(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Popular government [serial]"

opular 
overnment Index 





VOLUMES 51-52 


RECEIVED 


SUMMER 1985 


AUG 19 1987 


THROUGH 


Lit 


SPRING 1987 




INSTITUTE OF 




GOVERNMENT 




THE UNIVERSITY OF 


" 


NORTH CAROLINA 




AT CHAPEL HILL 



Adams, J. Allen 

Industrial development bonds— Still alive and relative- 
ly well in North Carolina. 51 (Fall 1985). 1-5. 

ADETS 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked 
in North Carolina? 51 (Winter 1986). 44-48. 

Adolescent suicide: Is there a need for public policy in 
North Carolina? by Philip N. Henry. 52 (Summer 
1986), 30-35 

Advocating for children: North Carolina's guardian ad litem 
program, by Virginia G. Weisz. 51 (Summer 1985), 
16-19. 

ALCOHOL 

North Carolina's new legal drinking age. 51 (Fall 1985). 
13-18. 

ALCOHOL LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Purchase of beer and wine by nineteen- and twenty-year- 
olds. 52 (Summer 1986). 51-52. 

An analysis of House Bill 1314: A bill to repeal the property 
tax in North Carolina, by Charles D. Liner et al. 52 
(Summer 1986). 40-47. 

Andrews, Richard N. L. 

Book review: Hazardous materials in North Carolina— A 
guide for decisionmakers in local government. 
Reviewed by William G. Ross, Jr. 52 (Fall 1986), 
28-29. 

Arson in North Carolina, by Ben F. Loeb. Jr. 51 (Winter 
1986), 9-14. 

Automobile liability insurance rates: An update, by Ben 
F. Loeb. Jr. 52 (Winter 1987). 1-4. 



B 



Bashor, Christen R. 

Small claims procedure in North Carolina. 51 (Sum- 
mer 1985), 35-43. 

Bell, A. Fleming, II 

Questions I'm most often asked: To what extent may 
North Carolina cities and counties make use of lease- 
purchase financing in real estate transactions? 51 
(Spring 1986), 33-35. 

BOOK REVIEWS 

A citizens handbook on groundwater protection, by 
Wendy Gordon. Reviewed by William A. Campbell. 
51 (Fall 1985), 12, 18. 

Hazardous materials in North Carolina— A guide for 
decisionmakers in local government, by Richard W. 
L. Andrews, Raymond J. Burby, and Alvis G. Turn- 
er. Reviewed by William G. Ross, Jr. 52 (Fall 1986), 
28-29. 

Burby, Raymond J. 

Book review: Hazardous materials in North Carolina— a 
guide for decisionmakers in local government. 
Reviewed bv William G. Ross. Jr. 52 "(Fall 1986) 
28-29. 



Burnett, Gilbert H. 

Juvenile court dispositions: An interagency evaluation 
team. 51 (Summer 1985). 12-15, 53. 



Campbell, William A. 

Book review: A citizen's handbook on groundwater pro- 
tection, by Wendy Gordon. 51 (Fall 1985), 12, 18. 
Local government occupancy taxes in North Carolina. 

51 (Winter 1986). 25-29. 

Resource recovery in North Carolina. 52 (Summer 
1986), 1-10. 

Changes in the North Carolina Administrative Procedure 
Act. by Robin W. Smith. 52 (Spring 1987), 53.-60. 

CHILD ABUSE 

Advocating for Children: North Carolina's guardian ad 
litem program. 51 (Summer 1985), 16-19. 

Protecting North Carolina's children: The duty to report 
suspected abuse and neglect. 52 (Summer 1986), 17-29. 

CHILDREN AND YOUTH 

Adolescent suicide: Is there a need for public policy in 
North Carolina? 52 (Summer 1986), 30-35. 

Advocating for children: North Carolina's guardian ad 
litem program. 51 (Summer 1985). 16-19. 

Hostages to fortune: An address to the fifth annual 
southern legislators conference on children and youth. 

52 (Summer 1986). 36-39. 

Meeting the needs of latchkey children: A community 
effort. 52 (Spring 1987), 23-27, 60. 

Protecting North Carolina's children: The duty to report 
suspected abuse and neglect. 52 (Summer 1986), 17-29. 

Relationship between university research and state poli- 
cy: Division TEACCH— Treatment and education of 
autistic and related communication-handicapped chil- 
dren. 51 (Spring 1986), 23-32. 

Rules of evidence in criminal trials involving child vic- 
tims. 52 (Spring 1987), 1-16. 

Clarke, Stevens H. 

Pretrial release: Report on a study in Durham. North 
Carolina. 52 (Spring 1987) 43-51. 

Clotfelter, James. 

Of revenues and morality: The debate over state lotter- 
ies. 51 (Winter 1986). 49-53. 
Community mediation programs: A growing movement, 
by Dee Reid. 52 (Winter 1987), 24-28. 

COMPUTERS 

Computer-assisted mass appraisal systems: Practical con- 
siderations. 51 (Summer 1985). 44-49. 

Developing a microcomputer policy in local government. 
51 (Winter 1986), 1-8, 24. 

Computer-assisted mass appraisal systems: Practical con- 
siderations, by Joseph E. Hunt. 51 (Summer 1985), 
44-49. 

Congress v. the courts: Extracurricular student religious 
groups, by Benjamin B. Sendor. 51 (Fall 1985). 14-28. 



CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS 

Congress v. the courts: Extracurricular student religious 
groups. 51 (Fall 1985), 24-28. 

Contributions of the city council to effective governance, 
by James H. Svara. 51 (Spring 1986), 1-8. 

CORRECTIONS (Penology) 

An interview with Rae McNamara. 51 (Summer 1985), 

8-11. 
History of jails in North Carolina. 51 (Winter 1986), 

30-34. 48. 
Innovations in North Carolina prisons. 51 (Summer 

1985), 1-7. 

COURTS 

Community mediation programs: A growing movement. 
52 (Winter 1987), 24-28. 

Equitable distribution comes to North Carolina. 52 
(Winter 1987), 13-23. 

Infractions: A new class of non-criminal offenses in 
North Carolina. 52 (Summer 1986). 48-50. 

Juvenile court dispositions: An interagency evaluation 
team. 51 (Summer 1985), 12-15. 53. 

Lincoln County remodels its courthouse. 52 (Fall 1986), 
1-7. 

Small claims procedure in North Carolina. 51 (Sum- 
mer 1985), 35-43. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE see also CORRECTIONS 

Management: A new role for district attorneys. 51 (Sum- 
mer 1985), 29-34. 

Pretrial release: Report on a study in Durham. North 
Carolina. 52 (Spring 1987), 43-51. 

Protecting North Carolina's children: The duty to report 
suspected abuse and neglect. 52 (Summer 1986), 17-29. 

Rules of evidence in criminal trials involving child vic- 
tims. 52 (Spring 1987), 1-16. 



D 



Developing a microcomputer policy in local government, 
by Gary R. Miller. 51 (Winter 1986), 1-8, 24. 

DISPUTE SETTLEMENT CENTERS 

Community mediation programs: A growing movement. 
52 (Winter 1987), 24-28. 

DISTRICT ATTORNEYS see CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Don Hay man retires, by Warren Jake Wicker. 51 (Fall 
1985), 11, 29. 

Drennan, James C. 

Infractions: A new class of noncriminal offenses in North 
Carolina. 52 (Summer 1986), 48-50. 

DRUNKENNESS 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked 
in North Carolina? 51 (Winter 1986). 44-48. 

Ducker, Richard D. 

Federal and state programs to control signs and outdoor 
advertising. 52 (Spring 1987), 28-42. 

Dunn, Glenn 

Memo: How far may North Carolina local governments 
go in regulating hazardous waste? 51 (Fall 1985). 19-23. 



E 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Industrial development bonds— Still alive and relative- 
ly well in North Carolina. 51 (Fall 1985), 1-5. 

State economic development policies: Review of four 
reports. 52 (Spring 1987), 61-63. 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked in 
North Carolina? by John H. Lacey, Linda C. Rudisill. 
Carol L. Popkin, and J. Richard Stewart. 51 (Winter 
1986), 44-48. 

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

Groundwater quality law in North Carolina. 52 (Winter 

1987), 39-49. 
Memo: How far may North Carolina local governments 

go in regulating hazardous waste? 51 (Fall 1985), 19-23. 
Pollution prevention. 52 (Winter 1987), 29-38. 
Resource recovery in North Carolina. 52 (Summer 

1986), 1-10. 
Strategies for protecting North Carolina's natural areas. 

51 (Winter 1986), 15-24. 

Equitable distribution comes to North Carolina, by Dona 
G. Lewandowski. 52 (Winter 1987), 13-23. 



FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT 

Living with the Fair Labor Standards Act. 51 (Spring 
1986), 13-22. 

Federal and state programs to control signs and outdoor 
advertising, by Richard D. Ducker 52 (Spring 1987), 
28-42. 

FINANCE 

Lease-purchase financing: To what extent may North 
Carolina cities and counties make use of lease- 
purchase financing in real estate transactions? 51 
(Spring 1986). 33-35. 

Seven options for financing water and waste water fa- 
cilities in North Carolina. 51 (Spring 1986). 44-56. 

State-local responsibilities for financing highways, roads, 
and streets. 52 (Winter 1987). 5-12, 23. 

FIRE PROTECTION 

Arson in North Carolina. 51 (Winter 1986), 9-14. 



Galloway, Patton G. 

Management: A new role for district attorneys. 51 (Sum- 
mer 19 

85). 29-34. 

Gordon, Wendy 

A citizen's handbook on groundwater protection. 
Reviewed by William A. Campbell. 51 (Fall 1985). 
12, 18. 



Green, Philip P. Jr. 

Marjorie Bounds Retires. 52 (Spring 1987), 64. 

Questions I'm Most Often Asked: What is "spot zon- 
ing'? 51 (Summer 1985), 50-53. 

Groundwater quality law in North Carolina, by Milton 
S. Heath, Jr. 52 (Winter 1987). 39-49. 
Gunn, Lynn E. 

Outpatient commitment for the mentally ill. 52 (Spring 
1987), 17-22. 



H 

Henry, Philip N. 

Adolescent suicide: Is there a need for public policy in 
North Carolina? 52 (Summer 1986), 30-35. 

History of jails in North Carolina, by Michael R. Smith. 
51 (Winter 1986), 30-34, 48. 

Holloway, Donald P. 

Land records management in North Carolina. 52 (Fall 
1986). 12-17. 

Hostages to fortune: An address to the fifth annual southern 
legislator's conference on children and youth, by Willis 
P. Whichard. 52 (Summer 1986), 36-39. 

Hunt, Joseph E. 

Computer-assisted mass appraisal systems: Practical con- 
siderations. 51 (Summer 1985), 44-49. 



I 



Ide, R. William, III 

Industrial development bonds — still alive and relative- 
ly well in North Carolina. 51 (Fall 1985). 1-5. 

Industrial development bonds— still alive and relatively well 
in North Carolina, by J. Allen Adams and R. William 
Ide, III. 51 (Fall 1985), 1-5. 

Infractions: A new class of noncriminal offenses in North 
Carolina, by James C. Drennan. 52 (Summer 1986). 
48-50. 

Innovations in North Carolina prisons, by Michael R. 
Smith. 51 (Summer 1985), 1-7. 

INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT 

New Institute faculty member (Stephen Allred). 52 
(Winter 1987), 28. 

New Institute faculty member (Roger Schwarz). 52 
(Spring 1987), 52. 

Two new Institute faculty members (S. Grady Fuller- 
ton and Dona Lewandowski). 51 (Spring 1986). 35. 

Purchasing organizations present gift to Institute of 
Government. 51 (Winter 1986). 35. 

INSURANCE 

Automobile liability insurance rates. 52 (Winter 1987), 
1-4. 



JAILS 

History of jails in North Carolina. 51 (Winter 1986), 
30-34, 48. 



Jeffress, Charles 

The right to know about hazardous chemicals: Local 
government responsibilities. 51 (Winter 1986), 36-43, 
48. 

Jenne, Kurt 

Strategic planning: Taking charge of the future. 51 
(Spring 1986), 36-43. 

Joyce, Robert P. 

Living with the Fair Labor Standards Act. 51 (Spring 
1986), 13-22. 

JUVENILES 

Advocating for children: North Carolina's guardian ad 
litem program. 51 (Summer 1985), 16-19. 

Juvenile court dispositions: An interagency evaluation 
team. 51 (Summer 1985), 12-15, 53. 

Juvenile court dispositions: An interagency evaluation 
team, by Christopher L. Ringwalt and Gilbert H. Bur- 
nett. 51 (Summer 1985), 12-15, 53. 



Lacey, John H. 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked 
in North Carolina? 51 (Winter 1986), 44-48. 

LAND RECORDS 

Land records management in North Carolina. 52 (Fall 
1986). 12-17. 

Land records management in North Carolina, by Donald 
P. Holloway. 52 (Fall 1986), 12-17. 

LAND USE 

The local land trust: Formation and operation. 52 (Sum- 
mer 1986), 11-16, 47. 

The public trust in submerged lands. 51 (Spring 1986), 
9-12. 

LEGISLATION 

Arson in North Carolina. 51 (Winter 1986), 9-14. 

Changes in the North Carolina Administrative Proce- 
dure Act. 52 (Spring 1987). 53-60. 

Infractions: A new class of noncriminal offenses in North 
Carolina. 52 (Summer 1986). 48-50. 

Purchase of beer and wine by nineteen- or twenty-year- 
olds. 52 (Summer 1986), 51-52. 

The right to know hazardous chemicals: Local govern- 
ment responsibilities. 51 (Winter 1986), 36-43, 48. 

Lewandowski, Dona G. 

Equitable distribution comes to North Carolina. 52 
(Winter 1987), 13-23. 

LIBRARIES 

State documents: Proposed statewide despository sys- 
tem. 52 (Fall 1986), 8-11. 

LINCOLN COUNTY 

Lincoln County remodels its courthouse. 52 (Fall 1986). 
1-7. 

Lincoln County remodels its courthouse, by Carol Often. 
52 (Fall 1986). 1-7. 

Lindsey, Marjorie W. 

Suite documents: Proposed statewide depository system. 
52 (Fall 1986), 8-11. 



Liner, Charles D. 

An analysis of House Bill 1314: A bill to repeal the 

pioperty tax in North Carolina (Executive summary). 

52 (Summer 1986). 40-47. 
State economic development policies: Review of four 

reports. 52 (Spring 1987), 61-63. 
State-local responsibilities for financing highways, roads, 

and streets. 5-12, 23. 

Living with the Fair Standards Act, by Robert P. Joyce. 
51 (Spring 1986), 13-22. 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

Developing a microcomputer policy in local government. 
51 (Winter 1986), 1-8, 24. 

Local government occupancy taxes in North Caro- 
lina. 51 (Winter 1986), 25-29. 

Memo: How far may North Carolina local governments 
go in regulating hazardous waste? 51 (Fall 1985). 19-23. 

Questions I'm most often asked: To what extent may 
North Carolina cities and counties make use of lease- 
purchase financing in real estate transactions? 51 
(Spring 1986). 33-35. 

The right to know about hazardous chemicals: Local 
government responsibilities. 51 (Winter 1986), 36-43, 
48. 

Local government occupancy taxes in North Carolina, by 
William A. Campbell. 51 (Winter 1986), 25-29. 

The local land trust: Formation and operation, by David 
H. Bland. 52 (Summer 1986), 11-16, 47. 

Loeb, Ben E., Jr, 

Arson in North Carolina. 51 (Winter 1986), 9-14. 
Automobile liability insurance rates: An update. 52 

(Winter 1987). 1-4. 
North Carolina's new legal drinking age. 51 (Fall 1985). 

13-18. 

LOTTERIES 

Of revenues and morality: The debate over state lotter- 
ies. 51 (Winter 1986), 49-53. 



M 



MANAGEMENT 

Management: A new role for district attorneys. 51 (Sum- 
mer 1985), 29-34. 

The responsible administrator: Contributions of the city 
manaeer to effective governance. 52 (Fall 1986), 18-24, 
27. 

Management: A new role for district attorneys, by Pat- 
ton G. Galloway. 51 (Summer 1985). 29-34. 

Marjorie Bounds retires, by Philip P. Green, Jr. 52 (Spring 
1987). 64. 

Mason, Janet 

Protecting North Carolina's children: The duty to report 
suspected abuse and neglect. 52 (Fall 1986). 17-29. 

Social services in North Carolina: The state-county rela- 
tionship. 51 (Summer 1985). 20-28. 

McLawhorn, Daniel F. 

The public trust in submerged lands. 51 (Spring 1986). 
9-12. 



McNamara, Rae 

An interview with Rae McNamara, by Michael R. 
Smith. 51 (Summer 1985). 8-11. 

Meeting the needs of latchkey children: A community ef- 
fort, by Janice Stroud. 52 (Spring 1987), 23-27, 60. 

Memo: How far may North Carolina local governments 
go in regulating hazardous waste? by Glen Dunn. 51 
(Fall 1985), 19-23. 

MENTAL HEALTH 

Adolescent suicide: Is there a need for public policy in 
North Carolina? 52 (Summer 1986), 30-35. 

Outpatient commitment for the mentally ill. 52 (Spring 
1987), 17-22. 

Miller, Gary R. 

Developing a microcomputer policy in local government. 
51 (Winter 1986), 1-8, 24. 

Morgan, Sheron Keiser 

Seven options for Financing water and waste water fa- 
cilities in North Carolina. 51 (Spring 1986), 44-56. 

MUNICIPALITIES 

Contributions of the city council to effective governance. 

51 (Spring 1986). 1-8. 
The responsible administrator: Contributions of the city 

manager to effective governance. 52 (Fall 1986), 18-24. 

27. 
Understanding the mayor's office in council-manager 

cities. 51 (Fall 1985), 6-11. 

Murray, Donald M. 

Purchase of beer and wine by nineteen- or twenty-year- 
olds. 52 (Summer 1986), 51-52. 



N 



NATURAL RESOURCES AND COMMUNITY 
DEVELOPMENT 

Pollution prevention. 52 (Winter 1987). 29-38. 
Strategies for protecting North Carolina's natural areas. 
51 (Winter 1986), 15-24. 

NEW HANOVER COUNTY 

Juvenile court dispositions: An interagency evaluation 
team. 51 (Summer 1985). 12-15. 53. 

North Carolina's new legal drinking age, by Ben F Loeb, 
Jr. 51 (Fall 1985), 13-18. 







Offen, Carol 

Lincoln County remodels its courthouse. 52 (Fall 1986). 
1-7. 

Of revenues and morality: The debate over state lotteries, 
by James Clottelter. 51 (Winter 1986). 49-53. 

Outpatient commitment for the mentally ill. by Lvnn E. 
Gunn. 52 (Spring 1987), 17-22. 



p 



R 



PERSONNEL 

Living with the Fair Labor Standards Act. 51 (Spring 
1986), 13-22. 

Management: A new role for district attorneys. 51 (Sum- 
mer 1985), 29-34. 

PLANNING AND ZONING 

Strategic planning: Taking charge of the future. 51 

(Spring 1986), 36-43. 
Questions I'm most often asked: What is "spot zoning"? 

51 (Summer 1985), 50-53. 

Pollution prevention, by Roger Schecter. 52 (Winter 1987), 
29-38. 

Popkin, Carol L. 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked 
in North Carolina? 51 (Winter 1986), 44-48. 

PRISONS See CORRECTION 

PROPERTY TAX 

An analysis of House Bill 1314: A bill to repeal the 
property tax in North Carolina (Executive summary). 

52 (Summer 1986), 40-47. 
Computer-assisted mass appraisal systems: Practical con- 
siderations. 51 (Summer 1985), 44-49. 

Protecting North Carolina's children: The duty to report 
suspected abuse and neglect, by Janet Mason and L. 
Poindexter Watts. 52 (Summer 1986). 17-29. 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Purchase of beer and wine by nineteen- or twenty-year- 
olds. 52 (Summer 1986), 51-52. 

PUBLIC OFFICIALS 

Contributions of the city council to effective governance. 

51 (Spring 1986), 1-8. 
Understanding the mayor's office in council-manager 

cities, 51 (Fall 1985), 6-11. 

Public trust in submerged lands, bv Daniel F. McLawhom. 
51 (Spring 1986), 9-12. 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Seven options for financing water and waste water fa- 
cilities in North Carolina. 51 (Spring 1986), 44-56. 

Purchase of beer and wine by nineteen- or twenty-year- 
olds, by Donald M. Murray. 52 (Summer 1986), 51-52. 

Purchasing organizations present gift to Institute of Govern- 
ment. 51 (Winter 1986), 35. 



Questions I'm most often asked: To what extent may North 
Carolina cities and counties make use of lease- 
purchase financing in real estate transactions? By A. 
Fleming Bell, II. 51 (Spring 1986). 33-35. 

Questions I'm often asked: May a North Carolina munic- 
ipality levy privilege license taxes on newspapers and 
radio and television stations? By William A. Camp- 
bell. 52 (Fall 1986), 25-27. 

Questions I'm most often asked: What is "spot-zoning"? 
By Philip P. Green. 51 (Summer 1985), 50-53." 



Reid, Dee 

Community mediation programs: A growing movement. 
52 (Winter 1987), 24-28. 

Relationship between university research and state poli- 
cy: Division TEACCH— Treatment and education of 
autistic and related communication-handicapped chil- 
dren. 51 (Spring 1986), 23-32. 

Resource recovery in North Carolina, by William A. 
Campbell. 52 (Summer 1986), 1-10. 

The responsible administrator: Contributions of the city 
manager to effective governance, by James H. Svara. 
52 (Fall 1986), 18-24, 27. 

The right to know about hazardous chemicals: Local 
government responsibilities, by Charles Jeffress. 51 
(Winter 1986), 36-43, 48. 

Ringwalt, Christopher L. 

Juvenile court dispositions: An interagency evaluation 
team. 51 (Summer 1985), 12-15, 53. 

Roe, Charles E. 

Strategies for protecting North Carolina's natural areas. 
51 (Winter 1986), 15-24. 

Ross, William G., Jr. 

Book review: Hazardous materials in North Carolina — a 
guide for decisionmakers in local government, by 
Richard N. L. Andrews, Raymond J. Burby, and Al- 
vis G. Turner. 52 (Fall 1986), 28-29. 

Rudisill, Linda C. 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked 
in North Carolina? 51 (Winter 1986), 44-48. 

Rules of evidence in criminal trials involving child vic- 
tims, by Benjamin B. Sendor. 52 (Spring 1987), 1-16. 



Saxon, Miriam S. 

Pretrial release: Report on a study in Durham, North 
Carolina. 52 (Spring 1987), 43-51. 

Schecter, Roger 

Pollution prevention. 52 (Winter 1987), 29-38. 

SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION 

Adolescent suicide: Is there a need for public policy in 
North Carolina? 52 (Summer 1986), 30-35. 

Congress v. the courts: Extracurricular student religious 
groups. 51 (Fall 1985), 24-28. 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked 
in North Carolina? 51 (Winter 1986). 44-48. 

Meeting the needs of the latchkey children: A commu- 
nity effort. 52 (Spring 1987). 23-27, 60. 

Relationship between university research and public poli- 
cy: Division TEACCH— Treatment and education of 
autistic and related communication-handicapped chil- 
dren. 51 (Spring 1986), 23-32. 

Schopler, Eric 

Relationship between university research and state poli- 
cy: Division TEACCH— Treatment and education of 
autistic and related communication-handicapped chil- 
dren. 51 (Spring 1986), 23-32. 



Sendor, Benjamin B. 

Congress v. the courts: Extracurricular student religious 
groups. 51 (Fall 1985), 24-28. 

Rules of evidence in criminal trials involving child vic- 
tims. 52 (Spring 1987), 1-16. 

Seven options for financing water and waste water facili- 
ties in North Carolina, by Sheron Keiser Morgan. 51 
(Spring 1986). 44-56. 

Small claims procedure in North Carolina, by Christen 
R. Bashor. 51 (Summer 1985), 35-43. 

Smith, Michael R. 

An interview with Rae McNamara. 51 (Summer 1985), 

8-11. 
History of jails in North Carolina. 51 (Winter 1986), 

30-34, 48. 
Innovations in North Carolina prisons. 51 (Summer 

1985), 1-7. 

Smith, Robin W. 

Changes in the North Carolina Administrative Proce- 
dure Act. 52 (Spring 1987), 53-60. 

SOCIAL SERVICES 

Protecting North Carolina's children: The duty to report 
suspected abuse and neglect. 52 (Summer 1986). 17-29. 

Social Services in North Carolina: The state-county rela- 
tionship. 51 (Summer 1985), 20-28. 

Social Services in North Carolina: The state-county rela- 
tionship, by Janet Mason. 51 (Summer 1985), 20-28. 

State documents: Proposed statewide depository system, 
by Marjorie W. Lindsey. 52 (Fall 1986), 8-11. 

State economic development policies: Review of four 
reports, by Charles D. Liner. 51 (Spring 1987), 61-63. 

STATE GOVERNMENT 

Federal and state programs to control signs and outdoor 
advertising. 52 (Spring 1987), 28-42. 

State-local responsibilities for financing highways, roads, 
and streets, by Charles D. Liner. 52 (Winter 1987), 
5-12, 23. 

Stewart, Richard J. 

Education for drunk drivers: How well has it worked 
in North Carolina? 51 (Winter 1986), 44-48. 

Strategic planning: Taking charge of the future, by Kurt 
Jenne. 51 (Spring 1986), 36-43. 

Strategies for protecting North Carolina's natural areas, 
by Charles E. Roe. 51 (Winter 1986). 15-24. 

Stroud, Janice 

Meeting the needs of latchkey children: A community 
effort. 52 (Spring 1987). 23-27. 60. 

Svara, James. H. 

Contributions of the city council to effective governance. 

51 (Spring 1986), 1-8. 
The responsible administrator: Contributions of the city 

manager to effective governance. 52 (Fall 1986), 18-24, 

27. 
Understanding the mayor's office in council-manager 

cities. 51 (Fall 1985), 6-11. 



TAXATION 

Local government occupancy taxes in North Carolina. 
51 (Winter 1986), 25-29. 

Questions I'm often asked: May a North Carolina munic- 
ipality levy privilege license taxes on newspapers and 
radio and television stations? 52 (Fall 1986), 25-27. 

Questions I'm most often asked: To what extent may 
North Carolina cities and counties make use of lease- 
purchase financing in real estate transactions? 51 
(Spring 1986). 33-35. 

Turner, Alvis G. 

Book review: Hazardous materials in North Carolina— A 
guide for decisionmakers in local government. 
Reviewed by William G. Ross. Jr. 52 (Fall 1986). 
28-29. 

Two new Institute faculty members (Dona Lewandowski 
and S. Grady Fullerton). 51 (Spring 1986). 35. 



u 

Understanding the mayor's office in council-manager cities, 
by James H. Svara. 51 (Fall 1985), 6-11. 



w 



WATER RESOURCES 

Book review: A citizen's handbook on groundwater pro- 
tection, by Wendy Gordon. Reviewed by William A. 
Campbell. 51 (Fall 1985). 12. 18. 

Ground water quality in North Carolina. 52 (Winter 
1987), 39-49. 

Seven options for financing water and waste water fa- 
cilities in North Carolina. 51 (Spring 1986), 44-56. 

Watts, L. Poindexter 

Protecting North Carolina's children: The duty to report 
suspected abuse and neglect. 52 (Summer 1986), 17-29. 

WASTE MANAGEMENT 

Resource recovery in North Carolina. 52 (Summer 
1986), 1-10. 

Seven options for financing water and waste water fa- 
cilities in North Carolina. 51 (Spring 1986). 44-56. 

The right to know about hazardous chemicals: Local 
government responsibilities. 51 (Winter 1986). 36-43. 
48. 

Weisz, Virginia G. 

Advocating for children: North Carolina's guardian ad 
litem program. 51 (Summer 1985). 16-19. 

Whichard, Willis P. 

Hostages to fortune: An address to the fifth annual 
southern legislators conference on children and youth. 
52 (Summer 1986), 36-39. 

Wicker, Warren Jake 

Don Hayman retires. 51 (Fall 1985), 11. 29. 



Institute of Government 

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil 
John L. Sanders, Director 

Faculty 



Stephen Allred 
Rebecca S. Ballentine 
A. Fleming Bell, II 
Joan G. Brannon 
William A. Campbell 
Stevens H. Clarke 
Ann C. Clontz 
Anne M. Dellinger 
James C. Drennan 
Richard D. Ducker 
Robert L. Farb 
Joseph S. Ferrell 
S. Grady Fullerton 
Philip R Green, Jr. 
Milton S. Heath. Jr. 
Joseph E. Hunt 
Kurt J. Jenne 
Jeffrey S. Koeze 



David M. Lawrence 
Dona G. Lewandowski 
Charles D. Liner 
Ben F. Loeb. Jr. 
Ronald G. Lynch 
Janet Mason 
Richard R. McMahon 
Laurie L. Mesibov 
Joseph F. Miller 
Robert E. Phay 
Roger M. Schwarz 
Benjamin B. Sendor 
Michael R. Smith 
Stephen K. Straus 
Mason P. Thomas, Jr. 
A. John Vogt 
L. Poindexter Watts 
Warren J. Wicker 



THE INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT, an integral part of The University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, is devoted to teaching, research, and consultation in state 
and local government. 

Since 1931 the Institute has conducted schools and short courses for city, county, 
and state officials. Through guidebooks, special bulletins, and a magazine, the research 
findings of the Institute are made available to public officials throughout the state. 

Each day that the General Assembly is in session, the Institute's Legislative 
Reporting Service reports on its activities for both members of the legislature and 
other state and local officials who need to follow the course of legislative events. 

Over the years the Institute has served as the research agency for numerous study 
commissions of the state and local governments. 



A total of 350 copies of this public document were printed by the Institute of Government. The University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at a cost of S71.68. or S.20 per copy. These figures include only the direct costs 
ol reproduction. They do not include preparation, handling, or distribution costs.