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Full text of "Police and peace officers' journal of the State of California"

I 



SAN FRANCISCO EDITION 




POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



W. G. FISHER & SON 



Farm Produce Hauling 



* 



1261 First Avenue 

Phone 7500 
Salinas, California 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 



San Francisco Sacrilege 3 

Another Officer Murdered 4 

Pistol Pointing 5 

Police Promotional Examination Questions . . 6 

Associated Public Communications Officers . . 7 

Marysville — 1850-1954 8 

Sutter County Centralizes 9 

Railroad Police 19 

The Cop 20 

Accident Rate Up 21 

They Called Him Lucky 22 

Bumble Bee Fingers Federal Fugitive .... 25 

Safety Precautions 26 

Transportation Center 28 

Too Late For Lunch 32 

Speaking Of Policemen 40 

Sonoma County Peace Officers 44 

Pioneers of Science 52 

Research Grant 55 

Inspector's Bureau 56 

First Lie Detector 58 

Judge and Jury 5^5 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for i>ubIication. Con- 
tributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not possible, copy 
should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a "nom de plume," 
but all articles must bear the name and address of the sender, which will be 
treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor will also be pleased to consider 
photographs of officers and of interesting^ events. Letters should be addressed to 
the Editor. 



Directory 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KMA-438 

Mayor, HoN. Elmer E. Robinson 

POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 2:00 p.m.. Hall of Justice 

Henry C. Maginn, President 315 Montgomery Street 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery Street 

WAsmNGTON I. KOHNKE 686 Sacramento Street 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Juitice 

CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Gaffey 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE George M. Healy 

Chief of Inspectors Jamm Enoliih 

Director of Traffic Otto Meyer 

Dept. Sec'y....Captain Michael F. FrrzPATRiCK ...Hall of Justice 
District Captains 

Central Edward Donohue 635 Washington Street 

Southern A. G. Steffen Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Peter Conroy 1240 Valencia Street 

Northern Daniel McKlem 941 Ellis Street 

Richmond Edward Green 451 Sixth Avenue 

Ingleside ..J. J. Couchlin Balboa Park 

Taraval Phil Kiely 2348 Twenty-fourth Avenue 

Potrero Walter Ames 2300 Third Street 

Golden Gate Park Ted Terlau Stanyan opp. Waller 

Traffic .....Ralph E. Olstad Hall of Justice 

City Prison Lt. Walter Thompson Hall of Justice 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel John Meehan Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Harry Nelson Hall of Justice 

Director of Juvenile Bureau 2475 Greenwich Street 

Dan Kiely 
Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information LiEtrr. George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools 

Traffic Control Insp. Thomas B. Tract 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts John A. Encler Hall of Justice 

Headquarters Dan Kiely Hall of Justice 

Chinatown Detail Lt. H. C. Atkinson Hall of Justice 

Range Master Pistol Range, Lake Merced 

Emil Dutil 



When In Trouble QaH SUttCr hlO-lO 

When In UOUbt Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Februarv. 1954 




HUMBOLDT LUMBER CORP. 
HUMBOLDT PLYWOOD CORP. 



Douglas Fir Lumber & Plywood Products 
Fir Plywood Exterior & Interior 



p. O. Box 248 
ARCATA, CALIFORNIA 



I'lhruary, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3 



"Efficient Police 

Make a Land of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




±S5 PEACE OFFICERS' 




The Magazine 

Peace Officers 

Read 

( Trade Mark Copyright ) 



Vol. XXVII 



FEBRUARY, 1954 



No. 1 



SAN FRANCISCO SACRILEGE 



! The evening of March 4th had been 
cool and clear, but as the long night 
drew to a close a curtain of moisture rose 
from the Pacific and drifted in through 
the Golden Gate to shroud San Francis- 
co's North Beach with a ghostly blanket 
of fog. 

For the most part the city slept. There 
were of course e.xceptions. On the 
Kearny Street side of Telegraph Hill 
stocking footed young bohemians darted 
from apartment to apartment in the Cas- 
bah, sipping forbidden liquor and indulg- 
ing in strange, whispered revelry. Half 
way up Pacific Avenue a swarthy man 
known as Izzy Gomez moved his mon- 
strous bulk along the battered bar of his 
secret establishment and beamed evilly at 
his assembled guests. 

On Eddy Street a pint sized reporter 
whom people called "The Killer" stayed 
for one more drink while Shanty Malone 
locked up the back bar and prepared to 
call it a day. A block away a tired young 
woman walked wearily toward her tiny 
hotel room, her night's work done. 
Across the street a beat policeman trying 
doors paused for a moment to watch her 
progress and, after a moment's hesitation, 
shrugged his shoulders and moved on. 

And over on Columbus Avenue, where 
the tortuous slopes of Telegraph Hill 
flow into a gentle incline a solitary man 
carrying a heavy bundle moved through 
the mist toward the massive church that 
towered over Columbus Square. A man 
without a name as far as San Francisco 
was concerned. An anonymous stranger 
moving with grim purpose toward his 
appointment with destiny . . . and death. 

Within the church eight men, none of 
whom knew what he looked like, awaited 
his arrival. They sat in ambush with 
ready guns as they had for many nights 
before, because while they could not 



By Walter R. Hecox 

describe the man they knew what his 
package contained. And they did not ap- 
prove. The eight silent men who guarded 
the altar at SS. Peter and Paul's were 
firmly convinced that nitroglycerine has 
no place in a church. The stranger drew 
nearer, turning up Filbert Street and 
moving rapidly toward the entrance of 
the giant edifice. 




Louis De Mattei 

In Columbus Square a shapeless lump 
on a park bench stirred, stretched, and 
became a man who stared curiously at the 
stranger. His right hand waved erratical- 
ly and for no apparent reason. 

Another man, seated in an apartment 
house next to the church caught the ges- 



ture and turned his attention to a care- 
fully placed mirror. The reflection let 
him see the stranger, and a second man, 
walking down the middle of Filbert 
Street. He too moved toward the church 
and conversed briefly with the man who 
held the package. When he had crossed 
the street and taken a watchful position 
there, the stranger laid down his package, 
placing it carefully where it would do 
the most damage. He lit a match vvhich 
sputtered weakly in the fog and went 
out. The second match he cupped in h s 
liands carefully until it burned brightly. 
He leaned over. A fuse sputtered. The 
stranger turned to run. Corporal Larry 
Alclnerny shoved his revolver from his 
place of concealment and shouted 
"Halt!" And while the fuse burned 
brightly between the pair, the stranger 
drew a gun of his own. 

The dramatic nightmare which had 
terrorized San Francisco's North Beach 
for more than a year was about to end. 

The first bomb had exploded early on 
the morning of January 26th the preced- 
ing year, powdering the moist air of the 
North Beach with a fine spray of plaster 
and concrete. It was not a big bomb. Not 
in comparison with those to come, but 
the explosion was violent enough to shat- 
ter windows for blocks around and bring 
the bulk of San Francisco's Italian popu- 
lation into an angry awakening. 

The calm which had descended over 
the Latin quarter during the pre-dawn 
hours erupted suddenly into a tumul- 
tuous crescendo of angry voices, scream- 
ing sirens, and scurrying policemen. All 
eyes turned toward the towering church 
on Columbus Square where the column 
of dust and smoke drifted up toward the 
mist masked sky and dispersed itself in 
sooty streamers across the startled city. 
(ConiinueJ on page 46) 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Another Officer Murdered 



i 



February, 1954 



Quietly, but with a dogged determina- 
tion not often matched in any icind of 
work, peace officers throughout the state 
are helping to track down a trigger hap- 
py burglar who shot and killed Police- 
man Francis AL (Jack) Rea of North 
Sacramento. 

Rea, known affectionately throughout 
the North Sacramento area as "Jack the 
Cop," was shot in the head during a 
running gun battle with the bandit on 
the night of January 2nd, and died in a 
hospital 16 hours later. 



ing on the case was reflected by North 
Sacramento Police Chief ^Villiam F. 
^Vilson, when he told the North Sacra- 
mento City Council : 

"He was murdered by an unknown 
assailant while doing his duty. As yet 
there has been no arrest, but there defi- 
nitely will be one. 

"We're checking every lead we get. 
All of them, regardless of how insigni- 
ficant they may seem, will be in\esti- 
gated." 

This is what happened : 



away as they neared the building. He 
ducked between two houses and Rea 
leaped out of the squad car with a shot- 
gun and gave chase. Gassaway drove 
around the corner, hoping to head the 
man off. 

The prowler fired several shots at the 
assistant chief's car, but failed to hit it. 

He wheeled, and headed back toward 
Rea. There were more shots. Marvelli 
and Jones ran toward the sound of the 
gunfire. They found Rea lying uncon- 
scious in the street. The savage gunman 




1 he lead in the investigation is being 
taken by Jack's fellow officers on the 
North Sacramento Police Department. 
Helping are the state bureau of Criminal 
Identification and Investigation, the 
Sacramento Police Department and 
Sheriff's Office, the Brawley Police De- 
partment, the Santa Ana Police Depart- 
ment, and others. 

The intentness of every officer work- 



Jack Rea 

Joseph Compton, the manager of the 
Acme Brewery Warehouse at 320 Cedar 
Street, North Sacramento, spotted a 
burglar in the building and called the 
police. Rea and Assistant Chief Percy 
Gassaway sped toward the scene. 

Officers Joseph Marvelli and Dean 
Jones hustled to the warehouse in an- 
other car from another direction. 

Ihe burglar spotted Rea and Gass- 



apparenth' iind run straight into him, 
shot him through the head and kept 
going. 

Rea was rushed to the Sacramento 
County Hospital where a team of doc- 
tors worked all night in the \ain effort 
to sa\e his life. 

Meanwhile, the North Sacramento 
officers, with the aid of the Sacramento 
(Conlinurd on page 29) 



February , 1 954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



PISTOL POINTING 



Annual Report of the San 
Francisco Police Pistol Range 

The report shows that a complete fire- 
arm training, qualification, and practice 
firing program was carried out for the 
San Francisco Police Department, Fed- 
eral, State, county and municipal law 




Jack Chanev and Friends 

enforcement agencies, United States 
Armed Forces, civilians and civilian or- 
ganizations; that National, State, and 
San Francisco Police Department pistol 
tournaments were conducted, and that 
the number of persons who used the 
range facilities, under control and per- 
sonal direction of Range Master Emile 
J. Dutil and staff, made a grand total of 
12,854, as revealed by group data, as 
follows : 

Police Revoher Qualification : 

(Number of men firing) 4,772 

Police Revolver Practice: 

( Men firing on own time) 1,063 

Police Revolver Traning: 

(111 men over 3-day period ) 41 7 

Shotgun Traning and Qualification 304 
Revolver Qualifying Tests : 

Master Class 150 

Expert Class 450 

Sharpshooter Class 1,587 

Marksman Class 1,944 

Unqualified' Class 622 

Reserve Police: Training 

and qualification 318 

Federal Bureau of Identification, 
Special Police, Sheriffs, Indus- 
trial Guards and other law en- 
forcement agents: For Instruc- 
tion, training, qualification and 
practice 889 



By Ross DUNNIGAN 

Civilians: Instruction, training 

and practice 199 

United States Armed Forces : 

Practice Firing 10 

Inter-Departmental championship 

revolver tournaments 6 

Officers firing in six tournaments.... 906 

National and State Pistol 

Tournaments 6 

Matches fired 36 

Competitors registered in six 

tournaments 725 

Competitors firing in scheduled 

matches 3,976 

Match entry fees collected $2,860.75 

Range fees collected 142.50 

Ammunition Reloaded : 

Total rounds, .38 caliber 570,000 

Total rounds, .45 caliber 800 

Reloads Expended : 

Total rounds, .38 caliber 567.752 

Total rounds, .45 caliber SOO 

New Ammunition Expended : 

Total rounds, .38 caliber 2,658 

Total rounds, 12 gauge shotgun 6,742 



THE OAKLAND MATCHES 

Siuiday, December 6th was the last 
shoot for 1953 at the Oakland Club back 
of the Zoological Grounds with over 225 
shooters on the lines and completely up- 
setting the guess of the range officials 
who had allowed for about 185 of tin- 
shooters to bounce the long green for the 
days shooting. The day was a hone\' an.l 
the shooters were out for blood with 
Karl Schaugaard, of the SFPD taking 
the high score over Bob Chow's second 
place. At this time the ^^'estern Revolver 
Association has not announced the 1953 
champion but will do so at their annual 
banquet to be held sometime this month 
approximately the 23rd. There the class 
winners will be presented with their 
awards as will the team winners. The 
pistoleers as they all like the awards 
"Appreciation Awards" sure bring out 
for their shooting trophies. This year 
the awards were little loving cups with 
Spike Spiken receiving a nice gold one 
for his eight straight year without miss- 
ing a match — and that's a record. Ed De- 



Mello, Wesley Lim and Evar Roseburg 
received their awards for seven straight 
years without a miss. After the matches 
there was the usual lucky target shoot 
and some of the gang had a heck of a 
time getting three shots on the paper — 
anyhow, it was a lot of fun. 

Glad to see the scribeshooter. Jack 
Markham, out of the hospital where he 
went for a bit of hernioplasty (how's 
that for a word?) His shooting showed 
he should have had other things patched 
up at the same time. 

Then there was the sad, sad tale of 
Bill Fung appearing on the scene with 
the nicest Scottish cap any chinaboy could 
wear — on Bill it looked charming. Then 
Jack Chanev, he of Irish ancestry, spor- 
ted Bill and it was a tuff go to keep Jack 
from using Bill as a target. The attac'^ed 
photo shows Jacks perple :ed look while 
Bill MacFung looks on quite placid like. 
Alt!~o I noticed 3.IacFung ducked out as 
foon as possible. 

Ph.il Lander, of Oaklan.!, Uk-i; ;o tr ' 
off each year to .".om; distant £r>o: and 
a bit of h'uiting f,o this year 't h~?. 
for Idaho w':ere (he cla'nr) t*^- 'ui ' 
and the finding, was perfect. Well '^•w 
day, out pops an old timer 'n the n";- 
.=;onage of Al Friend who had also rp :r 




The Old Timer 

his vacation hunting in the wilds of Ida- 
ho. That finished the shooting for Phil 
and when I left late in the afternoon 
there were the two old liars sitting on a 
bench going thru the motions of how 
they killed bears, buffalos, wild-cat<, 
lions — oops — no, not lions. Anyhow it 
was some bull session — and I do mean 
HULL!!! 

(CuntinuiJ nn paijf 12) 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



POLICE PROMOTIONAL 
EXAMINATION QUESTIONS 



In the last issue of this Journal the 
following numbered statements, on the 
subject Penal Code, were true: 1, 2, 3, 
7, 8,9, 13, 14, 17, 18,22,23,25,27,28, 
29, 30, 35, 36, 39, 40, 41, 42, 46, 49. 

1. Every executive or ministerial offi- 
cer, employee or appointee of the State 
of California, county or city therein or 
political subdivision thereof, who know- 
ingly asks, receives or agrees to receive 
any emolument, gratuity or reward, or 
any promise thereof for doing an official 
act is guilty of a felony. 

2. Extortion is a felony. 

3. The value of the bribe offered to 
any ministerial officer, employee or ap- 
pointee of the State of California, county 
or city therein or political subdivision 
thereof, retermines the gravity of the 
crime to be charged. 

4. The rule of the Common Law, that 
penal statutes are to be strictly construed, 
has no application to this code. All the 
provisions are to be construed according 
to the fair import of their terms, with a 
view to effect its objects and to promote 
justice. 

5. \Vhenever any person is declared 
punishable for a crime by imprisonment 
in the state prison for a term not less 
than any specified number of years, and 
no limit to the duration of such imprison- 
ment is declared, the court authorized to 
pronounce judgment upon such convic- 
tion may, in its discretion, sentence such 
offender to imprisonment during his 
natural life. 

6. No person can be piuiished for a 
public offense, except upon a legal con- 
viction, in a court having jurisdiction 
thereof. 

7. Not all public offenses must be 
prosecuted by indictment or information. 

8. The parties in criminal actions are 
the defendant and the people of the state 
of California, as a party. 

9. No part of the Penal Code is retro- 
active. 

10. Justices of the peace are not magis- 
trates, as set forth in the Penal Code 
definition. 

11. The counsel for the people may 
make comments on the failure of the de- 
fendant to explain or to deny by his testi- 
mony any evidence or facts in the case 
against him. 

12. A husband convicted of wilfully 
abandoning and leaving his wife in a des- 
titute condition is punishable in the state 



prison for a period of two years and a 
fine of $1000.00. 

13. Common barratry is the practice 
of advertising the procurement of divorce 
or the securement of alimony. 

14. If two or more persons conspire to 
commit any crime thev are punishable 
by a fine of $5000.00. 

15. Unlawful killing, with malice 
aforethought, is murder. 

16. A statement of that which one does 
not to be true is equivalent to a state- 
ment of that which one knows to be false. 

17. Every juror, or person drawn or 
summoned as a juror, who makes any 
promise or agreement to give a verdict or 
decision for or against any party is liable 
to a fine of $5,000.00 or imprisonment in 
the state prison for five years. 

18. Under Penal Code provisions, the 
word "day-time" means the period be- 
tween sunset and sunrise ; and the word 
"month" means a calendar month. 

19. Under the Code, only "policeman 
of a city or town" are "peace officers." 

20. Every crime not punishable in the 
state prison is a misdemeanor. 

21. For acts punished as crimes no 
civil damages can be recovered. 

22. No act committed by a person 
while in a state of intoxication is less 
criminal by reason of his having been in 
such condition. 

23. All persons are of sound mind who 
are not lunatics. 

24. Temporary insanity is as much a 
defense to a criminal charge as insanity 
of a longer duration. 

25. Among the classes of those who 
are not responsible for the commission 
of crime are those who committed the act 
charged without being conscious thereof. 

26. A person who commits an offense 
v.'ithout this state, which would, if com- 
mitted within this state, be termed rob- 
bery, is punishable under the laws of this 
state if he brings the property stolen 
within this state. 

27. Every person who, with intent to 
defraud, presents for allowance or pay- 
ment, to any city board, authorized to 
pay the same if genuine, any false claim 
or bill, is guilty of a felony. 

28. A jailor who permits the escape of 
prisoners in custody is guilty of a felony. 

29. Unlawfully destroying evidence is 
a misdemeanor. 

30. Unlawfully deceiving a witness is 
a felony. 

31. Unlawfully offering false evidence 
is a misdemeanor. 



32. Persons who by threats compel an- 
other to commit a crime are accessories. 

33. An assault is an unlawful attempt 
to commit a violent injury on the person 
of another. 

34. Throwing a caustic chemical on 
the person of another is a felony. 

35. Wilfully administering stupefying 
drugs, in any alcoholic beverages to be 
drunk by another, for ulterior motives is 
a felony. 

36. The crime of assault with a deadly 
weapon is punishable by a fine of $5,000 
or imprisonment for ten years. 

37. The crimes of libel and slander 
are committed either by the spoken or 
the written word. 

38 Under Code provisions, the punish- 
ment for the crime or slander is the same. 

39. The crime of seduction is a felony. 

40. The crime of adultery is punish- 
able in the county jail for one year and 
a fine of $1,000.00. 

41. Dogs are personal property and as 
such their value determines the charge to 
be made for their theft. 

42. The penalty for pool-selling or 
bookmaking may be not less than thirty 
days in state prison or a county jail. 

43. No child under the age of sixteen 
years must be placed in any prison, in 
company with adults convicted of crime, 
except in the presence of a proper official. 



Excerpts from San Francisco 
Police Ordinances 

(Continued from last issue) 
Sec. 1350: San Francisco Police 
Range. 

1. The Pistol Range located near 
Skyline and Merced Boulevard, in the 
City and County of San Francisco, is, 
under the Municipal Code, placed under 
the jurisdiction and management of the 
Police Department. 

2. The purposes of the Pistol Range 
are: 

A. To instruct, train, and to qualify 
regular members of the San Francisco 
Police Department, Auxiliary Civilian 
Defense Police in good standing. Patrol 
Special Police Officers, and. such other 
law-enforcement officers, who in the 
judgment to the Chief of Police, co- 
operate or may be called upon to cooper- 
ate with the San Francisco Police De- 
partment in the apprehension of crinu- 
nals or the maintenance of peace in the 
City and County of San Francisco. 
(Continued on page IS) 



Fibninry. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



ASSOCIATED PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS OFFICERS 



John Atkinson, President 



Thomas A. Bayley, Secretary 



October, 1953. 

The Northern California Chapter of 
APCO Inc., was called to order by 
President Atkinson at 1 1 :00 A.M. at the 
Shattuck Hotel in Berkeley- 

The minutes of the last meeting were 
read and approved. 

Host Frank Roach outlined the pro- 
gram of the day. 

Robert Mason of Santa Clara County 
told of a meeting held in regards to a 
State wide radio network for the Fire 
Service which includes 4, 150 MC and 2, 
450 MC channels at an estimated cost of 
$120,000.00. 

The group was pleased to hear Capt. 
McMurphy of Alameda County describe 
the progress in the planning for tying the 
three Inter Systems in the State together. 
The plan proposes that one key station 
in each of the three Inter Systems be ar- 
ranged so that it could dial into the State 
wide system. 

We were informed, that effective Nov. 
1st, the restricted operators permit will 
be issued for an indefinite period. 

The Chairman of the Frequency and 
Engineering Committee McMurphy re- 
quested clearance for a base and mobile 
frequency of 45.14 MC for Madera 
County, Orange Cove requested 155.01 
MC and 155.07 MC for their Inter Sys- 
tem, and Merced County requested 
155.07 MC for Inter System use. Art 
McDole of Monterey County made a 
motion that these frequencies be cleared. 
Ivan Hudson of Piedmont seconded and 
the motion carried. 

We adjourned for lunch at 12:00 
noon. Refreshments were served through 
the courtesy of several of the commercial 
members. The meeting reconvened at 1 
p.m. 

An application for membership ( com- 
mercial) from Donald L. Kestell of 
Neely Enterprises and one for associate 
memlsership from Thomas R. Ferry of 
PG&E were unanimously accepted by 
the membership. 

Santa Clara County was chosen as the 
next meeting place where we will learn 
all about transistors. There being no fur- 
ther business the meeting was adjourned 
at 2 p.m. 

We were all taken by bus to the Uni- 
versity of California Radiation Labs and 
conducted on an extensive tour of the 
Cycletron, the Linear Acceleratoc and 
the 6,000,000,000 volt "Bevatron." 

After seeing what happens to some of 
our taxes we were returned to Berkeley 
by bus and the membership expressed its 



thanks to Frank Roach for a most in- 
teresting meeting. 



November 1953. 

The November meeting of the North- 
ern California Chapter of APCO con- 
veined at Vale Restaurant at Alviso at 

1 1 :00 a.m. The minutes of the last meet- 
ing were read and approved. A portion 
of the minutes of the southern group was 
also read and a discussion followed on 
the advisability of allowing CHP sub- 
stations on the inter system nets. 

Chowchilla requested clearance of 
155.07mc for inter system net, and a 
base and mobile frequency within 24 
OKCs of 155.07mc. 154.89mc was rec- 
ommended provided that there was no 
objection, from Merced County. An al- 
ternate frequency of 155.31mc would be 
available iti that case. 

Yuba County requested 155.13MC. 

Carmel requested 158.85 MC. 

Pacific Grove requested 158.85 MC. 

Concord requested 155.31 MC. 

After a motion by Martin Landers of 
Napa that the above frequencies be 
granted and a second by LeBoeuf of 
Marysville the frequencies were ap- 
proved. 

Humboldt County requested clearance 
of a Base and mobile frequency of 39.86 
MC which was cleared after a motion 
by Maybee of Sonoma County and a 
second by Hudson of Piedmont. 

Art ]VIcDole of Monterey County 
gave the first reading of some minor 
changes to Constitution. 

The meeting adjourned for lunch at 

12 noon. 

Mr. Robert Barrington of the PT&T 
gave a very interesting talk and demon- 
stration about transistors, which gave us 
a rough idea of what we might expect to 
have to work with in the future. 

The business meeting reconvened at 
2 p.m. and a discussion followed in re- 
gards to payment of dues in advance. 
The Commercial members present were 
introduced. There were 35 members and 
guests present. 

An offer of Sacramento for our De- 
cember meeting was accepted. 

There being no further business the 
meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 



December 1953 

The December 9th meeting of the 
Northern California Chapter of APCO 
was called to order by President John 
Atkinson at the State Civil Defense Con- 



trol Center in Sacramento at 1 1 :00 a.m. 
Ihe minutes of the last meeting were dis- 
pensed with and a count showed that 
there were 45 members and guests 
present. 

The City of Grass Valley was given a 
frequency clearance for a base station of 
10 watts output on 37,18 MC, and the 
County of Sonoma was given clearance 
on 155.67 MC for the Point to Point 
System. 

Frank Roach of the State OCD an- 
nounced when he would be in each Area 
for a survey. 

Art McDole gave the second reading 
of the Constitution Amendments. Hank 
Borgardus of San Francisco moved that 
they be adopted. After a second by John 
Mayr the motion carried. 

Applications for active membership 
were accepted from William Brown, 
Merle Fagundes, Dan Filice and Max 
Watson, all employed by Santa Clara 
County Communications Dept. 

Nominations were opened for Officers 
of this Association for the coming year. 

Merrill LeBoeuf of Marysville nomi- 
nated Tom Bayley of Solano County for 
President. Bayley declined and then 
nominated our Vice President Art Mc- 
Dole for President. 

Frank Roach nominated the secretary, 
Pom Bayley, for Vice President. 

John Atkinson of Santa Clara County 
was nominated for the combined office of 
Secretary and Treasurer by J. Mansfield 
Lewis of Marin County. 

For the Board of Directors, Bob Ma- 
son of Santa Clara County nominated 
the entire Board who are all eligible for 
re-election. They are Lewis of Marin 
County, Maybee of Sonoma County, Le- 
Boeuf of Marysville, Keller of Santa 
Cruz and Freeman of Mare Island. 

Nominations will be reopened at the 
next meeting before elections. 

DeWitt Nelson, Director of Natural 
Resources, Member of the State Coni- 
mimications Advisory Board and former 
State Forester, and affectionately known 
as "Swede" was nominated and vmani- 
mously voted to Honorary Membership. 

I he Commercial Members present 
were introduced. Everette LeGette of 
Motorola reported on Bob Kranholt's 
improved condition. 

Bob Mason proposed the International 
Kitchen at Niles for our next meeting. 

Our Host Fom Kelly introduced Gen- 
eral Robertson, State Chief of Civil De- 

(Continued on page 17) 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



MARYSVILLE 1850-1954 



The City of Marysville received its 
name 103 years ago when the citizens of 
the new community at the conHueiice of 
the Feather and Yuba rivers rejected pro- 
posed titles of Yubafield and Circumdoro 
(surroinided with gold). 

Instead the 500 to 1,000 inhabitants 
voted unanimously for the present name, 
in honor of Mrs. Mary Murphy Covil- 
laud, wife of Charles Covillaud, one of 
the foiuijers of Yuba county. A survivor 
of the Donner Party which experienced 
puch frightful hardships in crossing the 
Sierra Nevada in the winter of 1846-47, 
Mrs. Covillaud was described by a writ- 
er in the Marysville Appeal in 1871 who 
declared that "never on the soil of Cali- 
fornia has a woman trod of a purer na- 
ture, more amiable disposition, a more 
generous heart." 

Disaster struck early at the new city 
foundeil on what had previously been 
known as Nye's Ranch. On the night of 
August 30, 1851, a blaze originated in a 
Chinese washhouse on High St. and 
quickly spread to a conflagration which 
destroyed 80 buildings at an estimated 
loss of $500,000. A succession of fires 
followed in the city's early years, but the 
community continued to grow as it shook 
off the efifects of its fiery baptism. 

From such humble beginnings the city 
of Marysville has grown to the present 
day and now boasts a population of more 
than 8,300. Head of the chartered city 
government is Mayor Gavin Mandery 
and his four fellow-councilmen. 

Mandery was elected for his first four- 
year term in 1952. He is associated with 
the Daoust Chevrolet Co. 

Councilman Roy G. Cunningham, 
partner in Bud and Roy service stations, 
was reelected in 1952 to serve a second 
four-year term. Also serving his second 
term as Councilman John J. Murphy, 
\\ ho was elected in 1946 and again in 
1950. Murphy, a former constable, has 
announced at recent council meetings he 
will not seek reelection next year when 
his present term expires. 

Councilman Jack W. Iden, partner 
in Iden's Pharmacy, was elected in 1952 
and served as mayor last year. Council- 
man Marion Bew, proprietor of the 
Lakeview Motel, was elected to serve a 
four-year term in 1950. 

City Councilmen receive $5 for every 
council meeting attended with a limit of 
$150 per member for any one fiscal year. 

Veteran city official is Phil J. Divver, 



Jr., who began his association with 
Marysville in 1915 when he was a con- 
crete inspector on the construction of the 
approach to the D St. bridge. Following 
military service in World War I, he was 
appointed assessor in February, 1920, 
city engineer in August, 1927, and su- 
perintendent of public works and grounds 
in April, 1946. 

In his latter role Divver is in charge 
of some 25 street department employes 
headed by Foreman J. L. Cota and sub- 
foreman Homer Moore. 

City Clerk Chester O. Gates has serv- 
ed since his appointment to that position 
in April, 1928, and also acts as deputy 
tax collector, controller of the budget, 
purchasing agent, clerk of the personnel 
board, and ex-officio clerk of the city 
council. 

Mrs. Marjorie Ahern has been tax and 
license collector and deputy city clerk 
since she went to work for the city in 
December, 1939. Other employes in the 
city clerk's office are Mrs. Alice Green, 
who went to work in June, 1951, as 
clerk-stenographer, and Miss Maria Uri- 
guen, clerk-typist since May, 1952. 

Eugene M. Boyd, Jr., was appointed 
city treasurer in July, 1952. 

Ralph L. Palm was appointed City 
Inspector in April, 1949, and since that 
time has been responsible for seeing that 
building, plumbing and electrical work 
within the city complies with the various 
ordinances. He is also charged with en- 
forcing the city zoning regulations. Palm 
is assisted by Mrs. Mary Jane AIcRee 
who has been employed as a clerk-typist 
since August, 1952. 

Police Chief Jack O. Blevins heads 
Marysvjlle's 21-man police department. 
Blevins joined the force in June, 1942, 
and after service with the U. S. Navy in 
World War II was promoted to sergeant 
in November, 1946, and appointed police 
chief in January, 1951. 

Serving under Blevins are five ser- 
geants. Sgt. Dennis McAuliffe joined the 
department in February, 1922, and is 
now in charge of one shift. Sgt. George 
Galligan, a World War I Navy veteran, 
joined in September, 1926, and also heads 
a shift. The third shift is headed by Sgt. 
Jason Meek, a \\^orld Way 1 Army \et- 
eran who joined in March, 1944. 

Sgt. Nick Nicholau, a Marine Corps 
veteran of World War II, joined in 
January, 1943, and serves as an investi- 
gator. Also serving as an investigator is 



Sgt. George Garcia, a World War II 
Navy veteran who joined the department 
in June, 1946. 

Desk officer Leo Stein, joined the de- 
partment in March, 1925. A World 
War I Army veteran, he has served as 
Chief of police. The other desk officers 
are George B. Darr, who joined in Jan- 
uary, 1947, after Army service in World 
War II, and William McNabb, also an 
Armv \eteran. who joined in August, 
1948. 

Officer Dewey AUread who joined the 
department in November, 1938, is in 
charge of parking meter maintenance. 
Officer Charles Neuerberg, ^Vorld War 
II Army veteran is asigned to the traffic 
detail. 

Serving as patrolmen are Officers Tru- 
man Bee, who joined the force in August, 
1941; Joseph .M. McNab, joined in 
June, 1943; Almon O. Coleman, World 
War II Marine Corps veteran, April, 
1948; John Gust, who served in the Air 
Force 'in World War II, June 1951; 
James Polmanteer, Army veteran of 
World War II, July, 1951; George 
Reusser, December, 1951 ; Richard 
Camper, July, 1952; and Donald An- 
derson, World War II Navv veteran, 
April, 1953. 

Officer John Talley, World AVar II 
Marine Corps veteran, was appointed on 
a temporary basis in August of this year. 

Officer Mary AUread serves as police 
matron and clerk, and also acts as inter- 
preter in cases involving Spanish and 
Mexican prisoners and witnesses who are 
luiable to speak English. 

Another well-known Yuba County 
official is Dist. Atty. Joseph L. Heenan 
who was appointed to the job in 1936 
and retained the position since that time 
by winning voter approval at subsequent 
elections. 

Asst. Dist. Atty. Francis Arnoldy was 
appointed in 1941, and Marysville attor- 
ne\' James G. Changaris appointed last 
July 16 to serve as part-time deputy Dist. 
Atty. Mrs. Albert Arostegui has served 
as secretary in Heenan's office for the 
past two years. Public Defender Richard 
Schoenig was appointed to his present 
position in Sept., 1951. 

Sheriff John Dower was elected in 
1946 to the position he now holds after 
ilefeating at the polls C. J. McCoy who 
had served as sheriff for 32 years. He 
was reelected in 1950, and has publicly 
(Continued on page 70) 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



SUTTER COUNTY CENTRALIZES 



With a $500,000 office building of 
modern design ready for occupancy, Sut- 
ter county is planning to centralize its 
government agencies in Yuba City. 

The new structure, on Second St. be- 
tween B and C Sts., faces the old court- 
house and the Hall of Records. 1 he 
courthouse will remain in use by the law- 
enforcement divisions of the county gov- 
ernment. The Hall of Records is slated 
for later remodeling and has been sug- 
gested as site for the county public 
library. 

Housed in the new structure will be 
offices of the auditor, assessor, treasurer 
and tax collector, clerk, recorder, school 
department, welfare department, road 
department and supervisors. 

The courthouse, with its present coun- 
ty jail annex, will quarter the sheriffs and 
constable's offices ; superior and Yuba 
City District courts ; Judges' chambers 
and law library; probation officer and 
district attorney's offices. 

Sutter county's government is headed 
by an elective fi\e-man supervisorial 
board which now includes Marshall S. 
Davis of Meridian, District 3 and chair- 
man of the board ; ? Norred, District 
1, Live Oak; Harold W. Moore, Dis- 
trict 2, Yuba City ; Edward DaCosse, 
District 4, Yuba City ; and Eber F. Beil- 
by. District 5, Rio Oso. 

Albert B. Brown is county clerk, with 
Mrs. Beatrice Johnson, clerk of the 
court of the board of supervisors, as 
deputies. 

Eugene M. Boyd, county recorder, has 
as staff Mrs. Bette Bell, chief deputy, 
Mrs. Frances A Vest, senior typist and 
Mrs. Elsie Lathrop, junior typist. 

Evelyn H. Chipman, county auditor, 
is assisted by Bertha Lantz, chief deputy, 
Ruth Paxton, Phyllis Chiappini, Lorene 
Johnson and Gladys Mills. The two lat- 
ter are part-time aides. 

Ernest R. Hauck, assessor, has a regu- 
lar staff including Mary Van Arsdale, 
chief deputy; Mrs. Valerie Bell, deputy; 
Marion H. Hiesch, map-man; Arthur 
Hill and Gerald F. Allen, appraisers. 

Tax-collector and treasurer E. Hanlon 
Brown has in his office June Hammons, 
chief deputy treasurer; Mildred Davis, 
chief deputy tax collector ; and Betty 
Woodhead, deputy. 

All of these departments will be in the 



new structure before the end of the year, 
if present plans are carried through. 

Also to be located in the new building 
will be the supervisorial chamber and 
private offices and the county road de- 
partment, which is headed by E. E. Wat- 
kins, road commisioner. On his staff are 
Alvah Thorson, engineer and James Mi- 
randa, assistant ; Patricia Lembke and 
Bette Jones, clerks. 

Frank E. Willard, county superin- 
tendent, will establish school headquar- 
ters in the new building with his staff. 
This also will be the meeting place of the 
county board of education. 

Cecil F. Prichett, county welfare di- 
rector, and his staff of 12 will occupy a 
suite of offices, approved by the state wel- 
fare department. 

B. T. Berndston, Yuba City, is official 
county surveyor. 

The old courthouse will be revamped 
for new uses after general government 
offices are removed. Noel C. Stevenson, 
district attorney, will be supplied with 
quarters here. His staff included Chief 
Deputy John G. Hauck and Deputy 
Rezo Del Pero. Carol Neyens is office 
secretary. 

^Villianl G. Thomas, an appointive 
official, as county probation officer also 
will be located in the courthouse. Mrs. 
Geraldine S. Boyd is deputy probation 
officer. With an advisory committee, this 
department is in charge of the juvenile 
hall and detention home in Yuba City. 

\y. G. Carpenter, sheriff, is located 
in the courthouse adjacent to the county 
jail which is operated under his supervi- 
sion. C. Earl Blackburn, undersheriff, 
heads the list of deputies in this depart- 
ment. Included are O. O. Brown, H. P. 
Ollar, Art Myers, Ben Stevens, 
Mathews G. ^VoHf and Joseph Shea. 
Verdene Andersen is secretary. E. L. 
McCune is Yuba township constable. 

The coroner and public administrator 
is Burwell W. Ullrey of Yuba City. 

Sutter count\' shares with Yuba county 
in the bi-county health department, with 
Dr. Edith Young as health officer and in 
the veterans' service office, with Herman 
Kruithof in charge. 

In the Sutter-Yuba Mosquito Abate- 
ment district, covering area in the two 
counties Thomas M. Sperbeck is man- 
ager. The housing advisory board oper- 
ates three projects in the county, two in 



\'uba City and one in Live Oak, with 
Folbert C. Elliott as executive secretary. 
The county also maintains an airport in 

Yuba Lity, located at the south end of 

Second Street. 

The county agricultural department is 
located in another new Yuba City build- 
ing, on Garden Hwy. near Second St. It 
was erected this summer. Offices, labora- 
tories and space for inspections necessary 
under California's agricultural laws are 
included. 

T. D. Urbahns, county agricultural 
commisioner, has held this position for 
26 years. His staff includes W. A. 
Greene, deputy commissioner ; W. C. 
Pitt, Donald F. Harris and Alfred C. 
Perrin, inspectors; Alice \Villing, secre- 
tary. County Sealer of Weights and 
Measures K. E. Covington also has his 
office in this department. 

The present city government with 
headquarters in the municipal building 
on Sumner St., is topped by the five-man 
council. 

Joseph W. Sanderson of Anchor Mo- 
tors, Inc., was appointed mayor by the 
other councilmen last April. Other coun- 
cil members are Howard H. Harter, of 
Harter Canner\- ; Lloyd I. Huse, auto- 
mobile salesman ; Riley W. Young, until 
recently a service station operator ; and 
Raymond T. Butler, manager of the Sut- 
ter theater. 

Matt ^V. Slankard has been Yuba 
City administrator since Sept. 1 when 
he came here from San Bruno to replace 
Lee Roberts, resigned. 

Lewis A. Duncan, also an appointive 
official, is chief of police and tax collec- 
tor. Members of the police staff include 
Gordon Phillips, inspector; Otto Kunde, 
sergeant; Frank Wamsley, acting ser- 
geant; Donald Carlson, Nick Frandrup, 
Leonard Karley, Roy Kornmeyer, Archie 
Harmon, Robert Bumpus, patrolmen ; 
Oliver Howard, poundmaster; Mrs. 
Marveleen Williams, clerk and secretary 
to the chief. 

Police headquarters in the basement 
of the city hall contain the special police 
radio station with call letters KME-418. 

The city does not maintain a municipal 
jail but uses the facilities of the Sutter 
county jail in the Yuba City courthouse 
under a special arrangement with the 
county. 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February. 1954 



BELL'S SPUDNUT SHOP 

BET YOU'LL LIKE 'EM 
402 E Street 



MAR-l'SVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes 

J. R.'s PLACE 

BEER AND WINES 

Friendly Service Always - Bundle Check Room 

205 "C" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

VICTORY CAFE 

For Real Chinese and American Foods 

"Patronage Where Your Business Is Most 

Appreciated" 

203 "C Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3. 4659 "T-O-K" Tokunaga 

MARYSVILLE GARAGE 

GENERAL REPAIRING - STORAGE 



VISIT THE SILVER FRONT BAR 

FINEST BEERS - WINES - LIQUORS 
Best of Service - Light Lunches 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



ARCADE RESTAURANT 

or in Bottles 
317 Second Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

JOHN TAYLOR FURNITURE 

"FAMOUS FOR THRIFTY FURNITURE" 
Yuba City - Chico - Grass Valley 



116 D Str 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes from 

H, EARL PARKER I 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



Responsibility 
Skill — Integrity 



Phone 3-5481 
12th and F Streets 

MARYSVILLE, 
CALIFORNIA 



MARYSVILLE— 1850-1954 

(Continued from page S) 
aniiouced his intention to seek a third 
term next year. Serving under Dower is 
a staff of nine deputies and two secre- 
taries headed by Undersheriff John Mur- 
phy. 

Unh'ke a police chief, who is an ap- 
pointed official whose staff is picked for 
him, the position of sheriff" is elective and 
the successful candidate on taking office 
is responsible for appointing the deputies 
who will serve under him. 

Thomas E. Mathews succeeded Dow- 
er as County Probation Officer in Jan- 
uary, 1947, when the latter assumed of- 
fice as sheriff. Matthews is aided by Mrs. 
Mamie A. Mather, assistant probation 
officer. 

Henry ^V. Drewes was elected con- 
stable of the Mar\sville area in Nov., 
1950, and took office the following Jan- 
uary for a four-year term. Clarence \V. 
Harvey serves as constable of the Wheat- 
land area, and Louis Marquardt in 
Comptonville. 




Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco 3, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 



itlily 



ALL CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA 
LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES 

Published Monthly by 
Police and Peace Officers Journal 
OUR FOREICN E.XCHANCES 
THE GARDA REVIEW 
2 Crow St.. Dublin, Ireland 
ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ 

Desp. 6, Mexico. D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioja, 606. Buenos .\ircs. 

Republic of .Argentine. S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE 

Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS 

New South Wales 

POLICE JOURNAL 

Wellingt.in. New Zealand 



WALTER R. HECOX 



Edii 



SUBSCRIPTION TERMS— $6.00 a year. 
I)ayable in advance; 60c a number. In Can- 
ada, $7.00 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by 
Reg-istered Letter, or by Postage .Stamps of 
2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE -- Do not sub 
scribe lo POLICE AND PEACE OFFl 
CEKS' JOURNAL through agents unknown 
to you personally, or who cannot present 
projier credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 



o^^B 30 



GOLDEN EMPIRE CAFE 



Phone 2-1665 W. L. "Red" Jeffr 

JEFFRIES MOTORS 

USED CARS OF DISTINCTION 
Bank Financins 



Dial 3-492 7 "Talk of the Town" 

JOE SCOTT FURNITURE 

NEW AND USED 

Furniture - Appliances - Antiques 

Corner Ninth and C Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

KIRK-CLAYTON MOTORS 

PACKARD - WILLYS SALES AND SERVICE 

819 "E" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

GREYHOUND COFFEE SHOP 

"We Never Close" 

We Pride Ourselves on Good Food! 

Tommy McDonald. Prop. 

529 "E" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2396 

RADIO STATION KMYC 

Mutual - Don Lee Affiliate 

Horace E Thomas, Pres. - Joe D. Carroll. Mgr, 

1.000 Walts ■ 1410 Kilocycles— AM 

99 9 Megacycles - 4,900 Watts— FM 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

MARYSVILLE FLORIST 

Bonded Member T. D. S. 

Opposite Catholic Church 

310 Seventh Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



MASSEY-HARRIS 

Sales and Service 

Better Engineered, Better Built 
Farm Equipment Since 1847 

Middleton Implement Co. 

TRACTORS — COMBINES 

FARM IMPLEMENTS 



MARYSVILLE & WOODLAND 
CALIFORNIA 



Class-A Welding & 
Blks. Works 

ALUMINUM & MAGNESIUM 
WELDING 

No Job too Large or too Small 
Guaranteed Workmanship 

Telephone 3-3237 

112 E STREET 

MARYSVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Phone j--4i0l 

ROBERTS ELECTRIC CO. 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 
324 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-7885 

RUBEL'S DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTIONS OUR SPECIALTY 

320 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-9647 

BURTON'S SHOE STORE 

ROBLEE - AIR-STEP - BUSTER BROWN 
314 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

THE FASHION 

LADIES' APPAREL 

Woodland - Marysville - Salinas - Santa Rosa 

316 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

YOUR WESTINGHOUSE STORE 

MARYSVILLE FURNITURE 

Two Stores to Serve You 
304 Third Street. Marysville, California 
758 Plumas Street, Yuba City, California 

Dial 3-9859 

ROMA GRILL 

ITALIAN DINNERS - AMERICAN DISHES 

True Italian Style Spaghetti 

308 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNI\ 

Phone 2-0117 

HARBORD STATIONERY 

OFFICE SUPPLIES - RUBBER STAMPS 
Y & E Desks - Files - Chairs 

321 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Marysville Tractor 
& Equipment Co. 

CATERPILLAR 
JOHN DEERE 

Marysville - Robbins 

Roseville 

1009 - 5th Street 

MARYSVILLE, CALIF. 



i 



Olson Pontiac 

PONTIAC 

Sales and Service 



418 F STREET 

Telephone 3-7339 

MARYSVILLE, CALIF. 



CHECK BRAKES 

Check your brakes before it's too late, 
advises the National Automobile Club. 



ANTICIPATION IN DRIVING 

When driving, anticipate the actions 
of the other fellow and you won't so fre- 
quently find yourself in these tight spots 
that call for catlike reactions to avoid 
disaster. Anticipation is half the fun of a. 
feast. It is also, points out the National 
Automobile Club, half the battle of safe 



KNOWING NOISES HELPS 

I he noises that a car makes are ex- 
cellent clues to the maladies by which it 
may be affected, points out the National 
Automobile Club. As many of today's 
automobile instruction books indicate, 
there are impressive differences between 
knocks, squeaks, squeals, rattles, whistles, 
thumps, and so on. 



Office: 3-7341 Res.: 2-0315 and 3-7762 

GALLIGAN BROTHERS 

INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 
323 "D' Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



HOME MADE BREAD 

Until commercial bakeries were estab- 
lished, points out the National Automo- 
bile Club, quantities of home made bread 
were offered for sale in the open air mar- 
kets of Santa Fe and other New Mexico 
towns. 

DON'T OVERLOOK FRONT 
WHEELS 

One of the places the car owner usual- 
ly forgets to inspect for possible need for 
lubrication is the front wheel bearings, 
according to the National Automobile 
Club. It is true that when well packed 
this point rarely needs further attention 
for a considerable period, but this very 
fact causes many motorists to overlook it 
entirely for months longer than is good 
for its efficient operation. 



USE DISTILLED WATER 

Use only distilled water in the battery, 
advises the National Automobile Club. 
Regardless of how pure it may be no 
other water is pure enough for such use. 



RENDEZVOUS FOR HORSE 
THIEVES 

Ladron Peak, located south of Sabinal 
in south-central New Mexico, is reported 
b\' the National Automobile Club to ha\e 
been the rendez\ous for horse thieves 
long before the advent of American 
rustlers. 



Telephone 2-1625 

M. FRUITMAN 

New Men's Clothing and Shoes 

We Buy, Sell and Loan 

Gold, Jewelry and Diamonds 

230 "D" Street, Marysville, California 

Tel, 3-9919 Mitch Medigovich. Your Host 

STAR it GRILL 

MARYSVILLE'S FINEST 

Noted for Wonderful Food! 

222 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Golden Pheasant Restaurant 

FINEST CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOODS 

Hours: I I A. M. till Midnite 
219 "D' Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-4629 

PAYLESS DRUG STORES 

"WE LIVE UP TO THE NAME" 



DANNY'S TAILOR SHOP 

Specialists in Alterations - Guaranteed Work- 
manship - Reasonable Prices 
Dry Cleaning - Hats Cleaned 
206 "D- Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

"Stop and Say Hello!" 

JACK SCOTT'S MOBILE SERVICE 

LUBE JOBS A SPECIALTY 

Tires, Batteries, Accessories 

603 "B" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



YUBA RIVER 
SAND CO. 



PLASTER SAND , 

CONCRETE SAND 

SAND-BLAST SAND 

CONCRETE MIX 

WASHED ROCK 



We Specialize in 
QUALITY and SERVICE 



Plant Located at 
"B" Street and Levee 

MARYSVILLE, 
CALIFORNIA 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Telephone 2-201 1 

JOHN C. CARLIN 

REALTOR 
317 Fifth Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

JACK'S OPEN-AIR MARKET 

MARYSVILLE'S LARGEST AND BEST 

Quality Vegetables - Fruits - Wines 

Where Price (Lowest Prices) Is King! 

409 So. Highway 99-E 

MA RYSVILLE CALIFORNI.' 

CAMERON'S MATTRESS CO. 

Mattresses Recovered and Renovated - New 
Mattresses Made to Order - Inner Springs Our 

Specialty - Sterilizing 
816 Highway 99-E Phone Marysville 2-2057 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNL' 

Phone 3-7036 Ruby and Ed 

LINDA LUNCH 

BEST OF FOOD . . . ALWAYS 

Coffee That Hits the Spot 

Highway 99-E 

MAR YSVILLE CALIFORNV 

Here's How to Get Rich . . . Phone 3-3744 

RICH FLOORS 

COMPLETE FLOOR COVERINGS 
Venetian Blinds . . . Free Estimates 
940 Highway 99-E. at Linda Comers 

MARYS VILLE CALIFORNIA 

THE APPALOOSA CAFE 

Ray and Nancy Ganoung 

BEERS - WINES - LUNCHES 

"You Bet — We Appreciate Your Business!" 

944 Highway 99-E, One and a half miles South 

MARYS VILLE CALIFORNIA 

POP'S CAFE 

"Where the Boys Meet!" 

QUALITY BEERS AND LUNCHES 

1000 South Highway 99-E 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNI/^ 



Dial 3-9253 



DEL PERO-MONDON 

MEATS WITH YOUR APPROVAL 

Wholesale Jobbers Serving Superior 

California 



1109 Chestnut Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES OF 

ORCHARD LUNCH 

OPEN 24 HOURS 
215 D Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-54 79 

Yuba-Sutter Oil & Burner Co. 

APPLIANCES - STEEL FABRICATING 
BUTANE - ROAD OILING 

L. M •Pick" Rose, Owner 

420 Third Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFOR^ '• 

Phone 3-3402 

TOURIST GARAGE 

GUARANTEED LUBRICATION 

TIRES - TUBES - ACCESSORIES 

GAS - OIL 

Clyde G. Smith, Prop. 

316 E STREET 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



PISTOL POINTING 

(Continued from page 5) 
Hank Bowes arrives for his first shoot 
with the Sacramento gang and right 
away whaddaya think he sez? "Why 
don't they move them 50 yard targets 
about 20 yards closer ?"01d stuff, Hank. 
Every shooter for the past 37 years has 
made that statement after his first try 
at 50 yards and I hereby predict that for 
the next 37 years new shooters will still 
be saying it. 

The WRA assures me that this year 
they will most definitely send out their 
yearly score and average book. I he gang 
likes 'em and felt a bit put out in 1953 
when the club found it was unable to 
send them to the shooters — but this vear 
—YES!!! The WRA would like the 
Clubs around the bay area to join the 
association (for unity is strength) and 
receive the monthy results so just send in 
the two bucks for the year's dues and the 
^VRA will do the rest. And besides you 
also get a copy of my column each month. 
That's worth the 2 bucks alone. 

Don't forget that the San Jose Pistol 
Club still holds their monthly shoots as 
does the Stockton ganji. The ne.xt Oak- 
land shoot will be in March while San 
Francisco will open in February. Keep 
those dates open. 

Those WRA members who haven't 
the price of the new lapel button just out 
of the jewelers can find Spiken and he 
will trade you sumpin' for one. Spike 
loves to swap anything, horses, guns, 
bobby pins, fertilizer or anything yuh got 
to swap. Spike is living at the range, in 
charge, and can be found there daily a 
ready and a waitin' for barter, trade or 
just plain swap. 

Our idea of putting the family to 
work is exemplified by Ed de Mello who 
had his young daughter standing behind 
him during the .45 National match re- 
trieving the shells as fast as Ed could 
pop 'em out. Of course, after the match 
there was the usual cry and howl about 
loosing brass to some so-and-so who pick- 
ed up more'n he shot but didn't cause 
any comment or excitement for no .45 
match would be complete without its 
stolen brass scream. Wonder, if Ed paid 
th" \oangster for her work? 

Elaine Hunt of the Monterey Hand- 
gun Club, in her second competitive 
shoot, confided that it's a lot harder to 
hit the black in a match than it is when 
one is only practicing. Elaine, young 
lady, \'ou have just made the statement 
that oh, so-o-o-o many tyro's make in 
their early shooting days. 

John Faleti has the right idea as he is 
bringing out his 15 year old son John, 
Jr., to do, a spot of shootin'. From the 



Phone 3-5478 

HENRY J. RIECHERS 

INSURANCE - REAL ESTATE 
425 Fourth Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-1201 W. M. "Biir' and Kathryn Arne 

ARNE'S PAINT STORE 



MARYSVILLE 



nd Household Paints and Supples 
423 Eye Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 3-7570 

DAVE & CY 

GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES 

Tune-Up and Electrical Specialists 

Fifth and Eye Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2656 

BERT YARBOROUGH 

FIRE AND AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE 

700 Fifth Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

OLYMPIC RADIO SHOP 

Henry K Swanson, Ownsr 

Hoffman Television - Raytheon Television 

Sales and Service 

642 Plumas Street, Yuba City. Phone 2-0977 

918 Fourth St., Marysville, Calif.. Phone 3-7782 

AMERICAN CLEANERS 

"QUALITY AND SERVICE— ALWAYS" 
We Pick Up and Deliver 
Plant — 309 Third Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

David McVey Harley-Davidson 

"The Standard of the Law Enforcement Field" 
SALES AND SERVICE 



312 "E" Street 

MARYSVILLE 



le 2744 

CALIFORNIA 



HUST BROTHERS. INC. 

AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES 
LARGEST STOCK IN THE COUNTY 

Fourth and E Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-9897 

PAGO PAGO CAFE 

FAMILY SYLE DINNERS 

You'll Love 'em! 
— COCKTAILS — 

George Doersch and Earl Hake. Props. 

227 "C" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-2389 

FRANK M. BOOTH 

Since 1912 

PLUMBING - HEATING 

SHEET METAL WORK 

AIR CONDITIONING - REFRIGERATION 

222 Third Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2494 

OHRT, CORNELL & HALL 



John F Ohrl. Francis Hall. Ceorue E. Come 

ALL KINDS OF INSURANCE 

AUTO - FIRE - CASUALTY - BONDS 

LIFE - ACCIDENT 



329 E Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Phone 3-3062 George Herboth, Prop. 

HERBOTHS MACHINE SHOP 

General Machine Work - Repairing Pumps 

Tractors and Trucks - Electric and Acetylene 

Welding 

519 "B" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



3-7516 

DRYDEN'S DRUG STORE 



111 East 12th Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

REED AND HEFFLEY 



821 "B" Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



M. FRUITMAN 

COMPLETE OUTFITTERS FOR MEN 

Quality Merchandise Only 

Comer Third and D Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

BASALT ROCK COMPANY. INC. 

Before You Build Get the Facts on Basalite! 

Marysvillc Office: 

E. 12th and Walnut Streets - Phone 3-7770 

Yuba City - Home Phone 2-0135 

Woodland Phone 2-5382 

TONY'S GROCERY 

First for Quality and Service 

MEATS - GROCERIES - BEER AND WINES 

We Feature Borden Dairy Products 

27 East 12 Street Telephone 3-4234 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Best Wishes 
CHARLES B. GROSS 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-73 5 1 

CHAS. MERZ CO. 

TIRE DOCTORS 
TIRES AND APPLIANCES 

Chas Merz - Virgil Songer 

517 Fifth Street 
MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 

Phone 3-4371 

WHITE & DIPPEL 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Typewriters, Adding Machines, Calculators, 

Duplicators and Supplies, Check Writers 

Office Stationery and Supplies, Business Forms 

Ideal Business Records. Office Furniture, 

Drawing Material 

"LARGEST STOCK IN THE COUNTY" 

Remington Rand Agents - Sales and Service 

509 D Street P. O. Box 270 

MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 



NATIONAL DOLLAR STORES 

THE HOME OF SERVICE 
SAVINGS — COURTESY — QUALITY 



424 D Street 
MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 

Phones 2 15 1 I - 34086 

SHINGLE TRAVEL AGENCY 

TRAVEL ACCOMMODATIONS 

AIR • RESORTS • STEAMSHIP • TOURS 

BUS CHARTERS 

424 Fourth Street 
MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 



Start a beginners school and set himself 
looks of the kid's scores Sunday he should 
up as the teacher so a lot of us can get a 
few pointers. No wonder the old man 
has decided to quit shooting for a spell. 

Oh, these new shooters and their 
troubles! There was our friend "Dee" 
Henry who had a slight case of mis-fire 
ill the Camp Perry match with the in- 
evitable results that he was completely 
discombobulated for the rest of the day 
and couldn't understand wot hoppen to 
all his hard practicing. 

I just couldn't figure out who that 
dope with the gun strapped onto his back 
was. Besides that he had a great big, old 
nickle plated .45 strapped on his leg and 
enuf off size bullets to start a second 
class revolution, if the different sized 
shells would fit his firing pieces. He 
wandered around all day long asking 
questions and taking in the sights but to 
this day I'll be darned I don't know 
what it's all about. 

There was a side bet between the 
Hiway Patrol Gang on one of the 
matches with Boomhower, Kolb and 
Harry Plummer giving the business to 
Milt Klipfel and trying to get his goat. 
The boys wasted their time as it was no 
dice. Milt didn't fall for their stuff, and 
went on to win the match and collect 
his just debts. 

There will be a two day shoot in July 
over the 4th as the ^VRA would like to 
keep up the custom they so long ago es- 
tablished but let it slip for the past couple 
of years. This is a tuff one to decide as 
the 4th is celebrated on Monday giving 
the shooters a three day holiday and just 
how many would be there is problematic 
— anyhow, it's in the making. More 
about it later. 

John Rygh (yep, thas the right spell- 
ing RYGH — but don't know hows the 
pronunciation) from Berkeley, is still 
trying to get a double out of that 10 in 
the Camp Perry match. No one at the 
scoring table could find the tenth shot on 
the target, look as they might, but John 
said it was there and if John sez it was 
there then by God is was there ! Never- 
theless, John got credit for only 9 shots ! 

Most of the gunsmiths were sore as 
the de\il because it wasn't raining Sun- 
day. Being winter and liable to rain the 
gunsmiths gleefully pray for rain, rain, 
rain so the guns will get wet, jam and 
sputter and go out. Then the smiths 
gather up the guns, take 'em to their re- 
spective shops and fix 'em up again in 
great shape. The smiths, as I said before, 
weren't too happy with the sunshine. 

I find a note jotted down among my 
notes about the El Morocco Motel in 



McKEAN'S 5c & 10c STORE 

Largest Assortment Variety Merchandise 

Household Supplies - Paints - Hardware 

tuh Line of Toys 

1059 Highway 99-E (South) 

LINDA CORNERS MARYSVILLE. CALIF. 

PINE HOUSE LIQUOR STORE 

"Stop in and Say Hello!" 

OFF SALE QUALITY LIQUORS 

1061 Highway 99-E, 2V2 MUes South at 

LINDA CORNERS MARYSVILLE, CALIF. 

WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

AUTO SUPPLY HEADQUARTERS 
321 Fourth Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFOR NIA 

J. J. NEWBERRY CO. 

FOR VALUES AND SAVINGS 

407 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNI A 

Telephone 3-464 1 

Best Wishes From 

HALLS STATIONERY STORE 

G. W Hall. Jr. 
421 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-3758 

SYVERTSENS 

ELECTRIC APPLIANCES - REFRIGERATOI^S 
WASHERS 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNl.A 



Phone 2-2483 

KIRK'S PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS 

Accuracy - Pur.ty 

400 "D" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Dial 3-5441 

BRADLEY'S DEPT. STORE 

FIFTH AT D STREET 

MARYSVILLE CA.LIF ORNIA 

Telephone 3-4603 

OLYMPIC HOTEL 

COFFEE SHOP :-: COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
SWIMMING POOL :-: BANQUET ROOM 

Fred J. Carash. Managing Owner 

MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-4593 

CHARLES-MARTIN MOTORS 

STUDEBAKER - SALES AND SERVICE 

Fourth and Eye Streets 

MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 

Phone 2-1570 

ROCKHOLT & SON 

QUALITY BOATS AND MILLWORK 

Estimates Furnished 

Jobbing ... A Specialty 

Anything of Wood 



MARYSVILLE 



CA.LIFORNIA 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Phone 3.9636 

Electric and Carburetor Service 

Harry Marks, Owner 

GENERATORS - TUNE-UP - STARTERS 

Electric Auto-Lite Service 

United Service Motors 

Comer Fifth and G Streets 
MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 



Pho 



3-5447 



HAMON BROS. 

CHRYSLER AND PLYMOUTH 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Genera! Automotive Repairing 

TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 

Fourth and G Streets 

MARYSVILLE CA.LIFORNIA 



Pho 



3-4655 



Frank L. Cornwell & Son 



Frank L. Comwell - Louis R Cornwall 

Dealers in 

HIGH GRADE PUMPING EQUIPMENT 

Fairbanks-Morse Products - Pressure Systems 

Peerless Turbine Pumps - Well Drilling 

521 Third Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3.4093 

L. F. PUTMAN'S APPLIANCES 

GIFTWARES - HOUSEWARES 

426 Third Street 
MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Meyers Hardware & Roofing 
Service 

"Established Over 32 Years" 

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 

304 G Street, Telephone 2-0313 

711 Third Street, Telephone 2-3046 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



555 



CHISELER'S INN 

Established 1865 

Fred E. Helwig. Emil Steuer and A. E. Helwig 

Proprietors 

A FAMOUS CALIFORNIA LANDMARK 

On Sale and Off Sale Liquors— Fine Foods 

Come in and Enjoy Your Favorite Drink and 

Food in the Environment of California's 

Roaring •QO's 

415 Third Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-3 724 

The Home of the 
"FREE HOME TRIAL" 

GLOBE TELEVISION 

321 Third Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-9207 

Ivan Norris Appliances & Television 

Authorized Dealer 

PACIFIC MERCURY - SPARTON 

TELEVISION 



Sunnydale and can't for the life of me 
figure who, or what it is. After searching 
a bit more into my hen-scratched notes 
I discovered it's the way to the San Jose 
shoots. Just past the EI Morocco Motel 
you turn left to the range. Simple, isn't 



BEST WISHES FROM 

General Teamsters and 
Warehousemen 

"SHIP BY TRUCK" 

Local No. 137 - I.B.T.C.W.H. of America 

Affiliated with The American Federation of 

Labor 



307 Third Street 
MARYSVILLE 



P O. Box 750 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-6521 P. O. Box 104 

Office 1010 EYE STREET 
. . MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

C. r. \alional Match 

Dial 2-252 1 

Master M. Klipfel 289 

Expert J. Bellera 279 SWINSON MOTORS 

Sharpshooter W. Alarkell 277 

Marksman 1st D. Christensen 265 fine used cars - large selection 

Marksman 2nd H. Hilker 262 

Marksman 3rd G. Schaefter 246 126 e Street 

MARYS\'1LLE CALIFORNIA 

G. r. Lamp rcrry 

Phons 21612 

Master K. Schaugaard 298 

Expert L. Melching 292 Bordens Capital Dairy Co. 

Sharpshooter E. DinsmOOr 286 Robert Dahneke, Manager 

Marksman 1st C. Smith 283 pasteurized milk - cream and 

Marksman 2nd F. Cooper 275 ice cream 

Marksman 3rd W. Hinterman 264 , j ^ ^ c: 

12th and Yuba Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

.22 Short C^oursc 

Phone 3-6232 

Master B. Chow 295 

Expert W. Martens 283 CROW "n* BULL 

Sharpshooter R. [Miller 281 cocktail lounge 

Marksman 1st G. DeFino 286 ... The Spot in Town . . . 

Marksman 2nd E. Talley 279 -Mike- Terek 

Marksman 3rd C. Horton 

228 "D" Street 
-,-^ r, ■ , i~ ^ MARYSVILLE CALIFORN'A 

.22 Kafiid t irc Course 

AT . w r iQQ THE BRUNSWICK 

Master W. Lim 198 

r-, „„ ^ in.- 1Q7 recreation and smoke shop 

txpert J. Durst IM/ 

Sharpshooter D. Henry 19b «<""« "f Tampa Nugget and Hav-a-Tampr. 

Marksman 1st L. Ackerman 191 '^^" 

Marksman 2nd E. Tally 195 ^""' ' ^'""= " ^""'''" " ^•'""""^^ 

Marksman 3rd H. Wilson 180 „„ ..„„ ^ . 

218 D Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORN'.A 

.45 Short Couru- Phone 3-3368 

Master K. Schaugaard 285 URiZ HOTEL 

Expert .1. Moore 284 ^.ke and Edd.e Glugosk,, Proprietors 

Sharpshooter H. Jenkens 271 family style dinners 

Marksman 1st H. Lisenby 265 "a Must in MarysviiU" 

Marksman 2nd L. EngStrom 260 We Cater to Parties and Banquets 

Marksman 3rd E. Tally 258 cocktail lounge 

Fourth and "A" Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNA 
.1 f/grrgate Match 

Master K. Schaugaard 871 

Expert L. Melching 843 syp^ k_ KAHN 

Sharpshooter W. Markell 833 

.Marksman 1st G. DeFino 812 shoes for all 

Marksman 2nd E. Tally 807 

Marksman 3rd E.Kenney 741 

MARYSVILLE AND YUBA CITY 

Team Scores ~ 

Telephone 2-248 1 

1st Place— S. F. Police 

Reyoher Club No. 1 1 152 Marysville Savings and Loan Assoc. 

„iid Place California thrift and home ownership 

Highway Patrol 114fa our specialty 

3rd Place— S.F.P.D. No. 1 1127 

4th Place— Peninsula ""s "D" Street 

Shooting Club No. 1 1 1 1 1 ^^AI^VSVILLE CAUFORN^N 



Fehrutiry. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 




Coca Cola 
Bottling Co. 

425 - 9th St. 

Marysvllle 

Calif. 



a 



SEVEN-UP 

BOTTLING Co. 

126 B Street 

MARYSVILLE 

Tel. 2-1474 



Phones 37301 - 37302 • 37303 

John C. Bayes Co., Inc. 

For 
FORD SALES AND SERVICE 

420 E Street 

MARYSVILLE CALlFORr^lA 

Phone 2-2823 

GEORGE E. HOWELL 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 

Property Management - Income Tax 

Preparations 

404 E Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



NORTHERN COUNTIES BANK 

"YOUR HOME OWNED BANK" 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporator 

421 Fourth Street, Marysville, California 
700 Plumas Street, Yuba City, Californ a 
Phone 2-1439 

ERNIE'S BABYLAND TOYLAND 

TOY HEADQUARTERS 
Bicycles - Toys - Wheelgoods - BabylanJ 

418 Fourth Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL BANK 

COMMERCIAL — SAVINGS — TRUST 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL MARYSVILLE 

AIR-CONDITIONED THROUGHOUT 
Other Newcomb Hotel Interests 

Hotel Clark. Stockton. Calif. 

Hotel Marysville. Marysville. Calif. 

Hotel Casa del Rey. Santa Cruz. Calif. 

Hotel Holland, Duluth. Minn. 

Hotel Bristol, Bristol, Va.Tenn. 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



CITY ORDINANCES 

(Conlinucd from page 6) 

B. Jo instruct and train individuals 
and members of clubs, organizations and 
associations who may be interested in the 
proficient use of firearms. 

C. To conduct firearms tournaments 
by the San Francisco Police Department. 

RANGE DUES 

No fees shall be charged to : 

1. Regular members of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department ; 

2. Auxiliary Civilian Defense Police 
in good standing; 

3. Patrol Special Police Officers, and 

4. Such other law enforcement officers 
as may, in the opinion of the Chief of 
Police, be called upon to cooperate with 
the Police Department in the apprehen- 
sion of criminals or the maintenance of 
peace in the City and County of San 
Francisco. 

For a single individual, using the 
range in individual firearm practice, with 
a minimum time allowance of one ( 1 ) 
hour, the range fee is $.50. 

For each Class A tournament the reg- 
istration fee is $.50 per person — and an 
entry fee of $1,00 per person for each 
match. 

For each Class B or Class C tourna- 
ment the registration is 25c per person 
— and an entry fee of $.50 for each 
match. 

If fees are subject to tax, the amount 
of such tax shall be added to the range 
fee. 

All fees collected, shall, under Charter 
provisions, be deposited in a "Police 
Range Fund," which is created under 
Municipal Code. 

3. The Police Department of the City 
and County is authorized to hold mem- 
bership in the National Rifle Association 
— and the cost of said membership shall 
be paid from such funds as may be ap- 
propriated or set aside for that purpose. 

4. Trophies, medals, and prizes, 
awarded in tournaments, shall be pur- 
chased with money in the "Police Range 
Fund." 

5. The Chief of Police is authorized 
to collect and receive registration fees 
prescribed by the Rules and Regulations 
of the National Rifle Association, on be- 
half of said Association, in connection 
with the holding of the firearms tourna- 
ments. The said fees shall be deposited 
in and paid from the "Police Range 
Fund." 

6. ^Vith the approval of the Police 
Commission, the Chief of Police may 
accept; Trophies, medals, gifts and dona- 
tions, for use in connection with the 
operation of the pistol range, or the con- 
duct of matches or tournaments. 



LOTUS INN 



CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 
. . . COCKTAILS . . . 



A Must in Marysville 



Most Beautiful 



31 S Second Street Phone 3-9564 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Phone -Office: 2-0528 



Ho 



HORN'S USED CARS 

See "HORN' for Your Used Car 
Finest Late Model Cars Our Specially 

Wholesale - Retail 

101 D Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES TO THE 
MARYSVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

From 

THE CLOVER CLUB 

221 D Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-7501 

THE WESTERNER 

STOCKMAN'S EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 
— World Famous Brands — 

410 THIRD STREET 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

TOWN HOUSE MOTEL 

"Marysville's Newest and Finest" 
Refrigerated Air Conditioning 

In the Heart of Marysville 
Highway 20 and 24, One Block Off 99-E 

■Opposite Beautiful Ellis Lake'' 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNI A 

Phone 2-2762 Vic and Gene 

PITTS & BROCKER 

EAGLE'S NEST 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
RESTAURANT 

901 "B' Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



YELLOW CAB CO. 

TELEPHONE 3-4661 

for 

"COURTESY AND SERVICE" 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



BURCHELL HARDWARE 
AND SPORTING GOODS 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE - PAINTS 

TOOLS 

"The Best And Nothing But . . . The Best!" 

225 "D" Street 
MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Phone 3. 3523 

SIEVWRIGHT'S MUSIC 

"ENJOY LIFE WITH MORE MUSIC" 
320 FIFTH STREET 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Yuba Map & Blue Print Co. 

COMPLETE REPRODUCTION SERVICE 
51 31/2 D Street 
MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone: Dial 2-2361 

LAKEVIEW MOTEL 

"For the REST of Your Lite" 
P. O. Box 164 122S B Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

METZGER GARAGE 

24-Hour Parking at Fourth and C 

Repairing - Storage - Tire and Battery Service 

24-Hour Service 

221 E Street 

CALIFORNIA 



MARYSVILLE 



COLUMBIA CAFE 

THE WORKINGMAN'S CLUBROOM 
Quiet - Friendly 

Sam Theros, Prop. 
130 E Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

ALLEN'S EXCHANGE 

We Buy and Sell 

NEW AND USED CLOTHING 

Jewelry - Luggage - Guns 

Phone: 2-1393 - Res. 2-2008 

408 SECOND ST. MARYSVILLE, CALIF. 

ELLIS-HUNTLEY COMPANY 

INSURANCE SPECIALISTS - ALL LINES 

Mai Huntley - Ray Huntley 

414 Second Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-3540 



TRIPLETT'S LIQUOR STORE 

LARGEST STOCK - FINEST LIQUORS 
BEERS AND WINES 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Royal Petroleum Company 

— Quality Plus Service — 

GASOLINE - MOTOR OILS 

ACCESSORIES 

Tenth and G Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-6184 

Hutchison's Colonial Chapel 

Warren R. Hutchins 

830 D Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-6311 

CLUB LINDA VILLA 

A CONGENIAL COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
Dancing Every Night 
Wilbur Reed, Prop. 

Highway 99E, 1% Miles South of 
MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



7. To carry out the Municipal Code 
mandates, in regard to the operation of 
the Police Pistol Range, the Chief of 
Police, with the approval of the Police 
Commission, is authorized to adopt, pro- 
mulgate, and enforce such rules and 
regulations regarding the Police Pistol 
Range, the operation thereof, firing 
thereon, and the course of said firing, as 
will enable him to secure the greatest 
amount of success from the functioning 
of the Police Pistol Range. 

8. The Chief of Police shall procure 
such insurance as may be necessary to 
protect the City and County of San 
Francisco against claims and suits arising 
because of injury to persons or damage to 
property, arising out of the maintenance, 
operation or control of said pistol range, 
out of such funds as may be appropriated 

or set aside for that purpose. 

* * * 

Note — The San Francisco Police 
Range — planned and constructed by 
members of the San Francisco Police 
Department on their own time — is one 
of the finest in the world. — Editor 

MOTORING TAKE-ALONGS 

There are four important things every 
motorist should always carry in his auto- 
mobile, says the California State Auto- 
mobile Association. They are a first-aid 
kit, fire extinguisher, flashlight and a 
package of flares. Maybe you will never 
have to use them, but in an emergency 
any or all of them may save your life 
or the lives of others. 



INSPECT BRAKE DRUMS 

Automobile wheels should be removed 
for inspection of the brake drums at 
least once each season, and oftener if the 
car is used extensively, advises the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association. 
Neglected brakes may operate, but dam- 
aged brake drums result when lining 
wears thin and rivets are allowed to cut 
grooves in the drums. 

WIPER CHECK-UP 

It is advisable to make sure of safe, 
clear vision through your automobile 
windshield during the coming wet 
weather driving by having a check-up of 
the windshield wiper blades and the 
wiper operating mechanism, the Califor- 
nia State Automobile Association sug- 
gests. Necessary repairs and replacements, 
now will prevent inconvenience later. 

Telephone 3-7378 Mail: P. O. Box 1589 

LAWRENCE MAYFLOWER 

MOVING AND STORAGE CO. 

Visit the Largest. Most Beautiful Dis^play of 
" ~ Our May- 



Phone 3-5873 Jack Fisher, Samuel M. Farnum 

Marysville Wholesale Produce Co. 

Everything in Fruits and Vegetables 

Corner Second and £ Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

SORENSON DRAYAGE CO. 

The World's Largest and Most Complete 

Moving Service 

Offices and Telephones 

Chico - 3395, Oroville - 220. Marysville - 2-2377 

YUBA CITY MARYSVILLE 

BI-COUNTY FARM SUPPLY CO. 

563 Rowe Avenue 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-74 76 Ram Partap, Prop. 

ARMATURE & ELECTRIC SERVICE 

Rewind All Kinds of Automotive Generator 
Armatures . . . Rebuild Starters 

Two Miles South of D Street Bridge on High- 
way 99E - P. O. Box 687 
MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-6073 

SMITH'S AUTO PARTS 

TRAILERS FOR RENT 

Open Sundays 

99.E at LINDA CORNERS 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1990-W R. H. Strang - R. B Strang 

Oroville Pump & Motor Works 

Motor Rewinding & Repairing - Pressure 

Systems - Ditch Pumps - Sales & Service 

Universal Pumps 

Marysville Road - One and One-Half Miles 

South of Oroville, California 

TOM'S CHICKEN COOP 

Real Fried Chicken (Family Style) 

Linda Comers - On 99-E, 1 V: Miles South of 

MARYSVILLE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-6519 

ET M. BARTH CO.. INC. 

FORD TRACTOR 
DEARBORN FARM EQUIPMENT 

Sales and Service 

S2S F Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-1011 

CHERRY'S TRADING POST 

NEW AND USED FURNITURE 
A Beautiful Selection of Antiques 

21/2 Miles South of Marysville 
Route 1 Box 2240 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



flo 



Fur 



Wa 



Speckert Lumber 
Co. 

LUMBER AND BUILDING 
MATERIALS 

1/2 Mile So. of Marysville 

on 99-E Highway 

Office 2-2439 — Mill 3-5455 

P. O. Box 309 

MARYSVILLE, CALIF. 



February. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Pho 



3-98 



SING CHONG RESTAURANT 

FINE CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOODS 

Complete Catering and Food to Take Out 

315 Third Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2. 1342 

JIM WATSON FURNITURE 

NATIONALLY KNOWN BRANDS 
Sixteenth and B Streets 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 9 or 1307 

J. J. BRADLEY 

BUICK AND CMC SALES AND SERVICE 
2185 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 122 

Dot's Feather River Inn 

Warm Beer - Lousy Food - Lazy Bartenders 
Off Sale on Sale Liquors 
2227 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone I2b2 John Voos. Prop, 

VOOS SHELL SERVICE 

Shell Lubrication - Tires - Batteries 
2180 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 1081-R 

ONYETTS DAIRY 

FRESH QUALITY DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Your Family Deserves the Best 

There Is None Better Than 

GOLDEN STATE DAIRY PRODUCTS 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



1210 



DUNCAN BOAT WORKS 

EVINRUDE MOTORS — SALES AND SERVICE 
All Types of Boats Made to Order 
Chico Highway and Mono Avenue 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1361 Res. I 393 -J 

FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE 

ITS 

CONCRETE READY MIX CO. 

L. J. Reagan 



K & S EQUIPMENT CO.. INC. 

T. J. Long. Jr. 

Kay Brunner Drums and Axles - Deico - Remy 
Electrical Equipment - Fabrication - Complete 
Truck Equipment - Gas & Diesel Repair - Port- 
able Welding - Road Service - Heavy Duty 



C. H. Miller 
Transportation 

Statewide Hauling 
All Cargo Fully Insured 

P. O. BOX 1027 

Phone 1872 

OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



COMMUNICATIONS 
OFFICERS 

{Continued from page 7) 



fense who spoke briefly on Civil Defense 
Communications. 

Our Host then introduced DeWitt 
Nelson who stressed the need of adequate 
communications, and praised our group 
on the job they are doing. 

State Director of Finance Pierce sent 
regrets at not being able to be present as 
did Commissioner Caldwell of the CHP. 

The following visitors were intro- 
duced, Arnold Carver of the State Div. 
of Highways, Gil Johansen of the State 
Teletype System, Capt. AVilliams of the 
CHP and members of the State CD 
staff. 

The meeting adjourned for a lunch 
served at the CHP Academy. 

After lunch we were conducted on a 
tour of the Academy. 

Vice President Art McDole recon- 
vened the group at 1 :30 p.m. 

Tom Kelly told of a meeting to be 
held at Region 3 Control Center on the 
11th, regarding matching funds. He then 
introduced Dr. Heslep who spoke on 
Radiological Instrumentation and com- 
munication problems. 

Dr. Heslep and an assistant conducted 
the group on a tour of the State Control 
Center and the Radiation Laboratory. 

The January meeting of Associated 
Public Communications OfUcers was call- 
ed to order at 11 :20 A.M. by the Presi- 
dent, John Atkinson. Our host being 
Captain C. B. McMurphy of the Ala- 
meda County Shefif?'s Department. 

The minutes of the December meeting 
were read and approved. 

The Frequency & Engineering Com- 
mitte recommended the use of 155.67 mc 
to the State Office of Civil Defense for 
two temporary base stations to be install- 
ed in their mobile Communication Cen- 
ters. On a motion by Lewis, seconded by 
Mayr, this was approved. 

Mason then described the test to be 
made on 460 mc between Mt. Diablo, 
Copernicus and Blue Ridge Mountain. 
These tests are in conjunction with the 
proposed police and hre point-to-point 
systems. 

Bill AVhiting of Kern County describ- 
ed the latest earthquake in his area and 
how he was able to obtain reports on the 
condition throughout the county and Los 
Angeles by radio while all of the tele- 
phones were jammed, lis Supervisors 
received a first hand demonstration as he 
was appearing before them when the 
earthquake occurred. He also gave a 
short report on the proposed state-wide 
micro-wave system. 



BEST WISHES 

Merlin's Billiard Recreation 



Watch-Word" 



TONG FONG LOW 

"Charley's Restaurant" 

Hours: 12 N. to 1 A.M.— Sun. 4 P.M. to 1 A.M. 

Closed Wednesday 

Phone 506 2051 Robinson St. 

Lee You & Sun Gee, Props. 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

THE BANK CLUB 



2053 Montgomery 



CALIFORNIA 



THE RITZ CAFE 

Eat with us or we'll both Starve! 
Just Good Food — Served Right! 

1360 MYERS STREET 
OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Stop Here for the Best Beer in Town 

DUCK INN 



9 Mi. So. of Or 



Meet all your friends at 

SEYBOLD'S 

Famous for Fun and Food 



1333 Huntoo 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Gray-Nurse Hardware Co. 

Crockery, Household Goods, Hardware, Cutlery 

Sporting Goods, Paints and Oils 

Gray S. Lawton, Mgr. 

1359-65 Huntoon Street Telephone 12 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 155 

OROVILLE AUTO PARTS 

F. W. Sills - Harold Yorton 

AUTOMOTIVE :-: TRUCK :-: LOGGING 
SUPPLIES 

1340 Huntoon Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3 99 

BEST WISHES FROM 

LOCAL UNION No. 13-428 

INTERNATIONAL WOODWORKERS OF 
AMERICA - C. I. O. 



1331 Hunto 
OROVILLE 



P. O. Box 1271 

CALIFORNIA 



Feather River Wood Products Co. 

Manufacturers of 
MOULDINGS AND TRIM 



P. O. Box 67 

OROVILLE 



Telephone 17 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone MI9.W 

TABLE MOUNTAIN MOTORS 

Dwighl E. Cook 
GENERAL REPAIRING AND REBUILDING 



Gasolii 



Specializing in CUMMINS DIESELS 

TRUCK - TRACTOR - HEAVY EQUIPMENT 

Acetylene and Arc Welding 

Road Service Anywhere 

1981 Oro Vista P. O. Box 1026 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Pnge 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



'^"""^ ' OROVILLE GROCERY 

QUALITY FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

MEATS 

1843 Montgomery Street 

ORO VILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 15 80 

JOHNSON PAINT COMPANY 

PAINTS AND SUPPLIES 

Oroville's Largest, Most Complete Stock 

1877 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone I and 2 

WOLFE'S GROCERY 

J. L. Vaughan, Prop. 

Delivery Service - Telephone Orders 

1810 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



184 



Best Wishes 

RYSTROMS 



THE COMPLETE "G. E." LINE 
1877 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 488 

DR. E. A. DEVANEY 

CHIROPRACTOR 

1328 Huntoon Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Savage Hardware & Plumbing Co. 

NOTED FOR SERVICE! 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 6-0488 

JOHN F. KITCHEN. JR. 

CHEVRON SERVICE 

"A-X" From the Court House 

1920 Robinson Street 

ORO VILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 1191 . -^ .. 

C€3svve!! & Harrell Service Station 

Flying "A" Gas and 01 Products 

Expert Lubrication - Cars Washed - Tires 

Batteries and Accessoreis 

1881 Robinson Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Phc 



I 16 



A. VAUGHAN & SONS 

HAY, GRAIN, FEED & SEEDS 
15S0 Huntoon Street 

ORO VILLE CALIFORNIA 

CHirS NEWS STAND & 
FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

BEST MALTS AND SODAS IN TOWN 

1898 Bird Street 

O ROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

HECKER'S SHOE STORE 

FINE FOOTWEAR FOR THE 
ENTIRE FAMILY 

1911 Montgomery Street 

O ROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1706 

MORWEAR PAINT STORE 

Distributors of 

MORWEAR PAINT PRODUCTS 

1919 Montgomery Street 

O ROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 104 _ . 

PAT SCOTT'S SERVICE STATION 

Mobil Products Exclusively - Lube Jobs 

Cars Washed. Steam Cleaned and Polished 

Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

Corner Myers and Montgomery Streets 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 936W 

Blackle's L. & B. Exchange 

Dealer in New and Used 

GUNS - WATCHES - CLOTHING 

I. A. (Blackie) Butler, Mgr. 

1958 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Captain McMurphy then read the 
National APCO contents of Docket 
10777. 

The meeting was recessed for hinch at 
12:00 Noon. 

The meeting was reconvened follow- 
ing lunch and Sherifif H. P. Gleason of 
Alameda County was introduced and 
then presented Brewer McAiurphy, the 
new National President, with the Na- 
tional Gavel and National Membersh'p 
Card No. 1 and installed him as Nation- 
al President. 

Mr. Herb Breuer of the Federal State 
Market News Service told of the history 
of the Market News Service and explain- 
ed its operation. He then gave a very 
complete picture of the proposed micro- 
wave system. A general discussion fol- 
lowed. 

On a motion by Lewis, seconded by 
Burton, the Association went on record 
as concurring with the comment of Na- 
tional APCO on Docket 10777. 

Membership application of Willard 
W. Wehe of Alameda County was ap- 
proved as an active member on a motion 
by Keller, seconded by Hudson. 

Nominations for all officers were again 
opeijed and subsequently closed when no 
further nominations were offered. As 
there was no contest, on a motion by 
Mayr, seconded by Hudson, the Secre- 
tary was instructed to cast a unanimous 
vote for all officers. 

Bill Whiting then installed fhe incom- 
ing officers: Art McDole, President 
Tom Bayley, Vice-President and John 
Atkinson, Secretary-Treas. The Board 
of Directors elected were: Lewis, May- 
bee, Leboeuf, Keller and Freeman. 

National President McMurphy gave 
a brief discusion on his plans for the com- 
ing year. 

Commercial members reports were 
called for. 

The February 11th meeting will be 
held in Santa Clara County. 

As there was no further business the 
meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



Warmack Electric & Gift Shop 



Westinghous 
Zenith Radio - E 
Randall E. Warma 
1933 Bird Street 

OROVILLE 



Electric Applii 
isy Washers - Est. 1922 
:k - Richard R. Warmack 
Phone 49 P.O. Box 49 

CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes to all Law Enforcement Officers 

The First National Bank of Oroville 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



KARL'S SHOE STORE. LTD. 

Good Shoes for the Entire Family! 
148 2041 BIRD STREET 

OR OVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 225 1 

T. AND G. CLEANERS 

QUALITY WORK FOR OVER 30 YEARS! 

—Yes, we call and deliver — 

2185 Baldwin Avenue 

ortOVILLE CALIFORN'A 

Gateway to Feather River Region 

DAHL'S MOTEL 

OROVILLE'S FINEST MOTEL 
ON HI-WAY 24 



Cowee's Auto Wrecker & Garage 



Phc 



255 



KEEP GLASS CLEAN 

A clean windshield not only improves 
visibility but is handy in other ways, 
points out the National Automobile 
Club. For instance, when it rains there 
will be no abrasive clinging to it to 
scratch the glass when the windshield 
wiper is brought into use. 

When on a long trip always keep the 
rear window clean. Fast driving creates 
a vacuum that pulls the dirt onto the 
back of the car. A dirty window prevents 
use of the rear view mirror. 

Side windows also should be kept clean 
for best possible visibility. 



Best Wishes From 

L. H. CASAGRANDE 

Agent RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION 
P. O. Box 110 

OROVILLE CALIFORNV 

Phone 1403 

KEITH BUILDING MATERIALS 

Paint Lumber - Roofing - Fencing - Cement 

Builders' Hardware 

1600 Mitchell Avenue (Cannery Road) 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 15 70-W 

C. E. KINIKIN 

Sandy's Clothing and Shoe Repair 

Where Your Business Is Most Appreciated 

3000 Myers Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3 1 l-R 

O. K. Mattress Upholstering Co. 

We rebuild your old mattress into a fine 

Inner Spring Mattress, or rebuild your old 

Inner Spring - Your choice of ticking. 

1925 "A" Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORN'A 

Phone 1 3 1 -J Household Goods 

WALLACE FURNITURE 

NEW - USED 

Headquarters for Bargains — Always 

Myers at Wyandotte 

OROVILLE CALIFORN'.-^ 

Phone 1S07-J W. M. Wilkerson 

THE FIX QUICK SHOP 

RADIO SALES AND SERVICE 
3017 Myers Street 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORN'A 



Telephone 402 

RHOADES CORNERS 

"IF WE HAVEN'T GOT IT . . . 

YOU DON'T NEED IT!" 
3108 Palermo Road 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 230 Eber Stackpole - loan StBckpole 

STACKPOLE'S R AND R MOTEL 

Serving You a Pleasure - Headquarters for 

Commercial Men! 

790 Montgomery Street 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Fchruarx, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Telephone 555 

A. E. TREICHLER 

CONTRACTOR 

Sheet Metal - Plumbing - Roofing 

1212 Myers Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Office Phone 46 1 Home Phone M24J 

J. C. (Charlie) WAGNER 

Real Estate - Business Opportunities 
2062 Montgomery Street 
OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phc 



739 



LOG CABIN PASTRY SHOP 



.._ »-. Props 

QUALITY BAKERY GOODS 

2062 Montgomery Street 

OROV ILLE CALIFORNIA 

HARRY'S CIGAR STORE 

Headquarters for the Best Tobaccos 

PIPES, CIGARS — NOTIONS & TOYS 

1346 Myers Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Ph 



)ne 429 Mr. and Mrs. Q. K. Martil 

MARTIN'S MOTOR COURT 



In Town . . . Tile Sho 

711 Montgomery Street 
OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 678 Federal Tires 

Let's Get Associated 

VENE SHARKEY 

DistV. - Tide Water Associated Oil Products 
750 Montgomery Street 

ORO VILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone M79-J Pick-Up & Delivery 

SMITH'S 

New Method Laundry and Launderette 

"Pleasing You . . . Pleases Us! 

720-722 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



1280 



OROVILLE TRUCK TERMINAL 

Diesel Fuel - Gas - Oil - Tires - Batteries 

We Fix Flats 

Marysville Road - Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 447-W AAA 

WONDERLAND MOTEL 

Owners: John A. MacFarlane and 

Wm. B. MacFarlane. Mgr. 

Also Kitchenettes If Desired 

I Robinson and Marysville Road 

: OROVILLE. CALIF. HIGHWAY 24 

i Telephone 866 

GORDON C. WIGG 

YOUR UNION OIL DISTRIBUTOR 

Nothing Finer on the Market 

1560 Marysville Road 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

TWIN CEDARS CAFE 

"EAT WITH POP" 
Ruth and Bill Clatworthy. Props. 
Breakfast - Plate Lunch - Soft Drinks 
Ic 



lone 4 1 1 

B. C. SEEM 

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 

Located One-Half Mile South of Oroville 

on Hi-Way ^4 

Route 2, Box 503 



CALIFORNIA 



SPORTSMEN'S SUPPLY STATION 

GAS - OIL - ACCESSORIES 

Guns - Tackle - Bait - Hunting and Fish-ng 

Licenses - Open 24 Hours Every Day of Week 

1700 Marysville Road 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

HARRIS ORANGE SPOT 

Finest Fruits and Vegetables of the Season. 



Marysville Road South at Richvale Lateral 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



RAILROAD POLICE 
SANTA FE RAILROAD 

Once in a while contact is made with 
a railroad Special Agent or Police Offi- 
cer, but to the average person, little is 
known about them, the scope of their 
authority, duties performed, and where 
they operate. 

Each railroad has its own police de- 
partment, and each railroad has a differ- 
ent title for members of their department 
and the duties assigned them. 

The AT&SF Railroad, better known 
as the Santa Fe, has officers from San 
Francisco to Chicago, Galveston, Texas, 
San Diego, assignment in proportion to 
needs of the service. Duties vary, from 
plain station duty, train yards, escort of 
prisoners or ailing pasengers, investiga- 
tion of missing persons from trains en- 
route, or investigation along the right 
of way of thefts, damage to property, ac- 
cidents, and theft from freight ship- 
ments. Each officer must be aware of the 
state, county and city laws and ordi- 
nances within the district assigned him. 

Each officer when employed in Cali- 
fornia has a 90 day probation period, and 
within that time a check of his qualifica- 
tions, finger prints, personal history is 
made, and, if approved, he is appointed as 
a police officer by the state under Sec. 
228, Sta. of 1901, and in most cases he 
holds a Special Police or Deputy Sheriff 
appointment within the city or county 
where he works, and cooperates with the 
department from which he received the 
appointment. Within the Bay Area there 
are members of the Railroad Police at 
San Francisco (5) Oakland (2) Rich- 
mond, (3) a Division Special Agent at 
San Francisco in charge of other officers 
are employed at Stockton, Fresno, and 
on up the line, with Investigators work- 
ing up and down the line, who have no 
regular asigned hours or assigned beat 
duties. 

Head of the Railroad Police in this 
Area, which includes Los Angeles, is Mr. 
John L. Hastings, Supt. or Special Serv- 
ice at Los Angeles. Each Supt. of Special 
Service has one or more Inspectors who 
work out of the superintendent's office 
where needed, or to take over investiga- 
tions started by officers at different sta- 
tions. In time of need, such as a wreck, 
disaster, or other trouble, all officers 
within the area are called to the scene. 
Officers from San Francisco are sent to 
Los Angeles, if an emergency exists 
there, or any other section on the coast 
lines, when needed. 

Railroad Police of all railroads co- 
operate, lists of known pick pockets, bag- 
gage thieves, bunco operators, etc. are 
passed through the protective section of 



Telephone 84 

McGINNIS AUTO SERVICE 

CHRYSLER AND PLYMOUfH 



Sale 



nd Se 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



MOOR'S HARDWARE & PAINTS 



2111 Myers Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CURRIER BROS. MARKET 

BUTTE COUNTIES' FINEST— LARGEST! 

2325 Myers Street 
OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

NORM'S CUT RATE SERVICE 

Complete Automotive Service - Tires 

Batteries, Etc. 

Norwalk Petroleum Products 



Phone 988 

PIGG'S CLUB & CAFE 

A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

G. E. Barnes, Prop. 

3070 Myers Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone: 140 

WESTWOOD LUMBER SALES 

William J. Ryan. Mgr. 



LUCAS MARKET 

Complete Stock 

QUALITY MEATS, GROCERIES, FRUITS, 

AND VEGETABLES 

Beers and Wines 

2257 Quincy Road 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

WHITMILL BAR 

Deservedly Popular . . . There's a Reason! 
Where Friends Meet and Relax 

John Kelly, Prop. 

1010 Quincy Road 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1347-M 

ALFRED A. JATKO PLUMBING 

PLUMBING CONTRACTORS 



Phone Oroville 784 

GIBBONS EQUIP. & REPAIR 

Headquarters for 

POWER EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE 

2295 Quincy Road 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Best Wishes from 

KELLY & URBAN 

MUSIC 
1010 Quincy Road 

ORO\ILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 736 

Best Wishes from 

K. E. SOULE 

LICENSED SURVEYOR 

1638 Huntoon Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 82 

DON HOBBIE 

CHEVROLET AND CADILLAC 
Sales and Service 
Bird and Oliver 

ORO\'ILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 250 

BAIL BONDS 

AND GENERAL INSURANCE 
DAHLMEIER BROS. INSURANCE AGCY. 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Telephone 8 1 8 

JACK CONNER 

JEWELER 
2055 Bird Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Phone 130 



HALSTEAD'S 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



SCHMIDT'S QUALITY DO-NUTS 

NONE FINER! 
Try Them Today ! 



OROVILLE 



2472 Myers Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 144 Thos. P. James. Prop. 

JAMES MACHINE SHOP 

Cylinder Grinding - Welding - General 

Machine Work 

2421 Myers Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1570- J A. S. Parrish, Prop. 

OROVILLE ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

"No Job Too Large - No Job Too Small" 

3024 Myers Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

RADIO TOWER DRIVE-INN 

Adrian and Doris Smith 
"QUALITY FOODS — BEST OF SERVICE" 



2325 Myers Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



Q|9 



MEYER BROS. 

FURNITURE — FLOOR COVERINGS 

Appliances - Sales and Service 

1789 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

STOP, READ AND REMEMBER 

It Pays to Baby Batteries a Bit; YouVe Careful 

About 0:l; You're Careful About Gas; You 

Watch Your Radiator With an Eagle Eye; Why 

Not Watch Your Battery? 

Have Your Battery Checked By 

BILL'S BATTERY SERVICE 

At Oroville Auto Parts Cable Warehouse 

On Road to Mesa Drive-ln Theatre 

Phone Oroville 1419-J — Ask for Bill 

Factory Experienced - Service Guaranteed 

Recharging - Repair 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



OSCAR'S LIQUOR STORE 

FINEST STOCK OF FINE LIQUORS, BEER 
AND WINES IN BUTTE COUNTY! 



2130 BIRD STREET 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

THE HOB NOB CLUB LOUNGE 

The Waffle Shop for Steaks and Chops! 

The Popular Spot of Orov-lle 

"Stop in and Say Hello" 



the AARR and forwarded to each super- 
intendent of special service. They also 
receive and have on file all Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, Post Office and 
escape bulletins, as issued, with special 
bulletins from their own department re- 
garding men wanted. A large number of 
the men apprehended in train yards or on 
trains are wanted by some department, 
and a large number of runaway boys and 
girls are apprehended every year. 

Unless in uniform, you may not note 
the officer on duty, but there is one at all 
large railroad stations. 



THE COP 

By Walt AIason 

No bard embalms the cop in song. 
Few people praise or toast him ; 

Whate'er he does is always wrong. 
So we unite to roast him. 

He is the butt of hoary jests — 
Can't name the time he wasn't ; 

We damn him if he makes arrests. 
And damn him if he doesn't. 

We cuss him daily for his sins. 
With criticisms haunt him ; 

For every copper should be twins — 
He's never where we want him. 

We blame him if some schoolboy hits 

Our precious little AVillie ; 
We blame him if the cat has fits, 

Or if the cow goes silly. 

AVe roast him from crown to feet. 

The custom is contagious ; 
And still the copper walks his beat. 

Calm, patient, and courageous. 

He guards the traffic in great style, 
From blockades and congestions; 

And answers with a kindly smile 
Five million silly questions. 

He hunts the bad man and the yegg. 
He walks all night with dangers ; 

And gets a bullet in the leg, 
Pursuing deadly strangers. 



Phone 3-4039 Res. Phone 3-7842 

C. STUART HILL 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 

Ranches - Orchards - Homes 

725 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2 1419 

S and H MEN'S SHOP 

"Exclusive But Not Expensive" 

COMPLETE OUTFITTERS 

728 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone: Office 3-4091 Res.: 3-4983 

Ray Simmons, Real Estate Broker 

INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



723 Plumas Street 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 1479R 

"A Home Where You Want it" 

OROVILLE TRAILER SALES 

New and Used Trailers - Repairs and Suppli( 
S. Marysville Hwy. at Richvale Lateral 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



BURTON'S SHOE STORES 

Jim Maroney, Mgr. 

Fine Footwear for the Entire Family 

1359 Myers Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Bes^ Vi'ishes from 
KITRICKS INSURANCE AGENCY 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES TO ALL OFFICERS FROM 

OROVILLE LODGE No. 1484 

B P. O. E. ELKS 
W. J. Sharkey. Sec'y 
OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 189-R 

NEW YORK MACHINE SHOP 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

Steel Fabrication - Tanks - Electric and 

Acetylene Welding 

IV2 Miles South on Highway 24 
P. O. BOX 731 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY MUSIC SHOP 

MUSIC FOR EVERY OCCASION 
RCA VICTOR TELEVISION - RADIO 



1345 Myers Street 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



RITZ CLUB LOUNGE 

OROVILLE'S FINEST AND MOST POPULAR 
Dancing Friday and Saturday Nights 



2027 Robarts 



OROVILLE 



Street 

CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 
FROM 

K. & D. R. CO. 

(LOGGERS) 



V. O Or 



23 I 



OROVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



He seeks in dark and noisome lairs 
The burglar who eschews him ; 

And in our cozy rocking chairs, 
AVe sit up and abuse him. 

When those who roast him daunted 
stand, 

In times of strife and riot. 
He takes his life and club in hand. 

And scraps for peace and quiet. 



—IN THE HEART OF OROVILLE— 
Telephone 1237 

OROVILLE LIQUOR STORE 

Largest Stock of Fine 

WINES - LIQUORS - BEERS 

Where Your Patronage Is Appreciated 

Gus Aleck, Prop. 

1975 Montgomery Street 

OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Telephone 3-6395 

SUTTER AUTO PARTS 

Industrial and Automotive Equipment and Parts 

"Largest Stock in Sutter County" 

741 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-9806 or 2-2800 Herbert G. Brown 

Herb Brown's Friendly Service 

Mobilgas, Mobiloil, Tires, Batteries, Accessories. 
Lubrication, Steam Cleaning 
Plumas and Church Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

THE SEWING CENTER 

SALES - SERVICE - REPAIRS - RENTALS 

Pfaff, Necchi, Elna, Domestic, Etc. 

Pfaff - World's Finest Zig-Zag Sewing Machine 

752 Plumas Street Phone 3-3136 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-985 4 

MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 

SCOTTY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



2-15 



GARDEN WAY NURSERY 

Trees - Shrubs - Bedding Plants - Seed 

and Pottery 

Second and Bridge Streets 

YUBA CITY CALIFORM.A 

E. L. ATKINS REALTY 

HOMES - RANCHES - ORCHARDS 

Roy T. PhUlips. Broker 

Lucile Atkins, Salesman 

224 Bridge Street Phone 2-0259 

Sutter Hotel Bldg. Yuba City, Calif. 

Telephone 3-7666 

SIMMONS TRENCHING CO. 

747 Suiter Street 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

HIATT'S GROCERY 

QUAUTY GROCERIES - FRUITS 

VEGETABLES 

BEER AND WINES 

Gas and Oils 



2785 Mitchell Av 



CALIFORNIA 



681 

BILL TURNER 

OROVILLE TIRE SERVICE 

RECAPPING - VULCANIZING 

New and Used Tires 

Kelly Springfield Tires 

U. S. Royal Tires 

2667 Myers Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

HENRY J. KAISER CO. 

SAND - GRAVEL - CRUSHED ROCK 

S. S. Lord. Manager 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 1872 

A Load on Our Truck i 



Res. Phone 1476-J 
Load off Your Mind 



C. H. Miller Transportation 

STATEWIDE HAULING 
ALL CARGO FULLY INSURED 



P. O. BOX 1027 
OROVILLE CALIFORNIA 



ACCIDENT RATE UP 

1 raffic accidents in San Francisco de- 
creased 2.2 per cent in 1953 as compared 
with 1952. There was, however, one 
more death in 1953 than in the previous 
year, with pedestrians again accounting 
for the majority of the fatalities, accord- 
ing to Iver C. Larson, executive vice 
president of the San Francisco Chapter, 
National Safety Council. 

There were 17,004 reported accidents 
in 1953, compared to 17,399 the year be- 
fore, or a drop of 395. The greatest de- 
cline was in accidents involving a colli- 
sion of two or more motor vehicles, a 
drop of 281. Progress was also made to- 
ward reducing accidents involving motor 
vehicles and pedestrians. This type of 
accident showed a drop of 82. 

Almost every one of the twelve major 
categories of accidents showed appreci- 
able declines — with the e.xception of mo- 
tor vehicles striking bicycles and motor 
vehicles overturned in roadways. There 
were 19 more auto-bicycle accidents and 
72 more vehicles overturned than in 
1952. Police attribute the latter mishaps 
mostly to e.xcessive speeding. 

San Francisco had 67 traflfic fatalities 
in 1953, one more than the previous year. 
Pedestrian deaths totaled 43 — the same 
as 1952. 

Persons killed in motor vehicles col- 
liding with other motor vehicles dropped 
from 18 in 1952 to ten in 1953. while 
there were six deaths in 1953 resulting 
from automobiles overturning in the 
roadway or running off the roadway, as 
compared with none in 1952. Motor ve- 
hicles striking fixed objects resulted in 
seven deaths, an increase of three over 
1952; and motor vehicles striking other 
objects, such as construction areas, ac- 
counted for one death. 

"In view of the fact that almost all 
types of accidents decreased in 1953, we 
have been greatly concerned with the in- 
crease of accidents involving bicycles and 
automobiles, and automobiles overturn- 
ing due to fast and reckless driving,'" 
Larson said. 

"The National Safety Council, the 
San Francisco Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce, California State Automobile As- 
sociation and other agencies are current- 
ly cooperating the a "Lite-A-Bike cam- 
paign to cut bicycle accidents. Safety 
pamphlets and strips of Scotchlite re- 
flector tape are being distributed free 
through the San Francisco License Bii- 
real to all bicycle owners. 

"Police are effectively reducing the 
speeding hazard with increased patrols of 
Golden Gate Park and other areas in the 
city where accidents resulting in over- 
turned cars have been most frequent." 
Larson stated. 



Phone 2-0373 

MILHOUS TRACTOR CO. 

FERGUSON SYSTEM 

Jess Milhous, Owner 

772 Suiter Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-1656 Anita Benton 

THE BEAUTY BOX 

. . . YOUR WAY TO LOVELINESS . . . 

"Yuba City's Largest and Best" 

714 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

TRESSLER'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

Yuba City's Largest, Most Complete Stock 
of Men's, Women's and Children's Wear 



680 - 700 Plu 



YUBA CITY 



Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Phones— Office: 2-2574 Res.: 2-1825 

LESTER L. LAIRD 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 

Business Property - Homes - Ranches 

660 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Ripley's Restaurant & Fountain 

Real Home Cooking - All Women Cooks! 
Dinners - Lunches - Hamburgers 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone: 2-1600 Residence: 3-7670 

GLENN A. GAUCHE 

FARM LANDS - RANCHES 
642 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-7581 Frank and Ize'la 

NEW PLUMAS CAFE 

STEAKS - CHICKEN - SEA FOOD 

"You've Tried the Rest — Now Try the Be:l!" 

624 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORM.-. 



CHILES & FIELD OIL CO. 

Distributors for 

NORWALK GASOLINE AND LUBRICANTS 

MACMILLAN OILS AND LUBRICANTS 

P. O. BOX 547 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-37 14 

"Barnickol Bill and Barney" 

W. F. BARNICKOL & SON 

YOUR PUMP MEN 
DEEP WELL AND PRESSURE SYSTEM 

PUMPS 

P. O. Box 687 Colusa Road 

(Across Road from Valley Concrete Pipe Co 1 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-543 7 

ULLREY MEMORIAL CHAPEL 

Bur«-eII W, UUrey - Walter B. Ullrey 
Bert M. Ullrey 

817 Almond Street 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-1363 

GOLDEN STATE CO., LTD. 

CALIFORNIA'S FAVORITE DAIRY 
PRODUCTS 

310 Bridge Street 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Phone 3-465 1 

WALTER ("Wally") THOMPSON 



YUBA CITY 



INSURANCE BROKERS 
Lite - Fire - Auto 
4131/2 Centr St 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-1810 

BLUE ROOM COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

The Uptown Cocktail Lounge With Downtown 

Prices 

224 Bridge Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

SAVAGE "Heap Good" CANDIES 

DEUCIOUS - HOME-MADE 
Johnnie and Mary 



S58 Second Street 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Gambles Western Auto Supply Co. 

W. G. Bennett, Authorized Dealer 

Everything for the Home, Ranch, Car 

669 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-9957 

Yeates Union Oil Service 

EXPERT LUBRICATION 

Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

474 Bridge Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

BROWN'S SHOE REPAIR 

EXPERT WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 
Ladies' Shoes Our Specialty 

631 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-4345 Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Baker 

SUTTER MOTEL 

"A Home Away From Home" 

% Miles North of Yuba City on Highway 99E 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-3962 Frank Jackson, Prop. 

MIDWAY MOTEL APTS. 

NIGHTLY AND WEEKLY RATES 

Singles and Doubles 

Highway 99E, 1 Vj Miles North of 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-6420 The Willmerfs, Props 

TWIN PALMS MOTEL 

HIGHWAY 99-E 

\Vi Mibs North of Yuba City, California 

Route 2 - Box 118 

GOBEN'S MOTEL 

KITCHENETTES - AIR-CONDITIONED 

Da ly and Weekly Rates 

Cl?an - Cool - Comfortable 

One Mile North on 99-E 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Associated 
Transportation Co. 

"Nothing To Sell But 
Service" 

B & CRADDOCK STREETS 
Phone 2-2323 

Yuba City, Calif. 



THEY CALLED HIM 
"LUCKY" 

From the talk one hears about the so 
called "perfect crime" it is obvious that 
most people do not realize there are a 
great many unsolved murders moulder- 
ing in the files of the larger police depart- 
ments throughout the country. 

By the same token it is obvious that 
the man on the street is not aware that 
there are a great many homicides which 
do not rate a one paragraph story in the 
pages of the bustling metropolitan press. 
\Vhen, at the year's end, he reads a 
roundup story which tells him there were 
forty-one murders in San Francisco dur- 
ing the past year he assumes, subcon- 
sciously, that he read or heard about all 
forty-one killings. 



Ma 



Sha 




Phone 2-289! 

NEEDLES AND YARNS 

Domestic and Imported Yarns - Knitting 

Instructions and Designing - Custom Knitting 

721 Taber Avenue 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

CARLINO'S CAFE 

True Italian Style Spaghetti 

We Cater to Parties — Dial 2-3894 

BUNCE & RICHLAND RD. 

'A Mile South Yuba City High School 

YUB A "CITY CALIFORNIA 

JIM'S NORWALK SERVICE 

TRUCK HAVEN 

Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

Corner Live Oak and Colusa H-ghways 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-5449 Res,: Nicolaus 2291 

N. D. WISE 

BE WISE . . . INSURE WITH NATE WISE 



LlEUTEN.^NT M,-\RTIN LeE 

He will never know how wrong he is. 
Less than half of the murders which take 
place in this nation's larger cities ever 
rate a line in the newspapers, and the 
majority of these receive little attention. 
It is an axiom with all city editors that 
a murder, in order to be worthy of at- 
tention, must have that intangible some- 
thing known as "class. 

Because of this many of the most fas- 
cinating tales in the files of every homi- 
cide detail are, like Sir Thomas Grey's 
flowers, "born to blush unseen." 

The murder of Phyllis Aguon had lit- 
tle to offer in the nature of class in spite 
of its bizarre nature. The death of the 
shapely brunette was just good enough 
to rate page one on the early street sales 
e<]itions of the afternoon papers and un- 
important enough to be forgotten the 
next day. But there are two men who 
will never forget the murder of Phyllis 



Street 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



SUTTER HOLDING COMPANY 

INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES! 
204 Bridge Street 

\UBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

REEVES & FRASER CO. 

COMPLETE FARM SERVICE 

Sprays - Gypsum - Dust - Seeds - Best 

Fertilizers 

I'hon- 3-4252 717 Bridge Street 

-lUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

I'hone 3-3895 

LINDSTROM & YANK Dhtributors 

MOBILGAS - MOBILOIL 

MOBIL TIRES - MOBIL BATTERIES 

651 Bridge Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Whitson & Hodge Service Station 

SIGNAL OIL PRODUCTS - GASOLINE 
"We Specialize in Lube Jobs" 



Ed Wilson Painting & Decorating 

PAINTING AND DECORATING 

Paints, Wallpaper, Glass, Venetian Blinds, 

Aluminum Windows, Wholesale, Retail 

454 Bridge Street Phone 2-0752 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

TWIN CITIES FURNITURE 

FINE MAPLE FURNITURE 

610 Sutter Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

BRUCE & TROXEL 

SIGNAL OIL DISTRIBUTORS 

Number One Sixth Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3-6272 

PARK GROCERY 

Best Quality 
MEATS - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
Where Your Patronage Is Appreciated 

513 "B" Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



Phone i-P<)22 



YUBA CITY 



BANK CLUB 

i in and Get Acquainted 



CALIFORNIA 



TEEGARDEN GROCERY 

Not the Largest, But One of the Best 
Quality Groceries - Meats. Fruits & Vegetables 

328 Teegarden Street 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2247 I 

T. F. BURNS 

DRAYING AND MOVING 
870 West Forbes Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2046 Paul Mell 

MELL'S PLUMBING SHOP 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE 



YUBA CIT"!' 



CALIFORNIA 



FROSTiE FREEZE 

HAMBURGER HEADQUARTERS 

Biggest and Best Malts in Town! 

Ice Cream to Take Out 

290 Percy Avenhe 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone: Dial 3-9513 

BILL'S SPORT SHOP 



Phone 3-6575 

EARL R. HUFFMASTER 

OLDSMOBILE - CADILLAC 

226 - 228 Bridge Street 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Best Wishes From 

B. AND M. CAFE 

J. H Barrie. Prop. 

BEERS AND LUNCHES 

"Where Your Patronage Is Appreciated" 

231 Garden Way 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3.5583 Dottie and Otto. Props. 

THE SUN DOWN TAVERN 

BEER AND SANDWICHES 

On Highway 24, South 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

SONNY'S GARDEN WAY CLUB 

BEER, LUNCHES AND RECREATION 

PARLOR 

"Stop in and Say Hello!" 



Phone Marysville 2-2333 

BOYKIN MOTORS 

QUALITY USED CARS 

Eleventh and B Streets 
MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2301 



MARYSVILLE JUNK CO. 

Dealers in New and Used 
STEEL SUPPLIES 



Eighth and D Streets 
MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Aguon. Lieutenant Martin Lee and In- 
spector Alvin Corrasa of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department Inspectors' 
Bureau frequently recall the case which 
ran them ragged for almost a year and 
finally ended on the trail of a Marine 
with the fantastically appropriate nick- 
name of "Lucky." 

No one who rolled out to the Divisa- 
dero Street apartment house that night 
is likely to forget the body they found 
lying at the foot of a dimly lighted stair- 
way. Phyllis Aguon was moderately at- 
tractive from the shoulders up, but her 
statuesque body was beautiful by any 
standards and lying there on her back, 
wearing only a silken slip which was 
tightly knotted around her neck, she left 
a lasting impression. 

It was almost three o'clock in the 
morning when the original call was re- 
layed to the Northern Station patrol car. 
A latecomer to the Divisadero Street 
apartment house had reported a drunk 
blocking a doorway and the two officers 
were sent to investigate. Not many mo- 
ments later the bewildered complainant 
was attempting to explain to the police 
just how he had managed to stumble 
over the murdered body of a nude wom- 
an and not recognize her as such, no mat- 
ter how dark it was. He was a good 
starting point for the investigation by 
Lee and Corrasa when they arrived on 
the scene, but as a suspect he lasted only 
until a doctor was able to estimate the 
time the woman had been dead. The fact 
that she had been dead almost two hours 
before discovery provided him a perfect 
alibi . . . and made every one else in the 
apartment house a suspect. 

The whole case worked that way. In- 
credible as it seems, every resident in 
that Diversadero Street apartment house 
was able to account for his actions at the 
time Phyllis Aguon was murdered and 
all of them had an alibi. Lee and Corrasa 
had their work cut out. 

Days passed while the detectives in- 
vestigated every facet in the life of the 
murdered woman. Every acquaintance 
was questioned. All her relatives were 
contacted. Physical evidence . . . the 
pathologist's report, fingerprints and 
photographs . . . were examined and re- 
examined. Slowly the picture came into 
focus. Every clue, each lead, [Jointed to 
a red headed Marine, whom a lot of peo- 
ple new as Lucky as the logical killer. 

Relatives of Phyllis Aguon identified 
Lucky as the man who had visited her 
home town, a suburb of San Francisco, 
with her on the day before the fatal in- 
terval on the doorstep. Favern owners 
in San Francisco remembered Phvllis had 



Phone 2-4 162 

Ken's Auto Appearance Center 

Body and Fender Work - Painting 
Upholstering 

Out West on Colusa Highway 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-3 725 Helsem Dairy SlerUizers 

LEONARD PARSONS 

International Harvester Refrigeration - Pack- 
ard-Bell Television - Hardware and Appliances 
Welding and Machine Shop 
Walton and Franklin Avenue 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

NATE'S 

Complete One-Stop Shopping 

Fine Quality Meals. Vegetables and Groceries 

Beer and Wines 

We Deliver 

815 "B" Street Telephone 2-1898 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone Marysville 3-6680 We Close on Sat. 

Sierra Spring Water Service 

Bottled Spring Water and Distilled Water 
Why Take Chances — Drink Spring Water! 

Year Around Delivery Service 

490 PERCY AVE. YUBA CITY. CA LIF. 

Phone 3-5019 

RAY W. JOHNSON CO. 

Manufacturing - Electric Welding 

Machine Work - Agricultural Repair 

86S Market Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-3856 Don Clayton, Prop. 

DON'S PAINT SHOP 

Car Painting - Body and Fender Repairs 

Guaranteed Workmanship 

629 East Taber Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-5 144 

GREEN THUMB NURSERY 

Largest Selection of Shrubs, Plants & Bulbs 

306 Percy Avenue 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

EDDY AIR SERVICE, INC. 

Aerial Crop Work - Dusting. Seeding, Spraying 

All State and Federal Taxes Included 

Sutter County Airport 

Phone 3-9934 p. Q. Box 709 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

MADDOX AUTO SERVICE 

Tires - Batteries - Accessoreis 
Sporting Goods 
Route 4, Box 2 Phone 3-7852 

viiD, ^-It^- °'"** Hiway at Onstott Road 

tUBA CIT1 CALIFORNIA 



HAROLD DUKES 

Extra Friendly Service 

Mobilgas, Mobiloil, Washing, Polishing 

Steam Cleaning 

, "* f-^iy** Avenue Phone 3-9877 

'BA CITY CALIFORNIA 



1^ 



Souza Brothers 

Heavy Equipment Hauling 

Ala/ling Address: 
680 BROWN AVENUE 

Office: 
1 Mile West of Yuba City 

Phone 2-3161 
YUBA CITY, CALIF. 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Cookie's Bike & Toy Shop 

Bicycle Repairing & Bicycle Accessor! 
David R. Cook, Owner 



Phone 3-7615 

YUBA CITY 



215 PERCY AVE. 

CALIFORNIA 



Mayfield's Grocery & Meat Mkt. 

QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES 
Beers - Wines - Cigars and Candy 

■•Where Your Patronage Is Appreciated" 

Corner FrankLn at Walton Roads 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-6106 



Res. Phone 3-3563 



ROSE INSURANCE AGENCY 

INSURANCE FOR ALL! 
Al Rose 



Phone 3-7775 

ANDERSON PHARMACY 

Roy A. Anderson 
PRESCRIPTIONS - DRUGS - LIQUORS 



653 PIu 



Street 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 3-9205 

Pepsi-Colo Bottling Company 

OF YUBA CITY 
"MOST BOUNCE TO THE OUNCE" 
"Built on Quality and Se 



750 Sutter Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-0460 

WHEN LOW IN SPIRITS, VISIT 

DELUXE LIQUOR STORE 

Russell Neal. Prop. 

449 Bridge Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2942 

Sportsman's Club and Cafe 

A Good Place to Eat 
FINE LIQUORS - BEER AND WINE 

622 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES 

The BRITE SPOT 

Johnny Newmanic. L H, Wrestler 

311 THIRD STREET 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone; Yuba City 2-0806 - Nevada City 304 

Regal Pale & Budweiser Beers 

J. Cartoscelli. Prop and Sole Distributor 

Distributor to the 
"PEACH BOWL OF THE WORLD" 

766 Sutler Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



been seen with Lucky on that last, fatal 
evening. Friends remembered meeting 
Phyllis and her handsome, red haired 
Marine. There was the group of people 
who had seen Phyllis and her boy friend 
argue as the small hours approached who 
had actually seen him strike the shapely 
brunette and heard him threaten to 
throttle her. 

\Vhile the investigation developed, one 
major flaw appeared in the detectives' 
case. A lot of people knew Lucky, and a 
lot more were sure they would recognize 
him if they saw him again. But no one 
knew his proper name. He was known as 
Lucky and, as close as Lee and Corrasa 
could discover, nothing else. 

The two detectives discovered that in 
a body of men the size of the Marine 
Corps there are a lot of red headed per- 
sons with the nickname "Lucky." They 
sorted them out and sifted them down. 
Photograph after photograph was shown 
to the witnesses who had seen the Marine 
with Phyllis. Weeks passed into months. 
Eventually patience paid off. 

Members of the murdered woman's 
family recognized a picture. Other wit- 
nesses verified their judgement. Armed 
with a name Lee and Corrasa were able 
to dig deeper into the case and discover 
definitely that Phyllis had frequently 
dated the man whose picture had been 
identified. Satisfied at last that their case 
was complete the detectives told their 
story to the Marine Corps. The Corps 
promised to cooperate. Lee and Corrasa 
sighed with relief. Within a few days the 
case would be in the hands of the courts. 
Then they received the call from a Ma- 
rine colonel. 

"I wouldn't arrest Lucky if I were 
you," he advised. 

"Why not?" Lee demanded. "We 
have a perfect case against him." 

"Not now," the colonel replied. "We 
checked on Lucky. He had a little 
trouble a short time before the murder. 
He was restricted to his station on the 
day of the killing." 

"But couldn't he have gone AWOL 
and sneaked back safely?" 

"He could have," the colonel answered 
dryly. "But what sergeant of the guard 
would admit he got away with it? And 
what court would convict him ?" 

Lee sighed, thanked the officer, and 
hung up. He moved to his desk, closed 
the folder bearing the data on the Aguon 
case, and stamped it with large purple 
letters. "Case Inactive." Then he turned 
to Corrasa. 

"Now I know where that Marine got 
his nickname," he declared. "Just how 
lucky can a man get ?" 



SPECIALTY MART 



Phone 3-4043 
YUBA CITY 



979 Richland Road 

CALIFORNIA 



ROY'S PLACE 

"Where Your Patronage is Most Appreciated" 

Beer — Recreation — Cigars & Candies 

H. C. Stone, Prop. 100 Percy Avenue 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

OWEN'S RADIO & TV SERVICE 

We Specialize in Radio & TV Service Only 



105 Percy Avenue 

YUBA CITY 



Telephone 3-3223 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-92 73 

Valley Concrete Pipe & Products 
Company 

CHICO — Phone Fireside 2-7566 
DIXON— Phone 8-5733 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

NORTHRUP. KING&CO. 

Seedsmen Since 1884 

276 Wilbur Avenue Phone 3-5407 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-1046 

HOWARD CLEANERS 

FOUR CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 

236 Bridge Street - 712 Plumas Street 

YUBA CITY 

113 East 12th Street - 107 D Street 

MARYSVILLE 

JOHNNIE'S QUICK LUNCH 

For Quality and Service Always 
REAL HOME COOKING 

Prompt Service 

200 Bridge Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-2359 

ALLENDER'S TELEVISION 

TELEVISION IS OUR BUSINESS ; 

Admiral - Westinghouse - RCA i 

First in Sales - First in Service 

720 Plumas Street 

^UBA CIY CALIFORNIA 

SUTTER ORCHARD SUPPLY 

FEEDS - SEEDS - SPRAYS AND 

FERTILIZERS 

Branch at East Gridley 

573 BRIDGE STREET 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



WALNUT 


COURT 


GROCERY 


Quality 
Fruits — Vege 


Groceries 
tables — 


& Meats 
Candy & Cigars 


J. C. LiUard. P 

LIVE OAK 


rop. 


13th & M Street 

CALIFORNIA 



CLIFFORD'S FURNITURE 

New & Used Household Goods 

We Specialize in Antiques! 

176 Percy Avenue Telephone 2-3563 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Percy Ave. Grocery & Market 

For Quality Groceries — Meats & Vegetables 

We Deliver - Your Friendly Neighborhood Store 

Telephone 2-1120 179 Percy Avenue 

YUBA CITY' CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



3-65 14 



BREMER HARDWARE, INC. 

IMPLEMENTS - SPORTING GOODS 
HOUSEHOLD APPUANCES - PLUMBING 

546 Second Street 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-306 1 

PULLIAM'S FURNITURE 

The House of Bargains! 

WE BUY, SELL OR TRADE 

New - Used and Antique 

1028 Colusa Highway 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

THE RIB 

THE TWIN CITIES NEWEST 
(Marysville and Yuba City) 

Featuring 
HICKORY SMOKED "RIB-BAR-B-Q" 
Fountain Service - Drive-ln Service 

>rivate Banquet Room — Catering Service 
Take Home Dinners— We Deliver 



Built-Rite Redwood Fence Co. 

Redwood Fences - Vast Selection Styles 
Outdoor Furniture - Patios - Landscaping 

Weather Stripping - Venetian Blinds 

100% F.H.A. Financing — 36 Months to Pay! 

No Down Payment . . . Call 2-2663 or 3-6579 

Free Estimates — Open Sundays 

Colusa Highway Off Onstott Road 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

'hone 3-6564 

Yuba City Scrap & Steel 

HEADQUARTERS FOR STEEL AND PIPE 

USED AUTO PARTS 

"Ask for Denny" 

Route No- 4, Box 3, Colusa Highway 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-0262 

Bi-County From Supply Company 

ALL BASIC FARM SUPPLIES 
Owned, Controlled and Operated by 



BUMBLE BEE "FINGERS" 
FEDERAL FUGITIVE 

Luther Saunders was convicted in a 
Federal Court of a liquor law violation, 
but he jumped bail. When Deputy 
United States Marshal J. Harrison 
Roche paused to act as a Good Samari- 
tan he recognized Saunders who thus 
landed at McNeil Island Prison. The 
poetry covering the strange coincidence 
was writen by a friend of the Marshal. 
— Editor. 
How doth the little busy bee 

Assist the roving copper? 
By boldly stinging culprits 

In places hardly proper. 

'Twas a fine day last September 
When U. S. Marshal Roche 

Was driving through Los Angeles 
In his speedy benzine coach. 

He passed another motorist 
Who was fixing up a puncture 

But a busy little bumble bee 
Arrive at just this juncture. 

The sweating, cursing motorist 
At his work was bending over; 

The pattern on his pantaloons 
To the bee resembled clover. 

Upon these pants the bee sat down; 

His sitting was not tender; 
The tire fixer gave a scream 

And bit clear through his fender. 

The passing U. S. Marshal 

In horror jammed his brakes on ; 

"This surely is a mad man," 

Said he, "Hear how he takes on." 

Prepared to cope with anything. 

E'en to a crazy beggar. 
Right boldly forth he strode and met — 

A fugitive bootlegger! 

"Aha!" the marshal cried in glee, 
"You naughtie bootie, come with me! 

"And for a raiding partner — Gee! 
"Give me the little bumble bee!" 



563 Row 

YUBA CITY 



(Near Fairgrounds) 

CALIFORNIA 



A TWO WAY PROFIT 

Having the ignition system gone over 
and replacing spark plugs that need it 
does more than insure easier starting in 
cold weather, according to the National 
Automobile Club. There is also another 
form of profit to be obtained in the im- 
pressive guise of gasoline economy. 



IMPERIAL GAS CO. 

ROCKGAS - PROPANE - BUTANE 

Economical, Safe. Clean 

Phone 2851 No. Main St. at the Y 

Frank G. Phillips, Manager 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 



KOEPLE'S DO-NUT SHOP 

Special Varieties Made to Order 

Lunches - Sodas - Donuts & Coffee 

595 SPRUCE STREET 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



O. K. RUBBER WELDERS 

COMPLETE TIRE SERVICE 

Recaps - Repairs - New - Used - Coast to Coast 

Hal Linge 

Phone 7461 Post Office Box 681 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

MORRIS BROTHERS— LIQUORS 

On and Off Sale Liquors 

"Where Your Patronage is Really Appreciated" 

868 HAZEL STREET 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



JERRY VOWER 

Cocktails - Breakfast - Luncheon - Dinner 
On and Off Sale Liquors 

Phone 3-9864 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

ROBBIN'S MARKET 

Home of Quality Groceries - Meats - Vegetables 

Wines & Beer — Also Home Furnishings - Toys 

Sporting Goods and School Supplies 

Corner Colusa and Biggs Road 
GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

STUKE NURSERY CO. 

WALNUTS A SPECIALTY 

Deciduous Fruit Trees 

Sales Yard on Highway 99E 

W. E. Stuke. Owner 

Phone 2 3 7« 
GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



YUBA CITY MILLS 

GRAIN • SEED • MACHINERY 
FERTILIZER 



YUBA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



Associated Transportation 
Company 

"NOTHING TO SELL BUT SERVICE" 
R. M Carroll - Paul Kunde 

B and Craddock Streets 

YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 

EARL FRUIT COMPANY 

Since 1687 

PACKERS AND SHIPPERS OF FRUITS 

359 "B" Street 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February. 1954 



Phone 2 382 

G. B. 

Elgin 

GRIDLEY 


SIMPSON JEWELER 

Longines - Wyler Watches 
617 Kentucky Street 

CALIFORNA 



Paul's Billiard & Recreation 

"Where Good Fellows Meet" 

Beer - Pool - Soft Drinks and Lunches 

547 Kentucky Street 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



VISIT THE GRIDLEY CLUB 

Where The Boys All Meet! 

Your Favorite Games 

Pinochle — Rummy, Etc. 

833 HAZEL STREET 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

GRIDLEY POULTRY MARKET 

Quality Poultry — Wholesale & Retail 
Best Eggs in Town— Free Delivery— Frozen Bait 
Phone 2103 540 Biggs Rd.. Cor. of Hazel 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 
from 

J. C. PENNEY CO. 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE DODINI DRUGS 

PRESCRIPTION — DRUGGIST 



972 HAZEL STREET 

GRIDLEY 



Phone 2156 

CALIFORNIA 



COPELIN PIANO CO. 

RADIO - TELEVISION - RECORDS 

Sales & Service 

,o„e 2493 985 HAZEL STREET 



CALIFORNIA 



GRIDLEY 



Gridley Home & Auto Supply 

SPORTING GOODS 

Gifts - Household Supplies - Appliances 

Tires - Auto Acessories - Tubes 

P^«„e 2245 842 HAZEL STREET 

GRlSrEY^ CALIFORNIA 



55 



Re 



Telephone: Offi 

GRIDLEY GROWERS SUPPLY 

Headquarters for the Ranchers and Farmers 

Harvey W. Mohr 

ORCHARD, FARM AND GARDEN SUPPLIES 

COMMERCIAL SPRAYING AND DUSTING 

Hazel Street North of S P. Ry. Depot 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



Woodward's 
Country Kitchen 

Charcoal Steaks and Chicken 

Sea Food — Cocktails 

Banquets in Cedar Room 

Mr. & Mrs. G. C. Woodward, Jr. 

Phone 5518 
On 99-E Half Mile South of 
GRIDLEY, CALIFORNIA 



— SAFETY PRECAUTIONS 

Problems of safet\' and safety educa- 
tion around the modern automobile don't 
start when it gets to rolling down the 
road, points out the National Automo- 
bile Club. They start much earlier, when 
the first bolt is being cast, the first fen- 
der shaped up. Safety and safety educa- 
tion, in fact, is one of the major opera- 
tions in the modern automotive factory. 
In the big plants around Detroit, 
crews of industrial hygiene specialists 
keep roaming about constantly on the 
lookout for metal fumes, dust, gases or 
other hazards to health. Safety specialists 
comb the plants from end to end search- 
ing closely for every dangerous situation, 
every dangerous mechanical process, and 
when they discover these they lose no 
time in eliminating them with safety de- 
vices, safety guards. 

But the detecting of danger areas and 
the covering of them with safety devices 
and guards is only part of the job. Per- 
haps the larger part of the job is getting 
the personnel to make use of devices and 
guards, for people are often lazy and 
careless and it has been found that hu- 
man carelessness is involved in more than 
eighty per cent of accidents. Safety ex- 
perts are continually doing what they 
can to educate personnel in the proper 
use of safe methods and safety devices. 

In spite of all the safety work men can 
do, however, in the way of accident pre- 
vention, accidents still happen and then 
the medical men have to take over. And 
in most big automotive factories they take 
over in a grand style. One company for 
example, has thirty-five first-aid stations 
and twenty-eight hospitals that are staff- 
ed by three hundred and twenty-nine 
doctors, nurses. X-ray technicians, first- 
aid men, and others. 

Another company finds that during the 
calendar year its personnel make use of 
five hundred thousand cold tablets, fif- 
teen hundred bottles of citro-carbonate 
for upset stomachs, fifteen hundred tubes 
of salve for sore muscles, one million 
seven hundred thousand aspirin tablets, 
and thirty tons of protective skin cream. 
That may seem like a lot of medicine, but 
it's just what it takes to keep the wheels 
rolling around an automotive factory. 



358 



FEATHER RIVER MOTEL 

In the Heart of the World's Finest Hunting and 

Fishing Area — E. E. (Eddie) Jackman 

On Hi-way 99E Just No. of Live Oak 

Phone 5054 Rt. No. 1. Box 109 

LIVE OAK CALIFORNIA 

STONES AUTO WRECKING YARD 

New & Used Parts — All Makes — All Models 

"Where Your Dollar Does Double Duty" 

On Hiway 99E 



HEAPE'S TAVERN & CAFE 

"In the Heart of Live Oak" 

Mixed Drinks — Beer & Wine 

OFF SALE OF LIQUORS 

Phone 9471 Ray & Sandy, Props. 

LIVE OAK CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES OF 

DON'S DRUG STORE 

Largest, Finest in Live Oak 



THe'rEXALL STORE 
Donald E. Eich, Ph. G. 



CALIFORNIA 



THE RIGHTWAY CLUB 

For the Best in Beer and Recreation be Sure to 
Visit the Rightway! 

16TH AND BROADWAY 

LIVE OAK CALIFORNIA 



WILSON HARDWARE 

Everything for the Ranch and Home 
Builders' Supplies — Full Line of Paints 



Phone 4331 



LIVE OAK 



CALIFORNIA 



LIVE OAK CLEANERS 

PERSONALIZED SERVICE! 

"Where Your Patronage is Most Appreciated" 

310 - 16TH STREET 

LIVE OAK CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

LIVE OAK HOTEL 

Johnny Oliveira, Prop. 

LIVE OAK CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2 104 

GRIDLEY IRON WORKS 

E- B. Squire «< Son 

WELDING AND MACHINE WORK 
Machinists, Designers and Manufacturers 



P. O. Box 684 
GRIDLEY 



Archer Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



BEHR'S MARKET 

Gridley's Largest, Most Complete Stock of 

Quality Groceries - Meats - Vegetables 

Wines - Liquors - Beers - Tobaccos 

Buy at Behr's & Save! 



PASSING 

Never pass on a curve or when ap- 
proaching the crest of a hill, advises the 
National Automobile Club. 

CHUCK & SMITTY'S 

COCKTAILS - STEAKS - DINNERS 

FINE WINES AND BEER 

LA 9963 2004 N. BROADWAY 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 



640 Hiway 99E 



CALIFORNIA 



s. s. 



HINAMAN & SON 

es — FORD — Service 

!ral Automotive Repairs 
— Batteries — Accessories 



; Bus. 5652 — Res. 2200 
and SPRUCE STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



P^ge 27 



L & J TAVERN & CAFE 

The Friendly Spot in Gridley 
Best in Mixed Drinks and Good Eats 



GRIDLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



FRANK'S PLACE 

Just a Friendly Place . . . Stop in! 

Beer and Recreation 

945 Hazel Street 

CRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



2613 



Sadi< 



Prop. 



GRIDLEY FLORAL SHOP 

HEADQUARTERS FOR FLORAL SERVICE 

571 Virginia Street 
GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2224 

WILCOXON INSURANCE AGENCY 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Notary Public 

555 Virginia Street 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2336 Since 1<)33 

W. J. SHEPARD. Realtor 

REAL ESTATE - INSUANCE 

W. J. Shepard. Res. Phone 2 155 

N. W. Cook, Res. Phone 2916 

549 Virginia Street 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

PASDERA JEWELERS 

HEADQUARTERS FOR FINE JEWELRY 

Gifts and Watch Repairing 

820 Hazel Street Telephone 2068 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

CRANDALL TRACTOR CO. 

FORD TRACTORS - Sales and Service 

Dearborn Farm Equipment 

P. R. Crandall - H C. Sannar 

303 Virginia Street Phone 2434 

GRIDLEY CALIFORN'A 

CUSH'S PLACE 

Where Friends Meet! 

Stop in and Relax When Nearby 

Best in Wines. Beer and Lunches 

101 Virginia Cor. of Locust (Main Entrance to 

the Cannery. W. H. Gushing, Prop. 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



2223 



DeBell's Gridley Furniture Store 

650 OHIO STREET 

CRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5646 

TUCKER CHEVROLET CO. 

BUICK AND CHEVROLET 

— Sales and Service 

GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 

24-Hour Towing Service 

P. O. BOX 127 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Phone Live Oak 401 I 

SUNSET MOULDING CO. 

Manfaclurers of 
QUALITY WHITE PINE MOULDING 

P. O. BOX 326 
YUBA CITY CALIFORNIA 



PREPARE FOR SNOW TRIP 

Planning a trip to the snow? 

In case you are, the California High- 
way Patrol has some helpful suggestions 
intended to add enjoyment and safety to 
the trip. 

"First, " emphasizes Commissioner B. 
R. Caldwell of the Patrol, "be sure you 
include a set of skid chains in the car and 
pack them where they can be easily reach- 
ed when you arrive in snow country." 

"When you reach a sign stating 'chains 
advised' you have reached a logical spot 
to stop your car and put on the chains. 
It is very probable that you will find an- 
other sign not too far up the road which 
will announce 'chains required.' This 
point will be the end of the road unless 
the car is equipped with chains," Cald- 
well said. 

Motorists are warned that even with 
chains an automobile is difficult to con- 
trol on ice or snow if operated at speeds 
that would be reasonable on dry pave- 
ments. 

"Another definite hazard in the snow 
areas is slick ice," continued the Com- 
missioner. "This is caused by alternate 
thawing and freezing and is usually 
found in shaded areas. Watch for these 
spots and slow down before hitting them. 
Whatever you do, don't apply the brakes 
while traveling over such areas, and, if 
your car does start to skid, turn the 
front wheels in the direction of the skid." 

"Enjoy the snow areas of our state but 
remember, driving conditions are much 
different than experienced in your nor- 
mal drixing," he concluded. 

OVERHEATING 

Sediment in the cooling system, or any 
foreign matter, is particularly to be 
avoided, points out the National Auto- 
mobile Club. If anything of this sort 
lodges in the thermostat valve, the water 
may not circulate to the radiator when 
the engine reaches the proper tempera- 
ture, thus causing th esystem to overheat. 

STANDING TRAFFIC 

Dri\e at a safe speed when coming up 
behind standing traffic, advises the Na- 
tional Automobile Club. In such traffic 
situations it is all too easy to misjudge 
distances, and misjudged distances can 
mean serious mishap. 

WASH WORTH EFFORT 

At this season the task of keeping the 
car clean is more difficult, points out the 
National Automobile Club, The extra 
effort, however, is worth the time or the 
cost. If the motorist is indifferent, reno- 
\ation of the finish may become neces- 
sary. 



Telephone 5658 

CECILE'S DRESS SHOP 

"LOOK YOUR BEST FOR LESS" 

Ladies' Ready-to- Wear Exclusively 

277 Kentucky Street 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

TOM GAGE CHEVRON STATION 

GRIDLEY'S NEWEST AND FINEST 
Standard Products and Accessories 
Corner Hazel and 99-E Highway 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2 588 

LINN LUMBER CO 

Agents: Valley Pipe and Concrete Co., Products 

611 Magnolia Street 
GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Bob & Fred's Signal Service 

Tires - Batteries - Lubrication - Car Washing 
Minor Repairs - Signal Oil Co. Products 

Highway 99-E Phone 2054 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Rancher's Petroleum Supply Co. 

Automobie Accessories - Everything for Your 
Car - Lubrication - Motor Tune Up - Weding 

Independent Marketers - We Sell for Less 

On Highway 99-E Phone 9906 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



2250 



C. E. McKelvey s Texaco Service 

LUBRICATION - ACCESSORIES 

Cars Washed - Tires and Batteries 

Highway 99-E and Wilson Street 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Bile's Mobile Service Station 

MOBIL PRODUCTS EXCLUSIVELY 

Car Washing - Tires - Batteries - Accessor es 

Best Lube Job in Town 

Highway 99-E 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



PRYDE-TEAGUE MOTORS 

Dodge Job-Rated Trucks - Dodge Passeng< 
Cars - Plymouth Passenger Cars for 1954 

130 Wilson Stree 
GRIDLEY 



Telephone 1791 

CALIFORNIA 



GRIDLEY CHAPEL 

Wesley W. Price 
AMBULANCE SERVICE 



679 Ohio Street 



CALIFORNIA 



WALTER JANSEN & SON 

Manufacturers of 
LINCOLN BRAND FEEDS 

Main Office: Lincoln, California 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 9160 

PASTIME CLUB 

Where Everybody Has a Good Time 
Geo. and Edna's 

429 Virginia Street 
GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



GRIDLEY'S CAFE 

QUALITY FOODS - LUNCHES - MEALS 
We Do Appreciate Your Trade! 



HIGHWAY 99-E 



GRIDLEV. CALIF. 



Pho 



2141 



H & L MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS VEGETABLES 
Open Sundays and Evenings 

99 East Highway 
GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

DE HOFF GROCERY & MEATS 

Where Quality Is First — Always 

Meats - Groceries - Fruits and Vegetables 

Complete Stock Wines, Liquors and Beers 

On Highway 99 South 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2606 

STARKEY'S HANCOCK SERVICE 

Steam Cleaning - Truck Tires Repaired 

Air Wrench 

Highway 99 East 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



STEWART PAINT & GLASS 

B. Stewart - Bill Stewart 

COMPLETE COLOR MATCHING ARTISTS 

If It Takes Paint ... We Have It! 

249 Highway 99-E Phone 2901 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 

HART'S OPPORTUNITY STORE 

"Come In and Get Acquainted" - When You Do 
Your House Cleaning, Bring Us Your Odds and 
Ends - We Buy Everything That's Usable - We 
Trade and Sell - See Our Antiques, Pictures, 
Furniture, Objects of Art, Etc. 
255 on Highway 99-E Tel. 9902 

GRIDLEY CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL 
RIO VISTA 



Coffee Shop 

Barber Shop 

Pharmacy 

Club Rooms 

Banquet Service 



Box 789 

Phone 4-2194 

Rio Vista, Calif. 



TRANSPORTATION CENTER 

The establishment of a national 
Transportation Center at Northwestern 
University has been announced by Presi- 
dent J. Roscoe Miller. 

The new Center will carry on a pro- 
gram of research, undergraduate train- 
ing, and graduate study aimed at the so- 
lution of major problems in the highway, 
rail, air, pipeline and water divisions of 
the nation's transportation industry. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of 
the University's School of Commerce, 
Technological Institute, and Traffic In- 
stitute. Several other divisions of the 
University will also participate. 

An advisory committee of business and 
professional men interested in transpor- 
tation will be formed to aid the Univer- 
sity in the formulation and direction of 
the Center's activities. 

"Transportation is such a vital factor 
in modern living," said President Miller, 
"that it seems desirable to expend the 
work of Northwestern University in this 
held. Because of its rapid development, 
transportation has become increasingly 
complex and has created many unsolved 
problems — economic, technical, and so- 
cial. 

"Northwestern University is admir- 
ably situated for transportation research 
and education. We have already done a 
great deal of work in this field, and we 
believe that, with adequate support, we 
can make a substantially greater and 
more effective contribution through our 
new Transportation Center." 

The following have been appointed to 
the University Committee charged with 
the initial direction and planning of the 
Transportation Center: Stanley Berge, 
professor of transportation, and Leon A. 
Bosch, director of the Graduate Divi- 
sibn. School of Commerce; Burgess H. 
Jennings, chairman of mechanical engi- 
neering, and Carl W. Muhlenbruch, 
professor of civil engineering. Techno- 
logical Institute ; George W. Barton, 
traffic engineer, and Franklin M. Kreml, 
director. Traffic Institute. Mr. Kreml is 
serving as chairman of the committee. 



KING FURNITURE STORE 

"Quality at Low Prices" Why Go Elsewhe 



GOOD CONNECTIONS 

Loose, dirty or corroded connections 
anywhere in the ignition system of your 
car can mean a loss of power and good 
performance, reminds the California 
State Automobile Association. If your 
car is sluggish or is using more gas than 
it once did, have the electrical connec- 
tions checked first. 



Phone 5014 

LINE OAK 



Cor. ISth St. & 99E 

CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 

Earl Corbin's Associated Service 



99E & Pennington Rd. 
LIVE OAK 



Phone 9371 
CALIFORNIA 



BOATSMANS SHELL SERVICE 

We Feature Shell Products — Phone 5511 

Complete Line of Tires, Batteries, Etc. 

Soft Drinks and Candies 



LI\E OAK 



CALIFORNIA 



LINEKER'S MARKET 

The Home of Quality and Fair Dealing! 

"Founded on Service" 

99E HIWAY 

LIVE OAK CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2 124 



RICHFIELD SERVICE 

TIRES - TUBES - ACCESSORIES 

L. M. Price 



GRIDLEY 



310 Highway 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2054 

UMSCHEID and POWERS 

Distributors of Signal Oil Products 
Highway 99-E P. O Box 3, Route 1 



GRIDLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS VALLEY 
VEGETABLE 
EXCHANGE 

GROWERS— 

—PACKERS- 
SHIPPERS 

CALIFORNIA AND 
ARIZONA VEGETABLES 

"Lettuce The Year 'Round" 

El Centro - Salinas, 
California 

Phoenix, Arizona 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Clara and Sid, Owners 

SID'S PLACE 

ON SALE — OFF SALE LIQUORS 



Modern Motel 



SIERRAVILLE 



Foam Rubber Mattresses 
PHONE 10 

CALIFORNIA 



FORK'S CAFE 



Just Wond 
s — Short Orde 



MOON'S CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

BAR SERVICE 

Hank and Ida Moon, Owners 



CALIFORNIA 



LONE PINE DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 
Baker and Renfrew 



LONE PINE 



CALIFORNIA 



JACK'S PLACE 

EAT AND DRINK 

Jack Molinari 

Phone 186 

ALTAVILLE (Calaveras County) CALIFORNIA 



TATUM'S HARDWARE AND 
SUPPLY CO. 



Paints - Hardv 



Sporting Goods - Roofing 



CARL'S SIERRA CAFE 

THE VALLEY'S FINEST RESTAURANT 



Phone 2-8205 
LONE PINE CALIFORNIA 



FRED'S LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic Wines and Liquors 

WE DEUVER 

Fred & Del Denton 

Phone 4541 102 No. Main St. 

LONE PINE CALIFORNIA 



JUNIPERA SERRA 
HOSPITAL 

Briggs Street 

PLaza 3-7735 

Colma, California 



OFFICER MURDERED 

(Continued from page 4^} 

police, the sheriff's office and highway 
patrolmen, started the most intensive 
manhunt the area had seen since a cow- 
ardly gunman shot and killed North 
Sacramento Police Chief E. G. Fish, 
August 11, 1935. (The killer Alfred 
Paine of Oakland, is serving a life term 
in Folsom Prison.) 

Chief AVilson ordered a house to 
house search of the vicinity. With splen- 
did cooperation from residents, he and his 
men searched, room by room, through 
more than 100 houses while the occu- 
pants sat huddled in the living rooms. 

The murder weapon, a .22 caliber tar- 
get pistol, was found near the murder 
scene, and quickly was identified as one 
of 24 stolen in a Santa Ana sporting 
goods store burglary. The State CII was 
called in to check this angle and the San- 
ta Ana police pledged their help. 

An all points bulletin was sent out 
with the killer's description : 20 to 22 
years of age, 5 feet 10 inches tall, be- 
tween 150 and 160 pounds, dark hair and 
of Mexican descent. He was wearing 
dark trousers or jeans, a brown jacket 
with a three inch wide vertical stripe 
down both sides of the front. 

The police station switchboard was 
swamped almost immediately with calls 
from residents who thought they had 
seen the murderer. The best tip came 
from N. J. Jenson, who lives near the 
warehouse. 

A doughty 78 year old, Jensen came 
upon the slayer behind his house minutes 
after the shooting. He seized the man, 
and tried to drag him to the front of the 
house, meanwhile shouting for an officer. 
The man slugged him, however, and 
escaped. 

Unfortunately the house to house 
search, the running down of numerous 
leads and the other intensive work did 
not turn up the murderer. He still is at 
large. 

But a lot of grim faced policemen, 
their hearts in their work, are patiently 
tracking him down. As Chief AVilson, 
said they will. 

And what kind of guy was Jack Rea ? 

The record shows he was a family 
man, 48, who left behind a grieving wife 
and four children. His favorite police 
job was guarding a school crossing so the 
school children would not get hurt. 

And none ever did get hurt during the 
years he guarded the crossing. He had 
been a policeman since 1945. 



MAIN STREET LI9UOR STORE 

SPORTSMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

Phone 2037 

931 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

M. J. Faure 
Gas — Oil — Lubrication — Accessories 



Model Laundry and Dry Cleaners 

EXPERT LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING 

Phone 2282 

2201 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

S-T CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

Phone 2338 
727 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

MT. LASSEN CLUB 

CHINESE-AMERICAN DISHES 
MIXED DRINKS 
DINE & DANCE 



CALIFORNIA 



CHESTER CLUB 

Chicken Fried in Butter Our Specialty 

Hot Biscuits and Honey 

ome Made Pies — Mixed Drinks of All Kinds 



PHONE 4131 



CALIFORNIA 



BRONSON & DOYLE 

Feed — Seed — Farm Machinery 

Authorized Dealers 
John Deere — Caterpillar 

SUSANVILLE — ALTURAS — LITCHFIELD 



WORLD FAMOUS RED BARREL 

COCKTAILS - DINING & DANCING 
Irving Mandel, Mgr. 



Tel. TOrrey 5-3716 
ARTESIA 



11915 E.Carson St. 
CALIFORNLA 



TRUTTMAN'S 
DAIRY 

P. 0. Box 111 

Olema, California 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 7954 



NEW METHOD CLEANERS 

Better Cleaning 
Bob Yanger, Prop 



Phone 2104 

32 NORTH LASSEN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



MARION'S 

Cocktails and Off Sale Liquors 



Phone 2159 
75 SOUTH WEATHERLOW STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



McClures Union Service Station 

Phone 3522 
MAIN & WEATHERLOW STREETS 

■SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

SPAULD1NG DRUG CO. 

Established 1865 
RELIABLE PRESCRIPTIONS 

708 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Trader George Buys and Sells Everything 

TRADING POST 

BUY USED FURNITURE 
Buy and Sell Guns 

Tel. 2178 

2406 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



ROBERTS AND SOMMERS 

Nationally Famed Apparel 
For Men, Women and Children 

722 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



8 2 C L y G 

Eddie — THE POMEROY'S — S^lly 

Cocktails — M'xed Drinks 

802 MAIN STREET 



SUSANVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



WIRTH-MSLLAR HARDWARE 

GENERAL ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

Phone 2305 
618 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



During the Summer of 1952 a fire 
levelled all the structures in the park 
where North Sacramento youngsters 
played bail. Rea organized work gangs 
of neighborhood kids and in double quick 
time had the ball diamond in operation 
again. 

He was a founder, director and team 
manager of the Pee Wee Baseball 
League, a police department project for 
youngsters. 

But aside from the record, what did 
his neighbors and fellow workers think 
of him. Here are a few quotes : 

Mrs. Earl Myers of North Sacra- 
mento: "Three months ago my little girl 
(Barbara, 2) wandered off with her col- 
lie dog. Jack noticed the dog circling the 
girl and figured she was lost. He was off 
duty at the time, but he managed to get 
her home to us. He was just marvelous, 
that's all." 

Chief Wilson: "He was a good man in 
every way. And I'm not just saying that 
because he's dead. He carried badge No. 
1 and from now on that will be Jack 
Rea's Badge. It won't ever be assigned 
again." 

Mrs. Lucille Chapman of North Sac- 
ramento: "He was the kind of cop who 
always tried to bring out the good in 
people. He wasn't always waiting to 
jump down your throat. He tried to 
show you how to do things the right 
way. " 

Mrs. Harold Keener, a neighbor: "He 
was such a good man with children. He 
was always helping the boys with their 
baseball teams and everything. All the 
kids used to call to him: 'Hi, Jack'. And 
he was never in too much of a hurry to 
stop and talk to them." 

Mrs. Harold Penner of North Sacra- 
mento: "My boy, Keith, used to go fish- 
ing with Jack and his boys a lot. He was 
always doing things for the kids." 

And Jack's grief stricken widow, could 
only say: "We will miss him so. We will 
miss him so terribly." 

Only once before the night he was shot 
fatp.lly did R"a draw his service revolver. 
It v.'a-, in 1951. He and Chief Wilson 
arrer.tcd two men wanted for passing bad 
checks. While Rea was handcuffing one 
of the prisoners, the man hit him in the 
face, breaking his glasses. Rea, his face 
and eyes covered with blood, drew his 
gun. The prisoner gave up. 

And that's where the best of all the 
quotes comes in. It's from Jack the Cop 
himself. 



Phil and Mary Parry at 

The Gables Tavern and Motel 

Southern Fried Chicken 



MIRACLE UPHOLSTERING CO. 

CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING 

Bob and Mary McPherson 

Phone 4841 

1326 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

SUNRISE BAKERY 

Phone 2103 
920 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

BANQUET ROOM FOR PRIVATE PARTIES 

GRAND CAFE 

Steve Sargent, Owner 

Excellent Food Properly Served 

730 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

CHRISTIE FURNITURE CO. 

M. A. Dolio, Proprietor 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 

Telephone 2135 



THE PINES 

Dolores Kelton 

COCKTAILS — MIXED DRINKS 
"Hunting and Fishing Information" 



ON HIGHWAY 89 AT 

CANYON DAM CALIFORNIA 



MILWOOD PLUMBING 



Phone 21 IS 
2314 MAIN STREET 

f.USANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



SIERRA DAIRIES 

J. A. Stephenson, Sales Manager 

1900 RICHMOND ROAD 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

LASSEN FEED AND FARM 
SUPPLY 

PURINA CHOWS 
Baby Chicks Farm Supplies 

Phone 4282 
JOHNSTONVILLE ROAD 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



CECIL'S MARKET 

Wilson & Larsen. Owners 

COMPLETE FOOD SERVICE 

Beers and Wines — Fresh Meats — Vegetables 

Groceries— Drugs 

PHONE TALLAC 65-J 
STATELINE. LAKE TAHOE CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



Jack Roberts Senior and Junior 
SPORTSMEN 

Fishing and Hunting Supplies 

720 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Chas. H. Courvoisier Telephone: Dial 2075 

SIERRA JEWELERS 

Store on the Corner 

FINE DIAMONDS AND WATCHES 
SILVER CHINA 

MAIN AND GAY STREETS 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

PIONEER CAFE 

Good Food — Mixed Drinks 

CLUB ROOM 

Off Sale Liquors 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS HERE 

B AND B COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

GOOD FOOD 



Phone 2084 
623 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



DeFOREST MOTEL 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer E. DeForest 

Located, Built and Furnished for Quiet Rest 

PHONE DIAL 2006 

1423 FIRST STREET 

One Block North of Main Street 

at the Center of Susanville 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 

T & A COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

THE FINEST NITE CLUB 

IN LASSEN COUNTY 

Alvise Surian, Owner 

DINING AND DANCING 

Phone 3061 
2101 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



BURR AUTOMOTIVE 

Telephone 2143 

1717 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



His brother-in-law, Clarence Carlson 
of Redding, said ; 

"One time Jack told me about ha\ing 
a kid in the sights of his revolver. He said 
he just couldn't pull the trigger, even 
though the kid might have shot him — he 
was armed. 

"He told me the only thing he could 
think of was his own sons." 

I hat's the kind of a man and a police- 
man Rea was. And that's just one of the 
reasons the killer is going to be caught 
and Jack the Cop will be revenged. 

MOTOR BRAKES BEST 

The engine is a good brake at all times, 
but there is one instance where it prob- 
ably is the best, according to the National 
Automobile Club. That occurs when one 
has blown out a tire. Putting on the 
brakes to stop a car, especially if a front 
tire has blown, makes the steering job 
many times more difficult. If the way 
ahead is clear, the better plan is to let the 
engine bring the car to a stop with the 
brakes used as sparingly as possible. 



BAD BRAKES 

Bad brakes and bad driving attitudes 
can both work to cause serious traffic 
accidents, advises the National Automo- 
bile Club. If you would keep yourself 
safe, keep your brakes tight and your 
driving attitudes right. 



TROUBLE FORECAST 

Any tendency of the speedometer to 
vibrate should be met with an inspection 
by an e.xpert on these delicate instru- 
ments, advises the National Automobile 
Club. The vibration may be due to loose 
unions or looseners in the flexible shaft or 
too shary a bend in the latter. A lack of 
lubrication or incorrect meshing of the 
gears are two other prolific causes of 
speedometer troubles. 



A MATTER OF VALVES 

That bucking effect that occurs when 
picking up speed from, say, twelve or 
fifteen miles an hour in high gear, ver\ 
rareh has an\thing to do with the condi- 
tion of the clutch or drive mechanism, 
points out the National Automobile Club. 
Nearly always it is a sign that the en- 
gine needs to be tuned up, from \ales to 
ignition. 



FAULKNER'S SIGNAL SERVICE 



Phone 4911 
2000 MAIN STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



TRADING CENTER 

Used Furniture and Appliance 
We Buy at Your Price 



Hills Flat Public Market 

THE COMPLETE FOOD MARKET 



GRASS VALLEY 



412 east main street 

californ:a 



Grass Valley Laundry & Dry 
Cleaners 

FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE 



O'REILLY TAVERN & CAFE 

For the Best Always in Good Food & Drinks! 
Stop In & Say Hello — Jim O'Reilly Your Host 

106 E. MAIN STREET 
~."^ASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Grass Valley Meat Company 

WHOLESALE MEAT PACKERS 
State Plant No. 367 

Phones: 976 or 428-R. After S P.M. 727 
P. O. BOX 92 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



MATSON LUMBER COMPANY 

SERVING THE BUILDER 

Phone 1320 
P. O. Box 960 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



RAY 



PHIL 



Crenshaw Sporting Goods 

AND FIXIT SHOP 

Gunsmith - Locksmith - Saw Filing - Cyclery 

Guns Sold and Repaired and Traded 

All Makes and Models 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY DRUG 



Purity — Accuracy — Dependability 



iption Specialists — Cosmetii 
Veterinary Supplies 



Telepho 

GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



Dealers in Builders' Supplies 

T & M CARPENTER SHOP 



Telephone 2292 

55 NORTH UNION STREET 

SUSANVILLE CALIFORNIA 



RANCHITO MARKET 

444« Brooklyn Ave. 

and 

LA PLAYA 

REAL MEXICAN FOOD — FOUNTAIN 

Ave. 

CAUFORNIA 



YUBA RIVER LUMBER CO.. INC. 

Everything for the Builder 
Redwood - Sugar and Ponderosa - Douglas Fir 



Sugar and Po 
White Fir 



Phone 489 
GRASS VALLEY 



Ceda 



Rt. 1, Box 478 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



HOTEL GOLDEN 

MIXED DRINKS 

Marie Painter 

102 Richardson St. Phone G. V. 156 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL GOLDEN CAFE 

Finest American & Chinese Foods 
Steaks - Chops & Fried Chicken - Chop Suey 

Chong Jick, Prop. — Restful Atmosphere 
Hotel Golden Phone 156 102 Richardson 

GrtASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

W. W. ESTERLY 

Organization Realtors — Investments 



Real Estate — Ins 

Nevada City Hwy. 
GRASS VALLEY 

Branch Office, Downie 



Phone 223 
CALIFORNIA 
- Phone 62-R 



THE HARMONY SHOP 

'ianos - Radios & Band Instruments 

and Used "Everything in Music" 

Charles L. Strohm 

Phone 61 
CALIFORNIA 

GRASS VALLEY GLASS CO. 

Plate - Window - Automotive - Glass Mirrors 
Resilvering - Steel Sash - Shower Doors 

124 Colfax Ave. Phone 70-M 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



IN GRASS VALLEY IT'S 

MONTY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Always Friendly, Comfortable 

133 NEAL STREET Phone 508 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

Grass Valley Liquor Store 

Open 9 A.M. to 12 M Seven Days a Week 

We Deliver Ross Boswell, Prop. 

Phone 128 156 MILL STREET 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

DAVID MALTMAN 

REALTOR 

INSURANCE - APPRAISALS — RENTALS 

129 MILL STREET Phone 168 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

CHUCK'S TELEVISION 

SALES - SERVICE - INSTALLATION 
Charles B. Hillier, Electronic Service Engineer 
101 MILL STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 883 

GRASS VALLEY 



STEELE SUPPLY COMPANY 

"Steele Supply — The Place to Buy" 

Mil Supplies - Appliances - Hardware - Paints 

Sporting Goods Rod Bost, President 



Builders & Consumers Lumber Co. 

Retail Yard - Planing Mill - Sawmill 

On Grass Valley-Nevada City Highway 

Largest Stock in Nevada County 

In the Center of the Gold District 

P. O. Address: Route No. 1, Box 452-B 
Phone 1050 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



SPRING HILL PLANING MILL 

RT. I, Box 88-B 
NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



TOO LATE FOR LUNCH 

It was Tuesday, June 2, 1953. Coro- 
nation day, in case anyone remembers. 
In faraway London the thunder of guns 
and pealing of bells proclaimed to mil- 
lions of massed Englishmen that Eliza- 
beth II had formally ascended to the 
British throne. A day of rejoicing in Eng- 
land . . . and a day when millions of 
American housewives huddled around 
television sets and saw for the first time 
the age old ceremony. 

Marybelle McGuire might have been 
among them had she been present. The 
coronation was a page from history 
which the kindly, intelligent housewife 
might not have been inclined to miss if 
possible. But fate had other plans for the 
attractive thirty-nine year old woman 
that day. 

Lowell McGuire was aware of the big 
event which was taking place half-way 
around the world, but it was insignificant 
in the mind of a nine-year old boy. He 
whistled discordantly as he followed an 
erratic course along the sun soaked hill- 
side toward the rambling home on Vista 
Drive in San Carlos, California, where 
lunch should have been waiting. The 
warm spring weather which came to the 
San Francisco peninsula so reluctantly 
in 1953 had arrived with a flourish. 
There are a lot of things a fellow can do 
when the sun is shining and young Mc- 
Guire was thinking about all of them as 
he made his way from the Britton Acres 
School to his home and midday meal. He 
had no way of knowing that lunch would 
be a little late that day. 

Death, not lunch, was waiting at the 
dining room table. 

Lowell McGuire skipped through the 
open gate, darted across the well trim- 
med lawn, and opened the front door. 

"I'm here. Mom. What's for lunch?" 

No answer. 

"Hey, Mom. Where are you?" 

Still no answer. 

Lowell frowned and moved through 
the living room toward the rear of the 
house. "What's going on, Mom? I've 
got to eat and go back to school." 

The youngster entered the dining 
room, still calling. The McGuire house 
was a large one. His mother could be 
ani,rvvhere. Crossing the threshold he 
caught sight of the flash of color beneath 
the dining room table. A bright red 
blouse, black skirt, and stark, white flesh. 

"Hey, Mom, what are you doing down 
there ?" 

Mrs. McGuire did not reply. Not a 
muscle moved. 

"Mom!" 



Mountain Chevrolet Company 

SALES AND SERVICE 

"The Mother Lode's Finest Automotive Service" 

Big Car Quality at Lowest Cost! 

Raddue Building — Telephone 1130 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

Grass Valley Map & Blue Print Co. 

DRAFTING AND BLUE PRINTING 
Architects and Engineers Supplies 

Duplication of all Kinds 

A. E. James, Prop. Phone 148 

Raddue Building GRASS VALLEY, CALIF. 

T. H. McGUIRE & SON 

CIVIL ENGINEERS - SURVEYORS 

Office Telephone 148 

CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

ROARK REALTY 

GOOD BUYS IN REAL ESTATE 

Phone 922 

306 W. MAIN STREET 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

"TABE BISHOP" 

'76- UNION OIL PRODUCTS '76' 
Expert Lubrication and Accessories 



Marion Wood — Diesel Service 

Complete Diesel & Automotiv 



TERMINAL GARAGE 

GRASS VALLE'l' CALIFORNIA 

J. A. BROWN— INSURANCE 

COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICE 

Phones: 1082 - 2-F-6 

111 SO. AUBURN STREET 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

BERT BURNS & CO. 

For the Outstanding Realty Deals! 
Consult Bert Brown 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



ENOKSEN ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 



147 Auburn St. 

lASS VALLEY 



Phone 733 

CALIFORNIA 



J & F SIGNAL SERVICE 



161 SO. AUBURN STREET 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Gold Nugget Inn 

Bancjuets — Dancing — Cocktails 
Bar Open 3 P.M. Tues. thru Sun. 
Dining Room Open 5 P.M. Except 

Sundays and Holidays 
Open at 4 P.M. — Closed Mondays 

Full Dinners until 10:30 p.m. 
Ala Carte Orders until 1 :30 a.m. 

Phone Grass Valley 885 
Midway Grass Valley and 

Nevada City HiWay 
GRASS VALLEY, CALIF. 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



WILEY MOTORS 

OLDSMOBILE SALES & SERVICE 

Complete Automotive Repairing 

Body and Paint Shop 

Hills Flat Phone G. V. 1218 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

Weisbrod's Awning & Canvas Wks. 

Ron-Del Folding Aluminum — Coverings of all 

Kinds — Lawn Furniture — Seat Covers 
Auto Tops — Truck Cushions — Rebuilt, Covered 
Phone G. V. 967 P.O. Box 659 Hills Flat 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

Becker's Liquor & Sporting Goods 

Complete Line of Guns, Ammunition & Sporting 
Goods — Full Line Fine Liquors, Wines, Beers 



Phone 1345- J 

CRASS VALLEY 



408 E. MAIN STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



Grass Valley Auto Parts, Inc. 

Largest Stock — Most Prompt Service! 
Call Us — Telephone 1329 
121 EAST MAIN STREET 

dASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

JOHNSON'S APPLIANCES 

Frigidaire Sales and Service 



Phone 1103 

GRASS VALLEY 



120 E. MAIN STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



HELBACH MOTORS 

SALES — FORD — SERVICE 

C. A. (Gus) Helbach, Manager 

Phone 400 Hills Flat 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

CENTRAL MOTOR CO. 



HILLS FLAT 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



ELKINS 
SAWMILL 

• 

Incense Cedar 

• 

Anderson, Calif. 



MORRISON & 

JACKSON 
LUMBER CO. 



Meyers Flat, 
California 



Silence, after the echoes had subsided. 
"MOM!" 

Then he saw the darker red. The deep 
cardinal fluid which formed a sticky pool 
beneath his mother's prostrate body. The 
boy's voice dropped to a bewildered 
half whimper. "Are you hurt, Mom?" 

Mrs. McGuire could not tell him that 
she was beyond pain. The boy pleaded. 
"Please, Mom, say something. Tell me 
what happened. " 

1 he continuing lack of response con- 
vinced him. Thoroughly frightened and 
pale with shock he stumbled across the 
room to the telephone and dialed the 
operator. 

"My name is Lowell McGuire and I 
live at 557 'Vista Drive," he reported. 
"Something's wrong with my mother." 

"What is the nature of the trouble?" 
the operator inquired. 

"I don't know," the boy answered. 
"Something's wrong. She's bleeding and 
awfully quiet. She won't talk to me. I 
don't know what's the matter with her." 

The operator routed the call to the 
San Mateo County Sheriff's oflSce who 
notified the San Carlos Police Depart- 
ment after hearing the boy's story. 

Young McGuire had sought the assist- 
ance of neighbors by the time Sergeant 
James Edling of the San Carlos Police 
Department arrived. A small knot of 
them had gathered outside the McGuire 
house. 

"Mother's inside," the boy reported. 
"I don't know what is the matter with 
her." He gestured toward the house. 
Sergeant Edling entered alone, and found 
his way to the dining room. One look at 
the woman on the floor told him she was 
beyond assistance. 

Marybelle McGuire lay on her back 
on the edge of the rug, staring sightlessly 
at the ceiling. A dark splotch on her 
blouse told of an injury to the abdomen 
and the partially dried puddle of blood 
on the floor and rug indicated she had 
bled heavily before dying. Edling looked 
around the room. 

The chair on which Mrs. McGuire 
had evidently been sitting was wedged 
between the table and the wall. Another 
chair, directly across the table from the 
woman, was lightly askew. Edling in- 
spected the floor around the second chair. 
Two tiny brass shell cases gleamed 
brightly on the living room rug. The ser- 
geant found the telephone and dialed 
Chief of Police George Seely. 

"You had better come out to 557 Vista 
Drive," he told his superior. "Ben Mc- 
Guire's wife is dead. It looks like she 
has been murdered." 



BEST WISHES FROM 

INTER-COUNTY TITLE CO. 



NEVADA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

"TEN TO ONE" CLUB 

Tom Walsh, Prop. 



NEVADA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



CHARLES USED FURNITURE 

New & Used Furniture — We Buy, Sell & Trade 

Phone 602-W 

Midway Grass Valley & Nevada City 

G. V. - N. C. HWY. 

GLENBROOK HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

GRASS VALLEY FLORAL CO. 

FLOWERS OF DISTINCTION 

Phones: G. V. 1141 — N. C. Enterprise 10679 

Nevada City Highway at Glenbrook 

P.O. BOX 1021 Bob Kerr 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

FRANKLIN'S 

Used Merchandise of All Kinds - Also Antiques 

Mr. & Mrs. Oscar Franklin, Props. 

Telephone Nevada City 579W 

On Grass Valley - Nevada City Hiway 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

ANEY REAL ESTATE OFFICE 



Rai 



operty i 



I Nevad; 
.-..fi, - Recreati 
M. C. Aney 
Resorts - Lu 
Office: Nationa 



...„>=, ...B - Mi 
il Hotel Bldg. 



id Sie..,. <.uu..iies 
■ Fishing - Hunting 

Al Merrill 

ning — Phone 122 
Nevada City 



G & H Prescription Pharmacy 

Nevada City's Leading Druggists 

221 Broad Phone 80 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Cheney California 
Lumber Company 

Manufacturers & Exporters 
Pacific Coast Forest Products 

Offices: 

Tacoma, Washington 

Greenville, Plumas County, 

California 



PICKERING 
LUMBER CORP. 

PONDEROSA PINE 

SUGAR PINE 

WHITE PINE 

INCENSE CEDAR 

Standard, Calif. 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PKACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Blagen Lumber 
Company 

Pouderosa Pi>ie - Douglas Fir 

Sugar Pine - White Fir 

Incense Cedar 

WHITE PINES, CALIF. 



Blair Brothers 
Lumber Company 

Phone 990 

Operating Address 

Pacific, Calif. 

PLACERVILLE, CALIF. 



W. D. MILLER 
LUMBER CORP. 



Douglas Fir 

Sugar Fine 

Fonderosa Fine 



ETNA 
CALIFORNIA 



Chief Seely arrived at the McGuire 
home in a matter of minutes. Edling 
greeted him at the door. 

"Where is she?" the chief inquired. 

"In the dining room. Apparently she 
bled pretty heavily from a wound in the 
abdomen before she died. From her ap- 
pearance 1 would say most of the blood 
is drained from her. The kid had the best 
description for it. He said she was white 
as a bone." 

"What makes you think it's murder?" 

"Directly across the dining room table 
from her there are a couple of shell cases. 
Twenty-two caliber," Edling replied. 
"And a dining room chair is slightly 
ajar, as though someone had been sitting 
directly opposite her just before she fell. " 

Chief Seely looked the dining room 
over carefully. He studied the shell cases, 
then turned his attention to the rest of 
the room. A tiny mark on the wall di- 
rectly behind Mrs. McGuire's overturn- 
ed chair held his interest. He moved 
around the table and examined it, then 
turned to Edling. 

"Someone sitting in that chair shot 
her all right," he said. "He missed with 
one of those two shots. Ihe bullet is in 
the wall there. There's one thing about 
this that worries me though. This room 
is too orderly. The only thing that is out 
of place is that one chair where the vic- 
tim was sitting. The other one is just 
pushed back as though someone got up 
from the table and walked away. Now 
how do you account for that?" 

Edling shrugged. "There's only one 
explanation as far as I can see. " 

The chief nodded. "Whoever it was 
knew Mrs. McGuire well. She didn't 
expect any rough stuff." He paused. I've 
called the District Attorney's office. 
Adolph Fernandez is coming over to 
help with the investigation. Don't move 
anything until he gets here." The chief 
sighed. "Now I've got an unpleasant 
task in front of me." 

Bennett McGuire, a well built, ath- 
letic man in the early thirties, was in the 
gymnasium when a student approached 
him with the message. "Someone wants 
to talk to you on the telephone, Coach," 
he reported. "It must be important." 

All the way to the telephone McGuire 
tried to tell himself it was foolish. A lot 
of people got called to the telephone 
every day. ^Vhy worry? But the basket- 
ball coach was worried. By the time he 
reached the telephone he was bathed in 
perspiration which was not the result of 
exertion. A hard knot gathered in his 
stomach. It churned with nausea. His 
hands trembled as he picked up the in- 
strument. 



S. C. LINEBAUGH 
Logging 



Sugar Fine 

Fonderosa Fine 

Douglas Fir 

Western Red Cedar 



WHITE PINES, 
CALIFORNIA 



RALPH L. SMITH 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 



Douglas Fir 

Sugar Fine 

Fonderosa Fine 

White Fir - Cedar 



ANDERSON 
CALIFORNIA 



February. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Forrest Airington, Realtor 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
Homes - Ranches - Income Property - Acerage 

Office Ph. 1109 Partridge Hotel 

CtASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

Also "Town Talk" — Ph. N.C. 137, Nevada City 



Eagle's Nest Restaurant 

Famous Chinese & American Dinners 
Steaks — Chops — Sea Foods 

Corner Ninth and B 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC DOLLAR STORE 

High Grade Merchandise For Your Dollar 

157 MILL STREET 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

MARQUIS OLIVE FAIR 

OLIVES — OLIVE OIL — HONEY 
DATES — FIGS 

"The Tourists' Rest Stop" 

HIGHWAY 99W 

CORNING CAUFORNIA 



CHUNG SUN GROCERY CO. 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
FREE DELIVERY 

CORNER SEVENTH & MAIN STREETS 
COLUSA CALIFORNIA 



BUCKE'S 
MARKET 

GROCERIES MEATS 
VEGETABLES 
Feed and Grain 

ORLAND, CALIF. 



Open 24 Hours Every Day 

SPECK'S CAFE 

Fountain Service 

Complete Dinners 

Short Orders 

We Specialize in Homemade 

Chicken Pies 

HIGHWAY 99-W 
ORLAND, CALIF. 



"This is McGuire speaking," he said 
in as calm a voice as possible. 

"Ben, this is Chief Seely," the official 
reported. "Can you come out to your 
house right away?" 

"Sure, Chief. But what's the matter? 
\Vhat's happened ?" 

"I think I had better tell you when 
you get here, Ben." 

"I'll be right there," McGuire prom- 
ised. He hung up the phone, staring 
blankly at the other side of the room. 
"She's dead," he told himself. Marybelle 
is dead," he repeated. And all the way 
from San Mateo High School to San 
Carlos he tried to talk himself out of the 
idea. But it was no use. His wife was 
dead. He was sure of it. 

Inspector Adolph Fernandez, investi- 
gator for the San Mateo County Dis- 
trict Attorney's office, found a scene of 
controlled confusion at the McGuire 
home when he arrived there in response 
to Chief Seely's call. Policemen whom 
Seely had stationed about the property 
kept inquisitive children from darting 
past the boundaries and peering in the 
windows. At the driveway a little girl 
stood talking to one of the officers. 

"But I'm Marilyn McGuire," she 
said. "I live here. My mother expects 
me for lunch." 

The officer turned bewildered eyes on 
Fernandez and shook his head. Fernan- 
dez nodded and knelt beside the child. 

"Your mother is too busy for lunch 
right now, Marilyn," he explained. "She 
wants you to go visiting for a while. Do 
you see anyone here you would like to 
visit?" 

A young woman stepped forward. 
"She can visit with me. Would you like 
that, Marilyn?" 

The little girl nodded doubtfully and 
was led away by the neighbor. Fernandez 
turned to the officer. "Is the mother 
dead?" 

Fhe policeman nodded. "Looks like 
she was shot. They're waiting for you." 
Fernandez was greeted by Chief Seely 
at the door. 1 he policeman showed him 
the scene, including the two shell cases 
and the bullet mark in the wall. Fernan- 
dez focused his attention on a second 
wall mark, then went back to where the 
shall cases were lying. A third cartridge 
case was almost hidden by the chair leg. 
He glanced at the woman's still form 
curiously. 

"No sign of a struggle, "^'et this fel- 
low shot three times. The woman looks 
perfectly calm. The only thing that is 
out of place is her apron and that ap- 
parently fell to one side when she keeled 
over. Strange." 



DIGG'S RADIO SHOP 

NEW & USED ELECTRICAL APPUANCES 
SALES AND SERVICE 



HI WAY MARKET 

GROCERIES — MEATS — NOTIONS 

WINE — BEER 

Open Evenings and Sundays 

Phone 167 North on 99W 

ORLAND CALIFORNIA 



VASEY BROS. 

HOME-OWNED STORE 



CALIFORNIA 



DURANGO'S CAFE 

627 MAIN STREET 
COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

ORCHARD INN AND MOTEL 

Frank and Bonnie Waddell 

Telephone 4I9-Y-2 
CORNING CALIFORNIA 



R. L. Donaldson 

LIVESTOCK 
TRANSPORTATION 

Rt. 2, BOX 281 
Phone 178-M 

Orland, California 



Ram Trucking 

Company 

and 

Jim Boyd Crane 

Service 

Coalinga, Calif. 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



THE OASIS 

Mrs. A. Dreith, Owner 

COCKTAILS — GOOD FOOD 

SUISUN CALIFORNIA 

AIRLINE CAFE 

THE BEST FOOD IN TOWN 
Quality and Service 

Eugenia Andronis — Frank Andronis 

844 TEXAS STREET 
FAIRFIELD CALIFORNIA 



PALACE GRILL 



Gregory Balto 



Theodore Audala 



GENOVA MARKET 

D. Moretti, Prop. 
DOMESTIC & IMPORTED GROCERIES 
Fruits — Vegetables — Beer and Wine 



CALIFORNIA 



JACK'S PLACE 

EDNA MOORE 



CALIFORNIA 



THE ORLANDO LOUNGE 

PHONE 71 

402 WALKER STREET 

ORLAND CALIFORNIA 

LOUIS CAIRO'S CLUB WILSON 

Featuring the 
ROUND UP DINING ROOM 

Charcoal Broiled Steaks — Italian D 
HIWAYS 99W AND 20 



WILLIAMS 



CALIFORNIA 



COUNTRY CLUB 

Dinners and Short Orders 
COCKTAILS 

Phone 182-W 
Winters, California 



"\ ou can say that again," Seely told 
him. 

"Any sign of forceful entry?" 

"We checked the doors and windows. 
If they were forced the guy was either 
good or lucky. There's not a jimmy mark 
on them." 

Fernandez frowned. "And she's per- 
fectly calm. As though she didn't believe 
the person would really shoot until she 
was dying. What do you make of it?" 

"Just that. She didn't believe the kill- 
er would shoot. She knew the person." 

"That's about it," the inspector agreed. 
"How about the rest of the house? Have 
you checked it?" 

Vhe chief nodded. "Everything is ship- 
shape. All except one room. And it does 
not make any sense. I'll show it to you." 

He led Fernandez to the second story 
and into a small room at the rear of the 
house. It was obviously a little girl's 
bedroom and it had been thoroughly ran- 
sacked. Drawers, most of them empty, 
hung wide open, the closet door was 
ajar, and even the mattress appeared to 
have been lifted from its original position 
on the bed. 

"\Vhy?" Fernandez asked. "AVhy 
would the killer loot this room and only 
this room?" 

"Apparently he knew what he wanted 
would be here and only here," Seely de- 
clared. "It bears out the theory that he 
must have known the family." 

A tour through the rest of the house 
revealed that nothing else had been dis- 
turbed. Fernandez looked over the rooms 
occupied by the McGuire children and 
their parents. 

"Two little girls and the boy," he 
commented. "I wonder where the other 
girl is?" 

"She's not the McGuire's child," Seely 
told him. She's a ward of theirs. A dis- 
tant relative, I understand. She's in a 
hospital now receiving some sort of psy- 
chiatric treatment. Apparently she led a 
pretty unhappy childhood until she came 
here." 

"Maybe McGuire can help solve this 
riddle," Fernandez said. "He must have 
some idea who the killer is." 

While Fernandez photographed the 
death scene and the ransacked room, 
Seely interviewed Lowell McGuire who 
had regained his composure to a remark- 
able degree. Aside from revealing that 
the front door had been unlocked and 
slightly ajar when he entered the house 
the boy could add little to the officer's 
store of information. A short time later 
Bennett McGuire, pale faced and trem- 
bling, arrived. 



Walter Stoll Auto Supply Co. 

Automobile Parts — Equipment and Supplic 
Walter Stoll — Ernest StoU 



JOHN'S PLACE 

John Moreno, Prop. 

BEER — WINE — LIQUORS 

On and Off Sale 

255 E. COMMERCIAL ST. Phone 9989 

WILLITS CALIFORNIA 



Wilson Cafe and Cocktail Bar 

where Sportsmen Get Together 
On Highway 99W 



ARBUCKLE 



CALIFORNIA 



POOL'S TEXACO SERVICE 

MARFAX LUBRICATION— MOTOR TUNE-UF 

We Carry a Full Line of United Motor Service 

Parts 

TEHAMA AND OAK STREETS 

WILLOWS CALIFORNIA 

HIWAY CLUB 

John West, Owner 
FINE WINES — UQUORS — CLUB ROOM 



JOHN F. POUCH & SON 

PHARMACISTS 

73rd Year of Dependable Service 
WILLIAMS CAUFORNIA 

HUNTER'S INN 

Rooms 
Beer — Sandwiches — Coffee — Soft Drinks 
Shuffleboard 
Frank & Laura Vac 



Phone 9982 

280 COMMERCIAL STREET 

WILLITTS CALIFORNIA 



HOGAN'S GROCERY 

Groceries, Cold Meats and Beverages 
Wines and Beer 

Phone 17-W 

Nello and Paul Cacci, Props. 

RIO DELL CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL GROCERY STORE 

John Viegas, Prop. 

FRESH MEAT - FRUIT - VEGETABLES 
BEER AND WINE — FREE DEUVERY 

Phone 10 
O DELL CALIFORNIA 



GOODY CAFE 

EXCELLENT FOOD — COURTEOUS SERVICE 
FORTUNA (Humboldt County) CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



TREDE BROTHERS 

"THE HAPPY CORNER- 
BILLIARD PARLOR — CAFE 
FINE UQUORS — BAR 



Albert H. Trede 



RED BLUFF 



CALIFORNIA 



KENNETT DAM CAFE 

COMPLETE DINNERS — SHORT ORDERS 

HOME MADE PIES 

Open 24 Hours Every Day 

605 MAIN STREET 

RED BLUFF CALIFORNIA 



CHUCK WAGON CAFE 

GOOD FOOD — BEER & WINE 



AT CITY UMITS ON HIGHWAY 99-W 

RED BLUFF CALIFORNIA 



LOGAN LUMBER AND BUILDERS' 
SUPPLY 

J.D.Logan 

SOUTH RED BLUFF HIGHWAY 99W 

Phone 739-J 

ROUTE 2, BOX 2540 

RED BLUFF CALIFORNIA 



ROYAL 
HINKLE 



Lumber 
Hauling 



Rt. 1, Box 276 

RED BLUFF 

CALIFORNIA 



"Where is my wife?" he inquired 
without preliminaries. 

As gently as possible, Seely told him 
about the shooting. The former athlete 
sank to a chair in the living room. He 
stifled a sob and fought for control of 
his voice. 

"That's it, then," he said at last. "He 
finally got his revenge." 

Fernandez had entered the room and 
overheard the remark. 

"^Vho?" he demanded. "Who got his 
revenge?" 

"Arthur Herbert, her stepfather." 
McGuire sighed. "I told her he was dan- 
gerous." 

"Why would he want to kill your 
wife?" Fernandez demanded. 

"It's a long story," AIcGuire explain- 
ed. "It started more than a year ago 
when there was an explosion in Her- 
bert's Los Angeles apartment." 

The basketball coach explained that 
IVIrs. McGuire's mother had been one of 
five women who had married the man. 
She had married him in 1928 and eventu- 
ally he deserted her. Somehow he had 
remained in contact with his stepdaughter, 
Marybelle. 

A gas explosion in Herbert's apartment 
on January 21, 1952 injured him badly 
and he had sent his seven year old 
daughter, Jerrylann to Las Vegas to live 
with his half sister. 

Jerrylann had stayed there until it be- 
came apparent that the arrangement was 
not working out. There were three other 
small children in the house and the half 
sister's husband was invalided. At that 
point the McGuires, who had met each 
other while teaching at a school for han- 
dicapped and underprivileged children, 
offered to take the little girl. 

To satisfy California juvenile laws, 
Jerrylann was made a ward of the San 
Mateo County Juvenile Court on May 
7, 1952 and placed in the McGuire 
home. She appeared to be as happy there 
as she had ever been, but appeared in- 
capable of adjusting to a normal life. 

She was a pretty, blond child with an 
appealing personality. In spite of this she 
suffered from extreme despondency and 
self criticism which appeared to interfere 
with normal adjustment. She told the 
authorities she had been mixed up since 
the day she was born. 

On February 23, 1953 the child was 
sent to the Hillcrest Juvenile Hall for ob- 
servation. Although she expressed a desire 
to return to the McGuire home, she 
agreed to go to the Napa State Hospital 
Children's Clinic for further observation 
and assistance. 



OLD CROW CLUB AND 
COFFEE SHOP 

1523 CALIFORNIA STREET 

REDDING CALIFORNIA 

HESS BROS. - AUTO WRECKERS 

WE BUY AND SELL 

PHONE 1024 

ROUTE No. 4 

1 MILE N. HIGHWAY 99 

RED BLUFF CALIFORNIA 

MODERN CLEANERS 

"Your Wardrobe's Best Friend" 

Otto Seem, Owner 
Director, Calif. Dry Cleaners Ass'n 

Telephone 472 

609 WALNUT STREET 

RED BLUFF CALIFORNIA 

RIVERSIDE MOTEL 

By the Sacramento River Bridge 

SLEEP OFF THE HIGHWAY 

Quiet - Modem - Cooled - Heated - Kitchenettes 

Near Business Center — Charles Schoelen 

PHONE 466 



RED BLUFF 



CALIFORNIA 



B. E. 
BARRINGTON 



LIVESTOCK 
HANDLING 



Rt. 2, Box 2126 

RED BLUFF, 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



RAMONA PLACE 

LIQUORS — WINES — BEER 
MEXICAN DINNERS 

Manual Martorell. Manager 



1100 Center Street 
REDDING 



Phone 224 

CALIFORNIA 



OASIS BEER 


GARDEN 


MIXED 


DRINKS - 


- COCKTAILS 




GOOD FOOD 


"Whe 


re Good Fe 
Nick Bo 


Hows Meet" 




1443 Cali 


ornia 


REDDING 




CALIFORNIA 





Durable Plywood 
Company 

DOUGLAS FIR PLYWOOD 
LUMBER and VENEER 

Douglas Fir 
Sugar and Santa Rosa Pine 

CALPELLA, CALIFORNIA 



WILDWOOD 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 

Logging and Sawmill: 

Wildwood, Trinity Co., California 

Phone Wildwood 315 

Planning Mill and Main Office: 

Red Bluff, California 

Phone 1060 

Manufacturers of 

California Soft and Yellow 

Pine and Douglas Fir Lumber 

Mailing Address 

P. O. Box 472 

Red Bluff, California 



Meanwhile Herbert had become in- 
creasingly bitter toward the McGuires 
and had frequently demanded that the 
child be returned to him. 

"In view of the child's problems, past 
and present, we have refused his request," 
the juvenile court stated flatly. 

Herbert's resentment toward the Mc- 
Guires increased. Frequently during the 
early months of 1953 he accused them of 
injuring his daughter. Mrs. McGuire's 
protests that the treatment was for the 
child's own good and that she would re- 
turn to the McGuire home when her 
problems were solved only served to fur- 
ther enrage the man. Several times, be- 
fore that fatal June morning, he had 
threatened violence. 

"I wanted to call the authorities," 
McGuire explained. "Marybelle would 
not hear of it. She was the type of person 
who trusted and forgave everybody. This 
is her payment for that," he concluded 
bitterly. 

Seelv told him of the ransacked room 
upstairs. "Was that the little girl's 
room?" he inquired. 
McGuire nodded. 

"That makes Herbert our top sus- 
pect," Fernandez declared. "We had bet- 
ter get out a pickup order right away. " 
An all points bulletin was placed on 
both the teletype and police radio request- 
ing that Herbert be held for questioning. 
Five states were warned to be on the 
lookout for the suspected killer. 

Meanwhile autopsy surgeon Dr. Ar- 
thur Lack reported that Mrs. McGuire 
died of severe internal bleeding within 
a few minutes after the shooting. The 
bullet which caused death ripped through 
her abdomen and pierced her liver. A 
second bullet had grazed her neck and 
ricocheted around the room, and the 
third bullet missed entirely. All three 
bullets were turned over to ballistics 
experts for testing. 

June third and fourth passed with offi- 
cers in five states searching futilely for 
Herbert. No further developments were 
turned up in San Carlos. On June fifth 
the break came. 

Sergeant George Sewards of the Los 
Angeles County Sheriff's office was wear- 
ily winding up his shift when the be- 
spectacled, little man walked into the 
Firestone substation and asked to see 
I)eput\' Sheriff Ernest Foster. 

"He's not here," Sewards reported. 
"He'll be in at nine o'clock. Do you 
want to wait?" 

The visitor wavered, then shook his 
head. "No. I just thought I'd say hello." 
"Who shall I tell him called?" 



OEd Crow Club and Coffee Shop 

1523 CALIFORNIA 

REDDING CALIFORNIA 

OLNEY BAR 

MIXED DRINKS — COCKTAILS 
Margaret Bennett, Prop. 

1529 CALIFORNIA 

REDDING CALIFORNIA 

O'CONNOR 
BROTHERS 

General Contractors 

Phone 122 
Red Bluff, Calif. 



Red Bluff 
Moulding Company 

Robert L. Parker — Leslie 0. Cody 

• 

CALIFORNIA PONDEROSA & 

SUGAR PINE MOULDING 

Moulding Manufacturing 

• 

:^ MILES SOUTH OF RED 

BLUFF ON HIGH^^AY 99-\^ 

P. O. Box 149 
RED BLUFF. CALIFORNIA 



CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE 

We Will Gladly Furnish 
All Facts Concerning This 
Great Section of California 

RED BLUFF, CALIF. 



i-hruary. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



THE TROPICS 



2555 SOUTH MARKET 

REDDING CALIFORNIA 

Photographic Supply Co. 

CAMERA FILMS 

MOVIE PROJECTORS 

Sales — Rentals 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

1622 MARKET STREET 

REDDING CALIFORNIA 



DO YOU KNOW 

) oil can ^et these services thru 

Vogue Cleaners 

Clleaning and Dyeing - Tailoring 

\^'aterproofing and Hat Blocking 

Repairing and Remodeling 

Free Mothproofing 

Free Delivery — Phone 2521 

We Give S & H Green Stamps 

\(A "L" STREET 
CRESCENT CITY. CALIFORNIA 



JACK 
DICKINSON 



Lumber 
Transportation 



P. O. Box 1725 
Fhone 1544 
REDDING 

CALIFORNIA 



I. 



"Ne\er mind. It doesn't matter." The 
visitor turned and walked out. He was 
hardh' through the door when Sewards 
did a quick double take. He dashed out. 
The visitor was just a few feet away, 
about to step into his parked car. 

"Wait a minute," Sewards ordered. 

"\\'hat for?" the man asked. 

"''l ou're wanted for murder, that's 
what for." Sewards told him. "Come on 
into the station." 

Arthur Herbert docilely followed the 
sergeant into the station. During a sub- 
sequent search Sewards produced a for- 
eign make twenty-two caliber automatic 
from Herbert's coat pocket. 

The bullets and shell cases recovered 
from the murder scene were forwarded 
to Los Angeles by plane and Sheriff's 
ballistics expert George Lucy identified 
them as having come from Herbert's 
gun. 

Under questioning by Los Angeles 
Deputy Sheriff Floyd Rosenberg Her- 
bert refused to discuss the shooting, stat- 
ing only that he had been in the bay area 
on the preceding Sunday or Monday, 
rented a room and got drunk. He said 
he might have been in San Mateo, but 
couldn't be sure. 

Fhe suspect told a \ague story of 
driving to Napa to visit his daughter 
and said, "When I saw m\' girl I blowed 
my top." 

Rosenberg also discovered that Her- 
bert had been arraigned the preceding 
1 hursday on a bigamy charge. Herbert 
claimed to ha\e forgotten a Carson Cit\', 
Ne\ada, marriage following the apart- 
ment explosion. 

A. L. Lamport, chief investigator for 
the San Mateo County District Attor- 
ney's office flew to Los Angeles with 
Chief Seely to question the suspect. After 
talking to him and examining the evi- 
dence Lamport declared that he was con- 
\inced of Herbert's guilt. 

"His story is full of holes," Lamport 
reported. "He has no alibi and the gun 
is the clinching evidence. He can't get 
around those matching bullets." 

Herbert was charged with the murder 
of Mrs. Marybelle McGuire and found 
guilt) by a San Mateo County jury. He 
is serving a life sentence now. 



BROOKLYN-FORD MARKET 

4500 BROOKLYN AVENUE 
LOS ANGELES 22 CALIFORNIA 



MARIBEL GRILL 



CHICKEN - STEAKS AND CHOPS 
Delicious Home Made Pies 



"On Highway 101" 
WEOTT (Humboldt County) CALIFORNIA 



LEE'S CAFE 

Chisholm and Griffith, Props. 

WHERE THE WORKING MAN GETS 

A SQUARE DEAL 

Open 7:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M. 



214 E STREET 



CALIFORNIA 



Frantz & Wisler 
Trucking Company 

Modern Truck and Trailers 

Cargo Fully Insured 

General Trucking Our 

Specialty 

LUMBER HAULING 

805 - 7th St. Hillside 2-3459 
EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



UNITED STATES 
PLYWOOD 
COMPANY 



Douglas Fir - Sugar Pine 

Ponderosa Pine 

Incense Cedar 

White Fir 



Box 1688— Redding, Calif. 
Operations: Anderson, Calif. 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



TERESA'S LUNCH 

Beer — Wine — Liquors 
GOOD FOOD 



ODORLESS CLEANERS 



DIAMOND HORSESHOE GRILL 

Dan Chism, Prop. 

STEAKS AND SEA FOODS 

9SS SECOND STREET 
CRESCENT CITY CALIFORNIA 



R & R TRAILER PARK 

ONE MILE NORTH OF CRESCENT CITY 
All New and Modem — "55 Spaces" 

"On Highway 101" 

Phone 4462 

CRESCENT CITY CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL YUBA 

CLEAN ROOMS — GOOD BEDS 

1423 YUBA STREET 

REDDING CALIFORNIA 



THE PACIFIC 
LUMBER CO. 

Palco Products 

INSULATION 

PRESTO-LOGS 

LUMBER 

Wholesale and Retail 

• 

Mills and Yard at 

Scotia and Eureka 
California 



SPEAKING OF POLICEMEN 

To speak intelligently of a police offi- 
cer, as such, we must first consider what 
is expected of him. 

Well, like a ball player, he must be a 
man of correct and hasty thought and 
action, for his errors are charged against 
him — and may even prove fatal. 

He must be a man of tact and diplo- 
macy, one who can assert authority with 
poise, dignity, and a sense of justice. 

Like an actor on the stage, he must 
be able to step into any situation, and, 
by his personality, assume entire com- 
mand. 

By his every act he must be able to 
bring about in the general public a feel- 
ing of respect for his department ; and 
personally be looked up to as a guardian 
of the peace, and a protector of the lives, 
homes, and property of decent people. 

On battle fronts courage is a must ; 
but retreat is sometimes commendable. 
The creed of the police officer is differ- 
ent ; for him there is no retreat — he must 
get his man. 

I have just finished reading a most in- 
teresting article on the police officer as a 
man, a unit, an individual. 

The writer took each letter of the al- 
phabet, in order for the twenty-six para- 
graphs of his summary on the required 
qualifications of a worthwhile police offi- 
cer. 

With the letter A he set down "alert," 
with a short explanation. Then followed 
B, for "bravery," C, for "caution," D, 
for "decision", and so on, down to Z, for 
"zeal." 

I read the piece a couple of times, and 
felt, as I have on many occasions, that 
none of us humans are pioneers with an 
idea. Yes, that man took the words right 
out of my mouth — words that I could 
have heartedly uttered so many times 
since fate has had me work side by side 
with police officers. 

Day in and day out, for many years, 
I have had a ringside seat on police offi- 
cers at work, in every phase of their 
never ending routine. I have watched 
their efforts, and learned the underlying 
reasons of their successes as well as their 
truly heartbreaking failures. 

I have come to definitely realize that 
the man wearing a police star is just a 
lone individual, sailing a more or less 
treacherous course, from the moment he 
takes the oath of office. 

The police rookie must definitely be 
the man for the job. To state the case 
bluntly, I admit I thoroughly agree with 
my colleagues, whom I have heard say 
so in so many different words: A police 
department should be hard to join and 
mighty easy to leave. 



THE FIREPLACE 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

BEER and SANDWICHES 

C. E. and S. L. McAlister 



CALIFORNIA 



VOLPI'S CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
5 MUes South of Eureka on "101" 
One Mile North of Fields Landing 

ERNEST BURGER 

Groceries — Meats — Vegetables 

BEER, WINES and UQUOR 

Phone 2-1215 

CALIFORNIA AND HARRIS STREETS 

EUREKA CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS 

CHARLES Mcdonough 

CIGAR STORE 



MILES . 



EUREKA'S FLORIST 



Phone HI 2-6455 — Night Phone HI 2-2295 

GROSS BUILDING 

517 FIFTH STREET 

EUREKA CALIFORNIA 



STOP AT 

ED'S FRIENDLY CLUB 

FOR COCKTAILS 



PEPPERWOOD 



CALIFORNIA 



THE ORICK CLUB 

Martha and Smitty 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE — CAFE 
PACKAGE GOODS 



CALIFORNIA 



Davis & Brede 
Timber Company 

REDWOOD FIR 
HEMLOCK — SPRUCE 

934 H. Street 

Phone 1029 

ARCATA, CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



SPADONI'S 
GROCERY AND GAS STATION 

WINES— LIQUORS 

Phone 2-9S23 2200 FOURTH STREET 

EUREKA CALIFORNIA 



CLASS A CAFE 

ITALIAN AND AMERICAN DISHES 
BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



219 Second Street 



CALIFORNIA 



PAT AND AILI'S 

THE FRIENDLY PLACE TO EAT & DRINK 

207 THIRD STREET 

(Humboldt County) 

EUREKA CALIFORNIA 



PIERCE MORTUARY 

Ernest G. McWhinney and R. Chalmers Crichton 

Phone Hillside 2-37S1 

707 H STREET 

EUREKA CALIFORNIA 



SPEED KILLS 



TAKE IT EASY 



( 

1 

D 


U R A B 


L 


E 


P 


L Y W O 


O 


D 


C 


O M P A 


N 


Y 




DOUGLAS FIR 






Mills at 








Arcata and Uriah 






California 







The police officer is a man whose occu- 
pation is most difficult to define. 

He is thought of as one of a group; 
but he isn't — not as a mechanic or a 
longshoreman, a letter carrier, a sailor 
or a soldier are correctly considered. 
These groups have definite, supervised 
duties to perform, but the police officer 
stands at the bat to take the pitches as 
they come. 

On duty — and oH duty — he is defi- 
nitely on his own. Yes, he is a one-man 
army, with no reserves and no place to 
retreat to. 

The uniform does not make the police 
officer even though he secures it through 
civil service rating or otherwise. If he is 
a misfit police officer he is a most expen- 
sive civic nuisance. 

A police officer is always on parade — 
casual scrutiny by juveniles and voters 
a never ending object of much more than 
alike. Even his home life is much more 
a matter of check and double check, and 
gossip and more gossip, than that of the 
butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker, 
or even the mayor. 

People know all about his social con- 
nections and can name his relatives, his 
doctor and his grocer. They also know 
his hobbies and how much he owes on his 
house and his car. 

So, being, as it were, a marked man, 
he must indeed be a sterling citizen to be 
able to play the part of The Village 
Blacksmith, and — "look the whole world 
in the face and fear not any man." 

How can such a man be secured for 
a police department ? 

The problem is not at all simple. It 
demands time and care on the part of 
the selectors. They must first look 
thoroughly into each applicant's record. 
Of course, they must realize that a police 
officer need not be a superman. But they 
must not for a moment lose track of the 
fact that it takes a lot of worthwhile 
consideration to have the proper man fill 
a police uniform. 

Physical and mental standards of a 
high grade are very desirable of course, 
but the problem for the small group of 
selectors is to find the man, the personal- 
ity for the job. 

Police service is rendered by individual 
policement on a person-to-person basis, 
thus the quality of service is determined 
by the individual men who provide it. A 
police officer lacking in personal quali- 
fications is certain to give poor service 
and bring criticism and possible discredit 
on the entire department. 

High standards of physical and aca- 
demic and technical ratings, as deter- 
mined by civil service examiners, rate 



SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 

■ "ON THE REDWOOD HIGHWAY" 

Donald H. Smith, Prop. 
FORTUNA CALIFORNIA 

7-11 CLUB 

Roy Engstrom 

711 S. STATE STREET 
UKIAH CALIFORNIA 

UKIAH AUTO WRECKERS 

New & Used Parts 

WRECKING SERVICE 

24 HOUR SERVICE 

Open 7 Days 

Phone 70SM 

HI WAY 1 01 NORTH 

UKIAH CALIFORNIA 

UKIAH SAW AND KNIFE WORKS 

Band Saw, Circular Saw, Knife Grinding 
Hammering and Welding 

Phone 1098 W 
270 EAST SMITH STREET 

UKIAH CALIFORNIA 



BOLLMAN & 
BROWN 

Contract Loggers 

Phone 74 
Garberville, Calif. 



Into Wirta 
Logging Company 

• 

CONTRACT 
LOGGING 

• 

Phone 0213 

GARBERVILLE, 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Warm Air Heating Air Conditioning 

MORK SHEET METAL WORKS 

Gutters — Down Spouts — Patent Chimneys 

& General Sheet Metal Work 

Phone 1491 

125 FORD STREET 

UKIAH CALIFORNIA 

Radiant Heat Hotpoint Appliances 

UKIAH ELECTRIC CO. 

LICENSED CONTRACTORS 

Telephone 1238-W 

268 E. SMITH STREET 

W. P. Kirkpatrick Jack Riggs 



PALACE OF THE PAST 

BEYOND DESCRIPTION 

"Highway 101" 

(Humboldt County) 

MEYERS FLAT CALIFORNIA 

FOREST CLUB 

Where All Sportsmen Meet 
Cocktails and Select Foods 

239 No. STATE STREET 

UKIAH CALIFORNIA 

Pease Conservatory of Music 

PIANO — VOICE — ORGAN AND THEORY 

Phone GI 3-7038 

2130 L STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Orchard Motel 

Modern Units with Kitchens 

on "The Famous Redwood 
Highway" 

Reservations Phone 407R 

1050 South State Street 
UKIAH, CALIFORNIA 



PICKERING 
LUMBER CORP. 

Sugar Pine - White Fir 
PoNDEROSA Pine 



STANDARD, CALIF. 



about equal and first in the selection of 
rookie policemen. 

The rookie gets a uniform. But, has 
this man inside the uniform the heart to 
go with it ? That is the great problem 
the civil service tests leave unsolved. 

There is always a way to solve human 
problems when we apply common sense. 

For our bird dogs, our race horses, and 
our live stock we carefully consider pedi- 
gree as well as present appearance. The 
burning eloquence of our daughter, or 
the best presentment of an automobile 
salesman, will not quickly sway us in the 
acceptance of a prospective son-in-law or 
a marvelous looking used car. In such in- 
stances we do make haste slowly. 

The would-be rookie wants a uniform. 
Naturally, he has already found he has 
the physical qualifications ; and has also 
done some special preparation to insure 
his acceptance. 

The prime duty of the police head 
is now to get personally acquainted with 
his prospective employee — to meet him 
face-to-face, for a brief interview. This 
interview he will conclude by handing 
the applicant a long list of questions to 
be carefully answered at home and then 
mailed to the police head. 

An application blank such as is used 
by the larger public utility corporations 
will serve as a model for this question- 
naire. Of course, many additional ques- 
tions could be added, such as: 

1. Schools attended — dates to be given, 
also names of teachers and reasons for 
leaving school ; 

2. Jobs held — dates to be given, also 
names of employers, and reasons for 
quitting or being dismissed ; 

3. U. S. Service — why, also account 
for court martial or reduction in rank ; 

4. Arrests — number of, and charges ; 

5. Divorced — why, and if paying ali- 
mony, or if taking care of parents or 
others ; 

6. Financial standing — paying on 
home, automobile or furniture, or out- 
standing debts ; 

7. Why applying for position as a 
police officer? 

Some people are adept at filling out 
such sets of questions. But, sometimes 
they prove to have very poor memories, 
and sometimes they are very careless in- 
deed as to the correctness of their answers. 

I'he returned questionnaire will give 
an excellent chance for some close check- 
ing. Through a careful perusal of it by 
you and each of the three or four citizens 
comprising your appraisement hoard ad- 
vance skeleton knowledge of the efforts 
of the candidate since he left school will 
be available. 



TEXACO SERVICE 

Motor Tune-up - Carburetion - Generator 

Starter - Voltage Regulator - Ignition Repair 

American Bosch Magneto Sales & Service 



L. H. FITCH & SONS 

Retail Dealers in Murphy Color Scheme Paints 

Window Glass - Wall Paper - Established 1890 

House Painters and Paper Hangers 



PRESSWOOD GRILL 

"Where Friends Meet" 
Thelma Battrell 

Phone SS2-W 
HIGHWAY 101 NORTH 

UKIAH CALIFORNIA 

UKIAH TRADING POST 

Charles Thompson, Prop. 
We Buy, Sell or Trade Everything 



CALIFORNIA 



Star Trailer Park 
Sales and Parts 

Mr. & Mrs. C. H. Baughn, Props. 



Ultra-Modern Tiled Showers 
and Heated Rest Roms 



ON 101 HIGHWAY 

One Mile North of Ukiah 

UKIAH, CALIFORNIA 



A. A. DIMMICK 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 

• 
Garberville, 

California 



i 



February. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



JACK'S CHEVRON SERVICE 

DEPENDABLE LUBRICATION SERVICE 
Tires — Batteries — Accessories 



805 Market Street 

CALIFORNIA 



CHUNG SUN GROCERY CO. 

Fruits & Vegetables — American Chinese Store 

FREE DELIVERY 

Cor. 7th and Main Streets — Phone 175 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

TONY'S PLACE 

BEST BEER IN TOWN 

Hamburgers — Chili Beans 

Tony & Helen, Props. 

Phone 174-R 537 MAIN STREET 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

JACK'S PLACE 

BEER — WINE — LIQUORS 
On & Off Sale 



COLUSA 



521 MAIN STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



CUT RATE LIQUOR 

Quality Liquors — Wines — Beers 

"Where Your Patronage is Appreciated" 

118 - 5TH STREET 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES 

RIVERSIDE HOTEL 

AND PALM MOTEL 

Commercial & Tourists Headquarters 

Tavern — Coffee Shop — L. S. Currie Your Host 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

C. V. WHALEY 

SHEET METAL WORKS 

EVERYTHING IN SHEET METAL 

Phone 236-K or 400-F 530 Main Street 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 



Niles Automobile 
Co. 

Your Sonoma County 

BUICK Dealer 

SANTA ROSA 
PETALUMA 



JACK & ED'S 

BAR AND LIQUORS 
Best in Eats and Drinks 

"Where good fellows get 
together" 

29 Santa Rosa Avenue 

Telephone 6821 
Santa Rosa, California 



Across the table from you and your 
selected friends you may suddenly find a 
candidate who has mailed you a complete 
questionnaire that is loaded with misin- 
formation. 

You may also run across a shallow 
bluffer, who, no matter how whimsical 
or ponderous a question you may put to 
him, will become more and more wordy, 
but will definitely refrain from just re- 
plying: "I don't know," or "I can't an- 
swer that question." 

By this face-to-face, orderly meeting 
of the candidate, your appraisement 
board can judge each man from the 
standpoint of critical employers-to-be, as 
to: 

1. His physical appearance, which 
though of no consequence in many lines 
of endeavor, is important in the case of 
a police officer. 

2. His speaking behavior, which really 
is of prime importance in police work be- 
cause of the fact that it entails such con- 
stant verbal contacts with all classes, 
both in and out of court ; 

3 His personal history, both in and 
out of school, and in U. S. Service, or 
business jobs, also his arrests, his marital 
and financial status, his lodge connec- 
tions and his hobbies ; 

4. His aims and reasons for becoming 
a police officer. This will permit of many 
questions from the board concerning 
good jobs he may have had or business 
opportunities he may have passed up, 
when his academic or technical attain- 
ments are considered ; 

1 he man who lied in his written an- 
swers will need to bluster and bluff. The 
man whose active history shows he drift- 
ed from one job to another will have to 
be quite persuasive to prove his stability; 
and the candidate who has had school, 
marital, occupational, financial, U. S. or 
police troubles will certainly have to be 
a good attorney in his own defense to 
clear himself before the board. Yes, this 
face-to-face meeting is bad indeed for 
eager beavers and that large percentage 
of peppy, self confident drifters of whom 
it may be truly said: They labor not, 
neither do they spin. 

It is gratifying to think that finding 
good material for a police department is 
not at all impossible after the civil serv- 
ice people have done their screening. The 
police head and his supervisory aides can, 
with no great difficulty, do at least a 
ninety per cent perfect job of final screen- 
ing. Out of a group, soberly interviewed, 
will be selected and hired one or more 
normal and natural citizens who have 
steadily sailed on an even keel — men 
who, from their youth up, have shown 
that grand stability that comes from head 
and heart. 



Brown Bros. Roofing Service 

Roofing of all Kinds — Quality Always 

25 Years Roofing Service 

903 Oak Street Phone 198R 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

SPROUSE-REITZ CO., INC. 

528 MARKET STREET 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

J. C. PENNEY CO., INC. 

640 MARKET STREET 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

PROCTOR & VENNERY 

Decorators — Featuring Fine Wallpapers 
Distributors of Fuller Paint Products 
Phone 613 543 JAY STREET 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

ANDREWS PLUMBING 

Licensed Plumbing Contractor 

Plumbing Supplies 

Portable Electric and Gas Welding 

109 FIRST STREET Phone 573- W 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

COLUSA MOTEL 

Air Conditioned and Centrally Heated 

John and Fred Tiedemann, Owners 

In The Heart of Town 

Phone 424 

CO'.USA CALIFORNIA 

BUCK & WILLOH 

BUICK— Sales and Service CMC TRUCKS 

General Automotive Repairing 
Home of U. S. Royal Tires 



Pho 



39 



Unzelman's Motel 

Member AAA & United Motor 

Courts 

Leon & Rose Trefeil, Owner-Mgr. 

On U.S. Highway 101 - ll^ miles 

South of Center of Santa Rosa 

Phone 115 
2245 Redwood Highway S. 



Best Welshes from 

J. V. "J^d Cummins 

Body^ Fender and Glass Shop 

Complete Rebuilding of Wrecked 

Cars & Trucks. 

Expert Workmanship 

Phone 136 

639 Second Street 

Santa Rosa, California 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



John E. Chick Montgomery 

SPORTS EQUIPMENT 

Everything We Have Is First Rate — 

And We Have Everything 

Phone 53S 334 MARKET STREET 

'O.USA CALIFORNIA 



"Let's Get A 


sociated" 


Bob Fitch 


s Associated Service 


"Best Li 
Tires — 


be Jobs i 
Batteries 


1 the County!" 
— Accessories 


Phone 304 

COLUSA 


356 


MARKET STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



HIGHSTREET & BUSCH 

THE FIRESTONE DEALER STORE 

Auto Accessories — Tires & Batteries 

Largest Slock of Toys Carried thruout the Year 

Phone 311 220 Fifth Street 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

SANKEY & GRIFFIN 

Chevrolet Sales & Service 

General Automotive Repairing 

31 S MARKET STREET 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 

O. K. RUBBER WELDERS 

Don't Go Wrong Go To O. K. First! 

We Won't Be Undersold 
318 MARKET STREET 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 



ROBERT E. SHIRRELL 

LINCOLN— MERCURY— NEW & USED 



SHIRRELL MOTORS 
St St. and Santa Rosa i 



Telephone 5717 
-Santa Rosa Calif. 



SONOMA COUNTY 
PEACE OFFICERS 




Chi 



Dei, Maestro 



BOB SHIRRELL MOTORS — Telephone 2-6608 
600 Main Street — Petaluma, Calif. 



Chief Del Maestro of Petaluma is one of 
Sonoma County's top police executives. He 
has been a member of the Petaluma Police 
Department since 1933 and Chief for the past 
four years. He has done every type of police 
work and is a graduate of the Federal Bureau' 
of Investigation National Academy in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



"LAUU—DRY—W 

Phone 3064-J 

Cleaning & Pressing 

Finished Laundry — Laundrette 

In the Town & Country Shopping District 

ULVA HARTMAN 

Ladies' & Gentlemen's Alterations 
Fitting A Specialty — All Work Guaranteed 

Tel. 4839-J — 1612 Terrace Way 
In The Town & Country Bldg. 

GOURMET HOUSE 

Fine Foods — Spirits — Gifts 

Fine Wine & Liquors — All Best Beers 

Phone 4924-J — 1415 Town & Country Bldg. 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

BURBANK BUSINESS COLLEGE 



KRAFT BROS. BAKERIES 

In Town and Country 



In Montgomery Village 
The Village Pastry Shop — Phon 



BROWN'S MARKET 

Biasotti Bros. 
Op 



PI 



Sundays and Holidays 
enty of Cold Drinks 



461 WEST STREET 
Phone 92 



HEALDSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

MILLER MOTOR CO. 

White Truck Sales and Service 

Telephone 2510 
964 PETALUMA HILL ROAD 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

HARRY B. TREMBLEY 

Wholesale Distributors of 

AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

AND SUPPLIES 

Telephones 95 and 2048 
THIRD AND B STREETS 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes from 

Berglund Tractor 
& Equipment Co. 

SALES— SERVICE 
Caterpillar — John Deere 

SANTA ROSA— WILLITS 
NAPA, CALIFORNIA 




IN SANTA ROSA IT'S THE 

TO PAZ ROOM 

Excellent Food — Friendly S^ 
THE BEST IN DRINKS 
BEST WISHES FROM 

EL PORTAL MOTEL 

Spacious DeLuxe Accommodatio 



1, 2, and 3 Bedr 



Units — Mode 



tecommended by "AAA" 

st Western; Redwood En 

T A. Cable, Manager 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



Chief Ai. Giorgi, Heai.osburc. 



ALEXANDER'S 

Van & Storage 



Telephone 1944 

107 "A" Street 

Santa Rosa, California 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



SANTA ROSA STEAM 

LAUNDRY — DRY CLEANERS 

Phone 1370 or 880 

3S2 FIRST STREET 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

DECK'S 

SAW & LAWNMOWER SHOP 

General Sharpening — Prompt Service 

Fair Prices — Telephone 3548 

115 Santa Rosa Avenue 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

REDWOOD EMPIRE NURSERY 

Landscape Service 

Joseph C. Badger — Phone 4131-W 

2350 REDWOOD HIGHWAY SOUTH 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

Best Wishes from 

R A S 

Welding & Boiler Works 

Complete Boiler Installation 

3099 Redwood Hwy. — 2 Miles So. — PO Box 466 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

LLANO MOTEL 

Little But Nice — And Close In! 
Mr. & Mrs. J. Crowther, Owners-Managers 
Phone 1623-W — 2400 Redwood Hwy., So. 
"AAA" Appr 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



CLOVERDALE CLEANERS 

Mickey and Mary McManus 
We operate our own cleaning plant 

SECOND STREET NEAR WEST 

CLOVERDALE CALIFORNIA 



CURLY WAITMAN 

Cocktails 
Phone 125 



CLOVERDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



AL MONTEDONICO 

Norge Washers — Kelvinator Electric Ranges 

Kelvinator Refrigerators and Home Freezers 

RCA Television 

Zenith Radio and Television 

Phone 275 
1ST & MAIN STREET 

CLOVERDALE CALIFORNIA 




CHitK Jim Bakkr, Sonom.x 



JOE'S PLACE 



ON STATE HIGHWAY No. 1 

MARIN COUNTY CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES 

Colusa Laundry & Dry Cleaners 

For Quality Workmanship — Always! 
330 MARKET STREET Phone 98 

COLUSA CALIFORNIA 



STEELE'S TRAILER COURT 

Modern Cabins - Trailer Space - Boat Dock ai 

Boat Rentals - Plenty of Shade - Jack Steele 

Near Sacramento River 



Phone 

COLUSA 



109-L 



CARL EDWARDS 

PIANOS (Former Piano Builder) 
Kohler & Chase, Andrew Kohler, Sohn 



G. WEINHOLDT 



503 BARKAM AVENUE 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



BILL'S AUTO ELECTRIC 

UNITED MOTOR SERVICE 

Complete Carburetor, Electric & Motor Tune-up 

Phone 5349 — 601 FIRST STREET 

W. H. "Bill" Siemsen, Owner 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 
Edna Robinson & Dolly Le Mora, Props. 

EL CHARRO 

Fine Mexican and American Foods 
Finest Home Cooking and Baking 

Telephone 3722-M 
2693 REDWOOD HIGHWAY SOUTH 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

PISENTI BROTHERS 

Garage and Associated Service 



Body and Fende 
24 Hour Towing Se 



Work— Painting 
vice — Phone 898 



2612 REDWOOD HIGHWAY SOUTH 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 



CHAPEL OF THE CHIMES 

Santa Rosa's Most Beautiful 
Crematorium 

Above Ground Burial in Niches 

and Crypts Amidst Lovely 

Gardens and Peaceful 

Surroundings 

Visitors Always Welcome 

1 mile South of Santa Rose on 101 

Telephone 6-R 

Redwood Hgy. So. at Hearn Ave. 

Santa Rosa, California 



i 



1' 




JOHN SLOSS COMPANY 

SALES— MACHINERY RENTALS 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



Chief LIkant C\i;sh,iI'. C'i nvi kii \i.i-: 



Wheeler Trailer & Body Works 

Truck Bodies and Trailers Built to Order 
Large Stock of Paits — Repairs — Alterations 
Look for the Wagon Wheel — Jack Wheelei 



Telephone 3500-W 

2710 REDWOOD HIGHWAY SOUTH 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February. 1954 



RAY DUCA LIQUORS 

WINES - BEER - LIQUORS - MIXES 

FREE DELIVERY 

JUniper 7-6572 4712 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DR. JAMES T. DING. D.C. 

RECTAL DISORDERS 

Herbs — X-ray and Physiotherapy 

DOuglas 2-5469 952 Powell Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CASTELLI WINES & LIQUORS 

Mario Castelli 



JUniper 6-1309 

SAN FRANCISCO 



947 Geneva Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



WING SING CHONG CO. 

IMPORTER AND EXPORTER 

GROCERIES - WINES - LIQUORS 

1076 Stockton Street YUkon 2-4171 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Pacific Tea Packing Company 



1663 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HEmlock 1-1755 

CALIFORNIA 



E. CLEMENS HORST CO. 

235 PINE STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ERKSON-SHARP Chevron Service 

George Erkson 

JUniper 4-5400 4801 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Alex Isackson Hardwood Floor Co. 

2401 SANTIAGO STREET 

SEabright 1-0888 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SABELLA'S 
RESTAURANT 

Seafood Specialists for 
Generations 

North of Richardson 

Bridge 

in 

MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



S. F. SACRILEGE 

(Continued from page 3 ) 

From his quarters in the adjoining 
building Father Orestes Trinchieri ran 
at the head of his little group of Salesian 
Fathers toward the church which was 
his charge. They were the first to reach 
the large hole which had been blown in 
the pavement at the rear of the church. 
The building itself appeared to be un- 
damaged. The priests were making an in- 
spection tour of the premises when the 
police arrived. Father Trinchieri greeted 
their questions with a bewildered shrug. 

"How can I tell what happened?" he 
asked. "What kind of man would try to 
destroy the house of God ?" 

News of the bombing was the top 
story for the San Francisco newspapers 
the following morning and it sta\ed on 
page one of the city newspapers for days 
to come. 1 he attempted bombing of any 
church would have been enough to arouse 
the ire of the city by the Golden Gate, 
but none so much as the attempt to de- 
stroy the building which watches over 
Columbus Square. 

St. Peter and Paul's Church is more 
than just another place of worship to San 
Francisco. It is a matter of civic pride. 
1 he huge church, with its towering twin 
spires that pierce the northern edges of 
the city's skyline, was almost new at the 
time and considered the most beautiful 
building of its kind west of Chicago. 
Every San Franciscan, regardless of re- 
ligion or creed, was proud of the struc- 
ture. The demand for the capture of the 
bomber was instantaneous. But the inves- 
tigation directed by Captain of Detective 
Duncan Matheson and Detective Ser- 
geant Louis DeAIattei of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department ran up a series 
of blind alleys. Lead after lead was ex- 
plored and found wanting. Investigation 
of alleged members of the infamous Black 
Hand and Mafia societies led nowhere. 
Phony tips wasted days of checking. 
Then during the small hours of May 
•^th, the bomber struck again. 

At 3 :26 a.m. a bomb, infinitely more 
powerful than the first one, was set off 
in the marble vestibule at the entrance 
of the church, shattering several large 
stained glass windows within the build- 
ing, damaging the huge, twelve foot por- 
tals leading to the chvirch proper,' and 
breaking windows throughout the North 
Beach. 

For the ensuing hours terror ruled in 
San Francisco's Italian colony. Himdreds 
of the area's residents clad in nightshirts, 
pajamas and bath robes tumbled out to 
the streets and refused to reenter their 
homes for fear of another explosion. 



VITTORI BROS. 

Fruits, Vegetables and Poultry, Fancy Groceries 

Phone Mission 8-3270 6 3820-26 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DEANS AND HOMER 

INSURANCE AND GENERAL AGENTS 

340 Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

STEMPEL QUALITY DOUGHNUTS 

320 FELL STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

LA NACIONAL GROCERY 

1295 ALABAMA STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

RELIANCE FRUIT & GROCERY 

1919 McAllister street 

san francisco california 



The Methodist Publishing House 

83 McAllister street 

san francisco california 

MR. HOT DOG'S RANCHO 

5121 Geary Blvd. EV 6-9898 

MR HOT DOG 
3815 Geary Blvd. EV 6-9684 

MEET MR. HOT DOG 
The World's Largest 
CHARCOAL BURGERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



F. KORBEL & BROTHERS 

WINES 

314 FRONT STREET 

Phone sutler 1-3529 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



LY 3-2316 

BUENA CAMPBELL 
SANITARIUM 



Laurel and Hill Streets 
BELMONT, CALIF. 



Fihruary. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



P-age 47 



KEYSTONE COFFEE 



SEQUOIA HOTEL 

174 - 3RD STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CabalDeros De Dimas — Along 
Grand Lodge 



443 Broadway St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-3728 

CALIFORNIA 



VESUVIO CAFE 

Forty-five Imported Beers to Cho 



2SS Columbus 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DO 2-9808 

CALIFORNIA 



NEW ATHENS MARKET 

GROCERIES DELICATESSEN 

1311 FILLMORE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CENTURY GARAGE 

675 POST STREET 

Phone TUxedo 5-2800 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



BUDDAH BAR 



Phone SUtter 1-9292 

901 GRANT AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Enterprise Engine & Machinery Co. 

A Subsidiary of General Metals Corp. 

18TH AND FLORIDA 

Phone Mission 7-0862 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



H. Moffat Company 

MOFFATS MANTECA 
FED BEEF 



3rd Street & Arthur Avenue 
AT 2-0700 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Harried policemen from all over the 
city ru.shed to the scene. DeMattei ar- 
rived and found little more evidence than 
the first e.xplosion had produced. The 
bomb, apparently consisting of dynamite 
sticks, had been bound together with 
wire and placed in a corner where the 
front steps and doors joined. A heavy 
woven steel and rubber mat had been 
thrown over it. 

A few strands of wire and the disin- 
tegrated remains of dynamite sticks were 
all in the way of clues DeMattei had to 
work with. A door to door canvass of the 
area produced a lot of theories but no re- 
sults. Father Trinchieri and his Salesian 
Fathers worked tirelessly in an attempt 
to assist the iinestigation, but without 
visible results. Days merged into weeks 
and weeks into months while the investi- 
gation bogged down. 

October came. The bombings of St. 
Peter and Paul's Church were all but 
forgotten by everyone except the police 
working on the case and Father 1 rin- 
chieri and his Salesian Fathers. Hallo- 
ween approached. Grinning, snag toothed 
pumpkins leared from their window 
ledges. School children planned pranks 
to be played on the evening preceding 
All Saints Day. But the most monstrous 
prank of all was scheduled to be played 
two days before the night when witches 
ride. 

Sunday, October 29, 5:15 a.m. Ihe 
eternal fog lay heavy over the North 
Beach, dripping moistly on gleaming 
streets. A solitary figure moved through 
the sleeping city toward the church by 
Columbus Square. He deposited his pack- 
age carefully in the marble vestibule, 
touched a match to it, waited for a mo- 
ment to be sure the fuse burned brightly, 
then darted of? at top speed into the 
gloom. There was need to run. The 
bomb which exploded that morning was 
not soon forgotten by San Francisco. 

The blast which followed the bomber's 
departure from the church was heard 
throughout the city. Its effects in the 
North Beach were devastating. Three at- 
tendants asleep within the church were 
tossed rudely from their beds. Six priests 
quartered in the adjoining rectory joined 
them on the floor. The marble \estibule 
crumbled and the huge doors were ripped 
from their hinges and crashed to the 
floor. 

Chaos reigned on the North Beach. In 
addition to the priests scores of persons 
living near the church were thrown from 
their beds. Hundreds of windows were 
shattered. The cry of "Earthquake" was 
heard as the nightshirted residents pour- 
ed out into the open. 



RODRIGUES GROCERIES 



598 ATHENS STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JU 6-1949 

CALIFORNIA 



BLUE LAGOON AQUARIUM 

Exotic Fish and Supplies 



18lh and Irving St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



LO 4-232a 

CALIFORNIA 



SQUARE CAFE 

Filipino and American Dis 



447 Kearny Stre: 

"^AN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-9950 

CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAM & MARY KIMURA 

CATERING SERVICE 

2328 Clement Street 

Phones: SKylne 1-4087 & WEst 1-8740 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SIDNEY MIRON 

Men's and Ladies' Used Clothing 

Highest Prices Paid 

1750 GEARY WEst 1-1552 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Comp/imenfs of 
ARGUS CAMERA'S 



The Home Insurance Company 

Phone YUkon 2-5221 

580 CALIFORNIA STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

EL PRADO 

One of San Francisco's Most Distinguished 
Restaurants 

For Reservations Phone SU 1-7200 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 




and we thank all Police Officers 
for continuing their patient cour- 
tesy in answering those perennial 
questions — "How do I get to the 
Emporium"? 

The Emporium 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



JOE CERVETTO COMPANY 

Bonded and Insured Employees 

Window Cleaning — Janitorial Service 

IS Columbus Avenue Yukon 2-1SS6 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



UTILITY TRAILER SALES 

ISS BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Parker Water Heater Service 

All Types of Water Heaters Installed & 
Repaired — Successor to Edward H. Parker 
Chester C. Parker, Licensed Gas Appliance Dlr. 
Phone JUniper 7-7233 750 Monterey Blvd. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Pound's Refrigeration Service 

LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT 

Phone VAIencia 4-7737 61 S Diamond Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

1846 UNION STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



FREDERICK MEISWINKEL 

CONTRACTING PLASTER 
Plain & Ormental 

Phones: JO 7-4694 — JO 7-7587 
2155 TURK STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SVEN BOSIN 

BRICK CONTRACTOR 

Phone overland 1-3638 
1228 - 20th AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



OPERA HOTEL 



Ho 



and Mrs. Angell Johnson, Managers 
Heated — Rooms with Shower or Bath 
Hot and Cold Water 
elike Atmosphere — Reasonable Rates 



IN CIVIC CENTER, ON 101 HIGHWAY 

UNderhlll 1-2904 

145 FELL STREET, NEAR VAN NESS 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Sullivan, Roche, 
Johnson & Farraher 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

MILLS TOWER 
Phone DOuglas 2-2822 

San Francisco, Calif. 



The damage to the church was tre- 
mendous. Stained glass windows burst 
from their sashes and crashed to the pave- 
ment. Father Trinchieri and his priests 
moved through a dust storm of powdered 
plaster toward the center of the explo- 
sion. Police from all over the city hurried 
to the North Beach to restore order. And 
when Louis DeMattei arrived on the 
scene not a shred of evidence remained. 
Th explosion had destroyed all traces of 
the bomb. 

Fortunately no one was seriously in- 
jured by the blast. Captain Matheson 
was convinced that a fourth bombing 
would be almost sure to be fatal to some- 
one, however. Each bomb had been more 
powerful than the last. He believed a 
fourth attempt to destroy the church 
might send the entire building crumbling 
to the pavement. He called Detective 
DeMattei into his office and asked for 
a report on the investigation. 

DeMattei explained that every possi- 
ble angle had been explored. He de- 
clared that the Mafia and Cammorra 
societies, then at the peak of their power, 
had been investigated to the best of his 
abilities and found innocent. 

"The Mafia works for a profit," he 
explained. "There is no profit in destroy- 
ing a church." 

"How do you suggest we prevent this 
from happening again?" Matheson in- 
quired. 

"We set a trap," DeMattei replied 
promptly. "It's the only answer." 

With the help of Father Trinchieri 
and Corporal Larry Mclnerny, a little 
Irish policeman who knew the beach al- 
most as well as DeMattei, who had been 
raised there, the detective laid his snare. 

Father Trinchieri took DeMattei 
through the church, pointing out the 
damaged areas and suggesting possible 
hiding places for policemen. The detec- 
tive was amazed by the priest's fortitude. 
For years he knew the Salesian Father 
had combatted the actitvies of the Mafia 
and Cammorra fearlessly and tirelessly. 
Now, faced with a new enemy, he work- 
ed long hours with the policeman while 
at the same time pacifying and soothing 
his terror stricken flock of parishioners. 

DeMattei's task was no simple one. 
The park in Columbus Square made the 
problem of laying an effective ambush 
doubly tough. Without buildings to hide 
his men in across the street he was forced 
to improvise a method of watching the 
street from adjoining buildings without 
having the watcher seen. 

To do this he placed a mirror on a 
door leading to a front balcony in a man- 



HOTEL GRAYSTONE 

REASONABLE RATES 



EXbrook 2-4885 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1 Geary Street 

CALIFORNIA 



LACE HOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme. J. P. Bourdet, Prop. 

CASH AND CARRY 

Mission 7-4720 3036 - 24th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MOLER BARBER SCHOOL 

System of Barber Colleges 

Approved for Veteran Training 

161 - 4th Street GA 1-9979 

S AN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Garrett M. Goldberg Paint Co. 

MANUFACTURERS SINCE 1906 



1019 Mission Si 

SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhill 1-0192 

CALIFORNIA 



JOS. C. FLETCHER 



778 Brannan Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhUl 1-2991 

CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC FELT COMPANY 

Phone Mission 7-0111 
710 YORK STREET 

SAN FRAN CISCO CALIFORNIA 

American Sponge & Chamois 
Co., Inc. 

Phone DOuglas 2-53S0 
113 FRONT STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Premium Products & 
Walker Beverage Company 

Distributors for 

LUCKY LAGER — ALMADEN WINE 

BALLANTINE BEER — MARIPOSA WINES 

SAN FRANCISCO, REDWOOD CITY, SAN JOSE 



LAWRENCE 

WAREHOUSE 

COMPANY 

37 Drumm Street 
Phone DOuglas 2-5575 

San Francisco, Calif. 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e 49 



P. K. EXPRESS 

Phone GArficId I-46S3 
785 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Walton N. Moore Dry Goods 
Co., Inc. 

Phone EXbrook 2-4282 
FREMONT & MISSION STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

METZ SUPERIOR DOUGHNUTS 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
Phone BAyview 1-9782 
1724 HAIGHT STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC BRASS FOUNDRY 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone YUkon 6-6745 
251-259 - 2nd STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CRISTIANI & COMPANY 



Phone sutler 1-0162 
573 WASHINGTON STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Enterprise Engine & Machinery 
Company 

A Subsidiary of General MetaU Corp. 

Phone Mission 7-0S62 
18th & FLORIDA STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Winston's Moving & Storage Co. 

Phone UNderhill 3-5305 
2164 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Schirmer Stevedoring Co., Ltd. 

STEVEDORING CONTRACTORS 

Phone YUkon 2-4500 
55 SACRAMENTO STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Miller & Lux, Inc. 

RVSS BUILDING 

235 Montgomery Street 
Phone GArfield 1-4800 

San Francisco, Calif. 



ner that anyone approaching from the 
east could be observed. It took many 
hours to place the window in such a way 
that the reflection from the street lights 
would not show and make it visible to 
the street. 

The building on the east side of the 
church was an apartment house with 
front windows which projected several 
feet over the sidewalk. DeMattei was 
given permission by the persons renting 
the apartment to use the rooms contain- 
ing the windows for observation to the 
west. 

Next the detective called in a city 
electrician who installed an elaborate 
system of wiring which covered every 
vantage point in the building with sig- 
nals. Bell signals were installed in the 
apartment house and the whole setup 
was connected to the rectory by an inter- 
communication system. 

The toughest problem facijig De- 
Mattei was how to arrange the entry. 
The vestibule, twenty feet square, led 
directly from the broad steps in front of 
the church to the massive doors. The 
doors, being solid, were useless because 
there was no visibility for guards. 

Two stained glass windows which 
stood about twelve feet up on each side 
of the portal provided the solution. De- 
Mattei ordered them removed and re- 
placed with carefully colored isinglass. 
The windows were directly over the con- 
fessionals within the church. Heavy 
planks were placed across the tops of the 
booths and two watchers, armed with 
shotguns, were placed at each window 
for man\' nights to come. 

Because the lookouts at the fake win- 
dows had their visibility limited by the 
vestibule it was necessary to arrange a 
system which would make it posible to 
notify the officers of the approach of any 
suspicious characters. A muflled telephone 
was placed by each window. 

Another man, equipped with telephone 
and buzzer signals, was stationed at a 
rear portal where he could watch an alle\ 
at the back of the building. As an added 
precaution DeMattei rented an apart- 
ment which faced on the alley. 

Absolute secrecy was maintained while 
the trap was prepared. The officers often 
interrupted their work for hours while a 
religious ceremony was held in the 
church. Meanwhile, a squad of picked 
detectives combed the area in search of 
the bomber. Suspect after suspect was 
hauled to the Hall of Justice, grilled and 
released. A uniformed officer was sta- 
tioned in front of the church at all times 
for the purpose of frightening off the 
bomber in case he attempted to act before 



L. KOSLOFF 

Chinese Art — Export - Import 

YUkon 6-1691 210 Post Street 

Studio 204 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

TROJAN POWDER COMPANY 

Phone GArfield 1-3114 
620 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

M. R. FLEISCHMAN COMPANY 

Phone VAlencia 4-6293 
2285 PALOU AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

LATHE TOOL WORKS 

Phone DOuglas 2-5740 
41 CLEMENTINA STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

BELL BAZAAR 

Phone UNderhill 1-2824 
3030 - 16th STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Western Life Insurance Company 



Ted Collins, Superintendent of Age 



lies 



Phone EXbrook 2-1913 
544 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Rosenberg Brothers & Company 

Phone DOuglas 2-4080 

230 CALIFORNIA STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

K. W. CURTISS COMPANY 

Factory Representative 
SPARTON TELEVISION 

1355 MARKET STREET 

Phone UNderhill 3-6600 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Lynch Carrier 
Systems, Inc. 

96 Jessie Street 

SUtter 1-1136 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



MARINA HOTEL 



3143 Fillmore Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



FI 6-9764 
CALIFORNIA 



THE NIGHTHAWK CAFE 



3450 - 3rd Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



VA 6-3«3« 
CALIFORNIA 



DR. CHARLES F. DeROSE 



3009 - 16TH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



MArket 1-5318 
CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC BUILDING 

4TH AND MARKET STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DILLS & GOODWAY 

General Building Contractors 

Lloyd Dills 

416 Garden Ave. Phone JUno 8-3177 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Simonds Saw & Steel Company 

Phone EXbrook 2-4466 
228 - Itt STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Valente Marini Perata &Company 

MORTICIANS 

Phone DOuglas 2-0627 
649 GREEN STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ASHLEY & McMULLEN 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Phone SKyline 1-8403 
GEARY BLVD. & 6th AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



FELIX A. ALFARO 

Licensed Contractors 

— Insured — 

Painting and Decorating 

Brocade Wall Finish 

Interior and Exterior 

Weather-Dex . . . 5-Year 

Guarantee 

Phone Us — Mission 7-2478 

370 Coleridge Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



the net was thoroughly woven. Then the 
day came when the newspapers announc- 
ed that the police guard had been with- 
drawn from St. Peter and Paul's Church. 
Chief of Police Daniel O'Brien announc- 
ed that the department had decided no 
further bombings would take place. 

In spite of all precautions a fourth 
attempt was made to bomb the church 
before the trap was complete. At 5 :30 
on the morning of January 9th an auto- 
mobile came down the street and paused 
long enough for a man to descend, throw 
a bomb against the wall, dart back into 
the car, and speed away. Officer Edward 
Moran, who was guarding the church at 
the time, emptied his gun at the fleeing 
car but was unable to hit it or secure the 
license number. Shortly after that the 
trap was ready. 

Night after night the picked squad 
traveled to the church. Every device was 
used to avoid tipping the bomber off to 
the ambush. The detectives arrived carry- 
ing laundry and food baskets. Some were 
dressed as women and others as workmen. 
I he most elaborate stakeout in the his- 
tory of San Francisco was in operation. 

Two months passed and nothing hap- 
pened. DeMattei and Matheson won- 
dered if the bomber had actually given 
up. Then, on the morning of March 5th, 
the two strangers met in front of the 
church and one laid his lethal package 
on the doorstep. He lit the fuse and turn- 
ed to run when Mclnerny challenged 
him. The final dramatic chapter was 
about to be enacted. 

Detective DeMattei, sitting at his 
vantage point by the apartment window, 
had been uneasy that night. For two 
hours he had watched a drunk stagger 
around Columbus Square. The detective 
wondered whether he was actually drunk 
or just casing the church. Finally he left 
abruptly, but DeMattei could not get him 
off his mind. His hunch was right. The 
officer recognized the drunk immediately 
when he returned with his package. 

The bomber's drawn gun and the 
burning fuse did not give Corporal Mc- 
lnerny any choice. He fired immediately 
and the bomber turned, staggering toward 
the street. The throaty roar of a sawed- 
off shotgun in the hands of Patrolman 
D. A. Kauffman ended the argument. 
I he bomber died instantly, but the fuse 
burned on. Only a few seconds separated 
Mclnerny and his companions from be- 
ing blown to eternity. They watched, 
helpless and horrified, while the sputter- 
ing snake grew shorter. 

One of the massive doors swung open. 
Patrolman J. C. Gremminger dashed 



SEQUOIA HOTEL 



174 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-9803 
CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC BUILDING 

4th and MARKET STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOS. C. FLETCHER 

Phone UNderhill 1-2991 
778 BRANNAN STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Garrett M. Goldberg Paint Co. 

MANUFACTURERS SINCE 1906 



1019 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderhill 1-0192 

CALIFORNIA 



MOLER BARBER SCHOOL 

SYSTEM OF BARBER COLLEGES 

D. E. Brown, Manager 

161 Fourth Street GArfield 1-9979 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



AXEL ISACKSON HARDWOOD 
FLOOR CO. 

2401 SANTIAGO STREET 
SEabright 1-0888 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ERKSON-SHARP CHEVRON 
SERVICE 



Phone JUniper 4-5400 

4801 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



E. CLEMENS HORST CO. 

235 PINE STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

New Mission Heating & 
Ventilating Co. 

Phone Mission 8-3933 
3401 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

H. F. SUHR COMPANY, INC. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Phone Mission 7-1811 
2919 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



February. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

1846 UNION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Pound's Refrigeration Service 

LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT 



VAlencia 4-7737 

SAN FRANCISCO 



615 DIAMOND ST. 

CALIFORNIA 



Parlcer Water Heater Service 

Successor to Edward H. Parker 
All Types of Water Heaters Installed, Repaired 
Chester C. Parker, Licensed Gas Appliance Dlr. 



UTILITY TRAILER SALES 

ISS BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOE CERVETTO COMPANY 



Window Clean 
15 Columbus Ave 

SAN FRANCISCO 



YUkon 2-15S6 

CALIFORNIA 



Police Officers Save $ $ on Auto Insurance 
3U are ElisT'ble for the Benefits of Membership 

Civil Service Employees 
Insurance Union 



571 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



YUkon 2-0448 

CALIFORNIA 



CECO STEEL PRODUCTS CORP. 

Phone Delaware 3-3600 

401 TUNNEL AVENUE 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Souther Warehouse Company 

CAR UNLOADING AND WAREHOUSING 

Phone GRaystone 4-7000 
1006 NORTH POINT STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Matson Navigation Company 

S.S. LURLINE TO HAWAII 

Phone DOuglas 2-5233 
215 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ARTHUR BURMAN 

PLASTERING CONTRACTOR 



Phone DEIaware 3-2452 

998 CHENERY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



into the vestibule, knife drawn. For a 
moment he hesitated, getting his bear- 
ings. Then he spotted the now short fuse 
and moved toward it. The sizzling ser- 
pent was inches long when he severed it. 
The danger was over, but not the shoot- 
ing. 

At the sound of the first shot DeMat- 
tei, shotgun in hand, had sprinted into 
the street. He arrived in time to see the 
second man running toward the park 
shrubbery. The detective ordered him to 
halt. The man ran faster. 

"Stop!" DeMattei shouted a second 
time. "This is the police." 

The man ran on. De Mattei fired when 
he saw the fugitive reach into his breast 
pocket. The buckshot caught him in the 
hip and he fell, shouting, "God save me. 
I have the Bible!" He was telling the 
truth. DeMattei found the Bible in his 
breast pocket. 

The bombings ended that morning of 
March 5, 1927, but the mystery has lived 
with San Francisco ever since. Although 
descriptions of the dead man were sent 
all over the United States and the affair 
received nationwide publicity, the bomb- 
er was never identified. The second man 
flatly refused to talk. He declared that 
he was innocent and knew nothing of the 
bomber or bombings. Several months 
after the shooting he died in the San 
Francisco hospital as the result of an op- 
eration on his injured hip. If he knew 
the bomber's name he took it with him 
in death. 

The last bomb had been big enough to 
destroy the church entirely. It consisted 
of twenty-six sticks of dynamite, each one 
wrapped in moulder's clay to add force 
to the explosion. The fuse was attached 
to a fulminate of mercury cap on the 
center stick. Experts declared it would 
have leveled the church and killed many 
people in the immediate neighborhood. 

A thousand dollar reward offered by 
Father Trinchieri for the capture of the 
bomber was refused by the officers and 
returned to the Salesian Fathers to be 
used for charity. And today, more than 
a quarter of a century after the persist- 
ent attempt to destroy the building, St. 
Peter and Paul's Church stands across 
from Columbus Square, still the domi- 
nant structure on the North Beach sky- 
line. 



MINNIE "KIT" CARSON 

Owner-Manager Carson's Beverage Store 

Largest Assortment of Imported and Domestic 
Liquors, Wines and Beers in Orange County 



DR. JAMES T. DING. D.C. 



952 Powell Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DOuglas 2-5469 

CALIFORNIA 



RAY DUCA - Liquors 

Wines • Beer - Liquors - Mixes 
FREE DELIVERY 



JUniper 7-6572 

SAN FRANCISCO 



4712 MISSION STREET 
CALIFORNIA 



LACE HOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme. J. P. Bourdet, Prop. — Cash & Carry 



Mission 7-4720 

SAN FRANCISCO 



3036 - 24th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



9131 Garde 
GARDEN GROVE 



HOTEL GRAYSTONE 

REASONABLE RATES 

EXbrook 2-4885 

66 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

L. KOSLOFF ■ Chinese Art 

EXPORT — IMPORT 

Telephone YUkon 6-1691 

210 POST STREET — STUDIO 204 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Joseph D. Sheedy Drayage 

Phone MArket 1-8080 

601 ILLINOIS STREET 

SAN FRANaSCO CALIFO RNIA 

THE JAPANESE TEA GARDEN 

IN BEAUTIFUL 

GOLDEN GATE PARK 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



George W. Caswell Company 

elicious CASWELL COFFEE Now Available 
at Your Favorite Grocers 



Phone SUtter 1-6654 
642 HARRISON STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MAIN ENGINEERING COMPANY 

BOILERS - HEATING - STEAMFITTING 

Phone JUniper 7-7366 
146 SHAWNEE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Stanley Rosenthal & Company 

Phone TUxedo 5-1363 
283 ELLIS STREET 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



DEANS AND HOMER 

INSURANCE AND GENERAL AGENTS 



340 Pii 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



VITTORI BROS. 

Fruits, Vegetables and Poultry. Fancy Groceries 
Phone Mission 8-3270 — 3820-26 Mission St. 

SAN FRA NCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Pacific Tea Packing Company 



Individual Tea B, 
Coffee Urn Bags - Fla 



1663 Mis 

SAN FRANCISCO 



St. 



HEmlock 1-17SS 

CALIFORNIA 



WING SING CHONG CO 

IMPORTER AND EXPORTER 

GROCERIES - WINES - LIQUORS 

1076 Stockton Street YUkon 2-4171 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CASTELLI WINES & LIQUORS 

Mario Castelli 



Phone JU 6-1309 

SAN FRANCISCO 



974 Geneva Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



DUDLEY PERKINS COMPANY 

HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTORCYCLES 



Distributor 



1914 



Phone PRospect 5-5323 

655 ELLIS STREET 

S AN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MOSCHINO'S PLACE 

Phone JUno 8-9948 

12-MILE HOUSE 

ON OLD MISSION ROAD 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Office Pho 
Residence: 



; So. S. F., JUno 8-1685 
1 Mateo, Fireside 5-9132 



SCHENE LIVESTOCK 
COMMISSION COMPANY 

CATTLE - HOGS - SHEEP 
R. E. "Bob" SCHENE 

UNION STOCK YARDS 

SOUTH SAN FRA NCISCO CALIFORNIA 

FRANK PARIANI 

Specialist in 

Buick, Chevrolet & Pontiac Service 

PARTS AND TIRES 

Wheel Balancing and Aligning 

JUno 8-1259 
304 CYPRESS AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



MINUCCIANI AND SON 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 
Estimates Given on All New and Old Work 

JUno 8-6008 
555 MILLER AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



PIONEERS OF SCIENCE 

(Conclusion) 
By B. C. Bridges 

The oldest recorded identification bu- 
reau in Switzerland is located at Geneva, 
although others were set up subsequently 
at Aarau, Basel, Lucerne, Zurich and 
Berne, which latter place was finally se- 
lected as the National Registry. Anthro- 
pometry was used as early as 1891, but, 
in 1902, fingerprinting was introduced at 
Geneva, where the only impressions at 
first taken were those of the right thumb, 
index, middle and ring fingers, and the 
thumb and index digits of the left hand. 
The procedure was patterned after the 
Paris methods. Nevertheless, this was 
later superseded by the recording of all 
ten fingers, which were then classified 
and filed according to pattern designs. 

Anthropometry was instituted in Spain 
by royal decree on September 10, 1896, 
and measuring equipment was placed in 
seven of the principal prisons under su- 
pervision of Dr. H. Simancas. A few- 
years' trial of this system disclosed it to 
be untrustworthy; accumulative error 
rendered the files practically useless, and 
three of the original bureaus ceased to 
function. Official recognition of these 
inefficient conditions resulted in orders 
for reorganization, which were issued 
February 28, 1901, and F. Oloriz Aqui- 
lera, professor of anatomy at Madrid, 
was appointed as supervisor. Registration 
by fingerprints was sponsored by this 
authority, who compiled yet another 
classifying and filing technique which he 
named the "Oloriz System," but this he 
later discarded in favor of the more in- 
clusive employment of the Vucetich 
method. 

Along with his other contributions to 
fingerprint innovations, Oloriz Aquilera 
taught his subordinates to classify the 
digital patterns by direct examination of 
the subject's hands, rather than by read- 
ing the same prints on a registration card. 
This was a recognition of the methods 
employed by the primeval savage, who 
knew his "public enemies" through their 
earth-recorded skin designs. It is indeed 
comforting to recognize that this in- 
volved inconsistency, arbitrarily termed 
"civilization," occasionally nourishes a 
mentality with enough perception to ap- 
preciate such sterling utilities. 

In 1910, the capable Aquilera pre- 
pared for his officers a manual on crimi- 
nal identification in which were furnish- 
ed detailed descriptions of many known 
offenders, together with the code formu- 
las for their fingerprints. Thus, twen- 
tieth-centur\' Madrid police officers were 
equipped with information enabling them 



B. J. RODONDI & SONS 

Real Estate Brokers — Insurance of all Kinds 

OWN YOUR HOME 

Phones Off. JUno 8-3849 — Res. JUno 8-0217 

338 GRAND AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

INTERNATIONAL PAINT CO. 

Phone JUno 8-8663 
SOUTH LINDEN at TANFORAN AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRA NCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JENNINGS Rexall DRUGS 

FREE DEUVERY 

Phone JUno 8-7744 

231 GRAND AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Ted and Archie's 
Grocery and Delicatessen 

FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES - IVIEATS 

Phone JUno 8-1981 615 Linden Ave. 

SOUlH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SANTINI & ROCCUCCi 

JUno 8-0365 
356 GRAND AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CHAS. BLUMENAU 
Livestock Dealer 

UNION STOCKYARDS 

SOUTH SAN FRA NCISCO CALIFORNIA 

GREETINGS FROM 

GRENIER & McCARTY, INC. 

521 HILLSIDE BLVD. JU 3-0866 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

BOYD & LEN'S SERVICE 

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD DEALER 

Orange and El Camino Real JUno 8-3159 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ARMOUR AND COMPANY 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Scofield Overhead Door Co. 

OVERHEAD GARAGE DOORS 
AND HARDWARE 



74 South Linden JUno 8-2559 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



February. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 53 



GOODRICH MFG. CO. 

JUniper 7-7537 
lOS South Bayshore Highway 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

FRANK GIFFA & SONS 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

240 Grand Aenue Phone JUno 8-1740 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DARRELL JAHN 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 

Telephone JUno 8-7S70 

MILLER AND AIRPORT BLVD. 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Myers Garage & Trailers 

Specializing in Truck Repairs 

& Trailers Built to Order 

Phones: Bus: JU 3-3760 - Res. DI 4-4754 

101 UNDEN AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Don's South City Auto Wreckers 

We Buy Cars Any Condition 

Parts for All Year's Cars 

Res. GRaystone 4-6153 

Plant: JU 3-0385 1 10 So. Maple Ave. 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

THE HUB 

JUno 8-7926 
382 GRAND AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

751 CLUB 

DANCING - ENTERTAINING 

A Hearty Welcome to All 

751 Bayshore Blvd. Phone JUno 8-9960 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

South City Sheet Metal Works 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 

SHEET METAL WORK OF ALL KINDS 

rices That Are Right — Jas. O. Wallace, Prop. 

208 Cypress Avenue JUno 8-4102 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



A. W. DICKER 



to appro.ximate the accomplishments of 
the cave man. 

For some years, the civil police depart- 
ment of Constantinople maintained an 
identification bureau copied after the 
French ; but here too the tide of popular 
opinion swept anthropometry into the 
discard, and a fingerprint bureau, pat- 
tern after the German technique, became 
a central office for the entire Ottoman 
Empire. As explained, the German classi- 
fication and filing procedure utilized the 
Galton-Henry advocation, modified by 
Windt and Kodicek. 



"ALWAYS LOWEST PRICES" 

ERCOLI'S MARKET 



Painter and Decorator - Paperhanging 

Phone JUno 8-6899 

734 West Orange Ave., Southwood 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS 

LOUIS P. BALDINI 

417 GRAND AVENUE 
Phone JUno 8-4730 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

F. D. MINUCCIANI 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Phone JUno 8-3225 

417V2 Grand Avenue Opposite City Hall 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

5175 Mission St. - San Francisco - JU 7-0689 

RYAN REALTY COMPANY 

BURI BURI OFFICE 

Members of MLS - Insurance-Loans-Appraisals 

1123 El Camino Phone JUno 3-1386 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Guinn's Body & Fender Shop 

COMPLETE AUTO PAINTING 

Free Estimates — Prompt Service 

EDDIE GUINN 

Phones: Bus. JUno 3-2693 - Res. JUno 8-3253 

27 SOUTH LINDEN AVENUE 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 




B. C. Bridges 

At this time, fingerprint registration, 
with few exceptions, was decentralized 
in European territory. However, Buda- 
pest, the first continental city to utilize 
the unmodified Galton-Henry system, 
achieved an interchange program of 
registration that was both novel and ef- 
fective. On October 15, 1908, an order 
of the Minister of Justice created the 
"Royal Central Registry Office of Hun- 
gary," which came into actual existence 
a few months later. Thereafter, active 
exchange of data was practised between 
representative cities, and criminal court 
procedure required that fingerprints be 
furnished with records of the defendants 
sent to the criminal registry. In connec- 
tion with the central office, there was 
also maintained a complete technical 
laboratory to deal with such evidential 
impressions as might be found at a crime 
locale ; this valuable service was available 
to the whole country. 

Modern fingerprint methods were em- 
ployed in Egypt during the year 1902. 
and descendants of the mighty pharaohs 
again used a facility which had well 
served their ancient progenitors. It is in- 
teresting to observe that the latter-day 



713 Linden Ave. 
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



JUno 8-2417 

CALIFORNIA 



LOVI & BOTTAI 

Groceries, Olive Oils, Macaroni, Fruits 
Vegetables, Coal, Hay and Grain 

Phone JUno 8-5297 442 Baden Avenue 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CLARK'S AUTO PAINT SHOP 

Body and Fender Repairing - Free Estimates 

Complete Auto Painting — Color Matching 

Allen Clark 



Phone JUno 3-2234 
South San Francisco 



66 A STREET 
Californi 



SILVAS MOTORS 

Dodge & Plymouth Passenger Cars 

Dodge Job Rated Trucks 

Lou Silvas — Res. JUno 8-1307 

110 Linden Ave. JU 8-7867 - DE 3-0121 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



M. & H. SERVICE 

Phone JUno 8-2127 

800 SAN MATEO AVENUE 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

NORVELL'S JEWELRY 

Joseph W. Norvell 

Phone JUno 8-0851 

540 SAN MATEO AVENUE 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

WILSON DILLS REALTY 

Telephones JUno 8-3177 — PLaza 5-9130 

299 EL CAMINO REAL 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

DILLS & GOODWAY 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS 

Lloyd Dills 

416 Garden Avenue JUno 8-3177 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

TED'S TEXACO STATION 

B. F. Goodrich Home and Auto Supplies 

Marfak Lubrication 

JUno 8-9876 

900 EL CAMINO REAL 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

GOLDEN'S 

CURTAINS - DRAPES - LINENS - FABRICS 

Henry Golden 

JUno 3-1289 579 San Mateo Avenue 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

PENINSULA GUN SHOP 

Pistol Work - Sights - General Gun Work 

CUSTOM BLUEING A SPECIALTY 

Phone JUno 8-5690 290 East Aenue 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

A. SANVIDOTTO & SON 

CEMENT CONTRACTORS 

ESTIMATES FREE 

FIRST CLASS WORK 

Telephone JUno 8-6784 

440 KAINS AVENUE 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February , 1 '^'54 



Chapman's Youth Fashion Shoppe 

INFANTS- & CHILDREN'S WEAR 

S. & L. Green Stamps 

Open Every Friday Evening 'lil 9 

556 San Mateo Ave. JUno 8-1109 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

WALTERS COCKTAILS 

LUNCH — SANDWICHES 
Frank & Babe 



JUno 8-9974 
SAN BRUNO 



Mateo Avenue 
CALIFORI«A 



F. HOLMAN. Builder 

RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 

Phone JUno 8-3294 

1681 JENEVEIN AVENUE 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS 

DONALD G. FRENCH 



SAN BRUNO 



CALIFORNIA 



KRAMERS RESTAURANTS 

"WE NEVER CLOSE" 

Harry A. Kramer Jack A. Kramer 

675 El Camino Real 3636 El Camino Real 

SAN BRUNO CALIFO RNIA PALO ALTO 

ZOLA'S BEAUTY SALON 

Phone JUno 8-7844 

436V2 SAN MATEO AVENUE 

SA N BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

LARRY'S MOHAWK SERVICE 

Phone JUno 8-9752 

497 EL CAMINO REAL 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

ANTHONY ZICKE 

Gas Furnaces - General Sheet Metal Work 

THE TINKER 

175 El Camino Real JUno 8-1794 

SAN B RUNO CALIFORNIA 

SMITH & SON 

WATER SERVICE ENGINEERS 

Well Testing & Developing - General Repairing 

SALES AND SERVICE 

ARGO PUMPS - PEERLESS PUMPS 

Res. Phone JUno 8-2043 

Office Phone JUno 8-4342 

828 SAN MATEO AVENUE 

SA N BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

DUKE'S MARKET 

COMPLETE FOOD MARKET 
Meats - Vegetables - Fruits - Groceries 



G. L. De 



, Prop. 



Phone JU 8-4005 

899 SAN MATEO AVENUE 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

Tony's Flying A Service 

"LET'S GET ASSOCIATED" 

LUBRICATION — OIL CHANGE 

BRAKE SERVICE — WASH & POLISH 

MOTOR TUNE-UP 

Tony Cirelli 

Phone JUno 8-9846 

510 EL CAMINO REAL 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 



practice included civil registration of in- 
dustrial as well as municipal employees. 
A similar enactment of non-criminal 
fingerprint law was made in the 1 rans- 
vaal on January 1, 1908, where widely- 
inclusive civilian fingerprinting was made 
legally imperative. 

As already indicated in connection 
with the famous South American crimi- 
nologist, Juan Vucetich, fingerprinting 
was well established in the Argentine at 
an early date, this being one of the first 
countries to employ it. Succeeding de- 
velopment and expansion included the ex- 
tensive registration of civic retainers and 
others engaged in public service, as well 
as of domestics. Descriptive information 
for passports also included fingerprints. 
Through Vucetich's example in the Ar- 
gentine, other South American states fol- 
lowed with the installation of similar 
programs, and, on October 20, 1905, an 
agreement was formed among Argen- 
tine, Chili, Uruguay and Brazil, whereby 
all of these were included in the scope 
of fingerprint registration, and provision 
was made for an exchange of photographs 
and records of outstanding offenders, and 
unidentified casualties. 

Personal identification, of a sort, came 
into being in Me.xico, with a bureau of 
anthropometry was set up at the Belem 
Prison on September 1, 1895, by Dr. Ig- 
nacio Ocampo, the movement having 
been furthered some years previously by 
Fernandez Ortigosa. But, like all other 
trials of body-measurement systems, this 
also finally was discarded, and it is a 
significant circumstance that within re- 
cent years, national registration has made 
mandatory the fingerprinting of every 
man, woman and child within the bound- 
aries of Mexican territory. 

In French Indo-China, fingerprinting 
was selected to replace anthropometry, 
which had been adopted in 1879 and 
employed at Saigon. Another original 
technique in fingerprint classification was 
compiled here by M. Pottecher, although 
the advocation enjoyed no great popu- 
larity elsewhere. In the Straits Settle- 
ments and the Malay States of Penang 
and Singapore, fingerprinting attained 
high success; record-exchange data were 
received from the United IVIalay States, 
from Malacca, and from Jahore. In the 
adjacent Philippines, fingerprints came 
into commercial recognition and usage, 
even in banking. 

In Australia, as might be expected, the 
Galton-Henry application attained popu- 
larity coincidental with its rise in other 
British possessions; Sydney was selected 
as the Continental Bureau, and an active 
exchange of records continued with 
Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, Melbourne 
and other important centers. 



CHAPEAUX by ROZE 

CUSTOM-MADE - CALIFORNIA 
IN BETTER STORES EVERYWHERE 

WILSON DILLS REALTY 

Telephones JUno 8-3177 — PLaza 5-9130 

299 EL CAMINO REAL 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

J. W. KOKLICH 

JEWELER 

JU 3-2930 

583 SAN MATEO AVENUE 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

CALDERONI'S MARKET 

GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - MEATS 

Phone JUno 3-2340 

875 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

C & M RICHFIELD SERVICE 

Phone JUno 8-9949 

700 EL CAMINO REAL 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

HIGHSMITH REALTY CO. 

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 

Phone Bus. JU 3-2732 — Res. JU 3-2732 

777 Kains Avenue Corner of Linden 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 

Spencer's Self Service Laundry 

Finished Laundry - Dry Cleaning 



713 Cam 
SAN BRUNO 



JU 3-1947 

CALIFORNIA 



Jack & Paul's Signal Service 
Station 

Tires - Tubes - Batteries - Accessories 



H. K. "Doc" COLLINS 

LICENSED CONTRACTOR 

FULLY INSURED 

PAINTING - DECORATING - PAPERHANGING 



Phone JUno 8-3917 
SAN BRUNO 



400 Chapman Avenue 
CALIFORNIA 



WHITIE'S AUTO PARTS 

AUTOMOTIVE MACHINE SHOP SERVICE 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL JOBBERS 



Phone JUno 8-5300 
SAN BRUNO 



El Camino at Angus 
CALIFORNIA 



S & M MOTORS 

OTT MOLINARI 

Phones: Bus. JUno 8-3762 — Res. JUno 8-3058 

601 So. EI Camino Real 

LOMITA PARK 

SAN BRUNO CALIFORNIA 



Fchruan'. J 954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



THE BEVERAGE HOUSE 

BEERS — LIQUORS — WINES 

Frank Eilert 

We Deliver — Phone Fireside 5-4401 

40 - 37th Avenue, Just West of El Camino Real 

SAN MATEO CALIFORNIA 

WANDER INN 

Cocktails & Liquors - Beautiful Marine View 

Ilium nated at Nght — Joe & Maggie Delucchi 

Phone FLanders 5-3787 

PEDRO VALLEY BEACH 

One-Half Mile South of Rockaway 





HAZEL'S 


CASINO 






COCKTAILS 


— DANCING 






MOTEL APARTMENTS 






Hazel Nickola, Proprietor 




Oce 


in Blvd. Ph 


jne FLanders 


5-9992 


SHARP PARK 


CALIFORNIA 



Beautiful — Secluded — Modern 

OLIVET MEMORIAL PARK 



Columbarium — Cr 



PLaza 5-0322 
COLMA San Mateo County 



COLMA GOLF DRIVING RANGE 



Hours 8 A.M. 'till 10 P.M. 

Phone PLaza 5-8140 

3325 JUNIPERO SERRA BLVD. 

COLMA CALIFORNIA 



Eastside Bakery 

specializing in Birthday and 
Wedding Cakes 

PORTUGUESE SW^EET 
BREAD 

Otto A. Redman 

CYpress 2-0888 

1060 E. Santa Clara St. 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



DALMO VICTOR 
COMPANY 

Leader in 
AIRBORNE RADAR 

ANTENNAS 

I4l4 EI Camino Real 
Phone LY 3-3131 

San Carlos, Calif. 



RESEARCH GRANT 

The Traffic Institute of Northwestern 
University has received a $10,000 grant 
from the Allstate Insurance Company to 
conduct research and development work 
in the street and highway traffic field, 
according to Franklin M. Kreml, Insti- 
tute director. 

This is the second year the funds ha\e 
been granted. Last year $5,000 was allo- 
cated to the Traffic Institute by Allstate. 

In connection with the granting of the 
funds, Calvin Fentress, Jr., president of 
Allstate said : 

"This year our company has substan- 
tially enlarged the grant made to the 
Traffic Institute because of our high re- 
gard for the IVaffic Institute's program. 

"We are pleased to make this contri- 
bution to the splendid work that is being 
done to help public officials meet their 
responsibilities in traffic supervision and 
accident prevention." 

The Allstate funds, Mr. Kreml said, 
will be used to further that phase of the 
Institute's program directed by James 
Stannard Baker, director of research and 
development. 

Institute activities cover a broad pro- 
gram of traffic training, field and exten- 
sion service, publications, research and 
development. 

Principal financial supporters of the 
Institute, which was established in 193b, 
are the Automotive Safety Foundation, 
the Kemper Foundation for Fraffic Safe- 
ty, the Association of Casualty and Sure- 
ty Companies, the National Asociation of 
Automotive Mutual Insurance Com- 
panies, and the Liberty Mutual Insur- 
ance Company. Contract work is done 
for the U. S. Bureau of Public Roads, 
the American Association of Motor Ve- 
hicle Administrators, the \J . S. Army, 
and the U. S. Air Force. 



WATER HEATERS 

Don't get into hot water over your 
automobile's heater. Proper installation 
of an automobile hot water heater is 
essential if maximum efficiency is to be 
obtained, the California State Automo- 
bile Association advises. This type of 
heater should be installed so that the 
water in the heater will be at least two 
inches below the water level of the car 
radiator, and lower if possible. 



WORSHIP OF KATCHINAS 

Fhe Pueblo of Zuni, located in west- 
ern New Mexico, is reported by the Na- 
tional Automobile Club to have a form 
of worship centered on many gods that 
are called Katchinas. 



Car/o's PIZZERIA 

SPAGHETTI - RAVIOLI 

Italian Specialties — Orders to Take Out 

Juno 8-9952 1 125 El Camino Real 

LOMITA PARK CALIFORNIA 

ORLANDO'S LIQUOR STORE 

WiNES - BEERS - LIQUORS 
FREE DELIVERY 



225 El Camin( 
LOMITA PARK 



JUno 8-8032 
CALIFORNIA 



"DUTCH" SCHNEICKERT 

QUALITY RETAIL MEATS 

Diamond 3-0896 

202 MYRTLE ROAD 

BURLINGAME CALIFORNIA 

MARGARET'S DRESS SHOP 

White Stag Sportswear - Rosenblum's Sport 

Jackets - Pandora Lingerie 

Jewelry by Caro - Darlenc Sweaters 

Charge Accounts — Lay-away Plan 

Open FKday nite until 9:00 P.M. 



IDS Park Boule 
MILLBRAE 



JUno 8-0983 
CALIFORNIA 



ROLLY SOMER 



THE PENINSULA'S BEST STOCKED 
LIQUOR STORE 



EL CAMINO AT SELBY LANE 
REDWOOD CITY CALIFORNIA 



WELLS P. 

GOODENOUGH, 

INC. 



CONTRACTORS 



Box 120 
PALO ALTO, 
CALIFORNIA 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



Peninsula Stove & Gas Appliance 
Service 

Water Heaters - Furnaces - Gas Refrigerators 



Russ Bodine's Texaco Service 

Marfax Lubrication - Minor Repairing 

Washing - Polishing 

Phone JUno 8-9861 

941 EL CAMINO REAL at Santa Maria 

LOMITA P ARK CALIFORNIA 

THE SNACK SHACK 

FOUNTAIN AND LUNCHEON SPECIALTIES 

3719 Mac ARTHUR BOULEVARD 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

ALAMEDA APOTHECARY 

PROFESSIONAL PHARMACY 
FREE DELIVERY VERN AVELAR 



Phone LA 3-6168 
ALAMEDA 



2237 Central Avenue 
CALIFORNIA 



HANK'S KITCHEN CABINETS 

Formica & Panelyte Sink Tops 
Evening Appointments SWeetwood 8-1384 

96th Ave. at E. 14th Street (1410 - 96th Ave.) 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

UNCLE AL'S RADIO SHOP 

TELEVISION AND APPLIANCES 

Bill Johnson Clifford C. Cunningham 

KEllog 2-4340 40.06 MacArthur Blvd. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

GEORGETTE CUNNINGHAM 

ANTIQUES 

Want to buy old glass, china, linens, and 

bric-a-brac. Also old prints and bronzes 

Phone LA 6-7434 1534 Solano Ave. 

ALBANY CALIFORNIA 



Marshall Bag & Barrel Co. 

BARRELS, DRUMS, BURLAP, COTTON BAGS, 

PAPER BAGS - NEW - USED 

RECONDITIONED 

Don Marshall, Prop. 



3454 Haven Street 
OAKLAND 



Piedmont S-1077 
CALIFORNIA 



SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

Oakland Branch: Phone GLencourt 2-4S88 

1101 GROVE STREET 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN IRON 

AND 

BODY WORKS 



1165 -67TH Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



INSPECTORS' BUREAU 

Beyond the city limits of San Jose lie 
the duties and problems of the Santa 
Clara County Sheriff's Department. Be- 
hind the routine duties of the deputy 
sheriff's lies the nucleus of the entire 
department — the Bureau of Inspectors. 
This bureau handles everything from 
homicide to e.xposition of bunco games, 
through the us eof specialist teams. 

The specialist team is composed of two 
men highly trained in one particular field 
of investigation. These teams are put 
into action the moment an act is reported. 
The initial investigation is generally han- 
dled by the uniform patrol and then the 
specialist teams are dispatched by the 
captain of the Bureau of Inspectors. 

Santa Clara County Sheriff's Bureau 
of Inspectors has four outstanding Spe- 
cialist teams. Due to the greater fre- 
quency of burglary and petty thefts two 
teams, well trained in this field, are 
necessary. Homicide, armed robbery and 
assault with a deadly weapon are han- 
dled by another team and forgeries, 
grand-theft, sex and bunco rackets are 
handled by still a different team. 

The inspectors bureau now has a per- 
sonnel of twenty-eight, this is quite an in- 
crease over the four investigators used a 
few years back. Expansion in the depart- 
ment has been constant with the in- 
creased housing and families coming into 
the area. The department's teletype let- 
ters are now received on a twenty-four 
hour basis. (This is a state wide service. ) 
Also, there has been an addition of a 
Juvenile Department to increase the bu- 
reau's efficiency in handling any type of 
case. AVorking directly under the Cap- 
tain of the Inspector's Bureau are two in- 
spectors and a police woman, all well 
trained in handling juvenile problems. 

One man who has watched the con- 
tinual growth of the Bureau is the cap- 
tain of the inspectors, James Cunning- 
ham. Captain Cunningham was born in 
the Evergreen District of San Jose No- 
vember 7, 1902. His school education 
was not fancy — he was unable to attend 
college because of a necessity to work. 
He entered the San Jose Police Depart- 
ment in 1924 and absorbed sound educa- 
tion in police procedure and techniques 
during his ten years in the city depart- 
ment. He then spent two years in busi- 
ness and again returned to police work. 
However, this time he entered the 
sheriff's department where he has re- 
mained for over fifteen years. 

Upon entering the Sheriff's Depart- 
ment James was introduced to the opera- 
tion of the teletype machine and for six 
vears he held this duty. He continued to 



A & B REALTORS 

"A Good Deal Depends upon the Broker" 

Phone LO 9-4532 

9821 MacARTHUR BLVD. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

BIGLERS STORE FOR MEN 

p. J. BIGLER 

14353 East 14th Street 

Phone LOckhaven 8-4336 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

LEM'S FOOD STORE 

FRANK LEM, Mgr. 

Phone LOckhaven 9-3148 

15287 HESPERIAN BLVD. 

SAN LORENZO CALIFORNIA 

ULIANA'S NURSERY 

Camellias — Rhododendrons — Azaleas 

Ornamental Plants — Fruit Trees — Rose: 

Bedding Plants — Flowers, the Most Graciot 

Gift 

Phone TRinidad 2-1107 

10263 MacArthur Blvd. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

VAN'S MARKET 

H H. AUBRY 

Phone KEllog 4-3118 
3901 - 35th AVENUE 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

MACDONALD'S MARKET 
VINCE'S GROCERY 

2884 THIRTY-EIGHTH AVENUE 

Grocery KElIogg 3-3611 

Meat KEllog 2-5366 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

LENS- Ford 

ENGLISH BUILT FORDS 

Franchised Dealer — L. Gallagher 

Phone ANdover 1-6269 

4647 Foothill Blvd. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



CORNETTI & SON 

VACUUM CLEAN CHIMNEY AND REPAIR 
PATIOS — BARBECUES 
OUTDOOR FIREPLACES 

2413 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

BERKELEY POULTRY CO. 

A Simoni, Prop. 

Wholesale and Retail Poultry 

FRESH RANCH EGGS - LIVE AND DRESSED 

POULTRY FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



1411 San Pablo Ave 
BERKELEY 



le LA S-6202 
CALIFORNIA 



Insured 
Transporters, Inc. 

R. S. KOENIG 

INTERSTATE TRUCK 
CARRIERS 

LOckhaven 2-8422 

251 Park Street 
SAN LEANDRO, CALIF. 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



LUCCA DELICATESSEN 

SALUMl — RAVIOLI — TAGLIARINI 

FACTORY 

Telephone TRinidad 2-6311 

9637 EAST 14TH STREET 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

HANK'S KITCHEN CABINETS 

FORMICA & PANELYTE SINK TOPS 

Phone SWeetwood 8-1384 

96th Avenue at E. 14th Street 

(1410 - 96th Avenue) 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Vince's Auto Sales and Repairs 

TOPS IN USED CARS AND REPAIRS 

Vince's Will Convince You 

Phone KEllog 2-5810 

4817 E 14TH ST. & 1313 - 49th Ave. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Ward's Radio and Television 

ADMIRAL TELEVISION DEALER 

Complete Radio and Television Service 

Phone SWeetwood 8-8945 

6633 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

VERNS DRUG STORE 

Vern Avelar 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

Phone TRinidad 2-4411 or 2-1348 

86th & BANCROFT AVENUES 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

GENE ALLEN'S UNION SERVICE 

••HOME OF FRIENDLY SERVICE" 
Phone SWeetwood 8-9999 
8809 MacArthur Boulevard 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

MANUEL S. VIEIRA - Grocer 

Bus. Phone SWeetwood 8-3737 

2252 - 94th AVENUE 

Res. Phone SWeetwood 8-7402 

Res. 3609 Columbian Drive 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



STANDARD TRAILER CO. 

415 SAN LEANDRO BOULEVARD 
SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

PARISH BROTHERS 

General Contractors 

daxon P. Parish Richard I. Parish 

Harold O. Parish 

P. O. Box 6 

Phone 330 

1205 EAST 2ND STREET 

BENICIA CALIFORNIA 



Bartenders & 

Culinary Workers 

Union 

LOCAL 822 

405 E. 10th Street 
Phone 2-6088 
PITTSBURG, 
CALIFORNIA 



study and absorb during this period and 
was later promoted to a senior deputy in 
investigation, then to inspector and final- 
ly to his present position as Captain of 
the entire Inspector's Bureau. 

Captain Cunningham is a friendly 
well spoken man and well educated in 
his specializ.ed field of investigation. In 
his twenty-five years of police work I 
felt that Captain Cunningham must have 
had some very unusual experiences. 

When talking with the Captain I ask- 
ed if he could relate any outstanding per- 
sonal e.xperience but I found him to be 
a modest man relating only experiences 
of the men in his department. 

Later when talking to, one of the in- 
spectors, I was told of the time that Cap- 
tain Cunningham arrested a bank robber 
less than fourteen minutes following the 
actual robbery. The bank was the Bev- 
erly Burbank Branch of the First Na- 
tional which had been held up by John 
Franz. As the inspector explained, Cun- 
ningham had a description of the bank 
robber and his car. As he was driving 
North he recognized the robbery suspect 
speeding in the opposite direction. He 
immediately made a "U" turn, caught 
the car and apprehended Franz. 

Such an arrest would require an ever 
alert eye and constant presence of mind. 
I am confident that this particular inci- 
dent, great or small, in a large measure 
shows the caliber of men we have direct- 
ing our local police departments. Men 
like Sheriff Hornbuckle, Chief Black- 
more and Captain Cunningham make 
our cities and counties ever increasingly 
safe. 



LICENSE SUSPENSION 

California residents involved in serious 
violations of motor vehicle laws in an- 
other state may have their driver's license 
suspended or revoked in this state under 
the provision of a new law, the Califor- 
nia State Automobile Association warns. 

At the discretion of the Department 
of Motor Vehicles, the driver's license 
of a resident of California may be sus- 
pended or revoked if that person is guilty 
of certain offenses in another state which, 
had they been convicted of the same of- 
fenses in this state, would have resulted 
in the loss of the license here. 

The CSAA further points out that an- 
other new law requires suspension of the 
driving privileges of any resident of Cali- 
fornia upon receipt of a report by the 
Motor Vehicle Department that his or 
her driving privileges has been suspended 
in another state for failure to meet the 
financial security provisions of that state, 
if such failure would compel suspension 
here. 



KING KOVERS 

CUSTOM BUILT TOPS — SEAT COVERS 

UPHOLSTERY 

2840 Broadway HIgate 4-5375 

4035 - Mlh Street KEllog 6-1661 

O AKLAND CALIFORNIA 

WHITNEY'S GROCERY 



Phone KEllog 6-0622 
4369 Fleming Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKMORE SERVICE 

"Let Us Do It" 

BATTERIES— TIRES AND LUBRICATION 

Phone KE 2-9656 Jim Wilson 

1425 Leimert Boulevard 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

DR. ARTHUR R. BRADLEY 

Phone KEUog 4-7043 
1438 - 46th AVENUE 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE E. HARRIS 

REALTOR — GENERAL INSURANCE 

"Everything in Real Estate" — Notary Public 

Phones: SW 8-5144 — Res. TR 2-8671 

14263 E. 14th Street 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

Wood and Wood Super Service 

RICK WOOD 

Phone LO 9-9962 

598 ESTUDILLO AVENUE 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

ALVES SERVICE 

TRANSPORTATION CO. 
"Ship By Truck" — Phone SW 8-3061 

General Office: 1947 Davis Street 
SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 



CORNETTI & SON 



Patios — Barbe 



an Chimney and Repair 
:ues — Outdoor Fireplaces 



Phone LAndscape 4-5242 

2413 CALIFORNIA STREET 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



HOME FIXTURE BUILDERS 

1189 - 65th STREET 
Phone OLympic 2-0670 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



I ]. A. BRYANT 

General Contractor 

• 

1806 Capital Street 

Vallejo, Calif. 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



W. "Woodie" Morris Motor Co. 

"Where Customers Send their Friends" 

Bus. LO 8-8820 Res. K£ 3-3533 

6329 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

YEP'S CAFE 

American Family Style Dinners or Chinese 

Served to Take Out 

Phone LO 9-9636 — Wm. S. Yep, Prop. 

5825 FOOTHILL BLVD. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

YATES FACTORY SERVICE 



Phone AN 1-4910 - 
OAKLAND 



& E. 34th St. 

CALIFORNIA 



L. F. WITHARM 



Phone AN 1-1688 — 
OAKLAND 



1718 E. 12th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



ANDY'S LIQUOR STORE 

Phone KEllog 2-9776 

1300 E. 14TH STREET 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



HODGE FLORISTS 

FLORIST DESIGN 
4420 Piedmont Ave. HUmboIdt 3-9800 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

FAMILY GROCERY 

Phone THornwaU 3-8037 

1701 PARKER STREET 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



OLYMPIC 3-3713 

Higgins - Magee 

Printing Ink and 

Chemical Company 



PRINTING INKS 

1219 Park Avenue 
Emeryville, Calif. 



FIRST LIE DETECTOR 

The world's first lie detector can be 
seen at \Vashington State college. 

It is an odd combination of bolts and 
belts that the inventor, John Larson, first 
used in solving a series of thefts in a girls' 
dormitory back in the year 1921. Detec- 
tives had been stimiped by the robberies 
in this dormitory on the University of 
California campus. Larson, a pre-med 
student, with police permission, adminis- 
tered the test to the girls living in the 
dormitory, and, within an hour, with the 
machine's aid, had found the thief. 

Thus, from Larson's polygraph, was 
born the world's first lie detector. Lar- 
son, a friend of Dr. V. A. Leonard's, 
loaned the contraption to the present 
chairman of the department of police 
science and administration. 

At the time Dr. Leonard first knew of 
the machine he was on the Berkeley Cali- 
fornia, police force, which he joined in 
the early twenties. During those years he 
saw lie detecting machines in acting in a 
number of the two thousand criminal 
cases in which it served. 

"This machine helped to give the 
Berkeley police force its reputation as one 
of the finest in the nation" says Dr. 
Leonard, adding: "The polygraph, 
known popularly as the lie detector, soon 
became a necessary part of police equip- 
ment." 

Improvements and stepped up produc- 
tion of lie detectors put the original ma- 
chine out of use in 1930, and it was 
placed in storage. There it remained un- 
til 1944 when Dr. Leonard had it sent 
to ^VSC, thinking of its double-\aIue as 
a collector's item and to aid in student 
study. 

Now, the machine is enclosed in a 6 
foot by 2lA foot glass case and looks 
greatly unlike the modern lie detector. It 
is equipped with two recording needles, 
which are in turn joined by a sensitive 
transmission device so that their writings 
are scratched on a six-inch strip of paper, 
coated with lamp-black. Hooked up to 
the cardiac and pulmonary systems these 
needles record any change in rate of pulse 
and respiration. 

Dr. Leonard says: "Invention and 
ultimate success of the lie detector has 
not only proven many guilty of crimes, 
but in addition it has freed innocent men 
who might have been convicted. It has 
cut the cost of police protection and saved 
hours of investigation. It is but one of 
many instruments the modern law en- 
forcement agency uses." 

Dr. Leonard invites all who arc in- 
terested to see this machine in its quar- 
ters in his office in Morrill hall. 



CORMIER'S FOUNTAIN 

Phone KEIIog 2-9816 

3719 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

J & J Body and Paint Shop 

Gas Tanks and Radiators Repaired 
BOBS AUTO LAUNDRY 

nd Polishing — Under Seal 



Phone LO 8-0285 

OAKLAND 



7613 E. 14th Str 

CALIFORNIA 



GATES AUTO BODY 

AUTO PAINTING 

5341 College Ave. HUmboIdt 3-7303 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

DICK'S INN 

Phone Piedmont 5-9350 

nil STANFORD AVENUE 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

THE CHILD'S WARDROBE 

"Everythinjf for the Baby" 
Phone AShberry 0250 — 1563 Solano Ave. 
BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 

SHEPHERD'S 

PELTON CENTER 

Distinctive Casuals — Mary J. Shepherd 

Phone LO 9-7373 1S5S E. 14th STREET 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 



VIC'S LIQUORS 



"The Best In Bottles" 
Phone SWeetwood 8-9340 Victor H. Rosen 

10623 East Fourteenth Street 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



BERKELEY POULTRY CO. 

A Simoni, Prop. 

Wholesale and Retail Poultry 

FRESH RANCH EGGS — LIVE AND DRESSED 

POULTRY FOR ALL OCCASIONS 



1411 San Pablo 
BERKELEY 



Pho 



le LA 5-6202 
CALIFORNIA 



VERMILLION WHOLESALE MEATS 

Distributor Port Stockton Sausage 

Res Phone KEIIog 2-1508 

JOHN W. JOSSE 

Bus Phone SWeetwood 8-6709 

6318 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Steam Heat - Cozy Rooms - Down- 
town and Convenient to Everything 
Under New Management - Colored 
Welcome 

HOTEL MONROE 

628 Twelfth Street 
Oakland, California 

Telephone TEmpIebar 2-9221 

• 

ROXY HOTEL 

3619 San Pablo Avenue 
Emeryville, California 

Telephone Piedmont 5-9366 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Littrell, Mgrs. 



Fchriiarw 1054 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



VIOLET'S REST HOME 

Violet Milleman Trained Nurse & Prop. 

Phone ANdover 1-2307 

5400 FOOTHILL BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

WITHROW GARAGE 

TRUCK REPAIR & RE-BUILDING 

BUD WITHROW 

Phone TRinidad 2-7954 

829 SAN LEANDRO BLVD. 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

REX'S DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

Phone LO 9-6100 

5838 E. 14TH STREET at SEMINARY 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

UNCLE AL'S RADIO SHOP 

TELEVISION AND APPLIANCES 

Phone KEUog 2-4340 

400S MacARTHUR BLVD. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

WALT'S DINER 

CHINESE AMERICAN FOOD 

FOOD TO TAKE OUT 

Phone LO 8-2136 

8012 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

McBRAYER & WALP 

ASSOCIATED SERVICE 
4259 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

WILLIS BROTHERS 

"Your Friendly Richfield Dealers 

BATTERIES — TIRES — ACCESSORIES 

Phone LO 9-9816 

88TH AND MacARTHUR BLVD. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



H. F. WALKER 

MAYONNAISE AND APPETIZERS 

Phone LO 2-2166 

751 - 105th Avenue 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

DIAMOND JANITORIAL SERVICE 
& SUPPLY COMPANY 

Personalized Service 

LOUIS A. ROLLINO 

Main Office 6101 Vallejo St. — HU 3-3313 

EMERYVILLE 8, CALIF. 

Richmond Office 477 - 12th St. — BE 4-9272 

RICHMOND, CALIF. 

MARSHALL BAG & BARREL CO. 

USED STEEL DRUMS — DRUM INCINERATORS 

WOODEN BARRELS — FIBRE DRUMS 

Bought, Sold and Reconditioned 

Phone Piedmont 5-1077 
3454 HAVEN STREET 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



LOUIS VALDOVINOS 

REALTOR — INSUROR 

Good Deals In Real Estate 

Bus Phone LO 9-6172 — Res. TR 2-2988 

9978 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



JUDGE AND JURY 

Editor's Note: We will have to con- 
fess. Not too long ago we were employed 
for the purpose of writing a lot of Cali- 
fornia history. A week or so ago we were 
glancing through our notes and decided 
that the problems of law enforcement 
officers in those days would rival those in 
the field today. For instance there was 
the case of California's first lynching. 
This happened in Sacramento early in 
1850. It did actually happen. \Ve cannot 
vouch for the conversation. We just did 
our best to reconstruct it. But the inci- 
dent is true. What would you do with 
this judge and jury ? 

Spring came and expanded streams, 
made fat by the thaw of Sierra snows, 
swallowed rich bars and sent the miners, 
idle and irritable, into the streets of 
Sacramento where the sweaty palm of 
tension prodded their restless souls. 

The saloon they called The Shades 
was a mud -caked tent where argonauts 
stood on the hard packed earth and rest- 
ed^ their elbows on an unfinished plank 
which served well enough as a bar. 

From his post behind the plank, Mark 
Stewart watched his customers warily 
The bar was lined from end to end with 
the rugged blend of raw humanity 
which had drifted west with the talk 
of gold and founded the city by Sutter's 
Fort. Quiet men now. No shouting or 
laughing or talk of home. They ordered 
their drinks in low pitched grunts and 
downed them with the thirsty gulps of 
those who had seen and done too much 
too fast. Strange, somber men whose eyes 
never lifted from the whiskey ringlets 
their glasses made on the board, each one 
pretending the neighbor whose shoulder 
he rubbed was in another plane or an- 
other world. 

One bottle was dry and another near 
empty. The men drank steadily, still 
avoiding each other's gaze with eyes 
which reflected an odd mixture of shame 
and definance. Stewart waited nerviously 
for someone to talk. One word would 
break the tension. 

The right word. But it could not 
come from him. They could not know 
he had been there. Thei,' would resent 
the fact that he had rushed pell mell 
from the fringe of the crowd back to his 
makeshift tavern in time to take advan- 
tage of the rush of business he knew 
was sure to come. 

Still, the silence was getting the best 
of him. A weird silence with a discordant 
rumble in the background, drifting 
toward the river from the east. A rum- 
ble which had been a roar a few minutes 
ago when the crowd had been a mob 



LEOGRANDE BROS. 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 
395 FOURTH STREET 

OAKLAND CALIF ORNIA 

BERNI-LEE FOUNTAIN 

Phone LOckhaven 8-5976 
7427 MacARTHUR BOULEVARD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Kellog 2-7836 H. C. James 

James Clock Manufacturing Co. 

Manufacturers of 

"JAMES REMIND-O-CLOCK" 

5307 E. 14th STREET 

OAKLAND CALIF ORNIA 

Georgette Cunningham - Anf'it\ues 

We Wish to Buy old Linens, Lace, Bric-a-brac 
e LAnd 



1520 Sol 
ALBANY 



ape 6-7434 
CALIFORNIO 



JACK WHEELS AUTO BAZAAR 

We "Wheel Out" a Better Deal 

Phone SW 8-6523 

8163 EAST 14TH STREET 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAM'S BROS. MARKET 

GROCERIES— FRUITS— VEGETABLES 

Phone TRinidad 2-6983 

507 DUTTON AVENUE 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 

DR. ROBERT F. THAYER 

EXODONTIA AND ORAL SURGERY 

Telephone HIgate 4416 

301 California Building - 1736 Franklin Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



KEN WILSON • Realtor 

REALTOR — BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

NOTARY— REAL ESTATE— LOANS 

INSURANCE 

Phone LO 9-4188 — Res. LO 9-8937 

6021 FOOTHILL BOULEVORD 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



M E T A L C O 

ALUMINUM STORE FRONTS 

DOORS— FRAMES— SASH 

Phone OLympic 2-7470 

1505 - 62ND STREET 

EMERYVILLE CALIFORNIA 



AVENUE AUTO WRECKING 

New & Used Parts — Glass Installed 

We Buy. Sell or Exchange Cars 

Phone HU 3-0728 or HU 3-2178 

AL SANTONI 



3103 San Pablo Av 
3120 San Pablo Av 



CALIFORNIA 



PROGRESSIVE PLATING & 
ENAMELING WORKS 

PRECISION PLATING 
Licensed by United Chromium Corporation 

• Phones TE 2-0S87 or TE 2-7884 
880 - 27TH STREET 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February, 1954 



JACK WHEELS AUTO BAZAAR 

We "Wheel Out" a Better Deal 

SWeetwood 8-6523 

8163 EAST 14TH STREET 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

REX'S DRUG STORE 

Prescription Specialists 

REXALL 

Ph. LO 9-6100 5838 E. 14th St. at Seminary 

OAKLAND ^CALIFORNIA 

CHILD'S WARDROBE 

CLOTHING - TOYS - WHEEL GOODS 



1563 Solano Ave 
BERKELEY 



LAndscape 5-1044 
CALIFORNIA 



W. L. Mitchener & Company 

Realtors — Bars — Hotels — Motels — Insuran, 
Carl S. Mitchener 



Phone TE 2-6239 
OAKLAND 



343 Thirteenth Street 
CALIFORNIO 



HARBOR SUPPLY COMPANY 

Electrical & Plumbing Contractors 

Building Material Headquarters 

1141 MAIN STREET 

MORRO BAY CALIFO RNIA 

Homer T. Hayward Lumber Co. 

Quality and Service Since 1919 

BILL ALSIP, Manager 

Cor. Fifth and Magnolia Phone 2291 

MORRO BAY CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES 

EARL S. ROBERTS 

Electric — Plumbing — Heating & Appliances 



MORRO BAY 



CALIFORNIA 



IN SAN LUIS OBISPO IT'S 

HOTEL ANDREWS 

J. M. P. Hewson, Manager 

901 OSOS STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

California Motor Express, Ltd. 

CME FIRST FOR SERVICE 



L. E. Chr 



Agent 



390 PACIFIC STREET 

Phone 800 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



Sleep off the Hi-way 
MOTEL 

Ju,st off U. S. 101 Hi-Wav 
QUIET! 

Thermostatically Controlled Heat 

Look for our Neon Sign inside 

South City Limits 

Arthur Kentel 

Phone 791 
1000 South Street « 
San Luis Obispo, California 



these men had led. He could picture them 
lingering now, standing curiously by the 
trunk of the tall oak tree on K Street 
where the body hung, still twitching. 

Stewart could not stand it. He had to 
talk. 

"Nice day," he observed. 

Joe Stephens, the tall young man in 
the center of the bar drained his tumbler 
m one quick gulp and wiped the glisten- 
nig drops from his beard and moustache. 

"Nice day for a hanging," he replied. 

Flecks of grey speckled the beard of 
the man ne.xt to him. He tilted the bot- 
tle and drained its contents into the two 
glasses. Then he lifted his own and 
stared soberly at his companion. 

"You should know, Joe," he declared. 
It was your rope. ' 

The young man's color deepened. 
" 1 hat's not funny, Bartlett. This is a 
bad day for a man to be funny on." 

"I didn't mean it funny. I'm glad you 
had the rope." 

"You sure look like you're glad." 

"Take it easy, boys," Stewart admon- 
ished. "You've had enough excitement 
for one day." 

Stephens drained his glass and stared 

at the bar pensively. "I wish I still had 

the rope." 

"I don't, Joe." A dark, clean shaven 

man wearing a tall beaver hat and bright 

satin vest addressed him. "The devil had 

it coming, didn't he?" 

"I guess he had it coming," Stephens 

answered. "I don't know. I didn't see itl 

All I knou- is that the blacksmith was 

my friend." 

"I saw it all," the dark man assured 

him. "He had it coming all right. 1 was 
standing at the bar in the Mansion 

House when the blacksmith poked his 
head through the door. He never had a 
chance." 

"That's right, Joe," Bartlett chimed 
m. "The poor fellow didn't even get to 
the bar. Got it right through the back 
of the neck." 

The dark man shook his head. "Not 
the back, Bartlet. He didn't get that far. 
The thing had been building up for 
quite a while. Not with the blacksmith, 
but with the gambler. You see, he was 
new in town and 1 guess he figured on 
making a quick killing." 

The dark man paused and riffled a 
stack of gold coins through his fingers 
significantly. "I don't suppose he knew 
there were some pretty good poker play- 
ers here back in the da\s when John 
Sutter was the big cheese out at the Fort 
and we thought all the gold in the coun- 
try was running around on the backs of 
beaver and otter." 



BEST WISHES 

Pacific Engineers & Surveyors, Inc. 

Eng.neer.ng — Surveying — Blueprinting 
Kenneth Beck — W. E. McLennan 



857 Palm Str^^. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Pho 



SHANGHAI LOW 

FAMILY STYLE DINNER 

Finest Chinese Foods 

8S1 Palm Street Phone 12S0-J 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



HAPPY TRAILERING FROM 

Wyman T. Harder Trailer Sales 

1661 Monterey Street 
SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



RANCHOTEL 

One of the Finest Motor Hotels on the Hiway 

Excellent Cafe on the Property 

Quiet — Secluded — Picturesque 

Phone 2333 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



A. O. JOHNSON 

REDI-MIX CONCRETE 

Curbs — Sidewalks— Foundations 

EVERYTHING IN CONCRETE 

Christian & Victoria Sts. Phone 703 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CAL°FORMA 



BEST WISHES 

J. C. PENNEY CO. 

YOUR FRIENDLY STORE 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



Joe Carreia's Mobil Service 

BEST LUBE JOBS IN TOWN' 

TIRES - BATTERIES & ACCESSORIES 

Foothill Blvd & Morro Road Phone 3423 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



Utility Metal Products Mfrs. 

PUNCH PRESS WORK OF ALL KINDS 
Chas. A. Canepa — A. A. Cinepa 



1315 CARMEL STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



KIMBALL TIRE CO., INC. 

REPAIRING— BALANCED TREADING 

BATTERIES 
Distributors for SEIBERLING TIRES 



283 HIGUERA STREET 
Telephone 758 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



DON MOTEL 



1473 Monterey Street Phone 4316 

SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA 

ACE MOTEL 

94 TORO STREET phone 533-W 
SAN LUIS OBISPO. CAL IFORNIA 

BORIACK MOTOR COMPANY 

YOUR KAISER WILLYS DEALER 

SAI-ES & SERVICE 

75 — Large Selection of Used Cars 75 

1330 MONTEREY STREET 
Telephone 1469 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 









February. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



DOLLAR MARKET 

Your Handy Neighborhood Store 

QUALITY — LOW I-RICES — SERVICE 

Bud Poulsen Prop. 

Foothi.l & Old Morro Road Phone 160S 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

LANKFORD'S FOOTHILL MARKET 

Where Your Business is Most Appreciated 

Groceries - Meats - Fruits & Vegetables 

BEERS AND WINES 

Stop in and Say Hello — Nabor 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



J BEST V 

i C. R. "Clin 

Distr:butor General 



WISHES 

int" FARRAR 

Petroleum Products 
MOBILGAS 
Footh:ll & Calif. Blvd. Phone 1880 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA PARK GROCERY 

Groceries - Meals - Beer & Wines 
Soft DKnks — Ice Cream 

390 California Blvd. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



hone 2738-W 

CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 

MYRON W. LARSON 

DISTRIBUTOR OF SHELL PRODUCTS 
Box 70S 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

GEORGE BRANIN 

LICENSED CONTRACTOR 

SHEET METAL — HEATING 

no Stenner Street Phone 2824-W 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

TODD'S BEAR SERVICE 

Frame Straightening - Wheel Aligning and 



Bala 

FREE ESTIMATES 
303 HIGUERA 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



LES TODD 
Phone 3180 

CALIFORNIA 



UNIVERSAL AUTO PARTS CO. 

JOBBER AUTOMOTIVE REPLACEMENT 

PARTS 

Largest, Most Complete Stock in the County! 

969 MONTEREY STREET 
Phones 1418 and 1419 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



K A T Y 

Exclusive A. B. C. Station for San Luis Obispo 
County! 

M. "Marq" Marquardt, President - Gen. Mgr 



Dial 1340 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Box 700 

CALIFORNIA 



V^ALDORF BUFFET 

(THE HOUSE OF SHELBY) 

OLD FASHIONED HOSPITALITY 

Friendly Courteous Service 

BEER - WINE AND LIQUORS 

Bob Shelby — Your Host 



975 OSOS STREET 
SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 1002 
CALIFORNIA 



ROSE BOWL COURT 

16 New, strictly modern, fully-carpeted units 

with tubs or tile showers. Steam and Panelray 

Heat. Garages. San Luis Obispo's Finest. 

1575 Monterey St. (6 Blocks No. of City Center) 

Phone 647 
SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



"I Still don't get it, Sam," Bartlett 
protested. "The blacksmith wasn't play- 
ing with him, was he? What started the 
shooting anyway?" 

"No, the blacksmith didn't play with 
him," Sam replied. "The fellow went 
crazy, that's all. Just clean, plumb crazy. 
He came out here to a place where a 
man pays five dollars for a bed in a penny 
Hophouse and a dollar for a drink of 
whiskey and he couldn't make it. His 
pile was too small to begin with. And 
his table didn't make a dime all the time 
he was in the Alansion House. When the 
blacksmith poked his head through the 
door he was broke. Dead, flat broke. He 
was so mad he felt like shooting someone, 
so he just shot the first man that talked 
to him." 

"Well, that's murder, isn't it?" some- 
one inquired. 

"Sure, its murder," the dark man told 
him. "It's just like I said. The devil had 
it coming to him. In fact, maybe hanging 
was too good for him." 

"Where did the blacksmith get it?" 
Stephens inquired. 

"In the chest. As close as I could tell 
right through the heart," Sam declared. 

"I heard there was a girl mixed up in 
it," someone said. 

"That little dancing girl over at the 
Stinking Tent. One of the fair but 
frail." 

Once again Sam shook his head. "No. 
it vv'asn't the girl. The gambler wasn't 
in town long enough to get to know a 
girl." 

"Then the blacksmith must have said 
something." 

Sam grinned wryly. "He said some- 
thing all right." 

Stephens poured himself a brimming 
glassful, downed it, then turned to the 
dark man. "^Vhat did he say?" 

"He asked him what time it was." 

"That was all ?" 

"That was all." 

There was a long pause while Stephens 
filled his glass again and held it to the 
light. He drained it with a series of 
shorter sips. AVhen he spoke his voice 
was noticeably thicker. 

"We should have hung the sherifif 
too," he muttered. "He tried to save the 
gambler." 

"Now take it easy, Joe," Bartlett ad- 
monished. "The sheriff is all right. He 
was just trying to do his job." 

"His job isn't to protect murderers, is 
it?" Stephens demanded. 

"No," Sam interjected. "But he is 
supposed to protect one until he gets a 
fair trial. Then he can have the pleasure 
of hanging him all by himself." 



Phone P.O. 6-2482 Barney & Opal Barnhill 

PISMO BOWL 

EIGHT ALL MAPLE ALLEYS 

Sandwiches - Home Made Pastry - Coffee 

Soft Dr.nks - Beer 

277 POMEROY PISMO BEACH. CALIF. 

BEST WISHES FROM 

MORRO RECREATION CENTER 

Where Your Patronage is Most Appreciated! 

Joel Eubank & Bill Gould, Props. 

MORRO BAY CALIFORNIA 

FRED BROWN'S LIQUOR STORE 



842 MAIN STREET 
MOS.^O BAY CALIFORNIA 

BOTTLE LIQUOR STORE 

A COMPLETE LINE OF BEVERAGES 
Use Our Parking Lot for Your Convenience 

Dan & Julia Robertson 

931 MAIN STREET Phone 3347 

MOrC^.O tiAY CALIFORNIA 

Car/ KIRKeby Men's Wear 

54 Steps from the Traffic Light 

Van Heusen Shirts — Holeproof Sox 

Levis — Lee Hats — Botany Ties 



SEARS ROEBUCK AND CO. 

SHOP AT SEARS AND SAVE 

879 HIGUERA 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

ECONOMY DRUG CO. 

STORE NO. 2 

798 HIGUERA STREET Phone 488 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

RAY E. DUNLAP 

Distributor — Petri Wines and Calso Water 

Premium Quality FALSTAFF 
The Choicest Product of the Brewer's Art! 



P. O. Box 234 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 1934-W 

CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 



Guarantee Building-Loan 
Association of San Luis Obispo 



1127 GARDEN STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 362 

CALIFORNIA 



Mission Laundry & Dry Cleaning 

QUALITY PLUS SERVICE ALWAYS! 

331 PACIFIC STREET 
Phone 1440 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

DANTE'S CHOICE LIQUORS 

From The Gates of Heaven to Dante's "Inferno" 

955 HIGUERA STREET 
Phone 2197 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Fch 



1954 



ALL ROADS LEAD TO 

RHODES 

GENERAL PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

G. F. Rhodes 
950 Chorro Street Phone 1397 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 1S83J 

Real Home Cooking Wilkie Wilkins, Prop. 

NIPOMO LUNCH 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNERS 
"Absolute Tops" 

CALIFORNIA 

Banks Radiator and Battery Shop 

"RADIATOR SERVICE SINCE 1937" 



1011 Toro Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



ne 2184 

CALIFORNIA 



FRANKLIN RADIATOR 

Edgar J. Claassen, Prop. 

1185 MONTEREY STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

RANELL'S COFFEE SHOP 



1050 Monterey Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

MISSION TAILORING SERVICE 

CLEANING - PRESSING 

"We Specialize in Uniforms" 

1220 Morro Street Telephone 496 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

Home Laundry & Dry Cleaners 

Telephone 70 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



GINO'S and 1023 CLUB 

ITALIAN KITCHEN 

Real Italian Spaghetti & Pizza 

CLUB ROOM 



1023 MORRO STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Ph 



1170 

CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

Moino Construction Company 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
(Since 1912) 



2238 Broad Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Ph 



3177 

CALIFORNIA 



RILEY'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

Since 1887 

749 HIGUERA STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

C. H. KAMM & CO. 

BUICK MOTOR CARS 

Established 1913 

A. L. Cunningham — J. E. O'Connor 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



"He had a trial, didn't he?" Stephens 
inquired. "You were the judge and we 
were the jury. " 

"Not quite fair, I suppose," the dark 
man admitted. "After all, we weren't 
what you would exactly call an officially 
designated body. But is was fair enough, 
I guess. The crowd elected us. And 
everybody in Sacramento was there." 

"It was fair enough," Bartlett agreed. 
"What I don't understand is Judge 
Warren's attitude. He sure pulled a 
quick about face. One minute he got the 
whole thing organized. Then that little 
ball headed coot from Doc Gainsley's 
office came running over to him and he 
turned right around and tried to talk us 
out of it." 

Stephens grinned drunkenly. "A lot 
of good it did him. By then everybody 
was yelling so loud nobody heard what 
he had to say." 

There was another pause, but one of 
a different nature from the one which 
had existed earlier. Mark Stewart 
breathed a sigh of relief. The tension had 
eased. Everything would be all right. 
And business was good. The men at the 
bar had settled down to some steady 
drinking. Hardly anyone noticed when 
the broad shouldered man in the frock 
coat and soft black hat walked through 
the entrance. The tavern owner greeted 
him. 

"Good afternoon, Doc," he said pleas- 
antly. "^Ve don't see you very often." 

Doc Gainsley gazed at him steadily. 
"Not often," he agreed. 

"What will it be?" 

"The only thing you've got. Whisky." 

Stephens stared at the newcomer 
through half closed eyes. "What's the 
matter. Doc? Something eating you?" 

Gainsley shook his head. "Nothing im- 
portant." 

"It's all right. Doc," Bartlett inform- 
ed the doctor. "We all know they called 
you when the blacksmith got it. No one 
blames you." 

"That's fine," the doctor said. "That's 
just fine." 

"Take it easy. Doc," the dark man ad- 
vised. "You couldn't do anything. The 
blacksmith was dead before he hit the 
floor." 

Doc Gainsley eyed him coldly. "Not 
quite," he declared. 

Stephens braced himself against the 
plank and turned toward the doctor. 
"What do you mean 'not quite'. Doc? 
Either a man dies or he doesn't. The 
blacksmith is dead, isn't he?" 

"He's dead all right." 

"Then what are you worrying about ?" 

The doctor grimaced, downed his 
drink, then stepped away from the crowd 
at the bar. He cleared his throat and the 



JOHN M. EAKES 

STATE FARM INSURANCE 



982 Monterey Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 2020 

CALIFORNIA 



STEVE'S AND MARION'S 

COLD DRINKS FOR HOT DAYS 



1022 Morro Sti 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 1866 

CALIFORNIA 



ST. CLAIR'S NEWS DEPOT 

lewspapers - Magazines - Subscription 



1015 Ch 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



tablished 1669 
Street Ph 



>ne 152-J 

CALIFORNIA 



FRANK'S LIQUOR STORE 

Ice Cream - Ice Cubes - And All Liquors 

Delivery Service 

Fred Gray. Mgr. 
1019 Chorro Street Phone 1022 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

Golden West Recreation Parlor 

Billiards - Snooker - Pool - Beer and 

Soft Drinks 

678 Higuera Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

Ed Carlson Rod Carlson 

ED'S SERVICE 

Carburetors - Motor Tune-Up 

Automotive Electric Service 

Nipomo and Higuera Streets Phone 123 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

STRONG'S CLEANING WORKS 

QUALITY PLUS SERVICE — ALWAYS 



659 Higuera Stre 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



ephone 236 

CALIFORNIA 



E. H 



BEST WISHES 

"Deke" THRESH 

FORD 



E. H. THRESH, INC 

Phone: Business 102 — Residence 439 

1101 MONTERTY STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



MORT'S UNITED 

CIGARS — SUNDRIES — LIQUORS 
EXPERT PIPE REPAIRING 



C. R. Morte 



998 HIGUERA STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 853 

CALIFORNIA 



JIM'S INN 



*ell and Joe McC 
PISTOL CLUB 



1025 MORRO STREET 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES FROM 

JAMES F. CRAWFORD 

Vice President and Manager 
TITLE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY 



777 HIGUERA STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 2533 
CALIFORNIA 



ebruary. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



BEST WISHES FROM 

H. S. BOWEN 

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



THE GABBY BOOK STORE 

■■The Friendly Little Store- 
Stationery - Office Supplies - Books 
Gifts - Greeting Cards 
I 104D Chorro Street Phone 867-W 

ISAN LUIS OBISI-O LAl-IFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 

SAN LUIS OPTICAL DISPENSARY 

781 HIGUERA STREET 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

RALPH C. KENNEDY 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 
Notary Public 
P. O. Box 711 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

E. E. LONG PIANO CO. 

Appliances — Frigldaire, Maytag, Conlon, Rudd, 

O Keefe & Merrit, Easy Deepfreeze, Hoover 

Radios — Magnavox, Zenith, Admiral 

Pianos — Wurlitzer, Lester, Kimball — Ph. SOS 

777-779 Marsh St. San Luis Obispo, Cal f. 

BOB WALKER 

Typewriters, Adding and Accounting Machines 

Office Equipment & Supplies 

Duplicators & Suppl.es 

785 Marsh Street Phone 681 -W 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

George's Station & Equipment 

Cars - Trucks - Traibrs 

Miscellaneous Rentals and Service 

George V. Bettencourt 



PEPPER INN 

DINE AND DANCE — CHICKEN DINNERS 
A. R. Schroder, Prop. 



101 So. Highway 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



'hone 1965 

CALIFORNIA 



ROSS' GRANDVIEW MOTEL 

24 new, fully-modern units with thermostatii 

con-rolled Panel-ray heat. Tile showers or tubs 

Fully carpeted. Garages. Radios. No air-condi 

tioning necessary. Good restaurants nsarby. 

Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Ross Managing Owners 



2074 Monterey St. (U.S. 101 )North End 

Phone 1451 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

Standard Motors & Equipment Co. 

OLDSMOBILE - CADILLAC 

INTERNATIONAL 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER 

SALES AND SERVICE 



1701 Monterey Street 
SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 3144 

CALIFORNIA 



self styled judge and jury turned to look 
at him. 

"It may please you gentlemen to know- 
that the blacksmith died in my office," he 
said. He paused a moment, waiting to be 
sure that his next remark would sink in. 
"He died about five minutes ago. The 
cause of death, as close as I can tell, was 
a cardiac obstruction. Heart failure to 
you. The bullet barely nicked him." 

Doc Gainsley pulled aside the tent 
flap and stepped out into the clean spring 
sunlight. Back in the tavern Mark 
Stewart watched his customers warily. 
They were quiet again. Too quiet. 1 hey 
ordered their drinks in low pitched 
grunts and downed them with the thirsty 
gulps of those who have seen and done 
too much too fast. 



ONE IN NINE 

During 1953 one of every nine motor 
vehicle drivers in the state was cited by 
a member of the California Highway 
Patrol for failure to observe traffic regu- 
lations. 

"A ghastly by-product of this disre- 
gard for traffic laws was 3376 persons 
dead and upward of 110,000 injured," 
said Patrol Commissioner B. R. Cald- 
well today following a review of provi- 
sional reports on the 1*^53 traffic toll. 

There were 3562 fatalities during 
1952. 

"Seven per cent of all drivers, or al- 
most one-half million, were observed 
committing dangerous acts while their 
vehicles were in motion. \ hese are the 
violations that most often result in death 
or injury," Caldwell emphasized. 

The state's 6,017,000 licensed drivers 
received 524,383 citations and 165,560 
warnings from members of the Patrol 
last year for traffic law infractions. Of 
the citations issued, 460,717 were for 
hazardous accident causing violations. 
These figures represent increases over the 
439,324 total citations and 368,701 mov- 
ing violation arrests made during 1952. 
^Varnings dropped from 241,797 to 
165,560. 

"The primary concern of the Highway 
Patrol is the protection of all users of 
the highways. At the same time, the pri- 
mar\' objective of every motorist should 
be to drive within the laws," Caldwell 
declared. 



CITY CLEANERS 

FIRST IN QUALIFY CLEANING 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

Singer Sewing Machine Company 

ierv.ng San t-uis Obispo County 



731 H.gue 

iAN Luis OBISPO 



one 2295 

CALIFORNIA 



Reed's Paint and Wall Paper 

"make Your fa.nt rroblems Ours' 
Imperial Wallpaper 

1121 Broad Street Telephone 1364-W 

dA.. Luis OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

San Luis Waltpaper & Paint Store 

Beautity I'our Home 

Eva H. Seaback. Prop. 



1125 Broad Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



ne 1072-R 

CALIFORNIA 



Office: 2422-W Office: 313-W 

HAROLD HAYDOCK CO. 

NO i IONS - SUNDRIES - SPECIALTIES 



1218 Carmel Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Hal Haydock 

CALIFORNIA 



FARMER'S MARKET 

QUALITY AT A SAVING — ALWAYS! 

44S Marsh Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

WESTWAY MARKET 

"WESTWAY IS BEST- WAY" 
Quality - Service - Satisfaction 

447 Higuera Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Telephone 491 -W 

CALIFORNIA 



Agent North American Van Lines, Inc. 

TELFORD MOVING SERVICE 

845 W. Barrett Street - Santa Maria, Calif. 

Phone 5-2682 

348 Higuera Street - San Luis Obispo, Calif. 

i-hone 3840 

BERRY'S TOP SHOP 



303'/2 Higuera Stn 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



ine 4-31 4- W 

CALIFORNIA 



PETERSEN AUTO PARTS 



742 March Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



ephone 1106 

CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 

NICK TIESSEN 

Secretary and Business Representative 

Construction and General 
Laborers Union 

LOCAL 1464 



1530 Monterey Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 



Phone 256 

CALIFORNIA 



MONTEREY COURTS 

KITCHENETTES— MODERN— REASONABLE 

1756 MONTEREY STREET 

iAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



DON'T DANGLE ARM 

Don't dangle your arm out the win- 
dow w-hilc driving, advises the National 
Automobile Club. Such false arm signals 
only cause contusion on the highw-ay, and 
confusion on the highw-ay usually ends in 
collision. 



LOS OSOS VENDORS 

COIN OPERATED EQUIPMENT 
McClure, Owner-Mgr. Res. Phone 1833 

For Service Call 2992 
750 MILL STREET 



SAN LUIS OBISPO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February. 195 



Albrecht's Furniture Exchange 

FURNITURE - APPLIANCES - DRAPERIES 

Trade-ins Gladly Accepted 

2211 South Broad Street Phone 1428 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFOR NIA 

Office Phone: 2203 Res. Phone: 2 1 02M 

Southern Pacific Milling Company 

Aggregates Division Since 1885 

Transm;t Mix Concrete - Rock - Sand - Cement 

Santa Barbara Avenue 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFOR NIA 

Telephone II 05 Ed Bennett. Owner 

BENNETT CARPET CO. 

LINOLEUM - WINDOW SHADES - BLINDS 

1459 MONTEREY 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFO RNIA 

Phone 239')-IVl 

DEPOT COFFEE SHOP 



1020 RAILROAD AVENUE 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1199 Res. 3 887 

FRED P. RATLIFF 

WELDING AND MACHINE SHOP 

No Job Too Large or Too Small! 

1243 Monterey Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

Best Wishes 

GEORGE A. HESSLER 

UNION OIL PRODUCTS 
Best Lube Job in Town! 

Phone 968 



ERNIE'S LIQUOR STORE 

The Little Store With the B g Stock 
WINES - LIQUORS - BEER 

Plenty Free Parking 
1253 Monterey Street 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



St 



TELEPHONES 
d Office 908 Salvage Yard 1198 

Glass and Tires 185 1 

WEST SIDE AUTO PARTS 



ey Str 



CALIFORNIA 



NORTHSIDE MARKET 

CHOICE MEATS AND GROCERIES 
We Give S & H Green Stamps 



SANTA ROSA MARKET 

Your Handy Neighborhood Store 
QUALITY GROCERIES AND MEATS 
"We Do Appreciate Your Patronage" 

T. Seba,= lian, Prop. 
Santa Rosa at Mill Telephone 326 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

Business Phone 329-W Residence Phone 3846 

WATKINS PRODUCTS 

"BUILT ON QUALITY AND SERVICE" 



Best Wishes From 

GREEN BROS. 

. KNOWN FOR GOOD CLOTHING . 



SPINK BODY & PAINT SHOP 

EXPERT BODY AND PAINT WORK 
Guaranteed Workmanship 

1365 Monterey Street Telephone 754 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

FREEMAN'S BAKERY 

DELICATESSEN— QUALITY FIRST ALWAYS! 

Plenty of Free Parking 

445 MONTEREY 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



ONE CAR ENOUGH 

"It doesn't take a second car to make 
a fatal crash." 

Authority for this statement conies 
from pro\isional statistics released by 
the California Highway Patrol which in- 
dicate that more than one-fourth of all 
fatal accidents during 1953 were non- 
collision accidents. Of 2896 fatal acci- 
dents, 766 or 26.4 per cent, involved only 
one car. 

"Most common types of non-collision 
accidents are those that occur when a car 
goes out of control and overturns on a 
roadway or runs off the roadway." com- 
mented B. R. Caldwell, Patrol Commis- 
sioner. 

"Many factors figure in these non- 
collision accidents but errors of driving 
judgment are responsible in the \ast ma- 
jority of cases. 

"Common errors," he said, "include 
traveling too fast for conditions, espe- 
cially on strange roads; permitting dis- 
tractions or obstructions to interfere 
when driving; continuing to drive when 
overtired or sleepy; overdriving head- 
lights; and operating cars that are in un- 
safe mechanical condition. 

"The driver himself can control these 
conditions in the vast majority of cases," 
he cautioned. 

Other types of non-collision acqidenrs 
which contributed to last year's non-col- 
lision toll included occupants falling 
from moving vehicles, mechanical fail- 
ures and fires, and accidents caused by 
wheels or other parts coming off the 
vehicle. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

KARL'S MEAT CO. 



OWNER ACCOUNTABLE 

The registered owner of an unoccupied 
motor vehicle which breaks away or slips 
its brakes and goes careening destruc- 
tively down a hill has to answer to a 
new law incorporated in the California 
V^ehicle Code. 

The owner of a driverless runaway- 
motor vehicle, whether it is parked by 
him or someone else with his knowledge 
and consent, is considered to be the dri\er 
and must comply with the requirements 
of the financial security law and, if neces- 
sary, post security, reports the California 
State Automobile Association. Thus a 
rectification has been effected in the law 
which, through a former inequity, re- 
quired only the owner of the vehicle 
struck by a runaway machine to file a 
report and, if there were injuries or dam- 
ages, to post security. 



Box 11 
RIDGECREST 



8-4261 

CALIFORNIA 



PORTHOLE CAFE 

COCKTAILS 

Chet & Ray 

RIDGECREST CALIFORNU 



LOUIE'S WESTSIDE GROCERY 



p. O. BOX 107 



CALIFORNIA 



SMOOT'S 

(Since 1893) 
GUY T. SMOOT — MARIE J. SMOOT 

ENDOTA CALIFORNIA 

SMITT CHEVRON SERVICE 

GAS — OIL — LUBRICATION 
TIRES — BATTERIES — ACCESSORIES 



MENDOTA 



CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 

AL'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

"SMALL IN SIZE— BUT BIG IN CLASS!" 

PISMO BEACH CALIFORNIA 

The Interstate Company 

. . . Operating . . . 

TRAIN NEWS SERVICE, NEWS STANDS 

AND TERMINAL STATION RESTAURANTS 

Traveler's Treat— The Place to Eat! 

BEST WISHES FROM 

RALPH R. WESTFALL 

A COMPLETE REALTOR SERVICE j 

lOOS Palm Street Telephone 3220 I 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA ' 

CRESCENT PARK AUTO-COURT 

BARBECUE - GAMES - PICNIC GROUNDS 

On the Busness H ghway — U. S. Highway 101 

(One Mile South of Shopping District) 

Phone 2705 Albert & Karin Dawe 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

SMILE INN CAFE 

THE BEST COFFEE IN TOWN! 

"Truckers Headquarters" 

H. M. Bird, Manager 

101 Old Hi-Way South Phone 213-W 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

BEST WISHES FROM 

SAN LUIS TRUCK SERVICE 

For Complete 'One Stop' Truck Service 
Ted Lecuyer Manuel Pimentel 



BEST WISHES 

SAN LUIS MEAT CO. 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 



PACIFIC MOTEL 

CABINS & KITCHENETTE APTS. 

One Mile Out of Town H. Kuden 

Phone 1405W Route 1, Box 16 

South on Old Highway 101 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 

MORRO BAY MARINE SUPPLY 

GENERAL MDSE. - GOVT. SURPLUS 

Fifth & Morro Sts Phone 4461 Morro Bay 

727 Marsh Street Phone 1202 

SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



GASPAR'S FURNITURE STORE 

See Caspars Before You Buy 

Home Furnishings — Household Appliances 

Phiico, Maytag, Crosley, Youngstown Kitchens 

Phone 3091 310 So. Main St. 

BISHOP CALIFORNIA 

SIERRA LIQUOR STORE 

Our Business is to Keep You in Good Spirits 

LIQUORS AT L. A. PRICES 

Phone 4871 1 15 MAIN STREET 

BISHOP CALIFORNIA 



MEADOW FARMS COUNTRY 
STORE AND BAKERY 

2 miles North of Bishop Calif, on U. S. Hwy. 395 

Specializing in 

HOME-SMOKED HAM - BACON - SAUSAGE 

"BUCKAROO" BREAD 



PARADISE CAMP 

CABINS - COCKTAIL LOUNGE - CAFE 
SERVICE STATION GENE C. CROSBY 

15 Miles North of Bishop California 

On U. S. Highway 395 

Phone 3651 



BISHOP BAKERY 

Home of the Original 
SHEEPHERDER BREAD 



RAINBOW CAFE 

COCKTAILS - BEER & SOFT DRINKS 



PHONE 538 

II NORTH MAIN STREET 

BISHOP CALIFORNIA 



CHINA LAKE TAVERN CAFE 

FINE FOODS AND COCKTAILS 

Phone Inyokern 8-2311 

BOX 734 A. H. and ANN FITZ 

RIDGECREST CALIFORNIA 



Give Young Hoodlum Gangs 

the "Harass and Haunt" 

Treatment 

A recent news item from Philadelphia 
recounts a startling method adopted by 
the police of that city for the handling of 
young hoodlum gangs. It reads as fol- 
lows: "Philadelphia police, deluged with 
complaints of rowdyism by youthful 
mobs in recent weeks, drove ahead with a 
crackdown on teenage gangs today after 
rounding up more than 1,000 youngsters 
over the week-end. Captain Howard R. 
Leary of the Juvenile Aid Bureau and 
Police Commissioner Thomas J. Gibbons 
said : 'The police will harass and haunt 
these gangs until they make up their 
minds to settle down, be good citizens 
and stop bothering others.' 

CHANGE OIL 
THOROUGHLY 

If you are one of those motorists who 
buy crankcase oil in bulk, and quite a 
number do, according to the National 
Automobile Club, don't allow haste spo'l 
the effect of changing the engine lubri- 
cant. It is easy to do, accomplished most 
frequently by not allowing the old oil 
thoroughly to drain off. The last drop, it 
should be borne in mind, always is the 
dirtiest. 



Don't drive after drinking, advises the 
National Automobile Club. 



ANTI-FREEZE 

If vou're going to add a permanent- 
type anti-freeze to your car's cooling sys- 
tem it mav nofbe very permanent luiless 
you first check all water connections for 
leaks, replace defective hoses and tighten 
hose clamps. It's also a good idea, sug- 
gests the California State Automobile 
Association, to check the thermostat and 
flush the entire cooling system with clean 
water before adding the anti-freeze. 



C/^LIFORIVIA. 
S>%DDLE I.EL%THER 



Wong's Ace Super Market 

MEATS, GROCERIES. FEEDS, VEGETABLES 

Cor. Belmont and Madera Avenues 

Route 2, Box 11 Phone 7272 

KERMAN CALIFORNIA 

FRED & LOUIE'S CLUB 

WHITE BRIDGE ROAD & MADERA AVE. 
KERMAN CALIFORNIA 

EaiE^E'S CLOTHING STORE 

AND SPORTING GOODS 



Phone 6526 
:<CERMAN 



Route 2, Box X 

CALIFORNIA 



ANDY'S MARKET 

YOUR PROGRESSIVE INDEPENDENT MKT. 

SERVING THE WEST SIDE 

Cor. Madera and Wh-te Bridge Ave. 



XERMAN 



CALIFORNIA 



MENDOTA FOOD CENTER 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERIES — MEATS — VEGETABLES 

Seventh & Q Phone 3911 

MENDOTA CALIFORNIA 

AMAPOLA STORES 

GROCERIES — MEATS AND VEGETABLES 
DRY GOODS AND VARIETIES 



Fidel, Ramirez 


and Family, Props. 


TeLphones: Bu 


.3011 — Res. 3471 


MENDOTA 


CALIFORNIA 



UNderhill 0-1161 - UNion 8-2228 

]. H. ROSE TRUCK 
LINE, INC. 

"Seniu^ the Oil Industry" 

TEXAS • CALIFORNIA 

OKLAHOMA • ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA • NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA • COLORADO 

UTAH • KANSAS 



P. O. Box 389 

1415 W. Washington Blvd. 

MONTEBELLO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Februdry. 1954 



MOORPARK MOTOR COMPANY 

SALES - SERVICE 
Telephone 19 



MOORPARK 



CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS 

CASTRO'S PLACE 

WINE & BEER 

1049 OLIVER 

FIREBAUGH CALIFORNIA 

POPS PLACE 

BEER ON TAP 

SANDWICHES — SHORT ORDERS 

12TH AND O 

FIREBAUGH CALIFORNIA 

OLD CUCAMONGA CAFE 



On Highway 66 
CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA 

JOE SIERRA'S CAFE 

Finest Mexican & American Dishes — Beer 
Orders put up to take out 

291 W. Foothill Phone ETW 561 

CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA 

EL RANCHITO CAFE AND 
POOL HALL 

IN THE HEART OF 
CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA 

EL RANCHO MOTEL 

ULTRA MODERN 
THOUSAND OAKS CALIFORNIA 



ETIVISTA WINERY & VINEYARDS 



The Choice Wines of Cucamonsa District 
Winery Location, Foothill Blvd., Etiwanda, Ca 



SIXTH STREET MUSIC SERVICE 

AMUSEMENT MACHINES OF ALL KINDS 



! M. Garcia, Prop. 



Telephone Thousand Oaks 2515 

World Jungle 
Compound 

Trader Horne, President 
W. J. Richards, Ex. V. P. 

P. O. BOX 151 

On Ventura Boulevard 
Thousand Oaks, Calif. 



NEW TRAFFIC BOOK 

I he Traffic Accident Investigator's 
Manual, a 285-page, 15 chapter text- 
book, has just been published by the 
Traffic Institute, Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 

The new publication covers the basic 
problems confronted by the traffic acci- 
dent investigator at the operational level. 
It contains more than 100 photographs, 
charts, tables, and diagrams. 

Chapter titles are: 

Traffic Accidents and Their Causes, 
Traffic Accident Investigation — What It 
Is and Why It Is Important, Legal Re- 
sponsibilities in Connection with Traffic 
Accidents, Planning the Accident Inves- 
tigation, Questioning Drivers and Wit- 
nesses, Road and AVeather Conditions, 
Clues Useful in Accident Investigation, 
Skidmarks, Measurements and Diagrams 
in Accident Investigation, Skidmarks 
Measurements and Records, Photogra- 
nh\ in Accident Investigation, The Acci- 
dent Report Form, Speed Estimates, Hit- 
and-Run Investigation, and Civil Lia- 
bility Aspects of Police Accident Inves- 
tigation. 

"It has not been possible to cover all 
operational phases of traffic accident in- 
vestigation in this volume," L. J. Mc- 
Ennis, Jr., Institute director of publica- 
tions, said. "Had publication been delay- 
ed until all topics were developed, the 
materials presented might not have been 
available under one cover for several 
\ears. It is anticipated, however, that 
these materials will e\entually become 
part of a larger complete volume to be 
published by the Traffic Institute." 

The new book is paper bound. The 
price is $3.50. It mav be ordered from 
the Traffic Institute, Northwestern L^ni- 
\'ersity, 1704 Judson Ave., Evanston, 111. 



PELOIAN PACKING CO., INC 

RAISINS AND DRIED FRUITS 



Months later, following surgery, she 
was finally informed that she would 
never walk again. 

"I hope people will realize, when the>' 
start to take unnecessary chances, that an 
accident doesn't always end when the 
glass is swept of? the street. A fraction 
of a second can change an entire life- 
time," she commented. 

SAFETY 

The first twenty-five miles away from 
home are the most hazardous when 
you're driving an automobile, says the 
California State Automobile Association. 
Statistics show that sixty-one per cent 
of the drivers involved in the 33,000 
fatal accidents during 1952 lived within 
twenty-five miles of where the accident 
occurred, in short, safety should begin 
at home. 



P. O. Bo» 
DINUBA 



Code Cal Pa 
CALIFORNIA 



HADEN HOTEL 

THE PLACE TO STAY IN DINUBA 
CORNER OF J & E. TULARE STS. 



Pho 



CALIFORNIA 



Jack Pruitt Chevron Service 

TIRES — BATTERIES — ACCESSORIES 

4TH AND CLOVIS AVENUE 
CLOVIS CALIFORNIA 

JOHNNIE'S 

John & Norma Madriano 

MIXED DRINKS — BEER AND WINE 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

748 Pollasl<y 

CLOVIS CALIFORNIA 

ECONOMY MERCANTILE 

G. KOUTROULIS 



P. O. Box 36 
TEHACHAPI 



114 G STREET 
CALIFORNIA 



VERN'S AUTO PARTS 

VERNON DU PONT 
24 HOUR TOWING 



TEHACHAPI 



CALIFORNIA i 



TRUSTY'S RESTAURANT 

Ray & Velda Trusty, Props. 

Open 24 Hours a Day 

Phone TAylor 2-9922 Highway 466 

TEHACHAPI CALIFORNIA 



Co7nplimeiits of the 

SANTA PAULA 

WATER WORKS, 

LTS. 



SANTA PAULA, CALIF. 



JACK'S PLACE 

Beer, Soft Drhiks, 
Cards 

MojAVE, California 

340 "J" STREET 



February, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



LOS TACOS CAFE 

MEXICAN DISHES 

Tony & Alice Castillo, Props. 

14S PANOMA STREET 

PORT HUENEME CALIFORNIA 

M. & L. BATES CAFE 

Draught & Bottle Beers 

Imported and Domestic Wines 

6455 SO. MANCHESTER BLVD. 

BUENA PARK CALIFORNIA 

MESA CLUB 

LUNCH COUNTER 

At Boulevard Stop Center of Town 

BEacon 5938 1818 Newport Blvd. 

COSTA MESA CALIFORNL\ 

POLKA DANCING AT 

CASALETTI CAFE 

Fri.. Sat., Sun. — Join Our Stein Club — Ph. 416 

Always a Friendly Welcome 
12583 Highland Ave., Vi mile W. Etiwanda Ave. 
ETIWANDA CALIFORNIA 

PAUL'S MARKET 

THE BEST FOR LESS 

135 VALLEY BLVD. 
BLOOMINGTON CALIFORNIA 

El Monte Repair Service 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
UNION OIL SERVICE 



Phone 12F4 
REEDLEY 



ute 3, Box 452 
CALIFORNIA 



ALASKA PIPE AND SALVAGE 
COMPANY 

SHIP SUPPLIES 



Youngstown Grape Distributors 

GROWERS, PACKERS & SHIPPERS 
FRUITS — VEGETABLES 

Phone 70 — L. D. 533 — Teletype 243 

DIRECT WIRE 

P. O. BOX 348 

REEDLEY CALIFORNIA 

Now under the Management of "B and Lee" 

ACE'S INN 

Bottled Beer & Soft Drinks — Beer on Draught 

The Largest Glass in Town 

SHUFFLEBOARD 



STANTON MARKET 

THE BEST FOR THE LEAST 

Phone Anaheim 9154 

10771 CHESTNUT STREET 

STANTON CAUFORNIA 



J. FILIPPI VINTAGE CO. 

WINE GROWERS 
"Pride of Cucamonga Brand" 



STOPPING POWER 

The chances of >our brakes failing 
when you step on the brake pedal are not 
very great but that doesn't mean you 
should neglect them. The complete brak- 
ing system of an automobile should be 
checked over carefully at regular inter- 
vals, advises the California State Auto- 
mobile Association. Having this done 
once a year or every 15,000 miles is a 
wise rule to follow. 



COMMUNITY PRIDE 

Clean highways and streets reflect 
communitN' pride and alertness, states the 
California State Automobile Association. 
Motorists should help keep streets and 
highways unlittered by not tossing trash 
out of car windows. 



LIVESTOCK 

If you meet or overtake any animal or 
livestock, \ou must reduce the speed of 
your vehicle or stop as may be necessary 
or may be requested by any person in 
charge of the animal or livestock, the 
California State Automobile Association 
says. 

DRIVING IN FOG 

Use your lower headlight beams when 
driving in a fog, and reduce your speed, 
says the California State Automobile As- 
sociation in reminding motorists of the 
law. Driving with your high beams in a 
fog is like shining your lights on a mirror 
— the light is reflected back into your 
own eyes. 

WHITE AT NIGHT 

A large metropolitan police depart- 
ment made a check of the clothing worn 
by pedestrians killed in traffic at night. 
About four-fifths of the victims were 
wearing dark clothes and one-fifth light- 
colored garments. This study points up 
the rule stressed b\- the California State 
Automobile Association that pedestrians 
are less likely to encounter traffic mis- 
haps at night if they wear or carry some- 
thing white after dark so that drivers 
can see them more easily. 



MIRA LOMA 



CALIFORNIA 



HELP YOUNGSTERS 

Sometimes persons who dri\e children 
to and from classes double-park at the 
school, thus requiring the youngsters to 
step between parked \ehicles. Children 
are constantly taught at school not to 
step between vehicles parked at a curb, 
a rule that is vital to their safety, so don't 
encourage the youngsters to violate it, 
urges the California State Automobile 
Association. 



LA CASITA CAFE 

Beer - Wine - Spanish Kitchen - Home Cooking 

Phone 8-47245 

318 D STREET 
SAN BERNARDINO CAUFORNIA 

BALLESTER LIQUOR STORE 

VINCENT M. BALLESTER 



KImherly 2-9073 
SANTA ANA 



1820 W. FIRST STREET 
CALIFORNIA 



THE SMOKE HUT 



9413 SO. SIERRA AVENUE 
FONTANA CALIFORNIA 

Calaveras Builders Supply 

COMPLETE LINE OF BUILDING MATERIALS 

Phone 70-J 

P. O. BOX 446 

SAN ANDREAS CALIFORNIA 

TOPS RESTAURANT AND 
DINING ROOM 

A Family Restaurant Serving Family Style 

Banquet Facilities Phone 823403 

We Never Close — Children's Plate 

CALIFORNIA 

J & F IRON WORKS 

BUILDERS 

Ornamental - Structural - General Repairs 

Arc and Gas Welding 

Phones: ROckwell 9-2961 — CHarleston 6-8461 

1037 VICTORY PLACE 
BURBANK CALIFORNIA 



BIG BOB'S CAFE 

Lee and Ward, Props. 
BEER AND WINE 



1671 East "A" Street 
ONTARIO 



Phone 610-143 
CALIFORNIA 



LONG BAR CAFE and 
A. MARTINEZ CO.. inc. 

:eries - Liquors - Meats - Mexican Food 
Genuine Spanish Chorizos 



Phone 318364 
UPLAND 



680 FoothUI Boulevard 
CALIFORNIA 



SUNNY CREST DAIRY 

Save 16c A Gallon At Our Dairy 
Darco Protected 

Phone West 4002 

13602 Huntinffton Beach Blvd. 

WESTMINSTER CAUFORNIA 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February J 1954 



JOHNNIE'S MOBILE SERVICE 

Mobilgas - Mobiloil - Mobil Products 

Trailers for Rent — We Give S&H Stamps 

Johnnie Bland 



Pho 



MARY'S LUNCH 



14731 SO. VERANO STREET 
SANTA ANA CALIFORNIA 

TIME OUT CAFE 

COCKTAILS 
Hours 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

KImberly 2-9280 14882 Harbor Blvd. 
SANTA ANA CALIFORNIA 

NAD'S CAFE 

Beer & Wine — Hot Dogs & Hamburgers 

404 W. 4th STREET 

SANTA ANA CALIFORNIA 

RANIER'S COIFFEUR d'ART 

Originator of Exclusive and Artistic Styles 
Permanent Waving and Coloring Expert 

Phones KI 2-4491 - 2-4492 1st & Main St. 
SANTA ANA CALIFORNIA 



"TAXCO " GIFT SHOP 

Highland Park Lapidary Machines 

Congo Diamond Blades & Equipment 

Jewelry Supplies 

Steve & Ruth Rodriguez 

815 North Broadway Street 
SANTA ANA CALIFORNIA 



KELLOGG'S AUTO AND TRAILER 
COURT 

MODERN 
Mr. & Mrs. L. L. Anderson, Owners 

KImberly 2-6127 2651 Santa Ana Blvd. 

On Highway 101 U. S. 

SANTA ANA CALIFORNIA 

LANGLEY OIL CO. 

DOUGLAS GASOLINE AND MOTOR OILS 
VALVOLINE MOTOR OILS 

Orange County Distributors 

Bus. Phones: KI 2-3931 - KI 2-3932 
John J. Mills — Res. Phone KI 3-6669 



HERRIN'S BARGAIN CORNER 

NEW AND USED MERCHANDISE 
WE BUY AND SELL 

Free Parking for Customers 



211 French St. 

CALIFORNIA 



BLUE BIRD MOTOR LODGE 

21 Modern Units — Some with Kitchenette 
Heated Pool 



TRAFFIC SIGNS 

Signs, signals and markings are visible 
symbols of traffic laws and safety rules. 
It is always to the driver's advantage to 
heed and obey them, advises the Califor- 
nia State Automobile Association. Here 
in California nine out of every ten fatal 
and injury accidents involve at least one 
traffic law violation. Break a traffic law 
and you'll probably have an accident. 

BAD WEATHER 

Accidents increase at night and in bad 
weather. Most of these mishaps can be 
avoided if drivers adjust driving habits 
to the hazardous conditions facing them, 
says the California State Automobile As- 
sociation. It's also important to keep a 
car's safety equipment — tires, brakes, 
lights, horn, windshield wipers, steering 
gear — in good working order. 



CLEAN MOTOR 

Keep your car's motor clean, advises 
the California State Automobile Asso- 
ciation. An accumulation of oil and 
grease on the engine and ignition system 
not only creates a fire hazard but it may 
cause hard starting. 



SNOW COUNTRY TRIP 

If you plan a week-end trip to the snow 
country check your car battery to see that 
it is fully charged, advises the California 
State Automobile Association. A battery 
that is not fully charged may function in 
temperate weather, but often it will not 
start your car in below-freezing tempera- 
tures. 



BELATED CURES 

Those who disregard health rules con- 
tract serious ailments and suddenly be- 
come desperately aware of the need for a 
cure. Drivers who disregard safety rules 
sooner or later become involved in serious 
accidents and then suddenly become des- 
perately aware of the necessity of traffic 
safety rules and practices. The California 
State Automobile Association urges 
drivers to remember that an ounce of 
accident prevention is worth a pound of 
safety cure. 



A DEADLY FORCE 

Centrifugal force isn't a living thing, 
but it can quickly become a deadly thing 
when a driver takes a curve too fast. 
Watch your speed when rounding 
curves, warns the California State Auto- 
mobile Association. A car out of control 
at a bend may mean your life's at an end. 



CLEAN WINDSHIELDS 

Clean windshields cut light glare, re- 
ports the National Automobile Club. 



ALLEN & ROBERSON 

GENERAL SHEET METAL SHOP 
Phones: Bus. FR 4-3784 — Res. FR 4-2977 

1107 SEPULVEDA BLVD. 

MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA 



LA SOLANITA 



Corsages — Floral Designs 
Don and Wally 

Phone FRontier 2-8290 

1601 - 1607 GOULD LANE 

MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA 



THE KREDERS 

GENERAL INSURANCE BROKERS 



Phone PL 3-2538 
INGLEWOOD 



2345 W. Manchester 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-8406 3509 Highland Avenue 

MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA 



CENTER REXALL DRUGS 

FREE DELIVERY 

Phone FRontier 2-6036 

1125 MANHATTAN AVE. 

MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA 

LAMAR THEATRE 

A FOX THEATRE 
THE PLACE TO GO 

Phone Frontier 2-8500 
228 MANHATTAN BEACH BLVD. 

MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA 

GHENT H. CARPENTER 

Realtor and Business Opportunity Broker 

HOMES - LOTS - INCOME - RENTALS 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Phones: FRontier 4-9780 or FRontier 2-4514 
2409 SEPULVEDA BLVD. 

MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA 



Bristol Drug Co. 

Prescription Pharmacists 



Fourth and Bristol 
Santa Ana, Calif. 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 




COCA-COLA 

BOTTLING COMPANY 

of San Francisco 



Phone 8-4731 

THE 
HIDE AW AY 

Fitie Foods :-: Cocktails 



. . . Your Hosts . . . 
Louise and Bud Miller 



313 No. China Lake Blvd. 
RiDGECREST, CALIFORNIA 




lOSEPH MASSASLIA. JR . Preside 



Hotel MIRAMAR and BHngalows , 
SANTA MONICA. California 



Hotel SENATOR 
SACRAMENTO. Californi 



r/ie Copilali Pre^mier Hotel— 400 > 
CHARLES W COLE, Manage 



Hotel EL RANCHO S Bungolows , 
GALLUP. New Mexico 



■Id i Lorgest Ranch House — 200 ■ 
MARTIN L HANKS. Manager 



Hotel RALEIGH 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



On Fomou' P=nnsy/von.o A»e - 500 'ooms 

lOEL E 6AUGH, Manoger 
World-tamed Hotels 



BE CAREFU L! 

the life you save 
may be your own 

COURTESY TIDE WATER ASSOCIATED OIL CO. 



Stohl, Nets 

270 C'aremont Blvd. 
San Francisco 27, Cal. 



Sec 
U. 


34.66 P. L. & R. 
S. POSTAGE 




PAID 


San 
P 


Francisco, Calif, 
srmit No. 3172 



Return PoEUEe Guaranteed 
465 Tenth Street, San Francisco 



Ladies : Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. 
Men: Fri., Sat. and Sun. 

CASTRO ROCK 

STEAM BATHS 

• 

Hygiene Beneficial 

for Health 

• 

open Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
Sundays 9 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

• 

MASSAGE 

by 
APPOINTMENT 

• 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone UNderhill 1-5995 

• 

582 CASTRO 

(Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.) 

San Francisco, Calif. 



BUCKHORN 
STEAK HOUSE 

Finest hi Food — Cocktails 

Steak, Chicken and 
Prime Ribs 



Charlie Hudson 
Wendell Missamore 

Phone 80156 
2411 South Union Ave. 

Bakersfield, Calif. 



y. ---------- ---------... 

OSCAR 




H E D L U N 


D 


S A W M I L 


L 


• 




Quincy Road 




Oroville, California 



WeVe proud as 
punch so many Police 
Departments in the 
West ♦ ♦ ♦ think there^s 
no car like a FORD ! 

FORD MOTOR CO., RICHMOND ASSEMBLY PLANT 




SAN FRANCISCO EDITION 




APRIL • 1954 



The 
wh 



i^ 




When Grandpa tucked you between his knees, 
you knew you were going to listen again to 
his wonderful watch— to hear its magic 
tick . . . tick . . . tick . . . 
And as you listened, those measured whispers of 
time shut aivay the world, leaving you close to 
Grandpa, secure in his love. 

From fathers and mothers to sons and daughters passes 
the lifeblood of happiness-security. The privilege of 
providing it for those we love can be found only in a 
land like ours. 

And another wonderful thing is this: By realizing this 
privilege of freedom for ourselves, we achieve the security 
of our country. For, think-the strength of America is 
simply the strength of one secure home touching that 
of another. 



Saving for security is easy! Read every word — 
now! If you've tried to save and failed, chances are it 
was because you didn't have a plan. Well, here's a sav- 
ings system that really works — the Payroll Savings 
Plan for investing in Savings Bonds. 

This is all you do. Go to your company's pay office, 
choose the amount you want to save — a couple of dol- 
lars a payday, or as much as you wish. That money 
will be set aside for you before you even draw your 
pay. And automatically invested in Series E U. S. 
Savings Bonds which are turned over to you. 

If you can save only $3.75 a week on the Plan, in 9 
years and 8 months you will have $2,1,'?7.30. If you 
can save as much as $18.75 a week, 9 years and 8 
months will bring you $10,700! 

For your sake, and your family's, too, how about 
signing up today? 



The V. S. Government does not pay for this advrrtwement. II is dunalrd by this vuhliration in cooperation with the 
Advertising Council and the Magazine Publishors oS America. 




April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 



"Are You Guilty " — Rook Review by B. C. Bridges 3 

Resort Police Chief 4 

Teen Age Solution 5 

Devitt To Retire 6 

Airborne Prisoners 7 

Associated Public Communications Officers 8 

Pistol Pointing — B3' Ross Dunnigan 9 

Police Promotional Examination Questions 10 

Stanislaus Peace Officers 11 

The Deraas Murder 12 

Instructor's School 21 

McClure Leaves Beat 23 

Training Catalog 26 

Conference Slated 28 

Hayes Heads Drive 30 

June 1st Deadline 31 

April First 33 

Help the Boy 33 

Short Courses 34 

Road Problem 35 

Licensing Course 36 

Chief Cato Retires 67 



Directory 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KMA-438 

Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 

POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 2:00 p.m., Hall of Justice 

Henrv C. Maginn, President 315 Montgomery Street 

J. Warnock Walsh _ 160 Montgomery Street 

Washington I. Kohnke 686 Sacramento Street 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Juitice 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. Con- 
tributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not possible, copy 
should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a "nom de plume," 
but all articles must bear the name and address of the sender, which will be 
treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor will also be pleased to consider 
photographs of officers and of Interesting events. Letters should be addressed to 
the Editor. 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Gaffey 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE George M. Healy 

Chief of Inspectors Jamu Enoluh 

Director of Traffic Otto Meter 

Dept. Sec'v... Captain Michael F. FrrzPAT«icK....H«Il of Justice 
District Captains 

Central Edward Donohue 635 Washington Street 

Southern A. G. Steffen Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Peter Conroy 1240 Valencia Street 

Northern Daniel McKlem 941 Ellis Street 

Richmond Edward Green 451 Sixth Avenue 

Ingleside J. J. CoUGHLiN Balboa Park 

Taraval Phil Kiely 2348 Twenty-fourth Avenue 

PoTRERo Walter Ames 2300 Third Street 

Golden Gate Park Ted Terlau Stanyan opp. Waller 

Traffic Ralph E. Olstad Hall of Justice 

City Prison Lt. Walter Thompson Hall of Justice 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel. _ John Meehan Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipb Hill of Juitice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services ...Harry Nelson Hall of Justice 

Director of Juvenile Bureau 2475 Greenwich Street 

Dan Kiely 
Director - Bureau of Criminal 
Information LiEtrr. George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools 

Traffic Control Insp. Thoma« B. Tract 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts John A. Encler Hall of Justice 

Headquarters Dan Kiely Hall of Justice 

Chinatown Detail Lt. H. C. Atkinson Hall of Justice 

Range Master Pistol Range, Lake Merced 

Emil Dutil 



When In Trouble Coll SVtteY h2020 

When In UOUbt Always At Your Service 




Why gasoline 

is a real bargain 

today 

Two fSCtS lie behind the low price you pay for gasoline: 
oil companies work constantly through research to im- 
prove products and keep prices low, and they compete 
intensely for your patronage. That's why Standard opened 
the West's first petroleum research laboratory 32 years 
ago — and invests about $6 million annually in research. 







One result you see here. Thanks to competition, 

gasoline prices (aside from taxes) have risen only 
20% since 1925 . . . less than half as much as practi- 
cally anything else you buy. But there have been 
other benefits for you, too. Research, motivated by 
competition, has resulted in a steadily improving gas- 
oline. Two gallons of modern gasohne do the work 
that required 3 in 1925, and this has paved the way 
for lighter, more efficient car engines that give you 



more power, performance and economy. Competition 
and research have led to better gas station service, as 
weU, and to the world-wide search that has discovered 
the largest known oil reserves in America's history. 
Last year, Standard Oil Company of California 
invested $225 miUion in exploration, new oil wells, 
improved facilities to keep pace with competition. 
The result is better gasoline at prices which make 
it one of the real bargains in your family budget. 



STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3 



'Efficient Police 

Make a Land of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




±n5 peace officers' 




The Magazine 

Peace Officers 

Read 

( Trade Mark Copyright ) 



Vol. XXVII 



APRIL, 1954 



No. 1 



ft 



ARE you GUILTY?" 



Reviewed hy B. C. Bridges 
This question, "Are you guilty? ", rep- 
resents the startling title of the most re- 
cent book by William Dienstein, Profes- 
sor of Criminology in the Fresno State 
College at Fresno, California. It is pub- 
lished by Charles C. Thomas, 301-327 
East Lawrence Avenue, Springfield, Illi- 
nois. The work also offers the added dis- 
tinction of an illuminating foreword by 
August Vollmer, AVorld-recognized lead- 
er in the law-enforcement field, and just- 
ly famed as "the father of modern police 
science. " His stamp of approval on any 
text in this domain is ample proof of its 
merit. 

With ARE YOU GUILTY? Profes- 
sor Dienstein has presented a fearless e.x- 
pose certain to shock the most blase read- 
er into vivid awareness of reality. In view 
of his wide experience and background, 
this writer is well suited to cover his sub- 
ject, competently. In his preface, he as- 
serts: "The purpose of this book is to 
present to the public an overall picture 
of the program of the administration of 
criminal justice in the United States of 
America. Neither is it a legalistic inter- 
pretation. Rather, it is an attempt at ob- 
jectivity such as an observer who seeks 
information would like to obtain. — The 
writer is not a reformer, nor a crusader, 
nor a muckraker. The text is presented 
to allow the reader to take a look at those 
factors which have made the administra- 
tion of justice the subject of contempt, 
abuse, disrespect, and even hatred. — The 
machinery of criminal justice is an intri- 
cate and involved process that loses its 
meaning when separated into its various 
parts and examined by segmentation. 1 he 
sequence of chapters in this book attempts 
to present in chronological pattern the 
various parts of the machinery as the of- 
fender is a part of or in contact with each 
part." 



In addition to the fact that Professor 
Dienstein's book personifies stark real- 
ism, it is exceptionally well written. All 
readers familiar with the lucid style iden- 
tifying all of his earlier writings, must 
agree that this present work is his best to 
date. 




B. C. Bridhes 

Certain other contributors have as- 
sumed to offer unbiased surveys on the 
shortcomings of American jurisprudence, 
but, in many cases, the\ have either dwelt 
upon a few aspects only, or else skirted 
the problem, diffidenth'. Furthermore, all 
too frequently, popular apathy has tended 
to ignore or mim'mize discrepancies in our 
justice program, thus encouraging dan- 
gerous complacency in the public mind. 
In fact, only occasional writers have dis- 
played the self-reliance needful to take 
issue here and wage a campaign for bet- 
terment. 



Professor Dienstein, howe\er, is hap- 
pily free from such inhibitions, and to all 
who read his book, it will be plain that 
he offers a new concept calculated to in- 
spire both corrective thought and action. 
His material is well documented by case 
histories and much factual data assembled 
from many sources; it leaves no valid 
ground for challenge. Also, he has given 
his theme ample coverage, as attested by 
his chapter titles, which include the fol- 
lowing : "What is Justice ? ; The People 
and the Press ; Laws, Legislators, Lob- 
bies and Politicians; The Police; Jails 
and Hails ; Lawyers, Defense Attorneys, 
and Prosecutors; Judges; Juries; Proba- 
tion ; Prison ; Parole." From this resume, 
it is obvious that Professor Dienstein has 
considered his subject from many angles. 

As to the book's more intimate con- 
tents, there is herein an enlightening sur- 
vey of the entire law-enforcement pro- 
gram in all of its ramifications. The 
actual events portrayed include instances 
citing obviously guilty persons who elud- 
ed punishment ; and also examples of per- 
fectly innocent victims subjected to in- 
human persecution ; it describes crass af- 
flictions of misfeasance and malfeasance 
imposed upon the unsuspecting, together 
with numerous other legal travesties. In 
short, he outlines the diverse machina- 
tions of graft, \ice, crime, ignorance and 
indifference, as affecting the highly-placed 
law official down to the lowliest civic 
servant, to say nothing of the general pub- 
lic. Added to this. Professor Dienstein 
explains not only why these conditions 
exist, but also offers practical measures 
for their eradication. 

It is a conservative statement to sa\ 
that Professor Dienstein's technique com- 
bines force with clarity. His following re- 
(Continued on page 46) 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

RESORT POLICE CHIEF 



April 1954 



How would you like to be the chief of 
police in a city whose population fluctu- 
ates between 20 and 150 thousand regu- 
larly? 

That is the problem that faces Chief 
of Police Al Huntsman and his Santa 
Cruz police force. 

Santa Cruz, a city with a normal popu- 
lation of 22,000, is a strict resort com- 
munity. From May to September, and 
even during the winter months if the 
weather is nice, crowds of fun seekers 
jam Highway 17 in an effort to reach 
the sandy beaches of northern Califor- 
nia's favorite resort area. 

The entire county is resort minded, 
and the crowds not only jam-pack the 
famed beach and broadwalk, Ijut they 
pour into the nearby recreation areas such 
as famed Big Basin state park and the 
quiet, charming San Lorenzo Valley. But 
Santa Cruz is the center of the annual 
migration. 

Unlike some resort spots, Santa Cruz 
has a diversified group of vacationists. 
They come from all walks of life — from 
farm workers of Central California to 
the upper crust of San Francisco society. 
On a beautiful day you are likely to find 
a group of high school students lading on 
the beach listening to their portable radio, 
while nearby will sit a pensioned couple 
enjoying the warm sun and the weekly 
band concerts. 

It is during the vacation period that 
the resources of Chief Huntsman and his 
police force are strained to the breaking 
point. 




Donald F. Lynn 



But it isn't crime that provides Santa 
Cruz policemen with their main problem 
— it is the flow of traffic. Thousands of 
autos pour from the three highways lead- 
ing into the community each weekend, 
and they create a traffic problem that 
would bring a frown to the officer on 
duty at 'Fhird and Market streets at 
5 p.m. 

The problem isn't helped by highways 
that have not been kept up to the times, 
or city streets that are too narrow. But 
the 39-man Santa Cruz police depart- 
ment has learned to take the influx in 
stride, and they handle it with compara- 
tive ease. There are still tieups, but the 
police force keeps them to a minimum. 

In Huntsman, the city of Santa Cruz 
was lucky to find one of the top police 
administrators in the state. Last July, 
Huntsman rounded out 20 years of serv- 
ice in the local force. It was in 1933 that 
Huntsman became chief of the 12 officers 
who comprised the squad in that day. 
Today, he heads an organization of 39, 
including four women on the clerical 
staff. 

\Vhen he assumed leadership of the 
police department, there was one patrol 
wagon and a touring car, no radio, and 
next to no record system. Today, the 
police of Santa Cruz have at their dis- 
posal a fleet of modern patrol cars, equip- 
ped with the latest radio and electronic 
devices, and a record section that com- 
pares favorably with any in the state. 

Huntsman believes in a "clean town", 
and one of his first acts in taking over 
the police department was to crack down 
on the flourishing gambling houses and 
to rout what there was of prostitution. 
He let it be known that neither would 
henceforce be tolerated in the surf city — 
and he has kept the lid down since. 

He would be the first to admit that 
during the summer months some un- 
savory "characters" make their appear- 
ance. But the alert work of the depart- 
ment makes sure their activities are kept 
to a minimum. 

Chief Huntsman considers the biggest 
single step forward in the 20 years of 
development of the modern police de- 
partment was the purchase and installa- 
tion of modern radio communications for 
the dispatch and intercommunication of 
police vehicles. 

He explains that while Santa Cruz is 
a comparatively small city, population 
wise, it covers a great many square miles, 
and without modern police equipment it 
would be impossible to provide citizens 




Chief of Police Al Huntsman 

with the proper protection. "With our 
communication system," Huntsman says, 
"we are able to rush reinforcements to 
trouble spots as they develop, whether 
they be a traflSc tieup, or an armed rob- 
bery. 

A second reason for the rapid growth 
of the police department, according to 
Huntsman, was the free hand given him 
in building up a complete and ampl\ 
staffed record bureau. 

"Both cost money," he says, "but both 
have paid big dividends in a better and 
more efficient system of law enforce- 
ment." 

The police department was also 
strengthened when the city manager form 
of government was installed in Santa 
Cruz following AVorld War II, and with 
it came the civil service system. Both 
have proved effective in making the police 
department more effective. 

Himtsman has attempted to keep up in 
all fields of police work. His officers are 
continually imdergoing training in the 
latest methods of law enforcement, and 
they are regular members in the courses 
sponsored by the FBI. 

Always interested in youth, the Sant:i 
Cruz police force has kept juxem'le de- 
linquency at a minimum. Headlines tell- 
ing of wild teenage parties, kid narcotic 
addicts and other youthful crime activities 
are rare in Santa Cruz. 

(Cnntinuril nn page 13} 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



TEENAGE SOLUTION 



Youthful Don Latta, Capitola's 28- 
year-old chief of police, believes he has 
found the solution to stopping juvenile 
vandalism in resort areas. 

When Latta took over the department 
21/2 years ago, Capitola was plagued by 
visiting teen-agers who visited the small 
Santa Cruz county resort city during the 
vacation periods. The youths, many who 
came from nearby Stanford university 
and San Jose State college, committed no 
major crimes, but some of their pranks 
proved very disturbing to the residents of 
the community. 



drive 30 or 40 miles to get junior out 
of a jam. 

Under Latta's direction, the depart- 
ment has also helped put an end to juven- 
ile delinquency at home. He formed a 
rifle club and a hot rod group. Both have 
proved successful, and are well attended 
by youths from throughout the northern 
part of the county. 

Actually, the Capitola police depart- 
ment takes in more than just the city of 
Capitola. It is a district, and includes 
portion of nearby Soquel and Live Oak. 

Capitola has two full-time men on its 



tized and help out when an emergency 
arises outside their immediate area. 

Since taking over the department, Lat- 
ta has modernized his office to keep it up 
with the times. He has put in a modern 
record system, bought camera and finger- 
print equipment. Latta now believes his 
department is as modern as any small 
force in the state. 

^Vhile Latta's methods of cutting 
down youthful pranks may not have sat 
very well with some parents, his regis- 
tration program has brought forth some 
fine compliments. 




Latta, who stands six-foot, five inches, 
soon found that lectures and fines did not 
have much effect. So he devised a system 
whereby a violator had to call his parents 
immediately, da\' or night, and tell them 
to come and get him. 

Parents who were wont to laugh at the 
pranks of their youngsters during the 
daytime, soon wiped the smiles off their 
faces when dragged out of bed in the 
early hours of the morning and forced to 



THE BEACH AT CAPITOLA 

staff, Latta and one assistant, Martin 
Bergthold. But during the summer 
months when the population swells to 
three or four times its normal size of 
2.000, an additional six or seven men are 
hired. 

The department works closely with 
Sheriff J. R. Devitt and his office. The 
sheriff's department handles all the radio 
work for the small department, and in 
exchange, Latta and his staff are depu- 



.r*!''^^^-. 



More than once the Capitola PD spent 
many hours looking for a youngster who 
was needed at home because of an emer- 
gency. So Latta contacted the student 
bodies of nearby colleges and high schools 
and told the students that if they would 
register with his department he would 
deliver messages to and from parents. 

The system proved a big succe.ss, and 
last year a total of 340 students took part 
(Continued on page 13) 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

DEVITT TO RETIRE 



April, 1954 



Santa Cruz county will lose a faithful 
and honest servant, and the law enforce- 
ment profession one of its keenest and 
most fearless members when Sheriff J. R. 
(Bob) Devitt turns in his badge this 
coming January. 

Devitt has served the people of this 
small Monterey bay area county for 39 
years, and if he chose to run again he 
could probabh- serve double that number. 
But at 61 years of age, the still energetic 
sheriff believes it is time for him to step 
aside. 



Vast changes ha\e taken place in the 
sheriff's office since Devitt took control. 
I he department had only fi\e employees, 
including the sheriff when De\'itt went 
into office in 1934. It now employs a total 
of 33, including matrons and a secretarial 
staff. Where there were three old-fash- 
ioned touring cars there are now seven 
high-compression autos that can whip the 
deputies from one end of the country to 
the other in a matter of minutes. 

A complete radio svstem has been in- 



most important improvements made since 
taking office. 

"Our radio system has enabled us to 
completely cover the county," he says, 
"and, of course, makes it doubly tough on 
criminals." 

Another addition since Devitt took 
over is a night and day patrol system 
throughout the 435 miles of the county. 
A sheriff's patrol car is within a few 
minutes notice no matter where you live | 
in this small, but mountainous commun- 
itv. 




A native of Felton, Devitt first went to 
work as a member of the county's engi- 
neering department in 1915. He remain- 
ed there until 1928 when he joined Sher- 
iff Nick Sinnott as undersheriff. A posi- 
tion he held for three years. 

In 1934, Devitt ran for sheriff for the 
first time and emerged victorious. Since 
then he has served five consecutive terms 
in the tough office before deciding to call 
it quits. 



SUMMERTIME AT SANTA CRUZ 



stalled, and the sheriff's office not only 
carries its own messages, but handles 
work for the count\' coroner, countv engi- 
neering department, Capitola's police de- 
partment and five independent merchant 
patrols. It is a far cry from the one-way 
system that was working when Devitt 
too over. 

Devitt has also installed a complete 
record system in the office. He considers 
the radio and record s\steni as the two 



Santa Cruz county is lucky from a 
crime standpoint, according to Devitt, in 
that it is oft" the main line of big highways 
and railroads. And as a result has a low 
number of major crimes. 

"Our biggest problem," Devitt claims, 
"is one that is somewhat unusual." He is 
speaking of cabin pilfering. Santa Cruz, 
of course, is a resort center, and thou- 
sands of persons from outside the county 
(Continued on page 14) 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

AIRBORNE PRISONERS 



Page 7 



In Januarii' 1948 chiefly through the 
efforts of Sergeant Eldon Heck, (now 
Lieutenant) of the Santa Clara County 
Sheriffs Office, a tremendous step for- 
ward was taken increasing the efficiency 
of the department in charge of prisoner 
transportation. Heck, who had been with 
the Sheriff's Department but one year 
was quick to recognize the need for effi- 
cient, safe, inexpensive prisoner trans- 
porting. 

He realized almost immediately the 
antiquity in the present system of prison- 
er transport. Heck served as a flyer with 
the Army Air Corps in the 156th wing 
battalion, 8th fighter command and was 
a commercial pilot even before entering 
the service. It can therefore be easily 
understood with his flying experience that 
he recognized the man hours and expense 
involved as needless waste. Each time 
Eldon Heck was sent to pick up prisoners 
in Los Angeles or San Diego he was re- 
quired to be away from home three days 
and drive an estimated 1100 to 1200 
miles. The county allowed $11 per man 
per twenty four hours and an additional 
twelve ($12) per day wages for each of 
the two deputies making the trip. The 
mileage expense cost 7c per mile figuring 
depreciation and operation. The com- 
bined expenses at a minimum would total 
$199.00 and this expense of course was 
carried by the County of Santa Clara. 

Keeping these figures in mind Heck 
proceeded to gather information on air 
travel and time involved. He collected 
the data and presented his ideas to Sheriff" 
Hornbuckle who was quick to recognize 
the advantages of air travel. 

The collected data recorded the trip 
at a leisurely two hours, 20 minutes from 
San Jose to San Diego and involved $20 
in wages. The total time round trip was 
less than five hours and a rate of around 
$110 for the plane and fuel was charged. 
This gave a total expense of $130 or a 
savings of $69 on one trip. 

It was arranged to rent a plane on 
contract and pay only the flying time. 
The department was given the key to the 
plane and given explicit rights to a D17 
Stagger Wing Beach Craft with a 450 
H.P. Pratt ^Vhitney Engine. This plane 
has a five passenger cabin and a cruising 
speed of 190 miles per hour. 

Extra equipment was installed for 
more safety and efficiency. A full flying 
panel is one factor plus a high and low 
frequency radio and also a special plane 
to patrol car communication. Everything 
was all set except who could and would 
fly the plane. Naturally this presented no 



problem since Elton Heck had long an- 
ticipated piloting the craft. 

It took little time for the county to 
recognize the values of this new system. 
It so completely dwarfed the man hours 
and comity expenses that over $9,000 was 
saved the first year. 

How safe is it flying and are the pris- 
oners had to handle in a plane? Many of 
these questions entered the minds of in- 
terested observers and were soon answer- 
ed by Lieutenant Heck. 



Should conditions be poor the trip is can- 
celled until favorable conditions for fly- 
ing prevail. 

When making a pick-up in another 
county the prisoners are driven to the air- 
port at a pre-arranged time thus eliminat- 
ing any lay-over. 

An interesting highlight of Lt. Heck's 
flights occurred several years ago at the 
Salinas Airport. Heck and his deputy 
made a pickup of a large wide e\'ed negro 
boy. The}' were flying a new plane, a 




Sheriff Hornbuckle 



Safety? The chances for accidents are 
far below that of driving a car. ^Vhen 
flying rugged terrain and high mountains 
they are flown around if at all possible. 
Heck always tries to keep in a location 
where he can make a forced landing 
should some emergency arise. Thus he 
greatly limits additional hazards. 

Are prisoners hard to handle? When 
one considers that perhaps one in one- 
hundred has ever flown and that one in 
one-thousand has ever flown in a small 
aircraft, the flying experience among 
prisoners is of course a very slim margin. 
Therefore it is usually a new experience 
and quite often a frightening one. Being 
suspended in the air is a great psycholo- 
gical factor and the prisoners are well 
behaved, cooperating in every way. 

Another important factor of safety is 
the weather checking before take-off. 



Cessina 170. This particular type plane 
was used for training student pilots and 
was equipped with a "stall horn." This 
"stall horn" automatically blows when 
the plane gets into a stalling position, to 
warn the pilot. As the story goes, the men 
took oft' into the North and just cleared 
the ground when the engine stopped 
without warning. Heck quickly made a 
180° turn and headed back to the field. 
At the moment of the turn the "stall 
horn" blasted out and startled the prison- 
er. The plane pancaked in without dam- 
age and Heck and his deputy asked the 
prisoner how he felt — "Boss," he an- 
swered, "when I saw you sweating and 
heard that noise, I thought it was Gabriel 
blowin' his horn." 

The use of the Sheriff's Department 
plane is not solely for transporting pris- 
(Conlinui-d on page 66) 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



ASSOCIATED PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS OFFICERS 



John Atkinson, President 



Thomas A. Bayley, Secretary 



The February 1 1th meeting of the As- 
sociated Pubh'c Communications Officers, 
Inc., was called to order at 1 1 :15 a.m. by 
the President, Art McDole, with 37 
members and guests in attendance. The 
meeting was held at Vahls, in Alviso and 
the host was Robert Mason of the Santa 
Clara County. 

The minutes of the January meeting 
were read and approved. The Treas- 
urer's report showed a balance of $487.00 
on hand as of February 10, 1954, with all 
bills paid. 

President McDole appointed the fol- 
lowing committees for this year : 

Membership: Mason, Chairman, 
Freeman and Mayr. 

Procedure and Operation: Lewis, 
Chairman, Bogardus, Keller and Atkin- 
son. 

Teletype: Huston, Chairman, George 
Burton and Harrington. 

Commercial Relations: Olson, Chair- 
man, Robertson and Parmenter. 

Frequency & Engineering. McMur- 
phy. Chairman, Bayley and Atkinson. 

The President stated that starting 
with the March meeting the Secre- 
tary would call the roll of the members. 
Membership applications of Russ Pat- 
tison as a Commercial Member and Eu- 
gene Huston as an Active Member were 
approved on a motion by McMurphy, 
seconded by Bayley. 

1 he President then called for the re- 
port of the Frequency and Engineering 
Committee. Chairman McMurphy rec- 
ommended approval of the frequency of 
155.31 mc, base and mobile, for the city 
of Walnut Creek. This was approved on 
a motion by Keller, seconded by Free- 
man. 

McMurphy also reported on FCC 
Dockett 10869 which proposes licensing 
fees by the FCC. Bob Mason brought to 
the attention of the membership that it 
appears San Francisco and San Mateo 
County are not maintaining continuous 
monitoring watches on the point-to-point 
system as there is difficulty in contacting 
them. 

President McDole reported on the 
methods and the attempt by the Tele- 
phone Company to have the favorable 
comments filed by Monterey County on 
Dockett 10777 withdrawn. He reported 
that the Board of Supervisors, after an 
open discussion refused to take any action 
in withdrawing the comments. 

The meeting was adjourned for lunch 
at 12:00 Noon. 

During lunch our host introduced his 



guests. Commissioner Roger Nash and 
Chief Henry Lingua of the Central Fire 
Protection District of Santa Clara Coun- 
ty. The President then called for intro- 
duction of members and their guests. 

The meeting was called back to order 
at 1:10 p.m. by President McDole. He 
then introduced Vic Zacharia of Zack's 
Radio, who spoke briefly on industrial 
close circuit TV. He then introduced a 
crew from RCA who put on a very en- 
lightening demonstration of RCA's new 
close circuit TVI. 

Chief Simpson of Monterey then spoke 
on some of the problems the Administra- 
tor finds in communications and gave 
some suggestions on how communications 
personnel can assist the Administrator. 

Mason reported on the results on the 
450 mc survey which was run between 
Mt. Diablo, Copernicus Peak and near 
Blue Ridge Mountain. He stated that 
communications was 100% between 
these points. 

The Secretary read an invitation from 
CPRA to hold the next joint meeting in 
Visalia on May 14th and 15th. On a 
motion by LeBouef, seconded by Keller, 
the membership voted to accept CPRA's 
invitation. 

General discussion on standard operat- 
ing procedure followed. It was brought 
out that point-to-point procedure is pend- 
ing installation of selective calling on the 
point-to-point. McMurphy pointed out 
that the cooperation of the State Division 
of Communications has not been very 
good and their help is needed on the proj- 
ect. It was also pointed out that the fre- 
quency of 154.71 mc is available to event- 
ually replace the 73.26 mc frequency on 
Mt. Diablo. The change from one fre- 
quency to the other rests with the State 
of California and from all indications 
they were unaware of the problem. 

On a motion by Mason, seconded by 
Bayley, the Secretary was directed to 
notify the State Division of Communica- 
tions that the frequency of 154.71 mc is 
available to replace 73.26 mc on the 
point-to-point on Mt. Diablo. The Secre- 
tary was further directed to request the 
State make immediate arrangements to 
duplicate the 73.26 transmitter with a 
154.71 mc transmitter to operate simul- 
taneously with 73.26 until the frequency 
is no longer available. The funds for 
such transmitter having been included in 
the present budget on the Civil Defense 
law enforcement service. A copy of this 
letter to be directed to the Director of 
Finance. 



On a motion by McMurphy, seconded 
by Mason, an invitation was extended to 
Preston Allen, Chief of the State Divi- 
sion of Communications to become an ac- 
tive member of this Organization. 

The Secretary requested a clarification 
on the use of double and single postcards 
and permission to have addressograph 
plates made for the mailing list. On a 
motion by Lewis, seconded by Bayley, 
the Association approved the addresso- 
graph plates and authorized the Secretary 
to exercise his own discretion pn the use 
of single or double postcards. 

Jim Lewis of Marin County offered to 
host the March 11th meeting at Hamil- 
ton Air Force Base. 

As there was no further business the 
meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 



BUELL NEW B.B.B. HEAD 

Roy N. Buell, Division Manager of 
Pacific Telephone & IVlegraph Com- 
pany, became the New President of the 
Better Business Bureau of San Francisco, 
Ltd., at the annual membership meeting 
held recently. Mr. Buell has served as a 
Director for several years and succeeds 
Renolds J. Barbieri, Vice President of 
Bank of America, who was President of 
the Bureau for two terms. 

Other officers elected are: Vice Presi- 
dent, Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 
Zellerbach Paper Company; Vice Presi- 
dent and Counsel, Arthur H. Connolly, 
Jr., attorney; Secretary Thomas J. Lene- 
han, Secretary-Treasurer, Imperial Dis- 
tributing Co. ; Treasurer, Ronald Kaeh- 
ler. President, San Francisco Stock Ex- 
change. Re-elected Assistant Secretary- 
Treasurer and General Manager was 
Muriel Tsvetkoff. 

Elected to ser\e on the Board of Di- 
rectors for a three-year term are Harry 
A. Lee, S. F. Division Mgr., Pacific Gas 
& Electric Co. ; Earle C. Dahlem, Vice 
President, Wm. L. Hughson Co. Inc. ; 
Ray Turnbull, Vice President, General 
Electric Co. ; Charles R. Brown, Vice 
President, Tide Water Associated Oil 
Co.; Ralph Montali, President, Ralph 
Montali, Inc.; Reginald H. Biggs, Vice 
President, Emporium-Capwcll Corp. ; 
Ransom M. Cook, Vice President, Amer- 
ican Trust Co. ; Albert F. Roller, Archi- 
tect ; Frank F. AValker, Partner, Dean 
\Vitter & Co. 

James H. Connolly, Vice President, 
American Broadcasting Company, was 
elected to serve a one-year term. 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



PISTOL POINTING 



LTsually the month of January in any 
year is tuflf going for the pistoleers as 
there are no major matches around for 
them to go to and strut their stufT. Its 
equally tuff on the writers as then they 
have to use their imaginations and what- 
ever material they can manage to scrape 
together. I am fortunate this year as I 
have a wealth of dope for the readers and 
in fact, I have so much I will be unable 
to use it all as my space in the "Journal" 
is limited. 

First on the calendar is the Oakland 
club and their yearly booklet on the 1953 
matches. Their booklet has not been re- 
leased as yet as it is still in the process of 
being printed but the club secretary, Tom 
Monahan, kindly gave me the highlights 
of the book which will be sent out to the 
members in ^larch so if yours is not on 
hand by then better get hold of someone 
and ask how come? 

Nineteen-hundred and fifty-three was 
the Chinese year of the Snake and was 
purported to be bad luck for all sons of the 
celestial empire and many of the orientals 
tread most lightly last year less their al- 
ready foredained bad luck be worst. One 
worthy son of Cathay, Bob Chow, by 
name, evidently didn't take his Confu- 
top championships around these parts. He 
won the San Francisco pistol range cham- 




By J. Ross DUNXIGAN 

pistol championship of the Oakland Club. 
Bob, as you probably know is one of 
San Francisco's leading gimsmiths and 
has his own shop out on Mission street 
but he has a bad habit (and this is right 
from the shooters, too) of winning a heck 
of a lot of matches and giving the other 
shooters a pretty ruff time of it. The 
second place high aggregate winner was 
Sgt. Karl Schaugaard of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department while Milt 
Klipfel, of the California Highway Pa- 
trol placed third. This championship is 
obtained by taking the highest 15 scores 
shot during 1953 and are for the three 




Doc Paynton 

pionism to heart as he went all out in pis- 
tol shooting last year and copped the two 
pionship and then conies back to win the 



Gloria Nortox 

caliber guns, the .22, .38 and .45 and the 
scores were not too far apart for the three 
champions. 

The only records set in Oakland in 
1953 were set by the three top winners 
with Schaugaard shooting in the .22 cali- 
ber 20 shot timed-fire match shot a 200+ 
50— a real new record. In the .45 
matches Chow set a new high in the 
Camp Perry with a 295 while Klipfel 
jerked his way to a 289 in the National 
Match course. The 289 over the Nation- 
al match course is really shooting with 
that .45 canon. 



Fhe rest of the information is long and 
too much to set down here at this time so 
will give you the scores for these shooters 
who finished first in each class. Remem- 




Dave Me nary 

her, the scores quoted above are for the 
three gun aggregate while those follow- 
ing are for the classes only. 

Master Class 

Karl Schaugaard 4355 

:\rilt Klipfel 4341 

Bob Chow .....4328 

Expert Class 

W. Thomas 4209 

J. McNamara 4208 

J- Durst 4163 

Sharpshooter Class 

J. Dickerson 4178 

P. Smith 4140 

J. Bellera 4129 

Marksman First 

B. Sutton 4060 

C. Copeland 4045 

H. Jenkins 4016 

Marksman Second 

D. Henry 4040 

A. Bellera 3950 

J. Magee 3950 

Marksman Third 

E. Talley 3771 

D. Hand 3714 

M. Morris 3657 

(Continued on page 18) 



?age 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



POLICE PROMOTIONAL 
EXAMINATION QUESTIONS 



In the last issue of this journal the 
following numbered statements, on the 
subject Penal Code, were true: 4, 6, 7, 
8, 11, 12, 14, 17, 20, 25, 26, 27, 29, 36, 
38,39,40,41,42,43. 

1. Persons who knowingly ac^cept 
stolen goods are accessories to the crmie. 

2. In any trial which is authorized by 
law, it is a felony to offer as evidence, 
any record that has been forged. 

3. The act of wilfully procuring an- 
other person who commits perjury is 
called subordination of perjury. 

4. Any person who wilfully refrains 
from giving the required bond for the 
public office in which he is functioning is 
guilty of a felony. 

5. An accessory is the person who ad- 
vises another to commit a crime. 

6. Ten years in state prison is the 
maximum penalty for the crime of man- 
slaughter. 

7. Every person who attempts to bribe 
a person is guilty of a felony. 

8. No person may be subjected to a 
second prosecution for the same offeijse. 

9. The penalty provided in the Penal 
Code for a public officer, who, under 
color of authority, without lawful neces- 
sity, assaults or beats any person, is re- 
moval from office. 

10. When no penalt)' is provided in 
any statute for a public offense the act or 
omission is punishable as a misdemeanor. 

11. Only the officer mentioned in its 
directions may serve a search warrant. 

12. If one wilfully destroys by fire the 
dwelling of another person he is guilty 
of arson. 

13. Perjury is punishable in the state 
prison for not less than one or more than 
ten years. 

14. The obtaining of money from an- 
other under color of official right is a 
misdemeanor. 

15. Lack of criminal intent is not suffi- 
cient to disprove the commission of a 
crime. 

16. Kidnaping for blackmail is punish- 
able by death in this state. 

17. Every person convicted of assault 
to commit murder is punishable by im- 
prisonment in the state prison for not 
less than one nor more than fourteen 
years. 

18. Mayhem is punishable by imprison- 
ment in the state prison for not less than 
fourteen years. 

19. The malicious throwing of vitriol 



on the person of another is punishable by 
fourteen years in the state prison. 

20. The Governor can grant a pardon 
only for certain crimes. 

21. \Vitnesses must be examined in the 
defendant's presence. 

22. Even when the crime charged is 
only a misdemeanor, the officer in the case 
may kill the alleged criminal if the latter 
resists arrest. 

23. The officer, in the making of an ar- 
rest, may break open doors for the pur- 
pose of admittance only after he has ex- 
plained the purpose. 

24. An officer cannot break open a 
door to make an arrest for a misdemean- 
or. 

25. Every officer who arrests any per- 
son without lawful authority therefor is 
guilty of a felony. 

26. Every person who wilfully breaks 
up a public meeting, other than religious 
or political, and which is not unlawful 
in its character, is guilty of a misdemean- 
or. 

27. Any peace officer who refuses to 
arrest any persons charged with a crim- 
inal offense may be punished by a fi\e 
year term in state prison. 

28. No criminal act may be punishable 
as a crime if it is also declared to be 
punishable as a contempt. 

29. Service of a subpoena is made by 
showing the original or a copy to the wit- 
nes personally and informing him of its 
contents. 

30. An officer, who, under color of 
authority and without lawful necessity, 
assaults another person, is punishable by 
a fine of $5,000.00. 

31. A majority of the grand jury can 
find an indictment. 

32. An accessory to the commission of 
a felony may not be prosecuted until the 
principal has been brought to trial. 

33. Upon a defendant's request the 
magistrate must exclude the public from 
the examination. 

34. Only a peace officer may execute a 
warrant of arrest. 

35. As used in the Chapter of the 
Penal Code dealing with the crime of 
burglary, the phrase "night time" is the 
standard solely used in determining 
"night time" legally in California. 

36. The Code of Civil Procedure deals 
only with the presentation and handling 
of cases in court ; and the Penal Code 
with crimes only. 

37. A coroner's jury, must, as a mini- 
mum, have nine jurors. 



38. Unless a burglar is armed with a 
deadly weapon, or so arms himself while 
in the commission of the offense or as- 
saults a person while in the commission 
of the offense, he cannot commit burglary 
of the first degree of an uninhabited 
dwelling house in the night time. 

39. Justices of the Peace are classed 
as magistrates. 

40. An indictment must be found, or 
an information filed, or the case submit- 
ted to the Superior Court, within three 
years after the commission of any felony. 

41. Indictments are "found" in the 
room in which the grand jury assembles. 

42. A complaint is an allegation to a 
court or magistrate that a person has been 
guilty of some designated offense; and 
must be in writing. 

43. Jurisdiction for murder may be in 
any one of three counties. 

44. Under Penal Code provision com- 
mon drunkards and beggars are vagrants. 

45. Every person who deserts his child 
in any place whatever, with intent wholly 
to abandon such child, is punishable in 
the state prison, or in the county jail, 
not exceeding one year, or by a fine not 
exceeding $5,000.00, or by both. 

46. Public officials found guilty of 
bribery or other acts of official miscon- 
duct thus become forever disqualified 
from holding any office in this state. 

47. A juror who makes any promise or 
agreement to give a verdict or decision, 
for or against any party, is punishable in 
the state prison not exceeding five years 
or by a fine not exceeding $5,000.00. 

48. A boy under fourteen years of age 
may not be charged with crime. 

49. There are at least two parties to all 
crimes. 

50. The word "writ" signifies an order 
or precept in writing issued in the name 
of the people, or of the court or judicial 
officer. 



EXCERPTS FROM SAN 

FRANCISCO POLICE 

ORDINANCES 

(Continued from last issue.) 
Section 1400: Return of Prisoners to 
San Francisco. 

1. Persons arrested within the State of 
California and triable, either on a com- 
plaint or indictment, in San Francisco, 
may be returned to San Francisco by the 
Chief of Police. 

(Continued on page 19) 



.^pril. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



STANISLAUS PEACE OFFICERS 



Three of California's finest peace offi- 
cers defend and enforce the law in Stan- 
islaus County. 

In Modesto, a city of about 35,000 
population situated in the heart of one 
of California's richest agricultural dis- 
tricts. Chief James C. Neel, a progres- 
sive, modern minded law enforcement 
officer, directs the destiny of the police 
department. 



the narcotics bureau and the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation. 

In addition to his own force, Neel in- 
\ited officers from other Stanislaus Coun- 
ty Police Departments and Sheriff Dan 
Kelsay's office to attend. 

He declared that the constant devel- 
opment of new techniques by criminals 
requires continuing exchange of the lat- 
est ideas on law enforcement from agen- 



and has continued through the various 
phases of police work. 

Working in close harmony with Neel 
is Sheriff Kelsay, a man whose office pro- 
duced one of the outstanding examples 
of detective work in connection with a 
homicide case in recent years. 

With little to go on aside from a 
twenty-two shell which was not where it 
should have been. Sheriff Kelsav and his 




Left to right. Top row: Elton Franci 



TTRLOCK ['OI.HK PEPAR I'MF.N 1' 
Bill Sinclair, Bert White, Ed Field, Steve Nunley, Eugene Kregnes 



Sam Matson, H. H. .Alle 



Bottom row: George Mello, Sgt. Bill Ladd, Capt. Al Hedin, Nora Robertson, Chief John Vierengo, Sgt. Norris Norem and Sgt 

Harry Villinger. 



Recently, with an eye toward improv- 
ing the technical knowledge of his de- 
partment. Chief Neel has inaugurated a 
stepped-up training program. 

The program covers narcotics control, 
the laws of arrest, police procedure, de- 
fensive tactics and traffic accident inves- 
tigation. 

Cooperating agencies included the of- 
fice of District Attorney F. W. Re>land, 
Jr., the state department of education. 



cies on the state, county, city and nation- 
al level. 

"Through a careful selection of per- 
sonnel and a well rounded, continuous 
training program, police agencies can 
raise their standard of service to the pub- 
lic," Neel stated. "The training program 
is part of a long range program to im- 
prove our service," the chief concluded. 

The program started with a lecture 
on the laws of arrest early in the year 



men proved that the "accidental shoot- 
ing" of a Ceres housewife was actually 
one of the most brutal and cold blooded 
murders in California history. 

The stor\' of how Kelsay's men proved 
that Clarence Simpson did not stumble 
o\er a stake in the ground and accident- 
ally shoot his mother is one of the most 
fascinating examples of detective work 
to be executed in California during the 
(Continued on page 17) 



Pate 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



THE DERAAS MURDER 



The rich black earth was freshly 
plowed and moist so that a thick layer 
clung to the feet of the farm hands as 
they cut across the field toward their 
morning chores. A heavy dew had wash- 
ed the grass so that it was bright and 
gleaming in the warm spring sunlight. 
Nearby the Tuolumne River flowed 
peacefully toward its junction with the 
San Joaquin, filled to its broad brim by 
the melting snows of the High Sierras. 
A distant farmhouse was half hidden by 
its border of trees. 



By Walter R. Hecox 

last night and didn't know the field was 
plowed. Then when it bogged down left 
it here and went for a tow." 

The farm hands changed direction so 
as to pass closer to the mired vehicle. 
Its rear wheels were deep in the soft 
earth and a low mound of dirt had been 
thrown behind them, apparently while 
the driver spun them in a hopeless at- 
tempt to escape the muddy grup. Teekle 
and AVelch were very close before they 
noticed the body. It was half covered 
by loam flung from the wheels. For a 



"Leonard," Teekle asked, "do you 
know who it is?" 

"It's Eilif Deraas." Snapped back into 
reality by the sound of his own voice, 
Welch started forward, but the restrain- 
ing hand of his companion arrested the 
movement. 

"It's too late to help him," Teekle 
remarked. "We'd better call the sheriff." 

"The sheriff?" 

"That's right, the sheriff," Teekle re- 
peated dully. "Look at his head. What 
could this be except murder?" The pair 







The black coupe and th^ grisK sicc- 
tacle ber.idc it were th • o'lly di r^jnlanr 
notes in the pastoral bc.uity of tlic land- 
scape. 

The farm hands passed n?arby. A' 
first the body was hidden f om t'"eir 
view, but one of them, C. M. Teekl"", 
noticed the strange position of th" car. 

"Funny place to leave a car," he re- 
marked to his companion, Leonard 
AVelch. "Must have driven into the soft 
sand and got stuck." 

"Velch nodded. "Probably drove up 



Stanislaus County Murder Scene 

moment the farm hands stood frozen in 
t''cir tracks. 

The d"ad man was lying on his back 
on the right side of the coupe, his out- 
stretched left hand almost touching the 
right rear wheel. His right arm was 
crumpled beneath him in a grotesque po- 
sition. Congealed blood had gathered 
thickly behind his head and his flaxen 
Viking hair was stained rust brown. 
Two cold gray eyes, half open, stared 
vacantly at the farmhands, unwinking in 
the morning sun. 



hurried to a nearby farmhouse and tele- 
phoned. Deputy Jack Hammett, of the 
Stanislaus County sheriff's office, an- 
swered. 

"Ther's a dead man by a parked car 
that's stuck in the mud at the end of 
Vivian Avenue," Teekle told him. "I 
think he was murdered." 

"I'll be right there," Hammett re- 
sponded. 

The deputy sherifj called Coroner 
George Sovern and the pair rushed to 
(Continued on page 48) 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Telephone 63 

The Woman's Shop 

SAYONNA KEEFE 

Specializing in Sizes 12I/2 to 32I/2 
and 12 to 60 

1535 Pacific Avenue 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



A. L. RUSO, INC. 

Frozen Fruits and Vegetables 

Phone 4-6381 

Teletype W.T. 91 

Plant: 241 Walker Street 

P. O. Box 109 
WATSONVILLE, 

CALIFORNIA 



Growers & Canners 

oj the 

Popular Shady Oak 
Brand Products 



WEST FOODS OF CALIF. 



Santa Cruz, Calif. 



RESORT POLICE CHIEF 

(Continued from page 4-) 

A two-man juvenile bureau headed by 
Sgt. Ernie Marenghi and Officer Tor 
Spindler keep a constant check on the 
doings of the youth of the community. 

Huntsman has also interested himself 
in youth work. A lover of sports, he is 
president of the well-known Santa Cruz 
Seahawk Athletic club. The club, under 
his direction, has built a large athletic 
stadium and recreation area within the 
city, and also sponsors baseball and foot- 
ball teams. The stadium, which is the 
pride and joy of Huntsman's life, has be- 
come a mecca for the sports-minded youth 
of Santa Cruz. 

What is the most important thing to 
keep in mind as a police chief ? 

"Treat everybody on an equal basis, 
and treat people the wa\' \'ou like to be 
treated yourself," Huntsman claims. "In 
that manner, you will make a difficult 
and delicate job easier for yourself and 
for others. Public relations is an impor- 
tant part of law enforcement." 

Although eligible to retire now. Chief 
Huntsman has no definite plans as yet, 
and he is planning to "stay on for a 
while." "After all," he comments, "after 
20 years of service I'm not even at the top 
step by pay classification. There's still 
time . . ." 

Huntsman gives a lot of credit to the 
people of Santa Cruz for giving him a 
free hand in running his department ac- 
cording to his ideas and ideals. "The peo- 
ple, and the various city councils and 
mayors have always been reasonable and 
kind," he says. "\Ve've tried to give them 
the best department we know how to 
make. We'll continue to do so if that is 
what the people want." 



TEEN-AGE SOLUTION 

(Continued from page 5) 
in the program during the Easter vaca- 
tion period alone. 

Latta is a native of Tulare, but his 
families owned a summer home in Capi- 
tola. And while working on the Oxnard 
Police department he learned of the job 
in the small beach city and applied. 



DUPLICATE KEYS 

To avoid the embarrassing delay caused 
by being accidentally locked out of your 
automobile, the California State Auto- 
mobile Association suggests that extra 
duplicate keys should be obtained from a 
locksmith. Tape one to some portion of 
the chassis and place the other one in 
your billfold. When an emergency arises, 
either will be available for use. 



I.O.O.F. Cemetery 

Crematory - Mausoleum 

1927 Ocean Street 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Phone 6900 

Mercantile 
Acceptance Co. 

Hugh Hinman 
Branch Manager 

701 Front Street 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Compliments of 

EAST SIDE DAIRY 



Phone 724 or 50-W-4 

101 mentel avenue 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



Milano Manor 

APARTMENT COURT 

'All Panel Ray Heating' 

OPEN ALL YEAR ROUND 

G. Waite Curtis — Sally E. Curtis 



Telephone 2222-W 

350-354 OCEAN STREET 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



Santa Lucia 
Motor Inn 

"A Vacation for a Night" 

Electric Controlled Heating and 
Cooling 

Mr. & Mrs. Wiedeman, Mgrs. 

5 Miles North of Santa Cruz 

Phone S. C. 4W5 

5271 Los Gatos Highway 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



LUM BUNN 
<5r SONS 



Grower and Packer 



P. O. Box 596 

Phone 3781 

Walnut Grove, 

California 



DEVITT TO RETIRE 

(Continued from page 6) 
own small cabins and summer resorts. 
These residences, which range from log 
cabins to swanky mansions, are vacant a 
great part of the year. 

"We are plagued constantly," Devitt 
says, "by the owners of these homes re- 
porting to us when they arrive in the 
summer that their premises have been en- 
tered, and valuables stolen. The normal 
housebreaking is discovered within a mat- 
ter of hours or a few days, but in Santa 
Cruz it may be months. 

"And if you think it isn't tough to 
solve a house robbery in which the trail 
has been cold for as long as six months, 
well, try it sometime," the youngish look- 
ing Devitt says. 

One thing that makes Devitt very 
happy is that the juvenile problem is 
light. "Sure we have the kids who break 
and enter cabins, but dope and the major 
crimes by juveniles that you hear and 
read about in other sections of the state 
are virtually non-existent in Santa Cruz 
county. 

Despite being one of the chief political 
figures in the county for the past 20 years, 
Devitt does not believe the sheriff's office 
should be an elective one. "It is my be- 
lief," he claims, "that the sheriff should 
be an appointive official just as most chief 
of police are now selected. 

He points out that every four years a 
sheriff must forget his official duties for 
several months to campaign. "It makes 
an officer more vulnerable if he must de- 
pend on politics to retain his job," De- 
vitt says. 

Devitt not only believes that his office 
should be appointive, but it is his belief 
that in coming years law enforcement of- 
ficials will need far more formal educa- 
tion than is now required. 

"I can see the day," he states, "when 
every deputy sherii? and police officer will 
need a college degree. \Vhy some forces 
already demand police training before 
they hire a man, and 1 think it is a great 
thing." 

But before the public can demand col- 
lege trained personnel, Devitt says the\- 
must be accustomed to higher salaries. 
"You can't expect a man who has spent 
a lar,';e sum of money for his education to 
take a position that hardly provides a de- 
cent standard of living," he says. 

Devitt points out his own office as a 
good example. "We have a 50 per cent 
turnover in personnel every year, and it 
isn't because of the job or working con- 
ditions. The county of Santa Cruz, and 
most other counties are also guilty, just 
don't pay enough to keep good men," he 
says. 



RIVERSIDE 
FOUNTAIN 

A Good Place To Eat 
John A. Crughton 



817 BEACH STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



K. K. McGranahan 
General Contractor 

500 SPRING STREET 

Phone 4126 8i 6485 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



VETTERLE 

and 
R E I N E L T 

Hybridizing Gardens 



BEGONIAS • PRIMROSES 
DELPHNINUMS 



Phone Santa Cruz 2067-J 

Capitola, California 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



O. K. Rubber 
Welders for Tires 

World's Finest Recapping 
National Guarantee 

1481 Freedom Boulevard 

Phone 2-1244 

WATSONVILLE, 

CALIFORNIA 



W^hen at the Beach Visit the 

Merry-Go-Round 

Restaurant and 

Fountain 

• 

Tony Curci & Nick Dinapoli 

605 BEACH STREET 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



BUD, INC. 

• 

Growers - Packer 
Shipper 

Cal. Fruits And 
Vegetables 



P. O. Box 759 

WATSONVILLE 

CALIFORNIA 



The veteran law enforcement official 
believes it is false economy to pay low 
salaries. "Because of it," he says, "we are 
forced to spend a great deal of time and 
money on training the constant stream of 
new personnel." 

Santa Cruz county has not produced a 
great number of headline crime cases 
during the past 20 years, but one murder 
has become famous, and Sheriff Devitt 
played a large part in it. 

We're speaking of the McMonigle 
murder case, one of the few murder con- 
victions obtained when no trace of the 
body was ever found. 

McMonigle was convicted of killing a 
15-year-old Campbell high school girl in 
1945 somewhere in Santa Cruz county, 
and throwing her body down "Devil's 
Slide " in San Mateo county. 

Sheriff's Devitt and his staff trailed 
more than 1000 miles on various confes- 
sions made by the San Jose man on where 
he buried the body. 

Now that his days of work are num- 
bered, Devitt is making plans on how to 
spend his retirement. He expects to do 
quite a bit of traveling, though he still 
hasn't made any definite plans. "I do 
plan, though," he said, "to make sure to 
visit those spots where the fish are 
biting." 



FULL HEADLIGHTS 

Don't drive with only your parking 
lights at daybreak or dusk, advises the 
National Automobile Club. A poorly 
lighted car can be as great a danger as a 
car with no lights at ail. If lights seem 
necessary, full headlights should be used. 



COLOR VALUE 

Light colored and highly transparent 
motor oils are obtained by certain refin- 
ing processes, according to the National 
Automobile Club. The color of an oil is 
of little value to the consumer for judg- 
ing its value as an engine lubricant but 
should assist in the detection of dirt or 
other foreign material. There is no 
known relation between color and serv- 
ice performance. 



KEY NUMBERS 

The back of the automobile registra- 
tion card makes a fine place on which to 
write down the numbers of the vehicle's 
various keys, points out the National 
Automobile Club. The card usually is 
handv. 



Clark & Clark 
Sanitation Division 

H. L. (Lee) CLARK 

Phones: 4-7869 - 2-1028 

250 FIRST STREET 

WATSONVILLE, 

CALIFORNIA 



Watsonville 
Golf Course 

Rain or Shine — Snow or Sleet 

GOLF AT WATSONVILLE 

Joey Rey, Owner 
Golf Pro. 

Two Miles So. of Watsonville 
On Monterey Highway 



T. 



H. ROSEWALL 



Building 
Contractors 



Phone 4-3843 

544 MAIN ST. 

WATSONVILLE 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



On the Beach and River 

Venetian Court 
Apartments 

Comfortable — Cozy — Convetiient 

Reasonable Rates 

— Open All Year — 

Steam Heated Apartments 

Hot and Cold Showers 

Phone 2732-J — P.O. Box 417 
CAPITOLA BY-THE-SEA 



OFFICER— SOLDIER 



Batterson Nursing 
Home 

(State Licensed) 

Convalescents — Post-Operative 

Diabetic — Chronic Cases 

and Bed Patients 

— 24 Hour Nursing Service — 

Phone Santa Cruz 1477 
255 MATTISON LANE 

P. O. Box 398 
SOQUEL, CALIFORNIA 



PFYFFERBROS. 



GROWERS — PACKERS 
SHIPPERS 

Artichokes — Brussel Sprouts 
Broccoli 



Santa Cruz, Calif. 




Officer Thomas B. Gryder of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department Traffic Detail is 
shown here being sworn in as a Chief War- 
rant Officer in the United States Army Re- 
serve. He is taking the oath from Lieutenant 
Colonel John H. Cates, of the California Mili- 
tary District Headquarters. 



SAFETY AT HOME 

Is your home really "safe" ? 

One of the easiest — and most economi- 
cal — ways to insure a higher degree of 
safety in your home is to build one of the 
Safety Council recommended housekeep- 
ing closets. 

"In this good looking cabinet that you 
can build yourself you can store most of 
the principal hazards to your children. 
Remember, more than 1700 little ones die 
each year because some adult left a gun, 
some paint thinner, ammonia, lye, or an- 
other deadly poison in a spot easily reach- 
ed by a child," says Arnold E. Archibald, 
president of the San Francisco Chapter of 
the National Safety Council. 

The housekeeping closet is designed to 
hold all of the more dangerous household 
items in addition to serving as an ade- 
quate storeplace for brooms, brushes, car- 
pet sweepers, and a host of other items 
that contribute to many home falls, Mr. 
Archibald reports. 

"Lock up your home hazards in this 
neatly designed closet and remove temp- 
tation from your children. Permanent 
disfigurement or death is too great a 
price for them to pay for curiosity that 
you can eliminate by spending a few dol- 
lars and a few hours time," reminds Mr. 
Archibald. 

Write today to the San Francisco 
Chapter, National Safety Council, 28 
Geary Street, San Francisco 8, Califor- 
nia, and ask for the free plans and de- 
scription of the "safety" designed house- 
keeping closet. 



Santa Cruz Rug 
Cleaners 

Modern Equipment 

Work Guaranteed 

NEW & USED RUGS SOLD 

Daniel T. Fogarty 

Telephone 4119-W 

1521 SEABRIGHT AVE. 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



The Palmer House 

Formerly Laura-Lee Court 

BEACH HILLS NEWEST 

Ultra Modern 2 Room Apts. 

Clifford & Bertha Palmer, Owners 

Phone 4695 

820 - 3rd STREET 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



Celebrating Van Camp's 
90th Anniversary — 

STOKELEY-VAN 
CAMP, INC. 



General Offices 
Indianapolis 6, Indiana 



Santa Cruz 
California 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Concha Del Mar 
Court 

open All Year— 1/2 Blk. to Beach 
Overlooking Ocean 

2 and 3 ROOM APARTMENTS 
WITH GARAGES 

Bud and Mabel Finney 

Phone 1765-R 

130 WEST CLIFF DR. 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



Seabright Motel 
Apartments 

60 MOTEL APARTMENTS AT 

SEABRIGHT BEACH 

Small Units — Large Units 

Volney L. Hay, Owner 

Phone 3440 

Atlantic and Second Avenue 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



WHITE'S 
MORTUARY 

W. H. White 



'Thought Jul, Efficient 
Service" 



Telephone 4800 
138 WALNUT AVENUE 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



STANISLAUS PEACE 
OFFICERS 

(Continued from page 11) 
past year. Through intelligent conclu- 
sions and smart interrogation, they were 
able to prove that Clarence had con- 
spired with his father, Henry, to murder 
his mother. Henry is now awaiting exe- 
cution and Clarence is in the custody of 
the juvenile authority. 

Farther down the county Chief John 
J. Viarengo of Turlock is doing an out- 
standing job of maintaining law and or- 
der. The 1953 report of the Stanislaus 
County Grand Jury, which was not too 
complimentary to some prisons, declared : 

"The Turlock jail is outstanding as to 
excellence of arrangement, maintenance 
and administration, particularly in rela- 
tion to the manner in which the criminal 
and identification records are kept. 

The department and the auxiliary 
earned the praise by overhauling the old 
jail in 1951 and 1952. Members, work- 
ing on their own time, partitioned the 
office with sand blasted ph'wood. They 
divided the cavernous old station into an 
office for the chief, an interrogation room 
and reception room. 

Keeping of proper criminal and iden- 
tification records is relatively new also, 
being introduced by the former chief, 
Harry L. Oliver, and Chief John Vi- 
arengo. 

By introduction of complex filing rec- 
ords, an officer now can put his finger 
on the record of any man booked at the 
jail. 

The department also makes use of 
Federal Bureau of Investigation infor- 
mation on criminals and criminal activi- 
ties, taking full advantage of the services 
offered by FBI in all phases of crime de- 
tection. 



DEFECTIVE MUFFLER 

A clogged muffier or a bent muffler 
tail pipe on your car can create sufficient 
back pressure to cause poor engine per- 
formance, states the California State 
Automobile Association. 



ADJUST HEADLIGHTS 

Keep your headlights properly adjust- 
ed so that the lower beams are not aimed 
upward into the approaching driver's 
eyes, advises the California State Auto- 
mobile Association. If in doubt about the 
adjustment of the headlights on your 
automobile, have them checked at an offi- 
cial Light Testing station. 

GOOD VISIBILITY 

Keep your windshield glass and head- 
light lenses clean and windshield wipers 
in top working condition, says the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association. 



Mitchell's Septic 
Tank Service 

SEPTIC TANKS 
Pumped and Repaired 

K. A. Mitchell, Owner-Opr. 

Phone 6472 

822 HANOVER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Hotel Chamberlin 

3 Blocks from Casino at the 
Beach — Open Year 'Round 

Mildred Jensen, Ann Leonard 
Managers 

Phone 5358 

905 THIRD STREET 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



DEER PARK 
TAVERN 

specializing in . . . 

BROILED STEAKS - CHOPS 
Whole or Roast CHICKEN 

N. J. Butriza, Prop. 



DINE AND DANCE 

Phone Aptos 9401 
8 Miles from Watsonville 
8 Miles from Santa Cruz 

Watsonville-Santa Cruz 
Highway 

RIO DEL MAR, CALIF. 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



Granite Construction 
Company 

Engineering Contractors 

Office Phone Santa Cruz 5102 

Res. Phone Santa Cruz 764-J 

725 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Shoppers Corner 

Groceries — Meats — Produce 
Liquor 

Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

Williams & Beauregard 

Cor. Soquel & Branciforte 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



DAVENPORT 
PRODUCERS 
ASSOCIATION 

GROWERS - PACKERS 
DISTRIBUTORS 

Artichokes - Asparagus 
Broccoli • Peas - Sprouts 



L. Poletti, Geti. Mgr. 



HEAD OFFICE 

Davenport, Calif. 



PISTOL POINTING 

(Continued from page 9) 
Team If'inners 
Class A — California Highway 

Patrol No. 1 ; 5800 

Class B— Oakland Police De- 
partment No. 1 5522 

Class C — Santa Cruz Handgun 

Club No. 1 5365 

Class D— Oakland Police De- 
partment No. 3 5138 

High Shooters in Each Caliber 

.38 caliber— Milt Klipfel 1439 

.22 caliber— Bob Chow 1462 

.45 caliber— Bob Chow 1420 

J ust a Feiv Notes Here and There 
One of my first notes concerns Gloria 
Norton and to my mind there isn't a 
better all-around woman pistol shot in 
the whole dog-gone U.S.A. In looking 
over the list of women champions I was 
particularly interested in the records that 
Gloria holds or has tied. Out of 19 rec- 
ords, she now holds 1 1 and is tied in two 
others which leaves just six records that 
she does not have. It should be noted that 
some of the records she does not hold are 
matches she has not ben able to shoot in 
— take for instance the .45 slow, rapid 
and timed matches, which matches are 
not fired at any of the registered ranges 
around her part of the country but I do 
feel certain that if she were to participate 
in any of these matches a few more rec- 
ords would be in her name. Here enters 
one of the things the shooters would love 
to see but mayhap never will. In the 
southern part of the state a new woman 
pistol champ has risen but her forte is the 
.45 cannon and her scores are really re- 
markable. She holds plenty of .45 records 
and that she does shoot this big handgim 
well is clearly shown by looking over the 
record book. A match between this .45 
champ. Peg Culbertson and Gloria 
would really be something. But here is 
the rub. It seems as tho Gloria had to 
give up real pistol competition for two 
very good reasons, the first is that she is 
a housewife with a family to care for ; 
secondly, the expenses of entering and 
practicing for the matches, as you well 
know, all takes a lot of the long green. It 
just doesn't seem right that right here in 
our own back yard we have the finest 
woman shot in the country and we are 
unable to see her perform in real compe- 
tition due to expenses — and many others 
of us find ourselves in the same boat. 
Why couldn't Gloria's home town of 
^Voodland Chamber of Commerce send 
her to the Regionals — just think of the 
wonderful notices Woodland could get 
from such a gesture. It kinda leaves me 
stumped as just what to do in such a case 
and I was wondering if any of the shoot- 
ers had some ideas on the subject. 



Bob 
Donaldson's 



Al 
Williams' 



MAMBOO 
GARDENS 

"The Hot Spot of the Beach" 
523 BEACH STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Bay City Hotel 

Excellent Beds 

Reasonable Rates 

Hot and Cold Water 

Deas and Deas, Props. 



Phone 1460 
1003 PACIFIC AVENUE 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



SANTA CRUZ 

AGGREGATES 

CO. 



Felton Silver Sand 

Sand & Gravel 

Concrete Mix and 

Sandy Loam 



LOCK HART GOLCH RD. 

Felton, California 



■ April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Lloyd's Tire Service 

RECAPPING - TIRES 
TUBES - BATTERIES 

All Recapping Done in Lodi 
Equipment 

New and Used Tires 

Telephone 468 
1520 Old Highway No. 1 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



HIGHWAY AUTO 

WRECKERS 

and 

PACIFIC JUNK COMPANY 

R. H. Swinn 

Phone 1728 
1505 Old Highway No. 1 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Beti Hudson's 

Park City Service 

Gas - Lubrication 

Friendly Service — Ph. 2312 

Housekeeping Cabins 

Day — Week — Month 

4100 OLD HIGHWAY 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Art's Refrigeration 
Service 

Frigidaire Sales — Service 

Authorized Frigidaire Dealer 

Art Hutcheon, Mgr. 

Phones: 6969— Nite 6449-W 
SOQUEL, CALIFORNIA 



Speaking of the .45 cannon brings 
another notation on the calendar. I have 
been asked, mostly by new shooters, why, 
for instance, does a sharpshooter or ex- 
pert drop down one class lower when the 
.45 match is on ? The explanation is very 
simple especially if you shoot the .45 gun. 
The .45 is a ruff, tuff, rip-snortin' gun to 
handle and in order to give the shooters a 
break they are allowed to drop back one 
class until such time as they can climb 
back to their higher classification and be- 
lieve me, brother, that takes a long, long 
time — sometime. 

I see by the amount of material already 
given out I am about out of space so will 
close with just this one more question 
asked at the last San Francisco match. 
What is the meaning of the open class 
and who gets into it, especially as they 
have the master class ? Some explanation 
is in order. The open class is just what it 
says — open to all classes for the top prize 
of the match. Just supposing that a 
marksman get real hot and shoots the 
highest score of the match he may elect 
to take the top medal in the open class or 
the first place medal in the marksman 
class, just as he chooses. This same goes 
for any other class to the shooter having 
the highest scores. The open class is used 
in San Francisco but there is no open 
class around these parts other than S. F. 



POLICE ORDINANCES 

(Continued from page 10) 

2. Such persons are returned to San 
Francisco at the expense of the people of 
the City and County of San Francisco. 

3. When a complainant at whose in- 
stigation a warrant or an indictment has 
been issued shall notify the Chief of Po- 
lice of a desire to have the defendant re- 
turned to San Francisco, the Chief of 
Police will have the complainant deposit 
the amount necessary for the return of 
the defendant. 

4. When the necessary amount is de- 
posited it becomes the duty of the Chief 
of Police to return such defendant, on ar- 
rest, to the City and County of San 
Franci.sco. 

5. Upon the return of the defendant it 
shall be the duty of the District Attorney 
to provide for the proper arraignment of 
said defendant for his preliminary exami- 
nation and (or) trial, if held for trial. 

6. When the returned defendant has 
duly been given a preliminary examina- 
tion, or has pleaded guilty, or has been 
tried for the offense charged, the person 
who deposited the amount necessary to 
return the prisoner is entitled to be reim- 
bursed in the amount so deposited. 



For Fun! 

It's Gene Engle's 

ALPINE INN 

Music — Friday & Saturday 

# 

Boulder, Calif. 



Bert's at the Beach 

Gay Nineties Taproom 

Smorgasbord Dining Room 

Chief Chicken Picker 
Jack Schutte 

801 BEACH STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Barney Morrow's 
World Famous 

BROOKDALE 

INN AND 
LODGE 



Brook Runs Thru Dining 
Room 



Brookdale, Calif. 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



NATIONAL DISTRIBUTORS OF 

FOG KIST VEGETABLES 

Phone 623 
P. O. Box 498 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

MISSION PHARMACY 

Fred Carcello, Prop. 

Phone 2780 
1521 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

PETE & CLARA'S GARDEN 

Italian Dinners by Reservation 

BOCCIE BALL 

Pete Baudo, Prop. 

Phone 2S97-W 

140 Encinal Street 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

KALAR'S 

BLACKSMITH AND WELDING SHOP 

Electric and Acetylene Welding 

Tank Manufacturing — General Blacksmithing 

Ray Kalar, Owner 



Phone 1SS2 — Res. 6929-R 

325 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



GRAHAM & SON 

Transit Mix Concrete 

Sand — Gravel — Cement 

Loams — Top Soil 



Phone 6019-J 
500 MT. HERMON RD. 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Alexanders 
Cocktail Lounge 

Genial Hospitality 

SPECIAL DINNERS 

W. D. Alexanders 



BOULDER CREEK, CALIF. 



7. It shall be the duty of the Chief of 
Police to approve of the payment of the 
amount deposited, and of the Comptrol- 
ler to draw a warrant therefor, and of 
the Treasurer to pay the same. 

8. The complainant is not entitled to 
be reimbursed if : ( 1 ) He settles or com- 
promises any claim which may be the 
basis of charges against the defendant, or, 
(2) If he agrees to the dismissal of said 
charges, or, (3) If he agrees to settle or 
compromise the claims which are or may 
be the basis of charges against the de- 
fendant. 

9. When an amount is offered to the 
Chief of Police to return a defendant 
from some other part of the State it is 
not obligatory for the Chief of Police to 
accept such deposit — and the Chief of 
Police may, at all times, consider if the 
ends of justice will or will not be served 
by such return 

10. The Municipal Code stipulations, 
in the matter of intra state extradition, 
are in no wise intended to render in- 
operative any provisions of : ( 1 ) The 
Penal Code, or, (2) Any other law or 
statute of the State of California dealing 
with the arrest, admission to bail, extra- 
dition, or return for trial of any person 
charged with crime; and the Municipal 
Code stipulations shall be deemed to be 
in aid of and supplemental to all existing 
laws and statutes. 

11. If the defendant to be returned is 
discharged on bail, or released from cus- 
tody by a court of competent jurisdiction, 
any money advanced for the return of 
said person may be refunded. 

12. The "Cost of returning a person 
to San Francisco" shall include — besides 
all other items: (1) The cost of travel 
to and from the place from which the 
person is to be brought; (2 Living, and 
other expenses, during the time consumed 
in going to and returning from said place, 
and, (3) Any other expense incident to 
the return of the prisoner. 



EXTRA CAUTION 

Visibility is very poor during early 
evening hours, points out the National 
Automobile Club, and the wise pede- 
strian will use extra caution when cross- 
ing the street at that time. 



GOOD TEAMWORK 

Signals clearly given and understood 
make for good teamwork both on the 
gridiron and on the highway, points out 
the National Automobile Club. You can 
help rechice our tragic traffic accident toll 
by making your arm signals clearly and 
deliberately and by watching carefully 
for the signals of others. 



GUNNISON BROS.. INC. 

Phone 306 
SOQUEL CALIFORNIA 

TROUT FARM INN 

1500 ZAYANTE ROAD 
FELTON CALIFORNIA 

RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION 

Fred J. Devins, Agent 

Phones: 2940 - 2308 
139 ENCINAL STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LINDA VISTA MARKET 

Telephone 5335 
2404 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



M. D. Samuelson 

WHOLESALE 
DISTRIBUTOR 

Standard Oil of Calif. 



P. O. BOX 517 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



CAMP EVERS 
GARAGE 

General Auto Repair 
and Tmie-Up 

John Shepard, Prop. 
CAMP EVERS JUNCTION 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



TONY DAYS 

UQUORS — WINES — BEER 
Days Pet Shop 

415 SEABRIGHT AVENUE 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

CECIL SEARLE ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
Electrical Work of All Kinds 

Phone 6220 

2340 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

BLUE BIRD APT. MOTEL 

Modern Kitchens and Electrical Refrigerators 
Only 2 Blacks to Beautiful Beach 
Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Akens, Props. 

Phone 4361 -M 

14TH AVENUE & E. CLIFF DRIVE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



EAST SIDE BAKERY 

Phone 3416 

922 SOQUEL AVENUE 

sAnTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



CASA ALTA 

AT THE BEACH 

Hotel Apartments — Cottages — 
Courts 

Beautiful Roof Garden — Electric 
Elevator — Steam Heat 
Electric Refrigeration 

BEACH & RAYMOND STS. 

Phone Santa Cruz 2799 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



GARBINI'S 

Real Italian Cuisine 

Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 
Fine Foods — Italian Dinners 

On Old Highway near 4 1st Ave. 

Between 
SANTA CRUZ & SOQUEL 

Phone Santa Cruz 214-M 



INSTRUCTOR'S SCHOOL 

High school teachers of driver educa- 
tion will study the newest developments 
in all aspects of highway transportation 
during a two-week course, June 21 to 
July 2, conducted at the 'Frafific Institute 
of Northwestern University in Evanston, 
Illinois. 

1 he seminar for driver education 
teachers will be under the direction of 
F. R. Noffsinger, who is in charge of 
course development at the Traffic In- 
stitute. He was formerly dean of the 
School of Commerce of St. Louis Uni- 
versity and pioneered in training teachers 
in driver education when he was educa- 
tion consultant for the American Auto- 
mobile Association. 

1 he course, said Mr. Noffsinger, will 
enrich the teacher's knowledge and add 
new meaning to the teaching of driving 
both in and out of the classroom. 

"Eighty-five per cent of traffic acci- 
dents today are related to faulty driving," 
said Mr. Noffsinger. "Thorough driver 
education will greatly reduce this per- 
centage, and cut down the accident rate. 
This is largely the job of the driver edu- 
cation teachers." 

Topics to be presented in the seminar 
for driver education teachers will be: 

Recent Findings in the Nature and 
Characteristics of the Dri\er. 

New Problems and Solutions in 1 raf- 
fic Engineering. 

The Advance of Driver Licensing. 

Programs of Driver Improvement. 

Latest Trends in Motor Vehicle De- 
sign and Construction. 

Traffic Courts — Their Place in Traf- 
fic Safety. 

Uniform Traffic Laws. 

Streets and Highways for 1 omorrow. 

How an Accident Happens. 

Successes in the Coordinated Attack on 
the Traffic Problem. 

Philosophy of Traffic Law Enforce- 
ment. 

Insurance and Civil Liability in Auto- 
mobile Accidents. 

New Developments in School Traffic 
Safety Problems. 

Successful Community 1 raffic Safety 
Programs. 

Highway 1 ransportation System-Ex- 
tent and Problems. 

Preventing Accidents Through Vehi- 
cle Maintenance and Inspection. 

Developments in Accident Investiga- 
tion and Reporting. 

Role of Public Iiiforniatioii in Acci- 
dent Pre\ention. 

Support Agencies in the Highwav 
Transportation System. 

Training Needs and Facilities in the 
Highway Fransportation System. 
(Continued on page 22) 



H. W. VOSS 

WELL DRILLING 



1760 LOS GATOS HIGHWAY 

ROUTE 4 

SOQUEL CALIFORNIA 



SHERMAN & STICKELS 

TEXACO SERVICE AND GARAGE 

17lh AVENUE & CAPITOLA ROAD 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

SANTA CRUZ HATCHERY 

Telephone 335 

1010 Rodriguez Street 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

CIMARELLI'S LAUREL PLUMBING 

PLUMBING — HEATING 

Phone 1169 — Res. Phone 248S 

209 LAUREL STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

........1 ^.., . . I—..... ^ 

Private Shoivers } 

Beauty Rest Beds \ 

Arnold's Surf Court 

open All Year 

Leibrandt Ave. at the Beach 

Phone 74 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Pop and Mom's 
GOBBLE INN 

Good Chicken Dinners and 
Hot Cinnamon Buns 

• 
RT. I, BOX 610 

Aptos, Calif. 



Paffe 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



B & B FERTILIZER COMPANY 

Liquid Fertilizer - Mixed Fertilizer 

Weed Killers - Insecticides 

Fungicides - Sulphurs 

Sprays - Dusts 

phone 4-4195 
30 BROOKLYN AVENUE 



WATSONVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Monterey Concrete Pipe Company 

ANYTHING MADE FROM CONCRETE 

Plant: Salinas Highway 

Phone 4-4186 

WATSONVILLE CALIFORNIA 

OPAL CLIFFS 

LIQUOR 

3961 PORTOLA DRIVE 
OPAL CLIFF CALIFORNIA 

EVIRINGTON MEAT CO. 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 

P. O. BOX 839 
WATSONVILLE CALIFORNIA 



K. J. McGranahan 
Building Contractor 

500 Spring Street 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Andy's Beverage 
Company 

LUCKY LAGER AND 
BURGERMEISTER BEER 

Andy Boido 

Phone 68 

316 MAY AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Additional sessions will be devoted to 
the discussion of the material presented 
in terms of its use in teaching driver edu- 
cation in the high schools. 

Leading traffic authorities who will 
present the various topics include: J. 
Stannard Baker, director of research, 
Traffic Institute; George W. Barton, 
traffic engineering consultant; George C. 
Bowers, director of field service, Traffic 
Division, International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, and Traffic Institute 
staff including: Gerald O'Connell, di- 
rector of training; Glenn V. Carmichael, 
assistant director of Training, and 
Robert L. Donigan, Counsel. 



DEATH ON WRONG SIDE 

Traffic fatalities resulting from driv- 
ing on the wrong side of the road have 
almost tripled during the past five years. 

Truth of this statement is borne out 
by a review of California Highway Pa- 
trol accident reports for the past few 
years. In 1949 driving on the wrong side 
of the road accounted for 4.2 per cent 
of total violations in fatal accidents. Last 
year this percentage jumped to 11. The 
increase has been steady during the past 
five years. 

Patrol Commisioner B. R. Caldwell 
pointed out that these drivers were not 
in the act of passing cars nor swerving to 
avoid other accidents, again emphasizing 
the human frailties in individual cases. 

"Drowsiness, drunkenness, fatigue, and 
inattention are among the reasons for 
this increase in serious accidents of this 
type," he explained. 

"Any motorists who feels ill, sleepy, 
or unable to concentrate on driving, 
should pull immediately to the side of the 
road and park off the highway. A nap, a 
cup of coffee, or some exercise will head 
off the trouble before it starts. 

"It seems almost unbelievable that 
eleven per cent of the violations noted in 
fatal collisions last year were for driving 
on the wrong side of the road. Among 
the first instructions a beginning driver 
receives is to stay on the right side of the 
road," Caldwell declared. 



KNOW YOUR NOISES 

In the lexicon of the automobile me- 
chanic, according to the National Auto- 
mobile Club, a squeak is recognized as 
an urgent demand for oil, a rattle the 
product of looseness, and a hum a very 
fast rattle with the individual beats so 
closely spaced as to produce a sound that 
is not unmusical even though it is excep- 
tionally irritating. 



NAPOLI PIZZARIA 

Pizza Our Specialty, Italian Sandwiches 

SPAGHETTI AND MEAT BALLS 

Carol Affinto, Prop. 

609 BEACH STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

REA COURT 

2 ROOM APARTMENTS 
Convenient to Stores 
Jack & Marie Azevedo 

Phone 4 118 

1 16 RAYMOND STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

DEL MAR APTS. & COTTAGES 

Modern 2 & 3 Room Apts. With Electric Refr. 

REASONABLE RATES 

Mr. & Mrs. Rudy Fenna, Owners 

Phone 3899 
126 LEIBBRANDT STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORK!' 



A. G. SILVA 

2015 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

BOGNER'S 
SHEET METAL 



Phone 1568-J 
422 SOQUEL AVENUE 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Compliments of 

D. D. WILDER 
RANCH 



Phone 518-W 
COAST ROAD 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



\ April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



BOB & JOE'S 

HAM EGGS 

THE BEST OH! SO GOOD 



109 BEACH STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

THE CAVALIER 

Try Our Delicious Bar-B-Q 

Spare Ribs — Shish Kebab — Fish & Chicken 

Breakfast — Lunch — Dinner 

Food to Take Out 
For Reservations Phone 4349-J 

127 PACIFIC AVENUE 

S^NTACRUZ CALIFORNIA 

J & J APTS. 

John Gomes — Jim Nohrigt 

Telephone 1935 
811 BEACH STREET 

SA\TA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

GLOVER COURT APARTMENTS 

Private Bath, Rates: Day or Week 
T. Lagatos - P. Hassouros, Owners 

Phone 3206 
! lis RIVERSIDE STREET 

I SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



FARMERS 

COOPERATIVE 

EXCHANGE 



415 River Street 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



H. H. LEDYARD 
COMPANY 



SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



McCLURE LEAVES BEAT 

A month or so after San Francisco 
Examiner reporter Stuart McClure re- 
turned from World War II Infantry 
service in Europe his city editor called 
him up to his desk. 

"Mac," he said, "I want you to go 
down to the Hall of Justice and cover 
the night police beat for a couple of weeks 
until we get some one to fill in perma- 
nently." 

Last month, more than seven years 
later, McClure, 38, turned in his special 
police reporter's star to Chief Michael 
Gaffey and left the Examiner's employ 
to enter the political arena as a candidate 
at the June 8th primary election for the 
First District Board of Equalization seat 
now held by George R. Reilly. 

During the years intervening, Mc- 
Clure served with three police chiefs in 
addition to Gaffey — Dullea, Riordan and 
Mitchell — and became known to the en- 
tire San Francisco force and to many 
other law enforcement officers in the Bay 
Area as a fair-minded, thoroughly com- 
petent reporter. 




Stuart McClure 

In turning in his badge and credentials 
as a special police officer, a status held by 
all San Francisco newsmen who regularly 
cover the police beat, McClure, in a for- 
mal statement to the Chief, said in part : 

"It has been a great pleasure as well as 
a great honor to serve with you. The San 
Francisco Police Department is deserving 
of the outstanding reputation which it 
has throughout the nation for its high 
level of efficiency in all phases of police 



CARL TERMITE COMPANY 

Sub-Area Reconstruction Specialized 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Concrete Work 

R. B. Carl — Established 1928 



Telephone 6722 
210O - 17th AVENUE 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



ANTHONY'S SALES & SERVICE 

McCULLOCH CHAIN SAWS 

Phone 1317 
2818 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

S. & M. BAKERY 

Phone 793 
1339 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

Glenn-Rowe Service Co., Inc. 

CIGARETTE VENDING MACHINES 
Jack Malloch. Mgr. 

Bus Phone 572 — Home Phone 2664-R 
1305 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

Sherman Villa 
Motor Court 

Modern Cottages on 
Branciforte Creek 

Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Lynch, Prop. 

Phone 4185-W 
438 MARKET STREET 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



RIVERSIDE 
HOTEL 

and 

COLONIAL DINING ROOM 

Peter J. Marchese 

RIVERSIDE AVENUE AND 

BARSON STREET 

Telephone 3940 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



THE LAUNDROMAT 

WASH AND DRY 
Frank & Mollie Marshall 

Phone 6390 

Cor. Washinston and Laurel Street 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

RAYMOND COURT APARTMENTS 

1 Block From Beach — Open All Year 

2 & 3 Room Apts. — Private Showers 

Irma Thompson 

Phone 6522 
309 RAYMOND STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

San Lorenzo Apartment-Motel 

Modern Three-Room Completely Furnished 

Open All Year 

D. T. Bettencourt 

Telephone 407-J 
324-A THIRD STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

SUNNY BEACH COTTAGES 

2 & 3 Room Housekeeping — Private Showers 
Merry-Go-Round and Beach 
Bertha & Fred Bettencourt 

Telephone 7563-W 
129 RAYMOND STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



PERRY A. ROSS 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



Phone 282 1-M 
730 - 1 7th AVENUE 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



CENTURY 

MAINTENANCE 

CO. 



P.O. Box 444 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



work. I have learned a great deal while 
working with you and will always carry 
with me the highest respect for you and 
your Department. 

"Please extend to your officers and men 
on my behalf my genuine apprecia- 
tion for their cooperation and assistance 
throughout the years of my work with 
them. I wish you and them the best of 
everything for the future." 

McClure first entered the newspaper 
field 15 years ago this month in the classi- 
fied advertising department of the Ex- 
aminer, subsequently moving as a report- 
er to the old San Jose Mercury Herald 
where he also covered police, and then 
returning as a reporter to the Examiner 
about a year before entering \Vorld ^Var 
II military service. 

Recent highlight of this outstanding 
newspaperman's career was the receipt in 
January of the Pall Mall Award for 
"distinguished service in the field of jour- 
nalism" and the radio dramatization of 
his work with San Francisco homicide 
Inspectors Al Nelder and John O'Haire 
in the apprehension of Robert Ranson, 
19-year old juvenile gang leader who shot 
five youths in Civic Center following a 
ball at the Civic Auditorium two years 
ago. 

He was also involved closely with the 
press coverage of the recent $500,000 
Moskovitz kidnaping, having been on 
duty at the Hall of Justice both at the 
time the story first broke and in the early 
morning hours several silent days later 
when the young real estate broker was re- 
covered unharmed. 

Throughout his years of newspapering, 
McClure has maintained a lively interest 
in the affairs of his community and State, 
playing an active role in more than a 
score of activities designed to improve 
existing conditions. 

Initially active in the veterans' move- 
ment as a Post commander and State 
officer of the Veterans of Foreign Wars 
and a member of the American Legion 
and the "Veterans Political Council, he 
turned to partisan politics and became 
successively a member, and in some cases 
an officer, of the Young Republicans, 
the Republican Assembly, the San Fran- 
cisco Republican County Central Com- 
mittee and the Republican State Central 
Committee. 

At the same time he has been active in 
the local unit of the CIO American 
Newspaper Guild and in such organiza- 
tions as the World Affairs Council of 
Northern California, the San Francisco 
Council for Civic Unity and the San 
Francisco Planning and Housing Asso- 
ciation. Chairman of the board of Trus- 
tees of the Lucinda Weeks Foundation 



ART J. GREYER 

Authorized Dealer — English Fords 
We Buy, Sell and Trade 
Cash Paid for Used Cars 
Time to Deal with Honest Art's Used Ca 

Phone 1344 

1215 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIJ 

SUTHERLAND SERVICE 

Automotive Service — Motor Tune 

Lubrication — Trailer for Rent, City to City 

Brakes - Generators - Starters - Magazines 

Carburator Serviced and Reconditioned 

Groceries — Beer — Wine — Drugs — Gas. OU 1 

Phone 4388 

1906 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA I 



RADIO-TV CENTRE 

TELEVISION SALES AND SERVICE 
R. J. Hamm 

P. O. Box 121 

Phone Santa Cruz 362-R 

SOQUEL CALIFORNIA 

STATE RESTAURANT 

American and Italian Dishes 
Gladys & Frank Galati 

Phone 4137 
1412 SOQUEL AVENUE 

■ \TA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



Live Oak Poultry 

BROILERS — FRYERS 

FRICASSEE 

Wholesale 

E. M. Ross 

Phone 2244-'W 
1841 Chanticleer Avenue 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



BROWN BULB 
RANCH 

• 

41st Avenue 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



April. 1954 



PODICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



ROYAL HOTEL 

815 PACIFIC AVENUE 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

FLYING "A" GAS STATION 

L. M. Wame 

692 Soquel Ave., Old Hwy. and Slate Dr. 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



SAM WO LAUNDRY 

SPECIAL QUICK SERVICE ON REQUEST 

823 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALlFORNI.^ 

JONES MOTEL 

ON HIGHWAY No. 1 

Phone 2469 
1126 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



HIDDEN MOTOR 
COURT 

Quiet, Restful Atmosphere 
Units With or Without 
Kitchens — Large Apts. 

719 RIVERSIDE AVENUE 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



ST. CHARLES 
COURT 

New, Modern, Heated Apts. 
and Rooms 

Day, Week or Month 

Phone 2033 
902 - 3rd STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



for Handicapped Children, he is also a 
former director of the San Francisco 
Press and Union League Club and vice 
chairman of the Federal Rent Advisory 
Board for the San Francisco Area. 

McClure is also known in the seven- 
county First District, which encompasses 
San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, 
Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Benito and 
San Luis Obispo Counties, as a staff offi- 
cer of Northern California's 49th Na- 
tional Guard Division and as a former 
officer of the alumni association of the 
University of California, from which he 
was graduated in 1937. 

A member of the Native Sons of the 
Golden West, he is the grandson of the 
late A. A. Moore, pioneer Northern 
California atorney and early day district 
attorney of Alameda County, where his 
father, Donald McClure, also served as 
a deputy district attorney with Chief 
Justice Earl \Varren following World 
War I. His Great-grandfather, Richard 
A. McClure of Mission San Jose, served 
in the California Legislature during the 
1870's. The newsman-turned politico is 
married, the father of 3 boys and a girl 
and resides at 2700 Scott St., San Fran- 



COLD ENGINE 

Contamination of the oil in the crank- 
case occurs much more rapidly in an auto- 
mobile engine that is not driven far 
enough to thoroughly warm it up, the 
California State Automobile Association 
states. The automatic choke with which 
most engines are equipped causes raw fuel 
to reach the crankcase when the engine is 
cold. Furthermore, condensed moisture 
and gasoline on cold cylinder walls drains 
into the crankcase where it is eventually 
converted to sludge by combining with 
other materials. 



CAR LOOTERS 

Valuables should always be removed 
from an automobile left standing for any 
length of time, particularly at night, 
urges the California State Automobile 
Association. Car looting is increasing and 
thieves who take cameras, clothing, suit- 
cases and other expensive items from 
automobiles, are difficult to apprehend 
and the stolen goods rarely recovered. 
Don't leave easily lifted articles in the 
car, even if it is locked. 



STOP FENDERIZING 

Dents and nicks on fenders indicate 
careless driving. Drivers can stop "fen- 
derizing" one another b>' driving with 
more courtesy and carefulness, advises 
California State Automobile Association. 



JOE'S MOBIL SERVICE 

Phone 2369 

LAUREL AND MISSION STREETS 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LILLIAN'S KNITTING STUDIO 

Phone 1512 
1512 OCEAN STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

JOSEPH MIRTALLI L-33 

Phone 4179 

MISSION AND LAUREL STREETS 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

BUCKHORN 

ON SALE 
Emil L. Jasoni 

Telephone 2426 

117 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORN'A 



CASA DEL REY 

Fountain & Mkt. 

You'll Choose Santa Cruz 
117 CLIFF STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



3 A Approved 

El Patio Apt. Motel 

Rooms, Apts. & Garages with 

Drive In Parking 

New — Clean — Quiet 

Mr. & Mrs. E. S. Heywood, 



Phone 4319 
SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



Capitola Home & Auto Supply 

FIRESTONE DEALER — SHELL SERVICE 

All Repair Work Guaranteed 

Concrete Garage 



Phone S. C. 7066 
CA PITOLA CALIFORNIA 

OPAL CLIFF'S NURSERY 

PLANTS - SHRUBS - POTTERY 

FERTILIZER 

Doris and Arthur Turner 

3911 POROLA 
Near 41st Ave. 
Phone 3274-J 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



C-P. TRUCKING 

C. A. Carriker - L. D. Putney 

Phone Santa Cruz 205O-J 

P. O. Box 116 

SOQUEL CALIFORNIA 

MELLIS MARKET 

Fottls Mellis 

Phone 6442 

1204 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



GARIBALDI 
HOTEL 



Telephone 90 
808 FRONT STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



East Side Tavern & 
Liquor Store 

Glenn - Al - Richie 



Phone 1011 
1007 SOQUEL AVENUE 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



TRAINING CATALOG 

The Traffic Institute of Northwestern 
University has announced the publica- 
tion of its 1954-55 Catalog of Training 
Courses. 

Described in the 36-page booklet are 
the 72 traffic training courses, confer- 
ences, seminars, and clinics which will be 
offered by the Traffic Institute during 
1954 and the first six months of 1955. 
Forty-one courses will be held on the 
Northwestern campus in Evanston. 
Thirty-one will be presented at cooperat- 
ing universities in the West, East, and 
South. 

Training in virtually every field of 
traffic work will be offered. The Traffic 
Institute will conduct specialized courses 
for police officers, motor vehicle admin- 
istration and driver licensing personnel, 
traffic court judges and prosecutors, traf- 
fic engineers, teachers, safety personnel 
atached to the armed forces, fleet safety 
personnel, laboratory technicians, and 
newspapermen. 

Copies of the catalog are available on 
request to the Director of Training, 
Traffic Institute, 1704 Judson Ave., 
Evanston, Illinois. 

Courses scheduled for the first half of 
1954 are: 
January — 

14-16 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with the American Bar Associa- 
tion), Michigan State College, East Lan- 
sing, Mich. 

25-27 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with ABA), University of Ore- 
gon, Eugene, Oregon. 

25 (to February 5) Traffic Law En- 
forcement — Administration and Tech- 
niques, University of California, Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

28-29 Regional Conference for Grad- 
uates of Traffic Police Administration 
Course, Los Angeles, Calif. 
February — 

1-5 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with ABA), University of South- 
ern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 

1-19 Police Traffic Records ■ — Proce- 
dures and Use of Data, Traffic Institute. 

8-10 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with ABA), University of Ari- 
zona, Tuscon, Ariz. 

11-13 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with ABA), University of New 
Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

15 (to March 5) Police Traffic 
Course (Introduction to Police Traffic 
Supervision), Traffic Institute. 
March — 

1-5 Traffic Engineering — Field Study 
and Survey Methods, Traffic Institute. 



SANTA CRUZ HOTEL 

THE FINEST IN LIQUORS 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

Your Host . . . John Rigbetti 

Phone 484 
LOCUST AND VINE STREETS 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



MOTEL DEL PRADO 

MOTOR HOTEL 

Phone 2613 
P. O. Box 547 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

FOODLAND MARKET 

1118 OCEAN STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

MISSION RADIO SERVICE 

CAR & HOME - P. A. SYSTEM 

90 Day Guarantee Parts & Labor 

Ted Krause 

1323 MISSION STREET 
Phone 7690 

■ \NTACRUZ CALIFORNIA 



CAP and DON'S 

SHUFFLE INN 
Ice Cold Beer 

m 

Phone 5039 

725 SOQUEL AVENUE 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Bibbins Home & 
Auto Supply 

We Give S & H Green Stamps 

# 

Phone 3050 
2015 to 2023 N. PACIFIC 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



McMILLEN BROTHERS 

CLEANERS AND DYERS 

We Operate Our Own Plant 

Free Pick-Up and Delivery Service 

G. H. & M. L. McMillen 

Branch— Highway 1, SOQUEL 

Near Osocales Theatre 

Phone 3874-W 

CAPITOLA CAUFORNIA 



OPAL CLIFF'S MOBIL SERVICE 

Bob — Bus 

Phone 5290-R 
4001 PORTOLA DRIVE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

DETTLE'S SUPER SERVICE 

CAPITOLA RAILWAY EXPRESS OFFICE 

Phone 6721 
PORTOLA DRIVE AT 35TH AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

HIGHWAY FEED STORE 

Hay - Grain - Fuel - Poultry and Dairy Feed 

Distributors 

PILLSBURY'S BEST FEEDS 

Balance Does It 

Delivery Service 



Phone 368 

SANTA CRUZ 



801 Old Highway No. 1 

CALIFORNIA 



Zanze's Rocky Falls 
Famous Restaurant 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Louie Zanze 



Phone Santa Cruz 880 

4 Mi. N. of Santa Cruz 

ON LOS GATOS HWY. 



ACACIA INN 

COCKTAILS— DINNERS 

Fun for Everyone 
Frank & Esther Hunt 



Phone Santa Cruz 6915 
1250 LOS GATOS HWY. 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



b-l Regional Conference for Grad- 
uates of the Traffic Institute's Traffic 
Police Administration Course, Louisville, 
Ky. 

8-12 Traffic Engineering — Regulation 
and Control Devices, Traffic Institute. 

15-19 Traffic Engineering — Traffic 
and Transportation Planning, Traffic In- 
stitute. 

22 (to April 2) Accident Investiga- 
tion — Administration and Techniques, 
Northeastern University, Boston, Mass. 

29 (to April 2) Chemical Tests for 
Intoxication, Northeastern University, 
Boston, Mass. 

29 ( to April 2 Traffic Court Confer- 
ence (conducted with ABA), Northeast- 
ern University, Boston, Mass. 

31 (to April )2) Traffic Safety Semi- 
nar for Newspapermen, co-sponsored by 
Boston University and Northeastern 
University, Boston, Mass. 
April — 

5-6 Regional Conference for Grad- 
uates of Traffic Police Administration 
Course, Pikesville, Md. 

21-23 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with ABA), University of Mis- 
souri, Columbia, Mo. 

26 (to May 7) Accident Investigation 
— Administration and 1 echniques. Uni- 
versity of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

26 (to May 14) Accident Investigation 
— Administration and Techniques, Traf- 
fic Institute. 

28-30 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with ABA), University of Iowa, 
Iowa City, Iowa. 
May— 

3-7 Traffic Court Conference (con- 
ducted with ABA), University of Ala- 
bama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

3-7 Chemical Tests for Intoxication, 
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

3-21 Examiner Records and Their 
Uses, Unit 4, Chief Driver Examiner 
Program (conducted for American Asso- 
ciation of Motor Vehicle Administra- 
tors), Traffic Institute. 

10-28 Traffic Law Enforcement — Ad- 
ministration and Techniques, Traffic In- 
stitute. 

24 ( to June 1 1 ) Motor Vehicle Traf- 
fic Supervision Course for Air Provost 
Marshals, Traffic Institute. 
J une — 

7-18 Second Annual Southeastern Po- 
lice Traffic Traning School, University 
of Florida campus, Gainesville, Fla. 

10-12 Seminar for Traffic Administra- 
tors, Traffic Institute. 

21-25 Public Information Programs 
for Police, Traffic Institute. 

21-25 Motor Fleet Supervision, Traf- 
fic Institute. 

24-25 Motor Fleet Supervisor Re- 
fresher Seminar, Traffic Institute. 



WALT'S QUALITY MEATS 

Retail -Wholesale - Smoked & Fresh Meats 
Home-Made Variety Sausage - Poultry - Cheese 

Walter E. Bertuccelli, Own.-Mgr. 

Phone 1628W 

Cor. MISSION AND YOUNGLOVE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



MORRIS UNION SERVICE 

LUBRICATION - WASHING & WAXING 

306 CAPITOLA ROAD 
CAPITOLA CALIFORNIA 

THE COVE 

"ON THE BEACH" 
A. V. Buck - A. H. Campodonico 

Phone 1671-J 
C API TOLA CALIFORNIA 

CAPITOLA LAUNDRY 

Next to Cap:tola Theatre 
Gwong G. Lee 

Phone Santa Cruz 5416-W 
CAPITOLA CAL'FO^,:: 



ENTERPRISE 
SERVICE 

L. L. Ford 
C. E. "Cy" Eneboe 

Telephone Santa Cruz 1 14 
110-112 RIVER STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



VAPOR 
CLEANERS 

"PARKING A PLEASURE" 



Phone 46 
285 WATER STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 ; 



TOU-REST APT. MOTEL 

ROOMS— APTS. — GARAGES 
Mr. & Mrs. W. R. Coomes, Owners 



Phone I720-W 
203 LAUREL STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

WOOD'S RADIO & TV 

COMPLETE SALES & SERVICE 
G. E. - Hoffman and Others 

E. H. Wood, Owner 

Phone 645 

623 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



IVORY LAUNDRY 

LAUNDERERS AND CLEANERS 
Call & Deliver 

Phone 1561 
705 BRANCIFORTE AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNI' 

BYRNE'S MOTEL 

Kitchens - Tile Showers - Steam Heated 

REASONABLE RATES 

Andrew Byrne 



Phone 3380 
1614 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



OPAL CLIFFS 
FOOD CENTER 

4125 Portola Dr. 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



SANTA CRUZ 
ELECTRONICS 

• 

Wholesale Electronic 
Equipment 



CONFERENCE SLATED 

\Villiani M. \Vhelan, Special Agent 
in Charge of the San Francisco Office of 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation, an- 
nounced recently that an FBI Law En- 
forcement Conference on Interstate 
Transportation of Stolen Property will 
be held in April in San Francisco. 

Whelan said more than 100 confer- 
ences of this type have been scheduled 
this year by the FBI on a regional basis 
throughout the United States and are de- 
signed to cover confidence game swindles, 
fraudulent checks, major thefts and other 
varied violations which fall within the 
classification of interstate transportation 
of stolen property. I he conferences will 
be aimed at bringing about additional co- 
orination among law enforcement agen- 
cies and improved efficiency in dealing 
with these crimes. They will be operated 
on a forum basis providing for a mutual 
exchange of information and knowledge 
by all participants. 

Whelan illustrated the importance of 
the meetings by pointing out that the 
FBI's investigative activity under the In- 
terstate Transportation of Stolen Prop- 
erty Statute has increased greatly during 
the past several years. For example, he 
said there were 407 convictions resulting 
from FBI cases in this category during 
the 1953 fiscal year, an increase of 15 per 
cent o\er the preceding year. He stated 
he feels the conferences will be of much 
value to law enforcement agencies, not 
only in this area, but throughout the 
country. 

Although the conferences will cover 
numerous types of crimes, AVhelan said 
the three main phases of discussion will 
concern fraudulent checks, confidence 
game swindles, and major thefts. 

In the panel on fraudulent checks, the 
discussion will include information con- 
cerning the methods of operation most 
often used by bad check artists, the juris- 
diction of the FBI, the cooperative role 
of the FBI's Laboratory and Identifica- 
tion Division, and the availability of the 
FBI's National Fraudulent Check File 
to local authorities in a criminal case even 
though a Federal violation may not be 
involved. 

The discussion on confidence game 
swindles will relate closely to the major 
theft panel, since interstate transporta- 
tion of more than $5,000 often is in- 
voKed in the dubious dealings of the 
"con man." 

The panel on major thefts, Mr. Whe- 
lan said, will provide for an explanation 
of the facilities of the FBI which are 
available for the use of local authorities 
in investigating such cases. In addition, it 
will be pointed out that the FBI will en- 
ter into acti\e investigation any time 



GRIBBLE COURT 



Phone 536 
304 CLIFF STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LYN-DEL MOTEL APTS. 

2 & 3 ROOMS 

New and Modem With Refrigerators 

And Automatic Heat 

Phone 7251 

308 CLIFF STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

YELLOW Acme Arrow CABS 

COURTEOUS 24 HOUR SERVICE 
Limousine Service — Airport Service 

WE GO ANYWHERE 
"The Thinking Fellow Rides a Yellow" 



Phones: 1234 - 222 - 3500 
1320 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



FIDEL'S TEXACO 

1218 OCEAN STREET 

Ocean and Glenwood 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



BROWN'S 

SCIENTIFIC SWEDISH 
MASSAGE 

Medical Gymnastics and 
Therapy Treatment 

Phone 677-M 
118 DOYLE 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



CAPITOLA 
LIQUOR STORE 

Alice Laird, Owner 



Phone 1228-'W 
210 ESPLANADE 

Capitola, Calif. 



Jpril, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



AL L E N ' S 

CHICKEN DINNERS AND FAMOUS FOODS 
Steaks - Chops - Family Dinners 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Allen 

Telephone 4506-J 

3960 PORTOLA DRIVE at Opal Cliffs 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



REDWOOD PICNIC 

EATE'S 

441 SEABRIGHT STREET 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

HOLY CITY CAFE 

Dias Bros. 
BEERS, WINE. LUNCHES 



HOLY CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



MODERN MANOR 

3-ROOM APARTMENTS 
Located On Beach Hill 

R. A. Mallet 

Phone 4699 
321 - 2nd STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



EDGEWATER 
CLUB 

Louis Aluffi 

217 Esplanade 
Capitola-by-the-Sea 



J. ART ELLIS 

Groceries 



302 Capitola Rd. 
Capitola, Calif. 



there i.s an indication that stolen property 
or stolen currency having a value of 
$5,000 or more has been moved in inter- 
state commerce. Specialized thefts, such 
as jewels and furs, as well as the activity 
of "fences" of stolen property, also will 
be covered on the agenda. 

Whelan said this conference will be at- 
tended by local, state and county law en- 
forcement officers, FBI personnel, repre- 
sentatives from banks, hotel associations 
and business groups, and officials from 
other interested organizations. 

According to Special Agent in Charge 
Whelan, the FBI has held similar con- 
ferences throughout the country for the 
past two years. In 1952, there were 131 
auto theft conferences which were at- 
tended by 8,707 individuals representing 
3,121 agencies. There were 133 confer- 
ences in 1953 on thefts from interstate 
shipment. They were attended by 8,702 
persons representing 4,159 agencies. 



CARS IN CALIFORNIA 

A grand total of 225,811 motor ve- 
hicles entered California during the 
month of January, 1954, according to the 
National Automobile Club. Of this total, 
which is just 577 vehicles less than that 
for January, 1953, 200,041 were passen- 
ger cars, 22,085 were commercial trucks, 
and 3,685 were busses. 



CALL PATROL OFFICE 

If a driver is involved in a traffic acci- 
dent in which there is death or injury on 
any highway outside an incorporated city, 
an immediate call to the nearest office of 
the California Highway Patrol will 
bring expert assistance. Such emergency 
calls can be made collect. 

"This reminder is issued because in- 
formation arriving at Headquarters in- 
dicates that many recent accidents occur- 
ring in unincorporated areas have not 
been promptly reported," stated B. R. 
Caldwell, Patrol Commissioner. 

"In order to help motorists, offices of 
the Highwa\' Patrol will accept charges 
on incoming calls reporting accidents," 
he aded. 

The law states that any driver in- 
volved in an accident in which there is 
death or personal injury must report the 
accident in writing to the Highway Pa- 
trol within 24 hours provided the acci- 
dent occurs outside the limits of any city. 

In the event that the driver of any 
vehicle is unable to report the accident 
and there is another occupant in the ve- 
hicle, that occupant shall report the acci- 
dent or cause the report to be made. 

These required reports are in addition 
to Financial Responsibility reports or 
others that are required to be submitted. 



GREEN'S MKT. 



HOLY CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



TERRACE COURT 

lusekeeping Apts. - Private Sun Decks 
Closed Garages 
Mr. & Mrs. John Azevedo, Owners 



Phone 718 
125 BEACH STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORN' 



CLUB ALOHA 



Phone 3575 
1218 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

MOSSO & PUCCINELLI 

KAISER — FRAZER 

America's Most Copied Car! 

Hobbs Batteries 

General Tires 

25 Years in Business 



136 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



COLONIAL 
HOTEL 

Mrs. Sadie Wirth, Mgr. 



1114 PACIFIC STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



SOQUEL 
STORAGE CO. 

E. Otto 

• 

Phone Santa Cruz 1404 
P. O. BOX 276 

SOQUEL, CALIF. 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



ROUSSEL'S LIQUORS 

Telephone 523 
311 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

A. PENNA GAS STATION 

Phone 13W-2 
5451 LOS GATOS HWY. 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

BAY SIDE LODGE 

Mrs. Miller. Mgr. 



Phone 4010 

SANTA CRUZ 



114 FIRST STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



WISHING WELL COFFEE SHOP 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH & DINNERS 

303 BEACH STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFO RNIA 

LINDY'S APARTMENTS 

W. H. Giljohann, Owner 

Phone 3065 

159 THIRD STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



Santa Cruz Swiss Dairy 

2301 MISSION STREET 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

Santa Cruz Shirt Co., Inc. 

MEN'S FINE SHIRTS 

1010 FAIR AVE. 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFOR NIA 

GRAFFS GROCERY 

Phone 1365 
510 ERRETT CIRCLE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

H. E. BEDELL— Ih'SURANCE 

Telephones: 

Office 69S8 — Residence 1641 -W 

212 RIVER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

TONY'S MARKET 

STAPLE & FANCY GROCERIES 
Quality Meats and Groceries 

1515 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



HAYES HEADS DRIVE 

Arthur Hull Hayes, vice president of 
the Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc., 
will direct the planned expanded 1954 
accident prevention fund raising cam- 
paign of the San Francisco Chapter of 
the National Safety Council, Arnold E. 
Archibald, president of the Chapter, an- 
nounced recently. 

Hayes was appointed general chairman 
for the drive following a special meeting 
of the Council Board of Directors where 
it was decided to place the problem of 
financial aid for the Chapter squarely 
before the public in a city-wide campaign. 

Archibald reports that the present fi- 
nancial support for the Green Cross 
work here in San Francisco is received 
mainly through business and industrial 
memberships. 

I he Safety Council plans to expand its 
activities in 1954, but the present mem- 
berships are not sufficient within them- 
selves to meet the increased demands for 
accident prevention. Because the public 
benefits most from National Safety 
Council activities the Board decided that 
a general appeal must be made to meet 
the increased safety problems facing San 
Francisco. 

Upon accepting the appointment as 
general chairman Hayes stated : 

' If we are to fight the growing menace 
of accidents in our city, with its after- 
math of tragedy and expense, we must 
place in the hands of our Safety Council, 
the financial weapons with which to do 
the job. The San Francisco Chapter is 
not subsidized by any governmental or- 
ganization, nor does it receive aid from 
welfare organizations. Yet the National 
Safety Council is the only organization 
of its kind that has received a federal 
charter recognizing the work it does in 
saving lives. 

"Industry and business, which have 
long recognized the need for the council, 
should not be asked to bear all the fi- 
nancal burden for such a comprehensive 
program which in reality is beneficial to 
rvrrNone." 

"\Vhen jou consider that the Safety 
Council has been largely responsible for 
consistently reducing the accident death 
r.-ite in San Francisco since the local 
c'lanter was founded in 1945, it becomes 
obvious that this vitally needed life-sav- 
'ng activity deserves the support of every- 
one. For safety is everybody's job," 
Haves said. 

The community-wide campaign will 
embrace the various civic bodies, clubs, 
fraternal groups and organizations, racial 
and minority groups, professions, etc. 



Lindemann Apartments & Cottages 

By Day or Week 

Phone 2424-W 203 THIRD STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFO RNIA 

Palais Monte Carlo Apt. Hotel 

924 THIRD STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORN IA 

HOTEL BEACH HILL INN 

DINING ROOM IN CONNECTION 

Mrs. A. Damave, Owner 

Phone 740 Cor. 2nd & MAIN STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

BLUE BELL APTS. 

Mr. & Mrs. Manuel Costa, Jr., Owners 

Phone 3110 120 TRINITY STREET 

1% Blocks to Beach 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

POPPY COURT 

2 & 3 Room Apts. With Bath 

P. J. Veatch 

Phone 4040-W 1 IS TRINITY STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



Stives Upholstering Shop 

1511 MISSION STREET 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFOR NIA 

SAN LORENZO NEWS CO. 



Phone 1273-J 
346 Younslove Avenue 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



BROWN'S BARN 

THAT FASCINATING HOUSE AND GARDEN 
SHOP 

We Specialize in Gifts - Imports 



Phone 6422 
153 CENTER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



SMART MOTEL 

Phone 3960 
152 CENTER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

SANTA CRUZ MARKET 

Phone 6123 
214 CAIF AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



Jpril. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



FRIENDLY PET SHOP 

Wholesale and Retail — Visit our Aviaries 
Leo van Logher 



hhone 388-J 

SANIA CRUZ 



1250 SOQUEL AVE^fUE 

CALII-OKNIA 



HOLSER'S TIRE SERVICE 

Quality Recapping — 8 Hour Service 

300 CAPITOLA ROAD 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

HENRY PRINCE 

Auto Beauty Garage & Service Station 
Buffing - Waxing - Polishing — Shell 



Phone 5350-J 

SANIA CRUZ 



300 CAPITOLA ROAD 

CALIFORNIA 



Coffee & Donuts The American Pastime at 

FERRELL'S DONUT SHOP 

loss WATER STREET 

SANIA CRUZ CALIFORNI, 

HARDING MEAT MARKET 

PROMPT SERVICE 



Phone Santa Cruz 2884 
SANTA CRUZ 



943 Pacific Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



HARLEY ANTHIS 



Anthis Ambulance Service 
Oxygen herapy Service — 



one 6100 
ne 5138 



For Rent— Hospital Beds - Wheel Chairs 

Invalid Walkers & other Sick Room Equipment 

24 Hour Service 

628 OCEAN STREET 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

TAMPICO KITCHEN 

TAMALES - TORTILLAS - ENCHILADAS 

TACOS - TOSTADAS 

Mexican Foods — Orders to Take Out 

Featuring a Complete $1.25 Mexican Dinner 

Ramona & Albert Saldana 



Phone 3070-W 

SANTA CRUZ 



107 Ri' 



rside Avenuo 
CALIFORNIA 



GENE'S COVE 

ROOM AND BOARD 
Gene Panelti, Prop. 



Telephone 2277-R 
705 BAY STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



FRINDLEY INN 

126 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LEIBBRANDT & CO. 

KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES 
William (Bill) Puget 

1216 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



JUNE 1ST DEADLINE 

June 1 is the deadline for applying for 
grant-in-aid awards for the 1954-55 
Traffic Police Administration Training 
Program conducted by the Traffic In- 
stitute of Northwestern University, 
Franklin M. Kreml, director, has an- 
nounced. 

Applications are now being accepted 
for this nine-month training program at 
the Traffic Institute, 1704 Judson Ave., 
Evanston, 111. The program begins Sep- 
tember 23, 1954, and continues through 
June 13, 1955. 

Funds for sixteen $1,650 fellowships 
and sixteen $500 tuition scholarships 
have been provided by the Kemper Foun- 
dation for Traffic Safety, Chicago, 111., 
to enable police departments to send 
qualified officers for training in the execu- 
tion of effective traffic supervision and 
accident prevention programs. 

"To increase the possibility of having 
a man selected from their departments, 
police chiefs who are interested are en- 
couragd to permit all policemen of the 
rank of sergeant and above to submit 
applications to them," said Air. Kreml. 
"If they need help in establishing a basis 
for evaluating these applicants. Traffic 
Institute staff members will be glad to 
assist them," 

Eight fellowships and eight scholar- 
ships are provided for municipal police 
officers. \ he same number are awarded 
to state and county officers. A limited 
number of qualified students will be ad- 
mitted on a tuition-paying basis. 

The training program, designed es- 
pecially for stafif and command traffic 
personnel comprises four major areas of 
study and activity: 1 ) Problems in High- 
way Transportation, and the agencies 
concerned with these problems ; )2 Func- 
tions of Traffic Police, covering accident 
investigation, traffic law enforcement, 
and traffic direction; 3) Management of 
Police Traffic Services; and 4) general 
education courses which are arranged to 
increase the competence of the student 
and to provide answers to problems in 
traffic police management which are 
found in the fields of psychology, eco- 
nomics, sociology, and political science. 

The program consists of classroom 
work, supplemented by field laboratory, 
and study projects, and guidance and 
specialized conferences. 

Factors which are considered in the 
selection of police department representa- 
tives and granting of awards are: 1 ) the 
applicant's ability and potential useful- 
ness to his department; 2) the extent of 
the accident and congestion problem in 
his city or state; 3) the need of the de- 
partment for trained personnel, and 4) 



RED DOOR CAFE 



Half Way Between Santa Cruz and 

WatsonviUe Freeway 

Rt. 2, Box 3944 

APTOS CALIFORNIA 



BAY AND MISSION MKT. 

1604 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

Youngman's Variety and Hardware 

HOBBY SHOP 

Light Hardware - Hobby Supplies - Gifts 

Household Necessities - Key Making - Notions 



Stanley Hillard Union Oil Dealer 



Phone 31 SOW 

SANTA CRUZ 



1504 MISSION STREET 
CALIFORNIA 



THE TARGET 

HAPPY DAYS 

Your Hosts: Ed Hopkins - Virgil Parker 

Phone 1682-W 

SOQUEL CALIFORNIA 

BOULDER CREEK NURSERY 

PRICES RIGHT — SERVICE BRIGHT 



ith 



Telephone 8-6767 

Box 246 BIG BASIN ROAD 

BOULDER CREEK CALIFORNIA 

CHEQUITA RANCHO STABLES 

RIDING - BOARDING - LESSONS 

Beautiful Trails Open all Year 

Children Solicited 

Emma C. Knight 



P. O. Box 509 — 1 Block East of Hwy. 9 

Phone Boulder Creek 8-6564 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

KALER PLUMBING & HEATING 

Plumbing Fixtures - Heating Equipment 
Sold, Installed and Repaired — Contracting 

Louis P. Soucey, Owner 



P. O. Box 56 

Telephone 5-4580 or 5-4143 

FELTON CALIFORNIA 



GRACE'S BEAUTY SHOP 



Phone 5-4294 

SAN LORENZO DRIVE 

FELTON CALIFORNIA 

VETTERLE & HOUGHTON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

Contract - Jobbing - Water Heaters 

Floor & Wall Heaters - Plumbing Supplies 

Appliances 

John Azevedo 
Elvin J. Loofbourrow 

Telephone Santa Cruz S119-J 
SOQUEL CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



SEA CLIFF AUTO COURT 

SEVEN UNITS WITH KITCHENS 

Mr. & Mrs. Gallegor 

Box 551 

APTOS CALIFORNIA 

JOE & EANNY'S 

MOBILE SERVICE 

J. C. Gibson 

1926 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

BELLA'S SPORTSMEN RETREAT 

Bar in Connection - Rooms - Italian Dinners 

OCEAN VIEW HOTEL 

Chas. J. Bella, Prop. 

Phone S. C. 85-W-2 

DAVENPORT CALIFORNIA 



CARMELITA'S 

CAPITOLA, CALIFORNIA 

BENIAS RESTAURANT 

Phone S. C. 2S92-W 
CAPITOLA BY-THE-SEA. CALIFORNIA 

LINO'S CAFE— HOME COOKING 

Meals - Lunches - Sandwiches - Short Orders 

Joe and Christine 
Telephone 5412-J Espanade and Stockton 

CAPITOLA CALIFORNIA 

McCOY'S TEXACO SERVICE 

Mclvin A. McCoy 

3801 PORTOLA DRIVE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

CLIFF DRIVE COURT 

Nicely Decorated Apts. & Rooms — Private Bath 

Day, Week or Month 

WONDERFUL VIEW OF BEACH 

1 Block to Beach and Broadwalk 

Mr. & Mrs. J. J. Capener 

Telephone 1059 
1003 E. CLIFF DRIVE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

STONE GRIST MILL — FLOUR — MEAL 

POLLY PRIM 

SPECIAL PURPOSE 
FOODS 

Phone 4667-W 
1119 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



TONEYS BARBER SHOP 

Phone 5880 
807 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LAUREL INN 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Dancing Every Saturday Night 

Angelo Meni 

Telephone 2735 

803 LAUREL STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



his department's plans for the profitable 
use of his training to further improve its 
traffic supervision program. 

To be eligible to compete for admis- 
sion and for award consideration, the 
applicants must : 1 ) be not more than 45 
years of age; 2) be a police officer in 
active service in a municipal, township, 
county, state, or provincial department ; 
3) have at least three years of police e.\- 
perience; 4) have the approval of his 
chief ; 5) be assured of a leave of absence 
— or equivalent temporary status — from 
his department, during which his salary 
will be paid ; 6) have the assurance of his 
superior that he will be returned to ac- 
tive service upon completing the pro- 
gram ; 7) agree to return to his depart- 
ment for at least three years, and 8) be 
in good health and physically fit. 

The Kemper Foundation for Traffic 
Safety has been one of the principal sup- 
porters of the Traffic Institute since it 
was established in 193b. More than 700 
men have attended the twenty-eight pre- 
vious courses in traffic police administra- 
tion. Nearly 4,000 judges and prose- 
cutors, driver training instructors, motor 
vehicle fleet supervisors, chief driver li- 
cense e.xaminers, and military personnel 
have attended short courses, conferences, 
and seminars at the Traffic Institute. 



SIGNS ALONG HIGHWAY 

Signs along our highways are posted 
to warn you of dangers ahead, advises the 
National Automobile Club. Read them, 
heed them, and keep yourself safe. 

KEEP TO THE RIGHT 

Whether you're on a three, four or six 
lane highway, the California State Auto- 
mobile Association urges you to drive in 
the right-hand lane unless you are pass- 
ing another vehicle. It's safer and if 
others are driving faster than you, the 
law requires you to keep to the right 
even if you're driving at limit speed. 



TRY OTHER FILAMENT 

The odds are that both filaments of a 
headlight bulb have not burned out at 
the same time, points out the National 
Automobile Club. Rather than drive 
with only one light, switch to the beam 
that provides that both lights will oper- 
ate. 



BEFORE ADOBE BRICKS 

The present method in the use of 
adobe bricks for building purposes in 
New Mexico, according to the National 
Automobile Club, was preceded by the 
ancient process of puddling the "mud" 
into the walls in stratified layers. 



SEABRIGHT BEAUTY SHOPPE 

Maryadell, Mgr. 

Phone 3S52-J 

535 SEABRIGHT AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LINCOLN ST. BAKERY 

Phone 6392 
210 LINCOLN STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

STEENSTRUP CANDY CO 

Wholesale Distributor 

CANDIES - CIGARS - FOUNTAIN SUPPLIES 

Robert Steenstrup 

Phone 2475W 421 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SamACRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LANDESS & TOUHY MARKET 

GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS 

Phone 1366 

707 PACIFIC AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

E. V. "ED " MOCEO COMPANY 

FRESH VEGETABLES 

Falslaff, Tradition, Brands 

Phones: Office 16 — Res. 3132 

POST OFFICE BOX 776 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

NINO HAIR STYLIST 

DISTINCTIVE AND INDIVIDUAL 

HAIR STYLES 

Nino Faggianc, R. C. 

Telephone 99 2409 MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

FRY'S GARAGE 

Complete Auto and Truck Service 
OfAcial State Brake and Light Station 
Austin and Hillman Sales & Service 
644 OCEAN STREET 

CALIFORNIA 

SANTA CRUZ PET SHOP 



"PETS FOR GIFTS — GIFTS FOR PETS" 
Mollie Craig — Fred Craig 

514 SOQUEL AVENUE 

(Opp. Santa Cruz Hospital) 

Phone 1568-W 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



Gambles Western Auto Supply Co. 

RADIOS — REFRIGERATORS — WASHERS 
CORONADO APPLIANCES 

113 LINCOLN STREET 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

WARD MOTOR SALES 

Automobiles Bought and Sold 



s B 


ought 


nk 


Terms 


Id 


A. Wa 



Phone 5045 
1303 OCEAN STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



McADAM MOTEL 



2401 

SANTA CRUZ 



lone 6068-J 
41 St AVENUE 



CALIFORNIA 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



MORTIMER ROOFING CO. 

Authorized Johns-Manville Contractors 

A. B. Mortimer — Res Phone S. C. 2128 

Phone 1749 159 CENTER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



MODERN BAKING CO. 

CORNER MAPLE & CEDAR STREETS 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

ALTA REST HOME 

Phone 3443 
31S MISSION STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

ACE FURNITURE CO. 

902 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SAN TA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

THE COZY CLUB 

THE PLACE TO RELAX 
Draw Poker - Tobacco - Beer 
530 SEABRIGHT AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

SEABRIGHT HOTEL 

Edna C. Street, Mgr. 

508 SEABRIGHT AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

THE ORIGINAL 

IDEAL FISH RESTAURANT 

MUNICIPAL WHARF 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



ELSIE'S BEAUTY BOX 

WATER STREET DRIVE-IN FREE PARKING 

Telephone 5278 

303i/i WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



HOCOM'S 

Asphalt Tile - Carpel 
Venetian Blinds 

FREE ESTIMATES 
C. J. Hocom 



Phone 1331 

SANTA CRUZ 



818 FRONT STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



HUGHES YATES LUMBER CO. 

Jack Yates 

Phone 1371 

1605 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

VALLEY VIEW DAIRY 



Phone I056-R 
I 704 OLD SAN JOSE ROAD 

• SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



APRIL FIRST 

Practical joke players abound in every 
community. Their friends and acquaint- 
ances are generally on the alert for them, 
and occasionally turn the joke on their 
prankful friend. But, it is quite different 
in the case of the crude amateurs who 
operate only on April 1st of each year. 

Some of this latter class do really go 
far beyond the funny stage and cause 
trouble and expense in addition to loss of 
valuable time spent visiting designated 
persons or places. 

The Police Department is unwittingly 
a factor in many shallow April 1st jokes. 

The joker gives his victim the Police 
Department telephone number and in- 
structions to call: Mr. Kopp, Flatty, et 
cetera. 

Many of the victims telephoning the 
Police Department for: Mr. Sargent, 
Kopp, Kaboose, Gunn, Cuffs, Coffin, or 
Lamorgue, sense the joke instantly, laugh 
heartily, and tell the police officer an- 
swering the telephone they will remem- 
ber not to be caught again next year. But, 
about the other victims ? 

To some people a joke is a deadly 
wrong, and quite a large percentage of 
April 1st joke victims on police station 
phones could definitely have a Code 
charge placed against them for the siz- 
zling things they yell when they happen 
to ring in and ask for one of the gentle- 
men mentioned above. 



HELP THE BOY 

"Help a boy to help himself", we say — 

Ah, a wonderful thought and a wonder- 
ful way. 

To make the alloy that shall take the 
pure gold. 

Of his heart, of his dreams, of his ener- 
gies bold. 

And mix with the brass of his courage 
and nerve 

And the steel of his muscles and make 
them all serve. 

Give those fingers a chance to pick out 

what will win him, 
Give those muscles a chance to develop 

within him. 
Give the heart the right beat, and 'twill 

need no repression. 
Give the brain the right thought and 

'twill find full expression. 
Give this and the soil of the street will 

not stain 
The body, the hands, the heart or the 

brain. 

Do this and the boy by this definite plan 
Is transmuted in God's human mint to 
a Man. 

Raymond O. Hanson. 



LUDWIG'S TURKEY RANCH 

FREE DELIVERY 

5320 Coast Road 
Phone Santa Cruz 55J3 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

GLORIA COURT 

2 & 3 ROOM APARTMENTS 
Mr. & Mrs. Ed. Bettencourt 

Telephone 2129J 138 Liebbrandt St. 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

BEACH GROCERY STORE 

119 RIVERSIDE STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

Nick & Ernie's Shopping Center 

EVERYTHING FOR THE BEACH 
Nick & Ernest Faitos 

613 BEACH STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

LAURANCE FRANK 

WHAT NOT SHOP 

513 BEACH STREET 

"\NTACRUZ CALIFORNIA 

NUGGET CAFE— HOME COOKING 

AI Weymer - Emily Weymer 

6 Mi. N. of Santa Cruz — 1 Mi. S. Bethany Park 
5520 LOS GATOS HWY. 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

SOCPUEL AVENUE HARDWARE 

AND BUILDING SUPPLY 
E. M. Giubblni 



Phone 3209-W 
SANTA CRUZ 



1823 SOQUEL AVE. 

CALIFORNIA 



MOTEL LENGYEL 

Phones: 2640 - 4003 

1717 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

SILVERS MARKET 



1723 SOQUEL AVENUE 
SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

REDWOOD COURT 

Small - New ■ Neat and Complete 
C. C. Herling 

Phone 4470 

1606 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORN' ' 



Riverside Manor Apt. Motel 

OPEN YEAR 'ROUND 
G. C. Pinheird - J. Pacheco, Co-o 



Phone 4362 

532 RIVERSIDE AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

TRADERS HEADQUARTERS 

We Buy, Sell & Exchange Household 

Furnishings, Hardware, Camping & 

Sporting Goods 



Phone 1524 

502 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 



Page U 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Aprii 1954 



SANTA CRUZ 
SAW WORKS 

D. D. Thomas 

2210OLDHIWAYN0. 1 
at Chanticleer Avenue 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



DAVID'S 
TEXACO SERVICE 



Phone Santa Cruz 5019 
MAIN ST. & HIWAY No. 1 

Sequel, Calif. 



CASTRO BROS. 
SERVICE 

Complete Automotive 
Service 

Fred C. Castro 

Phone 5242-J 
P. O. BOX 306 

Sequel, Calif. 



MADDOCK'S 
BAKERY 

H. E. Maddock 
Telephone Santa Cruz 71 

Sequel, Calif. 



SHORT COURSES 

Two basic functions of traffic police — 
accident investigation and traffic law en- 
forcement — will be covered this spring in 
two short courses conducted at the Traf- 
fic Institute of Northwestern University 
in Evanston, 111. 

The first of these courses, "Accident 
Investigation — Administration and 
Techniques," will be offered April 26 to 
May 14. "Traffic Law Enforcement — 
Administration and Techniques" will be 
conducted May 10 to 28. 

Men wishing to broaden their study of 
the traffic problem may attend both 
courses. The five days in which the two 
courses overlap are devoted to the same 
general subject, so that those who are 
finishing the course in Accident Investi- 
gation will be able to enroll in the second 
course without missing any material. 

The Accident Investigation course is 
open to commanding officers of traffic di- 
visions, and officers or potential officers 
in charge of accident investigation. 

"Before a good job of preventing acci- 
dents can be done," said Franklin M. 
Kreml, director of the Traffic Institute, 
"a city or state must first have the facts 
about how many traffic accidents are oc- 
curring in the community. He must know 
where, when and why they happen." 

"These facts can be obtained through 
good accident investigation by trained 
police officers. This course is offered to 
teach police officers to train their men in 
accident investigation and to organize, 
direct and supervise accident investiga- 
tion." 

Some topics covered in the course are : 
nature of traffic accidents and their 
causes, purposes of accident investigation, 
investigating late-reported accidents, fa- 
tal and hit-and-run investigation. 

Determining speed from skidmarks, in- 
terrogation of suspects and witnesses, pre- 
paration of cases and court work, and 
uses of the accident report form also are 
included. 

Students will be taught to reconstruct 
an accident to determine the cause, to 
train the investigator, and to organize 
and equip an accident investigation unit. 
"Equally valuable for traffic inipro\e- 
meiit is the traffic law enforcement 
course," said Kremy. "This course will 
give the student information which will 
help his police department to make the 
best possible use of the manpower avail- 
able." 

Included in the enforcement courses 
are: reasons for traffic law enforcement, 
essentials of traffic law, and tactics, tech- 
niques, policies, measurement and organi- 
zation of enforcement. 



Hannah's Cottages 
and Apartments 

Free Parking to Patrons 



Phone 4492 
312 RAYMOND STREET 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



To Rest and Play Come 
Here to Stay 

1 Block to Beach 

FITCHIE COURT 

Robert & Josephine Rouse, 
Props. 

221 RAYMOND STREET 

Phone 3243-J 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Villa Del Mar Apts. 

Electric Refrigeration 
Showers and Kitchens 

1 or 2 Bedrooms 

321 RIVERSIDE 

Santa Cruz 4054-J 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIF. 



Knight Meter Co. 

HUDSON MOTOR CARS 
Jack L. Knight 

* 

503 PACIFIC AVENUE 
Phone 2010 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Salt Air Court — Near the Beach 

ROOMS - APTS. - GARAGES 
Mr. &. Mrs. Leo Schon 



Phone 6799 

SANTA CRUZ 



510 Leibbrandt Street 

CALIFORNIA 



OPAL CLIFFS HARDWARE 

Plumbinc - Electric - Building Supplies 
(Opal Cliffs Area) L. J. & Iris Swafford 

Phone 4295M 1764 - 41st AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

RIVERBANK AUTO PARK 

Modem Cottages — Modern TraUer Park 

Mrs. M. J. Little 

Phone 1919-J 259 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

E. C. BETTENCOURT 

Prop. 

Groceries, Tobaccos, Candies and Beer 

Phone 2340 

535 OCEAN STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORN /. 

Ted's Drive in Liquor Store 

LIQUORS - WINES - MIX 

Phone 532 

505 WATER STREET 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORA'V 

FRIENDLY CLUB 

BEER — WINE — FOOD 

Phone 4318 
1014 SOQUEL AVENUE 

SANTA CRUZ CALIFORNIA 

CACACE, VICTORINO & CACACE 



Phone SOS 

SANTA CRUZ 



413 PACIFIC AVE. 

CALIFORNIA 



GYPSY INN 
Marie Todens 

• 

102 Capitola Ave. 
Capitola, Calif. 



THE BON TON 
Do-NUT SHOP 



Phone 6966-W 

860 -41 St Ave. 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



ROAD PROBLEM 

Something like the man in the story 
who jumped on his horse and rode off in 
all directions, the American motorist can 
get behind the wheel of his car and drive 
oft in almost any direction. Roads lead 
everywhere and these roads are in every 
stage of repair and disrepair. Keeping 
this vast network up to date, points out 
the National Automobile Club, keeping 
this vast network capable of handling 
the ever increasing volume of traffic, is 
really quite a problem. 

Thoroughly aware that this problem 
existed, the engineers and experts of fed- 
eral and state government got their heads 
together as early as 1934, and started a 
nation-wide highway survey that has 
since become a permanent activity. This 
survey has revealed many important facts 
about where and when the traffic is roll- 
ing and just how intensely. 

^Vith the facts before them and road 
planning no longer a matter of vague 
speculation and personal whim, the engi- 
neers wasted little time in getting their 
plans down on paper. These plans call 
for expressways that will run under or 
over cross streets in the large city areas, 
will loop around the downtown districts 
to avoid congestion, and will carry as 
much as five times the traffic that ordi- 
nary streets will carry. They also call 
for the streamlining and modernizing of 
thousands of miles of rural roads that 
have been gradually becoming obsolete. 

But it isn't merely a matter of having 
plans down on paper. Construction has 
been under way for many years now, 
more than seventy-one thousand miles of 
high type surface roads were built in the 
eleven years from 1941 to 1951 inclusive, 
and the huge roadbuilding industry that 
has been built up under the private con- 
tract system with competitive bidding is 
bringing the job giant scrapers and pow- 
er shovels that can fill up valleys and 
level hills in almost a matter of days. 
With the latest equipment, a modern 
paving crew can turn out a mile of new 
surfacing in one working week. 

All over the country new roads and 
new road surfaces are coming into exist- 
ence. Blasting out rocks and shoving 
around great mountains of top soil, con- 
struction crews are bringing to the Amer- 
ican scene a system of roads that will gi\e 
ever greater efficiency to our travel, ever 
greater safety to our driving, and will 
link the remotest hamlets with the great- 
est cities. 



RICKEY'S CREAMERY 



SOQUEL 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone: 2-7287 Res. Phone: 2-4869 

SLAKEY BROTHERS, INC. 

SAN JOSE 



OAKLAND 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNI.A 



Phone 3-7956 P. O. Box 1938 

A-One Sheet Metol Company 

Contractors of Heating. Ventilating, Air 
Conditioning and Sheet Metal 

Industrial and Commercial 

Joe Stencil, Owner 

45 1 TULLV ROAD MODESTO. CALIF. 

MODESTO TRANSFER CO. 

MOVING - STORAGE 
Local and Long Distance - Packing - Crating 

Agents: Allied Van Lines 
150 Coyado Aenue Phone 1475 

MODCSIO CALIFORNIA 

OBEY TRAFFIC SIGNALS 

. . . PLAY SAFE . . . 

P. CO. 

MODESTO AUTO PARKS 

DAY AND NIGHT PARKING 
Inside and Out 



1016 ELEVENTH ST. 



MODESTO, CALIF. 



TRIANGLE MARKET 

Quality Food Products 

Meats - Groceries - Vegetables 

"We Give Thrifty Shoppers Stamps" 

910 Needham Telephone 3-3607 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



ARCHIE L. GRAY 

(SrSON 

PLUMBING - HEATING 

SHEET METAL 

AIR CONDITIONING 

Phone 3-8365 

1322 - 7th Street 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 547 

CLUB DEL MAR 

Most Popular Place in Town 

Cocktails and Daticit/^ 

Owner Bernie 

107 SoQUEL Street 
Santa Cruz, Calif. 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



Miller Manufacturing Company 

Manufacturing The Miller Feed Mill 
and Equipment 

Factory at 99 Highway and Haney Road 
P. O. Box 1490 Telephone 2-1876 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Stanislaus Mill and Mfg. Co. 



Stor 



Church Work, and C 
• and Office Fixtures 



Residence 3-4481 
630 Kearney Avenue Phone 2-2623 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Day and Night Auto Repairing 
and Parking 

National Auto Club Service 
Motor Rebuilding - Brake Relining - Motor 
Tune-Up - Guaranteed Work - Honest Values 

Elmer L. Weeks, Prop. 



Best Wishes 

JOHNSON FRUIT COMPANY 



p. O. Box 91 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

GROUND LUMBER CO. 

"Everything From the Ground Up" 

G. E. Ground. Managing Owner 

P. O. Box 1304 Telephone 2-1001 

Comer Seventh and Tuolumne 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

J. F. DICKINSON COMPANY 

YOUR WESTINGHOUSE DEALER 



Home Applii 
Radio: 



;s - Refrigerators - Range 
Television - Records 



716 Tenth Street 

MODESTO 



Telephone 3-2677 

CALIFORNIA 



FOR OVER 96 YEARS 

Dependability in Quality 
and in Service 

BORDEN'S 

FRESH DAIRY FOODS 

Telephone 3-9151 

204 Campus Way 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



LICENSING COURSE 

A three-week course, "Examiner Rec- 
ords and l^heir Uses," will be offered by 
the American Association of Motor Ve- 
hicle Administrators April 26 to May 14 
in Evanston, 111., for men responsible for 
driver licensing in their states, L. S. 
Harris, e.xecutive director of the AAM 
VA, has announced. 

"Today's increased horsepower, traffic 
volume, and more highway problems de- 
mand a better grade of drivers," said Mr. 
Harris. "It is necessary to screen drivers 
so that only those who are qualified will 
be facing these problems." 

Tuition scholarships for the course 
are given by the Farmers Insurance 
Group Safety Foundation of Los An- 
geles. The course is conducted by the 
Traffic Institute of Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1704 Judson Ave., Evanston, 111. 

"Comprehensive records which show 
the need for changes and which disclose 
the necessary research data for improved 
procedures are needed to improve stand- 
ards in examining drivers," according to 
Mr. Harris. 

"Examiner Records and l^heir Uses" 
is the final unit of the chief driver li- 
cense examiner program which has been 
conducted by the Traffic Institute over 
a four-year period. Participants in it who 
have attended the three previous units 
will complete 400 hours of specialized 
college-level instruction in the adminis- 
tration of driver license examining. The 
first unit, held in March, 1951, was "Ad- 
ministration of Driver License Examina- 
tions." Unit III, "Selection and Train- 
ing of Driver License Examiners," was 
conducted in May, 1953. The series will 
begin again in 1955. 

Subjects to be covered in the unit 
given this spring include: analysis of 
operations for record purposes, reports 
of examinations, record and report, sum- 
maries, and annual and other special re- 
ports. 

How problems are revealed and sug- 
gestions made for courses of action based 
on records, preparation of data for analy- 
sis, rates, percentages, charts, graphs, and 
tables are also covered. 

The course is under the direction of 
Glenn V. Carmichael, assistant director 
of the training division of the Traffic In- 
stitute and one of the country's foremost 
authorities on driver license examiner 
training. He will be assisted by Paul C. 
Keller of the Institute staff who was 
formerly driver licensing specialist for 
the Utah State Department of Public 
Safety. 



BENSON & ZIMMERMAN CO. 

Leaders in Original Equipment Lines 
Automotive Parts and Equipment 



11th and H Streets 

MODESTO 



Bus. Phone 2-1061 

CALIFORNIA 



RAMONT'S TOW SERVICE 

24-HOUR SERVICE 



725 - 8th Street 

MODESTO 



Dial 2-2974 

CALIFORNIA 



JOSEPH L. COUGHLIN & CO. 
INC. 

FROZEN BOYSENBERRIES 

Bus. Phone 3-B378 - Res. Phone 3-7255 
P. O. BOX 1153 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



VALLEY TRACTOR 



THE TRAILER MART 

Sales and Service 
Ac< 

Elmer J. Amett, Owner 

PAN AMERICAN :-: TERRA CRUISER 
VIKING 

526 South 99 Highway Phone 3-2329 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



SEE OR PHONE 

PUTNAM SAND & GRAVEL 



ROAD MATERIAL, CONCRETE AGGREGATE 
PLASTER SAND 



200 S. Santa Cla 

MODESTO 



>ne 2-7257 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-6473 



McHenry Village 

MODESTO'S NEWEST 

AND LARGEST, 

COMPLETE SHOPPING 

CENTER 

1700 McHenry Avenue 
Modesto, California 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



MODESTO STEAM LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 
Henry Simidian - Ed. Simidian 

Established 1895 

1201 Eighth Street 
MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



A S B I L L ' S 



Washers - Ironers - Refrigerators 
Freezers - Ranges 



14th and D Streets 
MODESTO 



Phone 3-1813 

CALIFORNIA 



May Transfer & Storage Company 

Official Mayflower Transit Co. 



10th and M Streets 
MODESTO 



Phone 3-3241 

CALIFORNIA 



ACME GLASS CO. 

EVERYTHING IN GLASS 
Wholesale and Retail 

Joseph A. (Tony) Mengelt 



710 G Street 
MODESTO 



3-4554 

CALIFORNIA 



TRENT TILE 

Coston Trent 
Jimmy and Richard - Sons Associated 

"Covering San Joaquin Valley" 

Office and Display Room 

1601 YOSEMITE BLVD. (Waterford Road) 

Dial Phone: 2-6098 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

FARM EQUIPMENT CENTER 

EVERYTHING FOR THE FARM 
SALES :-: PARTS :-: SERVICE 
Ferguson System - Air-O-Fan Sprayer 

1220 South 99 Highway - Phone 3-6471 
MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 

995 Lander Avenue - Phone 4-5824 
TURLOCK, CALIFORNIA 



Francis Plating Co. 

Brass — Zinc — Copper 
Nickel and Chrome 
Controlled Plating 
Hardest Chrome Plating in the 
World ! 
Decorative Plating 
Automobile Parts 

Telephone 3-5958 

407 Seventh Street 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



DEATH HOURS 

Watch out during the "death hours" 
— from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. 

This four hour period is listed by the 
San Francisco Chapter of the National 
Safety Council as the most hazardous for 
pedestrians and motorists — day in and 
day out — through the year. 

Of the 67 traffic deaths listed here last 
year, 24 occurred during this four hour 
span, Arnold E. Archibald, Chapter 
president, reported. Seventeen of the vic- 
tims were pedestrians, he said. 

1 his compares with sixteen deaths 
(eight of them pedestrians) through the 
10-hour period between 7:00 a.m. and 
5 :00 p.m. when foot and motor vehicle 
traffic is far heavier, Archibald pointed 
out. 

"Higher speeds, reduced visibility, and 
reckless night-time habits combine to in- 
crease the hazards and the death rate," 
the safety leader said. 

Archibald urged motorists and pedes- 
trians to use "extreme care" when driv- 
ing or walking during the "death hour" 
period. "The record here is similar to 
that for other cities and in most rural 
areas." he said. "There seems to be a 
universal let down in carefulness during 
the time when most care is needed. Mo- 
torists gain a sense of false security from 
the reduced flow of traffic and instead of 
dropping their speed below the posted 
limits they are inclined to get a 'heav\- 
foot'." 

The Safety Council official added: 
"Pedestrians forget that they cannot be 
seen so well at night and step in front 
of fast moving cars. This combination of 
speed, carelessness, and limited \isibility 
leads to the unusually high death toll be- 
tween 10 p.m. and 2 a.m." 



BEST BEHAVIOR 

California drivers last year were on 
their best driving behavior since 1950 ac- 
cording to official statistics released to- 
day by the California Highway Patrol. 

There were 3,371 traffic fatalities dur- 
ing 1953 compared to 3,562 in 1952. Of 
these, 2,342 were suffered in unincor- 
porated areas of the state while 1 ,029 
occurred within corporate cities. 

Total injuries were also below the 
1952 figures with 106,427 persons in- 
jured in traffic during 1953 as compared 
to 110,874 in 1952, a reduction of 4,447. 

The mileage death rate, based on the 
number of fatalities per each hundred- 
million miles of travel, dropped from 7.4 
in 1952 to 6.6 in 1953, an all time low 
for California, according to available 
records. 



J. M. EQUIPMENT CO. 

MODESTO 
PATTERSON - TURLOCK 

CALIFORNIA 



Stanislaus Food Products Co. 

Distributors of 
CALIFORNIA "FULL RED" TOMATOES 

ODESTO CALIFORNIA 

UNITED LUMBER YARDS 

EVERYTHING FOR THE BUILDER! 
Use Our Budget Plan — -No Down Payment 



430 Tenth Street 
MODESTO 



Phone 2-1081 

CALIFORNIA 



ARISTOCRAT 
VENETIAN BLIND COMPANY 

"LARGEST MANUFACTURER IN THE 
SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY" 

586 South 99 Highway Phone 3-6264 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

A. M. DUCKART 

. . . Distributor . . . 

SEASIDE GASOLINE AND PETROLEUM 

PRODUCTS 

P. O. Box 1152 Telephone 3-4559 

Gilmore Avenue and Waterford Road 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL COOPERATIVE, INC. 

Headquarters for 
FARM AND RANCH SUPPLIES! 



P. O. Box 1118 Phone Modesto 2-7205 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



"Noted for Courtesy" 

McHENRY DRUG 

"MODESTO'S FINEST" 

330 McHenry Village 

Modesto's Finest Shopping 

Center ! 

Also Our Downtown Store 

Located at 

ROGERS DRUG 

402 "H " STREET 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



RAY'S RADIO SHOP 

RADIO AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT 



121S H Street 

MODESTO 



Telephone 3-1028 

CALIFORNIA 



MUNN & PERKINS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



P. O. BOX 1092 



CALIFORNIA 



Modesto Livestock Commission 
Company 

AUCTIONS EVERY MONDAY 

1 Mile South of Modesto on Old 99 Highway 
Route 4, Box 3235 Phone 2-7762 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Modesto 3 7 771 

California Vegetable Concentrates 
Inc. 

Harvey Jensen, Manager, Modesto Plant 

General Office: Huntington Park, Calif. 

Coldwell Avenue Near Tully Way 

P. O. Box 1095 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

WELDERS SUPPLY SERVICE 

Oxygen - Acetylene - Carbide 

Distributors for Lincoln Electric - Smith 

Welding Equipment - Stoody Co. 

All Types of Welding Equipment Repaired 

Route 6, Box 380 Phone 3-4527 

Scenic Drive — 200 Yards East of the Oakdale 

Road 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC VALLEY STORES. INC. 

Distributors and Jobbers 

TIRES :-: BATTERIES :-: RECAPPING 

Pacific Tires . . . None Better 

444 South 99 Highway Phone 2-5219 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-1871 

HOTEL COVELL 

Completely Air 
Conditioned 

J. W. Ensign 
Manager-Owner 

M. E. Marchant 
Assistant Manager 

MODESTO, CALIF. 



BOULEVARD & BYWAY 

I he American automobile seems to be 
getting better and better and each time 
you buy a new model you will invariably 
find some change in design that makes 
for greater safety or greater convenience. 
All this improvement, points out the Na- 
tional Automobile Club, just doesn't hap- 
pen by accident but is the result of care- 
ful research by the teams of development 
engineers to be found in every automotive 
factory. 

These teams are assigned to different 
parts of the car. One will work with the 
engine, another with the transmission, 
another with the axle, another with the 
chassis, and so on. And even each team 
will be subdivided and the subdivisions 
assigned to specific parts, the chassis 
group, for instance, finding themselves 
subdivided and assigned to frame and 
suspension design, wheel and tire prob- 
lems, springs, brakes, or steering qual- 
ities. 

Once a group has been assigned to a 
specific part, it is asked to find out all 
that it possibly can about that part from 
every possible source. To do so they go 
to suppliers, to laboratory or field testing, 
to rival makes of cars, or to any other 
source they can think of. 

With this background knowledge in 
mind they are then asked to develop ideas 
for the improvement of their special part. 
When the ideas come up they are careful- 
ly discussed and screened and the go- 
ahead is given for experimentation and 
testing. Although about four out of fi\e 
of these ideas are usually doomed to fail- 
ure, the senior engineers are very liberal 
in giving their go-ahead because they 
know that by some slight new twist, some 
slight new adjustment in design, a young 
engine is apt to come forth with a new 
development that will prove to be of 
great benefit to all concerned. 

Ideas are tested in a dozen different 
ways and often over a period of many 
years before they are finally abandoned 
or come to their full fruition. And when 
that one-out-of-five comes through, the 
American motorist has another new im- 
provement to look forward to, another 
added something in the way of his safety 
or his driving comfort. 



CARE OF BRAKES 

Because brakes lose efficiency in a gratl- 
ual manner, it is important that they be 
checked regularly, the California State 
Automobile Association cautions. If the 
pedal can be depressed to a point within 
two inches of the floor board, it is time 
to visit a repair shop for readjustment. 



LATTIMER'S LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic 

WINES AND UQUORS 

For Your Pet Drink 



Phone 2-3655 
1347 McHenry at Orangeburg 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



WHERRY FURNITURE CO. 

FLOOR COVERINGS - DRAPERIES 

917 - Eleventh Street Phone 25 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

MADDUX & VAN SANDT 

Hughson - Turlock - Modesto 

TELEVISION - APPLIANCES 
RCA VICTOR 



533 McHenry 



CALIFORNIA 



s. Phone 3-6625 Res. Phone 7-1008 

. C. REFRIGERATION SERVICE 

gineered Refrigeration, Heating & Ventilating 
Air Conditioning 
General Electric - Worthington - Tyler 



W. Imfeld, Manager 



Office Phone 3-9224 



LEW'S DOUGLAS SERVICE 

Lew Campbell 

HOOD TIRES - DIAMOND T MOTOR 
TRUCKS 



849 So. 99 Highway 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



CAFE VIENNA 



Otto and Susan Schoenherr 
Managing Host and Hostess 

We Cater to Banquets and Private Parties 

Phone MarysvlIIe 2-2954 

Three Miles South of the MarysviUe D Street 

Bridge. 

Highway 99-E MarysvlIIe, Calif. 



PHONE 3-0781 



Stanislaus 
Implement & 
Hardware Co. 




INTERNATIONAL, DOMESTIC, 

FARM AND COMMERCIAL 

REFRIGERATION AND HOME 

FREEZER UNITS 

Largest Implement, Farmer's Supply, 

Dairy Supply and Poultry Supply 

House in Stanislaus County. 

Tenth and F Streets 
MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



Bamboo Room and El Patio 

TWO OF MODESTO'S FINEST 

FINE FOODS :-: FINEST COCKTAILS 

Bob Watson and Henry T. Schantz, Your Hosts 



724 - 1 0th Street 

MODESTO 



1309 McHenry 
CALIFORNIA 



HELM CHEVROLET 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Eleventh and K Streets Telephone 2-S2S1 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

CORNFORTH TRACTOR CO. 

SALES AND SERVICE 

trbom Farm Equipment 



Ford Tractor 



1302 Ninth Street Phone 2-2564 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 

123 North Center Street Phone 4-3377 

TURLOCK, CALIFORNIA 

Since 1918 

S H O O B ' S 

ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

Camera Shop - Portrait Studios 

Artist Supplies 

1118 Eleventh Street 
MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Karl M. Roth Sheet Metal Co. 

"Quality Craftsmanship" 

Sheet Metal - Air Conditioning - Heatine 
Metal Products Manufacturing - Poultry 
ng Equipment - Port-O-Que 
Barbeques 





— SERVEL— 




1134 See 


[lie Drive Pho 


ne 3-8609 


MODESTO 




CALIFORNIA 



MISSION LINEN SUPPLY 

••LINEN SERVICE SAVES YOU MONEY" 



136 Coyado 
MODESTO 



2-4298 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 2-1016 

E. D. Blakely & Son 

Distributors for 

HANCOCK 

PETROLEUM 

PRODUCTS AND 

QUAKER STATE OILS 

AND LUBRICANTS 

Gilmore Avenue and 

Waterford Road 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



EXPENSIVE PROPOSITION 

Here's the way the money goes. 

The average California family's share 
of traffic accident costs amounted to ten 
dollars per month during 1953. On a per 
capita basis, accidents cost each resident 
of the state $30,000 per year. 

Total economic loss last year is placed 
at $320,245,000.00, according to an an- 
nouncement released by the California 
Highway Patrol. This total is reached by 
multiplying $95,000, representing the 
a\erage cost of one traffic fatality, by the 
total of 3371 fatalities suffered in traffic 
collisions in the state last year. 

This formula allows for injury and 
property damage accidents as well, and 
includes wage losses, medical expenses 
and professional services, and auto re- 
pairs, costs that must be shared among all 
the people. 

"\Vhile the loss of human life can 
never be reduced to terms of dollars and 
cents, and while there is no possible way 
of compensating for these tragedies, li\es 
can be saved, painful and permanent in- 
juries can be prevented, and millions of 
dollars in property damage can be pre- 
vented by defensive driving," declared B. 
R. Caldwell, Commissioner of the High- 
wav Patrol. 

"The economic loss in traffic accidents 
for 1954 has alreadv reached a figure in 
excess of 50,000,000.00," he pointed out. 
Caldwell suggests that every motorist 
approach traffic problems assuming that 
every other motorist is going to make a 
mistake. 



BUNKO MEN ON HIGHWAYS 

^'ou have a nice car. It bespeaks your 
prosperity and you feel you are really 
somebody as you glide in comfort over 
the smooth highways. But, since the 
world began there is always that disturb- 
ing fly in the ointment — you notice a bat- 
tered flivver keeping just a tantalizing 
distance ahead of you on the road. The 
driver of that flivver is doing an excellent 
job of, as they say in football, "running 
interference." He is your shadow, but 
always up front. 

For your present — and perhaps your 
future — peace of mind there are two 
things you can do ; Pull off to the side for 
a few minutes, or drive verv carefully 
until you get past the pest. Yes — dri\e 
carefully for the pilot of the flivver may 
be a racketeer of a common brand of 
recent years. 

His game is to get a larger car to crash 
into him, then to adroitly act his part as a 
poor man in a bad predicament due to 
your fault, and to accept a cash settle- 
ment. 



BERT CANTRELL 

KAISER - WILLYS 
Sales - Service 



1107 Eleventh Street 
MODESTO 



Telephone 3-072S 
CALIFORNIA 



FISCHER & PETERSON 

A. P. Fischer - M. H. Peterson 
Plumbing, Electric, Sheet Metal Manufactur 
CONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIERS 



1316 Ninth Street 
MODESTO 



Phone 3-3266 

CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 
FROM YOUR BIG HOME MARKET 

JUSTENSEN'S 

Owned and Operated in the San Joaquin Valley! 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

'•Sincerity in Service" 

CHAS. W. RIISE AGENCY 

REAL ESTATE - RANCH PROPERTIES 

INSURANCE - AUTO - FIRE - CASULTY 

Charles W. Riise - Doris Lynn Riise 

Phone: Office 2-5217 
925 - 12th Street, Suite 1, Carlton BIdg. 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes From 

STANISLAUS COUNTY TITLE CO. 

1207 EYE STREET 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

BRADBURY'S - Dry Cleaners 

THE QUALITY CLEANER OF MODESTO 

— Branch Stores — 

1614 J Street - 1 14 N. Santa Crui 

1314 Crows Landing Road 1033 Orangeburg 

Main Office: 1133 Tenth St. Dial 3-1154 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-7261 

Modesto 
Store 

YOUR COMPLETE 

ON-STOP SHOPPING 

CENTER 

Open Thursday Nite til 9 :00 

TENTH AND K STS. 




Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



JOHNSON'S UPHOLSTERY 

UPHOLSTERING — First Class - Reasonal 
Furniture - Auto - Truck - Tractor 

E. F. Johnson. Prop. 



Ave 



Pho 



W. Neville - W. G. Neville 

NEVILLE BROTHERS 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
All Work Guaranteed 



MODESTO DAIRY SUPPLY 

Complete Stock of Dairy Supplies 

De Laval Sales & Service 

Bud Houser, Manager 



Pho 



Mercantile Acceptance Company 

R. E. Childers, Branch Manager 



Commercial Credit Corporation 

James Bumey, Manager 



LOUIS M. JONES 

UNION OIL DEALER 
ion Oil Products Exclusively 



SMITH'S MARKET 

ur High Quality - Low Pri 
FOOD MARKET 



1137 Needha 



CALIFORNIA 



QWIKSERV MARKET 

For Quality Meats and Gi 



DON L. DAVIS 

Paints - Wallpaper - Linole 



MEMORIAL ART COMPANY 

Monuments - Markers - Statuary 

Building Marble - Interior - Exterior 

Marble and Granite Dealers 

G. B. Chilotto. Contraclor 

523 Scenic Drive Phone 3-2731 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-1683 

WE SPECIALIZE IN 

PEACE OFFICERS' 
UNIFORMS 



fat 



o^ 



Herman Schwartz 

1020 Jay Street 

MODESTO, CALIF. 



BET YOUR LIFE 

Any driver who gambles against the 
traffic laws may pay with his life if he 
loses. 

"A review of accident reports indicates 
that in about 85 per cent of all traffic acci- 
dents, one or more traffic laws were vio- 
lated by motorists or pedestrians, or 
both," declared California Highway Pa- 
trol Commissioner B. R. Caldwell. 

"Too many drivers approach their 
duty of observing traffic laws asking 
themselves, 'Can I get away with this?' 
Then, if they think they can, they'll 
break the law almost every time. 

"Very often they don't get away with 
it. They receive citations as half-a-million 
did on highways in unincorporated areas 
of California last year, or they are in- 
volved in accidents. ^Vorst of all, they 
often injure or kill innocent people," he 
added. 

Caldwell also had a word for careless 
pedestrians. He said that while there are 
few traffic laws governing pedestrian con- 
duct, there are safety rules, and pedes- 
trians who don't observe them are their 
own worst enemies. 

"It is absolutely senseless," the Com- 
missioner pointed out, "for a pedestrian 
to pit his weight against the weight of an 
automobile. The odds are all against 
him." 

Pedestrians were especially cautioned 
not to cross streets in mid-block nor 
against red lights. 



REMOVING SPOTS 

Here a few of the more common up- 
holstery spots and suggestions for getting 
rid of them, passed only by the National 
Automobile Club. 

For grease and oil spots rub with clean 
cloth wet with carbon tetrachloride. For 
lipstick, apply a small amount of tetra- 
chloride directly to the stain and imme- 
diately press a blotter on the spot. Repeat 
until stain is removed. Rub ice cream 
spots with soap suds and clean with a 
cloth wet with cold water. After drying, 
cleaning fluid may be used to eliminate 
any last traces. 

Candy spots should be rubbed with a 
cloth wet with hot water. If necessary, 
follow by sponging the spot, after drying, 
with carbon tetrachloride. To remove 
chewing gum spots, wet with carbon 
tetrachloride and work gum off with a 
dull knife while moist. ^Vet fruit spots 
with hot water, scraping any pulp from 
the fabric. In an extreme case pour very 
hot water directly on the spot before 
scraping. 



JESSUP'S TRUCK RENTAL 

"THE BEST IN THE WEST" 
lember Modesto Reserve Police — No. 33 



MAZE C. FULKERTH 

FRIGIDAIRE SERVICE DEALER 



MODESTO LUGGAGE SHOP 

LugiT^Sc* Leather Goods and Handbaffs 



K & D SEA FOODS 

Eat More Fish for Health . . . Economy 
McHenry Village— 128 "H" Stret 

1409 Crows Landing Road 

1500 Broadway, Atwater 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

VILLAGE HARDWARE 

For Your Every Need in Hardware, Paints, 
McHenry Village 'Building 5 

1700 McHenry Avenue 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Modesto 2-6036 

DOROTHY'S ... of Modesto 

LADIES' AND MISSES' AND CASUAL 
AND SPORTS' WEAR 



Telephones 3-3288 - 3-5474 

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICAL CO. 

Electrical Contracting: Industrial - Commercial 
Domestic - Motor Rewinding and Repairing 
1244 McHenry Avenue P. O. Box 1025 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

H. H. Heron Jack Herron 

HERRON'S GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



nth Street 



Pho 



Phone 3-8075 Francis Atteberry 

MODESTO FURNITURE SERVICE 

Furniture Repairing - ReBnishing and Cleaning 
Custom Upholstering - Samples on Display 

1431 McHenry Avenue P. O. Box 674 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



2-8486 



FINES 

• WOOD • COAL 



Phone 3-2493 

CALIFORNIA 
TRAILER SALES 

ONCE TRIED . . . 

ALWAYS SATISFIED 

Mayflower - Angelus - Rod and 
Reel - Terry Rambler 

557 So. 99 Highway 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



J 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



EL CAPITAL 

Capital Drinking - Capital Courtesy 
Capital Friendship 



913 "J" Street 



CALIFORNIA 



NEEDLES CLUB 

PACKAGE LIQUORS 



BEST WISHES 

J. J. NEWBERRY CO. 



SALAS BROTHERS 

MOORE'S FUNERAL CHAPEL 



419 Sc 

MODESTO 



ie 3-5646 

CALIFORNIA 



SCENIC LIQUOR STORE 



Domestic and Imported Liquo 



1292 Sc 

MODESTO 



ne 3-8698 

CALIFORNIA 



SCENIC MARKET 



1301 Scenic Drive 
MODESTO 



JAMISON FURNITURE SHOP 

W. R. (Bill) Jamison • Gene Jamison 
Furniture Upholstering and Refinishing 



MODESTO PUMP SERVICE 

R. E. Caviness 

Service Any Make of Pump 

Emergency Calls — 7-Day Week 

Phone 3-8967 



SCENIC NURSERY 

Shrubs - Bedding Plants - Tropicals 

Sidney C. Rogers. Owner 



BEST WISHES 

SPROUSE-REITZ CO., INC. 



Office Phone: 3-6285 
Residence Phone: 3-7831 

Silveira's Livestock 
Auction Yard 

One-Half Mile South of Modesto 
on Crows Landing Highway 

AUCTION EVERY 
THURSDAY 

M. F. Silveira 
Res.: 701 Griswold Avenue 

P. O. Box 1033 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



WATCH THOSE SIGNS 

SACRAMENTO— "Do you believe 
in signs?" asks the California Highway 
Patrol of ever}' driver using California's 
streets and highways. 

"We ask that question because each 
year at least 6,000 drivers are involved 
in fatal and injury traffic accidents be- 
cause they disregarded traffic signs and 
signals," B. R. Caldwell, Highway Pa- 
trol Commissioner said recently. "Prob- 
ably 100 times that many drivers habit- 
ually ignore traffic signs and signals. 
They may escape trouble for a while but 
the odds are against them. Sooner or 
later they will ignore a sign and then 
tragedy strikes. 

"Traffic signs are in reality signs of 
life and are erected with just one pur- 
pose in view, to w^arn motorists of haz- 
ards and dangerous situations just 
ahead," Caldwell continued. "Drivers 
who believe in these signs will obey them 
because they realize the possibility of an 
accident if they don't. 

"Obedience to traffic signs means ad- 
justing the speed of your car to the in- 
dicated conditions," the Commissioner 
added. "It also means making a full stop 
at ever\' stop sign, never crossing a 
double line except when the dotted line 
is on your side, being extra alert at rail- 
road crossings and when driving through 
construction zones, giving proper sig- 
nals when turning, changing lanes or 
stopping and heeding the speed limit 
signs indicating a speed lower than 55 
miles per hour. Obeying the signs of life 
will make your journey safer, quicker 
and more enjoyable." 



POLICE RESERVES 

Volunteers for the Auxiliary Police 
Reserve may apply weekda\'s except Sat- 
urday between '^ a.m. and 5 p.m., and 
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7.30 to 
9:30 p.m., at the Police Academy, Fulton 
Street and 37th Avenue. 

A new class of Civil Defense volun- 
teers is now forming and began train- 
ing under regular departmental instruc- 
tors, Tuesday evening, Februar\' 23, at 
7:30 o'clock. Inspector William J. Os- 
terloh, SFPD, training officer of the San 
Francisco Disaster Corps, announced. 

The course, a thorough training in 
police work, consists of 36 sessions, which 
include Civil Defense indoctrination, 
basic criminal law and procedure, investi- 
gative techniques, and firearms practice. 
Though the volunteers are unpaid, all 
necessary eqvnpment is issued free. 

All physicalh' fit men. over 21 years of 
age, not subject to military draft, are 
eligible to apply. 



GREEN AND BERRY. INC. 

FARMING HEADQUARTERS 

Farm Implements - Berkeley Pumps - Well 

Drilling - Universal Miling Machines 



Pho 



ANNAN'S - Firsf for Oil 

Electrical Appliance Headquarters 
Refrigerators - Coolers - Stoes 



FRANK PARADIS 



BAKER & CO. 

— BEANS — 



1313 Ninth Street 

MODESTO 



ne 3-3249 

CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO JUNK CO. 

Office Phone: 2-1435 Res. Phone I580-W 

Alex Highet. Prop. 
Dealer in Scrap Iron - Metal ■ Rubber & Sacks 



MODESTO 



142S Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HAMMOND LUMBER COMPANY 



p. O. Box 769 

MODESTO 



7th and E Street 

CALIFORNIA 



BELL'S FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

"Just Like Home!" 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 

"Where Your Patronage Is Appreciated" 

103 Grand Elsie Bell, Prop. 

DESTO CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes From 

John Inglls Frozen Foods Co. 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

JACK L. NIEMEYER CO. 

FEEDS - FERTILIZERS - SPRAY - DUSTS 



FLOR DE MEXICO CAFE 

We Feature Best in Mexican Foods 

Where Your Patronage Is Appreciated 

Beers - Wines - Soft Drinks 



Phone Modesto 3-9135 

Franklin & Downs 

Funeral Home 



704 Twelfth Street 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



MADONNA'S 

WINES AND LIQUORS 
iome of Refrigerated Beverages 



Plio 



"TAR" SCOTT— Drugs 



Corner 13th and H Streets 

MODESTO 



Phone 3-9193 

CALIFORNIA 



Frank Ringler Electrical Service 

Magneto - Generator - Starter - Speedometer 

Repairs - Radiators Repaired - Expert 

Lubrication 

Corner 12th and H Streets Phone 715 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

AD -ART SIGN CO. 

1. R. Kenworthy R. H. Spencer 

Fluorescent Lighting - Signs and Show Cards 

Neon Manufacturing and Service 

Adding Art to Advertising 

712 Tenth Street Phone 2-2314 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-1049 Residence 2-4732 

FRED L HILL 

Plumbing - Heating - Air Conditioning and 

Sheet Metal Contracting 

1222 Tenth Street 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

AMERICAN LUMBER CO. 

BUILDERS' HEADQUARTERS 



Pho 



Phone Modesto 7-0462 

Jack and Millie Welcome You at 

Olympic Drive-In & Variety Store 



LESTER'S MARKET 

Your Handy Neighborhood Store 

Mr. and Mrs. William Lester. Props. 

Quality Meats - Groceries - Fruits and 

Vegetables 

900 Hatch Road Phone 7-2202 

3DESTO CALIFORNIA 



MOSS SERVICE 



C. E. WRIGHT'S SERVICE 



Phone 2962 

SINGLETON & 
PORTER 

. . . BUICK . . . 

Sales and Service 

720 Twelfth Street 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



COURTESY HELPS 

"Highway courtesy can materially re- 
duce the disgraceful traffic accident, 
death and property damage tolls, " de- 
clared California Highway Patrol Com- 
missioner B. R. Caldwell in commenting 
on the nation-wide program to bring 
more courtesy to bear in highway travel. 

"The adopted slogan, 'Make Courtesy 
Your Code of the Road,' is particularly 
good advice when common violations that 
cause accidents are analyzed. Discourtesy 
is a prominent factor in right-of-way dis- 
putes, improper and unsafe passing, il- 
legal turns, failure to obey lights and 
traffic signs, and especially aggravating 
lane-straddling," Caldwell said. "One of 
the more discourteous acts noted on our 
streets and highways," continued the 
Commissioner, "is the practice of driving 
slower than the normal flow of traffic." 

"These discourteous acts provoke other 
drivers, agitate the quick-tempered to 
retaliate, and actually increase traffic 
hazards. At the same time a courteous 
deed promotes goodwill and often in- 
spires another driver to return the favor. 
It is indeed unfortunate that many 
highway users have not learned to dis- 
play the same courtesy in traffic that is 
customarily shown guests in the home. 
If this were the case, highways would 
be much safer for everyone," he con- 
cluded. 



RATTLE RELIEF 

Those of us who have automobiles that 
"just weren't built yesterday" are in- 
clined to accept all those miscellaneous 
squeaks and rattles and clunks with a stiff 
upper lip, deciding in our hearts that this 
is all an inevitable part of our ancient 
cars. This decision, according to the Na- 
tional Automobile Club, is not quite 
justified because there are really all sorts 
of things that one can do to get rid of 
those rattles and clunks. 

Take the clunking that comes from a 
looseness between frame and body. \ou 
can get rid of that by tightening up a 
few key body bolts that tie the frame to 
the body. Some more banging and clunk- 
ing can be cleared away by tightening up 
on battery containers and battery hold- 
down bolts and by tightening up a few 
attaching and assembly bolts on that 
front and rear bumper. For that bang- 
ing that comes from springs and shackles 
that are just too loose, a few quick turns 
on the right bolts will end all that. 



TROLLEY TRACKS 

Avoid wet trolley tracks when driving, 
advises the National Automobile Club. 



Security State Bank of Turlock 

TURLOCK'S HOME OWNED 
INDEPENDENT BANK 
Member F. D. I. Corp. 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

IN TURLOCK 

Member F. D. I. C. 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-8620 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

PEEBLER'S 

Carburetor - Electrical - Speedometer 
Expert Workmanship . . . Always! 

714 EYE STREET MODESTO, CALIF. 

Telephone 3-1823 

MODESTO PAPER CO. 



CALIFORNIA 



ARMOUR CREAMERIES 



P. O. BOX sso 



CALIFORNIA 



Snider Lumber Products Company 

LUMBER - BOXES AND MOULDING 



TURLOCK 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 4-4981 Res. Phone 4-461 I 

CHRISTOFFERSEN 

POULTRY - EGG AND FEED MARKET 



Berry Seed and Feed Company 



Seeds - Feeds - Best Fertil 



Insecticides 



Route 1, Box SOS 

MODESTO 



Dial Modesto 7-0202 

CALIFORNIA 



Turlock Lumber Company 

Lumber, Paints, Cement, Wallboard, Shingles 

Insulations, Builders' Hardware, Millwork 

200 South Golden State Highway, Phone 4-4961 

Yards Located at Delhi and Turlock 
TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

PLYWOOD 

Delivery Any Place in the State of California 

Office and Warehouse: Foot of South Center St., 

Next to Poultry Producers 

P. O. Box 741 Phone 4-3S23 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAM R. FOX 

MOBILGAS - MOBILOIL 



TURLOCK 



CALIFORNIA 



JIM'S RESTAURANT 

QUALITY FOODS - PROMPT SERVICE 

Stop Once . . . YouTI Stop Again 

Open Day and Night Telephone 4-9948 

On 99 N. Highway One-Half Mile North of 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

LANE'S GROCERY 

Ruby and Walter Mitchell. Props. 
QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES 



nd Street 



Pho 



STANISLAUS CAFE 

Elmer C. Logan. Prop. 

LUNCHES AT THEIR BEST 

We Are Proud of Our Good Coffee: 

6 A.M. till 4 P.M. 

SIO Tenth Street 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



Farmer's Produce & Fruit Stand 

QUALITY VEGETABLES AND FRUITS 
"Where Your Dollar Has More Cents" 
On Highway 99 — South of Modesto 

G. & W. TRAILER CENTER 

Member Nation Wide Trailer Rental System 



FRANK'S MARKET 

QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES 
We Feature Mexican Products 

Lupe and Abel Pulido. Props. 



503 South 99 Highway 



CALIFORNIA 



MINER'S CAFE 

Bruce Miner. Prop. 
BEER - WINE - EATS 



FERRINI BROTHERS 



Agents - Wholesale Jobbe 
and Fountain Supplies 



426 South 99 Highway 
MODESTO 



OLYMPIC SUPER MARKET 



Corner Hatch Road at 99 Highway 
Telephone 7-0242 

JDESTO CALIFORNIA 

KEARNEY MOTEL 

ames M. Duffy • Harold Duffy - Ralph Duffy 

A Home Away From Home 

Air Heated and Air Cooled - Inner Spring 

Mattresses 

Phone 2-6901 



Commercial Truck Service 

Joe Hinton 

Truck and Auto Repairing, Welding 

Steam Cleaning, Lubrication and Tire Work 



TOWN & COUNTRY RESTAURANT 

Fine Foods - Chicken Dinners 
Next Door to Anderson Motor Court 





B & 


M 


CO. 




B 


ob Baker 


- B 


ob Bake 


, Jr. 


P. 0. 

MODESTO 


Box 441 




Pbon 


2-3277 

CALIFORNIA 



]. S. WEST AND 
COMPANY 




A Home Institution 

709 Ninth Street 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



PYRAMID LAKE DRIVE 

Pyramid Lake is a desert sea, all that 
remains of prehistoric Lake Lahontaii, 
which once covered most of Nevada. T he 
Truckee River empties into Pyramid, 
and there is no outlet. 

The Pyramid after which Pyramid 
Lake is named is a huge stone forma- 
tion both older and larger than the 
Pyramids of Egypt. It was first dis- 
covered by General Fremont's expedi- 
tion in 1843, and is 400 feet high. 

Anaho Island, near the Pyramid is the 
world's largest pelican rookery. Yew 
sights are as impressive as a formation 
of these graceful birds flying along the 
shores of the lake. 

The cui-ciri, a prehistoric fish un- 
known elsewhere, thrives in Pyramid 
Lake. At one time this lake was noted 
for its record breaking trout, with speci- 
mens weighing more than 40 pounds. 

To get to Pyramid Lake from Reno, 
drive east on 4th St. (Highway 40) to 
Alameda Avenue, (Hwy. Zi) . Turn left 
at the traffic light there. Four blocks 
from 4th street, you will pass the Reno 
Rodeo grounds. Past the rodeo grounds, 
follow the paved road. You will drive 
for approximately three miles past beau- 
tiful Cottonwood trees and green irri- 
gated fields. A sudden change to sandy 
areas and sagebrush marks your depar- 
ture from Reno's irrigated zone. The 
road continues on through desert hills 
scarred occasionally by the prospector's 
pick. Old "diggins " show as white pock- 
marks in the brown hills, and pros- 
pectors trails can be seen leading away 
from the road on either side. Nine miles 
from Reno, on the right, you will see 
the Herold's Club Trap and Skeet 
Club, scene of major matches. 

Pyramid Lake comes into view as the 
highway emerges from the hills. The 
"Pyramid" is at the far side, looking 
tiny in the distance. Approximately one 
mile to the left is the Pyramid Lake 
Guest Ranch, and a trading post which 
sells Indian craft work and beverages. 

Pyramid Lake has an all-pervading 
atmosphere of peace and solitude. Only 
one or two houses are on its shores, and 
it's easy to feel like an explorer as you 
step out of your car. Sunset at Pyramid 
Dake is one of the most beautiful sights 
in the \Vest. 

Returning, turn your car and back- 
track. Passing the road by which you 
came, follow the lake shore to Nixon, 
Paiute Indian settlement. At Nixon, 
turn right on highway 34 to Wadsworth, 
once a main maintenance station for the 
Southern Pacific Railway. Turn right 



BILL'S LIQUOR STORE 



1515 North Main Street 
PORTERVILLE 



Phone 627 

CALIFORNIA 



Beard Land & investment Co. 

REAL ESTATE 

Turlock Office: 116 W. Main Street 

914 - 13th Street Telephone 3-6425 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Save 30% to S0°„ on Nationally Branded 
SHOES 

ASHER BROS. 

Cut Rate Shoes 



Tenth and H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ANDRE CLUB 



727 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



THRIFTY MART MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 
FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS - POULTRY 



713 Tenth Street 

MODESTO 



rie 2-9278 
CALIFORNIA 



THE MAYFLOWER 

THE HOME OF CHOCOLATES 
N. G. Yialouris, Prop. 



310 McHenry Ave 

MODESTO 



hone 3-2043 

CALIFORNIA 



STANISLAUS ROOFING CO. 

ALL TYPES OF ROOFS AND ROOF REPAIRS 



223 McHenry 

MODESTO 



Telephone 2-9429 

CALIFORNIA 



McHenry 3 Minute Car Wash 

WASHING - POUSHING 

Ed Walters - Elmer Price, Owners 

Elmer Price, Manager 



Ave 



McHenry Fisherman's Wharf 

Finest Fresh Fish and Poultry 

(Wholesale and Retail) 



439 McHenry Ave 

MODESTO 



(at Morris) 

CALIFORNIA 



Elwood's Dry Cleaning Service 

Quality Work Guaranteed 



435 McHenry Av 

MODESTO 



Phone 3-8126 

CALIFORNIA 



Dial 3-5601 



Griswold & Wight 

FORD SALES AND SERVICE 
SINCE 1937 

YOU CAN PAY MORE . . . 

BUT YOU CAN'T ??.'.' 



Ninth and L Streets • 
MODESTO, CALIF. j 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



BROWN'S MFG. CENTER 

Welding - Machine Work - Blacksmilhing 

Home of the New Scrape-All, the All-Purposc 

Farm Scraper - We Build and Repair Farm 

Machinery 

818 Lander Avenue Phone 4-3781 

TURLOCK. CALIFORNIA 

BROWN'S SUPER MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES 

Quality Plus Service — Always 

Lander and Bernell 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

O. K. RUBBER WELDERS 

Ross O. Tanner and Son 

COMPLETE TIRE SERVICE 

Recaps - Repairs - New - Used - Coast to Coast 

423 Seventh Street Phone 2-03S6 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Barrett Boiler & Welding Works 

ELECTRIC - ACETYLENE 

Portable Service 

Corner 7th and "D" St. Phone 2-7612 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

OLSON'S PHARMACY 

You'll Like Our Fountain Service! 



125 North Broadway 

TURLOCK 



one 4-9207 

CALIFORNIA 



SAUNDERS' SHEET METAL 

Ewel F. Saunders 

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 

Orchard and North First Phone 4-363« 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

HAUCK'S PHARMACY 

Quality Plus Accuracy Equals Satisfaction! 

Broadway & West Main St. Tel.4-6598 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 



For Greater Safety on the 
Streets and Highways! 

"HATS OFF" to All Law 

Enforcement Officers! 

FOR FINER QUALITY 
IN FINER WINES! 

"HATS OFF" to Califor- 
nia's Finest Vintages! 



PRODUCED BY 

E. & ]. GALLO 
WINERY 

Modesto, California 



onto Highway 40 at Wadsworth and re- 
turn to Reno through the Truckee 
river canyon, route of the first emigrant 
wagon trains. Estimated driving time 
2!/2 hours. 81 miles. 



CARSON CITY 

Carson City, Nevada, 30 miles from 
Reno, is the nation's smallest state capi- 
tal, with a population of appro.ximately 
5,000. Towering mountains of the Sierra 
Nevada, usually snow-capped, lie just 
outside the city limits to the west. Desert 
hills are on the east. North and south of 
Carson City are beautifully fertile fields 
supporting agriculture and cattle. 

Nevada's state buildings line tree- 
shaded Carson street. The capital's huge 
dome may be seen from any part of the 
city. 

At the end of the last century, the Car- 
son City mint made silver coins from ores 
mined at the nearby Comstock Lode in 
Virginia City. The mint building, across 
from the V. & T. Depot is a museum and 
silver coins stamped with the mint's 
"C-C" mark are highly prized by coin 
collectors. 

The museum has become a treasure 
house for the old West. Indian craft- 
work, historic newspaper files, ancient 
guns, and other relics are displayed in its 
halls. Mining has played such a large 
part in the history of Nevada that a full- 
size replica of a silver mine has been re- 
constructed in the museum's basement. 
Every detail of the mine was supervised 
by experienced mining men. Most mines 
refuse to admit visitors because of haz- 
ards to themselves and workmen. The 
Carson City Museum's mine is one of 
the few places where actual mining con- 
ditions may be examined in safety. 

Even the state prison has historic 
significance. In cutting a passageway, 
prehistoric footprints were discovered, 
and carefully preserved. 

Carson City's homes are fine examples 
of the 18th Century's best. Most of 
them are furnished, at least in part, in 
the ornate manner of Civil War days. 
One, the Rinckel mansion, is set up so 
that visitors to Carson City can go 
through and see the fine examples of 
craftsmanship that made living comfort- 
able and luxurious for early Nevadans. 

Indians whose ancestors roamed Neva- 
da centuries ago are educated at the 
Stewart Indian school, just a few miles 
south of Carson City. The school build- 
ings are built of natural Nevada rock in 
a multitude of colors. Indians from 
Stewart complete with students of other 
schools in sporting events, and usually 
come out high on the list. 



S C O T T Y ' S 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE :-: RECREATION 

Liquors - Cigars • Tobaccos 

110 WEST MAIN STREET 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

Best Wishes From 

QUAILE R. NORTON 

NORTON MORTUARY 
286 West Main Street Turlock 4-4904 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

J. GREENBERG AND COMPANY 



1326-32 Ninth Street 

MODESTO 



one 3-4412 

CALIFORNIA 



JOE SASO 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Chrysler and Plymouth Sales and Service 

Phone 4-5593 - 4-3560 

520 North Center Street 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

TURLOCK REXALL DRUG CO. 

Headquarters for Quality, Service and Values! 



Opposite the Bank of A) 

TURLOCK 



Tel. 4-6601 

CALIFORNIA 



CHAMPION SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

B. I. David. Prop. 

Quality Workmanship . . . Always 

Shoe Rebuilding and Supports 

129 North Front Street 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

■•SURGE" 

BRIDGES & MILLER 

A COMPLETE DAIRY SERVICE 



331 North 99 Highway 
TURLOCK 



tione 4-5361 
CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes to All 

Law Enforcement 

Officers 

Modesto & Empire 
Traction Co. 



530 Eleventh Street 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



BRADLEY'S LIQUOR STORE 

Full Line of Choice of Bottled Goods 

The House of Goods Brands and Courteous 

Service Free Delivery 



THE FLAME 

SANDWICHES AND COCKTAILS 

Paul and Terry 

Beaty Bldg., 929 11th Street 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

MODESTO HARDWARE COMPANY 

Paint - Hardware - Farm Supplies - Household 
Ware - Sportinf Goods - Appliances 

912 Eleventh Street Phone 3-2679 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

HUGGINS' 

"The House That Truth Built" 
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS 



1107 Eye Street 
MODESTO 



e 3-1583 

CALIFORNIA 



RANCHO MARKET 

QUALITY GROCERIES AND MEATS 
At Lowest Prices Always! 

1239 Yosemite Avenue 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

Anderson's Truck Terminal, Inc. 



919 SOUTH 99 HIGHWAY 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

WALTER P. SHOEMAKE 

JEWELER 

Watch Inspector for Southern Pacific and 

Western Pacific 



RADIO ■ ELECTRONICS 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Zenith - Sylvania - Hoffman - Packard Bell 

Sales and Service 

1226 H Street Dial 2-7678 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

HANSEN'S 

Mechanical and Electrical Contractors 
Plumbing, Electrical, Heating, Sheet Metal, Air 
Conditioning — Dealers for Carrier Equipment — 
Heating and Air Conditioning Installations for 

Home and Office. 
429 Tully Road Telephone 2-5261 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

BI-RITE MARKET 

QUALITY MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Fresh Vegetables and Fruits 

"Where Your Patronage Is Appreciated" 



RANDIK PAPER CO. 



Residence Pho 
1314 Coldwell Avenue 
MODESTO 



2-6995 

Dial 2-6798 
CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes 

B. ZEFF CO. 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 

P. O. BOX 425 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



SEVEN-UP 
BOTTLING 
COMPANY 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 

1518 Ninth Street 

Phone 3-3421 




"Virginia and Truckee" is a name 
well known to railroad fans. Once this 
railroad was one of the very richest, 
hauling ore from the Comstock to Reno 
for shipment to San Francisco. It was 
closed down in 1950, but one of the old 
engines stands near the V. & T. shops on 
Carson Street, and the tools once used 
for maintaiiung the custom-built locomo- 
tives are still in the shops. 

Carson City would be charming if it 
were just another town, so beautiful is 
its location. As capital of the State and 
storehouse of \Vestern lore it is a must 
for the visitor to Nevada. 



SPECTACULAR TOWN 

Mount Rose — Tahoe- — Carson City 
tour is one of the most spectacular in 
the West. The ]\It. Rose road in itself is 
a memorable experience, climbing from 
the lush Truckee meadows almost to the 
8,933-foot summit of Mt. Rose, and then 
descending through dense evergreens to 
the shores of Lake Tahoe, largest lake 
at its altitude or higher on the North 
American continent. 

Carson City, Nevada's capital, and 
the smallest in the United States, is rich 
in historic interest. Here are the yards 
of the famous Virginia and Truckee rail- 
wey, which once was the richest road in 
the nation and has now ceased opera- 
tions. The Carson City museum has a 
multitude of items that played their part 
in the development of Nevada and the 
West, and a full-size replica of the sil- 
ver mines which made Nevada famous. 

Starting at the center of Reno, drive 
south on highway 395 (South Virginia 
Street). You will pass through the won- 
derfully fertile Truckee meadows and at 
the same time be able to see desert hills 
to the East on your left. All the fields are 
irrigated by water from the Truckee 
River, and you will see irrigated ditches 
as you drive. 

Nine miles from Reno, turn right on 
the Mount Rose road (Nevada high- 
way 27.) You will drive through typical 
Nevada sagebrush and greasewood until 
you reach, in about 4 miles, the begin- 
ning of the evergreens. Just after enter- 
ing the wooded area, >ou will come to 
Galena Creek, and the Galena Creek 
picnic area. Outdoor cooking facilities 
and pure water make this a fine place to 
stop. 

Farther up the road, 20 miles from 
Reno, you will pass the Mt. Rose Bowl, 
site of the famous Silver Dollar Ski 
Derby. Topnotch skiers in the United 
States and abroad have tried these slopes, 
and liked them. 

The road is steeper above the bowl, 
and it's wise to keep a close watch on 
(Continued on page 47) 



NORMANDY RESTAURANT 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON - DINNERS 
Private Dining and Banquet Rooms 

— Open Seven Days a Week— 



McHenry Hardware 

Hardware - Sporting Goods - Appliances - Gifts 
Housewares - Paint - Toys 

Open Sundays Mornings 

Phone 2-253S 



LAWRENCE ROBINSON & SONS 

Breeders and Producers of Pedigreed Seeds 

P. O. BOX 1373 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

E. T. "Jim" NYEGAARD 

District Manager 
California Canning Peach Association 



1211 K Street 



Phone: Modesto 2-6470 



ED F. LACQUE & SONS 

Authorized Gun and Locksmith 

Spinning Tackle Specialist - Latest Equipment 

Sporting Goods 



FOR A FAST SALE LIST WITH 

TOLLIE THOMPSON 



Real Estate 

902 - 13th Street 
MODESTO 



ne 2-4953 

CALIFORNIA 



V. E."PETE" BARTON 

Realtor - Homes, Farms, Business Opportunities 

Member Modesto Multiple Listing Service 

904 - 13th Street, Phone 3-8393 

202 Elmwood, Phone 2-5143 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

HI-WAY MARKET 

Your Handy Market lor Quality Meats, 
and Vegetables 



1293 North 99 Highway 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

BALSWICK'S TIRE SHOP 

Seiberling Tires 
RECAPPING - REPAIRING 



Telephone 4-6574 



CALIFORNIA 



OLSON'S 

PLUMBING AND WELL DRILLING 



755 North 99 Highway 

TURLOCK 



lone 6-6613 

CALIFORNIA 



WAH Q RESTAURANT 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN ORDERS 

TO TAKE OUT 

"Best Coffee in Town" 



J. & B. MOTORS 

Studebaker Sales and Service 

F. Johnson - H. Emory Bonander 

Phone 4-6703 

CALIFORNIA 



153 South Broadv 
TURLOCK 



BOB DONNER'S AGENCY 

REAL ESTATE - GENERAL INSURANCE 
Homes - Ranches - Commercial Property 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



AprU. 1954 



CAREW & ENGLISH. Inc. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

. . . Chapels . . . 
Masonic at Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

BAY CITIES METAL TRADES 
COUNCIL 



GEORGE M. PHILPOTT CO.. Inc. 

1060 BRYANT STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAUFORNIA 

Morning Glory Sandwich Co. 

Ivan Branson, President 

DISTINCTIVE CATERING 

Fancy and Co 



Fillmore 6-6922 - (Salinas 3005) 
Grove and Baker Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CARUSO'S 

THE PIZZA KING 
FINEST ITALIAN FOOD 



No. 1 

136 Taylor Street 

PRospect 5-9867 



No. 2 

138 Mason Street 

YUkon 6-4309 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



ARE YOU GUILTY? 

(Continued from page 3) 
marks on "justice" and "law" represent 
a typical example ; also they are a lit- 
erary masterpiece. 

"Man has always sought justice, but 
has never agreed as to what it is. — Man's 
continuous seeking for justice has resulted 
in our elaborate framework of law and 
organization for the administration of 
law. — The purpose of law is to make it 
possible for people to live together peace- 
ably. To live together peaceably, people 
must mutually respect each other's lives, 
property, and opinions. The law should 
aim to harmonize and adjust these areas 
of conflict and of overlapping desires and 
claims which arise when people live in 
close proximity. This should be done with 
as little requirement or sacrifice on the 
part of each as will bring about the re- 
quired harmony in interaction. — Society 
has arranged policemen, judges, jails, 
probation officers, parole officers, juries, 
attorneys, and has set up the law which 
must be obeyed. This program of justice 
has been torn asunder by bitter criticism. 
No part of it has escaped, and as long as 
man is what he is, no program of justice 
can be constructed which woidd be satis- 
factory to all. Society can, however, agree 
upon a concept of justice, primarih' by 
conditioning through family life, educa- 
tion, and precept. But if the machinery 
is set up by society, the individual in the 
society is what makes the machinery 
work. Justice then becomes ivhat man 
makes it." 

In giving a definitive opinion of Pro- 
fessor Dienstein's book, ARE YOU 
GUILTY? I can, without reservation, 
recommend it as an indispensable contri- 
bution. It most certainly shoLild be made 
available in every library, and be required 
reading both for primary and advanced 
students as well. I heartily advocate its 
use and study by teachers in the class 
room, by peace officers (executives and 
subordinates alike) and, more important- 
ly, by the public at large, since it is to the 
"man in the street" that we turn, in the 
final analysis, for aid and support in a 
crisis such as the present ; and we do face 
such a crisis, as the reading of Professor 
Dienstein's book and a little careful re- 
flection will discover. And in this connec- 
tion, a final truism will be worth remem- 
bering; namely, justice can only be what 
the citizen wants it to be ; the machiner\ 
of justice must afford equal protection for 
all, be accessible to all, and swift in opera- 
tion. Only thus can Democracy hope to 
survive. 



LACHMAN BROS. 

MISSION AT SIXTEENTH STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Phone PRospect 5-7600 

RAY RADLIFF 

AUTOMOTIVE FINISHES 
PAINTS - SUPPLIES 

IOCS Franklin Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Triangle Conduit & Cable Co. 
Inc. 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

ROBERT F. McDonald 

District Manager 

2415 - 17th Street Tel. UNderhill 3-6260 

SAN FRANCISCO 10 CALIFORNIA 

MERRILLS - MAYFLOWER 

moving AND STORAGE 
Jnit 

Exclusive Agent Aero Mayflower Transit Co. 

Vic Merrill 

424 Ninth Street Phone UNderhill 1-2471 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



G. E. Cardarelli 
Concrete Contractor 




Photie JUniper 4-5080 

2288 SAN BRUNO AVE. 

San Francisco 24, Calif. 



Heald Engineering 
& Business College 

Day and Night Sessions 



Phone ORdway 3-5500 
Van Ness Ave. and Post St. 

San Francisco, Calif. 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pnge 47 



JOHN P. LYNCH COMPANY 
of San Francisco 



Brewers, Malsters and Yeast 

Workers of California 

Local Union No. 893 

San Francisco, California 



FROMM AND SICHEL, INC. 

717 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 3 CALIFORNIA 

BUILDING SERVICE EMPLOYEES 
UNION LOCAL No. 87 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

C. HUNTINGTON 



ORdway 3-2010 

Hotel Governor 

CHARLES H. ROBINSON 
MANAGER 

TURK AND JONES STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



(Continued from page 45) 
your engine temperature, shifting into a 
lower gear when it begins to rise. 

Deer abound in the territory adjacent 
to the road. \o\.\ may also see porcupines, 
chukar partridge, and ground squirrels 
if you watch closely. 

Downgrade, after passing the summit, 
is a scenic thrill. Lake Tahoe, emerald 
green, blue, and dusty gray, lies be- 
neath you like a painting, unbelievably 
beautiful. 

Turn left at the lake shore (route 28) 
and drive along the lake's edge for 14 
miles to Glenbrook. Turn left on high- 
way 50, and head for Carson City on the 
Clear Creek grade, ^\''agon trains once 
followed this road on their way from 
Sacramento to Virginia City. 

Turn left at the foot of the grade 
(10 miles from Glenbrook) on highway 
395 and drive 3 miles to Carson City. 
You will see the old Carson City Mint, 
now the Nevada State Museum, the 
state Capitol, and the other state build- 
ings right on 395. 

Continue on through Washoe Valley. 
About 18 miles from Carson City you 
will see steam rising from the ground 
at Steamboat Springs. Continue on to 
Reno. 

Ten miles north of Carson City is 
Bowers Mansion, a reminder of the first 
Comstock millionaires, Lemuel (Sandy) 
Bowers and his wife. Now owned by 
Washoe Coimty, it is a recreation center 
with swimming pools and picnic grounds. 
The mansion, hidden behind formal 
planting of Lombardi poplars and Scotch 
broom is a museum. 



SPEEDS BELOW FIFTY 

Speeds below fifty miles per hour are 
said by National Automobile Club to be 
most economical. 



NOT ONLY COST 

Driving in such a manner that severe 
use of the brakes is necessary is costly 
in more ways than mere lining wear, 
warns the National Automobile Club. 
Think of the energy generated by the 
engine to get up to such a speed that be- 
comes pure waste when the car has to be 
stopped suddenly. The motorists who 
drives more slowly and is able to coast 
to an approximately stop is the one who 
gets the most gasoline mileage in the 
course of a vear. 



TRAFFIC OFFICER 

Cooperate with the traffic officer, ad- 
vises the National Automobile Club. He 
is not out there to kill your fun. He is out 
there to keep you from killing yourself. 



HELP US HELP OTHERS 



Society St. Vincent de Paul 
Salvage Bureau 



1815 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HEmlock 1-4S88 

CALIFORNIA 



U. S. WOOD PRODUCTS 



444 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



GArfisId 1-3605 



CALIFORNIA 



ROBERTS TURKEY BRAND 
CORNED BEEF 

Since IIIO 

SERVED IN SAN FRANCISCO'S 
FINEST RESTAURANTS 



1030 Bryant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Mrket 1-2624 

CALIFORNIA 



E. P. FINIGAN COMPANY 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 

GYMNASIUM, PLAYGROUND AND 

SWIMMING POOL EQUIPMENT 



314 - I2th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



HEmlock 1-8850 

CALIFORNIA 



Frontier Coffee 
Shops, Inc. 

10 Locations in the Bay 
Area 



Phone ORdway 3-1711 

449 ELLIS STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 



RESERVE OIL & 


GAS CO. 


405 Montgotuery St. 


San Francisco, 


California 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



THC TRADE PRESSROOM 

394 PACIFIC AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

ZIM'S RESTAURANT 

1415 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

ASHLEY & McMULLEN 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Service With Distinction 
Two Beautiful Chapels 

Paul E. McConnell, Manager 

Geary Blvd. at Sixth Ave. SKyline 1-8403 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



STAG LIQUORS 



6273 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JUniper 5-8786 

CALIFORNIA 



VALENTE MARINI PERATA 
& COMPANY 

MORTICIANS 

649 Green Street DOuglas 2-0627 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOHN'S RENDEZVOUS 



so Osgood Place 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DOuglas 2-837S 

CALIFORNIA 



MOSER FROZEN FOOD 
FREIGHT LINES 



67 Loomis Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ATwater 2-7921 

CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 
E. M. TWIGGS 



THE DERAAS MURDER 

(Continued from page 12) 
Vivian Avenue which reaches a dead end 
at the Tuolumne River on the edge of 
the Fairbanks district, a suburb of Mo- 
desto, California. They found Teekle 
and Welch waiting for them beside the 
car. 

The officials recognized the dead man 
as readily as the farm hands had. Eilif 
Deraas was an athlete known through- 
out California for his prowess on skis. 
Born in Norway, he had developed his 
mastery of the sport there and come to 
AVisconsin during his boyhood. There he 
had continued to ski until he became 
champion of the state, a title he held for 
several years before coming to Califor- 
nia. Deraas went on to new honors in 
the Western state, winning the ski cham- 
pionship of Tuolumne County in the 
High Sierras, and becoming known as 
one of the outstanding performers on the 
Pacific Coast. 

Silently Hammett and Sovern studied 
the body. The lean athletic figure of the 
ski champion was stretched out close to 
the rear wheel, so close in fact that the 
outflung left hand showed burn marks 
from contact with the spinning wheel. 
He was wearing work clothes and a 
small woolen ski cap on the back of his 
head. Sovern removed the ski cap and 
studied the head. He turned to Ham- 
mett. 

"It was murder all right. He was shot 
in the rear of the skull by a small caliber 
revolver. He couldn't have done it him- 
self." 

"He'd have had a hard time spinning 
those rear wheels and throwing diit over 
himself or disposing of the gun after he 
was dead, too," Hammett remarked. "I 
wonder what the motive was?" 

Further investigation revealed that the 
skier's blood soaked pockets contained 
only a package of cigarettes and a pocket 
comb. 

"It looks like robbery," Hammett ob- 
served. "Whatever it was, this case is 
going to be too big for one man to han- 
dle. I'm going to call SherifT Hogin. 
Better not touch anything until we get 
some pictures." 

The deputy called Sheriff Grat M. 
Hogin at his home in Modesto and out- 
lined the facts of the case briefly. Hogin 
immediately dispatched Chief Criminal 
Deputy Stanton Briggs and Deputy 
Sheriff John B. Moorhead. He then 
called District Attorney Lester Cleary 
who assigned a deputy, William Zefif, to 
the case. 

Briggs and the two deputies hurried 
to the scene where they found Sovern, 
Hammett, and the two farm hands im- 
patiently awaiting their arrival. The 



M. D. GREEN RICE MILLING 
COMPANY 

^SAN FRANCISCO, CAUFORNIA 



VALLEY CAFE 

1089 SUTTER STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

MIKADO HOTEL 

M. Serata, Prop. 

1645 BUCHANAN STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

JOE JUNG'S INDO CHINA 
RESTAURANT 

263 O'FARRELL STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

CHIN'S 

LIQUORS AND GROCERIES 

2092 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

DIX CHEMICAL SERVICE 

irine and Industrial - Engineered Chemical 
jning - Consulting Chemists - Pittsburgh 
Testing Laboratory 

Phone Mission 7-6477 

CALIFORNIA 

J. W. "BUD" JACOBSON 
Representing 

COAST CASKET COMPANY 

Residence UNderhill 1-22 79 
74 LANGTON ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Phone PRospect 5-0581 G.H.Monroe 

Monroe Body and Fender Works 

Frame and Wheel Aligning - Collision 
Specialists - Auto Painting 

CALIFORNIA 

MINATO CAFE 

FINE JAPANESE FOOD 



1715 Post Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JOrdan 7-9770 

CALIFORNIA 



A. M. BLUMER 



465 California Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



sutler 1-6950 
CALIFORNIA 



MEET MR. HOT DOG 

The World's Largest CHARCOAL BURGERS 

3815 GEARY BLVD. EV 6-9684 

and 

MR. HOT DOG'S RANCHO 



5121 GEARY BLVD. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EV 6-9898 
CALIFORNIA 



Comp/Zmeflfs of 
ARGUS CAMERAS 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



The Macintosh Company 



544 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 4 



Tel. EXbrook 2-1412 

CALIFORNIA 



The Original Maytag Sales and Service Dept. 

Maytag Washers and Ironers 

~ — - - _ ^ Ranges 



487-493 Valenci 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Freezers - Dutch O' 
Street 



UNderhill 1-5835 

CALIFORNIA 



BARNEY KERNS & SONS 

SAVE 4c ON GAS 

Tires - Tune-Up Service 

ISOO South Van Ness VAlencia 4-7805 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

IDEAL AUTO REBUILDERS 

Complete Automotive Service - Body and 
Fender Work - Motor Tune-Up " " 



& F. PLUMBING AND 
APPLIANCES 



CALIFORNIA 



Roily Somer - Norm Standlee 

PACKAGE LIQUORS, WINES AND BEER 
Parking in Rear 

Free Delivery 

DAvenport 2-2214 - EMerson 6-9952 
El Camino Real at Selby Lane 

ATHERTON CALIFORNIA 



SHAMROCK LIQUORS 

FREE PARKING IN REAR 
Free Delivery 



49 East Main Street 
LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



EAGLE INN AND MARKET 

Highway 101 and San Antonio Road 

i LOS ALTOS CALIFORNIA 

OLD PALACE MARKET 

MEATS, VEGETABLES AND GROCERIES 

823 - 825 MAIN STREET 
REDWOOD CITY CALIFORNIA 

I Britton Livestock Transportation 

i SHIP BY TRUCK AND SAVE SHRINKAGE 

I California - Oregon - Nevada - Idaho 

CARGO INSURED 



Phone Day or Night: CYpress 3-6393 

962 VINE STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



corpse was lying in exactly the same posi- 
tion as it had been when Teekle and 
^Velch discovered it. 

"I tried not to disturb anything any 
more than necessary," Hammett told 
them. "I knew you would want pictures. 
There should be fingerprints on that car 
and maybe footprints in this soft dirt." 

""\'ou haven't noticed any footprints 
yet?" Briggs inquired. 

Hammett shook his head. "No. But I 
haven't looked too close. I didn't want 
to add mine to them and confuse the 
issue." 




John Moorhead 

The chief deputy nodded his approval 
and approached the car gingerly, study- 
ing the ground carefully. He circled the 
entire vehicle and stopped where he had 
started. 

"Strange," he observed. "There are 
footprints around the car, but they're 
just fragments. We couldn't get a decent 
cast out of any of them. And I don't see 
any leading away. You don't suppose 
the murderer flew." 

Hammett grinned. "Something like 
that. He indicated a grassy strip about 
five feet from the auto that lead to the 
river bank and followed it indefinitely. 
"If the killer walked along that he 
wouldn't leave any decent prints. He 
could walk along until he reached hard 
ground or the road and we might never 
find his prints. He could have jumped 
from the car to the grass. It's a short 
enough distance." 

Briggs nodded. "That's probably what 
he did. He must have had a good reason 
to be so careful about his feet." 

The chief deputy set up his camera 
and photographed the scene from every 
angle before investigating further. ^Vhen 
he was through he wrapped his handker- 
chief around the car door handle and 



Ray's Office Machine Service 

COMPLETE OFFICE SERVICE 
SALES — RENTALS — REPAIRS 



,e GL 3-0375 
3RD STREET 



SAN RAFAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



MOZZETTI BROTHERS 
Service Station and Motel 



p. O. Bo 

BRISBANE 



JU 7-9898 

CALIFORNIA 



T. & T. COFFEE SHOP 

77 BAYSHORE HWY. 

MT. VIEW CALIFORNIA 

Tires Tubes Batteries 

JACK OSBORNE TIRE SERVICE 

New — Used — Repairing 

Res. CYpress 3-4960 

Office CYpress 7-1392 

955 THE ALAMEDA 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



JENKS CORP. 

Phone 112 

Rt. 2, Box 1050 

GRASS VALLEY, 

CALIFORNIA 



CHRIS BECK, 
INC. 

Livestock 
Quality Meats 

Petaluma, Calif. 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



C. L. TARWATER 

BUILDING 
CONTRACTOR 



80 Bay Shore Circle 

Phone JUno 8-1278 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Grafen Machine 
Works 

Precision • Production 
Complete Shop Service 



1245 San Mateo Ave. 

Pho»e JUno 8-0664 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Shell Service Station 

Gei/e and George Faniicchi 



1278 San Francisco Blvd. 
Phone FLanders 5-9980 
SHARP PARK, CALIF. 



San Bruno Electric 
Co. 

Electrical Contracting, 
Repairing and Merchandising 



100 Linden Avenue 
Telephone JUno 8-2841 
SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



opened it carefully. The upholstery was 
saturated with blood, but aside from the 
blood stains there was no indication of a 
struggle. Briggs noticed that there was 
no registration slip on the steering wheel 
post. 

"I wonder if this car beyonged to De- 
raas or someone else," he remarked. "It 
could be somebody else's, or stolen." 

"That ought to be easy enough to 
check on," Sovern said. "But what drew 
\our attention to it?" 

"Two things. First, the body is lying 
by the right side of the car, as though 
he got out on that side. The second is 
even more obvious." Briggs indicated the 
blood soaked upholstery. "You'll notice 
all the blood in the car is in the center. 
A little to the right, if anything. Deraas 
wasn't in the driver's seat when he was 
shot." 

"That means the crime took place in 
this car," Zeff mused. "He could have 
been killed somewhere else and taken 
here." 

"That's right," Briggs agreed. He 
turned to the Coroner. "Have you any 
estimate as to how long he has been 
dead ?" 

"About seven hours." Sovern replied. 
"It could vary an hour one way or an- 
other. I couldn't make it much closer." 

"In other words he was murdered 
about one-thirty a. m. today," said 
Briggs. It was eight-thirty a. m. on the 
morning of March 16, 1936, when he 
spoke. 

"Or twelve-thirty, or two-thirty," the 
Coroner answered. "I can't set the time 
to the minute. I'd just hinder you if I 
tried to." 

"That's close enough," Briggs ob- 
served. "Let's see if we can find anything 
else here. And somebody see if there is 
anything around that will tell us who 
owns this car." 

A close examination of the auto show- 
ed that a hurried attempt had been made 
to remove all fingerprints from the win- 
dows and other sections. The thin film 
of gray dust that covered the car had 
been wiped away in several places. In 
his hurry, however, the killer had neg- 
lected three clear prints on the right- 
arid door window. 

"I hope they are the murderer's," 
Briggs remarked. "At least we have the 
victim's. We got them after a tavern 
brawl last month, when he was arrested." 

An oil change card, tied inside the 
hood, indicated positively that the auto- 
mobile belonged to Deraas. Meanwhile, 
Hammett, assisting in the examination 
of the car, made a startling discovery. 



L 



TAYLOR'S 

Sixteen Mile House 

GOOD FOOD 
COCKTAILS 

Phone JU 8-9899 

EI Camino Real at Center 

MILLBRAE, CALIFORNIA 



FREDRICKSON & 

WATSON 

CONSTRUCTION 

CO. 

General Engineering 
Contractors 

873 - 81ST Street 

Oakland 3, California 

SWeetwood 8-1264 



WILLIAMS & 
BURROWS 

General Contractor 

Phone JU 3-3818 

18 W. Orange 

South San Francisco, 

California 



T. FALASCO 



49 No. Mercy 

Springs Road 

Los Banos, Calif. 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



Plaza 5-0322 

Beautiful - Secluded - Modern 

Olivet Memorial 
Park 

One of the Largest Endowment 

Care Cemeteries 
Serving All Faiths 

MAUSOLEUM - COLUMBARIUM 
CREMATORY 

Outstanding Lot and Grave 
Locations 

M. JAY JENSEN, MANAGER 

COLMA 25, California 



CUSTOM CRAFT 

FURNITURE - REPAIRING 
REFINISHING - CABINETS 

WOODWORKING 
FORMICA TOPS - BUILT-INS 

R. B. Stiver 



Rear 511 San Bruno Avenue E. 

Phones JUno 3-0839-JUno 8-5377 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 



Boots and Saddle 
Lodge 

Amidst California's Magnificient 

Redwoods 

COCKTAILS - DANCING 

LODGING 

Mandie White's Fine Diniiers 

Personal Direction of Mack and 

Grace McCart)' 

For Reservations 

Phone La Honda 2871 

LA HONDA, CALIFORNIA 



DVnlap 8-2062 

SABELLA'S 

Beautiful Restaurant 

Located Just North of Richardson 
Bridge in Mill Valley 

633 Redwood Highway 
MILL VALLEY, CALIF. 



"The turtleback has been wiped off," 
the deputy shouted. "What do 3'ou sup- 
pose made him do that?" There must 
have been something to hide." 

The deputy searched further, and 
found what he was looking for, half con- 
cealed by the handle of the cover. There, 
clearly outlined against the dust, was a 
heel print complete in every detail. Even 
the trade name, "Goodrich Wingfoot" 
stood out distinctly. 

Three more more prints were found, 
all on the turtleback, but none as clear 
as the one beneath the door handle. The 
investigators noted that the heelprint 
was unusually small, indicating that it 
had been left by a woman or a very 
small man. Briggs set up his camera and 
photographed the evidence. 

"I don't see why it was on the turtle- 
back," he remarked. "It may be that the 
killer used it as a springboard from 
which he jumped to that patch of grass. 
Anyway, if it was a woman, the solution 
of this case should be simplified. Robber\ 
as a motive would be practically elimi- 
nated." 

"Perhaps there were two of them and 
one stood on the rear of the car and tried 
to rock it free while the other sat at the 
wheel," Hammett suggested. "The gaso- 
line indicator shows the tank is empty." 

A moment later Hoff, who had been 
inspecting the ground surrounding the 
scene, turned up evidence that substanti- 
ated Hammett's theory. He found two 
sets of footprints apparently belonging to 
a man and woman leading across the 
plowed field from the grassy river bank. 

Leaving Hammett to watch the car, 
Briggs and the rest of the party set out 
immediately to follow the mysterious 
footprints, hoping they would lead to 
some more likely clue. Their hopes were 
shattered, however, when they found the 
trail lead to a farmhouse where the 
owner and his wife admitted the trail 
had been left by them when they re- 
turned from working on the river bank 
the preceding day. 

The officers returned to the scene and 
resumed their investigation. A blood- 
stained copy of the Stockton Record was 
found in the bushes by the riverbank and 
taken as evidence. The paper had been 
sold on Friday, March 13, and was a 
copy of the home edition. Briggs pointed 
out that while it was probably of little 
significance, the home edition was not de- 
livered in Stanislaus Count\', indicating 
that the paper would ha\e had to be pur- 
chesed north of the Stanislaus River in 
San Joaquin County. 

Moorhead called attention to a deep 
break in the riverbank close to where the 
paper was found. 



Since 1864 

H. MOFFAT CO. 

PACKERS 
Livestock Growers - Dealers 

BEEF — VEAL — PORK 
LAMB— MUTTON— SAUSAGE 

Third Street and Arthur Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone AT water 2-0700 

First National Bank Building 
RENO, NEVADA 
Phone Reno 6862 



KING COLE 
MOTOR CO. 



Kerman, Calif. 



Phone Diamond 3-5671 

Harvey Crane 

Mgr. - J. E. French Co. 

Dodge - Plymouth Motor Cars 
Dodge Job Rated Trucks 

327 LORTON AVENUE 

BURLINGAME, CALIF. 



CompUments of 

Reno's Hardware & 
Sporting Goods 

• 

Kerman, Calif. 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



BLUE GOLD FARM 



Groceries - Fresh 

Garden Grove 
GARDEN GROVE 


Fruits and 
and Harbo 


Vegetables 

r Blvds. 
CALIFORNIA 


c u 


In Fontana 
R T ■ S 


C 


's 

A F E 



456 SO. SIERRA AVENUE 



CALIFORNIA 



RELIABLE MEAT MARtCET 

Phone Torrance 2933 Wholesale 
Free Delivery 

After May — Phone FA 8-1216 Retail 

Paul Klinger A. H. Zwicke 

1954 CARSON STREET 



SIERRA NURSERY 

If It Grows — We Have It. 
What About Trees and Shrubs 



737 SO. SIERRA AVENUE. 
FONTANA 



Phone 9-5233 
CALIFORNIA 



Phone 6131 

Muzquiz 
Equipment Co. 

Caterpillars - Cranes 

Shovels - Motor Graders 

Skip Loaders 

Oficinas en Mexico, D. F. 
Filomeno Mata 17, Desp. 415 

315 W. Arrow Boulevard 

Fontana, California 



Day and Nite Phones: 
6784 and 96542 

Fontana Van and 
Storage 

GENERAL HAULING AND 

MOVING - FAST EXPRESS 

Coast to Coast Mo ring 

Walt Hickey — Pete Hickey 

151 East Orange Way 

Fontana, California 



"Maybe the murderer is in there," he 
observed. "If he is we'll never find him." 
"He could have come here and fallen 
in when he attempted to wash the blood 
from himself," Briggs admitted. "With 
these rivers all at the peak of their spring 
Hood, he could be washed clear into the 
San Francisco Bay before the body is 
found. That wouldn't help a bit. It's 
also possible that he came here and dis- 
posed of the murder weapon. I was 
counting on the bullet in Deraas skull as 
a valuable clue." 

Satisfied that they had investigated the 
scene of the murder as completely as pos- 
sible, the officers returned to Modesto. 
A check with Deraas' fingerprints there 
revealed that all of the seven prints 
found on the car belonged to the owner. 
Meanwhile Sovern removed the fatal 
bullet from the dead man's skull and 
reported that it was a thirty-two caliber 
and in good enough condition for a bal- 
listics expert to match it with the gun 
from which it had been fired. 

Moorhead and Hammett set out to 
check on the dead man's personal history 
for some clue that might lead to the 
cause of the murder. In spite of the fact 
that his pockets contained only the cigar- 
ettes and comb, indicating robbery, the 
investigators felt that the impression 
might have been left deliberately to cover 
up some less obvious motive. 

Close questioning of the dead man's 
friends and acquaintances revealed only 
that Deraas had been extraordinarily un- 
communicative regarding his personal 
life. They found only that the skier was 
employed in off season by a Ripon vine- 
yard and that prior to that he had work- 
ed for the Roma AVinery there. Ripon, a 
small town half way between the larger 
cities of Modesto and Manteca, could 
not produce a single individual who 
knew of any feminine acquaintances of 
the ski champion. Apparently he had no 
love affairs. AVhat then, they wondered, 
was the significance of the small heel- 
print? Was it possible that, as the heel- 
print indicated, there had been a woman 
in the car at the time Deraas was mur- 
dered ? Or had an exceptionally small 
man committed the crime and with rob- 
bery as his motive? In the light of their 
findings at Ripon the detectives leaned 
toward the latter theory. 

One bit of evidence was uncovered in 
Ripon which gave added strength to the 
robbery, motive. The deputies found two 
\ouths, Fred Gritton and Elvin Lemas, 
who were apparently the last two people 
to see Deraas alive, with the exception of 
the killer. 

The two youths, both admirers of De- 
raas' ability as a ski jumper, told Ham- 
mett and Moorhead they had seen the 



CARTA - BLANCA CAFE 

SPANISH KITCHEN — WINE & BEER 
STUFFED PEPPERS OUR SPECIALTY 



PARADISE LAUNDAIRE 

SELF SERVICE 



John J. Moran 



2254 W. VALLEY BOULEVARD 
FONTANA CALIFORNIA 



LUPIEN TIRE AND RECAPPING 
COMPANY 

W. Orange Co. Dist. for Mohawk Tires & Tubes 

O K Rubber Welder — Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Phone Garden Grove 2152 

13021 CENTURY BOULEVARD 

GARDEN GROVE CALIFORNIA 



COCA-COLA BOTTLING 
COMPANY OF VENTURA 



TURNER STEEL 
ERECTION CO. 

STEEL FABRICATION AND 

ERECTORS 

Turn to Turner for any size Steel 

Building to Suit Your Needs 

Phone Bakersfield 5-4408 

Field Office 

534 E. Minner, Oildale 

Office 
2809 Charleston Dr., Bakersfield 



Phone Garden Grove 2740 

Garden Grove 
Bowl 

Bowling 

Eight All Maple 
Shellacked Alleys 

Garden Grove, Calif. 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 53 



MATT SCHREINER & SONS 

Farm Machinery and Implements 
Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties 

Phone 662231 643-656 Oxnard Blvd. 

NARD CALIFORNIA 



FONTANA PRODUCERS' EGG 
& SUPPLY CO. 

Phone 2S3 P. O. Box 66 

105 EAST ORANGEWAY 

Res. 501 South Elm — Phone 6892 

FONTANA CAUFORNIA 



FONTANA JEWELERS 

YOUR FRIENDLY JEWELRY STORE 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - SILVERWARE 
S & H Green Stamps Given 

Phone 5016 8546 SIERRA AVE. 

M. W. Leetzow 

FONTANA CALIFORNIA 

MELODY ACCORDION SCHOOL. 
INC. 

Pomona Studio, 763 E. Holt Street 

Chino Studio. Community Building 

Ontario Studio. 800 E. "A" Street 

Rialto Studio. Womens Club 

Phone 6665 
FONTANA 



Telephone MI 3-9279 

Town & Country 
Drive - In 

Cocktail Lounge & Dining Room 

A Friendly Place to Eat and 

Drink 

corner arcade and 

thompson blvd. 
Ventura, Californla. 



L. F. WILL 

Prolimn Reclaimed 
Motor Oil 

Plant: 17th and Verano 

GARDEN GROVE, CALIF. 

Phone 24247 

Office: 14921 Wilson Street 

MIDWAY CITY, CALIF. 
Phone Westminster 7384 



murdered man in the Midway Service 
Station in Manteca at about nine o'clock 
the night of March 15. Earlier in the 
e\ening, they said the dead man had been 
drinking in a Ripon beer tavern and had 
stated when he left there he was going 
home. 

A short time later the two boys saw 
him stop at the Midway Service Station, 
where a young man approached. his car, 
spoke to him briefly, and got in. They 
told the officers that the rider appeared 
to be a hitchhiker and described him as 
being light complexioned, short, and at- 
tired in a light shirt, dark hat, and dark 
necktie. They added that he appeared to 
be wearing a small mustache, although 
they could not be sure in the bad light. 
They estimated his weight at about 145 
pounds. 

"One more thing," Moorhead asked 
them. "Did you notice whether or not 
Deraas had any money when he left you 
at the tavern?" 

"As near as I could tell he had about 
twenty dollars," said Gritton. Lemas 
agreed that the ski champion had at least 
that amount. 

Convinced that the man seen entering 
the ski champion's car was the most 
likely suspect, Moorhead and Hammett 
pressed their investigation in Ripon, hop- 
ing to discover someone who could give 
them a satisfactory clue as to the identity 
of the hitchhiker. 

Wallace Sheppard, the owner of a hog 
ranch on the outskirts of town, provided 
the only other bit of information. He re- 
ported that he had been approached the 
night before the murder by a young man 
who wanted work, and had hired him 
for the evening to look after the hogs 
while he attended a moving picture. 
Sheppard added that he believed the man 
was familiar with Modesto because he 
had asked if the rancher was going to the 
Strand Theatre. 

"I went to the Strand, all right," 
Sheppard told the officers. "But he didn't 
watch the hogs. ^Vhen I returned from 
the movies he was gone, and so were fif- 
teen dollars and a valuable camera." 

"Can you describe him?" 

"Only that he was young, seemed 
small, and had brown hair and a brown 
hat. I couldn't swear to the color of the 
hair or the hat. It was pretty dark when 
I talked to him," the rancher said. 

"Would you recognize him if you saw 
him again ?" 

"I believe I would," Sheppard replied. 

In the hope that the man described by 
Sheppard was in the rogue's gallery at 
the sheriff's office, the rancher was taken 
there and shown scores of photographs 
that answered his description in a general 
way. Sheppard studied them all carefully 



PAT'S LIQUORS AND 
DELICATESSEN 



Phone Ml 3-7246 

2789 EAST MAIN STREET 

VENTURA CALIFORNIA 



LITTLE BROWN JUG 

Mrs. Leola Bresnahan, Prop. 
LIQUORS — WINES — BEER 

Phone 8-8953 
2207 NILES STREET 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

SCHUTT MOTEL 

Mr. & Mrs. Cecil Renfrew, Props. 

18 MODERN AIR COOLED UNITS 

Soma With Kitchenettes and Frigidaire 

TILE SHOWERS 

5 Minutes to Heart of City 



U. S. 99 North 

BAKERSFIELD 



Phone 2-0484 

CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN WELDING CO. 

Acetylene and Electric Welding 

Phone MI 3-4275 Licensed Contractors 

Murl S. Brand Patrick Monahan 



THE SWALLOW 

specializing in 

Spanish Dishes 
Cocktails 

31785 South State Highway 
San Juan Capistrano 



Phone MI 3-3537 

ALTHEA'S 

the corset shop 

Ventura, California 
2320 East Main Street 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



BILLIE'S K. C. CLUB 

COLD BEER 

32t8 NILES STREET 
Phone 2-9538 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

LOLA'S 

SPECIALIZING IN MEXICAN FOOD 

PHONE 3-4616 
523 EAST 18TH STREET 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

DERRICK LIQUOR STORE 

REFRIGERATED LIQUORS 

PHONE 6-7058 
3216 NILES STREET 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

Julius Cafe and Cocktail Lounge 

WHERE GOOD FRIENDS MEET 



ANTON'S CAFE 
Mixed Drinks — Draught Be 



GAREHIME 

MUSIC 
COMPANY 



Telephone 483 

115 North 3rd St. 

LAS VEGAS, 

NEVADA 



but reported he did not see the man. 

"That's too bad," Briggs remarked. 
"Our only suspect is now an anonymous 
hitchhiker. One of thousands on the Cal- 
ifornia highways. Our only clues are a 
blood stained newspaper, a photograph 
of a size three heel print, and a thirty- 
two caliber slug." 

Returning to the scene of the murder, 
Moorhead and Hammett questioned the 
residents of surrounding farmhouses, but 
could find no one who had heard the 
fatal shot. One farmer, John Loinbar- 
dini, who lived closest to the scene of the 
slaving, reported that he had seen a car 
drive along Vivian Avenue toward the 
river at about eleven o'clock the night of 
the murder and that he had not see it 
return. 

"That must have been Deraas," Ham- 
mett observel. "But if he picked up the 
hitchhiker at nine o'clock in Ripon and 
took a half hour to get here, that leaves 
an hour and a half unaccounted for. It 
is entirely possible that the hitchhiker 
had left him then and someone else was 
with him." 

"Maybe the hitchhiker killed him 
somewhere else and came here to dispose 
of the body. That would take up some of 
the time," Moorhead pointed out. "Per- 
haps nobody heard a shot here because it 
was fired some other place. " 

Locating one murdering hitchhiker 
amongj:he thousands who roam the high- 
ways and placing him in the death car at 
the time of the murder appeared a hope- 
less task, but Hogin, Briggs, and their 
deputies were working at it stubbornly 
when evidence was unearthed that threw 
an entirely new light on the case. 

A few days after the murder the ski 
champion's sister, Mrs. J. P. Jorgensen 
of Ripon, approached Coroner Sovern. 
She stated flatly that she did not believe 
her brother was killed by a hitchhiker. 

"He was killed in a row over a woman. 
I'm sure of it," she said. 

"It would be easier to find the mur- 
derer if he had been," Sovern admitted. 
'But up to the present no one has been 
able to find any woman in his life who 
was more than a casual acquaintance." 

"I found one," Mrs. Jorgensen told 
him. She drew a small package of letters 
from her purse. "I opened these because 
I thought they might contain some clue 
that would lead to Eilif's killer. I hated 
to do it, but now I'm glad I did. When 
vou read them I think you'll have your 
killer. 

Sovern opened one of the letters and 
glanced through it. The words "he'll be 
mad, but I don't care" caught his eye. He 
read several more, then picked up the 
telephone and called the sheriff. 



Pizzini's Store and Shoe Repair 

Orthopedic and Shoe Correction Service 
IF YOU WEAR SHOES, SEE US FIRST 



944 BAKER STREET 

BAKERSFIELD 



PHONE 2-0162 ! 
CALIFORNIA I 



EL PORVENIR GROCERY 

GROCERIES — MEATS — BEER & WINE 
FRESH VEGETABLES AND FRUITS 

Phone 5-3094 

1016 SOUTH BAKER STREET 

EAST BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

NILE POINT 

THE MOST MODERN COMFORTABLE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE IN GREATER 

BAKERSFIELD 

Owned and Operated by 

Robert R. (Pop) - Roy R. - and Opal Henry 



2225 Niles Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



Ph 



2-7810 
CALIFORNIA 



M. K. B. OIL TOOL SHOP 

Shop Phone 2-2942 — Res. Phone 2-7787 

LOCATED ON PIERCE ROAD 

BOX 564 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 



CRAWFORD 

LUMBER 
COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 

PONDEROSA PINE and 
DOUGLAS FIR LUMBER 



Longvale, Calif. 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



UNITED CAFE 

Your Patronage Appreclaftd 

1011 Main Street Phone 9670 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

JOHNNIE'S PLACE 

KOTCHEVAR :-: CADONA 

Route 1, Box 244 

TIPTON CALIFORNIA 

DELANO AUTO COURT 

T. J. Olt, Prop. 

MODERN CABINS - AIR CONDITIONED 

Groceries - Gas Station - Cafe 

1800 Highway 99 Phone 43S1 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

THE CLUB 

WHERE FRIENDS MEET 
Buster Chroman, Prop. 



1007 Main Street Phone 4921 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

SIERRA CLUB & 
CIGAR STORE 



Phone 2-7629 

708 Union Avenue 

BAKERSFIELD, 

CALIFORNIA 



"I think we can forget about the rob- 
bery motive in the Deraas case," he said. 
"The victim's sister is here with some 
letters that throw an entirely new light 
on the case." 

"I'll be right over," the sheriff re- 
sponded. A few moments later Hogin 
and Briggs arrived in Sovern's office and 
examined the letters. They were written 
in a fine hand and revealed a love affair 
that the ski champion had succeeded in 
keeping completely secret by his silence. 
The letters were signed by a Hilda John- 
son, and the return address was Mo- 
desto. They indicated that she had been 
engaged to a young San Francisco ma- 
chinist to whom she "referred as Frank, 
for some time, but that she was going to 
break off the engagement because of her 
love for the ski champion. 

"This ought to clear things up," Ho- 
gin remarked. "I guess our hitchhiker 
was not implicated after all. We'd better 
go talk to that girl." 

The girl, a good looking blond young 
lady of Swedish descent, was nervous 
when the officers arrived but told her 
story willingly. 

"I've really been expecting you," she 
said. "But I'm sure Frank didn't do it. 
He was awfully angry, but he wouldn't 
kill anybody." 

Miss Johnson went on to tell the offi- 
cers that she had been engaged to the San 
Francisco man for three years before 
meeting the ski champion. After meeting 
Deraas she had known that her engage- 
ment to Frank would have to be called 
off and was considering such action when 
he heard from other sources that she was 
going out with someone else. 

Angrily he came to Modesto on 
March 13 and expressed his displeasure 
at her behavior. While he was visiting 
her Deraas had arrived to discuss a ski- 
ing expedition they had planned for the 
weekend in Yosemite Valley. The girl 
had talked to him outside her house and 
through the curtains her fiance had seen 
her embrace and kiss the ski champion. 
Seething with indignation he deno\uiced 
her and told her he was through. 

"I don't want anything to do with 
that kind of a girl,' he said, and left in 
such a hurry he neglected to take his hat. 

When the girl finished her story she 
reiterated that she did not believe her 
fiance had been responsible for the mur- 
der. She added that he had called her the 
day after the murder and told her he 
read about it in the San Francisco paper. 
They had decided not to say anything 
about the argument. When the officers 
insisted she gave them his name and ad- 
dress. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

in Delano, California 
COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE 
Member F.I.D.C. - Member Federal Res 



CALIFORNIA 



DELANO SUPPER CLUB 

Bill Swanson • Bake Lynch 
YOUR FAVORITE FUN SPOT 



708 Cecil Av 

DELANO 



Phone 9519 

CALIFORNIA 



CRYSTAL DAIRY 

Pasteurized * Homogenized 
MILK AND CREAM 

Home Delivery Service 



Route 1, Box 1088 

DELANO 



Phone 7951 

CALIFORNIA 



SOUTHWICK'S 

FEED • SEED • GROWERS' SUPPLIES 
Garden and Field Seeds 
Insecticides Fertilizers 



827 Main Street 

DELANO 



Phone 5131 

CALIFORNIA 



CALAVERAS 

CEMENT 
COMPANY 

23 Years of 

Continuous 

Service 



Phone 110 

San Andreas, 

California 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



DELANO POULTRY AND FEED 

Wilbur Sllva. Owner 

POULTRY AND EGGS 
Poultry Bought and Sold 

Residence 5941 
1220 High Street Phone 4181 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



BARBER TEXACO SERVICE 



LUBRICATION 
Tires and Tube 



BATTERIES 



P. O. Box 673 
EAR LIMART CALIFORNIA 

NATIONAL CLEANERS AND 
TAILORS 

QUALITY WORK 

811 - nth Avenue Phone 2083 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

HERNANDEZ TORTILLERIA 

. . . Our Specialty . . . 
TORTILLAS AND TAMALES 

341 Glenwood Street Phone 9047 
DELANO CALIFORNIA 

A. REBECCHI 

GENERAL STORE 
Clothing - Shoes - Pants - Shirts - Hats 

Phone 11 
FIREBAUCH CALIFORNIA 

KERN BODY WORKS 

ALL TYPES OF AUTO RECONSTRUCTION 
FENDER AND BODY WORK 
WELDING AND PAINTING 



Phone 4-670S 
220 Kentucky 

BAKERSFIELD 



Res. Phone 2-2329 

I. B. Drennan 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 9889 

ROY HOSKINS 

CHEVRON SERVICE 
STATION 

Complete Service for Your Car 

STANDARD OIL PRODUCTS 

cecil and main streets 
Delano, California 



"\'ou'd better let us decide whether or 
not he is the killer," Hogin told her. 
"People do strange things when they are 
in love and particularly when they have 
been jilted. If Frank is not guilty he'll 
be given every opportunity to prove it. If 
he is guilty he must pay the penalty." 

A teletype bearing the name, address, 
and description of the fiance was for- 
warded immediately to San Francisco, 
stating that he was wanted for question- 
ing in the Deraas case. A few hours later 
Briggs and Deputy District Attorney 
Zeff appeared at the Hall of Justice in 
San Francisco and were told that a San 
Francisco Inspector was posted in the 
suspect's room and waiting for him to ar- 
rive. The investigators hurried to the 
room and joined the Inspector in his vigil. 

Less than a half hour later the young 
man entered, smiling, and told them he 
had been to a movie and stopped to visit 
a friend on the way home. 

"I hope you haven't been waiting too 
long," he remarked. "I suppose you've 
come to question me about the Deraas 
murder." 

The officers started. He had taken 
them by surprise. 

"^Vhat makes you think so?" Briggs 
demanded. 

"It stands to reason that you would. 
Deraas was dating by girl and I broke 
up with her just before the murder. 
AVhen I read about it I was sure you 
would question me, although I hoped of 
course you wouldn t. 

The young man's frank manner and 
honest attitude impressed the detectives. 
Perhaps his former sweetheart's assump- 
tion that he could not have committed 
murder was correct. Zei? began ques- 
tioning. 

"Can you account for your movements 
on the night of the murder?" 

The machinist nodded. He explained 
that he had arrived in San Francisco 
about five o'clock in the afternoon and 
played California draw poker in a public 
card room for an hour or so, then gone 
to his room. In the evening he went to a 
friend's house and played poker until 
three-thirty a. m. 

"Of course we'll have to hold you 
until we can check that story." If it is 
true you have nothing to worry about," 
Zeff told him. 

The machinist nodded amiably. "It 
shouldn't take long." 

A careful check proved that it was im- 
possible for the San Francisco man to 
have committed the murder. His story 
was correct in every detail and he was 
released promptly. Briggs and Zeff re- 
turned to Modesto empty handed. 



AL'S VILLA 

Where All Good Friends Meet 
COLD BEER AND WINE 



CALIFORNIA 



TERRACE MARKET 

MEATS AND GROCERIES 
BEER AND WINE 



2340 Norwalk Route 1, Box 370 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

NELSON SUNLAND No. 301 

Bob Nelson, Prop. 
TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 



1441 High Street 



CALIFORNIA 



North Highway Phone 6282 

MOTEL DELANO 

Air Conditioned - Phones in Each Unit 

24-Hour Service 

Swimming Pool and Patio 

Cocktail Lounge - Coffee Shop 

The Last Word in Comfort 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



KATANO'S SHOE REPAIR 

GUARANTEED REPAIRS 
New Work Shoes 

8251/2 Glenwood Avenue Phone 9701 
DE LANO CALIFORNIA 

RAY'S PLACE 

FOOD COOKED AS YOU UKE IT 
Open Day and Night 

111 No. Main Street Phone 156 

PORTERVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Louie's Automotive 
Service 

TOWING SERVICE 
24-Hour Service 

Day Phone 9108 
Nite Phone 8177 

510 high street 
Delano, California 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



QUALITY CLEANERS 

NEW ODORLESS CLEANERS 

909 West Olive Street Phone 2042 

PORTERVILLE CALIFORNIA 

TANG SUE'S TEAGARDEN 

FINE CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 

Catering to Private Parties and Banquets 

Headquarters for Service Clubs 

Phone 361 

PORTERVILLE CALIFORNIA 

LF^ITED CAFE 

COCKTAILS - FINE FOODS 
CLUBROOM - GIFTS 

505 North Main Street Phone 9 

PORTERVILLE CALIFORNIA 

MT. VERNON SERVICE 

F. W. Wilson, Prop. 

GAS - OIL - COMPLETE LUBRICATION 

Diesel Fuel - 60-Ft. Public Scale 

301 W. Hermosa Street Phone 2-3091 

LINDSAY CALIFORNIA 

ANDERSON PACKING CO. 

PACKERS AND SHIPPERS OF 
Citrus Fruits 

P. O. Box 637 Phone 2-3094 

LINDSAY CALIFORNIA 



MEET ME AT 

LINDSAY CLUB 

(Best Wishes to All Police Officers) 

DSAY CALIFORNIA 

Phone 8681 

Yonaki Bros. 

Service 

TEXACO 

TIRES - BATTERIES 
ACCESSORIES 

Ninth and Glenwood 

Delano, California 



"We're right back where we started," 
they told Sheriff Hogin. "I guess the 
hitchhiker is the man we want after all." 

"Let's try Sheppard again," Hogin 
suggested. "There has been a wave of 
juvenile delinquency lately. It might be 
a good idea to let him see the files at 
lone. The killer may have been a Pres- 
ton graduate." 

The officers returned to the hog ranch- 
er's home and told him of their plan. 
The chance of spotting the killer was a 
slim one, but it was a known fact that 
many crimes in the San Joaquin Valley 
were directly attributable to desperate 
young bandits just released from the re- 
form school at lone. 

Sheppard consented willingly and ac- 
companied Briggs and Hammett to the 
reform school. After studying a variety 
of photographs he picked not one, but 
two pictures. 

"I'm sure it was one of these two 
boys," he told the sheriff. He indicated 
the photographs of Emmett C. Baldwin 
and Oliver Peters, both twenty-one years 
old and recently released from the re- 
form the reformatory. 

Acting on information received from 
officials at Preston, Hammett accompan- 
ied Sheppard to Los Angeles where they 
found Baldwin living with relatives in 
the nearby city of Glendale. Sheppard 
looked at the young man and made up 
his mind quickly and with conviction. 

"I'm sorry," he told Hammett. "That 
isn't the man." 

While the two men returned from 
Los Angeles, Hogin received word that 
Peters had been located in San Rafael 
as the result of a statewide radio broad- 
cast and teletype mesages. The rancher 
was hustled to the northern city. Once 
again a quick look was all he needed. 

"I guess I was mistaken. That's not 
the man who worked for me." 

For the time being, Sheppard's value 
as a witness had been e.xhausted and he 
was allowed to return to his ranch. For 
Hammett, who returned to Modesto 
with him, a new duty waited. 

During his absence a teletype had ar- 
rived from Sheriff George Lyle of Santa 
Clara County, informing Hogin that he 
had a likely suspect for the Deraas mur- 
der. During a hunt for a service station 
prowler Lyle's deputies had arrested a 
San Quentin ex-convict, George Kerner, 
and his girl friend, Nellie Carter, and 
were holding them for inxestigation. 

Information revealed by Lyle's depu- 
ties indicated that Kerner had been em- 
ployer recently in the Roma ^Vinery at 
Ripon as a truck driver and that he had 
known the murdered ski champion while 
working there. 



PUERTO LIBRE CAFE 

292S E. FIRST STREET 

OS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 

LEE'S TV SERVICE 

919 TOWNE AVENUE 

' OS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 

REDWING MOTEL 



at HOME for the Night 



On Route 66 
14885 Foothill Blvd. 
FONT ANA 



one 9-6742 
CALIFORNIA 



JIM MORRIS APPLIANCES 

Servel Refrigerators, Washing Machines. Ranges 
Sylvania Televisions, Sunbeam Elec. Appliances 



GARDEN GROVE NURSERY 

For Your Outdoor Living Enjoyment 
Kusuda & Ogata 



Phone 9120 
GARDEN GROVE 



Grove Blvd. 
CALIFORNIA 



You are Always Welcome at 

EL CHARRO CAFE 

- Ccrvezas y Antojitos Mex 
Ruben Galindo, Mgr. 



COLONIAL MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS & VEGETABLES 
COMPLETE LIQUOR STORE 

Phone 65298 300 COOPER ROAD 

OXNARD CALIFORNIA 

L. N. STICKLER, M.D. 

Hours: 2-5 except Saturday and 8-9 exi 

Capitol 12677 

rOS ANGELES 



:ept Fri. 

2807 No. Broadway 

CALIFORNIA 



AMIGOS MARKET 

Meats, Wine, Beer, General Merchandl! 
GREGORIO CHEVERES 



436 COLONIA ROAD 

CALIFORNIA 



STEPHEN'S 

Stephen Jim. 



. . Fine Postr/es 

ez. Prop. 



432 So. B Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 8669 



Subway Wrecking 
Yard and Garage 

24-HOUR TO'W SERVICE 



route 1, box 37 
Delano, California 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



SONORA CAFE 

Stanley Del Real. Prop. 
SPANISH FOOD 

Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 

MENDOTA CALIFORNIA 

BRIGHT SPOT CAFE 

GOOD FOOD 
Beer - Wine - Soft Drinks 

MFNDOTA CALIFORNIA 



FRENCHY'S COCKTAILS 

MIXED DSINKS MADE BY EXPERTS 

MENDOTA CALIFORNIA 

LOUIS' WEST SIDE GROCERY 

p. O. BOX 107 

MENDOTA CALIFORNIA 

SUNSET CAFE 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 

Open 5 A.M. to 10 P.M. — Closed Sundays 

COCKTAILS :-: BEER 

M ENDOTA CALIFORNIA 

M. J. TIMBROOK 



P O. Box 416 Phone 3552 

MENDOTA CALIFORNI,\ 



SMITTY'S SERVICE 

p. O. Box 27 Phone 3951 

MENDOTA CALIFORNIA 



E. D. KiRBY Phone 2-1410 

Our Regards to all Peace Officers 

Highland Park 
Cleaners 

A Modern, Complete Cleaning 
Service 

Fire and Theft Insurance 

1905 North Chester Avenue 
BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 



IDEAL HOTEL 

ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS 



INNER SPRING MATTRESSES 
AIR COOLED 

Geo. F. Oliver, Prop. 

• 

1003 NINETEENTH STREET 

Phone 2-1387 
BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 



Further investigation lead to the dis- 
covery of a thirty-two caliber automatic 
together with several rounds of ammuni- 
tion in the ex-con's room. The suspect 
was very small and had extraordinarily 
small feet. 

Hammett and Lhidersheriff Harvey 
Wright hurried to the Santa Clara 
County Jail at San Jose to interrogate 
the suspect. Hammett produced a photo- 
graph which he handed to Sheriff Lyle. 

"Before we question him, let's com- 
pare his shoe with this heel print," the 
deputy suggested. "I'd like to know just 
where we stand, before we question 
him." 

One of the prisoner's shoes was 
brought to the Sheriff's ofSce and com- 
pared to the photograph. The officers 
smiled. The shoe bore the "Goodrich 
W^ingfoot" trade mark on the heel and 
was approximately the same size as that 
in the photograph. 

"Of course we'll have to make more 
accurate tests," Wright observed. "The 
marks are a little different, but the shoe 
has been worn some. There is a good 
chance this is our man. There aren't 
many men with feet that small." 

The officers called Kerner into the 
room and told him why they were ques- 
tioning him. He paled but denied the 
charge emphatically. The damaging heel 
print was pointed out, but Kerner stub- 
bornly refused to confess to the crime. 

"I don't know whether you did it or 
not, George," said Lyle. "But we have 
\our gun and we can make ballistics tests. 
They'll show if you killed Deraas or 
not." 

"The sooner you make them, the bet- 
ter I'll like it," the prisoner replied. "I 
haven't been near Modesto recently. All 
I knew of Deraas while I was there was 
that he was some kind of a ski jump 
champion. Why should I kill him?" 

"I don't know why anyone should 
have," Wright informed him. "But I in- 
tend to find out. Where were you when 
the murder was committed?' 

"Hunting in the mountains behind 
Madera," Kerner responded. 

"If you can prove it you'll be all right. 
All we want is the truth." 

^Vhile the Modesto deputies question- 
ed the suspect, Sheriff Lyle detailed two 
men to check on the prisoner's testimony. 
Under hours of questioning the suspect 
refused to break down, continuing to 
maintain that he was on a hunting trip 
over the fatal weekend. Finally he was 
returned to his cell to await the report 
of Lyle's deputies and the ballistics ex- 
pert. 

The deputies and ballistics report re- 
turned at almost the same time. The re- 
sults obtained from both were conclu- 



JALISCO CAFE 

LUNCHES DINNERS 

Wine and Beer Served 



CALIFORNIA 



LOUIE'S CAFE 

Louie and Vi 

MIXED DRINKS - OFF SALE LIQUOR 

Beer and Wines 



Drop in at the 

DERBY CAFE 

Gertrude Elms 

FINE FOOD AND DRINKS 

Phone 6101 

FIREBAUCH CALIFORNIA 

MARIANO'S CLEANERS 

PICKUP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 



1305 Gle 

DELANO 



Telephone 9036 

CALIFORNIA 



SEBBINS T.V. 

HARDWARE AND APPLIANCES 

Hunting and Fishing Supplies 

B;er - Wine - Liquors 

P. O. Box 188 Phone 2781 

TIPTON CALIFORNIA 

TIPTON MARKET 

Harry E. Harris 

GROCERIES AND MEATS 

Telephone 2671 



CALIFORNIA 



W. J. (Bill) Elkins 

DELANO TIRE SHOP 

U. S. Royal Tfres - Recapping - Automotive 
Cervic3 . . . "We Guarantee Everything We Sell" 

1 3th and Main Streets Phone 4620 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 



Archie F. Tompkins 

Cor/tractor 

Grading - Surfacing - Paving 
Oiling 

Specialty: Land Checking 

Driveways — Any Type 

Box 65 
LOCKEFORD, CALIF. 



Phone MI 3-3397 

O. C. O. Tool 
Company 

1895 N. Ventura Ave. 
Ventura, California 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



SANCHEZ CAFE 

Alejandro Omega 

Featuring FILIPINO FOOD 

Beer - Soft Drinks - Cigars and Cigarettes 

917 Glenwood Avenue Phone 9944 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

CAREY AND SILLIMAN 

Jay Silliman 
RADIATOR SERVICE 

Phone 9444 



FARMERS MARKET. INC. 



p. O. Bo 

DELANO 



e 8491 

CALIFORNIA 



BILL'S DOG HOUSE 

Bill Nakagama, Prop. 
A GOOD PLACE 
od Avenue Phone 



THE CLASSIC SHOP 

"Where Style Is Inexpensive" 
Ready-to-Wear Sportswear - Lingerie 



DELANO HOTEL 

AIR COOLED BY REFRIGERATION 



930 Main Str 

DELANO 



Pho 



le 9030 

CALIFORNIA 



McCarthy motel 

M. D. McCarthy, Manager 
AIR CONDITIONED 



Young's Transfer 
& Storage 

Light and Heavy Hauling 

Local and Long Distance Moving 

Packing and Crating 

Agent ALLIED VAN LINES 

H. J. Baxter, Owner 

Phone 5-9008— Nite 2-3600 

901 ESPEE STREET 
BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 



Carl Ingalls 
Trucking Co. 

Trucking and Excavating 

Contractors 
• Bentonite • Chemicals 
Rotary Mud • Yuba Barites 
•Lost Circulation Materials 

Phone 8-8521 

1425 UNION AVENUE 

By the Underpass 

BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 



sive. A thorough investigation proved 
that Kerner had been hunting at the time 
of the fatal shooting. The fatal bullets 
had failed to match his gun. After inter- 
viewing what seemed to be four "hot" 
suspects, Sheriff Hogin and his men were 
right where they started from the heel 
print, bullet, bloody newspaper and the 
mysterious hitchhiker. 

While the days rolled in to a month, 
the murder of the ski star disappeared 
from the front pages of the newspapers. 
A shorter paragraph each day noted that 
nothing new had developed in the case. 

A sports columnist turned his atten- 
tion to the champion himself, telling 
how he had been called the finest per- 
former ever to appear in Central Cali- 
fornia, remembering how he had twice 
jumped and landed erect on one ski, and 
recalling how he had frequently hurtled 
through the air with a young woman 
riding his skis behind him. The writer 
finished by remarking that it seemed a 
shame that so fine an athlete should die 
at the hand of an anonymous killer who 
had apparently been successful in evad- 
ing justice. 

The column was a challenge to Briggs. 
Although the investigator was faced con- 
stantly with a variety of other work, he 
clung stubbornly to his task, convinced 
that with his two vital bits of evidence, 
the heel print and the bullet taken from 
the slain skier's head, he could some day 
solve the crime. With grim determina- 
tion he sifted Modesto for evidence, hop- 
ing only to turn up a faint trail. 

Over a month after the killing his ef- 
forts were rewarded. A youthful Mo- 
desto ranch hand took him to one side. 

"It sounds silly," the boy said, "but 
there was an ex-con in town a while back 
who disappeared the day after the mur- 
der. I thought it might be worth your 
looking into." 

"Anybody who disappeared on March 
16 is worth investigating," the detective 
told him. "What's the man's name?" 

"I don't know his name," the youth 
admitted. "Mrs. Nelson does, though. 
She brought him here." 

Briggs frowned. Mrs. Nelson was one 
of the best known women in town, a 
leader in church and welfare work. She 
was known for her philanthropic philoso- 
phy and had helped a great many unfor- 
tunate people get a fresh start in life. As 
the investigator approached Mrs. Nel- 
son's home on High Street, he wondered 
whether her generous attitude toward 
the stray lambs of society had backfired. 

The church leader laughed when 
Briggs told her of his suspicions. "\Vil- 
liam did leave town about that time," 
she told him. "But he couldn't hurt any- 
one. I'm sure he had completely reform- 



THE YELLOW 


CAB CO. 


Why Take a Chance— Call a Yellow Cab 


10191/2 Main Street 


Phone 9888 


DELANO 


CALIFORNIA 


Laundromat Half 


Hour Laundry 


SPURRIER NEWS AGENCY 


1213 Jefferson 


Phone 9966 


DELANO 


CALIFORNIA 



DELANO IGNITION WORKS 

Generator, Starter and Distributors - America 

Bosch, Case, Fairbanks-Morse. Wico Magnetos. 

Sales and Service. 

1411 High Street Phone 9097 

DELANO CALIFORNIA 

MID-VALLEY BUTANE 

Wilfred Ennis 



P. O. Box 128 



le 212 

CALIFORNIA 



GRADY'S CAFE 

STEAKS, CHOPS AND SHORT ORDERS 



P. O. Box 96 



• 9952 
CALIFORNIA 



QUINTANA'S LAUNDRY 



The Finest 



Hand Finished Laundry 



902 Jefferson Street 

DELANO 



hone 9690 

CALIFORNIA 



CROSS GROCERY & MARKET 

p. O. Box 414 Phone 3582 

TIPTON CALIFORNIA 



El Portal Motor 
Court & Coffee Shop 

12 "Really " Modern, Fire Proof 

(Adobe), Air Conditioned Units 

With Panelray Heat, Tile Showers, 

Radios, Carpeted Wall to Wall 

SWIMMING POOL 

A. A. A. Approved 

5801 Golden State Avenue 

On U. S. 99 and 466 

3 Miles North of Fresno 

BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 



Send All Your Dry Cleaning 
With Your Laundry 

MAKE ONE CALL DO IT ALL 

Silver Lake Laundry 
and Dry Cleaners 

Guarantees you Tops in Service 
at Lowest Prices 

717 Baker Street Phone 4-9961 
BAKERSFIELD, CALIF. 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



HOUSE OF RASMUSSEN 

WHERE NOTHING BUT THE BEST IN FOOD 
IS SERVED 



719 NiUs Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



e 4-7380 
CAUFORNIA 



JOSH CLARKE— Rea/for 

General Real Estate and Insurance 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

Office Phone 5-6283 Res. Phone 4-4402 

956 BAKER STREET 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 



SNIDER'S 



SPORTING GOODS — LOCKSMITHING 
BICYCLES — GUN AMMUNITION 



1011 Baker Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



Phone 4-4759 
CALIFORNIA 



SEVEN ELEVEN CLUB 

YOUR FAVORITE COCKTAILS AND 
MIXED DRINKS 



727 Sumner Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



ne 2-9556 
CALIFORNIA 



GENE & JOE'S 

LIQUOR AND SPORTING GOODS 

Bicycle Repairing — Free Delivery 

630 Bernard Street Phone 3-9141 

B AKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

Green Acres Store and Cafe 

GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS 

Wheeler's & Son 

9701 Rosedale Hwy. Phone 2-5079 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

HORTON MOTEL 

FINE FOODS — COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Horton Sledge, Proprietor 

Hwy 99 & Brundage Lane Phone 2-8174 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 



Sun Valley Grape 
Distributors 

Growers — Packers and 
Shippers 



Reedley Phone 755 

Fresno Phone 4-9511 

REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-3992 



J & N LIQUORS 

ICE COLD BEER 

REFRIGERATED WINES 

AND LIQUORS 

ICE CUBES 



1305 Niles 

BAKERSFIELD, CALIFORNIA 



ed. Anyway, he only had one arm and he 
was such a little fellow. He wouldn't 
have been any match for a man like Mr. 
Deraas." 

The deputy was interested. "A little 
fellow, you say. Tell me about him.' 

Mrs. Nelson told the detective how 
another ex-convict had told her of the 
man while he was still in prison and 
pointed out that he was particularly 
worthy of her help. 

The convict's name was William Mc- 
Manus, he was twenty-eight years old 
and serving a five year sentence for rob- 
bery in Los Angeles. Mrs. Nelson had 
corresponded with him and learned that 
he had lost an arm after it had been 
crushed by a freight train nine years be- 
fore in Nevada. He told her that the 
thing that would make him happiest at 
the time would be a cornet he could play 
.in the prison band. The welfare worker 
responded by sending him a cornet and 
telling him she would try to arrange vo- 
cational training for him in Modesto. 

Impressed by the convict's attitude in 
prison, plus the fact that he had lead a 
particularly hard life and was physically 
disabled, she arranged for his parole. 

William McManus was paroled from 
San Quentin on Thanksgiving Day 1935 
and enrolled in the Modesto Business 
College soon after. The disabled ex-con- 
vict was affable and had many friends. 
He became a regular church goer and 
many people in Modesto were willing to 
back Mrs. Nelson's belief that he was 
incapable of murder. They were convinc- 
ed that the Los Angeles robbery was a 
youthful error and that he had com- 
pletely reformed. 

A significant fact though was that not 
one of these people had seen McManus 
since Sunday, March 15. 

A check with San Quentin Authori- 
ties revealed that he had left the prison 
wearing size 5-5 shoes, a prison listing 
corresponding with the normal men's 
size three. The shoes were equipped with 
Goodrich Wingfoot heels. 

"That explains why his heel print 
matched Kerner's," Briggs observed. 
"They were released from prison about 
the same time and both pairs of shoes 
came from the prison shop." 

The ex-convict's room were searched 
and it was discovered that he had left 
most of his belonging's there. Missing, 
among other things, was the cornet. 
Briggs detailed Hammet to investigate 

BOB'S DRIVE-IN 

Sandwiches, Beer and Soft Drinks 

P. O. Box 825 

PIXLEY CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES 

NORIEGA HOTEL 

GRACE EUZALDE, Prop. 

525 Summer Street Phone 2-8419 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

NILES LI9UOR STORE 

BEER — WINE — LIQUORS 



727 Niles Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



Phone 2-0913 
CALIFORNIA 



DUDLEY'S EAST HI' LUNCH 

23 Cent HAMBURGERS 

Phone 2-9428 

Across East Bakersfield High School 

EAST BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

J C COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



808 Baker Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



Ph^ 



S-5250 
CALIFORNIA 



JOE'S NATIONAL MARKET 

MEATS— GROCERIES— VEGETABLES 
FREE DELIVERY 



511 E. 18th Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



Ph 



4-4975 
CALIFORNIA 



BEST WISHES TO OUR FINE OFFICERS 

CARROLL'S LIQUORS 



731 Baker Street 
EAST BAKERSFIELD 



Phone 2-0451 
CALIFORNIA 



Central Body & Paint Works 

EXPERT BODY & FENDER WORK 
Free Estimates — Pickup and Delivery Se 
2912 Eye Street Phone 5-4318 

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNM 



STEEL COAL 

UHALT'S 

Blacksmith and Welding 
Works — Electric and 
Acetylene Welding 



Phone 2-7993 

532 E. 19th Street 

Bakersfield, California 



RANCH HOUSE 
MOTEL 



KERN COUNTY'S 
NEWEST 



TEHACHAPI, CALIF. 



April, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



ENGLISH POOL HALL 

RECREATION & GAMES 

15S E. SIXTH STREET 
OXNARD CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ARTHUR G. WINSWORTH 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Builder of Personalized Homes 

Phone REdondo 8338 116 - 29th Place 

MANHATTAN BEACH CALIFORNIA 



BILL'S FINE LIQUORS 

Beers - Wines - Liquors - Tobaccos 

Phone FRontier 4-4536 — We Deliver 

BOB REUBEN 



HOBBY NOBBY MARKET 

Imported and Domestic Groceries 

Fresh Meat - Beer and Wine - Vegetables 

Jim Bono, Prop. 

Phone 9901 8S1 W. FoothUl Blvd. 

FONTANA CALIFORNIA 

HOWARD'S MARKET 

Meats - Groceries - Light Wine and Beer 

Forest Howard 

591 E. FOOTHILL BLVD. 

FONTANA CALIFORNIA 

ULIS MARKET 

2170 VALLEY BOULEVARD 

FONTANA CALIFORNIA 

ACME GLASS CO. 



583 South Sierra 

CALIFORNIA 



MOTEL INN 

70 Units in Cottages 

FINE FOOD & COCKTAILS 

New Owners — Newly Decorated 

Phone 1340 

North City Limits — 101 Hiway 

San Luis Obispo, Calif. 

Note : When in Sacramento it's 
the HOTEL BERRY 

Same ownership and management 



Phone 9181 

CURVE IN CAFE 

AND CHEVRON SERVICE 
STATION 

GOOD FOOD 

"Where Trucks Stop" 

Gas - Oil - Diesel Fuel - Butane 
Service . . . Open 24 Hours 

ON HIGHWAY 99 
South End of 

Delano, California 



Modesto music stores, thinking the miss- 
ing instrument might provide some clue 
to the reason for the e.\-convict's dis- 
appearance. 

The detective located the cornet at the 
store which which Mrs. Nelson had pur- 
chased it. McManus, in selling it, had 
e.\plained to the dealer that he needed 
money, fifteen dollars, for a pair of 
glasses. 

When Briggs carried this information 
to Mrs. Nelson she reported that she had 
arranged for the e.\-convict to get free 
glasses from a philanthropic society. 

Meanwhile Hammett, going through 
McManus' possessions, found a pair of 
rubbers bearing the latent heel print 
which corresponded almost identically 
with the ones found on the turtleback of 
the death car. 

Convinced that McManus was a like- 
ly suspect Hogin wrote to Clarence S. 
Merrill of the State Department of 
Criminal Identification and requested 
that a hold for suspicion of murder card 
be sent to all points with the ex-convict's 
record card. 

As a clinching bit of evidence, Deputy 
John Moorhead made the rounds of Mo- 
desto pawn shops, convinced that the one 
armed man's secret desire for spare funds 
had been for the purchase of a weapon, 
perhaps the weapon that had ended De- 
aas' life. 

His suspicions were proven well found- 
ed when he discovered that on March 3, 
the same day on which he had sold his 
cornet, McManus had purchased a thir- 
ty-two caliber automatic. The ex-convict 
had signed his name as Robert Williams, 
but the pawn shop proprietor remem- 
bered him as a very small one armed man 
and the handwriting on the registration 
slip tallied exactly with that of Mc- 
Manus. 

Moorhead recorded the serial nimnber 
of the automatic, 103899. "If he used 
that gun on Deraas, we'll need it for a 
conviction," he remarked as he forward- 
ed the information to Briggs. 

"The gun and the heelprint are the 
only things we've got that can tie him up 
with the crime," Briggs agreed. "We'll 
need both of them if we capture him." 

"\Ve'll get him all right," Hogin told 
them. "It's just a matter of waiting now. 
A bad apple always turns up." 

The waiting game did not last as long 
as the Sheriff and his deputies had ex- 
pected. On the last day of April, Briggs 
picked up a teletype message from Clar- 
ence Merrill with vital news. 

AVilliam McManus was in custody. 
More than that, he had picked the Ore- 
gon State Penitentiary as the safest place 



KOLMARS 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Geo. Cooluris, Nicholas Marsis, feter Marsis 

Props. 

Phone 66-3197 439 So. Oxnard Blvd. 

OXNARD CALIFORNIA 

LA HACIENDA CAFE 

Bottled Beer - Wine - Spanish & Mexican Food 

154 East 6th Street 
OXNARD CALIFORNIA 

TOBY'S CAFE 

Beer - Mexican & American Food 
131 East 6th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



JUAN VILLALOBOS GRILL 

Restaurant — Beer 
140 East 6th Street 



OXNARD 



CALIFORNIA 



■LA BARCA " 

Tienda Mexicana de Abarrotes y Carnes Frescas 

GROCERIES — MEAT MARKET 

Phone 64563 167 So. Grant Avenue 

OXNARD CALIFORNIA 

ANDY'S WRECKING 

LET US BUY YOUR OLD CAR 

Phone 660062 P. O. Box 37S 

Located on Highway 101 Near El Reo 

OXNARD CALIFORNIA 

H & H CAFE ■ CLUBROOM 

MIXED DRINKS 



Lucksinger Motors 

Sales and Service 
DE SOTO & PLYMOUTH 

Automobiles With a Future 

Fred Lucksinger 

Telephone 404 

1255 Monterey Street 

San Luis Obispo, Calif. 



Madonna 
Construction Co. 

Bulldozers - Shovels 
Dump Trucks - Materials 

Phones 99 or 3020 

P. O. Box 910 

399 FREEWAY 

San Luis Obispo, Calif. 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Aprii 1954 



LA AURORA BAKERY 

Bakery & Complete Line of Grocer! 
4161 Brooklyn Av 



LOS ANGELES 



CALIFORNIA 



PEDRO BARRERAS COMPANY 

Meats and Sausages • Lard - Wholesale & Retail 
Phones: Bus. AN 9-1594 — Res. AN 1-6377 

101 So. KERN AVENUE 
LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 

MENDOZA MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - BEER &. WINE 

4323 E. FLORAL DRIVE 
LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 

SPANISH KITCHEN 

BEER - MEXICAN DISHES 



EL GALLO BAKERY 

MEXICAN BREAD AND PASTRY 

445 I Brooklyn Avenue 
LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 

GRAND STAR MARKET 

GROCERIES, MEATS AND VEGETABLES 
SERVICE, QUALITY AND ECONOMY 



THE LEADER BAKERY 

PIES - PASTRY - WEDDING CAKES 

3614 East First Street 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 485 

Selma Trailer & 
Manufacturing Co. 

BUILDERS OF THE 

FAMOUS 

SELMA TRAILER 

U. S. 99 at Highland 
SELMA, CALIFORNIA 



INDEPENDENT 
REDWOOD CO. 



Boonville, Calif. 



he could find in which to hide out from 
a murder charge. He was serving a ten 
year sentence there for an armed robbery 
in Vale, Oregon. 

The one armed bandit had been cap- 
tured just twelve days after the death of 
Eilif Deraas in Modesto. He had con- 
fessed to the robbery and entered a plea 
of guilty immediately, seeking sanctuary 
behind the walls of the Oregon prison. 

Hogin put through a telephone call to 
Sheriff C. W. Glenn at Vale, Oregon. 

"How was McManus armed during 
his robbery attempt there?' he asked. 

"With a thirty-two caliber automatic," 
the sheriii responded. 

"Have you still got it?" 

"We have,' Glenn told him. "What 
do you want to know?" 

Briggs read oiif the number on the gun 
McManus had purchased in Modesto. 
"Check it with the gun you have," he in- 
structed Glenn. "If it is the same, please 
let us know immediately?" 

Ihe numbers checked. 

On May 3, almost two months after 
the fatal shooting, Sheriff Hogin and 
District Attorney Leslie Cleary faced 
McManus in the visting room of the 
Oregon penitentiary. They had already 
matched the lethal bullet with Mc- 
Manus' gun. 

"You may as well confess," Hogin 
told him. "We've got everything we 
need. Heelprint, gun, and a matching 
bullet. You can't win." 

"How about extradition?" 

"It's only a formality," Cleary told 
him. 

"O.K., I'll confess," McManus told 
them. "But I shot in self-defense." 

The little ex-convict told them that he 
had picked up a ride with the slain ski 
champion on the night of the killing and 
that Deraas had asked him to drive. Be- 
cause he observed that the athlete had 
been drinking, McManus claimed he had 
consented to take the wheel. 

He went on to say that Deraas had 
fallen alseep and awakened to accuse him 
of stealing the car. 

"He attacked me,' said McManus, "so 
I had to shoot him." 

"Try again," said Cleary. 'I don't be- 
lieve you." 

Once again McManus told his story, 
this time admitting that he shot the ski 
champion in cold blood with the inten- 
tion of stealing the car. He told how he 
had wiped away the fingerprints and 
footprints, knowing that either would 
give him away. 

"I forgot about the turtleback," he 
told Hogin. "If I hadn't you never 
would have caught me." 

"As long as you kept the gun, we had 
a chance," the sheriff replied. 



STEVES LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic Liquors 
Carlos Satragni, Prop. 
4120 Brooklyn Avenue 

LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA 

BARGAIN BASKET 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL PRODUCE 



Phone Fontana 9354 
FONTANA 



884 S. Sierra Avenue 
CALIFORNIA 



MONA LIZA CAFE 

y Sodas - Comidas Mexicanas 
Jennie Domingues, Prop. 
703 S. OXNARD BLVD. 
OXNARD CALIFORNIA 

LA TROPICAL CAFE 



Antojitos Mexicanos Cerbeza 

Farm Labor Contractor — Open 6 a.m. to 2 a.m. 

FRANK JIMENEZ, Prop. 

Phone 666-113 173 N. Hayes Street 

OXNARD CALIFORNIA 

DUNN'S LIQUOR STORE 

Chas. and Jo. Dunn. Props. 

Phone SS3-R for Delivery 

1003 East Date 

EAST PORTERVILLE CALIFORNIA 



K & M New-Used Merchandise 



3085 West Oli 

PORTERVILLE 



Route 2, Box 860-C 

CALIFORNIA 



ORANGE LUNCH 

172 WEST HONOLULU 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 881 



Arnold's Spot Cafe 

Southern Fried Chicken 
Steaks - Chops 

Lunch - 75 Cents and Up 



228 North Main Street 
PORTERVILE, CALIFORNIA 



RON - D - VOO 

Our Specialty 

CHARCOAL STEAKS 

. . . Dine and Dance . . . 



514 North Main Street 
PORTERVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



SMITH 


FURNITURE CO. 


COMPLETE 


HOME 


FURNISHERS 


732 Yosemite Re 


ad 


Telephone 3-3269 


MODESTO 




CALIFORNIA 


ENSLEY-DUNCAN 


LUMBER CO. 


Lumber - Builders 


Hardw 


ire - Paints - Cement 


202 Santa Cruz A 


irenue 


Telephone 3-5484 


MODESTO 






CALIFORNIA 



California Pine Box Distributors 

650 Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco, Calif. 

P. O. BOX 812 MODESTO. CALIF. 

The Union Furniture Company 



91S Eleventh Street 

MODESTO 



Telephone 3-3271 

CALIFORNIA 



SCOGGINS GROCERY 



p. O. BOX 526 



CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

SEV'S BARBER SHOP 

S. E. Varquez, Prop. 
701 - 12lh Street Phone 5682 



DELANO 






CALIFORNIA 


4th an 
DELANO 


PEOPLE'S 

Salvadore To 
d Glenwood Sts 


MARKET 

rres. Prop. 

Phone 9982 

CALIFORNIA 



hi San Luis Obispo — A MUST.' 

FRED WATSON'S 

Streamliner Cocktail Lounge 

and 

CASA MONTERY 

Finest Spanish Food 
Ale.xico to Canada! 

Phone 2341 
1011 HIGUERA STREET 
San Luis Obispo, Calif. 



TOWER CAFE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
STEAK HOUSE 

San Luis Obispo's Finest 

Known From Coast to Coast — 
Gulf to Border! 

COFFEE SHOP 

VISING ROOM 

BAR-B-Q 

HIGUERA & MARSH STS. 
SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIF. 



McManus entered a plea of guilty to 
first degree murder in the Stanislaus 
County Superior Court. Because of his 
confession and physical disability, Dis- 
trict Attorney Cleary did not demand 
the death penalty. 

On May 6. Superior Court Judge L. 
J. Maddux sentenced William Mc- 
Manus to life imprisonment in Folsom 
Penitentiary for the murder of Eilif 
Deraas. 



SLAPPING PISTONS 

To determine which piston or pistons 
are doing the slapping, points out the Na- 
tional Automobile Club, short out each 
cylinder by disconnecting the spark 
cable. The guilty one will show up in the 
decreased noise it makes. The engine of 
course, should be thoroughly warm for 
the test. 



DRIVING VISIBILITY 

One out of five fatal trafSc accidents 
occurs because of poor driving visibility, 
points out the National Automobile 
Club. Rainy weather blurs your wind- 
shield and clouds the highway, so drive 
with special care and always try to keep 
vour windshield clean. 



OVERINFLATED TIRES 

Overinflated tires cause hard riding, 
according to the National Automobile 
Club. 



WHY CHANGE OIL? 

Why should crankcase oil be changed ? 
Because, points out the National Auto- 
mobile Club, it breaks down after con- 
tinued use under tremendous heat and 
because it becomes dirt and grit laden. 
The best way to emphasize these points 
is for the motorist to take a look at the 
dirty oil next time he has his crankcase 
drained. This makes a graphic and im- 
portant lesson. 

RATTLES 

Remember that the fender guard at- 
tached to the bumpers of most cars are 
subject to pressures and vibration that 
may loosen them and cause them to 
rattle, points out the National Automo- 
bile Club. It is one of the many types of 
noise that has a way of being picked up 
and transmitted to another part of the 
car, making it difficult to locate. 



YELLOW LIGHT 

Running that yellow light is a danger- 
ous practice, points out the National 
.Automobile Club. 



HOTEL LINDSAY 

Don Turlington, Owner 



Phone 2-2086 



CALIFORNIA 



LOG CABIN 

BEER - SANDWICHES 



4506 West OH' 
PORTERN'ILLE 



Phone 1999 

CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS 

KILCHI'S PLACE 



1001 Gle 

DELANO 



bone 7846 

CALIFORNIA 



Jane and Irene's 
Motel and Cafe 

open 24 Hours 

The Biggest Little Truck Stop in 
the Valley 

W^hen in Visalia See Us at 
IRENES DRIVE IN 



600 NORTH COURT 
VISALIA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-2827 

Taylor's Welding 
Service 

. . . WELDING . . . 



J 525 So. MiRAGEAVE 

I Lindsay, California 
L 



Frontier Clubroom 

Cocktails 



219 North Main Street 
PORTERVILLE, CALIFORNIA 




Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



Day Phone 9571 

Night Phones 9887 or 8273 

A-1 PAINT AND 
BODY SHOP 

Ernest Johnson 
G. O. "Short)'" Galloway 

24-HOUR TOWING 
* SERVICE 

Official AAA Garage 

5021/2 HIGH STREET 
Delano, California 



BONITA 

PACKING 

COMPANY 

Fresh 
Vegetables 



P. O. Box 345 

SANTA MARIA, 

CALIFORNIA 



SQUEAK RELIEVER 

\ ou can take care of those anno.\ ing 
squeaks that come from the hood metal 
rubbing against the slick and hardened 
weblike material that runs around the 
cowling, l^he trick to this is simply add- 
ing a fair amount of graphite to the web- 
like material to make things slip about 
more smoothly and soundlessly. Other 
squeaks owing to loose brackets here and 
there throughout the car can be elimi- 
nated by tightening up those brackets. 

Squeaking or rattling doors or win- 
dows are not much of a problem either. 
\ ou can take the rattle out of the door by 
merely re-setting the adjustable bufier 
that presses the door against the lock. 
And you can take the rattle out of that 
window by merely renewing the rubber 
channels in which the glass slides or by 
adding those inexpensive anti-rattle gad- 
gets carried in most car supply stores. 

Try some of those tricks. Even though 
your car is ancient, you will find that 
you, too, can ride along in silent serenity. 



TRAFFrC REGULATIONS 

^Vise motorists know that traffic rules 
and regulations and the laws of safety 
on which they are based operate to the 
motorists' advantage and that it is to 
their ad\antage to see that these rules 
operate. 1 hey therefore, according to the 
National Automobile Club, practice a 
great deal of self enforcement of these 
rules and regulations. ^Vhat is your atti- 
tude towards the traffic laws and regula- 
tions? Do you practice a wise self en- 
forcement ? 



REMEMBER SHOCKS 

Shock absorbers, even of the most ad- 
vanced design, will generate considerable 
heat in operation, points out the National 
Automobile Club. The heat, in turn will 
evaporate the fluid with which they are 
filled. It is one of those natural laws that 
science has not been able to o\ercome so 
the wise motorists will remember that 
and have the fluid level checked periodi- 
callv, at least every ten thousand miles. 



CARBON MONOXIDE 

Tests have shown that an automobile 
following another closely in heavy traffic 
can pick up enough carbon monoxide 
from the exhaust of the first vehicle to 
ha\e its distinct physical effect upon the 
following driver, reports the National 
Automobile Club. It is something to 
keep in mind if you find yourself sudden- 
ly inclined to drowsiness when driving in 
imdulv hea\v traffic. 



Phone 829 

Village Shopping 
Center 

A Complete Shopping 
Center 



San Bernardino and 
Alder Streets 

FoNTANA, California 



JACK HALEY'S 
TIRE SERVICE 

"hi the Middle of the Block' 



Gasoline and Oil 
of Course 



HIGHWAY 99 
Phone 764 

Selma, California 



April. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



Phone 2-7172 



mission 



ORANGE 

Flovov 




HIRES ROOT BEER 

Mission Bottling Co. 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



Ladies: Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. 
Men: Fri., Sat. and Sun. 

• 

CASTRO ROCK 

STEAM BATHS 

• 

Hygiene Beneficial 

for Health 

• 

Open Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
Sundays 9 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

• 

MASSAGE 

by 
APPOINTMENT 

• 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone UNderhill 1-5995 

• 

582 CASTRO 

(Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.) 

San Francisco, Calif. 



TRUCK OWNERS KNOW 

Truck tires naturally come at higher 
prices than those for passenger cars, 
points out the National Automobile 
Chib. Wheel wobble due to bearing wear 
or wear in other parts makes tires wear 
out more rapidly. Because the penalty 
attached costs considerable money, truck 
operators guard against it. In their policy 
there is an excellent lesson for the owner 
of the passenger cars. 



NEW CAR PURCHASE 

Even before one goes forth in search 
of a new car, one should make up one's 
mind regarding the body style that most 
nearly fits one's needs, advises the Na- 
tional Automobile Club. With so many 
types available today, this is more diffi- 
cult, but the careful buyer will have 
made a thorough study of his needs and 
determined which type meets them ade- 
■ quately before he starts his shopping trip. 
A mistake in this case is too expensive. 
A little thought will prevent errors. 



POLICCE 



E=£ PEACE OFFICERS' 



Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco 3, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 



ALL CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA 

LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES 

Published Monthly by 

Police and Peace Officers Journal 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 

2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ 

Desp, 6, Mexico, D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioja. 666, Buenos Aires, 

Republic of Argentine, S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE 

Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS 

New South Wales 

POLICE JOURNAL 

Wellington, New Zealand 



WALTER R. HECOX 



Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION TERMS— $6.00 
payable in advance; 60c a number. In C 
ada, $7.00 a year. Remittance must be ni; 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, 
Registered Letter, or by Postage Stamps 



year 



nt de 



by check. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not sub- 
scribe to POLICE AND PEACE OFFI- 
CERS' JOURNAL through agents unknown 
to you personally, or who cannot present 
proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application, 
o^^ 30 



MOVING FROM CURB 

When you move out from the curb, 
move out with caution, advises the Na- 
tional Automobile Club. Wait for an 
opening in the stream of traffic, and sig- 
nal your intention clearly. This is the 
course of common courtesy, and of com- 
mon sense. 



TAKE CORNERS SLOWLY 

Go around those corners slowly, ad- 
vises the National Automobile Club. 
Squeegeeing around corners at high 
speeds will scrape miles off your tires. 



RAILROAD CROSSINGS 

It takes enormous braking power and 
a considerable distance to bring a long 
passenger train or a fast freight to a stop. 
That is why, according to the National 
Automobile Club, the wise motorist al- 
ways treats railroad crossings with a 
great deal of respect. He comes to a full 
stop and takes a good look up and down 
the tracks before venturing over. He's 
careful at the crossings, and he doesn't 
get himself killed. 

HAND SIGNALS 

Hand signals are a modern motoring 
must, reports the National Automobile 
Club. 



Greetings to the 

CALIFORNIA 

POLICE 

OFFICERS 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1954 



CYpress 4-0386 - CYpress 4-6020 

AMERIAN BROS. 

. . . Wholesale . . . 
FRUIT AND PRODUCE 



335 East Taylor Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



CYpress 2-7234 

Wagner Lockheed Parts and Fluid 
Wagner Comax Brake Lining 

Robinson's and Parry's 

Reliable Brake Service 

Complete Brake and Wheel 
Aligning Service 

7 South Montgomery Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND- 
CHASE 
COMPANY 

Quality Packers of 

CANNED FRUITS & 

VEGETABLES 

DRIED FRUITS 

FRUIT NECTARS 



SAN JOSE 

STOCKTON 

CALIFORNIA 



AIRBORNE PRISONERS 

(Conlinued from page 7 ) 
oners. Its use has expanded to searching 
for lost parties and crashed airplanes and 
at times for helping to combat forest fires. 
From his plane Lieutenant Heck can 
skillfully guide the ground parties by 
walkie-talkie to plane communication. 

When you consider the great contri- 
butions this flying service can make to a 
department, it is hard to realize that six 
\ears ago such a service did not knowing- 
Iv exist in the countrv. 



WORTH REMEMBERING 

The fact that the oil level shows full 
on the gauge does not mean always that 
the crankcase is full of oil, points out the 
National Automobile Club. It may be 
that part of the supply is made up of 
gasoline seeped down from the cylinders 
where it never was burned. Crankcase_ 
ventilation takes care of this to a great 
extent, but in the case of a car with 
badly fitting piston rings, the burden may 
be too heavy. 

DON'T RUN 

If you wear rubber overshoes, don't 
run near traflflc during rainy weather, ad- 
vises the National Automobile Club. 
Rubber overshoes, like smooth tires, will 
slip easily on wet pavements, and a slip 
jiear traffic can be fatal. 

EMERGENCY AID 

Pushing another car, which has dis- 
placed towing it in many an emergency, 
is not harmful to the mechanism of the 
\ehicle doing the pushing if it is dri\en 
carefully, points out the National Auto- 
mobile Club. Clutch and tires, the com- 
mon sufferers, are not damaged if they 
are given a chance to take on the extra 
load gradually. It involves starting gent- 
Iv and picking up speed slowly and even- 
ly. 



LOCK MUST LOCK 

That cotter pin that locks the nut on 
the wheel must really lock it. points out 
the National Automobile Club. If the pin 
is broken when remoxed, it is not safe to 
try to use it, or what is left of it, again. 
A new pin costs but a few cents and is 
worth its weight in gold from a safety 
standpoint. 

KEEP SUPPLY NORMAL 

If pro\ision is made for carrying spare 
headlight fuses, the supply should be re- 
plenished as rapidly as the spares are 
used, advises the National Automobile 
Club. The supply, otherwise, may be- 
come exhausted just at the wrong time. 



I Phone CYpress 5-4575 

Compliments to the 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Sally Thompson 
Pie Company 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Phone CYpress 5-5646 

A. ]. Peters & Son 

Mechanical Contractors 

Plumbing, Heating and Utilities 
Industrial Piping 

534 Stockton Avenue 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Central Eureka 
Corporation 

Wholesale Meats 
Eighth and Bayshore 

CYpress 3-7312 



Central Eureka 
Feed Lots 

Quality Cattle Feeding 

P. O. Box 880 

Berryessa Road 

CYpress 5-7250 

San Jose, California 



^pril, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



Phone CYpress 3-9101 

SAN JOSE MEAT 
COMPANY 

The Home of Shamrock Beef 

Wholesale Butchers and Meat 
Jobbers 

Plant and OflSce — Berryessa Road 

Route 2, Box 635 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



CYpress 4-5546 

Gagliardi Bros. 

"Builders of Fine Homes" 

REAL ESTATE • LOANS 

Complete Insurance Service 



351 Park Avenue 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



CYpress 5-2993 

Corrigan's Liquor 
Store 



300 N. Thirteenth St. 
SAN JOSE, CALIF. 



Phone 4-0812 




, CHICKEN tCITCHEN 

CHICK£N 




ON A 



BUN 



11 A. H. to 12 F. H. 



i HIGHWAY 99 

BETWEEN STOCKTON and LODl 



CHIEF CATO RETIRES 

Chief E. Raymond Cato, command- 
ing officer, Division of Field Operations 
and a member of the California High- 
way Patrol for the past 23 years, an- 
nounced his retirement from active duty 
on March 31. His action brings to a 
close an active enforcement career which 
spans more than 43 years. 

Legislation abolishing the position of 
Chief of the California Highway Patrol 
is now before the Governor for his sig- 
nature and the job will be filled in the 
future by an Assistant Commissioner. 
B. R. Caldwell, Patrol Commissioner 
has named Fred J. Bly, Supervising 
Traffic Inspector and veteran of 29 years 
of patrol work, as the acting Command- 
ing OflScer of Field Operations. 

Cato came to the Highway Patrol at 
the invitation of the late Governor James 
Rolph, Jr., leaving the Los Angeles Po- 
lice Department where he was Captain 
of Detectives, to take command on Janu- 
ary 6, 1931. Though he reported on a 
loan arrangement, he has served as Chief 
continuously since that time. 

On March 10, he celebrated his 65th 
birthday and at the same time reached 
compulsory retirement age for a member 
of the Highway Patrol. 

Cato first entered enforcement work 
as a patrolman with the Los Angeles 
Police Department on September 26, 
1910. He advanced through the ranks 
and was number three on the list for 
Chief of Police when he came to Sacra- 
mento to succeed Eugene Biscailuz, then 
Superintendent of the Highway Patrol, 
now Sheriff of Los Angeles County. 

When he arrived in Sacramento, Cato 
found a statewide force of fewer than 
350 officers. At the present time total 
patrol strength is 1526 uniformed mem- 
bers and 571 civilian employees. Recent 
legislative action has approved an in- 
crease of 220 members of the patrol 
which will bring total strength, members 
and employees, to 2317. 

Reflecting on his 23 years of patrol 
service. Chief Cato recalls four news- 
making events that stand out as major 
accomplishments by the patrol in trouble- 
free handling of traffic. These occasions 
were the disastrous Montrose flood of 
1943, the Long Beach earthquake of 
1933, the first mooring of the Airship 
Macon at what is now Moi?ett Field, 
and the opening of the San Francisco- 
Oakland Bay Bridge in 1936. 

During Cato's tenure as Chief, the 
California Highway Patrol aided in the 
establishment of state patrols in Arizona, 
Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. 



Phone CYpress 5-9872 

Most Popular Place in Town 

THE KNOTTY PINE 

Manuel Borges - Tony - Fraga 

. . . Dancing . . . 

Friday and Saturday Nights 

9 P.M. to 2 A.M. 

Shufifleboard Games at Their Best 

728 North 13th Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Residence: CYpress 4-2389 
Business: CYpress 3-2577 

ENGLES, BROWN & 
BROWN 

Wholesale Meats 

Purveyors of Meats to Hotels, 

Restaurants and Other Eating 

Places 

455 Kb YES Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Phone CYpress 3-1719 

J. C. BATEMAN, 
Inc. 



CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

PAVING - GRADING AND 

HAULING 

EQUIPMENT RENTAL 

CRANE SERVICE 

Member Associated General 
Contractors of America 



650 STOCKTON Avenue 
SAN JOSE, CALIF. 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April. 1954 



E. J. WALLACE < Realtor 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 



Bus.: CYpress 4-1303 Re 

408 West Santa Cla 
SAN JOSE 



CYpress 5-2840 
Street 

CALIFORNIA 



— You Are What You Eat — 

Heide's Natural Food Stores 

Russ Heide 

260 South Second - CYpress 5-9388 
63 North First Street - CYpress 2-7292 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

LES JOSEPH'S GARAGE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 



IS South Eighth Street 

SAN JOSE 



WILLIAMS SIGNAL SERVICE 

Lubrication, Washing and Accessories 
Lock and Key Service 

698 East Santa Clara Street 

SAN JOSE 



VINCE GROCERY 



SOO North 17th Str 

SAN JOSE 



CYpress 3-9677 

CALIFORNIA 



NICK SUTO RADIO 

AUTO RADIO SALES AND SERVICE 



Bus.; CYpress 7-1449 Res 

296 West Santa Cla 

SAN JOSE 13 



FRanklin 8-0210 
a Street 

CALIFORNIA 



RADCLIFFE TIRE SERVICE 

TIRE SPECIALISTS 
Sales :-: Service :-: Repairs 
The Largest and Most Complete in Coun 



BERYL ROBINSON 

RICHFIELD AGENT 

Richfield "Rust-Proof" Gasoline and Heating 

Oils - Stove Oil - Diesel - Motor Oils 



Grass Valley Furniture Company 

"WHERE YOUR FURNITURE DOLLAR 

GOES FARTHER" 

John E. Tremewan, Owner 



Central Concrete Supply Co. 



610 McKendrie 

SAN JOSE 1 1 



CYpress 3-6272 

CALIFORNIA 



Liberty Market 

Headquarters for Quality and 
Low Prices 

GROCERIES— 

—MEATS-— 

—VEGETABLES 

Doo Hoy Ping, Prop. 

Telephone 4-9219 

700 Lander Avenue 

TURLOCK, CALIFORNIA 



Having seen the California Highway 
Patrol gain recognition as the foremost 
state traffic enforcement organization in 
the United States, Cato now intends to 
"loaf and have some fun." 

A retirement dinner is being planned 
to be held in Governor's Hall, Sacra- 
mento on April 28. On May 13, the 
Chief and iVlrs. Louise Cato are embark- 
ing on a trip to the Hawaiian Islands. 

"We want to loaf and have some fun, 
so we're buying one-way tickets," the 
Chief declared. 



CHECK THOSE TABS 

Upon receipt of information that cur- 
rent registration renewals for the year 
1954 are practically complete, Commis- 
sioner B. R. Caldwell of the California 
Highway Patrol has announced that the 
patrol will immediately step up enforce- 
ment of those sections of the Vehicle 
Code relating to proper registration of 
motor vehicles. 

Motorists are reminded that the one 
red tab for 1954 is to be securely at- 
tached to the rear license plate. Under 
no circumstances is the front plate to be 
removed, though all drivers are requested 
to dispose of the 1953 license tab. 

Attention of all vehicle operators is 
also directed to the provision of the code 
which requires the registration certifi- 
cate to be displaj'ed in a manner that 
makes the name and address of the regis- 
tered owner plainly visible and legible 
from outside the vehicle. 



OUT OF NOWHERE 

The common remark after every traffic 
mishap is, "I didn't see the other car," 
or, if a pedestrian is involved, "He (or 
she) just appeared out of nowhere." It's 
easy to be taken unawares when you day- 
dream while driving, so always be doubly 
alert at the wheel, advises the California 
State Automobile Association. Vehicles 
and people don't just pop into existence 
in front of \ou unless your mind has 
been drifting out of time and space. 



KEEP WINDOW OPEN 

Even in cold weather, it pays to keep 
a window of your automobile open, says 
the California State Automobile Asso- 
ciation, which points out that good venti- 
lation at all times is the only assurance 
against dangerous carbon monoxide from 
exhaust fumes accumulating in your car. 
These fumes need not necessarily come 
from your own automobile ; they may be 
sucked into your ventilation system from 
other cars ahead of vou. 



WINNER LADDER CO. 

C. E. Sanders — M. E. Sanders 

Orchard, Household, ExteHor Ladders 

Repairing All Makes — Phone CYpress 4-0426 



EDDIE'S BAIT SHOP 

EDDIE YOSHIDA 

CYpress 3-9070 

631 ROSA AT 13TH STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

BOURDET FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Telephone CYpress 2-5515 

1119 EAST SANTA CLARA STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

JULES BOZZI - Jeweler 

JEWELRY GIFTS FOR EVERY OCCASION 
"It's Jules for Jewels" 

23 EAST SANTA CLARA STREET 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ROBERTS TYPEWRITER CO. 

"The Underwood Agency" 

Phone CYpress 2-4842 

156 WEST SAN FERNANDO 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

FIRST CALIFORNIA COMPANY 

BANK OF AMERICA BUILDING 

Phone CYpress 4-6684 
SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

Phone CYpress 4-6195 

HANDLY MACHINE REPAIR CO. 



DURA LITE LADDER CO. 

All-Weather Orchard Ladder, Oil Treated 

Mechanic or Household Ladder 

Wholesale or Retail 

1710 GRANT STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

CYpress 3-6388 

KAGEL'S of Willow Glen 

S. R. KACEL, Ov 



nd De 
1180 LINCOLN AVENUE 



CAUFORNIA 



Di Salvo Brothers Duco Shop 

Automobile Painting • Body & Fender Repaii 

Polishing & Waxing • Auto Tops 

Phone CYpress S-34S3 

500 VINE STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 



CYpress 5-9237 

SMITTY'S 

The Finest of Foods 
and Cocktails 

349 W. SAN CARLOS ST. 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



HOTEL 
WHITCOMB 




lu San Francisco 
The HOTEL WHITCOMB, over- 
looking the beautiful Civic Cen- 
ter, is central to shopping district, 
theaters and terminals ... in di- 
rect line with San Francisco's two 
great bridges and U. S. Route 101. 
Garage Within Building 

500 Rooms 

Phone UNderhill 1-9600 

KARL C. WEBER 

President and General Manager 



LET . . . 

BLUE 
SHIELD 

Shield you 

from 

medical bills 




California 

Physicians Service 

450 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 

SUtter 1-4633 




lOSEPW MASSAGLIA JR . Presid 



Hotel MIRAMAR and Bungalows 
SANTA MONICA. California 



Hotel SENATOR 
SACRAMENTO. Califo 



r/ie Cop.'o/ 1 P'emie/ Hotel— 400 't 
CHARLES W COLE, Manager 



Hotel EL RANCHO i Bungolc 
GALLUP. New Mexico 



Hotel RALEIGH 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



On Fomoi/t Ponnsy/von/o A»o - 500 'OOms 

lOEl e BAUGH, Manager 
World-famed Hotels 



^^^^^) 



50 NEW UNITS • SWIM POOL 

DINING ROOM • COCKTAIL LOUNGE • COFFEE SHOP 

SMORGASBORD 

TOWNE & COUNTRY JaJ<^ 

Al Pardini, Manager-Owner 

Phone 4-5111 
HIGHWAY 99 - 2 MILES NORTH OF FRESNO 

ROUTE 10 - BOX 561 FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

AND WHEN IN SANTA CRUZ . . 

Qlnlnmal Jinn 

specializing in BROILED STEAKS • PRIME RIBS 
SMORGASBORD DINNERS 

Don Stefani, Manager-Owner 



1602 OCEAN STREET 



Telephone 6030 



SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 



Stohl, Nels 

270 Claremonl Blvd. 
San Francisco 27, Cal. 



Sec. 34.66 P. L. & R. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Frinciico, C«K(. 
Permit No. 3172 



Retarn Postare Guaranteed 
4S5 Tenth Street, San Praneiaeo t 



ALL ROADS 
LEAD TO 



HOTEL 



HCUEROn 



PIGUEROA AT OLYMPIC 



cc««;ble to . 



of "eodrout Lei Aa- 
fort. .conom,_j«f ''""'^' ' 



•ooderW h„,,i. t™7. 




SHADOW BROOK 



ROMANCE 

IN 

DINING 



Make Your Reservations Now 
Phone Santa Cruz 6l40 

Capitola, California 



On the Blue Shores of Monterey 

Enter the Great Driftwood Doors and 

You're in the West Indies 

SAYBA in Capitola 

THERE'S DANCING EVERY NIGHT 
A World of Tropical Splendor • Excitingly Different 



SAN FRANCISCO EDITION 





WINGS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT 
"Sacramento Sheriff's Office Air Squadron' 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

HELP PREVENT 

FOREST FIRES 




/dememSer—Onh/ you can 

PREVENT POREST FIRES! 



Keep California 
GREEN AND GOLDEN 



'une, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pagf 1 



Featured in This Issue 

* 

PAGE 

Safety Dividends 3 

Air Squadron + 

Cox Adds Juvenile Division 5 

Policewomen Organize 6 

Civilian Deputies 7 

Pistol Pointing 8 

Traffic Deaths Drop '^ 

Expanding City 10 

Blackmore Serves Quarter Century 11 

Old Town — New Faces 12 

Foothill Cities 13 

That We Shall Never Forget ! 14 

Perserverance Pays 22 

Science Workshop 23 

Bonds for Jail 27 

Orchard City 29 

Mission City 30 

Second Chance 31 

Hunting Accidents 32 

Safer Cars 35 

Uniform Crime Reports 36 

Big Yellow Bus 39 

Summer Courses 42 

ID Bureau Advances 44 

McDonnell Raises Sights 45 

Juvenile Convention 47 

Still on Trail 4<? 

Two Million Toll 50 

The Fact Sheet 53 



fhe Edito* is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. Con 

iributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not possible, copy 
hould be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a "nom de plume," 
)Ut all articles must bear the name and address of the sender, which will be 
reatcd with the strictest confidence. The Editoi will also be pleased to consider 

jikoto^aphs of officers and of interesting events. Letters should be addressed to 

ihe Editor. 

I 



Directory 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KMA-438 

Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 2 :00 p.m., Hall of Justice 

Henry C. Maginn, President 315 Montgomery Street 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery Street 

Washington I. Kohnke 686 Sacramento Street 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Gaffey 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE George M. Healy 

Chief of Inspectors Jamu Engliih 

Director of Traffic _ Otto Meyer 

Dept. Sec'y. ...Captain Michael F. Fitzpatrick... Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Edward Donohue 635 Washington Street 

Southern A. G. Steffen Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Peter Conroy 1240 Valencia Street 

Northern Daniel McKlem 941 Ellis Street 

Richmond Edward Green 451 Sixth Avenue 

Ingleside J. J. Coughlin Balboa Park 

Taraval Phil Kiely 2348 Twenty-fourth Avenue 

Potrero Walter Ames 2300 Third Street 

Golden Gate Park Ted Terlau Stanyan opp. Waller 

Traffic Ralph E. Olstad Hall of Justice 

CiT^' Prison Lt. Walter Thompson Hall of Justice 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hal! of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel _ John Meehan Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipb Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Harry Nelson _.Hall of Justice 

Director of Juvenile Bureau 2475 Greenwich Street 

Dan Kiely 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information Lieut. Gborge Hippely Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools 

Traffic Control Insp. Thomas B. Tract 

Supervising Captain 

OF Districts John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Headquarters Dan Kielt Hall of Justice 

CiHNATOvvN Detail Lt. H. C. Atkinson Hall of Justice 

Range Master Pistol Range, Lake Merced 

Emil Dotil 



Wfven In Trouble Coll SUtteV 1-2020 

Wfl6Tl In Doubt Always At Your Service 



"then the dragon came./ 




Nobody tells a story like Daddy. The 
everyday woiid fades aivay as his words 
lead you into a new and shining land. 

And ivhat if the Dragon is a bit scary? 
You need only climb into Daddy's arms 
to be safe and secure again before it's 
time to sleep. 

To make those we love safe and secure 
is the vei'y core of homemaking. It is a 
privilege known only in a country such 
as ours, where men and women are 
free to work for it. 

And taking care of our own is also the 
way we best take care of our country. 
For the strength of America is simply 
the strength of one secure home 
touching that of another. 



Saving for security is easy! Read every word — now! 

If you've tried to save and failed, 
chances are it was because you didn't 
have a jilaii. Well, here's a savings sys- 
tem that really works — the Payroll 
Savings Plan for investing in U.S. 
Savings Bonds. This is all you do. Go 
to your company's pay office, choose 
the amount you want to save — a couple 
of dollars a payday, or as much as you 
wish. That money will be set aside for 
you before you even draw your pay. 



And automatically invested in Series 
"E" U.S. Savings Bonds which are 
turned over to you. 

If you can save only $3.75 a week on 
the Plan, in 9 years and 8 months you 
will have $2,137.30. 

United States Series "E" Savings 
Bonds earn interest at an average of 3 Vi 
per year, compounded semiannually, 
when held to maturity! And they can 



go on earning interest for as long as 19 
years and 8 months if you wish, giving 
you a return of 80'; on your original 
investment! 

Eight million working men and 
women are building their security with 
the Payroll Savings Plan. For your 
sake, and your family's, too, how about 
signing up today? If you are self- 
employed, ask your banker about the 
Bond-A-Month Plan. 



The U.S. Government does not pay for this advertisement. It is donated bu this publicatii 
cooperation with ttie Advertising Council and the Magazine Publishers of America. 




June. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3 



'Efficient Police 

Make a Land of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




^so PEACE OFFICERS' 




The Magazine 

Peace Officers 

Read 

(Trade Mark Copyright ) 



Vol. XXVII 



JUNE, 1954 



No. 2 



SAFETY DIVIDENDS 



Accident prevention programs paid ad- 
ditional dividends for 15 San Francisco 
truck fleets and 13 industrial or business 
firms, when they were presented \vinning 
awards in the Inter-Fleet and Intej- 
Plant safety contents, conducted by the 
local Chapter of the National Safety 
Council. 

The presentation took place at a lunch- 
eon held at the Marines Club before 
more than 150 representatives of winning 
or participating firms and school and pub- 
lic officials. Safety Council awards also 
were presented to 13 San Francisco 
schools for "outstanding ' scliool shop 
safety records. 

Public service awards for "exceptional 
service to safety" were presented by Iver 
C. Larson, Safety Council manager, to 
Radio Station KYA and to the Dwight- 
Edwards Company. KYA's popular 
"Car-Tunes" program, broadcast daily 
from the Bay Bridge plaza by Bert 
Winn, brought that station the coveted 
award for the second successive year. Tlie 
Dwight-Edwards Compan>' recei\ed the 
award in recognition of thcr 80-station 
safety contest which produced the win- 
ning slogan: "If you care to keep driving 
keep driving with care." 

Fleet contest division winners received 
their awards from Paul J. Fanning, di- 
rector, Bureau of Personnel and Safety, 
San Francisco Public L^tilities Commis- 
sion. Dr. O. D. Adams, assistant super- 
intendent of schools, presented the shop 
safety awards to the principals or repre- 
sentatives of the winning schools. L. Jack 
Block, director of the Safet>' Council pre- 
sented awards to the winners in the in- 
dustrial contest. 

Northern California "Drivers of the 
Month:" Andrew Brunner, General Pe- 
troleum Company ; David E. Smith, Mu- 
nicipal Railway ; Herman L. Cologne, 



Municipal Railway, received awards for 
"exceptional safety services above and be- 
yond the call of duty." These awards 
were presented by Miss Yvonne Martin, 
the Green Cross Lady- 
Firms winning their divisional compe- 
tition in the 44-company Inter-Fleet 
Contest were : Foster Lunch System, bak- 
eries ; San Francisco Brewing Company, 
bottling and beverages; Planter's Nut & 
Chocolate Company, foods; Market 
Street Van & Storage Company, city 
trucking; J. H. Wiley, The Furniture 
Man, department and retail store de- 
livery ; Le Grande Laundry Company, 
laundry and cleaning (large fleet) — 
Thomas- Allec Cleaners and Dyers (small 
fleet) ; Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel 
Corporation, Shipbuilding Div. (large 
fleet) — Fleishhacker Paper Box Com- 
pany (small fleet) ; Union Oil Company, 
petroleum; Safeway Stores, Inc., inter- 
city trucking; The Pacifiic Telephone ^' 
Telegraph Company, public utilities; and 
also for the passenger car division, ( large 
fleet) ; Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel 
Corporation, Shipbuilding Div., passen- 
ger cars (small fleet) ; and The Gray 
Line, Inc., public passenger carriers. "No- 
accident" honors were won by St. Francis 
Pie Shop and Mnie. Ferran, Mme. Ple- 
gat & Company — placed second in their 
di\isions on a mileage traveled basis. 

W'inning industrial firms in the 61- 
company Inter-Plant Contest were: 
Mullen Manufacturing Co., construc- 
tion ; Schenley Industries, Inc., Wine 
Div., beverages; E. I. du Pont de Ne- 
mours & Co., Inc., chemical & mineral 
prodticts; Eraser & Johnston Co., heat- 
ing, plumbing and air conditioner con- 
tractors; St. Francis Pie Shop, foods; 
California Press Manufacturing Co., 
heavy dntv machinery and equipment ; 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.-Morck Brush 



Div., textiles; H. R. Basford Co., elec- 
trical equipment; Kortick Manufactur- 
ing Co., metal products; Schmidt Litho- 
graph Co., paper products and printing; 
J. H. \Viley, The Furniture Man, retail 
stores ; and The Pacific Telephone & 
Telegraph Co., public utilities and the 
office personnel section of that division. 



PEDESTRIAN RIGHT-OF-WAY 

Violation of the pedestrian right-of- 
way in crosswalks or at signalized inter- 
sections here, caused the deaths of seven 
pedestrians and injured nearly 300 others 
Lip to May 1, the San Francisco Chapter 
of the National Safet\- Council reported 
today. 

Iver C. Larson, executive vice presi- 
dent of the Chapter, charged that "lack 
of knowledge on the part of motorists 
about the pedestrian right-of-way law 
seems to be a leading factor in the high 
accident rate due to this violation." 

Larson warned drivers to observe the 
following State traffic laws to avoid a 
serious right-of-way accident involving a 
pedestrian : 

1. The driver of a vehicle must yield 
the right-of-way to a pedestrian crossing 
the street or highway within any marked 
or unmarked crosswalk at an intersection, 
except where the traffic movement is 
being regulated by an officer or by traffic 
control signals. And at all times the mot- 
orist must exercise proper caution for 
safety of the pedestrian. 

2. In turning a corner at an intersec- 
tion controlled by traffic signals the driver 
must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians 
crossing with the green light. 

An\ dri\er who fails to observe the 
abo\e regulations and fatally injures a 
pedestrian may face a manslaughter 
charge in addition to a costly law suit, 
Larson pointed out. 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 



AIR SQUADRON 



Not only does Sheriff Don Cox have 
at his disposal his full contingent of paid 
deputies and his colorful and well-known 
mounted posse, but he also has one of the 
west's most active air squadrons. 

Boasting a membership of 48 fliers, 30 
of whom own their own airplanes, the 
squadron was created about 14 years ago. 



The Sacramento squadron is one of the 
most active members of the Western 
States Association of Sheriffs Air Squad- 
rons, which includes between 30 and 40 
fling groups in California and other units 
in Nevada, Arizona and Oregon. 

The purposes of the organization are 
to have readv a volunteer flving force 



is in accordance with an agreement be- 
tween the members and the command. 

All of the airplanes in the Sacramento 
squadron are equipped with two way ra- 
dios. Some even have ship to ship com- 
munication facilities. The smallest planes 
are two passenger models. The larger 
carry five and six passengers. 




SACRAMENTO SHERIFF'S OFFICE AIR SQUADRON 



The late Tex Rankin, one of the nation's 
foremost stunt fliers, was the inspirational 
spark which led to the creation of the 
Sacramento County Sheriffs Aero Squad- 
ron. He was a member of the Los An- 
geles County Sheriffs Aero Squadron. 

Since its creation the Sacramento unit 
has been instrumental in the organization 
of sister squadrons in San Francisco, 
Monterey and Butte Counties. It also as- 
sisted the Fresno squadron in organizing 
the California Association of Sheriffs 
Squadrons. 



which can be used in national or local 
disasters ; to search for downed or lost 
aircraft or for persons who are lost or in 
distress in desert or mountain areas ; to 
assist in policing the air under the state 
air navigation act ; to cooperate with the 
federal authorities in the enforcement of 
safety regulations and to foster and pro- 
mote civilian aeronautics. 

In an emergency, the aircraft belong- 
ing to the members can be taken over for 
use by the Air Defense Command. This 



An annual function of the group is a 
goodwill flight in which the Sacramento 
Chamber of Commerce Aviation Com- 
mittee participates. This flight includes 
stops in various cities, both within the 
limits of California and in neighboring 
states. 

The activities of the squadron were 
disrupted only once. That was during 
World War II when nearly all of the 
unit's members were enlisted in wartime 
flying activities. 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



COX ADDS JUVENILE DIVISION 



A significant step forward in the battle 
against juvenile deliquency in Sacramen- 
to County was taken by Sheriff Don Cox 
when he named Lieutenant Robert 
Thomas and Deputy Herbert M. Ander- 
son as full time juvenile officers. 

This action, taken last October, marks 
the first time the Sacramento County 
Sheriff's Office has officers whose sole re- 
sponsibilities lay in the field of juvenile 
crime. 

Thomas, who has been with the sher- 
iff's office six years, formerly was with 
the identification department. Anderson, 
a patrolman prior to assuming his new 
duties, has been with the office about 
three and a half years. 

Both handled some juvenile cases be- 
fore taking over their new assignment 
but their experience naturally was lim- 
ited. This seeming lack of experience, 
however, is belied by the record they 
have amassed in the short six months 
since the formation of the juvenile de- 
partment. 

Thomas and Anderson have been re- 
sponsible for more than 100 arrests in 
the course of clearing over 300 cases re- 
ported to the sheriff's office. This in- 
cludes not only juvenile crimes but 
crimes committed against juveniles by 
adults. 

The department, new as it is, has prov- 
en itself as valuable to the sheriff's office 
as two way radios. 

One reason Thomas and Anderson 
have keen insight into the workings of 
juvenile minds may lie in the fact both 
are fathers, though their children are a 
bit young to be considered juveniles; 
Thomas' son is 14 months old and An- 
derson has two children, a son, 25^2, and 
a daughter, 1. 



The board of supervisors authorized 
the formation of the juvenile division af- 
ter Don Cox convinced them such a unit 
was sorely needed to cope with delin- 
quency in the county. 

Cox pointed out the county's growth in 
population was not limited to adults. 
Juveniles were assuming an ever increas- 
ing importance in crime and specialized 
men were needed to keep check on young- 
sters who otherwise might escape detec- 
tion for years until they committed a 
major crime. 



G. A. KAMINSKY DIES 

George A. Kaminsky, Sr., a well- 
known Sacramento police officer and 
brother of former Chief Fritz Kaminsky, 
died recently. 

He was 61 and had been ill for about 
two years. He was appointed to the Sac- 
ramento force January 18, 1923, and re- 
tired March 26, 1947. 

Most of his police service was on the 
narcotics detail in the detective bureau 
and and a patrolman in the tough West 
End of town. As a young man Kaminsky 
played semi professional baseball in the 
old Sacramento Valley League and after 
joining the department he was an in- 
fielder on the police team for 20 years. 

His son, George A., Jr., is a member 
of the police department. 

AVOIDS WEAR 

Some motorists may scoff at the neces- 
sity for frequent oil changes, points out 
the National Automobile Club, but it is 
a case of he who laughs first pays finally. 
The only preventive of worn cylinder 
walls is a lubricant with good body. 



EMERGENCY POLICE 

Approximately 150 men are registered 
for emergency police service in Sacra- 
mento. 

They are members of the auxiliary 
police unit of the Sacramento Civil De- 
fense and Disaster Corps. Nearly 50 men 
have received certificates for completion 
of a training program and the balance are 
in different stages of training. 

Police Captain Walter F. Sked is in 
charge of the trainees. He is assisted by 
the regular instructors at the police aca- 
demy and by outside authorities on radio- 
logical defense, highway patrol service, 
criminal identification and allied subjects 

SCISSORS TREATMENT 

Butch haircuts recently became vogue 
in the juvenile hall in Sacramento. 

Four youths wearing long, socalled 
ducktail hairdos underwent the scissors 
treatment at the order of Police Chief 
James V. Hicks. 

The chief labeled the pachuco hair 
style a trade mark of the hoodlum ele- 
ment and ordered that delinquents having 
their hair cut in that fashion would be 
subject to a free clipping. 

He pointed out his order had a two- 
fold purpose. First it was a health and 
safety measure. Secondly, Hicks said he 
hoped it would do away with the prac- 
tice of groups in adopting hairdos as a 
badge or mark. 

"We find that more and more of the 
youths we pick up as delinquents wear 
their hair in this style," he noted. 

The first youth who received a quick 
trim was arrested in connection with an 
attack on another boy. The three other 
boys were taken into custody for their 
part in the abduction of a 13-year-old 
girl. 





SCISSORS TREATMENT BEFORE 



^'^se 6 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

POLICEWOMEN ORGANIZE 



June, 1954 



The first all women's chapter of 
Lambda Alpha Epsilon, national law en- 
forcement fraternity, ever formed in 
Northern California was organized re- 
cently in Sacramento. 

Sixteen women associated with various 
law enforcement agencies were sworn in 



Gulick, Margaret T. Mentink, Gertrude 
Frances Patterson, Vera Louise Patter- 
son, Betty Jane Perry, Rogune K. Ryan 
and Marian Wagner. 

T. P. Hunter of the CII, who is sec- 
retary-treasurer of the Grand Chapter of 
Lamh.la Alpha Epsilon, was the speaker 



CALIFORNIA LEADS 

California led all other states in the 
number of fishing licenses issued last year 
and in the fees paid by anglers, accord- 
ing to figures reported by the California 
State Automobile Association. 




(From left to right) MRS. GERTRUDE PATTERSON, EDWINA HELZER, TRULY KNOX SHUEY AND MARY MILLS. 



as members during a ceremony which fol- 
lowed a dinner in Danisio's Restaurant. 
The officers of the new chapter are: 
Edwina Helzer of the state bureau of 
criminal identification and investigation, 
president; Gertrude Patterson of the Sac- 
ramento Count\' Sheriff's Office, vice 
president ; Truly Knox Shuey of the San 
Francisco District Attorney's Office, sec- 
retary-treasurer, and Mary Mills of the 
Sacramento County Sheriff's Office, ser- 
geant at arms. 

Other members include: Virginia M. 
Allbert, Gretchen Elizabeth Barbeiro, 
Nancylee Bland, Lena Bannucci, Lor- 
raine June Gorman, Mildred Lucille 



at the meeting. Anson H. Crutcher, dep- 
uty to Board of Equalization member 
Paul Leake and president of the Grand 
Chapter, also took part. Crutcher is a 
former chief of the State Police. 

The new unit is known as Theta 
Chapter and is the eighth of the Lambda 
Alpha Epsilon Fraternities. Other chap- 
ters are in Oakland, San Jose, the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley and Los 
Angeles, San Francisco and Muncie, In- 
diana. 

1 o qualify for admission, applicants 
must be students of criminology, regular 
police officers with police science training 
or instructors in police science. 



The total number of fishing licenses 
issued by all the states in 1954 was 17,- 
652,478; the total for California was 
1,158,465, of which 15,428 were issued 
to non-residents. 

Only two other states came near this 
mark— Michigan, with 1,146,387, and 
Wisconsin, with 1,011,813. 

For their licenses in this state, Califor- 
nians and visitors paid $3,476,705, near- 
ly a tenth of the total of $35,602,903 in 
anglers' fees collected by all 48 states. 

Minnesota was second in fishing li- 
cense fees with a total of $2,283,216 and 
Michigan was third with $2,218,908. 



June. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



CIVILIAN DEPUTIES 



Sheriff Don Cox's policy of keeping 
his office prepared to meet any emergency 
is typified in the Sheriff's Reserve, an or- 
ganization set up to train civilians in law 
enforcement work. 

Fifty-three certificates recently were 
presented to men who had successfully 
completed a 72-hour course of training 
under the direction of Lieutenant Robert 
Thomas of the sheriff's office. 

This training, which covered such 
fields as rules of evidence, the penal code, 
laws of arrest, patrol duties and collection 
of identification for preservation as evi- 
dence, was designed to give those taking 
the course a complete background in all 
phases of law enforcement so they would 
be ready in the event of an emergency. 

Businessmen, lawyers, laborers, school 
teachers, salesmen and doctors were in- 
cluded among those who received certif- 
icates at the end of the course. 

The program was the second to be 
given by the sheriff's office; the first was 
in 1951". 



RAUSCHERT NOW DDA 

Robert R. Rauschert, a longtime mem- 
ber of the Sacramento Police Depart- 
ment, has taken up a new job and a new- 
career as a lawyer. 

A member of the department for 14 
years, Rauschert recently took a leave of 
absence and joined the criminal division 
of District Attorney J. Francis O'Shea's 
office as a deputy. 

During most of his police career Raus- 
chert was a detecti\e. He handled the 
major crime and other details and two 
years ago was assigned as liaison man 
between the police department and the 
district attorney's office replacing Otis 
Feil who was promoted to a sergeantcy. 

In his spare time Rauschert studied 
law at McGeorge College of Law in Sac- 
ramento and was admitted to practice last 
July. 

The City Civil Service Board, inci- 
dentally, paid a high compliment to Raus- 
chert in granting him a year's leave. 
Granting a man a leave to take another 



job is almost unheard of. But Rauschert 
had the strong backing of Chief of Police 
James V. Hicks, who pointed out to the 
board Rauschert would be gaining in- 
valuable experience which would help 
him considerably if he decides to return 
to police work. 



MONSON HEADS DEPUTIES 

Monrad Monson, a veteran member of 
Sheriff Don Cox's staff, is the new presi- 
dent of the Sacramento County Deputy 
Sheriffs Association. 

He was elected recently to succeed Ed- 
ward Bristo. 

Other officers are: David Mason, vice 
president ; Harold Guerin, secretary- 
treasurer; Ray Lagomarsino, sergeant at 
arms. The members of the board of di- 
rectors are: William DeLaMater, Lago- 
marsino, Leighton L. Littlejohn, Tom 
Howard Ray Peppers, Eugene Lant and 
Herbert Anderson. 




SHERIFF COX HANDS CERTIFICATE TO H. E. TIPTON, CAP IAIN OF RESERVES. 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 



PISTOL POINTING 



THE SAN FRANCISCO 
MATCHES 

The opening matches for 1954 at the 
S. F. Police range on Sunday started off 
with a hoop-de-doodle record crowd of 
195 shooters which gave the range per- 
sonnel a real workout and made the 
shooters quite late in getting home to 



By Ross DUNNIGAN 

do too well but he had a lot of fun. And 
while speaking of Phil I must say that 
last year he established a new world's 
NRA record for the 30-06 big bore rifle 
at 600 yards and the record still stands. 
As for me I could never get in that 
match as it's about all I can do to see 
the target at 50 yards, let alone 600 of 
'em! ! 



And wonders will never cease. The 
Oakland Police Department finally 
broke down and actually detailed their 
team to the matches and the boys were 
so shocked over the gesture they fell 
apart and finished seventh in the team 
matches. 

The bulletin board was literally cov- 
ered with "for sale" signs and one even 




mother and the family. The day was 
just made for shooting and the gang 
was really on the ball all day long. And 
where did that gang of new shooters come 
from??? Holy smoke, there were around 
40 of 'em and from all the states west 
from Washington to Montana. One of 
the boys was Phil Judd from Butte, 
Montana who dropped in after being 
away for about three years. Y'sec, Phil 
is in the sporting goods sales business 
and has been trying to synchronize his 
western trips with some of the matches 
out this way and this was the first time 
he made connections. Phil sez he didn't 



BOB CHOW— CHAMPION 

It's really fiuiny to watch how a 
group of shooters grow, then fade and 
grow again and finally round out into a 
real club of shooters. To take a horrible 
example let's look at the bunch from 
Sacramento headed by Les Narvaze. For 
years they have had a doctor on their 
staff and a dentist so last week they 
blossomed out with an attorney to get 
them out of scrapes, no doubt, and 
were smiling all over the joint that they 
had a swell club. A shooting club should 
do just that — shoot! Now if they are 
real smart they will get an instructor to 
teach 'em. 



included a dog. Yes, sir, a dog but for 
why is one of those questions that go tui- 
answered. 

The Hurlingame Police force is doing 
their darndest to get themselves a pistol 
range so last month Sgt. Sheehan and Al 
Lena promoted a dance to raise funds 
for their venture. The affair was held at 
Bob's on the highway with over 300 in 
attendance and about a thousand dollars 
worth of tickets sold — and that there is 
quite some frog-skin.s. By the way, Al 

(Cnntinurd nn page 16) 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



TRAFFIC DEATHS DROP 



Traffic Captain Patrick J. Bennett 
points with pride to reductions in the 
death, injury and accidents rates in Sac- 
ramento during 1953. 

There were 15 deaths, a decrease of 21 
per cent over the previous year ; 1 ,48 1 
injuries, a decrease of 5.5 per cent, and 
4,776 accidents, a reduction of 10 per 
cent. 



four years has been good, especially in the 
fields of traffic enforcement and accident 
records. 

"National Safety Council recognition 
has proven this fact. Sacramento's Safety 
record for the year 1953 is more out- 
standing than in previous years. This is 
the first time in nine years that through 
increased safety eefforts the property 



if not all, of the fast breeding creatures. 
There were so many of them that they 
endangered light aircraft during takeofis 
and landings. 

It was about 8 o'clock on a cloudy 
March morning when Hicks and 30 of 
his men lined up at one end of the air- 
field and started their march to the other 
side. Shotguns blasted and one by one 




SCRAMBLE PEDESTRIAN CROSSINGS WERE INTRODUCED TO CALIFORNIANS IN SACRAMENTO 



He noted there are approximately 90,- 
000 automobiles registered within the city 
limits. This is approximately one car to 
every 1.6 persons, a higher registration 
rate per capita than in any other city in 
the country. 

Commented Bennett: 

"These figures, I believe, will indicate 
that Sacramento is doing a splendid job. 
The city's traffic safety record in the past 



damage, injury and fatal accidents ha\c 
been decreased." 

In true dragnet fashion, the Sacra- 
mento police, led by Chief James V. 
Hicks, opened war on the municipal air- 
port's jackrabbit population awhile back 
and did away with more than 200 of the 
long eared animals. 

The purpose of Operation Jackrabbit 
was to clear the airport runways of most, 



jackrabbits toppled head over heels in the 
tall grass at the sides of the runways. 

There was an air of merriment among 
the officers, clad in old hunting clothes, 
but they were deadly serious in the bull- 
eye department. Very few rabbits which 
got in range of the sharpshooters got 
awa\'. 

(Continued on page 58) 



Fage JO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

EXPANDING CITY 



June, 1954 



The thriving City of Sunnyvale is a 
city of homes, gardens and factories. It 
is also a city of active civic leaders and 
community boosters, whose efforts are in 
no small measure responsible for Sunny- 
vale's remarkable growth. 

It is a city of enthusiastic, energetic 
personalities, the full listing of which is 
impossible in the space of one article. 



ing as secretary of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and holding office in many clubs 
and associations. 

"I might as well keep going as long 
as I can," is her philosophy. 

Another of the more prominent per- 
sons in Sunnyvale is Henry W. Lloyd, 
plant manager at Bowser, Inc., manu- 
facturer of gasoline pumps. 



Sunnyvale will soon have a new medi- 
cal center through efforts of Dr. How- 
ard G. Diesner, who has practiced medi- 
cine in Sunnyvale about 20 years. He re- 
ceived his doctor of medicine degree 
from the University of Illinois and went 
to Southern Pacific Hospital in San 
Francisco for his internship. 




SUNNVV.XLE PUBLIC SAFETY HEADQUARTERS 



Those personalities, selected at ran- 
dom by a wandering reporter, leaders as 
Mrs. Edwina Benner, who makes her 
home at 321 Frances St. She holds the 
distinction of being the first woman 
Mayor in the State of California. She 
held that office in Sunnyvale twice in 
1^24 and again in 1938. She came 
here in 1907 and became office manager 
for Libbv McNeill & Libbv canncr\ iji 
1920, holding that job until 1940. ' 

She is now semi-retired after holding 
various public offices, heading the local 
OPA office during World ^Var II, serv- 



Lloyd, a native of Los Angeles, came 
to Sunnyvale about seven years ago. He 
lives at 530 Yosemite Ave., Moimtain 
View, with his wife, teen-age daughter, 
and two dachshunds. 

In additioti to his job as plant mana- 
ger, he is West Coast controller for his 
firm. Lloyd is a member of the executive 
board of the Santa Clara Comity Coun- 
cil, Boy Scouts of America, Sunnyvale 
district chairman for the Scouts. 

He is also past president and a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the 
Chamber of Comnierce and past presi- 
dent of the Sunnyvale Rotarv Club. 



He was a resident physcian at Santa 
Clara County Hospital for two more 
years before coming here. He built the 
present medical center at 352 S. Murphy 
A\e. in 1947, but it has now been out- 
grown. Bids will be opened in about two 
weeks on a new medical center, to ac- 
commodate six doctors when completed 
and 12 doctors eventually. It will be lo- 
cated at Carroll St. and Old San Fran- 
cisco Highway. 

Dr. Diesner is another past president 
of the SiMiny\'ale Rotary Club, has been 

(C.onlinuid on paijf 25) 



June. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Blackmore Serves Quarter Century 



As of today the San Jose Police De- 
partment is made up of 133 men and 
women under the general supervision of 
Chief J. Raymond Blackmore who re- 
cently wound up his 25th year as a mem- 
ber of the force. 

From Blackmore 's general command, 
the authority necessary for efficient op- 




Chief Blackmore 

eration descends in a manner patterned 
closely after the military. 

Assistant Chief Joel Carter, serving 
his 28th year with the department, acts 
as chief in the absence of Blackmore. At 
other times, he is charged with responsi- 
bility of keeping books pertaining to pris- 
oners' personal property and bail, sched- 
uling court appearances of arrested per- 
sons, and seeing that they get to court 
according to these schedules. He also 
maintains work schedules for men who 
patrol the city's beats. 

In these duties and a host of others. 
Carter is assisted by Donald DeMers, 
the department's inspector of operations, 
who is specifically charged with overall 
training in the organization, maintaining 
police manual, and general disciplinary 
matters. 

The detective bureau, which follows 
up investigation of criminal matters, is 
directed by Chief of Detectives Barton 
L. Collins. Also under his direction is 
the juvenile department which takes 
cases involving minors. Only a small 
number of cases processed each month 
by this unit are of a criminal nature and 
the greater part of these are settled with- 
out court action. 



Capt. Melvin Hornbeck heads traffic 
law enforcement and accident investiga- 
tion. Hornbeck's efforts can be best de- 
scribed as an unending effort to keep 
death off San Jose's streets. 

In the Bureau of Identification, Ken- 
neth Jordan superintends operations. He 
has an assistant, Peter DeLuca, and five 
identification officers, all women. Ihis 
department is responsible for photo- 
graphing and fingerprinting all persons 
arrested. Fingerprints must be classified 
and filed for future reference and made 
available for other police agencies 
throughout the nation. 

Capt. Arthur Philpot is the city's traf- 
fic analyst. His department collects facts 
concerning traffic movement and studies 
how to keep it moving swiftly and safely 
through the streets. 

Ne.\t there is Sgt. Edward Pracna, 
who supervises the activities of 200 vol- 
unteers who make up the au\iliar> 
police. 

Capt. Thomas Short, a veteran of 34 
years in the department, is in charge of 
the desk and street sergeants and 91 uni- 
formed patrolmen. His hours of duty are 
in the late afternoon and night when pa- 
trol activity is of the greatest importance. 

In San Jose 25 men take shifts to 
roam the streets in automobiles and on 
two- and three-wheeled motorcycles. 
Sometimes these gents make you very un- 
happy indeed but they strictly enforce 
traffic laws to an important end — that of 
keeping you alive. 

San Jose's traffic police are under the 
direction of Capt. Melvin Hornbeck 
who has three sergeants, Joseph S. Az- 
zarello, Ernest Anderson and Seymour 
Wakeman. 

Azzarello is in charge of the patrol 
work while Anderson's and AVakeman's 
duties are confined largely to follow-up 
investigations. The latter two try to de- 
termine whether illegal acts have been 
contributing factors in accidents, or they 
compile evidence for prosecution if it 
must be obtained. 

Six patrolmen work in radio cars. 
They investigate accidents and make re- 
ports immediately after the crashes oc- 
cur. 

It's unlikely wives can keep their hus- 
bands from finding out how they got 
that banged-up fender because there will 
be a couple of those lads at the scene 
of the accident before the dust settles. 
Invariably, they will just ask for the 
facts, ma'am, just the facts — including 
age. 



The men who may ask those questions 
ill a quiet way are Fred Hoffman, Louis 
Haller, John IVIattern, Floyd Kuehnis, 
Charles Cardona and Nal North. 

Those who may bring sadness to your 
heart by putting expensive numbers on a 
slip of paper to take to the judge after 
you have been slipping along about 50 




Barton Collins 
Chief of Detectives 

miles an hour in a 25-mile zone or dash- 
ing merrily through a red light or a stop 
sign may be William Maddox or Wil- 
liam Campbell, Robert Sims, Ernest Ba- 
rozzi, Roy Gerringer, Mario Stefanini, 
Joseph B. Vittoe, Thomas O'Connell, 
Olin Bowden, Dwight Salisbury, Ed- 
ward Amaral, ^Valter Emory, Gilbert 
Cardoza, Thomas Kinney, Keith Mel- 
ton, Ray Gray or Merlin Wheatley. 

Some of these lads spend a good bit 
of their time riding around the village 
on three-wheeled motorcycles slapping 
\ellow tags on cars which have been 
parked longer than the meter says they 
should or longer than you thought they 
HAD been. 

But, all in all, ticket or no ticket, the 
traffic boys are just trying to keep you 
alive and \vt\\ and they are doing a good 
job. 



OVERINFLATE 

Is it better to overinflate or underin- 
flatc automobile tires? All engineers ac- 
cording to the National Automobile 
Club, are emphatic on the point: over- 
inflation is much to be preferred. 



f'^'t' ^2 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

OLD TOWN -NEW FACES 



June, 1954 



MOUNTAIN VIEW — Selecting 
persons typifying the community and 
civic leadership of Mountain View is 
like dropping 100 or 200 names in a hat 
and then drawing a few of them. 

Mountain View is an old community 
but it has grown so fast a majority of 
its citizens are now relative newcomers. 
Its two school superintendents, Kenneth 
N. Slater for the elementary schools and 



Elementary and High Schools and from 
San Jose Normal School, as San Jose 
State College was then called. 

He has always been active in commu- 
nity affairs, serving on fund raising com- 
mittees such as Community Chest and 
taking part in Chamber of Commerce 
work. His responsibility as head of the 
city's elementary school system has ex- 
panded tremendously since World War 



Escuela Ave., and Escuela is the Spanish 
word for school. 

Over a year ago another school was 
built and this time his self-effacing ef- 
forts to prevent his name from being 
attached to the school were overruled by 
sentiment of trustees, teachers and citi- 
zens. Kenneth N. Slater School is now a 
reality. 

Mrs. Lawrence Armanini is relatively 




Charles Crooke for the High School, 
have been fixtures in the community for 
many years. 

Slater has the longer term of service, 
however, and he was born in Mountain 
View. He has been head of the elemen- 
tary schools for more than 35 years. He 
was graduated from Mountain View 



MOUNTAIN VIEW POLICE DEPARTMENT 

II, of course, and he has furnished the 
leadership which has won public support 
for bond issues to finance necessary 
school expansion. 

Some years ago he succeeded in 
thwarting a move to have one of the dis- 
trict's new schools named for him. It is 
still called Escuela School because it is on 



a Mountain View old timer, having lived 
in the city 23 years, but her activity in 
civic affairs, in raising a family of four 
daughters and in helping her husband 
operate the Armanini Drug Store belie 
any inference that may be attached to 
the term "old timer." 

(Continued on page 26) 



« .h^ru; 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



FOOTHILL CITIES 



Los Gatos, nestled in the foothills of 
tilt- ^^'est Valley, is home to many people 
whu have had interesting careers, mili- 
tai\ experiences and business promi- 
nence. Here are but a few of the people 
w ho are well-acquainted with the town 
because they come in daily contact with 
its inhabitants. 

E\eryone knows Ed Soderberg, the 

>eLretary-manager of the Los Gatos 

Chamber of Commerce. Soderberg — 

mustached, friendly and "one of the 

I better-dressed men in Los Gatos" — is in 

i his second year at the iVIain St. chamber 

I office. He's got his wife on the job, too. 

! Mrs. Soderberg was hired as C of C 

receptionist in April. 

Mr. Secretary-Manager is a former 
newspaper reporter, editor and publisher. 
He came to Los Gatos in 1950 and his 
first role here was manager of the local 
theater. 

The Soderbergs live at 54 Mullen 
Ave. They have two married daughters 
and don't deny they're grandparents. 

Prentiss Brown doesn't work for the 
Chamber of Commerce but he says, after 
23 years in Los Gatos he wouldn't work 
anyplace else. Brown, in the field of edu- 
cation for 30 years, came to Los Gatos 
Union High School as principal and dis- 
trict superintendent and he's got the 
same job today. 

"This is a pleasant place to work — 
the young people come from fine homes 
and we receive splendid co-operation 
from parents," he says. 

Before coming to Los Gatos, Brown 
was superintendent in Baker, Ore. 

After receiving his bachelor of arts de- 
gree from University of Oregon, Brown 
came to Stanford University for gradu- 
ate work. That was during the depres- 
sion and he says when the Los Gatos 
high school job opened up he grabbed it 
— and he's not sorry. 

The superintendent has been instru- 
mental in the planning of high school ex- 
pansion. He and his wife live at 16730 
Magneson Loop. They have two daugh- 
ters, one a teacher in Stockton High 
School. 

Mrs. Martin Fremont of 443 No. 
Santa Cruz Ave. thinks a woman gets 
a feeling of accomplishment from par- 
ticipating in cure activities — a feeling 
that can never be attained washing dishes. 
The wife of a Los Gatos veterinarian 
and mother of two young children, Mrs. 
Fremont has found time to advise a 
Brownie troop, serve on the Los Gatos 
Advisory Committee for a new town 



park, and serve as secretary of the Los 
Gatos Council. 

In addition she has been active on the 
\'outh Centers' Finance Committee. A 
former resident of San Francisco, she has 
lived here six years and believes a small 
town can have many active groups be- 
cause it's easier to reach people and to 
enlist their co-operation. 

Keeping the Town of Los Gatos in 
good civic shape is the job of Karl Bald- 
win. Baldwin was appointed town man- 
ager by councilmen last May. 

The young public administrator came 
here from San Mateo where he was as- 
sistant city manager. 

During ^Vorld War II he served as 
a Navy lieutenant (jg) in the South 
Paciiic Area. He and his wife Eileen live 
at 148 New York Ave. 




Chief L. M. Phillips of Los Gatos 

Western-garbed Jeff England, 91, was 
an Indian scout for Bill Cody. He has 
lived a rustic life in the Santa Cruz 
mountains for five or six years. 

He was a member of the Dawson 
party who went to Alaska during the 
gold rush and founded the town of the 
same name. 

When England comes to town, he 
usually indulges in a bit of oyster stew 
at a local restaurant. 

Mrs. Carl Stephenson has one of the 
more unique first names. She was named 
Coquille after a river in Southern Ore- 
gon. 

"Coke" as her friends call her is the 
court clerk of the Los Gatos-Saratoga- 
Campbell judicial district, a job she's 
held for two and a half years. 



She and her husband and three chil- 
dren have lived in Los Gatos eight 
years. They reside at 18640 Maude Ave. 
Active in masonic organizations, Mrs. 
Stephenson is associate matron of Los 
Gatos Chapter of Eastern Star. 

Whether he's driving a police car or 
riding a police motorcycle. Officer Bill 
Griswold is a "friendly cop." 

Griswold joined the Los Gatos force 
in 1948. He attended police school in 
Santa Rita and was an M.P. in the 
Army during World War II. He and 
his wife, Joan, and one daughter live at 
16870 Fillmer Ave. 



SARATOGA 



Saratoga, a residential community 
bounded by orchards and subdivisions, is 
home to an estimated 2700 persons. Al- 
though unincorporated, the area has an 
expanded elementary school district, a 
newly reorganized chamber of commerce, 
and active community groups. 

A well-known Saratoga resident is 
Postmaster Lewellyn B. Peck. Peck ar- 
rived here in 1921 to publish the weekly 
Saratoga Star. A newspaperman of long 
standing, he had been on the staffs of 
several California dailies including the 
Fresno Republican and the San Fran- 
cisco Call. 

His wife is Mrs. Lida O'Bannon 
Peck, retired adult education teacher in 
San Jose, Los Gatos and San Mateo 
County Adult Centers. They have two 
sons and three grandchildren. 

Peck belongs to Saratoga Lions, Sara- 
toga Men's Club and the Federated 
church. He and Mrs. Peck live on Or- 
chard Road. 

A man who travels the West Valley 
every day and who makes his home in 
Saratoga is Judge Paul ^V. Crawford, 
head of the Los Gatos-Saratoga-Camp- 
bell Judicial District. 

Crawford started his law career as an 
attorney in Los Animas, Colo. After 
coming to Saratoga seven years ago, with 
his wife, Althea, Crawford was ap- 
pointed judge in Saratoga. Then in Jan- 
uary, 1953, when the judicial district 
was created by a constitutional amend- 
ment, he was elected to the post. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crawford live at 2800 
Wordell Road. 

Charles Hunter has been in the bank- 
ing profession for 14 years. In Saratoga, 
he manages the Bank of America, and 
has been manager of branch banks in 
Diiiuba and Los Gatos. Hunter came 
here in November, 1951. 

(Continued on page 21) 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 V. 



\ 



I'hat We Shal 


L Never Forget! 


ARGENS, ALBERT W. 

February 21, 1937. Shot by Eliot Ambrose. 


LYNCH, VINCENT P. 

August 30, 1941. Killed by automobile. 


BURKE, WILLIAM B. 

March 21, 1898. Shot by Thomas Haines. 


McCartney, edward t. 

September 3, 1907. Shot by John Tansey. 


BATES, CHARLES H. 

July 26, 1912. Shot by unknown assassin. 


Mcdonald, michael j. 

August 26, 1933. Shot by James Kirk. 


BAILEY, TIMOTHY 

August 3, 1922. Shot by Walter Castor. 


MALONEY, EDWARD 

April 19, 1915. Shot by bandits. 


BRADY, MICHAEL J. 

October 5, 1924. Shot by William Rhinehart. 


MORIARTY, JOHN J. 

May 26, 1919. Shot by V. Osakin. 


BROSNAN, CORNELIUS 

November 15, 1937. Killed by automobile. 


MALCOLM, JOHN 

April 29, 1930. Shot by bandits. 


COOTS, JOHN 

June 12, 1878. Killed by John Runk. 


MANNING, WILLIAM E. 

January 2, 1932. Shot by George Rankin. 


COOK, JAMES S. 

August 26, 1906. Shot by unknown assassin. 


MANN, JAMES H. 

February 26, 1934. Killed by James Jacobs. 


CASTOR, CHARLES P. 

November 26, 1911. Shot by P. Prantikos. 


NICHOLSON, JOHN 

February 16, 1884. Shot by unknown assassin. 


COOK, FREDERICK 

November 24, 1915. Shot by Harry Wilson. 


NOLTING, ANTONE 

January 9, 1909- Shot by Thomas Jordan. 


CONROY, JOSEPH 

November 3, 1923. Killed by automobile. 


NOLAN, JOHN J. 

March 19, 1912. Killed chasing thug. 


CAMPBELL, GEORGE 

April 9, 1925. Shot by George Sloper. 


OSGOOD, EDGAR 

December 13, 1886. Stabbed by unknown assassin. 


DEASY, THOMAS 

January 8, 1916. Shot by unknown assassin. 


OCONNELL, GEORGE 

November 16, 1906. Shot by John Burns. 


DORMAN, LESTER 

December 5, 1920. Shot by gangsters. 


OSHAUGHNESSY, WILLIAM 

June 10, 1908. Killed by C. Ritchie. 


DRISCOLL, JOHN J. 

June 28, 1927. Shot by bandits. 


ROBINSON, EUGENE 

January 20, 1903. Shot by thugs. 


FENNER, MAX 

April 18, 1906. Killed by falling building. 


ROOT, BENJAMIN G. 

April 1, 1926. Killed by unknown assassin. 


FINNELLY, THOMAS 

November 26, 1911. Shot by P. Prantikos. 


REARDON, MAEVYN A. 

June 19, 1932. Shot by Glen Johnson. 


FLAGLER, EDWARD F. 

February 8, 1927. Killed by hit-run driver. 


ROGERSON, CHARLES 

November 23, 1930. Killed by automobile. 


GRANT, ALEXANDER 

September 11, 1891. Shot by Samuel of Posen. 


RYAN, TIMOTHY 

February 1 1, 1943. Shot by maniac. 


HEINS, WILLIAM H. 

June 4, 1908. Shot by Young brothers. 


SAUER, HARRY L. 

May 7, 1907. Shot by unknown assassin. 


HAMMOND, PETER 

September 12, 1915. Shot by George Nelson. 


SHEEHAN, WILLIAM 

June 25, 1917. Shot by Thomas Sheehan. 


HURD, JOHN B. 

January 27, 1918. Killed by streetcar. 


SCHOEMBS, ANTONE 

November 19, 1919. Shot by bandits. 


HORTON, JAMES W. 

September 19, 1920. Shot by unknown assassin. 


SPOONCER, FREDERICK N. 

November 24, 1928. Killed by automobile. 


HANNA, THOMAS 

January 15, 1921. Shot by unknown assassin. 


SALISBURY, WALTER 

January 1, 1939. Shot by George Dally. 


JUDGE, MARTIN 

December 12, 1916. Killed by streetcar. 


THONEY, ELMER C. 

December 31, 1931. Killed by streetcar. 


JACKSON, MILES 

December 5, 1920. Shot by gangsters. 


WOOD, BYRON C. 

May 4, 1913. Shot by W. Thompson. 


JENTZSCH, WALDEMAR L. 

December 25, 1937. Killed chasing speeder. 


WALSH, THOMAS 

July 4, 1922. Shot by auto bandits. 


KELLY, THOMAS 

June 4, 1923. Shot by John Paris. 


WALTERS, ROBERT E. 

September 19, 1952. Shot by Boyd O. Van Winkel. 


KING, CHARLES W. 

June 7, 1931. Killed by automobile. 


BRADLEY, DENNIS 

October 7, 1953. Shot by Harold Miller. 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



OAK'S GARAGE 

24-Hour Towing Service 

REPAIRING . LUBRICATION • STORAGE 
GAS and OIL 

FI 2-0459 

322 WEST SECOND 

:HIC0 CALIFORNIA 



WILLARD MOTEL 



YOUR HOME AWAY FROM HOME 
HIGHWAY 99-E NORTH 



CALIFORNIA 



W. POLLAK STEEL SUPPLY 

Structural Steel • Pipe Fittings 
Valves • Cases • Machinery 

FI 2-439S 

23RD and PARK AVE. 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

STEP OUT OF TOWN TO THE 

CLUB SUNDOWN 

BROILED STEAKS . CHICKEN 

PRAWNS 

DANCING NIGHTLY 

FI 2-9775 

CHICO AVENUE 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

SERVICE PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION PHARMACISTS 
Quick Delivery 

2ND i 

MEDICAL PHARMACY 

FI 2-0191 

BROADWAY at 4TH 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 



BURKE'S MARKET 

FINE MEATS and GROCERIES 

FI 2-4786 

1538 PARK AVENUE 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

CHICO SPORTING GOODS 

FISHING TACKLE . GUNS . AMMUNITION 
HOBBIES 

Phone FI 2-0446 

343 BROADWAY 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

BURTON'S SHOE STORE 

SHOES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Phone FI 2-8665 

236 MAIN 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 



WATCH SPEED LIMITS 

California motorists planning to drive 
over freeways and turnpikes in the East- 
ern United States are cautioned by the 
National Automobile Club to observe all 
posted speed limits. 

The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commis- 
sion and other state bodies have recently 
made drastic reductions in these speed 
limits in various areas in a concerted 
effort to cut down on the large number of 
serious and fatal traffic accidents. 

Typical of the ways in which the au- 
thorities are cracking down on speeders 
is the practice on the new Turner Turn- 
pike between Oklahoma City and Tulsa 
of stamping the time on a driver's ticket 
when he enters and then checking it when 
he leaves. If, according to the time 
elapsed, he has driven this stretch faster 
than he should have, he is given a ticket 
for speeding. 

MAKE IT ROUTINE 

Car care, like brushing the teeth, 
reaches its zenith when it is made a 
routine proposition, points out the Na- 
tional Automobile Club. The efficient 
motorist is the one who has a regular 
schedule to which he rigidly adheres. In 
the matter of keeping the tires constant- 
ly at the right pressure, this system is an 
excellent one. Why not set aside a cer- 
tain day every week for this process ? 



YOU MAKE IT SAFE 

Your car is only as mechanically safe 
as you make it, points out the National 
Automobile Club. 

Approach all curves with caution, ad- 
vises the National Automobile Club. 



LET IT COOL 

Ten to fifteen minutes usually is re- 
garded as a sufficient interval to allow 
the engine to cool before adding water if 
the radiator content has become unduly 
low causing the motor to become over- 
heated, reports the National Automobile 
Club. 



O. D. SIMMONS 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE - LOANS 

See Us 

BUY - BURN - BORROW 



118 MAIN STREET 



CALIFORNIA 



Chico Paint and Wallpaper Co. 

FI. 2-S062 
229 W. SECOND STREET 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 



SPRING'S RADIATOR SERVICE 

SPECIALISTS IN CLEANING AND 
REPAIRING RADIATORS 

815 W. FIFTH STREET 
HICO CALIFORNIA 

LEE PHARMACY 

Prescriptions 



FI. 2-0114 
247 BRODWAY 



CALIFORNIA 



PARK MOTEL 

W. 4TH and MAIN STREETS 

FI 2-8386 

CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



RODARMEL PLUMBING 

STEAM, HOT WATER. RADIANT HEATING 

Domestic and Industrial Plumbing Repairs 

FI 2-7551 

298 E. FIRST STREET 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 



LASSEN PUMP AND MOTOR 
WORKS 

WELL DRILLING and PUMPS 

W. 8TH and CHERRY 

FI 2-1801 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

CHICO PLUMBING 

& SUPPLIES 

Phone FI 2-2816 

1425 NORD AVENUE 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 

CHICO LUMBER COMPANY 

"THE FRIENDLY YARD" 

Phone FI 2-8374 
HIGHWAY 99-E . NORTH-O-TOWN 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 



SUNSHINE BAKERY 

218 BROADWAY 

CHICO 

CALIFORNIA 



AISTHORPE LUMBER CO. 

Everything for Building 



FI. 2-6212 
948 BROADWAY 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 19541 



Phone WA 5-3856 

Compliments of 

DR. ALLEN C. JAYNES. Denfist 

3202 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

COMPLETE PIANO SERVICE 
Keys Recovered - Restyling - Refinishing 

WESTERN PIANO CO. 

USED AND REBUILT 

— Also — 

Songwriters' Service - Piano Lessons 

Paul Baker - Chas. Belcher 

2968 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 
WA 5-1716; if no answer WA 5-0392 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STEWART'S CAFE 

. . . Serving . . . 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 

From 5:30 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 



1022 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



)ne WA 5-9982 

CALIFORNIA 



PASH MOTORS 

SALESBURY SCOOTER PARTS 

Air Cooled Engine Repairing a Specialty 

Cylinder Reboring - Valve Facing 



2832 Rio Linda Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone WA S-8586 
CALIFORNIA 



CLINTON N. 
COLLINGWOOD 

Contractor 

LAND LEVELING 

BULLDOZING 

ROAD CONSTRUCTION 

EXCAVATION 



IV 9-8812 

2320 CORTEZ LANE 

SACRAMENTO, 

CALIFORNIA 



PISTOL POINTING 

(Continued from page S) 

Lena is in charge of the kids' program at 
the range and has his official NRA in- 
structor's arm band and a swell group 
of kids in the class. 

By now you probably know the re- 
gional matches have been definitely called 
off in Bakersfield with the probability of 
them going south — mayhap to San Diego. 

And who do you think is back at the 
range ? None other than Sgt. Cliff Smith 
who announced his retirement a few 
months ago only to come begging for his 
job when he found it wasn't so much fun 
being a civilian. Sgt. Gus Palmiri was 
taking over for a while (and well liked, 
too) but the constant popping of the 
guns got his ears so the doctor told Gus 
to get where it was quieter. This made 

Cliff sore as the devil — oh, yeh? 

Captain Jacobs, of the California 
Highway Patrol, informs me he is very 
anxious to hold a couple of pistol matches 
on his own up in Woodland this spring 
and maybe a couple more in the fall. 
Cap will sponsor the matches himself to 
see if the shooters would be interested 
in such a match. Woodland is about 100 
miles from S. F. and if one cared to stay 
over Saturday nite there is ample motel 
and hotel accommodations around the 
vicinity. More about the match as it 
progresses. 

One of my secret ambitions is to go to 
a pistol match and hear everyone say 
they are having a swell day and shooting 
swell scores. But I should live that long. 
Utopia and mavbe Technocracy or Eure- 
ka !! ! 

And the guy who bought target 13 
failed to show up all day long. Maybe 
the guy was superstitious and bought an- 
other set of squadding tickets on another 
target. 

And the boys were disturbed about the 
lateness of the matches. 

Scores 
22 National Match 

.Master — Karl Schaugaard 2^3 

ICxpert — Elwood Johnson 287 

Sharpshooter — Chas. Copeland 280 

.Marksman 1st — Ed Murray 276 

Marskman 2nd — Tom Hamon 240 

C.F. National Match 

Master— Milt Klipfel 286 

Expert— Weslev Lim 279 

Sharpshooter — Ted Methot 275 

Marksman 1st— Cliff Webb 273 

Marksman 2nd — Frank Ramos 23Q 

.22 Tinu'd-Fire 

Master — Karl Englehait 199 

Expert — J. Durst 197 

Sharpshooter — Chas. Copeland 195 

Marksman 1st — T. Wagner 194 

Marksman 2nd — Ed Kligerman 170 



JAPANESE BUILDING COMPANY 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
Y. Imura 



622 S Street 

SACRAMENTO 



Phone HU 4-2551 

CALIFORM \ 



BEST WISHES 

Sacramento Freezers, Inc. 

Processors 
FROZEN VEGETABLES AND FRUITS 

830 D Street - Sacramento 
GI 2-1034 

655 Cooper Avenue - Yuba City 

Telephone Marysvllle 3-5451 

CALIFORNIA 

KAMPUS KITCHENS 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 
FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



5530 H Street 
SACRAMENTO 



Phone HI 7-4788 

CALIFORNIA 



W. C. T. SHELL SERVICE 

WIDNER - CUNNINGHAM - THURMAN 
Service Is My Business . . .24-Hour Service 



1 6th and L Streets 
SACRAMENTO 



e: GI 2-9365 
CALIFORNIA 



Phone WAbash 5-9869 



Argonaut Club 

"Smile With Miles" 

Now Serving 3 Dimensional 
Whiskey 



1438 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 

CALIFORNIA 

Phone 'Wabash 5-5250 

RISCO TV 

Installation and Service 

Appliance Repair 

Fully Insured . . . Prompt, 

Courteous Service . . . Material, 

Workmanship Guaranteed 

1711 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 

CALIFORNIA 



Jun 


-. 1954 




POl 


WA. 


5-0304 








DEL PASO LOCKER 


PLANT 




COLD STORAGE 


LOCKERS 




WHOLESALE 


MEATS 




3805 Rio Linda 


Boule 


vard 


DEL 


PASO HEIGHTS 




CALIFORNIA 











POLICE AND PKACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Hunting and Fishing Headquarters 

WAYNE R. SWART 

HARDWARE . . . PAINTS 

Dial WA S-0784 
1927 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Don Larson's Shell Service 



WAbash 5-7239 

3801 MARYSVILLE ROAD 

Corner of Grand 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

WAbash 5-2284 

Walker-Wilkerson Natural 
Cut Stone 

NORTHERN CAUFORNIA DIVISION 
Hoyt M. Lesher, Distributor 

1519 Del Paso Boulevard 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 19 CALIFORNIA 



Leutholtz Crane 
Service 



p. O. Box 42 

Phone 4-0813 

692 CALIFORNIA ST. 

Rio Vista, Calif. 



Asta Construction 
Co. 

• 

Phone 4-0861 

P. 0. Box 758 

Rio Vista, Calif. 



Camp Perry Match 

Master — Karl Schaugaard 296 

E.xpert — Wade Anderson 291 

Sharpshooter — Vern Clayton 285 

Marksman 1st — W. Vandehey 285 

Marksman 2nd — H. Papenberg 250 

.45 National Match 

Master— Ken Kolb 286 

Expert — Charley Young 282 

Sharpshooter — Chas. Metta 264 

Marksman 1st — Tom Combs 266 

Marksman 2nd — L. Kennedy 230 

Aggregate Match 

Master — Karl Schaugaard 1355 

Expert — Wade Anderson 1318 

Sharpshooter — Park Smith 1277 

Marksman 1st— Cliff Webb 1258 

Marksman 2nd — Jim Lope 1098 

Team Scores 
Class "A" 
1st Place — California Highway 

Patrol 1126 

2nd Place — San Francisco Police 

Team No. 1 1099 

3rd Place — San Francisco Police 

Revolver Club No. 1 1080 

Class "B" 
1st Place — Olympic Club Team 

No. 2 1031 

2nd Place — Santa Cruz Handgun 

Club 1027 

3rd place — San Francisco Revolver 

Club No. 2 - 1003 

THE OAKLAND MATCHES 

Speaking of a big opening day at the 
SF matches, just take a look at the open- 
ing day, March 7th, at Oakland with 
over 240 shooters laying down that long 
green for a chance at the medals they 
were passing out. There were five re- 
lays in each match and set a new club 
record, passing that established in 1940 
when they almost had five relays in each 
match, and as you already know the gang 
got home a lot later than the good wife 
intended they should. Some of the boys 
skipped the last match so as not to incur 
the wrath of the squaw — anyhow it was 
one swell day and to coin a new phrase, 
"a good time was had by all." 

Ray Ottoboni, one of the San Mateo 
sheriff's office, is also contemplating hold- 
ing a few shoots for the gang at the old 
pistol range in Colma. Ray is now hav- 
ing the range re-graded and plans on 
adding 8 more firing ponits bringing the 
total up to 24 in all. Within the next 
two months we should be hearing from 
Ray as to when the gala opening will be 
announced. 

After a two year lay-off ex-Lt. Cliff 
Hatch arrives on the lot all full of that 
vinegar and stuff expecting to slay the 
boys with his fancy pistolecring. Alas 
and alack, the long lay-off was too long 
for our hero and he flopped by the way- 



Kistler Appliance - Television 

WALTER KISTLER, Prop. 



1715 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



WAbash 5-6337 

CALIFORNIA 



GIDE APPLIANCE CO. 

L. A. Bermardi - Verne E. Gibbs 

WESTINGHOUSE - GIBSON 

WESTERN HOLLY 



1512 Del Paso Boulevard 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Pho 



le WA 9-7486 

CALIFORNIA 



MAIL ■ ME ■ MONDAY 

OF NORTH SACRAMENTO 

BOOKKEEPING AND TAX SERVICE 

Lila L. Hann 

1719 Del Paso Blvd. WAbash 5-5424 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNAI 



TOM PERRY 

USED CARS AND GENERAL INSURANCE 

1811 Del Paso Blvd. Phone WAbash 5-1383 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone WAbash 5-5527 

The 
Heights Pharmacy 

ERNEST C. SPINETTI 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
Sundries - Cosmetics - Gifts 

3739 Rio Linda Boulevard 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS, CALIF. 



BELL AVE. 
ELECTRIC SHOP 

ELECTRIC MOTOR SERVICE 

Free Pickup and Delivery 

Exchange of all Washing Machine 

Motors our Specialty 

Rebuilding - Rewinding 

Repairing — WA 5-1248 

Noel W. Wright 

1301 BELL AVENUE 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS, CALIF. 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



1954 



Rocky's Grand Ave. Service 

GAS— OIL— LUBRICATION— ACCESSORIES 
TIRES— BATTERIES 



Phone WA 5-7272 

1615 GRAND AVENUE 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

HI-SPOT CREAMERY 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 
BREAKFAST— FOUNTAIN — PASTRIES 

Phone WAbash 5-9944 

1535 GRAND AVENUE 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 



DEL PASO TAXI 



PHONE WA S-1236 

3745 RIO LINDA BOULEVARD 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

CORBETT'S 

HIGHLANDS RESTAURANT AND 
FLIGHT DECK DINING ROOM 

We Cater to Private Parties & Banquets 
Rodger Corbett, owner and Mgr. 

Phone IV 7-6214 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

N. J. Glascock Trailer Sales 

USED TRAILERS YOU CAN AFFORD TO BUY 



Phone WA 5-1116 

1916 EAST EL C AMINO 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



THE BEAUTY CENTRE 

COUNTRY CLUB CENTER 



Phone IV 7-0426 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORN'\ 



Frontier Club 

JACK & MARTY GROVES 

BEER AND DANCING 

WA 5-3185 

3625 Rio Linda Boulevard 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS, 

CALIFORNIA 



side — and in a puddle of mud, too! ! Cliff 
still claims he is the perpetual maricsman 
and hopes never to get out of that class. 
Move over, Cliff, I'll be right with you. 

Ed Rosenberg was in a bad way all 
during the matches because he knew he 
had one bum, poorly loaded shell in the 
box but wasn't too sure as to which one 
it was. Every time he'd pull the trigger 
he didn't know whether it was going off 
or just — poof However, it didn't poof 
all day and by 1 1 o'clock Ed was so 
jumpy and full of the bounce he wasn't 
worth the powder to blow him up. 

One thing you have to say about Al 
Heath is that at least he is starting his 
wife's shooting lessons with a .22 gun in- 
stead of the usual .45 cannon a man 
thinks he should give his wife to begin 
her shooting career. After the wife gets 
her arm nearly jerked off from the .45 
monster she is more than ready to go 
back to knitting and baking — but does 
hubby start off with the .45 ? Oh, gosh, 
no — that's too tuff to start on. 

"Spike" Spiken tells me that this Sun- 
day that he has been nearer the 280 mark 
in the Camp Perry match than in over 4 
years. Spike just made 280 and for the 
rest of the day felt as though he really 
knew how to shoot. 

Tony Daily, of the Oakland Police 
Department, and Charley Johnson of 
Santa Cruz were shooting side by each 
in the .22 national match and each fin- 
ished with the identical score 89-92-91. 
Tony never got over the affair and for 
the rest of the day he made it a special 
point to tell everybody on the lot all 
about it. 

Y'know there is something I never 
could figure out and would like the an- 
swer — or some sort of an answer because 
1 don't think there is a real answer to it. 
Why does a guy have to tuck one of his 
pants legs into those low cowboy boots 
they wear? 

Lou Panecaldo, from Gridley, learns 
f^st, fast, fast. At his first shoot Sunday 
he had 9 shots on his target (which ain't 
bad for a tyro) but swears by the nine 
rrods that the shot he had in the 9 ring 
was a double. Some wise guy has been 
'■oaching Lou but Lou hasn't taken his 
lessons to heart as not a darn guy at the 
scorina; table could find that double. Nice 
tvv. Lnu, keep it up and some day mavbc 
1 on'll hit the jack-pot. 

In the first match of the day there 
were 64 shooters in the expert class but 
only three medals were given out which 
caused some to ask why don't they give 
out extra medals in that class when 
there were more than 24 entries. The 
answer is very simple. The only class in 
which extra medals are given out is in 
the marksman class. O.K. ? O.K. 



COMPLEMENTS OF 

ESSEX PENCIL PRODUCTS 
COMPANY, INC 

Manufacturers of 
VENUS-VELVET PENCILS 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



SALES SERVICE 

NECCHI SEWING CENTER 

DEL PASO MANOR 

SHOPPING CENTER 

NECCHI - ELNA DISTRIBUTOR 

RENTALS — REPAIRS 



DEL PASO AUTO SUPPLY 

L. H. "TIP" TIPPIT 

Distributors of 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS - ACCESSORIES 

GOODYEAR TIRES - HOOD TIRES 

Norwalk Gasoline 

WA 5-7383 

901 GRAND 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

MOORE EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 

Allis-Chalmers Industrial Equipment 

Ingersoll-Rand Compressors— Air Tools 

Stores in Fresno, Stockton. Reno, Redding 



Phone WAbash 5-8525 

903 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DR. G. A. HOCKENSMITH 

OPTOMETRIST 

Announces the Opening o( his Office in 
DEL PASO MANOR 

Phone IV 7-6262 

2432 MARYAL DRIVE 

DEL PASO MANOR 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 




LEONARD 
ANDRES 



Phone 2-3489 
1208 Ninth Street 
MODESTO, CALIF. 



GLISSMEYER 
APARTMENTS 

Furnished — Air Conditioned 
"North Area's Best" 

Phone WA 5-7294 

2551 NORTH llTH STREET 

NORTH SACRAMENTO, 

CALIFORNIA 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Compliments of 

COPELAND & WILKES 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

Richard L. Copeland - William A. Wilkes 

PROFESSIONAL CENTER 

WA S-5S11 

210 CALVADOS AVENUE 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

VICTOR A. LO FORTE 

PLUMBING CONTRACTOR 

Contracting Plumbing Repairs 

Estimates Gladly Given 



Pho 



WAbash 5-2256 



205 NORTH BIRCH AVENUE 
NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



THE LAUNDERETTE 



USING THE BENDIX AUTOMATIC HOME 
LAUNDRY 



225 FAIRFIELD ROAD 
NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



JACUZZI PUMP & SUPPLY, INC. 

PUMPS FOR EVERY PURPOSE 



1650 EAST EL CAMINO AVENUE 
NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DEL PASO GLASS CO. 

Window - Plate - Auto Glass and Mirrors 

Structural Glass and Steel Sash 

Arcadia Sliding Doors 

AUB. SMITH — AL RATZLAFF 



Phone WA 5-4296 

1019 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SCOTT LUMBER CO. 



"See Scolty for All Yo 
Action Stamps for Ca 



Building Nee 
and Carry Sa 



Phone WA 5-1454 — WA 5-4478 

2809 RIO LINDA BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



A.A.A. Septic Tank 

& CESSPOOL CLEANING 

Modern Vacuum Equipment 
REASONABLE RATES 

J. D. FITZGERALD 

WAbash 5-6591 
No. Sacramento, California 



Usually a stray dog runs up the hill in 
back of the backstops and delays the 
matches until the pooch is chased off. 
Sunday there were three kids running 
up the hill and later followed by some 
goof in an auto. Some one hollered out 
"to fire a shot across their bows" but 
that's just what they don't want to hap- 
pen as the shot might come closer than 
the bow. 

Ken Kolb, of the Highway Patrol, has 
a peculiar and fantastic way of getting 
in the news. Sunday he bellies up to the 
squadding window and buys tickets for 
all the matches — but no, he didn't buy 
'em because he discovered his wallet was 
gone — driver's license and cash. Left the 
darned thing home. And Ken just got 
thru giving a poor guy up near Vallejo 
a ticket for not having his driver's license 
with him! 

Pete Peters, of San Rafael, Jack 
Ahern, of the SFPD, and Ray Ottoboni 
of the San Mateo Sheriff's office are 
about the oldest shooters, in point of 
shooting years around the bay area. The 
three young fellows started at the old 
Kentfield range in 1927 and have been 
going ever since. That's kinda hard to 
believe as I don't think Jack was old 
enuf to lift a pistol in 1927. 

Merv Given, the range exec, sure be- 
lieves in getting things in shape for the 
day's shooting. Merv gets up at 4:30 on 
match days and within an hour is chug- 
ging up the hill toward the range so he 
can set the 50 yard targets out, clean 
the benches, cut the grass — and wake up 
Spike, the caretaker. Merv will go 
places — it may not be far but the boy is 
going. 

Scores 
C.F.Short National 

Master — K. Schaugaard 291 

Expert — Mike Carroll 286 

Sharpshooter — Chas. Johnson 277 

Marksman 1st — Ernie Lum 269 

Marksman 2nd — Don King 251 

Marksman 3rd — ^Jack Sunderland ..256 

C.F. Camp Perry 

Master — Joe deCola 296 

Expert— Jack Ford 288 

Sharpshooter — Chas. Kirkman 292 

Marksman 1st— T. B. Combs 269 

Marksman 2nd— Bill Elledge 274 

Marksman 3rd — A. Cameron 279 

.22 National Match 

Master— Bob Chow 295 

Expert — Jack Dickerson 283 

Sharpshooter — G. DeFino 289 

Marksman 1st — A. Serrell 281 

Marksman 2nd — J. Tyree 259 

Marksman 3rd— D. Wright 252 



MERRITT DANCE STUDIOS 

ALL TYPES OF DANCING 

Phone WA 5-0449 

Home Phone WA 5-3340 

3705 MARYSVILLE ROAD 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

B ■ Z ■ B 

RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Good Food, Good Fun 
Mike Schwartz, Restaurant Mgr. 
Howard S. Schwartz, Bar Mgr. 

Phone WA 5-7027 

420 EAST EL CAMINO 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SEWER CONTRACTOR 

STATE LICENSED - INSURED 
Marcor N. Duus 
Free Estimates 

Telephone WA 5- 1 451 

130 NORTH lOTH STREET 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 

NORTH AVENUE CAFE 

BETTY E. PECHAUER, Owner 

Specializing in Mexican Foods 

Charlie (Poncho) Nimon 

DRAFT BEER ON TAP — SOFT DRINKS 

Phone WA 5-9757 

2149 NORTH AVENUE 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

"LET'S GET ASSOCIATED- 
DANNY'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

FEDERAL TIRES AND FLYING A BATTERIES 



Phone WAbash 5-8836 

22ND AND GRAND AVENUE 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CAUFORNIA 

Keed Window & Janitor Service 

GUARANTEED SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY 
FLOOR WAXING - WALL WASHING 

Free Estimates 
All Work Guaranteed — Fully Insured 

Phone WA 5-2231 

212 BASSETTLAW AVENUE 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 



Silent Salesmen of 
"SUNSHINE BISCUITS- 

Product of 
Loose Wiles Biscuit Co. 

Sacramento "Niks" 
Distributors 

Candy and Cigaret Distributors 

CRACKER AND BISCUIT 

VENDING MACHINES 

2621 Tioga Way 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 20 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL • June. 195^ 

.22 Slow-Fire Match 

John Vasu Hancock Service Master— K Schaugaard 191 WOODLAKE SERVICE STATION 

GAS • OIL • LUBRICATION Fvnprf T nirlrfrsnn ISA Mobilgas - Mobiloils - Tires - Tube. 

Pickup and Delivery Service JLXpert ^J . JJlClcerSOn 100 Lube - Electronic Wheel Balancing 

3561 Del Paso Blvd. Phone WA 5-9941 SharpshoOter T. Chambers 183 1212 Dei Paso Blvd. Phone WA 5-2190 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA Marksman 1st T. Wagner 180 north sacramento California 

THE COZY CLUB Marksman 2nd— Gus Corneer 173 STEWART'S MARKET 

T°ny Kios Marksman 3rd— J. Rygh 171 Quality Meats - Groceries - Vegetable, 

COME IN AND GET ACQUAINTED -.j ■ , n f ^ L Beer and Wine 

National JMatcn 

2330 Del Paso Blvd. WA 5-9920 ^„„ 3200 Rio Linda Blvd. Phone WA 5-9908 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA Master — Al Heath 287 north sacramento California 

Bill's Barber Shop and Pool Hall fhrr^sh^ot'er-? Melchin 268 '^::^^^^:::::^i 

Have a Lot of Fun With a Small Sun, of Mun ^Iar£m°a°n'lst-FranVLjfold";i;;;;;260 '^'"'^^E^ISer^sSl^Jwn^^'"^^ 

3617 Rio Linda Blvd. Phone WA 5-9784 Marksman 2nd— GuS Comeer 244 1701 Del Paso Blvd. Phone WA 5-7209 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA Marksman 3rd J. Wagner ..246 north sacramento Californ ia 

DELUXE LAUNDRY Aggregate Match MAPES LUMBER CO. 

AND DRY CLEANING Master— K. Schaugaard 879 square 'm:al"1l''around 

1009 Del Paso Blvd. Phone WA S-0486 Expert J. DickerSOn 853 2430 Rio Linda Blvd. WAbash 5-1101 

sacramento CALIFORNIA Sharpshooter C. Kirkham 851 north sacramento California 

DON'S PAINT STORES Marksman 1st— A. Cameron 810 Slayton's Automotive Repair 

Don Dieller. Owner Marksman 2nd T. Combs 769 Lee E. Slaylon. Jr. 

treasure tone paints - WALLPAPER \/f \ i < wt TTIl J TCC . ■ c ■ ,i,-.i. o . •• 

2623 J Street, Sacramento, HU 4-6639 Marksman 3rd— W. Elledge 755 Automotive Servce W.th a Reputation 

2202 Del Paso Blvd., North Sacramento, ^p o 2455 Rio Linda Blvd. WAbash S-217S 

WA 5-4487 J earn cscores north sacramento California 

Lyman's Appliance and Home 1st Place— California Highway Roscoe D. Cook ■ Auio Supplies 

Coruifo Patrol Team No. 1 1165 ^ \. 

berVICe O j m C t? t» l- t- Budget Terms - Firestone Tires - General 

E. Todd" Chappell -ind Place b. r. Police learn Electric Appliances and Television " 

•'^T'J.THome 'of MaWai in'No'rJrSa''c?amento" ^0. 1 1 146 2125 Del Paso Boulevard Phone WA 5-2754 , , 

?803 oTf piso ¥iv/. ''wAbash 5-"?Si 3rd Pkce— S. F. Police Revolver north sacramento California 

north sacramento California r'l l t- mi i no .>m,-fr^K, ei E^vm^ 

■ Club I eam No. 1 1128 PRESTON ELECTRIC 

UNITED MARKET 4th Place— Oakland Pistol Club Buck Preston 

Wholesale and Retail Free Delivery TeamNo. 1 1125 ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

CHOICE MEAT - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES . . 1310 Del Paso Blvd. Phone WA 5-0484 

.,.. ,..=.. n- 1 r-r -, AS..T ^ north SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

420 K Street Dial GI 3-4547 , . 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA ARM SIGNALS 

' , . . Compliments of 

Some drivers give arm signals in such /[ g_ |_ LUSK 

NORTH STAR a sloppv way that their intent seems to be .^^"^^ \ .,■ ^ , ,^ „ 

Lylea and L. E. Watts, Owners ,„ ^^^f^,^^ ^^^ j^;^^^ j,^^;,^^ ^^^^^^ ^j^^_^ ^ ^^ A Tirade o^_^Qua''«>' 

ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY ^,° '"^'." ^^^ "^^^^'^at they are about to ■ H ■ ^^ ,^ ^ ^^,^ 

do, points out the National Automobile ^ MSlM "* 7-7514 

Club. How do you make arm signals ? ^^^g^^^ 3840 el camino ave. 

2003 DEL PASO BOULEVARD Are your signals designed to warn, or ^^^ sacramento, calif. 

NORTH sacramento CALIFORNIA ™,,^,,5p? 

^..■^■,^^ TBA.. cp ^^iiPT °"*'^^ __^^_ STUDIO OF REFLEXOLOGY 

SANTIAGO TRAILER COURT -^ stories the feet tell 

centrally located in the heart of point TO REMEMBER p. , „„ s,,i„,i,h 

TOWN Florence bteinrich 

We Know Our Camp Will Please You! AmOng the things that the motorist Foot Massage — Incredible Relief 

Welcome Trailer Camp might well remember is the fact that 

MARAKAS U • . j u- l f Phone WA 5-3240 

MAKArvAs being towed requires a higher type of 

Phone WA 5-9955 alertness than does driving the car under ^'^ fairfield street 

130 NORTH lOTH STREET j,, ,^„ j^^^ J^ ^^e National north sacramento CALIFORNU 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA Automobile Club. Compliments of 

P & M CLUB -^^ SANFORD PLASTICS 

Don Hoster, Prop. ^EFT HAND TURNS Manufacturers of Hammered Gold Jewelry 

BPFR on TAP ,» , ■ , ■ , WHOLESALE ONLY 
BEER ON TAP jy^^l^g ^j^^^^ jgj^ l^^^^j ^^^^^^ ^.^.^ p^ 

tience and care, advises the National phone wa 5-4247 

Phone WAbash 5-9988 Automobile Club. 4,49 ^ORTH SIXTEENTH STREET 

3025 BEN ALI AVENUE . DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA ^^^^^ lif^MWO, 

ALHAMBRA FLOOR COMPANY ^^.^^ p^^i^i^^ ^,.^1^.^^ ,^^^^^_^^ ,^^^^^j STRANGE M. RENO 

FRANK J. CAPACHi, Owner vvheels and locked wheels will slide, service station maintenance 

"'^ maple"^ oak^"*^ warns the National Automobile Club. All Types of Meter Service 

Res. Dial IV 9-3431 T^ ^ n . j: 11 J • Phone WA 5-0469 

1 wenty-rive per cent of all drivers in- 

Shop: 3005 BEN ALI AVENUE 1 i • r ^ \ ,. ■ i ..-..UTTC IS29 ELDRIDGE AVENUE 

■^ volved in fatal auto accidents in the U.S. "'■''' t.i-L>K'">^t. /wcnuc 

Dial WAbash 5-7442 , ^ j of ij NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

last year were under 25 years old. 



1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



ORVIS BROS. &C0. 

Keith, Lisle and Ben 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 

Crows Landing Road Telephone 3-845Z 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

S O U Z A ' S 

Butane-Propane Sales and Service 

Turlock's TV Center - Full Line of Home 

Appliances and Furniture 

199 Boulevard Avenue Telephone 2-1041 

NORTH HIGHWAY 91 TURLOCK., CALIF. 

Turlock Concrete Pipe Co. 

PATTERSON CONCRETE PIPE CO. 

TURLOCK ROCK CO. 

Ready-Mix Concrete 

540 N. Center Street Phone 4-4931 

TURLOCK CALIFORNIA 

WAbash 5-2858 Res. Gilbert 3-4437 

United Pipe & Machinery Co. 

Mining Machinery - Contractors* Equipment 

[ 1435 AUBURN ROAD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

I A Good Place to Eat Mixed Drinks 

I COBBLE STONE 

Henry's Fried Chicken - Steaks & Sandwiches 

Dancing — Lots of Parking Space 

Frank Palagi and Frank Mentessi, Props. 

AUBURN BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Aero Batteries . Federal Tires - Veedol Lube 

McClellan Field Associated Service 

John McAndrews, Proprietor— IVanhoe Q-qSIB 
We Give S. & H. Green Trading Stamps 
Corner Watt Avenue and North Haven 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SUTTON & SUTTON 

PAINTING CONTRACTORS 

We Specialize in Spraying 

1419 Hood Road Phone WAbash 5-4323 

NORTH SACR.AMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Del Paso Heights Hardware Store 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Paints — Plumbing Supplies 

Fishing Tackle — Sporting Goods — Glassware 



Phone WA 5-8512 

PARK AND GRAND AVENUE 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

RIVIERA TRAILER COURT 

Most Modern in Northern California 

OPEN ALL HOURS 

Manuel N. Famelis. Owner 

Georgia Famelis. Manager 



Pho 



WA 5-4319 - WA S-9912 



2644 No. EIGHTH STREET 
NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Quality Plastering by 

ISAAC J. H. FONTAINE 

Licensed Plastering Contractor 
Plaster to be Sure — Fire Proof 



1026 NORTH AVENUE 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

HALL - BURDETTE 



AND THE AMBASSADOR LIGHTWEIGHT 



1138 BELL AVENUE 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 



FOOTHILL CITIES 

(Continued from page 13) 

He is president of the chamber of 
commerce, first vice president of the 
Lions Club and treasurer — his bank ex- 
perience comes in handy — of the Youth 
Center, Inc. 

The Hunters, who have three chil- 
dren, live at 20460 Williams Ave. 

Getting more buildings to accommo- 
date the area's growing elementary 
school population is the task of Saratoga 
Elementary School District Superintend- 
ent Dan Ungaro, and his school trustees. 
The district now has two schools — Sara- 
toga Elementarjf, which Ungaro has ad- 
ministered as principal since 1946, and 
Fruitvale School which opened this Fall. 

He was appointed superintendent in 
1952. His first teaching job was in Rose- 
ville, Calif. 

He and his wife and baby daughter, 
Michele, live on Thelma Ave. 

Mrs. Virgil Campbell and her hus- 
band have two teen-age sons. Perhaps 
that is why they are both working indus- 
triously to perfect the expansion and 
growth of Los Gatos Union High 
School. Mrs. Campbell is president of 
the high school PHT. Mr. Campbell is 
clerk of the high school board of trustees. 
Mrs. Campbell, a graduate of San 
Jose State, serves as secretary of the Sar- 
atoga Youth Center, Inc. 

The Campbells have lived here since 
1935. Mr. Campbell is a grocer. The 
family resides at 14482 Oak Place. 




Phone WA 5-5224 Local Pickup & Delivery 

COTTONS TAXIDERMY STUDIO 

W. E. -Biir- Cotton 
3044 N. 12th Street, between Acacia & Sonoma 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BUSY BEE MARKET 

MEATS — GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 
BEER — WINE 

Under New Management 
2785 American Ave. Phone WA 5-1 197 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

IVanhoe 7-5714 Pickup and Delivery 

CHARLES L. ELLIS 

TEXACO SERVICE 

Complete Line Firestone Tires & Accessories 

We Give Action Stamps 

2 301 El Camino at Bell S acramento, Calif. 

THOMAS FLAUS 

HOME FOR THE AGED AND BLIND 



1032 Alamos Ave. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Dial WA 5-1872 

CALIFORNIA 



HELENS CAFE 

DINING AND DANCING 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

3611 Rio Linda Blvd. Phone: WA 5-9783 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFO RNIA 

McCOY'S CHEVRON SERVICE 

RPM LUBRICATION 
El Camino & Maryal Drive IVanhoe 9-4713 

At Del Paso Manor Shopping Center 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STEWART'S MOTEL 

WEEKLY RATES 

Drive in on Business Route 40 or 99E 

1600 Auburn Blvd. Phone WAbash 5-9922 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Hagginwood Floral Gardens 

CUT FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Decorative Plants - Trees and Shrubs 
Floral Designs 

Herb & Alma Taynton 

Phone WA 5-0161 

1045 ARCADE BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BALKOW NURSERY AND FLORIST 



BALKOW GIFT SHOP 

Brass - Copper - Ceramic 

PLANTERS 

Planted and Unplanted 

Phone WA 5-9491 

2993 MARYSVILLE ROAD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Bellview Sand & Gravel Co. 

Drain Rook - Plaster Sand - Fill Dirt 

Fill Sand - Decomposed Granite 

All Kinds of Crushed Rock - Good Top Soil 

Prompt, Courteous Service 

J. M. (TEX) PIERCE, Owner 

Phones: WA 5-3909 — WA 5-7231 

4333 - 24TH STREET 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 



CAPITOL VENDING CO. 

CIGARETTE VENDING MACHINES 
Fred M. Burrows 



Telephone WAbash 5-4321 
320 South 10th Street 
•There's a UOO-mileiveek-enJ trip ptanneJ to north SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 
a split second." 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. 19 54 



WOODLAKE TUNE-UP SERVICE 

AUTOMOTIVE CARBURETION ELECTRICAL 

1224 Del Paso Blvd. Telephone WA 5-3838 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SUNSHINE FOUNTAIN 

Mary Raines, Prop. 

Breakfast • Lunch - Short Orders 

Open 7;30 A.M. till 12 Midnight 

2201 Del Paso Blvd. Phone WA 5-9880 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

YOUNGS MARKET 

Complete Food Line . . . Beer and Wine 



5610 Stockton 

SACRAMENTO 



HI S-0847 

CALIFORNIA 



HAGGINWOOD DRUGS 

Paul Busch 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 



3207 Marysville Roac 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



WA 5-2834 

CALIFORNIA 



WILEY AND SON 

Ivers E. "Bill' Wiley 
Automobile and Heavy Duty Repair 

Marine Industrial 

Route 3, Box 635 WA 5-4213 

LOWER MARYSVILLE ROAD 

Just North of Silver Eagle 

Office: WA 5-0252 Res.: WA 5-3784 

FISHER REALTY CO. 

Established since 1930 

REAL ESTATE - RENTALS - INSURANCE 

3090 Marysville Road (Hagginwood) 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Grant Union Five & Ten Cent Store 



3742 Rio Linda Blvd. 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



Phone WA 5-1879 

CALIFORNIA 



SMITH'S CENTER MARKET 

MEATS — GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 
VARIETIES — DRUG SUPPLIES 



2500 Grand Avenue 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



Phone WA S-7392 

CALIFORNIA 



THOMAS GOCHIE 

GENERAL CONTRACTING 
REMODELING and ROOFING 

IVanhoc 7-2260 
4751 FAIROAKS BOULEVARD 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CHAPMAN MACHINERY CO.. Inc. 

Designing - Fahricating - Machine Shop 
Sawmills a Specialty 



3008 Rio Linda Blvd. 

NORTH S.ACRAMENTO 



Dial WA 5-4364 

CALIFORNIA 



L & W AUTO REPAIR 

BODY & FENDER WORK — W5;LDING 
CUSTOM WORK — 24 HOUR TOW SERVICE 



H. C. Wa 



— C. A. Logan 



Phone WAbash 5-3393 

2428 GRAND AVENUE 
DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

I. B. ROBERTSON 
Theatrical >lgency 



Phone WAbash 5-1751 

3128 - 12TH STREET 
NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



PERSEVERANCE PAYS 

Proof that perseverance in police work 
pays off was e.xemplified in a case which 
had its beginning back in March when 
Sacramento Detective Carl Blasofsel 
came into possession of a bit of informa- 
tion which threw a light of suspicion on 
three men. 

The information was meager and not 
considered absolutely reliable. It labeled 
the trio as good burglary suspects. And it 
indicated the men were ready to pull a 
job. 

Blasofsel, whose dogged determination 
to see every case through to a successful 
conclusion is unmatched, began tailing 
the trio. He, with the aid of fellow de- 
tectives, North Sacramento police officers 
and sheriff's deputies, kept the three un- 
der surveillance day and night. Time 
passed but nothing happened. 

Once Blasofsel had reason to believe 
the men were planning a holdup. The in- 
formation appeared reasonably reliable 
so stakeouts were maintained on a couple 
of stores which were labeled likely tar- 
gets. Still no crime was committed. 

As time went on periodic checks were 
made on the trio and law enforcement 
officers were alerted of their suspected 
activities. 

Early one morning in April Assistant 
Chief of Police Percy Cassaway, Ser- 
geant Walter Land and Patrolman Pete 
Rineberg of North Sacramento saw the 
three cruising in the vicinity of a grocery 
market. The officers parked nearby where 
they could watch the rear door. 

When they saw the three force open 
the door they radioed for reinforcements. 
Five sheriff's cars and another North 
Sacramento police car responded and a 
cordon was formed around the market. 
When the burglars ignored orders to 
walk out some of the officers entered. 

Gassawa\' spotted one of the burglars 
hiding in a storeroom and told him to 
step out. \Vhen he did not respond Gass- 
away fired one shot over his head and 
again ordered him out. This time he re- 
sponded. Other officers routed the two 
others. Two of the burglars were armed. 
Subsequent investigations disclosed the 
three were responsible for another mar- 
ket burglary in which $500 worth of 
merchandise was taken. One of the men 
admitted he and his companions had 
planned to stage a holdup of the market 
in which they were caught but backed 
out. He also admitted a robbery of a 
Sacramento bar had been planned. 

Chief of Detectives George Lofquist, 
commenting on the work Blasofsel did, 
noted there is no substitute for persever- 
ance in the investigation of a case. No 
lead, regardless of how small it might be, 
can be overlooked, he said. 



DAVE'S SEPTIC TANK 

SERVICE— CESSPOOLS 
Sewer Lines De-Rooting - Cleaned, Installed 

Free Estimates - Anywhere, Anytime 
Guaranteed Work - Over 25 Years Expereince 

533 Arcade Ave. WA 5-0898 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Alice Baker's School of Music 

20 Studios to Serve You in the Sacramento 

Area — All Instruments Taught 

2100 "1" Street Phone GI 3-4942 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Grayco Construction Co. 

Jack Gray 

Building - Roofing - Remodeling 

P. O. Box 2686 Phone WA 5-4991 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

LION HOTEL 

Jimmy Sumida, Prop. 

STEAM HEAT 

Dial GI 2-9717 

5131/2 K STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GREGG'S CLUB 

THE FINEST OF UQUORS 

Dancing: Wed., Fri. and Sat. Evenings 

Gilbert 3-9551 

1704 BROADWAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

COMPOSITION FLOOR CO. 

ROY A. DaRe 

Telephone HI 6-6967 

1917 - 28TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GUS' RESTAURANT ■ Fine Foods 

BREAKFAST — LUNCH — DINNER 

DIET AT HOME — EAT AT GUS'S 

GI 2-9478 

1800 BROADWAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DING~HOW~CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

SPECIAL CHINESE DISHES TO TAKE OUT 

Telephones: Hlllcrest 6-2755 - S-9716 

2721 BROADWAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

INTERNATIONAL POULTRY 
MARKET 

Live and Dressed Poultry and Eggs 

Phone Hlllcrest 5-0536 

2616 BROADWAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

FELLOS' MIDTOWN CLUB 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WIN'S DRIVE UP 

HAMBURGERS 20c 
SWISS ROLLS 

Phone IV 9-8760 

2S2S WATT AVENUE 
SACRAMENTO CAUFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA OXYGEN CO. 

OXYGEN - ACETYLENE - NITROGEN 

CARBON DIOXIDE 
WELDING APPARATUS & SUPPLIES 

Phone HU 1-1207 

1200 S STREET 
SACRAMENTO CAUFORNIA 



'une, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



SNO-WHITE DRIVE IN 

Specializing in 
JUMBO DOGS - BURGERS - SHAKES 

Across from Grant Union 
1425 GRANT AVENUE 

5EL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

DEL PASO LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER— HARDWARE — ROOFING 
PAINTS— CEMENT 

800 Grand Avenue (Next to Fire House) 

WA S-3S07 

)EL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

HAGGIN CAFE 

ADAM AND KEN INVITE YOU! 



3401 Rio Linda Blvd. 

SORTH SACRAMENTO 



WA S-9949 

CALIFORNIA 



O. POLETTI 



"SUITING YOU IS OUR BUSINESS" 

Police Uniforms a Specialty - Tailor Made 

Alterations - Guaranteed 



>1421 Del Paso Blvd. 

INORTH SACRAMENTO 



Pho 



NEW CHINA CAFE 

Chinese and American Food to Take Out 

Open Daily 3:00 P.M. to 12:00 M. 

S211 Marysville Road WA S-8672 

HAGGINWOOD CALIFORNIA 



LUX MARKET 



1198 El Camino Avenue 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



le WA S-5646 
CALIFORNIA 



Res. Phone WA 5-8670 WA 5-2487 

ELLEBY & LEWIS 

Auto Laundry - Car Washing: - Steam Cleaning 
- Mohawk Station 



GEO. E. CAMPBELL 

AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

Motor Conditioning 

131 S El Monte Ave. Telephone WA 5-8629 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

ACME BREWERIES 



RAY'S NORWALK SERVICE 

MOTOR TUNEUP AND BRAKE SERVICE 



Across from McClella 
Route 6, Box 1801 Phoi 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Field 
■ IV 7-2766 
CALIFORNIA 



MAC'S BOTTLE SHOP 

Jerry & Gordon Macken 

HAGGINWOODS THIRST CENTER 
LIQUORS — WINES — BEER 

Phone WA 5-6322 
321 S MARYSVILLE ROAD 

DYER ELECTRIC 

LICENSED CONTRACTOR 

Industrial ■ Commercial - Residential 

Automatic Fire Alarms - Audible Signals 

Burglar Alarms 

John H. Dyer 

Phone WAbash 5-8595 



SCIENCE WORKSHOP 

A one-week police science workshop for 
law enforcement officers will be given 
June 21-26 at Western Reserve Uni- 
versity in Cleveland, Ohio. 

The Institute on Science in Law En- 
forcement will be sponsored by the new 
Law-Medicine Center at ^Vestern Re- 
serve, established this \Vinter in coopera- 
tion with the Cuyahoga County (Cleve- 
land) Coroner's Office. 

A faculty of 32 e.xperts representing all 
phases of police science will lead the lec- 
tures, demonstrations and discussions 
comprising the workshop. Tuition will be 
$75, which includes the cost of three 
main meals. Registrations now are being 
accepted. 

Director of the WRU Law-Medicine 
Center and chairman of the institute is 
Oliver C. Schroeder Jr., associate profes- 
sor of law at Reserve. Working closeh 
with him in planning the workshop are 
Dr. Samuel R. Gerber, Cuyahoga 
County coroner, and Dr. Alan R. Mo- 
ritz, nationally-known director of the In- 
stitute of Pathology at WRU and pro- 
fessor at the School of Medicine. 

Study topics scheduled for each day of 
the workshop are : 

Monday — apparent and real causes of 
death — identification of person (skeletal, 
dead bodies and living persons) — arson 
and fires — bombs and explosives — me- 
chanical injuries and deaths. 

Tuesday — time of death — gunshot 
wounds — modern firearms training — bal- 
listics and firearms identification — dem- 
onstration at gunnery range — examina- 
tion of the Cleveland Police Department 
scientific laboratory — scientific instru- 
ments for law enforcement— police ad- 
ministration. 

AVednesday — chemistry and medical 
aspects of poisons and alcohol — juvenile 
court — gunnery range — Cleveland Police 
Department scientific laboratory- — adult 
psychiatric criminals — alcohol and drug 
addicts — juvenile delinquents. 

Thursday — trace evidence — blood — 
investigation of a crime scene other than 
homicide — traffic hit-skip- — sex crimes — 
demonstrations at the Cuyahoga County 
Coroner's Laboratory and police depart- 
ments in the Cleveland suburbs of East 
Cleveland, Shaker Heights and Cleve- 
land Heights. 

Friday — police photography — scien- 
tific laboratory photography — questioned 
documents, inks, typewriters, papers — 
demonstrations at the coroner's labora- 
tory and police departments in East 
Cleveland, Shaker Heights and Cleve- 
land Heights. 

Saturday — investigation of homicide 
scene — interrogation of suspect — crim- 
inal interrogation and lie detection. 



COOPER BROS. 

PLASTERING CONTRACTORS 
Free Estimates 



1871 Kubel Circle 

SACRAMENTO 



e IV 9-9027 

CALIFORNIA 



ARCADE PLUMBING CO. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 



2730 Elvyra Way 
SACRAMENTO 



IVanhoe 9-2906 

CALIFORNIA 



Suburban Acres Trailer Court 



1530 Ho-we Phone WA 5-9978 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CAPITAL PLUMBING COMPANY 

Water Heater Experts - Radiant Heating Engrs. 
General Plumbing Service - Sprinkling Systems 



2237 Fulton 

SACRAMENTO 



IV 9-5837 

CALIFORNIA 



Enzler's Hardware & Sporting 
Goods 

A COMPLETE HARDWARE STORE 



Res. WA 5-0861 Phone WA 5-1485 

NYE'S APPLIANCE REPAIR 

WASHERS - REFRIGERATORS - RADIO 

Let Your Problems Be Our Problems 

150 LEA WAY 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

ARCADE ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

"Let's Get Associated" 



Watt and Whitney Av 

SACRAMENTO 



ne IV 7-1871 
CALIFORNIA 



Bus. WA 5-5251 Res. WA 5-3128 

H. G. LATHAM - Plumbing 

CONTRACTING — JOBBING 



FARMERS HARDWARE 

A COMPLETE HARDWARE STORE 

3736 Marysville Road WA 5-0906 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

MOTOR PARTS SALES 

Joe Lanphier 
Auto Parts - Accessories and Equipment 



110 Linden Ave. 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Pho 



WA 5-8545 

CALIFORNIA 



PAYLESS SERVICE STATION 

EXPERT AUTO REPAIRS 

Repairs on Any Kind of Car or Truck 

Gas and Oil - Overhauling Our Specialty 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

M. Duponte 



1401 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Phone WA 5-9603 

CALIFORNIA 



ROBERT H. LADD 

T-V SERVICE - INSTALLATION 
T-V Antenna Service 

2450 Rio Linda Blvd. Phone WAbash 5-5305 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 



O'Brian's Drapery Service 

2763 - 1 9th Street Phone WA 5-3809 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STEVE'S SERVICE STATION 



We Gi' 



Trading Sta 



2320 Lower Marysville Road WA 5-9705 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BEN ALi CABINET SHOP 

David and Gordon Joelson 

3019 Ben Ali Avenue 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



LORD AND BISHOP 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 

P. O. Box 812 Phone WA S-3S84 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC REFRIGERATION STORE 

Heil Bros. 

Contractors, Sales and Service - Sheet Metal 

Air Conditioning - Commercial Refrigeration 

Office Phone WAbash 5-3503 

1430 AUBURN BLVD. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WHITE'S APPLIANCE SHOP 

Television - Furnaces - Water Heaters 

Ranges - Thermostats - Work Guaranteed 

Evaporative Coolers 

3091 Marysville Road WAbash 5-1709 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

KING'S JEWELERS 

In Four Oaks Shopping Center 

GUARANTEED WATCH REPAIRING 

2138 Grand Avenue Phone WA S-75S8 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

E. L. MATHISEN. D.D.S. 

DENTIST 

COMMUNITY MEDICAL CENTER 
201 Hawthorne Avenue WA 5-2771 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

MAY FLOWER CAFE 



1802 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



WA 5-6508 

CALIFORNIA 



NORTH CITY SERVICE 

Chuck Houck 
Tune-Up Specialists — Automotive Repairs 
17311/2 Del Paso Blvd. WA 5-1317 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNl/ 

OUR PLACE 

W W. Ray, Prop. 

BEER - SANDWICHES 

130 North Ninth St. Phone WA 5-1311 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALlFOR^'l ^ 

Height's Drive-In Neat Market 

CHOICE MEATS 



3538 Rio Linda Blvd. 

DEL PASO HEIGHl.S 



Phone WA 5-731 I 

CALIFORNIA 



PATTON CAFE 

BEER— WINE— SANDWICHES 

'hone WA 5-9810 

CALIFORNIA 



3525 Rio Linda Blvd. 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS 



EWALD H. ZORN 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Phone: HU 6-8924 

6112 - 41 ST STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Special events on the institute calendar 
include two dinner meetings, a night 
baseball game between the Cleveland In- 
dians and the New York Yankees; and 
the final banquet Saturday noon, when 
certificates will be awarded to persons 
completing the course. 

Institute sessions will take place at the 
year-old, $800,000 coroner's office and 
laboratory in Cleveland, and at the near- 
by home of the WRU School of Law. 
Housing will be available at Claud 
Foster Hall, WRU's new men's dormi- 
tory, for $15 for the entire week of the 
workshop. Hotel and motel facilities also 
are located in the university area. 

This June's police science workshop is 
planned as part of the three-fold pro- 
gram of teaching, research and publica- 
tion under way at the Law-Medicine 
Center. Two 18-week legal medicine 
courses have been given on an experi- 
mental basis, before the Center actually 
was established Feb. 1, 1954. Pilot re- 
search study concerns homicide in Cleve- 
land, and first volume in the Center's 
legal medicine series will be "The Physi- 
cian in the Courtroom," to be published 
by the Western Reserve University Press 
this Spring. 

Detailed information and application 
forms for the Institute on Science in 
Law Enforcement are available from: 
Oliver C. Schroeder, Jr., Director, Law- 
Medicine Center, ^Vestern Reserve Uni- 
versity, Cleveland 6, Ohio. 



BEING TOO GOOD 

Some drivers, accorch'ng to the Na- 
tional Automobile Club, are so good that 
they become overconfident and indulge 
ui careless driving practices. Such motor- 
ists, points out the National Automobile 
Club, should remember that on our 
streets and highways, a little carelessness 
can kill. 




WA 5-3961 Res. IV 9.1101 

COASTAL NEON CO. 

SALES - SERVICE - RENTALS 



13I8V2 Del Pas 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Boulevard 

CALIFORNIA 



NORTH SACRAMENTO HOTEL 

Ella E. Moss. Mgr. 
STEAM HEAT - AIR CONDITIONED 



2326 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



WA 5-9867 

CALIFORNIA 



C. E. MARSH - Dentist 

18231/2 DEL PASO BOULEVARD 

Above Curtis Drug Store 

WAbash 5-2114 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GENOVA DELICATESSEN 

JOE BR UNA 

Ravioli - Fresh Salads - Olives - Pickles 

Phone AX 6-9953 

970 FRANKLIN STREET 

SANTA CLARA CALIFO RNIA 

BERNICE'S CLEANERS 

ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS 

PICK-UP AND DELIVERY 

Phone CY 4-1987 

134 E. SAN SALVADOR 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

BLAINE'S 

LAMPS AND SHADES 
Electrifying & Repairing of Lamps 

Phone CYpress 5-2340 
1130 LINCOLN AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

HYDE PARK MARKET 

Tom Orlando — Chas Maciel 

QUALITY MEATS - PRODUCE - GROCERIES 

1098 N. FIRST STREET 

SAN JOSE CALI FORNIA 

RALPH'S 

SMOKE SHOP 

Formerly Joe Dorsas Smoke Shop 

Featuring BOYCE'S PIPE TOBACCO 

Ralph Goldstine 

Phone CY 3-1460 62 W. Santa Clara St. 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Chadsey's Auto Upholstery 

SEAT COVERS - SPORT TOPS 

TRUCK & TRACTOR CUSHIONS 

CYpress 5-6552 Harold Chadsey 

95 NORTH MARKET STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



HAROLD W. WALTERS 

See us for all kinds of Real Estate 

REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 

Phone CYpress 2-4974 

17 N. SECOND STREET 

Res. CY 2-4396 403 S. 1 4th Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

SAN JOSE TILE CO. 

Everything in Tile — Estimates Furnished 

Floor, Wall and Mantel Tile. Sinks. Store Fronts 

Tile and Chromium Fixtures 

Phone CY 4-1354 C. P. Catello & Sons 

91 BASSETT STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

BEAUTY IS ACQUIRED 

THE HOUSE OF ROIE 

Phone CYpress 4-9934 

14 ALMADEN AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Joseph G. Sunseri Plumbing Co. 

HOME APPLIANCES 

WATER HEATERS - FLOOR FURNACES 

Phone CYpress 5-1991 

1177 VINE STREET 



SUTTER'S PLACE 



PHONE CYpress 2-6093 
7/ow many pedestrians have you haggedf" "^'-^'^^ CALIFORNIA 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



QUALITY KITCHEN 

Phone CYpress 2-8751 Rose Galati, Owner 

Specializing in Artichoke Hearts in Olive Oil 

All Types of Peppers 

269 SUNOL STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Homecraft Construction Co. 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Builders of Fine Homes 

CYpress 7-1220 

881 PARK AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

HORTON'S CERAMIC STUDIO 



CYpress 5-1258 

1592 MERIDIAN ROAD 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

DERYL M. JONES 

MOBILE SERVICE STATION 

CYpress 5-9825 

FIRST and UNION STREETS 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Walt Netton CYpress 3-7572 

WALT'S SERVICE 

General Auto Repairing 

Service Station - Lubrication 

24TH AND JULIAN STREETS 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

GARDEN CITY PET SHOP 

33 E. SAN ANTONIO— CYpress 4-1787 



SAN JOSE 



FRED LUCCHESI 

TEXACO SERVICE 
898 DELMAS 



CAUFORNIA 



HAP GEORGE & BUSH SERVICE 

ROAD SERVICE - SERVICE STATION 
Complete Automotive Service 



WATSON'S AUTO CLINIC 

TEXACO GAS AND OIL 

Servicing and Repairing 

Phone CYpress S-9837 

THIRTEENTH AND TAYLOR STREETS 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

DAHL'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

Tires - Batteries - Trailers for Rent 

Phone CYpress 3-9731 

FOURTH AND TAYLOR 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

THE FLYING CHICKEN 

Phone CYpress 5-2556 

Delivery in San Jose and Santa Clara 

Open 11 A.M. to 10 PJVI. — Closed Mondays 

929 PARK AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

GIL'S AUTO REPAIR SERVICE 

All Makes of Autos and Trucks Repaired 

Phone CY 2-3635 

824 NORTH 13TH STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

GRECO AND BARCELONA 

TRUCK and AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS 

Phone CYpress 4-7064 

150 NORTH SAN PEDRO STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

IN SAN JOSE IT'S 

HEAVENLY FOODS 

Specializing in French Dinners 



EXPANDING CITY 

(Continued from page 10) 

a member of the board of trustees of the 
Fremont Union High School District 
for 17 years, the past 10 as its president. 

Burr M. Matthews came to Sunny- 
\ale 22 years ago and operates an appli- 
ance store and a real estate business. He 
lives at 85 Oak Ave., Mountain View. 

Matthews is a native of Pietermaritz- 
burg, South Africa, and was brought to 
the United States by his American father 
when he was 7 years old. He lived in 
Colorado and St. Louis before coming to 
California. 

Before coming to Sunnyvale, Matth- 
ews lived in Oakland for 12 years en- 
gaging in the contracting and building 
business. He is past president of the 
Chamber of Commerce and of the Sun- 
n>'vale Lions Club. 

The Rev. Charles S. Gienger, pastor 
of St. Martin's Church, has been largely 
responsible for the beautiful new St. 
Martin's Parochial School on Old San 
Francisco Road. 

He confided that he was sent here to 
accomplish just that in 1949. Father 
Gienger is a native of San Francisco 
who started his education for the priest- 
hood in 1918 at St. Patrick's Seminary 
in Menio Park. 

He was forced to interrupt this school 
for a five year period during which he 
left the seminary and worked for a large 
San Francisco store to assist his family. 

Later he was able to continue his edu- 
cation for his calling and was ordained a 
priest in 1933. 

H. Kenney Hunter is known, by name 
at least, to every Sunnyvale citizen. He 
is city manager. 

Hunter is a native of Nashville, 
Tenn., but came to Sacramento in 1922. 
He attended the University of Califor- 
nia in Berkeley, majoring in economics 
and taking graduate work in public ad- 
ministration. 

After employment with a management 
consultant firm in San Francisco for 
about three years, he joined the Califor- 
nia State Personnel Board. 

He became Sunnyvale's first city man- 
ager in December, 1949, when the new 
City Charter became effective. 

He is married, lives at 423 South- 
wood Drive and has two children. Hunt- 
er belongs to the Commonwealth Club 
of San Francisco, the Lions Club in 
Sunn)vale and to various associations of 
city managers and public administrators. 

Another well-known business man in 
Sunnyvale is Robert H. Hamilton, 
whose R. H. Hamilton Co. on N. Sun- 
nyvale Ave. manufactures store fixtures 
and does mill and cabinet work. 



POMONA GROCERY 



ne CYpress 5-9616 
1481 POMONA 



CAUFORNLA 



HARTKE MOTORS 

Phone CYpress 3-5344 

255 W. SAN CARLOS 

(Corner Vine) 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

V. LIppolis Drayoge Company 

TRUCKING - GENERAL HAULING 

Dial CYpress 4-1862 — Established 1919 

Oakland Office 928 -66th Ave. — SW 8-5353 

Main Office 330 Keyes Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

PIPE & TUBE BENDING 



JIM'S HIGH LOW TAVERN 

THE PLACE TO GO 

Phone CYpress 3-9664 

171 E. SANTA CLARA 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

NELSON'S TEXACO 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
CYpress 4-0752 



L. L. Nelson - F. R. Nels 
4TH & ST. JOHN 



CALIFORNIA 



San Jose Awning & Tent Company 

I. S. ERBENTRAUT 

AXminster 6-9286 

2245 THE ALAMEDA 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

SANTA CLARA DRUG CO. 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS 

AXminster 6-4727 

COR. MAIN & FRANKLIN 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 



"POP'S COFFEE SHOP" 

3430 STEVENS CREEK ROAD 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Sam Alaimo Art Nieri 

San Jose Cleaners and Dyers 

CYpress 4-5834 

507 WEST SAN CARLOS STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

RITA'S DELICATESSEN 



CYpress 4-3716 
163 WEST ALMA 



CALIFORNIA 



JERRY DAVIS TRAVEL SERVICE 



AVILA'S MARKET 



1604 HAMILTON 
hone CYpress 2-1767 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



Ultra Modem Hotel Se 

BELL MOTEL 

Close to Stores, Shows and Cafes 
Telephone AXminster 6-8608 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 



DORLEE'S RESTAURANT 

Phone CYpress 5-9668 

42 FOUNTAIN 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Union Oil Dealer Phone CY 5-9875 

A. L. ALDRIDGE 

Lubrication - Washing - Batteries 



Leo Berken's Automotive Service 

Pick-Up and Delivery Service 

Phone CYpress 5-1627 

356 AUZERIAS AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

FRANK'S MARKET 

Phone CYpress 4-7478 

601 BIRD AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

TENTH STREET PHARMACY 

Formerly Tuggle's Drug Store 

Phone CYpress 4-9131 

COR. TENTH AND SANTA CLARA STS. 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

AHREN'S SERVICE 

MOTOR TUNE-UP - ACCESSORIES 

LUBRICATION - CAR WASHING 

Phone CYpress 3-9950 

llTH AND SAN CARLOS STREETS 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

J E N O T T ■ S 

TO SERVE YOU FINE PASTRIES 

Barney Jennott 

Phone CYpress 2-4612 

1732 PARK AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



JOE'S PLACE 

LEON TERRY 

We Specialize in 

GOOD LIQUORS AND SANDWICHES 

BEER AND WINE 

551 West Julian Street Phone CYpress 3-9676 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



A . D . CLINK 

Sc - 10c - 15c VARIETY 
$1.00 and Up 

1897 West San Carlos Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

NELSON FURNITURE CO. 

We Spec alize in 
FINE MAPLE AND CHERRY FURNITURE 

Open Thursday Evenings Till 9:30 

10S0-I0S4 Park Avenue Phone CYpress 5-44ro 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



C. I. •Slim" Hardcastle 



J Myron Hardr 



HARDCASTLE BROTHERS 

ne and Axle Work - Auto Tops - T, 

Radiator. Fender and Body Works 

Auto Painting 



Telephone CYpress 2-14«8 
187 NORTH SAN PEDRO STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



MOUNTAIN VIEW 

(Continued from page 12) 

Mrs. Armanini a native of San Fran- 
cisco, born May Jennings, and her par- 
ents have been South San Francisco 
druggists for the past 45 years. The Ar- 
maninis' daughters are Patricia, 20; 
Elaine, 18; Gail, 14, and Carol, 9. 

Her record of civic service in Moun- 
tain View includes seven years on the 
City Recreation Commission, chairman- 
ship of the annual city pet parade several 
years, PTA work, Woman's Club activi- 
ties and leadership in the Girl Scouts. 

In 1952 she was chairman of the city's 
highly successful united community fund 
drive for residential areas. She is a grad- 
uate of the University of California and 
a registered pharmacist. She admits that 
community activities, keeping up a home 
and raising four children, and helping 
regularly in the store do not allow her 
much time for cultivation of hobbies. 

A comparative newcomer to Moun- 
tain View is Francis ^Vallace, brisk 
young manager of the Mountain View 
Chamber of Commerce. Fran, as he is 
known to everybody in town, came to 
this job two years ago from a back- 
ground of salesmanship, five years with 
the American Red Cross and a year and 
a half with the National Safety Council. 
He was graduated from Macalaster Col- 
lege, St. Paul, Minn., in 1941. His Red 
Cross service began in 1939 when he was 
still an undergraduate. 

He had a look at California in 1941, 
liked what he saw, and persuaded the 
Red Cross to transfer him to San Fran- 
cisco in 1943. He and his wife, Ruth, 
ha\e two sons and a daughter. His hobby 
is Boy Scouts. 

He is presently district camp and did 
his post-graduate work in Emory Uni- 
versity, Atlanta, Ga. He is a member of 
Mountain View Kiwanis Clvib. For re- 
laxation he likes swimming, skating and 
taking his family to the beach. 

James K. Thomas is hardly a Moun- 
tain View old timer, arriving in the city 
from Grand Coulee Dam in AVashington 
State in July, 1939; but if he is a new- 
comer he must be classed as an old-time 
newcomer, since the big influx of popu- 
lation has been since then. 

Thomas has been city manager of 
Mountain View since October, 1952. 
He was first employed by the city in 
June, 1946, as superintendent of public 
works, and became citv administrator in 
1949. 

He and his wife, Elsie, have a daugh- 
ter, now Mrs. David E. Farlev, Camp- 
bell. 

"If you are going to say anything 
about me at all," he declared, "You must 
also mention that I have a grandson." 



BILL'S SPEEDOMETER SERVICE 

Phone CYpress 3-5353 

260 WEST SANTA CLARA 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

TRINCHERO DRIVE-IN 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS - SERVICE 

Phone CYpress 3-0293 

618 SOUTH FIRST STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

COMMERCIAL TIRE SERVICE 

Passenger and Truck Wheel Balancing 

New and Used Tires - Recapping and Retreading 

CYpress 7-1174 

1135 AUZERIAS AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ADRIAN PUMP SERVICE 

Sprinkler Systems - Rain Control Irrigation 
Pump Sales and Service 

CYpress 2-2213 

226 PHELAN AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

"Let's Get Associated" 

PERVAN'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

Phone CYpress 3-9748 

1940 PARK AVE. AT MAGNOLIA 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



CRISCIONE EGG BISCUIT CO. 

Italian Cookies Made with Fresh Eggs 



JOHN'S GROCERY 

QUALITY GROCERIES - WINE & BEER 

Phone CYpress 5-3900 

20O SO. KING ROAD 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



STONE AND SCHULTE - Rea/tors 

Office: CYpress 2-5130 

Residence: ELgato 4-4904 

436 West San Carlos Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

O & R RADIO AND TELEVISION 
COMPANY 

Jimmy Rodenbaugh's 

NIGHT T-V SERVICE 

By Appointment 

Expert Repairs on All Makes and Models 



405 South Se 

SAN JOSE 



CYpress 4-183S 

CALIFORNIA 



JACA'S LIQUORS 

1000 EAST SANTA CLARA 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



PRIME RIB OF SAN JOSE 

Air-Conditioned 



1330 The Alameda Phone CYpress 4-7141 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



,/«/;,', 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 







LESTER 


E. 


GESELL 






R« 


!al Estate 


- All Forms 


of Insurar 


ice 






Incc 


,ine 


Ta: 


« Ser 


vice 




598 

SAN 


W. San Carlo! 

JOSE 


i St. 




Phoi 


le CYpress 3-7643 

CALIFORNIA 



LoPresto Automotive Service 

Martin A. (Tony) LoPresto 

General Auto Repairs - Tune-Up - Carburetor 

and Ignition - Wash and Polish 

155 Margaret CYpress S-4184 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

CAR WASH 

APPROVED MINIT-MAN SERVICE 
Open Daily and Sunday A.M. 
AUTOMATIC CAR WASH CO. 
77 South Montgo 



D. ERENO 

Furniture Repairing and Re6nishing 



SAN JOSE 



Phone CYpress S-S723 
730 BIRD AVENUE 



CAUFORNIA 



Coast Line Trucic Service, Inc. 

Daily Service Between Los Angeles 

and San Francisco Bay Points 

Telephone CYpress 2-6632 

NINTH AND BAYSHORE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

JOHNSON BROS. 

DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Phone CY 2-2551 

976 NORTH FOURTH STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

CHIARAMONTE'S 

CASH and CARRY MARKET 

Phone CYpress 5-0943 

609 NORTH 13TH STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 



ANDY'S PLUMBING SERVICE 

Andy Molica 
CONTRACTING - REPAIRS - HEATIN< 
Als 



582 North Ninth Street 
SAN JOSE 



CYpress 2-1656 
CALIFORNIA 



ALAMEDA MOTEL 

iss Edith A. M. Carlson, Ow 



Located Inside the City Limits, West Side on 

Highway U. S. 101 and State 17 
1050 The Alameda Phone CYpress 3-5763 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



JOSEPH W. FOSTER 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

214 Spencer Street CYpress 5-4801 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

San Jose Frame and Wheel Co. 

Wheel Aligning - Repairs and Balancing 
Frame Straightening - Complete Brake Service 

M. R. Grant, Mgr. - A. O. Le Fevre, Owner 
Jack Thatcher - Louie Leitch 



355 Stockto 

SAN JOSE 



Phone CYpress 3-0343 

CALIFORNIA 



BONDS FOR JAIL 

Ihe culmination of years of work and 
effort on the part of Sheriff Don Cox 
may be in sight if Sacramento Count> 
voters approve a $3,000,000 bond issue 
which has been placed on the ballot for 
the June 8th elections. 

The bond issue, the first scheduled b\' 
the county government in 40 years, pro- 
vides $1,250,000 for the construction of 
a new county pail and $250,000 to re- 
model the present jail. 

This work, and higher pay for his 
deputies, are projects which Cox has ad- 
vocated unceasingly for many years. 

The sheriff pointed out the inadequacy 
of the present jail facilities time and again 
but failed to get the board of super- 
visors to act on his recommendations un- 
til this spring. 

A site for the proposed new jail has 
not been definitely selected yet but indi- 
cations are that it will be built adjacent 
to the present jail. 

Members of the board of supervisors 
had hoped to build it at the site of the 
Airport Road camp south of Sacramento 
but were informed bonding experts be- 
lieve it should be built next to the present 
facilities to make what they termed "a 
package deal" out of it. 

In addition, the county does not have 
completely clear title to the acreage 
where the road camp is located. 

Final plans for the nev^' jail have not 
been completed but Cox said it probably 
would be built in the form of an L and 
possibly would be 10 stories high. A 
garage and parking space could be pro- 
vided beneath the building. 

Cox said he would like to see the pres- 
ent facilities remodeled for use as a re- 
ceiving jail where prisoners could be held 
for short periods before being transferred 
to the new jail or to a road camp. 

Cox knows whereof he speaks when he 
points out the inadequacy of the present 
county jail setup. During his service he 
has seen the activity of the jail increase 
by at least six times, from 1,091 prison- 
ers to more than 6,000 who pass through 
the jail annually. 

He was appointed sheriff by the board 
of supervisors in 1932 to fill out the term 
of the late Ellis Jones when Jones re- 
signed. Cox started with the sheriff's 
office as a deputy in 1921 and advanced 
through the ranks to become under- 
sheriff, the post he held at the time of his 
appointment. 

Shortly after he went to work for the 
sheriff's office he took up the study of law 
as an aid to his law enforcement activi- 
ties. He was admitted to practice at the 
California State Bar in 1926 and has 
been a member of the bar association since 
then. 



San Jose Creamery and Cafe 

Phone AXminster 6-1688 

2939 PARK AVENUE 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 



VIC'S PLACE 



1080 MAIN STREET 
SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

V I D A L ' S 



DEE'S BAYSHORE CAFE 

Food Like Mother Tried to Cook and Couldn't 

AXminster 6-9852 BAYSHORE HIGHWAY 

(At Santa Clara-Alviso Road) 
SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

ANGELO'S PAINTING CO. 



>ne CYpress 4-8875 
346 DELMAS 



CALIFORNIA 



ARNONE'S MARKET 

Phone CYpress 2-6268 

830 MALONE ROAD 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNLA 

CYpress 3-1963 Open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

ALONGI'S AUTO SERVICE 

Motor Tune-Up - Brakes - Carburetion 

Signal Oil Products 

1343 THE ALAMEDA 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



DANNA & DANNA. INC. 

GROWERS - PACKERS - SHIPPERS 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

760 West San Fernando Street 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

SAN JOSE TALLOW CO. 

FOR SERVICE— CALL COLLECT 

Office CYpress 3-5707 Res. CYpress S-0528 
BERRYESSA ROAD 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

D. AND E. STEAK HOUSE 

5:30 A.M. to Midnight Six Days a Week 

S49 West Julian 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Phone CYpress 2-8363 Res. AXminlster 6-0302 

LIVESTOCK SPRAYER MFG. CO. 

Wm. Abildgaard, President 
AUTOMATIC SPRAY DIP 

765 Coleman Street 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 



CLAYBOURN'S BAKERY 

Decorated Cakes for All Occasions 
Full Line of Bakery Goods 

CYpress 4-2914 

2210 LINCOLN AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ART MASHBURN 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 

Bascom & Heatherdale 

Phone AXminster 6-9835 

PICKUP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

BUCKLES - SMITH CO. 

WHOLESALERS OF ELECTRIC PRODUCTS 
Phone CYpress 4-8482 



Cademartori's Restaurant and 
Fountain 

SIL and GLORIA 

CYpress 7-2246 

348 PHELAN AVE., Between S. 7th & S. 10th 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Dl PIETRO'S FISH & POULTRY 

Fresh and Canned Fish - Dairy Products - Eggs 
Phone CY 7-0885 Fred and Al, Props 



KELLEY'S CASH GROCERY 
AND MEAT MARKET 

BEER and WINES - LIQUORS 

CYpress 5-8420 

70-72 GEORGE STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Patsy Gallo Service Station 

Phone Bal. 8651 

PARK AND SPENCER 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



GUSTAVE DOMROSE 

MASONRY - STONEWORK 



Cox's thorough background in law en- 
forcement and his e\erpresent desire to 
serve the residents of Sacramento County 
has made his office one of the finest in the 
state. 

His record shows Sacramento County 
is relatively free of major crime, ^^'hen it 
does crop up his able stafif works with 
speed and efficiency to eliminate it. Proof 
of this lies in the fact organized crime 
never has been able to gain even a toehold 
in the county since Cox took over as 
sheriff. 




CYpress 4-2984 Samuel J. Batinovich 

SAM'S AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Specializing in Hudson Service and Parts 

General Repairing - Bonded Used Car Dealer 

71 NORTH FIFTH STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Bergmann's Department Store 

Phone CYpress 5-5056 

1365 LINCOLN AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

CLARENCE HARRIS 

General Electric Appliances 

CYpress 5-2068 

425 SOUTH BASCOM AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Coonley's Welding Service 

Block and Head Welding - Valve Seats 
At Your Shop Without Removing Motor 



SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

F. M. JOHNSON 

REALTOR 

Telephone CYpress 3-4313 

298 WEST SAN CARLOS 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Res. CYpress 4-5996 Office CYpress 3-4623 

E. M. GODLEY 

Grading and Paving Contractor 

Oil Macadam Driveways My Specialty 

1290 AUZERAIS AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



BEN McDonald motors 

Phone CYpress 7-5974 

952 ALMADEN 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



W. M. (BILL) RINEHART 



Phone CYpress 3-8954 
943M; TERRA BELLA 



CAUFORNIA 



MORWEAR PAINT STORE 

Distributors of 
MORWEAR PAINT PRODUCTS 

Clyde Hicks 

1275 FRANKLIN STREET 

Phone AX 6-7092 

Res. CYpress 2-SOSI 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

ROBERTS 

PLUMBING & BUILDING SUPPLY, INC. 

Plumbing Contractor — Free Estimates 

PLUMBING — HEATING — SHEET METAL 

J. W. Scott 

2280 PIONEER 

Phone CYpress 7-0338 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

BERNARD FOOD INDUSTRIES. 
INC. 

Plant 

559 W. FULTON STREET 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

1208 E. SAN ANTONIO STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



Cox does more than protect the people 
of Sacramento County from criminals. 
He looks after something which means 
much more to many people than their fear 
of criminals — their pocketbooks. 

Despite an increase in population and a 
corresponding expansion of law enforce- 
ment activities during the last 15 years 
Cox has been able to show a decrease in 
the cost of running the office in propor- 
tion to the number of prisoners handled. 

The June 8th elections, by the way, 
hold more interest for Cox than just the 
bond issue. He is on the ballot for reelec- 
tion to his sixth term as sheriff. Nothing 
to worry about, though. He has no op- 
position. 



ADJUST SEAT 



Adjust the seat in your car to provide 
maximum visibility, advises the National 
Automobile Club. 

TRAFFIC PATTERN 

Always cooperate with the traffic pat- 
tern, advises the National Automobile 
Club. 



CLayburn 8-5765 

141 GORDON AVENUE 
SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

VICTOR'S CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE & RESTAURANT 

DANCING SATURDAY NIGHT 

PACKAGE GOODS 



328 SOUTH BASCOM AVENUE 
SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

OLIVER M. JOHNSON 

GENERAL MACHINE SHOP 
Manufacturing 



320 WEST SAN CARLOS STREET 
SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

W. R. KALSCHED & CO., INC 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Phone CYpress 4-4967 



201 SAN JOSE AVENUE 



CAUFORNIA 



1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



CLIFF KELLEY'S LIQUORS 

A Full Line of Liquors and Wines 



SARATOGA 



Phone FR 8-0056 
Quito Shopping Center 



CALIFORNIA 



"LES" SELLS FOR LESS 

ELDRIDGE USED CARS 
■Les" Eldridge 

Phone AX 6-0S74 

2323 THE ALAMEDA 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

BOHANNON'S TABU 

The House of Good Spirits 

1401 South First Street 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



DICKMAN CONSTRUCTION 



Industrial — Commercial and 
Residential Contractor 



Phone YO 7-S827 

U87 SLADKY 

MOUNTAIN VIEW CALIFORNIA 



STANGER OR HESTWOOD 

REALTORS 
Business Opportunities 

Wt~ Phone CYpress 5-8844 

■^ 497 PARK AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

GUILBERT BROS. 
Electric Company, Inc. 

CYpress 4-1656 

133 LOCUST STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

CHAMBERLAIN PLUMBING 

CLAUDE CHAMBERLAIN 



Phones: CY 2-6078 - AX 6-6234 

2466 PIONEER AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

Eckel Engineering Division 

Manufacturer of 

CONCRETE PIPE MACHINERY 

OF CASCADE METALS CORPORATION 

Structural Steel Fabrication 

Phone CYpress 4-8318 

595 EMORY STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



GLEASON TIRE SERVICE 



Phones: 
CYpress 2-7346 — CYpress 2-3184 

55 TULLY ROAD 
SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 



ORCHARD CITY 

The church, the school and the gov- 
ernment are integral parts of any com- 
munity. Campbell, the Orchard City, is 
proud of the persons who provide effi- 
cient leadership in these three spheres. 
Here are some of them. 

Mrs. Gussie Baker holds the honor of 
being the only woman superintendent in 
the county. As superintendent of More- 
land School District, she also watches 
over the oldest known school district in 
California. Moreland district was estab- 
lished in 1851. 

Mrs. Baker is also principal of More- 
land School (historical landmark 489), 
a job she has held since 1941. She has 
been superintendent since 1952. 

Entering the field of education 28 
years ago, Mrs. Baker got her first teach- 
ing e.xperience in the elementary schools 
of Modoc, Calif. She lives at 297 Carlyn 
Ave. 

Campbell's police chief, Bob Locke, 
has lived here since 1940. He was named 
to the force after the city incorporated in 
March, 1952. He then rose to the rank 
of senior officer and in November was 
named chief. 

He supervises an efficient four-man 
force and 15 auxiliary policemen. Locke 
served with the Army of Occupation in 
Korea with the counter-intelligence corps 
as an M.P. 

He and his wife. Merle, and four 
children live at 466 E. Casey Ave. 

Jack of all repairs — especially street 
repairs — is Le Roy H. Black, who heads 
the city's maintenance department. Black, 
a former Marine Corps sergant, moved 
here in September. 

A native of Santa Monica, he came to 
San Jose in 1948 with his wife. Norma, 
and young son, Richard. They live at 
126 E. Campbell Ave. 

Another essential figure in any com- 
munity is the postmaster. This job has 
been held for 20 years by Ira H. Grim, 
of 46 S. Third St. 

Grim has lived in Campbell since 
1919. He has been very active in civic 
affairs. He served two terms as president 
of the Chamber of Commerce, was chair- 
man of the 1954 Old Settlers Day Pa- 
rade, and is a member of the Kiwanis 
Club. 

Born and raised in West Virginia, 
Grim and his wife have five children. 

Leader of the community's second old- 
est church, the Campbell Congregational 
Church founded in 1889, is the Rev. 
Corwin H. Olds. Olds and his family 
have lived here five and a half years. 

He came here from Berkeley where he 
was an official in the Pacific School of 
Religion. 



TROPIQUARIUM 

TROPICAL FISH - GOLD FISH 

AQUATIC PLANTS and SUPPLIES 

12115 So. Saratoga-Sunnyvale Rd. — AX 6-5463 

(So. Highway 9 Near Prospect Road) 
CUPERTINO CALIFORNIA 

COMBS CAR CO. 

BETTER USED CARS 

Phone CYpress 3-6190 

1480 WEST SAN CARLOS 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Phone CYpress 2-5868 

S. S. Dl SALVO 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 



FAIROAKS PARK 

SUNNYVALE 

3-Bedroom Homes 

$10,125 

v. A. and F. H. A. Terms 

Color Construction Company 

Tract Office RE 6-5063 



DRAKE'S WRECKING YARD 

Justin C. Letcher — Bruce A. Carson, Props. 

BUYERS OF CARS AND JUNK 
Used Parts — Used Tires — Batteries 

923 Meridian Road — CYpress 2-6114 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ALARIO MUSIC CO. 

Juke Boxes - Coin Operated Machines 
24-Hour Service 

CYpress 5-3707 

Res. Phone: CYpress 3-4070 

1320 FORRESTAL AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

FiOR D'lTALIA 

HOTEL AND GRILL 
Raviolis Every Day Banquet Parties Arranged 
MONDORA, DELLA MAGGIORE and POLETTI 



101 NORTH MARKET 

Cor. San Augustine Street 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

Insurance Real Estate Loans 



CIMINO BROS. 

INSURANCE AGENCY 



CYpress 2-0314 

84 NORTH FIRST STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 



H. F. OLIVER CO. 

HARDWOOD FLOOR CONTRACTING 

Telephone CYpress 5-4482 

80 ST. JOHN 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. 1954* 



LA COCINA CAFE 



Specializing in M 
Mr. & Mrs. J 



Dishes 
Salazar 



Phone CYpress 3-9864 

131 W. SANTA CLARA STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 



COAST MOULDING CO. 

FENCES — REDWOOD 
Pam Doty 

AXminster 6-4336 

1710 GRANT STREET 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 



Telephone CYpress 5-8513 

CUNNINGHAM 
ROOFING CO. 

Waterproofing and Siding 
All Types of Roofing 

Route 4, Box 134 

SENTER ROAD 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Edward Keeble 
Contractor 

Excavating • Grading 
Equipment for Rent 

CYpress 2-8458 

RT. 4. BOX 64 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



o. c McDonald 

CO. 

Plumbing • Heating 

Sheet Metal 

Phone CYpress 5-2182 

1150 WEST SAN CARLOS 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



MISSION CITY 

Getting to know folks in the Mission 
City is easy when one strolls leisurely 
down Franklin St. where, sooner or 
later, all Santa Clara convenes to do 
business and to pass the time of day. 

Hub of the small city that is growing 
fast is the City Hall of course, where 
all doors are open and the city's oflBcial- 
dom is friendly and easy to approach. 

Take City Manager Joseph F. Base, 
for instance, who came here from Ellens- 
burg, Wash., to become Mission Town's 
Hrst city manager. In two years he has 
put the city on a sound operating basis 
with his background of 10 years experi- 
ence in civil, sanitary, and construction 
engineering. As busy as he is, a visitor 
can usually corner him for a few minutes 
of interesting and informative conversa- 
tion. 

En route to see the city manager, a 
City Hall visitor can always spot City 
Clerk A. S. (Steve) Belick, pecking at 
an adding machine, phoning, or talking 
over a problem with a taxpayer at the 
counter. Belick is a graduate of Univer- 
sity of Santa Clara and a veteran of 
WQrld War II in which he worked up 
the hard way from private to major in 
the field artillery. 

Downstairs is the office of City Attor- 
ney Robley E. Morgan, veteran lawyer 
and amateur photographer of considera- 
ble note. Morgan succeeded his partner, 
Judge Charles A. Thompson, in 1950 
when the latter retired. Thompson still 
retains his activity in the law office and 
is usually around discussing matters with 
his deputy of some 34 years standing. 

A man who knows every square inch 
of expanding Santa Clara is City Engi- 
neer Edgar C. Schott who maintains a 
busy little office downstairs in the rear 
of the City Hall building. The city's 
phenomenal rise from sleepy agriculture 
to bustling industry is a tribute to 
Schott's foresight. The suntanned engi- 
neer is a fishing and hunting enthusiast 
and plays the piano with a deft touch. 
Before becoming city engineer in 1940, 
Schott taught at University of Santa 
Clara. 

Around the corner of the building 
from Schott's office is the Police Depart- 
ment where Chief William J. Garrity 
directs operations. Garrity appointed to 
the post last year, is a graduate of the 
FBI police training course and was once 
chief of the Santa Barbara police force. 
When the charter was changed to make 
the post elective, the voters retained Gar- 
rity in office to continue his work of re- 
organizing the department. 



HOEFLERS COFFEE SHOP 

CYpress 4-2980 

25 NORTH FIRST STREET 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNU 

KRING CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CONTRACTORS 

2690 PLUMMER AVENUE 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



GMC Construction, 
Inc. 

Builders & Subdividers 

Now Building El Camino Homes 
Unit No. 4 in Santa Clara 

NO DOWN PAYMENT 

To Qualified Veterans 

1625 Los Padres Blvd. 

Phone AXminster 6-6653 

SANTA CLARA 



Gwinn Building 
Maintenance 

Insured — Bonded 

Complete Janitorial Service 

Window Washing 

Myco Floor Maintenance 

The Very Best — Free Estimates 

Ed Gwinn, Owner— CY 5-3678 

567 Lorraine Avenue 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



1001 - 66th Avenue 

Phone TRinidad 2-6288 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA CONCRETE 
PRODUCTS COMPANY 

CONCRETE PIPE 

1660 Monterey Road 

Phone CYpress 4-9394 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



GUERRA REALTY CO. 

MICHAEL GUERRA, REALTOR 
PETER GUERRA, INSURANCE 



Phone CYpress 3-6048 

28 No. SECOND STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



J. BOTHELIA, JR. 

Gravel - Sand - Loam - Concrete - Cemer 
House Moving - General Contracting 



CYpress 2-3326 

102 SAN JOSE AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CAUfORNIA 



Howard's Cocktail & Liquor Store 

Play Shuffleboard in air conditioned building 
From 6 A.M. til 2 A.M. 



Phone CYpress 5-9924 

675 SOUTH FIRST STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

WILLIAM VERZI & CO. 

GENERAL PAINTING 
Industrial — Commercial — Residential 



CYpress 2-8684 CYpress 2-6760 

562 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 
SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

LOU'S VILLAGE PANTRY 

We Take Pride in Our 

UNUSUALLY DECORATED CAKES 

For Weddings — Birthdays— Anniversaries 

Pastries & Other Bakery Products 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 

8 A.M. to 10 P.M. 

John M. Douat, Owner 

1457 W. SAN CARLOS 

CYpress 3-7002 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Buck's Propane-Butane Service 

Youngstown Kitchens — Refrigerators 

Stoves — Appliances 

Buck Canepa - Louis Canepa 

Natural Gas and Butane Equipment 

CYpress 3-8912 

1102 BAYSHORE AT I2TH 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



D & H AUTO SALES 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 



1302 SO. FIRST STREET 
SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 

Craft Linoleum & Carpet Service 

Linoleum, Asphalt and Rubber Tile 

Venetian Blinds, Window Shades, Screens 

Rugs and Carpets, Plastic Tile, Formica 

Frank Gunia 

Res: 148 Tyler Ave. — AX 6-6843 

Office: 420 SO. BASCOM AVENUE 

Phone CYpress 2-2488 

SAN JOSE CAUFORNIA 



Three years ago, Fire Chief Leonard 
George won the nomination for the job 
from all five volunteer fire companies 
in the city. George and other paid mem- 
bers of the regular fire department can 
be found in the brand new main fire 
station a few blocks from City Hall, un- 
less the city's raucous fire horn happens 
to be sounding at the moment. 

A city collector who carries on his offi- 
cial collection duties on an even grander 
scale at home is Willard N. Norris. Nor- 
ris has a unique hobby in that he gathers 
distinctive insignia, medals, and decora- 
tions of the U. S. military service. He's 
been doing it for some 22 years and has 
o\er 3000 badges and other decorations 
at his home. He served in the coast ar- 
tillery in the first world war. 

One of Santa Clara's proudest posses- 
sions is its efficient municipal electric de- 
partment and the man who heads it is 
Sherman D. Jackson. The electrical su- 
perintendent is continually on the move, 
supervising installation of new power 
units, checking lines and keeping the sys- 
tem up to snuft' at all times. 



SECOND CHANCE 

SANTA CLARA — The Juvenile 
Advisory Council was organized a few 
months ago to keep youngsters out of 
further trouble after they once become 
entangled with the law. It is headed by 
an attorney who lives in Santa Clara and 
practices law in San Jose. Austen War- 
burton, civic leader in the Mission City, 
holds down important post in the Santa 
Clara County organization to prevent 
juvenile delinquency. William Garrity, 
Santa Clara police chief, took the lead 
in forming the Juvenile Advisory Coun- 
cil. He wanted to give youngsters a sec- 
ond chance by putting behind them their 
first offenses. 

Boys and girls singled out for a second 
chance are those whom law enforcement 
officers feel will benefit by guidance 
rather than detention home confinement. 

The Juvenile Advisory Council meets 
the last Saturday in each month and 
ferrets out the cause of the child's be- 
havior. It studies testimony presented 
and makes a decision which does not 
have legal machinery behind it — but has 
an influence in the conuiiunity and on 
the child's future welfare. 

The council is comprised of two mem- 
bers of the clergy, the Rev. Paul Nelson 
of the Community Church of Santa 
Clara, and the Rev. Walter Schmidt, 
S.J., director of the Santa Clara Count\ 
Youth Center, and Miss Katherine Gra- 
ham and Joseph Laurenco, civic leaders. 
Police Chief Garrity and Mrs. Edna 
Mirrione, Santa Cliara police matron, 
also attend the juvenile council meetings. 



BERRY'S FLOWERS 

FLOWERS WIRED— WORLD WIDE 



422 Sali) 
SALINAS 



me 4881 
CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS ICE COMPANY 



p. O. Box 1367 
SALINAS 



Telephone 5781 

7CALIFORN1A 



HORSE SHOE INN 



44 West Market St. 
SALINAS 



hone 8232 
CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS GLASS SHOP 

H. E. Silva 



44 West Gabilan Str 
5ALINAS 



Phone 5968 
CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Mexico City Cafe Independent 

1792 HAIGHT STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SIESTA INN 

L. D. Garcia, Prop. 

Enchiladas - Tacos - Toaslados - Fritos 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 



V. CRACCHiOLO 

POOL ROOM AND BARBER SHOP 

279 Alvarado Street 
MONTEREY CALIFORNIA 

SPROUSE-REITZ CO. 

5c - I Oc - 15c Store 
475 Alvarado Street 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



Town House Restaurant and 
Cocktail Lounge 

SPANISH KITCHEN 



B. v. McMenamin, Prop. Phone 5-4165 

MISSION INN 



456 Tyler Street 



MONTEREY, CALIF. 



UNITED AUTO SERVICE 

L. P. Lazzaretto and E. L. Anderson, Owners 



177 Webster St. 
MONTEREY 



Telephone 5-3171 

CALIFORNIA 



BARRETO'S LA FONDA 



MONTEREY 



Phone 2-9605 
CALIFORNIA 



RALPH R. BRYAN 

ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 

Wrought Iron Furniture 

Tool Shaping and Sharpening 

A. N. Mullin, Welding 

CYpress 7-0453 

1201 WEST SAN CARLOS 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



1954 



ROSE'S TV SERVICE 



ORNAMENTAL POULTRY 

RARE BANTAMS, PARRAKEETS, BABY DUC 
RAKE BANTAMS — PAKRAKEETS 

BABY DUCKS 

Show Birds — Breeding Stock — Pets 

GIVEN POULTRY YARDS 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

CONTRACTOR Phone: Off. FR. 8-3322 

INSURANCE Res.: Camp. 3380 

J. M. DAHL 

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 



M. G. HAGA 



Pho 



FR. 8-4541 
Shop: FR. 8-7162 

MAURICE SAW SERVICE 

SAWS & LAWN MOWERS SHARPENED 

One Block South of Camden Avenue 

SAN JOSE-LOS GATOS HWY., CAMPBELL 

LEW & LIL'S CAFE 

295 NORTH SAN JOSE-LOS GATOS ROAD 
Phone: FR. 8-9885 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

Talephone 3650 J. M. NELSON 

Nelson Grain & Supply Co. 

POULTRY AND DAIRY FEED 
Poultry Remedies. Hay, Grain, Orchard Supplies 

201 East Campbell Avenue 
CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

Schoenberger's Shell Service 

PHONE: FRANKLIN 8-3323 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 



CAMPBELL STATIONERY 

200 East Campbell Ave., Campbell, Calif. 

Phone: FR. 8-4245 

mes. Crafts, Business Forms, Stamps, Co 



VERLE O. GRIZZLE - Jewe/er 

DIAMONDS — WATCHES — REPAIRS 

267 EAST CAMPBELL AVENUE 

FR. 8-5 110 CAMPBELL. CALIFORNIA 

ELDRIDGE'S AUTO SALES 

70 SOUTH WINCHESTER ROAD 

CAMPBELL, CALIF. 

ELDRIDGE THURMON, Owner FR. 8-2252 

LaSCOLA'S MARKET 

201 SOUTH SAN JOSE-LOS GATOS ROAD 
CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 



C. E. WEEKS 



TED'S SERVICE 

425 NORTH WINCHESTER ROAD 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

RACHEL'S 

WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR 

294 EAST CAMPBELL AVE. FRanklin 8-3623 
CAMPBELL, CAUF. 



HUNTING ACCIDENTS 

\\'^hat can be done to pre\ent hunting 
accidents and other mishaps involving 
sporting firearms? 

The most realistic approach to a solu- 
tion of this perennial problem is the so- 
called "New Hampshire Plan" — based 
on the premise that high school students 
given thorough training in safe gun han- 
dling will be spared shooting accidents. 

By mustering the officials in education, 
conservation, law enforcement and two 
authorities from ^Vestern-Winchester, 
the White Mountain State during the 
past year has established a program de- 
signed to teach every boy and girl in its 
public school system how to use a shot- 
gun or rifle without endangering them- 
selves and others. 

Several thousand youngsters in high 
schools throughout the state this spring 
are attending indoor and outdoor classes 
as an e.xtra-curricular activity. State 
authorities estimate than 30,00 boys and 
girls will be trained to handle guns safely 
within a few years. 

Although the New Hampshire Fire- 
arms Safety Education Program has been 
underway only since last September, it 
has proven so successful that those in 
charge plan to establish additional classes 
in junior high schools and in primary 
grades possibly by this September. Inter- 
est on the adult level is so great that 
three high schools in the state have started 
safety classes for experienced hunters, 
and sportsmen's organizations in other 
areas already have instituted moves to in- 
stall similar study sessions for all those 
interested in hunting or target shooting, 
regardless of how many years they have 
been handling firearms. 

New Hampshire took its first step in 
the pioneering effort "to make ever> 
shooter a safe shooter" in March of last 
year. Bowdoin Plumer, editor of the 
"Bristol Enterprise" and a member of 
the state legislature, conferred with offi- 
cials of the Department of Education, 
the Fish and Game Department and the 
State Police about possible steps which 
might be taken to establish a training pro- 
gram through the schools. 

When these officials agreed to take 
over the job of actuating such a program, 
legislation was prepared and immediately 
passed enabling any school district in the 
state "to include instruction in the safe 
and proper handling of firearms." 

The New Hampshire Firearms Safety 
Education Program then was prepared 
by Jack George, physical education di- 
rector of the Department of Education ; 
John Dodge, conservation educator for 
the Fish and Game Department ; James 
Dee, Western-^Vinchester's field repre- 
sentative in New Hampshire, and Vin- 



Established 1906 

HARLESS MOSER AGENCY 

JOSEPH LONG 

RELAL ESI ATE— INSURANCE 

16 LOS GATOS ROAD UNion 7-3318 

SARATOGA CALIFORNIA 



H. M. PURCELL 



UNion 7-3782; Night & Holidays UNion 7-3S7I 
BOX 428, SARATOGA, CALIF. 

SARATOGA THEATRE 

IN THE FOOTHILLS 
FINEST FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FILMS 

SARATOGA, CALIF. 

M. A. VARNER UNion 7-3537 

VARNER'S GARAGE 

LOS GATOS & OAK STREETS 
SARATOGA, CALIF. 

Thompson's - Ye Olde Junke Shoppe 

BIG BASIN WAY NEAR FOURTH 
IN SARATOGA 

AITKEN BROTHERS 

SARATOGA GARAGE 

SARATOGA CALIFORNIA 

CYpress 3-8238 

E. (Eddie) DAHL 

Specializing in General Repairs 

All Makes and Models 

1018 ALMADEN AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

SAM BARRANTI ■ Banana King 

76 N. FOURTH STREET 
SAN JOSE 
CY. 4-7230 Res.: 25634 



Pho 



Office Phone: CYpress 2-9244 

A. ARDIZZONE & SON 

INTERLOCKING RUBBER TILE 

for Modern Floors 
FOR STORE, OFFICE. GOLF CLUB & HOMES 
285 BALBACH ST. SAN JOSE, CALIF. 

AMERICAN OFFICE APPLIANCES 

Exclusive Dealers for 

National-Precisa Adding & Bkpg. Machines 

Complete Line of Typewriters, Furniture, Check 

Protectors. Safes and Files 

CY. 3-3063 — 98 N. First St., San Jose, Calif. 

THE WEE TERRACE 

ROOMS AND BOARD FOR GIRLS 

177 SOUTH TWELFTH ST. — CY. 5-9619 

SAN JOSE 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Charles G. Dominick Duco Shop 

Body and Fender Repairing 

CY. 5-1984 

272 W. SAN FERNANDO STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

C. J. (Chet) BRISCOE 

REAL ESTATE BROKERS 

Notary 

Residence: CL. 8-3730 — Office: CL. 8-3696 

4142 ALUM ROCK AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ANDERSON'S PEST CONTROL 

Service That Satisfies 
PALO ALTO SAN JOSE SAN MATEO 



\june. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



ANDY'S PET SHOP 

YOUR PET'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

ANDY CAMILLERI 
Res. Phone CY. 7-0254 

EL GATO 4-3682 1280 The Alameda 

SAN JOSE 

Duke's Service Station No. 1 

FRANK DUTRA, JR. 



Phone AXminster 5-7512 1965 Bayshore Hwy. 

JIM'S 

"SPECIALIZING IN FINE FOODS" 

One-Fourth Mile West of the Santa Clara- 

Alviso Road 

SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA 

BEDSPREADS BLANKETS 

Bess' Draperies and Curtains 

1193 FRANKLIN STREET 

SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA 
BESS DRAPER AXminster 6-5386 

MIKE'S SHELL SERVICE 



CLAY & MAIN 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 



NICK A. GANDINE 

ASSOCIATED SERVICE 



ANN ROBERTO'S 

67 Washington St. 



BEAUTIFY YOU 
Santa Clara, Calif. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

R. M. CUTHBERT 

SAN JOSE 



INCOME HOMES RANCHES 

RAY M. ADAMS - Reaftor 

Phone CY. 5-2513 

45 N. FIRST STREET (ROOM 131) 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

SAN RAFAEL PLATING 

HIGH GRADE ELECTRO PLATING 

724 FRANCISCO BLBD. — SAN RAFAEL 

ERNIE WURFER 

CARBURETOR & ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

298 E. EVELYN AVE. 
Phone; Sunnyvale, 

RE. 6-5288 California 

HENRY'S TRADING POST 

USED - NEW FURNITURE 

Phone: RE. 6-3091 
RTE. 1, BOX 707, SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 



"BILL" AMMON 



lized 

PAINTING & DECORATING SERVICE 
Telephone 1 20 W. Campbell Ave.. 

FRanklin 8-2123 Campbell, Calif. 

"Let's Get Associated" 

W. L. TEEPLE & SONS 

ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

Big Basin Way «c Saratoga Ave. — UN 7-3525 
SARATOGA, CALIF. 



cent Tiefenbrunn, shooting promotions 
director of Western-Winchester. Dee 
and Tiefenbrunn were called in as con- 
sultants because of their years of service 
in establishing junior shooting programs 
and because both are qualified National 
Rifle Association instructors. "Tief" also 
is a director of the association. 

As outlined in a booklet prepared by 
this quarter at the state capitol, the pro- 
gram called for the qualifying of at least 
one teacher in each high school as an 
NRA instructor in gun handling. Each 
of these trained teachers in turn would 
conduct classes which would give four 
hours of theory and practice of safety for 
every boy and girl. 

All procedures were to be based on 
those which have been established by 
the National Rifle Association. In addi- 
tion to instruction in the handling of all 
types of sporting firearms, the youngsters 
would be taught how to determine 
whether a gun or rifle was in proper con- 
dition for shooting. 

Copies of the program booklet were 
distributed throughout New Hampshire 
to officials of schools in each district, 
physical education instructors, YMCA 
personnel and to conservation officers and 
members of the state police. 

Reaction was immediate. A majority 
of the school superintendents and prin- 
cipals contacted the office of Jack George 
to request assistance in setting up safety 
classes. 

Although half a dozen schools from 
the start were able to begin sessions be- 
cause a qualified N.R.A. instructor was 
on the faculty, the majority sought infor- 
mation on how a teacher assigned to the 
program could receive the necessary 
training. 

With Jim Dee as technical advisor, 
the first few weeks of September were 
spent by Jack George and John Dodge 
in setting up classes in six public high 
schools ready to take part in the pro- 
gram. In addition to these schools, they 
answered a request from two of the 
state's largest parochial high schools to 
give them help. 

Their net step was to qualify all con- 
servation officers and a group of state 
police volunteers as instructors and con- 
sultants. Principal activity of these uni- 
formed men would be to act as teachers 
to high school faculty members assigned 
by their principals to the new project. 

On January 21 of this year, a three- 
day course in firearms and their safe han- 
dling was opened at the University of 
New Hampshire for all 35 conservation 
officers of New Hampshire's Fish and 
Game Department and 12 state troopers. 



L A C E E ' S - Jewe/ers 

Phone: REgenl 6-5260 
173 S. MURPHY AVE., SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 

TONY AND JOE'S MARKET 

TONY & JOE GILL, Props. 

223 N. Fairoaks Ave. Phone RE. 6-4112 

SUNNYVALE 

PARISH EGG BASKET 

•FRESH EGGS" 

REgent 6-6006 20400 Crescent Drive 

SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 

Telephone REgent 66794 

DON MORRIS - Jeweler 

SWISS-AMERICAN WATCH REPAIRING 

CHOICE SELECTION OF JEWELRY 

208 S. FRANCES ST. 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

MORENO'S GROCERY 



396 W. WASHINGTON AVE. 

Phone RE. 6-367 1 SUNNYVALE. CAL. 

SUNNYVALE RADIO CLINIC 

153 BRIGGS 

Phone RE. 6-3695 — SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 

Culligan Soft Water Service 

E. W. GENTRY 

134 CARROLL ST. — REgent 6-4277 

MONTE VISTA— CUPERTINO 
SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 

Sunnyvale Auto Bake Enamel Shop 

500 EL CAMINO REAL 

P.O. Box 5 74, SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 

Phone REgenl 6-4324 

WILLIAM BROST OLIVER PETERSON 

Lou Sporleder, Jr., Shell Service 

Phone EL. 4-3303 
SANTA CRUZ & SARATOGA AVE. 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

NELSON CLEANERS 

"In the Kaiser Shopping Center" 

VINCENT MOSCARELLA 

AXminster 6-5709 

53 WASHINGTON STREET 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

"Al" Cervelli Paint and Body Shop 

Service and Quality — All Work Guaranteed 

Phone CYpress 4-1420 Res. CYpress 4-0733 

44 VINE STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

RHODA'S TREASURE NOOK 

GIFTS AND IMPORTS 

EL. 4-9500 

284 N. SANTA CRUZ AVE. 

The Village Square 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

PIERCE PLUMBING 

WAYNE PIERCE 

Plumbing • Heating • Sheet Metal Work 

Residence: ELgato 4-5831 

Office: ELgato 4-2135 60 West Main St. 

CALIFORNIA 



LOS GATOS 



RAO'S MARKET 

206 N. SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

14406 UNION AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 



H. WESTERGARD 

LICENSED PAINTING CONTRACTOR 

Paintingr — Decollating — Spraying 

FR. 8-5940 

15309 HERRING AVE. 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

MOLLY'S MOTEL APARTMENTS 

Telephone ELgato 4-1963 
40 EAST MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

William's Distinctive Coiffures 

Phone ELgato 4-1306 
Village Square 290 North Santa Cruz Ave. 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

LOU'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

Ph. 4-9744 
PARK & MAIN 



LOS GATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



SORENSON PLUMBING 

ELgato 4-2333 

21 WEST MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

ROGERS ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

Motor Tune-up • Brake and Tire Service 

CHUCK and JOE ROGERS 

Phone FR. 8-5458 

Cambrian & Union Aves. — Cambrian Park 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

DAN'S BAKE SHOP 

Wedding and Birthday Cakes a Specialty 

A. SOLERI 

Telephone ELgato 4-2164 



H. F. GREEN 

UNION OIL DEALER 

Ph. ELgato 4-9739 
300 SARATOGA AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

WILDCAT SPORT SHOP 

DOROTHY and STANLEY SANDERS, Props. 

Athletic Equipment, Fishing Tackle, Hunting 

Materials, Camping Goods, Outboard Motors 

Phone 634 27 E. MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

GEM CITY REALTY CO. 

Specializing in All Types of Real Estate 

CHAS. F. O'CONNOR 

Res. Ph.: ELgato 4-3612 Ph.: ELgato 4-2130 

483 NO. SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

M c A B E E ' S 

Building Materials • Feed & Fuel 

Res. AXminster 6-2685 

223 W. MAIN STREET 

P. O. BOX 402 ELgato 4-1347 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

NEOLITE COMPANY ■ Signs 

W. "HAL" CRAWFORD 
Evenings FRanklin 8-6444 
Telephone ELgato 4-3131 
23 EAST MAIN STREET 
LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

MRS. GOFF'S HOLLAND HOUSE 

Ph. EL. 4-333S 

210 E. MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

HOLTZ HARDWARE 

Plumbing, Heating, Sheet Metal 

P. O. BOX 667 ELgato 4-2504 

14783 SAN JOSE AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



It proved so successful that a similar 
course was held beginning March 22 
with Jim Dee as its head at the Univer- 
sity for school officials and 50 teachers 
from all parts of the state. This made it 
possible for more than half of the 92 
public high schools to begin classes for 
their students immediately following the 
training course. 

Instruction to the youngsters covers 
both small and large caliber rifles and 
all types of shotguns. Indoor sessions 
cover nomenclature of firearms parts, 
mechanism and operation of guns, am- 
munition, determination of unsafe fire- 
arms and the traditional ten command- 
ments of safe gun handling. 

Instruction in the handling of firearms 
safely is given both in the school gymna- 
sium and in nearby wooded areas. Boys 
and girls are shown how to cross over, 
through or under various types of fences 
and instructed in the proper method of 
hunting for ma.ximum safety while walk- 
ing abreast or in line. Written and dem- 
onstration tests must be passed by the 
youngsters before they are graduated 
from the safety classes. 

One of the most ardent supporters of 
the "New Hampshire Plan" is youthful 
Governor Hugh Gregg, a former Army 
officer and father of a 10-year-old boy. 
The chief executive was qualified as an 
instructor after he took part in the train- 
ing course for conservation oificers and 
state police early this year. 

Governor Gregg is opposed to restric- 
tive legislation as a step toward prevent- 
ing hunting accidents. He believes that 
accidents are caused by ignorance and 
carelessness and that education can elim- 
inate these causes. 

"The youngster or grownup who 
knows — really knows — guns and how to 
handle them safely at all times, loaded 
or unloaded," said the governor, "isn't 
going to hurt himself or someone else." 

In the short time that New Hamp- 
shire has made the safety program a part 
of its educational training, interest in it 
has developed throughout the country. 
Legislators, teachers, sportsmen's organ- 
izations, conservation authorities and 
parents by the thousands have flooded 
Jack George and John Dodge with 
queries on how they can set up a similar 
program in their states. 

Already Maine proposes to follow in 
the footsteps of its neighboring state very 
soon. Vermont and Massachusetts con- 
servationists and educators have sent rep- 
resentatives to Concord to study the 
New Hampshire Plan. Other states plan 
to send officials for conferences with 
George and Dodge. 



F R E U N D ' S - Fine Arts 

Phone CYpress 2-8528 
1740 PARK AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Perry Pump and Machine Shop 

Phone CY. 4-3446 
N. KING ROAD RT. 6, BOX 120C 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Robert LeRoy's Upholstering Shop 

FURNITURE UPHOLSTERING & REFINISHING 

Custom Made Furniture 

Bus. Ph. CY. 3-2401 Res. FR. 8-0738 

307 N. MARKET STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Chirco Dr., San Jose-Los Gatos Rd., Los Gatoc 
ELgato 4-1083 

Paul Morton's Auto Service 

AUTO AND TRUCK REPAIRING 

Prompt, Courteous, Efficient Service 



C-J MARKET 

363 SAN JOSE AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

"WE WRAP 'EM TO GO" 

COTTON'S HICKORY PIT 



Telephone 
ELgato 4-9766 



300 E. Main Street 
Los Gatos, Calif. 



Gambles Western Auto Supply Co. 

AUTHORIZED DEALER 

I I N. Santa Cruz 
LOS GATOS, CALIF. W. O. GRAHAM 

WINE AND COLD BEER— GREETING CARDS 
MAGAZINES, SMOKES, CANDY 

ART'S GIFT SHOP 

216V2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., LOS GATOS, CAL. 

JOHNSON'S TRIM SHOP 

UPHOLSTERING AND AWNINGS 
TAILOR MADE SEAT COVERS 

Phone: EL 4-2 143 
465 N. Santa Cruz Ave., LOS GATOS. Calif. 

BILL HOBBS' RICHFIELD SERVICE 

335 N. Santa Cruz Ave. 
LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



GUS' LIQUOR 



FRanklin 8-2509 

14279 UNION AVE., CAMBRIAN PARK 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

Recapping Road Service 

LOS GATOS TIRE SERVICE 

577 University Avenue 
LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

CLARENCE FRAZIER Telephone 

Owner ELgato 4-2573 

OMOBONO GRIJALVA & SON 

GENERAL LABOR CONTRACTORS 

Telephone CYpress 4-3460 

440 NORTH I7TH STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



June, 


1954 






POL 


LOU' 

Dinners, Dan 

Pho 
1465 W. 

SAN JOSE 


S VILLAGE 

ing. Cocktails and Catering 

ne CYpress 3-4S70 
SAN CARLOS STREET 

CALIFORNIA 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



STAN'S EAGLE INN 

228 S. MURPHY 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

FERNANDEZ & MORALES 

MIRA-MAR POOL HALL 

Cards - Cafe - Beer and Wine On & Off Sale 

Phone RE. 6-8810 

101-103 S. MURPHY ST. 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

R. H. HAMILTON CO. 

R. H. ■BOB ■ HAMILTON 

101 Enendy Ave. REgent 6-4918 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

2845 Oakdale Ave. Mission 7-0842 

SAN FRANCISCO 7 CALIFORNIA 

DE LUXE TRAILER SALES 

EVERYTHING FOR THE TRAILER 

Paul - Jerry - Tom Goldfarb 

Bayshore Highway and Borregas Avenue 

REgent 6-8830 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

FORT PLUMBING 

JAMES A. FORT 

Telephone REgent 6-4746 
143 SO. TAAFFE STREET 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

Tony's TV and Radio Service 

All Work Guaranteed for 90 Days 

TONY BARDAKOS 



SUNNYVALE 



CALIFORNIA 



SARATOGA TRANSFER 

MOVING AND HAULING 



THE BARN 



Los Gatos Upholstering Shop 

Jamer. L. Bittle J. L. Biltle 

Where Quality Tells and Service Sells 

NO. SANTA CRUZ AND SHELBURNE WAY 

EL. 4-2371 17450 Shelburne Way 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

CORREA'S AUTO PAINT SHOP 

MANUEL R. CORREA. Proprietor 

ELgato 4-9059 
12 FIESTA WAY, Off East Main St. 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

HOWARD DUNCAN - AutomobWes 

HOWARD DUNCAN 

ELgato 4-2443 
228 NORTH SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

TOM J. DAVIS 

LICENSED CONCRETE CONTRACTOR 

Foundations, Steps, Drives, Curbs, Patios, Walks 

Phone ELgato 4-1705 

220 N. SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

SPOTSWOOD MOTOR SALES 

CECIL B. SPOTSWOOD 
Telephone: EL. 4-2520 
66 E. MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

Beavers Electric Motor Service 

MOTOR REWINDING and REPAIRS 



One of the top e.xperts in the field of 
gun safety is General Meritt Edson, 
famous Marine hero and head of the 
National Rifle Association. He has made 
several trips to study the plan and con- 
siders it one of the finest ever developed 
as a move against restrictive laws. 

"Daniel Webster used to claim that 
the nation always could look to New 
Hampshire for progressive thinking" 
said the general recently. "As a result of 
my observation of the Firearms Safety 
Education Program, I'm inclined to 
think he wasn't exaggerating." 



SUNNYVALE 



CALIFORNIA 



SAFER CARS 

We all know that the automobile has 
undergone some considerable changes in 
both appearance and power since it first 
appeared on the American scene but not 
too many of us are aware, points out the 
National Automobile Club, of the quite 
considerable changes that it has under- 
gone to make it a safer means of trans- 
portation. 

AVhen the transition from the carriage 
with a horse to the carriage without a 
horse was first being made, the coach- 
makers went to work with a will to turn 
out some very fancy bodies made entirely 
of wood or, a little later, of wood with 
sheet metal nailed over it. All this looked 
very fine, but if you happened to hit a 
tree or even an extra large bump in the 
road, you were apt to end up sitting in 
the middle of a jumbled heap of sheet 
metal and quite badly bruised and cut 
to boot. Today's all steel bodies will take 
a much greater beating with much great- 
er grace. 

Some important steps, too, have been 
taken to cut down on driver fatigue, that 
contributor to catastrophic accidents. In- 
sulation has all hut done away with the 
noise of the motor. The grouping, sim- 
plifying, or eliminating of controls has 
made driving an easier chore. Consider 
how the hand controlled spark has gone, 
and the hand controlled throttle has be- 
come foot controlled, how the gear shift 
has moved from the floor, to the steering 
wheel, and then to nowhere at all. The 
grouping and lighting of instruments on 
the dashboard has made it much easier 
for the driver to read them and get his 
eyes back on the road ahead. 

Safety refinements inside the body 
have come along apace: seats wider for 
more elbow room, doors hinged at the 
front to prevent the wind from taking 
them if they should begin to open, han- 
dles curved in or replaced by buttons to 
prevent snagging of clothing, locks made 
more inaccessible to children to prevent 
them from falling out, and no-draft ven- 
tilation to keep the driver free from 
drowsiness. 



PRESTO PLATING V\^ORKS 

JOE • DOOLE"! 

Phone AXminster 6-6771 
1798 GRANT ST. EXTENSION 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

JANE'S GIFT SHOP 

JANE DELLA MAGGIORE, Prop. 

The Friendly Home Shop 
ALL OCCASION PARTY GOODS 
755 Market St. X. 6-6088 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

BOY - JEAN'S 

INDUSTRIAL WELDING AND FABRICATING 

E, W. BOYAJIAN. Consulting and Engineering 

Phone CYpress 7-1060 

1570 WEST SAN CARLOS STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Italian Hotel and Restaurant 

First Class Service • Banquet Room for Parties 

AL FRANZINO • AL VISCA 

CYpress 4-5045 

Downstairs — 175 San Augustine Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Wallace Brothers Cabinet Shop 

Sink Cabinets Made to Order 

Window and Door Frames, Mill Work 

Phone EL. 4-3456 

17466 SHELBOURNE WAY 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

If We Don't Satisfy, Let Us Know Why 

COONCE PLUMBING 

PLUMBING • HEATING 

Phone ELgato 4-2479 

512 NORTH SANTA CRUZ AVE. 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

HAL BELYEW - Realtor 

Courtesy - Sales - Service - Listings 

Wo Give the Earth with Every Home 

Telephone ELgato 4-4556 • Res. ELgato 4-4744 

2 So. Santa Cruz Ave., Hotel Lyndon Comer 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



F. & F. DECORATING COMPANY 

1 1 1 LOMA ALTA AVE. 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

Ann Loehde's Lamp Shade Studio 

CUSTOM MADE 

FRanklin 8-0420 

181 NO. WINCHESTER RD. 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

HILDING HERNSTEDT 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Residential Construction • Remodeling 

Phone ELgato 4-5599 

14975 BLOSSOM HILL ROAD 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

ADA'S BEAUTY SHOP 

All Types of Beauty Work 

CYpress 2-7484 
CORNER 14TH AND JULIAN 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Sund Television & Radio Co. 

Sale] • Custom Installation • Repair 

Herman E. Sund. Jr.. Electronics Engineer 

Phone ELgato 4-4962 

128 E. MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

COURT'S CABIN 

SAN JOSE-LOS GATOS ROAD 
AT CAMPBELL 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

MAIN STREET CAFE 

Always a Friendly Welcome 

Tony & Catherine Veloris 

Phone EL. 4-4558 

78 WEST MAIN 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 195', 



WELDING SERVICE CO. 



SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ACONDA HOTEL 

SAM and MARGARET WISE, Managing Owners 

CYpress 3-7663 
141 W. SANTA CLARA ST. 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Vendome CofFee and Turkey 
Pie Shop 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

PETE ROUKES. Proprietor 
163 W. Santa Clara St. Ph. CYpress 3-0232 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

PATSY'S SERVICE STATION 

Telephone CY. 3-9674 

PARK AVE. and SPENCER ST. 
Res.: 338 Royal Ave. CY. 5-0222 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

JIMMIE LYONS 

BELTONE Sales and Service Headquarters 

Certified Hearing Aid Audiologist 

CY. 4-3272 

309 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

KELLER AND BICHO MFG. CO. 

MACHINISTS • DESIGNERS 

JESS H. KELLER. Technical Manager 

KEN W. BICHO. Business Manager 

771 Coleman Ave. Phone CYpress 2-7716 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

HOLTON'S REAL ESTATE 

INSURANCE • NOTARY PUBLIC 

CY. 4-2524 
85 NORTH BASCOM AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



, CYpress 5-6504 

SODALITY MEAT CO. 

WHOLESALE MEAT JOBBERS 



Beef • Veal 



Pork 



596 AUZERIAS AVENUE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS 

GRANNIS FURNITURE 

Paul D. Grannis, Personalized Service 

OPEN MON.. WED.. FRI. EVES. 
TERMS — TRADE IN 

Telephone FRanklin 8-2745 

388 EAST CAMPBELL AVENUE 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

SARATOGA DRUG STORE 

Phone UN. 7-3423 



SARATOGA 



CALIFORNIA 



WHITLOW'S DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

p. O. BOX 598 
UN ion 7-3990 

SARATOGA CALIFORNIA 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

Fhe 1953 annual Uniform Crime Re- 
ports bulletin reveals the continuing in- 
crease of crime in the United States. The 
previous record number of crimes set in 

1952 increased six per cent last year. 
The estimated number of major crimes 
totaled 2,159,080. 

Rural crimes increased by a considera- 
bly larger percentage, 9.6, than did city 
crimes, up 4.5 per cent. Urban crimes in 

1953 were 39 per cent above the pre- 
World AVar II average of 1937-39. 

Fhe 1953 annual Uniform Crime Re- 
ports bulletin, based upon data submitted 
to the FBI by law enforcement agencies 
throughout the United States, reflects 
the following trends: 

Fhere were an estimated 2,159,080 
major crimes in the United States dur- 
ing 1953, an increase of six per cent over 
the 1Q52 figure of 2,036,510. 

Robberies led the individual increases 
with an 8.5 per cent rise over 1952, and 
burglaries followed closely with an in- 
crease of 8.2 per cent. 

Larceny rose 5.4 per cent, aggravated 
assault 5.3 per cent, and auto theft 5.2 
per cent. Crimes of rape increased 3.8 
per cent ; negligent manslaughter was up 
0.7 per cent. Murders were 1.2 per cent 
lower than in 1952, the only decline 
noted in the 1953 statistics. 

In the urban areas of the country, 
crime was up 4.5 per cent over 1952, 
with increases ranging from 2.6 per cent 
for rape to 8.3 per cent for robbery. The 
only decrease noted was in the murder 
category, down 2.2 per cent. 

Rural crimes in 1953 jumped 9.6 per 
cent higher than the 1952 total. The in- 
creases ranged from 0.4 per cent for 
murders to 16.5 per cent for burglaries. 
Negligent manslaughters, down 5.5 per 
cent, showed the only rural decrease. 

Seasonal variations in crime during 
1953 generally followed the pattern es- 
tablished in previous years. Murder and 
aggravated assault started from their 
lowest points in the early part of 1953 
and reached their peaks in the summer 
months. Rape also was more prevalent 
(luring the summer. On the other hand, 
robberies, burglaries and auto thefts oc- 
curred less frequently in the summer 
than in the cold months. Larceny-theft 
tended to rise steadily from the begin- 
ning to the end of the year. 

Negligent manslaughter was the only 
crime against the person to reach its low- 
est peak in the summer. Chiefly com- 
prised of traffic fatalities wherein the 

MARK MOTORS 

CY. 7-1720 
168S EAST SANTA CLARA 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



FRANK X. PARRY HARDWARE 

Established 1909 



212 S. MURPHY AVE. 
Tel. REgent 6-6134 



134 E. WASHINGTON ST. 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 



Greetings to the 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY PEACE OFFICERS 



Fitch, representing 

State Farm Mutual Insurance Co. 

559 S. TAAFE AVE. 
Ph. RE. 6-4204 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 



LARRY HOPKINS MOTORS 

Telephone 3474 
222 EL CAMINO REAL 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

CUPERTINO ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
TV Service 

AX 6-4414 
20S59 STEVENS CREEK RD. 

CUPERTINO CALIFORNIA 

Greetings to the 
SANTA CLARA COUNTY PEACE OFFICERS 

GOLDEN WEST DRY CLEANERS 

CY. 2-1052 
25 SO. 3RD ST. 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Campbell 4401 

FOOTHILL CONVALESCENT 
HOSPITAL. INC. 

24 HOUR NURSING CARE 
GEORGYA ASH, Manager 
676 W. PARR AVENUE 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

JAY'S 
SHEET METAL AND HEATING 

N. J. McCOY, Owner 
Phone FRanklin 8-4181 
871 LANTZ AVENUE 

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 

A SPECIALTY 

Phone FRanklin 8-4249 

635 SAN JOSE-LOS GATOS ROAD 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 

YOUR FAVORITE SPOT 

TONY'S BUSY BEE 
Cockta// Lounge 

Phone FR. 8-9871 

242 E. CAMPBELL AVENUE 

CAMPBELL CALIFORNIA 



June. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



Office CYpress 3-3326 Res. CYpress 2-98S6 

C. A. GUSSMAN 

TRUCKING CONTRACTOR 

Excavating and Grading 

Rotavating . Top Soil . Fill Dirt . Loam 

Free Estimates 

1033 THORNTON WAY 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

FLETCHER MOTOR CO. 

Phone BAllard 6600 
Res. Phone BAllard S752-W 

477 SOUTH MARKET STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

SAM BARTOLONE 

PLASTERING CONTRACTOR 
BUILDER 

FREE ESTIMATES 

AXminster 6-3996 
2250 SHERWIN AVENUE 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE BROTHERS 

GROWERS • SHIPPERS 

BOX 61 

SULTANA 

CALIFORNIA 



Associated Transportation Co. 

"Nothing to Sell But Service" 

B & CRADDOCK STREETS 

Phone 2-2323 
YUBA CITY 
CALIFORNIA 



DAVE RENSCHLER 

EXTERIOR - INTERIOR PAINTING 



The Price Is Right 
Service Guaranteed 



CALL RE 6-7080 



Phone REgent 6-4288 

LUND PLUMBING AND HEATING 

LICENSED CONTRACTOR 

RT. 1, BOX 727 

EL CAMINO REAL 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

Phone RE 6-7286 

GREG'S SPORT SHOP 



GEORGE A. GANANIAN 
539 S. MURPHY 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 



police investigation establishes gross neg- 
ligence, negligent manslaughter tends to 
rise sharply during the vviner when driv- 
ing conditions may be generally less fa- 
vorable. 

A tabulation of reports from 400 cities 
reflected that the value of property stolen 
in those cities last year totaled $224,- 
552,605. An average value of $1,038 
was placed upon 124,607 automobiles 
stolen in the 400 cities last year. Victims 
in these cities lost $222 in the average 
robbery, $163 in the average burglary, 
and $76 in thefts of property excluding 
automobiles. 

Data for 1953 concerning the age, sex 
and race of persons arrested is based 
upon reports which were submitted b\ 
law enforcement agencies representing 
1.174 American cities. This is the second 
successive year these figures have been 
published. One of the long-range goals of 
the Uniform Crime Reports program 
has been to obtain complete data con- 
cerning the age, sex and race of per- 
sons arrested directly from law enforce- 
ment agencies. This goal was partialh 
achieved in 1952 and 1953. 




Director J. Edgar Hoover 

Complete reports concerning persons 
arrested during 1953 were received by 
the FBI from 1,174 cities. These cities, 
representing 37,255,808 persons, or ap- 
proximately 42 per cent of the nation's 
urban population, submitted data con- 
cerning 1,791,160 arrests. 

The 1,174 cities reported that more 
than eight times as many males as fe- 
males were arrested during 1953. A 
study made of an average group of 1,000 
male arrests and 1,000 female arrests 
showed that in proportion a higher per- 
centage of the women than the men were 



OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 

GENE'S COUNTRY STORE 

COMPLETE MARKET 

ELgato 4-2772 
217 NORTH SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 



LOS GATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone CYpress 3-0497 

BIDDLE ROOFING 

HAROLD BIDDLE. Prop. 

DAVID BIDDLE. Mgr. 

Wood . Shingles . Composition 

Free Estimates 

LICENSED AND BONDED 

Rt. 3, Box 460-C 

McLaughlin avenue 

san jose california 

Open 'til 9 p. m. FR. 8-7471 

FREE DELIVER'^' 

LEITER'S PHARMACY 

THE REXALL STORE 
Prescriptions 

Cambrian Park Plaza 

14458 UNION ABENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

•EVERYTHING FOR THE ARTIST" 

THE ARTISTS PALETTE 

H. MILTON SNYDER. Artist 

Phone ELgato 4-4913 
248 NO. SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 



LOS GATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



THE PINK HOUSE 
Opposite The Little Village 

BERG'S ANTIQUES 

CLARENCE and MARGE BERG 

Telephone ELgato 4-3716 

• 30S NORTH SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

REAL ESTATE INSURANCE 

STYER REALTY ■ Reo/tor 

C. W. STYER 

REALTOR 

Res. ELgato 4-2529 

PHONE ELgato 4-1400 

400 N. SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

At comer of Saratoga Avenua 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



ELgato 4-2459 



GREEN THUMB NURSERY 

15796 SANTA CLARA - LOS GATOS ROAD 



LOS GATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone ELgato 4-2834 



BORTOLUSSI BROS. 

CEMENT AND STONE WORK 
17901 ANDREWS 



LOS GATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. 1954 



Phone ELgato 4-2312 BUD STEWART, Owner 

BUD'S AUTOBODY AND FENDER 

WRECK REPAIRS 
AUTO REFINISHING 
140 E. MAIN STREET 



LOS GATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



FOR APPOINTMENT 
Telephone EL. 4 4916 

THE LAWRY CONVALESCENT 
HOME 

J. H. FLEECER. Manager 

16304 SAN JOS EAVENUE 

LOS GATOS 

CALIFORNIA 

CHAS. M. CURRIER ■ Reo/for 

Business Opp. Broker - Real Estate 
Fire and Auto Insurance 

Telephone Sunnyvale RE 6-3071 or RE 6-467S 

323 SO. MURPHY STREET 
P. O. BOX 54 611 KNICKERBOCKER DR. 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

Wholesale Only . Jobbers Solicited 

PACIFIC AUTO ELECTRIC CO 

JIM STUART 

GENERATORS . STARTERS 

Voltage Regulators 

Regent 6-5053 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 



Cleaning 



Dye 



LEE WINTER ■ Upholstering 

SLIP COVERS . DRAPES 
AWNINGS . CANVAS GOODS 

Phone RE. 6-5201 
272 S. MURPHY 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 

PAUL AND HARVEY'S - CocktaUs 

PAUL GABRIEL 
Telephone 8816 



130 S. MURPHY AVENUE 

SUNNYVALE CALIFORNIA 



GREETINGS TO THE 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

PEACE OFFICERS 



RYAN 



SUNNYVALE 



CALIFORNIA 



GUARANTEED WORK 
ROTOTILLING 

L E R O Y 

70 San Jose - Los Gates Ro 
Campbell. California 
FRanklin 8-3404 



charged with murder, aggravated as- 
sault, larceny, and embezzlement and 
fraud. This study further showed that a 
higher percentage of the men were 
charged with burglary and auto theft. 
Of the 1,791,160 arrests recorded by 
the 1,174 reporting cities, 8.4 per cent 
were persons 17 years of age or less, and 
14.7 per cent were under 21. In the cate- 
gory of auto thefts, 53.6 per cent of all 
persons arrested were juveniles, and in 
fact 29 per cent were not even old 
enough to get a regular driver's license 
in most states. 

Nearly half of the persons arrested for 
burglary were not yet 18, and two-thirds 
of these were under 16 years of age. Per- 
sons under 21 represented 50.6 per cent 
of the arrests for crimes against property 
— robbery, burglary, larceny, auto theft, 
embezzlement and fraud, buying and re- 
ceiving stolen property, and forgery and 
counterfeiting. 



RIGHT-OF-WAY 

Many serious accidents are caused by 
drivers who may have the right of way 
but who insist on their rights in the face 
of almost certain disaster. This combina- 
tion of stubbornness and today's high- 
speed traffic has killed thousands, says 
the California State Automobile Asso- 
ciation. A driver who lets his actions re- 
sult in an accident, even when he has 
the right of way, may be held at fault 
by the court if he has the last clear 
chance to prevent it. 



T(J(r 



s^^tdzii^ 




B. SCHWARTZ & CO. 
of Ca/ifornfo 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

Benjamin F. Schwartz, President 

P. O. BOX 154 

Telephone AXminster 6-5414 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 

Res. Phone ELgato 4-3882 

HERBERT H. DAW 

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 

Phone ELgato 4-2324 

DAW REALTY 
16434 SAN JOSE AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

Phone ELgato 4-1304 

...UPLANDS... 

RESTRICTED HOMESITES 
Al Billingsley 



P. O. BOX 741 



CALIFORNIA 



FINEST OF DINNERS AND 
COCKTAILS 



ELLIOT'S RED COACH INN 

On the San Jose-Los Gatos Highway 



RALPH A. ANDERSON 
Auto Wrecking 

24- HOUR AUTO TOWING 

Wrecker Service 

Elgato 4-4442 

518 N. SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

Nights Sundays and Holidays Call 

ELgato 4-5121 

Ph. Elgato 4-1345 J. D. McDonald, Manager 

MCDONALD'S VAN & STORAGE 

Three Household Goods Warehouses 

PACKING . CRATING . SHIPPING 

Local and Long Distance Moving 

Agents for Allied Van Lines 

194 SARATOGA AVENUE 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

FRANK SURIAN 
Building Contractor 

Commercial and Residential 
Phone CY. 3-5295 

18790 ALMADEN ROAD 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

Phone ELgato 4-5S66 

DAN LANDERS 

WHERE OLD FRIENDS MEET 



2i/i Miles North of Los Gatos 
San Jose - Los Gatos Road 
rOS CALIFORNIA 



\june. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



MAYFAIR PACKING COMPANY 

DRIED FRUIT PACKERS AND EXPORTERS 

Buy SARATOGA Brand Fruits 

Phone CYpress S-S030 

P. O. Box 758 

Main Office and Plant 

1582 SOUTH HRST STREET 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA TERMITE AND 
FUNGI CONTROL COMPANY 

23 YEARS IN SAN JOSE 

B. R. Byrd, Owner-Operator 

1505 WASHINGTON AVE. 

Cypress 2-4191 CYpress 5-3707 

SAN JOSE 25 CALIFORNIA 

LYDIA'S REST HOME 

"A Home Away From Home for Aged 

Ambulatory Patients" 

Lydia Chessari, Prop. 

S386 ALUM ROCK AVE. 

CL. 8-2670 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ASSOCIATED METAL PRODUCTS 

G. GREENBERG 

Phone PR. 8-2675 

1040 LOVELL 



CAMPBELL 



CALIFORNIA 



THE GOLDEN BUDDHA 

ORIENTAL ARTS 

ELgato 4-2216 

307 N. SANTA CRUZ AVENUE 

LOS CATOS CALIFORNIA 

Telephone FRanklin 8-3154 

SUNSET ANNEX NURSING HOME 

COMPLETELY FIREPROOF 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Herman, Owners 
559 S. SAN JOSE-LOS GATOS ROAD 



CAMPBELL 



CALIFORNIA 



THE PALMS HOME 

For 

AMBULATORY PATIENTS 

Clean Rooms, with Board 

Phone ELgato 4-2787 

15049 SAN JOSE-LOS GATOS ROAD 

LOS CATOS CALIFORNIA 



DAY & YOUNG 

BUTTERSWEET PRODUCTS 



P. O. BOX 27 



SANTA CLARA 



CALIFORNIA 



BIG YELLOW BUS 

"Just who is the driver of that big 
yellow bus?" 

Any mother who scrubs and starches 
and sends her bright-eyed youngster off 
to catch the school bus for the first time 
wants the answer to this question ; and 
others, too. 

"How does the driver happen to be 
there? 

"Does he know his job? 

"Does he keep his bus in good condi- 
tion ? 

"Is my child safe in his hands?" 

It's only natural, since mother cannot 
take her youngster to school herself, that 
she wants to know all about the person 
who does the job. 

The driver of the bus may be a man 
or a woman. Many women drive school 
buses in various areas of the State. He, 
or she, must be at least eighteen years of 
age and possess a valid California Opera- 
tor's or Chauffeur's license. In order to 
obtain this license the applicant must 
pass vision, written and driving tests. 

Not required, but helpful to the driver 
are a combination of many of the at- 
tributes of the diplomat, doctor, janitor, 
lawyer, mechanic, parent and policeman 
in addition to top-flight driving ability. 

If the candidate possesses at least a 
majority of these attributes and a driv- 
er's license he is eligible for considera- 
tion for his school bus driver's certificate. 

He must pass a complete physical ex- 
amination and a written test on school 
bus operation and general traffic move- 
ment. Next comes an exacting driving 
test in a school bus. This test is con- 
ducted by a specially trained ofificer of 
the California Highway Patrol. 

There is an investigation of the pros- 
pective driver's background to determine 
if he has ever committed a felony, or 
has violated vehicle code regulations per- 
taining to personal injury, drunk driv- 
ing, or reckless driving for three j'ears 
past. Convictions of these offenses or ad- 
diction to alcohol or narcotics or other 
habit-forming drugs result in immediate 
disqualification. Any act of moral turpi- 
tude or attempt to falsify an application 
likewise eliminates the candidate. 

If the driver is of high moral character 
he is then instructed to obtain a first aid 
certificate from the American Red Cross 
or the Bureau of Mines. He has sixty 
days to obtain the card. Then he must 
e.xecute a written agreement to abide by 
all provisions of law pertaining to safe 
transportation of pupils. 

It is now apparent that the driver 
wants the job. A less determined person 
might have become discouraged and quit 
long ago. 



LOS GATOS REALTY CO. 

INSUR.ANCE 

ELgato 4-3030 

W. John Whisenant 

41 EAST MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



CHARLES A. REESE 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 



Phone FR. 8-6515 
15104 CHARLOTTE AVENUE 



LOS CATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



Res. ELgato 4-3356 Pohne ELgato 4-1779 

GUERIN & MORGAN 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Paving, Macadam Driveways 
Plant Mix Surfacing, All Types of Excavating 

J. P. GUERIN 
FARLEY ROAD 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 

Phone EL-gato 4-5536 

MAX J. NIGL 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR AND 
HOME BUILDER 

16392 BURTON ROAD 

LOS GATOS CALIFORNIA 



SCARDINA CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



661 KING'S ROW 
SAN JOSE 



WINTERS SHELL SERVICE 

DENNIS WINTER 

ELgato 4^9724 

280 EAST MAIN STREET 



LOS G.ATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



FAMOUS FOR FRIENDLINESS 

THE CRYSTAL BAR & CAFE 

Frank Cooney 

CYpress 4-7497 

42 W. SAN FERNANDO STREET 



CALIFORNIA 



FANNING'S MOTEL 

MRS. CL1 DE FANNING, Prop. 
"California-s Paradise- 
Phone EL Gato 4-3509 
214 SARATOGA AVENUE 



LOS GATOS 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 'V5-/ 



HOME LUMBER CO. 

NEW & USED BUILDING MATERIALS 

Phone HU. 6-1282 

RT. 4, BOX 3154F 

Corner of Franklin and Power Inn Road 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DOTTIE'S GIFT SHOP 

GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
Featuring "Awful Fresh" McFarlane's Candies 



Just Like Mother Used to Cook 

LET'S EAT CAFE 

Breakfast * Lunch • Dinner 
Steaks • Chops • Chicken Dinners 

IV. 7-1724 
Auburn Blvd. Opposite Wills Point 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

HOLMES SERVICE 

MOBIL GAS STATION 

TRAILER RENTALS 

Gas, Oil, Lubrication, Tire & Battery Service 
1901 FULTON AVE Phone IV. 9-8984 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

M. De BACCO - Tile Contractor 



LET'S USE TILE!— IT'S PERMANENT 

J. 1. McDermott Tile Co. 

TILE CONTRACTOR — CERAMIC 

700 FIFTY-SEVENTH STREET 
Office Phone HU 6-4617; Res. IV 9-0S71 

JACK McDERMOTT SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

LAWRENCE CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CARL K. LAWRENCE 

3020 V STREET 

HI. 6-3835 SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

IVanhoe 9-2940 

MID-WEST CONTRACTING CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
WATER & SEWER CONTRACTORS 
F. F. DAHMS 3210 FULTON AVE., 
Gen. Supt. SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

RUSTIC INN 

ZODA MATTHEWS, Owner 
COLD BEER ON TAP 



KITCHENETTES AIR CONDITIONED 

GEM AUTO COURT 

MIKE SCOTTO & MAURY PHILLIPS, Props. 
Phone: WA 5-9975 
99-E and 40 Business Routes 
1590 Auburn Blvd., 1 Mile N. of N. Sacramento 

Jim Grundman - Chevron Service 

GAS, OIL, ACCESSORIES, LUBRICATION 

TRAILER RENTALS 
23rd Ave. & Franklin Blvd. — Hlllcrest 7-3774 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WOODY'S TEXACO SERVICE 

••SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS— 
NOT A SIDELINE" 

Phone IV 7-6414 
3011 FAIROAKS BLVD., CARMICHAEL, CAL. 

Berkan & Clark , - Sheet Metal 

••PERSONALIZED SERVICE" 

WARM AIR HEATING SYSTEMS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

Oaks Blvd., 



"What does he do on the job?" the 
still apprehensive mother might ask. 

Most important, always, the driver 
must drive carefully. He must always 
operate the bus in a safe manner, having 
due regard for the welfare of the pupils. 
He is responsible for the safety of chil- 
dren while they are loading and unload- 
ing, and shall escort them across the 
street when necessary for safety. 

School bus drivers are charged with 
the orderl)' conduct of pupils on the bus 
and continued disorderly conduct of any 
student shall be grounds for denying 
transportation. 

Each driver must submit weekly writ- 
ten reports to his employer concerning 
the condition of the bus. This, however, 
is no special effort as he must inspect the 
bus daily and is always aware of its con- 
dition. Daily checks include windshield 
and wipers, lights, horn, brakes and 
doors. Unless these items are all in good 
condition, the bus may not roll. 

In the event of any accident the driver 
must immediately report the occurrence 
to the California Highway Patrol and 
must also remove the bus from operation 
if damage or defect makes continued use 
of the bus unsafe for transporting pupils. 
Legal requirements state that no driv- 
er may work more than 15 hours in any 
24 hours, and not more than 10 of these 
hours may be spent in actual driving. Of 
course, he must keep his bus clean at all 
times and is responsible for cleaning the 
bus at the end of each day's use. 

There are other rules to protect the 
children. There must be adequate artifi- 
cial light. The driver may not leave the 
bus when the motor is running or when 
the brakes are released. He must stop the 
bus and open the doors before crossing 
railroad tracks; and must not shift gears 
when actually crossing the tracks. 

No animal may be taken onto a school 
bus, no smoking is permitted when chil- 
dren are on the bus, and intoxicants in 
any form are never allowed on a school 
bus. No bus may be loaded in a manner 
that will interfere with the vision of 
the operator. 

Motorists know they must stop, re- 
gardless of direction of approach, any 
time they see the flashing red lights of 
the school bus. They also must remain 
stopped until the lights cease to flash. It 
is the job of the bus dri\er to see that 
these red lights are working as and when 
the\' should be. 

Finally, the driver shall report to the 
California Highway Patrol the vehicle 
license number and, if possible, the name 
and address of any operator who is guilty 
of violating any provision of the Vehicle 
Code which in any way endangers the 
safety of the pupils being transported. 



BEUTLER SHEET METAL 

HEATING, COOLING, SHEET METAL WORK 
FURNACES, COOLERS 

Phone IV 9-4141 — P.O. BOX 456 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

BARBARA WORTH STABLES 

BARBARA WORTH DODGE DON DODGE 



Tr 



HUNTERS, JUMPERS, STOCK AND 
CUTTING HORSES 

Phone 3400 Del Paso Blvd 
WA 5-5267 North Sacramei 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

D. B. RASMUSSEN. D.D.S. 

Phone IV. 9-6753 

5805 MARCONI AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL CALIF ORNIA 

CARLTON'S GARAGE 

AUTO REPAIRING— ONLY THE BEST 

3129 FAIR OAKS BLVD. — Phone IV. 9-5098 

CARMICHAEL, CALIF. 

Phone IVanhoe 9-9645 CLIFF FLEWELL 

FLEWELL'S GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

FREE ESTIMATES 

3115 FAIR OAKS BLBD., CARMICHAEL, CAL. 

RAY'S BARBER SHOP 

QUALITY HAIRCUTTING FOR THE ENTIRE 

FAMILY 
Hours 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. (Sundays Excepted) 

Phone IV. 9-1980 
1301 MORSE AVENUE, SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

E/B SPUDNUT COFFEE SHOP 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNERS 
Hours: 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

Phone IV. 9-3716 — 2464 AVALON DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

FIVE OAKS POULTRY FARM 

EGGS: WHOLESALE & RETAIL 

R. B. MOORMAN, Owner 

Phone IV. 7-6711 

4740 PALM AVE., Route 6, Box 1646 

4740 PALM AVE. ROUTE 6, BOX 1646 

ALLIED FUR INDUSTRIES 

— INC.— 

CHINCHILLA SALES, FEED, EQUIPMENT 

SUPPLIES 

OSCAR A. GIESE. Representative 

3145 Fair Oaks Blvd., Carmichael— IV 7-5912 

GERALD W. SWANSTON 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
FIRE— LIABILITY — AUTO 



FRANK M. RICE 

THE ROSEBUD 

NEW FURNITURE— RUGS— UPHOLSTERING 

Phone IV. 9-1464 
1976 FULTON AVE., SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

IV. 9-6547 

Preferred Insurance Exchange 

BERNARD F. COLBY 
3240 FULTON AVE.. SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

LEE AND SMITH 

CLARENCE W. LEE 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS 

IVanhoe 9-7618 

3415 FULTON AVE., SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



June. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



HERMINA FORD Phone IV. 9-4S83 

Kiddies Kingdom Day Nursery 

3600 Fair Oaks Across from Cardinal Store 
Blvd., near Watt Ave. Sacramento, Calif 

I COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

JDRIVE CAREFULLY 
The Life You Save 
May Be Your Own 

BLUE BIRD CLEANERS 

6213 Fair Oaks Blvd. at California Avenue 

DAY SERVICE 
Call For and Delivery Service — All Work Done 

in Our Plant 
GEO. WIGLEY, Owner Phone IV. 7-3SSS 

WALTER N. HOWE 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

Telephone IV. 9-0542 

5117 KOVANDA AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

VENTILATING COOUNG 

How's YOUR Heating Equipment? 

CARMICHAEL SHEET METAL 

ALL TYPES OF SHEET METAL WORK 
SHOP PHONE RES. PHONE 

IV. 9-5208 IV. 9-0504 

RAY HAZELWOOD 

PAINTING AND DECORATING 

SHEETROCK FINISHING, PAPER HANGING 

Free Estimates — Immediate Service 

2824 lONE STREET— IV. 9-4049 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

NEVA'S COFFEE SHOP 

FOUNTAIN — FOOD — GOOD COFFEIE 

HOME-MADE PIES 

Phone IV 9-9359 

6118 FAIR OAKS BOULEVARD 

NORTH CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

PARKER'S SHELL SERVICE 

WASHING — POLISHING — LUBRICATION 

3021 FAIR OAKS BLVD. — Phone IV. 7-3162 
CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

ARDEN TOWN JEWELER 

SPECIALIZING IN WATCH REPAIRING 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS to All Peace OFFICERS 

Returning This Ad. 

576 LA SIERRA DRIVE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



24-Hour Service Enpuku Rooms 

GEORGE OKIMOTO - Enpuku 

DEPENDABLE AUTO FOR HIRE 

LOCAL «. LONG DISTANCE 

Phone Gilbert 2-0351 Residence 601 N Street 

SACRAMENTO — CALIF. 

47th Avenue & Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, Cal. 

MILLER'S AUTO WRECKERS 

AND USED CARS 



FASOLO'S CAFE 

MEXICAN FOOD 

BREAKFAST — LUNCH — DINNER 

Phone HI. 7-2332 

Orders To Take Home 

4807 Folsom Blvd. SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

ED GLACKEN & SON 

GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR 

Brake, Carburetor, Starter, Generator Service 

MOTOR TUNE-UP 

Phone GI. 3-3534 — Rear 1322 O Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Phone GI. 3-3594 — Res. Phone CI. 2-2567 

JIMMIE'S EXPRESS 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE TRIPS 
REFRIGERATORS «c LUGGAGE 

407 N STREET, SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



"How well is the job being done?" 
seems a logical question. 

Based on California Department of 
Education figures, 5073 school buses car- 
ried 325,925 school children a total of 
45,500,00 miles to and from school last 
year. All types of accidents involving 
school buses totaled 326. There were 70 
injuries and two pupil deaths. Not all 
of the injured were children ; some were 
drivers. The fatally injured children 
were crossing the street either to board, 
or after alighting from, the bus. 

The river of the big yellow bus, then, 
is carefully selected, thoroughly trained 
and competent, and proud to be a mem- 
ber of that exclusive group of drivers 
who have compiled one of the best traffic 
safety records that exists anywhere. 

When mother scrubs and straightens 
junior and puts him on the school bus, 
she can turn with vigor to her daily 
tasks. Her fledgling is in good hands. 

TRAFFIC TAGS 

If you get a traffic ticket, it's one-out- 
of-three it'll be for speeding. 

In a survey just completed by the Cal- 
ifornia Highway Patrol 33.7 percent of 
all traffic citations written by the Patrol 
were shown to be issued for driving too 
fast for existing conditions. 

"Need of this type of enforcement is 
emphasized by the fact that 34.8 percent 
of all accidents in unincorporated areas 
of the state were caused by excessive 
speed and reckless driving," Patrol Com- 
missioner B. R. Caldwell pointed out. 

"Because speed is by far the greatest 
cause of accidents, we are directing a 
proportionate share of enforcement at- 
tention to this dangerous driving prac- 
tice." 

"Also, in order that no motorist may 
be taken by surprise, we want everyone 
to know in advance that an important 
objective of the Patrol will be the appre- 
hension of speeders," he said. 

"During the early part of this year a 
few motorists were arrested for speeds 
in excess of one hundred miles per hour, 
though the great majority of those 
stopped were traveling from five to fif- 
teen miles per hour over the limit. 

"Since it is widely known that speed 
kills, motorists should have enough feel- 
ing of self-preservation to observe the 
legal limits. If they don't they'll face the 
alternative of firm enforcement action." 
Caldwell declared. 



HOLIDAY DRINKING 

Don't let Holiday drinking end in 
Holiday dying, advises the National 
Automobile Club. If you've been drink- 
ing, lion't drive. 



FRED STRUVE 

CEMENT CONTRACTOR 
PATIOS, OKIVES, WALKS, STEPS 

Terms Arranged 

Phone HI. 6-7022 

emon Hill Avenue, — SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

SOUTH SIDE GROCERY 

MANUEL J. MACHADO, Prop. 
MEAT— VEGETABLES— LIQUORS— FISH 



Pho 



GI. i-9364 



COMPLIMENTS OF - 

STEELE & EASTON 

EXCAVATING CONTRACTORS 



2937 35th St. 



Pho 



BOYER'S BARBER SHOP 

Featuring CHILDREN'S HAIRCUTS 
LADIES' — MEN'S 

392 4Sth St. (between C & D Sts.) Sacramento 

MERRILL BOYER, Owner — Phone HI. 6-1667 

Highway 50 Telephone HI. 7-9000 

LA SIERRA MOTEL 

MR. AND MRS. FRED CLARK, Owners 
NONE BETTER IN CALIFORNIA 

ROUTE 2. BOX 255 1 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Lucca Italian Grocery and Meat 
Market 

OPEN DAILY 8:30 A.M. TO 7:00 P.M. 
SUNDAYS, HOLIDAYS 9:00 A.M. TO 1:30 P.M. 

5001 FOLSOM BOULEVARD 
Phone HI. 7-1911 SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Sacramento Building Specialties 

Finished Lumber, Builders' 
Hardware, Electric Supplies 



Pho 



DON HAZEL 

D & H CLUB 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
3221 FOLSOM BOULEVARD Phone HI. 5-9568 

Dial HU 6-0179 On Highways 99 & 50 

SWAN MOTEL 

CLEAN, COMFORTABLE MODERN COTTAGES 

i,»-Mile South of City Limits 
RTE. 4, BOX 3310 — STOCKTON BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

ERMA RAY ■ Fountain Lunch 

GOOD HAMBURGERS, THICK SHAKES 

COLD BEER, SOFT DRINKS 

CAS AND OIL 

STOCKTON BLVD. AT FLORIN ROAD 

Phone HI. 5-9928 SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Phone HlUcresl 7-6583 

C AND C AUTOMOTIVE 

JOBBERS 



EASTERN MARKET 

MEATS — GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 

Phone HI. 51584 

3901 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



CAPRA'S - Profess/ono/ Pharmacy 

3230 FOLSOM BOULEVARD, SACRAMENTO 

M ST. LAUNDRY 

3-DAY SERVICE 

Dial HI. 5. 4075 

3175 FOLSOM BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 195-, 



KANZLER'S Upholstering Studio 

CUSTOM-MADE FURNITURE, RESTYLING 
DRAPERIES 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Graham - Hoeme Plow Co.,inc. 

Phone HUlcrest 7-0388 
6260 STOCKTON BOULEVARD (REAR) 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CARL H. PEARSON 



NICK ZUPAN Phone GI. 2-3466 

ZUPAN SHEET METAL 

Gutters — Valleys — Sinks — Hoods 

Steam Tables — Furnaces — Coolers — Fans 

2110 FIFTH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

HI. 5-6763 

ANDY'S - Cleaners 

Our Motto 
•TO SATISFY" 
2726 X STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

LA SIESTA MOTEL 

SACRAMENTO'S MOST MODERN MOTEL 

AIR CONDITIONED 

Dial HI 6-533S 

S8SS STOCKTON BLVD. ON HIGHWAY 99 

SOUTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone HI 7-2372 Res.: HU 6-0156 

Oak Park Upholstering Co. 

FURNITURE MADE TO ORDER 



WHITTING'S PLANING MILLS 



PEGG'S PALLET EXCHANGE 

PALLETS MADE TO ORDER 
REPAIRED & ALTERED 

Office Phone: HUnter 6-5 190 
5889 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Y. Ishihara Manufacturing Co. 

CEMENT LAUNDRY TRAYS 

WHOLESALE — RETAIL 

Space-Saving 18-inch Width Singles 

Phone HU. 4-2650 — 510 P STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

McMAHON & FORD 

Developers of Beautiful Fruitridge Manor 
and the Fruitridge Shopping Center 

5653 STOCKTON BLVD. 

Dial HU. 6-8419 SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Specializing in Construction Repair 

FLORIN WELDING 

AUTOMATIC HARD SURFACING 

ART DUNTON and GID SCHNAIDT 



HUnter 6-2764 



CALIFORNIA 



Perkins Lumber & Supply Co. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE BUILDER 



HI. 5-2307 



CALIFORNIA 



GREETINGS TO ALL OUR FRIENDS 

CLINE'S SURPLUS 

NEW AND USED FURNITURE 

Phone. IV. 7-1362 
4936 AUBURN BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SUMMER COURSES 

Special summer short courses for_go- 
lice executives, conmiercial motor fleet 
supervisors, driver education teachers, 
police instructors, and chemical test tech- 
nicians will be offered during June and 
July at the Trafllic Institute of North- 
western University. 

Franklin M. Kreml, director of the 
Traffic Institute, has announced that 
eight courses varying in length from 
three days to two weeks will be oitered 
during the 7th annual Suminer Institute 
for Traffic Training on the Evanston, 
111., campus from June 10 to July 30. 

Ihe courses are: 

Seminar for Traffic Administrators, 
June 10T2. 

Public Information Programs for Po- 
lice, June 21-25. 

Motor Fleet Supervision, June 21-25. 

Seminar for Driver Education Teach- 
ers, June 2TJuly 2. 

Accident Records and Their Uses, 
July 12-16 (offered by the National 
Safety Council). 

Training Methods and Programs for 
Police, July 12-23. 

Supervisory Officers 'Training Course, 
July 19-30. 

Chemical Tests for Into.xication, July 
26-30. 

The annual three-day 'Traffic Safety 
Clinic for Newspapermen, sponsored by 
the Inland Daily Press Association, Me- 
dill School of Journalism, and the IVaffic 
Institute, and usually held in July, will 
be conducted September 15-17. 

Descriptions of the courses follow: 

SEMINAR FOR 'TRAFFIC AD- 
MINIS'TRA'TORS — June 10-12. 
MINIS'TRATORS — June 10-12. 
Open to chiefs of men in the nine-month 
traffic police administration course and 
other police executives by invitation, this 
seminar will take up new developments 
and trends in police traffic work and will 
discuss specific problems. Reports will be 
made on complete Traffic Institute re- 
search projects. 

PUBLIC INFORMATION PRO- 
GRAMS FOR POLICE (TRAF- 
FIC)— -June 21-25. For police officers 
with public information functions in re- 
lation to traffic safety in city or state 
police departments. 'The course will cen- 
ter around discussions of public informa- 
tion activities that have been found suc- 
cessful in helping reduce accidents, and 
techniques in contacting and aiding news- 
papers, radio stations, television stations, 
school safety programs, and civic groups. 
Fee is $40.00. 

MOTOR VEHICLE FLEET SU- 
PERVISION— June 21-25. For Fleet 
owners, operators, supervisors, safety en- 



MILLS WINERY 

PAUL KERSHAW, JR. 
BULK WINES RETAIL 



TOM'S TRAILER EXCHANGE 

3'/2 Miles East of Perkins, North Side U. S. 50 
We Pay Cash for House Trailers 

Sell Easy Terms 
HUlcrest 7-5185— P. O. Box 196 

PERKINS CALIFORNIA 

O. T. ILLERICH 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER 

Consulting 

HUlcrest 5-4557 

10S8 FOKllETri biREET 

SACRAMENI0 19 CALIFORNIA 

Open 7 Days a Wek Phone HI. 7-2945 

Smitty's Hobby & Sport Shop 

HOBBIES FOR THE ENTIkE FAMILY 

Fresh and Salt Water Fishing Hqtrs. 

117 Tallac Village Square, 14th Ave. at 60th St. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORM.A 

SADLER POULTRY FARM 

"Freshest Eggs In Town" 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WATERIN' TROUGH CAFE 

GOOD EATS AND GOOD BEER 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



KARA'S DRIVE-IN MARKET 

MEATS • GROCERIES • VEGETABLES 
DRY GOODS 

EVERYTHING UNDER ONE ROOF 



Pho 



HI. 6-8602 



CALIFORNIA 



COLLEGE CAFE 

MRS. TOMMIE L. EVANS, Prop. 

HOME MADE PIE AND CHILI 

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinners 

Phone HI. 5-9598 

FOLSOM BLVD. 14 Mile East of Subway 

"Two Heel" Shoe Sales & Repairs 

WOODRUFF BROS., Props. 

"Peters" Shoes for the Entire Family 

Ph. HU. 6-3368 

5352 FRUITRIDGE RD. & STOCKTON BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WILLIAMS ELECTRIC SERVICE 

LICENSED ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

Phone HUlcrest 6-4619 

Res. Phones: HI. 5-1714 - HI. 6-5747 

1100 SIXTY-FIFTH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BOULEVARD MOTOR SERVICE 

Phone HU. 6-3146 
6512 FOURTEENTH AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

LOVERDE MARKET 

Groceries and Fresh Vegetables • Grade A Meat 

Phone HI. 7-8737 

Wo Give S & H Stamps - GAS, OIL AND ICE 

1/2 Mile East of Stockton Blvd. on Fruitridge Rd. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SPONSORED BY 

ELKINS SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

1640 THIRTY-SEVENTH STREET 

DRIVE CAREFULLY 



Thompson's Boarding Kennels 

JIM & MELBA THOMPSON. Owners 

A Home Away From Home for Your Dog or Cat 

Phone GI. 2-1382 

3208 B STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Junf. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pa^e 43 



BLUE AND WHITE KITCHEN 



Florin Barber and Beauty Shoppe 



HU. 6-4465 



FLORIN 



CALIFORNIA 



WALSH SERVICE STATION 

SHELL PRODUCTS 

GAS • OIL • LUBRICATION 

Phone HU. 6-3682 

JACKSON HIGHWAY & BRADSHAW ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GREETINGS FROM 

CALIFORNIA MARKET 

p. O. Box 336 Ph. HI. 5-9084 

V. Q. QUIAOT. Notary Public 

FLORIN CALIFORNIA 

CONWAY TRUCK CO. 

LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE HAULING 

Phone WA. S-9588 
P. O. BOX 517 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

COLLY REALTY 

'SUBURBAN HOMES 

Office: FULTON AVE. at CARSON WAY 

Tel. IV. 7-5115 or IV. 9-0447 

31 OO FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

RAY RAYMOND 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL 

216 North 12th Street HU. 4-2454 

Res. 2620 Tioga Way IV. 9-8573 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Rainbow Gardens Roller Rink 

JAMES V. GUIDER, Manager 

Telephone IVanhoe 9-985S 
2436 AUBURN BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO 2 I CALIFORNIA 

STEVE O'NEIL 



GEORGE D. CROCKER 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 
Specializing in Residential Paperinf & Painting 

530 Senator Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone WA. S-2123 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Mohawk Petroleum Corporation 

Sacramento Division 

Telephone IV. 7-0515 

AUBURN BLVD. & FULTON AVE. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Gambles Western Auto Supply Co. 

ROUTE 7, BOX 1321 
Phone IV. 9-S660 

SACR..\MENTO CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE'S BARBER SHOP 
and G. & M. BEAUTY SHOP 

MEN WOMEN and CHILDREN 
Hair Specialists— Quality Work 



BIRD'S MARKET 

MEATS • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 

Hours 8-7 — Sundays 9-2 

Phone IV. 7-2409 

S837 AUBURN BLVD. 

SACR.AMENTO CALIFORNIA 



gineers, training or personnel directors, 
and others connected with fleet safety. 
Stresses making the fleet safety program 
more effective ; getting good drivers ; 
keeping records to improve efficiency and 
reduce accidents ; more effective training 
of drivers. Tuition $40.00. 

SEMINAR FOR DRIVER EDU- 
CATION TEACHERS — June 21- 
July 2. Designed to acquaint teachers 
with the newest developments in all as- 
pects of highway transportation as well 
as current problems in driver education. 
Among topics discussed will be recent 
findings in the nature and characteristics 
of the driver, new problems and solu- 
tions in traffic engineering, advance of 
driver licensing, driver improvement pro- 
grams, trends in vehicle design, traffic 
courts, laws, traflRc law enforcement, 
new developments in school traffic safety 
programs, and training problems in driv- 
er education. Fee is $75.00. 

ACCIDENT RECORDS AND 
THEIR USES— July 12-16. Sponsored 
by the National Safety Council for city, 
county, and state personnel who work 
with traffic records. 1 he course provides 
training in collecting and processing of 
accident data for use in traflSc accident 
prevention work. Fee is $30.00. 

TRAINING METHODS AND 
PROGRAMS FOR POLICE — July 
12-23. Open to directors of police de- 
partment training programs, personnel 
assigned to training, and staff officers. 
Course will cover relation of training to 
improved police service, determination of 
training needs, developing a training pro- 
gram, fundamental principles of teaching, 
factors that conditon learning, use of 
visual aids, use of reports and records, 
and preparation of training outh'nes. Fee 
is $75.00. 

SUPERVISORY OFFICERS 
TRAINING COURSE — July 19-30. 
For police officers with command or su- 
pervisory responsibilities, and personnel 
and training officers. Purpose of the 
course is to develop understanding of 
human relationships to increase effective- 
ness in dealing with police personnel on 
nil levels. Fee is $75.00. 

CHEMICAL TESTS FOR IN- 
TOXICATION — July 26-30. For 
technicians and other persons from po- 
h'ce, health, and medical departments 
who niav be called upon to determine de- 
gree of intoxication. The course includes 
classroom lectures and laboratory in- 
struction in the use of breath, blood, and 
urine tests for determining intoxication 
of drivers and pedestrians. Fee is $40.00. 

Further information may be obtained 
bv writing the Traffic Institute, 1704 
Judson Avenue, Evanston, III. 



CHUNGKING CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

Phone for Parties • Reservations 

Orders to Take Out 

4090 Stockton Blvd. Phone HI. 5-0167 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Nelson's Jay-Cee Restaurant 



Murray's Associated Station 



A. Levy and J. Zentner Co. 



Pete and Marion's New Deal Cafe 

MANUEL PAULO. Prop. 

Phone GI. 3-9822 
430 NORTH 12TH ST. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WASH-RITE LAUNDRY 

INDIVIDUAL LAUNDRY SERVICE 
BENDIX EQUIPMENT 
J. F. & Louise Olmsted 



Western Aluminum Corporation 

ALUMINUM BUILDING MATERIALS 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

411 NORTH 16TH STREET 

Telephone HUdson 4-9159 

SACRAMENTO 14 CALIFORNIA 

M . C . BRINES 

COMPLETE PAINTING SERVICE 

Office Phone HI. 5-4623 
3007 FRANKLIN BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

YOUNG'S MARKET 

COMPLETE FOOD LINE . . . BEER AND WINE 

HI. 5-0847 
5610 STOCKTON ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SAVING CENTER MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, Vegetables, Liquors 

Dial HI. 6-2697 
4070 STOCKTON BLBD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STUCKY'S HARDWARE. INC. 

Frigidaire Appliances. Occidental Gas Ranges 
Store No. 1, 4106 Franklin Blvd.. Sacramento 

Hlllcrest 7-6576 

Store No. 2, 1 1th & Mich., West Sacramento 

Gilbert 3-5417 

LESLIE OSWALD 

EXPERT AUTO RADIATOR REPAIRING 
GAS TANK REPAIRING 

Phone 4-2929 
1208 T STREET (Rear) 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STOCKER AUTO SERVICE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 

HU. 6-6014 • Res. HI. 5-0050 
2500 SUTTERVILLE ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



S. & M. MOTOR SALES 

LOOK 
WE BUY - SELL - TRADE USED CARS 

BOB MARSTON. Prop. 

2420 Broadway Dial HI. 5-0543 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June J lOSl] 



Y-MOTEL CLUB 

AND BOTTLE SHOP 

MIXED DRINKS . COCKTAILS 

GOOD FOOD 

Phone IV 7-7403 
Corner of AUBURN BLVD. & FULTON AVE. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



99 TOUR -O -TEL MOTEL 

TOPS IN COMFORT 

SHOWERS . GARAGES . KITCHENS 

AIR CONDITIONED . HEATED 

Dial IV 7-I06S 
ROUTE 7, BOX 1215 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BAY CITIES EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 

Construction and Earth Moving Equipment 

601 FULTON AVENUE, SACRAMENTO 
Phone IV 9-8298 

2606 CYPRESS STREET, OAKLAND 
Phone TW 3-8313 

MOORE'S 
WINDOW & BLIND SUPPLY 

E. L, MOORE. Owner 



Cloth Shade 

Window Screens 

HARDWARE . 



Blinds 



IV 9-9047 
2031 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



DON'S BEAUTY DECK 

Telephone IV 9-7148 
2727 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone IV 7-2213 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

KOUPAL'S BAKERY 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL 

Homes of the Twisted Kruller 
Special Rates for Private Parties 

Route 7, Box 1238 
AUBURN BLVD. NEAR WATT AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

We Buy Your Entire Stock or Sell on 
Commission 

"99" 
NINETY-NINE LIQUIDATORS 

Liquidators and Auctioneers 

3012 AUBURN BOULEVARD 
IVanhoe 9-7626 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Telephone IVanhoe 9-2326 

Pacific Coast Insulation Co. 

M. L. FR^•E. Owner 

Licensed and Insured Contractor 

Paico Wool Distributors and Applicators 

HOUSE AND COLD STORAGE 



Rt. 7, Box 1390 
AUBURN BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



ID BUREAU ADVANCES 

There have been many changes in the 
Sacramento Police Department's identifi- 
cation bureau and the one man who has 
been around to see most of them is Les 
Co.x, superintendent of the bureau since 
1037. 

Cox, who succeeded Captain Max P. 
Fisher, founder of the bureau, recalls 
ancient systems of filing and complicated 
setups for taking identification photo- 
graphs in use when he joined the bureau 
in February, 1922. 

"At least I had it better than Captain 
Fisher," Cox declares with a smale, "He 
used shoe boxes for filing cabinets, and 
an old, beat up box camera to take mug 
shots when he opened the bureau about 
1900." 

^\Tien Cox first became part of the 
bureau the staff consisted of Captain 
Fisher, his daughter, Alice Fisher, and 
Irene Richter. 

Today there are nine men and three 
women in the bureau. They include, in 
addition to Cox, John L. Crump, assist- 
ant superintendent, John D. Lane, Nor- 
man Readdy, James E. Smith, Herbert 
Hoover, Bryon W. Onser, Noel LaDue, 
Florence Vesey, LeAnn Manby and Lil- 
lian .Ava Andretta. 

In place of the old box camera are two 
of the latest type flash cameras, one of 
which takes both side and front \iews on 
the same negative and also can be used for 
full length photos. The bureau also has 
its own darkroom for processing photos. 

Another camera for making copies of 
fingerprints and signatures also is part of 
the equipment. 

To point up the growth of the depart- 
ment since he joined it. Cox estimates 
more than 400,000 indi\idual records are 
on file today as compared to 100,000 
then. 

The department averages about 1,100 
identifications annually. About 900 of 
this total are connected with criminal 
work while the remaining 200 in con- 
nection with license applications and the 
like. 

The pro\imit\- of the bureau to the 
state department of criiuinal investigation 
and identification which has headquarters 
in the Capitol eliminates the need for a 
ballistics expert or chemist. All such work 
for the department is handled by the CTI. 

The great value of the identification 
bureau is spotlighted by the fact 15 burg- 
laries, a grand theft and two petty theft 
cases were solved in 1953 by identifica- 
tions made through latent fingerprints 
found at the scene. Cox said this figure 
has been about the annual average in the 
last few years. 



"TAKE - E . HOME 

FINE CHINESE FOOD 
TO TAKE OUT 



IVanhoe 9-6381 
2853 FULTON ABE. at MARCONI AVE. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFOR NIA 

VERN CALLISON'S 
Cocktail Lounge 

FULTON «t MARCONI 

Phone IV. 9-9868 
2878 FULTON AVENUE 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

C. S. GRACEY 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

Wiring — Complete Service 
RESIDENTIAL— COMMERCIAL 

IVanhoe 9-2922 

611 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORN IA 

P . S . DYER 

REALTOR 

REAL ESTATE . LOANS 
AND INSURANCE 

Phone IV. 9-3175 

1921 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



RANDY WAGAMAN 

REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE 

Phones: IV. 9-3677 — IV. 9-9514 
2760 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone IVanhoe 9-4711 

VALLEY SEED & NURSERY 

FLOWERS OR VEGETABLES 
Special Services for Police and Peace Officers 



Auburn Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO 



at White Bears 

CALIFORNIA 



TUPPERWARE HOME PARTIES. 
INC. 

RINGER SALES 
Vacuum Sealing Unbreakable Dishes 
For Food Storage and Preservation 

FOR INFORMATION OR DEMONSTRATION 

511 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GRAVELY TRACTOR SALES 
AND SERVICE 

John W. Heinen, Manager 

FOR LAWN - GARDEN & FIELD 

Phone: WAbash 5-2338 

2105 ARDEN WAY 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



///;),. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



C. E. "Mac" Magouirk Lee R. Magouirk 

MAGOUIRK AUTO AND TRUCK 
SERVICE 

MOTOR TUNE-UP • MOTOR REBUILDING 

WHEEL ALIGNING • 24-HOUR TOWING 

Business Phone IV. 9-3166 

lARVllCHAEL CALIFORNIA 

CARMICHAEL 

Upholstering & Mattress Co. 

Mattresses Remade • Box Springs 

Furniture Upholstered • Trailer Cushions 

N. PAYNE 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Phone IV. 9-6443 
4149 GARFIELD AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

ARDEN PHARMACY 

R. B. HAMILTON 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

Complete Stock Home Medicinal Needs 

Phone IV. 9-7607 
520 LA SIERRA DRIVE (Arden Town) 

SACRAMENTO 2 I CALIFORNIA 

TOMAHAWK TOGS 

Custom Made 

MOTORCYCLE JACKETS AND SEATS 
RELINING— ZIPPERS— KNIT CUFFS 

Phone IV. 7-7296 
3127 FAIROAKS BLVD. 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

CROWDER & SON 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
IVanhoe 9-6667 

820 EL CHORRO WAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STANDARD FURNITURE CO. 

Modern— Maple — Provincial— Contemporary 
EDWARD SAMOVILLE 



IVanhoe 9-7689 
2171 FULTON ABENUE 

SACRAMENTO 2 1 CALIFORNIA 

FARMERS INSURANCE GROUP 

GENE SPENCER. Agent 
Carmichael Area 



Phone IV. 9-9697 
2916 FAIROAKS BLVD. 



CARMICHAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



CARMICHAEL COUNTRY 
MARKET 

MEATS • GROCERIES • VEGETABLES 
VARIETIES • DRUG SUPPLIES 

Phone IV. 9-6082 
7021 FAIROAKS BLVD. 

NORTH CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 



McDonnell raises sights 

Judge James M. McDonnell, who has 
been closely associated with the Sacra- 
mento Police Department for more than 
15 years as a prosecutor and judge, is 
trying for a new and better job. 

He is campaigning for the Superior 
Court bench in a three-way race against 
Superior Judge James H. Oakley and At- 
torney Otis D. Babcock, former Sacra- 
mento County District Attornev. 







Judge McDonnell 

Since June, 1940, McDonnell has 
served as a jurist in Sacramento. He was 
city prosecutor before his appointment as 
police judge. When the voters approved 
the municipal court in 1943 he was se- 
lected to the bench and won a six-year 
term. He was unopposed for reelection in 
1949. 

In his capacity as judge of Department 
1 of the Municipal Court he handles all 
misdemeanor cases presented by the po- 
lice department and many of the felony 
preliminary hearings. 

Many honors have come to Judge Mc- 
Donnell since he ascended the bench. In 
1948 his court tied for first place with 
Tulsa, Okla., in cities throughout the na- 
tion with populations of from 100,000 to 
200,000 in a traffic court contest. Sacra- 
mento and Tulsa were selected from 
more than 200 cities for improvements in 
traffic court procedures and for effective- 
ness in aiding the cause of highway safet\'. 

The State Judicial Council has selected 
him on several occasions to sit on the Su- 
perior Court bench in nearby counties. 

In 1952 Judge McDonnell was se- 
lected as one of 26 judges who served on 
a state judicial council committee which 
studied ways and means of impro\'ing the 
administration of justice in traffic cases. 



sierra view funeral chapel 

"Steady Growth Through Service" 

HUGH E. KENNEDY 
Funeral Director 

2701 NORTH FAIR OAKS BLVD. 
IVanhoe 9-0271 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

JIM'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 



SERVICE OUR SPECIALTY 

3041 FAIR OAKS BLBD. 
Phone IV. 9-1652 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

Tel. IV. 7-0807 

HABIT CLEANERS 

5105 FAIR OAKS BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL 



CALIFORNIA 

2200 WEST CAPITOL AVENUE 
WEST SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

THE BREAKERS 

BILL MERENDA, Manager 

Phone IV. 9-9994 
3300 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

RICHARD E. COONLEY. D.D.S. 

564 LA SIERRA DRIVE 
Phone IV. 9-3113 

ARDEN TOWN CALIFORNIA 

VISIT OUR NURSERY 

Fair Oaks Boulevard Nursery 

Quality Merchandise at Reasonable Prices 
POTTED PLANTS 

IV. 9-9870 
4408 FAIR OAKS BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Trouble Shooting 



Ph. IV. 9-1364 



L. W. SCOTT 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 
Residential • Commercial 

2521 DUARTE COURT 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

W. HACK GREEN 

WELL DRILLING 
Licensed Contractor 

TEST DRILLING • WATER WELLS 

Phone IVanhoe 9-0522 
2500 VERNA WAY 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June. 195 



OREN GENTRY 
IV. 9-9781 



VERN GENTRY 
HU. 6-5712 



GENTRY BROS. 

CONCRETE CONTRACTORS 

FREE ESTIMATES 

2481 VALLEY ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Veneering Barbecues Planter Boxes 

GRAND CANYON CAST STONE 

A. MILNE CAL WYATT 

Phone WAbash 5-4228 
208 ALMOND AVENUE 



NO. SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



le HI. 6-7441 Phone IV. 9-9424 

CAMPBELL DECORATORS 

PAINTING • DECORATING 
COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL 



Finest Workmanship and Mate 
"For People Who Care" 

5614 McADOO AVENUE 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



JIFFY PORTABLE STEAM 
CLEANING COMPANY 



SHOPPING CARTS. AUTOMOBILES, TRUCKS 

Wa 5-2122 
3820 MAHOGANY STREET 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 

MAC'S VARIETY STORE 

YARD GOODS • TOYS 

ALL YOUR NEEDS 

Phone HU. 6-0332 
5614 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SMITH BROS. PHARMACY 

MRS. ROSS L. SMITH, Prop. 

Phone HI. 5-7698 

Professional Prescription Pharmacist 

FREE DELIVERY 

Since 1924 

3900 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

QUICK'S SERVICE 

MOBIL PRODUCTS • UHAUL TRAILER 
Local and One Way 

BRAKE SERVICE 

Phone HI. 5-9635 
3400 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CLARK'S WELDING WORKS 

ELECTRIC • ACETYLENE 

Contractors', Loggers and Industrial Equipment 

Specializing in 

Building, Repairing and Rebuilding 

Hlllcrest 5-2714 — Res. HI. 6-8434 
FOLSOM BLVD. AT PERKINS 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



He also has served as a member of the 
subcommittee on pretrial court procedure 
of the State Judicial Council. 

And only last month he was a member 
of a panel which discussed traffic court 
procedure at the University of Southern 
California under the sponsorship of the 
university's school of law, the American 
Bar Association and the Traffic Institute 
of Northwestern University. 

Judge McDonnell's friends in the law 
enforcement field are wishing him luck 
in his campaign, and many are working 
for him. One of his chief supporters is 
Mervin H. Reith, former Sacramento 
City Prosecutor. 

Whether he wins or loses, he still will 
be on the bench. His municipal court 
term does not run out this year. 



RIGHT READING 

It is not uncommon for the motor car 
owner to make the error of taking a hy- 
drometer reading of the battery just after 
the electrolytic solution has been replen- 
ished with water, points out the National 
Automobile Club. At such time the acid 
and water have not mixed and the gra\- 
ity reading is bound to be incorrect. The 
proper time to take note of the charge is 
after the car has been run for several 
iiours and the solution has had time to 
integrate. 



SLOW DOWN 

Slow down after the sun goes down, 
advises the National Automobile Club. 




a,„„(i^..- 



"There's slitl iwlhing nvrong <wilh the old re- 
flexes. Notice the neat ivay I avoided that 
joker in the car back there?" 



^ 



GARDNER CONVALESCENT 
HOME 



Phone HI. 7-0625 



2618 X STREET 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA; ',) 



KRUEGER'S MARKET 

Groceries — Lunch Meats — Vegetable 
Beverages 



Phone HI. 5-6760 
2620 T STREET 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA; 



BIRELEY'S BOTTLING COMPANY 



1200 SIXTY-npTH STREET [ 

SACRAMENTO 16 CALIFORNIA 



LEMON HILL NURSERY 

GROWER-PLANTS, SHRUBS & TREES 

Wholesale — Retail 

Dial HI. 6-8592 

Rt. 4, Box 3970 

One Half MUe South of City Limit 

On Stockton Blvd. — 1 Block East 

Lemon Hill Avenue 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

PARK LANE MOTEL 

New and Modern 36 Units and Apartments 
LARGE TRAILER COURT 



SACRAMENTO 



th of Fruitridge I 
. S. Highway 99 
: 2999 
HU. 6-6361 



Rt 



CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN BUILDING SPECIALTIES 

R. W. BLAKEMORE 

BUILDERS HARDWARE 
BUILDING SPECIALTIES 



Phone: HUdson 6-6466 
6409 EASTERN AVE. 



SACRAMENTO 1 Q 



CALIFORNIA 



Deale 



Ford Tractor — Dearborn Farm Equipment 

DOME TRACTOR COMPANY 

AND USED FARM MCHINERY 

REPAIR PARTS AND SERVICE 

TRACTORS AND FARM IMPLEMENTS 

6200 Folsom Blvd. — Phone: Hlllcrest 6-8922 

Ford Dealer — O. E. Saugstad, 308 Vernon St. 

Roseville, Calif. Phone 203 or 513 

Ford Tractors & Used Farm Machinery — Wood 

land Tractor Co., West Main, Woodland, Calif. 

Phone: 2-S669 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



HILLTOP CAFE 

BEER • WINE • LIQUOR 

5040 FOLSOM BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



June. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



ANNOUNCING 

THE SQUARE DEAL ROOFING CO. 

ALL TYPES OF ROOFS 

and 

ASBESTOS SIDING 

Your Friendly Roofins Service 

HU. 6-4462 

6037 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

HI. 6-4653 

BEN'S MOBILE SERVICE 

FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY 

GAS - OIL - LUBRICATION 

MOTOR TUNEUPS 

"As Near As Your Phone" 

STOCKTON BOULEVARD and 

FRUITRIDGE ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

McKINLEY REST HOME 

NEW MANAGEMENT 

Roy and Ila Couts 

PHONE HU. 4-5781 

When in Doubts — Come to Couts 

310 THIRTY-FOURTH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



BAKER'S NURSERY GARDEN 
& GIFT SHOP 

SHRUBS . TREES - PERENNIALS - SEEDS 

BULBS - BEDDING PLANTS 

Fertilizer, Garden Tools and Machines 

Telephone WA. 5-3139 
2321 FAIROAKS BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

KARL OETTLE RANCH 



QUALITY FRUITS IN SEASON 
DIRECT FROM FARM TO YOU 



Phone WA. 5-1532 
Vi Mile Beyond H Street Bridge 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

STEPHAN BROS. TEXACO 
SERVICE 

"We Give Breuners Stamps" 

COMPLETE LINE OF FIRESTONE TIRES. 

BATTERIES & ACCESSORIES 

Phone IV. 7-6024 

2601 FAIROAKS BLVD. 

Near Fulton 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNI A 

OTTO'S SPORT SHOP 

Fishing Tackle • Bait • Guns • Ammunition 

Sporting Goods • Bicycle Accessories 

Toys • Wallets • Gifts 

LICENSES • FREE CAMPFIRE PERMITS 
Open Friday Evening Til 9 P.M. 

Phone IV. 7-0641 
2910 FAIR OAKS BLVD. AT MARCONI AVE. 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

BOB'S GARDEN SERVICE 

MAINTENANCE 
RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL 
ROBERT E. HAYES 
Pho 



IV. 9-1374 
3653 SEAN DRIVE 



SACRAMENTO 21 



CALIFORNIA 



JUVENILE CONVENTION 

Juvenile law enforcement interest 
throughout the state centered on Sacra- 
mento early this year when the fifth an- 
nual California State Juvenile Officers 
Association convention was held there. 

For Captain Frank H. Gessner, head 
of the Sacramento Police Department 
Juvenile Division, this was an especially 
momentous occasion, inasmuch as he was 
one of the organizers of the state associa- 
tion. 

And, thanks in great part to the efforts 
of Captain Gessner, who with Police 
Chief James V. Hicks and Juvenile Offi- 
cer Francis E. Gregory, was a cochair- 
man, the convention has been hailed as a 
prototype at which future conventions 
may well aim. 

Held March 24th, 25th and 26th, the 
confab featured such outstanding speak- 
ers as Richard A. McGee, director of the 
state department of corrections ; Heman 
G. Stark, director of the California 
Youth Authority, and Attorney General 
Edmund G. (Pat) Brown. McGee ap- 
peared in place of Governor Goodwin J. 
Knight who was unable to attend due to 
the press of state business. 

Particularly valuable to the 117 dele- 
gates were the panel discussions which 
covered such topics as "Rights and Re- 
sponsibilities for Juveniles," "Liquor En- 
forcement at Juvenile Levels," "Female 
Juveniles as a Police Problem," and 
"Juvenile Gangs — Their Cause and Con- 
trol." 

The Northern California Juvenile 
Officers Association was host to the Cen- 
tral Valley and Southern California 
Juvenile Officers Associations. Before 
scattering to their respective cities, the 
delegates chose Santa Monica as ne.\t 
year's convention site and elected new 
officers. The new officers include Komer 
Dyal of the San Bernardino Police De- 
partment, president ; John Huddelston of 
the Concord Police Department, secre- 
tary-treasurer, and A. J. Lauder of the 
Fresno Police Department, sergeant at 
arms. The board of directors consists of 
Harold Stockridge of Los Angeles, Jack 
Ford of Merced, Peter Bolhick of San 
Mateo, Katherine Williams of Taft, 
Leon Green of San Jose, and Dick 
Frazier of Glendale. 

Gessner was instrumental in the for- 
mation of the state association which had 
its birth at a meeting in Asiloinar in 
1948. For this reason he was particularly 
pleased to see Sacramento have an oppor- 
tunity to be the host city. 

Prior to the 1948 meeting the North- 
ern and Southern and Central Valley as- 
sociations were separate organizations. 



LEATHURBY CO. 

CONNSONATA by C. G. Conn, Ltd. 
America's Finest Electronic Organ 

DAVID W. WHITNEY 

nto Representative 



906 FORTY-FOURTH STREET 

Hlllcrest 5-3180 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
A FRIEND 



SAFETY PAYS 

PHONE HI. 7-1451 

MUZIO BAKING CO. 

Bakers of SOUR DOUGH BREAD 
"Rich in Goodness" 

J*e Fochetti, Maanger 

1708 THIRTY-FOURTH STREET 

Res. Phone GI 3-S3S4 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GAVEL AND FLANDERS 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

BUILDING CONTRACTORS 
COMMERCIAL — RESIDENTIAL 

Office Gilbert 2-7764 
229 W STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone GI. 2-9405 

VICTOR GROCERY 

YOSHIO SHIBATA 

400 T STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SACRAMENTO TILE CO. 

INSTALLATION ND REPAIRING 



404 MEISTER WAY 
Hlllcrest 7-4964 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



STEVE HOPKINS • PLUMBING 

PLUMBING - HEATING - WATER HEATERS 



613 JAY STREET 
Gilbert 2-2692 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BARMBY DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Distributor of Valvoline Oils and Greasei 

IGNITE BATTERIES • WIX FILTERS 

ROUTE 2, BOX 3868 — Phone HI. 5-0110 

V% Mile East of Underpass on Folsom Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954 



W. S. MARKS BONING PLANT 

Phona HI. 6-9677 

FLORIN ROAD 
Route 1, Box 3361 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

South Sacramento Junk Co. 

A. WARING 

Phone HI. 5-9266 

47TH AVENUE & STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

2 Blocks East 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



TED'S MARKET 



6439 FOLSOM BOULEVARD 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



ELECTRONIC LABORATORIES 

Radio, Television Installation and Service 

AUTHORIZED FACTORY BRANCH SERVICE 

for 

KAYE HALBERT— BENDIX — 

HALLICRAFTER & STEWART- WARNER 

Howard D. Zanders 

3960 SACRAMENTO BOULEVARD 

Hlllcrest 7-1592 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA LIQUID GAS 
CORPORATION 

F. M. ROWLES, President 



POST OFFICE BOX 73 
OAK PARK STATION 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



DRIVE SAFELY 

T/ie Life You Save 
May Be Your Own 

Phone HI. 5-3492 

SACRAMENTO MEMORIAL 
LAWN 

"Sacramento's Most Beautiful Memorial Park" 

CEMETERY - MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM - COLUMBARIUM 

Non-Sectarian - Endowment 

Stockton Boulevard at Lemon Hill Road 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Gilbert 2-5206 



1631 O STREET 



PAUL NELSON REALTY CO. 

RENTALS— INSURANCE— LOANS 
BONDS — NOTARY 



AUSTIN CONE 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Gessner was one of six men who met to 
lay the groundwork of the state organiza- 
tion. Today the association numbers some 
600 members throughout the state. 

Practically all of Gessner's law en- 
forcement career has been spent in juve- 
nile work. 'I'he first si.\ months after his 
appointment to the police department 
were spent in the detective bureau. He 
then was placed in the juvenile bureau 
as a night man and to supervise ta.xi dance 
girls who at that time were required to 
register with the juvenile bureau. 

In 1937 Gessner was picked as the man 
to inaugurate the city s new bicycle iicens- 
ing program. He got the system rolling 
and remained with it for a year before 
being transferred to the major crime and 
pawnshop details m the detective bureaus. 
Gessner was named head of the juvenile 
division in 1947. 

A native Sacramentan, Gessner has 
been active in community altairs for many 
years. His fraternal activities include a 
past presidency of the Sunset Parlor, Na- 
tive Sons of the Golden West and mem- 
bership in the xMasons. He also is a 32nd 
degree Scottish Rites Mason and a past 
president of the Northern California 
Juvenile Officers Association. 

Sports followers remember Gessner as 
a member of two state champion basket- 
ball teams in the 1920's. In 1922 he 
travelled to Kansas City, Kans., with an 
American Legion champion team to com- 
pete in regional finals. 



SENSIBLE DRIVING 

Use all your senses when you're driv- 
ing. See what's ahead. Listen for warn- 
ing signals. Feel trouble, like faulty 
steering or bad brakes. Smell trouble 
brewing, like raw gas or dangerous 
fumes. Then develop your sixth sense — 
good judgment — and give full time and 
attention to your driving, says the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association. In 
this way, you'll avoid senseless accidents. 



FLAWS AND QUIRKS 

A motor vehicle enlarges the driver's 
personality, says the California State 
Automobile Association. That is the rea- 
son little flaws and quirks of a person's 
character become more manifest when 
they are magnified into the behavior of a 
few tons of steel moving in an unsafe or 
irregular manner at "x" miles per hour. 
Practice sportsmenlike driving and it 
will improve your character, your repu- 
tation and the public safety. In short, 
everybody gains. 



T H Y S CO. 

FOUNDRY & MACHINE SHOP 

ELECTRIC STEEL CASTINGS 

HOP PICKING MACHINES 

Phone HI. 6-3048 
6900 FOLSOM BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

THE COPPER LANTERN 

We Cater to 

BANQUETS AND PRIVATE GROUPS 

Featuring Smorgasbord Dinners on 

Saturdays and Sundays 



Open Saturdays 5 



- Sundays 6 p.i 



100% Air Conditioned 
Phone HU 6-9910 

You Are Always Welcome At 

TAHSOE ACRES MOTEL 

AND DRIVE-IN 

DAVE & EMMA BOSWELL, Mgrs. 
AAA APPROVED 

5 Miles E. of State Capitol, U. S. Highway SO 

PERKINS CALIFORNIA 

LANE'S ELECTRIC DISPOSAL 
SERVICE 



2541 DANUBE DRIVE 
IV 9-4700 

2153 STACIA WAY 
HI 7-4497 

TACO HOUSE 

MEXICAN AND AMERICAN FOODS 

PATIO OPEN NOW 

TACOS • ENCHILADAS • TAMALES 

Orders to Take Out 

BEER 

HI. 5-9830 

'/2 Mile So. Fruitridge Shopping Center 

6000 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNI A 

Phone GI. 2-9430 

DOSSMAN BROS. 

BODY & FENDER— AUTO REPAIRS 
TOWING SERVICE AVAILABLE 



415 O STREET (Re 
SACRAMENTO 



r) 

CALIFORNIA 



Phcne HU. 6 8565 

NORMAN'S RBCHFIELD SERVICE 

BATTERIES • LUBRICATION • TIRES 
ACCESSORIES 

Felix Norman 
3801 STOCKTON BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GREENBRIER MOTOR HOTEL 

SACRAMENTO'S NEWEST AND SMARTEST 

ROOM TELEPHONES 

AIR CONDITIONED 

SWIMMING POOL 

Highway 99, South of Fairgrounds 

4331 STOCKTON BOULEVARD 

Phone HU. 6-2861 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



fune, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



ANCKER PAINTING AND 
DECORATING 

INDUSTRIAL - RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 

■'We Go Anywhere" 

Graining • Marblizing • Hand Painted Scenes 

Murals • Sheet Rock finishing • Waterproofing 

Spray Painting 

Phone HU 6-5409 
6300 - 33RD AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

L . E . L U C K E 

CEMENT CONTRACTOR 
Estimates Given Free 

■FOR THE BEST CALL LUCKY' 

HlUcrest 5-4512 
5920 - 71 ST STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



KRPAN TRENCHING CO. 

p. O. BOX 144 
PERKINS 
CALIFORNIA 
Phone HI. 6-2776 

BARGAIN BILLS 

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE 
RUGS, LINOLEUM, 
APPUANCES, ETC. 



UNITED LINOLEUM, INC. 



PLASTICS . LINOLEUM . CARPETS 

ASPHALT TILE . RUBBER TILE 

VENETIAN BINDS 

Phone: HI. 7-8851 
2717 BROADWAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

GANT REALTY 
We Pay Cash for Your Property 
Residential and Income Property 

BOYD L. GANT 

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 
Member Sacramento Multiple Listing 

Hlllcrest 7-6750 

5021 D STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

THE GREAT ORANGE 

ART & RUBY BALLENGER 

FRESH ORANGE JUICE — SEE IT MADE 
Hot Dogs — Sandwiches 
Lime Ade and Lemonade 



FOLSOM & BRADSHAW ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone HI. 6-6655 

ACE AUTO WRECKERS 

FOLSOM BLVD. AT PERKINS 
FULL HOUSE OF PARTS 

VIRGIL HARRIS BOX 193 
PERKINS CALIFORNIA 



STILL ON TRAIL 

Killers sometimes think when they get 
away with their crimes for a time the 
heat dies down and they are safe. 

But if the murderer of Francis M. 
(Jack) Rea, North Sacramento police 
officer thinks he is safe because more than 
four months have gone by since the kill- 
ing and he still hasn't been caught, he 
should think again. 

Police Chief William Wilson, Assist- 
ant Chief Percy Gassaway, and the other 
members of the department still are ex- 
amining every lead, no matter how re- 
mote, determined to track down the killer 
if it takes the rest of their lives. 

Gassaway, who was working with Rea 
the night of January 2nd when the slay- 
ing took place, was placed in personal 
charge of the investigation and still is 
working at it. Hundreds, in fact thous- 
ands, of clues have been sifted and more 
than a dozen possible suspects have been 
arrested and released. 

So far, unfortunately, the right clue 
has not been turned up. The killer was 
burglarizing a warehouse in North Sac- 
ramento when Rea and Gassaway sur- 
prised him. In a running gun battle 
which followed, a fatal bullet hit Rea. 
The sla3'er escaped, but even if he still is 
running, the North Sacramento police 
are determined to get him some day. 

The people of North Sacramento, in a 
spontaneous demonstration of their liking 
for Rea, who was familiarly known as 
Jack the Cop, raised nearly $4,000 and 
gave it to Mrs. Rea to apply to the mort- 
gage on the family home. 



Phone IVanhoe 7-5762 

MANOR BARBER SHOP 

CLIFFORD E. SMITH 

Five Barbers to Serve You 

Watch Your Favorite T-V Program 

While Being Served 

Shoe Shine Service 



FRITZ NOW FOREMAN 

Fritz Kaminsky, who retired as chief 
of the Sacramento Police Department 
last November, has taken up new duties 
as foreman of the Federal Grand Jury 
for Sacramento County. 

Federal Judge Dal M. Lemmon ap- 
pointed Kaminsky to the position last 
month. 

The ex'chief, who served just short of 
29 years on the Sacramento Police De- 
partment, has been taking things easy 
since his retirement. As he explained at 
the time : 

"I'm going to take a little vacation and 
do a lot of fishing." 

Kaminsky began his career in the de- 
partment November 16, 1923, as secre- 
tary to the chief. He served under seven 
chiefs and climbed through the ranks, 
serving as a patrolman, superintendent of 
the traffic department, captain, head of 
the juvenile bureau, chief of detectives 
and assistant chief. He served as chief 
from March 16, 1951, until his retire- 
ment. 



Bus. IV. 7-1835 



Res. IV. 9-4540 



JACK HOLLOWAY - Realtor 

Real Estate - Insurance 

■THE SIGN OF ACTION' 

3420 FULTON AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

SKIPPER'S DRIVE-IN 

BARBARA HARRIS, Owner 
IF YOU'RE LOOKIN' FOR GOOD FOOD 

Phone IV 9-1041 
5911 AUBURN BOULEVARD 

FAIROAKS CALIFORNIA 

Phone HI 7-9013 

GIFT SHOP 

VARIETY and GIFTS 
GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
Ifs A Pleasure to Serve You 



Lumber - Fireplace Wood - Doors - Windows 
Roofing Pumice Blocks 
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

NICHOLS 

WOOD, LUMBER, and BUILDING MATERIALS 

For Liberal Savings . . . Phone IV 9-1711 

Mail Address 

5304 NORTH AVENUE 

Business Address 

Between Walnut and Garfield on 

NORTH AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

DRIVE CAREFULLY 
The Life You Save 
May Be Your Own 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

HAROLD MOON 

Pine Veneer Cover Co. 
Unitized Covers— Veneer Stock 



SUPERIOR SEPTIC TANK AND 
SEWER CO. 

All Work Guaranteed — Licensed Contractors 

SUPERIOR WORK — OUR SPECIALTY 

R. D. Griffin . W. M. McPherson 

IVanhoe 9-0756 

6001 COUNTRY LANE 

FAIR OAKS CALIFORNIA 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 195^ 



OLD MACDONALD'S FARM 

A 2S-Acre Playground 

Specializing in . . . 

CHICKEN DINNERS $1.50 

CHILD'S PLATE .80 

Come as You Are and Relax in the Big Red Bar 

Open Tuesday thru Friday, 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m. 

BANQUET ROOM OPEN 

JEAN and AL — HI 5-9033 



"Let's Get Associated" 

BENNETT & MULLENIX 
Associated Service 

FREE PICK-UP and DELIVERY 
OPEN 24 HOURS 



Phone : HI 6-1915 
FOLSOM BLVD. at 57TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



BASSO'S PLACE 

MIXED DRINKS AND OFF SALE 

Phone HI 6-3916 

FOLSOM BLVD. and POWER INN ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

TIRE REPAIRS Phone HI. 6-4514 

PERKINS TIRE SERVICE 

T. N. Wait and A. J. Smith 

COMPLETE TIRE SERVICE 
RECAPPING OUR SPECIALTY 

FOLSOM BOULEVARD 

PERKINS CALIFORNIA 

14TH AVENUE GROCERY 

MEATS . GROCERIES . VEGETABLES 

HANCOCK GASOLINE 

FIRESTONE TIRES , TUBES . ACCESSORIES 

YOUR CREDIT 13 GOOD 

Phone HI. S-9418 

6500- 14TH AVENUE 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

THREE ACRES SERVICE 
STATION 

DON BEACH for SHELL PRODUCTS 

ROUTE 2, BOX 281 IB 

3 Miles East of Perkins 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



DRIVE SAFELY 
The Uie You Save 
iAayf Be Your Own 

WALKER AND DONANT 

DEVELOPERS and BUILDERS 
Thomwood Terrace 
QI and FHA LOANS 

IV 9-7358 
3232 MONTCLAIRE STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



TWO MILLION TOLL 

The worst automobile accident toll in 
the nation's history — more than two mil- 
lion ^^asualties — was recorded in 1953, 
according to figures released by The 
Travelers Insurance Companies. 

Traffic deaths totaled 38,500, an in- 
crease of 900 over 1952. The injury 
count reached 2,140,000 compared to 2,- 
090,000 for the previous year. 

The totals are statistics from "The 
Passing Scene," twentieth in an annual 
series of traffic accident data booklets 
published by the The Travelers. Accident 
facts from every state in the country are 
collected and analyzed for the publica- 
tion by Travelers statisticians. 

Excessive speed was the most danger- 
our driving mistake in 1953. Speed killed 
13,870 persons and injured more than 
600,000. Drivers under 25 years of age 
were involved in almost 25 per cent of 
the year's fatal accidents although they 
constitute only about 15 per cent of the 
total of all drivers. 

Week end crashes accounted for 15,- 
800 killed and 800,000 hurt during 1953. 
Forty-one per cent of the deaths and 36 
per cent of the injuries occurred on Sat- 
urdays and Sundays last year. 

The pedestrian record reflected the 
third consecutive year of improvement. 
Booklet figures show pedestrian casualties 
reduced by 50 to 8,600. Crossing between 
intersections, "jay walking," still is the 
chief cause of pedestrian deaths and in- 
juries. 

"The Passing Scene" also reports that 
three out of four 1953 auto accidents 
happened to passenger cars driving in 
clear weather on dry roads. 

Eighty per cent of vehicles involved in 
fatal accidents were traveling straight 
ahead. 

Saturday was the most dangerous day 
of the week to drive. 

1953 was the fourth consecutive year 
of increase in the death toll. 



DRIVER ANALYSIS 

Do you think of yourself as a person, 
but of the other driver as just a motor 
vehicle — an inanimate moving force? 
Even on the occasions when the other 
"car" shows "you" a courtesy, do you 
frequently fail to let the "other driver" 
know that "your car" appreciates the 
courtesy? The California State Automo- 
bile Association advises that, for safety's 
sake, you should firmly fix in your mind 
that all other automobiles, like yours, 
represent the human beings inside them 
and are not just inanimate moving 
forces. 



PAT-KATH BOXER KENNELS 

Home of Champion Meastro 
HARRY JONES & WALTER MERKSAMER 



2416 WALNUT AVENUE 
CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

A. C. A. SERVICE 

TIRES — BATTERIES 
At WHOLESALE TO YOU 

201 NORTH 12TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

" Keep 'em Growing" 

R. O. ROBINSON. Jr. 

Distributor 

SHUR-RANE SYSTEM 

The Choice of Experienced Operators 

Complete RAIN MACHINE Service 

Bus. HI 5-6936 ■ Res. GI 3-1004 

212 BROADWAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



FOX SALES COMPANY 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 
Hudson 4-5673 - 4-0477 

303 NORTH 12TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

MILLER'S 24-HOUR CAFE 

COMPLETE MEALS 

SHORT ORDERS 

Phone GI 2-1657 

227 NORTH 16TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

"HUDG" HUDGINS 



Scales, Gasoline, Diesel and Butane 
Truckers Parking Area and Bunk Room 

324 N. 16TH STREET . HIWAY 40 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WEIR'S FURNITURE STORE 

For Used Furniture See Us 

HU 4-8483 

WE BUY— SELL OR TRADE 

Household Goods 

Stoves . Refrigerators . Washers 

Dishes . Kitchen Utensils 

Open 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 

322 NORTH 12TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SWING CLUB 

DANCING — MIXED DRINKS 

Phone GI 3-94G3 

549 NORTH SIXTEENTH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 51 



RIVER AUTO MART 

DEPENDABLE USED CARS 

Phone Gl 3-1449 
601 NORTH 16TH STREET 

, SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

LA CARDO'S CLUB STADIUM 

DANCING . FINE FOODS 
ITALIAN DINNERS 

Banquet Specials 
Phone HI 5-9709 

2344 SUTTERVILLE ROAD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

ARMANDO MAGRI 

HARLEY-DAVIDSON 

SALES and SERVICE 

Phone GI 3-5362 

815 TWELFTH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

COMMERCIAL BODY & TRAILER 
SERVICE 

TRUCK-TRAILER EQUIPMENT 

Phone HU 1-I4I3 

710 HARBOR BLVD. 

WEST SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

James Mulhern • HU 6-3Z66 
Emil Isler • HU 6-4119 

ACME CABINET SHOP 

NEW CABINETS — FURNITURE 

REPAIRING — REMODELING 

Free Estimates . Attractive Prices 

Telephone HU 1-1753 

341 NORTH 12TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Phone HI 7-2733 



Free Instructio 
Hours 

Evenir 

TERRELL'S PLASTICS 

Complete Line of Wood Fibre Flower Materials 
PLASTICS . CERAMICS - DRESDEN 

COPPER, ETC. 
FIBRE GLASS AND BOAT PLASTICS 



SMITH MATTHEWS. INC. 

We Give S & H Green Stamps 

Successors to Sacramento Service Station 

Equipment Co. & Motor Hardware Co. 

Alan H. Matthews 

325 NORTH SIXTEENTH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

HALLCRAFT BOATS 

A. N. Sommer — H. A. Soloman 

Builder of the BOY SCOUTS BOATS 

Phone GI 2-4870 

769 NORTH 16TH STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



CAUTION SIGN 

A child near the street is a caution 
sign. 

California Highway Patrol Commis- 
sioner B. R. Caldwell said that any child 
playing near a street or highway should 
be an automatic warning signal to motor- 
ists to slow down and proceed with cau- 
tion. 

"The greatest single killer of children 
under 15 years of age in our country to- 
day is the traffic accident," Caldwell de- 
clared. 

Pointing out that children are usually 
willing to follow the example of others, 
Caldwell said that a youngster who ex- 
hibits a disregard of traffic regulations of- 
ten mirrors the training or lack of train- 
ing, that he has received in the home. 
Careless habits in walking, wild play in 
moving cars or leaning out car windows 
always reflect a lack of proper safety 
training in children. 

"It is the responsibility of every parent 
to educate children to the dangers that 
are always present in traffic," Caldwell 
said. "It is equally important that these 
same parents practice safe driving and 
walking behavior that will save the lives 
of unwary youngsters. Failure of too 
many motorists to stop for flashing red 
lights on school buses and disregard of 
speed limits all take a tragic annual toll 
in young lives." 

CHECK YOUR CAR 

Check your car, check accidents; and 
do it now for tomorrow may be too late. 

In offering this suggestion to Califor- 
nia motorists, Commissioner B. R. Cald- 
well of the California Highway Patrol 
reminded that May is the month for spe- 
cial emphasis on vehicle maintenance 
throughout the nation. 

"Previous voluntary Safety Checks 
have uncovered at least one faulty con- 
dition in order to lawfully operate on 
the streets and highways of the state," 
Caldwell pointed out. 

He advised every motor vehicle owner 
and operator to give himself the follow- 
ing test: 

"Can I see, steer and stop safely?" 

"Such a test," Caldwell explained, 
"will cause drivers to check mirrors, 
window glass, windshield wipers, lights, 
steering mechanisms, wheels, brakes and 
tires. If these items, together with the 
horn and exhaust system, are in safe con- 
dition the vehicle should be ready for 
road use. 

"It is inexcusable negligence to oper- 
ate an unsafe vehicle," he admonished. 



HEARTY & GANNON 

BUILDERS 



Developer! 
McCLELLAN MEADOWS 



GARY GARDENS 



Phones IV. 9-7313 and IV. 9-8310 
3625 DON JULIO BOULEVARD 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

IVanhoe 9-2793 

EARL R. KELLEY 

CONTRACTOR 

1245 EL SUR WAY 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Enjoy Living at 

TOWN AND COUNTRY TRAILER 

PARK 

ULTRA MODERN— ALL CITY CONVENIENCES 

$22.50 up per month 

GOLD STAR RATING 

AUBURN BLVD. (99E) and MORSE AVE. 

IV. 9-9850 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

JOHN I. HAAS. INC. 

2700 PILSEN LANE 
SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

ROY S. REED 

BUILDER OF DISTINCTIVE HOMES 
All Types of Commercial 
and Home Construction 

Telephone IVanhoe 9-483S 

6930 SUTTER AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

JEFF'S BAIT AND TACKLE 
SHOP 

R. Jeffries 

FISHING TACKLE and BAIT 

Phone HI 5-1392 

37 IS STOCKTON BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

MASTER CLEANERS 

CARPET AND FURNITURE CLEANING 

IVanhoe 7-0591 
3221 MONTCLAIRE STREET 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WESTERN CONCRETE PIPE 
COMPANY. INC. 

Phone HU 6-0026 
POWER INN ROAD 

PERKINS 
CALIFORNIA 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 195'i 



» 



"AL" BOWKER'S 

TOWN & COUNTRY FURNITURE 

REUPHOLSTERING • REFINISHING 
DRAPERIES 

TERMS AVAILABLE 

IVanhoe 9-S372 

2501 MARCONI AVENUE 

(600 Ft. West of Fulton) 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



ROBERT N. PORTER 

CONTRACTOR • BUILDER 
5636 MARCONI AVE. 
Phone IVanhoe 9-4296 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

ROEDIGER & ROBINSON 

CEMENT CONTRACTORS 

Phone IV. 9-2741 

3920 HOLLISTER AVENUE 

NORTH CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

CARMICHAEL PLUMBING SUPPLY 

FREE 

Loan of Tools, Estimate, Layout 

COMPLETE LINE OF PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

Phone IVanhoe 7-6116 

Ben Statnick • Willie Litwak 

2840 FAIR OAKS BLVD. 

Off Marconi Ave. 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

BOB'S DRIVEWAY SERVICE 

SEWER TAPPING 

Robert E. Delzer, Plumbing Contractor 

PAVING AND TRENCHING 

Phone IVanhoe 7-2142 
6548 FAIR OAKS BLVD. 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

HARRIS & BERRY 

CARPET FLOOR COVERING 

TILE — Linoleum, Rubber, Asphalt, Cork 

and Metal Wall Tile 

INLAID LINOLEUM • PRINT LINOLEUM 

IV. 7-3621 
62211/2 FAIR OAKS BOULEVARD 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

For Reo/ Estate 

■ITS THE NUMBER OF THE YEAR" 

IV 9-1954 
JOHN WAGAMAN 

HAPPILY MINDING YOUR BUSINESS 

2310 FULTON 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CRAIG'S ICE CREAM 

E. L. CRAIG 
Arden Farmer's Market 

FAIR OAKS & FULTON 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



PERMANENT REST 

Practically all of us look forward to 
the week-end as a time for rest and pleas- 
ure. We can catch up on our golf game, 
work around the house and have some 
fun with the children. It's the time for 
going to church, watching television, lis- 
tening to the ball game or visiting or 
being visited by friends. 

The week-ends are all of those things 
— e.xcept on the highways. In 1953, 15,- 
800 persons were killed and 800,000 
were injured in week-end accidents, ac- 
cording to figures compiled and recently 
released by The Travelers Insurance 
Companies. Forty-one per cent of the 
deaths and 36 per cent of the injuries 
were recorded on Saturdays and Sundays 
in 1953. 

Saturday continued to be the most 
dangerous day of the week. One reason 
is that more cars are in vise Saturday 
than on any weekday. There is another 
distinguishing feature which sets this day 
apart from the others. For too many peo- 
ple, Saturday night is a time when drink- 
ing and driving combine. No one knows 
exactly how many traffic accidents are 
caused by drinking drivers but everyone 
knows it is a major problem. Everyone 
needs to know that even one drink be- 
fore driving is too many. 

Week-ends indeed are a time of rest. 
For too many they are the beginnings of 
permanent rest. 



YOU CAN HELP 

Will you help save 38,500 lives in 
1954 and help stop needless injury to 2,- 
140,000 persons? 

If the above strikes you as an unusual 
challenge you need to read a booklet we 
just received from The Travelers Insur- 
ance Companies. Entitled, "The Passing 
Scene," it is their annual publication of 
traffic accident data in which statisticians 
have analvzed the traffic safety picture in 
1953. 

\'ou would learn that 38,500 people 
were killed and 2,140,000 were injured 
b\' motor vehicle accidents last year. Leaf- 
ing through the booklet you would find 
out why 1953 made tragic history as the 
most disastrous year for traffic accidents 
ever experienced. 

The report makes it clear that most 
of last year's accidents need not have 
happened. Most of them were caused b\' 
drivers and pedestrians who could have 
prevented the circumstances which led 
them to disaster. 

The conclusion is clear and the chal- 
lenge is unavoidable, (^nly those who do 
the driving and walking can keep the 
traffic prnbleni under control. 



DWIGHT CARMACK 

APPLIANCE — TELEVISION 

Westinghouse . Western Holly . Maytag 

"EASY PLAN" 

FI 2-1015 

132 BROADWAY 

HICO CALIFORNIA' 



RALPH S. WATKINS CO. 

DODGE . PLYMOUTH 

FI 2-753S 

E. 2ND and FLUME STREETS 

CHICO CALIFORNIA 



"IT'S SEVEN-UP- 



WILLOWS . OROVILLE 
RED BLUFF 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN MOULD'S 

INTERIORS & FABRICS 

DRAPERIES • RUGS • UPHOLSTERING 

FURNITURE 

Counseling Service on 

COMPLETE INTERIOR PLANNING 

Phone IV. 9-6116 

2944 FAIR OAKS BLVD. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

BUSINESS MEN'S ASSURANCE 
COMPANY 

LIFE • ACCIDENT • HEALTH 

HOSPITALIZATION 

ANNUITIES • FAMILY GROUPS 

Phone HU. 1-0108 

420 FORUM BUILDING 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



FEY COOK 

YOUR LOCAL CHEVRON DEALER 



ROBERTSON AVENUE and FAIR OAKS BLVD. 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 

McCOMAS LUMBER SALES 

WE SELL LUMBER- 
DIRECT FROM MILL TO YOU 

Phone IV. 7-2263 

5125 FAIR OAKS BOULEVARD 
at Arden Way 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 



T. W. SMITH & SONS 

LUMBER AND LOG HAULING 
Phone IV. 9-1062 

6045 LANDIS AVENUE 

CARMICHAEL CALIFORNIA 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 53 



ALL KINDS OF REPAIRS AND 
CONCRETE WORK 

JOHN MUNOZ 

General CONTRACTOR 

9 Home Building, Commercial 
Building, Excavating, Tractor 
Work, Dump Truck Hauling. 

FREE ESTIMATES 
503 Bryan Ave. Phone RE. 6-4164 

SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 



Len Griffiths and 
Harry Powers 

REALTORS 

INSURANCE 

NOTARIES 

Harry E. Powers 

300 S. Murphy Ave. RE. 6-5477 
SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA 



REgent 6-4432 

RAY - MAC 
RESTAURANT 

(Formerly Toby's Hiway Cafe) 

Alviso Rd. & Bayshore Hiway at 

Big Richfield Station 

Where 

TRUCKERS STOP 

TO EAT ! ! ! 

20490 Bayshore Hiway 
SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA 



Sunnyvale Laundry 
Washette Machines 



390 EAST EVELYN 
RE. 6-6730 

SUNI^VALE, CALIF. 



THE FACT SHEET 

The Problem : Speed 

The biggest traffic problem this month 
is unsafe speed. The solution to this prob- 
lem lies in convincing drivers that the 
only safe speed is a speed determined b> 
pre\ailing conditions . . . and that the 
onl\- intelligent speed is a safe speed. 

For safety's sake, a good driver doesn't 
travel at the same rate of speed when 
driving in snow, rain or darkness as he 
does when driving on a bright, sunny 
day. Similarly, when he's not feeling up 
to par or when he knows his car is not in 
top condition, he drives slower than he 
does when both he and his car are in the 
pink. He also slows down on rough or 
narrow roads. 

Letting conditions determine the speed 
at which a vehicle is driven is not only 
common sense, it's the law. In every state 
a driver is liable to arrest if he is driving 
at a speed that is not sate under prevail- 
ing conditions ( even though he may be 
tra\eling at a speed well under the posted 
limit). 

Another argument for driving at a 
speed safe for conditions is that such dri\- 
ing is economical. The driver who travels 
at a sensible rate of speed uses less gas and 
oil than the fellow who burns vip the 
road, and his tires dn not wear out as 
fast. 

Speed and the Law 

All states have enacted legislation to 
cope with the problem of speed. Although 
speed regulations \ary with locality, the 
traffic laws of all states include the basic 
rule that motorists must drive at speeds 
that are reasonable and safe under pre- 
vailing conditions. 

Disregard of such laws is a leading 
factor in traffic accidents. 

Ivventy-eight per cent of the dri\ers in 
fatal accidents in 1952 were violating a 
speed law. Seventeen per cent were ex- 
ceeding stated speed limits, and eleven per 
cent were exceeding safe speeds although 
traveling at less than the speed limit or 
were on a road where no stated limit ex- 
isted. 

Because many fatal accidents involve 
two vehicles, the number of accidents is 
fewer than the total number of drivers in- 
volved. Speed violations were a factor in 
.1,^ /)(T cent of fata! aeeidents. 
Regulattox Governixt, Mammlm 
Speed 

In traveling about the coiuitr\-, a dri\cr 
will encounter three types of speed regu- 
lations governing maximum speed. 

1. Posted Speed Limits — Signs are 
erected at frequent intervals stating the 
speed limit. The limit may be a general 
one for the area, or a special limit for a 



S. M. MUCCIA 

Quito Center 
RICHFIELD SERVICE 



18736 COX AVENUE 

Phone: FR. 8-2876 

SARATOGA, CALIFORNIA 



LUNDQUIST 
AND OVERBECK 

HARDWOOD FLOOR 
CONTRACTORS 

New Floors Installed 
Old Floors Refinished 

Ray Lundquist FRanklin 8-2567 
14405 Holden Court, Los Gatos 



LARK NURSING 
HOME 

MRS. LUTTER, Proprietor 

20 South San Jose- 
Los Gatos Highwa)- 
FRanklin 8-0252 
CAMPBELL, CALIFORNIA 



WHOLESALE RETAIL 


William Stagner 


LUMBER SALES 


FRanklin 8-2758 


1^ 


FIR— PINE— REDWOOD 


^ 


462 Emory Avenue 


CAMPBELL, CALIFORNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1954'j 



EDDIE'S 

Northside Market 

H. EDWARD GOULART 
GROCERIES & MEATS 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

551 N. Santa Cruz Avenue 

Phone: EL. 4-4561 

LOS GATOS, CALIFORNIA 



RAY M. SNYDER 

CONTRACTOR AND 
BUILDER 

16850 VASONA AVENUE 

FRanklin 8-5373 

LOS GATOS, CALIFORNIA 



ALPINE CHALET 

GUEST LODGE 

Guests Permanently or by the 

Week. Consideration to 

Retired People. 

5 Min. Walking Distance to the 

HEART OF LOS GATOS 

20 College Ave. ELgato 4-9701 



C. A. DISCOE 

General CONTRACTOR 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 

REMODELING— ADDITIONS 

Commercial — Residential 

State Licensed and Insured 

ELgato 4-1057 
17409 High, Los Gatos, Calif. 



short zone. The driver must remember 
that these limits have been determined on 
the basis of what is considered safe speed 
for normal conditions. They do not neces- 
sarily apply when weather, road or other 
conditions are not normal. Some states 
have established one speed limit for day- 
time driving and a different speed limit 
for night driving in the same area. (See 
"Uniform Speed Regulations" below.) 

2. Established Speed Limit — Not 
Posted — In some jurisdictions, little or 
no effort is made to erect frequent signs 
advising the driver of the speed limit. A 
limit exists, however, in the laws of the 
state or community and is just as much in 
effect as if posted. The driver has the re- 
sponsibility of learning and obeying the 
limit. He must remember also that the 
limit represents the maximum under fav- 
orable conditions. 

3. No Established or Posted Speed 
Limit — In some areas there are no estab- 
lished or posted speed limits. The law 
merely states that you must drive at 
speeds that are reasonable and safe under 
prevailing conditions. All states inelude 
this basie rule in their traffic laics, even 
though a stated limit is also set forth in 
the law. (See "Uniform Speed Regula- 
tions" below.) 

Uniform Vehicle Code 
A constant effort is being made to 
bring about uniformity in traffic laws. 
Manv states have revised their traffic leg- 
islation to conform with the Uniform Ve- 
hicle Code, and conformitv with this code 
is recommended bv ba\' area Chanters of 
the National Safety Council to improve 
traffic legislation. 

Act V, Article VI, Uniform Vehicle 
Code, Speed Restrictions, provides: 

"Section 56. Special restrictions — 
(a) No person shall drive a vehicle on a 
highway at a sneed greater than is reason- 
able and prudent under the conditions 
and having regard to the actual and po- 
tential hazards then existing. In every 
event speed shall be so controlled as mav 
be necessarv to avoid colliding with an\' 
person, vehicle, or other conveyance on or 
entering the highway in compliance with 
legal requirements and the duty of all 
persons to use due care. 

"(b) AVhere no special hazard exists 
that reauires lower speed fnr comnliancp 
with paragraph (a) of this section the 
•ioeed of anv vehicle not in excess of the 
limits snocified in this section or estab- 
lished as hereinafter -Tuthorized shni' he 
lawful, hut anv sneed in excess of f^f lim- 
its snecified in thi« section or est-abli^hed 
ns hereinafter authorized ■ihnll he prima 
fnri» evidence that the speed is not reason- 
able or prudent and that it is unlawful: 



CHERRY CHASE 
Quality Homes 

by 

McKenzie & Crawford 

A Name of Integrity! 



1298 LYNN WAY 

SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 

Phone: REgent 6-4547 



P.O. Box 111, LOS GATOS, Cal. 

LOS GATOS 

Construction Co. 

NICHOLS & CASH 
Phone: ELgato 4-1380 

ir 

R. K. Nichols 
CY. 5-5823 
SAN JOSE, 
Calif. 

R. J. POUEY, 

LOS GATOS, 
Calif. 



I urn-, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



"THE PAINT POT" 

FRED O'HAVER 

SHEET ROCK TAPING 

615 So. San Jose- Los Gatos Hiway 
CAMPBELL, CALIFORNIA 

Res. Ph.: FRanklin 8-3761 
383 CAMBRIAN DRIVE 



We Specialize in Plastering 
over Sbeetrock 

JOHNSON AND 
SUTTON 

PLASTERING 
CONTRACTORS 

N. R.Johnson, IO6O Juanita Way 
Campbell, Cal. Ph. FR. 8-4900 

V. G. Sutton, 481 Crockett Ave., 
Campbell, Cal. Ph. FR. 8-6380 



YOUR perfect plan for perfect 
living 

4 Bedrooms — 2 Full Baths 
$175 DOWN 

INCLUDES closing costs to 
Veterans 

$75.35 PER MONTH 

INCLUDES estimated taxes and 
insurance 

Blossom Hill Manor 

a beautifully planned home com- 
munity in the exclusive Los Altos 
school district 

DIRECTIONS: From Bayshore 
or El Camino drive out Sunny- 
vale-Santa Cruz Highway to Cu- 
pertino; turn left on Stevens 
Creek Road to San Jose-Los Gatos 
Road (Highway 17); turn right 
and follow signs to BLOSSOM 
HILL MANOR, corner of Farley 
Road. 

Telephone ELgato 4-2755 



1. Twenty-five miles per hour in any 
business or residence district ; 

2. Fifty miles per hour in other loca- 
tions during the daytime ; and 

3. Forty-five miles per hour in such 
other locations during the night time. 

"Daytime means from a half hour be- 
fore sunrise to a half hour after sunset. 
Night time means at any other hour. 

"'Fhe prima facie speed limits set forth 
in this section may be altered as author- 
ized in sections 57 and 58. 

"(c) The driver of every vehicle shall, 
consistent with the requirements of para- 
graph (a) drive at an appropriate re- 
duced speed when approaching and cross- 
ing an intersection or railway grade cross- 
ing, when approaching and going around 
a curve, when approaching a hill crest, 
when traveling upon any narrow or 
winding roadway, and when special haz- 
ard exists with respect to pedestrians or 
other traffic or by reason of weather or 
highway conditions." 

Note: See under (b)3 — Daytime, etc. 
("A prima facie speed higher than 50 
miles per hour for daytime travel on rural 
highways may be proper for certain states 
where such higher speeds are safe over a 
very large percentage of the rural mileage 
because of favorable physical and traffic 
conditions. Any prima facie speed liinitn- 
tion greater than 45 miles per hour is not 
recommended for nitjht travel on nn- 
lighted hit/huays.") 

"Sec. 59. Minimum speed regulation. 
— No person shall drive a motor vehicle 
at such a slow speed as to impede or block 
the normal and reasonable movement of 
traffic except when reduced speed is neces- 
sar\' for safe operation nr in compliance 
with law. 

"Police officers are hereby authorized 
to enforce this provision bv directions to 
drivers and in the event of anoarent will- 
ful disobedience to this provision and re- 
fusal to comph' with direction of an offi- 
cer in accordance herewith the continued 
slow operation by a driver shall be a 
misdemeanor." 

Speed axd Safety 

Since many factors enter into the mak- 
ing of every accident, it is impossible to 
give accurate statistics on the relationship 
between speed and traffic accidents. How- 
ever, there are two facts that are signifi- 
cant in any consideration of this question. 

1. The first is that a speeding car 
travels a greater distance between the 
time the brakes are apph'ed and the time 
the car stops than a slow-moving vehicle 
travels in the same time. Obvioush, a 
driver's chances of not hittine an obiect 
that suddenlv looms in his path increases 
as his speed decreases. 

The following table shows minimum 
braking distances for the best theoretical 



A. W. STEED 

138 EAST MAIN STREET 

LOS GATOS 



Paving 


Building 


Grading 


Materials 


Blades 


Roofing 
Sand 


Loaders 


Cement 


Dump Truck 


Bricks 


Rollers 


Fire Clay 


Dozers 


Loam 


etc. 


Cow Manure 



Draining Problems Engineered 
Phone: EL. 4-2876 



FOOD 

MACHINERY 

and 

CORPORATION 

CHEMICAL 



Executive Offices 

SAN JOSE 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



195 



HINKEL TILE CO. 

Licensed Contractors 

* 

INTERIOR TILE-Free Estimates 
Heinz W. Hinkel, FR. 8-4337 

* 

870 Audrey Avenue 

CAMPBELL, CALIFORNIA 



C. L. DISHEROON 
PAINTING CO. 

15330 CHELSEA DRIVE 
Phone: FR. 2781 

LOS GATOS, California 



Los Gates 

Plumbing, Heating 

& Sheetmetal 

Works 

198 SARATOGA AVE. 
{Corner of N. Santa Cruz Ave.) 

ELgato 4-2401 
LOS GATOS, CALIFORNIA 



THE LITTLE VILLAGE 
GROG SHOP 

The SIVERTSENS 



CUSTOM 
LIQUORS 

337 N. Santa Cruz Ave. 
Phone: ELgato 4-2242 



performance with tour-wheel brakes 
(performance that is theoretical and 
never achieved under actual conditions) 
that could be made in a laboratory — the 
and average distances. 1 he hrst braking 
distance column represents the best stops 
second set of distances, about what the 
average car on the average road will do. 

c J Lab. tests Road tests 

Min. braking Aver, braking 
ni.p.h. dis. — feet dis. — feet 



20 


13.4 


21 


30 


30 


47 


40 


53.6 


84 


50 


83.8 


131 


60 


120.6 


189 


70 


164.2 


257 


80 


214.4 


336 



2. The second significant fact is that, 
according to the laws of physics, energy 
is proportional to the square of the speed. 
In other words, if you double your speed, 
you'll hit four times as hard. This can be 
an important factor in the severity of an 
accident. The following examples illus- 
trate this point: 

A car striking a fixed obstacle at 20 
miles per hour will suffer the same dam- 
age it would if it dropped from a height 
of 13 feet onto a concrete highway. 

At 40 miles per hour the damage 
would be the same as if the car were 
dropped from a 4-story building. 

At 50 miles per hour the same is if the 
car were dropped from a 7-story building. 

At 60 miles per hour the same as if the 
car were dropped from a 10-story build- 
ing. 

Speed and Economy 

In addition to the legal and safety as- 
pects of speed there is a third aspect that 
concerns all drivers. This is the relative 
expense of speed. 

Recent tests, conducted by the Na- 
tional Safety Council and other agencies, 
comparing a top cruising speed of 65 
miles per hour with one of 40 miles per 
hour, showed the higher speed to be much 
more costly. 

Gas consumption per mile increased 30 
per cent at the higher speed and the num- 
ber of brake applications and braking 
time increased 50 per cent. Tire wear was 
two and a half times as great. When 
speed was stepped up, oil consumption per 
mile increased even more than gas con- 
sumption. 

Tests over city routes comparing top 
speeds of 25 and 35 miles per hour 
showed that 20 per cent more gas was 
consumed at the 35 mile per hour speed 
than at the 25 mile per hour speed. 



All New Completely Modern 

Riley's Trailer 
Court 

Watch jar Arrow on 

Fulton Avenue 

2541 North Tesla Way 
IV. 9-9809; IV. 9-1348 

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



Agnes Cox Wright 
Realtor 

specializing in 

Santa Cruz Mountain 
Properties 

24199 Summit Road, Los Gatos 

Phone EL. 4-6081 

Branch Office — 

Phone: Santa Cruz 69 W2 

EMPIRE GRADE 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNLA 



READY TO BUILD? 

— See — 

Murphy and 
Cunningham 

GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 

Pat Murphy, DA 2-0885 
Biff Cunningham, AX 6-6082 

P.O. Box 231, Santa Clara, Calif. 



Paper-Hanging Texturing 

MAX KNADLER 

Painting 
Decorating Contractor 

Residences and Commercial 

Residence Phones 

15680 Linda Ave. ELgato 4-2205 
Los Gatos, Cal. CLaybrn 8-5160 



June, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



GREETINGS 

PARKWAY 
ESTATES 



SACRAMENTO'S 
COMMUNITY 
OF TOMORROW- 
TODAY 



D&N 
CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 



IV. 9-7657 

2131 Fulton Avenue 

SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



FARM SAFETY WEEK 

"There are signs that farm people are 
becoming more aware of the need to work 
and live safely," said Secretary of Agri- 
culture Ezra Taft Benson, in calling for 
support of the 1 1th National Farm Safety 
Week, July 25-31. "Participation in last 
year's National Safety Week convinced 
me of that. That is why I urge all farm 
residents to join in, or start, a local ver- 
sion of the national Farm To Live — Live 
To Farm campaign. Safety, like charity, 
begins at home." 

Other farm leaders join in asking for 
support of the 1 1th National Farm Safety 
Week. Statements follow : 

Senator George Aiken, chairman of the 
Senate Agricultural Committee: "Home 
Safety Day of the 11th National Farm 
Safety Week appeals to me as the time for 
thinking about the fact that one out of 
every four farm persons killed in acci- 
dents are killed in the home. I would like 
to see every farm child receive an all- 
around safety lesson during the Week. 
Don't let tragedy hit your child for lack 
of knowledge of the right way to live to 
farm." 

Representative Clifford Hope, chair- 
man of the House Committee on Agricul- 
ture: "It is interesting to me to note that 
6,000 of the 14,000 farm residents killed 
in accidents last year were killed in motor 
vehicle accidents. This points up the ne- 
cessity for observing the third of the Na- 
tional Safetv Council's Ten Command- 
ments for Safe Living: KNOW AND 
OBEY TRAFFIC LAWS. I believe 
that National Farm Safety AVeek is 
worthwhile for teaching that lesson 
alone." 

Allan B. Kline, president, American 
Farm Bureau Federation: "Obser\'ation 
of National Farm Safety Week serves to 
emphasize that farm people still suffer a 
high proportion of unnecessary losses 
from fires and accidents. Safety is an in- 
dividual responsibility. Each of us must 
make a contribution to reduction of fire 
and accident hazards in order to make 
American farms safer, more efficient and 
happier places to live." 

Herschel D. Newsom, master, Nation- 
al Grange: "Accidents kill about 38 farm 
residents each day according to the latest 
figures. Think of that many funerals each 
day during 1954! Doesn't such a toll em- 
phasize the need for ever\'one who li\es 
on a farm to take a personal interest in 
making every farm safety campaign a suc- 
cess ? Farm folk who farm to live must 
truly live to farm. 

James G. Patton, president, National 
Farmers Union : "I am sure each of the 
National Safetv Council's Ten Com- 
mandments for Safe Living on the Farm 
can save lives, but in this modern age, I'd 



LOU'S PRODUCE 

541 MUNROE: Phone IV. 7-0041 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

If It Grows: 
We Have It! 

Direct From Farm to 
You 

FARMERS' and MERCHANTS' 
SHOPPING CENTER 



"King Built" 
HOMES 

IN 
DEL PASO MANOR 



M. J. KING 
BUILDER 



Traa Office: 
WATT & MARCONI 

Phone: IV. 9-4336 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 195'i 



JOE MOSSOLO 


TRUCKING COMPANY 


^ 


337 ROSSI STREET 


SALINAS, CALIF. 



A. L. RUSSO, Inc. 

FROZEN 
FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

241 WALKER STREET 

WATSONVILLE, CALIF. 



INDEPENDENT 
REDWOOD 
COMPANY 

REDWOOD— FIR 

Wholesale— Retail 

Boonville, Calif. 



F. V. Hampshire, 
Inc. 

General Contractor and 
Builder 

Residential — Commercial — 
Industrial 

743 SOUTH SANBORN ROAD 
Phone 7316 

SALINAS, CALIF. 



place special emphasis on the First Com- 
mandment: 'Keep Machines in Good Re- 
pair, and Keep All Guards and Safet\ 
Devices in Place.' If every farm man did 
this, I'm sure the toll of 14,000 dead each 
year would be greatly reduced." 

LIVE TO FARM 

In proclaiming the 11th National 
Farm Safety Week for July 25-31, 1954, 
President Eisenhower suggested the 
theme he first made popular in 1953 — 
"Farm To Live — Live to Farm" 

The United States Department of 
Agriculture and the National Safety 
Council, as co-sponsors of the Week, wel- 
come the theme from the 10th obser\ance 
because of its success in encouraging farm 
residents to practice safety in the home, at 
work, in traffic and elsewhere to a greater 
degree than any other theme. 

"Now that the National Safety Coun- 
cil is operating under a charter granted 
by the Congress of the United States, the 
Council should be able to work more ef- 
fectively than ever with all organizations 
interested in reducing accidents on the 
farms in America," said Ned H. Dear- 
born, president of the National Safety 
Council. 

"The 11th National Farm Safety 
Week will be a good test of this in- 
creased efficiency," Mr. Dearborn said. 
"Indications are that 31 states will 
have active Farm Safety Week commit- 
tees this vear, as compared with 28 in 
1953," said Maynard H. Coe, director of 
the Farm Division of the National Safety 
Council. "Moreover, 16 of the cooperat- 
ing states will have State Farm Safety 
Specialists, as compared with 12 last 
vear." 

"I urgently request all farm residents 
to make e\-ery effort to develop safe work 
habits and skills, so that they may 'Farm 
to live — and live to farm'," said the 
Presidential Proclamation. "I also re- 
quest all persons and organizations inter- 
ested in farm life and welfare to join in 
the campaign to free as many homes as 
possible from the tragedies and losses 
caused by needless accidents." 

TRAFFIC DEATHS DROP 

(Continued from page 9) 
Two hours after the hunt got under- 
way the dead rabbits were collected by 
jeep and truck. Many of them were given 
away to persons who gathered at the air- 
port when they learned the hunt was in 
progress. 

In addition to reducing the jack popu- 
lation at the airport, the shoot served an- 
other purpose. Hicks and his men got 
some quick fire practice with their not 
guns. 



Durable Plywood 
Company 

DOUGLAS FIR PLYWOOD 
LUMBER and VENEER 

Douglas Fir 
Sugar and Santa Rosa Pine 

CALPELLA, CALIFORNIA 



PICKERING 
LUMBER CORP. 

PONDEROSA PINE 

SUGAR PINE 

WHITE PINE 

INCENSE CEDAR 

Standard, Calif. 



ASTA 

Construction 
Company 



POST OFFICE BOX 758 

RIO VISTA, California 



E. G. Wool Packing 
Co., Inc. 



2296 A. SENTER ROAD 
CYpress 5-5425 

SAN JOSE, California 



une. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



T. 


J. MARTIN 




& COMPANY 




i!r 




Developers 




Builders 




^ 


410 


GEORGETOWN AVENUE 


SAN MATEO — CALIFORNIA 




Diamond 4-5137 



SEE "7" OAKS 
SUBDIVISION 

Walnut Ave., CARMICHAEL 

Homes 
of Distinction 

At Country Flair with 
City Conveniences 

JOHN HOLT 

Sales Agent, J.&D.P. Developers 

Call IV. 9-7989 
WALNUT AV., CARMICHAEL 



SAFETY BUS 

Watch tor the California High\va>' 
Patrol satet\' bus in your locah'ty. 

Latest addition to the Patrol's safety 
education program is a recently acquired 
mobile safety education unit which is now 
niaiving its way around the state. 

The unit is housed in a converted com- 
muter-type bus made available to the 
Patrol as a public service by the Pacific 
Greyhound Lines and will be operated 
by Patrol personnel. 

This bus contains nimierous testing de- 
\ices designed to measure the driving 
skills of motorists. 

"These devices are purely educational 
and for the information of the individual. 
No performance records of an\' kind are 
kept bv the Highway Patrol," empha- 
sized Patrol Commissioner B. R. Cal- 
dwell. 

Other features of the safety education 
bus include accident photos, safe driving 
tips, and traffic law information. 

While the bus has only recently been 
placed in action, it has already been 
booked solid through October. 



PEDESTRIAN HAZARD 

More than 60 per cent of the persons 
killed in San Francisco traffic during the 
past decade have been killed while walk- 
ing across a street, Iver C. Larson, execu- 
tive vice president of the San Francisco 
Chapter, National Safety Council, said 
recently. 

"So far this year 18 persons have been 
struck and fatally injured on tlie streets 
of this city. This compared with 13 who 
have died in cars as the resull of crashes, 
Larson noted. 

''Constant care is necessary when cross- 
ing any street. A momentary lapse can 
cause an accident in a hurry. If pedes- 
trians would LOOK for approaching 
cars; THINK for their own safety; and 
CROSS only at lawful places in a sens- 
ible manner, the traffic congestion and 
snarls in the downtown area and the ac- 
cidents in the residential areas would be 
effectiveh- reduced," the Safety Council 
official said. 

Larson warned pedestrian violators 
that the\- face a $2.00 fine if thev are ap- 
prehended in the downtown area. 

"People living i'l the residential ,a ■■ea> 
— where most of the fatalities occur — 
should cooperate with th'- police depart- 
ment for their own safety and to set a 
good example for children. Javwalking 
and crossing against signal lights are 
senseless violations — always the top kill- 
ers in traffic," he stated. 



McNAMARA & 

PEEPE LUMBER 

COMPANY, INC. 



DOUGLAS FIR 



CRESCENT CITY 
CALIFORNIA 



In 1953, 269,360 pedestrians were in- 
jured in I'.S. traffic accidents. 



COAST PACIFIC 
LUMBER CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
DOUGLAS FIR LUMBER 



EUREKA 



CALIF. 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 195- 



San Rafael Service 
Station 

Complete 

Automotive SERVICE 
Motorola T.V. Sales 

4th & Irwin Phone GL. 3-9998 

SAN RAFAEL, California 



WEBB & ROGERS 
Drugs 

YOUR— 

Friendly REXALL Store 

FOURTH AND "B" STREET 
Phone: GL. 3-0451 

SAN RAFAEL, California 



Newell's Gas 
Service, Inc. 

BUTANE— PROPANE 

Sacramento — Route 7, Box 1443, 

Phone IVanhoe 7-l6l4 
Loomis— P.O. Bx. 42, Phone 4253 
Co//tfx— P.O.Box 538, Phone 154 
Hayfork— P.O. Box 487, Ph. 380 
Nevada City — 553 Coyote Street 
Phone 696 



L. D. Reader Co. 

Installation of 
ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS, 
FLOOR COVERINGS and 

HARDWOOD 

Noise Takes a Holiday 
Through Our Treatments 

Phone: HI. 7-3505 
3026 V St., Sacramento, Calif. 



BLASTING CAPS 

Blasting caps sometimes are lost or 
stolen and boys and girls find them. 
While playing with these caps, explosions 
frequently occur, and as a result hundreds 
have been hurt. Some lose fingers and 
hands, some are blinded for life. Blasting 
caps are small copper or aluminum cylin- 
ders about as big around as a lead pencil 
and between llA inches and 5 inches 
long. They contain a highly sensitive ex- 
plosive and are used to explode dynamite, 
to mine coal and metals, quarry stone, 
and build bridges, roads, and skyscrapers. 

There are two kinds of caps. The 
"ordinary cap" is exploded by sparks from 
a burning fuse inserted in one end of the 
cap. The other kind of cap is an electric 
blasting cap. It has two wires coming out 
of one end. These two wires are con- 
nected by a very thin wire that is sunk in 
the explosive charge in the cap. ^Vhen 
electric current is applied, the thin wire 
becomes red hot and detonates the cap. 

The explosives in blasting caps are very 
sensiti\e, so that they will be sure to det- 
onate the dynamite charge. An experi- 
enced person knows how to handle them 
safely. In the hands of an inexperienced 
person they are extremely dangerous. 

Comparatively few persons know what 
a blasting cap looks like; children partic- 
ularly are likely to play with them. 

When a cap explodes, hundreds of 
small pieces of metal fly out in all direc- 
tions — sometimes as much as 200 feet — 
and even at that distance could cause 
blindness. 

Bovs and girls should know what a 
blasting cap looks like, and what great 
damapre it can do. If found it should be 
left alone. Other bovs and girls should be 
warned and a reoort made to a fireman, 
policeman, sheriff, or other law enforce- 
ment officer. He will dispose of it prop- 
erlv. 

Unless officers are thoroughlv experi- 
enced in the wav to handle such explo- 
sives withovit endangering themselves or 
others: 

1. Get in touch with the county agri- 
cultural asrent. 

2. Call the area headquarters of any 
maior quarrying, mining, or construction 
proiect. 

3. Contact a representati\e of the 
U. R. Bureau of Mines, or 

4. Gef ill touch with a representative 
of an explosives manufacturer. 



Last year's traflfic toll of deaths and 
iniurles was the heaviest in history. 



Landson Electric 
Company 

Electrical Contractor 

We Specialize in 

COMMERCIAL and 

INDUSTRIAL WIRING 

1920 T STREET 

Phone HI. 7-3419 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



BUTTE CREEK 
ROCK COMPANY 

Crushed Rock Products, Asphalt 
Paving Mixes, Concrete Mix, 
Plaster, Sand, Paving, Grading, 
Surfacing. 

New Paradise Road, 2 Miles S.E. 
Phone FI. 2-8346 

CHICO, CALIFORNIA 



In 1*55.'?. 8,600 pedestrians were killed 
in U.S. traflic accidents. 



NOWHERE 

WILL YOU FIND 

CLEANER CARS AT 

LOWER PRICES 

'54 Ply. Sta. Wgn. Save .. 400.00 

'54 Dodge Sed. Save 400.00 

'53 Dodge V-8 Sed 2,295.00 



•53 


Chev. "210" 2-dt 


., tu- 


tone 


R.&H. custom covers, | 


E-Z 


eyeglass, W.W. 


tires. 


power steering, 8000 


miles 




1,975.00 





'52 M.G. Like new 1,295.00 

'51 Olds. 2-dr 1,250.00 

'51 Chev. Bel Air 1,345.00 

20 more Fine Cars to choose from. 
Bank Terms 

Williamson's 

USED CARS 
1958 Fulton Av. IV. 9-3815 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



LET 



BLUE* 
SHIELD 

Shield you 

from 

medical bills 




California 

Physicians Service 

450 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 

SUTTER 1-4633 




Ladies : Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. 
Men: Fri., Sat. and Sun. 

• 

CASTRO ROCK 

STEAM BATHS 

• 

Hygiene Beneficial 

for Health 

• 

open Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
Sundays 9 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

• 

MASSAGE 

by 
APPOINTMENT 

• 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone UNdbrhill 1-5995 

• 

582 CASTRO 

(Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.) 

San Francisco, Calif. 



PEACE OFFICERS* 






rifrht, 1<)31, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 



Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco 3, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 



ALL CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA 

LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES 

Published Monthly by 

Police and Peace Officers Journal 

our foreign exchanges 

THE GARDA REVIEW 
2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 
ALERTA, a. V. JUAREZ 

Dcsp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

REVISTA DE POLICIA 

Rioja, 666, Buenos Aires. 

Republic of Argentine, S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE 

Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS 

New South Wales 

POLICE TOURNAL 

Wellington, New Zealand 



WALTER R. HECOX 



Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION TERMS— $6.(10 a year, 
payable in advance: 60c a number. In Can- 
ada, $7.00 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by 
Registered Letter, or by Postage Stamps of 
2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not sub- 
scribe to POLICE AND PEACE OFFI- 
CERS' JOURNAL through agents unknown 
to you personally, or who cannot present 
proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 



30 




lOSEPH MASSAGLIA. JR., Presid 



Hotel MIRAMAR and Bungalo 
SANTA MONICA, ColifornI 



Calilrirnia'i World-lamoui Resort— 2i0 rooms 
GEORGE J. MEYER, Ma 



otel SENATOR 
SACRAMENTO. Californi 



r*» CopHal'i Premier Hotel— 400 > 
CHARLES W COLE, Manage 



Hotel EL RANCHO i Bunqale 
GALLUP. New Mexico 



'^orid'i Largest Ranch Hot/se — 200 rooms 
MARTIN I HANKS. Manager 



Hotel RALEIGH 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



On Fcimou> ''"nnsyhania Ave - 500 'ooms 
lOEl E 8AUGH, Manager 
World-famed Hotels 



BE CAREFUL 

THE LIFE YOU 

SAVE MAY BE 

YOUR OWN! 



TIMELY TYPOGRAPHY 

510 Clay Street 

Compliments 
the 

SAN FRANCISCO 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

on its 
efficiency and integrity 



GRATTAN ENGLISH, JR., Manager 



5+ohl, Nels 

270 Claremont Blvd. 
San Francisco 27, Cal. 



A family hotel 
in do>viitowii 
LOS ANGELES 



Sec. 34.66 P. L. & R. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Cal!f. 
Permit No. 3172 



Return Postage Guaranteed 
4r>.i Tenth Street. San Francisco 




lltMtcd -.\M I inning pool 
~''" evlusnoK tor i:uc!?tb . . . 

ample parking . . . fine food 
modestly priced . . . only 
2 blocks from Statler Center. 

EARL J. WOLFORD, Manager 

HOTEL FIGUEROA 

Figueroa and Olympic Blvd. Los Angeles 15, California 



EDGERTON BROTHERS LUMBER CO 

WHITE FIR 
PONDEROSA PINE 



BOX 186 

ADIN, CALIFORNIA 



iilNCISCO EDITION 



rAC£ OFFICERS' JOURNAL 




DINUBA POLICE DEPARTMENT 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



HELP PREVENT 

FOREST FIRES 




/demember—Onhi you can 

P^VENT PORjEST FIRES I . 

Keep California 
GREEN AND GOLDEN 

EDGERTON BROS. LUMBER CO. 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 



PAGE 

A Candle ... A Spoon ... A Gun 3 

Pistol Pointing 4 

Public Honors Safety Patrols 5 

Tracy Runs on Record 6 

Youngest Police Chief 7 

Sousa Wins Again 8 

Delta City 9 

Fingerprinting 11 

The Social Roots of Crime 24 

Recognizing Murder 35 

Opportunities in Investigation 41 

Peace Officer's Training 48 

Patrol Ambulance 53 

And Then There Were Nine 54 

California Leads Again 70 

Physician in Courtroom 73 

CHP Training Period 74 

Afraid of the Dark? 75 

Growing Older 76 

First Graduates 82 



Directory 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephone SUtter 1-2020 

Radio Short Wave Call KMA-438 

Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 

POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 2:00 p.m., Hall of Justice 

Henry C. Macinn, President 315 Montgomery Street 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery Street 

Washikgton I. KoHNKE 686 Sacramento Street 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. Con- 
tributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not possible, copy 
should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a "nom de plume." 
but all articles must bear the name and address of the sender, which will be 
treated with the strictest confidence. The Editok will also be pleased to consider 
photographs of officers and of interesting events. Letters should be addressed to 
ll^the Editor. 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael Gaffey 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE George M. IIeai.y 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic _ Otto Meyer 

Dept. Sec'y... Captain Michael F. Fitzpatrick... Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Edward Donohue 63 5 Washington Street 

Southern A. G. Steffen Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Peter Conroy 1240 Valencia Street 

Northern Daniel McKlem 941 Ellis Street 

Richmond Edward Green 451 Sixth Avenue 

Ingleside J. J. Coughlin Balboa Park 

Taraval Phil Kjelt 2348 Twenty-fourth Avenue 

Potrero Walter Ames 2300 Third Street 

Golden Gate Park Ted Terlau Stanyan opp. Waller 

Traffic Ralph E. Olstad Hall of Justice 

City Prison Lt. Walter Thompson Hall of Justice 

Bur. Inspectors Cornelius Murphy Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel John Meehan Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Harry Nelson Hall of Justice 

Director of Juvenile Bureau 2475 Greenwich Street 

Dan Kiely 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information Lieut. George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools 

Traffic Control Insp. Thomas B. Tract 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Headquarters Dan Kielt Hall of Justice 

Chinatown Detail Lt. H. C. Atkinson Hall of Justice 

Range Master Pistol Range, Lake Merced 

Emil Dutil 



When In Trouble Coll SlJUer ^2020 

VV hen In Doubt Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1954 



LET . . . 

BLUE* 
SHIELD 

Shield you 

from 

medical bills 




California 

Physicians Service 

450 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Calif. 

SUTTER 1-4633 




JOSEPH MASSAGLIA. JR.. PRESIDENT 



Hotel MIRAMAR and Bun9alows 
SANTA MONICA. California 



Co/ifornlo'sWor/d-fomous Resorl-2S0 i 



Hotel SENATOR 
SACRAMENTO. California 



The Capilol s Premier Holel-400 i 
CHARLES W COLE, Managi 



Hotel EL RANCHO i Bunqolows 
GALLUP. New Mexico 



World s lorgesl Ranch House— 200 ro 
MARTIN L HANKS, Manager 



Hotel RALEIGH 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



On famous Penntylvania Ave. -500 

JOEL E.BAUGH, Manager 



Hotel BOND 

HARTFORD Connecticut 



Horlfords f/nesi— (00 i 
MURREL F. VAUGHN, Manager 



Hotel SINTON 
CINCINNATI, Ohio 



Hospitality at its Best-700 rooms 
JOHN SCHEIBLY, Manager 

World-famed Itotels 

Teletype service — Family Plan 



Ladies : Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. 
Men: Fri., Sat. and Sun. 

CASTRO ROCK 

STEAM BATHS 

• 

Hygiene Beneficial 

for Health 

• 

Open Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
Sundays 9 A.M. to 4 P.M. 

• 

MASSAGE 

by 
APPOINTMENT 

• 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone UNderhill 1-5995 

• 

582 CASTRO 

(Bet. 18th and 19th Sts.) 

San Francisco, Calif. 



HUMBOLDT 
PLYWOOD CORP. 



Douglas Fir Plywood 

Fir Plyivood Exterior and Interior 



Areata, California 



UCKNER 




SPRINKLER^ ' ^ 



No other sprinkler ever built has all these features: 
No Springs . . . Sealed Bearings . . . Removable 
Head . . . Automatic Wear Signal . . . No Adjust- 
ment Required. 

See Buckner's complete line of sprinklers for 
crop, turf, and lawn irrigation. 

BUCKNER MANUFACTURING CO.. INC. 

1615 Blackstone Avenue P. O. Box 232 

Fresno, California 



July. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3 



'Efficient Police 

Make a Land of 

Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




552 PEACE OFFICERS' 




The Magazine 

Peace Officers 

Read 

(Trade Mark Copyright ) 



Vol. XXVII 



JULY, 1954 



No. 3 



A Candle, A Spoon ... A Gun 



He was a medium sized man, about 
five feet nine inches tall and a hundred 
and fifty pounds. His eyes were dark 
with closely contracted pupils, and his 
hands shook a little every time he raised 
the damp end of his cigarette to his 
mouth and all his movements were tight, 
nervous gestures. He had trouble, plenty 
of trouble, and he knew it so he talked 
freely. 

A long time ago he had learned that 
if you told the police what they wanted 
to know in a spot like this your trouble 
might not be so bad. Maybe they would 
let him alone. 

He was on the stuff and they knew he 
was on it, but he did not have any with 
him and they had not found any, so he 
was in the clear for a while at least. But 
he was hooked and hooked good, and 
when a man is like that he has to have 
his daily ration of snow. If he didn't 
talk and they hounded him, sooner or 
later the\' would find the stuiif and take 
it away from him and he could not 
imagine anything worse. A man who is 
hooked like that suffers when they take 
his heroin supply away. He suffers more 
than anyone can imagine. The drug 
wears off and a million tiny nerve end- 
ings come to life and catch fire and 
nothing will help the excruciating agony 
which follows except more heroin. 

So the dark, nervous man talked. He 
told Inspectors Max Girard and Dennis 
Bradley of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment Robbery Detail everything he 
could, which was not much but seemed 
to be enough. They were not interested 
in narcotics. Robbery was their specialty 
and while they had another job in mind 
when they contacted the dark man he 
had touched on a more important matter. 
He knew a little about a series of Safe- 



By Walter R. Hecox 

way Store holdups which had baffled and 
irritated San Francisco Bay Area police 
for some time. 

He knew the name of a man, Harold 
Miller, and his blond girl friend, who 
bore the name, if not the habits of a 
Greek goddess. There was the fact that 
the girl was driving a bright red Stude- 
baker with a black top which was so 
new that the permanent license plates 
had not arrived yet. He did not know 
Miller's address or the girl's either for 
that matter, but he did know the vicinity 
she lived in. Just the general area within 
a block or so. It was just a crumb of 
information, but enough. 

\Vhen they were satisfied that they had 
dragged all the available information 
from the dark man Girard and Bradley 
withdrew for a brief conference. They 
talked for a short time, then turned to 
the informer. 

"^Ve'd like \ou to stay close to home. 
There are other officers who know more 
about these cases than we do. We want 
them to talk to you." 

The dark man let a sigh of relief 
escape from the tense lips a;id nodded. 
"Anything you want. Anything at all." 

Within the hour Girard and Bradley 
were back in their headquarters on the 
fourth floor of the massive, brownstone 
Hall of Justice discussing their informa- 
tion with Lieutenant Martin Lee, head 
of the Robbery Detail, and two Inspec- 
tors, Jules Zimmerlin and George Heeg. 

"This Miller could be a hot suspect," 
Girard concluded. "He fits the descrip- 
tion of the holdup man prettv well and 
he owns a blue 1949 Buick and a 1938 
Ford." 

Zimmerlin nodded. "We've been look- 
ing for him. He just finished doing a 
\ear in the county jail for second degree 



robbery last summer. He's a hophead 
and he must be getting money for the 
stuff. The descriptions of him and his 
Buick fit the pattern, even if he did use 
a handkerchief over his face. But two 
weeks ago he just disappeared. We 
haven't been able to get a line on him." 

"Maybe his pal will help," Lee sug- 
gested. "Let's make a date with him." 

It was 7:30 p.m. on October 7, 1953 
when Inspectors Girard, Heeg, Zimmer- 
lin, and Bradley met the dark eyed in- 
former and accompanied him to the 
Crocker-Amazon district. 

"She lives around here somewhere," 
he told the officers. "I don't know ex- 
actly where, but we ought to see the car 
if she's home." 

The ultra streamlined, bright red 
Studebaker was easy to spot and the tem- 
porary paper license plates pasted to the 
rear window of the car revealed the 
girl's address. Bradley and Girard took 
the informer home, while Heeg and 
Zimmerlin proceeded to Ingleside Police 
Station where a quick check revealed the 
girl had been arrested recently on a nar- 
cotics charge and was free on bail while 
awaiting trial. 

"She should be easy to reason with," 
Heeg remarked. "She's in enough of a 
jam to make her want to cooperate." 

Zimmerlin nodded. "These hopheads 
are never too tough." 

Ten minutes later the two inspectors 
were talking to a willowy blond, a name- 
sake of the ancient goddess of the dawn, 
whose youthful beauty had become hard 
and cold beneath the carefully applied 
layer of pancake makeup. 

"Sure I know Harold Miller," she ad- 
mitted. "He's a nice guy." 

(Continued on page 10) 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Juh, 1954 



PISTOL POINTING 



Perhaps the first thing I do this time is 
to explain just why the Aiarch matches 
were called off at San Francisco. Many 
people have asked me in the past few 
weeks so I think all should know. It's 
very simple. The back-stop on the 50 
yard line has been taking such a beating 
in the last 9 or 10 years it has kinda 
worn down in spots and the lead catcher 
has not been able to get all the bullets 
with the result that some of the lead was 
flying back to the shooters and giving the 
boys a bit of hot lead during the matches. 
All has been fixed now and as you know 
the matches were held in April as 
scheduled. 

So now to the matches in Oakland on 
May 2, '54. (Sunday) And another 
record day can be chalked up for the 
Oakland Club as it was the first day of 
trout season and in spite of the crazy 
fishermen there were 225 shooters on 
the lot for the day's outing plus the 
usual assortment of wives, kids and dogs. 



By Ross DUNNIGAN 

Cap Boomhower, of the Hiway Patrol, 
fooled the boys by getting his limit Sat- 
urday morning at his private fishin' hole 
where he got the limit in two hours. 
Honest, that's what the man said ! 

Vic Vignola of the Oakland Club is 
one of those hard working guys that all 
clubs have — but don't appreciate. Vic 
fixes broken plumbing, bum wiring, 
busted boards, backstops and all sorts of 
gadgets that go wrong in any club. Vic 
does it with a smile and actually gets a 
kick out of helping out in his own way. 
But what I started to say was that Vic 
has been shooting pretty good scores with 
a gun handed down to him by his great, 
great grandfather and has often wished 
for a more modern weapon — say, like 
one made about 1900 or so then maybe 
he would shoot better scores. The boys 
from the Oakland Club got together and 
bought him a new 1954 model .38 re- 
volver and made the presentation last 
Sunday. At first Vic thought it was some 



sort of a joke but soon the light dawned 
in his noggin and was he happy? How 
would you have felt under the same 
circumstances ? Well, Vic, you can now 
put the old blunderbus back in the 
museum. 

Another of our regulars was Frank 
Lipoid who brought along his 6 year old 
daughter. Frank and the youngster were 
having a swell time sitting on the benches 
playing paddy-cake, paddy-cake, baker's 
man. Later Frank confided that the kid 
had the right idea and he should have 
listened to her when she wanted Frank 
to stay and finish the game. 

Now some folks would find a good, 
clean moral to this tale but to me its 
just another way of a guy trying to put 
up a good alibi. Ed Roseberg claimed 
that he hadn't cleaned his gun in over a 
year so the nite before the matches he 
most carefully cleaned and pressed his 
shootin' irons. Comes the matches and 
(Continued on page S6j 




MIKE CARROL'S GUNNERY SCHOOL 



1 

I 



Iuly.1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



PUBLIC HONORS SAFETY PATROLS 




In massed formation, the 4,500 members of the San Francisco School Safety Patrol await the start of the parade in Kezar Stadium. 




Officers in charge of training the San Francisco School Patrol are Inspector Thomas B. 
Tracy (left) and his assistants. Officers Charles Maggioncalda and Philip Lindecker, and 
Sergeant Matthew Duffy. 




Bay Area police departments and the Cali- 
fornia Highway Patrol were represented at 
the annual review of San Francisco's School 
Safety Patrol. Left to right: first row. In- 
spector A. J. Ford, Captain J. W. Kennedy, 
Captain Ted Parnow, Inspector Fred Leber, 
California Highway Patrol; Officer Eugene 
Baroni, Richmond; W. A. Hutchins, Oakland 
Office, California State Automobile Associa- 
tion. Second row. Officer Henry Sundermann, 
Dalv Citv ; Lieutenant Harold Richardson, 
Oakland;' Officer E. B. Ayres, California 



Highway Patrol; Captain Wyman Vernon, 
Lieutenant Howard Sorrells, Oakland; Cap- 
tain Earl Fitch, Richmond; Vaughn Seidel, 
Alameda County School Superintendent; 
James Bunker, formerly of the Alameda 
County School Department. Third row. Ser- 
geant George A. Rennacker, Sergeant W. D. 
Hoyt, Officer Paul Hurych, Berkeley; Officer 
Ray Morris, El Cerrito; Officer Earl McKin- 
non, San Mateo; Nelson Vassallo and Earl 
Mennet Alameda County School Department. 



Parades and reviews of School Safety 
Patrols, the young guardians of the cross- 
walks who are trained by local police 
officers and highway patrolmen, were 
staged in many cities during the closing 
weeks of the school term. 

Public ceremonies honoring the acci- 
dent-prevention records of the boys and 
girls took place in San Francisco, Oak- 
land, Berkeley, Livermore, El Cerrito, 
Richmond, Stockton, San Rafael, Burlin- 
game and San Alateo. Other events such 
as picnics, trips and outings were held for 
School Patrols in many other communi- 
ties. 

School Safety Patrols number some 
600,000 in nationwide membership with 
northern and central California totalling 
30,000 School Patrol boys and girls. Po- 
lice Departments in cities and the Cali- 
fornia Highway Patrol in rural areas 
supervise the training of the School Safety 
Patrols and join with the School Depart- 
ments, Parent-Teacher organizations and 
the California State Automobile Associa- 
tion in sponsoring this outstanding youth- 
safety movement. 

The following cities reported events 
honoring the Patrols: 

San Francisco School Safety Patrols 
marched in their annual Parade and Re- 
view in Kezar Stadium, June 2, marking 
their thirty-first anniversary. 

Some 4,500 boys and girls representing 
131 public, parochial and privafe .schools 
paraded before city officials, civic leaders, 
representatives of the Police Department, 
the School Department, Parent-Teacher 
groups, the California State Automobile 
Association, and thousands of the general 
public. 

The San Francisco Patrol has a record 
of not one school child killed at a patrol- 
(Continued on page 77 ) 



Page 6 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

TRACY RUNS ON RECORD 



July, 1954 



Sheriff Joseph B. Tracy is campaigning 
for re-election to the combined office of 
Sheriff-Coroner, to which he was elected 
four years ago after several years of serv- 
ice as Deputy United States Marshal of 
the Fresno District. Tracy said he will 
base his candidacy strictly on his record in 
office. He is opposed by Melvin Will- 
mirth, superintendent of the Fresno 
County Jail farm. 

Tracy's statement follows : 

"Four years ago I pledged myself to 
devote my full time to the office of 
Sheriff-Coroner, if elected, and I have 
carried out that pledge. Aside from trips 
out of the County, for the most part on 
official business, and a few short vacation 
trips, I have been on call twenty-four 
hours a day. 

"My campaign program four years ago 
was based on five main points, and I 
have carried out every one of them. 

"First, I promised to tighten the secu- 
rity of our County Jail. This has been 
accomplished by frequent inspections and 
by talcing away from the trustees the keys 
to the tanks which they formerly carried. 
Moreover, telephones have been installed 
so that prisoners may make one personal 
call at the time of arrest. 

"Second, I promised to provide better 
food for our prisoners, and more vege- 
tables at no extra cost. This has been 
accomplished. Formerly prisoners were 
fed only twice a day, and had nothing to 
eat between dinner at 3 o'clock in the 
afternoon and breakfast at 6:30 o'clock 
the next morning. Now we give them 
nourishing soup and bread at 6:30 
o'clock in the evening. Juveniles are fed 
three times daily, under supervision, in 
the kitchen dining room. 

"My third promise was that I would 
establish a Crime Prevention Bureau to 
handle juveniles. This was accomplished 
some six months after I took office. The 
first full year, 1952, saw the handling of 
1,109 cases, involving 1,771 persons. Of 
this number 1,390 were juveniles, includ- 
ing 900 boys and 490 girls. Of these 
youngsters, 590 were under 14 years of 
age, ranging up to 216 at age 16. 

"It may be a surprise to some that, of 
the 1,771 individuals handled by this bu- 
reau, 1,682 were of the white race, in- 
cluding 347 of Mexican descent ; 67 were 
Negroes and 22 were Asiatic. Some 589 
came from broken homes; 186 were re- 
peaters. Of these cases there were 187 on 
which petitions were filed or certified ; 
284 were given voluntary probation ; 249 
were transferred, and with 1,051 action 
was suspended or the individual was dis- 



missed. We are justly proud in the 
Sheriff's Office of the Crime Prevention 
Bureau, which has received much com- 
mendation. 

"The fourth point in my program was 
physical examination and F.B.I, training 
for Sheriff's deputies. All applicants for 
dcputyships now receive complete physi- 
cal examinations when they are selected 
from the lists. We have had two F.B.I. 
schools on general investigation and re- 
port writing, one on defense tactics, and 



one on the use of firearms. We have also 
had first-aid training by the Red Cross 
for all deputies, plus civil defense first- 
aid for all auxiliary officers. We sent 
two men to the explosives school in Los 
Angeles and they, in turn, conducted 
local schools, the first in California. We 
have been commended by Major General 
W. M. Robertson, State Director of 
Civil Defense, for these training pro- 
grams. 

(Continued on page S6) 




SHERIFF JOSEPH B. TRACY 



/uly. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



YOUNGEST POLICE CHIEF 



Since the first of Februan-, 1954 the 
it>' of Dinuba has claimed the youngest 
police chief in the State of California to 
be in charge of a police force consisting 
of more than four men. 

Thirty year old William H. Berlin. 
Jr.. who responds more readily to just 
plain "Bill", took over the Dinuba de- 
partment on that date and since then has 
concentrated on developing one of the 
most efficient law enforcement agencies 
in the state. 

Berlin, who was born in Santa Cruz, 
California, was graduated from Santa 
Cruz High School in 1941 and immedi- 
ately enlisted in the United States 
Marines. He served until November 13, 
1945. including a 30 month hitch over- 
seas in the Pacific Theater of operations. 
Ten days after his discharge he joined the 
Santa Cruz Police Department and 
sened as a radio patrolman, juvenile 
officer, member of the detective bureau 
and as Sergeant. 



He left the Santa Cruz department in 
April, 1953 to take over a position with 
a Fresno insurance company as claims 
adjuster and investigator and worked 
there until his appointment as Chief of 
the Dinuba department. 

During his service with the Santa 
Cruz department Berlin attended more 
than 18 Federal Bureau of Investigation 
training schools, was considered the out- 
standing shot on the police pistol team, 
has qualified as a fingerprint expert and 
is qualified to teach criminal law, inter- 
rogation, road blocks, burglary investiga- 
tions, homicide investigation and firearms 
technique. 

His wife, Marjorie is a former Fresno 
girl. The couple have three children. 
Loren, Terr\- and Trudy. Berlin is a 
member of the Dinuba Rotary Club. 

His first move on joining the depart- 
ment was to change the uniforms to full 
tropical worsted shirt and trousers, green 
jackets and a red stripe on the sleeve, a 



uniform which, for some strange reason, 
reminds one faintly of the USMC. All 
personnel are now sporting crew haircuts 
and must be clean shaven. (We have no 
data on reveille, mess call, retreat or 
taps. Hafta check with Chief Berlin.) 

The population of Dinuba is estimated 
at about 6500 within one and one half 
square miles with an additional 6,000 
living within a three mile radius around 
the city. 

The department includes Chief Ber- 
lin. Captain Ben Webb, an 18 year 
veteran. Sergeant Elmer "Buck" Pence, 
five years service. Officer Clarence Spier, 
two years service. Officers Frank Leal 
and Robert Pizzo and Reserve Officers 
Robert Collins and Charles Davis. 

Mobile equipment includes two patrol 
units, both equipped with modern three 
way radio. At present the radio diiparch- 
ing is taken care of by Fire contro', a 
situation Chief Berlin hopes to impro' e 
soon. 

(Continued on page 8-f) 




DINUBA POLICE DEP.\RT.\IENT 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

SOUSA WINS AGAIN 



July. 195^. 



Carlos A. Sousa, the reformed foot- 
ball coach who became sheriff-coroner of 
San Joaquin County four years ago, may 
not be the best peace officer in California, 
but you will have to look a long time for 
a better one and, after finding him, it 
will take an array of Philadelphia law- 
yers to convince the people of Sousa's 
home county that anyone can top the 
local boy. 

A lot of people laughed when Sousa, 
then a recreation director, ran for sheriff 
back in 1946 but nobody laughed this 
year when Sousa, after eight years of out- 
standing service in a post no one thought 
he had a chance to get, took on all 
comers and nearly lapped the field while 
he breezed into a third term of office 
during the primary elections. 

There is ample reason for Sousa's out- 
standing success. Together with Michael 
Canlis, who once played football for the 
Sheriff, he has organized one of the 
most efficient sheriff's departments in 
California. Sousa is the type of man 
whom almost everyone likes on first sight 
and who builds up a feeling of respect 



and admiration over a longer acquaint- 
ance. He is a man who plays the game 
fair and who expects his fellow man to 
and he runs his office on that premise. 

When he ran for Sheriff the first time 
he announced that he would keep his 
campaign clean and he kept his word. 

"I want to win," he declared, "But I 
want a clean fight. You will not get any 
name calling or mud slinging from me. 
There is no need to roll politics in the 
gutter." 

Apparently some contemporary politi- 
cians could take a lesson from Sousa, be- 
cause he has demonstrated that clean poli- 
tics and a good record in office is what 
the people in San Joaquin County like. 

Sousa had a lot of work to do when 
he took over the office eight years ago. 
The old San Joaquin Sheriff's office was 
efficient, but needed a thorough going 
over. Modernization was one need. Im- 
proved working conditions for the 
sheriff's deputies and office staff were 
also needed. Ex-coach Sousa pitched into 
his new job with vigor. 



His first move was to place his entin 
personnel under civil service and give 
them a shorter work week. Slowly th( 
wages of his men climbed and the work- 
ing day shrunk. Today a San Joaquin 
deputy works a 40 hour week. 

Sheriff Sousa's next step was to set 
that all deputies were dressed in service^ 
able, neat uniforms. Then he turned his 
attention to their ability and education. 
Today every man must take refresher 
training courses for two weeks ever'' 
year. These courses include instructioi 
in all phases of peace officer fundamentals 
and a rundown of new laws. In addition 
to the extra schooling, every man must 
take periodic examinations which estab- 
lish his standing with the force. And 
the examinations do not stop with the 
ordinary deputy. Every officer up to and 
including the rank of captain must take 
the tests. 

As a step toward forwarding with his 

modernization program. Sheriff Sousa 

sent his old pupil, Michael Canlis, back 

to school. Canlis' new alma mater wa 

(Continued on page S5) 




SHERIFF CARLOS A. SOUSA AND HIS SQUAD OF SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY SHERIFF'S RESERVES 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



DELTA CITY 



Stockton, one of many Pacific Coast 
communities which is bulging at the 
seams with an expanding population, is 
unique among cities of comparative size 
in the State of California due to the fact 
that it has both agricultural and indus- 
trial activities as a reason for its phenom- 
enal growth. 

Stockton, located along the fabulously 
rich San Joaquin River Delta, distrib- 
utes by truck, rail and ocean-going 
steamers a wealth of vegetables and 
fruits. It also boasts dozens of modern 
plants ranging from small shops with 
half a dozen hands to the giant Ameri- 
can Can Company factory which is 
located there. 

Residents of the city are proud of the 
outstanding rating their city has as a 
business center and of the cultural and 
social status they have attained. They ad- 
mit nature has helped them and boast 
that their industrious and far seeing pio- 
neer citizens worked hard and success- 
fully to make their town a perfect com- 
bination of agricultural and industrial 
enterprises. 

Jack A. O'Keefe, a rabid baseball fan 
with a background in police work dating 
to 1936, took over the Stockton Police 
Department in 1950 and since then has 
maintained a department capable of do- 
ing a more than ample job of handling 
Stockton's multiple police problems. 

At present Chief O'Keefe is giving the 
city a high order of law enforcement 
which ranks second to none in Califor- 
nia. He attributes his success to the fact 
that he is in charge of a loyal and effi- 
cient group of peace officers who take 
pride in their community. 

The department is truly a stream- 
lined force following in every detail the 
latest subuniting approved in the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation and Inter- 
national Police Administration. This 
method of having the right protection at 
the proper place has given Stockton a 
minimum of crimes against persons and 
property and made it a city that can 
boast of few crimes of violence and a 
small percentage of so called nuisance 
offenses. 

Recruits to the department and promo- 
tions within the force are secured 
through strict civil service examinations 
and the entire personnel are men in the 
prime of life. 

Recruits are trained in the various 
phases of police activity and the inter- 




Chief J. A. O'Keefe 

pretation of department rules and regu- 
lations. During the non summer months 
a program of in service training is car- 
ried on for all ranks in the department. 
The lectures in the non summer course 
cover patrol procedure, station procedure, 
public relations, criminal investigation, 
criminal identification, care and use of 
firearms, reports and records, communi- 
cations, criminal law and procedure and 
target practice. 







The traffic division includes a captain, 
a lieutenant, a sergeant and twenty-five 
partlomen. Route 99, a main Central 
California and North South travel 
artery, calls for continuous service on 
the part of the traffic division. The seven 
three wheel motorcycles, five radio cars 
and six motorcycles assigned to this ex- 
cellent department unit are busy at all 
times with parking violations, speeders 
and others who violate traffic laws or run 
afoul of the physical laws against the 
irresistable force meeting the immovable 
object. 

Because of the fact that Stockton al- 
ways houses a considerable percentage of 
migratory workers, the detective division 
including one captain, two lieutenants, 
ten sergeants and three patrolmen, have 
a mansized job in holding organized 
criminal elements out of the city. Their 
arrest and conviction records are out- 
standing and though Stockton is a cos- 
mopolitan city, gangsterism is unknown 
there and petty offenses are at a mini- 
mum. 

Crime prevention is believed to be of 
prime importance by Chief O'Keefe. He 
has discovered that this phase of recog- 
nized police efficiency is best effected 
through specialized attention to the youth 
of the community and, along this line 
the Stockton Juvenile Squad has been 
eminently successful, proving time and 
again that an ounce of prevention is 
worth the proverbial pound of cure. 

Fourteen years ago Chief O'Keefe 
married Miss Mary Budiselich. The 
couple have two children, Marlene, 12, 
and Johnny, seven. 

Within easy distance of the city are 
excellent fishing and hunting. Bass, both 
large mouth, small mouth and stripers 
are the top local favorites along with 
upland birds and wild duck. 

Chief O'Keefe, a man who has lead 
an active athletic life, concentrates on 
baseball. He has held the post of Vice 
President of the Stockton Ports and is 
an avid fan. 



DANGER 

NARROW 

BRIDGE 

^ONELANE 



MOANING CAVE 

Moaning Cave, located seven miles 
east of Angels Camp in Calaveras 
County, is reported by the National 
Automobile Club to have been named for 
the weird moaning sound made by the 
wind when it blows through it. It was 
discovered by a gold-prospecting French- 
man in 1853. 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1954 



A CANDLE. A SPOON. A GUN 

(Continued from page 3) 
"^V^e don't think so," Zimnierlin told 
her. "But we'd like to meet the gentle- 
man." 

The girl hesitated. "If he's in trouble 
I don't want to turn him in. I like the 

guy." 

"You're in trouble yourself," she was 
reminded. "Plenty of trouble. You've 
got that to think about." 

"Willi get a break if I talk?" 

"We can't promise anything. But 
we'll get Miller sometime. AH we want 
to do is question him. If he's innocent, 
he'll be all right. If he's guilty he belongs 
in jail. ^Ve'll appreciate your help." 

The girl decided discretion was the 
better part of her peculiar brand of 
valor. She talked. When she finished she 
had given the detectives Miller's apart- 
ment address and admitted that he had 
asked her to provide an alibi for him in 
case he was ever picked up on a holdup 
charge. 

An hour later Bradley and Girard re- 
turned and the four inspectors proceeded 
to the corner of Andover and Park 
Streets, parked, and moved on foot down 
Park. 

"That ought to be 384 over there," 
Zimmerlin declared. "His '38 Ford is 
parked in front of it." 

"That's it all right," Heeg agreed. 
"But no Buick." 

Girard shrugged. "All we can do is 
try. Maybe the Buick is in the garage." 

"Someone had better cover the rear 
entrance," Bradley suggested. "If Miller 
is in there he may try to duck out the 
back way." 

After a brief huddle the inspectors de- 
cided that Zimmerlin and Girard would 
try the front door while Bradley and 
Heeg covered the rear. An c\amination 
of the premises revealed that the only ac- 
cess to the rear would be through the 
garage. Zimmerlin and Girard waited 
while their companions worked on the 
garage doors. The doors were locked 
from the inside and stubbornlv res'sted 
their attempts to open them. Heee pro- 
duced the standard piece of celluloid, but 
it soon became apparent that the doors 
were not fastened by an ordinary spring 
lock. 

Bradley worked on the bottom of a 
door. Bv reaching with a wire through a 
recess there he was able to release a 
spring jam and, after several attempts, 
to lift a bar which held the double doors 
closed. Thev swung open soundlessly as 
soon as the bar was removed. There was 
no car in the garage, but Bradlev's flash- 
light focused on a rubble littered passage 
which led to a rear entrance. He waved 
to the others and started inside, followed 



closely by Heeg. The passage took them 
to a narrow aisle which paralleled the 
rear of the garage and apartment house, 
terminating at the rear steps of the build- 
ing, where it opened into the major por- 
tion of the back yard. The two detectives 
proceeded soundlessly toward the steps 
with Bradley, flashlight in hand, leading 
the way. 

When Heeg and Bradley disappeared 
into the garage, Zimmerlin and Girard 
approached the front door of the apart- 
ment house. The doorbell, an instrument 
of ancient vintage which was supposed 
to work manually as the result of the 
twist of an outside knob, proved to be 
worthless, so the two men rapped on the 
glass. There was no answer. They 
waited a respectable time, then knocked 
again. Still no answer. 

Zimmerlin turned to Girard. "What 
do you think ?" he whispered. 

"Maybe he's not home, or maybe . . ." 
Girard paused and listened intently for 
a moment. "I think someone's moving 
around in there. Listen." 

He paused in time for the detectives 
to hear a door close stealthily, almost 
soundlessly. There was a slience, then 
the door creaked open. The sound of 
muffled footsteps moved toward the rear 
of the building. 

"He's taking it on the lam," Girard 
declared. "Try that door." 

The door opened easily and the two in- 
spectors darted toward the rear of the 
long hall that confronted them. A shot 
sounded from the back of the building, 
then another and another. The detectives 
broke into a full run. 

At seven o'clock that evening Harold 
Miller had been nervous. Part of it was 
the drug which was getting a good, 
strong grip on him again. But mostly it 
was the telephone call he had received 
a couple of hours earlier. The cops had 
been asking questions. As close as he 
could tell they didn't have anything but 
a hunch, but a hunch was enough. He 



was hot and he knew it. If they nailed 
anything on him they had plenty to send 
him to the big house. Even if they did 
not get him for a specific stickup there 
were the dope and his guns. They were 
enough to send him up for a long stretch. 

A man who is on snow gets nervous 
when he thinks about things like that. 
They don't give you a ration of stuff in 
San Quentin. Just thinking about it 
brings the frayed nerve endings a little 
closer to the snapping point and makes 
the hands do a little dance of their own 
over which the mind has no control. But 
there is a cure. For a man who is hooked 
there is always a cure if he can get it. 

Miller went to his bureau drawer and 
procured a candle, a spoon, an eyedrop- 
per, some cotton, a hypodermic needle, 
and a little package of white powder. 
He worked with speed that comes from 
experience. First he mixed the powder 
and cut it. Next he heated it over the 
candle in the spoon. Finally he trans- 
ferred it to the eyedropper, then the 
needle, and at last his arm. When that 
job was finished he checked his .41 revol- 
ver to see that it was properly loaded, 
pumped a shell into the chamber of his 
nine millimeter Luger, then replaced it 
in the clip, slipped ofiE the safeties on 
both guns, laid them on the bed table, 
and retired. He started to read, but the 
fast acting drug soon stopped that. Within 
minutes he had turned out the light and 
was sleeping peacefully. Several hours 
later he heard the knocking on the front 
door. 

Miller left the bed and the .41 left 
the bed table simultaneously. Cautiously 
he opened the hall door and peered 
toward the front portal. Two figures sil- 
houetted against the window which 
formed the top third of the door told 
him all he needed to know. Two men 
wearing snap brim hats and topcoats. 
Miller found this significant in two 
wavs. First, none of his friends wore 
(Continued on page QO) 



NOT NOW AND THEN 



BUT ALWAYS 



'Good Design - Contemporary Furniture - Draperies - Accessories" 
"Light-0-Lier Headquarters . . . Famous Raymor Shop" 




"the village college shopping center" 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Phones 2-3296 or S-1666 

C. L. WINES 

PAINTING AND DECORATING CONTRACTOR 

12 Months to Pay ... No Interest or Carrying 

Charge 

2075 Cherokee Lane 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Jerky Sanzan Fred Chinchiolo 

"MATTY'S" COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

DINING AND DANCING 

429 E. Weber Avenue Phone S-5014 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4 5 163 



Res. Phone 2-2702 



H. M. WOLFE 



Manufacturers of 
LINERS - VAULTS - MARKERS 



2000 North Wilson Way 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



QUINN'S FOR OFFICE SUPPLIES 



120 East Ma 

STOCKTON 



Dial 7-7712 

CALIFORNIA 



MONTGOMERY 
WARD & CO. 

Retail Department Store 
Serving San Joaquin County 

Complete Lines for Every 
Need 



Telephone 4-7751 

24 N. AMERICAN ST. 

23 N. STANISLAUS ST. 

STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



FINGERPRINTING 

From the book FIXGERPRINTS bv Douglas G. 
Browne & -Man Brock. Copyright. 1954, bv E. P. 
Dutton & Co., Inc.. Fubhshers. 

AVolseley Crescent and Koomasi A\e- 
nue, in the suburb of Hanbury, in South- 
east London, were laid out, as their names 
imply, soon after the Ashanti War of the 
I870's. Their houses, designed for well- 
to-do families with at least two servants 
living in, are detached and double-fronted, 
with front and back gardens. In the days 
before two world wars it is probable that 
these houses were never empty except 
when the families were on holiday, when 
the servants were put on board wages and 
such things as silver and jewelry went to 
the bank. Times have changed, and now 
in 1953, though there are still households 
in Wolseley Crescent and Koomasi Ave- 
nue living in comfortable style, they have 
to make do with a daily maid and a char- 
woman, and, indeed, feel thenisehes 
lucky to get either. 

The Harrisons, at Chatsworth, AVolse- 
ley Crescent, live in this way. Almost 
their only link with the past is the habit 
of sending their valuables to the bank 
when they go away in August and Sep- 
tember. They have — or they had — some 
good antique silver, and Mrs. Harrison's 
jewels were valued at £4000. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harrison are seldom both out in 
the evening, though their two daughters 
aged seventeen and nineteen, are then, on 
the contrary, seldom both at home. It did, 
however, sometimes occur to Mr. Harri- 
son that in these servantless and lawless 
days, with the papers full of burglaries 
and bashings, he really ought to do some- 
thing about the leaded panes in the front 
door and in certain windows, particularly 
the drawing-room window, which over- 
looked the large back garden. These orna- 
ments, with their colored glass, the pride 
of the builder in the 1870's, were as good 
as an invitation to the least skilful burg- 
lar. I\Ir. Harrison's sensible intentions, 
however, never got beyond putting in 
screw latches and an extra lock on the 
front door. After all, either he or his wife 
was almost always at home in the dark 
evening hours. 

But not quite alwa> s ; and one evening 
in February, to celebrate his elder daugh- 
ter's success in an extremely stiii examina- 
tion in physiotherapy, the whole famih- 
went to the theater. Returning home b\' 
Tube, they reached Chatsworth at 1 1 :M), 
to find that the long-standing invitation to 
thieves had been accepted. The house had 
been entered by way of the leaded panes 
along the top of the drawing-room win- 
dow, and most of Mrs. Harrison's jewels 
and smaller pieces of silver taken. 

While Mrs. Harrison and the girls 
were onh' beginning to find out what had 
gone, Mr. Harrison ran to the telephone 



Office: 8-8958 Res.: 2-0912 

FRASER SALES AND SERVICE CO. 

Freddie Sievers. Mgr. 

HEATING - AIR CONDITIONING 
SHEET METAL WORK 

445 South San Joaquin Street 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Phone 6-6725 

COSTA BROS. 

Growers and Shippers 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Office: Union and Lafayette Streets 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

MANILA INN 

MEET YOUR FRIENDS HERE 

Phone 3-3621 

227 South Eldorado 



MANILA HOTEL 

CLEAN - REASONABLE RATES 

Phone 2-9788 

229 South Eldorado 

T. P. Suasillo. President 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



WOOD'S MARKET 

FRESH MEATS AND VEGETABLES 
Full Line of Groceries, Beer and Wine 



3629 East Market 

STOCKTON 



hone 3-9180 

CALIFORNIA 



FLOYD G. 
BORCHARDT 

Heavy - Industrial 
Commercial 

General Building Estimates 



P. O. Box 1208 
Stockton, California 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1954 



Day Phone 2-5273 



Nite Phone 3-4568 



BLINCOE TRUCKING CO. 

"SERVICE AT ITS BEST" 
F. E. Blincoe. Jr. 

2431 Mariposa Road 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Global Electric Manufacturing Co. 

CORDS - COILS - SWITCHES 

SPECIALTIES 

Electric Heat Engineering and Manufacturing 



S3S Visalia Street 

STOCKTON 



Telephone 3-718S 

CALIFORNIA 



Dr. Merchant and Dr. Halley 

Medical-Dental Building 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

BOND AND RUSHING 

LAND LEVELING • SUBSOILING 
BULLDOZING • LAND PLANNING 



849 Buena Vista Avenue 

STOCKTON 



Phone 3-47S8 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 5-7277 

CANNERY 

W O R K E R'S 

UNION 

Local No. 601 

AMERICAN 

FEDERATION 

OF LABOR 



. . . OFFICE . . . 

745 East Miner Avenue 
STOCKTON 2, CALIF 



in the hall, grabbed the receiver, and 
dialed Hanbury 1113. Most Metropoli- 
tan police stations are so numbered. AIv. 
Harrison had heard a good deal about 
fingerprints, but either he thought that a 
burglar was not likely to use the tele- 
phone, or he did not stop to think at all. 



The police station being near at hand, 
a uniformed inspector, a detective-ser- 
geant in plain clothes, and a constable 
were at Chatsworth within five minutes 
Before the inspector did anything else he 
asked the family to stop handling things; 
he did not waste breath in reproving Mr. 
Harrison, whose finger- and palm-prints 
had no doubt obliterated many others on 
the telephone receiver, but, picking this 
up with greater care, by the earpiece, he 
dialed Whitehall 1212. The response was 
immediate, and the inspector then asked 
for two e.xtension numbers, those of the 
Fingerprint Department and its no less 
important branch the Photographic De- 
partment. In the Metropolitan Police 
Area, though each of the twenty-three 
divisions has its own C.I.D. officer, when 
a crime is committed fingerprint and 
photographic experts are summoned from 
Scotland Yard. 

While the inspector waited for their 
arrival, he went over the house with Mr. 
Harrison. The detective-sergeant interro- 
gated the rest of the family, discouraging 
their impulse to illustrate their stories by 
touching things. The inspector himself, 
well trained though he was, took the ex- 
tra precaution of keeping his hands be- 
hind his back most of the time. It was ap- 
parent to him that the burglar had known 
what he was after, and had worked with 
intelligence and restraint. Having simply 
pushed in a strip of leaded glass in the 
drawing-room window, which was not 
overlooked by neighboring houses, and 
satisfied himself that Chatsworth was 
empty, he had then, the inspector thought, 
begun his depredations on the first floor. 
All the bedroom doors there stood open, 
but the intruder was interested only in 
the elder Harrison's room, where Mrs. 
Harrison kept her jewel case in a locked 
drawer of her dressing table. The drawer 
and the case had been forced, and the 
case, empty, was left on the dressing table 
among silver-backed brushes and other 
e.xpensive toilet implements whose value 
was insufficient to outweigh the disad- 
vantage of their bulk. As the inspector 
saw it, the thief, having pocketed the jew- 
els, had then gone through the drawing 
and dining rooms below, collecting small 
silver. 

All this would have taken little time. 
What had the unknown done then ? Had 
he left at once, or had he, as so often 
happens, lingered for a drink or food ? It 
it at this stage, when the booty has been 



ATA TIRE SERVICE 

TIRES ■ CUSTOM RECAPPING - BATTERIES 

ACCESSORIES - SEAT COVERS 

•Our Treads Are Miles Ahead" 



IV 05 South El Do 

STOCKTON 



Dial 4-4578 

CALIFORNIA 



MOORE EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 

Allis-Chalmers Road Machinery - Ingersoll- 

Rand Compres-iors - GMC Trucks - Unit Cran( 

Buckeye Trenchers 



NORTH 99 HIGHWAY 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



MIRACLE DRIVE-IN 

Henry Bielfeldt 



2520 Pacific Avenue 

STOCKTON 



Telephone 4-0864 
CALIFORNIA 



HENRY F. (pUINN, M.D. 



Phone 5-3149 

99 LUMBER YARD 

Fortnerly 

WILK'S LUMBER 

SAME LOCATION 

NEW AND USED 
BUILDING MATERIALS 

Free Estimates and 
Delivery 



SOUTH HIGHWAY 99 

One-Half Mile South of Mariposa 
Road 

STOCKTON, CALIF. 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Phone 2-92 19 



Otto and Belle White 



MOTHERS MODERN HOTEL 



1446 Mariposa Road 
One-Half Mile South on Highway 99 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



RICHARDS HOTEL 

Alice Silva. Manager 

18 South El Dorado Street Phone 6-6440 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

ANDERSON CARTAGE AND 
WAREHOUSE CO. 



430 North Aurora Street Phone 2-6502 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 5.825 1 



P. O. Box 1289 



L. F. GRIMSLEY. INC. 

944 East Scotts Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



San Joaquin County 

FARM 
PRODUCTION 
ASSOCIATION 

Incorporated — January 27, 1951 

A. R. DUARTE 

Secretary-Manager 



Stockton, California 



gathered, that a criminal tends to relax, 
if only for a few minutes, before quitting 
the scene of action as unobtrusively as he 
came. Anyone who has had to do a job 
under a considerable nervous tension 
knows that an immediate result is thirst, 
and breakers and enterers are notoriously 
addicted to a quick one for the road. It 
may be only water or lemonade. But dur- 
ing what in fact is reaction after strain 
the most cautious veteran will sometimes 
forget routine precautions he has employ- 
ed automatically until that moment ; hav- 
ing as a matter of course worked in 
gloves, he may even take one ofif to handle 
a bottle, or to peel an apple, and so leave 
fingerprints behind. 

Mr. Harrison's small store of wine and 
spirits, kept in a sideboard cupboard in 
the dining room, did not appear to have 
been touched. Leaving it for the finger- 
print people to examine, the Hanbury in- 
spector asked Mrs. Harrison to see if she 
thought that anything in the kitchen was 
out of place. The kitchen was well lighted 
and extremely neat ; china and polished 
glasses filled a glazed cupboard above the 
dresser ; along the top of the dresser was 
ranked an array of painted tins marked 
Tea, Coffee, Sugar, and Biscuits, a large 
flat tin being for cake. Everything, said 
Mrs. Harrison, was as she had last seen 
it. So far as she could tell, food in the 
refrigerator had not been tampered with. 

In the dining room, in the meantime, 
the constable was obtaining from Mr. 
Harrison and the two girls, with the aid 
of an address book, a preliminary list of 
all recent visitors to the house, beginning 
with the daily maid and the charwoman. 
He was at work on this, and his senior 
officers were returning with Mrs. Harri- 
son from the kitchen, when a police car 
drew up outside. It was just after mid- 
night. 

Four officers had come from Scotland 
Yard — a first-class sergeant of the Fing- 
erprint Department, on duty that night, 
accompanied by a detective-constable, and 
a sergeant from the photographic branch 
with his own assistant. All were in plain 
clothes. In the presence of the Harrison 
family the local inspector received the 
newcomers with due formality, but when 
he and his detective-sergeant had taken 
them into the drawing room formal man- 
ners were dropped, for all happened to be 
known to one another. C.I.D. officers 
from the Central Office work in teams, 
and the teams are often the same. 

"Well, George," said the fingerprint 
sergeant, whose name was Ash, "here we 
are again, How's the wife?" 

Social exchanges were brief, and the 
inspector got on with his tale. Sergeant 



Phone 20593 



Residence 4-5731 



Sinox and Di-Nltro Distributor 

Valor Brand 

Dusting Sulphurs - Wettable Sulphurs 

Insecticides - Spray Materials 

FLOYD BROOKS 



P. O. Box 1362 Weber Ave. at Co 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



JOHN KESSEL - Property Renfals 

3138 Pacific Avenue Phone 7-7748 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

RIVIERA CLIFFS ESTATES 

EXCLUSIVE HOME SITES 

932 East Main Street Phone 4-2225 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DICK'S DRIVE INN 

1301 Harding Way Phone 2-9540 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL CLARK 

Arbor Room :-: Walnut Grill 
Sutter and Market Streets 

Stockton, Californl\ 

Newcomb Hotel Interests 



James E. Johnston 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT 
HAULING 

Crane Service ■ Winch Trucks 



Residence Phone 3-4332 

Office Phone 5-3621 

2915 East Miner Avenue 

Stockton, California 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1954 



JOHN MORENO. Jr. 

GENERAL HAULING 

5279 Cherokee Road Phone 2-2163 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

C. O. WELLIVER 

Plumbing Service Repair My Specialty 

212 West Rose Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

VALVERDE BROTHERS 

Wheel Alignment and Balancing - Complete 

Brake Service ■ Featuring the New Method 

Balantru Service. 



Compliments of 

WRIGHT PAINT & CHEMICAL 

139 North Sutter Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Automobile Mechanical Specialists - Battery 

LATEER^"spfRO "motor CO. 

Automotive Super Specialty Shop - Wheel 

Axle - Brake Specialists 
225 North American Phone 7-7964 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

REGAL INN AND CAFE 

Elmer and Rufe, Owners 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 

Liquors and Mixed Drinks 

Way Phone 2-9448 



COUNTRY CLUB MARKET 

Your Neighborhood Grocer 
Groceries - Fresh Fruits and Vegetables - Fresh 
Meats - Complete Line of Frozen Foods. Plenty 
of Free Parking Ted Simmons 

1875 Country Club Boulevard 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

SPUDNUT SHOP & SPUDNUT BAR 

(Party Orders Taken) 

Hot Lunches - Fountain - Sandwiches 

Spudnuts to Take Home 

1724 East Main Street Phone 3-9272 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

THE HIDEAWAY INN 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - SANDWICHES 



2415 Waterloo Road 

STOCKTON 



lone 2-9396 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 6-6607 Owen R. Ward 

ATLAS GLASS CO. 

MIRRORS - GLAZING 
Glass for Every Purpose 
808 East Weber Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Branches at 

Stockton - Tracy - Brentwood 

AND Oakley 

Day-Lite Market 

Wholesale — Retail 
MEATS AND GROCERIES 

Main Office 

111 SOUTH CENTER STREET 

Phone 4-4896 

STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA 



Ash whistled through his teeth in a minor 
key. 

"You'll be getting after the maid," he 
said at the end. 

The other nodded. "And the char. 
Some one told the fellow what to look 
for, and where to look. And when. " 

"Any ideas about him?" 

"It might be so-and-so. . . ." Fhe in- 
spector reeled off the names of several 
professions, known in the Division, who 
favored entry by leaded windows. "But 
it could be anybody. Needn't be a local. 
It's money for jam. Only this is rather 
a bigger haul than usual. I've heard of 
Mrs. Harrison's jewelry." 

Sergeant Ash whistled more mourn- 
fully. "Some people ne\er learn. Well, 
George, if you want to be home for break- 
fast, we'd better begin." 

By the broken window his assistant had 
opened an attache case and was setting 
out on an occasional table two small bot- 
tles of fine powder, gray and black, and 
camel's-hair brushes of various sizes. Fak- 
ing a bottle of gray powder and a small 
brush, he went into the hall, followed by 
the photographers with their camera and 
tripod. As Ash and the inspector passed 
by, on their way to the dining room, the 
camera was being set up, while the finger- 
print man lightly brushed powder o\er 
the telephone instrument. 

In the dining room the four Harrisons 
were still recalling the names of recent 
visitors, who were numerous, for friends 
of the two girls were constanth' in and 
out. Mr. Harrison's glance at the side- 
board suggested that he felt he could do 
with a drink. The divisional inspector 
soon left Sergeant Ash with the famil\ 
and returned to the hall. The telephone 
instrument had been powdered and the 
surplus powder blown away, re\ealing on 
the recei\er a mass of superimposed 
finger- and palm-prints, over all being 
the impression of Air. Harrison's hand, 
moist with agitation. Photographs had 
then been taken, and the instrument be- 
ing now available for use, the inspector 
rang up Hanbury Police Station to de- 
mand the immediate summoning, from 
their beds if necessary, of the Harrison's 
daily maid and charwoman. The detec- 
tive-constable from the fingerprint De- 
partment had returned with the photog- 
raphers to the drawing room, where he 
began to work over the window. The 
leading of the upper panes had been 
thrust inward until it broke, and many 
of the small colored segments of glass had 
fallen to the floor. AH these, and the glass 
and glazing bars surrounding the gap, 
would be powdered and scrutinized and 
perhaps photographed. The patient work 
would be continued with the furniture of 
the room — much of the vanished silver 



FRED GRILLO ■ Grocer 

grocery and vegetable market 



STOCKTON 



Phone 2-6353 
CALIFORNIA 



NAD MALCOUN 

Groceries • Meats • Vegetables 

Eighth and B Streets 

MARKET — 2201 South B Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Slockl 



Plant: Cha 



■ Way at W. P. Tr, 



cks 



Ed. Spiekerman Concrete Pipe Co. 

Stockton Office: P. O. Box 534; Phone 4-4052 
Lodi Plant: 412 S. Sacramento St.; Ph. 9-3596 
STOCKTON CALIFORN IA 

LOGAN CAMERA SHOP 

"EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC" 

Fred and George Schneider 
223 East Weber Avenue 

STOCKTON CALIFORN IA 

Res. Phone 21255 Shop Phone 2-5886 

SATTUI'S SADDLE SHOP 

Harness and Riding Equipment - Leather 

Jackets - Boots - Shirts - Paints - Etc. 

Repairing 

807 E. Main Street Stockton, CalifomU 



SEA FOOD GROTTO 



15 No. California Street 

STOCKTON 



Phone 2-9084 
CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-7452 Res. 2-4652 

DELUXE BAKERY 

BREAD • CAKES • PASTRY 

Wedding and Birthday Cakes to Order 

329 So. San Joaquin Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORN IA 

A. E. TOCCOLI 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
Commercial Work - Quality Homes 



1932 West Euclid 

STOCKTON 



Dial 6-6392 
CALIFORNIA 



e Phone 4-4998 Res. Phone 3-0553 

Macorio D. Bautlsta, M.D. 

Office Hours by Appointment 



;e Delivery Mike T. Rishv 

DELUXE LIQUORS 

(Your Friendly Neighborhood Store) 
Quality Brands - Liquors - Wines - Beers 



Phone 51748 

JOHN VIERA 

LABOR CONTRACTOR 

LICENSED AND BONDED 

FAST AND DEPENDABLE 
PICKERS 

We Use Bus Transportation 

STOCKTON, California 



Julv, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



Kappy Nahigian Carl Nahigian 

El Tehran Restaurant 

Specializins in Broiled Food, Shish Kebab, 
Chops, Steaks, Chicken . . . Facilities for Pri- 
vate Parties and Banquets in Our Gold Room 
333 East Market Street Phone 8-8796 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



FOX HOTEL 



305 So. El Do 

STOCKTON 



Telephone 2-9748 

CALIFORNIA 



YALE BRODY. M.D. 
MOOSHY SERGIS. M.D. 

127 East Acacia 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CHARTER WAY FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
Free Delivery 



236 East Charter Way 

STOCKTON 



Dial 4-2713 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN JOAQUIN MORTUARY 

AND BURIAL INSURANCE 



W. F. Bell, Pre 
544 South Califo 

STOCKTON 



I Crawford, Prop. 
Telephone 3-6434 

CALIFORNIA 



YOUR MARKET 

For Top Quality Groceries 
Meats - Vegetables - Liquors 

Visit Our AdjoininK Variety Store 



Pho 



Phone 5-2555 Night Phone 4-4254 

BROUWER MOTOR CO. 

NEW AND USED CARS 
S20 No. El Dorado St. John J. Brouwer, Owner 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

FARMERS FEED CO. 

PURINA CHOWS 



1302 East Mil 
STOCKTON 



lione 5-5739 
CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 3-1854 Jack Hensen, Prop. 

JACK'S TIRE SERVICE 

VULCANIZING - RETREADING 
1905 East Fremont 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

THE MOLAR RANCH 

99 Highway and 8-Mile Road 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Greetings to the 
Police and Peace Officers 

AL ANDERSON 



Stockton, California 



had been in two glass-topped cabinet 
tables — and so onward, if it had to be 
done, throughout the house. ^Vhole doors 
might be powdered and examined inch by 
inch. Movable objects, such as the cabinet 
tables, would probably be taken to Scot- 
land Yard. Such labors, as Sergeant Ash 
told the startled Mrs. Harrison, have 
been known to go on for days. 

The sergeant, however, had his own 
ideas. He was fond of taking what he 
called short cuts, the fruits, in fact, of 
considerable experience in the ways of 
criminals. He now rejoined his friend the 
inspector and went off with him to the 
kitchen. As the pair stood looking at the 
picture of neatness it presented. Sergeant 
Ash whistling again in a mournful key, 
an idea came to his companion, who 
reached out to feel two dishcloths hang- 
ing on a line. They appeared to be dry 
and clean, but, having felt the second one, 
the inspector fingered it again. 

"I'd say that's been used since the fam- 
ily went off at si.x o'clock," he said. 

The sergeant felt it too. "Aye, damp- 
ish," he agreed. 

He ran his eye along the array of 
glasses in the glazed cupboard ; opening 
this by inserting a pocketknife under the 
handle, he peered at a row of upturned 
tumblers. Then, taking a long pencil 
from his pocket, he pushed a tumbler to- 
wards him with the knife until the rim 
projected beyond the edge of the shelf 
and he could insert the unsharpened end 
of the pencil inside the inverted glass. 
When the end touched the bottom of the 
tumbler he pulled this off the shelf and 
spun it gently before his eyes, finally ma- 
nipulating it back into its place without 
touching it with his fingers. Having re- 
peated the process with the other five 
tumblers in the row, he shook his head. 

"He probably had a drink, if he used 
that cloth. But he polished up after him. 
Trod on something, George?" 

The inspector was standing on one leg 
and bending sideways to feel the sole of 
his other boot. 

"Only a currant," he said. "But I can 
never bear squashy things underfoot. Re- 
minds me of the beetles in the old kitchen 
when I was a boy." 

"No beetles here," said the sergeant, 
but with an abstracted air. He was look- 
ing thoughtfully at the cake tin on the 
dresser. The tin was circular and flat, 
nearly a foot in diameter, and, like the 
other cylindrical tins, it was painted 
green, with "Cake" in gold letters on the 
lid. Sergeant Ash opened his pocketknife 
and, pushing the blade under the tin, 
caused this to rotate slowlv on the dresser 



George and Ernie's Service 
Station 

No. Highway "99" at Sanguinetti Lane 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DON'S REPAIR SHOP 



elry - Watch Repaii 
son Lighter Repairs 



921 East Main Street 

STOCKTON 



done 2-7878 
CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-155 1 0. K. Proffit, Roger Loh 

San Joaquin Research Laboratories 

Laboratory of Forensic and Legal Chemistry 
Laboratory of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 
Laboratory of Agricultural & General Chemistry 
2253 S. McKinley Avenue Stockton, California 

WATT AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Tune-Up - Headlights Adjusted - Expert Car- 
buretor Work - Starters - Generators - Fuel 
Pump Distributors 
2238 So. Monroe Phone 2-4171 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

AZTECA CAFE 

Frank Reves. Prop. 

Mexican Dishes in Real Mexcan Style 

Beer and Cold Drinks - Orders to Take Home 

31 South Hunter Street Phone 2-9262 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

M. CORREN & SONS 

—Our 48lh Year- 
Stockton's Leading Furniture, Floor Covering 
and Applance Store. 



THE NEWS ROOM 



1201 East Main Street at Pilgrim 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

AL'S WAFFLE SHOP 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 



110 East Main Street 

STOCKTON 



Phone 2-8769 

CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 4-7605 Residence 3-7475 

J. WARNER SMALLEY, D.O. 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



DON THIEL 



UCENSED CONTRACTORS 

Structural Steel - Pipe - Machinery and Pipe 

Installation - All Types of Welding 



THE WONDER 

SMART FASHIONS 

for 

WOMEN and CHILDREN 



340 East Main Street 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1954 



Dial 2-1874 

VALLEY GLASS CO. 

The House of Mirrors - Complete Glass Servic 



Florence Scribner 

Subway Ringlette Beauty Shop 

Complete Beauty Service 

Treat Yourself to the Best Available 

848 E. Miner Avenue Phone 2-0874 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Office 2-7255 Residence 2-0114 

DARTER & LEONARD 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

We Write All Lines of Insurance 

117 North San Joaquin Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

T. W. THOMAS 

INSUROR • NOTARY 



527 E. Channel 

STOCKTON 



3-1836 - 3-2196 

CALIFORNIA 



SERVICE CAB CO. 

LOCALLY OWNED BY VETERANS 
Radio Dispatched 



448 East Mil 

STOCKTON 



lone 7-7045 
CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAM BROCK, M.D. 

Practice Limited to General Surgery 



2633 Pacific Avenue 

STOCKTON 



Telephone 2-2143 
CALIFORNIA 



Costanza 


S 


Tamale 


Factory 


Ready to Take 
Ra 


H 


ome — Tama 
lis, Spaghe 


les. Enchiladas, 

tti 


1820 W. Lucerne 






Phone 4-0283 


STOCKTON 






CALIFORNIA 



EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE 

J. I. Case — Agricultural and Industrial 

GM Diesel Engines - Kohler Electric Plants 

Chrysler Industrial Engines 



821 So. Wilson Way 

STOCKTON 



Telephone 7-7826 
CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL SHERMAN 

Wm. and Marie Murray 



32 South Sutter Street 

STOCKTON 



Phone S-8501 

CALIFORNIA 



Bus Phone 3-3532 



Res. Phone 4-9980 



WHITED CHAIN SAW CO. 

SALES - SERVICE 



2608 N. Wilson Way (On the ••99") 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



GARRIGAN'S CANDY SERVICE 

Distributors of 
CARDINET CANDY PRODUCTS 



422 East Jefferson 

STOCKTON 



Phone 5-5589 

CALIFORNIA 



while he stooped to scrutinize every inch 
of the rounded side. 

"Does your wife polish her cake tin, 
George?" he inquired. "Doesn't seem na- 
tural to me." 

Stooping lower, his head on one side, 
he peered along the top of the lid, and 
then again rotated the tin to examine the 
side, the glossy surface of which reflected 
the bright kitchen light overhead. 

"See what I see, George?" 

The inspector stooped with him. 
"There's a blur there that might be a 
print." 

"How do you open a tin like this, with 
a tight-fitting lid?" 

The inspector, straightening himself, 
went through motions with his hands. 
Sergeant Ash began to whistle through 
his teeth again, but now it was a lively 
air. 

"Yes," he said. "You get your nails un- 
der the edge of the lid. If you press the 
tin against your tummy you can lever the 
lid off without touching the side of the 
tin. You could do it one-handed, but if 
the fit's really close it wouldn't be so easy 
if you were wearing a glove. How do you 
put the lid on again ?" 

The inspector went through more mo- 
tions in the air. "You'd need at least one 
thumb on top," he said. 

"So you would, George. You'd press 
your thumb on top and your fingers 
against the side. There isn't a vestige of a 
print on this lid, but that's a dab on the 
side of the tin all right. Looks to me as if 
whoever last opened the tin gave it a 
hasty wipe over, but missed that print on 
the side. If it isn't a man's, the woman 
who made it has bigger hands than most." 

Picking up his attache case from the 
chair on which he had laid it, the sergeant 
again produced his bottle of gray powder, 
the porcelain dish, and a brush. He pow- 
dered the print on the cake tin, and blew 
the surplus powder away. 

"A loop," he said. 

His friend peered earnestly at what 
now was obviously a fingerprint on the 
side of the tin. 

"Well, you \vould know," he said. 

"As you say, George. Well, we'll check 
it with the family's. If it doesn't belong 
to any of them we'll have this pretty tin 
packed up and taken to the Yard straight 
away. I like short cuts," Sergeant Ash 
added, "and if I was a betting man I'd 
risk a bob on there being a currant cake 
inside." 

The pair went back to the dining 
room, where the sergeant laid his attache 
case on the table. 

"Now, sir," he said to Mr. Harrison, 
"I must ask you all to have your finger- 
prints taken. We may have to take all 
your friends' prints too." From his at- 
tache case he took out an inkpad and roU- 



L & L CLUB 

RAY A. OTT 

Phone 2-9781 

3223 EAST FREMONT 

STOCKTON CAUFORNIA 

Costanza's Pacific CofFee Shop 

On the Miracle Mile — Breakfast, Lunch, Dinne 



2043 Pacific Avcnua 

STOCKTON 



Phone 2-9024 
CALIFORNIA 



Phones: 4-04''' - 4-0230 

Sasselli's Refrigeration and 
Air Conditioning 

Authon'Ted Frgidaire Sales and Service 

Service With Satisfaction 

919 N. WILSON WAY STOCKTON. C ALIF. 

BILL L U N T 



Pacific Avenue at Castle 

STOCKTON 



Dial 2-9010 
CALIFORNIA 



UNION GARAGE 

Automobile. Fender and Body Repairing — Day 
and Night Service. Storag?. Washing, Greasi 
Auto Paintinp, Gas and Oil. Tires and Tubes 

232 S. Sutter Street Telephone 4-4789 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

DAY AND NIGHT DRUG STORE 

-WE NEVER CLOSE" 



134 East Websr Avenue 

STOCKTON 



Phone 8-8601 

CALIFORNIA 



BOUNDS & McDonald 

UphoIs>?rn? - Custo-n Bu-If Furniture 
Dreper;«s and Slip Covers 

?33 W. Harding Way Phone 3-4307 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



Mor-Pak Preserving Corporation 

Packers of the Famous 

AUNT MARTHA'S ELBERTA PEACHES 

FANCY "ADOTA FIGS 

FANCY WHOLE PEELED PRICOTS 



P. O. BOX 391 



CALIFORNIA 



Stockton Electric Motor Repair 

MOTOR REWINDING AND REPAIRS 

1324 East Miner Avcnua Telephone 4-4913 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

S. M. McGAW CO.. INC. 

CONTRACTORS 

307 Eilu BuUdinc 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5 02 3 8 

ERNEST C. GRINER, M.D. 

407 Medical-Dental Building 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



AMARALLA'S MARKET 

2702 East Weber Street 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CLAUD'S SERVICE 

General Repair - All Makes - Models 

S333 East Washington Street Phone 8-8853 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



HARBOR INN 



2 East Main at Center 
STOCKTON 



hone 3-9848 

CALIFORNIA 



one 4-0241 

MARVIN R. WIGLEY 

Manufacturing Jeweler - Diamond Sette 



FRY BROS. 

FURNITURE - APPUANCES 
Package Delivery 

502 No. Hunter Street Phone 4-2283 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

CARANDO MACHINE WORKS 



Designers - Man 
General Machine 


ifacturers o 
Work and 


f Special Machinery 
Engine Rebuilding 


420 N. Madiso 


n St. 


Telephone 4-9418 


STOCKTON 




CALIFORNIA 


MIKE'S BAIT 


SHOP 


Fresh Monterey Sardines - Live Minnows 

Fishing Tackle - Open at 4:30 A. M. 

Guns and Ammunition 


12 East Web 

STOCKTON 


er Avenue 


Phone 7-7S31 

CALIFORNIA 



GAINES MARKETS 

STOCKTON'S FINEST INDEPENDENT 

FOOD STORES 

No. 2 — 2222 Sharps Lane 

No. 3—3314 North Delaware 

No 4 4115 North El Dorado 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



EDDIE'S LIQUOR STORE 

(Formerly Cooper's) 



No. 1 — 2007 McKinlcy Avenue 

No. 2—1134 West Washington 

Eddie Rishwain, Proprietor 



STOCKTON 



CALIFORNIA 



STOCKTON SCAVENGERS 
ASSOCIATION 



424 East Weber Avenue 

STOCKTON 



'hone 4-7357 

CALIFORNIA 



CHAS. F. RICH 

H. P. FISHER TILE AND MARBLE CO. 
AND STOCKTON TILE COMPANY 



4780 E. Fremont Street 
STOCKTON 



lone 3-0636 
CALIFORNIA 



er, some small fingerprint forms, a bottle 
of spirit, and a clean cloth. "These forms 
will be destroyed as soon as we've done 
with them," said the sergeant. "They're 
just for checking." 

The prospect of being fingerprinted 
took Mr. Harrison's mind off his troubles 
and delighted his daughters, but Mrs. 
Harrison, looking at her hands, asked 
rather distastefully if it was really neces- 
sary. 

"Elimination, ma'am," said Sergeant 
Ash. "You have what we call right of ac- 
cess. So have your friends, and your ser- 
vants. The inspector here will look after 
them if necessary — take their prints on 
special forms like these, and send them 
to us. The forms will be destroyed after- 
wards. It's just a formality, ma'am. When 
we've printed all of you there may be a 
print in the house that don't belong. It 
may be the print of one of our friends, 
not yours." 

Mrs. Harrison seemed dismayed. "You 
mean you will look all over the house for 
fingerprints? But that will take a long 
time." 

"Days, ma'am, perhaps," said the ser- 
geant cheerfully. "But we may be lucky," 
he added more encouragingly. "We have 
our own little ideas about where to look, 
and sometimes it pays to take a short 
cut." He started to whistle through his 
teeth, but, remembering his company, 
checked himself. "Now, sir," he said to 
Mr. Harrison. 

The latter, much interested, had his 
fingers cleaned with spirit. First the 
thumb and then the fingers of his right 
hand were pressed firmly on the special 
form and rolled evenly from side to side. 
Satisfied with the result, Sergeant Ash 
repeated the process with Mr. Harrison's 
left hand. While Mr. Harrison wiped his 
fingers, his daughters eagerly followed 
him, but when his wife's turn came she 
submitted with obvious displeasure. Leav- 
ing her to clean her fingertips. Sergeant 
Ash drew the inspector into the hall. 

"Harrison's prints are Whorls," he 
said, as soon as they were out of hearing. 
"So are his wife's. The girl's are Loops, 
but they're too small. However, we'll 
check 'em for the record." 

Once more in the kitchen, under the 
bright light. Sergeant Ash compared the 
isolated print on the cake tin with those 
made by the Misses Harrison on the spe- 
cial forms. Size apart, there were enough 
points of difference, when indicated by 
the sergeant, to convince the divisional 
inspector that no member of the family 
had left the print on the tin. 

Before two o'clock in the morning the 
cake tin was at Scotland Yard, conveved 
there in the car which had brought Ser- 
geant Ash and his colleagues to Chats- 
worth. 



Phone 2-1295 Leo F. Denloni. Prop. 

LEO'S GROCERY 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables - Meats 

First Delivery Leaves at 1 A. M. 

805 North Sierra Nevada Steet 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

Phone 9-9561 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS CO. 

Complete Automotive Replacement Lines 



Aurora Body & Fender Works 

AUTO GLASS AND AUTO PAINTING 
S. Neri. Prop. 



446 North Aur 

STOCKTON 



hone 5-2636 

CALIFORNIA 



Harris Manufacturing Company 

Manufacturers of 
FARM AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

Main Office and Factory: 702 North Wilson Way 
STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

ANDY'S CLUB 

COLD BEER ON TAP 
Meet Your Friends Here 



2539 East Ma 

STOCKTON 



hone 3-9361 

CALIFORNIA 



SOLINA GROCERY 



Cold 
1303 W. Sonora Street 

STOCKTON 



Phone 9-9942 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-4779 



Res. Phone 8-6124 



Colony Furniture & Restaurant 
Supplies 

New and Used . . . Bought and Sold 

Counters, Stools, Refrigerators, Ranges, Cash 

Registers, Deep Fryers, Griddles. 

1820 So Eldorado St. Stockton, Calif. 



Day 3-3919 



Night 2-6854 



ANDERSON REFRIGERATION 
COMPANY 

SALES - SERVICE - INSTALLA'HON 

814 Monroe Street 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 

COMBINING QUALITY WITH ECONOMY 

TO BUILD BEAUTIFUL HOMES 

GOLDEN GATE REALTY CO. 

5902 Pacific Avenue Phone 4-9811 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN AMBULANCE 
SERVICE 



414 East Mil 
STOCKTON 



Phone 6-6869 

CALIFORNIA 



NEW SAN JOAQUIN HOTEL 



243 East Weber Av 
' STOCKTON 



Phone 2-9547 
CALIFORNIA 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1954 



NORTHERN DISINFECTING CO. 

ED TOPP 



8Z9 Fulton St. 

FRESNO 



Phone 2-8514 

CALIFORNIA 



KENNETH INMAN, Manager 

FRANCIS I. Du PONT & CO. 

Members: New York Stock Exchange, 
Principal Security and Commodity Exchanges 

2117 Merced Street Tel. 60533 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



SPEED B. LEAS CO 

Real Estate and General 



PHONE 4-5028 

2515 MERCED STREET 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



PAUL'S LIQUOR STORE 

FINE LIQUORS - WINES - BEER 

Phone 7-6618 

2445 NORTH FIRST STREET 
5NO CALIFORNIA 



BEST PLUMBING 

Contracting & Jobbing 

PLUMBING 
HEATING 
COOLING 

RESIDENTIAL and 
INDUSTRIAL 

CITY & COUNTY WIDE 
SERVICE 

Free Estimates 
and Guaranteed Work 

842 BLACKSTONE 

Phone 6-6283 

If no answer call 7-8062 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



7 he Fingerprint Department, the 
Criminal Record Office, and the photo- 
graphic studios and laboratory are housed, 
with the rest of the C.I.D., in New Scot- 
land Yard North, commonly called the 
North Building, the third and newest of 
the three known generically throughout 
the world as Scotland Yard. No right- 
minded person, when using that term, is 
thinking of the Lost Property Office on 
the other bank of the Thames. 

I he senior officer on duty in the Scenes 
of Crime Section of the Fingerprint De- 
partment to whom the cake tin was de- 
livered read the note from Sergeant Ash 
and then examined the imprint under a 
powerful light. He saw that it was a 
fairly well-defined pattern of the Loop 
type. 

The fingerprint system employed by 
the British police and devised by Sir Ed- 
ward Henry some fifty years ago groups 
the patterns of fingerprints into four main 
types: Arches, Loops, Whorls, and Com- 
posites. 'To simplify further the keeping 
and searching of records. Whorls and 
Composites are grouped together, and are 
given numerical values according to the 
digits on which they appear. Arches, 
which are divided into two groups — the 
Plain Arch and the 1 ented Arch — pos- 
sess no numerical value. Neither do 
Loops, but these patterns play subsidiary, 
although important, parts in the Henry 
Classification Scheme. 

If the four main types of fingerprint 
patterns were distributed in equal propor- 
tion on human fingers, classification 
would be much simplified, but unfortun- 
ately the proportion on Loops far exceeds 
the number of Arches, \Vhorls, and Com- 
posites. It follows, therefore, that, the im- 
print on Mrs. Harrison's cake tin being 
of the Loop type, the search was likely 
to be more difficult than if the pattern 
had been an Arch, Whorl, or Composite. 

This, however, did not trouble the offi- 
cer unduly, for after a few delicate 
touches with a camel's hair brush to re- 
move a little surplus powder he again ex- 
amined the imprint with a lens to which 
was attached a reticule inscribed with 
concentric circles. During the examina- 
tion he was very careful not to allow the 
reticule to come into actual contract with 
the imprint. 

He jotted down on a piece of paper the 
result of his scrutiny. Next he went 
through a series of motions with his hands 
over the tin. From these movements a 
casual observer might have formed the 
opinion that he was making some magical 
passes over the tin to conjure up some oc- 
cult power to help him trace the un- 
known maker of the print on the tin. But 
he was really making tests to ascertain 
the particular digit responsible for the 
telltale imprint. If this could be done 



Western Turkey Packing Company 

Phone 3-4205 

1206 G STREET 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

TOY'S MARKET 

FRESH MEATS - VEGETABLES 
BEER AND WINE 

Phone 2-7304 

601 CALIFORNIA 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Rest Haven Convalescent Home 

Lorraine C. Petersen, Owner-Manager 

A HOME FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE 

Ambulatory and Bed Patients - 24-Hour Service 

Special Diets - Heart and Diabetic Cases a 

Specialty ■ Licensed by State of California 



ROSENBERG BROS. & CO. 

Main Office: 334 California Street, S. F. 
DRIED FRUITS - NUTS - HONEY 



1844 So. Broadway Phone 4-2991 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes 



on 



Your 1934 Traffic 
Safety Program 



FLEMING 
Transportation 



2463 Kirk Street 

Phone 6-4291 

Fresno, California 



U 



July. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



NEW SHANGHAI CAFE 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 

FOOD TO TAKE HOME 



1S38 Tula 
FRESNO 



Street 



Phone 28618 

CALIFORNIA 



STEVE POTZERNITZ . . . 

HARNESS & SADDLE SHOP 

CUSTOM MADE SADDLES 
LTS - HARNESS - SILVER ENGRAVING 



1836 Kern Street 

FRESNO 



Tel. 6-9046 

CALIFORNIA 



BOB BALDOCK 

BUCKNER SPRINKLERS 

TORO POWER MOWERS 

GOLF COURSE ARCHITECT 



ISOS BUcksto 

FRESNO 



Phone 4-1521 

CALIFORNIA 



Pho 



3-S489 



Pho 



9-2685 



Russ Reeder Richfield Service 

GAS - OIL - TIRES - TUBES & ACCESSORIES 

MOTOR TUNE-UP - REPAIRS 

EXPERT LUBRICATION 

1606 N. Fresno at McKinley 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Mexico Cafe 



Mexican Dishes 



Orders to Take Out 
We Cater to Parties 

Emile & Alice 
Banuelos 



PHONE 4-0497 

915 "E" Street 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



*-. . t 



with certainty his task would be lightened 
immeasurably. 

Presently he paused in his mystic 
passes, and it became evident that he had 
come to some conclusion. He ceased his 
tick-tack display and added a figure "4" 
to his notes. 

The imprint was that of a Loop, you 
will recall, the most common of all types. 
Loops are divided into two categories — 
Radial and Ulnar — the latter being far 
more common than the former. The slope 
of the majority of the ridges of the print, 
together with the hand from which it is 
taken, decides into which category it is 
placed. The great majority of Loops 
which appear on the right hand have the 
trend of ridges to the right, and are des- 
ignated Ulnar Loops ; those on the left 
hand which slope to the left are again 
Ulnar Loops. In each case if the direction 
of the ridges is reversed the prints are 
Radial Loops. 

Thus it will be seen that a solitary 
print of the Loop type having the trend 
of the ridges to the right could be ( 1 ) 
an Ulnar Loop made by a finger of the 
right hand or (2) a Radial Loop made 
by a finger of the left hand. If the trend 
of the ridges is to the left the same crite- 
rion is applied by inversion. 

As the ridges of the print on the cake 
tin from Chatsworth sloped to the right, 
it appeared most likely that it had been 
made by a finger of the right hand— an 
Ulnar Loop — and less likely that it was . 
a print from the left hand — a Radial 
Loop. 

Now all Loops possess, in fingerprint 
language, two fixed points — (a) the core, 
(b) the delta. The core, as the term indi- 
cates, is located somewhere about the cen- 
ter of the print, and is usually the shape 
of an inverted staple (CI). This staple 
is enclosed by a number of similar staples 
which increase in size until the delta is 
reached. In some prints the delta is situ- 
ated near the core ; in others at varying 
distances. It is the inconstancy of the posi- 
tion of the delta in different prints which 
provides valuable data for the classifica- 
tion of this common pattern. The number 
of ridges intervening between the core 
and delta may be any number from one 
to thirty or more. 

The delta being present in the cake tin 
print, the examining officer carefully 
counted the ridges between it and the 
core. There were fifteen. He next turned 
his attention to the core. This was classi- 
fied under the symbol "C." By means of 
a special lens he fixed the position of the 
delta as "F" — which meant that it was 
located between the fifth and sixth of the 
concentric circles of the reticule. 

Having finished his examination of the 
print, he opened the cake tin. Sergeant 



BELMONT PAINT STORE 

WALL PAPERS - PAINTER SUPPLIES 

DENVER H. OWENS, Owner 

1108 Belmont Avenue 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

OLIVER'S FLOWER SHOP 
and NURSERY 

G. C. OLIVER, 
Licensed Landscape Contractor 



3204 Van Ness Blvd. 
FRESNO 



Tel. 7-2764 

CALIFORNIA 



OLD MASTER WINERY 

DISTILLERS OF QUALITY BRANDIES 

Fruit Distillery No. 40 

2310 RAILROAD AVENUE 

Phone 3-OSll 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-1435 



Res. Phone 4-4286 



FRESNO ELECTRIC CO. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

W. M. POLLOCK 

183 N. VAN NESS AVENUE 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Casner Drug Co. 

Prescription 
Specialists 

45 Years A Part 
of Fresno 



Fresno at Fullerton 
Streets 

FRESNO, 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1954 



BELSTONE GARAGE 

BEECHER A\AK:1AN. Mgr. 

GRAY MARLNE ENGINES 

GENERAL REPAIRING 



1626 Belmont Ave. 

FRESNO 



Bus. Phooe 2-2612 

CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA CHROME 

DECORATIVE CHROME - WATTS NICKEL 

ACID COPPER - RochelU Copper PLATING 

BOB MARTIN. OvracT 



220 Broadway 

FRESNO 



Pho 



e 2-1427 

CALIFORNIA 



MACK TRUCKS - ACE TRAILERS 

RELIABLE AUTOMOTIVE 
COMPANY 

H and SAN JOAQULN STS. 

Phone 3-7174 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

LOCAN MARKET 

■iOUR GENERAL STORE 

GROCERIES - MEATS - BEER - WINE 

HARDWARE 

Kings Canyoa Road and Temperance 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Calwa Compress 
Company, Inc. 

Standard and Hi oh 
Density Compression 

FULL TARIFF PRIVILEGES 

A.T.S.F. and S. P. RYS. 

COMPLETE TRUCK 
FACILITIES 

Plant and Office Located 

at 2~42 South Railroad A\e. 

and South Highway 99 



Phone 3-7610 

Post Office Box 166 

FRESNO, 

CALIFORNIA 



.•\sh had, in his accompanying note, asked 
for information about its contents. The 
tin contained a wedge of currant cake 
somewhat crumbled after its journey. 
The examining ofiBcer put the fragments 
into another container, replaced the lid, 
and made his way to the room which 
contained the Single Fingerprint Collec- 
tion, taking the tin with him. Fingerprint 
men are very jealous of their fragile ex- 
hibits, and are careful to see that they 
are not mutilated or destroyed. 

The method he proceeded to employ to 
classify the print on the tin was the in- 
vention of Superintendent Battley and 
Inspector Cherrill (later Chief Superin- 
tendent ) , and has simplified considerably 
the search for such isolated impressions 
among a collection running into millions 
of individual prints. By the Henry Sys- 
tem a primary classification of 1024 is ar- 
rived at. Theoretically it would require 
an enormous cabinet of thirty-rwo rows 
of thirty-two pigeonholes to provide stor- 
age for the collection now existing in Scot- 
land ^ ard, but in practice intensive sub- 
division has made it possible to house the 
fingerprints in a larger number of cabi- 
nets of convenient size. 

Every fingerprint form in the collec- 
tion has a complementary index card 
which enables a particular form to be lo- 
cated in a matter of seconds. Each form, 
however, pertaining as it does to a con- 
victed criminal, has a complete set of ten 
prints upon it — one from each digit. Be- 
fore the advent of the Single Fingerprint 
System the task of tracing the duplicate 
of a single casual print among millions of 
sets of ten had become all but an impos- 
sibility-. 

The Single Fingerprint System is in 
ettect a series of ten collections numbered 
from 1 to 10. each number referring to 
individual digits as they appear on the 
official form. The general classification is 
based on Henry's formula, but more in- 
tensive classification is carried out by the 
use of the special lens referred to previ- 
ously, and the designation of more sub- 
groups by special reference to cores and 
deltas. The prints for inclusion in the col- 
lection are selected from duplicates of 
those filed in the Main Collection. Each 
individual print is filed in the appropriate 
sub-collection, the whole collection being 
coordinated by an index and housed in 
a single room in a number of cabinets. 

Formulae on each card refer the 
searcher to the appropriate set of prints 
in the Main Collection. 

So far as the examining officer knew, 
the fingerprint on Mrs. Harrison's cake 
tin might have no connection whatever 
with the robbery at Chatsworth. It might 
even have no connection with crime at all. 
On the other hand, it might be the print 
of a first offender or that of a more prac- 



Ed Severin's Chevron Service 

Complete Lubrication. Tires, Batteries, Wiled 
BaUnc:ns and Accessories. Brakes Adjusted and 
Reined, t'arts Installed, Carburetor. Fuel humps 
nd Ignition . . .We give Green Trading Stamps 



all Purchases and Service. 



6341 Blackstc 
FRESNO 



ne 7-1532 

CALIFORNIA 



FLAMINGO CLUB 

COCKTAILS - .MIXED DRINKS 
Entertainment Nightly 

Kern and Broadway Phone 3-9602 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

VALLEY TIRE CO. 

Distributors 

Goodyear Tires - Super Nu-Tred 

Tires and Service 



1804 H Street 
FRESNO 



Phone 6-1636 

CALIFORNIA 



Ernie Ganner's Auto Service 

EXPERIENCED AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALIST 
Official Brake Station 3720 



1606 West Av 
FRESNO 



Phone 4-2102 

CALIFORNIA 



J. R. PRICE 

Lathing & Plastering 
Contractor 

RESIDENTIAL 

AND 
COMMERCIAL 



Phone 7-0454 
j 1249 West Sierra Madre 

FRESNO, 
I CALIFORNIA 

\ 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



LION PACKI^:G CO. 

Packers and oli'ppers of 
CALIFORNIA Pw'-IS.NS 

Telephone 2-4520 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

RAINBOW DAERY 

John Rocha 

28»3 Folwer Avenue Phoa: S-2036 

Fowler and Shields 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Bus. Phono 42 I U 



Ris. Fhane 7-lo5l 



LOTZ AUTO SALES 

U-iUiam ■Bill • Lou 
GOOD USED CARS 



Whites Bridge and Hughes 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



CHONG'S CAFE 

FINE CHINESE FOOD 
Food to Take Out 

2830 Tulare Phone 3 3342 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Samuels 
GOURMET 

Excellent Dinners 



BUSINESS MEN'S 

AND 
WOMEN'S LUNCH 

1313 Broadv/ay 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



ticed hand whose owner had never been 
charged and whose prints, therefore, 
would not be on file in the Main Collec- 
tion. In such case the photograph of the 
print would end up in the Scenes of 
Crime Collection, consisting of a large 
assortment of unidentified prints, many 
being those of innocent but unknown per- 
sons associated with innumerable police 
inquiries. 

But Sergeant Ash felt that the print 
was worth immediate investigation, and if 
the examining officer, having studied the 
formulae he had worked out, went to 
the cabinet without much hope — well, it 
was all in the way of his daily or nightly 
job, as the case might be. 

He pulled open a drawer. It was lab- 
eled "No. 4," and contained prints of 
the right ring finger. Under the number 
was an oblique stroke indicating that the 
patterns in the drawer were Ulnar Loops. 
Selecting a section of the cards marked 
''C. Core" and showing the number 15 
over the letter "F" in the top righthand 
corner, he began to flick over the cards. 
A few seconds later he paused and with- 
drew a card. Using a hand lens, he 
quickly checked the print on it with the 
imprint on the tin. A satisfied smile flitted 
over his face. The meager but suflScient 
particulars on the card were laid out as 
shown opposite : 

The symbols were identical with those 
the officer had jotted down previously. 
He noted the reference to the Criminal 
File entered on the card : it would be re- 
quired shortly. The next step was to ob- 
tain a photograph of the imprint as 
quickly as possible. Taking the tin and 
the card, he hurried to the Photographic 
Department. There he pointed out the in- 
criminating mark. A photographer imme- 
diately set up the tin in front of a camera 
fitted with a prism, which enables photo- 
graphs of white powdered fingerprints to 
be taken direct on to bromide paper. 
Type Core 

L C 

272148/44 15 

4, — R. Ring Finger F 

1 Ur 12 

1 R 
(Photograph of rolled print of Finger) 

After a few adjustments of the light- 
ing system an exposure was made. Re- 
moving the exposed paper from the cam- 
era, the photographer went into the dark 
room and quickly immersed the bromide 
paper in a developer. In a few seconds a 
clearly defined image of the print on the 
tin appeared. The photograph was merely 
shoivn the fixer, and there followed a 
rapid wash. It was blotted ofif, and very 
soon the examining officer was comparing 
the print disclosed in the still damp 
photograph with the impression on the 
card he had removed from No. 4 drawer 



"Own Some Earth Before You Leave It" 

REAM REALTY 

Insurance - Bonds - Notary - Loans 
REALTOR 

Phones: Office 6-0406 - Home 3620 

1540 Palm Avenue 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL CREST 

CATERING TO 

BUS DRIVERS, RAILROAD MEN AND 

LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS 

1838 Fresno Street Phone 3-9791 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



510 LIQUOR STORE 

FREE DELIVERY 

510 Olive Avenue Phone 6-6278 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

CHELF'S BUILDING SUPPLIES 

Glenn Dillon 
TELEVISION SALES AND SERVICE 

2430 McKinley Phone 6-9986 

Just West of North Fresno Street 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Johnnie's Cafe 

OPEN 6 A.M. 
UNTIL 2 A.M. 



Dine - Dance 

LIQUOR ON and 
OFF SALE 

Meals At All Hours 
Earl and Merle 



1 Block East of Fair Grounds 

4610 e. kings canyon rd. 
Phone 5-2X14 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July J 954 



OTTO'S FOUNTAIN 

HOME OF ECONOMY FREEZE 
A LESS FATTENING DESERT 



CALIFORNIA 



NOLE'S MARKET 

FRESH MEATS and VEGETABLES 

2976 Huntington Boulevard 
Phone 6-6351 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

PALM - OLIVE CLEANERS 

QUALITY DRY CLEANING 

Hat Cleaning - All Kinds of Repairing 

Call and Delivery Service 

218 Olive Avenue Tel. 3-5331 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

ROGERS NORWALK SERVICE 

TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES 

MINOR AUTO REPAIRS 

356 No. Fresno Tel. 3-8417 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

C. p. CAIN CO. 

Since 192 7 
WE RAISE CAIN WITH TERMITES 

C. L. CLANCY 

COTTON 

2144 Merced Street Phone 6-9254 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

BROWN'S GROCERY 



1015 North Hughe 

FRESNO 



>ne 6-4475 

CALIFORNIA 



]. ]. HOWELL 

& Associates 

SHEET METAL 

HEATING - COOLERS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

Phone 7-2979 

4434 N. Blackstone 
Fresno, California 



For Reservations Phone 3-5104 

MOTEL FRESNO 

Air Conditioned 

Cocktail Lounge and 
Dining Room 

Enjoy a fine dinner 
in pleasant surroundings 

On 99 Hwy. 1^ mile north 

P. O. BOX 989 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



of the Single Fingerprint Collection. 

\es! There was no doubt about it! 
Nemesis was overtaking the unwelcome 
visitor to Chatsworth. Leaving the tin 
with the photographer for permanent 
photographs to be made of the mark, the 
examining officer made his way to the 
Criminal Record Office. In a few mo- 
ments the officer on duty there had pro- 
duced a folder in which the principal item 
was the descriptive form of Albert Wil- 
liam Simkin, aged twenty-seven, five feet 
three inches in height, blue-eyed, brown- 
haired, with a mole beneath his left shoul- 
der blade and a scar on his right forearm, 
four times convicted of burglary, his last 
sentence having expired five months pre- 
viously. Other documents in the folder 
provided information about Albert Sim- 
kin's various addresses and usual haunts 
(when not in prison), his parentage and 
friends, his more harmless pleasures — 
football and "the dogs" — and, what was 
of greater interest, his m.o., or modus 
operandi, when he went a-burglaring. He 
had twice broken into a house by means 
of a leaded window ; he usually chose the 
evening hours when families went out to 
local cinema or to a theater, obtaining his 
information from a servant; he was care- 
ful and tidy on the job; and he liked a 
bite and a drink before leaving, having 
a special weakness for sweet cookies or 
cake. 

A larger machinery of routine now 
went to work. Instructions were issued 
for the discovery and detention of Albert 
Simkin, particulars of whom were circu- 
lated. The fingerprint officer whose ex- 
amination of the cake tin had led to this 
conclusion ended his brief part in the 
case by telephoning the good news to 
Sergeant Ash, still at Chatsworth. It was 
not yet three o'clock. That, in all human 
probability, the burglar had been identi- 
fied within less than four hours of the 
Harrisons' discovery that their house had 
been entered was due to the efficiency of 
the fingerprint system. 

It may be added that there was a slight 
delay in locating Albert Simkin. He was 
not to be found in his usual haunts. Pos- 
sibly he had learned that the Harrisons' 
maid, a simple creature, complained an- 
grily to the local inspector that the nice 
young man who had taken her out once 
or twice, and who had shown such a s\m- 
pathetic interest in the behavior and ha- 
bits of her employers, had failed to meet 
her at the cinema as he had promised to 
do, on the evening of the burglary. When 
eventually the nice young man was picked 
up, it was too late to recover the Harri- 
sons' lost property. But Mr. Simkin him- 
self, as a result of his weakness for cake, 
and his carelessness in wiping a tin, is 
now undergoing his fifth and so far his 
heaviest, term of imprisonment. 



Mingle Transportation & Whse. Co. 
Starr Transfer Co. 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING 

3464 McKenzie Ave. Tel. 4-4665 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

NATIONAL RADIATOR WORKS 

Established Since 1927— All Work Guaranteed 

Repairing - Cleaning - Recoring 

Bus. Phone: 3-8718 - Res.: 6-9076 

802 Broadway 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

LOUIE'S SHOETORIUM 

Louie Collier 

Shoe Repairing - Dyeing - Shining 

1909 Fresno Street Phone 2-2498 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

THE BUCKEYE INCUBATOR CO. 

1608 Merced Street 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

R. D. KNOWLES CO. 

MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 

Heating & Ventilating - Air Conditioning 

Forced Air Heating - General Sheet Metal 

2237 McKinley Avenue Tel. 6-0561 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

LIMP IN — LEAP OUT 

DEE'S "41" CLUB 

OFF SALE 

1275 Blackstone Tel. 3-2575 

FRESNO CALIFORN IA 

JACKSON WELDING WORKS 

Gasoline, Butane, Propane Tanks 

and Truck Tank Equipment 

Installation of Meters, Pumps and Fittings 

4460 East Belmont Tel. 5-3422 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



J. M. OHANESIAN 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 



Loans 
Property 



Appraisals 
Management 



2044 Mariposa Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Office Phone 4-3009 



PETERS & 
GARABEDIAN 

Winery 

Fresno, California 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



A and H MARKET 

VIRGIL NABORS. Owner 

COMPLETE MARKET— BEER AND WINE 

6943 West Shields Phone 6-4991 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

BUTLER DRUG CO. 

35S8 BUTLER STREET 



CALIFORNIA 



OAK N" HICK'RY PIT 

Specializing in Genuine Barbecued Sparerihs 

Chicken - Steak - Beef - Pork - Ham 

Open Every Day 11 A.M. to 1 A.M. 

Blackstone at Shields Phone 7-5805 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

MELODY MUSIC 

COIN OPERATED PHONOGRAPHS 

Phones: 6-5837; If no Answer 2-5222 

113 Whites Bridge 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Joseph A. Boggero's 

ACCORDION CENTRE 

SALES AND INSTRUCTION 

Accordions Imported 

377 No. Fresno Street Phone 3-3452 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

TOWER'S FINE SHOETORIUM 

THE FINEST IN SHOE REPAIRING 



925 Oli' 
FRESNO 



le 2-8608 

CALIFORNIA 



THE PUB 

DRAFT BEER 
BARBECUE FRENCH DIPPED SANDWICHES 



Pho 



Compliments of 

Sunnyside Packing 
Co. 

FRUIT and VEGETABLE 
GROWERS and SHIPPERS 

Phone 6-1888 

2040 G Street 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Central California 
Commercial College 

Sponsors the Famous Dale 

Carnegie Course in Human 

Relations, Effective Speaking, 

and Salesmanship 

Free information sent on request 

Phone 4-3081 

No Obligation 

2209 Fresno Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



It is unlikely that he is historically 
minded, or that prison libraries contain 
books on fingerprints. To the end of his 
life he will probably remain unaware that 
the process which has sexeral times led to 
his undoing, and which will be a con- 
tinual menace to him unless he alters his 
habits, has a history that goes back a very 
long way. 

GOOD RECORD 

California's motorists approach the sum- 
mer holidays with the best traffic safety 
record in recent years. 

"Let's keep it that way," urged the 
California Highway Patrol today. 

At the same time the Patrol cautioned 
motorists that many persons are expected 
to die in California traffic during the 
summer according to the estimates of sta- 
tisticians. 

Highway Patrol Commissioner B. R. 
Caldwell announced that the Patrol wil'i 
continue to emphasize visible enforcement 
to discourage accident-causing \'iolations 
and offered a fi\e point program for mo- 
torists in order to help them stay alive in 
the heaviest traffic nf the year thtis f?.r: 

1 . Be sure the car is in safe mechanical 
condition before starting. 

2. Never plan a trip longer than cm 
be made with safety. 

3. Travel in the proper line ar a speed 
consistent with the .low of traffic. 

4. Do not drive when overtired or 
sleepy. 

5. Never dri\-e after drinking. 

"If holiday highway users will manage 
their driving to comply with these five 
points, we can creste a pleasant surprise 
for the statisticians and also make this 
year, 1955, a time to honor the dead and 
not a time to join them," Caldwell com- 
mented. 

"Another pedestrian practice which 
causes a large number of deaths is walk- 
ing on the wrong side of a rural high- 
way, Caldwell added. The lawful and 
safe method is to walk as close to the left 
side of the highway as possible, f.acing on- 
coming traffic. This allows the pedestrian 
to watch traffic and gives him time to 
step out of the way when necessary." 

LEAVE NOZZLE ALONE 

It is a great deal easier to wash the car 
with a hose if the nozzle is left off en- 
tirely, points out the National Automo- 
bile Club. The nozzle, regardless of the 
setting used, gives the water greater pres- 
sure than if it is allowed to flow unre- 
stricted from the end of the hose. -As little 
pressure as possible is the desirable thing. 
Resides, the task of washing is less messy 
if the nozzle is removed from the hose. 



HIRSCHLERS RICHFIELD 

BLUE EAGLE SERVICE 



1 - Washing and Polishing 
!S - Pick-Up and Delivery 
nd Olive Phone 3-4898 

CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC FURNITURE CO. 

H. Waxman 

— Main Store — 

1417 Fulton Phone 2-0223 

—Annex Store — 

8630 Broadway Phone 4-3388 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

GOLDEN STATE BROOM CO. 

Office: 412 Delno Phone 3-7761 

Factory: 2735 Woodward Phone 2-5416 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

OCHINERO PRODUCE CO. 

Wholesale 

FRUITS AND PRODUCE 

Produce and Growers Market - Stalls 39 - 43 

Phones: 4-5501 - 2-1893 Res- Phone: 3-255 I 

1898 G Street 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

THE MOLER COMPANY 

SYSTEM OF BARBER COLLEGES 
"If he Is an expert — He is a MOLER graduate." 



MAX'S STEAEC HOUSE 

Meals 7 A-M- to 9 P.M- 
BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 

Home Cooking - Beer on Tap 
2133 McK nley Phone 4-1625 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Compliments 

SEAL'S SALES AND SERVICE 



S327 South EIr 
FRESNO 



Phone 3-0656 

CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

THE FOOD BANK 

SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE 

2440 Blackstone Avenue 
Phone 7-5744 

First and McKinley 
Phone 6-2817 

14 15 North Van Ness Avenue 
Phone 3-4841 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Fresno Malt Shop 
and Cafe 

COMPLETE FOOD AND 
FOUNTAIN SERMCE 

You are Always Welcome 
Fresno's Busy Corner 
George Mehas, Prop. 

Phone 6-3602 
Corner Fresno & Van Ness 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1954 



MULDOON COMPANY. INC. 

BUILDING SPECIALITIES 



Tom Bruce Curly Roberts Percy Wimer 

MECCA BILLIARD THEATRE 

Billiards - Snooker - Pocket Billiards 

"Where the Stars Play" 

2136 Tulare Phone 2-8393 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

ARNOLD'S SUPER SHELL STATION 

Howard Arnold 

GAS - OIL - BATTERIES 

TIRES - ACCESSORIES 



UNITED MOTOR SALES 

Victor Rololo 
AUTOMOBILES BOUGHT AND SOLD 



TED HARTE 

REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 
1215 "M" Street Telephone 4-1274 

lESNO CALIFORNIA 

POLLARD BROS., LTD. 

Concrete Pipe - Transit Mix - Equipment 



Compliments of 

PARAMOUNT PEST CONTROL 



1724 Paralta Way 
FRESNO 



ne 3-0169 

CALIFORNIA 



Automotive Rubberized 
Insulation Service 

H. D. RUSSELL 

STOP RUST AND NOISE 

The Oldest Insulation Service 
in the Valley 

Let Us Protect Your Car 

451 Harrison 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-5641 



DICKEY-MAYFLOWER 

Moving a!i<l Storage 

MOVING — STORING 
PACKING — SHIPPING 

Phone 6-9804 

Emergency — 5-1405 - 3-0035 

1640 H Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



THE SOCIAL ROOTS OF CRIME 

From the book. PROTECTING OUR CHIL- 
DREN, by John R. Ellington, copyright, 1948, bv 
Prentice-Hall Inc. 

In our society t\vo conflicting aims 
struggle to control both the administra- 
tion of criminal justice and the treatment 
of disobedient or offending children, 
whether by parents, school, or the law. 
These opposed aims are. punishment to 
fit the crime versus individual treatment 
to win the offender over to acceptable be- 
havior. Back of the conflicting aims stand 
conflicting ideas about the reasons each of 
us behaves the way we do. 

As the earliest and long the sole aim, 
punishment has the inside track. It enjoys 
the sanction of our instinctive reactions, 
of the ancient law-givers, and of the me- 
diaeval theology that so largely shaped 
the Western world. It rests on the funda- 
mental human impulse to strike out 
against what harms us. Thus primitive 
tribes retaliated against those individuals 
who put the whole tribe in danger by 
such major crimes as sorcery or treason. 
They left it to the individual or his clan 
to avenge the much less serious personal 
wrongs such as murder, theft, or slander 
on the basis of life for life, eye for eye, 
stripe for stripe. 

No moral judgments or interest in mo- 
tives entered into the use of punishments 
by primitive people. A man died for kill- 
ing another by accident just as surely as 
if he had lain in wait for him with a 
knife. It remained for the theologians of 
the early Middle Ages to introduce the 
emphasis on motives with their doctrines 
of free will and of original sin. They in- 
sisted that an individual sins or breaks 
the law solely because he wilfully prefers 
evil to good. He is a free moral agent who 
always knows right from wrong and is 
always free to choose between them. If 
he chooses evil he not only harms society 
but challenges the divine order. He must 
be punished to atone for his sin and to 
serve as a warning to others to deter them 
from committing the same offense. Chris- 
tendom held to this doctrine of wilful 
evil for centuries and, while it did, jus- 
tice could have no interest in the person- 
ality of the individual or in the circum- 
I'.tances surrounding the act. In theor\', at 
I'^ast, and often enough in fact, justice 
fixed its eyes exclusively on the theft, un- 
mindful of whether the thief was a child 
or was starving. Its duty was limited to 
measuring the degree of evil and to 
weighing out the amount of punishment 
that would expiate the crime. 

The associated doctrine of original sin 
held that a tendency to evil is born in 
each of us, inherited from Adam as a 
consequence of his sin in the Garden of 
Eden. And so John Robinson, an English 
Puritan divine, could say in the earh' 
1600's: "And surely there is in all chil- 



Phone 2-9882 Anton Petersen. Prop. 

EAST TULARE SERVICE STATION 

Wholesale and Retail 

Gasoline - Oils - New Tires - Recapping 

Batteries 

3605 East Tulare 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



FIOR D' ITALIA 



ARAM'S LIQUOR STORE 

LIQUORS • WINE • BEER 



Blacksto 



FRESNO 



: 6-0348 
CALIFORNIA 



Gross Richfield Service Station 

Henry E. Gross 
COMPLETE SERVICE - TIRES - BATTERIES 



2167 South "G" St. 

FRESNO 



Phone 2-9493 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-7888 Paul Beer and Sons 

West Belmont Marble & Granite 
WORKS 

Near the Cemeteries 

SOS West Belmont and Fruit Avenue 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-7725 Ralph V. Quataro 

West Coast Venetian Blind Co. 

Venjtian Blinds - Window Shades - Drapery 

Drapery Cornices - Bamboo Shades 

1402 Blackstone Avenue 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



HOME MARKET 



Phone 4-5584 

Allen's 
Welding Works 

Gilbert Allen — Vernon Allen 

Welding and Repairing 

Tanks and Manufacturing 

1339 Church Ave. 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 
of 

HOAK PACKING 
CO., Inc. 

529 Rowell Bldg. 
Fresno, California 



July. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



COLLIER'S 

LIQUOR - BEER - WINE - FOOD 



FARMER JOHN MEAT CO. 

WHOLESALE MEATS 



1500 Santa Cla 

FRESNO 



Street 



'hone 3-4189 

CALIFORNIA 



UNITED AUTOMOTIVE WORKS 

Trailers and Bodies Built to Order - Automobile 
Truck and Trailer Parts - Truck Repairing 



Pho 



Phono-Tel Modern Music Co. 

WIRED MUSIC . . AUTOMATIC PHONO 



851 Broadway 

FRESNO 



Phone 2-9268 

CALIFORNIA 



CERTIFIED CESSPOOL CO. 



BUD EBERWEIN 

BRAKES AND WHEEL ALIGNING SERVICE 



1821 Cala 

FRESNO 



Pho 



• 3-8461 
CALIFORNIA 



7-8424 Joe Ochi. 

OCHINERO'S MARKET 

Complete Line of Imported Foods 



Wilder Saw Works 

Manufacturer 
Cotton Gin Satvs 

Distributors 
Simonds Saw and Steel Co. 

A. P. Wilder 

Phone 2-1486 

2520 VENTURA AVE 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 




Phone 2-2735 

3104 McKENZIE AVENUE 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



dren, though not alike, a stubbornness, 
and stoutness of mind arising from na- 
tural pride, which must, in the first place, 
be broken and beaten down . . ."^ And in 
colonial America the criminal code of the 
Province of East Jersey, adopted in 1688, 
could decree that a child convicted of as- 
saulting or cursing his parents or of per- 
sistent disobedience or stubbornness 
should be hanged. 

As society grew more humane, the law 
relaxed the barbarity of its punishments 
but without altering its basic belief in the 
complete moral responsibility of the of- 
fender or in the need for punishment and 
expiation. Thus, when in the late 18th 
and early 19th centuries imprisonment 
largely replaced executions, tortures, and 
pillories, the old belief that the law 
breaker was inspired by moral perversity 
determined the nature of the new institu- 
tions. They became penitentiaries to "en- 
courage" the criminal to repent his wilful 
sins. In time, the law conceded that the 
insane could not be held morally respons- 
ible for their acts and exempted them, as 
it had long exempted children under sev- 
en, from the sanctions of the criminal 
code. Finally, less than a century ago 
came the first major challenge to the be- 
lief in wilful evil as the cause of crime 
that underlay the whole administration 
of criminal justice. New insight into hu- 
man behavior has continually reinforced 
the attack. As a result, new aims and pro- 
cedures such as probation, the juvenile 
court, and clinical diagnosis have been in- 
jected into the administration of criminal 
justice. 

Nevertheless, the ancient reliance on 
punishment remains dominant in the 
criminal code, in the machinery for its 
enforcement, and in the minds of many 
of its administrators. A section of the 
public cries frankly for punishment as re- 
venge, and men still talk of making a 
criminal pay his debt to society "in the 
coinage of punishment." However, the 
main prop behind the punitive system is 
the doctrine of deterrence. Punish a man 
and he will be afraid to sin again. Also 
the example of his suffering will keep 
others from breaking the law and des- 
troying the social order. In other words, 
fear and fear only keeps our lawless ten- 
dencies in line. 

Is this true ? What leads men to com- 
mit crimes ? \Vhat determines the way 
any man acts? Until we make up our 
minds on these points we can scarcely 
hope to bring reason and order into the 
administration of criminal justice or to 
do anything very effective to prevent de- 

'Quoted by the Committee on Home Responsibility. 
National Conference on Prevention and Control of 
Juvenile Delinquency, 1946, from The Works of John 
'Robinson, Dnctrinal Tract and Book Society, 1851, 
Vol. I, p. 246. 



MELODY FOOD MARKET 

Our Motto . . . Courteous Se 



Tommy Thompson's Catering 
Service 

THE FINEST IN CATERING 
The Tower Palm Room for Private Parties 
1296 Wishon Avenue Phone 6-0543 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

JOHNNIE'S MARKET & CAFE 

FRESH MEATS 

Beer - Wine - On and Off 

Good Food - Reasonable Prices 

3292 No. Espee Avenue Phone 2-2673 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

John Williams Wm. (Bill) Williams 

J. WILLIAMS & SON 

Electric Repairing 

Repairing nf AH iKnds of Motors 

1410 Palm Avenue Phone 6-9235 

FRESNO CALlFOi-iNIA 

JENSEN CAFE 

STEAKS - CHICKEN - BEER 



4069 JENSEN 

FRESNO 



e 41003 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-9452 Frank Valla 

VALLA'S SERVICE 

NORWALK GAS - OIL - TIRES 

BATTERIES - LUBRICATION 

Church and Cedar Avenue 

FRESNO CALIF0?,N1A 



COMPLIMENTS of 
A FRIEND 



ST. AGNES 
HOSPITAL 



Phone 6-9331 
1451 North Fruit 
Fresno, California 




Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Juh,1954 



Shop Phone: 3-0543 



Res. Phone 3-7428 



O. W. WILLHOITE 

GORDON PRESSURE SYSTEMS 

EJECTOR AND TURBINE TYPES 

Repair All Makes 



440 North H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



"Let's Get As 



ated" 



Art Nan's Flying "A" Service 

FEDERAL TIRES AND FLYING A BATTERIES 
Motor Tune Up and Brake Service 

Belmont and Ferger Ave. Phone 2-9624 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Walter Reitz Meat Market 

"Featuring Only the Best" 
GERMAN SAUSAGE 

4S0 West McKinley Phone 6-4«S3 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

STREIT'S DRAPERY SHOPPE 

UPHOLSTERING - DRAPERIES 
DECORATIVE FURNITURE 

853 Fulton Phone 3-6149 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

TRIANGLE 
PLUMBING CO. 



Phone 6-3159 
2233 "F" Street 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



linquency. Until we answer these ques- 
tions we cannot avoid frittering away our 
energies on more earnest but largely fu- 
tile efforts to control delinquency and 
crime. The responsibility for gaining a 
deeper insight into human behavior can- 
not be left to specialists. Only as parents, 
teachers, and the citizenry share in the 
understanding of behavior and recognize 
their own major part in pushing children 
into rebellion, delinquency, crime, and 
neuroses can prevention reach its maxi- 
mum effectiveness. Only as police, judges, 
probation officers, and all the other agents 
of law enforcement discover the true na- 
ture of the human material with which 
they are dealing (and take a look at their 
own motives and desires) will correction 
move up from an accident to an art. 

Some Discredited Causes 

Since the middle of the last century, 
a good deal of scientific information on 
the factors that lead human being to act, 
each of us in our own particular way, has 
piled up to disprove the notion that an 
individual who breaks the law or commits 
a socially unacceptable act does so solely 
because of a wilful preference for evil. 
The by-no-means unique case history of 
the normal girl, secure in a well-balanced 
family relationship, who at 17 fell ill of 
encephalitis and ultimately got up from 
her sick bed a confirmed liar and thief 
demonstrates what a brain lesion can do 
to alter a behavior pattern. I here was 
nothing wilful about her change to anti- 
social behavior. 

The foregoing illustration serves 
merely to bring out sharply how factors 
quite outside the individual's control can 
lead him or her to commit crimes. It sug- 
gests a simple relationship between cause 
and effect which rarely holds true. \'et 
we still hear people, who should know 
better, eagerly fixing on one single factor 
or another to explain all the misbehavior 
of our age — broken homes, working 
mothers, lack of religious instruction, 
drinking, gangster films and radio pro- 
grams, the automobile, unemployment, 
poverty, slum housing, lack of play- 
grounds and clubs. Early in the century, 
many earnest people looked with sus- 
picion on cigarettes and dime novels. 

Science, itself, has had its many pe- 
riods of oversimplification. Eighty years 
ago, Cesare Lombroso, the man who per- 
formed the great service of directing at- 
tention from the crime to the criminal 
and thereby led the attack on the moral 
wilfulness theory, strove to prove that 
the criminal is a physical and mental 
throwback to primitive man, a kind of 
contemporary Neanderthaler. In recent 
years the Harvard anthropologist. Earn- 
est A. Hooton, has lent his efforts and 
pen to support this theory. It would be 



BOB'S NURSERY 

L. R. (Bob) Bissett 

Ornamentals-Fruit and Shade Trees; Garden 

Tools and Supplies; Power Lawn Mowers; 

Floral Designs for all Occasions. 

Telephones: Bus. 3-3467; Res. 2-8180 

1566 Palm (Near McKinley) 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



G. A. HART & SONS 

WELL DRILLING 
Licensed Contractor - Woi'k Guarante 



1824 Cal 
FRESNO 



Phone 3-8«47 

CALIFORNIA 



NEHI PRODUCTS CO. 

ROYAL CROWN COLA 
PAR-T-PAK - NEHI SODAS 



390 Safford 
FRESNO 



Phone 3-7306 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-5222 Res. Phone 4-4866 

SUMNER'S DELIVERY SERVICE 

Laurence E. Sumner. Prop. 
Calls Before 12 Delivered Same Day 



1826 White Street 



CALIFORNIA 



DRAPER 
HOUSE MOVING 



Licensed Contractor 



Phone 5-4463 

4896 East Washington 

FRESNO, 

CALIFORNIA 



July. 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



ENIX REST HOME 

PERSONAL ATTENTION 

Male and Female 

Ambulatory Only - Family Style Meals 

252 Abby Phone 2-6403 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



BROWNIE'S MUFFLER SERVICE 

Dual Mufflers - Stock Mufflers - Tail Pipes 
FOR ALL CARS 



Ventura and P Streets Phone 2-3447 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

LADD BROOM CO. 

WHOLESALE BROOMS 

Highway 99 North Highway City 
Phone 4-7722 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

BONNER PACKING CO. 

Packers of 
DRIED FRUITS AND RAISINS 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 

Hollenbeck Bush 
Planing Mill Co. 

Wholesale & Retail 

Windows - Doors 
Mouldings - Cabinets 

GENERAL MILL 
WORK 

Phone 3-3296 

2206 South Van Ness 

FRESNO, 

CALIFORNIA 



interesting to have Professor Hooton 
measure the heads of the several million 
former members of Nazi S.S. and Brown 
Shirts to determine whether they differ 
perceptibly from the rest of the German 
population, or from the rest of us. 

For a time the more articulate investi- 
gators insisted that only feeble-minded 
people could become criminals and that 
the condition was inherited and ran in 
families, of which the Jukes and the Kal- 
likaks became the popular symbols. When 
studies of criminals in prisons proved that 
the majority possessed normal intelligence, 
and when other studies proved that per- 
haps not one half of true feeble-minded- 
ness is inherited, the theory crumbled. 
One fact of value remains from the in- 
vestigations, however. Feeble-minded peo- 
ple are easily led or influenced so that 
they respond readily to exposure to crimi- 
nal or vicious behavior. Consequently we 
can say that feeble-mindedness is one im- 
portant factor in some cases of delin- 
quency and crime. 

More recently, pioneering work with 
the glands of internal secretion — the thy- 
roid, pituitary, adrenal, thymus, and other 
glands — led some endocrinologists to 
claim that all criminal acts trace to ab- 
normal conditions of these glands. If a 
man stages a fake bankruptcy or commits 
a rape or murder — said this theory — it is 
because his glands fail to work properly. 
Perhaps, as we shall see later, glandular 
dysfunction, like heart disease or deafness 
or feeble-mindedness, may be one factor 
in the commission of crimes by some indi- 
viduals, but it is no more than that. 

To advance any single cause or ex- 
planation for all delinquency and crime is 
to repeat the error of our ancestors who 
clung to the moral-wilfulness theory. The 
explanation of a particular act of law 
breaking may be single and simple. Thus, 
sheer accident explains the death of a 
youth who is knocked down in a fair fight 
and chances to strike his head on a curb 
and die. The act of the young driver who 
for a reason not necessarily his fault hits 
a pedestrian and in panic drives away 
can also be attributed to chance. AVe have 
seen in the instance of the victim of ence- 
phalitis that the explanation of the crimi- 
nal behavior of a particular individual 
may also be single and, for practical pur- 
poses, simple. The injury to the brain 
cells may result from mishandling at 
birth or from a subsequent accident as 
well as from disease. Also there may be 
a defect in the brain organization in the 
same way that a child may be born with 
six fingers. 

The percentage of such unfortunate 
victims of brain pathology is small both 
in prisons and in the general population. 
The percentage of accidental offenders in 
prisons is far too large. Howe\ er, the ex- 



VERNON L. KOCH 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
sewer Construction and Service 



1956 Orange Av 

FRESNO 



Phone 6-2S47 

CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

BISCEGLIA BROS. WINE CO. 

Wholesale Distributors 

Cedar and California Phone 4-6S01 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



EUGENE B. SMITH & CO.. INC. 

COTTON 

2146 Merced Street 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

BENSON BAKERY 

Specializing in 

DANISH PASTRIES - WEDDING CAKES 

DONUTS - PIES 

O. W. Turner. Owner 



4528 Belmont Street 

FRESNO 



Phone 5-4478 

CALIFORNIA 



O'Neill Meat Co. 

Distributors of 

Tender, 
Full O' Flavor 

O'Neill-Fed Beef 

Wholesale Meats 
& Provisions 



FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 1954 



VALLEY BUILDERS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
AUcn S. Clarey Robert RcviUa, Jr 



515 Ha 

FRESNO 



Street 



Tel. 4-2074 

CALIFORNIA 



CLIFF SMITH 

USED CARS 
"We Deal In Little Gems Only" 

Phone: 6-4743 Res. Phone: 7-8146 

3427 BELMONT 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



KLIEWER'S PAINT STORE 

WALL PAPER - PAINT SUPPLIES 
SANDER RENTALS 



454 North First Street 
FRESNO 



Tel. 4-53S2 

CALIFORNIA 



ACME AUTO PARTS 

PARTS FOR ALL MAKES & MODELS 

Auto Repair - New and Used Parts 

24-HOUR TOWING SERVICE 

We Sell Used Cars 

Ben Mathew — Prop. 



3272 S. Elm Av 

FRESNO 



Tel. 2-9335 

CALIFORNIA 



Free Television 

Tile Showers 

Air Conditioned 

Panel Ray Heating 

Avalon Motel 

Wall To Wall 

Carpeting 

Kitchenettes 

21/2 Miles North 
of Traffic Circle, 
on U.S. 99 Hwy. 

JACK and PEARL SPINKS, 
Owner-Operator 

Phone 3-9709 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



planation of the behavior of the majority 
of convicts and of the great majority of 
criminals at large is not simple but lies 
deep-seated in the environment, human 
and material, and in the individual's re- 
action to it. In the complicated interac- 
tions that result in most delinquency and 
crime, it is misleading to speak of a single 
cause, such as broken homes or poverty 
or feeble-mindedness. These are at most 
contributing factors that affect behavior 
only in association with other factors. 
The hopeful fact lies in the achievement 
of science in identifying social conditions 
as the dominant factor in most delin- 
quency and crime. 

Changing Definitions of Crime 

To test the foregoing statement let us 
look not at the causes of unacceptable be- 
havior but at the acts themselves. What 
is crime? The obvious answer would 
seem to be, whatever the law says it is. 
If so, what of the blue laws in Delaware 
which make selling a newspaper or tak- 
ing an automobile ride on Sunday pun- 
ishable offenses? What of the law in one 
southern state that still provides the death 
penalty for a third successive failure to 
attend church on Sunday? What of pro- 
hibition ? 

Perhaps we should narrow the defini- 
tion of crime to specific acts like murder, 
rape, arson, and theft. Was it, then, a 
crime during the occupation for Polish, 
French, or Norwegian boys to stick 
knives in the backs of Germans, or to 
set fire to Nazi warehouses or to steal 
food and guns? Certainly in the not-so- 
distant days of the American frontier, 
neither the law nor public opinion con- 
sidered those pioneers to be criminal who 
acted in the belief that "the only good 
Indian is a dead Indian." The Japanese 
Samurai are reported to have held on, 
down to relatively modern times, to the 
feudal right of exercising their swords on 
the necks of peasants. William L. Shirer 
has reported a 1940 Berlin conversation 
with two young Nazis back from the oc- 
cupation of Poland in which they told 
him as a matter of course of using Polish 
citizens as they might tin cans for pistol 
practice. The most shocking element in 
the story was their complete unawareness 
of anything morally reprehensible in their 
actions. 

The point of these dissimilar illustra- 
tions is to bring out the fact that in none 
of the societies concerned were the acts 
considered crimes. Their members com- 
mitted these acts of violence not because 
their glands failed to function properly, 
or because individually they were biologi- 
cal throwbacks to primitive man, or be- 
cause they came from poverty stricken 
slums. Each was merely following the 
pattern of behavior set by his society. 



Aid To Health Studio 

Physio-Therapy * Swedish Massage 

Corrective Massage • Steam Baths 

Special Foot Massage 

For Home Calls and Evening Appointments 

PHONE 4-6605 

Henry and Carolyn Kroeker 

1052 Olive 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

W. D. PHIPPS OSCAR KEVORK 

YOST & WEBB MORTUARY 

PHONE 2-4147 

Comer Tulare and "T" Streets 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

OTTO HAMM 

HAMM'S ROOFING CO. 

TILE ROOFING 
Built-Up and Composition Roofinf 



2685 Cherry 



Tel. 6-4272 

CALIFORNIA 



CONNERS 

AUTO BODY & UPHOLSTERING WORKS 

Body and Fender Repairing - Automotive 

Painting - Electric and Acetylene Welding 

Automotive Upholstering - Sport Tops 

Seat Covers - Canvas Work 

All Work Fully Guaranteed 

145 Callisch St. Phones 2-8617 • 2-4685 

Vi Block South of East Tulare St. 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Golder's 
Turkey Hatchery 

Charley Colder 



2137 North Maple 
Phone 5-O802 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



July, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



ORIENTAL DRY GOODS CO. 

Ladies', Gentlemen's and Children's Wear 



J 502 Tulare Street 

FRESNO 



Phone 2-7421 

CALIFORNIA 



I 



HARRIS FENCE CO. 



HARRIS 

STEEL FENCE 



4S43 E. VENTURA AVENUE 
FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

A & F CABINET SHOP 

CABINETS MADE TO ORDER 

Kitchen Cabinets Our Specialty 

Free Estimates - Prompt Service 

GUY FULLMER, Res. 7-6644 

CHARLES ATKINSON, Res. 5-8085 

3732 Belmont Tel. 2-3238 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Abco Manufacturing Company 

PREFAB BUILDINGS 

4752 East McKinley Avenue 
TELEPHONE 5-8306 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Leslie A. Lynn 

Public Accountant 

Originator Of 

ALL PURPOSE 

ACCOUNTING BOOK 

THE FINEST BOOKKEEPING 

SYSTEM AVAILABLE 

FOR ANY SMALL 

BUSINESS MAN 

OR FARMER 



Phone 3-6797 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



These considerations lead us to several 
useful conclusions. First, to a practical 
definition as distinguished from a defini- 
tion based on morals : Crime is whatever 
the dominant elements of a particular so- 
ciety believe to be dangerous to the se- 
curity and solidarity of the society at any 
particular time. The crime conceptions 
of one society differ from those of an- 
other, and within a given society the con- 
ception changes. A society can be tragi- 
cally wrong in its definition of crime, as 
the executions for witchcraft in colonial 
New England demonstrate. And a change 
in conception can be wrong, as our experi- 
ment with prohibition bears witness. 

The Influence of a Lawless Society 

These changing definitions of crime 
seem to reduce to absurdity the idea that 
individuals are born "bad." It would ap- 
pear that none of us is born either "bad" 
or "good." Rather, each of us enters the 
world, as the Germans have recently 
demonstrated, capable alike of evil and 
of good. On which side our behavior falls 
is determined largely, though not wholly, 
by the ideas and behavior of the com- 
munity into which we are born. The law- 
lessness of American citizens largely re- 
flects the lawlessness of American society 
on which we touched in Chapter 1. Our 
efforts to reform bad individuals will 
prove vastly more successful when we re- 
form the badness of our social values and 
behavior — our worship of material suc- 
cess no matter how it is achieved ; our re- 
spect not for competence but for aggres- 
sive competition, not for good workman- 
ship or for cooperation, but for getting 
ahead of the other fellow ; the too com- 
mon effort of business and organized la- 
bor and the professions to get "some- 
thing for nothing" regardless of the rest 
of the community ; the violence of picket 
lines and goon squads ; the too frequent 
corruption of local government and law 
enforcement oificials ; aggressive intoler- 
ance of Mexican, Negro, Japanese, Jew- 
ish and other minorities. In the main our 
children and young people learn conduct 
not from what we say but from what we 
do. 

Let us see what these generalizations 
mean in terms of day-to-day behavior and 
example. In three articles in its issues of 
July, August, and September 1941, the 
Reader's Digest reported the results of a 
nationwide investigation of the business 
ethics of garages, radio repair shops, and 
watch repair shops. The investigations 
were made by a man and woman who 
spent three months in a tour of the na- 
tion. To test garages, they would discon- 
nect a coil wire so that it was "glaringly 
obvious" just before driving in. Out of 
347 garages in all 48 states, 129 spotted 
the wire at once, told the drivers, and 



FRESNO LIQUOR STORE 

FISHING and SPORTING GOODS 



Phone 3-8278 
534 BLACKSTONE 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Flat Top Truck & Car Terminal 

RETREAD PLANT 

— 24-Hour Service — 

NIGHT and DAY SERVICE 

No. 99 Hwy. and Princeton 

Phone 6-9967 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

MANUEL KINDSVATER 

MILL and CABINET SHOP 

Cabinets Made To Order 

General Mill Work 

Business 5-0672 Residence 5-0170 

4678 E. OLIVE AVENUE 

FRESNO CALIFOR NIA 

HAEHL EQUIPMENT 

SERVICE STATION 

TANK TRUCK • BULK PLANT 

EQUIPMENT 

Phone 3-8843 
1903 NO. 99 HIGHWAY 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



San Joaquin Valley 
Nurses' Institute 

and 
Placement Service 

Maternity 

Child Care 

Companion Nurses 

Private Duty 

Rest Homes, etc. 

204 N. Van Ness 
Phone 3-6823 

FRESNO, 
CALIFORNIA 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July, 1954 



"LIL" BROWN JUG 



Pho 



FRESNO SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 

George Tousounis, Prop. 
"OUR SPECIALTY — SEA FOOD" 



Pho 



Compliments of 

SCHILLING'S PARKING LOT 



SILAS CHIN, M.D. 



Suite 513 
P 

FRESNO 



Rowell Building 
2-4719 

CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

HUGH WESLEY GOODWIN 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 



Pho 



Shop Phone 2-7690 Res. Phone 62754 

BIGGERSTAFF BODY WORKS 

Complete Auto Body Service 

Free Estimates - Art Biggerstaff, Owner 

485 Poplar Avenue 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

DR. NORMAN C. SMITH 

Chiropodist - Foot Surgeon 

T. W. Patterson Building 

Phone 3-724 Res. Phone 7-2816 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



CLOVER CLUB 

Fresno's Finest Cocktail Lounge 

Featuring 

SHISH-KEBAB - STEAKS AND 

CHICKEN 




Across from Hotel Californian 

Phone 3-1842 

2039 Kern Street 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Palm-Shields 
Liquor Store 

FAST FREE DELIVERY 

Phone: 7-3427 

PALM and SHIELDS AVES. 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



either charged nothing or a nominal sum. 
The rest, 63 per cent, "took the investi- 
gators for suckers and treated them ac- 
cordingly. . . . Three out of five garage 
men will overcharge, lie, insert unneces- 
sary work, or charge for work not done, 
for new parts not needed, for parts not 
installed." The investigators found that 
small towns and small garages were 
much more honest than cities and elabo- 
rate garages. 

To test the radio repair shops, the in- 
vestigators would loosen a tube or discon- 
nect a wire in a new radio. Says the re- 
port: "A repair man who didn't see them 
or speak up was taking the first step to- 
ward petty thievery." Out of 304 shops 
in 48 states, 109 spotted the obvious 
trouble, repaired it and either made no 
charge or a minor charge; 195 tried to 
take advantage of the customer. Summing 
up, the report said : "When the average 
American takes his radio set into a repair 
ship ... he will be cheated 64 out of every 
100 times by repair men who will sell 
him tubes, batteries, and service which his 
set doesn't need, or charge him for new 
parts they didn't put in. In some cases 
they will even remove good parts and add 
them to the supply on their shelves, sub- 
stituting inferior equipment." Again the 
big cities showed up worse than the small 
towns. 

The watchmakers made a slightly bet- 
ter showing than their fellow craftsmen. 
Out of 462 watch repair men in the 48 
states, 229 or 49 per cent "lied, over- 
charged, gave phoney diagnoses, or sug- 
gested expensive and unnecessary re- 
pairs." The test involved loosening the 
little screw that fastens the winding 
wheel. In all, 236 repair men or 51 per 
cent met the test by swiftly correcting 
the trouble and of these only 8 charged 
anything at all. 

It is perhaps no wonder that youths 
doing time in reform schools for the theft 
of a car, a burglary, or snatching a purse 
feel — as almost all of them do — that they 
are not worse but only less lucky than the 
unimprisoned citizens who sent them 
there. 

Dclinijuericy Areas 

However, the immediate interest of 
those dealing with recognized delinquents 
and criminals is not so much in the in- 
fluence on children exerted by lawlessness 
in the general cultural pattern as it is in 
the influence on children of the aggres- 
sively lawless patterns of certain areas 
and neighborhoods. Ideas, customs, and 
habits of conduct are never universal, not 
even the dominant ones. Islands of differ- 
ential behavior exist in different sections 
of the country and within cities and re- 
gions. Some variant behavior may be as 
innocent as the Texans' fondness for ten- 



P. A.'S LUNCH 

Brother P. A. Fries. Prop. 

BEER AND WINE 

Good Eats at All Times 

2249 South G Street Phone 2-9997 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

101 CLUB 

Lois Murphy 

STEAKS AND CHICKEN DINNERS 

Wine - Beer - Dancing 

4810 Jensen Phone 3-9651 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

J. J. FISHER 

MANUFACTURING 
Jewelry Repairing - Diamond Setting 
216 Helm Building Phone 2-8629 



CALIFORNIA 



A. DIEL GROCERY 

Alexander and Norman Borger 
For Service and Quality in Meats 



Pho 



CHET'S QUALITY MEATS 

"Never a Bum Steer" 



Poultry - Fish 



GARO SHOWCASE AND 
FIXTURE CO. 



307-309 Belmont Ave 

FRESNO 



'hone 2-1331 
CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-185! Res. Phone 3-6405 

V. V. WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

Vartar Vartikian 

SPECIALIZING IN CITRUS FRUITS 

1040 C STREET 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



The Murray Company 
OF Texas, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Cotton Ginning Machinery 

Cotton Seed Oil Mill Machinery 

Steel Buildings & Mill Supplies 

P. O. BOX 3260 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Las Palmas Manor 

R. G. Letnes, Director 

A Fine Home for the Aged 

Your Inspection 
Most Cordially Invited 

Phone 5-2551 

Olive and Clovis Aves. 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Juh, 1954 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



JEAN AND HAROLDS MARKET 

Complete Market 

GROCERIES - FRESH MEATS - VEGETABLES 

Beer - Wine 

3970 Calwa Phone 3-9608 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Musaccbio Bros. Phone 6-0937 

SUBWAY SERVICE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Painting - Body and Fender Works 
Well Specialists - Motor Installations 

1535 FRESNO ST. FRESNO, CALIF. 

KING'S HERBS 

Specialists - Chinese Herbs for all Diseases 
Office Upstairs - Room 21-22, Washington Hotel 



MANDARIN MEAT CO. 

FRESH MEATS AND GROCERIES 



SULLIVAN NURSERY CO. 



Street 



Pho 



DOWNTOWN GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

24-Hour Service 

925 Broadway Phone 6-0637 



npli. 



STRUZAS LIQUOR STORE 

3693 Elm Street Phone 4-3275 

;no califof 

OPTIMO CLUB 

Cocktails 



lOyi Fresno Street 

FRESNO, 

CALIFORNIA 



Founders' 
Insurance Co. 

Fire - Marine - Casualty 



Phone 6-9441 

305 Angelo Bank Bldg. 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



gallon hats. But other variant behavior 
constitutes a direct attack on the social 
order. Neighborhoods marked by such 
beha\ior manufacture delinquents and 
criminals. They may have up to 25 per 
cent of their boys aged 10 to 17 arrested 
for delinquency every year. Just what 
this means appears by comparison with 
more favored home neighborhoods in 
which the proportion of annual arrests 
and referrals to the juvenile court shades 
down to less than one per cent of all resi- 
dent boys." 

These ''delinquency areas," as Clififord 
Shaw calls them, are the readily recogniz- 
able slums and blighted areas of our cities. 
Bad housing identifies them. Bad in that 
it is run down, unpainted, dirty, hidden 
from the sun, infected with rats and ver- 
min, equipped with hall toilets or even 
outdoor privies that have to be shared 
with many families. Bad in that it is over- 
crowded, with children and adults of 
both sexes sleeping in the same rooms, 
denying to all any privacy of person or 
possessions or emotions. Bad in that it 
provides children no space to play and 
drives them into the streets, alle\s, cellars 
and vacant houses. Bad in that ware- 
houses, freight yards, traffic encroach on 
the dwellings. In these areas the city finds 
it easy to neglect the schools, health serv- 
ices, pavements, garbage collection, and 
other public services. Almost always tub- 
erculosis rates far exceed those in more 
favored neighborhoods. 

As soon as any family can afford to, 
it generally escapes from the slum and 
blighted area, leaving it to the poverty 
stricken and demoralized, to the new im- 
migrants from Europe and Latin Amer- 
ica and from the rural South. The mixed 
population with its high mobility rarely 
acquires the sense of community of the 
typical neighborhood. The lack of social 
standards in\ites the shadv rooming house 
and tavern, the professional crook and 
the gangster. These latter, as the symbols 
of success and power, are likelv to be the 
"leading citizens" of the neighborhood 
and to become the heroes of impression- 
able youngsters. From the statement of a 
delinauent bov in Chicago, Shaw quotes 
the following illuminating comment: 

Every bov has some ideal he looks up 
to and admires. His ideal may be Babe 
Ruth, Jack Dempsev, Al Canone, or some 
other crook. His ideal is what he wants 
to be like when he grows up and becomes 
a man. AVhen T was twelve years old we 
moved into a neighborhood where there 
lived a mob of gangsters and big crooks. 



"These fieures mav show a prrpater difference in de 
litiquent behavior between different neiphborbood? 
than the facts i"stifv. Children nf well-to-do citizens 
commit many offenses inelndioj; ^erio.ts ones tb^n do 
not api)ear in the statistics because police turn the 
children over to tbeir parents rather than to the 
court. 



e 2-9556 

NINETEEN SIXTEEN CLUB 



Guy Tippett. Prop. 
BEER - WINE 

Route 12 - Box 44 
CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-0419 George E. Bakn 

THE MANOR HOUSE 

LIQUORS - WINES - BEER 
2196 Elm Av 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-0640 Res. Phone 4-7949 

Centra! Tile and MarbBe Co. 

TILE • MARBLE • TERRAZZO 

3707 Belmont Street 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

BUDDY LANG'S GARAGE 

AUTO REPAIR AND BODY WORKS 



1659 F Street 

FRESNO 



2-9146 

CALIFORNIA 



RUPPEL'S LIQUOR STCRE 



RUFPELS CORNER . 



FREEMAN ^50VELTY CO. 



2513 McKe 

FRESNO 



! 2-1592 

CALIFORNIA 



HENRY C. WRIGHT 

GUN AND MACHINE WORKS 

Authorized Remngton and Winchester 

Gunsmith 

4863 East Olive Street Phone 5-I96( 

FRESNO CALIFORI 



DOWD SHEET METAL 

Wilbur Z. Dowd, prop. 

LENNOX AIR FLOW 

HEATING and 
AIR CONDITIONING 

More Families Buy Lennox 
Than Any Other Make 

Phone 4-5961 

1819 E. Lamona Ave. 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 6-6556 



^i%SBI01(ED 



fioit^ 



go^^ 



2040 Fresno Street 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



July. 19 54 



Phone 31715 T. B. Morain, Prop. 

Belmont Ice & Ice Cream Co. 

Wood - Coal - Blocks - Locker Boxes 
Dairy Products 

Belmont at Seventh Street 
FRESNO CALIFOR NIA 

Goode's Farm & Plumbing Supplies 

Master Craftsmen 

Plumb ng and Electrical Supplies 

Two Blocks West of Chandler Airfield on 

Whitesbridge Road 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 

BELMONT 



4225 Belmont 

FRESNO 



NN 



5-0441 

CALIFORNIA 



DON PHILLIPS 



Automotive Repairing - Official Brake Station 

Motor Tune-ups - General Repairs - Priced 

Right - Done Right - All Work Guaranteed 

645 Divisadero Phone 3-7491 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

LARSEN-RATTO 



ROY W. PETERSON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 
Gas Appliances - Repair Service 

Phone 31305 Res. Phone 7-6 1 70 

535 Blackstone Ave. - Residence 1028 Saginaw 

FkESNO CALIFORNIA 

DON'S MEATS 
Paradise Super Market 

Complete Market - Don Brown 

WINE - BEER - LIQUOR 

5726 Blackstone Phone 7-2821 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 



Fresno 
Steam Cleaning 

AUTOS 

TRUCKS 

TRACTORS 

H and El Dorado 

Pick-up and Delivery 
Phone 4-4928 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



HOME TITLE CO. 

HOME OWNED 

PHILIP WILSON 

Vice-President and Manager 



Phone 3-5264 

2032 Mariposa 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



They were all swell dressers and had big 
cars and carried 'gats.' Us kids saw those 
swell guys and mingled with them in the 
cigar store on the corner. Jack Gurney 
was the one in the mob that I had a fancy 
to. He used to take my sis out and that 
was how I saw him often. He was in 
the stick-up racket before he was in the 
beer racket and was a swell dresser and 
had lots of dough. He was a nervy guy 
and went in for big stuf¥. He was a mys- 
terious fellow and would disappear some- 
times for several days but always came 
back. He was looked up to as the leader 
of his mob and anybody would gladly be 
in his place.' 

Delinquency the Key to Respect 

In such areas delinquency and crime 
may become a social tradition, passed on 
from boy to boy, from group to group, 
and from generation to generation just 
as naturally as the practice of church at- 
tendance and playing baseball are passed 
on in other neighborhoods. In the gang, 
the natural form of boyhood association, 
one generation of boys after another 
learns to shoplift, to pilfer from railroads 
and old buildings, to raid stores and 
trucks, to roll drunks, and to carry on 
deadly gang wars. Another of Shaw's 
youthful informants gives a vivid picture 
of how and why delinquency starts and 
evolves : 

When we were shoplifting we always 
made a game of it. For example, we 
might gamble on who could steal the 
most caps in a day or who could steal in 
the presence of a detective and then get 
away. We were always daring each other 
that way and thinking up new schemes. 
This was the best part of the game. I 
would go into a store to steal a cap by 
trying on one, and when the clerk was 
not watching walk out of the store, leav- 
ing the old cap. With the new cap on my 
head I would go into another store, do 
the same thing as in the other store, get- 
ting a new hat and leave the one I had 
taken from the other place. I might do 
this all day and have one hat at night. It 
was fun I wanted, not the hat. I kept this 
up for months and then began to sell the 
things to a man on the west side. It was 
at this time that I began to steal for gain.'' 

Do so many children in blighted areas 
imitate these delinquent activities because 
they are "moral imbeciles" ? The evidence 
indicates that they do it for the same rea- 
sons that boys in more fortunate com- 
munities imitate the acceptable behavior 
of such communities — to gain recogni- 
tion, approval, companionship, and ex- 
citement. Tn delinquent areas a boy wins 

^Quoted in a mimeographed monograph. JuveniU- 
Delinquency, Chicago Area Project, 1946, pp. 6-7. 

^piloted in Shaw, Delinquency Areas, University 
of Chicagn Press, 1929, p. 38. 



THE LEILANI 



Jimmie Dunn 

COCKTAILS - DINNERS 

Featuring G'Neil Choice Steaks and Chinese 

Dinners 

1425 Blackstone Phone 6-4217 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

DR. BRUCE M. BERG 



HANS SUMPF CO. 

ADOBE BRICK 



Moroa and Sii 

FRESNO 



Phone 7-15S1 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-9968 John Farino. Prop. 

PIONEER CLUB 

Specializing in Italian Pizza 
Mixed Drinks - Cocktails 
3704 Ventura Boulevard 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

UNION OIL STATION 2933 



Expert Lubricat 

Pick-Up and D. 
Fruit and 01 

FRESNO 



d Gaus 

Washing and Polishing 
■ •■ y Service 

hone 3-9782 

CALIFORNIA 



WILES CAMELLIA NURSERY 

L. B -Wiles. Owner 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 

Plans and Estimates Free 

1519 Simpson Street Telephone 7-5119 

■RESNO CALIFORNIA 

A. C. KING, INC. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
1120 Parallel Avenue Phone 2-3115 

■RESNO CALIFORNIA 



Delta Electric Co. 

George Kasparian, Prop. 

SUNBEAM APPLIANCES 
REPAIRING 

Phone 3-4216 

947 R Street 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



Art's Freezer 
Food Center 

Lockers and Home Freezers 

Complete Line of Meats and 

Frozen Foods for Locker 

or Home Freezers 

Phone 2-2685 

4101 Floradora Ave. 
FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



July. 195 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



RAINBOW MOTORS 

HOME OF NEARLY NEW CARS 
1710 Broadway Phone 6-0S09 



FRESNO 



CALIFORNIA 



HERB & DODE'S HUT 

EXCELLENT FOOD - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

CATERING SERVICE 

Also Banquet Rooms for Large & Small Parties 

701 Blackstone Phooe 3-2531 

FREoNO CALIFORNIA 

MARGARET BALES 

REGISTERED ELECTROLOGIST 

Hours 10 to 6. Evenings by Appointment 

Office Phone 2-9284 

Suite HOS-1107, Fulton-Fresno Bldg. 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

AL'S LIQUOR STORE 

ALL POPULAR BRANDS OF LIQUOR 

AL DIMAS 

Plenty of Parking Space 

Ventura and R Streets Phone 4-2312 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

International Travelers Agency 

ANTHONY G. SOUSA. Prop. 

Immigration & Natural'zation Counseling 

Tickets and travelers information to anywhere 

in the world. 

1013 Fresno Street Phone 2-2308 

FRESNO CALIFORNIA 

John R. Paul, Optometrist 

BELTONE HEARING AIDS 
1209 Van Ness (near Fresno St.) Ph. 4-4IS1 
FRESNO 21 CALIFORNIA 

Mazzei-Hill Aeronautics, Inc. 

CHARTER SERVICE 
CHANDLER FIELD 



Complete One Stop Service 

Olson's Automotive Service 

specializing in 
Brake Service and Tune-Up 

Gordon's Car & Body Repair 

Auto Bod)' and Fender Repairing 
Painting 

Andy's Texaco Service 

Wash - Lube - Tires 

4601 E. Tulare 

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA 



A. B. Demaray 

Chevron Dealer 
FISH CAMP, CALIF. 



honor by showing bravery in committing 
daring crimes, by refusing to betray his 
pals to the police, by a long record of ar- 
rests and court appearances, by doing time 
in an institution. In areas of bad racial 
friction and gang wars, knifing a member 
of the rival gang is no crime in the eyes 
of the group. It may be a condition of sur- 
vival as it certainly is the key to the re- 
spect of the boy's pals that he so badly 
wants. 

The blighted area with its destructive 
behavior patterns is by no means confined 
to the city. It often sprawls across the 
tracks into the unincorporated sections 
and occurs in small towns and rural re- 
gions from coast to coast. Filth and over- 
crowding reach their peak in some of the 
camps provided for migrant and rural 
workers. The majority of commitments 
to reform schools and prisons come from 
delinquent areas of one kind or another, 
urban, suburban, and rural. 

The Major Role of the 
Delinquency Area 

Shaw and his associates have some 
rather striking statistical proof that the 
bad behavior example set by delinquency 
areas and the unsatisfactory human rela- 
tionships found in them exercise the deci- 
sive causative influence in the delinquency 
and crime of the majority of those chil- 
dren and adults who come to the atten- 
tion of the law. Studying the home ad- 
dresses of all known juvenile delinquents 
and adult offenders in Chicago from 1899 
to 1933 (studies later extended through 
1940), the investigators found that the 
so-called delinquency areas maintained 
their disproportionately high percentages 
of delinquents and criminals continuously 
over the entire period. This was true even 
though the population of some of the de- 
linquency areas changed during the four 
decades from predominantly German, 
Irish, English and French immigrants to 
Scandinavian, then to Polish, and finally 
to Italian. The children of all nationality 
groups shoii'ed the same high rate of ar- 
rest so long as they lii'ed in the area. As 
soon as each nationality group prospered 
and moved to more desirable neighbor- 
hoods, the delinquency rate of their chil- 
dren fell oH sharply to the level of that 
characteristic of the better neighbor- 
hoods.' 

This is \ital information. It means 
that the majority of children and youths 
who break the laws when subjected to the 
social conditions and human relationships 
of blighted areas would be law-abiding 
under other conditions. It stamps tradi- 
tional delinquency and crime as mainly a 
neighborhood phenomenon. It puts major 

•Shaw and McKay. Juvenile Delinquency and Ur- 
ban Areas, University of Chicago Press, 1942. pp. 
■* 147-158. 



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