 Auburn Blvd. Phone HI 9-3539 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA NORTH SACRAMENTO CAl IFORN- \ 



■ Years- Experience Ray McDanlel 

McDANIEL AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

COMPLETE UP-TO-DATE EQUIPMENT lANDClJ'ARINr • CRADINr 

BRAKE SERVICE - MOTOR TUNE-UP CYLINDER REBORING ^^^° CLEARING GRADING 



T. R. EARNER 

TRACTOR WORK • LAND IXVELING 



Marysville Rd. A Grand Ave. Phone HI 9-S4I9 



2237 Fulton Avenue IVanhoe 0-0993 



NORTH SACRAMENTO l AllFORNlA NORIH .SACRAMLNlO lAlUdKNIA 



Pt7ge 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



ASSOCIATED PUBLIC 
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICERS 

Robert Mason, President 
John Atkinson, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular monthly meeting of the Associated Public 
Communications Officers, Inc., was held at the Santa 
Clara County Communications Department in San Jose 
on March 8th. Our host being Mr. Robert Mason. 

The meeting was called to order at 1 1 :30 a. m. by the 
president, Robert Mason, with forty members and guests 
in attendance. 

The minutes of the January and February meetings 
were read and approved. 

The following committees were then appointed by the 
president : 

Frequency and Engineering: Brower McMurphy, chair- 
man. 

Civilian Defense Coordinating: Robert Mason, chair- 
man ; George Burton and Tom Bailey. 

Procedure and Operating: Jim Lewis, chairman, George 
Maki and George Burton. 

QPO: Ray Myers, Chairman ; Art McDole. 
A treasurer's report by Charles Simpson showed a bal- 
ance of $289.42. 

Chairman McMurphy next presented the Frequency 
and Engineering Committee report. The following re- 
quests for clearances were presented : 

City of Emeryville — 155.67 Mcs — base only. 
City of Concord — 155.37 Mcs — base and mobile; 
155.01 Mcs— mobile. 

City of Fortuna — 1610 Kcs — base and mobile; 39.78 
Mcs — mobile. 

On a motion by Lewis, seconded by Kellogg, the above 
requests were approved. 

On a motion by Myers, seconded by Hudson, Chairman 
McMurphy was granted authority to approve point-to- 
point frequency requests without membership approval. 

President Mason then called upon Ray Myers for his 
reports. Ray stated that FCC Part 20, Disaster Com- 
munication Service, was now in effect. He also reported 
on "DO - 97" which has been issued by NPA for which 
we are eligible. A general dsicussion then followed. 
The meeting was then adjourned for lunch. 
During lunch, commercial member reports from the 
following were given : 

Ralph Celestre, Electric Supply; Clyde Davenport, 
Morse Company, Bob Kranhold, Motorola ; Lloyd French, 
Link Radio; and Rox Penlon, Aerial Engineering. 

After lunch the meeting was again called to order and 
the first draft of the code revision was read. A lengthy 
discussion followed and President Mason instructed the 
members to be prepared to act at the May meeting. 

George Maki next stated that the selective calling for 
the point-to-point will be the next project he will work on. 
A discussion on the joint meting then followed. 



As there was no further business, the meeting was ad- 
journed. 



The annual joint meeting of the Associated Public 
Communications' Officers, Inc., and the California Police 
Radio Association, Inc., was held in the Hotel Stockton 
on March 30th and 3Ist. Our hosts being Bill Kellogg 
and Al Gilbeau of Stockton. 

The meeting as called to order at 2 p. m. on March 30th 
by National Vice-President Ray Myers with 60 members 
and guests in attendance. 

President Myers then welcomed both groups and then 
introduced William Duham, National Secretary Art 
Sowle, National Past President. Ray next introduced 
CPRA President Bill McKinley who in turn welcomed 
the members and introduced his officers. Ra\' then intro- 
duced APCO President Bob Mason and turned the meet- 
ing over to him. 

President Mason then called for rising introductions 
of all present. Bob next introduced Tom Kelly and his 
assistant Mr. Crabtree of the Communications Division of 
the State CD Office. Mr. Kelly then spoke on the work 
and the plans of his office. The meeting was then opened 
for questions from the floor. 

The meeting was recessed at 2:50 p. m. for thirty min- 
utes so that pictures of all members could be taken. 

The meeting was again called to order and a general 
discussion on amateur radio in Civilian Defense followed. 
President Mason then introduced our hosts Rill Kellogg 
and Al Gilbeau. 

The minutes of the March APCO meeting were read 
and approved. 

Committee reports were then given by the following : 
Civilian Defense, Bob Mason; Codes, Bill Durham; 
Operating and Procedure, George Maki. 

President McKinley then stated that some means of co- 
ordination between the two California poin-to-point sys- - 
terns was needed. 

On a motion by Myers, seconded by Durham, the reso- • 
lutions committee was instructed to draft a resolution re- 
questing the Communications Advisory Board's assistance 
in obtaining a connecting link between the Northern and 
Sovithern California point-to-point systems. 

The Resolution Committee was then appointed, con- 
sisting of the following: Bill Durham, Hersh Calvert. Ray I 
Myers and Jim Lewis. They were instructed to prepare; 
resolutions from the following motions for Saturday's 
meeting. 

Motion by A\niiting, seconded by Bailev. Reqiiesting 
the Director of Finance to supply copies of all reports and ' 
surveys made by the Division of Communications be sent' 



.^fril. I'hl 



POLICE AND PFACi: OI riCFRS JOURNAL 



Pitge 31 



to iiK-mbcrs ot the CPRA and APCO. 

.Motion by Whitcman, sccoiulcd by Durham, rcqiirst- 
ing that the Division of Coninuiiiications notify the local 
municipalities of any changes of State Communications 
Equipment that will affect that local agency. 

Motion by AIcDole, seconded by Fox, that a resolution 
be drawn requesting the forming of a State Communica- 
tions Department to have complete control of all state- 
owned communications equipment. 'I'his resolution to be 
sent to those parties selected by the resolutions committee 
with the advice of the membership. 

Motion by McKinley, seconded by Crowder, requesting 
National APCO attempt to obtain FCC action reiiuiring 
the keying or other method of iticntilication of diarherin\ 
and other unlicensed devices. 

The above motions were the result of a \er\ lengthy 
discussion by the membership on the inadequacy of admini- 
strative, technical, and operational control and methods of 
the state-owned radio systems. 

On a motion by Durham, secomieii by .McDole. the 
meeting was adjourned until Saturday morning. 

A very nice dinner and excellent entertainment followed 
in the evening. 

Saturday, March M. 1951 

The meeting was called to order at l():(l() a. m. by 
CPRA President Bill McKinley. 

Frequency Committee reports were rlicn called tDi. Fre- 
quency Chairman C. H. Mc.Murphy and Fred Crowder 
gave a report on the lack of frequencies in both areas. 

A frequency request for the City of Paso Robles for base 
station operation on 155.73 mcs for coordination with 
Monterey County was approved on a motion by Keller, 
seconded by Uailey, after recommendation of both fre- 
quency committees. A request by Siskiyou County was 
referred to the frequency committee for further action on 
a motion by Landers, seconded by Myers. A request from 
the City of Vernon was approved on 45.58 mcs, only if 
they can not use their present fire channel, on a motion by 
Bailey, seconded by Fox, after frequency' committee rec- 
ommendation. 

President McKinley then showed the Articles of Incor- 
poration for CPRA. 

Membership applications for APCO from Frank Mogan 
and Kverett LeGette were read and approved by the Hoard 
of Directors on a motion by .Maki, seconded by McDole. 

President .McKinley then called for new business. 

On a motion by I-eHouef, seconded by Maki, Ray 

■ Myers was instructed to employ a public stenographer to 

■ write up the resolutions and the cost would be divided bv 
APCO and CPRA. 

Ray Myers then read the following resolutions. 

No. I. Identification of Diathermy. Approved on a 
I motion by Maki, seconded by Bailey. 

No. 2. Furm'shing of Reports and Surveys by State 
Division of Communications. Approved on a motion by 
Durham, seconded by Bailey. 

No. 3. Notification upr)n changes of St.ite Radio Fipiip- 
inent. Approved on a motion b\ Bailey, seconded b\ Kcl- 
■"Eg- 



CROSSROADS DRIVE-IN 

TRY OUR HOMEMADE PIES" 

3171 Mnry.villc Road 
NORTH SACKAME.NTO CALIFORNIA 

GAYLORD GROCERY 

MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES - GROCERIES 

3049 Rio Linda Blvd. Phoni- HI 9-989S 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CAI.II ORNIA 



TIMMY'S INN 

Howard and Tim, Owners 
GOOD FOOD • BEER • WINE 

20S E. El Camino Ave HI 9-9892 

NORTH SACRAMl.NTO CALIFORNIA 



BEN ALI GARAGE 

SCOTT and SUTTON 

HEAVY DUTY TRUCK, TRACTOR AND AUTO REPAIR 

TRAILERS MADE TO ORDER 

Phone HI. 9-0778 1958 Auburn Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BYBEE REFRIGERATION 

SALES AND SERVICE 

1314 Del Paso Blvd. HI 9-380S 

NORTH SACRAMENTO tALIFORMA 

B & M AUTO SPECIALISTS 

BRAKES • WHEEL ALIGNING • BALANCING • ELECTRICAL 
CARBURETION • BODY .nnd FENDER • PAINTING 

1416 Del Paso Blvd. Dial HI 9-7S8I 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

AL'S TAXI 

SERVING THE NORTH AREA 

24-HOUR SERVICE 

Phones: HI 9-3375 - HI 9-6231 

2019 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH .SACRAMKNIO CALIFORNI A 

H. J. (Bob) The.n Re. HI I)-6959 

NORTH SACRAMENTO MOIORS 

FormeHy BOB'S USED CARS 

GOOD USED CARS 

1410 Del Paso Blvd. Officr HI 9-8610 

NORTH SACRAMENTO cAl.lluKNIA 

No. 4. Point-to- I'oint Link. Approved on a motion by 
Burton, seconded by Piatt. 

No. 5. Creation of Depamncnt ot C'cinimuni. ;itiims 



P^ge 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



Approved on a motion by Piatt, seconded by Kellogg. 

On a motion by Fox, seconded by Lewis, the Secretary 
was instructed to request the assistance of the State Divi- 
sion of Communications in making a survey on diathermy 
of the State Division of Commimications in making a sur- 
vey on diathermy and other radiation devices which cause 
interference to Public Safety Radio Systems. 

A discussion on the present operation of the State T ele- 
type System then followed. 

On a motion by Moore, seconded by Freeman, the Reso- 
lutions Committee and Pat Amerine were given a vote of 
thanks by the membership for their good work on the 
resolutions. 

The meeting was then adjourned for lunch and a dem- 
onstration of the Link "FTB Air Raid Warning System." 

The meeting was again called to order at 1 :45 p. m. 
by President McKinley. 

Bill Durham then reported on the APCO Directory. 
He stated it will be 288 pages and should be ready around 
May 1st. Bill also stated that the paid-up membership of 
CPRA is 87, and APCO is 84. He also requested the 
names of any prospective members. 

President McKinley stated he felt we should try to 
separate our joint meetings farther apart from the IMSA 
meetings. 

George Maki then requested that the National APCO 
Convention be requested to reopen their previous discus- 
sion on the use of 30 to 50 mc mobile relays. The above 
request was carried on a motion by Calvert, seconded by 
Crowder. 

On a motion by Crowder, seconded by Burton a Fre- 
quency Coordinating Council was established for proper 
Frequency Coordination between Public Safety and Pub- 
lic Utility Agencies. The following were appointed: 

CPRA: Fred Crowder, Hersh Calvert and Bud White- 
man. 

APCO: Brower McMurphy, George Burton and Bob 
Miller. 

On a motion by Whiting, seconded by Calvert, the Sec- 
retary was instructed to request the Division of Commu- 
nications assign an Engineer to make a survey for the addi- 
tional use or expansion of Frequencies in the 152. - 162. 
mc band. 

On a motion by Myers, seconded by Burton, the Secre- 
tary was instructed to request the Director of Finance to 
assure the attendance of George Maki at our National 
APCO Convention in Miami. 

On a motion by McMurphy, seconded by Kellogg, a 
resolution was instructed to be drawn requesting the sec- 
retary of the Communications Advisory Board mail out 
copies of the proposed agenda of all Communications 
Board meetings to all interested parties. 

President McKinley then called for Commercial Mem- 
bers reports from the following: 

Sam Coombs, RCA; John Clark, Motorola; Bill Ham- 
ilton, Avia Co. ; Clyde Davenport, Morse Co. ; and Lloyd 
French, Link Radio. 

The meeting was then adjourned out of respect for the 
memory of the late Leo Reese of Lakeport. 



Phone Hickory 9-8784 

Bob and Hawley Service 

SIGNAL PRODUCTS 

GAS - OIL - SPECIALIZED LUBRICATION 

1000 Del Paso Boulevard 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Phone Hickory 9-2703 

Clare Lumber Co. 

Building Materials 

DOORS - WINDOWS - ROOFING 
CEMENT 

Mill at Glendale, Oregon 

320 East El Camino Avenue 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Phone 6-6451 

SPURGEON'S 

Cleaners and Furriers 

SACRAMENTO'S LEADING QUALITY 
CLEANER FOR 27 YEARS 

CASH AND CARRY at 
1601 "O" Street :-: 1007 Eighth Street 

. . . Plant . . . 
3200 FOLSOM BLVD. - SACRAMENTO 

1439 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



LUX MARKET 



GROCERIES - MEATS 
VEGETABLES 



1198 El Camino Avenue 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Aprtl. 1V:)1 



PULlCb ANU l^hACb UllICl.Kb JUURNAL 



Page 33 



BRIDGEVIEW MARKET 

MEATS ■ GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - FRUITS - LIQUORS 
nr 2-9262 330 Third Str 



BRODERICK 



CALIFORNIA 



GEO. BEALE STORES 



BRODERICK 



CALIFORNIA 



WESTGATE AUTO AND TRAILER COURT 

Cross Tower Bridge — Follow Signs 

A Sanitary Auto Court with 75 Modem Apartments 

and Cottages - 100 Modern Trailer Spaces 

C. D. Byrom. Owner - Telephone Gilbert 3-9323 

Route I. B.,x 1015 WEST SACRAMENTO. CALIF. 

Telephone 21 -J MRS. E. BARRIS. Prop. 

HOTEL DU BARRY 



A NICE PLACE TO STAY 



229 ATLANTIC STREET 



ROSEVILLE. CALIFORNIA 



BROVER MORTUARY 

AMBULANCE AND FUNERAL SERVICE 
103 Lincoln Way Telephone 236 



CALIFORNIA 



( IRCLE "K' DRIVE IN 



2107 Fultc 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



The Home of the 
BRANDBURGER 

Avenue Dial IV 9-1104 



CALIFORNIA 



THE WHEEL SHOP 

COMPLETE LINE OF BIKES , TRIKES AND WHEEL GOODS 

GARDEN SUPPLIES - PARTS - SERVICE - REPAIRS 

650 Fulton Ave. IV 9-0307 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STEVE O NEILS SOIL SERVICE 

WEED-FREE STEER. SHEEP. CHICK MANURES 

CALPEAT FOR GARDENS AND LAWNS 

Fulton at El Camino Ave. IVanhoe 9-4226 

NORTH SACRAMFNIO CALIFORNIA 

RAINBOW CLEANERS 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL CLEANING 
3416 Rio Linda Blvd. 



Tel. HI 9-2473 
NORTH SAC RAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



HAGGIN CAFE 

ADAM AND KEN INVITE YOU! 



3401 Rio Linda Blvd. 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



JOS CAFE 



Hour 

GENERAL DELI\ ER-i 



2:00 A.M. 

GOSHEN, CALIFORNIA 



HARRISON FAIT 



Barney's Auto Service and Supply 

COMPLETE REPAIR & MACHINE SERVICE 

PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

3741 Rio Linda Blvd. Phone HI 9-6108 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

DOUBLE E FURNITURE 

NEW AND USED - WE BUY. SELL OR TRADE 

Between Hagginwood and Jerry's Corner 

3550 Marysville Rd. Hickory 9-9446 

DEL PASO HEICHIS CALIFORNIA 

Grant Union Restaurant and Fountain 

CATERING TO FAMILY DINNERS 

OPEN -TIL 8:00 P.M. 

3721 Marysville Rd. Phone HI 9-9883 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

Mapes Fountain Lunch - Farmers Market No. 1 



3810 Marysville Blvd. 
DEL PASO HEIGH1S 



HI 9-7232 

CALIFORNIA 



FAIR FOODS MARKET NO. 2. CARMICH AEL. CALIFORNIA 

GUSS SERVICE 



3561 Del Paso Blvd. 
DEL PASO HElGins 



Phone HI 9-9941 



CALIFORNIA 



CASH STAMPS Glen and Ethel Hayden 

HAYDEN CLEANERS 

THE "HOME OF FINE CLEANING" 
3707 Marysville Road Phone HI 9-3175 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

SAV - MOR MARKET 

MEATS • Groceries • VEGETABLES 
3560 Del Paso Blvd. Phone HI 9-9970 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

AL AND HAZEL'S WASHETTE 



1441 Arcade Blvd. 



HAGGINWOOD 



CALIFORNIA 



SUBWAY AUTO WRECKERS 

H. Lauszus. Prop. 

PARTS FOR ALL CARS and TRUCKS - TRAILERS BUILT 

795 Del Paso Blvd. Dial 9-0458 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SIEFER AND MILLER 

AUTOMOTIVE MACHINISTS 
hone HI 9-0191 110 Linden Av 



NORTH SACRAMEN10 



c ALIFORNIA 



HAGGINWOOD DRUGS 

Paul Busch 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 

3207 Marysville Blvd. Hickory 9-2834 

NORTH SACRAMENM) C ALIFORNIA 



TRIANGLE CAFE 



1950 Hd» 
NORTH SACKWILM' 



Hickory 9-3924 



C ALIFORNIA 



OXFORD 


SHOE 


REPAIR 


SHOP 


AND 






DRY 


CLEANERS 




NORTH 


Comer Oxiord St 
111 Oxiord Stre< 
SACRAMENTO 


and Del Pas 
t Phone 


} Boulevar 
HI 9-4991 


d 
CALIFORNIA 



PONY EXPRESS CAFE 

BILL LAINE and STELLA HUGHES 
on FoUom BouUvard 



1700 Del Paso Blvd. 
NORTH SAtHAMLNIO 



Phone HI 9-9817 

CALIFORNIA 



Res. Phone HI 9-8670 Phone 9-2487 

ELLEBY & LEWIS 

AUTO LAUNDRY - CAR WASHING - STEAM 

CLEANING - SIMONIZING 

Mohawk Station. 20O East El CamIno 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

P»l» Caljrvaa Daisy Calyvaa 

Colonial Restaurant and Fountain 

BREAKFAST LUNCH - DINNERS 
SHORT ORDERS 



CALIFORNIA 



too E. El Camino Av 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Telephone Dial 0-9992 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1951 



SHERIFF DON COX 

(Continued from page 6) 
George Munizich, Roy Coy and Mel Reese. 

During the last year Sheriff Cox and his staff kept up 
the record for fine performance which has resulted in his 
re-election by wide margins since he first took over as 
sheriff in 1932. Despite the fact that more deputies are 
needed and Sacramento County's rural districts cover a 
great many miles, crime has been kept at a minimum. 

One important change took place which means added 
law enforcement efficiency to the county. The voters 
approved a suggestion by Cox that the seven county con- 
stables be placed directly under his office. This pretty 
much had the effect of adding seven men to the sheriff's 
force. 

A good many examples of fine police work were turned 
in by the sheriff's men last year, and one of the outstand- 
ing involves Deputies Lonnie Eastmade and Monrad 
Monsen. 

Two young thugs being taken to the Preston School of 
Industry in lone by a deputy sheriff from Eureka County 
shot the officer and fled in his car. Twenty minutes later, 
after a wild chase and an exchange of bullets, Eastmade 
and Monsen took them into custody. 

Cox has been in the Sacramento County Sheriff's office 
for 27 years, and has held the top job for 19 years. He 
started in as undersheriff under Sheriff Ellis Jones and 
took over the top spot when Jones retired in 1932. 

Cox is one of, if not the only California sheriff who also 
is a lawyer. He studied law at the McGeorge College of 
Law in Sacramento and took his degree in 1926. Shortly 
afterward he passed the bar examination and was admitted 
to practice. He has never practiced law, but has found the 
legal background invaluable in his work as sheriff. He 
was born in Spencer County, Indiana, and has been in 
California since 1911. He served in the United States 
Navy 1917 until 1921. 

He is second vice president of the State Peace Officers 
Association of California and will start up to the presi- 
dency at the Annual Convention at Yosemite National 
Park this fall. 



Dial HI 9-7411 Res. HI 9-4471 

ROBERT W. YEO 

REALTY SERVICE 
REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE • REALTY LOANS 



3725 Marysville Road 
E. DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



CALIFORNIA 



HI. 9-6789 



CAPITOL PUMP & SUPPLY CO. 

GORDON JET-FLO PUMPS 

Phone HI. 9-1304 Night Phone HI. 9-0968 

3373 Marysville Road 



DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



CALIFORNIA 



MINNEAPOLIS - MOLINE FARM MACHINERY - PARTS 

Manufacturing MACHINERY - EQUIPMENT - REPAIRS 

VANCO RICE EQUIPMENT 

Van Dyke's Machine & Welding Works 



3402 Rio Linda Blvd. 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



Hickory 9-2319 



CALIFORNIA 



W. R. KRIEGER & CO. 

INSULATION - WEATHER STRIPPING 
VENETIAN BLINDS 



Office Phone HI 9-3356 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Way 

CALIFORNIA 



North Sacramento Sewing Center 

SEW AND SAVE 

NEW AND USED SEWING MACHINES 

RENTALS 



1806 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone Hickory 9-5146 

CALIFORNIA 



EL CAMINO ROOMS 

Don C. and Dorothy H. Johnson 

REASONABLE RATES 
AIR-CONDITIONED 



200 West El Ca 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



HI 9-8722 

CALIFORNIA 



OUR PLACE 



BEER - SANDWICHES 
130 North Ninth Street Phone HI 9-1381 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

J. L. McPHEETERS 

Licensed Painting Contractor 

BEST OF MATERIALS 
FINEST OF WORKMANSHIP 



3088 Del Paso Boulevard 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-3379 

CALIFORNIA 



MAY FLOWER CAFE 

AUTHENTIC AMERICAN AND 
REAL CANTON STYLE CHINESE FOODS 
1802 Del Paso Blvd. HI E 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



DYER ELECTRIC 

LICENSED CONTRACTOR 

INDUSTRIAL • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL 

24-Hour Service — Free Estimates 

Telephone Hickory 9-1301 207 W. El Camino Ave 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALI 



KELLEY MOTORS 

GENERAL REPAIRING 
BETTER USED CARS 



Phone Hickory 9-1862 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



217 E. El Camino Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 9-5534 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



ELITE BEAUTY SHOP 

116 North Grove A 



CALIFORNIA 



April. l'?5l 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



CUudr T. Rilfy 

NIGHT HAVX^K TAVERN 

MIXED DRINKS • MERCHAIVTS LUNCH 



A. W. SWEET 



1822 DrI Paso Bo 

NORTH SACRAMtNTO 



t ALII ORMA 



Dial Hickory 9-1497 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



112 West BassFttUw Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone HI 9-396S 



Home HI 9-7162 



HUGH JAMES MOTOR COMPANY 

FIRST CHOICE PLEASURE CARS . . . 

. . . FIRST CHOICE BECAUSE 

THEY'RE FIRST CLASS 



I32S Del Paso Blvd. 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



MASONRY SUPPLY & EQUIPMENT CO. 

EVERYTHING IN MASONRY 
BUILDING MATERIALS 



1320 Del Paso Blvd. 
NORTH SACRAMF.NTO 



Hickory 9-6524 



CALIFORNIA 



ARGONAUT CLUB 



Chris and Johnny 

1438 Del Paso Blvd. HI 9-9869 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



WHITE HOUSE MOTEL 



1201 E. El Camino Ave. 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9957 

CALIFORNIA 



SUPREME CLEANERS 

Lux Theatre Building 

FREE PICKUP AND DELIVERY 

WE GIVE CASH CHECKS 



1192 East El Ca 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



CLARENCE MATHIAS 

MIDWAY AUTO WRECKERS 
USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 



ISth and Auburn Blvd. 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-7222 

I ■\LIFORNIA 



SIWLITE GRILL 



BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
From 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 



1022 Del Paso Blvd. 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



HI 9-9982 

CALIFORNIA 



STEWART'S MOTEL 



Auburn Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phon« HI 9-9922 



CALIFORNIA 



THE PASTRY SHOP 

Across Street from Bank of America 
WEDDING. BIRTHDAY and PARTY CAKES 



Phone HI 9-1787 
NORTH SACRAMtNTO 



2016 Del Paso Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



BERG'S RESTAURANT 

Home Cooked Meals 
BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER 



2014 Del Paso Blvd. 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9952 



CALIFORNIA 



SILVERNAIL AND SON 

GUARANTEED 
ELECTRICAL REFRIGERATOR 

SERVICE 

20 Years Experience - All Makes 

NIGHT SERVICE 

Phon> 9-3982 



I 2716 Del Paso Blvd. 

I NORTH SACRAMENTO 



1819 CLUB 

LARRY AND MARY 
MEET YOUR FRIENDS HERE 



1819 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone Hickory 9-98A2 

CALIFORNIA 



WOODLAKE STYLE SHOP 

IN APPAREL CENTER 
Hoyt Lesher, President 



Talcphona: 9-6283 - 9-2284 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



1517-27 Del Pa 



> Blvd. 

AI.IFORNIA 



BESSIE'S BEAUTY SHOP 

Beauty Shop Phone 9 5597 
PERMANENT WAVES OUR SPECIALTY 



CALIFORNIA 



464 W. EI Camin 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Hickory 9-7390 Home: HUdson 4-7611 

ARCADE RESTAURANT 

SPECIAL HOME COOKING AND 
HOME MADE PIES 
1443 Arcade Blvd. 
1 NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



BIRDS MARKET 



Phone HI 9-2917 
Complete Line of 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 

Auburn Blvd. and Manianita Avenue 

NORTH SA( R\SII NTi> CALIFORNIA 



'iige 36 



fULll^t. AINU ft./\l^il UrriCtKa JUUKiNAL 



.ipru, iVDi 



"USE OF HANDS" REMINDERS FOR 
AUTOISTS 

1. Don't make the other fellow guess; give a hand sig- 
nal and give it correctly. 

2. The driver behind you — unless he is a fortune teller 
or a first class mind reader — has no dependable means of 
knowing what you are going to do, so — "give him a hand." 

3. To avoid pile-ups at stopping places the law says we 
must give notice of what we are going to do at least fifty 
feet ahead of the place at which we wish to stop or turn. 
The law also states that the drivers before stopping, start- 
ing or turning their cars must see that same may be done 
in safety to themselves and the travelling public. 

4. Under the provisions of the Vehicle Act only three 
hand signals are recognized : ( 1 ) The horizontal — with 
the left arm and hand extended horizontally — for lefthand 
turns; (2) The vertical — with the left hand and arm 
extended upward beyond the left side of the vehicle — for 
righthand turns; (3) The downward — with the left hand 
and arm extended downwards beyond the left side of the 
vehicle — for sudden stopping or decrease of speed. 

5. A waving of the left hand, indicating to move forward, 
or to denote a necessary stop or backward or swerve move 
is not legal. 

6. A last-second use of the legal hand signals is no de- 
fense in actionable suits for damages. The provisions of 
the Act are definite in this matter and require — "that a 
signal be given continuously during the last fifty feet be- 
fore stopping or turning." 

I have driven automobiles for over 40 years and have 
always found, to my annoyance, that failure to hand signal 
is by far the most outstanding traffic violation, not only 
in this state but in the various states through which I have 
driven. Hand signals are easily given and there is no 
reason for the common scene of five or six automobiles, at 
a stop crossing, with damaged radiators and fenders be- 
cause the driver at the head of the line failed to give the 
legally required signal with his left hand. — Editor. 

SALLYS GARDEN 



E. L. Sneed 
FRUITS • MELONS 
1 M:le North of Goshen o 



• JUICES 
99 Hiirhway 

HANFORD. CALIFORNIA 



Phone HI 9-3961 



Res. IV 9-1101 



COASTAL NEON CO. 



Sacramento Door & Plywood Co. 



ALWAYS BETTER - ALWAYS LESS 



1010 El Camini 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Telephone Hickory 9-0314 

CALIFORNIA 



WEST COAST TRAILER SALES 

TRAILER INSURANCE 
TRAILER FINANCING 



301 East El Camil 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



VAN'S SELF-SERVE - Laundry 

MAYTAG WASHERS 
HEUBSCH DRIERS and EXTRACTORS 



208 East El Ca 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone 9-7111 



CALIFORNIA 



WONDER TEA ROOM 

CHOP SUEY - CHOW MEIN - FRIED PRAWNS 
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 



2124 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9843 



CALIFORNIA 



DR. C. N. LUNDE, D.C. 

Specializing in Nutrition 
PHYSIOTHERAPY - SPINAL ADJUSTMENTS 



Dial HI 9-3234 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



2829 Del Paso Boulevard 

CALIFORNIA 



DEL PASO MOTORS 



CARS • PICKUPS • JEEPS • TRUCKS 



1400 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-4345 



CALIFORNIA 



Office: HI 9-02S2 Res.: HI 9-3784 

FISHER REALTY CO. 



Established 



13181/2 Del Pa 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAM R. DRAPER 



3090 Marysville Road (Haggii 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



RAY'S BOTTLE SHOP 



HOUSES, FURNITURE, AUTOMOBILE 
HOUSE TRAILERS, ETC. 



1301 E. El Ca 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



COFFEE BAR 



COFFEE AT ITS BEST 
BREAKFAST - LUNCH - SHORT ORDERS 

Where Cleanliness Reigns 
Phone HI 9-9947 1121 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



LIQUORS - BEER - WINE 



Phone HI 9-6322 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



3215 Marysville Road 

CALIFORNIA 



Capitol Auto Wrecking & Supply Co. 

Phone Hlllcrest 6-6447 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

Parts for All Makes of Cars and Trucks 

412 East El Camino Ave. 1755 Stockton Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



April. J'A-^J POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL pTfe 



FAIR FOOD MARKET SUNNYDALE GARAGE 

•Your Fri.ndly Market" GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS 

COMPLETE ONESTOP SERVICE OFFICIAL UCHT AND BRAKE STATIONS 

Phonr IV 9-3524 Fair Oaks Blvd. Phone IV 9-033S Route I. Box 6175 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA CARMICHAEL lAl.lfORNIA 



LOUS MOBIL SERVICE 

Loui, H. Berinti. Prop. MAGOUIRK Aulo ciHcl Truck Sevvice 

EXPERT LUBRICATION 

MOTOR TUNE-UP • MOTOR REBUILDING 
WHEEL ALIGNING • 24-HOUR TOWING 
Phone HI 9-9994 Fair Oaks Blvd. & Frontier Way 

Business Phone IV 9-3166 
CARMKHAEL CALIFORNIA CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

CARMICHAEL FIVE & TEN ROBERT E. GRANT 



CARMICHAEL SHOPPING CENTER 



PLASTERING CONTRACTOR 



QUALITY WORK AT REASONABLE PRICES 

IVanhoe 9-4578 

Rt. I. Box 6272 IV 9-4057 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA r- a d.ji^u « tr , 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 



BECKES & ANDERSON ROBERT N. PORTER 

PLUMBING SALES AND SERVICE CONTRACTOR - BUILDER 

Phone IVanhoe 9-0303 P. O. Box 536 phon, |v 9-4296 Rt. 4. Box «684B 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA CARMICHAEL CA- I- 



C. R. GRAHAM & SONS 

PIANO and REFRIGERATOR MOVING CARMICHAEL SUPER MARKET 

HOUSE TO HOUSE FURNITURE MOVING Phone IV 9-3277 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE GROCERIES • MEATS • FRESH VEGETABLES 

IVaohoe 9-3538 Hlllcrest 5-374S '"»''■ Oaks Blvd. P. O. Box 473 
CARMICHAEL. CALIF SACRAMENTO CALIF ij Mile North of Marconi Ave 
CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

T. V. - FOTO DEN 

2831 Far Oaks Bivd BEUTLER SHEET METAL 

HEATING • COOLING • GAS CONVERSION 
SHEET METAL WORK OF ALL TYPES 
FURNACES • COOLERS 

COMPLETE PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

In Carmichael Palm Ave. Off F. O. Blvd. 

CARMICHAEL '^'"^°' " '"^ CALIFORNIA CARMICHAEL """ '^ " "'"' '^°"" =*• "°' "'"cALIFORMA 

EDGE CREEK GOAT DAIRY Tor P«,pl, who Appreciate th, Fine.t- 

PASTEURIZED AND RAW \\ AGON WHEEL BEAUTY SHOPPE 

DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT ARLENE Dr WILDE 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

3385 Marysville Rd. Dial Hickory 9-0175 

Telephone IVanhoe 9-2580 
CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA IIAGGINWOOD CALIFORNIA 



Mack Jurlsich Lloyd Perisich 

HODGE PLUMBING SERVICE 

HOBBY HANGAR 

PLUMBING AND HEATING SUPPLIES 

CONTRACTING • REPAIRING MODEL AIRPLANES - RACE CARS - BOATS 

PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 
Fair Oaks Blvd. IVanhoe 91507 

Route I, Box 6112 2307 Rio Linda Blvd. Phone 9-9878 

'CARMKHALl 1 ALIFORNIA NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

FREDS FARM SUPPLY THE COUNTRYMAN 

HARDWARE • DUPONT PAINT YARDAGE . SHOES . CLOTHING 

Fair Oak. Blvd. at California 

Phone IV 9-5«S4 Rt. I.Bo. «I70 Fair Oaks and Marconi Phone I V 9-4488 

TARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA ( ARMICHAEI. CAl IFORNIA 



P^ge 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



.-Ipril. 1951 



MYSHOPPE 

READY TO WEAR - LINGERIE AND HOSIERY 



Half Sizes and Sizes 9 - 52 
Phone HI 9-0840 1609 Del Paso Boulevard 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



A- 1 House and Window Cleaning Service 

KITCHENS AND WOODWORK WASHED 
FLOORS WAXED - INSURED 



CALIFORNIA 



2864 Del Pa 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-5616 



CALIFORNIA 



FINANS AUTO SUPPLY 



HI 9-8691 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



3206 MarysviUe Rd. 



CALIFORNIA 



FARRI'S MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES AND VEGETABLES 
3089 Del Paso Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA 



DR. GEO. A. MICHAELSON 

DENTIST 
1452 Del Paso Blvd. Telephone HI 9-4256 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

A. J. CARPENTER 

STATE WIDE LUMBER HAULING 

Local and Long Distance - All Cargo Insured 

24-HOUR SERVICE 

3317 Grove Hagginwood HI 9-2803 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



FOOTES PLUMBING SERVICE 

PLUMBING AND SEWER INSTALLATIONS 
JOBBING - REPAIRS 

1310 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-9555 



CALIFORNIA 



WOOD LAKE RADIATOR SHOP 

RADIATOR REPAIRING - PRESSURE PURGING 

CLEAN RADIATOR ON CAR WHILE YOU WAIT 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE AND TRUCK REPAIR 

1212 Del Paso Blvd. Hickory 9-3098 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CDUr* WPtP PLUMBING AND 
tKtU Kt.lt SHEET METAL 
WATER HEATERS - PLUMBING SUPPLIES 
FLOOR FURNACES - SHEET METAL PRODUCTS 



1019 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-0178 

CALIFORNIA 



OPAL'S SHOE STORE 



SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 
1524 Del Paso Boulevard 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



FORSCH BROS. ELECTRIC 



796 Del Pa 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



PORTRAITS 

DORRIS PHOTO STUDIO 

REASONABLE PRICES 
3085 MarysviUe Road 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-7230 

CALIFORNIA 



STANDARD MOTOR PARTS INC. 

Roy S. Gough and Ray Mullica, Owners 
1801 Del Paso Blvd. Phone HI 9-6363 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WALT'S SIGNAL SERVICE 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Fast Courteous Service Laundering and Alterations 

DUFFY'S CLEANERS 

ONE DAY SERVICE - NO EXTRA CHARGE 
Phone HI 9-3801 At the Y Fulton & Auburn Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Phone HI 9-9840 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 

FORT SUTTER INSURANCE AGENCY 

SUE COOK ZEITLER 
3077 Del Paso Blvd. Telephone HI 9-4362 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

VALLEY EQUIPMENT CO. 

USED 
TRACTORS, TRUCKS AND IMPLEMENTS 



902 Del Pa! 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



' Blvd. 



Phone HI 9-5325 



CALIFORNIA 



THE SMALL FRY SHOP 

INFANTS AND CHILDRENS WEAR 

REMEMBER. EVERYTHING FOR THE SMALL FRY! 

3728 MarysviUe Road Near Grand Avenue 

EAST DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

SCHMITZ REALTY CO. 

REAL ESTATE - RENTALS - INSURANCE 
Dial HI 9-3014 

CALIFORNIA 



2707 Del Paso Blvd 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Glen Schneider Norma Schneider 

DEL PASO BOULEVARD FLORIST 

WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS 
2431 Del Paso Blvd. HI 9-3211 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DEL PASO PHARMACY 

PROFESSIONAL PHARMACISTS 
SERVING THE NORTH AREA 



Phone Hickory 9-3531 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



2100 Del Paso Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA 



EUGENE L. MABLEY, D.D.S. 

20141/2 Del Paso Blvd. 
Res. Hickory 9-6295 Office Hickory 9-9477 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

E. J. RUTHERFORD - The Apple Man 

APPLES WHOLESALE AND VENDED 



Pho 



HI 9-5312 

CALIFORNIA 



Lee E. Slayton. Sr. Lee E. Slayton. Jr. 

SLAYTONS AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE WITH A REPUTATION 

2455 Rio Linda Boulevard Hickory 9-2I7S 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Res. HI 9-0861 chas. F. Nye 

NYES APPLIANCE REPAIR 

WASHERS - REFRIGERATORS - RADIO 
Phone HI 9-1485 2203 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

AMERICAN ICE COMPANY and 
ICELAND SKATING RINK 

1430-34 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



NORTH STAR 



p. H. Kamilos, Owner-Manager 

2003 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



COZY CLUB 

Tony Kios. Prop. 
FINE FOOD AND COCKTAILS 



2330 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9920 

CALIFORNIA 



Afril. I'i5l 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page is 



For Real Comfort Try 
Hatch Corset Stay Shield 

I'.AIl Nl (.KANTI I) 

See how easy it is to put a Stay Shield on the end 
of any corset - or brassiere stay - and how QL'ICK 
comfort comes. No more jabbing corset or bras- 
siere stays. Sold on money back guarantee. 

8 SHIELDS FOR SI. 00 

Order toilny. 

Hatch Corset Stay Shields 

Dept. 3-1, P.O. Box 1894 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

HI 9-9635 



SINCERE MARKET 

COMPLETE FOOD MARKET 

2800 Rio Linda Blvd. Chonc HI 9-2141 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



THE DIAMOND MATCH CO. 

F. N. Benton. Mgr. 

LUMBER AND BUILDING 
MATERIAL 

2826 Que- Street Phone HI 6-4703 

NORTH SACKAMKNTO YARD 1100 \L. EL CAMINO 



Phono HI 6-7184 



C. C. "TEX" CARSON 

ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

PICKUP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 
LUBRICATION SPECIALIST 



Fulton 
NORTH SACRAMENIO 



nd El Camino Av 



CALIFORNIA 



"MORE TASTE THAN MONEY" 

DRESSES • SPORTSWEAR 

MILES 'N MILES 



1984 Fultc 


n Ave. 


IV 9-1350 




Hours 10 - 


5:30 • 


Eves. 7 to 9 




NORTH SACKAMENTO 






CALIFORNIA 


Shop: 3005 Ben Ali Ave. 






Dial HI 9-7442 



ALHAMBRA FLOOR COMPANY 



JOES PLACE 



NORTI I SACRAMENTO 



Frank.J. Capachi, Owner 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 

MAPLE • OAK 

Dial IV. 9-3431 



MEALS AND SHORT ORDERS 

6:00 A.M. 'til 2:00 A.M. Phone 0-8521 

P. O. Box 122, Bakersfield 

LDLSON I Kern (ounlv). CALirORMA 



CALIFORNIA 



J. M. LEACH IRON WORKS 

GREY AND WHITE IRON CASTINGS 
SEWER MANHOLES 



Phone HI 9-0286 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



16 Glohe Ave 



VALLEY SEED & NURSERY 

Phone IVanhoe 9-4711 

ROSES • VEGETABLES 

FLOWERS 

Special Services for Police and Peace Officers 

Auburn Blvd. and Norrls, at White Bears 



( ALIIORMA NORTH SACRAMINIT) 



Phone 9-4348 



IV 9-2180 Phone Hickory 9-8587 



IVanhoe 9-2260 



JACKSON'S CABINET SHOP 



DOOR AND WINDOW FRAMES • KITCHEN CABINETS 
GENERAL CABINET WORK 



( Al.ll ORNIA 



U. S. PIPE AND MACHINERY CO. 

GENERATORS • STEEL • PIPE 

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY • TRUCKS AND TRAILERS 
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT • ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

Post Office Box 99 2330 Auburn Boulevard 

Phones - Hickory 9-2779, 9-2770 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



VAUGHAN'S BEAUTY SHOP 



CALIFORNIA NEON DISPLAYS 

NEON SIGNS • LIGHTING • MAINTENANCE 

16 Globe Street 
ORTH .SACRAMENTO I Al.ll ORN" ^ 

Standard Water & Sewage Products, Inc. 

Complete -Septic Tank Service 

CONCRETE SEPTIC TANKS BUILT. INSTALLED 

AND MAINTAINED • HOLE DRILLING 

PUMP SERVICE 

Located at North End of North Sacramento Froway 

Route 7. Box 1143 Telephone HI 9-5374 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Laura Vaughan, 0« 



1907 Marconi Ave. Hickory 9-7314 

NORTH SACRAMENTO ( ALIFOMNIA 



RAY D. MORAN 

INDUSTRIAL • CONSTRUCTION 
MINING EQUIPMENT 



Hickory 9-6111 

NORTH SAl RAMI.NTO 



S21 Cantaller Street 



( ALIKORNIA 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



MONTEREY COUNTY PEACE OFFICERS' 
ASSOCIATION MARCH MEETING 

The March meeting of the Monterey County Peace 
Officers' Association, held in American Legion Hall, Sa- 
linas was a big one, 119 members and guests were present 
to partake of a barbecue dinner, and listen to a most con- 
structive speech on the present United States-Russian con- 
ditions. 

Following the dinner Coroner Elmer Machado, presi- 
dent of the Association presented Chief Raymond J. Mc- 
Intyre who introduced the speaker of the evening. Chief 
Mclntyre had prevailed upon Stuart R. Ward, radio and 
television moderator and editor of The Cornmonwealth, 
and secretary of the Commonwealth Club of California, 
to address the peace officers of the county. 

Speaker Ward said if the United States waits for Russia 
to start a third world war we will lose it. 

He declared we have the first weapon capable of de- 
stroying a city in a split second, and that this fact has 
given us the balance in power and that this fact is a big 
factor as to whether we should start such a war first. 

He had maps to show the progress of communism and 
those sectors where these unholy agitators are stirring up 
dangerous unrest — Africa, India, Pakistan, Siam, Burma, 
and Malaya. 

He warned that it would be dangerous to our people 
to believe rumors that the satellites of Russia, or Russia 
itself, are folding up. 

He described the communist problems in this country, 
of the techniques used by Red infiltrators. In their pro- 
gram to expand their party line they caused confusion and 
by getting a hold in key positions got control of presiding 
officers and weak workers. 

He told how the selected Red workers worm their way 
into many organizations and recruit fellow travelers to 
carry on their destructive operations. 

The distinguished editor closed his talk with this ques- 
tion : "What can you do?" His answer is worth pasting 
on one's desk. 

"Inform the FBI of anyone under suspicion. Bar such 
persons from any important positions. Never fully trust 
a former communist. Keep your name off letterheads. 
Stay to the end of all public meetings, when the 'Commies' 
will gather to urge their line, and keep them worried." 



Del Mar and 
Freeport Manor Markets 

Complete Food Line 

Quality Meats at Lowest Prices 
free delivery 



1831 - 6th Street 
Phone GI 2-9765 



5942 Freeport Blvd. 
Phone HI 5-9578 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Lentz Constuction Co. 

CONTRACTORS 

Excavating - Pipe Line Construction 
Paving - Grading 

YARD OFFICE 

2416 SUTTERVILLE ROAD 

Telephone HI 7-6571 

Sacramento, California 



ZOMBIE HUT 

Enjoy Your Dinner 
in Hawaiian Atmosphere 

Cocktails and Mixed Drinks 
Open 5 P.M. each day except Monday 

for Reservations 

Phone HI 5-9885 

5635 Freeport Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



FAIR OAKS 
BOULEVARD MARKET 

"A COMPLETE MARKET" 

Phone IV 9-2493 

Route 1, Box 6165 

CARMICHAEL, CALIFORNIA 



Rudy and Ruth Springfield invite you to the 

RANCH WAFFLE 
SHOP AND FOUNTAIN 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 

"Cbilibur^ers a Specialty" 

Reasonable Prices 

Open 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. Seven Days a Week 

Home Made Pies 

4880 Freeport Blvd. Phone HI 5-9587 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Jpril. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e 41 



THE VILLAGE— NORTH SACRAMENTO 

We have been in the center of things more than 104 
years ! 

The present site of Town and Country Village was 
deeded by Mexico to American Elias Grimes in 1844. 
Things began to happen around here and they've been 
happening ever since. 

Lately the City of Sacramento burst its seams. People 
began to look for room to live and play in outside the 
city and they found it on these broad acres, once called 
the Rancho del Paso — "ranch of the pass" — meaning the 
gap in the Sierra which led to this Valley. 

When suburban Sacramentans needed a shopping cen- 
ter, we gave it to them. We came along in 1946 and in 
one 1 1 acre area are providing all the shops and services 
required for this community. The designer was clever 
John Gaire. 

Here at 1 own and Country N'illage you can find any- 
thing you need — imported delicacies, costume jewelry, re- 
sort fashions or an interior for your home. 

More than 50 shops — even a bank with a fireplace — 
make up this interesting and unusual shopping center. 

City Sacramentans like to visit us, too. They make the 
six-mile trip from the center of town in a matter of min- 
utes to shop where shopping is fun. 

And we're open evenings. 

The gay, informal, friendly atmosphere of the early 
Spanish hacienda is here — in the casual outdoor furniture 
for shoppers' relaxation — the folk dances held in the Patio 
and Plaz.a where shoppers get together evenings for an old 
fashioned, western brand of fun. 

\Ve're proud of our past here at 1 own and Country 
Village. We're proud of our present, too. And wait rill 
you see our future! 

Come visit us, won't you ? 



CANNON & CO. 

CLAY PRODUCTS 
HOLLOW BUILDING TILE • FACE BRICK • FIRE BRICK 



SACRAMENTO 



Phone 9-2794 P. O. Box 802 

Office and Factory 



CALIFORNIA 



Modern Service & Supply 

TEXACO GAS AND OILS 
/;/ GARDENLAND 

Good Candy - Cigarettes - Sporting Goods 

Auto Supplies - Firestone Tires 

Nic-L-Silver Batteries 

Jack Shaul - Ray Shaul - Clarence Shaul 

W. El Camino and Marysvillc Road 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



J. E. FLETCHER 

PLASTERING CONTRACTOR 
SPECIALIZING IN STUCCO WORK 

Veteran Contractor in Sacramento 14 years 
3608 North >X'estern Avenue 

Del Paso Heights, California 

Phone HI 9-1825 




Satisfied Customers Our Motto 

GLISSMEYER'S 

PLUMBING AND SUPPLIES 

HINR^- ]. (,LISSMi;^KR 

2551 N. Nth Street 

North Sacramento, California 

Dial HI 9-729'< 






BOB AND PEGGY'S 
HITCHING POST 

HOME COOKING 

Bar-B-Q'd SparcriKs - Steaks - Sea Foods 

Auburn Blvd. 99E 

NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Phone HI <)00()'' 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 







♦ 4 




lAAv/yyYyYVYYYYYYVVYYYYT 



[ April. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 




♦ ♦ ♦ 



SHOPS 




POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. J 951 



THE SIGN OF THE RED HAND 

(Continued from page 18) 
race." It, too, is decorated with elaborate carvings repre- 
senting vultures, priests holding the severed heads of vic- 
tims, and the oft-repeated symbol of the sacred Feathered 
Serpent. Surmounting this is a coping of tall, pointed 
stones, once stained bright red to suggest flame. 

At the time of the sacrificial rites, a fierce fire was 
kindled within this space, and into the seething furnace 
each victim was cast, and allowed to remain briefly before 
the final act. This horrible ceremony is described by an 
eye-witness, one Bernal Diaz del Castillo, a companion of 
Cortez during the Spanish Conquest. In depicting the re- 
volting scenes which he personally looked upon, this his- 
torian writes: "When cast in, there sprang up a cloud of 
sparks and ashes, and a hole opened in the coals where each 
fell, as it was all fire and cinders there. The unfortunate 
victim began to scream, and roll, and vomit. The body 
began to roast, crackling like an animal being roasted, and 
blisters formed all over the body. While still in agony, 
the victim was dragged out of the fire by means of long 
sharp hooks in the hands of the priests, who then seized 
the poor wretch, and with great haste placed him upon his 
back over a sort of stone chopping-block, and held him 
firmly by the arms and legs. At this time the chief priest 
came forward, and with much skill and cruelty struck the 
victim beneath the ribs on the left side with a stone knife, 
inflicting a deep wound. He ne.xt plunged his hand within 
this opening, and seized the victim's heart like a raging 
tiger, tearing it out alive, and threw it at the feet of the 
huge stone statue of the god of fire." 

As already stated, the procedure differed with time and 
place, but at Chichen-Itza the practices were especially 
hideous. The actual killing was done by a priest called 
the "Nacon," held in disrepute by the populace, as were 
the embalmers of Egypt, or as a present-day executioner 
might be. The Nacon was aided by four lesser priests 
called "Chacs," and a sixth, called a "Chilan," together 
with certain lesser funtionaries. When the victim's heart 
was torn out, the Chacs threw the corpse down the temple 
stairs to the court below where their subordinates stripped 
off the skin, and the devotees cut off and devoured bits of 
the flesh as a superstitious rite. Also, the Chilan would 
remove his ceremonial vestments, and array himself in the 
still-dripping skin ; and thus attired, would dance before 
the spectators. 

Nor was their any stinting in these devotional excesses. 
History describes one occasion upon which over 70,000 
persons were slaughtered at the dedication of a temple. 
Fantastically horrible as this appears in print, it becomes 
trivial and innocuous when compared with the fiendish and 
wholesale hideousness of modern warfare, which most cer- 
tainly lacks the extenuation of religious impulse. 

CARMICHAEL LAND COMPANY 



Fair Oaks Boule 



TOM PERRY 



Used Cars 



Phone HI 9-1383 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA 



WAYNE R. SWART 

HUNTING AND FISHING HEADQUARTERS 
HARDWARE • PAINTS 



1927 Del Pa 



CALIFORNIA 



DON R. ADAMS 

REAL ESTATE CENTER 

REAL ESTATE • LOANS • APPRAISALS 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT • NOTARY 

INSURANCE 



Hickory 9-6463 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



RICKMAN LEE CO. 

WEATHERSTRIP MANUFACTURERS AND CONTRACTORS 

WEATHERSTRIPPING • VENETIAN BLINDS 
INSULATION • FREE ESTIMATES 



Dial IV. 9-3689 

SACRAMENTO 



2031 Fulton Av 



CALIFORNIA 



J. E. TELESCO - Realtor 

INSURANCE • F. H. A. LOANS 
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



Phone IV 9-3637 
SACRAMENTO 



3231 Fulton Av 



CALIFORNIA 



DELK PEST CONTROL 

D. D. T. SPRAYING 
Member National Pest Control Association 



Phone HI 9-5436 



Res. Phone HI 9-2356 
P. O. Box 2147 



CALIFORNIA 



HADDIX CAFE AND SERVICE STATION 

Loyd and Lorene 

LUNCHES AND SANDWICHES 

Hours 7:0O 'til 2:00 A.M. 

Highway 193 - Across from Motor Inn 

P. O. BOX 153 VISALIA. CALIFORNIA 



CARMICHAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



FOSTER'S OLD FASHION 
FREEZE 

Now Located 

4601 FREEPORT BOULEVARD 

Phone HI 7-2775 

Sacramento, California 



April. /V5/ 



} Telephone 90432 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Page 4i 



LEO A. WATSON 

Building Contractor 

Covimercial - Residential 



3107 Del Paso Boulevard 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Hickory 9-4964 GEORGE IRA BURKETT. JR., Owner 

PAYLESS TRAILER 
SALES 

Dealers for 

Kit - Terry Rambler 
Budger - Dixie Coach 

New and Used . . . Awnings and Supplies 

"You'll Ijke the W'tiy H V Do Bitshwss" 

415 East El Camino Avenue 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



RANDOLPH PARKS 



Developers 
Builders 

for the finest in homes 



IVanhoe 9-1470 
IVanhoe 9-4157 

2800 EL CAMINO AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



.—.—......—...——-— —.-4 



Sullivan Transportation Co. 



\\n\ I I Til NHOKSl 



CONTRACT CARRIER 
IHROl GIIOUT CALIFORNIA 



2437 - 10th Street • P. O. Box 4SS 

North Sachamfnto, California 
Phone Ilickorv 9-7038 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers^ Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Chief R. C. TuEuiiR, Burliiisanie P. D., Frcs'ulcni Captain BERNARD McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The members first were directed to the Recreation Hall, 
to await the arrival of the entire assemblage. When all 
arrived, they went to the officers dining room where a very 
fine lunch was served. After the lunch they went to the 
Auditorium of the Peace Officers' Training School, where 
the meeting was called to order by Chief R. C. Theuer of 
Burlingame. 

Chief Theuer then called on the Rev. Dr. Edward 
Mattson who delivered a memorial prayer for the follow- 
ing members who pased away in the past year. 

Robert O'Brien, Chief of Police, San Mateo. 

Phillip E. Geaque, U. S. Secret Service, retired. 

Jess Hession, Ass't Attorney General, retired. 

Jos. A. Murphy, American Trust Company. 

Wm. A. Merrill, U. S. Secret Service. 

Chief Theuer introduced Sheriff Jack Gleason, the host 
for this meeting, who introduced police and other officials 
of Alameda County who were present. 

Names of those who applied for membership at the 
meeting of January 25th, 1951, were read by the Secre- 
tary-Captain McDonald and on the recommendation of 
the Membership Committee, were accepted into the Asso- 
ciation. 

Following are the names of those who filed applications 
at this meeting and same have been referred to the Mem- 
bership Committee : 

George R. DuBois, Pinkerton's National Detective 
Agency, San Francisco. 

John H. Ellison, Captain, U. S. Navy, Mare Island. 

Wm. S. Guill, Pinkerton's National Detective Agency, 
San Francisco. 

Frank S. Lucero, Police Department, San Carlos. 

Delph R. Rexroth, Police Department, Napa. 

Clifford E. Rishell, Mayor, Oakland. 

Jewell L. Ross, Inspector, Berkeley Police Department. 

James T. Turner, Chief, Air Police, Hamilton Field. 

C. W. Willett, Constable, Martinez. 

J. P. Williams, Agent, U. S. Treasury Department. 

Ray Meyers, Superintendent of Communications of the 
Vallejo Police Department was then called upon and he 
reported that the point-to-point communication system is 
now operating in several offices in the nine Bay Counties 
and more will be connected. He also spoke of a meeting 
of the Communication Officers' Association which will be 
held in Stockton in the near future. 

Chief Theuer advised the membership that Jack Green- 
ing is ill and that is the reason that he is not present at this 
meeting. 

Sheriff Jack Gleason was then called upon again to in- 



troduce the speakers. He said that there were two speak- 
ers today, both having messages somewhat timely and they 
were not going to make extended talks, but wanted to 
bring the members up-to-date on the Civilian Defense pro- 
gram. Sheriff Gleason then introduced Law f^nforcement 
Coordinator of Civil Defense for the State of California, 
Ross McDonald, retired Deputy Chief of Police of Los 
Angeles and who was also connected with the Civil Police 
of the Army of Occupation. 

Mr. McDonald stated that law enforcement has a tre- 
mendous task in civil defense. He talked of Mutual Aid 
and stated that Mutual Aid is not peculiar to Civil De- 
fense, but it is applicable to Civil Defense. He spoke of 
the train disaster in New Jersey, where it was necessary 
for all enforcement agencies to come to the aid of their 
brother community. That is the purpose of Mutual Aid, 
to cope with any emergency situation. In 1950 the Civil 
Defense Mutual Aid program was superimposed upon the 
1946 Mutual Aid program. Law enforcement services 
participating are the Police, Sheriffs and the Highway 
Patrol. It is the local law enforcement agencies that have 
to bear the brunt of Civil Defense. At the present time 
there is contemplated interstate aid, pointing out that some 
outlying localities in the southern part of the state are 
closer to Yuma than they are to points in California. If 
there were two or three bomb strikes centered at any one 
area, we would have to depend on aid from the fringe 
areas. 

If people did start to mo\e after a strike, it is going to 
be a tremendous task for law enforcement to take care of 
them. People will move and when they start to move they 
will live off the land as they move. All kinds of crimes 
will be committed, even in areas that are unharmed. When 
people move, crimes would be increased and everybody 
should be prepared. 

Regarding Auxiliary Police, in some communities called 
reserves. They are trained to take care of an emergency 
when it arrives. Mr. McDonald felt that it would be 
necessary to recruit some women auxiliary police. There 
would be a job for women in evacuation centers and 
women properly trained would be of great assistance in 
handling women and children. 

Regarding the Mutual Aid Set-up, the state is divided 
into ten regions and regional coordinators are selected. 
There are eight coordinators now and they handle all ac- 
tivities pertaining to law enforcement and then pass it on 
to the State Coordinator. 

Regarding passes, three types are contemplated. First 
is a personal pass for key personnel. The second is for 



utilities on a trip basis back aiiil forth. Ihc third is a tiMii- 
porary pass in case of emergcncx. Mr. .McDonalii appre- 
ciated the opportunity to talk before the organization ami 
asked that his office be called upon for any assistance thc\ 
might be able to give. 

Sheriff Gleason then introduced Worth Kidd, who is in 
charge of Plant Protection in Civil Defense. Mr. Kidd 
advised the members that there are approximately 40,000 
industrial plants in California and possibl> a third will be 
assigned to the militar\'. So far they have not accomplished 
a great deal. He suggested that law enforcement agencies 
try and establish miniature civil defense organizations in 
each plant. He hopes that his organization will be able to 
come to law enforcement agencies in the near future to 
help with their local plant protection problems. He stated 
that the FBI issued a book some time ago on plant pro- 
tection which is very good, and the Motorola people are 
now re-issuing copies of this same book. 

Chief Don Wood of San Anselmo asked the first speak- 
er by what authority could they set up lines to prevent the 
movement of people. Chief Wood said he attended a meet- 
ing and at this meeting they would be advised how to han- 
dle the problem and to date they have heard nothing about 
it. Mr. McDonald assured Chief AVood that he would 
look the matter up and see what he could do about it. 

Chief Theuer thanked .Mr. .McDonald and Mr. Kiild 
for appearing before the Association and gi\ iiig these \er\ 
nice talks. 

The selection of the next meeting place was then before 
the membership and Mayor Owen Seavy of Napa invited 
the Association to hold the next meeting in that city as 
guests of the Napa Police Department. His invitation was 
unanimously accepted. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 

The following applications for membership in the As.so- 
ciation filed at the meeting of January 25, were voted in 
at the March meeting: 

Wallace I. Baxter. Police Officer. Santa Rosa P. I). 

Leland .M. Boruck, Chief of Staft, San Jose Auxiliary 
Police, 

Ernest M, Carli, Sergeant, S. F. Police Dept. 

D. L. Cormack, Dist. Supt., P. G. & F. Co.. Hayward. 

James H. Duane, Special Agent, San Francisco. 

Jack A. Fker, Director of Traffic, S, F, Police Depart- 
ment, 

Fred C. Duane, Investigator, Calif. Dept. of Justice, 
San Francisco. 

Michael Gaflfey, Chief of Police, San Francisco. 

Walter A. Gesek, Police Officer, Santa Rose P. D. 

Guy v.. F^eadlee. Captain, Solano Co, Sheriff's (~)tfice. 

Henry V.. Henderson. Police Officer, Mountain \'iew 
Police Department. 

George Jones, Lieutenant, Richmond Police Dept. 

Lylc L. Jones, Attorney, I'. S. Dept. of Justice. 

George A. MacFachern, Lt, Col,, Commanding Officer, 
S. F. Armed Services, 

; August Meister. State Bureau Criminal Investigation, 
{Sacramento. 

Francis T. Merriman, Constable. X'allejo. 



Daniel C. Murphy, Jr., Industrial Acciilent Bureau. 
San Francisco, 

Maxwell G. Pererin, Captain, Intelligence and Second 
Officer, Benecia Arsenal, 

George Scinto, Police Officer, Santa Rosa P. D, 

Frnest J. Torregano, Planning Commission. S. F. 

Peter J. Cresci, Alpha Dist, Co., San Francisco. 

Kmil Triimy, Police (Officer, Richmotid. 

ALEX J. KNUTSON 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 
THE HANDIEST SPOT IN TOWN 



1601 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone Hickory 9-9807 

CALII-ORNIA 



Bus. Phone: HI ';-23()4 



Res. Phone: HI 9-7502 



Brouwer Motor Co. 

USED CARS 

John P. Bedford, Manager 

1701 Del Paso Boulevard 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Hickory 9-2269 

Del Paso Lunch 

G. S. Markow 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

Service Viiexcelleil hi the Entire \orlh Area 

Open Daily from 6 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

1312 Del Paso Boulevard 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Hickory 9-55iS 

0. K. Rubber Welders 

r 1 R H s 

NEVC'-LSED AND RECAPS 

New Electrical Equipment 

Saliiiiniiilc Guaranlee 

One D.iy Service 

109 East El C^ainino Avenue 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



rtge 4» 



fULH^U AiNL' fUAL.n VjrrH^CKS JVJUKiNAL 



.i/>nl. IV.il 



HUCKABAY BROS. 

BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS 

We Specialize in Rental Units and Remodeling 

FREE ESTIMATES 



IV 9-2376 



3741 La 



as Way 

CALIFORNIA 



CHIEF WILLIAM WILSON — 

(Continued from f>agr 14) 

\Vilson's assistant is Percy Gassoway, also a veteran 
North Sacramento officer, and a former deputy sheriff. 
The other North Sacramento officers are Walter Land, 
Walter Welch, Pete Rineberg, Ben Bruno and Jack Rhea. phone iv 9-3241 

Lorraine Peters is the department's clerk and matron. sacramento 
Another woman employee is to be hired soon. Elwood 
Miller and John Criss are the radio dispatchers. ALERT TRUCK LINES 

In addition to their regular duties the North Sacra- service • quick • efficient 

rr ,1 IV U ..1, J steel machinery • GENERAL FREIGHT 

mento orhcers are more than a bit busy these days super- local and statewide 

vising the training of a force of 40 auxiliary policemen 

who will help in the event of a disaster under the Civilian Phone iv 9-3835 

Defense Program. sacramento California 



GLENN'S QUALITY SHOES 

2016 Del Paso Boulevard - Across from Bank of Ami 
Phone Bus. HI 9-4495 - Res. HI 9-1176 



NORTH sacramento 



CALIFORNIA 



ALLEN BULLER - Insurance 

WORKMEN'S compensation • PUBLIC LIABILITY 
automobile • TRUCK • FIRE 



2448 Del Paso Blvd. 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Hickory 9-9591 



CALIFORNIA 



STAN'S SEASIDE SERVICE 



TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 



DICK'S USED CARS 

BOUGHT • SOLD • EXCHANGED 
"A Square Deal or No Deal" 



HUds 

SACRAMENTO 



779 No. 1 6th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



A. LEVY and J. ZENTNER CO. 

RECEIVERS - JOBBERS - SHIPPERS 
FRUIT AND VEGETABLES 



220 North 16th Street 

SACRAMENTO 



Phone GI 3-5771 

CALIFORNIA 



PAR-MAC DISTRIBUTING 

Distributors of Beer and Wine 

Ben Parino, HI 7-2771 

VALLEY BREW • NAPA SODA 
FOPPIANO WINES 



2534 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9989 

CALIFORNIA 



Bus. HI 9-5251 



H. G. LATHAM - Plumbing 

CONTRACTING • JOBBING 
LICENSED 



221 North Cr 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



...GLOBE... 

Slicing Machines - Choppers 
Scales - Saws - Steak Tenderizers 

N. E. SORENSON, Owner 

On Auhurn Blvd. - Eleven Miles Out 
Rt. 6, Box 3192 Phone Hickory 9-5149 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SCHURR BROTHERS 

CONTRACTORS 

EXCAVATING • GRADING • STREET PAVING 

LAND LEVELING 



Phone Gilbert 2-3972 

SACRAMENTO 



1708 Thornton .Av 



CALIFORNIA 



F E Y ' S . . . /';/ Ardeu Town 

HARDWARE • APPLIANCES • RADIOS • RECORDS 



3511 La Brea Way 
IVanhoe 9-1377 



552 La Sierra Dri\ 
IVanhoe 9-3931 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



TRIANGLE SERVICE 

MOHAWK GASOLINE 
Phone GI 3-9325 103 Bannon 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Tom Chekouras Gus Drallo 

New MANHATTAN LUNCH 

BEER 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



Telephone Hickory 9-3112 204 South 8th Street 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

S & S FARM SUPPLY 



2441 Rio Linda Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone Hickory 8-2842 

CALIFORNIA 



227 North 16th Street 

SACR.AMENTO 



Phone GI 3-9735 

CALIFORNIA 



MAYFIELD'S SEASIDE SERVICE 

AND garacj: 

GAS • OIL • LUBRICATION • REPAIRS 

TUNEUPS A SPECIALTY 

501 Fulton Ave. Phone HI 9-9985 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



TONY'S CAFE 

LIQUOR • BEER • WINE 
MIXED DRINKS 



Phonf GI 2-9373 
SACRAMENTO 



305 North 12th Strtft 

CALIIORMA 



ORCHESTRA NITELY 



DINNERS - SANDWICHES 



PETE AND MARION'S 

MIXED DRINKS • WINE • BEER 
430 N. I2lh Street Dial 3-9822 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL VAN LINES 

STATE WIDE 

PIONEERS IN LONG DISTANCE MOVING 
OFFICES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES 



CHARLES F. UNGER 

BUILDER 
COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDING 

2210 Sutterville Road Telephone HI 7-3646 

SACRAMKNTO ( Al.ll ORMA 

Route I. Box 1938 HI 6-6915 

SOUTH SACRAMENTO NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING 
1 Block East of Franklin Blvd. on Fruit Ridle Road 



KEATON MOTORS 

USED CARS 
"LET'S MAKE A DEAL" 



Phone GI 3-5901 401 North 12th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

HAROLD'S FOUNTAIN 

SERVED Sr- 
BREAKFAST • LUNCHES • DINNERS 

Phone HU 4-6740 302 North 12th Street 

SACRAMENTO CAl.HORNIA 



511 North 16th Striet 
SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 4-3967 

CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



Cut Rate Plumbing & Builder's Supply 

PLUMBING • ELECTRICAL 
HEATERS • FURNACES 

333 North 12th Street Gilbert 3-3087 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Commercial Body and Trailer Service 

TRAILMOBILE PARTS • AIR AND VACUUM BRAKES 
TRUCK EQUIPMENT 



McKILLOP FROZEN FOODS 

PICKSWEET FROZEN FOODS 
LIBBY FROZEN FOODS 
SWANSON P;)ULTRY 

1519 McCormack Way Phone HU 1-0257 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Hickory 9 5282 Hlllcrest 6-8629 

DONOHUE AND ICE 

LICENSED CONTRACTORS 
MACHINE TRENCHING 



I 524 Forty-eighth Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



E. CLEMENS HORST CO. 



Phone HUd.on 4-5997 Home Hlllcrest 7-4802 

510 North Twelfth Street 



P. O. Box 1024 



< Al.lir)RNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN ALUMINUM 
CORPORATION 

411 North 16lh Street HU 4-9159 

pACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



DELICIOUSLY YOURS 



Dad's Root Beer Bottling Co. 

2390 Sutlet^ille Road Phone HI 7-0460 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 





• 




* 


i 


KtV^riTtll <'*'-'f'>'""* SfRArCHlMICU COUP. 




"WfftJUiiadvt id MitK^pe^ooritkot 


4 1'. NORIII ri.NIII STHI.I I SAI HAMLNTO. I ALII 



Pa^e 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



J/>ril. 1951 



SAINT PATRICKS DAY ECHOES 
FROM SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPT. 

San Francisco is one of the "Iiishest" communities in 
the United States, so about the middle of March each year 
when people emphasize the Erin in their talk, brogues are 
thicker than fog in the city by the Golden Gate. 

As the spirit of Saint Patrick's Day catches fire, men 
are eager to boast: "I'm half Irish, you know" ... or 
"my mother came from Ireland" ... or "my grand- 
mother's name was O'Rourke." Patrolman Clifford Bian- 
cuUi of the Bureau of Communication even becomes "Offi- 
cer Brian Kelly." 

This year several fair and impartial observers on the 
Hall of Justice scene — not particularly Irish — got together 
and decided to search for the most Irish of the Irish. 

The investigation was short lived — in a matter of min- 
utes it was known that the name, CON ROY, was it. 

From a farm in County Galway, Ireland, came a family 
of 13 children. Nine of these youngsters were boys — five 
of them were to become members of the San Francisco 
Police Department. Two were to join the San Francisco 
Fire Department. 

Holding responsible positions in the police department 
today, with years of outstanding service behind them, are 
Sergeant Patrick J. Conroy, Northern Station; Lieuten- 
ant John H. Conroy, Motorcycle Detail; Lieutenant 
Hugh J. Conroy, Park Station; and Captain Peter A. 
Conroy, of Park Station. 

Men of the department honor the menior\ of Patrol- 
man Joseph G. Conroy, who was killed by an automobile 
while he was directing traffic at the scene of a fire at 
Fourth Avenue and Geary Boulevard. 

Eldest of the Conroy brothers is Coleman J., battalion 
chief in the San Francisco Fire Department. Fire Depart- 
ment Captain James P. Conroy passed away one year ago. 

Though civilians, the two remaining brothers are right 
on a par. They are Anthony L., San Francisco insurance 
broker, and Thomas M., an electrician. 

The Conroy s«:ory doesn't end there — Lieutenant John 
added a couple of chapters. His son John William, now 
a Military Police captain in the Army, is on leave from the 
SFPD. "Bill" has one of the most outstanding police 
records of the young men in the department. Getting his 
feet firmly on the ground at Central Station is the second 
son, Kevin. 

Four of the brothers — Patrick, John, Hugh, and Joseph 
— served in the Army during World AVar I. 

John's Irish chest swells with pride as he recalls his 
service with the "Fighting 69th" Infantry of New York, 
part of the famed Rainbow Division. John was a sergeant 
in the all-Irish 69th, one of the few Californians who 
shared that distinction. He was wounded in the fighting 
at Sedan in October, 1918. 

Everyone loves the Irish, but the Conroy popularity 
does not depend upon ancestry. 



Phone GI 2-9767 

BELL HOTEL 

6OII/2 "K" Street 

CHICAGO HOTEL 

1022 Second Street 

GOLDEN WEST HOTEL 

1024 Fourth Street 

Hotel and Cold Water hi Every Room 
Cooling System in the Summer 

George Morimoto, Prop. 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Res. Phone 6-1994 



Bus. Phone 6-6459 



FLOOD EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 



OLIVER 



Sales and Service 
CLETRAC AND TCWNER 



Agricultural - Tractors and Implements 

Industrial Tractors and Heavy Equipment 

Hercules Power Units 

Alhambra and Vee Streets 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone: Gilbert 3-9075 

FRANK MALONEY 

. . . BUILDER . . . 



1915 "S" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



GILBERT 3-7941 

Safe Courteous Service 

UNION TAXI CO. 

Prompt Two-Way Radio Service 
100 Per Cent Union 

Office at 726 L St., close to Greyhound Depot 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone GI 2-3062 



Res. HI 6-842S 



1 r; 



STOCKER'S BOILER AND 
WELDING WORKS 



Phone 5-2473 



HOLDENER 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

J. A. HOI.DENER 



500 - 506 Broadway 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



2608 "R" Street 
SACRAMENTO 16, CALIFORNIA 



) 

j Phone Gilbert 2-8488 

( 

I GARAGE SERVICE • MOTOR TUiNELT 

BRAKE WORK • PARKING • LUBRICATION 
I WASH • POLISH • OPEN 2i HOURS 

TENTH & L GARAGE 

III the Heart of the Dotintowii 
Shopping District 

H. L. Newi.and 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Gilbert 3-S541 Home Phone Fair Oaks 96 

CALIFORNIA 
ENGINEERING CO. 

ELECTRIC MOTORS - PUMPS 
MACHINE SHOP 

Chari.es a. Utiey 

516 Twelfth Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone ^-IS-j Res. Phone 5-0964 


PIONEER LUMBER CO. 


Jack. Simas, Manager 


• 


6438 Foisom Boulevard 


SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



RANCH FOOD LAND 

SOUTH SACRAMENTO'S LARGEST 

VARIEIY OF FOODS 

MEATS - BEER AND WINE - GROCERIES 

R. H. Eakins - R. S. Davies 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-2876 . . . Day or Night 

CIVIC CENTER GARAGE 

24-HOUR AUTO REPAIRING 
COMPLETE LUBRICATION 

24-Hour Storage . . . Tire and Battery Service 
Washing - Waxing - Steam (Cleaning 



715 "I" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 5-0717 

COLONIAL BUILDING 
SUPPLY COMPANY 

Complete Line of 
HI II DING MATERIALS 

•<6l9 Stockton BoulevarJ 
SACRAMFMO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 52 



fULlCb AINU h-hACt ui-rictKa juuK-iNAJL 



.Ifirii. jy.-)i 



Phone Hlllcrest 5-4036 

McCrum Bros. Hardware 
and Sheet Metal 

Custom Built Sheet Metal Items - Fuller Paints 

Plumbing Supplies - Pipe Threading Builders' 

Hardware - Furnaces - Power Tools and Equipment 

for Rent . . . Electrical Supplies. 

400 Yards West of Perkins on Folsom Boulevard 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 3-7658 

FRENCH MODEL 
LAUNDRY 

Good Work Good Service 

George A. Crone, Proprietor 

414 Fourteenth Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone GI 3-5504 

CAPITAL SHEET METAL 

HEATING - VENTILATING AND 
AIR CONDITIONING 

Frigidaire Distributors 

Manufacturers of 

Sheet Metal Products 

Albert Pagni, Gen. Mgr. 

200 "P" Street 

SACRAMENTO 14, CALIFORNIA 



1 

PACIFIC COAST 


NISEI CLUB 


• 


75 Jap Alley 


SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Gilbert 2-1851 

CAPITAL CITY TITLE CO. 



801 Jay Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Gilbert 2-0475 

SACRAMENTO RUBBER 
COMPANY 

"Ij It's Rubber . . . We Have It" 

721 - 723 Jay Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 






Phone 6-3895 



CAPITAL FREIGHT LINES 

COMPLETE TERMINAL FACILITIES 

STATEWIDE TRUCKING 

John F. Dougery, General Manager 

4850 Stockton Boulevard 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



LOG CABIN 
RESTAURANT 

EXCELLENT FOOD AND MIXED DRINKS 
Air Conditioned by Frigidaire 

701 Jay Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



DEATH TAKES W. A. MERRILL 

William A. Merrill, special agent in charge ot the San 
Francisco office ot the L'nited States Secret Service, ilied 
suddenly at his home on the night of February 23, from 
a heart attack. He was 49 years of age at the time of his 
death, and had just returned from an inspection trip to 
Sacramento shortly before he was stricken. 

Chief Merrill was born in Salt Lake City and started 
his law enforcement career in San F"rancisco as a special 
agent for the Western Pacific Railway. In 1925 he was 
wounded four times while capturing two bandits who had 
robbed a railroad hotel at Wendover, Nevada. 

On his recovery from his wounds he joined the \j . S. 
Secret Service and for over a quarter of a century he has 
made a great name for himself, not only for protecting 
Presidents of the L'nited States who came on trips in his 
jurisdiction, but for his great work in smashing counter- 
feit rings and breaking many forgery cases of United 
States negotiable paper. 

During his long career he was assigned to the White 
House in \\'ashington, D. C., and during 1941 served as 
personal bodyguard for Lord Beaverbrook of England on 
his historic visit to this country. 

Last year when President Truman came to San Fran- 
cisco to celebrate the anniversary of the L'nited Nations 
founding. Chief Merrill directed the protective measure 
for the President, and from the time he reached the coast 
until he was on his way home, the manner in which he 
assembled every law enforcement body of the Bay Area 
and conducted the presidential party through its various 
trips and programs brought high commendation from 
President Truman who personally praised him for the 
splendid job he had performed. 

He was a member of the State Peace Officers' Associa- 
tion and the Bay County Peace Officers' Association, and 
seldom missed any meetings of these organizations. He 
will be sadly missed at future meetings for he was a very 
popular member. 

Surviving him is his widow, Mrs. Ellen Benson .Merrill, 
who was his nurse while in the hospital following his gun- 
fight with the Wendover bandits ; a daughter Darlien, and 
his mother, .Mrs. Henry C. Taggart, of Salt Lake City. 






Phone: Gilbert 2-3553 


PACIFIC NEON 


• 


719 Twelfth Street 


SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone GI 3-1853 


"W here's the Best:- . . . I^lh and S" 


Gene and Lucky 
HARRIS 


AUTOMOTIVE PAINTING 

BODY AND I ENDER REPAIRING 


1709 "S" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone GI 3-9541 

Aieet Your Friends Here 

CLUB DELTA 

BEER - WINE - LIQUOR 

Becker and Del Monte 

2431 "J" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



HI ';-()i83 

FINE FOOD MARKET 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

\\"e Carry a Good Line of Ererylhinf; 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRl ITS AND 
VEGETABLES 

2308 Del Paso Boulevard 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



(lllbert 2-1051 




THE PALM IRON AND 


BRIDGE 


WORKS 


S7C£L FABRICATORS ASD JOBBERS 


FiftLcntli am 


"S" Streets 


SACRAMFN'KX 


CALIFORNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Ami. 1951 



Phone 2-7629 

DANA MOTORS 

MOTOR REBUILDERS AND 
DISTRIBUTORS 

Armor W. Harris, Manager 

1731 "K" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone GI 3-6473 



BRODERICK MARKET 



p. O. Box 1027 



714 Third Street 
BRODERICK, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-8539 H. T. Groves, Prop. 

CITY MATTRESS CO. 

Mattress Renovating and Box 
Spring Repairing 

. . . We Call for and Deliver . . . 

1517 Second Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 5-3009 



Res. 4-5148 



MURPHY MEAT 
COMPANY 

Wholesale Beef, Veal, 

Lamb and Pork 

A. J. Murphy 

Corner 23rd and "R" Streets 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Gilbert 3-1846 

Seebold's Parking Lot 

YOUR CAR IN GOOD HANDS 

714 "L" Street 
SACRAMENTO 14, CALIFORNIA 

Phone HI 7-3667 

ART JOSEPH 

SHEET METAL 
FURNACE - VENTILATION 

6332 Eastern Avenue 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-1584 Public Phone 2-9797 

HONG KING LUM 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN 
DISHES 

No Cover Charge 

WE SERVE ALL KINDS OF DRINKS 

Hours: 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. . . . Weekdays 
11 a.m. to 2 a.m. . . . Saturdays 

Corner Third and Eye Streets 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone HI 3-8856 

B. & B. SHEET METAL 
WORKS 

JOBBING 

AND GENERAL SHEET METAL WORK 
Repair Work Our Specialty 

1817 Fifth Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



.ipril. I'A-'I 



l^ULK I-. AND I'hAC L OIIICIRS |OURNAL 



Page 5^ 



SACRAMENTO PD HAS FINE B. OF I. 

More ami more criminals waiitcil by the law are learn- 
ing it is a smart idea to keep away from Sacramento. 

This is due particularly to the fast anii efficient work ol 
Superintendent Leslie Cox of the police department's 
identification bureau and its staflF. 

During 1''50 Cox and his men iiientified do/ens of men 




Superintendent Leslie Cox 

wanted in various parts of the country, and were respon- 
sible for solving a large number of burglaries through 
identifying latent fingerprints. 

Just during the last few months half a dozen important 
; burglaries and a particularly vicious knifing were solved 
because the criminals left telltale fingerprints where the 
B. of I. men could find them. 

During the year the bureau lost the services of George 
Kaminsky, Jr., and Herbert Hoover, and the department 
now is one man short of its quota. 

John Crump, a veteran bureau member, is Cox's chief 
a.ssistant. Others in the department are: George R. Haker, 
John D. Lane, Norman Readdy, James Smith, and Kdg.ir 
and Byron Orser, who are brothers. 

Cox has seen the B. of L grow tremendously during th<' 
28 years he has served in the police department. 

He joined the Bureau of Identification as a clerk in 
1922, after serving in the Army as an infantryman during 
the first World \Var. 

He learne<l the business well under Fisher, was pro- 
moted to the position of assistant superintendent and took 
nvrr the top spot when Fisher passed on in \0i2. 

I nder Cox the bureau has been greatly expanded and 
lias been modernized to a point where it compares favor- 
ably with any similar unit of its si/c anywhere. The pho- 
iphic equipment, filing system, and other aspects of 
\\ork are among the most modern to be found any- 
A iH-re. 

< )ldtimers in the Sacramento area also remeinbc-r Cox as 
Mile- of the outstanding cross country and relay ruiuiers in 
\iiirhern California when he was a youngster. 



Office: GI 3-'5565 



Home: HI 6-8459 



CAPITAL SOUNDIES CO. 

musk; boxhs - pinball machines 

VicroR Pa(,anucci 
Office at FaiiltiHtl 

1220 "K" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-6438 

ALHAMBRA AUTO 
LAUNDRY 

CARS WASHED $L50 

WASH - POLISH - STEAM CLEAN 

RADIATORS CLEANED - SLMOSIZING 

Wilt Call for anil Deliver Your Car 

A. ToNARil.l.I - O. J. TONARIM.I.I 

910 Alhambra Boulevard 
SACRAMENTO 14, CALIFORNIA 



EL RANCHO GRANDE 

flOME OF THF FINEST MEXICAN FOOD 

Pleasant Atmosphere - Courteous Serrice 

DINNERS FROM 90c TO SI. 50 

Special Merchants' Lunch Served Daih 

Orders tn Take Out 

Open Every Day From 11 A. M, to 3 A. M. 

Pete and Mar)' Gomez, Chefs and Owners 

One hour free parking to our patrons at the 

Ramona Garage, next door. 

612 "J" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Oflicc: HI 7-6511 



Res. Cil 2-671i 



SIERRA BUILDERS, INC. 

LAND AND HOME 
DEVELOPMENTS 

John Ikrnandiz, PresiJent 



1716 - 261 h Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



L 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1951 



DIRECTOR J. EDGAR HOOVER 

(Continued from fiagc 16) 
government. Time after time, the strength and valitlity 
of this system have been demonstrated. In the 1930's, dan- 
gerous criminals, who brazenly flaunted the orderly forces 
of government, who had a vast network of aid and assist- 
ance, who were glorified by sentimentalists, were finally 
brought to justice when the American public became suffi- 
ciently aroused to demand and support the campaign which 
brought about their destruction. During the war, the man- 
ifold problems arising from the national defense of the 
Nation were efficiently and expeditiously handled in this 
manner. 

This nation has no need for a national police force. 
Cries frequently are heard that America, to meet "the 
problems of the day," must create a master, over-all law 
enforcement agency, whose authority would extend to 
every nook and cranny of the nation. I disagree with this 
attitude. My experience has demonstrated that the present 
system of law enforcement, national, state and local, is the 
best system. The peace officer must be the servant of the 
people — protecting their interests and responding to their 
will. The law enforcement agency must be an integral 
part of the community. Otherwise, the American system 
of democratic government would be defiled. 

There can be no concealment of the fact that law en- 
forcement has not always performed at peak expectations. 
The fault is not in the system but in the way it works. The 
American people, if they desire competent, efficient and 
effective administration of justice, must be willing to pro- 
vide financial means; moral support; and a practical reali- 
zation of the responsibilities of citizenship. A police de- 
partment, under-staffed, under-paid, and ill-equipped, can- 
not properly fulfill its duties. Lack of public interest may 
allow a small minority of peace officers, aided and abetted 
by corrupt politicians, crooked prosecutors and underworld 
"fixers," to bring shame upon the profession. Action is 
needed, not to revamp the fundamental structure of Amer- 
ican law enforcement, but to strengthen, in technical skill, 
character and esprit de corps, the existing institutions. 
(To Be Continued) 

RELIANCE FRUIT & GROCERY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1919 McAllister Str 



CALIFORNIA 



J. DICKSON SMITH 

Getieral Buildhm Contractor 

OFFICE AND YARD 

2400 AUBURN BLVD. 

Hickory 9-6347 
SACRAMENTO 15, CALIFORNIA 



EL PARAISO 
RESTAURANT 

BEER - WINES - MEXICAN DISHES 
TAMALES - ENCHILADAS - CHILI 

1023 Sixth Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Gilbert 3-4345 

GOLDEN TAVERN 
AND GRILL 

WHERE YOU GET THE BEST FOOD AND 

DRINKS ... WE ALWAYS TRY TO PLEASE 

YOU . . . MODERATE PRICES 

623 - 25 Kay Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



LINCOLN THEATRE 



You Have Seen the Rest 
Come in and See the Best in Downtown 

Best Entertainment for Your Family 



412 "L" Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



THYS COMPANY 

Edouard Thys, President 

Manufacturers - Engineers 
Steel Founders 

Route 2, Box 650 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



.Ipril. 1951 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 57 



ARMANDO MAGRI ALHAMBRA BARBECUE 

HARLEY- DAVIDSON OI'EN DAY AND NIGHT 

SALES * SERVICE SANDWICHES . BARBECUE . LUNCHES 

815 - 12th Slrrrt Phonr GI 3-5362 1310 Alhambra Blvd. Phonr HI 5-9738 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO (AI.lrORNIA 

GRAND RAPIDS FURNITURE CO. NAKAMURA CO. 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS APPLIANCES . FURNITURE 



7th and Kay Street Dial 2-5631 



Phone GI 3-7532 1313 - 4th Street 



SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



RICE GROW ERS' ASSOCIATION CAPITOL COFFEE ROASTER 

of Ciilijornia daily coffee roasters 

p. O. BOX 958 '"'• Second Street Telephone Dial 3-9303 

JSACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



BERRY COFFEE SHOP 

THE PLACE WHERE REAL MEALS ARE SERVED 
WE SERVE GOOD FOOD 



CITY IRON AND METAL CO., INC. 



Phone 3-8561 701 S Street 



1 128 - 8th Street 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Phone HI S-I0I3 Ros. Phono HI 6-43SI 

STEVE HOPKINS PLUMBING sheet metal experts 

WEBER SHEET METAL WORKS 



(PHIL MOTT PLUMBING) 



Gilbert 2-2692 613 Jay Street 



HEATING • AIR CONDITIONING 



1212 - 30th Street 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Henry Arrouzet. Sr. Henry Arrouzet. Jr. 

JOHN ELLIS BOULEVARD FRENCH LAUNDRY 

MODERN LAUNDRY METHODS 



AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP 
910- 19th Street GI 2-2488 



Telephone Hlllcreit S-3468 3315 FoUom Boulevard 



NEW LOCATION - NEW MODERN SHOP 
lACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



PETE BETTY •*«•• '" 9-1262 Dial GI 3-2354 

CENTURY CLUB ROBERT McNAIRN MACHINE 

WORKS, INC. 

THE HOTTEST SPOT IN TOWN ^^^^^^^ ^^^^,^^ ^^^^ 

ON & OFF SALE LIQUORS 

LEW MILLER. Mana(in(-Owner 

Phone GI 2-9611 SOO "L" Street ,.,, - jc. . 

1431 Second Street 

ACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 9-0488 Herman Lati>iu>, Prop. 



SUTTER CASKET CO. SUBWAY AUTO WRECKERS 

WE BUY. SELL AND WRECK AIL MAKES OF 
CLOTH COVERED AND METAL CASKETS CARS AND TRUCKS 

TRUCK PARTS A SPECIALTY 

Phonr 2-6604 330 - 20th Street 795 Del Pa>o Boulevard 

«RAMENTO CAI.IIOKNIA NORTH SACRAMENTO ( .\| IFORNIA 



HI 1:1 TCI c XAVCPM MIDWAY AUTO WRECKERS 

BLEUEL S TAVERN ci.rence M.ihi.. 



USED CARS BOUGHT 
New Addmi; Rl. 7, Box 1074 Phonr 9-7222 

kCRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SAtRAMINTO CALIFORNIA 



Stockton Blvd. at 35th 



Page 38 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL .^/.r/7, 1951 



Phone Gilbert 2-1473 Res. Hlllcrest 5-5947 

PARK SHEET METAL WORKS rorr^ccmTA^ A^Ar^Auoxir r^o 

COLOSSEUM MACARONI CO. 

HEATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING ^^^ ^^^^ ,^ MACARONI PRODUCTS 

Phone Hlllcres, 5-26.9 3.24 Broadway 4th and Broadway P. O. Box 464 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Wirlncr - Repairing - Commercial - Industrial - Residential 
WE DO ALL DARNING AND MENDING FREE 

WILMUNDER ELECTRIC 

CHUNG KING LAUNDRY rj , ■ > r , , 

AND CLEANING WORKS Ehctricd CoutractoTS 

ED H. WILMUNDER 
1.24 2nd Street Phone GI 2-8548 

1705 29th Street Telephone HI 5-6857 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



FOR A NEW 



SACRAMENTO JUNK AND refrigerator, washer or other APPLIANCE See 

MACHINERY COMPANY c a r^i, a ATr^r-rr^ a btjt t a xir^i: nr^ 

Wenberg Bros. SACRAMENTO APPLIANCE CO. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 910 - 12th Street • .7.5 Del Paso Blvd. 
JUNK AND MACHINERY 

NO DOWN PAYMENT - 2 YEARS TO PAY 
Phone 60725 2720 R Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



J. R. WOOD R. L. WOOD NEAL ETUE 



SACRAMENTO WRECKING AND ^^^ AMIGOS . . . Cocktail Lounge 

PLUMBING SUPPLY "-^^ ^^'^'"' ' ^"^ '"'"''''■'' 

NEW AND USED PLUMBING SUPPLIES Phone Hlllcrest 5-9568 3221 Folsom Blvd. 

Gilbert 2-3441 417 12th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



,.. 24 HOUR MECHANICAL SERVICE & TOWING 

PALL MALL . . . Cocktails SOUTH SIDE MOTOR CO. 

HOMER ARONS. Manager COMPLETE MOTOR OVERHAUL . PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 

DAY AND NIGHT PARKING 
1606 J Street Phone Gilbert 3-9651 

Gilbert 2-6898 516 L Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



FIFTH STREET GARAGE AND 

BODY SHOP SERRA BROS. MARKET 



B. F. BOESSOW QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES 

BEER - WINES - COLD BEVERAGES 
Our Everyday Prices are Lower 



AUTOMOTIVE AND BRAKE REPAIR 
BODY AND FENDER REPAIR AND PAINTING 



Dial Gilbert 2-7423 520 First Avenue 5960 Franklin Boulevard at 38th Avenue 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO ' CALIFORNIA 



CHRIS SAM 

CUILLA BROS. . . . Toii'wg P^jj^ VIEW TAVERN AND CAFE 

Auto Painting & Duco Finishers - Wheel Aligning - Frame & Axle ACROSS FROM STATE FAIR GROUNDS 

Straightening - Body and Fender Repairing 

Telephone 5-9837 2900 Stockton Blvd. 

2413 J Street Phone 3-6323 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



JOHN HARVEY ETTORE 

KELLY AND LESE'S SWING CLUB ^O^TE CARLO CAFE 

DANCING . MIXED DRINKS MIXED DRINKS 

LIQUORS 
Phone GI 3-94S3 549 16th Street 

Phone GI 3-9891 1430 S Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



KAYS POOL HALL GREEN LANTERN CAFE 

SOFT DRINKS BEER • WINE • MEALS 

1214 Fourth Street "ial Gilbert 3-9787 604 Q Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Af-ril. 19.->1 



POLICE AND PKACIi OllICERS JOURNAL 



Page 59 



ITS CAPTAIN PRESSEV OF SACRAMENTO 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The year 1950 was a big one tor Zdbcr C. (Zd) 
Pressey, the able secretary to Sacramento Chiefs of Police 
for more than 20 years. 

In recognition for his able work he was promoteil to the 
rank of Captain aiul made an administrative assistant to 
the Chief of Police. 

Captain Pressey is the only chief's secretary in the his- 
tory of the department entitled to wear a captain's bars. 
The promotion was given to him not only for his years of 
efficient work, but also because of the importance of the 
work he does. 

His job entails handling the public, aiding the chief in 
all sorts of administrative work, helping to run the record 
bureau and doz.ens of other things. His sympathetic and 
wise handling of the problems of yomig officers ha\e earn- 
ed him the thanks of a good many policemen, man\ of them 
now veteran officers themselves. 

And there is no doubt that Captain Presses will con- 
tinue on with the work he is doing no matter what change 
may take place in the high command of the police force. 

Zel came to the police department as a civilian property 
clerk in 1924 after doing clerical work for Wells F"argo, 
the California Western States Life Insurance Company 
and the Southern Pacific Railroad. 

Three years later, after taking the police examination, 
he was made a regular police officer and continued on as 
property clerk. In 1940 he took the sergeants' examina- 
tion, and two years later received his stripes. 

He first became secretary to the chief in 1930 when 
William Hallanan headed the department. Since then he 
has served in the same capacity to Chiefs Austin j. Roche, 
Alec K. McAllisrer and James \'. Hicks. 



RAY RAYMOND 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL 



216 North 12th Street 

SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

Sacramento Chevron Truck Station 

324 North 16th Sircrl Phonr CI 2-9638 

SACRAMENTO < AI.IFORNIA 



FOX SALES COMPANY 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

HUdion 4-S673 ■ 4-0477 303 North t2lh Stmt 

SACRAMENTO I ALIFORNIA 



PAULS TEXACO SERVICE 



Rt. 6, Box 1610, Auburn Blvd. 



6 Milo North of Cupilol on Hi|[hway 40 and BSE 
Recommended by A. A. A. 

99 TOUR-O-TEL MOTEL 

TOPS IN COMFORT 

SHOWERS • GARAGES • KITCHENS 

AIR CONDITIONED • HEATED 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Law 



Dial Hickory 9-5357 

SACRAMENICJ 



Route 7, Box I2IS 

CALIFORNIA 



DON'S AUTO SERVICE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS 
BRAKES - TUNE-UP - WHEEL ALIGNING 



Phone IV 9-5553 
AUBURN BLVD. 



Route 6, Box 1524 

SACRAMENTO. CALIF. 



Arcade Insulation and Materials Company 

INSULATION - INSULBESTOS - ROCK WOOL 

Distributors (or: 

INFRA FOIL INSULATION - VITROCEL PLASTER 

AGGREGAIES - WEATHERSTRIt-PING 



Route 7, Box 

SACRAMENTO 



IV. 9-2060 

CALIFORNIA 



MOODY HARDWARE 

PAINTS - PLUMBING AND 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 



Auburn Blvd. at Oak St. 
SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-31 10 

CALIFORNIA 



F. C. HOUSER 

Distributor 

BEACON GASOLINE - MacMILLAN MOTOR OIL 

CAMINOL DIESEL FUEL 



Phone Gilbert 3-2093 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



SUNSET MOTEL 

r. .ind Mrs. E. E. Rodgers. Managinc Ownei 
CENTRAL AIR COOLING AND HEATING 



Highways 40 and 99E • Opposite Municipal GoK Court* 
Phonr Hickory 9-735S Route 7, Box 1154 

SACRAMF.N I O CALIFORNIA 

OUT OF THE HIGH RENT DISTRICT 

MODERN FURNITURE CO. 



>, Mile East ol Fulton A 
Phone Hickory 9-3032 

SACRAMF.N lO 



on Auburn Blvd. 
P. O. Box 87S 

CALIFORNIA 



ayton. Owner F. H. A. APPROVED 

DRAYTON HEIGHTS 

SUBDIVISION 

SEWER, WATER AND STREETS 

Morse Avenue at El Camino 

3128 El Camino Avenue Phone IVanhoe 9-02S2 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WAGON WHEEL 



[SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 60 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL /l/'ril. 1951 



Phone HI 5-9869 



^T^^^^TiTrc A/TTJATc \7T;r^PTATiTT7<; ALHAMBRA LAUNDRY and 
GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES ^^^^^ ^^pp^^ 

]F/;/e rtw^ Beer ^^^ ^ p„,„^ 

COMPLETE WITH GAS AND OIL 



SACRAMENTO 



HI S-2617 2114 Alhambra Blvd. 

Sutter Ave. on Frultridge Road CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



LOUERDE MARKET BRADEN & GARLAND 

GROCERIES AND FRESH GROCERIES • GRADE A MEAT Frank E. Garland. Owner-Manager 

Phone 5-9737 Wholesale - Retail 

^ _., , , AUTOMOBILE SEAT COVERS 

We Give S & H Stamps • Gas. O.I and Ice UPHOLSTERY SUPPLIES 

Vj Mile East of Stockton Blvd. on Fruitvale Road 817 . 12th Street Phone Gilbert 2-2849 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CAUFORNU 

EAGLE'S CLUB PIONEER CLUB AND CAFE 

FINE FOOD . LIQUORS j400 g g, Camino 

T. Sutich, Prop. 

G. H. Beierle 



SACRAMENTO 



2963 35th Street Hlllcresl 5-9611 

CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO COUNTY. CALIFORNIA 



LUCKY HOTEL 



O. E. SAUGSTAD 

Phone 513 308 Vernon Street Roseville, Calif. 

For Cars and Trucks - Ford Tractors - Dearborn Implements 

WOODLAND TRACTOR CO. ^^^^ "^^^ safety LTRs^'oN^ArL^DooRs" "-^"-^^ ''°°'^ 

West Main Street Phone 2-5669 Woodland, Calif. MODERATE PRICES 

DOME TRACTOR CO. 

SACRAMENTO^'"" '^°'^°'" """'- ''"""^ ''"'" CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO ^^'''' '" '^'•^°' CALIFORNIA 

SPURGEON'S - Cleaning and Dyeing OLD PIONEER CLUB 

SACRAMENTO'S LEADING CLEANERS FOR THE GOOD FOOD AND DRINKS 

PAST THIRTY-ONE YEARS 

Phone GI 2-9823 231 - 12th Street 

3200 Folsom Boulevard Phone HI 6-6451 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

FORK LIFT SALES AND RENTALS ^^^ ^^ ^^ 

Various Types of Operation 
ROSS . CLARK . HYSTER • McDONALD BOB'S BAR - B - Q 

CONVERSE INDUSTRIES 

Stockton Blvd. and Fruitvale Road 4001 Freeport Boulevard 

Phone HI 6-6479 5331 Stockton Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

„ „ .^^^^-^ L^-r-^ CALL GI 2-3677 "THE BLIND MAN- 

CLUB DANCELAND ,„, 



FINE LIQUORS • COCKTAILS 



WINDOW SHADES AND VENETIAN BLINDS 
GOOD FOOD AND SERVICE WILLIAM A. RAPP & CO. 

Phone 3-3692 2630 Fifth Street 



622 - 20th Street 

.,^.,.^„ r-Ai iirnnWTA SACRAMENTO 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



YOUNGS MARKET 

Dial 39381 LOUIS POULOS 

SANITARY COFFEE SHOP & ANNEX complete food line 

BEST IN FOOD AND MIXED DRINKS BEER AND WINE 

1022-24 -8th Street 5610 Stockton Road 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO C/ 



KUCKS TAVERN SAVE - A - LOT MARKET 

Phone 3-9551 1704 Broadway Phone Gilbert 2-7943 1600 F Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Jfri/. V'51 



POLICE AND PHAGE OFFICERS' lOURNAL 



Page 61 



WOOL GROW ERS HOTEL 

Teresa and Ben Morlonrs 
BASQUE AND ITALIAN DINNERS 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

325 So. Hunter Phone 2-4377 

STOCKTON CALIIORNIA 

ElUblishcd 1925 J. Pesavenio 

STAR ELECTRIC WORKS 

MOTOR WINDING, REPAIRING. SERVICE 

NEW. RE-BUILT MOTORS - PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

1715 Sixth Street HUdson 4-3328 

SACRAMF.NTO ( ALII ORNIA 

POULTRY: Gilbert 3-7981 FISH: Gilbert 3-7892 

Capital Poultry Company tind Pacific Fish Market 

Wholesale and Retail 

A Full Line of 

LIVE, DRESSED POULTRY. EGGS AND FRESH FISH 

516-520 EYU STRELT SACRAMENTO. CALIFORNIA 



NEW TIENTSIN CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE - SPECIAL DINING ROOM 

Open 11:30 A.M. to 1:00 A.M. 

1117 Eighth Street brt. K and L St<>. Phone 3-3287 

SACRAMF.NTO (Al. II ORNIA 

HOBBS BATTERY CO. 

BATTERIES FOR EVERY PURPOSE 
Dial Gilbert 2-3745 1220 C Street 



SAC RAMKNTO 



CALIFORNIA 



COMMERCIAL HOTEL 

LOUNGE AND RESTAURANT 

Emmet Regan. Owner 

ITALIAN AND STEAK DINNERS - BAR-B-QUE RIBS 

Third and Eye Streets Gilbert 3-3688 

SACRAMENTO CALIIORNIA 



Jack Pappas 



Albert Alex 

VETERAN S CLUB 



Chiulos 



SHEU FONG CO. 



BEER - WINES - LIQUORS - LUNCHES 

Where Friendly Veterans Meet and Get More for their Money 

314 "K" Street Phone 2-4218 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Hanley's Blacksmith and Spring Shop 



EGGS AND POULTRY — WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Phones Gilbert 2-6925 - Gilbert 2-6926 

420-422 Eye Street 



SA( RAMIf.NTO 



CAI.II fJRNIA 



j SACRAMENTO 



Phone 23306 



I2IS G Street 



r.\LII ORNI.A 



SUN HOTEL 



FRUITRIDGE MARKET 

MEAT - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES 

GASOLINE - OIL 

FRUITRIDGE ROAD SACRAMENTO. CALIFORNIA 

JOE POPES JOYLAND CAFE 



328' i K Street 



3322 Broadway 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



( Al.IFORNIA 



BILL - JOE 

WE SERVE THE BEST OF BEERS 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

.3402-06 Broadway Telephone 5-9871 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Welcome Hand Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

KINDLY RECOMMEND US TO YOUR FRIENDS 



TOP HAT POTATO CHIP CO. 



1616 No. C Str 
SACRAMENTO 



Phone Gilbert 2-0S97 

CALIFORNIA 



726 Alhambra Blvd. 
SACRAMENTO 



Phone Gilbert 2-2402 

CALIFORNIA 



"L" STREET LAUNDRY - Dry Cleaning 

Dial 2-2378 311 L Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

A & J LIQUOR EMPORIUM 

Louise Anderson. Proprietress 

WINES - BEERS - LIQUORS - GROCERIES 

1315 Fourth Street Phone Gilbert 2-9494 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN POULTRY CO. 

Lee and Louie. Proprietors 

A Full Line of 

LIVE. DRESSED POULTRY. TURKEYS, EGGS 

1206 Fifth Street Phone Gilbert 3-9242 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DING HOW CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

SPECIAL CHINESE DISHES TO TAKE OUT 

Telephones: Hlllcrest 6-275S - 5-9716 2721 Broadway 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

INTERNATIONAL POULTRY MARKET 

Wholesale and Reta'l Dealers in 
LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY AND EGGS 

FREE DELIVERY 

Phone Hlllcrest 5-0536 2616 Broadway 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



K. N. MARKET 



MEAT 
401 Capitol Avenu 



SACRAMENTO 



GROCERIES 

Telephone Gilbert 2-1434 

CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



FRANKS POOL HALL 

SOFT DRINKS AND SMOKES 
1211 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC RE-TINNING WORKS 

Vahan Kaznnjian, Owner 

Reconditioning of 

DAIRY AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRY EQUIPMENT 

Hlllcrest 5-8476 2809 S Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

F. B. HART - Dnir'ibiitor 

GASOLINE - DIESEL— GMC — TRUCKS 

Gilbert 3-5743 

CALIFORNIA 



PANAMA MARKET 



3406 Storklon Boule 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



438-470 No. 16th Street 
, SACRAMENTO 



SACRAMENTO 



EVERYBODY'S CAFE 

THEY ALL LIKE OUR CAKE 

EVERYONE BUYS THEM 

206 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone II07-W 



OPEN SUNDAYS 



BASSO PLACE 

SERVICE TAVERN 

MEALS AT ALL TIMES 

M. Ryno 



BONHAMS AITO RFPAIR 

COMPIXTE MOTOR OVERHAULING • TUNE-UP 

ACETYLENE WELDING - BATTERY CHARGING 

PROMPT COURTEOUS SERVICE 



CALIFORNIA 



lots Quincy Road (AcroM (r 
SACRAMENTO 



Whil Mill) 

CALIFORNIA 



?e 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



/Ipril. 1951 



CAPTAIN GESSNER AND SPD 
JUVENILE DIVISION 

Captain Frank Gessner and his aides in the Juvenile 
Division of the Sacramento Police Department are doing 
an ever more important job in helping to straighten out 
youngsters who get headed the wrong way. 

Last year, for example, they took into custody 869 boys 
and girls for offenses ranging from traffic violations to 
serious crimes of violence. Of this total 745 were boys 
and 124 were girls. 

But the measure of success, Gessner says, is not the total 
number, but the number who will see the light and not 
get into trouble again. 

And the people of Sacramento, who pay close attention 
to the activities of the juvenile division, are satisfied that 
the greatest possible number will be straightened out under 
the kindly but firm policy Gessner and his assistants follow. 

Since he took charge of the bureau in 1947 Gessner has 
worked constantly to improve the methods employed and 
to do everything else possible to concentrate on rehabilita- 
tion rather than punishment. 

"Of course we find it necessary to put juveniles into 
jail just about every day," the Captain says. "But we 
would rather not. And we don't if we can see our way 
clear to dispose of a case to a youngster's benefit without 
putting him behind bars." 

And the fact that this policy is closely adhered to is at- 
tested to by the fact that of the 69 boys and girls called to 
the attention of the division during 1950 a total of 389 
were released without being locked up in Juvenile Hall. 
And even more significant — 658 were granted police pro- 
bation. Under this system the division knows what the 
young probationer has done that was wrong, but he is 
saved from the disgrace of having a police record at a 
tender age. 

Then, if the offender does not get into trouble with the 
law again, the whole matter can be forgotten. But if he 
persists in violating the law, the division is armed with his 
history. 

Gessner, who is a veteran of many years in juvenile 
work, is assisted by two men and two women juvenile offi- 
cers. They are Henry Holdson, Charles Leuthy, IVIrs. 
Dolora Sutter and Mrs. Virginia C. Wilson. 

Gessner and his staff have won a reputation for coopera- 
tion with other agencies interested in juvenile work. They 
cooperate closely with the county probation office, neigh- 
borhood councils, and youth guidance agencies. 

MARCONI PALMS 

MILD MENTAL AND NERVOUS DISORDERS 
Francis I. Anderson, Owner 



IVanhoe 9-3542 



Rt. 9. Box 3365 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Guy Milidrag, Owner Route 5, Box 567 

COUNTRY CLUB SERVICE STATION 



RAY S. POTTER 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 



440 Hopkins Road 

SACRAMENTO 



IVanhoe 9-2661 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN W. POPOFF 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 
FLOORS SANDED AND REFINISHED 
CLEANING - WAXING - POLISHING 



2303 Parkwood Dr 

SACRAMENTO 



IVanhoe 9-0444 

CALIFORNIA 



NOBLE'S KID - E - SHOP 

CLOTHING FROM TOT TO TEEN 
TOVS - FURNITURE and SHOES 



3523 Fair Oaks Blvd. Phone IV 9-4112 

In Arden Shopping Center 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



BROLINE'S 



DRY GOODS 



FURNITURE 



1520 Draper Street Phone 2171 

KINGSBURG CALIFORNIA 

LEWIS APPLIANCES & FURNITURE 

HI 5-9480 
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS 



5008 Freeport Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO 



2514 Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY TELEVISION AND SERVICE 

COMPLETE TELEVISION INSTALLATION 
MOBILE TESTING UNIT 



5010 Freeport Blvd. 
SACRAMENTO 



Hlllcrest 6-0971 



CALIFORNIA 



FLEETLINER MANUFACTURING, INC. 

CUSTOM BUILT BODIES 
AND TRAILERS 

45th Avenue and Franklin Boulevard 

P. O. Box 74, Oak Park Station 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SOUTH SACRAMENTO SPORT SHOP 

Distributors of 

WILSON ATHLETIC EOUIPMENT 

MERCURY MOTORS 

COMPLETE HUNTING AND FISHING SUPPLIES 

BOATS 



Pho 



HIIIc 



CALIFORNIA 



SCHOEN'S KIDDIE FARM 

CHILD'S DAY NURSERY AND CARE 

MOVIES WEEKLY 

3750 Fair Oaks Blvd. Phone IV 9-0181 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Ricp Hull A»h (Gri-a>WF<-p) Phonci: Warchouic, 4-0433 

FRUITRIDGE PHARMACY R..,a.„... 5.4»«3 

George Yoe. Prop. 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS BEAGLE PRODUCTS CO. 

FREE DELIVERY O*" CALIFORNIA 

SSOO Franklin Blvd. Dial HI 7-1769 
SACRAMIMO CNLIIOKMA .SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WM. H. MANNIX LATTIN'S INC. 

CUSTOM GROUND CRANKSHAFTS LINOLEUM - ASPHALT TILE - CARPETS 

RUGS - VENETIAN BLINDS 

HI 5-2300 •J.140 Del Rio Ave. 

Phone HI S-482S 1519 Alhambra Boulevard 

SACRAMENTO (AIIIORNIA ^ ^, „ , ,,^ k,t-^ 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



HOLLYWOOD PASTRY SHOP ^- ^,;,it!:^,T.F^ 

PLUMBING - HEATING - VENTILATING and SHEET METAL 
WORK - OIL BURNERS - GAS BURNERS - FURNACES 

5031 Freeport Blvd. Phone HI 6-4690 

SACRAMENTO CALI.ORNIA Phone Gilbert 2-7702 907 Fron, S.ree. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



C. D. Tyler W. F. Keller R. T. Trueworthy 

THE DIAMOND MATCH COMPANY 
BUILDING SUPPLY & LUMBER CO. 

FRED N. BENTON. Manager 
A CO.MPLETE BUILDING SERVICE 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 
2396 Sutterville Road Dial Hlllcrest 7-5711 

Phone 6-4703 2826 Q Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

TRUCK PARTS AND EQUIPMENT CO. w/ 1: c -ri: d tvt r^ a in. 

Gilbert 35905 WESTERN CAFE 

PARTS FOR ALL TRUCKS - TRACTORS Quirico "Bill" Dallosta, Prop. 

GASOLINE AND DIESEL ENGINES BEST MIXED DRINKS IN TOWN 



400 N. Sixteenth Street Post Office Box 1647 

Irr\D Ml A 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Phone GI 3-9831 2001 "K" Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



FAIR DEAL... Liquors PALACE LAUNDRY 

Louii Micotto, John Boyd, Props. 
Phone Hlllcre.t 5-9633 3I0O Stockton Blvd. '*•""" 2-1844 13th and R Street. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WONDER FOOD MARKET ALHAMBRA LAUNDRY 



Complete Line of CLEANERS 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
ALSO SODA FOUNTAIN 



PROMPT. MODERN, COURTEOUS SERVICE 



Phone 6-2640 3924 Fr.nklln Blvd. 21 14 Alhambra Blvd. Telephone Hlllcr,., 5.2«,7 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA -SAC RAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Manuel Samagaio Ralph R. Silva 

CHANNEL MARKET F^,r yiEW TAVERN AND CAFE 

MEATS, GROCERIES, GAS, BEER AND WINE ACROSS FROM STATE FAIR GROUNDS 

Phone GI 3-1646 Jeffer.on Boulevard T.I.phon. 5-9837 2900 Stockton Blvd. 

N^l.-sr SACRAMENIO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

*^?Tls?A^TioN^A^wA^f WHOLESALE LIQUIDATORS 

4634 Stockton Blvd., South Ed„ of Town on 99 AUCTIONEERS APPRAISERS 

Phone Hlllcreit S-98I7 ""^ No. B Street Dial HUd.on 4-3333 

I SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Pase 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



.■]pril, 1951 



Steve Cuckovich Hickory 9-8501 

BLUE N GOLD DISTRIBUTORS 



ROHRER BROS. PRODUCE 



1005 EL MONTE AVE. 



NORTH SACRAMENTO. CALIF. 



P. O. Box 731 

SACRAMENTO 



16th and North B Str 



CALIFORNIA 



MARKET CENTER AND CANNERY 
SURPLUS SALES 

SAVE UP TO 50r{ O.N ALL FOOD STUFF 

ONE CAN OR A TRUCKLOAD 

3419 Rio Linda Boulevard 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

Bill Renneker, Prop. Free Pick-Up and Delivery 

BILLS BODY AND FENDER SHOP 

SPECIALIZING IN AUTO PAINTING • FREE ESTIMATES 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRING 

Phone HI 9-2115 3729 Rio Linda Blvd. 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

PACKED FRESH DAILY 

TUNG'S SALAD 

MIXED VEGETABLES 

TUNG'S 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



HARVEY YOUNG MEAT MARKET 

QUALITY MEATS • CUTS THAT SATISFY 

4Sth Ave. and Franklin Blvd. Phone HI 5-9851 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

RANCH HARDWARE 

FULLER PAINTS • BRUSHES • WALLPAPER 
GARDEN SUPPLIES • TOOLS • HOUSEWARES 



4868 Freeporl Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



THE BALL MOTOR CO. 

WHITE TRUCK DISTRIBUTOR 



501 No. 12th Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



ACE VARIETY 



Phone GI 3-5650 222 North 12th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Residence 3-8784 

T. G. FRAZIER 

Wholesale PRODUCE and FRUIT DISTRIBUTOR 
972 Swanton Drive 

CALIFORNIA 



Market Dial 3-3302 

SACRAMENTO 



LAWRENCE'S 



Paul Jackson C. P. Rich 

BOULEVARD APPLIANCE 

SALES AND SERVICE 

NEW • USED • REPAIR SERVICE 

Dial IV 9-5026 Fair Oaks Blvd. and California Ave. 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 



HEADS 



WELDING AND REPAIRING 

24-Hour Service 

Phone 7-0919; Res. 6-9529 3945 Franklin Blvd. 

SAC-JAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Joe Baumann, Prop. Phone HI 5-9567 

ALPINE INN 

BEER, WINE AND SANDWICHES • GAS - OIL 
Where Hunters and Fishermen Meet 
Freeporl Blvd., Across from Air Port 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

UNIQUE CERAMIC STUDIO 

GREENWEAR • GLAZES AND SUPPLIES • FIRING 

CLASS INSTRUCTIONS • ALSO FINISHED PRODUCTS 

DISTRIBUTORS OF CERAMICHROME PAINTS 

Hlllcrest 7-8815 5071 Freeport Boulevard 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STOCKER AUTO SERVICE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 



SACRAMENTO 



Hlllcrest 5-9348 : Res. 6-7339 
2500 Sutterville Road 



CALIFORNIA 



LIGHTHOUSE CAEE & SERVICE STATION 

GOOD FOOD • GENERAL REPAIRS 

24-HOUR SERVICE 

18 Miles North of Bakersfield on 99 Hwy. Rt. 1, Box 40AA 

McFARLAND CALIFORNIA 

SANITARY TRAY CO. 

M. H. Furlow, Owner 

LAUNDRY TRAYS AND TRAY STANDS 

Hudson 4-5366 631 North 16th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



L. N. MEINZER 



GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

IN ADOBE VILLAGE 

4331 Sierra Madre Drive Phone IV 9-3813 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



F. L. ANDERSON 



SACRAMENTO 



Hlllcrest 5-1931 



Freeport Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



BLUE BIRD BAKERY 

RETAILERS » WHOLESALERS 

Modesto and Sacramento 

4643 Freeport Blvd. Phone HI 6-6888 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

ROBERTS' PLUMBING COMPANY 



341 Munroe Street 

SACRAMENTO 



Telephone 9-4486 



CALIFORNIA 



SUBURBAN ACRES TRAILER COURT 



SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9978 



CALIFORNIA 



DOM'S GROCERY 

PASTRIES 



Office Phone HI 7-4510 5121-27 Franklin Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

J. J. (JACK) LEWIS 

SUTTERVILLE SERVICE STATION 



4800 Freeport Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 5-9639 



CALIFORNIA 



The KID & KORRAL 

TOWN AND COUNTRY VILLAGE SHOPS 



1300 Hov 

SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 9-9816 



CALIFORNIA 



RUSSELL'S GUN SHOP 

GENERAL GUN SMITHING 

CUSTOM SPORTERS AND REBARRELLING • SCOPES, 

CHOKES AND PADS • HIGH QUALITY BLUING 

1623 Dreher Avenue Phone Gilbert 3-0104 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



KOMOORIAN REALTY 



5004 Freeport Blvd., Sa 

Call Us— We have . . 
booth to a 40-rc 



:o. Califori 
telephone 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA Evenings GI 3-7465 



HARRY KOMOORIAN 
censed Real Estate Broke 



Office HI 7-7587 



Atril. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



FORMER CHIEF DIERKING IN NEW JOB 

Karl Difrkiii;;, who scrscil X'allcjo as policf chiet tor 
upwards of ten years, and after leaving the police depart- 
nieiit was appointed Constable for \'allejo township, which 
he gave up when he ran for sheriff of Solano County last 
November and was defeated, has a new job. On March 




Former Chief Earl UitRKiS(. 

8, he was appointed assistant purchaser of supplies for the 
City of Vallejo. His appointment was made by City Man- 
ager Alfred I. Wagner. He succeeds William G. Elliott, 
Jr., who resigned to go into private business. 

T he former police chief was one of the three top men 
who took a ci\il service examination for the post, and the 
job has a top salary of $350 per month. 

1 he many friends of Earl Dierking, extending through- 
out the state, and particularly in Vallejo, where he has re- 
sided for more than 30 years, were greatly elated over the 
j good fortune of an outstanding peace officer. 
j He has alwa>s been interested in organizations of law 
enforcement officers. He is a member of the State Police 
; Officers' A.ssociation, and the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' 
1 As.sociation of which he was president two years ago. 
I He is very capable of handling his new position, for 
I while police chief he had charge of purchasing thousands 
of dollars of equipment for the police department. This 
was before a city purchaser was provided the city. 

F he new assistant purchaser stated on taking over his 
new duties: "I am happy to be back in the service of the 
city, and it will be a pleasure to work with my former 
associates again. 

"I feel that after my years of public experiences I can 
be of some constructive service to the City of Vallejo. I 
will serve to the very best of my ability." 

I hose who know him are well aware he will gi\e a 
good acconnf <t\ himself to the citizens oi Vallejo. 

AIR CONDITIONING GAS, COAL and 

SHEET METAL OIL FURNACES 

L. F. WITHARM 

WARM AIR HEATING • STAINLESS STEEL 

Phonr ANdovrr I-I8S8 1718 E. I2lh Sirrcl 

OAKLAND (ALIFORNIA 



TERMITE AND PEST CONTROL 

George W. Garlinghousc 
GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 



D.al IV 9-2347 R.-sidrnce IV 9-3795 

2015 .Morse Avenue 



SACRAMENTO 



CALI^OR^IA 



Jack Mulligan Sam Calagna 

THE F. B. CLUB 

DANCING 
WEDNESDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY - SUNDAY 



4450 Franklin Kiwi 
-SAtRAMENTO 



Phont- HI S-96S5 



CALIFORNIA 



HOLLYWOOD BEAUTY SALON 

ALL TYPES OF BEAUTY SERVICE 
Open Evenings by Appo'ntment 



HOLLYWOOD BARBER SHOP 

NOTH'NG TO SELL BUT SERVICE 

Hours 9:0T A. M - 7:C0 1 . M. 

5141 Frccport Blvd. Phone HI 6-3021 

SACRAMENTO lALlFORNi\ 



Office: HI 6-6848 



Res. HI 5-8387 



JENSEN CROP DUSTERS 



CROP DUSTING • LIQUID SPPAYING 

SEED PLANTING • FERTILIZING 

AIRPLANF AND HFl 'COPTER 

INSURED 



RANCH FOOD LAND 

LARGEST VARIETY OF FOODS IN 
SOUTH SACRAMENTO 



4864 Freeport Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 6-7731 



CALIFORNIA 



J. W. CHASSER 



STEEL FABRICATION 



Hlllcrest 5-2491 
SACRAMENTO 



4701 24th Street Road 

( ALIFORNIA 



CONTINENTAL CAN COMPANY, INC. 

Manufacturer 



METAL CONTAINERS 



601 No. 7lh Street 



Phone Gl 3-igiS 



5ACRAWENTO 



CAl IIORMA 



JOHN O. BRONSON CO. 

INSURANCF. 

FIRE • AUTO • ACCIDENT • COMPENSATION 

GLASS • LIABILITY • BURGLARY • SURETY BONDS 



1702 BROADWAY 
.SA( RAMENTO 



Phone Gl 2-2909 



CALIFORNIA 



JENNINGS' AUTO SERVICE 

711 North 16th Strad Gilbert 3.97SB 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1951 



SOME NEW SHERIFFS IN THE STATE 

((Uinlinncd from page 15) 
Chico Police Department, who has another son, Ben 
Kranig who heads the Orland Police Department. 

Harry E. James won over incumbent Sheriff Joseph 
Zwinge of Calaveras County. 

It is now Sheriff Joseph Tracy of Fresno County. He 
defeated veteran George Overholt. 

Sheriff E. J. Kenison lost out to William Elam in 
Placer County. 

Sheriff Ben Richardson of Siskiyou was defeated by 
A. R. Cottar. 

Wayne Brown is now sheriff of Nevada County win- 
ning over Richard Hoskins. 

Sheriff Thomas J. Kelly won over Sheriff John Lousta- 
lot of Kern County. 

L. K. Robinson is the new sheriff of Tulare County, 
and down south in San Bernardino Eugene Mueller, long 
time chief of police of Upland defeated Sheriff James W. 
Stocker. 

COLWELL'S RESILIENT FLOOR 
COVERING'S 

INLAID LINOLEUM PRINTS • FLOR-EVER VINYLITE PLASTIC 
LINOLEUM • ASPHALT TILE OUR SPECIALTY • RUBBER 
TILE • CORK TILE • FREE ESTIMATES IN YOUR HOME 



SWING CLUB 



DANCING • MIXED DRINKS 



Phone GI 3-9453 

SACRAMENTO 



549 North 16th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone IV 9-3736 

1989 FULTON AVE. 



lings Call HI 9-6664 

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Office IV. 9-2228 



TOWN AND COUNTRY AREA 



A. W. YATES REALTY 

LOANS • INSURANCE • RENTALS 
"CALL ANYTIME" 



3010 Fulton Av 

SACRAMENTO 



Country Club Estates 

CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Phone IV 9-3128 



Phone IV 9-2945 



R. W. "BOB" COOK 

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 

INSURANCE • LOANS 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



SACRAMENTO SERVICE STATION 
EQUIPMENT CO. 

Claude J. Canfield, Owner 
Contractors License No. 108773 

INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE 



301 North 16th Street 

SACRAMENTO 



4-2385 

CALIFO" 



A. P. SERVICE 



ONE-STOP SERVICE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS • BODY AND FENDER WORK 

GAS • OIL • ACCESSORIES 



Directly Across fr< 
6000 Freeport Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO 



[unic-pal Airport 
Phone HI 7-7575 



CALIFORNIA 



RHEA TRACTOR & ENGINE CO. 

ALLIS-CHALMERS TRACTOR AND FARM MACHINERY 

GENERAL MOTORS D'ESF' S 

SEAMAN TILLERS • WADERAIN 



SACRAMENTO 



7800 Freeport Blvd. Hlllcrest 7-6S3S 



CALIFORNIA 



RECOMMENDED BY DUNCAN HINES AND A.A.A. 
MEMBER UNITED MOTOR COURTS 

LOS ROBLES MOTOR LODGE 



Auburn Blvd. - Highway 40 and 99 E 
Phone HI 9-3516 

SACRAMENTO CALIFO'' 



OLD 12 MILE HOUSE 



TOPS IN FOO'i AND 
MIXFn DR'NKS 



511 Fulto 

SACRAMENTO 



Off Fair Oaks Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



On U. S. 40 - Aubu 



LONE OAK MOTOR COURT 

ALL KITCHENETTE APTS. • STEAM HEAT 

Don & Thelma Olsen, Props. 

Look for the Lone Oak 

Comer Auburn Blvd. and Watt Ave. - Hwy. 40 - 99E 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



STROTHER REALTY 



HOMES • I.ANH » FARMS 
INCOME INVESTMENTS 



Opportunities Broke 



Listings Wanted! 



fM C>-"i»"l Av». 
Pb-np r.' '-nsis 



CARMli^HAEI. OFFICE 

Cor. GunnRd »"■" M- -.-oni ; 

Res IV 9-2327 



M. De BACCO, Tile Contractor 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
ESTIMATES GIVEN 



SCOTT EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

'^'^^'^LOGGiNG MACHINERY --r"' 



1139 Fulton Av 

SACRAMENTO 



IVanhoe 9-3130 



CALIFORNIA 



FULTON AVE. MARKET 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



HEWITT MARKET 



A Completp M»-k-' 

CHOICE MEATS • FRESH VEGETABLES • GROCERIES 

BEER AND W'NE 

Phone HI 9-9757 2033 Fulton Ave. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



MEATS 

3241 Fulton Ave 



Phone IV 9-2238 



CALIFORNIAil 



April. Wfil 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



Phone Gilbert 2-0542 



BETTY'S PLACE 

BEER - WINES - HAMBURGERS 
CHILI 



Doggone good place to drink and eat 
Always a Friendly Welcome 

j 1831 Third Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO'S FINEST 
REST AURA NT" 

Specializing in Delicious Food for 
Discriminating People 

LUNCHES AND DINNERS 

BEAUTIFUL COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
LARGE PARKING AREA 

ROSEMOUNT GRILL 

3145 FOLSOM BOULEVARD 
Phone 5-5387 



Phone Hickory 9-7193 

CLARENCE LEE 

Contractor and Builder 

Cabinet Specialties - Remodelini^ 

Home Phone Hickory 5-3591 



2400 Auburn Boulevard 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



ALPINE LUMBER CO. 
OF SACRAMENTO 

PHONE FOR ESTIMATES ON ALTERA IK )NS 

OR ADDITIONS TO YOUR HOME. WE 

FURNISH EVERYTHING. 

Residence Phone: HUdson 4-7565 

Business Phones: 
Hickory 9-9<22 - Hickory 9-OI2( 

Auburn Boulevard Across From 
Municipal Cjolf Course 

POSr OFICE BOX 1954 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



///■r/7. 1951 



THE CHEMICAL 

and 

PIGMENT COMPANY 

Division of 
THE GLIDDEN CO. 



OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 



BLACKWELDER IRON 
WORKS 

E. F. Blackwelder, Manager 



Telephone 136 

Box 808 

RIO VISTA, CALIFORNIA 



DEL PASO MANUFACTURING 

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 
SHEET METAL 

3646 Rio Linda Blvd. Phone Hickory 9-7544 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

DEL PASO PROVISION CO. 

WHOLESALE MEATS 
CHOICE CUTS OUR SPECIALTY 

Route 1, Box 27S3 Phone GI 2-4034 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORN'^ 



DEL PASO HEIGHTS MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 
COMPLETE LIQUOR DEPT. 



Park and Grand Av 



DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



CALIFORNIA 



CORBIN LOCKER PLANT 

PROCESSING - WHOLESALE MEATS FOR HOME FREEZERS 

Box 4S9, Del Paso Heights HI 9-0304 

Rio Linda Blvd. at Grand 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

AUSTIN TRUCKING 

W. H. Austin, Owner 

GENERAL HAULING 
RANCH WORK 



1204 Grand Av 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



Phone HI 9-9541 



CALIFORNIA 



FENLEY KING 

QUALITY MEATS 
FREE DELIVERY 

HI 9-8731 HI 9-7415 

2140 Grand Avenue 



DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



CALIFORNIA 



FOUR OAKS FOUNTAIN & LUNCH 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
HOME MADE PASTRIES • HAND PACKED ICE CREAM 



Phone HI 9-9804 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



2144 Grand Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



DEL PASO RECAP & SPORTING GOODS 

NEW AND USED TIRES AND TUBES 
BICYCLE PARTS 

3611 Rio Linda Blvd. Hickory 9-0805 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

BEER WINE EATS 

GRAND CLUB 

B. L. (Tee) Tewalt, Owner 

CLUB ROOM ADJOINING 

813 Grand Avenue Dial 9-9924 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 



Jpril. 1951 



POLK H AND PHACF. OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



£./?. 



WH/TeL 



EALTY 



FARMS AND HOMES 

PHONES: Office HI 9-3282 - Res. HI 9-S819 

884 Grand Avenue P. O. Box SIS 

DEL PASO HLICmS t ALIIOKMA 



RICHARD E. COONLEY, D.D.S 



564 La Sierra Drivo 
ARDEN TOWN 



Phone IV 9-3113 



CALM ORMA 



L. E. NOLAN, D.B.A. 

AN-NAM CONSTRUCTION 
SEWER CONTRACTING - GRADING 



3660 24th Street 
DEL PASO MF.IGHTS 



Phone HI 9-178S 



I ALII-ORNIA 



LASLEY AND LIVINGSTONE 

IRRIGATION ENC.'NEERS 

RAIN BIRD AND BUCKNER SYSTEMS 

RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL SPRINKLERS 



Phone Hickory 9-9222 



Route 2. Box 549 

CALIFORNIA 



PARKERS SHELL SERVICE 

WASHING • POLISHING • LUBRICATION 
Fair Oaks Bivd Phone HI 9-9785 



CARMKHALL 



CALlrOKMA 



BROWNE'S 

Fraluring COSMETICS • DRUG SUNDRIES • MAGAZINES 
HOME MADE CANDIES • PASTRIES 
FOUNTAIN GRILL • SANDWICHES 



CARMICHAEL 



P. O. Box 14 



I ALIKORMA 



CARMICHAEL SHOE REPAIR 



ARDEN PHARMACY 

Phone IV 9-1486 520 La Sierra Drive 

ARDLN TOWN ( ALMORNIA 



ARDEN VARIETY 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF 
VARIETY MERCHANDISE 



510 La Sierra Dr 
ARDEN TOWN 



Phone IV 9-0149 



TALI FORMA 



THE SMITH BOYS o] Ardeu Toini 

FOR THE BEST IN 
MEAT, DELICATESSEN AND PASTRIES 



3535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 



ARDEN TOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



ARDEN TOWN NURSERY 

A COMPLETE NURSERY 

SHRUBS - TREES - BEDDING PLANTS - LAWN SEEDS 
FERTILIZER - SPRAYS 



Fair Oaks Blvd. 



Phone IV 9-2845 



CARVIIt IIAEL 



t ALIFORNI A 



TOWER CLEANERS 

Joe Finnin, Prop. 
TWO SHOPS TO SERVE YOU 
Del Paso Manor 
Dial HI 9-5164 1905 Marconi A 



GENERAL WOODWORK & CABINET SHOP 



CARMICHAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



lawrenc:e m. porter, d.d.s. 



CARMKIIAKI 



5745 Marconi Av 



CALIFORNIA 



OLIVE INN 

MEALS • BEER • WINE 



Fair Oaks Blvd. 



Phone IV 9-3398 



Pho 



"EVERYTHING FOR THE JUNIOR MISS TO MRS." 

DRESSES • SKIRTS • BLOUSES • LINGERIE 

JEWELRY AND ACCESSORIES 

ARDEN FASHION SHOP 



Telephone IV 9-0533 
vMRAMENTO 



CAI.IFORNIV 



HARRISON'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

ARDEN TOWN 

GAS • OIL • LUBRICATION 

GOODYEAR TIRES • BATTERIES • ACCESSORIES 

WASHING • POLISHING 



Watt and Fair Oaka Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO 



Phone IV 9-1915 

CALIFORNIA 



KAYS FOUNTAIN RESTAURANT 

COMPLETE MEALS AT POPULAR PRICES 



CARMICHAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone IV 9-4818 



CALIFORNIA 



Ed Harfui Re>. Hickory 9-4149 

DEL PASO CAFE 

EXCELLENT FOOD AND MIXED DRINKS 



3600 Rio Linda Blvd. 
DEL PASO IIIK(;ill.S 



Hickory 9-9850 



CALIFORNIA 



rk:ks salon arden 

nalized HAIR SHAPING and HAIR STYLING 

IV 9-4262 3815 Fair Oaka Blvd. 

ARDENTOWN SHOPPING CENTER 



TUCKER CERAMICS 

FREE INSTRUCTIONS 

FIRING AND SUPPLIES 

576 La Sierra Drive Phone IV 9-3103 

ARDI.N TOWN 

ACME PIPE AND SUPPLY CO. 

J. S. Steinhrri 

PIPE AND MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS 

1801 Eaal Camino Ave. Phone HI 9-3076 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



/Ipril. 1951 



POLICE PROMOTION EXAMINATION QUESTIONS 



In the March issue of this journal the following num- 
bered true-false statesments were true : 
1 2 3 5 6 7 10 12 16 18 19 21 

22 23 24 29 30. 



These questions were given in a San Francisco Police 
Department promotion examination, as a true-false test, 
on the subject: Rules of Evidence. 

1. To establish facts, the law requires such a degree of 
of proof as, excluding possibility of error, produces 
absolute certainty. 

2. Oral evidence of the contents of a written instrument 
is secondary evidence of the instrument and contents. 

3. The direct evidence of one witness who is entitled to 
full credit is sufficient for proof of any fact. 

4. When an instrument consists partly of written words 
and partly of a printed form, and the two are incon- 
sistent, the former controls the latter. 

5. An attorney can not, without the consent of his client, 
be examined as to any communication made by the 
client to him. 

6. The judge himself may not be called as a witness by 
either party. 

7. On a trial for bigamy the marriage can be proved only 
by the producing of the marriage certificate. 

8. Any writing may be proved only by the persons who 
saw the writing executed. 

9. Upon a trial for forging a bank note of an incorpor- 
ated bank, the incorporation of the bank can be proved 
only by the producing of its articles of incorporation. 

10. In a criminal case the court has no power to permit 
the jury to view the place where the crime was com- 
mitted. 

11. A subpoena can be issued only by the judge or the 
clerk of the court. 

12. In a criminal case the people may cause the testimony 
of a witness who is about to leave to be taken by depo- 
sition, and said deposition may be used at the trial. 

13. In a criminal case the people may cause the deposition 
of a witness who resides out of the state and use the 
deposition at the trial. 

14. A witness is not required under any circumstances to 
answer questions legal and pertinent to the matter in 
issue, if his answer may establish a claim against him- 
self. 

15. A person served with a subpoena to attend as a wit- 
ness before a court, is exonerated from arrest in a civil 
action, while returning from attendance at such court. 

16. The defendant in a criminal action case may use the 
testimony taken by deposition of a witness residing out 
of the state. 

17. An offer to compromise is a direct admission that 
something is due. 

18. A public officer cannot be examined as to communica- 
tions made to him in official confidence. 

19. Any person who willfully prevents a person who is 



20. 

21. 

22. 

23. 

24. 
25. 

26. 

27. 

28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 

32. 



subpoenaed as a witness in a criminal trial from at- 
tending the trial, is guilty of a misdemeanor. 
Upon a trial for murder the law requires a degree of 
proof that produces absolute certainty. 
The record of a court of competent jurisdiction cannot 
be contradicted by the parties to it. 
It is presumed that a person intends the ordinary con- 
sequences of his voluntary acts. 

When a verdict has been decided by lot by the jurors 
a new trial may be granted. 
A witness can be heard only on oath. 
A witness in a trial can be heard only in the presence 
of and subject to the examination of all parties. 
All statutes are public. 

The court must decide all questions of law which arise 
in the course of a trial. 

On a trial for libel, the jury has the right to determine 
the law and the fact. 

A defendant in a criminal action is presumed to be 
innocent until the contrary is proved. 
The language of a writing is to be interpreted accord- 
ing to the meaning it bears in the place of its execution. 
There can be no evidence of the contents of a writing 
other than the writing itself, except as otherwise pro- 
vided. 

The rights of a party cannot be prejudiced by the 
declaration, act, or omission of another. 



TRUE - FALSE EXAMINATION QUESTIONS 

In the January issue of this journal the following num- 
bered statements, on Rules of Evidence, were true : 
p 3 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 17 



19 



20 22 23 24 29 30 32. 



CHONG WO LAUNDRY 

FOUR-DAY SERVICE • FINE WORK 
2863 California Street WEst 1-4991 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



NIPPON POOL HALL 

1700 Post Street 

Post Street at Buchanan Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



GOLDFIELD HOTEL 

TRANSIENT AND PERMANENT ROOMS 
1S7 Fourth Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



K. J. KITAGAWA, M.D. 

T. TANAKA, D.D.S. 
1568 Buchanan Street Fillmore 6-5288 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



BAY LAUNDRY 



1731 Divisadero Street Phone WEst 1-2420 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



jAfiril. 1951 POIMV. AND PHAGE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 71 



S & S AUTO WRECKERS 

USED CARS AND PARTS WORLD'S FAIR FRENCH LAUNDRY 



Cl 3-9425 211 North I2th Slrct 462S Geary Blvd. SKylinc 1-7716 

' Al IIORMA 



SACRAMENTO '^1. IIORMA ,,,^ , kaNCISCO 



NORTHGATE MOTORS 

DEPENDABLE USED CARS AND TRUCKS FAIR TRADE GROCERY 

601 Nor.h I6,h S.reH Phone Gllber, 3-1 449 GROCERIES • DELICATESSEN • BEER . WINES 

SACRAMENTO CALIIHRNIA 464 Broadway 

,' SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

LATON LUNCH & POOL ROOM 

I "^ ^ '^'''''- °-" W. & J. SLOANE CO. 

SERVING MEALS AND SANDWICHES 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS HOME FURNISHINGS 

Open from 6:00 'til 12:00 

P. O. Box 176 224 Sutler Street 

LATON (AMFORNIA cam rp M^r-icr-r. 
^AN FRANCISCO (A IFOR* '■ 



GODLEYS GARAGE TELEPHONE MARKET 

AUTO REPAIRING AND SERVICE STATION Thomas Cabe, Proprietor 

AUTO WRECKING 
USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD GROCERIES • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 

BEER • WINE 

Phone 2611 P. O. Box 204 o- j d , o 

LATON ( .\| IhORNIA ^'"' ""'' Baker Streets 

— '■ SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

LAGUNA TRADING POST 

H c GONSER, Prop HYSTER COMPANY 

Phone 2102 

444S Third Street Mission 8-0680 

LATON CALIFORNIA 

1^ SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



'^^J:!:^ll^;inir^^ Romeo fruit and vegetable 

COCKTAILS • STEAKS • CHICKEN MARKET 

SWIMMING POOL GROCERIES - FRESH AND DRIED FRUIT 

Phone 2471 5216 Third Street ATwaler 2-8466 

(A.IORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Buiine.s Phone 13 Residence S3-J 

CHARLES W. NICELY GOLDEN STAR CAFE 

AUTHORIZED FORD DEALER 

^ ^B^ j_ SERVING BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 

SALES W^^^^i) SERVICE VERY REASONABLE PRICES 

piv, , .. "^ ">•>■ ""<• B Street 717 Howard Street 

'^"''f^ CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



OLD FRANKLIN MARKET 

PANCHITA'S RESTAURANT 

MEATS • GROCERIES • VEGETABLES 

MEXICAN FOOD 
LIQUORS 

BEER AND WINES • TACOS 

IS59 Franklin Street PRoapect 6-2481 

«AKi «o.v„..,,^ 2644 Third Sira.l 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISIO CALIFORNIA 

FLORENCE RAVIOLI FA( TORY BRUEHLS METAL MANIIFA( TURING CO. 

BEST INGREDIENTS • SKILLFULLY MADE TOOLS •"'dIes' i" 'sTAMPINGS 

■ >k. ^. 1412 Stockton Street TF.mnlebar 2-2900 TU/i.«n.Lr « w\ 

^N FRANC I.S.O CALIFC:)RNIA W , Nl'ixHM I ,m7u.1.T CMKLAND ( "i II ORn'a 



p^ge 72 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL .V /.;•//, 1951 



MIKADO HOTEL WILLAT PRODUCTION COMPANY 

1645 Buchanan Street, Corner of Post Street 1122-1128 Folsom Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORf'i' SAN l-RANCISCO CALIFO 



MONT-BLANC MARKET 

Fred and Henry Lancelotti ALI HOTEL 

Imported and Domestic Groceries - Wmes - Liquors - bruits 
Vegetables - Delicatessen 
1145-49 Grant Ave. EXbrook 2-1977 964 Howard Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFOR^•'• SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CHIN'S LIQUORS & GROCERIES 

Hours 9 A. M. to 12 P. M. - OPEN EVERY DAY BETTY LOU'S CHICKEN SHACK 



2092 Sutter Street JO 7-3663 



1683 Post Street 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MICHAEL A. GORB SINCERE CAFE 

3027 Sixteenth Street 
WATCHMAKER & JEWELER 

WE SERVE THE BEST CHINESE FOOD AND AMERICAN 
5S45 Geary Boulevard Phone BAyview 1-3077 DISHES - ALSO FUT UP TO TAKE HOME 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'K SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SUNNYSIDE TAVERN PHiL'S CIGAR STAND 

MURRAY AND MURRAY 

2978 Sixteenth Street 
CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



133 Sixth Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



TAO LEE YON 

GENUINE CHINESE DISHES 



RED WING BARBECUE CAFE 

Geo. N. Harris, Prop. 
96 Fourth Street Phone SUtter 1-9314 

CALIFORNIA ^AN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

~ VIENNA FRUIT MARKET 

ALL BRITE CLUB groceries • vegetables • fruits • fish 

3317 20th Street ATwater 2-2591 

CALlFORKiA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

BETHLEHEM CAFE 

BEER • WINES • LIQUORS 



2231 Chestnut Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JIMMY BRITTS 

SAN FRANCISCO '74 Eddy Street cALlFORr- SAN FRANCISCO 



2290 Third Street HEmlock 1-9455 

174 Eddy Street ^a, icnR>.- SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



UNION MACHINE COMPANY ^-^^ "O'^^"'^ ^'^"'^ 

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS DINNERS . SHORT ORDERS . SANDWICHES 

934-944 Brannan Street MArket 1-2772 742 "2 Howard Street _ 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNM SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

LA FE GROCERY 
JACKSON MARKET 



1201 Jackson Street 



1052 Folsom Street MArket 1-9016 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFOR NIA 

GENOVA CLUB MONTEREY HOTEL 

1062 Valencia Street 345 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Theresa Wagner Roy Wagner 

CRYSTAL WINE & LIQUORS SPARTA HOTEL • 

4310 California Street SKyline 1-3233 ,,, -.. . . „. 

314 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFOR''". 



UNITED CAFE KELBRA HOTEL 

151 Third Street DOuglas 2-9695 

160 Sixth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



JUILLARD, INC. 
EL REY VENETIAN BLIND CO. 

LIQUOR DISTRIBUTORS 

1455 Bush Street Telephone YUkon 6-01 10 310 Townsend Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNl>^ 



April. lOyl 



POLICE AND PEACF OFFICERS JOURNAL 



I'ngv U 



CHIEF RAYMOND J. McINTYRE 

((','jntiiiiinl iruni fxijif 17 ) 
are the parents of a four year oM daughter. 

Lieutenant Duncan, 34, was born in AnchoraRc, Alaska, 
but came to Salinas 28 years ago. Following his education 
in the public schools he was for seven years with a Salinas 
lettuce firm. He joined the department on June 4. I'H.^ 
He was appointed a sergeant June 7, 1'?4<S. 

Because he is a graduate from the FBI National Acail- 
«ny he will have charge of the training and investigation 
division. 

Like his fellow lieutenant, Duncan ni.inicd .i Soleilaii 
girl, Miss Anita Reghetti. Ihe couple li.i\f two sons, aged 
11 and 13. 

Chief .Mclntyre emphasized the fact that the appoint- 
ments were made as the result of promotional e.vaminations 
and on the splendid records of the three competent officers 
during their incimibency on the SPD. 



SHERIFF H. P. GLEASON 

(('.ontinued from f>ngc 5 ) 
unteer squadron which is comprised of business and pro- 
fessional men, all expert flyers, many with war experience. 

Squadron Captain is George Stone. With George I,. 
Fawkner, a Major in the Civil Air Patrol, he directed 
the landing strip project for Sheriff Gleason's office. 
Br.ooD Donors, Too 

Incidentally, every member of this air squadron is most 
active in the Red Cross blood bank drive. Altogether they 
contributed 100 pints of blood. Right now they are ofiFer- 
ing free airplane rdes to the first 50 persons who volunteer 
blood. 

Sherifif Gleason is justly proud of his \r)lunteer ci\ il de- 
fense volunteers on land and in the air. 

Salute to Sheriff Jack Gleason of Alameda County! 



OLD MISSION GROTTO 

3085 Sixteenth Street 



SAN FRANCISCfJ 



( AI.IFORM A 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SUNSHINE c:afeteria 

117 Third Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



LOUIES CAFE 

3319 Mi»ion Street 



( AI.IFORNIA 



SAN FRANC IS( O 



HOTEL DWAINE 

242 Turk Street 



t Al.lFf)RNI/ 



SQUARE CAFE 

FILIPINO AND AMERICAN DISHES 



' SAN FRANCISCO 



447 Kearny Street 



CALIFORNIA 



! SAN FRANCISC O 



PARAS BROS. 

31 S Third Strert 



Phone 2-976y 

JOCKEY CLUB 

Frank Napoi.i, Prop. 

BEER - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

"Enjoy Yotnself" 

137 Franklin Street 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-5829 

CENTRAL GROCERY AND 
MEAT MARKET 

Friendly Sen ice - Free Delivery 

663 Lighthouse Avenue 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-2321 

PALACE DRUG STORE 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE 

401 Alvarado Street 
MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-960S 

BARRETO'S LA FONDA 

FAMOUS MEXICAN RESTAURANT 

Cocktuil Fonni^c 

ll:M) A.M. to 2:.30 P.M. 
S:M> P.M. (() 10:30 P.M. 

Corner Fremont and Abrego 

M () N T i: R [• Y . C A I. I V () R N I A 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jf,r 



PISTOL POINTING 

(Conliriiicd from pnnc 25) 

Expert Chas. Boomhower . 

Sharpshooter .... S. J. Garner . . 

Marksman 1st . . . Ken McClenaghan 

Marksman 2nd . . . Jim McCue . . . 



.22 Timed fire Match 

Master Art Lindauer 

Expert Charley Young 

Sharpshooter .... Tom Elton . 
Marksman 1st . . . Lewis Erbes . 
Marksman 2nd . . . Miles Kline . 



Ca?iif> Perry Match 

Master Ellis Lea .... 

Expert Harry Baix . . . 

Sharpshooter .... S. J. Garner . . 
Marksman 1st . . . Ken McClenaghan 
Marksman 2nd ... J. McEllanon . . 



Master . . 
Expert . . . 
Sharpshooter . 

Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 



.45 National Match 
Art Lindauer 
Ellis Lea . . 
Ernie Parisi . 
Dan Carrick 
Bob Prichard 

iggregate Match 

Gloria Norton 
Charley Young 
Tom Elton 
Lewis Erbes . 
J. Moroney 



Team Matches — Class "A" 
First Place — California Highway Patrol . 
Second Place — Olympic Club Team A . . 
Third Place — Olympic Club Team B . . 

Class "B" 
First Place — Oakland Police Team No. 1 
Second Place — Peninsula Shooting 

Club Team No. 2 

Third Place — Oakland Police Team No. 2 



278 
275 
271 
241 



198 
196 
196 
191 
168 



294 
290 
289 
278 

244 



282 
277 
266 
267 
233 



1057 

1031 

1021 

992 



1096 
1077 
1029 



1008 

972 

972 



The Oakland Matches 

The Oakland Club did another bang-up job, as per 
usual, with their second match of the year on Sunday, 
April 1st. It might have been April Fools' Day but none 
of the boys were really fooled by the day and none of the 
practical jokes amounted to anything — except the joker 
who shot on our slow fire target in the Camp Perry match 
and cost us the first place medal. However, we accepted 
the third place bronze souvenir and let it go at that. The 
total number of shooters hit the low mark of 190 but as 
the season is just beginning this should increase as we roll 
along. The weather was perfect with no trace of clouds 
or wind so that meant the "no sunshine" award was not 
in evidence. 



Master 

Expert . . . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 
Marksman 3rd 



SCORES 

(jcntcr Fire — National Match 
Jack Ahern . 
Bill Albrecht . 
Jack McNamara 
George Baldi 
Don Nelson . . 
Jack Hines . . 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 
Marksman 3rd 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 
Marksman 3rd 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 
Marksman 3rd 



Centc 
Master . . 
Expert . . . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 
Marksman 3rd 



Master . . 
Expert . 
Sharpshooter . 
Marksman 1st 
Marksman 2nd 
IVIarksman 3rd 



r /• 



-Camp Perry Match 
Karl Schaugaard 
Jack Chaney 
Bill Martens 
Don Gilbert 
Walt Forrister 
George Lee . 



22 National Short 

Ralph Kline . . . 
Ted Stone . 
Charley Woodall . 
Ken McClenaghan 
Eearl Dinsmoor 
Jack Hines . 



22 Ti, 



led Fire Match 
Karl Schaugaard 
Ted Stone . 
Charley \Voodall 
George Baldi . 

E. W. Howes . 

F. J. Hynes . . 



.45 Short National 
Doc Bilafer . 
^Vells Irving 
Tom Elton . 
Ray Freeman 
Bob Mahoney 
John Steele . 



iggrcgatc Match 

Frank Graham . 
Jack Chaney 
Bill Martens . . 
Ken McClenaghan 
E. ^V. Howes . . 
J. Hines . . . . 



Team Scores 
First Place — S. F. Police Team 
Second Place — S. F. Police 

Revolver Club Team No. 1 . . . 
Third Place— Oakland Pistol Club No. 1 
Fourth Place — 12th U. S. Naval District 
Fifth Place— S. F. Police 

Revolver Club Team No. 2 . . . 



1153 



^pril. I 'hi 



KULlCi'. AINU I'UA*..!-. 1>I IK lllO JUUKINAI, 



fage /> 



PhnlU' T\X'lN()AKS 3-996 I 



JAMES Q. LEAVIIT CO. 

CANNERY - DAIRY - BRIAX IKY 
MACHINERY 



1 



410 25th Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



BRODHEAD STEEL 
PRODUCTS COMPANY 



17th and Wisconsin Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



r 

j B. Q. MARKET 

We Buy for Less - We Sell for Less" 

((ioinpliinents to All Peace Officers) 
101 1 Cilcnwood Street 

DlI.ANO, Cai.iiornia 

Phone 9071 
p— ————— ————— ————— —————————— 1 

Best Wishes 

to 

All Peace Officers 

C. D. SIMONIAN 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
Bank of America Building 

Phone 5751 

P. O. Box 343 

FOWLER, CALIFORNIA 



CANTON FLOWER SHOP 

12 Ross Alley - China Town 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Phone YUkon 2-3997 

San Francisco, California 



YEE DAI LEE CO. 



716 Fresno Street 

P. O. Box 102 

PARLIER, CALIFORNIA 



SUN TAI SAM YUEN 


BEST IN 


CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 


622 Jackson Street 


Phone Yllkon 2-28'(i 


San Francisco, CIaiiiorma 
• -..., ...... T » 



T LAND LEVELING SUB-SOILING 

BULLDOZER WORK 

GLEN GORE - Police Reserve 

1621 Krniinglon Slrprt I'hunr 2401 

DLI.ANO CALIhORNIA 









H K N 


' s 


c; 


A I- E 




I'AKI 


11. R 




Phonr 3 


73<1 


Fr 


Ptno SirrrI 


CALIFORNIA 








STAR 


P(X)L 


HALL 








SOKT 


DRINKS • BEER - 


FOUNTAIN SERVICE 








Phon- I25-W 


P 


O. Box 37 




l-AKl 


UK 




1*A 


Frcino 


Strp»t 


CALIFORNIA 



Page 76 



l-'ULICL ANU l-'hALh U^i-lt^tK^ JUUKINAL 



April. 19 til 



Dinuba^s Police Chief Raymond Pruitt 



By Thomas H, Greexe 



Dinuba, a small city of some 5000 contented people, 
occupying a municipal limits of about a square mile, and 
located on the northern end of Tulare County, is the 
center of rich farming area. From the nearby farms, 
ranches and fields there is produced annually one-sixth of 




t'Hii F Raymond Pruitt 

the diversified crops of Tulare County, which total $180,- 
000,000. Roughly there are some $30,000,000 yearly 
brought to those engaged in raising fruits, vegetables, live- 
stock, poultry and field crops. 

There are all varieties of fruits grown in the area — 
both citrus and deciduous. Most every kind of vegetable 
thrive in the sector. Field crops are prolific and cotton 
brings in large returns to the growers. 

There are processing plants for handling all kinds of 
fruits and vegetables. There are cotton gins, meat packing 
plants, wineries, box factories and canneries, which furnish 
employment for hundreds of men and women. 

Noted for its grapes, raised on the rich soil of the dis- 
trict and with plenty of water for irrigation, there is a 
large tonnage of fresh grapes and more for drying into 
raisins, which have become famed throughout the country. 

The homes of Dinuba are well kept places and 15 miles 
of well paved streets give access to motorists. There are 
436 miles of surfaced roads in the 1 75 square miles of 
which Dinuba is an important center. There are 25,000 
prosperous farmers living in this area, and a great majority 
use Dinuba as a trading center. 

Within an hour good roads will take one to many fine 
mountain resorts of the high Sierras, and hunting and fish- 
ing are great. 

Dinuba is a law abiding community, and its resident 
aim to keep it so. The\- have a good and modern police 



department headed b\' Chief RaNinond Pruitt. 

Chief Pruitt was born in Prescott, Kansas, on Febru 
ary 13, 1913. He attended grammar and high schools in 
the midwest. 

After graduating from the latter he moved to Tulsa, 
Oklahoma, where he was employed as a fireman on the 
Frisco Railroad. 

In 1936 he married a Tulsa girl, Wilma Reese. The 
couple has one son, Raymond, Jr., a leader in scholastic 
and athletic endeavors. 

Mrs. Pruitt is very active in civic affairs. She is den 
mother for the local Cub Scouts, who hold their weekly 
meeting in the Pruitt home. 

Chief Pruitt joined the Dinuba Police Department in 
1945 as a night patrolman. His services in that capacity 
were so outstanding that he was appointed Chief on Sep- 
tember 3, 1947. 

He attended the 44th session of the FBI National Acad- 
emy held in AVashington, D. C. in 1950, and completed 
the three month's course, graduating with high honors. 

Dinuba's Police Department is composed of four other 
members. They are : 

Assistant Chief Benjamin Webb. 

Sergeant Floyd Hulsey. 

Patrolmen Phillip Sanders and Elmer Pence. 

In addition there are ten special officers to augment the 
regular force during harvesting season. 

Chief Pruitt is fortunate in having a city council which 
has made possible a new police station, with all modern 
equipment, as well as the department's own radio station 
— call letters KAAT — with a hookup with the office of 
Sheriff Ben B. Gurr's office in Visalia. 

The department has two police patrol cars fully radio 
equipped, replaced every year. 

The city council is composed of Fred Looney, Mayor; 
Myron Frew, Police Commissioner; Don Finley, Foster 
Elam and William Heintz. 

Newly elected Constable of the Dinuba township was 
formerly a member of Chief Pruitt's force, so there is full 
cooperation existing between both departments. 



Phone 1006-W W. J. Cross. Prop. 

EL MONTE MOTEL 

AIR CONDITIONED • PRIVATE BATH 
East of Dinuba City Limits - El Monte Way 

DINUBA CALIFORNIA 

HADEN HOTEL 

THE PLACE TO STAY IN DINUBA 



\ 



of J. & E. Tulare St. 



Phone 94 

CALIFORNIA 



COLLINS RADIATOR SHOP 

Kay Kandarian. Owner 

REPAIRING • RECORING • CLEANING 

NEW AND USED RADIATORS 

Telephone 531 377', South K Street 

DINUBA CALIFORNIA 



April, mi POI.Ki; AND PHACI- OllIC IJRS JOURNAL Page 77 



Arlo C. Gillen Robiit W. GiM.n 

CITY TRANSFER "' NUBA ELECTRIC CO. 

SEEO - FEED CHAIN - HAY - (ARM SUPPLIES WATEB^HEAfERs" i hSuS^ wf«?NS ' "MtTOR'RtpAlRINC 

RADIOS • RANGES • REFRIGERATORS 

Phon.. U 232 South M Slrcpt WESTINGHOUSE AP" lANCES 

Phon.. 11 Z3Z south M sircpt SALES • SERVICE 

D'NL'BA CALIICKMA ,20 South K Strc., 
DINLHA 



J, B. HILL CO. Inc. 

FARMERS FEED & SUPPLY CO. STATE MARKET 

FEED - SEED - POULTRY - EGGS Young Brothers 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
243 So. M Siriet Teh-phone 1 S6 

DINUBA I Al.ll ORNIA '20' J'fferson Street Telephone 9827 



DKLANO (ALIIOKNIA 



DINUBA AUTO CAMP 0>^,L BAIT SHOP 

G. A. Cropper, Prop. 



TRAILER COURT AND CABINS 

GROCERIES - GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

SERVICE STATION 



H. N. Dennis and Sons. Props. 

FRESH BAIT • WORMS • TACKLE 

Hours II P. M. to 7 P. M.— 19 Hours Service 



8B70 MacArthur Boulevard Phone TRinidad 2-81 SI 

I DINLBA CALIIORNIA OAKLAND t ALIIORMA 

, P. O. BOX 728 PHONE 6S0 Code: CALPACK 

' PELOIAN PACKING CO., INC. GIORGETTI PRODUCTS CO. 

GROWER - DEHYDRATOR - PACKER PICKLE PRODUCTS 

RAISINS 

Member Dried Fruit Association ol Calilornia 9507 Edes Avenue Phone SWeetwood 8-8120 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

DINLBA tALIIORNIA 



DINUBA HARNESS SHOP 

Ovid Sleinbrink. Prop. 



CLARENCE BULLWINKEL 



DUPONT PAINTS AND VARNISHES - WALLPAPERS AUTHORIZED DEALER 

Manufacturers o( HARNESS, STRAP GOODS, AWNINGS 
Dealer, in COLLARS. SADDLES, CANVAS 



FORD SALES AND SERVICE 



6300 College Avenue, Near Alcalraz OLympic 3-3113 

OAKLAND l..\LiroRNIA 



PARKS BODY AND FENDER WORKS BILTWELL MATTRESS COMPANY 

H. W. Martin, Prop. 
THE BEE-UNE SYSTEM WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

FRAME AND AXLE STRAIGHTENING Our Trade Mark is Your Protection 

Phone 239- W 143 South K Street 

DINLBA CALIFORNIA 4345 E. 14lh Street KEIIof 2-8942 



OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



EL MONTE REPAIR SERVICE MK. KILPATRICK 

. . . Sitys . . . 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

UNION OIL SERVICE BUY U. S. SAVINGS BONDS 



Phone 12F4 Route 3, Box 452 

^^EPLKv -ALiioRMA HOSKINS HARDWARE 

HUTCHISON'S DRIVE INN oinuba California 



Where All Your Friends Meet 

TRAY SERVICE - RAIN OR SHINE 
Hours 8 A. M. 'Ill 2 A. M. 



LEES MARKET 



400 W. Tulare 

CALIFORNIA 



TATUMS FROSTY FOOD LOCKERS ^^^ LINC, CAFE 

ALWAYS A FRIENDLY WEl.COS 
AND FROZEN FOOD CENTER HOURS II AM. to 12 P.M. 

Phone 686 1 88 North J Street _ Phone 171 189 "L" Strxl 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 78 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



Jf-nl. 1951 



CHIEF BRUCE SPURGEON OF CLOVIS 

liy Thomas H. (jRi;im; 
The City of Clovis is fortunate in having a man of such 
high caliber as Bruce Spurgeon as Chief of Police. 

When he took over as Police Chief the City of Clovis 




Chief Bruce Spurgeon 

was in need of strong and steady hands at the helm of the 
Police Department. 

The finances of the city, now of nearly 3000 population, 
were at a low ebb and crime was on the increase. Chief 
Spurgeon with the aid of the city council, civic groups and 
public spirited citizens and by an energetic campaign soon 
had crime on the run. At present the city's finances are at 
an all time high. 

With the able assistance of Officers Thomas Hageason 
and Spencer Nelson, and Fire Chief James May as relief 
officer the City of Clovis is given a high type of law en- 
forcement. 

Chief Spurgeon has been a peace officer for many years 
and is a veteran of the first and second AVorld Wars. At 
the start of World War II the United States Government 
had need of experienced peace officers to train the boys in 
the Navy for duties on the Shore Patrol. He spent 23 
months on Shore Patrol duty in the Bay Area. 

While stationed in Oakland it was his duty to transport 
prisoners, as well as recruits to the -various cities in the 
states as far east as Colorado. 

Many times it was Chief Spurgeon's job to take full 
charge of forty or more prisoners and transport them to 
another city. A big job for any law enforcement officer, 
but all his missions were completed without the loss of a 
single prisoner. 

Chief Spurgeon returned to Clovis and resumed his job 
as head of the police department, from which he had been 
given a leave of absence. 

The citizens of Clovis have just completed their new 

THE MEN'S WARDROBE 

ELVIN W. HANSON 
1S16 Draper Street Phone 2228 



rodeo grounds with a roomy grandstand. Much of the 
material was donated by merchants and citizens of the 
rich farming area. The last week of April is always rodeo 
time in the city, and plans for the celebration of 1951 call 
for the biggest and best program ever put on. 1 housands 
of people always converge on the town for this annual 
show and this year's events will draw even more. Those 
who attend get their money's worth in fine horsemanship 
and keen competitive contests. 

Chief Spurgeon and his force f)f officers see that no 
crookedness of any kind is permitted to interrupt the en- 
joyment of the throngs who come to have a good time. 



SUPERIOR - ACADEMY GRANITE CO. 

WHOLESALERS AND QUARRIERS 



STEPHEN PRATINI 

1401 No. Calaveras 

Fresno, California 

Phone 2-8552 



PLANT and OFFICE 

Clovis. California 

Phone 146 



HAWTHORN'S CAFE 

OAKWOODS PARK 
FINE FOODS AND COLD DRINKS 



Highway 99. South Kingsburg 

KINCSBURG 



Rt. 2, Box 470 

CALlFORNIAi 



OWEN GROCERY & SERVICE STATION 

D. M. Owen 

General Line of GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 

UNION OIL PRODUCTS 

Phone 5570 Rt. 2, Box 379 

KINGSBURG CALIFORNIA 

McINTYRES MARKET 

FRESH MEATS, GROCERIES AND 
SERVICE STATION 



RT. 2, BOX 4 70 



KINGSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN'S TRUCK STOP AND CAFE 



402 High Street 



Phone 9830 



KINGSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



(Best Regards to our 
Police Officers) 



* 



CLOVIS FRUIT COMPANY 

Arthur Azhderian 

Growers and packers of 
DRIED FRUIT AND RAISINS 

Herndon & Minnewawa Ave. 

CLOVIS, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 266- P. O. Box 741 



Ifiril. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACH OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pai^e 79 



i:. (Ed.) Bri:tz 

L. H. (Lor ) Bri rz 

R. W. (Hon) Hrit/ 

BRETZ LUMBER 
COMPANY 

DEALERS IN 

SUGAR PINE AND 

PONDEROSA PINE LUMBER 

BUILDING MATERIALS 



Phone Clovis 59-F-4 

P. O. Box 86 
CLOVIS, CALIFORNIA 



WING'S CAFE 

Open 24 hours - (Jooled by Refrigeration 
(Compliments to our Fine Police Force) 

Wc Cater to Banquets and Parties 

Phone ';o 11 - 1301 High Street 

DELANO, CALIFORNIA 



SPLIT REDWOOD 
STAKES AND POSTS 

MIRIGIAN TRUCKING CO. 

(.ouTlcty Strike ,iml Itmiriil (tirfioii 
llfAl ^H IN 

GREEN AND DRIED FRUITS 
KIRK MIRIGIAN 

p. (). Box I5S Phone 3^26 

Fowler, California 



DIXIE DRIVE -INN 

We Thifik It's Di II u hit's V in est 
Across from the Fire House 

Featuring Borden's Ice Cream 

Hours 7 A.M. 'til Midnight 
493 East Tulare 

DINUBA, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 987 



UNITED MARKET 

David 'i'ouNt,, Pmi). 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Complete line of Groceries & Vegetables 

Phone 260 - 142 East lulare 

DINUBA, CALIFORNIA 



M A R C E I L ' S 

PiojK H. G. 'Hill ; hri 1 in- 
American Dishes - Steaks - Chops 
Cocktails - Mixed Drinks 



337 West Tulare Street 

DINUBA, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 998 
—————— — — -— . — ———„„--„__«._- 



Dinuba Floor Covering Co. 

>X'ii I I I I Mah UN, Piiijnitliii 

(ORK • rubber ■ ASPHALT TILT 

carpets - VENETIAN BLINDS 

LINOLEUM - MASTIPAVE 

Telephone 7()4 230 South K Street 

DINUBA, CALIFORNIA 



Piige 80 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jf>ri/. 1951 



FOWLER'S POLICE CHIEF S. W. JOHANSEN 

Chief S. W. Johaiisen, of Fowler, is a native of Sweden 
and came to the United States in 1905, settling in the 
small town of Bowles in Fresno County. There, in 1922, 
he married Clara Peterson, a native of the small commu- 
nity. Mrs. Johansen has been of great assistance to her 
husband in his official duties and besides being active in 
civic organizations she has for many years been PBX tele- 
phone operator for the Police and Fire Department. 

The Johansen's have a married daughter Mrs. Beverly 
Fearnside, who is the mother of two sons, Stanley, 3 years 
of age, and Michael, born last February. Chief Johansen 
and his wife are justly proud of their grandchildren. 

Chief Johansen first entered law enforcement work in 
1925 when he was made a special deputy sheriff in Ala- 
meda County, where he served for two years. Following 
this service he returned to Fowler, where he had moved 
from Bowles, and engaged in private business. 

On February 22, 1922, he was unanimously chosen by 
the city council to take over the duties of Chief of Police, 
and has served well ever since. 

When he became Chief there was but one other officer, 
and neither he nor the chief had uniforms, and had to use 
their own cars for patrol duty. The work day for each 
officer was 12 hours. 

Today there are three regular officers, and one special 
traffic policeman. Uniforms are provided and a new prowl 
car is now in service, equipped with two-way radio and a 
complete arsenal. The men work eight hour watches. 
Those serving the Police Department besides the Chief are : 
Officer L. L. Martin, acting assistant chief on night 
watches, and George W. Brukare. Special Traffic Officer 
is Fred Hayes. 

Mayor C. P. Buchanan and his fellow councilmen, Car- 
roll W. Wright, H. H. Kaspariand, L. R. Toreson and 
Viggo C. Madsen, who is also Police Commissioner, work 
closely with Chief Johansen on all modern improvements. 
At the present time plans are under discussion for a new 



city jail in the near future. 

Under the able guidance of Chief Johansen a good 
civilian defense organization has been formed. 

Even though the City of Fowler is free of vice and 
crime the chief and his assistant have given great aid to 
the sheriff's office in the pursuit and capture of wanted 
criminals. 

A recent case in which Chief Johansen figured, promi- 
nently, was that of the Black Mountain torturer. On 
April 22 last year at 3 :30 p. m. the chief was checking re- 
ports that came to his office and was struck by the awful 
torture murder of an old recluse named Ejnar (Smokey 
Joe) Asmussen. His multilated body had been discovered 
just two days before. 

The outer door of the chief's office opened and in strode 
two youths. One was a big swarthy youth of 22 years and 
weighing over 20O pounds. His companion was slender, 
thin faced, and had a worried, furtive expression. 

The thin faced youth spoke up and said: "Chief, we 
want to talk to you about the murder of 'Smokey Joe' up 
at Tollhouse." Tollhouse is a small community not far 
from Fowler. 

Chief Johansen quickly realized he had a mighty fine 
clew to the brutal and savage murder. He called the 
sheriff's office in Fresno, and then began taking down 
statements from the two lads. 

Fifteen minutes after the phone call, Deput\' Sheriffs 

JORGENSEN FUNERAL HOME 

p. O. Box 245 

Byron B. Haller, Funeral Director 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

Fifth and Merced Streets 



FOWLER FLORAL SHOP 

"ORCHIDS TO MOTHER ON HER DAY" 
Viggo C. Madsen, Police Com 



WING SING CHONG CO 

Importer and Exporter 
GROCERIES - WINES - LIQUORS 



1076 Stockton Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



YUkon ■2-4171 



CALIFORNIA 



FILLMORE QUALITY MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 
BEER AND WINES 



1624 Fillmore Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN MARKET 



MEAT • POULTRY 



VEGETABLES 



1714-16 Filln 
SAN FRANCISCO 



6-3311 

CALIFORNIA 



P. O. '?ox 91 



CALIFORNIA 



FLOYD WILKINS NUT CO. 

Processor and Buyer 
Custom Work— Hull, Shell, Clean and Pack 
ALMONDS • PECANS • WALNUTS 



Phone 4171 



Rt. 1, Box 15 



CALIFORNIA 



Since 1885 - J C & S 

J. CARTWRIGHT & SON 

Manufacturers 

PRUNING SHEARS • DROP FORGING • HEAT TREATING 
GIRDLING TOOLS • TRU-CUT TIN SNIPS • HEDGE SHEARS 



MALAGA, CALIFORNIA - U.S.A. 



PHONE - FRESNO 2-6191' 



SHO'S FOOD CENTER 

Phone 113 P. O. Box 517 

740 Fresno Street 



CALIFORNIA 



^pril. I'A^l 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page SI 



Hunt, Pieretti and Lackie arri\eii and with the chict soon 

had the whole story. 
I The two youths not wanting to be involved in a murder 
i charge named a third man, Claude Osborn of Fowler. 
I The boys said Osborn had approached them and asked 
I to be taken to Ejnar Asmussen's cabin to recover a pair ot 
i shoes, which he had left there after committing the 

murder. 

Led by the chief, the deputies and Officer Martin, who 

knew Osborn, started for the latter's home. A plan of 

action had been prepared. At a signal from Chief Johati- 
I sen the three deputies walked up to the front door of the 
I Osborn home, and knocked. The wanted man looked out 
I a window, and seeing the sheriff's men, realized the jig 
I was up. He made a break for the back door, but when he 
I saw Chief Johansen and Officer Martin, with guns ready, 
t he wheeled in his tracks, and strode to the front of the 

house and meekly gave himself up to the deputy sheriffs. 
' At this time Claude Osborn awaits execution in the gas 
I chamber at San Quentin. 

j This is a splendid example of cooperation on the part 
j of the law enforcement officers and the\ are to be con- 
I gratulated for clearing up such a ghastly crime. 

John Tarkanian. Prop. Open 6:30 A. M. to 8 P. M. 

MIDWAY GROCERY 

FULL LINE OF GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS 

WINE. BEER. SOFT DRINKS 

3rd and Midway Phone 224 

CLUMS CALIFORMA 

CEORGES MOTOR SERVICE 

COMPIETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

BODY AND FENDER WORK - PAINTING 

Phone 2S3I P. O. Box 427 

I FOWl LR I \LIFORMA 

EASLEY & CAUDLE 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 

I Adam> and U. S. 99 Highway Phone 9321 

! FOWLKR ( Mil ORM \ 

CLUB G U S S 

"GOOD FOOD. COURTEOUSLY SERVED" 
) BEER • WINE • SOFT DRINKS 

8 A. M. 'til 2 A. M. 
I Phone 9611 P. O. Box 336 



C ALIFORMA 



GADDIS MOBILE SERVICE STATION 



p. O. Box 382 



Al II ORM.\ 



U. S. 99 SERVICE STATION AND CAFE 

Aivazian. Bra>., Prop. 

GAS - Butane ■ DftI 

TRUCK SERVICE 

Open 24 Hour> Phone 9141 



< AI.IFORNIA 



.LSI KM. DF.I.IVF.H^ 



FOWLER C:OURT 

Mr. and Mr.. Henrickt 
TEN MONTHLY COURT RENTALS 

FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED 
, M'le South of Fowler on 99 Hifhwa 



I IIWI IK. 1 Al II iiKSIA 



Jo. Maciel, Prop. P. O. Box 58 

FOWLER FEED STORE 

GRAIN - FEEDS • SEEDS - SULPHUR 

TRAY PAPER - FERTILIZER 

Phone 3391 99 Hi(hw.iy Between Clay and Adama 

fO'*'' I R CALIFORNIA 

YONAKI BROS. SERVICiE 

TEXACO 
Phone 995S Qth and Glen 



FOWLER LUMBER CO. 

Lumber Yard and Store Merced and 7th Street 

LUMBER - HARDWARE - PA NT 
P. G Frnni. Man.ijer 



Phone 2671 



I" n 



ALIFORSIA 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
/■;/ DELANO, CALIFORNIA 

ofFers complete banking facil'ties including savings, commercial, 
loan, escrow service, safe depo-sit, .Tnd many other departmirnts to 
meet your individual needs. Come in often. 



M.-mber F.D.I.C. 



Member Federal Re 



STRADLEY'S MARKET • 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 
BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 



1017 Main Street 



Phone 3421 



l^ \L1I ORM \ 



PARTS 2371 



-SHOP 9137 



SEVIER'S AUTO SUPPLY 

AUTOMOTIVE JOBBERS 
"Everything Automotive" 



425-27 99 Highway 



DELANO 



CALIFORNIA 



Harold Southwick Ted McLachlii 

SOUTHWICK'S 

FEED • SEED • GROWERS SUPPLIES 
INSECTICIDES • FERTILIZERS 



COLBERT'S JEWELERS 

1015 Main Street Phone 7167 

DELANO IMIKIKMV 

QUALITY SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

E. Towery 

RED WING SHOES AND BOOTS 

GENERAL LEATHER "ppAIR 

SHOE REBII" 'ilNG 



I 124 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 9593 



Phone 9802 



HAYW ARD LUMBER AND 
INVESTMENT CO. 

John C. Meiner. "Jack" 



I2IS High Slrrel 



I \l II (IMM \ 



f ALIFORNIA 



TAKAKI PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 
907 Glenwond Street Phone 94« 



ACCURACY 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 82 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. I '/''I 



Chief Scott, 2 Years As Head of Delano P D 



B\ Ihomas H. GrkI'Xi; 



Delano, one of the major cities of Kern County was 
founded in 1870, but was not incorporated into a munici- 
pality until 1915. For many of its early years the district 
was noted for sheep raising, then later a great shipping 
center for wheat. But with water made a\ailable for irri- 




Chief Meri.e Scott 

gating the rich soils for the past half century it has devel- 
oped into one of the richest areas of the continent. 

More than $10,750,000 worth of cotton is raised annu- 
ally, the fields produce the greatest crops, running from 
60Q to 750 pounds per acre. Potatoes bring in over $4,686,- 
000 yearly. Table grapes produces each to the extent of 
some $3,500,000, and wine grapes nearly $900,000. Al- 
falfa puts over $850,000 into the growers pockets, fol- 



lowed with around $600,000 from cantaloupes, and over 
$434,565 from raisins. The first raisin vineyard was 
planted in 1890. 

AVith other crops the annual income is close to $24,000,- 
00 per annum. 

There are 8672 people living within the incorporated 
limits of Delano. A fine city hall houses the mimicipal de- 
partments, and the police department has its station next 
to the city hall. 

Delano has a police department of ten police officers 
working under a competent chief in the person of Merle R. 
Scott. 

Chief Scott was born in Delano in 1917. After gradu- 
ating from the Delano High School he became a safety offi- 
cer and school bus driver, until November 1, 1942. The 
then police chief, H. L. Martin, realizing that Merle 
Scott had the real capabilities, as well as understanding of 
the many problems confronting law enforcement, ofiFered 
the bus driver a position as patrolman on his force. Young 
Scott accepted and as a result the city soon became "safety 
wise," with a marked decrease in automobile accidents. 

When young Scott became a patrolman the town had 
but six men on the police roll. 

On March 1. 1949, he was appointed Chief of Police, 
a position he has held with high honor ever since. 

Under the efficient leadership of Chief Scott, the depart- 
ment was increased ten members. The department has two 
patrol cars fully equipped with two-way radio. Also a 
complete arsenal, handled by members of the department 
who know how to handle the various weapons. 

There are also two walkie-talkie radios which are used 
in foot patrol duty. 

The city council has been most cooperative with the; 
police department and all requests and suggestions of Chief 



t"C A v^. 









r ^il>^ri' I •- !■ i' V rfi li,fi \ 



THESE MEN GIVE DELANO GOOD LAW ENFORCEMENT 



Regular Police — top row, left to right: Officer Al Browser, Desk 
Sergeant Sam Lancaster, Officers Roy Marshall and Paul Rine- 
hart. Desk Sergeant Lome Lewis, Chief Scott. Bottom row; 
Officers A\ Espinnsa and Charles McNutt, Asst. Chief Flovd 
Boylcs, Officers Clarence Hardy and Henrv Aramlnila. 



Reserve Officers, top row, left to right : Boh Moonty, CJlenn Gore, 

Kenneth CJray, Richard Vount, John Sprague, C. Hundson, Floyd 

Horsey. Bootom row: David Enri<iuez. James Parker, Henry 

Aramhula, Clyde Henry, Joseph Vergano, Willie Lott. 



April. 1951 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 8.} 



Scott are given immediate attention. 

All regular officers have received trainirig in all phases 
of police work, and have attended various training courses 
under the direction ot the FBI and State Peace Officers' 
Association through the State Board ot Education. 

In addition to the regular force of ten men. Chief Scott 
and his men have trained and equipped a twelve man re- 
serve officer corps, ready at all times for any emergency. 

With the regular force augmented by the reserve corps 
Chief Scott is well able to meet any disaster that may be 
visited on the two square mile area of the city. 

Due to large percentage of Spanish speaking citizens, 
Chief Scott has added an officer to his department who 
speaks the language, and it has been a great aid in con- 
tacting and imparting what the Mexican populatioti must 
do to observe the laws of the land. 

Delano is a city free from vice and crime, and juvenile 
delinquency is held to a minimum, due greatly to the many 
parks and supervised playgrounds. All the youngsters of 
the city are very fond of Chief Scott, and readily seek his 
advice on their problems. The chief is always available to 
umpire a baseball game, judge a contest of other athletic 
skills put on by the "kids" on their youth program. 

The less fortunate adults are always assured of a kindly 
ear when they bring their troubles to Chief Scott. He is 
an understanding listener and able to impart constructive 
advice. 

Various civic groups and numerous individuals have 
started a pistol and rifle range, and when completed will 
be the envy of other cities within Kern County. It will be 
opened to the public, and will be supervised by the police 
department. 

There will be a place for reloading cartridges with all 
necessary tools. 

It is planned to hold matches in both types of firearms 
and they will all be held under the direction of the DPI), 
ind out-of-city teams will be invited to take part in the 
matches. 

Chief and .Mrs. Scott are the parents of a two and a 
half year old son. 

Mrs. Scott is acclaimed for her culinary attainments, 
and is considered one of Delano's finest hostesses. She is 
prominent in many civic activities and always has time to 
give council to those who come to her for advice. 

Having demonstrated during his first two years as chief 
law enforcement officer his competency, there seems to be 
valid reason why Chief Scott can't equal the record of 
former Chief William Stanford who was chief of V'allejo 
for over 35 years. If he d<-sires it we sincerely hope he 
attains that goal. 



Houn 9 'IH 12 P. M. 



CiREEN GRILL 



FILIPINO FOOD OUR SPECIALTY 

BREAKFAST • HAM AND EGGS AND BACON 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

707 - I2lh Strt«l Phon» 9904 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

T .V M RADIATOR SERVICE 

Robrri Kni»hl. Ownrr 

CLEANED • REPAIRED • RECORED 

RADIATORS OUR SPECIALTY 

Phonr 9072 1409 Hlfh Strrit 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



E. & J. ELECTRIC 



HOTPOINT DEALER 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 

RADIO AND APPLIANCE REPAIRS 



DELANO 



Phonr 9034 



I 103 Main Street 



CALIIORNIA 



Clyde Herren. Prop. Phone 3S0I 

Herren's Upholstery and Body Shop 

AUTOMOBILE PAINTING AND UPHOLSTERING 

BODY AND FENDER WORK 

POLICE RESERVE 

DELANO lAI.IIORMA 

BEER WINE 

KIM'S Steak uud I'ried Ch'nkiu House 

CHINESE DISHES* ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 
718 High Street Phone 9I8S 



DELANO 



CALIFORNIA 



CITY DRY CLEANERS 

MRS. W. H. DUDNEY. Owner 
15S4 High 641 F Street • Phone 7552 

EARLIMART. CALIFORNIA WASCO. CALIFORNIA 

920 Main Street Phone 5147 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



PARKERS WATCH SHOP 

JIM PARKER — POLICE RESERVE 
914 Main Street Phone 2986 



CALIFORNIA 



DELANO HOTEL 



Phone 9030 



930 Main Street 



DELANO RECREATION CENTER 



1004' 3 Man Street — Downstaii 



Phone 9S43 

CAl IIOR' 



REFRIGERATORS RADIOS 

THOMSEN BROS. 

COIN OPERATED PHONOGRAPHS 



Phones 3301 



I III 2 Main Street 



Nite 3301 - 5246 

DELANO. CALIFORNIA 



STRAUSS JEWELERS 

HOUSE OF PERFECT DIAMONDS 
llth and Main Phone 2841 



CALIFORNIA 



PEACOCK DAIRIES, INC. 

1123 Hifh Street Phone 7321 



Al II ORNI \ 



Greyhound Coflfcc Shop and Fountain 

Bill and Iria l.ott 

GOOD SANDWICHES AND THICK MILK SHAKES 

POLICE RESERVE 

Phone 3521 1112 Hi(h Street 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

THE CLASSK SHOP 

"Where Style i> lne»pen>ive" 

READY-TO-WEAR • SPORTSWEAR • LINGERIE 



DELANO 



1210 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



"C.onif)litnet/ts of a Friend 
to all Police Officers" 



CALIFORNIA 



DELANO WASCO BAKERSFIELD TAFT 

GEO. HABERFELDE, Inc. 

1032 Golden Slate H'fhoav 

AUTHORIZED FORD DFAIXR 

Phon* 64«l Mailini Addir..: P O. Boa S47 

DELANO CAI.irORNIA 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Atril. 1951 



MAYOR ELMER E. ROBINSON 

(Continued on page 4) 
of our school children to take courses in first aid as a meas- 
ure of self-defense, over 11,000 parents of San Francisco 
school children have indicated their intention to take such 
training. On this point I am happy to inform you that all 
members of the San Francisco Police Department are to 
be instructed in first aid. 

\Ne have already disseminated throughout the city cop- 
ies of the official booklet "Survival Under Atomic Attack" 
with the request that the booklet be read aloud to members 
of each family receiving a copy. 

But though our city departments are thoroughly aware 
of their responsibilities ; though we have had excellent co- 
operation- from such organizations as the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company, the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, the Western Union; though we have plans, 
which, in the judgment of Admiral Cook and the members 
of the Disaster Council and Corps, are admirably fitted to 
the emergency, plans remain pieces of paper unless and 
until the volunteers step forward to translate those plans 
into action. 

At the outset of my remarks to you I stated the size and 
the depth of the problem which confronts us now. I did 
it in stark terms because, in my judgment, no other terms 
are adequate or, indeed, admissible. I feel, as I am sure 
you do, that the American people can face up to the chal- 
lenge which hangs above their families, their community 
and their nation. 

We must have self aid — aid to each other within our 
families, aid to others on our block, aid to the people of 
our district, and strong, firm mutual aid between the cities 
and the states of this country. 

For we, the American people, are now the arsenal of 
freedom not only in the sense of providing the sinews and 
the weapons of war, but also and to a greater degree in 
demonstrating to the world the tangible blessings of free- 
dom and of democracy in our standards of living, in our 
way of life and in the principles which endow every man, 
woman and child in this country with that dignity which 
comes only from a recognition of rights which cannot be 
violated with impunity by any tyrant or any group which 
happens to wield political power and uses it as an instru- 
ment for the destruction of human dignity, human decency 
and human freedom. 

The challenge is great, but the response to that chal- 
lenge must be and shall be overwhelming. We shall meet 
the threat of terror with confidence, courage and resolu- 
tion. We shall not panic and we shall not surrender our 
heritage of freedom. 

AVe shall meet this threat united, resolute and prepared, 
as every generation of Americans has met, and please God, 
shall always meet any threat, internal or external, to the 
security of our people and to the survival of the United 
States of America. 

MCCARTHY MOTOR LODGE 

M. D. McCarthy, Manager 

AIR CONDITIONED 

Phone 3371 On U. S. Highway 99 

SOUTH END OF DELANO. CALIFORNIA 



LAUNDROMAT HALF-HOUR LAUNDRY 



Ph 



SPURRIER NEWS AGENCY 
9473 1213 Jefferso 



CALIFORNIA 



UNITED CAFE 

YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED 
Phone 5741 1009 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



THE YELLLOW CAB CO. 



10191/2 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CLUB G. & M. 



Billiards 



George and Charlii 
1005 Main Sti 



CALIFORNIA 



CASA BLANCA CAFE 

COCKTAILS 

DINE AND DANCE 

On Highway 99, 2 MIL'S South of 



CALIFORNIA 



DELANO AUTO COURT 

E. H. Chamberlin, Prop. 

MODERN CABINS - AIR CONDITIONED 

GROCERIES - GAS STATION - CAFE 

Telephone 4351 1800 Highway 99 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



RICHFIELD TRAILER COURT 

Cec I and Highway 99 
Box 38 Phone 9096 



CALIFORNIA 



Underhill Edgar Harpe 

A. AND U. MARKET 

WHERE QUALITY AND SERVICE PREVAILS 
Phone 2411 1206 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GENERATORS. STARTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS - AMERICAN 

BOSCH, CASE, FAIRBANKS MORSE WICO MAGNETOS 

SALES AND SERVICE 

DELANO IGNITION WORKS 



1411 High Street 



Pho 



9097 



CALIFORNIA 



LEADER DEPARTMENT STORE 



A. Bronstein, Prop. 



Bus. Phone 4531 



1107 Main Str 



CALIFORNIA I 



DELANO REFRIGERATION SERVICE 

Y. Hernandez, Owner 

SALES AND SERVICE 

COMMERCIAL AND HOUSEHOLD • NEW AND USED 

Phones 9727 - 7376 913 - 12th Avenue 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 



Salvadore Tor 
lurth and Glen' 



CALIFO'^NI/1 



WINGATE POULTRY MARKET 



THE CLUB 

WHERE FRIENDS MEET 

Buster Chroman, Prop. 
1007 Main Street Phone 4921 



CALIFORNIA! 



lipri/. 1951 



POLICI- AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Telephone 6-2042 

COLLEGE HARDWARE 
AND CYCLERY 

Hardware - Household Goods 

Paints - Appliances - Cyciery 

Mower Sharpening and Repairs 

Schwinn Bicycles 

2760 Twenty-first Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



SETZER FOREST 
PRODUCTS 

Maiiujiicliirers of 

California Sugar 

and 

Ponderosa Pine Lunilx-r 

Box Shooks 

Factory and Pattern Stock 

Pres-to-logs 

Timbers 

Mills and Factories 

Greenville and Sacramento 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



THE DORRIS LUMBER 
AND MOULDING CO. 



p. O. BOX 2688 

Sacramento 10, California 



UNITED CONCRETE 
PIPE CORPORATION 



OfTKc Phone 5-4847 
Residence Phone 5-3809 

Sacramento, California 



Sec 
U. 


. 34.66 P. L & R. 
S. POSTAGE 


San 
P 


PAID 

Francisco, Calif, 
ermit No. 3172 



Return Postage Guaranteed 
46S Tenth Street, San Francisco 3 



"^^f^X^- 







Lumber Jack Says: 

BUILD IT AND 
BUDGET IT THE 
STEINER WAY ! 






Three Big Yards to Serve You 

SACRAMENTO • CARMICHAEL 
OROVILLE 



HORSESHOE SHOPPING CENTER 

Del Paso Blvd. at Cantalier NORTH SACRAMENTO 



THE MERRIANN DRESS SHOP 



Open Evenings Til 9:00 P.M. 
101 -A Cantalier Street 



Phone HI 9-6581 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



LUCKY CLEANERS 

Repairs and Alterations a Specialty. We Give Cash Checks 

FREDA L. REDD HI 9-3050 



BALLINGER'S BUTTON BOX 

Headquarters for Knitting and Sewing Supplies 
FREE Knitting Instructions. HI 9-6106 



HOUSE OF UNUSUAL GIFTS 

DEL PASO GIFT SHOP 
Mildred Gerardy HI 9-8817 



Brewer's Stationery & Office Supplies 

EVERYTHING FOR THE OFFICE 
WE DELIVER HI 9-7019 




THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

fra,Ven0^ int. Ftb. lO, ISeS ■ Mcmhtr Fidtral Dipml Imuranct Corp. ^iU^ 

526 California St. and 405 Montgomery St. • San Francisco 

Eight Complete Offices— Six in San Francisco ■ Oakland ■ Burlingame 
Parker S. Maddux. President 



9Mn rKMnwiDWv^ 





REAR ADMIRAL A. G. COOK 

Direcfor, San Francisco Disaster 

Council and Corps 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Compliments 
To All Our Fine 

Peace Officers 

THE DAILY REPORT 

WM. BREITINGER 



Our Specialty: 

LEGAL NOTICES 



1660 Chester Avenue 

Bakersfield, California 



Merchants Association 
of Bakersfield, Inc. 

Credit Reports 

THE CREDIT BUREAU 

Phone 4-9771 

Credit Center Bldg. 

1712 K Street 

THE 

CREDIT 

BUREAU 

Collections 

HERBERT P. SEARS CO. 

Phone 5-5981 

Credit Center Bldg. 

1712 K Street 

Best Wishes to our Sheriff Tom Kelly 
and Utider sheriff Wm. 'Bill" Dolan 



KELLY AND SON 

City and County Properties 

OIL LANDS 



'Best Wishes to Our Police 
and Sheriff's Office 



1712 Chester Avenue 

Bakersfield, California 

Phone 5-5091 



PEACOCK DAIRIES, INC. 

Phone 4-4761 



PEACOCK 
MILK AND ICE CREAM 



"Best Wishes To Our 
Sheriff's Department" 



130 East 18th Street 

Bakersfield, California 



■^i 



June. 1051 



POLICE AND PFACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pitge 1 



Featured in This Issue 

PAGE 

S. F. Civilian DrfiiiM- Well t)rKani/tcl 3 

By Rfar Admiral A. G. Cn»k 

Chief Hvdit Ha> Made Merced a Iniiid lOwn . . 5 

By Opit I.. H'arnrr 

Chain Reaction Clears Seattle Murder 6 

How Cr<iok> Are Cacght 7 

Junior Trartic Patrol of S. F. in Annual Review . . 8 

Mv Old Home Town. San Bernardino, Ha> CJn.wn In 

By Opif /.. Ifiirncr 

Brutal Thugs Caught in Salinas II 

ln>i> County Has a tJood Sheriff 12 

Bishop, Inyo County, and Its Police Oepartment 13 
By I'nJfrs/ieriff I'rrn Brandon 

Sheriff Thomas Kelly of Kern County 14 

Sheriff Whitmore Gels His Man 15 

From a Man Who Knows the Score — Director J. 

Edi:ar Hoover's Statement Before Senate Committee 16 

S. F. Juvenile Bureau 17 

The Sign of the Red Hand 18 

By B. C. Bridges 

Bay Counties' Peace Officers Meet 19 

Editorial Page — Kefauver Crime Commi-sion Sa>s 

S. F. White Spot of Nation 2(1 

Polire-Fire Departments' Charity Baseball (Jame . 21 

Turlock's Chief Oliver on Second Year in Office . . 22 

Stanislaus County's New Sheriff KeHay 23 

Chief Flohr, Santa Rosa, an 11-Year Man .... 24 

Petaluma Officer Park Shows How to Write a Report 28 

Associated Public Communications Officers May 

Meeting 31) 

Modestr)s Police Chief Pickering 32 

Marin County Murder Solved by Hard Work ... 33 

!' ■itrewoman Mileslein, Vallejo, "Woman of the 

■ ir" 36 

I) Class of .April, 1931, Has Reunion 55 

li McPcrmott Recovered From Serious Illne-s 58 

rpts From S. F. Police Ordinances 62 

\ico Chief Promotes Crwiperation 65 

70 
73 
76 
78 
79 



' '■ Promotion Examination Questions . 

I Pointing — By J. Ross Dunnigan .... 

. Iilights of Cniform Crime Reports f..i \'>W 

Vacation Reminders 

Th. Candid Friend 

'v Opif I.. Harnrr 

:■ .ml Trinta San Mateo Police Deparlcnenl a 



Directory 



I lilt is always pleaded to consider arcictrs tuiuhic fur publication. 
.lions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
pv should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with .1 
I' plume," hut all articles must bear the name -ind jddnss of the 
^^hich will be treated with the strictest confidence. The FniTOR 
' he pleased to consider photofiraphs of officers and of inierestini: 
letters should be addressed to the EriiTOR. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KMA-438 

Mayor, Hon. El.mer E. Robinson 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

ReguLir Meetings, Wediiesiiay, 2:00 p.m., Hall of Justrce 

J. Warsock Wai.sh, President 160 Montgomerj Street 

Washincton I. KoHNKE 686 Sacramento Street 

He\rv C. MA(aNN 315 Montgomery Street 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIKF OF POLICE Micii.vf.i. Gafff.y 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Qitioi.ey 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic Jack Eker 

Dept. Sec'y.... Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRiciC....Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Centrai EnwARD p. Do.>JoHUE 635 Washington Street 

Southern Damei. McKi.em Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Al.ovsius t)'BRlEN 1240 Valencia Street 

Northern Walter Ames 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park Peter Conroy Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond TedTeri.au 451 Sixth Avenue 

I NCELSIDE. ...George M. Heai.v Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taravai Leo Tackney .2348 - 24th Avenue 

PoTRERO John M. Sum.IVAN 2300 Third Street 

Traffic Rmph E. Oistad ll.ill of Justice 

Property Clerk and 

City Prison Bernard McDonald Hall of Justice 

Relief Captain James Carric 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel John A. Engi er Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Otto Meyer Hall of Justice 

Director of Juvenile Bureau 274$ Greenwich Street 

John Meehan 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Informxtion Lieut. Georiie Hippkly Hall of Justice 

iNSP. OF Schools 

Traffic Control Injp, Thomas B. Tract 

Supervising Captain 

OF Districts Jeremlmi J. Couc;hlin 

Chinatown Detaii 

Lieut. Harold Anderson 

R\v<:F MxsrrR Pistol Ranyr. I akr Mrrrrd 

Emu, Dutii. 



Hall of Justice 
Hall of Justice 



When In Trouble Call SUtter hlO-lO 

Vv hen in Doubt m — v. v .. scr i.. 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. 1951 



THE TWIN PEPPERS 



Jim & Harry 



904 North Chester 
OILDALE (Kern County), CALIF. 



Togus Ranch Barbecue 

* 

spit Bar-B-Q Meals 
and Sandwiches 

* 
Banquet Rooms for Parties 

* 

"The Best Barbecue in the West, 
Served Western Style." 

* 
WE NEVER CLOSE 

* 

Stop and say Hello to 
Mary and Henry 



PHONE ORDWAY 3-3040 
DAY - NIGHT OR SUNDAY 

D E V I N E 

National Detective Agency 

Paul H. Devine, Principal 

LICENSED BY 

THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

B O N D E D D 

RELIABLE CONFIDENTIAL 

INVESTIGATIONS 

1286 CALIFORNIA STREET 

Member of 

INTERNATIONAL SECRET SERVICE 

ASSOCIATION 

24-hour Service to All Cities in the United States 



PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 

PLAYLAND 
at the BEACH 

Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks 

Home of Thrill - Provoking Ridet . . . Uniqu* Restaurants 
Fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 

Owned and Operated by 

GEO. K. WHITNEY 



Lloyd and 
Mary Coatney 



Union House 
Television 



SANDWICHES 
BEER 



T CAFE 




3102 Ca.ion 

Boulevard 

Phone 7-5736 

Genial 

Atmosphere 

with 

Service 

San 
Bernardino 
California 



JACK BLAKE Welcomes You 

Club Barrel House 

ON FOURTH street ON THE 
NEW FREEWAY 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



I San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

(B.-.iablished 1922) 




^5 PEACE OFFICERS* 




A Police News 

and Education.il 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyngliii 



Vol.. .\.\\ 



June, 1951 



No. 4 



S. F. Civilian Defense Well Organized 

/>i Ri- \R .Admiral A. G. Cook 
Diri I lor. Sun Frtinci.uti Disaster Council and ('.nrf<s 



1 he organized proiessiona! services of a city — the skill- 
ed groups already trained tor emergency work — are the 
concrete foundation upon which any Ci\ il Defense struc- 
ture must be built. 




Kfar .Admikm. a. G. Cook 



San Francisco, in organizing an intensive Civil Defense 
program under the supervision of Mayor Klmcr E. Robin- 
son, Conuiiander of the Disaster Council and Corps, is Disaster Corps' Speakers' Bureau and have conducted lee 



As liaison officer between the Warden Service and the 
Disaster Corps headquarters. Captain George M. Heal\, 
assisted by Patrolrtian Nick Crivello, has facilitated the 
solution of the many organizational problems faced by 
such an extensive service. 

In the establishment of the Plant Protection Service, the 
concept of which is to make every non-residential structure 
in the city self sufficient in the event of enemy attack or 
other disaster, the work of Inspector Thomas M. Moran 
has been invaluable. 

But not even the best of police departments can cone 
alone with the police problems which would arise in the 
event of an extreme emergency. A Police Auxiliary Re- 
serve is necessary and it is the training of this reserve force 
of volimteers which has been undertaken by the Police 
Academy. 

Patrolman Julius Von Nostitz is liaison officer between 
the Disaster Corps and the Academy. Patrolmen Charles 
Fowlie and Edward Epting. Academy staff members, are 
instructors. 

Inspector Edward Comber, Sergeant William Osterloh 
and Patrolman Howard Markuse conduct in-service trail- 
ing there in atomic indoctrination with more than 1,200 
regular members of the Police Department already trained 
under their program. 

In addition. Comber and Osterloh have ma<le innumer- 
able appearances throughout the city as members of the 



most fortunate in this respect. 

A Police Department, thoroughK organized and trained 
to a high degree of excellence, and other splendid city serv- 
ices, provide a sound basis for this great city's defense ef- 
fort. 

'I"he front lines of Civil Defense- are the police and 
other professional agencies. Headeil by Chief Michael 
Gaffey, the San Francisco Police Department has given 
iinstintingly the services of its trained personnel. 

A former Chief. Michael Riordan, accepted the resixm- 
sibility of heading the Warden Service, now numbering 
more than 5.000 persons and ready for expansion to more 
than .10.000 when the mechanics of organization afid train- 
ing and the establishment of battalion headquarters are 
completed. 



tures on atomic defense for large groups of plant person- 
nel. Both are frequently consulted by the Disaster Corps 
Headquarters. 

An alert or test alert is first received in San Francisco 
at the Police Bureau of Communications, headed by Di- 
rector fieorge Hippely. and fanned out from there t(» the 
various services. 

Lieutenant Weslev Murrav ami Ins(>ector .Mfred (i. 
Arnaud gave valuable assistance in the original organiza- 
tion of the Civil Defense Plant Protection program. 

Captain John E. Meehan of the Police Juvenile Bureau 
has assisted youth groups in the presentation of Civil De- 
fense programs. 

In Planning Directive No. 1. recently issued to all 
members of the Disaster Council and Corps. Mayor Rob- 



P^ge 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jiint', l'>^l 




Former Chief Michael Riordan 




Lieutenant Wesley Murray 



Captain George M. Healy 



inson, as commander, listed the following objectives, in 
the order of their priority, of Civil Defense : 

The saving of lives, by the removal of people from dan- 
gerous areas or buildings; getting the injured to first aid 
stations, and the prevention of entry into dangerous areas. 

Control of fire, which requires a decision by the Fire 
Department as to where a stand will be made. A tempo- 
rary stand to enable rescue squads to operate may be re- 
quired. 

Transportation of injured to hospitals. 

Provision for the care of the homeless by registration 
of casualties and homeless persons, and furnishing the in- 
formation to relatives; furnishing of mass feeding, cloth- 



ing and shelter for the homeless ; prevention of sabotage 
and looting and otherwise maintaining internal security. 

Restoration of normal community life. 

To accomplish this purpose, the directive pointed nut, 
panic miLst be prevented by pre-education on what to ex- 
pect ; pre-assignment of tasks to every individual; calm 
and forceful leadership by all echelons of the entire organ- 
ization under emergency conditions ; immediate isolation 
and care of hysterical persons and prevention of the spread 
of rumors by furnishing accurate information. 

Plans must be simple and flexible. 

Staffs must be organized in depth. 

(CotJtinucd (in page 35) 





^B^^ ^^^ 




Inspector Edward Comber Director George Hippely Officer Nick Crivello 

ALL THOSE PICTURED ABOVE ARE PART OF S. F. POLICE WORKING FOR CIVILIAN DEFENSE L 



JlltlC. I'J.^I 



POLICE AND Pl^ACF OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page :> 



Chief Hydic Has Made Merced A Good Town 



Hy Oi'ii-; L. Warnkr 



Mercfd, the city known for its great variety of fruit. 
vegetable, grain, cotton and other crops, and which for 
many years enjoys the deserved title of "Gateway to the 
^Oseniite" is a vastly changed city from what it was before 
November 18, 1^48. At that time William A. H\(lic, who 




t HItf Wll.LUM llVDlt 

had served for nine years as a member of the Albany Police 
Department under Chief Stanley Williams, became Chief 
of Police of the busy and attractive city. Besides his police 
experience he brought with him a good etlucational back- 
ground. He attended the Berkeley High School, the I'ni- 
versity of California and St. Mary's College. After finish- 
ing his college courses he entered the emplo\ of the Stanii- 
ard Oil Co.. continuing until he became an Albaiu police- 
man. 

When he went to Merced the town was as open as an\ 
in the state. Being a handy stopping off place for the easy 
winners tra\eling from Los Angeles to San Francisco and 
vice versa, some of these shady characters decided to locate 
in this rich community. 'I'here were 18 houses of prosti- 
tution, gambling was plentiful and bookies for racing were 
easily l(K-ated. 

Chief Hydie would have nothing of this kind of illegal 
activities, and he served notice that the easy way of life 
for a lot of the country's scum was over. He met with 
plenty of op|wisition, and many of the good, law abiding 
people of the city were "agin" him cleaning the place up. 
It would hurt business, they claimed. 

However, he was persistent in face of the cry it would 
hurt legitimate business to close the town. He succeeded 
in a comparatively short period of time in giving the easy 
winners the gate, and now any of them traveling through 
Merced don't even hesitate to (ill up their cars with gas. 
They know the heat is on and will stay on as long as Chief 
Hydie is on the jf)b. 

NAOMA'S DRE.SS SHOP 



4774 Kr 
SAl KAMKSro 



OI'EN EVENINGS 
Blvd. Phonr Hlllc 



>l 6-6767 

CALIFORNIA 



And it will undoubtedh stay on long after Chief Hydie 
decides to lay aside his duties, for the business men of the 
community as well as all other law abiding residents con- 
cede that since the town has been closed it has never en- 
joyed such prosperity. We are inclined to believe no one 
down in that garden spot town will ever go to the front 
to have an\' of the vices that once pervaded their section 
re-establishe<i. 

Merced is now a city of over 17,500 people residing 
within its limits. More than 20,000 residents from .sur- 
rounding areas are served by Merced. To protect the city 
of four square miles, Chief Hydie has a force of 22 officers. 
He had 15 when he assumed his present post. 

There are four radio patrol cars and three motorcycles 
devoted to servicing the parking meters of which there are 
844. 

His department work from headquarters which have 
been erected since Chief Hydie became chief. It is mod- 
(•ri)!\ arranged in a two-story building. The lower floor is 
devoted to various units of the department with the latest 
in filing cabinets and other equipment and a radio room 
which served ten units. The upper story is given over to 
an assembly room and personal lockers. 

1 here are few homicides and robberies and not many 
more burglaries. All murder cases coming to Chief Hydie 
and his department have been cleared by arrests and con- 
victions, and the clearance for robberies and burglaries is 
very high. 

To-date there have been two deaths from traffic accidents 
\\ liich is lower than the number at this time a year ago. 

Captain Mahlon Stanley, with two inspectors, W. T. 
.McSwain and Robert Kellerer handle the investigations 
for the department, and they ha\ e acquired a commendable 
record. 

There are three sergeants — A. K. McCully. R. .A. 
Shankland and James T. Finch. 

Officer Jack E. F"ord has charge of the juvenile activi- 
ties. 

'I'he chief has provitled a shooting range for his men 
and when it is completed will be in line with all other fine 
improvements he has introduced. He has FBI experts at 
the range once a year to give instructions and all members 
of the department must (ire from 80 to 150 rounds a 
month for obtaining qualifying scores. 

Chief Hydie is a stickler for police training, not only 
for those who desire to enter police service but tor those 
who qualify for police positions. 

He is a member of John I'eper's State Police Officers' 
'I'cchnical Instructors, Pacific 'Tralfic Officers' 'Training 
School with a teacher's certi(icate. He has this year sent 
tour of his men for courses in the Police Officers' Traim'ng 
School operated at Sheriff H. P. "Jack" (ileason's Santa 
Rita Prison Farm. The chief is also a graduate of the 
(Continued on page 4*^) 



I'n,,- 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. I'>5I 



Chain Reaction Clears Seattle Murder 



Little did the Bay Area Law Enforcement Agencies in 
the Bay Area realize that many departments would be- 
come involved in the hunt for the mad killers of Robert 
\VhitIock late in March of this year. 

San Francisco homicide picked up the trail and notified 




Chief Jack Stiltz, Vai.i.ejo 

all agencies in California through APBs 81 and 95 that 
the murder suspects were believed to be in the Bay Area 
and on the 27th of March notified Chief Jack Stiltz of 
Vallejo that in all probability they were operating around 
Vallejo. 

Descriptions were somewhat vague but the tatoo marks 
L O V E on the hand of one Dan E. Garrity was probably 
the one identification which might trip the gang up. 

Around 5 :30 P.M. on the evening of April 7th Chief 
Petty Officer R. W. Johnson and his patrol partner Bob 
White operating out of the Vallejo Shore Patrol Office 
ran into a drunk in one of the local bars who did his best 
to start an argument with the Navy. His language indi- 
cated he might be a service man but there were two fingers 
missing on one hand which had both SPs temporarily 
fooled. P. O. Johnson, a motorcycle patrolman on the 
Oakland Police Department, who had been called back 
to the Navy for active duty a few months earlier, gave 
White the wink and they moved outside rather than start 
a beef with a civilian. 

The more they thought about the drunk's actions and 
speech the more they were sure he was a service man and 
they couldn't figure out why the drunk was so insistent 
on picking a fight with the Shore Patrol. Johnson recalled 
that the sidekick of Garrity was a fellow called "Billy" 
and this drunk called himself "Billy" according to the bar- 
tender who could offer no further identification on the fel- 
low who had arrived around town a week or so previous. 



At 8:53 P.M. the drunk met the Navy Patrol again and 
this time insisted on taking the boys on even though they 
had been joined by another officer of the Patrol, White 
notified the Vallejo Police Department by radio of the 
beef and the drunk was hauled off to the station for ques- 
tioning by Sergeant Albritton on duty at the station. ^Vhe^ 
frisked they found on his person a Navy discharge certifi- 
cate which identified him as a Billy Gene Calliham which 
satisfied Johnson and White that their observations were 
partly correct. The drunk mumbled something about 
knowing all about a murder in Seattle and things started 
to click with all hands. This no doubt was the "Billy" re- 
ferred to and the SFO APB. Inspector Kramer and Lieu 
tenant James Boris were called in on the deal but the 
drunk was in no condition to get coherent information 
from. 

As there were some young females involved in the bar- 
room row Inspector Kramer and Matron Rose Milestein 
of VPD took a walk down town and around 1 1 :00 P.M. 
the Matron walked into the station with two young girls 
who claimed they were from Seattle. Both were given a 
place to rest up and shortly afterward in walked a fellow 
claiming to be the husband of one of the girls. Lieutenant 
Boris spotted an extended hand with the letters LOVE 
tattoed on the knuckles and in less time than it takes to 
say "Jack Stiltz" he was in custody and grilleil for his 
part in a murder. 

All four were held for investigation by the San Fran 
cisco Police and Inspector Nelder of the SFPD notified of 
the haul. At 3:00 A.M. Inspectors Nelder, Michael Do- 
herty, Edward Vandervort and James Horwege picket 
up the four who were booked as Billy Gene Callihai 
\VMA, 23, who by that time had sobered up somewhj 
and admitted he was one wanted as a deserter from th 
Air Force at Great Falls, Mont. Oddly enough Prival 
Calliham was an Air Force Police Officer who had gottei 
in bad company. Jerry Garrity, alias Pam Martin, alii 
Lewis, alias Allison, ^VFJ, 18 years, of Ogden, Utall 
Betty Christian, 19, of Green River, Wyoming, and th 
trigger man was Richard Merenz, 22, of Great Falls 
Mont., also known as Dan E. Garrity. 

The trail was a long one and many agencies had a par 
in the apprehension of the gang. Cooperation by the Nav] 
Shore Patrol and Vallejo PD is something hard to beat 
Oakland should be proud of their motorcycle officer P. W 
Johnson who is now serving as a Chief Radioman aboan 
one of the killer submarines and to such officers as Lieuten 
ant James Boris, Inspector Larry Kramer, Sergeant "Tex 
Albritton and Matron Rose Milestein we in the Bay Arei 
say "Well Done" and appreciate the fact that you, like al 
of the efficient force under Jack Stiltz, are really on thi 
ball. 

What led to the excellent example of team work c 

divers law agencies was the discovery on a San FrancisC( 

((Jonliniic/i on pugc 39) 



Jun,-. 1951 POLICE AND PEACE OIEICERS' JOURNAL 

How Crooks Are Caught 

Story of Sflfiiilid ll'ork of Ttio Sf/'l) 1 nsfirr tors on the Capture of a I'mr of Holdup Men. 



Page 



Business was as usual List December 21 for Jorge Ra- 
mirez, owner of the I titer- American Travel Bureau, 461 
Market Street. Helping him « as his 20-year-ol(l liauglucr, 
Ivy, an art school student. 

Before the day had entled, however, Ramirc/ ami liis 
daughter had been terrorized by a pair of bandits and 
thrown into separate closets, bound and gagged. The rob- 
bers left the office with $10,000 in currency and travelers 
checks in two brief cases belonging to Ramirez. 

Though the holdup was successful and the suspects es- 
caped unseen by witnesses, it was marked by a desperate 
battle for the gun between the two robbers that left the 
office in shambles. 

Soon after the bandits appeared, the one holding the gun 
soon developed a case of jitters, shaking so violently he 
could hardly hold the gun. His partner, cool ami methodi- 
cal, didn't want any shooting. Stopping his work he faced 
the shaking gunman: "Here, give me that gun before you 
kill somebody!" 

When his nervous friend refused, he decided to take it 
forcibly. The travel bureau owner and his daughter 
watched in amazement as the two struggled over the office 
for possession of the gun. Eventually the gun changed 
hands, and the work of the robbery resumed. 

Robbery Inspectors Michael J. Maguire and Jack F. 
Cruickshank were assigned to the case; and it was three 
months to the day before it was closed . . . after brilliant 
examples of deduction and investigation. Skillful use of 
underworld informers was demonstrated by the inspectors 
during the investigation that accounted for 14 arrests and 
questioning of appro.vimately 500 persons. 

Serious as it is, robbery was secondary to the crime be- 
hind this case, Cruickshank and Maguire learned. The 
holdup was to finance an operation to purchase with 
$10,000 enough heroin in Mexico to turn over a profit of 
from $100,000 to $200,0(W when sold in San Francisco. 
And, of course, the two robbers proved to be mere pawns 
of someone bigger. 

The long and involved investigation that sometimes kept 
Magm're and Cruickshank going for 72 hours without 
sleep, began the following day. At the Arguello Boulevard 
entrance to the Presidio were found the two Ramirez 
briefcases. 

The pair of robbers were Negroes, so the inspectors 
began the painstaking examination of all colored soldiers 
ill the huge Army reservation. When that failed, they 
turned to the nearby Marine Hospital. 

Then their contacts in the underworld began to pay 
of?. They "got a lug" . . . cr)uld be that "Nubby" did it. 

"Nubby? Who is he?" 

"Don't know" — informants have a peculiar method ot 
guarding their consciences. They avoid positive statements, 
suggesting, instead, and speaking in generalities. .Maguire 



an<l Cruickshank, however, have been in the business long 
enough to analyze the strange conversations. 

Mat^uire, who once worked on the Boosting Detail, 
knew a "Nubby." He was Norman "Nubby" Augustine, 
25, 1879 Grove Street, petty thief, auto booster — a crimi- 
nal because of his addiction to narcotics costing him from 
$60 to $100 a day. Augustine worked as an orderly at 
Marine Hospital. They'd see how good the "lug" was. 

Augustine failed to appear at the hospital for work on 
December 21. The lug was good. Nubby even had an $85 
pay check waiting for him. 'Fhe inspectors spent eight 
tedious hours at the hospital, on the chance the suspect 
might call for the check ... he didn't. He wasn't in San 
F"rancisco — he was their man, and he knew he was hot. 
Ramirez and his daughter identified his photo. 

As a vital part of the investigation, Cruickshank and 
Maguire had supplied serial numbers of the missing travel- 
er checks to all grocery chains, airports, bus and railroad 
stations, banks, service stations, and had spread the word 
through business to watch for the missing numbers. 

1 he inspectors hit another piece of pay dirt because of 
the action of a girl clerk in an Oakland super market. One 
'Fhriton Amis, 24, offered a $10 check for cashing. When 
it proved to be a Ramirez check, the girl notified the store 
detective . . . Oakland police . . . San F'rancisco police. 

"Now, Mr. Amis, where did you get that check?" in- 
quired Maguire and Cruickshank, in effect. 

Well, it seemed Amis and some of his friends were pay- 
ing a friendly visit at the home of a lady on Divisadero 
Street. While they were there, they saw a pile of paper 
on the mantel. They asked about it. 

" 1 iiose is trav'lers checks, boys. Want some?" 

Fhe boys dug in, and a few days later new clothes, tele- 
vision sets, etc., were evident in their homes. 

One of the group was Willie Hollins, who "thought" 
the checks came from a fellow named "'Fim," didn't know 
any other name — just 'Fim. 

After a short lecture on points of law, the lady on Divis- 
adero Street proved helpful. 

Shortly after the inspectors found $800 in the stolen 
checks in a waste paper basket hidden in a closet, the 
woman said "'Fim" was the common law husband of her 
granddaughter, one 'Fimnthy Watson. He hail a sheet in 
the Bureau of Identification — 'Fimothy "Thug" Watson, 
27, three-time loser out of San Quentin and Folsom. Wat- 
son lived at 520 Fell Street, the woman stated. 

'Fhe Watsons no longer lived at the Fell Street address 
— no forwarding information had been left behind. Ma- 
guire and Cruickshank called the old Watson telephone 
number, and as they expected, were told the phone had 
been disconnected. 

"We know," Maguire answered the o|>erator. "But at 
(Continued on page 30) 



P<ige 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



.liitn-. I'J^I 



Annual Review of S. F. School Safety Patrol 



San Francisco's School Safet\' Patrols, supervised by the 
city's police department, were accorded public tribute at 
their recent annual parade and review for the excellent 
accident prevention work of the Patrols during the past 
year. The ceremony in Kezar Stadium, \la\ 23, was the 




Mayor Elmer E. Robinson (left) was principal speaker, and 
Porter Sesnon, president of the California State Automobile As- 
sociation, presided at the 1951 School Safety Patrol parade and 
review in Golden Gate Park. 

highlight of School Safety Patrol Week, officialh' pro- 
claimed by Mayor Elmer E. Robinson. 

More than 4,000 Patrol boys and girls from 124 schools 
were assembled in the stadium and marched in review be- 
fore a crowd of 10,000. The spectators, besides public offi- 
cials and civic leaders, included teachers, parents, relatives 
and friends of the youthfiil safetv' patrolmen. 



Police Inspector Thomas B. J racy, who supervises the 
School Safety Patrol, and his assistants, Sergeant Mat- 
thew Duffy and Officers Clifford L. ^Valker and Robert 
J. McKee, led off the parade. 

As the uniformed squads passed the reviewing staiul, 
thev' saluted Mayor Robinson; Chief of Police Michael 
Gaffey, colonel of the Patrol regiment; Herbert C. Clish, 
superintendent of schools; the Rev. James N. Brown, 
archdiocesan superintendent of schools ; and officers of Bay 
Area police departments and the California Highway 
Patrol. 

i'he annual parade and review is arranged by the Board 
of Education, Parent-Teacher organizations and the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association in cooperation with 
the police department. 

Since 1923, when the Patrols were first organized, no 
school child has been killed at a Patrol-guarded crossing, 
of which there are now more than 600 in San Francisco. 

Porter Sesnon, president of the California State Auto- 
mobile Association, was chairman of the dav' and in his 
opening address said : 

"^Ve have assembled here today to pay tribute again to 
San Francisco's young Soldiers of Safety, members of our 
School Safety Patrols. For over twenty-eight years, re- 
gardless of weather or personal inconvenience, the Patrol 
members have given unselfish .service, protecting their 
schoolmates against the hazards of traffic. " 

Mayor Robinson, speaker of the day, voiced the grati- 
tude of the citizens of San Francisco for the services ren- 
dered by the School Patrols to the cause of traffic safety. 
Commending the accident-prevention work of the youthful 
experts in pedestrian safety, he said : 




San Francisco's School Safety Patrol members, 4,000 strong, marched before one of the largest crowds of public oHicials 
leaders, teachers, parents and friends ever to turn out for their annual parade and review at Kezar Stadium, May 23. 



I urn. 1951 



POLICt AND PI-ACE OFFICURS lOURNAI. 



^age 9 



'On beh.ilt of San Francisco. I wish ro ofHciall) com- 
pliment and congratulate the Patrol tor a top-notch job. 
Patrol work teaches respect tor the law. 1 want you to 
Iremember the law is made to help you anil not hurt you. 
lYou have icarneil respect for the law. Do not forget it." 

^ After the introihiction of guests of honor by Mr. Ses- 
on, Patrol Member Richard Kandel of the Geary School 
Iwas presented with an AAA lifesaver me<lal for his recent 
heroic action in pushing four schoolmates from the path of 
iin automobile careening out of control at (iear\ Boule- 
vard and Collins Avenue. 

After the ceremonies were opened with the Invocation 

Father Brown, the eleven Patrol battalions and the 

audience, led b\- William Collins, member of the Marina 

[Junior High School Patrol, joined in Pledging allegiance 

to the flag. 




Irgani/ation <<{ the liij; tvrni fur thi- cil\'> Schoul Safily I'alri)! 
Ua* carried out hv I'olicc In>|)ccl<>r Thomas B. Trary and his 
ihrfc asiiManls who art in charge of MipervisinK and training 

h» bovs and girls. L«-ft to right: OfJicrrs Clifford Walker and 
Robert McKee, Sergeant Matthew Dutfy, and In>pector Tracy. 

I During the march in the arena, each Patrol unit was led 
[by a high school RO TC officer who drilled the Patrol for 
he review under the direction of Lieutenant Colonel 
l^eroy B. Wilson, of the public high schools, and Major 
SusC, I • ■ ■ ■ ■' . . ■ .1 hi''h xrliMoK. Iniiior l,r_'li 




The School Safety Patrol review had among guests of honor, left 
to right: Police Commissioner Washington I. Kohnke. Chief of 
Police Michael Ciaffey. colonel of the Patrol regiment, Police 
Ci>mmission President J. Warnr>ck Walsh, and Captain Ralph 
Olstad, commanding Traffic Bureau. 

school bands, under the supervision of Mr. Charles .M. 
Dennis, director of music for the San Francisco public 
schools, furnished the martial airs for the procession. 

At the conclusion of the march, the School Safet\ bat- 
talions returned to their stations on the field to await the 
presentation of efficiency award ribbons provided by the 
California State Automobile Association to the stjuails 
with outstanding records during the past year. 

As Chief GafiFey announced the awards, the standard 
bearers of the winning schools stepped forward, forni"d a 
line in front of the re\iewing stand and remained at at- 
tention while the ribbons were affixed to their school 
guidons. 

The ceremonies closed with the singing of the Nationn' 
Anthem, in which the Safety Patrols and aiulience joined, 
led by W. L. Gallatin, music director of the I'ortola 
Jimior High School. 

( "•::!'iiit'd nn l^agc 74) 




East lia\ police dipailimnis ji,d the (.alitCinu lln;hw.n Patrd vmh i. pus, mi. . I .ii ih. i,m, u ..| s,,, 1 ,.,„. im..\ s,h. .,1 s.ifrty 
Pjtr..|. Left to right: Sergeant W. P. Ilovl, Berkeley; Officer* John Kstes and «ilen Butler, Captain Karl Filch, and Dfficer 
Eugene Boroni, Richmond, lieutenant William McNIurrv, Officer William Radcliffe, Lieutenant Harold Richardson, OHicer 
Winston Werner, Captain Vermm Wvman, Officer K. L. Jones and Chief of P.dice Letter Oiviiie, Oakland: Inspectors Klmrr 
Sicinmever and Fred Leber. Captains John Shatter and Harold .\iiil"irii, and Officer Ed .Xyers, lalifornia llighwa\ Patrol 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



195] 



My Old Home, San Bernardino, Has Grown 



By Opie L. Warner 



The city of San Bernardino has grown since this writer 
left that famed pioneer interior niunicipah'ty of Southern 
California in 1911. When the Warner family niosed into 
San Bernardino in 1886 it was indeed a small community. 
It was wild and woolly, with saloons, gambling houses and 




Chief W. D. Gilchrist, San Bernardino 

plenty of such places in its tenderloin district. Gambling 
ran practically 24 hours of the day, and on the tables and 
in the cashier cages would be found more gold than any of 
the three small banks of that time had in their vaults. 

The city marshal of those days, Hugh Thomas, had 
three men help him maintain law and order, and brothers, 
believe me there was plenty to keep the members of his de- 
partment on the jump. There were frequent pistol slay- 
ings and some of them would be prime front page material 
for modern journalism. But the police did a good job of 
law enforcement considering their handicaps. There were 
no automobiles, no teletypes, no radio, no fingerprinting 
or "mugging" of prisoners, because that was 'way before 
the modern identification bureaus came into being. 

Through the years we watched such chiefs of police as 
John Henderson, Walter Shay, Fred Seccombe and others 
carry out their duties in a manner that causes wonderment 
for the splendid manner in which they acted because of 
the lack of so many of the modern facilities available now- 
adays to any police organization. In those early days no 
more than a half dozen men were given a police star, and 
it was not until Chief Shay took over that the men wore 
uniforms. 

Not only has there been a big change in population, but 
in the e.xtension of the municipal limits. Back in those 
early days when we were selling Thr Courier on the 
streets, the town's morning paper, there were scarcely 2000 



people living within the city limits which were about one 
and one-half miles square. Today there are nearly 75,000 
people residing within an area that has expanded greatly 
on all points of the compass. 

There were no paved streets in those early years of our 
residence. Horse drawn street cars furnished transporta- 
tion to the villagers. One line ran up E Streets, from 
Third to nearly Highland Avenue to accommodate W. S. 
Hooper, one of the town's big bankers, who lived at the 
other end of the line. 

The other ran from the Santa Fe depot on Third Street 
up D Street to Tenth then over to C Street to Baseline. , 
If you had plent\ of time you took the street cars. If you 
didn't you hoofed it. 

Any entertainment for the residents centered occasion- 
ally at the opera house — there, of course, were no movies 
in those days. Mrs. M. L. Kliplinger ran the opera house, 
and because she had sided with a big New York theatrical 
producing firm during a war among those interests, she 
was booked all plays coming West. Other entertainment 
was afforded by medicine shows which made regular visits 
to the old town, dispensing some third grade programs and 
(Continued on page 41) 



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June. 1951 fOUCV AND VV.\CT OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page II 

Brutal Thugs Nabbed in Salinas 

There are three persons starting life sentences in Cali- the trial of the accused, who had heen identified by the 

fornia penal institutions on kidnap-robberv charges, and two wounded men. Parker's watch was found on one of 

they will never be paroled. The three arc David Camp- the men. 

j bell, 20, his wife Mildred, 18. of W'atsonville, and Dale After shooting Parker the newlyweds and the best man 

I Kellogg, ex-convict of Salinas, who was the best man at drove into Salinas. This was a sad mistake for them. The 





Sheriff Jack McCoy 



Chief RAVstnM) J. McIstvre 



, the wedding of the former two. held in Phoerux. Arizona, 
early last March. 

; In the conviction of this trio in Salinas b\- a jury on 
May 16 ends one of the most wanton and brutal kidnap- 

\ ping and robbery shooting case that the state has ever 

' known. 

After returning from Phoenix, on .March 31. following 
the wedding of the Campbells the three were rolling along 
Highway 101 when they picked up a hitchhiker. Frederick 
Smith of Los Angeles. They drove up the Release Can- 
yon road, and after robbing him of 15 cents told him to 
disrobe. Near a 200-foot enbankments they ordered him 

' out of the car and told him to run for it. As he got to the 

- edge of the embankment one of the trio fired a shot into 

I his spine and he fell to the bottom of the dry creek, where 
he lay for 1 1 hours from 1 :00 a. m. when he was discov- 

I ered by a couple of youths. He was taken to the Salinas 

; Hospital where he is paralyzed from the waist down. 

A second victim was found earlier oflf the Monterey- 
Salinas highway. He was Donald W. Parker of Taft. He 

I was asleep in his car when the cruel three helil him up. 
took his watch and ML He had been slugged by one of 
the bamlits who got into Parkers car ami drove him off to 
asideroad. then transferred him to their car and tolil him 
to undress. Then he w.ns ordered to nui for it and as he 
climbed through a fence four shots were fired into his 
body. He was left there and the bloodthirsty three left. 
Parker crawled to his car after hours of suffering and 
was later discovered and taken to the Salinas Hospital, 

I where he recovered sufficiently to enable him to testify at 



car at a late and unusual hour attracted the attentiou of 
Officer W. B. Hurley of the Salinas Police Department. 
He stopped it and questioned the dri\er. who happened to 
be -Mrs. Campbell. He noted some blood stains on the 
lady's clothing, which she explained came from a fight she 
had had in Soledad, some miles below Salinas. Then he 
noted some bloodstains on the upholstery of the rear seat 
of the auto. He rightfully decide<l the three should go to 
the police station, and called for another car. The officers 
found two .38 pistols and 18 loose cartridges in the car. 
.'\bout the same time the police were advised of the dis- 
covery of Parker, and completing their questioning of the 
three, the police turned them over to Sheriff Jack McCoy 
and his comr>etent boys. With Captain Phillip Ci. Crocker. 
Sheriff .McCoy wove an airtight case around the suspects. 
They told different stories, finally admitting the kidnap- 
ping and robberies but tried to shift the blame to one of 
the others. 

It was a line example of teamwork on the part of the 
police, the sheriff's office ami District Attorney Burr Scott 
and particularly does Officer Hurley come in for a big 
amount of credit for bringing this bloodthirsty bunch of 
crooks to their deserved place, the state penitentiary. Of- 
ficer Hurley was on the job and he has been officially 
praised by Chief Ravmond J. Mclntyre for his alertness 
in apprehending the CampbelK an<l Kellogg. 

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Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Inyo County Has A Good Sheriff 



Jiini-. 1 9"^ I 



By Undershhriff Vkrn Branson 



The county of Inyo is the second largest county in area 
in the State of California, comprising 12,000 square miles. 
San Bernardino is the largest and no other state has a 
bigger county. 

In the high mountain ranges there are o\er 2000 lakes 




Sheriff Charles Cline 

and miles of streams that furnish the best of piscatorial 
sport to many men, women and youngsters. Throughout 
the mountains big game abounds, and the lowlands are 
noted for doves, quail and pheasants, and thousands of 
sportsmen are drawn to this great sector each year. As an 
added attraction 200 elk roam the hills. 

As is known the county has Mt. Whitney, the highest 
point in the United States, and Death Valley the lowest. 
In this vast area 12,00 people live. They are a prosperous 
and contented people and they are friendly to all visitors. 

Enforcing the laws of Inyo County there is the need of 
a courageous and able man to serve as Sheriff. A man who 
knows the terrain and the people, the many trails and the 
many potential hideouts. For if such a man was not in 
charge of preserving the peace the county could well be- 
come the haven, as it was in the distant years, for fleeing 
criminals. 

Inyo County has just such a man in charge of law en- 
forcement. He is Sheriff Charles F. Cline who was elected 
to the office in 1943, succeeding Sheriff A. MacFee. When 
he took office in 1943 Sheriff Cline was one of the young- 
est men ever to hold such a responsible position in the state. 

He was born in Lone Pine, Inyo County, on April 27, 
1909. After completing his education he engaged in pri- 
vate business until in 1939 when he became a patrolman 
for the Bishop Police Department and served until 1942 
when he announced his candidacy for Sheriff. He won by 
a big majority in the election of November of that year. 

Sheriff Cline has completed organizing various auxiliary 



units for his office. He gave the task of forming, recenth, 
a sheriff's posse, to his undersheriff, Vern Branson, who 
has been assisted by Charles Herron of Bishop as captain 
and Leo F. Smith, as secretary. The undersheriff has gone 
all out in following the sheriff's orders and he has a ucli 




Undersheriff Vern Branson 

organized body of riders, 70 in number. 

I he posse has divided its activities into five divisions: 
air, horse patrol, ham radio, walkie-talkie radio and a 
medical branch. Each division is well trained and prop- 
erly equipped and the posse is able to meet an}- emergency. 
The organization helps Sheriff Cline in maintaining 
order at rodeos, rallys and barbeques. It is a self sustain- 
ing body of public spirited men and the Sheriff is grateful 
for the splendid cooperation his posse is giving him. 

Of the membership of 70 men, ten are from the Tacopa 
area, and under the personal direction of Deputy Roger 
Moudy, who has the rough, rugged and arid domain of 
Death Valley to look after — a big job for any man. Dep- 
uty Moudy's area is made up of the scattered valley spots 
of Stove Pipe Wells, Creek Ranch and Inn, Death Valley 
Junction, Shoshone and Tacopa, where the big copper and 
smelter is located employing many people. Tacopa is so far 
from Independence, the county .seat, it has its own jail. 

A recent meeting of the posse was held at Olancha, Inyo 
County, and those present included District Attorney John 
McIMurry, AVilford Cline, Sheriff Cline, Everett Setzer, 
Chief of California Civilian Defense, Captain Boyd, Rich- 
ard Brown and Edward Carroll of the Lancaster Civilian 
Defense Corps, and "Chan" Chandler and AVilliam Shae- 
fer of State Civilian Defense. 

Captain Herron, head of the posse was in charge of the 
meeting. For many years he has been director of the An- 
nual Gilmore Sportsmen's Show, held in Los Angeles 
(Continued on page '74) 



J 



June. 1951 



POLICE AND PHACK OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Bishop, Inyo Co., And Its Police Department 



I Bishop, a city of some 3500 population, lies at the north 
I end of Inyo County, and is the only incorporated city in 
: the county. To the West rises Mt. Whitney, the highest 
I point in the L'nited States. Its elevation is 14,4% feet. To 
I the southeast lies Death V'alley, the lowest point in these 




Chief Woodson Rathjkn 
Bishop, Inyo County 

United States, 279 feet below sea level. 

Inyo County is an agricultural and a cattle raising sec- 
tor, and Bishop is the center for this activity, as well as the 
stopping place for thousands who come into the county to 
hunt and fish as well as enjoy annual vacations in the great 
areas of the county. There are no better fishing streams or 
better big game hunting. L'pland birds are to be had in 
plentiful numbers by those who know how to hunt them. 

Bishop has no serious crime problems, and has had none 
for many years. Law enforcement is in gfMid hands. Its 
police department of six members is headed by Chief 
Woodson Rathjen. 

Chief Rathjen was born in Ottawa, Kansas, in 1894. 
but when 20 years of age came to California, settling in 
Inyo County. After following various vocations he be- 
came a member of the police department in 1941 and his 
rise to the topmost rank, of chief, was rapid, he having 
been put in charge of the police department in 1942. 

Inyo's chief has seen that his force is well trained in the 
profession of law enforcement. \Vith .Assistant Chief F.arl 
Schrimpf he attended the FBI Training School in Los 
Angeles. He has modern equipment and has on innumer- 
able occasions rendered great assistance for [lolice officials 
from outside by arresting wanted men who sought escape 
through his juris<liction. 

It is through the efforts of Chief Rathjen that the mem- 
bers of the police department are among the be-it paid of 
any police officers of the state. 

The chief has organized and trained a competent civilian 



defense force, comprising 20 men who are ready to do their 
duty when and if the occasion occurs. 

He is president of the Kastern Peace Officers' Associa- 
tion, comprised of law enforcement officers from Inyo, 
Mono and Alpine counties. This organi/.ation is also well 
prepared to cope with any disaster that may be visited on 
this country. 

The Bishop Police Department is made \ip as follows: 

Chief Rathjen. 

Assistant Chief Schrimpf. 

Patrolmen Floyd Barton, John Preskie, Frank Phillips 
and John O'Neil. 

Chief and Mrs. Rathjen are the parents of two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Nellie Butts who resides in X'entura and who 
graduated from Santa Barbara State College with high 
honors in domestic science; and Mrs. Janice Hoflfmand 
who with her husband are licensed morticians and own a 
fine flower shop in Santa Maria. 

1 he Rathjens are prominent in all civic movements and 
their home is always the center of meetings of those plan- 
ning for the betterment of the community. 



UNDERSHERIFF BRANSON, INYO CO. 

Undersheritt \'ernon Branson, who has been chief as- 
sistant to the Sheriff since February this year, grew up in 
Independence with Sheriff Charles Cline. 'Fhey went 
through school together atid graduated at the same time 
from the high school. 

The undersheriff started his public career with the state 
highway department and later with Los .Angeles city. In 
1942 he became an instructor for the 18th Ktigineer Corps 
of the L'uited States Army and w.is stationed in the .Aleu- 
tian Islands. 

After getting his discharge he re-entered the employ of 
the City of Los .Angeles where he continued until his boy- 
hood friend offered him the job as urulersheriff. which he 
accepted. 

Like Sheriff Cline, Branson, whose public work has 
always been in the Owens V'alley, knows every oldtime 
resident by their first names, and both are popular with the 
oldtimers as well .is with the newcomers. 

L'ndershcriff Branson is married to the former Miss 
Gladys Clraham of Man/inar. Inyn County. Mrs. Bran- 
son has been correspondent for the San Fernatido Valley 
Tunes for many years. 

The couple has two daughters. 

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POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Sheriff Thomas Kelly of Kern Co. 



1951 



By Thomas N. Greene 



Kern County, the southmost end of the famed San 
Joaquin Valley is a prolific one. In natural resources, agri- 
culture, cattle and sheep raising, and field crops it is tops. 
During 1948 it produced over 25% of the state's cotton 
crop, 28% of the state's oil products and nearly 25% of 
the state's value of mineral products. Its 563,996 acres 
devoted to fruits, vegetables and field crops is among the 
leading for productiveness throughout the nation. 

Let's look at the record as assembled by the Kern 
County Chamber of Commerce. In its report for the year 
1950 it shows $14,892,550 worth of natural gas was sold, 
and $189,532,584 of oil was brought to the surface from 
its 10,362 wells. 

There was harvested $54,284,175 worth of cotton, with 
an added $6,799,230 from cotton seed ; followed by $30,- 
969,117 in potatoes and $27,239,023 worth of livestock 
was marketed. Grapes brought in $9,765,050, alfalfa, 
wheat and barley, $11,345,694; onions, plums and other 
fruits contributed their share and brought the annual in- 
come to nearly $145,000,000. 

One does not marvel as to why the population is now 
over 230,000, a 70% increase over the census of 1940, 
when Kern County reflects the prosperity that has 
increased yearly since 1937. 

This vast income from the many activities of the county 
means employment for thousands of people and that means 
the various cities and towns enjoy the highest in economic 
success. That the people are prosperous is indicated by the 
fact that the tax delinquencies run less than 1 percent per 
year. 

Kern County has a lot of wild territory, all reached by 
fine highways. Through Bakersfield there flows an end- 
less line of automobiles coming or going from the south 
end of the state to the north over the Golden State High- 
way or over the Tehachapi. 

There are good roads to many scenic and recreational 
parts of the county, ranging from the Mojave desert to 
mountains of over 8,000 feet elevation. 

All this calls for a modern and competent law enforce- 
ment body and Kern County has just that. 

They have a new sheriff down there, Thomas Kelly. 
When he was elected last November, he became the first 
policeman ever to become sheriff of the county. He was a 
member of the Bakersfield Police Department when he de- 
cided to run for the higher office, and had been since 1942, 
with a fine record as a law enforcement officer. 

When he first joined the department he was assigned 
to patrol duty. He soon demonstrated a knack for traffic 
control and was transferred to the traffic division, as 
safety officer for the Bakersfield schools and he supervised 
the program of the city's traffic committee for the 19 
schools, and rode "traffic" for the high school and junior 
college as well as the lesser temples of learning. 

He conducted a constructive radio program devoted to 



traffic for appro.ximately two years. This program known 
as "Death Rides the Highways" carried to the listening 
public messages of news of traffic accidents and methods 
of self preservation for the motorist as well as the pedes- 
trian. It was a good program and gave the community an 
understanding of the cause of accidents and offered reme- 
dies for their prevention. 

When Sheriff Kelly took over the office the first of last 
January the first thing he did was to appoint William R. 
Dolan as undersheriff. Undersheriff Dolan was a former 
member of the Bakersfield Police Department, but of late 
years he has been an investigator for the District Attorney. 

These two former police officers set about to make the 
Kern County sheriff's office one that would function as 
near perfect in all matters of law breaking and crime pre- 
vention. 

The new sheriff did no house cleaning. In fact of the 
119 members of the force only two have left the office 
since he took over. 

Sheriff Kelly realizes there is nothing like experience, 
and he was only interested — free from all politics whatso- 
ever — to see that his agency was organized to give the 
ultimate in public service. As a police officer he well 
knows the probleins of those charged with enforcing the 
peace and his approach to his new job has won him the 
loyalty of all members of his staff, and they are teaming 
up to make the sheriff's organization of Kern County one 
of the best in the West. 

The sheriff and his chief aide could see there was need 
for several changes in the organizational setup of the de- 
partment, which would improve its efficiency and effective- 
ness. 

There was no practical method of handling evidence, , 
stolen or found property and over a period of time much • 
of it was lost, because each deputy seemed to act as a 
property clerk. 

The desk sergeants were without necessary authority, 
and details such as transportation, court assignments and 
so on, were handled in a haphazard manner by the crimi- 
nal division which was heavily overloaded with many 
cases. 

The first administrative change which Sheriff Kelly 
made was to raise Sergeant Asa Larsen to the rank of 
lieutenant and place him in charge of a newly created 
headquarters section, which was made up of bailiffs, war- 
rant detail, transportation and court detail. In addition 
Lieutenant Larsen was assigned the responsibility of keep- 
ing an accurate account of all property coming into the 
custody of the department, and control of all county 
owned sheriff's automobiles. 

He was also put in charge of all communications — tele- 
type, telephone, telegraph and radio. All these things con- 
stitute a big job, but Lieutenant Lar.sen is doing first rate 
(Continut'd on page 52) 



Jum-. 1051 POl.ICH AND VllACE Oll-ICF.RS' JOURNA7. 

Sheriff Whitmore Gets His Man 



Page n 



Sheriff Earl Whitmore who took over as San Mateo's 
I top lawman the first of this year has shown in many ways 
' that he is the officer for the job his many f rieiuls claimed 
I for him during the election campaign of last year. He has 
not only demonstrated his ability as an e.\ecuti\e bur Ik- 




Sheriff ExRi. Whitmore 

ha,s as well shown his aptitude for unravelling the myster- 
ies of crime as come to his notice and getting out and work- 
ing on them. He has on several occasions taken to the 
field with his men and put in long hours digging up clews 
that would clear some crime in the county. A notable ex- 
ample is one that happened last March. 

During the last week of the month the body of a voiing 
woman, later identified as Mrs. Barbara Taylor, 18, was 
found along Dennison Creek near Moss Beach. There 
wasn't much for the sheriff's force to work on. However 
Sheriff Whitmore took personal charge of the work of 
solving the crime. 

He finally located a man named Juan Tabar, who owns 
a ranch near the scene where the body was found. All that 
Taber could tell the officers was that there was a cream 
colored Buick at the scene on the day the dead woman was 
discovered. Then by painstaking investigation Sheriff' 
Whitmore found in San Francisco some people who had 
seen Mrs. Taylor with a man of which they gave a work- 
able description. 

Then calling eight deputies, including l)eput\ led 
Moudakas, formerly a member with \\'hitmore on the 
Redwood City Police Department and Investigator A. I.. 
Lambert he set forth for San Francisco, with the avowed 
purpose of visiting every night spot in the latter city. 

The posse did a complete job of doing just that, but 
their efforts brought nothing in the way of the man they 
sought. The\ founil ,i lot of cars of the color scheme and 



Maine, but no man on which to make a pinch. 

The next day, with Moudakas and Lampert, the sheriff 
again returned to San Francisco. They went to the Coast 
Guard headquarters where they went through the port se- 
curity photographs, 'ihey found one answering the de- 
scription of the man they were seeking. It was shown to 
the father and mother of the dead girl and they said it 
looked like the man their daughter had gone out with. But 
it proved to be the wrong man. 

However, with the identification of the sought for man 
well established in their minds they continued the hunt for 
such a person with a cream colored Buick. 

That afternoon while driving along Sutter Street Sher- 
iff Whitmore spotted a man walking along the street. 
He and his companions halted the man. The suspect when 
confronted with information the San Mateo officers had, 
admitted he had been on a ride, in a borrowed cream color- 
ed car. with the girl found dead along Dennison Creek. 

Later he admitted he and Mrs. Taylor had gone to his 
apartment on Geary Street and that both took sniffs of 
heroin. The man, Bilh' Jackson, said he passed out, and 
when he came to found the girl also out. He found the 
girl also out. He tried to revive her but was not success- 
ful, so he took her down to San Mateo County where he 
buried her in a shallow grave. 

W^ashington is held in the San Mateo County Jail at 
Redwood City with a murder charge against him. 



MARIO'S 
ITALIAN DINNERS 

Mario Fornaciari 

169 East First Street 
LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA 

rdcphonc 552 

jrs'nc:F of ihf peace 
FRANK NORIEGA 

Third Township 

Has served l-'aithfully and l-'airly for 18 years. Also 

Secretary Kern (bounty Wool Growers' Association 

and President Kern Mutual Building and Loan 

Association. 

. . . C'ourtroom . . . 
HOI HAKIR STRITT 

BAKERSFIELI), CALIFORNIA 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jtinr. I '^5 1 



rom a 



Man Who Knows The Score 



Statement of J. Edgar Hoover, Director of FBI, Before Senatorial Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in 

Interstate Commerce, March 26. 



(Continued from last issue) 
I think the time has come for some straight thinking on 
the subject of responsibility. All too frequently in the past 
few years, there has been too much "buck passing" to the 
Federal Government. Too frequently, when pressures 
mount in local communities by reason of dissatisfaction 



and is today the policy of the F'BI. The Federal Bureau of 
Investigation has the responsibility for investigating al- 
leged violations of certain specified Federal criminal stat- 
utes. That responsibility is definitely fixed and is well 
known. In the event we fail to perform our duties incident 
to such responsibility, the public would know what agency 
to hold responsible. 

In the absence of a specific F'ederal Statute, the FBI is 
not authorized to conduct any investigation of what is 
strictly a local violation. Yet, there are many services of a 
coordinating and clearinghouse type which the FBI is able 
to offer for local law enforcement officers in connection 
with the enforcement of local laws. The FBI Laboratory 
receives evidence from local law enforcement officials and 
its scientists make a study of the evidence submitted and 
prepare a report of their findings. In the event testimony 
is desired, the scientists will testify in the local courts and 
these services of examination and testimon\' are available 
to all police agencies without cost. 

The FBI Fingerprint Identification Division is another 
service established by Congress to assist local officers. This 
service includes the furnishing of criminal records based 
upon fingerprints, latent fingerprint identification, the fil- 
ing of wanted notices for individuals whose apprehension 
is desired, the identification of unknown dead, the location 
of missing persons and similar identification services. 

The facilities of the FBI National Academy are avail- 
,vith conditions, leaders, either to escape the wrath of citi- a^jg {„ local, county and state police agencies for select 
^ens or to conceal their own inability to cope with situa- representatives to receive training as police executives and 




Director J. Edgar Hoover 



tions, have advanced the alibi that "This is a job for the 
Federal Government." The time has come to take stock. 
The Federal Government can never be a satisfactory sub- 
stitute for local self-government in the enforcement field. 



as police instructors and upon request, assistance will be 
given in local police training schools. These are some of 
the FBI cooperative services which are available and which 
are made use of by the local police throughout the country 



The experience of people in other lands who suddenly on a voluntary basis, 

found themselves living in a totalitarian state discloses that There is no mystery about good law enforcement. \ 

always the trend started with people in local communities merely applies to crime detection the same principles 

being unable or unwilling to take care of local situations. efficiency necessary to any well organized business. Regan 

I hope that day never comes to America, as our way of life Jegg gf th^ potential effectiveness of law enforcement aget 



is too precious to be supplanted by either a Socialist, Facist 
or Communist form of government. 

The mere fact that conditions have been exposed which 
are shocking, to say the least, is no reason to depart from 
our traditional concepts of Constitutional government. In 



cies as such, they are powerless to give their full measui 
of protection unless properly supported. Your Committt 
has inquired into the reasons why crime exists in tha 
communities where you have found it thriving and pra 
pering. The people of each community need to do as yo 



the deplorable conditions which have been exposed, it was have done — endeavor to seek answers to such questions ai 
not the system that was at fault but the men who were re- What has happened to the important cases which were 
sponsible for its proper functioning and, more important, the newspaper headlines a few months ago? Were th( 



the citizens who failed to raise their voices or to exercise 
their responsibilit\ at the ballot bax. 

Federal law enforcement, however, has a role to play 
which is a vitally important one. A Federal law enforce- 
ment agency must always be willing to lend all possible 
assistance to local agencies without usurping local func- 
tions, prerogatives or jurisdiction. That always has been 



igorously prosecuted, or were the felons allowed deli 
after delay while witnesses disappeared, and the final cou; 
room scene became a mere mockery of the law ? Wei 
juries tampered with, witnesses intimidated, perjury sul 
orned ? Did the criminal in a serious crime get off easiB 
than some wayward youth who stole a car or burglarized 
(Continued on page 69) 



June. 7^5/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



ve 17 



San Francisco P. D.'s Juvenile Bureau 



It IS rare, indeed, that a police department in a cit)' the 
size of San Francisco has approached the juvenile dehn- 
quency problem with such vigor, such understanding and 
las successfully as it has been handled in the city by the 
Golden Gate for the past thirteen years. 




IXCTMS J(lH\ 1'. MkKHAN 

I Since the time when the late Harry Reilly was placed 
lin charge of the Big Brothers of the PD, the needs for 
Isuch a unit of the police force have become more apparent 
'with the passage of the years. This need has been met 
'with an enlargement of the personnel devoted to work 
with youths; with an ever increasing program to meet the 
ever increasing juvenile problem; with the men and women 
detailed to this important work giving their every thought 
'and all their energy to steer the wayward into the pathway 
'of rectitude; and having a separate headquarters to work 
'with the boys and girls who come under their jurisdiction. 

The present Juvenile Bureau is located in the old North- 
cm Station out on Greenwich Street. It is a commodious 
building and has been arranged to give the officers assigned 
a place to work, with all conveniences attendant on a well 
organized police headquarters. It offers quarters where 
young people, and the parents of young ones in trouble 
:ian meet with sympathetic workers and come out of their 
meetings with encouragement for a better future for the 
erring ones. 

' It is the tirst time the SFPD has as high a ranking officer 
jin charge of the Bureau, who has devoted 1 3 of his 22 
'years in the Police Department to juvenile welfare. He 
IS Cjptain John P. Meehan. who joined the department on 
October H, 1028. He served nine years in the Mission 
.district, reporting first to former Captain Fred Lemon. 
In the middle 'SOs he was sent to the Big Brothers Bureau, 
where he worked with the late Lieutenant Harry Reilly 
until his retirement. 



A big well set up man, with a kindly disposition, though 
he can become mighty stern when occasion demands, 
Captain Meehan has been more res[X)nsible during the past 
ten years for the fine development of the Juvenile Bureau 
than any other man. He knows about all it is possible for 
one man to know of juvenile troubles. He is an able 
speaker and has devoted many and many an hour appearing 
before social, civic, religious and other organizations inter- 
ested in the youths of the state and his native city in par- 
ticular. He has done an outstanding job of public relations 
for the Police Department. 

His Juvenile Bureau is open seven days a week — the 
hours 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. There are eight policewomen de- 
tailed to the bureau and 16 men. Of these two are Ser- 
geants Daniel R. Mullen and Frank J. Wilson, veterans 
in this work. 

The others of the Bureau are: 

Policewomen: Dorothy Arriola, Shirley Barisone, Gene- 
vieve Bayreuther, Virginia Cullen, Margaret Dolan, Mary 
Loftus, Claire Lutz, Margaret Sprague and Amy Siigcr. 

Policemen: Jack Atwood, James J. Casey, John Cavalli, 
Richard J. Dwycr, Eugene Gibbons, Edward J. Hodgers, 
Edward Huegle, John Kerrigan. Francis J. Lunch, Sidney R. 
Mahler, Earl O'Brien, Erling P. Rolandson, Thomas Ryan, 
William Sampson, Russell Wood. 

The Juvenile Bureau handles all stolen bicycle complaints. 
There are around 700 bikes stolen annually in San Fran- 
cisco, and the Bureau has a batting average of 89 per cent 
recovery. The members of the bureau also look into com- 
plaints of damaged school property, disturbances on school 
land, and follow up on all law violations by boys or girls 
under 18 years of age. 

The Bureau has supervision over public dancing halls, 
and it is to the credit of the men and women of the Bureau 
and the special women police officers who attend each 
dancing place that public dancing is no longer a worry 
to the police. 

Captain Meehan is president of the Bay Counties Juvenile 
Officers Association, of which he was prominent in organ- 
izing. He is also vice president of the State Juvenile Officers 
Association of which Lieutenant Al Ricdel of Berkeley PD 
is president. The state organization is made up of regional 
as.sociations from the Bay area, central California and 
Southern California. 

The state body with the regional associations have done 
a great job in bringing to the public the juvenile delinquency 
problem and in giving the subject intelligent, constructive 
and effective service. 

DON & ARTS CLUB 

Irrnr and Bmny 
BEER - WINE ■ GOOD FOOD - FREE DANCING 
4>M>0 Franklin Blvd. t'honr HI S-993S 

SACRAMENTO CALIFO'' 

POccT KfARKET 

MEATS a GROCERIES a WINE AND BEER 

GAS AND on. 

B9O0 Franklin Blvd. I'hona HI 5-9651 

SACRAMLNTO (AI.IIC)R'-- 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. 1951 



THE SIGN OF THE RED HAND 



By H. C. Briik-.ks 



*TA/.t nrliclc uvis ivrittcn for the Police mid Peace Offi- 
ers' Joiiriiol hy B. (^. Bridges, iii/ernationnl/y recognized 
authority in police science. Retired from active duty, after 
twenty-five years' service as police executive and university 
instructor. Mr. Brid(;cs devotes his time to meriting in the 




law enforcement field, and is the author of numerous 
li'orks, including the world's leading textbook on personal 
identification, "Practical Fingerprinting." published by 
Funk y H'agnalls Company. — Editor. 

(Continued from last issue) 

The vivid tales of by-gone Chichen-Itza now are legend- 
ary, but many are the tragic episodes which they set forth. 
A poignant pathos still lingers where small and shapely 
hands left fingerprints that dimly endure upon the inner 
walls of what was once a royal palace. Here, and in 
neighboring structures, were stored the priceless codices 
and tomes of national history, later burned by the zealot. 
Bishop Diego de Landa, a long-deplored destruction which 
even he afterward repented. 

1 his especial building is now known as Akab Tzib, 
"The House of Dark Writings." The name is derived 
from undeciphered glyphs in antique forms of the ancient 
tongue, inscribed above the inner doorway. Broad designs 
in red, blue and green, and mystic scarlet hand-prints also 
appear above the entrance. Standing south of the pyramid 
of Kukulcan, this structure is one of several freed by ex- 
cavation from its jungle shroudings, though many others 
still are covered. Of those now cleared that stand south- 
east of the pyramid, the House of Dark Writings holds 
importance. Nearby and to the west, the House of Nuns 
and Temple of ^Vall Panels are neighbors of the Old Ob- 
servatory farther north, East of the pyramid, the Temple 
of Warriors adjoins the Court of the Great Emporium 
with its thousand columns. North-westerly, the Tiger 



Temple lies, very near the Place of Skulls and the Fire 
Terrace. 

Conspicuous upon the chamber walls of the House of 
Dark Writings, as well as in other of the temples, the por- 
tentious and ever-present red hand-prints were long mys- 
terious until their sinister significance was finally revealed. 
At this place, the delicate outline of maidens' tapered fin- 
gers has left a pathetic record to symbolize the Death 
Bridal of the Sacred Well. Dark was the fate of those 
gentle martyrs, yet each was required to face the crisis 
willingly; and like others slain upon insatiable altars, a 
final hand-print signified agreement — unquestioning sub- 
mission to the harsh tents of an implacable faith. 

Almost due north of the huge pyramid of Kukulcan, a J 
broad, raised roadway leads straight to the Sacred \Vell, | 
once deemed the dwelling-place of Noboch Yum Chac, 
terrible God of Rain, whose fickle favor must be insured : 
b\' human sacrifice. The geological formation of Yucatan 
is luiique, the soil being unusually thin, with porous lime- 
stone beneath. This substratum is often marked by deep 
erosion ; the entire peninsula is honeycombed with caverns j 
and channels, many of which assume the form of vast cavi- j 
ties, or "wells," such as those at Chichen-Itza. Some of I 
these are tiny, while others are wide and deep, and form j 
large, natural cisterns. "When not adjacent to the coast, j 
the water in these wells is fresh, sometimes constituting 
the water source from the dwellers in widely surrounding 
areas. 

The once-worshipped well of the god \ um Chac is a 
pit, elliptical in shape, measuring two hundred fifty feet 
in one direction and one hundred eighty-five feet in the 
other. Its sides are sheer precipices that fall seventy feet 
to the dark green waters below. The strange color is partly 
due to certain unusual mineral inclusion, but mostly to the 
pool's great depth. 

During the olden days, into this abyss were cast vast 
offerings in valued tokens of carven jade, small golden 
bells, rare jewels, arms, implements, and also many comely 
maidens. Without stain or blemish they had to be, these 
Rain-God Brides, the fairest in all the land, for any lesser 
gift would sorely offend the critical and jealous deiti,-. Long 
the priests sought each victim throughout the cities, vil- 
lages, and countryside, until they discovered some youth- 
ful neophyte possessed of matchless beauty; and she alone 
it was who must play the grim and leading role in the 
Bridal of Death. 

Upon this day, the morning sun-rays touch the peak of 
Kukulcan's tall pyramid where flutters the Serpent-Banner 
of Mayapan, bright standard of a rich and teeining empire 
with shore-lines bathed by the waters of two oceans. But 
now that fair and guardian flag looks down upon a season i 
of drouth ; corn parches in the fields, and Yum Chac, Lordi 
of Rains, demands his tribute. 

(Continued on page 44) 



/V5/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' lOURNAI. 



Pa^e 19 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers^ Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



e'niFF R. C. I'lllA IR, Hiiiliniz.inic P. I)., I'ri.urLril CaPTAIN Bl-RNARH McDoNAI.D, Secrf tdrv-Treoiurer 



The bi-m()ntlil> meeting of the Ba\ Counties" Peace 
Officers' Association was held in May 31, in Napa. The 
host of the occasion was the Napa County Peace Officers' 
Association, comprised of law enforcement officers of the 
great, rich and scenic Napa Count\'. Officer Delph Rex- 
roth is president of the NCPOA and (Officer George H. 
Burton, secretary, both of the Napa Police Department, 
are the officers of the organization. President Re.xroth 
with Officer Al Southgate of the California Highway 
Patrol, acting secretary — Secretary Burton was unable to 
attend — was on hand to welcome nearly 200 peace officers 
on their arrival at attractive Napa \'ailey Inn on the 
northern limits of the City of Napa. 

Chief R. C. (Jack) Theuer of the Burlingame Police 
Department, called the members and guests to the lunch- 
eon tables where an excellent midday meal was ser\e(l. 
There was plenty of good wine furnished by the Christian 
Brothers Winery in nearby Mt. La Salle. 

At the conclusion of the luncheon President Theuer 
called the meeting to order. Secretar\ Captain Bernard 
McDonald was spared the task of reading the minutes, 
and the remainder of the business of the session was quickK' 
dispatched. Prominent members were presented to the as- 
semblage. Among them were Sheriffs Daniel Murphy, San 
Franci.sco; Earl VVhitmore, San Mateo; Thomas Joyce 
and Jack Thornton, former sherifif, Solano County; Sher- 
iff Jack Claussen, Napa County; former Chiefs Charles 
\V. Dullea and Michael E. Mitchell, SFPD; Captain of 
Inspectors Cornelius Murphy, and Captain George Healy 
of SFPD, William Nasser of Nasser Brothers, operator 
of a big chain of moving picture theaters, and owner of 
the Napa Soda Springs; Chief Special Agent A. D. 
Thatcher, Western Pacific Railroad Co.; Chiefs Rex 
Cliff', Fairfield; Jack F". Stiltz, Vallejo; James W. Lyall, 
Belmont; Melvin Flohr, Santa Rosa; William Maher, 
San Bruno; Donald T. Wood, San Anselmo; Walter J. 
Wisnom, Burlingame; James F. Doyle, Sausalito; Stan- 
Icy C. Williams, Albany; Edward Wheeler, San Carlos; 
and A. E. Eamorcux, San Eeandro. Chief Special Agent 
Walter J. Vervais, California Auto Club; Ray Meyers, 
Superintendent of Comnunncations for \'allejo, on lea\r 
to the Califortn'a Civilian Defense. 

President Theuer then turned the gavel over to Presi- 
dent Rexroth, who introduced City .Manager Charles 
Martin, Councilinan W. Manwaring and other Napa 
officials. He then called on Chief Eugene Riordan of the 
Napa Police Department who welcomed the members of 
the Bay Counties' Asosciation. 

Then followed the introduction of .Mavor Owen Sea- 



vex. The .Ma\()r gave a short hut magnilicent talk, deal- 
ing with the attractions of Napa County and City. He 
pointed out that the City of Napa was one of the oldest 
of the state, having been first settled in the early 1850's 
after being inhabited by Indians for centuries. 

He called the attention of his audience to the fine cli- 
mate, the excellency of its soils, and of their productiveness 
of many crops, which is the backbone of the county's econ- 
omy. Anyone can easily see by visiting Napa Valley that 
the economy is one of prosperous success. He also pointed 
out the scenic attractions — natural and cultivated. He 
particularly referred to the ge\sers of Calistoga. He sum- 
med up his remarks by saying Napa Valley was the home 
of happy people, and insisted that each and every member 
should make the trip to the Christian Brothers mammoth 
winery in the Mt. La Salle district. 

All did and they were treated to a rare treat. 

Situated in a forest of redwood and other trees the 
Christian Brothers have cleared several hundred acres and 
planted them to wine grapes. F'rom this acreage they 
gather crops of grapes for making both dry and sweet 
wines, mostly the former. 

Started back in 19.H, when the Brothers moved from 
Martinez, this big modern winery, constructed of massive 
rock, today produces annually from '^00,000 to a million 
gallons of as fine wines that can be found on this earth. 

Brothers John, Timothy and Gregory operate the big 
plant and are now engaged in erecting new buildings that 
will double their output for making, aging and packaging. 

The winery also makes a limited anioimt of brandy. 

There is a school on the vast acreage of the Christian 
Brothers that is attended by many young folks, who get 
their education from specialists amid the most beautiful 
surroundings of vineyards and forests. 

Guiding the cavalcade of visitors was Captain J. B. 
Critchley and Officer K. W. Jarvis of the California 
Highway Patrol. Guides took the scores of guests through 
all the floor of the winery, where they saw vats of 50,000 
gallons capacity on down to smaller ones of 2500 gallons. 

On arriving at the bottling rooms all were given some 
f)f the various wines and on leaving were presented with 
bottles of white and red wines and brandy. 

The Christian Brothers went all out to make the visit 
of the BCP(^A one to be remembered and they were given 
a vote of thanks for their cooperation with the Napa 
County peace officers. 

Divisional John Greening was not able to be present 
but he sent word that the State Training School at Santa 
(Cnnlinurd on page '74) 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. I 'hi 



■San Francisco = 



I PEACE OFFICERS' 



(Copyright. 19^1, 20 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco 3, California 

Phone MArket 1-7 UO 

An Official Police News and Educarional Magazine Devoted to 
the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short 'Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 
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KEFAUVER CRIME COMMISSION SAYS 
S. F. WHITE SPOT OF NATION 

The United States Senate Crime Investigating Com- 
mittee which has been given an extension of some months 
to continue their splendid work, has brought a lot of grief 
to numerous big shot gamblers, racketeers and some public 
officials throughout the country. There will be more on 
whom the spotlight started by Senator Estes Kefau\er, 
chairman of the Senate committee, will be focused and 
brought to the attention of a nationwide public. However, 
California fared better than most states investigated, and 
in the report of the year's work submitted by the commit- 
tee during the last days of April. Particularly was North- 
ern California given a comparatively clean bill of health as 
far as tie-up with racketeers and gangsters were concerned. 
San Francisco was designated as a "white spot" in the 
crime picture. No tie-up with organized mobsters was 
found, as it has been for the last 30 years. 

Senator Kefauver in a letter to Mayor Elmer E. Robin- 
son said "I have learned for myself that organized crime 
has been stopped in any effort to establish a foothold in 
San Francisco in decent years." 

Gambling and prostitution and bookmaking had been 
curbed and limited on a "sneak basis," he continued. 

The Senator further stated: "I think that your police 
department is entitled to a great deal of commendation 
for its relentless campaign against sydicated crime. 



"W^e all know as a practical matter that an alert police 
liepartment can keep gambling and other crimes under 
control by pursuing a policy of continual vigilance. 

"Other police departments might do well to consider 
seriously the program of the San Francisco police with re- 
spect to handling known mobsters." 

Senator Kefauver gave Chief Michael Gaffc\ and Dis- 
trict Attorney Thomas Lynch praise for their excellent 
conduct of their respective duties. 

He also e.xpressed special thanks and appreciation to the 
police department for the services of Inspectors Frank 
Ahern and Thomas Cahill, who spent over five months 
carrying out extensive investigations regarding rackets and 
the Mafia and other blackhand organizations, of whom no 
peace officers know more of the operation methods of these 
despicable bodies, than the two San Francisco inspectors. 

Inspectors Ahern and Cahill have a vast file on the 
murderous Mafia, gathered through their years with the 
Homicide Detail of the SFPD. They have been limited 
in their inquiries regarding the way this relentless society 
works. The Bay Area and not more than California con- 
tained their efforts. It is an undisputed fact with the scope 
of their operations enlarged to include all of the L^nited 
States they have amassed a wealth of information that is 
going to make it tough on this illegal tribute levying bunch 
of mobsters. It may be some time before the result of their 
tireless and relentless invesigations are revealed, and un- 
doubtedly much of it used will be revealed in hearings of 
the committee in the coming months. 

The U. S. Senate Crime Investigating Committee has 
brought forth startling revelations regarding how organ- 
ized criminals have gotten a foothold in numerous Ameri- 
can cities. But San Francisco can take pride in that it 
continued to be "the white spot" in this nation as' far as 
any unholy alliance with this far-flung organized gangsters 
and racketeers with those responsible for maintaining law 
and order. It has been that way for many, many years. . 
The "easy winner" boys have had no luck in fastening, 
their festering fangs onto anything that would give them al 
clearance to work their rackets with any sort of protection, 
whatsoever. 

The California Crime Commission furnished a lot of 
material for the Kefauver Committee to work on, and they 
have come in for its share of the bouquets passed out for 
outstanding services. It is pleasing to law abiding citizens 
that there will be another state commission appointed by 
Governor Earl Warren, fortified with all the legal 
weapons to ferret out those who would break down our 
law enforcement. The legislature now in se.ssion has fa- 
vored the appointment of another commission with suffi- 
cient funds to pursue their work, but there was .some 
delay in getting the matter settled because some pressure 
was e.xerted to prevent the commission from being 
given subpoena powers. One does not have to stretch his| 
thinking to figure just what interests would be against 
giving it the right to call any person and make him tell \ 
the truth under oath. We don't think this ilk will prevail I 
in this instance. Governor Warren will appoint good meni 
for the job and no right living person will get a bad deaLI 



Jim,. I'^^^l 



POLICE AND PEACE OF TICI-RS JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Police — Fire Department Charity Baseball Game 



Night aii(i liay, throughout the year, hrfmcii and poluc- 
mcn work side by side to protect life and property in San 
Francisco. Ihey are great friends. 

Once a year — on the baseball diamond — they are after 
each other's scalps. Behind the rivalr>', ho\ve\er, is (irni 
unity of purpt)se. The proceeds of their yearly game go 
into a Christmas fund for needy San Francisco children. 

Last year the two departments distributed $12,501) 
among approximately 2500 youngsters, whose Christmas 
might otherwise have been somewhat dreary. 

Thirty-three baseball players — 17 policemen and 16 
firemen — will play again for the kids Friday night, June 
22, at Seals Stadium. Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, avowed 
non-partisan, will throw the first ball at 8:00 p. m. Under 
the practice of rotating for "home team" po^ntion, police 
will have the honor this year. 

Firemen have won three of four previous games, in- 
cluding last year's, which they won by an 8 to 6 score. Po- 
lice Commission President J. Warnock Walsh, game 
chairman, predicted victory for the police this year, con- 
ceding that they would have a bitter fight to win it. 

"The fellows on both teams," he said, "are not just a 
bunch of Sunday ball players. Nearly all of them are ex- 
professionals." 

Fiften players on the 17-man police squad are former 
professionals; and 10 of the lb firemen have played with 
professional teams. 

All the players on both squads are graduates of San 
Francisco high schools. 

Truckman Ray Mines manages the Fire Department 
team; and Patrolman Manus T. ".Mickey" Diiggan is 
manager of the rival police team. 

Skipper Mines is himself a former pro, having worked 
with the Seals, Oakland, Muscogee, Oklahoma; Dcs 
Moines, Iowa; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Mis team. Mines 
said, is an improvement over the team that beat the police 
last year. 

"We have a younger club this year," Mines explained; 
"and though there are fewer men because of the man- 
power shortage, we still have the hustle and harmony that 
has always characterized Fire Department teams." 

"All of us are stars," Mines admitted modestly. 

Three "old reliables" are on hand to tend to pitching 
chores, according to Mines — redheaded Ed Dunn, Jack 
Jones and Bill Kenna. 

"I understand the gendarmes have a hot club this year," 
the fireman manager said. "It may be something to worry 
about — but remember, it's our business to put out fires." 

Appearance of Police Manager Duggan on the diamond 
will awaken fond memories for San Francisco Missions. 
Mickey, a graduate of Mission High School, is one of the 
team's most valuable assets. Players and fans alike main- 
tain that his leadership has given the police team the sup- 
port it needed. 

The hard work and loyal backing of Captain John P. 
Meehan, business manager of the team, has also IvMisteil 
team morale. Captain Meehan, chief of the I'd ice Juve- 



nde Bureau, has been one ot the n)o\ uig forces behind the 
Knothole Club, an organization sponsored by the San 
Francisco Seals and the police department to see that the 
city's kids see their quota of ball games gratis. 

.Members of the Fire and Police Department squads are 
as follows : 

Fire Department — 

Ed Dunn, pitcher, from Balboa High School. 

Jack Jones, pitcher, also from Balboa. 

Bill Kenna, pitcher, ex-Commerce High School. 

Frank V. "Lopey" Lopez, second base, ex-Seal and tried 
out with Chicago Cubs, from Galileo High School. 

1 om McDonough, centerfield, from Galileo, of one 
San Francisco's best known ballplayers. The veteran Mc- 
Donough, according to Manager Mines, is "worse than the 
Townsend Plan — he won't quit either." 

Bob Shechy, third base, ex-Balboa High School. 

Mike Switzer, rightfield, formerly with the Oaks, from 
Mission High School. 

Don Beck, catcher, once signed with the Cleveland In- 
dians, from Mission High School — injuries received when 
an engine from Engine Company 6 was struck by a truck 
while responding to a fire kept Beck out of last year's 
game. Me will make up for it this \ear, Mines said. 

John Hernandez, first base, all-city from Mission High 
School, played pro in Fexas and Pioneer Leagues. Her- 
nandez is pride and joy of the firemen's team. "Any ball 
club in the Coast League would be glad to get him right 
now," Mines stated. "He can more than hold his own 
with any first baseman, in either fielding or hitting." 

Jimmie Giorvas, catcher, newcomer from Commerce 
High School, professional in Brooklyn system, Santa Bar- 
bara, and Boise. 

Don Steele, shortstop, from Mission High School, 
played pro ball with Pittsburg, Calif. 

'Fony Brain, utility infield, from Galileo High School, 
new on the team, played semi-pro in Bay Area. 

Norman Malman, utility outfield, another Galileo 
graduate, new on the team, with Bay Area senu'-pro expe- 
rience. 

Tom "'Frixie" Treganza, utility outfield, first year 
man, from Balboa High School. Played semi-pro in San 
Francisco. During World War II was a Naw boxing 
coach. 

Joe Tudoni, utility outfield, new on the team, San 
Francisco semi-pro experience. From Balboa High School. 

Police Department — 

Charles Bates, first base, e\- Mission High, e\-pro with 
Oaks, Idaho Falls, Salem (Oregon), 'Fucson, Moline 
(Illinois), and Jeanerette (Louisiana). 

John J. "Jake" Caulfielil, shortstop, formerly with 
Oaklantl, Salt Lake City, Philadelphia Athletics, R<xhes- 
ter (New \'ork), Sacramento, and San Diego, Jake is 
from Sacred Heart High. 

John J. Cavilli, third base, ex-all-city at Mission High, 
experience with Seals, Hollywood, San Diego, Salt Lake 
(Continurd on f>agr 71 ) 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jiinr. 19.^1 



Turlock^s Chief Oliver on 2ncl Year in Office 



liy Opie L. \Varner 



Turlock, an important center of the great agricultural 
empire of the San Joaquin Valley, and where more turkeys 
are raised in a ten-mile area from the city than any place 
on the face of this earth, is enjoying, as its sister cities of 
this vast valley enjoy, the best in law and order. Its Police 




Chief Harry Oliver, Turlock 

Department has for years seen that law violators were 
held in check, and particularly is the success of this pro- 
gram emphasized under the leadership of Chief Harry 
Oliver. 

Chief Oliver, who won the appointment to his present 
office in a competitive examination, participated in by many 
law enforcement officers of the \Vest Coast, a year ago 
last December, has set an enviable record since he took 
charge of the Turlock Police Department. 

He brought to the job years of experience as a peace 
officer. For ten years he was in the office of former Sheriff 
Jack Thornton of Solano County, and thence he went to 
the Vallejo Police Department where he remained for 
seven years until he went to Turlock. He is a member of 
all worthwhile peace officers' associations and a graduate 
of the FBI National Police Academy in Washington, 
D. C. 

When he went to Turlock to succeed the late E. W. 
Gaddy, who retired after 25 years served as Chief of Po- 
lice, he set about to continue and improve policing of the 
city. How well he has succeeded is reflected in the crime 
record of Turlock. 

Since he has been in office there hasn't been a murder 
in the city, not a robbery, and burglaries have shown a 
reduction, as has petty crimes. For the past six months 
there has not been a traffic death. This is remarkable when 
the heavy traffic flow that passes through Turlock is con- 
sidered. At a recent check it was found that at the top 
peak hours of the day 1008 cars per hour entered the city 



from the north on Highway 99, and 835 cars per hour 
from the south entrance. At the main crossing streets east 
and west the count was 680 per hour. 

Chief Oliver has as his top assistant Captain A. G. 
Hedin, a veteran of the department who became a member 
in 1930. He has one sergeant, Harry L. Villinger, another 
of that rank is promised. 

Since he became chief the police department has gotten 
new furniture and equipment, including the latest in filing 
cabinets. The headquarters are now undergoing a remod- 
elling with space for all police activities, including a bu- 
reau of identification room and photography. 

A new shooting range has been obtained with 14 silhou- 
ette targets fashioned along the lines of the FBI range at 
Quantico, Virginia, with three lanes for various distances. 
When it is completed with landscaping it will be a modern 
and attractive adjunct to the police department. All mem- 
bers of the force have to fire 100 rounds a month on pistol 
practice and come up with a qualifying score. 

Chief Oliver has a reserve unit of 25 men, all out of the 
draft and most veterans of the last world war. The mem- 
bers, whose uniforms are the same as the regular police 
meet twice a month for training and lectures. They cover 
beats, afoot and in the radio equipped patrol cars and are 
a great help to the 14 members of the Turlock Police De- 
partment. They are used on all special events, and for 
their service receive nominal pay. They are well trained in 
all phases of police work. 

The civilian in charge of the reserve unit iS Captain 
Charles E. Napp, a prominent businessman of the city. 

But it is among the boys and girls of Turlock that the 
police department devote a lot of time and effort. 

There is a Junior Traffic Patrol of 150 boys and girls 
who guard streets near the three elementary schools and 
the high school. So well have these juniors performed 
their duties during the past that as a reward Chief Oliver 
arranged for a trip to San Francisco for all members of 
the Junior Patrol. The second annual trip was on May 
12 when three greyhound buses transported the 150, with 
some teachers, some parents and two trained nurses. The 
cavalcade was in charge of Officer Elton Francis, 
charge of juvenile activities of the police department and 
Officers Morris Noren and Eugene Kregners. 

The three buses were met at the Fifth Street ramp in 
San Francisco on the arrival by a motorcycle detail which 
paraded them out by way of Market Street to Golden 
Gate Park where they saw the main sights ; thence to the.' 
Zoo, where they took in all the animals and birds. ; rode 
the merry-go-round, the steam train and saw a special 
show with the trained seals in the Zoo auditorium. Afteri 
a box lunch at the Zoo they were whisked to Playland at| 
the Beach where Owner George Whitney threw open to! 
the visitors every concession of the great place. 
(Continued on page 27 ) 



Jun,-. 1951 




POLICE AND PliACII OII-IC ERS' JOURNAL 

Stanislaus County's New Sheriff Dan Kelsay 



Page 23 



Sheriff 
Dan Ktf.SAV 



When Dan Kclsa\ was sworn 
in as Sheriff last January, Stanis- 
laus County got as chief enforce- 
ment officer one who has built up 
1 I considerable experience as a po- 

lice executive. 

Born in Idaho in !*)!() and com- 
ing to Oakdale, in the north part 
of the county in 1928 he became 
chief of police for the noted farm- 
ing center in 1941. He served for 
nearly four years and then was ap- 
pointed chief of the Patterson Po- 
lice Department in 1945, serving 
I until his installation as sheriff which he won at the last 
I November election. In Patterson he was also superintend- 
I ent of streets, tax collector, park superintendent and health 
[ officer, and performed his many duties well. 

Though the head of small police departments, he has 
I well demonstrated his aptness in running any law enforce- 
I ment agency. To further perfect his experience he attend- 
I cd and graduated last year from the FBI National Police 
I Academy. 

[ Today he has a force of 48 people in his sheriff's office. 
\ Of this force 1 1 are women. Most are veterans of the de- 
partment and all are bent on but one purpose — to keep 
' Stanislaus County's large unincorporated area free from 
crime. During his first six months in office Sheriff Kelsay 
' ha.s done just that. There have been no major crimes worth 
a headline in the newspapers, and such crooks who tried 
I their hands in outlawry have been safely tucked away in 
the county jail in Modesto. 

Sheriff Kelsay appointed as his Undersheriff, Deputy 
Cecil Kilroy. Undersheriff Kilroy was a former member 
of the Turlock Police Department before jioning the sher- 
iff's force. He served as superintendent of the Bureau of 
Identification and as one of the top investigators as a Dep- 
uty Sheriff. In his new office he has charge of all investi- 
gations, supervision of all departments and many other 
details necessary to a well operated law agency. 
' Sheriff Kelsay selected as his deputy in charge of crimi- 
nal matters, Jack Ross, who for years was an investigator 
for the district attorney of the county. Deputy Durwood 
H. Simms, who has been with the sheriff's office for the 
past six years is in charge of civil matters. 

The Bureau of Identification has been placed in charge 
of Joe Osterman. He is a fingerprint expert as well as an 
expert photographer. 

Deputy Buck Hensley is chief jailor, heading a force of 
SIX men ami three matrons. 

The sheriff' has a complete coverage of the county b\ 
two-way radio equipped patrol cars. Five cars are on 
night duty throughout the week, and all mobile equipment 
is served by the Sheriff's station under the able direction 
of Technician Ray Gada who is a recognized authority 
on radio in anv of its various branches. He is a charter 



member ot the Associated Public Communication Officers' 
Association. 

Sheriff Kelsay has resident deputies stationed around 
various districts of the county. 'Ihese deputies patrol their 
sector in radio equipped cars. Salida, Keyes, Patterson, 
Turlock, \Vatcrford, Hughson, South Modesto area and 
Crows Landing are the main districts, with regularly ap- 
pointed deputies functioning. 

There is an aero squadron for the sheriff's use and Sher- 
iff Kelsay has formed a reserve force of 50 special depu- 
ties. 'They are well organized and trained to take over 
and give assistance to the regular force in case things call 
for extra efforts. 

Sheriff Kelsay is a man easy to meet and talk with and 
if he so desires should have no trouble in equalling the long 
service that former Sheriff Gratton Hogin built up prior 
to his retirement in September, 1949. He is a solid, de- 
pendable public servant who from his past record as a 
peace officer is bent on giving the best of service to the 
people of his jurisdiction and the State of California. 



TRAFFIC FINES IN S. F. BIG BUSINESS 

1 he 1 raffic Bureau of the SFPD continues to be a big 
factor in the economy of the city. It is "big business." In 
fact over a million and a half dollar business. During the 
year 1950 according to figures released by Presiding Mu- 
nicipal Judge Carl H. Allen the city collected an all-time 
high in traffic fines when the cash register showed $1,613, 
527 was paid into the city treasury. 'The preceiling year 
the sum was $1,385,866. 

Fines for illegal parking and other non-mo\ing traffic 
violations accounted for $1,159,751 which is $220,756 
more than for 1949. 

Director of Traffic Jack liker has stressed strict en- 
forcement of all traffic laws. No man has ever, with 
greater intelligence and energy taken over the tough job 
of meeting the traffic problems of San Francisco than Di- 
rector Ekcr. He has carried on a continuing study of 
every feature of the ever mounting problem and applied 
many worthwhile features that keep the streets open for 
the greatly increased motor traffic. 

'There is one violation that it seems impossible to stop, 
that of failing to properly turn the front wheel while 
parking on hillsitle streets. During the first three months 
this year there have been 155 motor vehicles that broke 
loose on the city's hills, with no drivers in them. 

One death and eight injuries resulted and 40 homes and 
stores were damaged by the runaway cars. 

It seems a simple thing for a motorist to turn his front 
wheels out and see that the hand brake is securely set. But 
so niany drivers fail to ilo this simple thing. 

CALIFORNIA ( F EANERS 



SACRAMF.NTO 



WE r.lVF. CASH CHECKS 

FREE PICK UP AND DELIVERY 

4703 Franklin Blvd. Phonr HI 7-M77 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Jim,-. 1951 



Chief Flohr, Santa Rosa, An 11 Year Man 

For 11 years, this June, Melvin Flohr has served as 'I'he chief with Inspector Leland Gleason handles all 

Chief of Police for the City of Santa Rosa. During that investigations and their record of accomplishments in solv- 

more than a decade he has given the over 28,000 contented ing all cases assigned to them is one that would be difficult 

people of the famed city of pleasant living and prosperity to exceed by any other department 



law enforcement of the highest order. 

Chief Flohr, a strapping well set up man, 



md 




Chief Melvin Fi.ohr, Santa Rosa 

ate of the FBI National Police Academy seven years ago, 
has to take no back seat to any other police department 
when it comes to organization, training of his personnel 
and record of results for crime prevention and solution. 

The chief came to Santa Rosa following a term as chief 
of the Healdsburg Police Department which was preceded 
by five years as a deputy sheriff in Sonoma County. When 
he assumed his present position he had 13 officers, today 
26 people are on the police roster. 

He has four 3-way radio equipped patrol cars served by 
the department's radio station. 

Records and a filing system fashioned on the FBI plan 
has been utilized for a number of years, and functioning 
perfectly. 



Phone 3511 



DIXON HARDWARE CO. 

HIGH-GRADE HARDWARE 



425 Fourth Street 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



Since clearing a series of safe crackings three years ago 
by the arrest of the safecracker, there have been no import- 
ant burglaries or robberies since. It has also been some 
time since there was a murder in the city. 

Captain Jack Spalding and Lieutenant William Clark 
have charge of the night activities. 

A recent innovation was the installation of Officer Jack 



Phone 321 



EMPIRE ELECTRIC SHOP 

Electrical Center of the 
Redwood Empire 

435 Fourth Street 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 800 

There's a FORD in Your Future 

Bishop Motors 

We Are Easy to Deal With 
FORD'S OUT FRONT 

"The City Designed for Living" 

421 "B" Street 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



\ 



Sawyer's News 

The Largest Stock of Magazines in Santa Rosa 
TOBACCOS AND PIPE REPAIRING 

641 FOURTH STREET 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 

1241 FOURTH STREET 
SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 



/v^'/ 



POLICE AND PI-ACI-: OIFICKRS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



Cliner and Beatrice Green in charge of the office, attend- 
wi to receiving and filing of all records and meeting 
■l:.iM' who have business with the police department and 
'i.iMilling other routine office duties. They work under 
>i:s:fant H. I). Huntington who handles the H. of I. 

I'or traffic. Sergeant Walter Reylea is in charge during 
.hutinie hours; Sergeant Carl Mister, mght ; and Officer 
luk Mc.Mullen and Richard Donaldson handle the park- 
iii: meters of which there arc 800 in Santa Rosa. 

It might be stated here that for over a year there have 
hnri no traffic deaths in the city, and a lot of automobiles 
pass through to and from the Russian River resorts and 
lover the Redwood Highway. 
Ij Chief Flohr has a well organized Junior Traffic Patrol 
|bf some 200 students. Neatly uniformed and equipped 
rire they with the necessary accessories. 'I'hey are well 
Itrained by members of the SRPD. and like all junior traf- 
fic organizations have maintained a splendid record of 
[Preventing accidents at school crossings. 
I There is a reser\e police force of 95 men. mostly veter- 
i ans of the last world war. They have been properly uni- 
formed and given regular police equipment. Vav the past 
iix months they have received intensive training and every 
)ther week meet for a three-hour course of lectures and 
raining. 

An activity that Chief Flohr is justly proud is the forni- 
ng of his boys club. Some months ago he got permission 
o use the facilities of the Santa Rosa Junior College to 
lave the young boys gather and be given some supervised 
^ports. lender the direction of Sergeant Gleason and 
n'ded by Chief Flohr and Lieutenant Clark, lads from 5 
o 18 years were invited to participate in this undertaking, 
""rom the start it was a popular move and during the past 
[•our months the attendance of youths have risen from 100 
o 150 per (lay. 



Mary Ward Batt 



Wesley W. DanieU 



WELTI FUNERAL SERVICE 



LADY ATTENDANT 



747 Fourth Street 



Telephone 21 



CALIFORNIA 



"A Complete Line o( Store Fixture." 

AL NICHOLSON 

MEAT CHOPPERS - SCALES - SLICERS - MEAT SAWS 

DAIRY CASES - DELICATESSEN CASES 

FROZEN FOOD CABINETS 



t'honr )6/) 
isA. CALIFORNIA 
I Fifth Sirrel 



Phone IMA 
SANTA ROSA. CALIFORNIA 

305 Sebastnpol Avenue 



TONY'S CIGAR STORE 

MAGAZINES 

ON AND OFF SALES LIQUORS 

427 Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HAHMAN DRUG CO. 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 
213 Exchani* Avenue Phone 3: 



ANG - ROSSI 

Sales and Service 

INDIAN MOTORCYCLES AND BICYCLES 

sirs and Parts for All Makes of Motorcycles 

Bicycles - Cushman Motor Scooters 



415 Da 



Str 



Pho 



716 



.SANIA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



GREY'S AUTO SUPPLY 

EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTO 



SANTA ROSA 



727 Fourth Street 



Phone 3120 



C AI.IFORMA 



SANTA ROSA 



SHOP AND SAVE AT 

A R L E N E • S 

DRESSES - SPORTSWEAR - COATS 
525 Fourth Street Phone 2235 



CALII ORMA 



SNOW WHITE LAUNDRY 

H. A. Coldfarb 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO COMMERCIAL WORK 

123 Fourth Strert Phone 113 



SANTA ROSA 



t AMICI'^^ !•■ 



Excuse the Truth— Tell "Her You are at The Office" 

THE offic;e 

"DRINKS THE WAY YOU LIKE THEM" 
530 Third Str"ct Phone 1491 



SANTA ROSA 



SANTA ROSA 



L. M. BRITTON 

WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 
729 Fourth Street 



( Al irORMA 



SANTA ROSA 



SPORT CLUB 

NORM and HARRY 
231 Fourth Street 



CALIIORMA 



EVANS AUTO UPHOLSTERY 

Exclusively 
AUTOMOBILES. TRUCKS AND TRACTORS 



SANTA ROSA 



546 First Strert 



Phone 241 3-W 



CALIFORNIA 



SANTA ROSA 



G E M E T T IS 

since 1893 
516 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MITCHELL MOTOR COMPANY 

SONOMA COUNTY'S LARGEST STUDEBAKER DEALERS 
Third and B Sireeta Telephone 1201 

CALIFORNIA 



SANTA ROSA 

Harry Barkas. Prop. GOOD FOOD 

CLASSIC GRILL 

LIQUORS - WINES - BEER - COCKTAILS 
430 Fourth Street Phone 1606 



-SANTA ROSA 



I Al.IIORNIA 



Phone 878 Ralph L Lewis - Tony CamplflU 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

CUT FLOWERS AND FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS 

WE teij;graph flowers 

100 Santa Rn«a Avenue In Burhank Gardens 
SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

VIRGIL CLARK 



ALIFORNIA 



Phone 4280 

SANTA ROSA 



203 Santa Rota Ave., opp. Burbank Cardena 

I ALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



J tin,'. l<i>l 



At first games of various kinds were indulged in anii the 
police officers were on hand to give instruction and partici- 
pate in the enjoyment of the youngsters. A show was 
given some weeks ago and from this some $400 was rea- 
lized. This money will be used to furnish various kinds of 
equipment designed to give happiness for many a boy. 

Chief Flohr has been able to get the services of a college 
boxer and a college wrestler who will instruct the boys in 
these great arts of self defense. There will be baseball, 
basketball and football teams and other forms of athletics. 

The spirit of friendship between the lads and the police 
and the fact the boys are given some wholesome sports 
and entertainment has worked wonders in reducing ju- 
venile delinquency in the Sonoma county seat. 

Every member of the police department has received 
training in the FBI regional courses and eight members 
have been sent to the State Police Training School at 
Sheriff H. P. Gleason's Santa Rita Prison Farm. 

Chief Flohr is not only highly regarded by the people 
of Santa Rosa but he is a popular man with the peace offi- 
cers of the state. He is a past president of the Bay Coun- 
ties' Association and a member of the State Peace Officers' 
Association. At the annual meetings of this latter body 
he is always called upon to serve on important committees. 

He is one of the relatively small number of chiefs of 
California who have a college education. He graduated 
from Santa Clara University before turning to law en- 
forcement as a career. 



Phone 4 

B E R GE R ' S 

CIGARS - MAGAZINES AND PERIODICALS 
Also PACKAGE GOODS 

Television As You Like It Nightly 

533 Fourth Street 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



When Better Automobiles Are Built . . . 
Buick Will Build Them! 

Niles Automobile Company 

BUICK DEALERS 

339 MAIN STREET 

Petaluma, California 

and 
965 REDWOOD HIGHWAY SOUTH 

Santa Rosa, California 



Telephone 1286 

Wagar Williamson 

CAMERA AND PHOTO SUPPLIES 

Wholesale and Retail 

USE OUR LAY-AWAY PLAN 

Kodaks - Film - Chemicals - Photo Finisher 
Oil Tinting - Movie Equipment 

Our Work Is the Best ... We Admit It 

415 Fourth Street 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. 

Distributor of 

SQUIRT and 

NESBITT'S CALIFORNIA ORANGE 



SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



1 



BENSON AND ZIMMERMAN 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO MARKET 

M. E. Angelo, Prop. 

MODESTO"S FINEST FOOD MARKET 

Ninth and H Streets 

MODESTO CALIFORNW 

P. AND G. HOME APPLIANCES 

Washers - Ironers - Home Freezers - Dutch Oven Gas Rang. 
We Repair All Makes of Washers 
508 H Street Phone 1703-W 



PECK'S BAIT AND SPORTSHOP 

Ray Peck. Prop. 
725 Seventh Street Phone 3257-W 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA POULTRY MARKET 



502 H Street 



SING LEE LAUNDRY 



Phone Modesto 2074 



HOTEL UNION 

702'2 Seventh Street 



FLOR DE MEXICO CAFE 

M. Fortado, Prop. 

MEXICAN DINNERS - BEER AND WINE 

608 Seventh Street Phone 5622 



MODFSTO 






CALIFGRNlj 



i,nu-. io<;i 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



I'ngf >7 



TURLOCKS CHIEF OLIVER 

(Continued from page 22) 
The young folks and their elders returned late at nit;lit 
and all were so grateful for the kindness of the Park au- 
thorities, the SFPD and particularly Inspector Thomas 
Tracey of the S. F". Police Junior Traffic Patrol and his 
assistants, who gave them their attention from the time 
they arrived until they departed. They were also giving 
high praise to George Whitney. 

Chief Oliver has started another activity, which will be 
an annual affair. It is an annual ball and show for the 
Widows' and Orphans' fund of the department. The 
event is given at the Fairgrounds and the second of them 
took place on May 26, and was a bigger success than the 
one a year ago. 

A splendid program was provided, including numbers 
by Officer George Simpson, the highway patrolman with 
the operatic voice, Veda Deckebach, marimba artist, San- 
tra Rossi, Modesto accordionist, the Musicadets, a Tur- 
lock musical trio and a quartette from Stockton. AI St. 
Johns of the Solano District Fair was master of cere- 
monies and he did a fine job. 

Other youth activities, which gi\es the reason there is 
mighty little juvenile delinquency in and around Turlock, 
are two bands, one a junior and the other the cadets. One 
of the outstanding organizations of the city is its Cavaliers, 
a mounted group of boys under 16 years of age. They are 
skilled riders, have been drilled to perform many intricate 
maneuvers on their mounts, are splendidh' uniformed. 
They have appeared throughout the state, and in the court 
of Justice of the Peace H. O. Carlson there is a windowful 
of trophies and ribbons the lads ha\e won through the 
years of their organization. 

J. F. DICKINSON COMPANY 



RADIO - RECORDS - HOME APPLIANCES 
716 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



KNOX SEED COMPANY 

'•EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN" 

STOCKTON AND MODF.SIO. CALIFORNIA 



WALTERS VARIETY 

Ed Walter. Owner 

5c - lOc - 2Sc and Up 

60S "H" Street 



CALIFORNIA 



"THE BEST FOR LESS" 

LEE SANG MEAT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

1004 H Street Phone 528 



( ALIFORNI" 



CALIFORNIA MEAT MARKET 



916 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SASAZZA BROTHERS 

DELICATESSEN 
311 H Street Phone 473-W 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO AUTO PARTS 



814 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW DEAL MARKET 

WE SELL FOR LESS AT ALL TIMES 
402 Fourteenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GRAYSTONE TILE PLANT 

Peter Jandpaiil, Prop. 

Manufacturers of Hl-TEST BUILDING BLOCKS 

River Road, West of 99 Highway Phone 3I08-\V 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

THE COBBLES MOTEL 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hernandez, Owners 

P. O. Box 1162 Phone 3204 

South on Highway 99 



CALIFORNIA 



GARY'S BICYCLE SHOP 



705 Eye Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GARETTOS 



DELICATESSEN AND RAVIOLI FACTORY 
818- 13th Street Phone 452 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



ARCH CLUB 

826 Ninth Street 



( ALIFORNI \ 



ANDRE CLUB 

427 - tOth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



I MODESTO 



FARMER'S INN 



W. M. Capen. Pr 



716 Ninth Street 



Phone 5617 



CALIFORNIA 



JACKSON, BETTENC:OURT & KOUTROS 

PAYROLL CHECKS CASHED 

FINE LIQUORS - WINES ■ BF.ER 

804 Ninth Street 

MODF.STO I AI II ORNIA 



EL CAPITAL 



913 J Str»*t 



CALIFORNIA 



ECONOMY LAUNDRY 

SPECIALISTS IN FAMILY LAUNDRY 
1424 Ninth Street Phone 283 



CALIFORNIA 



ASBILLS APPLIANCES 

TV - RADIOS - REFRIGERATORS AND FREEZERS 
WASHERS - IRONERS - APPLIANCES 



VALLEY TRACTOR EQUIPMENT CO. 



I4th and D SirMt 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Junr. 1<^5} 



PETALUMA OFFICER PARK SHOWS 
HOW TO WRITE A REPORT 

We present the following report of Officer Harvey E. 
Parks of the Petaluma Police Department respecting an 
attempted burglary of a hardware store on February 22. 
\Ve do so to show how intelligent today's police officers are 
and how thoroughly they perform their hazardous duties. 
It is not only a well written report but it is one that indi- 
cates how well the young officer had been trained and how 
he applied the information he had been given about obser- 
vation, caution and apprehension of the suspects, it is com- 
plete in every detail : 

Statement of Officer Harvey E. Park on the morning of 
February 22, 1951, relating to burglary of Rex Hardware 
Company, 313 "B" Street, Petaluma. 

At about 3 :05 A. M., February 22, 1951, I was making 
my rounds. When at the corner of "B" and ]VIain Streets, 
by Wagar Photo Supply Store, I heard noises like someone 
hammering from the direction of Rex Hardware. I went 
across "B" Street to the front of the Rex Hardware and 
flashed my light inside. The hammering stopped and 1 
heard a door slam. I ran around to the back of the Rex 
Hardware, which can be reached through a gate on the 
Fourth Street side alongside of the back of the Independ- 
ent Ice Company. I opened door to a vacant building, 
where Dr. Bradner once had his business. It had been 
broken into. Then upon checking around with my flash- 
light, I could see there was no other exit from the rear lot 
except by the gate by which I entered. I returned to the 
gate and stood guard until I stopped a passing truck and 
told him to go to the police station and have them send the 
car right down. 

Officers Karl Kohl and George Wagner arrived about 
3 :20 A.M. Officer Kohl went around to the front and 
Officer Wagner and myself entered the rear lot. Upon 
checking I noticed an attempt had been made to enter the 
back door of Rex Hardware. Upon further checking we 
found two men hiding behind a barrel at the east corner 
of the lot. There was a colored man and a white man. 
The colored man appeared to be lying on top of the white 
man behind the large barrel. I kept them covered while 
Oflicer Wagner handcuffed both. We then searched them. 
We brought them to the station, searched them again and 
booked them. 

Officer Kohl, Sergeant Vallier and myself returned to 



MODESTO JUNK MARKET 

Dealers in 

Scrap iron - Metal - Sacks - Wool - All Types of Government 

Surplus for Sale, Including Pipe. Bslting, Hardware, Anvils, 

Vises, Sleeping Bags, Hooks. Cables, Etc. 



1425 Ninth Street 



Phone 546 



CALIFORNIA 



HOME MARKET 

Everything in 

MEATS AND GROCERIES 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



CALlFORNI\ 



PUTNAM SAND & GRAVEL CO. 

CONCRETE MIX 

PLASTER SAND - ROOFING GRAVEL 

SCREENINGS - CONCRETE SAND 



200 Santa Ros 



MODESTO 



Box 486 • Phone 2323 

CALIFORNIA 



E. D. BLAKELY AND SON 

Distributors for 
HANCOCK OIL PRODUCTS AND 
QUAKER STATE LUBRICANTS 



Plant: Gilmorc Aveni 
P. O. Box 1308 



nd Weatherford Road 
Telephone 2244 



CALIFORNIA 



STANISLAUS IMPLEMENT AND 
HARDWARE COMPANY 

LEADING LINES OF FARM EQUIPMENT 

10th and F Streets Phone 401 

lESTO CALIFORNIA 

TIOGA CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 
QUALITY BEERS - SOFT DRINKS 



1012 "H" Street 



Phone 3404 



CALIFORNIA, 



JOHN N. ROCHA 

UVESTOCK TRANSPORTATION - NIGHT AND DAY 

Route No. 6. Box 1062 Phone 5434 

On 99 Highway 1 Vi Miles North of 



CALIFORNIA 



NEEDHAM LIQUORS 

MAZE LIQUORS, Phone 3018 



12th and Needham Av 



CALIFORNIA 



ACME GLASS COMPANY 

Joseph A. Mengelt. Prop. 
710 G Street Phone 3226 



CALIFORNIA 



THE DELL'S 400 CLUB 



Sixth and "H" Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



Ph 



DANNY'S 

FINE FOODS - COCKTAILS 
5610 415 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO CHINESE HERBS CO. 

Dr. L. N. Mein, Expert Herbalist 

CURES DISEASES AND ALL AILMENTS 

1602 "H Street. Cor. 16th Phone 1086 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA! 

NEW CANTON GRILL 

CHOP SUEY 

EXCELLENT CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

WE PUT UP ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

1008 Tenth Street Phone 5582 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



W5I 



POLICE AND FliACL Ol'l-ICLRS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



the scene. \Vc noticed four lioors had been tanipcrc<l with. 

(1) The backdoor to Rex Hardware; 

(2) Two doors to the vacant building next to Ke\ 
Hardware ; 

(3) One of which had been entered ; 

(4) Another door also in the vacant building; which 
appeared to be broken from the outside. 

On the inside there had been an attempt made to break 

through the wall into the Rex Hardware by pounding 

with a 2 .\ 3 board. It was pushed through the wall at one 

' point. Also at the scene was a broken claw hammer and 

I two jimmy bars. In the rear lot was also a green panel 

1 truck (Dodge) with P-7 printed on the side, license num- 

I ber COM C-51109. 1951 plates. There was no frost or 

mist on it, and the engine was still warm. The engine 

• number is T 112- 188036. 

I In Everett McGhee's property there was a pink rental 
j agreement from the Arrow Truck and Rental Service. 
j 38 Eighth Street, San Francisco 3. California, for equip- 
I ment number P-7, license number A-6469. Out at 2/21/ 
51, 3:40 P. M., signed by E. McGhee with present ad- 
dress, a San Francisco hotel, formerly Nampa, Idaho. 

NATIONAL DOLLAR STORE 



i MODESTO 



WHERE YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE 
926 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



TED BERMAN CO. 

WAR SURPLUS 

WHOIF XLE • RETAIL 

Hlllcrest 7-0436 4920 Franh 



Milk Producers Association 
of Central California 



A. 



MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



HEMLER MOYLE HOTEL 

(,. (... Homier, Owner 
Modern Rooms iind Apiiit/NO/ls 

9171/2 JAY STREET 
MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



ONE-MAN RADIO CARS 

A revolutionary change in procedure was effected early 
in .May by Michael Gaffey, Chief of the San Francisco 
Police Department, when he ordered one-man operation 
of police radio cars. Practice prior to the change called 
for two-man crews. 

Chief Gali'ey's action paralleled a recommendation made 
last year in the department's personnel survey report. This 
report was the work of Captain John Engler, director of 
personnel; Lieutenant Wesley Murray, legal adviser; In- 
spector Alfred Arnaud, legal adviser; Inspector Edward 
Comber; and Supervising Captain Jeremiah Coughlin. 

A disciple of the theory that the man on the beat is the 
best crime preventive, Chief Gaffey ordered the change in 
car crews in order to make 44 more men available for foot 
patrol duty. At the same time, he said, the shift could be 
made in such a way as not to cut down on radio car effi- 
ciency. 

The chief predicted no lessein'ng of effectiveness if the 
department would brush up on some of its operations. For 
example, he said, it would be the responsibility of the Bu- 
reau of Communications (radio) to screen all incoming 
complaints — obtain as much information as possible from 
complainants in order to give radio car officers assigned to 
the scene of the disturbance a reasonably accurate idea as 
to what he would encounter. 

At the same time. Chief Gafifey directed, vehicular units 
cruising in adjacent areas should, in their judgment re- 
spond to questionable calls, just for a "look-see" — then 
go on about their business if their presence was not needed. 

Doubts as to the advisability of one-man operation of 
the radio cars were raised in several quarters — but the 
opinion was universal that it should be tried, and that if 
Chief Gaffey thought it would work, it probably would. 

The chief, though convinced that heads-up police work 
would eliminate possibility of accident, frankly admitted 
that if the change didn't suit him, he'd change back. 

At last reports the one-man cars were carrying out their 
assignments efi'ectively. The general belief supported the 
chief. If everyone paid attention to business, didn't get 
reckless, they would work. And there were, meanwhile, 
indications that Chief Gaffcy's desire for more men on 
beats was paying dividends. 



See \'ic for lihcrly 

VIC'S BAIL BONDS 

24-Hour Service 

214 East Oak 

VISALIA, CALIFORNIA 

Phoni; 4-441! 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



J II 111' . 1951 



ASSOCIATED PUBLIC 
COMMUNICATIONS OFFICERS 

Robert Mason, President 
John Atkinson, Secretary-Treasurer 



The regular monthly meeting of the Associated Public 
Communication Officers, Inc., was held in San Mateo on 
May 10. Our host being Sergeant Manual Trinta of the 
San Mateo Police Department. 

The meeting was called to order at 11:15 A.M. by the 
president, Robert Mason, with 38 members and guests in 
attendance. 

The minutes of the joint meeting held in March were 
read and approved. The resolutions passed at the same 
meeting were also read. 

On a motion by Ray Myers, seconded by J. M. Lewis, 
the secretary was instructed to mail copies of Resolution 
5 and a letter of transmittal to all members and the Asso- 
ciation would pay the cost. 

The secretary then read a resolution proposed by Cap- 
tain Brower McMurphy regarding the announcement of 
the State Communications Board's agenda and the estab- 
lishment of a State Technical Advisory Committee. The 
resolution was adopted on a motion by Myers, seconded 
by Walter Keller. 

Ray Myers then spoke on his new job in the Communi- 
cations Division of the State Civilian Defense Office. 

President Mason next called for the- Frequency and En- 
gineering report by Captain McMurphy. Recommenda- 
tions were as follows: 

County of Sonoma— 455.950 Mcs— Base (Repeater). 

County of Solano at Benicia— 155.490 and 1558.790 
Mcs — Base and mobile, 155.670 Mcs — Base. 

County of Butte— 45.86 Mcs,— Base; 45.01 Mcs— 
Mobile, 73.18 Mcs— Control. 

County of Siskiyou — 1-5.90 — Base and mobile. 

University of California at Berkeley^l55.85 Mcs — 
Base and Mobile. 

County of Tehama — No recommendation pending fur- 
ther information. 

The above recommendations for clearances were ap- 
proved on a motion by Keller, seconded by Ivan Hudson. 

Captain McMurphy, then gave the final report of the 
Code Committee. The revised 900 Code was presented 
to the membership. On a motion by Edward Maeshner, 
seconded by Mayr, the new revision was adopted as a 
guide to be used by those departments so desiring, over 
the "No" vote of Art McDole with Walt Keller abstain- 
ing. 

The secretary presented the following bills: $25.16 
from Kellogg for the joint meeting. $5.00 from Ray 
Myers for the hiring of a public stenographer for assem- 
bling the resolutions for the joint meeting. 

The treasurer was ordered to pay these bills, on a mo- 
tion by Myers, seconded by Keller. 

A letter of withdrawal from the organization by Her- 
man Schwandt was read. On a motion by Myers, second- 



ed by Kirby, the secretary was instructed to address a let- 
ter to Herman expressing our regret that he feels it neces- 
sary to withdraw and the treasurer was instructed to see 
that funds are available to provide him with the APCO 
Bulletin as a token of our appreciation for his excellent 
work for our Association. 

Applications for membership from Frank Bello and 
Ray Stevens were approved by the Board of Directors on 
a motion by Lewis, seconded by Bailey. 

Commercial Reports were then given by the following: 
Bob Kranhold, Motorola, Inc. ; Herb \Vatson, Link Radio 
Corp. ; Ray Stevens, Popkey Company ; Bill Wheeler, 
Brill; Frank Bello, KAAR Engineering, and E. H. Rob- 
ertson, Electric Supply. 

Walt Keller offered Santa Cruz as the next meeting 
place. 

The secretary was then given a vote of thanks for the 
work he did on the joint meeting. 

As there was no further business the meeting was ad- 
journed. „ r „ ... 
Respectfully submitted, 

John H. Atkinson 

Secretary 



/v5/ 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS JOURNAL 



rui^f M 



, i.uc — he longed tor security. Aiid like ail other men, his 
thoughts had turned to his mother and home in New Or- 
leans. The consuming desire for narcotics forced him to 
[cash the stolen checks frequently; six ^50 checks were 
iwritten in Chicago. His other mistakes were minor com- 
pared with the fatal sl