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Full text of "The popular rhymes of Scotland, with illustrations"

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THB 



POPULAR RHYMES 

OP 

SCOTLAND, 

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS, 

CHIEFLY COLLECTED FROM ORAL SOURCES. 



By ROBERT CHAMBERS, 

AUTHOR or " TRADITIONS OP EDIKBUR6H," 
" WALKS IN EDINBURGH," &C. 



. he raucht me ane roll ; to rede I began 



> The royetest ane lagment with tnony a rati rime.** 

Douglas' Virgil, Prol 839 a 53. 



EDINBURGH: 

WILLIAM HUNTER, 23, HANOVER STREET, 

CHARLES SMITH & CO. 25, HANOVER STREET, 

AND JAMES DUNCAN, LONDON. 



MDCCCXXVI. 



0? ^^;v: ■ 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC^ 



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S2.E 
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PREFACE. 






^ 
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In the compilation of the following sheets, it 
having been my only aim to form an emi- 
nently cuKioDs BOOK, — ^the whimsicality of 
the design, the oddness of the materials, and 
the native Scottish humour which pervades 
a considerable part^ are the humble and sol^ 
qualities upon which it can found any claim' ; 
to public notice. 

In the peculiar eyes of antiquaries, I trust 
the Work will find favour upon a distinct 
account. There can be no doubt, thiit many 
of the " ratt rimes," preserved in this, and 
to be preserved in the succeeding series, 
though they may now appear vulgar and 
nugatory, contain memorials of obsolete man- 



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PREFACE. 



ners of which the present generation would 
gladly know more, and are the relics of a body 
of Scottish poetry long antecedent to any 
which has yet met the attention of collectors. 

It may seem strange to the uninitiated, — 
and, perhaps, more than strange to the great 
mass of periodical critics, at present so re- 
markable for their ignorance upon every to- 
pic out of the circle of the Belles Lettres, — 
that many of the popular phraser here ad- 
mitted are not distinguished by any rhyme, 
or even by the appearance of versification. 
But this will excite no surprise in those who 
understand the word rhyme in its extended 
Scottish sense. 

Two reasons have induced me to add to 
this volume a list, with specimens, of the 
classes of Rhymes which yet remain to be 
published. By a perusal of that paper, the 
public at large may form some idea of the 
probable contents of the intended second se- 



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PBSFAGE. Vll 

ties; while certain individual readers, who 
happen to possess stores of such <^ legendary 
lore," and who may entertain the patriotic or 
the kind wish ofperfecting this collection, will 
be directed in the tasks to which I most ear- 
nestly solicit their attention — of jotting down 
and communicating such Rhymes and Tra- 
ditionary Anecdotes of Scotland as may, 
by that means, be caDed to their memory. 

In thus soliciting future contributions, I 
am reminded of the duty of acknowledging 
those to which the collection has been alrea- 
dy indebted. That these have not been few, 
must be apparent to the most superficial 
reader, who will here find several hundred 
various pieces of original information, deriv- 
ed from natives of almost every district of 
Scotland. Indeed, the enthusiasiawith which 
my numerous friends entered into my de- 
sign immediately upon its being disclosed to 
them, and the vast trouble which they have 



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Vlll PREFACE. 

SO willingly endured in canvassing for the 
collection, are to me matters, at once, of infi- 
nite gratitude and serious regret. I am con- 
scious, that some have devoted to my service 
time which they could have spent more pro- 
fitably, and for which thanks, however warm, 
form but an inadequate remuneration ; while 
many others must have, Uke myself, cracked 
credit with their grandmothers, by inquiring 
after such homely and foolish things. 

R. CHAMBERS. 

Ikdia Place, January 5, 1826. 



P. S. — The public is indebted for the 
whole article entitled " ClanGregor" to a 
literary clansman, who has made researches 
into the history of his family with a view to 
publication. 



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CONTENTS. 



RHYMES ON LOCAUTIBS. 



Me&strie.— dackmannanshire, 


6 


Vale of Manor.— Peebles-shiie, 


7 


Lochannoss. — Domfries-ahiie, 


8 


The Links of Forth, 


9 




ib. 




11 


Ayrshire and Oalloway, 


ib. 


Tintock and Gouterfell, 


16 


Red Syke, &c_Selkirk8hire, 


17 


Pool Midnicht— Selkiikshiie, 


18 


Lylliaid's Edge, 


«I 


Biggar, 


ib. 


Mofiat,. 


n 


Tintock,--a hiU in Lanarkshire, 


24 




26 


Oilbum. — ^lanlithgowshire, 


27 


Fittempton, near Dundee, 


28 


Annan, Tweed, and Clyde, 


32 


Praam, Eik, and Canty, 


ib. 



CONTENTS. 



Lochde, &c — ^Flfeshire, 

Tweed and Till, - 

Tanas, — a Dumfnes-shire stream, 

Don and Dee, 

Meredeuch.Uead. — Peebles-shire, 

Lettered Crags of Galloway, 

Hills in the south-west of Scotland, 

Fanns near Peebles, 

— — — near Edinburgh, 
■ in Forfarshire, 

— in Fifeshire, 

■ in Lanarkshire, 

— — in the Vale of Clyde, 

. in Peebles-shire, 

»■ in £ast Lothian and Berwickshire, 

Sl Abb*s, &c East Lotbiaa, 

Church of Deer. — ^Aberdeenshire, 

Bastern Coast of Scotland, 

Repentance Tower. — ^Dumfrifis.«hire, 

Itoslin, 

Bridge of Teath«r-Perthshire, 

Roman Fort of Ardoch. — Perthshire, 

Money-digging Eh3nnea, — ^referring to DundonaJd 
Castle, ;Strathaven, Largjo Law, HenniCag^ Castle, 
Tamleuchar Cross, Place unknown, Grawfocdkuid 
Bridge^ and Farm of Clarkston in t^e panab ckf 
Lesmahago, 

Prophecies of Thomas the Rhymer & Notice of l2ie 
Seer,— Prophecy on his hott8e|-««JSibyne on Kis 



Page 

33 
34 
35 
ib. 
36 
37 
39 
ib. 
39 
40 
ib. 
41 
ib. 
42 
44 
45 
46 

4r 

ih. 
46 

Si 



56..70 



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C0NTSNT8. 



XI 



P«ge 

burial-place, — Prophecies r^emiig to the Thorn- 
tree of Earlstown, — Price of Salt and Meal, — The 
White Ox,— The Windy Winter, &c of 181»- 
tOy — YorR, Ixmdon, and Edinburgh, — The In- 
Tasiony—Eildon-tree,—— Agricultural improve- 

ments, Bannockbum, Carrolside Braes,-.- 

The Union, and the use of Lime as a manure, 70-^8 
lena, • .88 

Perth, . 93 

PowbateM-.Peeble8-8hire, . 94 

Sundrum, - 95 

Ewes of Oowrie, - 96 

Dee and Don, - 97 

Bridge of Don, . 98 

Tweed and Pewsail, - 99 

Seton. — Haddingtonshire, - 100 

Montrose, Dundee, Forfar, and Brechin, 102 

Dryfesdale Kirk, - 103 

Musselburgfa.^— Edinburghshire, 107 

Edinburgh, - 108 

CHABACTBBISTIOS OP LOCALITIES. 



AbodecD, 

A6, Dumfiiei-shire, 

Ayr, 

Oirse of Gowrie, 

Dundee, 

Ihinse, 



111 
lb. 

113 
ib. 

115 
ib. 



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XM CONTSNTt. 






Page 


Edinbuigh, 


116 


Bumblaoe, 


117 


Forfar, 


ib. 


Falkland, 


118 


Glasgow, Greenock, and Paisley, 


ib. 


Kippen, 


119 


KlrkaMy, 


ib. 


Linlithgow, 


ib. 


People of the Meams, 


120 


Musselburgh, 


ib. 


POPULAR REPBOACHES. 




lidth. 


125 


The Canongate, Edinburgh, 


133 


The Nether.bow, ditto, 


133 


liitde Dunkdd, 


134 


Dunbar, ^ 


ib. 


Maybole, Ayrshire, 


135 


Jedburgh, Roxburghshire, 


ib. 


Bowden, Roxburghshire, 


136 


Lauder, Berwickshire, 


ib. 


Aberlady, East Lothian, 


138 


Path.head, Fifeshire, 


139 


Kirriemuir, Augus-shire, 


ib. 


Selkirk, 


140 


Kinghom, 


ib. 


lianark. 


ib. 


The Highlands, 


148 



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CONTENTS. 


xiii 




Page 


Farms iu Angus-shire, 


143 


The Jacobites, 


ib. 


Ecdesiamagirdle, 


144 


Famay of Gordon, 


145 


Bucklyvie, 


ib. 


Elliots, Armstrongs, Johnstons, and Jaidines, 


146 


Boys of Heriot's Hospital, Edinburgh, 


148 


Weavers, 


150 


Shoemakers, 


151 


Candlemakers, . 


152 


Shepherds, 


ib. 


Lamp-lighters, 


153 


Tailors, 


154 


Cadgers, 


ib. 



RHYMES UPON FAMILIES OP DISTINCTION. 

Leslie, . . 157 

Home of Cowdenknows, . 159 

Haig of Bemerside, . 160 

Graham of Moiphie, - 163 

Fraser, , 164 

Mosman of Auchtyfardle, . 165 

Kennedy, . ib. 

ClanGregor, . 166 

Guthrie, . 182 

The Duke of AthoII, . 184 

SomerYiUe, Lord Somenrille, - ib. 



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CMmTBNTS. 



FAMILY GHAaACTfiBISTICS. 

Page 



Gordons, 


. 


199 


CampbeUs, 


, - 


205 


Daliymples, 


- 


206 


Qrahams, 


- 


209 


LincUays, 


. 


ib. 


Moriflons, 


. 


209 


SomerrUles, 


. 


210 


Hamiltoiu, 


w 


212 


ArmstroDgs, 


- 


ib. 


Humes, Scotts, Kem, and Rutherfonls, 


ib. 


Johnstons, 


. 


ib. 


Douglas, 


. 


213 


Dufis, • 


• 


ib. 


Setons, 


. 


214 


Macraes, 


• - 


ib. 




• 


ib. 


Hays, 


■ 


215 


FouUsofColinton, 


• 


ib. 


Monteaths, 


• 


216 


Boyds, 


• 


ib. 


Frazers, 


• 


ib. 


Macneils, 


• 


ib. 




. 


ib. 


Macdonalds, 


. 


2ir 


Munays, 


. 


ib. 


Madeans, 


- 


240 


MaxtOD of Cultoquay*8 


Litany, 


241 



niniti7PHhuCiooale 
»^ .,„ .. :......— - 



CONTXXT8. XV 
8L0OAN8 OF FAHILIS8 AND TOWNS. 

page 

Doa^, . - 251 

Dwnlqr, - ib. 

Soott, - - ib. 

Home, - ib. 

Granstoiu, - 252 

SeUms, - - ib. 

Hepburns, • - ib. 

Forbes, - ib. 

FarquhaTSOii, - - 253 

MacphenoD, - - ib. 

Gkngany, - - ib. 

Ooidon, - - ib. 

Mackenzie, - - 254 

Gnmt, - - ib. 

Macfarlane, - - 255 

Buchanan, - - ib. 

ClanraBBald, - - ib. 

MacQiegor, - - 256 

Mercer of Aldie, - ib. 

Dumfries, - • ib. 

Hawick, - - ib. 

Jedbuigh, - • ib. 

District of Olenlivat, - - ib 

District of Strathdown, - ib. 

RHYMES AFPBOFBIATB TO SUPERSTITIONS. 

The Fairies, . - 256-66 



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XVI OONTXMTS. 

Page 

Brownies, - - 266-77 

The Witches, - - 277-9 

Lomtie and the Mennud, - 279 

Rhyme of the Red-Etin, - 281 

Miscellaneous Freits, - - 283-^ 

SPECIMENS OF UNPUBLISHED CLASSES OF 
POPULAR RHYMES. 

Rhymes upon seasons and the weather, 291 

Rhymes on natural objects, - - 292 

Nursery rhjrmes, - - 298 

Nursery Legends and Ballads, - 294 

Puerile rhymes, - - 296 

Rhymes appropriate to juvenile amusements, 297 

Rhjrmes appropriate to games, - 298 

Riddles, - - 299 

Rhymes connected with the festive observances in 

Scotland at the New-Year, - 300 

Miscellaneous, ib. 



.C,aoo]e 



0n U.0uaititff* 



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The Local Rhymes are of several sorts. 
Some refer to events and stories, which we 
have done our utmost to relate with fidelity : 
others are simj^y descriptive of territorial 
peculiarities ; and a considerable portion are 
mere enumerations of various localities, with- 
out any characteristic description. Besides 
these, there is another important class in the 
form of predictions, the greater part of which 
being popularly ascribed to Thomas the 
Rhymer, we have added to our other illus- 
trations a notice of that personage, so re- 
markable as being the earliest poet and the 
only prophet produced in Scotland- 



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ON LOCALITIES. 



Thb beautifnl district of Menstrie was formerly 
hoooizred by the presence and presidency of a 
fairy^ which, within the recollection of people 
still alive^ was expelled from her favourite 
haunts, by the intrusion of a very different spi- 
rit — ^the genius of agricultural and commercial 
enterprise. In peculiarly dark and stilly nights, 
however, it is believed, that, ^' like a ghost re^ 
visiting the pale glimpses of the moon," this 
ddiicate spirit occasionally returns to her aban- 
doned territory, and laments the devastations 
whidi have been committed in her absence by 
8tone^£ences, cotCon«mills, and the copse-'de- 
Btroying plough* Many, moreover, asgert that 
a2 



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6 



I^OCALITIES. 



she has been heard to vent her sorrows in the 
following affecting stanza :«-* 

OH, ALVA WOODS ARE VONKIE, 

TILLIECOULTRY UILI.8 ABE FAIB ; 

BUT WHEN I THINK O* THE BONNIE BEAE8 O* 
MBN8TBIE, 
IT MAES MT HSABT AY S4IB. 

But there happen to be two stories to this 
rhyme. Instead of a fairy, a miller's wife, 
who was taken away by fairies, b said by some 
to have been the author of the ditty. The 
miller's wife was very pretty ; and having at- 
tracted the attention of the good neighbours, 
who seem to have had a constant eye to good 
looks, was eloped with by some gallant green- 
coated cavalier, and taken away to Fairyland. 
The " injured husband" had, of course, no 
more than the usual resource on such occa- 
sions—resignation ; for there is no commissary 
court, and, what is worse, no Chalk Farm, for 
cases of faferie gallantry. The most provoking 
thing of all was, that the disconsolate miller 
. was every day tantalised by hearing his lost 
spouse singing, from overhead, in the air, the 
above ditty, which finely e^spressed her anxious 



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LOCALITIES. 7 

desire of returning to his widowed arms. At 
length, one day, as he was riddling some stuff 
upon his own dunghill, happening unconscious- 
ly to use a magical posture, the lost nymph of 
the mill dropped down out of the air into his 
riddle^ and remained for ever after " a faithful 
and loving wife^" in despite of the fairies^ 
whose spells had thus been broken. 

VALE OF MANOR.— P<?efcfe*-*A»rf, 

THERE STAND THREE HILLS ON MANOR WATER« 

A FOURTH AT FOSSO CLEUGH : 
GIN HEATHER.BELLS WERE CORN AND BEAR, 

THEY WAD GET GRIST ENEUGH. 

In the desolate vale of Manor there were 
formerly no fewer than four mills, each be« 
longing to a distinct laird, who bound all his 
tenants to take their grain thidier, according to 
an oppressive and absurd old practice, known 
by the phrase thirlage. Since one mill now 
serves to grind all the grain produced in Ma« 
nor, ev«i in the present advanced state of agri- 
culture, some idea may be formed of the state 
of things in regard to the trade of grinding. 



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8 LOCAL1TIB8. 

when there wQre four rival profeftMnrs of thst 
useful art^ to be supported by what now scarce* 
ly suffices for one. The people felt» saw^ and 
satirized the thing in a style highly character- 
istic^ by the sneering rhime affixed, whidi is 
still popular, though the occasion has long since 
passed away. — ^It may be proper to remind our 
readers, that the vale of Manor is remarkable 
for having been the residence of David Ritchie, 
the deformed and eccentric pauper, whose cha- 
racter and appearance are supposed to have 
formed the groundwork of the tale entitled 
'' The Black Dwarf." 

LOCHAR.MOSS.~7>«m/>-l^«^Aim 

FIBST A WUDD, AND STME A SBA ( 
KOW A M0J9S, ANJ> Ay£ WILL BC* 

This ancient popular rhyme records the re* 
volutions undergone by the territory called 
Lochar-moss, previous to settling in its present 
and final character of a peaUbog ; and it may 
appear singular, that the modern naturalist ac« 
counts for the producti<Hi of moss in precisely 
» similar way* 



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LOCALITIES. 9 

THE LINKS OF FORTH. 

'' The numerous wiiulings of the Forth, 
called Links, form a great number of beautiful 
peninsulas, which, being of a very luxuriant 
and fertQe soil^ gave rise to the following old 
rliyme. — 

*^ THE LAIRDSHIP 0* TBE BONNIE LINKS O* FORTH 
IS BETTER THAN AN EARLDOM OF THE NORTH.** 

NimtM't SHrUngshirey 439, 440. 
WHITTINGHAME.~i:a*< Lothiaiu 

It is Httle more than half a century since the 
good people of Whdttinghame got happily quit 
of a ghost, which, in the shape of an " un- 
christened wean," had annoyed them for many 
years. An unnatural mother having murdered 
her child at a large tree, not far from the vil- 
lage, the ghost of the deceased was afterwards 
seen, on dark nights, running in a distract- 
ed manner between the said tree and the 
chnrch-yard, and was occasionally heard to 
greet. It was understood by the villagers, that 
it was obliged thus to take the air, and bewail 



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10 LOCAX^ITIBS. 

itself^ on account of wanting a fMime>— -no ano- 
nymous person^ it seems^ being able to get a 
proper footing in the other world. Nobody 
durst speak to the unhappy little spirit^ out of 
a superstitious dread of dying immediately af- 
ter ; aiid^ to all appearance^ the village of Whit- 
tinghame was destined to be haunted till the 
end of time^ for want of an exorcist. At 
lengthy however^ it providentially happened^ 
that a drunkard, one night, in reeling home, 
encountered it; and, being fearless in the 
strength of John Barleycorn, did not hesitate 
to address it in the same familiar stylje as if it 
had been one of his own flesh and blood fellow- 
topers. " How's a' wi' ye this morning, Short- 
Hoggers?" cried the courageous villager,— 
when the ghost immediately ran away, joyful- 
ly exclaiming,— i 

OH WEEL*S ME NOO9 I^V'E GOTTEN A KAME ; 

THEY CA' UE SHOaT-HOOGERS O* WHITTINGHAME ! 

And, since that time, it has never been either 
seen or heard of. The name which the drunk- 
ard applied to it denotes that the ghost wore 
short stockings without feet, — a probable sup- 



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LOGALITIBS. 11 

position^ considering the long series of years 
during which it had walked. Our informant 
received this ^ry^ with the rhyme, from the 
lips of an old woman of Whittinghame, who 
had seen the ghost. 



BILHOPE BBAES, &e^Liddetdale. 

BILHOFE BRAES FOR BUCKS AND RABB, 

CARIT HAU6HS FOR SWINE, 
AND TARRA8 FOR A GUDE BULL-TROUT, 

IF IT BE TA*EN IN TIME. 

" An old rhyme, which celebrates the pla- 
ces in Liddesdale remarkable for game. The 
bucks and raes, as well as the swine, are now 
extinct; but the good bull-trout is still fa- 
mous." — Notes to Lay of the Last Minstrel, 
296. 



AYRSHIRE AND GALLOWAY. 

KTLE FOR A MAN, 

CARRICK FOR A COW, 
CUNNINGHAM FOR CORN AND BEAR,. 

AND GALLOWAY FOR WOO*. 



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12 IiOCALITIBS. 

This old rhjrme points out what each of the 
three districts of Ayrshire and the neighbour- 
ing territory of Galloway are remarkable for 
producing in greatest perfection. The men of 
Kyle^ the cows of Carrick, the grain of Cun- 
nlngham, and the tvool of Galloway, are all 
the best of their kind. Some variations are 
made upon the rhyme; as, " Carrick for a 
man/' and ^' Kyle for a cow :" but though the 
people of Carrick always give it thus, we be- 
lieve the above reading to be correct. '' But- 
ter and cheese" have been of late years substi- 
tuted by many for " com and bear ;" and we 
believe the former to be now most applicable 
to Cunningham : yet we have thought proper 
to prefer the original version. 
. The inhabitants of the three various dis- 
tricts of Ayrshire are, or were till lately, not 
less dissimilar in character, manners, and do- 
mestic economy, than are the favourite pro- 
ductions of their respective soils. The farm- 
ers of Kyle may be described as very poor, 
very decent, -and very stupid, and as strongly 
attached to the modes of conduct in every 
thing pursued by their ancestors. Because 
their fathers had small farms, made family- 



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liOaALlTIES. 13 

worship at mom and eventide^ wore old-fa- 
shioned clothes, and used all descriptions of 
obsolete, ill-constructed,, farming implements, 
the present genera|tion think themselves obliged 
to do the same, even at the risk of falling be« 
hind, and b^ng laughed at by their more en- 
terprising neighbour^ On representing to a 
fSirmer of Kyle, that the plough he used was 
the most inconvenient and expensive of aU 
poMble old-fashioned ploughs, he defended 
himself by saying, that the plough had been 
^' used for bunders o' years," and might, there- 
fore, be considered as proved and sanctified by 
experience ; whereas the implements of a novel 
construction^ though, to appearance, they seem- 
ed convenient and '^ easy to work," wanted 
that indispensable recommendation. Nor did 
he seem capable of appreciating the allegory 
or parable, under cover of which his objections 
were answered. " Suppose your house across 
the fields, which is exceedingly old and ruin- 
ous, were declared on the point of falling, 
would you rfjmain in it, because, as it had shel- 
tered so many of your fore&thers, it would, 
might, could, or should continue to shelter 
you?" Kyle may be considered a precious 



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14 LOCALITIES. 

district to an antiquary ; so many rich and en- 
tire spedmens does it contain of the habits of 
living, as well as of farmings which prevailed 
some centuries ago; and so completely does 
the present time^ in every respect^ shadow fordi 
the past. It may be proper to mention^ that 
the character of a Kyle farmer of the old school 
is very fully and faithfully represented in 
Burns's delineations of his own father, and, still 
more completely, in the exquisite sketch of the 
*^ auld fiu*mer/' who wishes a good new year- 
to his equally venerable mare. — The farmers 
of Carrick 9xe the very antipodes to those of 
Kyle, being, in general, rich, bold, debauched 
young men, possessed with infinite propensities 
to wild specttlaticms. This diaracter they seem 
to have chiefly acquired Arom the smuggling 
which, till within the last few years, prevailed 
to so flagrant an extent along the whole *' Car-' 
rick shore." The farmers of Carrick are con* 
stantly riding about upon blood-horses ; and, 
as they make a point of attending every lair 
and market within fifty miles round, they sel- 
dom get drunk oftener than six times a-week. 
" Tarn o* Shanter " was intended by Burns as 
a picture, and it was a most faithful onc^ of 



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ZiO0ALITIBS« 15 

the Carrick fanner about forty Jbtirs ago, when 
he as yet wore a " gude blue bonnet^" and re* 
tained some portion of his primitiye simplicity 
of character.— The farmers of Cunningham are, 
if possible, still more antiquated than those of 
Kyle. A great proportion of them have mere- 
ly small dairy concerns, of which they tran- 
sport the proceeds once or twice every week to 
Ayr, in their single old-fashioned cart, with 
their single old-fashioned horse,— themselves 
perched up in front, with their broad blue bon- 
nets, hodden-grey great-coats, and stout wool- 
len rig^and-fur gamashes. These dairy farm- 
ers are very numerous, and their farms usually 
consist in a single park, which they denomi- 
nate their " spat." From the travels of Wil- 
liam Lithgo^, (1628,) it appears that Cun- 
ningham was then, as now, a perfect hot-bed 
of puritanism. 

Galloway has, at all times, been remarkable 
for its primeval savage character. Its early 
inhabitants seem to have been considered as 
strangers in this country ; hence the popular 
phrase, thejremit Scot o' Gallowa*, It also ap- 
pears that a still worse character was occasion- 
ally ascribed to them, — ^that of robbers ; which 



i 



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16 LOCALITIES. 

may be considered as indicated by the nursery 
rhyme used by mothers when repelling the ad* 
vances made by the elder children to the sweet 
and delicate food appropriated to that enviable 
personage^ '* the bairn/'—** Eh !" she will say, 
striking them, perhaps, over the fingers with 
the spoon, 

'« GBEtDT OAITS O* GALL0WA% 

TAKS A* THK BAIRH'S MEAT AW A* !*' 

The distinction which Oalloway long ago ac* 
quired, and still maintains, on account of its 
wool, is pointed out by a common puerile 
rhyme, appn^riate to the game of riding horses^ 

CaiPVLE DICE 

UPOir A STICK, 
SAKDT OK A SCO, 

BIDE AWAY 

TO OAI.I.OWAr, 
TO BU« -A PUHB O* WOO*. 

TINTOCK AND COULTEBFELIi* 

THE HEIGHT ATWEEK TIKIOCK-TAP AMD COULTER- 
FELL 
18 JUST THBEE QUARTERS O* AN ELL. 



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LOCALITIES. 17 

These hills are the most conspicuous objects 
in a district of Lanarkshire^ which is in gene- 
ral rather fiat ; and the rhyme seems m^ely to 
doiote that they are nearly of the same height* 

RED SYKE, SL^c^Selkirkihire, 

WHEN THE RED SYKE AT E*£N SOUNDS LOUD, 
AND THE LAN*-£A8£ IS KIYERED WI* A CLUD, 
AND THE CORBIE CROUPS ON THE AULD THORN, 
WE*RE SURE, WILLIE WISE, THERE *LL BE RAIN THE 
MORN. 

The Lan'-ease is a mountain lying in the 
wilds of Buccleuch^ west of Ranklebum. It 
bas evidently got its name from the circum-* 
atance of its formerly having been a common, 
to whidb the muirland farmers around were wont 
to send their eild sheep and cattle, during the 
summer months, as a sort of ease to the rest of 
their land. The Red Syke is a rapid .rivulet 
which descends from a hill opposite to Lan'- 
ease. The ihom is no longer to the fore. As 
for Willie Wise, our informant professes igno* 
ranee respecting him or his use in the rhyme, 

b2 



vCooale 



18 LOOALITies. 

It is still believed in the secluded district of 
Selkirkshire^ where alope the rhjrme seems to 
be known^ that^ when the combination of signs 
shall occur as foretold in the text, the follow- 
ing day will produce a second deluge. 

POOL-JtflDNIGHT, &c — Selktrkthire. 

AULD MEG LINTON, O* THE FULE O* IIIDNICHT 

HAUGH, 
IS BURIET AKETH THE BOGLE SAUCH ; 
8A£ AULO MEG LINTON IS CAULD AND BEAD, 
AND NOCHT IN HER HOUSE BUT A PYKIT SUEEP- 

BEAP« 

This rhyme belongs to the same district with 
the preceding. Auld Meg Linion was a real 
personage,— one of those poor, old, solitary, in- 
firm women, who are so often to be found in 
the rural districts of Scotland, living in remote 
cottages, with no company, perhaps, but that 
of a cat ; and no provision but the slender pro- 
fits of their spiiming-wheel, or a few pence 
weekly from the parochial funds. Mause, in 
the Qenile Shepherd, is a picture of these old 



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LOCALITIES. 19 

creatures, who, in former times, got the credit 
of being witches. The tradition respecting 
Meg Linton bears, that she was found stark 
and stiff in her cottage ; and was supposed to 
have died of hunger, as there was no appear* 
ance of food in her house, except tlie bare skull 
of a sheep. It was found necessary to bury 
her, without ceremony, beneath a willow-tree 
near the house; which, thenceforth, got the 
name of the Bt^le Sauch, her ghost being sup- 
posed to haunt the spot. It does not now 
exist ; but the vestigia of her humble hovel are 
still visible. Pule-Midnicht, so named from its 
depth and blackness, is formed by the Timma, 
a rough-running stream, which takes its rise 
amongst the wilds of Tamleuchar, in Esfkdale- 
rouirhead. The whole scenery of the rhyme is 
singularly wild and gloomy, even in the hours of 
open day. To what extent its horrors must be 
redoubled at midnight, none can tell or even 
imagine, as the people who dwell in the neigh- 
bourhood would consider it a tempting of Pro^ 
vidence tp intrude upon its haunted solitudes at 
that dreary hour. Indeed, there is another 
circumstance connected with Midnight Haugh, 
which may be considered as finishing off its 



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20 LOOAIiXTIBB. 

character of horror, and to this the following 
rhyme expressly refers :-— 

LET NANE WHAE 6AE BY THE OAIT-CLSUCH FIT, 
look' EAST 0& WAST AT THE AULI> BIHK THEE, 

FOB TBXEKy AT S'ZV, WILL WEE JOHNKIE BE SEElT, 
Wl' HIS NECK TWIKB9 ROUMB Wl' LOOM-COBBS 
THBEE I 

We have received the story from an intelli- 
gent old shepherd, who resides near the scene 
in question, who derived his information from 
his grandfather. Wee Johnnie was a weaver, 
and a respectable man; but, being oppressed 
with poverty and a bad wife, found himself 
compelled to end his cares, by hanging himself 
with his loom-cords from the birk-tree of the 
Gait-cleugb, He, accordingly, made the fatal 
attempt, and had, it is supposed, so far sue* 
ceeded, when, with his weight and wriggling, 
little and weak as he was, the loom-cords broke. 
The subjacent pool, however, was deep, and 
beset all round with rugged rocks, so that the 
unfortunate weaver ultimately gained his point 
by a threefold process ; being, as the country 
people say, half-hanged, half-felled, and half- 
drowned,— making up, in all, a very 8ub$tan« 
tial de^th. 



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L0CALITIB8. 21 



LYLLIARB'S EDGE. 

FAim HAI15EN LTLLTAftD LIEB UITDER THIS STAKE, 
LITTLE WAS HEB. 8TATUEE, BUT GREAT WAS HER 

fame; 

UPOV THE ENGLISH LOUKS SHE LAID MANY THUMPS, 
AND WHEK HER LEGS WERE OFF SHE FOUGHT UPON 
HER STUMPS. 

" The spot on which the noted battle of 
Ancrum Moor was fought^ is called Lylliard's 
Edge^ from an Amazonian Scottish woman of 
that name, who is reported, by tradition, to 
have distinguished herself in the same manner 
as Squire Widdrington. The old people point 
out her monument, now brbken and defaced. 
The inscription is said to have been legible 
within this last century."— -Miw*^. Scot. Bard, 
iii, 247. 



BIOGAR. 

THE LAPOIE HAD TRICKS THAT COST HIM FU* DEAR, 

FOR HE. WAS A RANNAGAT LOON ; 
BUT THEIR AIN LICKS AND THEIR AIN DRUM-STICKS 

HAE FARED AS ILL FOR THE TOON. 



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32 LOOALJTIBS. 

This rhyme relates to a circumstance whidi 
happened while Biggar was a burgh of regality. 
An iU-deedie youths it is said^ for some offence^ 
was drummed out of the town. Ooing to 
Edinburgh, however, where he found a better 
field for the exercise of his genius^ and attained 
to eminence as a lawyer, the rights of the 
town of Biggar happened, in the course of 
business, to fall into his hands ; and, in the 
spirit of retaliation, be thought proper to de- 
stroy the same, so fiS to deprive his native 
place of all its burgal privileges. On the 
people of Biggar demanding restitution, he is 
said to have sent them a taunting message^ to 
the effect that they had certainly drummed 
their rights out of the town, adding the above 
rhyme, which is still preserved in Biggar, as a 
melancholy memorial of ih^ir lost importance 
and immuniti^, 



HOFFAT. 

The following rhyme refers to a real cir- 
cumstance, and gives us a very clear idea of 
the state of the popular supei^stitions respect* 



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LOOALVflMB. 23 

ing witchcraft daring the ceaataty before the 
last 



THKKE DWALT A WEAVES tV UOFFAT TOtTH, 
THAT SAID THV MIKI8TER WAD DEE 8UKE ; 
THE mKISTXaDSE^D; Ain> THE FOUK O* THE TOUlT, 
THEf BRANT THE WEAVEB WI* THE WUDD O* HIS 

LUME, 
AND CA'D IT WEEL'-WAKED ON THE WABLOCK LOON ! 

The village of Moffat has of late years thriven 
considerably^ by reason of the visitors attracted 
to it by a mineral-well in the neighbourhood. 
As its prosperity, however, is great during the 
summer months, so it is little during the de« 
solate period of winter, when the inhabitants 
are, in reality, almost starved. The neigh« 
bouring villagers, who, of coarse, envy Moffat 
during the days of its excessive splendour, and 
despise it proportionably in its period of de- 
pression, have long had a standing-joke upon 
the town. — " If you meet," say they, •* a Mof- 
fat man in summer any where out of doors, 
and ask him where he resides, he vociferates, 
* Moffat, and be d — dT but, on the -contrary, 
if you ask the same question in winter, the 



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24 L00ALITIB8. 

answer is esfMressed in the most piteous strain^ 
' Moffat, God help us f " The people of Mof- 
fat being far removed from any coal district^ 
and^ therefore, under the necessity of digging 
their fuel from a neighbouring moss, the 
phrase, a Moffat firty has long been proverbial, 
being thus explained by the authors of the 
above joke, — imae peals and ae truff. 

TINTOCK A mn in Lanarkshire. 

OiX TIKTOpK-TAP THSKK 18 ▲ MIST, 
AND IN THAT M18T THERE IS A KI8T, 
AND IN THE KIST THERE 18 A CAUF, 
AND IN THE CAUP THERE 18 A DRAP ; 
TAK DP THE CAUP, DRINK AFF THE DRAP, 
AND SET THE CAUP ON TINTOCK-TAP. 

Tintock may be called a very popular moun- 
tain ; and this diiefly arises from its standing 
almost alone in the midst of a country generally 
level. On the summit is an immense accumu- 
lation of stones, said to have been brought 
thither at different times from the vale (dis- 
tance three Scotch miles) by the country 
people, upon whom the task was enjoined as a 
penance by the priests of St. John's Kirk, which 



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LOCALITIES. 25 

was situated in a little glen at the north-east 
skirt of the mountain, though no vestige of its 
existence now remains except the burying- 
gTQund. The summit of Tintock Ss often en- 
veloped hi mist ; and the ** kist" mentioned in 
the rh3nne^ was^ perhaps^ a large stone^ re- 
markable over all the rest of the heap for 
having a hole in its upper side^ said to have 
been formed by the grasp of Sir William Wal- 
lace's thumbs on the evening previous to his 
defeating the Enghsh at Boghall^ in the neigh- 
bourhood.* The hole is generally full of water^ 
on account of the drizzling nature of the at- 
mosphere ; but if it is meant by the " caup " 
mentioned; we must suppose that the whole is 
intended as a mockery of human strength ; for 
it is certainly impossible to lift the stone and 
drink off the contents of the hollow. 



• The advancement of the Scottnsh nation, in the arts of 
oomlbrt, at that early period, may, perhaps, be proved by 
the ciicamstance of a plain in Tweedsmuir being still called 
the '^ PuvUUm Haugh,'* on account of the Scottish hero 
having there pitched his tent after the battle of Biggar. 



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26 ^ LOCAItlTIBS. 

COWDAILY CASTLE — Lanarkshire. 

*TWCZ)r THE RAE-RILL AKD LORIBUKVSHAW, 
THERE TS*LL f IVD COWDAII.T WA% 

AMD TKE rOUKDATIOJrs I. AID OK BEK. 

Near Camwath^ in Lanarkshire, stands Cow- 
thaUy, Cowdaily, or Quodaily Castle^ the ori- 
ginal property and residence of the noble fiunily 
of Somerville. The first Somerville> as tradi- 
tion reports, came from France, and dispossess- 
ed the former proprietor of Quodaily ; some of 
whose vassals he subjected to his authority, 
though, it appears, without succeeding in at- 
taching them very faithfully to his interests. 
Somerville demolished the outer walls of the 
castle, and a good part of the castle itself, be- 
fore he could make himself master of it ; and 
afterwards saw fit to rebuild the same de novo 
in a different place. But against this design he 
found circumstances in strong opposition. As 
the country people say, '^ what of the wall he 
got built during the day was regularly dung 
down at night.'' In this dilemma, Somerville, 
suspecting the fidelity of his watchmen, under- 
took to ^' wake the castle" in person. It would 



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I«0CAI.ITIB8. 27 

appear^ however^ ^t this had no effect m sav- 
ing the building ; for who should come to de« 
molish it but the Devil himself, with four or 
five of his principal servants, who, without 
heeding Somerville's expostulations, or even his 
active renstance, fell too, like men cutting rice, 
and undid all the work of the day, diannting 
all the while, in unearthly articulation, the 
above rhyme ; and it is added, that, in com- 
pliance with this hint, Somerville was neces- 
sitated to rebuild the castle of Cowdaily on its 
original foundations, which were of iron. It 
is supposed, that some of the vassals of the for- 
mer lord, in this affair, personated the demons; 
and that, while the French watchmen were 
thereby torified out of their wits, the Scottish 
men, whom SomerviUe had pressed into his 
sarvice, considered the whole transaction as a 
piece of good sport, and connived at it out of 
. secret emnity to their new master* 



An unfortunate lady, whose first name was 
AiUe, (Anglic^ Alice,) was kept by a Duke of 



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38 LOCAI^ITIJBB. 

Hamilton, upwards of a century ago» at Kinniel 
Hou«e^ West Lothian. Aeoording to the tradi- 
tions of the country people, this wretched fe- 
male put an end to her exi8tence> by throwing 
herself from the walla of the caatle into the deep 
ravine below, through which the Gilbum de- 
scends. Her sfnritis supposed to haunt this glen; 
and it is customary for the children of Linlith- 
gowshire, on dark and stormy nights, to say,*— 

LAD7, LADT LILBUaX, 
HUITTS IJT THE OILBUEIT. 



PITTEMPTON— A'car Dundee. 

1 WAS TEMPTED AT PITTEMPTON, 

DBAIGL1T AT BALD&AGON, 
STBICKEN AT STRIKE*MARTIK, 

AKO KILLSS AT MARTIN*8 STAMB. 

Tradition connects this rhyme with the fol- 
lowing romantic incident, which is generally 
known and believed by the country people liv- 
ing near the localities referred to. — 

At a very, remote period, when Scotland was 
not altogether redaimed from its aboriginal 



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LOGAIiITlES. 99 

savage 8tate> and when it was yet inflated by 
beasts of prey^ a peasant, who resided at a place 
called Pittempton, about three miles frc«n Dun^ 
dee, along with his nin^ daught^s, all famed 
fbr their beauty and virtue, one day desired the 
eldest to bring a pitcher of water ftoia the 
well, which lay at the distance of about a gun- 
shot from the house. It was near sunset ; and, 
as the girl stayed unusually long, one of her 
sisters was sent out to learn the occasion of her 
delay. Ske likewise faUed to return at the 
time expected ; and another was then dispatch- 
ed, with an angry message to the former two, 
commanding them instaitf ly home, uilder pain 
of their father's severe displeasure. The third 
was, in her turn, also delayed : and it was not 
till the fourthi fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, 
and ninth had been successively dispatched in 
tibe same manner, and when he observed night 
fast approaching, that the father became seri-* 
ously alarmed for their personal safety. He 
then smed his fish-spear, and ran to the well, 
where he ^aecfy&ed a monstrous serpent, <Hr 
dragon, lying, besmeared with blood, apparent* 
ly having killed and devoured all the nine un-f 
^rtumte maidens. Unable to cope single^ 

q2 



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30 LOCAI/YTIS8. 

handed with so formidable a foe^ the poor man 
retreated in dismay ; but^ having quickly cd- 
lected several hundreds of his -neighbours^ soon 
returned to the place^ and prepared to attadc 
the monster^ which had thus deprived him of 
all earthly comfort. 

The dragon^ (for so it is styled by the coun- 
try people^ though^ probably^ only one of those 
serpents^ of vhose devastations so mimy tradi- 
tion£a*y stories are told in different places^) find« 
ing himself hotly pressed on all sides^ endea* 
voured to escape^ and maintained a sort of run- 
ning fight with the little army of rustics, eadi 
individual of which* seemed anxious to signal- 
ize himself by killing so extraordinary a rep- 
tile. Among these, a youth, named Martin, the 
lover of one of the hapless maidens, and a man, 
it would appear, of great bravery and strength, 
was determined either to revenge the death of 
his mistress, or die in the attempt. The ser- 
pent at first took a northerly route, and was 
sorely beset, and roughly handled, at a place 
called Baldragon, distant about a quarter of a 
mile in that direction frmn Pittenipton, and 
which, though now drained, was then a moss,.-^' 
whence the line in the rhyme '^ droiglit/* 



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I<0CAI.1TI1SS. 31 

(i. e. weiied) *^ at Baldragon." Still continuing 
his flight northwards for about two miles^ he 
was again surrounded by his enemies ; and 
here Martin endeavoured to signalize himself 
by a single combat with his scaly foe. With a 
Uow of his massy club he restrained the pro- 
greas of the monster^ which was about to re- 
turn the same^ by darting upon him^ when the 
rusttes^ coming up at tUs momait, exclaimed, 
" Strike, Martin!" and Martin, then letting 
fall his club a second time, with prodigious ef- 
feet> and to the almost complete discomfiture q£ 
the dragon, which now crawled heavily away, 
the scene Df so .remarkable &n achievement was 
thence called Sltike-'Martin. The dragon now 
continued his retreat about half a mile still far«^ 
ther north, when it was again hemmed in by 
the rustics, and finally slain by the heroic Mar- 
tin. A stone, bearing the outlined figure of a 
serpent, and the above rhyme, in very rude and 
ancient characters, still marks the spot, and is 
always called ** Martin's Stane." It is also 
worth narrating, as a confirmation of the cir- 
cumstances related, that the well is still called • 
" The Nine Maidens' Well,"— being known 
by no pthen 



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32 UMALITIBS. 



ANNAN, TWEEP, AND CLYDE. 

ANlfAN, TWEED, AKD CLYDE, 

RASE A* OUT O' A£ HILL SIDE. 

TWEED BAX, AVKTAK WAK, 

CLYDE TELL, AKD BKAK' ITS X^jaJC OW&S COBKA 

Liwir. 

These three chief rivers o£€be south of Scot- 
land rise at different sides of one^hill, and mn 
in different directions towards the Solwaj firth, 
the German ocean^ and the Atlantic^—- 4he course 
of the Annan being the shortest, whence, in the 
rhyme, it is said to win the race. This rhjrme 
prevails all over the south of Scotland, with 
plight variations, 

PROSIN, ESK, AND CAKATy. 

P&O0IK, X8K, Airn CARAT Y, 

JUXET AT TitE BIRXEJT 0088 O^ syVElUUlXTY. 

This is a eorrect description of the jiinction 
pf the said three rivers, {nverarit^ ia f^ parifjb 



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LOCALITIJSa. 33 



LOCHTIE, &c — Fifeshire. 

LOCSTIC, X.OTHRIE, tEVEH, AND ORR, 
BIN A* THBaVOH CAHEROK BRXGa BORE. 

Of these four Fife streams^ the Leven is the 
principal. It absorbs the waters and names of 
all the rest^ before passing under the bridge of 
Cameron, near the sea-port village of Wemyss. 
Orr is next in point of importance, and, run- 
ning for a considerable way parallel to the Le« 
yen, joins it a little above the bridge. Each 
receives a tributary stream, — the Leven the 
Lothrie, and Orr the Lochtie. The Orr takes 
ks rise from Loch Orr, which is now drained, 
and forms part of the estate of Walter Scott, 
Esq. son of Sir Walter Scott of Abbotsford. 

On the top of Benarty, which rises above 
Loch Orr, there were formerly held games, 
which all the herds of Fife, and other neigh- 
bouring counties, attended. They brought their 
wives, daughters, and sweethearts ; and having 
a plentiful stock of victuals, kept up the fete 
for a few days, bivouacking upon the ground 
during the night The chief games were the 



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34 LOCALVnMB. 



the foot-ballj and the wads ;* and what 
with howling^ singing, and drinking, after the 
manner of the modem Irish, they continued to 
spend the time very merrily. The top of Ben* 
arty is flat, and sufficiently extensive for their 
purpose. This custom is now disused, — ^the 
number of herds being much diminished, and 
the profession not being of such impcwtance in 
the country as formerly, on account of the in* 
creased number of fences. 



TWEED AND TILL. 

The Tweed is, in general, a broad, shallow^ 
clear, and rapid river. Its English tributary, 
the Till, is, on the contrary, narrow, sullen, 
deep, dark, and slow. Their various character- 
istics are distinctly pointed out by the follow- 
ing well-known rhyme.— 

TWEED SAIB TO XILTL^ 
*' WHAT QABL8 TS aiK 8AE STILL ?" 



* Wad-oi pledge or hostage. 



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TILL SAID TO TWEEB, 
^' THOUGH YE BUT WI* SPEED, 

" AND I HIN SLAW, 
(« 7£T WHERE YE DROUK AE UAV, 

" I DEOUM TWA !" 

TARRAS. 

The Tarras, a Roxburghshire stream, is so 
impetuous^ ££nd so much broken by falls, that 
any person whom it might sweep away would 
be dashed to pieces against its rocks, before he 
could be drowned by its waters. The follow- 
ing rhyme spea;ks for itself. — *^ X>Ott&<" here 
signifies danger. 

WAS NE^ER AKE DROWKED IK TARRAS, 
NOR YET IN DOUBT, 
FOR E'RE the head WflTS DOWYT 
THE HARNS ARE OUT* 

DON AND DEE. 

A ROOD O' don's WORTH TWA o' DEEj 
EXCEPT IT BE FOR FISH AKD TBC:B. 

A very anoieiit and very true saying. 



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36 hoejkhmE^ 



^ MERECLEUCH-HEAIX— i»Ar»fe#^fre. 

THE KIKO RADE BOUND THE MEBZCLEUCH-HEAD) 
BOOTED AND 8PURBED, AS WE A* DID SEE, 

AKD DIKED W* A LASS AT MOSFENKAX YETT, 
A LITTLE BELOW THE LOOAK LEE. 

Merecleuch is a ravine on the farm of Glen- 
cotho^ on the south side of Hokns Water^ pa* 
rish of Glenholm. Mosfennan lies upon the 
banks of the Tweedy about three miles ta the 
southward of Merecleuch. The above is per- 
haps a relic of some old ballad, describing one 
of those hunting visits which the kings of 
Scotland so frequently paid to this sylvan dis- 
trict. Polmood, the ancient seat of the Hun- 
ters, was their chief residence upon these oc- 
casions, of which the country people preserve 
numerous and very distinct traditionary anec- 
dotes. 

LETTEREP CRAGS. 

In certain remote di^cts large stones are 
found, with rude, though not antique, inscrip- 
tions, apparently the work of idle or ingenious 



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LOCALITIES. 37 

3hepherd8. They abound in Galloway. Upon 
the form of Knockiebay^ in this district, there 
is one of a very singular and witty description. 
Upon the upper side are cut the following 
words : — 

LIFT HE UP, AND i'LL TELL YOU KODE. 

Obeying this injunction^ many simple people 
have, at various periods, exerted their strength, 
in order to discover the expected treasure be- 
low, where they only found carved the remain- 
ing member of the couplet, — 

LAY ME DOWN AS I WAS BEFORE. 

Some are epitapbSy — as one in the neighbour- 
hood of the above. 

THIS STAKE LIES ON AULD ROBIN'S WAME, 

HIS PURSE AND HIS STAFF ARE BESIDE THE SAME. 

IF THOU THINKS THIS WRANO, TAK THE 8TANE AFF 

MY WAME, 
AND LAY IT ON THINE, TO PRESERVE THY NAME ! 



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38 LOCALITIES. 

An epitaph in die diurch-yard of Torrybum 
Gontains two of the best puns in print :— > 

flEKE XIXS JCARaSKT GKEIG, 

WHO NEVER HAD ISSUE EXCEPT IK HEE X^EG. 
THIS MAEOERT GREIG WAS WOND^ROUS CUKNIKG, 
FOR WHILE ONE LEG STOOD STILL THE OTHER 
KEPT RUNNING. 



HILLS IN THE SOUTH-WEST OF SCOTLAND. 

CAIRNSMUIR O' FLEET, 

CAIRNSMUIR O* DEE, 
AND CAIRNSMUIR O* CARSPHAIRN, 

THEBI^GGEST O' THE THREE. 



FARMS NEAR PEEBLES. 

BONNINOTON LAKES, 
AND CRtTIKSTON CAKES, 

KAOEMITIR, AND THE RAE ; 
AND BITNGRT; hungry HVNDELSHOPE, 

AND SKAWED BELLAS BRAE* 



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LOCAiilTXfiS. 39 



FARMS NEAR EDINBURGH. 

IN LITTLECOATS A BOW O* OILOATS, 
IX LirCKENUOUSES QUID FLESH BOATS ; 
AlTD there's kike LASSES IK CARSEWELL, 
AND NOT A LAD AKAKO THEM ALL ! 

f 

These are farm-steads upon the south side of 
the Pentland Hills, about nine miles south from 
Edinburgh. Between Littleeoats and Lucken- 
houses runs the rivulet called the 'DeadmarCs 
Grain, which received its name from a remark- 
able circumstance. One of the Covenanters, 
flying fi-om RuUion Green, mounted the horse 
of a- slain dragoon a little way from the field 
of battle, but was immediately and closely pur- 
sued. In this extremity, he took one of the 
pistols from the holster before him, and, by a 
Parthian-like manoeuvre, fired it through be- 
neath his l^t arm at his enemies ; but was thus 
so unfortunate as to destroy his only chance 
of escape, by wounding his own horse in the 
flank ; whereupon he was caught and slain.-— 
In commemoration of this event, the place was 
called the Deadman's Grain, — the latter word 
signifying the place of junction of two small 



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40 LOCALITIES. 

mountain rills which happen to meet in a fork- 
ed manner. The nine lasses of Carsewell^ 
-whose situation must have been none of the 
most cheering^ belonged^ says tradition, to one 
farmer's family, named Henry. 

IN FORFARSHIRE. 

THE BEOGAK8 O' BEK8HIV, 

THE CAiaDS O* LOOB,* 
THE SOUTERS O* FOJLFAR, 

THE WEAVERS O* KII.LIEHDTR. 

IN FIFE. 

THE WEW TOON O' BEKIRSTT,-f> 

BALCARRAS, AND THE BROUOH, 
FITTENWEEM AND AN8TER, 

CRAIL AND ERINCROUOH ; 
CUFFABOUT AND CAULDSTREAU, 

DIRT -PAT HA% 
BANKHEAD AND ETHERNIE 

IS UP ABUNE THEM a\ 

iFifeshire.\ 
* i. e. Lover. -f Balchrystio. 



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LOCAMTIES. 41 



IN LANARKSHIRE. 

CAULD KAIL IN COMESTANE, 

AND CROWDIE IN QUOTMQUAN ; 

SINGIT SWEENS IN SYMINGSTANE, 
AND BEdSE IN PETTINAIN. 

The places here mentioned are famed for 
their several not very favourite dishes. The 
whole lie in the Upper Ward of Lanarkshire. 
Quothquan^ or Quodquan^ consists in two vil- 
lages^ called the Upper and Nether Towns of 
Quothquan ; and, though important neither 
from population nor wealth, this self-compla- 
cent little place had the assurance, in 1706, to 
petition the Scottish parliament against the 
Union, 

IN THE VALE OF CLYDE, 

CANNEB AND CANNERMILL, 
CANNEBSIDE AND RAWHILL, 
THE RICCARTOUN, THE RABBERTOUN, 

THE RAFLOCH, AND THE ROSS, 
THE MIRRTTOUN, THE BKELLYTOUKi 

C0RN8ILL0CR, AND DALBER?* 

p3 



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42 liOCALITIBS. 



FARMS IN PEEBLBS^HIRIi. 

GLXNKIKK AND GLENCOTHA, 
THE MAINS O* KILBUCHO, 
BLENDEWAN AND THB BAW, 
MITCRELLHILL AND THE 8HAW9 
THERE*8 A HOLE ABUNE THE THKIEFLANO 
HA8 HELD THEM A* ! 

The farm -Steadings here mentioned lie in the 
western district of Peebles-shire. The '* hole 
abune the Thriepland" is a hollow in the side 
of a hill^ shaped like a basin^ and which stands 
in rainy weather nearly half full of water. On 
the upper side of the hollow^ there is a cave 
penetrating the hill^ and nearly blocked up 
with stones and shrubs. This is said to be of 
considerable extent ; and^ as tradition reports, 
gave shelter in the persecuting times to the in- 
habitants of the farms enumerated in the rhyme. 
Both the hole and the cave are evidently arti- 
ficial; but it is probable that the latter was 
formed at a much later period than the other ; 
and this is probable, from the circumstance of 
there being many such hollows in the hill-sides 



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LOCALITIES. 43 

of the neighbourhood^ without the correspond- 
ing cave. Indeed^ these hollows are justly sup- 
posed to have been used at a much earlier 
period of warfare and danger than the perse^ 
cuiing times, — ^namely, in the days of Wallace 
and Bruce. They were certainly places of 
military vigil^ as the soldiers stationed in them 
could survey an extensive tract of country^ with- 
out being themselves seen by the enemy whose 
motions they watched. They might even be 
of more remote origin and use^ as there are se- 
veral Roman camps in the neighbourhood. — 
Thriepland is near Bogha^ where the immortal 
hero of Scottish independence (Wallace)^ is 
said, by Blair, to have fought a bloody but 
successful battle with the English ; and where, 
according to tradition, various skirmishes of 
lesser consequence also took place. 



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44 L0CAX<ITIS8. 



IN EAST LOTHIAN AND BBRWICK8HIRS. 

I STOOP UPON BYBMOUTH FOKT,* 

AMD OUXfiS TB WHAT I SAW ? 
FAIBNIESIDB AND FLEMINGTON, 

MBWH0USE8 AND COCKLAW ; 
THE FAIRY-FOUK o' FOSTERLAND, 

THE WITCHES O' EDIKCRAW, 
THE RYE-RI008 0* RESTON, 

AND DUN8B DIM08 A* ! 

There is an interesting variation of the above, 
as follows:— 

THE FAIRT-FOUK O* FOSTBRLAND, 

THE WITCHES O* BDINCRAW, 
AND THE &Y£*KAIL O* RESTOM, 

GAR'd a* THE DOUGS DEE* 

Fosterland once existed in the parish of 
Bunkle as a small village ; but even its vestiges 
are not now visible upon the brown moor 



• Eyemouth Fort is the name of a rocky promontory 
near that village ; but from which it would be impossible 
to see o^ the places, not to speak of persons, mentioned. 



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IX>CALITIBS. 45 

where it once stood. Edincraw^ properly 
Auchincraw^ is an estate in the vicinity of 
Fosterland ; as also Reston. The rye*kail al- 
luded to must have been a broth made chiefly 
of rye ; which grain^ it is well known^ is some- 
times so much tainted as to be poisonous. The 
circumstance upon which the rhyme is found* 
ed has not come to our knowledge^ but seema 
obvious enough. 

ST. ABB*S, &4i.-^JSatt Lothian. 

ST. ABB, ST. HELEN, AND ST. BEY, 
THEY A* BUILT KIRKS WHICH TO BE NEAREST 
THE 8EA,«- 
8T. abb's, upon the NABS ; 

ST. HELENAS, ON THE LEA ; 
ST. BEY*8, UPON DUNBAR SANDS^ 
STANDS NEAREST TO THE SEA* 

St. Abb, St. Helen^ and St Bey, were, ac- 
cording to the country people, three princesses, 
the daughters and heiresses of a king of Nor« 
thnmberland, who, b^ng very pious, and tak- 
ing a disgust at the world, resolved to employ 
their dowries in the erection of churches, and 
the rest of their lives in devotion. They all tried 



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46 LOGALITItt. 

widdi flliould find a situadoii for their buildings 
nearest to the sea, and St Ann suceeeded^-* 
her diurch betng built upon a lerel s{Miee dose 
to the irater-mark ; while St Abb placed her 
s^uGtare upon the points^ er nabt, of a high 
rock overhanging the German Ocean^ and St 
Helen pitched hers upon a plain near, but net 
ezaedj bordering upon the shores None of these 
fabrics now remain^ except St Helen's in rnins. 

CHURCH OF lOEEK^Aherdeenshire. 

" When the workmen were engaged in erect- 
ing the ancient church of Old Deer^ upon a 
small hill called Bissau^ they were surprised to 
find that the work was ingipeded bj superna- 
tural obstacles. At length, the Spirit of the 
River was heard to saj, — 

'^ IT IS NOT HERE, IT IS NOT HERE, 

THAT YE SHALL BUILD THE CHURCH OF DEER, 

BUT ON TAPTILLERY, 

WREKS MANY A CORPS B SHALL LfE. 

'' The site of the edifice was, acoovdingly, 
transferred to Taptillery^ an eminence at some 



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I.OOAI<ITIES. 47 

distance from the place where the building had 
been commenced." — Macfarlane MSS. apud 
Notes to Lay of Last Minst, p. 230. 

EASTERN COAST OF SCOTLAND. 

'tween the isle o' may 

AND THE LINES O* TAf, 

UOKY A SHIFTS BEEN CAST AWAY. 

REPENTANCE TOWER,^Dumfries-9hire. 

REPENTANCE TOWE& STANDS ON A HILL, 
THE LIKE YOU*LL SEE NO WHE&E, 

EXCEPT THE ANE THAT's NEIST TO IT, 
FOUKS CA' it WOODCOCKAIRE. 

Repentance Tower stands upon a beautifal 
hill near, the Solway. Por its story, see the 
notes to Lord Herries' Complaint, in the Min« 
strel^ of the Scotti^ Border. Woodcockaire 
is a hill contiguous to that on which the Tower 
stands. In remote times, it formed part of the 
large ^domains of the Carlyksy Lords of Tortheft- 
wald ; and it is known to have afforded exceb- 
l«it fodder to the horses belonging to the gar* 
rison of Lochmaben. 



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48 I^OCALITIKS. 



ROSLIN. 



'* The tomb of Sir William Sinclair, on which 
he appears sculptured in armour, with a grey- 
hound at his feet, is still to be seen in Roslin 
Chapel. The person who shows it always 
. tells the story of his hunting-match, with some 
addition to Mr. Hay's account, — as, that the 
knight of Roslin's fright made him poetical; 
and that, in the last emergency, he shouted, — 

'' HELP, HAUD AN YE MAT, 

OR BOSLiy WILL LOSE HIS HEAD THIS DAY. 

" If this couplet does him no great honour as 
a poet, the conclusion of the story does him still 
less credit. He set his foot oh the dog, says the 
narrator, and killed him on the spot, saying, he 
would never again put his life in such a risk. 
As Mr. Hay does not mention this circumstance, 
I hope it is only founded on the couchant pos- 
ture of the hound on the monument." — Notes 
io Lay if Last Minst p. 341* 

The old female cicer<me, who exhibited the 
chapel before the person above mentioned, used 



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LOCALITIES. 49 

ftho to tell the story with the rhyme. She was 
a tall, slender, solemn personage, dressed in a 
black gown, with a piece of white muslin 
muffling her cheeks, like a nun ; and, * (what 
has often provoked laughter,) when interrupted 
in her story, she had always to commence it 
again from the very beginning. 

BRIDGE OF TEATH.— Per/AMtre. 

In 1530, Robert Spittel, who designated 
himself *' tailzour (qu. ? breeches-maker) to the 
maist honorabill Princes Margaret, queen to 
James the Feird," and who seems to have made 
a large fortune by his trade, founded the bridge 
of Teath, immediately above Doune Castle, for 
the convenience of bis fellow-lieges, who, be^ 
fore that period, had no means of crossing the 
river, excepting by an old, ill-constructed, 
wooden bridge at Callander, some mOes distant. 
Though this splendid edifice, however, was a 
work of charity, and intended exdusively for 
their convenience, the common people oould^ 
not help regarding it with idl the suspicion 
and dislike which the lower classes of Scotland 
entertain respecting every attempt at improve- 



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50 LOCALITIES. 

mentj comfort^ or decotatioii. While th^ tock 
advantage^ therefore, of tlie expensive public 
work erected for their service, they could not 
help thinking upon the good old bridge ^ Calf- 
lander with feelinga similar, perhaps, to tho^e 
of the Israelites, when they thought of the 
comfortable slavery of Egypt ; and this s»:iti- 
ment seems to have extended itself into a com- 
parison between the old and the new bridges, 
much to the disadvantage of the latter. The 
rhyme, in which this sentiment was embodied, 
has been preserved by tradition, though the 
object of its flattery is supposed not to have 
been in existence since the time of the Reform- 
ation. 



THE NEW BftIO AT DOVlft, AKD THS AUXB BKI^ o' 

CALLAMi)ia,-^ 
FOUR AMD TW£KTY BOWS IN TKE AVLD BRIG O* 

CALLANDEK ! 

This, we su|^ose, alludes to the circumstance 
^of there having been no few^ thaa the^Ktrtor* 
dinary number of tweaty-f^Mir arches in the an- 
cient bridgey-**-^ peculiarity of structure tirhich 
would by no means recommend it to a commit^ 



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liOOALrrxss. 51 

tee of modem architects^ whatever might have 
been; thought of its magnificence in former 
times. The reader will remark the curious 
coincidence between what is above recorded and 
the subject matter of Bums's admirable poem^ 
entitled^ " The Twa Brigs," where the popular 
opinions respecting bridges, ancient and mo- 
dem, are brought into contrast in a style sin* 
gularly happy and fanciful. 

R03IAN FORT AT ARDOCU^Perthshire. 



BETWEEK THE CAMP At AaDOCH AND THE GREEN 

HILL O' KEIBy 
LIE SEVEN kings' BANSOHS FOR SEVEN HUNDER 

TEAR. 

This is the present popular version of a 
rhyme otherwise given by Mr. Gordon in his 
Itiherarium, as follows : — 

FROM THE FORT OJF ARDOCH 

TO THE GRINNAN-HILL OF KEIR, 

ARE NINE KINGS* RENTS 

FOR NINE HUNDRED YEAR. 



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52 UX3ALITIBS. 

The variations are not important, as the 
places are the same in eadi> and the suppoaed 
treasures are alike vast 

The Camp at Ardoch is supposed to be the 
most complete Roman fortification now exist- 
ing in Britain. It lies in the parish of Muthil« 
Perthshire^ upon a rising ground dose by the 
Knaic Water, and at a short distance from a 
Roman causeway, which runs in a north and 
north-east direction from a part of the wall of 
Antonine, near Falkirk, past Stirling, and so 
on towards Dundee. The area of the camp 
was 140 by 125 yards within the lines; and 
beyond the scope of this measurement a grtot 
deal of ground is occupied by the remains of 
numerous walls and trenches. The PrwierUu^ 
rap or GeneraVs Quarter, rises above the level 
of the camp, but is not in the centre. It is a 
regular square, each side being exactly twenty 
yards. At present, it exhibits evident marks 
of having been inclosed by a stone wall, and 
contains the foundations of a house 10 yards 
by7. 

At the distance of half a mile from the camp 
at Ardoch stands the Grinnan Hill (t. e. Sunny 
Hill) of Keir, another Roman fortification of 



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LOOALITIES* 53 

inferior impartance^ supposed to communicate 
with tlie former by a subterranean passage. 
This is not a popular traditicm only^ but a pro- 
bable fact^ countenanced by the opinions of an* 
tiquaries^ and by the following circumstancer 
Till the year 1720 there existed^ about six 
paces to the eastward o£ the prsetentura, the 
aperture of a passage^ which went in a sloping 
direction downwards and towards the hill of 
Keir. This, according to the rhyme, was sup- 
posed to contain vast treasures ; and there is a 
tradition that this supposition received something 
like confirmation about two centuries ago. In 
order to ascertain the fact, a man, who had 
been condemned by the baron-court of a neigh- 
bouring lord, was proffered his life, on condi- 
tion that he would descend into the hole, and 
try what he could do in the way of treasure- 
finding. Being let down by a rope to a great 
depth, and then in a short time drawn up again 
to the surface, he brought with him some Roman 
helmets, spears, fragments of bridles, and other 
articles. On being let down a second time, he 
was killed by foul air ; and though it was be- 
lieved that, if he had lived, great discoveries 
would have been made, no one after that 
e2 



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54 IiOCALITIfiS. 

thought it prudent to make the attempt The 
articles mentioned lay at the house of Ardoch 
for many years^ but were all carried off, by 
some of the soldiers in the Duke of Argyle's 
army> in 1715^ after the battle of Sherifimuir, 
and could nerer afterwards be recovered. The 
mouth of the hole was covered up with a mill- 
stone^ by an old gentleman^ who lived at the 
house of Ardoch, while the family were in 
Russia, about the year 17^> to prevent hares 
from running into it when pursued by his dogs ; 
and as earth, to a considerable depth, was laid 
over the mill-stone, the spot cannot now be 
found. 

Sir James Balfour (in his Geographical Notes, 
MSS. Adv. Lib.) speaks of Ardoch as *' a sta* 
tione of the Roman soldears, or Spanish stipen- 
diars, under the command of the proconsull 
Hostorius Scapula, in his march from the river 
Bodotria (Forth) against the Otholinians, quhen 
as he thought to have surprised the Pictish king 
in his castell of Baen- Artec." 

Sir Robert Sibbald, in a dissertation^ pub- 

* '' THUL£,**-.pTuited in Bishop Gibson's edition of 
Camden's Remains, 1696. 



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LOG^IilTIBS. 55 

lished about the end of the seventeenth cen- 
tury^ has given a ground plan of the Roman 
castellum of Ardoch, below which he says 
'/ there are caves." 

Gk>rdon has also illustrated its remains in 
his Itinerarium^ as well as General Roy^ in his 
government survey of 1755. 

It ought not to be omitted in the history oi 
Ardoch^ that General Wade, in 1724, mutilat- 
ed the fort, on the side next the water of Knaic, 
by cutting his famous military road along the 
trenches. 

The eminence in the centre of the area, 
which, after Sir Robert Sibbald, we have call- 
ed the Prcetentura, seems to have been nothing 
more than the foundation of a Romish chapel 
of comparatively modem date, which has given 
to the whole works the'grotesque popular appel- 
lation of " The Chapei-Hill." In the Retours, 
(Retomatorum Abbreviatio, Perth,) this place of 
worship is termed " The Croft called Raith, 
(g. d. Fortification,) or'Chapel-Lands," It be- 
longed to the priory of Inchmahome in Men- 
teith, as appears from a tack, granted by " Da- 
vid Erskine,* commendator of Inchmahome, 
with the consent of the convent, chapterly gad- 



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56 I<0CAI#ITIB8. 

dered^ to William Sinclair^ of the Catnp^ and 
to Elizabeth Stirling^ his gpouse^ of the said 
lands, &c. at Stirling Castle, September 7> 
1613/' &c.—Book of Styles, MS., in the pas- 
session of a private gentleman, who permitted the 
writer to make this extract. 



MONEY-DIGGING RHYMES. 

In Ayrshire, the following rhyme is preva- 
lent, and is probably very old ; 

DONALD DIN 

BUILT HIS HOUSE WITHOUT A PIN. 

Alluding to Dundonald Castle, the ancient seat 
of King Robert II, ♦ and now the last remain- 



• *« Dundonald Castle, the scene of King Robertas ear- 
ly attadiment and nuptials with die fair Elizabeth (Mure,) 
is situated in Kyle-Stewart^ of wbichy from the ^nootest 
period, it appears to have be^ the chief messuage, about 
six miles south-west of KowaUan, and ap]>roaehing within 
about a mile of the Firth of Clyde. Its situation, on the 
summit of a beautiful round hill, in the dose vicinity of 



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L0CALITIB8. 57 

ing property in Ayrshire of the noble family 
who lake their title from it. According to 
tradition^ it was built by a hero named Donald 
Din^ or Din Donald^ and oonstracted entirely 
of stone^ without the use of wood^— a supposi- 
tion countenanced by the appearance of the 
buildings which consists in three distinct 
stories^ arched over with strong stone-work^ 



Dundonald Church, b angularly noble and baioniaL Al- 
though evidently of considerable antiquity, yet certainly an- 
other of still greatiy more remote origin to die present Cas- 
tle of Dundonald once occupied the same site. To the 
more remote building, may allude the following rude 
ifayme, if it be not altogether a piece of rustic wit of recent 
times:—. 

' *< TB£mX 8TAHOS A CASTLE IX THE WEST, 
THEY CA* IT DOKALD-DUr ; 
Tfi£EE*S NO A NAIL IN A* ITS ROOF, 
NOa YET A WOODEN *IN." 

\Hutarff of the House ofRowallau^ 50. 

. King Robert died at Dundonald Castle, anno 1390. Dr. 
Johnson and Mr. Boswell visited tiie ruins, on tiieir return 
Arom tiie Hebrides ; and the former laughed outright at the 
idea of a Scottish monarch bdng accommodated, with his 
court^ in so narrow and mean a mansion. 



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58 ' LOCAIiITIBS. 

the roof of one forming the floor of another. 
Donald^ the builder^ was originally a poor man, 
but had the faculty of di^aming lucky dreams. 
Upon mf occasion^ he dreamed^ thrice inu»ie 
night, that if he were to go to London Bridge, 
he would make a fortnne. He went accord- 
ingly, saw a man looking over ' the parapet 
of the bridge, whcHn he accosted oourteoudy, 
and, afler a little conversation, intrusted with 
the secret of the occasion of his visiting Lon- 
don Bridge. The stranger told him that he 
had made a very foolish errand ; for he himself 
had once had a similar vision, which directed 
him to go to a certain spot in Ayrshire, in Scot- 
land, where he would find a vast treasure ; and, 
for his part, he had never once thought of 
obeying the injunction. From his description 
of the spot, however, the sly Scotsman at once 
perceived that the treasure in question must 
be concealed in neither more nor less than his 
own humble kaU-yard at home, to which he 
inunedlately repaired, in full expectation of 
finding it : nor was he disappointed ; for, afler 
destroying many good and promising cabbages, 
and completely cracking oredit with his wife, 
who esteemed him mad,, he fimmd a large pot- 



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iul of gold coin^ widi tbe proceeds of ^hich 
he bailt a stoist castle for hiaiBelf^ nkid became 
the founder of a flourishing £imily. This eih- 
surd story is localized in ahnost every districfc 
of Scotland^ idwaysr herring to London Bridge ; 
for the fame of Qutten Maude's singular eke^ 
tion seems toliaMe xeached ihis remote cauntsry 
at an eairiy period. Mr. Hogg haf vroagl^ 
up the fictiotiin aver^^ aoMisiDg manninr in one 
tyf his '' Winter £ven9Bg Tales," sulMtkutbg 
the Bridge of Kelso £oirt^t of London. Other 
tales of mon^-dtggers and treasure-seekeris 
abound in Scotland. We veiit«i>e to record the 
following^ on acoosht of their aceompai^ying 
Thytn«s. 



A poor mm, -vrho dw^ at '8tratii«y:ei)^ in 
LanaT%!shty^, ^neamed t^^e jrimesin ^uocession 
that there was a rich pose concealed 'at a parti- 
cular spot near Carrenduff^ in the neighbour- 
hood of tlie vilfkge. l^hjther he went, to dig 
fer tile satte. After worlcing a good while, laJe 
came to what he considered the lid of a pot ; 
and was just about to lift it up, when he heard 
a noise overhead, which caused him to look up. 
At a little distance from the scene of his exca- 



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60 LOCAUTIBi. 

vadons^ he perceived a bright blue flame issuing 
firom a rock ; which flame Addressed him in a 
rhyme, the express words of which we have 
been unable to retrieve from oblivion, but of 
which the sense was, that the treasure was noit 
to be found there, but somewhere on the other 
side of the hill. According to this injunctioii, 
he took up pick and shovel, and proceeded to 
the spot pointed out by the poetical flame, 
where he dug for a long time, and found no* 
thing. He then returned to the spot he had 
left ; but here he found the hole filled up, and 
the ground closed over, and looking as clean 
and neat as if it had never been touched since 
the creation.* Struck with wonder and -fear, 
he resolved to give up the pursuit; and the 
consequence was, that, ever since, the pl«(b^ has 
been regarded by the conunon people as a 
feartoime 9pat, 

The following story is stUI more curious than 
the above. — It is supposed by the people who 

* This must temind our readers of the open grave in 
^( The Monastery," dosed by the White Lady of Avenel, 
during the short absence of Halbert GlendiB^ing. 



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LOGAIilTIBS. 61 

live in the neighbourhood of Largo Law, in 
Fife, that there is a very rich mine of gold 
under and near the mountain, which has never 
yet been properly searched for. So convinced 
are they of the verity of this, that whenever 
they see the wool of a sheep's side tinged with 
yellow, they think it has acquired that colour 
from having lain above the gold of the mine.-— 
A great many years ago, a ghost made its ap- 
pearance upon the spot, and was supposed to 
*be laden with the secret of the mine; but as 
it, of course, required to be spoken to before it 
would condescend to speak, the question was, 
who should take it upon himself to go up and 
accost it At length, a shepherd, inspired by 
the all-powerful love of gold, took courage, and 
demanded the cause of its thus '^ revisiting," - 
&c. The ghost proved very affable, and re- 
quested a meeting, on a particular night, at 
eight o'clock ; when, said the spirit, — 

IP'AUCHINDOWXI£ COCK DISNA CKAW, 
AVn BAI.MAIM HORN DISHA BLAW, 

I*LL TELL YE WHERE THE GOWD MIKE IS IN LARGO 
LAW. 



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62 JLOCAIilTISS* 

This rfayme is also presaited in another 
fonn and tense, as follows :•-*- 

/ GIN AUCHINDOWNIE's COCK HADNA CRAWK, 
XOE BALMAIN KILL-HOEX BLAWIT, 

A Gt)WD MIKC HAB BEEN AT LA&OO LAW. 

The shepherd took what he conceived to be 
^ectual measures for preventing any obstacles 
J»eing thrown in the way of his becoming custo- 
dier of the important secret ; for not a cock, old, 
young, or middle-aged, was left alive at the. 
farm of Auchindownie ; while the man who, at 
tbajt of Balmain^ was in the habit of blowing 
the horn for tjie housing of the cows, was 
iMarictly en|oinfid to dispense with that duty pn 
the night in question* The hour wiis^come^ 
and the ghost, true to its promise, appeared, 
-raady to divulge the secret, whenTammie 
Norrie, .thecow-hl^rd of Balmain, either thspugb 
obstinacy or fwrgetfulness, " blew a blast both 
loud and dread," and I may add, ^' were ne*er 
prophetic sounds so fuU of woe;" for, to the 
shepherd's mortal disappointment, the ghost 
vanished, after exclaiming, — 

WOE TO THE MAN THAT BLEW THE HOBN, 

FOR OUT or THE SPOT HE SHALL NE'ER BE BORNE. 



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LCkCAUTlSS. 63 

In fal£knent of tbis denunciation^ the un- 
fortunate horn-blower was struck dead upon 
the apot ; and it being found impossible to re- 
move his body> which seemed, as it were^ 
pinned to the earth, a cairn of stones was 
raiaed over it, which, now grown into a green 
hillock, is still denominated Norries Larv^ and 
regarded as no canny by the common people. 
This place is situated upon the estate of Fortharj 
which is memorable as having been the patri- 
monial property of the celebrated Dr. Archi- 
bald Pitcaum. 

In the south of Scotland, it is the popular 
belief that vast treasures are concealed beneath 
the ruina of Hermitage Castle, but which, being 
in the keeping of the EvO One, are, therefore, 
considered beyond redemption. It is true, some 
hardy persons have, at different times, made 
the attempt to dig for them ; but, somehow or 
other, the elements always on such occasions 
contrived to produce an immense storm of 
thunder and lightning, and deterred the ad- 
venturers from proceeding; otherwise, of course, 
the money would have long ago been found. 
It is ever thus that supernatural obstacles com^ 



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64 LOCAUTIXfl. 

in the way of these interesting disooverie 
An honest man in Perthshire^ named Finlay 
Robertson, about fifty years ago, went, with 
some stout-hearted companions, to seek the 
treasures which were supposed to be concealed 
in the darksome cave of a deceased Highland 
robber ; but, just as they had commenced 
operations with their mattocks, the whole party 
were instantaneously struck, without attaining 
their object, as with an electric shock, which 
sent them home with fear and trembling ; and 
they were ever afler remarked as silent, mys« 
terious men, very apt to take offence when al- 
lusion was made to their unsuccessful enter- 
prise. 

In the south country, it is also believed that 
there is concealed at Tamleuchar Cross, in Sel- 
kirkshire, a valuable treasure, of which the si- 
tuation is thus vaguely described by a popular 
rhyme: — 

▲TW£EK THE WAT OKUim AKD THE DRY, 
THE aOWD O* TAHLEUCHAa DOTH LfS. 



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LOCALITIES. 65 

The following is another southern tradition- 
ary tale of money-digging. — ^A shepherd once 
dreamed, (as usual,) three times in one night, 
that there was a pot-ful of gold in his cabbage- 
garden. Upon digging, he foi^nd a pot ; but, 
alas, it contained nothing ! He was much dis- 
appointed; but, rather than lose all, turned 
over the empty vessel to the care of his wife, 
that it might be appropriated to domestic uses. 
About eighteen years thereafter, when the 
shepherd had almost forgot his delusive dream, 
the said vessel was hanging one day over the 
fire, in the respectable capacity of a kail-pot, 
when a pedlar came in, with his professional 
drouth, i. e. hunger, and was treated by the 
gudewife to a basin of broth. While devour- 
ing his mess by the fireside, his eye caught 
some strange characters encircling the rim of 
the pot, which he forthwith proceeded to in- 
spect, and found to form a Latin sentence. 
Being, by some chance, acquainted with that 
language, he was able to explain the meaning 
in English to the honest couple, who affected 
to know nothing particular about the pot, and 
expressed but little curiosity respecting the 

f2 



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66 L00AL1T1S8. 

meaning of the legend, which was to the fol- 
lowing effect ; — 

BENEATH THIS FOT YOU WILL FIND ANOTHER, 

being, perhaps, expressed thus, in a sort of 
monkish rhyme : — 

INFRA RANG PATERAM, 
INYENIENB ALTERAM. 

The pedlar wondered what could be meant 
by this; and the proprietors of the pot won- 
dered as much as he, though well they knew 
what was implied. After the stranger had 
taken his leave, they went to the garden, dug 
at the spot where they found the first pot, and, 
accordingly, discovered another, which was 
quite full of gold, and made them comfortable 
for life. 

A story somewhat similar to one of the pre- 
ceding is very well known in the neighbour- 
hood of Kilmarnock. It is popularly believed 
that, for many ages past, a pot of gold has lain 
perdu at the bottom of a pool beneath a fall of 
the Finnick Water, near Crawfordland Bridge, 



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LOCALITIES. 67 

and about three miles from Kilmarnock. Many 
attempts have been made to recover this trea- 
sure; but something always occurred to pre- 
vent their successful termination. The last was 
about a century ago^ by no less a person than 
the laird of Crawfordland, at the head of a 
party of his domestics, who first dammed up 
the water, then emptied the pool of its con- 
tents, and were just upon the point of draw- 
ing up the object of their search, when a noise 
overhead caused them to let go their prize, and 
look upwards. They perceived a terrific fi- 
gure standing on the top of the hill, using 
violent gesticulations, and crying, 

TIP tow! 

caAWFoa]>i.AyD*s a' in ▲ low ! 

Whereupon the laird, believing that the Devil 
had set fire to his house, in order to divert him 
from his researches, left the scene, followed by 
,his servants, and ran home to save what he 
could. Of course, there was no fire whatever 
at the house ; and when they came back to re- 
sume their operations, they found the water 
falling over the lin in full force ; and such was 



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66 LOCALITIES. 

their consternation^ that they durst not make 
any farther attempt ; and no one has since been 
found of sufficient hardihood to encounter the 
dangers which are supposed to guard the trea- 
sure. 

We conclude our anecdotes of money-digging 
with the following ludicrous story, so highly 
characteristic of Scottish cunning and Irish 
simplicity. On the farm of Clerkston, in the 
parish of Lesmahagow, there had existed since 
creation an immense stone, or saxum, which, 
being deeply bedded in the middle of a good 
field, at a great distance from any other rocks, 
was productive of infinite inconvenience to the 
husbandman, and deirauded the proprietor of 
a considerable portion of territory. Beneath 
this stone, it was believed by the country peo- 
ple of the last generation, that there was se- 
creted a vast treasure, in the shape of " a ket- 
tle-full, a boot-full, and a bull-hide-full," of 
gold ; all which got the ordinary nanie, reason 
unknown, of " Katie Neevie's hoord." The 
credibility of this popular tradition was attest- 
ed by a rhyme to the following effect : — 

BETWEEN DILLERHILL AND CItOSSFOORP, 
HERE LIES KATIE NEEVIe's HOORD. 



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LOCAIflTIKS. W 

Many efforts had been made, according to the 
gossips, to remove the stone, and get at the 
treasure ; but all were baffled by the bodily ap- 
pearance of the enemy of mankind, who, by 
breathing intolerable flame in the faces of 
those making the attempt, obliged them to de- 
sist. Thus well guarded, the legacy of Mrs. 
Katherine Niven lay for centuries as snug as if 
it had been deposited in Chancery ; and it was 
not till at least an hundred years after the last 
despairing effort had been made that the charm 
was at length broke. Mr. James Prentice, the 
present farmer of Glerkston, had the address to 
convince several Irishmen, who had served him 
during the harvest, of the truth of the said 
rhyme ; and, by expatiating upon the supposed 
immensity of the treasure, wrought up their 
curiosity and their cupidity to such a pitch, 
that they resolved, with his permission, to break 
the st6ne in pieces, and make themselves mas- 
ters of whatever might be found below. On 
the day after the kirn, therefore, the poor fel- 
lows provided themselves with a well-loaded 
gun, for the protection of their persons from 
the Devil, and fell to work, with punches and 
mallets, to blow up and utterly destroy the 



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70 LOCAIilTIBB. 

huge etone which aione intervened between 
them and everlasting affluence. They laboured 
the whole day, without provoking any visit 
fh>m Satan, and at last succeeded in fairly era^ 
dicating the stone from the field which it had 
so long encumbered ; when they became a^ 
once convinced of the fallacy of the rhyme, of 
the craft of Mr. Prentice, and of their own de- 
luded credulity. 



PROPHECIES OF THOMAS THE RHYMER. 

The names of Wallace, Bruce, Buchanan^ 
and Bums, are not more familiar to the Soot* 
tish peasant than is that of Thomas Learmont, 
commonly called Thomas the Rh3rmer, or, in 
the phrase of succeeding seers, ** True Thomas/' 
This personage united the profession of a poet 
with that of a prophet, — ^thereby realizing the 
idea which the Romans expressed by the word 
'^ vates." Of his poetical talents there remains 
one splendid monument in the romance of ^^ Sir 
Tristrem," which was published by Sir Walter 
Scott in the year 1804, and is the earliest known 
specimen of Scottish poetry. But it is by the 



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LOCALITIBS. 71 

moltifaritfus prophetic sentences popularly 
ascribed to him, and which are no ways re« 
markable for any poetic quality, that he is best 
known in his native country. 

Of Thomas the Rhymer, who must have been 
one of the most gifted men of his time, little is 
known ait aU, and still less with certainty. He 
was one of those rare and solitary lights of dark 
times, of which little more than the shadow of 
n name remans, — in whose case the tacic of the 
biographer descends from the developement of 
character, and the illustration of contemporary 
history, to dissertations on the probable date of 
a birth or death, and dubious refutations of 
^^rmer conjectures upon the same points. 

It is. at least certain that Thomas Learmont 
flourished during t^e latter half of the.thir* 
teenth century, and that he was the prc^Rietor 
of a house and some adjoining lands near the 
village of Ersildoun, or £arlstoun, in Box^ 
burghe^re. He must have died be&>re 12d9 ; 
'for his %&SL then resigned t^ property of his 
late father to the fraternity of the Trinity- 
house of Soltra, in whose chartulary (preserved 
in the Advocate's Xiibrary) exists the .docu- 
ment testifying this circumstance. From Bar- 



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72 LOCALITIES. 

bour's '^ Bruce^" it is observable^ that his pre- 
dictions were held in such reputation, as to in- 
fluence the conduct of that Scottish hero in 
1306. 

If we are to believe a story told by Fordun/ 
and repeated by Boethius and Spottiswoode, 
Thomas Learmont was held in repute as a 
prophet in 1285. On the day before the death 
of King Alexander III, " he did," says the 
latter lustorian, *' foretel the same to the Earl 
of March, saying, * That before the next day 
at noon, such a tempest should blow, as Scot- 
land had not felt for many years before.' The 
next morning, the day being dear, and no 
change appearing in the air, the nobleman 
did challenge Thomas of his saying, calling 
him an impostor. He replied, that noon was 
not yet passed. About which time a post 
came to advertise the earl of the king his sud- 
den death. ' Then,' said Thomas, ' this is the 
tempest I foretold; and so^it shall prove to 
Scotland.' Whence or how ne had this know- 



• Foidim calls Leaimont " ruralis iUe vaUs.** Lib. x, 
cap. 40. 



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JLOCALITIKfiU 73 

ledge>" adds the sagadotis historian^ " eaa hard* 
ly be affirmed ; but sure it is, that he did di< 
vine and answer truly of many things to come." 

It is affirmed by Mackenzie, in his Literary 
Biography of Scotland, that Learmont derived 
all his prophecies from an inspired nun of a 
convent at Haddington, who acted to him the 
part of an Egeria, and whose wyings he had 
only the honour of versifying. But as no au-« 
thorily has i>een discovered for this assertion, 
either in, history or tradition, little credit is to 
be attached to it. 

Laying aside both the credulity and the 
doubts of the learned, the truth may, perhaps, 
be more nesrly attained by listening only to 
popular tale^ which, bating what may appear 
4superstitious, gives us, at least, a natural and 
consistait idea of the Rhymer^ 

According, then, to ^ 



«( I , Tradition's dubious Hght, 

That hovers 'twixt the day and night, 
Dazzling ahenuitely and dim,'* 

tliomas Learmont was the laird, or proprie< 
tor, of a tower, near Earlstoun, of which part 

o 



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74 I.0CAI4TIS8. 

of the walls^ and nearly the whole of th^ 
lower vaults, still exist. That he was a mail 
of distinction, is proved hy the important 
character of his dweUing, which appears to 
have been a species of baronial tower ; and this 
is confirmed by the expressions used in the 
charter of renunciation by his son above men* 
tioned, — ^the renundator being styled, ''Thomas 
de Ercildoun ;" while the property resigned is 
termed " ejusdem domus totam terram meam 
cum omnibus pertinentibus suis quam in tene- 
mento de Ercildoun hereditarie tenui." More- 
over, one of the Rhymer's popular appellations 
is *' Laird Learmont," a phrase denoting much 
more distinction a few centuries back than 
now ; and it is said by the country people in the 
neighbourhood of his residence, that he married 
the daughter of no less a personage than the 
Knight of Thirl stane, ancestor of the Lauder- 
dale family. 

Whatever might be the Rhymer's own rank 
or wealth, it does not appear that he enter- 
tained any hope that it would continue with 
his posterity ; for he is said to have foretold 
the destruction of his habitation and family in 
the following lines, which are erroneously quot- 



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LOCALITIES. 75 

ed in the prophecies of Waldhave, printed at 
Edinburgh^ by Andro Hart, in 1615 : — 



THE HA&E SHALL KITTLE ON MT HEaBTH-STAKE, 
AND THERE NEVER WILL BE A LAIRD LEARMONT 
AGAIN. 



Implying, that, in succeeding ages, wild ani- 
mals should litter upon the innermost and most 
sacred penetralia of his house, and that he him- 
self would be the last laird of his family. The 
first part of this prediction is said to have been 
fulfilled about a century ago, when a hare 
actually did take up her residence, and pro- 
duce her young, upon the hearth-stone of the 
ruined tenement; and the second may, per- 
haps, be considered as verified by his son's 
alienation of the family property immediately 
after his demise. 

The popular talp b^ars,* that Thomas was 



• Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, iii, p. 170, to 
which work we have been indebted for some of the above 
particahin respecting Thomas the Rhymer^ 



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76 LOCAIilTISS. 

carried o% at an early age^ to the Fairy Jj&nd, 
where he acquired all the knowledge which 
made him afterwards so famous. After seven 
years residence^ he was permitted to return to 
the earth, to enlighten and astonish his coun- 
trjrmen by his prophetic powers; still, how- 
ever, remaining bound to return to his royal 
mistress, when she should intimate her plea- 
sure. Accordingly, while Thomas was mak- 
ing merry with his friends, in the town of 
Ersildown, a person came running in, and told, 
with marks of fear and astonishment, that a 
hart and hind had left the neighbouring forest, 
and were, composedly and slowly, parading 
the street of the village. The prophet instant- 
ly arose, left his habitation, and followed the 
wonderful animals to the forest, whence he was 
never seen to return. According to the popu- 
lar belief, he still drees his weird in Fairy Land, 
and is one day expected to revisit earth. 

^* In the meanwhile, his memory is held in 
the most profound respect. The Eildon-tree, 
from beneath the shade of which he delivered 
his prophecies, now no longer exists ; but the 
spot is marked by a large stone, called the 
Eildon-tree Stone. A neighbouring rivulet 



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LOCALITIES. 77 

takes the name of the Bogle Bum^ (Goblin 
Brook,) from the Rh3aner's supernatural visi- 
tants. The veneration paid to his dwelling- 
place^ even attached itself^ in some degree^ to a 
person, who, within the memory of man, chose 
to set up his residence in the ruins of Lear- 
mont's tower. The name of this man was 
Murray, a kind of herbalist, who, by dint of 
some knowledge in simples^ the possession of a 
musical clock, an electrical machine, and a 
stuffed alligator, added to a supposed com- 
munication with Thomas the Rhymer, lived 
for many years in very good credit as a wiz- 
ard." 

In addition to the oral report of Earlstoun^ 
as to the existence of their celebrated towns- 
man, the place contains a still more credible 
memorial. In the wall of the church of Earl- 
stoun there is a stone> bearing this inscrip-* 
tion : — 



AVLD HHTME&^S RACE 
LIES IN THIS PLACE, 

A family of the name of Learmont^ or Lear- 
month^ said to be descended from the Rhymer, 
g2 



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78 LOCi^LITIBS. 

Still claim and exercise the right ci burying 
their dead in the ground adjacent to this stone, 
which is a modem copy of a more ancient one, 
destroyed about forty years ago by a company 
of drunken boors, Now> when we conader 
the singular degree of reverence paid in Scot- 
land to places of sepulture^ and that small 
patches of burying-ground have been known 
to be preserved in the possession of v^y hum- 
ble fiuniliesj without any other right than the 
good old one of '^ use and wont" for several 
centuries^ nothing could appear so probable as 
that this is the very burying-place of the sooth- 
sayer. 

We now present to the reader all the rhymes 
attributed to Learmont which we have been 
able to collect^ — premising^ that though some 
are not strictly local, we have found it^ in some 
measure^ necessary to place them hercj as form-? 
ing part of one important subject. 

One of the rhymes most popular at Earls- 
toun^ referred to an old thorn-tree nfhich stood 
near the village. It ran thus : — 

THIS THOair-T&EB:, AS LANO AS It 8TAHOS» 
EARLSTOUN 9ALL rOSSESS A* HEK LAKJDB* 



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LOCAIilTlBS. 79 

Now> the lands originally belonging to the 
communitj of £arl8toun> have been, in the 
course of time, alienated piece^meal by the 
magistrates, till there is scarcely now an acre 
left. The tree fell during the night, in a great 
storm ifvhich took place in spring 1821 ; and 
what gave additional wdght to the prophecy 
was, that the greater part of the shopkeepers 
in the town happened to be then, cm account 
of a tissue of unfortunate circumstances, in a 
state of bankruptcy. 

The Rhymer is supposed to have attested 
the infallibility of his predictions, by a couplet 
to the following effect:—-* 

WHEN THE SAUT GAE8 ABUNE THE MEAL, 
9BL1EVE KAE MAI& o' TA1IMI£*& TALE. 

This seems to mean, in plain English, that»it 
is just as impossible for the price of the small 
quantity of salt used 'in the preparation of 
*' Scotland's homely fare" to exceed the value 
of the larger quantity of meal required for the 
same purpose, as for his prophecies to become 
untrue. If we might be permitted to venture 
a conjectural comment on the rhyme, it might 



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80 LOCALITIXS. 

be observed^ that the way in which ** the saut" 
and *' the meal" are mentioned^ perhaps indi- 
jcates, thatthese articles formed, in the Rhymer's 
time, almost the onl^ food of the lower classes 
in Scotland, — a circumstance worthy of remark, 
since it would go far to prove that the condi- 
tion of the common people was not, at that ear- 
ly period, very different, in one important par- 
ticular, from the present ; and, as a corollary, 
that Scotland has advanced very little in the 
arts of domestic comfort during five centuries. 
It will not escape the attention of the reader, 
that if the shyme be the genuine production of 
Thomas Learmont, . the homeliness of his self- 
applied appellation may be considered charac- 
teristic of the man and the period. 

One of Learmont's prophecies refers to our 
own good town of Edinburgh, but is unfortun- 
ately altogether inexplicable, and as yet sup- 
posed to be unfulfilled, — ^though some wise 
people attempted to explain it, about ^ve years 
ago, when the Crawley spring was introduced 
into the city, and the Edinburgh troop of yeo- 
manry marched westw^ds to suppress the Ri^ 
dical rebellion. 

WHEN THE WHITE OX COMES TO EDIKBU&GH C0R8, 
ILKA MAN MAY TAKE HIS HORSE. 



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LOCALITIJU. 81 

Another of his prophecies was supposed to 
have been fulfilled about the same time : 



A WIITBT WIKTSR, AND A WET SPRIire : 
A BI.9IPT 8IMXX&, AVD A DEID KXIIO. 

The series of circumstances ha*e referred to^ 
were understood to be the stormy winter of 
1818-19> the humid spring of the latter year, 
" the Peterloo niissacre/' and the death of 
King George III, in January 1820. The 
above version is taken from the lips of a mid- 
dle-aged gentleman, who learned it in his in- 
£uicy. 

A native of Edinburgh, aged seventy-two, 
informs us, that, when a boy, the following pro- 
phectic rhyme, ascribed to True Thomas, and 
so complimentary to the good town, was quite 
common : — 

TOBK WAS, LOlTDOir IS, AKD £DIVBIIUCH *liL BE^ 
THE BIGGEST AVD THEBOVMIEST O* A* THE THREE. 

In our informant's early days, Edinburgh 
consisted <mly in what is now called the Old 



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ra LOCAJLITIE8. 

Town ; and the New Town^ though projected^ 
was not then expected ever to reach the extent 
and splendour which it has since attained. 
Consequently^ we are able to attest that the 
prophecy has not been put into circulation o/- 
ter its fulfilment became a matter of hope or 
possibility. Indeed, this is placed beyond a 
question, by the circumstance of the rhyme 
having been popular seventy years ago, and 
being now scarcely known. ^ Recondite, how- 
ever, and improbable as it is, we consider it 
worthy of preservation; and we may, more- 
over, be permitted to remind the reader, be he 
Yorkist, Londoner^ or man of Edinburgh, that 
the good town is at present increasing more ra- 
pidly, both in extent and beauty, than any 
other pity in the empire. 

Among the unfulfilled predictions of the 
Rhymer is the following.: — 

ATWEEX CRAIIL-CORS AKD EILDON-TBEE, 
IS A* THE SAFETT THEBE SALT. BE. 

The space specified is about thirty miles in 
extent. This rhyme came much into notice 



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UN3ALZTIBS. 83 

during the early years of the French revolu- 
ti<mary war, when people of all ranks, except- 
ing, parhafjs, the very highest, laboured under 
the most agonizing apprehensions of invasion. 
In the south of Scotland, this prophecy then 
obtained universal credence ; and the tract of 
country alladed to was weU surveyed and con- 
sidered by many wealthy persons, anxious to 
save their goods and lives, as the place to which 
they would probably fly for re&ge, " in case 
of the French coming !" The danger of inva- 
sion having long past away like an unburst 
storm-cloud, leaving serenity and sunshine be- 
hind, it is now almost impossible for the youth 
of the present generation to imagine, or for 
older pec^le to recollect, the state of the pub- 
lic mind at the time referred to ; yet, in a time 
of peculiar prosperity and happiness, it may 
not be unseasonable to remind the aged, and to 
inform the young, of a period, when Weahb, 
holding bank-notes as the dust of the earth, 
busied, himself in collecting and concealing 
well-marked crown and half-crown pieces,— 
when Old Age prayed that he migh the permit- 
ted to resign his breath in peace, ere he met 
death in a more dreadful form,— »and when 



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84 L0CALITIS6. 

Maternal Affection clasped her infant to her 
breast with more than ordinary solicitttde^ and 
thought how^ by sacrificing herself^ she might 
purchase safety to her bdoved charge. 

The following refers to' the tree from be- 
neath the shade ai which the Rhymer detiyer* 
ed his predicti(ms :«— 

AY XlLDOK-'rilEi: IF TOO 8AI.L BS, 

A &Ria OWEE TWEED TOU THBBE MAY 8BX. 

'^ This rhyme seems to have been founded 
in that insight into futurity possessed by most 
men of a sound and combining j udgment. The 
spot in question commands an extensiTe pro* 
spect of the course of the river ; and it was easy 
to see that> whoi the country became in the 
least degree improved^ a bridge would be some* 
where thrown over the stream* In fact> you 
now see no less ^efter] than three bridges 
from the same elevated situation." Minsi, Scot* 
Bord. iii^ p. 210. 

, Another verse, referring to the Aitu^ im- 
provements of the country, may be taken as 



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LOGALITIB& 85 

even a more curiouB specimen of the same sort 
of wisdom. Learmont had the sagacity to dis** 
cover that the ground would be more generally 
cultivated at some future period than it was in 
his own time ; but^ also knowing that popula« 
tion and luxury would increase in proportion^ 
he was enabled to assure the posterity of the 
poor^ that their food would not consequently 
increase in quantity. His words were : — 

THE WATfiaS SAIL Wax, THS WUDD9 SAI.L W£XE, 
niLL AKD MOSS SALL BE A* tOUIt IK $ 

BUT THE BAITKO* *ILt. BE KAE tHS BBAIDEB. 

*^One of Thomas's rhymes^ preserved by 
tradition^ runs thus :<--^ 

" THE Buaif or BttEtn ' 

8AX.I. RtIV EOU REtn. 

Bannockburn is the brook here meant. The 
Scots give the name of bannock to a thick 
round cake of unleavened bread." Minst, Scot. 
Bord. iii, p. 211. 

The Rhymer satiriaed the esUte oi one of his 



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86 LooALrriEs. 

ndghboors in die following lines, which seem 
to form only the half of a ibar-lines verse, the 
rhyme of which was alternate :— 

tHE HOUSE *I.I« OAXO OK CiAHOLSIDE BmAXS, 
TILL HIS BAKES COME THRODOH THE SXIK. 

Carrolside Braes were, within the recollec- 
tion of the present generation, very sterile ; and 
it is said, that, in reality, a horse, which once got 
liberty, by way of experiment, to graze over the 
whole territory, pined away, till he fulfilled the 
Rhymer's prophecy ad Itteram. It is now in an 
improved state, and capable of maintaining 
many horses, being in the possession oi an en- 
terprising proprietor, James Home, Esq. of 
Carrolside. 

We are unable to afford any illustration of 
the following rhyme, attributed to Learmont, 
excepting an explanation of the technical phrases 
used in it : — 

OK THE WATER-FA* AKl) THE WATEE-SHED, 

WHEK IS SEEK THE KE8T OF THE BIKOLE-TAILED 

OLED, 
THE LAKB8 OF THE KOBTH SALL A* BE FBEE, 
AKO AE K1K& BULB OWBE CTK6BOM8 THBEB. 



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LOCALITIBS. - 87 

The water-fiill and water-shed are terms used 
to distinguish the marches or boundaries of 
property, when these extend vaguely along the 
tops of hills, without the possibility of a more 
substantial line. The former more particularly 
signifies the ridge where the water of heaven 
divides; and the latter denotes the declivity 
immediately adjacent on either side along which 
it descends. In title-deeds, these boundaries are 
usually described by the phrase, " as wind and 
water sheers and divides." 

True Thomas seems to have turned his pro- 
spective mental optics not unfrequently towards 
the interesting subject of agricultural improve- 
ment. We have already exhibited proofs of his 
sagacity in the matters of both oat and barley- 
pneal. It now remains to be shown, that he 
could see the disadvantages, as well as advan- 
tages, of future systems of cultivation. One of 
his prophetic rhymes runs thus : — 

VHSEE 8ALI. A STANE Wi* I.EADEU COME, 

THAT 'LL M^K f OlI^H fA/^HEft, BUT A PUIR SON. 



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88 IiOCALIVISS. 

The snuiU river <^ Leader takes its rise near 
the quarry which supplies that district with 
Ume, and runs through part of the Rhymer's 
property before joining the Tweed. The fiov 
mers of this distriet have hitherto made great 
use of the said lime ; and the present genera^ 
timi is said to be feeling the ultimatdy im« 
poverizing effects of the practice^-*7-hence the 
prediction, that it would '^ mak a rich fiither, 
but a pair son." 

Some of the prophetic rhymes which follow, 
and close the local class, are- popularly ascribed 
to l^omas the Rhymer no less than the above ; 
but as they do not, like them, refer to either 
the author's own circumstances or peculiar dis- 
trict, we have judged it necessary to adopt a 
s^Murate arrangement. 



lONA. 

The inhabitants of lona entertain a belief 
that the desolate shrine of St. Columba shall 
yet be restored to its primitive glory and 
sanctity ; and, in support of their belief, quote 



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LOOALITIBS. 89 

no less credible authority than that bf Columba 
himself, expressed in the following lines ; — 

AK I, MO CHRIDHE f I MO OBRAIDH ! 

AN AITE GDTH MHAKAXCH BXDH GENM BA ; 
ACH MUX TIO AN 8AOGHAL GU ERICH 

BITHIDH I MAR A BHA ! 

Thus literally translated : — 

IN lONA OF MY HEART, lONA OF MY LOVE, 
INSTEAD OF THE VOICE OF MONKS SHALL BE LOWING 

OP CATTLE ; 
BUT ERE THE WORLD COME TO AN END 
lONA SHALL BE AS IT WAS. 

Implying, says Paterson, author of the "Legend 
of lona/' that the island, after ages of ruin 
and neglect, shall again be the retreat of piety 
and learning. This sentiment seems to have 
struck Dr. Johnson, without any knowledge of 
Columba's prophecy. *' Perhaps, in the revo- 
lutions of the world, lona may be some time 
again the instructress of the western regions." 
Jmr. to West. Ish 

In illustration of the above rhyme it is ne« 
cessary to-state,that I(pronounced Ee) is the po^ 
h2 



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go hOaAhlTlMB. 

pular local appellation of lona. The inacriptidna 
on some of the tombatonea among the ruins of 
the monastery^ of a very ancient date, designate 
it " Hi/' or " Hij." I signifies is^nd, and is 
synonymous with inch. loolmkill, the name 
given to the island in honour of its celebrated 
resident, literally interpreted, signifies. The 
Island of Cdumba of Cells. lona, which may 
be called the classical appellation of the island, 
since it was adopted by Dr. Johnson, signifies, 
in Gaelic, The Island of Waves, — what must ap- 
pear a most appropriate etymology to all who 
have seen the massy and frequent waves of the 
Atlantic break upon its shore. 

Another prophecy, still more flattering to 
lona than the above« affirms, that " seven years 
before the end of the warl4* the sea, at one 
tide, s)ial) cover the We^t^n Islands and the 
giieen-headed Isla» while th^ island of Columbia 
shall swim," or oontinue afloat. 

SEACHD BLIADHKA KOISIHV BHEA A 
THIO MUm THAH EIRIKK RE AON TRA* 
'S THAR ILE GH17IRM 6HI.AIS 
ACH SNAMHAIDH I CHOLtJM CHLXIHICH ! 

Dr. Smith of CampbeUtqii b>a translated this 



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LOOAMTiaS. 91 

prophecy, with peculiar elegance, though with 
the most latitudinarian freedom, in two English 
ballad verses: 

«^ BCVEH YSAYS BSFO&X THAT AWFUI. BAT, 

UVUEX TIME SHALL BE XO MORE,^ 
A DREADFUL DE|:.U6E SHALL o'EBSWEEP 

HIBERNIANS MOSSY SHORE. 
THE GREEN-CLAD ISLA, TOO, SHALL SINK ; 

WHILE, WITH THE GREAT AND GOOD, 
C0LUUBA*8 HAPPIER ISLE SHALL REAR 

HER TOWERS ABOVE THE FLOOD." 

*' Eirinn/' the word in the Gaelic rhyme lor 
*' Hibernia's mossy shore" iii Dr. Smith's ver- 
sion^ signified, anciently, the Western Islands 
in general, Ireland included, though now the 
popular and poetical name of the sister islarid 
alone. In its more extaided ancient sense, 
tliere is good reason for, believing that it also in- 
eluded that part of the mainland of Scotland, — 
namely, Argyleshire, and its adjacent territory, 
which was certainly peopled from Ireland, at 
an early period, by the tribes whose sovereign 
'eventoally extirpated the Picts, extended his 
^ominicHi over tfaeliowlands, and was the found- 
<er of the Scottish monarchy. 



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93 LOCALITtBS. 

The island of lona is separated ftom that ai 
Mull by a strait about a mile broad. An islet 
d^se to the Mull shore^ immediately opposite 
to the ruins of lona^ is called " Eilean nam 
Ban," that is, " The Women's Island." The 
name gives some countenance to a tradition of 
Columba, that he would not allow a woman or 
a cow to remain on his own island. The reason 
said to have been assigned by him for this un« 
gracious command, is characteristic of his well- 
known piety ; and, as is generally the case with 
remarkable sayings, preserved by tradition, 
couched in a distich,— 

FA& AM BI BO BIDH BEAM 

*8 FAB AM BI BTAU BIl>H MALLACBADH. 

Literally signifying, — 

WHEEE THERE IS A COW, 

THERE WILL BE A WQMAK ; 

AKD WHERE THERE IS A WOMAN, 

THERE WILL BE MISCHIEF [OR WICKEDKE88.] 

The saying has settled into a proverb, and i» 
generally repeated as a good*humoured satice 
on the fair sex. 



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I.0CAI4ITIS8. 93 

PERTH. 

This beautiful city suffered from a nocturnal 
inundation of the Tay, anno 1210 ;* and it is 
predicted that yet once again it will be destroy- 
ed in a similar manner. The Gaelic prophecy 
is couched in the following lines : — 

TAA MHOa KA'n TOU N 

BHEIR I* SCaiOB LOIN Ala PEAIRT. 

Literally in English : 

GREAT TAY OF THE WAVES 
SHALL SWEEP PERTH BARE. 

The tawn lies so little above the level of the 
river, that such an event does not seem impro- 
bable. There is also a Lowland rhyme equally 
threatening : 

SATS THE SHOCHIE TO THE ORSIE, 

" WHEftE SHALL WE MEET ?" 
" AT THE CROSS OP PERTH, 

*' WHEM A' MEN ARE PAST ASLEEP l" 



• So, according to Boece and others, though historians.of 
the Balrymple cast deny the event altogether. 



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94 LOCALITiBB. 

These are two streams, which fall into the 
Tay about five miles above the town. It is said, 
that, on the building of the old bridge, the 
cross of Bertha was takeil down, and built into 
the central arch, with a view to fulfil, without 
harm, the intentions of the Shochie and Ordie, 
and permit the men of Perth to sleep secure in 
their beds, 

POWBATE Peehlet^thire. 

Powbate is a large, deep well, on the top of 
a high hill at Eddlestone, near Peebles, consi« 
dered a sort of phenomenon by the country 
people, who believe that it fills and occupies 
the whole mountain with its vast magazine of 
waters. The mouth, at the top of the hiU, calU 
ed Powbate Ee, is covered over by a grate, to 
prevent the sheep from falling into it ; and it 
is supposed, that if a willow-wand is thrown 
in, it will be found, some time after, peeled, at 
the Water-laugh, a small lake at the base of the 
hill, supposed to communicate with Powbate. 
Of course, the hill is expected to break some 
day, like a bottle, and do a great deal of mis- 
chief. A prophecy, said to be by Thomas the 



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liOCALITISS. dS 

Bhymer^ and bearing evident marks of his style, 
is eited to support the supposition: 

POWBATE, AN YE BBEAK, 

TAK' the MOORFOOT in YERE GATE' 

MOORFOOT AND MAULDSLIEj 

HUNTLYCOTE A THREE, 

FIVE KIRKS AND AN ABBACIE ! 

Moorfoot, Mauldslie, and Huntlycote, are 
farm-towns in the immediate neighbourhood of 
the hill. The kirks are understood to have 
been those of Temple, Carringion, Borthwick, 
Cockpen, and Dalkeith; and the abbacy was 
that of Newbottle, the destruction of which, 
however, has been anticipated by another ene- 
my. 

SUNDKUM, SLC^Ayrshire* 

SDNDRUM SHALL SINK, 

AUCHINCRUIVE SHALL FA% 
AND THE NAME o' CATHCART 

SHALL IN TIME WEAR AWA' I 

This rhyme threatens the prosperity, and 
predicts the ultimate extermination,, of the an* 



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96 LOOALi'rii:^. 

cient Ayrfiihire fkmily represented by Lord Cath- 
cart Sundram and Auchincruive were for- 
merly the property of this family, but, long 
since alienated, now respectively belong to 
J. Hamilton, Esq. and R. A. Oswald, Esq. — 
Sundrum, which, in bygone times, was the 
chief residence of the family of Cathcart, is si- 
tuated about four miles eastward from Ayr, 
upon the banks of the water of Kill, and, being 
placed upon the top of a high brae of very ill- 
compacted material, (geologically speaking,) 
has really an insecure appearance. But, per- 
haps, the sinking with which it is threatened, 
is only a figurative allusion to the ruin of those 
who formerly possessed it. Many such pro- 
phecies are attached to the strongholds and 
names of families remarkable in feudal times 
for their power, or their oppressive disposition. 

THE EWES OF QOWKlE^^Perththire. 



WHEK THE Y01VE8 GOW&IE COME TO LAND, 
THE DAY O' judgment's NEAR AT HAITD. 

A prophecy prevalent in the Carse of Gow- 
rie and in Angus-shire. The Ewes of Gowrie 



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JLOCALITIBS. 97 

are two large blocks of stone^ situated within 
high- water mark, on the northern shore of the 
Firth of Tay, at the small village of Invergow« 
rie. The prophecy is ancient, perhaps by 
Thomas the Rhymer, and obtains universal cre- 
dit among the country people. In consequence 
of the natural retreat of the waters from that 
shore of the firth, the stones are gradually ap- 
proaching the land, and there is no doubt will 
ultimately be beyond flood-mark. It is the po- 
pular belief, that they move an inch nearer to the 
shore every year. The expected fulfilment of the 
prophecy has deprived many an old woman of 
her sleep ; and it is a common practice among 
the weavers and bonnet-makers of Dundee, to 
walk out to Invergowrie on Sunday afternoons, 
simply to see what progress ^' the yowes" are 
making! 

THE BEE AND THE DON, && — Aberdeenshire, 

V 

WHEN SEB AND DON SHALL RUN IN ONE, 

AND TWEED SHALL BUN IN TAY, 
THE BONNIE WATER O' UBIB 

SHALL BEAR THB BASS AWAY- 



Ys/^Jv!) Digitized by Google 



98 LOCALITIES. 

This rhyme^ known all over Scotland, is at- 
tributed to Thomas the Rhymer. The Bass is 
a high rock overhanging the water of Urie in 
Aberdeenshire. When the Dee was joined to 
the Qon by a canal a few years ago,* the pro« 
phecy came into considerable notice. But as 
it was not considered probable that the Tweed 
would ever be united to the Tay, the popular 
apprehensions for the safety of the Bass were 
soon put to rest. 

BRIDGE OF BON Aherdceruhire. 

When a wife^s ae son, a^d a hearts ae foal, 

SHALL meet on THE BRIG O^ DON, DOWN IT SHALL 
FALL. 

This is the present popular version of a rhyme 
alluded to by Lord Byron in the following note 
to his poem of " Don Juan." 



* The junction of the Canon and die Clyde wss also 
predicted by Thomas the Rhymer ; but no rtiyroe applica- 
ble to the prophecy is in existence. 



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LOOALITISS. 99 

'^ The brig of Don, near the auld town of 
Aberdeen, with its one arch and its black deep 
salmon^stream below, is in my memory as yes- 
terday. I still remember, though, perhaps, I 
may misquote, the awful proverb which made 
me pause to cross it, and yet lean over it with 
a childish delight, being an only son, at least 
by the mother's side. The saying, as recollect- 
ed by me, was this, but I have never heard or 
seen it since I was nine years of age: 

«< BEIG OF BALGOWNIE, BLACK^S YOUR WA% 

Wl' A wife's A£ son, AND A MEA&'s AE FOAL) 
POWN YE SHALL FA* !" 



TWEED AND POWSAIL. 

The small stream of Powsail fklls into the 
Tweed a little below a small eminence called 
Merlin's Grave, near Drumelzier, in Peebles- 
shire. Whether the prophet or wizard Merlin 
was buried here or not, Pennicuick, who no- 
tices both the grave and the rhyme, cannot cer- 
tify. The following popular version of the 



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100 LOOiXITIBS. 

rh3rme is better than that which he has printed 
andj we believe^ improved: 

WHEN TWBBO AND POWSAIL MEET AT MERLIN^S 

GRAVE, 
SCOTLAND AND ENGLAND THAT DAY AE KING 

SHALL HAVE. 

Accordingly^ it is said, that on the day of 
King James's coronation^ as monarch of Great 
Britain, there was such a flood in both the 
Tweed and the Powsail, that their waters met 
at Merlin's Grave. An ingenious friend re- 
marks, that the lines might be originally intend- 
ed to attest the improbability of the two hostile 
kingdoms ever being united under one sove- 
reign, and as a means of keeping ^ive, at least 
in Scotland, the spirit of disunion. Both the 
events implied came to pass, it would appear, 
in the face of probability. 

8ZT0N.— Haddingtonshire. 

BETWEEN 8ETOK AND THE SEA 
MANY A MAN SHALL DEE THAT DAY. 

That this propheqr, which is still well known 



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LOCALITIES. 101 

in. East Lothian^ aiid supposed to have been 
fulfilled at the battle of Prestonpans^ was not 
made (tfler the event alluded to, is proved by- 
its being mentioned in Patten's account of the 
Duke of Somerset's expedition into Scotland, 
printed in 1548.* " This battell and felde, 
now, yc Scottes and we arc not yet agreed how 
it shall be named. We cal it Muskelborough 
felde, because that is the best towne (and yet 
bad inough) nigh the place of our meeting. 
Sum of them cal it Seton felde, (a towne thear 
nie too,) by means of a blynde prophecy of 
theirs, which is this or sum suche toye, Be- 
twene Seton and the sey, many a man shall dye 
that dey," — Preface, p. xi. 



Rq>ublished in Mr. Dalyell's <^ Fragments of Scottish 
History." 



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102 LOCALITIES. 



MONTROSE, DUNDEE, FORFAR, AND 
BRECHIN. 

From the following rhyme^ Dundee seems to 
be but in a staggering condition : 

BOKVY MUVaOSS WILL BE A MOM,* 
DUNDEE WILL BE DUKO DOUV I 

FORFAR WILL BE FORFAR STILL ; 

AND BRECHIN A BBAW BURROW^ TOUN. 

Munross^ in Gaelic^ signifies about or around 
a promontory, — an etymology justified by such 
a local peculiarity in the situation of this thriv- 
ing little town. The Latin name Mons Rosa-- 
rum is of monkish origin^ and is still used in 
the titl&<leeds of the family which takes its 
title from the town. 

Munross^ it is said^ may also signify '^ Moss 
of the Promontory ;" an interpretation favour- 



• Variation,-. 

ABEHDEEN SHALL BE A OBEEN. 



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L0GALITIB6. 103 

able to the prophecy^ which may thus be con- 
siderecfas only snppoeing that the ground shall 
return to its primitive condition. 

PRYFESDALE KIRK.— Z)«m/riM-*^ir<?. 

This unfortunate kirk was for many cen- 
turies threatened with the following prediction: 

LET SPADES AND SHOOLS DO WHAT THEY MAY, 
DSYFE BALL TAE.' DBYFESDALE KIJ^K AWAY. 

The Dryfe is one of the most rattling^i roar- 
ings rapid mountain-streams in the south of 
Scotland^ — a river of very equivocal character, 
uncertain size, and unsettled habits ; never con- 
tent for a week at a time with the same channel; 
now little, now large, now here, now there ; in- 
satiable in the articles of lint, com, and hay, 
\ast quantities of which it carries away every 
autumn ; and, what is worst of all, a river of a 
most si^legious disposition, seeing that it has 
made a vow of perpetual enmity to the church 
and diurduyard of Dryfesdale, and promises 
soon to destroy every vestige of the same. It 
may well be said that the last trait in its cha- 



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104 LOCALITIES. 

racter^ which, before the year 1559, would have 
been enough to draw dovni upon it the terrors 
of excommunication, is the most strongly mark- 
ed ; for whatever circuitous channels, whatever 
new tracts it may be pleased to pursue in its 
way down the vale of Dryfesdale, it is always 
sure, before coming to the church, to resume 
that single and constant route, which there 
enables it to sw;eep impetuously round the bank 
on which the church stands, and gradually un- 
dermine its foundations. 

These remorseless aggressions on the part of 
the Dryfe, which neither bribery, in the shape 
of a new and more pleasant channel, nor re-^ 
sistance, in the shape of banking, can withstand, 
have, at last, compelled the parishioners of 
Dryfesdale to remove their place of worship to 
the village of Lockerbie; which, being thus 
rendered the kirk-town, has taken away and 
appropriated all the prosperity of the former 
kirk-town of Dryfesdale. The stream of Dryfe 
is, therefore, left %o work out the purpose oi 
the prophecy at ita leisure; and we are in- 
formed that it now seems on the point of ac- 
complishing its wiU,"-^part of the walls of the 
ruined church actually overhanging the water. 



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LOCAXiITJBB. 105 

The sepulchral vault of the ancient family of 
Johnston of Lockerbie^ which contains some 
old monuments^ must thus also be destroyed ; 
and as for the church-yard> against which the 
wrath of the Dryfe seems to have been as fully 
directed aa it was at the churdi^ only a small 
porti<m is now left 

There is a saying in this district of Dumfries* 
shire^ that ^^ a Dryfesdale man once buried a 
wife and married a wife baith in ae day/'— *- 
However strange this may appear^ it is perfecU 
ly true ; but the whole wonder is to be attri- 
buted to the incalculable Dryfe. In making 
its advances towards the churchy the stream has, 
of course, made away with all the intervening 
part of the burying-ground. At every flood a 
portion of the ground has been carried off, to« 
getber with the relics of mortality contained 
therein, as well as the grave-stones, some of 
whi<^ lie in the. channel of the stream a good 
way down. On account of the attachment of 
the peasantry to their respective places of se- 
pulture, the aggressions of the Dryfe, however 
threatening, have scarcely ever deterred the 
people from depositing ■ their dead even close 
by the bank, and where there could be no pro- 



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106 LOCALITIBS. 

bability of their being permitted to remain till 
decayed. So strong is this ruling passion said 
to have been^ that one particular funeral com- 
pany were not deterred from burying a deceased 
friend near the brink of the precipice^ though 
a supernatural voice was heard from the water 
threatening them with the speedy abstraction 
of the coffin. A man having once buried his 
wife under these circumstances^ the Dryfe soon 
succeeded in detaching the coffin ; but expedi- 
tious as it was in this, not less expeditious was 
the widower in wooing a new bride ; and it so 
happened, that, on the very day when he was 
leading his lady to church in order to marry 
her, the stream, being at flood, carried off the 
coffin of his former spouse. In going along the 
water-side, therefore, the bridal company were 
met, full in the face, by the coffin, which, as 
the country people tell the story, ^* came houd- 
in' down the water in great haste." The poor 
bride took a hysteric, as became her; while 
the horror-struck bridegroom and his friends 
proceeded to re-inter her predecessor ; and after 
hastily concluding this ceremony, they went on 
with the more blythesome affiiir of the bridal ! 



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LOCALITIES. 107 

tt is^ perhaps^ worthy of remark^ that 
Dryfesdale church-yard was one of those hon- 
oured by the attentions of Old Mortality^ and 
that that celebrated personage was found ex- 
piring upon the road near the burying-ground^ 
while his old white horse, scarcely less inter- 
esting than himself, was discovered grazing 
among the tdmb-stones^ which it had been so 
long its master's delight to keep in repair. 



• MUSSELBtJRGH BdinUrghsMrc 

M0SSEtBURGH WAS A BURGH 

WHEN EDINBURGH WAS NANE ; 

AN1> MUSSELBURGH 'iLL BE A BUUCH 
WHEN EDINBURGH'S 6ANE* 

We need hot say that this is a bravado on 
the part of the people of Musselburgh, for 
which there is not the slightest foundation in 
fact, and in the prophetic part of which there 
is not the least probability. 



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108 LOCALITIES. 

EDINBURGH. 

SDINBUaGH CASTLE, TOUNE, AXD TOWttS, 
GOD GRANT THOU SINK FOR SIMNE, 

AND THAT ETEN FOR THE BLACK DINOURE 
ERLE DOUGLAS GAT THEREIN* 

This emphatic malediction^ which is partly 
known also as a prophecy, especially in the 
south-western district of Scotland, appears to 
be the only surviving relic of a ballad on the 
death of William, sixth £arl of Douglas^ a youth 
of eighteen, who, having been inveigled, by 
Chancellor Crichton, into the castle of Edin- 
burgh, was there basely tried and beheaded, 
anno 1440. Hume, in his History of the House 
of Douglas, speaking of this transaction, says, 
with becoming indignation, " It is sure the • 
people did abhoi^e it,-— execrating the very 
place where it was done, in detestation of the 
fact,— of which the memory remidneth yet to 
our dayes in these words." As Godscroft seems 
to have known no more than tjie single verse, 
we are to suppose that it was popular, in its 
present form, so early as 1646, the date of <' The 
History of the House of Douglas." 



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€^nvmeti0tit^ oi n^ttrntu^* 



K 



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CHARACTERISTICS OP LOCALITIES- 



ABERDEEN. 

THE BRAVE TOWN OF ABERDEEN. 

^* Panmure with all his men did come ; 
The provost of braif Aherdene^ 
VfV trumpets and wi' touke of drum, 
Came schortly in their armour schene.*' 

The Battle of Harlaw, 

Spalding^ the annalist^ speaks often of the 
" brave town" of -Aberdeen. 

Al^^-^Dumfrles^thire. 

THE LADS OP'AE. 

" Ae is a moor in Dumfries-shire^ having, 
of course, a glen, called Glenae, — ^the male in-* 
habitants of which were long famed for broils. 



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112 CHAAACTVBISTICS OF 

battles^ and feats of activity^ — ^whence called 
' the Lads of Ae/ a phrase^ in some measure, 
expressive of their 'wild and daring character. 
At every fair and wedding, in those days, it was 
customary to have a fight ; and the Lads of Ae 
were ever foremost in the fray. 

** Before carts were used, or roads made in 
the country, and yet within the memory of man, 
the goods of merchants were all conveyed, from 
one place to another, on the backs of horses ; 
and the farmers of Ae, who were almost all 
employed in this business, often transported 
merchandize in this manner from Olasgow to 
Carlisle, Manchester, and various other towns 
in England. Wherever they went, through 
England or Scotland, their names were famous 
for cudgel-playing, boxing, and similar exer- 
cises. 

** A number of the Lads of Ae, under aae of 
the Dalziels of Glenae, fought at the famous 
battle of Dryfe Sands, where almost all were 
killed ; and not a man of them, it is said, would 
have escaped, had not young Kirkpatrick of 
Closeburn, (who was to have been married to 
Dalziel's daughter,) come to their assistance.-—* 
A little after this insti^ice of heroism, Kirk- 



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liOOAJLITIBS. lis 

patrick himself fell, greatly lamented."— ^ofe 
to '' The Battle of Br^e Sands," by WUUam 
MTtUe. Dumfries, 1815. 

AYR. 

AULD AITB* 

<' Auld Aji ! wham ne'er a town surpasses 
For honest men and bonny lasses." * 

Burn*. 

CARSE OF GOWRIE. 

THE CAELE8 O* THE CAUSE. 

William Lithgow, the celebrated traveller, 
in his very singular book, referring to a jour- 



• We may be permitted to remark, that the Ayrshire 
lasses are worthy of this hackneyed compKment, — being, 
perhaps, the most beautiM women in Scotland. Witness 
also Sir Alexander Boswell, in one of hif excellent songs : 

« Well awa' to Ayrshire, 

Where green grow the rashes, O ! 
WeTl awa' to Ayiahiie, 
To flee the jHnwyiOstet^ O! " 
x2 



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114 CUABACTBBISTICB OF 

nej through Scotland in 1628^ calls the Carse 
of Cowrie an earthly paradise ; but adds the 
following ungracious information. — " The in- 
habitants being only defective in afiableness and 
communicating courtesies of natural things, 
whence sprung this proverb^ the Carles (i e. 
Churls) of the Carse." P. 394. 

Pennant records an ill-natured proverb ap- 
plicable to the people of the Carse of Gowrie, 
— that '^ they want water in the summer^ fire 
in the winter, and the grace of God all the 
year round." We have, moreover, derived 
from an original source the following anecdote 
illustrative of this subject — A landed gentle- 
man of the Carse used to complain very much 
of the awkwardness and stupidity of all the 
men whom be employed, declaring, that, if he 
were only furnished with good clay, he believed 
he could make better men himself. This ridi- 
culous tirade got wind among the peasantry, 
and excited their no small indignation. One of 
their class soon after found an opportunity of 
revenging himself and his neighbours upon the 
author, by a cut with his own weapon. It so 
happened that the laird was so unfortunate, 
one day, as to fall into a quagmire, the ma- 



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LOCALITIES. 115 

terial of which was of such a nature as to hold 
him fast^ and put extrication entirely out of his 
own power. In his dilemma^ observing a 
peasant approaching^ he called out to him^ and 
desired his assistance^ in order that he might 
get himself relieved from his unpleasant con- 
finement. The rustic^ recognising him im- 
mediately^ paid no attention to his ^itreaties^ 
but passed carelessly by ; only giving him one 
knowing look, and saying, — " I see ye're 
making your men, laird ; I'll no disturb ye !" 

DUNDEE, 

BONKY DUNDEE. 

DUNSE. 
DUNSC DINGS A*. 

That is, surpasses all other places ; but in what 
respect it would be difficult to imagine. It may 
be mentioned, that this is only the opinion 
which the people of Dunse entertain of the 
town, as their neighbours, in general, scout 
the idea with great indignation. 



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116 CHAHACTBRISTICS OF 



EDINBURGH. 

TKK aVDK TOVV OF EDIVBUBOH. 

Edinburgh is not called "the Good Town^" 
ia the decreet-arbitral pronounced in 1583 by 
King James, in confirmation of its mode of 
burgal government, nor even in an act of ooon- 
dl dated 1858 ; but in an act of council dated 
1678 it is so termed. 

One of the senses of " gude," givfen by Dr. 
Jamieson, is, that it expresses rank, and means 
kommrable. Thus, '^ gudeman" meant laird. 
The " Gudeman of North Berwick," (Melvil's 
Memoirs, p. 122,) is the same person who had 
been designed " Alexander Hume of North 
Berwick," at p. 93, where he is mentioned in 
common with " divers other barons and gentle- 
men." It is easy to see how a burgh, advanced 
to privilege by the royal .fiat, would come to 
be styled " gude," or honourable ; and that 
Edinburgh, as at length the chief of them, 
would be so styled eminently. 

It is worthy of notice, that the keeper of the 
prison of Edinburgh was, during the seven- 



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LOGALITIBS. 117 

teenth century, called '^ the Gudeman of the 
Tolbooth/' 

DUMBLANE. 

DBUCKEK DUMBLAXE* 

This proverbial phrase perhaps arose from 
the alliteration, like other similar expressions ; 
but we can testify, that it is by no means con- 
tradicted or discountenance by the habita of ' 
the people of Dumblane. 

FORFAB. 

BROSIE FpBFAB. 

The legal gentlemen of this town are cha- 
racterized as the " drucken writers of Forfar." 
Their tippling habits are finely illustrated by 
an anecdote of the late Earl of Strathmore. — 
The town is a good deal annoyed with a lake 
in its neighbourhood, which the inhabitants 
have long had it in contemplation to drain, and 
which wduld have been drained long ago, but 
for the expensiveness of such an undertaking. 



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118 CBARACTBBI8TIC8 OF 

At a public meeting held some years ago, for 
the discussion of this measure^ the Earl said^ 
that he believed the cheapest method of drain- 
ing the lake vould be, to throw a few hogsheads 
of good mountain-dew into the water^ and set 
the drucken writers of Forfar to drink it up ! 

FALKIiANB. 

The inhabitants of Falkland, in Fife, from 
their neighbourhood to a royal palace, must 
have had manners considerably different from 
those of other districts. This is testified, even 
in our own days, when all traces of the refine- 
ment or viciousness of a court have passed 
away, as if they had never been, by a common 
expression in Fife : — 

Y£'aE QUEEa FOUE, NO TO BE FALKLAND FOUK ! 



INHABITANTS OF GLASGOW, GBEENOCK, 
ANB PAISLEY. 

OLASaOW FXOPLSy GaEEVOGK FOUX, AXJ> PAISL^T 
BODIES. 



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L0CALITIB9. 119 



KIPPEN. 
OUT or THE WOBLD AND INTO KIPPEN. 

A proverb meant to show the seclusion and 
singularity of this district of Stirlingshire, of 
which the feudal lord wa» formerly styled 
King of Kippen. 

KIRKALDY. 

THC LANG TOUN O* EIEEALD7. 

Kirkaldy is, in reality, as Andrew Fairser- 
vice represents it, as long as any town in all 
England, with, perhaps, a few exceptions; 
but we shall, no more than that honest serving- 
man, condescend to the trivial particular of its 
breadth. 

LINLITHGOW. 

THE FAITHFUL TOWN OF LINLITHGOW. 



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120 CHARACTBRI8TICS OF LOCALITIES. 
PEOPLE OF THE MEARNS. 

THE MEaET MEN O* THE KEABK8. 

MUSSELBURGH. 

THE HOKEST TOVK 0* MU88ELBUBOH. 



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3^<"»ttlat mmoHttft0, 



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The hen-pecked philosopher in the old 
song, " Tak' your auld cloak about ye," 
says very truly, (though not in the sense we 
mean,) 

'' Uka land has its ain lauch;'*^ 

And it is no less true, that almost every 
place is in its turn a subject of laughter to 
its neighbours. There is a nationality in 
districts as well as in countries: nay, the 
people living on different sides of a streamlet, 
or of the same hill, sometimes entertain pre- 
judices against each other, not less virulent 
than those of the inhabitants of the different 
sides of the British Channel or the Pyren- 
nees. This has given rise, in Scotland, to 
an infinite number of phrases, expressive of 
vituperation, obloquy, or contempt, which 
are applied to the inhabitants of various 
places by those whose lot it is to reside in 
the immediate vicinity. Some of these are 
versified, and have the appearance of rem. 
nants of old songs ; others are merely coup- 
lets or single lines, generally referring to 
some circumstance in theTiistory of the sub- 



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124 

ject, which ori^ally called forth the ridicule 
of the neighbours, and continues to do so 
traditionally. Almost qU the counties of 
England have such standing jokes against 
each other. For instance, the men of Wilt- 
shire are called " Moofi^rakers^ in comme- 
moratign, it is said, of a party of them hav- 
ing once seen the moon reflected in a pool, and 
attempted to draw it to the ^hore by means 
of rakes, under the idea that it was a tangi- 
ble and valuable object. The inhabitants, 
too, of a village in Wales, where the last 
prince was betrayed into the hands of Long- 
shanks, are still called " Traitors^ by way 
of reproach. And, to call the people of 
Kent '* Kentish Men^ is considered a dis- 
paragement, while the phrase " Men of Kent 
has quite a contrary sense. 

To the Local Reproaches here commemo- 
rated, we have added a few which are appli- 
cable to professions* 



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POPULAR REPROACHES. 



LEITH. 

KISS YOUn LUCKIE,-^8H£ LEEVES IN LEITH I 

That this phrase is at least a century old^ is 
proved by the circumstance of its being used in 
the poems of Allan Ramsay, who, in a letter, 
or rather a return of compliments, to his flatter- 
er, Hamilton of Gilbertfield, thus elegantly ex- 
presses himself: — 

" Gin ony sour-mouM ginung* bucky 
Ca' me conceity keckling chucky. 
That we, like nags whase necks are yeuky, 

Ha*e used our teetb, % 

I'll answer fine, — Gae kiss your lucky. 
She dwalls i' Leith !'* 

What the origin or meaning of the phrase 
may be we cannot tell ; though the poet, in an 
equally elegant note, thus attempts an explana- 
tion : — " It is a cant phrase, from what rise I 

l2 



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12S POPULAR ^ 

know not; bat it is made use of, when one 
thinks it not worth while to give a direct an- 
swer, or thinks himself foolishly accused." 
Our curiosity having been not a little excited 
respecting this strange expression, we have 
made numerous and repeated inquiries respect- 
ing it, especially among the inhabitants of the 
honourable place referred to ; yet, though the 
people of Leith usually get the credit of being 
at least a century behind the rest of the world, 
and would, therefore, seem peculiarly calculat- 
ed to serve as informants for a collector of tra- 
ditions, we cannot say that we have ever been 
able to find any one qualified fully to illustrate 
the phrase. By detailing, however, the few 
circumstances which follow, we hope to throw 
a little light upon this dark, but interesting, 
subject. 

In confirmation of the meaning assigned to 
the phrase by Ramsay, we discover, that "Your 
luckie's mutch !" is, in Scotland, an ordinary 
exclamation, expressive of petulant contempt, 
or, as the case happens, of impatience under 
expostulation, advice, or reproof. The word 
lucky signifies an elderly woman, — ^is sometimes 
used as a phrase of style, like mistress or goody. 



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RBPKQAOHXS. 127 

— -«nd has another and different sense, when 
added to the words daddif or minny, in which 
cases it signifies grandfather or grandmother. 
But it is in the more unusual sense of wife 
that we must suppose it to be used above ; and 
to say to a person, '* Pshaw ! your luckie's 
mutch!" is, therefore, neither more nor less 
than to remind him of his spouse's head-gear ; 
though how such a reminiscence could be dis- 
agreeable, or in any way delicate, in the ears of 
a husband, seems inexplicable. It may be pro* 
per to mention, that, at least in Peebles-shire, 
it is customary to throw the phrase into a sort 
of rhyme, thus :— 

>YOUR luckie's MUTCH, AND LIN6LES AT IT ! 
DOWN THE BACK, AND BUCKLES AT IT ! 

There is also a puerile rhyme, to the follow* 
ing effect, popular throughout all Scotland : — 

LUCKIS LAUTHEB LE£V£8 IN LEITH, 

Or, 
I've an auntt down at leith, 

WI* FOUR AND twenty TIMMER TEETH J 
TEN TO CHACK, AND TEN TO CHOW, 
AND rOUa TO EAT A BAWBEE-EOW. 



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128 FOPuiiaa 

Perhaps the term of relationship used in one 
of the versions of this childish ditty may- 
countenance the supposition^ that the word in 
the text does not signify vife^ but some more 
distant kinswoman^ and that the scope of the 
whole is a direction to the person addressed to 
go and court his grandmother. Yet great 
doubt is cast upon this^ when we recollect, 
that the word luchf to this day obtains in the 
sea-port of Edinburgh, and that (we are as- 
sured) even in the best society, as a familiar,' 
elegant^ and endearing synonyme for mife I 

Perhaps the best illustration of the curious 
phrase at the head of this article may be found 
in the past hist&ry and present manners of the 
savoury town of Leith itself It was at an ear* 
ly period depressed by the tyranny of its baro- 
nial superior, Logan of Reetalrig, and from his 
cruel hands only escaped as from the fVying- 
pan into the fire, when that superiority was 
purchased by the inhabitants of Edinburgh, 
The magistrates of the capital, sensible that 
the advantages which it possessed as a sto-port 
would soon, if left in full independent action, 
prove injurious to the prosperity of their own 
city, took every measure for depressing it as a 



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BBFB0ACHB8. 129 

separate town^ and for directing towards Edin- 
burgh the gains which were to be derived from 
its commerce. The natives and constant inha- 
bitants of Leith were^ therefore, forbidden to 
deal in any profitable trade, or even to enter 
into partnership with the citizens of the capi- 
tal ; and as every species of honourable profes- 
sion thus of course £ell into the hands of the 
hitter, it is not to be wondered at, that the 
Leithers, in being confined to menial offices on- 
ly, should have become degraded, both in 
household wealth and in manners. All this 
has, in latter times, been looked upon as op- 
pression,; yet such a charge against the magis- 
trates of Edinburgh must appear unfounded 
and absurd, when it is considered, that the 
scope and tendency of their measures were 
merely the prevention of settlements in Leith 
to the prejudice of the city. There seems to 
have rather been a species of wisdom exercised 
in their policy ; for, by having a sea-port at a 
convenient distance, and discouraging removals 
to such a seat of disgust, they secured to the 
community at large all the commercial advan-r 
tages of a neighbourhood to \h^ sea, without 



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130 POPULAR 

exposing it to the customary ocmtaminatioiis of 
a sea-port 

The early inhabitants of Leith beings diere- 
fore> only the slaves and servants of those of 
Edinburgh^ and possessing no sort of claim to 
consideration in the eyes of the rest of the 
worlds the town itself must have at length be- 
come a perfect '' hissing and reproach" to all 
who knew it. To be a native of Leith would 
be considered as equivalent to a mark of bon« 
dage and infamy ; and it would be impossible 
to see^ or even to think of^ the place^ without 
' sensations of horror similar to those with which 
we visit a jail or penitentiary. The very men* 
tion of '^ Leith"— ^miserable, disgraceful Leith^ 
— ^the native place of slavery and squalor^ — the 
hideous refining-pot^ through which Edinburgh 
distilled the sweets of commercial wealthy leav- 
ing the scum behind^ — ^would in time be assimi- 
lated with the idea of all that was offensive to 
the senses : and as it was^ perhaps, customary 
for the merchants of Edinburgh to keep their 
mistresses or sub-wives in this place, (a mean- 
ing we did not before think of,) the phrase, 
'^ Gae, kiss your lucky, — she lives in Leith !'* 
might be neither more nor less than a taunt of 



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RBPBOACHES. 131 

the most mortifying and humiliating nature 
which • an offended and unmannerly person 
could use. 

The early laws which repressed the popula* 
tion of Leith haying been^ of late centuries^ in 
a great measure disused, the present inhabi* 
tants possess immunities niearly as great, and 
affect to hold their heads quite as high, as those 
of Edinburgh. It is but doing them common 
justice to say this, after presenting such a pic- 
ture of their ancestors ; y^, as bad laws often 
do little evil, so good laws as often do little 
good. Though the magistrates of Edinburgh 
have for a long time been accustomed to consi- 
der Leith and Edinburgh as equally entitled to 
their protection, and the capabilities of the re- 
spective citizens are decidedly upon a par, it 
does not follow that " The Leithers," as old 
Maitland called them, are as good in every re- 
spect as ** The Edinburghers." Laws do not 
much or immediately affect manufers ; and thus 
it happens, that the people of the sea*port still 
exhibit a general inferiority to those of the ca* 
pital, — ^not exactly the same sort of inferiority 
which distinguished them four centuries ago, 
but an inferiority in point of refinement of 



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132 POPULAR 

manners. Whether this is the result of its 
primeval circumstances alone, or the general 
effect of what may be called commercial promn^ 
cialigm, we shall not take it upon us to say. 
We merely point out what is apparent to every 
eye, in illustration of certain local circumstances 
connected with an interesting subject 

THE CASOl^GAT^^Edihburgh. 

THE LASffES O* THE CAKONGATE, 

O, TH£T A&E WOXTDROUS VICE, 
THET WIKKA GI*E A SINGLE KISS, 

BUT FOR A DOUBLE PRICE ! 
OAR HAKO THEM, GAR HAXG THEM, 

HICH UPOir A TREE, 
FOR we'll get better UP THE GAIT 

FOR i BAWBEE. 

This rhyme, which seems intended for a sa- 
tire upon the court ladies, was procured, thirty 
years ago, from the recitation of a very aged 
lady of quality. It is not now used; but 
wherefore should it, since the Delias of the Ca^ 
nongate are not now a whit more disdainful 
than those of the High Gait I Tempora mu^ 
tantur, el hce mutatas sunt cum Hits, 



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RBPB04CHE8. 133 



THE NETHERBOW Edinburgh, 

This ancient place^ which is said to have been 
in former times chiefly occupied by weavers, is 
no more exempted than its ancient neighbour, 
the Canongate, from popular reproach, — the 
following rhyme being still common among the 
children of Edinburgh :— 

A8 I OACD UP THE CAKOKOATS, 

AND tbhough the nethekbow, 

FOUR AND TWENTY WEAVERS 

WERE SWINGING IN A TOW. 
THE TOW Ga'E a CRACK, 

THE WEAVERS GA*E A OIRN, 
FIE, LET ME DOWN AGAIN, 

I'LL NEVER STEAL A PIRN. 
I'll NE*£R STEAL A PIRN, 

I'll nb'kr steal a pow,* 

O fie let me down AOAIN9 

I'll STEAL NAE MAIR FRAE TOU. 



• A pme of lint is the quantity put upon the distaff at 
once. 

M 



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134 POPULAR 



LITTLE DUNKELD. 

WAS THEEK ERE SIC ▲ PA&I8H, A PAKISH, A PARISH, 
WAS THERE ERE SIC A PARISH AS LITTLE DUNKELL ? 
TttBT*r« 8TICKIT THE MINISTER, HAlfOED THE PRE- 
CENTOR, 
DUNG OOUK THE STEEPLE, AND l^KUCKSN THE 
BELL I ! I 

'^ Little Dunkeld" is the name of the parish 
dose to Dunkeld^ on the opposite side of the 
Tay. 

DUNBAR. 

HEY THE HAGOIS O* DUNBAR, 

FATHARA LINKUM, FEEDLE ; 
MONT BETTER, FEW WAUB, 

FATHARA ^INKUM, FEEDLE. 
fob: TO MAR THIS HAGGIS NICE, 

FATHARA, &C 
THEY PAT IN A PECK O' LICE, 

FATHARA, &C. 
FOR TO MAK THIS HAGGIS FAT, 

FATHARA, &C. 
THEY PAT IN A SCABBIT CAT, • 

FATHARA, &C. 



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RBPAOA0HB8. 135 

MAYBOhl&^^Ayrshirey^commonfy calkd Mlnniehok, 

MIVKIEBOLE 

'S A DIRTT HOLE, 

IT STANDS ABUNK THE MI&E. 

JlS,ViBVKOiBy^Roxburgfuikire. 

JETHAET JUSTICE, — ^FIRST HAUG A MAN AKS SYKE 
JUDGE HIM. 

According toCrawford, in his ^'Memmrs/' the 
phrase Jedburgh Justice took its rise in 1574^ 
CHI the occasion of the Regent Morton there 
and then trying and condemning, with cruel 
precipitation, a vast number of people, who 
had offended against the laws, or against the 
supreme cause of his lordship's faction. A 
different origin is assigned by the people. Upon 
the occasion, say they, of nearly twenty crimi- 
nals being tried for one offence, the jury were 
equally divided in opinion as to a verdict, when 
*one who had been asleep during the whole trial 
suddenly awoke, and, being interrogated for 
his vote. Vociferated, " Hang them a' !" This' 
does not seem precisely consistent with the 
latter part of the phrase, which, perhaps, ap- 
plies better to Cupar, where the reproach is 
quite as proverbial as at Jedburgh, and where 



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136 POPULAR 

a more probable origin is assigned to it. The 
story of the people of Cupar bears^ that, on a 
man once refusing to come out of his room in 
the jail, to be tried, and having contrived to 
bar the officers out, they opened a hole in the 
ceiling, through which they poured water upon 
him, till he was drowned; after which, the 
body being brought out to the street, the judges 
and jury assembled over it, and pronounced 
sentence in due form, decreeing that he had 
" richly deserved to die." 

The English phrase '^ Lidford Law," com« 
memorated by Grose> bears the same significa- 
tion. 

BOWDE^^^Roxhurgfuhire. 

TILtlELOOT, TILLIELOOT, TILLIELOOT o'BOWDEn!* 
OUa CAT*8 KITTLED IK ARCH^K's WIG ; 

TILLIELOOT, TILLICLOOT, TILLIELOOT O* BOWBEK, 
THAEE O* THEK KAKED, AVD THREE O* THEM 
CLAD I 

hAVDEl^y— Berwickshire. 
LOUSIE lauther! 

This poor and squalid town labours under 

* Tillieloot, an eld Scottish tenn for cowaid or chieken* 
heart* 



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HEPSOA0HBS. 137 

the above phrase of reproach, which, indepen- 
dent of " apt alliteration's artful aid/' seems 
to be very well applied. It is said to have 
been first applied on the following occasion. 
Some of the inhabitiants of Lauder were once 
disputing with a native of a neighbouring town 
upon the comparative merits of their respective 
places of abode, when the latter happened, in 
his endeavours to disparage Lauder, to call it a 
'^ Umstf place" Being required to prove his 
words, by shewing how he came to consider 
Lauder worthy of so disgraceful an epithet, he 
was somewhat posed for an explanation, but at 
length exclaimed, " Deed, I think there's nae 
muckle need o' proving the matter, for yere 
ain skins should ken better than I can tell 
ye ; but there's just ae thing I'll swear to, and 
that is, that nae farer gane than yesterday, as I 
was oommin' owre to the town, I met a Lau- 
der chest o* drawers takin' the road for Edin- 
burgh, o' its ain accord, as hard as it could 
hotobr 



m2 



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138 W>PUIiAR 

ABERLADY.— ^ Village in East Lothian. 
STICK U8 A' IV ABSELADY I 

The following laughable origin is assigned 
to this phrase of reproach,-p-«An honest man^ 
who dwelt in Ab^lady^ coming home one day, 
was sudd^ly convinced of what he had never 
before su^ected^ — that his wife was not faith- 
ful to the nuptial vow. In a transport of rage» 
he drew his knife^ and attempted to stab her ; 
but she escaped his vengeance, by running out 
to the open streets and taking refuge among 
the neighbours. The villagers all flocked 
about the incensed husband, and, as usual in 
cases of conjugal brawls, seemed disposed to 
take part with " his poor wife." The man 
told his tale, with many protestations, expect-i 
ing their sympathy to be all on his own side; 
but what was his disappointment, when the 
wives, with laudable indifference to his woful 
case, cried out, " Deed, billy, gin that be yere 
story, ye might stick us a' in Aherlady !*' 

The .inhabitants of Aberlady to this day feel 
aggrieved when this unlucky expression is cast 



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RBPBOACHSS. 139 

up to them^ and seldom fail to resent it with 
blows. Not many years ago^ an English gen- 
tleman^ residing with the Earl of Haddington 
at Tynningham^ was invited by some wags at 
his lordship's table, after dinner, to^ go forth 
and cfy, " Stick us a' in Aberlady," at the top 
of his voice, through the principal street of the 
village. He did so, and was treated for his 
pains with so severe a stoning, that he was 
carried to bed insensible, and never recovered 
from the effects of the frolic. 

PATH-HEAD. 

FICKLE TILL *M IN PATH-HEAD ! 
ILKA BAILIE BUANS ANOTHEB ! 

KIRRlEMUIKr 

FAR AKE Y£ GAIN ?^-T0 KILLIEMUI& ! 
TAARE NEVER ANE WIEL FURE,* 

BUT FOR HIS ANE PENNY FEE. 

Forfarshire, 



Fared. 



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140 POPULAR 



SELKIRK. 

SUTOES ANB, SUT0E8 TWA, 
■UT0R8 IN THE BACK EAW ! 

If any of our readers desire to have a com* 
fortable lapidation^ they may parade the maiu 
street of the old burgh of Selkirk^ crying this 
at a moderate pitch of voice. 

KINGHORN. 

HERE STANDS A KIRK WITHOUT A STEEPLE, 
A DRUCKEN PRIEST AND A GRACELESS PEOPLE. 

LANARK. 

It is said that the burgh of Lanark was^ till 
very recent times^ so poor^ that the single 
butcher of the town^ who also exercised the 
calling of a weaver^ in order to fill up his spare 
time^ would never venture upon the speculation 
of killing a sheep^ till every part of the animal 
was ordered beforehand. When he felt dis- 
posed^ to engage in such an enterprise, he 



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RSPBOACHES. 141 

usually prevailed upon the minister^ the provost^ 
and the town-coundl^ to take shares ; but when 
no person came forward to bespeak the fourth 
quarter, the sheep received a respite till better 
times should cast up. The bellman, or skeUy- 
many as he is there called, used often to go 
through the streets of Lanark, with advertise- 
ments, such as are embodied in the following 
popular rhyme :-»- » 

bell-ell-ell ! 

there's a vat sheep to kill ! 

A LEG FOa THE P&OVOST, 

ANOTHEB FOB THE PRIEST, . 

the bailies and deacons, 
they'll tax the keist ; 

AND IF the fourth LEG WE CANNOT SELL, 
THE SHEEP IT MAUN LEEVE, AND OAE BACK TO THE 
HILL ! 

This rhyme, which is well known over all 
Clydesdale, may excite the ridicule of people 
who live in large cities, and have the command 
of plentiful markets ; and the respectable little 
town of Lanark may thereby suffer consider- 
ably in the estimation of their more fortunate 
neighbours. Yet it is not, or was pot, alon^ in 



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142 POPULAR 

this occasion of reproach. The ceremony of 
advertisement is still gone through, at the death 
of a sheep, in the town of Auchtermuchty. In 
Peebles beef is unheard of, except once a-week^ 
The numerous valetudinarian visitors of Inner* 
leithen, in the summer of 1825/ were almost 
starved upon a perpetuation of lamb ; and there 
is scarcely, we believe, a small town in 6cot« 
land, where it is not customary io announce, bj 
the bell, the drum, or the clap, the joyful in- 
telligence of bovicide. Even in Edinburgh,* 
we remember seeing announced, in an old ma- 
gazine^ the death (in 1796) of a eadie, or mar- 
ket-porter, who was old enough to remember 
the time when the circumstance of beef being 
for sale in the market was publicly announced 
in the streets of the capital ! We need not, 
however, remind the reader, that it was then 
the practice of almost every family to lay in a 
stock of salted beef (called their mart) in No- 
vember, sufficient to serve all the year round; 
and that, consequently, few thought of having 
recourse to the public market for a supply.—- 
To such a system was this carried, that at least 
in one, if not more farm-houses, to our know* 
ledge, the gudewife was in th^ habit of r^o^ 



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REPROAORBS. 143 

larly salting the tripe of the mart^ by way of 
provision for the Highland reapers^ whom she 
would require to entertain about ten months 
after. 

IN VITUPERATION OF THE HI0HLANDS. 

THERE^S NOUGHT IN THfi HIELAKTS 

BUT SYBOES.AND LEEKS, 
AND LANfi-LEOaiT GALLANTS 

GAUN WANTIN* THE BBEEKS. 

FARMS IN ANGUS-SHIRE. 



STAR TAFT AND STAR COTTIN, 

DVHEN ye' V£ GOT THERE, YE 'LL SEE MONIE A 

ROTTEN ! 
STAR COTTIN AND STAR TAFT, 
YE 'LL see twenty THOUSAND IN THE LAFT ! 



WHIG RHYMES AFTER 1745. 

the cats HAE KITTLED IN CHARLIE'S WIG, 
THE CATS HAE KITTLED IN CHARLIE'S WIG, 
there's ANE O' THEM LXYIn' AND TWA O' THEM 

DEAD, 
THE CATS HAE KITTLED IN CHARLIE'S WIG. 



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144 POFULAK 



A PB0TE8TAKT PRINCE FEOK ROME DOES ADVANCE, 

LDLLIBULERO, LULI.IB1TLEE I 
AXD, WHAT 18 MORE RARE, BRIKOS FREEDOM FROM 
FRAKCE, 

LVLLIBULERO, LULLIBULEE ! 



ECCLESIAMAGIRDLE, 

One of the Ochitt HtlUy upon ike south tide of 
Strathearn.* 

THE LASSES O* EXMAOIRDLE 

MAT VERY WEEL BE DIV ; 
FOR, FRAE MICHAELMAS TILL WHITSUITDAT, 

THET KEVER SEE THE 8UK. 



* Tlie name of Ecdesiamagirdle was derived from a 
place of worship, and seems to signify '^ Church of St. 
Grizd." Ma, is Gaetic for Sanctut, Gamerarius has 
omitted St. Grizelda in his Catalogue of the Saints of Scot- 
land ; but many samts had places dedicated to them in 
Scotland, who were not canonized as saints of other coun- 
tries. 



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BISPROACHBS. H5 



Family of oordon. 

THE GULK,* THE GORDON, AKD THE HOODIE-CEAW, 
ARE THE THREE WARST THXNOB THAT UORAT EVER 
SAW. 

BUCHLYVIE. 

BAROV or BUClILTyZE, 
« MAY THE FOUL FIEHD DRIVE YE, 
AND a' TO PIECES RIVE YE, 

FOR BUILDING SIC A TOWN, 
WHERE THERE*S NEITHER HORSE MEAT NOR MAN^S 
MEAT, 
NOR A CHAIR TO SIT DOWN. 

Buchanan, baron of Buchly vie, was a prince 
of the blood-royal of the house of Kippen ; 
and the rhyme seems to have been intended as 
a satire upon the v^retched village which form- 
ed his principality. 



A sort of damd weed, very pemicious to com. 



N 



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146 TOrVUkJBk 



ELLIOTS, AAMSTRONOS, JOHNSTONS, AND 
JARDINES. 

XtUOTS AND ▲JtMS'nLOROS, ftlDS, TH1BTS8 ▲*! 
JOHNSTONS AND JARDINES, 'LIGHT, TBIEVB8 A* ! 

. The Elliots and Armstrongs predominate in 
the eastern districts of the border^-^the John- 
stons and Jardines in the weftero. Their re- 
spective neighbours still taunt them with the 
above allusions to their ancient riding propen- 
sities^ and though their border spears have 
long been converted into shepherds' crooks, 
find it still possible thereby to excite their 
wrath in no ordinary degree. 

Previous to the middle of tie laaft century, 
as the JLords of Justiciary yeariy pmekd between 
Jedburgh and DuBifrief> Amstrong of Sorfaie- 
trees used to bring out a larg^ brandy^boltle, 
from which he treated his friend the Loid Jus- 
tice Clerk, (Sir Gilbert Elliot,) and the other 
members of the cavalcade, to a dram. The 
coach which contained the liords osuaUy stop- 
ped for a few minutes, while Sorbietrees crack- 
ed a few Jokes with Lord Minto, with whom 



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BKTBOACHSS. 147 

he wM v^y intimate. Upon one ocCftsion^ 
whien tbe odebcated Henry Home^ (a&eewarda 
Lord KupeiSy) for tKe first time went upon tiie 
cicciiil^ As «dvot;ate-depulie^ Armstrongs m « 
whisper^ asked Lord Minto^ ^^ Whatna hmg, 
biftdc^ doiiir4ookin' dhiel ibat -wbb, they had 
got M' them i' .the &ont o' the coa^?"-^ 
" That," rq)Ked his Lordfihip, '^is a man cosae 
t» bang a' the Anii6trong&" ^ iVuth^ thai/' 
retorted Sorbietrees^ shuttihg^ the coachndooTy 
" its dfiie Use Klliots were ridim* r 

The Johnstons^ ironically characterized as 
gentle^ were the most disorderly of all the clans 
in the south of Scotland. A rival chiefs with 
whom they had long been at feud^ once suc- 
ceeded in cutting off a party^ whose heads he 
caused to be severed from the bodies^ and put 
promiscuously into a sack. The bearer of the 
bloody burden, chuckling at the idea of hav- 
ing completely and forever quelled the turbu- 
lence of the clan, said, significantly, as he siting 
ihe sack opon his shoulder, ** Gree amang 
yereseUs, Johnstons !" which is still a proverbial 
expression in Annandale. 

So exclusively are some districts inhabited 
by people f^ these n«neB, that there are seve« 



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148 POPVLAR 

ral villages without any other. It is said that 
an English traveller, one winter*night, coming 
to a border town called Lockerby, went to every 
house in search of lodgings, but without sue- 
ceeding in rousing any of the inmates. At 
length, an old woman looked over her window, 
and asked what he wanted. He exclaimed, 
piteously, '' Oh, is there no good Christian in 
this town, that will give shelter to a poor be- 
nighted traveller?" '' Na!" answered the 
woman, '^ We're a' Johnstons and Jardines 
hcrer* 



THE BOYS OF HERIOrS HOSPITAL, 
EDINBURGH. 

RXaaX, HE&XI-OTTTy 
WI* THE SHO&T COATXE ! 

The boys of the town of Edinburgh have, 
from time immemorial, been in the habit of 
insulting those of George Heriot's Hospital by 



• This story has heen improperly transferred to Argyll, 
shire, the Johnstons and Jardines altered fbr the Camp- 
beUs, and the traveller made an exciaeman. But th», 



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REI>&0ACH1!S. 149 

this couplet «f fittle meaning. Jhe present 
drea of thfese boys is a shorty broad-tailed 
bvowsi coaty covduroj tciovser8> and a dose 
raaad 'ieaxhat cap»^ vriih ^ ankoat in front. Yet^ 
old-fashioned as this dress may appear^ it is not 
many years since the boys wore breeches but- 
toned at the knees, with grey stockings. This 
was only abandoned in the year 1808. An old 
man, who was a l^oy in the Hospital in the me- 
morable year 17^5, informed us, that the boys 
Aen wore robes, with t>ands at the breast, si- 
miter to those of the Christ Hospital boys at 
London. 

The boys of the Hospital have only one holi- 



though, perhaps, 'moib piquant, is toot so correct as the 
above version, localising the story at Lockerby, where the 
old woman's mistake wta nacnnil enough, because Christian 
is a common family name in tbe adjacent territory of Cum- 
berland. 

* These caps y/f'eti manufactured, abont half a cen- 
tury ago, by an old man named 0ndiam, who had a shop 
at the fiead of the Oowgate, and wasihe father of Dr. James 
Graham, an infamous quack, whose munificent projects 
and indecent htttiiesi made a great noise in Edinburgh 
about the year 17M. 

n2- 



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150 POPUI.AB 

day m th^ year^ the first Monday of June, when 
they get new clothes, and are permitted to range 
at will through the town. In anticipation of 
this happy occasion, they have the following 
rhyme:— 

IT*S O ! FOR THE ST0CKIN8, 

it's O ! FOR THE SHOOK ! 
IT*8 O ! FOR THE OLORIOVS 

FZR0T MOKDAT O' JUITS ! 

Aliter, — ^in allusion to the custom of dressing 
the statue of George Heriot with flowers, &c. 
on this holiday : 

HET FOR THE BTRK, 

AND HEY FOR THE BROOM ! 

AKD HEY FOR THE GLORIOUS 
FIRST MONDAY O* JUNE ! 

WEAVERS. 

THE DEAKON O' THE WEAVERS, 

THE SOW-LUOOIT LOON, 
he's aw a* to EDINBURGH, 

TO SEE THE NEW MUNE ; 
Wl' THE TREDDLES ON HIS BACE, 

AND 80WEN-MUG ABUNE,*— 
AND he's AWA' to EDIXBVROH, 

TO SEE THE NEW MUNE ! 

AnnandaU^ Dumjriet»shire. 



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BSPHOAOBBS. 151 

Varntion at Broagfaton^ near Edinburgh^ 
tbirly years ago: 

S0W]SV*MnO, TH£ WEAVER, 

OAZD UP TO SEE THE MUKE ; 

A* THE TEEDDLE8 ON HIS BACK, 
THE SOWEN-MUO ABUKE. 

Also, in Tweeddale : 

A WEAVER, A WAB8TER, A WIKDER O* PIRN8, 
A LICKER O* DISHES, A SCUMMER O* KIRNS.* 



SHOEMAKERS. 

SHOEMAKER, SHOEMAKER, SEW Mf SHUNE ; 
BRING THEM HAME WHEN A*S DUNE. 

Peebles. 



* The heid-boys of Biggar are wont to rise ver3r early 
on Midsummer-fair morning, in order that, after feeding 
their charge, they may have as much of the day to them- 
selves as possible for amusement. He who has the ill fate 
to be the latest in coming to the pasture, is saluted by his 
brethren with this stanza. 



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163 WQBVitAM 

The fofUownig proverbial couf^ alliides de^ 
spitefully to the professionalism of shoenakers } 

A* SOUTEEfl A)n> flOCTZftS* SKEB, 

KANX: O* TH£M BtJT CAN BHtSE A THBEAD. 



CANDLEMAKERS. 

THEBE^S NAE IlLUMINATIOK',— . 

it's a* bio lees ! 

IT*S OVLY THE CAHDLEMAKEBB 
WAKTIN' BAWBEES I 

Cried by the Edinburgh boys during an il» 
lumination. 



SHEPHERDS. 

SHEPHERDIE, SHEPHEBDIE, SHEBNIE HOUCH^ 

A* tHE WATERS in THE LaCH 

WADNA WASH SHEPHEBDIE'S SHERNIE HOUCH. 

a' the waters I* THE SEA 

WADVA WASH SHEPHEBDIE^S SHEBKIE TBIE. 



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BBPBOACBBS. 153 



LAMP.LIGHTERS. 

CEXE8HIE PATI£ BBAK A LAMP, 
AMD SAID IT WAS A LADDIE ; 

TAX* A StlCK AND BREAK HIS BACK, 
AKD 8EKD BIH TO KIBKAWDT. 

With this rhyme, which cannot be old, the 
boys of Edinburgh insult the lamp-lighter ; an 
official who, perhaps on account of his con- 
nection with the police, seldom enjoys much of 
their good will. 



In Peebles, the boys use the following :-.. 

LZERIE, LEE&IE, LIGHT THE LAMPS, 
LAXO LEGS AND SHORT SHAKK8, 
TAX* A STICK AMD BREAK HIS BACK, 
AMD SEMD HIM THROUGH THE MOR*OATE I 

The Nor'gate is a street in Peebles, leading 
towards Edinburgh. 



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154 P07UI.l|i Bn>ROA4SHE8. 



TAILORS. 

TAILO&, TAILOR, JAB THE LOUSE, 

HEAVE THE NEEDLE OWE& THE HOUSE t 

GIK THE NEEDLE IT COME BACK, 

PET TO YOUR WARE, — NOR DRINK, NOR CEACR.* 

CAD6EKS. 

THE CADOER, WI* THE CANNIE BEABT9 

LAP ON AHINT THE CREELS ; 
DOUN FELL THE CADGER, 

AND UP GAT 'S HEELS ! 

Forfarthiref 



* ^'.The jovial tailor, at his carouse, sings meRil7 
thi)St — 

^< Th^ maBf— be he piioce or B«Ue bon, 
iimx handieraft maat him «d«rD.** 
Mr. UreU History ofQUugow^ (ITSa,) />. 2T6. 



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2fiC1&amejs 



UPON 



d?amafej5 of mi$tinction* 



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RHYMES UPON FAMILIES OP 
DISTINCTION. 



LESLIE. 

BETWEEK THE LESS-LEE AND THE MAIB, 

HE SLEW THE KKIOHT, AND LEFT HIM THEBS. 

Said of the founder ofiihis fiunily, in allusion 
to the localities of the diivalrous feat whereby 
he first signalised himself. The numerous and 
honourable family of Leslie assign for their 
'' first man" Bartholomew, a Flemish knight, 
who settled in Aberdeenshire in the time of 
William I. Numerous branches of the family 
exist on the Continent,-— especially in Germany, 
France, Russia, iuid Poland. There were at 
one time three general officers of the same name 

o 



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158 FAMILIB8. 

in the service of three sovereigns^ namely^ 
Walter Count Leslie^ of the Emperor of Gto- 
many ; Alexander Earl of Leven^ of the King 
of Great Britain; and David Leslie^ (after- 
wards Lord Newark^) of Oustavus Adolphus^ 
King of Svedea. The latter, the conqveror of 
Montrose^ and of whom it was remarked^ that 
fortune attended him so long as he stuck fast by 
the Covenant and Commonwealth, and forsook 
him when he entered die service of the King, 
is mentioned in another rhyme, which origin- 
ated at the time of the dvil war, and which 
seems to characterise the principal leaders of 
that period. 

LESLIE FOR THE KIBK, 

BDT DEIX. ▲ UAX CUX GIB ▲ KVOCK 
BUT BOSS AND ▲UaUSTlKX. 

MiddletoDy one of tlie most talented officers 
of his time, was afterwards inHunous in Scot- 
land, as the minister of Charles II, in 1662, 
when episcopacy was established*-— Boss was a 
celebrated captain of horse in the service of the 
parliament, anno 1650,and disCingoisbed hknself 



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FAMILIliS^ 1^ 

SO much at the battle of Kerbester^ where Mon- 
trose was taken, that he received the thanks of 
that body, besides a pecuniary gratuity. — ^Augfis- 
tine, by birth a High Grerman, but who seems to 
have entertained a sentiment of regard for Scot- 
land almost amounting to patriotism, had the 
command of a troop in the armj of Chiarles IT, 
(1650,) and rendered Jijniself ifemous by some 
very heroic exploitB perfiirmed against tine 
Englidi army, under OromwelU " Oaptane 
Auguatine," is often mentiioaMd with rei^ect by 
Sir James Baikkmr, in the fourth volume of his 
'' Anmai& rf SooUand." 



HOME OIP COWMNKKOWS. 

VEKt3EAKCE ! VEWGEAITCE I WHEIT AND WHEUE ? 
VVOTf THE ROtrSS OV COWlMBHKKOWfl, HOW AKD 

zvejubazr! 

This rhyme is ascribed to Thomas Lear^ 
moot. 



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100 FAMILIES. 



HAIG OF BEMERSIDE. 

TIDE, TIDE, WHATE*EE BETIDE, 
THERE 'X.L AT BE HAI08 IK BEMEE8IDE. 

*' This family/' says Sir Robert Douglas^*^ 
'' is of great antiquity in the south of Scotland ; 
and in our ancient writings the name is written 
De Haga. Some authors are of opinion that 
they are of Pictish extraction : others think that 
they are descended from the ancient Britons ; 
but as we cannot pretend, by good authority, 
to trace them from their origin, we shall insist 
no further upon traditionary history, and de- 
duce their descent, by indisputable documents, 
from Petrus de Haga, who was undoubtedly 
proprietor of the lands and barony of Bemer- 
side, in Berwickshire, and lived in Uie reigns of 
King Malcolm IV and William the Lion, which 
last succeeded to the crown of Scotland in 1165, 
and died m 12l4" 

From this Petrus de Haga the present pro- 



* Baronage. 



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FAMILIES. 181 

prietor of Bemeraide is fiinefteeflih in lineal de« 
scent. The above riijine^ irhich testifies die 
firm bdief entertained by the oooiltrypeopla in 
the perpetual lineal succession of the Haigs, is 
ascribed to no less venerable and infallible -aa- 
thority than that of Thomas the Rhymer, 
whose patrimonial territory was not far fimn 
Bemerstde. ^' The fp'andfather of die present 
Mr, Haig had twelve daoghti^s bc^e his wi& 
brought him « male heir.* The common people 
trembled f(» the oredst of their favmaite sooth-* 
sayer. The hte Mr. Haig was at leo^ bom, 
and their belief in the prophecy ~ee»fi«]ied'be« 
yond a shadow of «k«^t.''--^MtR«f. JSkat^jBant, 
m, p. 209. '.'-.'■' ' - 

-The ftmiiy of De Haga is nukttwed^m 
^* The -Monastery," by Captain; >€Siittaptisci^ 
Who sBjrs thac "his kaxraed and' aiUknoivyiqf 



* This genUeman, being «tty pieuB, wfidlbgDint, once 
or twice a^y, to a retired place near his house, fall down 
OD his knees, (placing his bonnee beneath, however,) and 
pray that Gk)d would send him a son. As his name was 
Zorobabel, we are led to suppose that he inherited this sin- 
gular degree of piety, like his name, from some ancestor 
contemporary with Praise God Baiebones. 

o2 



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160 FAMILIES. 

Mend, the Benedictine, could tell to a day 
when they came into the country* Bemerside 
is supposed to be the '' Glendearg " of that 
romance. — There is a common saying in the 
south of Scotland, — '' Ye're like the lady o' 
Bemerside; ye'U no sell yere ken in a rtmy 
day." 

There is a parody, or rather additional coup* 
let to the above rhyme, disparaging a family of 
dull good men, resident in the neighbourhood 
of Bemerside. It is to the efiect that, whatever 
^ould befall, there shall be a gonk, that is, 
fool, in ■■ i haU. A story is told of the 

representative .pf this hc^fUl family having 
once hinted to his neighbour the laird of Be<« 
merside, the disagreeable likelihood of the ori- 
ginal prophecy failing, on account of his want- 
ing a male heir ; and the other retorting, in 
high pique, that there was little chance of the 
part which related to — — — — ever bringing 
any discredit on the prophet 



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FAJiiuss^ 163 



GRAHAM OF MORPHIE. 

The old family of the Grahams of Morphie 
was in former times very powerful, but at 
length became impoverised, and finally ex** 
tinct Among the old women of the Meams, 
their decay is attributed to a supernatural 
cause. When one of the lairds, say they, built 
the old castle, he secured the assistance of the 
water-kelpy or river-horse, by the accredited 
means of throwing a pair of branks over his 
head. He then compelled the robust spirit to 
carry prodigious loads of stones for the build- 
ing, and did not relieve him till the whole was 
finished.* The poor kelpy was glad of his de- 



* In Dr. JaiDiewm*8 poem of << The Waler-Ke^** 
iMinst, Scot. Bord. iii, p* 388) allusion is made to this su- 
perstition: ^ 

^^ Quha with a bit my mou can fit, 
May gar me be his slave. 
To him 1*11 work baith mom and mirk 

Quhile he has wark to do, 

> Gin tent he tak I do na shak 

His bridle firae my mou." 



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164 FAXILItS. 

liverance^ but at the same time felt himself so 
galled with the hard labour^ that on being per- 
mitted to escape from the branks, and just be- 
f<Mre he disappeared in the water, he turned 
about, and expressed, in the following words, 
at once hia own grievances, and tihe destiny of 
his task-master's fiunil j :— - 

BUM BACK AND SAXR BANES, 

SBIVIN* THE LAIED O* HORPHI£*S 8TANE8 ! 

THE LAiaP O* HORFHIB 'lL NEVEB THAIVE, 

AS Lang's the kelpy is alive ! 

The present family of Morphie assumed the 
name and arms of their predecessors, on pur« 
chasing the estate. 

FRASER. 

A perpetuity of Frasers k promised to Phi- 
lortfa, by the Allowing rhyme :— 

AS LANG AS TBE&lE^S A COCK IN THE KOHTH, 
THEBE*LL BE A FRASER IN FHILORTH. 

Philorth at present belongs to Fraser, Lord 
Salton. 



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FAMILIBS. 165 



MOSMAN OF AUCHTYFARDLE. 

It is said that the progenitor of this family^ 
at some period antecedent to his acquisition of 
the estate^ being applied to by soroe famished 
drovers for a fardle or cake of household bread, 
presented them with no fewer than eight; 
whereupon, like the witches in Macbeth, they 
saluted him in the style of his future dignity, 
by pronouncing the following punning rh3rme 
upon his beneficence, which is still well known 
in Lanarkshire, and especially in the parish of 
Lesmahagow :•— 

AUCHT FARDLE SIN* YE GIE, 
AUCHTY FABPLE TB SHALL BE ! 

KENNEDY. 

'tween WIGTON and the town O' AYR, 
FORTFATRICK AND THE CRUIVES O* CREE, 

NAE MAN NEED THINK FOR TO BIDE THERE, 
UNLESS HE COURT WI* KENNEDIE. 

This rhyme, which indicates the extensive' 
power of the ancestors of the Earl of Cassillis, 
is preserved in the Macfarlane MSS., Advo- 
cates' Library. 



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166 



FAMUIBS. 



CLANGREGOR. 

CNOIC IS UISGH IS ALFANIC 

AN TKUIR BU THIKE >BHA ALBIK* 

Literal Translation* 

HILLS, Airs WATBRS, AND ALPIN9, 
THE BLOEST THBEE IN ALBIN. 



6LI0GHD NAN BIOHRIBH DUCHAI6AC 
BHA 8HI0S AN DUN 8TAIFHNIS 
AI6 AN BOBH CRUN NA H' ALB* O THUS 
8AIG A ROBH DUCHA8 PATH AID RIS- 

Andent Gaelic Stanza, 

Literal Tramlation hy Mr. Alexander Campbell^ Editor 
of^^ AlbynU Anthology.'' 

THE ROYAL HEREDITARY FAMILY, 
WHO LIVED DOWN AT DUN8TAFKAOE, 
TO WHOM AT FIRST THE CROWN OF ALBIN BELONGED, 
AND WHO HAVE STILL {A. D- 897-1020] AN HEREDI- 
TARY CLAIM TO IT. 

See CampbelVs Edition of M^IntoslCs 
Gaelic Proverbs, p, JOT. 



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FAXIX.IJBB. 107 

The foregoing' Gaelic ]ine% of acknawk^ed 
Bndqintj, allude^ the liral eoaplet to CiiAiv. 
Albin> and the rest,* tiumg^ soaewhat mde- 
finite in themaelTes^ to CiiUcOsEGOR ;-— collec- 
tive tenaa^ which^ indodiiig the immerDus ca- 
deta heeviog vaariom smnames, are correlatiTe^ 
being expressitre of a eoimiaon male descent 
from both Ai.sxN and QmxaooBLY, the latter of 
whom had sparung of tibe fomer, and^ according 
to the very oldest of our national muniments^ 
had been hb grandaon, beings as expressly as- 
serted by the GSadie historiaB, '* son of Kenneth 
MacAlpm--t 



* They are conjectured to have applied to Qregory^a 
kingdoBi of Seots and Picts, from fan death to 1020, when 
Malcohn II enlai:ged Scotland from the Forth to the 
Tweed ; and, consequently, to have been composed before 
that impoctant accession of new tecritory to which the light 
of succession cannot be regarded as applying. 

-f Gaelic Manuscript, of date 1020, translated into Latin, 
under the title, ^' Chronicon de rcgibus Scotise a Kenetho 
MacAlpin ad Makolmum MacKeneth.** It was printed 
by Father Innes from the nwnuscript in the Royal Library 
of France, in 1729. See Innes*s Critical Essays, &c. Ap- 
pendix, No. iii, p. 784, with his learned remarks on this 
most ancient muniment in the body of the work. 



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}68 FAMlLIXS. 

Gregory, sumamed " the Great,*' and who, 
notwithstanding the obloquy of aome modem 
writers, was not unworthy the splendid ap- 
pellative, (as might be shewn, from various 
and very ancient authorities*), reigned, from 
882 to 897, over the united kingdom of Scots 
and Picts; but, as the rule of Tanutty then 
prevailed, was succeeded in the throne, not by 
his son, but by a nephew, Donald, son of Con- 
stantine, brother, and penult predecessor, of 
Gregory. Nor did Gregory's posterity ever 
attain that regal status to which they had, for 
aught that appears, as good a claim as any 
others of the blood-royal. They, however, 
enjoyed as great advantages in regard to, not 
posts of honour only, but territorial acquisitions^ 



* Register of St Andiew^s, of date 1251. See Innes^s 
Critical Essay, Appendix^ No. y, p. 801, — ^Chnmicon £le- 
gaicum, in Chronide of Melross, written about 1250,— 
Pinkerton's Inquiry, voL ii. Appendix, No. iii, p. 331,— 
and Chalmerses Caledonia, vol. i, p. 429. — These authori- 
ties will be found amply to illustrate the greatness of Gre- 
gory, whether as a warrior qt a legislator. Buchanan says, 
(lib. iv, cap. 73,) " meritd apud suos Magni cognomefitum 
est adeptus ;" and may be trusted in his praises of kings. 



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FAlflLISS. 169 

as any other subjects of the same rank^ being, 
in early times, the allodial holders of the dis- 
trict betwixt the Dee and the Spey, and after- 
ward of Glenurquhay (whence they had, dur- 
ing four centuries, from about 1004 to 1440, 
their style), Olendochart, and other lands in 
the diires of Argyll and Perth. The learned 
^ author of " Caledonia," whilst, contrary to his 
usual predilection, he has overlooked the best 
by far of 4he old authorities for Gregory's pa- 
rentage, is of opinion that he was '' by descent 
merely the Maormor of the ample country 
comprehending Aberdeen and Banff."* Gre- 
gory's being Maormor, Mor'air, or Earl, (as 
the Gaelic compound word came to be translat- 
ed in the Saxont), of the district alluded to, is 



* Caledonia, voL i, p. 393. 

•f* Maormor and ilfor'air are the sani# Gaelic compound 
with the syllable transposed, and signify ^^ Great Man,** 
and, by eminence, " Great Officer.*' That the Comites or 
Earls were the ancient Maormors, under Latin and Saxon 
styles, is the opinion of Lord Uailes and Mr. Chalmers. See 
Haile8*8 Annals, 2d edition, vol. i, p. 331, and Chalmers's 
Caledonia, vol. i, p. 701. Mor^air is stiU, among the 
Gad, the generic appellation of the Peen^e. 



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170 FAMILIBS. 

io Strict accotdance both with faiB bdng son of 
Kenneth MacAlpin md with hb tabseqacBtlj 
mounting Kenneth't throne / b«t, move csped^ 
allj^ with a manuscript history of die family 
of Grant, dated l?!^^^ now in the hands of a re- 
q>ectable cadet,* and which, with a candour 
unwonted in such histories, ststte% that " Neil 
MacGregor, lineally desccoded of Gregory 
the Great, King of Scotbnd/' had a daughter, 
Morsj married, befiire the year 98d, to Allan, 
eldest son of ** Heming Grandt/' «id who ob- 
tained with her, '^ in portion or todier/' the 
holds of Preochie and BaUachi«rtel, in 8trath. 
^ley; and that their son, Patrick, had, by 
Dordagilla, daughter of M'Pender, Earl (or 
Maormor) of Mcams, a son, Gregory of Bafia- 
chastel and Freuchie. This account, so far as re« 
gards the acquisition, by the chief of the Grants, 
of their principal messuage, is supported by ano- 
ther manuscript history of the Grants, by one 
of their name, and dated 1729.t The first of 



* Onmt of Bonhaid, Perthsluie. 

t Hittoiy of the Family of Onal, by Mr. Joba Graat, 
JMinuter at CronuUc MS. in Madfadane*8 Colketioiia, 
Advocates* Library, Edinbnigh. 



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FAMILIMB. 171 

these numuicrqails is die mare to be irelied up* 
on, as (besides its extreme candcnir in regard 
to the acquisition of Bdlachastel and Freacfaie> 
fi'om another^ and then depressed, iurdky) it 
gives a very natural view of the way in which 
the ehristian name Gregory has been so much 
used by the &nily of Grant in various agea^ 
akhough, as asserted in diat history, this liu 
mily 1)0 of Danish eai^iu 

Whether the chiefs of the ClanGr^or had 
attained to the rank of Mor'air, Maormor, or 
Comes, which was, at first, purely official and 
personal, is not cert<un)y known ;* but if they 
had, th^y must have lost it b^ore the time of 
Edward I of England, for the chief was then 
cfxnsidered one of the MAaNATSfl SqoTUB) the 



* In tbd Enfi^Kh leoiids, which have he«B better pzc^ 
served than the Scottish, many mstances oociu of nMe Hm 
ties fiOUng into abeyaaoe from the holders being overlooked 
in the summonses to Psfliament. Some were summoned 
once only. Of odiers the h^rs were not summoned. Thia 
altenMte aotioe and neglect hj the English monarcfas forma 
one of the evidences of in^vidaal tyranny. See BealMia^i 
Political Indei;, vol. i, List of the En^^ Pc^en. 



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172 FAMIMB8. 

distinction, then, and long after, next to that 
of the Comites.* 

Of the foregoing assertions, bold as they 
may be deemed, more abundant proof might 
be submitted, were it not, by the general class 
of readers, held inadmissible into a work of this 
nature. 

As these chiefs obtained their lands before 
the introduction of charters into Scotland, t 



* R4>tiili Sootic in Tune Londineiise Camerrati, wbcnoe 
it appean, that John of Glenurquhay, one of the Magnates 
Scotiie, had heen taken prisoner in the battle of Dunbar, 
28th April 1296,— Rymer, under 1297, on the 30th of 
July, (7th August by the modern reckoning,) of which 
year John of Olenurquhay, with others of the Magnates 
Scotia, gave bail-bond to King Edward of England to 
serve him in his wan against the king of France. 

•f The earliest charter in Soodaftd is one by King Dun- 
can II, 1094 5....S CC Robertson's Index of Charters, pp. 
153, 156, 157. Sir Jc^in McGregor of Olenurquhay (son 
of Oregor of Glenurquhay, by a daughter of Paul na 
Sporan^ of Lochow, treasurer to King Malcolm II) 
flourished in the earlier part of the reign of Malcolm III, 
tlwt is, about 1050. MS. history of the family of (Camp- 
bell, as dted by Buchanan of Auchmar, voce. Surname of 
MacOregor. For Paul na Spornny i. e. «' of the Purse,'* 



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FAMILIBS. 173 

and had not» afterward^ irhether ifrom pride or 
from inadvertence^ got crown grants ; so^ when 
royal charters of huids had been bestowed in 
most other instances over the kingdom, they, 
along with some others, who, from similar dr- 
cum8tance8> stood in the same predicament, 
were classed as ** king's tenants," * removi^e 
by the sovereign,— ^ measure which had, as 
would seem, been introduced during the usurp* 
ation of Edward I of England, and was cer- 
tainly ccmfirmed by another sovereign, of Scot- 
tish birth indeed, but of English education, 
Robert Bruce> who, as is weil known, near- 
ly lost his life by a formidable consjuracy of 
the subjects thence arbing, and fois whidi he 
deemed it expedient not to spsre the execution 
of even his nephew, a person otherwise of the 
highest character, David de Brechin, 

John Campbell, Earl of Atholl, cousin-ger- 



wbo n ^tescribed gea«nUy by the MS. quoted by Audi* 
mar, as '' holding great offices under Makolm II." See 
Gampbdl of Kimane's Genealogical Table of the Family 
of Aigyk, in History of John Bake of Argyle and Gieea* 
wich. 
* See Pryime, under Perthshire. 

p2 



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174 FAMILIB8. 

t^m, bj his mother^ of King David 11^* hav- 
ing as undoubtedly appears^ married the hdress 
of Ai'Oregor of Glenurquhaj^t obtained^ along 
with her^ early in the reign of this monarchy a 
royal charter of Glenurquhay. These had died 
(the Earl 19th July 1333, in the battle of 
Halidonj:) without issue; when McGregor's 
heir-niale kept possession of Glenurquhay, as 
did several of his descendants, § one of whom 
was expelled from this property, by Sir Duncan 
Campbell of Lochow,(afterward by creation Lord 
Campbell,) early in the reign of James II, when 
the iBuooessful party gave Glenurquhay to a 
younger son of his own, Ccdin, afterward Sir 
Colin, known popularly as " the Black Knight 
of Rhodes," || having been in a croisading ex* 



• Robertson's Index, xix, 105, and xxvi, 11. 

t Ibid. xKv, 7. 

j: Fordun, xiii, 38. 

§ This certainly appears from a Latin obituary, com- 
posed about 1531, and which gives the deaths of several 
M'Oregors of Glenurquhay, at Glenurquhay, subsequently 
to AthoU's time, and the death of Sur Clolin Campbell of 
Glenurquhay, in 1473. MS. penes Highland Society of 
Scotland. 

II Douglas' Peerage, Wood's Sdition, voce Breadalbane. 



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FAHILIBS. 175 

pedition. What right Sir Duncan had had to 
Glenurquhay does not appear. He may have 
had it as heir to the Earl of AthoU, the grantee 
under the charter above mentioned ; or he may 
have had it by grant from the crown, to which 
it had, in all probability, reverted on the death 
of Atholl and Countess without issue. But the 
silence observed on this point by all the genea-' 
logical and family historians, by the peerages, 
generally so ample in« their information, and by 
the public records, makes it probable that both 
suppositions are too favourable to Sir Duncan, 
who, like most of the Scottish barons, could 
use the strong hand when his power kept pace 
with his will, as it certainly did when he put 
his son in possession of Glenurquhay, — ^being 
then king's lieutenant of ArgyUshire, and arm- 
ed, ex officio, with fire and sword against any 
party whose conduct could, by any possibility, 
be construed into rebellion against the crown. 
That a family once illustrious, and of royal 
descent, should quietly succumb to the mea- 
sures, legal indeed, but unjust, of which it had 
become the victim, could hardly be expected. 
The clan, accordingly, as appears, did not fail 



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176 fjoiiuss. 

to harass thoee wbo had thus not only shorn it 
of its honours^ but got possession of its very 
means of existence. On the other hand, these, 
aided by all the power of the estaUished go- 
vernment, proceeded, with the utmost keest- 
ness, to retaliation. Hence arose diose mutual 
outrages, of which the blame has, by the pub- 
lic functionaries in the first instance, next by 
the popular historians (who are generally but 
superficial inquirers), and, aft» the example of 
both, by the periodical and several gr^wious 
writers, been attributed to the unsuccessful 
party. 

That ClanGregor committed great atrocities 
is neither denied ncv palliated ; btt^ that it had 
been driven to this last resource by the intolei^ 
able oppression committed systematically by the 
other party, must, in the judgment of such as 
have regularly inquired into all the known facts 
of the case, instead of taking a has^ and partial 
survey of them, be deemed equally admissible. 
One thing is clear, that as the clan has not un- 
frequently stood forward in defence of the 
crown in the hour of need (as might be shewn 
by a detail of its loyal acts), so its acknow- 



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FAMILIES. 177 

ledged turbulence^ at other times^ and when 
the crown was not in jeopardy, proceeded^ not 
from that inbred aversion to order ascribed to 
this clan exclusively by some sagacious Celtic 
antiquaries, l3ut from the necessity, both moral 
and physical, of regaining those means of 
existence, and that status in society, of which, 
under the shew of law, it had, in its own esti- 
mation at least, been most arbitrarily, unjust- 
ly, and cruelly denuded. 

Not only were its territorial possessions, 
which had been held by its* chiefs during so 
many hundreds of years, given away by a 
flourish of the pen ; but its very name pro- 
hibited undier pain of death, for an action in- 
stigated by the very individual appointed by 
the crown to keep the clan in good order,* — ^a 
prohibition which implied (de jure at least, if 
it had not entirely the effect in practice,t) the 



• This certainly appears from origiDal papers preserved 
in the iTegister-House, Edinburgh. 

-|- It actually fared with the operation of this, as of every 
law outrageously tyrannical, that it was of^ eluded. 



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178 FAXXLIBS. 

annihilation, in Mo^ of its rlglite, penonal a« 
well as hereditable. 

Even atill ClanGregor (as if a dan now 
nameless by the Jiat of the ^povemment ooald, 
by this power more especially, be supposed to 
exist !) was the object of ghostly terror to Ae 
public functionaries ; for the secret coancil,-— 
that Star-diamber of the north,«»liesides the 
barbarous policy of ordering the wives of the 
dan to be *' marked with a key in the fao^"* 
and of tendering rewards for the heads of the 
anonymous owners, and tempting these to cot 
each other's throats, decreed diat the dan shook! 
wear no armour other than a pointless knife to 
carre its food,t nor assemble in parties exceed* 
ing four individuals. 

*^ The landleM dan wat ftmnd to grow 
Imperium in Imperio, 



* In justice to the lieges, it must be acknowledged, 
that no case is known in which this ungaU^nt enactment 
was carried into execution. 

t '' Ony kind of armouT but aae poynUest knyflr to cutt 
thair meat under pain of death.** 



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FAMII/IES. 17^ 

That boAM »U the atatesrae&s* twoids^ 
And made them try the edgt of woxd«— 
Sternly decree that one and all 
Should die the death political ; 
And, kst even this should not suffice, 
Set OB each loppM-ofFhead a price ; 
Of the cUBi<^me» t*^ enhance the graces, ' 
Ofder t9 led^ot stamp the ftces. 
The comwil, nervo«« for their lives, 
Debarred all tools save table-knives ; 
And^ that they safe might cross their doors. 
Stinted the dan to groups of fours ; 
BmAy first, m legislatiTe glee,* 
That DO sneh dan should hcnceftxrth be ; 
And, next, as if the daa atiU was. 
Subjected it to wholesome hsws*'*f 



* The Secret Council is well known to have done busi- 
ness, when heated with wine, whilst Middleton was king's 
coomnssioner ; and as the act alluded to was passed two 
dayt only btfiore his Majesty's departure fram Edinburgh, 
to take fossessioo of the Eng^iiah thiDiie, it seems not unfair 
to fi^np'Me it possible at least, that he aod los council had 
liyshted duringy or inanediately after, die festivities of his 
JiiIaj«s«y*s/7^ The Council now ^ to ClanOregor what 
the Parliament, 5th November 1600, had done to the sur- 
name of Bwthven. 

-(* Lines by a nameless Clansman. 



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180 FAMIiilES. 

The acts of council forbidcting the names 
*' Gregour" and *' M'Gregour," specifying the 
panoply of the nameless clan, and limiting 
the numerical quantum of its popular assem- 
blies, (which acts had been passed from 1603 
to 1613 inclusive,) were ratified, nominatim, 
under the personal auspices of the British 
sovereign, by the Scottish Parliament, 1617, 
which stated, as the ground of its paramount 
interposition, that ^' the bare and simple name 
of M 'Gregour maid that haill Clane to presume 
of thair power, force, and strenthe."* 

This puerile tyranny (of which, indeed, there 
was, by the parliamentary repeal of the penal 
laws, a cessation from 1661 to 1693, at the 
later of which dates, and under the stem sway 
of that sovereign by. whose express order the 
massacre of Glencoe had been perpetrated,t 

* IpHsiima verba. See latest printed edition of the 
Acts of the Scottish Parliament, by command of his Majes- 
ty King George III, voL iv, p. 550. The regulatitm of 
«« the poyntless knyff to cutt thair meat" was revised by the 
Parliament 1621, and made more extensively binding, len- 
der the same extreme penalty. ^ 

•f* See the royal mandate to this effect, published, first 
by Mr. i<aing, and afterwards in the Culloden Pi^iers. 



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FAMILIB8. 181 

they were revived^ in a clandestine manner^ as 
might he shewn^^ hy the Scottish Parliament^) 
— ^has happily been put an end to by an act of 
the British legidature.* And although the ter- 
ritories of the chiefs still remain in the families 
who obtained them at the expense of the for- 
mer proprietors, but had nearly lost them to 
the more ancient family, during those civil 
broils which hurried King Charles I to the 
block, and in which the chartered occupants 
joined his Majesty's enemies, whilst landless 
ClanGregor, with its accustomed loyalty, 
rallied around the tottering throne, (facts 
which can be fully proved)t, it has, in the 
recovery of its name, regained a valuable part 
of its rights, natural and political. Albeit, 
moreover, it can hardly be expected it should 



* A bill to this effect, brought into Parliament in 
1774, obtained the royal assent early in the following year; 
and afibrds one of the many illustrations of the equity of 
the administration of his late most gracious Majesty King 
George III. 

t See Spalding's History, vdL ii, p. 265; Wishart's 
Memoirs of the Marquis of Montrose ; Red Book of Clan- 
ronald, &c. &c. &c. 

Q 



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FAMJJJMB. 

forget its ancient concGtion^ it ou^t to be^ as 
we have reason to thitik it is^ its earnest desire^ 
to suppress all feelings of animosity towaids 
the descendants of those to whom, in tknes 
long since departed^ and the recunroice of 
which is to be devoutly deprecated^ it owed its- 
depression. 



GUTHRIE, 

GUTHRIE 0* GUTHRIE, 

GUTHRIE O* GAI6GIE, 
GUTHRIE O* TAYBAKK, 

AM* GUTHRIE O* CRAIGIE. 

This rhyme, referring to the respectaiUe old 
Forfarshire family of Guthrie, though not an- 
cient, is well known in the neighbourhood of 
Dundee. The following is the traditionary ac- 
CMmt of the origin of the Guthries. — One of 
the kings of ScoUa^nd, when on an aquatic ex- 
cursion to the northern part of his dominions, 
was overtaken by a storm, and driven ashore 
on the east coast, somewhere between Arbroath 
and Montrose. Getting in safety to land, his 
majesty, like the pious ^neas under siijoiiar.' 



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F^IHILIBS. 183 

circumstances^ turned his thoughts upon the 
means of acquiring food^ wherewith to satisfy 
his own hunger and that of his attendants^ both 
considerably^ sharpened by the sedr-breeze. He 
had not, however, the good fortune of the Tro- 
jan hero, in'either seeing or shooting 
^— — tres littore cervos 



.erranteft-* 



nothing was to be seen on the bare Scottish 
coast but a poor fisherwoman, who was clean- 
ing some small fishes she had just caught. 
*^ Will ye gut ane to me, gudewife ?" said the 
monarch. " 111 gut three !" being her imme- 
diate answer, the king exclaimed, in rapture at 
her heartiness and hospitality, 

THEN GUT THREE 
YOUR NAME SALL BE ! 

and immediately put herc!family in possession 
of the adjoining lands, which yet continue in 
the possession of her descendant, the present 
Guthrie of Gnlkrie. 



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184 FAMILIES. 



THE DUKE OF ATHOLL. 

DUKB OF ATHOLL,— KING IN MAN, 

AND THE WISEST MAN IN A* SCOTLAND ! 

This rhyme is common among the people of 
Lochaber^ Badenoch, and other districts chiefly 
occupied by the tenants of the Duke of AtholL 

SOMERVILLE^IiORD SOMERVILLE. 

THE WOOE LAIED OF LARISTONE 
SLEW THE WORM OF WORME*S OLEN9 
AND WAN ALL LINTON PAEOCHINE* 

The Story which gave rise to this rhyme be- 
ing related with considerable spirit by the gos<- 
siping author of the '^ Memorie of the Somer- 
villes," we subjoin the entire passage for the 
amusement of our readers. 

" In the parish of Linton^ within the sheriff- 
dom of Roxburgh, there happened to breed a 
hideous monster in the form of a worm,* so 

* Orme, or wonn, is, in the axident Notse, the generic 
name for serpents. 



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FAMILIES. 185 

called and esteemed by the country people, 
(but in effect has been a serpent, or some such 
creature,) in length three Scots yards, and 
somewhat bigger than an ordinary man's leg, 
with a head more proportionable to its length 
than greatness, in form and colour to our com- 
mon muir-edders. 

*' This creature, being a terror to the coun- 
try people, had its den in a hollow piece of 
ground, upon the side of a hill south-east from 
Linton church, some more than a mile, which . 
unto this day is known by the name of the 
Worme's Glen, where it used to rest and shel- 
ter itself; but when it sought after prey, then 
this creature would wander a mile or two from 
its residence, and make prey of all sort of bes- 
tial that came in its way, which it easily did, 
because of its lowness, creeping among the 
bent heather, or grass, wherein .that place 
abounded much, by reason of the meadow- 
ground, and a large flow moss, fit for the pas- 
turage of many cattle, (being naturally of itself 
of no swift motion,) it was not discerned before 
it was master of its prey, instantly devouring 
the same, so that the whole countrymen 
thereabout were forced to remove their bestial, 

q2 



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186 FAMILI£S« 

and transport themselves three or four miles 

from the place^ leaving the country desolate: 

neither durst any passenger go to the church 

or market^ upon that road^ for fear of this 

beast. Several attempts were made to destroy 

it by shooting of arrows^ throwing of darts, 

none daring to approach so near as to make 

use of a sword or lance ; but all their labours 

were in vain. These weapons did sometimes 

slightly woundj but were never able to kill this 

beast ; so that all men apprehended the whole 

country should have been destroyed^ and that 

this monster was sent as a just judgment from 

God to plague them for their sins. During 

this fear and terror amongst ,the people, John 

Somerville being in the south, and hearing 

strange reports about this beast^ was^ as all 

young men are, curious to see it ; and^ in order 

thereto^ he comes to Jedburgh^ where he found 

the whole inhabitants in such a panic fear, that 

they were ready to desert the town. The 

country people, that were fled there for shelter, 

had told so many lies at first, that it increased 

every day, and was beginning to get wings. 

Others, who pretended to have seen it in the 

night, asserted it was full of fire, and in time 



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PAMILIES. 187 

would throw it out> with a thousand other ri- 
diculous stories^ which the timorous multitude 
are ready to invent on such an occasion; 
though^ to speak the truths the like was never 
known to have been seen in this nation before. 
However, this gentleman continues his first re- 
solution of seeing this monster, befall him what 
will: therefore, he goes directly to the place 
about the doming of the day, being informed 
that, for ordinary, this serpent came out of her 
den about the sun-rising, or near the sun-set- 
ting, and wandered the field over to catch 
somewhat. He was not long near to the place 
when he saw this strange beast crawl forth of 
her den ; who, observing him at some distance, 
(being on horseback,) it lifted up its head with 
half of the body, and a long time stared him in 
the face, with open mouth, never offering to 
advance or come to him : whereupon he took 
courage, and drew much nearer, that he might 
perfectly see all its shapes, and try whether or 
not it would dare to assault him ; but the beast, 
turning in a half circle, returned to the den, 
never offering him the least prejudice : whereby 
he concludes this creature was not so danger- 



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188 FAMILIB9. 

em as the report went, and that there might be 
a way found to destroy the same. 

^' Being informed of the means that some 
men had used for that end ah-eady^ and that it 
was not to be assaulted by sword or dagger^ 
(the ordinary arms, with the lance, at that 
time,) because of the near approach these wea- 
pons required, if the beast was venomous, or 
should oast out any such thing, ^e might be 
destroyed without a revenge. Being appre- 
hensive of this hasard, for several days he 
marks the out-going, creeping, and entering of 
this serpent into her den, and found, by her or- 
dinary motion, that she would not retire back- 
ward, nor turn but in half a circle at least, and 
that there was no way to kill her but by a sud- 
den approach, with some long spear, upon horse- 
back ; but then he feared, if her body was not 
penetrable, he might endanger not only his 
hiMrse's life, which he loved very well, but also 
his own, to no purpose. To prevent which, he 
falls upon this device, (having observed that 
when this creature looked upon a man she al- 
ways stared him in the face, with open mouth,) 
in causing make a spear near twice the ordin- 
ary length, ordering the same to be plated with 



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PAM1LIS8. 189 

iron at least six quarters from the point up« 
wards^ that no fire, upon a sudden, might 
cause it to fall asunder : the which heing made 
according to his mind, he takes his horse, well 
acquaint with the lance, and, for some days, did 
exercise him with a lighted peat on the top of 
the lance, until he was well accustomed both 
with the smeU, smoak, and light of the fire, 
and did not refuse to advance on the spur, al- 
though it blew full in his face. Having his 
horse managed according to his mind, he cau8« 
ed make a little slender wheel of iron, and fix 
it so, within half a foot of the point of his lance, 
that the wheel might turn round on the least 
touch, without hazarding upon a sudden break- 
ing of the lance. 

'^ All things being fitted according to his 
mind, he gave advertisement to the gentlemen 
and commons in that country, that he would 
undertake to kill that monster, or die in the at- 
tempt, prefixing a day for them to be specta^ 
tors. Most of them looked upon this promise 
as a rodomontade ; others as an act of madness, 
flowing from an inconsiderate youth; but he 
concerned not himself with their discourses. 
The appointed day being come, somewhat be- 



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190 ' VAMILISS. 

ftw ^he dawning of the day^ 1m placed himsell^ 
witti a stout and resolute fellow^ his servant, 
(whom he gained by a large reward to hazard 
with him in this attempt,) within half an arrow- 
flight, or thereby, to the den's mouth, which 
msa no larger than easily to admit the out-go- 
ing and re-entering of this serpent, whom now 
he watched with a vigilant eye upon horseback, 
having before prepared some long small and 
hard peats, bedaubed with pitch, roset, and 
brimstone, iSxed with small wire upon the 
wheel at the point of his lance: these being 
touched with fire, would instantly break out 
into a flame. The proverb holds good, that 
the fates assist bold men ; for it was truly 'veri- 
fied in him, fortune favouring the hardy enter- 
prise of this young man. The day was not 
only fair, but extremely calm, no wind blow- 
ing, but a breath of air that served much to his 
purpose. 

^ About the sun-rising, this serpent, or worm, 
(as by tradition it is named,) appeared, with 
her head, and some part of her body, without 
tile den j whereupon the servant, according to 
direction, s^ fire to the peats upon the wheel 
at the top of the lance, and instantly this resolute 



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FAHIJLISS. 191 

gentlemfin pi^ Bpur^ to bis horse^ advanced 
with a full gftUop, the fire still incieasiiig^ 
placed the same with the wheels and almost 
the third part of his lance^ directly into the ser-» 
pent's mouthy which w&A down her throat inter 
her heliy> which he kfb there> die lance hreak* 
ing with the rehound of his horse^ giving her 
a deadly wound, who in the pangs of death, 
(some part of her hody heing within the den,) 
so great was her strength, that she raised up 
the whole groand that was above her, and over- 
turned the same, to the furthering of her ruin, 
being partly smothered by the weight thereof. 
" Thus was she brought to her death in the 
way and manner rehearsed, by the bold under-r 
taking of this noble gentleman, who, besides a 
universal applause, and the great rewards he 
received from his gracious prince, deserved to 
have this action of his engraven on tables of 
brass, in a perpetual memorial of his worth. 
What that unpolished age was capable to give, 
as a monument to future generations, he had, 
by having his effigy, in the posture he per- 
formed this action, cut out in stone, and placed 
above the principal church-door of Linton kirk, 
with his name and surname, which neith^ 



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192 FAMILIB8. 

length of time nor casual misfortune has been 
able to obliterate or demolish^ but that it stands 
entire and legible to this very day ; with re- 
membrances of the place where this monster 
was kiUed^ called the Serpent's Den^ or^ as the 
country people named it, the Worme's Glai^ * 
___^ fc .• ■ ... ., 

* *' The spot mentioned in the text is still called the 
Worm's Glen, and the common people retain among diem 
a traditional account of the feat of Sometrille, neady as de- 
scribed in the text. But the monument i^pealed to, whidi 
is still distinctly visible in the wall of the old church, throws 
a great doubt on the kind of monster which this valorous 
knight destroyed. The sculpture presents a rude repre- 
sentation of a horseman in complete armour, bearing a fal-. 
con on his arm, in allusion, probably, to SomerriUe's of- 
fice of loyal falconer. He is in the act of charging his 
lance down the throat of a large four-footed animal, proba- 
bly a bear, or wolf, but which in no point resembles a ser- 
pent. There is an effaced inscription, afterwards mention- 
ed in these memoirs, which the common people, (adapting 
it to their own tradition,) pretend run thus : 
«' The wode laird of Laristone 
Slew the worm of Worme's Glen, 
And wan all Linton parochine. 

'^ The house of Somerville, in allusion to this exploit, and 
the means employed by their ancestor upon this occasion, 
bear, for a crest, a wyvem, (or horaldric dragon,) vert^ 
perched upon a wheel, or." 



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FAHILTE8. J 93 

vhose body^ hemg taken from under the rub- 
bishy was exposed^ for many days^ to the sight 
of the numerous multitude^ that came far and 
near from the country^ to look upon the dead 
carcase of this creature^ which was so great a 
terror to them while it livedo that the story^ be- 
ing transmitted from father to son, is yet fresh 
with most of the people thereabout, albeit it is 
upward tff five hundred years since this action 
was performed." 

At another part of ^' The Memorie," the au- 
thor mentions a popular misconception of the 
knight who performed this enterprise. — *^ Some 
inhabitants of the south/' says he, " attributing 
to William, baron of Linton, what was done by 
his father, albeit they have nothing to support 
them but two or three lines of a rude rhyme, 
which, when any treats of this matter, they re- 
peat,— 

'< Wood Willie Sommemll, 
Killed the wonn of Wonnandaill, 
For whilk he had all the lands of Lintoune, 
And sex mylles them ahout*' 

Memorie of the Somervilkt^ i, 63. 



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194 FAMlhllRB. 

It may be proper to mention an additional 
circamatanoe^ which the auther^ prolix and 
particular as he 1«^ seems to have forgotten^ or 
irilfuUy pmitted> though k refers to no less im* 
portent a matter than the origin oi tfa^ siimame 
of his iamilj. We derive; i4 from that most ir« 
refragaUe of all authorities, the memory of mi 
old woman^— one who was» moreoveTi the 
MeH inhabikuU of the place where Ae lived ; 
BO, be hushed, ye sceptics ! 

According to the story in ^' The Memorie," 
Somerville performed his daring feat, merely in 
the sight jo£ the gentlemen and commons of the 
eottnjbry, and had his services acknowledged only 
by the. inhabitants of the distrid which had 
been aobject to the devastations tit the worm. 
Biity if our more magnificetit edition is to be 
credtted, the knight had the king, with all his 
nobles, for spectators, and was rewarded for his 
prowess by royal gifts. However, these arc 
discrepancies of no importance, compared with 
that which follows. After he had dispatched 
the worm, says our venerable informant, he 
deliberately dismounted from his horse, cut its 
enormous body to pieces with his sword, and, 
as if that was not a satisfactory enough revenge 



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FAMILIBS. 196 

for the similar deeds of violence which it had 
committed upon the persons of the lieges^ pro- 
ceeded to eat it up / The surprise of the spec- 
tators at this ludicrous epilogue to the tragedy^ 
is only to be conceived. They had such re- 
spect^ however^ for the knight^ that they re- 
mained where they were till he had concluded 
his repast. When he had finished the whole 
carcase^ the gallant knight rode out of the deep 
dell where the afiray took place^ and rejoined 
the royal party. All congratulated him^ of 
course^ op his achievement, and many express- 
ed their wonder at the concluding feat; but 
none either congratulated or wondered so loud- 
ly as the king. ^' But^ lock the door^ man^ 
Willie !" exclaimed his majesty ; '^ how did the 
worm eat ?" " Ou," replied the knight^ " it 
just eated like a piece simmer veal !" ^* Then^ 
Simmer Veal sail be your name !" replied the 
monarch.* 



* By the oomnioii people, SomerviUe is usually pro. 
nouQced Simmervelly or SimmeriU. 



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dPam«a €ffiivmnmit0. 



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FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS. 



GORDONS. 

THE GAT GORDONS. 

The Gordons were not only so characterised 
by the people^ but also by all the old ballad- 
writers. They were always considered very 
GALLANT^ and^ perhaps^ gaiety only formed a 
part^. or consequence^ of this more general 
characteristic ; for^ as the old song says^-— 

'* He wha seeks for ladies* love, 
Maun be baith brave and gay.^* 

In favour of their characteristic of gallantry, 
we have no less respectable authority than that 
of the blacksmith's wife in Waverley, who said 



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200 FAMILY 

of that hero> on his arrival at the Lowland vil- 
IsLge, " I'll warrant him nane o' your wheengin' 
King-(>eorge fouk^ but a gaUant Gordon at the 
least of him/'— ^av. ii, 123. In the baUad of 
" The Battle of Otterbum/' they are styled 
the Gordons gude; but there rhyme^ as well as 
the occasion^ might determine the poet. Amidst 
die havoc of a battle, it would not have been 
so appropriate to style them gay ; and they are« 
therefore, introduced in the following sterner 
terms:— 

<< The Gordcms* gude, in English blade, 
Did dip their hose and shocm.*' 

We subjoin a balladj never before published^ 
in which they are styled gay, and in which s^ 
fin^ trait of their personal manners is preserved, 



OLENLOGU;. 

F<mr««ttd.twent7 nobles sit in the king's ha\ 
Bonnie Olenlogie is the flower mnang them a* : 

in came Lady Jean, skipping on the floor. 

And she has dHwen OUnlogie 'numg a* that was there. 



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CHARACTERISTICS. 201 

She turned to his footman, and thus she did say :<^ 
O I what is his name, and where does he stay ?*' , 

«* His name is Glenlogie, when he is from home : 
^* Heiaoithe gay Gordons^ his name it is John." 

«< Olenlogie, Olenlogie, an* you will prove kind, 
'' My love is laid on you, I*m telling my mind." 

He turned about lightly, as the Gordons does a*, 

*■*• I thank you, Xiady Jean, my love 's promised awa\" 

She called on her maidens, her bed for to make. 
Her rings and her jewels all firom her to take. 

In came Jeanie^s father, a wae man was he. 
Says, '< 1*11 wed you to Drumfendrich, he has mair gold 
than he." 

Her father's own chaplain, being a man of great skill. 
He wrote him a letter, and indited it well. 

The first lines he looked at, a light laugh laughed he ; 
But ere he read through it, the tears blinded his e'e. 

O ! pale and wan looked she when Olenlogie came in, 
But even rosy grew she when Olenlogie sat down. 

** Turn round, Jeaoie Melville, turn round to this side, 
«^ And 1*11 be the bridegroom, and you'll be the bride." 

O ! 'twas a merry wedding, and the portion down told. 
Of bonnie Jeaoie Melville, who was scarce sutteen years old. 



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203 FAKILT 

In the following pqsulMr rfa3nne of the fif- 
teenth century, the Gordons are also termed 
gay:— 

WHXB£ LEFT THOU THY MEK, 

THOU GOI^OH 80 OAT ? 
IV THE BOGUE OF DUNKINTIE, 

MOWIHO THE HAT ! 

The history of this rhyme is as follows :«- 
Alexander de Seton, first Earl of Huntly, hav« 
ing been employed by King James II, with 
whom he. was in high favour, to suppress seve- 
ral rebellions in the north, was success^l in 
defeating that of the Earl of Crawford, at 
Brechin, in 1452, but was subsequently dis- 
comfited at Dutikinty by the Earl of Moray. 
Hume of Godscroft, in his History of the House 
of Douglas, gives a very interesting. account of 
the latter incident. After the battle of Brechin, 
" Huntly," says he, '' had the name of the 
victory, yet could not march forward to the 
king as he intended, and that partly because 
of his great k>sse of his men, paf^y'ibr that he 
was advertised that Archibald Douglas, Earl 
of Murray, had invaded his landa, and burnt 
the Piele of Strabogie. Wherefore he retum- 



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GHARA0TBBJ8TICS. 20^ 

ed speedily to his own contxtxj, which gave 
Crawford. kieitTe.ADd msiakakmiD pour out his 
wrath agajmiu themxwhd .bad so . tieadherooaljr 
forsaken, dieitb,. by buhiing. and waafeiiig: theie 
lands. Hmitly bein^ returned to the noEthy 
not only, rt^eompensed th^ daniage done to.lnm 
by the Earl of Munray> but also cooupdled hiai 
out of bj^ wbdb boundi -of Muarmy ;t yetH 
was not dtjn^. without cnbnflcct and mutaal 
harm ; £«r Huntly^ oomiBg.t5 JSIgih in Jdimray^ 
found it .diyjded^-*the .one ludf standing for 
faun^ the other half .(and. almost the other side 
of the street) standing for th» Earl of Murray.; 
wherefore he burat the half which was for 
Murray ; a|id bereapon rdse the proverb/*^ 
Ha^e done, as Eigin mas bnr^.f Whale heis 
there> Murray. assembled his power, which con^ 
stating mostly c^ footmen, he sale down upon a 
hill some two or three miles oft, called the 
Drum of Pluscardine, which was inaccessible 



* This might give occasion to the rhyme deoouncing the 
Gordon as one of the wont things that Murray ever saw. 

•{• It is observable from this, that Elgin then could boast 
of but one street. 



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2M FAMILY 

tothehonanen. Hvntlj farroweA ('^undered J 
his lands^ to draw him ftcm the hill, or, at 
leasts to be revenged of him that waj, thinking 
he durst not come into the plain fidds, and not 
thinking it safe to assault him in a place of such 
disadvantage. But Murray^ seeing Hnntlj's 
men so scattered^ came out of his strength^ and 
falling upon four or five thousand horsemen^ 
drave them into a bogue« called the Bogue of 
Dunkintie, in the bounds of Pittendriech^ full 
of quagmires^ so deep^ that a speere may be 
thrust into them and not find the bottom. In 
this bogue many were drowned^ the rest slain^ 
few or none escaping of that company. There 
are yet (1646) to be scene swords^ steel-caps^ 
and such other things^ whidi are found now 
and then by the country people who live about 
it. They made this round rhyme of it after* 
wards: 

<^ Where left thou thy men, thou Ootdon so gay ? 
In the Bogue of Dunkintie, mowing the hay !" 

HiiU Home qfDoug.p. 197, 198. 



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CHARACTBRISTICS. 205 



THE CAMPBELLS. 



THE GKEESY CAMPBELLS. 



The CampbeUs seem to have deserved this 
designatioD^ from their rapid acquisition of lands 
in the Highlands immediately after their settle* 
ment in the country. Political talent has al- 
ways been a distinguishing characteristic of 
this clan^ and is supposed in the Highlands^ 
where such a quality was always despised^ to 
have contributed more to their advancement in 
power and wealthy than the more honourable 
qualifications of a brave spirit and a strong arm. 
The stigma of ^' greedy" can, therefore, be on- 
ly considered as grounded in a prejudice; 
though, no doubt, the advantages which the 
Campbells have always had over their neigh- 
bours on this account, were usually sufficient to 
excuse the indignation which gave rise to it. 

The Campbells were also styled ^aiV and 
false apparefitly on the same grounds. The 
most remarkable feature in the history of this 
claii, is its constant attachment to what mo- 
dern cant styles " the great cause of civil and 



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S06 PAXILT 

religious liberty,** which gave rise to a saying 
of King Charles II, — '* That there never was 
a rebellion in Scotland, without either a Camp- 
bell or a Dalrymple at the bottom, of it" 

THE DALRYMPLOS. 



The Dalfyuiples, #ho sha^e itt the iibov6 ad- 
cusa^en, tftd- who, like the €lam]^dls, o#e-thcf 
pbwer whidi they havi» had in Scotland for up« 
wards of a eehtury to political talent, have al- 
ways been noted for their foul speaking and 
l^oss wit^ which gttve rise to their poptxkr ap-- 
pellation> 

THB DIRTY DALBTMPLES. 

The name Dalrj^mple, in Scotland pronoim^ 
ced Darwrnplcy seeriis to have always been ocm^ 
sidered in a ridiculous ligitt, probably on M* 
count of the middle syllable of the misproaoun-^ 
ced word. In proof of this, and to shew that 
the preji^ice is not defieient in antiquity, BXt 
anecdote is told of Kin^ James V# A cowfi 
gentleman having complained to that monarch, 
that he was obliged to change his name, ^9r 



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CHABAOTBBlfiTICS. HffJ 

diejsiikeof an estate, into one less fine in sound 
or honourable in histcffy, the monarch said, 
'^ Hoot, awa, man ! If ony body wad make 
me heir to sic a braw yestate, I wadna care 
though they should ca' me Darumple !" 

When upon the spbjec^t of the Dalrymples, 
it may be worth while to allude to their very 
common Christian name, Hetv. This is not 
Hugh, as is g^ierally supposed ; but a pecu- 
liar word, which is said to have originated in 
the following circumstance. One of the early 
kings of Scotland, ailer an unsuccessful battle, 
took refuge in the Bass Island, whither'he was 
pursued by hb- enemies. His majesty planted 
himself on the voy top of the rock, where his 
pursuers could not reach his person, without 
climbing one by one up a steep ascent. His 
only attendant, a Dalrymple, stood in the gap ; 
and as every successive assailant came up, 
hewed him down with a sword. The king see- 
ing his safety depend on the strength of one 
man, called out, " Hew, Dalrymple, hew !'* 
and his defender, thus encouraged, accordingly 
hewed away at them with all bis force, till the 
whole were di^>atched« The monarch, in grati- 



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206 FAMILY 

tude^ gave him land»> and ordained Hew to be 
thenceforth his first name. In allusion^ more* 
over^ to this story^ the crest of the Dalrymples 
b a rock proper, 

TH£ GRAHAMS. 

THE GALLANT GRAHAMS. 

As such^ they give the name to a popular 
air. So also^ 

'' O ! the Grahams, the gallant Grahams^ 

Wad the gallant Grahams but stand by me, 
The dogs might douk in Eng^h blade, 
Ere a foot's breadth I wad flinch or flee !*' 

Finlay's Old Ballads. 

A ballad in the Minstrelsy of the Scottish 
Border bears the name of " The Gallant 
Grahams." When we think of Montrose, and 
of the hero of Vittoria, can the claims of the 
family to this title be disputed ? 

THE LINDSAYS. 

THE LIGHT LINDSAYS. 

The prompt and sprightly Lindsays were ce- 
lebrated for their warlike achievements. At 



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CHABisCfTSBISTICS. 209 

the battle of Otterbum, their chief distinguish- 
ed himself b^ personal prowess. The whole 
dan seems to have made a conspicuous figure 
on d^is memorable occasion. 

^^ He duMe the Oofdons and the GTahame^ 
With them the Lindsays light and gay. 

******* 

The Lindsays flew like fire about, 
TiU a' the fray was done." 

SaUad rf <« The Sattk qf Otterlmm.^ 

It is said that the Lindsays usually appeared 
in the Scottish army in the character of light 
infimtry. But, perhaps, the phrase light only 
denoted gaiety of deportment. 

THE MORISON8. 

TBK MANLY M0RX80N8. 

This IS, or was, especially applicable to a 
family, which had been settled for a long pe- 
riod at Woodend, in the parish of Kirkmichael, 
in Dumfiriesoshire, and become remarkable for 
the handsomeness of its cadets. 

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210 FAMILY 

THE SOMERVILLES. 

TH£ F13DDIKO SOMERVILLES. 

In illustration of this phrase^ we quote a pas- 
sage in the Manuscript Memoirs of the Somer- 
villes^ which was omitted in the printed work^ 
at the request of Lord Somerville^ who thought 
it too discreditable^ or ridiculous^ for publica- 
tion. 

'^ Noe house of any subject of what degree 
soever^ for hospitalitie, came near to Cowthally^ 
and that for the space of two hundreth years. 
I shall^ to make good this assertione^ adduce noe 
meaner witnesses than the testimonie of three 
of our kings, viz. King James II I^ IV^ and 
V. The first of these^ in the storie of the Speates 
and Raxes^ asserted that Lord S.'s kitchen 
bred moe cookes and better than any other no- 
bleman's house he knew within his kingdom : 
The second^ because of the great preparatione 
that was made for his coming to Gowthally^ at 
the infare of Sir John of Quathquan, gave the 
epithete ojc nickname of Lord Puddings to the 
Lord Somervill, and^ out of ane pleasant hu- 



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CHARACTERISTICS. 2ll 

mer, would need persuade him to carry a black 
and a white pudding Jn his armes^ which gave 
the first occasione that to this day wee are still 
named the Pudding Somervilles. For King 
James V, from the eighteine year of his age 
to the threttie-two^ he frequented noe noble- 
man's house soe much as Cowthally. It is true 
there was a because. The castle of Crawfuird 
was not far off, and it is weill enough knowne, 
as this king was a gallant prince, soe was he 
extremely amorous. But that which I take 
notice of as to my purpose, is, that his majestie 
very frequently, when occasione offered to 
speak of housekeeping, asserted, that he was 
sure to be weill and heartily intertained at Cow- 
thally by his Motlier Maitland, — ^for so the king 
gradously and familiarly pleased to design the 
lady S. then wife to Lord Heugh the first of 
that name. Albeit there needs no farther testi- 
monies ; yet take this for a confirmatione of ther 
great housekeeping, that it is uncontravertedly 
asserted they spent a cow every day of the year ; 
for which cause, it is supposed the house was 
named Cow^dayly" 



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21S VAUlhY 

THE HAMILTONS. 

THE HAUGHTY HAMILTOKS. 

THE ARMSTRONGS. 

THB BTCraDT AHMSTAOKOS. 

THE HUMES, SCOTTS, KERRS, AND 
RUTHERFORD& 

THE HAUGHTY HUMES, 
THE SAUCY SCOTTS, 
THE CAFPIT KEB&S, 
THB BAULD KUTHBBF0BD8. 

Constantly associafted as in one distich^ though 
no rhjrme is disoemible. 

THE JOUmTQm 

THB OEKTLB JOHNSTONS. 

This must have been ironical It is at least 
little in consonance with the epithet bestowe4 
lipon them by a distinguished modem poet ; 

M The rough-riding Scott and the rude JohmUm**^ 



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CHARACTERISTICS. 213 

DOUGLAS. 

The house of Angus was characterized as 

THE BED DOUGLAS* 

That of Liddisdale as 

THE BLACK DOUGLAS. 

" The last battell the Earl of Douglas was 
at, the Earl of Angus discomfited him ; so that 
it became a proverb, ' The Red Douglas put 
down the Black.'" Hume's Hist. House of 
Douglas, p, 207. 

THE DUFFS. 

THE LUCKY DUFFS. 

'' DufTs Luck" is proverbial in Aberdeen- 
shire, on account of the good fortune which 
seems to have attended numerous members of this 
family, in the acquisition of lands in that dis- 
trict. The phrase, however, can only be con- 
sidered in the light of a compliment to the 



/ 



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314 FAMILY 

Duffs ; for, though the foolish^ the unambitious^ 
and the disappointed^ usually .ascribe success in 
life to luck^ the wise man knows that skill alone 
leads to fortune. 

THE 8ETONS. 

TALL AND FBOUD** 

THE MACRAES. 

THE BLACK XACftAES O* KIXTTAIL. 

THE MACRAWS- 

THE WILD HACRAW8. 



* The Setons were a &ir coD^lezioned race, as appean 
fiom the family pictures in the possesucm of Mr. Hay of 
Dnimelzier ; wherefore their djaracterif tic pride doea not 
agree with a oommon rhyme respecting complexions. 

LANG AND LAZY, 
LITTLE AKD LOUD, 
BSD ksb #'OOLISR, 
BLACK AKD FBOUD. 



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CHABACTfiRISTICS. 216 

Macrae and Macraw are but variations of the 
same name. This clan is said to be the most 
unmixed race in the Highlands^ — a circum- 
stance which seems to be attended^ with quite a 
contrary effect from what might have been ex- 
pected^ the .Macraes and Maera^nrs hmg the 
handsomest and most athletictneii b^ond th^ 
Grampians, 

HAYS. 

THE HAKDSOME HAYS. 

FOULIS OF COLINTON. 

BLUID7 FOULIS O* COLIKTON. 

This popular expression must have originat- 
ed at the time of the Persecution, — ^the latter 
years of the reign of Charles II and James 11^ 
— ^when Sir James Foulis of Colinton was Lord 
Justice Clerk^ and of course instrumental in 
the deaths of the^matical religionists of that 
unhappy period. We remember hearing an old 
man call Sir James by the sobriquet of Bluidt 
Margbt; but how such a name could have ori- 
ginated does not appear. 



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21(1 FAMILY 

THE MONTEITHS. 

THE FAUSE MONTEITHS. 

Originating^ probably^ in the treachery of 
Wallace's friend. 

THE BOYDS. 

THE TRUSTY BOYDS. 

So^ at leasts characterised by Henry the 
Minstrel. 

THE FRAZERS. 

THE BAULD FR^ZEBS. 

THE MACNEILS. 

THE PROUD MACNEILS* 

THE MACINTOSHES. 

FIERY AND QUICK-TEMPERED. 



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CHABACTEBI6TICS. 217 



THE MACDONALDS. 

THE BRAVE MACDONALSS. 

A hardly-earned and well-deserved epithet^ 
which we do not consider invalidated by a 
rhyme popular among the Macgregors :— 

ORIGHAIR IS CROIC, 
DOMNUIL IS FREUC. 

That is, 

MAGGREGOR AS THE ROCK, 
MACSONALD AS T&E HEATHER. 

THE MURRAYS. 

THE MUCKLE-MOU'ED MURRAYS. 

This phrase is applied, we believe, only to 
the Murrays resident in the southern parts of 
Scotland, where the name is pronounped Mwa. 
That the successive generations of a family 
continue to be distinguished by remarkable 



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218 FAJIII.T 

features, is a natural fact so well known, that 
* we shall not stop to expatiate upon the '^ rouckle 
mou' " of the Murrays. The following legend, 
the circumstances of which, though strange, 
are all perfectly true, may perhaps serve as a 
more agreeable illustration of the phrase than 
any philosophical inquiry : 

LEOENB OF THE LARGE MOUTH. 

^ Here's a lazge mouth indeed !^ 

SHAKSFEAaZ.-^Jirffl^ Johth, 

Arriving one evening at an inn in Glasgow, 
I was shown into a room whidi already con- 
tained a promiscuous assemblage of travellers. 
Amongst the rest, there was one whose features 
struck me as being the most horrible I had 
ever beheld. He was a large pursy old man, 
with a head '^ villanoas low," hak like bell- 
ropes, eyes that were the smallest and most 
porkish of all possible eyes, and a nose which 
showed no more prominence, en prq^U, than 
that of the moon as exhibited in h^ first quar- 
ter upon a freemason's apron; but ail these 
monstrosities were as beauties, as lovelinesses, as 



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CHARACTSBISTICS. 219 

absolute perfections, compared ^th the mouth, 
^— 4he enormous mouthy which^ grinning be« 
neath, formed a sort of rustic basement to the 
whole superstructure of his facial horrors. 
This mouth — ^if mouth it might be called^ which 
had so little resemblance to the mouths of man^ 
kind — turned full upon me as I entered; and, 
happening at the moment to be employed in a 
yawn, actually seemed as if it would have wilU. 
ingly received me into its prodigious crater, 
mumbled me to a mummy, and then bolted 
me, spurs and all ! 

On sitting down, and proceeding to make 
myself acquainted with the rest of the com« 
pany, I discovered this monster to be a person 
of polite manners and agreeable conv^satioti. 
He spoke a good deal, and always in a lively 
style. The best of him was, that he seemed 
quite at ease upon the subject of his mouth. 
No doubt, he was conscious of his supernatural 
ugliness, — for, whatever may be said of vanity 
and so forth, every person, male and female, 
with unpleasant features, is so ; but he had none 
of the boggling, unsteady, uncomplaoent de- 
portment, so remarkable in the most of persons 
so drcumstanced. On the contrary, there was 



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220 FAMILY 

an air of infinite self-satisfaction about him ; 
which told that he was either so familiar with 
the dreadful fact as to mind it not^ or that he 
was a man of the world above considering so 
trivial a particular^ or that he was richj and 
could afford to be detested. His talk occasion* 
ally displayed considerable humour, and even 
wit. But he never laughed at his own jokes. 
He evidently dared not. Though his conver- 
sation, therefore, was exceedingly agreeable, 
his deportment was rather grave. He never 
opened his whole mouth at once. It was like 
a large carriage-gate, with a wicket for the 
convenience of foot-passengers. A small aper* 
ture, about the middle of it, sufficed for the 
emission of his words. And, sometimes, he 
made an opening at either flank relieve guard 
upon the central hole, especially when he hap« 
pened to speak to some person sitting dose by 
his side. Now and then, it closed altogether, 
and looked (for it could look) forward into the 
fire, with an appearance of pensive composure, 
as if speculating upon the red embers, and au- 
guring the duration of the black coal above. 

As the time of supper drew nigh, I began, to 
feel an intense anxiety about the probable con- 



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CHARACTERISTICS. 221 

duct of THB MOUTH at table. How so eztraoiv 
dinarjr a character would behave^ what it would 
ask for, after what manner it would masticate, 
and, above all, how much it would devour,-^ 
were to roe subjects of the most interesting 
speculation. I thought of the proverb of my 
native country, so ungracious to people with 
large mouths, and wondered if it would be in 
.this case belied or confirmed. Should the ap- 
petite, thought I, be in proportion to the 
mouth, the scene will either be prodigiously 
horrible or highly amusing. But, perhaps, af- 
ter all, this man is misrepresented by his 
mouth; great eaters have been known to be 
little, thin, shrivelled persons ; while fat men 
have been supported ere now upon two spare 
meals a day ; more would seem to depend upon 
the activity of the internal machine, than upon 
its outward capacity. Who knows but this 
man, with all his corporeal size and large 
mouth, may turn out a perfect example of ab- 
stemiousness ! The question was one of deep 
concernment, and I continued to consider it 
till supper was announced as nearly ready. 
Upon the mention of that interesting word, I 
observed ths mouth suddenly bustle up, and 
t2 



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222 FAMILY 

assume an air of promptitude, that seemed r». 
ther more favourable to the proverb than I 
could have desired. The man rose, and, going 
to a comer of the room where a number of port- 
manteaus lay heaped, selected and brought for- 
ward one. He opened it with a deliberation 
that was inexpressibly provoking^ and, slowly 
turning up a few articles, at length produced a 
parcel. This he laid down upon the table, 
while I gazed on it with great and impatient 
curiosity, till the owner as deliberately strapped 
up, locked, closed, and finally replaced the 
portmanteau. He then took up the parcel, un- 
folded the paper, and took out a large strange- 
looking spoon. The proverb, thought I, will 
stand yet, — ^the spoon might have served in 
the nursery of Glumdalclitch. It was a silver 
implement, of peculiar shape. The calix was 
circular, like the spoons of the Romans, about 
four inches in diameter, and one deep in the 
centre, altogether bearing some resemblance to 
an ordinary saucer ; and it had a short sturdy 
handle, with a whistle at the extremity. Ob- 
serving the attention of the company to be 
strongly directed towards his spoon, the old 
man showed it round, with the most good-na- 



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CHABACTBRIBTICB. 2^ 

tared poiiteness^ telling us, that he had been so 
long accustomed to use this goodly article at 
home, that, when he happened to travel, he was 
obliged always to take it along with him, being 
unable to make such neat work of his soup 
with the ordinary implements which he found 
abroad. " But, indeed, gentlemen," said he, 
*' why should I make this a matter of delicacy 
with you ? The truth is, the spoon has a his- 
tory, and my mouth, none of the least you see, 
has also a history. If you feel any curiosity 
upon these points, I shall give you a biographi-i 
cal sketch of the one, and ah autobiographical 
sketch of the other, to amuse you till supper is 
ready." To this frank proposal all the com- 
pany joyfully assented ; 

'* Conticuere omnes, et intenti ora tenebant,*' 

upon the principle of " when lions rair the 
dougs are dumb;** and the old man began a 
narrative, of which the following is the sub- 
stance. 

His mouth was the chieftain and represen- 
tative of a long ancestral line of illustrious and 
most extensive mouths, which had flourished, 
for upwards of two centuries, at a place called 
Tullibody, somewhere in the western parts of 



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224 FAMILY 

Fife. There was a tradition^ that the mouth 
originally came into the family by marriage— 
Its introduction was a story of itself. A pa- 
ternal ancestor of the speaker wooed^ and was 
going to roarry^ a lady of great beauty^ but no 
fortune^ when his design was knocked in the 
head by the interference of his father, who very 
kindly told him, one morning, that if he mar« 
ried that tocherless dame he would cut him off 
with a shilling ; whereas, if he took to wife a 
certain lady of his appointment, he would be so 
good as-^-not do that. The youth was some- 
what staggered by his father's declarations, and 
asked time to consider. The result was, that he 
married the lady of his father's choice, who was 
the heiress to alarge fortune anda large mouth,-— 
both bequeathed to her by her father, one of 
the celebrated kail-suppers of Fife. When this 
was told to the 'slighted lady of his love, she 
was so highly offended, that she wished the 
mouth of her fortunate rival might descend, in 
all its latitude, to the latest generation of her 
faithless swain's posterity; and then took ill, 
and — ^married another lover, her second^bestyiiext 
week, by way of revenge. The country people, 
who pay great attention to the sayings and do- 



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CHARACTJEBBISTICS. 225 

ings of ladies condemned to vre&r the willow, 
waited anxiously for the fulfilment of her male- 
diction ; and, accordingly, shook their heads, 
and had their own thoughts, when the kail- 
supp^'s daughter brought forth a son, with a 
mouth reflecting back credit on her own. The 
triumph of the ill-wisher was considered com- 
plete, when the second, the third, and all the^ 
other children were found to be equally dis- 
tinguished by this feature ; and, what gave the 
triumph still more piquancy, was, that the 
daughters were found to be no more excepted 
than the sons from the family doom. In the 
second generation, moreover, instead of being 
softened or diluted away, the mouth rather 
increased ; and so it had done in every succes- 
sive generation since that time. The race hav- 
ing been very prolific, it was now spread so 
much, that there was scarcely a face in Tulli- 
body altogether free of the contagion ; so that 
the person addressing us, who lived there, 
could in reality look around him with all the 
patriarchal feelings of the chief of a large 
Highland clan. 

Fate and fortune are said to be very favour- 
able to people with large mouths. So it proved 



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326 FAMILY 

in this case. After the nunith cume into tSie 
family, luck also came ; and still as the month 
had increased with successive generations, just 
so had riches increased. The third in line from 
the *' first man/' a cooper by pn^ession, be* 
came so wealthy before he died, that he might 
have got his name banded down to imnuMrtality 
on a certain conspicuous, thougli dus^ and ille« 
gible, board in the parish-church, along with 
those of other charitable persons, by leaving 
'' ane bunder merks Scots to y® pvir." ]>e« 
spising the humble glory of making sndi a 
legacy, and being too poor to found a college, 
and too wise to endow a cat, he did better ; he 
founded a spoon,^-^^ spoon which should go 
down to future ages as a traditionary joke up<m 
his family-feature, and remain forever in the 
hands of those who could appreciate his bene- 
ficence. He left it under certain provisions or 
statutes of foundation. The main scope of his 
intentions was, simply, that the spoon should 
always be possessed by his largest-mouthed 
descendant. In the first place, after his own 
death, it was to fall into the hands of his eldest 
son, a youth of highly promising mouth ; or, 
indeed, whose mouth was fully entitled to the 



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CHARACTSBISTICS. 22? 

proverbial praise bestowed upon the cooper of 
^ogo, — '^ that it was ^stther's equal and mair ;" 
and who^ moreover, entertained sttdi a rei^ct 
for the will of his parent^ that he seemed likely 
to preserve and trannnit the precious heir-loom 
with all due 2eal and care. At his death, it 
was to become the property of the soa, daugh- 
ter, nephew, or niece, (for it was not Umited t& 
heredUms masculis, but, with laudable rc^;ard 
for the claims of the fairer sex, dcs^ned to 
heredibus quibus€unque,J who should appear to 
him, judging conscientioudy and in his right 
mind, to have the mouth most fitted to enjoy it 
in all its latitude. At the death of that person 
it was to go to the next*largest mouth, f Mto, 
vel isia, JMdiceJ, and so on in all time oomlng* 
After passing the second generation, of course 
uncles, cousins, and grand-nephews might be* 
come eligible, provided that the family should 
spread itself out into these relationships ; but> 
quihus deficieniibus, the nearest of kin and 
largest of mouth whatsoever, so that they were 
of the name, might come in as competitors, the 
same being always subject to the review and 
choice of the j&)rmer possessor. In the case of 
any possessor being cut off suddenly, wi^out 



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FAMILY 

appointing a successor to his trust, then the 
affair was to be decided by a popular election. 
It may seem a strange, though a liberal and 
even gallant, thing in the founder of the spoon, 
that he should have considered the females of 
his posterity in the statutes, seeing that, ac- 
cording to the ordinary rule of human nature, 
there was little chance of their ever being found 
to excel the males in point of mouth. Yet this 
was a very proper and well-judged article.— 
The truth is, that, as the feature had originally 
come into the family by a lady, so had it al- 
ways continued to distinguish the daughters, 
to an equal, if not superior, degree with the 
sons. Indeed, the wisdom of the statute was 
put beyond a doubt, by the circumstance of a 
daughter having actually been, upon one occa- 
sion, (nearly a century ago), the possessor of 
the spoon ! And this circumstance was the 
more remarkable on the following account.—- 
This lady, when her mouth was brought to its 
last speech, attempted to bequeath the valuable 
heir-loom to her second, and favourite, and 
largest-mouthed son, — a person, of course, not 
eligible, on account of his being only the Aa^ 
blood, and wanting the necessary name. By 



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CHARACTSBISTICS. 229 

this infraction of the statute^ the spoon might 
have fallen into the possession of a new ^unily 
altogether^ and probably never again reverted 
to any one of the name and mouth of the 
founder. It is true^ the articles were some- 
what defective upon this point, and the question 
might have stood a discussion before the Fif- 
teen. Yet the thing looked at least against 
the spirit of the founder's intentions ; and, any 
how, the male-heirs determined, at all hazards, 
to oppose her will. Having come to this reso- 
lution at a general meeting; they forthwith 
marched in posse to the bed of their dying re- 
lative ; and there, after lecturing her for some 
time upon the heniousness of her intentions, — 
which they did cum oribus, not only roiundis, 
but also both longis et laiis, imo etiam perUUis, 
as Dominie Sampson would have said, — de- 
manded the spoon, which, they said, she had 
fairly forfeited by her misconduct, one of the 
statutes containing the clause ad vitam aut cui*- 
PAM. The sons of the dying lady proposed to 
dispute the point ; but she told them, that as 
she repented of her fault, she would endeavour 
to repair it before time and she should part 
for ever, by surrendering the spoon of her an- 

u 



I 



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S30 FAMILY 

oestors to ks jusf and lawful clakmntg; and 
thb die forthwith duL The large-mottthedlKMt 
then went away fiatifified, and proceeded to ad« 
judge it by votes to one of two or three per* 
0008 of the true bloody who entered as €andi« 
dates for the highly-prijEed trust. 

After the electi<m, the whole clan entered 
into a paction, whereby they bound themselves 
and their posterity to take similar measures in 
case of the same exigency recurrmg. They 
might, however, have spared themselves this 
trouble, and left posterity iaree to act as it 
thought proper ; for, thenceforward, (Fate 
seeming to take so important a matter into 
her own hand,) to the surprise and satisfac* 
tion of the £unily, the dau^ters began to be 
bom with less and the sons with larger mouths 
than formerly; so that, though the law of 
Tanistfy * still prevailed, that entitled the Sa^ 
Uque came into full £brce, as it were, of its 
own aoeord ; and no instance had ooearred finr 



* The phrase applicable to the succesnon of uncles and 
nephews, in preference of sons, customaiy in the eailj ages 
of llie Scottish morar^y. 



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CHABA0TB1I18TICS. 331 

a centary pmt, of an j female, married or un- 
maorried^ beoomxng so modi as a competitor fo? 
the invaluable vessel^ — which now glided peace- 
fully down the current of ages^ in the possession 
of a lineal male line of truly respectable mouths, 
prized by the happy inheritors, and honoured 
by the homage and veneration of all the rest of 
the family. 

Just as the old gentleman concluded his nar- 
rative^ supper was introduced, and we all rose, 
in order to re-arrange ourselves round the 
table. I now knew the history of his mouth and 
spoon ; but I was still ignorant of the extent of 
his appetite. The confesnons of the mouth 
had been ample and explicit ; but it had been 
silent as the grave which it resembled^ upon 
the corresponding matter of the stomach. My 
anxiety upon this point was excessive, — ^was 
painful^ — ^was intolerable. I did not know what 
to expect of it. Ere we sat down, I cast it a 
look of awful curiosity. It was hovering like 
a prodigious rainbow over the horiaon of the 
table, uncertain where to pitch itself,-— 



> avi simile, qos cireum titora, ciream 



Piscosoft scopulos, I volat . 



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FAMILY 

Tliere was an air of terrible resolution about 
it, which made me almost tremble for what was 
to ensue. Still I hoped the best; and I at 
last sat down, with the resigned idea that time 
would try all. 

The Mouth, — ^for so it might be termed par 
excellence, — ^was preferred by acclamation to 
the head of the table, — a distinction awarded^ 
as I afterwards understood, (secundum morem 
bagmanorum,J not so much on account of its 
superior greatnes^s, as in consideration of its se« 
niority, though I am sure it deserved the pas 
on both accounts. The inferior and junior 
mouths all sat down at different distances from 
the great mouth, like satellites round a mighty 
planet. It uttered a short gentleman-like grace, 
and then began to ask its neighbours what they 
would have. Some asked for one thing, some 
for another, and in a short time all were served 
except itself. For its own part, it complained 
of weak appetite, and expressed a fear that it 
should not be able to take any thing at all. I 
could scarcely credit the declaration. It added, 
in a singularly prim tone of voice, that, for 
its part, it admired the taste of Beau Tibbs in 
Goldsmith,-.-^' Something nice, and a little will 



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GHARA0TBBI8TICS. 233 

dOy-^l hate your immense loads of meat ; that's 
country all over !" Hereupon^ I plucked up 
courage, and ventured to look at it again. It 
was still terrible, though placid. Its expres- 
sion was that of a fresh and strong warrior, who 
hesitates a moment to consider into what part 
of a thick battle he shall plunge himself, or 
what foes he shall select as worthy of particu- 
lar attack. Its look belied its words ; but again 
I was thrown back by its words belying its 
look. It said to a neighbour of mine, that it 
thought it might perhaps manage the half of 
the tail of one of the herrings at his elbow, if 
he would be so kind as carve. Was there ever 
such a puzzling mouth ! I was obliged again 
to give credit to words ; yet again was I disap- 
pointed. My neighbour, thinking it absurd to 
mince such a matter as a Glasgow Magislraie, 
handed up a whole one to the chairman. The 
Mouth received it, with a torrent of refusals 
and remonstrances, in the midst of which it 
began to eat, and I heard it continue to mum- 
ble forth expostulations, in a fainter and fain- 
ter tone, at the intervals of bites, for a few se- 
conds, till behold the whole corporate substance 
of the burgal dignitary hadmelted away to a long 

u2 



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234 FAMILY 

meagre skeleton. When done^ its remonstran- 
ces changed into a wonder how it should have 
got through so plump a fish ; it was perfectly 
astonishing ; it had never eaten a whole herring 
in its life before ; it was an unaccountable mira- 
cle. I did not hear the latter sentences of its 
wonderments ; but^ towards the conclusion^ heard 
the word ** fowl" distinctly pronounced. The 
fowls lying to my hand> I found myself under 
the necessity of entering into conference with 
it^ though I felt a mortal disinclination to look 
it in the mouthy least I should betray some 
symptom of emotion inconsistent with good 
manners. Drawing down my features into a 
resolute pucker^ and mentally vowing I would 
speak to it though it should blast me^ I cast 
my eyes slowly and cautiously towards it^ and 
made inquiry as to its choice of bits. In re- 
turn for my interrogation^ I received a polite 
convulsion intended for a smile^ and a request, 
out of which I only caught the important words 
" breast" and " wing." I made haste to exe- 
cute the order; and on handing away the desir- 
ed viands, received from the Mouth another 
grateful convulsion ; and then,-— thank God, all 
was over ! Well, thought I, at this juncture, a 



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CHARACTBBISTICS. 235 

herring and a fi*aginent of fowl are no such 
great matters^-^perhaps the mouth will prove 
quite a natural mouth after all. In brief space, 
however, the chairman's plate was announced 
as again empty ; and I heard it receive, discuss, 
and answer ' various proposals of replenishment 
made to it by its more immediate neighbours. 
I thought I would escape ; but no, — ^the fowl 
was really so good, that it thought it would 
trouble me for another breast, if I would be so 
kind, &c. I was of course obliged to look at 
it again, in order to receive its request in pro- 
per form ; and, oh, me muertm ! neglecting this 
time my former preparations of face, I had 
nearly committed myself by looking it full in 
the mouth, with my eyes wide open, and with- 
out having screwed my facial muscles into their 
former resolute astringency. However, in- 
stantly apprehending the amount of its de- 
mands, my glance at the mouth fortunately re- 
quired to be only momentary, and I found im- 
mediate relief .from all danger in the ensuing 
business of carving. Yet even that glance was 
in itself a dreadful trial ; it suflBced to inform 
me, that the mouth was now more terrible than 
before, — ^that there was a fearful vivacity about 



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236 FAMILY 

it, — a promptitude, — an alacrity, — and energy^ 
— 'Whicli it did not formerly exhibit. Should 
this increase, thought, I, it will soon be truly 
dreadful. I handed up a whole fowl to it^ in 
a sort of desperation. It made no remon- 
strances, as in the case of the herring, at the 
abundance of my offering. So far from that, 
it seemed to forgive my disobedience with the 
utmost good- will; received the fowl, dis-f 
patched it with silence and celerity, and then 
began to look abroad for further prey. In- 
deed, it now began to crack jokes upon itself, 
-—a sportive species of suicide. It spoke of 
the spoon ; lamented that, after all, there should 
be no soups at table whereon it might have ex- 
hibited itself; and finally vowed, that it would 
visit the deficiences of the supper upon the des- 
sert, even unto the third and fourth dish of 
blanc'tnange. The proprietor of the mouth 
then laid down the spoon upon the table, there 
to lie in readiness, till such time as he should 
find knives and forks of no further service,—- 
as the Scottish soldiery in former times used to 
lay their shields upon the ground while mak- 
ing use of their spears. I now gave up aU 
hopes of the mouth observing any propriety in 



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^ CHARACTBBI8TICS. 23? 

its future transactions. But^ having finished 
mj own supper, I resolved to set myself down 
to observe all its sayings and doings, without 
giving myself any further concern about the 
proverb which I was formerly so solicitous 
that it should not fulfil. Its placidity was now 
gone, its air of self-possession lost. New pow- 
ers seemed to be every moment developing 
themselves throughout its vast form, — ^new and 
more terrible powers. It was beginning to have 
a tvild look ! It was evident that it was now 
Jleshed, — that its naturally savage disposition, 
formerly dormant for want of excitement, was 
now rising tumultuously within it, — ^that it 
would soon perform such deeds as would scare 
us all ! It had engaged itself, before I com- 
menced my observations, upon a roast-jiggot of 
mutton, which happened to lie near it. This 
it soon nearly finished. It then cast a look of 
fearful omen at a piece of cold beef, which lay 
immediately beyond, and which, being placed 
within reach by some kind neighbour, it imme- 
diately commenced to, with as much fierceness 
as it had just exemplified in the case of the 
mutton. The beef also was soon laid waste, 
and another look of extermination was forth- 



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FAMILY 



With cast at a broken pidgeon-pie, which lay 
still farther off. Hereupon the Eye had scarce^ 
ly alighted, when the man nearest it, with 
landable promptitude, handed it upwards. 
Scarely was it laid on the altar of destruction^ 
when it disappeared too ; and a fourth, and a 
filth, and a sixth look were successivdy cast at 
other dishes, which the different members of 
Ae par^ as promptly sent away, and which 
the mouth as promptly dispatched. By this 
time, all the rest of the party were lying upon 
their oars, obsenring, with leisurely astonish- 
ment, the progress of the surviving and, as it 
i^peared to them, eternal feeder. He went on, 
xi^icing in his strength,— unheeding their idle- 
ness and wonder,—- his very soul apparently en* 
grossed in the grand business of devouring. 
They seemed to enter into a sort of tadt com- 
pact, or agreement, to indulge and fiu:iUtate him 
in his progress, by making themselves, as it 
were, his servitors. Whatever dish he looked 
at, therefore, over the wide expanse of the table^ 
immediately disappeared from its place. One 
after another, they trooped off towards the head 
of the table, like the successive brigades which 
Wellington dispatdied at Waterloo against apar« 



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CHARACTBBISTICS. 239 

ticular field of French artillery ; and, still, dish 
after dish, like said brigades, came successively 
away, broken, diminished, annihilated. Fish, 
flesh, and fowl disappeared at the glance of that 
awful Eye, as the Roman fleet withered and 
vanished before the grand burning-glass of 
Archimedes. The end of all things seemed at 
hand ! The mouth was arrived at a perfect 
transport of voracity ! It seemed no more capa« 
ble of restraining itself than some great engine, 
full of tremendous machinery, which cannot 
stop of itself. It had no self-wiU. It was an 
unaccountable being. It was a separate crea* 
ture, independent on the soul. It was not a 
human thing at alL It was every thing that 
was superhuman,.^*— every thing that was im« 
mense, — ^inconceivably enormous I All objects 
seemed reeling and toppling on towards it, like 
the foam-bells upon a mighty current floating 
silently on towards the orifice of some prodigi- 
ous sea-cave. It was like the whirlpool of 
Mae'lstrom, every tiling that comes within the 
vortex of which, for miles round, is sure of 
being caught, inextricably involved, whirled 
round and round and round, and then down, 
down that monstrous gulf,-^-4hat mouth of the 



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240 PAMILX 

mighty ooean^ the lips of which are overwhelni- 
ing waves, whose teeth are prodigious rocks, 
and whose belly is the great abyss ! 

Here I grew dizzy, fainted, and, — I never 
saw the Mouth again. 

THE MACLEANS. 

It was alleged of the Macleans by those who 
were not friendly to them, that they were ad- 
dicted to a sort of ostentatious egotism, to 
which an untranslatable Gaelic epithet was af- 
fixed, not unaptly expressed by the word 
'' Gasconade'* When they began to decline 
before their more fortunate neighbours and ri- 
vals, the Campbells, they designated themselves 

AN CINNEADH MOR *S AM FOR TUBAISTRACH. 

Which, literally translated, means, 

THE GREAT CLAN AND LUCKLESS RACE ; 

but this was observed by their enemies to be 
only an instance of their incurable ostentation^ 
"^^ the ruling passion strong in deaths" 



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CHARACTBBISTJG8. 241 



MAXTON OF CULTOQUEY'S LITANY. 

The small estate of Cultoquey^ in Perthshire^ 
is considered a sort of miracle in the Highlands, 
having been preserved, without either the di- 
minution or the addition of a single acre^ by 
the family whose representative still possesses 
it, for the space of Eye hundred years ! This 
is the more surprising, as the estate, which is 
small, is surrounded on all hands by those of 
about half a dozen different proprietors, whose 
power, wealth, or policy, would long ago have 
succeeded in attaching it to their own enor- 
mous properties, had not the Maxtons, from fa- 
ther to son, made it a point of pride to preserve 
and transmit it entire. A Lowlander, or a mo- 
dem, can scarcely conceive the difficulty which 
the honourable old family must have experien- 
ced in carrying their point, in the midst of 
such powerful and avaricious neighbours, and 
through successive ages of barbarism and civil 
discord. That aggressions were not unattempt- 
ed, or, at least, that the neighbours were not 
the most agreeable imaginable, is proved by an 
addition to the litany which Mr. Maxton of 



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242 FAMILY 

Cultoquey made, (about a century ago,) and 
which 18 here preserved, as flloetrathig, in 
some measure, the characteristics of certain 
Scottish fimilies. 

FEOH THB OEEED OP TBB CAHPBBLLS, 
PBOM THB IBB OT TBB DBCMMONIIS, 

F&OM THB PBIPB OF THE OBAHAMS9 
F&OM THB WIHD OF THB IfVEEAYS, 
GOOD LOEO SELIVEE US I 

The author o£ this strange prayer was in the 
halHt of repeating it, with the rest of the litany, 
every morning, on performing his toilette at a 
well near his house; and it was perhaps the 
nuist heart-felt petition he preferred. The oh* 
jects of the satire were, Campbell of Monaie, 
who lived one mile and a half from Cultoquey ; 
Campbell of Aberuchill, a judge of session, and 
one of the greatest land-buyers of bis time, 
(eight miles ;) Drummond of Perth, (four 
miles ;) Oraham, Duke of Miontrose, at Kincar« 
dine Castle, (eight miles ;} Murray, Duke of 
AthoU, at TuUibardine Castle, (six miles;) and 
Mori^ of Abercaimey, at Abercairney Castle, 
(two miles.) All these gentlemen took the 



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CHABACTBBISTICS. SUd 

joke in good part^ except the Mnrtays, yfhose 
characteristic is the most opprobrious^ — wind^ in 
Scottish phraseology^ signifying a propensity 
to vain and foolish bravado^ It is said that 
the Duke of Atholl, hearing of Cultoquey's Li- 
tany^ invited the old humourist to dinner^ and 
desired to hear from his own mouth the lines 
which had made so much noise over the coun- 
try. Cultoquey repeated them^ without the 
least boggling ; when his Grace said^ half in 
good^ half in bad humour^ " Take care> Cultie, 
for the future to omit my name in your morn- 
ing devotions ; else I shaU certainly crop your 
ears for your boldness." " Thafs wind, my 
Lord-duke !" quoth Cultoquey, with the great- 
est coolness, at the same time taking off his 
glass. On another occasion, a gentleman of his 
Grace's name having called upon Mr. Maxton, 
and used some angry expostulations on the 
manner in which his dan was characterized, 
Cultoquey made no answer, other than bidding 
his servant open the door, and let out the tvitid 
qf the Murrays /* 



* Imitations of the litany were common in fonner times. 
Mr. Thomas Forrester, an eccentric clergyman of Mebose, 



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344 FAMILY 

about two hundred yean i^, made hinudf ooDspicuous, 
and was ezpdled from his parish^ on account of his satiri- 
cal additions to the service-book. He and his verses are 
thus noticed in '' A Description of the Parish of Mehrose, 
in answer to Mr. IMaitland's queries, (1782) :" — " He was 
deposed by the Assembly, at Glasgow, anno 1638 ; and, as 
Honoritts R^us acquaints us, ^ Classe Muliossiaiui accu- 
sante, probatum fuit,* that l\e had publicly declared, that 
any servile work might be done on the Lord*s day, and, as 
an example to the people, he had brought home his com 
out of the fields to his bam-yard on that day ; as also, that 
he had said, that the public and ordinaiy preaching of the 
word was no necessary part of divine worship ; that the 
reading of the Uturgy was to be prefSeired to it ; that pastors 
and private Christians should use no other prayers but what 
were prescribed in the liturgy. They charged him likewise 
with Arminianism and Popery, and that he said publicly 
that the Reformers had done more harm to tlie Christian 
churches, than the Popes at Rome had done for ten ages. 
I am surprised that no notice is taken of his litany, which 
made a great noise in those times. Bishop Guthrie, in his 
Memmrs, only mentions it : 

FItOM DICKSON, HENDERSON, AND CANT, 
TH* APOSTLES OF THE COVENANT, 

GOOD LORD DEIIVEB US. 

I have been at great pains to find out this litany in the li- 
braries of the curious, but in vain. There was an old gen- 



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CHABAOTBBISTICS. 245 

tlewoman here, who remembered some parts of it, such as, 

FKOM THE JESUIT KKAVE IK GRAIN, 
AKD FaOM THE SHE-PRIEST CRACKED IV BRAIK, 
FROM HER AMD A* SUCH BAD LASSES, 
AND A* BALD lOKORANT ASSES, 
SUCH AS JOHN ROSS, THAT DOKKART GOOSE, 
AND DAK DUKCAK80K, THAT DUKCY GHOST, 
GOOD LORD DELIVER US. 

For the understancUiig of this part of the litany, we are to 
observe, that there was one Abemethy, who, from a Jesuit 
priest, turned a zealous presbyterian, and was settled minis- 
ter at Hownam, in Teviotdale ; he said the liturgy of Scot- 
land was sent to Rome to some cardinals, to be revised by 
them, and that Signior Con had shewed it to himself there : 
He is the ' Jesuit* And as to the she-priest, this was one 
Mrs. Mitchelson, who was looked upon as a person inspir- 
ed c^ God, and her words were redted as oracles, not a few 
taking them fiom her mouth in characters. Most of her 
speeches were about the Cknrenant.* 

FROM LAY-LADS IK PULPIT PRATTLIKO, 
TWICE A DAY RAMBLING AND RATTLIKG. 

And concludes his litany, 

FROM ALL THE KKOCK-DOWK RACE OF KKOXES 
GOOD LORD DELIVER US." 

Descrip, Par. Melr.p, 39. 
* Buinet^s Memoirs of the Dukes of Hamilton, p. 83. 

x2 



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^loeatijS 



OF 



dFamilfejfl! ^m Zofjon^, 



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The Slogan, (more properly shighorne^ 
from the Irish sliLagh^ an army, and corn^ a 
horn), was the watch-word used by troops in 
the field, to distinguish friends from enemies, 
or to excite the spirit of courage at the mo- 
ment of attack. Almost every commander 
had his war-cry. Among the Lowlanders, 
as well as on the English side of the border, 
the word was usually the name of the leader 
repeated, and sometimes the name of the 
place of rendezvous. In the Highlands, 
where the slogan went round with the Jiery 
cro8s^ the latter practice mostly obtained. A 
considerable number in every part of the 
country seem to have been ancient words and 
phrases, of which the origin and meaning 
were unknown even to those who used them, 
as in the noted case of Hawick. 

The following collection must be consider- 
ed very meagre and defective. 



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SLOGANS OF FAMILIES AND TOWNS. 



DOUGLAS. 

A DOUGLAS ! A DOUGLAS ! 

DARNLEY. 

AVAKT, DERKLE ! 

SCOTT. 
A BELLEMDEN ! 



Place of rendezvous. Bellenden is situated 
near the head of Borthwick water, and in the 
centre of the possessions of this powerful clan« 



HOME. 

A HOME ! A HOME ! 



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252 SLOGANS. 

CRANSTON8. 
hehwoodie! 

Place of rendezvous^ on the Oxnam water, in 
Roxburghshire. 

SETONS. 

SET ON I 

A pun on the name. 

HEPBURN. 

BIDE SIE FAIR I 

FORBES. 

LONACHIV ! 

Place of rendezvous, — a hilly ridge in Strath- 
don. The Forbeses inhabit Strathdon and other 
parts of Aberdeenshire. 



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SLOGANS. 253 

FARQUHARSON. 

CAIBN-KA-CI7EK ! 

That is^ Cairn of Remembrance,''^a. mountain 
in Braemar. The Farqaharsons are a power- 
ful^ though not ancient dan^ occupying the 
whole south-western comer of Aberdeenshire. 

MACPHERSON. 

CRAIG-DHV. 

Place of rendezvous^ — a high^ blacky con- 
spicuous rock in Badenoch^ the country of the 
Macphersons. 

GLENGARRY. 

CRAOGAK AK FHITHICH ! 

Place of rendezvous^— signifying Rock qftke 
Raven, 

GORDON. 
oosDoy, oosnoK, bti>and ! 

Y 



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S54 SLOOANd. 

MACKENZIE. 

TULLICH-AAD ! ^ 

Place of rendeBTous>'-^8ignifying a high 
rUing gnmnd* Tullich«ard is a hill in Kintail, 
on thtt side of Lodi Duic)i> a £ew miles frmn 
the ruined castle of EUandonan^ the original 
seat of the Clan Mackenzie. It is said to have 
commanded veneration in ancient times^ and, 
like the temple of Janus^ indicated peace or 
war. " When war commenced^ a barrel of 
burning tar, on the highest peak, was the sig- 
nal at which all the tenants around Seafortfa 
assembled, in twenty-four hours, i^t the castle 
of St. Donan. The mountain yet forms the 
crest of the Seaforth arms.^' — Laing's Ceded* 
Ilin. i, 71. 

GRANT. 

STAKD FAST, CBAIOELLACHl£ I 

Place of rendezvous,— -a wooded hillock o^ 
rock in Strathspey, newr Ihe river of Aviemore, 



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SXiOOANS. 255 

on the side of the great road leading from Perth 
to Inverness. 

MACFARLANE. 

LOCH 8L0Y ! 

Place of rendezvou8^f-^*a small lake between 
Loch Long and Loch Lomond. 

BUCHANAN. 

CLABE INKI8 ! (Oa IKCU). 

Place of rendezvous^ — a small island in Loch 
Lomond. 

CLANRANNALD. 

▲ DH' AIN DEOIN CO *BEia£ADH £ ! 

Translated literally : — 

IN SPITE OF WHO WOULD SAT IT. 

That is, to the contrary, indicating a very 
strong and fearless resolution. 



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356 SLOGANS. 

MACGREOOR. 

O* ARD CHOILLE ! 

Place of rendezvous^ — signifying from the 
woody height. 

MERCER OF ALDIE, 

THE GRIT PULE ! 

DUMFRIES. 

LOREBURK ! 

HAWICK. 

TERRI BUSS AKD TERRI ODIK I 

JEDBURGH. 

JETHART*S HERE \ * 

DISTRICT OF GLENLIVAT. 

BOGHAIL ! 

DISTRICT OF STRATHDOWN. 

KNOCK FERGHAUK ! 

* '< Then rose the slogan with a shout, 
To it Tynedale f-^ethart's here." 

OUBdOad. 



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WiVitnt^ 



APPROPRIATE TO 



SiViptt^titiom* 



y2 



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n 



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RHYMES APPROPRIATE TO 
SUPERSTITIONS. 



THE FAIRIES. 



The fairies^ or, as they were popularly call- 
ed, the gude neebors, were famous for their 
elopements with the wives of mortals. The 
miller of Alva is not the only ** injured hus- 
band," whose case we have to record. A 
neighbour of that person, — ^the smith of TuUi- 
hody, — ^was equally unfortunate ; and had not, 
for any thing we ever heard, the ultimate hap- 
piness of getting back his lost spouse. The 
former case has already made our readers ac- 
quainted with the modus restorandi ; but we 
are now to complete the history of a fairy crvm. 
con. with an account of the modus abducendi. — 
The case of the smith was attended, as the 
newspapers would say, with circumstances of 



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260 SUPERSTITIONS. 

peculiar poignancy. His spouse was taken 
away almost before his very eyes ; and not only 
was his honour thus wounded in the tenderest 
point, but his feelings were also stung by a 
rhyme of exultation sung by the fairies, in 
which they reflected, in a most scandalous and 
ungenerous manner, upon his personal habits. 
The tale goes, that, while he was busy at work 
at one end of the house, he heard the seducers, 
as they flew up the chimney at the other, sing« 
ing, with malicious glee ; — 



BEXOLE l,U[Jf.VU ]>OI>IX, 

WXVS GOTTEN PBUCKEV PAV)LE*S WIFE, 

THE 81UTH OF TULX.IB0UT I 



The fairies do not appear to faav^ ever foeeu 
successful in intr^iducixig the human race, by 
the above means, into their own coumtry. At 
least, it is well known that they were in the 
habit of frequently stealing away children from 
the cradles of mortal mothers, for the purpose 
of adopting them as their own offiipring, amt- 
turing them in Fairy-land, and ma^cing them 
part of their own community. The heavy ooil 
of humanity does not a^^pear to have been tfm$ 



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SUPBR8TITI0NS. 261 

engrafted upon the light-bodied raqe^ who could 
exhibit feats of rope-dancing upon the beame of 
the new moon^ and feast unseen^ in thousands^ un- 
der the blossom of the wild violet.* These adopt- 



* <' It is stiU coirently bdiered, that he who has the cour- 
age to rush upon a fairy festiyal and snatch from them their 
drinking cup, or horn, shall find it prove to him a cornu- 
copia of good fortune, if he can bear it in safety across 
a running stieam. A goblet is still carefully preserved in 
Edenhall, Cumberland, ivhich is supposed to have been 
seized at a banquet of the elves, by one of the ancient family 
of Musgrave ; or, as others say, by one of their domestics,^ 
in the manner above described. The fairy train vanished^ 
crying aloud,— 

«' If this glass do break or fall, 
FareweUW luck of Edenhall ! 

<' The goblet took a name from the prophecy, under which 
it is mentioned in the burlesque ballad, commonly attributed 
to the Duke of Wharton, but, in reality, composed by 
Lloyd, one of his jovial companions. The I>nke, after tak- 
ing a draught, had nearly terminated the '' luck of Eden- 
hall," had not the butler caught &e cup in a napkin, as it 
dropped from his grace*s hands. I understand it is not 
now subject to such risks, but the lees of wine are still ap- 
parent at the bottom." — Minst. ScoU Bord, ii, 130. 



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263 supBUBTiTiOMa. 

ed children^ perbape^ remained amongst them 
only in the quality of firiends^ platonic lovers^ 
or servants ; and were permitted^ after a few 
years of probationi to return to earthy in a fitter 
condition than formerly to enjoy its blessings. 
Whether their attachment to the grown women 
whom they took away^ was of a grosser sort^ 
we cannot tell ; but it seems certain^ that both 
were alike unproductive of a mongrel race of 
offspring. It ought not to be forgotten, that^ 
in ca^es of stealing children^ one of their own 
unearthly brats was usually left in the cradle. 
A story is told of a Dumfiries-shire fairy hav- 
ing once done a valuable piece of service to a 
country-woman, and threatened afterwards to 
take away her child as a remuneration, unless 
the woman should find out her name before a 
certain day. The mother, of course, despaired 
of ever discovering what was required, and 
looked forward to the loss pf her infant 9S i^ 
thing unavoidable. One day» however, before 
the time had expired, happening to walk in a 
wood, she came to a wene in which sat her 
friend the fairy, — a little creature dressed in 
green, spinning on a wheel, the sound of which 
she accompanied with these words>— ^ 



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LITTLE KEirS OUR G17DE>.&AlfE AT HAK^, 
THAT itY KAMS*fl WbUPP^TIS STOtJlilB I 

<»*) accotding to another Version^"*-- 

LTTTLE KENS OBR GUDE-DAME AT HAME, 
THAT MY NAUE^S FtTTLE^TE-TOT ! 

Of course^ when the no longer anonymous 
fairy came at the appointed time, either to 
take away the child or hear her name pro- 
nounced by the lips of the mother, she was 
sent away disappointed. 

It was, till lately, believed by the plough- 
men of Clydesdale, that if Ihey repeated the 
rhyme,— 

FAIET) FAI&T, BAKE ME A BAlTirOCK) AlTK) ttOABT ME 
A COLLOP, , 

AND I'll oi'e ye a spcrtle aff my gad end ! 

three several times, on taming their cattle at 
the terminations of ridges, they Would find the 
said fare prepared for them on reaching the 
end of the fourth furrow. 

The fairies are said to have been exceeding- 
ly delicate upon the subject of their popular 



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264 8tnPBB8f IflONS. 

appellations. They considered the term fairy 
disreputable ; and are thought to have point^ 
out their approbation and disapprobation of the 
other phrases applied to them in the following 
verses:— 

OIK YE CA* ME IMP OK ELV, 

I EEDE TE LOOK WEEL TO TOUE8ELF ; 

oi2r YE ca' me fairy, 

I*LL WOBX YE MUCXLE TA&&IE ;* 

OIK ODDE KEEBO& YE CA* ME, 

THEK OUDE KEEBOE I SHALL BE ; 

BUT OIK YE CA* ME SEELIE WICHT, 

I*LL BE YOUB FBEEKD BAITH DAY AKD MIGHT. 

Husbandmen avoid, with superstitious rever- 
ence, to till or destroy the little circlets of 
bright green grass which are believed to be the 
favourite ball-rooms of the fairies ; for, acoord-> 
ing to the appropriate rhyme, « 

HE WHA TILLS THE FAIRIES GREEK, 

KAE LUCK AOAIK SHALL HA*S ; 
AKD HE ^HA SPILLS THE FAIRIES RIKG, 

BETIDE HIM WAKT AKD WAE ; 
FOR WEIRDLE8S DAYS AKD WEARY KIGBTS 

ARE HIS TILL BIS DEEAK DAY ! 

• Vexation. 



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SUPERSTITIONS. 265 

Whereas^ by the same authority^ 

HE WHA GAES BT THE FAIBY BIKG, 
KAE DULE NOB PINE SHALL SEE ; 

AND HE WHA CLEANS THE FAIBY BINO, 
AN EASY DEATH SHALL DEE. 

Tbe fairies^ of course^ figure prominently in 
the superstitions respecting Halloween. In- 
deed^ the children of Scotland seem to consider 
that dreadful eve as more peculiarly the festi- 
val of the fairies^ than of any other description 
of spiritual beings^ — ^the following being by far 
the most popular rhyme used by them on the 
occasion: 

HEIOH HOW FOB HALLOWEEN ! 
WHEN THE FAIBIES A* ABE SEEN ! 
SOME BLACK AND SOME 6BEEN— 
HEIGH H^W FOB HALLOWEEN !* 

There were two species of fairies^— <me black 
and the other green. The black had sold 



" It was believed, that children bom on All Saints Eve 
were in after life patronised by the good neighbours, and 
endowed with the peculiar faculty of *' seeing tkhU.** 

z 



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266 ftUPEllSTIl'IONS. 

themselves to the devW, and were^ therefore^ 
inimical to the interests of mankind ; but those 
in green^ apj)arently the most numerous class^ 
vere favourable to mortals^ and^ for that reason^ 
distinguished by the appellation ^^ good people." 

BROWNIES. 

Thb brownie was a household spirit, of an 
useful and familiar character. In former times^ 
almost every farm-house in the south of Scot- 
land was supposed to be haunted by one. He 
was understood to be a spirit of a somewhat 
grotesque figure^ dwarfish in stature^ but en« 
dowed with great personal strength^ and hav- 
ing a mind of the most disinterested and even 
exalted sort. It was his humour to be unseen 
and idle during the whole d&y^ or while the 
people of the house were a-stir, and only to ex* 
tTt himself while all the rest were asleep. It 
Was customary for the mistress of the house to 
leave out work for him^ — such as the supper-> 
dishes to be washed, or the chum to be prepar- 
^d, — ^and he never failed to have the whole 
done in the morning. This drudgery he peN 
formed quite gratuitously. He was a most dis- 



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interested spirit To have offered him wagesj 
or even to present him with an occasional boon, 
would have insured his anger> and perhaps 
caused him to abandon the establishment alto* 
gether. Numerous stories are told of his re- 
sentment in cases of his being thus afironted. 
For instance^ on the ^oodman of a farm-'house 
in the parish of Glendevon leaving out some 
clothes one night for the brownie^ he was heard 
during the night to depart^ sayings in a highly 
offended tone. 



oVE BaOWHIE COAT, 0I*£ BROWVIE SAAK, 
TE*8E ^ET KAE HAIR O' BROWNIE^S WARK ! 



The brownie of the farm-house of Bodsbeck, 
in the wilds of the southern Highlands, left his 
employment upwards of a century ago, on a si- 
milar account He had exerted himself so 
much in the farm-labour, both in and out of 
doors, that Bodsbeck became the most prosper- 
ous farm in the whole district. He always 
took his meat as it pleased himself^-^usually in 
very moderate quantities, and of the most hum-i 
ble description. Daring a time of very hard 
labour, perhaps harvest, when a little better 



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368 80PBB8TITION8. 

fare than ordinary might have been judged ac- 
ceptable^ the goodman took the liberty of leav- 
ing out a mess of bread and milk> thinking it 
but fair that at a time when some improrementy 
both in quantity and quality^ was made upon 
the fare of the human servants, the useful 
brownie certainly deserved to share in the bless- 
ing. He had calculated, however, without 
his guest ; for the result was, that the Brownie 
left the house for ever, exclaiming, 

CA*, BROWNIE, CA.* 

A* THE LUCK 0* B0D9BECK AWAY TO LEITHEKHA*. 

The luck of Bodsbeck accordingly departed 
with its brownie, and settled in the neighbour- 
ing farm-house, called Leithenhall, whither the 
brownie transferred his friendship and services. 

The traditions of Forfarshire put the rhyme 
which follows into the mouth of a brownie, 
which, having been expelled by exorcisms from 
its favourite haunt, the old castle of Clay-pots, 
near Dundee, spouted before departing a some- 



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I 

t 



what satirical ^lumeratum of tbe neighbouring 
localities. 

THE FEEAY AXB THE FERaY^WELL, 
THE CAMF AND THE CAMF-HILL, 
BALMOSSIE AND BALMOSSIE MILL, 
BUBN8IDE AND BURN<-HILL, 
THE THIN SOWCNS O' DRUMGEITH, 
THE FAIR MAY o' MONIFEITH ; 

there's outterston and WALLACKSTON, 

CLAT-PATS TLL OI'S MY MALISON ; 

come i late or come i aib, 
valemie's boord's aye baae. 

One of the principal characteristics of the 
brownie was his anxiety ahout the moral con- 
duct of the household to whkh he was attach-i 
ed. He was a spirit very much inclined to be 
upon the qui vive, at the first appearance of any 
impropriety in the manners of his fellow-ser- 
vants. He was a very busybody^ — ^indeed^ a 
perfect spoil-sport^ in this way. The least de- 
linquency committed either in bam^ or cow* 
house^ or larder^ he was sure to report to his 
master^ whose interests he seemed to consider 
tantamount to every other thing in this world, 
and from whom no bribe whatever could in* 

z2 



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270 8UPBB8TiTION8. 

duce him to conceal the offences iiehich fell un- 
der his notice. The men^ therefore^ and not 
less the maids, of the establishment, usually re- 
garded him with a mixture of fear, hatred, and 
respect; and though he might not often find 
occasion to do his duty as a spy, yet the firm 
belief that he would be relentless in doing so, 
provided that he did find occasion, had the sa- 
lutary effect of generally restraining their vici- 
ous inclinations. He thus might be said to ful- 
fil the great political precept which enjoins the 
prevention as preferable to the punishment of 
crimes. A ludicrous instance of his zeal as 
guardian of the household morals is told in 
Peebles- shire. Two dairy-maids, who were 
pinched in their food by a too-frugal mbtress, 
found themselves one day compelled by hun- 
ger to have recourse to the highly improper 
expedient of stealing a bowl of milk and a ban- 
nock, which they proceeded to devour, as they 
thought, in secret They sat upon a form, 
with a space between, whereon they placed the 
bowl and the bread, and they took bite and sip 
alternately, each putting down the bowl upon 
the seat for a moment's space after taking a 
draught, and the other then taking it up in her 



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8UPBBST1TI0NS. 271 

hands^ and treating herself in the same way. 
This they thought the fairest possible mode of 
parting the spoils and one^ moreover^ which 
permitted them both to satisfy their hunger si- 
multaneously. They had no sooner commen- 
ced their mess^ than the brownie came between 
the two, invisible^ and^ whenever the bowl was 
set down upon the seat^ took also a draught * 
by which means^ as he devoured fully as much 
as both put together^ the milk was speedily ex- 
hausted. The surprise of the famished girls at 
finding the bowl so soon empty was extreme^ 
and they b^an to question e$u;h other very 
sharply upon the subject^ with mutual suspi- 
cion of unfair play^ when the brownie unde- 
ceived them by exclaiming with malicious glee^ 

HA ! HA ! HA I 
BROWNIE HAS'T a' ! • 



• We are induced by what we consider the extraordi- 
nary merit of the following poem, and a conviction that it 
will amuse our readers, to append it to these notices. It is 
the composition of a Bumfries-shire peasant, whose name 
(William Nicholson) certainly ought to be better known to 
fame. If the appearanc* of the poem in these pages shall 
tend to that ei!ect, (besides serving our purpose as 8£R>rdiDg 



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272 snnBflTinoim. 

a eooD^lete illmtrndon of the chaiacter cf the bgownie,) it 
win give US the greatest pleaawre* 

<' THE BROWNIE OF BLEDN0C9. 

(« Theee cam* a ttzange wight to our towB-eii\ 
An* the fient a body did him ken ; 
He tirPd na lang, but he glided ben 
Wi' a dreary, dreary hum. 

His fiu» did glow like the glow o' the west. 
When the drumlie doud has it half overcast ; 
Or the struggling moon when she's sair distrest. 
O, sirs ! *CwBS A]ken*4fam. 

I trow the bauldest stood aback, 
Wi* a gape an' a glow'r till their lugs did crack, 
As the shapeless phantom mumming spak, 
Hae ye wark for Aiken-dium ? 

O ! had ye seen the baims' fright, 
As they star*d at this wild and unyirthly wight $ 
As they skolkit in 'tween the dtaik an' liie light. 
An* graned out, Aiken-dram ! 

* Sauf us !' quoth Jock, ' d'ye see sic een ;* 
Cries Kate^ * there's a hole where a nose should ha' been ^ 
An' the mouth's like a gash which a horn had ri'en ; 
Wow ! keep's frae Aiken<4rum !* 

The black dog growling cow'red his tail, 
The lassie swarf *d, loot fa' the pail ; 
Bob's lingle brack as he men't the flail, 
At the sight o* Aiken-dram. 



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8UPBB8TITIONS. 373 

His matted head on his breast did rest, 
A laDg blue beard wan'ered down like a vest ; 
Bat the glare o* his e'e hath nae bard exprest, 
Nor the skimes o* Aiken-drum. 

Roa4 his hairy form there was naething seen. 
But a philibeg o* the rashes green, 
An* his knotted knees play'd ay kndt between ; 
What a sight was Aiken-drum { 

On his waucfaie arms three daws did meet, 
As they trailed on ihe grun* by his taeless feet ; 
£*en the auld gudeman himsel* did sweat, 
To look at Aiken-drum. 

But he drew a score, himsel' did sain, 
The auld wife tried, but her tongue was gane ; 
MHiile the young ane closer clasp*d her wean, 
And tum'd frae Aiken-drum, 

But the canty auld wife cam till her breath. 
And she deemed the Bible might ward aff scaith ; 
Be it benshee, bogle, ghaist, or wraith— 
But it feardna' Aiken-drum. 

' His presence protect us !* quoth the auld gudeman ; 
' MTiat wad ye, whare won ye, — ^by sea or by Ian' ? 
I conjure ye — speak — ^by the Beuk in my han* 1' 
What a grane gae Aiken-drum ! 

^ I liv'd in a Ian' whare we saw nae sky, 
I dwalt in a spot whare a bum rins na by ; 
But I'se dwall now wi' you if ye like to try — 
Hae ye wark for Aiken-drum ? 



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374 snrBssnTioNB. 

' 1*11 ahid a* your iheep i* the morain* nine,* 
1*11 beny jaax cnp by the light o* th« mooo. 
An* ba the baims wi* an unken'd tune, 
Jf ye*ll keep puix Aiken-dnim. 

' I'll loup the linn when ye canna vade, 
1*11 kirn the kirn, an* I'U tarn the bread ; 
An* the wildest fiUie that ever ran rede 
J*Be tame*t,' quoth Aiken-drum I 

< To wear the tod ftae the flock on the feUp— 
To gather the dew frae the heather-belL^ 

An* to look at my fiuse in yoor deu^crystal wdl. 
Might gie pleasure to Aiken-^nmu 

< I'se se^ nae guids, gear, bond, nor mark ; 
I use nae beddin*, shoon, nor aaric ; 

But a cogfii* o* brose 'tween the light an' dark, 
Is the wa^ o' Aiken-dmm.* 

Quoth the wylie auld wife, *• The thing speaks wed ; 
Our workers are scant — ^we hae routh o* meal ; 
Oiff he*ll do as he 8ayB-.l)e he man, be he de'il, 
TVow ! we*ll try thia Aiken«drum. 

* On one occasion, Brownie had undertaken to gather 
the sheep into the bugfat by an early hour, and so zealously 
did he perform his task, that not only was there not one 
sheep left on the hiU, but he had also collected a number of 
hares, which were found fairly penned along with them. 
Upon being congratulated on his ejctraordinary success. 
Brownie exdahned, «« Confound thae wee gray anes ! they 
cost me mair trouble than a* the lave o' ihem." 



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8UPBB8TITIONS. 275 

But the wenches ftMrlM ' he's no' be here ! 
His eldritch look gan us swarf wi' few ; 
An' the feint a ane will the house come near^ 
If they think but o' Aiken-drnm« 

' Puir dipmalabors I je hae little wit ; 
Is't na hi^wmas now, an' the crap out yet ? 
Sae she silenjc'd them a' wi' a stamp o* her fit, 
* Sit-yer-wa's-down, Aiken*4nim.* 

Roun* a' that side what wark was dune, 
By the streamer's gleam, or the glance o' the moon ; 
A word, or a wish — an' the Brownie cam sime^ 
Sae heipfu' was Aiken-drum. 

But he slade ay awa or the sun was up, 
He ne'er could look straug^t on Macmillan's cup )* 
They watch'd, — ^but nane saw him his brose era sup. 
Nor a spune sought Aiken-dmm. 



* A communion cup, belonging to McMillan, the well* 
known ousted minister of Balmaghie, and founder of a va* 
riety of the i^ecies Covekakter. This cup was treasur- 
ed by a zealous disciple in the parish of Kirkcowan, and 
long used as a test by which to ascertain the orthodoxy of 
suspected persons. If, on taking the precious relic into his 
hand, the person trembled, or gaye other symptoms of agi- 
tation, he was denounced as haying bowed the knee to Baal, 
and sacrificed at the altar of idolatry ; and it required, 
through his future life, no common exertions in the good 
cause, to efface the stigma thus fixed upon him» 



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370 SUPfiBBTITlONft. 

On Blednoeh ImnkB, an* on czyttal Cvee, 
For many a day a toil*d wight was he ; 
While the bainu phiy*d hannlcBS nmn' his knee^ 
Sae social was Aiken-dnim. 

But a new.made wife, fu' o* rippiah freaks. 

Fond o* a' things feat fbr the fiye first weeks. 

Laid a mouldy pair o* her ain man's breeks 

By the bione o' Aiken-drum. 

Let the learnM decide when they conyene, 
What spell was him an* the breeks between ; 
For frae that day forth he was nae mair seen, 
An* sair miss'd was Aiken-drum. 

He was heard by a herd gaun by the Thrievey 
dying * Lang, lang now may I greet an* grieve ; 
For alas I I hae gotten baith fee an' leave, 
O, lucUeas Aiken-drum !* 

Awa ! ye wrangling sceptic tribe, 
Wi* your pro's an* your con*8 wad ye decide 
Gain the 'sponsible Toioe o* a hale oountiy-side 
On the facts 'bout Aiken-drum ? 

Tho* the * Brownie o* Blednoeh* lang be gane. 
The mark o* his feet*s left on mony a stane ; 
An* mony a wife an' mony a wean 
Tell the feats o' Aiken-drum* 

E'en now, lig^t loons that jibe an' sneer 
At spiritual guests an' a' sic gear. 
At the Olasnoch mill hae swat wi' fear, 
An' look'd roun' for Aiken-drum. 



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SUPERSTITIONS. 277 

An* puStf Ma hae gotten a fHght, 
When the moon was tet, an* the stan gaed nae lafjtity 
At the xoaring linn in the howe o* the night, 
Wi* Bughs like Aiken-diam.** 

Dumfriet Magaxine^ Oct, 1825, p, 327. 

THE WITCHES. 

The articles enumerated in the following 
rhyme were supposed to have influence over 
witches : 

BLACK LUOOIE, LAMMEIL BKAD, 
BOWAK-TEEE, AMD BED THBEAD, 
PUT THE WITCHES TO THEIB SPEED f 

Aliter,— 

OAB THE WITCHES DAKCE TO DEAD. 

According to a curious pamphlet first print- 
ed in 1591, entitled, ** Newes from Scotland, 
declaring the damnable life of Dr. Pian,*' the 
following was the dancing song of a large body 
of witches, who landed one night in a fleet of 
sieves and cockle-shells, at a place near the 

A A 



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378 SUPBSSTITIONS. 

church of North-Barwick, where thqr held 
some unspeakable saturnalia ; 



CUMMEll, GO YE BEFOAE ; CDHMER, GO TE ! 
OIF TE WILL NOT GO BEFOllE, CUMMER, LET ME ! 



tt is Still popularly believed^ that, both when 
they dance on the ground and ride through the 
air, they observe the order of a troop of wild 
fowl, — ^the whole following one leader, and en- 
joying that honour by rotation. 

Witches * were supposed to have it in their 
power to supply themselves with milk, by pulling 



* In the author's boyhood, and so late as within the 
last twelve yean, there resided at Peebles several old wo- 
men who had the credit of being witches. One infirm old 
hag, in particalar, dwelt in an hiimble eottage in the Nor. 
gate ; and I remember perfectly weU, that no boy ever went 
past her door, or her window, without laying his thumb 
into the palm of his hand and closing down the fingers. — 
It is supposed that the original meaning of this action was, 
to form, in the least ostentatious way possible, the sign of 
the crass upon the body^ which mi^^t thus be vndcnptood 
as efiectually protected from the influence of the evfl eye. 



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SUPERSTITIONS. ^J9 

at a h«ir-rope> as dairymaids tug the teats of 
cattle^ and using the following conjuration : 

M£Ea*S MILK AXD DEEa*8 MILK, 
AND EVEAT BEAST TBAT BEAH's MIJLK, 
ATWEEN ST. JOHK8TOV AKD PUKDE^y 
COME a' TC) me, come A* TO ME. 



LORNTIE AND THE MERMAIP. 

The young laird of Lorntie^ in Angus-shire, 
was one evening returning from a hunting ex« 
cursion, attended by a single servant and two 
greyhounds, when he met the following strange 
adventure. In passing a solitary lake, which 
lies about three miles south from Lomtie, and 
was in those times closely surrounded widi na- 
tural wood, his ears were suddenly assailed by 
the shrieks of a female apparently drowning in 
the water. The laird, who was both prompt and 
fearless, instantly spurred his horse forward to 
the side of the lake, and there saw a beautiful fe- 
male struggling with the water, and, as it seem- 
ed to him, just in the act of sinking. " Help, 
help, Lomtie !" she exclaimed, " Help, Lom- 
tie,— -help, Lor-—" and the waters seemed to 



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380 8UPBBBTITION8. 

cboke the last sounds of her voice as they gur« 
gled in her throat The laird^ unable to resist 
the impulses of humanity, rushed into the lake, 
and was just about to grasp the long yellow 
locks of the lady, which lay like hanks of gold 
upon the water, when he was suddenly seized 
behind, and forced out of the lake, by his ser- 
vant, who, farther-sighted than his master, per- 
ceived the whole afiair to be the feint of a wat^- 
spirit ** Bide, Lomtie, — ^bide a blink !" cried 
the faithful creature, as the laird was about to 
dash him to the earth, '^ That wauling madam 
was nae other, God sauf us ! than the Mer- 
maid." Lomtie instantly acknowledged the 
truth of this asseveration, which, as he was pre- 
paring to mount his horse, was confirmed by 
the mermaid raising herself half out of the 
water, and exclaiming in a voice of fiendish 
disappointment and ferocity : 

^OUKTIE, l^OEKTIE, 

WEaE h't na yoDR ;nAK, 

X BAD f>ART YpUa HEART'S BLCTBV 
BKIBL IK HY PAX. 



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S17PBB8TIVION8. 381 



RHYME OF THE RED-ETIN. 

The red-etin is a monstrous personage^ supr 
posed by the common people to be so named 
on account of his insatiable penchant for red or 
raw flesh. He was the bug-bear* of the fifteenth 
and sixteenth centuries^ and^ in particular^ of 
King James V, whose infancy was lulled by 
Lindsay, as we are told in the prologue to his 
Dream^ with '^ tales of the red-etin and gyr&* 
carlin." He is still a popular character in 



* It would be woitfa while to give a list of popular and 
infantine hugbean^ ancient and modem. Marlborough is 
still the weU-known bugbear o£ the French children. At 
Peebles, the old women say to peevish children, '^ Wheeshst ! 
ihere^s Borlan coming !" This must have originated in the 
fear entertained by the people thereabouts for Madntosh of 
Borland, who commanded the detachment of the High- 
landers that passed through Peebles in 1745, and put the 
inhabitants into great bodily terror, besides shocking their 
pious feelings by setting all the mills to work on Sunday. 
In the very centre of England, it is customary for nurses 
to mtunidate children, with, " There's Willie Wallie,'* 
that is, Sir William Wallace. 

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282 BUPXBSTITfONS. 

Scotland, and is supposed to go about search- 
ing for what he may devour, and constantly ex. 
claiming, as in the story of Jack and the Bean 
Stack, 



8M00K ■ BUTT, 8K0UK BEN, 

I FIND THE SHELL OF EARTHLY HEV. 



He is supposed by Leydent to have some 
connection with one of the characters of a nur- 
sery story of which he only records a few 
rhymes ; 



THE HOirSB, THE LOUSE, AKD LITTLE REDE, 
WERE A* TO HAK* A OBUEL IK A LEAD. 



The two first associates desire little Rede to 
go to the door, to ^^ see what he could see." 



* Snouk signifies, to search for with the nose like a dog 
or hog, and here communicates a dreadful idea of the per<^ 
sonal habits of the Red-etin. 

f Notes to Complaynt of Scotland* 



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i 



8UPXB8TITI0NS. 283 

He declares that he saw the gyre->carliil com-* 
ing, 

WITH SPADE, AND SHOOL, AKD TJiOWSX.) 
TO LICK Ur a' THf: QRUEL. 

Upon which the party disperse, 

THE L0U8X TO THE CLAITH, 

AND THE MOUSE TO THE WA% 

LITTLE REDE BEHIND THE DOOE, 
AXD LICKET UP a\ 



MISCELLANEOUS FREITS. 

Charm used in G^loway for curing scorbu* 
tic spots on the skins of children, 

KINOWOOD, RiyoWOOD, EOON, 

I WISH TE MAT NEITHER SPREAD NOE 8PEIN9) 

BUT AT GROW LESS AND LESS, 

TILL TX FA* I* £* A8E AND BURN \ 



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264 supusTrrioKB. 

Chann used by the cUiryinaidi of Clydes- 
dale^ to induce refractory or bewitched cows to 
give their milk. 

BOKKIE LADTE, LET DOCK TERE MILK, 

AND I'll oi*e tou a gook o* silk ; 

A GOON O* SILK AKD A BALL O* TWIlTEy^^ 
BONiriE LADYE, TERE MILK S KG MIKE. 

In Scotland^ it is Accounted ft>rtunate to be 
seated when we first see the swallow in spring, 
to be walking when we first hear the cuckoo, 
and to see for the first time in the year a foal 
going before the eyes of its dam. 



GANG A2f' HEAB. THE GOUK YELL, 
SIT an' see THE SWALLOW FLEE, 

SEE THE FOAL BEFOBE ITS MITHEB'S E'E, 
TWILL BE A THRIVING YEAB Wl' THEE.* 



The young women in Galloway, when they 



* Id the Highlands, it is reckoned lucky to see a foal, 
calf, or lamby for the first time, with the head towards the 
observer. 



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8UPBBSTITION8. 285 

first 8ee tbe new moon,* sally out of doors and 
pull a handful of grass, saying : 

NEW MUNEyT&UE MUNB, TELL ME IF YOU CAN, 
OIF I HAS HEEE A HAIR LIKE THE HAIR MY 
GUDEMAlf. 

The grass is then brought into the house, 
where it is carefully searched, and if a hair be 
found amongst it, which is generally the case, 
the colour of that hair determines that of the 
future husband's. 

Throughout all Scotland it is a belief that 
the number of magpies seen at a time denotes 
various degrees of good and evil fortune. 

AKE'S JOY ; TWA^S GRIEF ; 

three's a MARRIAGE } FOUR*S DEATIf. 

There is a similar rhyme about colours : 

BLUE IS BEAUTY, R£p\s A TAIKBN, (TOKEN,) 
yellow's grief, and green's FORSAKEN* 



* It is well known to be a prevalent custom or freitf 
on fint sedng the new moon, to turn money in the pocketr 



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286 flVTBBSTITIONfi. 

In Morayshire, there is a saying-— 

GREEN, 

18 LUTE SESN» 

That is done or abandoned; and it is well 
known^ that to dream of any thing green is ac- 
counted unlucky. This may perhaps be con- 
nected with the expression, " to wear the wil- 
low," and with the custom of saying, when the 
youngest female of a family is married first, 
that she has *' given her elder sisters green 
stockings." * 

" The herb vervain, revered by the Druids, 
was reckoned a powerful charm by the common 
people, and the author recollects a popular 
rhjrme supposed to be addressed to a young 
woman by the devil, who attempted to seduce 
her in the shape of a handsome young man : 

GIN YE WISH TO BE LEMAN MINE, 

LAY OFF THE ST. JOHN's WOET AND THE VERVINE. 

By his repugnance to these sacred plants, his 
* Biue seems to be the modem idea. 



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SUPBRSTITIONa 287 

mistress discovered the cloven foot"* Mins, 
Scat. Bord. iii, 304. 

The young women of the Lowlands, on first 
observing the new moon, exclaim as follows : 

NBW MUNE, TRUE MUNE, 
TELL UNTO ME, 

ir (naming their favourite lover,) my true-love, 

HE will marry me. 

IT he marry me in haste, 

LET ME SEE HIS BONNIE FACE ; 
IF HE M4RRY ME BETIDE, 
LET ME SEE HIS BONNIE SIDE ; 
GIN HE MARRY NA ME AY A, 
TURN HIS BACK AND GAE AWA. 

A halloween rhyme, recited while tying knots 
on a thread or string : 

I KNIT THIS KNOT, THIS KNOT I KNIT, 
To SEE THE SIGHT I N£*£R SAW YET, 



• *' The very same idea must have prevailed in Sweden, 
for one of the names given to the Thypericum perfora- 
tum, is Fuga I>emonum."^i.Jamie«(m*« ScottUh Die. 
Supplement^ i, 636. 



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288 817PBIt8TITION£r. 

TO SEE MT TRUE LOTS IK HI8 BEST ASSAT, 

OR THE CLOTHES THAT HE WEARS ETERT DAT. 

AMD IF HIS LIVERY I AH TO WEAR, 

AKD IF HIS BAIRNS I AM TO BEAR, 

BLTTHE AMD MERRY MAT HE BE, 

AlTD MAT HIS FACE BE TURNED TO ME. 

From the recitation of a West^country lady. 



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§hpttimmfi 



UNPUBLISHED CLASSES 



i^o^tilar l^'^mtff* 



B B 



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SPECIMENS OF UNPUBLISHED CLASSES OF 
POPULAR RHYMES. 



I.— -RHYMES UPON SEASONS AND THE WEATHER. 

Shepherd's Rhyme on Leap^ear, 

Leapoyear 

Was never a gude sheep-year, 

OB account of the greater length of February, 
— a month blessed with but a small share of 
the shepherd's good -will. 



A wann May and a weeping June 
Bring the har'st richt sune* 



Auld mune mist, 
Ne'er dee'd o' thrist. 



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293 POPULAB 



n.<-*BHYMBB ON NATUBAL 0BJBCT8. 

On a heavy fall of Snow. 

Th9 men o' the east 

Are pykin their geese, 
And sendin* their feathers here away, here away 



On the RoUn Redbreast and the Wren, 

The robin and the wren 
Are God's cock and hen. 



Oft the YeUow YoldHn. 

Hauf a puddock, hauf a taed, 
Hauf a drap o' de'il's blade, 
On a May morning. 



On the different species of Humble Bees* 

The todler-tyke has a very gude byke. 

And sae has the gairy bee ; 
But weel's me on the little xed-doup, 

The best o* a' the three. 



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BHTIIES. 283 



m.-^NURSERY RHYMES* 



Play, pan, play, 

Play, pan, play ; 
And gi'iB the bairn meat,'—. 

It*s gotten nane the day. 



Poussikie, poussikie, poussikie, wow 1 
MHiare shall we get banes to chow ? 

We'll up the bc^. 

And worry a h(^, 
And then we'll get banes enow I 



AVlien first my Jamie he cam' to the toun. 

He had a blue bonnet, — a hole in the croun ; 

But noo he has gotten a hat and a feather : 

Hey, Jamiej lad, cock your b'aver. 
Cock your b'aver, cock your b'aver, 
Hey^ J»mie, lad, co«k .your, b'aver ! 

There's gowd'aftiint, there's gowdufbre, 
There's silk U!i ev-er-y sad^e-bdi^e'; 
SOarer jingling aft your biidle,. .. i 
Andfirames to baud yoiir hoirse ,when be stands idle« 
, So cQclf your b'aYei:, cock your b'aver, 
^ Hey, Jamie, lad, cock your b'aver. 



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8M F0P17LAE 

There wai a gnse, they ca*d it Luoe^ 
It was paicUin in a pule-y ; 

Bj cam* a tod, wi* mony a nod. 
And bad her tell her Yule-y. 

He took her hame, and warmed her wame. 

And pat her on a atole-y ; 
He singet her daes, and bnmt her daes, 

And made her look like a iule-y ) 



IT. NUR8EBY LEGENDS AND BALLADS. 

Pippety Pewy — partly prote^ — a Nurtery Legend, 

There was once a cruel mother^ who mur- 
dered one of her daughters^ and made a dish 
of meat of the body^ which she gave to her 
husband^ who devoured it. Sister Kate^ the 
favourite of the mother, (as the murdered 
daughter hiul been of the father,) was- in the 
secret ; and rejoiced at being rid of th^ rivalry 
of her sister. The &ther, on eating his horrid 
mess, picked all the bones, and tfarerw'them, 
one after another, below the table, where sister 
Kate sat to gather them. The deceased, after 
some time, came back in the shape of a bird ; 



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RHYMBS. 



and divulged to her father the dreadful deed, 
by singing as follows :— * 

Pippety Pew ! 

My mammie me slew. 

My daddie me ate, 

My sister Kate 

Oathezed a* my banes, 

And laid them between twa milk-idiite stanes. 

Sae I grew a bird, and away I flew. 

Sing Pippety Pew. 

Ba capo. 

The father, enraged at the death of his fa« 
vourite child, immediately killed the mother. 



Nursery Ballad of the^Wee Croodlen Doo. 

Whare hae ye been a* the day. 
My little wee Croodlen Doo ? 

Oh, IVe been at my grandmother's, 
Mak' my bed, mammie, noo ! 

YHiat gat ye at your grandmother*s, 
My little wee Croodlen Doo ? 

I gat a bonnie wee fishie, 

Mak' my bed, mammie, noo ! 

Oh, whare did she eatch the fishie. 
My bonnie wee Croodlen Doo ? 



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290. FOFVIiAR 

She catchM it in the gotterJiole, 
Mak* my bed, mammie, noo I 

And what did you do wi* the banes o*t, 
My bonnie wee Cioodlen Doo ? 

I gi^ them to my little dog, 

Mak* my bed, mammie, noo ! ' 

And what did the littlo doggie do. 

My little wee Croodlen Doo ? 
He Btretcfa*d oat his head and his feet, and dee*d, 

As I do, mammie, noo! . 



y. ^PUERILE RHYMBS. 

In reproach qf a companion who retutnet pouetnon of a 

Gi'e a thing, tak* a thing, 
Auld man's deid ring i 
Lie butt, lie ben, 
Lie amang the deid men. 



Scrawled and bawled everywhere in Edin- 
burgh^ by the boys attending the High School, 



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iftHYHXS. 297 

in allusion to the happy months of the yacation^ 
and the bitter ones -which immediately follow : 

O ! for August and September, 
De'il tak* October and November. 



Wben I was a little boy, strikin' at tbe studdy, 
I had a pair o* blue breeks, and oh but they were duddie ! 
As I atrook, they shook, like a lammie*s tailie ; 
But noo I*m grown a gentleman, — my wife she wears a 
ndlie. 



VI. BHYHES APPBOPBIATB TO JXTYENILE 

AMUSBMKNTS. 

Jtiding Hobby-horses, 

I had a Uttle hobby-horse, 
His mane was dapple-grey ; 

His head was made o' pease-strae, 
His tail was made o* hay. 



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298 rwvhAM 

. Used foxmerlj by the boys of Sdinborgh, in 
parading tbe streets at nigbt, in bands : 

We*]law^0$iQkettUii toBheax, , 
We*ll awa to KinkcttUn to shear ; - 
Gin we dinna get whisky, we*ie sure to get beer, 
And we'll awa to Kinkettlin to shear. 



VII.— SHTME8 AFl^EtOFRIATE TO GAMBS. 

King and Queen of Cantelon, 
How many miles to Babylon ? 
It's eigjit and eight and other eight, 
Try to win there wi' candle-licht. 



My mistress sent me unto thine, 

Wi' three young flouirs, baith fair and fine ; 

The pink, the rose, and the yellow-fiouir ; 

And as they here do stand, 
Whilk will ye sink, whilk will ye swim. 

And whilk bring hame to land ? 



The following are the names of some games^ 
upon which our information is already almost 



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RHTMBS. 

complete : — " We are three brethren come from 
Spain." — " Janet Jo." — ^*' Lirapie^ limpie^ the 
pot's boiling owre."— '' The Clews."—'' I've 
lost my mother's darning-needle." — '' The 
Hinnie-pots."— " Shew, Gled-Wylie!"—'' Scots 
and English."—" Bloody Tom."—" Through 
the needle-ee, boys." We need not say how 
imperfect is this list, nor repeat the necessity of 
enlarging it by contributions from the patriotic 
and the charitable. 



VIII. — BIDDLES. 

I sat wi* my love, and I drank wi* my love, 

And my lore' she gave me licfat ; 
I'll give any man a pint o* wine, 

That'll read my riddle richt I 

Solutton."^! sat in a chair made of my mis- 
tress's bones ; drank out of her skull ; and was 
lighted by a candle made from her tallow. 



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* 300 VOPVhAM 

Th«ra standi a tiee at our bouBe-ead, 
It*s a* dad owie wi* leather-bend ; 
It'U fecht a bull, it'll fecht a bear, 
' ItH fecht a thousaad men o* weir ! 

Death. 



A muckle doug, and a little doug, 

A llM doag, and a mair, 
A lang-tatled doug, and a short-tailed doug,- 

How mony dougs are there ? 



Two. 



IZ. — ^BHTMES CONNSCTBD WITH THB FESTIVE 
OBSBRYANCBS IN SOOTIiAND AT THE NEW-TJSAB^ 

Aifir Chrittmatj Hogmanay^ New-year* t-dayy ^c. ; and 
a Drama performed by sett of juvenile fnatkerty termed 
Gui»ard», 

X. — MISCELLANEOUS. 

A very numeroi|s class, consisting in rhymes 
which could not be placed under any of the 



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IIHTMBS. 301 

above heads. One or two may be selected for 
the amusement of our readers, though without 
any hope of their serving as specimens of so 
varied a class. 

On MoHS Meg, 

Pottiher me wed, and keep me dean, 
I*n cany a bullet to Peebles Green. 



The tragical adventure of Tarn oi* the Lin and hitfimily. 

Tarn o* the Lin, and a* bis bairns, 
Fell i* the fire in others* anns ! 
Oh, qao' the bunemost, I ha*e a bet skin I! 
It's better bdow, quo* Tarn o* the lin !!! 



Oh, beard ye o* an auld wifie, an auld wife, an auld wife, 
Ob heard ye o* an auld wife bung owre ^e dyke to dry ? 

The day was bet, the wife was fat, and she began to fry ; 
Was there ever sic an auld wife hung owre the dyke to 
dry? 



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SOS POPULAR RHTMSS. 

Whistle, wfauUe, anld wife, 
And ye'se get a man. 

I wadna whistle, quo* the Wife, 
Though ye wad gi*e me ten. 

Whistle, whistle, auld wife, 
And ye*8e get a cOck. 

I wadna whistle, quo* the wife, 
Though ye wad gi'e me a flock. 

Whistle, whistle, auld wife. 
And ye*8e get a man. 

Wheep, whaup, quo' the wife ; 
1*11 whistle as I can. 



There was an auld wife, and they ca*d her EiIAiddie, 
And a* body said she wad gang to the wuddie ; 
But I think she de*ed in a better oommaund. 
For she danced her to ddd at her ain house end. 



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CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Page 

6. For Perthshire,' >^«rf Clackmannanshire. 

7. In fifth line from bottorn, for phrase, read 

' term. 
9. The original version of the rhyme on the 
Links of Forth is :— 

A CROOK O* THE FORTH 

IS WORTH AS EARLDOM O' THE KORTH. 

II. For Carit-haughs read CARiT-aaGk, -which 

-is not precisely in but closely adjacent 

to Liddisdale. 
13. Top line, nead morning, and evening tide. 
21. ToLYLLIABD'S EDGE, add Roxburgh^ 

4hire, and in last line of rhyme insert. 

the woi:d)SMx«i;TJEUK ^between wjbre and 

OFF* « •. 



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304 COBBBCTIONS 

26. A note was here omitted^ mentioning the 

equivocal credit in which the battle of 
Biggar is held by all historians. 

27. Line 6, for too, read to. 

31. After the last word, add name. 

33. Sixth line from bottom, for herds, readshep^ 
herds ; and make the same alteration in 
page 34. 

35. The Tarras is a Roxburghshire stream. 

40. LooB is more properly spelled LouB. 

42. Second Rne from bottom, dele and this is 
probable. 

52. For Dundee, read Brechin ; and in bottom 
line, for another B.oman, read a Caledo- 
nian. 

58. For the highly improper phrase in ndther 
more nor less, read in no other place 
than. 

61. To the superstition about the sides of the 
sheep of Largo Law, add, as a note, 
that the same idea prevails in the south 
about the teeth of those whidi graze 
upon the Eildon hills* We know, from 
authentic documents, that there were 
gold mines in these hills in the time of 



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AND .ADDITIONS. 305 



James VI ; but whether the metal com* 
municates any tinge to the verdure^ and 
the' verdure again to the teeth of the 
diieep, must be left to naturalists. 

63. i^Qr> the estate of Forthar^ &c. read the 
ferm of Fairy field, vhich was formerly 
tiie property of' Dr. Archibald Pit- 
cairn. 

QQ* Invenibns is, cf course, a misprint for 
INYENIES, — which, hi) the may, is bad 
enough Latin to be monkish* 

74. Charter of renunciation would bei more 
technically correct as charter of resig- 
nation, and renuDciator should be re* 
signer. 

89. In Gaelic rhyme on lona, for hhanaich 
read uhanach, for oenm read geum^ 
and for erich, crich. 

92. For piety, read sanctity. 

93. The Gaelic rhyme on Perth should be 

read thus : — 

TATHA MH0& VA 'n TOUlir 
BHEIR 1* 8CRI0B LOM 
AIR PEAIRT. 

cc2 



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SOC COBEBCTIONS 

Page 

102. Read snd is used in the clwrters of the 

family which takes its title £rom the 
town. Munross, it is said, may also sig- 
nify Promontory of the Moss, && 

103. For and promises soon to destroy every 

vestige of the same, read of which it 
promises soon to destroy eyery vestige. 

104. For banking, read embanking. 
126. In line, for style, read st^le. 
137* For applied, read used. 

139. For invited, read incited. 

140. It ought to have been stated, that die re- 

proach of Kinghom does not now apply. 
144. In penult line, dele not. 
146. For Sorbietrees, read Sorby* 
154. For Mr. Ure, read M'Ure. 
166. The first Gaelic rhyme should he spelled 

thus : — 



CKOIC IS UISG IS ALPAXICH 

AN TRIUR BU SHINE 'BRA *X ALBIN. 

In second Gaelic rhyme, for sligIghd, read 
3LI0GHD ; for DUCHAiSAC, read duch- 



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AND ADDITIONS. 307 

Page 

AI8ACH ; and last line should he spelled 
Jhus ;f— 

'8 AlO A BHEIL DUCHA8 FATHA8D BI8. 

184. Various popular version of the Somerville 
rhyme :~^ 

THE WOOD LAIRD OF LARI8TOK9 
SLEW THE WORM OF ORHISTOK ; 
AND GAT, FOR HIS REWAIRDISHIMi;^ 
A* LINTOM FARQCHINtU 



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INDEX TO RHYMES. 



Page 

Abxkdeen shall be a green, « , 102 

Adh* ain deoin co *heireadh e t • . 255 

A muckle doug, and a little doug, • SOO 

Ane*8 joy, twa*8 grief, • • . 285 

An I mo cridhe ! 1 rao graidh I • . 89 

Annan, Tweed, and Clyde, ... 32 

A Protestant prince from Rome does advance, 144 

A rood of Don's worth twa o' Dee, . . 35 

As I gaed np the Canongate, • . 133 

As lang as there's a cock i* the North, . 164 

A* souters, and souters* seed, • • 152 

At Eildon Tree, if you shall be, . . 84 

Atween Craig Cors and Eildon Tree, . 82 

Atween the wat grand and the dry, • 64 

Aucht fardle sin ye gi'e, • . 165 

AuldAyr, . ... 113 

Auld M^ lanton o* the Pole o* Midnieht Hauch, 18 

Auld mune mist, . . 291 

Auld Rhymer's race, . . 77 

Avant, Demle ! . . ' 251 

A wann May and a weeping June, . 291 



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310 



INDSZ TO BHTIUSS. 





Page 


A weaver, a weaver, a winder o* pims, 


157 


A windy winter and a wat spring. 


81 


BaoM Frazers, 


216 


BeU.eU^! 


141 


BeUenden ! 


251 


Beneath this pot yon will find another. 


66 


Between Seton and the sea, 


100 


Between the Camp of Ardodi, 


51 


Between the Less Lee and the mair, 


157 


Bide me fair ! 


252 


Bilhope Bzaes for bucks and raes, 


11 


Bhu:k Douglas, 


21S 


Black Lu^ie, lammer bead, • 


277 


Black Macraes of KintaO, 


214 


ISlue is beauty, red*s a taikcn, 


285 


Bhiidy Foulis o* Colinton, 


215 


Boghail! 


256 


Bonnie Dundee, 


115 


Bonnie huly, let doun your milk. 


284 


Bonnie Munross shall be a moo, 


102 


Bonnington Lakes, . . 


38 


Brave Maodonalds, 


217 


Brave toun gf Aberdeen, 


111 


Brig of Balgownie, blade's your wa* ! 


99 


Brosie Forfar, 


117 


Ca% Brownie, ca', 


268 


Oaim-na-cuen ! 


253 



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INDEX TO SHYMX8. 



311 



Page 

Gainunnuir o* Fleet, . . 39 

Calmer and Cannennill, . . ^\ 

Carles o* the Cane, . . II3 

Cauld kail in Comestane, . . 4] 

CIb]% Innis ! . . 256 

Cnoic is uisg is Alpanich, . i^ 

Craggan an Fhithich ! . . 2^ 

Craig-dhul . . ib. 

Cieeshie Patie brak a lamp, . 1^ 

Cripple BidL, . . iq 

Cummer, go ye befote ! Cummer, go ye I . 278 

Ileedle, linlram dodie ! . . 260 

Dirty Dalrymples, . 2O6 

Bonald Din, • . 5$ 

Douglas! a Douglas! . . 251 

Drticken Dumblane 1 . .117 

Dunse dings a* ! . . ix5 

XJfake of AthoU, — king in Man ! . X84 

Edinburgh Castle,— 4oune and tonre, . 108 

Elliots and Annstrongs, ride, thieves &*! . 146 

Fair Maiden Lylliard lies under this stane, . 21 

Fury, fairy, bake me a bannock, • 263 

Faithful toun of Linlithgow, . . 119 

Far are ye gaun ? To Killiemuir, . 139 

Far am hi bo bidh bean, . . . 92 

Pause Mentdths, . . 216 



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312 



INDBZ TO BHTUBfi. 



Fiery and quick-tempered M ackintoshes^ 
First a wudd and syne a sea, 
From the greed of the Campbells, 

Gallant Orahams, 

Cbng and hear the gowk yell. 

Gay Gordons, 

Gentle Johnstons, 

Gi*e a thing, tak* a thing, 

Gi'e Brownie coat, gi*e Brownie sark. 

Gin Auchindownie's cock hadoa Oawn, 

Onn ye ca* me imp or elf. 

Gin ye wish to be Leman mine, 

Glasgow people, Greenodc fouk, and Paisley 

Glenkirk and Glencotha, 

Gordon, Gordon, Bydand ! 

Great clan and luckless race, 

Great Tay of the wayes. 

Greedy Campbells, 

Greedy gaits o* GhiUowa*, 

Green, 

€hide toun o* Edinburgh 

€hithrie o* Guthrie, 

Ha ! ha ! ha ! 
Handsome Hays, 
Hauf a puddock, hauf a tacd, 
Haughty Hamiltons, 
Haughty Homes, 



bodies,. 



Page 

tie 

8 

208 
284 
199 
212 
296 
267 

62 
264 
286 
118 

42 
253 
240 

93 
205 

16 
286 
116 
182 

271 
215 
292 
212 

lb. 



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INDBX TO BHTMBS. 



313 



Page 



Hd^ how for HaUoween ! 


965 


Help, haud, an ye may. 


48 


Henwoodie ! 


258 


Here lies Margery Greig, 


38 


Here stands a kirk without a steeple, 


140 


Hem, Hem-otty ! • 


148 


He wha gaes by the fairies ring. 


266 


He wha tills the fSEories green. 


864 


Hey for the birk. 


150 


Hey the haggis o* Dunbar, 


134 


Hills, and paters, and Alpins, 


166 


Home ! a Home ! 


851 


Honest toun o* Musselbargli, 


120 


If Auchindownie cock disna craw. 


61 




897 


I knit this knot, this knot I knit. 


887 


In lona of my heart, lona of my love. 


89 


In Littlecoats a bow o* groats. 


39 


I sat wi' my lore, and I drank wi* my love. 


299 


I stood upon Eyemouth Fort, 


44 


It is not here, it is not here, 


46 


It^s oh for the stockings, 


150 


I've an aunty down at Leith, 


127 


I was tempted at Pittempton, 


28 


Jethart justice. 


135 


Jcthsrt*s here, 


256 



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314 



IMDBX TO BBniBS. 





Page 


King and Queen of Gantdon, 


298 




12$ 




11 


Knock Ferghaun ! 


256 


T^RofAe, 


111 


JjBdy, Lady liilbarn. 


28 


Xiang toun o* Kirkaldy, 


119 


Leap-year, 


291 


Leerie, leerie, light the lamps, 


1^ 


Leslie for the kirk, 


158 


Let nane whae gae by the Gait-deuch fit, 


20 


Let spades and shools do as they may. 


103 


Lift me up, and 1*11 tell you more, 


37 


light Lindsays, 


208 




263 


Loch Sloy ! 


25S 


Lochtie, Lothrie, Leyen, and Orr, 


33 


Lonachin ! 


252 


Lorebum ! 


256 


liomtie, Lomtie, 


280 


Lousie Lauther, 


136 


Lttckie Lauther leeves in Leith, 


127 


Lucky Dufis, 


213 


Manly Morisons, 


209 


Meer*s milk and deer's milk, 


279 


Muckle-mou'ed Murrays, 


217 


Merry Men of the Meams, 


120 



uGooale 



I i|t ■■!■ riawwi 



INDKX TO BHVHB& 



31^5 





Page 


Mumiebole^s a dirty hole, 


135 


Musselburgh was a burgh, 


107 


My mistress sent me unto thine. 


299 


New mune, true mune, 


28T 


New mune, true mune, tell m^ if ye can. 


285 


0*ardchoiUel 


256 


Oh, Alva woods are bonnie. 


6 


O ! for August and September, 


297 


Oh heard ye o* an anld wife, an anld wife, an 


auld wife, 301 


Oh, weel*s me noo, I've gotten a name. 


10 


On Tintock tap there is a mist. 


U 


On the water-fa* and the water-shed. 


86 


Out 0* the world and into Kippeo, 


119 


Pickle till him in Pathhead, 


139 


Pippety Pew, • 


295 


Pky, pan, pUy, 


293 


Poussikie, poussikie, poussikie wow. 


293 


Pouther me weel, and keep me dean. 


301 


Powbate, an ye break. 


95 


^rosin, Esk, and Canity, 


32 


Proud MaoMils, 


216 


Pudding Somervilles, 


210 


Red Douglas, 


213 


Repentance Tower stands on a hill. 


47 


Rlngwood, xingwood, lOon, 


28 



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316 



INBSX TO BHTMBS. 



Sair back and sair banes. 

Says the Sbochie to l^e Oidie, 

Seachd bliadhna roimh *n bhia a, 

Seven yean before that awful day, 

Set on ! 

Setons,-~taU and proud, 

Shepherdie, Mhej^erdie, shemie hough, 

Shoemaker, shoemaker, shew my shoon, 

SUoghd nan lighribh duchaisaicfa, 

Snouk butt and snouk ben, 

Sowen-mug, the weaver, 

St. Abb, St. Helen, and St Bey, 

Standfast, C^raigeOachie ! 

Star Taft and Star Cottin, 

Stick us a' in Aberlady, 

Sturdy Armstrongs, 

Sundrum shall sink, 

^ters ane, suten twa. 



P«ge 

164 

93 

90 

91 

252 

214 

152 

151 

166 

182 

151 

45 

254 

143 

138 

212 

95 

140 



Tailor, tailor, jab the louse. 

Tarn o* the Lin, and a' his bairns, 

Tatha mhor nan toun, 

Terri buss and Terri odin ! 

The beggars o* Benshie, 

The bum of Breid, 

The cadger on die canny beast, 

The cats haV kittled in Charlie*s wig, 

The deacon o* the weavers. 

The fairy fouk o* Fosterland, 



^ 



154 
301 

93 
256 

40 

85 
154 
143 
150 

44 



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INBBX TO BHYHBS. 31? 

Page 

The Ferry and llie Ferry well, , 2G9 

The grit pale ! . 256 

The gule, the Gt>rdon, and ilie hoodie-craw, 145 

The hare shall kittle on my hearth-stane, 7S 

The height atween Tintoclctap and Ck)uterwfeU, 16 

The horse shall gang on Carrolside Braes, B6 

The king rade round the Mere-deuch head, 36 

The lairdship o* the bonnie Links o' Forth, 9 

The laddie had tricks that cost him fu* dear, 21 

The lasses o* Exmagirdle, . 144 

The lasses o* the Canongate, , 132 

The men o* the east, . . 292 

The mouse, the louse, and Little Rede, 282 
The new brig at Doune, and the auld brig o* Callander, 50 

The new toon o' Bekirsty, . 40 

The robin and the wren, . 292 

The royal hereditary family, « 166 

The todler-tyke has a very gude byke, . 292 

The waters shall wax and the woods shall wene, 65 

The wood laird o* Lariston, . 164 

Then gut three, . 163 

There dwdt a weaver in Moffat toun, 23 

There sail a stane wi* Leader come, . 67 

There stands a castle in the wast, . ib. 

There stands a tree at our house-end, . 300 

There stands three mills on Manor water, 7 

There*s nae illumination, . 152 

There's nocht in the Hielants, . 143 

There was a gase, they caM it Luce, . 294 



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318 



INDBX TO RHYMES. 



Page 

There was an auld wife, and they caM her KJlfuddie, 302 

This stane lies on auld Robin's wame, 37 

This thorn .tree, as lang as it stands, . 78 

Tide, tide, whatever betide, • 160 

TilUeloot, tillleloot, tilUeloot o* Bowden, 135 

Tip tow! . . 67 

Trusty Boyds, . . 216 

Tweed s«ud to TiU, . 34 

'Tween the Isle o' May, . 47 

'Tween the Rae.hill and Loribum-ahaw, 26 

'Tween Wigton and the toun o' Ayr, . 165 

TuUich-ard, . 254 

Vengeance, vengeance ! — when and where, 159 

Was ne'er ane drowned in Tarras, . 35 

Was there e'er sic a parish, a parish, ft parish, 134 

We'll awa to Kinkettlin to shear, . 298 

Whare hae ye been a' the day, . 295 

M^en a wife's ae son, and a meer's ae foal, 98 

Wlien Don and Dee shall run in one, . 97 

When first my Jamie he cam' to the toun, . 293 

When I was a little boy, strikin' at the studdy, 297 

When the Red Syke at e'en sounds loud, 17 

When the saut gaes abune the meal, . 79 

When the white os. comes to Edinburgh Corse, 80 
When the Yowes o' Gowrie come to land, - 96 
When Tweed and Fowsail meet at Merlin's grave, 100 

Where left thou thy men, . 202 



uCooale 



INDEX TO RHYMES. 319 

Page 

"Wliere there is a cow, . 92 

Whisde, whistle, aold wife, . 302 

Wild Macraws, . . 214 

Woe to the man that hlew the horn, 62 

Wood Willie Somerville, . 193 

Ye're 'queer fouk, no to he Falkland fouk, 118 

York was, London is, and Edinhurgh will he, 81 

Yoar lucky *s mutch, and lingles at it, . 127 



THE END. 



James Auchie, Printer, Edinburgh. 



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