(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Porney's Syllabaire franc̜aise, or French spelling book. With the addition of the most necessary verbs, adjectives, and idiomatical phrases, alphabetically arranged"

I 




AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIES 




RAUCrHOH 






^H 



ciftOJi^T^^^ 






■^^T''' 



J. y^ I\L\ i^l'^ 



SYLLABAIRE FMN^AIS, 



FEENCH SPELLING BOOK, 



REVISED, CORRECTED, AND IMPROVED. 



WITK THE ADDITION OF 



THE MOST NECESSAEY VERBS, ADJECTIVES, AND 
IDIOMATICAL PHRASES, " 



ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED. 



BY J. MEIER, 

LATE PROFESSOR OF FRENCH AND GERMAN IN TALE UNIVEKSITY. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
PUBLISHED BY E. H. BUTLER & C^O. 

TS57. 



Knterbu, accorainp^ to Act ol Congreas, m tne year 1834, by E. J. Uoalk 
& <^"^o . in tlie Clerk's Office of tlie District Court of Maryland. 



^ 



fEB 11 '75 
M S-T 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



This eaition of Forney's French Spelling Book is much 
unproved, by having annexed Mr. Pasquier's translation 
of Mrs. Barbauld's Lessons ; by a Treatise on the Gender 
of Nouns ; by a collection of Ihe most difficult Idiomatical 
Phrases, and by other impr rtant additions to the original 
^ork. A few unimportant words in the long spelling 
lessons, have been omitted ; but a sufficient number is 
retained to answer all good purposes. By these additions 
the work is not only greatly improved, but somewhat 
enlarged. 



Digitized by tbe internet Archive 

in 2010 wit«h funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/porneyssyllabairOOporn 



PREFACE, 

BY MR. FORNEY. 



That reading, with propriety, is the basis cf modern 
languages, every individual must admit ; notwithstanding 
this acknowledgment, daily experience furnishes us with 
sufficient proofs of its being very little attended to, by 
most of the French teachers. 

I would not, however, be understood, that there are not 
to be met with, learned, skilled, and careful French mas- 
ters ; I speak only of the greatest part of them ; and I 
may venture to say, that many would be found, upon a 
strict examination, very deficient in their methods, or 
rather their manner of teaching : to this deficiency, I 
imagine, may be not improperly attributed the slow or 
little progress their scholars usually make in our language ; 
though admitting that Nature be not equally lavish of her 
favours to every individual, yet time and a good master, if 
the latter will take pains to instruct his pupils, will go, as 
it has often been experienced, a great way towards the 
acquisition of those endowments, which nature has with- 
holden from them. 

I might, in this place, be expected to point out those 
faults and defects, in the general method of teaching, which 
obstruct the progress of the learners ; but, lest I should 
give ofience to anybody, I will content m3'-self, with offer- 
ing the following one, which, till French teachers can pro- 
•ect a better of their own, they have my pressing desire 
to make use of. And, at the same time, I beg they may 
be assured, that, if they sufier no infringement upon it, it 
will very likely answer three beneficial purposes, viz. 
speedier improvement in their pupils — consequently more 



6 

credit to ihemselves,— and a greater satisfaction in then 
occupation. 

When learners are first taught the names of the letters 
of the alphabet, the greatest pains should be used to make 
them pronounce each letter properly ; neither should they 
be taught more than eight at a time : when perfect in 
these, go on with eight more ; then let the whole sixteen 
be added together, continuing in this manner till they have 
learned the whole. 

This method, all must allow, is more easy and more 
certain than teaching beginners, and especially young 
ones, the whole number of letters at once, which are too 
many for them, to retain the right pronunciation of their 
names. When this is effected, it is necessary that the 
pupil should be informed, 1st, That those names are given 
to letters only for the sake of reminding him of their form, 
since some of them can be made no rational use of at all 
in reading, particularly, the name of some of the con- 
sonants. 2dly, That the letters are divided into vowels 
and consonants, which, when joined together, compose 
syllables ; as in the words ba-ni, co-ri-ge ; &c. and that 
each distinct syllable is to produce a distinct sound. 

After this, in order to accustom learners to unite the 
idea of the sounds of letters to their appearance, they 
should be taught to pronounce, without spelling, the syl 
lables or combinations of the letters. To proceed other- 
wise, that is, to induce them to form several sounds in 
those syllables, which have but one, is to throw obstacles 
in their way, and retard their progress. Is it not, in fact 
falling into this error, when we teach a person to spell, be 
a, in order to pronounce ba ; or be, ell, a, enn, ce, for pro- 
nouncing blanc ? Who does not perceive the real difficul- 
ties which are to be met with in this last mentioned man- 
ner of spelling ? What person is there, who does not see 
clearly the propriety of teaching young learners to pro- 
nounce syllables according to the sounds they serve to 
denote ? As to the monosyllables, or words of one sylla- 
ble, young people will hardly find any difficulty with the 
manner of pronouncing them, provided they are cautioned 
to observe before they read them ; 1st. That most of our 
final consonants are not pronounced, particularly, d, g, p 



s, t, X, z, except the word following begins with a vowei 
or h mute, that is, h not aspirated. 2dly. That our sylla- 
ables form oral, nasal, and liquid sounds ; the oral being 
those whose air, which constitutes them, passes entirely 
through the mouth ; as in bas, cle, pis, dort, fait, jeu, &c. 
The nasal, those whose air is emitted through the mouth, 
and partly through the nose, as in grand, cent, fin, nom, 
hmn, faim, lien, &c. And the liquid, those which resul* 
from the concurrence of gn, or that of il, the pronuncia- 
tion of which ought to be, generally speaking, glib, and 
gliding. 

Should learners meet with difficulties herein, it would 
be proper to make them read these words over again tiL 
they become perfect in them before thev are suffered to 
proceed to the essays on readmg, which are annexea to 
this class of words. In readmg dissyllables, trissyllables 
&.C. it will be easy for teachers to make their scholars un- 
derstand, that instead of the division, they should sub- 
stitute the simple or articulated sound which is represented 
by the letters that are annexed to it, and read the word 
all together: and that these divisions are inserted only for 
the sake of facilitating the syllabisation, if I may be al- 
lowed the expression. They should then be made to read 
at first, cha-peau, ba-di-ne ; and afterwards, without stop- 
ping, chapeau, badine ; and apply what has been said con- 
cerning words of one syllable, to the reading of those of 
several syllables. By thus leading them from one class 
to another, they may soon, and easily, be qualified to read 
the most difficult words. 

Add to this, that as soon as young persons are able to 
read words of two syllables, they may be directed to get 
by heart, twice or thrice in a week, half a page of these 
words : and if they can write, to copy them, place the 
accents, and divide the syllables, as they find them in 
their respective classes. This method of transcribing, 
will be of the utmost service to them, and will impress 
them much better on their memory than if they were to 
read them ten times over successively. 

When they are come to the end of the spelling-book, 
t would be very useful, if the teacher approve of it, to 
go over the different essays on reading, and in so doing 



8 

to apply to each of them the observations and rules con- 
tained in the second part, which is entitled, Analyse des 
sons, &c. making at the same time one letter, with its 
various sounds and uses, the subject of a lesson : for, as 
our alphabet contains but twenty-five letters, we are oblig- 
ed, in order to indicate other sounds, to alter the pronun- 
ciation of some of them, by the cedilla, different accents, 
and even several combinations of vowels. 

I shall conclude with giving such directions for reading 
with propriety, as must be greatly advantageous, not only 
to young beginners, but also to many others, although they 
may have made some progress in our language. 



i 



RULES 

TO SB 

OBSERVED FOR READING WITH PROPRIETY. 



1. Read slow, and with a great deal of attention, as there 
arc several inconveniences attending fast reading; for you 
will not only be liable to make many mistakes, but per- 
haps learn to stammer ; neither is it possible for you to 
pronounce at first, what you are reading, so distinctly as 
you ought. 

2. If you are not sure of knowing how to read a word 
at first sight, do not guess at the pronunciation of it, lest 
you should contract the bad custom of miscalling words ; 
but spell it within yourself, before you offer to pronounce 
it with a loud voice. 

3. Be verj'' careful in minding your stops, as they are 
pointed ; or else neither you that read, nor those that 
hearken to you, wiU be able to make sense of your read- 
ing. 

4. Never make any stops between your words where 
there are none introduced ; neither utter hemms, nor haas, 
ptill observing to pronounce what you read with ease, and 
in the same manner as if you were holding a familiar 
conversation. 

The result of these general rules is, that your pronun- 
viation ought to be natural ; that is to say, without art or 
ifectation ; clear, that is to say, distinct and intelligible ; 
smooth, that is to say, without any constraint or hesitation 



THE FRENCH ALPHABET. 



A oh 

B bay 

C say 

D day 

E a 

F eff 

G jay 

H ash 

I c 

J ......... yee 

K /fcoA 

L ell 

M 



N erm 

O o 

P jo«y 

Q hi 

R err 

S ess 

T tay 

U 00 

V vay 

X ccA"s 

Y e{grec) 

Z zaid 



A collection of almost all 
Language which are to 
is to say, with one 



the moTiosyllables in the French 
be read without being spelt, thai 
e of the voice. 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


^■(il) 


Has (he) 


bans 


banns. 


d 


at, to. 


beau 


fine. 


ais 


shelf. 


beaux (pi.) 




an 


year. 


bel 


fine. 


arc 


bow. 


bien (bien) 


well. 


art 


art. 


bis (bi) 


brown. 


an 


to the 


bon 


good. 


au2 (pi.) 




blanc (blan) 


white. 


Bac 


Ferry-boat. 


bled (ble) 


corn. 


bai '^ 


bay. 


bleu 


blue. 


bal 


ball. 


bleux (pi.) 




bard 


hand-barrow 


bloc 


block. 


bas 


stocking. 


blond 


fair. 


bain 


bath. 


bceuf 


ox. 


banc (ban) 


bench. 


bois (o-a) 


wood or woods. 



11 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


bon 


good. 


chou 


cabbage. 


herd 


edge, brink. 


Christ (fcrist) 


Christ. 


^ourg 


borough. 


ciel 


heaven. 


bous 


boU (I.) 


cieux (j)l) 






bout 


end. 


cinq 


live. 


bras 


arm. 


clair 


clear. 


bref 


brief. 


clef icle) 


key. 


brin 


slip. 


clerc {cler ) 


clerk. 


broc {bro) 


jug- 


clos 


close. 


brun 


brown. 


clou 


nail. 


brut 


rough. 


ccBur {/ceur) 


heart. 


bu 


drunk. 


coin 


corner 


buis 


box. 


col 


neck. 


Camp 


Camp. 


cor 


corn. 


cap 


cape. 


corps (car) 


body or bodies. 


car 


for. 


cond-elle? 


sews-she? 


cas 


case or cases. 


coup 


stroke. 


ce 


this, that. 


cour 


yard. 


ceint 


girded. 


cours 


course or run. 


cent 


hundred. 


court 


short. 


cerf 


hart. 


cri 


cry. 


ces 


these, those. 


croix (p-a) 


cross or crosses. 


cet 


this, that. 


cm 


grown. 


ceux 


those. 


cuir 


leather. 


chair 


flesh. 


cuit 


cooked. 


champ 


field. 


cul (cm) 


bottom. 


chant 


singing. 


Daim {daing) 


1 Deer. 


char 


chariot. 


dais 


canopy. 


chat 


cat. 


dam 


damage. 


chaud 


warm, hot. 


dans 


in, into. 


chaux 


lime. 


dard' {dor) 


dart. 


chef 


chief. 


de 


of, or from. 


cher 


dear. 


dent {dan) 


tooth. 


chez 


at, to. 


des 


of the 


chien 


dog. 


des 


from. 


ch(Bm(keur) choir. 


de3 {de) 


dice. 


choc 


shock. 


deux 


two. 


choir (o-a) 


fall. 


Dieu 


God. 


iKjix (o-a) 


1 choice. 


dix 


ten. 



12 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


doigt (o-a) 


finger. 


fleur 


flower. 


don 


gift. 


flot 


billow. 


done 


then. 


foi (o-a) 


faith. 


dont 


whose. 


foin 


hay. 


dos 


back or backs. 


fois 


time or times 


dot (dote) 


portion 


fol 


fool. 


doux 


sweet. 


fond 


bottom. 


drap 


cloth. 


fort 


very. 


droit (o-a) 


right. 


fou 


fool. 


dru 


thick. 


four 


oven 


du 


of the or some 


frais 


fresh. 


da 


owed. 


franc 


free. 


dur 


hard. 


frit 


fried. 


dut 


owed-he. 


froc 


frock. 


Eau 


Water. 


froid (o-a) 


cold. 


eaux (pi.) 
en (an) 
et (e) 




■frnnf 


■forpliporl 


in, into. 


IIUIIL 

fruit 


fruit. 


and. 


Gai 


Gay. 


eu 


had. 


gain 


gain. 


eus 


had-I. 


gant 


glove 


eut 


had-he. 


gens 


aeople 


eux 


them. 


git 


ies. 


Faim 


Hunger. 


gland 


acorn 


faon (fan) 


fawn. 


gond 


hinge 


fard 


paint. 


gourd 


stifi: 


fat (fate) 


foppish 


gotit 


taste. 


faut 


must. 


grain 


corn. ^-J 


faux 


false. 


grand 


great #n^W 


fer 


iron. 


gras 


fat. 


feu 


fire. 


gre 


will. 


feux (pi.) 




Grec 


Greek. 


fiel 


gall. 


gres 


stone. 


fier 


proud. 


gris 


gray. 


^(file) 


thread. 


groin 


snout 


fin 


end. 


gros 


big 


*fils (fi ovfils) son or sons. 


gue 


ford. 


flair 


scent. 


guet (gue) 


watch. 


flan. 


custard. 


gueux 


beggar 


flanc-j^a/i. 


flank. 


' Heart 


Knock. 




• The / is mute aud the s is sounded. 



IS 



FRENCH 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


hier 


yestesday. 


moms 


less. 


' hors 


out. 


mois {o-a) 


month, months. 


' houx 


holly. 


mol 


soft. 


Jeu 


Game. 


mon 


my. 


Jong 


ring. 


mont 


mount. 


jour 


day. 


mors 


bit. 


jus 
Lac 


gravy. 


mort 


death. 


Lake. 


mot 


word. 


lacs (la) 


snare. 


mou 


soft. 


laid 


ugly- 


muid 


hogshead. 


lait 


milk. 


mur 


waU. 


lard 


bacon. 


mur 


ripe. 


legs (le) 


legacy. 


Nain 


Dwan. 


lent 


slow. 


ne 


born. 


lieu 


place. 


ne 


not, no. 


loi (o-a) 


law. 


nef 


body of a church. 


loix, pi. 




nerf 


sinew. 


loin 


far. 


net 


clear. 


long 


long. 


neuf 


new. 


lors 


then. 


nez {ne) 


nose. 


lot 


lot. 


ni 


nor. 


loup 


wolf. 


nid 


nest. 


lourd 


heavy. 


noeud 


knot. 


lui 


him. 


noir {o-a) 


black. 


Ma 


My. 


non 


no. 


main 


hand. 


nos 


our. 


mais 


but. 


nous 


we. 


mal 


evil. 


nud 


naked. 


marc {mar) 


weight. 


nuit 


night. 


mat 


mast. 


nul 


none. 


maux 


bad. 


(Euf 


Eg?, 
anomted 


me 


me. 


oint 


mer 


sea. 


on 


they. 


mes {me) 


m.y. 


or 


gold. 


miel 


honey. 


or 


therefop 


mien 


mine. 


OS 


bone. 


mieux 


better. 


ou 


or. 


mceurs 


manners 


ou 


where. 


moi {o-a) 


me 


oui 


yes. 



14 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


Pain 


Bread. 


rang 


rank. 


pair 


eouple. 


rien (nen) 


nothing. 


paix 


peaee. 


rieur 


laughter. 


pal 


pale. 


roi (ro-a) 


king. 


pan 


lappet. 


rot 


belch. 


par 


by. 


r6t 


roast meat. 


pare 


park. 


roux 


ruddy. 


peau 


skin. 


sa 


his, her. 


peaux (pZ.) 




sac 


bag. 


pied (pie) 


foot. 


sacs {sak) 


bags. 


plan 


plan. 


sain 


wholesome. 


plat 


dish. 


saint 


holy, saint. 


plein 


full. 


sang 


blood. 


pleur 


tear. 


sans 


without. 


pii 


plait. 


sauf 


safe. 


plus 


more 


sceau 


seal. 


plomb (plon) lead. 


sec 


dry. 


poids (o-a) 


weight. 


sein 


bosom. 


poil 


hair. 


seing 


signature. 


point 


stop. 


sel 


salt. 


pois 


Dea or peas. 


, sens 


sense or senses 


pont 


Dridge. 


ses 


his or her. 


pore 


pork. 


seul 


alone, only. 


port 


harbour. 


si 


if. 


pot 


pot. 


sien 


his own. 


pour 


for. 


sieur 


master. 


pres 


near. 


six 


six. 


pret 


ready. 


soi (o-a) 


one-self. 


pris 


taken. 


soir (o-a) 


evening. 


prix {pri) 


price or prices sueur 


sister. 


pur 


pure. 


son 


sound. 


quand 


when. 


son 


his, her. 


quant 


as for. 


sont 


are-they. 


quart 


quarter. 


sors 


go out (I.) 


que 


that. 


sort 


fate. 


quel 


what. 


sot 


fool. 


qui 


who 


sou 


penny. 


quint. 


fifth. 


sous» 


under. 


quoi (ko-a) 


what 


suif 


taUow. 



15 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH, 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


sur 


upon. 


veau 


calf. 


sfir 


sure. 


veaux-/?/. 


calves. 


tard 


late. 


vent 


wind. 


te 


thee. 


ver 


warm. 


teint 


complexion, verd 


green. 


tel 


such. 


vers 


towards. 


terns m 


temps time or 


times, veuf 


widower. 


the 


tea. 


vieux 


old. 


tors 


twisted. 


vif 


quick. 


tort 


wrong. 


vil 


vile. 


tot 


soon. 


vin 


wine. 


tout 


aU. 


vis {vice) 


screw. 


tous-^Z. 




VOBU 


vow. 


toux 


cough. 


vceux-jf?^. 




train 


course ofr train voir (o-cr) 


to see. 


trait 


dart. 


voix io-a) 


voice or voices. 


tres 


very. 


vol 


theft. 


va 


go- 


vos 


your. 


vain 


vain. 


vrai 


true. 


val 


dale. 


vu 


seen. 


van 


fan 


yeux 


eyes. 



LessoTis of Words of one Syllable. 
FIRST LESSON. 



n n'y a qu'un seul Dieu ; 
il est le Roi des rois, et le 
Saint des saints. 

Dieu est si bon qu'il me 
fait tons les jours du bien ; 
de lui je tiens tout ce que 
j'ai ; sans lui je ne puis 
rien ; il sait tout ce que 
je fais et ce que je dis ; et il 
voit a a fond de mon cceur. 

Pres de lui, les rois'sont 
moius que rien. 



There is only one God ; 
he is the King of kings, and 
the Saint of saints. 

God is so good that he 
loads me every day with 
kindness ; from him I re- 
ceive all ; without him I can 
do nothing ; he knows all 
that I do, and whatever I 
say ; his eye sees to the 
bottom of my heart. 

Near him kings are less 
than nothing. 



16 



Ses mains ont fait tout 
ce que je vois de bon et de 
beau ; en un mot tout est 
plein de son saint nom. 

Ne fais point le mal. mais 
le bien ; car qui fait bien, 
plait a Dieu ; mais qui fait 
mal, ne craint pas Dieu» 
et a grand tort. 

Tons nos pas vont vers 
la mort ; mais quand on vit 
bien, on nela craint pas. 



His hands have made 
all I see that is good and 
fine ; in a word, all is full 
of his holy name. 

Don't do what is bad, but 
do what is good : for who- 
soever does good, pleases 
God; but whosoever does 
bad, does not fear God, and 
acts very wrong. 

All our steps move to- 
wards death ; but those who 
live well, are not afraid of it.- 



SECOND LESSON. 



Ne fais point de cas du 
mal que Ton dit de toi ; et 
fais de bon coeur tout ce que 
tu dois. 

Tiens-toi pres de ceux qui 
sont gens de bien ; et si tu 
les crois tels, ne sois point 
du tout las de les voir. 

On ne plait pas tant par 
ce que Ton dit, que par ce 
que I'on fait, tin don en 
vaut deux, quand on le fait 
de son chef; il en vaut cent, 
quand on le fait de bon 
coBur. 

Lorsque Ton sent que 
Ton est bon, on ne Test past 
long tems ; mais, des qu'on 
le dit, on ne Test plus du 
tout. 

Le jeu ne vaut rien ; je 
plains ces gens que Ton 
voit par-tout, et tous les 
jours au jeu, ils font du jour 
la nuit, et de la nuit le jour. 



Do not mind what one 
may say of thee ; and do 
heartily whatever thou hast 
to do. 

Keep company with such 
as are good ; and if thou 
knowest them to be so, never 
be tired of seeing them. 

We do not please so 
much by what we say, as 
by what we do. A gift is 
worth two when freely giv- 
en ; it is worth a hundred 
of them, when it is made 
heartily. 

When a man knows he 
is good, he does not remain 
long so ; if he declares it, 
he is so no longer. 

Gaming is good for no- 
thing ; I pity those who are 
every day gaming ; they 
turn day into night and 
night into day. 



n 



Quand on perd, on est 
tout hors de soi ; on se sent 
le coeur tout en feu ; on la 
voit a nos yeux ; on ne salt 
plus ce que Ton dit ni ce 
que Ton fait ; ce sont la les 
beaux fruits du jeu. 



When a man loses, he is 
quite mad ; he feels his 
heart heated, which is 
known by his looks ; he no 
longer knows what he says, 
nor what he does ; these are 
the consequences of gaming. 



Tn order to read and pronounce well the following njoords^ 
Learners should notice the subsequent observations : 

1st. The Diphthong oi is pronounced like o-2itn several words, 
and in others, it takes only the sound of e, with the grave 
accent; as may be seen by referring to the display of our 
Diphthongs, p. 7. 

EXAMPLES. 
Prononcez o-a. Prononcez e* 



Avoir, Trottoir, 

Chassoir, Hachoir, 
Devoir, Lavoir, 



Avals, Trottais, 

Chassais, Hachais, 
Devait, Lavait 



2c?/y. When a syllable terminates with an e not accented, the 
foregoing consonant is to be pronounced strongly, and 
the e is to have no sound. 



"Ecrivez 



EXAMPLES. 

Lisez. Ecrivez. 



Aime, 


Aim. 


Fausse, 


Fauss, 


Bande, 


Band. 


Gene, 


G^n. 


Cuve, 


Cuv. 


Huppe, 


Hup. 


Dire, 


Dir. 


Juste, 


Just. 


Faire, 


Fair. 


Perle, 


Perl. 



Lisez, 



* The final consonant of these and the like words is not pro- 
Bounced. 

2* 



18 

Sdly. These three letters ent must not be pronounced at the 
end of a word with which the personal Pronoun ils and 
elles {they) do or can agree. 



EXAMPLES. 
ils ou elks, lAsez, ils ou elles, Lisez. 



Ai-ment, 


aim. 


For-ment, 


form 


Bor-dent, 


bord. 


Gar-dent, 


gard. 


Cou-rent, 


cour. 


Hu-ment, 


kum 


Dres-sent, 


dress. 


Ju-rent, 


jur. 


Eus-s^nt, 


euss. 


Vi-vent, 


viv. 



4thly. The letter s between two vowels is generally pro* 
nounced^ like the letter z. 







EXAMPLES. 




Ecnvez. 


Li^ez. 


Ecrivez. 


Lisez. 


Aise, 
Baisa, 
Choisi, 
Desir, 


Ais^e. 
Baiza. 
Choizi. 
Dezir. 




Fraise, 
Grison, 
Nasal, 
Vase, 


Fraize. 
Grizon. 

Nazal. 
Vaze. 



bthly. When there are two dots auer a vowel, it must 
made a distinct syllable from that which precedes it. 



Ecrivez. 

Noel, 
Saiil, 



Lisez. 

No-el. 
Sa-ul. 



EXAMPLES. 

Ecrivez 

Hai', 
Laic, 



Lisez. 

Ha-i. 
La-ic. 



• There are some exceptions to this rule, which are Inserted tn the 
dissartation on this letter. 



19 

French Words of Two Syllables. 
With the English Signification to each Word. 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


A.-gneaii 


Lamb. 


bou-quet(^e) nosegay. 


a-mi 


friend. 


bou-ton 


button. 


a- vis 


advice. 


Ca-chet 


Seal. 


ac-ces 


access. 


ca-chot 


dungeon. 


ac-teur 


actor. 


cal-me 


calm. 


ac-tif 


active. 


cam-pe 


encamped. 


ad-mis 


admitted 


can-deur 


candour. 


ai-greur 


sourness. 


cap-tif 


captive. 


ai-ne 


eldest son. 


cau-se (ze) 


cause. 


ai-se {ze) 


easy. 


cau-se 


caused. 


am-bre 


amber. 


cer-cle 


circle. 


an-chois (o-a) 


1 anchovy. 


chai-se (ze) 


chair. 


aii'-neau 


ring. 


cham-bre 


chamber. 


ar-bre 


tree. 


chan-ge 


changed. 


ar-gent {jan) 


silver. 


chan-son 


song. 


ar-me 


armed. 


chan-te 


sung. 


as-saut 


assault. 


chan-teur 


singer. 


as-sez (se) 


enough. 


char-bon 


coal. 


as-sis 


seated. 


char-mant 


charming. 


au-cun 


any. 


chas-seur 


hunter. 


au-pres 


near. 


che-min 


way. 


au-tour 


about, round, 


, cher-cher 


to seek. 


Ba-bil 


Prattle. 


chi-che 


stingy. 


ba-din 


playful. 


cho-que (ke) 


shocked. 


bai-se (ze) 


kissed. 


ci-seau (zo) 


chissel. 


bal-con 


balcony- 


clar-te 


clearness. 


b'an-quet {Id) banquet. 


clo-che 


ben. 


bar-be 


beard. 


cle-ment 


merciful. 


bas-sin 


basin. 


cloi-tre (o-a) 


cloister. 


beur-re 


butter. 


clou-e 


nailed. 


bi-ble 


bible. 


co-cher 


coachman. 


bi-jou 


jewel. 


co-chon 


hog, pig. 


blan-cheur 


whiteness. 


coif-fe (p-a) 


hood. 


bles-se 


wounded. 


com-te 


county. 


bou-che 


mouth. 


cou-leur 


colour. 



^ 



FRENCH. 

cou-teau 

crain-dre 

cre-dit 

cro-chet [she) 

croi-re (o-e) 

crou-te 

cru-che 

cu-ve 

cu-veau 

cul-te 

Da-mas 

dan-ger (je) 

de-bout 

de-gu 

de-cret (ere) 

de-dans 

de-gout 

de-gre 

de-ja 

de-sir (zir) 

des-sous 

des-sus 

des-tin 

de-voir {o-d) 

dis-cours 

doc-teur 

don-ne 

don-nant 

dor-mant 

dor-meur 

dou-ble 

dou-ceur 

dou-teux 

dou-ze 

dra-gon 

du-rant 

E-bats (e) 

e-clair 

e-crit 



ENGLISH. 

knife. 

to fear. 

credit. 

hook. 

to believe. 

crust. 

pitcher. 

large tub. 

small tub. 

worship. 

Damask. 

danger. 

standing. 

deceived. 

decree. 

within. 

disgust. 

degree. 

already. 

desire. 

under. 

upon. 

destiny. 

to owe. 

discourse. 

doctor. 

given. 

giving. 

sleeping. 

sleeper. 

doubled. 

sweetness. 

doubtful. • 

twelve 

dragon. 

during. 

Sport. 

lightning. 

written. 



FRENCH. 

e-dit 

ef-fet 

ef-fort 

em-pli 

em-plir 

em-ploi {p-a) 

en-ceint 

en-cens 

en-cre 

en-fant 

en-fer 

en-fle 

en-fler 

en-tre 

en-tre 

er-rant 

er-reur 

es-poir (o-a) 

es-sai 

ex-act 

ex-ces 

ex-ploit {o-a) 

ex-trait 

Fa-ce 

fa9on 

fai-re 

far-deau 

fer-me 

fes-tin 

flai-rer 

flam-beau 

flan-que 

fle-chi 

fleu-ri 

fai-ble {fe) 

for-me 

for-me 

for-ment 

four-gon 



ENGLISH. 

edict. 

effect. 

endeavour. 

filled up. 

to fill up. 

employ. 

enclosed. 

incense. 

ink. 

child. 

heU. 

swelled. 

to swell. 

between. 

entered. 

wandering 

error. 

hope. 

essay. 

exact. 

excess. 

exploit. 

extract. 

Face. 

fashion. 

to make. 

burden. 

shut. 

feast. 

to smell. 

torch, link 

flanked. 

bent. 

blossomt* • 

weak. 

form. 

formed. 

form, they 

poker. 



/' 



ENGLISH. 

frock. 

strawberry. 

French. 

to tremble. 

brother. 

to curl. 

frugal. 

frustrated. 

smoker. 

ferret. 

gun. 

Pledge. 

cake. 

joy or lad. 

guarded. 

left. 

frozen. 

to groan. 

rack, pain. 

gender. 

ice. 

frozen. 

gleaner. 

glory. 

glutton. 

clammy. 

gulf. 

throat. 

grace. 

hail. 

bigness. 

Coat. 

romancer. 

ax. 

minced. 

to hate. 

hatred. 

* Such words as are preceded 
initial h aspirated : but, in other 



FRENCH. 

four-re au 

frai-se (ze) 

Fran-9ais (se) 

fre-mir 

fre-re 

fri-ser, (ze) 

fru-gal 

frus-tre 

fu-meur 

fu-ret (re) 

fu-sil (Ji) 

Ga-ge 

ga-teau 

gar-9on 

gar-de 

gau-che 

ge-le^ 

ge-mir 

ge-ne 

gen-re 

gla-ce 

gla-ce 

gla-neur 

glo-ire (o-a) 

glou-ton 

glu-ant 

gol-fe 

gor-ge 

gra-ce 

gre-le 

gros-seur 

Ha-bit 

' hableur* 

* ha-che 

' ha-che 

' ha-ir 

' hai-ne 



FRENCH. 

' har-di 

* har-pe 

' hau-teur 

he-las 

her-be 

her-bu 

heu-re 

heu-reux 

' hi-deux 

hi-ver 

h'6-te 

hom-me 

hon-neur 

'honte 

'hon-teux 

hor-reur 

hu-main 

hum-ble 

hym-ne 

Ja-loux 

ja-mais 

jam-be 

jar-din 

jau-ge 

jau-ne 

je-ter 

Jeu-di 

join-dre 

jou-ant 

jou-e 

jou-er 

jou-eur 

jou-jou 

joy-eux 

ju-ge 

Juil-let (u-i) 

ju-meau 

by the inverted 
words, the letter 



ENGLISHa 

bold, 
harp, 
height, 
alas. 



grassy. 

hour. 

happy. 

hideous. 

winter. 

landlord. 

man. 

honour. 

shame. 

bashful. 

horror. 

human. 

humble. 

hymn. 

Jealous. 

never. 

leg. 

garden. 

gauged. 

yellow. 

to throw. 

Thursday. 

to join. 

playing. 

played. 

to play. 

gamester. 

toy. 

joyful. 

judged. 

July. 

twin. 

comma, have the 
h is mute. 



\, 



FRENCH. 



FRENCH. 



ju-re 


sworn. 


men-ton 


ju-reur 
jus-que 


swearer. 


mi-roir (o-a) 


until. 


mon-de 


jus-te 


just. 


mor-ceau 


La-bour 


Plowing. 


mous-quet(^e 


la-ce 


laced. 


mous-se 


la- cat {ce) 


lace. 


mu-et (e) 


M-che 


loose. 


mu-tin 


la-.che 


loosed. 


Na-geur 


lai-de 


ugly. 


na-if 


lai-deur 


ugliness. 


na-tif 


lan-gue 


tongue. 


na-vet (ye) 


lar-cin 


theft. 


nat-te 


lar-geur 


breath. 


nat-ter 


lar-me 


tear. 


ne-ant 


le-gon 


lesson. 


ne-veu 


lec-teur. 


reader. 


nei-ge (ne) 


let-tre 


letter. 


ner-veux 


li-bre 


free. 


neu-tre 


lin-ge 


linen. 


ni-veau 


?o-ge 


lodged. 


no-ble 


lo\-siT{!o-azir) leisure. 


no-ces 


lon-gueur. 


length. 


No-el 


lus-tre 


lustre. 


nom-bre 


ly-re 


lyre. 


nom-bre 


Ma-gon {sm) 


Mason. 


nom-brer 


ma-lin 


mischievous. 


nom-bre as 


ma-ri 


husband. 


nom-me 


ma-tin 


morning. 


nom-mer 


mai-son (son) 


house. 


nou-veau 


mai-tre 


master. 


nul-le 


mal-heur 


misfortune 


0-deur 


man-teau 


cloak. 


o-mis 


mar-bre 


marble. 


ob-scur 


mau-vais 


ill, bad or evil 


1 (EU-vres 


me-chant 


wicked. 


oi-seau (o-a) 


me-le 


mingled. 


om-bre 


mem-bre 


limb. 


on-cle 


^en-tir 


to lie. 


on-gle 



ENGLISH. 

chin. 

looking gl iss 
world. 

bii o*- mouel 
) musket, 
moss. 

dumb, mute 
head-strong. 
Swimmer, 
ingenuous, 
native, 
turnip, 
mat. 
to mat. 
nothing, 
nephew, 
snow, 
nervous, 
neuter, 
level, 
noble, 
wedding. 
Christmas, 
number, 
numbered, 
to number, 
numerous, 
named, 
to name, 
new. 

void, not one 
Smell, 
omitted, 
obscure, aarn 
works, 
bird, 
shadow, 
uncle, 
nail. 



/ 



23 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


on-ze 


eleven. 


pu-deur 


bashfulness 


or-dre 


order. 


pu-ni 


punished 


or-gue 


organ. 


Qua-si (ka) 


Almost. 


on-bli 


forgetfulness. 


' qua-tre 


four. 


ou-tre 


overstrained. 


quar-te 


quart. 


ou-vert 


open. 


que-rir (ke) 


to fetch. 


Pa-iais 


Palace. 


que-teur 


beggar. 


pa-quet (ke) 


bundle. 


que-lle 


what. 


par-fum 


perfume. 


quel-que (ke) some. 


par-mi 


among. 


quoi-que (o-a 


:) although. 


pas-feur 


pastor. 


Ra-bais 


Abatement. 


pau-vre 


poor. 


rai-son {zon) 


reason. 


pe-cheur 


fisherman. 


ran-gon 


ransom. 


pe-cheur 


sinner. 


re-gu 


received. 


peig-ne 


comb. 


rei-ne 


queen. 


pein-tre 


painter. 


rem-pli 
ren-dre 


filled. 


pen-sif 


thoughtful. 


restore. 


per-dre 


to loose. 


ren-du 


restored. 


pes-te 


plague. 


res-tant 


remaining. 


pla-ce 


placed. 


res-te 


remained. 


plai-re 


to please. 


res-ter 


to remain. 


pleu-reur 


weeper. 


ri-che 


rich. 


po-che 


pocket. 


ri-gueur 


rigor. 


poi-vre [o-a) 


pepper. 


ris-que 


risk. 


pom-me 


apple. 


ris-que 


ventured. 


pom-pe 


pump. 


ris-quer 


to venture. 


por-te 


door. 


rom-pu 


broken. 


por-te ur 


porter. 


ron-deur 


roundness. 


por-trait 


picture. 


rou-ge 


red. 


pou-dre 


powder. 


rou-geur 


redness. 


pour-tant 


however. 


ru-ban 


ribbon. 


pre-che 


preached. 


ru-rceur 


rumour. 


pre-cher 


to preach. 


ru-ral 


rural 


pres-que 


almost. 


ru-se {ze) 


cunning. 


pres-sant 


pressing. 


Sa-ble 


Sand 


preu-ve 


proof. 


sa-cre 


sacred. 


pro-chain 


neighbour. 


sa-fran 


saffron. 


pro-gres {^gre 


progress. 


sai-si (zi) 


seized. 


pro-pre 


proper. 


sai-son {zon) 


season. 



'M 



san-glant 


bloody. 


trou-peau 


flock. 


se-cret (gre) 


secret. 


ty-ran 


tyrant. 


sel-le 


saddle. 


U-ni 


United. 


sen-ti 


felt, smell. 


u-se (ze) 


worn out. 


ser-pent(para) 


1 serpent 


Va-cant 


Vacant. 


so-bre 


sober. 


va-che 


cow. 


sol-dat 


soldier. 


va-se (ze) 


vessel, vase 


som-bre 


dark. 


vain-cre 


to vanquish, 


sou-dain 


sudden. 


vain-queur 


conqueror. 


suc-ces 


success. 


vais-seau 


ship, vessel. 


sus-pens 


suspense. 


ve-lours 


velvet. 


Ta-bac 


Tobacco. 


ve-nir 


to come 


ta-lon 


heel. 


ven-deur 


seller. 


tam-bour 


drum. 


ven-geur 


revenger. 


tan-te 


aunt. 


ver-tu 


virtue. 


tein-te 


colouring 


vo-leur 


thief. 


tre-sor (zor) 


treasure. 


voi-le (o-a) 


veiled. 


trem-blant 


trembling. 


voi-sin [zin] 


) neighbour. 


tri-but 


tribute. 


vol-can 


volcano. 


trom-peur 


cheat. 






Lessons of Words of 


One and Two 


Syllables 




FIRST LESSON. 





The Fable of the Dog and his Shadow. 



Un chien ay ant un bon 
morceau de chair entre les 
dents, passa sur le bord 
d'un fleuve, ou il vit son 
ombre, et celle du morceau 
de chair. 

II crut que c'etait un au- 
tre chien, qui portait une 
autre proie ; et, comme les 
chiens sontfort gourmands, 
il voulut la lui oter. 



A Dog having a good 
piece of flesh between his 
teeth, went on the banks 
of a river, where he espied 
his own shadow, and like- 
wise that of the piece of 
flesh. 

He thought it was another 
dog, that was carrying an- 
other piece of flesh ; and, 
as dogs are great gluttons, 
he wanted to snatch it from 
him. 



25 



Mais il fut bien trompe 
et enmemetemsbienpuni; 
car il lachalemorceauqu'il 
avait a la gueule, et ne put 
se saisir de celui qu'il vou- 
lait avoir. 

Ainsi, tout surpris de la 
perte qu'il venait de faire, 
il dit ; 6 sot que tu es ! si 
tu n'eusses pas ete si gour- 
mand, il te serait reste 
quelque chose entre les 
dents, au lieu que tu te 
trouves force de jeuner a 
present. 



But he was much deceiv- 
ed, and at the same time 
deservedly punished; for 
he let go the piece he had 
in his mouth, and could 
not lay hold of that which 
he wished to have 

Being quite astonished 
at the loss he had at that 
moment sustained ; he said, 
what a fool thou art ! hadst 
thou not been so gluttonous, 
thou wouldst still have had 
something to eat, whereas 
thou art reduced to fast at 
this time. 



MORAL. 



Ne quittons pas le cer- 
tain, crainte de perdre ce 
que nous avons, et de ne 



lien avoir. 



Let us not quit a cer 
tainty,' for fear we should 
lose what we have, and 
get nothing.- 



SECOND LESSON. 
The Fable of the Stag admiring his Horns. 



Un cerf alia boire a une 
source, dont I'eau etait fort 
claire ; apres qu'il eut bu, 
il se mit a s'y mirer, et prit 
un grand plaisir a voir la 
beaute de son bois. 

Mais la joie qu'il en avait 
se changea bientot en un 
chagrin qui lui rongeait le 
coBur, en voyant que ses 
jambes etaient silongues et 
si laides. 



A stag went to drink at 
a fountain, whose water 
was very clear; after he 
had drank, he viewed him- 
self in it, and admired, 
with pleasure, the beauty 
of his horns. 

But the joy he had of it 
was very soon changed into 
an uneasiness, which prey- 
ed on his heart, when he 
espied his long and ugly 
legs. 



26 



Pendant qu'i? pensait a 
ces choses, il survint un 
chasseur, avec une meute 
de chiens : 

Aussi-tot le cerf s'enfuit, 
et coure de toutes ses for- 
ces vers une grande foret, 
pour s'y cacher : mais com- 
ma elle etait fort pleine 
d'arbres, son bois, par mal- 
heur pour lui, se mela par- 
mi les branches, ce qui lui 
6ta le pouvoir d'aller plus 
loin, et le mit, dans cet 
etat, en prise aux chiens. 



Whilst he was thinking 
on these things, a hunts- 
man came up with his 
hounds : 

Immediately the stag 
went away, and ran to- 
wards a great forest, to 
hide himself in it; but i\ 
being very thick of trees, 
his horns, unluckily for him, 
were soon entangled in 
the branches and prevent- 
ed his running away, and 
the dogs then laid hold of 
him. 



MORAL. 

II ne faut ni louer ni 
blamer une chose, sans 
avoir connu a quoi elle 
pent etre propre. 



We must neither praise 
nor blame any thing, until 
we have known its proper 
use. 



Observations necessai- 
res a faire a un ecolier, 
pour prevenir qu^il ne pro- 
nonce mal quelques mots. 

1. Les diptbongues ia, 
ie, ie, to, forment deux syl- 
labes dans la poesie ; mais 
dans la prose, on ne les y 
prononce que cnmme une 
syllabe, pourvu que ni la 
lettre / ou r ne ies precede, 
et que I'e de la syllable ie 
ne soit point accentue, car 
dans ce cas la. il en faut 
toujours faire deux syl- 
labes. Lorsque le t se 
rencontre devant la com- 
binaison des voyelles ia 



Observations necessary 
to be taken notice of by the 
learner to prevent his mis- 
pronouncing some words. 

1st. The diphthongs ia, ie, 
ie, io, form two syllables in 
poetry; but in prose they 
are usually considered as one 
syllable only, provided they 
be not preceded by either 
the liquid letter / or r, and 
that the e of ie be not accent- 
ed ; for in those cases they 
always constitute two sylla- 
bles, and must be pronounc- 
ed accordingly. When the 
letter t occurs before the 
combination of the vowels ia, 



27 



ou ion, on e nfait ordinaire- 
ment deux syllabes, et Toil 
donne a ti, dans la plupart 
de nos mots, I'articulation 
de si. 



or ion, we also generally 
make two syllables of them, 
and pronounce the syllable 
ti in most French words * 
like si. 



Dia-de-me 

Su-pli-e 

Ac-ti-on 



EXAMPLES. 

ou-bli-a 

pi-ti-e 

fic-ti-on 



de-cn-a 

vio-len-ce 

par-ti-al. 



2o Dans la Dipthongue 
ui, la voyelle u forme quel- 
quefois un son separe de 
Vi, et dans certains mots Vi 
geul s'y fait entendre ; 



2dly. In the Diphthong 
ui, the 'vowel u forms 
sometimes a sound distinct 
from the t, and in some 
words the i only is to be 
pronounced ; 



EXAMPLES. 

ui Ai-gui ser, cui-si-ne, puis-san-ce, 
i De-gui-ser, guir-lan-de qui-con-que, 



sui-van-te, 
vui-de-rent 



3o La lettre / jointe a 
one de ces Dipthongues ai, 
ei, id, eui, oui, et uei, dans 
une meme syllabe, produit 
un son liquide ; et lorsqu'il 
se trouve une autre Z a la 
suite, dans le meme mot 
elle participe du meme son, 
quoiqu'elle appartienne a 
la syllabe suivante. 



.3dly. The letter I being 
joined to the diphthongs, 
ai, ei, id, eui, oui, or ud, in 
the same syllable, requires 
to be pronounced liquid; 
and when another I imme- 
diately follows it, in the 
same word, we make it par- 
take of th« same sound, al- 
though it belongs to the 
next syllable. 



* The words wherein this pronunciation is not to be observed, are 
those which have an s or an a: perfixed to ti ; as in Chris-ti-anis-me, 
hcua-tion, mix-tion, and likewise in these two, viz. ga-li-ma-tias, bom- 
bast ; ti-are, a sort of diadem ; for the t must bfe articulated hard. 



Gou-ver-nail, 
Vieil-lis-sant, 



EXAMPLES. 



mu-rail-le, 
feuil-la-ge, 



ap-pa-reil, 
rouil-lu-re, 



bou-teil-le, 
cueil-leu-se 



French Wards of Three Syllables. 



A-bat-tu 

a-bais-ser 

a-ban-don 

a-beil-le 

a-mi-ral 

ap-pa-reil 

ab-sen-ce 

ac-ti-on (si) 

ai-guil-le(t^-i) 

al-pha-bet(Z>e) 

am-bi-gu 

an-ce-tres 

ar-gu-ment 

ar-ran-ge 

au-da-ce 

aug-men-te 

aug-men-ter 

Ba-lan-ce 

ba-lan-ce 

ba-lay-e* 

ba-la-yer 

ba-lay-eur 

bail-le-ment 

bar-bouil-le 

bar-boLiil-leur 

be-quil-les 

blan-chis-seur 



ENGLISH. 

Lowered. 

to debase. 

to abandon. 

bee. 

admiraL 

preparation. 

absence. 

action. 

needle. 

alphabet. 

ambiguous. 

ancestors. 

argument. 

set in order. 

boldness. 

augmented. 

to augment. 

balance. 

balanced. 

swept. 

to sweep. 

sweeper 

yawning. 

daubed. 

dauber. 

crutches. 

bleacher. 



FRENCH. 

bou-teil-le 

bou-ti-que 

bril-lan-te 

Ca-ba-le 

ca-bi-net {ne) 

cam-pe-ment 

car-ros-se 

cau-ti-on (si) 

ce-le-brant 

ce-le-bre 

ce-le-bre 

cha-gri-nant 

cha-gri-ne 

chan-del-le 

char-la-tan 

ci-men-te 

com-bi-ne 

com-men-ce 

com-pe-tent 

com-pi-le 

com-pli-que 

com-po-se [ze) 

com-pro-mis 

con-dui-te(z<-2) 

con-fon-du 

con-ju-guer 

con-seil-lant 



ENGLISH. 

bottle. 

shop. 

shining. 

Cabal. 

closet. 

encampment. 

coach. 

bail. 

celebrating. 

famous. 

celebrated. 

vexatious. 

vexed. 

candle. 

quack. 

cemented. 

combined. 

begun. 

competent. 

compiled. 

complicated. 

composed. 

compromise. 

conduct. 

confounded 

to conjugate. 

advising. 



* The letter y, in this and the following words, and when it occurs 
between two vowels, assumes the sound of two i's ; therefore sav, 
ha-lai-ie, &c. 



29 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


* con-si-gne 


consigned. 


diph-thon-gue diphthong. 


con-si-gnant 


consigning. 


dis-pa-ru 


disappeared. 


con-train-te 


constraint. 


dis-pen-se 


dispensation. 


con-trai-re 


contrary. 


dis-po-se {ze 


) disposed. 


cor-rom-pu 


corrupted. 


dis-si-pe 


dissipated. 


cou-ron-ne 


crown. 


dis-so-Ju 


dissolute. 


cri-ail-leur 


bawler. 


dis-tin-gue 


distinguished. 


cri-mi-nel 


criminal. 


dou-lou-reux 


painful. 


cui-si-ne {ui) kitchen. 


E-blou-i 


Dazzled. 


cul-ti-ve 


tiUed. 


e-chan-ge 


exchanged. 


Da-me-ret 


Spark. 


e-chauf-fe 


overheated. 


dan-ge-reux 


dangerous. 


e-clip-se 


eclipsed. 


de-bau-che 


debauched. 


e-cou-te 


heard. 


de-bi-teur 


debtor. 


e-cou-ter 


to hear. 


de-chai-ne 


unchained. 


e-cri-re 


to write. 


de-char-ge 


unloaded. 


e-cri-te 


written. 


de-cla-re 


declared. 


e-cri-vain 


writer. 


de-cla-rant 


declaring. 


e-veil-le 


sprightly. 


de-cli-ne 


declined. 


em-bar-quer 


to embark. 


de-cli-ner 


to decline. 


em-bra-se(2e 


) inflamed. 


de-dai-gner 


to disdain. 


em-bra-sant 


inflaming. 


de-fai-re 


to undo. 


em-bras-se 


embraced. 


de-fen-seur 


defender. 


em-bras-sant 


embracing. 


de-ga-ge 


disengaged. 


em-brouil-lyr to embroil. 


de-gar-ni 


unfurnished. 


em-ploy-ant 


employing. 


de-gui-se {ghi) disguised. 


en-sei-gne 


ensign. 


de-mo-li 


demolished. 


en-chai-ne 


chained. 


de-pe-che 


dispatch. 


en-dor-mi 


sleepy. 


de-pen-se 


expense. 


en-ga-geant 


engaging. 


de-pouil-ler 


to strip. 


en-join-dre 


to enjoin. 


de-pri-mer 


to depress. 


en-sei-gnei 


to teach. 


de-ran-ge 


disordered. 


en-sui-te {m) afterwards. 


de-ro-be 


stolen. 


en-vi-ron 


about. 


de-sar-me 


disarmed. 


es-pe-rer 


to hope. 


des-se-che 


dried up. 


es-say-er 


to try. 


des-si-ne 


drawn. 


ex-ac-te 


exact. 


dif-fe-re 


deferred. 


ex-ci-ter 


to excite. 


dif-fe-rent 


different. 


ex-cu-se (ze) 


excuse. 


• III th">s Md the like words, gn alwayc n^oui 
■»nrp iiouid 


between two Toweis, «»- i 


aro pronouiK-eil I'ke- 



FRENCH. iEiVGLISH. FRENCH. ENGLISH. 

gre-nouil-le frog, 
guir-lan-de garland, 
gut-tu-ral gutural. 
Ha-bi-tant Inhabitant, 
ha-bi-tant inhabiting. 
ha-bil-]e dressed. 

ha-is-sent(^75) hate, they. 
' har-di-ment boldly. 
' har-na-che hanessed. 
'har-na-cher to harness, 
he-ri-te inherited, 

he-ri-ter to inherit. 

heu-reu-se(2re )happy . 
his-toi-re (oa) history. 



ex-em-ple 

ex-pli-quer 

ex-tor-que 

ex-trai-re 

Fa-bri-que 

fa-bri-que 

fa-gon-ner 

fe-ne-tre 

iic-ti-or (si] 

fi-gu-re 

fi-gu-rer 

flo-ris-sant 

fo-men-te 

fo-men-ter 

for-tu-ne 

for-tu-ne 

fou-droy-e 

four-chet-te 

frai-che-ment 

fran-che-ment 

frau-du-leux 

fre-quen-te 

fre-quen-ter 

fri-cas-se 

fruc-tu-eux 

Ga-ba-re 

ga-ran-ti 

ga-ran-tir 

gail-lar-de 

gan-te-let (le) 

ge-mis-sant 

ge-ne-reux 

glo-ri-eux 

glu-ti-neux 

gou-ver-nail 

gou-ver-ne 

gou-ver-ner 

gran-de-ment 



example. 

to explain. 

extorted. 

to extract. 

Fabric. 

manufactured. 

to fashion. * 

window. 

fiction. 

figured. 

to figure. 

flourishing. 

fomented. 

to foment. 

fortune. 

fortunate. 

thunderstruck. 

fork. 

freshly. 

frankly. 

fraudulent. 

frequented. 

to frequent. 

fried. 

profitable. 

Lighter. 

warranted. 

to warrant. 

sprightly 

gantlet. 

groaning. 

gcD drous. 

glorious. 

glutinous. 

rudder, helm. 

governed. 

to govern. 

greatly. 



hi-ver-ner 

ho-no-re 

ho-no-rer 

ho-tes-se 

*,hon-teu-se 

hor-lo-ge 

hor-lo-ger 

' hur-le-ment howling. 

Ig-no-rant Ignorant. 

i-voi-re (oa) 

im-mo-ler 



to wmter. 

honoured. 

to honour. 

landlady. 

bashful. 

clock. 

clockmaker. 



ivory. 

to sacrifice, 
im-par-fait imperfect, 
im-plo-re implored, 
im-po-li unpolite. 

im-por-tun troublesome 
im-pri-me printed, 
im-pu-ter to impute, 
in-flu-e influenced, 

in-cli-ner to incline, 
in-con-nu unknown. 
in-cul-que(A:e)inculcated. 
m-cul-te uncultivated 

in-di-gent indigent, 
in-di-gne unworthy. 



• See the note on the aspiration of /t, which is annexed to page 21 



31 



FRENCH 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


iii-dis-cret [ere) indiscreet. 


me-moi-re {oa) memory. 


in-dul-gent 


indulgent. 


men-son-ge 


lie. 


in-fec-ter 


to infect. 


mer-veil-leux marvellous 


in-fli-ger 


to inflict. 


meur-tri-er 


murderer. 


in-ge-nu 


ingenuous. 


mon-ta-gne 


mountain. 


in-jus-te 


unj ust. 


mu-rail-le 


wall. 


in-no-cent 


innocent. 


mys-te-re 


mystery. 


i-non-de 


overflowed. 


Na-tu-rel 


Natural. 


iii-sen-se 


senseless. 


nar-ra-tif 


narrative. 


ms-pi-rer 


to inspire. 


nar-ra-teur 


relater. 


:ns-tal-le 


installed. 


ne-bu-leux 


cloudy. 


ins-truc-tif 


instructive. 


ne-gli-ge 


neglected. 


ins-trui-re (ui) 


to instruct. 


ne-gh-gent 


negligent. 


in-sul-te 


insult. 


nom-me-meni 


namely. 


in-sul-te 


insulted. 


Ob-li-gea 


Obliged. 


in-tri-guant 


intriguing. 


o-bli-geant 


obliging. 


Ja-lou-se 


Jealous. 


o-reil-le 


ear. 


jeu-nes-se 


youth. 


o-reil-ler 


pillow. 


jo-li-ment 


prettily. 


o-seil-le (zeil) 


sorrel. 


joy-eu-se [ze) joyful. 


ob-sti-ne 


obstinate. 


ju-ge-ment 


judgment. 


oc-ci-dent 


the west. 


ju-ge-rent (ils) 


judged, they. 


oc-cu-pe 


busy. 


jus-te-ment 


justly. 


ceil-la-de 


ogle, leer. 


La-bou-reur 


Ploughman. 


of-fen-se 


offence. 


la-ce-rer 


to tear. 


of-fen-se 


offended. 


ia-che-ment 


cowardly. 


of-fen-ser 


to offend. 


M-che-te 


cowardice. 


«f-fen-sif 


offensive. 


lan-ga-ge 


language. 


om-bra-ge 


shaded. 


lar-ge-ment 


largely. 


om-bra-ger 


to shade. 


len-te-ment 


slowly. 


or-don-ner 


to order. 


li-brai-re 


bookseller. 


or-gueil-leux 


proud. 


lo-ge-ment 


lodging. 


or-phe-lin 


orphan. 


loy-au-te 


loyalty. 


ou-bli-er 


to forget. 


Ma-ga-sin 


Magazine. 


ou-ra-gan 


hurricane. 


ma-gis-trat 


magistrate. 


ou-tra-ge 


outrage. 


ma-jes-te 


majesty. 


ou-tra-geux 


Outrageous 


main-te-nu 


maintained. 


ou-vri-er 


workman. 


man-chet-te 


ruffle. 


Pa-pil-lon 


Butterfly. 


me-de-cin 


physician. 


pa-res-seux 


lazy, idle 



M 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH 


par-ta-ge 


share, portion, ra-bo-te 


planed. 


pas-sa-ble 


passable. 


ra-bo-teux 


rough. 


pau-vre-te 


poverty. 


ra-che-te 


redeemed. 


pen-du-le 


pendulum. 


re-che-ter 


to redeem. 


per-met-tre 


to permit. 


ra-frai-chi 


cooled. 


per-sua-der 


to persuade. 


ra-frai-chir 


to cool. 


pi-geon-neau 


. young pigeon, ra-gou-tant 


relishing. 


pil-la-ge 


plunder. 


rac-cour-cir 


to shorten. 


pis-to-let (le) pistol. 


rai-son-ne 


reasoned. 


plai-san-ter 


to jest. 


rai-son-ner 


to reason. 


plau -si-ble 


plausible. 


ran-gon-ne 


ransomed. 


pli-a-ble 


pliable. 


ran-gon-ner 


to ransom. 


poin-til-leux 


punctilious. 


ray-on-nant 


radiant. 


pour-sui-te 


pursuit. 


re-ce-veur 


receiver. 


pour-sui-vre 


to pursue. 


re-cueil-li 


gathered. 


pre-cc-der 


to precede 


re-cueil-lir 


to gather. 


pre-cep-teur 


preceptor. 


re-don-dantr redundant. 


pre-fe-rer 


to prefer. 


re-fle-chir 


to reflect. 


pre-pa-re 


prepared. 


re-gar-der 


to look upon. 


pre-ten-du 


pretended. 


re-gle-ment 


'regulation. 


pre-tex-te 


pretence. 


re-veil-le 


awaked. 


pro-cu-reur 


attorney. 


rem-bour-se 


re-imbursed. 


pro-lon-ge 


prolonged. 


ren-c©n-tre 


meeting. 


pro-non-cer 


to pronounce. 


. ren-con-tre 


met,metwith. 


pro-te-ge 


protected. 


ren-con-trer 


to meet with. 


pro-te-geant 


protecting. 


res-sen-ti 


resented. 


pro-vo-que 


provoked. 


res-sen-tir 


to resent. 


Qua-ran-te 


Forty. 


ri-che-ment 


richly. 


qua-tor-ze 


fourteen. 


ri-ches-se 


riches. 


quan-ti-te 


quantity. 


roy-au-me 


kingdom. 


que-rel-le 


quarrel. 


Sa-cre-ment Sacrament. 


que-rel-le 


quarrelled. 


sa-ge-ment 


wisely. 


que-rel-leur 


quarreller. 


scan-da-leux 


; scandalous. 


que-rel-leux 


quarrelsome. 


scru-pu-le 


scruple. 


quel-con-que 


whatever. 


scru-pu-leux 


scrupulous. 


qui-con-que 


whosoever 


se-an-ce 


session. 


quin-zai-ne 


fifteen. 


se-con-de 


seconded. 


quit-tan-ce 


receipt. 


se-con-der 


to second. 


Ra-bat-tu 


Abated. 


se-cou-er 


to shake. 



m 



FRENCH. 


ENGhlSh. 


FRENCH. 


ENGLISH 


se-cou-rir 


tfl j^cx^pur. 


tra-dui-re(wi^ 


) to translate* 


se-cou-ru 


succoured. 


tra-fi-que 


to traffic. 


sel-let-te 


ibw stool. 


tra-gi-que 


tragic^. 


sem-bla-ble 


like. 


tra-hi-son 


treason. 


sem-bkn-ce 


likeness. 


tra-vail-ler 


to work. 


sen-si-ble 


sensible. 


tra-ver-se 


crossed. 


sen-ten-ce 


sentence. 


tra-ves-ti 


disguised. 


sen-ti-ment 


sentiment. 


trai-te-ment 


treatment 


ser-via-ble 


serviceable. 


trans-for-me 


transformed. 


sim-ple-ment 


: simply. 


trans-por-te 


transported.'- f 


somp-tu-eux 


sumptuous. 


treil-lis-se 


latticed. ^ 


souf-fran-ce 


suffering. 


tres-sail-lant 


starting up. 


fiou-hai-te 


wished. 


tris-te-ment 


sadly. 


sou-hai-ter 


to wish. 


U-sa-ge (za) Usage* 


sou-la-ge 


eased. 


u-si-te 


used. 


sou-lig-ne 


underlined. 


u-sur»pe 


usurped. 


soup-gon-ne 


suspected. 


u-sur-pant 


usurping. 


sup-pli-ant 


intreating. 


Va-can-ce 


Vacancy, 


su-re-ment 


surely. 


va-car-me 


uproar. 


subs-tan-tif 


substantive. 


vail-lam-ment valiantly. 


suc-ce-de 


succeeded. 


veu-va-ge 


widowhood. 


sur-pre-nant 


surprising. 


vieil-lis-sant 


growing old. 


sur-pren-dre 


to surprise. 


vil-la-ge 


village. 


Ta-bli-er 


apron. 


vo-lon-te 


wiU. 


ta-bou-ret 


stool. 


voy-a-geur 


traveller. 


tem-pe-re 


temperate. 


Y-voi-re 


Ivory. 


ten-dres-se 


tenderness. 


y-vres-se 


drunkenness. 


ton-ner-re 


thunder. 


y-vro-gne 


drunkard. 


tour-bil-lon 


whirlwind. 


Ze-la-teur 


Zealot 



FIRST LESSON. 
T%4 Fabk of the Crow emd the Pox. 



Ud Corbeau s'etant per- 
ch e sur un arbre, pour 
manger un morceau de 
fromage, qifil tenait en 
son bee ; un Renard qui 
I'apergut, fut lente de le 
iui enlever. Ainsi, pour 
arauser le Corbeau, il com- 
men9a a le louer de son 
plumage. Le Renard voy- 
ant que le Corbeau prenait 
gout a ses louanges, Iui dit ; 
si votre voix est aussi belle 
que votre corps est beau, 
vous devez etre le plus joli 
de toug les oiseaux. 

Le Corbeau fut si con- 
tent de ce compliment flat- 
teur, qu'il ouvrit le bee 
pour montrer qu'il avait la 
voix beUe, et laissa tomber 
le fromage ; le fin Renard 
s'en saisit, et le mangea 
aux yeux du Corbeau, qui 
demeura tout honteux de 
sa sottise. 



A crow, having perched 
herself on a tree, in order 
to eat a piece of cheese 
which she held in her bill ; 
a fox that perceived her, 
was tempted to take it away 
from her. Therefore, with 
an intention of alluring the 
crow, he began to praise 
her for the extraordinary 
beauty of her feathers. The 
fox seeing that the crow 
took some pleasure in his 
praises, said to her. if your 
voice is as fine as your body 
is beautiful, you must be the 
most lovely of all birds. 

The crow was so well 
pleased with this flattering 
compliment, that she open- 
ed her bill in order to show 
what a fine voice she had, 
and let fall the piece of 
cheese ; the cunning fox 
immediately seized it, and 
eat it in the crow's sight, 
who was quite ashamed of 
her folly. 



MORAL. 



Les flatteurs sont tres 
dangereux ; il faut toujours 
etre en garde centre eux. 



Flatterers are very dan- 
gerous ; we should always 
be upon our guard against 
them. 



m 



SECOND LESSON. 

The Fable of the Frog and the Ox. 



Une Grenouille ayant 
un jour apergu un Bceuf 
qui paissait dans une prai 
rie, se flatta de pouvoir 
devenir aussi grosse que 
cet animal. EUe fit de 
grands efforts pour enfler 
sa peau ridee, et demanda 
alors a ses compagnes, si 
sa taille commen9ait a ap- 
procher de celle du Boeuf. 

Elleslui dirent, que non. 
EUe fit done de nouveaux 
efforts pour s'enfler toujours 
de plus en plus : et deman- 
da encore une fois aux 
Grenouilles, si elle egalait a 
peupreslagrosseurduBoeuf. 

Elles lui firent la meme 
leponse que la premiere 
(bis. 

La Grenouille ne chan- 
gea pas pour cela de des- 
sein, elle persista ; mais le 
dernier effort qu'elle fit 
pour s'enfler fut si violent, 
qu'elle en creva sur le 
champ. 



A Frog spying one day 
an Ox m a meadow, fan- 
cied that she could make 
herself as big as that ani- 
mal. She made great ef- 
forts to swell the wrinkles 
of her skin, and asked her 
companions, whether her 
size began to come near 
that of the Ox. 

They told her that it was 
not. She therefore made 
new efforts to swell herself 
still more and more ; and 
asked a second time of the 
Frogs, whether she did 
almost equal the bigness of 
the Ox. 

They made her the 
same answer as they had 
before. 

The Frog did not, how- 
ever, change her design ; 
but the last effort which 
she made to swell herself 
was so violent, that she 
burst immediately. 



MORAL. 

Les petits se ruinent Little folks ruin them- 

Bouvent, quand ils veul- selves, when they attempt 

ent aller de pair avec les to be upon an equality 

Grands et les imiter. with the Great. 



French Wptds of Fo^r SyUablts. 



A. ban-don-na {il) 

a-ban-don-ner 

a-bon-dan-ce 

ab-so-lu-ment 

ac-ces-si-ble 

ac-ces-soi-re (50-«) 

ac-ci-den-tel 

ac-co-mo-de 

ac-co-mo-der 

ac-cora-pa-gne 

ac-com-pa-gner 

ac-cou-tu-me 

ac-cou-tu-mer 

ac-cu-sa-teur {za) 

ac-ti-vi-te 

ad-mi-nis-tre 

ad-mi-ra-teur 

ad-ver-sai-re 

af-fec-tl-on (si) 

al-lon-ge-ment 

am-bas-sa-de 

am-bas-sa-deur 

am-bi-gu-ment 

am-bi-gui-te ''gti-i^ 

ar-che-ve-Ciie 

ar-che-ve-que 

ar-chi-tec-te {shi) 

ai-ro-gam-ment 

ar-ti-cu-le 

ar-ti-cu-ler 

as-sai-son-ne {zon) 

as-sai-son-ner 

as-sai-non-neur 

as-si-dui-te ((lu-i) 

as-su-jet-tir 

as-tro-lo-gue 

f)s-tro-rio-me 



ENGLISH. 

Abandoned {he) 

to abandon. 

abundance. 

absolutely. 

accessible. 

accessary. 

accidental. 

fitted or drest. 

to fit or dress. 

accompanied. 

to accompany. 

accustomed. 

to accustom. 

accuser. 

activity, briskness. 

administered. 

admirer. 

adversary. 

affection. 

lengthened. 

embassy. 

ambassador. 

ambiguously. 

ambiguity. 

archbishopric. 

archbishop. 

architect. 

arrogantly. 

articulated. 

to articulate. 

seasoned. 

to season. 

seasoner. • 

assiduity. 

to subdue. 

astrologer. 

astronomer. 



37 



FRENCH. Vfvi.K.ji^ 

au-di-toi-re (to-a) ■'■ ■ 
au-pa-ra-vant 
au-then-ti-quer ,|i 

Ba-di-na-ge 
ba-ga-tel-le 
ban-nis-se-ment 
bar-ba-re-raent 
bar-ba-ri-e 
bar-ba-ris-me 
bar-ri-ca-der 
be-ni-gne-ment 
be-ni-gni-te 
bi-en-veil-lance 
blan-chis-sa-ge 
blas-ph e-ma-teur 
bre-douil-le-ment 
bre-douil-leu-se (zei 
bru-ta-le-ment 
bm-ta-li-te 
Ca-bri-o-le 
ca-bri-o-leur 
ca-jo-leu-se (ze) 
ca-ni-cu-le 
cam-pa-gnar-de 
cha-touil-le-ment 
cin-quan-tai-ne (kan) 
com-po-si-teur {zi) 
con-fu-se-ment (ze) 
con-ju-gai-son (zon) 
con-jonc-ti-on (si) 
con-nois-san-ce (nes) 
con-sen-te-ment 
con-si-de-rant 
con-ta-mi-ne 
con-ten-ti-on (si) 
con-tri-ti-on (si) 
con-tro-ver-se 
con-tro-ver-se 
ton-ver-si-ble 
4 



ENGLISH. 

'"^.^ditory. 
before. 

to make authentic. 
Play or Sport, 
trifle. 

banishment, 
barbarously, 
barbarity, 
barbarism, 
to barricade 
kindly, 
binignity. 
good \^11. 
"washing, 
blasphemer, 
stammering, 
stammerer, 
brutishly. 
brutality. 
Caper, 
caperer. 
wheedler. 
dog-days, 
country-woman, 
ticking, 
fifty. 

compositor, 
confusedly, 
conjugation, 
conjunction, 
knowledge, 
consent, 
considering, 
contaminated, 
contention, 
contrition, 
controversy, 
controverted, 
conversable. 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


con-vic-ti-on (si) 


convictioiL 


cor-res-pon-dant 


correspondent. 


cre-pus-cu-le 


twiligj^. 


cro-as-se-ment 


croaking. 


Da-ri-o-le 


Custard 


da-van-ta-ge 


nK)re. 


dan-ge-reu-se {ze) 


dangerous. 


de-bou-ton-ne 


unbuttoned. 


de-ca-pi-te 


beheaded. 


de-cli-nai-son {zon) 


declension. 


de-con-seil-ler 


to dissuade. 


di-mi-nu-e 


diminished. 


di-mi-nu-er • 


to diminish. 


di-rec-te-ment 


directly. 


di-rec-ti-on (si) 


direction. 


dis-tmc-ti-on (si) 


distinction. 


dis-tri-bu-e 


distributed. 


dis-tri-bu-er 


to distribute. 


dis-tri-bu-teur 


distributer. 


do-re-na-vant 


hereafter, henceforfli. 


dou-teu-se-ment {ze) 


doubtful. 


E-cri-toi-re (to-a) 


Inkhorn. 


c-cri-tu-re 


writing. 


em-pe-che-ment 


hindrance. 


em-poi-son-neur 


poisoner. 


em-pri-son-ne 


imprisoned. 


en-tre-pri-se (ze) 


undertaking. 


en-ve-lop-pe 


cover. 


en-ve-lop-per 


to cover or wrap up 


en-vi-ron-ner 


to environ, surround. 


es-ca-la-der 


to scale, to climb. 


es-cla-va-ge 


slavery. 


es-pe-ran-ce 


hope or trust. 


ex-em-plai-re 


exemplary. 


ex-tre-me-ment 


extremely. 


Fa-bu-leu-se 


Fabulous. 


fa-ci-]e-ment 


easily. 


fa-ci-li-te 


ease or easiness 


fer-ti-le-ment 


fruitfully. 



*^ 



FRENCH. 

fer-ti li-se (ze) 

fer-ti-li-ser 

fer-ti-li-tp 

fi-de-le-ment 

fi-na-le-ment 

fou-droy-an-te 

Ga-lo-pa-de 

gen-til-hom-me 

gou-ver-nan-te 

Ha-bi-ta-ble 

ha-bi-tu-de 

ha-bi-tu-el 

' ha-is-sa-ble* 

' hi-deu-se-ment 

I-do-la-tre 

i-gno-ran-te 

il-li-ci-te 

il-lu-mi-nent (ils) 

im-mo-bi-le 

in-con-stan-ce 

in-con-stan-te 

in-de-cem-ment 

in-de-cen-ce 

in-de-cen-te 

in-dus-tri-eux 

in-ge-nu-merit 

in-ha-bi-te 

in-ju-ri-eux 

in-nom-bra-ble 

in-sti-tu-er 

in-ter-pre-te 

Ja-lou-si-e {zi) 

La-bo-ri-eux 

las-si-tu-de ' 

lu-na-ti-que 

Ma-gni-fi-que 

ma-li-gne-ment 



ENGLISH. 

made fruitful. 

to make fruitful. 

fruitfulness. 

faithfully. 

finally. 

thundering. 

Galloping. 

gentleman. 

governess. 

Habitable. 

habit, use, custom 

habitual. 

hateful. 

hideously, frightfully. 

Idolater. 

ignorant. 

unlawful. 

illuminate (they) 

immoveable. 

inconstancy. 

inconstant. 

indecently. 

indecency. 

indecent. 

industrious. 

ingenuously. 

uninhabited. 

injurious. 

innumerable 

to institute. 

interpreted. 

Jealousy. 

Laborious. 

weanness 

lunatic. 

Magnificent, 

maliciously. 



* See the note on the aspiration of h which is annexed to p 21. 



40 



FRENCH. 

ma-tu-ri-te 

me-chan-ce-te (sfum) 

me-ca-ni-que [ha) 

me-tho-di-que 

mer-veil-leu-se (ze) 

mul-ti-pli-e 

Na-ti-on-al 

ne-ces-si-teux 

ne-gli-gem-ment 

nou-vel-le-ment 

Ob-la-ti-on ^^si) 

oc-ci-den-tal 

ou-ver-te-ment 

Pa-ci-fi-^ue 

pa-co-til-le 

pa-reil-le-ment 

pai-si-ble-ment {zi) 

pre-ci-se-meji* 

pre-di-ca-teur 

pre-me-di-te 

pre-me-di-tant 

pro-fon-de-ment 

Qua-ran-tai-ne (ka) 

ques-ti-on-ner 

ques-ti-on-neur 

quo-ti-di-en 

Ka-bais-se-ment 

ra-pi-de-ment 

re-com-man-der 

re-cou-vre-ment 

res-sou-ve-nir 

res-tau-ra-teur 

ri-gi-de-ment 

rus-ti-ci-te 

Sa-cra-men-tal 

scan-da-li-se (ze) 

scan-da-li-ser 

se-che-res-se 

se-con-de-ment {gon) 



ENGLISH. 

maturity. 

wickedness. 

mechanic, 

methodical 

marvellous. 

multiplied. 

National. 

needy, poor 

negligently. 

newly. 

Offering. 

westerly or western 

openly or publicly. 

Pacific. 

parcel of goods. 

likewise. 

quietly. 

precisely. 

preacher. 

premeditated. 

premeditating. 

cjeeply, 

Quarantine. 

to question. 

examiner. 

daily or quotician. 

Abatement. 

rapidly. 

to reccJnmend. 

recovery. 

remembrance. 

restorer. 

rigidly, strictly 

clownishness. 

Sacramental. 

scandalized. 

to scandalize. 

dryness. 

secondly. 



4J 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


«e-cre-te-ment 


secretly.' 


se-di-ti-eux (si) 


seditious. 


sem-bla-ble-ment 


likewise. 


so-lem-nel-le (la-nel) 


solemn. 


soi-gneu-se-ment {ze) 


carefuly. 


sol-li-ci-ter 


to solicit. 


sol-li-ci-teur 


solicitor. 


som-mai-re-ment 


summarily. 


sou-hai-ta-ble 


desirable. 


su-bi-te-ment 


suddenly. 


suf-fi-sam-ment {zd) 
suf-fi-san-ce (zan) 


sufficiently. 


sufficiency. 


sur-na-tu-rel 


supernatural. 


sur-vi-van-ce 


survivorship. 


sus-crip-ti-on {si) 


superscription. 


Ta-ber-na-cle 


Tabernacle. 


te-moi-gna-ge (mo-a) 


testimony. 


tra-duc-ti-on (d) 


translation. 


tran-quil-le-ment 


quietly or peaceably. 


U-na-ni-me 


Unanimous. 


u-ni-que-ment 


only or entirely. 


u-ni-ver-sel 


universal. 


u-ni-vo-que 


univocal. 


us-ten-si-le 


utensil, fttrniture. 


Ve-ne-ra-ble 


Venerable. 


ve-ri-ta-ble 


true. 


ver-ba-le-ment 


verbally. 


vi-gou-reu-se {ze) 


vigorous. 


vi-si-ble-ment {zi) 


visibly. 


vo-lu-mi-neux 


voluminous. 


Vul-gai-re-ment 

4* 


vulgarly. 



42 



FIRST LESSON. 

The Fable of the Fox and the Wolf. 



Un Renard etant tombe 
par hasard dans un puits, 
etait sur le point de se 
noyer, lorsqu'il aper9ut un 
Loup sur le bord du puits. 
II le pria instamment de 
I'assister dans le peril 
extreme ou il se trouvait, 
et de lui jeter une corde 
pour qu'il en pnlt sortir. 

Le Loup, plaignant sa 
disgrace, lui fit plusieurs 
questions, pour savoir com- 
ment il etait tombe dans 
le puits. Ce n'est pas 
maintenant le terns de me 
questionner, ni de discourir, 
repliqua le Renard, quand 
vous m'aurez tire d'ici, je 
vous expliquerai a loisir, 
toutes les circonstances de 
cette aventure. 



A Fox having fallen by 
chance into a well, was 
on the point of being 
drowned, when he per- 
ceived a Wolf on the brink 
of the well. He earnestly 
begged of him to assist him 
in this extreme danger, 
and to throw him a rope 
that he might get out of it. 

The Wolf pitying his 
misfortune asked him se- 
veral questions, in order to 
be informed how he had 
happened to fall into the 
well. It is not now a 
time to question me, nor 
to hold a discourse, replied 
the fox ; when you have 
drawn me out of the place 
I will explain to you, at 
leisure, all the circumstan- 
ces of this accident. 



II ne convient pas de 
haranguer nos amis ni de 
ieur faire des reprimandes 
quand ils sont en danger. 
II faut d'abord les secourir 
et ensuite Ieur parler, si 
Ton a quelque chose a Ieur 
dire. 



It is not fit to make long 
speeches to our friends, 
nor to reprimand them, 
when they are in any dan- 
ger. We must immediate- 
ly assist them, and then 
speak if we have any thing 
to say to them. 



43 



SECOND LESSON. 

The Fable of the Wild Boar and the Ass. 



Un Ane ayant par ac- 
cident, rencontre un San- 
glier, eut I'impudence de 
se moquer de lui et de I'in- 
sulter. 

Le Sanglier fremissant 
de courroux, et grin9ant 
les dents, eut d'abord gran- 
de en vie de le mettie en 
pieces ; mais, fesant aussi- 
tot reflexion qu'un tel ani- 
mal n'etait pas digne de sa 
col ere et de sa vengeance, 
il fie retint. 

Miserable que tu es, lui 
dit-il, je te punirais severe- 
ment, si tu en valais la 
peine ; mais je ne veux pas 
me souiller du sang d'une 
aussi vile bete. Tu n'es 
qu'un Ane, et ta lachete 
te met a convert de mes 
coups, et te sauve la vie. 
Apres lui avoir fait c-es re- 
proches, il le laissa aller. 



An Ass having accidentally 
met with a Wild Boar, had 
the impudence to deride 
and insult him. 

The Wild Boar foaming 
with rage, and grinding his 
teeth, had, at first, a great 
mind to tear him in pieces; 
but immediately reflecting 
that such an animal was 
not worthy his anger and 
revenge, he refrained from 
doing him any harm. 

Poor wretch, said he to 
him, I could severely pun- 
ish thee for thy audacious- 
ness if thou wert worthy 
my notice ; but I will not 
stain myself with the blood 
of so mean a beast. Thou 
art but an Ass, and thy 
cowardice secures thee 
against my revenge. After 
having upbraided him so, 
he let him go away. 



Le mepris est 1' unique 
vengeance que Ton doive 
prendre d'un sot, ou d'un 
malheureux. D'ailleurs, la 
victoire que Ton remporte 
sur un vil et faible ennemi, 
est trop aisee, et ne fait 
pas honneur. 



Contempt is the only re- 
venge which we ought to 
take of a silly fellow, or of 
an impudent wretch. Be- 
sides, the victory which is 
gained over a weak and j)al- 
try enemy, is too easy, and 
d"^s not procure honour. 



44 



THIRD LESSON. 

TJie Fable of the Lion and the Rat. 



l/ii Lion, fatigue de la 
chaleur, et abatta de lassi- 
tude, dormait a 1' ombre 
d'un arbre. Un Rat, qui 
le vit, lui monta sur le corps 
pour se divertir. 

Le Lion se reveilla, 
etendit la patte, et s'en sai- 
sit ; le Rat se voyant pris, 
et sans esperance d'echap- 
per, demanda pardon au 
Lion de son incivilite et 
de sa hardiesse et le sup- 
plia tres humblement, de 
lui sauver la vie. Le Lion, 
touche de cette soumission, 
le ]aissa aller. 

Ce bienfait ne fuf pas 
perdu ; car, le Lion etant 
tombe, quelques jours a- 
pres, dans un filet, dont il 
ne pouvait se debarrasser, 
il se mit a rugir de toute 
sa force : le Rat reconnois- 
sant aux rugissemens du 
Lion qu'il etait pris, accou- 
rut promptement pour le 
secourir ; il se mit aussitot 
a ronger les mailles du filet, 
et lui procura par la le 
moyen de s' evader. 



A Lion faint with heat 
and -weary with fatigue 
slept under a shady tree. 
A Rat, that saw him, got 
upon his back, to have a 
little sport. 

The Lion, waking, stretch- 
ed his paw, and took him ; 
the Rat finding himself ta- 
ken, and without hopes of 
escaping, asked the Lion's 
pardon for his boldness, and 
very humbly craved for his 
life. The Lion, moved by 
his submission, let him go. 



This favour was not lost; 
for th-e Lion, being caught 
a few days after, in a net, 
from which he could not 
free himself, he began to 
roar mightily : the Rat 
knowing by the Lion's 
roaring, that he was taken, 
ran quickly to his assist- 
ance ; he began instantly 
to gnaw the meshes of his 
net, and thereby enabled 
him to make his escape. 



MORAL. 



En excusant une petite 
faute, an se procure sou- 
vent r affection de celui a 
qui Ton a pardonne. 



By forgiving a small 
fault we often secure the 
affection of the transgres- 



45 



.^j{, ,, Frmch Words of Five Syllables. 



FRENCH 

Ab-so-lu-ti-on (si) 
ac-com-plis-se-ment 
ac-qui-si-ti-on (zi-si) 
ad-mi-ra-ti-on (si) 
al-le-go-ri-que 
al-te-ra-ti-on {si) 
ar-ti-li-ci-eux 
as-tro-no-mi-que 
Be-ne-dic-ti-on (si) 
bi-bli-o-the-que 
Ca-lom-ni-a-teur 
ce-re-mo-ni-eux 
cha-ri-ta-ble-ment 
chris-ti-a-nis-rae {cris) 
cir-con-spec-ti-on (si) 
clan-des-ti-ne-ment. 
con-gre-ga-ti-on (si) 
con-si-de-re-ment 
con-so-la-tion (si) 
cu-ri-eu-se-ment (ze) 
De-ci-si-ve-ment 
de-cla-ra-ti-on (si) 
dis-a-gre-a-ble 
dis-in-te-res-se 
dic-ti-on-nai-re (si) 
do-mi-na-ti-on (ze) 
dou-lou-reu-se-ment (ze) 
E-bul-li-ti-on (si) 
em-poi-son-ne-ment (po-e) 
em-pri-son-ne-ment 
en-dur-cis-se-ment 
en-nuy-eu-se-ment (ze) 
ex-com-mu-ni-8 
ex-pe-ri-men-te 
ex-pli-ca-ti-on (si) 
Fa-vo-ra-ble-ment 
fre-quen-ta-ti-on (si) 



ENGLISH. 

Absolution. 

accomplishment. 

acquisition. 

admiration or wondering. 

allegorical. 

alteration or change. 

cunning, subtle or crafty. 

astronomical. 

Blessed. 

library. 

Slanderer. 

ceremonious. 

charitably. 

Christianity. 

circumspection. ' 

clandestinely. 

congregation. 

considerately. 

comfort or consolation. 

curiously. 

Decisively 

declaration. 

disagreeable. 

disinterested. 

dictionary. 

domination. 

grievously. 

Ebullition. 

poisoning. 

imprisonment. 

hardness. 

tediously. 

excommunicated. 

experienced or tried. 

exphcation, or explanation. 

Favourably. 

frequenting. 



m 



FRENCH. 

fruc-tu-eu-se-ment (ze) 
G^-ne-ra-le-ment 
ge-ne-reu-se-ment (ze) 
* Ha-bi-ta-ti-on {si) 
he-ro-i'-que-ment 
he-si'ta-ti-on (si) 
ho-no-ra-ble-ment 
I-ma-gi-na-ble 
im-mpr-ta-li-te 
im-pra-ti-ca-ble 
in-cer-ti-tu-de 
in-sta-bi-li-te 
jn-to-le-ra-ble 
in-tro-duc-ti-on (si) 
ir-re-li-gi-eux 
La-bo-ri-eu-se (ze) 
la-men-ta-ble-mejit(77za72g') 
la-men-ta-ti-on (si) 
le-gi-ti-mi-te 
Ma-jes-tu-eu-se (ze) 
mal-heu-reu-se-ment (se) 
mal-ver-sa-ti-on (si) 
me-cha-ni-que-ment (ka) 
Na-ti-o-na-le (si) 
na-tu-ra-li-se (ze) 
ne-ces-sai-re-ment 
0-bli-ga-toi-re (to-e) 
o-be-is-san-ce 
oc-cu-pa-ti-on (si) 
ou-tra-geu-se-ment (ze) 
Pa-ci-fi-ca-teur 
per-ni-ci-eu-se (ze) 
po-si-ti-ve-ment (zi) 
pre-e-mi-nen-ce 
pro-di-gi-eu-se (ze) 
Ra-dou-cis-se-ment 
re-cre-a-ti-on (si) 
ri-gou-reu-se-ment (ze) 
Sa-tis-fac-ti-on (si) 



ENGLISH. 

profitably, successfully, 
generally, 
generously. 
Abode, 
heroically, 
hesitation, 
honorably, 
imaginable, 
immortality, 
impracticable. 
. uncertainty, 
instability, 
intolerable, 
introduction, 
irreligious. 
Laborious. 

lamentably or dolefully. 
lamentation, 
legitimacy. 
Majestic. 

unhappily or unfortunately 
misdemeanor, 
mechanically. 
National, 
naturalized, 
necessarily. 
Obligatory, 
obedience, 
occupation, 
outrageously. 
Pacifier, 
pernicious, 
positively, 
pre-eminence 
prodigious 
Softening, 
recreation, 
rigorously. 
Satisfaction 



47 



scan-da-Ieil-se-ment (ze) 
sin-gu-la-ri-te 
Tem-po-rel-le-ment 
ty-ran-ni-que-ment [si) 
U-na-ni-me-ment 
u-na-ni-mi-te 
u-ni-ver-si-te 
Vi-si-ta-ti-on (si) 
vic-to-ri-eu-se (ze) 



scandalously. 

singularity 

Temporally. 

tyrannically. 

Unanimously. 

unanimity. 

university. 

Visitation. 

victorious. 



French Words of Six SyllMea* 



FRENCH. 

A-bo-mi-na-ti-on {si) 
a-ca-de-mi-que-ment (si) 
am-bi-ti-eu-se-ment (si) 
Ca-pi-tu-la-ti-on {si) 
ca-pri-ci-eu-se'ment {ze) 
con-di-ti-on-nel-le {si) 
com-mu-ni-ca-ti-on {si) 
con-si-de-ra-ble-ment 
coR-si-de-ra-ti-on {si) 
De-no-mi-na-ti-on {si) 
ec-cle-si-as-ti-que {zi) 
es-sen-ti-el-le-ment {si) 
fa-ce-ti-eu-se-ment {si) 
fa-mi-li-a-ri-se {ze) 
im-pe-ne-tra-ble-raent 
im-pos-si-bi-li-te 
in-con-si-de-re-ment 
in-fal-li-bi-li-te 
in-ge-ni-eu-se-ment {ze) 
in-ter-ro-ga-ti-on {si) 
in-to-le-ra-ble-ment 
ir-re-o-u-la-ri-te 



ENGLISH. , 

Abomination. 

academically. 

ambitiously. 

Capitulation. 

capriciously. 

conditional. 

communication. 

considerably. 

consideration. 

Denomination. 

acclesiastic, ecclesiastical. 

essentially. 

facetiously, comically. 

familiarized. 

impenetrably. • 

impossibility. 

inconsiderately. 

infallibility. 

ingeniously. 

interrogation. 

intolerably. 

irregularity. 



4^' 



ir-re-pre-hen-si-ble 
ju-di-ci-eu-se-ment (ze) 
mi-se-ri-cor-di-eux 
re-li-gi-eu-se-ment (ze) 
su-per-sti-ti-eu-se (si) 
tu-mul-tu-eu-se-ment (ze) 



ENGLISH. 

irreprehensible. 

judiciously. 

merciful. 

religiously, 

superstitious. 

tumultuously 



French Words of Seven Syllables. 



Am-phi-bo-lo-gi-que-ment 
an-ti-chris-ti-a-nis-me (kris) 
ar-ti-fi-ci-eu-se-ment (ze) 
con-di-ti-on-nel-k-ment (si) 
con-sub-stan-ti-el-le-ment (si) 
de-sa-van-ta-geu-se'ment (ze) 
im-pe-ne-tra-bi-Ii-te 
ir-re-li-gi-eu-se-ment 
par-ti-cu-li-e-re-ment (ze) 
ple-ni-po-ten-ti-ai-re (si) 



Amphibolically. 

antichristianisra. 

artfully, craftily. 

conditionally. 

consubstantially, 

disadvantageously 

impenetrability. 

irreligiously. 

particularly. 

pleaipotentiary. 



French Words of Eight Syllables^ 



FRENCH- 



In-com-pre-hen-si-bi-li-te 
ir-re-con-ci-li-a-ble-ment 
ir-re-pre-hen-si-bi-li-te 
mi-se-ri-cor-di-eu-se-ment 



incomprehensibility 
irreconcilably, 
irreprehensibility. 
merciifal. 



49 
French Words w/ierdn the final Consonant is articalated 



FRENCH, 

Air 

aimer 

amour 

arsenal 

autel 

auteur 

Bonheur 

brut 

Calcul 

cap 

coeur 

cuiller 

Dot 

Echec 

enfer 

espoir 

Est 

exact 

Fat 

fier 

fil 

froc 

Hier 

hiver 

Mat 

mer 

iniel 



ENGLISH. 

Air. 

bitter. 

love. 

arsenal. 

altar. 

author. 

good luck. 

rough. 

Calculation. 

cape. 

heart. 

spoon. 

Dowry. 

Check. 

heU. 

hope. 

East. 

exact. 

coxcomb. 

proud. 

thread. 

monk's dress. 

yesterday. 

winter. 

Mute. 

sea. 

honey. 



FRENCH. 

Nageur 

naif 

Odeur 

Quest 

Pair 

pact 

pare 

poil 

pleur 

Retif 

rougeur 

Sel 

serviteur 

seul 

sieur 

soc 

soif 

soir 

Sud 

Tambour 

troc 

iVeuf 

vif 

vis 

Z elate ur 

zenith {nit) 

zest 



ENGLISH. 

Swimmer. 

ingenuous 

SmeU. 

West. 

Couple. 

covenant. 

park. 

hair. 

tear. 

restive. • 

redness. 

salt. 

servant. 

alone. 

sir. 

plough shara 

thirst. 

evening. 

South. 

Drum. 

exchange. 

Widower. 

alive. 

screw. 

Zealot. 

zenith. 

zest. 



French Words wherein the final Consonant is nai 
articulated. 



FRENCH. 

Aout 
apprentif 
Babil 
banc 



ENGLISH. 

August, 
apprentice. 
Prattling, 
bench. 



FRENCH. 

baril 
berger 
bis, pam 
blanc 



ENGLISH. 



barrel, 
shepherd, 
brown bread 
white 



50 



FRENCH. 


EWGWSH. 


FJ^ENCa. 


EltGLISH 


bled 


com, wheat 


;. Instinct 


Instinct 


boulaiiger 


baker. 


Jonc 


Rush. 


bourg 


borough. 


Laid 


Ugly. 


broc {bro) 


jug- 


Ut 


bed. 


Choux 


cabbages. 


loup 


wolf. 


clef 


kev. 


mat 


mast. 


clerc 


clerk. 


monsieur 


sir. 


contrat 


covenant. 


Nid 


nest. 


cordonnier 


shoemaker. 


nombril 


navel. 


coi-ps 


bod3^ 


Officier 


Officer. 


crucifix 


crucifix. 


outil 


tool. 


Danger 


danger. 


ouvert 


open. 


drap 


cloth. 


Paix 


Peace. 


Et 


and. 


pied 


foot. 


exempt 


exempt. 


prix 


price. 


Flanc 


flank. 


Rang 


Rank. 


flux 


flux. 


respects 


respects. 


froid 


cold. 


Sort 


Fate. 


fusil 


gun. 


soul 


drunk. 


Genet 


broom. 


sourd 


deaf. 


gentil 
goflt 


pretty, 
taste. 


Tort 


Wrong. 



French Words which are the same in sound, hut different w 
orthography and signification.* 



FRENCH. 

A. v. 

a. p. 

abaissa v. 
abesse, s. f. 
ail, s. m 



ENGLISH. 

Has. 
at or to. 
let down, 
abbess, 
garlick. 



FRENCH. 

aille (qu'il) 
aie, (je) 
ais, s. m. 
aile, s. f. 
elle, pr. 



ENGLISH. 

go (let him.) 
have (I may) 
board, shelf 
wing, 
she 



* The grammatical distinction of each word is denoted by the letter 
annexed to it , viz- ar. stands for Article ; s. for Substantive ; a. for 
Adjective ; m. for Masculine ; f. for Feminine ; c. for common to 
both Genders; pK for Plural ; pr. for Pronoun; v. for Verb ; and p. 
for Participle. 



51 



FRENCH. 

apres, p. 
appret, s. m. 
ancre, s. f. 
ncre, s. f. 
arrhes, a. f. 
arts, s. m. 
"iutel, s. m. 
hotel, s. m. 
avant, p. 
avent, s. m. 
Bas, s. m. 
bat, s. m. 
baux, s. m. 
beaux, a. pi. 
bouillie, s. f. 
bouillis, a. pi. 
Cap, s. m. 
cape, s. f. 
Face, s. f. 
fasse, qu'il. 
faim, s. f. 
fin, s. f. 
faon, s. m. 
fend, il. 
car, c. 
quart, s. m. 
carte, s. f. 
quarte, s. f. 
ces, pr. 
ses, pr. 
chaine, s. f. 
chene, s. m. 
chair, s. f. 
cher, a, 
choc, s. m. 
choque, il. 
eigne, s. m 
signe, s. m 
cceur, s m. 



FRENCH, 



ENGLISH. 



after. 

preparation.' 

anchor. 

ink. 

pledge. 

arts. 

altar. 

large house. 

before. 

advent. 

Stocking. 

pack-saddle. 

leases. 

fine. 

pap. 

boiled. 

Cape. 

cloak. 

the face. 

let him do. 

hunger. 

end. 

a fawn. 

he splits. 

for. 

quarter. 

a card. 

a quart. 

these or those 

his or her. 

a chain. 

an oak. 

flesh. 

dear. 

shock. 

offends, he. 



sign. 
heart. 



choeur, s. m. choir, 

cor, s. m. hunter's horn. 

corps, s. m. body. 

Dans, p. In or Into* 

dents, s. m. teeth, 
des, ar. ofthe, from the. 

dais, s. m. canopy, 

dois, v.(o-a] owe. 
doigt, s . m .(o-fl)finger. 

Echo, s. m. Echo, 

ecot, s. m. share, 

non, p. no. 

Nom, s. m. name. 

On, pr. They, 

ont, ils. they have. 

Pain, s. m. Bread, 

pin, s. ra. a pine tree. 
foie, s. m.(»-a)liver. 
fois, s. f.(o-a) time. 

Grace, s. f. Grace, 

grasse, a. fat. 

Haut, a. • high, 

ho ! p. oh ! 

Joue, s. f. Cheek, 

joug, s. m. yoke, 

laid, a. ugly, 

kit, s. m. milk. 

Mais, c. But. 

mes, pr. my. 

maux, s. m. evils, 

mots, s. m. words, 
pan, s. m. 
paon, s. m. 
Rais, s. f. 
rets, s. m. 
rang, s. m. 
rends. 



skirt, of a coat 
peacock. 
Line, 
a net. 
rank, 
renderest Cthou'^ 



Seau, s. m. Pail, 
saut, s. m. a jump 



FRENCH. 

suie, s. f. 
suis, (je) 
Tant, p. 
terns, s. m. 
toue, s. f. 



ENGLISH. 

«oat. 
lam. 
so much, 
time, 
towinff. 



52 

FRENCIf. 

toux, S. f. 
Vain, a. m. 
vin, s. m. 
vice, s. m. 
vis, s. £ 



ENGLISH. 

a cough. 

Vain. 

wine. 

vice. 

screw. 



French words which are the 

but different in 
Aire, m. nest (of hawks.) 
aire, f. floor (of a barn.) 
aune, m. elder, a tree, 
aune, f. ell, a measure. 
Barbe, f. a beard, 

barbe, m. a Barbary horse. 
Capre, m. 
capre, f. 
coche, m. 
coche, f. 
cornette, m. 
cornette, f. 



same in sound and orthography, 

their signification. 

foudre, m. sort of a vessel. 

foudre, f. thunder bolt 

fourffon, m. a .poker 



a privateer. 

a caper. 

a caravan. 

a saw. 

an -officer. 

a head dress. 



exempt, s. m. free from, 
exempt, s. m. an officer, 
cravate, m. a soldier, 

cravate, f. a neck-cloth. 
Dragon, m. a dragoon, a 

soldier. 
dragon,m. dragon,a serpent 
Easeigne, m. an officer, 
enseigne, f. sign of a house, 
ete, m. summer, season, 
ete, V. been (auxil. v.) 
exemple, m. an example, 
exemple, f. a copy. 



pair, m. 
pair, m. 
Feu, m. 
fed, m 
fin, m. 
fin, f. 



a peer. 

even. 

fire. 

aeceased, late. 

chief point. 

end of things. 



fourgon, m. 
Garde, m. 
garde, f. 

greffe, m. 
greffe, f. 
Jeune, m. 
jeune, a. c. 
Livre, m. 
livre, f. 
Mariche, m. 
manche, f. 
memoire, m 
memoire, f. 
mode, m. 
mode, f. 
moule, m. 
moule, f. 
mousse, m. 
mousse, f. 
Neuf, a. c. 
neuf, a. m. 
Office, m. 
office, m. 
ombre, m. 
ombre, f. 
ou, p, 
oa, p. 



a wagon. 

guard, a soldier. 

nurse to a sick 

person. 

registry 

a graft, 

fasting. 

young. 

a book. 

a pound 

handle 

sleeve. 

a bill 

the memory. 

a mood. 

way or fashion. 

a mould, 

a shell fish. 

a swabber 

moss 

nine 

new 

duty, business 

an office 

ombrCj a game 

shade 

where 



^. 



m 



FRENCH. ENGLISH. 

page, m. a page, at court, 
page, f. a page, of a book, 
palme, m. hand's breadth, 
palme, f. a branch of a tree, 
parallele, m. comparison, 
parallele, f. a parallel line, 
pendule, m. a pendulum, 
pendule, f. a clock, 

periode, m. a^pace of time, 
periode, f. period of a 

discourse, 
pique, m. a spade, at cards, 
pique, f. pike, a lance, 
pivoine, m. gnat-snapper, 
pivoine, f. piony, a plant, 
plane, m. plane, a tree, 
plane, f. plane, a tool, 
poele, m. a stove, 

poele, f. frying pan. 

poste, m. place, employ, 
poste, f. post office, 

pourpre, m. spotted fever, 
pourpre, f. royal dignity. 



FRENCH, ENGLISH. 

Quartier, m. part of a town. 
quartier, m. quarters at war. 
Reclame, m. sound to call a 

hawk, 
reclame, f catch word of a 

page, 
regale, m. repast or feast, 
regale, f a king's perquisite. 
Satire, m. heathen god. 
satire, f. satire or sarcasm, 
somme, m. a nap, sleep, 
sorame, f. a sum of money, 
souris, m. a smile, 

souris, f. a mouse. 

Temple, m. a place of 

worship, 
temple, f temple of the head, 
tour, m. turn or trick, 

tour, f tower or spire. 

vase,m. vessel or urn 

vase, £ sHme, 

voile, m. veil or cloth, 

voile, f. sail of a ship. 



RECAPITULATION. 

In order to give a summary of the different classes q\ 
words which have been perused, I will conclude i 
Spelling-Book with a collection of those which may ap- 
pear the most difficult to be pronounced in it, viz : 

* Abeille, aigreur, aiguille, aiguillon, anguille, anchois, 
anneau, ambre, arrhes, avoir, avais, ambiguite, anti- 
quaille. 

* The signification of the following French woids, may be found in 
the preceding, according to their respective syllables and ir:taJ 
letters. 

5* 



Balaye, beau, baillement, bequilles, borgnesse, bouleille, 

bouche, bouilloire-, braiidiller, bredouilleur. 
Chataigiie, choix, chercher, choeur, coeur, corps, cueil- 

leuse. 
Dieu, deux, depouiUe, douceur, douze, douillettement. 
Eventail, effi'oyable, ennuyeusement, enseigne, ecaille 
Feuillage, fructueux, foible, fran^ais, faon, fiel, flageolet. 
Gai, gaillardement, geai. gorge, gout, gueux, grenouillere. 
Hache, haissent, henissement, heureurx, huitre, humble. 
Ignorance, infaillible, inguerissable, inquisition, ivoii-e. 
Juive, joyau, joyeuse, jeu, jonquille, Juillet, Juin. 
Laique, loyaute, longueur, luisant, lorgnette, louange. 
Magnifique, manchon, meuble, muet, raeiveilleux, mu- 

raiJJe. 
National, nom, nettoye, noueux, noyau, nuisible, neu- 

tralite. 
Oiseau, ceuvres, ceillade, oreille, oseille, orthographe, 

orgue. 
Partial, partition, peigne, peux, pointilleuse, philoso- 

phique. 
Quai, quoi, quasi, quelque^ quenouille, quiconque, ques- 

tionne. 
Rechaud, recueillir, racaille, rigueur, rayonnant, rouil- 

lure. 
Seditieux, spherique, soigneux, secret, sommeiller, son- 

geais. 
Taon, taureau, tourbillon, travailler, tortille, temoignage. 
Un, usurpant, uniquement, equivoque, ustensile, un- 

anime. 
Vainqueur, vaillamment, vieux, vieillissant, voyageur, 

vuider. 



Lessons of Words containing different Sorts of Syllables 
FIRST LESSON. 

The Fable of the Bii'd-catchei- and the Stork. 

Un oiseleur prit un jour, A Eird-catcher took one 
dans ses tilets, plusieurs day, in his nets, several 
Grues, et plusieurs Oies ; Cranes, and several Geese: 



m 



parmi lesquelles ils s'y ren- 
contra une Cicogne. 

Ce pauvre Oiseau le pria 
avec instance de lui sauver 
la vie et de lui rendie la 
liberie ; d'autant qu'elle 
n'etaii ni Oie, ni Grue, et 
qu'elle ne fesait de tort a 
personne. 

De plus, dit elle, j'ai 
grand soin de ma vieille 
mere, et la nourris avec 
toute r attention dont je suis 
capable. 

L'oiseleur impitoyable 
lui repondit arec aigreur, 
qu'est-ce que cela m'im- 
porte ? puisque te voila 
prise avec les autres qui 
m'ont fait du tort, tu mour- 
ras avec eux. 



amongst which there hap- 
pened to be a Stork. 

This unfortunate Bird 
entreated him earnestly to 
spare her life, and to set 
her at liberty ; as she was 
neither a Goose nor a 
Crane, and did no harm 
to any body. 

Besides, said she, I take 
great care of my old mo- 
ther, and feed her with all 
the attention I am capable 
of. 

The unmerciful bird- 
catcher answered her, with 
an angry tone, what is all 
that to me ? since thou art 
now taken with others that 
have done me harm, thou 
shalt also die with them. 



II ne faut jamais fre- 
quenter que des gens de 
bien ; car ceux qui s'asso- 
cient avec les mechans, 
periront avec eux, quoi- 
qu'ils soient innocens. 



We must never associate 
with any other but good 
people ; for those who keep 
company with the wicked 
will suffer with them, 
though they may be inno- 
cent. 



SECOND LESSON 

The Fable of the Horse and the Fly. 



Une Mouche placee sur 
le timon d'une voiture cri- 
ait d'un ton imperieux 
apres le Cheval qui la tirait: 
que tu vas lentertient ! ne 



A Fly sitting upon the 
pole of a carriage, called to 
the Horse that was drawing 
it ; how slowly you creep 
alonsr won't you mend 



d 



veux-tu pas marcher plus 
vits ? Prens garde que je te 
perce le cou de mon aiguil- 
kin, 

Le Cheval lui repondit 
froidement : tes paroles et 
tes menaces ne me tou- 
chent gueres ; je ne crains 
que celui qui conduit, avec 
un fouet long et souple, le 
joug que je porte ; c^est 

f)Ourquoi, cesse de me par- 
er avec cet air frivole et 
temeraire ; 

, . C^r J/s §9is mieux que 
toi,. quand ii faut m'arreter, 
et quand je dois Courir. 



yoiir pace, and go faster 
Take care or I shall twinge 
your neck with the weapon 
I have. 

The Horse, with an air 
of contempt, replied, your 
commands and threats are 
not worth my notice ; I only 
dread the man, who with 
his long and pUant whip 
drives the burden which I 
bear; therefore leave off 
speaking to me in that sau- 
cy and impertinent man- 
ner ; 

For I know better than 
you can tell me, when to 
halt, an-d when to mend 
my pace. 



MORAL. 



Cette Fable sert a ex- 
poser I'impudeiite hardiesse, 
et le ridicule deportement 
de ces gens, qui, sans avoir 
ni force ni pouvoir, ne lais- 
sent pourtant pas de faire 
de vaines menaces. 



This fable serves to ex- 
pose the impudent boldness 
and ridiculous behaviour of 
those people, who, having 
neither abilities nor power, 
dare,nevertheless,utter vain 
and disdainful threats. 



THIRD LESSON. 

The Fable of the Dog and the Wolf. 



(Jn Loup, extremement 
maigre et afFame, rencon- 
tra, par hasard, un Chien 
gras, dodu, et des mieux 
noiirri. 



A lean, hungry and half- 
starved Wolf, met, by ac- 
cident, a jolly, plump, and 
very well fed Mastiff. 



57 



S' etarfc arreles pour se 
saluer reaproquement I'un 
et r autre ; apprenezmoi, je 
vous prie, ditle Loup, d'ou 
vous vient cet embonpoint, 
et comment faites-vous done 
pour etre aussi gras que 
vous I'etes ? 

Pour moi, qui suis beau- 
coup plus fort que vous, et 
qui bravant tresoouvent les 
dangers, auxquels je suis 
expose, me donne bien des 
peines pour avoir de quoi 
subsister, je meurs cepen.- 
dant de faim 

Le Chien lui repondit 
aussitot, je n'en doute nulle- 
ment; mais vous jouirez des 
memes avantages que moi, 
si vous pouvez vous resou- 
dre a rendre les meraes ser- 
vices au Maitre que je sers. 

Et quels services, done ? 
lui-repliqua le Loup. 

C'est, repondit le Chien, 
de garder sa maison pen- 
dant la nuit, et d'en eloi- 
gner les Voleurs, et toutes 
sortes d' strangers. 

Ami, reprit le Loup, tout 
transports de joie, s'il ne 
tient qu'a cela pour etre 
heureux, je le ferai tres- 
volontiers : car je traine 
maintenant une vie mise- 
rable dans les bois, ou je 
suis presque toujours expose 
a I'air et souvent a la pluie, 
a la neige et a la greJe. 



Having stopped to pay 
each other the usual com- 
pUments ; prithee, says the 
Wolf, how comes it about 
that you look so comely, 
and how do you live, that 
\'-ou are so much fatter than 
I am ? 

Fox my part though I am 
stronger than you are, and 
very often venturing many 
dangers, undergo great dif- 
ficulties to obtain a liveli- 
hood, yet I am almost ready 
to perish with hunger , 

The Dog answered him 
bluntly, i make no doubt 
of it ; but you shall hve as 
well as I do, if you can but 
condescend to do the same 
service for my Master as I 
do. 

And what's that, then? 
said the Wolf to him. 

It is, replied the Dog, to 
watch about his house at 
night and keep it from 
Thieves, and all kinds of' 
strangers. ^ 

Friend, answers the Wolf, 
quite overjoyed, if that is 
all I must do to live happy, 
I'll do it with all my heart : 
for at present I have but a 
sorry time of it, in the 
woods exposed, as I gene- 
rally am, to the open air, 
and frequently to rain 
snow, and hail. 



58 



n me seralt Men plus 
doux, sans doute, de vivre 
a couvert dans une maison, 
oil je serais sur de trouver 
de quoi me rassasier terns 
ies jours. 

C'est vrai dit le Chien, 
ainsi viens done avec moi. 

lis partent done ensem- 
ble ; mais, en Tshemin fes- 
ant, le Loup s'apergut que 
le cou du Chien etait pele, 
et comme il etait fort curi- 
eux, il lui demanda d'oii 
cela pouvait provenir ? 

Oh ! ce n'est rien, re- 
|)OfKlit le Chien. 

Mais encore dites-moi, 
je vous prie. 

He ! bien, il faut que vous 
sachiez qu'etant quelque 
fois un peu trop vif on me 
lie, a cause de cela, attache 
pendant le jour, afin que 
je me repose, et que 'fen 
sois plus eveitle et plus 
actif, pendant la nuit : mais 
vers le soir on me detache, 
et pour lors je puis aller 
roder ou bon me semble. 

On a grand soin de m'ap- 
porter du pain ; mon maitre 
me donne des os de sa ta.- 
ble ; Ies domestiques me 
jettent souvent d'excellens 
morceaux ; ettous Ies restes 
de viande, dont on ne se 
soucie pas, me sont aussi re- 
serves. C'est ainsi que jevis, 
alls avoir beaucoup de pei- 
ne, ni de fati2:ue a essuyer 



It would be much more 
agreeable, no doubt, to have 
a good house over my head 
and be sure of a beily-fuU 
of victuals every day. 

True, says the Dog, there 
fore follow me. 

They then set off toge- 
ther ; but, as they were jog 
ging on, the Wolf spied a 
crease in the Dog's neck, 
and, havmg a strange curi- 
osity, he asked him what it 
meant ? 

Puh ! nothing at all, says 
the Dog. 

Nay, but, pray, says he, 
tell me. 

Why, to tell you the truth, 
you must know I am now 
and then a little fierce, for 
which reason I am tied up 
in the day time to make me 
sleep, that I may watch the 
better in the night time ; 
but, when twilight comes, 
out I am turned, and may 
freely range about where- 
ever I please. 

Then I have bread in 
plenty ; my master brings 
me bones from his table, 
the servants every now and 
then toss me a tit-bit ; and 
whatever scraps are left by 
the family, fall of course to 
my share. — This is my 
manner ol living without 
having any great trouble. 



6y 



Mais, dis-moi, reprit ie 
Loup, s'il te prenait quel- 
quefois envie d'aller faire 
un tour ou tu voudrais, en 
as-tu ia liberte ? 

Aon pas tout-a-fait, re- 
pondit le Chien. 

Oh ! votre serviteur, 
Monsieur le Chien; jouis- 
sez, a la bonne heure, des 
avantages dont vous fei-tes 
tant de cas. 

Quant a moi, je ne vou- 
drais pas^ accepter un Roy- 
aume a de pareilles condi- 
tions ; car la Liberte est ma 
Devise. 



But, tell me, replied the 
Wolf, if you should be 
inclined sometimes to take 
a little trip any where are 
you at liberty to do it ? 

I can't say that I am, 
said the Dog. 

Then farewell, friend, 
enjoy and welcome, all the 
good things you have been 
just now boasting of. 

For my part, I would 
not be a king upon the 
terms you mention ; for 
Liberty is the word for me. 



Cette Fable est bien pro- 
pre a nous apprendre qu'un 
homme, quoique pauvre, 
pent etre plus heureux s'il 
jouit de sa liberte, que ce- 
lui qui est opulent, et vit 
dans un etat de servitude. 



This Fable is fit to teach 
us that the poor man who 
enjoys his liberty, may be 
far happier than he who 
makes the greatest figure 
and lives in a state of de- 
pendence. 



llecueil des noms de 
Bapteme les plus ordinaires 
d'Hommes et de Femmes, 
et des Abreviationsdont on 
fait usage, en Frangais. 
J'ai juge necessaire de les 
mettre ici, par ordre alpha- 
betique, afin qu'on en 
puisse trouver plus facile- 
ment la signification, en 
Anglais, quand on en aura 
beso'n. 



A collection ol the most 
usual Christian names of 
men and women, and of 
the abbreviations which are 
made use of in French. I 
have thought proper to 
range them here in an al- 
phabetical order, that the 
signification of any of them 
in English, may the more 
easily be found, when there 
is occasion for it. 



J 



JSTames which are the same in French and m the English 
language are omitted. 



FRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


FjRENCH. 


ENGLISH. 


Achille, m. 


Achilles 


Dominique, n] 


L. Dominick 


Adelaide, fm. Adelaid 


Dorothe, f. 


DoFothy 


Adeline, f. 


Adehna 


Edouard, m. 


Edward 


Adolphe, m. 


Adolphus 


Edouin, m. 


Edwin 


Adrien, m. 


Adrian 


Elie, m. 


Elias 


Agathe, f. 


Agatha 


Elisee, m. 


Elisha 


Alain, m. 


Allen 


Emile, m. 


Emilius 


Alexandre, ra 


. Alexander 


Emilie, f. 


Amelia 


Alithe, f. e 


Alithea 


Emme, f. 


Emma 


Ambroise, m. 


Ambrose 


Eraste, m. 


Erastus 


Amelie, f. 


Amelia 


Etienne, m. 


Stephen 


Andre, m. 


Andrew- 


Ezechias, m. 


Hezekiah 


Angelique, f. 


Angelica 


Ezechiel, m. 


Ezekiel 


Anne, f. 


Anna, Ann 


Fabien, m. 


Fabian 


Annibal, m. 


Hannibal 


Panchon, f. 


Fanny 


Antoine, m. 


Anthony- 


Fran9ois, m. 


Francis 


Arabelle, f. 


Arabella 


Fran^oise, f. 


Frances 


Athanase, m. 


Athanasius 


Gaspard, m. 


Jasper 


Auguste, m. 


Augustus 


Gautier, m- 


Walter 


Auguste, f. 


Augusta 


Gedeon, m. 


Gideon 


Barbe, f. 


Barbara 


GeofFroi, m. 


Geoffrey 


Barnabe, m. 


Barnaby 


Georgette, f. 


Georgiana 


Barthelerai, 


Bartholomew Gerard, m. 


Gerard 


Benoit, m. 


Benedict. 


G^rvais, m. 


Jarvis 


Catherine, f. 


Catharine 


Giles, m. 


Giles 


Cathos, f. 


Kate 


Godefroi, m. 


Godfrey 


Cataln, f. 


Kitty 


Gotten, f. 


Peggy, Peg 


Cecile, f. 


Cecilia 


Grace, f. 


Grace 


Christine, f. 


Christina 


Gregoire, m. 


Gregory 


Christophe, m 


1. Christopher 


Griffon, m. 


Griffin 


Claire, f. 


Clara 


Guillaume, 


William 


Constance, f. 


Constantia 


Guillelmine, 


Wilhelmina 


Corneille, m. 


Cornelius 


Guillot, m. 


Baily 


Corneille, f. 


Corneha 


* Hector, m. 


Hector 


Debora, f. 


Deborah 


Henri, m. 


Henry 



• See the note on the aspiration of h vvliicli is annexed to p. 21. 



61 



FRENCH. 

Henriette, f. 
Hilaire 
' Homfroi 
' Hortence, f 
' Hughes 
Ignace 
Isabau oT \ 
Isabelle, f. j 
Jaques 
Jaqueline, f. 
Jannot, m. 
Javotte, f. 
Jean 

Jeanne, f. 
Jeoifroi, m. 
Jeremie 
Josephe, f. 
Josue, m. 
Jule, or 
Jules, m. 
Julie, f. 
Julienne, f, 
Laure, f. 
Laurent, m. 
Lazare, m. 
Lea, f. 
Leandre, m. 
Leonarde, f. 
Leonore, f. 
Louis, m. 
Louise, f. 
Luc, m. 
Lucie, f. 
Lucrece, f. 
6 



Heniietfa 
Hilary- 
Humphrey 
Hortensia 
Hugh 
Ignatus 

Isabella 

James 

Joan 

Johnny 

Jenny 

John 

Jane 

JeoiFrey 

Jeremiah 

Joseph a 

Joshua 

Julius 

Julia 

Juliana 

Laura, Lora 

Lawrence 

Lazarus 

Leah 

Leander 

Leonarda 

Leonora 

Lewis 

Louisa 

Luke 

Lucy 

Lucretia 



FRENCH. 

'Marc, m. 
Marguerite, 
Marthe, f. 
Mathilde, f. 
Mathieu, m. 
Maurice, m. 
Moise, m. 
Nannette, f. 
Octave, m. 
Octavie, f. 
Osee, m. 
Othon, m. 
Patrice, ra. 
Phinees, m. 
Pierre, m. 
Priscille, f, 
Randolphe, 
Raoul, m. 
Renand, ra. 
Rodolphe, m. 
Sabine, f. 
Salomon, m. 
Samson, m. 
Sara, f. 
Sebastien, m. 
Silvestre, m. 
Sophie, f. 
Sophonie, f. 
Susanne, f. 
Theodose, m. 
Thibaud, m. 
Timotee, m. 
Tobie, m. 
Valentin, m. 



ENGLISH 

Mark 
Margaret 
Martha 
Matilda,Mau(^ 
Matthew 
Morris 
Mos^s 
Nancy 
Octavius 
Octavia 
Hosea 
Otho 
Patrick 
Phineas 
Peter 
Pris cilia 
Randal 
Ralph 
Reynold 
Rolph 
Sabina 
Solomon 
Sampson 
Sarah 
Sabastian 
Silvester 
Sophia 
Zepheniah 
Susannah 
Theodosius 
Theobald 
Timothv 
Toby 
Valentiffi^a 



A 

SHORT INTRODUCTION 

TO 

FRENCH GRAMMAR 

BY WAY OF aUESTION AND ANSWER, 



GHAP. I. 



Of Grammer in general i Of Letters, Accents^ and othet 
Marks used in the French Language. 

Ques. What is Grammer ? 

Ans. It is an art which teaches the proper manner of 
speaking and writing a language. 
It has, therefore, for its object, the consideration of 
Letters, Syllables, Words, and Sentences. 

Q. How many letters are there in the French Language ? 

A. There are twenty-five ; namely, six Vowels and nine- 
teen Consonants. 

Q. Do they always retain the vocal and articulated sounds 
ascribed to them in the Alphabet ? 

A. No:, for these being insufficient to represent, of 
themselves, all the vocal sounds and articulations of 
the French language, there are, besides the various 
combinations, figured Accents and Marks, which 
are made use of to' indicate others. 

Q How many sorts of figured Accents are there in tbe 
French Language ? 

A . There are three sorts ; namely. 

The Acute, (') L'Aigu. 

The Grave, (^) Le Grave. 

The Circumflex, {f^S Le Circonflexe, 



^3 

Q. What is the Acute ? 

A.. The Acute, which is a short line drawn from the right 
hand toward the left, is placed on the vowel e only, 
to indicate a sharp sound, as in eU, being, &.c. 

Q. What is the use of the Grave ? 

A. The Grave, which, on the contrary, is a short line 
drawn from the left hand towards the right, is chiefly 
used on the vowel e, to denote a clear and open 
sound ; as in acces, access : apres, after, &c. It is 
also used at a, to ; /a, there ; ou, where, merely to 
distinguish them from a, has ; la, the ; ow, or» ^ 

Q What is the use of the Circumflex ? 

A. The Circumflex, which consists of the two former 
accents, is occasionally set on the vowels, a, e, t, o 
u, to point out that such letters are to be pronounced 
long; as in matin, a mastiff^'dog; tempete, a tempest; 
gite^ a lodging ; ebU, a side ; flute, a flute ; whereas 
they are short in jnatin, morning ; trompette, a trum- 
pet, &c. 

Q. What are the other marks used in tlie French lan- 
guage ? 

A.. There are three sorts of them ; namely, 

The Cedilla, (5) La Cedille. 

The Diseresis, (") La Dierese. 

The Apostrophe, (' ) L' Apostrophe. 

Q. What is the use of the Cedilla ? . 

A. The Cedilla, or Cerilla, as some call it, which is a 
short curve line, is put under the c only before a, 
u, to divest it of its strong articulation, and give it 
the sharp hissing sound of the s ; as in il menaga, 
he threatened ; une legon, a lesson ; Je regus, I re- 
ceived, &c. 

Q What is the use of the DiaBresis ? 

A. The Diuresis, which consists of two dots, is placed 
over the last of two vowels that meet together in a 
word, to mark they are to be pronounced in two 
syllables ; as in Israel, Luic, Saul, &c. read Isra-el, 
Lu-ic, Sa-ul. 

Q. What is the use of the Apostrophe ? 



A. The Apostrophe, which is lifee a'c'OMma set ai th^ 

"top of a consonaiit, serves to indicate tile omission 

of one of these vowels oaly, viz. a, e, i; ^9ml'dme 

for la-ame, the sonl;- 1' eiprit for k-esprit, the mind; 

, s'il for si-il, he ; it is likewise used before an h mute, 

*' ' ^ or not aspirated, as in Vhcmme for le-homme, the man, 

^^ " &c. and after qu' instead oi que, when this wori 

occurs before any of the vowels. 
'*Q. What is the meaning of the letter A being mpirated 
in some Words and irmte in others ? 
A. When the letter h is said to be aspirated, it implies 
that it must be uttered in as strong a manner as in 
''''*'■ the English words, hctrd, hast; for instance, it is as- 
'^' ■ pirated in hardi, bold ; honte, shame ; but when it is 
' ■ ■ mute, or not aspirated, it is no more uttered in French 
than that of the English words hovr, heir, honour ; 
therefore we read abih,{6t habile, clever; emme, 
for homme, man, &,c.* 
Q. What is the use of the letter y in French ? 
A. The letter y often serves to denote the etymology of 
words derived from the Greek, wherein it stands for 
a single z; as in analyse, analysis, syllabe, syllable, 
&c. but between two vowels in French words, it 
indicates, in some of them, the sound of two i's ; as 
in essay er^ip try ; envoy er, to send, &c. and in others, 
that of a liquid i ; as in ayeul, grandfather, &.c. 
Q. What is the best way to acquire the different sounds 
fe and articula,tions of French syllables } 

There are general rules prefixed to most French 
Grammars for that purpose ; but, from all the at- 
tempts that have hitherto been made, it does not ap- 
pear, that written directions will sufficiently answer 
the views of an inquisitive learner, without the as- 
sistance of a good teacher. 

CHAP. II. 

Of Words and their Grammatical Distinctions, 

Q. What is meant by a word ? 

A. A word is one or more syllables put together to sig. 
nify something 



65 

Q. Are there many different sorts of words in a Lan 
guage ? 

A. There are several distinct kinds of words in languages 
but grammarians do not agree about their respective 
denominations, nor even their numbers.* 

Q. What is the usual denomination of those which serve 
to compose the English and French languages ? 

A The various words, made use of in speaking or 
writing, may be denominated and classed as fol- 
low : viz. 

ENGLISH. FRENCH. 

1. The Articles, Les Articles. 

2. The Substantives, Les Substantifs. 

3. The Adjectives, Les Adjectifs. 

4. The Pronouns, Les Pronoms. 

5. The Verbs, Les Verbes. 

6. The Particles. Les Particles. 

Q. Are not these denominations suitable to the various 

classes of words, in aU languages ? 
A. No : for the Latin Language has no Articles ; therefore 

it is more ambiguous than modern Languages are. 

CHAP. in. 

Of Articles in General. 

Q. What is an Article ? 

A. The Article is a small word perfixed to Substantives; 
to show their relations to preceding or following 
words ; these circumstances being not expressed in 
modern Languages, by Cases or different termina* 
tions, as they are in the Greek and Latiji Languages. 

*The different sorts of word§, that constitute a language, are 
generally called -parts of speech; but they are not uniformly dis- 
tinguished by modern grammarians; some reckon fen of them, which 
they call and range thus : nouns, adjectives, articles, pronouns, verbs, 
participles, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections ; some 
nine, by leaving out the participles ; others dgfa, by omitting the 
denominations of adjectives a.nd participles, and so down to four ; viz. 
nouns^ adnouns, verbs, and particles. 

6* 



66 

Q. What is there to be observed with regard to French 
and English Articles ? 

A. That the French Articles have Genders and J^um- 
bers ; vsrhereas the English Articles are not suscepti- 
ble of any grammatical variation. 

Q. How many Genders and Numbers are there in French ? 

A. Two Genders only, viz. the Masculine and Feminine ; 
and two Numbers, vis. the Singular and Plural. 

Q How many sorts of Articles are there in French ? 

A- Most grammarians reckon three, viz. 

The Definite- — (the) le m. la f. les pi. — Le Dejini. 
The Indefinite — (a or an) un m. une f. — Ulndejini, 
The Partitive — (some) du m. de la f. des pi. Le Par- 
titif. But strictly speaking, there are but two in 
French, viz. The Definite and the Indefinite ; the 
Partitive being to all external appearance, though 
different in signification, like the variations of the 
second State of the Definite Article ; see the Ex- 
amples of the different Declensions. 

Q, Are these Articles to be placed before aU French 
Substantives, according to their respective Genders 
and Numbers ? 

A. No : for before Substantives, in the singular Number, 
beginning with a vowel or h mute, the final vowel 
of le and la is cut off, as I have observed before. 

Q. What Parts of Speech, besides the Articles, have 
Genders and Numbers in French ? 

A. The Substantives, Adjectives, and Pronouns. 

CHAP. IV. 

Of Substantives in General. 

Q What ifi a Substantive ? 

A. A substantive is a- word that expresses the name of 
every thing real or imaginary, without the help of 
any other word to make us understand it ; as un 
Homme, a Man ; un Ange, an Angel ; une Maison, a 
house ; une Eglisc, a Church, Sec. 

Q. How many sorts of Substantives are there ? 

A. Three : viz. Common, Abstract, and Proper. 



67 

Q. What are Common Substantives ? 

A. Such as are apphcable and common to all real ob- 
jects of the same species or kind, as homme, man; 
cheval, horse ; maison, house ; arbre, tree, &.c 

Q. And what are the Abstract Substantives ? 

k Those which signify objects that have no other mark 
of existence but in our minds ; as Ange, Angel ; 
chagrin, grief; esperance, hope, &c. 

Q. What are those that are called Substantives Proper ? 

A. Such as are appropriated to distinguish Men, Women, 
Places, or particular things ; as Jean, John ; Maries 
Mary ; Londres, London ; la Tamise, the Thames, 
&c. for John is not the name of every man, nor 
London of every city, &.c. 

Q. Is there any grammatical difference between the 
French and English Substantives ? 

A. French Substantives are either of the Masculine or 
Feminine Gender; whereas the greatest part of 
" English substantives are neuter, that is, of neither 
gender ; such are those that express the name of 
inanimate things ; for we say, le Livre, the Book ; la 
Table, the Table ; &c. but substantives which relate 
to the Male sex, as iin Homme, a Man ; &c. are of 
the Masculine Gender, and those which relate to 
the Female sex, as une Femme, a Woman ; &c. are 
of the Feminine, in both languages. 

Q. By what means is the Gender of French Substan- 
tives, expressing inanimate things, to be known ?* 

A. By practice in general; but for a greater ^ certainty, 
by looking into a French dictionary for it. 

Q. How can practice enable a learner to find out their 
respective Genders ? 

A. By remembering those substantives that admit of 
le and la, or un and une before them ; for instance, 
Livre is of the Masculine Gender, because we can 
say le Livre, or un Livre; and Table is of the Fem- 
inine Gender, because we may say either la Table or 
une Table. 

* See Treatise on the Gender of Nonna, 



68 

Q, But how can the Gender of these Substantives 
which begin with a vowel or A mute, be acquired by 
practice ? 

A. By prefixing to thorn an Adjective beginning with a 
consonant ; as iin grand esprit, a great wit ; une 
grande dme, a great soul ; un grand honneur, a great 
honour, &c. 

Q. What difference is there between a Substantive and 
an Adjective ? 

A. A Substantive has no need of being joined to any 
other word, in order to be well understood ; for we 
understand very well what is meant by book, table, 
house, &c. but an Adjective has, or is supposed to 
have, a Substantive to which it relates, and without 
which it cannot be understood : thus great, small, 
lofty, are not clearly understood, but when they are 
joined to substantives, as a great book, a small table, 
a lofty house, Sfc. 

Q. What else is there to be observed with respect to 
the French Substantives ? 

A. The manner of forming their plural number, which 
is commonly done by the addition of an s, to the 
termination of their singular ;* and the way of 
declining them, that is, of using the different vari- 
ations of the articles before them, as in the following 
examples. 

EXAMPLES. 

Of Substantives declined with the Definite Article. 

Jl Substantive Masculine, beginning with a Consonant. 

Singular. Plural. 



Le livre, the book ; 

du livre, (for de le) of or 

from the book ; 

au livre, (for a le) to the 

book ; 



Les livres, the books. 

des livres, (for de les) of or 

from the books. 

aux livres, (for a les) to the 

books. 



• There are, however, several French Substantives that deviate 
from this Rule 



69 

EXAMPLE II. 



Jl Substantive Feminine, beginning with a Corvsonant. 

Singular. 
La table, the table 

de la table, of the table 
a la table, to the table 



Plural. 
Les tables, the tables, 

des tables, of the tables 
aux; tables, io the tables. 



EXAMPLE III 

^ Substantive Feminine, beginning with a Vowel. 



Singular. 
L'ame, the soul; 

de Fame, of the soul ; 
a I'arae, to the soul ; 



Plural. 
Les ames, the souls 

des ames, of the souls 

aux ame§, to the souls. 



EXAMPLE IV. 

j1 Substantive Masculine, beginning with an h mute. 



Singular. 
L'Homme, the man ; 

de I'homme, of the man ; 
a I'homme, to the man ; 



Plural. 
Les hommes, the men. 

des hommes, of the men. 
aux hommes, to the men. 



*^* The French particle a, signifying io or at, is al- 
ways to be accented thus, a ; and the Articles du, de la, 
and des, may as well be rendered here by from the, as by 

EXAMPLES. 

Of Substantives declined with the Indefinite Article. 

A Substantive Masculine, beginning with a Consonant. 

Singular. Plural. 



Un gargon, 


a boy ; 


Des gardens 


boys. 


d'un gargon, 


of or from a 


de gargons. 


of or from 




boy; 




boys. 


a un garQon, 


to a boy ; 


a des gar9ons, 


to boys 



70 
EXAMPLE II. 

^ Subdtanhve Masculine, beginning with a Consona7i 



Singular. 
Une fille, a girl ; 

d'une fille o' a girl ; 

a' une fille, to a girl ; 



Plural. 

Des filles, girls, 

de filles, of girls 

a des filles^ to girls 



EXAMPLE m. 

A Substantive MascuUne, beginning with a Vowel 



Singular. 
Un enfant, a child 

d'un enfant, of a child 

a un enfant, to a child 



Plural. 
Des enfans, children 

d'enfans, of children., 

a des enfans, to children 



EXAMPLE IV. 
A Substantive Feminine, beginning with an h mute. 



Singular. 
tine heure, an hour ; 

d'une heure, of an hour; 
a une heure, to an hour ; 



Plural. 
Des heures, hours 

d'heures, of hours 

a des heures, to hours 



*^* The French monosyllables de and a, which are 
prefixed to the Indefinite Articles un and une in the sin 
gular, and to des in the plural number, are Prepositive 
Particles. 

EXAMPLES. 

Of Substantives declined with the partitive Article. 

A Substantive Masculine, beginning with a Consonant. 



Singular. 
Du papier, some paper ; 
de papier, of or from some 

paper ; 
a du papier, to some pa- 
per; 



Plural. 
Des papiers, some papers 
de papiers, of some papers 



a des papiers, 



to some pa 
pers 



71 
EXAMPLE 11. 

^i Substantive Feminine, beginning with a Consonant. 



Singular. 
De la poudre, some powder ; 
de poudre, of some powder ; 
a de la poudre, to some pow- 
der : 



Plural. 
Des poudres, some powders 
de poudres, of some powders 
a des poudres, to some pow- 
ders. 



EXAMPLE III. 

^ Substantive Feminine beginning with a Vowek 

Singular. Plural. 

De I'eau, some water ; Des eaux, some waters, 

d'eau, of some water; d'eaux, of some waters. 

a de I'eau, to some water ; a des eaux, to some waters. 



EXAMPLE IV. 
j1 Substantive Masculine, beginning with an h mute. 



Singular. 
De I'honneur, some honor ; 
d'honneur, of some honor; 

si de I'honneur, to some 
honor ; 



Plural. 
Des honneurs, some honors, 
d'honneurs, of some 

honors. 
a des honneurs, to some 

honors. 



*#* After the manner of these various Examples, and 
with their respective Articles, may be declined both 
Common and Abstract Substantives, when used in the 
same se se. 

EXAMPLES. 

Of Substantives proper, declined with Particles. 

JVames of Men and Women beginning with a Consonaani. 

Singular. Singular. 

Jean, John , Marie, Maria. 

de Jean, of or from John ; de Marie, of or from Maria. 

a Jean, to John : a Maiie, tu Maria. 



72 

EXAMPLJ] H, 

Jfames of Men and Women beginning with a Vowel. 
Singular. Singular. 



Antoine, 


Anthony ; 


Anne, 


Anna. 


d'Antoine, 


of Anthony ; 


d'Anne, 


of Anna 


a Antoine, 


to Anthony ; 


a Anne, 


to Anna. 



EXAMPLE m. 

JSTames of Men and Women with an h aspirated cnr mute. 
With an h aspirated. With an h mute. 



Henti 
de Henri, 
a Henri, 


Henry ; 
of Henry ; 
to Henry : 

EXAMI 


Helene, Helena, 
d Helene, of Helena, 
a Helene, to Helena. 

'LE IV. 


Jfames of 


Cities, Towns, 


Villages, and other places. 


Singular. 
Londres, London ; 
de Londres, of London ; 
a Londres, to London ; 


Singular. 
Oxford, Oxford, 
d' Oxford, of Oxford, 
a Oxford, to Oxford. 



*^* This is the manner of declining most proper 
Names of Men, Women, Cities, Towns &c. as also the 
names of Months ; as Janvier, January ; Fevrier, Febru- 
ary, &c. 

CHAP. IV. 

Of Adjectives in General. 

Q. What is an Adjective ? 

A. It is a word that expresses the quality or condition 
of a Substantive, but has of itself no precise or 
determinate meaning, as bon, good ; mauvais, bad ; 
grand, great ; pjetit, small, &c. 

Q,. How can Adjectives be distinguished from Sub- 
stantives ? 

A. By adding the word chose (thing) to them ; for those 
that will admit of that word, and make sense with 
it, are Adjectives ; and those that will not are Sub- 
stantives ; for we may say UTie bonne chose, a good 



73 

thing ; une mauvaise c/io^e, a bad thing, Sec. But we 
cannot say un Livre chose, a Book thing ; une Tab.e 
chose, a Table thing, &c. 

Q. What Grammatical difference is there between the 
. French and English Adjectives ? 

A. French Adjectives are, generally speaking, liable to 
vary their termination, in order to agree in Gender 
and Number with their Substantives ; I say gene^ 
rally speaking, because those ending with an e not 
accented, as jeune, young ; facile, easy, &c. have 
their Masculine and Feminine terminations alike. 

Q. How do French Adjectives vary their terminations 
with respect to Gender and Number ? 

A. The general rules are to annex an e to them, for the 
Feminine Gender; and an 5 for the Plural Number ; 
as grand makes grande, for the Feminine Gender 
singular ; and grands Masculine, grandes Feminine, 
for the Plural ; as to their irregularities, see the 
Grammer p. 63. 

Q. What is meant by degrees of Comparison ? 

A. As Adjectives are made use of to express the quali- 
ties or conditions of Substantives, there are expres- 
sions called Degrees of Comparison which serve to 
increase or diminish those qualities, &.c. in order to 
ascertain the real or apparent differences of the 
objects of our discourse. 

Q. How many degrees of comparison are there ? 

A. Three, which are distinguished by the denomina 
tions of Positive, Comparative, and Superlative 

Q. What is the Positive ? 

A. The Positive is the Adjective in its natural signifi- 
cation, without any regard to the increasing or di- 
minishing of it: 2is grand, great; petit, small; fori, 
strong, &c. 

Q What is the Comparative ? 

A. The comparative increases or diminishes the signi- 
fication of the positive ; and is formed, in French, 
by putting either plus (more) or moins (less) befoi-e 
the Adjective ; q.s plus grand or moins grand, greater 
or less great : plus petit, or moins petit, smaller nr ](\=s 
small. 



74 

Q. What is the Superlative ? 

A. The Superlative expresses the signification of the 
Adjective ia the highest or lowest degrees of all ; 
and is formed in French by putting le plus, la plus, 
les plus, the (most) or le mains, la mains, les mains, 
(the least,) before the Adjective, according to the 
Gender and Number of the Substantive it relates 
to ; as in these examples : il est leplus grand^ mats 
le moins fort de tous, he is the tallest, but the weak- 
est of all; voire Tante est la plus riche mais la moins 
liberale de v-os Parens, your aunt is the richest, but 
the least liberal of your relations, &c. 

(^. Do all French Adjectives form the Degrees of Com- 
parison in the same manner ? 

A. No : for the ?hree following Adjectives have a Com- 
parative and Superlative of their own ; viz. 
Positive. Comparative. Superlative. 

Bon, Good ; mdlleur, better ; le meilleur, the best. 

Mauvais, bad ; pire, worse ; le pire, the worst. 

Petit, little ; moindre, less ; le moindre, the least. 

Yet the two last may also be compared with plus and 
leplus, perSxed to their Positive ; for we frequently 
sdi.y plus mimvais, plus petit, &c. But never plus ban. 

CHAP.V. 

Of Pronouns in General. 
Q. What are Pronouns ? 
A. They are words of peculiar use in speech ; some 

serving as substitutes for Substantives, and others 

performing the office of Adjectives. 
Q. How many sorts of pronouns are there ? 
A. There are six sorts which are distinguished by the 

following names, viz. 

The Personal, Les Personnels 

The Conjunctive, Les Conjonctifs 

The Possessive, Les Possessifs. 

The Absolute, Les Absolus. 

The Demonstrative, Les Demonstratifs. 

The Relative, Les Relatifs. 

Q. What are tbe Personal Pronouns ? 



75 

A They are those whkh directly denote Persons, and 
are used instead of their name ; as: Je I, tu thou, il 
he, elle she, for the Sing-ular ; J^ous we, vous you or 
ye, 275 or elles they, for the Plural. See the conjuga- 
tions of Verbs, which are annexed to chap. vi. 
p. 104. 

Q. What are the Conjunctive Pronouns ? 

A. The Conjunctive Pronouns are also used instead of 
the Personal Pronouns in this respect, that they are 
either governed by verbs, or set after Prepositive 
particles : as moi or me me, toi or te thee, le, la, elle, 
or lui, se, soi, which may be rendered by him, her, 
or it, in the Singular, JVous us, vous you or ye, eiix, 
elles, les, leur or se, for the Plural, according to the 
sense they imply. 

Q What are the Possessive Pronouns } 

A. They are Pronouns which indicate the Possession 
of the object before which they art:; placed, as mon 
livre, my book, ta plume, thy pen, aon ckapeau, his 
hat, &c. 

As these Pronouns perform the offic;e of Adjectives, 
they must likewise agree, in French, with the Gen- 
der and Number of the Substantive which they 
precede. 

Q. What are the Absolute Pronouns ? 

A. They are Pronouns which also indicate possession, 
but in an absolute sense, that is to say, without hav- 
ing a Substantive annexed to them ; though they 
relate to one already expressed betbre. These are 
le mien or la mienne, mine ; le tien or la tienne, thine ; 
le notre, or la nbtre, ours, &c. They likewise agree 
m French, with the Gender and Number of the 
Substantives they relate to. 

Q. Are these two last sorts always placed among Pro- 
nouns ? 

A. They are so by the generality of Grammarians, 
because they serve as substitutes for conjunctive 
pronouns ; for instance, when I say c'est mon livre 
it is my book ; c'est le mien, it is mine ; these phrases 
imply, ce livre est a moi, this book belongs to me, &c. 

Q. What are the Demonstrative Pronoi^ns ? 



76 

A. They are pronouns which serve to point out any 
person or object whatever ; as ce Monsieur, this or 
that Gentleman ; cet Enfant, this or that Child ; cette 
Maison, this or that House; cesArbres, these or those 
Trees, &c. 

Q. Are the Pronouns ce and cet, used indifferently in 
French ? 

A. No : for ce is only used before a Substantive of the 
Masculine Gender, beginning with a Consonant or 
h aspirated ; and cet before a Substantive Masculine, 
beginning with a vowel or h mute. 

Q. What are Relative Pronouns ? 

A. They are Pronouns that generally have a relation to 
a preceding Substantive, which is called by gram- 
marians, the Antecedent ; as le Maitre qui enseigne, 
the Master who Teaches ; le livre quefai achete, the 
book which I have bought, &.c. But when they are 
used for asking questions, they commonly begin a 
sentence , as Qui vous appelaitl Who called you ? 
Que dites vous ? What are you saying ? &.c. These 
six classes of Pronouns are distinctly exhibited in 
the two following pages, viz. 

Of the six different classes of Pronouns desa'ibed in tkis 
chapter, together with their respective significations. 

PERSONAL PRONOUNS. 
Singular. Plural. 

Je, I. 

Tu, thou. 

II, He. 

Elle, She. 



It. 



Nous, We. 

Vous, *You or ye 

\ They. 



lis 
Elles, 



CONJUNCTIVE PRONOUNS. 
Singular. Plural. 



Moi or me, Me. 
Toi or te, Thee. 

Lui, se, soi, c. > Him. ) j, 
Le m la, elle f. ] Her. ) 

•The Pronoun you as well as vous is, through custom, which gives 
law to grammar, used either for the Plural or Sin/rular number. 



Nous, Us. 

Vous, You or ye. 

Eux, m. elles, f > ,r.u 
Les, leur, se, c. S 



77 



POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS. 
Singular. Plural 



Mon m. ma f. 
Ton m ta f. 
Son m. sa f. His, 
Notre c 
Votre c. 
Leur c. 



My. 
Thy. 
her, or its. 
Our. 
Your. 
Their. 



Mes c* 
Tes c. 

Ses c. 
Nos c. 
Vosc. 
Leurs c. 



My, 

Thy 

His or her 

Our. 

Your. 

Their. 



SiNGU 

Le mien m. 
La mienne/ 
Le tien m. 
La tienne /. 
Le sien m. ) 
Lasienney! ) 
Le notre m. 

Le votre m. 

Le leur m. 



ABSOLUTE 

LAR. 

I Mine. 
I Thine. 

his or hers. 

la notre /. 

Ours. 

la votre f. 

Yours. 

la leur /. 

Theirs. 



PRONOUNS. 

Plural. 
Les miens m. 
Les miennes/. 
Les tiens m- 
Les tiennes/. 
Les siens m. 
Les siennes f. 
Les notres c: 



Les votre s c. 
Les leurs c. 



Mine. 

Thine. 

his or 
hers. 
Ours. 



Yours. 
Theirs. 



DEMONSTRATIVE 

Singular. 
Ce et cet m. ^ This 

Cette/. > or 

Celui m. celle/. S That. 
Ceci c. 
Celui-ci m 
Celle-ci/ 
Cela c. 



Celui-la m. 
Celle la /. 




PRONOUNS. 

Plural. 
Ces c. 
Ceux m. 
Celles/ 

Ceux-ci m. 
Celles-ci/. 



Ceux-la m. 
Celles-la/. 



KAL. 



These 

or 
Those. 
These 
or 
These here, 
hose 
or 
hose there. 



) Tho; 



* c stands for common to both Genders. 



78 

RELATIVE PRONOUNS. 

Singular. Plural. 



Qui c. Who or that 

Que c. Wham or that. 
Quel m. Quelle f. What* 
which. 
Lequel m. laquelle f. 

Which. 

Dont c. whose, of whom, 

&c. 



Qui c. Who or that. 

Que c. Whom or that. 
Quels m. ^uelles f. What 
Which, 
Lesquels m. lesquelles/. 
Which. 
Dont c. whose, of whom 
&c 



CHAP. VI. 
Of Verbs in General. 

Q. What are Verbs ? 

A. They are words which serve to express either the being 
or condition of their subjects, as etre, to be ; rester, to 
stand ; or the actions corporeal and mental which they 
do ; as parler, to speak ; penser, to think ; &c. 

Q. How many sorts of. Verbs are there ? 

A. There are generally speaking, but two sorts, viz. the 
Personal and the Impersonal. 

Q. What is a Personal Verb ? 

A. It is a Verb that can be conjugated with three Per- 
sonal Prounouns in each number; as Je park, I 
speak; tu paries, thou speakest; il parle, he speaks, 
&c. 

Q, What is an Impersonal Verb? >« 

A. It is a verb that can only be conjugated in the third 
person of the singular number ; as il phut, it rains ; 
il pleuvait, it did rain ; il pliit, it rained, &c. 

Q. How are Verbs distinguished with respect to their 
use and signification ? 

A. By six different denominations, of which it will be 
sufficient, for our present purpose, to mention the 
two following, viz. The Auxilary and Active Verbs, t 

* Besides the signification prefixed to this Pronoun, it is also ren- 
dered by ce qui, cc que and qud ; according to the sense it implies. 

t The name and use of other kinds of Verbs may be known, if 
required, by referring to the Practical French Grammar, p. 92. 



71) 

Q. What are the auxilary Verbs,? ^ 

A. They are a kind of Verbs which, being prefixed to 
the Participle of other Verbs, help to convey the 
meaning of such actions or conditions as cannot be 
expressed by single words in modern languages, 
a.s' J'ai donne, I have given; Je suis blame, I am 
blamed, &.c. There are but two of them, viz. avoir 
to have ; etre, to be. 

Q. What are Active Verbs ? 

A. They are Verbs, that express an action that passes 
from an agent to an object, as he drinks wine, {it boit 
du vin ;) in which phrases, drinks is the Verb Active; 
He, the Agent, and Wine, the Object of that action. 

Q. What grammatical Accidents are there in French 
Verbs ? 

A. There are four, viz. The Moods, Tenses, Numbers, 
and Persons of their respective conjugations. 

Q. What is meant by the conjugation of a Verb ? 

A. The due distribution of the several inflections of a 
Verb, into Moods, Tenses, Numbers, and Persons. 

Q. How many different Conjugations are there in 
French ? 

A. There are four, which are known by the termination 
of the Infinitive Moods of Verbs ? 

Q. What are the marks of each Conjugation ? 

A. The first ends in er, as donner, to give ; the second 
in ir, asjinir, to finish ; the third in oir, as recevoir, 
to receive ; the fourth in re, as rendre, to restore. But 
as some Verbs vary in their inflections, they are dis- 
tinguished into Regular and Irregular Verbs. 

Q. What is signified by Moods ? 

A. They are divers distinctions that are made in the man- 
ner of using Verbs, in order to express the different 
circumstances of actions, conditions, or sensations. 

Q. How many Moods are there in Verbs ? 

A. Five, which are called tlie Infinitive, Indicative, 
Subjunctive, Imperative, and Conditional. 

Q,. What is meant by Tenses ? 

A. They are the divisions of the Moods, which serve 
to indicate, by various endings, the time in which 
something is, was. or shall be done, and are there 



BO 

fore called Present, Imperfect, Preterite, and Future 

Tenses. 
Q. What are Persons in Verbs ? 
A. Those inflections that are adapted to thek respective 

Pejsonal Pron&uns ; there are three in each number, 

as may be seen in the following conjugations. 

CONJUGAISON DU VERBE AVOIR (3. ir.) 
INFINITIF. 

Present, Avoir, to have. 

Participle pres. ayant, having. 

Participle pret. eu m. ef. had. 



Present 


liMJlUJ 


Compose du Pres. 


S. 1. J'ai, 


I have. " 


eu, 


had. 


2. Tu as, 


thou hast. 


ete 


been. 


3. n ou elle 


a, he or she 


1. donne, 


given. 




has. 


> 




P. ]. Nous avons, we have. 


2. fini, 


finished. 


2. Vous avez 


you have. 


3. reqn, 


received. 


lis ou elles ont, 


they have. _^ 


4. rendu, 


restored 


Imparfait 


. 


Com. de 


rimp. 


S. J'avais, 


I had. ~ 


eu, 


had. 


Tu avais, 


thou hadst. 


ete, 


been. 


11 avait, 


he had. 


1. donne, 


given. 


P, jSous avions, 


we had. 


2. fini, 


finished 


Vous aviez, 


you had. 


3. lequ. 


received. 


lis avaient, 


they had. ^ 


4. rendu, 


restored. 



%* The capital letters S. P., which are placed before 
and at the beginning of the subdivisions of the Tenses, 
denote their respective Singular and Plural Numbers 
The figures 1, 2,3, in the first column, indicate the three 
different Persons of each number ; those of the second 
column, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, serve to point out the particular 
conjugation of those Verbs to which the adjoining Parti 
ciples belong, for don?ie comes from donner. 



81 



Preterit. 




Comp. 


du Pret. 


S. J'eus, I had. 




eu, 


had. 


Tu eus thou hadst. 




ete, 


been. 


11 eut, he had. 


1. 

> 


donne, 


given 


P. Nous eumes, we had. 


2. 


fini, 


finished. 


Vous eutes, you had. 


3. 


regu, 


received. 


Us eurent, they had. , 


4. 


rendu, 


restored. 


Future. 




Comp. du Future. 


S J'aurai, I shall or will "^ 




eu. 


had. 


have ; 








Tu auras, thou shalt have ; 




ete 


been. 


n aura, he shall have ; 


1. 


donne 


given. 


P. Nous aurons, we shall 


> 2. 


fini, 


finished. 


have ; 








Vous aurez, you shall 


3. 


regu, 


received. 


have; 








lis auront, they shall 


4. 


rendu, 


restored. 


have ; ^ 








Conditional. 




Comp. du Cond. 


S. J'aurais, I should have ; ^ 




eu, 


had 


Tu aurais, thou shouldst 




ete, 


been. 


have ; 








n aurait, he should 


1. 


donne, 


given. 


have ; 








P. Nous aurions wo 


' 2. 


fini, 


finished. 


should have ; 








Vous auriez, you 


3. 


re^u, 


received 


should have ; 








lis auraient, they should 


4. 


rendu, 


restored 


have. ^ 









Present. 

S. Que, That. ^ 

J'aie, I may have ; 

Tu aies, thou mayest 

have ; 

n ait, he may have ; 



SUBJONCTIF. 

Compose du Pres, 
Quoique, although 
eu, had. 

ete, been. 



P. Nous ayons, we may 

have ; 

Vous ayez, you may 

have; 

lis aient, they may 

have, j 

Preterit. 

S. J'eusse. I might have ; 

Tu eusses, thou mightst 

have ; 

n etit, he might have. 

P. Nous eussions, we 

might have ; 

Vous eussiez, you 

might have ; 

lis eussent, they might 

have. 



1. donne 
(^ 2. fini, 

3. regu, 

4. rendu, 



given. 

finished. 

received. 

restored. 



Comp. du Pret. 
eu, 
ete, 



had 
been. 



1. donne, 

2. fini, 

3. regu. 

4. rendu. 



given, 
finished 
received 
restored 



IMPERATIF. 

Aie, Have or have thou. Ayons, Let us have. 

Qu'il ait, let him have, ayez, have or have you. 

Qu'elle ait, let her have, qu'ils aient, m. p. ) let them 

qu'ellesaient,/.p. 5 have. 



CONJUGAISON DU VERBE EIRE (4. ir.) 
INFINITIF. 

Present, Etre, to be. 

Participles pres. etant, being. 

Participle pret. ete, been. 



m 



INDICATIF. 
Present. Compose du Pres. 

1. Je suis, I am.^ content, satisfied. 

2. Tu es, thou art. I pret, ready. 

3. II ou elle est, he or j 1. estime, esteemed. 

she is J 



P. 1. Nous sommes, we 

are. 

2. Vous etes, you are. 

3 lis ou elles sont, they 



2. 



punis, 



3. regus, 

4. craints, 



punished. 

received, 
dreaded 



Imparfait. 



Comp. de I'lmp 



S. J'etais, 
Tu etais 
It etait, 

P. Nous etions, 
Vous etiez, 
lis etaient, 



I was. 

thou wast. 

he was. 

we were, 
you were, 
the}^ were.^ 



content, 
pret, 
1. estime, 



2. punis, 

3. regus, 

4. craints, 



satisfied 

ready. 

esteemed. 

punished, 
received, 
dreaded. 



Preterit. 



S. Je fus, 
Tu fus, 
II fut, 



I was. 

thou wast. 

he was. 



Comp. du Pret. 



P. Nous fumes, we were. 
Vous futes, you were. 
lis furent, they were. 

Future 
S. Je serais, I shall or will^ 
be. 
Tu seras, thou shalt be. 
n sera, he shall be. 

P. Nous serons, we shall be. 
Vous serez, you shall be. 
lis seront, they shall be. ^ 



content, 
pret, ^ 

1. estime, 

2. punis, 

3. lequs, 

4. craints, 



satisfied. 

ready. 

esteemed. 

punished 
received, 
dreaded 



Comp. du Fut. 
content, satisfied 



pr^t, ^ 

1. estime, 

2. punis, 

3. regus, 

4. craints. 



ready 
esteemed 

punished, 
received 
dreaded, 



84 



Conditional. 



Comp. du Cond. 



S. Je serais, I should be. "l content, 

pret, 

1. estime, 



Tu serais, thou shouldst 

be. 

II serait, he should be. 



P'Nous serions, we should }>2. punis, 

be. 
Vous seriez, you should 3. re9us, 

be. 
lis seraient, they should 4. craints, 

be. J 



satisfied, 
ready. 

esteemed. 

punished 
received 
dreaded. 



9UBJ0NCTIF. 

Present. 

S. Que, That, 

Je sois, I may be. 

Tu sois, thou mayst be. 

II soit, * he may be. 



Compose du Pres. 
Quoique, althouo;h 



content, 
pret, 
1. estime 



P. Nous soyons, we may be. "^ 2. punis, 
Vous soyez, you may be. >3. regus, 
lis soient, they may be. J 4. craints, 



satisfied, 
read}, 
esteemed. 

punished 
received, 
dreaded. 



Preterit. 

S. Je fusse, I might be. 

Tu fusses, thou mightest 

be. 

n fut, he might be. 

P Nous fussions, we might 
be. 

Vous fussiez, you might 
be. 

lis fussent, they might be.. 



Comp. du Pret. 
content, satisfied. 



pret, 
1. estime, 
^2. punis, 

3. regus, 

4. craints, 



ready 

esteemed. 

punished. 

received. 

dreaded. 



IMPERATIF. 

SiNGULIER. PlURIEL. 



Sois Be or be thou. 

Qu'u soit, let him be. 

Qu'elle soit, let her be. 



Soyons, Let us be. 

Soyez, be or be you, 

Qu'ils soi'>nt, let them be. 



85 

\* Learners are to observe, that all Adjectives and 
Participles of the Preterite, which are annexed to any of 
the Inflections of this Verb, must be of the same Gender 
and Jfumber as the Pronoun or Substantive that is adapted 
to them : as in the following examples — Je suis content, 
m. sing — Je suis contente, f. sing, &c. Jfous sommes pujiiSy 
m. plur. J^Tous sommes punies, f, plur. &c. 



MODELE DE LA lere CONJUGAISON. 
INFINITIF. 

Present, Donner, to give. 

Participle pres. donnant, giving. 

Participle pret. donne m. ef. given. 



INDICATIF. 
Present. 
Je donne, I give ; 

Tu donnes, Thou givest ; 

II donne, He gives ; 



Nous donnons, 
Vousdonnez, 
lis donnent, 



We give ; 
You give ; 
They give : 



Imparfait. 



Je donnais, 
Tu donnais, 
H donnait, 
Nous donnions, 
Nous donhiez, 
Us donnaient. 



I did give ; 
Thou didst give ; 
He did give. 
We did give ; 
You did give ; 
They did give. 



Preterit. 



Je donnai, 
Tu donnas, 
n donna, 
Nous donnames, 
Vous donnates, 
lis donnerent 
8 



I gave ; 
Thou gavest, 
He gave. 
We gave ; 
You gave ; 
They gave. 



Compose du Pres. 
J'ai donne, 

I have given ; 
Tu as donne ; 
Thou hast given. 

II a donne ; 

He has given, &c 



Comp. de I'lmp. 
J'avais donne, 

I had given ; 
Tu avais donne. 
Thou hadst given , 
II avait donne. 
He had given, &c. 

Comp. du Pret. 
J'eus donne, 

I had given ; 
Tu eus donne, 
Thou hadst given; 
U eut donne, 

He had given. 



86 



Singulier. 

Je donnerai, I shall or 

will give ; 

Tu donneras, Thou shalt 

give ; 

3s donnera, he shall give. 



Pluriel. 
Nous donnerons, we shall 

give; 
Vous donnerez, you shall 

give , 
lis donneront, they shall 

give. 



CONDITIONAL. 



Je donnerais, 
Tu donnerais, 

II donnerait, 



I should give ; 
Thou shouldst give ; 

He should give ; 

Nous donnerions, We should give ; 

Vous donneriez, You should give ; 

lis donneraient, They should give ; 



Je donne, 
Tu donnes, 
II donne, 



SUBJONCTIF. 

Present. 

I may give ; 
Thou mayest give 
He may give . 



Nous 'Aonnions, 
Vous donniez, 
lis donnent, 



We may give ; 
You may give ; 
They may give. 



Preterit. 
Je donnasse, I might give ; 

Tu donnasses, Thou mightst give 
n donnat, He might give. 

Nous donnassions, We might give ; 

Vous donnassiez, You might give ; 

Us tlonnassent, They might give. 



Comp. du Cond 
J'aurais donne, 
I should have 
given ; 
Tu autais donne, 
Thou shouldst 
have given ; 
II aurait donne, 
He should have 
given, &c 



Comp. du Pres. 
J'aie donne, 

I may have given, 
Tu aies donne 
Thou mayest have 

given, 

II ait donne, he may 

have given. 

Comp. du Pret. 
J'eusse donne, 

I might have given; 
Tu eusses donne, 
Thou mightest have 

given , 

II eftt donne, 

He might have 
given, &c. 



87 

IMPERATIF 

Singulier. Pluriel. 

Donne, give or give thou ; Donnons, Let us give, 

Qu'il donne, let him give ; Donnez, give or give you, 

Qu'eile donne, let her give. Qu'ils donnent, let them 

give. 

*^* Most verbs ending in er, may be conjugated after 
this model ; for there are but four of that terminatic« 
which deviate from it, viz : Aller, to go ; Envoyer, to send ; 
Puer, to stink ; Recouvrer, to recover ; whose irregularities 
or indifferent inflections, are displayed in the Practical 
French Grammar, from page 127 to page 129. 



MODELE DE LA Ilde CONJUGAISON. 
INFINITIF. 

Present, Finir, to Finish. 



Participle 


Pres. finissant, 


finishing. 


Participle 


pret. fini, m. ef. 
INMCATIF. 


finished. 




Present. 


Compose du Pres. 


Je finis. 


I finish ; 


J'ai fini, 


Tu finis, 


Thou finishest ; 


I have finished ; 


11 finit. 


He finishes. 


Tu as fini, 

Thou hast finished ; 


Nous finissons, 


We finish; 


11 a fini. 


Vous finissez, 


You finish; 


He has finished, 


lis linissent, 


They finish. 


&c. 


Imparfait. 


Comp. de I'lmp 


Je finissais 


I did finish ; 


J' avals fini, 


Tu finissais. 


Thou didst finish ; 


I had finished; 


11 finissait, 


He did finish. 


Tu avals fini^ 
Thou hadst finish 


Nous finissionj 


I We did finish : 


ed; 


Vous finissiez, 


You did finish ; 


11 avait fini, 


l]s finissaient, 


They did finish. 


He had finished &c. 



88 





Preterit. 




Corap. du Pref. 


Je finis, 


I finished ; 


J'eus fijii, 


Tu finis, 


Thou finishedst; 


I had finished ; 


11 fiinit, 


He finished. 


Tu eus fini, 
Thou hadst finish- 


Nous finimes, 


We finished ; 


ed ; 


Vous finites, 


You finished ; 


11 eut fini, 


Us finirent, 


They finished. 
FUTURE. 


Hehadfinished,&c 


SingnUer. 


Pluriel. 


Je finirai, I 


shall or will 


Nous finironsj We shall 




finish : 




finish ; 


Tu finiras, Thou shalt fin- 


Vous fin 


irez. You shall 




ish: 




finish ; 


11 finira, He shall finish. 


lis finirent, They shall finish. 




CONDITIONAL. 


Comp. du Cond. 


Je finirais, 


I should finish ; 


J'aurais fini, 


Tu finirais. 


Thou shouldst fin- 


I should have fin- 




ish ; 


ished; 


n finirait, 


He should finish ; 


Tu aurais fini. 


Nous finirions 


We should finish ; 


Thou shouldst have 


Vous finiriez, 


You should finish ; 


finished ; 
11 aurait fini, 


lis finiraient, 


They should finish. 
SUBJONCTIF. 


He should have 
finished, &c. 




Present. 


Compose du Pres. 


Je finisse, 


I may finish ; 


J'aie fini, 


Tu finisses, 


Thou may'st fin- 


I may have finish- 




ish ; 


ed; 


11 finisse, 


He may finish. 


Tu aies fini, 
Thou mayst have 


Nous finissions We may finish ; 


finished ; 


Vous finissiez 


You may finish ; 


11 ait fini, 


Tls finissent 


They may finish. 


He may have fin- 








ished, &.C. 



89 



Je finii^se, 
Tu finisses, 



II fin it, 

Nous finissions, 

Voiis finissiez, 
lis finissent, 



Preterit. 

I might finish 
Thou „ . 

ish 
He might finish ; 
We miofht finish 



mightst fin- 



You might finish ; 
They might finish. 

IMPERATIF. 



Comp. du pret. 
J'eusse fini, 

I might have fin- 

ished ; 
Tu eusses fini, 
Thou miglitst have 
finished; 

II eut fini, 

He might have fin- 
ished, &c. 



Singulier. 
Finis, Finish or finish thou; 
Qu'il finisse, let him finish ; 
Qu'elle finisse, let her fin- 
ish. 



Pluriel. 

Finissons, Let us finish ; 

Finissez, finish or finish you; 

Qu'ils finissent, let them 

finish. 



%* The remark vi^hich learners may make on the 
Verbs of this Conjugation is, that the Present and the 
Preterite of the Subjunctive Mood, have nearly the same 
inflections ; as they only differ with respect to their ter- 
minations in the third person of the Singular Number, 
viz. il finisse, in the Present, and ilfinit, in the Preterite. 



MODELE DE LA Illeme. CONJUGAISON. 



Present, 
Participe, pret. 
Participe, pret. 



/e regois, 
Tu reQois, 
II regoit, 

Nous recevons, 
Vous recevez, 
lis re(joivent, 

8* 



INFINITIF. 

Re ce voir, 
recevant, 
regu, m. ef. 

INDICATIF. 

Present. 

I receive ; 
Thou receivest ; 
He receives. 

We receive ; 
You receive ; 
They receive 



to receive, 
receiving, 
received. 



Compose du Pres. 
J'ai regu, 

I have received; 
Tu as regu. 
Thou hastreceived; 

II a rcgu. 

He has receiveaj 

&C. 



90 



Imparfait. 




Comp. de ITmp 


Je recevais, 


I did receive , J'avais regu, 


Tu recevais, 


Thou didst receive; 


[ had received ; 


11 recevait, 


He did receive. 


Tu avals regu. 
Thou hadst receiv 


Nous recevions, 


We did receive ; 


ed- 


Vous receviez, 


You did receive ; 


Q avait regu, 


lis recevaient, 


They did receive. 


He had received, 
&c. 


Preterit. 


Comp. du Pret 


Je regus, 


I received ; 


J'eus regu, 


Tu regus, 


Thou receive dst ; 


I had received ; 


n re gut, 


He received. 


Tu eus regu. 
Thou hadst receiv- 


Nous reguraes, 


We received ; 


ed; 


Vous regutes, 


You received ; 


11 eut regu, 


lis regurent, 


They received. 


He had received. 




&c. 




FUTURE. 


Singulier 


Pluriel. 


Je recevrai, I shall or will 


Nous recevrons. We shall 




receive : 


receive; 


Tu recevras. Thou shalt 


Vous recevrez. You shall 




receive : 


receive ; 


lis recevra, He shall re- 


Us recevj,-oiit, They shall 




ceive. 


receive. 




CONDITIONAL. 




Comp. du Cond. 


Je recevrais. 


I should receive ; 


J'aurais regu, 


Tu recevrais. 


Thou shouldst re- 


I should have re- 




ceive ; 


ceived; 


11 recevrait. 


He should receive ; 


Tu aurais regu, 


Nous recevrions. 


We should re- 


Thou shouldst 




ceive ; 


have received j 


Vous recevriez, 


You should re- 






ceive ; 


11 aurait regu, 


lis recevraient, 


They should re- 


He should have re- 






ceive 


ceived, &c 



91 



Je re.QOive, 
Tu reQoives, 

II re9oive, 
Nous recisvions 



SUBJONCTIF. 
Present. 

I may receive ; 
Thou mayst re- 
ceive : 
He may receive ; 
We may receive ; 



Vous receviez, 
lis re9oivent, 

Preterit. 
Je regusse, 
Tu regusses, 

II re9ut, 

Nous re"9ussions, 



You may receive 
They may receive. 



I might receive ; 
Thou mightst re- 
ceive ; 
He might receive ; 
We might receive; 



Vous regussiez, You might re^ 
ceive 

I regussent, They might re- 

ceive : 



Compose du Pres. 
J'aie re9U, 
I may have receiv- 
ed : 
Tu aies re9u, 
Thou mayst have 
received ; 
n ait re9u, 
He may have re- 
ceived ; 

Comp. du Pret. 
J'eusse re9U, 
might have re- 
ceived, 
Tu eusses re9U, 
Thou mightst have 
received ; 
II eut regu, 
He might have re- 



ceived, &c. 



IMPERATIF. 

Singulier. Pluriel. 

Regois, Receive or receive Recevons, Let us receive ; 

thou ; 
Qu'il regoive, let him re- 
ceive ; 
Qu'elle regoive, let her re- 
ceive ; 



Recevez, receive or receive 

you ; 

Qu'iis regoivent, let them 

receive. 



%* The verbs that are conjugated like this model are 
only Apercevoir, Concevoir, Decevoir, and Fercevoir, for 
Ihe verb Devoir (to Owe) and its derivative Redevoir, 
though Regular, yet not ending in cevoir, have never a 
cedilla (9) before o and u, but take the letter d before 
these inflections, as je dois, Si'c. 



MODELE DE LA IVeme. CONJUGAISON 
INFINITIF. 



Present, 


Rendre, 


to restore. 


Participe pres. 


rendant. 


restoring. 


Participe pret. 


rendu, m, tf. 
INDICATllF. 


restored. 


Present. 


Comp. du Pres 


Je rends, 


I restore ; 


J'ai rendu, 


Tu rends, 


Thou restorest; 


I have restored ; 


11 rend, 


He restores ; 


Tu as rendu. 
Thou hast restored, 


Nous rendons. 


We restore ; 


11 a rendu. 


Vous rendez, 


You restore ; 


He has restored, 


lis rendent, 


They restore. 


&c. 


Imparfait. 


Comp. de I'lmp. 


Je rendais, 


I did restore ; 


J'avais rendu, 


Tu rendais, 


Thou didst restore; 


I had restored ; 


11 rendait. 


He did restore. 


Tu avais rendu, 
Thou hadst restor- 


Nous rendions. 


We did restore ; 


ed. 

11 avait rendu, 


Vous rendiez, 


You did restore ; 


He had restored, 


ris rendaient, 


They did restore. 


&c 


Preterit. ! 


Comp. du Pret. 


Je rendis. 


I restored^- 


J'eus rendu. 


Tu rendis, 


Thou restoredst ; 


[ had restored ; 


11 rendit, 


He restored. 


Tu eus rendu, 
Thou hadst restor- 


Nous rendiraes, 


We restored ; 


ed ; 


Vous rendites. 


You restored ; 


[1 eut rendu, 


lis rendirent, 


They restored. 


He had restored, 



93 

FUTURE 

Singulier. 
Je rendrai, I shall or will 
restore ; 
Tu rendras, Thou shalt re- 
store ; 
II rendra, He shall restore. 



PI Uriel. 
Nous rendrons, We shall 
restore ; 
Vous rendrez, You shall re- 
store ; 
Us rendroot, Thev shall re- 
store. 



J^ rendrais, 
Tu rendrais, 

II rendrait, 

Nous rendrions, 
Vous rendriez, 
lis rendraient, 



Present. 
Je rende, 
Tu rendes, 

H rende, 

Nous rendions, 
Vous rendiez, 
Us rendent, 



CONDITIONAL. 

I should restore ; 
Thou shouldst re- 
store ; 
He should restore. 

We should restore ; 
You should restore; 
They should re- 
store. 

SUBJONCTIF. 

I may restore ; 
Thou mayest re 
store 
He may restore. 

We may restore ; 
You may restore ; 
They may restore. 



Preterit. 
Je rendisse, I might restore ; 

Tu rendisses, Thou mightst re- 
store 
11 rendit, He might restore. 

Nous rendissons, We might restore ; 
Vous rendissiez, You might restore ; 
lis rendissent, They might re- 
store. 



Comp. du Cond. 
J'aurais rendu, 

I should have re- 
stored : 

Tu aurais rendu, 
Thou shouldst 
have restored ; 

II aurait rendu. 
He should have 

restored, &c. 

Comp. du Pres. 
J'aie rendu, 

I may have restor 
ed ; 

Tu aies rendu, 
Thou mayest have 
restored ; 

II ait rendu, 
He may have re- 
stored, &c. 

Comp. du Pret. 
J'eusse rendu, 
might have re- 
stored ; 
Tu eusses rendu, 
rhou mightest 

have restored ; 
n eut rendu, 
He might have re- 
stored, &c. 



94 

IMPERATIF. 
Singulier. Pluriel. 

Rends, Restore or restore Rendons, Xet us restore 
thou. 

Qu'il rende, let him re- 
store ; 

Qu'elle rende, let her re- 
store. 



Rendez, restore or resV wj 
you; 

Qu'ils rendent, let them re- 
store. 



*^* Verbs ending in endre, except Prendre and its de- 
rivatives, which are irregular, and those in andre, erdre, 
midre, and ordre; as Repandre, Perdre, Fondre, Mordre, Sec. 
form their inflection like those of this model. As to the 
irregularities of other verbs ending in re, see the Pracit^ 
cal French Grammar, p. 184, &c. &c. 



VOCABULAIRE 

FRAN^AIS ET ANGLAIS, 

Des mots le plus en usage dans les deux Langues, 



SECTION I. 
Du Monde en General. 
Of the World in General. 



Dieu, m. 


God 


le tems. 


the time 


le Createur, 


the Creator 


le jour, 


the day 


le Redempteur 


the Re- 


la nuit, 


the night 




deemer 


le matin, 


the morning 


le ciel, 


the heaven 


I'apres-midi, 


f. the after- 


le soleil, 


the sun 




noon 


la lune, 


the moon 


le soir, 


the evening 


une etoile 


a star 


un an. or > 
une annee 3 




les etoiles, 


the stars 


a year 


une planete, 


a planet 


une demi-annee, half a 


les planetes, 


the planets 




year 


la mer, 


the sea 


un mois. 


a month 


une riviere, 


a river 


les mois de, 


the months of 


une source, 


a spring 


I'annee, 


the year 


une fontaine, 


a fountain 


Janvier, 


January 


une montagne, 


a mountain 


Fevrier, 


February 


une colline, 


a hill 


Mars, 


March 


une vallee, 


a valley 


Avril, 


April 


une plaine, 


a plain 


Mai, 


May 


un element. 


an element 


Juin, 


June 


les elemens, 1 


the elements 


Juillet, 


July 


— le feu, 


the fire 


Aout, pr. 00 


August 


— I'air, ra. 


the air 


Septembre, 


September 


— la terre, 


the earth 


Octobre, 


Octobei 


-- I'eau. f 


the water 


Novembre 


Novembei 



96 



Decembre, 


December 


une semaine, 


a week 


les jours de la 


the days 


semaine, 


of the week 


Lundi, 


Monday- 


Mardi, 


Tuesday 


Mercredi, 


Wednesday 


Jeudi, 


Thursday 


Vendredi, 


Friday 


Samedi, 


Saturday 


Dimanche, 


Sunday 


une heure, {mute) an hour 


un moment, 


a moment 



une saison, a season 

les quatre > the four 

saisons ) seasons 

— le printems, the spring 

— I'ete, m. the summer 
— ■ I'automne, f. the autumn 

— I'hiver, m. the winter 
le vent, the wind 
les quatre vents, the four 

winds 

— I'Orient, m. the East 

— r Occident, m. the West 

— le Midi, the South 

— le Septentrion, the 

North 
une nuee or nue, a cloud 
un brouillard, a fog 

un orage, a storm 

une eclair lightning 

le tonnerre, thunder 

I'arc-en-ciel, the rain bow 
une ondee, a shower 

la pluie, the rain 

la grele, the hail 

la neige, the snow 

la glace, the ice 

le degel, the thaw 

la rosee, the dew 



SECT. 11. 

D'un Pays en General. 

Of a Country in General 

Un empire, an empire 
un royaume, a Idngdom 
une republique, a republic 
I'Europe, f. Europe 

I'Asie, f. Asia 

I'Afrique, f. Africa 

I'Amerique, f. America 

1 la France, France 

2 I'Angleterre, f. England 

3 I'Ecosse, f. Scotland 

4 rirlande, f. Ireland 

5 I'Espagne, f. Spain 

6 le Portugal, Portugal 

7 ritalie, f. Italy 

8 la Hollande, HoUand 

9 I'Allemagne, f. Ger- 

many 

10 la Pologne, Poland 

11 la Suede, Sweden 

12 le Danemarck, Den- 

mark 
une capitale, a capital 

1 Paris, Paris 

2 Londres, London 

3 Edimbourg, Edinburg 

4 Dublin, Dublin 

5 Madrid, Madrid 

6 Lisbonne, Lisbon 

7 Rome, Rome 

8 Amsterdam, Amsterdam 

9 Vienne, Vienna 

10 Cracovie, Cracow 

11 Stockholm, Stockholm 

12 Copenhague, Copen- 
hagen 



une nation, 



a nation 



97 



in Europeen, .an Euro- 
pean 
un Asiatique^ |ui Asiatic 
im Africain, an African 
an Americain, an Ame- 
rican 
un Fra.nQais, a Frenchman 
un Anglais, an English- 
man 
un Ecossais, a Scotchman 
un Irian dais, an Irishman 
un Espagnel, a Spaniard 
un Portugais, a Portuguese 
un Italien, an Itahan 

un Hollandais, a Dutchman 
un Allem^and, a German 
un Polonais, a Pole 

un Suedois, (o-a) a Swede 
un Danois, (o-«) a Dane 
une langue, a language 
I'Hebreu, the Hebrew 

le Grec, the Greek 

le Latin, the Latin 

le Frangais, the French 
1' Anglais, m. the English 
i'Ecossais, m. the Scotch 
rirlandais, m. the Irish 
ritahen, m. the Italien 
I'Espagnol, m. the Span- 
ish 
I'Allemand, m. the Ger- 
man 
un village, a village 

une paroisse, (p-a) a parish 
un hameau, a hamlet 

une metairie, a farm 

un champ, a field 

un pre, a meadow 

un verger, an orchard 

un jardin, a garden 

une maison, q a house 



^ILOT. Ill 

D'une Ville en General, 

Of a Town in Genei-al 

Une ville, ' a town 

une cite, a city 

ville fortifiee, fortified town 
gros bourg, m. market town 
port de mer, m. sea port 
une rue, a street 

use cour, a yard 

une place, a square 

le marche, the market 

I'hotel de ville, the town 

house 
une eglise, a church 

line hotellerie, - an inn 
une auberge, an eating 

house 
uri cabaret, a public house 
une taverne, a tavern 

uti cafe, a cdfiee-house 
la comedie, the play-house 
la prison, the jail 

les portes, the gates 

un pent, a bridge 

les fauxbotirgs, the suburbs 
les habitans, the inhabit- 
ants 
un art, an art 

art liberal, liberal art 

art mechanique, mechanic 
art 
la theologie, divinity 

la philosophic, philosophy 
la medecine, physic 

la chirurgie, surgery 

le droit, (o-a) law 

la rhetorique, "hetoric 

la poesie, poetry 



98 



Tastronomie, f. 


, astronomy 


un statuaire, statuary 


I irithmetique, 


f. arith- 


un sculpteur, a carver 




metic 


un imprimeur, a printer 


I'algebre, m. 


algebra 


maitre de danse, dancing- 


la geometrie, 


geometry- 


mastei 


la geographic, 


geography 


mattre de musique, music- 


r architecture, 


£ archi- 


mastei 




tecture 


maftre d'«criture, writing- 


la navigation, 


navigation 


master 


la musique, 


music 


maitre d'ecole, school- 


la chiraie, 


chemistry- 


master 


la peinture. 


painting 


un sous-mattre, an usher 


la sculpture, 


carving 


un ecolier, a scholar 


rimprimerie, 


printing 
dancing 


un comedien a stage- 


la danse, 


player 


i'ecriture, f. 


writing 


un bourgeois, (o-a) a citizen 


un theologien, 


a divine 


un artisan, a tradesman 


un philosophe, 


a philcffio- 


un negociant, a mercha.nt 




pher 


unjoailler, a jeweller 


un historien. 


a historian 


un mercier, a mercer 


un medecin, 


a physician 


un marchand drapier, a 


un chirurgien, 


a surgeon 


woollen-draper 


un apothicaire, 


an apothe- 


un mswchand de toile, a 




cary 


linen-draper 


un avocat, 


a lawyer 


un marchand de sole, a 


un orateur 


an orator 


silk mercer 


un poete 


a poet 


un parfumeur, a perfumei 


un astronome, 


an astrono- 


un confiturier, a confec- 




mer 


tioner 


un geometre, 


a geometri- 


un epicLer, a grocer 




cian 


^ a goldsmith 


an geographe, 


a geogra- 


un orfevre > or silver- 




pher 


) smith* 


un architecte, 


an architect 


un chapelier, a hatter 


«n ingenieur, 


an engineer 


un colporteur, a pedlar 


un rausicien, 


a musician 


un libraire, a bookseller 


un chimiste (shi) chemist 


un relieur, a bookbinder 


'in peintre. 


a painter 


un barbier, a barber 



• These two trades are denoted, in French, by the word Orflvrt 
only. 



un perruquier, a wig maker un poissonnier 



un horloger, a watch maker 
un boutonnier, a button- 
maker 
un graveur, an engraver 
un vitrier, a ^azier 

un verrier, a glass maker 
un chandelier, a tallow- 
chandler 
un cirier, a wax chandler 
un brodeur, an embroiderer 
un tapissier, an uphol- 
sterer 
un fripier, a clothes-broker 
un gantier, a glover 

un coutelier, a cutler 

un fourbisseur, a sword 
cutler 
un potier d'etain, a pew- 
terer 
un chaudronnier, a brazier 
un drouineur, a tinker 
un forgeron, a smith 

un serrurier, a blacksmith 
un marechal, a farrier 

un seUier, a saddler 

un vanier, a basket maker 
un tailleur, a taylor 

un cordonnier, a shoe- 

maker 
un savetier, a cobler 

un tourneur, a turner 

un charpentier, a carpen- 
ter 
un menuisier, a joiner 
un magon, a mason 

un meunier, a miller 

un boulanger, a baker 

un psitissier, a pastry cook 
un rotisseur, a cook 

un boucher, a butcher 



a fish 
monger 
un brasseur, a brewer 

un aubergiste, an inn- 

keeper 
un tonnelier, a cooper 

un messager, a carrier 

un courier, a messenger 
un postilion, a post-boy 
un batelier, a waterman 
un bahutier, a trunk maker 
un bonnetier, a cap maker 
un passe mentie^-, a lace 
maker 
un tisserand, a weaver 
un teinturier, a dyer 

un pelletier, a skinner 
un corroyeur, a currier 
un tanneur, a tanner 

un cordier, a rope maker 
un epinglier, a pin maker 
un fondeur, a founder 

un foulon, a fuller 

tin cocher, a coachman 
un porteur de chaise, a 
chairman 
un crocheteur, a street 
porter 
un mendiant, a beggar 
un instrument, an instru- 
ment 
un crayon, a pencil 

un pinceau, a brush 

un outil, . a tool 

un marteau, a hammer 
un maillet, a mallet 

des tenailles, f. pincers 
un foret, a gimblet 

un virebrequin, a wimble 
une lime, a file 

une scie. a saw 



100 



une hache, an axe 

une cognee, a hatchet 

un ciseau, a chissel 

des ciseaux, scissors 

SECT. IV. 

D'une Maison en general. 

Of a House in general. 
Une maison, a house 

un hotel, a nobleman's 
house, 
un appentis, a shed 

un batiment, a building 
la muraille, the wall 

le fondement, the founda- 
tion 
un coin, a corner 

un auvent, a pent-house 
un plancher, a floor 

la plafond, the ceiling 

un abat-jour, a sky light 
une boutique, a shop 

un <^*age, a story 

le premier etage, the first 
story 
un bas 6tage, a ground 
floor 
le grenier, the garret 

le toit,(o-a) the roof 

un appartement, a lodging 
I'escaUer, the stairs 

une porte, a door or gate 
porte de devant, fore door 
porte de derriere, back 
door 
le seuil, the threshold 

un guichei, a wicket 

un gond, a hinge 

un marteau, a knocker 
une serrure, a lock 

une cle ou clef, a key 



un verrou, 
un loquet, 
le vestibule, 
le salon, 
une chambre, 
un cabinet, 
une etude, 



a boll 

a latch 

the hall 

the parlour 

* a room 

a closet 

a study 



une salle a manger, a din- 
ing room 
une bibliotheque, a library 
une garde robe, a ward- 
robe 
un balcon, a balcony 

une fenetre, a window 
les vitres, f. the glass win- 
dows 
une fenetre a chassis, a 
sash window 
les volets. Hi. the shutters 
la depense, the buttery 
la sommellerie,. the pantry 
la cuisine, the kitchen 

le garde-manger, the larder 
le lavorr, {p-a) the scullery 
la lingerie, the laundry 
la brasserie, the brew 

house 
la boulangerie, the bake 

house 
le bucher, the wood house 



le four, 
la cave, 
la cour, 
un puits 
I'ecurie, f. 
les lieux, m. 
les commodi- 
tes, f. 
un jardin. 



the oven 

the cellar 

the yard 

a well 

the stable 

he house 
of office 

a garden 



une remise, a coach house 
un ateher, a work house 



101 



un magasin, a wai-ehouse 
une poutre, a beam 

un soliveau, a joint 

une latte, a lath 

un ais, a board 

ane plan die, a shelf 

la boiserie the wainscot 
une pierre, a stone 

pierre de taille, a free- 
stone 
une brique, a brick 

une tuile^ a tile 

une ardoise, (o-«) a slate 
du mortier, mortar 

de la chaux, Urae 

du sable, sand 

les meubles, the goods 

la garniture, the furniture 
la tapisserie, the tapestry 
un tableau, a picture 

un miroir, (o-a) a looking 
glass 
une bordure, a frame 

un siege, a seat 

une chaise, a chair 

un fauteuil, an arm chair 
un tabouret, a stool 

un escabeau, a joint stool 
un marchepie, a foot stool 
un banc, a bench 

un coussin, a cushion 

un tapis, a carpet 

une nappe, a table cloth 
une assiette, a plate 

une serviette, a napkin 
un couteau, a knife 

une gaine, a sheath 

une fourchette, a fork 

une cuiller, a spoon 

une saliere, a salt cellar 
'm plat, a dish 

ii* 



une ecuelle, a porringe 
une sauciere, a sauce^ 

un essuie-main, a towei 
une bouteille, a bottle 

une carafe, • a decanter 
un verre, a glass 

une chandeUe, a candle 
une bougie, a wax candle 
un chandelieri a candle- 
stick 
les mouchettes, f. the 

snuffers 
un gueridon, a stand 

un binet, a save-all 

un panier, a basket 

une corbeille, a flat basket 
une cruche, a pitcher 

une cuvette, a cistern 

un vaisseau, a vessel 

une barrique, a barrel 

un pergoir (o-a) a piercer 
Vm buffet, a cupboard 

une- armoir6, a clothes 
press 
une commode, chest of 

drawers 
un tiroir, (o-a) a drawer 
un coffre, a trunk 

une boit«, a box 

une caisse, a chest 

une valise, portmanteau 
un lit, a bed 

la couche, the bedstead 
colonnes de lit, f. bed posts 
ciel-de-lit, m. top of the 
bed 
le fond-du-lit, the tester 
le chevet, the bolster 

lit-de-plumes, feather bed 
une paillasse, a straw bed 
un matelas, a mattress 



102 



un oreiller, 
les couvertures, 



a pillow 
. f. bed- 
clothes 
les draps, m. the sheets 
les rideauXj'm. the curtains 
la ruelie du lit, the bedside 



la bassinoire, 



warming 
pan 
a state bed 
a couch 
a field bed 
a cradle 
a mat 



a brush 



lit de parade, 
lit de repos, 
lit de camp, 
un berceau, 
un natte, 
une brosse, 
des vergettes, 
la cheminee, the chimney 
I'atre, m. hearth 

la grille de fer, the grate 
les chenets, the andirons 
le souflet, the bellows 

les pincettes, the tongs 
la pelle, the fire shovel 
le fourgon, the poker 

le garde-cendre, the fender 
un ecran, a small screen 



un paravant, 



le feu, 

la flamme, 

une etincelle, 

du bois, (o^a) 

un fagot, 

une buche, 

du charboU; 

charbon de terre, pit-coals 

charbon de bois, charcoals 



a folding 
screen 
the fire 
the blaze 
a spark 
wood 
a faggot 
a billet 
coals 



un tison, 
Jes cendres, 
la fumee, 
(asuie, 
f)6ite-a-fusil, f. 



a firebrand 

the ashes 

the smoke 

the soot 

tinder box 



la meche, l^amafdou, tinder 
une allumette, a match 
une pierre-a-feu, a flint 
le briquet, ) , 

le fusil, \ ^^^ '^^'' 

un chaudron, a kettle 

une marmite, porridge pot 
le couvercle, the lid 

le manche, the handle 
I'anse, (d'un pot, &c.) the 
ear 
une ecumoire, (o-a) a 

skimmer 
ime cuiller-a-pot, 
un trepie, 
un coquemar, 
un poeion, 
une poele, a frying-pan 
une casserole, a stew-pan 
une tourtiere, a baking-pan 
un gril, a gridiron 

une broche, a spit 

une brochette, a skewer 
line lechefrite, a dripping 
pan 
un tournebroche, a jack 
un rechaud, a chafingdish 
un potager, 
un fourneau, 
un mannequin, 
un seau, 
un balai, 
un torchon. 



a ladle 

a trivet 

a boiler 

a skillet 



a stove 



a hamper 

a pail 

a broom 

a dusting 

cloth 

un couloir, (o-a) a cullen- 
der 
une passoire, [o-a) a strain- 
er 
une rape, a grater 

un mortier, a mortar 

un pilon, a pestle 



103 



un tamis, a sieve 

un sac, a bag 

un cuvier, une cuve, a tub 

SECT. V. 
Dm Grenre humain. 
Of Mankind. 
Un homme, a man 

homme age, man in years 
un vieillard, an old man 
une femme, a woman 

femme §gee, woman in 
years 
une vieille, an old woman 
un enfant, a child 

petit enfant, a little child 
les enfans, the children 
un gar9on, a boy, lad • 

une fille, a girl, lass 

jeune homme, young man 



jeune fille, 
les jeunes gens 



I'enfance, f. 

la jeunesse, 

la virilite, 

la vieillesse, 

un maitre, 

une maitresse 

le mari, 

la femme, 

un tuteur, 

un or une pupille, a minor 

I'hote, the landlord 



young girl 

young 

people 

childhood 

youth 

manhood 

old age 

a master 

a mistress 

the husband 

the wife 

a guardian 



a footman 
a servant 
maid 
les domestiques, the ser- 
vants 
the father 
the mother 



un valet, 
une servante, 



le pere, 
la mere, 



lefils, ■ 
la fiUe, 
le frere, 
fa scBur, 
TainS, m. ) 
Tainee, f. ) 
le cadet, > 
la cadette, 5 
le grarid-pere, 



the son 

the daughter 

the brother 

the sister 

the eldest 
the youngei 



la grand'mere, 



a cousm 



grand fa- 
ther 
grand 
mother 
la petite-fiHe, grand daugh- 
ter 
les parens, the relations 
un oncle, an uncle 

une tante^ an aunt 

un neveu, a nephew 

une niece, a niece 

un cousin, 
une cousine, 
le beau-pere, father-in-law 
la belle mere, mother-in- 
law 
un beau fils, son-in-law 
une belle fille, daughter-in 
law 
le Ijeau-frere, brother-in- 
law 
la belle scEur, sister-in-law 
le parrain, the god-father 
la marraine, the god-mo- 
ther 
un filleul, a god-son 

une fiUeule, a god-daughter 
unami,m ) ^^^.^^^ 
une amie, f. 3 
un compagnon, m. > a com- 
une compagne, f. 5 P anion 

un voisin, m. ) „ „„• i,k^,„ 
. .' r- > anei^nboui 
une voisme.i. 



104 



SECT. VI. 



Des Parties du Corps, he. 
OftkeParts of the Body, &, c. 
Le corps, the body 

an membre, a- limb 

la tQte, the head 

ie visage, the face 

le front, the forehead 

les traits, m. the features 
I'oeil, m. the eye 

les yeux, the eyes 

le sourcii,. the ey^-brow 
la paupiere, the eye-lid 
la prunelle de I'oeil, the 
eye-ball 
le nez, the nose 

les narines, f. the nostrils^ 
lajoue, the cheek 

une fossette, a dimple 

la levre, the lip 

levre de dessus, upper lip 
levre de dessous, under lip 
la bouche, the mouth 

une dent, a tooth 

les dents, the teeth 

dents oeilleres, eye teeth 
dents machelieres, grind- 
ers 
la gencive, the gum 

la machoire, (o-a) the jaw 
le palais, the palate 

legosier, > the throat 

la gorge, ) 

I'oreille, the ear 

la temple ou tempe, the 
temple 
le menton, the chin 

le cou ou col, the neck 
le sein, the bosom 

la poitrine, the breast 



I'epaule, f. the shouldei 
le bras, the arm 

bras-droit, right arm 

bras-gauche, left arm 

Taisselle, f. the arm])it 
le coude, the elbow 

le poignet, the wrist 

le poing, the fist 

la main, the band 

main-droite, right hand 
main-gauche, left hand 
le doigt, the finger 

petit-doigt, little fingeV 

doigt du milieu, middle 

finger 
le pouee, the; thumb 

une jointure, a joint 

I'ongle, m. the nail 

*le ventre, the belly 

le nombril, the navel 

le dos, the back 

repine du dos, f. back 

bone 
les reins, m. the loins 

le cote, the side 

une cote, a rib 

la ceinture, the waist 

la hanche, the hip 

I'dine, f. the groin 

la cuisse, the thigh 

le genou, the knee 

le j arret, the ham 

lajambe, the leg 

le mollet, > the calf of the 
le gras, \ leg 

le pie ou pied, the foot 
la cheville (du pie) the 

ankle 
la plante (du pie) the sole 
le talon, the heel 

le coude pie, the instep 



105 



une veine 



I orteil, m. the great toe 
doigts du pie, the toes 

la peau, the skin 

un OS, a bone 

la moelle, the marrow 

la chair, the flesh 

la ^raisse, the fat 

the blood 
a vein 

une artere, an artery 

les pores, m. the pores 
un nerf, a sinew 

un muscle, amuscle 

le crane, the scull 

le cerveau, the brain 

les entrailles^f. the entrails 
I'estomac, m. the stomach 
les boyaux, m. the Dowels 
le coBur, the heart 

les poumons, m. the lungs 
le foie, the liver 

les rognons, m. the kidneys 
la rate, the spleen 

le fiel, the gall 

la vessie, the bladder 

les cheveux, m. the hair 
chevelure, la. head of hair 
la barbe, the beard 

une larme, a tear 

la salive, the spittle 

I'haleine, f. the breath 
la voix, the voice 

la parole, the speech 

un gemissement, a groan 
un soupir, a sigh 

I'etemuement, m. sneezing 
le hoquet, the hiccough 
le sommeil, sleep 

le ronflement, snoring 

la be ante, beauty 

ia laideur. ugliness 



rembonpoint, m. plump- 
ness 
la maigreur, leanness 

la sante, health 

la taille, the shape 

Tair, m. the looks 

la demarche, the gait 

le porte, the carriage 

le geste, th« action 

une grimace, grimace 

les cinq sens, m. the five 
senses 
— . la vue, the sight 

— I'oui'e, m. the hearing 

— I'odorat, m. the smell 

— le gout, trie taste 

— le toucher, the feeling 
des engelures, f. chilblains 
une brulure, a burn, a scald 
un rhume, a cold 
une toux, a cough 
uix mal-de-tete, a headach 
un mal-de -gorge, a sore 

throat 
une dartre, a tetter 

une verrue , a wart 

une ride, a wrinkle 

un boutoD, a pimple 

une loupe, a wen 

une bosse, a hunch 

une entorse, a sprain 

une egratignure, a scratch 

SECT. VII. 
Des Habillemens, et des 
Choses qu'on porte sur 
soi. 
Of the Apparel and Things 

which are worn. 
Habit complet, a suit of 
clothes 



ii6 



habit de deuil, mourning 
clothes 
un habit de drap, a cloth 
coat 
un habit uni, a plain coat 
habit galonne, a laced coat 
une veste, ^ waistcoat 

veste de soie, silk waistcoat 
veste de satin, satin: waist- 
coat 
un gilet, a waistcoat 

la culotte de velours, vel- 
vet breeches 
calotte de peau^, leather 
breeches 
un cale^on, drawers 

un sourtout, a surtout 

une redingote, a great coat 
un manteau, a cloak 

la doublure, the lining 

les boutons, m. the buttons 
boutonnieres, f. button 
holes 
une chemise, a shirt or 
shift 
chemise blanche, clean 
shirt 
chemise sale, dirty shirt 
chemise garnie, ruffled 
shirt 
le collet, the neck (of a 
shirt) 
poignets, m. the wrist- 
bands 
manchettes, f. the ruffles 
le jabot, the bosom 

une cravate, a neckcloth 

tour de cou, ) 

nn bonnet, a cap 



bonnet de nait, a night 
cap 
une robe de chambre a 
morning or night gown 
l6s bas, m. the stockings 
bas de laine, worsted 

stockings 
bas de coton, cotton stock- 
ings 
bas de soie, silk stockings 
chaussettes, f. under stock- 
ings 
chaussons, m. socks 

les jarrettieres, f. the gar- 
ters 
les pantoufles, the slippers 
les souliers, the shoes 

les escarpins, the pumps 
les boucles, f. the buckles 
boucles d' argent, silver 

buckles 
boucles d'acler, steel 

buckles 
les bottes, the boots 

Un tire bottes, boot-jack 
les eperons, the spurs 

des guetres, spatterdashes 
une perruque, a wig 

perruque a queue, cue-wig 
perruque a bourse, bag-wig 
perruque ronde, round wig 
perruque a I'abbe, bob-wig 
un chapeau, a hat 

chapeau uni, plain hat 

chapeau galonne, laced hat 
une cocarde, a cockade 
un mouchoir, a handker- 
chief 
un mouchoir de poche, a 
Docket handkerchief 



i07 



Urt moucfaoir de cou, a neck 

handkerchief 
les gants, m. the gloves 
gants de peau, leather 

gloves 
gants de sole, silk gloves 
une montre, a watch 

montre d'or, gold watch 
montre d' argent, silver 

watch 
montre a repetition, repeat- 
ing watch 
le cadran, the dial plate 
r aiguille, f. the hour hand 
la boite, the case 

la chaine, the chain 

le cordon, the string 

la cle, the key 

le crochet, the hook 

le cachet, the seal 

une tabatiere, a snuffbox 
une bague, a ring 

une bourse, a purse 

une lorgnette, opera glass 
des lunettes, spectacles 
une epee, a sword 

le ceinturon, the belt 

une canne, a cane 

un baton, a stick 

une baguette, a switch 
une houssine, a twig 

un fouet, ■ a whip 

Des Habits de Femmes. 

Of the Women's Clothes. 
ane chemise de ) a shift 
femme, \ a smock 
une gorgerette > a tuck- 
un tour de gorge \ er 

les manches. f. the sleeves 



rufflea 

the stays 

a bodice 

jumps 

a lace 

a bodkin 



manchettes, f. 
le corps, 
un corset, 
des brassieres, f. 
un lacet, 
un poin^on, 
la piece, the stomacher 
une echelle > a stomacher 
de rubans, \ of ribbons 
une jupe, a petticoat 

un jupon, under-petticoat 
jupoH pique, quilted petti- 
coat 
ui^ panier, a hoop 

un fourreau, a frock 

une robe, a gown 

robe de toile, linen gown 
robe de coton, cotton gown 
robe d'Indienne, calico 
gown 
silk gown 
a scarf 



robe de sole, 
une echarpe, 
un tablier, 
un mantelet, 
des mitaines, 
une coiffure, 
une cornette, 
un coUier, 
un eventail, 
des boucles 
d'oreilles, 
des pendane 
dioreilles, 
un anneau, 
un jonc, 
un bracelet, 
un bouquet, 
desjoyaux, m. 



an apron 

a cloak 

mittens 

1 head dress 

a mob 

a necklace 

a fan 

ear-rings 

drops or 

pendants 

a plain ring 

a hoop ring 

a bracelet 

a nosegay 

jewels 



des diamans, m. diamonds 
un porte-feuille, pocket- 

b00i£ 



108 



SECT. VIII. 
Des Alimens et de la 
Boisson. 
Of Food and Brinks. 
un pain, a loaf 

petit pain, a foU 

du pain, some bread 

pain blanc, white bread 
pain bis, brown bread 

pain frais, new bread 

pain rassis, etale bread 

de ia mie, some crumb 
de la croute, some crust 
une tranche, a slice 

un morceau, a bit, a mor- 
sel 
une bouchee, a mouthful 
d u bouillon, some broth 
de la soupe, some soup 
de la viande, some meat 
du bouiUi, boiled meat 
du roti,' roast meat 

du boeuf, some beef 

du veau, some veal 

du mouton, some mutton 
de I'agneau, some lamb 
du p©rc, ■ some pork 

du lard, some bacon 

du jambon, some ham 

des saunsses, f. sausages 
des trippes, f. -some tripe 
uiie volaille, a fowl 

uae poularde, a pullet 

du poisson, some fish 

de la sauce, some sauce 
un fEuf, an egg 

du sel, some salt 

du poivre, some pepper 



de la muscade, some nut- 
meg 
de la moutarde, some mus- 
tard 
de I'huile, some oil 

du vinaigre, some vinegar 
du beurre, some butter 
beurre frais, fresh butter 
beurre sale, salt butter 
du from age, some cheese 
un biscuit^ a biscuit 

un gateau, a cake 

un pate, a pie 

des confitures, f. sweet- 
meats 
du Sucre, some sugar 

un flan, a custard 

une tarte, a tart 

une talmouse, a cheese- 
cake 
de rea«, f. some water 
du lait, some milk 

du petit lait, some whey 
de la creme, some cream 
de la biere, some beer 
biere forte, strong-beer 
du cidre, some cider 

du poire, some perry 

du vin, some wine 

vin rouge, red wine 

vin blanc, white wine 

du the, ' some tea 

the bou, bohea tea 

the vert, green tea 

du cafe, some coffee 

du chocolat. some choco- 
late 
de Veau de vie some 

brandy 



109 



SECT. IX 

Des Divertissements^ &c. 

Of Plays and Diversions. 
Un jeu, a game, a play 
an passe-tems, a pastime 
un joujou, a plaything 

une balle, a ball 

un balon, a foot ball 

un volant a shuttle-cock 
une raquette, a racket 

un batoir, (p-a) a battle- 
door 
une toupie, a whirligig 
un sabot; a top 

une corniche, a grig: 

une laniere, a lash 

un cerceau, n. hoop 

une crecelle, a rattle 

un bilboquet, cup and ball 
des marbres, marbles 

un sifJlet, % whistle 

une canoniere, a pop-gun 
des echasses, f. stilts 

le frappe-main, hot cockles 
le coupe-tete, leap frog 
le colin-maillard, blind 
man's buff 
a pair ou non, the game at 
even or odd 
a croix ou pile, the game at 
head or tail 
le jeu de boules, the game 
at bowls 
)e jeu de quilles, the game 
at nine-pins 
une boule, a bowl 

le but, the jack at (bowls) 
une quille, a pin 

le jeu de barres, the game 

of prison bars 
10 



le jou de la fossette, the 

game at chuck farthing 

la poussette, pusn-pin 

lejeu de la crosse, the' 

game at cricket 

une crosse, a bat 

un cerf- volant, a kite 

une brandilloire, a swing 

une balan9oire, a see-saw 

un jeu de hasard, a game 

of chance 

un ieu d'adresse, a game 

of skill 

le jeu de paume, the game 

at tennis 

le jeu de billard, the game 

of billiards 

le jeu de dames, the game 

of draughts 

un damier, draught-board 

le jeu des echecs, the game 

of chess 

un echiquier, a chess 

board 

un jeu de cartes, a pack of 

cards 

un atout or > , 

une triomphe, \ ^ *^"^^P 

une main > , . .., 

1 - > a trick 

une Levee, 5 

un jeton, a counter 

une fiche, a fish 

des des,-m. some dice 

SECT. X. 
Des Animaux et des 

Oiseaux. 

Of Animals and Birds. . 

Un animal, an animal 

un agneau, a lamb 

un ane, an ass 



lid 



une belette, 


a weasel 


uii belier, 


a ram 


une biche, 


a hind 


un blaireau, 


a badger 


un boeuf, 


an ox 


un bouc, 


a he-goat 


une brebis, 


an ewe 


un cerf, 


a stag 


un chat, 


a cat 


une cbatte, 


a she-cat 


un cheval, 


a horse 


des chevaux, 


some horses 


une chevre, 


a she-goat 


une chevreau. 


a kid 


un chien, 


a dog 


une chienne, 


a bitch 


un cocbon, 


a hog, a pig 


un daim, 


a deer 


une daine, 


a doe 


un ecureuil, 


a squirrel 


un furet, 


a ferret 


une genisse, 


a heifer 


une jument, 


a mare 


un lapin, 


a rabbit 


un lievre, 


^ a hare 


un lion, 


a lion 


un loup, 


a wolf 


un mouton, 


a sheep 


un ours, 


a bear 


un poulain, 


a colt 


un rat, 


a rat 


un renard, 


a fox 


un sanglier, 


a wild boar 


un singe. 


a monkey 


une souris, 


a mouse 


un taureau, 


a bull 


une truie, 


a sow 


une vache. 


a cow 


un veau, 


a calf 


un oiseau [o-d 


) a bird 


un aigle, 


an eagle 



un alouette, a larK 

une becasse, a woodcock 
une becassine, a snipe 
un canard, a duck 

ua chardonneret, a gold- 
finch 
un eigne, a swan 

un coq, a cock 

un corbeau, a raven 

une corneilLe, a crow 

un dinde, a turkey 

un faisan, a pheasant 

une hirondelle, a swallow 
une linotte, a linnet 

un moineau, a sparrow 
une oie, a goose 

un paon, {pan) a peacock 
une perdrix, a partridge 
un perroquet, a parrot 

une pie, a magpie 

un pigeon, a pigeon 

une poule, a hen 

un poulet, a chicken 

un rossignol, a nightingale 
un serin, a canary-bird 

SECT. XL 

Des Poissons et des 

Insects. 
Of Fishes and Insects. 
Un poisson, a fish 

une alose, a shad 

un anchois, an anchovy 
un anguille, an eel 

un barbeau, a barbel 

une barbue, a dab 

un brochet, a pike, jack 
une carpe, a carp 

un carrelet, a flounder 
une crevette, a shrimp 
une ecrevisse, a crawfish 



Ill 



6crevisse de mer, a lobster 

un eperlan, a smelt 

un goujon, a gudgeon 

un hareng, a herring 

un huitre, an oyster 

une limande, a burt, bret 

un maquereau, a mackerel 

une melette, a sprat 

un merlan, a whiting 

une merluche, a haddock 

une morue, a codfish 

une moule, a muscle 

une perche, a perch 

une petoncle, a cockle 

uueplie, a plaice 

un rouget, a roach 

une sardine, a pilchard 

un saumon, a salmon 

une sole, a soal, sole 

une tanche, a tench 

une truite, a trout 

un tourbot, a turbot 
une vendoise (o-a) a dace 

un insecte, an insect 

une abeille a bee 

une araignee, a spider 

un bourdon, a drone 

une cantharide, a Spanish 

fly 

un cerf-volant, a horned 

beetle 

une chenille, a caterpillar 



un ciron, a hand- worm 
un cloporte, a wood-louse 
un cousin, a gnat 

un crapaud, a toad 

un escarbot, a beetle 

une fourmi, an ant 

un frelon, a hornet 

une grenouille a frog 

un grillon, a cricket 

un guepe, ■ a wasp 

un hanneton, a cock cha- 
fer 
UR limagon, a snail 

une limace, a slug 

une mouche, a fly 

un papillon, a butterfly 
un perce-oreille, an ear- 
wig 
un pou, a louse 

une puce, a flea 

une punaise, . a hug 

une sangsue, a leech 

une sauterelle, a grass- 
hopper 
un taon, an ox-fly 

un ver, a worm 

un vermisseau. a small 
worm 
un ver-a-soie, a silk-worm 
un ver-luisant, a glow- 
worm 
une vip^rtj, a viper 



u^ 



A LIST OF ADJECTIVES NOT FOUND IN GRAMMARS, 
ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED. 



4battu, e. faint, dejected 
C abstemious, one 

absteme, < who drinks no 
f wine 

absent, e. • absent 

absolu, e. ' absolute 

1 , ., C abstruse, inat- 

abstrait, e. < , .. , , 

' I tentive, absent 

absurde, nonsensical, ab- 
surd 
accablant, e. trouMesome, 
very heavy 
acceptable, acceptable, 
worth accepting 
accessible, accessible 

accommodant, e. complai- 
sant, complying 
accordable, that may be 
granted 
aeephak, without a head or 
chief 
" statue acephale, a sta- 
tue without a head 
acide, acid, sharp 

acrimonieux, se. acrimoni- 
ous 
adorable, adorable, divme 
adoptif, ve. adoptive 

adoucissant, e. emollient 
adroit, e. skilful, dexter- 
ous 
adventif, ve. adventitious, 
casual 
aerostatique, concerning 
aerial navigation 
ifFable, courteous, affable 



affaire, e. full of business 
affecte, e. affected 

affectif, ve. ' pathetic 

affectionne, e affectionate, 
loving 
affectueux, se. full of kind- 
ness 
" des manieres > kind man- 
affectueuses, ) ners 

affide, e. trusty 

C frightful, 
affieux, se. < dreadful, 
( shocking 
aga5ant,e. alluring, enticing 
age, e. aged, stricken in 
years 
agent, e. an agent 

" agent de change, a 
stock broker 
aigre, sour, shrill, sharp, 
severe 
aile, e. winged 

aimantin, e. magnetic 

aine, e. eldest brother, m. 
eldest sister, f 
aimable, amiable, lovely, 
agreeable, charming 
aise. glad, joyful, well 

pleased, happy 
aise, e. easy, convenient, 
in easy circumstances 
alarmant, e. dreadful 

alarming 
alegre, brisk, lively 

alerte, cheerful, watchful, 
upon one's guard 



aiise or alize^ 
"les vents alises, 



^ used 
OQly 
in the 
" trade 
^ winds" 
alite, e. bed ridden 

altere, e. thirsty, dry 

altier, e. proud, haughty 
ambigu, e. ambiguofts, 
equivocal 
ambitieux, se. ambitious 
ambulant, e. strolling, rov- 
ing 
un comedien < a strolUng 
ambulant, ( player 
amer, e. bitter 

ami, e. friendly, courteous 
amiable, kind, friendly 
a r amiable, amicably, in a 
friendly manner 
amoureux, se. in love, smit- 
ten, fond of, amorous 
ample, large, wide, plenti- 
ful 
ampoule, bombastic, high- 
flo^Ti 
analogue, analogous 

ancien, ne. ancient, of for- 
mer times 
angfelique, angelical 

angulaire, angular 

" Pierre angulaire, Cor- 
ner stone 
appetissant, e. relishing, 
lovely, desirable 
C ardent, very 
ardent, e. •? hot, fierce, vio- 

( lent ^ 

ardoise, e. slate colored 
aride, dry, barren, unfruit- 
ful 
10* 



ii8 

arque, e. bent like a bow, 

crooked 

assure, e. sure, certain, 

bold, confident 

atroce, atrocious, highly 

wicked 

attache, e. covetous, near, 

selfish 

atfeint, e. hit, struck, &c. 

attenantj e. contiguous 

attenuant, e. mitigating, 



attractif, ve. 
attristant, e. 
auo'uste. 



weakening 



attractive 
id, afilicting 
majestic, sacred, 
august 
avariciettjjSe. stingy, 

mean, covetous 
avarie, e. damaged 

avenant, e. weH-loaking, 
genteel^ suitable 
aveugle, ' Wind 

avide, greedy, eager 

avine,e. seasoned with wine 
"C*est un ( "H© k a. 
corps avine" ( good toper" 
a2ure, e. of a blue colour 
" La voute azuree," The 
azure sky, 
Badine, e. frolicksome, full 
of play, sportive 
basane, e. tawny, sunburnt 
has, se.low, mean, dishon- 
orable 
beau (bel) belle, beautitul, 
finej handsome 
beni^ e. ite. praised, 

blessed 
bienvenu, e, welcome 

bienvoulu, e. beloved, es- 
teemed 



114 



bizarre, capricious, fantas- 
tical 
oisulce, cloven footed, 

(Nat. Hist.) 
blanc, che. white 

blesse, e, wounded 

blond, e. light, fair 

bon, ne. good, kind, he 
boreal, e, northern 

hossu, €)s hump-backed 
hot, (pied) club-footed 
^ boiteaux, se. lame, limping 
bou€h«^ e. heavy, duU, 
stopt 
bojijieipt, se. muddy, miry, 
dirty 
bouffon, full of drollery 
branlant, e. shaking 

brief, eve. short 

brulant, e» > hot, burning 
brdle, e. burnt 

" vin br^le/' mulled wine 
brun, e. brown 

brut, e. rough, unpoHshed 
brutal, e. brutish, churlish, 
rude 
Iwruyant,, e, noi^y 

Gaduc, que. decrepit, 

worn out 
"1© mai C?due," the fall- 
ing sickness 
cagot, e. hypocritical 

calleux, se. callous, hard- 
ened 
calme, esdm, quiet 

calomnieux, se. slanderous, 
calumnious 
camus, e. flat-nosed 

capabel, capable, able, &c. 
capital, e. capital, chief, 
principal 



carre, ?> squaro 

^atral, «. central 

cereniM^eux, se. ceremo- 
nious 
charitable, charitable 

ehaud, €. warm, hot 

chauvej^ bald 

cher, e, dear 

qhetif, ve. mean, pitiful, 
poor 
choisi, e. chosen, select 
civil, e. civil, political 

clair, e. clear, bright, &c. 
clair voyaat, e. discerning, 
clear sighted 
classiqi^, classical 

comble, heaped to the top 
comique, comical 

commercial, e. commer- 
cial 
commotle, convenient, 
commodious 
oommanj.e. common, usual, 
ordinary 
compact, e^ cjbse, compact 
comparable, comparable 
compatible, compatible, 
suitable 
complaisant, e. com- 

plaisant 
complet, e. complete 

complique, e. complicated 
coinprehensible,intelligible 
compris, e. comprehended 
comptant, e. ready 

" argent comptant," ready 
money 
concerte, e. stiff, affected, 
agreed upon 
conciliable, reconcilable 
concis. e. short, brief 



115 



coiicluant, c. conrkicing, 
conclusive 
conditioniie, e. in good or- 
der 
confiant, e. confiding 

confondu, e. confounded, 
perplexed 
conjugal, e. conjugal 

consequent, e. consistent 
considerable, Considerable 
considerant, e. considerate, 
cautious 
consolable, consolable 

contestable, disputable 

contraint, e. constrained, 
stiff 
contraire, contrary, hurtful, 
adverse, opposed 
contrariant, e. of a contra- 
dictory temper 
r convenient, 

r 1 J proper, suit- 
con venable,< ^, ,5 L r^« 

' J able, season- 
( able 

coriace, as tough as leather 
" un hommfe coriace," a 
tough fisted fellow 
corrigible, corrigible 

courage ux, se. courageous, 
bold, resolute 
couperose, e. red, full of 
pimples 
courant, e. flowing, run- 
ning current, present 
court, e. short 

'•' avoir la vue courte," to 
be short sighted 
cousu, e. sewed, stitched 
couvert, e. covered 

craintifjVe. timorous, fearful 
creux, se. hollow, deep 



criant, e. glaring, snameful 
criard, e. clamorous, noisy 
criminel, le. criminal, 

guilty 
croupissant, e. standing, 
stagnating 
Croyable, credible, worthy 
of beliet 
cru, e. raw, crude, unman- 
nerly 
cruel, le. cruel, unkind, 
hardhearted 

{used only in 
writino; as "ecri- 
ture cursive, ^a 
running hand 
Dangereux, se. dangerous 
dansant, e. dancing 

debile, debilitated, weak, 
feeble, faint 
decent, e. becoming, decent 
decide, e. decided 

decisif, ve. decisive, per- 
emptory 
decliiiant, e. declining 
defectueux, se. defective, 
faulty 
d«licat, e. delicate, fine, 
dainty 
delicieux, se. delicious, 
voluptuous 
dehe, e. fine, tbin, small 
deloyal, e. disloyal, unfaith- 
ful 
denature, e. unnatural 
dense, dense close, com- 
pact 
desastreux, se. disastrous, 
unfortunate 
desavantageux, se. disad- 
vantageous 



'If^ 



116 



dfesert, e deserted 

desirable, desirable 

desolant, grievous, afflicting 
desole, e. disconsolable 
despotique, despotical 

detestable, detestable, hate- 
ful, wretched 
devolu e. devolved, trans- 
ferred 
devot, e. devoted, bigoted 
different, e- distinct, diversf 
various 
difficile,, hard, troublesome, 
difficult 
diffus, e. prolix, diffuse 
digne, deserving, worthy, 
. honest, uprig^ 
discorde, discord, strife 
di^gracieux, se. ungraceful, 
disagreeable, disgraceful 
discret, e. discreet, prudent, 
considerate 
divers, e. various, different, 
distant, remote 
divin, e. divine, excellent 
docile, docile, submissive 
dodu, e. fat, plump 

douloureux* se. painftit, 
smarting 
douteux, se. doubtful 

doux, ce. soft, sweet 

right, just, honest, 
straight 
dur, e. hard, firm 

durable, lasting 

Eblouissant, e. dazzling 
echauffant, e. heahng 

echevele, e. dishevelled 
ecumeux, se. frothy, foamy 
efficace, efficacious, power- 
ful 



droit, e. 



egare, e. strayed, wild, out 
of one's senses 
egrillatfd, t. sprightly, met- 
tlesome 
eminent, e. high, lofty 

enduranty e. patient, who 
submits to insult 
enfantin, childish 

-ennuyant, e. which causes 
weariness, tedious, tire- 
some 
eoauy««k, se. wearisome, 
tiresome, troublesome 
enrage, e- desperate, mad, 
raging 
entreprenant, e. enterpris- 
ing, bold, daring 
envieux, *e. envious 

epais, se.' thick, dense 
epars, e. scattered, dis- 
persed 
eperdu, e. dismayed 

epineux, .se. difficult, 

thorny, prickly 
eplore, e. all in tears, 

bathed in tears 



equivoque, 
errant, e. 



equivocal 
wanderins: 



errone, e. erroneous 

erudit, e, learned, erudite 
espiegle, waggish, frolic- 
some, a little mischievous 
eternel, le. everlasting, 
without end, eternal 
etonne, e. astonished 

etoile, e. starry 

etouffant, e. sultry 

etrange, strange, foreign 
etroit, e. narrow, strait 

evitable, avoidable 

exact, e. punctual, exact 



117 



excellent, e. excellent, rare 
excessif, ve. excessive 
experiinente, e. experienc- 
ed 
expres, se. express, plain, 
clear 
expressif, ve. expressive 
expiatoire, expiatory 

exprimable, that can be ex- 
pressed 
extant, e. extant, in being 
exterieur, e. exterior, out- 
ward 
externe, eiternal 

extrait, e. extracted 

Fabuleux, se. fabulous 

facetieux, se. facetious, 
merry 
facile, easy 

facheux, se. hard, provok- 

^°? 
factice, factitious, made, 

coined 
" un mot factice," a new 
coined word 
factieux, se. factious, sedi- 
tious 
faible, weak 

fade, insipid, nauseous 
faineant, e. idle, lazy, sloth- 
ful 
falot, e. ridiculous 

fame, e. famed 

fam clique, famished, 

starved 
fameux, se. famous 

fantasque, fantastical, 

whimsical 
farci, e. stuffed 

farde, e. painted, rouged 
fatio-ue, e. tired, fatigued 



fautif, ve. faulty 

faux, sse. false, deceitful 
favorable, propitious, kind 
favori, ite. agreeable, best 
liked 
fecond, e. fruitful, prolific 
felon, rehellious, cruel 

ferme, fast, strong, steady 
fertile, fertile 

feu, ue. late, deceased 

" le feu roi/' the late king 

"lafeue teine,'' the late 

queen 

fidele, faithful 

fieffe, e. arrant, downright 

" un fripon fieffe," an 
arrant rogue 
fievreux, se. feverish 

filial, e. filial 

fin, e. cuftning, fine, sly 
figure, €. figurative 

finaud, e. ^ly, artful 

fixe, immovable, steady 
fluide, fluid, liquid 

fonce, e. deep 

" couleur foncee/' deep 
coloured 
fondu, e. melted 

foroene, e. mad 

forrael, le. formal 

fort, e. strong, vigorous 
fou, (fol) folle, foolish, mad 
fragile, brittle, weak 

frais, che. fresh, cool 

franc, che. frank, sincere, 
open 
frequent, e. frequent 

frivole, frivolous 

froid, e. cold 

Gai, e. cheerful 

gauche, left, awkward 



118 



( generous 



genereuxjse. < liberal, mag- 
( nanimous 
gentil, le. genteel, neat, 
pretty 
gla9ant, e. freezing 

glace, e. frozen, glazed 
glissant, e. slippery 

glorieux, se. glorious 

gluant, e. gjutinous, tena- 
cious 
pacieux, se. gi-aceful, be-'» 
coming 
graisseux, se. greasy 

grand, e. big, tall, great, 
huge 
gratuit, e. gratuitous 

grave, - heavy, grave, low 
Grec, que. Grecian, Greek 
gredin, e. beggarly, shabby 
grieche, speckled 

grossier, e. coarse, mean, 
vile 
grotesque, grotesque, ridi- 
culous 
gueux, se. needy, indigent 

,, Ti i T" He IS as 

"Ilestgueuxl ^^^^^ 

commeun ra^ \^^^^^ 

^«gl^«^' [ mouse" 
Habile^ skilful 

*haut, (h. a. ) e. high, tall 
heroi'que, heroical 

*hLdeux, se. hideous 

heureux, se. happy, fortu- 
nate, lucky 
homipide, murderous, kill- 
ing 
hommogene, homogeneous 



*honni, obsc^. confounded, 
abashed 



"Honai soit, J 

qui mal y > 

pens©." J 

*hoii:teux, se. 



" Evil be to 
him, that 
evil thinks" 
shameful, 
ashamed 
horrible^ horrible, frightful, 
dreadful 
humain, e, humane, human 
humjde, v^et, damp, humid 
hydropique dropsical 

hypocrite hypocritical 

Idiot, e. silly, foolish 

ignorant, e. ignorant 

ignoble, ignoble, vile, base 
ignomineiix, se. ignomini- 
ous, disgraceful 
iUegitime, illegitimate, un- 
just 
imbue, 6. imbued, tinctured 
immense, immense 

immobile, immovable 

i-mmoderc, e. immoderate 
immortel, le. immortal 
impair, odd 

" nombre impair," " odd 
number" 
impatient, e. 
imperieux, se. 
impetueux, se 



impatient 
imperious 
"mpetuous, 
hasty 
impolite 
important 
improvi- 
dent 

imprevu, e. unforeseen 
improbable, improbable 
impuni, e. unpunished 



impoli, e 
important, e. 
imprevoyant, e. 



* Marked thus, the h to be sounded. 



119 



impropre, improper 

impudent e impudent 

impur, e. impure 

incapable, incapable, unfit 
incertain. e. uncertain, 
doubtful 
incivil, e. uncivil 

incGnnmode, troublesome, 
inconvenient 
iaconnu, e, unknown, 

strange 
inconstant, e. incon^fant 
incorrect, e. incorrect 

incorruptible, incorruptible 
incroyable, incredible 

indecis, e. undecided, ir- 
resolute 
indefendu, e. defenceless 
indefini, e. indefinite 

indelicat, e. indelicate 

indevot, e, irreligious 

indicible, unspeakable 

indiferent, e. indifferent 
indigeste, indigestible 

indigne, undeserving, un- 
worthy 
indiscret, e. in^creet, un- 
wise 
indistinct, e. indistinet, 
confused 
C individual, 
individuel, le. < single, par- 
( ticular 
inexpiable, not to be aton- 
ed for 
inedit, e, unpublished 

inexerce, e. unexercised 
inexorable, 
inexorable, •{ not to be en- 
trea ed 



{' 



infame, infamous, base 

infertile, unfruitful, barren 

infirme, infirm, weak, 

sickly 

infortune, e. unfortunate, 

unhappy, unlucky 

r ingenious, 

ingenieux, seJ ^^^^l^^^] 

[ skilful 
C frank, sincere, 
iagenu, e. < wi^out 

i guile 

ingrat, e. ungrateful 

intelligent, e. intelligent 
integre, upright, honest 
intarissable, that never 
dries up 
intrepide, fearless, un- 
daunted 
intestate, dy- 
intestat, e. ^ ing without a 
will 
introuvabje, not to be 

found 
inutile, Useless 

invendu, e. unsold 

r (of a carriage) 
inversable, < cannot be 
(_ overset 

isc^e, e. insulated, alone 
issu, e. sprung, descended 
ivre, inebriated, intoxi- 
cated 
" ivre mort," " dead 

drunk," 
Jaloux, se. jealous, envi 
Gus, tender 
jambe, e. legged 

jeune, young, fiery 



■•••1 



120 



joli, e. pretty, neat, bonny 
joufflu, e. chubcheeked, 
chubby 
journalier, e. daily, uncer- 
tain 

,, T f ^' The fate 

" Les armes I , ^ 

sontjournaJ^^^^^?^^^^^ 

lieres,"] war is un, 

' (^ certain 

jovial, e. jovial, merry 

joyeux, se. joyous, glad 

Juif, ve. Jewish 

Juste,- I J--''«^tw)^} 

justifieatif, ve. serving to 

prove 

juteux, se. juicy 

Laborieux, se. laborious 

lacfie, ^ ^ cowardly 

ladre, leprous, stingy, mean 
laid, e. ugly, plain 

laiteux, se milky 

{languish- 
droopini 
lingeHng 
lan|iiisi§tftt, e. languid, 
weak, faint 

lanifere J bearing wool, 
lamtere, |, lanigerous 

lal^uginisux, se. downy, 
lanuginotts 
large, broad, wide, large 
larmoyant, e. in tears, pa- 
thetic, moving 
las, se. weary, tired 

leger, e. light, active 

lent, e. slow, sluggish, dull 
libertin, e. libertine, licen- 
tious, irreligious 



libfe, - free, at liberty' 

■ ' C muddy, 

limpneux, se. < slimy, oozy, 
( marhsy 
livide, black and blue, 

livid 
laintain, e. far away, dis- 
tant 
long, tie. long 

louable, praisworthy, laud- 
able 
louche, ' squint, looking 
awry 
loupeux, se. knobby 

" un arbr© loupeux," a 
knobby tree 
lourd, e. heavy 

loyal, e. loyal, faithful, 
trusty 
lucid, e. • lucid, bright 
lucratif, ve. lucrative, gain- 
ful, profitable 
lugubre, mournful, sad 
luisant, e. bright, shining 
" un ver luisant," " a glow 
worm" 
lumineux, se. luminous, 
emitting light 
lunaire, lunar, lunary 

* 'rayons lunaire s," " moon 
beams' 
Maigre, meagre, lean 

majestueux, se. majestic 
malade, ill, sick 

maladif, ve. sickly, un- 
healthy 
male, stout, manly 

malefique, mischievous 
C ill made, badly 
malfait, e. < done, ill shap- 
( ed 



121 



malgracieuXj se. 



'dnman- 
nerly, 
ungraci- 
(^ ous 

malhabile, unskilful 

malheureux, se. unhappy, 
unlucky, unfortunate 
C dishonest, 
malhonn^t©, < rude, unci- 
( vil, knavish 
malicieux, se. malicious, 
wicked 
malpropre, uncleanly, slo- 
venly 
maniere, e. affected 

" maniere noire," *'mez!zo- 
tinto" 
manifeste, manifest, plain 
marri, e. sorry, grieved 
mauvais, e. bad, evil, ill 
medisant, e. slanderous, 
reviling 
mefiant, e. mistrustful 

memoratif, ve. remember- 

^^ 
meridionale, southern 

meritoire, worthy of being 
, rewarded 
mielleuxjse. that tasted like 
honey 
miraculeux, se. miraculous 
moisi, e. mouldy, hoary 
moUet, te. a Uttle soflt 

mondain, e. worldly 

montagneux, se. mountain- 
ous, hilly 
mort, e. dead 

morose, morose, sad 

mortel, le. deadly, mortal 
muet, te. dumb, speech- 
11 less 



mucilageneax, se. rnucila 
ginous 
musical, e. musical 

mutin, e. mutinous 

myterieux, se. mysterious 

C nj.tural, unaf- 
Naif, ve. < fected, ingenu- 

( ous 

nain, dwarjfish 

naissant, e. rising, coming 
forth, beginning to appear 
naturel, le. natural, un- 
affected 
natal, e. natal, native 

natif, ve. native born 

" il est natif ) he was born 
de Berlin," J in Berlin 
nebuleux, se. nebulous 
necessaire, necessary 

neeessiteux, needy, neces- 
sitous 
negligent, e. negligent 
nerveux, se, nervous, 

sinewy 
net, te. clean, neat 

neuf, ve. new, fresh 

niais, e, silly, foolish,, 

simple 
noir, e, black, dark 

" un jnoir chagrin," " a 

gloomy sorrow" 
nonpareil, le. matchless, 
incomparable 
non pair, ' odd 

nouveau, > 
nouvel, le. 5 

novice, inexperienced 

nu, e. naked 

nuageux, se. cloudy 

nubile, marriageable 

nntritif, ve nutritious 



I'Z-l 



obligeant, e. 

obscure, 
obstine, e. 



civil, kind, 
accommo- 
dating, 
(^ obliging 
gloomy, dark 
obstinate, stub- 
born 
odieux, se. odioias, hateful 

oeu„e,| (-O^'fj!^) 

offensant, e. offensive 

( officious, 
officieux, se. < kind, oblig- 
( ing 

oisif, ve. Idle, useless 

olivatre, of an oKve colour 
ombrageux, se, suspicious 
onctu^ux, se. oily, clammy 
ondoyant, e. undulating, 
waving 
obstinate 
rich, opnlent 
tempestuous^, 
stormy 
ordinary, com- 
mon 
orgueilfeui, fee. proud, 
haughty 



opinI§.tre, 
opulent, e. 
orageux, se. 

ordinaire, 



origiaaire, 

original, e. 
ossu, e. 
ouvert, e. 

ouvre, e. < 

Paissant, e. 
pale, 

pantois, e. 
paradoxial, e. 



originally. 

Coming from 

original, first 

bony 

open 

(said of linen) 

diapered, 

woi'ked 

grazing 

pale 

short-winded 

paradoxical 



pareil, le. alike, equal 

jiaresseux, se, idle, lazy 
parlant, e, speaking 

pateux, se. mealy, gluish, 
sticky 
pathetique, pathetical 

paternel, le. ' paternal 
patient, e. patient 

pendable, that deserves 
hanging 
perfide, perfidious, false 
perillenx, se, perilous, 
dangerous 
p^rissable, perishable 

C permanent, 
permanent, e. < durable, 
( lasting 
pei^lexe, perplexing, wa- 
vering, uncertain 
pervers, e. bad, wicked 
la fortune ) adverse 

perverse ) fortune 

pesant, e. heavy, weighty, 
slow, indolent 
petit, e. small, little 

petreux, se. stony, gravelly 
petulent, e. pert, saucy 
peureux, se. timorous, 
fearful 
pieux, se. pious 

piquant, e.p**-g;^^^ 

pitoyable, pitiful, compas- 
sionate 
plaintif, ve. plaintive, com- 
plaining 
C pleasant, de- 
plaisant, e. < lightful, agree- 
( able, merry 
Dlat, e. insipid, flat 



123 



plein, e. full, replete 

pluviale, rainy, joined to 
eau pluviale, rainy wa- 
ter 
])oignaBt, €. sharp, severe 
pointiileux, se. captious, 
cavellin^ 
pointu, e. pointed, sharp 
portatif, ve. portable 

possible, possible 

poudreuXj se. powdery, 
dusty 
prealable, previous 

precis, e. precise 

precieux, se. precious 

preliminaire, previous 

prefixe, prefixed 

premature, e. too early, 
preffiarture 
predial,, e. predial 

des rentes > ground 

prediales, ) rents 

preferable, preferable 

prejudiciable, prejudicial 
prenable, that can be taken 
preparatlf, ve. preparative 
present, e. present 

presse, e. in haste, in a 
hurry 
pret, e. ready, prepared 
pretendu, e. pretended, 
self dubbed 
pretentieux, se. affected, 
pedantic 
prevenant, e. obliging, 
pleasing 
preux, se. valiant 

un preux ) a valiant 
chevalier, ) knight 

prevoyant, forecasting, 

. provident 



probable, probable, likely 
prodigieux, se. prodigious, 
amazing 
prodigue, prodigal, waste- 
ful 
pjofond, e. deep 

propre, fit, becoming, 

apt 
provenant, e. coming, pro» 
ceeding 
pueril, e. * childish 

jMiissant, e. powerful, po- 
tent 
pur, e. pure, unmingled, 
guiltless 
purpurin, e. purplish 

putatif, ve. supposed, re- 
puted 
putride, rotten, putrid 

Quarte, quartan 

la fievre ) the quartan 
quarte, ) ague 

quinteux, se. capricious, 
huniorsome 
quotidien, ne. daily 

C'estson.^j^j^j^.^^^jj 

^""""dieO '"'"'^''^ 

Raboteux, se. rough, rug- 
ged 
rachitique, ricketty 

radieux, se. radiant, shin- 
ing 
raffine, e» clever, fine, 
keen 
raide, stiff, rigid 

ntomba^ He dropped 
•J _x \ down stone 
raide mort, j 



rampant, e 



dead 
creeping, 
crawl insr 



I^ 



rapide, swift, rapid 

rare, scarce, uncommon 
ras, e. smooth, plain 

rebelle, rebellious 

rebutant, e. repulsive, dis- 
pleasing 
recent, e. recent 

rechigne, e. sour, crabbed 

, . ^ (a soar 
mme rechignee, < i , 

reciproque, reciprocal, my- 

tual 

recuit, e. overboiled 

eela est cuit ) that is boil' 

et recuit, y ed to rags 

reducible 



reductible, 
reel, le. < 

reojardant, e. 



real, true, 
genuine 
too saving, 
niggardly 
regnant, e. reigning 

regrettable, lamentable 
rejoui, e joyous 

religieux, ae, religious, 
pious 
remuant, e. gtirjing, nqoving 



renomme, e. 

reparable, 
repulsif, ve. 
reserve, e. 

resineux, se. 



renowned, 

fsimed 

reparable 

repulsive 

prudent, cati- 

ikons 

resinous 



revenant, e. likely, taking 
une physio- ) ^ ^^^^. 

n««^^«f-^ countenance 
venante, ) 

revoltant, e. scandalgus 

riche, rich, wealthy 

ride, e. wrinkled 

rond, e. round, circular 



sage, 



rouge, ( d 

devenir ?cmge, to Wi,ish 
rougedtre, reddish 

roulant, e. rolling 

rude, harsh, rough, severe 
ruminant, e. ruminating, 
chewing the cud 
Sablonneux, se. sandy 

sacrilege, sacrilegious 

sage, (speaking of a man) 
wise> prudent 
(of a female) modest 
(of a child) good, 
sedate 
(of an animal) mild, 
tame 

saint, e. saint, holy, pious 
saisissant, e. striking 

"^f^^;'? J a striking cold 
saisissant, ) . ° 

sain, e. healthy 

sale, dirty, nasty 

sale, e. salted 

salubre, salubrious, healthy 

salutaire, salutary 

sauf, ve. safe, secure 

savonneux, se. soapy 

iseant, e. sitting, decent 

sec, che. dry, barren, 

sandy 

secret, e. secret, hidden 

C seditious, 
seditieux, se. < turbulent, 

( factious 
semblable, like, ahke 

serieux, se. serious, solemn, 
grave 
sereux, se. thin, watery 
sensible, sensible, feeling 
serein, e. clear, serene 
serre, e. . close, compac. 



125 



sevl, e. aIoii6, only 

seveie, severe 

signale, e. famous, signal, 
memorable 
silencieux, s€. feilent, still 
similaire, similar, homo- 
gen ecus 
simple, simple, plain 

simultane, e. simultaneous 
simule, e. deceitful, ficti- 
tious 
sincere, honest, sincere 
fiobre, temperate, sober 
soigneax, se. careful, dili- 
gent 
solemnei, , f solemn^ irt 
solennel, ^' 5 due time 
solitaire, solitary, lonely 
sombre, dark, gloomy 

somptueux, se. sumptuous 
soudain, e. suddenly, im- 
mediately 
soul, e. full, glutted 

somis, e. submissive 

soupgonneux, s. suspicious 
souterrain, e. subterraneous 
spacieux, se. spacious 

studieux, se. studious 

suifocant, e. stifling, choak- 
ing 
suject, te. subject, exposed 
superflu, e. superfluous 
superieur, e. superior 

■siir, e. sure, certain 

surnaturel, le. supernatural 
Tachete, e. speckled 

tardif, ve. tardy, slow, 

late 
tarissable, that can be dried 

tedieux, se. ' tedious 
11* 



tel, le. sucli 

temeraire, bold, rash 

tempestueux, se. stormy, 

tempestuous 
l^ndre, tender, soft 

terreux, se. full of earth 
tietu, e. obstinate, head- 
strong 
tortu, e. crooked 

tortueux,(s-e) winding 
touchant, e. moving, affect- 
ing 
touifu, e. thick, bushy, 
tufted 
tourbeux, se. turfy 

towTm«ntant, e. tormenting, 

troublesome 
tout, €. - ■ all, every, any 
tranchant, e. sharp, cutting 
triomphant, e. victorious, 
triumphant 
trivial, e. trivial, common 
turbulent, e. turbulent, vio- 
lent 
tyrannique, tyrannical 
Uligineux, se. damp, 

marshy 
unanime> unanimous 

unique, only, sole 

use, e. worn out, used 

utile, useful, profitable 

{reeling, stag- 
gering, tot- 
tering, wa- 
vering 
vague, loose, indef. 

vacant, e. vacant 

vain, e. vain, fruitless 

valeureux, se. valiant, 

stout, courageous 
valide, legal, valid 



im 



vaporeux, 


se. 


vaporous 


veillant, e. 




awake 


veneneus, 


se. 


venomous 


vereux, se. 


full of maggots, 






rotten 


vert, e. 




green, fresh 


vertueux, se. 


virtuous 


vetu, e. 




clad, dressed 


vide, 




empty, void 


vif, ve. 




lively 


viceux, se. 




vicious, 
wicked 


™r«"'M 


old, aged 


victorieux, 


se. 


victorious 


vigoureux, 


se< 


vigorous, 
stout 


vil, «. 




vile, meaa 



violent, €« violent, pas- 
sionate 
viril, e. manly 

vJte, quick,^ swift 

vif, ve, tvefy, impetuous 
voJant, e. flying 

volage, fickle, inconstant 
volatile, flyitig, volatile 

volontaire, vcduntair, wilful 
voluptuejQX, se. voluptuous 
vomitif, ve. vomitive 

voyant, e» very gaudy 

vrai, e. true, right, real 
vraisemblable, likely, pro- 
bable 
vulgaire, vulgar, common 
Zele, e* jealous, ardent. 
passionate 



127 

AdjecUfs J^umeraux. 

Numeral adjectives are those which serve to indicat* 
objects, either by determining or declaring iheii number 
as one, two, three, &c., or by assigning or distinguishing 
their order and rank ; as, the first, the second, Sfc. for 
which reason, they are divided into Cardinal and Ordv- 
nal numbers,* viz. 



Nombres Cardinaux, 



Cardiaal Nambers. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5. 
6. 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12^ 
13 
14 
15- 

la 

17. 
19. 
19. 
20. 
2t 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 



♦ The word Cardinal signifies chief or frmdipidy and is given to the 
first kind of Numeral Adjectives, because they are the root from 
which those that are called the Ordinal Murders are derived. It 
must be observed, that the final consonant of cinq, six, sept, huif:, neuf, 
and dix, are articulated at the end of a phrase, and before a word 
beginning with a vowel ; and that the three compound numbers 
diw-sept, &c, are also pronounced dis-set, dis-tiit, dis-neuf. 



Un, m. une, f. 


One. 


Deux 


two. 


Trois 


tbfee. 


Quatre 


four. 


Cinq 


five. t 


Six 


six. 


Sept 


seven. 


Huit 


ei^t. 


Neuf 


nip,e- 


Dix 


ten. 


Cfeize 


eleven. 


Douze 


twelve. 


Treize 


thirteen. 


Quatorze 


fourteen. 


Quinze 


fifteen. 


Seize 


sixteen. 


Dix-sept 


seventeen^i 


Dix-huit 


eighteen. 


Dix-neuf 


nlneleen. 


Vingt 


twenty. 


Vingt-et-un 


twenty-one. 


vingt-deux 


twenty-two. 


vingt-trois 


twenty-three. 


vingt-quatre 


twenty-four. 


vingt-cinq 


twenty-five. 



198 



vmgl-sjx 
viagt-sept 
vingt-huit 
vin^t-neuf 
Trente 
Trente-et-un 
trente-deux, &.C. 
Quarante 
quarantd-et-un 
quarante-deux, &c. 
Cinquante 
cinquante-et-un 
cinquante-deux, Sec. 
Soixante 
ssoixante-et-un 
'n soixante-deux, &c. 
Soixante-dix 
soixante-onze 
soixante-douze, &c. 
Quatre-vingt 
quatre-vingt-un 
quatre-vingt-de ux 
Quatre-vingt-dix 
quatre-vingt-onze 
qiiatre-vingt-douze 
Cent , 
Qent-un* 
cent-vingt 

cent-vingt-et-un, &Cj 
c«nt-trent.e, &.c. 
Deux-cents 
deux-cent-un 
deux-cent-deux, &.c. 



twenty-six. 


26 


twenty-seven. 


27 


twenty-eight. 


28 


twenty-nine. 


29 


Thirty. 


30 


thirty-one. 


31. 


thirty-two, &c. 


32. 


Forty. 


40. 


forty-one. 


41. 


fory-two, &c. 


42. 


Fifty. 


60. 


fifty-ooe. 


51. 


iifty-two, &c 


52. 


Sixty. 


60. 


sixty-one. 


61. 


sixty-two, StC. 


62. 


Seventy. ' 


70. 


seventyf-one. 


71 


sev^nty-fwo, &c. 


72. 


'Eighty. 


80 


eighty-one. 


81. 


eighty-two, &c. 


82. 


Ninety. 


90. 


ninety-one. 


91. 


ninety-two, &c. 


92. 


Hundred. 


100. 


huhdi-ed and one. 


101. 


hundred and twenty. 


120. 


hundred & twenty-one, &c. 


121. 


hundre-d and thirty. 


130, 


Two hundred. 


200, 


two hundred and one. 


201. 


two hundred and two, &c. 


202. 



* Observe that though the t of Vingt be articulated in vingt-et-ttn, 
vingt-deux, &c. as far as Trente, yet it must not be sounded in' Qnafre- 
vingt-un, quatre-vmgt-onze, nor in any of the other compound num- 
bers, wherein the gt is not uttered. We never say in French, cent' 
st-un, nor cent-et-deux, cent-et-trois, &c., neither deux-cents-et-un, two 
tiundred and one ; deux-cents-et-deux, &c. in EngUsh ; but cent-un, 
eent-deux, cent-huit, cmt-onze, &c. without pronouncing the t. 



I5i9 



frois-cents 


three hundred - 


300 


Quatre-cents 


four hundred. 


400. 


Cinq-cents 


five hundred. 


500. 


Six-cents 


six hundred. 


600. 


Sept-cents 


seven hundred. 


700. 


Huit-cents 


eight hundred. 


800. 


Neuf-cents 


nine hundred. 


900. 


Mille 


a thousand. 


1000. 


Deux-mille 


two thousand. 


2000. 


Trois-mille 


three thousand. 


3000. 


Quatre-mille, &c 


four thousand. 


4000. 


Dix-mille 


ten thousand. 


10,000. 


Cinquante-mille 


fifty-thousand. 


50,000. 


Cent-mille 


hundred thousand. 


100,000. 


Deux-cent-mille 


two hundred thousand. 


200,000. 


Cinq-cent-mille 


five hundred thousand. 


500,000. 


Un million 


a million. 


1,000,000. 



■1st. That the Cardinal 
Numbers un, vingt, cent, and million, are susceptible of 
the following additions, viz. Un mak^s une, either be- 
fore or relating to a Substantive of the feminine Gender ; 
as un Gargon, one Boy ; un£ Fille, one Girl ; fen vois un 
or une, I see one of them, &c. Vingt makes vingts, when 
annexed to guatre or sis before a substantive only ; as 
Quatre-vingts Gargons and Six-vingts honnties, hxii in no 
other instance ; for we always write Qucdre-vingt-deux 
gargons, Sfc. Both Cent and Million require an s, when 
used to denote more than one;* as deux cents, two hun- 
dred, &c. ; deux millions, two millions, &c. — 2ddly, that 
the Particle et or and is used before the unit, as far as 
Quatre-vingt (eighty) as in vingt-et'Un, irente-et-un, qua- 
rante-et-un, S^c, but not before the other numbers : and 
after Quatre-vingt, the conjunctive particle et is not used 
before the Unit. 



* Cent, a hundred — and Million, a million — both take the sign of 
the plaral number when followed by a Substantive , but they remaii? 
unalterable when followed by another noun of number. 



130 



Nombres Ordinaux. 


Ordinal Numbers. 


Le Premier, la premiere. 

ler. 

le Second, la seconde 2d. 


The first 


1st 


the Second 


2d 


le Troisieme 


3e. 


the Third. 


3d. 


le Quatrieme 


4e. 


the Fourth 


4th. 


le Cinquieme 


5e. 


the Fifth. 


5th 


le Sixieme 


6e. 


the Sixth. 


6th. 


le Septieme 


7e. 


the Seventh. 


7th. 


le Huitieme* 


8e. 


the Eighth. 


8th. 


le Neuvieme 


9e. 


the Ninth. 


9th. 


le Dizieme 


lOe. 


the Tenth. 


lOth. 


le Onzieme* 


lie. 


the Eleventh* 


11th. 


le Douzieme 


l^e. 


the Twelfth. 


12th. 


le Treizieme 


I3e. 


the Thirteenth. 


13th. 


le Quatorzieme 


14e. 


the Fourteenth 


14th 


la Quinzieme 


15e. 


the Fifteenth. 


15th. 


le vSeizieme 


16e. 


the Sixteenth. 


16th. 


le Dix-septiem6 


17e. 


the Seventeenth. 


17th 


le Dix^huitieme 


18e. 


the Eighteenth. 


18th. 


le Dix-neuvieme 


19e. 


the Nineteenth. 


19th 


le Vingtieme 


20e. 


the Twentieth. 


20th 


le Vingt-et-unieme 


21e. 


the Twenty-first. 


21st 


le Vingfc-deuxieme, 








&c 


'.. 22e. 


the Twenty-second 


. 22d. 


le Trentieme 


30e. 


the Thirtieth. 


30th, 


le Quarantieme 


40. 


the Fortieth. 


40th. 


le Cinquantieme 


506. 


the Fiftieth. 


50th. 


le Soixantieme 


60e. 


the Sixtieth. 


60th 


le Quatre-vingti^me 


80e* 


the Eightieth. 


80th 


le Centieme. 


lOOe. 


the Hundredth. 


100th 


le Cent-unieme, &c. 


lOle. 


the Hundred > 


101st 


e Deux-centieme 


200e. 


and first. \ 






the two Hundredth. 


200th 


le Millieme, &c. 


lOOOe. 


the Thousandth. 


1000th 



* The vowel c is not dropt in le before huit and huitieme, nor be- 
fore onze and o.nzie'm ; write le huit, le huitieme ; and le onze, le 
»nzieme. 



Months of the fear. 



Janvier, 

Fevrier, 

Mars, 

Avril, 

Mai, 

Juin, 

JuiUet, 

Aout, (^ silent) - 

Septembre, - 

Octobre, 

Novembre, - 

Decembre, - 



January 

FebruaiT 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Nqvember 

I>ecember 



DAYS OF THE WEEK. 



Dimanche, 

Lundi, 

Mardi, 

Mercredi, 

Jeudi, 

Vendredi, 

Samedi, 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



132 



VERBES FRANCAIS ET ANGLAIS 

French and English Verbs. 



Abaisser, to lower, to hum- 
ble, to let down 
abandonner, to forsake, to 
leave 
abattre, to p«ll down, to 
fell 
abimer, to destroy, to ruin 
^bonner, to compound 

aborner, to set bounds to 
aboutir, to border upon, to 
meet, to end in 
abreuver, to soak, to lead 
animals to drink 
absoudre, to absolve 

accelerer, to hasten 

accepter, to receive, to ac- 
cept 
acccmpagner, to accom- 
pany 
accoucher, to be brought to 
bed 
acheminer, to set forward 
acquerir, to acquire 

adoniser, to dress one's 
self out 
adresser, to direct a letter, 
to send, to dedicate 



to love, to like, jo 

be fond of 

ajuster, to adjust, to fit up 



alarmer, 

allumer, 

aller, 

alterer, 

araarrer, 

amasser, 

annoncer 

Badiner, 

bailler, 

baiser, 

bassiner, 

batir, 

battre, 

bercer, 

beugler, 

beurrer, 

bigarrer. 



blanchir, v. a. 



blauch 



to alarm 
to light, to kindle 
to go 
to change 
to moor a ship 
to gather, to col- 
lect 
to announce 
to joke 
to gape, to yawn 
to kiss 
to warm a bed 
to build, to erect 
to beat 
to rock a child 
to bellow 
to butter 
to speckle 
C to bleach 
linen, to 
wash linen 
to grow 
white, to 



afFecter, 

aggraver, 

agrandir, 

aider, 
aigrir, 

aiguiser, 



ir, v. n. < 



to enlarge, to 

widen 

to help, to assist 

to exasperate, to 

make sour 

to sharpen 



grow old 

to aifect blesser, to hurt, to woun^ 

boucher, 5 to stop a hole 

' ^ to block u} 

bruler, to burn 



Cacher, to hide, to conceal 

cadrer, to suit, to agree, to 

answer 

calomnier, to calumniate 



133 



( to shoot at a 
canarder, < person from a 

( sheltered place 
causer, v. n. to prattte, to 
tattle 
causer, v. a. to cause, to 
occasion 
ceder, to yield, to give up 
celebrer, to celebrate 

ceindre, to gird 

chanter, to sing 

charger, to charge, load 
chasser, to drive away 
chauffer, to -warm, to heat 
choisir, tb choose, to select 
clone r, to nail 

commencer, to begin 

concerner, to belong, con- 
cern 
concerter, to contrive, to 
agree 
confondre, to confound 
connoitre, to know, to be 

acquainted with 
conseiller, to advise, to 
counsel 
convoiter, to covet 

coudre, to sow 

couler, to flow 

courir, to run 

couvrir, to cover 

cracher, to spit 

ere user, to dig, to deepen 
croire, to believe, to credit 
cuire, to cook, to bake 

{to rid, to get 
clear of a 
troublesome 
person 
deborder, to overflow, to 

. 12 J"'""' 



decacheter, to unseal 

dechiffrer, to decipher, to 

unravel 
decouvrir, to uncover, to 

discover 
decreter, to order, to de- 



defaiUir, 

degager; 

degenerer, 

degrader, 

degraisser, 

d^loger, 

demeurer, 



cree 

to get weak, to 

fail 

to redeem 

to degenerate 

to degrade 

to scour, skim 

to dislodge 

to dwell, to re- 



mam 
depecher, to dispatch, to 
sead 
depeufJer, to depopulate 
depoter, to take a plant out 
of a pot 
desassocier, to dissolve 
partnership 
desserrer, to loosen 

deservir, to clear the table 
devorer, to devour 

differer, to delay, to put off 
disposer, to dispose 

dorer to gild 

doubler, to double 

ebranler, to shake, to move 
ehruiter, to divulge 

ecaler, to shell 

ecarter, to drive away 

echapper, to escape 

echauder, to scald 

echauffer, to heat, to warm 
eclaircir, to clear, to 

brighten 
echouer, to fail, to run 

aground 



134 



eclairer, 



ecrire, 
effaliser. 



egorger. 



•1 



to light, to watch, 
to have an eye 
upon 
to write 
to equahze 
to cut the throat, 
to murder, 
to slaughter 
egratigner, to scratch 

embraser, to burn, to con- 
sume by fire 
embrassm") to embrace, to 
hug 
emporter, to carry away 
endosser, to put on, endorse 
Fagonner, to figure, to 

shape 
facher, to grieve, to afilict 
farcir, to stuff, to cram 

feindre, to hesitate, to scru- 
ple 
felicit«r, to congratulate 
feuilleter, to turn over the 
leaves 
fiancer, to betroth 

fixer, to fix, to make firm 
flatter, to flatter 

fondre, to melt, to liquefy 



former, 


to form 


fortifier, 


to fortify 


fratchir, 


to freshen 


frequenter^ 


to visit often 


frire, 


to fry 


friser, 


to curl hair 


fuser, 


to melt 



Gagner, to win, gain, earn 
garantir, to warrant 

garder, to watch, to keep 
gargouiller, to paddle in the 
water 



gemir, to groan, to moan 
glacer, to freeze, to chill 
glisser, to slide, to slip 

glousser, to cluck like a 
hen 
grandir, to grow, to grow 
taU 
griller, to broil 

guider, to guide 

Hair, (H. asp.) to hate 
hiler, to dry 

hanter, to haunt, frequent 
h^ter, to hasten 

herissel", to stand on end 
heurter,^ to strike, to hit 
hisser, to hoist 

honnir, to disgrace, to 

curse 
houer, to hoe 

haranguer, to make a 

speech 
hurler, to howl, to yell 
habiller, (H. mute) to dress 
heriter, to inherit 

honorer, to honour 

humecter, to moisten 

humilier, to humiliate 

IdoMtrer, to idolize, to 
worship 
imaginer, to imagine 

impliquer, to implicate 
impugner, to impugn, to 
oppose 
imputer, to ascribe, to at- 
tribute 
incarcerer, to imprison 
indemniser, to indemnify 
indiquer, to indicate 

inscrire, to inscribe 

intriguer, to intrigue 



i35 



Jaillir, to spout out 

japper, to yelp, to bark 
jeuner, to fast 

jouer, to play 

jouir, to enjoy 

jucher, to roost 

juguler, to choak 

justifier, to justify 

Labourer, to till, to plough 
lacer, to lace 

laisser, to leave 

languir, to languish 

lever, v. a. to lift, to raise 
lever, v»n. to grow, to grow 
up 
lier, to tie, to bind 

livrer, to deliver, to give 
up 
loucher, to squint 

louer, to praise 

lutter, to wrestle, to 

struggle 
Maigrir, to grow lean 

malfaire, to do harm 

mander, to order, to ac- 
quaint with 
manquer, to fail 

marchander, to bargain 
marcher, to march 

marier, to marry 

masquer, to disguise 

meler, to mix, mingle 

menacer, to threaten 

menager, to husband, take 
care 
modifier, to modify 

monter, to mount, to as- 
cend 
mortifier, to mortify 

moniller, to moisten, to 
wet 



mounir, to store, to provide 
Nager, to swim 

naitre, to be born 

natter, to mat 

negocier, to negotiate 

noircir, to blacken 

nommer, to name 

Obeir, to obey 

obliger, to oblige 

oiTenser, to offend 

offrir, to offer 

ondoyer, to rise in waves 
omer, to ornament 

oter, to remove, to take off 
ourdir, to contrive, to warp 
oublier, to forget 

ouvrir, to opei. 

Pacifier, to pacify 

pdlir, to turn pale 

panser, to dress a wound 
panser, to look after a horse 
paraitre, to appear 

parier, to bet 

partir, to set out, to depart 
passer, to pass, to call 

payer, to pay 

peindre,^ to paint 

penser, to think 

perfectionner, to make per- 
fect 
perir, to perish 

persecuterj to persecute 
peupler, to populate 

pincer, to pinch 

piler, to pound 

plaindre, to pity 

plaire, to please 

pie u voir, to rain 

plonger, to plunge, dip 
plumer, to pluck out fea- 
thers 



136 



poignarder, lo stab 

policer, to govern, to civi- 
lize 
polir, to polish 

pondre, to lay eggs 

porter, to carry 

poser, to lay, set, put 

r to put up for, to 
postuler, < be a candidate 

f for 



pouiller, 

pourrir, 

■pourvoir, 

precber, 

precipiter, 

prendre 

preter 

prev^nir, 

priver, 

prohiber, 

projeter, 



to call names 
to putrefy 
to provide 
to preach 
to precipitate 
to take 
to lend 
to prevent, to 
prepossess 
to deprive 
to pi'ohibit 
to scheme, con- 
trive 
to protect 
to punish 

t6 fetch 



proteger, 
punir, 

Querir, (used 
only with aller,) 
questionner, to question 
qu^ter, • to beg, to collect 
money 
qtaitter, to quit 

Rabattre, to puU down 

again 
racommoder, to mend, to 
patch 
raccourcir to shorten 

racheter, to buy again, re- 
deem 
radoucir, to soften 

railler, to jest, to jeer 

rai.sonner, to argue, reason 



rajeuner, 

rajuster, 

ramer, 
ramoner, 

ranger, 
raper, 
rapprendre, 
xaser, 

rassurer, < 

ratiser 

rattraper. 



to take up, to 
pick up 
to grow young 
again 
to set in order 
again 
to row 
to sweep a 
chimney 
to set in order 
to grate, rasp 
to learn again 
to shavo 
( to quiet one's 
I fear, to secure 
to poke the fire up 
to catch again, 
to overtake 
ravager, to ruin, lay waste 
receler, to conceal 

reciter, to recite 

reconnaitre, to know again, 
to recognize 
C to revive, to re- 
recreer, < lieve, to delight, 
{ refresh 

reeueiUir, to gather, to re- 
ceive, to collect 
to recoil, to fall 
back 
to say again, to 
repeat 
to reiterate 
to reduce 
to reflect 
to govern, to rule 
to regulate 
to reign 



reculer, 



redire 



■1 



redoublei, 

reduire, 

reflechir, 

regir, 

regler. 

regner, 

regretter, 

rehausser. 



to raise, to 
heio-hten 



137 



releguer, to exile 

remedier, to remedy 

reiTiercier, to thank, to re- 
turn thanks 
remettre^ to restore, to 

remit 
rendormir, to fail asleep 

again 

reparer, to repair, restore 

repeter, to repeat 

1 (to find fault, 

reprendre, w ^ i 
^ ' ^ to take agam 

retenir, to retain, to with- 
hold 
rever, to dream 

revenir, to return, to come 
again 
rire, to laugh 

Saccager, to sack^ pil- 

lage, plunder 
saigner, to bleed 

saper, to sap, undermine 
savoir, to know 

secourir, to assist, to suc- 
cour 
seduire, to seduce 

seller, to saddle 

sentir, to feel 

serrer, to presSj squeeze 
servir, to serve, attend 

siffler, to whistle 

sommeiller, to slumber, to 
doze 
sommer to summon 

sonner, to ring, strike, 

sound 
souffler, to blow 

souiFrir, to suffer 

souiller, to stain, to soil 
soumettre, to subdue 

soutenir, to sustain 

1*2* 



subir, to undergo, sutjmit 
suer, to perspire 

suivre, to follow 

supplier, to implore, suppli- 
cate 
surcharger, to overload 
survivre, to survive, out- 
live 
sympatiser, to sympathise ' 
Tailler,^ to cut, to carve 
tarder, to delay 

tarir, to drain, dry up 

taxer, to tax 

tenir, to hold 

teter, to suck 

tirer, to draw, to pull 

tolerer, to tolerate 

tomber, to fall 

tordre, to twist, wring 

tortuer, to make crooked 
tourner, to turn, to move 
round 
traire, to milk 

traiter, to treat, to settle 
tranquilliser, to tranquillize 
travailler, to work 

trebucher, to stumble, tum- 
ble 
trembler, to tremble 

tremper, to dip, steep 

tricher, to cheat 

trotter, to trot 

tuer, to kill 

Unir, to unite 

user, to wear out, use 

usurper, to usurp 

utiliser, to make useful 
Valoir, to be worth 

vegeter, to vegetate 

veiller, to watch, to sit up 
at nio-ht 



m 



vendre, 


to sell 


"Vogufe la ) 
galere,'* \ 
Toiler, 


venir, 
vetir, 


to come 
to clothe 


vider, 

vieillir, 

violer, 

vivre, 


to empty 
to grow old 
to violate, to trans- 
gress 
to live 


voir, 
voler, 
voyager, 
vouloir, 


voguer, 


to row 





"Let happen 

what may" 

to veil 

to see 

to fly, to steal 

to travel 

to wish, to be 

willing 



139 



EXPRESSIONS QUI SONT INVARIABLES. 



Expressions which are Invariable.* 



Autrefois^ 

auparavant, 

dernierement, 

aujourd'hui, 

a present, 

maintenant, 

dans peu, 

desormais, 

tres-souvent, 

toujours, 

rarement, 

quelquefois, 

jamais, 

a jamais, 

ailleurs, 

d'ailleurs, 

neanmoins, 

pourtant, 

tot ou tard, 

bientot, 

trop tot, 

trop tard, 

trop pen, 

peu a peu 

encore, 

pas encore. 



formerly. 

before. 

lately. 

to-day. 

at present. 

now. 

shortly. 

hereafter. 

very often, 

always. 

seldom. 

sometimes. 

never, ever. 

fdr ever. 

elsewhere. 

besides. 

nevertheless. 

however. 

soon or late. 

very soon. 

too soon. 

too late. 

too little. 

little by little. 

again. 

not yet. 

here, from hence. 



ici pres, 
pres d'ici, 
la,de la, there, 
la haut, 
la has, 
d'en haut, 
d'en bas, 
€n dedans, 
^n dehors, 
sur, dessus, ' 
sous, dessous, 
plus, moins^ 
deplus, 
du moins, 
sur tout, 
tout au plus, 
serieusement, 
ensemble, 
ensuite, 
tour a-tour, 
oui vraiment, 
non — non pas, 
point du tout, 
pourquoi, 
parceque, 
ou, d'ou. 



just by. 

hard by. 

from thence. 

above. 

below. 

from above. 

from below 

within 

without. 

upon, on. 

under. 

more, less. 

moreover% 

felt least 

above all. 

at the most. 

seriously. 

together, 

afterwards 

by turns 

yes indeed 

no — not 

not at all 

why 

because 

where, front 

whence 



* The following expressions and the like, wiiich are frequently 
used to maiie the tenses of our Form of Speech either more clear, 
or better connected together, are called invariabh, because they do 
not admit of a diversity of grammatical terrainauons, as those of the 
preceding Sections. 



1.10 



PHRASES FAMILIERES, 

ET 

Propres a exercer les Jeunes Gens dans la Lajigue 
Franqaise. 

1. 1. 



Mon cher, m. ma cljere, 
Mon cher enfant, m. 
Ma cbere enfant, f. 
Mon bel ange, 
Mon amour, 
Ma chere amel, 
Mon cher Monsieur, 
Ma qhere Dame, 



f. My dea^r. 

My dear child. 

My pretty angel. 
My love. 
My dear soul. 
My dear sir. 
My dear madam. 



Donnez-moi, s'il vous plait, 

Une tasse de the--— de cafe, 

Une beurree, 

De la creme ou du lait, 

iTn pen de sucre, 

Je vous remercie, 

Je vous rends traces, 



Give me if you please. 

A cup of tea — of coffee. 

A slice of bread and butter 

Some cream or some milk 

A bit of sugar. 

I thank you. 

I return you thanks. 



3. 



Apportez-moi, 
Mon livre — du papier, 
De I'encre — une plume, 
Pretez-moi, pour un mo- 
ment, 
Un Dictionnaire, 
Votre crayon — votre canif, 

Je vous suis bien oblige, 



Bring me. 

My book — some paper. 
Some ink — a pen. 
Lend me, for a moment. 

A Dictionary. 
Your pencil — your pen- 
knife. 
I am greatly obliged to you 



m 



Accordez-raoi une grdce, 
Je vous prie, 
Je vous supplie, 

De tout mon coeur, 
Si je le puisfaire, 
Permettez-moi de sortir, 
Je ne saurais, > 
Je ne puis pas, 5 
Kestez ici un moment, 
Prenez votre ouvrage, 



Approchez-vous de moi, 
Montrez-moi cela, 
Asseyez-vous la, 
Prenez-garde, 
Preparez votre legon, 
Etes-vous pret, m. prete, f. 
Je sais ma leQon, 
Levez-vous a present, 
Fermez la porte, 
Ouvrez la fenetre, 
Allez vous chauffer. 



Que souhaitez-vous ? 

Que cherchez-vous ? 

Qu'avez-vous perdu ? 

Repondez-moi, 

Je cherche mon chapeau 

Que dites-vous ? 

Parle z plus haut, 

Je ne vous entends pas 

A quoi pensez-vous ? 

Que faites-vous ? 

Qu'avez-vous fait? 



Grant me a favour. 

Pray, or I pray you. 

I beseech you or entreal 

you. 
With all my heart. 
If I can do it. 
Give me leave to go out. 

I cannot. 

Stay here a moment. 
Take up your work. 

5. 

Come near me. 

Show me that. 

Sit down there. 

Take care. 

Get your lesson ready, 

Are you ready. 

I can say my lesson. 

Rise or get up now. 

Shut the door. 

Open the window. 

Go and warm yourself. 

6. 

What do you want ? 

What do you look for? 

What have you lost ? 

Answer me. 

I ara k>oking for my fiat. 

What do you say ? 

Speak louder. 

I don't hear you. 

What are you thinkmgof ? 

What are you doing ? 

What have you done ? 



U2 



I. 

Pour Aborder et Saluer quelqu'un. 
Of Meeting and Salutiiig a Person, 



Monsieur, Madame, ou 
Mademoiselle,* je vous 
souhaite le bon jour, 

Comment vous portez-vous 
ce matin ? 

Tres-bien, Dieu merci, 

Je me porte fort bien, 

A votre service, 

Pr^t a vous xendre service, 

Et vous, comment va la 
sante, 

Assez'-bien, 

Passablement bien, 

Tout doucement ; li li, 

A mon ordinaire, 

Parfaitement bien, 

T'en suis bien-aise, 

Xt vous, Madame, com- 
ment va I'etat de votre 
sante ? 

Je ne me porte pas bien, 

J'en suis fache, m. fa- 
chee, f. 

Comment ge porte mon- 
sieur votre frere au- 
jourd'hui? 

II est un pen indispose, 

U est enrhurae ; il a mal a 
la tete, 

Je suis faehe d'apprendre 
qu'il se porte mal, 

J'irai le voiJ ce soir, 



Sir, madam, or miss, I wisii 
you a good day, or good 
morning to you. 

How do you do this morn- 
ing? 

Very well, thank God. 

I am very well. 

At your service. 

Ready to serve you. 

And you, how is it with 
you.? 

Pretty well. 

Tolerably well. . 

In<iifferent ; so so. 

As usual. 

Exceedingly well. 

I am verr glad of t 

And you, madam, how do 
you enjoy your health? 

I am not well. 
I am sorry for it. 

How does your brother do 
to-day ? 

He is a little indisposed. 
He has a cold : he has the 

head-ache. 
I am sorry to hear he is ill. 



I'll go and see him this 
evening. 

* Although I have omitted inserting either of these three titles, 
Monsieur, «&c. in the following phrases, yet one of them is to be 
used according to the person spoken to, every time % question or an 
answer is made. 



143 



XL 

Du Terns et de I'Heure. 
On the Weather omd the Hour. 



Quel teras fait il ? 
Fait-il beau tems ? 
Fait-il froid ou chaud ? 
[1 fait un tems clair, serein 
et sec, 
— ^obscur, humide,venteiis 
orageux, pluvieux, 



It pleul A verse, 
n neige un peu, 
II gele — il grele, 
II fait grand vent, 
n iait un brouillard fort 
epais, 
Le soleil commence a pa- 

roitre, 
Je vois I'arc-en-ciel, 
C'est signe de beau tems, 
Quelle heure est il? 
II n'est pas tard, 
11 est pres d'une heure, 
Une heure vient de sonner, 
II est une heure et deraie, 
II s'en va deux heures, 
E'horloge sonne. 
Deux heures sont sonnees, 
Je ne croyais pas qu'il fut 

si tard, 
Regardez a votre montre, 
Elle avance — elle retarde, 



EUe ne va pas bien, 



What weather is it ? 
Is it fine weather ? 
Is it cold or hot ? 
It is clear, serene, and dry 
weaiher. 
•— rdark, wet, windy, stormy, 
rainy. 
Does it rain ? Does it 
snow? 
It rains very hard. 
It snows a little. 
It freezes — ^it hails. 
The wind- is very high. 
There is a very thick fog, 

The sun begins to appear 

I see the rainbow. 
It is a sign of fair weather 
What's o'clock ? 
It is not late. 
It is almost one o'clock. 
It has just struck one. 
It is half an hour past cme. 
It is almost two o'clock. 
The clock strikes. 
It has struck two. 
I did not think it was so 
late. 
Look at your watch. 
It goes too fast — it goes too 
slow. 
It does not go right 



144 



m. 

Pour Manger et pour Boire. 
F&i' Eating and Drinking, 



J'aifaim; j'ai grand'faim, 

Donnez-moir quelque chose 
a manger, 
Que voulez-vous manger ; 
du pain et du beurre ? 
Apportez-moi quelque autre 
chose, 
Voulez-vous du roti ou du 
bouiUi ? 
Voici du raoutoa, du boguf, 
du veau, et du lard, 
Nous avons aussi du jam- 
bon, qui est excellent, 
En souhaitez-vous manger? 
Voila une assiette, un cou- 
teau, et une fourchette, 
Du pain rassis et du pain 
frais, 
Du fromage et des fruits, 
Servez vous, mon-sieur, 
J'ai assez mange, 
J'ai soif ; j'ai gran d'soif, 
Donnez-moi a boire, 
Votre petite biere n'est 
pas bonne, 
Je la trouve trop amere, 
Apportez-moi un verre 
d'eau et de vin, 
A present, j'ai mange etbu 
suffisamment, 
Olez tout ceci, 



I am hungry ; I am very 

hungry . 

Give me something to eac. 

What will you eat; some 
bread and butter ? 
Bring me something else. 

Will you have roast or 

boiled meat? 

Here is some mutton, beef, 

veal and bacon. 

We hav6 also a ham, 

which is very nice. 

Do you choose to eat any ? 

There is a plate, a knife, 

and a fork. 

Some stale and new bread. 

Some cheese and fruit. ' 
Help yourself, sir. 
I have eaten enough. 
I am dry ; I am very dry 
Give me some drink. 
Your small beer is not 
goodc 
I think it is too bitter. 
Bring me a glass of wine 
and water. 
Now I have eaten and 
drunk quite sufficient. 
Take away all these things. 



140 



IV. 

Pour AlJer, Venir, &c. 
Of Going, Coming, <S*c. 



Ou allez-vous ? 
Je vais chez-nous, 
D'ou venez-vous? 
Je viens de chez M. B-— 
Voulez-vous venir avec moi? 
Voulez-vous faire un four ? 
Eepondez-moi ; dites-moi 
oui ou non, 
Je n'ai pas le terns, 
Je le veux bien; j'y con- 
sejis^ 
Ou irons-nous ? 
Par ou irons-nous ? 
AUez par ici — par la, 
C'est le plus court, 
Par ou il vous plaira, 
A main gauche ou a droite, 

A main gauche ou a 
gauche, 
Restez la — venez ici, 
Traversons ici la rue, 
Enfilons cette cour-ci, 
Vous marchez bien vite, 
Je ne saurais vous suivre, 
Vous allez trop vite, 
Vous etes un mauvais 
marcheur. m. 
Allez un peu plus douce- 
ment, 
Etes vous las, m. lasse, f. 
Je suis fort fatigue, m. e. f. 
Reposons-nous un peu, 
Eiitrons dans ce cafe-ci, 
13 



Where are you going? 
I am going home. 
Whence do you come ? 
I come from Mr. B — 's. 
Will you go along with m&i' 
WiU you take a walk ? 
Answer me ; tell me yes 
or no 
I have not time. 
I will \ I consent to it 

Where shall we go ? 
Which way shall we go ? 
Go this way — that way. 
It is the nighest way. ■ 
Which way you please. 
On the 'idft hand or to the 
right. 
On the left hand or to the 
left. 
Stay there-— come here. 
Let us cross the street here. 
Let us go through this court. 
You walk very fast. 
I cannot go so fast 
You go too fast. 
You are a bad walker. 

Go a little slower. 

Are you tired ? 
I am very much tired. 
liCt us r«st a little. 
Let us go iiito this cofFee 
house. 



lUi 



Des Jours, Des Mois, et des Saisons. 

Of the Days, Months, mid Seasons. 

J'irai a Londres Lundi ou I shall go to London on 



Mardi proehain. 
Je reviendrai Mercredi. 

i 

Mon frere partira Jfeudi ou 

Vendredi. 
Je lui ecrirai Samedi ou 

Dimanche. 
II fait froid aux mois de 

Janvier et de Fevrier. 
Xes jours sent longs au 

mois de Mars. 
La nature semble revivre 

au mois d'Avril, 
Les arbres sont en fleurs 

au mois de Mai. 
On fauche les pres au 

mois de Juin et de Juil- 

let. 
On commence a couper les 

bies au mois d'Aout.* 

La moisson est presque 
finie au mois de Sep- 
tembre. 

Les jours sont fort accourcis 
au mois d'Octobre. 

L«; feu commence a etre 
de saison au mois de 
Novembre. 

II fait bien-tut nuit a la fin 
de Decembre. 



Monday or Tuesday 
next. 

I will return on Wednes- 
day. 

My brother will set out 
Thursday or Friday. 

I will write to him on Sa- 
turday or Sunday. 

It is cold in the months of 
January and February. 

The days are long in the 
month of March. 

Nature seems to revive in 
the month of April. 

The trees are in bloom in 
the month of May. 

The meadows are mowed 
in the months of June 
and July. 

They begin to cut down 
the corn in the month of 
August. 

The harvest is almost over 
in the month of Sep- 
tember. 

The days are much short- 
ened in the month of 
October. 
-Fire begins to be comfort- 
able in the month of No- 
vember. 

It soon grows dark at the 
end of December. 



Pronounce doo 



147 



t^e Printems est agreafele ; 
I'Ete est ordinairement 
chaud ; I'Automne est 
temperee ; et THiver est 
froid. 



The Spring is 

the Summer is generally 
hot ; the Autumn is 
mild ; and the Winter is 
cold. 



VI. 
Ce qui concerne I'Erole et les Ecoliers. 
Concerning ike Schoal and the Scholar Sr, 



Oil est votre livre ? 
Voila votre gram m aire, 
Asseyez-vous a votre place, 
Lisez votre le9on, , 
Vous lisez trop vite, 
Lisez plus doucement, 
Etudiez votre legon, 
Apprenez-la tout has, 
"Vous ne faites que badiner, 
Je vous marquerai, 
Faites-moi un peu -de place, 
Vous avez assez de place, 
Reculez-vous un peu, 
\Ji\ peu plus haut, 
Un peu plus has, 
Donnez moi mon livre, 
Ou commen9ons-nous ? 
Jusqu'ou disons nous? 
Jusqu'ici, et pas plus loin, 
A qui est ce livre ? 
Je ne sais pas a qui il est, 

Quelle est votre tache ? 
Savez-vous votre le9on ? 
Pas encore ; elle est longue 

et ditiicile. Souflez-moi, 
Vous etes un bredouil- 

Icur. 



Where is your book ? 

There is your grammar.. 

Sit down in your place. 

Read your lesson. ^ 

You read too fast. ^ 

Read slower. 

Study your lesson. 

Get it to yourself. 

You do nothing but play 

I will set you down. 

Make me a little room. 

You have room enough. 

Sit a little farther. 

A little higher. 

A little lower. 

Give me my book. 

Where do we begin ? 

How far do we say ? 

So far and no farther. 

Whose book is this ? 

I don't know w^ho it be- 
longs to. 

Where is your task? 

Can you say your lesson ? 

Not yet; it is very long and 
hard. Prompt me. 

You are a stammerer. 



148 



Prononcez plus distincte- 

ment, 
Avez-vous^ une plume, de 

I'encre, et du papier ? 

Ecrivez voire devoir, 

Vous I'avez mal ecrit, 

II est plein de fautes, 

Allez le recrire, 

Et depechez vous, 

Dites ott recjtez votre le9on, 

Montrez-moi votre traduc- 
.» 

tion, 
Je ne I'ai pas encore faite, 
Vous s^rez puni m. punie/. 
A quelle heure vous etes- 

vous leve ce matin ? 
A huit heures, 
Pourquoi ne vous etes-vous 

pas leve plutot ? 
Personne ne m'a evejlle m. 
VoDs etes un paresseux, 
Demeurez a votre place, 
Otez-vous de ma place, 
Pourquoi mepoussez-Vous, 

com me cela ? 
Qui est-ce qui volis pousse ? 
Je me plaindrai de vous, 
Faites le, si vous voulez, 
Je ne m'en soucie point, 
Vous etes un rapporteur, 
Taisez vous, 
Tenez-vous tranquille, , 
II a crabhe sur mes habits, 

H m'a donne un souflet, 

II m'a egratigne le visage, 
II a dechire mon livre, 
C'est un espiegle, 
Vous-etes un vaurien, 



Pronounce more distinctly. 

IJave you got a pen, some 

ink, and paper ? 
Write your exercise. 
You have done it badly 
It is full of faults, 
Gro and wrrite it over again. 
And make haste. 
Say, or repeat your lesson. 
Show me your translation. 

I have not wrote it yet. . 
You shall be punished. 
At what o'clock did you 

g^t xip this morning ,? 
At eight o'clock. 
Why did you not get up 

sooner ? 
Nobody called me up. 
You are a sluggard. 
Ke€ip in your place. 
Get out of my place. 
Why do you push me or 

thurst me so ? 
Who pushes you .? 
I'll complain of you. 
Do it, if you will. 
I don't care for that. 
You are a tell-take. 
Hold your tongue. 
Be quiet, or be still. 
He has spit upon my 

clothes. 
He gave me a box on the 

ear. 
He scratched my face. 
He has torn my book 
He is a mischievous boy. 
You are a wicked boy. 



149 



Monsieur, il m'empeche 
d'apprendre ma legon', 

11 me pousse hors de ma 
place, 

II me dontie des coups de 
pied. 

Pourquoi ^avez-^T)Us de- 
nonce au Maitre ? 

Je vous en ferai repentir, 

Melez-Tous de vos affaireg. 

13* 



Sir, he hinders me from 
getting my lesson. 

He thrusts me out of my 
place. 

He kicks me. 

Why did you tell the Mas- 

ter of him ? 
I will make you repent it. 
Mind your own business. 



150 

LECONS POUR LES ENFANS, 

Traduit de V Anglais de Mde Barbauld, par M. Pasquter 



Charles, que c'est un6 b^lle chose de savoir lirei il y 
a peu de terns, vous savez, vous ne pouvkz lire que de 
petits mots ; vous etiez force de les epeler. — c-h-a-t, chat ; 
c-h-i-e-n, chien. A present vous pDuvez Ure de petites 
nistoires, et je vais vous en ecrire quelques unes. 

Savez-vous pourquoi vous valez-mieux que minette ? 
Minette peut jouer aussi hien que vous ; minette pent 
boire du lait et se coucher sur le tapis ; €lle peut courir 
aussi vite que vous et meme beaucoup plus vite ; elle 
peut grimper sur les arbres mieux que vous, et elle peut 
attraper des souris, ce que vous ne pouvez €aire. Mais 
minette peut-elle parler ? Non. Peut elle lire ? Non. 
Voila done la raison pour laquelle vous valez mieux que 
minette, parceque vous pouvez parler et lire. Votre 
chien Pierrot peut il lire ? Non. Voulez-vous lui 
enseigner ? Prenez I'epingle et montrez-lui les mots, 
Non, il ne veut pas apprendre. Je n'ai jamais vu un 
chat ou un petit chien apprendre. Si vous n'apprenez 
pas, Charles, vous ne vaudrez pas la raoitie autant que 
minette. 11 vaudrait mieux que vous soyez noye. 



Quelle heure est-il, Charles } II est midi. Venez 
dans le jardin. Ou est le soleil a present ? — Tournez- 
vous vers lui. Regardez le soleil ; c'est le Sud. Tous 
les jours, quand il est midi et que vous regardez le soleil,, 
votre visage est tourne vers le Sud. Maintenant tournez- 
vous a gauche. Regardez devant vous, c'est I'Est. — 
Tous les matins, quand le jour va paraitre, regardez a 
cette meme place, et alors vous verrez le soleil se lever. 
Tous les matins cherchez le soleil ; car il se leve toujours 



151 

a I'Est. Maintenant tournez le dos au soleil, regardez 
tout droit devant vous. C'estle Nord. A present tournez 
vous a gauche, regardez devant vous. C'est I'Ouest. 
Quand vous ave? soupe et qu'il va faire nuit, cherchez 
le soleil justement la, il y est to jjours quand il se couche ; 
car le soleil se couche a I'Ouest. Nord, Sud, Est et 
Guest. 



il fait du vent. De quel c6te le vent soufle-t-il ? 
Prenez votre inouchoir. Tenez-le en Fair. Le vent 
soufle de ce cote. Le vent vient du Nord. Le vent est 
Nord. C'est nn vent froid. Hier le vent etait Quest, 
alors il etait chaud. 



Le pluie vient des nuages, Regardez, voila des nuages 
noirs. Comme ils courent vite ! ils out cache le soleil. 
lis ont couvert le soleil qomme vous couvrez votre visage 
quand vous jetez un mouchoir dessus. Voila encore un 
petit coin du ciel bleu. A present il n'y en a plus du 
tout : il est tout noir comme les nuages. H fait aussi 
obscur que dans la nuit. II pleuvra bientot. II com- 
mence a pleuvoir. Que les gouttes d'eau sont larges! 
Les canards sont bien contents, mais les petits oiseaux ne 
le sont pas : ils vont se mettre a couvert sous les arbres. 
La pluie est finie. C'etait seulement une ondee. A 
present les fleurs sentent bon, le soleil luit, les petits 
oiseaux chantent, et il fait moins chaud qu'auparavant la 
pluie. 



Nous gouterons en plein air. Apportez le goute. 
Allez chercher votre chapeau. II fait un tems charmant 
Mais il n'y a point de table ici. Comment ferons-nous ? 
Oh ! voila un large tronc d'arbre, qiii nous servira fort 
bien de table. Mais nous n'avons pas de chaises. Voila 
un siege de gazon et un banc presque couvert de vio- 
lettes, nous nous asseyerons sur le banc, et vous et Guillot 



152 

sur le tapis. Le tapis est dans le parloir. Oui, il y a iin 
tapis dans le parloir, mais il y en a un ici aussi. Oii est 
il done ? Le gazon est le tapis des champs. C'est un 
tapis verd fort doux, et qui est tree grand car il s'etend 
part tout dans les prairies. Les moutons et les agneaux 
le trouvent tres agreable pour se coucher dessus. .Tene 
sais comment ils ferai^nt sans cela, car ils n'ont pas de 
lit de plumes pour dormir. 



II fait uhe soiree charmante. Venez ici, Charles, 
regardez le soleil. Le soleil est dans ia partie de I'ouest. 
Oui^ parcequ'il va se coucher. Corame il est beau! 
Nous pouvons le regarder a present ; il n'est pas aussi 
eblouissant qu'il etait a I'heure du diner. Comme les 
nuages sont beaux! En voila de cramoisis, pourpres et 
de couleur d'or. A present le soleil va se coucher; 
nous n'en voyons plus que la moitie. Nous ne le voyons 
plus du tout. Adieu, soleil ! jusqu'a demain matin. 

Mais, Charles, tournez la tete du cote de I'Est. Qu'est- 
ce que c'est qui brille si fort derriere les arbres ? Est-ce 
du fea? Non, c'est la lune. Elle est tres gi-ande, et 
ro«ge comme du sang^ La lune est ronde maintenant 
parce qu'elle est dans son plein ; mais elle ne sera pas 
aussi ronde demain au soir, elle sera encore moins le jour 
suivant et ainsi de suite jusqu'a ce qu'elle soit com.me 
votre arc quand il est tendu : on ne la verra plus alorsque 
vous serez couch^, et elle diminuera petit a petit pendant 
quinze jours, au bout desquels il n'y aura plus de lune 
du tout. Alors il en viendra une nouvelle que vous 
pourrez voir I'apres-midi ; elle sera bien petite en premier, 
mais elle croitra chaque jour jusqu'a ce qu'enfin dans 
une autre quinzaine elle sera pleine lune comme celle- 
ci, et vous la verrez se lever encore derriere les arbres. 



Savez-vous comment on fait les raisins sees ? Ce sont des 
grappes de raisin que Ton fait secher. Vous savez que 
les grappes croissent sur la vigne, mais les raisins sees 
sont faits avec des grappes plus grosses que celles qui 
viennent sur la vigne dans le jardin : ils viennent (]p 



153 

fort loin. Savez-vous comment on fait le sucre ? Le 
Sucre vient d'une canne comrae un baton pour marcher, 
qui croit dans la terre ; on en exprime le jus que Ton 
fait bouillir beaucoup, et le sucre est fait. Qu'est ce aue 
c'est que le the ? Le the est une feuille qui croit sur un 
petit arbuste, at que I'on fait secher. 



Charles veut du pain e.- du beurre. Mais le parn n'est 
pas cuit. Dites done a Christophe de chauffer son four 
pour le faire cuire. Mais le pain n'est pas petri. Dltes 
done a Marguerite de prendre de la pate et de le petrir. 
Mais le grain n'est pas moulu. Portez-le done au raoulin 
et dites a Roger le meunier de le moudre. Mais le bled 
n'est pas battu. Dites done a Jean de prendre sqn flea.u' 
et de le battre. Mais le bled n'est pas coupe. Dites 
done d Richard de prendre sa faucille et de le couper. 
Mais le grain n'est pas seme. Dites done au fermier Ju- 
lien de prendre de la semence pour semer. Mais le 
champ n'est pas laboure. Dites done d Pierre de prendre, 
les cheveaux et de le labourer. Mais la charrue n'est 
pas faite. Allez done chez Jacob Niveau le charpentief 
et dites-lui d'en faire une. Maijs il n'y a pas de soc a 
la charrue. Dites done a Brasde-fer le serrurier d'en 
forger un. Mais nous n'av on s point de beurre. Susanne 
allez done en acheter au marche. Mais le beurre n'est " 
pas battu. Prenez done votre barrate Manon et battez-en. ' 
Mais la vache, n'est pas traite. Prenez done votre seau 
Cecile, et trayez-la. A present. Babet faites une tartine 
de pain et de beurre pour Charles. 



CharleSj ne vous ressouvenez-vous pas de cette chenille 
que nous avons mise dans une boite de papier avec 
quelques teuilles de murier pour sa nourriture ? Aliens 
la voir, elle n'y est plus, il y a quelque chose dans la 
boite. Qu'est ce que c'est? Je ne sais pas. C'est une 
petite boule d'etoffe jaune. Ouvrons-la, peut-etre trou- 
verons-nous la chenille. Non, il n'y a qu'un petit ver, 
qui est mort, je crois, car il ne remue pas. Touchez-lui 
la qneu^ doucement, a present il remue, il n'est pas tout- 



154 

a-fait mort. Charles, ce ver n'est 'autre chose que votre 
chenille. Cette matiere jaune c'est de la sole. C'est la 
chenille qui apres avoir file^oute cette sole, s'est changee 
en ver. Prenez-le, et mettez le au soleil : nous viendrons 
ie revoir demain. — Eh bien ! cela est tres suprenant ! je 
ne trouve pas lever. Ne I'avions-nous pas mis hier sur 
cette feu ilie de papier? Oui, cependant perspnne n'est 
entre dans la chambre. Mais n'y a-t-il rien sur la feuille 
de papier ? Oui, it y a un petit papillon bianc. Je suis 
etonne comment il est entre ici, car les fenetres sont 
fermees. Peut-etre que le ver s'est change en papillon.? 
C'est la vefite, et regardez la c'est la la coque du ver. 
Voila d'ou est sorti le papillon, Mais le papillon est trop 
gros, cette coque ne pourraitle contenir. C'est la sienne 
pourtant, que ses ailes se sont developees depuis qu'il en 
est sorti ! Tous les jolis |5apillons que voCis voyez voltiger 
etaient chenilles autrefois et rampaient sur la terre. 



Charles il ne faut jamais sortir seul, ni sans permission. 
Vous etes un tres petit gargon, vous savez ; et si vous 
•sortiez-seul, vous voUs perdrie2^ ; alors vous pleureriez, 
la nuitviendrait, elle serait si obscure que vous ne pourriez 
^as retourner a la mai^on, vous n'auriez pas de Ut pour 
dormir, vous seriez force de coucher dans les champs sur 
I'herbe froide et humide, et peut-etre que vous mourriez, 
ce qui serait bien triste a raconter. 

Je Vais vous dire a ce sujet une histoire sur un petit 
agneau. II y avait une fois un berger, qui gardait un 
grand nombre de moutons et d'agneaux. II avait grand 
soin de leur donner de bonne herbe fraiche a manger, de 
I'eau claire pour boire, et de les guerir quand ils etaient 
malades; quand ils grimpaient sur une montagne escarpee 
SI les petits agneaux etaient fatigues, ils les portaient 
dans ses bras. Pendant qu'ils soupaient dans les champs 
il avait la bonte de leur jouer un air et de chanter ; de 
maniere que c'etait le troupeau le plus hereux du mon-de. 
Mais chaque nuit ce berger avait I'usage de les enfermer 
dans un pare. Savez-vous ce que c'est qu'un pare d 
moutons ? Eh bien ! je vais vous le dire. C'est une place 
com me la cour, au lieu de pallissades ce sont des claies 



155 

faites avec des batons souples comme des branches d'osier 
et qu'on entrelace tres pres les ims des autres, de mani- 
ere que nen ne peut entrer m sortir. Ainsi chaque soir, 
quand la nuit et ie froid venaient, le berger rassemblait, 
tout son troupeau et le conduisait dans le pare ou il I'en- 
fermait, la il etait aussi chaudement et autant d son aise 
qu'il etcut possible, rien ne poyvait lui nuire, car les chiens 
faisaient une garde fidele en dehors du pare et aboyaienl- 
sitot quelqu'un approchait. Tons les matins le berger 
ouvrait le pare et les laissait sortir. lis etaient tons tres 
heureux, comme je vous ai dit, et aimaient tendrement 
le bon berger, excepte un imprudent petit agneau. Get 
agneau n'aimait pas a etre enferme toutes les nuits^lans 
le pare ; de sorte qu'il vint trouver sa mere qui etait une 
vieille et sage brebis, et il lui dit: Je suis etonne pourquoi 
on nous enforme ainsi toutes les nuits, les chiens ne le 
sont pas, pourquoi le serions nous ? Je trouve cela tres 
facheux etje m'eniraisije puis, j'y suis resolu, car j'aime 
a aller ou il me plait, et je cfois qu'il est fort agreable 
de courir dans les bois au clair de la lune. Aiors sa 
mere lui dit : que vous etes simple, mon fils, il vaut mieux 
que vous resliez dans le pare; le berger a tant de bonte 
pour nous, que nous faisons toujours ce qu'il nous dit; 
et si vous vous aventurez tout seul, je vous assure qu'il 
vous arrivera quelque malheur. J'ose dire le contraire, 
dit le petit agneau: ainsi quand le soir vint et que le 
berger appela tout son troupeau pour I'enfermer dans le 
pare, le petit agneau au lieu de suivre ses camarades, se 
coula adroitement sous une haie ou il se cacha ; quand 
le troupeau fut enferme et bien endormi, il sortit de sa 
cachette, et tout en sautant, fretillant, et dansant, il sortit 
des champs, et entra dans une epaisse foret ; alors un 
loup terrible sortant d'une eaverne fit des hurlemens 
afFreux. Le pauvre sot agneau en ce moment, souhaita 
avoir ete enferme dans le pare; mais il n'etait plus terns, 
car le loup qui I'avait vu, se jeta sur lui et I'emporta 
dans un repaire tout couvert de sang et de carcasses, ou 
etaient ses petits, auxquels il dit, voila un jeune agneau 
fort gras que je vous apporte ; aiors ils le prirent et apres 
avoir murmure centre lui pendant quelque tems, ils le 
mirent en pieces et le devorerent. 



im 

L'or est de couleur jaime. C'est un ttietal fort joli et 
brillant ; il est extremement pesant, car il est plus pesanl 
que toute autre chose. On le tire du sien de la terre. 
Preiidrai-je ma beche pour en avoir ? Non : il n'y en 
a pas dans les champs aux environs, il vient de fort loin 
d'ici ; et il est beaucoup plus profond dans la terre que 
vous ne pourriez creuser avec votre beche. Les guinees 
et les demi-^uinees sont faites avec de V&t. Cette 
montre est d'or, la bordure de ce miroiret les cadres des 
tableaux solit dores avec des feuilles d'or. Qu'est-ce 
que c'est qi;ie des feuilles d'or? Ce sont de petits mor- 
ceaux d'or que Ton bat jusqu'd ce qu'ils soient plus 
minces que des feuilles de papier. 

L'argent est blanc et luisant. Les cuilliers et les 
fourchettes sont d'argent, les ecus de six livres, de trois 
livres, les pieces de vingt quatre sous, de c ;iize et de 
six sont faites avec d6 1' argent. L'argent vient aussi 4e 
bien loin d'ici. 



II y a deux espedes de cuivre, le rouge et le jaune 
Les bouilloires et les cafetieres sont de cuivre rouge» 
Le cuivre jaune est brillant presque comme For. Ce 
poelon et ce chandelier sont de cuivre jaune. Qui y 
3,-t-il de vefd sur ce poelon ? C'est du vert-de-gris qui 
Vous ferait mourir si vous en mangiez. 

I^e fer est tres dur ; iln'est pas joli, mais sans lui je 
ne sais pas comment nous ferions, car il nous sert 'a bien 
des choses. Allez dem.ander d la cuisiniere si elle pent 
r^tir sa viande sans broche. Eh bien ! que dit elle.? 
elle dit que non. Mais la boche, les tenailles, les pin- 
cettes et la pelle sont faites de fc, Allez demander d 
Guillaume s'il pent labourer sans le soc de la charrue ? 
11 dit, non ; qu'il ne pent pas, mais le soc de la charrue 
est de fer. Le fer fondrait-il dans le feu ? Mettez-y 
les pincettes, vous essayerez. Eh bien sont-elles fondues ? 
Non, mais elles sont rouges et molles et elles ployent. 
Ecoutez, Charles, si on laissait long-tems un morceau de 
fer dans un tres grand feu, alors il fondrait. Allons voir 
travailler le serrurier. Que fait-il? il a une forge, il sou^te 



J57 

le feu pour faire chauffer le fer* II est rouge. 11 ).e 
piend avec des tenailles, il le met sur I'enclume et il le 
bat avec on marteau, Commeil travaille avec courage ! 
Les etincelles sortent de toutes parts. Qu'elles sont 
jolies ! Que font les forgerona? ils font des clous, des 
fers-a-cheval et beaucoup d'autres chose s. 

L'acier est tres dur. Les couteaux et ciseaux sont faits 
avec de l'acier. 

Le plomb est raou et trds-pesant. En voild un mor- 
ceau, levez-le. La gouttiere, la citerne, les balles de 
fusil et autres choses sont faites de plomb. Le plomb 
fond-il dans le feu ? essayez : mettez-en sur la peile, 
tenez-la sur le feu, actuellement il est tout foadu, Jetez- 
le dan,'3 ce bassin d'eau. Oh 1 <\ue\ sifiiement ! regardez 
les jolies choses que cela a produit. 

L'etain est blanc, mou, etbriilant. Les pois, les serm- 
gues et autres utensiles sont faits d'etain ; les reverberes 
et les casseroles sont couverts d'etain, ce qu'on appelle 
etames. 

Le vif argent €st tres brillant, comme I'argent, et il est 
tres pesant. Voyez comme il court 9a et ia. Vous ne 
sauriez le toucher ni le tenir dans vos doigts. On fait les 
barom^tres avec du vif argent. 

L'or, I'argent, le cuivre, le fer, ie plomb, l'etain et le vi/ 
argent sont sept metaux qui sont tires du sein de la 
terre. 



Le miarbre est tire de la terre, il est tres dur ; vous en 
pourriez le couper avec un couteau ; mais la scie et le 
ciseau A pierre peuvent le couper ; il 3^ a du marbre 
blanc, noir, verd, rouge et jaune. Le chambranle de la 
cheminee est de marbre. Les monumens dans les eglises 
sont de marbre. 

Les pierres et les cailloux sont tires de la terre: voild 
deux cailloux, ils sont tres durs. Frappez-les Tun contie 
I'autre il en sortira des etincelles. Le gravier est tire de 
la terre, on le met dans des tombereaux, pour faire des 
alees ou des chemins. La craie et la terre glaise sont 
tirees de la terre. Le charbon de terre est tire de la terre 
14 



■158 
on fait des trous profonds, on y descend, on ramasse le 
charbon et on le monte hors de la mine. Car c'est ainsi 
qu'on appelle ces -grands trous ; les hommes qui sont 
occupes a ce travail sont tres noirs. Le charbon de terre 
sert d faii-e du feU, et sans l»i, je ne sais pas comment 
on ferait en Angleterre pour se chauffer. On tire de la 
terre bien des choses, car>elle est tres profonde, elle est 
si profonde que si vous la creusiez pendant cent ans, 
vous n'en trouveriez pas encore la fin. 



Charles, voila, ime bague que je vous pr^te ; voyez 
comme elle brille I Tenez-la au soleiL J'y vois toutes 
sortes de couleurs. Qu'elle est cette pierre hrillante ? 
C'est un Diamant. II est tres dur. Vous pouvez ecrire 
avec sur du verre. Un Rubis est rouge ; une Emeraude 
est verte ; une Topaze est jaune ; un Sap hire est bleu ; 
une Amethyste est pourpre ; le Granat est rouge. Le 
Beril est d'un vert leger. Toutes ces choses sont tirees 
de la terre. On les appelle joyaux, ou pierres precieuses. 
Qu'est ce que c'est que ces petits grains ronds et blancs 
qui pendent a vos oreilles et qui sont si jolis ; comment 
les appelle-t-on ? ce sont des Perles. Cela vient-il aussi 
de la terre? Non, elles vienent de la mer. On trouve 
des perles dans des ecailles d'huitres. 

Les pierres fondent-elles dans le feu ? Non. 

Le verre vient-il de la terre ? Non, on le fait dans une 
verrerie, oil il y a un grand feu jour et nuit. Dans quel- 
ques jours je vous menerai a une verrerie pour voir faire 
le verre. 



LTn arbre a des racines qui s'etendent loin sous terre, 
Ces racines lui servent de jambes, car sans elles I'arbre 
ne se tiendrait pas droit ; il a un tronc large, epais et 
droit, ce qui fait son corps ; il a des branches qui s'eten- 
dent fort loin et qui lui servent comme de brdjs ; sur ces 
branches il y a des rameaux qui portent des feuilles et 
des fleurs. Yoilla une fleur sur le pommier. Restera 



159 

l-elle toLljours sur I'arbre ? Non, elle tombera blentot, 
peut etre cette nuit ; mais d sa place-il viendra un fruit 
qu'on appell^ pomme. Si la fleur torabe cette nuit, vien- 
drai-je cueilbr la pomme demain ? Oh ? non ; H faut 
prendre patience, car elle ne sera pas mure encore de 
longtems. D'abord il viendra un petit bouton a peine 
aussi gros que la tete d'une epingle, qui grossira chaque 
jour jusqu'a ce qu'il soit devenu une grosse pomme. 
Mais il ne faut pas encore la manger, il faut la laisser 
sur I'arbre, jusqu'^ ce que le soleill'ait rougie et jusqu'd 
ce que vous puissiez la cueillir facilement. A present 
elle est mure, elle est aussi rouge que vos^ joues^ voUg 
pouvez la cueillir et la manger. 

Une fleur a-t-elle aussi des racines? Oui, voud un prim- 
evere, arrachons-le. Voyez, ses racines sont comme des 
cordons, voiiasatige, son pied, voila le calice, les feuilles 
de la fleur qui sont d'un joli jaune avec des taches cra- 
moisies, et voila la graine. Si vous mettez dans la terra 
cette graine quand elle sera mure, il viendra une fleui 
pareille. 



La femelle du cheval s'appelle jument. Le jeane 
cheval s'appelle poulain. 

La femelle du lion s'appelle lionne. 

Celle du tigre, tigresse. 

Le taureau, la vache, le veau, le bcBuf. 

Le sangiier, la truie, le cochon de lait. 

Le mouton, le belier, la brebis, I'agneau. 

Le chien, la chienne, les petits chiens. 

Le chat, la chatte, les petits chats. 

Le coq, la poule, les pouiets. • 

lie jar, I'oie, I'oison. 

Le canard, la canne, les cmnetons. 

L'aigle, Taigbn. 

Le cerf, le diim, le daine le chevreuil, la biche la 
faon. 

Le lievre, le levreau. 



he lion vit dans un repaire. II est tres fort, il a une 
ciiniere jauue fort epaisse sur le cou. 11 a des grifies 
ti-es pointues qui voiis dechireraient en pieces. Regar- 
dez-le. II est tres en colere, voyez, il bat ses ilancs 
avec sa queue, ses yeux brillent conflme du feu. II ru 
git furieusement. II est terrible, il montre ses dents aigues. 
Sa langLie est tres rude. Le lion dort toute la journee 
dans son repaire. Quand la nuit est venue, il sort et 
rode aux environs pour trouver a riianger. II mange 
les vaches, les moutons les chevaux et il vous mange- 
rait aussi s'il vous trouvait. La lionn^. n'a point de 
(triniere. Elie est comme.un grand chien. Tout le 
Inonde a-t-il peur du lion ? Oui, parcequ'ii est feroce. 
Mais Charles, per^onne n'a peur des chiens, parcequ'iJs 
sont bons. Je. vais vous conter une petite histoire a leur 
sujet. 

II y avait une fois un petit gar^on qui etait si polfron 
que la moindre chose I'efFrayait ? II avait peur de deux 
petits cabris ; quand iJ^ passaient leur tiez au travel's des 
pallissades de la cour, il n'osait pas les prendre par la 
bai-be. Quel pauvre gargon il etait ! Comment s'ap- 
pellait-il, je vous prie ? En verite je ne vous dirai pas 
son nom, car j'en suis honteus,e pour lui. Enfin il avals 
aussL peur des chiens. S'il en entendait aboyer un, il 
s'enfuyait et venait en pleurant se cacher sous le tablier 
de sa maman. Qu'il etait done sot ! Car les chiens ne 
font pas de mal, vous savez; ils aiment les petits gar9ons 
et jouent avec eux. Avez-vous jamais vu un chien 
devcrer un petit garQon ? Non, jamais j'ose dire. Un 
jour done que ce sot gargon, se promenait tout seul, un 
petit chien noir sortit cj'une maison, dit: ba oua ouap et 
vint au petit gar9on en sautant apres lui car il voulait 
jouer avec lui, mais le petit gargon se mit a fuir. Le 
petit chien courut apres lui et criait plus fort ba, oua, 
ouap; il voulait lui dire par la, bon jour comment vous 
portez vous ? Mais le petit gargon etait encore plus 
effraye et s'enfuit aussi vite qu'il put, sans regarder 
devant lui, de sorte qu'il tomba dans un fosse tres sale ; 
il pleurait au fond de ce fosse dont il ne pouvait sortir, 
et je crois qu'il y serait reste toute la journee sans le 
petit chien qui avait un si bon naturel, qu'il fat a la mai 



161 

son ou (lemeurait le petit gargon, pour dire ou il etait. 
II gratta done a la porte et dit : ba oua ouap, car il ne 
pouvait pas parler plus clairement, et Ton ouvrit la porte. 
Que voulez-vous petit chien noir ? Nous ne vou^ con- 
naissons pas. Alors le chien fut d Raoul le domestique, 
et le tira par son habit jusqu'a ce qu'il I'eut amene au 
fosse, et il aida Raoul d tirer le petit gar§on du fosse ; 
mais il etait tout couvert de boue et tout-a-fait mouille ; 
tout le monde se moqua de lui parcequ'il etait un poltron. 
Maintenant, Charles, je suis fatiguee ; je ne puis ecrire 
d'avantage a present, mais si vous etes bon gar9on, peut- 
etre vous ecrirai-je encore quelques histoires. Adieu. 



Charles, voila quelques histoires de plus pour vous, 
les unes cencernent de bons gargons, et les autres de 
mauvais et sots gargons; car a present vous savez ce 
que c'est d'etre bon gargon. La premiere de ces his- 
toires est au sujet de deux mechans coqs qui se querel- 
laient sans cesse, ce qui est tres vilain. Vous ne querel- 
lez jamais, Charles? Non, j'en suis bien aise ; mais si 
vous voyez quelques petits gar9ons se quereller vons 
jK?urrez leur dire I'histoire des deux coqs. La voici. 

II y avait une fois une poule qui vivait dans la coui 
d'une ferme et qui avait une grande couvee de poulets 
Elle avait grand soin d'eux, les rassemblait chaque nuit 
sous ses ailes, et les nourrissait tres bien : aussi ils etaient 
tous fort beaux, excepte deux coqs qui se disputaient 
toujours. A peine etaient-il hors de la coquille qu'ils 
se donnaient des coups de bee ; et quand ils furent plus 
forts lis se battirent jusqu'a ce qu'ils furent tout en sang. 
Si Tun ramassait un grain d'orge I'autre voulait toujours 
I'avoir. Aussi ne furent-ils jamais jolis, parceque dans 
leurs combats ils s'arrachaient presque toutes le-^ plumes, 
et se donnaient tant de coups de bee dans les yeux qu'ils 
etaient presqu'e aveugles. La vieille poule leur disait 
souvent que c'etait fort mal de se battre sinsi, mais ils 
ne I'ecoutaient pas. 

Un jour done que ces deux coqs s'etaient battus, 
comme ils faisaient toujours, et que le phis gros qu' s* 
14* 



KB 

nommait Cliantclair avait force I'autre a sortir tout-a-fai'' 
de la cour, le vaincu honteux et fache de sa defaite hv 
se cacher, se proposant bien de tirer vengea^ice de sod 
ennemi ; mais il ne savait trop comment faire, parcequ'ij 
n'etait pas assez fort pour etre sur de reussir. Enfin 
apres avoir beaucoup refiechi, il se determina a aller 
chez un vieux renard fort ruse, qui etait voisin de la ferrae, 
et il lui dit, renard, si vous voulez venir avec moi, je 
vous indiquerai un endroit ou il y a un coq fort gras que 
vous pou|-rez manger si vous voulez. Maitre renard 
tres content de la nouvelle, car il avait bon appetit, lui 
repondit, oui da, j'irai de tout mon coeur et je n'en lais- 
serai pas une plume je vous assure. lis partirent done 
ensemble et etant arrives, le coq montra au renard, le 
cbemin de la cour de la ferme et Tendroit ou le pauvre 
Chantclair etait endormi. Le renard aussitot le saisit par 
le cou et le devora; I'autre coq temoin de sa vengeance 
se mit a chanter de joie ; mais quand le renard eut tini, 
il dit, Chantclair etait fort bon, mais je n'ai pas assez 
mange, ainsi disant, il se jetta sur I'autre coq et le devora 
aussi. 



Je vais vous raconter une autre histoire. 

n y avait un petit gar9on qui se nommait Henri ; ses 
parens I'envoyerent a I'ecole, Henri etait un gargon 
intelligent qui aim.ait a etudier, aussi il devint le premier 
de sa classe. Sa maman qui en fut informee se leva un 
jour de bonne heure, appella Babet sa servante, et lui dit, 
allez acheter un beau gateau pour Henri, car il apprend 
bien ses legons. Babet y fut de tout son cceur et apporta 
un tres grand gateau rempli de prunes, de confitures, 
d'ecorces d'orange et de citron, glace de sucre sur le 
dessus et on I'envoya a Henri a son ecole. Quand 
Henri le vit, il fut tres content, il sauta de joie tout 
autour et sans attendre qu'on lui pretat un couteau pour 
encouper un morceau, il le rongea comme un petit chien , 
il en mangeaainsi jusqu'a I'heure de I'ecole, apres I'ecole 
il en mangea encore jusqu'a ce qu'il fut couche, et 
son camarade de lit m'a dit, qu'il avait mis son gateau 



](i3 

sous le chevet de son lltet qu'il s'etait rele\e la nuitpour 
le manger jusqu'au dernier morceau. Mais aussitot 
apres le petit gargon fut tres malade, et tout le monde 
disait; qu a. done Henri? ordinaireraent il est si gai, il 
joue avec plus d'agilite qu'aucun autre gar9on, et main- 
tenant il est pale et parait tres rnalad^. A la fin quelqu'un 
dit, qu'Henri avait regu un gros gateau, qu'il I'avait tout 
mange et que c'etait cela qui le rendait malade. On en- 
voya done chercher le Docteur Camomille, qui lui fit 
prendre je ne sais combien de drogues ameres ; le pauvre 
Henri ne les aimait pas du tout ; mais il fut force de les 
prendre, si non il serait mort ; enfin a force de remedes 
il fut gueri; mais samaman lui dit, qu'elle ne lui enver- 
rait plus de gateaux. 

Alors, il J avait un autre gargon camarade d'ecole de 
Henri, qui se nommait Pierre ; les gargons I'appellaient 
habituellement Pierre le soigneux. Un jour il ecrivit a 
sa maman une jolie lettre, dans laquelle il n'y avait 
aucune tache d'encre. Desorte que sa maman lui en- 
voya un gateau. Alors Pierre songeant en lui meme, 
combien Henri avait ete malade, pour avoir mange tout 
son gateau dans un seul jour, se proposa de le garder 
longtems. Ainsi il prit le gateau qui etait fort pesant, le 
porta avec peine en haut, I'enferma dans sa boite et 
chaque jour il enmangeaitun tres petit morceau et le 
renfermait soigneusement, de sorte qu'il le garda plusi- 
eurs semaines car il etait bien gros ; mais les souris 
entrerent dans la boite et en rongerent une partie. Le 
gateau etant devenu moisi, ne valait plus rien, desorte 
qu'il fut oblige de jetter le reste ; ce qui lui fit grand 
peine, mais personne n'en fut fache pour lui. 

II y avait encore a la meme ecole un autre gargon qui 
s'appellait Guillaume. Un jour sa maman, qui I'aimait 
beaucoup, lui envoya un gateau. Aussitot que le gateau 
fut arrive, Guillaume dit a ses camardes d'ecole, j'ai regu 
un gateau, allons-en manger. lis s'assirent done tous 
en rond ; Guillaume prit une part pour lui, et alors en 
donna une a I'un une a un autre et ainsi de suite jusqu'a 
ce qu'il n'en resta presque plus; alors Guillaume mit le 
reste a part, se proposant de le manger le lendemam. II 
fut jouer avec ses camarades qui s'amuserent beaueoup 



164 

avec lui : comme ils jouaient encore, il vint dans ia cour 
un vieux bon homme, il avait une baibe blanche et 
comme il etait aveugle, il avait un petit chien, attache 
avec une corde, qui le conduisait. II s'assit done dans 
la cour sur une pierre, et dit. Mes petits amis, si vous 
voulez, je vous jouerai un petit air sur mon violon. Les 
petits gargons quitterent aussitot leur divertissement, en 
tourerent le bon homme et I'ecouterent. Guillaume 
s'etant appergu pendant que le vieillard jouait, que les 
pleurs co«laient sur ses joues ; il lui dit, bon homme 
pourquoi pleurez-vous ? parceque j'ai bien faim repondit- 
il. Je n'ai persone pour me nourir ; je n ai rien dans 
le monde que ce petit chien; je ne puis travailler; si 
je le pouvais^ je le ferais ; alors, Guillaume sans dire un 
mot, fat chercher le reste de son gateau, qu'il avait in- 
tention de manner un autre jour, et le donna au vieillard, 
en lui disant, bon homme, voiH un morceau de gateau 
pour vous. Le bon vieillard, remercia Guillaume qui 
etait plus content que s'il avait mange dix gateaux. 

Dites moi, je vous prie, lequel aimez-vous le mieux 
des trois, Henri, Pierre, ou Guillaume? 



Petit bon homme, venez-ici, et dites moi a quelle dis- 
tance du logis avez-vous deja ete? j'ai envie devous 
emmener bien loin pour voir ce que nous pourrons, car 
il y a beaucoup de places dans le monde autres que 
votre maison. Prenez votre chapeau. Adieu ! papa, 
adieu! Guillaume, Henri, et tout le monde, car nous 
allons bien loin. Nous irons d'abord au bout de cette 
ruelle, ensuite a travers le cimetiere, de la nous tourne- 
rons au coin de la maison, nous passerons par dessus la 
barriere et nous marcherons jusqua ce que nous soyons 
tout-a-fait dans les champs; enfin, nous y voila, les 
champs sont bien jolis ; oui, car nous sommes dans I'ete. 
Regardez, voila des fleurs jaunes, des blanches, de I'herbe, 
des arbres, et des haies ; ecoutez chanter les sauterelles, 
n' essay ez pas de les attraper, cela nous retarderait, et 
nous avons beaucoup de chemin a faire. 

Dites moi, je vous prie, qu'elles sont ces jolies crea- 
tures, paraissent si douces, qui ont sur le dos une laine 



165 

blanche, epaisse et molle, comme Line espece de redin 
gote, et qui font un bruit semblable a celui que font les 
petits eafans quand ils pleurent ? Ce sont des moutons 
et des agneaux. Et comment appelie-t-on ces cieatures 
avec des cornes et qui sont beaucoup plus grosses que les 
moutons ? les unes sont noires, d'autres rouges ; eJes 
font grand bruit ; mais ne paraissent pas vouloir faire d^ 
mala, personne. Ce sont des vaches, qui donnent le 
lait. Caressez-les. Pauvres vaches ! 

Arretez-vous, et retournez-vous. Nous n^ voyons plus 
la maison de papa ; nous ne voyons que le haut du clo- 
cher de Teglise. Allons un peu plus loin. Retournez- 
vous. Maintenant nous ne voyons plus I'eglise du tout. 
Adieu ! Nous allons bien loin. Retournerons-nous au 
logis.? Oui, mais a present il faut continuer notre che- 
min. Allons ; depechons. 

Qu'elle est cette haute machine qui a quatre grands 
bras qui remuent tres vite .'' je crois que si j'etais aupres, 
ils me jetteraient par terre, C'est un moulin a vent. Ces 
bras sont des voiles dans lesquelles le vent soufle pour 
les faire tourner. A quoi sert un moTalin a vent.? a 
moudre le grain. Vous ne»pourriez pas manger de pain 
si le bled n'etait pas moulu. Ho ho 1 voila une riviere ;■ 
comment ferons-nous pour la passer .'' Ne voyez-vous 
pas comment ces canards font, ils la passent a la nage.- 
Mais je ne ne sais pas nager. II faut done I'apprendre ; 
je crois qu'elle est trop large pour sauter par dessus. 
Oh ! voila un pont ! Quelqu'un a fait ce pont pour que 
nous puissions passer cette riviere. Ce quelqu'un etait 
fort bon et tres adroit, car sans lui je ne sais pas comment 
nous aurions fait. Je m'etonne comment il a pu faire 
ce pont. Je suis sur qu€ je ne pourrais pas en faire un 
pareil. 

Allons, continuous notre chemin, nous verrons plus de 
rivieres, plus de champs et des villes beaucoup plus 
grandes que la notre, de belles eglises, des rues et des 
personnes — plus qu'il y en a a la foire. Nous aureus 
de grandes montagnes a gravir. Je crois qu'il faudra 
quelqu' an pour porter le petit gar9on au haut de ces 
montagnes. Quelque fois nous passerons a travers des 
routes pleines de sable et de poussiere ; qnelque fois par 



166 

des routes de verdure, oii nous entendrons chanter des 
oiseaux; quelque fois nous passerons par de o^randes 
communes ou nous ne verrons ni arbres ni mai.sons et a 
peine de I'herbe, seulement quelques fleurs pourpres, et 
quelques moutons. Ah ! avez-vous vu une johe petite 
creature brune qui a traverse le chemin en courant? 
En voila une autre ; encore une autre, 11 y en a beau- 
coup. Ces sont dek lapins. lis demeurent ici dans des 
maisons qu'ils se font dans laterre, on appelle cette place 
garenne a lapins. 

A present nous voila arrives dans une place oii il y a 
beaucoup d' arbres plus grands et en plus grand nombre 
que dans le verger. Voila un chene, un frene, un 
orme. On appelle ceci un bois. Quelles grandes 
branches les arbres ont! Ces sont comme autant de 
bras. Le soleil ne pent luire a travers ce feuillage, il 
est si epais ! Voila un ecureuil ! regardez, il saute d'un 
arbre a un autre. II est tres agile. Quelle belle queue 
ila! 

Maintenant que nous avons passe a travers grand nom- ' 
bre de champs, et de villes, nous voila arrives pres d'une 
eau profonde et beaucoup pUs large que la riviere, car 
vous pouvez voir les champs qui sont de I'autre cote de 
de la riviere • mais celle-ci est si large et si longue que ■ 
vous ne voyez autre chose que de I'eau aussi loin que 
votre vue peut atteindre, et comme vous voyez, cette 
eau n'est pas unie comme celle de la riviere ; au con- 
traire, elle est toute raboteuse, et elle est si profonde^ 
qu'elle vous noyejait quand bien meme vous seriez deux 
fois aussi grand que le clocher de notre eglise. Je vou- 
drais bien savoir comment on appelle cette grand eau. 
Voila un vieux pecheur assis sur une pierre au soleil 
pour se secher, car il est bien mouille ; allons lui deman- 
der. Pecheur, dites moi, je vous prie, comment appelle 
t-on cette grande eau ? C'est la mer : n'avez vous jamais 
entendu parler de la mer ? Quoi ! cette grande eau est 
la meme mer qui est sur notre globe au logis ? Oui. 
c'est la meme. Oh! oh! cela est tres etrange ! nous 
sommes venus a la mer qui est sur notre globe ; mais 
elle est tres petite sur notre globe, parceque les villes, 
et les rivieres y sont petites. 



s. 



167 

Pecheur, elites moi, je vous prie y a-t-il autre cliose de 
['autre cote de cette mer. Oui, il y a des champs, des 
villes et des gens. Voulez-vous les aller voir. J'aurais 
grande envie d'y aller ; mais comment ferons-nous pour 
passer cette mer. Car il n'y a pas de pont ici. Ne voyez- 
vous pa3 ces grandes boites de bois qui nagent sur I'eau. 
Elles sent plus grandes que toute la maison de papa. II 
y a de grandes perches dans le milieu aussi hautes que 
des arbres. Ces sont des mats. Regardez, a present on 
etend les voiles, ces linges blancs sont les voiles. Ces 
boites de bois sont comme des maisons avec des ailes. 
Oui, Charles ; et elles sont faites pour traverser la mer, 
alors le vent soufle dans ces voiles qui font aller ces 
grandes boites plus vite que le trot d'un cheval. Com- 
ment les appelle-t-on. On les appelle vaisseaus. Vous 
avez vu un vaisseau en peinture. Irons-nous dans un 
de ceux-ci. Oui ; comment sont done habilles les homraes 
qui sont dans ce vaisseau. lis ont de petites vestes, des 
pantalonsj et des chemises de toile rayee. Ces pont des 
matelots. Je pense qu'il faut que nous fassions de vous 
un matelot, et qu'au lieu de vos culottes, il fau^ que vous 
portiez un pantalon. Voyez-vous ce matelot, comme il 
gnmpe sur les cordes ? II est tres leste. II court laL 
dessus comme un singe. A present il est au haut du mat. 
Comme il parait petit ! Mais il faut que nous allions dans 
le vaisseau. Ail'ons, depechez-vous ; cal- ils n'attendront 
pas pour nous. Que faites-vous ? Vous ramassez des 
coquilles ! Allons, entrons en premier dans le bateau par- 
ceque le vaisseau n'est pas assez pres. A present nous 
sommes dans le vaisseau. 

Nous voila sur la grande mer. SouileZ, souflez vent ! 
Faites voguer le vaisseau ! Vdld de petites chambres 
dans le vaisseau. On les appelle cabaines. Promenons 
nous, et examinons le vaisseau. Eh bien vous ne mar- 
ches pas ferme. La mer n'est pas comme la riviere ; 
elle est verdatre, Quand nous aurons soif nous ne man- 
querons pas d'eau pour boire. Oui, il y a assez d'eau mais 
vous ne pourriez pas en boire parcequ'elle est amere et 
saiee. Comme nous allons vite ! Les champs sont deja 
bien loin. Maintenant nous ne pouvons plus voir ni 
champs ni maisons, nous ne voyons autour de nous que 



168 

cette eau profonde. Oui, et le ciel ; nous pouvons voir 
le ciel aussi. Tout ce qui est au dessus de nos tetes est 
le ciel, et tout autour de nous c'est de I'eau. N'ayez pas 
peur, petit bon homme ! Souflez, soufiez vent ; faites 
voguer le vaisseau. Je vois plusieurs choses sur la mer* 
a une grande distance. Ces sont encore quelques vais- 
seaux. Comme ils sont petits ! ils ne paraissent pas plus 
grands que des coquilles jde noix sur un grand etang. 
Oh ! nous approchons des villes qui sont de 1' autre cote 
de la mer. Je puis les voir un^ peu. A present je les 
vois un peu. A present je les vois tres bien. Voila une 
petite et endue -de terre couverte de verdure qui est toute 
entouree d'eau. C'est une isle. Toute partie de terre 
entouree d'eau s'appelle une isle. Mais nous n'allons 
pas sur celle Id, nous allons sur une plus grande. Nous 
voila arrives. Sortons du vaisseau. Comment appelle-t-on 
ce pays ci .? C'est I'Angleterre. I'Angleterre qui est 
aussi sur notre globe ? Et dites-moi, je vous prie, comment 
nomme-t-on le pays d'ou nous venoms ? C'est la France. 
Et comme vous savez la mer est entrq la France et I'An- 
gleterre ainsi qu'il est represents sur le globe. 

Oh ! que TAngleterre est un joli pays ! II n'y fait pas 
si chaud que dans le notre. Mais voila de jolies fleurs 
et de grandes et belles prairies. Comme I'herbe en est 
fine ! Je n'en ai jamais vu de si belle. 

Mais dites-moi, je vous prie, qu'est ce que c'est que ce 
chapip ou il y a tant de grandes perches entourees-de 
petites cordes vertes?"On appelle cela du houblon ; c'est 
la vigne de I'Angleterre ; comme le climat n'est past 
stssez chaud pour planter des vignes en plein champ 
comm.e en France, au lieu de raisin on y plants du hou- 
blon qui prepare avec de I'orge fait une boisson qu'on 
appelle bierre, et qui remp^ace le vin que le climat ne 
peut pas prqd^ire. Allons parler d ces gens qui sont la 
has. Voila une petite fille qui porte du lait. Ecoutez 
petite fille, donnez-nous un peu de votre lait, il a bonne 
mine. Your Serifant, Sir. Que dit-es-vous .'' Je ne vous 
entend pas. Comment faire ! Voila un vieux bon homme 
qui cueille des pommes, allons lui parler, peut-etre il nous 
entendra. Bon homme, donriez-moi je vous prie, un peu 
de vos pommes, eUes sont fo^ belles. Your Servant, Sir 



169 

IVhat do you want 1 Que dites-Yous ? Nous n'entendons 
pas ce que veut, dire, Your Servant, Sir. C'est de I'An- 
glais : mais nous n'entendons pas T Anglais. Je ne sais 
qu'y faire. II faut aller au logis et i'apprendre. IMais 
pourquoi parlez-vous Anglais. Parceque ce pays est 
I'Angleterre. Ne saviez vous pas que tout le monde 
paiie Anglais en Angleterre ? Ha, ha, ha ! He, he, he ' 
Ho, ho, ho ! Voila un sot petit gar9on venu par de la la 
mer, et qui ne sait pas que tout le monde en Angleterre 
Darle Anglais? Ha, ha, ha! He, he, he! Ho, ho, ho' 
Que ferons nous petit bon homme ? Tout ^e monde se 
moque de nous, jusqu'aux petits oiseaux qui nous siflent. 
Retournons prompteraent au logis. Adieu, Angleterre ! 
Nous ne reviendrons te revoir que lorsque nons saurons 
parler Anglais. Retournons au vaisseau. Souflez vent, 
faite.s voguer le vaisseau. Enfin nous voila de retour au 
logis. Papa, faites moi apprendre F Anglais, je vous 
prie, afin que je puisse me faire entendre quand j'jrai en 
Ano-leterre. 



Vous savez sans doute, Charles, combien un cheval a 
de jambes ? Oui, il en a quatre : et savez-vous comment 
on appelle un animal qui a quatre jambes? On I'-sppelle 
im quadrupede. Une vache, un chien, un lion, et toutes 
les betes sont quadrupedes. Mais les oiseaux ne sont pas' 
quadrupedes, car ils n'ont que deux jam.bes, Quelques 
quadrupedes ont des sabots. Le cheval, Fane, et la va- 
che ont des sabots de corne. Mais-le chien n'en a paSj 
il a des doigts avec des griffes, ainsi que le chat, I'lcu- 
reuil et beaucoup d'autres. Le sabot du cheval est d'une 
seule piece, mais celui de la vache esi separe comme si 
c'etaient deux sabots, ce qu'on appelle pied fendu ; ainsi 
les vaches, les moutons, les cochons et les cerfs out ie 
pied fendu. 



L'ane dit je suis quadrupede ; je suis une creature 
bonne et tres patiente. J'ai des sabots etdes tres longues 
oreilles, je fais beaucoup de bruit quand je brais ; le che- 
val est effraye quand je brais et tressaille de peur ; majs 
je suis fort paisible et ne fais de mal a personne ; je ne 
suis pas si gros que le cheval et je ne peux pas galoper 
15 ' 



170 

vite, mais je tra-'-aille beaucoup ; quelque fois je porto 
deux ou trois petits gargons sur mon dos, qui me dormenl 
des coups de fouet et me piquent les flarics pour me faire 
aller plus vite ; je porte des choux, des navets et des 
pommes de terre au marche, et quelque fois on me fait 
porter des fardeaux qui m'assommept ; cependant pour 
mon diner je n'ai que des chardons piquans et quelques 
rierbes grossieres. Je n'ai point d'ecurie poui coucher 
comme le cheval ; je suis toujours en I'air, expose a. la 
(leige ou a lapluie, mais je suis content. Je donne du lait 
comme la vache, et mon lait est tres bon pour rendre la 
fiante aux personnes qui sont malades. 



Ah ! ah ! que vois-je parmi ces bruyeres ? je ne vois 
qie des yeux fort grands. C'est un lievre dans son gite, 
qui est accroupi parmi les bruyeres pour se cacher, car il 
est tres craintif. Le lievre est tres doux et tres innocent 
Sa couleur est brune ; mais dans les pays tres froids elle 
est blanche comme la neige. II a une courte queue 
touiFue. Sa levre superieure est fendue et tres velue. II 
remue toujours tes levres. Ses jambes de derriere sont 
tres longues, afin qu'il puisse mieux courir. Le lievre se 
nourrit d'herbes, de racines, d'ecorce de jeunes arbres et 
de bled verd ; quelques fois ii entre furtivement dans les 
jardins pour manger des choux ou un peu de persil. II 
aime a jouer et sauter 9a et Id au clair de la iune, et d 
motdre les tendres tigres du bled quand la rosee est des- 
sus ; mais dans le jour 11 dort dans son gite les yeux ou- 
verts parcequ'il est tres timide, et quand il entend le 
moindre bruit il tressaille et dresse sqs grandes oreilles. 
II entend ou voit le chien d'un chasseur ; il cherche d 
s'enfuir avec vitesse, mais si la pauvre innocente bete 
e'chappe au fusil du chasseur, il est bientot pris par le 
levrier qui I'apporte d son maitre, qui a la cruaute de lui 
oter la vie pour satisfaire sa sensualite. 



Tous les oiseaux qui nagent ont les pieds plats dont les 
duigts sont joints par une membrane qui leur sert comme 
de nageoires pour bien nager. 

Lp eigne dit, mon nom est eigne, je suis un oiseau 
plus grand qu''<ine oie. Mon bee est rouge, horde de 



171 

noir. Mes yeux sont entoures de noir. Mes jambes 
sonl d'une couleur foncee, mais mes pieds sont rouges, et 
peuvent me servir ne nageoires. Mon corps est tout 
blanc et aussi blanc que la neige, et il est tres beau. J'ai 
un tres long cou. Je vis dans les rivieres et lacs. Je me 
nourris des plantes qui croissent dans Teau, de grJines, 
de petites insectes et de liraagons. Je n'ai pas bonne 
mine quand je marche car je nt peux marcher bien ; 
mais quand je suis dans I'eau, que je nage facilement ert 
courbant mon long cou, et plongeant m;i gorge blanche 
pour me faire passage dans I'eau, je suis le plus agreable 
de tous les oiseaux. Je batis mon nid dans une petite 
isle parmi les roseaux et les joncs ; je ie fais avec des 
batons et de grandes herbes, il est tres grand et haut. 
Alors je ponds mes ceufs qui sont blancs et tres gros, 
beaucoup plus gros que les ceufs d'oie, et je les couve 
pendant deux mois, alors mes petits sont eclos, on les 
appelle cignets ; ils ne sont' pas blancs d'abord, ils sont 
gris. Si quelqu'un approchait qnand je suis sur mon nid 
ou avec mes petits, je m'etancerais sur lui, car je suis 
furieux quand je les defends, et si vous v£>iiliez les em- 
porter, je vous renverserais par la force de mes ailes et 
peut-etre vous casserais-je le bras. Je vis tres longtems. 
Le soleil dit, mon nom est soleil : je suis tres brilliant. 
Je me leve a I'orient et quand je me leve, alors je fais le 
jour ; je lance un de mes rayons dores sur votre fenetre 
pour vous avertir qu'il est tems de vous lever ; et je dis, 
paresseux leve-toi, je ne luis pas pour que tu restes dans 
ton lit, mais pour que tu te leves, tu travailles, tu lises, on 
que tu marches. Je suis grand voyageur. Je parcours 
tous les cieux ; jamais je ne m'arrete et jamais je ne suis 
fatigue. J'ai une couronne resplendissante sur ma tete 
et je darde mes raj'ons par tout. Je luis sur les arbres, 
les maisons, et sur I'eau ; et tout ce que j'eclaire parait 
brillant et beau. Je vous donne le jour et la chaleur. Je 
mQris le fruit et le bled; si je ne luisais pas sur les 
champs et sur les jardins, rien ne croitrait. Je suis tres 
haut dans le ciel ; plus haut que tous les arbres plus haut 
que les nuees, plus haut que toute chose. Je suis fort 
eloigne' de vous ; si je venais pres de vous je vous con- 
Rumerais et je brulerais toute la verdure car je suis com 



172 

pose d'un feu tres ardent. II y a longtems que je suis 
dans le ciel II y a pres de cinq ans il n'y avait point 
de Charles ; Charles ne vivait pas alors, mais il y avait 
un soleil. J'etais dans le ciel longtems avant que votre 
papa et votre maman ne soient au monde, et je n'ai point 
encode vieilli. Quelque fois j'ote ma couronne resplen- 
dissante et j'enveloppe ma tete dans de legers nuagos 
argentes, alors vous pouvez me regarder ; mais quand ii 
n'y a point de nuages et que je brille dans toute ma force 
en plein midi, vous ne pouvez me fixer, si non je vous 
eblouirais, et vous rendrais aveugle. L'aigle seul peut 
me regarder alors, car en tout tems, par la force de son 
regard pergant il peut me fixer. Le matin quand je me 
leve pour faire le jour, alors I'alouette vole dans Fair a 
ma rencontre et chante gaiment, le coq par son chant 
annonce a tout le monde mon arrivee ; mais le hibou et 
la chaiive souris s'enfuient quand ils me voyent et vont 
se cacher, I'une dans de vieilles murailles, et I'autre dans 
des trous d'arbres ; le lion et le tigre rentrent dans leur 
repaire ou il dorment tout le jour. Je luis en tous lieux, 
en Angfeterre, en France, en Espagne, enfin sur toute la 
terre. Je suis la plus belle et la plus magnifiq-ue crea- 
ture qu'on puisse voir dans I'univers. 



La lune dit, mon nom estlune ; je luis pour vous eclai- 
rer quand le soleil est couche. Je suis tres belle et 
blanche comme I'argent. Vous pouVez toujours me re 
garder, car je ne suis pas assez brillante pour vous eblouir. 
Ma clarte est douce et moderee. Je laisse meme briller 
les vers luisans qui n^ brillent que la nuit. Les etoiles 
brillent autour de raoi, mais je suis plus grande et plus 
brillante que les etoiles. Je suis comme une grande 
perle entouree de petits diaiT^ans. Quand vous dormez, 
mes doux rayons luisent d travers vos rideaux, et je dis, 
dormez pauvre petit gargon qui etes fatigue, je ne vous 
toublerai point, Le rossignol qui de tous les oiseaus 
chante le mieux m'addresse ses scms melodieux tant que 
la nuit dure ; alors la rosee bienfaisante rafraichit la tige 
des fleurs des prairies emaillees. Et tout est tranquil! e el 
dans le silence tout a I'entour. 



173 



HISTORIETTES. 

Qu-elle est cette petite demoiselle, assise dans un coin 
qui semble craindre qu'on ne rapergoive - — C'est Ernilie, 
qui se rnoque des enfans mal vetus. Ce matin, eUe 
avait demande a sa bonne un toquet de velours orne de 
paillettes. Comme elle en paraissait fiere, sa maman^ 
pour la punir, lui a fait prendre un bonnet de nuit qu'elle 
g;irderadevantlespetites voisines qu'elle voulait humilier. 



Fanfan, le chat aurait-il mange ton oiseau? J'ai trouve 
beaucoup de plumes dans I'escalier. — Non, mon frere ; 
c'est moi qui I'ai plume pour voir quelle mine il aurait 
sans plumes. — Comment! tu as eu cette cruaute, et tu le 
dis sans rougir ! — Mais, mon frere, on m'avait donne cet 
oiseau pour m'amuser. — Mon frere, on ne s'amuse pas d 
des choses qui font du mal. Si on t'arrachait les che- 
veux, tu soufFrirais ; I'oiseau soufFre depuis que tu lui as 
arrache les plumes. 



Sophie avait un chat notnrae Zizi.: c'est un joli amuse, 
ment, qu'un petit chat ; mais Sophie avast pour Zizi une 
amitie si folle, qu'elle ne pensait qu' a lui, et qu'elle 
employait la plus grande partie de son temps a le cares- 
ser. Le matin, a peine etait-elle sortie du lit, qu'elle 
appelait Zizi ; en lisant sa legon, elle pensait a Zizi ; au 
lieu de coudre, elle s'occupait de Zizi ; et preferablement 
[I sa poupee, c'etait Zizi qu'elle habillait. On ota a So- 
phie son Zizi, et Ton se moqua d'elle quand elle voulut 
pleurer. 

Laurette etait une petite fiUe hi en etourdie : il ne se 
passait pas de jour qu'elle ne se fit cu mal, ou qu'elle 
n'en causat a ses camarades. Sa ma'inan lui avait ex- 
pressemeht defendu de manier des couteaux, et de trop 
s'approcher du feu ; mais a peine la maman etait elle 
detournee, que la petite fille oubUait la defense. ^Jn jour 
qu'on I'avait laissee seule avec sa sceur Sophie, au lieu 
ie faire attention a cet enfant, qui etait plus jeune qu'elle- 
15* 



174 

elle la laissa manier un couteavi qui la coupa bien fort 
Une autre fois, en ramassant une aiguille, elle approche 
la bougie si pres de son beguin, que le feu prit a la den- 
telle, et brula une grande partie de ses cheveux. 

Alphonse etait un petit enfant de si mauvaise humeur, 
qu'on le voyait pleur^r pour la moindre bagatelle. S'il 
trouvait sa le9on tant soit peu difficile, il disait quil n'en 
pourrait jamais venir about, et il laissait Id son livre, 
pour verser des larmes ; quand il lui manquait un de ses 
joujoux, au lieu de le chercher, il se desolait. Au moin- 
dre coup que lui donnait en jouant un de ses camarades, 
il poussait des<;ris si aigus qu'on I'aurait cruestropie pour 
la vie. Un jour son papa lui dit : Alphonse, si tu jettes 
ton livre pour un mot difficile, comment veux-tu appren- 
dre a lire ? Pendant le terns que tu mets a pleurer tes 
JQujoux, tu les retrouverais ; si, pour un petit coup, tu 
te mets a crier, pucun enfant ne voudra jouer avec toi. 
Alphonse entendit raison ; ses legons lui parurent moins 
difficiles, ses joujoux ne se perdirent plus, et ses cama- 
rades le regarderent comme un bon petit enfant, qu'ils 
mirent de toutes leur parties. 



Papa, quel plaisir, si j'etais grand comme le cerisier 
qui est dans notre jardin ! II ne me faudrait ni echelle, 
ni crochet pour avoir des cerises. D'une enjambeeje 
traverserais une riviire, et puis je serais bien plus fort, si 
j'etais si grand ! Qu'il vint un ours a ma rencontre, je 
lui tordrais le cou d'lm tour de m.ain — Mon fils tu ne fais 
done pas attention qu'il n'y aurait pas de place pour con- 
tenir des hommes si gros, et que tel pays qui fait vivre 
aujourd'hui mille hommes, en ferait tout au plus subsister 
vingt ? Chacun de nous mangerait un boeuf a son diner, 
et tu n'aurais pas trop d'une tonne de lait pour faire ton 
dejeuner. 

4 

Dorval etait un petit gargon si turbulent, que, malgre 
la vigilance de ceu;i qui I'environnaient, il lui arrivait toua 
les jours quelq jo accident. 'Jne fois en marchant a 
rcculons. il toraba du haut enbas d'un escalier : une autre 



I7o 

fois, il fit toniber sa maman en se balangant au dossier de 
son fauteui] : mais voici I'accident le plus facheux. Un 
jour qu'il jouait avec une petite demoiselle, a, qui croise- 
rait le premier deux epingles, en les poussant Tune 
contre 1' autre, il mit dans sa bouche des epingles qui 
I'embarrassaient. Dans le meme moment, un gros chien 
qu'il avait accoutume a jcmer avec lui, entra sans etre a 
per9u, el lui mit ses deux pattes sur les epaules. — Dorval 
qui ne s'y attendait pas, fit un hiauvement, et Idcha les 
epingles, qui lui descendirent dans le gosier. On eut 
beau appellerles chirurgiens ; Dorval mourut d'un abces, 
au bout de quelques jours. 



Germeuil etait un enfant tres indocile. Un jour qu'il 
passait pres d'une ruche, son papa I'avertitque les abeil- 
les etaient dangereuses quand on les troublait dans leur 
travail: Bon, dit Germeuil, si c'etait un gros chien. j'en 
aurais peur; mais des abeilles ^ d'un coup de mouchoir 
j'en abattrais un cent. Le petit incr&dule frappa la ruche 
avec sa baguette. Dans I'instant les abeilles le poursui- 
virent, et le piquerent au visage, au cou, aux jambes, aux 
mains, partout ou leur aiguillon put se faire jour. 

Cecile avait de beaux yeux, une jolie bouche, des 
couleurs vives ; Cecile etait une jolie petite fiUe. Elle 
en devint si orgueilleuse, qu'elle ne pouvait supporter 
ceux qui avaient quelque defaut dans la figure ou dans 
la taille. Josephine, sa coeur cadette-, rtait presque laide ; 
mais elle etait douce, prevenante, et savait lire avant que 
Cecile connut une lettre. Cecile et Josephine eurent 
ensemble la petite veroLe. Josephine supporta son raal 
avec patience; mais Cecile, craignant de perdre sa 
beaute, aigrit son sang, et fut tellem.ent defiguree, qu'on 
ne se ressouvint plus qu'elle avait ete belle. Comma 
elle ne savait ni travailler, ni lire, elle n'eut rien pour se 
distraire. Josephine, au contraire, fut recherchee, parce 
qu'elle joignait a r esprit beaucoup de connais'^ances et 
d'amabilite. 



176 



PRIERES DU MATIN. 



Mon Dieti, je vous adore, je reconnais voire grandeui 
supreme. Je ne suis devant vous que cendre, poussiere, 
neant. Faites-moi la grace de mourir plutot que de 
vous offenser. 

Mon Sauveur, conduisez-moi, et donnez-moi un cceur 
docile a votre loi. 

M^n Dieu, je vous aime par dessus tout, et je rends 
graces a votre bonte infinie, qui m'a cree et rachete de 
I'enfer. Je vous remercie de ra' avoir conserve cette 
nuit. Je vous ofFre mon ame, mon coeur, mon corps, 
toutes meG pensees, toutes mes paroles, et toutes mes 
actions. 

La Priere du Seigneur. 

Notre Pere, qui etes dans les cieux, que votre nom soif 
sanctifie : que votre regne arrive : que votre volonte soit 
faite, en la terre com me au ciel ; donnez nous au- 
jourd'hui notre pain de chaque jour; et pardonnez nous 
nos offenses, comme nous pardonnons a ceux qui nous 
cnt offenses ; et ne nous laissez pas succomber a la ten- 
tation: mais delivrez nous du mal. Ainsi soit il. 

Je crois en Dieu, le Pere tout puissant, Createur du 
ciel et de la terre, et en Jesus Christ, son Fils unique 
notre Seigneur ; qui a ete congu du Saint E.^prit, est ne 
de la Vierge Marie: a souffert sous Ponce-Pilate, a ete 
crucifie, est mort, et a ete mis dans le sepulcre, est des- 
cendu aux enfers ; est ressuscite des morts le troisieme 
jour, e^ monte aux cieux, est assis a la droite de Dieu, 
le Pere tout-puissant ; et de-la il viendrajuger les vivans 
et les morts : Je crois en I'Esprit saint, Ja sainte Eglise 



177 

Catholique, la Communion aes Saints, la remissior dea 
peches, la resurrection de la chair, la vie eternelle. 
' Ainsi soit il. 

Prions. 

Seigneur, Dieu tout-puissant, qui nous avezfait arriver 
au commencement de ce jour, sauvez-nous aujourd'hui 
par votre puissance ; afin que, durant le cours de cette 
journee, nous ne commettions, aucun peche; raais que 
toiites nos actions soient selon votre justice. Par N. S. 
J. C. votre Fils, qui, etant Dieu, vit et regne avec vous 
en r unite du S. Esprit, dans tons Lbs siecles des siecles. 
Ainsi soit-il. :, 



PRIERES DU SOIR. 

Je vous rends grdce, 6 Dieu de misericorde, de tous 
les biens qu'il vous a plu de me faire durant ce jour, et 
depuis que vous m'avez mis au monde. Je vous remercie 
de ce que vous m'ave2 fait Chretien. 

^pres avoir examine sa conscience. 

O mon Dieu, je vous demande pardon de ous me« 

peches; je les deteste pour votre amour, je fais me 

ferme resolution, avec votre gr^ce, de n'j plus re* 
toraber. 



178 



IDIOMATICAL PHRASES 

The peculiarities of Languages, or Idiomatical Ex- 
pressions, which threw such tbrraidable obstacles in the 
way of the translator, have been treated by all Gram- 
marians, Dufief excepted, with a kind of indifference as 
undeserving as unaccountable. Many years' experience 
in my professional pursuits has called my particular atten- 
tion to the necessity of an acquaintance with this^ubject; 
and Avith a view of benefiting the French student, and 
in particular my pupils, 1 beg leave to recommend to 
their attention the folio w"ing series of French Proverbs 
and Idiomatical Phrases. 

J. MEIER. 

Baltimore, June, 1834. 



AUons faire nn tour de pro- 
menade, 

Accordez vous done avec 
vous meme, 

Au lieu de s'occuper de ses 
propres affaires il se mele 
des affaires d'autrui, 

A present il ne m'en parle 
ni en bien ni en mal, 

A. ce que je vols, vous voila 
en pays de connaissance, 

A son compte vous lui 
redevez encore cent 
piastres, 

.4prcs avoir passe par plu- 
sieurs rues detournees, 
il me fit entrer dans un 
cul-de-sac, 

Au demeurant, jaurais tort 
de rae plaindre, 



Let us take a walk. 

Be then consistent with 
yourself. 

Instead of minding his own 
busines6,he meddles with 
that of others. 

Now, he tells me neither 
good nor bad of it. 

I perceive you are here ajs 
among your acquaint- 
ance. 

According to his account, 
you are stiU a hundred 
dollars in his debt. 

After ha^-ing passed thr'' ugh 
several by-streets, he 
made me enter into a 
blind alley. 

As for the rest, I should be 
in the wrong to complain 



179 



\}\ 9a! voulez vouii me 
faire mettre en colere ? 

Vous feriez mieux de vous 
taire, 

AUons, courage mon en- 
fant, il faut s6 faire une 
raison, 

A-h ! vous faites le rodo- 
mont a ce que je vois, 

,^ quoi bon faire le fin avec 
moi? 

A.U fond il vous est plus 

attache que vous ne 

pensez, 
Apres tout, que m'en re- 

viendra-t-il ? 
A-urai-je la jambe mieux 

faite ? 
Al I'heurequeje voy^parle, 

on vous cherche partout 

pour vous arreter, 

Ah vous voulez me jeter 
de la poudre aux yeux, 

A quelle heure est il jour 

chez vous ordinairement? 
Apres les vacances, je met- 

trai la derniere main a 

mon ouvrage, 
Apres tout il trouve a qui 

parler, 
A present le voila en pied, 

Avantqu'ilsoitpeuvous me 

rendrez justice, 
Accoramodons nous, et 

mettez que je n'ai rien 

dit. 



Now ! will you put me in 



a passion 



You had better keep si- 
lence. 
Come, cheer up, child, one 

must be reconciled to 

that. 
Ah ! you are playing the 

bully, as I can perceive. 
What is the use of your 

playing such tricks upon 

me. 
At the bottom, he is more 

attached to you than you 

think. 
After all, what shall I gain 

by it? 
Shall I be the better for it ? 

Even whilst I am speaking 
to you now, they are 
looking for you in order 
to arrest you. 

Ah ! you want to throw 
dust in my eyes (impose 
on me). 

At what o'clock do they 
get up at your house ? 

After the holidays, I will 
put the finishing stroke 
to my work. 

After all, he met with his 
match. 

He is now well off; doing 
well ; (set going) 

Ere long, or before long, you 
will render me justice 

Let us make it up, and sup- 
pose that nothing has 
been said, or that I have 
said nothing. 



180 



A propos de filous, savez 
vous qu'on vient d'en 
pendre le plus grand? 

A vous dire le vrai, je n'en 
serais pas fache, 

A coup sur, je ne sais ce 
que c'est qu^ votre af- 
faire, 

Avoir du degout pour la vie, 

AUons, a vous messieurs. 

A quoi vous sert il de lui 
en demander raison, 

4.pres avoir bu et mange 
tout son soul, il s'en alia 
sans rien payer, 

Allons toujours notre train 

et ne craignons rien, 
Ah! vous voulez trancher 

du maitre. Cela vous 

sied bien, 
A present je crois que nous 

y voila, 
A quel propos done, se sont. 

ils brouilles ? 
Au hout du coiTjpte, 
Ban courage ; voila qui va 

le mieux du monde, 
Bon nous y voici, 

Bien des nouvelles pieces 

ne passent qu'a la faveur 

de la musique, 
Bien lui en prit de n'avoir 

point la goutte au pied, 
Bien des femraes se laissent 

prendre par les yeux et 

par les oreilles, 
Brisons la dessus, 



Now we are talking' of ^ ck 
pockets ; do you Jcnow 
that the greatest of luem 
has just been hanged ? 

To tell you the truth, I 

■^ should not be sorry for it. 

Surely ! I do not know any 
thing about your Lusi- 
ness. 

To be disgusted with Kie. 

Now, your turn , gentlemen. 

What will be the good of 
demanding satisfact.uj of 
him for it. 

After having dramr and 
eaten to his heart's con- 
tent, he went ofFwxihout 
paying for it. 

Let us continue in our path, 
and fear nothing. 

Ah I you want to play the 
master. That becomes 
(fits) you well. 

Now, I think we have it. 

On what account did thev 
fallout? 

After all. 

Come, cheer up ; here we 
go with a flowing sheet. 

Now we are come to the 
point. 

Many new (pieces) plays 
succeed only by means 
of the music. 

It was lucky for him that 
he was nimble-footed. 

Many females suffer them- 
selves to be the dupes of 
their eyes and ears. 

Let us have no more of it 



IBI 



Otisi coujoms "la ineme 
ciinnson avec iui. 

Cet homme la me chiffonne 
I'esprii, et je veux nl'en 
debarasser, 

T-'est un raisonnement tire 
par les cneveux, 

Cela fait dresser les che- 

veux a la tete, 
Cet homme n'est jamais 

embarasse, il trouve a 

chaque trou une che- 

ville, 
Ce sont des contes a dqrmir 

debout. 
Chacun demeura d'accord 

qu'il n'avait fait qu& son 

devoir, 
Comment ! mon ami, vous 
en etes encore Id-dessus, 

Cet enfant crie taujours 

avant qu'on I'ecorche, 
Cela m'appartient de droit, 

C est un medccin d'eau 

douce, 
Chacun est ici pour son 

ecot, 
C'en est fait, tout est perdu! 
Ce village est compose de 

cent feux, 
Comment faites vous vos 

affaires a present ? 
Cette femme a la langue 

bien affilee, 
Ce sont des raisonnements 

en I'air, 
16 



It is always the same story 
over and over again with 
him. 

That man gives me the va- 
pors, and I want to get 
rid of him. 

This is an argument lug- 
ged in by the head and 
shoulders. 

That makes one's hair stand 
on end. 

This man is never at a loss ; 
he finds a plas-ter for 
every sore. 

They are old woman's 
stories. 

Every one agreed, or ac- 
knowledged, that he had 
only done his duty. 

What ! my friend ; you are 
still harping on this 
string. 

This child always cries be- 
fore he is hurt. 

That belongs to me, by 
right. 

He is a water-gruel doctor. 

Every one is here on his 

own account. 
It is all over ! all is lost. 
This village consists of one 

hundred houses. 
How are you coming on 

now? 
That female has a venr 

nimble tongue. 
These gj-e empty words. 



182 



Croyez vous que ceci fasse 

votre affaire ? 
Ce membre du Congres est 
i'ame damnee du presi- 
dent, 
Oomptez que nous ne som- 

mes pas brouilles, 
Cela ne peut aller, il faut 

absolument changer de 

batterie, 
Cela me conviendrait tres 

fort si vousletrouviezbon. 
Croyez tous que ce soit tout 

de bon, qu'il I'ait mis 

dehors ? 
Ces sont deux t^tes dans 

un bonnet, 
Ces confitures me font ve- 

nir I'eau a la bouche, 
Cette nouvelle perte m'a- 

battit, 
Chansons que tout cela, 
C'est dommage qu'ils se 

soient brouilles, car le jeu 

ne vaut pas la chandelle, 
Ce que vous dites-la n'a 

rien de commun avec ce 

dont il s'agit, 
Depuis quand etes vous 

bruilles ? 
Deposez ces grands airs que 

vous etes hors d'etat de 

soutenir, 
Dut il m'en couter la vie, 

Du-ssiez vous m^me rester 
le seul de votre partie, 
tenez bon jusqu'au bout ! 

D'ou vient que vous me 
faites la grimace ? 



Do you think that this will 
answer your purpose ? 

This member of Congress 
is tha president's tool. 

Take it for granted that we 

are not at variance. 
That wont do; we must 

absolutely change our 

battery. 
That would suit me exactly 

should you agree to it. 
Do you think he was in 

good earnest, when he 

turned him out ? 
They are both of the same 

mind. 
These sweetmeats make my 

mouth water. 
I was thunderstruck at this 

new loss. 
All these are idle tales. 
It is a pity they fell out, for 

it vsras by no means worth 

while. 
What you say there has 

nothing to do with the 

subject in question. 
How long have you been 

at variance } 
Give up these important 

airs you are little cal- 
culated to support. 
Though it should cost my 

life. 
Though you should even 

remain the only one on 

your side, hold out to the 

last. 
Why do you make faces 

at me } 



183 



Dites lui tout net que vous 
n'etes pas fa,it pour lui 
obeir, 

Doucement, on nous ob- 
serve ne faites done pas 
tant d' eclat, 

D'apres cela elle n' aura pas 
lieu d'etre jalouse de lui, 

Depuis que je tiens menage 

j'ai toujours 1' argent d la 

main, 
Dieu soit loue, nous en 

voila quittes, 
Elle n'a pas I'air de nous 

rien commander, 
Eh ! que diantre fillerent 

ils faire la ? 
Elle me bat froid depuis ma 

derniere visite, 
Entre nous soit dit, ce n'est 

pas la mer a boire, 
Elle a toujours les memes 

propos a la bouche, 
En tout cas je me rendrai 

chez vous. 
En lui parlant d coeur ou- 

vert, j'esperais obtenir sa 

confiance, 
Encore un coup, messieurs, 

cessez vos importunites ! 
Elle a emporte les cles, 

ainsi nous courons risque 

de diner par coeur, 
Elle ma fait enrager depuis 

le matin jusqu'au soir, 
Eh bien ! j'etais sur de 

mon fait, il est hors d' af- 
faire. 
Eh bien! n'importe; je 

m'en rapporte a vous, 



Tell him plainly, that you 
were not born to obey 
him. 

Softly, we ar6 observed* 
don't make such a clatter 

From all that, she will have 
no reason to be jealous 
of him. 

Since I have kept house, I 
have been always laying 
out money. 

God be praised, we have 
got rid of him. 

She does not appear to com- 
mand us in any thing. 

What the deuce brought 
them there } 

She treats me coldly since 
my last visit. 

Between you and I, it is not 
a very difficult thing. 

She repeats always th^ 
same thing. 

Whatever happens, I will 
come to your house. 

In speaking to him open- 
heartedly I expected to 
gain his confidence. 

Once more, gentlemen, put a 
stop to your importunities. 

She carried off the keys, 
and we stand a chance of 
going without our dinner. 

She plagues me from morn- 
ing till night. 

Well I was going on sure 
ground, he is out of the 
scrape. 

Well, it makes no odds , 1 
leave it to you. 



184 



En depitde tous ses efforts 

j'ai enfin pris le dessus, 
Faites en sorte qu'il ne sa 

che jamais que j'ai trem- 

pe la dedans, 
Fermez je vous en prie la 

porte a double tour, 
Faites le voir a notre voi- 

sin, 
Faites le monler, 
Faites le entrer, 
Faites lui quelqu^ charite ; 

pour moi, j® n'en ai pas 

le moyen, 
Faites comme vous I'en- 

tendez et moquez vous 

de qu'eji 4ii'a4-on, 
II n'y a pas de milieu, il faut 

en passer par-la, 
ri m'ennuya tellernent qu'a 

la fin je I'envoyai paitre, 

promener, 

II pourrait nous faire un 
mauvais parti, 

U a eu bon nez de ne pas 

accepter cela, 
Il a to uj ours le nez fourre 

par tout, 
II ne voit pas plus loin 

que le bout de son nez, 
II n'a p-as manque de faire 

bien ses orges dans cette 

place, 
11 est pair et compagnon 

avec lui, 
11 mh- fit «noriter la moutar- 

de au nez, et je le mis d 

la porte', 



In spite of his teeth, 1 go<' 

the better of it. 
Act in such a manner thai 

he may never know 1 

had a hand in it. 
Shut and double lock the 

door, I pray you. 
Shew it to our neighbour. 

Shew him up stairs. 

Bid him come in. 

Bestow some charity on 

him ; as for me, I cannot 

afford it. 
Do as you think fit, and 

laugh at other people's 

thoughts about it. 
There is no other way; you 

must submit to it. 
He annoyed, worried, tired 

me po much that at 

length I sent him about 

his business. 
He might make us pay deai 

for it, give us a deal of 

trouble. 
He acted very wisely in 

not accepting that. 
He always pokes his nose 

every where. 
He cannot see an inch be- 
yond his nose. 
He has not failed to feathe ■• 

his nest in this place. 

He goes cheek by jow? 
with him. 

He made me angry, pro- 
voked me, and I put him 
out of doors, or, turned 
him out 



186 



II a eu tort de le renvoyer, 
II fait du mieux qu'il peut, 

II vous promettra monts et 
merveilles, 

lis etudient a qui mieux, 
mieux, 

II n'apas etetue, ilestmort 
de sa belle mort, 

II a m.is de cote tout 1' ar- 
gent qu'on lui donna, 

n faut qu'il iui ait joue un 
nouveau tour de son me- 
tier, 

H ne vous entendra pas si 
vous ne lui mettez les 
points sur les i, 

II faut avouer qu'il vous a 
manque bien grossiere- 
ment. 

Us seprirent de paroles sans 
egard pour la cpmpagnie, 

n prend pour argent comp- 

tant tout ce que lui <ii- 

sent ses flatteurs, 
II me prend envie de lui 

dire ma fagon de penser, 
n ne nous reste plus d'au- 

tre ressource que de lever 

I'ancre et prendre le 

large, 
C ne faut pas prendre garde 

a cela, ce n'est qu'une 

bagatelle, 
n doit bientot prendre son 

parti, 
16* 



He did wrong to turn him 
away. 

He does his best, his ut- 
most. 

He will promise you won- 
ders. 

They study who will be the 
best. 

He was not killed, he died 
a natuial death. 

He has saved all the money 
which had beett given 
to him. 

He must have played him 
another of his tricks. 

He wont understand you 

unless you speak in plain 

language to him. 
It must be confessed that 

he treated you in a very 

uncouth, rough, rude 

manner. 
They began to abuse each 

other without regard to 

the company. 
He swallows every thing 

his flatterers tell him. 

I have a mind to tell him 
my way of thinking. 

No other resource is left vis 
but to weigh anchor and 
sheer off. 

You must not mind that, rt 
is a mere trifle. 

He must soon cometo some 
conclusion. 



18G 



pnt la parole et 
" Monsieur a ralson, 



dit, 



que 



II a vu bien d'autres 

tout cela, 
II soupgonne ^ueje ne me 

suis leve ce matin pour 

des prunes, 
n lui serra la main et I'em- 

brassa, 
n ne veut entendre ni rimer 

ni raison, 
II dit que c'est un ouvrage 

fait; je n'en revins pas, 

II a rendu les derniers 
soupirs dans mes bras, 



Je piquai des deux mon 
cheval qui n'y etait pas 
fait, &c. 

Je crois que vous voulez 
faire le mauvais plaisant, 



les jours 
d'arrache 



Je travaille tous 

neuf heures 

pied, 
J'ai peine a le croire, 
J'occupe un appartement 

de six pieces de plein 

pied. 
Je m'apperQois que vous 

savez mettre tout a pro- 

fit, 

Je fus oblige de lui couper 

la parole, 
Je sais de bonne part, etc. 

J'ai passe par Id, &c 



He took up the subject and 

said, " This gentleman is 

in the right." 
He is not so easily scared, 

intimidated. 
He suspects that I did not 

get up so early to no 

purpose. 
He shook hands with him 

and embraced him. 
He wontlisren to anything. 

He says the business is 

settled ; I cannot recover 

from my surprise. 
He breathed his last in my 

arms. 
I clapped spurs to my horse 

who M^as not used to this 

treatment, &c. 
I believe you mean to show 

some of your untimely 

wit. 
I work nine hours every 

day without intermis- 
sion. 
I hardly believe it. 
I occupy an apartment of 

six rooms on a floor. 

I see that you know how 
to take advantage of 
every thing, or make the 
best of every thing. 

I was obliged to interruj^ii 
him. 

I have it from good author- 
ity. 

I have experienced the 
same, &c. 



187 



•e voustiens quitte de tout 

ce que vous me devez, 
Jamais je ne pris uii front 

severe en parlant a mes 

enfans, 
Te savais fort bien que vous 

reviendriez de vos anci- 

ennes folies, 
Je I'aurais a quelque prix 

que se soit, 
Je I'a' envoye prier de 

passer ici ce soir, 
J'ai faim et soif on ne pent 

pas davantage, 
Je voudrais bien savoir 

quelle mouche vous a pi- 
que, 
J'ai sur le coeur la maniere 

dont il s'est conduit tan- 
tot, 
J'ai bien d'autres chats d 

fouetter, 
Je serai dans le cas de rou- 

gir, toutes les fois qu'il se 

presentera devant moi, 
Les fruits que j'ai manges 

m'ont agaces le dents^ 
Laissez le faire ; il ne 

manquera pas d'en tirer 

pied ou aile, 
Le parter'-e se mit a crier 

aussitot, " a bas les cha- 

peaux," 
La folic est faite, il faut la 

boire, 

Le plus court parti est de 
brusquer I'aventure, 

Le voleur fit sauter la 
cervelle au voyage ur, 



[ forgive you all you owe 
me. 

I never assumed a severe 
countenance when speak- 
ing to my children. 

I knew very well you 
would leave off your old 
pranks. 

I shall have it at any rate, 
price. 

I sent him a request to call 
here this evening. 

I am extremely hungry and 
thirsty. 

I should much like to know 
what whim has crept 
into your head. 

I cannot stomach his man- 
ner of behaving a Uttle 
while ago. 

I have other fish to fry. 

I shall have cause to blush 
every time that he ap- 
pears. 

The fruit set my teeth on 
edge. 

Let him alone ; nevermind 
him ; he will not fail to 
take care of himself. 

The pit immediately began 
to cry, " Hats off." 

The foolish thing is done, 

you must make the most 

of it. 
The shortest way is to come 

directly to the point. 
The robber knocked out the 

brains of the traveller 



168 



Les bons comptes font les 

bons amis, 
Les femmes n'ont pas la 

cle des champs dans ce 

pays, 
Le de en est jete, 
Le coeur vous en dlt il a 

present ? 
Le meilleur parti est de 

rire de la sortie que vous 

me faites la, 
Le gar9on pritdel'humeur, 
Le palefreiiier sent I'eau de 

vie a pleine bouche, 
La cavalerie poursuivit les 

fuyards I'epee dans les 

reins, 
Lespetits ruisseaux font les 

grandes rivieres, 
Le bateau a vapeur sauta 

en Fair, 
Lui avez vous parle de 

bonne sorte, 
La pauvre enfant est un 

vrai souffre douleur dans 

la maison, 
Laissez, je veux vous men- 

ager une agreable sur- 
prise. 
La meche ayant ete decou- 

verte ou eventee, on le 

condamna a etre pendu, 
Malgre toute votre peine 

vous n'avez rien fait qui 

vaille, 
Mais qu'etait il alle cher- 

cher a Baltimore ?■ 
Monsieur, en ce cas je vous 

nrie de me donner mon 

compte, 



Short accounts make long 

friends 
Females are not at liberty 

to go where they please 

in this country. 
The die is cast. 
Have you a liking to it 

now ? 

The best way is to laugh at 

the unmannerly language 

you give me. 

The boy grew ill-humoured. 

The hostler smells strong 

of brandy. 
The cavalier pursued the 

runaways at sword's 

point, or, very closely. 
Many a little, makes a mic 

kle. 
The steam-boat blew up. 

Did you speak to him in a 
becoming manner ? 

The poor child is a real 
drudge in the house. 

Let me alone, I will con- 
trive an agreeable sur- 
prise for you. 

The plot having been dis- 
covered, he was sentenc- 
ed to be hanged. 

In spite of all your trouble, 
what you have done is 
good for nothing. 

But what took him to Bal- 
timore ? 

Sir, in that case I request 
you to pay rae what ia 
due to me 



m) 



M'en voulez voiis pour 
avoir donne la main a 
son projet ? 

Ma situation devint si em- 
barrassante que je fus 
oblige de faire diete, ou 
d'user de regime, 

Men habit a fait son tems, 

Mais en attendant cela ne 
fait pas mon compte, 

Mettez tout en usage pour 

obtenir son consentement, 

Mourir pour mourir, il vaut 

mieux mourir en cora- 

battant, qu'en fuyant, 
Mais quel rapport cela a-t-il 

avec votre affaire ? 
Ne vous avals je pas dit 

qu'il ne donnait pas de 

ses coquilles ? 
Ne vous inquietez pas de 

lui, il a du pain cuit, 

Ne savez vous pas que e'est 

son fils du cote gauche ? 
Ne croyez pas un mot de 

ce qu'il dit, car il ment 

^omme un arracheur de 

dents, 
Ne vous avals je pas dit 

qu'il y avait quelque 

chose Id dessous ? 
N'est ce pas ici que de- 

meure le marchand de 

vin ? 
Non, j'en suis a cent lieues, 

j'en suis bien loin. 
Nous avons tons ris aux 

eclats. 



Are j'ou angry v^ith me fo' 
having favoured his pro- 
ject/ 

My situation became so 
perplexing that I wasi 
obliged to live low. 

My coat is v^^orn out. 

But meanwhile I gain no- 
thing by it — that does nol 
satisfy me. 

Employ all means to obtain 
her consent. 

Since we must die, it is 
better to die fighting, than 
to die in running away. 

But what has this to do 
with your bueirless ? 

Did I not tell you that he 
sold no bargains ? 

Dont make yourself uneasy 

on his account, he has 

money laid by. 
Are you not aware that he 

is his natural son ? 
Dont believe a word of 

what he says, for he lies 

like a jockey. 

Have I not told you that 
there was something at 
the bottom ? 

Does not the wine mer- 
chant live here ? 

No, I am far from the mark, 

very far from it. 
We all burst out in a laugh 

ter. 



190 



Ne faites pas 1' enfant; cela 
ne vous sied pas du tout, 

Nous fimes forces de voiles 

pour arriver au port, 
Nous avons fait maigre 

toute ]a semaine sainte, 
Nous convinmes que je 

sortirais pour prendre 

I'air du bureau, 
Ne vous impatientez pas, je 

ne ferai qu'aller et venir, 
N'avez vous rien a faire 

pour rester ici Jes bras 

croises ? 
Ne vous coupez pas ; ceci 

est de la plus grande 

consequence, 
N'empruntez pas les idees 

des autres, rejiondez de 

voire chef, 
N'est ce pas ceci le comble 

du ridicule ? 
Nous tombames de Caryb- 

de en Scylla, 
On m'a assure que ce ne- 

gociant branlait dans le 

manche, 
Oui maraud ! si iM raison- 

nes encore, je te ferai 

rouer de coups, 

On fait grand eas de jeunes 
gens, qui aimentl'etude. 

On envoyaun huissier pour 
lui mettre la main sur le 
collet, 

On voitbien que vous vous 
^tes donne du bon terns, 



Dont play the child, it very 
ill becomes you, or loea 
not become you at all. 

We made the best of oui 
way to get into port. 

We have eat no meat da- 
ring passion week. 

We agreed that I should go 
out to inquire how mat- 
ters stood. 

Dont grow impatient ; 1 
will be back presently. 

Have you nothing to do but 
to stand here with your 
fingers in your moutli ? 

Dont contradict yourself, it 
is of the utmost import- 
ance. 

Do not borrow other peo- 
ple's ideas, answer out of 
your own head. 

Is not this the height of 
ridicule ? 

We fell from the frying- 
pan into the fire. 

I have been told that this 
merchant was about to 
fail. 

Yes scoundrel, if you pre- 
sume to argue, I shall 
have you soundly thrash- 
ed. 

We highly esteem young 
men, who are fond of 
study. 

They sent a constable t« 
collar him, to apprehend 
him. 

One may see that you have 
had a fine time of it. 



191 



On debite sur mon compte 

les anecdotes les plus 

scandaleuses, 
On voit bien a son air que 

c'est un homme comme 

il faut, 
On m'a dit qu'il couchait 

en joae une riche veuve, 
Oh ! par ma foi, je crois 

que j'ai mis le nez des- 

sus, 
Ou diantre avez vous peche 

cela, 
Oui, mais je I'enverrai pro- 

mener avec toutes ses 

plaisanteries, 
Oh ! les gens du beau mon- 

de ne regardent pas de 

si pres, 
Prenez garde a vous ; it 

pourrait bien avoir quel- 

que anguille sous roche, 
Frendrez vous une autre 

fois de mes almanachs ? 
Pourquoi voudriez vous 

gouter ? j 'attends bien ? 

Pourquoi ne repondre qu'd 
batons rompus aux ques- 
tions qu'on vous fait, 
Pour couper court, ) 
Pour trancher court, ) 
Pour obtenir paix nous 
fumes obliges d'en de- 
coudre avec eux. 
Pour moi, je ne fais que 
pouss^r le terns avec 
I'epaule, 
Pardonnez moi, ce n'est pas 
trop; en honnete homme, 
j'y mets du mien. 



They pubbsh ou my ac- 
count the most untrue, 
scandalous stories. 

One plainly sees by his 
looks that he is a gentle- 
man. 

I was told that he was aim- 
ing at a rich widow. 

Oh I on my faith, I think I 
have hit the right nail on 
the head. 

Where the deuce did you 
pick that up ? 

Yes, but I shall send him 
about his business with 
all his jokes. 

Oh ! fashionable people are 
not quite 50 scrupulous. 

Be cautious, there may be 
some snake in the grass. 

Will you follow my advice 
another time ? 

Why are you anxious for 
the collation? am I not 
waiting likewise ? 

Why do you answer the 
questions which are put 
to you by fits and starts ? 

To cut the matter short. 

To obtain peace we were 
obliged to have a brush 
with them. 

As for me, I keep but life 
and soul together. 

Pardon me, it is not exact- 
ing, I am a loser by it. 



192 



Pour m'en debarasser je 

vais le mettre airs prises 

avec le capitaine, 
Paix dent, le voici qui yient 

avec le maitre, 
Pt>urquoi tourner autour 

du pot? 
Passe pour ceci, mais cela 

est un peu fort, 
Parbleu ! il a frise la corde 

de bien pres, 
Qui se sent morveUx, se 

mouche, 
Quant d lui il, a toujours le 

petit mot pour rire, 
Quel dommage, 
Quant a. moi je vous avoue 

que j'airae a voir clair 

dans les marches, 
Quoiqu' il demeure chez 

sa soeur, 
Qu'a-t-il a jeter des hauts 

cris ? 
Qu'elles sont jolies, 
Quoique fort jeune, il a 

deja fait ses cara vanes, 

Queveuxtu? ces messieurs 
font tout a leur t^te, 

Quel sort ferez vous d votre 
fille iorsque vous la ma- 
rie z ? 

Quand il s'agit de I'hon- 
neur je n"'entends pas 
railierie la-dessus, 

Quel age lui donneriez vous 
bien ? 

Que voulez vous que je 
dise, pour moi, les bras 
m'en tombent, 



To get rid of him, I shall 
set him and the captain 
by the ears. 

Silence then 1 here he 
comes with the master. 

Why stand shilly shally so 
long ? 

I may overlook this, but 
that is a little too far. 

Zounds, he narrowly es- 
caped hanging. 

If any one find the cap fit 
him, let him wear it. 

As for him, he has always 
something witty to say. 

What a pit3^ 

As for me, I confess I like 
to see my way clear in a 
bargain. 

Although he resides with 
his sister. 

What is the matter with him 
that he cries so loud. 

How pretty they are. 

Although very young he 
has already travelled a 
great deal. 

What can I do ? these gen- 
tlemen follow their own 
heads in every thing. 

What portion will you give 
your daughter when she 
marries ? 

When my honour is at 
stake, I understand not 
joking in such matters. 

How old would 3'-ou take 
I him or her to be ? 

What can I say ? as for me, 
I am thunderstruck. 



193 



Que devenez vous cette 
apres inidi ? 

Quand il aura jete son feu, 
je lui parlerai raison, 

Quant d moi je ne vols 

goutte a cette affaire, 
Quand une fois vous avez 

pris la mouche it n'y a 

pas moyen de vous parler? 
Rien ne lui est impossible ; 

il fait des gens toat ce 

qu'U veut, 
Reglez vous Id-dessus, 

poursuivait^elle, en pre- 

nant son serieux, 
Revenons d nos moutong, 
Si quelqu'un ose s'y oppo- 

ser, il aura affaire a moi, 

Si vous me laissez faire, 
je saurai bien lui fermer 
la bouche, 

S'il n'est pas content^ dites 
lui de prendre ses caiies, 

Son air de vertu mit en de- 

faut ma penetration, 
S'etant apper9u que son 
domestique ferrait le 

muie, il le mit d laporte, 
S'il n a pas reussi ce n'est 

pas faute d' avoir mis 

tout en ceuvre, 
Soyez bien assure qu'elle 

vous aime a fond, 
Soyez tranquille ! vous avez 

trouve votre homme 

17 



What are you going tu '!«> 
this afternoon ? 

When he has vented his 
passion, I shall reason 
witli him, or speak sense 
to him. 

As for my part, I cannot 
make out this business. 

When you are once in a 
huff, there is no speaking 
to you. 

Nothing is impossible to 
him ; he makes what he 
pleases of people. 

Govern yourselves accord- 
ingly, added she, grow- 
ing serious. 

Let us resume our subject. 

If any body dares to oppose 
himself, he will have to 
deal with me. 

If you leave it to me, I will 
find means to silence him. 

If he dont, be pleased to tell 
him to go about his busi- 

' ness. 

His plausible appearance 
baffled my penetration. 

Finding that the servant 
played the rogue he turn- 
ed him out of doors. 

If he has not succeeded, it 
was not for having left 
one stone unturned. 

You may rest assured that 
she loves you in secret. 

Make yourself easy, you 
have found the man you 
wanted. 



194 



Tenez vous prct a noi>s 
dormer un coup de main, 

Tant pis pour lui, que dia- 
ble allait il faire dans 
cette galere, 

Tenez, quand j'y .pense 
c'est qu'il me prend des 
impatiences, 

Tout compte et rabattu, il 
m'a encore quelque obli- 
gation, 

Treves un moment a vos 
soupirs, 

Tout fin que vous ^tes, je 
gagerais que vous y a"vez 
ete trompe cette fois-ci, 

Tenez ! voiH vos ciseaux 

que vous laissez trainer 

par terre, 
Toutes ces marchandises 

me paraissent bien avan- 

turees. 
Tout cela est bel et bon, 

mais, &c., 
Tenez ne m'echauffez pas 

la bile ; decampez tout 

de suite, 
Tenez, prenez pitie de ces 

pauvres enfans ; ils me 

fendent le cceur, 
Vous en parlez bien d 

votre aise, 
Vraiment, je vous admire,, 

Vous ne voulez pas faire a 
present ni I'un ni I'autre, 

Votre sang froid sui cet 
artkle me met hois de 
moi m^me, 



Hoid yourself in readiness 

to give us a lift. 
So much the worse for hira; 

why the devil did he 

get into this scrape. 
Hold! when I think of it I 

get into a passion. 

Every thing duly consider- 
ed, he is still under some 
obligation to me. 

A truce for a moment to 
your sighs. 

Cunning as you are. I 
would lay a wager that 
you have been imposed 
upon this time. 

Look ! there are your scis- 
sars lying on the floor. 

All the merchandise appeal 
to me as good as lost. 

All that is very good, but, 
&c. 

^ark ye, do not provoke 
me ; decamp ye immedi- 
ately. 

Hear me, take pity on these 
poor children, they break 
my heart. 

It is easy for you to talk so. 

ISTou are a pretty fellow 

truly. 
You will now do neither. 

Your coolness on this sub- 
ject entirel}' disconcerts 



195 



Vous avez beau dire, &c., 



Vous n'avez qu'^ I'ecouter 

il vous contera des belles, 

&c. 
Vous verrez clairement que 

je ne vais pas par quatre 

chernins, 

Voici bien une autre chan- 
son, 

Vous n'avez tenu aucun 
compte de ce que je vous 
avais ecrit, 

Vous mettez toujours la 
chanue devant les boBufs, 



You are talking in vain, 

&c. or it is useless talking. 
Only listen to him, and he 

will impose oja you fine 

stories. 
You will clearly perceive 

that I make no round 

about, or that I go straight 

forward. 
This is quite a different 

story, or, another piece 

of news. 
You have not taken any 

notice of what I had 

written to you. 
You always put the cart 

before the horse. 



196 



PROVERBES FRANCAIS. 



A barbe de f(M, on apprend a rcdre. — Men learn to shave 

on the chin of a fool. 
A bon chien il ne vieni jamais un bon os. — A good bone 

does not always come to a good dog. 
j1 V extinction de la chandelle. — To the extinguishing of 

the candle. 
A tort ei a travers. — At random. 
Aucun chemin dejieurs ne conduit a lagloire. — The path 

that leads to glory is never strewed with flowers. 
Aussitot dit aussitbt fait. — No sooner said than done. 
Autant en emporte le vent. — So much the wind carries 

away. 
Bmne renommee vaut mieux que ceinture doree. — A good 

name is better than a girdle of gold. 
Ccar tel est notre plaisir. — For such is our pleasure. 
Cela va sans dire. — That passes without comment. 
Cera est fait. — It is all over. — Cen est fait de lui. — He 

is a ruined man. 
Ce qui vient par la flute, s^en va par le tambour. — Lightly 

come, lightly gone. 
Ces discoicrs, il est vrai, sont fort beaux dans un livre. — 

All this would do very well for a book. 
Ce sont toujours les avanturiers, qui font des grandes 

choses, et non pas les souverains des grandes empires. 

It is only adventurers that perform great actions, 

and not the sovereigns of large empires. 
Cest le crime qui fait la honte, et non pas Vechafnud. — It 

is the guilt, not the scaffold, which constitutes the 

shame. 
Cest le ton qui fait la musique. — It is the tone that 

makes the music. 
O^est la prosperite qui donne les amis mans c'est Vadversite 

qui les eprouve. — It is prosperity that gives us friends^ 

but it is adversity that tries them. 



197 

C'est la le diable. -^Theve is the devil. 

C*esi une grande habiliU que de savoir cacher son habilite. 

The greatest skill is shown in disguising our skill. 
Cest une grande folie de vouloir etre sage iout leul. — It is 

a great folly to think of being wise alone. 
C^est pour Vachever de peindr e.-^Th'is is to finish his 

picture. 
Chacun dit du Men de son cceur, et personne n'en ose dire 

de son esprit. — Every man speaks of the goodness 

of his heart, but no man dares to speak in the same 

manner of his wit. 
Chague oiseau trouve son nid beau. — Every bird thinks 

his own nest handsome. 
Chat echxmde craint Veau froide. — A burnt child dreads 

the fire. 
Comme le voila accommode .—How finely he is fitted. 
Centre fortune bon caur. — One must bear up against 

fortune. 
Craignez tout d'un auteur en courroux. — Apprehend the 

worst from an enraged author. 
Dans I' art dHnteresser consiste I'art d'ecrire. — In the art 

of interesting, consists the art of writing. 
De la Vanite nait la Honte. — Vanity is the parent of 

shame. 
En la rose je jieuris. — I flourish in the rose. 
Faqon de parler. — A manner of speaking. 
Faire Vhomme d' importance. — To assume a consequence. 
Fuyez les dangers du loisir. — Avoid the dangers of idle 

ness. 
Guerre a outrence. — War to the uttermost. 
// aboye a tout le mande. — He snarls at every body. 
// a le diable an 'corps. — The devil is in him. 
// a seme des jieurs sur un terrain aride. — He has planted 

flowers on a barren soil. 
// croit quHl trompe, parce quHl ment. — He thinks he 

deceives, because he lies. 
II est plus aise d'etre sage pour les autres, que pour soi- 

meme. — It is more easy to be wise for other persons 

than for ourselves. 
II na ni bouche ni eperon. — He has neither mouth nor 

spur. 
T7* 



Unrest sauce que d'appetit. — Hunger is the best sauce. 

// ne salt sur quel pied danser. — He knows not on which 
leg to dance. 

// n'y a rien de beau, que ['utile. — Nothing is beautiful, 
but that which is usefuL 

Ily a anguUle sous la roche. — There is an eel under the 
rock. 

II y a Mm. des gens qu''on estime, pqrcequ'cm ne les con- 
noit point. — There are many persons who are es- 
teemed, only because they are not known. 

Ily a encore de quoi glaner. — There is something yet to 
be gleaned. 

Jamais on ne vaincra les Rormin^, que dans Rome. — The 
Romans can nev6r be conquered but in Rome. 

Jue de main, jue de vilain. — Practical tricks belong only 
to the lowest classes. 

Jeune, on conserve pour la vieillesse : vieux, on epargne pour 
la mart. — When young, men lay up for old age ; when 
aged, they hoard for death. 

La beaute sans vertu est une jieur sans perfum. — Beauty 
without virtue is like a flower without perfume. 

La critique est aisee, et I'art est difficile. — To criticise is 
easy, but to create is difficult. 

Vadversite fait Vhomme, et le bonheur les monstres. — Ad- 
versity makes men, and prosperity makes monsters. 

La faim chasse le loup du bois. — Famine drives the wolf 

from the wood- 
La ybi6/e55ecfe Vennemifait notre propre force. — The weak- 
ness of the enemy forms a part of our own strength. 

La grande sagesse de Vhomme consiste a connoitre ses 
folies. — The great wisdom of man consists in the 
knowledge of his follies. 

Vaigle d'une maison est un sot dans une autre. — The eagle 
of one house is but a fool in another. 

La maladie sans maladie. — The disorder without a disease. 

Jm patience est amere, m,ais son fruit est doux. — Patience 
is bitter, but its fruit is sweet. 

U argent est un bon serviteur, et un me chant maitre. — 

Money is a good servant, but a bad master. 
fart de vaincre est celui de mepriser la mart. — The art of 
conquering is that of despising death. 



199 

T^jeu rCm vautpasla chandelle.-^The game is not worth 

the candles. 
Le monde est le livre des femmes. — The world is the book 

of women. 
Le secret d'ennuyer est cehii de tout dire.— The secret of 

tiring and disgusting is to say all that can be said. 
Lesfous font des festins, et les sages les mangeni, — Fools 

make feasts, and wise men eat them. 
V esperance est le songe d'un homme eveille. — Hope is the 

dream of a man awake. 
Uesprit est toujours la dupe du Ccetir. — The understand- 
ing is ever the dupe of the heart. 
Le temps present est gros de Vavenir. — ^The present time 

is big with the future. 
Le vrai merite ne depend point du terns ni de la mode. — 

True merit depends neither on the time nor on the 

fashion. 
Uhypocrisie est un hommage que le vice rend a la vertu. — 

Hypocrisy is the homage, which vice renders to vir- 
tue. 
Lhmagination galope, le jugement ne va que le pas. — The 

imagination gallops, the judgment goes on foot. 
Uon espere de vieillir, et Von craint la vieillesse. — We 

hope to get old, and yet fear old age. 
Uoreille est le chemin du c(zur. — The ear is the course to 

the heart. 
Moms on pense, plus on parte. — The less we think, the 

more we talk. 
Jfe remettez pas d demain, ce que vous pouvez faire au- 

jourd'hui. — Defer not until to-morrow, that which 

you can do to-day. 
Kotre defiance justifie la tromperie d'autrut. — Our mis* 

trust justifies the deceit of others. 
Nous avons tous assez de force pour suppoHer les maicx 

d'autrui. — We have all sufficient strength to bear 

the misfortunes of others. 
On commence par etre dupe; onfinitpar eire fripon. — We 

begin by being dupes, and end in being knaves. 
On ne donne rien si liberalement que ses consdls. — We 

give nothing so liberally as advice. 
On n' est jamais si heure^ix ni si mMheureux, qu*on se 



200 

Vwmgine. — We are never so fortunate, nor so 

unfortunate, as we imagine ourselves to be. 
On pet'd tout le temps qn'on pent mieux employer. — That 

time is lost which might be better employed. 
On pent etre utile, sans attdiidre a la perfection. — We 

may be useful (in an art,) without being per- 
fect. 
On prend le peuplepar les oreilies, corrmie on prend unpoi 

par les anses.—We take people by the ears, as a pot 

by the handles. 
Par le droit du plus fort. — By ri^ht of the strongest. 
Par les memes voies on ne va pas ton jours aux memes fins. 

By the same means we do not always arrive at the 

same ends. 
Parlez du hup, et vous verrez sa queue. — Speak of the 

wolf, and you will see his tail. 
Parlez peu etbien, si vousvoulez gn'on vous regarde com- 

me un homme de merite. — Speak but little and well, 

if you would be esteemed as a man of merit. 
Pas a pas on va bien loin. — Step by step we go very far. 
Peu de bien, peu de soin. — Little wealth, little care. 
Peu de gens savent etre vieux. — Few men know how to 

be old. 
Plus je vis Vetranger, plus faimai mq patrie.— The more 

I see of foreign lands, the more 1 love my own. 
Plus sage que les sages. — More wise than the wise. 
Prend moi tel que je suis. — Take me just as I am. 
Qui rCa paint de sens a trente ans, rCen aura jamais, — 

He who has no sense at thirty years, will never have 

any. 
Qui prete a Vami, perd au double. — Who lends to a friend, 

is sure to lose double. 
Rim, n'est beau que le vrai, le vrai seul est aimable. — 

Nothing is beautiful but truth, and truth only is 

lovely. 
Bien n'est si danger eux qu'un indiscret a7»i— Nothing is 

more dangerous than an imprudent friend. 
Si Tious ne nous jiattions pas nous-memes, la flatterie des 

auires ne nous pourroit nuire. — If we did not flat- 
ter ourselves, the flattery of others could do us no 

harm. 



i>01 

Tel briUe an second rang, qui s^ eclipse au premier. — He 
may shine in the second rank, who would be eclips- 
ed in the first. 

Tirer le diable par le queue. — To pull the devil by the 
tail. 

Tout Men ou nm.— The whole or nothing. 

Tout le monde se plaint de sa memoire, et personne ne se 
plaint de son judgment.— -'Evevj one complains of 
his memory, but no one of his judgment. 

Un sot a triple etage — A fool of the third story. 

(In sot trouve toujours un plus sot qui V admire. — A fool 
always finds a greater fool to admire him. 

Verite sans peur. — Truth without fear. 

Vivre cen'est pas respirer, c'est agir. — Life does not con- 
sist merely in breathing, but in action. 

Voir tout en couleur de rose. — To see every thing under 
a favourable aspect. 

Vous y perdrez vos pas. — You will have your trouble 
for nothing. 



./' 



PHILADELPHIA: 
No 67 South Fourth Stkket. 



STANDAKD BOOKS 

PUBLISHBTD BY 

E. H. BUTLER & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 



0/ tht following wiU H forwarded ly maU, post-paid, for a remittance of the price i 
against the work or works ordered. 



GOODEICH'S SCHOOL HISTORIES. 

Goodrich's Pictorial History of the United States. 

A. Pictorial History of the TTnited States, wifli Notifies of other Portions of 
America. For the use of Schools. By Samuel G-. Goodrich. 1 voL 
12mo. 360 pages. 

Goodrich's Pictorial History of England. 

A Pictorial History of England, Scotland, and Ireland. For the use of 
Schools. By Samuel G. Goodrioh. 1 vol. 12mo. 444 pages. 

Goodrich's Pictorial History of Rome. 

A Pictorial History of Ancient Rome, with a Sketch of the History of 
Modern Italy. For the use of Schools. By Samuel G. Goodrich, 
1 vol. 12mo. 333 pages. 

Goodrich's Pictorial History of Greece. 

A Pictorial History of Greece, Ancient and Modern. For the use of 
Schools. By Samuel G. Goodrich. 1 vol. 12mo. 3T1 pages. 

Goodrich's Pictorial History of France. 

A Pictorial History of France. For the use of Schools. By Sasubl G 
Goodrich. 1 vol. 12mo. 347 pages. 



P^KLEz's (Goodrich's) Common School Histoky. 

k Brief Compend of Universal History. Fdr the use of Schools. By 
Samuel G. Goodemh. 1 vol. 12nio. 309 pages. Price, 75 cents. 

4®" These works are written in a lively and pleasing style, abounding m illutitTa- 
tine anecdotes, incidents, and descriptions, the histories, in all cases, being based era 
(Je>jgraphy, illustrated by maps. The manners and customs of each country and age 
are constantly kept in view. The works are freely supplied with engravings, giving 
correct ideas of manners and customs, views of cities, monuments, battles, &c. They 
nave been got up with great care and expense, and are published in a superior style. 
It is believed that therp is no series of familiar histories, in America or Europe, that 
may challenge comparison with these, either in interest, accuracy, or beauty of me- 
chanical execution. The publishers are able to add that they have received the appro- 
bition of leading men, and are introduced into the principal seminaries throughout 
the United States. They are uniform in size and price. 



MANN & CHASE'S NEW ARITHMETICAL 
SERIES. 

IN THREE PARTS. 

Mann & Chase's Primary Arithmetic, Part 1. 

The Primary School Arithmetic : designed for Beginners. Containing 
copious Mental E:^rcises, together with a large number of Examples 
for the Slate. By Horace Mann, LL. D., and Pliny E. Chase, 
A. M., Authors of " Arithmetic Practically Applie-d." 1 vol. 18mo. 
Price, 25 cents. 

Mann & Chase's Arithmetic, Part 2. 

The Grammar-School Arithmetic : containing much valuable Commercial 
Information ; together with a system of Integral, Decimal, and Prac- 
tical Arithmetic, so arranged as to dispense with many of the ordinary 
rules. By Horace Mann, and Pliny E. Chase, Authors of " Primary 
Arithmetic." 1 vol. duodecimo. Price, 63 cents. 

Mann & Chase's Arithmetic, Part 3. 

iirithmetic Practically Applied : for Advanced Pupils, and for Private 
Reference, designed as a Sequel to any of the ordinary Text Books on 
the subject. By Horace Mann, LL. D., the First Secretary of the 
Massachusetts Board of Education, and Pliny E. Chase, A.M. 1 vqL 
dnodoiiimo. Prioe, $1.00 „ 



ANGELL'S READING BOOKS. 

Tliia is a series of Spelling and Reading Books, in Six Numbers; comiile.'i 
by Oliver Angell, A. M., Principal of tbe Franklin High School, 
Providence. Th? Numbers composing the series may be briefly de- 
scribed as follows : 

AifQELL's Reader, No. 1. 

72 pages 18mo. Price, 8 cents. 
The arrangement of the lessons in this book Ls such, that the child commeiv!»a 
reading as soon as he commences putting the letters together into syllables, the exor^ 
dae of spelling and reading being simultaneous. The same syllables and words which 
form the Spelling Lessons, are arranged as Beading Lessons directly opposite, or im- 
mediately under the Spelling columns. 

A-Ngell's Reader, No. 2; 

136 pages 18mo. Price, 14 cents. 
This is a continuation of the First Number, containing Easy Ending Lessons, most 
of which are pleasing stories, designed to interest the mind of the learner, and afford 
Instruction. Spelling Lessons, consisting of words from the Keading Lessons, precede 
cTory Keading Lesson. 

Angell's Reader, No. 3. 

206 pages 18mo. Price, 17 cents. 
This is a gradual advance from, the Second Number, having the Reading and Spell 
tog Lessons arrang'^ on the same plan. The Lesson^ in each of the Numbers, are 
followed by a set of Questions, to exercise the reader on what he has read. 

Angell's Reader, No. 4. 

252 page^ 12mo. Price, 30 cents. 
Also designed as a Reading and Spelling Book, and containing & variety of other 
useful matter. 

Angell's Reader, No. 5. 

296 pages 12mo. Price, 50 cents. 
A Reading Book for the higher classes in Common Schools, with Spelling LesscaM 
tnd definitions adapted to each reading section; with Tables, Mental Arithmetic, &a 

Angell's Reader, No. 6. 

504 pages 12mo. Price, 75 cents. 

Being a selection of pieces in prose and verse ; aesigned as a Reading Bock for the 
highest classes in Academies and Schools. 
These six volumes, compiled by Oijveb AnQEiiL, comprise a series which is «» 

3 



Angsli/s Heading Books— continued. 

dcubtedly more suitable for the purpose for which they are designed, than sny />•<-- 
»ious publications; and they are more popular among those who have the direv-u- ' 
of education than any ever prepared in this country. Thfere is a decided advantage 
In possessing sets of elementary books by the same author, who has pursued a similat 
plan with each, rising step by step, and who, it is presumed, would be better able to 
preserve the proper gradation of style and matter, than several ^individuals would, 
rhis will be found to be the case in the present series. 



Richardson's English Dictionary. 

A New Dictionary of the English Langijage, by Charles Richakdsoic. 

2 volumes quarto, 2295 pages. Price, $22.5&. 

RICHARDSON'S ENGLISH DICTIONARY is acknowledged to be the great The- 
saurus of English Philology and Lexicography. Its character as a work of standard 
authority is so well established, that few scholars or professional men will deem theii 
libraries complete without it. 



Fleming & Tibbins' French Dictionary. 

An entirely New and Complete French and English, and English and 
French Dictionary, adapted to the present state of the two Languages. 
By Prof. Fleming, Prof, of English in the College of Louis-le-Grand, 
and Prof. Tibbins, author of several lexicographical works : with im- 
portant additions, by Charles Picot, Esq., Professor of French in the 
University of Pennsylvania, and Judah Dobson, Esq., Member of the 
American Philosophical Society, of the Academy of Natural Sciences, 
&G., &o. 1406 pages royal. 8vo. Price, $4. 



Fleming & Tibbins' French Dictionary, Abridged. 

1 vol. 12mo. 724 pages. Price, $1.25. 



Nugent's French and English Dictionary. 

A Pocket Dictionary of the two Languages. In two Parts. 1. French an 
English. 2. English and French. By TnoMA-rf Nugent, LL. D. 45 
pages square 12mo. Price, 63 cents. a 



Donnegan's Greek Lexicon. 

A New Greek and English Lexicon, on the Plan of the Greek and Gdiniuu 
Lexicon of Schneider; the words alphabetically arranged, — distin- 
guishing such as are poetical, of dialectic variety, or peculiar to cer- 
tain writers and classes of writers ; with Examples, literally translated, 
selected from the classical writers. By James Donnesan, M. D., of 
London. Revised and Enlarged by Robeet B. Patton, Professor of 
Ancient Languages in the College of New Jersey ; with the assistance 
of J. Addison Alexander, D. D., of the Theological Seminary at 
Princeton. 1422 pages, royal 8vo. Price, $4. 

^=- Tbe quick sale of so many large editions of this Lexicon, is the best evident 
Ihu publishers could desire of its acceptableness to scholars generally. 



Walker's Pronouncing Dictionary. 

A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary and Expositor ef the English Lan^ 
guage. To which is annexed a Key to the Classical PronunciatioD 
of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names, &c. By John Walker, 
Octavo, 7&2 pages. Price, $1.12^. 



IIurd's Grammatical Corrector^ 

a Grammatical Corrector, or Vocabulary of the Common Errors of Speech < 
being a collection of nearly two thousand barbarisms, cant phrases, 
colloquialisms, quaint expressions, provincialisms, false pronuncia- 
tions, perversions, misapplication of terms, and other kindred errors 
of the English Language, peculiar to the different States of the Union. 
The whole explained, corrected, and conveniently arranged, for the 
use of Schools and Private Individuals. By Seth T.. Httrd. 124 
pages 12mo. Price, 34 cents. 



Smith's Grammar. 

cglLsh Grammar on the Productive System: a Method of Instri»^tio.o 
recently adopted in Germany and Switzerland ; designed for SchoolB 
and Academies. By Roswell C. Smith, author of Introductory Arith 
meiie, &c. 192 pages 12mo. Price, 25 cents- 



Uj^rt's English Ghammar. 

A.U Ksposition t)f the Principles and Usages of tlie English Language. By 
. John S. Hart, LL.D., Principal of the Philadelphia High SohooL 
. 192 pages 12mo. Price, 34 cents. 



Hart's Class Book of Prose; 



Hart's Class Book of Poetry ; - 

Each 384 pages 12mo. Consisting of Selections from distinguished Eng- 
lish and American Authors, from Chaucer to the present day; the 
whole arranged in Chronological Order, with Biographical an d Critical 
Remarks. By John S. Hart, LL. D., Principal of the Philadelphia 
High School. These volumes are sold separately. Price, 75 cents for 
either work. 



Hart's Constitution ^p the United States. 

A Brief Exposition of the Constitution of the United States, in the form 
of Questions and Answers. ' For the use of Schools and Colleges. By 
John S. Hart, LL.D., Principal of the Philadelphia High School, 
and Professor of Moral, Mental, and Political Science, in the same. 
100 pages 12mo. Price, 30 cents. 



Comstock's Elocution. 

A System of Elocution, with special reference to Gesture and Defective 
Articulation. "With numerous Diagrams and engraved Figures, illus- 
trating the subject. By Andrew Comstock, M. D. 1 vol. 12mo. 
Price, $1.00. 



Frost's Composition. 

Easy Exercises in Composition, designed for the use of Beginners By 
John'Frost, LL.D. .120 pages 12mo. Price, 26 cents. 

« 



% 






^ 



ki)^^.^ 










':..:. A-' 




' 


KV ••,.r,VK_ 


] 'l 


:" r" -''^ ]•■■'■/ 


t) 




1 


■ ■■ :' ' I \'- r : 




■ ■ '■-''■--.■.■ '' . 


1 


■'■:"■ ■>■' ' ■' 


1 


;■;::■-■ >a in: , 


r 






-■':. '■ '■ ;■' ^.^ :;; ■;• 



iihjsiis. 












\!;rrMM: 



:]' J-ltM,. :i 






ED BY 

joiith To-'. 



itUTLEi:.& '. 
it^t. l?MladelpMa. 



1 „.J