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Full text of "Poor Roger, 1767. The American country almanack, for the year of Christian account 1767 : ... Calculated according to art, and fitted to the province of New-York ..."

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UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 

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1767 




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Poor Roger, 1767. 



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THE AMERICAN 

Country Almanack, 



FOR THE 



Year of Chriftian Account 

1767. 

AND 

From the Creation by Scripture, 5776. 

Being the third after BISSEXTILE, or 
LEAP-YEAR. 

Wherein is contained. 

The Lunations, Eclipfes, Judgment of the 

Weather, (in this uncertain Climate) Planet's Places 
in the Ecliptick, and mutual Afperfts; Sun's and 
Moon's rifing and fetting, feven Stars riling and 
fetting, Tide Table, Courts, and obfervable Days. 

Calculated according to Art, anil fitted to tke 

Province of Niw-York, but may without any fenfible Error 
fervt all the Provinces adjacent. 






*..■< 






By Roger More, Pbilodefpot. 



Behold the bright Expanfe: Then let y.i 

With Le-vf and Gratitude adore that Ptivtr 

Who frafd this wondrous Frame :---Ard hmufht its Parti 

To fucb Perftaion !—-Say, Lord I What it Man ! 



H 



NEW- YORK : 

Printed and Sold by James Parker, at the 
Tew-Printing-Office in Beaver-Street. 



is 



Kind Reader. 

WHEN 1 published my laft Year's Almanack the moil gloomy 
Profpeft appeared, that ever threatened our American 
Lands. '.-Slavery end impending Ruin fhook their baleful Rods; the 
Stamp-A#, big with the Fate of all thefe Colonies, was promuJged 
here ; and Liberty all on Tip-toe flood ready to take her Flight from 
thefe her long- pofieffed Happy Regions :-— For fome Time, the 
general Confternation firuck torpid all her Sons ;--- while the Clouds 

thickned round them; and as the Day approached, the Piofpclt, 

darkened :---- The important Day came on, 

That like a Cannon cramm'd with Ball and Powder, 
Thrtatned Deftru&ion whcrefoe'er it pointed j 
And nothing wanting but a tame Affent, 
To overwhelm us with d i ft r effing Slavery, 
And fill Amnita with painful Ruin. 
Stung at length with calm Reflections, and feeing all that's dear 
at Stake, like Men ftruggling tor Life, the Sons of Liberty rais'd 

their drooping Heads, in Favour of their long-lov'd Parent. The 

Conflict was fevere, but finally prevailing: Thereon we hail the 

Happy Day '.—-That baneful Aft, of which we gave an Abftraft 
in our laft, was never foffered to be put in Execution h«re, and 
fortunately the Repeal of it, at length obtained on the iSth Say of 
March laftj again we hail the happy Day ! Thrice wellcome to our 
Country was the glorious News :. The Air refounded with loud 
Acclamations, and Joy fat fmiling on every Countenance. Amongft 
the Reft Poor Roger was not hind-moll : Permit him, therefore, 

kind Readers, to congratulate ycu all on the happy Event: And 

feeing our Mother Country, who made the Attempt, being convinced 
fhe had acled inconfiftent, has reeeded from the Injuftice of the 
' fame, let us with Heart and Hand unite in thankful Diligence and 
Virtue. Then fhall we once More fee the Halcyon Days we juftly 
hope for; ©nee More reap the joyful Harveft of Peace and Plenty, 
and you of Almanacks have Rill one Mere. 
\ May Liberty reftor'd fuccefsful reign, 

With Power unbounded, o'er th' extenfive Main 
With Wings expanded wide, now freely foar, 
And unmolefted ftretch from Shore to Shore : 
Beneath their pleafing Downs, and peaceful Glade, 
Utr Sons fhall fit and fitting blefs the Shade; 
V/bilft chearful Commerce brings a Oleam of Light, 
Thaf ^M&J tne Gloom of dire Oppreffi'Vs Night; 
Let Fretdknt Sons unbofom all their Joy, 
And in her Praife their earlieft Songs employ, 
Let thefe with More crown every joyful Theme, 
Long live Great Pitt, Immortal be his Fame j 
Succefs to Commerce, All uniting fing, 
Long live each Patriot, and God blefs the KING. 
In Praife of Him let all our Sengs appear, 
Renew his Praife, as Heaven renews each Year. 
WVilft loyal Love unm?fkM with N"ble Zeal, 
A Flame in each Heart to puard the public Weal. 



An EPHEMER1S of the "Plant/ j Motion jot ir.t i/i, btb; 
\\th t l 6th t ir.Ji and zbttrba) of each Month, 1766. 



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The Anatomy of Maris Body, as gdvem'd by 
the Twelve Conft citations. 

Head and Face. 



cy» 



Neck. 

Breafi, 
25 

Botvels 
|& 

Secrets, 



# 



tf££8, 



Jtf 



TAURUS ^fypGEJ! 
CANCER 




SCORP 
CAPRJp^ 
PIS 



SAG! 
AQITA 



^^? 



Arms, 

n 

Heart, 

a 

Reins, 



Thighs, 
Legs. 



X feet. 



To know where the Sign is. 
fT'IND the Day of the Month, and againft the Dayj in the fourth 
jp Column, you have the Sign or Place of the Moon, and then 
find the Sign here, and it will ftew the Part of the Body it goverm. 

The Names and Characters of the feven Planets. 

1$ Saturn, % Jupiter, $ Mars, O Sol, £ Venus, 

g Mercury, and ]) Luna. 

The Ji-ue Afpe£ls~. 

6 Conjunction, * Sextile, A Trine, □ Quartile, I 

g Oppofition. 

Common Notes for the Tear 1767. 
Golden Number, 1, [ Cycle of the Sun, 12, 
Epaft, o, Dominical Letter D. 



. The firft of March Venus may be faid to be Morning Star, as /he 
rifes 20 mi. paft 5 in the Morniag, and the Sun rifes 26 mi. paft 6 : 
Venus Cets then at 3 in the Afternoon 5 but will be Evening Star 
again before the laft of September, and on the 26th of Otlober fhe ! 
coming in Conjunction with the Sun, becomes Morning Star again 
to the Year's End. 



i Mo. January, hath xxxi Days. 

Methinks, oq wings of contemplation rais'd, 
Tvc now a profpedl ot the bufy world, 
See multitudes with multitudes commix'd ; 

With furious ardour fee! they force their way, 

Run o'er the widow?, pufti the orphans down; 
And tender Virtue's almoft prefs'd to death ; 
She cries aloud, but who regards her cry ? 



i 

2 

3 

4 

5 
o 

7 

8 

9 

c 

i 

m 

3 
4 

5 

6 

7 
8 

9 

20 
21 
22 

23 

2 4 

2 5 

26 

27 
28 

29 

3° 
3' 



New Year's Z>. >fJ7 26 
A 7J ? Cold, Vf 7 25 
717*5 fouth 8. 33 ~:7 24 

D 2 Sund.pafl Chrijl. ZZ 7 
2I rain and fleet, 
3 Epiphany 
4 1 or fnow. 

61 now more 

7 : A1[0 fnow. 
D 1 Sund. aft. Epipb. 

2 D with 1? 

3 Al£ ? rain, 
4I bluftering winter 

5 * T? 6* 



24 
K 7 23 
X7 23 

*7 

|vh 
|nr '7 2i 

8 17 20 



like weather. 
7*5 fouth 7, 45 
D 2 Sund. aft Epipb. 
2 J) with % 



8 7 

n ,7 

"i7 
23 17 

£5'7 

*IJ7 
R7 
«. 7 

"k;7 

"£|7 

^'7 
"|J7 



moderate for a 
4 while, 
e, then grows 

6 coid again. 
7.7 *s fouth at 7 1TL7 
D\Con<ver. St. Paul $ 7 

2 £ I? D now £ 7 

3 more cold jvf 7 

4 A T? ? and fnow >^-j7 
5 ; D with ? j^lj 

v.Ciia. T. decol. Izzh 
7JDays incr.43 m. 'KJ7 



22 
22 



7 
6 

6 

4 
4 
3 

2 
I 

O 

o 

9 

8 

7 
6 

5 

4 

3 
2 



Dfcts. ( J great Talker 

8 32, »*i/rr iv ants 

9 20' Enemies, the 
IO 9 Afo» of ferfe 
10 56' ^^Ar //■///«» 
morn.JFirft Qu. 7 day 
12 58 ( 9 morning. 

1 4 8 and hears mu cb . 
238 When a 

3 36 Family rifes 

4 30 *tfr/y r'/z « 

5 34 mornings 
The Full© 14 day, 

Moon 8 afternoon, 
rifes. conclude the 
624 houfe to be well 

7 9 governed ; 
756' y*r be <vjho 

8 40! ^W^ not get up 

9 46; early, 
10 
I I IC 

morn 

1 28 

2 20 

3 20 

4 41 
The 

Moot 

fets. 

I 6 28 



8|0in^ 19 day, 
Days 9b. 38m 
La# Qu.22 da. 
10 aftern. 
never does a 
good Day 's 
tvork. 

New 5 29 day, 
n at night. 
O eclipfed, fo 
invisible. 



2 Mo. February, hath xxviii Days. 



How frail, how blind, how ignorant is Man i 
And yet bow ftrong, hew wife, how proud appears! 
His his a Span ; fo imall the distance from 
His irlt to lad; his cradle to his grave. 
Difeaies numerous await his pafs ; 
Nor can he fhun, in this ftrait path to life, 
The numerous ills thick-fpread throughout the whole. 



A W Remarkable Days t \\si 



D 



Afpefis &c Weather 



4 
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6 

7 

8 

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9, 

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2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

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20 
21 
22 



23 

24 
2 5 

26 

27 

28 



4 Sun. faft Epiph 
zPurif. P. Mary. 
5J7*i iouth 6 1 2 
4I Now mere 
5 & with 6* 

MO? * 6* O 
7 D wi n IP? raia 
D 5 Sun. pafi Epipb, 

1 and like ior 

3 Scow, then grow 

4* S ? 
57** fet 1 12 
6| warm and 

"{Valentine. 
D Septuagefma* 

2 D wiihlf. 

4' pleaiant weathe. 

5 fer a time 

6 variable, 

7 a h ? fnow) 
D Sexagejima. 

2 weather, 

3iSt. Matthias. 

4 7*s fet 1 2 20 

5 § 1| ? mild ano 

6 pieaiant to the 

7 8UD End. 



PI 




5 



R.&S 



Lunations, 



712 >^ Diamond 
$ I o ow/A Flaws is 
9 lOlpref erred to a 

10 I2k0//wa» Stone, 

11 14 ^a/ ta/£ »0/?*. 
Morn. Firit Quar. 5 

1 28 day 3 after ft. 

2 26 Wicked Men 

3 24 are feared 
412 more than 

5 8 Heaien, 

The Fuii©i3day, 
Moon 3 afternoon, 
rifes. Were you to 

6 2.& pafs the Sea on 

7 22 a bladder, beiv 

8 20 careful ivould 

9 16 ©inKiS day 

10 1 4 Days 10 hours 

11 10 42 minutes, 
vlorn. Lait Quar. 21 

1 28 day 2 afiern. 

2 26 >0« i* /* pre- 
ferve it from 
the prick of a 
needle. 



3 '8 

4 8 
4 54 



5 20 New ]) 28da. 



6 8; near noon. 



3 Mo. March, hath xxxi Days. 



Where is the honeft, where's th' ingenuous man, 
Who fquares his actions by the golden rule, 
Whofe heart is free from ev'ry paltry bribe ; 
Er'ry oppreflive means of gain defpife, 
And makes his fellaw creatures caie his own ? 
" The world's all face, the man who (hews his heart 
u Is whooted for his nudities, and fcorn'd." 



i 

2 

4 

5 

6 

7 
8 

9 

to 

H 

12 

'3 
H 
l S 
16 

'7 

18 

! 9 

20 
21 
22 

2 3 
2 4 
2 ? 

26 

2 7 
28 

2 9 
3o 

3i 



D 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
D 



St. Davjb. 
D with J 
Shrove -Tuesday. 
Afi-Wednefday. 
6 O g high 
D with ^ winds, 
8 OV- cold 
i S«». fa Lent. 
8 ? with 

3 7 *a fet 1 1 26 

4 fleet or 

5 fnow, and 

6 uncomfortable 

7 D with If. weather 
D 2 «Sh*. /» £*»/. 

2 more rain anc 

3 $/. Patrick. 

4 * T? ? cold, 

5 7 *s fet at 1 1 

6| 8 h D March - 
7j * h $ like. 
DI3 Stf». in Lent. 



X 

« 10 
n'n 



D Tets |ff 

7 226 

8 126 

9 2 6 
46 

^6 



X 



2 windy and 

3 wet - 

4 4nnun. V. Mary. 

5 but now grow 

6 mild and 

7 pleafanf. 
D;4 Sun. in Lent. 

2 ;])with$&? rj fcts 
3'Days incr. 3b. 20 !t Y" 7 2 



n Morn. 6 

°6 

48 6 
36,6 
2 46 
I2 6 



25 
2d 

a 



1 
1 
2 

3 
4 
5 c 

The 

i%;Moor> 
rifes. 

6 40 

7 3 2 

8 26 

9 20 

10 22 

11 30 
Morn. 

1 3 2 

2 20 

3 l6 

4 4 
The 

jVToo r 



"I 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

5 
5 
5 
$ 
5 
« 

5 
5 

5 

3 



£S. The Man who 
26 6 £*/£ never 
256 been fick, doth 
2 7, & not inoiv the 
22 6J ftf/»* */* 

20 & health. 
19 6| Firft Quar. 7 
1 9 6 day 4 morn. 
17 6J Ignorant 

I 5 6 P eo pfo c* n ft 
1 4 6 "^""J /*«^J"» 
5 while the <uif- 
5 */? can' 1 1 fee all 

5 /£«> 001; zr. 

6 Full© 1 5 day 



12 

9 
8 



7 
6 



S 

4 

2 

o 

59 
58 
*6 



9 morn. 
Miches way 
6 a dpr* /£* houfe, 
61 £#/ virtue 
6 0inT 2oday 
Then Spring 
Quart, begins, 
makes days & 
£r ^'nights equal. 
54 ^Laft Quar. 23 



7i 



53 
5 2 
5i 
49 
48 

47 



day 2 morn. 
tfzr/y adorns a 

7 New D 29 da. 



6 Afteraooi, 



s - 



4 Mo. April, hath xxx Days, 



See ! Father 'gairsft his Ton, and, in his turn, 
The (on againd his father; and the brother, 
By in'crefl blinded, drives to eheat his brother. 
Not only focial bonds, the ilronger tie 
Of relative affection, is diffolv'd ; 
The torrent of mere mercenary thoughts 
Have drowned love; have fympathy reprefs'd. 



i 

2 
3 

4 
5 

6 

7 
8 

9 

10 

i i 

12 



4ArRiLFooLsDay 

5 <5 ? 2 Begins 

6 D with ^ cold 

7\6 ? 3 ' 
D5 Sunday in Lent. 
for forne 
7*s fets 953 
days, 
but Toon 
changes to 



5 
6 



7 
D 

2 
3 



i8| 

■"9: 

20 

21 

.22' 



Palm Sunday. 
moderate 
and like 

4 < for a warm 

5 Eafler. 
7! 6 Good Friday. 

6 t? a* uns 

DJE ASTER-DAY. 

2 ! 7*s fer at 9 

3 more mild 

4 6 h 6* weather 
St. George^ 

this Week, 
t. 'Mark. 
1 Sund. poji Eafier 
D with £ 

but cold 2t the 
6 h ? End. 
Stripping rain. 



23 


J 


24 


6 


2C 


7 


z6 


D 


27 


2 


28 


1 


29 


4 


3* 


1 



.*v 



^ Afo« and 
a Woman 
that can be 
together 

O 

alone, and 
yet frefer<ve 
FirftQu.jjday 
ioartern. 
chafiitjy can 

3 34! ^r^ai »0 

A 6; /«W. 

4 38 A Man newer 
The 1 0/^*J a book 



r ! Moon|FulJ 
t\ rifes. 



7 5 



i4day 
morn. 

^O'lvithout reap' 
zoning feme ad- 
iQfvantage from 

2 in b aoda. 
Days 13 hou. 

17 min. 
Laft Qua. 21 
it morn. 
He it happy 
nvho under - 
jlands hii hap 
\pinefs. 

New >28day 
3 morn. 



a ay 



5 Mo. May, hath xxxi Lays, 



Vain man, purfuing riches, fame, or power, 
Forgets the bufinefs which demands difpatch. 
The mod momentous bufinefs of his life 
On which unfading glory does depend, 
Drops in his thoughts. He hunts illufive joys, 
Till, or affliction's fchool, the death -bed lhews 
His fatal error, by th' approach of death. 



7 
8 
o 
c 
1 1 

12 

"3 

14 

»5 

16 

i7 
18 

'9 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

26 

27 

zS 

20 

3° 



/ 
D 



Philip and 'James. 

This month 
2 Sun. fajl E after 

# 6* £ begin- 
pleafant 

4 7*s fet 8 4 

5! but not fc 

6 DwithU 

7 warm as might 
D 3 Sun. faji Eajler. 

2 be expected, 
now like 

for fhowers 
and 
§ T? 5 fomf 

thunder gufts. 
4 5«». petft E after. 
fine pieafau 
and growing 
wtather 

* 6* $ r»in 
and moderate 

weather, 
Rogation Sunday. 
D with ? 

3 windy and clouds 
4JAV8 <$ * ? 
V Afcenfton Day. 
olK. Char. II. reft. 
7\ J) with 6* 2r.H 2 

D|6 Saa. /«/ E after. 



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4 

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6 

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6 

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3 
2 

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58 8 

57 8 
56 8 

55 8 
54 8 
53 8 

52 8 
50 8 



1 1 14 
n ci 
Mcrn 

12 5; 



I 

I 
2 
2 
2 

3 
3 



1 



4 ( 
1 

22 

44 
11 

36 



The 
V?oor« 
rifes. 

9 39 



•^ paffion in- 
nulgd is a kind 
n fdrunkennrfs t 
Ftrfl Q-^da 
5 afternoon, 
tf*?**' a pajjiot. 
xve do not ge. 
rid of y is like 
a moth that 
flies round a 
candle. 

Full® I3day, 
4 afternoon. 
dd<verjity is a 

medicine that 



5 1 810 3 4 Qfi* Charlotte 



4- 5 ■ v 
4 49 8 


4 49 8 


4 48 8 


4 47 8 


4 46 8 


4 46 8 


4 45 8 


4 44 8 


4 43 8 


4 43 8 


4 42 8 


4 4i 8 


t 40 8 


I 39 8 
li 39 8 



/ 
10 



II 

1 1 56 
Morn. 

12 4 
1 
1 
2 
z 40 

3 I2 

7 he 

Vfo. ■ 
fets. 

9 3 8 
1 o 24 

to 59 



2 born !6*day, 

1744. 
often cures 
many difeafes 
LaflQjzo 
^qj 5 afterrenn 
"io© in n2iday 
Days 1 4h 1 4m 
avd fecures 
the he a ih 
N*w J) 27^a> 
2 sfcernr on. 
of him that 
take* it. 



R 



6 Mo. June, bath xxx Days. 



The cup of pleafure's mingled with the gal! 
Of disappointment; pain and paie cifesfe 
Of ev'ry rank and age, degree in Jife, 
None here exempt, the Wormwood** dealt to all. 
The lite of man is like a nat'ral day ; 
The fun of happinefs is often hid 
Behind a cloud of vapours from the earth. 






i 

2 

3 

5 
6 

8 
9 

10 

I ii 

i? 

«3 

M 

l 5 

16 

17 
18 

*9 
20 

21 

22 

2 3 
24 

25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 



Fine pleafantift 
growing weather ta 
*%$ buttrj^. 

) with # and If. rrjj 
a O % cool for nji 

the feafon, 
THHSUPiDAT. 

growing 
weather, 

fmall rains 
?/. Barnabas. 

nil? 

breezes 
D Trinity Sunday, 



2 

3 

$ 

6 

7 
D 

2 

3 
4 
5 



2 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
D 

2 

3 
o 

5 



6 O h clouds 

and thunder 

gufts by 

6 h $ 

6 O ? 

thefe afpecls. 
I Sun. pa/* Trinity. 
hot weather 
this week, 
>t. John Baptift. 
P with J? 
6; T) with §f 
7 D with $ miid 
J) 2 Sun fad Trinity 



3 St. PETER. 
2' and moderate. 



"I 
"1 

*!4 

>f 4 

4 

,4 

4 

4 

4 
4 
4 
4 

4 

4 



X 
T 

T 

« 

rc 

H 

n 



ctt; 



39 
38 
38 
38 
37 
37 

37 
36 

36 

56 

35 
35 
35 
34 
34 
33 
33 
3 2 
3 2 
3 2 
3 Z 
3 2 
3 2 
3 2 
3 2 
33 
33 
33 
34 



8 



8 



1 1 

11 



27 



5° 
Morn. 

2 5 

45 
10 

38 
6 

42 
8 



12 

12 

1 

1 

2 

2 



George III. 
K.ofG.B.&c. 
born 4th day, 

1738. 
'-aft Qu. 4 day 

1 1 morning. 
To dig tow- 
ards the Ea/f > 
to fill up a hole 

n tbeWefiy is 



The ufelefs trouble. 



Moon 
rifes. 

9 5* 

3° 
o 



10 
1 1 
1 1 
1 1 



29 

54 
Morn. 

38 
10 



12 
1 



36 



1 
2 

3 c 
The 
S] v4oon 

fets. 
9 23 



4 
^4 

SLU 

% 

^4 34 8jlO lytbtjirt* 



8 



FullQ 1 2 day, 

3 morning. 

^ £0fl</ ivork 

jlourijbesi 

tvery thing 

elf 1 pcrijhes. 

UftQ^. i8d, 

1 1 afternoon. 

^in252oday 

Then fummer 

'^uart. begins 

and makes the 

ongeft day. 

New) 26 day 

2 morning. 

Tojuftify 
yourjtlf to an 
anvry man, it 



9 5 l !'* r *w'»| oil upon 



7 Mo. July, hath xxxi Days. 

Remember life's a fcene prolationacc, 
Afflictions various do await us here; 
The alternates of health, di.leafe and pain, 
Viciffirudes of day, of night, of heat, 
Of cold, of Cummer, winter ; alternates 
Fill up our time, uncertain too, what in 
Th' approaching moment — life or fudden death ! 



i. 4 

3! t 



4 
5 

6 

/ 
8 

9 
10 

1 1 

1 1 

! 3 

"5 

16 

! 7 
i3 

"9 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24J 

2 5 
26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31! 



7 
D 

z 

2 

2 

5 
6 

7 
D 



"1 4 37 

^4 37 



b 



4 

5 

6 

m 

1 
D 

2 

3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
D 

2 

3 
4 
5 



The month ;«#4 3S 
Dwithi; j^4 Si- 
begins moderate — 4 35 
and cool. j^=4 36 

3 Sun.fall7rinitj.^\ 36 

# b ? rain "I4 36 

and wind 
and like for 
thunder 

this week. 

4 Sa». fa/? Trinity. 

more warm 
and fultry 
weather, 
perhaps 
fome 
rain 

5 Sun. pa/l Trinity. 
or thunder, 

7*s rife at 12. 
D with J? 
£)og Z>ayj begin, 
St. James. 

* T? $ roore&Lj. 50 

6 Sun.paft Trinity. Si ± r 1 
D with ^ warm Ji 4 52 
D with 5 rain and, WR 4 53 
D withlf.and $ 1^4 54 
6 'U ? then hot.:sG=4 55 
7*s rife 1 1 22. ^4 56 



8lO 301 Our works 



810 5 V alone nxill fol- 

811 1 zioiv us, we can 
8fi 1 38FirftQu 4 day 



8Morn. 
812 37 



X 

b 

n !4 

^2 
7 H 



38 

38 

39 

39 
40 

40 

4 1 

42 

43 

44 

45 

45 
46 

47 
48 

49 



2 



1 

2 

2 3& 
The 
Moon 
riles. 

8 53 

9 22 

9 5° 

810 15 

8J10 40 

811 14 
8*n 4; 
S'Morn 



4 morning. 
carry off no- 
thing etfe. 
IV bat you bate 
nyourjuperi- 
iriydonet treat 
Full 9 1 1 day, 

at neon, 
and eclipfed. 
your injeriors 
<witb. 

Revelling, 

great buila* 

LaltQ^i8day 

4 morning. 

ingiy la<w- 



1 
2 



vain 



20 futtSi 
\&curioftties and 

3 o£$in£l 23day 

Daysi4h22ai 

New") 25 day 

2 afternoon. 

O eclipfed j 

vihbSe. 



The 

Moon 

fets. 

8 10 

8 33 

8 53 

9 ,2 

1 



idlenejs, art 
alt mortal dif- 



9 3 *!'*>' 






•**>?• 



8 Mo. August, hath xxxi Days, 

Health, riches, fame and power, precarious goods, 
Mifus'd are evils ; prove our - 6 reateft curfe. 

Profperity ; this bieffing proves oar bane, 

If in its i'un-fhine wantonly we bafk. 
Then where's our fhelter? 'Tis humility, 
Humility, the proper dwelling-piece 
Of helplefs, blind, dependant, feeble man. 



1 1 7 Lammas Day. 
2iDy Sur.d. p Trinity 



while 
pleafant 



3| 2 , 

4j 3 

51 4 a h ? 

6j 5j and thea grows 
6\ hot, 

7j7*s rife io 51 
L> 8 Suud. p. Trin. 

fOiUS flyin2 



^bJ4 57 8|io 2j?irflQo. 2da- 
nx ! 4 58 8,10 34j 7 afternoon 



Moderate a jnx'4 59 8;ti 8 



a} ^ 




26 

2g 
2C 

3' 



then more 
warm and 
fultry, 
5 Saw*/. ^>. 7Vz>/. 
* J? 6* thundsr 

and rain, 
J) irital? 
cooler, and by 
thefe afpefh 
exps€t 
I O ^und. fa(i Trin 
t. Bartholomew . 

3 *© b 6 <? 3 
U » with g 6 © 5 



S 
6 

7 

D 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
D 



i 

^5 

Jtf>$ 

,- ^ 1 
A'V* C 

His 
5 
5 
> 



ihowcrs and 
variable weather,; X 

T 

« 

b 
n 

n 

07: 



o 71 1 58 

1 7 ; M0IR. 
'\ , 

2 7 I 36 

3 7 2 10 

4 7| The 

5 7 Vloon 

6 7 rifes 



25 
cm 



a 



7 

8 

9 
o 

1 

2 

3 

4 7 



7 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7i 



#* Ma/ 

regards not 

/mall things 

will never 

gain a great 

deal. 

FuJ % 9 day, 

7 afecrnoon. 

7 47I // is a happy 

8 1 3 talent to deter- 

8 ^^rnine lavo-fuits 

9 I fright, but a 
9 c 2 much happier 

9 Szji^Qi 3 - l6d - 



y to 31111 morning. 



ii iS 



Morn. 



•* J? £ very 
J) with ? change, 
able weather, 
Dji 1 Sund. pad Trin 
2] clears up cool. 



to prevent 
.mviu. their ever 
6 7 1 14, £«'»£ under- 
- j\ 2 1 4| taken. 
973 l8 0ini^ 23 da. 
£l!5 20 7 4 io ; Jay l 3h.2om. 

m 
*i 



5 21 7; The 



5 22 7 

5 23 7 

5 24 7 

5 25 7 

5 26 7 

5 27 7 

5 2 9 7 



Moon 
fets. 

.7 21 



Wew) 24 day 
7 morning. 

another mans 

7 A^b'-eadyjubmits 

8 38J himftifto 

9 46 blozvs. 



9 Mo. September, hath xxx Dap. 

" Time here's uncertain, tranfitory, fhort j 
11 This lower world is but a jail at bell, — 
" Contracted, dark; a drecry vale of tears. 
" The man who lives to anfwer life'* great end, 
«' Loves God, his nei?hbtur, and fulfils the Law, 
11 Exults o'er death, ard triumphs in the hcur 
11 Oi nature's diflolutioa. 



I 


yDog Days end. 


* 


J 3 2 7 


10 37 FirflQu.iday, 


2 


4 


moaeritely 


* 


5 33 7 


1 1 36 


8 morning. 


3 


5 


warm, 


b 


; 34 7 


Morn. 


// is a 


A 


t 


7*i rife g 15 


>r 


> 3? 7 


* 54 


precious thing 


5 


7 


cloud* . 

4 * 




5 3^ 7 


3 16 


to have 


6 


D 


1 2 Sum. p. Trinit). 


<wv 


5 37 7 


4 12 


a good 


7 


2 


* ?• S (5 O 6* 


K 


5 33 7 


The 


neighbour. 


o 


« 

3 


thefe aipects 


X 


5 39 7 


Moor. 


Full ©8 day, 


9 


^denote feme rain, 


V 


5 4° 7 


rifes. 


3 morning. 


c 


5 


clouds 


Y 


J 4^ 7 


7 20 Ruin follows* 


I 





and wind, 


b 


J 43 7 


758 £tf /'* 'L'fry z?£ jr 


2 


1 


then 


b 


> 44 7 


8 35 and mi/try is 


i 


D13 Sun. p. Trinity. 


ri 


5 45 7 


9 24 .LafiCVi.*. day 


4 


2 * T? $ mild 


u 


5 4 £ 7 


to 15 


9 after noor.. 


S 


3 D with T? and 


2c 


5 4S 7 


1 1 19 


at the tail of 


6 


4' A ]? ? pleafant 


25 


5 5° 7 


Morn . 


good fortune : 


7 


5 


weather 


25 


5 5i 7 


I 2 c or from gjed 


8 


6 


all this 


a 


; 52 7 2 26 


• > 
to evil, is not 


9 


*7 
/ 


week, 


ill 


5 54 'J 3 24 
J 55 7 4 5° 


the breadth 





D 


l^Sun. p. trinity . 


»s 


of a fix- 


:< 


2 


St. Matthew. j*$ 


>- 57 7 T6e 


New) 22 day 


•z 





1) with df 


9 58 7 Moor. 


jo aiicrr.oon. 


'j 


4 


D with % 


;£V 


; 59 7 few. 


(£in^h 22day 


-4 


5 


7*3 rife a: 8, 


./v 


6 6' 6 25 


Then autumn 


•5 


6 


£cod weather, 


in 


6 1 6 ( 6 53 


quarter begins 


s6 


7 


rf O U D wich ? 


rr L 


6 2 6' 7 22 


& makes days 


-7 


D 


I 5 Sun. p. Trinity. 


m 


6 4 6| 8 c 
6 5 6| 8 38 


a; nights equal 


58 


2 


D b rain 


* 


pence. 


'', 


3 


St. Michael. 


/ 


5 7 6] 9 3. 


: irf:Q^30 day 


> c < 


4 


iih% and co!d. YT 


5 8 65, 34 


7 afternton. 



V. 



io Mo. October, hath xxxi Days. 



The hone(!, virtuous man, hath nought to fear ; 
He bears about a heaven in kh foul, 
Who dares to meet his naked heart alonf, 
With hsr communes, without a iickly paJe, 
Nor feds his blood run trembling to its fource, 
And knows her teitimoay's on his fide — 
Confides in God— hath hope, nor feareth man. 



»| 5 
2 6 

3 
4 
5 



7 
D 

2 

3 
4 

5 



7 
8 

9 6 
io 7 

ii D 

12 

*3 

'*! 

itf 6 

*?; 7 

iS D 



The month 
begins cold 
and windy, 
1 6 Sun. p. Trinity. 
7*3 rife 7 20 h-c'6 14 6 
now very change-] h .6 *5 6 
6 O $ ab!ejvi6 16 6 

□ 1? <? weather,' cy> 5 18 6 



Vf|6 IO 610 48 When a moth 
XZ.6 11 6'Morn.j^w round a 



t 

"16 



12 6 

M 6 



with rain y 
and clouds y 
1 7 5a». ^, Trinity, n 
26 l|^ mild n 

3 D withT? !ss 

47*3 rife 6 42 j«g 
and pleafant ft 
weather this ft 
week. 1 ft 
iSp.Trin. Si. Luke vn^ 
19' 2' A ^ £ rain, ^ 

20 3! 2> with It 

21 4 1 3> with 6* 6 ? g 
21 5! cloudy, 
23 6 3) with $ and £ 
2^ 7 atd followed 
2 r L) 19 Sun. p. Trinity J jf 



19 6 

20 6 

21 6 

22 6 



2 32 

3 3 6 
The 

VJoon 

rifes. 

6 41 

7 21 

4 *4 
912 



6 2 3 6jn 17 
6 24 6|i 1 36 

6 25 6|Morn. 
6 26 612 52 

6 28 6j 1 46 
6 29 6 2 36 



in 



6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 



30 6 

31 6 

32 



6 



26 

2 7 

2S 

2^ 

?9 

30 
3* 



26 0? by coldly 
3 Iao h &h ?|icf 
a|3 t. Simon Sc Iude.Iw 
5 wind and 

61 • rain to 
7 the end. 



35 
6 36 



, 6: Moon 
34 6| fets. 

5; 6 

6: 6 44 



I 26! candle till its 
conjumedy 
a man of 
flecfure may 
Fell 9 7 day, 
at noon. 
heboid his 
oivn image. 
He av ho aims 
at being 'vir- 
tuous, is like 
LaftQ. i4day 
10 morning. 
one climbing 
up a fieep 
mountain ; 
but he ivho 
abandons 
New ) szday 
3 afternoon. 
©toR«3 day 
days? oh 44m. 
him/elf to 



3 3° 

4 26 

The 



3 



38 



6! 7 39 



6 

6 39 6; 8 36 



40 6^ 9 44 

41 6.10 52 
6 42 6' Morn. 
6 43 612 50 



vice, is like 
one going 

donxn a preci- 
pice. 

FirftQ^oda. 
4 morning. 



1 1 Mo. November, bath xxx Days. 

Would'it thou be happy here, hereafter too; 
Would'ft thou be wife, be rich, be full, be fife ? 
Unmoved hear the praife and fcorn of man ; 
Unmoved fee him nniie, or fee hin frown ; 
Nor praife nor obloquy ta!%e for thy rule 
Through life to lleer; within thou had a guide ; 
Thy confciencc ; lhc'a a faithful monitor. 



i 

2 

3 

5 

6 

7 
8 

9 
io 

1 1 

12 

13 

H 

! 5 

1 61 

'7 

18 

! 9 

20 
21 
22 

z 3 

*4 



26 

27 

28 
29 D 



3 
4 

i 



D20/».T. Ml Saints. 
2 moderate 

fair weather, 
wind 
Powder Plot. 

dark cold 
mifty weather, 
U:Z I 6"«W. ^ 7W*. 
2 5 with J? 
3; this conjunction 

4i 60"? 

5 denotes good 

6 to fomebody, 

(_•» . r »u _ _ o 



D 
2 

3 

4 

S 

6 

7 
D 

2 

3 

4 
5 



X 

8 
8 
n 
n 

25 
25 

a 

Si 

m 



7*3 fouth 12 8 
22 Zund.p. Trin. 

wind and '-£: 

])withl£ rain, & 

D with £ then ^ 

fair, jn| 

then wind and^ 

t 

t 
>r 



All S cold 

23 Sund. f. Trin. 
D with g 

frofty mornings 
fome fevere cold, 
pcrhnpi a 
little fnew, 
7*a foath 11, 14. 
£d<vent Sunday. 



ol 2i3t. Andrew. 



H 

X 



6 
6 
6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

£ 
II 

-> 
/ 

7 
/ 

7 
/ 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



466 
476 
486 
496 
516 

53 6 
546 

556 

57 6 
586 



1 30 

2 3I 

3 48 
The 

Moos 

rifes 



An old man 

without <vir- 

tue, and a 

poor man 

Full© 5 day, 

7 afternoon. 



6 i$\vji:&out indu- 



7 
8 



10 
>7 



/ry, an? 
'haraflers <we 



9 2oa#^/;/ /a have 



59610 19 f.o corre/jfon- 
oSll 23LaftQ w i3d. 



1 5 

2 5 
35 
45 
5 5 
85 
95 
05 

1 5 

2 5 

35 

45 
55 
65 
75 
75 



Morn. 3 morning. 

1 2 5 6-dence ivitb. 
Do not 
regale a 
man with 



1 46 

2 34 

3 24 

4 18 

5 12 
The 

Moon 

fets 

6 30 

7 31 

8 37 

9 47 
10 52 



fuccefs, 
New D 2 1 da. 
9 morning. 

d*n£ 22 d. 
Days 9h 30m 
ixben be 

himfelf has 



■u 



fl met 



ivitb a dif- 
11 58FiritQ^2Sd3. 

8 jjMcrnJ -2 r.orm'ng. 

9 51 1 58 a 1 -point men t. 



12 Mo. December hath xxxi Days. 



O thou Supreme, all- wife, Sufficient God— 
CssSe, unoriginate ! to contemplate 
The efFeSs of <u-ifdom, power, in Spheres above 
Th'&zure, wide, immmSurablc Space 
Of aether; or, the grand difpiay, beneath, 
Of power, and wifdoxn — feeble reafon bows 
In humble admiration— -tVb&ti$ man! 



zc 

" T 

*■ - 

23 

24 
2<" 

2 6 
2*7 
28 
2Q 

3^ 
3i 



3l 

4 
5 



The mcntr- 
begids moderate 
but don't laft 
long, before 
rain, fleet, 
DJ.2 Sun. in Advent. 
2} or Snow, 

g A \ % an- 

il variable 

3 * O If- wind} 
6 and cold, 

7,6 © $ weathf 
Dj3 $«». /« Advent. 
?: now more 
j D within 
r.| pleafant for the 
c | ! D with 6* Seafon. 
6 7*s South 9 48. 
7J 3) with g 
D 4 $»#• £« Advent. 
2 St. Thomas. 

as well as- dark 
rain or Snow 
CHRIST born. 

St. Stephen. 
St. John. 

[Innocents 



»7 



2C 5) 

20 ci 



2 2 3| Very few 

3 A& die cf hunger, 
b ;7 21 5J 5 o-^»/ thousands 

n 
n 



22 

2 3 



5 



D 

2 



al7*s South Q. 
31* 



V 



ram or 

Snow, 



3;7 

a? 
a7 

»K;7 

nRJ7 

4 

"17 

"17 
"17 

7 
7 



2 4 
2 4 
2 4 
2 5 



2 5 

2* 5 
26 5 
26 5 

26 5 

2 7 5 



nfcs.l 7 morning. 
6 8' yet nve fear 

|/£tf fl»£. /2»*/ 



Morn 



1 
2 

3 
4 

5 



5° 

5° 

5° 



t 



e 



27 5 The 

27 
28 

28 5 
28 5 



21 

21 5| The ] of overeating, 

22 5.MoonjFu!'0 5 day, 
5 



~J7 
7 



X 
X 



7 



V7 

T|7 

<Y\7 

8 7 



7 551 

855 difregard the 

958 other. 

10 5 8LaftQ^i2day 

11 58 2 afternoon. 

/fop the mouths 
of fanderersy 
is never to 
refent their 
ufage. 

New D 20 cay 
Moon 10 afternoon. I 
Sits. '<s)injjf2i day 

6 iq! The winter 

7 2 9 quarter begins 
28 5! 8 37J and makes 
28 5I 9 49! fhorteft day 
28 5;io c6;9hours 9 min. 
28 c 1 1 58.FirflQ 27<3ay 
27 c.Morn. 10 afternoon. 
27 51 1 17 To Jorget a 
27 5| 2 $i*wrong t is the 
27 5! 3 tfibejl revenge. 



Of ECLIPSES. 

THREE Times will the Luminaries of Heaven 
be deprived of their Light, by being eclipfed 
this Year.— -Twice the Sun, and once the Moon. 

The Firft is an Eclipfe of the Sun, on Friday 
the 29th of January, at 45 Min. paft 10 o' Clock 
in the Evening, confequently not to be feen in our 
Hemifphc-e, but will probably be vifible in the 
Land of Tea and China-ware. 

The Second is of the Moon, on Saturday the 
nth of July, 52 Minutes paft 10 o'Clock in the 
Forenoon, ami can only be feen in the fame Hemif- 
phere as the other. 

The Third is an Eclipfe of the Sun, on Sa- 
turday the 25th of July, beginning at 8 Minutes 
paft 1 o'Clock in the Afternooa :— The Middle of 
the Eclipfe will be at 30 Minutes paft 2 o'Clock, 

aad will be four Digits eclipfed. It ends at 22 

Minutes paft 3 o'Clock. The whole Duration, 2 
Hours and 14 Minutes; and will be vifible if the 
Air be clear. 

Of COURT S. 

y\70 TV, gentle Reader, if you deal in Laws, 
•*■ * And have a good Defire to gain your Caufe, 
Be fure, whatever elfe you do befide, 
A right good Store sf Money to provide 
To fee your Lawyer well, whene'er he calls, 
Or elfe you may be fure your In tr eft falls; 
For if you've Money plenty, never fear 
But Friends enough will in your Caufe appear ; 
Vet beware of Law, if you'd have Flea fure, 
tVith Eafe yon may get in, come out at Leijure ; 
For where a Suit is travers'd, Utile's won, 
And he that conquers, often is undone. 

In Short, 
Law-Suits are like great Fires, once kindled are hard 
to be exlinguijhed. 



Supreme Courts in NEW- YORK are held % 

AT the City of New-York, the 3d Tuefday in April, 
hit in July, and 3d in Gdoberand January. 
At Richmond, the 2d Tuefday in April. 
At Orange, the ill Tuefday in June. 
At Dutchefs, the 2d Tuefday in June. 
In Ul&er, the 3d Tuefdsy in Junr. 
At Albany, the 4th Tuefday in June. 
At Queen's Couaiy, the ift Tuefday in September. 
At Suffolk C&fenty, the 2d Tuefday in September. 
At King's County, the 3d Tuefday ift September. 
At Weft-Chefter, the 4th Tosfday in September. 

Tbtfe are only tbe 'Times fsrrr.erly afpsintei for btlding the Cirtutt 
Courts in the Jevtral Couniltt j of late Tears the Times are apf tinted 
by the Judges, at the Supreme Court at tbe City tf New-York, gene- 
rally near tbe limes above mentione d, 

"Courts cf SejfionTand Common Pleas. 

IN the City of New-York, the ift Tuefday in May, 
Auguft, November and February. 

At Albany, the iftT&ffoays in June and October, and 
3d Tuefday in January. 

At Weft- Chefter, the 4th Tuefday in May and Oaober. 

At Ulftei County, the ift Tuefday in May, and 3d in 
September. 

At Richmond County, the ift Tuefday in May, and laft 
Tuefday in September. 

At King's County, the 3d Tuefday in April and October. 

At Queen's County, the 3d Tuefday in May and Sep- 
tember. 

At Suffolk, the laft Tuefday in March, and ift in October. 

At Orange County, the laft Tueday in April and October. 

At Dutchefs County, the 3d Tuefday in May and October. 

Supreme Courts in NEW- JERSEY are held, 

AT the City of Perth- Am boy, the fecond Tuefday 
in Apri', and<tv!rtl Tuefday in September. 
At Burlington, the fecond Tuefday in May, and iirft 

Tuafday in November. 

Circuit Courts, or Courts for Trials of Caufes in tbe 

feverai Counties, brought to /flue in the Supreme Court, 

are held at Times a* t printed by the Judges ; thoje for 

the Wejlern Di*u:f. on generally in the Spring, and thsfe 

for the Eaftern Divifon in the Fall of the Tear. 



Courts of QtiArter SeJJlons y and County Courts 

Jo.- Picas, in New-Jerfey, are held, 

IN Bergen Count/, the ift Tuef. in January and April, 
the 2d Tuefd. in June, and id Tuef. in O&ober. 
in BlTti, the f:cond Tuefdays in January and May, the 

third Tuefday in June, and the fourth in September. 
In Middlefex, the third Tuefdays in January, April, 

and July, and fecond Tuesday in Odiober, 
In Som srfet, the firft Tuefdays in October, January and 

Ap;i', and tne fecond in June. 
In Monmouth, the fourth Tuefdays in January, April, 

and July, and the third in Odtober. 
In Hunterdon, the firft Tuefdays inFebruary and Auguft, 

the third Tucliay in May, and fourth in O&obcr. 
In Burl'rgton, the fecona Tuefdays in February, full in 

May, laft in July, and f^ond in November. 
In Gloucefter, the 2J Ttvc'day in June, fourth Tuefday 

in September, and fourth in December and March. 
In Salem, the full Tuefd. in June, fourth in November, 

and third Tuefdays in February and Auguft. 
In Cape May, the third Tuefday in May, fourth Tuef. 

in (Jdlob^r, and firft Tuefdays in Auguit and February. 
In Morris County, the fecond Tuefday in March, the 

firft Tuefday in July, the fourth Tuefday in Septem- 
ber, and the third Tuefday in December, 

Superior Courts in Connecticut are held. 

AT Hartford, the firft Tuef. in March, and the firft 
Tuef. in September. At N. London, the fourth 
I'uef. in September, At New-Haven, the laft Tuef. in 
Feb. and Auguft. At Windham, the 3d Tuef. in March, 
and September. At Norwich, the laft Tuef. in March. 
At Fairfield, the 3d Tuef. in Feb. and Auguft. At 
Litchfield the fecond in Auguft. 

Inf:ri»r Courts art held, 

AT Kartford, the il Tuefday in November, and 2 in April. 
At New-Haven, the 2d Tuefday in November, and ift in 
April. At Fairfield, the 3d Tuefday in November and April. At 
Windham, the 4th Tuefdzy in June, and 2d in December. At 
Litchfield, the 4th Tueiday in September and April. At New- 
London, the 2d Tuefday in [one. At Norwich, the laft Tuefday 

in November, annually. [Bejidri tvbicb, there art in all tbe Ccun- 

iti, A'ourned Courts once a Tear. There are a' jo frequently hi. 
icurn'd Superior CcuTts, tvboje Timet cffiuir.g are ai.egt'bii m certain. I 
. «» »— <+ •• ■ ■ * ' 



^r* 




A' 



St'trevie Courts in Pennfylvania, are held, I 

T Philadelphia, the tenth Day of April, and the * 
twenty -fourth Day of September. 

Ccurts of Quarter SeJJions, are held, 
T Philadelphia, the id Monday in March, June, 
September and December. At Newtown, for 
Sucks County, on the i ith Day following (inclufive) in 
every of the Months aforefaid. At Chetier, the laft 
Tuefday in May, Auguft, November and February. 
At Lancafter, the ill Tuefday in each. At York, the 
laft Tuefday id April, July, October and January. At 
Cumberland, the Tueidays proceeding York Courts. 
At Reading, for Berks County, the Tuefd. next after 
Laucsfier County. At Kafton, for Northampton Coun. 
the Tuefd, next after Bucks County. 

Courts cf Common Pleas, are held, 

AT Philadelphia, the ift Wednefday after the Quar- 
ter Stffions in Mfrch, June, Sept. and December. 
At Newtown, the 9th Diy following (inclufive) in every 1 
of the Months aforelaid. At Chefter, the laft Tuefday 
in May, Auguft, Novem. ard Feb. At Lancafier, the 
iftTueftl. in the Months aforefaid. At SuiTex, the 
1 ft, at Kent, the 2d, and at Newcaflie, the 3d Tuefday 
in the fame Months. 

Mayor s Courts in Philadelphia, are held, 

THE hrlt Tuefday in January, April, July, and the 
Jail Tuefday in October. 






i 



Q^A KERRS Genrral Meetings arc kept. 

AT Philadelphia, the 4th Sunday in March. At Chefter-River, 
the ad Sunday in April. At Duck-Creek, the 3d Sunday 
in April. At Salem, the 3d Sunday in May. At Weft-River on 
Whitfunday. At Little Egg- Harbour, the lft Sunday in June. At 
Fluthing, the laft Sunday in May, and kft in November. At Se- 
tacket, the lft Sunday in June. At Newtown (Long-Ifland) the 
laft Sunday in June. At Newport, the ad Friday in June. At 
Woodbridge (New-Jerfey) the third Sunday in Auguft. At Weft- 
bury, the laft Sunday in Auguft, and laft in February. At Phila- 
delphia, the 4th Sunday in September. At Nottingham, the ift 
Monday in October. At Cecil, the 3d Sunday in October. At 
I Chcptank, the 3d Saturday in October. At Little-Creek, the 2d 
Sunday in October. At Shrewfoury, the 4th Sunday in October. 
At Matinicock, the laft Sunday in October. At Wilmington, the 
next Sunday after Spring Meeting in Philadelphia. 



^ TIDE TABLE, &t. 




o 




S 




B 












_: 


; 5 bo 




O 

• — <* 

C9 


<3 


• 

J3 






H 

ST 

n 

** 


3 N 

cr^ 

• g. !*- 


8 K" 

-t I- . 








B 
2 


■ 


fer 

Vear. 


H 

2 


•— 3 «—• 




O 




/. J. i. 


/. 


j. */. 


* 




1 -« sr 




B 


I 


O24 


1 10 5 


o 

•1 


^ tjS 


- 3-3 




•v 


2O48 


3 


1 




■— • 3 ^ 

3 " 5 


t» n» ^ 
3 s» J? 






^ 3 7 
24° 9 4 


4 ii 3 
6 1 S 


?-: 


O 5» *< 

^« rt 


a 2 




*% 

* 


£50118 


7 1 


; 2 1 


o 

o 

* a 

m 

D. 

o 

i 

2 

3 
4 


1 2 S 

1 v. 




u 

> 

us 


6 14 
70 16 41 
8 18 81 


9 

10 1 

!2 


2 6 

[2 II 


H. M. 


3 4 


9 2 

9 5° 

10 38 

1 1 26 

12 14 


3 £ 3 

C K* 13 

On w .__ 




m 

m 
O 


91 1 01 

101 3 4 1 ; 5 
111 5816 


13 9 

4 2 

14 


1 

2 


i 8 .18 

2 16 36 


5 00 
10 


5 
6 

7 


1 2 

1 50 

5 


-H ^ £T 

j» 3 

to a. 


V 


U 

a 

0/ 


3 

ti4 

#5 


4 4 54 

5 12 73 
7 91 


15 


5 


8 
9 

10 

1 1 


3 26 

,4 14 

5 2 

S 5° 


6> ~ 

sf "0 Sf 

<* O 2 

■* 

en •» 




Be] 

«— 1 
O 

-a 


:s6 

"7 
8 

9 


S 8 o'ioo 

9 16 0127 

11 4 146 

12120 164 

1 _ 


10 
15 

9 
5 


12 


6 38 


-1 3 




h 


IO H O Itf2 


10 


'3 


7 8 


p» ** 
3 w 




< 


ir2I O 0273 


15 


14] 


3 14 


n- 






20:28 o ! 305 






Firft find how many Days Are part tho Fall or Change 
of the Moon; t>>cn find the Number in the firft 
Column of this Table, and againft it is the Hour 
and Minute of High-Water, at the Places above- 
mentioned. 



'The Tide and Time for r.one their Courfe delay t 
And Life like them for ever maflet auaay. 



A View cf the rffpc&i'vs £ga ef all the crowned Heads in Europe, 

with their isanitty 

GEORGE III. King of *?* Ciiarles Emanuel, Sardinia, 66 
' Great Britain, &c. 29 ££ Chrifti&n Vil. of Denmark, 21 
Clisiies Frederic King of %% Adalphus Frederick cf 

Prisma, C4. *£* Sweden, 

Lewis XV, in Francs, 57 *v< Catharine II. Emprefa of 

ejjj Ruffia, 37 

if ^ Emprefs Queen cf Hungary, 50 
D. Jofeph, King cf Portugal, 52 fit Clement XIV. Pope, 71 

D. Carlor, King of Spain, 51 *? 7 Ofman, the Grand Signior, 51 



57 



D. Ferdinand, King of the 
Two Sicilies, 




1 Ounce Trey of Geld (22 Car.) it worth 
Sterling - ' £• 3 : 17 



One Ounce Sterling of Silver, 



8A. 

6 



Dijlance of P laces from New- York, to Albany, and 
from Albany to Quebec in Canada. 



From Ntw-Yotk 
U> Kin^fhridge, 1 5 
tu Ctncklins 22 

to Cntont Rixtr 12 
to Pee 4* * Kill IO 

to Roger* t in the 

Highlands, 9 



to the F'fh Kit's 
to Pougb'neepjie 
to Staatfborcug 1 ) 
to Rynbak 
to Ry*r ScLermer~ 

borns 
f Living [lin t 



11 

11 

6 

IG 



Manor 14 

to CJ.ivarack 7 

to K: ne'er bock 14 

to Hi' f -way lloujt 10 
to Albany IO 

la all 157 Miiv. 



FKOM litany ito Crown Putt ftrt l$\to Le Prai<c 
to Saratoga 3 6' to For* Cbarr.hl'e, to Mor.fr ea I 

or St. Join's, at 
tki Baft Er.d of 



to F«rf Edward 
to La4* Cecrge 
to Tiiondtr9?* 



'4 
34 

44 



*5 

6 

to 7 roll Rivieres go 
to Quebec So 



L<j4« Cbamp.'ain, I2c| In all 434. Miles. 



/-ty? -fotfrf f ? Hartford aw^ Bofton. 



FROM New York to Windjer 
to N. Haven, ?7 ( to E»/eW 
to W ailing ftrd 1 3jto S^rm jfo'J 



to Durham 
to Middlttozvn 
to Wetbtrsfie.d 
to Hartford 



7. to Kinfflon 
6 to V^Tim 

1 1 to Erooifield 
3'to Spercer 

txf Mi'es. 'to Ltjttfttr 



c 
IC 
If 

< 

6 



: 



to V/erceftcr 
to Sbreivjbury 
;o Marlborough 
to Sudbury 
to W aiertvwn 
to Boftin 

In all 250 Miles, 



6 

5 
10 
11 
11 
10 



F 



2?Aft/; /r* w Philadelphia /<? Pittfburg. 

Rom Philadelphia to Z). of Cumberland 3 to CarliJJe 
to Sc'uyikiil 2 to F^i fyon 3 to Sbippenfburr 



to £/«* tfcr/e 

to Prince of Wales 

to Unicorn 

to Jf/ae £«// 

to Admiral Warren 3 to Bailey's 

to JPoir* ffer/i jjto Hughes's 

to Downing 1 1 7 to Sample's 



to Conafioga Creek 4 to i?. Chamber'' t 
to Lane after Court II. 2.to For/ Lcudon 
66 Mile*, (to For/ Littleton 
olto Junietta 



4 to o«/ 1 



to 7£<r ££»/> 
to Tiv Waggon 
to Mf/bri 
to Douglafs's 
to T4-* I/a/ 



2ito Sweetarra 

& to Taylor's 

6jto Harris's Ferry 



to liendrick's 
to Cbalmer's 



II 



3 
21 

11 

13 

18 

*9 
14 
'5 
15 



to Bedford 

to For* Ale*ana 

?o Stony-Creek 
Fa/? 5/V* lav. W. 12 
Fert-Ligonier 9 

to Pit'fburg. 54 

In all 320 Miles. 



/V*'/ Circuit Road on Long If and. 



From New-Ycrk 
to yautoica, 12 
Ca/>/. F/*/, en tfdJPf 



Hubbard' j, Soeetbb, ic 

Shelter- IJla. Ferry, 12 
Hogg- Neck, 4 



/??«</ Plainly 
Huntingtor. 
Bltndbury's, 
Satauket, 
Wading River, 
Rivr Hud, 



1 3 £«££ Harbour Ferry, $ 
15 E ail -11 amp tor, 7 

15 Soutb-Hamptcr., 1 4 
IO Homan's Tavern^ 16 

16 Smith's. 9 
Hi Dunbar* t, 9 



Avery's Tavern, 
Morris's, 
Udell's, 
Wafers' 1, 
H/mrftfd Town, 
yam vn, 
tieiu York, 



9 
6 

'7 

»3 

7 
ic 

12 



In all 251 Milts. 



ROADS Northeaftward. 



FRo.wN«w-York,'to 
to Kinvforidge I d 
to Eafi Cbtjler 
to New Rocbellt 
to Rye ' 
to Horfe Neck 
t8 Stanford 
to Nortualk 
to Fairfield 
to Stratford 
to Mfjfif^ 
to New -Haven 



4 

6jto 

4 ! to 
5, to 
6 to 
7 ;to 
10 



12 



to 



8 to 
4 to 



10 to 
87 Miles, 
to Br an ford 
to Guilford 
to Kiliingfworth 



to Ssytroek 
to Cbamplins 



ic 
12 

10 
10 



New -London 

147 Miles. 
Co/. William f $ 
Wefiirly 
EiWt 
Tewerbill 
Rhode-I/laud 

19S Mile 

Brifisl 

Warwick 

Previdence 

Atthbury 

Wrentbsm 

Deebam 

Bofion 



to 



I a 'to Salem 



27S 



8 

XI 

11 
10 

10 

12 
IC 

M 

IC 

10 

Milej. 



to Jpfivicb 14 

to Neivbsrry 1 1 

to Hampton 3 

to Portf mouth 19 
344 Miles* 



to York 

to Wells 
to Kevntbeck 
to Eiddeferd 
to Scarborough 

Falmouib 
CO Yarmouth 

Brunfzvick 

o Richmond 

Taconick Falls 
to Noridgeivalk 



4 

16 

6 

14 
7 

13 

10 

15 

16 

?! 



In all 5«8 Miles. 



ROADS Southweftward. 



FROM New Yoik'to Annapolis 30 

to Newark 9 239 Miles, 

to Elixa^ftb-Tcivn 6 to Mountpleefant 13 
to Wcodbridge 1 o\to Upper M*r,bro* 
iejio Pifcatatvay 
i7Jto For* Tobacco 

1 3 to Heft's Ferry 
to Mojs's Ferr-j 
to southern 's Ferry 18 
to Frazier^s F*rry 4S 
to Clayburn's Ferry S 

7 to Freneaus 12 

9 to Wiiliamfturp 16 

14 410 Miles. 



to Brutifzoick 
te Prince Ttw* 
to Trent§n 
to #r/,fo/ 
to Franiford 
to Philadelphia 

95 Miles. 
to Darby 
to Coe/er 
to Brandetoir.e 
to Neiocafce 
to Elk-River 



10 

5 



o 

16 
16 
16 

9 



to Nor: h- Eafi 
to Sufquihannah 9 
to Gunpoivdsr Fort 25 
to Petapfco Ferry 2« 



to £«7'i ^rry S 

to Bathtoivn 45 

to Newbern 3a 

600 Miles. 

to Wbittcck River 20 
to itosy R/tvef Firry 20 
to Capt~F ear River 45 
to Lockwoed's Fol. 1 «; 
to S ballet River S 

to T£* £ ^/? F»i 0/ 

Lo«g Zlify 22 

to The Weft End of 

Leng Bay 25 

to Winyaiv Firry 30 
to Santee Ferry 
to Se'ajte Ferry 
to Charles-Town 



12 

20 

3° 



In all 847 Miles. 



6,to Htg'Jfiand 
ijtoljliof White 

Court Houfe 1 8 

to Nanfemond 20 

to Bennetts Creek 3© 
to Eaenttn 30 

2V. 5. At alf thofe Places T^hieh are in Roman Characters above, 
there are Printing- QfKec-a. 

Diftance of Places from St. Laurence to Miflifippi. 

~ rt Frontensck 90I1O Furf Prefque-ijle 90 
to 27* F^r at Beuf 

River 15 

to Piufburg 120 

In all 121 5 Miles. 



FROM Louijbou*g\to Ft, 
to Quebec 3 60' to Of 



to STroj's Revtriet 
to Montreal 
to L« Galetfa 



toego 60 

2o to Niagara Falls 1 60 

go'.to y£ 5/are £?««/« 20 

120 to I/flie Fr/« 10 



By *n atl tf Parliament, tvb ch took Place tte lO'b tf Gcloher, 1765 ; 
the Rjtei tfijtb'njbed for tojtage of Letter 1 m Amcrui, a<t at ftilttut. 



Sterling 
Frcm New-Yoik, and ail other Poll- Offices | JS O 



1 Ami ica, t 



C4 



) " 



) 



4 d 

6< 



o 
Zr 



Sdn 



is 



it 6c 



Sj 11 4<J xi 



zd 4«1 

IS 2S 



6d 






3 s 



C 

c 
a 

r» 

n 

I»4d 

ftl 

2^8-' 

8d 
4» 



Any Sea Port in America by Water. 

Any Place by Land not abore 60 Miles, 

Above 60 to loo, -------. 

Aboye 100 to 200, -..--_. 

Above 2eo to 100 more, and for every fuch 
futher DiAance, 

London, ._,... 

Every Letter brought by a VefTsl to any -\ 
Pert where there it a Fcfl-Office, befidei > 
the PoAage above mentioned, 2d - - J 



No Vrflel permitted to break Bulk, or make Entry in any Port, 
where there is a Port- Office, till all Letters on board are delivered 
to the Port M*fter (he paying the bringer id f r eaih) [Except Let- 
ters fent by common known Carriers ot Go<d> by Carts, Waggons, 
or Pack Horfes, relating to the Goods they carry, to be delivered 
without Hire or Reward. And except Letters cf Merchants and 
Owners r't any VelTels of Merchandize, or any of ihe Cargo 
therein, whereof fuch Merchants or Matters are Owners, and de 
liver'd by them or their Subftrutes to the Perfons whom they a e 
directed, without Hiie or Reward, Advantage or Profit in ant wife j 
except alio any Letters fent by any private Friend in their Way of 
Journey or Travel, «r by any MeiTenger fent on Purpofie concerning 
any Private Affair. 

Provided nevcrthelefis, that thefe Exceptions fhall not authorize 
any Perfon tho' without any Hire or Reward, to receive, collect, or 
deliver any Letters, but fuch as come within the Delcription, and 
the true Intent and Meaning of the faid Exceptions. 

Except Letters brought by VefTels liable to Quarantine, whirh 'aft 
2re to be delivered to the Perfons fuperintending the Quarantine for 
proper Care, before, they are forwarded by the Port. A.l Perfons of- 
fending aga>nfl thefe Ails Forfeit, yf. 20, Sterling, 

Any Officer of the Ppft- Office fecreting er detiioying; any Letter, 
Bag or Ma'l of Letters, containing any Bank Note, Rill, or other Pa- 
per, Writing or Older for the Payment of Mone>, or ftealing out of 
any Letter, any fuch Bank Note, Bill, &c. on Conviction fhall fuf- 
fer Death as a Felon. 

Any Perfon robbing a Mail, in any Place or Manner whatfoever, 
litis* 1 it may not appear (hat any one was put in Tear thereby, fhall 
on Conviction fuffer Death as a Felon. 

N. B. The Narks tn Letters are rated in North 
America, thus Three-fence Stcrl. is One Penny. weight : 
or> a Penny Sterl. is 8 Grains of Plate. 



MISCELLANIES. 

THE plowman is of (mall reputation, and yet one of the moft 
necenary members in the common wealth. 

bo account of thy friend now, that thou always remember that it 
is poflible for him to be thine enemy. 

Every day is woife than other, and therefore he that is not (it to 
mend this day will be worle the next. ; 

It is an evil pleafure to delight in ufing another man's goods. 

Fie doth not foon come to ruin, which feareth it betore it ralleth. 

Like nothing that thou fhouldeft deny, and deny nothing that 
thou wmildcft like thy fclf. 

Whilft thou haft free liberty to do what thou wilt, thou mayeft 
eafily know what thou art. 

He that minds to give, muft not fay, will thou have any. 

Gocdnefr although it be trod under feet for a while, yet will it 
rife again in the end. 

U^briad no man with his mifcry, for fortune is common to all 
men, and thou knoweft not what chance may overtake thee before 
thy death. 

Some men the more they owe the more they hate, and if the debt 
be fmall, they will be fomewhat fhar.ge, and if it be great, they will 
be fwern enemrs to their creditors. 

He is unworthy to be a minifter ever others, which cannot mini- 
fter to htm (elf. 

He that hath once faifified his faith, wherewithal mall he 
prefe?ve himfelf any longer. 

The dog that barketh much, will bite but little, and the man 
that ufeth to make great promifes, will make but fmall performance 
in the end. 

Even they which do wrong themfelves, are loth to receive an in- 
jury from other »ien*s hands. 

Envy doth always accompany virtue. 

A good tonji ne is the beft member, and an ill tongue is the worft 
member that a man can have. 

Some men are wife in money matters, and ftark fools in every 
thing befides. 

Poor men are moft healthful, 2nd yet they ufe leaft phifick. 

If thou laciteit beauty, recempence it with good conditions, and 
fo thou /halt be moft beautiful of all. 

Ke that will thrive will begin to fpare in the firft year of his 
marriige. 

The memory of a benefit doth foon vanifh away, but the re- 
membrance of an injury Aicketh faft in the heart. 

This is a law that mould always be efiablifhed betwixt the giver 
and the receiver, that the one &ouI«i ftrsi^htway forget the benefit, 
and tbe other fhoald always have it remembrance. 

If thefe few words, (this is mine, and that is thine) were taken 
aways, all men (rnu'd live in peace. 

J Every man can foon efpy out a fiult, but few can, or leafc none 
will amend it. 



Memoirs of ibe Culture of SILK. 

A BOUT 2500 Years before Chri ft, the Emprefs Siling began 
/"\ the Culture of Silk in China, v»herc it was confined near zcoo 
YcArs, before it reached India and Peril*. 

A. D. 555. Thii Silk Culture fi.ft brought into Greece, par- 
ticularly Athens, Thebes and Corinth. 

1 1 30 Roger, King of Sicily, cfrabhfh-d it at Palermo and Calabria, 
by Workmen brought from Athena and Corinth, at the Time of 
the Cru fades. 

1 coo The Italians received it from Sicily, 

1600 It was eftablifhcd in France. 

1740 Began in America. The beft Levant Silk is brought from 
Shirvan, and the other Northern Provinces of Pcrfia, about the 
Cai'pian Sea, the fame Climate as thefe Provinces). In Italy, One 
Hundred Mulberry Trees, well grown, are worth iool. Sterling per 

Annum. That Part of the Imperial Revenue in C£na, paid in 

Silk, amounts to above • 55,coo»b. Troy, and perhaps this it not 
the twentieth Part of the Produce of that Empire. One Million 
of Trees difpofed into Mulberry Walks, in thefe Provinces, would 
in a few Years, enable a yearly Remittance to Great- Britain of a 
Million Sterling, and no Ways interfere with the other neccflary 
Branches of Labour in the Community. 

The Half-Joe changed. 

A Butcher in one of our Capital Cities, in his feeking for Cattle 
in the neighbouring Province, ufed frequently to put up at a 
certain Tavern, where the care of the Houfe fell upon a l.kcly hired 
Maid ; for whom the Butaher conceived an amorous Inclination : 
he tried various Means to inviegle her to his Wiflies, but found all 
his Efforts in Vain : About Three Years ago finding her £t her old 
Quarters, he tempted her with a Piece of Gold, well known by 
the Name of a Half Joe : the poor Girl was unable to refift the 
mining Bait, and contented to his Defires. The next Morning the 
Butcher going off early, enquired for the Mafter, and then asked 
him for the Change of bit Half Joe, which he had given the Maid 
the Night before for kirn to changs ; the Mafler aafweed he knew 
Nothing of it, but immediately called the Maid, who feeing greatly 
confufed at fuch a Qjeftion, and not chufing to own for what pur- 
pofe me had taken it, replied /he had forgot, and direclly returned 
it to the Butcher, who accordingly paid the Landlord, and went c it". 
About a Year ago the Butcher happen'd to travel that Way again, 
and being at the fame Tavern, he was not long feated before he found 
himfelf furrounded by the ConfHblc ?nd Overfecrs of the Poor, 
('the Girl in the Interval being brought to bed) who acquainted him 
thit a Burthen had been brought upon their Townfhip, thro* his 
Means, and he mull defray all Expences thereon before he departed. 
This alarmed the Butcher in his Turn; but f avoid further TroubU, 
be complied to pay all Charge*, and to give a good Treat into the 
Bargain, which amounted in the Whole to upwards of Forty Pounds. I 
—-To add a little to his Mortification, the young Woman made her | 

, , , ....... , - 



* 



Appearance amongft the Company, and with a farcafiick Smile, 
accoftcd him, with theie Words, I.bope, Sir, you have now gat the 
Change for your Half Joe. 

Some Directions in Hujbandry. 

GU T timber for laAing the Jafl. quarter of the moon in 
January. 

Cut wood for firing in the firft qu;rter of the moon. 

Kill beeves or fwine for faiting near the fuil moon. 

Geld cattle the Jaft quarter, to the change, the Moon in«y» £ or yf 

Shear fhcep, the moon increasing, foon after the change, unlets 
thofe whith lofs their wool much, and then 'tis beft decreasing. 

Gather apple?, pears Sec. near the fui ' moon, in dry weatker. 

Cut hedges between the change end fall, from January to May. 

Duog 'and, that weeds may not abound, in the iaft quarter. 

Graft andjiplant trees juft after the new moon. 

Cut hair to make it grow in the increafe of the moon. 

Gather flaweis or feces fuch. as ycu mean to keep ail the year, at 
the fall moon. 



RATES of the Stage* from New York to Philadelphia. 

THE Boat fets out from the Whitehall Slip in New-York, on 
Mondays and Thuifdays, Wind and Weather permitting j and 
the PafTengers generally arrive at Philadelphia on Wednefdays and 
Saturdays. s. d. 

The Fare for a Paffcnger from N. York to Amboy z o 

From Amboy to Bordentcwn in the Waggon, 4 o 

Frcna Bordentown to Philadelphia, 1 6 

For Goods from New-York to Amboy, per C. Wt. 1 o 

Goods from Amboy to Bordentown, per C. Wt. 2 9 

From Bordentown to Philacelphia, per Ditto. 1 o 

From Amboy to Burlington in a Waggon, 5 o 

From Burlington to Philadelphia, in a Boat, 1 o 

Goods froK Amboy to Burlington, per Ct. Wt. Waggon, 3 6 
From Burliugton to Philadelphia, per Ditto. 1 6 

Lately publifh'd, and to be fold, by Jamet Parker, in New-York j 
an;l by David Hall, in Philadelphia, Price livs Dsllart. 

THE Conductor Generalit : or, the office, duty and authority of 
jufiicei of the peace, high-fjerifft i under - ft trifft, coroners, con- 
fi ablet, gaoler t % jury- men, and over/eeri of the poor. At aljo the office 
sf clerktof cjjixt, and of the peace, Sec. Compiled chief y from Burn'j 
ju/Sice, and the feveral booh on ihofe jubjeBt, at far at they extend and 
can be adapted to thefe American coloniet. By James Parker, one 
•f bit Ma'jeflyt jufiicei of the peact /srMiddlefex county, in New-J*rfey. 
Ta -which it adZtd, a tre&tife en the law of dejeentt in fee-fmple : By 
William BJackftone, Efy- } Barrifter at Law, vinerian profffar of the 
laws sf England. 



bu-j mMmwmmm 



A ctnafk Acc.un: of tbe Inujx ,\ 'a tins :n Nor h America, t .nd »/ 
ibe inte tor Fart of tbit Continent, By Majr Robert Rogers, 
H'itb f»me Account of P*ndiac, tbe In tan King. 
/TT^ HE 1 loans on the continent or N rth America, are mnftly 
renred from the fea coafts (where lormerl) they were very 
numeroui) into the inte ior or wfter'y ,ims of the c untry, few of 
taem bcng to be round within leU than two or three hundred miles 
of (he Tea ; for tho many of them have bee» rhriftianifed, and in 
iome me.fure cm izrd, and parcels ot land* have been alotte* them 
in feveral of the Brttifh Colonies, where they have been 10 me. into 
fociet.es ; y. it is ublerv»«ble, that in proportion as thry lay by their 
lavage cuftomi, and conform to "ur methods of living, they dwind e 
away, either bccaufe title Methods are difagricabie and nox eus 
to their conftitution:, or elfe (which I ^m isclin'd to believe is the 
cafe) when fettled among the Eng^ila. th'y have greater opportum 
ties of procuring rpiritoOQl liquois, cf which they are grnerally, 
male and femalr, inordinately fond ,- and very littlt care has ever 
bern taken to prevent thofe, who are inclined to take advantages 
of them in Trade, fnm debauching them; by wh>ch me^ns, 
where :here were confiderabie fettlrments of them, a few years fince, 
rheir name is now almoft totally extinct. Thofe who ftill remain 
have m- ftly joined themfelvfi to other nations, in the interior 
coHitry, who have generally erected their towns upon the banks 
of lakes and rivers, where they enjoy fea -coafts of their own, to all 
their pu'pcfe?, as effectually ccncucive as if they p»ffefTed the 
eaftern fliore of the continent, 

Tbe River St. Lawxinci, 
This rive takes its rife upwards of 2«oo miles from its mouth, 
at a lake called by the Indians Nippifiong, (whith in their language 
fifmfies a large btdy of water) fituate noith weft from lake Superior, 
in lat. 52. north. The northcly bank of this lake is a bog, or 
marais, that is near 400 miles long, from north c-Q to fouth weft, 






and about 150 miles bread. North of th:s bog is a ridge of moun- 
tains, expending from north-eaft to fou'h-weft, the whole length 
of the marfhy country, and beyond it to the weft*arJ. Thefe 
mountains are very high and fteep, and are called by the Indians 
the head of the country, meaning thereby that they are fruited in 
tbe center, and are the- higheft land on the contmtnt of North 
America ; which indeed feems»to be the cafe ; for fouth eaft of thefe 
■ (es the river St. Lawrence, having its courfe from thence (outh 
'•fterW ; north eaft riffs the river Chriftino, and runs north eaft 
erlv , and from the fouth, and fouth-weft of thefe mountains, fifes 
the Mirt'ffipi, and runs foutherly; (o that by thefe rivers tae con- 
tneot is divided into fo many dspartments, as it were, from a centre, 
which is 'he belorementioned mountains. 

The Indians who inhabit round lake NipitTnng, the head of the 
river St. Lawrence, are called 'he lake Indians or Nippiflbngs, and 
are in number about 5 or 6000 men. They ehiftflv live upon the 
weft, fouth, and fouth -eaft of the lake, and on the iflands in it, 
where the lands are tolerably gond ; the othar parts being either 
marfhy or mountainous. Their country is »f csnfiderible OtCBt, 

r 



but of very difficult accefs ; on which account they have never had 
but very little commerce with the Englifh or Fiench. Tlvy have 
no fire-arms, but hunt with bows asd arrows. They have little »r 
no war, or connections with any otner tribe of Indians, but live 
*lmoft as independant as if they had a whole world to themfelves. 
They fometimes go through the Chriftinoux country to Hucfon's bay, 
and purcaalc ferae cloathing from the company j but their chief 
cloathing is the produce of their own country, the fkins of beafls. 
They never fhave or cut the flair from their heads, or any part of 
their bodies, on which account the other Indians efleem them a 
very favage and unpclite herd, and do not chufe any correfpORdence 
or connexions with a people fo rude and uncultivated. Their food 
is fuch as the lake and wild defarts afford them, fuch as deer, 
moofe, bear, beaver, &c. and in the lake are, in great abundance, 
a kind of fiib called the fucker ; and in fome places are fcund a 
kind cf wild maife", or rice, which they make ufe ef. They never 
pretend te plant or improve land by labour. 

From hence the river St. Lawrence runs through a rough, 
broken, uninhabited country, to lake Superior, having in its courfe 
feveral falls or cataracts; the moft remarkable of which is about 15 
miles from the lake, where the water falls perpendicularly from a 
great height The river is here a quaner of a mile wide, a rock 
extends ftra,t acrofs the ftream, ever which it falls with a noife that 
may be heard at the diPance of feveral miles. Below thefe falls are 
great plenty of fifh, efpeciilly trout, which are very large and good. 
At the entrance of the river into the lake, is a town of Indians 
railed the Souties or Attawawas 5 which nation inhabit all along at 
the mouths ef the rivers that fall into lake Superior, and on the 
north of the lakes Michigan and Huron. They can raife about 
izooo fighting men. Thefe Indians are more improved than the 
NippifTongs, having had considerable commerce with the French. 
They live in houfes or butts that are built in the form of cones 5 the 
bale is generally from 15 to 20 feet wide, containing commonly 10 
or 11 perfona , the top of the cone is left open for about two feet, 
which aperture ferves them for a chimney and a window, their fire 
being kindled in the centre. To render thefe huts a defence againft 
the cold, &c. they cover them with mats of rufhes, which the? 
have the art of weaving and placing in fuch a manner, as to render 
them warm and confutable, and their appearance is very elegant, 
clifcovering the exa&eft o»der and good workmanfhip. When they 
remove for any time frcm one place to another, for the fake cf 
hunting, fifhing, fowling, or any other convenience, they carry 
this external covering with them, by which means they are able 
in a very fhort time, to erect new towns, with all the elegance and 
convenience of their old ones. 

They generally change their habitations in fpring and autuma, 

fpending the faaamer feafon upon the banks of the rivers and lakes, 

where *h^ fifh and raife com, and the winter among the mountains, 

j forrerimee 2 or 300 miles diftant, for the fake of better hunting 5 

I and the food you meet with among them, is according to the feafon 

j ia which you viut thern. They, as yet, make but iitrie ufe of 



fpiritoous liquors, nor do they manufacture any kind or drink, 
encept the juice of the maple tree, of which they likewife make 
iugar, but live upon (he limple girts of nature when in health, and 
wh*n fick, the wood* ana lakes furniih them with all the d< ugs they 
ruakeufeof; in the application of which, fome indeed «ie allowed 
to excel in /kill, butafk.no fee or icwaro for their trouble. And 
although there isiuih a thing as private property amo;g them, 
which they transfer to one ano her, by way of bargain and ex- 
j change, tnd it taken out o> the compals of fair dealing, the agreilbr 
is rttgmatiled, and punrihed with dildain ; yet no individual, or 
family is aiio*t«4 to lulfer by poverty, ficknefs, or misfortune, 
woile their neighoours can fupply their wants ; and all this from 
the limple natural consideration, tf.at they and their families are 
liable to the fame unhappy circurnftancei they iee thai* triends in. 

At the north of Jake Superior is another tribe or divifion of 
thefe Indians who c»ii chczntelves the Bulls ; thefe inhabit round 
the bay, called by the French Merduouft, or the north-bay. i ney 
differ not much from the Souues in their manners j ; hey can rails 
about 4000 fighting men; They are originally of the Soutics, or 
Attawawas nation, as evidently ap ears by the affinity between tke 
iwa languages; for they can pe-tedly underftand on: another. 
The chief trat'e of thefe northern Indians is to HqdUbn'l bay, where 
they carry fur and ermine, in great abundance, and exchange for 
blankets, arms, Ac. 

Lake Supenor is upwards of 2000 miles in circumference, and 
very deep, excepting near the welt end, where are leveral iflands j 
and near where the river jaim if, is a large lflund f-paratea from tke 
main by a ftiait not moie than five or fix mites wide ; ihe foil of this 
ifland is very coed, and on it ace feveral Indian towns ; the banks 
to the north, fouth, and eaft, are very high and fleep in fome places, 
being more thai aco foot above the furface of the water, and almoff 
perpcneicular; fo that it is very difficult landing at any place, ex- 
cept where the rivers fall in. On the nerth and eaft of this lake, 
the lands are broken and monntaincus, intermixed with many fmall 
ponds and brocks of water; on the fouth and weft of the lake, 
after you leave the banks, the country is level and good quite to the 
MiiTiiiippi, having large plaint covered with tall fcrafs ; there being 
Icarce any trees or underwood upen them for hundreds of miles 
together ; in other places, the oak, maple and loruft trees are lofty 
and fair. There are fome good iflands in the nerth bay of this lake, 
of forty or fifty miles in length from north to fouth, but net near fo 
wide. 

The Indians in this territory certainly enjoy, in the greateft 
plenty, what they look upon to be the necefianes, and even the 
luxuries of life. Here are fifh, fowl, and beads of every lize and j 
kind, common to the climate, in the grcatcil abundance, nor do I 
fee any reafon why this fneuld net become a rich and valuaole 
country, fheuld it ever be inhabited by a civiiifed people. It has 
rivers, it has a fea of it's own, w Inch make great amends for its 
inland titration, by facilitating trade and commerce from one part 
af the country to the other, by a cheap and eafy conveyance; nor do 



the Indians eatireiy neg<ed"t this advantage, but make great aft of ; 
canoes on the avers and lakes j which vefiris they make of the tmk j 
of Birch, fpruce, or em; tho(e made of che forntei are much the 
belt and largeft, and will carry from 4 or 500 to 2000 weight, and 
are a kind of veffei well foiled to this country, being fa light that a 
fingle Indian will carry one of a middling fue, when they come to 
any clift or eataraei, till they think proper to take the water again. 

The river St, Lawrence runs from lake Superior to lake Heron, 
upwards uf 1 50 miles, and jams it aijour, 20 miles eail of the ftraits 
of Michiiinrukanae. The fircam here is generally very rapid, and 
has one confinerab;e fall, round which the Inouns are obliged to 
carry their canoes when taey pafs this way. The land adjacent to 
the river, between the two lakes, is broken, and hilly j but much j 
of it is capable of being improved to good advantage. The timber j 
is thick and lofty j and iron ore is here found in the greatest plenty, 
and it faid to be the bed in America j and here are ftreams fufrlcient \ 
for any kind of water-works. 

A little to the waft nf where the river joins lake Huron, is a town j 
of Suutie?, cr Attawawas Indians, who came here from the louth 
of lake Superior, their original country ; and to the north eaft of 
the lake is another town of the fame Indians j and on the weft fide 
of the lake the Sagaaongs inhabit at the head of a bay, eall&d 
Sagaiiong oa/. There are aifo feveral towns of the Souties, or 
Attawawas. upon the rivers running into the eaft and fouth eaft of 
the lake. Thefe Indians have much the fame cuftoms as thaie on 
lake Superior. 

The lake Hiaron is cf a triangular form j one of the extremities 
points to the north eait, where a cantilerab'e ftream runs into it, 
called the boutiss river, from which there is but a fhart carrynag- 
pUce to the Attawawas river, that joins St. Lawrence river near 
Montreal ; another extremity prists to the north-weft, at the 
ftjaitsof Michihmakana, the other to the fouth, where the river St. 
Law-ence 'fTnes as from the point of a heart. 

This lake is about 900 miles in circumference 5 the country on 
the north and north weft of it is rocky and naonataincus j cm the 
fouth-eaft the land is low, and cohered with tall t.Hiber, fuck as 
white- pine, oak, walnut, afh, map!e, &c. on the fouth weft, 
between lake Huron and lake Michigan, the coontry is level and 
slain, having very few trees upon it of any kind j the foil is tolera- 
ble gn©d. 

Th s wide extended plain is covered with tall grafs, among which 
are desr, elks, bears, racoens, &c. in great, plenty. This country 
alio abswads in great variety of land and water fowls, and indeed 
fe*ms to be deftitute of nothing that is nee flary to fupply the na 
tarsi wants of the human fpecics. The number of Indians that in 
ha*»;t roend lake Huron is about 3000, 600 of which are warriors, 
or fi£ht:n» men. 

Lke Michigan is fitaatcd weft from lake Huron, and is very 
much c. c th; fame form, excepting that it is lop.gfr, extending 
tssthsr to the fouth. Tbeie is a communication between the two 
iaker, by a flrait eailed the flrait of Michiliraakana j it is fifteen 



miles wide, and forty in length, running nearly e aft from the north 
of lake Michigan. On the n-rth end of lake Michigan, are fever jI 
town* of Indians; at the (out a ex remity the rivet St. Jofeph rum 
into it, about 300 miles weft of Dctro.t. The country between ;he 
rri lake* is level, and generally or an excellent 101I, the timber 
'.u?ty and fair ; it is well watered oy a variety of ftrearm, ru»*uog 
fame into one lake, foane into the other. 

At the point adjoining lake M. enigma, and fur five or fix mi'ei 
fmm it, lauth, the land js f»ndy. Hare fia.ic's our Fort of Micaili- 
naikinac, a good ftockade, near twenty feet hijih ; there «re at 
this place, feme Freuch inhabitant, vbocotne heie for the fake 
of tracing wi:h the Indians, and for the trout- rifhrry, which it hare 
very valuable, the trout in thefe ftraits beincj cxcee-U^j plenty, 
of an ex raordinary fixe; fome have been taken that weigiud 
upwards of Scib The Indians from all the atlj-tcent countries 
anhually refrt hither for the fake of thafe fiih, notwithstanding 
which their numbers feer.i not to be dirwimfked. 

On the foutb eaft fide of lake Michigan are f me towns of the 
S^uties, and at the fouih end live the Pottawatamici, which n*. f io« 
Ukr wife inhabit the wd tide* and havi feveral villages on that part 
of thelke. 

The Indians round lake Michigan »nmunt to -S -nr 4000 fighting 
men: On the north weft piir »f lake Michigan) ei.ters another 
ftrait from the Green-Bay $ this ftrait is about fmtv r'niles *de, 
and a hundred l.ing, and in it arc rmnv iUaada varioully traafpofed, 
lome of which are inhabited by the Pottawdtamics, and ethers by 
the Attav.jv.is. 

The Green bay is of confiderab'e extent ; into the north end of it 
flows a hrge river, that rifts between lake Superior and tbe MiSif- 
Gpi, which is called the river of Foxes, on which live a nation of 
Indians, called the Fox Indiant, whofe number is not !efs t v ;an 4 
or 5000 ine« ; and fuither fouthward the country is inhabited by 
the Kekabouze, whofe number is ab^ut c,co m*n. 

The wide cxtanded country uo n this river, the Gresn-bav, and 
the ftraits from thence to lake Michigan, is uniformly pleafant, the 
foil rocd and feit.le, and wants nocriing bu! civil zed ioduflriaos 
inh^bitatits to render it truly delightful, h i» at prefect well fiaied 
with a variety ef wi'd game, the natu'al fiorkj and herds of its 
lavage inhabitant!. The timber ia tall, but not :<> thick as to in- 
vent the growth of grafs, which is here very luxuriant, it being 
generally h»e or fix feet high, which fufftciently i dtra'ts the good 
nefs of the foil. This invites hither the greatefl p!:r:tv of dex. elks, 
. wild cows, bea;*, beavers, Sec. add ta> thefe ti.e nfh wi'h 
which the waters teem, and it certainly appears a nv ft definable 
n, for the air is not lets agreeable ths.T the foil ; t\ c winttrs 
are never fevcre, and great part of the year the country v.t.'3 a 
verdu e. 

Hrre likewife grow fpontaneoafly a gre*t variety of g- - 
which are agreeable encii^'t to the palate, and doubMefa might b: 
manufactured to advant- 'is have JearnV, , that th<r 

] juice cf tbefe grapes will make glad the heart or" imn, making 



I from tnem a kind of rough claret j but their want of knowledge 
ho* tt manage it properly, no doubt, renders it vaflly inferior to 
what it nsi^ht be made j they dspufit -his liquor in their empty rum 
krgs. Thii country alfo produces a kind of wild oats, or rice, 
which h?ta already been mentioned at growing upon lake Superior, 
and Nippiflbng ; feet here it grows in the greateft plenty in the fhoal 
water, where a Canoe may be loaded in a very mart time j it grows 
two or three feet above tfee water. Its toffel refembles oats, but the 
kernel is more like rice. 

The Indians in this country r&ife ladian corn, and have horfes in 
great plenty $ their «ab ns, and houfes, are like thofe on lake 
Superior, aheady defcribed. 

From this fliort account of the lakes of Huron and Michigan, the 

Green bay and the adjacent country, which I am certain is no ways 

exaggerated, nor even up to what will be found true of its beauty 

\ and fertility, it muft appear to be a very valuable territory, capable 

of rich improvements, and the promoting a fpeedy lettlement in it, 

a»d fscurkg its advantageous pofts, is even of a national importance. 

j The French were fo fenfible of this, tfcut they h3d advanced pofts, 

1 at the river St. Jofeph, at the Green'bay, and at the falls of St. 

| Miritj at the time when Canada was ceded to the crown of Great- 

£ 3riti>n, all which have been fince defboyed by the Indians j and 

the o-iiy poll we now have in this part of the ccuirtry i3 at Michili- 

; r.ilcin»c, which is garnfonsd with ioo men. # 

The Indians on the lakes are general. y at peace with one another, 

having a wide ex: tended and fruitful country in their poflefiion: 

They are -orrned into a fait of empire, and the Emperor is elecled 

from 'he ildcir tribe, which is the Atrawawas, fomeof whom inhabit 

near our fort at Detroit, but are moftly further weft ward towards the 

M ililfippi. P&nteack is their prefent king, or emperor, who has 

certainly the largcir empire and greateft authority of ao Indian chief, 

that ha j appeared on the continent fince our acquaintance with it. 

He puts on an air of majefty and princely grandeur, end is greatly 

honoured and revered by his fubjecbj he not long fince formed a 

dtfign of uniting zil the Indian nations together under his authority, 

but mifcarried in Che attempt. . 

5n the year 1760, when I commanded anc marched the firft 
detachment into this country that was ever fent there by the Englifh, 
I was met in my way by an embafiy from him, of fome of his 
warriors, and foms of the chiefs of the tribes that are under hisn, 
the purport of which was, to let me know, that Ponteack was at 
a fmall diftance, coming peaceably, and that he defired me to halt 
my dettchment till fuch time as he could fee me with his own eyes, j 
r -»:? ?.mb .-.fladors had ilfo ordere to inform me, that he was Ponteack, 
the kiag and lord of the country I was in. 

At fiift falutation when we met, he demanded my bufinefs into 
his country, and how I dared to enter it without his leave; when 
I informed hirn that it was not with any delign againft the Indians 
I came, but to remove the French out ef his country, who had 
been an obftaclc in our way to mutual peace asd commerce, and 
acquainted him with ray inftrudrions fcr thatpurpofe. I at the 



r ' — ■ " . . 

• me tine delivered him feveral friendly mefTages, or belts of 
wampum, wh : :h he received, tut gave me no oihtr ar.lwer, than 
that he flood in the path 1 travelled in till next morning, g vmg me 
a fmail Mr>ng of wampum, at much as to lay 1 rr.uit not march 
further without his leave. When he departed lor the night, he 
enquired whether I wanted any thing that his (cuntri jfioided, and 
he would fend his warr ors to fetch it ? I alfuied thjm that ary 
provifiom they brought frou'.d It paid for; and the next day v»e 
were fupplied by them with feveral bags of parched corn, and i< me 
other necefiariei. Ac our fecond mteting he gave me the pire of 
pe^ce, and both of us by turns fmoaked with it j and he allured 
me he had made peace with me and my detachment ; that I might 
pafi through his countty unmclefied, and relieve the Ficnth gar- 
nfon ; and that he would piorect me, and my parly, from any in* 
fulu that might be offered or intended by the Indians j and, cs an 
eameft of his frienefhip, he fent us ico warriors to protect and 
affift us in driving ico fat cattle, which we had brought fir the nfe 
of the detachment from Pitt/Wg, by the way of Ptefque I fie. He 
likewife fent to the feveral Indian towns on the fou;h fine and weft 
end of lake Erie, to inform them that I had his cmfent to come 
into the country. He attended me cor.ftantly after this interview, 
till I arrived at Detroit, and while I remained in the eiuntry, and 
was the meant of prefervmg the detachment frcm the fury if the 
Indianr, who had afiembled at the mouth cf the ftrait, with intent 
to cut us off'. 

I had feveral conferences with him, in which he difcovered great 
frength cf judgment, and thirft after knowledge. He endeavoured 
to inform bimlelf of cur military order and difcipline ; he often in- 
timated to roe, that he fhould be content to reign in his country in 
fubordination to the king of Great- Britain, and W2B willing to pay 
him fuch annual acknowledgment as he was able, in furs, and to 
call him his uncle. He was curious to know our methods of ma- 
nufacturing cloth, iron, &c. and exprcfled a great defire to fee 
England, and offered me a part cf his country if I woulo conduct 
him thither. He affured me, that he was inclined o live peaceably 
with the Eaglifh while they ufed him as he deserved, and to 
encourage their fettling in his country ; but int mated, that if they 
treated him with neglect, he fhtuld fhut up the way. and exclude 
them from it ; in fhort, his whole ronverfatien fufhciently indicated, 
that he was far from confidering himfelf as a cor.qu-ied prince, and 
that he exceeded to be treated with the refpecl and henou- due to a 
king or emperor, by all who came into his country, or treated with 
him. 

In 1763, this Indian had the art and addrefs t» draw a number 
of tribes into a confederacy, with a *f fi^n fiifi to redure the Englifh 
flirts upon the lakes, and then make a peace to hi* rrir.d, by 
which he intended to effablifh himfelf in his imperial authority 5 
and fo wifely were his measures taken, that in fVtcen da>t time, 
he reduerd cr took ten of our parrifon?, wheh were all we had in 
this country, except Detroit ; and had he carried thitalfo, nothing J 
was in the way to complete his fcheme. borne cf the I.idians left ; 






1 h'ns, arcd by hh cesser? rr.aee a feparate peace; Ley he would not 
b; adiive or p ' concerned Jn it, faying, that when be made 

; a prace, it ffaeuld be isch a one a? would be useful snd honouiable 
{ to hioifsif, and to the kin§ of Gf eat- /in trun j but he has no: as jet 
' prep fed his '.earn?. 

It tie ysar 1763, v-hf.n I went to throw prov;ficns into thr gar- 
| rifon at Detroit I feht this Indiana bottle of bransv k* a Frcpch- 
| man. Hi* ccunfella.rs a<-v kd h;»>i not to tafte it, infatuating >hat 
' if v«s poiionrtij and ■ to kill him j but Ponteack, 

with a 1 erf at their fufpiciorM, faying, it 

was nit '\ad fe laccty favsrd my hie. 

1 1 the late w ir of* • •. • ' began to 

j m<>ke m»ncv, cr b Is hath fcnte punCfuahv 

j rHee-ne'l. H;» room - £ e of what he wanted in 

exch>.r>>e for it, r'ra*.' ~ of an otter (his 

j arms) awn under i:. . rafilrrt t:k;n, this Incian 

i nut ... be rcn^r>*d vei y fcrvi- - . •; (.■:••? ■, <adc and fittle 

enn i* tbie ►untfy J « 10 ih&n any one that hath 

* cyer been in alliance with ». !ftt> 



I 



»<rc>T*>aMH' 1 ior?v»«wji 



. Afw Curt for tbt Ttotb'ji .. ;'» is Lr:.er, 

y HAVE cbfe.-vsd in the papc- Mr. Y ^h AV*n, an 2po- 

I thdeary at Orebo in Sweden, ha«i :. ir.de trials *n thirty people 
for curing t"»e to '» *<n with th* artifici'U Io'dfun-e, Eighteen of ! 



{ thete he ptjfefVy ru:ed by one /:>{>ie ar^ication of th* magneticai 
I h*r. h'^tHfl it on the t«>oth lot three irrigate? onlv ; sine wanted a j 
nd ano! cation of it before they we;e relieved ; and three oM'fctm , 
fWuwi <iri« » moroe j'ary car f.-nm their r-^njj on drswing the teeth 
■ r • te, a quintuy of rorupt matter was found under them, j 

! Which pro^ .#ly hi the r fTefr of the magnet. 

Tn<* relation of f» e'afy and fimpie a method of relieving peep!e in 
which is »> extremely troublffcme, tfruck me and gave me j 
1 pir*fa re. 1 tiic ! jt therefore on feveral fubjefts, and found it not I 
? to fa«l *ri nne iaftance, though the p2:n had laffed a confiderable j 
I timn i"> fome, and the teeth rotten j it is true, in one the pain wes j 
\ not rcmovrd ti',! after it had bv legated applicafions br^uffet on s. 
1 ' plentiful falivation. v-'hich euite carried it cfF. The only direction J 
\ I g?v« for the application of it was to put the north-pole to the » 
toeth, and to ho'A the bar as much a? ccu'd be in a perpendicular 
dire-ftion to if. for ah ce. four, or five minutes, taking care 

\ to ki'ej it »n ths to >th fti'me time after the pain w?s removed. 
I Tim very e^fv method < f getting relief I cannot but recommeRd to 
{ every one ; and th<*»ef'. re, fir, 1 have fent you this, though I 
know fome will n t, becaufe it is fo eafy. 

Thcfc aitificial m.:^-.et^ may be bought in the fhop» \a London, 
at 3^- or 9s 1 . e«ch, in a b'ack p3pr? cafe; thev are generally fix 
jnrhes Io^s, an i ^v* the inches marked en thtm. [And doubt lefs 
are to tad in mc . in Ameiica ] 



f »ij *I.M W«tffli1