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Full text of "Portrait and biographical record of Hancock, McDonough and Henderson counties, Illinois : containing biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens of the county"

L I E> RA FLY 

OF THE 
UNIVER.S ITY 
or ILLI NOIS 

920.0 T 1 T 734\ 
?83 



ILLINOIS HISTOWCAl SURVEY 



j.oTV- 



PREFACE. 



y HE greatest of English historians, Macaulay, and one of the most brilliant writers of the 
[C present century, has said: "The history of a country is best told in a record of the lives of 
VS/ i ts people." In conformity with this idea, the Portrait and Biographical Album of this 
county has been prepared. Instead of going to musty records, and taking therefrom dry statistical 
matter that can be appreciated by but few, our corps of writers have gone to the people, the men 
and women who have, by their enterprise and industry, brought the county to a rank second to 
none among those comprising this great and noble State, and from their lips have the story of 
their life struggles. No more interesting or instructive matter could be presented to an intelligent 
public. In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of 
coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy 
have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, 
have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and 
breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as 
statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who 
have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells 
also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued ' ' the even 
tenor of their way," content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a 
deed of mercy — "They have done what they could." It tells how that many in the pride and 
strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer's office and the counting- 
room, left every trade and profession, and at their country's call went forth valiantly "to do or 
die," and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the 
land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon 
those who follow after. 

Coming generations will appreciate this volume and preserve it as a sacred treasure, from 
the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which 
would otherwise be inaccessible. Great care has been taken in the compilation of the work, and 
every opportunity possible given to those represented to insure correctness in what has been 
written; and the publishers flatter themselves that they give to their readers a work with few 
errors of consequence. In addition to the biographical sketches, portraits of a number of repre- 
sentative citizens are given. 

The faces of some, and biographical sketches of many, will be missed in this volume. For 
this the publishers are not to blame. Not having a proper conception of the work, some refused 
to give the information necessary to compile a sketch, while others were indifferent. Occasionally 
i some member of the family would oppose the enterprise, and on account of such opposition the 
support of the interested one would be withheld. In a few instances men could never be found, 
though repeated calls were made at their residence or place of business. 

May, 1894. Lake City Publishing Co. 



I 1 5622 1 



Portraits and Biographies 



OF THE 



PRESIDENTS 



OF THE 



United States 



Presidents. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



GEORGE WASHINGTON. 



y HE Father of our Country was bora in West- 
/C nioreland County, Va. , February 22. 1752. 
Vj2/ His parents were Augustine and Mary I Ball ) 
Washington. The family to which he belonged 
has not been satisfactorily traced in England. 
His great-grandfather, John Washington, emi- 
grated to Virginia about 1657, and became a 
prosperous planter. He had two sons, Lawrence 
and John. The former married Mildred Warner, 
and had three children, John, Augustine and 
Mildred. Augustine, the father of George, first 
married Jane Butler, who bore him four children, 
two of whom, Lawrence and Augustine, reached 
maturity. Of six children by his second mar- 
riage, George was the eldest, the others being 
Betty, Samuel, John Augustine, Charles and 
Mildred. 

Augustine Washington, the father of George, 
died in 1743, leaving a large landed property. 
To his eldest son, Lawrence, he bequeathed an 
estate on the Potomac, afterwards known as Mt. 
Vernon, and to George he left the parental resi- 
dence. George received only such education as 
the neighborhood schools afforded, save for a 
short time after he left school, when he received 
private instruction in mathematics. His spelling 
was rather defective. Remarkable stories are 
told of his great physical strength and develop- 
ment at an early age. He was an acknowledged 
leader among his companions, and was early 
noted for that nobleness of character, fairness and 
veracity which characterized his whole life. 

When George was fourteen years old he had a 
desire to go to sea, and a midshipman's warrant 
was secured for him, but through the opposition 
of his mother the idea was abandoned. Two 



years later he was appointed surveyor to the im- 
mense estate of Lord Fairfax. In this business 
he spent three years in a rough frontier life, 
gaining experience which afterwards proved very 
essential to him. In 1751, though only nineteen 
years of age, he was appointed Adjutant, with the 
rank of Major, in the Virginia militia, then being 
trained for active service against the French and 
Indians. Soon after this he sailed to the West 
Indies with his brother Lawrence, who went there 
to restore his health. They soon returned, and 
in the summer of 1752 Lawrence died, leaving a 
large fortune to an infant daughter, who did not 
long survive him. On her demise the estate of 
Mt. Vernon was given to George. 

Upon the arrival of Robert Dinwiddie as Lieu- 
tenant-Governor of Virginia, in 1752, the militia 
was reorganized, and the province divided into 
four military districts, of which the northern was 
assigned to Washington as Adjutant- General. 
Shortly after this a very perilous mission, which 
others had refused, was assigned him and ac- 
cepted. This was to proceed to the French post 
near Lake Erie, in northwestern Pennsylvania. 
The distance to be traversed was about six hun- 
dred miles. Winter was at hand, and the journey 
was to be made without military escort, through 
a territory occupied by Indians. The trip was a 
perilous one, and several times he nearly lost his 
life, but he returned in safety and furnished a full 
and useful report of his expedition. A regiment 
of three hundred men was raised in Virginia and 
put in command of Col. Joshua Fry, and Maj. 
Washington was commissioned Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel. Active war was then begun against the 
French and Indians, in which Washington took 



GEORGE WASHINGTON. 



a most important part. In the memorable event 
of July g, 1755, known as "Braddock's defeat," 
Washington was almost the only officer of dis- 
tinction who escaped from the calamities of the 
day with life and honor. 

Having been for five years in the military- serv- 
ice, and having vainly sought promotion in the 
royal army, he took advantage of the fall of Ft. Du- 
quesne and the expulsion of the French from the 
valley of the Ohio to resign his commission. Soon 
after he entered the Legislature, where, although 
not a leader, he took an active and important 
part. January 17, 1759, he married Mrs. Martha 
(Dandridge) Custis, the wealthy widow of John 
Parke Custis. 

When the British Parliament had closed the 
port of Boston, the cry went up throughout the 
provinces, ' ' The cause ol Boston is the cause of 
us all! " It was then, at the suggestion of Vir- 
ginia, that a congress of all the colonies was 
called to meet at Philadelphia September 5, 
1774, to secure their common liberties, peaceably 
if possible. To this congress Col. Washington 
was sent as a delegate. On May 10, 1775, the 
congress re-assembled, when the hostile inten- 
tions of England were plainly apparent. The 
battles of Concord and Lexington had been fought, 
and among the first acts of this congress was the 
election of a commander-in-chief of the Colonial 
forces. This high and responsible office was con- 
ferred upon Washington, who was still a member 
of the congress. He accepted it on June 19, but 
upon the express condition that he receive no sal- 
ary. He would keep an exact account of ex- 
penses, and expect congress to pay them and 
nothing more. It is not the object of this sketch 
to trace the military acts of Washington, to whom 
the fortunes and liberties of the people of this 
country were so long confided. The war was 
conducted by him under every possible disadvan- 
tage; and while his forces often met with reverses, 
yet he overcame every obstacle, and after seven 
years of heroic devotion and matchless skill he 
gained liberty for the greatest nation of earth. 
On December 23, 1783, Washington, in a parting 
address of surpassing beauty, resigned his com- 
mission as Commander-in-Chief of the army to the 



Continental Congress sitting at Annapolis. He 
retired immediately to Mt. Vernon and resumed 
his occupation as a farmer and planter, shunning 
all connection with public life. 

In February, 1789, Washington was unani- 
mously elected President, and at the expiration 
of his first term he was unanimously re-elected. 
At the end of this term many were anxious that he 
be re-elected, but he absolutely refused a third 
nomination. On March 4, 1797, .at the expiration 
of his second term as President, he returned to his 
home, hoping to pass there his few remaining 
years free from the annoyances of public life. 
Later in the year, however, his repose seemed 
likely to be interrupted by war with France. At 
the prospect of such a war he was again urged to 
take command of the army, but he chose his sub- 
ordinate officers and left them the charge of mat- 
ters in the field, which he superintended from his 
home. In accepting the command, he made the 
reservation that he was not to be in the field until 
it was necessary. In the midst of these prepara- 
tions his life was suddenly cut off. December 12 
he took a severe cold from a ride in the rain, 
which, settling in his throat, produced inflamma- 
tion, and terminated fatally on the night of the 
14th. On the 1 8th his bod}* was borne with mili- 
tary honors to its final resting-place, and interred 
in the family vault at Mt. Vernon. 

Of the character of Washington it is impossible 
to speak but in terms of the highest respect and 
admiration. The more we see of the operations 
of our government, and the more deeply we feel 
the difficulty of uniting all opinions in a common 
interest, the more highly we must estimate the 
force of his talent and character, which have been 
able to challenge the reverence of all parties, 
and principles, and nations, and to win a fame as 
extended as the limits of the globe, and which we 
cannot but believe will be as lasting as the exist- 
ence of man. 

In person, Washington was unusually tall, erect 
and well proportioned, and his muscular strength 
was great. His features were of a beausiful sym- 
metry. He commanded respect without any ap- 
pearance of haughtiness, and was ever serious 
without being dull. 



UNIVERi 

URBMiMrt 




WF* 




wu 



JOHN ADAMS. 



(JOHN AD AIMS, the second President and the 
I first Vice-President of the United States, was 
(2/ born in Braintree (now Quiney) Mass., and 
about ten miles from Boston, October 19, 1735. 
His great-grandfather, Henry Adams, emigrated 
from England about 1640, with a family of eight 
sons, and settled at Braintree. The parents of 
John were John and Susannah (Boylston) 
Adams. His father, who was a farmer of limited 
means, also engaged in the business of shoe- 
making. He gave his eldest son, John, a classical 
education at Harvard College. John graduated 
in 1755, and at once took charge of the school at 
Worcester, Mass. This he found but a "school 
of affliction," from which he endeavored to gain 
relief by devoting himself, in addition, to the 
study of law. For this purpose he placed himself 
under the tuition of the only lawyer in the town. 
He had thought seriously of the clerical profes- 
sion, but seems to have been turned from this by 
what he termed " the frightful engines of ecclesi- 
astical councils, of diabolical malice, and Calvin- 
istic good nature, ' ' of the operations of which he 
had been a witness in his native town. He was 
well fitted for the legal profession, possessing a 
clear, sonorous voice, being read}' and fluent of 
speech, and having quick perceptive powers. He 
gradually gained a practice, and in 1764 married 
Abigail Smith, a daughter of a minister, and a 
lad}- of superior intelligence. Shortly after his 
marriage, in 1765, the attempt at parliamentary 
taxation turned him from law to politics. He 
took initial steps toward holding a town meeting, 
and the resolutions he offered on the subject be- 
came very popular throughout the province, and 
were adopted word for word by over forty differ- 
ent towns. He moved to Boston in 1768, and 
became one of the most courageous and promi- 
nent advocates of the popular cause, and was 
chosen a member of the General Court (the Leg- 
islature) in 1770. 

Mr. Adams was chosen one of the first dele- 



gates from Massachusetts to the first Continent- 
al Congress, which met in 1774. Here he dis- 
tinguished himself by his capacity for business 
and for debate, and advocated the movement for 
independence against the majority of the mem- 
bers. In May, 1776, he moved and carried a res- 
olution in Congress that the Colonies should 
assume the duties of self-government. He was a 
prominent member of the committee of five ap- 
pointed June 1 1 to prepare a declaration of inde- 
pendence. This article was drawn by Jefferson, 
but on Adams devolved the task of battling it 
through Congress in a three-days debate. 

On the day after the Declaration of Independ- 
ence was passed, while his soul was yet warm 
with the glow of excited feeling, he wrote a letter 
to his wife, which, as we read it now, seems to 
have been dictated by the spirit of prophecy. 
"Yesterday," he says, "the greatest question 
was decided that ever was debated in America; 
and greater, perhaps, never was or will be de- 
cided among men. A resolution was passed 
without one dissenting colony, 'that these United 
States are, and of right ought to be, free and in- 
dependent states.' The day is passed. The 
Fourth of July, 1776, will be a memorable epoch 
in the history of America. I am apt to believe it 
will be celebrated by succeeding generations as 
the great anniversary festival. It ought to be 
commemorated as the day of deliverance by 
solemn acts of devotion to Almighty God. It 
ought to be solemnized with pomp, shows, games, 
sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations 
from one end of the continent to the other, from 
this time forward forever. You will think me 
transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I 
am well aware of the toil and blood and treas- 
ure that it will cost to maintain this declaration 
nnd support and defend these States; yet, through 
all the gloom, I can see the rays of light and 
glory. I can see that the end is worth more than 
all the means, and that posterity will triumph, 



-I 



JOHN ADAMS. 



although you and I inay rue, which I hope we 
shall not." 

In November, 1777, Mr. Adams was appointed 
a delegate to France, and to co-uperate with Ben- 
jamin Franklin and Arthur Lee, who were then 
in Paris, in the endeavor to obtain assistance in 
arms and money from the French government. 
This was a severe trial to his patriotism, as it 
separated him from his home, compelled him to 
cross the ocean in winter, and exposed him to 
great peril of capture by the British cruisers, who 
were seeking him. He left France June 17, 
1779. In September of the same year he was 
again chosen to go to Paris, and there hold him- 
self in readiness to negotiate a treaty of peace and 
of commerce with Great Britain, as soon as the 
British cabinet might be found willing to listen 
to such proposals. He sailed for France in No- 
vember, and from there he went to Holland, where 
he negotiated important loans and formed im- 
portant commercial treaties. 

Finally, a treaty of peace with England was 
signed, January 2 1 , 1783. The re-action from the 
excitement, toil and anxiety through which Mr. 
Adams had passed threw him into a fever. After 
suffering from a continued fever and becoming 
feeble and emaciated, he was advised to go to 
England to drink the waters of Bath. While in 
England, still drooping and desponding, he re- 
ceived dispatches from his own government urg- 
ing the necessity of his going to Amsterdam to 
negotiate another loan. It was winter, his health 
was delicate, yet he immediately set out, and 
through storm, on sea, on horseback and foot, he 
made the trip. 

February 24, 1785, Congress appointed Mr. 
Adams envoy to the Court of St. James. Here 
he met face to face the King of England, who 
had so long regarded him as a traitor. As Eng- 
land did not condescend to appoint a minister to 
the United States, and as Mr. Adams felt that he 
was accomplishing but little, he sought permis- 
sion to return to his own country, where he ar- 
rived in June, 1788. 

When Washington was first chosen President, 
John Adams, rendered illustrious by his signal 
services at home and abroad, was chosen Vice- 



President. Again, at the second election of Wash- 
ington as President, Adams was chosen Vice- 
President. In 1796, Washington retired from 
public life, and Mr. Adams was elected President, 
though not without much opposition. Serving 
in this office four years, he was succeeded by Mr. 
Jefferson, his opponent in politics. 

While Mr. Adams was Vice-President the 
great French Revolution shook the continent of 
Europe, and it was upon this point that he was 
at issue with the majority of his countrymen, led 
by Mr. Jefferson. Mr. Adams felt no sympathy 
with the French people in their struggle, for he 
had no confidence in their power of self-govern- 
ment, and he utterly abhorred the class of atheist 
philosophers who, he claimed, caused it. On the 
other hand, Jefferson's sympathies were strongly 
eidisted in behalf of the French people. Hence 
originated the alienation between these distin- 
tinguished men, and the two powerful parties were 
thus soon organized, with Adams at the head of 
the one whose sympathies were with England, 
and Jefferson leading the other in sympathy with 
France. 

The Fourth of Jul}-, 1826, which completed the 
half-century since the signing of the Declaration 
of Independence, arrived, and there were but 
three of the signers of that immortal instrument 
left upon the earth to hail its morning light. 
And, as it is well known, on that day two of 
these finished their earthly pilgrimage, a coinci- 
dence so remarkable as to seem miraculous. For 
a few days before Mr. Adams had been rapidly 
failing, and on the morning of the Fourth he 
found himself too weak to rise from his bed. On 
being requested to name a toast for the cus- 
tomary celebration of the day,' he exclaimed 
"Independence forever!" When the day was 
ushered in by the ringing of bells and the firing 
of cannons, he was asked by one of his attend- 
ants if he knew what day it was ? He replied, 
' ' O yes, it is the glorious Fourth of July — God 
bless it — God bless you all!" In the course of 
the day he said, "It is a great and glorious 
day." The last words he uttered were, " Jeffer- 
son survives." But he had, at one o'clock, 
resigned his spirit into the hands of his God. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 





z, 



THOMAS JEFFERSON. 



<^"HOMAS JEFFERSON was born April 2, 
I C 1743, at Shadwell, Albemarle County, Va. 
V2/ His parents were Peter and Jane (Ran- 
dolph) Jefferson, the former a native of Wales, 
and the latter born in London. To them were 
born six daughters and two sons, of whom Thomas 
was the elder. When fourteen years of age his 
father died. He received a most liberal educa- 
tion, having been kept diligently at school from 
the time he was five years of age. In 1760 he 
entered William and Mary College. Williams- 
burg was then the seat of the Colonial court, and 
it was the abode of fashion and splendor. Young 
Jefferson, who was then seventeen years old, lived 
somewhat expensively, keeping fine horses, and 
going much into gay society; yet he was ear- 
nestly devoted to his studies, and irreproachable in 
his morals. In the second year of his college 
course, moved by some unexplained impulse, he 
discarded his old companions and pursuits, and 
often devoted fifteen hours a day to hard study. 
He thus attained very high intellectual culture, 
and a like excellence in philosophy and the lan- 
guages. 

Immediately upon leaving college he began the 
study of law. For the short time he continued 
in the practice of his profession he rose rapidly, 
and distinguished himself by his energy and 
acuteness as a lawyer. But the times called for 
greater action. The policy of England had awak- 
ened the spirit of resistance in the American Col- 
onies, and the enlarged views which Jefferson had 
ever entertained soon led him into active politi- 
cal life. In 1 769 he was chosen a member of the 
Virginia House of Burgesses. In 1772 he mar- 



ried Mrs. Martha Skelton, a very beautiful, 
wealth}-, and highly accomplished young widow. 

In 1775 he was sent to the Colonial Congress, 
where, though a silent member, his abilities as a 
writer and a reasoner soon become known, and he 
was placed upon a number of important com- 
mittees, and was chairman of the one appointed 
for the drawing up of a declaration of independ- 
ence. This committee consisted of Thomas Jef- 
ferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger 
Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson, 
as chairman, was appointed to draw up the paper. 
Franklin and Adams suggested a few verbal 
changes before it was submitted to Congress. On 
June 28, a few slight changes were made in it by 
Congress, and it was passed and signed July 4, 
1776. 

In 1779 Mr. Jefferson was elected successor to 
Patrick Henry as Governor of Virginia. At one 
time the British officer Tarleton sent a secret 
expedition to Monticello to capture the Governor. 
Scarcely five minutes elapsed after the hurried 
escape of Mr. Jefferson and his family ere his 
mansion was in possession of the British troops. 
His wife's health, never very good, was much 
injured by this excitement, and in the summer 
of 1782 she died. 

Mr. Jefferson was elected to Congress in 1783. 
Two years later he was appointed Minister Pleni- 
potentiary to France. Returning to the United 
States in September, 1789, he became Secretary 
of State in Washington's cabinet. This position 
he resigned January 1, 1794. In 1797, he was 
chosen Vice-President, and four years later was 
elected President over Mr. Adams, with Aaron 



28 



THOMAS JEFFERSON. 



Burr as Vice-President. In 1S04 he was re- 
elected with wonderful unanimity, George Clin- 
ton being elected Vice-President. 

The early part of Mr. Jefferson's second ad- 
ministration was disturbed by an event which 
threatened the tranquillity and peace of the Union; 
tiiis was the conspiracy of Aaron Burr. Defeated 
111 the late election to the Vice-Presidency, and 
led on by an unprincipled ambition, this extraor- 
dinary man formed the plan of a military ex- 
pedition into the Spanish territories on our south- 
western frontier, for the purpose of forming there 
a new republic. This was generally supposed 
to have been a mere pretext; and although it has 
not been generally known what his real plans 
were, there is no doubt that they were of a far 
more dangerous character. 

In 1809, at the expiration of the second term 
for which Mr. Jefferson had been elected, he de- 
termined to retire from political life. For a period 
of nearly forty years he had been continually be- 
fore the public, and all that time had been em- 
ployed in offices of the greatest trust and respon 
sibility. Having thus devoted the best part of 
his life to the sen-ice of his country, he now felt 
desirous of that rest which his declining years re- 
quired, and upon the organization of the new ad- 
ministration, in March, 1809, he bade farewell for- 
ever to public life and retired to Monticello, his 
famous country home, which, next to Mt. Vernon, 
was the most distinguished residence in the land. 

The Fourth of July, 1826, being the fiftieth an- 
niversary of the Declaration of American Inde- 
pendence, great preparations were made in every 
part of the Union for its celebration as the nation's 
jubilee, and the citizens of Washington, to add to 
the solemnity of the occasion, invited Mr. Jeffer- 
son, as the framer and one of the few surviving 
signers of the Declaration, to participate in their 
festivities. But an illness, which had been of 
several weeks' duration and had been continually 
increasing, compelled him to decline the invita- 
tion. 

On the 2d of July the disease under which he 
was laboring left him, but in such a reduced 
state that his medical attendants entertained no 
hope of his recovery. From this time he was 



perfectly sensible that his last hour was at hand. 
On the next day, which was Monday, he asked 
of those around him the day of the month, and 
on being told it was the 3d of July, he ex- 
pressed the earnest w'ish that he might be per- 
mitted to breathe the air of the fiftieth anniver- 
sary. His prayer was heard — that day whese 
dawn was hailed with such rapture through our 
land burst upon his eyes, and then they were 
closed forever. And what a noble consummation 
of a noble life! To die on that day — the birth- 
day of a nation — the day which his own name 
and his own act had rendered glorious, to dis 
amidst the rejoicings and festivities of a whole- 
nation, who looked up to him as the author, un- 
der God, of their greatest blessings, was all that 
was wanting to fill up the record of his life. 

Almost at the same hour of his death, the kin- 
dred spirit of the venerable Adams, as if to bear 
him company, left the scene of his earthly honors. 
Hand in hand they had stood forth, the cham- 
pions of freedom; hand in hand, during the dark 
and desperate struggle of the Revolution, they 
had cheered and animated their desponding coun- 
trymen; for half a century they had labored to- 
gether for the good of the country, and now hand 
in hand they departed. In their lives they had 
been united in the same great cause of liberty, 
and in their deaths they were not divided. 

In person Mr. Jefferson was tall and thin, rather 
above six feet in height, but well formed; his eyes 
were light, his hair, originally red, in after life be- 
came white and silvery, his complexion was fair, 
his forehead broad, and his w r hole countenance 
intelligent and thoughtful. He possessed great 
fortitude of mind as well as personal courage, and 
his command of temper was such that his oldest 
and most intimate friends never recollected to 
have seen him in a passion. His manners, though 
dignified, were simple and unaffected, and his 
hospitality Was so unbounded that all found at 
his house a ready welcome. In conversation he 
was fluent, eloquent and enthusiastic, and his 
language was remarkably pure and correct. He 
was a finished classical scholar, and in his writ- 
ings is discernible the care with which he formed 
his style upon the best models of antiquity. 



LIBRARY 
LKSI1Y OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



. 




/£"£-£-" L -<~ tsC{ gt^^t^r , 



JAMES MADISON. 



(TAMES MADISON, "Father of the Consti- 

I tution," and fourth President of the United 
Q/ States, was born March 16, 1757, and died 
at his home in Virginia June 28, 1836. The 
name of James Madison is inseparably connected 
with most of the important events in that heroic 
period of our country during which the founda- 
tions of this great republic were laid. He was 
the last of the founders of the Constitution of the 
United States to be called to his eternal reward. 

The Madison family were among the early emi- 
grants to the New World, landing upon the shores 
of the Chesapeake but fifteen years after the settle- 
ment of Jamestown. The father of James Madison 
was an opulent planter, residing upon a very fine 
estate called Montpelier, in Orange County, Va. 
It was but twenty-five miles from the home of Jef- 
ferson at Monticello, and the closest personal and 
political attachment existed between these illustri- 
ous men from their early youth until death. 

The early education of Mr. Madison was con- 
ducted mostly at home under a private tutor. At 
the age of eighteen he was sent to Princeton Col- 
lege, in New Jersey. Here he applied himself to 
study with the most imprudent zeal, allowing him- 
self for months but three hours' sleep out of the 
twenty-four. His health thus became so seriously 
impaired that he never recovered any vigor of 
constitution. He graduated in 1 77 1 , with a feeble 
body, but with a character of utmost purity, and 
a mind highly disciplined and richly stored with 
learning, which embellished and gave efficiency 
to his subsequent career. 

Returning to Virginia, he commenced the study 
of law and a course of extensive and systematic 
reading. This educational course, the spirit of 
the times in which he lived, and the society with 
which he associated, all combined to inspire him 
with a strong love of liberty, and to train him for 
his life-work as a statesman. 

In the spring of 1776, when twenty-six years of 



age, he was elected a member of the Virginia Con- 
vention to frame the constitution of the State. The 
next year (1777 ), he was a candidate for the Gen- 
eral Assembly. He refused to treat the whisky-lov- 
ing voters, and consequently lost his election; but 
those who had witnessed the talent, energy and 
public spirit of the modest young man enlisted 
themselves in his behalf, and he was appointed to 
the Executive Council. 

Both Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson were 
Governors of Virginia while Mr. Madison re- 
mained member of the Council, and their apprecia- 
tion of his intellectual, social and moral worth 
contributed not a little to his subsequent eminence. 
In the year 17S0 he was elected a member of the 
Continental Congress. Here he met the most il- 
lustrious men in our land, and he was immediately 
assigned to one ol the most conspicuous positions 
among them. For three years he continued in Con- 
gress, one of its most active and influential mem- 
bers. In 1784, his term having expired, he was 
elected a member of the Virginia Legislature. 

No man felt more deeply than Mr. Madison the 
utter inefficiency of the old confederacy, with no 
national government, and no power t > form trea- 
ties which would be binding, or to enforce law. 
There was not any State more prominent than 
Virginia in the declaration that an efficient na- 
tional government must be formed. In January, 
1786, Mr. Madison carried a resolution through 
the General Assembly of Virginia, inviting the 
other States to appoint commissioners to meet in 
convention at Annapolis to discuss this subject. 
Five States only were represented. The conven- 
tion, however, issued another call, drawn up by 
Mr. Madison, urging all the States to send their 
delegates to Philadelphia in May, 1787, to draft 
a Constitution for the United States, to take the 
place of the Confederate League. The delegates 
met at the time appointed. Every State but 
Rhode Island was represented. George Washing- 



32 



JAMES MADISON. 



ton was chosen president of the convention, and the 
present Constitution of the United States was then 
and there formed. There was, perhaps, no mind 
and no pen more active in framing this immortal 
document than the mind and the pen of James 
Madison. 

The Constitution, adopted by a vote of eighty-one 
to seventy-nine, was to be presented to the several 
States for acceptance. But grave solicitude was 
felt. Should it be rejected, we should be left but a 
conglomeration of independent States, with but 
little power at home and little respect abroad. Mr. 
Madison was elected by the convention to draw up 
an address to the people of the United States, ex- 
pounding the principles of the Constitution, and 
urging its adoption. There was great opposition 
to it at first, but at length it triumphed over all, 
and went into effect in 1789. 

Mr. Madison was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives in the first Congress, and soon became 
the avowed leader of the Republican party. While 
in New York attending Congress, he met Mrs. 
Todd, a young widow of remarkable power of fas- 
cination, whom he married. She was in person 
and character queenly, and probaby no lady has 
thus far occupied so prominent a position in the 
very peculiar society which has constituted our 
republican court as did Mrs. Madison. 

Mr. Madison served as Secretary of State under 
Jefferson, and at the close of his administration 
was chosen President. At this time the encroach- 
ments of England had brought us to the verge of 
war. British orders in council destroyed our com- 
merce, and our flag was exposed to constant insult. 
Mr. Madison was a man of peace. Scholarly in 
his taste, retiring in his disposition, war had no 
charms for him. But the meekest spirit can be 
roused. It makes one's blood boil, even now, to 
think of an American ship brought to upon the 
ocean by the guns of an English cruiser. A 
young lieutenant steps on board and orders the 
crew to be paraded before him. With great non- 
chalance he selects any number whom he may 
please to designate as British subjects, orders them 
down the ship's side into his boat, and places them 
on the gundeck of his man-of-war, to fight, by 
compulsion, the battles of England. This right 



of search and impressment no efforts of our Gov- 
ernment could induce the British cabinet to re- 
linquish. 

On the 18th of June, 1812, President Madison 
gave his approval to an act of Congress declaring 
war against Great Britain. Notwithstanding the 
bitter hostility of the Federal party to the war, the 
country in general approved; and Mr. Madison, 
on the 4th of March, 1813, was re-elected by a 
large majority, and entered upon his second term 
of office. This is not the place to describe the 
various adventures of this war on the laud and on 
the water. Our infant navy then laid the found- 
ations of its renown in grappling with the most 
formidable power which ever swept the seas. The 
contest commenced in earnest by the appearance 
of a British fleet, early in February, 1813, in 
Chesapeake Bay, declaring nearly the whole coast 
of the United States under blockade. 

The Emperor of Russia offered his services as 
mediator. America accepted; England refused. 
A British force of five thousand men landed on the 
banks of the Patuxet River, near its entrance into 
Chesapeake Bay, and marched rapidly, by way of 
Bladeusburg, upon Washington. 

The straggling little city of Washington was 
thrown into consternation. The cannon of the 
brief conflict at Bladeusburg echoed through the 
streets of the metropolis. The whole population 
fled from the city. The President, leaving Mrs. 
Madison in the White House, with her carriage 
drawn up at the door to await his speedy return, 
hurried to meet the officers in a council of war. 
He met our troops utterly routed, and he could not 
go back without danger of being captured. But 
few hours elapsed ere the Presidential Mansion, 
the Capitol, and all the public buildings in Wash- 
ington were in flames. 

The war closed after two years of fighting, and 
on February 13, 1S15, the treaty of peace was 
signed at Ghent. On the 4th of March, 18 17, his 
second term of office expired, and he resigned the 
Presidential chair to his friend, James Monroe. 
He retired to his beautiful home at Montpelier, and 
there passed the remainder of his days. On June 
28, 1836, at the age of eighty-five years, he fell 
asleep in death. Mrs. Madison died July 12, 1849. 



LIBRARY 

UMVcKSIIY OF ILLINOIS 

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j£t^Z^T^^'7 /^-Z^ 



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JAMES MONROE. 



(I AMES MONROE, the fifth President of the 
I United States, was born in Westmoreland 
G) County, Va., April 2S, 1758. His early life 
was passed at the place of his nativity. His an- 
cestors had for many years resided in the province 
in which he was born. When he was seventeen 
years old, and in process of completing his educa- 
tion at William and Man- College, the Colonial 
Congress, assembled at Philadelphia to deliberate 
upon the unjust and manifold oppressions of Great 
Britain, declared the separation of the Colonies, 
and promulgated the Declaration of Independence. 
Had he been born ten years before, it is highly 
probable that he would have been one of the 
signers of that celebrated instrument. At this 
time he left school and enlisted among the pa- 
triots. 

He joined the army when everything looked 
hopeless and gloom) - . The number of deserters 
increased from day to day. The invading armies 
came pouring in, and the Tories not only favored 
the cause of the mother country, but disheartened 
the new recruits, who were sufficiently terrified 
at the prospect of contending with an enemy 
whom they had been taught to deem invincible. 
To such brave spirits as James Monroe, who went 
right onward undismayed through difficulty and 
danger, the United States owe their political 
emancipation. The young cadet joined the ranks 
and espoused the cause of his injured country, 
with a firm determination to live or die in her 
strife for liberty. Firmly, yet sadly, he shared in 
the melancholy retreat from Harlem Heights 
and White Plains, and accompanied the dispirited 
army as it fled before its foes through Xew Jersey. 
In four months after the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, the patriots had been beaten in seven 
battles. At the battle of Trenton he led the van- 
guard, and in the act of charging upon the enemy 
he received a wound in the left shoulder. 



As a reward for his bravery, Mr. Monroe was 
promoted to be captain of infantry, and, having re- 
covered from his wounds, he rejoined the army. 
He, however, receded from the line of promotion 
by becoming an officer on the staff of Lord Ster- 
ling. During the campaigns of 1777 and 1778, 
in the actions of Brandywine, Germantown and 
Monmouth, he continued aide-de-camp; but be- 
coming desirous to regain his position in the 
army, he exerted himself to collect a regiment for 
the Virginia line. This scheme failed, owing to 
the exhausted condition of the State. Upon this 
failure he entered the office of Mr. Jefferson, at 
that period Governor, and pursued with consid- 
erable ardor the study of common law. He did 
not, however, entirely lay aside the knapsack for 
the green bag, but on the invasion of the enemy 
served as a volunteer during the two years of his 
legal pursuits. 

In 17S2 he was elected from King George 
County a member of the Legislature of Virginia, 
and by that body he was elevated to a seat in the 
Executive Council. He was thus honored with 
the confidence of his fellow-citizens at twenty- 
three years of age, and having at this early period 
displayed some of that ability and aptitude for 
legislation which were afterward employed with 
unremitting energy for the public good, he was 
in the succeeding year chosen a member of the 
Congress of the United States. 

Deeply as Mr. Monroe felt the imperfections of 
the old Confederacy, he was opposed to the new 
Constitution, thinking, with many others of the 
Republican party, that it gave too much power to 
the Central Government, and not enough to the 
individual States. Still he retained the esteem 
of his friends who were its warm supporters, and 
who. notwithstanding his opposition, secured its 
adoption. In 1789 he became a member of the 
United States Senate, which office he held for . 



3& 



JAMES MONROE. 



four years. Every month the line of distinction 
between the two great parties which divided the 
nation, the Federal and the Republican, was 
growing more distinct. The differences which 
now separated them lay in the fact that the Repub- 
lican party was in sympathy with France, and 
also in favor of such a strict construction of the 
Constitution as to give the Central Government as 
little power, and the State Governments as much 
power, as the Constitution would warrant; while 
the Federalists sympathized with England, and 
were in favor of a liberal construction of the Con- 
stitution, which would give as much power to the 
Central Government as that document could pos- 
sibly authorize. 

Washington was then President. England had 
espoused the cause of the Bourbons against the 
principles of the French Revolution. All Europe 
was drawn into the conflict. We were feeble and 
far away. Washington issued a proclamation of 
neutrality between these contending powers. 
France had helped us in the struggles for our 
liberties. All the despotisms of Europe were now 
combined to prevent the French from escaping 
from a tyranny a thousand-fold worse than that 
which we had endured. Col. Monroe, more mag- 
nanimous than prudent, was anxious that, at 
whatever hazard, we should help our old allies in 
their extremity. It was the impulse of a gener- 
ous and noble nature, and Washington, who could 
appreciate such a character, showed his calm, se- 
rene, almost divine, greatness, by appointing that 
very James Monroe who was denouncing the pol- 
icy of the Government, as the minister of that 
Government to the Republic of France. Mr. 
Monroe was welcomed by the National Conven- 
tion in France with the most enthusiastic dem- 
onstration. 

Shortly after his return to this country, Mr. 
Monroe was elected Governor of Virginia, and 
held the office for three years. He was again 
sent to France to co-operate with Chancellor Liv- 
ingston in obtaining the vast territory then known 
as the province of Louisiana, which France had 
but shortly before obtained from Spain. Their 
united efforts were successful. For the compara- 
tively small sum of fifteen millions of dollars, the 



entire territory of Orleans and district of Loui- 
siana were added to the United States. This was 
probably the largest transfer of real estate which 
was ever made in all the history of the world. 

From France Mr. Monroe went to England to 
obtain from that country some recognition of our 
rights as neutrals, and to remonstrate against 
those odious impressments of our seamen. But 
England was unrelenting. He again returned to 
England on the same mission, but could receive 
no redress. He returned to his home and was 
again chosen Governor of Virginia. This he soon 
resigned to accept the position of Secretary of 
State under Madison. While in this office war 
with England was declared, the Secretary of War 
resigned, and during these trying times the 
duties of the War Department were also put upon 
him. He was truly the armor-bearer of President 
Madison, and the most efficient business man in 
his cabinet. Upon the return of peace he re- 
signed the Department of War, but continued in 
the office of Secretary of State until the expira- 
tion of Mr. Madison's administration. At the 
election held the previous autumn, Mr. Monroe 
himself had been chosen President with but little 
opposition, and upon March 4, 1817, he was in- 
augurated. Four years later he was elected for 
a second term. 

Among the important measures of his Presi- 
dency were the cession of Florida to the United 
States, the Missouri Compromise, and the famous 
" Monroe doctrine." This doctrine was enun- 
ciated by him in 1823, and was as follows: " That 
we should consider any attempt on the part of 
European powers to extend their system to any 
portion of this hemisphere as dangerous to our 
peace and safety," and that " we could not view 
any interposition for the purpose of oppressing or 
controlling American governments or provinces 
in any other light than as a manifestation by 
European powers of an unfriendly disposition 
toward the United States." 

At the end of his second term, Mr. Monroe re- 
tired to his home in Virginia, where he lived un- 
til 1830, when he went to New York to live with 
his son-in-law. In that city he died, on the 4th 
of July, 1831. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

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/ 



■v; 




J, 2 . jblcut-nj, 



JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 



(JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, the sixth President 

I of the United States, was born in the rural 
G/ liome of his honored father, John Adams, in 
Quincy, Mass., on the nth of July, 1767. His 
mother, a woman of exalted worth, watched over 
his childhood during the almost constant ab- 
sence of his father. When but eight years of 
age, he stood with his mother on an eminence, 
listening to the booming of the great battle on 
Bunker's Hill, and gazing out upon the smoke 
and flames billowing up from the conflagration of 
Charlestown. 

When but eleven years old he took a tearful 
adieu of his mother, to sail with his father for Eu- 
rope, through a fleet of hostile British cruisers. 
The bright, animated boy spent a year and a-half 
in Paris, where his father was associated with 
Franklin and Lee as Minister Plenipotentiary. 
His intelligence attracted the notice of these dis- 
tinguished men, and he received from them flat- 
tering marks of attention. 

John Adams had scarcely returned to this 
country, in 1779, ere he was again sent abroad. 
Again John Quincy accompanied his father. At 
Paris he applied himself to study with great dil- 
igence for six months, and then accompanied his 
father to Holland, where he entered first a school 
in Amsterdam, then the University at Leyden. 
About a year from this time, in 1781, when the 
manly boy was but fourteen years of age, he was 
selected by Mr. Dana, our Minister to the Rus- 
sian court, as his private secretary. 

In this school of incessant labor and of ennobl- 
ing culture he spent fourteen months, and then 
returned to Holland, through Sweden, Denmark, 
Hamburg and Bremen. This long journey he 
took alone in the winter, when in his sixteenth 
year. Again he resumed his studies, under a pri- 
vate tutor, at The Hague. Then , in the spring of 
1782, he accompanied his father to Paris, travel- 
ing leisurely, and forming acquaintances with the 
most distinguished men on the continent, examin- 



ing architectural remains, galleries of paintings, 
and all renowned works of art. At Paris he 
again became associated with the most illustrious 
men of all lands in the contemplation of the 
loftiest temporal themes which can engross the 
human mind. After a short visit to England he 
returned to Paris, and consecrated all his energies 
to study until May, 1785, when he returned to 
America to finish his education. 

Upon leaving Harvard College at the age of 
twenty, he studied law for three years. In June, 
1794, being then but twenty-seven years of age, 
he was appointed by Washington Resident Min- 
ister at the Netherlands. Sailing from Boston in 
July, he reached London in October, where he 
was immediately admitted to the deliberations of 
Messrs. Jay & Pinckney, assisting them in nego- 
tiating a commercial treaty with Great Britain. 
After thus spending a fortnight in London, he 
proceeded to The Hague. 

In July, 1797, he left The Hague to go to Por- 
tugal as Minister Plenipotentiary. On his way to 
Portugal, upon arriving in London, he met with 
despatches directing him to the court of Berlin, but 
requesting him to remain in London until he 
should receive his instructions. While waiting 
he was married to an American lady, to whom he 
had been previously engaged — Miss Louisa Cath- 
erine Johnson, a daughter of Joshua Johnson, 
American Consul in London, and a lady en- 
dowed with that beauty and those accomplish- 
ments which eminently fitted her to move in the 
elevated sphere for which she was destined. He 
reached Berlin with his wife in November, 1797, 
where he remained until July, 1799, when, hav- 
ing fulfilled all the purposes of his mission, he so- 
licited his recall. 

Soon after his return, in 1802, he was chosen 
to the Senate of Massachusetts from Boston, and 
then was elected Senator of the United States for 
six years, from the 4th of March, 1S04. His rep- 
utation, his ability and his experience placed 



4° 

him immediately among the most prominent and 
influential members of that body. 

In 1809, Madison succeeded Jefferson in the 
Presidential chair, and he immediately nominated 
John Quincy Adams Minister to St. Petersburgh. 
Resigning his professorship in Harvard Col- 
lege, he embarked at Boston in August, 1809. 

While in Russia, Mr. Adams was an intense 
student. He devoted his attention to the lan- 
guage and history of Russia; to the Chinese trade; 
to the European system of weights, measures and 
coins; to the climate and astronomical observa- 
tions; while he kept up a familiar acquaintance 
with the Greek and Latin classics. In all the 
universities of Europe, a more accomplished 
scholar could scarcely be found. All through 
life the Bible constituted an important part of his 
studies. It was his rule to read five chapters 
every day. 

On the 4th of March, 1817, Mr. Monroe took 
the Presidential chair, and immediately appointed 
Mr. Adams Secretary of State. Taking leave of 
his numerous friends in public and private life in 
Europe, he sailed in June, 18 19, for the United 
States. On the 18th of August, he again crossed 
the threshold of his home in Quincy. During the 
eight years of Mr. Monroe's administration, Mr. 
Adams continued Secretary of State. 

Some time before the close of Mr. Monroe's 
second term of office, new candidates began to be 
presented for the Presidency. The friends of Mr. 
Adams brought forward his name. It was an 
exciting campaign, and party spirit was never- 
more bitter. Two hundred and sixty electoral 
votes were cast. Andrew Jacksorr received ninety- 
nine; John Quincy Adams eighty-four; William 
H. Crawford forty-one; and Henry Clay thirty- 
seven. As there was no choice by the people, 
the question went to the House of Representa- 
tives. Mr. Clay gave the vote of Kentucky to 
Mr. Adams, and he was elected. 

The friends of all the disappointed candidates 
now combined irr a venomous and persistent as- 
sault upon Mr. Adams. There is nothing more 
disgraceful in the past history of our country than 
the abuse which was poured in one uninterrupted 
stream upon this high-minded, upright and pa- 



JOHN QUINCY ADAMS. 



triotic man. There never was an administration 
more pure in principles, more conscientiously de- 
voted to the best interests of the country, than 
that of John Quincy Adams; and never, perhaps, 
was there an administration more unscrupulously 
and outrageously assailed. 

On the 4th of March, T829, Mr. Adams retired 
from the Presidency, and was succeeded by An- 
drew Jackson. John C. Calhoun was elected 
Vice-President. The slavery question now be- 
gan to assume portentous magnitude. Mr. Adams 
returned to Quincy and to his studies, which he 
pursued with unabated zeal. But he was not 
long permitted to remain in retirement. In No- 
vember, rS30, he was elected Representative in 
Congress. For seventeen years, or until his death, 
he occupied the post as Representative, towering 
above all his peers, ever ready to do brave battle 
for freedom, and winning the title of "the Old 
Man Eloquent." Upon taking his seat in the 
House, he announced that he should hold him- 
self bound to no party. Probably there never 
was a member more devoted to his duties. He 
was usually the first in his place irr the morning, 
arrd the last to leave his seat in the evening. 
Not a measure could be brought forward and es- 
cape his scrutiny. The battle which Mr. Adams 
fought, almost singly, against the pro-slavery 
party in the Government was sublime in its 
moral daring and heroism. For persisting in 
presenting petitiorrs for the abolition of slavery, 
he was threatened with indictment by the grarrd 
jury, with expulsion from the House, with assas- 
sination; but no threats could intimidate him, and 
his final triumph was complete. 

On the 2 r st of February, rS4S, he rose on the 
floor of Congress with a paper in his hand, to 
address the speaker. Suddenly he fell, again 
stricken by paralysis, and was caught irr the arms 
of those arourrd him. For a time he was sense- 
less, as he was conveyed to the sofa in the ro- 
tunda. With reviving consciousness, he opened 
his eyes, looked calmly arourrd arrd said "This 
is the end of earth;" then after a moment's pause 
he added, " I am content." These were the last 
words of the grand ' ' Old Man Eloquent. ' ' 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSHY Of ILI 
URbAM 




, </ 



^=Z^€? /*</££ s / 



ANDREW JACKSON. 



61 NDREW JACKSON, the seventh President 
Ll of the United States, was born in Waxhaw 
/ I settlement, N. C, March 15, 1767, a few 
days after his father's death. His parents were 
poor emigrants from Ireland, and took up their 
abode in Waxhaw settlement, where they lived 
in deepest poverty. 

Andrew, or Andy, as he was universally called, 
grew up a very rough, rude, turbulent boy. His 
features were coarse, his form ungainly, and there 
was but very little in his character made visible 
which was attractive. 

When only thirteen years old he joined the 
volunteers of Carolina against the British invasion. 
In 1 78 1, he and his brother Robert were captured 
and imprisoned for a time at Camden. A British 
officer ordered him to brush his mud-spattered 
boots. "lam a prisoner of war, not your serv- 
ant," was the reply of the dauntless boy. 

Andrew supported himself in various wa}-s, such 
as working at the saddler's trade, teaching school, 
and clerking in a general store, until 1784, when 
he entered a law office at Salisbury, N. C. He, 
however, gave more attention to the wild amuse- 
ments of the times than to his studies. In 1788, 
he was appointed solicitor for the Western District 
of North Carolina, of which Tennessee was then 
a part. This involved many long journeys amid 
dangers of every kind, but Andrew Jackson never 
knew fear, and the Indians had no desire to re- 
peat a skirmish with "Sharp Knife." 

In 1791, Mr. Jackson was married to a woman 
who supposed herself divorced from her former 
husband. Great was the surprise of both parties, 
two years later, to find that the conditions of the 
divorce had just been definitely settled by the 
first husband. The marriage ceremony was per- 
formed a second time, but the occurrence was 
often used by his enemies to bring Mr. Jackson 
into disfavor. 



In January, 1796, the Territory of Tennessee 
then containing nearly eighty thousand inhabi- 
tants, the people met in convention at Knoxville 
to frame a constitution. Five were sent from 
each of the eleven counties. Andrew Jackson 
was one of the delegates. The new State was 
entitled to but one member in the National House 
of Representatives. Andrew Jackson was chosen 
that member. Mounting his horse, he rode to 
Philadelphia, where Congress then held its ses- 
sions, a distance of about eight hundred miles. 

Jackson was an earnest advocate of the Demo- 
cratic party, and Jefferson was his idol. He ad- 
mired Bonaparte, loved France, and hated Eng- 
land. As Mr. Jackson took his seat, Gen. Wash- 
ington, whose second term of office was then 
expiring, delivered his last speech to Congress. 
A committee drew up a complimentary address in 
reply. Andrew Jackson did not approve of the 
address, and was one of the twelve who voted 
against it. He was not willing to say that Gen. 
Washington's administiation had been "wise, 
firm and patriotic. ' ' 

Mr. Jackson was elected to the United States 
Senate in 1797, but soon resigned and returned 
home. Soon after he was chosen Judge of the 
Supreme Court of his State, which position he 
held for six years. 

When the War of 18 12 with Great Britain com- 
menced, Madison occupied the Presidential chair. 
Aaron Burr sent word to the President that there 
was an unknown man in the West, Andrew Jack- 
son, who would do credit to a commission if one 
were conferred upon him. Just at that time Gen. 
Jackson offered his services and those of twenty- 
five hundred volunteers. His offer was accepted, 
and the troops were assembled at Nashville. 

As the British were hourly expected to make 
an attack upon New Orleans, where Gen. Wil- 
kinson was in command, he was ordered to de- 



44 



ANDREW JACKSON. 



scend the river with fifteen hundred troops to aid 
Wilkinson. The expedition reached Natchez, 
and after a delay of several weeks there without 
accomplishing anything, the men were ordered 
back to their homes. But the energy Gen. Jack- 
son had displayed, and his entire devotion to the 
comfort of his soldiers, won for him golden opin- 
ions, and he became the most popular man in the 
State. It was in this expedition that his tough- 
ness gave him the nickname of "Old Hickory." 

Soon after this, while attempting to horsewhip 
Col. Thomas Benton for a remark that gentleman 
made about his taking part as second in a duel 
in which a younger brother of Benton's was en- 
gaged, he received two severe pistol wounds. 
While he was lingering upon a bed of suffering, 
news came that the Indians, who had combined 
under Tecumseh from Florida to the Lakes to ex- 
terminate the white settlers, were committing the 
most awful ravages. Decisive action became nec- 
essary. Gen. Jackson, with his fractured bone 
just beginning to heal, his arm in a sling, and 
unable to mount his horse without assistance, 
gave his amazing energies to the raising of an 
army to rendezvous at Fayettesville, Ala. 

The Creek Indians had established a strong 
fort on one of the bends of the Tallapoosa River, 
near the center of Alabama, about fifty miles be- 
low Ft. Strother. With an army of two thousand 
men, Gen. Jackson traversed the pathless wilder- 
ness in a march of eleven days. He reached their 
fort, called Tohopeka or Horse-shoe, on the 27th 
of March, 1814. The bend of the river enclosed 
nearly one hundred acres of tangled forest and 
wild ravine. Across the narrow neck the Indians 
had constructed a formidable breastwork of logs 
and brush. Here nine hundred warriors, with 
an ample supply of arms, were assembled. 

The fort was stormed. The fight was utterly 
desperate. Not an Indian woidd accept quarter. 
When bleeding and dying, they would fight those 
who endeavored to spare their lives. From ten 
in the morning until dark the battle raged. The 
carnage was awful and revolting. Some threw 
themselves into the river; but the unerring bul- 
lets struck their heads as they swam. Nearly 
even' one of the nine hundred warriors was 



killed. A few, probably, in the night swam 
the river and escaped. This ended the war. 

This closing of the Creek War enabled us to 
concentrate all our militia upon the British, who 
were the allies of the Indians. No man of less 
resolute will than Gen. Jackson could have con- 
ducted this Indian campaign to so successful an 
issue. Immediately he was appointed Major- 
General. 

Late in August, with an army of two thousand 
men on a rushing march, Gen. Jackson went to 
Mobile. A British fleet went from Pensacola, 
landed a force upon the beach, anchored near the 
little fort, and from both ship and shore com- 
menced a furious assault. The battle was long 
and doubtful. At length one of the ships was 
blown up and the rest retired. 

Garrisoning Mobile, where he had taken his 
little army, he moved his troops to New Orleans, 
and the battle of New Orleans, which soon ensued, 
was in reality a very arduous campaign. This 
won for Gen. Jackson an imperishable name. 
Here his troops, which numbered about four 
thousand men, won a signal victory over the 
British army of about nine thousand. His loss 
was but thirteen, while the loss of the British was 
twenty-six hundred. 

The name of Gen. Jackson soon began to be 
mentioned in connection with the Presidency, 
but in 1824 he was defeated by Mr. Adams. 
He was, however, successful in the election of 
1828, and was re-elected for a second term in 
1832. In 1829, just before he assumed the reins 
of government, he met with the most terrible 
affliction of his life in the death of his wife, whom 
he had loved with a devotion which has perhaps 
never been surpassed. From the shock of her 
death he never recovered. 

His administration was one of the most mem- 
orable in the annals of our country — applauded 
by one party, condemned by the other. No man 
had more bitter enemies or wanner friends. At 
the expiration of his two terms of office he retired 
to the Hermitage, where he died JuneS, 1845. The 
last years of Mr. Jackson's life were those of a de- 
voted Christian man. 



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7 2 // ZS&: ^^/^J t-ot^^ 



MARTIN VAN BUREN. 



y>|ARTlN VAN BUREN, the eighth Presi- 
Y dent of the United States, was born at Kill- 
ed derhook, N. Y., December 5, 17S2. He 
died at the same place, July 24, 1862. His body 
rests in the cemetery 1 at Kinderhook. Above it is 
a plain granite shaft, fifteen feet high, bearing a 
simple inscription about half-way up on one face. 
The lot is unfenced, unbordered or unbounded 
by shrub or flower. 

There is but little in the life of Martin Van 
Buren of romantic interest. He fought no battles, 
engaged in no wild adventures. Though his life 
was stormy in political and intellectual conflicts, 
and he gained many signal victories, his days 
passed uneventful in those incidents which give 
zest to biography. His ancestors, as his name indi- 
cates, were of Dutch origin, and were among the 
earliest emigrants from Holland to the banks of 
the Hudson. His father was a farmer, residing 
in the old town of Kinderhook. His mother, also 
of Dutch lineage, was a woman of superior intel- 
ligence and exemplary piety. 

He was decidedly a precocious boy, developing 
unusual activity, vigor and strength of mind. At 
the age of fourteen, he had finished his academic 
studies in his native village, and commenced the 
study of law. As he had not a collegiate educa- 
tion, seven years of study in a law-office were re- 
quired of him before he could be admitted to the 
Bar. Inspired with a lofty ambition, and con- 
scious of his powers, he pursued his studies with 
indefatigable industry. After spending six years 
in an office in his native village, he went to the city 
of New York, and prosecuted his studies for the 
seventh year. 

In 1803, Mr. Van Buren, then twenty-one years 



of age, commenced the practice of law in his na- 
tive village. The great conflict between the Federal 
and Republican parties was then at its height. 
Mr. Van Buren was from the beginning a politi- 
cian. He had, perhaps, imbibed that spirit while 
listening to the many discussions which had been 
carried on in his father' s hotel. He was in cordial 
sympathy with Jefferson, and earnestly and elo- 
quently espoused the cause of State Rights, though 
at that time the Federal part}' held the supremacy 
both in his town and State. 

His success and increasing reputation led him 
after six years of practice to remove to Hudson, 
the county seat of his county. Here he spent 
seven years, constantly gaining strength by con- 
tending in the courts with some of the ablest men 
who have adorned the Bar of his State. 

Just before leaving Kinderhook for Hudson, Mr. 
Van Buren married a lady alike distinguished for 
beauty and accomplishments. After twelve short 
years she sank into the grave, a victim of con- 
sumption, leaving her husband and four sons to 
weep over her loss. For twenty-five years, Mr. 
Van Buren was an earnest, successful, assiduous 
lawyer. The record of those years is barren in 
items of public interest. In 18 12, when thirty 
years of age, he was chosen to the State Senate, 
and gave his strenuous support to Mr. Madison's 
administration. In 181 5, he was appointed At- 
torney-General, and the next year moved to Al- 
bany, the capital of the State. 

While he was acknowledged as one of the most 
prominent leaders of the Democratic party, he had 
the moral courage to avow that true democracy did 
not require that "universal suffrage" which admits 
the vile, the degraded, the ignorant, to the right 



*8 



MARTIN VAN BUREN. 



of governing the State. In true consistency with 
his democratic principles, he contended that, while 
the path leading to the privilege of voting should 
he open to even man without distinction, no one 
should be invested with that sacred prerogative 
unless he were in some degree qualified for it by 
intelligence, virtue, and some property interests in 
the welfare of the State. 

In [821 he was elected a member of the United 
States Senate, and in the same year he took a 
seat in the convention to revise the Constitution of 
his native State. His course in this convention 
secured the approval of men of all parties. No 
one could doubt the singleness of his endeavors to 
promote the interests of all classes in the com- 
munity. In the Senate of the United States, he 
rose at once to a conspicuous position as an active 
and useful legislator. 

In [827, John Quincy Adams being then in the 
Presidential chair, Mr. Van Buren was re-elected 
to the Senate. He had been from the beginning 
a determined opposer of the administration, adopt- 
ing the "State Rights" view in opposition to what 
was deemed the Federal proclivities of Mr. Adams. 

Soon after this, in 1S2S, he was chosen Governor 
of the State of New York, and accordingly resigned 
his seat in the Senate. Probably no one in the 
United States contributed so much towards eject- 
ing John O. Adams from the Presidential chair, 
and placing in it Andrew Jackson, as did Martin 
Van Buren. Whether entitled to the reputation 
or not. he certainly was regarded throughout the 
United States as one of the most skillful, sagacious 
and cunning of politicians. It was supposed that 
no one knew so well as he how to touch the secret 
springs of action, how to pull all the wires to 
put his machinery in motion, and how to organize 
a political army which would secretly and stealth- 
ily accomplish the most gigantic results. By these 
powers it is said that he outwitted Mr. Adams. Mr. 
Clay, and Mr. Webster, and secured results which 
few then thought could be accomplished. 

When Andrew Jackson was elected President 
he appointed Mr. Van Buren Secretary of State. 
This position he resigned in 1831, and was im- 
mediately appointed Minister to England, where 
he went the same autumn. The Senate, however. 



when it met, refused to ratify the nomination, and 
he returned home, apparently untroubled. Later 
he was nominated Vice-President in the place of 
Calhoun, at the re-election of President Jackson, 
and with smiles for all and frowns for none, he 
took his place at the head of that Senate which had 
refused to confirm his nomination as ambassador. 

His rejection by the Senate roused all the zeal 
of President Jackson in behalf of his repudiated 
favorite; and this, probably, more than any other 
cause ^ecured his elevation to the chair of the 
Chief Executive. On the 20th of May, 1836, Mr. 
Van Buren received the Democratic nomination 
to succeed Gen. Jackson as President of the United 
States. He was elected by a handsome majority, 
to the delight of the retiring President. ' "Leaving 
New York out of the canvass," says Mr. Partou, 
"the election of Mr. Van Buren to the Presidency 
was as much the act of Gen. Jackson as though 
the Constitution had conferred upon him the power 
to appoint a successor." 

His administration was filled with exciting 
events. The insurrection in Canada, which 
threatened to involve this country in war with 
England, the agitation of the slavery question, 
and finally the great commercial panic which 
spread over the country, all were trials of his wis- 
dom. The financial distress was attributed to 
the management of the Democratic party, and 
brought the President into such disfavor that he 
tailed of re-election, and on the 4th of March. 
1841, he retired from the presidency. 

With the exception of being nominated for the 
acy by the "Free Soil" Democrats in 1S48, 
Mr. Van Buren lived quietly upon his estate until 
his death. He had ever been a prudent man, of 
frugal habits, and, living within his income, had 
now fortunately a competence for his declining 
years. From his fine estate at Lindenwald, he 
still exerted a powerful influence upon the politics 
of the country. From this time until his death, 
on the 24th of July, 1862, at the age of eighty 
years, he resided at Lindenwald, a gentleman of 
leisure, of culture and wealth, enjoying in a 
healthy old age probably far more happiness than 
he had before experienced amid the stormy scenes 
of his active life. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSilY OF ILUNOIS 

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& M//#^. 



WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON. 



(ILUAM HENRY HARRISON, the ninth 
President of the United States, was born 
at Berkeley, Va., February 9, 1773. His 
father, Benjamin Harrison, was in comparatively 
opulent circumstances, and was one of the most 
distinguished men of his day. He was an inti- 
mate friend of George Washington, was early 
elected a member of the Continental Congress, 
and was conspicuous among the patriots of Vir- 
ginia in resisting the encroachments of the British 
crown. In the celebrated Congress of 1775, Ben- 
jamin Harrison and John Hancock were both 
candidates for the office of Speaker. 

Mr. Harrison was subsequently chosen Gov- 
ernor of Virginia, and was twice re-elected. His 
son William Henry, of course, enjoyed in child- 
hood all the advantages which wealth and intel- 
lectual and cultivated society could give. Hav- 
ing received a thorough common-school educa- 
tion, he entered Hampden Sidney College, where 
he graduated with honor soon after the death of 
his father. He then repairtd to Philadelphia to 
study medicine under the instructions of Dr. Rush 
and the guardianship of Robert Morris, both of 
whom were, with his father, signers of the Dec- 
laration of Independence. 

Upon the outbreak of the Indian troubles, and 
notwithstanding the remonstrances of his friends, 
he abandoned his medical studies and entered the 
army, having obtained a commission as Ensign 
from President Washington. He was then but 
nineteen years old. From that time he passed 
gradually upward in rank until he became aide 
to Gen. Wayne, after whose death he resigned 
his commission. He was then appointed Secre- 
tary of the Northwestern Territory. This Terri- 
tory was then entitled to but one member in Con- 



gress, and Harrison was chosen to fill that position. 
In the spring of 1800 the Northwestern Terri- 
tory was divided by Congress into two portions. 
The eastern portion, comprising the region now 
embraced in the State of Ohio, was called "The 
Territory northwest of the Ohio." The western 
portion, which included what is now called Indi- 
ana, Illinois and Wisconsin, was called "the Indi- 
ana Territory." William Henry Harrison, then 
twenty-seven years of age, was appointed by John 
Adams Governor of the Indiana Territory, and 
immediately after also Governor of Upper Loui- 
siana. He was thus ruler over almost as exten- 
sive a realm as any sovereign upon the globe. 
He was Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and 
was invested with powers nearly dictatorial over 
the then rapidly increasing white population. The 
ability and fidelity with which he discharged 
these responsible duties may be inferred from the 
fact that he was four times appointed to this 
office — first by John Adams, twice by Thomas 
Jefferson, and afterwards by President Madison. 

When he began his administration there were 
but three white settlements in that almost bound- 
less region, now crowded with cities and resound- 
ing with all the tumult of wealth and traffic. 
One of these settlements was on the Ohio, nearly 
opposite Louisville; one at Vincennes, on the 
Wabash; and the third was a French settlement. 

The vast wilderness over which Gov. Harrison 
reigned was filled with many tribes of Indians. 
About the year 1806, two extraordinary men. 
twin brothers of the Shawnee tribe, rose among 
them. One of these was called Tecumseh, or 
"the Crouching Panther;" the other Olliwa- 
checa, or "the Prophet." Tecumseh was not 
only an Indian warrior, but a man of great sagac- 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLIuUli 
LIBRARY 



52 



WILUAM HENRY HARRISON. 



ity, far-reaching foresight and indomitable perse- 
verance in any enterprise in which he might en- 
gage. His brother, the Prophet, was an orator, 
who could sway the feelings of the untutored In- 
dians as the gale tossed the tree-tops beneath 
which they dwelt. With an enthusiasm unsur- 
passed by Peter the Hermit rousing Europe to the 
crusades, he went from tribe to tribe, assuming 
that he was specially sent by the Great Spirit. 

Gov. Harrison made many attempts to con- 
ciliate the Indians, but at last war came, and at 
Tippecanoe the Indians were routed with great 
slaughter. October 28, 18 12, his army began its 
march. When near the Prophet's town, three 
Indians of rank made their appearance and in- 
quired why Gov. Harrison was approaching them 
in so hostile an attitude. After a short confer- 
ence, arrangements were made for a meeting the 
next day to agree upon terms of peace. 

But Gov. Harrison was too well acquainted 
with the Indian character to be deceived by such 
protestations. Selecting a favorable spot for his 
night's encampment, he took every precaution 
against surprise. His troops were posted in a 
hollow square and slept upon their arms. The 
wakeful Governor, between three and four o'clock 
in the morning, had risen, and was sitting 
in conversation with his aides by the embers 
of a waning fire. It was a chill, cloudy morning, 
with a drizzling rain. In the darkness, the In- 
dians had crept as near as possible, and just then, 
with a savage yell, rushed, with all the despera- 
tion which superstition and passion most highly 
inflamed could give, upon the left flank of the 
little army. The savages had been amply pro- 
vided with guns and ammunition by the English, 
and their war-whoop was accompanied by a 
shower of bullets. 

The camp-fires were instantly extinguished, as 
the light aided the Indians in their aim, and 
Gen. Harrison's troops stood as immovable as 
the rocks around them until clay dawned, when 
they made a simultaneous charge with the bayo- 
net and swept everything before them, completely 
routing the foe. 

Gov. Harrison now had all his energies tasked 
to the utmost. The British, descending from the 



Canadas, were of themselves a very formidable 
force, but with their savage allies rushing like 
wolves from the forest, burning, plundering, scalp- 
ing torturing, the wide frontier was plunged into 
a state of consternation which even the most vivid 
imagination can but faintly conceive. Gen. Hull 
had made an ignominious surrender of his forces at 
Detroit. Under these despairing circumstances, 
Gov. Harrison was appointed by President Madi- 
son Commander-in-Chief of the Northwestern 
Army, with orders to retake Detroit and to protect 
the frontiers. It would be difficult to place a man 
in a situation demanding more energy, sagacity 
and courage, but he was found equal to the 
position, and nobly and triumphantly did he meet 
all the responsibilities. 

In 1816, Gen. Harrison was chosen a member 
of the National House of Representatives, to rep- 
resent the District of Ohio. In Congress he proved 
an active member, and whenever he spoke it was 
with a force of reason and power of eloquence 
which arrested the attention of all the members. 

In 18 1 9, Harrison was elected to the Senate of 
Ohio, and in 1824, as one of the Presidential Elec- 
tors of that State, he gave his vote for Henry 
Clay. The same year he was chosen to the Uni- 
ted States Senate. In 1836 his friends brought 
him forward as a candidate for the Presidency 
against Van Buren, but he was defeated. At the 
close of Mr. Van Buren's term, he was re-nom- 
inated by his party, and Mr. Harrison was unani- 
mously nominated by the Whigs, with John Tyler 
for the Vice-Presidency. The contest was very 
animated. Gen. Jackson gave all his influence to 
prevent Harrison's election, but his triumph was 
signal. 

The cabinet which he formed, with Daniel Web- 
ster at its head as Secretary of State, was one of 
the most brilliant with which any President had 
ever been surrounded. Never were the prospects 
of an administration more flattering, or the hopes 
of the country more sanguine. In the midst of 
these bright and joyous prospects, Gen. Harrison 
was seized by a pleurisy-fever, and after a few 
days of violent sickness died, on the 4th of April, 
just one month after his inauguration as President 
of the United States. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URSANA 



JOHN TYLER. 



(JOHN TYLER, the tenth President of the 
I United States, and was born in Charles 
(2/ City County, Va., March 29, 1790. He was 
the favored child of affluence and high social po- 
sition. At the early age of twelve, John entered 
William and Mary College, and graduated with 
much honor when but seventeen years old. After 
graduating, he devoted himself with great assi- 
duity to the study of law, partly with his father 
and partly with Edmund Randolph, one of the 
most distinguished lawyers of Virginia. 

At nineteen years of age, he commenced the 
practice of law. His success was rapid and as- 
tonishing. It is said that three months had not 
elapsed ere there was scarcely a case on the 
docket of the court in which he was not retained. 
When but twenty -one years of age, he was almost 
unanimously elected to a seat in the State Legis- 
lature. He connected himself with the Demo- 
cratic party, and warmly advocated the measures 
of Jefferson and Madison. For five successive 
years he was elected to the Legislature, receiving 
nearly the unanimous vote of his county. 

When but twenty-six years of age, he was 
elected a Member of Congress. Here he acted ear- 
nestly and ably with the Democratic party, oppos- 
ing a national bank, internal improvements by 
the General Government, and a protective tariff; 
advocating a strict construction of the Constitu- 
tion and the most careful vigilance over State 
rights. His labors in Congress were so arduous 
that before the close of his second term he found 
it necessary to resign and retire to his estate in 
Charles City County to recruit his health. He, 
however, soon after consented to take his seat in 
the State Legislature, where his influence was 
powerful in promoting public works of great 
utility. With a reputation thus constantly in- 
creasing, he was chosen by a very large majority 
of votes Governor of his native State. His ad- 
ministration was a signally successful one, and his 
popularity secured his re-election. 



John Randolph, a brilliant, erratic, half-crazed 
man, then represented Virginia in the Senate of 
the United States. A portion of the Democratic 
party was displeased with Mr. Randolph's way- 
ward course, and brought forward John Tyler as 
his opponent, considering him the only man in 
Virginia of sufficient popularity to succeed 
against the renowned orator of Roanoke. Mr. 
Tyler was the victor. 

In accordance with his professions, upon tak- 
ing his seat in the Senate he joined the ranks of 
the opposition. He opposed the tariff, and spoke 
against and voted against the bank as unconsti- 
tutional; he strenuously opposed all restrictions 
upon slavery, resisting all projects of internal im- 
provements by the General Government, and 
avowed his sympathy with Mr. Calhoun's view 
of nullification; he declared that Gen. Jackson, 
by his opposition to the nullifiers, had abandoned 
the principles of the Democratic party. Such 
was Mr. Tyler's record in Congress — a record in 
perfect accordance with the principles which he 
had always avowed. 

Returning to Virginia, he resumed the practice 
of his profession. There was a split in the Demo- 
cratic party. His friends still regarded him as a 
true Jeffersonian, gave him a dinner, and show- 
ered compliments upon him. He had now at- 
tained the age of forty-six, and his career had been 
very brilliant. In consequence of his devotion to 
public business, his private affairs had fallen into 
some disorder, and it was not without satisfac- 
tion that he resumed the practice of law, and de- 
voted himself to the cultivation of his plantation. 
Soon after this he removed to Williamsburg, for 
the better education of his children, and he again 
took his seat in the Legislature of Virginia. 

By the southern Whigs he was sent to the 
national convention at Harrisburg in 1839 to nom- 
inate a President. The majority of votes were 
given to Gen Harrison, a genuine Whig, much 
to the disappointment of the South, which wished 



56 



JOHN TYLER. 



for Henry Clay. To conciliate the southern 
Whigs and to secure their vote, the convention 
then nominated John Tyler for Vice-President. 
It was well known that he was not in sympathy 
with the Whig party in the North; but the Vice- 
President has very little power in the Govern- 
ment, his main and almost only duty being to 
preside over the meetings of the Senate. Thus it 
happened that a Whig President and, in reality, 
a Democratic Vice-President were chosen. 

In 1 84 1, Mr. Tyler was inaugurated Vice- 
President of the United States. In one short 
month from that time, President Harrison died, 
and Mr. Tyler thus found himself, to his own 
surprise and that of the whole nation, an occu- 
pant of the Presidential chair. Hastening from 
Williamsburg to Washington, on the 6th of 
April he was inaugurated to the high and re- 
sponsible office. He was placed in a position of 
exceeding delicacy and difficulty. All his long 
life he had been opposed to the main principles of 
the party which had brought him into power. 
He had ever been a consistent, honest man, with 
an unblemished record. Gen. Harrison had se- 
lected a Whig cabinet. Should he retain them, 
and thus surround himself with counselors whose 
views were antagonistic to his own ? or, on the 
other hand, should he turn against the party 
which had elected him, and select a cabinet in 
harmony with himself, and which would oppose 
all those views which the Whigs deemed essen- 
tial to the public welfare ? This was his fearful 
dilemma. He invited the cabinet which Presi- 
dent Harrison had selected to retain their seats, 
and recommended a day of fasting and prayer, 
that God would guide and bless us. 

The Whigs carried through Congress a bill for 
the incorporation of a fiscal bank of the United 
States. The President, after ten days' delay, re- 
turned it with his veto. He suggested, however, 
that he would approve of a bill drawn up upon 
such a plan as he proposed. Such a bill was ac- 
cordingly prepared, and privately submitted to 
him. He gave it his approval. It was passed 
without alteration, and he sent it back with his 
veto. Here commenced the open rupture. It is 
said that Mr. Tyler was provoked to this meas- 



ure by a published letter from the Hon. John M. 
Botts, a distinguished Virginia Whig, who se- 
verely touched the pride of the President. 

The opposition now exultingly received the 
President into their arms. The party which 
elected him denounced him bitterly. All the 
members of his cabinet, excepting Mr. Webster, 
resigned. The Whigs of Congress, both the 
Senate and the House, held a meeting and issued 
an address to the people of the United States, 
proclaiming that all political alliance between the 
Whigs and President Tyler was at an end. 

Still the President attempted to conciliate. He 
appointed a new cabinet of distinguished Whigs 
and Conservatives, carefully leaving out all strong 
party men. Mr. Webster soon found it necessary 
to resign, forced out by the pressure of his Whig 
friends. Thus the four years of Mr. Tyler's un- 
fortunate administration passed sadly away. No 
one was satisfied. The land was filled with mur- 
murs and vituperation. Whigs and Democrats 
alike assailed him. More and more, however, he 
brought himself into sympathy with his old 
friends, the Democrats, until at the close of his 
term he gave his whole influence to the support 
of Mr. Polk, the Democratic candidate for his 
successor. 

On the 4th of March, 1845, President Tyler re- 
tired from the harassments of office, to the regret 
of neither party, and probably to his own unspeak- 
able relief. The remainder of his days were 
passed mainly in the retirement of his beautiful 
home — Sherwood Forest, Charles City County, 
Va. His first wife, Miss Letitia Christian, died 
in Washington in 1842; and in June, 1844, 
he was again married, at New York, to Miss Julia 
Gardiner, a young lady of many personal and 
intellectual accomplishments. 

When the great Rebellion rose, which the 
State Rights and nullifying doctrines of John C. 
Calhoun had inaugurated, President Tyler re- 
nounced his allegiance to the United States, and 
joined the Confederates. He was chosen a mem- 
ber of their Congress, and while engaged in 
active measures to destroy, by force of arms, the 
Government over which he had once presided, he 
was taken sick and soon died. 



LIBRARY 
UNJVEKSUY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



JAMES K. POLK. 



HAMES K. POLK, the eleventh President of 
I the United States, was born in Meeklenburgh 
Q) County, N. C, November 2, 1795. His 
parents were Samuel and Jane (Knox) Polk, the 
former a son of Col. Thomas Polk, who located 
at the above place, as one of the first pioneers, in 
1735. In 1806, with his wife and children, and 
soon after followed by most of the members of the 
Polk family, Samuel Polk emigrated some two or 
three hundred miles farther west, to the rich val- 
ley of the Duck River. Here, in the midst of the 
wilderness, in a region which was subsequently 
called Maury County, they erected their log huts 
and established their homes. In the hard toil of 
a new farm in the wilderness, James K. Polk 
spent the early years of his childhood and youth. 
His father, adding the pursuit of a surveyor to 
that of a farmer, gradually increased in wealth, 
until he became one of the leading men of the 
region. His mother was a superior woman, of 
strong common sense and earnest piety. 

Very early in life James developed a taste for 
reading, and expressed the strongest desire to ob- 
tain a liberal education. His mother's training 
had made him methodical in his habits, had taught 
him punctuality and industry, and had inspired 
him with lofty principles of morality. His health 
was frail, and his father, fearing that he might not 
be able to endure a sedentary life, got a situation 
for him behind the counter, hoping to fit him for 
commercial pursuits. 

This was to James a bitter disappointment. He 
had no taste for these duties, and his daily tasks 
were irksome in the extreme. He remained in this 
uncongenial occupation but a few weeks, when, 
at his earnest solicitation, his father removed 
him and made arrangements for him to pros- 
ecute his studies. Soon after he sent him to Mur- 
freesboro Academy. With ardor which could 
scarcely be surpassed, he pressed forward in his 



studies, and in less than two and a-half years, in 
the autumn of 18 15, entered the sophomore class 
in the University of North Carolina, at Chapel 
Hill. Here he was one of the most exemplary of 
scholars, punctual in every exercise, never allow- 
ing himself to be absent from a recitation or a 
religious sen-ice. 

Mr. Polk graduated in 1818, with the highest 
honors, being deemed the best scholar of his class, 
both in mathematics and the classics. He was 
then twenty-three years of age. His health was 
at this time much impaired by the assiduity with 
which he had prosecuted his studies. After a 
short season of relaxation, he went to Nashville, 
and entered the office of Felix Grundy, to study 
law. Here Mr. Polk renewed his acquaintance 
with Andrew Jackson, who resided on his planta- 
tion, the "Hermitage," but a few miles from 
Nashville. They had probably been slightly ac- 
quainted before. 

Mr. Polk's father was a Jeffersoniau Republican 
and James K. adhered to the same political faith. 
He was a popular public speaker, and was con- 
stantly called upon to address the meetings of his 
party friends. His skill as a speaker was such 
that he was popularly called the Napoleon of the 
stump. He was a man of unblemished morals, 
genial and courteous in his bearing, and with that 
sympathetic nature in the joys and griefs of oth- 
ers which gave him hosts of friends. In 1823, 
he was elected to the Legislature of Tennessee, 
and gave his strong influence toward the election 
of his friend, Mr. Jackson, to the Presidency of 
the United States. 

In January, 1824, Mr. Polk married Miss Sarah 
Childress, of Rutherford County, Tenn. His 
bride was altogether worthy of him — -a lady of 
beauty and culture. In the fall of 1825 Mr. Polk 
was chosen a member of Congress, and the satis- 
faction he gave his constituents may be inferred 



JAMES K. POLK. 



from the fact, that for fourteen successive years, 
or until 1839, he was continued in that office. He 
then voluntarily withdrew, only that he might 
accept the Gubernatorial chair of Tennessee. In 
Congress he was a laborious member, a frequent 
and a popular speaker. He was always in his 
seat, always courteous, and whenever he spoke 
it was always to the poiut, without any ambitious 
rhetorical display. 

During five sessions of Congress Mr. Polk was 
Speaker of the House. Strong passions were 
roused and stormy scenes were witnessed, but he 
performed his arduous duties to a very general 
satisfaction, and a unanimous vote of thanks to 
him was passed by the House as he withdrew on 
the 4th of March, 1839. 

In accordance with Southern usage, Mr. Polk, 
as a candidate for Governor, canvassed the State. 
He was elected by a large majority, and on Octo- 
ber 14, 1839, took the oath of office at Nashville. 
In 1841 his term of office expired, and he was 
again the candidate of the Democratic party, but 
was defeated. 

On the 4th of March, 1845, Mr. Polk was in- 
augurated President of the United States. The 
verdict of the country in favor of the annexation 
of Texas exerted its influence upon Congress, 
and the last act of the administration of President 
Tyler was to affix his signature to a joint resolu- 
tion of Congress, passed on the 3d of March, ap- 
proving of the annexation of Texas to the Union. 
As Mexico still claimed Texas as one of her 
provinces, the Mexican Minister, Almonte, im- 
mediately demanded his passports and left the 
country, declaring the act of the annexation to be 
an act hostile to Mexico. 

In his first message, President Polk urged that 
Texas should immediately, by act of Congress, be 
received into the Union on the same footing with 
the other States. In the mean time, Gen. Taylor 
was sent with an army into Texas to hold the 
country. He was first sent to Nueces, which the 
Mexicans said was the western boundary of Tex- 
as. Then he was sent nearly two hundred miles 
further west, to the Rio Grande, where he erected 
batteries which commanded the Mexican city of 
Matamoras, which was situated on the western 



banks. The anticipated collision soon took place, 
and war was declared against Mexico by President 
Polk. The war was pushed forward by his ad- 
ministration with great vigor. Gen. Taylor, 
whose army was first called one of ' ' observation , ' ' 
then of "occupation," then of "invasion," was 
sent forward to Monterey. The feeble Mexicans 
in every encounter were hopelessly slaughtered. 
The day of judgment alone can reveal the misery 
which this war caused. It was by the ingenuity 
of Mr. Polk's administration that the war was 
brought on. 

' ' To the victors belong the spoils. ' ' Mexico 
was prostrate before us. Her capital was in our 
hands. We now consented to peace upon the 
condition that Mexico should surrender to us, in 
addition to Texas, all of New Mexico, and all of 
Upper and Lower California. This new demand 
embraced, exclusive of Texas, eight hundred 
thousand square miles. This was an extent of 
territory equal to nine States of the size of New 
York. Thus slavery was securing eighteen ma- 
jestic States to be added to the Union. There 
were some Americans who thought it all right; 
there were others who thought it all wrong. In 
the prosecution of this war we expended twenty 
thousand lives and more than $100,000,000. Of 
this money $15,000,000 were paid to Mexico. 

On the 3d of March, 1849, Mr. Polk retired 
from office, having served one term. The next 
day was Sunday. On the 5th, Gen. Taylor was 
inaugurated as his successor. Mr. Polk rode to 
the Capitol in the same carriage with Gen. Tay- 
lor, and the same evening, with Mrs. Polk, he 
commenced his return to Tennessee. He was 
then but fifty-four years of age. He had always 
been strictly temperate in all his habits, and his 
health was good. With an ample fortune, a 
choice library, a cultivated mind, and domestic 
ties of the dearest nature, it seemed as though 
long years of tranquillity and happiness were be- 
fore him. But the cholera — that fearful scourge 
— was then sweeping up the Valley of the Missis- 
sippi, and he contracted the disease, dying on the 
15th of June, 1849, in the fifty-fourth year of his 
age, greatly mourned by his countrymen. 



LIBR'RV 

UNIVEKSIIY OF ILLINUIS 

URBANA 




^ 



"/ ' /5t~<^£&<^r-y/ y&^y 



ZACHARY TAYLOR. 



y/ACHARY TAYLOR, twelfth President of 
I, the United States, was horn on the 24th of 
/ -) November, 1784, in Orange County, Ya. 
His father, Col. Taylor, was a Virginian of 
note, and a distinguished patriot and soldier of 
the Revolution. When Zachary was an infant, 
his father, with his wife and two children, emi- 
grated to Kentucky , where he settled in the path- 
less wilderness, a few miles from Louisville. In 
this frontier home, away from civilization and all 
its refinements, young Zachary could enjoy but 
few social and educational advantages. When 
six years of age he attended a common school, 
and was then regarded as a bright, active boy, 
rather remarkable for bluntness and decision of 
character. He was strong, fearless and self-reli- 
ant, and manifested a strong desire to enter the 
army to fight the Indians, who were ravaging the 
frontiers. There is little to be recorded of the 
uneventful years of his childhood on his father's 
large but lonely plantation. 

In 1808, his father succeeded in obtaining for 
him a commission as Lieutenant in the United 
States army, and he joined the troops which were 
stationed at New Orleans under Gen. Wilkinson. 
Soon after this he married Miss Margaret Smith, 
a young lady from one of the first families of 
Maryland. 

Immediately after the declaration of war with 
England, in 1812, Capt. Taylor (for he had then 
been promoted to that rank) was put in command 
of Ft. Harrison, on the Wabash, about fifty miles 
above Vincennes. This fort had been built in the 
wilderness by Gen. Harrison, on his march to 
Tippecanoe. It was one of the first points of at- 
tack by the Indians, led by Tecumseh. Its garri- 
son consisted of a broken company of infantry, 
numbering fifty men, many of whom were sick. 

Early in the autumn of 181 2, the Indians, 
stealthily, and in large nnmbers, moved upon the 



fort. Their approach was first indicated by the 
murder of two soldiers just outside of the stockade. 
Capt. Taylor made every possible preparation to 
meet the anticipated assault. On the 4th of Sep- 
tember, a band of forty painted and plumed sav- 
ages came to the fort, waving a white flag, and 
informed Capt. Taylor that in the morning their 
chief would come to have a talk with him. It 
was evident that their object was merely to ascer- 
tain the state of things at the fort, and Capt. 
Taylor, well versed in the wiles of the savages, 
kept them at a distance. 

The sun went down; the savages disappeared; 
the garrison slept upon their arms. One hour 
before midnight the war-whoop burst from a 
thousand lips in the forest around, followed by 
the discharge of musketry and the rush of the 
foe. Every man, sick and well, sprang to hi 
post. Every man knew that defeat was not 
merely death, but, in the case of capture, death by 
the most agonizing and prolonged torture. No 
pen can describe, no imagination can conceive, the 
scenes which ensued. The savages succeeded in 
setting fire to one of the block-houses. Until six 
o'clock in the morning this awful conflict con- 
tinued, when the savages, baffled at every point 
and gnashing their teeth with rage, retired. 
Capt. Taylor, for this gallant defense, was pro- 
moted to the rank of Major by brevet. 

Until the close of the war, Maj. Taylor was 
placed in such situations that he saw but little 
more of active service. He was sent far away 
into the depths of the wilderness to Ft. Craw- 
ford, on Fox River, which empties into Green 
Bay. Here there was little to be done but to 
wear away the tedious hours as one best could. 
There were no books, no society, no intellectual 
stimulus. Thus with him the uneventful years 
rolled on. Gradually he rose to the rank of 
Colonel. In the Black Hawk War, which re- 



6 4 



ZACHARY TAYLOR. 



suited in the capture of that renowned chieftain, 
Col. Taylor took a subordinate, but a brave and 
efficient, part. 

For twenty-four years Col. Taylor was engaged 
in the defense of the frontiers, in scenes so re- 
mote, and in employments so obscure, that his 
name was unknown beyond the limits of his own 
immediate acquaintance. In the year 1836, he 
was sent to Florida to compel the Seminole Indi- 
ans to vacate that region, and retire beyond the 
Mississippi, as their chiefs by treaty had prom- 
ised they should do. The sen-ices rendered here 
secured for Col. Taylor the high appreciation of 
the Government, and as a reward he was ele- 
vated to the high rank of Brigadier-General by 
brevet, and soon after, in May, 1838, was ap- 
pointed to the chief command of the United 
States troops in Florida. 

After two years of wearisome employment 
amidst the everglades of the Peninsula, Gen. Tay- 
lor obtained, at his own request, a change of 
command, and was stationed over the Department 
of the Southwest. This field embraced Louisiana, 
Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. Establishing 
his headquarters at Ft. Jessup, in Louisiana, he 
removed his family to a plantation which he pur- 
chased near Baton Rouge. Here he remained 
for five years, buried, as it were, from the world, 
but faithfully discharging every* duty imposed 
upon him. 

In 1846, Gen. Taylor was sent to guard the 
land between the Nueces and Rio Grande, the 
latter river being the boundary of Texas, which 
was then claimed by the United States. Soon 
the war with Mexico was brought on, and at Palo 
Alto and Resaca de la Palma, Gen. Taylor won 
brilliant victories over the Mexicans. The rank 
of Major-General by brevet was then conferred 
upon Gen. Taylor, and his name was received 
with enthusiasm almost everywhere in the na- 
tion. Then came the battles of Monterey and 
Buena Vista, in which he won signal victories 
over forces much larger than he commanded. 

The tidings of the brilliant victory of Buena 
Vista spread the wildest enthusiasm over the 
country. The name of Gen. Taylor was on 
every one's lips. The Whig party decided to 



take advantage of this wonderful popularity in 
bringing forward the unpolished, unlettered, hon- 
est soldier as their candidate for the Presidency. 
Gen. Taylor was astonished at the announce- 
ment, and for a time would not listen to it, de- 
claring that he was not at all qualified for such 
an office. So little interest had he taken in poli- 
tics, that for forty years he had not cast a vote. 
It was not without chagrin that several distin- 
guished statesmen, who had been long years in 
the public service, found their claims set aside in 
behalf of one whose name had never been heard 
of, save in connection with Palo Alto, Resaca de 
la Palma, Monterey and Buena Vista. It is said 
that Daniel Webster, in his haste, remarked, " It 
is a nomination not fit to be made. ' ' 

Gen. Taylor was not an eloquent speaker nor a 
fine writer. His friends took possession of him, 
and prepared such few communications as it was 
needful should be presented to the public. The 
popularity of the successful warrior swept the 
land. He was triumphantly elected over two 
opposing candidates, — Gen. Cass and Ex-Presi- 
dent Martin Van Buren. Though he selected an 
excellent cabinet, the good old man found himself 
in a very uncongenial position, and was at times 
sorely perplexed and harassed. His mental suf- 
ferings were very severe, and probably tended to 
hasten his death. The pro-slavery party was 
pushing its claims with tireless energy; expedi- 
tions were fitting out to capture Cuba; California 
was pleading for admission to the Union, while 
slavery stood at the door to bar her out. Gen. 
Taylor found the political conflicts in Washington 
to be far more trying to the nerves than battles 
with Mexicans or Indians. 

In the midst of all these troubles, Gen. Taylor, 
after he had occupied the Presidential chair but 
little over a year, took cold, and after a brief 
sickness of but little over five days, died, on the 
9th of July, 1850. His last words were, "I am 
not afraid to die. I am ready. I have endeav- 
ored to do my duty." He died universally re- 
spected and beloved. An honest, unpretending 
man, he had been steadily growing in the affec- 
tions of the people, and the Nation bitterly la- 
mented his death. 



UNIVERc 

UKbrtrtA 




■/D 



MILLARD FILLMORE. 



^ILLARD FILLMORE, thirteenth President 
lr I of the United States, was born at Summer 
01 Hill, Cayuga County, N. Y., on the 7th of 
January, 1800. His father was a farmer, and, owing 
to misfortune, in humble circumstances. Of his 
mother, the daughter of Dr. Abiathar Millard, of 
Pittsfield, Mass., it has been said that she pos- 
sessed an intellect of a high order, united with 
much personal loveliness, sweetness of disposi- 
tion, graceful manners and exquisite sensibilities. 
She died in 1831, having lived to see her son a 
young man of distinguished promise, though she 
was not permitted to witness the high dignity 
which he finally attained. 

In consequence of the secluded home and limited 
means of his father, Millard enjoyed but slender 
advantages for education in his early years. The 
common schools, which he occasionally attended, 
were very imperfect institutions, and books were 
scarce and expensive. There was nothing then 
in his character to indicate the brilliant career 
upon which he was about to enter. He was a 
plain farmer's boy — intelligent, good-looking, 
kind-hearted. The sacred iufluences of home 
had taught him to revere the Bible, and had laid 
the foundations of an upright character. When 
fourteen years of age, his father sent him some 
hundred miles from home to the then wilds of 
Livingston County, to learn the trade of a clothier. 
Near the mill there was a small village, where 
some enterprising man had commenced the col- 
lection of a village library. This proved an in- 
estimable blessing to young Fillmore. His even- 
ings were spent in reading. Soon every leisure 
moment was occupied with books. His thirst for 
knowledge became insatiate, and the selections 
which he made were continually more elevating 
and instructive. He read history, biography, 
oratory, and thus gradually there was enkindled 



in his heart a desire to be something more than a 
mere worker with his hands. 

The young clothier had now attained the age 
of nineteen years, and was of fine personal appear- 
ance and of gentlemanly demeanor. It so hap- 
pened that there was a gentleman in the neigh- 
borhood of ample pecuniary means and of benev- 
olence, — Judge Walter Wood, — who was struck 
with the prepossessing appearance of young Fill- 
more. He made his acquaintance, and was so 
much impressed with his ability and attainments 
that he advised him to abandon his trade and de- 
vote himself to the study of the law. The young 
man replied that he had no means of his own, 
no friends to help him, and that his previous edu- 
cation had been very imperfect. But Judge Wood 
had so much confidence in him that he kindly 
offered to take him into his own office, and to 
lend him such money as he needed. Most grate- 
fullv the generous offer was accepted. 

There is in many minds a strange delusion 
about a collegiate education. A young man is 
supposed to be liberally educated if he has gradu- 
ated at some college. But many a boy who loi- 
ters through university halls and then enters a 
law office is by no means as well prepared to 
prosecute his legal studies as was Millard Fill- 
more when he graduated at the clothing-mill at 
the end of four years of manual labor, during 
which even - leisure moment had been devoted to 
intense mental culture. 

In 1823, when twenty-three years of age, he 
was admitted to the Court of Common Pleas. 
He then went to the village of Aurora, and com- 
menced the practice of law. In this secluded, 
quiet region, his practice, of course, was limited, 
and there was no opportunity for a sudden rise in 
fortune or in fame. Here, in 1826, he married a 
lady of great moral worth, and one capable of 



68 



MILLARD FILLMORE. 



adorning any station she might be called to fill, — 
Miss Abigail Powers. 

His elevation of character, his untiring industry, 
his legal acquirements, and his skill as an advo- 
cate, gradually attracted attention, and he was 
invited to enter into partnership, under highly ad- 
vantageous circumstances, with an elder member 
of the Bar in Buffalo. Just before removing to 
Buffalo, in 1829, he took his seat in the House of 
Assembly of the State of New York, as a Repre- 
sentative from Erie County. Though he had 
never taken a very active part in politics, his vote 
and sympathies were with the Whig party. The 
State was then Democratic, and he found himself 
in a helpless minority in the Legislature; still the 
testimony comes from all parties that his courtesy, 
ability and integrity won, to a very unusual de- 
gree, the respect of his associates. 

In the autumn of 1832, he was elected to a 
seat in the United States Congress. He entered 
that troubled arena in the most tumultuous hours 
of our national history, when the great conflict 
respecting the national bank and the removal of 
the deposits was raging. 

His term of two years closed, and he returned 
to his profession, which he pursued with increas- 
ing reputation and success. After a lapse of two 
years he again became a candidate for Congress; 
was re-elected, and took his seat in 1837. His 
past experience as a Representative gave him 
strength and confidence. The first term of service 
in Congress to any man can be but little more 
than an introduction. He was now prepared for 
active duty. All his energies were brought to 
bear upon the public good. Every measure re- 
celled his impress. 

Mr. Fillmore was now a man of wide repute, 
and his popularity filled the State. In the year 
1847, when he had attained the age of forty - 
seven years, he was elected Comptroller of the 
State. His labors at the Bar, in the Legisla- 
ture, in Congress and as Comptroller, had given 
him very considerable fame. The Whigs were 
casting about to find suitable candidates for Presi- 
dent and Vice-President at the approaching elec- 
tion. Far away on the waters of the Rio Grande, 
there was a rough old soldier, who had fought 



one or two successful battles with the Mexicans, 
which had caused his name to be proclaimed in 
trumpet-tones all over the land as a candidate for 
the presidency. But it was necessary to associate 
with him on the same ticket some man of repu- 
tation as a statesman. 

Under the influence of these considerations, the 
names of Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore 
became the rallying-cry of the Whigs, as their 
candidates for President and Vice-President. The 
Whig ticket was signally triumphant. On the 
4th of March, 1849, Gen. Taylor was inaugurated 
President, and Millard Fillmore Vice-President, 
of the United States. 

On the 9th of July, 1850, President Taylor, 
about one year and four months after his inaugura- 
tion, was suddenly taken sick and died. By the 
Constitution, Vice-President Fillmore thus be- 
came President. He appointed a very able cabi- 
net, of which the illustrious Daniel Webster was 
Secretary of State; nevertheless, he had serious 
difficulties to contend with, since the opposition 
had a majority in both Houses. He did all in his 
power to conciliate the South; but the pro-slavery 
part}' in the South felt the inadequacy of all 
measures of transient conciliation. The popula- 
tion of the free States was so rapidly increasing 
over that of the slave States, that it was inevitable 
that the power of the Government should soon 
pass into the hands of the free States. The fa- 
mous compromise measures were adopted under 
Mr. Fillmore's administration, and the Japan ex- 
pedition was sent out. On the 4th of March, 
1853, he, having served one term, retired. 

In 1856, Mr. Fillmore was nominated for the 
Presidency by the "Know-Nothing" part}-, but 
was beaten by Mr. Buchanan. After that Mr. 
Fillmore lived in retirement. During the terri- 
ble conflict of civil war, he was mostly silent. It 
was generally supposed that his sympathies were 
rather with those who were endeavoring to over- 
throw our institutions. President Fillmore kept 
aloof from the conflict, without any cordial words 
of cheer to one party or the other. He was thus 
forgotten by both. He lived to a ripe old age, 
and died in Buffalo, N. Y., March 8, 1S74. 



LIBR'RY 

UNIVERSIIY U^ iLLirtuia 

URBANA 



FRANKLIN PIERCE. 



fRANKLIN PIERCE, the fourteenth Presi- 
r3 dent of the United States, was born in Hills- 
I f borough, N. H., November 23, 1804. His 
father was a Revolutionary soldier, who with his 
own strong arm hewed out a home in the wilder- 
ness. He was a man of inflexible integrity, of 
strong, though uncultivated, mind, and was an un- 
compromising Democrat. The mother of Frank- 
lin Pierce was all that a son could desire — an in- 
telligent, prudent, affectionate, Christian woman. 
Franklin, who was the sixth of eight children, 
was a remarkably bright and handsome boy, 
generous, warm-hearted and brave. He won 
alike the love of old and young. The boys on 
the play-ground loved him. His teachers loved 
him. The neighbors looked upon him with pride 
and affection. He was by instinct a gentleman, 
always speaking kind words, and doing kind 
deeds, with a peculiar, unstudied tact which 
taught him what was agreeable. Without de- 
veloping any precocity of genius, or any unnatural 
devotion to books, he was a good scholar, and in 
b idv and mind a finely developed boy. 

When sixteen years of age, in the year 1820, 
he entered Bowdoin College, at Brunswick, Me. 
He was one of the most popular young men in 
the college. The purity of his moral character, 
the unvarying courtesy of his demeanor, his rank 
as a scholar, and genial nature, rendered him a 
universal favorite. There was something pe- 
culiarly winning in his address, and it was evi- 
dently not in the slightest degree studied— it was 
the simple ontgushing of his own magnanimous 
and loving nature. 

Upon graduating, in the year 1824, Franklin 
Pierce commenced the study of law in the office 
of Judge Woodbury, one of the most distinguished 



lawyers of the State, and a man of great private 
worth. The eminent social qualities of the young 
lawyer, his father's prominence as a public man, 
and the brilliant political career into which Judge 
Woodbury was entering, all tended to entice Mr. 
Pierce into the fascinating yet perilous path of 
political life. With all the ardor of his nature he 
espoused the cause of Gen. Jackson for the Presi- 
dency. He commenced the practice of law in 
Hillsborough, and was soon elected to represent 
the town in the State Legislature. Here he 
served for four years. The last two years he was 
chosen Speaker of the House by a very large 
vote. 

In 1833, at the age of twenty-nine, he was 
elected a member of Congress. In 1837, being 
then but thirty-three years old, he was elected to 
the Senate, taking his seat just as Mr. Van Buren 
commenced his administration. He was the 
youngest member in the Senate. In the year 
1834, he married Miss Jane Means Appleton, a 
lady of rare beauty and accomplishments, and one 
admirably fitted to adorn every station with which 
her husband was honored. Of the three sons who 
were born to them, all now sleep with their par- 
ents in the grave. 

In the year 1838, Mr. Pierce, with growing 
fame and increasing business as a lawyer, took up 
his residence in Concord, the capital of New 
Hampshire. President Polk, upon his accession 
to office, appointed Mr. Pierce Attorney-General 
of the United States; but the offer was declined 
in consequence of numerous professional engage- 
ments at home, and the precarious state of Mrs. 
Pierce's health. He also, about the same time, 
declined the nomination for Governor by the 
Democratic party. The war with Mexico called 



72 



FRANKLIN PIERCE. 



Mr. Pierce into the army. Receiving the appoint- 
ment of Brigadier- General, he embarked with a 
portion of his troops at Newport, R I., on the 
27th of May, 1847. He took an important part 
in this war, proving himself a brave and true sol- 
dier. 

When Gen. Pierce reached his home in his na- 
tive State, he was received enthusiastically by the 
advocates of the Mexican War, and coldly by his 
opponents. He resumed the practice of his pro- 
fession, very frequently taking an active part in 
political questions, giving his cordial support to 
the pro-slavery wing of the Democratic party. 
The compromise measures met cordially with his 
approval, and he strenuously advocated the en- 
forcement of the infamous Fugitive Slave Law, 
which so shocked the religious sensibilities of the 
North. He thus became distinguished as a 
" Northern man with Southern principles." The 
strong partisans of slavery in the South conse- 
quently regarded him as a man whom they could 
safely trust in office to carry out their plans. 

On the 12th of June, 1852, the Democratic con- 
vention met in Baltimore to nominate a candidate 
for the Presidency. For four days they contin- 
ued in session, and in thirty-five ballotings no one 
had obtained a two-thirds vote. Not a vote thus 
far had been thrown for Gen. Pierce. Then the 
Virginia delegation brought forward his name. 
There were fourteen more ballotings, during which 
Gen. Pierce constantly gained strength, until, at 
the forty-ninth ballot, he received two hundred 
and eighty-two votes, and all other candidates 
eleven. Gen. Winfield Scott was the Whig can- 
didate. Gen. Pierce was chosen with great una- 
nimity. Only four States — Vermont, Massachu- 
setts, Kentucky and Tennessee — cast their elec- 
toral votes against him. Gen. Franklin Pierce 
was therefore inaugurated President of the United 
States on the 4th of March, 1853. 

His administration proved one of the most 
stormy our country had ever experienced. The 
controversy between slavery' and freedom was 
then approaching its culminating point. It be- 
came evident that there was to be an irrepressible 
conflict between them, and that this nation 
could not long exist " half slave and half free." 



President Pierce, during the whole of his admin- 
istration, did everything he could to conciliate the 
South; but it was all in vain. The conflict every 
year grew more violent, and threats of the disso- 
lution of the Union were borne to the North on 
every Southern breeze. 

Such was the condition of affairs when Presi- 
dent Pierce approached the close of his four- 
years term of office. The North had become 
thoroughly alienated from him. The anti-slavery 
sentiment, goaded by great outrages, had been 
rapidly increasing; all the intellectual ability and 
social worth of President Pierce were forgotten in 
deep reprehension of his administrative acts. The 
slaveholders of the South also, unmindful of the 
fidelity with which he had advocated those meas- 
ures of Government which they approved, and 
perhaps feeling that he had rendered himself 
so unpopular as no longer to be able to accepta- 
bly serve them, ungratefully dropped him, and 
nominated James Buchanan to succeed him. 

On the 4th of March, 1857, President Pierce re- 
turned to his home in Concord. His three chil- 
dren were all dead, his last surviving child hav- 
ing been killed before his eyes in a railroad acci- 
dent; and his wife, one of the most estimable and 
accomplished of ladies, was rapidly sinking in 
consumption. The hour of dreadful gloom soon 
came, and he was left alone in the world without 
wife or child. 

When the terrible Rebellion burst forth which 
divided our country into two parties, and two 
only, Mr. Pierce remained steadfast in the prin- 
ciples which he had always cherished, and gave 
his sympathies to that pro-slavery part}- with 
which he had ever been allied. He declined to 
do anything, either by voice or pen, to strengthen 
the hand of the National Government. He con- 
tinued to reside in Concord until the time of his 
death, which occurred in October, 1869. He was 
one of the most genial and social of men, an hon- 
ored communicant of the Episcopal Church, and 
one of the kindest of neighbors. Generous to a 
fault, he contributed liberally toward the allevia- 
tion of suffering and want, and many of his 
towns-people were often gladdened by his material 
bounty. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSIIY Oh ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




a? 



z ^ZZ^ sZZ -Trie** (2st^h^^.^'7Z~^Cs7Z/? 



JAMES BUCHANAN. 



(TAMES BUCHANAN, the fifteenth President 
I of the United States, was born in a small 
G/ frontier town, at the foot of the eastern ridge 
of the Alleghanies, in Franklin County, Pa., on 
the 23d of April, 1791. The place where the 
humble cabin home stood was called Stony Bat- 
ter. His father was a native of the north of Ire- 
land, who had emigrated in 1783, with little prop- 
erty save his own strong arms. Five years after- 
ward he married Elizabeth Spear, the daughter 
of a respectable farmer, and, with his young bride, 
plunged into the wilderness, staked his claim, 
reared his log hut, opened a clearing with his 
axe, and settled down thereto perform his obscure 
part in the drama of life. When James was eight 
years of age, his father removed to the village of 
Mercersburg, where his son was placed at school, 
and commenced a course of study in English, 
Latin and Greek. His progress was rapid, and 
at the age of fourteen he entered Dickinson Col- 
lege, at Carlisle. Here he developed remarkable 
talent, and took his stand among the first scholars 
in the institution. 

In the year 1809, he graduated with the high- 
est honors of his class. He was then eighteen 
years of age; tall and graceful, vigorous in health, 
fond of athletic sports, an unerring shot, and en- 
livened with an exuberant flow of animal spirits, 
lie immediately commenced the study of law in 
the city of Lancaster, and was admitted to the 
Bar in 18 12, when he was but twenty-one years 
of age. 

In 1820, he reluctantly consented to run as a 
candidate for Congress. He was elected, and for 
ten years he remained a member of the Lower 
House. During the vacations of Congress, he 



occasionally tried some important case. In 1831 
he retired altogether from the toils of his profes- 
sion, having acquired an ample fortune. 

Gen. Jackson, upon his elevation to the Presi- 
dency, appointed Mr. Buchanan Minister to Rus- 
sia. The duties of his mission he performed 
with ability, and gave satisfaction to all parties. 
Upon his return, in 1833, he was elected to a seat 
in the United States Senate. He there met as 
his associates Webster, Clay, Wright and Cal- 
houn. He advocated the measures proposed by 
President Jackson, of making reprisals against 
France to enforce the payment of our claims 
against that country, and defended the course of 
the President in his unprecedented and wholesale 
removal from office of those who were not the 
supporters of his administration. Upon this 
question he was brought into direct collision with 
Henry Clay. He also, with voice and vote, ad- 
vocated expunging from the journal of the Senate 
the vote of censure against Gen. Jackson for re- 
moving the deposits. Earnestly he opposed the 
abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, 
and urged the prohibition of the circulation of 
anti-slavery documents by the United States 
mails. As to petitions on the subject of slavery, 
he advocated that they should be respectfully re- 
ceived, and that the reply should be returned 
that Congress had no power to legislate upon the 
subject. "Congress," said he, "might as well 
undertake to interfere with slavery under a for- 
eign government as in any of the States where it 
now exists. ' ' 

Upon Mr. Polk's accession to the Presidency, 
Mr. Buchanan became Secretary of State, and a9 
such took his share of the responsibility in the 



7* 



JAMES BUCHANAN. 



conduct of the Mexican War. Mr. Polk assumed 
that crossing the Nueces by the American 
troops into the disputed territory was not wrong, 
but for the Mexicans to cross the Rio Grande 
into Texas was a declaration of war. No candid 
man can read with pleasure the account of the 
course our Government pursued in that movement. 

Mr. Buchanan identified himself thoroughly 
with the party devoted to the perpetuation and 
extension of slavery, and brought all the energies 
of his mind to bear against the Wilmot Proviso. 
He gave his cordial approval to the compromise 
measures of 1850, which included the Fugitive 
Slave Law. Mr. Pierce, upon his election to the 
Presidency, honored Mr. Buchanan with the mis- 
sion to England. 

In the year 1856, a national Democratic Con- 
vention nominated Mr. Buchanan for the Presi- 
dency. The political conflict was one of the most 
severe in which our country has ever engaged. 
All the friends of slavery were on one side; all 
the advocates of its restriction and final abolition 
on the other. Mr. Fremont, the candidate of the 
enemies of slavery, received one hundred and 
fourteen electoral votes. Mr. Buchanan received 
one hundred and seventy-four, and was elected. 
The popular vote stood 1,340,618 for Fremont, 
1,224,750 for Buchanan. On March 4, 1857, 
the latter was inaugurated. 

Mr. Buchanan was far advanced in life. Only 
four years were wanting to fill up his three-score 
years and ten. His own friends, those with 
whom he had been allied in political principles 
and action for years, were seeking the destruc- 
tion of the Government, that they might rear 
upon the ruins of our free institutions a nation 
whose corner-stone should be human slavery. In 
this emergency, Mr. Buchanan was hopelessly 
bewildered. He could not, with his long-avowed 
principles, consistently oppose the State Rights 
party in their assumptions. As President of the 
United States, bound by his oath faithfully to 
administer the laws, he could not, without per- 
jury of the grossest kind, unite with those en- 
deavoring to overthrow the Republic. He there- 
fore did nothing. 

The opponents of Mr. Buchanan's administra- 



tion nominated Abraham Lincoln as their stand- 
ard-bearer in the next Presidential canvass. 
The pro-slavery party declared that if he were 
elected and the control of the Government were 
thus taken from their hands, they would secede 
from the Union, taking with them as they retired 
the National Capitol at Washington and the 
lion's share of the territory of the United States. 

As the storm increased in violence, the slave- 
holders claiming the right to secede, and Mr. 
Buchanan avowing that Congress had no power 
to prevent it, one of the most pitiable exhibitions 
of governmental imbecility was exhibited that the 
world has ever seen. He declared that Congress 
had no power to enforce its laws in any State 
which had withdrawn, or which was attempting 
to withdraw, from the Union. This was not the 
doctrine of Andrew Jackson, when, with his hand 
upon his sword-hilt, he exclaimed: "The Union 
must and shall be preserved!" 

South Carolina seceded in December, i860, 
nearly three months before the inauguration of 
President Lincoln. Mr. Buchanan looked on in 
listless despair. The rebel flag was raised in 
Charleston; Ft. Sumter was besieged; our forts, 
navy-yards and arsenals were seized; our depots 
of military stores were plundered, and our cus- 
tom-houses and post-offices were appropriated by 
the rebels. 

The energy of the rebels and the imbecility of 
our Executive were alike marvelous. The na- 
tion looked on in agony, waiting for the slow 
weeks to glide away and close the administration, 
so terrible in its weakness. At length the long- 
looked-for hour of deliverance came, when Abra- 
ham Lincoln was to receive the scepter. 

The administration of President Buchanan was 
certainly the most calamitous our country has ex- 
perienced. His best friends can not recall it with 
pleasure. And still more deplorable it is for his 
fame, that in that dreadful conflict which rolled 
its billows of flame and blood over our whole 
land, no word came from his lips to indicate his 
wish that our country's banner should triumph 
over the flag of the Rebellion. He died at his 
Wheatland retreat, June 1, 1868. 



LIPR'RY 
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Q ^//1&^<-'jr-fcl/ 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



61 BRAHAM LINCOLN, the sixteenth Presi- 
Ll dent of the United States, was born in Hardin 
/ I County, Ky., February 12, 1809. About 
the year 1780, a man by the name of Abraham 
Lincoln left Virginia with his family and moved 
into the then wilds of Kentucky. Only two years 
after this emigration, and while still a young man, 
he was working one day in a field, when an Indian 
stealthily approached and killed him. His widow 
was left in extreme poverty with five little chil- 
dren, three boys and two girls. Thomas, the 
youngest of the boys, and the father of President 
Abraham Lincoln, was four years of age at his 
father's death. 

When twenty-eight years old, Thomas Lincoln 
built a log cabin, and married Nancy Hanks, the 
daughter of another family of poor Kentucky- 
emigrants, who had also come from Virginia. 
Their second child was Abraham Lincoln, the sub- 
ject of this sketch. The mother of Abraham was 
a noble woman, gentle, loving, pensive, created 
to adorn a palace, but doomed to toil and pine, and 
die in a hovel. " All that I am, or hope to be,'' 
exclaimed the grateful son, " I owe to my angel- 
mother." When he was eight years ol age, his 
father sold his cabin and small farm and moved 
to Indiana, where two years later his mother died. 

As the years rolled on, the lot of this lowly 
family was the usual lot of humanity. There 
were joys and griefs, weddings and funerals. 
Abraham' s sister Sarah, to whom he was tenderly 
attached, was married when a child of but four- 
teen years of age, and soon died. The family 
was gradually scattered, and Thomas Lincoln 
sold out his squatter's claim in 1830, and emi- 
grated to Macon County, 111. 

Abraham Lincoln was then twenty-one years 
of age. With vigorous hands he aided his father 
in rearing another log cabin, and worked quite 
diligently at this until he saw the family com- 
fortably settled, and their small lot of enclosed 
prairie planted with corn, when he announced to 



his father his intention to leave home, and to go 
out into the world and seek his fortune. Little 
did he or his friends imagine how brilliant that 
fortune was to be. • He saw the value of educa- 
tion and was intensely earnest to improve his 
mind to the utmost of his power. Religion he 
revered. His morals were pure, and he was un- 
contaminated by a single vice. 

Young Abraham worked for a time as a hired 
laborer among the farmers. Then he went to 
Springfield, where he was employed in building 
a large flat-boat. In this he took a herd of swine, 
floated them down the Sangamon to Illinois, and 
thence by the Mississippi to New Orleans. What- 
ever Abraham Lincoln undertook, he performed 
so faithfully as to give great satisfaction to his 
employers. In this adventure the latter were 
so well pleased, that upon his return they placed 
a store and mill under his care. 

In 1832, at the outbreak of the Black Hawk 
War, he enlisted and was chosen Captain of a 
company. He returned to Sangamon County, 
and, although only twenty-three years of age, was 
a candidate for the Legislature, but was defeated. 
He soon after received from Andrew Jackson the 
appointment of Postmaster of New Salem. His 
only post-office *as his hat. All the letters he 
received he carried there, ready to deliver to those 
he chanced to meet. He studied surveying, and 
soon made this his business. In 1834 he again 
became a candidate for the Legislature and was 
elected. Mr. Stuart, of Springfield, advised him 
to study law. He walked from New Salem to 
Springfield, borrowed of Mr. Stuart a load of 
books, carried them back, and began his legal 
studies. When the Legislature .assembled, he 
trudged on foot with his pack on his back one 
hundred miles to Vandalia, then the capital. In 
1836 he was re-elected to the Legislature. Here 
it was he first met Stephen A. Douglas. In 1839 
he removed to Springfield and began the practice 
of law. His success with the jury was so great 



8o 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



that he was soon engaged in almost even- noted 
case in the circuit. 

In 1854 the great discussion began between Mr. 
Lincoln and Mr. Douglas on the slavery ques- 
tion. In the organization of the Republican party 
in Illinois, in 1856, he took an active part, and at 
once became one of the leaders in that party. 
Mr.' Lincoln's speeches in opposition to Senator 
Douglas in the contest in 1858 for a seat in the 
Senate, form a most notable part of his history. 
The issue was on the slavery- question, and he 
took the broad ground of the Declaration of In- 
dependence, that all men are created equal. Mr. 
Lincoln was defeated in this contest, but won a 
far higher prize. 

The great Republican Convention met at Chi- 
cago on the 1 6th of June, i860. The delegates 
and strangers who crowded the city amounted to 
twenty-five thousand. An immense building 
called " The Wigwam," was reared to accommo- 
date the convention. There were eleven candi- 
dates for whom votes were thrown. William H. 
Seward, a man whose fame as a statesman had 
long filled the land, was the most prominent. It 
was generally supposed he would be the nomi- 
nee. Abraham Lincoln, however, received the 
nomination on the third ballot. 

Election day came, and Mr. Lincoln received 
one hundred and eighty electoral votes out of two 
hundred and three cast, and was, therefore, con- 
stitutionally elected President of the United States. 
The tirade of abuse that was poured upon this 
good and merciful man, especially by the slave- 
holders, was greater than upon any other man 
ever elected to this high position. In February, 
1861, Mr. Lincoln started for Washington, stop- 
ping in all the large cities on his way, making 
speeches. The whole journey was fraught with 
much danger. Many of the Southern States had 
already seceded, and several attempts at assassi- 
nation were afterward brought to light. A gang 
in Baltimore had arranged upon his arrival to 
"get up a row," and in the confusion to make 
sure of his death with revolvers and hand-gren- 
ades. A detective unravelled the plot. A secret 
and special train was provided to take him from 
Harnsburg, through Baltimore, at an unexpected 



hour of the night. The train started at half-past 
ten, and to prevent any possible communication 
on the part of the Secessionists with their Con- 
federate gang in Baltimore, as soon as the train 
had started the telegraph-wires were cut. Mr. 
Lincoln reached Washington in safety and was 
inaugurated, although great anxiety was felt by 
all loyal people. 

In the selection of his cabinet Mr. Lincoln gave 
to Mr. .Seward the Department of State, and to 
other prominent opponents before the convention 
he gave important positions; but during no other 
administration had the duties devolving upon the 
President been so manifold, and the responsibilities 
so great, as those which fell to his lot. Knowing 
this, and feeling his own weakness and inability 
to meet, and in his own strength to cope with, 
the difficulties, he learned early to seek Divine 
wisdom and guidance in determining his plans, 
and Divine comfort in all his trials, both personal 
and national. Contrary to his own estimate of 
himself, Mr. Lincoln was one of the most cour- 
ageous of men. He went directly into the rebel 
capital just as the retreating foe was leaving, with 
no guard but a few sailors. From the time he 
had left Springfield, in 1861, however, plans had 
been made for his assassination, and he at last 
fell a victim to one of them. April 14, 1865, he, 
with Gen. Grant, was urgently invited to attend 
Ford's Theatre. It was announced that they 
would be present. Gen. Grant, however, left the 
city. President Lincoln, feeling, with his char- 
acteristic kindliness of heart, that it would be a 
disappointment if he should fail them, very re- 
luctantly consented to go. While listening to 
the play, an actor by the name of John Wilkes 
Booth entered the box where the President and 
family were seated, and fired a bullet into his 
brain. He died the next morning at seven 
o'clock. 

Never before in the history of the world was 
a nation plunged into such deep grief by the death 
of its ruler. Strong men met in the streets and 
wept in speechless anguish. His was a life which 
will fitly become a model. His name as the 
Savior of his country will live with that of Wash- 
ington's, its Father. 






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ANDREW JOHNSON. 



Gl NDREW JOHNSON, seventeenth President 
Lj of the United States. The early life of An- 
/ I drew Johnson contains but the record of pov- 
erty, destitution and friendlessness. He was born 
December 29, 1808, in Raleigh, N. C. His par- 
ents, belonging to the class of "poor whites" 
of the South, were in such circumstances that they 
could not confer even the slightest advantages of 
education upon their child. When Andrew was 
five years of age, his father accidentally lost his 
life, while heroically endeavoring to save a friend 
from drowning. Until ten years of age, Andrew 
was a ragged boy about the streets, supported by 
the labor of his mother, who obtained her living 
with her own hands. 

He then, having never attended a school one 
day, and being unable either to read or write, was 
apprenticed to a tailor in his native town. A gen- 
tleman was in the habit of going to the tailor's 
shcp occasionally, and reading to the boys at 
work there. He often read from the speeches of 
distinguished British statesmen. Andrew, who 
was endowed with a mind of more than ordinary 
ability, became much interested in these speeches; 
his ambition was roused, and he was inspired with 
a strong desire to learn to read. 

He accordingly applied himself to the alphabet, 
and with the assistance of some of his fellow- 
workmen learned his letters. He then called upon 
the gentleman to borrow the book of speeches. 
The owner, pleased with his zeal, not only gave 
him the book, but assisted him in learning to com- 
bine the letters into words. Under such difficul- 
ties he pressed onward laboriously, spending usu- 
ally ten or twelve hours at work in the shop, and 
then robbing himself of rest and recreation to de- 
vote such time as he could to reading. 

He went to Tennessee in 1826, and located at 



Greenville, where he married a young lady who 
possessed some education. Under her instructions 
he learned to write and cipher. He became 
prominent in the village debating society, and a 
favorite with the students of Greenville College. 
In 1828, he organized a working man's party, 
which elected him Alderman, and in 1830 elected 
him Mayor, which position he held three years. 

He now began to take a lively interest in 
political affairs, identifying himself with the work- 
ing-class, to which he belonged. In 1835, he 
was elected a member of the House of Represent- 
atives of Tennessee. He was then just twenty- 
seven years of age. He became a very active 
member of the Legislature, gave his support to 
the Democratic party, and in 1840 "stumped the 
State," advocating Martin Van Buren's claims to 
the Presidency, in opposition to those of Gen. 
Harrison. In this campaign he acquired much 
readiness as a speaker, and extended and increased 
his reputation. 

In 1841, he was elected State Senator; in 1843, 
he was elected a Member of Congress, and by suc- 
cessive elections held that important post for ten 
years. In 1853, he was elected Governor of Tenn- 
essee, and was re-elected in 1855. In all these 
responsible positions, he discharged his duties 
with distinguished ability, and proved himself the 
warm friend of the working classes. In 1857, Mr. 
Johnson was elected United States Senator. 

Years before, in 1845, he had warmly advocated 
the annexation of Texas, stating, however, as his 
reason, that he thought this annexation would 
probably prove ' 'to be the gateway out of which 
the sable sons of Africa are to pass from bondage 
to freedom, and become merged in a population 
congenial to themselves." In 1850, he also sup- 
ported the compromise measures, the two essen- 



ANDREW JOHNSON. 



tial features of which were, that the white people 
of the Territories should be permitted to decide 
for themselves whether they would enslave the 
colored people or not, and that the free States of 
the North should return to the South persons who 
attempted to escape from slaver y. 

Mr. Johnson was never ashamed of his lowly 
origin: on the contrary, he often took pride in 
avowing that he owed his distinction to his own 
exertions. "Sir," said he on the floor of the 
Senate, "I do not forget that I am a mechanic; 
neither do I forget that Adam was a tailor and 
sewed fig-leaves, and that our Savior was the son 
of a carpenter. ' ' 

In the Charleston-Baltimore convention of i860, 
he was the choice of the Tennessee Democrats for 
the Presidency. In 1861, when the purpose of 
the Southern Democracy became apparent, he took 
a decided stand in favor of the Union, and held 
that "slavery must be held subordinate to the 
Union at whatever cost. ' ' He returned to Tenn- 
essee, and repeatedly imperiled his own life to 
protect the Unionists of that State. Tennessee 
having seceded from the Union, President Lincoln, 
on March 4, 1862, appointed him Military Gov- 
ernor of the State, and he established the most 
stringent military rule. His numerous proclama- 
tions attracted wide attention. In 1864, he was 
elected Vice-President of the United States, and 
upon the death of Mr. Lincoln, April 15, 1865, 
became President. In a speech two days later he 
said, "The American people must be taught, if 
they do not already feel, that treason is a crime 
and must be punished ; that the Government will 
not always bear with its enemies; that it is strong 
not only to protect, but to punish. * * The 
people must understand that it (treason) is the 
blackest of crimes, and will surely be punished." 
Yet his whole administration, the history of which 
is so well known, was in utter inconsistency with, 
and in the most violent opposition to, the princi- 
ples laid down in that speech. 

In his loose policy of reconstruction and general 
amnesty, he was opposed by Congress, and he 
characterized Congress as a new rebellion, and 
lawlessly defied it in everything possible to the ut- 
most. In the beginning of 1868, on account of 



"High crimes and misdemeanors," the principal 
of which was the removal of Secretary Stanton in 
violation of the Tenure of Office Act, articles of 
impeachment were preferred against him, and the 
trial began March 23. 

It was very tedious, continuing for nearly three 
months. A test article of the impeachment was 
at length submitted to the court for its action. It 
was certain that as the court voted upon that ar- 
ticle so would it vote upon all. Thirty-four voices 
pronounced the President guilty. As a two-thirds 
vote was necessary to his condemnation, he was 
pronounced acquitted, notwithstanding the great 
majority against him. The change of one vote 
from the not guilty side would have sustained the 
impeachment. 

The President, for the remainder of his term, 
was but little regarded. He continued, though 
impotently, his conflict with Congress. His own 
party did not think it expedient to renominate 
him for the Presidency. The Nation rallied with 
enthusiasm, unparalleled since the days of Wash- 
ington, around the name of Gen. Grant. Andrew 
Johnson was forgotten. The bullet of the assassin 
introduced him to the President's chair. Not- 
withstanding this, never was there presented to a 
man a better opportunity to immortalize his name, 
and to win the gratitude of a nation. He failed 
utterly. He retired to his home in Greenville, 
Tenn., taking no very active part in politics until 
1875. On January 26, after an exciting struggle, 
he was chosen by the Legislature of Tennessee 
United States Senator in the Forty-fourth Congess, 
and took his seat in that body, at the special ses- 
sion convened by President Grant, on the 5th of 
March. On the 27th of July, 1875, the ex-Presi- 
dent made a visit to his daughter's home, near 
Carter Station, Tenn. When he started on his 
journey, he was apparently in his usual vigorous 
health, but on reaching the residence of his child 
the following day, he was stricken with paralysis, 
which rendered him unconscious. He rallied oc- 
casionally, but finally passed away at 2 A. M., 
July 31 , aged sixty-seven years. His funeral was 
held at Greenville, on the 3d of August, with 
every demonstration of respect. 



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ULYSSES S. GRANT. 



HLYSSES S. GRANT, the eighteenth Presi- 
dent of the United States, was born on the 
29th of April, 1822, of Christian parents, in 
a humble home at Point Pleasant, on the banks 
of the Ohio. Shortly after, his father moved to 
Georgetown, Brown County, Ohio. In this re- 
mote frontier hamlet, Ulysses received a common- 
school education. At the age of seventeen, in 
the year 1839, he entered the Military Academy 
at West Point. Here he was regarded as a solid, 
sensible young man, of fair ability, and of sturdy, 
honest character. He took respectable rank as a 
scholar. In June, 1843, he graduated about the 
middle in his class, and was sent as Lieutenant of 
Infantry to one of the distant military posts in the 
Missouri Territory. Two years he passed in these 
dreary solitudes, watching the vagabond Indians. 

The war with Mexico came. Lieut. Grant was 
sent with his regiment to Corpus Christi. His 
first battle was at Palo Alto. There was no 
chance here for the exhibition of either skill or 
heroism, nor at Resaca de la Palma, his second 
battle. At the battle of Monterey, his third en- 
gagement, it is said that he performed a signal 
sen-ice of daring and skillful horsemanship. 

At the close of the Mexican War, Capt. Grant 
returned with his regiment to New York, and 
was again sent to one of the military posts on the 
frontier. The discovery of gold in California 
causing an immense tide of emigration to flow to 
the Pacific shores, Capt. Grant was sent with a 
battalion to Ft. Dallas, in Oregon, for the protec- 
tion of the interests of the immigrants. But life 
was wearisome in those wilds, and he resigned 
his commission and returned to the States. Hav- 
ing married, he entered upon the cultivation of a 
small farm near St. Louis, Mo., but having little 



skill as a farmer, and finding his toil not re- 
munerative, he turned to mercantile life, entering 
into the leather business, with a younger brother 
at Galena, 111. This was in the year i860. As 
the tidings of the rebels firing on Ft. Sumter 
reached the ears of Capt. Grant in his counting- 
room, he said: "Uncle Sam has educated me 
for the army ; though I have served him through 
one war, I do not feel that I have yet repaid the 
debt. I am still ready to discharge my obliga- 
tions. I shall therefore buckle on my sword and 
see Uncle Sam through this war too." 

He went into the streets, raised a company of 
volunteers, and led them as their Captain to 
Springfield, the capital of the State, where their 
services were offered to Gov. Yates. The Gov- 
ernor, impressed by the zeal and straightforward 
executive abilitj- of Capt. Grant, gave him a desk 
in his office to assist in the volunteer organiza- 
tion that was being formed in the State in behalf 
of the Government. On the 15th of June, 1861, 
Capt. Grant received a commission as Colonel of 
the Twenty-first Regiment of Illinois Volunteers. 
His merits as a West Point graduate, who had 
served for fifteen years in the regular army, were 
such that he was soon promoted to the rank of 
Brigadier-General, and was placed in command at 
Cairo. The rebels raised their banner at Padu- 
cah, near the mouth of the Tennessee River. 
Scarcely had its folds appeared in the breeze ere 
Gen. Grant was there. The rebels fled, their 
banner fell, and the Stars and Stripes were un- 
furled in its stead. 

He entered the service with great determina- 
tion and immediately began active duty. This 
was the beginning, and until the surrender of 
Lee at Richmond he was ever pushing the enemy 



ULYSSES S. GRANT. 



with great vigor and effectiveness. At Belmont, 
a few days later, he surprised and routed the 
rebels, then at Ft. Henry won another victory. 
Then came the brilliant fight at Ft. Donelson. 
The nation was electrified by the victory, and the 
brave leader of the boys in blue was immediately 
made a Major-General, and the military district 
of Tennessee was assigned to him. 

Like all great captains, Gen. Grant knew well 
how to secure the results of victory. He imme- 
diately pushed on to the enemies' lines. Then 
came the terrible battles of Pittsburg Landing, 
Corinth, and the siege of Vicksburg, where Gen. 
Pemberton made an unconditional surrender of 
the city with over thirty thousand men and one 
hundred and seventy-two cannon. The fall of 
Vicksburg was by far the most severe blow which 
the rebels had thus far encountered, and opened 
up the Mississippi from Cairo to the Gulf. 

Gen. Grant was next ordered to co-operate with 
Gen. Banks in a movement upon Texas, and pro- 
ceeded to New Orleans, where he was thrown 
from his horse, and received severe injuries, from 
which he was laid up for months. He then 
rushed to the aid of Gens. Rosecrans and Thomas 
at Chattanooga, and by a wonderful series of 
strategic and technical measures put the Union 
army in fighting condition. Then followed the 
bloody battles at Chattanooga, Lookout Moun- 
tain and Missionary Ridge, in which the rebels 
were routed with great loss. This won for him 
unbounded praise in the North. On the 4th of 
February, 1864, Congress revived the grade of 
lieutenant-general, and the rank was conferred 
on Gen. Grant. He repaired to Washington to 
receive his credentials and enter upon the duties 
of his new office. 

Gen. Grant decided as soon as he took charge 
of the army to concentrate the widely-dispersed 
National troops for an attack upon Richmond, 
the nominal capital of the rebellion, and endeavor 
there to destroy the rebel armies which would be 
promptly assembled from all quarters for its de- 
fense. The whole continent seemed to tremble 
under the tramp of these majestic armies, rushing 
to the decisive battle-field. Steamers were crowd- 
ed with troops. Railway trains were burdened 



with closely-packed thousands. His plans were 
comprehensive, and involved a series of cam- 
paigns, which were executed with remarkable 
energy and ability, and were consummated at the 
surrender of Lee, April 9, 1865. 

The war was ended. The Union was saved. 
The almost unanimous voice of the nation de- 
clared Gen. Grant to be the most prominent in- 
strument in its salvation. The eminent services 
he had thus rendered the country brought him 
conspicuously forward as the Republican candi- 
date for the Presidential chair. 

At the Republican Convention held at Chicago, 
May 21, 1868, he was unanimously nominated 
for the Presidency, and at the autumn election 
received a majority of the popular vote, and two 
hundred and fourteen out of two hundred and 
ninety-four electoral votes. 

The National Convention of the Republican 
party, which met at Philadelphia on the 5th 01 
June, 1872, placed Gen. Grant in nomination for 
a second term by a unanimous vote. The selec- 
tion was emphatically indorsed by the people five 
months later, two hundred and ninety-two elect- 
oral votes being cast for him. 

Soon after the close of his second term, Gen. 
Grant started upon his famous trip around the 
world. He visited almost every country of the 
civilized world, and was everywhere received 
with such ovations and demonstrations of respect 
and honor, private as well as public and official, 
as were never before bestowed upon any citizen 
of the United States. 

He was the most prominent candidate before 
the Republican National Convention in 1880 for 
a renomination for President. He went to New 
York and embarked in the brokerage business 
under the firm name of Grant & Ward. The 
latter proved a villain, wrecked Grant's fortune, 
and for larceny was sent to the penitentiary. 
The General was attacked with cancer in the 
throat, but suffered in his stoic-like manner, never 
complaining. He was re-instated as General of 
the Army, and retired by Congress. The cancer 
soon finished its deadly work, and July 23, 1885, 
the nation went in mourning over the death 01 
the illustrious General. 



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RUTHERFORD B. HAYES. 



RUTHERFORD B. HAYES, the nineteenth 
President of the United States, was born in 
Delaware, Ohio, October 4, 1S22, almost 
three months after the death of his father, Ruther- 
ford Hayes. His ancestry on both the paternal and 
maternal sides was of the most honorable char- 
acter. It can be traced, it is said, as far back as 
1280, when Hayes and Rutherford were two 
Scottish chieftains, fighting side by side with 
Baliol, William Wallace and Robert Bruce. Both 
families belonged to the nobility, owned extensive 
estates, and had a large following. Misfortune 
overtaking the family, George Hayes left Scotland 
in 1680, and settled in Windsor, Conn. His son 
George was born in Windsor, and remained there 
during his life. Daniel Hayes, son of the latter, 
married Sarah L,ee, and lived from the time of 
his marriage until his death in Simsbury, Conn. 
Ezekiel, son of Daniel, was bom in 1724, and was 
a manufacturer of scythes at Bradford, Conn. 
Rutherford Hayes, son of Ezekiel and grandfather 
of President Hayes, was born in New Haven, in 
August, 1756. He was a farmer, blacksmith and 
tavern-keeper. He emigrated to Vermont at an 
unknown date, settling in Brattleboro, where he 
established a hotel. Here his son, Rutherford 
Hayes, the father of President Hayes, was born. 
He was married, in September, 1813, to Sophia 
Birchard, of Wilmington, Vt., whose ancestors 
emigrated thither from Connecticut, they having 
been among the wealthiest and best families of 
Norwich. Her ancestry on the male side is 
traced back to 1635, to John Birchard, one of the 
principal founders of Norwich. Both of her grand- 
fathers were soldiers in the Revolutionary War. 

The father of President Hayes was an industri- 
ous, frugal, yet open-hearted man. He was of a 



mechanical turn of mind, and could mend a plow, 
knit a stocking, or do almost anything else that 
he chose to undertake. He was a member of the 
church, active in all the benevolent enterprises 
'of the town, and conducted his business on Chris- 
tian principles. After the close of the War of 
1S12, for reasons inexplicable to his neighbors, he 
resolved to emigrate to Ohio. 

The journey from Vermont to Ohio in that day, 
when there were no canals, steamers, or rail- 
ways, was a very serious affair. A tour of in- 
spection was first made, occupying four months. 
Mr. Hayes decided to move to Delaware, where 
the family arrived in 181 7. He died July 22, 
1822, a victim of malarial fever, less than three 
months before the birth of the son of whom we 
write. Mrs. Hayes, in her sore bereavement, 
found the support she so much needed in her 
brother Sardis, who had been a member of the 
household from the day of its departure from 
Vermont, and in an orphan girl, whom she had 
adopted some time before as an act of charity. 

Rutherford was seven years old before he went 
to school. His education, however, was not neg- 
lected. He probably learned as much from his 
mother, and sister as he would have done at 
school. His sports were almost wholly within 
doors, his playmates being his sister and her asso- 
ciates. These circumstances tended, no doubt, to 
foster that gentleness of disposition and that del- 
icate consideration for the feelings of others which 
were marked traits of his character. 

His uncle, Sardis Birchard, took the deepest 
interest in his education; and as the boy's health 
had improved, and he was making good progress 
in his studies, he proposed to send him to college. 
His preparation commenced with a tutor at home; 



92 



RUTHERFORD B. HAYES. 



but he was afterwards sent for one year to a pro- 
fessor in the Wesleyan University in Middletown, 
Conn. He entered Kenyon College in 1838, at 
the age of sixteen, and was graduated at the head 
of his class in 1842. 

Immediately after his graduation he began the 
study of law in the office of Thomas Sparrow, 
Esq., in Columbus. Finding his opportunities 
for study in Columbus somewhat limited, he de- 
termined to enter the Law School at Cambridge, 
Mass., where he remained two years. 

In 1845, after graduating at the Law School, he 
was admitted to the Bar at Marietta, Ohio, and 
shortly afterward went into practice as an at- 
torney-at-law with Ralph P. Buckland, of Fre- 
mont. Here he remained three years, acquiring 
but a limited practice, and apparently unambitious 
of distinction in his profession. 

In 1849 he moved to Cincinnati, where his am- 
bition found a new stimulus. For several years, 
however, his progress was slow. Two events 
occurring at this period had a powerful influence 
upon his subsequent life. One of these was his 
marriage with Miss Lucy Ware Webb, daughter 
of Dr. James Webb, of Chillicothe; the other was 
his introduction to the Cincinnati Literary Club, 
a body embracing among its members such men 
as Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase, Gen. John 
Pope, Gov. Edward F. Noyes, and many others 
hardly less distinguished in after life. The mar- 
riage was a fortunate one in every respect, as 
everybody knows. Not one of all the wives of 
our Presidents was more universally admired, 
reverenced and beloved than was Mrs. Hayes, and 
no one did more than she to reflect honor upon 
American womanhood. The Literary Club brought 
Mr. Hayes into constant association with young 
men of high character and noble aims, and lured 
him to display the qualities so long hidden by his 
bashfulness and modesty. 

In 1856 he was nominated to the office of Judge 
of the Court of Common Pleas, but he declined to 
accept the nomination. Two years later, the of- 
fice of City Solicitor becoming vacant, the City 
Council elected him for the unexpired term. 

In 1861, when the Rebellion broke out, he was 
at the zenith of his professional life. His rank at 



the Bar was among the first. But the news of 
the attack on Ft. Sumter found him eager to 
take up arms for the defense of his country. 

His military record was bright and illustrious. 
In October, 1861, he was made Lieutenant- Colo- 
nel, and in August, 1862, promoted Colonel of 
the Seventy-ninth Ohio Regiment, but he refused 
to leave his old comrades and go among strangers. 
Subsequently, however, he was made Colonel of 
his old regiment. At the battle of South Moun- 
tain he received a wound, and while faint and 
bleeding displayed courage and fortitude that 
won admiration from all. 

Col. Hayes was detached from his regiment, 
after his recovery, to act as Brigadier-General, 
and placed in command of the celebrated Kanawha 
division, and for gallant and meritorious services 
in the battles of Winchester, Fisher's Hill and 
Cedar Creek, he was promoted Brigadier-General. 
He was also breveted Major- General, "for gallant 
and distinguished services during the campaigns 
of 1864, in West Virginia." In the course of his 
arduous services, four horses were shot from un- 
der him, and he was wounded four times. 

In 1864, Gen. Hayes was elected to Congress 
from the Second Ohio District, which had long 
been Democratic. He was not present during the 
campaign, and after the election was importuned 
to resign his commission in the arm}-; but he fi- 
nally declared, " I shall never come to Washing- 
ton until I can come by way of Richmond." He 
was re-elected in 1866. 

In 1867, Gen. Hayes was elected Governor of 
Ohio, over Hon. Allen G. Thurman, a popular 
Democrat, and in 1869 was re-elected over George 
H. Pendleton. He was elected Governor for the 
third term in 1875. 

In 1876 he was the standard-bearer of the Re- 
publican party in the Presidential contest, and 
after a hard, long contest was chosen President, 
and was inaugurated Monday, March 5, 1877. 
He served his full term, not, however, with satis- 
faction to his party, but his administration was an 
average one. The remaining years of his life 
were passed quietly in his Ohio home, where he 
passed away January 17, 1893. 



URR'.RY 

UNIVLRSIIV Uh ILLINOIS 

URBAAIA 




(^/^-r^fC^j 



JAMES A. GARFIELD. 



(JAMES A. GARFIELD, twentieth President 
I of the United States, was born November 19, 
(2/ 183 1, in the woods of Orange, Cuyahoga 
County, Ohio. His parents were Abram and 
Eliza (Balloui Garfield, both of New England 
ancestry, and from families well known in the 
early history of that section of our country, but 
who had moved to the Western Reserve, in Ohio, 
early in its settlement. 

The house in which James A. was born was 
not unlike the houses of poor Ohio farmers of 
that day. It was about 20 x 30 feet, built of logs, 
with the spaces between the logs filled with clay. 
His father was a hard-working farmer, and he 
soon had his fields cleared, an orchard planted, 
and a log barn built. The household comprised 
the father and mother and their four children, 
Mehetabel, Thomas, Mar} - and James. In May, 
1823, the father died from a cold contracted in 
helping to put out a forest fire. At this time 
James was about eighteen months old, and 
Thomas about ten years old. No one, perhaps, 
can tell how much James was indebted to his 
brother's toil and self-sacrifice during the twenty 
years succeeding his father's death. He now 
lives in Michigan, and the two sisters live in Solon, 
Ohio, near their birthplace. 

The early educational advantages young Gar- 
field enjoyed were very limited, yet he made the 
most of them. He labored at farm work for 
others, did carpenter work, chopped wood, or did 
anything that would bring in a few dollars to aid 
his widowed mother in her struggles to keep the 
little family together. Nor was Gen. Garfield 
ever ashamed of his origin, and he never forgot 
the friends of his struggling childhood, youth and 
manhood; neither did they ever forget him. 
When in the highest seats of honor, the humblest 
friend of his boyhood was as kindly greeted as 
ever. The poorest laborer was sure of the sym- 
pathy of one who had known all the bitterness of 



want and the sweetness of bread earned by the 
sweat of the brow. He was ever the simple, 
plain, modest gentleman. 

The highest ambition of young Garfield until 
he was about sixteen years old was to be cap- 
tain of a vessel on Lake Erie. He was anxious 
to go aboard a vessel, but this his mother strongly 
opposed. She finally consented to his going to 
Cleveland, with the understanding, however, that 
he should try to obtain some other kind of em- 
ployment. He walked all the way to Cleveland. 
This was his first visit to the city. After making 
many applications for work, and trying to get 
aboard a lake vessel and not meeting with suc- 
cess, he engaged as a driver for his cousin, Amos 
Letcher, on the Ohio & Pennsylvania Canal. 
He remained at this work but a short time, when 
he went home, and attended the seminar}- at 
Chester for about three years. He then entered 
Hiram and the Eclectic Institute, teaching a few 
terms of school in the meantime, and doing other 
work. This school was started by the Disciples 
of Christ in 1850, of which body he was then a 
member. He became janitor and bell-ringer in 
order to help pay his way. He then became both 
teacher and pupil. Soon " exhausting Hiram," 
and needing a higher education, in the fall of 1854 
he entered Williams College, from which he grad- 
uated in 1856, taking one of the highest honors of 
his class. He afterwards returned to Hiram Col- 
lege as its President. As above stated, he early 
united with the Christian, or Disciples, Church at 
Hiram, and was ever after a devoted, zealous 
member, often preaching in its pulpit and places 
where he happened to be. 

Mr. Garfield was united in marriage, Novem- 
ber 11, 1858, with Miss Lucretia Rudolph, who 
proved herself worthy as the wife of one whom 
all the world loved. To them were born seven 
children, five of whom are still living, four boys 
and one girl. 



9 6 



JAMES A. GARFIELD. 



Mr. Garfield made his first political speeches in 
1856, in Hiram and the neighboring villages, and 
three years later he began to speak at county 
mass-meetings, and became the favorite speaker 
wherever he was. During this year he was 
elected to the Ohio Senate. He also began to 
study law at Cleveland, and in 1861 was admitted 
to the Bar. The great Rebellion broke out in the 
early part of this year, and Mr. Garfield at once 
resolved to fight as he had talked, and enlisted to 
defend the Old Flag. He received his commission 
as Lieutenant- Colonel of the Forty-second Regi- 
ment of Ohio Infantry August 14, 1861. He 
was immediately put into active service, and be- 
fore he had ever seen a gun fired in action, was 
placed in command of four regiments of infantry 
and eight companies of cavalry, charged with the 
work of driving out of his native State the able 
rebel officer, Humphrey Marshall, of Kentucky. 
This work was bravely and speedily accomplished, 
although against great odds, and President Lin- 
coln commissioned him Brigadier-General, Janu- 
ary 10, 1862; and "as he had been the youngest 
man in the Ohio Senate two years before, so now 
he was the youngest General in the army." He 
was with Gen. Buell's army at Shiloh, in its 
operations around Corinth and its march through 
Alabama. He was then detailed as a member of 
the general court martial for the trial of Gen. 
Fitz-John Porter. He was next ordered to re- 
port to Gen. Rosecrans, and was assigned to the 
' ' Chief of Staff. ' ' The military history of Gen. 
Garfield closed with his brilliant services at Chick- 
amauga, where he won the rank of Major-General. 

Without an effort on his part, Gen. Garfield 
was elected to Congress in the fall of 1862, from 
the Nineteenth District of Ohio. This section of 
Ohio had been represented in Congress for sixty 
years mainly by two men — Elisha Whittlesey and 
Joshua R. Giddings. It was not without a strug- 
gle that he resigned his place in the army. At 
the time he entered Congress he was the youngest 
member in that body. There he remained by 
successive re-elections until he was elected Presi- 
dent, in 1880. Of his labors in Congress, Senator 
Hoar says: "Since the year 1864 you cannot 
think of a question which has been debated in 



Congress, or discussed before a tribunal of the 
American people, ip regard to which you will not 
find, if you wish instruction, the argument on 
one side stated, in almost every instance better 
than by anybody else, in some speech made in 
the House of Representatives or on the hustings 
by Mr. Garfield." 

Upon January 14, 1880, Gen. Garfield was elect- 
ed to the United States Senate, and on the 8th of 
June, of the same year, was nominated as the 
candidate of his party for President at the great 
Chicago Convention. He was elected in the fol- 
lowing November, and on March 4, 1881, was 
inaugurated. Probably no administration ever 
opened its existence under brighter auspices than 
that of President Garfield, and every day it grew 
in favor with the people. By the 1st of July 
he had completed all the initiatory and prelimi- 
nary work of his administration, and was prepar- 
ing to leave the city to meet his friends at Will- 
iams College. While on his way and at the 
depot, in company with Secretary Blaine, a man 
stepped behind him, drew a revolver, and fired 
directly at his back. The President tottered and 
fell, and as he did so the assassin fired a second 
shot, the bullet cutting the left coat sleeve of his 
victim, but inflicting no further injury. It has 
been very truthfully said that this was ' ' the shot 
that was heard around the world." Never before 
in the history of the nation had anything occur- 
red which so nearly froze the blood of the people 
for the moment as this awful deed. He was 
smitten on the brightest, gladdest day of all his 
life, at the summit of his power and hope. For 
eighty days, all during the hot months of July 
and August, he lingered and suffered. He, how- 
ever, remained master of himself till the last, and 
by his magnificent bearing taught the country 
and the world one of the noblest of human les- 
sons — how to live grandly in the very clutch of 
death. Great in life, he was surpassingly great 
in death. He passed serenely away September 
19, 1883, at Elberon, N. J., on the very bank of 
the ocean, where he had been taken shortly be- 
fore. The world wept at his death, as it rarely 
ever had done on the death of any other great 
and noble man. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



CHESTER A. ARTHUR. 



E HESTER A. ARTHUR, twenty-first Presi- 
dent of the United States, was born in Frank- 
lin County, Vt., on the 5th day of October, 
1830. and was the eldest of a family of two sons 
and five daughters. His father was the Rev. Dr. 
William Arthur, a Baptist clergyman, who emi- 
grated to this country from County Antrim, Ire- 
land, in his eighteenth year, and died in 1875, in 
Newtonville, near Albany, after a long and suc- 
cessful ministry. 

Young Arthur was educated at Union College, 
Schenectady, where he excelled in all his studies. 
After his graduation he taught school in Ver- 
mont for two years, and at the expiration of that 
time came to New York, with $500 in his pocket, 
and entered the office of ex-Judge E. D. Culver 
as a student. After being admitted to the Bar, he 
formed a partnership with his intimate friend and 
room-mate, Henry D. Gardiner, with the inten- 
tion of practicing in the West, and for three 
months they roamed about in the Western States 
in search of an eligible site, but in the end re- 
turned to New York, where they hung out their 
shingle, and entered upon a successful career al- 
most from the start. Gen. Arthur soon after mar- 
ried the daughter of Lieut. Herndon, of the 
United States Navy, who was lost at sea. Con- 
gress voted a gold medal to his widow in recog- 
nition of the bravery he displayed on that occa- 
sion. Mrs. Arthur died shortly before Mr. 
Arthur's nomination to the Vice-Presidency, leav- 
ing two children. 

Gen. Arthur obtained considerable legal celeb- 
rity in his first great case, the famous Lemmon 
suit, brought to recover possession of eight slaves 
who had been declared free by Judge Paine, of 
the Superior Court of New York City. It was in 



1852 that Jonathan Lemmon, of Virginia, went to 
New York with his slaves, intending to ship them 
to Texas, when they were discovered and freed. 
The Judge decided that they could not be held by 
the owner under the Fugitive Slave Law. A howl 
of rage went up from the South, and the Virginia 
Legislature authorized the Attorney-General of 
that State to assist in an appeal. William M. 
Evarts and Chester A. Arthur were employed to 
represent the people, and they won their case, 
which then went to the Supreme Court of the 
United States. Charles O' Conor here espoused 
the cause of the slaveholders, but he, too, was 
beaten by Messrs. Evarts and Arthur, and a long 
step was taken toward the emancipation of the 
black race. 

Another great sen-ice was rendered by Gen. 
Arthur in the same cause in 1856. Lizzie Jen- 
nings, a respectable colored woman, was put off 
a Fourth Avenue car with violence after she had 
paid her fare. Gen. Arthur sued on her behalf, 
and secured a verdict of $500 damages. The next 
day the company issued an order to admit colored 
persons to ride on their cars, and the other car 
companies quickly followed their example. Be- 
fore that the Sixth Avenue Company ran a few 
special cars for colored persons, and the other lines 
refused to let them ride at all. 

Gen. Arthur was a delegate to the convention 
at Saratoga that founded the Republican party. 
Previous to the war he was Judge-Advocate of 
the Second Brigade of the State of New York, 
and Gov. Morgan, of that State, appointed him 
Engineer-in-Chief of his staff. In 1861, he was 
made Inspector-General, and soon afterward be- 
came Quartermaster-General. In each of these 
offices he rendered great service to the Govern- 



CHESTER A. ARTHUR. 



ment during the war. At the end of Gov. Mor- 
gan's term he resumed the practice of law, form- 
ing a partnership with Mr. Ransom, and then 
Mr. Phelps, the District Attorney of New York, 
was added to the firm. The legal practice of this 
well-known firm was very large and lucrative, 
as each of the gentlemen composing it was an able 
lawyer, and possessed a splendid local reputa- 
tion, if not, indeed, one of national extent. 

Mr. Arthur always took a leading part in State 
and city politics. He was appointed Collector of 
the Port of New York by President Grant, No- 
vember 21, 1S72, to succeed Thomas Murphy, 
and he held the office until July 20, 1878, when 
he was succeeded by Collector Merritt. 

Mr. Arthur was nominated on the Presidential 
ticket, with Gen. James A. Garfield, at the 
famous National Republican Convention held at 
Chicago in June, 18S0. This was perhaps the 
greatest political convention that ever assembled 
on the continent. It was composed of the lead- 
ing politicians of the Republican party, all able 
men, and each stood firm and fought vigorously 
and with signal tenacity for his respective can- 
didate that was before the convention for the 
nomination. Finally Gen. Garfield received the 
nomination for President, and Gen. Arthur for 
Vice-President. The campaign which followed 
was one of the most animated known in the his- 
tory of our country. Gen. Hancock, the stand- 
ard-bearer of the Democratic party, was a popular 
man, and his party made a valiant fight for his 
election. 

Finally the election came, and the country's 
choice was Garfield and Arthur. They were in- 
augurated March 4, 188 1, as President and Vice- 
President. A few months only had passed ere 
the newly-chosen President was the victim of the 
assassin's bullet. Then came terrible weeks of 
suffering — those moments of anxious suspense, 
when the hearts of all civilized nations were 
throbbing in unison, longing for the recovery of 
the noble, the good President. The remarkable 
patience that he manifested during those hours 
and weeks, and even months, of the most terrible 
suffering man has ever been called upon to en- 
dure, was seemingly more than human. It was 



certainly godlike. During all this period of 
deepest anxiety Mr. Arthur's every move was 
watched, and, be it said to his credit, that his every 
action displayed only an earnest desire that the 
suffering Garfield might recover to serve the re- 
mainder of the term he had so auspiciously be- 
gun. Not a selfish feeling was manifested in 
deed or look of this man, even though the most 
honored position in the world was at any moment 
likely to fall to him. 

At last God in his mercy relieved President 
Garfield from further suffering, and the world, as 
never before in its history over the death of any 
other man, wept at his bier. Then it became the 
duty of the Vice-President to assume the respon- 
sibilities of the high office, and he took the oath 
in New York, September 20, 188 1. The position 
was an embarrassing one to him, made doubly so 
from the fact that all eyes were on him, anxious 
to know what he would do, what policy he would 
pursue, and whom he would select as advisers. 
The duties of the office had been greatly neglected 
during the President' s long illness, and many im- 
portant measures were to be immediately decided 
by him ; and to still further embarass him he did 
not fail to realize under what circumstances he 
became President, and knew the feelings of many 
on this point. Under these trying circumstances, 
President Arthur took the reins of the Govern- 
ment in his own hands, and, as embarrassing as 
was the condition of affairs, he happily surprised 
the nation, acting so wisely that but few criticized 
his administration. He served the nation well 
and faithfully until the close of his administra- 
tion, March 4, 1885, and was a popular candidate 
before his part}- for a second term. His name 
was ably presented before the convention at Chi- 
cago, and was received with great favor, and 
doubtless but for the personal popularity of one 
of the opposing candidates, he would have been 
selected as the standard-bearer of his party for 
another campaign. He retired to private life, car- 
rying with him the best wishes of the American 
people, whom he had served in a manner satisfac- 
tory to them and with credit to himself. One 
year later he was called to his final rest. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSIIYOF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




^_^„ 



*» 



STEPHEN GROVER CLEVELAND. 



(Stephen grover Cleveland, the 

•\ twenty -second President of the United States, 
\~) was born in 1837. in the obscure town of 
Caldwell, Essex County, N. J., and in a little 
two-aud-a-half-story white house, which is still 
standing to characteristically mark the humble 
birthplace of one of America's great men, in 
striking contrast with the Old World, where all 
men high in office must be high in origin and 
born in the cradle of wealth. When the subject 
of this sketch was three years of age, his father, 
who was a Presbyterian minister with a large 
family and a small salary, moved, by way of the 
Hudson River and Erie Canal, to Fayetteville, N. 
Y., in search of an increased income and a larger 
field of work. Fayetteville was then the most 
straggling of country villages, about five miles 
from Pompey Hill, where Governor Seymour 
was born. 

At the last-mentioned place young Grover com- 
menced going to school in the good, old-fashioned 
way, and presumably distinguished himself after 
the manner of all village boys — in doing the 
things he ought not to do. Such is the dis- 
tinguishing trait of all geniuses and independent 
thinkers. When he arrived at the age of four- 
teen years, he had outgrown the capacity of the 
village school, and expressed a most emphatic de- 
sire to be sent to an academy. To this his fa- 
ther decidedly objected. Academies in those 
days cost money; besides, his father wanted him 
to become self-supporting by the quickest pos- 
sible means, and this at that time in Fayetteville 
seemed to be a position in a country store, where 
his father and the large family on his hands had 



considerable influence. Grover was to be paid 
$50 for his services the first year, and if he proved 
trustworthy he was to receive $100 the second 
year. Here the lad commenced his career as 
salesman, and in two years he had earned so good 
a reputation for trustworthiness that his employ- 
ers desired to retain him for an indefinite length 
of time. 

But instead of remaining with this firm in 
Fayetteville, he went with the family in their re- 
moval to Clinton, where he had an opportunity 
of attending a High School. Here he industri- 
ously pursued his studies until the family re- 
moved with him to a point on Black River known 
as the "Holland Patent," a village of five or six 
hundred people, fifteen miles north of Utica, N. Y. 
At this place his father died, after preaching but 
three Sundays. This event broke up the family, 
and Grover set out for New York City to accept, 
at a small salary, the position of under-teacher 
in an asylum for the blind. He taught faithfully 
for two years, and although he obtained a good 
reputation in this capacity, he concluded that 
teaching was not his calling in life, and, revers- 
ing the traditional order, he left the city to seek 
his fortune, instead of going to the city. He first 
thought of Cleveland, Ohio, as there was some 
charm in that name for him; but before proceed- 
ing to that place he went to Buffalo to ask advice 
of his uncle, Lewis F. Allan, a noted stock- 
breeder of that place. The latter did not speak 
enthusiastically. "What is it you want to do, 
my boy?" he asked. "Well, sir, I want to study 
law," was the reply "Good gracious!" remarked 
the old gentleman; " do you, indeed? Whatever 



104 



STEPHEN GROVER CLEVELAND. 



put that into your head ? How much money 
have you got?" "Well, sir, to tell the truth, I 
haven't got any.'' 

After a long consultation, his uncle offered him 
a place temporarily as assistant herd-keeper, at 
$50 a year, while he could look around. One 
day soon afterward he boldly walked into the of- 
fice of Rogers, Bowen & Rogers, of Buffalo, and 
told them what he wanted. A number of young 
men were already engaged in the office, but Gra- 
ver's persistency won, and he was finally per- 
mitted to come as an office boy and have the use 
of the law library, receiving as wages the sum of 
$3 or $4 a week. Out of this he had to pay for his 
board and washing. The walk to and from his 
uncle's was a long and rugged one; and although 
the first winter was a memorably severe one, his 
shoes were out of repair, and as for his overcoat he 
had none; yet he was, nevertheless, prompt and 
regular. On the first day of his service there, his 
senior employer threw down a copy of Black- 
stone before him, with a bang that made the dust 
fly, saying "That's where they all begin." A 
titter ran around the little circle of clerks and 
students, as they thought that was enough to 
scare young Graver out of his plans; but in due 
time he mastered that cumbersome volume. 
Then, as ever afterward, however, Mr. Cleve- 
land exhibited a talent for executiveiiess rather 
than for chasing principles through all their 
metaphysical possibilities. "Let us quit talking 
and go and do it," was practically his motto. 

The first public office to which Mr. Cleveland 
was elected was that of Sheriff of Erie County, 
X. V., in which Buffalo is situated; and in such 
capacity it fell to his duty to inflict capital punish- 
ment upon two criminals. In 1881 he was 
elected Mayor of the City of Buffalo, on the 
Democratic ticket, with especial reference to bring- 
ing about certain reforms in the administration 
of the municipal affairs of that city. In this of- 
fice, as well as in that of Sheriff, his performance 
of duty has generally been considered fair, with 
possibly a few exceptions, which were ferreted 
out and magnified during his Presidential cam- 
paign. As a specimen of his plain language in 
a veto message, we quote from one vetoing an 



iniquitous street-cleaning contract: "This is a 
time for plain speech, and my objection to your 
action shall be plainly stated. I regard it as the 
culmination of a most bare-faced, impudent and 
shameless scheme to betray the interests of the 
people and to worse than squander the people's 
money." The New York S101 afterward very 
highly commended Mr. Cleveland's administra- 
tion as Mayor of Buffalo, and thereupon recom- 
mended him for Governor of the Empire State. 
To the latter office he was elected in 1882, and 
his administration of the affairs of State was 
generally satisfactory. The mistakes he made, 
if any, were made very public throughout the na- 
tion after he was nominated for President of the 
United States. For this high office he was 
nominated July 11, 18S4, by the National Demo- 
cratic Convention at Chicago, when other com- 
petitors were Thomas F. Bayard, Roswell P. 
Flower, Thomas A. Hendricks, Benjamin F. 
Butler, Allen G. Thurman, etc. ; and he was 
elected by the people, by a majority of about a 
thousand, over the brilliant and long-tried Re- 
publican statesman, James G. Blaine. President 
Cleveland resigned his office as Governor of New 
York in January, 1885, in order to prepare for 
his duties as the Chief Executive of the United 
States, in which capacity his term commenced at 
noon on the 4th of March, 1S85. 

The silver question precipitated a controversy 
between those who were in favor of the continu- 
ance of silver coinage and those who were op- 
posed, Mr. Cleveland answering for the latter, 
even before his inauguration. 

On June 2, 1886, President Cleveland married 
Frances, daughter of his deceased friend and part- 
ner, Oscar Folsom, of the Buffalo Bar. Their 
union has been blessed by the birth of two daugh- 
ters. In the campaign of 1888, President Cleve- 
land was renominated by his party, but the 
Republican candidate, Gen. Benjamin Harrison, 
was victorious. In the nominations of 1892 
these two candidates for the highest position in 
the gift of the people were again pitted against 
each other, and in the ensuing election President 
Cleveland was victorious by an overwhelming 
majority. 



UNIVERSIIV 

UKbANA 



BENJAMIN HARRISON. 



QENJAMIN HARRISON, the twenty-third 
Y\\ President, is the descendant of one of the 
d/ historical families of this country. The first 
known head of the family was Maj.-Gen. Harrison, 
one of Oliver Cromwell's trusted followers and 
fighters. In the zenith of Cromwell's power it be- 
came the duty of this Harrison to participate in 
the trial of Charles I., and afterward to sign the 
death warrant of the king. He subsequent v 
paid for this with his life, being hung October 13, 
1660. His descendants came to America, and 
the next of the family that appears in history is 
Benjamin Harrison, of Virginia, great-grandfa- 
ther of the subject of this sketch, and after whom 
he was named. Benjamin Harrison was a mem- 
ber of the Continental Congress during the years 
1774, 1775 and 1776, and was one of the original 
signers of the Declaration of Independence. He 
was three times elected Governor of Virginia. 

Gen. William Henry Harrison, the son of the 
distinguished patriot of the Revolution, after a 
successful career as a soldier during the War of 
18 1 2, and with a clean record as Governor of the 
Northwestern Territory, was elected President of 
the United States in 1840. His career was cut 
short by death within one month after his in- 
auguration. 

President Harrison was born at North Bend, 



Hamilton County, Ohio, August 20, 1833. His 
life up to the time of his graduation from Miami 
University, at Oxford, Ohio, was the uneventful 
one of a country lad of a family of small means. 
His father was able to give him a good education, 
and nothing more. He became engaged while at 
college to the daughter of Dr. Scott, Principal of 
a female school at Oxford. After graduating, he 
determined to enter upon the study of law. He 
went to Cincinnati and there read law for two 
years. At the expiration of that time young Har- 
rison received the only inheritance of his life — his 
aunt, dying, left him a lot valued at $800. He 
regarded this legacy as a fortune, and decided to 
get married at once, take this money and go to 
some Eastern tow y n and begin the practice of law. 
He sold his lot, and, with the money in his pocket, 
he started out with his young wife to fight for a 
place in the world. He decided to go to Indian- 
apolis, which was even at that time a town of 
promise. He met with slight encouragement at 
first, making scarcely an3~thing the first year. 
He worked diligently, applying himself closely to 
his calling, built up an extensive practice and 
took a leading rank in the legal profession. 

In i860, Mr. Harrison was nominated for the 
position of Supreme Court Reporter, and then be- 
gan his experience as a stump speaker. He can- 



io8 



BENJAMIN HARRISON. 



vassed the State thoroughly, and was elected by 
a handsome majority. In 1862 he raised the 
Seventeenth Indiana Infantry, and was chosen its 
Colonel. His regiment was composed of the raw- 
est material, but Col. Harrison employed all his 
time at first in mastering military tactics and drill- 
ing his men, and when he came to move toward 
the East with Sherman, his regiment was one of 
the best drilled and organized in the army. At 
Resaca he especially distinguished himself, and 
for his bravery at Peachtree Creek he was made 
a Brigadier-General, Gen. Hooker speaking of 
him in the most complimentary terms. 

During the absence of Gen. Harrison in the 
field, the Supreme Court declared the office of 
Supreme Court Reporter vacant, and another 
person was elected to the position. From the 
time of leaving Indiana with his regiment until 
the fall of 1864 he had taken no leave of absence, 
but having been nominated that year for the same 
office, he got a thirty-day leave of absence, and 
during that time made a brilliant canvass of the 
State, and was elected for another term. He then 
started to rejoin Sherman, but on the way was 
stricken down with scarlet fever, and after a most 
trying attack made his way to the front in time to 
participate in the closing incidents of the war. 

In 1868 Gen. Harrison declined a re-election 
as Reporter, and resumed the practice of law. In 
1876 he was a candidate for Governor. Although 
defeated, the brilliant campaign he made won for 
him a national reputation, and he was much sought 
after, especially in the East, to make speeches. 
In 1880, as usual, he took an active part in the 
campaign, and was elected to the United States 
Senate. Here he served for six years, and was 
known as one of the ablest men, best lawyers and 
strongest debaters in that body. With the ex- 
piration of his senatorial term he returned to the 
practice of his profession, becoming the head of 
one of the strongest firms in the State. 

The political campaign of 1888 was one of the 
most memorable in the history of our country. 
The convention which assembled in Chicago in 
June and named Mr. Harrison as the chief stand- 
ard-bearer of the Republican party was great in 
every particular, and on this account, and the at- 



titude it assumed upon the vital questions of the 
day, chief among which was the tariff, awoke a 
deep interest in the campaign throughout the 
nation. Shortly after the nomination, delegations 
began to visit Mr. Harrison at Indianapolis, his 
home. This movement became popular, and from 
all sections of the country societies, clubs and 
delegations journeyed thither to pay their re- 
spects to the distinguished statesman. 

Mr. Harrison spoke daily all through the sum- 
mer and autumn to these visiting delegations, 
and so varied, masterly, and eloquent were his 
speeches that they at once placed him in the fore- 
most rank of American orators and statesmen. 
Elected by a handsome majority, he served his 
country faithfully and well, and in 1892 was nom- 
inated for re-election; but the people demanded a 
change and he was defeated by his predecessor 
in office, Grover Cleveland. 

On account of his eloquence as a speaker and 
his power as a debater, Gen. Harrison was called 
upon at an early age to take part in the dis- 
cussion of the great questions that then began to 
agitate the country. He was an uncompromising 
anti-slavery man, and was matched against some 
of the most eminent Democratic speakers of his 
State. No man who felt the touch of his blade 
desired to be pitted with him again. With all 
his eloquence as an orator he never spoke for ora- 
torical effect, but his words always went like bul- 
lets to the mark. He is purely American in his 
ideas, and is a splendid type of the American 
statesman. Gifted with quick perception, a logi- 
cal mind and a ready tongue, he is one of the 
most distinguished impromptu speakers in the 
nation. Many of these speeches sparkled with the 
rarest eloquence and contained arguments of great 
weight, and many of his terse statements have 
already become aphorisms. Original in thought, 
precise in logic, terse in statement, yet withal 
faultless in eloquence, he is recognized as the 
sound statesman and brilliant orator of the day. 
During the last days of his administration Presi- 
dent Harrison suffered an irreparable loss in the 
death of his devoted wife, Caroline (Scott) Har- 
rison, a lady of many womanly charms and vir- 
tues. They were the parents of two children. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVtRSIIY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HANCOCK, McDONOUGH 



AND 



HENDERSON COUNTIES, 

ILLINOIS. 



I NTRODUCTORY. 



<Sr HE time has arrived when it becomes the 
I Q duty of the people of this county to perpet- 
VJy uate the names of their pioneers, to furnish 
a record of their early settlement, and relate the 
story of their progress. The civilization of our 
day, the enlightenment of the age, and the duty 
that men of the present time owe to their ances 
tors, to themselves and to their posterity, demand 
that a record of their lives and deeds should be 
made. In biographical history is found a power 
to instruct man by precedent, to enliven the mental 
faculties, and to waft down the river of time a safe 
vessel, in which the names and actions of the peo- 
ple who contributed to raise this country from its 
primitive state may be preserved. Surely and 
rapidly the great and aged men, who in their prime 
entered the wilderness and claimed the virgin soil 
as their heritage, are passing to their graves. The 
number remaining who can relate the incidents of 
the first days of settlement is becoming small in- 
deed, so that an actual necessity exists for the col- 
lection and preservation of events without delay, 
before all the early settlers are cut down by the 
scythe of Time. 

To be forgotten has been the great dread of 
mankind from remotest ages. All will be forgot- 
ten soon enough , in spite of their best works and 
the most earnest efforts of their friends to preserve 
the memory of their lives. The means employed 
to prevent oblivion and to perpetuate their mem- 
ory has been in proportion to the amount of intel- 
ligence they possessed. The pyramids of Egypt 
were built to perpetuate the names and deeds of 
their great rulers. The exhumations made by the 
archaeologists of Egypt from buried Memphis indi- 
cate a desire of those people to perpetuate the 
memory of their achievements. The erection of 
the great obelisks were for the same purpose. 
Coming down to a later period, we find the Greeks 
and Romans erecting mausoleums and monu- 



ments, and carving out statues to chronicle their 
great achievements and earn- them down the ages. 
It is also evident that the Mound-builders, in pil- 
ing up their great mounds of earth, had but this 
idea — to leave something to show that they had 
lived. All these works, though many of them 
costly in the extreme, give but a faint idea of the 
lives and characters of those whose memory they 
were intended to perpetuate, and scarcely anything 
of the masses of the people that then lived. The 
great pyramids and some of the obelisks remain 
objects only of curiosity; the mausoleums, monu- 
ments and statues are crumbling into dust. 
^ It was left to modern ages to establish an intel- 
ligent, undecaying, immutable method of perpet- 
uating a full history — immutable, in that it is al- 
most unlimited in extent and perpetual in its ac- 
tion; and this is through the art of printing. 

To the present generation, however, we are in- 
debted for the introduction of the admirable sys- 
tem of local biography. By this system every 
man, though he has not achieved what the world 
calls greatness, has the means to perpetuate his 
life, his history, through the coming ages. 

The scythe of Time cuts down all; nothing of 
the physical man is left. The monument which 
his children or friends may erect to his memory in 
the cemetery will crumble into dust and pass 
away; but his life, his achievements, the work he 
has accomplished, which otherwise would be for- 
gotten, is perpetuated by a record of this kind. 

To preserve the lineaments of our companions 
we engrave their portraits; for the same reason 
we collect the attainable facts of their history . Nor 
do we think it necessary, as we speak only truth 
of them, to wait until they are dead, or until those 
who know them are gone; to do this we are 
ashamed only to publish to the world the history 
of those whose lives are unworthy of public record. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSIIY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 







H. G. Ferris 



Biographical. 



NIRAM G. FERRIS was for many years one 
of the most prominent business men and 
leading citizens of Carthage, and when 
called to the home beyond, his loss was mourned 
throughout the entire community, for he had not 
only won many friends, but was ever interested in 
those enterprises which were calculated to prove 
of public benefit. His father was Stephen G. 
Ferris, a pioneer of Hancock County, who emi- 
grated with his family to the West, and settled in 
Fountain Green, December 18, 1832, the journey 
being made in a flatboat down the Ohio River to 
Cincinnati, where the}' boarded a steamer. 

Hiram was then a lad of ten years, for he was 
born May 13, 1822, in Steuben County, N. Y. 
In early life he attended the common schools, and 
afterwards pursued his studies in Knox College 
at Galesburg. In company with David D. Colton, 
in 1850 he made the overland trip to California, 
and took a leading part in public affairs. He 
was appointed one of the Commissioners who or- 
ganized Siskiyou County, of which he afterward 
served for two terms as Circuit Clerk. At that 
time Gen. Colton was Sheriff of the county, which 
contained many rough characters among the min- 
ers. On one occasion a mob tried to rescue one 
of their number who was in jail, but Mr. Ferris 
and Gen. Colton kept them back with drawn 
revolvers. Our subject also witnessed the Mor- 
mon War, but did not take part in it. He served 
as Deputy Sheriff in 1842, and was highly spoken 
of by his superior officer. In 1857 he returned 
from California to Hancock County, and, having 
previously studied law, was admitted to the Bar. 
He formed a partnership with the firm of Hooker 
& Edmunds, which continued until 1863, when 
Mr. Edmunds withdrew. Mr. Ferris, however, 
continued in the business until the following year. 
In 1865 he embarked in the banking and real-es- 



tate business with F. M. Corby, and established 
what became the Hancock Count)- National Bank, 
of which he was elected President, and continued 
to serve as such until his death. 

In McDonough County, August 20, 1857, Mr- 
Ferris married Miss Julia E. Holton, and to them 
were born nine children: Junius C. ; Esta Maude, 
wife of Frank H. Graves, an attorney of Spokane, 
Wash.; Julia, wife of L. P. Hubbs, of Clayton; 
Ellen, wife of Ralph E. Scofield, an attorney of 
Kansas City; Phoebe, who was married October 
4, 1893, to George W. Wooster, of Spokane, 
Wash.; Hiram B., Joel E. and Harold G., who 
are still at home. Junius and Stephen are con- 
nected with the bank in which their father's old 
partner, Mr. Corby, was interested until his 
sudden death in Chicago. His widow still holds 
her husband's shares of stock in the same. 

Mr. Ferris became a member of the Masonic 
fraternity in 1850, and several times served as 
Master of the Blue Lodge. He also belonged to 
the chapter, council and commandery. He was 
honored with a number of city offices, having 
served as President and Councilman, and for 
many years was on the Board of Education. 
The cause of temperance ever found in him a 
most stalwart advocate, and he strongly opposed 
the licensing of saloons in Carthage. He was al- 
ways found on the side of right and justice, was 
strictly honorable in all business dealings, and 
his word was as good as his bond. He won suc- 
cess not by over-reaching others, but by good 
management, industry and enterprise. He was 
always alive to the best interests of the city, and 
was liberal in the support of everything which he 
believed would prove of benefit to the community. 
Those who had known him from early life were 
numbered among his stanchest friends, a fact 
which tells of an honorable record, well worthy 



u8 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of emulation. He passed away August 20, 1893. 
The funeral services were conducted by the 
Masonic fraternity, and a large concourse of friends 
gathered to pay their last tribute of respect to one 
who had long been among them. He was a loyal 
citizen, a faithful and considerate friend, a kind 
and loving husband and father, and left to his 
family the priceless heritage of a good name. 

(Jameson hawkinswetzel, the genial 

I and popular proprietor of the Adams House, 
(~) of Warsaw, is a native of the neighboring 
State of Indiana. He was born in Marion Coun- 
ty. J u b' 5. I 835. an( i i s descended from good old 
Revolutionary stock. His grandfather, John 
Wetzel, served for four years under Washington, 
and the maternal grandfather, John Symmonds, 
bravely served as a soldier in the War of 1812. 
Our subject now has in his possession several 
Revolutionary relics. 

The father of Jameson H., John Wetzel, was a 
native of Pennsylvania. When a young man he 
served a three-years apprenticeship to a cabinet 
maker, and then worked for seven years as a 
journeyman. He became quite proficient in that 
line, and manufactured some fine pieces of furni- 
ture. Later in life he turned his attention to 
farming. Having removed to Ohio, he was there 
united in marriage with Mary Symmonds, a na- 
tive of the Buckeye State, and to them were born 
eleven children, as follows: Marion; John, who 
died in 1845; Mahlon, who died in 1839; Jameson; 
Nelson M., now residing in Elvaston, 111. ; Joanna, 
who died at the age of fourteen years; Levi and 
Benjamin Franklin, who died in infancy; Loyal 
Fairman, of Hamilton; William S., ofBasco, Han- 
cock County; and Perry LaFayette, of the same 
county. The father of this family died Novem- 
ber 12, 1858, and the mother, who survived him 
for many years, passed away in 1884. 

Jameson Wetzel, whose name heads this rec- 
ord, was reared to manhood upon his father's 
farm, and in his youth received such educational 
advantages as the district school of the neighbor- 



hood afforded. After arriving at mature years he 
followed farming for some time, and was fairly 
successful in the undertaking. He was married 
January 16, 1859, the lady of his choice being 
Miss Martha J., daughter of William Kimbrough. 
To them were born eight children, but only three 
of the number are yet living, namely: Mary E., 
wife of James Biggs, of Basco; John W., of New 
York ; and Charles. Their son Albert was drowned 
on the 9th of August, 1892, and the following 
touching memorial was written by Francis Marion 
Wetzel: 

'Albert, we bid thee a sad and silent farewell. 
In thy youth thou wast laid to rest in the narrow 
limits of the tomb, there to await the resurrection 
morn. So quiet didst thou appear in thy sleep of 
death that knows no earthly awakening, it seemed 
almost mockery to weep over thy calm features. 
Death stole in softness and touched thy face with 
angelic sweetness, and stamped upon it the quiet- 
ness of calm repose, which told that thy soul was 
free from this earthly prison, and that thou hadst 
passed away from the poor cares of life. Yes, Al 
bert, thou hast crossed the dark stream of death 
and hast gone from those who loved thee dearly. 
In memory we see the suppressed grief of thy par- 
ents, the touching affection of thy brothers and 
thy sister — hear their soft wail and see their 
farewell look. What volumes of love they be- 
spoke! But thy marble lips gave no kindred re- 
sponses. As we gazed upon this sad and affecting- 
separation, manhood was moved to pity, and sor- 
row claimed her due. We turned away, feeling 
that we had parted, but not forever. Only a few 
short years and we shall come and dwell in the 
silent tomb by thy side. Thy faithful friends, true 
from first to last, all shall come and rest in their 
silent beds, and with thee we shall sleep through 
death's long dreamless night until the archan- 
gel's trump shall awake us on that memorable 
morn. May we awake in that paradise where 
sorrow, pain and death are unknown!" 

Mr. Wetzel carried on agricultural pursuits un- 
til chosen Deputy Sheriff of the count} - in 1878. 
He thus served for four years and was then elected 
Sheriff in 1882. He made a splendid record 
while in that office, winning the commendation of 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



119 



all concerned. When his term had expired he 
embarked in the livery business in Carthage, and 
continued operations along that line for two years, 
when he sold out and took charge of the Adams 
House in Warsaw, which he has now been con- 
ducting for two years. This is a first-class hotel, 
complete in all its appointments, and has found 
favor with the traveling public. In his political 
views, Mr. Wetzel is a Democrat and warmly ad- 
vocates the principles of his party. He holds 
membership with the Masonic fraternity, the In- 
dependent Order of Mutual Aid and the Mutual 
Benefit Association. His life has been well and 
worthily passed, and he well merits the high re- 
gard in which he is held. 



HENRY WILLIAM RABE, pastor of the 
Lutheran Church of Warsaw, was born 
March 12, 1856, in Concordia, Mo., andisa 
son of Frederick and Dorothea (Oetting) Rabe, 
both of whom were natives of Hanover, Germany. 
With their respective families they came to Amer- 
ica in 1840. By occupation the father of our sub- 
ject was a farmer, and followed that pursuit 
throughout his entire business career. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Rabe were born seven children, of whom 
Henry is the sixth in order of birth. Frederick, 
the eldest, is located at Concordia, Mo. Mrs. 
C. E. Marr resides in Buckley, 111. Mrs. Sophia 
Brackmann is a resident of Concordia. Mrs. Mary 
Paar makes her home in Indianapolis, Ind., and 
Mrs. Lydia Blanken resides in Buckley, 111. 

Mr. Rabe whose name heads this sketch ac- 
quired his education in the schools of St. Louis, 
and was graduated from Concordia College of 
Springfield, 111., in 1877, in a class of fourteen. 
Quite early in life it had become his earnest de- 
sire to enter the ministry and devote himself to 
the Master's work, and having fitted himself for 
that labor he accepted a call from a congregation 
at Webster City, Iowa. He spent nearly six 
years as pastor of the Lutheran Church at that 
place, and built up a church which at the begin- 
ning numbered only a few families. Under his 



supervision a parsonage was there erected, and 
the church, which was greatly increased numeri- 
cally, was placed in a thriving condition. Through 
his efforts a house of worship was also erected 
in Alden, in Hubbard and in Eldora, Iowa. In 
1875, when but a student, he built a church in 
Waverly, Iowa. He has always been quite suc- 
cessful in this line of work and thereby has done 
much for the cause. 

Ere leaving the Hawkeye State, Mr. Rabe was 
married in Dubuque, on the 21st of May, 1878, 
to Miss Louise Weland, daughter of Frederick 
Weland, who belonged to a family of Mecklen- 
burg, Germain - . Mrs. Rabe has proved to her 
husband a faithful helpmeet in the truest and 
best sense of that word, and by her encourage- 
ment and sympathy has greatly aided him in his 
labors. Like her hnsband, she wins friends 
wherever she goes and has the high regard of all. 

On the 6th of June, 1883, Mr. Rabe came to 
Warsaw, in response to a call from the Lutheran 
Church at this place, and has been its pastor 
for eleven years. The church now numbers 
three hundred and twenty- four members and has 
a well-located property. In connection with the 
church a parochial school is also conducted, now 
under the charge of William A. Erdmann. Mr. 
Rabe has accomplished much in getting the mem- 
bership into good working order. There is now 
a Young People's Society of sixty members which 
was organized by him, and in 1886 was organized 
a Ladies' Aid Society, which has a membership 
of one hundred and six. He is indefatigable in 
his labors for the advancement of the cause of 
Christianity, and is highly esteemed, not only by 
the people of his own denomination, but by those 
of other denominations as well. 



*VSAAC BLISS has for many years resided in 
I Hancock County, and is so widely and favor- 
X ably known that this work would be incom- 
plete without the record of his life. He comes of 
an old family of England, that belonged to that 
class which considered coats of arms as indis- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



pensable appendages of gentlemen. At the time of 
the Reformation coats of arms were treated in a 
measure as idle trappings of aristocracy, and lost 
the prestige originally attributed to them. In 
America they soon began to be regarded as relics 
of former family vanity, and the stanch old 
Puritans would not allow themselves to tolerate 
even a thought that could remind them of the 
vain-glorious display and pomp of their persecu- 
tors in England; and so their children and de- 
scendants born in America grew up in ignorance 
of the heraldic standard of their ancestors in the 
mother country. The coat of arms of the Bliss 
family, as set forth in Edmundson's Heraldry, is 
thus described: "Gules a bend vaire between 
two fleur de lis," and bore the inscription "Sem- 
pei Sursum," meaning "Ever upward." 

Ancient traditions represent the Bliss family 
as living in the south of England and belong- 
ing to the yeomanry. From time immemorial 
they had been inclined to Puritanism, through ob- 
serving the loose manners of most of the clergy 
and laymen of the established church. This 
led the family to undergo persecution, and their 
goods were seized, and some of their number were 
thrown into prison. Such treatment led them to 
look toward America with longing, and repre- 
sentatives of the family emigrated hither. Thomas 
Bliss and his brother George landed in Boston in 
the autumn of 1635. From the former in direct 
line is descended our subject. His fourth child, 
Nathaniel, was born in Springfield, Mass., and 
married Catherine Chapin, by whom he had four 
children. One of these, Samuel, was born No- 
vember 7, 1647, and lived to the advanced age of 
one hundred and one and a-half years. He wed- 
ded Sarah Stebbius, and the youngest of their 
nine children, Ebenezer, who was born March 4, 
1696, married Sarah Colton. They had ten chil- 
dren. Isaac, the sixth in order of birth, was 
horn January 28, 1727, and became a prominent 
citizen of Warren, Mass. He served as one of 
the Selectmen and as a Deacon in the Congrega- 
tional Church. He took part in the Indian War 
in 1758. He married Hannah Hubbard and they 
had seven children, of whom Daniel was born 
April 10, 1 76 1. The latter became a prominent 



physician in Chandlersville, Ohio, and married 
Prudence Chandler, by whom he had twelve chil- 
dren. 

Their second child, Samuel, was born May 22, 
1791, and became the father of our subject. He 
was united in marriage with Elizabeth Jordan, 
and they became the parents of eleven children. 
The Bliss family has furnished many men to the 
country who have been prominent in professional 
and business circles, and the honored name has 
remained untarnished through many generations. 

Isaac Bliss of this sketch was the fifth in order 
of birth in his father's family, and was born Sep- 
tember 9, 1824, in Muskingum County, Ohio. 
His father, however, was a native of Vermont, 
and died in 1852, at the age of sixty-one years. 
His wife long survived him, and passed away at 
the advanced age of ninety-eight. She was buried 
on the anniversary of her birth, August 12, 1893. 
Two grand-uncles of our subject were soldiers in 
the Revolutionary War. Both were Englishmen, 
but one fought in the British service, while the 
other was in the Colonial army. The Jordan fam- 
ily is probably of Irish lineage. 

In the State of his nativity Isaac Bliss spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth. In his early 
years he enjoyed excellent educational advantages, 
and, making the most of his opportunities, he be- 
came a well-informed man. In 1848 he deter- 
mined to try his fortune in the West and emi- 
grated to Hancock Count}', 111. For many years 
he devoted his energies to teaching school during 
the winter season, being thus employed for more 
than a quarter of a century in the public schools 
of Muskingum County, Ohio, and in this locality. 
After his arrival in Hancock County, he was en- 
gaged during the summer months in farming and 
breeding Short-horned Durham cattle, of which 
he had a large and valuable herd. He also taught 
for a short time in Keithsburg, Mercer County, 
111. He was an educator of recognized ability, 
and his success along that line made him well 
known among other members of the profession in 
this State. 

On the 4th of October, 1849, Mr. Bliss wedded 
Elizabeth M. Peairs, and to them were born four 
children. The mother died April 17, 1878, and 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



on the 23d of May, 1S8S, Mr. Bliss married Mrs. 
Harriet M. Cherry. They have one daughter, 
May Elizabeth. Mrs.. Bliss is a daughter of Alonzo 
and Eliza (Lyons) Sanford. Her father came 
from New York to Hancock County in 1837, and 
is now living in Wythe Township. The mother 
came with her family in 1831. Her father estab- 
lished a town that year which he called Mechan- 
icsville. He was a blacksmith by trade, built a 
smithy and a mill and opened a dry -goods store. 
This undertaking, however, proved unprofitable 
and he lost nearly everything he had. The town 
was situated about four miles west of the present 
site of Augusta. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bliss are members of the Presby- 
terian Church. In 1853 h e aided in organizing a 
church of nine members and was Superintendent 
of its Sunday-school for twenty-five years. He 
continued his connection with it until 1892, and 
lived to see it become a prosperous and flourish- 
ing church. In politics, he is a stanch Republi- 
can, but in exercising his right of franchise he is 
guided not by party, but by principle. By virtue 
of his integrity of character, by his adherence to 
principle, and by his honesty of purpose he has 
embodied in his life the motto on the old coat of 
arms, ' ' Semper Sursum. ' ' 



<a_ 



c=l 



&+$m= 



i=j' 



WlARTIN POPEL, the senior member of the 
IT firm of Popel & Giller, of Warsaw, claims 
V3 Bohemia as the land of his birth, the date 
of that event being the 22d of April, 1837. The 
first fifteen years of his life were spent in his na- 
tive land, and no event of special importance oc- 
curred during that period. He then left his old 
home for America, and on reaching the shores of 
this country made his way to St. Louis. He 
was dependent upon his own resources for a live- 
lihood, and began working at the butcher's trade, 
which he there followed for a number of years. 
In 1 86 1 he came to Warsaw and embarked in the 
same line of business. 

In 1863, Mr. Popel was joined in wedlock 
with Mrs. Catherine Giller. He continued oper- 



ations along the old line of business for some time, 
but afterwards embarked in the brewing business. 
In 188 1 he was joined by his stepson, John Giller, 
and the present firm was formed. They estab- 
lished a brewery in this place on a small scale, 
but have steadily increased it until it has reached 
its present large proportions. The business has 
continually grown, and employment is now fur- 
nished to about eighteen men. Their sales amount 
to about $50,000 per annum. The members of 
the firm are enterprising and progressive men, and 
their industry and perseverance have brought to 
them a comfortable competence. 



IILLIAM KUHNS HILL is Principal of 
the Carthage public schools. He is well 
capable of filling the responsible position 
to which he has been called, for he is an educator 
of recognized ability and has already won the 
commendation and favorable criticism of those 
concerned. He has under him eight assist- 
ant teachers, and the scholars enrolled number 
four hundred. The schools are well graded, the 
corps of teachers efficient, and under the able 
management of Prof. Hill, the cause of education 
is steadily advancing in Carthage. 

Mr. Hill was born in Leechburg, Pa., Decem- 
ber 11, 1857, an d is a son of Salem and Esther 
(Kuhns) Hill, both of whom were also natives of 
the Keystone State. The mother was descended 
from an old Huguenot family, and Capt. Mar- 
chand, one of the commanders at Mobile, was her 
cousin. Her grandfather, Michael Steck, was the 
pioneer Lutheran minister west of the mountains 
of Pennsylvania. Henry Steck, who is connected 
with the Chicago Stock Yards, is one of the same 
family. The Hill family is of English origin, 
and settled in Philadelphia shortly after the found- 
ing of that city. 

Returning to the personal history of Prof. Hill, 
we note that at the age of seventeen years, he en- 
tered Pennsylvania College, of Gettysburg, Pa., 
from which institution he was graduated in the 
Class of '79, with the degree of A. B. When 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



that course was finished he entered the Lutheran 
Theological Seminar}-, of Gettysburg, where he 
studied for three years. He then engaged in 
teaching in that place for a time, and in 1884 
came to Carthage, to take the Chair of Science in 
Carthage College with Dr. E. F. Bartholomew. 
He continued to acceptably fill that position for 
eight years. He then spent the summer of 1892 as 
a season of rest, after which he accepted the posi- 
tion of Principal of the Carthage public schools, 
which place he yet fills. 

On the 23d of December, 1887, Mr. Hill was 
married to Miss Kate Griffith, daughter of 
Dr. A. J. and Margaret (McClaughry) Griffith, 
whom we will mention later on. The lady was 
born in this city and was graduated from Carthage 
College in the Class of '82. Three children grace 
their union: Esther Margaret, William Griffith 
and Katharine. In the fall of 1884, before the 
Iowa Synod of the Lutheran Church , Prof. Hill 
was ordained as a minister, and has supplied vari- 
ous pulpits, but has never regularly taken up pas- 
toral work, although he takes a deep and active 
interest in everything that pertains to the promo- 
tion and upbuilding of the church. 

Dr. Andrew Jackson Griffith, father of Mrs. 
Hill, was for some time a well-known physician 
of Carthage, and it is but just that mention should 
be made of him in this volume. He was born in 
Highland County, Ohio, in February, 1822, and 
was a son of Llewellyn App and Hannah (Hope) 
Griffith. His parents came to Illinois in 1842, 
locating in Fulton County. His father was a 
wagon-maker, and the Doctor partially learned the 
trade, but before he completed it, he began read- 
ing medicine with Dr. P. S. Secor, of Fountain 
Green. He pursued a course in the Missouri 
Medical College of St. Louis, and after a few years' 
practice took a post-graduate course at the Jeffer- 
son Medical College, of Philadelphia, Pa. He 
entered upon the prosecution of his chosen pro- 
fession in Fountain Green in 1846. 

The following year, Dr. Griffith married Miss 
Fidelia Ferris, the youngest daughter of Stephen 
G. Ferris. She died in 1849, leaving one child, 
William, who is connected with the Hancock 
County National Bank. In 1850. the Doctor 



crossed the plains to California, where he remained 
two years. In 1854, he removed to Carthage, 
where he engaged in practice some years. On 
the iothofMay, 1854, he was joined in wedlock 
with Miss Margaret McClaughry, who yet sur- 
vives her husband. They became the parents of 
twochildren: Kate, wife of Prof. W. K. Hill; and 
Ralph, a bookseller and stationer of Carthage. On 
retiring from practice he became the editor and 
publisher of the Carthage Republican, and in 
1865 became interested in banking, being elected 
Vice-President of the Hancock National Bank. 
To the work connected with the bank he devoted 
much of his attention, and was thus employed un- 
til his death, which occurred March 19, 1884, af- 
ter a lingering illness. In politics the Doctor was 
a Democrat, and for forty years was a prominent 
Mason. He possessed hosts of warm friends, who 
esteemed him highly for his sterling worth and 
many excellencies of character, and his loss was 
deeply mourned throughout the community. 



\^^\ 



^HOMAS A. DAVIS, D. D. S., who is en- 
f C gaged in the practice of dental surgery in 
\2/ Warsaw, claims Missouri as the State of his 
nativity, his birth having occurred in Callaway 
County, Mo., July 9, 1837. He is a son of David 
B. and Rebecca Cynthia (Howe) Davis. His 
father was a native of Kentucky. He was born 
and reared near Mt. Sterling, and in his native 
State married Miss Howe. Soon after his removal 
to Missouri, the date of the event being 1832, he 
joined the church under the preaching of "Rac- 
coon" John Smith, a Christian minister, who 
also performed the wedding ceremony. Mr. Davis 
became a pioneer preacher of Missouri, and held 
meetings throughout that State and in Illinois, 
Kentucky and Indiana. He did much good in 
the world and added many to the church. He 
was born August 31, 1807, and died in Winches- 
ter, 111., March 9, 1887. His wife passed away 
in Taylorville, 111., November 7, 1864. This 
worthy couple were the parents of eight children, 
but the Doctor is the only one now living-. The 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



123 



Davis family was originally of Welsh extraction, 
but the great-great-grandfather married a French 
lady, and the great-grandfather married an Indian 
maiden. The Howe family was of English lineage. 

Dr. Davis was reared upon his father's farm, 
and early became familiar with the work of the 
fields, plowing corn, raising tobacco, etc. When 
he was sixteen years of age his father removed to 
Audrain County, Mo., and preached for many 
years for the Salt River Church. During that 
time our subject worked at carpentering for a 
while, and in the winter months engaged in teach- 
ing singing-school, but at length he determined 
to give his attention to dentistry. In the year 
1872 he began the study of the same with Dr. 
D. G. Palmer, of McLean County, 111., and in 
1874 he became associated with his preceptor as 
a partner. This connection continued for two 
years, when, in 1876, he went to Atlanta, Logan 
County, where he spent four years. On the ex- 
piration of that period, he removed to Jerseyville, 
where the succeeding four years of his life were 
passed. He also spent four years in practice in 
Winchester, 111., and in 1888 came to Warsaw, 
where he has since made his home. 

Dr. Davis has been twice married. On the 
2 1st of September, 1861, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sallie A. Broaddus, a daughter 
of William G. and Amelia Broaddus. Her death 
occurred June 8, 1883. They were the parents of 
eleven children, but only five are now living: 
Lucy E., wife of J. Hayes, a resident of Missouri; 
Ada, wife of J. E. Baird, of Jersey County, 111.; 
Ira J., who resides in Vandalia, Mo.; Dollie, who 
is living in Centralia, Mo.; and Myrtle, who 
makes her home with her sister, Mrs. Baird. 
On the 19th of March, 1884, was celebrated the 
marriage of Dr. Davis and Mrs. Man- E. White, 
daughter of H. S. Rodgers. They have one 
child, Viola. 

Dr. Davis has devoted his entire time and at- 
tention to dental work for the past twenty years, 
and has become an expert in his profession. His 
skill and ability secure him a liberal patronage, 
and he now occupies an enviable place among his 
professional brethren. Socially, he is a member 
of the Independent Order of Mutual Aid. He 



belongs to the Christian Church, is a stanch sup- 
porter of temperance principles, and takes an active 
interest in all that tends to benefit and elevate 
humanity. He is public-spirited and progressive, 
and the best interests of the city ever find in him 
a friend. 

HOMER JUDD, M. D., D. D. S., won great 
prominence as a dentist, and occupied a 
leading place in the ranks of his profession. 
He engaged for a time in practice in Warsaw, but 
the last eight years of his life were spent in Upper 
Alton. He was born in Otis, Berkshire County, 
Mass., March 29, 1820, and was a son of Asa 
and Adah Judd. His father was a farmer and an 
influential citizen of the community in which he 
lived. He several times represented his district 
in the State Legislature of Massachusetts. The 
son in the common schools acquired his early 
education, which was supplemented by study 
in the Lee and Worthington Academies. Wish- 
ing to fit himself for the medical profession, he 
entered Berkshire Medical College of Pittsfield, 
Mass., and was graduated therefrom in 1847. 
Subsequently, he studied dentistry with Dr. Cone. 
He displayed special aptitude in his studies and 
was a thorough student, whose deep researches 
along the line of knowledge in which he was in- 
terested made him a more than well-informed 
man. Not only did he confine his study to sub- 
jects connected with his profession, but later he 
reviewed his Greek and Latin, and acquired a 
knowledge of the French, German, Spanish and 
Italian languages, also became somewhat ac- 
quainted with the Sanscrit. 

Dr. Judd commenced the practice of medicine 
and dentistry in Ravenna, Ohio, and three years 
later removed to Santa Fe, N. M. He was the 
first educated dentist to fill a tooth in that Terri- 
tory. After a short time, however, he returned 
to the Buckeye State, and subsequently came to 
Warsaw, where he practiced his dual profession for 
twelve years. While here residing, he served 
for several years on the School Board, and for one 



124 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



year was Superintendent. He was always inter- 
ested in the cause of education, and in every en- 
terprise calculated to prove of public benefit. In 
1847 he became a member of the Odd Fellows' 
Lodge of Ravenna, Ohio, and filled all the offices 
in the lodge in Warsa jv. He was chosen as its 
representative to the Grand Lodge, which met in 
Chicago in 1859. 

In Pittsfield, 111., in March, 1853, Dr. Judd 
was united in marriage with Miss Emily F. 
Hodgen, of that city. Three children were born 
to them, a son and two daughters, but the son 
died at the age of six years. The daughters, 
Adah May and Mary Emily, are still living, and 
reside with their mother. 

In 1 86 1 the Doctor went to St. Louis, and en- 
tered the United States service as Assistant Sur- 
geon on a hospital steamer running to Vicksburg. 
After the battle of Shiloh, he offered his services, 
and was employed as one of the four surgeons 
charged with the care of four hundred Union 
soldiers. His labors were so arduous that his 
health became impaired, and he was compelled to 
visit Minnesota for rest and recuperation. He 
was subsequently made Surgeon of the Fortieth 
Missouri Regiment, and with it served in the bat- 
tles of Franklin, Nashville and Spanish Fort. 
For some months after the close of the war, he re- 
mained in the sen-ice, being stationed at Hunts- 
ville, Ala. In August, 1865, he was honorably 
discharged and returned to St. Louis, where he 
engaged in dental practice. He was prominent 
in his profession, and was untiring in his efforts for 
its advancement. His zeal in the cause led him to 
enter heartily into the movement for the establish- 
ment of a dental college founded on the basis of 
a medical education, and in 1866 the Missouri 
Dental College was organized, in connection with 
the St. Louis Medical College. Dr. Judd was 
appointed to the Chair of Institutes of Dental Sci- 
ence, and was made Dean of the college, which 
position he filled for several years. His fondness 
for literary pursuits, and belief in the need of a 
good dental journal, led him to establish one in 
St. Louis, and in 1869 he became the editor-in- 
chief of the Missouri Dental Journal, now the 
Archives of Dentistry. His connection therewith 



made him well known in professional circles 
throughout the country, and his magazine filled a 
long-felt want and aided in the advancement of 
his beloved science. As a journalist and teacher, 
he has never been excelled, and his skill, merit 
and ability won for him promotion, step by step, 
until he occupied a place at the head of the pro- 
fession. He was honored with its highest posi- 
tion, being unanimously elected President of the 
American Dental Association in 1869. His love 
for scientific investigation led him to take an active 
part in the work of the Academy of Science in St. 
Louis, of which he was an active member. 

In later years Dr. Judd was extensively inter- 
ested in silver mining in Colorado, and became 
the head of the Judd Mining Company, which 
owns valuable property near Ouray. His health 
failing in later years, he was compelled to aban- 
don to a great extent his literary and professional 
work, and in outdoor pursuits among the moun- 
tains of Colorado the summer seasons were passed. 
In 1882 he removed to Upper Alton, where he 
established a dental office, and practiced his pro- 
fession until his death, which occurred May 20, 
1890, at the age of seventy years. He possessed 
those sterling qualities of head and heart which 
win the respect of all, and although he never had 
many intimate friends, he was held in high es- 
teem by every one with whom he was brought in 
contact. His life was a noble one, well and 
worthily passed, and he left behind a hallowed 
memory. 

(ILLIAM R. FAIRCHILD is extensively 
engaged in coal dealing in Warsaw, hav- 
ing carried on that line of business in this 
place for ten years. He comes from the Buckeye 
State, his birth having occurred in Warrenville, 
Cuyahoga County, Ohio, January 23, 1840. His 
parents were Levi and Dyerdana (Barber) Fair- 
child. The Fairchild family is of Scotch origin. 
The father of our subject was a native of the Em- 
pire State, and by occupation was a farmer and 
carpenter. He emigrated to Illinois in June, 1849, 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and spent his last days in Augusta, where his 
death occurred on the 3d of August, 1879. His 
widow still survives him. To them was born a 
family of seven children. 

Mr. Fairchild of this sketch, who was the third 
in order of birth, was reared in the usual manner 
of farmer lads, no event of special importance oc- 
curring during his boyhood and youth. He aid- 
ed in the cultivation of the old homestead farm 
until after the breaking out of the late war, when, 
prompted by patriotic impulses, he responded to 
the country's call for troops, enlisting on the 7th 
of August, 1862, as a private of Company H, 
.Seventy-second Illinois Infantry. His service 
was principally in the Department of the Missis- 
sippi, and he participated in a number of import- 
ant battles. During the latter part of his term 
he served as Corporal. When hostilities had 
ceased, and the Stars and Stripes once more waved 
over a land of peace, he was honorably discharged, 
on the 7th of August, 1865. 

Returning to his old home in Augusta. Mr. 
Fairchild there remained until 1867, when he en- 
gaged in coal-mining and in running a construc- 
tion train on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad. In the same year he went to St. Louis, 
and while there was united in marriage with 
Miss Dora Ruger, daughter of Martin Ruger, 
their union being celebrated on the 7th of August, 
1867. 

After going to the city, Mr. Fairchild entered 
the employ of the Pacific Railroad Company, with 
which he continued for about a year and a-half. 
His residence in Warsaw dates from 1868, at 
which time he began dealing in threshing-ma- 
chines and also commenced teaming. He success- 
fully continued this dual occupation until 1884, 
when he embarked in the coal trade. He now 
handles about forty-five hundred tons of coal per 
year, and receives a liberal patronage from the 
surrounding farmers as well as the citizens ot 
Warsaw. He possesses good business and execu- 
tive ability, and by close attention to details, per- 
severance and enterprise, he has won the success 
which has crowned his efforts. Mr. Fairchild 
takes some interest in civic societies and holds 
membership with the Ancient Order of United 



Workmen, the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Grand Army of the Republic. He exer- 
cises his right of franchise in support of the Re- 
publican party, and is a warm advocate of its 
principles, but has never been a politician in the 
sense of office-seeking, preferring to devote his en- 
tire time and attention to his business interests. 



IELLINGTON LeROY WINNARD, M.D. , 
is an enterprising and leading young phy- 
sician of Warsaw, and though not far ad- 
vanced along life's journey, he has made rapid 
strides along the pathway of his profession. A 
native of Iowa, he was born in Greeley, Dela- 
ware County, on the 7th of November, 1867, and is 
a son of James P. and Rose Linda (Holden) Win- 
nard. His parents were both natives of Michigan, 
and the father followed the occupation of farming. 
The Doctor was the second child in their family. 
No event of special importance occurred during 
the childhood and youth of our subject, which 
was largely passed in his parents' home and in 
the country- schools of the neighborhood. There 
he acquired his primary education, which was 
supplemented by a course of study in Lenox Col- 
lege, Iowa, from which institution he was grad- 
uated in the Class of '87. His tastes and ambi- 
tion led him to enter the medical profession, and 
to fit himself for that work he became a student 
in the Homeopathic Medical College of Chicago, 
from which he was graduated in the Class of '90, 
with forty-two fellow-students. Having received 
his diploma and the degree of M. D., he then 
came to Warsaw to enter upon his life's work, 
reaching this place on the 6th of April. Here he 
has been engaged in active practice continuously 
since. He makes a specialty of ruptures and the 
diseases of women and children. He is now as- 
sociated with Dr. Lawrence, under the firm name 
of Winnard & Lawrence, which connection is 
proving mutually pleasant and profitable. 

Dr. Winnard was married on the 18th of No- 
vember, 1 89 1, the lad)- of his choice being Miss 
Laurine Ralston, a daughter of Rev. W. D. Ral- 



126 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ston, a minister of the United Presbyterian 
Church, now located in Maroa, 111. Both the 
Doctor and Mrs. Winnard are well known in the 
community and are held in high regard, for they 
possess many excellencies of character. He gives 
his entire time and attention to business, and the 
success which has crowned his efforts is well mer- 
ited. Socially, he is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, and in religious belief is a Methodist. He 
is a young man with good prospects of a bright 
future before him, and the industry and energy 
which are numbered among his chief character- 
istics will undoubtedly win him prosperity. 



"DWARD P. BECKER, a prominent and 
^ well-known citizen and ex-Postmaster of 
__ Warsaw, is also numbered among the native 
sons of this place, his birth having here occurred 
on the 1 8th of February, 1857. He comes of a 
family of German origin; his parents, Louis and 
Philipena (Brehm) Becker, were both natives of 
Germam r , and spent the days of their childhood 
and youth in that country. In 1851 they bade 
adieu to their old home and crossed the Atlantic 
to America, landing at New Orleans, from whence 
they came to Illinois, after which they were mar- 
ried. The father is a carpenter by trade, and fol- 
lowed that pursuit as a means of livelihood for 
some years, but he is now engaged in general mer- 
chandising. In the Becker family are two chil- 
dren, Rosetta E. and Edward P. They also lost 
four children, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Becker of this sketch has spent his entire 
life in the county of his nativity. The days of 
his boyhood and youth were quietly passed, and 
his education was acquired in the public schools 
of Warsaw. His business training was received 
as a clerk in his father's store, where he was em- 
ployed from an early age. He was also engaged 
in the milling business, continuing operations 
along that line from 1885 until 1887, inclusive. 
He then went upon the road to sell goods for the 
Warsaw Milling Company, and continued his 



labors as a traveling salesman until he became 
Postmaster of Warsaw. He was appointed to 
that position by President Harrison on the 18th 
of July , 1889, and it was not long after he had en- 
tered upon his duties that he demonstrated to the 
public the fact that a faithful officer was in charge, 
one who would fulfil his duties with promptness 
and fidelity. 

On the 6th of May, 1880, Mr. Becker was united 
in marriage with Miss Addie G. Bristow, the 
daughter of Henry G. Bristow, and a most esti- 
mable lady. By their union have been born three 
children: Arthur; Lester, deceased; and Harry; 
the first was born during President Arthur's ad- 
ministration, and the last while Benjamin Harri- 
son was the chief executive of the nation. In 
politics, Mr. Becker is a stalwart Republican, an 
inflexible adherent of the principles of his party. 
Socially, he is connected with the Masonic fra- 
ternity and is a member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America. He is a pleasant, genial gentleman, 
very popular with all, and his sterling worth has 
won him high regard. His entire life has been 
passed in Warsaw, and he well deserves mention 
among its leading citizens. 

to ' *"~^ <"T~$"&~^ ' S> 

f~ATHER JOHN CHRISTIAN SCHURZ, 
rQ who has charge of the Catholic Church of 
I Warsaw, was born in the city of Bonn, 
Rhenish Prussia, January 6, 1843, and is a son of 
Henry and Anna M. (Sneider) Schurz, the former 
of whom was a store-keeper. Our subject was their 
sixth and youngest child. His education was ac- 
quired in his native city, and he was graduated 
from the famous Bonn University in 1866. With 
a couple of fellow-students he then went to Eng- 
land, but the father of one of his friends, a Cap- 
tain in the army, was ordered to the East Indies, 
while the son died of consumption. Mr. Schurz 
was left a stranger in a country whose language 
he could hardly speak. He did not wish to re- 
turn to Germany, for he would then have to serve 
in the army. Having to provide for his own 
maintenance, he began working in a Spanish 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



127 



bakery in Liverpool, where he remained for three 
years, when he secured a very good position as 
Professor in a grammar school in that city. There 
he engaged in teaching Latin, Greek, German 
and geometry, and was thus employed until the 
spring of 1S65. In that year he was joined by 
his eldest brother, and with him came to America. 
The brother pleaded, "Let us go to the United 
States, for our cousin, CarlSchurz, and his parents 
are there and the advantages there are better than 
here." So Father Schurz severed his connection 
with the school, and in May, 1865, they landed in 
New York, from whence they went toWatertown, 
Wis., the home of Carl Schurz. There they found 
Jacob Jussen, a brother of Carl Schurz' mother, 
who had formerly been Mayor of a German city, 
and was then serving as Postmaster of Watertown. 
A vacancy in the postoffice was offered John, 
which he filled for two and a-half years, when a 
change in administration caused him to lose his 
position. 

The successor to Jacob Jussen offered to con- 
tinue him in the postoffice at an increase of wages, 
making his income $60 per month, but the posi- 
tion he declined. He then went to Milwaukee, 
and on to Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Kan- 
sas City,' and to the State of Kansas, where he 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of land. He 
knew nothing about farming, but he built a house, 
had his land broken, and there began studying 
with a view to entering the priesthood. He 
prosecuted his studies under the tutelage of 
priests in Topeka, and after a year and a-half be- 
came a student in St. Francis Theological Semi- 
nary, of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Father Schurz was ordained February 18, 1874, 
as a priest for the diocese of Leavenworth, Kan., 
and was stationed at Emporia, as assistant to Rev. 
Joseph Perry. After six months he was made 
first resident priest at Wichita, and was in that city 
duriiig its great boom. He there remained for four 
and a-half years, during which time the nearest 
priest to him was ninety miles away. A large scope 
of territory was under his supervision, including 
thirty-two stations. In 1878 he was given an as- 
sistant. About this time, Father Schurz was 
thrown from a buggy and dislocated his shoulder, 



besides sustaining internal injuries. While in poor 
health he took a trip to Europe, where he had two 
conferences with Pope Pius IX., and brought 
home with him as a relic an autograph and por- 
trait of the Pope. After four months he returned 
to this country. At Wichita he had many pleas- 
ant experiences. He found only twenty families 
there at first, but through his untiring labors he 
built seven churches in a missionary district, two 
presbyteries, two schoolhouses, laid out cemeteries 
for each church, and organized three colonies, two 
German and one Irish, called respectively St. 
Mark's, St. Joseph's and St. John's. 

In 1879, Father Schurz removed to St. Mark's, 
where he remained until 1882. For two years he 
had sought to sever his connection with the Leav- 
enworth Diocese and join the Diocese of Peoria, 
111., which he succeeded in doing in the spring of 
1882. He was assigned by Bishop Spaulding to 
Danville, Vermilion County. In 1885, he again 
went to Europe to settle up the estate of his father, 
who died in 1884. In October, 1886, he was sent 
to Ottawa, 111., but the following June resigned 
at that place and was appointed to take charge of 
the church at Warsaw, where he has remained 
since March, 1887. He also has charge of amis- 
sion at Hamilton, with fifteen families. He placed 
the church in working order and it is now in a 
thriving condition. Father Schurz is a great lover 
of flowers, and has many rare specimens in his 
collection. He is a social, genial gentleman and 
has the high regard of all with whom he has been 
brought in contact. 



(JAMES GUTHRIE JOHNSON, one of the 
I prominent citizens of Carthage, 111., well de- 
(2/ serves mention in the history of his adopted 
county, for besides being a man of enterprise and 
activity, in whom the thriving spirit of the age pre- 
dominates, he is a man of broad and liberal mind, 
conversant on all questions of the day. He was 
born in Jefferson County, Ky., about twelve miles 
from Louisville, December 24, 1827, and is a son 
of George and Eleanor (Guthrie) Johnson. His 



128 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



maternal grandparents were James and Elizabeth 
(Cooper) Guthrie. The former was one of the 
pioneers of Kentucky, and made a home eleven 
miles from Louisville, at the intersection of two 
much-traveled roads, where he kept a tavern. He 
built a stone house, which still stands, a relic ot 
former greatness. It was erected in 1774, and 
became a popular resort with the traveling pub- 
lic. There the numerous Catholic missionaries 
were instructed to remain until an escort was sent 
to conduct them safely further west. James Guth- 
rie was a prominent character in his day and knew 
all the prominent pioneers of the State. One of 
his daughters, Margaret, lived for many long 
years in the old stone house, and in speaking of 
her death the Christian Observer said: "On 
Thursday, December 22, 1892, Miss Margaret 
Guthrie, of Ferran Creek, Jefferson County, Ky., 
passed away in peace. She was ninety-two years 
and nine months old, had been a devoted member 
of the Presbyterian Church for sixty-eight years, 
and until past the age of eighty-eight had been a 
regular attendant at Sabbath-school. There are 
now living four generations of the family who 
were instructed by her. She was the last of 
twelve children who reached the average age of 
seventy-six years. One of the most liberal givers 
to the church while she lived, she bequeathed her 
house and land to the church for a parsonage. 
She was always to be found at the bedside of the 
sick, walking miles in her old age to impart com- 
fort to the afflicted. At her death she was the 
oldest subscriber of the Christian Observer, hav- 
ing read it for upwards of fifty years." 

When our subject was in his fourth year his 
parents removed to Adams County, 111., in Oc- 
tober, 1831, and the father entered land from the 
Government and made a home. He was a black- 
smith by trade, and carried on a smithy on his 
farm. He was born December 15, 1799, in Ken- 
tucky, and died on the old homestead in this 
State March 5, 1867. His wife, who was born 
in the old home mentioned, near Louisville, Jan- 
uary 21, 1802, passed away April 10, 1887. Mr. 
Johnson was the first nurseryman of Adams 
County, and set out trees in the hazel brush be- 
fore he had broken any ground. He carried on 



the nursery business until 1850. In the family 
were nine children, and with the exception of one 
who died at the age of three, all are yet living. 

James Guthrie Johnson was reared on the home 
farm, and from early boyhood was a great ad- 
mirer of the changing beauties of nature, which he 
studied closely. His love of the beautiful has 
gone with him throughout his life, undimmed by 
business cares. On attaining his majority, he 
left home and was married, on December 24, 1850, 
to Miss Melvina Jane Thomas, who lived in the 
same neighborhood. They began their domestic 
life upon a farm in Adams County, and there re- 
mained until 1855, when they settled on a par- 
tially improved farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Durham Township, Hancock County. 
There Mr. Johnson carried on farming until the 
fall of 1863, when he bought land near Elvaston. 
Three years later he came to Carthage, where he 
engaged in growing osage-hedge plants, and in 
making contracts for setting out fences of the same, 
for some years. In 1871 he secured patents for a 
corn-husking peg, known as the Johnson Husker, 
and established a factory for its manufacture. 
He has since given his time to this business, which 
has proved very successful, yielding him a hand- 
some competence, much of which he has invested 
in farming lands. He has visited nearly all the 
corn-growing States, making arrangements for 
the sale of his invention, which is now largely 
used. 

In 1884, Mr. Johnson was called upon to mourn 
the loss of his wife, who passed away on the 3d of 
December. On the 18th of November, 1886, he 
wedded Miss Minerva Hughes, of Ursa, Adams 
County, 111. His family numbers two daugh- 
ters: Rebecca Ella, wife of N. P. McKee, an artist 
and teacher of painting of Carthage; and Alice 
Geneva, wife of W. L. Aaron, an attorney of 
Hays City, Kan. 

The home of the Johnson family is one. of the 
most desirable residence properties in Carthage. 
It is a commodious house, standing in the midst 
of well-kept grounds, that are adorned with beau- 
tiful shrubbery. One has scarcely entered the 
door before he is impressed by the atmosphere of 
taste and refinement which pervades this home. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVLRSIIY Oh ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




Charles Chandler 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



13 » 



For twenty-five years Mr. Johnson has been col- 
lecting rare and interesting works, both of men 
and nature. We have before mentioned his love 
for the beautiful in nature, which is equaled only 
by his appreciation of the delicate and lovely in 
art. The walls of his home are handsomely 
adorned by many interesting and beautiful arti- 
cles, many of which are the works of his own 
hand. From polished horns taken from domestic 
cattle and goats, he has made several valuable 
ornaments. He also has a fine pair of deer horns ; 
a large hornets' nest, which hangs on a branch 
where the busy insects placed it; stuffed birds of all 
sizes, from the humming-bird to the white crane; 
the saw of the dangerous saw-fish, and many 
Indian relics, including pipes, clothing, etc. In 
a number of large glass cabinets are thousands of 
choice and valuable souvenirs. There are hun- 
dreds of varieties of birds' eggs, varying in size 
from that of the humming-bird and titmouse to 
that of the ostrich, together with alligator, turtle 
eggs, etc. Other cabinets contain fine specimens 
of oceanic animals and sub-marine growths, to- 
gether with all kinds of shells, wonderful for their 
beauty and delicacy of tint. Sea-mosses and corals 
add their loveliness to the collection, and the ad- 
mirable arrangement of the specimens show how 
carefully Mr. Johnson has studied designs and 
colors. What so elevates one as the study of na- 
ture unmarred by man ? This home is a delicate 
curiosity-shop, which speaks in no uncertain terms 
of the cultured taste and keen appreciation of the 
owner for all that is most beautiful and noble upon 
this earth. 



^H^l 



SOL. CHARLES CHANDLER, deceased. 
The name of Chandler is inseparably con- 
nected with the history of McDonough Coun- 
ty, and the gentleman whose name heads this 
record was connected with nearly all the important 
industries and enterprises that tended toward its 
advancement and further development. He was 
6 



born in Alstead, Cheshire County, N. H., August 
28, 1809, and was a son of James and Abigail 
(Vilas) Chandler. His father was also born in 
the old Granite State, but his mother was a na- 
tive of Massachusetts. Both reached an advanced 
age, the mother passing away in 1854, at the age 
of seventy-nine, while the father departed this 
life in 1857, at the age of eighty-six. The latter 
was an agriculturist, and his son was reared in 
the usual manner of farmer lads. His training 
at farm labor was not as meagre as was his 
training in the district schools, which he attended 
in the winter season . 

At the age of nineteen, Charles Chandler left 
the parental roof and went to Boston, where for 
two years he was employed as a clerk in a mer- 
cantile establishment. After two years he re- 
turned home, and a year later emigrated to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. The spring of 1834 witnessed his 
arrival in Macomb, where his elder brother, 
Thompson Chandler, had located a few years 
previous. Here he again engaged in clerking, in 
the store of which his brother was part owner, 
and in 1836 he embarked in business for himself 
along the same line. After three years he sold 
out and engaged in the real-estate business. With 
keen foresight, he bought land, which could be 
obtained at a low figure, and as it steadily rose in 
value, he realized a handsome income from its 
sales. His real-estate ventures proved a very 
profitable one, and his sagacity, enterprise and 
well-directed efforts made his business career one 
of great success. 

In 1858, Mr. Chandler embarked in the bank- 
ing business, establishing a private bank, which 
he successfully conducted until 1865, when he 
merged this in the First National Bank of Ma- 
comb. He became President of the latter insti- 
tution, and held that position until his death. He 
made it one of the solid financial institutions of 
the county, and its safe and progressive, yet con- 
servative, policy gained the confidence and sup- 
port of the entire community. He was also in- 
terested in banking in Bushnell, establishing a 
private bank, which afterward became the Farm- 
ers' National Bank. Of this he became one of 
the directors and largest stockholders, and con- 



132 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tinned his connection with the same throughout 
his life. 

On the 15th of December, 1836, was celebrated 
the marriage of Col. Chandler and Sarah K. 
Cheatham, of Macomb, a most estimable lad}-, 
who took an active interest in church and benev- 
olent work. Her death occurred in 1855, and her 
loss was mourned by many friends. In the fam- 
ily were seven children, three of whom survived 
the mother: Martha Abigail, widow of Henry C. 
Twyman, of Macomb; Charles Vilasco, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere in this work; and James 
Edgar, of Bushnell. In his family, Mr. Chand- 
ler was kind and considerate, and it seemed that 
he could not do too much to enhance the welfare 
or promote the happiness of his wife and chil- 
dren. 

In politics, the Colonel was a Whig in early 
life, but became a stanch Republican, and always 
took a great interest in politics, although he never 
sought or desired political preferment. He was, 
however, elected Coroner for two 3'ears, was Coun- 
ty Commissioner four years, long served as Jus- 
tice of the Peace, was also Alderman, and for one 
term served as Mayor of Macomb. His loyalty 
to the country was made manifest during the 
Civil War by his active service in behalf of the 
Union. He spared neither time nor expense in 
its aid. As he was too old to go to the front, he 
did much toward encouraging others to enlist, 
and his faithful and efficient service was recog- 
nized by Gov. Yates, who commissioned him 
Colonel of the State Militia, and authorized him 
to raise a regiment for home service. Through- 
out his life he maintained the greatest interest in 
the welfare of his adopted town, and few enter- 
prises or industries calculated to benefit this 
community failed to receive aid at his hand. He 
was popular with all classes of people, for he was 
a gentleman in the truest sense of the word, and 
his well-spent life won him high regard. For 
some years before his death, he spent the winters 
in a more genial clime, visiting the States along 
the Gulf, also Central America, Mexico and South 
America. He passed away December 26, 1878, 
and the country thereby lost one of its most valued 
and honored citizens. 



(JOHN W. BERTSCHI, who occupies the posi- 

I tion of County Treasurer of Hancock County, 
G/ «"d makes his home in Carthage, has the 
honor of being a native of this locality, his birth 
having occurred in Appanoose Township, on the 
1 2th of February, 1852. He is a representative 
of one of the honored pioneer families. His 
father, William Bertschi, is still living on the 
same farm to which he removed in the spring of 
1852. The mother, who bore the maiden name 
of Elizabeth Walti, died on the 7th of October, 
1893, at the age of sixty-six years, and was buried 
the following day, Sunday, in Nauvoo Cemetery. 
The parents were both natives of Switzerland. 
The father crossed the Atlantic to America in 
1849, but the following year returned to his native 
land. He was there married and then came with 
his bride to his new home in 1851. He now owns 
a good farm of one hundred and forty acres and is 
comfortably situated in life. 

In the Bertschi family were ten children, of 
whom eight are now living, five sons and three 
daughters. Four of the number are now residents 
of Hancock Count}-, and most of them follow 
fanning. John W. of this sketch was reared to 
agricultural pursuits, and devoted his time to farm 
work until the fall of 1890. He became familiar 
with the business in all of its details, for as soon 
as old enough to handle the plow, his labors in 
the field began. 

Mr. Bertschi continued upon the old homestead 
farm until the age of twenty-six years, when, on 
the 24th of October, 1877, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Margaret Porth, daughter of 
Frederick Porth, one of the early settlers of Ap- 
panoose Township, where the birth of the daugh- 
ter occurred May 28, 1856. Three children grace 
the union of our subject and his wife: William 
Tell, bornAugust 19, 1878; Roscoe Russell, born 
April 13, 1883; and Wallace, born May 14, 1887. 

Upon his marriage, Mr. Bertschi secured a farm 
near the old homestead, which he still owns. He 
began its cultivation, and soon the well-tilled fields 
yielded to him a golden tribute in return for the 
care and labor he bestowed upon them. He gave 
up farming in the autumn of 1890, when he was 
elected to the office of County Treasurer, being 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



[ 33 



the candidate of the Democratic party. He had 
previously held township offices, having served 
as Township Supervisor for three years, as Col- 
lector for four years, and as Town Clerk for one 
year. He has also served as Central Committee- 
man of his township. His entire time and atten- 
tion are now given to his official duties, which are 
discharged with a promptness and fidelity that 
have won him high commendation. He is always 
true to every trust, whether public or private, and 
has therefore won the confidence and high regard 
of all with whom business or social relations have 
brought him in contact. 



|~)EY. FATHER MICHAEL PAUL O- 
Y\ BRIEN, pastor of the Catholic Church of 
\?\ Carthage, is a native of County YVaterford, 
Ireland, but at the age of four years was taken by 
his parents to England, where he was reared to 
manhood, his boyhood days being spent in Darling- 
ton, in Durham County. He was educated in 
the public schools and by private study, and then 
engaged in school teaching, being for two years 
a teacher in St. George's Academy, of London. 
He was also employed in St. George's Industrial 
School of Liverpool, and at St. Joseph's Academy, 
Oxford Street, London. 

Having resolved to devote his life to the work 
of the ministry, Father O'Brien began studying 
for the priesthood in a college in Turin, Italy, and 
at Mondovi, Piedmont, Italy. He was ordained by 
Bishop Chadwick in St. Cuthbert's College, 
Ushaw, Durham, England, in 1873, and served 
as priest in the Diocese of Hexham and New- 
castle-on-Tyne until 1890, when he determined 
to devote his life to church work in America. 
Crossing the Atlantic, he landed on the shores of 
this country, and after a short time was appointed 
to the Catholic Church at Carthage. This was in 
July, 1890. 

The parish over which Father O'Brien now 
has charge includes four churches, namely, at 
Carthage, La Harpe, Gidding's Mound and West 
Point, with about fifteen hundred members. He 



devotes his time entirely to the work of the church 
and is laboring earnestly for its upbuilding and ad- 
vancement. He has now had charge of his present 
parish for about four years. Under his manage- 
ment the church has been considerably improved 
and enlarged by the addition of a beautiful sanct- 
uary and the useful sacristies, or vestries. 

P . . ,. ■=l <-JL^i^=' K> «? 



HENDRICKS VEATCH, M. D., who 
is numbered among the leading medical 
practitioners of Carthage, where he has 
built up an excellent business, claims Indiana as 
the State of his nativity, his birth having occurred 
in New Albany August 19, 1831. His father, 
Rev. Isaac Veatch, was a Baptist minister, and 
served in the State Legislature of Indiana as 
Representative from Spencer County. He died 
of cholera in Indiana in 1833, while visiting his 
daughter, who also died of the same disease. 
His son, James C. Yeatch, is an attorney of 
Rockport, Ind. , and served as Deputy County 
Auditor before he attained his majority. When 
he had reached man's estate, he was elected 
County Auditor. He was a candidate for Con- 
gress on the Republican ticket in 1856, and has 
represented his district in the State Legislature. 
In i860 he was a delegate to the Republican Na- 
tional Convention that nominated Abraham Lin- 
coln for President, and was also a Representative 
to the convention that nominated James A. Gar- 
field for the presidency. During the war he 
served as Colonel of the Twenty-fifth Indiana In- 
fantry, and after the battle of Ft. Donelson 
was made Brigadier-General. When the war 
closed he was breveted Major-Geueral. During 
his service he was placed in command of the city 
of Memphis, under Gen. Hulburt, and later had 
charge of the enlisting of the negro troops. At 
the battle of Hatchie River he was wounded, and 
was carried off the field for dead, but it was found 
that life was not extinct, and he ultimately re- 
covered. After his return home he was made 
Collector of Internal Revenue at Evansville, Ind., 
under President Grant, and filled the position for 



134 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



fourteen years. After that time he gave his atten- 
tion to law practice until about seven years ago, 
when he retired from business. 

The eldest son of the Veatch family, John Al- 
len, died in 1872. Before the birth of our subject 
he left home, going to Louisiana, where he en- 
gaged in teaching. He then went to Texas, and 
took part in the Mexican War as a Captain of 
a company of Texas Rangers. On the cessation 
of that struggle, he went to Colorado, and the 
last heard of him for twenty years was that he 
was in a massacre of the Indians while on the 
way to Texas. When two decades had passed, 
and James C. Veatch was serving in the Indiana 
Legislature, he met a gentleman who said there 
was a physician in California by the name of 
John Allen Veatch, that he lived in San Fran- 
cisco, and was the noted author of medical works, 
and also works on the flora of that State. Trac- 
ing him, it was found that he was the missing 
brother of our subject. He died in Oregon, but 
his family is still living in California. He pre- 
pared the first authentic record of the plants of 
California, and attained eminence as a botanist 
and physician. 

Our subject is the youngest of fifteen children, 
but only two are now living, our subject and the 
brother before mentioned, who is now seventy- 
five years of age. The mother of this family re- 
moved to Schuyler County, 111., in 1S37, and 
there died in 1874. 

Mr. Veatch whose name heads this record was 
a boy of only six years at the time of that re- 
moval. He remained upon the home farm until 
after the marriage of all his brothers and sisters. 
He took up the study of medicine with his broth- 
er-in-law, Dr. McCaskill, in Pawnee, Sangamon 
County, and pursued a course of lectures in the 
University of Missouri at St. Louis, from which he 
was graduated in the Class of '56. Among his 
classmates was Dr. J. Miner, of Winchester, 111. 
Dr. Veatch then joined his brother-in-law, who, 
after two years, went to California, and our subject 
continued in practice alone until 1877. He then 
removed to Sciota, McDonough County, and in 
1880 came to Carthage, where he has since suc- 
cessfully engaged in practice. He is a member 



of the Hancock County Medical Society, the Mili- 
tary Tract Medical Society, and the State and 
American Medical Societies. He has been a con- 
tributor to the Peoria Medical Monthly for some 
time, and has written many able articles for that 
sheet. He has also been the author of a number of 
articles of good literary merit which do not treat 
of the medical science. For six years he filled 
the Chair of Hygiene in the Carthage College, 
and has delivered many lectures on the subject 
before teachers' institutions. 

In 1857 Dr. Veatch was united in marriage 
with Miss Elizabeth Sweet, of Auburn, Sanga- 
mon County, who died five years later, leaving 
one child, Byron E. , a merchant of Chicago. For 
his second wife the Doctor married Martha E. 
Klepper, of Schuyler County, sister of Jacob 
Klepper, the banker and horseman of Augusta. 
They have one child, De Laskie Miller, who was 
named for Dr. De Laskie Miller, a prominent 
professor of Rush Medical College of Chicago. 
He is now in a dry-goods store in Quincy. Dr. 
Veatch is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, but was reared in the faith of the Baptist 
Church. In early life he was a Douglas Demo- 
crat, but when the war broke out he joined the 
Republican party, and has since been one of its 
stanch supporters. The greater part of his time 
and attention, however, is devoted to his profes- 
sion, of which he has ever been a close student. 
His skill and ability have won for him a high and 
well-merited reputation. 



wk^ 



(JOHN FRAZER SCOTT, of Carthage, occu- 
I pies the position of County Clerk of Hancock 
G/ County, and in the faithful discharge of the 
duties connected therewith has shown that he 
well merits the confidence and trust reposed in 
him by his fellow-citizens. He has the honor of 
being a native of this county, his birth having 
occurred in Warsaw on the 1st of March, 1856. 
His parents were John and Louisa (Frazer) Scott. 
His father, a native of North Carolina, emigrated 
westward in an early day and took up his resi- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



135 



dence near Jacksonville, 111. He afterward came 
to Hancock County, and was engaged in business 
in Warsaw. In Adams County, this State, he 
was united in marriage with Miss Louisa, daugh- 
ter of James Frazer, a native of Kentucky, who 
during the girlhood of his daughter came to Illi- 
nois. Mr. Scott carried on business in Warsaw 
until his death, which occurred in 1S65. He was 
several times nominated for office, and took an 
active interest in the anti-Mormon movement. 
He was connected with the events which occurred 
w hen Joseph Smith and others were killed. He did 
not sympathise with this, however, and, leaving 
the company who were engaged in the matter, he 
returned to his home in Warsaw. Mrs. Scott still 
survives her husband, and is now living in Carth- 
age. In the family were two daughters: Mary 
F., widow of George J. Rogers, of Warsaw: 
and Louisa J., wife of A. W. Boscow, of Carthage, 
with whom Mrs. Scott is living. An uncle of our 
subject, Larkin Scott, resides near Denver, 111. 
He and his wife have lived together for over sixty 
years. 

.Mr. Scott of this sketch was only nine years of 
age at the time of his father's death. Heacquired 
his education in the common schools of his native 
town, and then began earning his own livelihood 
by work as a farm hand. He was also employed 
as a clerk in a clothing store. On the 10th of 
September, 1874, he came to Carthage and ac- 
cepted a position as Deputy County Clerk, under 
his brother-in-law, George J. Rogers, with whom 
he served for three years. He then continued in 
the same position under John R. Newton, serving 
in all as Deputy County Clerk for twelve years. 
In 1886 he was elected to the superior office for a 
four-years term, and in 1890 was again elected, 
so that when his present term expires he will have 
served for eight years. He is the candidate on 
the Democratic ticket, for he is a warm advocate 
of Democratic principles, and in the campaign of 
1892 served as Chairman of the County Demo- 
cratic Committee. 

On the 1 6th of November, 1882, Mr. Scott was 
united in marriage with Miss Julia Stepp, of 
Carthage, daughter of Frank and Mary C. ( Pheil I 
Stepp. Her father, who was formerly engaged 



in the restaurant business, is now deceased, but 
her mother is yet living in this city, where Mrs. 
Scott was born. She is a member of the Episco- 
pal Church, and a most estimable lady. In the 
family of our subject and his wife are three chil- 
dren: Mary L. , John Frank and Eugenia. 

Mr. Scott was made a Mason in Hancock Lodge 
No. 20, A. F. & A . M , and has filled all of its offices. 
He was Worthy Master at the time of the build- 
ing of the Masonic Hall. He also belongs to Al- 
moner Commandery, of Augusta: and to Carthage 
Chapter No. 33, R. A. M., of which he has been 
High Priest, and he holds membership with the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity. He has frequently 
been a delegate to the State Democratic Conven- 
tions, and for fifteen years has attended the Na- 
tional Democratic Conventions. He is a man 
true to all trusts reposed in him, and throughout 
the community in which he has so long made his 
home is both widely and favorably known. 

■ F 3 1 * 



»+« 



(ILLIAM RANSOM HAMILTON is the 
well-known and popular Postmaster of 
Carthage. He was born in Johnstown, Ful- 
ton County, N. Y., November 5, 1829, and is a 
son of Artois Hamilton. The family has long 
been prominently identified with the history of 
this community, for it was founded in Hancock 
County in pioneer days. Our subject was con- 
cerned in the events which resulted in the death 
of Joseph Smith, the noted Mormon. He, in 
company with the Deputy County Clerk, David 
E. Head, took the county records in his father's 
wagon to about eight miles east of Carthage, and 
hid them in a cabin in the woods, for it was ex- 
pected that the Mormons would sack the town. 
Mr. Hamilton also remembers seeing the body 
of Hyrum Smith taken to Nauvoo in his father's 
wagon, while that of Joseph Smith was placed 
in a wagon containing four Mormons who had 
come to take the murdered men. Mr. Taylor, • 
who was wounded in seven places, was brought 
to the hotel which was kept by Mr. Hamilton's 
father, opposite the site of the Criss House, and 



136 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



William aided in caring for the injured man, who 
was kept there for ten days. Those were excit- 
ing times, and great dangers were often incurred. 

On the 8th of June, 1854, Mr. Hamilton was 
united in marriage with Miss Martha H. Miller, 
a native of Elmira, N. Y., and a daughter of 
Warren Miller. To them were born six children, 
but three are deceased. Ida A., Willard C. 
and Herbert are jet living in Carthage. 

The year following his marriage, Mr. Hamilton 
entered upon official duties, being Census Taker 
of the county, which then had a population of 
twenty-two thousand one hundred and fifty-eight. 
In 1858 he was elected Sheriff, which position he 
filled for two years. On his retirement from of- 
fice in i860, he removed to his farm in Prairie 
Township, now Carthage Township, and made 
his home thereon until 1882. His knowledge of 
public affairs, however, caused him to be often 
called upon to assist one or another of the county 
officials, and he has always been more or less 
connected with public interests. In 1882, he 
took his family to California and Oregon, expect- 
ing to make his home in the Northwest, but sick- 
ness caused his return to Illinois in 1883. Soon 
after he was chosen to fill a vacancy caused by 
the death of his old friend, Justice John M. Fer- 
ris, who was one of the honored and most highly 
respected pioneers of the county. A special elec- 
tion soon followed, and it seemed the universal 
wish that Mr. Hamilton should succeed to the 
judicial honors. He acceptably filled the various 
duties of the position for ten years, but about a 
year ago he became Postmaster of Carthage, Pres- 
ident Cleveland having appointed him to the posi- 
tion in recognition of his fifty years of faithful 
sen-ice in the ranks of the Democracy, his good 
business ability and popularity. 

Mr. Hamilton has long been well known to 
many of the leaders of his party, and faithfully 
served for some years as Chairman of the County 
Democratic Committee. He is a man of broad and 
liberal views and is highly regarded by all. For 
over forty years he has been a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, having been made a Mason in 
Hancock Lodge No. 20, A. F. & A. M., when 
twenty-three years of age, and for several years 



served as Master. He also belongs to Carthage 
Chapter No. 33, R. A. M. ; Carthage Council 
No. 47, R. & S. M.; and Almoner Commandery 
No. 32, K. T., of Augusta, and has frequently 
been a representative to the Grand Lodge. Mr. 
Hamilton is a pleasant, genial gentleman, of com- 
manding presence, free from all ostentatious dis- 
play, and possesses those social qualities which 
make him a favorite with all. 

6~ ■ "" c=J < T Sgj " d 

(TESSE C. WILLIAMS, who for many years 
I was prominently connected with the business 
(2/ interests of Carthage, but is now practically 
living a retired life in that city, was born in Rich- 
mond, Madison County 7 , Ky., on the 22d of Au- 
gust, 18 19. His father, Richard G. Williams, 
was a native of Culpeper County, Va. , and in 
1808 emigrated to Kentucky, where he met and 
married Catherine Holder, who was born in that 
State in 1797. Her father, John Holder, was a 
native of Virginia, and was a comrade of Daniel 
Boone. Her mother was a daughter of Col. 
Richard Calloway, who was prominent in the 
French and Indian and Revolutionary Wars. He 
made his home for some years in Kentucky. A 
story of romantic interest is connected with the 
marriage of his daughter, and is as follows: 

Late on a Sunday afternoon, three young girls, 
Betsy and Frances Calloway, daughters of Col. 
Calloway, and Jemima Boone, a daughter of Dan- 
iel Boone, ventured from the enclosure at Boones- 
boro to amuse themselves with a canoe upon the 
river that flowed by the fort. They drifted down 
with the current, and before they were aware of 
danger they were seized by five Indian warriors. 
Though they resisted with their paddles, they 
were drawn ashore and hurried off to the Shaw- 
nee tribe on the Ohio. Their screams were heard 
at the fort, and the cause of the outcry was at 
once imagined. The fathers were absent, but 
soon returned and quickly started in pursuit, 
Col. Calloway heading a mounted party, while 
Boone, as was his custom, went on foot. His 
party numbered eight, among whom were three 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'37 



young men, the girls' lovers, who shared in 
the anxiety of the almost distracted fathers. 
Betsy Calloway, the eldest girl, marked the trail 
as she was hurried along by breaking twigs and 
bending bushes, and when threatened with the 
tomahawk if she persisted, tore small bits from her 
dress and dropped them as she passed along. She 
would also frequently plant the heel of her shoe 
deeply in the soil to make distinct impressions to 
guide those she knew would soon pursue. Every 
precaution was taken by the Indians to obliterate 
any trace of their course, but keen eyes and anx- 
ious hearts were following, and as day dawned on 
Tuesday a film of smoke showed the vicinity of 
the camp where the Indians were cooking break- 
fast. Col. John Floyd, who was afterwards 
killed by the Indians, was one of the party, and 
vividly described the rescue. "Our study was to 
get the prisoners without giving the Indians time 
to kill them after they discovered us. Four of 
us fired, and we all rushed on them, by which 
they were prevented from carrying anything away 
except one shotgun. The red men escaped, but 
with no guns, clubs or provisions, and two of 
them were severely wounded. The return of the 
rescued girls was the occasion of great rejoicing. 
The young lovers had proved their skill and cour- 
age under the eye of the greatest of all warriors 
and woodsmen, Daniel Boone, and had fairly 
won their sweethearts." Two weeks later the 
first wedding on Kentucky soil was solemnized, 
the parties being Samuel Henderson and Betsy 
Calloway. The contract was witnessed by friends 
and neighbors, the formal license was dispensed 
with, and the vows were administered by Rev. 
Boone, a Hardshell Baptist preacher. Within a 
year Frances Calloway became the wife of the 
gallant Capt. John Holder, who afterwards dis- 
tinguished himself in Kentucky annals, and 
Boone' s daughter married the son of Col . Calloway . 
In tracing the ancestry of the Williams family, 
we find that Jesse Williams, grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was born in eastern Maryland in 1750. His 
grandfather had emigrated from Wales and had 
there located in 1720. Jesse Williams, Sr., emi- 
grated to Kentucky in 18 17, and there died in 
1835. His son Richard became a resident of that 



State in 1808, and continued there to make his 
home until called to his final rest in 1876, at the 
age of ninety. By trade he was a saddler. His 
wife died at the age of eighty-seven. In their 
family were thirteen children, of whom twelve 
grew to mature years, while eight are yet living. 
Only two are residents of Illinois, J. C. and a 
sister who lives in Bloomington. 

The boyhood days of J. C. Williams were spent 
upon the old home farm. At the age of twenty 
he left the parental roof and went to southeastern 
Tennessee, where, in 1839, he assisted in build- 
ing the East Tennessee & Virginia Railroad, the 
first road built into the former State. In 1840, 
he went with his employer to Georgia, and was 
engaged on the construction of the Georgia Cen- 
tral Railroad. He served as book-keeper for the 
contractors, and in 1S41 returned to Kentucky, 
where he engaged in farming for a year. He 
then followed school-teaching until 1843, when 
he began selling goods in Mt. Vernon, Ky. In 
1848, he began business there on his own account, 
and continued to successfully carry on operations 
along that line until 1S56, when he removed to 
Crab Orchard, Ky., where he spent eighteen 
months. In the fall of 1857, he came to Carthage, 
where for two years his brother, William H. Will- 
iams, had been engaged in business. In August 
the latter had opened a large store, and in October 
of the same year Mr. Williams of this sketch 
assumed control of the same. He carried a stock 
valued at $6,000, which included all kinds of 
general merchandise. After two years his brother 
retired and entered the army. Later he went to 
Iowa, but is now living in the northwestern part 
of Mexico. 

Mr. Williams had married ere leaving his na- 
tive State. On the 5th of March, 1850, in Lin- 
coln County, Ky., he wedded Mary Collier, 
daughter of John and Susan Collier, of Rock 
Castle, Ky. Unto them were born seven chil- 
dren, five of whom are yet living. Oscar W. 
who graduated from the law department of Har- 
vard College, is now an attorney and the County 
Judge of Pecos County, Tex. He is also a ranch- 
man and is largely interested in Texas lands. 
William I), graduated from Abingdon College, of 



i3» 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Abingdon, 111., studied law with Judge Ireland, 
of Austin, Tex., and is now a well-known attor- 
ney of Ft. Worth, where he is engaged in prac- 
tice as a member of the firm of Williams & Butts. 
Josiah J., who graduated from Carthage College, 
is also a successful lawyer. He studied with the 
firm of Scofield & Hooker, of this city, and is 
now in practice in Kansas City, Mo., where he is 
serving as Assistant Prosecuting Attorney of 
Jackson County, Mo. Susan, who graduated 
from Carthage College, is successfully engaged in 
teaching in the city schools. Jessie, a stenog- 
rapher and typewriter, is employed in the pub- 
lishing house of Chapman Brothers, of Chicago. 

Mr. Williams began business for himself in 
Carthage in January, i860, and for two years 
was alone, after which he admitted to partnership 
A. M. Ossman. The following June Mr. Oss- 
man was murdered, while assisting Sheriff Ing- ' 
rahm to arrest a man named Ritter, who was 
killed later in the day. The widow continued in 
the business for two years, after which Mr. Will- 
iams became sole proprietor. He did a good bus- 
iness, building up an excellent trade, and his well- 
directed efforts brought him a handsome compe- 
tence. In March, 1892, he retired after a third 
of a century spent in merchandising in Carthage. 
He was always prominent in business circles and 
honorable and straightforward in his dealings. 
He has always paid one hundred cents on the 
dollar, and his word is as good as his bond. He 
had established two branch stores, but did not 
continue their operation for any great length of 
time. He is now interested to a considerable ex- 
tent in Texas lands, having his capital well in- 
vested. 

When a young man in Kentucky, Mr. Will- 
iams became a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and he and his wife hold membership with the 
Christian Church, taking an active interest in its 
welfare. He has served as a member of the City 
Council, and was President of the Board. In 
1871 and 1872, he represented his district in the 
State Senate, during which time the work of re- 
construction was carried on. By his ballot he has 
always supported the Democratic party. His 
time, however, has been mostly given to commer- 



cial interests, and through the legitimate channels 
of business he has acquired a comfortable prop- 
erty, which is the just reward of a busy and well- 
spent life. 

y HOMAS F. DUNN, who is now serving his 
I C second term as Circuit Clerk of Hancock 
v2/ County, makes his home in Carthage, and 
is recognized as one of its progressive and public- 
spirited citizens, wide-awake to the best interests 
of the community. He is also one of Hancock 
County's native sons, and a representative of one 
of her early families. He was born on the 21st 
of April, 1858, and is of Irish lineage. His par- 
ents, John and Mary (Cummings) Dunn, were 
both natives of the Emerald Isle. The father re- 
sided in that country during the days of his boy- 
hood and youth, and when a young man of eigh- 
teen years sailed for America. Hoping to better 
his financial condition in a land where greater 
privileges were afforded, he crossed the Atlantic 
and took up his residence in Connecticut. ' 

In the Nutmeg State, John Dunn was united in 
marriage with Mary Cummings. They became 
the parents of eight children, but three of the 
number are now deceased. Mary still resides in 
Hancock County; Edward J. is a prosperous 
farmer of this county; John J. is also engaged in 
agricultural pursuits; Ellen is the wife of Edgar 
P. Hull, a resident of Hancock County; and 
William W. is clerk in the Exchange Bank of 
Carthage. In 1857 John Dunn came to Illinois, 
and took up his residence in Pilot Grove Town- 
ship, Hancock County. There he purchased land, 
and to its cultivation and improvement he has 
since devoted his energies. He is recognized as 
one of the leading agriculturists of the community, 
and by his well-directed efforts has acquired a 
comfortable property. 

We now take up the personal history of Mr. 
Dunn whose name heads this record. He was 
reared on the old homestead in the usual manner 
of farmer lads. His days were passed midst play 
and work, and in attendance at the common 



LIBRARY 

UNIVE.RSIIY UK kUfc-ii 

URBANA 




Gen. Oliver Edwards 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



141 



schools, where he acquired a good education. 
He early began to labor in the fields, and became 
familiar with farm life in all its details. It was 
his desire, however, to engage in some other pur- 
suit than that to which he was reared, and when 
twenty-two years of age he left the parental roof 
and came to Carthage. 

It was at this time that the official life of Mr. 
Dunn began. He was appointed Deputy Circuit 
Clerk of Hancock County, and continued to fill 
that position for six consecutive years. He was 
then, in 1888, elected as Circuit Clerk for a term 
of four years. So ably did he fill the office that 
on the expiration of his term he was re-elected. 
He is ever prompt and faithful in the discharge 
of his official duties, and has won the high com- 
mendation of all concerned. In 1881 he served as 
Township Assessor. In his political views, he is 
a Democrat, and the party has found in him a 
stanch supporter since he attained his majority. 
Like his parents, he is a member of the Catholic 
Church. In this county, where his entire life has 
been passed, he is both widely and favorably 
known, and his friends throughout the community 
are many. 

5= "^a^'rS b^ -® 



SEX. OLIVER EDWARDS, Mayor of War- 
saw, lives in an elegant home overlooking 
the Mississippi Valley for many miles. He 
is recognized as one of the most pi ominent citizens 
of this place, and his name is inseparably con- 
nected with many of its leading events. His an- 
cestors were numbered among the Revolutionary 
fathers, and his great-grandfather, who served in 
the War for Independence, was made a prisoner 
in what was called the Black Hole at Quebec, but 
succeeded in escaping to Albany, N. V. His 
widow afterward received a pension in recognition 
of his sen-ices. The family has always fur- 
nished representatives as defenders of the country. 
John S. Edwards, who was in the War for Inde- 
pendence, was born July 11, 1764, in Dedham, 
Mass., and in 1775 removed to Norwich, Mass. 
In April, 1 781, he was drafted for six months' 



sen-ice in the Colonial army under Capt. William 
Forbes. With his command he marched into the 
interior of New York, where the Indians were 
harassing the settlers, and was stationed for three 
months at Ft. Schuyler. He aftenvard spent 
three months at Ft. Stannox, where he received 
his discharge. He died in the ninety-third year 
of his age. Capt. Oliver Edwards entered the 
Colonial sen-ice in 1775, and valiantly aided in 
the struggle to secure to the oppressed Colonies 
release from the British yoke of tyranny. 

Capt. Oliver and Rachel (Parsons) Edwards, 
of Northampton, Mass., were the grandparents of 
our subject. Their son, Dr. Elisha Edwards, 
father of the General, was born in Chesterfield, 
Mass., January 26, 1793. When a young man 
he went to Northampton, and began learning the 
apothecary's trade in the store of E. Hunt. In 
18 15, he emigrated to Springfield, 111., where he 
embarked in business on his own account. Af- 
terward he formed a partnership with Henry 
Stearns, which continued from 1820 until 1825. 
In 1828, he joined Charles J. Upham in business, 
under the firm name of C. J. Upham & Co. Dr. 
Edwards, who was a prominent citizen, was one of 
the subscribers to the fund for the purchase of the 
Court Square, and was one of the original Direc- 
tors of the Chicopee Bank. In 1821, he married 
Eunice Lombard, daughter of Daniel and Sylvia 
(Burt) Lombard, and to them were born five sons 
and five daughters. The members of the family 
now living are Mrs. Caroline L. Smith, of Spring- 
field, Mass.; Mrs. Sophia Orne Johnson, of Bath, 
N. H.; Mrs. Charlotte E. Warner, of Springfield, 
Mass.; William, a prominent merchant of Cleve- 
land, Ohio; Mrs. Julia E. Hurd, of Dorchester, 
Mass.; Oliver, of Warsaw; and Mrs. Mary E. 
Child, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

We now take up the personal history of Gen. 
Edwards, who was reared in the expectation of be- 
coming a master mechanic of Springfield, Mass. 
In 1856 he emigrated westward, making his home 
in Warsaw, 111., where he became a member of the 
firm of Heberling, Edwards & Co., and occupied 
the position of master mechanic. To that work 
he devoted his energies until the breaking out of 
the Civil War, when, prompted by patriotic im- 



I 4 2 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



pulses, he responded to the country's call for 
troops. He had studied the events previous to 
the beginning of the struggle, and when the disso- 
lution of the Union was threatened he resolved to 
strike a blow in its defense. He donned the blue, 
and like his ancestors of old fought valiantly for 
his country. 

Gen. Edwards was a brave soldier. He entered 
the service as First lieutenant and Adj utant of the 
Tenth Massachusetts Regiment, June 21, 1861; 
was mustered in as Colonel of the Thirty-seventh 
Massachusetts Regiment September 4, 1862; and 
was appointed Brigadier-General of Volunteers 
May 19, 1865. He received the brevet rank of 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers October 19, 1864, 
for gallant and distinguished sendees in the battle 
of Spottsylvania Court House, Va., and Major- 
General of Volunteers April 5, 1865, for conspic- 
uous gallantry at the battle of Sailor's Creek, Va. 
He was honorably mustered out of service January 
15, 1866. 

When the war was over, Gen. Edwards re- 
turned to Warsaw and for a year and a-half served 
as Postmaster of this place. In the mean time, he 
was married. On the 3d of September, 1863, he 
wedded Ann Eliza Johnson, daughter of the late 
Gen. E. Johnson, of Warsaw. They became par- 
ents of two children: John E. , who is now general 
superintendent in Montana for Cruse's cattle and 
sheep ranches; and Julia Kate at home. 

Gen. Edwards resigned as Postmaster to become 
general agent for the Florence Sewing-machine 
Company, of Northampton, Mass. His connec- 
tion with that company continued for seven years, 
during a portion of which time he was its man- 
ager. In 1879, he returned to Warsaw, and re- 
tired from business, but in 1882 he accepted an 
appointment as General Superintendent of the 
Gardner Gun Company in England. Thus his 
time was occupied for two years, when he resigned 
on account of ill health and returned home. The 
best interests of the community have ever found 
in him a friend, one ever ready to aid in the ad- 
vancement of those enterprises which are calcula- 
ted to prove of public benefit. He has been honored 
with a number of local offices, and is now serv- 
ing his third term as Mayor of Warsaw. The city 



has had no more competent official in that office 
than Gen. Edwards, whose fidelity to duty is 
everywhere known and recognized. In his polit- 
ical views he is a stalwart Republican, and so- 
cially, is connected with Arthur W. Marsh Post 
No. 343, G. A. R., and with the Masonic fra- 
ternity. 

6= d:= S] < ? > GE T* £ > 

~PHRAIM H. PORTER, the well-known 
'y editor of the Hancock County Pilot, which 
_ . is published in Warsaw, claims Alabama as 
the State of his nativity, his birth having occurred 
in Gadsden, November 24, 1858. His parents 
were Ephraim and Sarah A. Porter, the former 
a native of Connecticut, and the latter of North 
Carolina. During his life the father engaged in 
various pursuits, having been a school teacher, 
merchant, farmer and saddler. He spent about a 
quarter of a century in the sunny South, but in 
1865 removed from Georgia to the North, taking 
up his residence in Danville, Iowa, where his last 
days were passed. His death occurred on the 8th 
of August, 1890, at the age of seventy-four years. 
Mrs. Porter still survives her husband and is now 
living with her sou in Warsaw. The family num- 
bered eleven children, six of whom are yet liv- 
ing. Thej- are all married, but are widely scat- 
tered. One resides in Gadsden, Ala.; the second 
in Chicago; another in Triplett, Mo.; the fourth 
in Alliance, Neb.; and another in Marble Mount, 
Wash. 

Mr. Porter of this sketch was only seven years 
of age at the time of his parents' removal to Iowa. 
His education was completed in the High School 
of Danville, that State. He was reared on a farm, 
and with his father learned the saddler's trade, 
which he followed for a time, but, wishing to de- 
vote his time and attention to other pursuits, he 
decided to enter the newspaper field, and at the 
age of eighteen years began learning the printer's 
trade in an office in Danville. He was afterward 
associated with his father in the publication of the 
Danville News. He embarked in this enterprise 
in 1881 and continued it until 1883, when he sold 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



i43 



out and removed to Martinsville, Clark County, 
111., where he formed a partnership with John 
Shepherd, an old schoolmate, and established 
the Martinsville Planet. This connection con- 
tinued for a year, when Mr. Porter bought out 
his partner's interest and continued the publica- 
tion of his paper alone during the four succeed- 
ing years. Then, selling out, in 1889, and coming 
to Warsaw, he established the Hancock County Pi- 
lot, a paper published in the interest of the Demo- 
cratic party. He has been quite successful in this 
undertaking, and it has now gained quite an ex- 
tensive circulation. The paper is a bright, newsy 
sheet, well edited, and is deserving of a liberal 
patronage. 

On the 9th of May, 1882, Mr. Porter was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary Elizabeth Petzinger, 
and to them has been born an interesting family 
of six children. In his social relations, Mr. Por- 
ter is an Odd Fellow, belonging to Hancock Lodge 
No. 71, I. O. O. F. In his political views, he is 
a stalwart Democrat. Public-spirited and pro- 
gressive, he is ever alive to the best interests of 
the community in which he lives, and does all in 
his power to aid in its advancement. 

te l " = E3 <' T "> L=i ,S © 

^"HOMAS B. HUNT, M. D., who is success- 
I C fully engaged in medical practice in War- 
vJ/ saw; and who is numbered among the lead- 
ing physicians of Hancock County, is a native of 
Kentucky. He was born in Fayette County 
January 6, 1831, and is a son of Silas W. and 
Elizabeth C. (Wilson) Hunt, who were also 
natives of the same county. Their ancestors 
removed thither from Virginia. It seems that 
there were originally three branches of the family 
in this country, one locating in New York, one 
in Virginia, and the third in Alabama. The fa- 
ther of our subject was a farmer by occupation, 
and followed that pursuit throughout his entire 
life. He died in Kentucky, September 30, 1869, 
at the age of sixty-six years, and his wife died 
April 15, 1846, at the age of forty-three. They 
were the parents of eight children, but only three 



are now living: A. S., proprietor of the Phoenix 
Hotel, of Lexington, Ky. ; Mrs. Elizabeth Hen- 
dricks, of Georgetown, Ky. ; and Thomas B. of 
this sketch. 

The Doctor acquired his literary education in 
New Castle, Ky., and, taking up the study of 
medicine, was graduated from the Medical Uni- 
versity of Louisville, in the Class of '64. Pre- 
vious to this time, he had practiced to a limited 
extent, for he had taken his first course of lec- 
tures in the winter of 1859-60. For twelve years 
he engaged in the practice of his profession in 
Bedford, Ky. In September, 1864, he became 
Assistant Surgeon of the Fifty-fourth Regiment 
of Kentucky Mounted Infantry, and served one 
year, his duties calling him to southern and east- 
ern Kentucky, East Tennessee and southwestern 
Virginia. He was always in the field, working in 
an improvised hospital. 

When the war was over Dr. Hunt returned to 
Bedford, in September, 1865, and there continued 
to successfully engage in practice until 1872, when 
he left his native State and came to Illinois. He 
took up his residence in Tower Hill, Shelby 
County, where he remained until 1880, when he 
came to Warsaw, where he has since made his 
home, devoting his time and attention to general 
practice. His success has been assured from the 
first, and he now enjoys a liberal patronage as the 
result of his skill and ability. 

On the 29th of September, 1862, Mr. Hunt 
was joined in wedlock with Miss Mary H. Affleck, 
the wedding being celebrated in Bedford, Ky. 
The lady is a daughter of Alex and Mary R. 
(Bell) Affleck, and on her father's side is of 
Scotch descent. To the Doctor and his wife have 
been born nine children. Two died in Kentucky 
and three in Illinois. Those living are Mollie 
Gibson and Mattie M. , both of whom are engaged 
in teaching; Samuel J., who is employed in the 
machine shops in Peoria; and Berenice, at home. 

Socially, Dr. Hunt is a member of the Ancient 
Order of Free and Accepted Masons, the Inde- 
pendent Odd Fellows, Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, American Legion of Honor, and the 
Grand Army of the Republic. In 1886 he was 
elected Commander of Arthur W. Morris Post No. 



144 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



343, G. A. R., again served in 1890 and 1891, 
and was elected for the fourth term in 1893. He 
is a member of the Christian Church, and has 
served as Trustee of the Warsaw public schools 
for nine years, part of the time as President of 
the Board. He takes an active interest in the 
cause of education, and in everything that tends 
to elevate humanity. He is President of the 
Board of Pension Examiners of Carthage, with 
which he has been connected for several years, 
and for a time was President of the Board both in 
Bushnell and Carthage. He received his first 
appointment under President Cleveland, was re- 
appointed by President Harrison, and then again 
by Cleveland. By his ballot he always supports 
the Democracy. He is a man of social nature 
and generous disposition, and in the community 
where he has now made his home for fourteen 
years he is widely and favorably known. 

pGJlLLIAM P. RAICH, who is prominent in 
\ A / business circles in Warsaw, represents 
V Y various insurance companies, and is doing 
a good business along that line. One of War- 
saw's native sons, he was born in the city which 
is still his home on the 15th of November, 1858. 
His parents, Frederick and Elizabeth (Ross) 
Raich, were both natives of Germany. The fa- 
ther was a stone mason by trade and followed 
that pursuit for many years. He bade adieu to 
his native land in 1856, crossed the Atlantic to 
America, and took up his residence in Louisville, 
Kv., from whence he came to Warsaw. His 
death occurred in 1882, and his wife died twenty 
years previous, passing away in 1862. In their 
family were five children, of whom three are yet 
living, namely: William P. of this notice; Benja- 
min A. , who is connected with the pickle works 
of Warsaw; and Fannie M., who holds the posi- 
tion of book-keeper with the firm of Eckbohm, 
Dross & Co. 

Our subject spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth midst play and work, and his education 
was acquired in the public schools of Warsaw. 



He began earning his own livelihood at the age 
of fifteen years, and whatever success he has 
achieved in life is due to his own efforts. In 
1873, he began working as deliver}' boy in the 
grocery store of Stroh & Roth, and was thus em- 
ployed for about three years. In 1876, he began 
clerking for Mr. Stroh, and the following year en- 
tered the employ of the firm of Eckbohm, Dross 
& Co. as book-keeper. He continued in that 
capacity for fifteen years, a faithful and trusted 
employe. In the mean time he had worked into 
the insurance business, and in 1893 he opened 
an insurance office. He now represents various 
companies, including the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of New York; the Bankers' Life of Des 
Moines, Iowa; the Northern Assurance Company 
of London; Niagara Fire Insurance Company of 
New York; the Detroit Fire and Marine; Traders' 
of Chicago; and the American Fire Insurance 
Company of New York. He has a good and 
growing business, which has constantly increased 
from the beginning, until it has reached fair pro- 
portions, and yields to the proprietor a good in- 
come. 

The lady who bears the name of Mrs. Raich 
was in her maidenhood Miss Lousia A. Schott. 
The marriage of our subject and his wife was 
celebrated on the nth of November, 1884, and 
they have become the parents of four children, 
two sons and two daughters, Clara, George, 
Frederick and Carrie. Mrs. Raich is the daugh- 
ter of John Schott, a resident of Warsaw. Mr. 
Raich, who is a stockholder in the Warsaw Pickle 
Company, assisted in organizing the company, 
which was incorporated in February, 1887, and 
was its first Secretary, holding that position for 
one year. 

In his social relations, Mr. Raich is an Odd 
Fellow. He exercises his right of franchise in 
support of the Democratic party, and has been 
honored with a number of local and official posi- 
tions. He was elected Collector of Warsaw in 
1887, was chosen Alderman in 1889, and in 1893 
served as Assessor. His various duties he dis- 
charged with promptness and fidelity, for he is al- 
ways true to every trust, whether public or pri- 
vate, that is reposed in him. He is well known 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



H5 



in this community, where his entire life has been 
passed, and his warmest friends are those with 
whom he has been acquainted from boyhood, a 
fact which indicates an honorable and straight- 
forward career. 

HON. JOHN DEE STEVENS (deceased), 
of Carthage, was prominently identified 
with the history of Hancock County for 
many years, and, in fact, his name is inseparably 
connected therewith, for he was a leader in 
many enterprises and public movements which 
have resulted in the growth and development of 
the county and in promoting its best interests and 
material welfare. Almost his entire life was here 
passed, and so widely and favorably was he 
known that we feel assured our readers will re- 
ceive with interest this record of his career. 

Mr. Stevens was one of the native sons of Illi- 
nois, his birth having occurred in Carrollton, 
Greene County, February 8, 1826. His parents, 
Joseph and Elmira (Dee) Stevens, were married 
in Carrollton, in April, 1825. The maternal 
grandfather, John Dee, was a native of Vermont, 
and with his family removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where Mr. and Mrs. Stevens became acquainted. 
In 18 1 8, her father's family went to St. Charles, 
Mo., and two years later removed to Carrollton, 
111., where, in 1822, Joseph Stevens took up his 
residence. He was born in New York City, and 
in Cincinnati learned the hatter's trade. In 
r828, he removed with his wife and son John to 
Hazel Green, Wis., and for a few months was 
connected with the lead-mining interests of that 
region, but in the autumn he went down the 
Mississippi on a keel-boat to where now stands 
the town of Louisiana, Mo. , which was then only 
a hamlet. There he opened a hatter's shop, and 
in connection with business along that line traded 
extensively with the Indians, making various 
trips to the several tribes in northwestern Illi- 
nois, Iowa and Wisconsin. This he carried on 
until his business was almost stopped by the 
Black Hawk War, in 1832. The following year 



he came to Hancock County, and secured Gov- 
ernment land in Chili Township, about twelve 
miles due south of Carthage, being located on 
the main line of travel between Quincy and the 
East. He established the stage-house at Chili for 
the accommodation of the public, and, securing 
the control of the line, continued to run stages be- 
tween Macomb and Quincy for some years. His 
place was noted for its cheerful hospitality, and 
its most popular and companionable landlord be- 
came a favorite with all who went his way. He 
died on the old homestead in 1846, at the age of 
forty-six. His widow survived him about seven- 
teen years, her death occurring in 1863. Car- 
thage had just been chosen the county seat when 
he located here, and he was present at the first 
sale of town lots, which occurred in 1832. He 
was an anti-Mormon, and was called to aid in 
suppressing that sect. Not long after he located 
in this county, he was joined by his brother, 
Moses Stevens, who also secured Government 
land. He was a contractor, and erected the court 
house which is still standing. He completed the 
building in 1839, and soon afterwards went to 
Iowa. In 1850, he went to California, where his 
death occurred the same year. 

John Dee Stevens was the eldest in a family of 
four sons and one daughter who grew to mature 
years. George W. resides at Medicine Lodge, 
Kan.; J. O. is a fanner of Chili Township; Mrs. J. 
S. Hatton resides in Carrollton, 111.; and Frank, 
a Union soldier, was killed at the battle of 
Jackson, Miss., in 1863. John remained at home 
during his boyhood, and passed through the ex- 
citing scenes which accompanied the Mormon 
troubles. He was with the men who were called 
out by Gov. Ford to aid in disbanding the Mor- 
mons at Nauvoo. On the 27th of June, 1844, 
Hyrum and Joseph Smith were killed by a squad 
of men from Warsaw, who had been expected to 
join Gov. Ford at Golden Point, but who after 
disbandment came to Carthage and committed 
the atrocious murder. Mr. Stevens remembered 
seeing both men when they were brought into 
the court house the following morning. Later 
he was with the forces under Thomas Muckman, 
of Mt. Sterling, who, with John Carlin, went to 



146 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Nanvoo to serve the papers on the Mormons. 
This was in October, 1846. The army of about 
five hundred camped three miles from the temple 
at Nauvoo and awaited negotiations, which it was 
hoped would end the affair peaceably, but these 
were rejected, and hostilities commenced. The 
battle was begun and raged for an hour and a- 
quarter, when the supplies gave out, and the at- 
tacking party withdrew. Mr. Stevens remained 
with the army, doing the duty assigned him un- 
til hostilities ceased, and Nauvoo was given into 
the hands of the authorities. Soon after, the 
Mexican War came on, and he was anxious to 
enter the service, but the death of his father oc- 
curred about that time and he felt that his sen-ices 
were needed at home, although he had made 
preparations to join a regiment at Quincy. 

In 1849, gold was discovered in California, and 
the following year Mr. Stevens joined three 
young men, who with a six-horse team started 
overland to California. On reaching their desti- 
nation, Mr. Stevens began work in the mines at 
Plaeerville, but being attacked by rheumatism, 
he was disabled for that arduous labor. After 
leaving the mines, he sought a warm climate, and 
located near the old missions of Santa Barbara 
and Los Angeles, where he secured employment 
with some Mormons who were engaged in the 
lumber business. It is very probable that he did 
not tell his employers that he had acted as a sol- 
dier against them in Hancock County, else he 
would have lost his position, if nothing worse had 
occurred. At length he turned his face toward 
home, for he was tired of wild life in the West, 
and determined to join a surveying party which 
was fixing the boundary line between Mexico and 
the United States. In company with a Mr. Pea- 
body from Ohio, and an old sailor named Mor- 
mon Bill, he started on the trip, the three travel- 
ing on ponies. The journey was full of interest- 
ing and sometimes dangerous adventures and was 
one never to be forgotten by Mr. Stevens. His 
companions were not men of the best class, and af- 
ter a time he parted company with them, join- 
ing a man who was going direct to Texas. 
Mr. Stevens proceeded to Eltar, Mexico, where 
he joined two Americans and sixty native laborers, 



who were building a substantial fort. Here Mr. 
Stevens began raising tobacco, which sold for 
$10 per pound in Mexico, but the Apache In- 
dians coming to attack him, the camp and its fol- 
lowers all fled to Eltar, and the crop was lost. 
Our subject then set out to join the surveying 
party. On the way he fell in with a band of 
thieves, but at length reached the party, and later 
found himself in San Antonio, Tex. 

Mr. Stevens did not then at once set out for 
Illinois, but, with the hope of retrieving his for- 
tunes, made a trip to Ft. Clark. At length, after 
an absence of five years, he returned to the scenes 
of his boyhood, poor in pocket, but rich in expe- 
rience. The following year he visited Ft. Riley, 
Kan., then the headquarters of all the wild spirits 
of the border, but a few months spent there satis- 
fied him, for he was in the company of gamblers, 
and he returned to the prairies of Hancock Coun- 
ty, and accustomed himself to the habits of a 
more civilized life. 

About this time he married Miss Julia Ann 
Towler, of La Prairie, Adams County, and 
after his marriage he began farming on the old 
home which he had left seven years before, and 
there resided until 1870, when he was elect- 
ed County Sheriff, and removed to Carthage. 
In 1872, he was re-elected and efficiently served 
for four years. During the succeeding ten years 
he devoted himself to farming interests, but did 
not remove to the country. In 1882, he was 
chosen to represent his district in the State Legis- 
lature, and while thus serving always had the in- 
terests of his constituents at heart, and took an 
active part in advocating such legislation as 
would cause the railroads to provide more ade- 
quate service for the people. This roused the op- 
position of those connected with the railroads, and 
when he was renominated the opposing party so 
persistently worked against him that he was de- 
feated. For years he was Chairman of the Coun- 
ty Democratic Committee, and did all in his 
power to promote his party's interests. He was 
the author of the ' 'Aledo Letter, ' "which resulted in 
the union of the Democrats and Greenbackers in 
the district for the election to Congress of their 
candidate, William H. Neece, much to the cha- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



■47 



grin and annoyance of the Republican leaders. 
He was a man of keen observation, a close stu- 
dent of human nature, and his great urbanity and 
suavity of manner made him a leader of men. 
He became Postmaster of Carthage under Cleve- 
land, but resigned his office on the election of 
President Harrison, not desiring to serve under a 
political opponent. Though he was an advocate 
of Democratic principles, he did not fully agree 
with the President on all matters, as he was a 
strong advocate of the free-coinage system. 

Mr. Stevens took an active interest in every- 
thing that pertained to the perpetuation of the au- 
thentic history of the county in which he so long 
made his home. He was for years a member 
of the Old Settlers' Association, and for two 
years served as its President. He was a man of 
broad and liberal mind, who believed in giving to 
the pioneers who were the founders of the county 
their just dues. Those who knew him esteemed 
him highly for the many excellencies of his char- 
acter, and certainly his name deserves an honored 
place on the pages of his adopted county. 

Mr. Stevens died at his home in Carthage Jan- 
uary 3, 1S94, after an illness of but a few days. 
His children are Leona M., who is connected 
with the educational interests of the county; Clara 
B. , wife of Thomas Jackson, a fanner of Hancock 
County; and Elmira A., at home. 



Wl C. ECKBOHM is acknowledged by many 
y to be the leading business man of Warsaw. 
fc) He is connected with some of its leading 
industries and interests, and thereby has aided 
materially in the progress, prosperity and up- 
building of this place. The various enterprises 
with which he is connected have yielded to him a 
good income and numbered him among the sub- 
stantial citizens of the community. 

Mr. Eckbohm is a native of Germany. He 
was born in Liebick, March 13, 1846, and is a 
son of Henry and Marie (Wohlbrand) Eckbohm. 
The father was a ship carpenter by trade, and fol- 
lowed that business in his native land. In i860, 



he bade adieu to his old home and friends and 
with his family crossed the briny deep to America. 
On landing in this country he came direct to 
Warsaw, where he made his home until his death, 
which occurred about the year 1884. I" tne 
family were three children, of whom two are now 
living, namely: Mrs. Capt. Myers, and Martin C. 
of this sketch. A brother, Charles, was drowned 
at Mound City, 111., on the 10th of June, 1881. 

No event of special importance occurred during 
the boyhood and youth of our subject. He at- 
tended the public schools of his native land until 
fourteen years of age, when he accompanied his 
parents on their emigration to America. During 
the past thirty-four years, he has been a resident 
of Warsaw, and is familiar with the history of its 
upbuilding and advancement. In October, 1872, 
he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Shafer, 
of Warsaw, daughter of John Shafer. They have 
one child, Clara. 

In 1 88 1, Mr. Eckbohm established the firm of 
Eckbohm, Dross & Co., dealers in hardware, ag- 
ricultural implements and groceries. He had 
formerly been engaged in the grain business for 
several years. When the above-mentioned firm 
was established, he labored assiduously to build 
up a good business, and by his well-directed ef- 
forts, his fair and honest dealing, and his earnest 
desire to please his customers he soon secured a 
liberal patronage. He also established a branch 
house in Keokuk and one in Alexandria, and both 
proved profitable investments, yielding to the 
owner a good income. In 1888, he established 
the pickle works at Warsaw. A company was 
formed with a capital stock of $25,000. From 
the beginning trade has constantly increased, and 
the business in 1893 amounted to upwards of 
$75,000. In that year they purchased forty-two 
thousand bushels of cucumbers. 

In his political views, Mr. Eckbohm is a Re- 
publican, and has twice served as City Alderman 
of Warsaw with credit to himself and satisfaction 
to his constituents. He manifests a commenda- 
ble interest in everything that pertains to the 
welfare of the community, and his hearty support 
and co-operation are given to those enterprises 
which are calculated to prove of public benefit. 



148 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Socially, he is connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Through the legitimate 
channels of business he has won a success of which 
he is well deserving — a success which has brought 
to him a handsome income, and made him one of 
Warsaw's substantial citizens. 

REV. HOLMES DYSINGER. D. D., Presi- 
dent of Carthage College, is well known as a 
leading educator throughout Illinois and 
other Central States. He was born near Mifflin, 
Pa., March 26, 1853, and was one of a family that 
numbered six sons and a daughter. The family 
is of German origin, his ancestors having set- 
tled originally in York and Lancaster Counties, 
Pa., more than a century ago. His grandparents 
on both sides removed to that part of Mifflin 
County which was afterwards cut off and forms 
a part of Juniata County. There was celebrated 
the marriage of Joseph Dy singer and Mary 
Amelia Patterson, who became the parents of our 
subject. They were not wealthy people and did 
not leave to their children a handsome compe- 
tency, but they gave to them what is oftentimes 
far better — a good home training. They were 
reared to habits of industry and economy, and les- 
sons of honor, obedience and consideration for 
one another were instilled into their young minds. 
Their parents possessed true refinement, and sur- 
rounded their children with only that which was 
pure and good. 

In the labors of the farm, Mr. Dysinger of this 
sketch was also well developed. From an early 
age he was very fond of study, and soon man- 
ifested a praiseworthy ambition to excel in the 
country schools, which convened for about three 
mouths out of the year. He found in his parents 
his principal teachers, and the older members of 
the family often assisted the younger in their les- 
sons, an experience which proved of benefit to 
Mr. Dysinger in his after life. His love of good 
books continued to grow, and he soon became fa- 
miliar with the broad and elevating thoughts of 
many master minds. He wished to enter profes- 



sional life, and one of his first independent efforts 
was at school-teaching, which he began at the 
early age of seventeen. During the spring and 
summer he would aid in the labors of the farm, 
and in the winter season take charge of the 
school. He was thus employed for five years. 

In the winter of 1871-72, under the preaching 
of the Rev. D. M. Blackwelder, he united with 
the Lutheran Church, and from that time has 
been actively interested in its promotion. Be- 
coming imbued with a strong desire to enter the 
ministry, be began a course of preparation for the 
sacred office, and his studies were chosen with 
the view of fitting himself for college. In the 
spring of 1873, he became a pupil at Airy View 
Academy, at Port Royal, Juniata County, Pa., 
where he took up the study of Latin and Greek 
in connection with the academic course. As time 
advanced, his desire to enter the ministry grew 
continually stronger, for he felt that his labors 
were needed in the work of uplifting humanity. 
With the exception of one term at the academy 
and a few private lessons, he prepared himself for 
college without the aid of a teacher, and in the 
fall of 1875 was admitted to the Sophomore Class 
of Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, Pa., 
where he applied himself assiduously to his stud- 
ies. He was graduated from that school in the 
spring of 1878, and had the honor of being vale- 
dictorian of his class. The excellent work which 
he did in the school, and the regard of the faculty, 
were shown by his appointment as tutor and man- 
ager-in-chief of the preparatory department of 
his alma mater. While thus employed he spent 
all his spare time in the study of theology in the 
seminar}- classes, and at length completed the 
course and was graduated from the seminary in 
June, 188 1. However, he continued his studies 
along that line for the following year, and at the 
termination of his post-graduate course in theol- 
ogy, he received notice of his election to the Pro- 
fessorship of Ancient Languages of North Carolina 
College, where he remained for about a year. 
He afterwards served for a short time as supply 
in a mission church in Mooresville, N. C. In the 
spring of 1883, he accepted the Chair of Ancient 
Languages in Newberry College, Newberry, S.C., 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSIiY Of ILLINOIS 
UR8ANA 




~7% 



o£*ryL /£ 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



151 



and entered upon his duties in the following au- 
tumn. He filled that position five years, and 
during: four years of that period also served as 
Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Exegesis 
in the Evangelical Lutheran Theological Semi- 
nan- of the South. 

In August, 1886, was celebrated the marriage of 
Rev. Mr. Dysinger and Miss Ada Ray, a most es- 
timable and accomplished lady of Blairsville, Pa. 
While at Newberry College, the Professor became 
a member of the American Institute of the He- 
brew Language, an organization formed by Prof. 
W. R. Harper, then" of Yale College, but now 
President of the Chicago University. During the 
regular vacation months, he was employed one 
season as a professor in that institute. He is a 
man of earnest purpose, and his researches and in- 
struction in Hebrew literature did much for the 
advancement of knowledge along that line. His 
connection with Carthage College began July 10, 
1888. He was elected its President, and he and 
his able corps of assistants form a most excellent 
faculty. He is capable of filling the most respon- 
sible position, which he has now held for about 
six years to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

g- ^g<,,i>i; 



HON. WILLIAM HARRISON RANDOLPH, 
deceased, who was one of the most public- 
spirited and progressive citizens Macomb 
has ever known, and who was a leading factor in 
all that pertained to the upbuilding of the city, 
was born in Lebanon, Ohio, on the 20th of Au- 
gust, 18 13, and was a son of David and Rebecca 
(Sutphen) Randolph. Both were natives of New 
Jersey, and from that State they removed to 
Kentucky, and thence to Ohio. Some members 
of the family, however, are still living in Lexing- 
ton, Ky. The Randolph family was founded in 
America in a very early day, by ancestors who 
crossed the Atlantic and settled in New Jersey 
prior to the Revolution. 

W. H. Randolph spent his early boyhood on 
his father's farm, and in his youth he served an 
apprenticeship in a woolen mill in Lebanon, Ohio. 
7 



Wishing to try his fortune on the broad prairies 
of the West, and with the hope of thereby better- 
ing his financial condition, he came to McDon- 
ough County, 111., in 1834, and cast his lot 
among the early settlers. He embarked in gen- 
eral merchandising in Macomb, and from a small 
beginning he steadily increased his business until 
it had assumed extensive proportions. His fel- 
low-townsmen, soon recognizing his worth and 
ability, called him to public office, and in 1838 
he was elected County Sheriff, which position he 
filled for six years, or for three terms. In 1844, 
he was sent to the House of Representatives, and 
in 1846 was elected his own successor. Many 
years passed before he was allowed to retire to 
private life, for he was always found prompt and 
faithful in the discharge of his public duties, and 
the confidence and trust of the people were always 
with him. In 1848, he was elected Circuit Clerk 
of the county, and filled that position until 1856. 
He very- seldom, if ever, held an office to which 
he was not re-elected on the expiration of his first 
term. His popularity and the confidence reposed 
in him were so great that he always ran far ahead 
of his ticket, and on no occasion was he a defeated 
candidate. 

On the 26th of January, 1837, Mr. Randolph 
was united in marriage with Matilda Jane Brook- 
ing, daughter of Thomas Alexander and Mary 
Louise (Thrushley) Brooking, the former a na- 
tive of Richmond, Va., and the latter of Lexing- 
ton, Ky. Her parents were honored pioneers of 
McDonough County, who, in 1834, settled upon 
a farm four miles north of Macomb. They had a 
family of thirteen children, six of whom are yet 
living, namely: Mrs. Randolph; William T. and 
Alexander V., of Macomb; Robert S., of Audo- 
ver, S. Dak.; Mrs. J. E. Randolph, of Ft. Scott, 
Kan.; and August, a farmer of Dallas, Tex. 
One of the number, Edward S., was killed near 
Memphis, Tenn., upon the occasion of a raid by 
Forest's men. He was taken prisoner, and was 
afterwards killed by his captors, August 21, 1864. 
He was buried by the roadside, and all trace of 
his grave was soon lost, so that his resting-place 
is unmarked. A sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Upde- 
graff, died October 13, 1873. Mrs. Lucy Snyder, 



152 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Carrollton, Mo., died in August, 1889. Louise 
died in May, 1852, and the others died in early 
childhood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph began their domestic 
life in Macomb, and always made their home in 
this city. In 1854, he opened the first banking 
house in McDonough County, in company with 
Joseph M. Parkinson, Joseph \V. Blount and M. 
T. Winslow. During the first two years they 
were quite successful, but they were persuaded by 
T. L. McCoy, of Galesburg, to invest $20,000 in 
the Nemaha Y alley Bank. The Macomb Bank 
was to issue its own notes and to be held respon- 
sible for the same, as was the case with every 
other bank interested therein, but afterwards an- 
other arrangement was made whereby any notes 
issued on the Nemaha Valley Bank could be pre- 
sented to any bank connected therewith for col- 
lection, and then sent to their respective banks 
for final redemption. In 1858, the Nemaha Val- 
ley Bank failed. Messrs. Randolph & Co. re- 
deemed their whole issue and over $5,000 of the 
notes of other parties, for which they never ob- 
tained compensation. This caused their failure, 
and Mr. Randolph alone lost over $100,000. 
Here the honorable dealing which always charac- 
terized his business career was strongly shown. 
He did not compromise with his creditors, paying 
a few cents on the dollar, but he began at once to 
liquidate all debts, and labored earnestly to pay 
his creditors. At the time of his death he had 
paid nearly the entire amount. No one doubted 
his honesty of purpose, for his word was as good 
as his bond. 

In 1856, Mr. Randolph began the erection of 
the well-known Randolph Hotel, which stands as 
a monument to his enterprise and public spirit. 
Not finding a suitable tenant, he took charge of it 
in 1858, and continued to carry on the hotel busi- 
ness until his death. He made the house a fav- 
orite stopping-place with the traveling public, 
and it was an honor to the city. During the 
same year that work on the hotel was begun, he 
laid off Oakwood Cemetery, comprising a tract of 
eleven acres, north of the city. It was the most 
beautiful and eligible spot near Macomb, and he 
set it aside as a resting-place for those who had 



crossed the dark river. Mr. Randolph was also 
interested in the real-estate business. In 1853, 
he began business along that line under the firm 
name of Randolph, Parkinson & Co., and this 
connection was continued until November 3, 1856, 
when the firm became McLean, Randolph & Co. 
The}' confined their operations to a region known 
as the "Military Tract," comprising sixteen 
counties, lying between the Illinois and Missis- 
sippi Rivers, and for a time did an extensive bus- 
iness, which materially increased Mr. Randolph's 
wealth. He was a man of keen sagacity and 
foresight, which, combined with his thorough 
knowledge of the country, made his purchases 
and sales profitable. 

In politics, Mr. Randolph was first a Whig, 
and on the organization of the Republican party 
he at once joined its ranks. No one was ever 
doubtful as to where he stood, for he was a man 
of firm convictions, and neither fear nor favor 
could make him withhold an opinion on questions 
which he believed to be vitally important to the 
country. When the Republican party was yet 
new and its success seemed doubtful, he put forth 
every effort in its behalt and labored untiringly 
for its growth and upbuilding. In i860, he re- 
doubled his efforts in support of Illinois' greatest 
statesman, and his labors in this community did 
much toward securing the large majority which 
was given to the Martyr President. His loyalty 
and patriotism were made manifest on the out- 
break of the late war, and his time and means were 
given freely to the support of the Union. The 
boy r s in blue were ever welcome at his house, and 
if they had no money to pay bills it mattered not, 
for he gave to them freely. They were engaged 
in the effort to preserve the Union, and the cause 
was dear to his heart. 

On the 15th of June, 1863, Mr. Randolph was 
appointed Deputy Provost-Marshal for McDon- 
ough County, without his solicitation, and was 
re-appointed September 28, 1864. His friends 
urged him not to accept, for they knew that 
many enemies would arise, anxious to take the 
life of one whom they would regard as a foe; but 
it was a question of duty, not of safety, with him, 
and he accepted the appointment. His first act 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



•53 



was to make an enrollment of the militia, report- 
ing the names to the Provost-Marshal in Mt. 
Sterling. At this time McDonough Count}- was 
short in the quota, and a draft was ordered. The 
number deficient was drawn, and among others 
John Bond, of Hire Township, was drafted. Mr. 
Randolph at once notified him, and ordered him 
to report at once at Mt. Sterling; but this not be- 
ing done he proceeded to Blandinsville to arrest 
Bond. The latter endeavored to escape, but Mr. 
Randolph told him he was a prisoner. Bond 
then took a step or two back and fired at Mr. 
Randolph, after which he fled. The Marshal re- 
turned the shots, and each fired again several 
times. James Bond, a brother of the prisoner, 
now came up in the rear of the Marshal and be- 
gan firing, and inflicted a fatal wound, the death 
of Mr. Randolph following within twenty-four 
hours. His loss was mourned throughout the 
entire community, for he was one of the most 
prominent, influential and highly-respected citi- 
zens. His name is inseparably connected with 
the history of the community, for he was one of 
the important factors in its upbuilding. 

Mrs. Randolph still survives her husband and 
is yet living in Macomb. She is the possessor of 
considerable valuable property, and the income 
derived therefrom surrounds her with all the 
comforts of life. 



REV. DAVID LOY TRESSLER was born 
in Loysville, Pa., February 15, 1S39, and 
was a son of Col. John Tressler, whose death 
occurred in 1S59. The father was a man of much 
more than ordinary ability, and was a prominent 
citizen of the Keystone State. He was a warm 
friend to education, and with his own means 
erected a school in Loysville, of which he was at 
the head for several years. On his death his son 
succeeded to his position. This academy was 
later transformed into a Soldiers' Orphans' Home, 
and stands to-day as the permanent Orphans' 
Home of the Lutheran Church of Pennsylvania. 
Others in the familv evinced a talent for educa- 



tional work, and a brother of our subject, who 
died at the age of twenty-four, occupied the Chair 
of Mathematics in the Capital University in Col- 
umbus, Ohio. 

The Rev. D. L. Tressler whose name heads 
this sketch was educated in the public schools and 
in Loysville Academy, of which he afterwards be- 
came principal. In 1857 he entered the sopho- 
more class of the Pennsylvania College, and was 
graduated with honor in i860. The same year 
he became principal of the academy which his fa- 
ther founded, but in 1862 resigned that position, 
and largely among his students raised a company 
of volunteers for service in the Civil War. He 
was chosen Captain, and led his command in the 
battles of South Mountain, Antietam and Fred- 
ericksburg. In the last-named he was twice 
wounded, but after recovering he resumed his com- 
mand and took part in the famous battle of Chan- 
cellorsville. He was tendered a Colonel's com- 
mission, but declined this and returned home. 

Capt. Tressler then took up the study of law, 
and in 1864 was admitted to the Bar. For five 
years he continued practice, and was considered a 
rising young lawyer, for his talents were such as 
to make him well adapted for that profession ; but 
he had other aspirations, and as he expressed it, 
" If I wish to be rich in this world's goods, I will 
remain in the legal profession ; if rich in the next 
world, I will enter the ministry." Accordingly, 
in 1870, having removed to Mendota, 111., he en- 
tered the ministry of the Lutheran Church, and 
was immediately called to Lena, where he labored 
most assiduously and successfully until coming to 
Carthage in 1872, having been elected a professor 
in Carthage College. After one year's work in 
the classroom he was called to the head of the in- 
stitution, entering upon the duties of President in 
1873. He also had charge of the financial affairs 
of the college and was pastor of the Trinity Luth- 
eran Church. It was largely through his instru- 
mentality that the substantial house of worship 
was erected. 

In 1865, Dr. Tressler wedded AdaJ. Mclntyre, 
of Pennsylvania, who survives him and still makes 
her home in Carthage, highly respected by all 
who know her as a lady of refinement, possessed 



'54 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of many excellencies of character. She was a 
faithful helpmate to her husband, and by her gen- 
tle, womanly influence aided him greatly in his 
work as an educator and minister. 

Dr. Tressler was admirably fitted for the im- 
portant position which he held. He was a man 
of indomitable energy, quick intellect and fine 
business tact, possessed a kind, generous and sym- 
pathetic nature, was of a cheerful disposition, and 
always looked upon the bright side of things. He 
had a happy faculty of making every one feel at 
ease in his presence, and with untiring zeal and 
energy he labored for the success of the college 
and for the advancement of the cause of Christ. 
He was a fluent and graceful writer, possessed 
many of the qualities of a fine orator, and in man- 
ner was easy and free and void of all ostentation 
and display. His career was devoted to all that 
was noble and best in life and to the elevation of 
humanity. His death, which occurred February 
20, 1880, in his forty-second year, was deeply 
mourned, not only in this community, but 
throughout the circles of the Lutheran Church. 



3<' ? "^fa"* 2 

HENRY BOWER, of Carthage, who is now 
practically living a retired life, is a native of 
the Keystone State, his birth having oc- 
curred in Carlisle, Pa., on the nth of March, 
1825. His father, Daniel Bower, was also a na- 
tive of Cumberland County. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and married Martha Bishop, a na- 
tive of York County. Their last years were spent 
in Cumberland County, and when death came 
they were laid to rest in Carlisle Cemetery. 

Our subject spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth in his parents' home, and ere he attained 
his majority he served an apprenticeship of three 
years and a-half to the blacksmith's trade, which 
he followed for a time. At length he determined 
to seek a home in the West, and in 1855 started 
for Kansas, but located instead in Hancock Coun- 
ty, 111. In the spring of 1857, he came to Carth- 
age, and, meeting old friends, decided to remain in 
this place. He secured the position of Jailer, in 



which capacity he served for three years. In 
1865, he opened a blacksmith shop near the pres- 
ent site of the city water works, and continued 
to work at his trade until 1878. He did a good 
business and accumulated a comfortable compe- 
tence. Part of his capital he invested in a one 
hundred acre farm situated a mile and a-half west 
of Carthage, on the Keokuk road. He rents his 
land, which is under a high state of cultivation 
and well improved, and therefore yields to him a 
good income. 

Mr. Bower was married ere leaving the State of 
his nativity. On the 22d of March, 1849, in Mt. 
Rock, Pa., he was joined in wedlock with Miss 
Rachel Melinda Davidson, who has been his 
faithful companion and helpmeet along life's 
journey for forty-five years. To them were born 
the following children: John Davidson, who died 
at the age of twenty-three; Lillie, who died at the 
age of nineteen; William W., who is engaged in 
the poultry business; Matthew B., who died at 
the age of seven ; and Addie, who passed away at 
the age of one year. All died of typhoid fever in 
1871. 

In his political views, Mr. Bower is a Republi- 
can. He has long supported that party by his 
ballot, but has never been an office-seeker. His 
wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and both are highly respected citizens, who well 
deserve representation in this volume. 

OTHAIRE BRUCE COCKERN is one of 
I C the honored veterans of the late war, who 
\ J went to the front and valiantly stood for the 
preservation of the Union. He now makes his 
home in Carthage, 111., and for a year past has 
been engaged in the publication of the Hancock 
County Journal, of which he is now editor and 
proprietor. He was born at Hillsboro, Ky., on 
the 22d of December, 1838, and is a son of John 
P. and Mary A. (Crawford) Cockern, who were 
natives of Ohio and Kentucky, respectively. The 
Cockern family came originally from England, 
and settled in Pennsylvania. Later, its repre- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



155 



sentatives became residents of the Panhandle Dis- 
trict of West Virginia. The father of our subject 
is a carpenter by trade, and has followed that pur- 
suit through much of his life. He is now living 
in California, whither he removed in March, 
1863. The mother died in Carthage, 111. .Jan- 
uary 24, 1861. In the family were eight chil- 
dren, six of whom are yet living, namely: L. 
B., of this sketch; Mrs. Sarah A. Gilliam, who 
resides in Live Oak; Mrs. Eliza B. Gray, of 
Marysville; Mrs. Zerelda A. Bartlett, of Suisun; 
Mrs. Aramanda A. Creighton, of Glenburn; and 
George W. , who is located in Fairfield, Cal. 

We now take up the personal history of our 
subject, who was reared in the usual manner of 
farmer lads, spending his summer months at labor 
in the field, while in the winter season he attended 
the public schools of the neighborhood. The 
year 1851 witnessed his arrival in Hancock 
County, where he has made his home continu- 
ously since. At an early age he began working 
as a farm hand at $8 per mouth, and was thus 
employed for several seasons. 

The Union found in Mr. Cockeru one of its most 
zealous defenders during the late Civil War. 
Prompted by a spirit of patriotism,, he eidisted on 
the 6th of May, 1 861, in his country's service, and 
joined the boys in blue of Company D, Sixteenth 
Illinois Infantry. His first season's service was 
in northern Missouri. This was light service — 
he having only to chase the rebel cavalry just 
enough to keep the horses poor. In 1862 he was 
under the command of Gen. Pope until after the 
siege of Corinth. He participated in that siege, 
was later stationed atTuscumbia, Ala., until that 
line was abandoned, and then went to Nashville, 
where with his command he lay for ten months. 
He later did sen-ice under Gens. Rosecrans and 
Thomas, and went with Sherman as far as Rome, 
Ga., in the campaign against Atlanta, just prior 
to the ever memorable inarch to the sea. His term 
of service expired while at Rome, Ga. He was a 
non-commissioned officer, having been made Cor- 
poral on the day of his muster in, while later he 
was promoted to be Sergeant. He was ever found 
at his post of duty, faithful to the trust and confi- 
dence reposed in him. Through the heroic efforts 



of the private soldiers, the Union was preserved, 
and to them the country owes a debt of gratitude 
which can never be repaid. 

After his return to Hancock County, Mr. Cock- 
em was engaged in the recruiting service until 
the close of the war. He was married on the 
28th of March, 1866, to Miss Emily A. Symonds, 
daughter of Frederick W. Symonds, a native of 
New Hampshire. Five children were born to 
them, but two of the number, Robert and an in- 
fant sister, are at rest. Those still living are 
Mary, Isabel and John. 

In 1869, Mr. Cockern was appointed Postmas- 
ter at Carthage, 111., by President Grant, and held 
that position for five years, proving a capable and 
efficient officer. He now devotes his entire time 
and attention to the publication of his paper. In 
politics, he was first a Democrat, following in the 
political footsteps of his father, and on attaining 
his majority voted for Stephen A. Douglas. Dur- 
ing the war, however, he became a Republican, 
and has generally supported its men and meas- 
ures. .Socially, he is connected with the Masonic 
fraternity, and is an honored member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. He is a valued citizen of 
the community, who manifests the same loyalty 
to his duties of citizenship in days of peace as he 
did in days of war. Through the columns of his 
paper he exerts his influence for all that promotes 
the best interests of the community, and his co- 
operation is given to all worthy and commendable 
enterprises. 



"DWARD M. ROBBINS, D. D. S. , is the lead- 
^ ing dental surgeon of Carthage, where for 
_ _ eighteen years he has been continuously 
and successfully engaged in the practice of his 
chosen profession. A native of Indiana, he was 
born in LaGrauge County, April 11, 1S42, ami 
is a son of Dr. Eppaah and Mary (Clarke) Rob- 
bins. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, 
but was reared in Ohio, and the mother claimed 
New York as the State of her nativity. They con- 
tinued to reside in LaGrauge County until 1850, 



156 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



when they emigrated with their family to Fayette 
County, 111., and the Doctor continued in prac- 
tice in this State until 1871. He then removed 
to Osage Mission, Kan., where he resided until 
his death, in February, 1892, at the age of seventy- 
three years. He made his home in Hancock 
County from October, 1861, until 4871, residing 
in Nauvoo and Poutoosuc. The only brother of 
our subject, George E., a dentist, was drowned 
in the Walnut River, at Arkansas City, Kan., in 
June, 1893. The only sister became the wife of 
R. D. Cogswell, M. D. They lived in Hancock 
County from 1861 until 1868. 

Doctor Robbins of this sketch was a lad of only 
eight years when he came with his parents to 
Illinois. He acquired his education in the com- 
mon schools, and in an academy at Alton, which 
is now known as Shurtliff College. He then began 
the study of medicine with his father, but in Au- 
gust, 1862, prompted by patriotic impulses, he 
enlisted as a member of Company H, Seventy- 
eighth Illinois Infantry, and was mustered in at 
Ouincy on the 20th of the month, with John K. 
Allen as Captain, George T. Bear as Lieutenant, 
and Samuel Simmons as Second Lieutenant. He 
served under Gens. Buell and Rosecrans, and 
the first hard-fought battle in which he partici- 
pated was at Chickamauga, where his company 
suffered a heavy loss. His division, however, 
under Gen. Steadman, saved the entire army. 
Later, he was in the battles of Chattanooga, Mis- 
sion Ridge, Sweet Water, and was then with his 
command sent to Knoxville to relieve Banks. 
He took part in the first battle of the Atlanta 
campaign at Tunnel Hill, and the engagements 
at Resaca, Keunesaw Mountain and Peach Tree 
Creek. His division was also in the battle of 
Jonesboro, which resulted in the evacuation of 
Atlanta. They were then sent back to Hunts- 
ville and Mt. Forest, and afterwards again went 
to Atlanta, and on the celebrated march to the 
sea under Gen. Sherman. The Doctor then 
marched to Richmond and on to Washington, 
where he participated in the Grand Review. He 
received his discharge in Chicago. In the spring 
of 1863, he had been detailed to act as assistant 
hospital steward in the medical department, but 



was always with the regiment and on the field 
taking care of the wounded. 

When the country no longer needed his serv- 
ices, Mr. Robbins returned to Illinois, and re- 
sumed the stud}' of medicine, but soon after be- 
gan dealing in stock and later took up farming. 
In 1869 he resumed his studies and entered a 
dental college in Chicago, from which he was 
graduated in 1871. The following year he re- 
moved to Osage Mission, Kan., but after two 
years returned to Illinois, and in 1875 came to 
Carthage, where he has since been actively en- 
gaged in practice. He is a member of the Cen- 
tral Illinois Dental Society, of which he has 
served as President, and of the State Society, in 
which he is now serving as a member of the execu- 
tive council. 

Dr. Robbins was married March 24, 1870, to 
Miss Mary, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Con- 
ner) Brownlee, who were pioneers of Hancock 
County, where Mrs. Robbins was born. They 
have three children: Eulalie, a young lady of 
twenty, who is now studying music under Prof. 
Liebling, of Chicago; and Eddie and Samuel, who 
are at home. 

The Doctor served as a member of the Town 
Council for a number of years, and was then 
called upon by the people of Carthage who were 
in favor of anti-license and the support of public 
enterprises calculated to promote the interests of 
the community to become a candidate for Mayor. 
This he did, and he is now acceptably and credit- 
ably filling that office. He is indeed always 
found on the side of progress and advancement. 
The Doctor is one of the incorporators of the 
Hancock County Agricultural Board, which owns 
a forty acre-park, finely arranged for fairs and pic- 
nics. He is Secretary of the company, which has 
given twelve public exhibitions. He has always 
been a great lover of fine horses, and is now en- 
gaged in breeding trotters. He bred "Combina- 
tion, "with a record of2:i8^'2 ; "Sebasco," a three- 
year-old, with a record of 2:10; and he now owns 
"Eulalie," by "Egmont," full sister of "Combi- 
nation." He also has one mare sired by "Jerome 
Eddy," the famous horse that sold for $30,000. 

In his social relations, the Doctor is connected 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



157 



with the Odd Fellows' society and the encamp- 
ment, and also the Knights of Pythias fraternity , 
which he has represented in the Grand Lodge. 
He belongs to the Lutheran Church, and is ranked 
among the best and most valued citizens of the 
community, his name being inseparably con- 
nected with all that pertains to the general wel- 
fare and to the promotion of its best interests. 
Carthage has had no better Mayor, or one who is 
more universally esteemed. 



ILTOX T. HUNT, who is engaged in the 
dry-goods business in Warsaw, as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Elhebe, Hunt & Co., 
was born in this place on the 10th of October. 
1 86 1, and is a representative of one of the early 
families of the county. His parents, M. T. and 
Helen M. ( Baldwin 1 Hunt, came to this place in 
[854, and the father became prominently con- 
nected with the business interests of this place. 
He was a native of North Carolina, and his will- 
was born in New York. He came from his native 
State to Illinois, and took up his residence in Mc- 
Donough County, where he made his home until 
his removal to Warsaw, as before stated. For a 
time he followed farming, but later turned his at- 
tention to the pork-packing business, in which he 
continued for about seven years. He was a man 
of good business and executive ability, and his 
enterprising and well-directed efforts won for him 
success, and secured for him a comfortable com- 
petence. 

In 1856 Mr. Hunt was called upon to mourn 
the loss of his first wife. In their family were 
the following children: Mrs. Jennie Withers, who 
resides in Henderson County; Carrie, who is now 
deceased; Henry, who is living in Texas; and El- 
len, of Warsaw. After the death of his first wife, 
Mr. Hunt was again married, his second union be- 
ing with Mrs. Helen (Baldwin) Wilson. Their un- 
ion was graced by three children : Mrs. Eugenia A. 
Dallam, Milton T. of this sketch, and Kate, now 
deceased. The father of this family was called to 
his final rest March 8, 1879, and his wife passed 



away on the 6th of December, 1886. Mr. Hunt 
whose name heads this record has known no 
other home than Hancock County. Here the 
days of his boyhood and youth were passed, and 
it has been the scene of his business career. Dur- 
ing his earlier years he followed farming to some 
extent, and also worked in a grocery store at va- 
rious intervals, but in 1892 he embarked in the 
business as a member of the firm of Elhebe, Hunt 
& Co. He is now in charge of the store, which 
is a well-appointed one, tastefully arranged and 
stocked with everything found in an establish- 
ment of this kind. He is enjoying a good trade, 
for his courteous and gentlemanly treatment of 
his patrons, and straightforward, honorable deal- 
ing, always retain the trade of those whose cus- 
tom he once secures. He is wide-awake and enter- 
prising, and his success is well merited. 

Mr. Hunt is a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, and has taken the Knight Templar Degree. 
In religious belief he is an Episcopalian. He ex- 
ercises his right of franchise in support of the Re- 
publican party, for he is a stalwart advocate of 
its principles, and does all in his power to pro- 
mote the growth and insure the success of Repub- 
licanism, and he takes an active interest in even- 
thing pertaining to the welfare of the city. 



~»+£P~ 



flOHN GILLER is extensively engaged in the 
I brewing business in Warsaw. A native of 
G/ Canada, he was born in the city of Hamilton, 
Wentworth County, Ontario, on the 8th of Feb- 
ruary, 1859. His father, Rudolph Giller, was a 
native of Switzerland, and there spent the days 
of his childhood. In the year 1848, he bade 
adieu to home and friends and crossed the broad 
Atlantic to America. Taking up his residence in 
Louisville, Ky., he embarked in the brewing 
business, and there carried on operations for some 
years. At length he left that .State, and in 1S54 
removed to Canada. He was the first manufac- 
turer of lager beer in Canada, ale having been the 
only product of the kind made hitherto. Mr. 
Giller was united in marriage with Miss Catherine 



i5« 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Bauer, who was born in the grand duchy of 
Baden, and in 1852 he came with his family to 
Illinois. 

Our subject was a child of only two years when 
his parents came to this State. His early boy- 
hood days were quietly passed. During his 
youth he went to New York, and in Rochester 
learned his trade in Bartholomew's brewery. 
There he continued until 1879, when he returned 
home. Two years later he entered into partner- 
ship with Martin Popel, his stepfather. His own 
father had died in 1861. 

On the 4th of October, 1886, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Giller and Miss Anna Wolf, 
daughter of the late Charles Wolf. Their union 
has been blessed with three children, a son and 
two daughters: Florentine, Olivia and Walter 
John. 

Mr. Giller is a member of the Turners' Society, 
is one of the firemen of Warsaw, holds member- 
ship with the Independent Order of Mutual Aid 
and the Odd Fellows' fraternity, and belongs to 
Ft. Edward Encampment. He is a man of good 
business ability and has made a success of his un- 
dertakings. 

(D)ICTOR DORY was for many years promi- 
\ / nently connected with the mercantile inter- 
V ests of Warsaw, but is now living a retired 
life, having placed his business in the hands of 
his sons, who are now conducting it under the 
name of Doty Brothers. He is a man of deter- 
mined effort, enterprising and energetic, and in his 
undertakings he won a well-merited success. As 
he is so widely and favorably known in this com- 
munity, we feel assured that this record of his 
life will prove of interest to many of our readers. 
Mr. Dory was born in the department of the 
Moselle, France, May 7, 1827, and is a son of John 
and Barbara (Laluette) Dory. He remained on 
his father's farm during the days of his boyhood 
and youth, but in 1848, having attained his ma- 
jority, he left the old home and sailed for America. 
He took passage on the vessel "Pyramid, ' ' which 



after a voyage of fifty-three days, dropped anchor 
in the harbor of New Orleans. Mr. Dory then 
had a cousin living in the Crescent City, who ad- 
vised him to go North on account of the cholera 
which raged in the Southern States. On the fol- 
lowing day, therefore, he took passage on the 
"Southern" for a trip up the Mississippi. Three 
days later cholera broke out on board the ship, and 
each evening the boat would go to land to bury 
the victims of that disease, numbering from ten to 
sixteen in a single day. One entire family of 
seven members died, save a boy of fifteen. Mr. 
Don- was taken with the cholera at Louisville, 
the fifth day after his arrival in this country, and 
for six weeks he was unable to walk. He then 
went to Bloomington, Ind., where his brother 
Sylvester was living, and with him remained for 
three years. 

In 1852, Mr. Dory and his brother came to 
Warsaw, and, purchasing a stock of goods, opened 
a store on the present site of the store now con- 
trolled by Dory Brothers. There he carried on 
business continuously until his retirement, with 
the exception of two years spent in his native 
land. In 1858, on account of impaired health he re- 
turned to France, where he spent two years, again 
coming to Warsaw in i860. In 1872, his brother 
Sylvester left this place and went to Louisville, 
Ky. Later, he removed to Dakota, where he now 
resides. 

On the 9th of April, 1866, Mr. Dory wedded 
Miss Maty A. Festor, of St. Louis, who was of 
French extraction. They became the parents of 
eleven children, five of whom are yet living, 
namely: Firmin, Albert, Victor, Estella and Ce- 
celia. They have given their children all liberal 
educational advantages and thus fitted them for 
the practical and responsible duties of life. The 
children now deceased are Victor S., who died 
May 8, 1869; Amy, who died June 19, 1884; 
Yitaline A., who died August 27, 1886; Eugene, 
who died September 12, 1S86, at the age of eigh- 
teen; Joseph, who died September 17, 1890; and 
August, who died September 24, 1892. 

Mr. Dory is a member of the Catholic Church, 
and is one of its earnest and ardent supporters, do- 
ing all in his power for its promotion and upbuild- 



LIB- 




John B. Risse 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



161 



ing. When he came to the West he spent some 
time in looking over the country, visited Quincy, 
Keokuk, Burlington and Warsaw, and finally de- 
cided to locate at the last-named, for it then seemed 
to present excellent advantages and gave evidence 
of rapid growth . Although the town has not be- 
come as large as some of the others, Mr. Dory 
need have no occasion to regret his choice of it as 
a home, for he has here found friends and pros- 
perity. 



HON. JOHN B. RISSE is a prominent at- 
torney, and ex -County Judge of Hancock 
County. This locality has been the scene 
of his entire professional career, and on life's 
stage he has played well his part. For seventeen 
years he served as County Judge, and his long 
continuance in office well indicates his fidelity to 
duty and the high commendation which he re- 
ed veil from his fellow-townsmen. In the ranks 
of the legal profession, he occupies a foremost 
place, and as one of its most prominent representa- 
tives we gladly place his history in this volume. 

Judge Risse was born on the 28th of October, 
1835, in Dorsten, West Prussia, German}-, and 
was the third in a family of four children, num- 
bering three sons and a daughter. The two 
brothers of our subject, however, died in infancy. 
The sister, Frances, is now the wife of James Og- 
den, a prosperous farmer residing in Hancock 
County. The parents, Laurenz and Wilhelmina 
( Punzmann) Risse, were both natives of Ger- 
many. The father was born in Dorsten, and. be- 
came a shoe-maker by trade. In 1844, he crossed 
the Atlantic to America in company with his 
family, and located at Galena, 111., where he re- 
mained until 1847. In that year he removed to 
Nauvoo, where he embarked in business as a 
shoe-dealer. He continued in that business until 
his death and met with a fair degree of success in 
li is undertakings. In 1870, he was called to the 
home beyond, having reached the allotted age of 
three-score and ten years. His wife, who was in 
Cologne, survived him for a number of years and 



departed this life in 1887, at the advanced age of 
eighty-seven years. 

The Judge spent the first eight years of his life 
in the land of his birth, and then accompanied his 
parents on their emigration to America. The 
days of his youth were spent in his father's 
home. In the public schools of the neighbor- 
hood he acquired a good English education. He 
began reading in a law office in Nauvoo, and af- 
ter thorough and diligent preparation passed an 
examination and was admitted to the Bar in 
1856. Mr. Risse at once began practice in 
Nauvoo, and there remained until December, 
1869, when he was elected County Judge of Han- 
cock County, and removed to Carthage. For 
seventeen years he continued to fill that position 
with credit to himself and satisfaction to his 
constituents. At length, on his retirement from 
public life, he opened a law office, and has since 
devoted his energies to private practice. 

On the 1 6th of April, 1861, Judge Risse was 
united in marriage with Miss Ursula Reimbold, 
who was born in Cologne, Germany, a most es- 
timable lady, who has been to her husband a 
faithful companion and helpmate. They have be- 
come the parents of six children, four sons and 
two daughters. The eldest, William B., is now 
an attorney-at-law, associated with his father; 
Minnie is the wife of John J. Rheinberger, a wine 
grower of Nauvoo; Christina is the wife of Au- 
gust J. Beger, who is engaged in the drug busi- 
ness in Nauvoo; Henry C. is engaged in merchan- 
dising in Parsons, Kan. ; and the two youngest 
members of the family, Edward J. and Ferdinand 
L., are still with their parents. The family is 
one of prominence in the community, and its mem- 
bers are widely and favorably known. 

In his political views, Judge Risse is a Demo- 
crat, who warmly advocates the principles of 
his party and always supports by his ballot its 
men and measures. He is recognized as one of 
the leaders of Democracy in Hancock County, 
and does all in his power to promote his party's 
interests and insure its success. He and his fam- 
ily are members of the Catholic Church, and con- 
tribute liberally to its support. He is now en- 
joying an extensive law practice and is recognized 



l62 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



as one of the leading attorneys of this part of the 
State. His record on the bench is one of which 
he may well be proud. In his rulings he was 
ever just, unbiased by fear or favor, and the high 
opinion in which he was held by all the voters of 
the county is indicated by his frequent re-election. 
He is a man of deep research, of studious and 
thoughtful habits, and by earnest application he 
has won the prominent place which he now oc- 
cupies. Since his twelfth year Judge Risse has 
resided in Hancock County and has a large cir- 
cle of warm friends. 

P\HILIP DALLAM, editor and publisher of the 
\S Bulletin, of Warsaw, was born in St. Louis, 
\Z) Mo., May 22, 1853, and is a son of Frank A. 
and Anna M. (McKee) Dallam, who were na- 
tives of Kentucky and New York respectively. 
The father was a newspaperman, and it was thus 
very natural that his son should take up the line 
of work in which he is now engaged. During 
the War of the Rebellion, Frank Dallam wore 
the blue, enlisting as Captain of Company E, 
Tenth Illinois Infantry. He afterwards served 
on the staff of Gen. Ross, and continued in the 
army for about two years, when on account of ill 
health he was forced to resign. After being mus- 
tered out, he located in California, and thence re- 
moved to Nevada. He served as a member of 
the Constitutional Convention when the State 
was admitted to the Union, and in his business 
relations was connected with the Virginia City 
Enterprise , doing editorial work. His next 
place of residence was in Quincy, where he served 
on the staff of the Whig until 1867. In that year 
he came to Warsaw, where his death occurred on 
the 17th of March, 1868. After coming to this 
city, he purchased the Bulletin, which is now 
managed by his son. 

Philip Dallam was the third child in his fa- 
ther's family. His elder brother, Frank, is now 
Receiver of Public Moneys at Waterville, Wash., 
to which position he was appointed by President 
Harrison. Philip spent his boyhood days in 



Quincy and Oquaw T ka, and acquired a fair educa- 
tion in the public schools. He was practically 
brought up in the newspaper office, and to the 
work connected therewith has devoted his entire 
attention throughout his business career. He 
became the publisher of the Bulletin in 1875, and 
has one of the neatest offices in the State, the work 
which he turns out possessing the same charac- 
teristic. 

On the 17th of March, 1880, Mr. Dallam led 
to the marriage altar Miss Eugenie A. Hunt, 
daughter of Milton T. Hunt, one of the pioneer 
settlers of Hancock County. They now have a fam- 
ily of four children and have lost one child. The 
parents are widely and favorably known in this 
community, where they have many warm friends 
and pleasant acquaintances. 

Socially, Mr. Dallam is connected with the 
Masonic fraternity and the Ancient Order of 
Modern Woodmen. He is a member of the 
Library Board of Warsaw, and gives his support 
and co-operation to all enterprises which are cal- 
culated to elevate the community and promote 
the general welfare. In politics, he is a stanch 
supporter of the Republican party, and his pa- 
per advocates its principles. 

HON. ORVILLE F. BERRY, who is now 
representing the Twenty-fourth District of 
Illinois in the State Senate, is one of the 
leading and influential citizens of Carthage, prom- 
inent in its political and business affairs. A na- 
tive, of Illinois, he was born on the 16th of 
February, 1852, in Table Grove, McDonough 
County, and is the eldest in a family of three chil- 
dren whose parents were Jonathan L- and Martha 
(McConnell) Berry. The only daughter of the 
family died in infancy, and the two brothers are 
partners in the practice of law in Carthage. 

The father of this family was born in Tennessee, 
and there spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth. When a young man he came to Hancock 
County, 111., and in 1840 purchased land, whereon 
he remained for several years, successfully en- 



POkTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



163 



gaged in its cultivation. He came of a family 
of Scotch origin, but for several generations 
past its members have resided in this country. 
The father, who was a soldier in the Mex- 
ican War. was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Brewer, of Hancock County, who died in 
1S47, leaving two children: Charles L. , who is 
now a contractor of Wichita, Kan.; and John, who 
was in the naval sen-ice during the late war, and 
was killed during that struggle. In 1850, Mr. 
Berry was joined in wedlock with Miss McConnell, 
and removed to McDonough County, where he 
puichased a farm, making his home thereon until 
his death, which occurred at the age of forty-eight 
years. He served as Deputy Sheriff of McDonough 
County for two years, and was a highly respected 
citizen of the neighborhood in which he made his 
home. A well-educated man, he followed teach- 
ing for a time, and was thus employed both in 
Hancock and McDonough Counties. His brother, 
Harrison Berry, was one of the pioneer ministers 
and physicians of the latter county. The mother 
of Senator Bern- was a native of Pennsylvania, 
and during her early girlhood came with her par- 
ents to Hancock County, in 1844. Her death 
occurred in McDonough County when she was 
about forty years of age. Her father was one of 
the honored pioneers of Hancock County, and 
on his arrival here purchased a farm in Foun- 
tain Green Township, on which he resided 
until his death, which occurred at the very- ad- 
vanced age of eighty-four years. He was of Scotch 
and Irish extraction. In the development and 
upbuilding of this county he ever bore his part, 
and was numbered among its leading and valued 
citizens. 

We now take up the personal history of On-ille 
F. Berry, who was only five years of age when 
his father died. Three years later, in i860, his 
mother departed this life, and he was left an orphan 
when a lad of eight summers. He and his brother, 
Melvin P., then went to live with their grand- 
father, Francis McConnell, in Fountain Green 
Township. There they worked at farm labor and 
attended the country schools. Mr. Berry of this 
sketch thus spent his time until sixteen years of 
age, when he left his grandfather's home and be- 



gan earning his own livelihood. He was thus 
early thrown upon his own resources, but thereby 
developed a self-reliance and independence of 
character which have proven of incalculable ben- 
efit to him in later years. He began working as 
a farm hand by the month, and after spending the 
summer in the fields he would enter the district 
schools and pursue his studies through the win- 
ter season. The last three years he attended the 
High School at Fountain Green. ■ 

On starting out in life for himself, Mr. Berry- 
secured as a companion and helpmate on the jour- 
ney Miss Anna M. Barr, of Fountain Green 
Township, their marriage being celebrated on the 
5th of March, 1873. Having inherited a small 
amount of money from his father's estate, Mr. 
Berry then purchased a farm in Fountain Green 
Township, and continued its cultivation for a year, 
but, as his taste lay in another direction, on the ex- 
piration of that period he came to Carthage, where 
he began reading law in the office of Mack & 
Baird. In January, 1877, h e was admitted to the 
Bar, and immediately thereafter formed a partner- 
ship with Judge Thomas C. Sharp, of Carthage. 
This connection has since continued, covering a 
period of seventeen years. In 1879, Melvin P. 
Berry- was admitted to the firm, and the style was 
changed to Sharp & Berry Brothers. The senior 
member has now been an invalid for several years, 
and the business is thus left to the care of his 
partners. Our subject has won prominence in his 
chosen profession, and is recognized as one of the 
leading members of the Hancock County Bar, a 
reputation which is well merited, as it has been 
won through skill and ability. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Bern,- were born five children, 
but three of the number died in infancy, and 
one son was drowned at the age of fourteen years. 
Orville F., the only sun-iving child, is now a lad 
of ten summers. 

Mr. Berry affiliates with the Republican party, 
and is a most stalwart advocate of its principles. 
On attaining his majority he was elected Assessor, 
and when nineteen years of age he sen-ed as a 
delegate to the State Convention. He has always 
taken an active part in everything that tends to 
advance Republican interests. When Carthage 



164 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was changed from a village to a city, he was 
elected its first Mayor, and was twice re-elected. 
In 1888, he was elected State Senator, and when 
the returns were received in 1892 it was found 
that he was again the people's choice for that 
position. During the first session he served as 
Chairman of the Committee on Education and 
Educational Institutions. During that time the 
compulsory school law was passed. Mr. Berry 
has ever been a warm friend to the public schools, 
and his labors in the Senate resulted in great good 
to the cause of education. He was strongly op- 
posed to throwing out the English language from 
the public schools, and in 1 892 made an open fight 
in behalf of the mother tongue. The friends of ed- 
ucation rallied to his support, and he was re-elected 
by a large majority. Believing that good schools 
are the foundation of a good government, neither 
fear nor favor would cause him to waver in sup- 
port of that view. Mr. Berry was also a member 
of the Committees on Judiciary, Judiciary Depart- 
ment, Railroad Corporations, Charitable Institu- 
tions, Canals and Rivers, and World's Fair. He 
was also chairman of the Republican Steering 
Committee. His record in the Senate is one of 
which he may well be proud, for he labors to ad- 
vance the best interests of the people, and has 
their confidence and high commendation. He 
was also appointed as one of five Commissioners 
to revise the statutes, on a committee composed 
of two members from the Senate and three from 
the House. 

Mr. Bern- also takes great interest in civic so- 
cieties, is a Royal Arch Mason, a member of the 
Modern Woodmen Lodge, the Knights of Pythias, 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of 
which he was Grand Master of Illinois in 1883 
and 1884. He has been a representative to the 
Supreme Lodge of the United States and Canada 
for ten years, and was twice a delegate to the 
Congress of the Fraternal Societies of the United 
States. He also delivered the oration for Illinois 
on A. O. U. W. Day at the Columbian Exposi- 
tion in Festival Hall. He was the first Secretary 
of the County Fair Association, held that position 
for six years, and for three years was General 
Superintendent. In religious belief he is a Pres- 



byterian, and has served as Superintendent of 
the Sunday-school for eight years. He is an 
able attorney, and the large practice which he 
receives attests his skill and ability. He has risen 
to his prominent position by his own efforts; 
with no special advantages, he has steadily 
worked his way upward, until he has become a 
leader in political and professional circles in his 
native State. 

(TAMES SAMPLE, who resides in Carthage, 
I was born in May town, Lancaster County, 
O Pa., and is a son of Robert and Jane (Haw- 
thorne) Sample. The days of his boyhood and 
youth were spent upon his father's farm, where he 
remained until twenty-one years of age. He 
then started out in life for himself, and leaving 
the East emigrated to Illinois in 1847. He spent 
three years in traveling and working at his trade 
in New Orleans and other places, and in 1850 
came to Hancock County, settling near Fountain 
Green, where he entered land from the Govern- 
ment. In his early life he had learned the trade 
of a carpenter and joiner, and his brothers, John 
and Frank, also followed the same pursuit until 
the war. The parents both died in 1887, at the 
age of eighty-four. 

After coming to Hancock County, Mr. Sample 
was associated with his brothers in business until 
he entered the service of his country as a defen- 
der of the Union. He was a valiant soldier, al- 
ways found at his post of duty, and was wounded 
in the service. The injuries he sustained were 
such as to unfit him for further work in the line 
of his trade, and after his return home he em- 
barked in the furniture business, which he suc- 
cessfully carried on until the summer of 1893, 
when he retired. He not only built up a good 
trade in this place, but also established branch 
houses at Fountain Green and Ferris. He is a 
man of excellent business and executive ability, 
and his well-directed efforts brought him a hand- 
some competency. 

In 1852, Mr. Sample was united in marriage 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'65 



with Miss Elizabeth Delia Spangler, of Hancock 
County. They have an adopted daughter, Katie, 
now the wife of W. S. Huckins, a traveling sales- 
man, and Mr. and Mrs. Huckins have one son. 
The Sample home is a comfortable and substan- 
tial residence, and in addition to this property our 
subject owns a business block and is interested in 
farm lands. 

Mr. Sample has always been a supporter of the 
Republican party since its organization, and for 
many terms has served on the Town Board. He 
has been closely identified with the interests of the 
city, was partly instrumental in securing the es- 
tablishment of the college in this place, and has 
done all in his power toward aiding in those en- 
terprises which are calculated to prove of public 
benefit, and which advance the best interests of 
the community. Socially, he is connected with 
the Masonic fraternity of Carthage, and is a char- 
ter member of the Grand Army post. He is one 
of the ruling Elders in the Presbyterian Church, 
and has been active in church and benevolent 
work. His life has been well and worthily spent, 
and he is now enjoying a well-earned rest. 

Gl LBERT FULLER was born in Sandisfield, 
LA Mass. , on the 5th of September, 1804. and 
/ l died iu Warsaw, 111.. February 6, 1880, in 
the seventy-sixth year of his age. He was re- 
spected by all who knew him, and his loss was 
deeply mourned. His father, Joseph Fuller, was 
a farmer, but the son was reared to mercantile 
pursuits, and in his native State followed mer- 
chandising for some time. In 1850, he left his 
old home and removed to Vermont, becoming 
proprietor of a paper-mill in Fair Haven. He 
continued its operation for five years, and in 1855 
removed to Granville, N. V., where he spent one 
year. 

During the succeeding year, Mr. Fuller severed 
all business relations in the East and emigrated 
to Illinois, taking up his residence in Warsaw, 
where he spent his remaining days. He became 
one of the leading stockholders in a foundry, and 



continued in that line of business with excellent 
success for many years. 

On the 8th of September, 1840, Mr. Fuller was 
united in marriage with Mrs. Julia May, a daugh- 
ter of Asa and Adah Judd. She came from an 
old Massachusetts family, which was founded in 
America during early Colonial days. Her father 
was a farmer and also engaged in the manufacture 
of paper. She was born in Otis, Berkshire 
County, Mass., January 21, 1815, and is nowthe 
only surviving member of her father's family. 
Her brother, Dr. Homer Judd, came to Warsaw in 
1853, and engaged in the practice of medicine and 
dentistry here for a number of years. He became 
one of the most prominent men in the dental pro- 
fession, and was known throughout the countrv. 
His death occurred in Upper Alton, 111., May 20, 
1890. Another brother, Orson Judd, resided iu 
Shalersville, Ohio. Riley was a fruit-grower ot 
Kansas, and a sister was the wife of Dr. J. B. Mer- 
ryman, a physician now of Dixon, 111. 

Previous to her marriage with our subject, Mrs. 
Fuller was the wife of Charles May. Their wed- 
ding was celebrated on the 21st of June, 1837, an d 
thej' became the parents of one son, Charles, who 
was born May 10, 1838. He graduated from a 
medical and also a dental college of Cincinnati. 
During the late war he entered the army, and his 
sen-ice so impaired his health that his death oc- 
curred on the nth of March, 1867. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fuller were born three chil- 
dren. Dr. A. H. is now engaged in the prac- 
tice of dentistry in St. Louis, and holds a fore- 
most place in professional ranks. Dr. Briggs 
Judd, who was born December 8, 1843, became 
a physician, but entered the army as a mem- 
ber of Company A, One Hundred and Thirty- 
seventh Illinois Infantry. He was captured by 
Gen. Forest near Memphis, Tenn., July 21, 1864, 
and was incarcerated for a year in Cahaba 
Prison, Ala. His was the regiment that started 
home on the ill-fated "Sultana," but fortunately 
for the Doctor he had taken passage on the 
"Magenta" the day previous. Helen A. is the 
youngest member of the Fuller family, and resides 
in Warsaw. 

Mr. Fuller was possessed of excellent business 



1 66 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ability, was enterprising and industrious, and his 
energy and perseverance made his business career 
one of success. He took an active interest in the 
upbuilding of Warsaw and was long numbered 
among its leading and progressive citizens. The 
history of his life well deserves a place in this 
volume. 

(JOSEPH AVERY WHITE. Jr., has during 
I the past six years made his home in Warsaw, 
(2/ where he carries on business as a lumber 
merchant, enjoying a good trade, which he has 
secured through well-directed efforts and straight- 
forward, honorable dealing. The record of his 
life is as follows: A native of Massachusetts, he 
was born on the 3d of November, 1857, and is a 
son of J. A. and Jane Elizabeth (Fisher) White, 
who were also natives of the old Bay State. The 
White family is of English extraction, and the 
original American ancestors crossed the Atlantic 
from England to Boston in the year 1630, just 
one decade after the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth 
Rock. J. A. White, Sr. , was an importer of West 
India goods, and followed that business in Boston 
for about thirty years. He was a well-known 
merchant of that city. His wife died March 25, 
1868. In their family were four children: Henry 
F. , who now resides in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Ed- 
ward Irving, who is located in Chicago; George 
Allen, who is living at the old home in Massa- 
chusetts; and J. A. of this sketch. 

In taking up the personal history of Mr. White 
whose name heads this record we note that his 
boyhood days were spent midst play and work in 
his native State, and that his education was ac- 
quired in the city schools of Boston. After com- 
pleting his literary course, he was graduated from 
the Comers Business College, of Boston, in 1876. 
He then went to Minnesota, where, in the em- 
ploy of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & North- 
ern Railroad Company, he was engaged in sur- 
veying for a period of three years. Later, he re- 
moved to Knox County, Mo., where he was em- 
ployed in a lumber-yard at Knox City for two 



years. The succeeding two years were spent in 
La Belle, and subsequently he made his home for 
a short time in Alexandria, Mo. His next place 
of residence was in Kansas City, where he en- 
gaged in business as a dealer in feed, hay, grain, 
etc. The year 1888 witnessed his arrival in War- 
saw. Here he opened a lumber-yard, and has 
since conducted the same with good success. 

On the 15th of November, 1884, Mr. White 
was united in marriage with Miss Man- Kennedy. 
The lady is a daughter of John and Sarah (Mason) 
Kennedy. Her father was a native of Belfast, 
Ireland, and after emigrating to this country mar- 
ried Miss Mason, a native of Georgia. They re- 
sided for some time in Mobile, Ala., and thence 
removed to Kirksville, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. White 
are widely and favorably known in this com- 
munity, where they have many warm friends. 
Mr. White exercises his right of franchise in sup- 
port of the Republican party, but has never sought 
or desired the honors or emoluments of public of- 
fice. He is a man of good business and executive 
ability, and is a loyal and public-spirited citizen, 
who manifests a commendable interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the welfare of the community 
in which he makes his home. 

g *-^ H-^l=*— I 

(TAMES E. MANIFOLD was for many years 
I a prominent citizen of Hancock County, and 
(*/ will be remembered by the greater part of 
the citizens of this community. A native of Tenn- 
essee, he was born in Roane County on the 30th 
of July, 1822. His parents were George and 
Mary (Persley) Manifold, and their family num- 
bered eight children, five sons and three daugh- 
ters, who in order of birth were as follows: Sarah, 
deceased, wife of W. Wheeler, a resident of Jeffer- 
son County, Iowa; Nancy, who is now the wife 
of John McCord, a resident of La Harpe Town- 
ship, Hancock County; Elizabeth, now deceased; 
William F. ; Joseph N.; James E., of whom we 
write; Benjamin J., who is living in Durham 
Township; and John, who makes his home in La 
Harpe Township. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



167 



No event of special importance occurred during 
the boyhood and youth of our subject save his 
removal to Illinois. When a lad of fourteen years 
he left his native State and accompanied his par- 
ents on their emigration to Illinois. The family 
located in Hancock County, and the education of 
James Manifold, which was begun in his native 
State, was completed in the district schools of this 
locality. He shared in the trials and hardships 
of life on the frontier, and was familiar with the 
history of pioneer life of Hancock County, for he 
saw this region when it was wild and unimproved, 
and was an eye-witness of its development and 
advancement. 

After arriving at years of maturity, Mr. Mani- 
fold was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth 
Logan, a native of Indiana, and a daughter of 
William and Elizabeth (McCarty) Logan. The 
lady was born on the 28th of November, 1830, 
and was educated in the district schools. She 
has proved to her husband a faithful companion 
and helpmate, aiding him in his work by her 
thrifty ways, her good management, encourage- 
ment and sympathy. Mr. Manifold always fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming. He first pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of laud in 
Durham Township, eight miles west of the Mani- 
fold homestead, and there resided for forty-seven 
years. He placed the entire tract under the plow, 
and transformed the once wild land into rich and 
fertile fields, which yielded to the owner a good 
income. He then purchased an eighty-acre farm 
adjoining his first tract, and afterward bought two 
hundred and forty acres additional. 

Subsequently , he bought his present homestead 
of one hundred and sixty acres, and having made 
upon this farm some valuable improvements, it be- 
came one of the best country homes in Hancock 
County. Altogether he owned seven hundred and 
ninety acres of valuable land, of which all was 
arable, with the exception of a thirty-acre timber 
tract. 

For twenty-six years Mr. Manifold was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Dur- 
ham, and took an active interest in all that per- 
tained to its upbuilding and growth, and gave 
liberally to its support. He was also a friend to 



benevolent and charitable institutions, and the 
needy were never turned from his door empty- 
handed. In his political views, he was a Repub- 
lican, but never sought or desired official distinc- 
tion, preferring to devote his entire time and at- 
tention to business interests. Whatever he un- 
dertook he carried forward to a successful com- 
pletion, undeterred by any obstacles that might 
arise in his path. His death occurred August 
28, 1892. His widow now manages the estate. 

to l cj?'t">b :; a 

^" HO MAS H. BOSCOW, M. D., who is suc- 
I C cessfully engaged in the practice of medi- 
Viy cine at Kirksville, Mo., but resides in War- 
saw, is a native of England, his birth having oc- 
curred in Liverpool on the 27th of April, 18 19. 
His parents were Nicholas and Alice (Newell) 
Boscow. The father engaged in merchandising 
in his native land until 1842, when with his fam- 
ily he immigrated to America. He took up his 
residence in Hancock County, 111., but his death 
occurred in Buffalo, N. Y., in 1824, while visit- 
ing a daughter in that city. 

The Doctor is one of twelve children. He 
bade adieu to home and friends in 1842, and 
sailed for New Orleans, from whence he made 
his way to Peoria, and thence to Hancock Coun- 
ty, 111. Here he purchased a farm and carried 
on agricultural pursuits for about ten years. Ere 
leaving his native land, he had studied medicine, 
and embarked in his profession on the Isle of 
Man. In 1853, he came to Warsaw and opened 
a store, dealing in dry goods. He carried on 
operations along that line with fair success until 
1868, when he sold out and resumed the practice 
of medicine. He is a skilled physician, and 
makes a specialty of chronic diseases. He has 
an office in Kirksville, Mo., and for a time also 
had- a branch office in Quincy, 111. 

On the 17th of June, 1840, was celebrated the 
marriage of Dr. Boscow and Miss Anna F. 
Bonnyman, a native of the Isle of Man. Her 
mother, Mrs. Jane Maria (Radcliffe) Bonnyman, 
was also born on the Isle of Man, at the old 



1 68 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



homestead which had been in possession of the 
Radcliffe family for three hundred years. After 
the death of her husband she managed the affairs 
of the estate. She reached the very advanced 
age of ninety-two years, and up to the very last 
retained her mental and physical faculties to a re- 
markable degree. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Boscow were born nine 
children, of whom four are still living. Hard- 
ing, Alexander and Thomas are all residents of 
California. Maria is living in Warsaw. One son, 
Charles S. , became a physician of California. He 
graduated from the High School of Warsaw 
when only sixteen years of age, the youngest 
pupil who had ever graduated here up to that 
time. He was graduated from the Keokuk 
Medical College in 1884, and in 1886 removed to 
California, where he became an active and promi- 
nent member of the State Medical Society. His 
death occurred on the 21st of January, 1888. A 
daughter, Mrs. Fannie Wolf, died in New York, 
July 15, 1864. Sarah was the wife of Dr. Bull, 
ofKahoka, Mo., and died January 29, 1894. 

Dr. Boscow votes with the Republican party 
and keeps well informed on all the issues of the 
day, but has never sought or desired political 
preferment. In religious belief he is an Episco- 
palian. The greater part of his life has been de- 
voted to the practice of medicine, and he has ever 
been a close student of the profession. He has 
made a specialty of chronic diseases, and in this 
line has won prominence. He receives from the 
public a liberal patronage, which is well merited 
by his skill and ability. 

§ "-acrVb 1 " « 

(TjEYMOUR L. McCRORY, attorney-at-law 
?\ and Notary Public of Ea Harpe, is a native 
Cfy of Liberty Township, Adams County, 111. 
He was born on the 9th of March, 1867, and is a 
son of James McCrory, who was born in Wash- 
ington County, Pa., on the 1st of January, 1820. 
The latter was the eldest child of Samuel and 
Hannah McCrory. On the 6th of November, 
1843, in his native county, was celebrated the 



marriage of James McCrory and Miss Letitia Job, 
who was the youngest in a family of ten children, 
nine daughters and a son. Her mother died 
when she was only nine days old, and she is now 
the only survivor of the entire family. Until she 
was seven years of age her eldest sister cared for 
her, and from that time until her marriage she 
made her home with a Quaker family by the 
name of Sutherland. On the 6th of November, 
1893, Mr. and Mrs. McCrory celebrated their fif- 
tieth wedding anniversary. For a-half century 
they had traveled life's journey together, sharing 
with each other its joys and sorrows, its adver- 
sity and prosperity. Their union was blessed with 
a family of eight children, all of whom are yet 
living, namely: Minerva E., wife of Alvin Harts- 
horn, of Richfield Township, Adams County, 
where he is now serving as Township Supervisor; 
Zoula Myrtle, wife of N. P. Mclntyre, a resident 
farmer of Carrollton, Mo.; Martin R., a physi- 
cian and surgeon of Pueblo, Colo.; John K., a 
real-estate broker of Trinidad, Colo.; Charlotte 
L., wife of J. E. Worrell, Jr., who carries on 
farming in Bowen, Hancock County; George B., 
a blacksmith residing on the old farm in Liberty, 
111.; H. Geneva, at home; and Seymour L., our 
subject. The father of this family emigrated to 
Adams County, 111., in 1850, and for some time 
followed the plasterer's trade, which he had 
learned in early life. He is now living retired 
on the old farm which he purchased in 1851. 

We now take up the personal history of Mr. 
McCrory whose name heads this sketch. He 
attended the district schools near his old home 
until he was seventeen years of age, and then en- 
tered Chaddock College, of Quincy, 111., where 
he remained for a 3-ear. After leaving that insti- 
tution at the age of eighteen, he taught for four 
years in the district schools of Adams Count}-, 
and at the expiration of that period he again en- 
tered Chaddock College as a teacher of stenog- 
raphy. At the same time he entered upon a lit- 
erary course of study, which he continued for 
three years. During the second year of that 
course he also entered the law department 01 
Chaddock College, where he continued his studies 
for a time. Later he became a student in the law 



LIBR'RV 
I'l i;r IluNUIS 
URBANA 




Hon. C. V. Chandler 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'7' 



office of Shannon & Lemmon, of Quincy, 111., 
and under their direction completed his course. 
Passing the State examination, he was admitted 
to the Bar on the oth of March, 1893, and since 
that time has been successfully engaged in prac- 
tice. On the 1st of May following, he came to 
La Harpe and opened an office, and on the 8th 
of the same month he was commissioned Notary 
Public. 

On the 20th of September, 1893, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. McCrory and Miss Fannie 
B. Gillies, only daughter of Rev. John and Fan- 
nie (Bartholow) Gillies, of Kirksville, Mo. The 
young couple are both members of the Methodist 
Protestant Church and take an active part in its 
work and upbuilding. Their home is a hospita- 
ble one, and they are favorably known through- 
out this community. In politics, Mr. McCrory is 
a Democrat, and his first Presidential vote was 
cast for Grover Cleveland in [888. He is still a 
young man, but has given evidence of ability in 
his profession that will rapidly win him a fore- 
most place at the Bar. 

Mr McCrory, who has a bright future before 
him, is making marked progress in his profession. 
He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, belonging to Gem City Lodge No. 357, 
of Quincy, 111. 



B^+^l 



EHARLES VTLASCO CHANDLER has for 
many years been prominently identified with 
all that pertains to the upbuilding of Ma- 
comb, with its leading enterprises, with its 
industries, and with those interests which are 
calculated to promote the general welfare. In 
manner, he is plain and unassuming, yet prob- 
ably no man is better known in McDonough 
County. The family of which he is a mem 
ber traces its ancestry back through several 
generations to William Chandler and his wife 
Annis, who came from England to America, and 
located in Roxbury, Mass., in 1637. They be- 
longed to the nobility of England, ami the coal of 
8 



arms bore the family motto, ". Id Mortem Fidelis. ' ' 
The crest borne on the closed helmet above the 
coat of arms is that of a pelican in her nest wound 
ing her breast in order to feed her young witli her 
own blood — an emblem of parental affection. The 
mantle, cut and jagged, hanging from the hel- 
met indicates the faithful service of the warrior; 
the gauntlet, his prowess; and across the check 
ered base of blue and red is a belt ornamented by 
three lions passant. 

To William and Annis Chandler were born five 
children, one of whom, Capt. Thomas Chandler, 
was seven years of age when his parents emigrated 
to America. He became one of the proprietors 
and early pioneers in the settlement of Andover, 
and was a Representative to the General Court 
in [678 and [679. He died in 1703. A tradition 
tells of the existence of iron works owned by one 
of his sons, and the story is supported by a record 
of a bill of sale of a half-interest in the same in 
1718. The works were located where Marland 
Village now stands. Henry, the sixth child born 
to Thomas and Hannah 1 Brewer) Chandler, was 
born May 28, [667, and was married November 
26, [691, to Lydia Abbott. He was a man of 
prominence, who took a leading part in public 
affairs. Having purchased seventeen hundred 
acres of land, situated on the banks of the Con- 
necticut River, for .£700, he removed thither in 
1723, and there spent his remaining days, his 
death occurring August 27, 1737. He had thir- 
teen children and ninety-nine grandchildren. The 
fifth child, Nehemiah Chandler, was born in 1703, 
and in August, 1733. he wedded Man' Burroughs, 
who died at the advanced age of ninety-five years, 
five months and nine days. His death occurred 
September 9, 1756. Mr. and Mrs. Chandler were 
the parents of ten children. Their son Samuel 
was born October 1 1, 1737, and married Margaret 
Thompson, of Alstead, N. H. He was a Lieu- 
tenant of the first company of militia, formed in 
1773, in Alstead. James Chandler, who was the 
sixth in order of birth in their family of eight 
children, was born April 23, 1771, and on the 
29th of September, 1705. was joined in wedlock 
with Abigail Vilas. This worthy couple were 
the grandparents of our subject. Mr. Chandler 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



served as Justice of the Peace, and died Novem- 
ber t8, [857, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

The father of our subject, Charles Chandler, 
was the sixth in a family of nine children, and 
was born May 28, 1S09. Having arrived at years 
of maturity, he was married December 15, 1836, 
to .Sarah K. Cheatham, who was born October 15, 
iSiq. and wasa daughter of Samuel G. Cheatham, 
of Macomb. Her death occurred in this city Sep- 
tember 29, 1S55. Charles Chandler held the office 
of School Commissioner of the county, was Justice 
of the Peace and Notary Public. He also served 
as Colonel in the Illinois State Militia. In March, 
1858, he established a private bank, which, on the 
8th of February, 1865, was merged in the First 
National Bank of Macomb. He embarked in this 
line of business during the hard times that fol- 
lowed the financial panic of 1857, but the people 
reposed the utmost confidence in him, and knew 
that he would make good all promises. Never a 
dollar was deposited with him that was not re- 
turned when called for. In 1865 he organized 
the First National Bank, with a capital stock of 
$50,000. Among its stockholders were Joseph 
Anderson, Joseph Burton, J. W. Mcintosh, C. V. 
Chandler. A. E. Hoskinson, S. F. Lancey, Henry 
C.Twyman, J. H. Cummings and J. B. Cummings. 
Its first officers were Charles Chandler, President: 
J. H. Cummings. Cashier; C. V. Chandler, Teller; 
and Joseph Burton, Joseph Anderson, S. F. Lan- 
cey. A. E. Hoskinson and Charles Chandler as Di- 
rectors. The last-named gentleman continued his 
connection with the business interests of the city 
until his death in 1878. 

C. V. Chandler was born in the First Ward of 
Macomb, January 25, 1843, and still resides in 
his native city. After attending its public schools, 
he pursued his studies for a time in Danbury, 
Conn., and later was a student in Lake Forest 
Academy, of Illinois. It was his intention to en- 
ter Williams College ill [862, but love of country 
shaped his course otherwise, and with an earnest 
desire to aid in the defense of the Union, he 
joined the boys in blue of Company I. Seventy- 
eighth Illinois Infantry. After nine months, he 
was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant. 
At the battle ofChickamauga, September 20, [863, 



he was wounded by a rifle-ball, which passed 
through both thighs, and again by a ball which 
passed through one thigh. Just before the injury, 
he had taken hold of a small hickory tree, and re- 
marked to the First Lieutenant, "I guess we will 
pull through all right." Almost immediately 
the ball struck him, and he added, "I guess we 
will not." Mr. Chandler now has in his posses- 
sion a cane made from the tree to which he was 
holding at the time. Obtaining a furlough, he 
returned home, but after recovering his health and 
strength he rejoined his regiment March 1, 1864. 
In the mean time he had been made Adjutant, but 
he so, m found that he would have to resign his 
commission and return home, for the injuries he 
had sustained unfitted him for active service. 

The business career of Mr. Chandler has been 
an honorable, straightforward one, which has 
gained for him the confidence and good- will of all 
with whom he has been brought in contact. On 
his return from the war, he became Teller in the 
First National Bank, and continued to fill that 
position until the death of his father, December 
26, 1878, at which time he became President of 
the institution. He then continued at the head 
for a number of years, but afterward sold out to 
the firm of Hungate. Ward cc Co., who changed 
the name to the Bank of Macomb. In 1893, how- 
ever, Mr. Chandler re-purchased it. and is now 
its President. His business interests have been 
extensive. He erected and is still owner of the 
Opera House Block, and in connection with this 
he has a number of other fine brick business 
blocks in the city. 

On the 28th of August, 18(16. Mr. Chandler 
was united in marriage with Miss Clara A. Baker, 
daughter of Judge J. H. Baker, a well-known citi- 
zen of Macomb. Their union has been blessed 
with six children: Charles J., who died in infancy : 
Clara, wife of F. H. Mapes; Mary, Ralph. George 
and Isabella, who are yet at home. The Chandler 
household is the abode of hospitality, and the 
members of the family rank high in social circles. 

Mr. Chandler is connected with several civic 
societies. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias, 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is a 
Royal Arch Mason and a Knight Templar. He 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'73 



is also a member of the Odd Fellows and of Mc 
Donough Post No. [83, G. A. R., having served 
as Commander of the latter order. He votes 
in support of the Republican party, and is a 
stalwart advocate of its principles. In the year 
1S70 he was appointed City Treasurer, and held 
the office for sixteen years. He has also repre- 
sented his district in the Twenty-seventh General 
Assembly, and is now serving as a member of the 
City Council. By his connection with business 
interests, lie has aided materially in the prosperity 
of his native city. His hearty support and co- 
operation are given to all worthy public- enter- 
prises and charities, and in no small degree is 
Macomb indebted to him for its advancement and 
progress. He is free from all ostentation and dis- 
play, and does not take credit to himself, yet his 
fellow-townsmen recognize that he has been a 
most important factor in everything pertaining to 
the good ofMcDonough County. 

e. ^j gi <,, 1 „ > f=3 ..,. . m 

30HN H. HUNGATE is a banker of I.a 
Harpe, and is recognized as one of the most 
prominent and progressive business men of 
this place. He has also taken a leading part in 
politics, and has been an important factor in the 
upbuilding of this place. A native of Hancock 
Count) . he was born June 2, (838, and is a son of 
Adonijali Hungate, who was born in Washington 
County, Ky., September 15, 1 S07, and died in I.a 
Harpe, August 14, 1891, at the age of eighty- 
three years and eleven mouths. When he was 
but eight years old he lost his father. Col. John 
Hungate, who was an officer in tht War of 1S12, 
and died shortly before the declaration of peace. 
Adonijali Hungate. deprived of the means of 
modern education, and iii a sparsely settled region, 
grew b 1 manhood among the pioneers of his nativ e 
State, receiving but limited privileges. He was 
married August 27, (829, to' Elizabeth Ward, 
daughter of Capt. Nathan Ward. 

In [833, with his wife and two children, Mr. 
Hungate removed to the new and sparsely settled 
State of Illinois, locating near what is now Foun 



tain Green. He is therefore numbered among the 
pioneers of this county. In 1838, however, he re- 
moved to McDonough County, where he spent 
the greater part of his life on' a farm. Uniting 
with the Baptist Church at New Hope, he re 
mained ever after a faithful worker in the cause 
of Christ. At a time antedating the church and 
schoolhouse, his humble home was frequently 
opened for public worship, and thus it became a 
rendezvous for the itinerate evangelist, and the 
people who there gathered for service became the 
nucleus for the organization of a new church. It 
was at his house, February 20, 1849, that the 
Hillsboro Baptist Church was organized, he and 
his devoted wife becoming charter members. A 
short time after, largely through his liberality and 
efforts, a house of worship was erected near his 
home and a Sunday-school formed. In 1S73, ne 
retired from active life and removed to La Harpe, 
where he resided until his death. He was ever 
found faithful in the discharge of his duties, 
whether public or private. He endeavored to fol- 
low closely in the footsteps of the Master, and his 
philanthropic and patriotic virtues well deserve 
emulation. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hungate were born sixteen 
children: Charles G., of Blandinsville; William 
J., who died at the age of two years; Nathan 
Ward, who, with his wife and two children, was 
murdered by the Indians in [864, eighteen miles 
from Denver, Colo., at the beginning of the Indian 
War which resulted in the extermination of that 
band of red men at Sandy Creek by Gen. Schiving 
ton; Harrison H., a very extensive farmer of Walla 
Walla, Wash., ex -member of the Legislature from 
his district, and the present Treasurer of Walla 
Walla County; John II., of this sketch; Mary S., 
widow of Samuel Ruberts, ofMcDonough Count) ; 
Martha A., deceased, wife of Peter Calder, of Cal- 
ifornia; Cynthia J., wife of Isaac N. Reed, of Den- 
ver, Colo.; James A., a miller and farmer of Pull- 
man, Wash., and a member of the Constitutional 
Convention of that State; Laura J., who died in 
1871, while visiting in California: Samuel C, who 
was graduated from Abingdon College, and died 
in Macomb in 1873: Nancy E., wife of Campbell 
Robinson, of Washington; Calvin A., who died 



174 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



leaving a wife and four children in Washington; 
Levi L.. whodiedin Hancock Count)-, in 1882; 
Lucy W., who died in infancy; and Lillie B., wife 
of C. H. Ingram, of La Harpe. 

We now take up the personal history of John 
H. Hungate, who in the public schools of Mc- 
Douough County acquired his early education, 
which was supplemented by study in the Burling- 
ton University, of Burlington, Iowa. After teach- 
ing for a year and a-half, he entered the law de- 
partment of the University of Chicago, and was 
graduated therefrom in 1861. He immediately 
embarked in the practice of his profession, forni- 
ing a partnership with Judge Bailey, of Macomb, 
which was continued until 1864, when Mr. Hun- 
gate was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court for 
four years. During his term of office he framed 
the law providing for the indexing of all the Cir- 
cuit Court Records throughout the State of Illi- 
nois. The bill was drawn originally to apply only 
to McDouough County, but was taken up by the 
Judiciary Committee of the Legislature and ap- 
plied to the State at large. 

At the expiration of his term of office, Mr. Hun- 
gate removed to St. Louis, Mo., where he wasen- 
gaged in legal practice for five years. He then 
look a trip through the West, and on his return 
bought out the bank in La Harpe formerly owned 
by the firm of C. F. Gill ec Co. This was in 1874, 
and since that time he has been successfully en- 
gaged in the banking business in this place. Un- 
til quite recently he was also connected with the 
bank of Macomb. In 1876, he was nominated for 
Congress by the Democratic party, but as the dis- 
trict had a Republican majority of two thousand, 
he was defeated by Benjamin F. Marsh, who, 
however, won the election by only seven hundred, 
a fact which indicated the popularity of Mr. Hun- 
gate. In 1868, he was a candidate for the Senate 
from the district comprising McDouough, Mercer. 
Warren and Henderson Counties, but could not 
overcome the strong opposition of the other party. 
He was a member of the convention that nomina- 
ted Grover Cleveland for the Presidency in Chi- 
cago in 1884, and during that year made some 
speeches in support of his party. 

In 1877, Mr. Hungate made a trip to Europe, 



visiting various points of interest in England, Ire- 
land and France. After his return he was mar- 
ried, on the 8th of May, 1878, to Miss Florence E. 
Matthews, of Monmouth, 111., daughter of James 
H. and Nancy (Steward) Matthews. Her grand- 
father was a Presbyterian minister, and organized 
the first church in Macomb. Her father was a 
graduate of Hanover College, and for a time was 
President of McDouough College. A brilliant and 
scholarly man, his many excellencies of character 
made him greatly beloved. Five children have 
graced the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hungate: 
Quintin Ward, Edith Clare, John M., Jeane (who 
died in infancy ) , and Harold G. The family is one 
of prominence in the community, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Hungate are held in high esteem by all who know 
them. He is a member of La Harpe Lodge No. 
195, A. F. & A. M. His life has been well and 
worthily spent, and his business career has been 
one of success. 



(3 MITH F. BRYAN, who for years has followed 
7\ farming, now lives retired in La Harpe, 
Vjy enjoying the rest which he has so truly earned 
and richly deserves. His energy and enterprise 
in former years brought to him a competency, 
which supplies him with all the comforts and 
many of the luxuries of life, and his declining 
years will be pleasantly passed among his old 
friends and acquaintances in this community. 

A native of Mercer County, Pa., Mr. Bryan was 
born November 17, 1832, and is a son of Jacob 
Bryan, who was also born in the same county and 
was of Irish extraction. The family resided in 
New Jersey prior to 1819. The father received 
but limited school privileges, but through read- 
ing, experience and observation, he becamea well- 
informed man. On the 14th of May, 1824, he 
was joined in marriage with Mary Bagley, daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Showerman) Bagley, 
the ceremony being performed in Crawford Coun- 
ty, Pa. Seven children were born to them, four 
sous and three daughters, but the eldest daughter 
died in infancy, Rice B. is also deceased. Han- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



■75 



nah was killed by a runaway in La Harpe Town- 
ship in 1850. Cowden \I., a jeweler of La Harpe, 
died December 9, [884. Smith F. is the next 
younger. John F., a soldier of the late war, died 
of exposure at Port Hudson, La., March 9, [864. 
Elizabeth B., deceased, was the wife of J. W. Cas- 
singham, a resident farmer of I,a Harpe Town- 
ship. 

Smith F. Bryan was reared on the old home- 
stead in Mercer County Pa., and upon the farm 
in Hancock County, whither he came with his 
parents May 15. 1840. The trip westward was 
made by boat from Beaver down the Ohio River 
to Cairo, and up the Mississippi to Warsaw. On 
landing at that place they loaded their household 
effects on wagons, and in this way completed their 
trip to what is known as the James Gittings 
farm, three miles north of%a Harpe. The father 
purchased four hundred acres of land on section 
3, La Harpe Township, one hundred and sixty 
acres in Henderson County, and one hundred and 
twenty acres of timber-land. The son, Smith F., 
was educated in the subscription schools of La 
Harpe Township, but he too is mostly self-educa- 
ted, for altogether his attendance at the common 
schools would probably not cover a period of more 
than fifteen months. He became familiar with 
all the duties of farm life, however, and aided in 
the cultivation of the old homestead until about 
twenty-seven years of age. 

On the 28th of January, 1859, Mr. Bryan was 
united in marriage with Miss Delina Painter, 
daughter of Joseph T. and Phoebe (Rea) Painter, 
a native of La Harpe Township, born November 
13, [836. Her family had located in that town- 
ship on the 4th of May previous. Our subject 
and his wife became the parents of nine children, 
namely: Emma Y.. wife of James Brown, of La 
Harpe; Ida May, who died October 25, 1865; Jo- 
seph P., who died August 10, 1891; John P.. a 
farmer of LaHarpe Township; William E. and 
James R., who both earn- 011 agricultural pursuits 
in that township; Mary A., wife of Elmer M. 
Spiker; Charles C, at home; and one son who 
died in infancy. 

In 1 860 Mr. Bryan purchased two hundred acres 
of land on section 9, La Harpe Township, and still 



owns this farm. Hecontinued its cultivation un- 
til the 14th of August, [862, when he enlisted in 
Company G, One Hundred and Eighteenth Illi- 
nois Infantry, under Capt. Joseph Shaw. He 
faithfully served for three years, and was then 
mustered out in Davenport, Iowa, June 5, 1865. 
His first battle was with Sherman in the three- 
days fight at Yazoo River. He also participated 
in the engagement at Arkansas Post, and the 
battle of Thompson's Hill, and was under fire at 
Champion Hills, Black River Bridge, siege of 
Yicksburg, and the battle of Jackson. For 
three months he was confined in the hospital at 
Keokuk, Iowa. 

Mr. Bryan is now a member of Geddes Post 
No. 142, G. A. R., and takes an active interest in 
the organization, which perpetuates the fraternal 
feeling which existed among the boys in blue. He 
cast his first Presidential vote for John C. Fre- 
mont in 1856, and has since been a stalwart sup- 
porter of the Republican party and its principles. 
He has served as Township Assessor, and for 
twenty consecutive years was School Director. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Chris- 
tian Church, and their well-spent lives entitle 
them to the high regard in which they are held. 
and make them well worthy a place in this vol- 
ume, among the best and most prominent citizens 
of Hancock County. 

S ' "* _ S)"^"T~> &~~ ' 3) 

(TAMES E. MAKKLAXD, whois engaged in 
I the livery business in Blandinsville, claims 
G/ Indiana as his native State. He was born in 
Decatur County, on the 1st of January, 1S44, 
and is the seventh in order of birth in a family of 
twelve children, whose parents were Zadock and 
Delilah (Williams) Markland. Six of their chil- 
dren died in infancy, and those still living beside 
our subject are, Richard J., a farmer and stock- 
raiser of Clay County, 111.; William, who fol- 
lows the same pursuit in Wabash County, Ind.; 
Elizabeth, wife of John Duvall, a farmer and 
stock-raiser of Cumberland County-, 111.; Oliver, 
who carries on agricultural pursuits in Jasper 



7" 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



County, 111.: and Surrilda, wife of John Courson, 

a fanner of Jasper County, 111. 

When a lad of six summers, James E. Mark- 
land accompanied his parents on their emigration 
to Jasper County, 111. The father purchased a 
farm, and our subject was thereon reared, remain- 
ing under the parental roof until nineteen years 
of age, when he left home and began farming in 
his own interest. He worked as a farm hand 
for two years, and thus made a start in life. He 
acquired a good English education in the district 
schools, and is now a well-informed man. 

When he had attained his majority, Mr. Mark- 
land was united in marriage with Miss Lucy A. 
Bonham, daughter of Levi and Mary (Hunt) 
Bonham, the wedding being celebrated on the 
16th of July, 1863. They have become the par- 
ents of four children, namely: Frances I., wife of 
George N. Fife, a teamster of Blaudinsville: Will- 
iam L., who is now attending school in Chicago: 
Cora E., wife of James B. Mann, who is en- 
gaged in teaming in Blandinsville; and Roy, at 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Markland began their domestic 
life upon a rented farm in Jasper County, 111., 
which our subject continued to cultivate until the 
spring of 1865, when he left the State and came 
with his family to Blandinsville. Here he made 
his home until the spring of 1866, when he em- 
barked in farming in Sciota Township, there car- 
rying on agricultural pursuits for two years. In 
1868 we find him engaged in farming in Logan 
County, 111.: and in the spring of 1870 he re- 
moved to Henderson County, where he continued 
agricultural pursuits until 1874. In that year he 
returned to Blandinsville and began trading in 
stock, a pursuit which he followed until 1880, 
when he removed to a farm in Blandins- 
ville Township. In 1885 he again took up 
his residence in town, where he engaged in 
the butchering business for two years, and 
during the following four years he engaged 
in teaming in Blandinsville. In 1889 he em- 
barked in the livery business, and in 1890 built 
his present stables. 

Mr. Markland, who exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the Democracy, has twice served 



as Constable, and has been a member of the Town 
Board for two years. Socially, he is a member 
of Hardin Lodge No. 25, A. O. U. W. ; New 
Hope Lodge No. 263, I. O. O. F.; and Aten 
Lodge No. 22, L- H. He also belongs to the 
Christian Church, and is a valued and enterpris- 
ing citizen, who manifests a commendable interest 
in everything pertaining to the welfare of the 
community. He is a man of sterling worth and 
strict integrity, and is both widely and favorably 
known in this community. 

GJDDISON F. HELMS is now serving as Sher- 
I_l iff of Hancock County, and makes his home 
/ I in Carthage. The record of his life is as 
follows: A native of Virginia, he was born in 
Floyd County on the 1st of November, 1844, and 
is a son of Hamilton and Aurena (Slusher) Helms, 
who were also natives of Virginia. The father 
was a farmer, and in 1859 he left his native State, 
emigrating westward to Hancock County, 111., 
for he believed he might better his financial con- 
dition by removing to the broad prairies of the 
West. Taking up his residence in Carthage Town- 
ship, he there resided for seven years, after which 
he returned to Virginia, where his death occurred 
at the age of seventy-two. His wife passed away 
at the age of seventy-three. They had two sons 
and one daughter, who are yet living in Han- 
cock County. 

Our subject returned to the Old Dominion with 
his parents in the autumn of 1866, but the follow- 
ing spring again came to Illinois, where he began 
farming upon rented land. He continued to carry 
on agricultural pursuits until 1881, when became 
to Carthage, and was appointed Deputy Sheriff, 
holding the office under William Damson. He 
also served in the same capacity under James H. 
Wetzel, and when the latter's term had expired, 
in 1886, he became a candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket for the office. The election returns, 
however, showed that M. V. Riley, his opponent, 
was the successful candidate, and during the four 
succeeding years Mr. Helms served as Constable 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Carthage Township. In 1890 it was 
time to elect a sheriff, and in that year he ran 
against Z. T. Starkey. This time he received a 
good majority, and in December entered upon 
his duties as County Sheriff, with Charles Weis- 
mann as Deputy. He lias done considerable pri- 
vate detective work, and possesses a keen e\ e and 
retentive memory, which well fit him for that 
service. 

In Hancock County, in July, 1S67. was cele- 
brated the marriage of Mr. Helms and Miss Au 
relia Printy, step-daughter of John \Y. Cox, of St. 
Mary's, and a native of this county. Their union 
has been blessed with three children, two sons 
and a daughter, namely: Emma, wife of John 
Moore, formerly of Carthage, but now of Quincy; 
Jay H. and Clay Vaughn. The family is well 
known in the community, where its members have 
main warm friends. 

Mr. Helms is a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, belonging to Hancock Lodge No. 20, A. F. 
& A. M. He has made his home within the 
borders of this county since fifteen years of age, 
and has therefore witnessed much of its growth 
and development. He has led a busy life, and is 
now acceptably and creditably filling the respon- 
sible position to which he has been called by his 
fellow citizens. 

3 AMES C. Con. SOX. the popular and suc- 
cessful editor of the La Harper, which is pub- 
lished in La Harpe, Hancock County, is a 
well-known resident of this community. He is 
living in his native town, his birth having here 
occurred on the 24th of September, [846. Hi- 
father. George Coulson, was born in Virginia in 
[800. With a view to bettering his financial 
condition, he emigrated westward in C835, and 
cast his lot among the early settlers of La Harpe. 
He was the first physician of this place, and was 
widely and favorably known throughout this sec- 
tion of the State. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Nancy A. Cossitt. She was born in 
Hartford, Conn.. December 27, 1802. and was a 



daughter of Silas Cossitt. Thej became the par- 
ent- of nine children, five sons and four daugh- 
ters, namely: Sarah I'., wife of E. M. Sanford, a 
resident of La Harpe; Henry C who died in Vic- 
toria, Tex., in 1864; Mary K.. wife of H. H. 
Barnes, of La Harpe; Nancy J., wife of J. R. R. 
Morford, who is living in this place; Epaphroditus 
C, who died in La Harpe in 1867; Caroline A., 
wife of D. D. Smalley, who is located in Raritan, 
111.: Thomas, who died in 1854; George, a hard- 
ware merchant of La Harpe; and our subject. 

James C. Coulson, the youngest member of the 
family, acquired his education in the public 
schools of his native city, and started out for him- 
self as a clerk in the general merchandise store of 
William Tharp, of Raritan. There he continued 
for two years, after which he accepted a position 
as salesman with C. H. Stansbury, of Raritan, 
with whom he remained for fourteen years, a 
trusted and faithful employe. 

During this time, Mr. Coulson was united in 
marriage with Miss Anna B.. daughter of C. H. 
and Sidney E. 'Humes) Stansbury. Their wed- 
ding was celebrated on the 25th of June, 1868, 
and was blessed with two children, Effie M. and 
Charles S., both of whom are at home. The 
mother died April 8, 1883, and her loss was 
mourned by many. On the 28th of October, 1885, 
Mr. Coulson was again married, his second union 
being with Mrs. .Mice M. Corzatt, of Blandins- 
ville. 111. Three children have been born unto 
them, a son and two daughters: Margie C, 
George and Edna. 

Mr. Coulson entered upon his newspaper ca- 
reer in Raritan in [876, as editor of the Raritan 
Bulletin, of which the firm of Barnes .X: Butler 
were publishers. In [878, he removed to La 
Harpe, and began the publication of the then de- 
funct La Harper. He has since been at its head 
and has made it one of the leading papers of the 
county. Although his office and its contents 
were destroyed by fire on the 15th of October. 
1893. he did not miss an issue of the paper, but 
with characteristic energy he made arrangements 
to continue the work without interruption. The 
paper is devoted to the interests of the community 
and to the publication of local and general news. 



i 7 8 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Coulson is much interested in civic socie- 
ties and holds membership with various organiza- 
tions, including Bristol Lodge No. 656, I. O. O.F. ; 
Hardin Lodge No 28, A. O. U. W.; LaHarpe 
Camp No. 42S, M. W. A.; and the Independent 
Order of Mutual Aid. He has for eight terms 
served as representative to the Grand Lodge of the 
Odd Fellows' fraternity, and three terms to that 
of the Woodmen. In politics, he is a Democrat, 
but his paper is published independently. He 
served as Postmaster of La Harpe for four years, 
under President Cleveland, and as Assessor of 
La Harpe Township in 1890 and 1891. His life 
has been well and worthily passed, and he has the 
high regard of all. 

f~" LIAS M. BRANDON, who since August, 
re) 1S86, has occupied the position of telegraph 
I operator and statioti agent at Blandinsville, 
claims Illinois as the State of his nativity, his 
birth having occurred in Fountain Green Town- 
ship, Hancock County, March 7, 1851. His fa- 
ther, Richard Brandon, was born in Pennsylvania, 
in 1809, and was a fanner by occupation. Dur- 
ing his early childhood he accompanied his par- 
ents to Ohio, and was reared to manhood on a 
farm in the Buckeye State. Having arrived at 
years of maturity, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary M. Favorite, who was born in Mc- 
Connelsburg, Ohio, June 3, 1814. The wedding 
was celebrated Jan uary 6, 1S36, and their union 
was blessed with eleven children, seven sons and 
four daughters: Teresine C, deceased, wife of 
David Cratsenberg; James F., a canvasser resid- 
ing in Fountain Green; Galbraith L., a retired 
farmer residing in Bloomington. Ind. ; George M. , 
an agriculturist of Fountain Green Township. 
Hancock County; Elizabeth M., wife of Robert 
Geddes, also a farmer of Hancock County; Elias 
M., of this sketch; Julia A., wife of John Miller, 
who carries on farming in Fountain Green Town- 
ship; Edward B., who is proprietor of the Phoe- 
nix Hotel, of Hampton, Iowa; Edward A., who 
died in infancy; Richard B., who was a soldier 



in the late war and died in the service of his 
country, from exposure; and Mary, who died in 
infancy in Iowa City, Iowa. 

Richard B. Brandon emigrated westward in 
1838 and located near Macomb, McDonough 
County, where for ten years he engaged in farm- 
ing. In 184S, he removed to a farm in Fountain 
Green Township, Hancock County, purchasing 
one hundred and sixty acres of unimproved land 
on section 13. In an unpretentious frame house 
on this farm our subject was born. His father 
died of cholera in Iowa City, Iowa, in 1854, and 
thus at the age of three years our subject was left 
dependent upon his mother for support. He was 
reared on the old homestead, and in the winter 
season conned his lessons in the district schools of 
the neighborhood, while in the summer months 
he followed the plow and aided in the other labors 
of the farm. His early educational privileges 
were supplemented by one year's attendance at 
Monmouth College, which he entered in the au- 
tumn of 1871. In 1870, he taught one term of 
school in his home township, and in 1872 he was 
employed as teacher of the Eagle School, and 
again in 1873. Until 1880 his time was alternately 
passed in teaching and farming, but in October of 
that year he entered the store of J. M. Springer, 
of La Crosse, where he was employed as a clerk 
for two years, leaving that position in January, 
1882. During this time he also studied telegra- 
phy, and in 1882 was made agent on the Toledo, 
Peoria & Warsaw Railroad at La Crosse. There 
he continued until August, 1886, when he came 
to Blandinsville. 

The lady who now bears the name of Mrs. 
Brandon was in her maidenhood Susan C. Hay, 
daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (King) Hay, 
of La Crosse. The marriage of our subject and 
his wife was celebrated October. 5, 1876, and their 
union has been blessed with seven children, but 
Gertie, William, Charles and Freddie died in in- 
fancy. Bessie, 'Bertha and Nellie are still at 
home. 

Since casting his first Presidential vote for Gen. 
Grant in 1872 Mr. Brandon has been a warm ex- 
ponent of the principles of the Republican party, 
and in 1881 he was appointed Postmaster of La 



LIBRARY 

UMVtKSIlYOF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




William H. Twaddle 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



181 



Crosse, which position he afterwards resigned. 
He is now serving as School Director, and is an 
efficient and capable member of the Town Council. 
Socially, he is a member of Blaudinsville Lodge 
No. 233, A. I-'. & A. M; and of Cam]) Xo. .596, 
M. W. A. One of the leading and prominent 
members of the Christian Church, he is now serv- 
ing as one of its Elders, and fur five years he has 
been Superintendent of the Sunday-school. He 
is an untiring worker in the interests of the same, 
and does all in his power for the promotion and 
advancement of the cause. His life has been 
well and worthily passed, and his honorable, 
upright career has gained him universal confi- 
dence and esteem. He is a popular, genial gen- 
tleman, and in the community where he lives he- 
has made many friends. 



[ILLIAM HOOTON TWADDLE, who since 
[876 has been successfully engaged in the 
practice of law in Macomb, and is num- 
bered among the leading attorneys of McDonough 
County, claims Ohio as the State of his nativity. 
He was born in Jefferson County. June 2, 1833, 
and isa sou of Capt. William and Hannah 1 Hoot- 
on ) Twaddle. The father was also born in the 
Buckeye State, and was one of a family of fifteen 
children. He commanded a company of Ohio 
militia, made farming his life occupation, and in 
1844 came to McDonough County, where he car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits until his death. A 
year after coming here he was elected Justice of 
the Peace, and continued to fill that position until 
called to the home beyond, in 1 n 7 v . He also 
served as Town Treasurer, Supervisor, and School 
Treasurer. His life was an honorable, upright 
one, and made him a highly respected citizen of 
the community. His wife passed away in Au- 
gust. 1864. and was laid to rest in Scott Cemetery. 
Three brothers of the Twaddle family are yet liv- 
ing: John W., a resident of Tennessee Township; 
Marceua, who resides in Bethel Township; and 
William H. A sister, Minerva E.. is the wife of 
William Lawyer, of Tennessee Township. One 



brother, George W., died September 18, 1S89, 
leaving a widow and four children, two sons and 
two daughters. He was a prominent fanner and 
owned some valuable land. He also served as 
Justice of the Peace and Supervisor of Bethel 
Township. 

William Twaddle and his family made the 
journey to Illinois from Steubenville down the 
Ohio River, and then up the Mississippi and Illi- 
nois Rivers to Frederick, where they landed April 
6, 1S44. They at once came to McDonough 
County and settled on a quarter-section of land in 
Bethel Township, which had been purchased 1>\ 
the maternal grandfather, William Hooton. The 
early history of the Twaddle family in America is 
not known, but the name is of Scotch derivation, 
and is a contraction of the name of the place where 
their ancestors lived, Tweed Dale. 

William H. Twaddle of this sketch has spent 
almost his entire life in McDonough County, hav- 
ing accompanied his parents on their emigration 
thither when eleven years old. He is almost 
wholly self-educated, as the common schools of 
the neighborhood during his youth afforded but 
meagre advantages. In early life he became fa- 
miliar with the arduous task of developing new 
land, for he aided in opening up several farms. 
He continued to engage in agricultural pursuits 
until about forty years of age, and when incapac- 
ited by ill health for further manual labor, he 
turned his attention to law. After considerable 
private study, he entered the office of William H. 
Neece, of Macomb, and afterwards was with Jacob 
H. Folts. In [876 he was admitted to the Bar ill 
Springfield, and has since devoted the greater 
part of his time and attention to the management 
of estates and to the interests of minor heirs. He- 
has done a good business along this line, for the 
people have the utmost confidence in him. and 
therefore give him a liberal patronage. 

Since casting his first Presidential vote for 
Franklin Pierce, Mr. Twaddle has been a sup- 
porter of the Democracy, and warmly advocates 
its principles. He is a generous, benevolent and 
kind-hearted man, and as the result of his friendly 
disposition, he has done much work without com- 
pensation, especially aiding those who were una- 



i8i 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ble to hire counsel. He now owns a good farm 
in Bethel Township, besides being agent for other 
landed interests, which lie carefully guards. He 
has taken quite an active interest in political af- 
fairs, and has served both as Assessor and Col- 
lector. A well-spent life has won him high re- 
gard, and it is with pleasure that we present to 
our readers this record of his life. 

6 ^ ci<T "> G=T~ 31 

[""\RESTON HUSTON, a retired farmer resid- 
L/' ing in Blandinsville, well deserves mention 
Y$ among the honored pioneers of McDonough 
County, for here his entire life has been passed. 
He was born in Blandinsville Township Septem- 
ber 14, 1837, and is a son of John Huston, who 
was one of the very earliest settlers of this locality, 
and aided in opening it up to civilization. The 
father was born in White County, Tenn., May 17, 
1808, and on attaining his majority he emigrat- 
ed to Morgan County, 111., in 1829. Eighteen 
months later he came to this county and took up 
his residence on section 19, Blandinsville Town- 
ship. The first land which he here owned was a 
one hundred and sixty acre tract, which he entered 
from the Government. To this he added from 
time to time, until at his death he was one of the 
most extensive land-owners of the county. He 
made the journey from Tennessee to Illinois with 
an ox-team, and 011 his arrival his possessions 
were fifty cents in money and a blind mare. The 
half-dollar was spent for salt soon after his arrival. 
His uncle, who had accompanied him onthejour- 
ney, loaned him a yoke of oxen, and with these he 
plowed forty acres of land, which he planted in 
corn. During the first winter he split the rails nec- 
essary to fence this tract, and also built a log cabin, 
in which the family lived for eighteen months. 
The nearest mill was at Jacksonville, and it re- 
quired eight days to make the trip to and from 
that place. In 1832 Mr. Huston removed to a 
larger log cabin, which he had built about a half 
mile from his first home, and making additions to 
this he soon afterwards had what at that time was 
considered a very pretentious log residence. 



In White County, Tenn., on the 2d of October. 
1828, John Huston married Miss Ann, daughter 
of William and Mary (Duncan) Melvin, and to 
them were born the following children: William 
M., a practicing physician of Blandinsville; Wal- 
ter, Rigdon and Crockett, all deceased ; Preston, of 
this sketch ; Thomas, a farmer and stock-raiser of 
Columbus, Kan.; Mary, wife of Strather Givens, 
a retired farmer of Abingdon, 111.; and John, who 
carries on farming and stock-raising in Blandins- 
ville Township. The father of this family was 
called to his final rest July 8, 1854, and the 
mother, who long survived him, passed away 
January 22, 1892. 

Upon his father's farm, Preston Huston spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth, and during 
the winter season he attended the subscription 
schools of the neighborhood, to which he walked 
a distance of three miles. He is largely a self- 
educated man, for his advantages in youth were 
rather meagre. He remained at home until he 
had attained his majority, when he started out in 
life for himself, beginning the cultivation and im- 
provement of a one hundred and sixty acre farm 
on section 23, Blandinsville Township, which he 
had inherited from his father. As his financial 
resources were increased, he made additional pur- 
chases, and at one time was the owner of eight 
hundred acres of valuable land, which yielded to 
him an excellent income, and made him one of 
the prosperous citizens of the community. He 
continued to successfully engage in agricultural 
pursuits until 1890, when he laid aside all busi- 
ness cares and came to Blandinsville, where he 
has since made his home. He has remodeled his 
residence and now has a comfortable and tasty 
dwelling, in which he will probably spend his re- 
maining days. 

On September 12, 1861, Mr. Huston married 
Miss Elmira Bern - , daughter of Col. William and 
Patsy (Givens) Berry. Five children were born 
of their union: John, who died in infancy; Ma- 
rion W., who has also passed away; Robert, a 
clothier of Havana, 111.; George B., who went 
west for his health, and is now living in Delta, 
Colo.; and Donna Martha, deceased. The mother 
of this family died December 29, 187 1, and on the 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



15th of May, 1S74. Mr. Huston married Martha 
M. Berry, whose maiden name was Martha M. 
Campbell, daughter of Eli and Martha (Wren- 
shaw) Campbell. By this marriage was born a 
daughter, who died in infancy-. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Huston are faithful members of the Christian 
Church, in which he is now serving as Elder, and 
take an active interest in church and benevolent 
work . 

B\ his first Presidential ballot, cast in [864, our 
subject supported George B. McClellan. and has 
since been an advocate of the Democracy. Public 
office, however, has had no attraction for him. 
Socially, he is a member of Blandinsville Lodge 
No. 233. A. F. & A. M., and is an enterprising 
and progressive citizen, who contributes liberally 
to the support of all worthy public enterprises. 
The history of McDonough County is familiar to 
him from its earliest day. He has borne all the 
hardships and experiences of frontier life, and has 
aided in the upbuilding and development of the 
community, taking a commendable interest in 
everything pertaining to itsprogress and advance- 
ment. 

•JTSAAC LATHROP, who is now serving as 
I Police Magistrate of La Harpe, is one of the 
X honored citizens of Hancock County, one of 
its pioneers, and one of its oldest native sons. 
He was born in Fountain Green Township, on the 
22(1 of August, 1833, and is a representative of 
one of the first families in this locality. His 
father, John Lathrop, was a native of London, 
England, and was a farmer by occupation. Hav- 
ing emigrated to this country, he lived for a time 
in Leavenworth, Mo., and thence came to Illinois, 
locating in Hancock County in 1831. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Coffman. and they became the 
parents of nine children, four sons and five daugh- 
ters, namely: Adaline, who was born and died 111 
Missouri; William, who was born in 1S30. and is 
now living in Nebraska; Julia Ann, deceased; 
Isaac, whose name heads this record; George, 
who enlisted as a soldier during the late war and 
died in Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, as the result 



of. exposure; Marian T., who died in Knox 
County, 111., in 1863; Mary Ellen, who died in 

Blandinsville, 111., in 1858; Mary, widow ofZall- 
den Baldwin, and a resident of Nevada, Mo.; and 
Phoebe E., wife of Edward Taylor, of Topeka, 
Kan. 

In the county of his nativity Isaac Lathrop 
spent the greater part of his life. At an early 
age he began work upon his father's farm, and 
became inured to all the hardships of pioneer life. 
The district schools of the community afforded 
him his educational privileges, but his training in 
that direction was much more meagre than in 
farm labor. During the late war he was found 
among the defenders of his country, for in Au- 
gust. [862, he entered the Union service as a 
member of Company A, One Hundred and Eigh- 
teenth Illinois Infantry. For one year he served, 
and then re-enlisted in the same company, in 
1865. On the 1st of October following he re- 
ceived his discharge at Baton Rouge, La. He 
was a loyal soldier, ever found rrt his post of duty, 
and participated in a number of important en- 
gagements. During his first term he was con- 
fined in the hospital by sickness for some time as 
the result of exposure. 

On the 27th of December. 1S60, Mr. Lathrop 
was united in marriage with Miss Mildred E. 
Mesecher, and to them have been born five chil- 
dren, two sons and three daughters, namely: 
Alice, wife of R. P. Martin, of Birch Tree, Shan- 
non County, Mo.; Stephen H., who carries on 
fanning in Henderson County: Viola, who died 
in infancy; Martha J.; and Daniel, who is still 
living in La Harpe. The mother of this family 
was called to her final rest on the 6th of February, 
1891, and her loss was deeply mourned through- 
out the community, for she had a large circle of 
friends and acquaintances who esteemed her 
highly for her many excellencies of character. 
She was a very zealous and efficient worker in 
the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, as 
well as in the Christian Church, of which her fa- 
ther was a minister. 

In his political views, Mr. Lathrop is a Prohi- 
bitionist. He has held a number of local offices, 
the duties of which he has ever discharged with 



1 84 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



promptness and fidelity. While residing in Hen- 
derson County he served as Justice of the Peace 
and as Constable, and held several school offices. 
He is now serving as Police Magistrate of Da 
Harpe, and is a capable and efficient officer. 
Socially, he is a member of Geddes Post No. 142, 
G. A. R.. and is a member of the Christian 
Church. His life has been well and worthily 
passed, and in the community where he has so 
long resided he has won and retained the high 
regard and confidence of all with whom he has 
been brought in contact. He has witnessed the 
growth and development of the county, and has 
ever borne his part in its upbuilding and advance- 
ment. 



EEORGE W. SOULE, who is carrying on a 
good restaurant in La Harpe, was born in 
the city which is still his home, on the 15th 
of February, 1S44, and is a worthy representative 
of one of the honored pioneers of the county, his 
father, Isaac Soule, having here located in 1837. 
He wasborn in Warren, Trumbull County, Ohio, 
September 13, 1820, and was by occupation a 
tanner. He was married on the 1st of February, 
1843, to Miss Eunice P. Richer, daughter of 
Timothy and Mary Ann 1 Hill ) Richer, who 
were natives of the Pine Tree State. 

George W. Sonle is the eldest of a family of 
eight children. No event of special importance 
occurred during his boyhood and youth, which 
were passed midst play and work and in attend- 
ance at the public schools, where lie acquired a 
good education. He remained with his father 
until he had attained his majority, and then 
started out in life for himself to make his own 
wav in the world. In [863, he embarked in the 
harness business in La Harpe, and for nine years 
was in the employ of Mr. Claycomb. In 1872, 
however, he left his old employer and began busi- 
ness in his own interest, in connection withN. W. 
Montgomery, who sold his interest to Edward 
Ross. He in turn sold to George Coulson, and he 
again to William Kirkpatrick. They opened a 
grocery, and Mr. Soule continued his connection 



therewith for six years, when, in KS7.S, he began 
farming in La Harpe Township, about two miles 
southwest of the city. For fifteen years he car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits with good success 
on a well-cultivated and highly improved farm. 

Mr. Soule was married on the 29th of Novem- 
ber, 1S68, to Miss Harriet C. Painter, who is 
now deceased. They had one daughter, Hattie 
E., but her death occurred at the age of six 
years. Mr. Soule was again married, on the 27th 
of May, i s 7 7 , his second union being with Laura 
E. Sperry. Two children graced this union: 
Clara Bess, at home; and Minnie, who died in 
infancy. In 1880, Mr. Soule was again called 
upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who passed 
away, leaving many friands to mourn her death. 

In his political views, our subject is a Repub- 
lican, and cast his first Presidential vote for Abra- 
ham Lincoln in 1864. He takes considerable in- 
terest in the Masonic fraternity, and is a member 
of La Harpe Lodge No. 195, A. F. & A. M.; La 
Harpe Chapter No. 134, R. A. M.; and the Order 
of the Eastern Star. He holds membership witli 
the Methodist Protestant Church, of which he is 
one of the Trustees, and in the work of the saint- 
is deeplv interested. The cause of education also 
finds in him a warm friend, and for one term he 
served on the School Board. Leaving his farm 
111 [893, on the 1st of August of that year he 
formed a partnership with W. H. Strong, and 
opened the Bon Ton Restaurant, of La Harpe. 
The members of the firm are men of good busi- 
ness and executive ability, and their enterprise. 
industry and perseverance have brought to them 
a liberal patronage. 

(ILLIAM E. GRIGSBY, M. D., one of the 
enterprising young physicians of McDon- 
ough County, who is now successfully en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine in Blandinsville, 
is a native of Kentucky, his birth having occurred 
on the 16th of February, 1862, in Washington 
Count} , where his father, Redman Grigsby, was 
also born. The paternal grandfather, William 






PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



r85 



Grigsby, was a native of Virginia, and came of an 
old family of that State. The Doctor's father was 

a farmer by occupation, and carried on agricultural 
pursuits throughout the greater part of his life. 
On the 27th of September, [860, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Susan M. , daughter of 
William A. Seay, a native of Virginia. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Grigsby were horn six children, three 
sons and three daughters, namely: William E. 
of this sketch ; Francis M., a physician and sur- 
geon of Maud, Ky. ; Annie R., who died on the 
old homestead in Kentucky; Walter C, a jeweler 
and watchmaker of Stronghurst, 111.; Lena E., 
who died in infancy; and Martha /.. wife of 
William Moore, a planter of Washington County, 
Ky. 

Dr Grigsby was reared as a farmer's lad, and 
his earl) educational advantages were those af- 
forded by the district schools of the neighborhood, 
which he attended through the winter season un- 
til nineteen years of age. He then entered Pleasant 
Grove Academy, where he pursued his studies 
for a year, after which he engaged in teaching for 
a year in his native county. In 1884 hechauged 
his work, securing a position as salesman with 
the firm of A. H. McCord & Co.. of Springfield, 
Ky., continuing clerking for a year. 

On the expiration <>1 that period. Dr. Grigsbj 
came to McDouough County, 111., and in [885 
began farming, which pursuit he followed during 
the succeeding five years. He then took up the 
study of medicine, in 1890, under Dr. T. J. Crum, 
of Blandinsville, under whose direction he con- 
tinued his reading for six months. During the 
winter of [890-9] he was a student in the Keokuk 
Medical College, of Iowa, and in the winter of 
1891-92 he attended the Louisville Medical Col- 
lege, of Louisville, Ky., from which institution 
he was graduated in the following spring. In 
[892-93 he again attended the Keokuk Medical 
College, and was graduated from that school in 
the latter year. Immediately afterward he opened 
an office in Blandinsville, where he has since sue 
cessfullx engaged in practice. 

< )n the 2d of July, 1SS7, Dr. ( 5-rigsby was united 
in marriage with Mrs. Mary I.. Bushuell, daughter 
of William II. and Elizabeth (Seybold) Grigsby. 



They have a pleasant home in this place, and are 
highly esteemed people of the community. Both 
the Doctor and his wife hold membership with 
the Baptist Church, and he is a member of Bland- 
insville Lodge No. 233, A. F. & A. M.; Chap- 
ter No. 208, R. A. M.; Blandinsville Chapter 
No. [08, 0. E. S.; and Hardin Lodge No. 25, 
A. O. U. W. In politics, he is a supporter of the 
Democracy. A close student of his profession, 
he has already secured a good practice, and will 
undoubtedly win success in his chosen vocation. 

( g «. c=i _<^±2z_ *=> r § 



DWARD A. MESECHER carries on agri- 
j^ cultural pursuits on section 34, La Harpe 
I Township, Hancock County. He is num- 
bered among the native sons of this county, his 
birth having occurred in Pilot Grove Township 
on the 13th of June, [867. He is also a repre- 
sentative of one of the pioneer families of the 
community. His father, Elkanah Mesecher, is 
likewise a native of Hancock County, and he too 
is a farmer by occupation. A sketch of his life 
is given elsewhere in this work. The mother of 
our subject bore the maiden name of Rebecca M. 
Butler, and is a daughter of Samuel Baxter and 
Lucinda (Younger) Butler. 

Edward A. Mesecher is the eldest in a family 
of four children. The educational privileges 
he received were those afforded by the common 
schools. He early became familiar with all the 
duties of farm life, and to his father he gave the 
benefit of his services, and aided in tin- labors of 
the firm, until his marriage. < in the 6th of Feb- 
ruary, 1889, he was joined in marriage with Miss 
Amanda James, daughter of William E. and Su- 
san (Wright) James. Their union has been 
blessed with three daughters, Pearl Edna, Lena 
Esther and Bertha Emily. 

The parents have many warm friends in this 
communit) and hold an enviable position in so- 
cial circles. Their home is also noted for its hos- 
pitality. Mr. Meseelui is a member of the Chris- 
tian Church of Pa Harpe, and his wife holds mem- 
bership with the Methodist Episcopal Church of 



1 86 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Liberty, McDonough County. In politics, he is a 
stalwart advocate of the Republican party and its 
principles, and his first Presidential vote was cast 
for Benjamin Harrison in 1888. He has never 
sought or desired the honors or emoluments of 
public office, but has served as School Director. 
He is a wide-awake and progressive citizen, and 
one who takes an active interest in all that per- 
tains to the welfare of the community and its up- 
building. Throughout his life he has followed 
agricultural pursuits, and his industry and good 
management have brought him success in his 
chosen vocation. He is a worthy representative 
of an honored pioneer family, and it is with pleas- 
ure that we present to our readers this record of 
his life. 



(ILLIAM N. BVLER is a worthy represen- 
tative of the agricultural interests of Han- 
cock County, and now carries on general 
farming in Durham Township. He was born in 
this county on the 4th of August, 1862, and has 
known no other home. From an early age he 
has been familiar with all the duties of farm life, 
for as soon as old enough to handle the plow he 
began work in the fields, and soon became fa- 
miliar with everything connected with his chosen 
vocation. His early educational advantages, 
which were those afforded by the common schools, 
were supplemented by study in Gittings Semi- 
nary. In 1880, he entered the seminary, and af- 
ter pursuing a three-year course was given a de- 
gree by that institution. 

On leaving school, Mr. Byler embarked in 
farming in his own interest, renting land from 
his father, which he operated for seven years. 
With the capital he had acquired during this 
period as the result of his enterprise and industry, 
he purchased in the autumn of 1889 seven t> six 
acres of land in Durham Township. Here he has 
since made his home, and now has a well-devel- 
oped farm, which in its thrifty appearance indi- 
cates to the passer-by the enterprise which is 
among the chief characteristics of the owner. 



On the nth of February, 1886, in Hancock 
County, was celebrated the marriage of William 
N. Byler and Miss Clara B. Layton, daughter 
of James B. and Margaret (Rose) Layton, who 
were natives of Delaware and Maryland, respec- 
tively. The union of the young couple has been 
blessed with two children, a son and daughter: 
Bessie L. and Charles L. 

Mr. Byler is an honored and respected citizen 
of his native county. In 1891, he was elected 
Justice of the Peace to fill a vacancy, and so well 
did he discharge the duties of the position, that 
in 1893 he was re-elected for a term of four 
years, and is now filling that office with credit to 
himself and satisfaction to his constituents. He 
is connected with the Masonic fraternity, having 
been made a Mason on the 24th of June, 1886, in 
Dallas City Lodge No. 235, A. F. & A. M. In 
1887, he was elected Junior Warden of the lodge, 
and in the succeeding year was chosen Senior 
Warden. In 1889. he was elected Master, and 
four years later was re-elected to that office. He 
has been kept continually in office since joining 
the lodge, and it will thus be seen that he is one 
of its valued and leading members. In politics, 
he is a Democrat, and his first Presidential vote 
was cast for Grover Cleveland in 1884. Mr. By- 
ler is a member of the Baptist Church. 

3 <■■ t "> Set* ~~5 

(ILLIAM A. TOWLER is one of the enter- 
prising and successful business men of La 
Harpe. He now deals in groceries, queens- 
ware and agricultural implements, and is enjoying 
a fine trade, which is due to his fair and honest 
dealing, his courteous treatment of his customers, 
ami his earnest desire to please his patrons. His 
well directed efforts bring to him a success of 
which he is entirely worthy. 

On the [.6th of August, 1S44. Mr. Towler was 
born in Greenup County, Ky. His father, Will- 
iam Towler. Sr., was a native of Virginia, and 
was a fanner by occupation. In an early day he 
removed to Kentucky, and in [855 came with his 
familv to Hancock County. The mother of our 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



187 



subject bore the maiden name of Frances Barker. 
By the union of this worthy couple were born 
eight children, two sons and six daughters, as 
follows: Susan, who died in infancy; Frances, de- 
ceased, wife of John Nelson; Amanda, wife of 
Samuel Fortney, of Kirksville, Mo.; Aremathy, 
wife of Roswell Cooley, of Nemaha County, Kan. ; 
William A.; Adelaide, wife of Aaron Fogel, a 
fanner of La Harpe Township; Joseph, who died 
in infancy; and a daughter who also died in in- 
fancy. 

Mr. Towler of this sketch when a lad of eleven 
summers accompanied his parents on their emi- 
gration to Illinois. His father died during the 
year of their arrival, and he was thus thrown upon 
his own resources. He not only provided for his 
own maintenance, but also aided in the support of 
the family. His education was acquired in the 
common schools of the county, but his privileges 
in that direction were limited, as he had to spend 
his time in farm work. 

A.fter arriving at years of maturity, Mr. Towler 
was united in marriage with Miss Martha Sautter. 
Her adopted father, William Alton, gave them a 
farm of one hundred and six acres in I. a Harpe 
Township. Two years later they removed to that 
farm, which was mostly unimproved; but with 
characteristic energj Mr. Towler began its devel- 
opment, and in course of time the once wild land 
was made to yield to him a golden tribute in re- 
turn for the care and labor he bestowed upon it. 
He made it one of the best farms of the neighbor- 
hood, and its neat and thrifty appearance indica- 
ted to the passer- b) the careful supervision of the 
owner. Nine children came to bless the home: 
William B., who is now in partnership with his 
father: Sarah Frances, wife of Charles White, of 
I, a Harpe Township; Elmer, who is living in La 
Harpe: Lillian and Edward, both at home; Eva, 
who died in infancy; Mary and Henry, at home; 
and one son who died in infancy. 

Mr. Towler continued agricultural pursuits until 
( (ctober, [890, when he removed to La Harpe, and 
with his son purchased the store of Gill, Giuna- 
ven & Co. With the superior judgment and ex- 
perience of the elder partner are combined the en- 
terprise and progressive spirit of the younger, and 



the firm therefore possesses the requisites of suc- 
cess. In politics, Mr. Towler has always voted 
with the Republican party since casting his first 
1 'residential ballot for Gen. U. S. Grant. During 
the war, a man who had been drafted having run 
away, Mr. Towler was chosen in his place, but 
ere he was sent to the front, the escaped man re- 
turned. Our subject, his wife and three children 
are members of the Christian Church. The fam- 
ily is one of prominence in the community, and 
its members hold an enviable position in social 
circles. 



f3 FORGE W. BRADSHAW, who carries on 
I— general farming and stock-raising on section 
V_>| 25, Durham Township, has the honor of be- 
ing a native of Hancock County, his birth having 
occurred in La Harpe Township on the 1st of 
January, 1841. He is a worthy representative of 
an honored pioneer family, his parents being Joel 
and Catherine (Dixon ) Bradshaw, natives of Tenn- 
essee. They emigrated to Illinois in 18 19, and a 
sketch of their lives is given elsewhere in this 
volume. The district schools of the neighborhood 
afforded our subject his educational privileges in 
early life, but later his studies were supplemented 
by one term's attendance at the La Harpe Acad 
emy. 

Mr. Bradshaw early became familiar with all 
the duties of farm life, for as soon as old enough 
he began to handle the plow, and to agricultural 
pursuits he has devoted his energies throughout 
his business career. At length he took charge of 
the old home farm, which he continued looperate 
until thirty-nine years of age. Under his super 
vision it was always highly cultivated and im- 
proved, and the rich and fertile fields were made 
to yield him a g 1 income. 

On the ist ofjanuarj , [880, was celebrated the 
marriage which united the destinies of Mr. Brad- 
shaw and Miss Mary I). Manifold, daughter ol 
Jasper and Pennelia (Huttou) Manifold, of Dur- 
ham Township. Their union has been blessed 
with three children, a sou and two daughters, 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Man." Ellen, Cornelia Catherine aud George 
Cleveland, all of whom are still with their parents. 
The family is one of prominence in the communi- 
ty . its members being widely and favorably 
known. 

The farm of Mr. Bradshaw comprises two hun- 
dred and forty acres of valuable land, and with 
the exception of thirty acres the entire amount is 
in Durham Township. It is neat and thrifty in 
appearance, and the well-tilled fields and mam- 
improvements upon the place tell that the owner 
is a man of progressive and enterprising views. 
He also makes a specialty of raising and feeding 
fine cattle, aud ships quite extensively to Chicago. 
In politics, he has been a Democrat since casting 
his first Presidential vote for Gen. George B. Mc- 
Clellan. and has serve.! as School Director for 
about twelve years. He has always lived within 
a mile of his present home, and therefore has a 
wide acquaintance throughout the county. That 
lii^ stanchest friends are those who have known 
him from boyhood is a tact that bespeaks a well- 
spent life. 



(ILLIAM M. HUSTON. M. D..wh 
most a quarter of a century has been E 1 ; g 
in the practice of medicine in Blandinsville, 
was born in Jacksonville. Morgan County, 111., 
on the 6th of August. 1829, and is one of a family 
of eight children, whose parents were John and 
Annie (Melvin) Huston. The father aud mother 
were both, natives of White County, Tenn.. and 
their marriage was there celebrated. The lady 
was a daughter of William and Mary Duncan' 
Melvin. In 1830 John Huston removed with his 
family to McDonough County, III., and, locating 
upon a farm, was for many years here eng; . 
agricultural pursuits. Of the children. William 
M. of this sketch is the eldest: Walter L. died at 
the age of twenty-two years; Rigdou, a farmer 
and stock-raiser of McDonough Count) 

1; Preston is a retired tanner living in 
Blandinsville; Thomas B. is living a retired life 
in Columbus. Kan.: Mary E. is the wife of S. 



Given s. who formerly followed agricultural pur- 
now living retired in Abingdon. 111.: 
John carries on general farming and stock-raising 
in Blandinsville Township: and Crockett, de- 
cea^ed. was a farmer and stock-raiser of McDon- 
ough County. 

We now take up the personal history of Dr 
Huston whose name heads this record. He was 
reared to manhood under the parental roof, spend- 
ing his boyhood days on his father's farm in this 
county, whither the family came when he was 
in a year old. His father entered one 
hundred and sixty acres of land from the Govern- 
ment in Blandinsville Township, aud added to 
that from time to time until he had an extensive 
farm. Dr. Huston began his literary education 
in the subscription schools of the neighborhood, 
which he attended through the winter season, a 
time when the work upon the farm was not press- 
ing. During the summer months he aided in the 
f the fields, plowing, planting aud har- 
To his father he gave the benefit of his 
scn'ices until twenty-two years of age, when he 
left home to begin life for himself. During the 
years 1848 and 1S49 he attended Knox College, 
of Galesburg. 111., and on leaving that institution 
S tn reading medicine with Drs. McMurphy 
iN; Parkins, of Rushville, 111., under whose direc- 
tion he continued his studies for eighteen months. 
In 1852 lie entered the Cincinnati Eclectic Medi- 
cal College, which he attended for two terms, and 
in December, [853, he opened an office and began 
practice in Monmouth, 111., where he remained 
for three years. 

During that time Dr. Huston was married. On 
th of June. 1855, he wedded Sarah Cole- 
man, daughter of James and Lucy O. 1 Hawkins 1 
Coleman, of Hopkinsville. Ky. Three children 
were bom of their union: Lucy A., wife of Elder 
M. Stevenson, of Canton. 111.; Annan Lee, wife 
of Lyman I. Henry, an attorney-at-law of Ouray, 
Colo.: and Hardin C, of Blandinsville, who died 
,1. Ma\ 4, 

On leaving Monmouth, 111., Dr. Huston re- 
moved to Mexico, Mo., where he spent two years. 
aud then returned to Rushville. where lie engaged 
in practice until L862. In that year he took up 



Of ILLINOIS 
UR6AM 




I'ii 1 1. 1 r E. Elting 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



i 9 i 



his residence upon a farm in Henderson County, 
but still continued in practice, and in 187 J he 
came to Blandiusville, where he has since made 
his home. The liberal patronage he receives at- 
tests his skill and ability and the confid n 
posed in him. He has steadily worked his way 
upward, and now occupies a prominent place 
among his professional brethren of the county. 
In politics, he is a Democrat, and socially is a 
member of Blandinsville Lodge No. 233, A. F. 
X A. M. 



r^IIII.Il' ]•. HI. TING, arising young attorney 
W of Macomb. 111., has the honor of being a 
\H native of McDonough County, having been 
bom on January 23, [862, in Emmet Township. 
His grandfather, John Kiting, was a native of 
Holland, the Kiting famil) having emigrated to 
America about the time of the Revolution, in 
which war the elder brothers took part. When 
John grew to manhood he engaged in the mercan- 
tile business in the city of Xew York, the old 
homestead being in Dutchess County, X. V. 

In [840 he emigrated westward, locating" in 
Quincy, HI., and afterwards removed to Peoria. 
111., where he engaged extensively in the real 
estate business. By diligence and industry he 
became one of the wealthiest men in the West. 
His death occurred March 21. [86l. His wife, 
who was a native of France, died while on a visit 
to Xew York. 

The father of the subject of this sketch. Philip 
II. Elting, was born in the Empire State, Febru- 
ary 1. 1. [814. After acquiring a collegiate educa- 
tion, he took a position as book keeper in his 
father's store. His father, appreciating his pecu- 
liar fitness for positions of trust and con. 
sent him West in [834, to look after his extensive 
landed interests in McDonough and surrounding 
counties. 

Philip H. Elting was a farmer, and was fairly 
successful in the avocation of his choice. He was 
married January 24. 18^4, to Margaret, daughter 
of Francis McSperitt, who came to McDonough 

9 



County in 1837. They were the parents of twelve 

children, of whom eight are now living, all being 
residents of this county. Mr. Elting died July 
jj, [876. His widow, who is a native of Ireland, 
still survives him, and resides on the old home 
stead on section 12, in Emmet Township. 

We now take up the personal history of Philip 
E. lilting, who iswidelyand favorabl} known in 
his native county. He acquired his early educa- 
tion in the common schools, and by careful appli- 
cation laid a good foundation for the superstruc- 
ture of a useful life. 

Later, he was graduated from the Macomb Nor 
mal and Commercial College, in the Class of '84. 
Returning to the farm, he gave careful attention 
to farming until 1889, when, wishing to follow 
some other profession, he began reading law in 
the office of Sherman & Tunnicliff", attorneys of 
Macomb, with whom he studied one year. He 
then entered the law department of the North- 
western University at Chicago. After pursuing 
a thorough course of study, he was graduated with 
the Class of '02, as Bachelor of Laws. After leaving 
school he relumed to Macomb, where he opened 
an office and has since been successful!;, engaged 
in practice. He possesses a worthy ambition, is 
enterprising and progressive, and strictly profes 
sional in his practice, and has a blight future be- 
fore him. 

In early life Mr. lilting became identified with 
the p ilitical into 1 :sts ^<i his nath e township. 1 Ie 
is an uncompromising Republican and has the 
courage of his convictions. For years the pre- 
cinct had been strongly Democratic, when, in [884, 
he accepted the nomination for Township Clerk 
on the Republican ticket, and he was theonlj one 
elected on that ticket, receiving a majority of two 
votes. The part\ of his choice appreciated his 
efforts to mak< a faithful officer, and gave him a 
unanimous call for a second race. After an un- 
usually spirited fight, he was again successful, 
though the majority of the previous \ ear was re- 
duced fiftj per cent., and now numbered one. 
His faithfulness in the discharge oi his duties, and 
the vigorous campaigns that he made, brought 
about a change in the political sentiment of the 
township, and he was twice again elected his own 



192 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



successor, with a majority of twenty-three votes in 
each instance, and the Democratic supremacy of 
the precinct has never been regained. 

Mr. Kiting is connected with the Knights of 
Pythias Lodge at Macomb, and in religious belief 
is a Methodist. At the Bar he has already won a 
reputation which might well be envied by many 
an older attorney. 



(TAMES H. GRIGSBY is a prominent repre- 
I sentative of the business interests of Blandins- 
Q) ville, where he is now engaged in banking. 
He embarked in this enterprise in 1882, and has 
since continued it as a member of the firm of 
Grigsby Brothers & Co. Theirs is one of the solid 
financial institutions of the county, and the safe 
and conservative policy of the bank has won the 
confidence of the people throughout the commun- 
ity. 

The gentleman whose name heads this record is 
a native of Blandinsville, his birth having here 
occurred on the 5th of January, 1851, and he is a 
representative of one of the honored pioneer fami- 
lies of the county. His parents, William H. and 
Elizabeth (Seybold) Grigsby, were both natives 
of Kentucky, and on leaving that State in 1830 
they emigrated northward to Illinois, and cast in 
their lot with the early settlers of McDonough 
County. This locality then was an almost un- 
broken wilderness, the county seat contained but 
few inhabitants, and many of the now thriving 
towns and villages had not then sprung into exist- 
ence. The Grigsby family numbered six chil- 
dren, of whom four are yet living, namely: Nancy 
J., wife of Newton Gordon, a resident of Bland- 
insville; John E., who also makes his home in 
this place: James II., of this sketch: and Mary L., 
wife of Dr. W. E. Grigsby. Those deceased are 
Charles and Alice. 

Our subject was reared in his native town, and 
acquired his early education in the public schools, 
but he afterward continued his studies for five 
vears under the instruction of a private tutor, 
William Forest. He remained under the parental 



roof until twenty-five years of age, and for four- 
teen years he was employed to a greater or less 
extent in his father's mill, becoming familiar with 
all the details of the business. In 1882, he em- 
barked in the banking business, as before stated , 
and has since devoted his time and attention to 
the same. 

On the 2d of October, 1875, Mr. Grigsby led to 
the marriage altar Miss Lillian C. Mason, daugh- 
ter of Horatio N. and Louisa (Gruber) Mason. 
Three children have been born of their union: 
William Ehnnan, Harry M. and Roy, all of whom 
are still under the parental roof. The parents 
and the eldest son hold membership with the Bap- 
tist Church of Blandinsville. 

Mr. Grigsby takes an active interest in civic 
societies and is an honored member of various or- 
ganizations. He belongs to Blandinsville Lodge 
No. 233, A. F. <N: A. M.; Blandinsville Chapter 
No. 108, 0. E. S.; New Hope Lodge No. 263, 
I. O. O. F.; Hardin Lodge No. 25, A. (). U. W.; 
and the Modern Woodmen of America. He cast 
his first Presidential vote for Horace Greeley, and 
since that time has been a supporter of the Dem- 
ocratic party. He has been elected to a number 
of local offices, including that of Alderman, Town- 
ship Treasurer and Village Treasurer. He dis- 
charges his public duties with a promptness and 
fidelity that have won him the commendation of 
all concerned. He is true to every public and 
private trust, and is a man of sterling worth and 
strict integrity, who is held in high regard by all 
who know him. 



SEORGE M. OAKMAN is one of the wick- 
awake and enterprising citizens of Blandins- 
ville, who is now editing the Blandinsville 
Gazette. Almost his entire life has been passed 
in Mel tonough County and he is numbered among 
its native sons. He was born in Hire Township, 
on the 17th of April, 1S62, and is a sou of Isaac 
A. and Elizabeth M. Oakman. His father, a na- 
tive of Huntingdon County, Pa., came to Mc- 
Donough County in 1852. For many years he 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



i93 



followed farming, but at length retired from that 
pursuit and removed to Macomb. At this writing 
he is serving as Treasurer of the county. The 
mother of our subject bore the maiden name of 
Elizabeth M. Campbell, and was a daughter of 
James and Eliza 1 MeCollough ) Campbell, who 
were natives of Franklin County, Pa. 

The Oakman family numbered nine children, 
six sons and three daughters: James F., a farmer 
and stock-raiser residing in Bardolph, 111.: Man 
E., wife of X. Swigart, a farmer and stock-raiser 
residing in Macomb; John Orr, who is engaged in 
the grocery business in Blandinsville; Robert \\\, 
a furniture dealer of Macomb: George M.. whose 
name heads this record; Isaac N.. who is living 
in Fountain Green, Hancock County, where he 
follows fanning and stock-raising; Margaret B., 
at home: Bert, who is local editor of the Macomb 
Eagle; and a daughter who died in infancy. 

Mr. Oakman whose name heads this record 

spent the days of his boyh 1 and youth on his 

father's farm, aiding in the labors of the fields 
through the summer months, while in the winter 
season he attended the district schools of the home 
township. Thus his time was passed until sixteen 
years of age, when he entered the public schools 
of I, a Harpe, there pursuing his studies for two 
years. On the expiration of that period he began 
teaching in Durham Township, Hancock County, 
and followed that profession for ten years, being 
employed in Henderson, Hancock, McDonough 
and Morgan Counties. During this time he was 
principal of the schools in Terre Haute, Colches- 
ter and Meredosia, remaining in the last-named 
place for four years. He was successful as a 
teacher, his work along that line always proving 
very satisfactory. 

On Christmas Day, 1883, Mr. Oakman led to 
the marriage altar Miss Adelia St. Clair, of Dur- 
ham Township, Hancock County, daughter of 
Joel and Nancy P. 'Barn St. Clair. One child 
graces their union, Edna Pearl, born January 31 , 
1888. Socially, Mr. Oakman is connected with 
Good Will Lodge No. 91, K. P., of Colchester; 
Blandinsvile Lodge No. 233, A. F. & A. M.; 
Blandinsville Chapter No. 108, O. E. S. ; Mere- 
dosia Chapter No. 11, R. A. M.; Hardin Lodge 



No. 25, A. O. U. W.; Aten Lodge No. 22, D. 
H.; Meredosia Camp No, 705, M. W. A.; and 
the N. B. of J. 

Mr. Oakman cast his first Presidential vote for 
Grover Cleveland, and is an advocate of the Dem- 
ocratic party and its principles. Its men and 
measures he supports throughout the columns ol 
his paper. On the 17th of January, 1890, he 
purchased the Blandinsville Gazette, which he has 
since continued to publish. He did not remove 
to this place, however, until May of that year. 
The Gazette has a good circulation, and is well 
worthy of a liberal patronage. 

3OSEPH FRY, Jr.. one of the leading farmers 
of LaHarpe Township, Hancock County, 
residing on section 19, was born on the 6th 
of August, i860, in Missouri, and is the second 
son of Joseph Fry. The father was a native of 
Bourbon County, Ky.. bom on the 16th of Oc- 
tober, 1806. His education was acquired in the 
district schools of his native State, and when a 
young man he learned the trade of a bricklayer 
and stone-mason, which pursuits he followed for 
a number of years. In 1865 he emigrated with 
his family to Illinois, and located in Hancock 
County. 

Our subject was at that time a child of only five 
years. The district schools of LaHarpe Town- 
ship provided him his earlier educational privi- 
leges, but later he attended the public schools of 
La Harpe. Throughout his life he has followed 
fanning. As soon as old enough to handle the 
plough, he began work in the fields, and has since 
devoted his time and attention to the tilling of 
the soil. His farm is well stocked with a good 
grade of horses, cattle and hogs. Here he has 
lived since 1S90. Previous to this time he spent 
two years in Blandinsville Township, McDonough 
County, where he worked in a brickyard. 

Mr. Fry has been twice married. On the 18th 
of January, 1883, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary M. Harris, of La Harpe Township, 
Hancock County, and a daughter of Isaac and 



194 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mary (Atwater) Harris. One child was born to 
them, Leomie. The mother was called to the home 
beyond on the ist of June, 1892, and Mr. Fry was 
again married, on the ist of February, 1893, Miss 
Freddie P>. Duncan, daughter of John and Marga- 
ret A. 1 Chapiri ) Duncan, becoming his wife. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Fry hold membership with the 
Christian Church of East Durham, and take an 
active part in its upbuilding. In politics, he has 
been a Democrat since attaining his majority. 
His first Presidential vote was cast for Grover 
Cleveland in i.S.Xa. He is a public-spirited and 
progressive citizen, and the best interests of the 
community find in him a warm friend. He may 
truly be called a self-made man, for hissuccess in 
life is all clue to his own efforts, as he started out 
in life empty-handed, and by his own industry has 
steadily worked his way upward. 



IIIJJAM B. TOWLER, dealer in groceries, 
glassware, queensware, farm implements 
and general farmers' supplies, is a well- 
known resident of La Harpe, who is recognized 
as one of its leading and influential citizens. He 
was born in Hire Township, McDonough County, 
111., on the 27th of September, 1865, and mention 
of his family is made in the sketch of W. A. Tow- 
ler on another page of this work. During his 
first year, our subject removed with his parents 
to a farm in Pa Harpe Township, Hancock County, 
two and a-quarter miles from this place, and there- 
he was reared to manhood, spending the days of 
his boyhood and youth in the usual manner of 
farmer lads. His educational privileges were 
those afforded by the district schools of the neigh- 
borhood. He conned his lessons through the 
winter season, and in the summer months aided 
in the labors of the farm. However, he entered 
Gittings Seminary in 1885, and there pursued 
his studies for two years. 

On leaving school, Mr. 'fowler returned to the 
farm, where he continued for one summer, and in 
the autumn of 1888 he removed to La Harpe, 
where lie embarked iii the grocery business in 



connection with R. B. Hetrick. This partnership 
existed only about one year and nine months, 
after which Mr. Towler bought out his partner's 
interest and conducted the business alone until the 
10th of October, 1890, when his store and con- 
tents were destroyed by fire. Immediately after 
this disaster, he formed a partnership with W. A. 
Towler and bought out the store of Gill, Ginna- 
van & Co. They carried on this business success- 
fully for about three years and a-half, but are now 
rapidly disposing of their goods, preparatory to 
closing out their trade. 

On the 27th of September, 1892, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Towler and Miss Fannie J. 
Brizendine, daughter of John Brizendine, a well- 
known citizen of La Harpe. Their union has 
been blessed with one child, William C. The 
parents are widely known in this community, 
where they have many warm friends and agree- 
able acquaintances, who esteem them highly. 
Their home is a hospitable one, and a warm greet- 
ing is always extended to their guests. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Towler are members of the 
Christian Church, and take an active interest in 
its work and upbuilding. He is now serving as 
Deacon of the church, which position he has held 
for about six years. In politics, he advocates 
Republican principles, and his first Presidential 
vote was cast for Gen. Benjamin Harrison. He 
has never been an aspirant for public office, but 
in the spring of 1S92 he was elected Township 
Clerk for a term of two years. He is a young 
man of good business ability, and his enterprise 
and industry have won for him success thus far in 
his undertakings. 



(TAMES M. BRADSHAW, one of the enter- 
I prising, progressive and representative citi- 
(~) zens of La Harpe, was born in the township 
of the same name on the 20th of December, 1855, 
and is a son of Joel Bradshaw, a native of White 
Count), Tenn., born September 15, 1S12. The 
family numbered ten children, four sons and six 
daughters, but three of the latter died in infancy. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



195 



William Dixon is now a fanner 011 section 30, I. a 
Harpe Township; Mary Jane became the wife of 
Frank Hine, of Jacksonville, 111., and died in 
February, 188 1 ; George W. is living on section 
25, Durham Township, Hancock County; Sarah 
Louisa, deceased, was the wife of William C. 
Bainter; Emma K. is the widow of James W, P. 
Davis; and Joel D. is deceased. 

( »ur subject is the youngest child of the family, 
lie acquired his early education in the district 
schools of La Harpe Township, but afterwards 
supplemented it by study in the Jacksonville Bus- 
iness College, which he entered in the fall of 1875. 
( )n completing his course he was graduated there- 
from in March, 1N76. He entered a class in arith- 
metic of seventy-five pupils, which was reduced 
in number to fifteen on account of their deficiency. 
Mr. Bradshaw, however, remained with the class. 
After leaving college, he became a stock-dealer, 
and in connection with that business, which he- 
has carried on extensively, he has also been largely 
engagedin farming. He now owns a farm offour 
hundred and fifty acres, of which two hundred and 
thirty acres are located cm section 30, La Harpe 
Township, while the remainder is across the line 
in Durham Township. His farm is one of the 
best ill the neighborhood, and its well-tilled fields 
and excellent improvements indicate the careful 
supervision of the owner and his thrifty and pro- 
gressive spirit. 

On the 13th of February, 1S7S, Mr. Bradshaw 
was united in marriage with Miss Tillie E. Mani- 
fold, daughter of Benjamin J. and Cornelia (Hut- 
ton) Manifold. Their union has been blessed 
with three children, two sons and a daughter, but 
Lillian K. died at the age of four weeks. The 
others. James F. and Quinton M.. are still with 
their parents. 

Mr. Bradshaw exercises his right of franchise 
in support of the Democracy, and his first Presi- 
dential vote was cast for W. S. Hancock in 1876. 
1 le has served as School Director for several years, 
and was also Road Overseer for several terms, but 
has never sought or desired public office, prefer 
ring to give his entire time and attention to his 
business interests. He has been a Director of the 
La Harpe District Fair since its organization, and 



was Auditor for the first three years. The fol- 
lowing year he was Superintendent of Booths, 
and during the fifth year was elected Director, 
and Superintendent of the Beef Cattle Department, 
which position he has held for four years. He 
was also one of the Building Committee. He takes 
an active interest in worthy public enterprises, 
and is recognized throughout the community as 
one of its leading citizens. 

REV. CONRAD KLHL, pastor of Zion's 
Lutheran Church, of Carthage, is one of the 
able ministers of the denomination. He was 
born in Bindsachsen, in the grand duchy of Darm- 
stadt, Germany, October 21, [821. His father. 
Christian Kuhl, was an innkeeper and baker 
of that country, and married Elizabeth Gantz. 
In 1R34 became with his family to the United 
States, locating in Zanesville, Ohio. In the spring 
of 1836 he removed to Beardstown, 111., making 
thejourney in the old-style moving wagon, known 
as a "prairie schooner." In Beardstown the par- 
ents spent their remaining days, both passing the 
eightieth milestone on life's journey. In this 
country the father followed the occupation of 
farming. Their family numbered six children, 
who reached mature years and reared families of 
their own, but all are now deceased with the ex- 
ception of Conrad. The eldest brother, George, 
died recently at his home in Beardstown, at the 
age of eighty-six. One brother, Philip, was a 
Methodist Episcopal preacher, and died in Bur- 
lington, Iowa; and other members of the family 
were merchants and teachers. 

We now take up the personal history of our 
subject, who at a very earl} age began to earn 
his own livelihood by working as an errand boy. 
He was thus employed in Zanesville, and in 
Beardstown. Later for three years he entered the 
drug store of Dr. Hoffman, wdio was the origi- 
nator of the method of making glucose. There 
he became acquainted with the science of chemis- 
trj , but at the age of twenty he left the mercan- 
tile business, having decided to enter the ministry. 



196 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lit- studied two and a-half years at a private 
school at Springfield, and afterwards entered 
Pennsylvania College, of Gettysburg, Pa., and 
was graduated from its theological seminary in 
1848. He was now fitted for his chosen profes- 
sion, and was soon placed in charge of a church 
in Quincy, 111. His ordination as a minister oc- 
curred in 1850, in Oregon, Ogle County, 111., by 
the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Illinois. In 
the fall of 1850 he entered the western missionary 
work, and was employed in western Illinois and 
eastern Iowa for a year, supplying pulpits and 
establishing new churches. In 1851 and 1852 he 
was pastor of a church in Springfield, 111. 

On the 12th of September, 1849, our subject 
was united in marriage with Miss Evaline M. 
Sell, of Gettysburg, Pa. To them have been 
born three children, who are yet living: Clemen- 
tine E., wife of C. M. Banks, of Boardman, 
Fla.; Martha S., wife of J. W. Hunter, of Cali- 
fornia, Mo., who is a member of the Legislature 
of that State; and Abby A., a college graduate, 
who is now teaching in the public schools. 

On leaving Springfield, 111., Rev. Mr Kuhl 
went to Mt. Carmel, where he remained for three 
years. He then spent a year and a-half as agent 
in Pennsylvania for the Illinois University at 
Springfield, after which he returned to Quincy to 
take charge of a new church, of which he was 
pastor three years. The three succeeding years 
were spent in Liberty, 111., and later he was in 
Perry, Pike County, and in Pittsfield for six years. 
It was in 1868 that he came to Carthage to take 
charge of a small church, then paying a salary of 
only about $250. The condition of his coming 
was that the church should build a parsonage. 
He has since remained as a Lutheran minister in 
Carthage, and has done a good work in this place. 

During the latter part of 1869, at a synod held 
in Hillsboro, a visiting member urged that steps 
be taken to found a Lutheran college somewhere 
in Illinois. Mr. Kuhl, who was President of the 
synod, was favorably impressed with the idea, and 
was made Chairman of the committee to consider 
the same, and take steps toward its fulfillment. 
Later a convention met in Dixon, in 1869, to con- 
sider this subject. It advised the appointment of 



a Board of Commissioners of twelve, representing 
the four synods. These convened at Carthage, 
deliberated upon several overtures, and accepted 
one made by Carthage, which amounted to a fine 
building site and $20,000 toward the erection of 
the present building. In prosecuting this work, 
Mr. H. Draper acted as financial agent and attor- 
ney for the citizens. Carthage College was char- 
tered and organized by the citizens, and a Board 
of Trustees was chosen to conduct affairs. From 
the beginning, Mr. Kuhl has taken a prominent 
part in this enterprise, and has always served on 
the Board of Trustees until lately. He has also 
been prominent and active in Sunday-school work, 
and was an agent of the American Bible Society. 
For several years he served as President of the 
synod, and has frequently been a delegate to the 
General Synod. The greater part of his time and 
attention has been devoted to church work, and 
his efforts have not been unavailing, but have re- 
sulted in much good. 

% * c=J<"T'">[=~ a Til 

ROBERT TARMAN, who died January 17, 
1894, was a well-known agriculturist of 
Hancock County, residing on section 28, 
La Harpe Township. He was a native of Rappa- 
hannock County, Va., born May 19, 1827. His fa- 
ther, George Tarman, was born in Maryland, but 
in early life removed to Virginia, from whence he 
enlisted in the War of 1812. While residing in 
the Old Dominion, he served as overseer or slave- 
driver for Samuel Chancellor, but he did not like 
this occupation, and in consequence removed to 
Ohio, in 1836, accompanied by his family. All 
the produce raised on the one thousand acre plan- 
tation was hauled to Falmouth, and Mr. Tarman 
handled all the money for the same. He was 
married in February, 18 17, to Mary Spieer, 
daughter of William Spieer, of Rappahannock 
County, Va., and unto them were born nine chil- 
dren in all. He took his wife and eight children 
in a one-horse cart to their new home in Ohio. 
Their journey, which lasted four weeks, was 
made in December, 1836, the weather being 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



19/ 



bitterly cold. When they reached Muskingum 
County they put what household effects they had 
into a rented cabin, and the father worked at 
whatever he could find to do. The mother spun 
and wove all the wearing apparel for the family, 
and in those early days the}- suffered many trials 
and hardships. Their children were as follows: 
Martha Ann, deceased, wife of Philip Karnes, a 
fanner of Muskingum County, Ohio; Mary Eliz- 
abeth, widow of Philip Parker, a farmer of Fay- 
ette County, 111.: William, who was a farmer of 
Muskingum County, but is now deceased; Al- 
fred, who carries on agricultural pursuits in Mus- 
kingum County; Robert, of this sketch; Mahala 
Jane, deceased, wife of Michael Dolau, who was 
captain of a boat on the Ohio Canal and subse- 
quently became a physician in Allen County, 
Ind. , where he died: Sarah, deceased, wife of Ma- 
lliias barman, of Hancock County; .Samuel, who 
died in this county; and Archibald, of La Crosse, 
111. 

Robert Tarman accompanied his parents to 
Ohio, and received the rudiments of an education 
in the district schools of Muskingum County, but 
his privileges were very meagre. He worked on 
various farms for his father until he had attained 
his majority, when he began working in his own 
interest as a farm hand. His first independent 
effort in life brought him the munificent sum of 
twenty -five cents per day. He had many obsta 
cles to overcome, but by industry and persever- 
ance he worked his way upward to success. 

On the ist of May, 1 8 5 1 , Mr. Tarman was 
united in marriage with Miss Phcebe Cassingham, 
daughter of Richard and Margaret (Morrison) 
Cassingham. Six children were born unto them, 
a son and five daughters, namely: Minerva, wife 
of Peter Feck, a farmer of Page County, Iowa; 
Mattie, at home; Laura, wife of Judson Farman, 
an agriculturist of McLean County, 111.; Celia, 
deceased; Ollie. at home: and Luther, who has 
also passed away. 

Mr. Tarman came from Ohio to Hancock 
County in 1853, and purchased fifty acres of land 
in La Harpe Township, upon which he at once 
located. To this he added, however, from time- 
to time, until at his death his farm comprised one 



hundred and twenty acres of good land, which 
yielded to him a golden tribute in return for the 
care and labor he bestowed upon it. He was a 
man of good business ability, and his well-directed 
efforts brought him a comfortable competence, 
which his family now possesses. 

In politics, Mr. Tarman was a Republican. In 
early life he supported the Whig party, but on 
the organization of the Republican party he 
joined its ranks, and afterward fought under its 
banner. He served as School Director for about 
sixteen years, and during his term the cause of 
education found in him a stalwart supporter, ever 
ready to promote its interests. He held member- 
ship with the Methodist Protestant Church of La 
Harpe. During the past four years he had been 
in poor health, and in 1892 he made a trip to the 
West, hoping to be benefited thereby. For 
twenty-eight years, Mr. Tarman cared for his par- 
ents and made their declining days happy. His 
mother passed away April 9, 1S92, at the very 
advanced age of ninety-five years. Mr. Tarman 
was a man of upright principles, and one always 
honorable and straightforward in his dealings, and 
his well-spent life gained him the confidence and 
high regard of his fellow-townsmen. 

Mr. Tarman died January 17. 1S94, on ms 
farm, and shortly afterwards the family removed 
to La Harpe, where they now reside. Of him 
the I. a Harper said upon the occasion of his 
death : 

"For a long time he was seriously afflicted, 
but during all his afflictions he was patient and 
hopeful. His expressed desire to live was from 
intense love for his family. But though desirous 
to live, he became fulls- reconciled to the Divine 
Providence that called him away. His faith and 
hope rested upon the Rock of Ages. It is blessed 
to die the death of the righteous. Though con- 
scious that he had not lived up to the privileges 
afforded him — conscious of failure to live a perfect 
Christian life — yet such was his faith in the mercy 
and love of God, so clearly manifested in the gift 
of His Son to redeem a lost world, that he calmly 
rested at the foot of the Cross, and for many days 
before his death, as he thought of that hymn en- 
titled, 'Take Me as I Am.' requested that it be 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



sun- at his funeral. It was a great comfort to 
the bereaved that Mr. Tarman was conscious and 
able to converse with them to within a few min- 
utes of his death. In the death of Mr. Tarman 
the community has lost an excellent citizen, the 
church a devoted member, and the family a loving 
husband and father. 

0SCAR W. HUSTON is one of the prominent 
and highly respected citizens of Blandins- 
ville. He was formerly connected with the 
business interests of this place, but is now living 
a retired life. He has the honor of being a na- 
tive of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Hen- 
derson County on the iSth of May, 1858. His 
parents were Walter and Mary Ann (Johnson) 
Huston. His father was born in White Count}', 
Tenn., in 1823, and in 1830 became a resident of 
Illinois, locating in Henderson County. His 
wife was a native of Ohio. In their family were 
seven children: Nancy J., wife of Hugh Hodgins, 
a contractor and builder residing in Omaha, Neb. ; 
Matthew, who carries on farming in Henderson 
Count)-; Margaret, who is also living in Omaha, 
Neb.: Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Leinbach, an ag- 
riculturist of Henderson County; Joel B., fore- 
man of an importing firm of Georgetown, Tex.; 
and Mary K., who is now deceased. 

Oscar W. Huston whose name heads this record 
is the youngest child of the family. No event of 
special importance occurred during his boyhood 
and youth, which were quietly passed upon his 
mother's farm. Through the winter season he 
attended the district schools of the neighborhood, 
and thus acquired a good English education. In 
the summer mouths he aided in the labors of the 
field, and early in life became familiar with all 
kinds of farm work. Remaining upon the home 
farm, he gave his mother the benefit of his services 
until he had reached the age of thirty years. In 
February, 1892, he came to Blandiusville and 
opened a shoe-store, which he successfully con- 
ducted tor a year and a-half, doing a good busi- 
ness in that line, but on the [6th of November, 



1893, he sold out, and is now awaiting develop- 
ments in some business line. 

On the 5th of February, 1880, Mr. Huston was 
united in marriage witli Miss Eliza J. Green, 
daughter of Edward and Eliza J. (Howard) 
Green, and a native of Iowa. Three children 
have come to bless their union: Elsie L., who was 
bom November 16, 1880; Ola E., June 22, 1883; 
and Edna B., March 20, 1S88. 

Mr. Huston is a supporter of the Prohibition 
party. He was formerly a Democrat, but on ac- 
count of his strong temperance principles hejoined 
the political party which embodied his views on 
that subject. He has never sought or desired 
public office, but served as School Director, and 
the cause of education has found in him a warm 
and faithful friend. Socially, he is a member of 
Blandiusville Lodge No. 233, A. F. & A. M.: 
Blandiusville Chapter No. 208, R. A. M.; and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his 
wife are both members of the Order of the Eastern 
Star, and both are leading members of the Chris- 
tian Church. They are prominent people of this 
community, who occupy an enviable position in 
social circles and have many warm friends, who 
esteem them highly. 

§= ' ^-a<T> ta ^ a) 



W|RS. MARY B. URBAN is the youngest 
y daughter of. David and Elizabeth (Thomp- 
(g son ) Byler, wdio are numbered among the 
honored pioneer settlers of Hancock Count)'. Lo- 
cating here in an early day, they not only wit- 
nessed the growth and development of this locality, 
but were prominently identified with its upbuild- 
ing, and were actively interested in its progress. 
Further mention of the parents is made on another 
page of this work. 

Mrs. Urban was born in Hancock County on 
the 3d of October, 1S69. and acquired her early 
education in the district schools near her home. 
She thus became familiar with all the rudimentary 
branches. In the winter of 1891-92 she pursued 
a more advanced course in the Gittings Seminary 
of LaHarpe. Her maidenhood days were quietly 



LIRR'RV 
UNIVERSITY 

UKbANA 




Roland M. Parker 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



passed in the usual manner of girls of this period, 
and May 24, 1893, she was united in marriage 
with Albert Urban, an enterprising and wide- 
awake young farmer, who is now operating the old 
Byler homestead on section 9, Durham Township. 
He too is a native of Hancock County, born Feb- 
ruary 7. [872, and the district schools afforded 
him his educational privileges. In his political 
views, he is a Republican. Although a young 
man, he displays in the management of the farm 
good business and executive ability, and will un- 
doubtedly win success in life. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Urban are well-known people of Hancock County, 
where their entire lives have been passed, and 
throughout this community they have many warm 
friends. 



ROLAND M. PARKER, M. D., is a medical 
practitioner of recognized ability in Warsaw, 
and receives from the public a liberal patron- 
age, which is well merited. He was born in Madi- 
son County, X. V.. March 21, 1818, and is a son 
of Leonard C. and Betsy T. ( Bennett ) Parker, 
the former a native of Massachusetts, and the lat- 
ter df Connecticut. Tradition says that the Par- 
kers are descendants of Sir Peter Parker. The 
father of our subject carried on merchandising and 
farming for many years. Removing to the Em- 
pire State in an early day, he there spent the re- 
mainder of his life, reaching the ripe old age of 
eighty-two years. 

In taking up the history of the Doctor, we learn 
that he was educated in the common schools of 
his native county. His fust venture in business 
life was as a hotel clerk in the employ of his uncle. 
Subsequently he became superintendent of the 
hotel, and in [843 he embarked in the lumber 
business, which he carried on for a time. Hewas 
also engaged in the study of medicine, and after 
having acquired a certain proficiency he engaged 
in its practice as a member of the allopathic school. 
Later, he took up the study of homeopathy and 
embarked in the exclusive practice of medicine in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, in the spring of 1846. There 



he was employed until 1863, when he went to St. 
Louis, spending four years in that city. In 1867 
he came to Hancock County, and purchased a 
very fine farm in Nauvoo. Subsequently he be- 
came the possessor of the old Brigham Young 
property, and continued its improvement and the 
cultivation of his land until his removal to War- 
saw in 1888. Since that time he has/esided in 
this city. 

Dr. Parker was married in 1863, the lady of his 
choice being Miss Jennie Swan. She died in 
[878, leaving two children, a sou and daughter. 
James W. graduated both from the scientific and 
medical departments of the State University of 
Iowa, and is now engaged in medical practice 
with his father. On the nth of July, [888, la- 
was united in marriage with Miss Donna M. T. 
Bennett, who is also a graduate of the Iowa l"ni 
versity, and is engaged in practice with her 
husband. Bessie G., the daughter of the Parker 
family, is a highly educated young lady, who was 
also graduated from the State University of Iowa. 

Dr. R. M. Parker is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, and in politics is an inflexible adherent 
of the principles of Republicanism. He does all 
in his power to promote the growth and insure 
the success of his party, and was a delegate to the 
National Convention in 1884. His residence of 
more than a quarter of a century in Hancock 
County has brought him a wide acquaintance, 
and by all who know him he is held in high re- 
gard. The firm of Parker & Son is a well known 
one. and deserves mention on the pages of this 
history. 



1— *=m"H^w=*=-=4 

3AC< >P> RKISKI.T. who carries on general 
farming on section 23, Durham Township, is 
a native of German), born March 1, [829. 
In that country he spent the first fourteen years 
of his life, and in accordance with the laws of the 
land attended the public schools. In 1843, how- 
ever, he bade adieu to friends and country, and 
sailed for America in company with his parents, 
Jacob and Vienna (Spoon) Reiselt. His father 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



owned a farm in Germany, but in the year above 
mentioned lie disposed of his property and crossed 
the briny deep to the New World. Making his 
way to Ohio, he purchased a farm in Franklin 
County, and there spent his remaining days. He 
carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, 
which occurred at the ripe old age of eighty-four 
\ cars. a 

Not long after coming to the United States, Mr. 
Reiselt started out in life to make his own way in 
the world. In 1845-46 he worked as a farm hand 
for Jeremiah Clark, of Franklin County, Ohio, 
receiving only $1 1 per month for his services. 
After two years, however, his wages were in- 
creased to $15 per month. He has driven cattle 
to Philadelphia and New York at a time when it 
required three months to make the trip, and has 
also borne other hardships of frontier life. 

It was in 1S66 that Mr. Reiselt came to Illi- 
nois and located upon the farm which is now his 
home. He first bought one hundred and twenty 
acres of land on the southeast quarter of section 
23, Durham Township, and later he added to 
this an additional tract of forty acres. He has 
made substantial improvements upon the place, 
and has good buildings and fences and all the 
other accessories of a model farm. The fields are 
well tilled and the place is neat and thrifty in ap- 
pearance. To some extent he deals in stock, sell- 
ing generally to local buyers. 

On the 1 8th of December, 1851, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Reiselt and Miss Elizabeth 
Weatherington, a native of Franklin County, 
Ohio. They have become the parents of five 
children, namely: Henry, who is now living in 
Nebraska; William, a resident of this county; 
Effie, at home: Mrs. Mary Kradfield, of Han- 
cock County; and Rettie, who is still at home. 

Since casting his first Presidential vote for 
Franklin Pierce in 1852, Mr. Reiselt has been a 
supporter of the Democracy. He has held some 
local offices, having served as Township Trustee 
for fourteen years and as Commissioner for six 
\ ears. His frequent re-election to these offices 
well indicates his fidelity to duty. At the age of 
fourteen years he joined the Lutheran Church, 
and has since been one of its active and faithful 



members, working earnestly for its upbuilding 
and advancement. His business career has been 
a prosperous one. He carries forward to a suc- 
cessful completion whatever he undertakes, un- 
deterred by the difficulties and obstacles in his 
path. Enterprise and industry are numbered 
among his chief characteristics, and as the result 
he has become the possessor of a neat home and 
comfortable property. 



(JOSEPH T. PAINTER, deceased, was born 
I on the 25th of March, 1800, in Philadelphia, 
(2/ Pa., and came of a family of German origin. 
His father, William Painter, was also a native of 
the Keystone State, and was one of the heroes of 
the Revolution. He married Martha Torton, in 
1785, and the lady was also a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. They became the parents of nine chil- 
dren: Charles; Sarah, who became the wife of 
Henry Reynolds, and emigrated to Hancock 
County in 1836; William, who came to this county 
two years later; Philip, who became one of the 
early settlers of Missouri, of 1816; John; Mary 
Ann, wife of John Bryan, who came to Hancock 
County in 1839; Joseph; Martha, wife of John 
Reynolds; and Lydia, wife of Isaac Pierson, who 
came to this county in 1850. None of the family 
are now living. 

Joseph T. Painter, an honored pioneer of this 
locality, acquired his education in New Castle, 
Mercer County, Pa. His school privileges, how- 
ever, were limited to ninety days' attendance at 
the subscription schools. When a young man of 
nineteen years he left home, with the intention of 
trying his fortune in the West, and went on a flat- 
boat to Missouri, taking with him a carcling-ma- 
chine. He made the return trip on horseback in 
1823, reaching his destination after twenty -eight 
days of travel. He then purchased a farm of one 
hundred acres in Mercer County, Pa., and. turn- 
ing his attention to its cultivation, continued to 
engage in agricultural pursuits for about thirteen 
years, when, in 1836, he again left the East. It 
was in that year that he cast his lot among the 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



203 



pioneer settlers of Illinois. On the 4th of June 
he reached what was then called Spillmaii's Land- 
ing, now Pontoosuc, and made his way hither. 
Here he purchased the northwest quarter of sec- 
tion 9, La Harpe Township, and began the de- 
\ elopment of a farm. 

Ere his removal West. Mr. Fainter was mar- 
ried. On the 3d of January. 1828, he was united 
in marriage with Jane Graham, and to them were 
born three children, Angeline, Charles and 
Thompson, bnt all are now deceased. The 
mother of this family died August [3, [833, and 
Mr. Painter was married October 18, 1834, to 
Phoebe Rea, daughter of John and Ann (White) 
Rea. They also became the parents of three chil- 
dren: Plemon, deceased; Delina, wife ol S. F. 
Bryan, of La Harpe: and Arion. who was killed 
at the battle of Pittsburg Landing, while aiding 
in the defense of the Union during the late war. 
He was a member of Company 1), Twenty-eighth 
Illinois Infantry. Charles was also in the service, 
being one of the boys in bine of Company G, One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Infantry. He 
served for three years, and was mustered out in 
the fall of 1865. He was First Lieutenant of his 
company. 

In 183S Mr. Painter went to Pennsylvania, 
where he purchased material for a gristmill, which 
was put up by Henry Reynolds ou the southwest 
quarter of section 9, La Harpe, also for a saw- 
mill, which he erected himself on section 10, La 
Harpe, and which he operated about two years, 
although he owned it ten or twelve years, when 
it parsed out of his hands. These were among 
the pioneer mills of this section of country. 

Mr. Fainter continued to engage in agricultural 
pursuits until i860, when he retired from active 
life, and went to live with his daughter, Mrs. S. 
F. Bryan, with whom he remained until his death, 
which occurred on the 9th of September, [875. 
In politics, he was originally a Whig, and on the 
organization of the Republican party joined its 
ranks. He served as Constable for several yeai S, 
and was Assessor and Collector for fourteen years. 
For the long period of thirty years he served as 
School Director, and the cause of education ever 
found in him a warm friend. He was a faithful 



member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
was a charitable and benevolent man, who aided 
in the upbuilding of all enterprises calculated to 
promote the best interests of the community. He 
was a valued and prominent citizen of Hancock 
County for almost fortj years, and this history 
would be incomplete without the record of his 
life. 

("JACOB BRYAN, deceased, was one of the 
I early settlers of Hancock County, and one 
Q) who was widely and favorably known in this 
locality. A native of Hunterdon, X. J., he was 
born on the 15th of August, 1794, and was a sou 
of William and Mary iSuphen) Bryan. His 
father was born in New Jersey, February 12, 
1 761. Of their children, Mary became the wife 
of Samuel Hutton, of La Harpe Township, and 
both she and her husband are deceased. Rachel 
married Robert Simonton, of Pennsylvania, and 
they are now deceased: Eleanor became the wife of 
James Burns, and both died in Pennsylvania; 
Hannah married Thomas Fainter, and both passed 
away in the Keystone State; Jane, Eliza, John, Ja- 
cob, Isaac and William are also deceased. 

Jacob Bryan of this sketch was reared on his 
father's farm in New Jersey, and during his youth 
attended the subscription schools of his native 
State. In 1819, he removed to Mercer County, 
Fa., and, purchasing a farm of one hundred acres, 
there began life as a fanner. He followed agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout his remaining days, 
and met with good success in his undertakings. 
As a companion and helpmate on life's journey- 
he chose Mary Bagley, daughter of Daniel and 
Elizabeth 1 Showerman ) Bagley. Their marriage 
was celebrated in Crawford County, Pa., on the 
14th of May, 1824, and unto them were born 
seven children, one of whom died in infancy. 

The year 1840 witnessed the removal of Mr. 
Bryan and his family to Hancock Count}'. He 
took up his residence in La Harpe Township, and 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land on 
section 3, La Harpe Township, where he began 
the development of a farm. By additional pur- 



204 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



chase he added to this from time to time until he 
became the owner of six hundred acres of valuable 
land, which yielded to him a golden tribute in re- 
turn for the care and labor he bestowed upon it. 
He successful!} carried on farming until the 2dof 
November, 1857, when he retired from active life 
and removed with his wife and two children to 
La Harpe. He died on the 28th of March, 1S80. 
His wife, who still survives him, is now in her 
eighty-ninth year. 

In his political views, Mr. Bryan was originally 
a Whig, but when the Republican party was 
formed he joined its ranks, and was ever afterward 
one of its stalwart supporters. He never aspired 
to public office, nor would he accept political pre- 
ferment. He was originally a member of the 
Methodist Church, but afterward, when the Meth- 
odist Protestant Church was organized, he joined 
the same and was one of its consistent and faithful 
members until his death. He was always found 
on the side of right, a supporter of all that would 
benefit and elevate humanity. His career was 
ever honorable, and his example is one well worthy 
of emulation. 



*#$+£#-= 



*YSAAC SOULE, one of the honored pioneers of 
I Hancock County, who through a long period 
X has witnessed the growth and development of 
this region, and has aided in its progress and ad- 
vancement, was born in Warren, Trumbull Coun- 
ty, Ohio, September [3, 1820, ami is the second 
son of Josiah and Sarah Soule. The Soule fam- 
ily trace back their ancestry to the time the ' ' May- 
flower " made its way across the Atlantic, in 1620. 
Among the passengers on that vessel was George 
Soule. He cast in his lot with the Pilgrim Fa- 
thers, and lived to an advanced age, dying in 
[679. To him was born John Soule, who lived 
in Duxbury, Mass. His wife's given name was 
Mary. The settlement of his estate was dated 
March 1, 1707 or 1708, so that it is probable he 
died in 1707. Benjamin Soule, his son, married 
Sarah Standish, daughter of Alexander Standish, 
a son of Capt. Miles Standish. Benjamin died 



December 1, 1729, aged sixty-three years; his 
wife died March 14, 1740, aged seventy-three 
years. Zachariah, son of Benjamin, born March 
21, 1694, was married June 9, 1720, to Mary 
Eaton. Zachariah died May 3, 1 7 5 1 , aged fifty- 
seven years. Ephraim, his son, born May 11, 
1729, was married February 10, 1757, to Rebecca 
Whitmarsh, daughter of Richard Whitmarsh, and 
died January 24, 1817, aged eighty-seven years; 
his wife died September 5, 1805, aged seventy - 
five years. Daniel Soule, his son, born Novem- 
ber 16, 1757, was married May 1, 17S3, to Sarah 
Cushman, seventh daughter of Josiah Cushman. 
of' Plymouth, a lineal descendant of the fourth 
generation from Elder Thomas Cushman, one of 
the " Mayflower " Pilgrims. Daniel died in 1836, 
aged eighty-one years. 

Josiah, the father of our subject, born January 
13, 1794, married Sally Young, ofWareham, 
Mass., and died March 9, 1S72. The sous of 
Josiah Soule were Josiah, Isaac, George, Plymp- 
ton, James, Harrison and Warren. The daugh- 
ters were Julia, Clarissa, Emily and Clara. All 
are dead but Isaac and Julia. Julia, who lives at 
Warren, Ohio, attended the golden wedding of 
her brother in 1893. 

At the age of seventeen years Isaac Soule left 
his bovhood home to find one in the then far 
West, and in 1837 came to La Harpe. Here he 
secured employment with a Mr. McFarlaud, a 
tanner, to whom he engaged for a seven-year 
apprenticeship. 

On the 1st of February, 1843, Mr. Soule was 
united in marriage with Miss Eunice Ricker, the 
ceremony being performed by John Hicok, a 
Justice of the Peace. The lady was born near 
Portland, Me., January 19, 1826, and was the 
eldest child of Timothy and Mary A. Ricker. 
About 1838 her parents left the rock-ribbed, laud 
of Maine and started westward. They traveled 
In- rail from Dover to Boston; by water from Bos- 
ton to New York; again by rail from New York 
to Pittsburgh, and then on a boat went down the 
Ohio and up the Mississippi River to Spillman's 
Landing, now called Poutoosuc. There they 
hired a team, and after three weeks' travel reached 
La Harpe on the 2d of June, 1838. Mr. Ricker 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



205 



at once began the erection of a home, which is 
still known as the Ricker house, but his death 
occurred before its completion. His family was 
thus left in a new country, with few acquaintances, 
to battle with the world, and overcome as best 
they could the difficulties by which they were 
surrounded. 

Mr. and Mrs. Soule began their domestic life in 
a small frame house on the north end of the lot 
on which their residence now stands. It contin- 
ued to be their home for two years, during 
which time their first son, George W., was born, 
February is, 1 S44. In [845 the family located 
011 a farm two miles east of I. a Harpe. The other 
children are Charles \\\ . who was born May 5, 
[846, and died August 7, 1 s 4 7 ; Charles W., born 
March ;, 1 , 1S4S ; James J. , born October^, [850; 
Eugene X., born January 8, 1861; Ernest C, 
who was born July 25, t866, and died September 
25, 1868; Elbert I., who was born September 3, 
[868; .ind Mary E., who was born November 1. 
1870, and died on the 14th of April following. 

After two years spent upon the farm, Mr. Soule 
returned to La Harpe, and in [850 he purchased 
his present home. In company with John and 
Luther Warren, he crossed the plains in 1S52 
with ox-teams, bound for the gold fields of Cali- 
fornia. Thej' were four months upon the way, 
and during a part of the time they passed in Cali- 
fornia they suffered greatly for the necessaries of 
lift.-, especiallj for bread. At one time a great snow- 
storm prevailed, snow being fifteen feet deep oil 
the mountains. They were thirty-four days with- 
out bread. The first flour to get into the settle- 
ment brought Si. 25 a pound. Two years were 
passed by Mr. Soule on the Pacific .Slope, after 
which he returned home by way of the Isthmus 
of Panama and New York. He was rich in ex- 
perience if not in gold, and has main interesting 
stories to relate of that trip. for a number of 
years thereafter he was employed in the store of 
J. ,\; I'.. Warren. 

On the 1-4 of February, 1893, Mr. and Mrs. 
Soule celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniver- 
sary. During the fifty years in which they have 
traveled life's journey together they have wit 
uessed many important changes, both in the com 



munity in which they live and the lives of those 
around them. Sorrow has come into their own 
home, but the greater part of their lives has been 
blessed with happiness, which we trust may be 
theirs for many years to come. 

§ "-cj^r^ isi J — ® 



(ToilX N. HURDLE, deceased, was born Feb- 
I ruary 15, 1831, in Muskingum County, Ohio. 

\~) His education was confined to the district 
schools of his native county, and was obtained 
during his attendance through the winter season 
for a few years. At the age of eighteen he began 
business for himself by planting crops on rented 
tracts of land, when his services were not required 
on his father's farm. He did this work on 
shares, and in this way accumulated about $600 
at the time he was twenty-three years of age. 

On the 15th of December, [853, Mr. Hurdle 
wedded Miss Mary Wolf, and immediately there- 
after removed to Illinois, making the journey with 
a two-horse team. After twenty-six days of travel 
he reached Henderson County, and purchased a 
quarter-section of land for $1,900. He had to go 
in debt $1,500 for the same, but he paid off his 
indebtedness in three years, on selling the farm 
for S4.600. In February, 1857, m connection 
with his father, he bought a half-section of land 
in LaHarpe Township, Hancock County, for 
$7,875. In [861 he purchased his father's inter- 
est, giving a mortgage on the same for nearly 
$4,000. Hard times came 011 as the result of the 
financial crash in 1 S 5 7 . and he offered to sell six 
thousand bushels of corn for leu cents a bushel, in 
order to pay the interest on the mortgage, but 
this was not accepted. The mortgagee sued for 
his interest, but finally compromised, and Mr. 
Hurdle was to pay the following June. In the 
mean time the price of corn was raised to seventy 
cents per bushel, and lie easily paid off his in- 
debtedness. 

In [860 our subject was called upon to mourn 
the loss of his wife, who died on the 9th of April, 
leaving two children: Edgar F., a farmer of Eaton, 
Colo.; and Emma F., wife of John A. Goodau, a 



206 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lumber dealer of the same place. They also lost 
one child, Laura J., who died in infancy. Mr. 
Hurdle was again married. May 28, 1861, his 
second union being- with Klmira A. Barr, a na- 
tive of Breckeuridge County, Ky., and a daugh- 
ter of Elias and Sallie A. (Beauchamp) Barr, 
both of whom were natives of that State. Her 
grandfather, Adam Barr, who was a native of 
Maryland, served in the Revolution under Wash 
ington, and died in Kentucky. 

After coming to Hancock County, Mr. Hurdle 
added to his possessions, until at his death he 
owned nine hundred and five acres of valuable 
land in the home farm. His large residence, one 
of the finest country dwellings in the county, was 
erected in 1872. The barns and outbuildings on 
the place are models of convenience, and there is 
an air of thrift and prosperity about the whole 
place. Eight children came to bless the home, 
born of the second marriage, namely: Lula B., 
wife of Dr. T. W. Bath, of Ohio, 111. ; Sarah Olive, 
wife of L. S. James, a farmer of La Harpe Town- 
ship; Maggie C, wife of C. D. Rice, a farmer of 
Durham Township; Carrie A., deceased; William 
I v . , Dora K.. Henry A. and John F. 

In [873 and 1874. Mr. Hurdle lost about $40,- 
000 by indorsing notes for others. He was one 
of the most substantial and enterprising citizens 
of the county, and with time and means aided in 
every work calculated for the upbuilding and the 
permanent good of the community. He was a 
conscientious Christian gentleman, and was identi- 
fied with the Methodist Protestant Church from 
the age of eighteen. At the age of seven he be- 
came a member of the Washingtonian Temper- 
ance Society and ever adhered to the strictest 
temperance principles. His honesty was above 
question, and his word was as good as his bond. 
In early life he was a Whig, but on the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party joined its ranks. 

Mr. Hurdle's ancestors were of Scotch lineage. 
The first of whom we have any authentic account is 
John Hurdle, who was horn near Baltimore, Md., 
and there lived many years. He afterward re- 
moved to Muskingum County, Ohio, where he 
died in 1842. He was an Abolitionist, and voted 
that ticket when there were onh three others of 



the same political views in his precinct. His son. 
William V. Hurdle, was born in Virginia, and 
was reared on his father's farm, but on attaining 
manhood he studied medicine, and engaged in 
practice for twenty years in Ohio. About [826 
he wedded Mary Kinney, daughter of William 
and Margaret iMahan) Kinney, of Huntingdon 
County, Pa. In 1853 William Y. Hurdle re- 
moved to Illinois, where, in company with his son 
John, he purchased a farm, to which we have 
previously referred. 

Mr. Hurdle of this sketch died October 28, 
1887, and the county thereby lost one of its best 
citizens, his family a loving husband and father, 
and the community a wise counsellor, whose ex- 
ample may be copied by coming generations with 
profit. 



|~RANCIS L. FULLMER, dealer in hard and 
f^ soft coal, lime and cement, is one of the 
I wide-awake and progressive business men of 
Hamilton. He is a Canadian by birth, a native 
of Lincoln County, in the province of Ontario, 
Canada, born September 16, 1840. The family, 
however, is of German origin, and his parents, 
Jacob and Jane (Merrill) Fullmer, were natives 
of Pennsylvania and New York, respectively. 
Their family numbered eight children, as follows; 
Merrill, now an attorney-at-law and preacher of 
Wisconsin; Leander, a traveling salesman of Cal- 
ifornia; Francis L., of this sketch; Mary. deceased, 
wife of Rev. George Reynolds; Reuben, a lawyer 
of South Dakota: Alvira, wife of Joseph Sawyer, 
who resides in Beaver Dam, Wis.; Almira, de- 
ceased, twin sister of Alvira; and one child who 
died in infancy. The father of this family in an 
early day removed to Canada and located on a 
lann in the province of Ontario. In 1845, he 
took his family to Dodge County, Wis., where he 
secured land and made a homestead. 

Mr. Fullmer whose name heads this record was 
only five years of age at the time of the removal. 
His education was acquired in the district schools 
of Dodge County, and he also attended a sub- 
scription school for three terms. When attend- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ing school at that early period, it was a frequent 
occurrence for him to pass three or four Indian 
wigwains, when going to and fro from school. 
The red men were very numerous, and white set- 
tlers rather scarce. On one occasion, when his 
mother was at home with her children, a squaw 
made an attempt to steal one of her twins, and 
succeeded in getting the child rolled up in her 
blanket, and on her hack. When Mrs. Fullmer 
saw what she was doing, a lively skirmish en- 
sued between the two women, and the mother 
succeeded in recovering her child. During his 
boyhood he worked on his father's farm and early 
became inured to the hard labors of the field, but 
at length he determined to give his time and at- 
tention to other pursuits, and on attaining his ma- 
jority, in i Soi, he was engaged as an employe of 
the insane asylum at Jacksonville, 111., where he 
remained for two years. In 1863, he returned to 
Dodge County, and continued farming for a few 
years, lor his health had failed and he believed 
that outdoor exercise would greatly restore him. 

1 inrine, this time, Mr. Fullmer was married. 
On the 24th of November, 1 .S64. he was joined in 
marriage with Miss Man- Bayless, of Jackson- 
ville. Into them have been born two children: 
Lee, an employe of the Wabash Railroad, resid- 
ing in Springfield, 111.; and Maud, at home. In 
1 siio. Mr. Fullmer came with his family to Han- 
cock County, locating at West Point, and engaged 
in farming for about eight years. On the expi- 
ration of that period he removed to Keokuk, Iowa, 
where he secured a position as a toll-collector 0:1 
a bridge. In 1S76, he was elected Superinten- 
dent of the Hancock County Poor Farm, at 
Carthage, and held that position for a year. In 
[877, he returned to the farm in St. Albans 
Township, and for seven years devoted his time 
and attention to the cultivation and improve- 
ment of his land, making the well-tilled fields 
yield to him a good income. In [886, he came 
to Hamilton, and has since been engaged in the 
business which now occupies his attention. He- 
has a good trade and is meeting with well -de- 
served success. 

Mr. Fullmer holds membership with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, and exercises his right 



of franchise in support of the Republican party. 
He has served as School Director, but has never 
aspired to public office. He also belongs to Rapid 
City Lodge No. 286, K. P., and to Montebello 
Lodge No. 697, I. 0. 0. F.-. and also to the Mod 
ern Woodmen of America. He has led a busy 
and useful life, and his success is due to his own 
efforts. 



["PATRICK JOSEPH HESSION.M. D.,oneof 

Lf the leading young physicians of Hancock 
\S County, now successfully engaged in prac- 
tice in Hamilton, is a native of St. Louis, Mo., 
born May 26, [863. His father, Thomas Hession, 
was born in County Mayo, Ireland, and traced 
his ancestry to Usham the Great. Crossing the 
Atlantic to America in the steamer -Constella- 
tion," in 1N49, he landed at Castle Garden, and 
thence went to Greene County, Pa. He became 
a contractor on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, 
and worked along that line to Memphis, Teun. 
He was a member of the One Hundred and Fiftj 
fourth Regiment of State Militia, and was con 
nected with the United States standing army 
which aided in the protection of the city of Mem 
phis. In [862 he removed to St. Louis, Mo., 
where he wedded Miss Mary B. Laffey. The) 
were the parents of six children: Man - , HOW 
deceased; the Doctor; John P., of Hamilton; 
Catherine, at home; Thomas S., also a practicing 
physician of Hamilton; and Man B., who died 111 
infancy. 

When our subject was an infant his parents hit 
St. L,ouis and removed to Keokuk. Iowa, and in 
that city and in Hamilton he was reared. His 
education was acquired in the public schools of 
Hamilton, and his first independent effort in life 
was as a bridge carpenter. He then worked at 
bridge building and railroading for two years, 
and in [884 began the study of medicine under 
the direction of Dr. J. C. Hughes, of Keokuk, 
Iowa, with whom he continued his studies for 
three years. On the [St of March, 1887, he was 
graduated from the College- of Physicians and 



208 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



.Surgeons of Keokuk, Iowa, and, with the excep- 
tion of seven months spent in Hickory Ridge, has 
since been engaged in practice in Hamilton. In 
1893 he took a position with his alma main as 
demonstrator of anatomy. The fact that this po- 
sition was offered him by the school of which he 
was once a pupil, is a high testimonial to his skill. 
He at present fills the position of Company Sur- 
geon for the Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw Railroad 
Company. 

On the 27th of November, 1890, Dr. Hession 
was united in marriage with Miss Rosa A. Young, 
daughter of Absalom and Emily ( Palmer.) Young. 
Their union has been blessed with one son, 
Thomas Joseph. The Doctor and his wife hold 
an enviable position in social circles, and have the 
warm regard of many friends in the community. 
He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America; of Moutebello Lodge No. 697, I. O. (). 
F. ; and of Puckechetuck Encampment No. 7, of 
Keokuk, Iowa. In religious belief he is a Catho- 
lic, and in political sentiment he is a Democrat. 
In November, 1892, he was elected Coroner of 
Hancock County, and is now filling that position. 
For four years he was also Health Officer of 
Hamilton. He is one of the proprietors of the 
Palace Drug Store, and that branch of his business 
also yields him a good income. 

Dr. Thomas .Stephen Hession, who is also en- 
gaged in practice in Hamilton, has the honor of 
being a native of this city, his birth having here 
occurred on the 26th of April, 1870. ( For sketch of 
parentssee biography of P. J. Hession on another 
page. 1 In its common and high schools he ac-- 
quired his education. His boyhood da_\-s were 
quietly passed. He worked on his lather's farm 
until he was sixteen years of age, when he began 
railroading, being -employed with the construction 
crew on the Santa Fe Road. Six months later, in 
the fall of 1SS7, he began clerking for his brother 
in the drug store, and also took up the study of 
medicine. He was graduated from the Keokuk 
College of Physicians and Surgeons on the 10th of 
March, 1891, and then, returning to Hamilton, 
joined his brother in practice and in the drug bus- 
iness. He was registered as a pharmacist on the 
4th of March, 1894. In politics, he is a supporter 



of the Democratic party and its principles, and is 
a member of the Catholic Church. The firm of 
Hession Brothers has a finely appointed and well- 
kept drug store, complete in everything found in 
that line of trade, and by courteous treatment and 
straightforward dealing they have secured a lib- 
eral patronage. They are also doing well in the 
practice of medicine. 

■■<& i==J ■<t"> !=) si) 

(TOEL BRADSHAW, deceased, was one of 
I Hancock County's honored pioneers, and this 
G/ history would be incomplete without the 
record of his life. He was born near Sparta, in 
White County, Tenn.. on the 15th of September, 
1812, and when a lad of seven summers accom- 
panied his parents on their emigration to Illinois, 
the family settling in Madison County, where 
they resided for a year. His father was a native 
of Tennessee; his mother of Kentucky. To them 
were born ten children, five sons and five daugh- 
ters. In 1820, Mr. Bradshaw went with his par- 
ents to Morgan County, where his father entered 
seven hundred acres of land from the Government. 
The unsettled condition of the county at that time 
may be imagined from the fact that what was 
once wild land comprised within the Bradshaw 
homestead is now the site of the city of Jackson- 
ville. 

Joel Bradshaw attended the district schools of 
Morgan County, and acquired an excellent edu- 
cation, lie then embarked in farming, which he 
followed in that county until 1837, which year 
witnessed his removal to Hancock County. Soon 
after his arrival he purchased one thousand acres 
of laud in LaHarpe Township, and for many years 
extensively engaged in fanning. He bore all the 
hardships and trials of pioneer life, and took part 
in the Mormon War, which occurred near Camp 
Point and Nauvoo, and which resulted in driving 
the Mormons from the State. When he came 
here much of the land was in possession of the 
Government, and the settlements were widely 
scattered, lor the work of civilization and progress 
seemed scarcely begun. 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF li-LI 
URBANA 




John H. Catlin 



LIBRARY 

UMVERSI1Y OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




Joel Catlin 







Mrs. Joel Catlin 



LIBRAE 
URBANft 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



213 



On the 20th of March, 1834, Mr. Bradshawwas 
united in marriage with Miss Catherine Dickson, 
daughter of Hugh and Margaret (Libe) Dickson. 
The) became the parents of a family often chil- 
dren: Jane, who was born on the 14th of March, 
[835, and is now deceased; William I)., who was 
bom March 30, [837; Man- J., who was born 
January 3, 1839, and has now passed away; 
George W., born January 1, [841; Sarah L., who 
was born January 14, 1845, and is now deceased; 
Susanna S., who was born December 18, 1842, 
and has been called to the home beyond; Emma 
E.. who was born February 8, 1847, and is the 
widow of James \V. P. Davis; AlvinaC, who was 
born May 20, 1849, and is now deceased; J. I)., 
who was born October 2, 1852, and has departed 
this life; and James M., who was born December 
20, [855, and is represented elsewhere in this 
work. 

Mr. Bradshaw was an advocate of Democratic 
principles, but never was an office-seeker. The 
history of Hancock County was familiar to him 
for more than half a century, and he could relate 
many interesting incidents of frontier life. He 
always bore his part in the work of upbuilding 
and development, and was much respected by his 
friends and neighbors, who deeply mourned bis 
death. He passed away in La Harpe Township, 
November 5, E890, at the age of seventy-eight 
years. 



3OHN HAWLEV CATLIN, a fanner now 
residing in Augusta, is one of the honored 
pioneers of Hancock County, and this work 
would be incomplete without the record of his 
life. He was born' in Augusta, Ga., on the 23d 
of May, 1821, and is a son of Joel and Calista 
1 Hawlej 1 Catlin, both of whom were natives of 
Connecticut. Authentic records have been se- 
cured of the ancestry of both families, and as the 
data will prove of interest to all members of the 
family and their descendants, we gladly give it a 
place in this volume. 

The first of the Catlin family in America was 
Thomas, of Hartford, Conn. A deposition of his 



is on record in the office of the Secretary of State 
of Connecticut, dated October 19, 1687, in which 
he is said to have been seventy -five years of age. 
Consequently, he must have been born about 161 2, 
and may have come from England as early as 
1632, but perhaps earlier. Tradition says he- 
came over as a cabin-boy on a ship, and then left 
his employment, running away. A record of his 
in 1646 says he was appointed "viewer of lad- 
ders and chimneys. ' ' He was a Constable in 
1660, and he and his sou John were made free- 
men in 1669. The same record speaks of Mary 
Catlin, then forty-six years old, who was prob- 
ably- his wife. He had a daughter Mary bap- 
tised May 6, 1649. The Catlin name seems to 
have been of Norman origin, as appears from its 
form in old records; thus " Rymeis Federa " 
mentions Bevenge de Cateloiger, authorized to 
levy certain moneys for King Edward III., 
A. D. 1335- John de Catelaine also appears 
on record. Sir Robert Catlyn is named Lorel 
Chief Justice of England in the time of Edward 
VI., in a case of law recorded in " Decatur Lan- 
castriae, Pais Inseta," Calendar of Pleadings from 
the fourteenth year to the end of the reign of 
Queen Elizabeth. .Sir Nevil Catlyn and Sir 
Robert Catlyn were baronets of England. A 
work published by Hon. James Savage, of Bos- 
ton, given our subject in 1851, mentions the Cat- 
lin family in America. It tells of Thomas Cat- 
lin, who was the first ancestor of the family in 
America, and had John and Mary baptised May 6, 
1649. He died in 1690, leaving only John. The 
latter was a writing master of Barbadoes. He 
died in Cape Cod Harbor in December, 1685, 
leaving a cargo of a vessel to his only son, Charles. 
John Catlin went to Deerfield, Mass., before 1684, 
with his mother Isabel, a widow. They had re- 
moved from Connecticut to Newark, N. J., and 
thence to Massachusetts. She was afterward 
twice married. Her sou John, with his sons, 
Joseph and Jonathan, and his daughter, Eliza- 
beth, were killed in the Deerfield massacre, Feb- 
ruary 29, 1704. He left a son John, and one of 
Joseph's children, who also bore the name of John. 
Philip Catlin was at Hadley, Mass., April 7, 1676, 
and served in King Philip's War. These four 



214 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



names appear on the old Colonial records, and in- 
dicate that John Catlin of Hartford was a con- 
temporary of John of Barbadoes and John of Deer- 
field, while Philip lived at the same time as 
Thomas of Hartfoid. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Isaac 
Catlin, was born in Harwintou, Conn., in 1757, 
ami was there reared. He followed farming, and 
married Ruth Carter, by whom he had nine chil- 
dren. His death occurred in 1833, at the age of 
seventy-six. His wife, who was born in 1761, 
passed away in 1831. Joel Catlin, the father of 
John H., was a watchmaker in early life. He 
removed from Connecticut to Georgia in 18 18, 
and subsequently, after visiting the old home, 
made the journey to Georgia with a team and 
carriage. He drove one of the same horses from 
Georgia to Illinois in 1831, and made a location 
in Jacksonville the next year. In 1835 he came 
to Hancock County, again driving the same horse, 
and located on the present site of Augusta, which 
town was named for his previous home in Georgia, 
Here he engaged in farming until 1849, when he 
returned to Jacksonville, and was Station Agent 
for the Jacksonville & Naples Railroad for many 
years. He died in that city in 1879, at the age 
of eighty-four years and seven mouths. His wife 
passed away several years previously, in March, 
1S74. In early life they were members of the 
Congregational Church, but were afterward mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Catlin 
served as Elder, both in Augusta and in Jackson- 
ville. In the family were seven children, four 
sons and three daughters, of whom three are now 
living: John H.; William E., of White Sulphur 
Springs, Mont. ; and Charles Augustus, of Jack- 
sonville, 111. 

Mis. Catlin was a daughter of Rufus E. Haw- 
ley, a native of Northington, Conn. He drove 
across the country three times from Connecticut 
to Illinois before locating here in 1837. From 
that year until 1847 he made his home in Au- 
gusta. He was then called to his final rest. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Betsy Rich- 
ards, was also a native of Connecticut. In direct 
descent, the Hawley family comes from Samuel 



Hawley, the first known ancestor in America. 
The name of the second is unknown,' and Joseph 
Hawley is the third. He was followed by Tim- 
othy Hawley, who married Rachel Forward; Rev. 
Rufus Hawley, who wedded Deborah Kent; and 
Rufus Forward Hawley, grandfather of our sub- 
ject. This account was obtained by Rev. Will- 
iam E. Catlin from his uncle, Rev. James A. 
Hawley. Maj. Joseph Hawley, of Northampton, 
Mass., was a cousin of Jonathan Edwards, Presi- 
dent of one of the leading colleges of this country. 
The Richards family is descended from Thomas 
Richards, who emigrated to America between 
1600 and 1605. John Richards was born in 1631, 
and married Lydia Stocking. Thomas Richards 
was born in 1666, and wedded Mary Parsons. 
Thomas Richards, born in 1694, married Abigail 
Turner. Samuel Richards, born in 1726, mar- 
ried Eydia Buck; and Betsy Richards became the 
wife of Rufus F. Hawley, of Farmington, Conn. 
They removed to Augusta, 111., in 1837, ar >d her 
death occurred at Payson, in 1853. 

John Hawley Catlin was a youth of eleven years 
when his parents removed from Georgia to Illi- 
nois. He acquired his education in Augusta, 
and in the winter of 1840-41 taught the first 
school ever held in Newton, Adams County. He 
was reared on the farm where he now lives, and 
where he has made his home since 1835. The 
town of Augusta has grownup around him, but he 
has never left his old home. 

On the 5th of March, 1845, Mr. Catlin married 
Miss Lydia R. Hawley, daughter of Chauncey 
and Sophia (Austin) Hawley. Three children 
were born to them, namely: Ella Sophia, who 
became the wife of James W. Stark, by whom 
she had four children, three yet living, Cornelia, 
Clifford and Edna; Cornelia Hawley, wife of N. 
N. Tyuer; and Nettie Augusta, wife of Benjamin 
B. Crane. They also have three children, Jen- 
nie, Charlotte and Alice. Mrs. Catlin died in 
January, i860, and Mr. Catlin was again mar- 
ried, December 25, i860, his second union being 
with Miss Alice E. Adams, daughter of Chaun- 
cey and Mary (Benedict) Adams, of Galesburg, 
111. Her death occurred June 7, 1892. She was 



POkTRAlT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



215 



a member of the Congregational Church of Gales- 
burg, but united with the Presbyterian Church 
of Augusta. 

Mr. Catlin has long been an honored and faith- 
ful member of the Presbyterian Church, and since 
[854 has served as one of its Elders. In politics, 
he is a Republican. Throughout his life he has 
followed the occupation of fanning with excellent 
success, and now owns seven hundred and ninety 
acres of valuable land, a part of which lies within 
the city limits of Augusta. The house in which 
he lives was the first frame dwelling erected in 
Hancock County, and is still in a good state of 
preservation. The old Mormon trail, which was 
made in 1832, when that sect was going from 
Ohio to the promised land in Missouri, ran through 
his father's farm. Lincoln and Douglas spoke in 
the grove upon his land in the campaign of 1858, 
and many incidents of interest are connected with 
his home. In September, 1840, when the first 
census of Chicago was taken, he made a trip to 
Chicago with John Baldwin, a Mr. Perry and O. 
K. Hawley, who were on their way back to Con- 
necticut, where they were going for their sweet- 
hearts, whom they had left behind. They started 
in a two-horse Yankee wagon on Monday morn- 
ing, reached Chicago on Saturday afternoon, and 
the following Friday arrived at home. For this 
trip Mr. Catlin received $25. The history of 
pioneer life in Hancock County is familiar to him, 
for few have longer resided within its borders than 
he. He has always been actively interested in its 
welfare, and his name is inseparably connected 
with much of its upbuilding and development. 
He is one of the most valued citizens, and has the 
high regard of young and old, rich and poor. 

§ "~^i<^r^'^ =s i 



E. MANIFOLD, who is interested in the 
banking business in La Haqie as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Manifold & Kirkpatrick, 
was born in La Harpe Township, Hancock Coun- 
ty, on the 6th of February, 1856. He is a worthy 
representative of an honored pioneer family, 
which located here in the earlv davs in the his- 



tory of the community. His father, John Mani- 
fold, was a native of Tennessee, born on the 8th 
of April, 1829. When a lad of seven years he ac- 
companied his parents to Illinois, the family set- 
tling in La Harpe Township, Hancock County, 
where the grandfather of our subject entered land 
from the Government and opened up a farm. John 
Manifold was reared to agricultural pursuits and 
has made farming his life work. Since 1836, he has 
lived upon the old homestead, and the place is 
dear to him from the associations of his boyhood 
and from those of his mature years. In 1854, he 
was united in marriage with Miss Eliza A. Miller, 
daughter of William and Margaret (Dixon) Mil- 
ler. She has been to her husband a faithful com- 
panion and helpmate and is a most estimable 
lady. 

W. E. Manifold, their only child, began his ed- 
ucation in the district schools of La Harpe Town- 
ship, and in order to further complete his educa- 
tion he entered Abingdon College, where he pur- 
sued a three-year course, finishing the same in 
1873. In the succeeding winter he attended the 
Gem City Business College of Quincy, 111., tak- 
ing a special course in penmanship. Returning 
to the farm, he then devoted his time and ener- 
gies to stock-raising for a number of years, and 
met with good success in this undertaking, but at 
length he determined to engage in commercial 
pursuits. Carrying out this resolution, he rented 
his farm in February, 1890, and established the 
Bank of La Harpe, in connection with R. B. Kirk- 
patrick. Their partnership still continues, and 
has proven mutually pleasant and profitable. 
During the past four years, Mr. Manifold has 
also been extensively engaged in the raising of 
fine horses. 

On the 27th of October, 1874, our subject led 
to the marriage altar Miss Eleanor Ray, who 
died in February, 1890. He was again married, 
on the 22d of October following, his second union 
being with Miss Louella Franks, daughter of Job 
Franks. He and his wife have many friends 
throughout the community and hold an enviable 
position in social circles. 

In politics, Mr. Manifold is a supporter of 
Democratic principles. In 1881, he was elected 



2l6 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Commissioner of Highways for La Harpe Town- 
ship, and held that position for six years, or un- 
til 1887. His prompt and faithful discharge of 
the duties of the office won him re-election and 
gained him the high commendation of all con- 
cerned. In 1888, he was elected Township Su- 
pervisor, and has held that office continuously 
since. He is a leading member of the Masonic 
fraternity, and belongs to La Harpe Lodge No. 
195, A. F. & A. M.; Royal Arch Chapter No. 
184, R. A. M. ; and Macomb Commandery No. 
61, K. T. 

<a ' "~S <"T "> iru '" " a 

3OHN \V. McCORD, who is now living a re- 
tired life in La Harpe. is numbered among 
the honored pioneers of Hancock County, 
having since an early day not only been an eye- 
witness of the growth and development of this 
community, but having also aided in its progress 
and development. As he is so widely and favorably 
known throughout the county, we feel assured 
that this record of his life will prove of interest to 
many of our readers. His father, John McCord, 
was a farmer of Overton County, Tenn., whither 
he removed from South Carolina, his native 
vState. His father in turn was a Colonial soldier, 
and was killed in the Revolutionary War. John 
McCord acquired his education in the district 
schools of Overton County, and was married in 
Tennessee to Mary Willard. They became the 
parents of nine children. Nancy, the eldest, be- 
came the wife of John Ledgerwood, of McDon- 
ough County, but both are now deceased; Will- 
iam, who lived in McDouough County, is also 
deceased; Jane became the wife of Henry Hardin, 
of Keokuk, Iowa, and both have passed away; 
Mary, deceased, was the wife of Moses Foster, 
of McDonough Count) - ; John \V. is the next 
vounger: Thomas is a retired farmer of McDon- 
ough County; Margaret is the widow of James 
Welsh, of Kansas; Elizabeth is deceased; and 
Alexander V. is a farmer of McDonough County. 
The gentleman whose name heads this record 
was bom in Overton County, Tenn., July 1, 



1815, and when a youth of fifteen years accom- 
panied his parents on their emigration to Morgan 
County, 111., in 1830. After one year spent in 
that place he removed to McDonough County, in 
1 83 1. His education was acquired in the district 
schools of Tennessee and Illinois, but his privi- 
leges in that direction were very meagre. In the 
school of experience, however, he was an apt pu- 
pil, and acquired a knowledge sufficient to enable 
him to successfully conduct his business interests. 
He was one of the honored pioneers of McDon- 
ough County, and remembers the time when 
within its borders there were innumerable wolves 
and deer. He remembers many incidents of life 
on the frontier, and while talking to the historian 
recalled to mind the loss of a four-year-old boy, 
who one Sunday evening in 1832 wandered away 
from his home, about six miles north of Macomb. 
He remained in the woods for four days and four 
nights. A thunder-storm came on the night be- 
fore he was rescued, and he went into a hollow 
tree for safety. He subsisted on blackberries, 
which at that time were ripe. As soon as his ab- 
sence was discovered parties started out in search 
of him in all directions, and when he was once 
more restored in safety to the arms of his parents, 
their joy can better be imagined than described. 

Mr. McCord continued to work on his father's 
farm until he had attained his majority, when he 
started out in life for himself. He chose as a 
companion and helpmate on life's journey Miss 
Nancy, daughter of George and Man- (Persley) 
Manifold, and a native of Tennessee. Their mar- 
riage was celebrated March 15, 1838, and they 
became the parents of eight children: William, 
who died in La Harpe Township; Mary Louisa, 
who died in McDonough County; Elizabeth, wife 
of Israel Moore, of Osborne, Kan.; George, a farm- 
er of I, a Harpe Township; Sarah, deceased, wife 
of William Reed, now at Oklahoma; John, a 
farmer of Fountain Green Township, Hancock 
County; Noah, who carries on agricultural pur- 
suits in La Harpe Township; and Ida, deceased, 
wife of Charles While, of the same township. 

In 1840, John W. McCord came to La Harpe 
Township, Hancock County, and purchased forty 
acres of land, lie afterwards purchased a seven- 



LIBR"RY 
UNIVERSIiY Of ILI 
URBANA 




Gen. R. F. Smith 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



219 



ty-acre tract from a Mormon, and later bought a 
tract of eighty acres, and another of ninety-four 
acres in Fountain Green Township. He was a 
successful fanner, and in course of time the once 
wild land was transformed into rich and fertile 
fields. Mr. McCord took part in the Mormon 
War in 1N44. With about one hundred men he 
went to Golden' s Point and thence to Nauvoo, 
where a skirmish occurred. The effect of this 
was to drive the Mormons out of the State. This 
section of Illinois at that time was one vast 
prairie and forest, almost undotted by settlers' 
cabins. Game of all kinds was to be had in 
abundance, and the work of civilization and 
progress seemed scarcely begun. He has ever 
taken a commendable interest in the county and 
the rapid progress it has made. Since casting 
his first Presidential vote for Martin Van Buren 
in 1836, he has been a stalwart Democrat, but 
has never aspired to public office. He and his 
estimable wife are both members of the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian Church, and this worthy couple 
well deserve representation in the history of the 
community in which they have so long made 
their home, and where they have so many warm 
friends. 



i^H^I 



|c)EN. ROBERT F. SMITH was a native of 

|_ Philadelphia, Pa., born on the 2d of August, 
\Ji 1806. His death occurred in Hamilton, Han- 
cock County, April 25, 1892, and his loss was 
deeply mourned by all who knew him. He first 
came to this county in 1833, and was one of the 
most notable pioneers of this part of the State. 
He was ever prominent in public affairs that 
tended to promote the best interests of the com- 
munity, and, public-spirited and progressive, was 
recognized as a valued citizen. In 1834 lle re- 
turned to Philadelphia, where he was married on 
the 19th of June to Miss Amanda Benton. He 
then brought his bride to the new home which he 
had prepared in the West, and they began their 
domestic life in Hancock County. Fourteen chil- 



dren were born to them, all of whom are yet 
living. 

Throughout his life Gen. Smith was connected 
with military affairs. He was a born soldier, and 
his record during the Civil War was an honorable 
one, of which his family may feel justly proud. 
Ere leaving Philadelphia, he belonged to a local 
military organization, known as the Cumberland 
Guards, and after his removal hither he became 
Captain of the Carthage Greys, being in charge 
of that company at the time of the killing of Joseph 
and Hyrum Smith by the mob at the Carthage jail, 
June 27, 1844. He took a leading part in the Mor- 
mon War, and was in command of the troops at the 
battle of Nauvoo, in September, 1846. There he 
received a severe wound, a ball passing through 
his throat and just missing a vital part. He was 
taken to the home of Mrs. Susan Stevenson, and 
by her careful nursing and kind attention, his 
long hours of suffering were made more endurable. 

When the dissolution of the Union was threat- 
ened in 1 86 1, and the flag he loved so well seemed 
destined to be trampled in the dust by a rebellious 
.South, he raised and was elected Captain of what 
became Company D, Sixteenth Illinois Infantry. 
Afterward going to Quincy, he was then made 
Colonel of the regiment, and later was promoted 
for gallantry on the field of battle to the rank of 
Brigadier-General, and the following letter was 
written recommending his promotion: 

Jacksonville, III. , July is, 1S65. 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. 

Dear Sir: — I recommend that Col. R. F. 
Smith, of the Sixteenth Illinois Infantry, be pro- 
moted to the rank of Brigadier- General. He has 
been on duty in the field since 1861, and during 
almost the whole of the time has been in command 
of a brigade. He has been in nearly all the bat- 
tles of the West and Southwest, and is a most 
gallant, deserving and competent officer, and I 
sincerely hope he may receive the promotion to 
which he is so justly entitled. 

Very respectfully, 

Richard Yates. 

Gen. Smith's regiment was composed of com- 
panies from the counties of Adams, Pike, Schuy- 
ler, Henderson, Hancock and McDonough, and 
was organized and equipped at Quincy, and sent 
from that place into active service in Missouri on 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the 12th of June, 1S61. The regiment was or- 
dered to Hannibal, Mo., and on its arrival the 
following notice was published in the Hannibal 
Daily Evening News. Its editor, A. C. Apler, 
suddenly left for the South the next morning. 
The article was headed, "Arrival of Re-enforce- 
ments for the Abolition Railroad Battalion," and 
read: "The cowards who compose the most in- 
famous body of men, and particularly the scoun- 
drels who command them, sent this morning to 
Quincy for re-enforcements. In response, the 
military commander at Quincy dispatched on the 
'Blackhawk' four hundred or more of the Abolition 
army of Illinois. They were landed at noon to- 
day, and after parading ostentatiously on the 
levee at the foot of Hill Street, marched with 
drums beating and colors flying to South Hanni- 
bal. Two or three companies were well uni- 
formed and officered; the balance were a set of 
dirty, filthy, cowardly -looking fellows, without 
uniforms or competent officers. This evening or 
to-morrow morning we are promised six hundred 
more. What does Missouri want? How long, 
O God of justice and right! how long are these 
things to continue ?' ' 

Notwithstanding the assault of this paper, the 
brave boys of Col. Smith's regiment, undaunted, 
went to the front. They were at length ordered 
to St. Joseph, Mo., thence to Reed's Point, and 
on to New Madrid, where they were attached to 
the Army of the Mississippi. Going to Tennessee, 
they participated in the siege of Corinth, marched 
on into Alabama, took part in the battle of An- 
derson's Gap, and were then transferred to the 
Fourteenth Army Corps. They went with Sher- 
man on the celebrated march to the sea, and on 
to Richmond and Washington, participating in 
the Grand Review in the Capitol City. Going 
then to Louisville, Ky. , they were mustered out, 
July 8, 1865. 

After returning home at the close of the war. 
Gen. Smith was tendered a commission as Major 
in the regular army by Secretary Stanton, but did 
not accept, preferring a peaceful, quiet home 
life to a military career, unless his country's 
safety called him. In 1892, accompanied by his 
daughter, Miss Clara, he attended a brigade re- 



union in Quincy, where he met one hundred and 
seven of his old regiment, some of whom he had 
not seen since the close of the war. In Septem- 
ber, 1892, accompanied by his daughter, Miss 
Nettie, he attended the reunion of the Tenth 
and Sixteenth Illinois Regiments at Jacksonville. 
While there he was taken seriously ill, but after 
a few clays recovered sufficiently to return home. 
He told his comrades, however, that this would 
be the last time he would meet with them, and 
his prediction proved true, as his death occurred 
April 25, 1893, his wife having passed away Jan- 
uary 9, 1892. At the reunion in Bushnell in 
September, 1887, "the boys" of his regiment pre- 
sented him with a beautiful gold-headed cane as a 
slight token of their regard and esteem. In an 
account of the presentation, the Bushnell Record 
said: "Maj. McClaughry presented the cane with 
a neat speech, and Rev. Richard Haney, who was 
Chaplain of the regiment, responded in behalf of 
the recipient, while the latter wiped the salt tears 
from his venerable cheeks. ' ' 

After serving throughout the war, Gen. Smith 
took up his residence at his country home, "Maple 
Avenue," near Hamilton, where he continued 
until 1888, when he removed to the city. In 1861 
the family of father, mother and fourteen chil- 
dren were first separated, and since that time 
they have never all been assembled together. On 
the 19th of June, 1884, Gen. Smith and his most 
estimable wife celebrated their golden wedding. 
For fifty years had they faithfully kept their mar- 
riage vows, striving to make smooth, each for the 
other, the rough and rugged spots along life's 
pathway. Gen. Smith was a personal friend of 
Gens. Sherman, Rosecrans, Logan, Howard, and 
many others of the leading commanders of the 
Civil War. On the 4th of July, 1875, he enter- 
tained Gen. Sherman and his staff officers at his 
country home. Socially, Gen. Smith was a char- 
ter member of Black Hawk Lodge No. 238, A. F. 
& A. M., and was also an honored member of 
Russell Post No. 86, G. A. R. In politics, he 
was a most stalwart Republican, and in religious 
belief was a Presbyterian. He enjoyed the ut- 
most love and respect of his soldiers and superior 
officers. His character and integrity were unim- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



peachable. In his even-day life he fulfilled the 
scriptural injunction, "Be humble, that you may 
be exalted." In social and business circles he 
was an honorable gentleman, on the field of bat- 
tle a valiant hero, but through all and above all, 
he was a Christian, who hath "fought the good 
fight." 

We append the following, which gives a fuller 
account than is given previously of Gen. Smith's 
connection with the Civil War: 

THE FIRST FEDERAL TROOPS. 

When it was certain that Missouri would be 
one of the States wherein the battles of the Civil 
War would be fought, the immense importance 
of preserving and holding the Hannibal & St. 
Joseph Railroad was early realized by the au- 
thorities of the Federal Government. If it were 
kept intact, troops could be moved from one side 
of the State to the other, supplies and munitions 
of war sent, and all of north Missouri kept under 
Federal or Union dominion. The great thorough- 
fare would also be of incalculable service in keep- 
ing open communication with the first line of of- 
fense adopted by the Union commanders — the 
Missouri River. It was of the utmost importance, 
therefore, that the road should be well guarded 
from the actual and threatening assaults of the 
Secessionists, and kept in running order contin- 
ually. 

The authorities of the railroad were all loyal, 
and the Secessionists regarded it as the great 
enemy to the Southern cause, to be assailed when- 
ever practicable, and, when troops were passing 
upon it, to be attacked vigorously and with deadly 
intent. Time and again threats had been made by 
the zealous Secessionists of destroying the South 
River bridge on the Hannibal & St. Joseph, and 
the 1 nidges over the Fabius and North Rivers, on 
the Quincy & Palmyra, to prevent Federal troops 
from being sent into the State "to subjugate the 
people;" and President John W. Brooks, of Bos- 
ton, and President Joshua Gentry, of Hannibal 
( the latter the first Sheriff of this county I , ap- 
pealed to the military authorities for protection. 
It came in due time. 

On the 18th of June the Sixteenth Illinois In- 



fantry, Col. R. F. Smith commanding, lauded at 
Hannibal, being the first Federal troops to tread 
the soil of Marion County. In the command 
were eighteen men who had been warned out of 
Hannibal by the Secessiotiists, and had gone to 
Quincy and enlisted. One piece of artillery was 
with the regiment. A large crowd met the sol- 
diers on the levee, but there was no hostile 
demonstration made against them, and the greater 
portion of them soon encamped on "Lover's Leap. ' ' 
A few days later the Second and Third Iowa In- 
fantry came to Hannibal and went West over the 
Hannibal & St. Joseph. 

On the 20th of June two companies of the Six- 
teenth Illinois came from Hannibal to Palmyra, 
disembarked from the cars, and went into camp 
near and just west of the Hannibal & St. Joseph 
depot, where was then a piece of commons. The 
two companies numbered about seventy-five men. 
On the 22d they marched into town, raised the 
Stars and Stripes over the court house, and sang 
"The Star Spangled Banner." 

A few days later — say about July i — the Col- 
onel of the Sixteenth Illinois, Robert F. Smith, 
came to Palmyra in person with two more com- 
panies of his regiment, the Hancock Guards, 
Capt. Cahill, and the Union Rifles (Adams 
County), Capt. Petrie. The four companies went 
into camp in Sloan's Addition, west of the Quincy 
& Palmyra Railroad. Pickets were put out on 
the principal roads, and one company was sent 
down to the South River bridge. 

In a short time Col. Smith had arrested a num- 
ber of active Secessionists about Palmyra. In 
Hannibal, also, some persons were arrested. 

On the 3d of July, Col. Smith issued the follow- 
ing proclamation: 

col. smith's proclamation. 

Headquarters Camp Smith, i 
Palmyra, July 3, 1861. 1 

To the Citizens of Palmyra and Marion County: 
The headquarters of the Sixteenth Regiment 
of Illinois Volunteers is in your city. 

We came into your midst with no hostile intent 
toward Union-loving and peaceful citizens. To 
all such the appearance of United States soldiers 
on such a mission as ours should rather be hailed 
with gladness than viewed with suspicion and 
mistrust. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In so large a body of men as constitutes a regi- 
ment, there must of necessity be some less refined 
than we could wish; but it shall be the earnest 
endeavor of the officers of this regiment to curb 
the passions and to punish with the utmost se- 
verity the excesses of any such. 

Your hearthstones shall be held inviolate, your 
families protected from insult and injury, and 
your ladies treated with civility and politeness. 
No one shall be molested unless known to enter- 
tain treasonable sentiments toward the Govern- 
ment, and to be aiding and abetting its enemies. 

It is earnestly desired by the Colonel command- 
ing that the most friendly relations should exist 
between those who love the institutions and Gov- 
ernment of our country and the soldiers who have 
volunteered to protect them. 

He would, therefore, respectfully invite every- 
one who may have misconstrued our motives to 
return to the peaceful occupation of their houses 
and the resumption of their daily business, confi- 
dently believing that a better acquaintance and a 
freer interchange of sentiment will conduce to the 
welfare of both citizen and soldier. 
R. F. Smith, 

Colonel Commanding Sixteenth 

Regiment Illinois Volunteers. 

The proclamation was well received, and, in- 
deed, fairly observed by the soldiers, who con- 
ducted themselves with as seemly behavior as 
could have been expected. 

On the 4th of July Col. Smith's command, 
nearly four hundred strong, marched into Pal- 
myra with muskets and bayonets glistening in 
the sun, and drums beating, fifes and bugles 
blowing, and banners waving in the air. There 
was a celebration after a fashion . The troops had 
just been paid off in gold, and were feeling jolly. 
They paraded the principal streets, cheered the 
Stars and Stripes, President Lincoln, Col. Smith, 
and the Union men of Missouri. Then they re- 
turned to camp. There was no disturbance. All 
the saloons and many of the business houses were 
closed. 

The previous clay the soldiers had hoisted a 
fine flag over the court house in the room of the 
one raised by Capt. Fritz, which had been dam- 
aged by a wind storm. 

THE FIGHT AT MONROE CITY. 

The war clouds hovering over northeast Mis- 



souri grew blacker and blacker, and the rum- 
blings' of the battle-thunder louder and louder, and 
at last the storm broke. 

The State Guard companies flocked to Gen. 
Harris in such numbers that by the 5th of July 
he had probably five hundred men in his camp, 
near Florida. By their scouts and spies the Fed- 
eral military commanders were informed of his 
doings, and Col. Chester Harding, at St. Louis, 
under authority from Gen. Lyon, ordered Col. 
Smith, of the Sixteenth Illinois, to march upon 
him and his fellow-Secessionists and break up his 
camp. Col. Smith had himself re-enforced at Pal- 
myra by four companies of the Third Iowa, one 
company of the Hannibal Home Guards, and a 
piece of artillery (a six-pounder), and got ready 
for the work. 

On Monday evening, July 8, Col. Smith 
marched from Palmyra against Tom Harris. His 
force consisted of Companies A, F, H and K, of 
the Third Iowa Infantry; Companies F and H, of 
the Sixteenth Illinois; Capt. Loomis' company of 
the Hannibal Home Guards, and the six-pounder 
cannon — in all about five hundred men, or not 
more than six hundred. The expedition went by 
rail to Monroe City, where it arrived in an hour 
and disembarked. It was intended to make a night 
march on Florida, about twelve miles a little 
west of south of Monroe, and attack Harris' camp 
at daylight, but a severe storm coming up pre- 
vented this plan. 

Tuesday morning Col. Smith with his entire 
command set out towards Florida to encounter 
Gen. Harris. Passing out of the prairie, through 
the ' 'Swinkey Hills, ' ' the Federal troops reached 
the farm of Robert Hagar, three or four miles 
north of Florida. Here, in the thick timber and 
brush, and on the top of an eminence known 
as Hagar' s Hill, they encountered perhaps fifty 
mounted Secessionists under Capt. Clay Price, 
who had been sent out by Gen. Harris to recon- 
noitre. These at once, and without warning, 
opened fire from their ambush at close range, se- 
verely wounding four persons. The fire was re- 
turned, and the Missourians retreated, leaving 
one man mortally wounded, and perhaps half a 
dozen horses. This affair took place at about 4 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



223 



o'clock in the afternoon. Not caring to go on, 
and not daring to retreat through certain bodies 
of timber in the night on his way back to Monroe, 
Col. Smith went into camp on Hagar's farm, 
near the scene of the fight. 

During the afternoon and night of the yth Col 
Smith learned that he had stirred up a hornets' 
nest, and that the Secessionists were swarming 
all about him; that the) had gotten in his rear, 
and were playing havoc at Monroe City, and that 
their numbers were constantly increasing. Early 
mi Wednesday morning, the 10th, he began his 
retreat to Monroe City. On the "Swinkey Hills" 
his advance guard was attacked, but no serious 
damage done. Emerging from the timber north 
of Swinkey, or Elizabethtown, and coming in 
sight of Monroe City, the Federal discovered the 
station house, outbuildings, six passenger coaches 
and ten or twelve freight cars in flames. The 
Missourians, Capt. Owen's company, could be 
seen a mile or two away to the left, or west, 
watching the fire and the Federals. Col. Smith 
opened on them with his cannon, and fired half a 
dozen or more round shot at them, which killed 
several horses. 

The station house and train had been fired by 
about one hundred mounted Secessionists, under 
command of Capt. John L. Owen, of Warren 
Township, this county. The same morning the 
train from Hannibal was fired on a few miles east 
of Monroe City, it is said by some of Capt. Owen's 
men, and by his orders. The engineer was slightly 
wounded by a rifle-ball in the arm. 

Reaching the town, and finding himself sur- 
rounded, Col. Smith marched his men into a fine, 
large, two story brick academy building in the 
place, known as the Seminary, and took full pos- 
session of it and the grounds adjoining, around 
which he began throwing up breastworks, having 
dispatched a messenger to the nearest telegraph 
office to ask for re enforcements. 

Meantime the greatest excitement had arisen in 
the surrounding country. The news that five 
or six hundred were "holed up" or "treed" at 
Monroe City spread like wildfire. Hundreds of 
persons living within ten or twelve miles of the 
scene, roused by the messengers that went gal- 



loping over tile country by order of Gen. Harris. 
mounted horses and rode to the battle, some 
actuated by mere curiosity, others determined to 
participate in tin- fight. By noon of Wednesday 
Gen. Harris had collected around him probabl) 
one thousand effective men. who were reasonably 
well armed, and eager to take a pop at the 
"cooped-up" Federals. His skirmishers crawled 
up as close to the academy building as they dared, 
and fired away at the windows and breastworks 
very briskly, with but little effect, however. The 
Union troops returned the fire at every good op- 
portunity. The main portion of Harris' forces 
were at a safe distance, watching their enemies, 
and taking pains that they should not escape. 

The night of the 10th Gen Harris sent off for a 
cannon, the nine-pounder which had been cast 
by Cleaver & Mitchell, of Hannibal, for Drescher's 
artillery company, and which was then hidden 
under a haystack on a farm a few miles north of 
Palmyra. The nine-pounder was serviceable. 
and with this Gen. Harris hoped to compel the 
Federals to surrender, or else batter down the 
building and tumble the walls about their ears. 
That night a close watch was kept on the be- 
sieged that they might not make either a bold s, ,rtie 
or a stealthy attempt to escape. Thursday, the 
14th. the cannon came, to the great delight of 
the Secessionists, and the bombardment began 
about 1 o'clock. There were only a few nine- 
pound balls, however, and these were soon shot 
away. Nothing was then left for use but the 
smaller balls, and artillery practice with six-pound 
balls from a nine-pound gun is not certain to be 
accurate. Some amusing instances were narrated 
of the cannonading by Capt. Kneisley's gun. It 
was said the only safe place within its range when 
it was discharged was immediately in front of it. 
One shot, it is stated, struck in the road thirty 
feet from the muzzle of the gun, and ricocheted 
over to the left a-quarter of a mile, struck a black 
smith shop, and dispersed a crowd of Secessionists, 
who fled in dismay, declaring that they could not 
stand it to be fired on by their own men and the 
Federals too! The Academy was struck but a 
few times, and no damage done. 

Meanwhile, the number of Missourians gath- 



2 24 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ered around had increased to twelve or fifteen 
hundred, many of whom were not warriors pro 
tern., but mere spectators, who had come to see 
"the fun." Even ladies and children had ridden 
up in carriages and wagons, and, seated in their 
conveyances, under the shade of parasols and um- 
brellas, watched the battle, the first, perhaps, 
ever graced by the presence, as spectators, of the 
fair sex, out of deference to whose sensibilities, it 
is to be presumed, the occasion was made as 
bloodless as possible. Not a man was killed or 
badly wounded on either side by an enemy's ball. 
Gen. Harris was a "great speech-maker." He 
could not let this occasion pass without making 
one of his noblest efforts. At noon on Thursday, 
he assembled some of his troops, and addressed 
them. His cannon had not yet arrived, and 
without it, he told his men, he could not take the 
Academy, unless at a sacrifice of many noble 
lives. He further said, that a large re-enforce- 
ment for Col. Smith was hourly expected, and he 
thought the best thing that could be clone under 
the circumstances was to retreat. He then di- 
rected his troops to disperse. This, however, 
they refused to do. Then the cannon came up 
amid great cheering, and the fight was resumed, 
without a leader, really, on the part of the Seces- 
sionists — every man fighting "on his own hook." 

Meantime Col. R. F. Smith was not a little dis- 
turbed at the situation. He had unwisely allowed 
a greater part of his ammunition to be captured 
or destroyed, and he had but few cannon balls or 
shells, or other artillery ammunition, and so his 
six-pounder was not of much service. He saved 
his ammunition, in expectation of an assault, by 
firing boltings, gathered from the ashes of the 
burnt railroad cars True, his enemies were do- 
ing him no damage. Out of twenty-five or more 
of their cannon shots, only three had hit the 
building, and the shot-guns and squirrel rifles 
could avail but little against strong breastworks 
and brick walls. Yet he feared that another and 
more efficient piece of artillery might be brought 
up, and Gen. Harris' already large force would 
be made larger before his own re-enforcements 
could come up. 

Gen. Harris failed to tear up the railroad track 



east and west of the town as thoroughly as he 
could have done, and as he had no force in either 
direction, there was nothing to prevent the ar- 
rival of re-enforcements for Col. Smith from either 
Ouincy, Hannibal or Hudson, at all of which 
points it was known that Federal troops were 
stationed. True, Salt River bridge, to the west 
ten miles, had been burned, but a transfer could 
easily be made and the distance soon compassed. 

At last they came. 

At about half-past four a train was seen slowly 
approaching from the East, and as it came well 
into view, it was discovered to be crowded with 
Federal soldiers, and upon a flatcar a brass can- 
non gleamed ominously in the slanting rays of 
the declining sun. The beleaguered Federals set 
up a loud cheer, the cannon on the car opened 
with grape, and Gen. Harris and his troops, to 
use an expression common in the Civil War, 
"skedaddled" in short order, or rather in no or- 
der at all. Eye-witnesses describe the scene as 
highly ludicrous. Many of the- would-be soldiers 
hid their guns and sought safety in the carriages 
of the ladies and children. Others galloped wildly 
away. The prairie was covered with buggies, 
carriages, wagons, horsemen and footmen, all flee- 
ing for dear life, and becoming more terror- 
stricken everj- rod the}- traversed. The picnic 
was over, and it had ended in a stampede. 

The Federal re-enforcement proved to be Com- 
panies A, B and D, of the Sixteenth Illinois, un- 
der Maj. Hays of that regiment, accompanied by 
a nine-pounder field piece, manned by volunteer 
artillerymen. The whole force numbered about 
two hundred and seventy-five men, and had come 
from Palmyra and Hannibal to relieve their com- 
mander and comrades from their predicament. 

While these events were progressing, the most 
painful and exaggerated rumors were flying 
through the country, reaching not only Palmyra 
and Hannibal, but Quiney, Springfield, Chicago, 
and even New York and Washington. One re- 
port was that a desperate battle was taking place 
at Monroe City, and that Col. Smith's regiment 
was surrounded, and had been cut to pieces. The 
Fourteenth Illinois, Col. John M. Palmer, and the 
Twenty-first Illinois, Col. U. S. Grant, and other 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



•-•--, 



Illinois troops in camp at Springfield and Quincy, 
were ordered to the rescue. Palmer reached 
Monroe City on the morning of the 12th, and re- 
mained two days, returning to Quincy. Grant 
came up a day later and went on to Mexico. By 
Friday morning two thousand troops, infantry, 
cavalry and artillery, had reached Palmyra, the 
seat of war. 

One body of re-enforcements for Col. Smith, 
under ex-Gov. Wood, of Illinois, came from 
Quincy down the river, and landed at Marion 
City, and from thence marched to Palmyra, and 
then on to Monroe City. 

About twelve hundred troops started down from 
St. Joseph on the nth, and were joined at Macon 
City by seven hundred more. These were de- 
tained, however, by the burning of Salt River 
bridge, which locality they reached on the 12th. 
The evening of the nth, the greater portion of 
Smith's command, including some of those who 
had been in the Seminary, returned to Palmyra. 

The Federal troops soon scattered out. Grant 
and Palmer went down on the North Missouri. The 
Iowa troops from St. Joseph returned, and Col. 
Smith remained in this quarter. Gen. Tom Har- 
ris, with a portion of his command, went south- 
ward, in the direction of Jefferson City. 

The following was Col. Smith's official report 
to Gen. Lyon: 

Headquarters Sixteenth i 

Regiment Illinois Volunteers, 

Monroe Station, Mo., July 14, 1861. j 

Sir: — In accordance with your order on the 
8th of this month, I left my headquarters at Pal- 
myra, Mo., with Companies F and H of the Six- 
teenth Illinois Regiment, and Companies A, F, 
II and K of the Third Iowa Regiment, Company 
A of the Hannibal Home Guards, and one six- 
pounder, and proceeded to this place. A heavy 
rain-storm coming on retarded our further prog- 
ress. Early on the morning of the 9th, I started 
south in search of the rebel force under Harris. 
At 4 o'clock, p. M., when about twelve miles 
south of Monroe, our advance guard was fired 
into by the enemy, concealed in a clump of timber 
and brush, the first volley severely wounding 
Capt. McAllister, of Company G, Sixteenth Illi- 
nois Regiment; also Private Prentiss, of Company 
A, same regiment, and slightly wounding a pri- 
vate of the Iowa Regiment. I immediately or- 
dered a charge, and drove the enemy from their 



cover. As they were all mounted, it was impossi- 
ble to follow them further to advantage. We 
found one of their men mortally wounded, and 
have reason to believe that several more were shot 
and carried off by their friends, and captured sev- 
eral horses saddled and bridled. We made camp 
near this place for the night. 

On the morning of the ioth, having heard ru- 
mors of trouble at Monroe Station, moved my 
command back. On coming in sight of Monroe, 
found the station, outhouses, seventeen passen- 
ger and freight cars, and other railroad property, 
in flames, and found the enemy collected to the 
number of three or four hundred to our left. On 
Hearing them, thej<- began to move off, when I 
brought forward the field-piece and sent a few 
round-shot into their ranks, scattering them in 
all directions. The only damage done here, that 
I know of, was one horse killed. 

After coming into Monroe, I took possession of 
a brick building known as "The Seminary," and 
enclosed grounds adjoining, its position answering 
my purpose for defense, if necessary, and the 
apartments good quarters for the men, who were 
without tents. During the day we made several 
advances on the enemy without being able to get 
near enough to do much damage. 

On the morning of the nth the enemy began 
to collect from all quarters, and by noon we were 
surrounded by from fifteen hundred to two thou- 
sand men. At i o'clock, P. m., they opened fire 
upon us from one nine-pounder and one six- 
pounder at a distance of about a mile. Their fir- 
ing was very inaccurate, only three shots out of 
the first twenty-seven striking the building, and 
they did very little damage, my men being well 
covered by a breastwork they had thrown up. Af- 
ter throwing their first six shots, they moved their 
cannon some four hundred yards nearer and 
opened fire. I immediately answered with the six- 
pounder, dismounting their smaller gun, which 
made a general scattering, and caused them to 
carry their nine-pounder to a safer distance. 
Their firing from this time had little or no effect. 

Much credit is due Capt. Fritz, of Company F, 
Sixteenth Regiment, for the able manner in which 
he led his men throughout our expedition. Also 
to Gunner Fishbourn, who planted his shot among 
them every time, but who had to deal sparingly, 
as he was almost out of shot when we were re- 
lieved. I was also much pleased with the officers 
and men generally for their coolness and obedi- 
ence to orders throughout. 

At 4:30 o'clock, p. m., of the nth, a train was 
seen coming from the East with re-enforcements. 
It proved to be Maj. Hays, of my regiment, with 



226 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Companies D, B and A, of the Sixteenth Illinois, 
and one nine-pounder field-piece. The enemy now 
began to move off, and by dark had left the field 
entirely, since which time they had been skulking 
about the country in squads, burning woodpiles, 
small bridges and culverts when opportunity of- 
fered of doing so without danger. 

On the morning of the 12th, we were again 
re-enforced by Col. Palmer's Fourteenth Regi- 
ment, who returned to Ouincy to-day, leaving us 
in a worse position than ever, with the exception 
that we have more ammunition. 

Col. Palmer brought two brass field-pieces with 
him, which he has again taken away. Some- 
thing of the kind would be very acceptable here 
just now, as there is a slight probability of their 
being useful. 

I have the honor to be your obedient servant, 
Robert F. Smith. 

To Brig. -Gen. Lyon. 



£+^ 



EHARLES W. BALDWIN, who for many 
years successfully engaged in farming and 
stock-raising in Hancock County, but is 
now living a retired life at Hamilton, is a native 
of Orleans County, N. Y., his birth having oc- 
curred on the 19th of April, 1827, The family 
is of German lineage, and the parents of our sub- 
ject, Abram and Bridget (Van Waggouner (Bald- 
win, were both natives of New Jersey. The fa- 
ther was a farmer by occupation, and was also a 
hatter by trade, but during the latter part of his 
life he devoted his time and attention exclusively 
to agricultural pursuits. In the Baldwin family 
were seven children, three sons and four daugh- 
ters: Mary A., who married Otis Malcolm, a 
farmer of Warren County, 111., both being de- 
ceased; John M., who was a ranchman of Bitter 
Water, San Bernardino County, Cal., and died on 
the 1st of May, 1893: Abram W., deceased, who 
was a farmer of Warren County, 111.; Emeranda, 
who was married and died in Kansas; Charles 
\V.. of this sketch; Sarah M., wife of Charles W. 
Mather, a farmer of Le Roy, Kan.; and Myra, wife 
of Jacob Brake, an agriculturist of Jasper County, 
Mo. 

When our subject was a child of four years his 



parents removed to Upper Canada, now called 
Ontario, where they remained for seven years. 
In the spring of 1838, the family removed to Or- 
leans County, N. Y., where they remained for a 
year, and in 1839 emigrated to southern Michi- 
gan, where the succeeding three years were 
passed. The year 1842 witnessed the arrival of 
Charles W. Baldwin in Illinois. He took up his 
residence in Warren County, where he made his 
home until 184S, when he came to Hancock 
Count)-, settling near the site of Basco. The 
town of that name was laid out by him. Mr. 
Baldwin enjoyed only a district-school education. 
He worked on the farm during the summer 
months, and attended school through the winter 
season. At the age of twenty-one he began 
farming in his own interest on a one hundred and 
sixty acre tract of land, which he purchased on a 
tax title. This farm was located in Bear Creek 
Township, just east of Basco. 

In his business, Mr. Baldwin won a high de- 
gree of success and was ranked among the lead- 
ing agriculturists of the community. His land 
was under a high state of cultivation, and the 
fields were made to yield to him a golden tribute 
in return for the care and cultivation he bestowed 
upon them. He also made a specialty of stock- 
dealing, raising, feeding and shipping stock quite 
extensively. This also proved for him a profita- 
ble source of income. His untiring and enter- 
prising labors at length acquired for him a 
comfortable competence, and in the spring of 1889 
he laid aside business cares and removed to Ham- 
ilton, where he erected an elegant residence and 
has since made it his home. He still retains the 
ownership of two farms, one in Montebello Town- 
ship, and one in Wythe Township. 

On the 6th of April, 1S52, Mr. Baldwin wedded 
Miss Man- A., daughter of Isaiah ami Sarah Wi- 
ley. They became the parents of six children, 
namely: Lavina, now deceased; Alice, wife of 
M. C. Girard, a grain and stock dealer of Elvas- 
ton; Emma, wife of C. A. Denton, an attorney - 
at-law of Butler, Mo.; Ida, wife of R. A. Piggott, 
who is engaged in farming near Bruning, Neb. ; 
Charles, who carries on agricultural pursuits in 
Wythe Township; and Mattie, wife of J. H. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



227 



Guckert, a tailor engaged in business in Keokuk, 
Iowa. The mother of this family was called to 
her final rest July 16, 1892. 

Politically, Mr. Baldwin is a Democrat, and 
has served as Supervisor. Assessor and Road 
Commissioner of Bear Creek Township. He has 
never aspired to public office, but has been called 
to these positions by his fellow -townsmen, who ap- 
preciated his worth and ability and knew that he 
would prove true to his duties and to the trust re- 
posed in him. In the spring of 1890, he was 
elected Alderman of Hamilton for a term of two 
years, and on the expiration of that period he 
was elected for a second term, so that he is now 
filling that office. Socially, he is a member of 
Black Hawk Lodge No. 238, A. F. & A. M. 
He manifests a commendable interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the welfare of the community 
and to the advancement of public enterprises, 
loi forty-five years he has resided in Hancock 
County, and has therefore witnessed the greater 
part of its growth and development. In the his- 
toid of tlie community he well deserves represen- 
tation as one o! the honored pioneers. 



LIVER CRAIG, of Hamilton, is a native of 
Ohio, his birth having occurred in Cham- 
paign County, August 5, 1N44. The Craig 
family is of Scotch-Irish lineage. The father, 
Vincent Craig, was .1 native of Virginia, and a 
fanner bj occupation. In an early day he emi- 
grated westward and purchased land near Urbana, 
Champaign County, Ohio. In the Buckeye State 
he was united in marriage with Miss Ann Simnw. 
a native of Virginia, and by their union were born 
fourteen children, seven sons and seven daughters, 
who in order of birth are as follows: Man', wife 
Ol l-ii- Fay, a trader oi Texas, Champaign 
Countw Ohio; William, who is living in the same 
county, and who was a soldier of the late war; 
Oliver, of this sketch; Andrew, who also wore the 
blue in defense of his country, and now carries on 
agricultural pursuits in Champaign County; John, 
whose history is similar to that of his brother An- 



drew; Alfred, deceased; Eliza, deceased, wife of 
Benjamin Cage, of Champaign County; Nancy, 
who has also passed away; Lucy, wife of John 
Rock, the well-known Treasurer of Champaign 
County; Henry, deceased; Martha, wife of Lem- 
uel Bayless. an agriculturist residing in Cherokee, 
Logan County, Ohio; Susan, wife of Oliver Chat 
man, a farmer of Champaign County; George, a 
painter of the same county; and La Fayette, a 
trader of that county. 

Oliver Craig was reared on his father's farm in 
the county of his nativity, and acquired his edu- 
cation in the district schools of the neighborhood, 
but his privileges in that direction were meagre, 
for his services were required in the fields during 
the summer months, and during much of the win- 
ter in clearing timber-laud. At length he left 
home and began working as a farm hand by the 
month in the neighborhood, being thus employed 
until after the breaking out of the Civil War. 

The Craig family furnished a number of repre- 
sentatives to the Union Army, and among the 
number was our subject, who on the 5th of Octo- 
ber, 1N61, offered his services to the Government 
and enrolled his name among the boys in blue of 
Company I. Sixty-sixth Ohio Infantry. At Port 
Republic, W. Va., he was wounded, on the 9th of 
June, 1862, being hit just below the shoulder- 
blade by a minie-ball, which came out on the right 
side of the breast. His wound unfitted him for 
further duty, and he was discharged at Columbus, 
but after several months spent in rest and recup- 
eration he re-enlisted in January, [863, becoming 
a member of Company K, One Hundred and 
Thirteenth Ohio Infantry. He then remained in 
the service until after the close of the war. when 
he was mustered out, July 8, [865, at Louisville, 
Ky. During the same month he received hisdis 
charge at Columbus. As his wound unfitted him 
for field service, he did special duty at brigade 
headquarters. His loyalty, however, was mani- 
fest by the faithfulness with which he discharged 
every task allotted to him. 

After his return home, Mr. Craig was employed 
as a farm hand b\ the month until [868, when he 
went to Macon County, Mo., where he --pent five 
years. He purchased a faun ol" eighty acres, and 



228 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in connection with agricultural pursuits he bought 
and sold stock. In 1873, he came to Hamilton 
and purchased a farm in Hancock Count}-, on 
which he made his home until 1877. He then 
leased a farm, and on this tract of land lived for 
four years, then leased another farm, remaining on 
it for six years. In 1887, he bought a farm of 
eighty acres in Montebello Township, and contin- 
ued its cultivation and improvement for over two 
years, but in 1892 he sold out and purchased 
property in Hamilton, removing to this city. In 
September, 1893, ne embarked in the grocery 
business, but sold out in January, 1894, and is 
now living retired. 

The lad}- who bears the name of Mrs. Craig 
was formerly Mrs. Eliza Millage, widow of 
George Millage. Their wedding was celebrated 
June 15, 1867, and to them have been born three 
children: Myrta, wife of William Scannell, a 
farmer and stock-raiser of Hamilton ; and Frank 
and Fred, who are still with their parents. 

Since casting his first Presidential vote for 
Abraham Lincoln, in 1864, Mr. Craig has been a 
stanch supporter of the Republican party and 
warmly advocates its principles. He has also 
been honored with several local offices, the duties 
of which he has discharged with promptness and 
fidelity. He served as Constable of Montebello 
Township for eight years, has been Deputy Sheriff 
for the same length of time, and is now filling that 
office. He has also served as School Director. 
Socially, he is a member of Black Hawk Lodge 
No. 228, A. F. & A. M.; Russell Post No. 86, 
G. A. R. ; and belongs to the Christian Church 
of Hamilton. 

f= , s ~i=!) <"?••> Mr * ' & 

ROBERT R. WALLACE, the efficient and 
popular Cashier of the State Bank of Hamil- 
ton, and one of the wide-awake and progress- 
ive young business men of the city, was born in 
Montebello Township, Hancock County, July 2, 
1867. He comes of a family of Scotch-Irish ex- 
traction, and his grandfather, Washington R. , and 
his great-grandfather, Henry Wallace, were both 



natives of Ohio. The father, Francis M. Wallace, 
married Miss Susanna Davis, a native of Keokuk, 
Iowa, and they became the parents of seven chil- 
dren, the eldest of whom is Robert R. Nettie is 
now the wife of Lovell J. Foster; Station Agent 
of Clatonia, Neb.; Grace is engaged in teaching; 
Walter is now deceased; William A. is a telegraph 
operator in Clatonia, Neb. ; Kate is living in 
Weaver, Iowa; and Harry is now deceased. 

Mr. Wallace of this sketch left home at the age 
of seven years. He probably never attended 
school more than a year altogether in his life, but 
through his own efforts, by reading, study and ob- 
servation, he has become a well-informed man, 
and now holds teacher's certificates. In 1882 he 
began business as a peddler, and was thus em- 
ployed one summer. He then resumed work as 
a farm hand by the month, and continued to de- 
vote his time to agricultural pursuits for five years. 
In 1887 he made an engagement to teach school, 
but before entering upon his term cancelled the 
contract and entered the employ of M. B. Lane 
& Co., of Hamilton, druggists, insurance agents 
and bankers. He took charge of the books of 
this concern, and was with this company until 
1889, when Mr. Lane was taken ill and Mr. Wal- 
lace took charge of the insurance business, and 
also became Assistant Cashier in the bank. In 
October, 1889, the State Bank of Hamilton was 
organized, and Mr. Wallace was made its first 
Cashier, a position he has held continuously since, 
with credit to himself and satisfaction to his em- 
ployers. 

On the 4th of March, 1890, was celebrated the 
marriage of Robert R. Wallace and Miss Lizzie 
Denton, a daughter of Edmund P. and Jemima 
E. (Whitney) Denton, both of whom were natives 
of Kentucky. The young couple are widely 
and favorably known in this community and hold 
an enviable position in social circles. Their home 
is noted for its hospitality. Mr. Wallace takes 
considerable interest in civic societies, and holds 
membership with Black Hawk Lodge No. 238, 
A. F. & A. M.; Tecumseh Chapter No. 152, 
R. A. M. ; Montebello Lodge No. 697, I. O. O. F. ; 
Genevieve Lodge, D. R. ; Rapid City Lodge No. 
286, K. P.; and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



229 



He was also the first Captain of George O. Felt 
Camp No. 183, S. V., and is a member of the 
Sisters Pythias. In polities, he is a stalwart Re- 
publican, and is now serving as a member of the 
City Council. The best interests of Hamilton 
ever find in him a friend, and one ever ready to 
aid in the promotion of those enterprises calculated 
to prove of public benefit. 



b <" T "> Q =s ^ 

HENRY K. MeLELLAN, who carries on a 
billiard hall in Hamilton, is a native of the 
Pine Tree State, his birth having occurred 
in Lincoln County, Me., on the istof May, [838. 
His father, Thomas McLellan, who was also born 
in the same county, was a sea captain. In 1848 
he removed to New Orleans, and after remaining 
in the Crescent City one year came to Hancock 
County, 111., in 1N49. He settled in Carthage, 
and gave his attention to the distilling business 
and to farming. In 1S50 he returned to Maine, 
and brought our subject back with him to Illi- 
nois. In connection with A. Hamilton, Thomas 
McLellan laid out the present city of Hamilton, 
and was otherwise prominent in the upbuilding 
and development of the community. 

Henry K. McLellan whose name heads this 
sketch is the youngest in a family of nine chil- 
dren. Mary A., the eldest, became the wife of Ben- 
jamin Davis, and died at their home in New York 
City; Lydia C, deceased, was the wife of Crock- 
ett Wilson, of Carthage; Adeline F. is the wife of 
H. F. Emery, a ranchman residing near Hoxie, 
Kan.; William T. is a railroad conductor on the 
W T abash Road, and makes his home in Hamilton; 
and Adelia H., deceased, was the wife of Frank- 
lin Bell, of this place. 

Our subject spent the first twelve years of his 
life in his native State, and acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Lincoln County. 
When a youth of twelve summers he was brought 
by his father to Hancock County, where he con- 
tinued for four years, when, possessed with the 
spirit of restlessness which is often characteristic 
of youth, he ran away from home. Making 



his way south to New Orleans, he there secured a 
position as cabin-boy on a steamboat on the Miss- 
issippi. For one season he followed the river, 
and then engaged in the lightning-rod business for 
two years. 

Soon after the breaking out of the Civil War, 
Mr. McLellan was found among the defenders of 
the Union. In May, 1861, he donned the blue, 
enlisting as a member of Company I), Sixteenth 
Illinois Infantry, for one hundred days' sen-ice. 
After having been at the front for twenty days he 
re-enlisted for a term of three years. He remained 
with his old company for one year, and was then 
discharged, on the 21st of May, 1S63. Immedi- 
ately after, he returned home, where he spent a 
week, but feeling that his country still needed his 
services, he then re-enlisted, becoming a member 
of Company G, Twelfth Iowa Cavalry, and 
with his old command took part in the battles 
of Monroe Station and New Madrid. After be- 
coming a cavalryman he engaged in the battles-of 
Harper's Ferry, Antietam, and in numberless 
skirmishes. For one month he was ill in the 
hospital at Martinsburgh, Va. 

After his return home in 1863, Mr. McLellan 
began driving team and stages on the western 
plains, and was also steward in different hotels in 
the West. In Oakland, Cal., he learned the 
painter's trade, which he followed for about three 
years. He then returned home and took up his 
residence in Canada, but later he went to Indiana, 
where he engaged in canvassing for some time. 
He also worked at his trade of painting in the 
Hoosier State for a considerable period, and sub- 
secpuently embarked in the fire-insurance business, 
which he continued for a year. After abandoning 
that enterprise he became connected with a hotel 
in Bunker Hill, Ind., serving as day clerk. The 
succeeding two years of his life were thus passed, 
after which he engaged in the show business, 
which took him all over the United States and 
Canada. In this way he continued his travels 
until 1891, when he returned to Hamilton, and 
opened the billiard hall of which he is now pro- 
prietor. 

On the 14th of May, 1850, in New York City, 
Mr. McLellan was united in marriage with Miss 



230 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mary A. Violet, daughter of Monsieur A. Violet, 
a native of France. In polities, our subject is a 
Republican, and has supported that party since 
he cast his first Presidential vote for Abraham 
Lincoln, in i860. He has never aspired to public 
office, however, preferring to give his time and 
attention to other interests. Socially, he is con- 
nected with Russell Post No. 86, G. A. R., and 
Rapid City Lodge No. 286, K. P. 



&+£i 



gEORGE C. WAGGONER, of Hamilton, is 
one of the oldest native sons of Hancock 
County who still reside within its borders. 
He was here born on the 20th of May, 1839, andisa 
worthy representative of an honored pioneer fam- 
ily. His father, Isaac N. Waggoner, was one of 
the earliest settlers in the county, the date of his 
arrival being 1824. He pre-empted three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land four miles north of 
Hamilton, known as the Waggoner Tract, and was 
one of the successful fanners of the neighborhood. 
He had removed to this State from Pennsylvania. 
He was also one of the earliest pilots on the river, 
and was captain of a keel-boat, propelled by poles 
and sails, before the days of steamers. He after- 
wards owned and built several steamboats, and 
followed the river until about four years prior to 
his death. 

In Nauvoo, Mr. Waggoner married Miss Mary 
White, daughter of Capt. James White, a pioneer 
settler of Hancock County, who bought land from 
the Indians where the town of Nauvoo now stands, 
giving them seven bushels of corn for each wig- 
wam, and receiving an Indian d.eed on wampum 
for the same. On this tract he erected a stone 
house, the first one in Nauvoo. He also followed 
the river, whereon he owned two keelboats. Mr. 
and Mrs. Waggoner began their domestic life 
upon the land which he had pre-empted, and 
which he transformed into a well-cultivated tract. 
Their union was blessed with seven children, three 
Mins and four daughters. Martha, the eldest, 
is the widow of Henry I!. Parsons, of Hamilton; 
George C. comes next; Austin and Milton are 



both residents of Hamilton: Luella and Eleanor 
are deceased; and Clara is the wife of Ed Curry, 
a farmer of Montebello Township. The mother 
of this family, who is still living, resides in Hamil 
ton, and is said to be the oldest settler now living 
in the county. 

Our subject was reared to manhood on his fa- 
ther's farm, and acquired his education in the old- 
time district schools. With the family, he shared 
in all the hardships and experiences of frontier 
life, and was early inured to the hard labors of 
developing wild land. He knew the county when 
it was a part of the western frontier, and when 
much of the land was still in the possession of the 
Government. He has been an eye-witness of its 
growth and development, and has also aided in 
its progress and advancement, taking an active 
interest in all that pertained to the public welfare. 
Mr. Waggoner continued farm work until 1855, 
when he began work on the river: He spent four 
3 ears in learning all about the stream, its chan- 
nels, its sandbars, etc., and in 1859 ne secured 
a license to act as a pilot from St. Louis to St. 
Paul. During the war he served on a United 
States gunboat in that capacity for three years, 
participating in a number of naval engagements. 
He enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and 
Eighteenth Illinois Infantry, in 1862, and on the 
roth of July, 1863, was transferred to the navy. 
When the war was over he was mustered out, 
July 8, 1865. Returning home, he then engaged 
in the milling business for six years on the old 
homestead, but in 1871 he returned to the river, 
and has since served as master and pilot. He has 
been in every packet trade from St. Louis to St. 
Paul. During the winter months he is engaged 
in the real estate business. 

On the 17th of July, 1867, Mr. Waggoner was 
united in marriage with Miss Emerilla Forney, 
ami to them has been born a family numbering 
three sons: Isaac N., who is now an attorney-at- 
law of Keokuk, Iowa; Herbert, who is employed 
as telegraph operator in Hamilton; and Willard, 
who is engaged in the jewelry business. 

In his political views. Mr. Waggoner is a Dem- 
ocrat, and is a member of the Christian Church. 
Socially, he is connected with Russell Post No 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




Charlks Dorm an 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



233 



68, G. A. R.; and with Montebello Lodge No. 
697, I. O. O. F., of which he has been a member 
for twenty years. Mr. Waggoner is widely known 
throughout his native county, and all along the 
river. He makes friends wherever he goes, and 
his many excellencies of character have gained for 
him the confidence and good-will of those with 
whom he has been brought in contact. 

|^_^_-^^<., A. ^F .0. s> 

EIIARLES DORMAN. who since 1865 has 
made his home in Hamilton, was For many 
years prominently connected with its busi- 
ness interests as one of its leading merchants, 
but is now living a retired life. A native of New 
Jersey, he was born in Gloucester County, on the 
28th of November, 1817. He traces his ancestry 
back to Revolutionary daws, his maternal grand- 
father being one of the heroes in the War for In- 
dependence. His parents, James and Amy E. 
(Parker) Dorman, were both natives of New Jer- 
sey, and to them were born four children, but 
Charles, the eldest, is now the only surviving one. 
Those who have passed away are Josiah F. , 
Annie and Daniel H. 

The father of our subject died when Charles 
was only about seven years old; therefore the 
care of the children devolved upon the mother, 
who did her best for them, although she was left 
in very limited circumstances. All the school 
privileges which Mr. Dorman received were ob- 
tained prior to his tenth year, in the subscription 
schools of the neighborhood. At that time lie 
began earning his own livelihood by work upon 
the farm, and has since been dependent upon his 
own resources. He may truly be called a self- 
made man, for the success of his life is due en- 
tirely to his untiring labors and perseverance. 
At the age of twelve years, he began learning the 
blacksmith's trade in a shop at Good Intent, 
N. J., and served a seven-year apprenticeship. 
When his term was ended he was nineteen years 
of age. He then began working as a journey- 
man, and after a time, in 1839, he left the East 
with the determination of trying his fortune on 



the broad prairies of Illinois. He emigrated to 
Alton, where he followed blacksmithing for six 
months, and in 1840 he removed to Kane, 
Greene County, where he worked at his trade for 
three years. 

In the year 1843, Mr. Dorman removed to a 
farm in Macoupin County, where he carried on 
agricultural pursuits for two years, in connection 
with the blacksmith's trade. In 1845, we find 
him in Carlinville, where he continued his labors 
at the anvil for eleven years. From 1856 until 
1S58, he was again engaged in farming in Macou- 
pin County. His next place of residence was in 
Woodburn, 111., where he resided until 1865, 
when he came to Hamilton, where he has since 
made his home. He embarked in merchandising, 
and for main- years did a most successful busi- 
ness, thus acquiring a competence which enabled 
him to lay aside business cares and live retired. 

An incident illustrating his courage and fear- 
lessness is worthy of mention here. On the even- 
ing of Jul}' 29, 1S89, two masked men entered his 
store, and one of them presented a revolver and 
demanded his money, threatening to shoot if he 
did not comply with his request. Mr. Dorman 
stooped down to get a pistol from under the 
counter, replying, "Shoot, and I'll shoot too." As 
he raised his head above the counter, the robber 
discharged his pistol, the ball taking effect in Mr. 
Dorman 's mouth, striking the artificial teeth in 
his upper jaw, and lodging in his neck on the 
right side, near his ear, being taken out some 
days later by a surgeon. The day after the 
shooting the robbers were arrested, and Mr. Dor- 
man being able to identify them, they were con- 
victed and sent to the State penitentiary. By 
this daring act the old gentleman was enabled to 
retain his money, and at the same time rendered a 
valuable service to the public, by ridding the city 
of two worthless characters. 

Mr. Dorman has been twice married. On at- 
taining his majority he was married, in April. 
1838, to Anna M. Northrop, a native of Phila- 
delphia. Seven children were born to them,, as 
follows: Albert J., deceased; James P., a black- 
smith and farmer now living in Centralia, Kan.; 
Harriet \V., wife of E. M. Grubb, a merchant of 



234 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Hamilton; Amy and Charles, who are both de- 
ceased; Anna, wife of Jesse Middleton, of Cam- 
den, N. J.; and Emily, who died in infancy. Mr. 
Dorman was again married, on the 28th of June, 
1SS2, his second union being with Miss Rebecca 
C. Hoopes. They have a pleasant home in 
Hamilton, supplied with the comforts and con- 
veniences of life, and are surrounded by many 
friends. 

During the late war, Mr. Dorman enlisted in 
his country's service, in May, 1864, becoming a 
member of Company F, One Hundred and Thirty - 
third Illinois Infantry. He did guard duty, and 
in the autumn of the same year received his dis- 
charge. He cast his first Presidential vote for 
William Henry Harrison, and was a supporter of 
the Whig part}- and its principles until the Re- 
publican party was formed, when he joined its 
ranks. He has since been one of its advocates, 
and has a firm belief in its measures. He served 
as Tustice of the Peace at Woodburu for four 
years, and has also filled the office of School Di- 
rector. He holds membership with Russell Post 
No. 86, G. A. R., and for some years was an El- 
der in the Presbyterian Church, with which he 
held membership while a resident of Carlinville. 
He is true to every public and private trust, and 
is a man whose word is as good as his bond, for 
by an honorable, upright life, he has gained the 
confidence of all, as well as their high regard. 

g ^ -B^^^-g-^ 3 

EHARLES P. CRUM, deceased, was born in 
Cass County, 111., on the nth of April, 1S53. 
His father, James Crum, was a native of 
Kentucky, and followed agricultural pursuits as a 
means of livelihood. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Christina Ream. James Crum's father was 
Matthias Crum, a Virginian, and his father in turn 
bore the same name and was a native of Germany, 
whence he came to America before the Revolu- 
tion. Their son Charles acquired the rudiments 
of his education in the district schools of his na- 
tive county, and when he had thoroughly mas- 
tered the branches of learning there taught, he 



entered the State Normal University, of Bloom- 
ington, 111., where he pursued his studies for 
three years. He next entered Adrian College, of 
Adrian, Mich., and after two years was gradu- 
ated from that institution, on the 24th of June, 
1875, with the degree of B. S. 

When his life as a pupil was ended, Mr. Crum 
removed to Henderson County, 111., where he 
purchased a farm, at once turning his attention 
to the further development and cultivation of his 
land. He there carried on agricultural pursuits 
for two years, when, in 1877, he came to Han- 
cock County, and purchased an interest in a gen- 
eral store in Disco. His connection therewith, 
however, was continued only until the following 
year. In 1878, he purchased a farm on section 
6, La Harpe Township, comprising two hundred 
and fifty acres, and again took up agricultural 
pursuits, which he successfully carried forward 
until 1883. 

Mr. Crum w^as married on the 14th of Decem- 
ber, 1875, the lady of his choice being Miss Liua 
James, daughter of Andrew J. and Sidney (Pig- 
man) James, of La Harpe. Five children came 
to bless their union, four sons and a daughter, 
Ray, Charles, James, Mabel and Virgil, all of 
whom are still with their mother. Mrs. Crum is 
a most estimable lad}- and one who has many 
friends thoroughout the community. 

In 1883, Mr. Crum left the farm and, removing 
to La Harpe, accepted a professorship in Gittings 
Seminary. His school work was earnest and ef- 
ficient, and he took great interest in educational 
matters, doing all in his power to advance the 
cause. He was recognized as a most able instruc- 
tor, and his place will be hard to fill. He was a 
teacher of mathematics and science, and his con- 
nection with the seminary at La Harpe continued 
up to the time of his death, which occurred 
March 25, 1S85, the result of a wreck on the 
Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw Railroad. 

In his social relations, Mr. Crum was a Royal 
Arch Mason and an Odd Fellow. He held mem- 
bership with La Harpe Lodge No. 195, A. F. & 
A. M.; La Harpe Chapter No. 134, R. A. M.; 
and Bristol Lodge No. 653, I. O. O. F., of which 
he was Noble Grand at the time of his death. He 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



235 



was also a member of the Methodist Protestant 
Church, and his honorable, upright life made him 
a valued and highly respected citizen of the com- 
munity. He was a patron of all those interests 
which tend to elevate humanity, and his loss was 
deeply mourned in this community. 



IILLIAM PIERCE BARRETT, deceased, 
was born in the shadow of Westminster 
Abbey, in England, on the iSth of March, 
1820, and was a son of William and Sarah (Ray- 
ner) Barrett, who were also natives of England. 
The paternal grandfather, Thomas Barrett, was 
born in the same country, and throughout his 
business career was a dealer in dry goods. He 
died at the age of eighty-. The maternal grand- 
father, Isaac Rayuer, was a farmer by occupa- 
tion. His entire life was spent in England, where 
he died at an advanced age. The father of our 
subject became a dry-goods merchant, and carried 
on business until his death, in 1819. He was a 
member of the Church of England, and his wife 
held membership with the Congregational Church. 
She survived him for a quarter of a century. This 
worthy couple were the parents of five children, 
three sons and two daughters, but none are now 
living. 

Mr. Barrett whose name heads this record 
grew to manhood in the land of his birth, and 
when twenty-three years of age sailed for America. 
With the hope of bettering his financial condition 
in the Xew World, he crossed the Atlantic in 
1843, and took up his residence in McDonough 
County, where he engaged in farming. Later he 
bought a tract of land in Macomb, and was em- 
ployed in various ways for a time. In 1857 ne 
was elected Constable, which position he filled for 
eight years. During that time he also served as 
Deputy Sheriff. When his term of office had ex- 
pired, he purchased a forty-acre tract of laud south- 
west of Macomb, and to its cultivation and im- 
provement devoted his energies for eighteen years. 
This ended his career as a farmer. He came to 
Macomb, and was again officially connected with 



its interests. For about eight years he served as 
Deputy County Clerk, and was then appointed 
Deputy County Treasurer, which position he was 
filling at the time of his death. 

On June 6, 1846, Mr. Barrett was united in 
marriage with Miss Margaret Roberts, a daughter 
of Thomas and Ann (Roberts) Roberts, and to 
them were born six sons and two daughters, only 
four of whom are now living: Sarah E., wife of 
Charles Combs, of Chariton, Iowa: William T., 
of Chalmers, McDonough County: Maggie; and 
Edward, of Grafton, Cal. Mrs. Barrett's parents 
were natives of Denbigh, Wales, and during her 
infancy she was brought by them to America. 

In his political views, Mr. Barrett was always 
a stalwart Democrat, and took a warm interest in 
the growth and success of his party. As an offi- 
cer, he was always true to the trust reposed in him, 
and discharged his duties with a promptness and 
fidelity that won him the confidence of all con- 
cerned. His life was well and worthily spent, and 
tin ugh he lived quietly, he had the high respect 
of all with whom business or social relations 
brought him in contact. He held membership 
with the Church of England, and Mrs. Barrett 
belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 
During the last years of his life he served as No- 
tary Public, and was engaged in the insurance, 
real-estate and loan business. He passed away 
February 14, 1893, and his death was deeply 
mourned by many friends. 



^"HOMAS McCLURE, an attorney-at-law of 
/ C Macomb, who is successfully engaged in 
\J2/ practice at the Bar of McDonough County, 
claims Illinois as the State of his nativity. He 
was born in Augusta Township, Hancock County, 
July 5, 184S, and comes of an old Virginia family. 
His grandfather, John McClure. was a native of 
Virginia and a saddler by trade. Soon after mar- 
rying he moved to Kentucky, and spent his re- 
maining days in Adair County, that State. In 
his family were four sons and three daughters. 
The great-grandfather of our subject, John Mc- 



236 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL. RECORD. 



Clure, was a native of Scotland. He married an 
Irish lady, and crossing the Atlantic to America, 
located. in Albemarle County, Va.j but soon after 
located in Beaver County, Pa., where he spent 
his remaining days. 

The father of our subject, Thomas McClure, 
Sr., was born in Adair County, Ky., and through- 
out the greater part of his life followed the occu- 
pation of farming. With the hope of bettering 
his financial condition, he removed to Illinois prior 
to 1839, and after a few years' residence in St. Ma- 
ry's Township, Hancock County, 111., located 
three and a-half miles northwest of Augusta, at 
Mechanicsville, where he purchased one hundred 
and twenty acres of land. This he at once began 
to cultivate and improve. Subsequently he added 
to it a tract of eighty acres, and his energies were 
devoted untiringly to its development. Thus he 
accumulated a competency, and left his family in 
comfortable circumstances. He married Mary 
Ellen Samuels, a native of Virginia, who emigra- 
ted prior to 1840, with her father, Moses Samuels, 
to Illinois. Her grandfather, a Polish Hebrew, 
spent his last days in Richmond, Va. To Mr. 
and Mrs. McClure were born eleven children, of 
whom seven are living, four sons and three daugh- 
ters, namely: John W., who served in the late 
war as a member of the Thirty-sixth Illinois In- 
fantry, and is now a Christian preacher of Iowa; 
Elzy, who was a member of the One Hundred and 
Thirty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and is a merchant 
now living in Carthage, 111.; Thomas, of this 
sketch; Mary F., wife of James Garwood, of Au- 
gusta Township, Hancock County, 111. ; Ulysses 
G., baggage-master on the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe Railroad at Kansas City, Mo.: Eliza 
Ellen, wife of A. W. Byers, of Carthage, 111. ; and 
Ida Helen, wife of Leslie C. Richards, a druggist, 
now postal clerk on the Illinois Central Railway, 
residing in Centralia, 111. The father of this 
family, by exposure contracting typhoid fever, 
passed away May 4, 1863, at the age of forty- 
six years, two months and one day. His wife 
died April 21, 1874, at the age of fifty years, six 
months and seven days. In early life they united 
with the Christian Church, and were ever faithful 
and devoted members. Mr. McClure was a man 



of integrity and strong convictions, being well 
liked and highly esteemed by all who knew him. 
Politically, he was a Whig, and prior to the Civil 
War becoming a Republican, cast his last vote for 
Abraham Lincoln. Loyal to the Union, he was 
deeply interested in its successes up to the day of 
his death. 

Thomas McClure of this sketch early became • 
familiar with all the duties of farm life, and re- 
mained upon the old homestead with his mother 
until her death. His early education was ac- 
quired in the district schools, and supplemented 
by study in the public schools of Augusta, and in 
Abingdon College. He then embarked in teach- 
ing, and followed that profession for fourteen years 
in Adams, Hancock, McDonough and Fulton 
Counties. Later he began reading law in the of- 
fice of Judge L. Y. Sherman, of Macomb, and was 
admitted to the Bar in August, 1890, since which 
time he has been practicing on his own account. 

On the 25th of October, 1893, Mr. McClure 
was united in marriage with Miss Myra E. Cris- 
sey, daughter of Charles D. and Samira C. Cris- 
sey, of Macomb, 111. Mr. and Mrs. McClure are 
members of the Christian Church. Socially, Mr. 
McClure is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
and also a Knight of Pythias. In politics, he is a 
supporter of the Republican party and its princi- 
ples, and is now serving as City Attorney of Ma- 
comb, 111., to the satisfaction of all concerned. 
Although he has been in practice for little more 
than three years, he has already' won a place at 
the Bar and acquired a good patronage, and his 
future labors in the line of his profession will un- 
doubtedly be successful. 

S *=3^ ? ->fa * « 

[""\ORTER K. SUTTLE, senior member of the 
Yf firm of Suttle & Williams, proprietors of 
[2 the Macomb Steam Laundry, is a native of 
the Buckeye State. He was born in Knox Coun- 
ty, Ohio, on the 23d of January, 1846, and is a 
son of Wilford and Ann Eliza (Milhorn) Suttle, 
who were also natives of Ohio. Their family 
numbered four children, two sons and two daugh- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



237 



ters, as follows: Elizabeth, wife of Alberson 
Moore, a resident of Bushnell; Rosa, wife of L. 
Anghinbaugh, of Bushnell; Porter K., of this 
sketch; and Shannon, who is now deceased. In 
early days the father was a stage-driver for many 
years in Ohio. His death occurred about 1848. 
His wife, who still survives him, is yet living in 
Bushnell, 111., and is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church of that place. 

Porter K. Suttle spent the first fourteen years 
of his life in his native State, the year 1859 wit- 
nessing his arrival in Illinois. He has since that 
time made his home in McDonough County, for 
a short time he was a resident of Bushnell, but 
later he learned the marble-cutter's trade in 
Prairie City, following that business for three 
years. On the expiration of that period he went 
South and engaged in clerking in a clothing 
store for two years. Subsequently he followed 
railroading for a similar length of time, and then 
opened a grocery, boot and shoe store in Good 
Hope, which he carried on for nine years. Com- 
ing to Macomb, he then conducted a billiard hall 
in this city until May, 1893, when he formed a 
partnership with L. M. Williams, and established 
the Macomb Steam Laundry, which is conducted 
under the firm style of Suttle & Williams. They 
furnish employment to nine hands, and are doing 
a good business, which is constantly increasing, 
owing to the excellent quality of work which they 
turn out. 

In September, 1874, was celebrated a marriage 
which united the destinies of Mr. Suttle and Miss 
Luella Monger, daughter of Alexander Monger. 
One child was born unto them, Wilford Alexan- 
der. The mother was a member of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, and died in 1877. F° r 
his second wife Mr. Suttle chose Miss Ella Ans- 
line. Four children grace this union, a son and 
three daughters, namely: Claudia, Ray, Ethel 
and Lila. 

Mr. Suttle, socially, is a member of the Odd 
Fellows' Society and of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. His wife holds membership in the 
Presbyterian Church. In politics, he is a sup- 
porter of the Republican party and its principles, 
and while residing in Good Hope he served as a 



member of the Village Board of Trustees. His 
time and attention, however, have been devoted 
largely to business interests. He is meeting with 
good success in his undertakings, and the liberal 
patronage which he receives is well deserved. 

»a ~ a 1— i< a "~T'$T^r~ 3 ' Z 

(JOHN SMITH BARKER, the efficient Sheriff 
I of McDonough County, now living in Ma- 
Q) comb, is a native of this State. He was born 
in Fulton County on the 1 6th of November, 1852, 
and is a son of John W. and Eliza S. (Brand) 
Barker, the former a native of Ohio, and the lat- 
ter of Virginia. The father was thrice married, 
there being no issue of the third marriage. By 
the first union he had two children: Harriet, 
wife of Alexander Barnes, of Sumner County, 
Kan.; and Warren, who resides in the same 
county. By the second marriage were born 
eight children, six sons and two daughters, of 
whom six are yet living, as follows: Lafayette, 
who is located in Kansas City, Mo.; Mary J., 
wife of R. A. Miner, of McDonough County; 
John S.; George M. and Franklin, who reside in 
Fulton County; and Sarah E., wife of George 
Hefner, of this county. The father of this family 
was a farmer by occupation, and followed that 
business throughout his entire life. The year 
1832 witnessed his arrival in Illinois. He lo- 
cated in Fulton County, near the present site of 
Table Grove, and there made his home until his 
death, which occurred in 1888, at the age of sev- 
enty years. His wife passed away in 1883. They 
were both members of the Baptist Church, and 
were highly-respected people. 

Little is known concerning the origin of the 
family. The paternal grandfather, John Barker, 
was a native of Ohio, and served in the Mexican 
War. As a means of livelihood he followed both 
farming and blacksmithing. His death occurred 
at the age of eighty years, in Fulton County, 
where he had located at a very early day. His 
family numbered four sons and two daughters. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject claimed 
Virginia as the State of his nativity, and he too 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was one of the honored pioneers of Fulton Coun- 
ty. For many long years he there carried on 
fanning, and at an advanced age departed this 
life. 

In the county of his nativity our subject was 
reared to manhood, and the common schools of 
the community afforded his educational privi- 
leges. Under the parental roof he remained until 
twenty-five years of age, when he left home, and 
on the ist of January, 1878, was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary G. Miner, daughter of 
John F. and Susanna (Ward) Miner, who reside 
near Adair. Three children blessed their union, 
but a son died in infancy. Their daughters are 
Mary E. and Susanna S. 

In the spring of 1879, Mr. Barker came to Mc- 
Donough County and located in Bethel Town- 
ship, where for three years he engaged in farming. 
During the succeeding year he carried on agri- 
culture in Lamoine Township, and then removed 
to Colchester Township, where he made his home 
until 1886, when he came to Macomb. For four 
years he served as Deputy Sheriff under Theodore 
Huston, and was then elected to his present of- 
fice, which he is now filling in a creditable and 
acceptable manner. He served as Town Clerk of 
Bethel Township for one term, and in that posi- 
tion discharged his duties with the same prompt- 
ness and fidelity that now characterize his ad- 
ministration. In politics, he is a supporter of the 
Democracy, and, socially, is connected with the 
Knights of Pvthias fraternity. 



I^RM 



*VSAI AH ODENWELLER is now doing a good 
I liven- business in Macomb. He has an ex- 
X tensive stable, of which he has been proprietor 
since 1888, and keeps on hand a number of good 
horses and carriages; in fact, he has one of the best 
appointed establishments in his line in Mc- 
Donough County. He was born near Industry, 
in this county, November 29, 1856, and is a son 
of Leonard and Elizabeth (Danley) Odenweller, 
the former a native of Baden, Germany, and the 
latter of Ohio. His paternal grandparents lived 



and died in Germany. The maternal grandfather, 
Thomas Danley, was for many years a resident 
of Ohio, and followed farming in the Buckeye 
State. In 1850 he removed to Illinois, locating 
in McDonough County, and improved a good farm 
south of Macomb. There he spent his remaining 
days, passing away in 1S70, at an advanced age. 

The father of our subject also carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits. He began earning his liveli- 
hood in that way, but in 1843 came to Illinois, 
and spent two years in Macomb. He then re- 
moved to a farm two miles southeast of the city, 
but in 1847 again came to Macomb. Two years 
subsequently, he once more took up agriculture, 
and continued the cultivation and improvement of 
his land until 1878, when he came to the city, and 
here spent his remaining days, being called to the 
home beyond in February, 1887, at the age of 
seventy-two years. His wife survived him until 
1889, and passed away at the age of sixty-four. 
They were both members of the Christian Church, 
and were prominent workers in its interest. Of 
their family often children, seven are yet living, 
namely: Thomas F., a Christian preacher of Des 
Moines, Iowa; John L-, who resides in Schuyler 
County; Simon P., of Macomb; Richard A., of 
Pleasanton, Kan.; Isaiah; Mary M., wife of James 
Miller, of Graham, Mo.; and Lucy H., widow of 
H. D. Grider, a resident of Windsor, 111. 

As a typical farmer's son, Isaiah Odenweller 
was reared to manhood upon the old homestead 
in Scotland Township, and in the district schools 
his education was acquired. He remained at 
home until 1879. When he was married he con- 
tinued farming until 1887, when he came to 
Macomb, and embarked in the butcher's business. 
A year later he purchased the liven' stable of R. 
D. Merchon, and has since conducted the business. 
He also owns a good home property. 

On the 2d of October, 1879, Mr. Odenweller led 
to the marriage altar Miss Lizzie M. Ellis, daugh- 
ter of John and .Susan M. (Breckenridge) Ellis, 
who were natives of Pennsylvania. Two children 
were the fruit of their union, a daughter and son, 
M. Bertha and Walter Leonard, the former now 
deceased. The parents hold membership with 
the Christian Church, and Mr. Odenweller is a 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



239 



member of the Knights of Pythias and Odd Fel- 
low-' Societies and the Patriotic Order of Sons of 
America. He exercises his right of franchise in 
support of the Republican party, and is now serv- 
ing his second term as Alderman of the Third 
Ward. He has also served for several years as 
School Director, while residing in the country. 

fa ' d ^ySls S 1 

|~RANCIS M. JACKSON. M. I)., who is suc- 
r^ cessfully engaged in the practice of medicine 
I in Hamilton, is one of the honored veterans 
of the late war, who risked his life in defense of 
the Union, and valiantly aided in its preservation. 
The record of his career will prove an interesting 
one to many of our readers, for he is widely 
known in this locality. A native of Knox Coun- 
ty, 111., he was born July 31, 1841, and is of 
Scotch-Irish extraction. His father, Obediah 
Jackson, was a native of Otsego County, X. V., 
but when about ten years of age went with his 
father's family to Pennsylvania, and in 1839 kit 
tlie Keystone State for Illinois, locating in Knox 
County, where he engaged in farming. Before 
leaving Pennsylvania he wedded Mary Kings- 
bury, a native of that State, and unto them were 
born nine children, as follows: Cassandra D., wife 
of E. M- Wright, who is engaged in the jewelry 
business in Marysville, Cal.; Lyman A., a fruit- 
grower of Knoxville, 111.; Nancy J., Ruth A. 
and Ebenezer, deceased; Francis M., of this 
sketch; Julius, of Hamilton; Man- A., now the 
wife of George Wilson, a resident of California; 
and Lucy D., who is deceased. 

As l>r. Jackson emerged from early boyhood, 
he was put to work upon the farm, and be- 
came familiar with all the duties of that life. He 
early began to follow the plow, and by his serv- 
ices aided greatly in the development of the old 
home farm. When harvests were over and the 
winter had come on, he would enter the public 
schools of Knoxville, and there pursue his studies 
until spring again called him to the fields. 

Dr. Jackson remained at home until 1861, 
when, on the 14th of December, he responded to 



the country's call for troops and was assigned 
to Company C, Fifty-first Illinois Infantry. He 
saw much hard service, participated in the bat- 
tle of New Madrid and the siege and capture of 
Island No. 10, went with the fleet to Ft. Pillow, 
and participated in the siege of Corinth. On the 
2 2d of August, 1862, at Decatur, Ala., he was 
captured and sent to Libby Prison, where he re- 
mained for three months. He was then ex- 
changed and taken to Camp Carroll, at Annapo- 
lis, Md., where he remained for one month, when 
he was ordered to Camp Butler, 111. When he 
reached Chicago, he was taken quite sick and 
was forced to remain there for a time. He then 
obtained a furlough and returned home. Later 
he was ordered to Keokuk, Iowa, and on account 
of physical disability was discharged from the 
service on the 24th of March, 1863. He was a 
loyal defender of the Old Flag and the cause it 
represented, and well deserves mention among his 
country's patriots. 

On the 26th of March, 1863, Dr. Jackson mar- 
ried Catherine Yarvan, daughter of William Yar- 
yan. Unto them was born a son, William B., a 
fanner of Hamilton. The mother died July 29, 
1873, and our subject was again married. Novem- 
ber 26, 1877, his second union being with Kate 
G. Davis, by whom he has two children, Frank 
D. and Sallie. 

During the first year after his return from the 
army, the Doctor engaged in farming in the coun- 
ty of his nativity, but in 1864 he embarked in 
business in Colchester, McDonough County, 111., 
as a dealer in drugs and groceries. There he re- 
mained until 1866, and the last year was spent 
largely in the study of medicine under Dr. Yar- 
yan. When he had become thoroughly proficient 
in the science, he began practice in Colchester, 
hut in 1S67 he went West, spending about three 
years in Missouri and Iowa. In the year 1870, 
he returned to Knoxville, Knox County, and 
took charge of his father's farm, which he contin- 
ued to operate for a year. In 1871, he went to 
Gladstone, where he was successfully engaged in 
the practice of medicine until 1872, when he re- 
moved to Colchester. We afterwards find him in 
Hopper's Mills, Henderson County, where he 



240 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



continued to make his home until 1881, during 
which time he was elected to serve as Coroner of 
the county. 

Thirteen years have now passed since Dr. Jack- 
son came to Hamilton, and during this time he 
has been continuously engaged in general prac- 
tice. He does a good business in the line of his 
profession, and the liberal patronage he receives is 
well merited. In politics, he has been a Repub- 
lican since the time when he cast his first Presi- 
dential vote for Abraham Lincoln, in 1864. He is 
now serving as Mayor of Hamilton, and is a ca- 
pable and efficient officer, faithful in the dis- 
charge of all public duties. He has also served 
one term as Supervisor of Montebello Township, 
and as School Director. Socially, he is a member 
of Russell Post No. 86, G. A. R., and is a char- 
ter member of Montebello Lodge No. 697, I. O. 
O. F. The Doctor is a public- spirited and pro- 
gressive citizen, who gives his hearty support to 
all worthy public interests that are calculated to 
upbuild and benefit the community. He pos- 
sesses many excellencies of character, is a faith- 
ful officer, a skilled physician, and is highly re- 
spected by all. 



S^H^l 



pQlLLIAMT. McLELLAN, of Hamilton, a 
\ k I conductor on the Wabash Railroad, is one 
Y Y °f tne honored veterans of the late war, who 
in the days when the dissolution of the Union was 
threatened responded to the call for troops, and 
valiantly aided in its defense. He was born on 
the 16th of April, 1835, in Thomaston, Me., and 
is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His father, Capt. 
Thomas McLellan, was a native of the same place, 
and was one of a family which numbered three 
sons and a daughter. His educational privileges 
were very meagre, being such as the district 
schools of the neighborhood afforded. At the 
age of twelve years, he made his first sea voyage, 
going on a whaler. He was thus employed for 
two years, receiving $12 per month. When a 
youth of fifteen, he shipped on a sailing-vessel be- 
fore the mast, and won promotion from time to 



time, until, at the age of twenty-one years, he was 
Captain and owned a third-interest in the sailing- 
vessel ' ' The Four Brothers, ' ' plying as a freight- 
er throughout the world, with New York as its 
main port. He was afterwards Captain of the 
sailing-vessels " William Henry," " Brigg Lud- 
wig, ' ' and several others. The last ship he com- 
manded was the " European," of which he had 
charge many years. 

In 1848 Capt. McLellan removed with his 
family to New Orleans, where he remained for one 
year, having abandoned the sea; but the cholera 
drove them from the Crescent City northward. 
After a short time spent in St. Louis, they re- 
moved to Alton, 111., where they continued to re- 
side until their removal to Hancock County in 
1849. Carthage was chosen as their place of 
abode. Capt. McLellan had married Nancy Ful- 
ler, a native of Bangor, Me., and to them were ' 
born five children: Adeline, now the wife of H. 
F. Emery, a farmer of Hoxie, Kan.; William T., 
whose name heads this record; Henry K., a resi- 
dent of Hamilton; Adelia, deceased, wife of Frank 
Bell; and Joseph, who is also deceased. The father 
of this family was an old line Whig in early life, but 
afterwards became a Republican. 

William T. McLellan acquired his early educa- 
tion in the public schools, and afterwards attended 
Jubilee College, of Peoria County, 111., where he 
pursued his studies for a year. He began busi- 
ness for himself as a teamster in Hamilton, but 
afterwards went on a farm, where he was employed 
for three years. In this way he got a start in life. 
He also worked in a planing-mill in Keokuk for 
a short time. 

After the breaking out of the Civil War, Mr. 
McLellan, prompted by patriotic impulses, re- 
sponded to the call for troops in February, 1862, 
enlisting as a member of Company D, Sixteenth 
Illinois Infantry. He served for more than three 
years, and was mustered out at Louisville, Ky., 
on the 8th of July, 1865. He participated in all 
the battles from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and was 
with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea. 
He was also in the campaign from Savannah to 
Washington, and participated in the Grand Re- 
view in the Capitol City, the most brilliant mili- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



241 



tary pageant ever seen on the western hemisphere. 
He took part in the battles of Kennesaw Mountain, 
Peach Tree Creek, Big Shanty, Buzzards' Gap, 
Jonesboro, and numerous other skirmishes. He 
was always found at his post, and his army rec- 
ord is one of which he may well be proud. 

Shortly after his return from the service in 1865, 
he began railroading for the Wabash line. He 
was first employed in the freight house, later was 
made baggageman , then served as fireman on an 
engine for a time, afterwards became brakeman 
on a freight train, and was then made conductor 
on a freight train. In this capacity he has served 
for twenty-five years, a trusted and faithful em- 
ploye of the road. 

On the 15th of October, 1858, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. McLellan and Miss Mary R. 
Debitt, daughter of William and Rosetta (Si- 
mons) Debitt. To them have been born four 
children, three sons and a daughter, but the latter, 
Bertha, is now deceased. The three sons, Arthur, 
Edward and William, all reside in Hamilton. 
Mrs. McLellan is a member . of the Presbyterian 
Church, and a most estimable lady. In politics, 
Mr. McLellan is a Republican, but has never 
sought or desired the honors or emoluments of 
public office. Socially, he is a member of Black 
Hawk Lodge No. 238, A. F. & A. M.; Rapid 
City Lodge No. 286, K. P. ; and Russell Post 
No. 86, G. A. R. His long continuance with the 
railroad service indicates his faithfulness to duty, 
and the trust reposed in him by the company. 
He has for many years made his home in Hamil- 
ton, and is well liked, having many warm friends 
throughout the community. 



r~REDERICK WILLIAM HASELWOOD, 
Yri editor and proprietor of the Register, of Ham- 
| ilton, and one of the enterprising and pro- 
gressive citizens of Hancock County, has the hon- 
or of being a native of Illinois, for his birth oc- 
curred on his father's farm in Henderson County, 
on the 25th of June, 1867. He is of German and 
Scotch descent. His father, J. R. Haselwood, 



was born near Louisville, Ky., and came of a fam- 
ily of German origin. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Mary Jane Duncan, was born in 
Tennessee, and was of Scotch lineage. With the 
Huston family she removed to McDonough Coun- 
ty, 111., during the early settlement of that lo- 
cality. On leaving his native State, Mr. Hasel- 
wood went first to Indiana, and thence removed to 
Adams County, 111. At length he took up his 
residence in Henderson County, where he has 
since made his home. He is an enterprising and 
progressive man, and as the result of his untir- 
ing industry, his career has been a prosperous 
one. He is now the owner of two hundred and 
forty acres of land, and is recognized as one of the 
successful farmers of the community. 

F. W. Haselwood of this sketch was reared in 
the usual manner of fanner lads, and acquired his 
early education in the district schools of the 
neighborhood. Later he attended the graded 
schools in Blandinsville, 111., and subsequently 
completed his education in Eureka College, a 
school of the Christian Church in Eureka, 111., 
his parents both being members of that denomina- 
tion. During the summer months, he aided in 
the labors of the farm, but his taste lay in another 
direction than that of agricultural pursuits. At 
the age of eighteen years, he began school 
teaching. He then took up the business to which 
he has since devoted his time and energies. He 
entered the Gazette office at Blandinsville, then 
conducted by Fred Aldrich, to learn the "art 
preservative. ' ' He there worked for about a year, 
and then went to the West, spending some time 
in Kansas and Nebraska, where he was employed 
on the Missouri Pacific Railroad as brakeman. 

It was in 1890 that Mr. Haselwood returned 
to his native State and took charge of the Hustler, 
owned by Paul Hume, and published at Bland- 
insville, continuing thereuntil the plant was sold, 
when, in March, 1891, he came to Hamilton. 
Here he secured employment in the Press office. 
About eight months later he left that position and 
established the Register, on the 31st of December, 
1 89 1. This is a bright, newsy sheet, all home 
print, and in size is a seven-column folio. It has 
a liberal patronage, which has constantly increased 



242 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



from the beginning. A large business is well de- 
served by its editor, who ever takes an active in- 
terest in the best welfare of the community, and 
does all in his power to aid in its upbuilding. 

In his social relations, Mr. Haselwood is a 
Knight of Pythias, belonging to Rapid City Lodge 
No. 286, K. P., of Hamilton. In politics, he is a 
stalwart Democrat, who warmly advocates the 
principles of his party, and is an admirer of Gro- 
ver Cleveland. He takes great interest in athle- 
tic sports, is fond of boxing, and delights in foot 
and base ball and bicycle-riding. He is a pleas- 
ant, genial and accommodating gentleman, and 
throughout the community in which he lives is 
held in high regard. 

(SOLOMON TWIDWELL, a retired farmer 
?\ now residing in Macomb, is a native of North 
Q) Carolina, born January 20, 1818. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, George Twidwell, was a na- 
tive of Virginia, and was reared in that State by 
his grandfather. Both reached an advanced age. 
The father of our subject, Thomas Twidwell, was 
born in the Old Dominion, and in early life learned 
the cooper's trade, but afterward became a farmer. 
Having arrived at years of maturity, he married 
Miss Polly Way man, daughter of John Wayman, 
and a native of Maryland . Her father was a black- 
smith by trade, and spent the greater part of his 
life in North Carolina. 

In 1834, Thomas Twidwell brought his family 
to Illinois, and took up his residence in Apple 
Creek, in Morgan County, where he made his 
home for eighteen months. He then came to Mc- 
Donough County, and moved into a little cabin 
built of hickory logs and minus a roof. It was 
located in Lamoine Township, three miles east of 
Plymouth. There Mr. Twidwell took up two 
eighty-acre tracts of land from the Government, 
and afterward added to this from time to time by 
purchase, but ere his death he sold all of his land. 
He passed away February 16, 1883, at the very 
advanced age of ninety-four years. His wife had 
long since departed this life, having died of small- 



pox in 1865. In early life, she was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, but later she 
and her husband joined the United Brethren 
Church. After the death of his first wife, Mr. 
Twidwell married Mrs. Sarah (Sapp) Smith. 
Nine children were born of the first union, five 
sons and four daughters, namely: John, a resi- 
dent of Plymouth and a twin brother of our sub- 
ject; William, who is living at Elma, Wash.; 
Martha, wife of Josiah Morris, a resident of Nor- 
ton, Kan.; Nancy, who makes her home in Iowa; 
and Absalom, who is living in Jewell County, 
Kan. The other children are now deceased. 

In the State of his nativity, Solomon Twidwell 
was reared to manhood. At the age of eighteen, 
he left North Carolina and accompanied his par- 
ents on their westward emigration to Illinois. 
For about five years he then resided in McDon- 
ough County, and in 1841 went to Schuyler 
County, where, in connection with his father, he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land on 
Round Prairie. He still owns his share of that 
tract, and also sixty-seven acres of that which 
formerly belonged to his father. He was suc- 
cessful in his business dealings, and from time to 
time he added to his possessions, until he had 
over seven hundred acres of valuable land. He 
still retains possession of two hundred and seven 
acres, and derives a good income therefrom. 

On the 1 9th of December, 1839, Mr. Twidwell 
was united in marriage with Miss Rebecca Mor- 
ris, daughter of Simeon and Hannah Morris. 
Three children were born to them, two sons and 
a daughter, Thomas B., George W. and Eveline. 
The first-named wedded Mary House, by whom 
he had three children, Manlove, Carolina and 
Mary. The mother died, and he married Leonora 
Smith. With their two children, Solomon W. 
and Mattie May, they reside in Lamoine Town- 
ship. Eveline is the wife of Thomas Curtis, who 
resides near St. John, in Stafford County, Kan. 
They have six children: Delia May, Charles Solo- 
mon, Myrtle Maud, Jesse F. and Inez Pearl. 
Mrs. Rebecca Twidwell died in February, 1873. 
On the 8th of September, following, Mr. Twid- 
well was again married, his second union being 
with Mrs. Lucinda Graham, widow of William 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



243 



A. Graham, and a daughter of John and Leah 
(Gordon) Shuler, natives of North Carolina. 

Politically, Mr. Twidwell has always been a 
Democrat of the Jacksonian type, but has had 
little time or inclination to seek public office, pre- 
ferring to devote his entire attention to his busi- 
ness interests. He served three years as Super- 
visor, and eight years as Justice of the Peace, in 
Birmingham Township, Schuyler County, probab- 
bly the strongest Republican township in that 
county. His life has been a busy one, and his 
industry, and good management have brought to 
him the handsome competence which now en- 
ables him to live retired. He owns besides his 
farm a residence and other real-estate in Macomb. 
On laying aside agricultural pursuits, he came to 
this city, where he has since resided. He has 
made his home in Schuyler and McDonough Coun- 
ties for fifty-eight years, and well deserves men- 
tion among the honored pioneers of this locality. 



b'<" f">C 



DWTN LEE DALLAM, the senior member 
r3 1 if the well-known firm of Dallam & Wiley, 
I dealers in clothing in Macomb, is a wide- 
awake, enterprising and representative business 
man, who, as the result of his well-directed efforts, 
is meeting with success in his undertakings and 
now enjoys a liberal patronage. As he is wideb- 
and favorably known in this community, we feel 
assured that the record of his life will prove of in- 
terest to many of our readers. 

Mr. Dallam is a native of Macomb, his birth 
having here occurred October 16, 1855. He comes 
of an old family of Maryland, in which State his 
grandfather was born. The latter was a cabinet- 
maker by trade. Emigrating westward, betook 
up his residence in this city, where he died at the 
age of sixty years. Among his family of two 
sons and three daughters was Charles \V. Dallam, 
father of our subject. He too was a native of 
Maryland, and with his parents came to the West. 
In an early day he engaged in business as a dealer 
in threshing-machines, in connection with John 
Wiley, under the firm name of Dallam & Wiley. 



He then embarked in the milling business in con- 
nection with N. P. Tinsley, and they built the 
North Side Mill, with which he continued his con- 
nection for a few years. He then removed to a 
farm six miles east of Macomb, and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, which he successfully car- 
ried on until his death in 1885, at the age of sixty- 
nine years. He was united in marriage with 
Mary Plotts, a native of Pennsylvania, and a 
daughter of Thomas Plotts, a farmer of the Key- 
stone State, who came to Macomb in pioneer days, 
but afterward removed to Lucas County, Iowa, 
where he lived for about twenty years. He was 
called to the home beyond in 1884, at the ripe old 
age of eighty-five. Mrs. Dallam still survives 
her husband. Both were members of the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian Church, to which she still 
belongs. In their family were four children, three 
sons and a daughter: Edwin L. ; Frank W., of 
Washington County, Iowa; Charles T. , of Colby, 
Kan.; and Amanda, wife of L. L. Wilson, of Mc- 
Donough County. Mr. Dallam had been twice 
married, his first wife being in her maidenhood 
Rebecca Swain. They had four children, of whom 
three are yet living: Samuel W.; Margaret, wife 
of S. Moore, of Macomb; and Josephs., of San 
Francisco, Cal. 

Edwin L. Dallam was reared to manhood upon 
his father's farm, and lived at home until his mar- 
riage. On the 10th of May, 1878, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Ella Hill, daughter of Dr. 
Hill. Their union has been blessed with five 
children, a son and four daughters, and the fam- 
ily circle yet remains unbroken. In order of birth 
they are as follows: Daisy, Fred Clifton, Alice, 
Edith and Helen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dallam began their domestic life 
upon a farm, and he continued to engage in agri- 
culture for eleven years, but in 1887 he came to 
Macomb and purchased the clothing store of J. C. 
McClellan & Son. The firm then became Mc- 
Clellan & Dallam, and this connection was con- 
tinued for two and a-half years, when Mr. Dallam 
bought out his partner's interest and admitted to 
partnership J. Y. Wiley. They carry all kinds 
of gents' furnishing goods and have a good trade, 
which they well merit. Mr. Dallam is a member 



244 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and 
the Modern Woodmen of America. His wife holds 
membership with the Presbyterian Church. In 
politics, he is a Republican. His entire life has 
been passed in his native county, and those who 
have known him from boyhood are his stanchest 
friends. 



)ILLIAM M. CAMP, the senior member of 
the firm of Camp & Chatterton, liverymen 
of Macomb, has the honor of being a native 
of McDonough County . He was born in Chalmers 
Township, on the 6th of May, i860, and is the 
third in order of birth in a family of four children 
born to Daniel A. and Elizabeth (Kellough) 
Camp. His father was born in Connecticut, and 
spent his youth upon a farm in that State. At 
an early age, he accompanied his parents to Illi- 
nois, where he lived until August, 1861. He 
then enlisted in the service of his country, as a 
member of the Tenth Missouri Infantry, and died 
of the measles after seven months in the field. 
His parents were natives of the United States, but 
the family is of German extraction. The mother 
of our subject was born in Pennsylvania, and came 
to McDonough County with her parents when 
only two years of age. She is now living in Plym- 
outh, Hancock County, at the age of fifty-six 
-years. Sarah Anna, the youngest child, is now 
deceased. She married William King, and left a 
child, Posy Ethel. Andrew, the eldest, is a farm- 
er of Warren County ; and Louis makes his home 
in Macomb. 

Our subject lost his father when he was quite 
young, and at the early age of thirteen years he 
began to earn his own livelihood by working as a 
farm hand by the month. He was thus employed 
until twenty years of age, when he began farming 
in his own interest. As he had no capital with 
which to purchase property, he rented land for 
eleven years, but at length abandoned agricultural 
pursuits, and removed to Macomb. This was in 
1891. He then embarked in the livery business, 
which he has followed continuously since. In 



1893, ne formed a partnership with O. W. Chat- 
terton, and under the firm name of Camp & Chat- 
terton they are doing a successful and constantly 
increasing business. 

On the 3d of December, 1886, Mr. Camp was 
united in marriage with Mrs. Alice (Askew) Mur- 
ray, and three children have been born of their 
union: Gracie Askew, Mabel and Arthur L. 

In his political views, Mr. Camp is a stanch 
Republican, having supported that party since at- 
taining his majority. Socially, he is connected 
with the Odd Fellows' Society, and with the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. His wife holds mem- 
bership with the Christian Church, and although 
he is not a member, he contributes to the support 
of the same. He is a self-made man, whose pos- 
sessions represent his own earnings. He has 
steadily worked his way upward, and by his in- 
dustry and enterprise is now at the head of one of 
the leading livery establishments of Macomb. 

to — ^ c^l ■< Y "> CEa^ ' §> 

REV. J. G. LIBERT, who has charge of the 
Catholic Church of Macomb, is a native of 
Belgium, his birth having occurred on the 
20th of July, 1849. He was the fourth in order 
of birth in a family of seven children, whose par- 
ents were Charles and Man- (Lemaire) Libert. 
They too were natives of Belgium, and in 1856 
they came to America, settling in Kankakee, 111., ' 
where the father died in the seventy-fourth year 
of his age. His widow still survives him, and 
has now reached the age of eighty years. 

The subject of this sketch was a child of seven 
summers when, with his parents, he crossed the 
broad Atlantic to America. He remained at home 
until about twenty years of age, and became fa- 
miliar with all the duties of farm life, for as soon 
as old enough he began work in the fields. His 
early education was acquired in the common 
schools, and in 1869 he entered St. Viateur's Col-- 
lege in Bourbonnais, 111. There he continued 
his studies until he had completed the course and 
was graduated from that institution. Later, he 
began the study of theology in Grand Seminary , 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



245 



of Montreal, Canada, where lie was ordained as a 
priest of the Catholic Church in 18S5, by Arch- 
bishop Fabre. 

After his ordination. Father Libert was sta- 
tioned at Peoria, where he did pastoral duty for a 
short time. He was next transferred to Ivesdale, 
where he did duty as an assistant for a limited pe- 
riod, and was then placed in charge of the Catho- 
lic Church in Lewiston. There he continued for 
three years and a-half. and in 1S91 he came to 
Macomb and took charge of the congregation in 
this place. This church has been in existence 
for about thirty years, and has a membership of 
one hundred. Father Libert is an earnest and 
faithful worker and has the respect and love of all 
his people. 

a ,g i=3 < t ^> ilj^ §1 

PjAVID H. HAMPTON is the editor and pro- 
lyl prietor of the Macomb By-Stander, and 
](*) throughout his business career has been 
connected with the newspaper interests of this 
city. He was born in Macomb on the 26th of 
June, 1850, and is a son of Benjamin Randolph 
and Angehne E. (Hale) Hampton. His father 
was a native of Ohio, and his mother of Ken- 
tucky, but both are now deceased. The former 
resided in the Buckeye State during the days of 
his boyhood and youth, and when a young man 
he there conducted a sawmill and a woolen- 
mill. The year 1840 witnessed his arrival in 
Illinois. Coming to Macomb, he served as deputy 
in the office of his uncle, William H. Randolph, 
who was then serving as Circuit Clerk. He also 
took up the study of law, and afterwards prac- 
ticed at the Bar of McDonough County for some 
years. About 1850, he established the first news- 
paper in Macomb, called the Enterprise, and con- 
tinued its publication for a number of years. In 
1859, he removed to a farm in Macomb Township, 
which is known as the Ruukle Farm, and which is 
celebrated for the clay used in making the fine 
pottery ware manufactured in this locality. There 
Mr. Hampton resided until 1865, when he sold 
out and removed to Abingdon, there engaging in 



law practice for three years. On the expiration 
of that period he returned to Macomb and pur- 
chased the Macomb Journal, with which he was 
connected until 1880, when he sold to W. H. 
Bainline, the present proprietor. He then began 
the publication of the By-Standcr, and was its 
editor up to the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1886, at the age of sixty-three years. His wife 
survived him until the autumn of 1893, when she 
too passed away, at the age of sixty-eight. Thev 
were both faithful members of the Christian 
Church, and were numbered among its leading 
workers. Mr. Hampton took quite a prominent 
part in politics, and was a stalwart supporter of 
Republican principles. He served as Supervisor 
of Macomb for several years, served as Representa- 
tive to the State Legislature, and for four years was 
State Senator. Those interests which were calcu- 
lated to benefit and upbuild the community al- 
ways found in him a friend, and Macomb num- 
bered him among its best and most valued citi- 
zens. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Wan 
Culen Hampton, was a native of New Jersey, and 
was one of the pioneer settlers of this city. Here 
he engaged in operating a carding-mill for some 
time. He also owned land northeast of the city, 
011 which he had another carding-mill. He reared 
a large family, was one of the prominent men of 
the county in his day, and reached an advanced 
age. The maternal grandfather of D. H. Hamp- 
ton was Durham Hale. He was a native of 
Kentucky, and always made his home in that 
State, but in an early day he owned large tracts 
of land in Illinois, and made frequent trips 
hither. He also was well advanced in years at 
the time of his death. 

Our subject is the eldest of three children, and 
the only surviving one. His brothers, William 
R. and Durham Y., being now deceased. There 
were also three children who died in infancy. His 
boyhood days were spent in Macomb and upon 
his father's farm. He began his education in 
the district schools, afterwards pursued his studies 
in Abingdon, later attended the public schools of 
Macomb, and subsequently was a student in the 
Macomb Noimal College. In 1S68, he began 



246 



■PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



learning the printer's trade, which he has fol- 
lowed continuously since. In 1871 and 1872 he 
published a paper in Marshall, Mo., called the 
Saline Republican. In the latter year he shipped 
his outfit to Macomb, and sold the material, 
which was taken to another town. Mr. Hamp- 
ton then entered the Journal office and continued 
to work with his father on that paper and the 
By-Stander. Two years after the establishment 
of the latter, he was taken into partnership with 
his father, and this business relation was main- 
tained until the death of Mr. Hampton, Sr. , since 
which time the son has conducted it on his own 
account. It is a weekly journal of eight pages, 
and is a favorite with many of the residents of 
McDonough County, and those who are interested 
in this locality. It now has a large circulation, 
which has steadily increased. 

On the 1st of January, 1874, Mr. Hampton 
was united in marriage with Miss Mary, daugh- 
ter of Henry and Elizabeth (Throop) Bowles. 
Their union was blessed with five children, three 
sons and two daughters, Benjamin B., Lucie E., 
Jesse D., Joseph B. and Mary E. The last two 
were twins and died at the age of eleven months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hampton hold membership with 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. They have 
many friends throughout the community and are 
highly respected by all. Mr. Hampton votes 
with the Republican party, and is now serving as 
a member of the School Board. He belongs to 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and to the In- 
dependent Order of Mutual Aid. He is a pro- 
gressive and public-spirited citizen, in touch with 
the best interests of his native city, and through 
the columns of his paper has done much for its 
promotion. 

0R. JOHN WRIGHT, of Hamilton, is one of 
the honored pioneers of Hancock County, 
who has been prominently identified with 
the growth and upbuilding of the community for 
many long years. He located within its borders 
before the city of Hamilton had an existence, 



when the greater part of the land was wild and 
unimproved, and when the work of civilization 
and progress seemed hardly begun. He has al- 
ways been connected with every enterprise for 
the good of the county, and has taken a just 
pride in its advancement. 

The Doctor was born in Banffshire, in the 
north of Scotland, February 11, 18 19. His fa- 
ther, William Wright, a native of the same lo- 
cality, was born on the 24th of February, 1780, 
acquired his education in the public schools, and 
was a farmer by occupation. In 1802, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Ann Wilson, who 
was born January 4, 1780. They became the 
parents of nine children: Alexander, now de- 
ceased; Ann, deceased, wife of William Donald, a 
resident of Hamilton; Isabel, deceased; James, 
whose death occurred in this city; William, who 
died in England; Jane, widow of John Spence; 
John, whose name heads this record; Robert, who 
has also passed away; and Mary, wife of A. 
Horsper, of Hamilton. 

Dr. Wright spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth in the land of his birth, his time being 
passed midst play and work. In the summer 
months, he was busy in the fields, aiding in the 
cultivation and improvement of his father's farm. 
In the winter season he conned his lessons in the 
public schools of the neighborhood, and thus ac- 
quired a good education. In 1842, he bade adieu 
to his old home and accompanied his parents on 
their emigration to America. They crossed the 
Atlantic to New Orleans, and then started up the 
Mississippi. They resided in St. Louis and Alton 
until the spring of 1843, when they removed to 
Keokuk, but after a few weeks they came to 
Hamilton. It took them a whole day to cross 
the river from Keokuk, there being no ferry at 
that time. 

Dr. Wright aided in laying out this town, and 
is therefore numbered among its founders. He 
has watched with interest its growth, and has 
ever given his hearty support and co-operation to 
what tended toward its further development. Af- 
ter coming to the county, he worked for some 
time upon his father's farm, aiding in transform- 
ing the wild land into rich and fertile fields. He 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



247 



is a magnetic healer, and for some years was 
identified with the Riverside Sanitarium. He 
makes a specialty of the treatment of cancers and 
tumors, and has healed main w ho were suffering 
from diseases of that kind. 

[npolitics, tin- Doctor is a Republican. He cast 
his first Presidential vote for Henry Clay, and 
was a supporter of the Whig party until the or- 
ganization of the Republican party, when he 
joined its ranks. He is a member of the Anti- 
Horse Thief Association, and in his religious be- 
lief is a Congregationalist, holding membership 
with the church at this place. He served as Road 
Commissioner for one term, and has been School 
Trustee for more than forty years. 

e .... ^ <■ A ■> ?= - « 



(IIJJAM H. FRANKLIN, one of the hon- 
ored pioneers of McDonough County, who 
for many years has served as Justice of the 
Peace of Macomb, was born in Mercer County, 
Ky., on the 13th of June, 1813, and is one of 
thirteen children whose parents were James and 
Nancy ( Whitton 1 Franklin, natives of Virginia. 
The maternal grandfather was also born in the 
Old Dominion, and there died in 1800, when about 
seventy years of age. He followed farming in 
Amherst County. James Franklin was also an 
agriculturist. He was born on the 18th of May, 
1776, and died June 12, 1826, at the age of fifty- 
two years. His wife survived him until 1861, 
and passed away at the age of seventy-seven. 
She was first a member of the New-Light Church, 
and afterward joined the Christian Church. Of 
their eight sons and five daughters only three are 
now living, the subject of this sketch being the 
eldest. Elizabeth became the wife of Harmon 
Mclntyre, and is now the widow of Daniel Moore. 
She lives with a daughter in Van Buren, Ark. 
Hamilton G. is a resident of Corsicana, Tex. 

W. H. Franklin came to Macomb, 111., on the 
25th of October, 1839, and for nineteen years en- 
gaged in the practice of law. He then abandoned 
the profession to engage in the nursery business. 
For some time his trade along that line was quite 



extensive, and he made considerable money, but 
he afterward lost several thousand dollars during 
the panic of 1857. Since that time he has con- 
tinuously served as Justice of the Peace, having 
filled the office for forty-four years. During his 
residence in Macomb, the accumulated distance 
which he has walked in going to and from busi- 
ness is over forty thousand miles, or nearly twice 
the circumference of the globe. 

On the 1 st of April, 1841, Mr. Franklin mar- 
ried Miss Maria J. Clarke, daughter of James and 
Mary (Lewis) Clarke, pioneer settlers of Mc- 
Donough County. Here her father served as 
Count}- Judge for a number of years, and was a 
prominent and influential citizen. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Franklin were born ten children, six sons 
and four daughters. Maria is deceased. Will- 
iam J., who wedded Mary S. Gibbs, is a success- 
ful lawyer of Junction City, Kan., and has three 
living children: Maude, Dean and Ray. Nancy 
Jane, Mary Mahala and Samuel B. are all now 
deceased. John H. married Irene Hudgins and re- 
sides in Macomb. He was Second Deputy Audi- 
tor of the Treasury in Washington, D. C. , for four 
years, under President Harrison, and then ac- 
cepted the position of local attorney of the Santa 
Fe Railroad at Toluca, 111. He and his wife have 
six children: Mabel, Blake, Wirt, Delia, Junia 
and Harrison. Ben has also passed away. George 
A. married Miss Annie Pulford, by whom he had 
one child, Maria. After the death of his first wife 
he wedded Mrs. Ida Head, widow of Henry Head. 
Harrison, the youngest of the family, married 
Miss Louisa Munson, and resides in Beeville, 
Tex.: they have a daughter, Pearl. The mother 
of this family, who was born May 7, 182 1, died 
September 5, 1886. She was a devoted member 
of the Christian Church, and possessed many ex- 
cellent traits of character. 

Mr. Franklin has served as Fkler of the Chris- 
tian Church for forty-eight years. He obeyed the 
Gospel in Missouri, and was baptized in Locust 
Creek by Elder Thomas Thompson, July 9, 1843, 
more than half a century ago. He was one of the 
prime movers in organizing the Christian Church 
in Macomb, forty-eight years ago. During all 
this time he has never missed attending church 



248 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



services on Sunday more than six or seven times, 
unless absent from the city. Twice during this 
time he was detained on account of death in the 
family, and twice by sickness. He has always 
been faithful to the cause of Christ, and has ever 
been one of the leading members of the church to 
which he has belonged for nearly half a century. 
In politics, he was first a Whig and then became 
a Republican, but he now votes with the Prohibi- 
tion party. For three years he served as Master 
in Chancery. He came to McDonough County 
when it contained only about twenty-two hundred, 
people, not half as many as are now in the city of 
Macomb. He has seen the many changes which 
have since taken place, has witnessed its develop- 
ment, and has always taken an active interest in 
its growth and upbuilding. 

r^ROF. THOMAS J. DUDMAN, who is now 
LX editor and proprietor of the Macomb Eagle, 
[3 has the honor of being a native of Illinois, 
his birth having occurred on the 19th of Septem- 
ber, 1850, near Chili, Hancock County. He was 
the fourth in order of birth in a family of eight 
children, born to Robert Jackson and Phoebe 
(Mills) Dudman. His father was born March 
13, 1821, in Indiana. During his youth the lat- 
ter learned the cooper's trade in his native State, 
but later became an officer on a steamboat on the 
Ohio River. Thus his time was occupied until 
1849, when he came to Illinois and took up his 
residence in Adams County. After a short time, 
however, he removed to Hancock County and 
purchased a farm, which he continued to culti- 
vate and improve until his death. He passed 
away on the 2Sth of January, 1873. He came of 
a family of English origin, and his parents were 
both natives of England. While residing in Chili 
Township, Hancock County, he served as Super- 
visor. With the Methodist Church he held mem- 
bership. Mr. Dudman was married in 1842 to 
Miss Phcebe Mills, a native of Pennsylvania, born 
March 13, 1818. She was of German lineage, and 
died near West Point, in Hancock County, May 



25, 1861. Two years later, Mr. Dudman was 
again married, his second union being with Miss 
Rachel Ogden, by whom he had a daughter, Mrs. 
Martha Jane Lyberger, a resident of Eagle Grove, 
Iowa. 

The eight children born to Robert J. and Phcebe 
Dudman were as follows: Samuel, who died in 
infancy; Mary Frances, wife of Henry Garner, 
of Bowen, 111.; William H., who also died in in- 
fancy; Thomas J., of this sketch; Anna E., wife 
of James A. Veach, of Bentley, 111.; Lorain R., 
who died in infancy; Rev. William Finley, a 
Methodist Episcopal minister, now living in Bent- 
ley; and Elizabeth M., wife of Conrad Koehler, 
who resides in Hancock County. 

Prof. Dudman spent the days of his boyhood 
and youth upon his father's farm in the county 
of his nativity, and in the summer months he 
aided in the labors of the field, while in the win- 
ter season he attended the district schools of the 
neighborhood. He also spent two years as a 
student in the High School of Bowen, 111. At 
the age of eighteen he left home and began teach- 
ing, which profession he followed in Hancock 
County and in Missouri until he had attained his 
majority. He then entered the High School of 
Carthage, Mo., where he completed the teacher's 
course, after which he resumed teaching, being 
employed in both Missouri and Illinois. 

On the 22d of October, 1874, Prof. Dudman 
was united in marriage with Miss Marietta Lons- 
don, of Augusta, who was born in Adams County, 
111., May 24, 1856. Their union has been blessed 
with seven children, but Leila Annetta died in 
infancy. Those still living are William Ernest, 
who was born September 9, 1877, and is now 
pressman in the Eagle office; Louis Arthur, born 
March 6, 1879; Clarence Albert, April 4, 1881; 
George Otto, December 19, 1882; Robert Lloyd, 
March 10, 1885; and Lillie Ethel, August 30, 
1887. 

The year 1879 witnessed the arrival of Mr. 
Dudman and his family in McDonough County. 
He became Principal of the public schools at Col- 
chester, and after a year was offered and accepted 
a similar position in Industry. He then became 
connected with Prof. M. Kennedy, as one of the 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




Mrs. S. Weinberg 




Simon Weinberg 



LIBRARY 

UNWERSHY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



253 



Principals of the Macomb Normal and Commer- 
cial College. Mr. Dudmaii took charge of the 
mathematics and science departments, continuing 
his connection with the school until 188 1. In the 
fall of that year he was elected Count}- Superin- 
tendent of Schools, on the Democratic ticket, for 
a term of four years, and in 1885 was chosen his 
own successor. He was one of the most efficient 
and capable superintendents that MeDonough 
County has ever had, and under his administra- 
tion the excellence of the schools was greatly ad- 
vanced. In 1890, immediately aftSr the expira- 
tion of his second term, he purchased the plant of 
the Macomb Eagle from Charles H. Whitaker, 
who had conducted the paper for twenty-five years. 
During the four years in which Prof. Dudman has 
had control, the subscription list has increased 
from one thousand to two thousand, and the pa- 
tronage received in the job department has like- 
wise grown. He has one of the best equipped 
newspaper offices in this section of the State, and 
the Eagle is a neat and well-edited sheet. In 
politics, it is strongly Democratic, for its editor 
has always been a stanch supporter of the princi- 
ples of Democracy. He is connected with the 
Masonic fraternity and with the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 



) <" T "> \ 



MI.MON WEINBERG, who for many years 
/\ has been numbered among the prominent 
\~J and enterprising citizens of Hancock County, 
is now living a retired life in Augusta. His bus- 
iness career was an active and successful one, and 
he is now resting in the enjoyment of the fruits 
of his former toil. A native of Germany, he was 
born in Harmon, Hanover, February 15, 1817, 
and comes of an old family of that country. His 
paternal grandfather, .Simon Moses Weinberg, 
reared a family of seven sons, and died in his na- 
tive land. His maternal grandfather, Jacob 
Meyer, was a wealthy citizen and money-loaner 
of Germany, and died in Harmon at an advanced 
age. Moses Simon Weinberg, father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Rehburg, in the same country, 



and served as a soldier under Napoleon in his 
younger years. He afterwards followed the 
butchering business, and his death occurred in 
1840, at the age of fifty-eight years. His wife, 
k w T ho bore the maiden name of Pearlie Jacobs, died 
in 1851, at the age of sixty-nine. They were 
both members of the Presbyterian Church, and 
had a family of two sons and two daughters: 
Fredericka, wife of Jacob Reutz, of New York 
City; Mrs. Regina Herweg, of Hoboken, N. Y. ; 
Jacob, of Cincinnati, Ohio; and Simon, of this 
sketch. 

Simon Weinberg is a self-made man, who, in 
early life, started out to make his own way in the 
world, and has since been dependent upon his own 
resources. At the age of thirteen he began work- 
ing for a traveling merchant for his board and 
clothes, three hundred miles from his home, and 
was thus employed for four and a-half years. 
Later he spent five years and a-half in working 
for a trader and drover. With the view of bet- 
tering his financial condition, he bade adieu to 
the Fatherland in 1841, and boarded a sailing- 
vessel bound for America. They were upon 
the water ninety-two days, and long before 
they reached port the vessel, with its seven 
hundred passengers, was given up as lost. 
They encountered some very severe storms, but 
at length reached harbor in safety at Baltimore. 
Mr. Weinberg has since crossed the ocean six 
times. He first located in Cincinnati, where he 
worked at pork-packing. He was also employed 
at a stone quarry and as a farm hand at Cincin- 
nati for about four years. During that time he 
was sick for nine months. About 1845, he 
rented seventy acres of land, and, keeping bach- 
elor's hall, engaged in farming for himself. Dur- 
ing the first year he cleared $300. 

As a companion and helpmate on life's journey 
Mr. Weinberg chose Miss Louisa Juergens, a 
daughter of Henrich and Mary (Meyers) Juer- 
gens, natives of Germany, where the daughter 
was also born. The marriage was celebrated 
December 30. 1845, and they became the parents 
of nine sons and nine daughters. Of these, Re- 
gina is the wife of John Tarr, of Moravia, Iowa, 
by whom she has eight children, Edward Burt, 



254 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Louis Frederick, Nannie Louise, Simon Wein- 
berg, Frederick Augustus, Joseph Weinberg, 
Robert Lincoln and Mamie Deena. Jacob is now 
deceased. Joseph, of Plymouth, married Cor- 
nelia Holt, and they have four children, Ernest, 
Louise, Joseph and Leo. Elizabeth is the wife of 
Enos Bacon, of Tacoma, Wash., and their chil- 
dren are Frank, Alma, Jennie and Leonard. Fred- 
ericka is the wife of F. M. King, of Augusta, and 
they have four children, Jacob Weinberg (called 
Bergie), Harry Milton, Gertrude Louise and Ed- 
son. Deena married George S. Stark, of La 
Porte, Tex., and has a daughter, Pearl Elizabeth. 
Wilhelmina is the wife of C. M. Allensworth, 
of Augusta, by whom she has four children, 
Arabel Louise, Myrtle, Rollo and Leslie. Moses 
wedded Mrs. Flora Hobble, daughter of Rev. Dr. 
Boulton, and with their four children, Nina, 
Margie, Simon and Flora, they reside in Augusta. 
She had one child by a former marriage, Arthur. 
Mary is the wife of G. W. Worman, of Augusta, 
and the mother of six children, Flora, Ray, Fred- 
erick, Daniel, Russell and Bernice Elizabeth. 
Pearlie wedded F. A. Reich, of Moravia, Iowa, 
and has three children, Henry Claude, Clarence 
Percival and Gladys Pearl. Abraham wedded 
Mary Worman, and with his wife and daughter, 
Catherine, resides in Galesburg. Aaron is living 
in Augusta. La Fayette married Mabel Bab- 
cock, and with their daughter, Helen Louise, 
they make their home in Galesburg. Selina mar- 
ried Irving K. Wright, of Rose, Monroe County, 
N. V. Adolph and Simon complete the family, 
save two who died in childhood. The mother of 
this family passed away in Augusta, November 
21, 1893, at the age of sixty-three years, nine 
months and thirteen days. She was a faithful 
member of the Presbyterian Church, and was 
highly esteemed by all. . 

In 1857, Mr. Weinberg left Cincinnati and 
came to Augusta, where he has since made his 
home. He engaged in the butchering business 
for ten years, after which he dealt in dry goods 
for a similar period. On the expiration of that 
time he gave his business to his son Jacob, who 
died two years later, while he turned his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits, living upon a farrc 



for six years. At one time he owned several 
large larms, but has sold and divided his property 
among his children. In politics, he is a Demo- 
crat; socially, is connected with the Odd Fellows' 
society; and in religious belief is a Presbyterian. 
Although he has reached the age of seventy-six, 
he is still hale and hearty, his years resting light- 
ly upon him. His life has been well and worth- 
ily passed. Industry and enterprise have brought 
to him a handsome competence, and his sterling 
worth and many excellencies of character have 
won him the love of his family and the high es- 
teem of the entire community in which he lives. 
His example is in many respects well worthy of 
emulation, and it is with pleasure that we present 
to our readers this record of his life work. He 
has made his way in the world without any as- 
sistance, his parents being poor and unable to 
educate him, and he has given to each of his 
twelve married children a home. 



^H^l 



AFAYETTE M. WILLIAMS, who is suc- 
I C cessfully engaged in the laundry business in 
l_y Macomb, claims Ohio as the State of his na- 
tivity, his birth having occurred in Muskingum 
County on October 18, 1853. His parents were 
Washington and Jane (Dailey) Williams, the 
former a native of Ohio, and the latter of Virgin- 
ia. By occupation the father was a farmer, and 
followed that business throughout his entire life. 
When our subject was a child of four years, 
Washington Williams left the Buckeye State, and, 
accompanied by his family, emigrated westward 
to Illinois, taking up his residence in McDonough 
County. This was in 1857. Here he gave his 
attention to agriculture, which he successfully 
followed for some years. His death occurred on 
the 2Sth of August, 1891, and his widow is now 
living with her son, L. M. Williams. William 
D. is successfully engaged in farming near Adair, 
111. There were three children in the Williams 
family, but one of the number is now deceased. 
The paternal grandfather of our subject, William 
Williams, was a native of Connecticut, and spent 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



255 



the greater part of his life in Ohio. During the 
Revolutionary War, he aided the colonies in their 
struggle for independence. The family traces its 
ancestry back to Roger Williams, the noted pi- 
oneer and apostle of freedom in Rhode Island. 

No event of special importance occurred during 
the boyhood and youth of our subject, who in the 
usual manner of farmer lads was reared and edu- 
cated. The district schools afforded him a fair 
English education, and work in the fields aided 
in his physical development. After arriving at 
years of maturity, Mr. Williams was united in 
marriage with Miss Dora Adcock, daughter of 
Thomas Adcock. Their union was celebrated on 
the 25th of October, 1876, and was blessed with 
two children: Clarence and Glenn. Mrs. Will- 
iams, who was a member of the Christian Church, 
was called to her final rest on the 28th of March, 
[889. 

After the death of his wife, Mr. Williams en- 
gaged in driving a hack until 1893, when, form- 
ing a partnership with Mr. Suttle, he embarked 
in the laundry business, which he now carries on. 
From the beginning their trade has constantly in- 
creased, and they now enjoy a liberal patronage, 
which is well deserved. Mr. Williams votes with 
the Republican party, with which he has been 
identified since casting his first Presidential ballot 
for Gen. I". S. Grant, in 1S72. He holds mem- 
bership with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias fraternity, and 
to the Modern Woodmen of America. 



LMER ELLSWORTH GREER, part own- 
*y er and manager of the City Flouring Mills of 
_ Macomb, claims McDonough as the county of 
his nativity, his birth having occurred within its 
borders on January 8, 1862. He is a worthy 
representative of an honored pioneer family, which 
was here established at a very early day. His 
father, Alfred W. Greer, a native of Kentucky, 
born in 1834, went to Industry, 111., in 1S56. 
The next year he married Miss Annie E. Kemper, 
a native of this .State, born in Cass County, March 



29, 1835, and for many years they have resided in 
Industry, where he is now engaged in merchan- 
dising. To Mr. and Mrs. Greer were born eight 
children, all of whom are yet living: James, a 
resident farmer of Scotland Township. McDon- 
ough County: Harry, who is engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits in York County, Neb.; Elmer E.; 
John L-, who also resides in York County; Charles, 
who makes his home in Industry; Albert, who is 
living in Peoria, 111. ; Thomas L., who is employed 
in a dry -goods store in Macomb; and William, 
who is also located in Peoria. A. W. Greer is 
the third in a family of seven brothers, all of 
whom are now living. 

Asa Greer, grandfather of our subject, was a 
native of Logan County, Ky., where he dwelt all 
his life, and lived to the age of sixty-five years. 
Nancy Phelps, his wife, was also born in that 
county, and reached the age of seventy-four years. 
The maternal grandfather, J. M. Kemper, was 
born in Yirginia, March 10, 1815, and is still liv- 
ing, making his home in Industry, 111. He mar- 
ried Kitty Ann Cole, a native of the same State, 
in 1832, and she died eight years later. 

We now take up the personal history of Elmer 
E. Greer, who is engaged in the milling business, 
which pursuit he has followed throughout the 
greater part of his life. When a boy of ten years 
he began work along that line in the employ of 
P. Eish & Son. He remained for ten years in 
Industry, and also learned to run the engine of a 
mill. He served as mill engineer both in Quincy 
and in Macomb, and in 1892 he formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. Kirkbride. becoming interested in 
the City Mills of Macomb, of which he is now 
manager. This is a leading industry of the place, 
and they are doing a good business, having worked 
up a fair trade, which is constantly increasing. 
The flour which they turn out is an excellent 
grade, and in consequence they have secured 
many new customers. In his political affiliations, 
our subject is connected with the Democracy, but 
has never sought or desired public office, and is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of America. 
He possesses good business ability, and well de- 
serves prosperity. 

On the 5th of March, 1885, Mr. Greer was 



256 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



married, the lady of his choice being Miss Louisa 
Wilcox, daughter of Thomas R. Wilcox. Two 
children bless their union, both boys: Carl and 
Thomas. 

Thomas R. Wilcox, father of Mrs. E. E. Greer, 
is a native of Kentucky, born in 1S33. He left 
his native State when three years old, coming 
with his parents to McDonough County, 111., 
where he now resides. Phoebe Greenup, his wife, 
was born in the same State and year as himself, 
coming with her family to Schuyler County, 111., 
at the age of two years. They were married in 
1854, and had thirteen children, seven sons and 
six daughters, all of whom are living. Mrs. Greer 
is one of twin sisters, succeeding the fourth. 

Benjamin, father of Thomas R. Wilcox, was 
born in Kentucky in 1792, and died in the same 
State forty-four years later. His wife, Flora Mc- 
Cormick, was born in Kentucky in 1803, and im- 
mediately after the death of her husband came to 
McDonough County, 111., with her two sons and 
five daughters. She died in 1880, in her seventy- 
seventh year. Her marriage to Mr. Wilcox took 
place in 18 19. 

The parents of Phoebe Greenup were John 
Greenup and Elizabeth Harland. The former 
was born in Virginia in 1799, and died in Illinois 
in 1874. The latter was a native of Kentucky, 
and died in 1 844, nine years after they came to 
Illinois. 

e> ^_gg] j<^ J i 1 _,>_ {S_ < , i ® 



jILLIAM HENRY INGRAM, who now re- 
sides in Macomb, is a native of Maryland. 
He was born on the 2d of February, 1848, 
and is a son of Evan Ingram. The latter was 
born in Wales, and during his youth emigrated 
to America, settling in Maryland, on the banks of 
the beautiful Potomac. His father purchased a 
flouring-mill, and Evan learned the milling busi- 
ness, which he followed as a means of livelihood 
for many years. He was united in marriage with 
Mary Miller, and to them were born five children: 
John and Mary Jane, who are now deceased; 
Sarah, who became the wife of G. W. Morris, by 



whom she has one child, and resides in Omaha, 
Neb. ; Ellen, wife of U. S. Camp, of Omaha, Neb., 
by whom she has five children; and Elizabeth, 
wife of C. H. Given, who has one child, and re- 
sides near Republic City, Neb. Mr. Ingram hav- 
ing passed away, his widow was afterward mar- 
ried, and removed with her second husband (James 
Ingram, a brother of her first) to Guernsey Coun- 
ty, Ohio, where they are still living. They have 
two children, Evan and J. Hamilton. 

The subject of this sketch accompanied his 
mother and step-father to the Buckeye State, and 
the family located on a farm, whereon he was 
reared to manhood. The educational privileges 
which he enjoyed were those afforded by the dis- 
trict schools of that time. During his earliest 
years, he lived with his paternal grandfather. 
At the age of seventeen he left his old home in 
Ohio and came to Illinois, with a view to try- 
ing his fortune on the broad prairies of this State. 
He had only thirty-five cents in money and a lit- 
tle bundle of clothes, when, in company with J. 
W. Sheley, he came to McDonough County, and 
for four years and three months he worked for 
Mr. Sheley as a farm hand. He received for his 
services during that time $250 in money, his board, 
and the privilege of attending school during a 
short period in the winter season. His early life 
was not an easy one, but the obstacles which he 
had to surmount developed in him a self-reliance 
and force of character which have proven of in- 
calculable benefit to him in later years. 

On the 9th of February, 1871, Mr. Ingram was 
united in marriage with Mary Elizabeth Allen, 
daughter of Thompson and Rhoda Allen, who are 
residents of Mound Township, McDonough Coun- 
ty. Their union has been blessed with three chil- 
dren, but one of the number died in infancy. 
Those still living are, Allen T., who was born 
February 9, 1878, and Jessie Lee. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ingram began their domestic life 
upon a rented farm, and in 1874 he made his first 
purchase of land, buying an eighty-acre tract of 
his father-in-law. This he at once began to clear 
and improve, and in course of time the wild land 
was transformed into rich and fertile fields. The 
boundaries of his farm he also extended by the 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



257 



purchase of two hundred and fort}- acres ad- 
ditional. He has good buildings upon his farm, 
and in appearance it is neat and thrifty. In the 
spring of 1894, however, Mr. Ingram laid aside 
agricultural pursuits, and is now living a retired 
life, resting in the enjoyment of the fruits of his 
former labor. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Ingram are members of the 
Free Will Baptist Church, in which he is serving 
as Trustee and Deacon. He has also been Treas- 
urer of the yearly meeting and Superintendent of 
the Sunday-school. He takes an active interest 
in church and benevolent work, and has lived an 
honorable and upright life, which has gained for 
him the high regard of all. In politics, he is a 
Republican, has served as School Trustee and 
Road Commissioner, and is the present Super- 
visor of his township. He may well be called a 
self-made man, for his success in life is due to his 
own efforts, and his example is well worthy of 
emulation. 



|J\OAH X. TVNER, the subject of this sketch, 
YJ served in the United States Volunteers dur- 
\LD i"g the late Rebellion, from April 14, the 
day Ft. Sumter was fired upon, until the dis- 
banding of the right wing of the Sixteenth Army 
Corps at Montgomery, Ala., in the latter part of 
1865; and was thence transferred to the Indian 
service, being in the Commissary- of Subsistence 
Department for Iowa and Dakota, continuing 
therein until 1868. During his term of service 
he held all positions, having started as a private 
soldier in the First Iowa, three months' service; 
later he was made Adjutant of the Fourteenth 
Iowa Infantry, and left the volunteer service with 
the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel on the volunteer 
staff, he having been on the staff of Gens. Buford 
and Asboth, but chiefly and for over one year on 
the staff of Gen. A. J. Smith as Assistant Inspec- 
tor-General. Col. Tyner was born in Lexington, 
Ky., July 2, 1839, and is the son of Richard and 
Martha W. Tyner, His paternal grandfather, 
Rev. William Tyner, was a Baptist minister. 



whose earlier pulpit duties were performed in 
South Carolina. The latter part of his life was 
devoted to church work in southeastern Indiana. 
His death occurred at Decatur, Ind., at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-five years. 

The maternal grandfather of our subject, Dr. 
T. \V. Noble, was a native of Virginia, whore- 
moved to Kentucky when twenty-five years old, 
where he practiced medicine, and represented his 
county in the earlier Legislature and Senate of 
that State. He died at Frankfort, Ky., at the 
age of seventy-one years. 

Richard Tyner was a banker, merchant and 
manufacturer at Brookville, Ind., where Col. 
Tyner was reared, and where his father died in 
September, 1872, at the age of seventy-four. Mrs. 
Martha W. Tyner, the mother, died in Iowa while 
with her daughter, in May, 1864. In religious 
belief the family were Methodists, Mrs. Tyner 
having taken an active part in church work. She 
was a sister of James W. Noble, Indiana's second 
United States Senator; Gov. Noah Noble, of 
Indiana, another brother, was a Congressman from 
the same State; while a fourth was a Captain in 
the United States Navy. 

In the Tyner faintly were eleven children, seven 
sons and four daughters. Of the four living chil- 
dren, Hon. James N. Tyner, ex-Postmaster- 
General in Grant's cabinet, resides at Washing- 
ton ; Richard H . , a retired merchant , lives near his 
old home in Indiana; George N. is President of 
the Holyoke (Mass.) Envelope and Paper Com- 
pany; Noah N. is our subject. The latter was 
educated at his old Indiana home, attending one 
term at Miami College, Oxford, Ohio. Thence he 
went to Iowa, from which State he entered the 
sen'ice, participating in all the principal engage- 
ments of the Army of the Tennessee, commenc- 
ing at Ft. Donelson, and ending at Spanish Fort, 
Ala. He also was with Gen. Smith in the 
Red River campaign. Since the close of the war 
Col. Tyner has been engaged in newspaper woik, 
chiefly as correspondent for New York and Chi- 
cago paptrs until 1880, when he went to Fargo, 
N. Dak. While there he was Postmaster for four 
years, and at one time editor of the Dakota daily 
editii m of the St. Paul Pioneer Pnss. While in Da- 



258 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



kota, Col. Tyner was made Adjutant- General of 
that State, occupying the office for two years, dur- 
ing which time he received his commission as 
Brigadier-General of Militia. Subsequently, he 
received an offer, which he accepted and held for 
four years, on the editorial staff of the Daily Ore- 
gonian, Portland, Ore., and thence was assigned 
to the business department, as Assistant Manager 
of that paper. 

On October i, 1877, Col. Tyner was united in 
marriage with Miss Cornelia H. Catlin, daughter 
of John H. and Lydia (Hawley) Catlin, of Augus- 
ta. His wife holds membership in the Presbyterian 
Church. He is a member of the Masonic order, 
Loyal Legion, and the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, the former and latter membership being held 
in Augusta by transfer, since his location here two 
years ago. Army wounds, that have increased 
in severity with age, have forced Col. Tyner 
from active work, and hence he regards Augusta, 
where he has built a comfortable residence, as his 
permanent home. 



GlRTOIS HAMILTON, a pioneer settler of 
I I Carthage, was born in Tolland, Mass., Au- 
I J gust 15, 1795. He removed to Montgomery 
County, N. Y., in 1822, and on the 2 2d of Feb- 
ruary, 1827, married Miss Alva Bentle} - , of that 
county. In 1835, he came with his family, then 
consisting of four children, to Hancock County, 
111. He traversed the entire distance with horse- 
teams, and the journey lasted nearly two months. 
He arrived at Carthage on the 22c! of July, and 
the family on the 14th of August. During the 
first two weeks spent in Carthage, they slept in 
their wagons and prepared their food hard by on 
the prairie. He fed his horses on grass which he 
cut on the open prairie where the court house 
now stands. At the end of two weeks, Mr. Ham- 
ilton leased a dwelling, in which he lived about 
three months. In the following spring he pur- 
chased a small log house, and afterwards added to 
it other rooms, until it was large enough to enter- 
tain travelers, and his dwelling thereafter became 



by common consent the village hotel, which he 
carried on until 1851. He also entered and im- 
proved five or six quarter-sections of land in the 
vicinity of his new home. Close attention to his 
accumulating interests, and prudent management, 
soon made him the wealthiest citizen of the 
county . 

During the eventful period of the Mormon 
War, Mr. Hamilton was necessarily a spectator 
of most of the stirring events of that time. His 
hotel being the general headquarters for the 
traveling public of Carthage, he very frequently 
was compelled to entertain at the same hour 
guests holding the most antagonistic views on the 
Mormon question. When Joseph and Hyrum 
Smith were killed at the Carthage jail, Mr. Ham- 
ilton, as soon as he heard of it, went to the jail 
with a wagon and conveyed the bodies to his 
house, where he constructed rude coffins, in 
which they were placed. On the following morn- 
ing, accompanied by two of his sons and two 
neighbors, he conveyed the bodies in a wagon to 
Nauvoo, and delivered them to their friends. For 
this humane act he was cordially thanked by the 
Mormon people, who also offered substantial to- 
kens of their gratitude, which last, however, he 
declined. During the hostilities that followed be- 
tween the Mormons and anti-Mormons, an artil- 
lery company at Carthage had for some cause dis- 
banded, and a six-pound iron cannon belonging 
to it had, to some extent, become public property. 
Mr. Hamilton, learning that a Mormon squad, 
headed by one Jo Backenstos, a "Jack Mormon" 
leader, was coming to take away the cannon, un- 
limbered the gun and hid it in a cornfield, where 
it remained until the arrival of the State forces, 
to which he gave it up. 

In July, 1 85 1, a great calamity fell on Mr. 
Hamilton in the loss of five members of his fam- 
ily by cholera. One sister and a daughter died 
on the 1 6th, his wife on the 18th, his eldest son, 
Marvin, on the 19th, and his remaining sister on 
the 23d. In 1852, he married Mrs. Susan Smith, 
who survived him some years, and died in Carth- 
age, August 24, 1880. In 1855, Mr. Hamilton 
laid out the town of Hamilton, opposite Keokuk. 
This enterprise did not prove a pecuniary success. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



259 



His reticence during his life relative to the un- 
dertaking necessarily abridges what would 
doubtless have been a valuable and interesting 
portion of the history of the city of Hamilton. 

It was said by some that Mr. Hamilton never 
had but one hobby in his life, and that was the 
celebration of Jul}- 4. It was his habit from child- 
hood to regard the day as one of peculiar signifi- 
cance to Americans, a day to be observed and hon- 
ored in the ceremonies appropriate to its patri- 
otic inspirations. He was a leading and directing 
spirit in every Fourth of July celebration taking 
place in the town or vicinity. The day was to be 
celebrated in Carthage in 1873, and for this Mr. 
Hamilton had spent much time, labor and money. 
The program was mostly gotten up by him, and 
was to consist, in large part, of a military dis- 
play and mock battle by the "Army of the Revo- 
lution," as he delighted to call it. This consisted of 
some three hundred boys, for whom military hats 
and wooden guns had been provided by Mr. 
Hamilton. The military parade took place, the 
mimic battle was fought to the satisfaction of all, 
and the general program for the day was carried 
out as the old veteran had devised. The troops 
were then mustered into line and inarched to his 
residence, after which arms were stacked and the 
little soldiers dismissed. While there assembled 
at his well, he made them a little speech, saying, 
"Boys, you have done nobly to-day; you have 
acted like patriots and gentlemen, and I am proud 
of you. This is the last Fourth of July I will 
ever celebrate, boys, and I want you to remember 
this. Mind your parents, and remember the 
Fourth of July, and you will make good men and 
be an honor to the country." The boys then 
dispersed to their homes. 

Mr. Hamilton soon after sat down on the porch 
of his home to converse with his family and visit- 
ing friends. In a short time he complained of 
feeling sick. He went into the house and lay 
down, while his daughter fanned him. Shortly af- 
ter he said he felt better. His sons, William and 
Elisha, were with him, and he conversed with 
them easily and cheerfully some minutes. Soon 
he ceased talking and lay with his eyes closed, as 
if asleep. It was then discovered that his limbs 



were quite cold, and that he was unconscious. 
Physicians were sent for and restoratives applied, 
but he was beyond the aid of medical skill or the 
kind offices of friends. The old patriot was dead. 
He passed away as peacefully as an infant falls 
asleep in its mother's arms. The precise mo- 
ment of his death is not known, but it could not 
have been far from half- past six p. m., or about 
one hour after he had dismissed the boy soldiers 
at his home. Thus lived and died the patriot 
citizen. Doubtless had he been permitted to se- 
lect the hour of his death he would not have 
wished it different. The celebration he had 
planned and labored for with such zeal had hap- 
pily passed off to his complete satisfaction. He 
had said, ' 'Boys, this is my last Fourth of July.' ' 
He evidently thought it was, and thus feeling, he 
doubtless welcomed the summons to rest. 

Of his four children who survived him, three 
are now living: William Ransom, whose sketch 
appears on another page of this work; Man- B., 
who resides in Ouincy with her brother, Elisha 
B., who is a prominent lawyer of that city. He 
served as a soldier in the War of the Rebellion, 
and was First Lieutenant of Company B, One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Illinois Infantry. John 
D. served as Sergeant- Major in the Sixteenth Illi- 
nois Infantry during the Civil War, and was after- 
wards clerk in the Illinois penitentiary in Chester, 
111., where he died August 13, 1892. 



|ILLIAM ALBERT MAXWELL, common- 
ly known as Bert Maxwell, is but a young 
man, yet he is now editor and proprietor of 
the Bardolph News, and displays excellent busi- 
ness ability, bidding fair to make his life a suc- 
cess. He was born in Bardolph, where he yet 
makes his home, on the 9th of January, 1877, 
and is a son of H. A. and Mary F. ( Kee ) Max- 
well. The family is of Scotch origin, and was 
founded in America in the eighteenth century. 

The father of our subject was born near Cadiz, 
Ohio, in 1845, and there spent the first twelve 
years of his life, attending the district schools of 



260 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the neighborhood. After he had attained a suffi- 
cient age, about 1857, he became a resident of 
Industry, McDonough County. 111., and again 
entered school, pursuing his studies until eighteen 
years of age, when he began teaching. His first 
position was in Eldorado Township, this county. 
He has now successfully followed that profession 
for twenty years, and has won a high and envia- 
ble reputation as an educator. From 1877 to 
1882 he served as County Superintendent of 
Schools of McDonough County, and by his prompt 
and faithful discharge of the duties of the office 
won for himself great commendation. He has also 
held other offices, having been Township Clerk 
for about five terms, while for one term he was 
Supervisor. He is now serving his seventeenth 
year as Justice of the Peace in Macomb Township, 
a position he has filled with credit to himself and 
satisfaction to his constituents, as is indicated by 
his long retention in office. He has served as 
President of the Village Board of Trustees, and 
at this writing, the spring of 1894, is Clerk of the 
Village Board, and Postmaster at Bardolph. So- 
ciallv, he is a member of the Masonic fraternity 
and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and 
in his religious views he is a Methodist. His 
political support is given to the Democracy. 

Prof, and Mrs. Maxwell now reside in Bar- 
dolph, where they have a pleasant home and many 
warm friends, who esteem them highly for their 
sterling worth. Their family numbers twelve 
children, who, in order of birth, are as follows: 
Ella Gertrude, Inez Adell, Thomas, Frederick, 
William Albert, Walter Kee, Harry Victor, Anna 
Mary, Bessie Blanche, Grover C, Nellie Cleo and 
John Robert. All are living at home with their 
parents except Thomas, who is now in Duncombe, 
Iowa, where he has charge of a lumber establish- 
lishment. 

Mr. Maxwell of this sketch has always lived in 
Bardolph. The record of his life is not extensive, 
yet he manifests traits of character that will have 
a bearing on his entire future career, and will un- 
doubtedly make his business life one of success. 
He acquired his education in the public schools 
of Bardolph, and though only seventeen years of 
age is now editing and publishing the Bardolph 



News, a paper which is not only a credit to him- 
self, but also to the town. It is neat in appear- 
ance, is ably conducted, and well deserves a liberal 
patronage. Mr. Maxwell is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a young man 
highlv esteemed for his sterling: worth. 



~M£+£i= 



0ANIEE LOVITT, who for a number of years 
has been a resident of Augusta, is now living 
a retired life. His attention to business 
in former years, combined with industry and well- 
directed efforts, brought him prosperity, and he is 
now resting in the enjoyment of the fruits of his 
former toil. He claims Ohio as the State of his 
nativity, his birth having occurred in Muskingum 
County May 20, 181 2. He is a son of Daniel 
and Mary (James) Lovitt, natives of Maryland. 
On the paternal side he is of Dutch descent, and 
on the maternal side he is of Welsh and Scotch 
lineage. His father was a farmer and a minister 
of the Missionary Baptist Church. He died in 
1 82 1, at the age of fifty-eight years, and his wife 
passed away about twenty years later. She was 
a member of the Christian Church. Of their 
family of twelve children, six sons and six daugh- 
ters, only two are now living: Daniel, and Sarah, 
now the wife of Lawson Carter, of Hancock 
County. 

The gentleman whose name heads this record 
was reared in the Buckeye State, and made Ohio 
his home for fifty-seven years. His father was 
one of its pioneer settlers. On the 7th of January, 
1835, he married Miss Deborah Birch, daughter 
of William Birch, and to them were born seven 
children, three sons and four daughters. Mary 
Elizabeth, the eldest, is the wife of David Waters, 
of northwestern Kansas, by whom she has eight 
children. Eveline is the wife of Joseph Dorsey, 
of Augusta, by whom she had six children, two 
yet living. Reason married Miss Stots, and after 
her death wedded Mary Horn, by whom he had 
seven children. Maria J. is now the wife of John 
Beal, of southeastern Nebraska, and has three 
sons. Minerva, deceased, was the wife of Alex- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



261 



ander Davis, and they had four children, two yet 
living. Andrew, of Nebraska, married Miss 
Ellen Stots, and they became the parents of seven 
children. Daniel Walter married Miss Ida Lyons, 
and died, leaving a wife and two children. 

Mr. Lovitt of this sketch continued his residence 
in Ohio until 1869, when he came to Illinois, lo- 
cating on a farm three and a-half miles northwest 
of Bowen, where he spent eight years. He then 
came to Augusta, and has since made his home 
in this place. In 1885, he was called upon to 
mourn the loss of his wife, who died in the month 
of February, in the faith of the Christian Church. 
On the nth of October, 1888, he was again mar- 
ried, his second union being with Mrs. Mary E. 
Butler, widow of George J. Butler, and a daughter 
of William and Sarah A. (Smith) Pierce, who were 
natives of Baltimore County, Md. Mr. Lovitt 
for some years has lived retired, and his rest is 
well deserved, for his life has been a busy and use- 
fid one. He still owns some property, however, 
including one hundred and sixty acres of fine 
farming land in Chili Township, and his pleasant 
residence in Augusta. In politics, he was in early 
life a Free-Soil Democrat, but since the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party he has been a stanch 
supporter of its principles. He is now well ad- 
vanced in years, having reached the age of eight- 
ty-two, but is yet quite well preserved, and we join 
with his many friends in wishing that he may 
be spared for years to come. He holds member- 
ship with the Christian Church, and his life, 
which has been in harmony with his professions, 
is well worthy of emulation. 



(TOHN M. WILCOX, a lumber-dealer, is rec- 
I ognized as one of the leading business men 
(2/ of Bardolph. He was born on the 19th of 
March, 1826, in Carrollton, Ky., and is a son of 
Benjamin and Flora (McCormick) Wilcox. His 
father was born in Shelbyville, Ky., in 1796, 
was there reared to manhood, and became a brick- 
mason by trade. That business he followed as a 
means of livelihood until his death, which occur- 



red at the age of forty years. He was a well- 
known citizen, and served as Captain of a com- 
pany of militia in his native town. The mater- 
nal grandfather of our subject was born on the 
Emerald Isle, and on emigrating to America lo- 
cated in Lexington, Ky., where he worked at the 
shoemaker's trade. Our subject has one brother 
and four sisters who are yet living, namely: Man- 
Ann, wife of A. O. Webb, a resident of Kansas; 
Sarah E., wife of John Trimble, who makes his 
home in Iowa; Elvira, widow of Daniel Milton 
and a resident of Fairfield, Iowa; and Flora, wife 
of Robert C. Pointer, of McDonough County. 

The first ten years of his life John M. Wilcox 
passed in his native State, and his early education 
was acquired in the public schools of Carrollton. 
His father having died in Kentucky, he accompa- 
nied his mother in 1836 to McDonough Count} 7 , 
111., and the family locating upon a farm he gave 
his time and attention to the cultivation of the 
land until his nineteenth year. He bore all the 
hardships and trials of pioneer life, for the family 
lived in true pioneer style during those early 
days, and he also aided in the arduous task of 
opening up a new farm. Attracted by the dis- 
covery of gold in California, he crossed the plains 
with an ox-team to the Pacific Slope in 1849, and 
spent three years ranching on Cash Creek and in 
the mines at Rich Gulch, returning in 1852. 
With the capital he had thus acquired, he then 
purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land 
in Mound Township and began farming in his 
own interests. 

On the 13th of March, 1855, Mr. Wilcox was 
joined in marriage with Mary C. V. Yocum. Six 
children, four sons and two daughters, were born 
of their union, of whom the three eldest are de- 
ceased. George T. died at Bardolph, February 21, 
1894; he married Nancy H. Darr, and unto them 
were born a son and daughter, Elvira J. and Will- 
iam F. Of the survivors, Mary A. is the wife of 
E. L. Lindsay, of Wilcox, Neb., by whom she has 
had two daughters and a son. but the latter is now 
deceased. Robert C. married Carrie M. Portlock, 
and with their three daughters they reside in 
Bardolph; and John R., of Bardolph, was joined 
in marriage with Nancy E. Portlock, by whom 



262 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he has one daughter. The mother of this family 
was called to her final rest in 1882, at the age of 
forty-eight years, and was laid to rest in the cem- 
etery at Pennington's Point. 

On his return to McDonough County, Mr. 
Wilcox resumed farming, which he successfully 
followed for a number of years. He placed his 
land under a high state of cultivation, and made 
many excellent improvements thereon, until his 
farm became one of the best in the neighborhood, 
its well-tilled fields and neat appearance indicat- 
ing the thrift and enterprise of the owner. About 
1886, however, he laid aside all agricultural cares 
and removing to Bardolph established a lumber- 
yard, which he has since conducted. He is a con- 
servative and practical business man, and by his 
straightforward, honorable dealings he has won 
the confidence of the community and secured a 
liberal patronage. 

In his political views, Mr. Wilcox is a Demo- 
crat, and was for about eighteen years School Di- 
rector in Mound Township. He was also Treas- 
urer of Bardolph for about four years, and dis- 
charged his duties with promptness and fidelity. 
For more than half a century he has resided in 
McDonough County, and the growth and devel- 
opment of the community he has witnessed from 
almost the beginning. He has also ever borne 
his part in the work of public advancement, and 
well deserves mention among the honored pio- 
neers. 



e ^-s^r^iEs — s 1 

G7EBULON A. FOSTER, who is one of the 
I. leading merchants and pioneers of Prairie 
/~) City, has been prominently connected with 
the interests of this place and with its develop- 
ment for a long period. As he is widely and fav- 
orably known in the community, we feel assured 
that the record of his life will prove of interest 
to many of our readers, and gladly give it a place 
in this volume. 

Mr. Foster was born in Fulton County, 111., on 
the 10th of September, 1845, and is the younger 
of two sons, whose parents were Milton and Abi- 
gail ( Mills) Foster. The family is of English 



origin, but at an early day in the history of 
America was founded in this country. Milton 
Foster was a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, 
and resided upon a farm in that locality until his 
father's family removed to southern Indiana. 
There he lived until about 1833, when he came 
with his parents to Illinois, settling in Fulton 
County, where he made his home until 1857. In 
that year he removed to Prairie City, where he en- 
gaged in the lumber and grain business for three 
years. Later he purchased a farm in Prairie City 
Township, adjoining the corporation limits of the 
village, and there engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until 1874, when he again took up his residence 
in the town and made it his home until his death. 
He passed away at the advanced age of seventy- 
seven — a highly-respected citizen, who had the 
warm regard of all who knew him. He held 
membership with the Methodist Church. His 
father served in the War of 181 2. The mother of 
our subject was also born in Hamilton County, 
Ohio, and her last days were spent in this county. 
The brother of our subject, Algernon S. , entered 
the army during the late war, as a member of the 
band of the Fifty-fifth Regiment. While in the 
sen-ice he was taken sick and sent to the hospital 
in St. Louis, Mo., where his death occurred at 
the early age of twenty-three years. 

Under the parental roof Z. A. Foster was 
reared to manhood, and the days of his boyhood 
were quietly passed, unmarked by any event of 
special importance. He continued at home until 
his marriage, which was celebrated in April, 
1872, the lady of his choice being Miss Hettie E. 
White, of Prairie City. Their union was blessed 
with three children, but one of the number died 
in infancy. Abbie Estelle is now the wife of 
Sanford C. Love, who is in the employ of a rail- 
road company and resides in Lincoln, Neb; and 
Mamie is yet at home. 

In 1857, Mr. Foster came to Prairie City and 
embarked in the grocery business. Here he has 
carried on operations as a merchant continuously 
since. For a time he was not alone in business, 
but in 1892 he purchased his partner's interest 
and is now sole proprietor of a general store. He 
carries a full line of dry goods, notions, boots 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



263 



and shoes, groceries, etc., and has a good store 
and is doing a nice business. From the begin- 
ning he has enjoyed a fair trade, and a liberal 
patronage is now accorded him. 

In his political views, Mr. Foster is a stanch 
Republican, and is now serving as Supervisor of 
the township, and has served as Town Clerk and 
as a member of the School Board. His wife holds 
membership with the Baptist Church, and he 
contributes liberally to its support, as well as to 
other worthy interests and enterprises. He has a 
wide acquaintance throughout this community, 
and is recognized as one of its leading and influ- 
ential citizens. 



(TAMES P. GUTHRIE, who is extensively en- 
I gaged in the insurance business, is a repre- 
(2/ sentative of the Bankers' Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and has charge of its interests in fourteen 
counties. He is a well-known citizen of this com- 
munity, where he has resided since the age of 
seven years, and on account of his extensive ac- 
quaintance we feel assured that the record of his 
life will prove of interest to many of our readers, 
and therefore gladly give it a place in this volume. 
Mr. Guthrie was born in Adams County, 111., 
February 26, i860, and is of Scotch-Irish ex- 
traction. His great-grandfather was a native of 
Scotland, and, emigrating to America, became the 
founder of the family in this country. The grand- 
father, John P. Guthrie, was a native of Virginia, 
and from that .State removed to Kentucky, where 
William L. Guthrie, the father of our subject, was 
born. The latter emigrated to Adams County, 
111., with his parents in an early day and was there 
reared and educated. On the 13th of September, 
[855, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Amanda Breckbill, of Adams County, and by 
their union were born eight children, six sons and 
two daughters, namely: Dorman, who died in in- 
fancy; James P., of this sketch; William E., who 
is engaged in the butchering business in Hamil- 
ton; Laura M.. who resides at home; George W., 
who died in infancy; Ida M., wife of James Hurst, 



a farmer; and Charles and Harry L. , both of whom 
died in infancy. 

The subject of this sketch accompanied his par- 
ents on their removal to Hamilton in 1867, and 
was educated in the public schools of this city, 
where he pursued his studies until a youth of six- 
teen. He began earning his own livelihood at the 
age of twelve years, at which time he engaged in 
buying old rags and iron. He continued this 
work for two seasons, and thereby provided for 
his own support. At the age of fourteen, he be- 
gan working on a farm, and was thus employed 
through the summer months, while in the winter 
season he attended school. He continued to work 
as a farm hand for three years, when, at the age 
of seventeen, he began to learn the butcher's trade 
at a salary of $5 per month. He served a three- 
years apprenticeship, and when he had completed 
the same he purchased a half interest in the shop 
of Casley & Guthrie. This partnership was con- 
tinued for two years, when he sold his interest in 
the business and opened a shop of his own, which 
he conducted alone until 1889. 

Since that time Mr. Guthrie has been engaged 
in the life-insurance business. He became con- 
nected with the Hartford Life Insurance Com- 
pany, but after four months became agent for the 
Fidelity, with which he continued six months. 
On the expiration of that period, he entered into 
relations with the Bankers' Life Insurance Com- 
pany, and is now Superintendent of the district, 
comprising fourteen counties. He is well adapted 
for this work, for he is pleasant and entertaining 
in manner and possesses good business ability. 

On the 20th of October, 1886, Mr. Guthrie was 
joined in wedlock with Miss Harriet M. Poling, a 
native of Hancock County, and a daughter of 
Charles and Ann (Lakin) Poling. To them have 
been born two children, both daughters, Hazel 
A. and Ruby L- The parents are well known in 
this community and have a wide circle of warm 
friends and agreeable acquaintances. 

Mr. Guthrie exercises his right of franchise in 
support of the Democratic part}-. He has served 
as Assistant Postmaster of Hamilton, but has 
never been a politician in the sense of continuously 
seeking office; he takes, however, a deep interest 



264 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in political questions, and is alwaj-s well informed 
on the issues of the day. He is also interested in 
civic societies, and holds membership with Monte- 
bello Lodge No. 697, I. O. O. F. He also be- 
longs to Black Hawk Lodge No. 238, A. F. & A. 
M.; to Rapid City Lodge No. 286, K. P., and is a 
member of the Christian Church. Mr. Guthrie 
may truly be called a self-made man, for at the 
age of twelve years he was thrown upon his own 
resources, and since that time has made his own 
way in the world. His success, therefore, may be 
attributed entirely to his own efforts. 

Mr. Guthrie has always used his. influence for 
the advancement of the best interests of the city. 
In 1889, with the assistance and encouragement 
of the late Ed Ruggles, he was instrumental in 
getting the first newspaper, the Hamilton Press, 
established here. It was started by a Mr. Sher- 
man, who, in June, 1890, was succeeded by Mr. 
A. L. McArthur, the present able and efficient 
proprietor. To Mr. Guthrie also belongs the 
credit for getting two merchant-tailoring establish- 
ments located here. To these achievements must 
be added the honor of inciting the monied men of 
the city to establish the Canning Factory, which 
is now running on a paying basis. The boom the 
city enjoyed at that time, and its somewhat rapid 
development and improvement, which have stead- 
ily gone forward since, are in a large measure due 
to his enterprise and public-spiritedness. 



EWIS WHETSEL CAMP, second son of 
I C Daniel A. Camp (see biography of W. M. 
I J Camp), was born in Chalmers Township, 
McDonough County, 111., October 3, 1858. He 
had not yet reached the completion of his fourth 
year when cruel war robbed him of his father. He 
remained with his mother on the home farm un- 
til the spring of 1877, attending the country 
school for a few years while small. When twelve 
years old, he went out to work by the month 
through the summer on a farm, and after that 
spent but one summer at home. He is largely 
self-educated, as he never attended school after he 



was sixteen years of age. At the age of twenty 
years he engaged in farming on his own account, 
on rented laud, making a success of the undertak- 
ing, and continued operations in that manner un- 
til the spring of 1888. 

At the last-named date, he moved to Hubbell, 
Thayer County, Neb., where he conducted a liv- 
ery business one year. Returning to Illinois, he 
located in Macomb, and has since continued to 
reside here. During this time, he has carried on 
a dray line, and now employs six teams. In ev- 
ery undertaking of his life, Mr. Camp has made 
a success by his energy and attention to his own 
business, leaving others to care for theirs without 
his interference. He owns a comfortable home in 
Macomb, and town property beside. 

Mr. Camp is a member of the Uuiversalist 
Church, of the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
and Independent Order of Mutual Aid. He ad- 
heres to the principles of the Republican party, 
without any sign of wavering. December 15, 
1880, he married Miss Carrie Goodwin, a native 
of Macomb, and daughter of Washington and 
Mary (Dolan) Goodwin, of English and Irish de- 
scent. Ray Elwin is the only offspring of this 
marriage, and is now eight years old. 

6 — = s= aTT^rB= s = §1 



ROBERT C. WILCOX, one of the representa- 
tive merchants of Bardolph, who is actively 
engaged in business as a dealer in hardware 
and groceries, has spent his entire life in McDon- 
ough County, being numbered among her native 
sons. He was born September 21, 1862. His 
parents were John M. and Mary Z. V. (Yocum) 
Wilcox. His maternal grandfather served in the 
Black Hawk War and held an officer's commis- 
sion. 

John M. Wilcox is a native of Kentucky, and 
resided in that State until after the death of his 
father, when, with his mother and her family, he 
came to Illinois, and cast in his lot with the early 
settlers of McDonough County. He continued to 
engage in agricultural pursuits until 1849, when 
the srold excitement in California caused him to 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



265 



make a trip to that State. A few years later, 
however, he returned to McDonough County, 
where he has since made his home. Much of his 
life has been spent as a farmer, and he is recog- 
nized as one of the successful and enterprising ag- 
riculturists of the community, but about seven 
years since he removed to Bardolph and em- 
barked in the lumber business, which he still con- 
tinues. The children of the family were: George 
T., recently deceased, who married Hettie Darr, 
and with his wife and two children resided in 
Bardolph: Elvira, who died at the age of twelve 
years: William P., who died in 1884; Mary A., 
wife of E. T. Lindsay, of Nebraska, by whom she 
has three children: and John R., who married 
Nancy E. Portlock. They have one child and 
reside in Bardolph. 

Mr. Wilcox whose name heads this record was 
born on his father's farm in this county, and spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth in the usual 
manner of farmer lads. The summer months 
were passed in work in the fields, and in the win- 
ter season he conned his lessons in the common 
schools, thus acquiring a good English education, 
which fitted him for the practical and responsible 
duties of life. He remained on the old home- 
stead until 1892, when he left the farm and came 
to Bardolph. where for a year and a-half he was 
employed in his father's lumber yard. He then 
determined to engage in business for himself, and 
became proprietor of the hardware and grocery 
store which he now carries on. 

On the 3d of September, 1885, was celebrated 
the marriage of Robert C. Wilcox and Miss Car- 
rie M. Portlock, a most estimable lady. Three 
children grace their union, all daughters: Leah 
M., seven years of age; Maude G., aged five 
years; and Eva M., a baby of three years. The 
parents hold membership with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and take an active interest in 
its work and upbuilding. Their pleasant home 
is the abode of hospitality, and they have many 
friends throughout this community who esteem 
them highly. 

Mr. Wilcox is a member of the Modem Wood- 
men of America, and in politics is a supporter of 
the Democratic party ami its principles. The 



cause of education has ever found in him a warm 
friend, and for two years he served as .School Di- 
rector. He is a man of good business ability, sa- 
gacious, enterprising and persevering, and is 
well entitled to the liberal patronage which he 
now receives. 



^HHM 



(JOHN PAULROARK, M. D., one of the lead- 
I ing physicians and surgeons of Bushnell, 111., 
C2/ was born on the 5th of July, 1864, near Ma- 
comb, McDonough County, and was the eldest 
in a family of ten children, six sons and four 
daughters, whose parents were James and Cath- 
erine (McGiunis) Roark. On both the paternal 
and maternal sides our subject is of Irish descent. 
His father was a native of the Emerald Isle, where 
he resided until 1861, when he crossed the broad 
Atlantic to America. Coming west to Illinois, he 
purchased a farm in Chalmers Township, Mc 
Donough County, where he still resides. He was 
only about nineteen years of age at the time of his 
emigration. Since his arrival here he has suc- 
cessfully engaged in agricultural pursuits, and is 
now ranked among the substantial farmers of the 
neighborhood. In politics, he is a supporter of 
the Democratic party. His wife was born in Mc 
Donough County, but her parents were natives of 
Ireland, and came to this country in 1840. 

The children of the Roark family are: John 
Paul, of this sketch; Patrick D., who is now en- 
gaged in the drug business in Macomb; Mary, 
who is still at home; Michael E., who is engaged 
in teaching school and in reading law in his na- 
tive county; and Susie, Jo, Kate, Nell, Jimmie 
and Louis, who are still under the parental roof. 
The subject of this sketch remained upon the 
home farm and attended the district schools of the 
neighborhood until about seventeen years of age. 
He then supplemented his early educational ad- 
vantages by study in the Macomb Normal College. 
Later, he embarked in teaching, which profession 
he followed for two years, but it was his desire to 
enter the medical profession, and to this end he 
entered Rush Medical College of Chicago, where 



266 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



for three years he pursued his studies, graduating 
from that institution on the expiration of that 
period. He also attended and was graduated 
from the Cook County School of Surgery. 

When his college course was completed, Dr. 
Roark came to Bushnell, in 1889, and, opening an 
office, began the practice of his profession, to 
which he has since devoted his energies. On the 
iSth of October, 1893, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Mary G. Stanton, of White Hall, 111. 
Both are members of the Catholic Church. So- 
cially, the Doctor is a member of Chevalier Lodge 
No. 101, K. 1'., of Bushnell; and also of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. On subjects of 
national importance, he votes with the Democratic 
party, but at local elections supports the candi- 
dates whom he thinks best qualified, regardless 
of party affiliations. He has served as a member 
of the Board of Health since locating in Bushnell. 
Recognized as a skilled physician, he receives 
a liberal patronage, which is well merited. He al- 
ways keeps abreast with the times, and is a thor- 
ough student of even-thing connected with the 
science of medicine, so that this success is the re- 
sult of his earnest efforts. The Doctor has always 
lived in McDonough County, and is both wideb- 
and favorably known. 

g i ' c=j<" T "S-ira m 

~T EI BROWN is one of the honored pioneers of 
>) McDonough County, and in this volume he 
__ well deserves representation . He resides on 
section 25, Bushnell Township, where he is suc- 
cessfully engaged in farming. A native of Penn- 
sylvania, he was born in Crawford County in 
1828, and is a son of Jacob and Elmira (Hicker- 
nell) Brown. His parents were both born in the 
Keystone State, and were of German origin, but 
they died during the early boyhood of our sub- 
ject, and hence he knows little concerning his 
ancestry. In the family were two sons, and he 
was the elder. 

Eli Brown was only four years of age at the 
time of his mother's death, and when a lad of ten 
he was left an orphan. Thus early in life he was 



thrown upon his own resources to make his way 
in the world as best he could. He went to live 
with a farmer, with whom he remained for seven 
years, during which time he attended the com- 
mon schools to a limited extent. His training at 
farm labor, however, was not meagre. Pie early 
began work in the fields, and as soon as old 
enough to handle the plow he began turning the 
furrows, where in course of time would be gar- 
nered plentiful harvests. At the age of seven- 
teen he left Pennsylvania, and, emigrating west- 
ward, took up his residence in Fulton County, 111. , 
only a short distance from where he now lives. 
He began work at the carpenter's trade, which 
he followed continuously until i860, when he 
made his first purchase of land. He had worked 
earnestly and untiringly, and with the capital he 
had thereby acquired he purchased forty acres in 
Bushnell Township, McDonough County. He 
at once began to improve the tract, and has since 
made his home thereon. With characteristic en- 
erg}- he began its cultivation, and the wild land 
was soon transformed into rich and fertile fields. 
He has erected good buildings, and all of these 
improvements stand as monuments to his thrift 
and enterprise. As time passed and his earnest 
labors increased his financial resources, he ex- 
tended the boundaries of his farm, which com- 
prises two hundred acres of land, and in addition 
to this he owns a section (six hundred and forty 
acres) of land in Gosper County, Neb. The place 
is neat and thrift}- in appearance, and the well- 
tilled fields yield to the owner a golden tribute in 
return for the labor he bestows upon them. 

On the 27th of April, 1857, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Brown and Miss Perfenia Buck, 
a native of Pennsylvania, who during her infancy 
was brought to Illinois by her parents, Peter and 
Polly (Gaube) Buck, who are mentioned else- 
where in this work in connection with the sketch 
of Joseph Buck. Two children were born unto 
our subject and his wife, James F. and Charles 
W., who are wide-awake and enterprising young 
men, extensively engaged in the foundry business 
in Bushnell. 

The best interests of the community have ever 
found in Mr. Brown a warm friend. He has 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



267 



done much to advance the cause of education, 
and for fifteen years has faithfully served as 
School Director in his district. Throughout his 
life he has endeavored to follow the Golden Rule, 
and his career has ever been an honorable and 
straightforward one, which has gained him the re- 
spect and confidence of all with whom he has 
been brought in connection. In politics, he has 
ever been a stalwart Democrat, and has the cour- 
age of his convictions. 

CTOM H. B. CAMP, the well-known, genial 
I C and gentlemanly editor of the Bushnell Rec- 
\2) <"'d- published in Bushnell, 111., needs no 
special introduction to the readers of this volume, 
for few men have a wider acquaintance in Mc- 
Donough County and this part of the State than 
he. He was born in the county which is still his 
home, August 16, i860, and is a son of Sterling 
P. and Samantha (Hains) Camp. His father 
came of an old family of East Tennessee which 
strongly supported the Abolition cause, and his 
mother was a native of Pennsylvania. Sterling 
Camp came to McDonough County in the early 
'50s and settled in Walnut Grove Township, 
where he followed farming until his death, in the 
spring of 1870. His widow still survives him. 
Their children were as follows: Tom, of this 
sketch; John R., who was born February 6, 
1862; William, who was born November 2, 1863, 
and is now living in Jacksonville, 111.: Frank, 
born November 4, 1865; and Anna K., born April 
6, 1870. 

The first ancestor of our subject of whom we 
have any certain knowledge was Sterling Camp, 
a country squire and a soldier of the Revolution 
from South Carolina. He was of English origin, 
and his wife was of full Welsh blood. Their son 
John, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was 
an East Tennessee planter, who was the owner of 
a number of slaves. He gave to his sou Sterling 
one of the negroes, a colored preacher. As Ster- 
ling could not free him under the laws of the 
State of Tennessee, he did the next best thing, 



allowing him liberty to go and come as he 
pleased. The old man long outlived his master. 
The sympathies of the Camp family were all on 
the side of the Union, ami Tom Camp, an uncle of 
our subject, served throughout the late war among 
the boys in blue. He is now living in Beebe, 
Ark. His brother, John B., was drafted into the 
Confederate service when but a boy, but on ac- 
count of an injured foot he was unable to go to 
the front. He then managed to evade the pro- 
vost officers until enabled to make his way through 
the lines to the North. After coming to the 
North, he attended school for a time, and then 
went to California. He is now engaged in fruit- 
culture in Pomona. Three sisters of the family 
married and live in the South. 

We now take up the personal history of our 
subject, who in the usual manner of farmer lads 
spent his early boyhood days. Eater he attended 
the High School of Macomb, and subsequently be- 
came a member of the first class which was grad- 
uated from the High School of Bushnell. He 
then engaged in teaching, also worked in a brick- 
yard for a time, and later gave his attention to 
farming. His connection with the printing busi- 
ness began in 1889, when he commenced learning 
the trade in the office of The Gleaner. Two years 
later, in connection with Charles W. Taylor, he 
purchased the Bushnell Record, a paper founded 
in 1868 by Capt. Epperson. On the 1st of Jan- 
uary , 1893, John Camp purchased the interest of 
Mr. Taylor, who became an editorial writer on 
the Chicago Tribune, and the firm of Camp 
Brothers has since continued the publication of 
the Bushnell Record. 

On the 23d of December. 1882, Tom Camp was 
united in marriage with Jessie Fremont Baker, 
daughter of Frank N. Baker, of Hannibal, Mo., 
and a native of Connecticut. Three children have 
been born unto them: Howard Sterling, Frank 
Baker and Mar)- Inez. 

On the 1st of January, 1885, John R. Campled 
to the marriage altar Lura C. Keral, and one 
child graces their union, Lura Zolene. The jun- 
ior member of the firm of Camp Brothers learned 
his trade in the office where he is now a partner. 
He began work therein on the 1st of April, 1878, 



268 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and has served in its various capacities from er- 
rand-boy up to proprietor. The Bushnell Record 
is a bright and newsy sheet, well edited, and the 
liberal patronage which it receives is well de- 
served. The proprietors are both supporters of 
the Republican party, and the paper is published 
in the interests of that organization. 

John Camp has served as Town Collector, and 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America 
and of the Subordinate Lodge and Encampment, 
I. O. O. F. He has been several times Secretary 
and Chief Patriarch in the latter order, and has 
represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge. 

Tom Camp has been elected to several local of- 
fices and takes quite a prominent part in politics, 
but his influence is generally used for the support 
of a friend. When the Republican County Con- 
vention convened in 1892 to nominate a candi- 
date for Representative, several ballots were 
taken without any person receiving a majority. 
No great enthusiasm was shown for any candi- 
date. At length the Colchester delegation gave 
sixteen votes for Mr. Camp, and the Blandinsville 
delegation followed with seven. Other delegations 
which had previously voted tried to recall them, 
and it was moved that Mr. Camp be nominated 
by acclamation. The motion was seconded from 
all parts of the house, and it was soon seen that 
Mr. Camp was the popular candidate, but he had 
helped place Mr. Kaiser, of Bushnell, before the 
convention, and in view of this fact, together 
with other reasons, he declined the honor confer- 
red upon him. The Colchester Independent^ 
speaking of the incident, said: "It was a splen- 
did tribute to a splendid man," and this senti- 
ment was largely echoed throughout the county. 
Our subject has served as Alderman for two 
terms, and is now serving his second term as 
President of the Board of Education. The best 
interests of the community always receive his 
support, and he is enthusiastic in the promotion 
of those enterprises calculated to advance the gen- 
eral welfare. Socially, he is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Masonic fra- 
ternity, and is an honored member of the Knights 
of Pythias. 

Mr. Camp is an ardent follower of Isaac Wal- 



ton and takes great delight in the use of the 
rod and line. Of a social disposition, he is friendly 
and genial in manner, enjoys good humor, and is 
an entertaining conversationalist. His friends 
throughout the county where his entire life has 
been passed are indeed man}'. 

®= ,,r l=D <* H r*^"fa & Hi 

fDQlLLIAM E. LEWIS, editor and publisher 
\ A / °f tne Prairie City Herald, and a representa- 
V V tive citizen of that place, was born in Pied- 
mont, Va. , on the 2d of August, 1852, and is a son 
of Benjamin F. and Jane (Johnson) Lewis. His fa- 
ther was a native of Augusta County, Va., and 
there resided for many years. In early life he em- 
barked in merchandising, and successfully contin- 
ued operations along that line until after the break- 
ing out of the late war, when on account of the hard 
times he lost the most of his property. Reared to 
southern principles and views, he entered the 
Confederate army and served with Stonewall 
Jackson during the entire war. When the struggle 
was ended he came to Illinois, in 1866, locating in 
Lewistown, where his death occurred at the age of 
seventy-four years. His parents were both na- 
tives of America, but were of Scotch-Irish ex- 
traction. The mother of our subject was also of 
Scotch-Irish descent. She too was a native of 
the Old Dominion, and died in Lewistown. 

The subject of this sketch is the younger of two 
children. The first fourteen years of his life were 
spent in his native State, and he then accom- 
panied his parents on their emigration to Illinois, 
where he has since made his home. The public 
schools afforded him his educational privileges, 
and his service in the printing-office has also 
added greatly to his knowledge, making him a 
well-informed man, who is well posted on all the 
interests and issues of the day. Soon after locat- 
ing in Lewistown, he began learning the printer's 
trade, and was employed in an office at that place 
for about four years. He then began to read law, 
and was admitted to the Bar in 1886. 

Mr. Lewis first came to Prairie City in 1876. 
Here he engaged in the publication of a newspa- 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY Of ILL 
URBANA 




Henry C. Twyman 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



271 



per for some time, and also continued his legal 
studies. After his admission to the Bar he be- 
gan practice here, and has since continued the 
prosecution of his profession in connection with 
the publication of his paper, his time being de- 
voted to the two business interests. 

Mr. Lewis took for his wife Miss Ida Steach, 
of Prairie City, and by their union has been born 
a daughter, Hazel. In politics, our subject is a 
supporter of the Democracy, and is a stalwart ad- 
vocate of its principles. His paper is published 
in the interests of that party, and he does all in his 
power to advance the cause. 



!^HHN 



HENRY C. TWVMAN, deceased, was for 
many years numbered among the leading 
business men of Macomb, and no one's his- 
tory is more deserving of a place in this volume 
than is his. He was born in Hodgensville, 
Ky. , on the nth of June, 1832, and spent the 
days of his youth in his native State. He was a 
son of Elijah and Man - (Bell ) Twymau, natives 
of Virginia. At the age of eighteen years, how- 
ever, he started out in life for himself, and came to 
Macomb, where he ever afterwards lived. He 
became a leader in business circles and worked his 
way upward to a position of affluence. He was 
first employed as clerk in the store of Iverson 
Twyman and D. P. Wells. The former was his 
elder brother, who had come to Macomb in 1836. 
This gentleman was also an influential citizen of 
Macomb, and filled various responsible positions. 
He served as County Assessor, and twice held the 
office of County Treasurer. He was also col- 
lector for the North Cross Railroad during the 
time of its construction. He possessed most ex- 
cellent business and executive ability and those 
traits of character which win success. 

Henry Clay Twyman remained in his brother's 
employ for several years, where he became famil- 
iar with business methods, acquiring a knowl- 
edge which he applied to his own dealings when 
he had entered into business for himself. In 1854, 
he became proprietor of a drug store, which he 

13 



carried on for many years. He met with excel- 
lent success in that venture, and enjoyed a con- 
stantly increasing trade, which in course of time 
yielded him an excellent income. He had no 
special advantages in his youth, and he worked 
.his way upward by his own merit. 

On the gth of October, 1856, Mr. Twyman was 
joined in marriage with Miss Martha Chandler, 
daughter of Col. Charles Chandler, who for many 
years was one of the leading spirits in the up- 
building and development of Macomb. Eight 
children were born unto our subject and his wife, 
and five of the number are yet living, namely: 
Belle, who was born November 5, i860, and is 
the wife of Charles Mapes, a resident of Hutchin- 
son, Kan.; Willis F., who was born July 30, 
1865, and is now engaged in the real-estate busi- 
ness in Macomb; Catherine, who was born Octo- 
ber 2, 1870, and is the wife of Ross C. Hall, an 
attorney of Chicago; Mary King, who was born 
February 9, 1873, and is the wife of Dr. C. H. 
McLean, of Spokane, Wash.; and Franklin, who 
was born October 21, 1876, and is now a student 
in the State University at Champaign, 111. Those 
deceased are: Charles E., who died January 28, 
i860, at the age of twenty months; Henry Iver- 
son, who was born September 2, 1863, and died 
at the age of ten months; and Vilasco C. , who 
died February 20, 1889, a short time before his 
twenty-first birthday. 

For many years Mr. Twymau engaged in mer- 
chandising in Macomb, first as a dealer in drugs 
and later in dry goods. He was straightforward 
and honorable in all dealings, was enterprising 
and industrious, and progressive though conserv- 
ative. His success came to him as the result of 
well-directed efforts and careful attention to the 
details of his business. He became largely inter- 
ested in real estate and was the owner of a fine 
farm, besides considerable valuable town property. 
He was also one of the original stockholders in 
the First National Bank of Macomb. He died 
October 18, 1891, in the faith of the Christian 
Church, of which he had long been a member. 

Mrs. Twyman also holds membership with the 
Christian Church, and takes a deep interest in 
church and charitable work. .She still resides in 



272 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Macomb, in the comfortable home left her by her 
husband, and enjoys the confidence and esteem of 
a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Al- 
most her entire life has here been passed, for she 
belongs to one of the honored pioneer families of 
the county. 

£ "■ d<T ">E5~ a) 

QQlLLIAM G. RICH, who is engaged in 
\A/ £ enera l farming on section 28, Mound 
YV Township, McDouough County, is a na- 
tive of Germany, his birth having occurred in Wur- 
temberg on the 17th of June, i860. His par- 
ents, Frederick and Catherine (Muelberger) Rich, 
were also natives of that country. The father 
was bora about 1834, and was reared as a Ger- 
man farmer. Throughout his life he has carried 
on agricultural pursuits, and has met with good 
success iii his work. Crossing the Atlantic to 
America in 1866, he landed on the shores of the 
New World, and at once made his way to Knox 
County, 111. Some time afterwards he removed 
to Mercer County, and bought one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, to which he has since added a 
tract of eighty acres. He now has a good farm, 
which is under a high state of cultivation. He is 
a member of the Odd Fellows' society, and since 
coming to Illinois has held several township of- 
fices. 

In the Rich family are eight children, three 
sons and five daughters, of whom William G. of 
this sketch is the eldest. The others are Anna, 
Frederick, Katie, Paul, Mary, Rosa and Carrie. 
The family circle yet remains unbroken by the 
hand of death, and the children younger than our 
subject are still living with their parents in Mer- 
cer County. 

William G. Rich was only six years old when 
he left the Fatherland and accompanied the fam- 
ily to the United States. He attended the dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood until thirteen 
years of age, and then went to Galesburg, 111., 
where he entered a private German school, and 
pursued a German and English course of study 
for two years. The succeeding three years of his 



life were passed in learning the business of a florist 
and landscape gardener under the direction of 
E. H. Miller, of Galesburg. In 1877, he went 
to Elmwood, where, in the employ of Mr. McCoe, 
he learned the business of finishing furniture. 
One year was spent in that place, after which he 
came to McDonough Count}-, where he has since 
engaged in farming. 

On the 21st of February, 1884, Mr. Rich led to 
the marriage altar Miss Ida M. Scott, and by 
their union have been born five children, all of 
whom are still at home, namely: Bernice Estella, 
CardL., Lloyd S., Harrison R. and Jennie Grace. 
The parents of Mrs. Rich were Harrison R. and 
Annie M. Scott. They were numbered among 
the early settlers of McDonough County, and 
here resided for many years. The father was 
called to his final rest September 4, 1889, but the 
mother is now living in New Philadelphia, 111. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rich reside upon a good farm of 
eighty acres, forty acres of which Mrs. Rich in- 
herited from her father, while the remainder was 
purchased by our subject in 1883. He has placed 
the entire amount under a high state of cultiva- 
tion, and it yields to him a golden tribute in return 
for the care and labor he bestows upon it. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Rich are members of the Free- Will 
Baptist Church, in which they take an active in- 
terest, and he also holds membership with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. He exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the Republi- 
can party, with which he has affiliated since at- 
taining his majority. 



S^HM 



^"HOMAS T. HULEN, the genial and pleas- 
I C ant proprietor of the Commercial Hotel, of 
Vy Augusta, was born in Randolph County, 
N. C, October 30, 1837. His grandfather, Will- 
iam Hulen, was a farmer of that State, and reached 
an advanced age. He reared a family of three 
sons one of whom, George P., became the father 
of our subject. He was also born in North Caro- 
lina, and followed agricultural pursuits. After 
arriving at years of maturity, he married Jane 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



273 



Hardister, a native of the same State, and a daugh- 
ter of Elisha Hardister, who was born in Mary- 
land. The last-named served in the War of 18 12. 
By occupation he was a hatter and fanner, and 
owned a number of slaves. 

In 1S45, George P. Hulen left the South and 
made his way to Illinois. He located in Elm 
Grove, where he purchased eighty acres of land, 
to which he afterward added a tract of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. This farm he greatly im- 
proved, continuing its cultivation until his death 
in 1862, at the age of fifty-six years. His wife 
survived him about twenty years, and died at the 
advanced age of eighty-four. They were both 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and 
were highly respected citizens. Their family 
numbered three children, a son and two daugh- 
ters, I nit the former is the only one now living. 

T. T. Hulen was a boy of eight years when, 
with his parents, he removed to Adams County, 
111., where he was reared to manhood. The dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood afforded him his 
educational privileges. After he had attained 
mature years his father gave him a start in life, 
and he began farming in his own interest. He 
was married on the 3d of March, 1859. to Miss 
Mary E., daughter of Jesse and Martha (Shoe- 
maker) Burke, of Schuyler County, and they be- 
came the parents of two children. The elder, 
Cora M., married Rev. J. F. Homey, a Method- 
ist minister of the Illinois Conference, and died, 
leaving a daughter, Mary E. George B. mar- 
ried Miss Ida Jones, and resides in Augusta. The 
mother died November 7, 1885. She was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and her 
loss was deeply mourned, as she had many friends 
throughout the community. 

On the 22d of July. 1888, Mr. Hulen married 
Mrs. Hester A. Skelley, widow of James Skelley. 
She was born in Randolph Count)-, Ind., July 14, 
1842, and is a daughter of William B. and Mary 
(Rash) Doty, the former a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and the latter of Maryland. Her father, 
however, was reared in Ohio until the age of 
eighteen years, when he became a resident of 
Randolph County, Ind. Although too'old to go 
to the war himself, he raised two companies, 



drilled them for service, and placed the first com- 
pany in charge of Capt. William Burroughs. 
The second company was commanded by Capt. 
William Macy. When it went South, Mr. Doty 
was also determined to enter the service, and went 
to Nashville, but was not accepted on account of 
his age. He was numbered among the honored 
pioneers of Randolph County, and after locating 
there walked forty miles in order to enter his land, 
camping one night with the Indians, who were 
very numerous in that locality. His wife was 
fifteen days his senior, and they were but eighteen 
years of age at the time of their marriage. His 
death occurred June 20, 1873, at the age of fifty- 
eight years, and Mrs. Doty is still living, at the 
age of seventy-nine. They were both members 
of the Christian Church. 

In the Doty family were five sons and eight 
'daughters, nine of whom are yet living: LeviM., 
of Dallas County, Iowa; Hester Ann, wife of T. 
T. Hulen; Sarah Ellen, wife of Allen Yost, of 
Randolph County, Ind.; Mary E., wife of Laban 
Tunes, of Kokomo, Ind.; Delilah, wife of J. F. 
Fulton, of Muncie, Ind.; Emma, wife of James 
R. Davidson, of Frankfort, Ind.; Melvina, wife 
of David Rowe, of Kokomo; John M., of Marion. 
Ind.; and Benjamin F., of Decatur, 111. 

The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Hulen, Frazy 
Doty, was a native of Pennsylvania, and served 
in the War of 181 2, the Mexican War and the 
Indian War, He also lived to see the War of the 
Rebellion. He was a farmer, and for forty-eight 
years was a minister of the United Brethren 
Church. At the age of eighty-nine years he was 
murdered for his money, having drawn a pension 
of $800 the day previous. His wife reached the 
advanced age of ninety-two years, and died of 
paralysis, July 20, 1892. The maternal grand- 
father of Mrs. Hulen, Henry Rash, was a native 
of Ireland, and at the age often years he came to 
America, having hidden in the hull of a vessel, 
where he remained for three days without food. 
He grew to manhood in New Jersey, and there 
married a lady who was born and reared in Maine. 
His death occurred at the age of sixty-five, and 
his wife passed away at the age of forty-eight. 
They were buried near Indianapolis, Ind. Mrs. 



274 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Hulen's first husband, James A. Skelley, served 
for three years and three months as a Union sol- 
dier during the late war. 

Our subject and his wife are both members of 
the Methodist Church, and he belongs to the Ma- 
sonic fraternity and the Home Forum. In poli- 
tics, he is a Republican, and served as Postmaster 
of Elm Grove, 111. , for twenty years. He also has 
held a number of township offices, and discharged 
their duties 'with promptness and fidelity. For 
many years he followed farming, and now owns 
two hundred and seventy acres of valuable land 
in Adams County, which yield to him a good in- 
come. In July, 1893, he came to Augusta, and 
has since been proprietor of the Commercial Hotel. 
His house is well conducted, and has found favor 
with the traveling public, whicli gives him a lib- 
eral and well-deserved patronage. 



gENJAMIN GOULD, who is now living re- 
tired, is the oldest resident of Augusta. He 
was born in Pomfret, Windham County, 
Conn., June 2, 1808, and is a son of John and Olive 
(Keach) Gould, the former a native of Massa- 
chusetts, and the latter of Rhode Island. The 
father was a cooper by trade, and followed that 
business through the winter seasons, while in the 
summer he worked at farming. He died in Pom- 
fret, Conn., in 1863, at the age of ninety years, 
and his wife died six days previously at the age 
of eighty-nine. They were members of the Pres- 
byterian Church, and their family numbered 
thirteen children, only two of whom are living, 
Benjamin and William. The latter resides in Ox- 
ford, Chenango County, N. Y., at the age of 
seventy -seven. Their sister Nancy, wife of John 
Griggs, died in 1890, when ninety -seven years of 
age. The Gould family in America sprang from 
three brothers, natives of England, who, in early 
Colonial days, crossed the Atlantic to Massa- 
chusetts. 

Benjamin Gould was reared in Connecticut, 
and in 1832 he emigrated to Illinois, by way of 
the canals and the lakes, and by stage and horse- 



back. He made a settlement in what is now 
Augusta Township, Hancock County, and on 
Christmas Day of 1833 he married Miss Rebecca 
Jones, daughter of Cassandra Jones. Six days 
later the young couple removed to Northeast 
Township, Adams County, and lived upon a farm 
there for forty-seven years. Mr. Gould first pre- 
empted one hundred and sixty-seven acres of 
Government land, and afterwards bought and 
sold several tracts. In his seventy-fourth year 
he abandoned farming, and for the past twelve 
years has been living in Augusta. 

Ten children were born to our subject and his 
wife, four sons and six daughters. Olive C, the 
eldest, is the wife of Frank McGinnis, of Cam- 
eron, Mo.; Eliza A. is now deceased; John Henry 
makes his home in Obelisk, Kan. ; Elizabeth has 
passed away; Ellen is the wife of William Bacon, 
of Huntsville, 111.; Benjamin is now deceased; 
Benjamin Leslie is living in Kansas City, Mo. ; 
Cynthia has departed this life; Hattie is the wife 
of William Edwards; and one child died in in- 
fancy. The mother of this family, who was a 
member of the Christian Church, died in 1873. 
Mr. Gould afterwards married Mrs. Hester 
Campbell, widow of George Campbell, and a 
daughter of Philip Harney, of North Carolina. 
Her death occurred in 1884. She too was a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church. In April, 1884, Mr. 
Gould wedded Mrs. Abigail Bacon, widow of 
Abner E. Bacon, and a daughter of Joseph and 
Rhoda (Hamilton) Bowker, natives of Vermont. 
By her first husband Mrs. Gould had three 
daughters and two sons: Ann Virginia, wife of 
William Mead; Enos, of Tacoma, Wash.; Nettie 
Almira, deceased, wife of Leander Browning; Eu- 
gene, deceased; and Carrie R., wife of William 
Swartz, of Augusta Township. 

Our subject and his wife are faithful and con- 
sistent members of the Christian Church, in 
which he served as Elder for man}- years. In 
politics, he was first a Whig, and has been a Re- 
publican since the organization of the party. In 
Adams County he served as School Treasurer for 
thirty-seven consecutive years, was Justice of the 
Peace seventeen years, and during that time no 
appeal was ever taken from his docket. He has 



POkTRAlT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



275 



been Supervisor, Assessor and Collector. An 
honored pioneer of Hancock County, he is fam- 
iliar with its history from the days of its early 
infancy. He built the first cabin in Augusta, 
and was the first white man married in the town- 
ship. He is now nearly eighty-six years of age, 
and is still remarkably active for one of his years. 
He is quietly spending his declining days in Au- 
gusta, where he is surrounded by a host of warm 
friends. 



=-^HHM 



gEORGE HAVEN EASTMAN, who carries 
on general farming on section 15, Augusta 
Township, Hancock County, was born in 
Meridian, N. H., March 3, 1863, and is a son of 
Prosper Lee and Eleanor (Haven) Eastman, who 
were also natives of the old Granite State. They 
had only two children, George and Frank Henien- 
way. The father for about thirty years has en- 
gaged in dealing in live stock, and now makes his 
home in Albany, N. Y. In early life he followed 
fanning. On leaving New Hampshire, he re- 
moved to New York City, and later spent a few 
years in Wisconsin. He has purchased stock all 
through Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin and other 
Western States, and for many years was in part- 
nership with his brother, Timothy C. Eastman, 
who died in September, 1893. Many years ago 
be came to Illinois, and purchased seven hundred 
acres i if land, which he gave to his sons. After- 
wards he bought an adjoining tract of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, and built a fine residence 
upon his farm. His wife, who was the daughter 
of a Universalist preacher, died May 5, 1874. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Joseph 
Eastman, was also a native of New Hampshire, 
and was a carpenter by trade. He reared a fam- 
ily of three sons, Timothy, Stephen and Prosper, 
and died in middle life. The maternal grandfa- 
ther, Moses Haven, was also born in the Granite 
State, and devoted the greater part of his life to 
the work of the Gospel. 

George Eastman whose name heads this rec- 
ord spent the first three years of his life in the 



State of his nativity, and then accompanied his 
parents on their removal to the Empire State. 
The greater part of his youth was spent in Al- 
bany, N. Y., where he attended the public 
schools. Later he entered Williams College, of 
Williamstowu, Mass., and was graduated from 
that institution in 1886. Soon after he started 
for the West, and on the 9th of July of that year 
arrived in Augusta, where he worked under his 
father's instructions until 188S, when the latter 
presented him and his brother with their beauti- 
ful homes. 

On the 21st of October, 1889, Mr. Eastman led 
to the marriage altar Miss Jennie Estelle, daugh- 
ter of Nixon and Keziah Lamar (Robbins) Bal- 
four, who were natives of North Carolina. The 
young couple hold membership with the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, take an active part in its 
work and upbuilding, and contribute liberally to 
its support. Mr. Eastman is now serving as one 
of the Church Trustees. Socially, he is a Knight 
Templar Mason, and holds membership with 
J. L. Anderson Lodge No. 318, A. F. & A. M.; 
Augusta Chapter No. 72, R. A. M., of which he 
was High Priest; and Almoner Commandery No. 
32, K. T., of which he is now Past Commander. 
In politics, he is a stalwart supporter of the Re- 
publican party and its principles, but has never 
sought or desired political preferment. The 
cause of education has ever found in him a warm 
friend, and he is now the capable and efficient 
President of the School Board. The best in- 
terests of the community ever find in him a warm 
friend, and his hearty support and co-operation 
are always given to those enterprises which he 
believes will prove of public benefit. 



0RRIN W. CHATTERTON, whoisengaged 
in the livery business in Macomb, asamem 
berofthe firm of Camp & Chatterton, was 
born on the 16th of April, 1864, in Emmet Town- 
ship, McDonough County. His parents were 
Orrin and Permelia J. (Crabb) Chatterton. The 
father was a native of the Empire State, and re- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



276 

maiued upon a farm in New York until his emi- 
gration to the West. Locating in Illinois, he 
purchased a farm in Emmet Township, Mc- 
Donough County, and there engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits until his death, which occurred at 
the age of fifty-six years. He was one of the pio- 
neer settlers of the county, and witnessed much of 
its growth and development. His parents were 
also natives of New York, and the family was 
probably founded in America during Colonial 
days. The father served in the War of 1812. 
Mrs. Chatterton, mother of our subject, was a na- 
tive of Virginia, and came to McDonough County 
with her parents during the days of early maiden- 
hood. She is now living on the old homestead in 
Macomb Township, at the age of sixty-six years. 
In the family were the following children: Lucy, 
now the wife of Joseph McGinnis, of Kenosha 
County, Kan.; Charles, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in McDonough County; Josie, wife of Riley 
Sutton, of this county ; Samuel, also an agricul- 
turist of this county ; and Orrin W. , of this sketch. 

Our subject spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth upon the old homestead farm, remaining 
with his parents until he had attained his major- 
ity. He acquired his education in the common 
schools of the neighborhood, which he attended 
through the winter season, while in the summer 
months he aided in the labors of the farm. He 
inherited from his father some land, and on start- 
ing out in life for himself began the further de- 
velopment and cultivation of this tract, which he 
continued to successfully operate until 1893. He 
then sold out and came to Macomb, purchasing a 
half-interest in the livery barn with which he is 
still connected. 

On the 15th of February, 1883, Mr. Chatterton 
led to the marriage altar Miss Lydia M. Walker, 
of McDonough County, and their union has been 
blessed with three children: Walter W., Lucian 
B. and Willie. The youngest, however, died in 
infancy. Mr. Chatterton is a young man of good 
business and executive ability, and the firm with 
which he is now connected receives from the pub- 
lic a liberal patronage. Their barn is complete 
in all its appointments, and by their earnest en- 
deavors to please their customers, they have se- 



cured the confidence and best wishes of the entire 
community. Socially, Mr. Chatterton is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias fraternity, belong- 
ing to Montrose Lodge No. 104, K. P. He ex- 
ercises his right of franchise in support of the 
Democratic party. 

HENRY M. HARRISON, M. D., occupies a 
foremost place in the medical fraternity of 
the ' ' Military Tract. ' ' He is now located 
in Bushnell, 111., but has an extensive practice, 
which extends throughout central Illinois. A 
native of Alexandria, Licking County, Ohio, he 
was born July 26, 1852, and is a son of Spencer 
and Georgiana (Hall) Harrison, the former a na- 
tive of Bartholomew County, Ky. , and the latter 
of Greenwich, Prince William County, Ya. The 
grandfather of our subject, Gambriel Harrison, 
removed from Virginia to Kentucky, and thence 
to Ohio, where he died when his son Spencer was 
a small boy. He was an own cousin of Gen. 
William Henry Harrison, President of the United 
States. The Harrisons are an honored family. 
The great-grandfather of our subject was Carter 
Harrison, and the name of Carter is frequently 
found among his descendants. 

Spencer Harrison was a carpenter by trade and 
for many years also followed merchandising. In 
1853, he emigrated westward to Cuba, Fulton 
County, 111., and the following year made a per- 
manent location there. To him and his wife 
were born four children, namely: Henry M., of 
this sketch; George, who died in infancy; Frank 
M., who is engaged in the practice of medicine in 
Bryant, 111.; and John R., a practicing physician 
of Glassford, 111. The mother of this family was 
called to her final rest April 4, 1866, her last 
days being spent in Cuba. 

Dr. Harrison of this sketch attended the High 
Schools of Cuba and Canton, and was graduated 
from the latter. He taught school in Ohio one 
winter, when only sixteen years of age, and at the 
age of fourteen he successfully passed an exami- 
nation entitling him to a first-grade teacher's cer- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



277 



tificate. On his return from the Buckeye State 
he engaged in teaching school in Knox County 
until 1871, when he entered the Missouri Medical 
College, of St. Louis, Mo., attending the winter 
and spring course. He embarked in the practice 
of his chosen profession in Marietta, Fulton 
County, where he remained two years, and then 
went to Deland, Piatt County. In the winter of 
1S76-77, he was a student in the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons in Keokuk, Iowa, and was 
graduated therefrom in the spring of the latter 
year. 

In August, 1877, Dr. Harrison came to Bush- 
nell, where he has since continued in general 
practice. In 1883, he took the physician's course 
of study in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons of Chicago, and afterwards attended the 
Chicago Ophthalmic College, making a specialty 
of the diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, 
and graduating in 1S87. In 1883 he spent some 
time in the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary. He 
has since made a specialty of diseases along this 
line. He began fitting himself for this branch in 
1872 by private study under Dr. Charles E. 
Michel, of St. Louis. He also took a private 
course with Prof. John E. Harper, of Chicago, 
and was his assistant in 1885. In 1890, he 
erected the infirmary at Bushnell, of which he is 
the head. It was built at a cost of about $8,000, 
is heated by steam throughout, and the appoint- 
ments are excellent. 

On the 19th of July, 1873, Dr. Harrison wed- 
ded Miss Mary Louretta McCauce, and unto them 
have been born three children, Clara Leona, Flor- 
ence Myrtle and Henry Benjamin. The son was 
named in honor of President Harrison, who 
wrote a letter of congratulation to the parents at 
the time. The young ladies have been most 
highly educated. Both are graduates of the 
High School of Bushnell, and Clara graduated in 
music from the Western Normal College, at Bush- 
nell, 111., having studied vocal music for two 
years tinder Prof. Phelps, and instrumental music 
under Miss Ingersoll, of Chicago, 111. The fam- 
ily is one of prominence in Bushnell, and its mem- 
bers hold an enviable position in social circles. 

Dr. Harrison is a member of the Masonic or- 



der, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He has been repeat- 
edly elected Secretary and Treasurer of the "Mil- 
itary Tract" Medical Association, and has been a 
leader in promoting the interests of that organ- 
ization. He is a member of the Illinois State 
Medical Society, and was a member of the Ninth 
International Medical Congress, which con- 
vened in September, 1887, in Washington, D. C, 
when were present about seven thousand dele- 
gates, the largest medical congress ever held. He 
is a recognized leader in his profession, and in 
practice is enjoying a well-deserved success. 

In politics, Dr. Harrison has always been a 
stalwart Republican, unswerving in his allegiance 
to the party and its principles. For two consec- 
utive terms of two years each he held the office of 
Mayor of Bushnell, and declined a renomination 
in 1893. He received the largest majority ever 
given to a candidate for that office, and on ac- 
count of his advocacy of public improvements he 
won the support of all progressive and public- 
spirited citizens. 



(STEPHEN L. BABBITT, M. D., a retired 
/\ physician residing in Bushnell, claims Con- 
\~J necticut as the State of his nativity. He was 
born in Fairfield County, June 29, 18 14, and 
was the youngest in a family of eleven children, 
whose parents were Abiel and Abigail (Sturges) 
Babbitt. William, the eldest of the family, was a 
prominent attorney and graduate of Yale College. 
When a young man he went to Indiana, and re- 
ceived the nomination for Governor of that State, 
but died of typhus fever before the election. Abi- 
gail, Andrew S., Eliza M., Ambrose and Julia A. 
are all now deceased, while Francis L- is liv- 
ing in Arizona, at the age of eighty-three years. 
Edwin was a General in the United States Army 
and a man of prominence. The Babbitt family 
was founded in America at a very early day, and 
the grandfather of our subject served in the Revo- 
lution. The Doctor's father was a native of Con- 
necticut, and was a farmer by occupation. His 



278 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



death occurred in the Nutmeg State, when about 
seventy-six years of age. His wife was also a na- 
tive of Connecticut, as were her parents. Her 
death occurred at the home of her daughter in 
Galesburg, 111., at the ripe old age of ninety-five 
years. 

Dr. Babbitt spent his early boyhood days upon 
the home farm and in attendance at the district 
schools of the neighborhood. Wishing to acquire 
a better education than he could there obtain, he 
entered Yale College at the age of seventeen and 
later was graduated from Columbia College, of 
New York. During the succeeding three years 
of his life he traveled quite extensively through 
the West, and was engaged in loaning money for 
his father and others. 

The Doctor entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession in Centreville, Mich., where he spent 
about two years, and then removed to Schoolcraft, 
where he continued the prosecution of his profes- 
sion for a period of four years. His next place of 
residence was in Mattawan, Van Buren County, 
Mich. , and later he removed to Pine Grove Mich. , 
where he opened an office and soon built up an 
extensive practice. He there enjoyed a most ex- 
cellent business and for eighteen years was one of 
the acknowledged leaders of the medical profession 
in that locality. On the expiration of that period 
he came to Bushnell, 111., where he practiced for 
three years. He then removed to the southern 
part of the State, but in 1883 returned to Bush- 
nell, where he has since lived a retired life. 

In i860, Dr. Babbitt was united in marriage 
with Miss Myra H. Farr, a native of New York, 
and a daughter of Joseph and Sarah (St. Law- 
rence ) Farr. Her father was a native of Massa- 
chusetts, and for some years engaged in the 
jewelry business. His death occurred when he 
had reached the allotted age of three-score years 
and ten. His wife was a native of Ireland, and 
was distantly connected with the royal family of 
Great Britain. Mrs. Babbitt is the youngest in a 
family of eleven children, and is the only one liv- 
ing. The others were Mary A., Joseph G. , Fran- 
cis E., Melvin S., Amanda E., Harriet H., Ed- 
ward, and three who died in infancy. 

Dr. Babbitt and his wife have traveled life's 



journey together for about thirty-five years, and 
faithfully shared with each other the joys and 
sorrows, adversity and prosperity of life. As the 
days passed, their mutual confidence and love 
have increased, and the} - have won the esteem of 
all with whom they have been brought in con- 
tact. They possess many excellencies of char- 
acter, and have always been benevolent and 
generous with the poor and needy. All worthy 
enterprises have received their support, and the 
best interests of the community always find in 
them a friend. In his political views, Dr. Bab- 
bitt is a Democrat. He has now reached the age 
of eighty years, but is well preserved, and we join 
with his friends in wishing that he may yet be 
spared for some time to come. 



if^'T'^e 



REV. THOMAS AARON CANADY is one 
of the leading ministers of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church in Illinois, and is now 
serving as pastor of the congregation in Augusta. 
He has many friends in this community, and we 
feel assured that the record of his life will prove 
of interest to many of our readers. He was born 
in Clarke Count}', Ohio, Jul}- 30, 1846, and is a 
son of Thomas and Eva (Huffman) Canady, the 
former a native of the Buckeye State, and the lat- 
ter of Virginia. Samuel Canady, the grandfather, 
was born in the East, and was a farmer by occu- 
pation. He served as a soldier in the War of 
1812, and reached an advanced age. His family 
numbered nine sons and two daughters. The 
maternal grandfather, Aaron Huffman, was of 
German parentage, and he, too, served in the 
War of 181 2. In an early day he made his home 
in Virginia, but afterward removed to Ohio, and 
spent his last days in Cedarville, where his death 
occurred in 1865, at an advanced age. 

Thomas Canady, Sr. , also engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits as a means of livelihood. He was 
three times married. His first wife died when 
our subject was only five years of age. He after- 
ward wedded Mrs. Towne, and subsequently was 
united in marriage with Mrs. Joanna Miner. In 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



279 



1866, he emigrated to Missouri, and his death oc- 
curred near Mill Grove, that State, in 1885, at 
the age of sixty-eight years. A member of the 
United Brethren Church, he lived an honorable, 
upright life, and was highly esteemed by all. 
The children of Thomas and Eva Canady were 
six in number, but only three are now living: 
Joshua, of Mercer County, Mo.; Cynthia, wife 
of Philip Nagley, of Clarke County, Ohio; and 
Rev. Thomas A., of this sketch. 

The gentleman whose name heads this notice 
was a lad of twelve years when he came with his 
parents to Illinois. In 1865 he accompanied them 
on their emigration to Missouri. His education 
was acquired in the schools of Ohio, and the Mis- 
souri University, of Columbia, Mo. A year after 
leaving that school he began preaching in the 
Methodist Church, and has since been engaged in 
the work of the ministry. 

During the late war, Mr. Canady was found 
among the defenders of the Union, serving for 
two years and a-half as a member of Company F, 
One Hundred and Thirteenth Illinois Infantry. 
He participated in the battles of Chickasaw Bluffs 
and Arkansas Post, and was captured at the battle 
of Guntown. For nine months he was held a 
prisoner and incarcerated at Andersonville, Savan- 
nah, Milan, Blackshear, Florence, S. C, and 
Salisbury, N. C. He was ever found at his post 
faithfully performing his duty, and was a valiant 
defender of the Stars and Stripes and the cause 
which the Old Flag represented. He is now a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

After his return from the army, Mr. Canady 
took up his residence in Missouri until his re- 
moval to Augusta. He served as pastor of the 
churches in Albany, Savannah, Maryville and 
Brookfield, was presiding Elder of the Kirksville 
District, and was pastor of the Broadway Church 
in Hannibal for two years. In 1892 he served as 
a delegate to the General Conference held in 
Omaha, Neb. The degree of A. M. has been 
conferred upon him. 

On the 26th of March, 1875, Rev. Mr. Canady 
was united in marriage with Miss Margaret D. 
Ljndsey, daughter of John C. \V. and Elizabeth 
(Rhea) Lindsey, of Mercer County, Mo. The 



wedding was celebrated in Princeton, and by 
their union have been born a son and two daugh- 
ters: Laura E., Eva E. and Earl L. Mr. Can- 
ady now devotes his entire attention to pastoral 
work, laboring untiringly in the vineyard of the 
Master, and for the advancement of the cause upon 
earth. He has the high regard of this commu- 
nity, and is well liked by his congregation. 

'VSAAC A. OAKMAN, a retired farmer, now 
I living in Macomb, and Treasurer of the 
X. county, claims Pennsylvania as the State of 
his nativity. He was born in Bedford County 
on the 22d of April, 1827, and is a son of Ebe- 
nezer and Ann (Ansley) Oakman, the former a 
native of Massachusetts, and the latter of Penn- 
sylvania. The Oakman family is of Irish lineage, 
and it is probable that all of the name in America 
sprang from a common stem. Leaving the old 
Bay State, Ebenezer Oakman went to Philadel- 
phia, where he became acquainted with and mar- 
ried Miss Ansle)-, who was his second wife. By 
trade he was a shoemaker, and followed that pur- 
suit during his early life in the East. He re- 
moved from Philadelphia to Harrisburg, Pa. , and 
subsequently traded his shoe store for a large 
tract of land in Bedford County. Locating thereon, 
he began clearing and improving the same, and in 
that valley built two sawmills. His home was 
in the midst of the forest, where were seen few 
evidences of civilization and progress. He there 
died in 1840. By his first wife he had five chil- 
dren, and by the second union were born seven 
children. 

After the death of her husband, Mrs. Oakman, 
mother of our subject, came to Illinois, and six 
of her children ultimately located in Hancock and 
McDonough Counties. The journey was made 
by way of Pittsburgh, where they took a steamer 
for Warsaw. On reaching the Mississippi, they 
boarded a stern-wheel boat, thus saving about 
three hours in starting, but the other boat over- 
took them and the two vessels engaged in a race. 
This was a rather dangerous affair, and our sub- 



28o 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ject thought that the end had come. The only 
thing for the passengers to do was to get their 
guns and command the officers of the boat to stop 
putting on more steam. At length the}- reached 
their destination in safety. Mrs. Oakman con- 
tinued to reside in McDonough County until her 
death, which occurred at the home of her son 
Isaac in i88r. 

During his youth, Mr. Oakman of this sketch 
learned the tanning business in Huntingdon Coun- 
ty, Pa., serving a four-years apprenticeship to 
the trade. He then followed the same pursuit 
for five years in his own interest near Chambers- 
burg, Franklin County, Pa., and it was during 
his residence at that place that he met and mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth M. Campbell. The wedding 
ceremony was performed on the 17th of June, 
1 85 1. They became the parents of eight chil- 
dren, and seven of the number are yet living. 
All reside in McDonough County, and five of 
the number are now married. Frank is engaged 
in farming near Bushnell; Mary Emma is the wife 
of Nicholas Swigert; William is engaged in the 
furniture business in Macomb; George is now edi- 
tor of the Blandinsville Gazette; Maggie Belle is 
at home; and Bert is employed in the Eagle print- 
ing office in this city. 

On his emigration to Illinois, Mr. Oakman first 
took up his residence in Fountain Green, Han- 
cock County, where he arrived on the 12th of 
May, 1853. A year later he removed to Mc- 
Donough County, purchased a farm in Hire 
Township, and turned his attention to agricul- 
tural pursuits, which he followed for many years. 
He was very successful in the work, and was the 
owner of a neat and well-kept farm, whose thrifty 
appearance indicated the careful supervision of 
the owner. Ere leaving his old home, Mr. Oak- 
man was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, 
who died on the 2d of July, 1890. 

In politics, our subject has always been a sup- 
porter of the Democracy, and on that ticket has 
been elected to a number of public offices. He 
served for three terms as Supervisor, and was a 
member of the County Board during the erection 
of the court house. In 1891 he was elected 
County Treasurer, which position he still fills. 



Removing to Macomb, he has here since made 
his home. He at once entered upon the duties of 
hir office, and by his fidelity to the trust reposed 
in him he has won the commendation of all con- 
cerned. His business career has been one of suc- 
cess, and by his well-directed efforts, his industry 
and perseverance, he has acquired a comfortable 
competence, which numbers him among the sub- 
stantial citizens of the community. 

&~ i — ^1 <"?">& ' ? ' ^ 

0AVID CHAMBERS, an attorney-at-law of 
Bushnell, was born in Harrison County, 
Ohio, on the 22d of November, 1846. His 
parents, John and Hannah (Manley) Chambers, 
were both natives of the Buckeye State. The 
paternal grandfather, David Chambers, was born 
in Virginia, but died in Ohio, when his son John 
was a small boy. The maternal grandfather, 
Allen Mauley, was an Ohio farmer, and, emigrat- 
ing to Illinois, he located near New Philadelphia, 
in McDonough County, where he spent his re- 
maining days, passing away at the advanced age 
of eighty-two. The father of our subject carried 
on farming in Ohio until 1852, when he came to 
Illinois, and located in Harris Township, Fulton 
County, where he carried on agricultural pursuits 
until called to his final rest, in April, 1882, at the 
age of sixty-five years. His wife survived him 
until March, 1892, and died at the age of seventy- 
two. They were both members of the United 
Brethren Church. 

Mr. Chambers whose name heads this record 
was a lad of only six summers when his parents 
emigrated to Fulton County. He remained upon 
the old home farm, nine miles southeast of Bush- 
nell, until sixteen years of age, when he responded 
to the country's call for troops and joined the 
boys in blue of Company I, One Hundred and 
Thirty-seventh Illinois Infantry, for one hundred 
days' service. During that time he was captured 
and sent to Castle Morgan Prison, at Cahaba, 
Ala. , the old capital. After the war, he returned 
to Fulton County, where he engaged in teaching 
school until 1 881, when he began reading law 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



281 



with A. E. Barnes, who was the first white male 
child born in Fulton County. Under his direction, 
Mr. Chambers continued his studies until he en- 
tered the State University of Iowa, from which he 
was graduated in 1882. The following year he 
was admitted to the Bar in Illinois, and at once 
opened a law office in Bushnell, where he has 
since been engaged in his profession. 

On the 31st of December, 1873, Mr. Chambers 
was joined in wedlock with Miss Mary Bevans, 
daughter of Milton and Eliza (Williams) Bevans, 
the former a native of Ohio, and the latter of 
Maryland. Two children grace the union of this 
worthy couple, a son and daughter, Milton J. and 
Nellie M., who are still at home. They have a 
pleasant residence in Bushnell, and their home is 
noted for its hospitality. 

In his social relations, Mr. Chambers is con- 
nected with the Masonic fraternity, and with Car- 
ter Van Vleck Post No. 74, G. A. R. In his 
political views, he is a Democrat, and for seven 
years has served as Prosecuting Attorney for the 
city, a position he has filled with credit to himself 
and satisfaction to his constituents, as is indicated 
by his long retention in office. He is a lawyer of 
skill and ability, a man of keen judgment and quick 
discernment, and an able advocate. His earnest 
efforts in the interests of his clients have gained 
for him an enviable reputation and a liberal pat- 
ronage. 



0ILES C. HAWLEY, a retired fanner of Au- 
l_ gusta, is a native of the Buckeye State, and 
\^A comes of an old New England family. His 
paternal grandfather, Gad Hawley, was a native 
of Fannington, Conn., and the house in which 
he lived one hundred and six years ago is still 
standing. By occupation, he was a farmer. His 
family numbered two sons and two daughters, 
one of whom, Chauncey Hawley, became the fa- 
ther of our subject. He removed from Connect- 
icut to Ohio in 1806, when the Buckeye State 
was an almost unbroken wilderness, and, locating 
in Austinburgh, purchased land of the Govern- 



ment. There he spent his remaining days. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church, a very 
devout man, and aided in building the first house 
of worship in northern Ohio. When this church 
was completed, Mrs. Judge Austin went back to 
Connecticut on horseback, alone through the 
wilderness, and brought back Rev. Giles H. 
Cowles, after whom the subject of this sketch was 
named, who, with his family, came all the way 
by private conveyance in 18 13 to Ohio, where he 
reared his family. Alfred Cowles, of the Chicago 
Tribune, and Edwin Cowles, of the Cleveland 
Leader, were members, all of whom are now dead. 
Chauncey Hawley married Sophia Austin, daugh- 
ter of Judge Eliphalet Austin, who was the first 
settler of Austinburgh, Ohio, where he located in 
1798. In 1 89 1, Giles Hawley and wife went back 
to the old place on a visit, and brought home fruit 
from the trees which were planted by his grand- 
father in 1799. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Hawley became the 
parents of eight children, among whom were Mrs. 
John H. Catlin, E. P., Albert D. and Erastus A. 
Hawley, all of whom lived in Augusta, and are 
now deceased. Those living are Ursula, widow 
ofWilliam M. Dexter, of Augusta; Chauncey G., 
of Girard, Kan. , who during the late war was 
Colonel of the First Regiment of Heavy Artillery 
of Ohio, and during the last two years of his serv- 
ice acted as Brigadier-General; and Giles C. of 
this sketch. The father followed farming through- 
out his entire life, and died in Austinburgh, Ohio, 
in 1853, at the age of seventy-three. His wife 
survived him until i860, and died in Augusta, at 
the age of sixty-nine. She was a devoted mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, and took an act- 
ive part in its work. Her father, Eliphalet Austin, 
was one of the leading citizens of northern Ohio, 
and served in the Legislature from 1812 to 18 14. 
His death occurred at the age of seventy-seven. 
He was a farmer and Judge, and had two broth- 
ers who served in the Revolutionary War. His 
family numbered five sons and five daughters. 

Giles Cowles Hawley was born in Austinburgh, 
on the 2d of April, 1830, and there made his home 
until eighteen years of age, when he emigrated 
westward and became a resident of Augusta, 111. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Here he embarked in merchandising in company 
with his brother, E. P. Hawley, who was a lead- 
ing citizen of Augusta from 1847 to 1887, when 
he died. In this business, which was carried on 
under the firm name of Hawley Bros., our subject 
continued until 1856. He then established a liv- 
er) stable, which he conducted until the outbreak 
of the late war. After Ft. Sumter was fired upon, 
business interests no longer proved attractive to 
Mr. Hawley, for his sympathies were all with the 
Union, and he enlisted in its defense as a member 
of Company L, Second Illinois Cavalry, under 
Capt. Delano. He served on detached duty with 
Grant's brigade for several months, traveling 
through Missouri and Kentucky, his company 
acting as Gen. Grant's bodyguard. On account 
of becoming deaf, however, he was forced to leave 
the service after about a year. He, with a num- 
ber of others, was taken prisoner by Jeff Thomp- 
son in Missouri. After being robbed of every- 
thing but what they wore upon their persons, they 
were allowed to go. In 1 862, our subject returned 
to Augusta and embarked in farming, which he 
followed continuously until his retirement from 
active life. 

On the 9th of September, 1858, Mr. Hawley 
wedded Miss Mace Fosdyck, and their union was 
blessed with two children: Sophia and Edwin 
Hurd. The former became the wife of George 
\V. Gardner, of Warsaw, and died a true Chris- 
tian and active member of the church, leaving a 
daughter, Mace, who is living with her grand- 
father. For several years Edwin has been a 
commercial traveler in the employ of a Minneap- 
olis house. Mrs. Hawley, who was a member of 
the Presbyterian Church, was called to the home 
beyond September 26, 1872. On the 18th of 
April, 1878, Mr. Hawley married Miss Harriet, 
daughter of Wadsworth and Harriet (Ingersol) 
Mead. 

Our subject and his wife are both members of 
the Presbyterian Church, and, in politics, he is a 
supporter of the Republican party. He also holds 
membership with the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic. He owns a pleasant home in Augusta, and 
in addition to this until recently owned some 
good land along the river bottoms near Warsaw. 



There are only thirteen citizens in Augusta who 
were living here when Mr. Hawley came to the 
West in 1848. For years after he came to Illinois 
there were from thirty to forty of his name, and 
now he is the only Hawley living in Augusta, 
all but he having passed to the beyond. He has 
witnessed nearly the entire growth and develop- 
ment of the county, has seen its wild lands trans- 
formed into beautiful homes and farms, and where 
once roamed the deer domestic animals are now 
seen. Progress and development have placed 
Hancock County in the lead in the State, and Mr. 
Hawley has ever borne his part in the work of 
public advancement. 

g= • 5 " <=i <■ T > to * d 

0TEREING P. LEMMON, an attorney-at- 
?\ law, who is engaged in practice in Augusta, 
\~) has the honor of being a native of Illinois, 
his birth having occurred in Pima Township, 
Adams County, September 27, 1865. His par- 
ents, William D. and Elizabeth F. (Tout) Pem- 
mon, were also natives of Adams Count}'. They 
had a family of five daughters and a son, but 
only three are now living: Sterling P., our sub- 
ject; Anna, wife of J. W. Cunningham, station 
agent of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Rail- 
road at West Point, 111. ; and Frankie, a young 
lady engaged in teaching in West Point. The 
father was a farmer in early life, but in later 
years he has engaged in grain-dealing, and now 
makes his home in West Point. The greater 
part of his life has been passed in Adams County, 
and he removed to his present home in 1891. 
His wife passed away in 1882, in her thirty-ninth 
year. She was a member of the Christian Church 
and a most estimable lady. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Rud- 
ieu Pemmon, was a native of Tennessee, and em- 
igrated to Illinois about 1823, when Quincy 
was a small village. He followed farming as a 
means of livelihood. He was one of the pioneer 
settlers of Adams County, and there served as 
Collector for a number of terms. His death oc- 
curred at about the age of seventy-five years. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



283 



His family numbered seven children. The ma- 
ternal grandfather, John S. Tout, was born in 
Ohio, and came to this State at an early day, lo- 
cating in Galena, where he served as manager of 
the tannery belonging to the father of Gen. 
Grant. When the General was a boy, Mr. Tout 
three times whipped him for disobedience, and 
when Grant became President, whether in return 
for the favor or not, we cannot say, he tendered 
Mr. Tout the position of Postmaster of Quincy. 
The latter, however, preferred to remain upon 
his farm, where he died of a cancer in January, 
1893, at the age of eighty-three years. 

Sterling P. Lemraon has spent the greater part 
of his life in this section of the State. His school 
privileges were very meagre in early life, but he 
afterward attended Chaddock College, of Quincy, 
from which institution he was graduated in 1884. 
His parents did not wish him to become a lawyer, 
but as he felt that he could succeed in this branch 
of business, he began studying at home in 1882, 
and by faithful and persistent effort he fitted him- 
self for admission to the Bar, which event occur- 
red in 1.SS9. The date September 11 has been 
an important one in bis life. He began the study 
of law on that day, left the farm on that day, was 
married, and was admitted to the Bar on that 
day. 

The year of Mr. Lemmon's marriage was 1887. 
He wedded Miss Alice M. Akins, daughter of 
Dr. J. S. and Josephine (McFarland) Akins, of 
Loraine, 111. Two children grace their union, a 
son and a daughter, Chester A. and Edna Marie. 

Mr. Lemmon is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
and the Modern Woodmen of America, and in 
politics he is a supporter of the Democracy. In 
January, 1893, he embarked in the practice of his 
profession in Augusta. Prior to that time he 
was a member of the firm of Shannon, Lemmon 
& Duval, of Quincy. During that time he was 
one of the defenders of E. J. Sullivan, who was 
accused of the murder of his sweetheart in Quincy 
in 1890. The young man was acquitted after a 
hotly-contested trial. He was also connected 
with the celebrated case of Sloniger versus Sloni- 
ger, on which eleven lawyers were employed. 



His firm won the case, setting aside the will, and 
cutting off an alleged heir from any rights in the 
estate. Mr. Lemmon now has a good practice, 
receiving patronage from Schuyler, McDonough, 
Adams and Hancock Counties. His office was 
destroyed by fire in May, 1893, but he is now 
nicely located, and a short time since he added 
one hundred and forty-eight new volumes to his 
library. He is yet a young man, but has steadily 
risen in his profession, and now occupies a prom- 
inent place at the Hancock County Bar. 



(TOHX YOUNG. Among those who have 
I crossed the Atlantic, founded homes in Amer- 
\Zs ica, and won the success attendant upon ear- 
nest effort, may be mentioned the gentleman whose 
name heads this record. He was born in Koenigs- 
bach, in the grand duchy of Baden, Germany, 
October 15, 18 10, and passed the first twenty 
years of his life amid familiar home scenes in his 
native laud. Attending the common schools, he 
obtained a fair education. Having lost his father 
when but a small lad, he was obliged to go out to 
service among strangers as a shepherd. America 
possessed for him great attractions, and he gath- 
ered all the information possible relative to the 
country, climate and advantages. Of money, he 
possessed but little. His capital stock, as he says, 
"was a good pair of arms, a good body and a 
good will," and with these as a foundation on 
which to build a fortune he left the Fatherland, 
and on the 20th of June, 1830, landed in New 
York City. 

The first work which Mr. Young did was as a 
mower on a farm on Long Island. He had been a 
proficient hand at the scythe in the Old Country, 
but here he found the blade longer, and says he 
spent the first half-day learning to "swing the 
thing." He noticed the exchange of glances be- 
tween the others in the field, and, although ignor- 
ant of their language, believed they were laugh- 
ing at his awkwardness. This determined him to 
show them that he could do the work, and in the 
afternoon he accomplished more than any of the 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



others. This little incident is characteristic of 
Mr. Young's whole course through life. He 
overcomes all obstacles and carries forward to a 
successful completion whatever he undertakes. 
He remained in New York City and vicinity until 
1836. 

During this time, Mr. Young was made an Odd 
Fellow, December 26, 1834, so that he is one of 
the oldest members of the order in the United 
States, and in all probability the very oldest in Illi- 
nois. His long connection with the fraternity 
has led him to be frequently called upon to address 
lodges throughout the country, and he has spoken 
in the interest of the order in New Jersey, New 
York, Wisconsin, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Mis- 
souri, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and California. 

Another important event occurred during Mr. 
Young's residence in New York. He there met, 
wooed and won his wife, Catherine Ehrhardt, the 
marriage taking place June 20, 1835. For fifty- 
six years she was his faithful companion and 
helpmate, and all who knew her held her in the 
highest esteem for her exemplary life. She was 
a seamstress, and came from Alsace, France, in 
1833. Her death occurred March 16, 1891, and 
was deeply mourned. 

On the 28th of August, 1836, Mr. Young started 
westward to find a home, leaving his wife in the 
care of a sister. He traveled by stage to Phila- 
delphia, thence by rail to Columbia, and on by- 
stage to Pittsburgh, where he took boat to Louis- 
ville. The river being too low to shoot the falls, 
he had to transfer to another boat at Rockford, 
fri >m which place he went to St. Louis, and on 
to Burlington, which was then a village in the 
Territory of Iowa. From that place he walked 
to Warren County, 111. He had not a friend or 
acquaintance in the locality. He hired out to 
John Huston as a farm hand at $8 per month, and 
soon afterwards he was joined by his wife, who in 
company with her brother-in-law and sister had 
come west. Mr. and Mrs. Young enjoyed few of 
the luxuries of life in those early years, and even 
were sometimes without the necessaries, but they 
made the best of everything and had soon acquired 
a sufficient sum to purchase a farm. 

In the spring of 1837, Mr. Young bought fifty 



acres of land at $1.62 ! /2 per acre, and this tract 
became the nucleus of his extensive possessions. 
Soon after locating upon that farm, he made a 
trip to Oquawka, thirty miles distant, with an ox- 
team. The history of pioneer life in this locality 
is very familiar to him. He hauled the first rails 
across the Peoria and Burlington stage road, on 
the big prairie northwest of Greenbush, and broke 
the first forty acres of land on that prairie. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Young were born seven 
children, five of whom are yet living: Mary, the 
widow of Thomas Lewis, who is now keeping 
house for her father; Julia A., wife of Charles 
Hayes, who once served as Sheriff of McDonough 
County, but is now living in South Dakota; John 
Frederick, who resides on the old homestead in 
Roseville Township, Warren County; Sarah, 
widow of George W. Thomas; and Emma, the 
wife of S. H. Tuttle, of Roseville, 111. 

For many years Mr. Young remained engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, and success attended his 
well-directed efforts. He worked hard, and as the 
result of his industry and enterprise acquired a 
handsome competency, which now enables him to 
spend his declining years in retirement, surround- 
ed by all the comforts of life. He makes his home 
in Bushnell and is one of its honored citizens. He 
is a courteous, kindly old gentleman, and all who 
know him esteem him highly. 

NENRY R. and WILLIAM L. HAMPTON, 
of Augusta, are the editors and proprietors 
of the Augusta Courier. These gentlemen 
were both natives of McDonough County, the 
former born on the 3d of March, 1859, and 
the latter on the 2d of August, 1868. Their 
parents were William L- and Rachel A. (Jones) 
Hampton, both of whom were natives of Ohio. 
In their family were three children, the two men- 
tioned above, and one who died in infancy. The 
father was an engineer. During his early boy- 
hood he came to Illinois with his parents, the 
family locating near Macomb. His father, Van 
C. Hampton, was a native of New Jersey, and a 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



285 



woolen manufacturer. After his emigration to 
McDonough County, lie built and operated the 
first woolen -mill within its borders. William L. 
Hampton, Sr., grew to manhood under the pa- 
rental roof, and spent his remaining days in Mc- 
Donough County. During the late war he re- 
sponded to the country's call for troops, and, 
donning the blue, became a member of Company 
C, Eighty-fourth Illinois Infantry. While en- 
gaged in building breastworks of logs he was in- 
jured, and on account of disability occasioned 
thereby was honorably discharged from the serv- 
ice. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Baptist Church, and were people whose excel- 
lencies of character made them highly respected. 
Mr. Hampton passed away in Colchester in 1884, 
at the age of fifty-four years. His first wife had 
died many years previous, and he had married 
Mrs. Annie Butterfield, widow of William But- 
terfield. 

Both Henry and William Hampton were reared 
in Macomb, spending their early boyhood days 
midst play and work. They attended the public 
schools of that city, acquiring a good English ed- 
ucation, and when quite young they began learn- 
ing the printers' trade. Since ■ that time, they 
have been connected with newspaper work in one 
capacity or another, and they are thoroughly con- 
versant with the work in all its departments. In 
February, 1892, they came to Augusta and es- 
tablished the Augusta Courier, which they are 
still publishing. The paper is strongly Republi- 
can in politics, and is a neat and interesting 
journal, which is meeting with hearty support. 
Its circulation has steadily increased as its merits 
have become known to the people. 

On the 31st of December, 1882, H. R. Hamp- 
ton was united in marriage with Miss Mary L. 
Butterfield, daughter of William and Annie But- 
terfield, and to them has been born a son, Harry. 
On the 29th of March, 1892, was celebrated the 
marriage of William L. Hampton and Miss Lizzie 
Becker, daughter of Henry and Hannah Becker. 
( me child graces this union, Edna. The families 
are well known in this community, and rank high 
in social circles. 

The publishers of the Courier spent ten years 



of their lives in Colchester, during which time 
the senior partner of the firm held the office of 
Assessor, and also served as a member of the 
Board of Health. Socially, he is connected with 
the Home Forum, as is his brother, who is also 
a member of the Knights of Pythias. They 
are both men of good business ability, pleasant 
and genial in manner, and have the high regard 
of many friends in this locality. 

Ir" ,ds= c3 <' T "> 1= ' =S 

EHARLES C. CHAIN is the editor and pub- 
lisher of the McDonough Democrat, which 
is published in Bushnell, 111. As he has 
a wide acquaintance throughout this section of 
the State, we feel assured that the record of his 
life will prove of interest to many of our readers. 
A native of Fulton County, he was born on the 
nth of November, 1863, in Lewistown, and is a 
son of William H. and Amelia (Smith) Chain. 
On the father's side he is of Irish and German 
descent, and on the mother's side he is of Welsh 
and New England extraction. William H. Chain 
was a native of Ohio. He came to Illinois about 
i860, and embarked in the drug business in 
Lewistown, where he engaged in the wholesale 
grocery trade. He was thus engaged until 1871, 
when he removed to Lincoln, Neb., and began 
in business as a commission merchant. After a 
short time, however, he returned to Fulton Coun- 
ty, where he made his home until 1881, when he 
came to Bushnell. Here he engaged in the real- 
estate business until his death, which occurred in 
February, 1891. His wife was also a native of 
Ohio, and during her maidenhood went with her 
parents to Fulton County, 111. She is still liv- 
ing in Bushnell, where she has many friends and 
acquaintances. In the Chain family were six 
children, but only our subject and his sister 
Nellie H. are now living. 

Charles C. Chain spent the first ten years of 
his life under the parental roof, and during that 
time he made not a little money by selling news- 
papers. When a lad of ten years he returned 
to Fulton County and lived with his grand- 



286 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mother upon a farm for about ten years. He be- 
came familiar with all the duties of farm life, and 
aided in the labors of the field until 1881, when 
he decided to come to Bushnell and learn the 
printer's trade. He at once entered upon that 
work, and continued in the employ of others for 
about four years, when, on the 4th of July 1884, 
he established the McDonough Democrat, which 
he has since published. He was associated with 
a partner for about two years, and then became 
sole proprietor. Since 1887, he has been alone in 
business. He owns a well-appointed printing of- 
fice, and the McDonough Democrat is a neat and 
well-edited paper. It has a good circulation, and 
a liberal patronage is well deserved. 

On the 12th of March, 1889, Mr. Chain led to 
the marriage altar Miss Anna Oblander. To 
them has been born a son, W. H., who is now 
four years old. In his political views, Mr. Chain 
is a stalwart Democrat, unswerving in his alle- 
giance to the party and its interests. He takes 
quite a prominent and active part in political af- 
fairs, and has served as a member of the County 
Central Committee and of the Congressional Com- 
mittee. Public-spirited and progressive, he is 
recognized as one of the valued citizens of Bush- 
nell, for he manifests a commendable interest in 
everything pertaining to the welfare of the com- 
munity. Mr. Chain may truly be called a self- 
made man, for he started out in life for himself at 
an early age and has steadily worked his way up- 
ward through his own efforts. His possessions 
are the just reward of his labors. He was ap- 
pointed Postmaster under President Cleveland in 
1894. 

0ARIUS JONES, who is now engaged in gen- 
eral farming on section 26, Bushnell Town- 
ship, is one of the honored pioneer settlers 
of McDonough County, having for many years 
made his home in this locality. His farm com- 
prises two hundred and thirteen acres of valuable 
land, which is under a high state of cultivation, 
and well improved with all modern accessories 
and conveniences. His home is a beautiful coun- 



try residence, and is pleasantly located within a 
mile of Bushnell. In connection with the cultiva- 
tion of the fields, he also engages in stock-raising, 
and this branch of his business has likewise proved 
profitable to him. 

Mr. Jones is a native of Ohio. He was born in 
Hocking County August 17, 1828, and comes of 
a family of English lineage. His paternal grand- 
parents were both natives of Virginia, but his fa- 
ther, John Jones, was born in the Keystone State. 
His mother, however, who bore the maiden name 
of Rebecca De Moss, was born in the Old Domin- 
ion. When a young man, John Jones left Penn- 
sylvania, and, emigrating westward, took up his 
residence in Ohio, where he engaged in farming 
until 1 85 1. That year witnessed his arrival in 
McDonough County, where he carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits until his death, which occurred 
at the age of seventy-two years. His wife passed 
away at the age of seventy years. 

The gentleman whose name heads this record is 
the second in order of birth in a family of nine 
children. The common schools afforded him his 
educational privileges, and upon the home farm 
he was reared to manhood. He early began to 
work in the fields, plowing, planting and harvest- 
ing, and soon became familiar with all the duties 
of farm life. At length he began to work in his 
own interest, and for three years was employed as 
a farm hand in the neighborhood. He then oper- 
ated rented land until 1859, when, with the cap- 
ital he had acquired, he made his first purchase, 
becoming the owner of a tract of eighty acres, 
which has served as the nucleus around which have 
been gathered his present extensive possessions. 

On the 15th of February, 1853, Mr. Jones mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth Snapp, who was born Sep- 
tember 22, 1830, in Washington County, Tenn., 
and was a daughter of John and Mary Ann ( Kep- 
ple) Snapp, who were natives of Tennessee. They 
came to McDonough County in 1833, and here 
the father followed farming for some time. His 
death occurred in Missouri, at the allotted age of 
three-score years and ten. His wife passed away 
in McDonough County, when about forty years of 
age. To Mr. and Mrs. Jones were born nine 
children, but three of the number are now de- 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



wumw <» 1LUN0,S 

URBANA 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



291 



ceased. Mary is the wife of Emerson Huffman, 
a farmer of McDonough County ; Caroline is the 
wife of David Mowery, also an agriculturist: 
John L. follows farming in Fulton County: Laura 
is at home: and William G. and Frank are still 
living on the old homestead. 

The Republican party has ever found in Mr. 
Jones a stalwart supporter, who takes an active 
interest in its growth. His wife is a member of 
the Methodist Church, and he contributes liberally 
to the same. The cause of education has always 
found in him a warm friend, and he has served 
both as School Director and School Trustee, and 
is also Road Commissioner. In addition to his 
other property, he owns four hundred and fifteen 
acres of laud in Fulton County. His possessions 
have all been acquired through his own offorts, 
and the handsome competence which he now 1 os- 
sesses is but the just reward of his honest labors. 

i§ c=1 . <A. > ,f=J -° ? 

fe '"HS <" T ' "> 1= " a) 

(JOHN TWIDWKI.I.. a retired farmer now 

I living in Plymouth, has since 1836 been a 

(2/ resident of this section of Illinois. He has a 

wide acquaintance in this locality, and we feel as- 
sured that the record of his life will prove of in- 
terest to many of our readers. A native of North 
Carolina, he was born in Davidson County Jan- 
uary 20, 1818, and is one of a family of five sons 
and four daughters, whose parents were Thomas 
and Polly (Wayman) Twidwell. Only six of 
the children are now living, namely: John and 
Solomon, twins, the latter residing in Macomb; 
William, who is living in Washington, forty 
miles from Olympia; Martha, widow of Josiah 
Morris, and a resident of northern Kansas; 
Nancy, widow of Bartlet Whittington, of Peoria: 
and Absalom, of Kansas. 

The father of this family was a native of Vir- 
ginia, and was a cooper by trade. In [834, he 
started westward and, locating in Morgan County, 
111., therespent about two years. In 1S36, became 
to McDonough County, where he purchased laud 
and improved a fine farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres, three miles east of Plymouth, upon 

'4 



which he made his home until called to his final 
rest. He died in 1SS3, at the advanced age of 
ninety-four years and two days, and his wife- 
passed away twenty years previously. She was 
a native of Maryland. In early life they were 
members of the Methodist Church, but later 
joined the United Brethren Church. The mater- 
nal grandfather of our subject, John Wayman, was 
a native of Maryland and a minister of the Meth- 
odist Church. Removing to North Carolina, his 
death occurred in that State when well advanced 
in years. 

John Twidwell was in his seventeenth year 
when he preceded his parents on their emigra- 
tion to Illinois. After aiding in building a cabin for 
the family, he was left therewith his sister to keep 
house, and shot two deer from the cabin within a 
few days. He acquired his education in the old- 
time subscription schools, and remained at home 
until his marriage. October 10, 1839, he was 
joined in marriage with Miss Henrietta E., 
daughter of John A. Shelton, and eight children 
were born of their union. John Thomas, the 
eldest, married Miss Josie Lantermau, by whom 
he had eleven children, and they reside in Hays 
County, Tex. Nancy J. is the wife of Samuel 
Myers, of Brown County, Kan., and they have 
four children. Sarah E. died at the age of five 
years. David is the next in order of birth. Ma- 
rion wedded Miss Marvin, and with his wife and 
three children makes his home in McDonough 
County. George A. married Miss Ran Smith, 
and with their two children they also reside in 
McDonough County. William F. is married and 
lives in Iowa. Solomon P. is located in Wash- 
ington. The mother of this family having died, 
Mr. Twidwell afterwards married Mrs. Barbara 
Keziah. daughter of John Jarvis. They had 
born to them a daughter, Martha, wife of Hugh 
Banks, a farmer of McDonough County. On the 
4th of June. 1892, Mr. Twidwell was again called 
upon to mourn the loss of his wife, and on the 21st 
of September, 1893, he married Mrs. .Sarah J. 
Rhea. 

Throughout the greater part of his life, Mr. 
Twidwell has followed farming. In 1836, he be- 
came a resident of Lamoine Township. McDon- 



292 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ough Count}-. He is a self-made man, and by 
chopping wood acquired the capital with which 
he made his first purchase of land. He has pros- 
pered in his undertakings, and has accumulated 
a valuable property. He became owner of eight 
hundred acres of rich land in McDonough Coun- 
ty, and three hundred and thirty -five acres in 
Texas, and has given to each of his children land 
or property to the value of $1,000. He yet owns 
one hundred and fifteen acres in McDonough 
County, and derives therefrom a good income. 
In connection with this he has five acres in the 
city of Hiawatha, Kan. For many years he car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits, but in October, 
1 89 1, came to Plymouth, where he has since 
lived retired. He here owns a good residence 
and fifteen acres in town lots. 

For the long period of forty years, Mr. Twid- 
well has served as Justice of the Peace, and the 
promptness and fidelity with which he has dis- 
charged his duties are well indicated by his long 
retention in office. He is always just in his de- 
cisions, which are reached after carefully weigh- 
ing the evidence. He has also served as Town- 
ship Supervisor for one term, and for thirteen 
years was Assessor in McDonough County. 
Whether in public or private life, he is always 
true to everj - trust reposed in him, and he has 
the confidence and high regard of all with whom 
business or social relations have brought him in 
contact. 



(JOSEPH BUCK, who is successfully engaged 
I in farming on section 26, Bushnell Township, 
(*) McDonough County, was born in Crawford 
County, Pa., on the 23d of April, 1836, andisnext 
to the eldest of a family of five children, whose 
parents were Peter and Polly (Gable) Buck. The 
family is of German origin, and was founded in 
America by Jacob Buck, the great-great-grand- 
father of our subject, who braved the dangers of an 
ocean voyage to make a home in the New World. 
He located in Pennsylvania and became the first 
settler of what is now Bucks County , which was 



named in his honor. He was a tinker, and did 
general repair work along that line. The mem- 
bers of the family were all good mechanics. 

The grandfather and father of our subject were 
born in Bucks County, and the latter there re- 
mained until about seventeen years of age. He 
learned the blacksmith's and gunsmith's trade, 
and followed those pursuits until 1837, when, in 
company with his brother Daniel, he started west- 
ward for Illinois. Reaching his destination, he 
cast in his lot with the early settlers of Cuba, 
Fulton County, where he followed the blacksmith 
and gunsmith's trade and also engaged in farm- 
ing until 1855. In that year he purchased the farm 
on which our subject now resides, then a tract of 
wild prairie land; but he at once began to improve 
and cultivate the same and continued its develop- 
ment until his death. He was killed by accident 
in 1865, at the age of sixty-three years. Mr. Buck 
was twice married. He first wedded Sallie Foust, 
who died in Pennsylvania, leaving a family of 
seven children. Later he married Polly Gable, 
and they became the parents of five children. 
The mother of our subject was also born in Penn- 
sylvania, and is still living. She has reached the 
advanced age of eighty-two, but is yet well pre- 
served . Her parents were natives of the Keystone 
State and were of German lineage. 

Under the parental roof Joseph Buck remained 
until seventeen years of age, when he left home 
and began working on the construction of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in Henry 
County, 111. After six months spent in that way, 
he went to Chicago, where he followed the car- 
penter's trade for about five years, when, in the 
spring of i860, he left for Pike's Peak. There he 
engaged in mining, and also worked as a carpenter 
and millwright for a year. On the expiration of 
that period we find him in Leavenworth, Kan., 
where he engaged in carpentering until the fall of 
1862. 

On the 25th of September of that year, Mr. 
Buck responded to the country's call for troops, 
enlisting as a member of Company F, One Hun- 
dred and Third Illinois Infantry, in which he 
served for two years and eleven months. He was 
with Grant in the Vicksburg campaign, and took 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



293 



part in the battles of Missionary Ridge, Marietta, 
Chattanooga and Atlanta. At the first-named 
engagement he received a gunshot wound in the 
right jaw and shoulder. Two inches of the lower 
jaw bone were shot away, leaving a scar which he 
will carry with him through life. After being 
wounded he was taken to the field-hospital, where 
he remained for twelve days, when he was per- 
mitted to return home on a furlough. Three 
months later he rejoined his regiment, and con- 
tinued in the service until the close of the war. 
He participated in twenty-three battles, together 
with many skirmishes, and was ever a faithful and 
valiant soldier. He was promoted to the rank of 
Corporal, and was offered a commission as Second 
Lieutenant, but did not accept it. 

When his country no longer needed his services, 
Mr. Buck returned home and began dealing in 
stock, which enterprise proved very successful. 
The following year he took charge of the home 
farm, and for nine years he engaged in operating a 
threshing-machine. On the 9th of January, 1868, 
he wedded Miss Man' C. McGrew, of Fulton 
County, who died four years later, leaving a 
daughter, Carrie E., who is now the wife of 
George Augle, who resides in Bushnell. 

When first Mr. Buck was married he removed 
to Bushnell, where he began work at the carpen- 
ter's trade. A year later he removed to Knox 
County, where he carried on farming for two years. 
In 1 87 1, he purchased the old homestead, and has 
since engaged in its cultivation. On the 12th of 
March, 1875, he was again married, the lady of 
his choice being Miss Maria Myers, of Bushnell, 
who was born July 17, 1841. They became the 
parents of five children, but three died in infancy. 
William Allen and Dessie May are still with their 
parents. 

Mr. Buck is a stanch Republican in his political 
views, but has never aspired to public office. So- 
cially, he is a member of Van Vleek Post No. 
1 74, G. A. R. , of Bushnell and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. He and his wife hold mem- 
bership with the Christian Church, and their lives 
are in harmony with their professions. Mr. Buck 
is a natural mechanic, who can turn his hand to al- 
most any work. His privileges in early life were 



limited, but through his own efforts he has become 
a well-informed man and has won success in his 
business dealings. He now owns one hundred 
and eighty-five acres of land in the homestead in 
McDonough County and eight acres in Fulton 
County. He has also been extensively engaged 
in breeding Shorthorn cattle and Norman horses. 
His life has been an honorable and upright one, 
and his sterling worth and strict integrity have 
gained for him the confidence and high regard of 
all. 



LNATHAN KEMPER WESTFALL, M. D., 
'y the popular and efficient Postmaster of Bush- 
„ „ nell, and one of the leading physicians of 
that city, claims Indiana as the State of his na- 
tivity. He was born in Boone County, on the 
8th of January, 1839. The family is of German 
origin, and the paternal grandfather, Jacob West- 
fall, was a native of Westphalia. Three brothers 
came to America, one settling in the western por- 
tion of Virginia, another in New York, and a 
third in New Orleans. Jacob Westfall, who lived 
for a time in West Virginia, served as a soldier in 
the Revolutionary War, and held a Colonel's com- 
mission, was a son of one of these three brothers, 
and was a child when he came to America. In an 
early day he removed to Indiana with his family, 
and, settling in Montgomery County, there fol- 
lowed farming throughout his succeeding years. 
His death occurred at an advanced age. Corne- 
lius Westfall, father of the Doctor, was born on 
the site of Beverly, W. Va , when that was a 
stockade fort 011 the extreme frontier of civiliza- 
tion, and served as a Surveyor in the employ of 
the Government for many years. His duties called 
him to Indiana, but he made his home in Ohio. 
He taught the first school in Dayton, Ohio, and 
was the first settler of Troy, Ohio. He was also 
its first Postmaster, Collector and Assessor, its 
first County Clerk, and for twenty-four years was 
Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas. For many 
years he engaged in merchandising and traded 
largely with the Indians. In 1830 he removed to In- 
diana, locating on the present site of Thorntown 



294 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



after the Miami Indians had left that reservation. 
In 1854 he came to Illinois, settling in Macomb, 
where he died the" following year, at the age of 
seventy-eight years. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Sarah Davis, and was a daughter of John 
Davis, a native of New Jersey, a shoemaker by 
trade, who removed to Thorntown, Ind., where 
he died many years ago at an advanced age. Mrs. 
Westfall passed away in 1873, at the age of sev- 
enty-two. The parents of our subject were both 
members of the Presbyterian Church, and the 
father was for fifty years one of its Ruling Elders. 
During the Ft. Wayne campaign, he was ap- 
pointed Purchasing Commissioner under Gen. 
Harrison. 

Dr. Westfall is one of a family of nine children, 
three sons and six daughters, five of whom are 
now living: Mary E., widow of Dr. A. W. Arm- 
strong, who died at the age of eighty-five years; 
Melissa, wife of Joseph Ottermau, of Adel, Iowa; 
Louisa M., widow of Durham C. Harris, of Bar- 
dolph; Harriet S., wife of George S. Cogswell, of 
Saline County, Neb.; and our subject. 

The Doctor remained in Thorntown until six- 
teen years of age, when with his parents he came 
to Macomb. On the breaking out of the late war, 
he enlisted in 1861, as a member of Company B, 
Sixteenth Illinois Infantry, and served for a year 
and a-half, when he was honorably discharged on 
account of disability. He served as Orderly-Ser- 
geant, and won promotion to the rank of First 
Lieutenant. Before the war he had engaged in 
teaching school, and after his return from the 
South lie entered the office of his brother, Dr. B. R. 
Westfall, of Macomb, with whom he studied med- 
icine for some time. He then became a student in 
the Hahnemann Medical College, of Chicago, 
from which he was graduated in the Class of 
'67. On the 2d of May of that year, became to 
Bushnell, opened an office, and has since been con- 
stantly engaged in practice here. From the be- 
ginning he has enjoyed a good business, and is 
recognized as one of the best physicians of the 
community. 

In January, 1873, Dr. Westfall was united in 
marriage with Miss Emma Curl, who died eight 
months later. On the 1 6th of October, 1879, he 



wedded Miss Irene Wann, a native of Pennsylvan- 
ia, of which State her parents, Curtis and Eliza 
Jane (Maxwell) Wann, were also natives. Four 
children have been born to them: Mary H. : Clara 
E. , who died at the age of three and a-half years; 
Curtis C. ; and Beverly K. 

The Doctor is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, the Knights of Pythias, the Knights 
of Honor, the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
the Grand Army of the Republic. His wife holds 
membership with the Methodist Church. In pol- 
itics, he is a stalwart Republican, and has held 
several offices. He served as Alderman of Bush- 
nell two terms, was Supervisor two terms, and 
represented his district in the Twenty-eighth and 
Thirtieth General Assemblies of Illinois. In the 
spring of 1878 he was appointed Postmaster of 
Bushnell, and has filled that office for three terms 
in a creditable and acceptable manner. He is a 
leading and influential citizen of this place, and 
has many warm friends throughout the county in 
which he has so long made his home. 

0ANIEL HAMILTON SWISEGOOD, one 
of the enterprising and progressive farmers 
of Augusta Township, Hancock County, 
now living on section 12, was born in Davidson 
County, N. C, March 18, 1822, and is one of ten 
children, whose parents, John and Elizabeth 
(Delap) Swisegood, were also natives of North 
Carolina. Of their two sons and eight daughters, 
only five are now living: Daniel H., of this sketch; 
William Henry, of Birmingham, 111. ; John Frank- 
lin, of Schuyler County, 111.; Rosanua, widow of 
Franklin Collins, a resident of Floyd County, 
Ind.; and Abigail, wife of William B. Manlove, 
of Birmingham Township, Schuyler County. 
The father was a cabinet-maker and farmer. 
Emigrating westward to Illinois, he landed in 
Schuyler County June 22, 1846, and purchased 
one hundred and twenty acres of wild land, 
which he at once began to improve and culti- 
vate. He was vers- successful in his business 
dealings, and accumulated twelve hundred acres 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



295 



of good land, which he divided among his children. 
His success was due entirely to his own efforts. 
He made his home in that county until his death, 
which occurred in 1885, at the age of seventy-four 
years. His wife had passed away some years 
previously. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, John 
Swisegood, was a native of North Carolina, and 
he too carried on agricultural pursuits as a means 
of livelihood. His family numbered three daugh- 
ters and one son. The maternal grandfather, 
John Delap, was a North Carolina farmer, who 
reached the advanced age of more than seventy 
years. 

No event of special importance occurred during 
the childhood and youth of our subject, his boy- 
hood days being quietly passed in his parents' 
home. Soon after coming of age he hired out to 
work on a farm, receiving $6 a month for about 
a year and a-half. At the age of twenty-four 
years he came to Illinois and engaged in agricul- 
ture. He has lived upon his present farm since 
1847, and is one of the oldest settlers in the com- 
munity. His land is well improved and highly- 
cultivated, and his home is pleasantly situated 
about three and a-half miles from Augusta. 

On the 4th of January, 1847, Mr. Swisegood 
married Miss Anna C, daughter of George and 
Sarah (Crouch) Haines. Their union has been 
blessed with four sons and six daughters. John F. , 
of Richardson County, Neb., married Stella Sel- 
dom and has mx children; George P., who is living 
on the old homestead, wedded Emma Larkin, and 
they have three children: Earl, Pearlie and Guy; 
Thomas Lee, the next younger, died in 1888; 
Lurette is the wife of Joseph Ogle, of Richardson 
County, Neb., by whom she has five living chil- 
dren; Cornelia is the wife of Robert White, a 
farmer of Hancock County, and they have one 
child; Eliza B. died in 1892; Nora is the wife of 
Edgar Spence, and with their five children they re- 
side in Putnam County, Mo. ; Lenora and Adarine 
are now deceased; and one child died in infancy. 

Mr. Swisegood is a Knight Templar Mason, 
and in politics is a stalwart Democrat. He is num- 
bered among the earl\- settlers of Hancock County, 
for when he located in this region there was not 



a fence or house for twelve miles on the prairie 
west of Augusta, and almost the entire county was 
still in a primitive condition. He has succeeded in 
his business, and after giving considerable valu- 
able property to his children, he is still the owner 
of one hundred and seventy acres of good land, 
which yields to him a comfortable income. He 
is recognized as one of the substantial citizens of 
the county, not alone because he has prospered in 
his vocation, but also on account of his genuine 
worth. He is a man of his word, modest and un- 
pretentious in manner, of a quiet disposition, and 
has- the respect and confidence of his many friends 
and acquaintances. He has seen much of the 
country, having traveled in twenty-two States of 
the Union, and has made the best of life as he has 
found it. 

6= ! t *^) <* T> fa 3 -» 

HON. RICHARD G. BREEDEN, senior mem- 
ber of the law firm of Breeden, Painter & 
Switzer, of Macomb, is not only a leading 
lawyer of this city, but has also been prominent in 
the political history of McDonough County dur- 
ing the past decade, and will undoubtedly be 
found in the front rank among the valued citizens 
of the State for many years to come. His life 
record is as follows: A native of Iowa, he was 
born in Appanoose County on the 28th of Au- 
gust, i860, and is a son of the Rev. William and 
Damaris E. (Lawyer) Breeden, the former a na- 
tive of Kentucky, and the latter of Ohio. The 
father of our subject was a minister of the Baptist 
Church, and also engaged in farming. He was a 
remarkable man physically, with strong traits of 
character. In 1839 he decided to try his fortune 
on the broad prairies of Illinois, and became a 
resident of McDonough County. He was born 
February 7, 18 15, and came of an old Virginia 
family, which was founded in America by Scotch 
ancestors, who left that land and took up their resi- 
dence in the New World prior to the Revolution. 
There were three brothers who made the voyage, 
and all served in the Colonial Army during the 
struggle for independence. One of the number 



296 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was killed, and the ancestor of our subject, at the 
close ofthe war, migrated to Kentucky. A love 
for hunting and fishing has always been manifest 
in the Breed en family, and it is supposed that it 
indicates a trace of Indian blood. Rev. William 
Breeden was twice married. He first married 
Nancy Driscol, by whom he had seven children. 
He afterwards married Miss Lawyer, and they had 
seven children. Of the fourteen, seven were boys 
and seven were girls, and seven of the number are 
yet living. Our subject and Amanda, wife of H. 
N. Post, of this county, are the only ones now liv- 
ing ofthe last family of children. His mother -was 
a woman far above the average in intelligence and 
womanly qualities. 

No event of special importance occurred during 
the boyhood and youth of Richard G. Breeden, for 
his days were quietly passed in the usual manner 
of farmer lads. He early began work in the fields, 
and became familiar with the duties of farm life. 
His primary education, gained in the district 
schools of the neighborhood, was followed by a 
course in the Macomb Normal College, from which 
he graduated in the Class of '84. He afterwards 
pursued his studies for a time in the Monmouth 
College, in the mean time teaching school to ob- 
tain the means for securing his education. He 
was a thorough student, and in his early manhood 
he was respected for his firm decision of purpose, 
his fidelity to duty, his high ideas of honor, his 
sympathy for the oppressed or afflicted, his enter- 
prise and worthy ambition. While a boy he be- 
came noted as a forcible speaker and ready debater, 
and in the literary societies of which he was a 
member he was considered invincible. When a 
candidate for the Legislature, at the early age of 
twenty-six years, he stumped his district in a man- 
ner that won him the highest compliments, both 
from his political friends and opponents. 

Mr. Breeden entered on his political career in 
1886, when he was elected from this district to 
the State Legislature as the candidate of the Re- 
publican party. He was at this time the young- 
est member on the Republican side of the House. 
During that term he served as Chairman of the 
Committee on Education, and was a member of 
the Judiciary Committee, the most important com- 



mittee in the House of Representatives. He was 
the champion ofthe " Coal Screen Bill," intro- 
duced in the interests of the coal miners in the 
State, and, although the measure was defeated, all 
acknowledged that the young member made a 
gallant fight. So well did he fill the office, that on 
the expiration of his first term he was re-elected, 
in 1888. During the Thirty-sixth Session of the 
General Assembly he was Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Count}' and Township Organization, 
and a member of the Judiciary and Appropriation 
Committees. He secured the passage of what 
was known as the " Frisbee-Breeden Pharmacy 
Bill." He also took part in the senatorial con- 
test at the time of the election of Senator Farwell, 
and afterwards helped elect Senator Cullom. In 
1 89 1 he was elected County Judge of McDonough 
County, and is now filling that office with credit 
to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. 

On the 22d of December, 1888, Mr. Breeden 
was united in marriage with Miss Grace Gilchrist, 
daughter of Van B. and Sarah A. (Robinson) Gil- 
christ, residents of McDonough County. Their 
union has been blessed with three children, two 
sons and a daughter: Richard Gilchrist, Ralph 
Ballard and Helen. Judge Breeden is a member 
of the Odd Fellows' society, and is one ofthe hon- 
ored and prominent citizens of Macomb. He has 
won a foremost place at the McDonough County 
Bar, and, in addition to his duties as County 
Judge, he is enjoying a large and lucrative law 
practice, which is well deserved, for his knowl- 
edge of the law and his skill and ability have 
made him an able advocate. 



gEORGE W. PACE is one of the representa- 
tive and enterprising business men of Ma- 
comb. He is now the senior member of the 
firm of G. W. Pace & Sons, dealers in groceries, 
and proprietors of the Williams House of this 
city. McDonough County numbers him among 
its native sons, his birth having occurred in Scot- 
land Township on the 13th of May, 1835. His 
paternal grandfather, Langston Pace, was a native 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL, RECORD. 



297 



of Virginia, and removed thence to Cumberland 
County, Ky., where he died at the age of seventy 
years. His wife reached the advanced age of 
one hundred and four years, and was then killed 
by a door blowing against her. Their family 
numbered three sous and five daughters, one of 
whom, William I. Pace, became the father of our 
subject. By occupation he was a farmer, and fol- 
lowed that pursuit throughout his life. Having 
resolved to emigrate to Illinois, he came to this 
State in 1S30, making the journey from Kentucky 
with a two-wheeled ox-cart and a yoke of cattle. 
He was a half-owner of this conveyance. Before 
his death he accumulated a handsome property. 
Locating five and a-half miles south of Macomb. 
he there purchased fifty-seven acres of wild land 
at the Government price of $1.25 per acre, and 
to this he added from time to time until five hun- 
dred acres of rich land paid to him a golden trib- 
ute in return for the care and labor he bestowed 
upon it. He served as Captain of a military com- 
pany in the early days, and aided in arresting 
Joseph Smith, the Mormon. For a number of 
years he also engaged in peddling clocks, and for 
some time he served as Assessor of the county. 

William I. Pace was united in marriage with 
Sallie Sparks Yawter, daughter of Beverly Vaw- 
ter, a Kentucky farmer, who on leaving his na- 
tive State came to Illinois, in 1832, and located on 
a farm nine miles south of Macomb. There he 
died in 1848, at the age of sixty-three years. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Pace were born nine children, four 
sons and five daughters: Ingram A., deceased; 
Thomas J., of Scotland Township; Susan E., 
wife of William H. Dameron, of Macomb; George 
W., of this sketch; Permelia J., wife of George 
W. Porter; A. J., of Macomb; Annie, widow of 
Joseph T. Adcock; Man- Amanda, wife of Henry 
K. Smith; and Fannie Belle, wife of Prof. De 
Witt Roberts, of Denver, Colo. The mother of 
this family died in 1851, and Mr. Pace was again 
married. His death occurred in 1855, at the age 
of forty-six, and his second wife passed away 
three months later. 

Upon his father's farm in Scotland Township, 
G. W. Pace was reared to manhood. At the age 
of nineteen, he left the parental roof and came to 



Macomb, where for two years and a-half he en- 
gaged in the postoffice as clerk, under J. W. Ad- 
kinson. He also served in the same capacity 
with J. W. Westfall for two and a-half years. 
Later, he embarked in the grocery business, and 
subsequently he was for thirteen years a dry- 
goods merchant. In 1S75, however, he again 
opened a grocery and has since continued in 
that line of trade. 

On the 5th of September, i860, Mr. Pace mar- 
ried Sallie J. Sweeney, daughter of Milton and 
Ann (Clarke) Sweeney, who were natives of 
Kentucky. Six children have been bora to them, 
two sons and four daughters: James M., who is 
represented elsewhere in this volume; Henry J., 
who is a member of the firm of Pace & Sons; 
Nettie J., who died at the age of two and a-half 
years; Lona E., who died at the age of seven 
months; Lizzie and Hattie. 

Mr. Pace is a member of the Universalist 
Church, and his wife of the Christian Church. 
Socially, he is connected with the Odd Fellows' 
society, and in politics, he is a stalwart Republi- 
can, unwavering in his support of the men and 
measures of that party. Mr. Pace is a self-made 
man, for he started out in life empty-handed, and 
has steadily worked his way upward by industry, 
perseverence and determination to a position of 
affluence. 

« l =j«k V >t=, ■" i 

(JACOB L. BAILV, attorney-at-law of Ma- 

I comb. 111., was born in Fulton County, this 
Q) State, August 29, 1851, and is a son of 
Thomas and Nancy (Bottenburg) Baily, both of 
whom were natives of Virginia. The grandfather, 
Evan Baily, was also a native of the Old Domin- 
ion, and was of Irish descent. The Botteuburgs 
came of Pennsylvania stock. The Bailys are 
noted for longevity, and the daughter of our sub- 
ject has seen four of her great-grandmothers, two 
of whom are past ninety years of age. Evan 
Baily was killed by being thrown from a car- 
riage in Fulton County, 111., in 1S77, at the age 
of seventy-nine years. His wife bore the maiden 



298 

name of Elizabeth McHenry. In their family 
were fourteen children, namely: Nancy, deceased; 
Thomas; Mary A., deceased; Margaret, wife of 
E. D. C. Haines, a banker of Bushnell; Johnson, 
deceased; James, who was a Lieutenant in the 
late war, and was killed in battle in 1863; John, 
who has been called to the home beyond; Robert, 
a merchant of Lewistown, Fulton County, 111.; 
Lizzie, wife of Dr. John Bacon, of Texas; Alex- 
ander, who resides on the old homestead in Ful- 
ton County; Sallie, wife of John Barker, of Gir- 
ard, Kan.; Mrs. Mattie Osborn, of Texas; and 
Douglas, a merchant of Montana. In 1S35, 
Evan Baily removed with his family to Fulton 
County, 111., and entered one hundred and sixty 
acres of land from the Government in Vermont 
Township, for which he paid $1.25 per acre. He 
there erected a log cabin and began life in true 
pioneer style. He was a prominent man, and 
represented his district in the State Legislature 
for two terms. He also served as Treasurer of 
Fulton County from 1866 until 1874, and held 
other local offices. At the time of his death he 
was a candidate for County Judge on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. In religious belief he was a Uni- 
versalis!:. His business career was one of success, 
and he became a prosperous farmer of the com- 
munity. Both he and his wife were laid to rest 
in the old Baily Cemetery, near the old home- 
stead . 

Thomas Baily, father of our subject, was born 
in Virginia June 19, 1829, and when five years 
old was brought by his parents to Illinois, where 
he was reared to manhood. Remaining under the 
parental roof until twenty-two years of age, he 
then rented a part of the old homestead, which he 
cultivated for three years, after which he came to 
McDonough County. After renting land for six 
years in Eldorado Township, he purchased a 
tract of sixty acres, mostly covered with timber, 
but with characteristic energy he began its de- 
velopment and transformed it into rich and fertile 
fields. In 1883, he sold that farm and purchased 
one of one hundred and twenty acres in Bethel 
Township, which he yet owns, although in 1892 
he removed to Table Grove, where he is now liv- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ing a retired life. He was married October 15, 
1850, to Nancy, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth 
Bottenburg. They have become the parents of 
fifteen children, of whom fourteen are now living, 
viz.: Jacob; Elizabeth, wife of John Ayres; La- 
vina, wife of Edward Fleury; Ella, wife of Wes- 
ley Harrison; Mattie, wife of W. H. Foster; 
Jane, wife of Alonzo Foster; Mary, wife of Orrin 
Dunsworth; Belle, wife of Douglas Dunsworth; 
Myrtle, wife of Harry Robinson; Evan, a dentist 
of Vermont; William K., a school teacher; Quen- 
ton, who is clerking; Frederick and May, at 
home; and Ida, who died January 16, 1865. The 
mother of this family died December 25, 1891, 
and was laid to rest in Bethel Cemetery. She 
was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church, as is Thomas Baily. He is a Democrat 
in politics, and has served as Supervisor, Assessor, 
Collector and School Treasurer. As he takes an 
active interest in all public enterprises, he is 
numbered among the valued citizens of the com- 
munity. 

Jacob L, Baily whose name heads this record 
acquired his early education in the public schools 
of the neighborhood, and in the winter of 1871- 
72 attended college in Oberlin, Ohio. The fol- 
lowing year he was a student in Evanston, 111. 
At the age of eighteen he embarked in the pro- 
fession of teaching, which he followed alto- 
gether for four years. Wishing to take up the 
study of law and make its practice his life work, 
he spent the winter of 1873-74 nl fitting himself 
for his chosen profession in Lincoln University. 
He afterwards read law with W. H. Neece, of 
Macomb, and in 1876 was admitted to the Bar. 
At the same time William Prentiss was admitted 
to the Bar and the two gentlemen formed a part- 
nership, which continued until i89i,when Mr. 
Prentiss removed to Chicago. In October of the 
same year, Mr. Baily was joined in business by 
W. H. Holly, and the firm of Baily & Holly has 
since had a continuous existence. 

On the 12th of August, 1875. Mr. Baily led to 
the marriage altar Miss Lois C. Foster, daughter 
of John N. and Jane Foster, early settlers of Mc- 
Donough County. Their family now numbers 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



299 



two children, Jessie and Frances. They hold 
membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and are well-known people of this community. 

In his social relations, Mr. Bail}- is connected 
with the Knights of Pythias Lodge, and is a 
Knight Templar Mason. He cast his first Pres 
idential vote for Samuel J. Tilden, and has since 
been a stalwart advocate of the Democracy. He 
takes quite a prominent part in campaign work. 
In his profession he has been eminently success- 
ful, having secured a very large practice. 



6=^_ — <^_ S<?T>(=i ^> 

~LDER JAMES SMITH GASH, ex-Post- 
T) master of Macomb, is one of the most popu- 
__ lar and best known citizens of McDonough 
County, where for many years he has lived, hav- 
ing the acquaintance of almost every individ- 
ual in the city and that of many others through- 
out this part of the State. He is a native of Mer- 
cer County, Ky.. his birth having there occurred 
on the 30th of May, 1833. His parents, John J. 
and Man- Thomas (Jackson) Gash, werebothna- 
tives of Kentucky, and tradition says that the 
family is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His grand- 
parents, John and Ann I Wood 1 Crash, lived in 
Kentucky, being descended from Virginian fami- 
lies. The father was a farmer by occupation.' 
Bringing his wife and children to Illinois, he took 
up his residence in Rushville, Schuyler County, 
in 1835, and in 1852 removed thence to McDon- 
ough County. In March, 1856, in connection 
with Messrs. Anderson and Strong, he established 
the first lumber-yard in Macomb, but he did not 
long continue in that business, for death termi- 
nated his earthly career in November following. 
He passed away on the old home farm a mile and 
a-half from the city. Among the early settlers 
of the county he is numbered, and he was also 
recognized as one of its valued citizens. His wife 
survived him for some years, and was called to 
the home beyond on the 9th of December, 1873. 
They were the parents of thirteen children, of 
whom seven are yet living. The eldest, John J., 
is a resident of La Grange, 111. ; James S. is the sec- 



ond in order of birth: Henry Wood, George B. 
and Edgar, all make their home in Macomb; and 
Oscar and Hattie (wife of Samuel Jameson) re- 
side in Topeka, Kan. 

Mr. Gash of this sketch was but two years of 
age when he left the State of his nativity and ac- 
companied his parents on their emigration to Illi- 
nois. He acquired his early education in a log 
schoolhouse, but later attended the McDonough 
College, which was conducted under the auspices 
of the Presbyterian Church, where he pursued his 
studies for twenty months. He is now a well- 
informed man, who keeps versed on all the ques- 
tions and issues of the day. He began earning 
his own livelihood as a salesman in a retail mer- 
chandising establishment, and at the age of thirty- 
three years he became agent for the American 
Express Company. For a long period he filled 
that position, discharging his duties in a prompt 
and faithful manner, that won him the confidence 
of the company and of all with whom he came in 
contact. After twenty-three years' service he 
left the employ of the express company to ac- 
cept the appointment of Postmaster of Macomb, 
which was tendered him by President Harrison. 
The same fidelity to duty was here displayed dur- 
ing his term of four years, which has recently ex- 
pired, he being succeeded by a man of the same 
political views as the present Chief Executive of 
the nation. 

On the 7th of August, 1856, Mr. Gash was 
united in marriage with Mary K. Sweeney. They 
are both members of the Christian Church, and 
take a prominent and active part in its work. Mr. 
Gash united with the church in 1866, and has 
since engaged in preaching to a considerable ex- 
tent, being an ordained minister of the denomina- 
tion. He has accepted pastorates with several 
different churches, but other business duties have 
largely occupied his time, and his ministerial 
work has been confined greatly to supplying pul- 
pits throughout this part of the State. He is a 
great lover of music, in which he is quite pro- 
ficient. His voice is a fine profundo basso and 
he is a most excellent choir leader. In nearly all 
public gatherings where music forms one feature 
of the entertainment his voice is heard. For 



300 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



many years he has been a member of the glee 
clubs which have been engaged in campaign 
work. In politics, he has ever been a Republi- 
can since casting his first Presidential vote for 
John C. Fremont, and the principles of his party 
find in him a stalwart advocate. The Odd Fel- 
lows' society, the Knights of Pythias lodge, and 
the Patriotic Sons of America number him among 
their leading and valued members. His life has 
been well spent, and it is safe to say that few, if 
any, have more friends in McDonough County 
than James S. Gash. 

1=— ^H^P=— I 



0R. RALPH HARRIS is probably the oldest 
physician in this part of the State. He is 
now living retired, but for many years he 
was successfully engaged in practice in Illinois. 
He now makes his home in Macomb, and is one 
of its highly respected and honored citizens. A 
native of Charlotte County, Va. , his birth occurred 
April 6, 1812. His parents, Robert and Mary 
(^Bailey) Harris, were both natives of Virginia, 
and the grandparents on both sides came from 
Ireland, though of Scotch ancestry. In his na- 
tive State, Robert Harris followed farming and 
blacksmithing. He served as a soldier through- 
out the Revolutionary War, and held the rank of 
Captain in the Virginia troops. He was never 
wounded in battle, but on one occasion a bullet 
passed through his queue. At one time a num- 
ber of men in his regiment were taken prisoners, 
Mr. Harris among the number, but he and two of 
his comrades made their escape. They traveled 
by night through the woods, and slept in the day- 
time, for fear of detection. For some days they 
subsisted on nothing but roots and buds. One of 
the men fainted from want, and was resuscitated 
with water that was caught in the brim of the hat 
of one of his comrades, a shower having oppor- 
tunely fallen. 

Robert Harris was twice married. He first 
wedded a Miss Jackson, of Charlotte, Va., by 
whom he had seven children, and after her death 
he married Mary Bailey. His family altogether 



numbered eight sons and six daughters. Two of 
the seven children born of the second marriage 
are now living: Cornelia, who is the widow of 
Philip Anderson, residing with her daughter in 
North Carolina, and the Doctor. The latter was 
but four years old when his father died, and he lost 
his mother at the age of fourteen. 

In the county of his nativity, Dr. Harris spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth. When he 
was a lad of twelve his guardian told him that he 
had learning enough; but he did not think so. 
He had been bound out to learn the cabinet- 
maker's trade, and after serving for five years he 
paid $100 for his indentures. He then entered col- 
lege at Danville, Ky. , where he remained for a little 
more than two years, when his health failed him 
and he was forced to leave school. Some years 
later, however, the degree of A. M. was conferred 
upon him. He had completed nearly the entire 
course of Greek and Latin in two years. 

Young Harris then took up the study of medi- 
cine at home, and also studied theology. He en- 
tered upon the work of the ministry as a member 
of the Pennsylvania Presbytery in 1838, and was 
ordained in 1842. For a quarter of a century 
thereafter he engaged in preaching. His health 
then broke down, and he began the practice of 
medicine. In 1869, he was graduated from 
Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, and was 
then successfully and continuously engaged in 
practice until 1884, when he retired to private life. 
He also during that time filled various pulpits, 
but never accepted a regular pastorate, as his 
health would not permit the additional labor. 

Dr. Harris first came to Macomb in 1849, an< ^ 
took charge of McDonough College. He con- 
tinued in this city for six years, as pastor of the 
Presbyterian Church, and as a teacher in the col- 
lege. In 1855, he removed to Missouri, and set- 
tled upon a farm near Cameron, DeKalb County. 
He had charge of various country churches in 
that locality, and while there was injured in a 
railroad disaster, caused by the rebels having 
burned the bridge over'the Platte River, nine miles 
east of St. Joseph. Out of one hundred and four 
persons there were twenty-four killed. The Doc- 
tor was taken from amid the debris, and it was 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



301 



thought that he was dead, but after a time con- 
sciousness returned to him. He knew nothing of 
the accident, however, until it was all over. In 
1861, he again came to Macomb, and in 1881 he 
made a permanent location here. 

On the 2d of October, 1834, Dr. Harris married 
Miss Martha P. Hughes, who lived near Danville, 
K.y., and was a daughter of William and Jane 
(Sneed) Hughes. They became the parents of a 
daughter, Ellen Amanda, now the wife of Ed Ma- 
guire, of Macomb, by whom she has six children, 
namely: Martha Rosalind, Mary Rachel, Sarah 
Isadora, Hattie Thomas, James Ralph and Edward 
Calvin. On the 31st of May, 1837, the Doctor 
wedded Miss Mary P. Wilson, daughter of James 
and Elizabeth (Stewart) Wilson, of Kentucky. 
Their marriage was celebrated in Rock Castle 
County, and was blessed with a family of six sons 
and four daughters, but James H. R. is now de- 
ceased. The latter married Harriet Maguire, and 
they had one child, Frank W. Robert Campbell, 
the second child of the Doctor, was a soldier of 
the Union army, and was taken prisoner by the 
guerrillas in Missouri, tied up by the thumbs, dis- 
emboweled and thrown into the Platte River. 
William Thomas, who is engaged in the practice 
of medicine in Keosauqua, Iowa, married Miss 
Lottie Herrick, and they have a daughter, Lenna 
Pearl; Ralph Erskine, a machinist and plumber 
of Macomb, wedded Martha Jackson, and they 
have four children: Florence Ellen, Ralph C, 
Mary Isadore and Lela. John G. is deceased. 
Mary E. became the wife of William Carter, and 
the}- had four children: Jessie, Dollie, Ruby and 
William. After the death of her first husband, 
she married Jesse York, and they became the par- 
ents of one son, Harris. Mrs. York died in Feb- 
ruary, 1892. Sarah C. is the wife of J. J. Mc- 
Dannold, of Mt. Sterling, Congressman from the 
Twelfth District, by whom she has two children, 
Malcolm and Helen. Charles, an attorney-at-law 
of Galesburg, married Miss Addie Anderson, and 
to them have been born two children: Nina and 
Lillian. Dollie, who complets the family, is the 
wife of Ira Pillsbury, of Macomb, and they have 
three sons, George M., Ira H. and Walter E. 

During the late war. Dr. Harris served as Chap- 



lain of the Eighty-fourth Illinois Infantry for six 
months, and was then discharged on account of 
physical disability. His son Thomas was a soldier 
of the same regiment, and after being shot through 
the jaw at the battle of Stone River was mustered 
out of service. In his political views, the Doctor 
is a stalwart Republican. He is numbered among 
the oldest residents of Macomb, and is a man 
whose upright life and sterling worth have made 
him one of the most highly esteemed citizens of 
the community. 

["RANK H. MAPES, who is now connected 
r3 with the Bank of Macomb, was born in Bu- 
I reau County, 111., on the 25th of June, 1865, 
and is a son of Elder George W. and Martha E. 
(Dennison) Mapes, both of whom were natives of 
New York. His father was born April 30, 1825, 
his mother in May, 1827, and their marriage was 
celebrated in August, 1850. They became the 
parents of a family of six children, four sons and' .- 
two daughters, but one of its number, Ella, died 
at the age of nine years. Wheeler M., the eldest, 
is now a railroad conductor, and resides in Des 
Moines, Iowa. Charles is a traveling salesman in 
the employ of a boot and shoe house, and makes 
his home in Hutchinson, Kan. George G. is 
cashier in a bank and proprietor of a hotel in 
Moran, Kan. Franchetie is the wife of M. A. 
Hitchcock, a prominent dry-goods merchant of 
Macomb. Frank H. completes the family. 

Elder Mapes is largely a self-made man. He 
had no special advantages in his youth; indeed, 
his privileges were meagre, and while following 
the plow he studied the Bible. He began preach- 
ing in Walnut, Bureau County, 111., in 1857, and 
later was pastor of the Christian Church in 
Princeton, 111. Subsequently, he preached in 
Putnam and Washington, and then came to Ma- 
comb, where he remained for five years. During 
this time, and largely through his instrumentality, 
the present house of worship of the Christian 
Church was erected. At length failing health 
caused him to resign, and he removed to his farm 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in Bureau County, whence lie afterward went to 
Clarksville, Mo. Later, he made his residence in 
Montezuma, Iowa, and in 1890 he again ac- 
cepted a call from the church in Macomb, where 
he remained two years. He is now pastor in 
Fairfield, Iowa. Throughout this community he 
has a wide acquaintance, and by all who know 
him he is most highly respected. 

Mr. Mapes whose name heads this record at- 
tended the public schools in the different locali- 
ties where his parents resided, and completed his 
literary education in Painesville Academy. Wish- 
ing to engage in the drug business, he entered 
the store of John M. Keefer, of Macomb, and at 
length became a licensed pharmacist. For seven 
years he was engaged in business along that line, 
and for two years of that time he was the propri- 
etor of a drug store. 

On the 1st of March, 1892, Mr. Mapes led to 
the marriage altar Miss Clara Chandler, of Ma- 
comb. They are well-known young people of 
this city who rank high in social circles, and their 
friends are many. They have one son, George 
Chandler, born in 1893. 

After continuing in the drug business in his 
own interest for two years, Mr. Mapes disposed 
of his store and entered the Bank of Macomb, 
with which he is now connected. In his social 
relations, he is a Royal Arch Mason, and also 
holds membership with the Modern Woodmen of 
America. In politics, he is a Republican, and 
cast his first Presidential vote for Gen. Benjamin 
Harrison. 



^+^ 



HON. JONATHAN HASKELL BAKER, a 
prominent early citizen of Macomb, who 
served his fellows in various official capaci- 
ties, and was a leader at the Bar, was born in 
Walpole, N. H., May 8, 1817. He came of New 
England lineage, his ancestors having settled in 
that portion of the country- at so early a date that 
the exact time is not now discoverable. When 
only seven years of age he was left fatherless, and 
bound out to a farmer, with whom he remained ten 



years. At the expiration of that time, his "mas- 
ter" permitted him to enter a dry-goods store in 
Walpole as clerk, where he remained until he at- 
tained his majority. 

In the year 1838 he became thoroughly imbued 
with the idea that the then far western country 
known as Illinois was a proper field for a young 
man like him, full of energy and industry, and 
accordingly he made his way hither and settled 
in Macomb. The journey consumed twenty-seven 
days. He was not backward about the em- 
ployment which he might obtain, so long as it af- 
forded him an honest maintenance and an oppor- 
tunity for advancement, and he set to work at the 
first thing offered, which was labor in a brickyard, 
where he continued nearly a year. His natural 
ability and his business education brought him to 
the notice of James M. Campbell, who offered him 
a position as clerk, and this he accepted. He re- 
mained with Mr. Campbell two years, and then 
formed a partnership in the grocery business with 
Joseph P. Updegraff, which continued a number 
of years. 

In the year 1845, Mr. Baker received the ap- 
pointment of Postmaster at Macomb, and held that 
position four years. He engaged in the mercan- 
tile business with Charles Chandler in 1846, and 
during the remainder of his term as Postmaster 
the office was kept in their store. Mr. Baker re- 
mained in this business nine years, and at the 
expiration of that time ( 1855) went into the real- 
estate, or " land office, " business, as it was then 
called. He was appointed County Clerk in 1858, 
to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of Isaac 
Grantham, and served until 186 1. After the close 
of his term as Clerk, he engaged in the grocery' 
business with Joseph Burton, and remained in that 
line until 1865. 

Having given considerable time to the study of 
law, at the last-named date he formed a co-part- 
nership with W. H. Neecefor the practice of law, 
which continued until 1877, at which time he was 
elected County Judge. He served the four-years 
term to which he was elected, and was re-elected 
in 1 88 1, and served a second term. He was out 
of office four years, but was again nominated and 
elected in 1889 to the same office, and served 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



303 



therein until the time of his death, which occurred 
on the 31st day of August, 1890. 

Mr. Baker was married to Miss Isabelle Hemp- 
stead on the 14th day of March, 1843, at Macomb. 
Of this marriage four children were born, who 
survive him, viz.: Clara A., the wife of C. V. 
Chandler, whose biography will be found else- 
where in this work; Mary C, wife of E. L. Wells, 
of Macomb; Isabelle, wife of George A. Tunni- 
cliff, a prominent lawyer of Macomb; and Joseph 
H, who resides with his mother. Mrs. Baker is 
a daughter of Stephen Hempstead and Mary L- 
LeFevre, and was born in St. Charles, Mo., to 
which place her parents had moved from New 
London, Conn., a short time previous to her birth, 
At the age of eight or nine years, she was made 
an orphan by the death of her mother, who per- 
ished in the cholera epidemic of 1833. She was 
soon after sent by her brother (the father being 
absent) to McDonough County, where she made 
her home with her sister, Mrs. James M. Camp- 
bell, until the time of her marriage. 

The Macomb Journal, in speaking of Judge Ba- 
ker, pays the following just tribute to his memory: 
" He has always been a faithful and efficient offi- 
cial, and, though a strong Democrat, never carried 
partisanship into official life. He was a useful 
member of society. Industrious, sober, quiet and 
unobtrusive of demeanor, he was a pattern that 
young men may well follow. His life was full of 
years. As husband and father, neighbor and 
friend, he was a model. He leaves behind the 
record of a life well spent." 

Rev. L J. Dinsmore, formerly pastor of the Uni- 
versalis! Church of Macomb, speaking of Judge 
Baker's death, says: "This comes as a severe 
blow to the friends of our church in Macomb, 
where Judge Baker had been an honored and use- 
ful resident for more than fifty-three years. He 
was an honest and capable business man, widely 
known and universally respected. He had held 
important public offices for many years, and at the 
date of his death was Judge of Probate for Mc- 
Donough County. His name was intimately as- 
sociated with the early history of our church in 
that portion of the State, and his personal char- 
acter illuminated his Universalist profession. He 



was a thorough gentleman of the old school, dig- 
nified in his bearing, but kindly-hearted and good 
to the poor. It was said by one who knew what 
he was talking about that Judge Baker had done 
more good to the people of McDonough County, 
for less money, than any other man who ever lived 
in it. * * * He was a man of strong 
convictions, and fearless in their expression. He 
lived and died on the high grade of thoughtful, 
sincere and outspoken Universalism." 

6" ■ ° - 1=3 < T *> l=i ;S * 

HON. WILLIAM H. NEECE is probably one 
of the best known members of the Democracy 
in Illinois. For many years he has been 
prominent in politics, not as a politician in the 
commonly accepted sense of the term, but as a rep- 
resentative of the people, true to their interests and 
their welfare. He was born February 26, 1831, 
near Springfield, in what is now Logan, but was 
then a part of Sangamon County, 111., and is a 
son of Jesse and Mary D. (Maupin) Neece, the 
former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of 
Virginia. The Neece family is of German origin, 
but was founded in America prior to the Revolu- 
tionary War, for Peter Neece, the grandfather of 
our subject, valiantly aided in the struggle for 
independence. Mr. Neece now has in his posses- 
sion a Continental bill, the denomination of which 
is .£250, equal to $1,250 in our currency, and 
payable in Spanish milled dollars. 

After his marriage, which was celebrated in 
Kentucky, Jesse Neece removed to Greencastle, 
Ind., in 1824. There he remained for six years, 
and in 1830 became a resident of Sangamon 
County, 111., but after a short time he came to 
McDonough County, reaching his destination in 
April, 1 83 1 . The journey was made with wagons, 
drawn by horses and oxen, and the trip proved a 
laborious one. In the early spring, the rich soil 
of Illinois is deep mud, through which they had 
to make their way slowly. The family bore many 
of the hardships of pioneer life, and became fa- 
miliar with all the experiences of the frontier. 
To Jesse and Mary Neece were born ten children, 



3<H 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of whom four are yet living: Mrs. Icabinda West- 
fall, of Beatrice, Neb.; Artemus V., of Colches- 
ter, 111.; George W., ofBrookfield, Mo.; and Will- 
iam H., of this sketch. The mother of this fam- 
ily died in November, 1837, after which Mr. 
Neece was again married. By his second mar- 
riage he had three children. He became a well- 
known farmer of McDonough County, and in 
connection with agricultural pursuits he for many 
years engaged in the practice of medicine. His 
death occurred on the 16th of October, 1869, when 
the community felt that it had lost one of its best 
citizens. 

William H. Neece acquired his education in 
the common schools of this county, and in early 
life was inured to hard labor. During his youth, 
he engaged in breaking the prairie with an ox- 
team. Later he engaged in boating on the Illi- 
nois River, and worked at pork-packing. He also 
added to his income by running a threshing-ma- 
chine, and during the gold excitement in Cali- 
fornia, he crossed the plains to the Pacific Slope, 
in 1853. The journey was made with an ox- 
team. After five months, he reached Oregon, and 
another month was spent on the road to San 
Francisco, from whence he went to the Decosnus 
River. He was accompanied by his brother, 
George W. Mining, however, proved an un- 
profitable investment for Mr. Neece, and, going to 
Sacramento, he there secured a position as cook. 
In 1854, he went to Grass Valley, and engaged 
in mining in the gulches, but at length he re- 
turned home by way of the Panama route and 
New Orleans, having found that fortunes were 
not always so easily secured in California as rep- 
resented. At odd intervals and in leisure mo- 
ments in the mean time, he had been reading law, 
and now entered regularly upon its study in the 
office of Bailey & Van Fleck. In 1858 he was 
admitted to the Bar. He also engaged in pur- 
chasing land for the firm of Baker & Co. , secur- 
ing the same through soldiers' titles. 

On the 3d of May, 1857, Mr. Neece was united 
in marriage with Miss Janette Ingals, daughter 
of Thompkins and Esther Ingals. The lady is a 
native of Otsego County, N. Y. To them were born 
three children: Jesse T., who was educated in the 



Macomb High School and in the Northwestern 
University of Chicago, and is now engaged in 
the practice of law with his father; Dr. William 
A., a dentist of Macomb; and Orson B., who 
died October 5, 1888. 

After his admission to the Bar, Mr. Neece 
opened a law office in Macomb, and has since 
been successfully engaged in practice. He is 
recognized as one of the best criminal lawyers in 
this part of the State, and has won a reputation 
at the Bar of which he may well be proud, for he 
stands at the head of his profession in this locality. 
He defended Miles Bond, who was charged with 
the killing of William H. Randolph, United 
States Marshal , and was one of the attorneys for 
Tom Johnson, arrested for the murder of Owen, of 
Henderson County. He was also retained in the 
defense of Albert Head, who was charged with 
the murder of his cousin, Charles O. Head, and 
defended Gick, Payne and Davis, the murderers 
of Thomas Edmundson. Dr. Saunders was also 
tried for the same offense, and Mr. Neece assisted 
in defending him. Gick was sent to the peni- 
tentiary for life, Payne for eight years, Davis for 
one year, and Dr. Saunders was cleared. He also 
defended Frank and William Butler, of Prairie 
City, charged with the murder of a brother, and 
the decision of "guilty" pronounced by the Cir- 
cuit Court was reversed by the Supreme Court, 
and the defendants discharged. In connection 
with his extensive legal practice he has also been 
continuously engaged in farming and stock-rais- 
ing, and operates one of the largest farms in Mc- 
Donough County. 

The official life of our subject began in 1861, 
when he was elected Alderman of Macomb from 
the First Ward. In 1863 he was elected to the 
State Legislature, and in 1869 was made a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Convention. Grant had 
carried the county by a large majority the previous 
year, but Neece, running far ahead of his ticket, 
was sent to the convention. In 1869 he was again 
chosen as Representative, and took an active part 
in framing the laws under the new constitution. 
In 1872 he was nominated for the position of 
State Senator. The Republican party had a ma- 
jority of about one thousand, and that he could 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 




W. A. COMPTON. 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



305 



overcome this strong opposition indicates his great 
personal popularity and the confidence and trust 
reposed in him. In 1882 he was elected to Con- 
gress from the Eleventh District, comprising Rock 
Island, Mercer, Henderson, Hancock, Schuyler, 
McDonough and Warren Counties, and was chosen 
his own successor in 1884. In 1886 he was again 
the candidate of the Democracy, but was defeated 
by William Gest, of Rock Island, although he 
ran nineteen hundred and thirty-four votes ahead 
of the Democratic ticket in the district. In 1892 
he was prominently talked of for Governor. His 
course in public office has always been straight- 
forward. He has the courage of his convictions, 
and one who cares to ascertain can easily find out 
011 which side he stands. He is a man of the 
people, in touch with the people, and has their 
confidence and respect, for he has labored for 
their interests and done all in his power to pro- 
mote the general welfare. 

Socially, Mr. Neece is connected with the Odd 
Fellows' society. His first Presidential vote was 
cast for Franklin Pierce, and since that time he 
has never wavered in his support of the Democ- 
racy. He is void of ostentation and display, be- 
ing plain and unassuming in manner — a practical 
man, with a large amount of common sense. He 
does not win friends rapidly to lose them, but al- 
ways retains the high regard of those with whom 
he has been brought in contact, and in the com- 
munity where he is best known his friends are the 
most numerous and of the stanchest kind. His 
life has practically been passed in McDonough 
Count}-, and its history would be incomplete 
without his record. 



&+& 



(ILLIAM A. COMPTON, an ambitious and 
rising young lawyer, who is now success- 
fully engaged in practice in Macomb, was 
born in Scotland Township, McDonough County, 
on the 5th of March, 1864. He is a son of Henry 
and Sarah J. (Smith) Compton, the former a na- 
tive of Ohio, and the latter of Illinois. They were 
the parents of nine children, seven of whom are 



yet living, two sons and five daughters. Eliza 
J., the eldest, is the wife of Frank Starus, of Can- 
ton, 111. Mary C. is the wife of William E. Har- 
vey, of Stanberry, Mo. Ella V. is the wife of 
George A. Walker, who also resides in Stanberry ; 
Rosa A. is the wife of William F. Kelley, of Adair, 
111. John W. is located in Des Moines, Iowa. 
Ollie M. is at home. Edward and Arabel died in 
infancy. 

The paternal great-grandfather of the subject 
of this sketch was born in Ireland, about the year 
1750, and his wife, whose family name was Hill, 
was born in Germany, about 1757. About 1790, 
they emigrated to this country and settled in 
Hazeltown, Ya., where their son, Henry Comp- 
ton, was born soon afterward. The latter was a 
shoemaker, and worked at his trade for a number 
of years in Virginia. He migrated from Virginia 
about the year 1820, and settled on a farm near 
Royalton, Fairfield County, Ohio, where his son 
Henry, the father of William A. Compton, was 
born November 10, 1828. 

Mr. Compton's maternal great-grandfather, 
Thomas Delap, was the son of a Frenchman. He 
was born in 1781, in Kentucky, lived to a great 
age, and died in 1873, at his home near Burling- 
ton, Iowa. The maternal grandfather, David 
Smith, followed both agriculture and broom-mak- 
ing. He also reached a ripe old age, and his wife 
is still living. 

Henry Compton and his wife, grandparents of 
the subject of this notice, moved from Ohio about 
1846, and settled on a farm in Madison County, 
111., where the balance of their days was spent. 
In 1849, their son Henry returned to Ohio and 
remained one year. After living two years in 
Schuyler County, 111., he moved, in the fall of 
1852, to Iowa, and married Sarah J. Smith at 
Burlington, in that State, on the 25th of Septem- 
ber of that year. He remained in Burlington un- 
til the spring of 1856, and at that time moved to 
McDonough County, 111. After living one year 
011 a farm near Industry, he spent a year on 
what is known as the " Milton Knight farm," in 
Scotland Township. From there he moved to 
Muscatine, Iowa, where he purchased a farm, 
upon which he lived until the spring of 1861, 



3o6 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



when he finally returned to McDonough County. 
He lived on the farm of his father-in-law, David 
Smith, until 1864, at which time he bought the 
eighty-acre farm which he still owns in Scotland 
Township, and whereon he dwelt up to March, 
[893, when he laid aside business cares and has 
since lived retired in Macomb. He and his wife 
have for many years been members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, and are highly respected 
people. 

W. A. Compton whose name heads this record 
was reared to manhood upon his father's farm, 
and acquired his early education in the district 
schools. He afterward attended the Macomb 
Normal College, and was graduated therefrom in 
1885. His first independent effort in life was as 
a school teacher. He followed that profession for 
five terms, but, wishing to make the practice of 
law his life work, he studied the principles and 
standards of that profession, and was admitted to 
the Bar November 21, 1888, in Springfield. Dur- 
ing the same winter he was filling the position of 
Principal of the public schools of Bentley, Han- 
cock County, 111. 

On the close of the school year, Mr. Compton 
came to Macomb, where he opened a law office 
and also began dealing in real estate. A year 
later he was married to Miss Pearl Shriner, the 
second daughter of Levi and Harriet (Collins) 
Shriner, of Macomb Township. Their union was 
celebrated on the 5th of March, 1890, on the twen- 
ty-sixth anniversary of his birth. Mrs. Compton 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and is a most estimable lady, who has many friends 
throughout the community. 

Mr. Compton holds membership with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He is the owner of a fine farm, of one 
hundred and forty acres, situated on sections 22 
and 28, Lamoine Township, besides his residence 
at No. 432 S. Randolph Street, a block of ground 
in the Simmons' Addition, a house and lot in the 
Eastern Addition, and three lots in Twyman's Ad- 
dition. In politics, he is a stalwart supporter of 
the Democratic party and its principles and is one 
of the most popular and useful members of the 
party. He served as First Assistant Clerk in the 



House of Representatives during the Thirty-sev- 
enth General Assembly, to which position he was 
nominated by acclamation. When only twenty- 
four years of age he was a delegate to the State 
Convention, took an active part in the delibera- 
tions of that body, and seconded the nomination 
of Andrew J. Bell, of Peoria, for Governor. He 
is a man of splendid address and a brilliant talker, 
and stumped McDonough and adjoining counties 
for the Democratic ticket in the campaigns of 1888 
and 1892, gaining an enviable reputation as an 
orator. He is recognized as a leading young pol- 
itician of McDonough County. He was a candi- 
date for the nomination of County Judge, and also 
for Representative on two occasions. Though de- 
feated, he nevertheless gained a large following, 
and is recognized as a leader of the Democracy. 
He possesses more than ordinary ability, and his 
keen mind and quick perceptive faculties make 
him well adapted for his chosen profession. 



0LIN EMERY, editor and publisher of the 
Augusta Eagle, is one of the enterprising 
and progressive citizens of Augusta, always 
alive to the best interests of the place. He was 
born in Blaudinsville, 111., on the istof December, 
[868, and is a son of Dr. James H. and Rhoda E. 
( Hardisty 1 Emery. His paternal grandfather, 
Henry Emery, was a native of Pennsylvania, and 
was a fanner by occupation. He reared a large 
family, and lived to the age of seventy-two years. 
The maternal grandfather, J. V. M. Hardisty, 
was born in Kentucky, and about 1S30 emigrated 
to Illinois, locating in McDonough County. He 
is now living in Blaudinsville, and has reached 
the age of more than three-score years and ten. 

Dr. Emery, father of our subject, is a native of 
Richland County, Ohio. He is numbered among 
the early settlers of Illinois, whither he came in 
1840. He located near Galva, Henry County, 
and there made his home until i860. Having 
studied medicine, he began the practice of his 
chosen profession in 1S63, in Blaudinsville, and 
has there since made his home. He is a success- 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILL 
URBANA 




Charles J. Scofield 



POkTRAlT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



309 



ful physician, who has a high reputation, and, 
therefore receives a liberal patronage. In June, 
1893, he began the publication of the Blandins- 
ville Star, which he has since edited in connec- 
tion with his other business. He married Miss 
Hardisty, who was born in Blandinsville, and to 
them were born eight children, five sons and three 
daughters, seven of whom are yet living, namely: 
Oliti; James H.; Lois E., wife of Elmer L. Wise; 
Otto; Roscoe D. ; Daisy R. and Mamie O. 

Our subject is the eldest child of the family. 
The days of his boyhood and youth were spent in 
Blandinsville, and his education was acquired in 
the public schools of his native city. He was 
reared upon his father's farm, but not wishing to 
make agricultural pursuits his life work, he turned 
his attention to other interests, and began learn- 
ing the printers' trade. In the year 1891, he 
came to Augusta and purchased the Augusta 
Eagle, a Democratic journal, of which he is 
both editor and publisher. This is a bright and 
newsy sheet, ably edited and conducted, and 
from the public it receives a liberal patronage, 
which is constantly increasing, and which is well 
deserved. In his political views Mr. Emery is a 
Democrat, and warmly advocates the principles 
of that party. He is still a young man, yet is 
recognized as one of the valued citizens of this 
(immunity, for he is always found on the side of 
what pertains to the best interests of the county, 
and to its upbuilding and advancement. 



•3 HARLES JOSIAH SCOFIELD is one of the 
I C most prominent attorneys in the State, and 
{.) is now serving as Judge of the Sixth Judicial 
L strict of Illinois. Hancock County has no more 
highly-respected citizen, and that he has won a 
foremost place among his professional brethren is 
shown by the fact that when he was elected to his 
present office, he was the youngest Circuit Judge 
in the country. He was born in Carthage, Han- 
cock County, on Christmas Day, 1853, and is a 
son of Charles R. and Elizabeth Scofield. His 
father was born in De Wittville, Chautauqua 

15 



County, N. Y., and was a son of Darius and 
Sallie (Glenny) Scofield, the former a native of 
Stamford, Conn., and the latter of the city of 
Newry, Ireland. The mother of our subject was 
born in Kentucky, was of Scotch -Irish lineage, 
and was the daughter of Harrison and Alice Craw- 
ford. 

Charles R. Scofield died when his son Charles 
was only three years of age, being then in the 
prime of life. He had studied law, and about 
1 85 1 began its practice. His ability and talent 
were rapidly winning for him prominence in his 
profession, but after five years of successful prac- 
tice he was cut off by the hand of death. After 
losing her husband, Mrs. Scofield with her two 
children went to live with her father. The sec- 
ond son is Hon. T. J. Scofield, now Assistant At- 
torney-General of Illinois. He, too, has won 
success as a lawyer, and has a large practice in 
Quincy, where he lives with his wife and six 
children. 

The Judge spent the greater part of his child- 
hood and youth upon his grandfather's farm, 
about a mile from the city. His early education 
was acquired in the common schools, but he after- 
ward pursued a three-years course in a college, 
from which he was graduated at the age of seven- 
teen. When he was twenty } r ears of age, the de- 
gree of A. M. was conferred upon him. Soon 
after his literary education was completed, he be- 
gan teaching, and for three years had charge of 
the High School in Carthage. The profession to 
which his family had furnished several repre- 
sentatives attracted him, and during vacations he 
studied law in the office of his uncle, the Hon. 
Bryant T. Scofield, one of the ablest lawyers of 
the Bar of Hancock County. In the same office 
were William C. Hooker and George Edmunds. 
At the age of twenty-one, he was admitted to the 
Bar, and a few months thereafter was appointed 
Master in Chancery, which office he held for 
nearly ten years, or until his election to the Bench. 
When thirty-one years of age, he became one of 
the Judges of the Sixth Judicial Circuit, and on the 
expiration of his first term of six years was elected 
his own successor. He has also held court at 
many points outside of his circuit, among them 



31° 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Chicago, Galesburg and Morrison. In June, 
1893, he was appointed by the Supreme Court 
as one of the Judges of the Appellate Court for 
the Fourth District. 

On the 12th of September, 1876, Mr. Scofield 
was united in marriage with Miss Rose Spitler, 
an adopted daughter of Dr. Adam Spitler, of 
Carthage. Mrs. Scofield is a woman of more 
than ordinary intelligence, and is an active worker 
in the cause of Christ. As President of the Dis- 
trict Christian Woman's Board of Missions, she 
has done very efficient and satisfactory work in 
arousing and developing an interest in the mis- 
sionary field. 

■ Judge Scofield is a member of the Christian 
Church, and in connection with his labors as 
lawyer and Judge, he has served as pastor of the 
church in Carthage for fifteen years, his labors 
being performed without remuneration. His time 
and talent he gives to the cause, and during his 
pastorate the church membership has been in- 
creased from fifty to three hundred. He has also 
engaged to some extent in literary work, and is 
the author of an able volume, which was written 
to show some of the evils arising directly and in- 
directly from the liquor traffic. It was published 
in November, 1891, under the title of "A Subtle 
Adversary," and has had a large sale. It is fre- 
quently spoken of as "the Uncle Tom's Cabin of 
temperance reform, " and has been classed with 
Dickens' ' 'David Copperfield' ' and Wallace's ' 'Ben 
Hur," as among the greatest works of fiction in 
the English language. 

As a jurist, the Judge ranks among the best in 
the entire country. Few decisions of his are ever 
reversed, and he has the entire confidence of the 
Bar, not only in his own district, but wherever 
known. As a minister of the Gospel, he is elo- 
quent, forcible and logical. His legal studies 
have helped in the last direction. A firm believer 
in the Divine revelation, he does not hesitate to 
express his views fearlessly and intelligently upon 
disputed points among the higher and other 
critics. His Christianity none doubts, and he has 
the confidence and friendship of all of his religious 
neighbors without regard to creed. As a citizen, 
no one is held in higher esteem. His advice and 



counsel are sought by political friend and foe, by 
rich and poor, by the ignorant and learned, be- 
cause they know their confidence will never be 
betrayed, and any advice given will come from an 
honest heart. Socially, Mr. Scofield is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Mutual Aid, and 
of the Knights of Pythias. In his political views. 
he is a Democrat, and on that ticket was elected 
to the Bench, although he received the votes of 
many of other parties. 

lILLIAM H. HAINLINE is one of the lead- 
ing citizens of Macomb. He is now serv- 
ing as its Mayor, and is the editor and 
proprietor of the Macomb Journal. He is also 
one of the honored veterans of the late war, and 
his loyalty to his country is as manifest in days 
of peace as it was when he followed the Old Flag 
on the field of battle. Born in Emmett Town- 
ship, McDonough County, on the 29th of July, 
1841, he is a sou of John D. and Margaret A. 
(Douthitt) Hainline, both of whom were natives of 
Kentucky. The grandfather, George W. Hain- 
line, was also born in that State, and the great- 
grandfather of our subject removed from North 
Carolina to Kentucky in company with Daniel 
Boone. He was of German descent. He fought 
in the Indian wars with Boone, and lived to the 
ripe old age of eighty-five years. In 1838 the 
grandfather came to Illinois, where his death oc- 
curred in 1867. The maternal grandfather of 
W. H. Hainline was Lewis Douthitt. He, too, 
was a native of Kentucky, but because he was a 
Union man, he was driven out of that State dur- 
ing the war, and came to McDonough County. 
Later, however, he returned to his old home, 
where his last days were passed. He was a farmer 
and tanner, and owned about twenty slaves, which 
were freed through the emancipation proclama- 
tion. His death occurred when about ninety 
years of age. 

John D. Hainline, father of our subject, came 
to Illinois in 1838, and located in what was then 
known as the Spring Creek settlement, where he 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3ii 



has since made his home. Throughout life he 
has followed the occupation of farming, and there- 
by acquired a comfortable competence. During 
the time of the Mormon troubles he aided in driv- 
ing them from Nauvoo. An honored pioneer of the 
county for more than fifty -five years, he has wit- 
nessed its growth and upbuilding, and has ever 
borne his part in its development. His wife died 
in November, 1869, at the age of fifty-one, in the 
faith of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. 
They had a family of eleven children, five sous 
and six daughters, but only six of the number 
are now living, namely: W. H., of this sketch; 
Flora A., wife of Marcellus Shryack, of Warrens- 
burg, Mo.; Isabel, wife of Capt. B. A. Griffith, 
of Sciota; John Q., of Hire Township; Andrew 
J., of Macomb; and May, wife of William Stick - 
lenx, also of Hire Township, McDonough County. 
His eldest brother, George L. Hainline, fell dead 
by his side, shot through the head, at the battle 
of Bentonville, N. C, March 21, 1865. 

In taking up the personal history of our sub- 
ject, we present to our readers the life record of 
one of the native sons of McDonough County. 
He was reared to manhood under the parental 
roof, and the common schools afforded him his 
educational privileges. He continued at home 
until 1859, when, at the age of seventeen years, 
attracted by the discovery- of gold at Pike's Peak, 
he made a trip to that place, returning in the 
autumn. He then continued to engage in farm 
labor upon the old homestead until the beginning 
of the late war. Scarcely had the echo of Ft. 
Sumter's guns ceased to reverberate, when he 
offered his sen-ices to the Government, enlisting 
April 19, 1861, as a member of Company A, Six- 
teenth Illinois Infantry. After about three years 
he re-enlisted, January i, 1864, and continued in 
the service until after the close of the war. He 
participated in the battles of New Madrid, Island 
No. 10, the siege of Corinth, Buzzard's Roost, 
Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, 
Sherman's celebrated march to the sea, and the 
Carolina campaign, ending in the engagement at 
Bentonville, which was the last and most terrible 
battle in which his regiment participated. He 
was captured at Peach Tree Creek, and was in 



Andersonville Prison for sixty days, but by a 
special exchange he was returned to his regiment. 
During the last three years of his service, he held 
the rank of Corporal. Always faithful to his duty, 
he was a valiant defender of the Old Flag and the 
cause it represented. On the 8th of July, 1865, 
he was mustered out. 

When the country no longer needed his serv- 
ices, Mr. Hainline returned home, and was soon 
afterward elected County Treasurer. The office 
was entirely unsought by him, and he was the 
first Republican ever elected to that office in the 
county. On the expiration of his two-years term, 
he became interested in the drug business with 
P. H. Delaney, but after four years he sold out, 
and in June, 1870, purchased a half-interest in 
the Macomb Journal, owned by B. R. Hampton. 
This connection continued until 188 1, when he 
bought out Mr. Hampton's interest. He was 
then alone in business until 1884, when a stock 
company was formed, but Mr. Hainline has con- 
tinued as its editor and publisher. 

On the 1 6th of June, 1866, our subject was 
united in marriage with Miss Victoria, daughter 
of Jacob and Mary CMiller) Shleich, of Wurtem- 
berg, Germany. Two children were born to 
them, Maud L. and Mildred D. The former is 
the wife of Wade W. Meloan, a lawyer of Ma- 
comb, and they have one child, William. Millie 
is the wife of E. T. Walker, Cashier of the Citi- 
zens' Bank of Macomb, and they have a daughter, 
Caroline. Mrs. Hainline, who was a member of 
the German Reformed Church, died on the 24th of 
February, 1S74. Mr. Hainline was again mar- 
ried, January 24, 1879, his second union being 
with Miss Catherine L. Vorhees, daughter of 
Francis and Jane (Leslie) Vorhees, of Kingston, 
N. Y. They have two children, Jean L. and 
Andrew L. 

Mr. Hainline takes considerable interest in civic 
societies, and belongs to Macomb Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M.; the Knights of Pythias fraternity; Mc- 
Donough Post No. 103, G. A. R.; the Independ- 
ent Order of Mutual Aid; the Modern Woodmen 
of America; and the Home Forum. In politics, 
he is a stalwart supporter of the Republican party 
and its principles, is a member of the State Cen- 



312 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tral Committee, and does all in his power to aid 
in the growth and insure the success of the Re- 
publican party. He has been honored with vari- 
ous offices. He served as Alderman of the First 
Ward in 1868 and 1869, was a member of the 
Board of Supervisors for three years, and in 1893 
was elected Mayor of Macomb, which position he 
is now filling with credit to himself and satisfac- 
tion to his constituents. The standing of the 
Nla-corah Journal is well known, it being recog- 
nized as one of the best papers in this part of the 
State. Its editor is also well known, and few- 
citizens of McDonough County have more friends 
than Mr. Hainline, a popular and genial gentle- 
man, who has gained the respect and good-will of 
all with whom business or social relations have 
brought him in contact. 

(T E. LANE is one of Macomb's well-known 
I citizens. He is now serving as County Clerk 
O of McDonough County, a position which he 
has filled for some time. His life record is as 
follows: A native of Kentucky, he was born in 
Russell County, on the 1st of October, 1834, an d 
is a son of Gholson and Mary (Janes) Lane, both 
of whom were also natives of the same State. He 
was only one year old when, in 1836, his parents 
emigrated to Illinois, and took up their residence 
in Industry Township, McDonough County. The 
days of his boyhood and youth were quietly 
passed, and the public schools afforded him his 
educational privileges. 

Mr. Lane watched with interest the course of 
events which threatened to culminate in war, and 
after Ft. Sumter had been fired upon and the 
dissolution of the Union was threatened, he re- 
sponded to the call for troops, enlisting in April, 
1 86 1, as a private of the Sixteenth Illinois In- 
fantry. He served in the ranks until 1862, when 
he was appointed First Sergeant of Company A, 
and continued in that capacity until June 20, 
1864, when, his three-years term having expired, 
he was honorably discharged and returned to Ma- 
comb. He was a faithful soldier, and for a long 



period did arduous service at the front. His first 
campaign was in Missouri, and included many 
skirmishes, and the siege of Bird's Point and battle 
at New Madrid. At the latter point, the Tenth 
and Sixteenth Illinois Regiments captured five 
thousand men, with their entire equipment and 
munitions. The Sixteenth was in the reserve 
forces at Ft. Donelson and Pittsburg Landing, 
and marched from the latter point to Nashville, 
Tenu., where it spent the winter of 1862-63; it 
continued as a part of the Fourteenth Army 
Corps, in the Army of the Cumberland, and Mr. 
Lane was mustered out at Rossville, Ga., June 
20, 1864, having taken part in the battles of Buz- 
zard's Roost and vicinity, embracing a week's 
fighting in northern Georgia. 

Shortly after Mr. Lane's return, he was mar- 
ried, on the 20th of October, 1864, to Miss Josie 
A. Kendrick, daughter of W. H. Kendrick, of 
this city. Unto them has been born a son, Frank 
A. , who is now engaged in the practice of den- 
tistry in Macomb. 

Mr. Lane has been honored with various offi- 
cial positions since his residence here. In May, 
1865, he was appointed City Marshal, Assessor 
and Collector, and was re-appointed the next 
year, serving two years. In December, 1866, he 
received the appointment of Deputy Sheriff under 
Col. Sam. Wilson, and continued to fill that of- 
fice two years, and in the fall of 1868 he was 
elected County Sheriff for a term of two years. 
When that term had expired, he left Illinois and, 
in the fall of 1870, purchased a farm in Carroll 
County, Mo., which he operated until 1872. On 
the 24th of December of that year, he returned 
to Macomb, and on the 16th of January following 
purchased the interest of S. L. Babcock in a gro- 
cery store. Having formed a partnership with 
Joseph Updegraff, the firm of Updegraff & Lane 
continued in the grocer)- business for about a 
year, when the senior partner retired. Mr. Lane 
was then alone for about a year, when he admit- 
ted G. W. Pace to partnership. The new firm 
successfully carried on operations until the fall of 
1877, when they sold out. 

In the spring of 1866 Mr. Lane was elected 
Constable, and was re-elected, holding the posi- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3i3 



tion continuously until 1890, except during the 
two years he was Sheriff. In December, 1870, 
he was appointed Deputy Sheriff by Fred New- 
land, and was re-appointed in 1882 to serve four 
years. He is now holding the office of County 
Clerk, to which he was elected in November, 
1890. Mr. Lane has a wide acquaintance through- 
out McDonough County, and has many friends 
in Macomb. 

(TOHN M. DUNSWORTH. Jr., deceased, was 
I born in McDonough County, 111., near Col- 
\Z/ Chester, March 5, 1849, and died May 3, 1892, 
respected by all who knew him. He was a son 
of Wesley and Angeline (Vest) Dunsworth, his 
father being a well-known farmer, who settled in 
McDonough County in 1830. Our subject spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth near Colchester, 
no event of special importance occurring during 
that period of his life. He acquired a good edu- 
cation in the public schools of Macomb, and when 
his life as a student was ended he embarked in 
teaching, which profession he followed for years. 
His indomitable energy and perseverance are 
shown by the fact that he continued his teaching 
for some time, although he was forced to almost 
crawl to the school, being a cripple. He also 
served as County Superintendent of Schools four 
years, and in that position proved a capable and 
efficient officer, who by his faithful discharge of 
duty won the high commendation of all concerned. 
About 18S2, he removed to Plymouth and estab- 
lished the Enterprise, an independent paper, which 
he published for nine years. 

On the 3d of September, 1S85, in Bowen, 111., 
Mr. Dunsworth was united in marriage with Miss 
Rosa A. Adams, daughter of Charles G. and 
America H. (Taylor) Adams, who were natives 
of Kentucky , from which State they removed to 
Whitcomb, Ind., where Mis. Dunsworth was born 
and reared. Two children graced the union of 
our subject and his wife, Leroy and Glen A., but 
the latter died at the age of eight months. 

Mr. Dunsworth was a member of the Presby- 



terian Church, and his wife holds membership 
with the Methodist Church. He was one of the 
organizers of the Old Settlers' Association of Han- 
cock, McDonough and Schuyler Counties, and 
served as its Secretary for some time. After his 
death, his wife filled the office for one year. He 
continued the publication of the Enterprise for 
some time and met w r ith good success in the un- 
dertaking. His paper was ably edited, and was 
a neat, interesting sheet, which received hearty 
support throughout the community. Mr. Duns- 
worth was pleasant and genial in manner, and was 
a warm-hearted, whole-souled gentleman, who had 
a host of friends. He died May 3, 1892, from an 
accidental gunshot wound, at the age of forty-three 
years, one month and twenty-two days. 

By the request of her husband, Mrs. Dunsworth 
has continued the publication of the Enterprise 
since his death. She is a lady of good business 
ability, and possesses the necessary qualifications 
for a successful career in the journalistic field. 
She is now ably assisted by James E. Ewiug, who 
is serving as the local editor of the paper. He was 
born and reared in Plymouth and is well known 
throughout the county. 

g= S l e=J<- ? > Uu s a ) 

gVRON PONTIOUS', of Macomb, is recog- 
nized as one of the leading members of the 
McDonough County Bar. For the past four- 
teen years he has been engaged in practice in this 
city, and has rapidly worked his way upward, un- 
til he now stands in the front rank in his profes- 
sion in the county seat. He has a pleasant deliv- 
ery, and is a faithful, earnest and able advocate, 
who works untiringly for the interests of his cli- 
ents, and has therefore won their confidence and 
esteem. 

As Mr. Pontious has a wide acquaintance 
throughout this part of the State, we feel assured 
that his life record will prove of interest to many 
of our readers. A native of the Buckeye State, 
he was born in Ross County May 25, 1851, and 
is a son of Simon and Elizabeth (Bunn) Pontious, 
who were also natives of Ohio. The Pontious 



314 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



family originated in Holland. At an early day 
some of its representatives emigrated to Pennsyl- 
vania, and later some of its members removed to 
Ohio. In 1853, Simon Pontious came with his 
family to Illinois, and located upon a farm in Mc 
Donough County, where he carried on agricul- 
tural pursuits for a number of years. Of his five 
children, Leroy, the eldest, is now engaged in the 
lumber business in Lewist own, 111.; Lyman carries 
on merchandising in Adair; Anna M. is at home; 
Byron is the next younger; and Austin is engaged 
in farming near the old homestead. 

The gentleman whose name heads this record 
was reared in the usual manner of farmer lads, 
and early became familiar with all the duties of 
farm life. In his younger years he attended the 
district schools, but his early educational privi- 
leges were supplemented by study in Lombard 
University of Galesburg. On leaving that school 
in 1872, he engaged in teaching for a year, and 
then began clerking in a store in Adair. At 
length, with the capital he had acquired through 
industry and economy, he purchased an interest 
in the store, and finally became sole proprietor and 
carried on business along that line for a period of 
six years. In the mean time he began the study 
of law, reading under the instruction of Capt. 
Epperson and Maj. Barnes, of Bushnell, and in 
March, 1880, he was admitted to the Bar. In De- 
cember of the same year he opened an office in 
Macomb. 

On the 2d of April, 1873, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Pontious and Miss Ambrosia 
Woods, daughter of Morilla and Martha Woods, 
of McDonough County. Two children were born 
to them, a daughter and a son, but the former, 
Arah, died at the age of fifteen months. The 
latter, Ralph W., is now a student in Lombard 
University. Both Mr. and Mrs. Pontious hold 
membership with the Universalist Church, and in 
his social relations he is connected with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. 

In his political views, Mr. Pontious is a sup- 
porter of Democratic principles, and during his 
residence in Adair he served as Township Treas- 
urer for four years. He has continuously en- 
gaged in practice in Macomb since coming to this 



city in 1880, and is now doing a large and lucra- 
tive business. In February, 1888, he was ap- 
pointed Master in Chancery by Judge Schofield. 
In 1 89 1 he became associated in business with J. 
Ross Mickey, and this partnership still continues. 
Mr. Pontious is a pleasant and genial gentleman, 
who has many friends throughout the community 
and is highly respected by all. 

& ' "*~i^<! T '>lsa "' ' e> 

61 BSALOM G. BOTTS is the proprietor of a 
Ll feedmill in Plymouth. For many years he 
I I carried on farming in Hancock County, and 
is one of its leading agriculturists. He has long 
been recognized as one of its representative and 
valued citizens, and is numbered among the hon- 
ored pioneers who, since an early day, have aided 
in the growth and development of the county and 
in the promotion of the general welfare. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Seth 
Botts, was a native of Virginia, and throughout 
life followed farming. His death occurred in 
Kentucky at an advanced age. Among his fam- 
ily of five sons and three daughters was Joseph 
Botts, the father of our subject. He too was born 
in Virginia, but the greater part of his life was 
spent in other States. In 1836 he emigrated to Illi- 
nois, locating in St. Mary's Township, Hancock 
County, where throughout his remaining days 
he engaged in farming and preaching, for he was 
also a minister of the Baptist Church. His hon- 
orable, upright life won him the confidence and 
esteem of all, and his death was mourned by many 
warm friends. He passed away in 1882, at the 
advanced age of ninety years and six months, 
and his wife died in 187 1, at the age of seventy- 
nine years. The lady bore the maiden name of 
Sabra Wilkes, and was born in Virginia, as was 
her father. He was one of the heroes of the Rev- 
olution, and had a son who served in the War of 
18 1 2. His death occurred in Kentucky at an ad- 
vanced age. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Botts were 
born twelve children, six sons and six daughters, 
but only five of the number are now living: Ab- 
salom G.; James D., of Carthage; Ann, wife of 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3i5 



Ira G. Rhodes, of Brighton, Iowa; Jane, wife of 
John Logan, of MeDonough Count}-; and Louisa, 
wife of Daniel Barielo, of Nebraska. 

When a child of eight years, A. G. Botts ac- 
companied his parents on their emigration to Illi- 
nois, and was reared upon his father's farm in 
Hancock County, remaining at home until twenty- 
four years of age. He then started out in life for 
himself, and the occupation to which he was 
reared he resumed as a means of livelihood. His 
school privileges were such as were afforded by 
the old-time subscription schools. 

On the 8th of October, 1852, Mr. Botts wedded 
Sarah J. White, daughter, of Joseph and Maria 
(Armstrong) White, natives of Ohio. They be- 
came the parents of a family of four sons and two 
daughters, the eldest of whom is Robert. Joseph, 
who is living on St. Mary's Prairie, married Mrs. 
Gould, widow of Lewis Gould and a daughter of 
John T. Johnson. Jay married Miss Vernie Can- 
non, and lives on the old homestead. Ira is the 
next younger. Maria is the wife of Frank Yates, 
of Cawker City, Kan., by whom she has the fol- 
lowing children: Josie, Ivan, Ollie, Inez, Harry 
and Belle. Arabel completes the family, and is 
the wife of Robert Cloud, of St. Mary's Prairie. 
The mother died June 4, 1890, and Mr. Botts was 
again married, November 25, 1892, his second 
union being with Mrs. Rachel Crump, widow of 
Dr. Morris Crump, and a daughter of Joseph and 
Maria (Armstrong) White. She is a member of 
the Presbyterian Church, and is a most estimable 
lady. 

Mr. Botts holds membership with the Farmers' 
Alliance. He voted the Republican ticket from 
1856 to 1892, since which time he has affiliated 
with the People's party. Helms served as Town- 
ship Assessor and Treasurer, was Justice of the 
Peace two terms, and is now one of the Village 
Trustees. Prompt and faithful in the discharge 
of his public duties, he has proved an efficient 
officer. For fifty-seven years he has been a resi- 
dent of Hancock County. When he came here 
one could ride for miles across the prairie, with no 
fences to intercept his progress. Much of the 
land was still in possession of the Government, 
and the work of progress and advancement was 



largely a labor of the future. Mr. Botts has 
always borne his part in the upbuilding of the 
county, and well deserves mention among its hon- 
ored pioneers. 

1H ■ , °-s^~t"'> Eir * — m 

(Tames Alexander Anderson, dealer 

I in hardware and agricultural implements of 
(2/ Hamilton, was born in Botetourt County, 
Va., August 11, 1840, and is descended from old 
Scotch, Irish, Holland-Dutch and English fam- 
ilies. He comes of good old Revolutionary stock, 
as no less than eight of his ancestors served the 
Colonies as soldiers in their struggle for independ- 
ence. On his mother's side he traces his ancestry 
back to James Paxton, of County Armagh, Ire- 
land, whose ancestors were English, and whose 
son, Samuel Paxton, emigrated to America in 
early Colonial times, and settled in Pennsylvania, 
but afterward removed to Virginia. The latter's 
son, Thomas Paxton, married Betsy McClung 
for his first wife, and after her death wedded Polly 
Woods. William Paxton, a son of Thomas and 
Betsy Paxton, was the great-grandfather of the 
gentleman whose name heads this notice. He 
was a Revolutionary soldier, and married Jean 
Grigsby. The Grigsby family removed from 
Pennsylvania to Rockbridge County, Va., in 
1680. They were of Irish lineage. Elizabeth, 
daughter of William and Jean (Grigsby) Paxton, 
was the grandmother of Mr. Anderson. She 
married Alexander McClure, whose parents came 
from old Scotch families, the McClures and Trim- 
bles, who settled in Virginia prior to the Revolu- 
tion. Mary Ann, the mother of our subject, was 
a daughter of Alex and Elizabeth (Paxton) Mc- 
Clure, and was born in Rockbridge County, Va., 
three miles from the famous Natural Bridge, in 
1813, while her father was serving as a soldier in 
the War of 1812. 

On his father's side, Mr. Anderson traces his 
ancestry to James Anderson, who emigrated from 
Scotland and settled in Lancaster, Pa., about 
1750. In 1787 the family removed to Botetourt 
County, Va. About 1790, James Anderson, son 



3i6 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the above, married Ann Shirkey, daughter 
of Patrick and Ann (Pogue) Shirkey, the former 
a native of Ireland, and the latter of Holland. 
Patrick Shirkey served in the War for Independ- 
ence James and Ann ( Shirkey) Anderson had a 
family of ten children, namely: James, who was 
drowned in 1839, in Craig's Creek, near where 
that stream empties into the James River; Mar- 
garet, who became the wife of Elisha Bollinger, 
both being deceased; John, who died at the age 
of eighteen years; Elizabeth, who married W. A. 
Williamson, and both are deceased; George R., 
who died near Indianapolis, Ind., at the age of 
seventy-nine; Sallie, who became the wife of a 
Mr. Moten, and both died in Ft. Wayne, Ind.; 
Amelia, who is the widow of Thomas Paxton, 
and is living near Troy, Iowa; William, who died 
in the Confederate service during the Civil War; 
Ann, who is the widow of Joseph Lane, of Abing- 
don, Va.; and Matthew, who died November 22, 
1876. The last-named was the father of our sub- 
ject. On the 5th of October, 1839, he wedded 
Mary Ann McClure, and they became the parents 
of seven children: James Alexander: William P., 
a lumber dealer and farmer of Norcatur, Kan.; 
Elizabeth A., the wife of John Daw, a farmer of 
Montebello Township, Hancock County; Sallie 
G., who died in 1861, at the age of fourteen 
years; Mary A., who died in 1874, at the age of 
twenty-eight; Emma F., the widow of Harrison 
C. Miunick, of Hamilton; and George A., an 
attorney-at-law, of Quincy, and a member of the 
Fiftieth Congress. 

When a lad of thirteen years, James A. Ander- 
son left Virginia with his parents, the family emi- 
grating to Pendleton, Ind., where they remained 
one year. In 1 854, they came to Hancock County, 
settling near Basco, where the father purchased a 
farm. The educational advantages which our 
subject received were limited to those afforded 
by the district schools. He pursued his studies 
during the winter season, and in the summer 
months worked on a farm, aiding in the develop- 
ment and cultivation of the land. At the age of 
fourteen he began clerking, which he followed for 
a year, but at the expiration of that period he re- 
turned to the farm, where he continued until the 



spring of i860. Attracted by the discovery of 
gold at Pike's Peak, he determined to make an 
expedition to that place, and with two yoke of 
oxen started on the journey. He arrived in Den- 
ver on the 23d of May of that year, and thence 
went to Fair Play, to the gold mines, where he 
remained until the 1st of October. He then went 
to New Mexico, and spent the winter near Taos. 
On the nth of May, 1861, in company with three 
other men, he packed all his possessions on the 
back of a Mexican burro, and walked back to 
Fair Play, a distance of one hundred and ninety 
miles, arriving there nine days after leaving Taos. 
On the way back he met with other men who 
were also returning, but although they had not a 
dollar, they had plenty of provisions, and these 
they shared between them, so that when they 
reached Fair Play they had neither money nor 
food, only their camp utensils. Mr. Anderson then 
began to work for other miners who had their 
claims opened up, and was thus employed until 
he had saved enough to go to work on his own 
claim, of which he had obtained possession the 
year previous. 

There Mr. Anderson continued until August, 

1862, when he abandoned mining, and, going to 
a place near Denver, became a cow boy. On the 
back of a bronco he lived for about sixteen 
months, and at length, on the 29th of December, 

1863, started home on a visit, reaching his desti- 
nation on the 3d of February, 1864. At several 
places on the way home he could see evidences of 
Indian hostilities, graves of victims, smoking 
wagons, etc. This was the outbreak of the Sioux, 
Cheyenne and Arrapahoe War. After remaining 
at home for a short time and seeing old friends, 
Mr. Anderson returned to the West, and through 
the influence of William Paxton, the Omaha mil- 
lionaire, then a poor man, he took charge of a 
mule train across the plains. He made several 
trips, and at one time went as far as Ft. Laramie. 
On the 24th of June, 1865, he returned to Omaha, 
abandoned frontier life, and again went home. 
He then took up farming, which he continued 
until 1875, when he purchased a half-interest 
in Doty & Gordon's store at Basco, succeeding 
Mr. Dotv in the business. He retained his inter- 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3i7 



est until December 20, 1877, when, on the death 
oi' his lather, lie purchased the home farm, selling 
his share in the store to his brother William P. 
With good success he carried on agricultural 
pursuits until August, 188 1, when, in connec- 
tion with John Daw, he bought out Alex Watt, 
of Elvaston, and carried on general merchandising 
until February 5. 1SS9, when he sold out and 
came to Hamilton. Here he embarked in business 
as a dealer in hardware and agricultural imple- 
ments, and still continues the same. In 1890 
he built his fine residence in Hamilton, and re- 
moved into it on the 3d of December of that year. 

Mr. Anderson has been twice married. On the 
5th of October, 1875, he wedded Mary E., daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Nancy (Lyons) Mourning, who 
were natives of Adair County, Ky., but removed 
to this State in 1854. The union of the young 
couple was blessed with four sons, namely: Matt 
Mourning, George Clyde, Frank James and John 
Carroll, all of whom are at home. The mother 
died August 12, 1885. On the 1st of January, 
1889, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ander- 
son and Miss Nellie Jolidon, daughter of Francis 
J. and Dorcas (Thompson) Jolidon, who emi- 
grated to Illinois in 1S47. Her father's people 
were from France, and her mother's from Tennes- 
see. To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson has been born 
a son, Burns Jolidon, born October 27, 1892. 

In his political views, our subject is a stanch 
Democrat. He has been honored with a number 
of local offices, having served as Supervisor of 
Bear Creek and Prairie Townships. He was 
Chairman of the County Board of .Supervisors 
while representing the latter township in 1885. 
He was appointed Postmaster of Hamilton in 
February, 1894, and on the 19th of March his 
appointment was confirmed, and he is now per- 
forming the duties of that office. He was made 
a Mason, December 10, 1867, in Basco Lodge No. 
618, A. !•'. & A. M., in which he served as Wor- 
shipful Master for several years, a position which 
he also filled in the lodge at Elvaston while he 
affiliated there. He also belongs to Tecumseh 
Chapter No. 152, R. A. M.; Damascus Commaud- 
ery No. 5, K. T., of Keokuk; Montebello Lodge 
No. 697, I. O. O. P.; Puckechetuck Encamp 



ment No. 7, of Keokuk; and the Modern Wood- 
men of America; and he is a charter member of 
Rapid City Lodge No. 286, K. P. In religious 
belief, he is a Presbyterian. In his various busi- 
ness pursuits he has won success, and by a straight- 
forward, upright course has gained the confidence 
and esteem of a large circle of friends. 



(TOHN BLAZER, who for many years followed 
I fanning in McDonough County, is now liv- 
(2/ ing retired in Macomb, resting in the enjoy- 
ment of the fruits of his former toil. He began 
life in limited circumstances, but by well-directed, 
efforts, energy and perseverance, steadily worked 
his way upward and acquired a comfortable com- 
petence. 

Mr. Blazer was born in Washington County, 
Pa., May 12, 1814, and is a son of David and 
Sarah (Hoy) Blazer. His father was born on the 
old homestead, which came into possession of 
George Blazer, the grandfather of our subject, 
who obtained it before the Revolution from the 
Government. The last-named participated in the 
Indian wars, and erected what was known as Dil- 
lon's Fort, an old blockhouse, which was built for 
protectiou against the red men. 

On the 1st of January, 1836, John Blazer and 
his brother Charles left the old homestead and 
made their way to Steubenville, where they took 
a flatboat to Wheeling. At the latter place they 
boarded a steamer for St. Louis, and thence went 
up the Illinois River on the "Helen Marr" to 
Beardstown, where they landed on the 15th of 
January. Making their way to Rushville, they 
staid for a time with Dr. Teal, an old Revolu- 
tionary soldier, and then worked on the farm of 
William J. Frazer, a pioneer preacher of Mc 
Donough County. As soon as they aecpiired a 
sufficient capital, the Blazer brothers purchased a 
farm of Saunders Campbell, and the following 
year the father brought the other members of the 
family to the new home. He survived the re- 
moval only six weeks, however, his death here 
occurring in February, 1837. His wife survived 



3i8 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



him for sometime, and, with two of her children, 
removed to Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, where her death 
occurred just after the War of the Rebellion. 
Charles Blazer, who accompanied John to Illinois, 
afterward went to New Mexico, where he died in 
the month of June, 1879. 

More than half a century has passed since John 
Blazer became a resident of McDonough County, 
and with its history he is familiar from almost the 
beginning. He has been twice married, his first 
union being with Mary Montgomery. The wed- 
ding was celebrated February 15, 1852, and they 
became the parents of two children. The elder, 
James M., was born March 1, 1854, was reared 
on the home farm, and in 1874 was graduated 
from the Illinois Western University, at Bloom- 
ington. For two years thereafter he continued 
to aid his father in the cultivation of the home 
farm, and in 1875 began the study of law. In 
June, 1877, he was admitted to the Bar, and for a 
number of years successfully engaged in law prac- 
tice in Macomb, but is now engaged in the real- 
estate and insurance business in Chicago. He 
was married November 20, 1878, to M. Ada 
Laughlin, of Bloomington, and they have one 
child, Mary L- Charles H., the second son, is 
now living in East Liverpool, Ohio. The mother 
died when Charles was only six months old. 
He was then reared by an aunt in the Buckeye 
State. Our subject was again married, on the 19th 
of February, 1857, his second union being with 
Mary Ann Phillips. Her father, William Phil- 
lips, of Columbiana County, Ohio, was a repre- 
sentative of a pioneer family of that region. He 
was born in England, and when a child of twelve 
years came to America with his mother and step- 
father, the latter purchasing land where the town 
of East Liverpool now stands. Mrs. Phillips was 
a member of the Granville family, and was cast 
off because she married out of the nobility. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Blazer are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and their lives have 
been in harmony with their professions. They 
began their domestic life upon a farm, and for 
many years the husband gave his time and atten- 
tion exclusively to agricultural pursuits. His 
land was always under a high state of cultivation, 



the fields well tilled, and excellent improvements 
indicated to the passer-by that the owner was a 
thrifty and enterprising farmer. At length he 
left the old home, and, in 1889, came to Macomb, 
where he has since lived retired. He has a pleas- 
ant residence on South Randolph Street, and still 
owns two hundred and fifty acres of valuable land 
in Industry Township. His possessions have all 
been acquired through his own efforts, and he 
may truly be called a self-made man. 

In early life, Mr. Blazer was an Abolitionist, 
and voted for James G. Birney. Upon the organ- 
ization of the Republican party he supported Fre- 
mont, and continued to affiliate with that party 
for some time, but is now a Prohibitionist. He 
served as School Director for many years, and 
was also Trustee, but has never been an office- 
seeker. The cause of education, however, has 
always found in him a friend, and he gave a cor- 
ner of his farm on which to build a schoolhouse. 
He is a typical and honored pioneer citizen, a man 
of integrity and sterling worth, and it with pleas- 
ure that we present to our readers this record of 
his life. 

WILLIAM HUEY, a representative farmer 
and valued citizen of Hancock County, re- 
sides on section 14, St. Mary's Township. 
He was born in Boone County, Ky., October 19, 
1832, and is a son of John and Matilda (Rice) 
Huey, who were also natives of the same locality. 
The father was a farmer by occupation, and in 
1834 emigrated to Illinois, accompanied by his 
family. He located in Schuyler County, near 
Rushville, where he made his home for three 
years, and then came to Hancock County, pur- 
chasing eighty acres of laud on section 18, St. 
Mary's Township. To the original tract he added 
from time to time as his financial resources were 
increased, until at the time of his death his landed 
possessions aggregated six hundred and fifty acres. 
The greater part of this was richly improved, and 
yielded to him a good income. He lived in St. 
Mary's Township throughout his remaining days, 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



3i9 



his death occurring in 1872, when more than sixty 
years of age. His wife passed away a short time 
previous. They held membership with the Mis- 
sionary Baptist Church, and for many years Mr. 
Huey served as one of its Deacons, filling the of- 
fice at the time of his death. He aided in the ex- 
pulsion of the Mormons from the county, and held 
a number of township offices. He was one of the 
honored pioneers and had the confidence and high 
regard of all who knew him. 

In the Huey family were ten sons and two 
daughters, and nine of the number are now living, 
namely: Erastus; William; Frances Jane, wife of 
Dr. Turner; Robert; Agnes, wife of Reuben Gar- 
uett; James; George; Perry and Frederick. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Samuel 
Huey, was a native of Virginia, and removed 
thence to Kentucky, becoming one of the pioneer 
settlers of Boone County. His death was occas- 
ioned by injuries caused by a tree falling upon 
him. He served as a soldier in the War of 1812, 
and always followed farming as his life work. 
The maternal grandfather, Ezekiel Rice, was a 
southern gentleman, and for many years followed 
farming in Boone County, Ky., where he died at 
a ripe old age. 

Our subject was only eighteen months old when 
he was brought by his parents to Illinois. He was 
reared in St. Mary's Township, acquired his ed- 
ucation in its common schools, and remained at 
home with his parents until after he had attained 
his majority. By his first purchase of land he be- 
came the owner of a tract on section 14, where he 
has since made his home. His farm formerly was 
quite extensive, but he gave eighty acres to his 
son and has sold a considerable portion, but still 
retains possession of one hundred and fifty acres. 
This is a valuable tract, which is highly cultivated 
and improved, being supplied with all accessories 
and conveniences of a model farm. 

On the 28th of October, 1855, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Huey and Miss Margaret, 
daughter of Benjamin and Cynthia (Johnson) Tal- 
bott, natives of Champaign County, Ohio. Seven 
children have been born to them, as follows: 
Miriam M., wife of Rev. J. F. Foley, a Baptist 
minister, by whom she had two children, one 



yet living, William. Mrs. Foley is now deceased. 
L,ucy A., Sylvester and Cynthia have also passed 
away. Sheridan married Miss Lula Scott, and 
they became the parents of two children, one yet 
living, Blanche. For his second wife he married 
Leona Ruggles, and they make their home in St. 
Mary's Township. Alfred Pearlie completes the 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Huey and their two sons are 
members of the Baptist Church, and in politics he 
is a stalwart Republican. A representative of an 
honored pioneer family, he has witnessed almost 
the entire development of this county and is one of 
its best citizens. He is plain and unostentatious 
in manner, but possesses a noble mind, and his 
example is well worthy of emulation. Such men 
are of inestimable value to a community. 

t> ~ i " c=J <"' T '"> is ' ! — S) 

(JOHN W. SHAFFER is one of the enterpris- 
I ing and progressive citizens of Plymouth, 
\Z/ and occupies a prominent position in busi- 
ness circles. He has been connected with the 
commercial interests of this town since 1855, and 
since 1869 he has been proprietor of the drug 
store which he still carries on. He is also owner 
of the brick and tile works of this place, and his 
energy and well-directed efforts have done not a 
little for the advancement and prosperity of his 
adopted city. 

Mr. Shaffer was born in Page County, Va., 
near Luray, October 15, 1831, and is a son of 
John A. and Mary Catherine (Woods) Shaffer, 
who were also natives of the Old Dominion. The 
paternal grandfather, who was born in the same 
State, was of German descent, and was a black- 
smith and farmer by occupation. He served as a 
soldier in the War of 181 2, reared a large family, 
and lived to an advanced age. The maternal 
grandfather, Benjamin Woods, was a forger in a 
large iron foundry. He also attained a ripe age. 
The father of our subject was a native of Virginia, 
but in an early day removed to Ohio, where for 
many years he followed farming. His death there 
occurred in 1888, at the age of seventy-seven 



320 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



years, and his wife passed away in 1889. He 
held membership with the Lutheran Church, and 
she was a member of the Baptist Church. Their 
family numbered eight children, seven of whom are 
yet living: John W.; Sarah, wife of Fletcher 
Furrow, of St. Paris, Ohio; Rebecca, wife of 
James Largent, of Shawnee County, Kan.; Mary 
Catherine, wife of John Brown, of Champaign 
County, Ohio; Abram, who is living in the same 
county; Allen, of Clarke County, Ohio; and 
Philip, of Champaign County. 

The gentleman whose name heads this record 
was in his thirteenth year at the time of his par- 
ents' emigration to Ohio. In that State and in 
Virginia he acquired his education. When a 
young man he learned the carpenter's trade, which 
he followed for some years, doing contract work. 
With the hope of bettering his financial condi- 
tion, he emigrated to Illinois in the autumn of 
1855, and located in Plymouth, where he has 
made his home continuously since, with the ex- 
ception of a few months spent in Galesburg. He 
embarked in the lumber business, which he fol- 
lowed for some years, and in 1869 bought out the 
interest of James Carl in the drug firm of Carl & 
Wade. Subsequently he purchased his partner's 
interest, and has since been sole proprietor of the 
store. He is doing a good business, and receives 
a fair share of the public patronage. He is also 
engaged in the operation of a brick and tile fac- 
tory, and employs from five to ten men. 

On the 3d of September, 1854, Mr. Shaffer was 
united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Ann 
Proctor, daughter of William and Phcebe (Allen) 
Proctor, who were natives of Virginia. Ten chil- 
dren have been born to them, five sons and five 
daughters: Arthur E., who married Abbie Cor- 
field; Edgar, now deceased; Theodore, of Wy- 
oming, 111., who married Florence Hoagland, by 
whom he has a daughter, Grace; Elnora, wife of 
David Wade, of Plymouth, by whom she has a 
daughter, Florence; Mary and Lillie Florence, 
both deceased; MortC, who married Nellie Mi- 
chaels, and has a son, Randolph Clinton; Melvin, 
at home; Blanche, deceased; and Cecelia, still 
at home, who completes the family. 

Mr. Shaffer is a member of the Ancient Order 



W 



of United Workmen, and his wife belongs to the 
Methodist Church. In politics, he is a supporter 
of the Democracy, and his fellow-townsmen, ap- 
preciating his worth and ability, have called upon 
him to fill various offices. He has served as As- 
sessor, Collector, Town Clerk and Village Trus- 
tee, and is now serving as Township School 
Trustee. He owns a good home and other vil- 
lage property, and in his business dealings has 
met with excellent and well-merited success. He 
. has been identified with the best interests and 
prosperity of Plymouth since 1855, and is one of 
its most substantial citizens. 

p>,6)ESLEY WALTON, Sr., who for many 
years has engaged in farming, but is now 
living a retired life in Plymouth, claims 
Kentucky as the State of his nativity. He was 
born in Boone County, September 20, 1831, and 
is a son of Frederick M. and Emily (Rice) Wal- 
ton. This worthy couple were the parents of 
eight children, five sons and three daughters, of 
whom the following are yet living: Wesley; John, 
of Latimer, Kan.; Frances, wife of Charles O. 
Walton; Matilda A., wife of S. E- Harnest; and 
Simeon M., of Plymouth. William C, of Har- 
mony Township, Hancock County, died February 
16, 1894.- 

The father of this family was born in Virginia. 
After residing for some time in Kentucky, he 
came to Illinois, in the autumn of 1835, and spent 
one winter in Adams County. He then located 
two and a-half miles west of Ptymouth, where he 
purchased two hundred and forty acres of land, 
subsequently placing the same under a high state 
of cultivation. He also extended the boundaries 
of his farm until it comprised three hundred acres, 
and to his children he gave a considerable amount, 
helping them all to start in life comfortably. He- 
was a generous and kind-hearted man, and the 
many excellencies of his character won him high 
regard. He held a number of local offices, served 
as Supervisor several terms, and was also County 
Commissioner. He held membership with the 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL 3.ECORD. 



321 



Missionary Baptist Church of Plymouth, and 

passed away April 10, 1880, at the age of seventy- 
one years. His wife still survives him. and is 
now living on the old homestead, at the age of 
eighty-two. She is also a member of the Mission- 
ary Baptist Church. The paternal grandfather, 
William Walton, was a native of Virginia, and 
one of the honored heroes of the Revolution. He 
reared a large family, and followed farming as a 
means of livelihood. His death occurred at the 
age of four-score years. The maternal grand- 
father, Ezekiel Rice, was also a Virginian farmer, 
and lived to the age of seventy-five years. 

Wesley Walton whose name heads this record 
is one of the honored and highly respected citizens 
of Plymouth. He was a child of only four years 
when his parents came to Illinois, and in this 
State he has since made his home. Reared in 
Hancock County, its public schools afforded him 
his educational privileges. He remained on the 
old homestead until twenty -three years of age, 
and then continued farming in his own interest, 
following that pursuit throughout his business 
career. He owns a valuable farm of two hundred 
and forty acres, pleasantly located six miles west 
of Plymouth, on section 31, St. Mary's Township, 
but in 1886 ill health forced him to abandon the 
farm, and he has since lived retired in Plymouth. 

On the 14th of September, 1854, Mr. Walton was 
united in marriage with Miss Martha L. Brown- 
ing, daughter of Absalom and Nancy (Davis) 
Browning. The lady was to him a faithful com- 
panion for many years, but at length they were 
separated by death, Mrs. Walton being called to 
the home beyond on the 10th of May, 1893, at the 
age of fifty-six years. She was a member of the 
Christian Church, and a most estimable lady. 

Mr. Walton is also a faithful member of the 
Christian Church, in which he has served as Elder 
for about twenty years, and is one of its active 
and untiring workers. His life has always been 
an honorable and upright one, and whatever tends 
to elevate humanity receives his support. The 
cause of temperance finds in him a warm friend, 
and he is a member of the Independent Order of 
Good Templars. In politics, he is a Republican, 
and has served as Tax Collector for one year. 



He is numbered among Hancock County's hon- 
ored pioneers, having for fifty-eight years resided 
within its borders. When a little boy he was one 
day found playing with young wolves, thinking 
they were puppies, for those wild animals were 
very numerous in the locality. He has seen deer 
in great herds, and all kinds of wild game could 
be obtained in abundance in his y/outh. Much of 
the land was still in possession of the Government, 
and the work of progress and civilization seemed 
scarcely begun in this locality. In the work of 
development, Mr. Walton has ever borne his part, 
and has felt a commendable interest and just pride 
in the growth and upbuilding of the county. He 
is plain and unostentatious in manner, kind- 
hearted and true, and is highly esteemed by his 
neighbors and many friends throughout the 
county. 



IJJEHEMIAH FRANKUN NEWMAN, who 
rY is now living a retired life in Plymouth, 
I fo claims New York as the State of his nativ- 
ity, his birth having occurred in Delaware Coun- 
ty on the 7th of May, 1824. He comes of an 
old family of the Empire State, his grandfather, 
Abner Newman, having been a New York farm- 
er. The latter reared a large family, and there 
died at the age of seventy r -eight years. On the 
maternal side, our subject is of French descent, 
his great-grandfather, a native of France, being 
the founder of the family in America. His grand- 
father, Jesse Palmer, who was born in New York, 
made farming his life occupation, and served as a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War. In 1824, he 
was called to the home beyond, passing awav at 
the age of sixty-six. 

The father of our subject, Jonas Newman, was 
born in Orange County, N. Y., and he, too, en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. After arriving at 
mature years, he wedded Rebecca Palmer, a na- 
tive of Westchester County, N. Y., and they be- 
came the parents of four sons and two daughters. 
Our subject is now the only surviving member of 
the family. The father died at the age of fifty- 



322 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



two years, while visiting relatives in Michigan, 
and the mother, who survived him two years, 
passed away in New York, at the age of fifty-two. 

In the usual manner of farmer lads, N. F. New- 
man spent the days of his boyhood and youth 
in the Empire State. His parents died before he 
was sixteen years of age. He learned thecooper's- 
trade in his youth, but did not long follow it, 
turning his attention to other pursuits. Having 
acquired a good education in the public schools, 
he engaged in teaching through the winter sea- 
son, and in the summer months worked upon a 
farm. In 1848, when a young man of twenty- 
four, he emigrated westward. He went to Chi- 
cago to see the western country, but after a time 
he returned to New York, where he remained un- 
til 1 85 1. In that year he again came to this 
State, and was engaged in teaching school in 
Adams County until the autumn of 1855. In the 
following spring, he went to California, for it 
seemed that he was threatened with consumption, 
and he hoped that the western trip would prove 
beneficial to his health. After six months spent 
upon the Pacific Slope, he returned to Illinois. 

Mr. Newman was married October 14, 1858, 
to Miss Mary R., daughter of William and Mar- 
garet (Kellough) Maxwell. Six children were 
born to them, but only one is now living, Wal- 
lace Maxwell. The mother passed away June 6, 
1867, and Mr. Newman was again married, April 
14, 1869, his second union being with Miss Alida 
Chamberlain, daughter of William and Mary 
(Doau) Chamberlain, natives of New York. 
There were born to them three children, only 
one of whom, Jennie P., the wife of John W. 
Ralston, now survives. The son, Wallace, mar- 
ried Miss Laura E. Carr, and is a stenographer. 
Four children grace this union, Mary M., 
Florence A., Carl M. and Sarah Louise. 

About 1858, Mr. Newman whose name heads 
this record embarked in the livery business, and 
later engaged in farming west of Plymouth for a 
short time. He then purchased fifty acres of 
land in McDonough County, but subsequently re- 
turned to Plymouth, where he again engaged in the 
livery business, and for a year or more carried on 
general merchandising. His next venture was as 



a lumber dealer, and for a number of years he 
successfully carried on operations along that line, 
but in 1 88 1 he laid aside business cares, and is 
now living a retired life, enjoying the rest which 
he has so truly earned and so richly deserves. In 
politics, he is a Prohibitionist, and his wife is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Newman are held in the highest re- 
gard throughout the community, where they 
have many friends and acquaintances. 

[TSTA BIDWELL, who is now 
jO business as a dealer in agricultural imple- 
I ments at Plymouth, has for thirty-nine years 
been a resident of this locality, and has therefore 
witnessed the greater part of Hancock County's 
development. He was born in Madison County, 
Ohio, on the 19th of December, 1830. His grand- 
father, Joseph Bidwell, was a native of New York, 
and, having studied medicine, engaged in the 
practice of his chosen profession near Cleveland, 
Ohio, for many years. His death occurred in 
that locality at an advanced age. Russell Bid- 
well, father of our subject, was also born in the 
Empire State, and became a stock-dealer. In 
an early day he removed to Ohio, locating near 
Cleveland, and in 1837 he entered Government 
land in Illinois. Subsequently, however, he re- 
turned to the Buckeye State, where his death oc- 
curred soon after. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Mar}- Blout, survived him less than a 
year. She was probably a native of Virginia, 
and was a member of the Episcopal Church. 
Their family numbered seven children, five sons 
and two daughters, but our subject is now the 
only survivor. One son died in the Mexican 
War, and one in the late Civil War. 

Esta Bidwell, the well-known and highly-re- 
spected citizen of Plymouth, was reared on a farm 
in his native State, and acquired his education in 
its public schools. Believing that better oppor- 
tunities were afforded in the West, he came to Ill- 
inois in 1848, at the age of eighteen, and took 
up his residence in Canton, Fulton County, where 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



323 



he made his home until 1855, when he came to 
Plymouth. Here he has since resided, and with 
the best interests of the community he has always 
been identified. At the age of fourteen he began 
learning the blacksmith's trade, and in the years 
which have since come and gone has steadily fol- 
lowed that vocation. Being an expert workman, 
and slighting no task entrusted to him, he soon 
secured a liberal patronage, which has constantly 
increased and yielded to him a good income. Be- 
fore coming to Plymouth, he was for several years 
connected with the Canton Plow Manufacturing 
Company, and after his arrival in this village, 
he was extensively engaged in the manufacture 
of plows at this place for some years. He now 
carries a full line of plows and agricultural imple- 
ments, and enjoys a fine trade. 

In 185 1 Mr. Bidwell married Miss Hannah 
Whaley, and by their union have been born nine 
children, four sons and five daughters. Mary 
Effie became the wife of Erasmus Ellis, and to 
them were born two children, but both the chil- 
dren and the father are now deceased. William 
H. and Thomas L. have also passed away. Liz- 
zie B. is the wife of Mort Monk, of Plymouth. 
Ann Eliza became the wife of George Ralston, by 
whom she had a son, Blaine, and after the death 
of her first husband she married Samuel Talbot, 
by whom she has two children. John J. married 
Emma Mourning, and they have one son, Hugh. 
Homer L. is now studying medicine in Chicago. 
Hattie, twin sister of Homer, is the wife of Charles 
McLaren, of Macomb, and they have three chil- 
dren. Charlotte completes the family. 

Hannah (Whaley) Bidwell, wife of Esta Bid- 
well, was born in Terre Haute, Ind., and is a 
daughter of Henry Whaley and Effie Ramsay. 
Her paternal grandfather was a Scotchman. On 
the mother's side she is connected with the G rants, 
and is a distant relative of the hero of Appomat- 
tox. She came to Illinois at two years of age, 
and resided at Canton, Fulton County, until her 
marriage. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bidwell are faithful and consist- 
ent members of the Presbyterian Church, in which 
he has served as an Elder for many years. They 
have a pleasant home in Plymouth, and in addi- 



tion to this he owns several business houses here, 
and eighty-five acres of good farming land in Mc- 
Donough County. In politics, he is a Republi- 
can, and has served as a member of the Village 
Board for several terms. Ever alive to the best 
interests of the town, and ready to aid in its pro- 
motion, he has done all in his power to bring it 
back from the dilapidation into which it had fallen 
during Mormon times. He is recogniztd as one 
of its valued and substantial citizens, well worthy 
of representation in this volume. 



^+^ 



(TAMES M. PACE, proprietor of the Williams 
I House of Macomb, is so well known through - 
Q) out MeDonough County that he needs no 
special introduction to our readers. He was 
born in Scotland Township, on the 29th of June, 
1 86 1, and is a son of George W. and Sallie 
(Sweeney) Pace, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this work. His parents removed to Ma- 
comb when he was only a year old. When he 
attained a sufficient age he entered the public 
schools, and there continued his studies until he 
graduated from the High School of this city in 
1879. Mr. Pace then took up the study of med- 
icine under the direction of Dr. Garretson, of Ma- 
comb, but abandoning this he turned his attention 
to school teaching, which profession he followed 
for fourteen years, being Principal of the Prairie 
City Schools for seven consecutive years. He 
was a capable instructor and very successful, as is 
shown by his long-continued service in the above- 
mentioned place. 

In 1S92, our subject came to Macomb and 
joined his father and brother Henry in the groc- 
ery business. He still owns an interest in their 
store, which is one of the leading establishments 
of the kind in the county seat. On the 6th of 
March, 1893, he and his father and brother leased 
the hotel known as the Williams House, and he 
is now acting as its landlord. This is the most 
popular hotel in the city, and is a favorite with the 
traveling public. Mr. Pace looks after the inter- 



324 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ests and comfort of his guests, and has therefore 
secured a liberal patronage, which is well merited. 

On the 4th of October, 1883, was celebrated the 
marriage of our subject and Miss Lyde Jennings, 
daughter of James M. and Catherine (Davis) 
Jennings. Her parents were natives of Ohio, and 
her father is now deceased. One child blesses 
this union, a daughter, Lona Zoe. They have a 
pleasant home in Macomb, and are both widely 
and favorably known, their friends being many in 
the community. 

Mr. Pace also has other city property. He 
has made his own way in life, and his success 
therefore is the just reward of his own labors. 
He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the 
Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He is quite in- 
terested in civic societies, and is a leading member 
of these various organizations. In politics, he is 
a Republican, and is now serving as clerk of the 
City School Board. The cause of education has 
always found in him a warm friend, one ever 
ready to aid in its advancement and progress. 



0AYID P. COFFMAN is one of the prominent 
and influential citizens of Augusta, and the 
high position he occupies in business and so- 
cial circles is well merited, for his life has been an 
upright and honorable one. He is now serving 
as Supervisor, and is successfully engaged in gen- 
eral merchandising. Being both widely and fav- 
orably known in Hancock County, we feel as- 
sured that the record of his life will prove of in- 
terest to many of our readers. 

Mr. Coffman is a native of Jacksonville, 111., 
born December 4, 1835. On the father's side he 
comes of an old Virginian family, which was 
founded in that State at an early day. His grand- 
father died in the Old Dominion at an advanced 
age. His father, Philip Coffman, was born in 
Virginia, and throughout his business career fol- 
lowed general merchandising. In 1828 he came 
to Illinois, locating in Jacksonville, where he 
opened a store and carried on business for many 



years.. His death occurred in that city in 1869, 
at the age of seventy. He married Miss Susan 
Eckels, a native of Kentucky, whose father spent 
his entire life in that .State. Mrs. Coffman died 
many years previous to the death of her husband. 
Both were faithful and consistent members of the 
Christian Church, and the father served as one of 
its Elders for twenty years. Their family num- 
bered eight children, four sons and four daugh- 
ters, but only two are now living: our subject 
and Catherine, wife of Robert C. Bruce, of Jack- 
sonville. 

David P. Coffman made his home in his native 
city until twenty-eight years of age. In its pub- 
lic schools he acquired a good education, and re- 
ceived good business training in his father's store, 
where he acted as clerk. At the age of twenty- 
five he was married, on the 1st of October, i860, 
the lad)- of his choice being Miss Helen M. Stark, 
daughter of James and Man- Jane (York) Stark, 
of Augusta. They have became the parents of 
six children: Joseph H., who married Miss Fan- 
nie Leach; Susan, wife of James Working, of 
Grant City, Mo., by whom she has two children, 
Sarah Helen and James Paul; James S. ; Mary H. ; 
Anna K. and David P., all of whom are still at 
home. 

Mr. Coffman has been engaged in general mer- 
chandising in Augusta since February, 1864, at 
which time he became a member of the firm of 
J. & G. Stark. In 1889 he bought out his part- 
ners and associated with him his sons, Joseph H. 
and James S., under the firm name of D. P. Coff- 
man & Sons, and now carries on a growing and 
prosperous business. In 1 842 James Stark came to 
Augusta and founded what is probably the oldest 
store in the county. Mr. Coffman also owns 
good farming land in Hancock County, and a 
pleasant home and business property in Augusta. 
Prosperity has attended his well-directed efforts, 
and he is now numbered among the substantial 
citizens of the community. 

In his political views, Mr. Coffman is a Repub- 
lican. Socially, he is a Knight Templar Mason, 
and for many years he has been a member of the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Coffman hold membership with the 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



325 



Christian Church, and in church and benevolent 
work take an active interest. He has served as 
Elder for many years, and does all in his power 
for the growth and upbuilding of the church. 
His life is in harmony with his profession, and 
he is recognized as one of Augusta's most highly - 
respected citizens. 

2— ^+##— S 



0AVID KEMP, who follows general farming 
on section 9, Chili Township, Hancock 
County, is a native of the Keystone State, 
his birth having occurred in Washington County 
on the 10th of May, [844. His parents were 
Matthew and Nancy ( Peoples 1 Kemp, both of 
whom were natives of Ireland. On the Emerald 
Isle the father spent the days of his childhood, 
and when a young man, bidding adieu to friends 
and native land, sailed for the New World. Set- 
tling upon a farm in Pennsylvania, he there car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits until 1853, when he 
came to the West, hoping thereby to improve his 
financial condition. He took up his residence 
upon a farm in Adams Count)-, where he made 
his home until 1S66, when he went to Iowa. His 
death occurred in the Hawkeye State at the age 
ot sixty-two, and his wife passed away in Penn- 
sylvania at the age of forty years. 

David Kemp, our subject, was reared upon the 
"Id home farm until eighteen years of age, but on 
the breaking out of the Civil War he was no longer 
content to follow the plow, for he felt that his 
country needed him at the front. Bidding adieu 
to home and friends, he enlisted, and was assigned 
to Company B, Fiftieth Illinois Infantry, in which 
he served for about four years, or after the South 
had laid down its arms. He participated in the 
engagements at Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, 
Ft. Henry, Ft. Donelson and Beutonville. He 
escaped without being wounded or taken pris- 
oner, but on several different occasions the bullets 
penetrated his clothing. 

After being mustered out, Mr. Kemp came to 
Hancock County, and went to work by the day 
in the harvest fields. During the succeeding win- 
16 



ter he worked by the month as a farm hand, and 
in the spring of 1866 he began farming for him- 
self on rented land. At length, when he had ac- 
quired sufficient capital, he purchased a partially 
improved farm in Chili Township. That he af- 
terwards sold, and in 1890 bought the farm on 
which he now resides. It is a valuable tract of 
land of two hundred and forty acres, under a high 
state of cultivation, and well improved with good 
buildings and with all modern accessories and 
conveniences. In connection with general farm- 
ing he carries on stock-raising, making a specialtv 
of fine hogs. 

On the 5th of April, 1866, Mr. Kemp wedded 
Miss Mary J. Cannon, a native of Brown County, 
III. Seven children have been born to them: 
Eva A., at home; Aldo L. , a farmer of Chili 
Township, Hancock County; Thomas R., Melvin 
D., Elbert William, Clarence C. and Marcus E., 
all of whom are still with their parents. 

On all epiestions of national importance, Mr. 
Kemp is a stalwart Republican, and by his ballot 
supports that party, but at local elections where 
no issue is involved he votes independent of 
party affiliations. Socially, he is connected with 
Tobias Cutler Post No. 428, G. A. R., of Bowen. 
He and his estimable wife hold membership with 
the Methodist Church, and are highly respected 
people of the community, who have a large circle 
of warm friends. 



e^+^i 



SEORGE WASHINGTON YETTER owns 
and operates a valuable farm of four hundred 
acres on section 15. Carthage Township, 
Hancock County. As he is both widely and fa- 
vorably known in this community, we feel assured 
that the record of his life will be interesting to 
many of our leaders, and therefore gladly give it 
a place in this volume. He was born in Lancas- 
ter County, l'a., on the 26th of January, 1835, 
and is a son of William G. Yetter, who was also a 
native of the Keystone State, and of German de- 
scent. The mother of our subject bore the maid- 
en name of Lydia Rock. In the family were nine 



326 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



children, three sons and six daughters: Caroline, 
widow of James Booze; Samuel, a farmer of 
Carthage; Mary A. and Amanda, both deceased; 
Calvin, a resident of California; George W.; Sa- 
rah, wife of J. R. Goodrich, of this township; 
Margaret, the widow of James Russell, now re- 
siding in Carthage; and Matilda, who died in child- 
hood. 

Mr. Yetter whose name heads this sketch was 
only two years old at the time of the emigration 
of his parents from Pennsylvania to Illinois. The 
trip westward was made by water and team. 
Amid the wild scenes of the frontier George W. 
was reared to manhood, and early became famil- 
iar with the hardships and difficulties, as well as 
the pleasures, known only to pioneer life. His 
education was acquired in the subscription schools, 
which were held in a log schoolhouse, to which 
he had to walk a distance of three miles. He 
continued his studies at various intervals, mostly 
in the winter season, until sixteen years of age. 
During the summer months he was always em- 
ployed at farm work, for he began his labors in 
the fields as soon as old enough to handle the 
plow. At the age of eighteen he began working 
in his own interest, but continued at home for a 
year as a farm hand. He then began learning 
the carpenter' s trade, but followed this for only 
about six months, when, tiring of his new voca- 
tion, he returned to farm work and was employed 
by the month for a year. 

On the 22d of December, 1862, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Yetter and Miss Mary Briley. 
To them have been born five children, and the 
family circle yet remains unbroken by the hand of 
death. Calvin and Louis follow farming in Han- 
cock County; William is at home; Elizabeth is 
the wife of Ashford Perry, a resident farmer of 
Carthage Township; and Stella is the wife of 
Charles Kimbrough, a farmer of Carthage Town- 
ship. 

After his marriage Mr. Yetter rented land and 
engaged in farming in his own interest. He made 
his first purchase in 1865, when he bought eighty 
acres of the farm on section 1 5 where he yet re- 
sides. To this he has added from time to time, 
until the farm now comprises four hundred acres, 



and elsewhere he owns a tract of fifty acres. This 
is all valuable land, and the greater part of it is 
under a high state of cultivation, his pleasant 
home being situated in the midst of well-tilled 
fields, which indicate to the passer-by the thrift and 
enterprise of the owner. Mr. Yetter also engages 
in stock-raising, and has found this branch of his 
business likewise profitable. 

In his political views, Mr. Yetter is a stalwart 
Republican, who warmly advocates the principles 
of his party, and keeps well informed on the issues 
of the da> r . He has served as Commissioner of 
Highways, and for twenty-one years has filled the 
office of School Director. The cause of education 
has found in him a warm friend, and he has done 
effective service in its interest. He is always 
found in the front rank, ready to aid in the promo- 
tion of all worthy enterprises. Socially, he is 
connected with the Mutual Aid Society, and, re- 
ligiously, with the Methodist Church. 

1 ■ g ^ -Hfr— S 



(Tames rupple Goodrich, who carries 

I on general farming and stock-raising on sec- 
\Zs tion 23, Carthage Township, Hancock Coun- 
ty, was born on the 30th of August, 1830, in 
Greenbrier County, Va. His father, Misheck 
Goodrich, was born in Massachusetts, and was of 
English descent. He married Rebecca Ruddle, 
and they became the parents of fourteen children, 
five sons and nine daughters, all of whom grew 
to mature years. They were: Diana, who mar- 
ried Christopher Artz, and is deceased; Susanna 
and Sarah, who reside in California; George, 
Elizabeth, Tirzah and Marilla, who are deceased ; 
James R. , the next in order of birth; Amanda, the 
wife of William Raleigh, of Chicago, 111. ; Har- 
riet, deceased; Robert and John, residents of San 
Francisco, Cal. ; Ellen, who is dead; and Charles, 
the youngest, who is fanning in Carthage Town- 
ship. 

The father of this family emigrated westward 
in 1839, making the journey by team, and located 
on a part of the farm upon which our subject now 
resides. He had purchased this tract in 181 8 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



327 



from a soldier of the War of 1S12, paying for it 
$1.25 per acre. It was located on section 23, 
Carthage Township, and was wild prairie land, no 
improvements having been made thereon. After 
a time Mr. Goodrich built a log cabin upon his 
farm, and in true pioneerstyle began life in the 
West. He devoted his time and attention to the 
cultivation of his land, and made his home upon 
his farm until his death, which occurred on the 
24th of December, 1880, at the advanced age of 
eighty-six years. He was laid to rest in Frank- 
lin Cemetery. With the Christian Church he 
held membership, and in politics he was a Dem- 
ocrat. His wife, who was born in 1797, survived 
him fur a few years and died in 188S. She was a 
faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, and was buried in the same cemetery as 
her husband. 

James R. Goodrich was only in his ninth year 
at the time the family came to Hancock County. 
On the journey he walked across the Alleghany 
Mountains and carried a rifle. The history of 
pioneer life in this locality is familiar to him. He 
grew to manhood amid the wild scenes of the 
frontier, and acquired his education in the old- 
time subscription schools, which were held in a 
log schoolhouse. There he pursued his studies 
at intervals until eighteen years of age, but his 
advantages were not of the best, and he is largely 
a self-educated man. He aided in the arduous 
duties of opening up a new farm, breaking prairie, 
and cultivating hitherto unimproved fields. To 
his father he gave the benefit of his services un- 
til twenty-three years of age, when he rented a 
part of the old homestead. This he operated for 
a few years, when, with the capital he had ac- 
quired as the result of his industry and persever- 
ance, he purchased fort}- acres of land, a part of 
his present farm. He now has eighty-two acres 
under a high state of cultivation and well im- 
proved. 

In March, 1854, Mr. Goodrich married Miss 
Sarah Yetter, and by their union have been born 
ten children, namely: William, who lives in Car- 
thage; Mary, deceased; Matilda, wife of William 
White; Eliza, wife of Silas Stowe; Lydia, wife 01 
Alvin Swing; George, a farmer of Harmony 



Township; John, who is farming in St. Mary's 
Township; Harvey, who is farming with his 
brother George; Anna, the wife of Edward Fletch- 
er, a farmer of Harmony; and Susie, who is with 
her parents. 

Mr. Goodrich is a member of the Methodist 
Church and takes an active interest in church 
and benevolent work. In politics, he is a Demo- 
crat, and has served as School Director. For 
about fifty-five years he has resided in Hancock 
County, and has witnessed the greater part of its 
upbuilding. He has seen the wild lands trans- 
formed into beautiful homes and farms, towns and 
villages spring up, and has aided the progressive 
civilization which has made this one of the lead- 
ing counties of the State. In the work of up- 
building and development he has ever borne his 
part, and well deserves mention among the hon- 
ored pioneers who were the founders of the coun- 
ty and to whom much of her prosperity is due. 

& ' "^ c=j <* T "> B ' B 

gENJAMIN BURWELL BUTLER, who car- 
ries on general farming and stock-raising on 
section 34, Harmony Township, Hancock 
County, where he owns and operates a good farm 
of two hundred and ten acres, was born in Todd 
County, Ky., February 7, 1824. His father, 
Collier Butler, was a native of Virginia, and was of 
Irish descent. The mother bore the maiden name 
of Nancy Hale. Both parents died in Kentucky, 
and our subject is the only surviving member in 
the family of ten children. Those who have 
passed away are James, Martha, Lucy, Sarah, 
Needham, Poll)-, Elliott, Andrew and Rebecca. 
Midst play and work our subject spent his boy- 
hood days upon the old home farm in his native 
State. The subscription schools of the neighbor- 
hood afforded him his educational privileges. His 
was not "the flowery path of learning," for he 
had to walk about four miles to school, and then 
could attend only through the winter season, for 
his sen-ices were needed at home through the 
summer months. He early began work in the 
fields, plowing, planting and harvesting, and ere 



328 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



many years no department of farm work was un- 
known to him. He began life for himself on at- 
taining his majority, but remained at home until 
1850, when he bade adieu to friends and native 
State and in April of that year came to Illinois. 
The trip was made by team. On reaching Han- 
cock County, he settled in Pilot Grove Township, 
where he rented land for two years. On the ex- 
piration of that period he removed to Harmony 
Township, where he rented land until 1865, when 
with the capital he had acquired through his la- 
bors he purchased a tract of one hundred and 
forty acres. Later he purchased two hundred 
acres, upon which he lived until 1869, when he 
removed to his present farm, buying a tract of 
two hundred acres on section 34, Harmony 
Township. 

On the 20th of April, 1850, Mr. Butler married 
Miss Amanda Black, daughter of James and Mary 
(Martin) Black, both of whom were natives of 
Virginia. In early life, however, they removed 
to Kentucky. On the paternal side the family is 
of German and Irish origin. Mrs. Butler was 
one of eight children, namely: William, of Cali- 
fornia, who formerly engaged in prospecting, 
mining and stock-raising, but is now living a re- 
tired life; Amanda, wife of our subject; Joseph, a 
resident farmer of Brown County, 111.; John, de- 
ceased; Esther, who died in infancy; Henry, who 
is engaged in the real-estate business in the city 
of Oklahoma; Charlie, an agriculturist of Ottawa 
County, Mo. ; and Barbara, now deceased. Mr. 
Black came to Hancock County in 1850, and both 
he and his wife spent their last days in this lo- 
cality. 

Four children have been born of the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Butler, as follows: Mary, wife of 
D. C. Barber, a resident of Denver, 111.; Henry, 
who died in Newton, Kan., November*2g, 1893; 
Nancy, wife of Paul Bowen, Principal of the pub- 
lic schools of Alameda, Cal. ; and Eva, wife of 
Charlie Davis, a farmer of Chili Township. 

In his political views, Mr. Butler has always 
been a supporter of Democratic principles, and 
has held the offices of Road Commissioner and 
School Director. He and his wife hold membership 
with the Christian Church, and are actively in- 



terested in its work and upbuilding. His busi- 
ness career has been one of success, and although 
he started out in life a poor boy, he has steadily 
worked his way upward, and now occupies a posi- 
tion among the substantial farmers of the county. 
He is a man of sterling worth and strict integrity, 
and those who know him esteem him highly. 



y HO MAS HARDY, who resides on section 9, 
f C Harmony Township, is one of the extensive 
\2) land-owners of Hancock County, his pos- 
sessions aggregating between six hundred and 
seven hundred acres. This has all been acquired 
through his own efforts, and the improvements 
thereon stand as monuments to his thrift and en- 
terprise. He is a type of a self-made man, who 
through energy and well-directed efforts has ac- 
quired a handsome property, and won a place 
among the wealthy citizens of his adopted county. 
Mr. Hardy was born near Mendou, Adams 
County, 111., June 11, 1833, and is a son of Bap- 
tist and Tamer (Pallerson) Hardy. His father 
was a native of Tennessee, and was of Ger- 
man descent; and his mother, who was born in 
North Carolina, was of Irish lineage. By occu- 
pation the former was a farmer. He grew to 
manhood in his native State, was there married, 
and continued to make his home in Tennessee 
until 1829, when he emigrated with his family to 
Illinois, making the journey by team. He lo- 
cated in Morgan County, but in the spring of 1830 
removed to Adams County. The following year 
he entered from the Government a tract of prairie 
and timber land, and upon the farm which he 
there developed he made his home throughout 
his remaining days. He was very successful in 
his business dealings, and his prosperity is well 
deserved. At an early age he was thrown upon 
his own resources, and began to earn his own live- 
lihood. He lived frugally, was industrious and 
enterprising, and by his well-directed efforts he 
not only won a comfortable home, but became 
the owner of extensive landed possessions. He is 
numbered among the honored pioneers of that 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



329 



locality, for he came to this State when the Indi- 
ans were still in the neighborhood, and when 
Quincy was the nearest trading-post. In politics, 
he was a Democrat, and served as the first Super- 
visor of Keene Township, Adams County. He 
also held other local offices. In his religious be- 
lief he was a Baptist. His death occurred in 1872, 
at the age of sixty-five years, and his wife passed 
away in 1875, when about the same age. 

The Hardy family numbered nine children, four 
sons and five daughters: Sarah, wife of Jackson 
Witt; Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Fletcher; Thomas, 
of this sketch ; Nancy, wife of Henry W. Strick- 
ler; Joseph, who is living on the old homestead in 
Adams County; Frank M.; Louisa, wife of Jack- 
son Harris; Mary M., wife of William Felder; 
and Baptist. All are yet living and have families 
of their own. 

Mr. Hard\- whose name heads this notice was 
reared on his father's farm in Adams County, and 
attended the district schools of the neighborhood 
until twenty-one years of age, thus acquiring a 
good English education. When twenty-two years 
of age he began business for himself, and was en- 
gaged in teaching through the two succeeding 
winters. He then took up the occupation to 
which he had been reared, and carried on farming 
in other localities until the spring of i860, when 
he located upon the farm which has since been his 
home. His first purchase comprised a quarter- 
section of land, but only fifty acres had been 
broken, and a small house constituted the im- 
provements upon the place. He at once began 
the development of the farm, and as his financial 
resources were increased he extended its bound- 
aries from time to time. He owns nearly seven 
hundred acres, and with the exception of about 
ten acres the entire amount is in Harmony Town- 
ship. The improvements upon the farm have all 
been placed there by Mr. Hard)-. These include 
a good residence, barns and outbuildings, and all 
the accessories and conveniences which go to make 
up a farm that meets the requirements of modern 
civilization. 

On the 24th of February, 1858, Mr. Hardy was 
united in marriage with Miss Margaret S. Rog- 
ers, a native of the Empire State. To them have 



been born twelve children, four sons and eight 
daughters: Zuleika, Margaret T. (who died in 
infancy), Emma F., Clement V., Baptist, Sarah 
E., Delia, Mary J., Thomas, Martha E., Joseph 
and Louisa. In politics, Mr. Hardy has always 
been a supporter of Democratic principles. He 
has served as Assessor of his township, and for 
many years has been a School Director. He is a 
member of the Baptist Church, and his well-spent 
life has gained for him the confidence and esteem 
of all with whom business or social relations have 
brought him in contact. He is widely known 
throughout Hancock County, and his friends and 
acquaintances are many. 

(TAMES M. GROVES, a blacksmith and dealer 
I in agricultural implements in Plymouth, was 
(2/ born in Licking County, Ohio, November 
27, 1840, and is a son of Richard T. and Susan 
(Evans) Groves, who were natives of Virginia. 
The paternal grandfather was also a native of 
Virginia, and served as a soldier in the War of 
1812, as did the maternal grandfather. He, too, 
was born in Virginia, and there engaged in hotel- 
keeping for some time. Richard T. Groves was 
one of a family of eight sons and two daughters. 
In an early day he removed to Ohio, and in 1858 
emigrated to Mercer County, Mo., settling near 
Princeton, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. His death occurred in 1872, at the age of sev- 
enty-two years, and his wife passed away only a 
few days previous. They were both members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and their lives 
were in harmony with their professions. Mr. 
Groves served as one of the church officers for 
several years, and while living in Ohio he served 
as Deputy Sheriff. In the family were three sons 
and two daughters: John C, of Richland County, 
111.; Mary Jane, wife of William Bridge, of Mer- 
cer County, Mo.; James M., of this sketch; Dan- 
iel H., of Mercer County; and Leah C, wife of 
Charles Booth, of the same count). 

In the usual manner of farmer lads our subject 
spent the days of his boyhood and youth. His 



33° 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



educational privileges were those afforded by the 
common schools. He was reared as an agricul- 
turist, but, not wishing to follow that pursuit, he 
learned the blacksmith's trade, at which he 
worked until after the breaking out of the late 
war. In 1862 he enlisted in his country's service 
as a member of Company A, Seventy-eighth Illi- 
nois Infantry', aiding in the defense of the Union 
until June, 1865, when, the war having closed, 
he was honorably discharged. He was twice 
slightly wounded in skirmishes, and at the battle 
of Chickamauga he received a very severe wound. 
He took part in the engagements at Kennesaw 
Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Rome, 
Jonesboro, Chickamauga and Bentonville, and 
went with Sherman on the celebrated march to the 
sea. He also participated in the Grand Review in 
Washington, and received his discharge in the 
Capitol City. 

Before entering the service, Mr. Groves was 
married to Miss Elmira B. Myers, daughter of 
Jacob and Harriet (Wagle) Myers, the former a 
native of New York, and the latter of Pennsyl- 
vania. They have become the parents of seven 
children. James Madison married Miss Clara 
Black, and with their two children, Ida and Pearl, 
they are now living in Plymouth. Ida May and 
Freddie both died when about two years of age. 
Hattie, Maude, Charles and Ernest complete the 
family. 

On his return from the South, Mr. Graves lo- 
cated in Birmingham, Schuyler County, 111., pur- 
chasing a farm of eighty -five acres, to the devel- 
opment and cultivation of which he devoted his 
energies until 1876. He then embarked in busi- 
ness as a bridge contractor, and carried on business 
along that line for about eight years. He is now 
doing business in Plymouth as a blacksmith and 
dealer in agricultural implements, and along both 
lines of trade receives liberal patronage, which is 
well deserved. In addition to his business, he 
owns a good residence in Plymouth. Socially, he 
is a member of Plymouth Lodge No. 246, A. F. 
& A. M.; the Odd Fellows' society; and Augusta 
Post, G. A. R. In politics, he is a stalwart 
Republican, and while in Birmingham served as 
Constable, Commissioner and Collector. His suc- 



cess in business is due to his own efforts. He 
started out in life empty-handed, but by industry, 
perseverance and enterprise has steadily worked 
his way upward, securing a comfortable compe- 
tence. 

a i -c) ■< T S i^= s 08 

"TRASTUS HUEY now follows farming on 
'j section 17, St. Mary's Township, Hancock 
__ County. The name of Huey is inseparably 
connected with the history of this community, for 
the family of our subject came here in early pio- 
neer days, and its members have borne a promi- 
nent part in the work of advancement and public 
improvement. His parents, John and Matilda 
(Rice) Huey, were both natives of Boone County, 
Ky., and came of old southern families, of whom 
further mention is made in connection with the 
sketch of William Huey, on another page of this 
work. The father was one of twelve children, 
and was reared as a farmer. Throughout life he 
followed agricultural pursuits, and for main- years 
was a leading farmer of this locality. He came 
to Illinois in 1833, and after three years spent in 
Schuyler County, took up his residence in Hancock 
County, where his remaining days were passed. 
All who knew him respected him for his sterling 
worth and excellencies of character, and his death, 
which occurred at the age of seventy-two years, 
was deeply mourned by many friends. His wife, 
a most estimable lady, passed away four years 
previous, dying at the age of sixty-two. Of 
their family of ten sons and two daughters, the fol- 
lowing are yet living: Erastus; William; Frances, 
wife of Dr. James H. Turner; Robert, of Mc- 
Donough County; Agnes, wife of Reuben Garnett; 
James, of St. Mary's Township; Perry C. and 
George, who also live in the same township; and 
Frederick Gilmore, of Clarke County, Mo. 

Our subject was a lad of six summers when, 
with his parents, he became a resident of this lo- 
cality. Upon the old Huey farm he was reared, 
and his entire life has been passed within four 
miles of his present home. When a young man 
he studied medicine, but never engaged in the 
practice of his profession, preferring to follow the 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



33i 



pursuit with which he had been familiar from 
earliest boyhood. After arriving at years of ma- 
turity, he began farming in his own interest, and 
his well-directed efforts have been crowned with 
success, for he is now owner of two hundred acres 
of valuable land, constituting one of the finest 
farms of the township. 

Mr. Huey was joined in wedlock February 1, 
1858, with Martha Susan Dale, daughter of Luns- 
ford Dale, a native of Kentucky. Seven children 
have been born to them. Ida is the wife of I. N. 
Jeffries, by whom she has two children, Ormer 
and Ray. Mr. and Mrs. Jeffries make their home 
with her father. John R., who married Miss 
Helen Holbert, by whom he has three children, 
resides near Colmar, in McDonough County. 
William E. married Miss Ryle, and is located in 
Hancock County. Fannie is the wife of Walter 
Cannon, and they live on a farm in St. Mary's 
Township with their daughter Nellie. Walter and 
Olivia are yet at home; and one child died in in- 
fancy. The mother died June 10, 1891, in the faith 
of the Baptist Church, of which she was a member. 
Mr. Huey belongs to the same church, as do his 
brother and three of his children. In politics, he 
is a Democrat, but has never been an office-seeker. 
He came to Hancock County fifty-seven years ago, 
when it was an unbroken wilderness, and when 
there were only three houses between his father's 
home and Carthage. He has taken a just pride 
in the growth and development of his adopted 
county, and by his support and co-operation he 
has aided in its advancement and upbuilding. 



-##+£#* 



(ILLIAM FIELDING BAYNE, M. D., has 
for nearly half a century been engaged in 
the practice of medicine in Macomb, and 
for many years has been numbered among the 
most prominent physicians of McDonough Coun- 
ty. He was born in Shelby County, Ky., on the 
2d of January, 1827, and is a son of William and 
Barbara (Blankenbaker) Bayne, the former a na- 
tive of Culpeper County, Va., and the latter of 
Bourbon County, Ky. His maternal grandfa- 



ther, Nicholas Blankenbaker, was one of the 
heroes of the Revolution who served under 
Washington during the struggle for indepen- 
dence. The Bayne family was founded in Amer- 
ica about 1660, by five brothers of that name, 
natives of Scotland, who crossed the Atlantic and 
settled along the Potomac. The representatives 
of the family in America are their descendants. 
The grandfather of our subject bore the name of 
George Bayne. 

The Doctor's father, William Bayne, followed 
the vocation of farming throughout the greater 
part of his life, and was quite successful as an 
agriculturist. At length he left Kentucky to be- 
come a resident of the new State of Illinois. The 
journey hither was made by wagon, and the 
territory through which they passed was so un- 
improved that in order to cross the streams they 
had to build rafts on which to float their goods 
across. They first took up their residence in 
Adams County, and thence removed to Han- 
cock County, settling near Augusta, where the 
father died in 1854. In the family were nine 
children, of whom six grew to mature years, 
while three of the number are yet living, the Doc- 
tor and two sisters. 

In the usual manner of farmer lads William F. 
Bayne spent the days of his boyhood and youth. 
He remained under the parental roof until he had 
attained his majority, when, wishing to engage in 
some other pursuit than that of farming, he be- 
gan working at the carpenter's trade. With 
a view to entering the medical profession and 
making its practice his life work, he began study- 
ing with Dr. G. H. Young, of Adams County, 
and when he had become quite proficient he 
opened an office in Barry, Pike County. This 
was in March, 1854. In the following September 
he came to Macomb, where he has since engaged 
in practice, with the exception of that period 
which he spent among the boys in blue during 
the late war. 

Dr. Bayne has been twice married. He first 
wedded Martha Herndon, who survived their 
marriage a little less than a year. On the 24th 
of October, 1854, he wedded Lydia J. Fream, 
who has been to him a faithful companion and 



332 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



helpmeet on life's journey. They became the 
parents of seven children, but only two are now 
living, George Grant, and Nellie May, wife of 
Frank Knight, who follows farming near Ma- 
comb. 

After the breaking out of the late war, the 
Doctor expressed a wish to enter the sen-ice, and 
his wife loyally responded that if he felt his coun- 
try needed him, and that it was his duty to go, 
she would put forth no effort to prevent it. He 
enlisted on the 2d of August, 1861, and became 
Captain of Company B, Tenth Missouri Infan- 
try. He was engaged in service in Missouri, 
Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana, and partici- 
pated in the battles of Corinth, Iuka, Jackson, 
Champion Hill, Thompson Hill and Vicksburg. 
At the battle of Corinth a piece of his ear was 
shot away. On the 26th of June, 1863, Capt 
Bayne resigned on account of failing health, and 
crossed the mountains in the hope of being bene- 
fited thereby. He was greatly improved, and 
during his western trip his weight was increased 
from one hundred and twenty-nine to one hun- 
dred and eighty-four pounds. He returned home 
in the fall of 1864. 

Dr. Bayne is one of the most prominent citizens 
of Macomb, and has been closely identified with 
its upbuilding and development for half a cen- 
tury. He has aided in the promotion of a num- 
ber of its leading enterprises, and thus added 
materially to the prosperity of the city. He was 
one of the leading factors in the organization of 
the Tile and Sewer Pipe Works, and is now Presi- 
dent of the company, which position he has held 
for eleven years, having been elected in 1883. 
This is an important industry, which constantly 
employs from forty to sixty-five men. Shipments 
are made chiefly to the West, from Manitoba to 
Kansas City, Denver and other points. The 
largest shipments, however, are made to St. Paul 
and Minneapolis. 

In politics, the Doctor has taken an active in- 
terest. In the campaign of i860, he labored un- 
tiringly in the interest of the Republican party, 
and was Captain of a company of Wide- Awakes. 
He was well fitted for the drill work connected 
therewith, for he had studied tactics with his fa- 



ther, who was a leader of militia in Kentucky. 
The Doctor continued to vote with the Republi- 
can party until 1884, since which time he has 
been a Prohibitionist, and was a delegate to the 
National Prohibition Convention of 1892. He 
served as Mayor of Macomb for one term. For 
about twelve years he has filled the office of Alder- 
man, and for many years has been a member of 
the School Board. Socially, he is connected 
with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and 
is a faithful and consistent member of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church. 



ARKIN SCOTT, one of the honored pioneers 
I C of Hancock County, now living on section 
l_2? 31, Harmony Township, has since 1835 been 
a resident of this community. Almost sixty years 
have since passed, and during this long period he 
has not only witnessed the growth and develop- 
ment of the community, but has also aided in its 
advancement and progress. The community rec- 
ognizes in him a valued citizen, and it is there- 
fore with pleasure that we present to our readers 
this record of his life work. 

Mr. Scott is a native of Ashe County, N. C. He 
was born January 3, 1812, and comes of a family 
of Scotch origin. His parents were Samuel and 
Mary (Edwards) Scott, both natives of North 
Carolina. In their family were ten children, five 
sons and five daughters: Levi, John, Solomon, 
Larkin, Sibert, Sallie, Frances, Susan, Nancy and 
Margaret. 

Our subject is now the only surviving member 
of the family. He spent the first four years of 
his life in North Carolina, and then accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Kentucky. A 
year later they came to Illinois, making the jour- 
ney by team in the autumn of 1 8 1 7 . This State had 
not been admitted to the Union, and it was con- 
sidered in the far West. The father located in 
Madison County, but after two years removed to 
Morgan County, in 1820. The land was not then 
surveyed, but he made a claim near where the 
city of Jacksonville now stands, and when it came 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



333 



into market purchased it from the Government. 
He erected thereon a log cabin, 16x16 feet, and 
they lived in true pioneer style. They had been 
in Morgan County for three months before Larkin 
Scott saw a white person save the members of his 
own family. The Kickapoo and Pottawatomie 
Indians still lived in the neighborhood, but they 
were usually peaceable, occasioning the settlers 
little trouble. Thus amid the wild scenes of the 
frontier, surrounded by few of the evidences of 
progress and civilization, our subject was reared 
to manhood. 

Two and a-half miles from his home was the 
subscription school which Mr. Scott attended. 
His educational privileges, however, were meagre. 
He was only fourteen years of age when his father 
died, and much of the farm work devolved upon 
him. He continued to engage in the cultivation 
of the old homestead and remained with his mother 
until about twenty years of age, when he rented 
land in Morgan County and began farming for 
himself. There he continued until 1S35, when 
he came to Hancock County, and purchased eighty 
acres of laud on section 31, Harmony Township, 
paying the usual Government price of $1.25 per 
acre. He erected a log cabin, 16x18 feel, but the 
primitive home has long since been replaced by a 
commodious and substantial residence, and other 
good improvements have been made. The farm 
now comprises two hundred and eighty-five acres 
of valuable land and is one of the best in the 
neighborhood. 

On the 4th of December, 1831, Mr. .Scott was 
united in marriage with Miss .Sarah Foreman, and 
to them have been born eleven children, namely: 
William \V. ; Samuel; Rebecca, deceased; Louisa; 
Hettie; Mary, who died January 23, 1894; Lark-in; 
John A.; Sarah, deceased; Joshua V., and Walter, 
also deceased. The family is one of prominence 
in the community, and its members have many 
warm friends. The parents are both members of 
the Second Adventist Church, and Mr. Scott 
served as a local preacher of the same for a quar- 
ter of a century. In politics, he has been a stanch 
Republican since the organization of the party. 
He has served as Overseer of the Poor and High- 
way Commissioner, discharging his duties with 



promptness and fidelity. He enlisted in the Black 
Hawk War in 1831, and did service as Corporal 
during that struggle. Mr. Scott is one of the 
oldest residents of Illinois, having since Territorial 
days been numbered among its citizens. He lived 
within its borders before many of the leading cities 
of the State had sprung into existence, when Chi- 
cago was known only as Ft. Dearborn, and when 
the State was thought to be on the extreme western 
frontier. He has seen the advent of the railroad, 
the telegraph and telephone and has witnessed the 
onward march of progress which has brought with 
it an advancement and prosperity which make 
Illinois one of the leading States of the Union. 



S^H^E 



^lACOB KRIEG, who carries on general farm- 
I iug on section 16, Carthage Township, is 
(2/ numbered among the early settlers of Han- 
cock County. He has here resided since 1856, 
and during all these years has made his home 
upon his present farm. He now owns one hun- 
dred and two acres of good land, and is engaged 
in general farming and stock-raising. The place 
is neat and thrifty in appearance, and the practical 
and progressive spirit of the owner has made him 
one of the leading agriculturists of the commu- 
nity. 

Mr. Krieg is a native of the Keystone State, his 
birth having occurred in Euphrates, Lancaster 
County, on the i6thof March, 1815. He is a son 
of John Krieg, who was born in Pennsylvania, 
and was of German descent. The mother bore 
the maiden name of Sarah Gorgas. In the Krieg 
family were eleven children: Cyrus and John, 
both of whom are now deceased; Jacob, our sub- 
ject; Allen, who is extensively engaged in farm- 
ing in Miami County, Ind. ; Mary, deceased; Sam- 
uel, a retired farmer, now living in Manchester, 
Ind.: Martin, who has also passed away; Levi, 
a mechanic residing in Indianapolis, Ind.; Will- 
iam, deceased; Benjamin, who follows agricultu- 
ral pursuits near Disco, Ind.; and Philip, a farm- 
er of the same locality. 



334 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



No event of special importance occurred during 
the boyhood and youth of Jacob Krieg. He spent 
his early days in the usual manner of farmer lads, 
and acquired his education in the district schools 
of the neighborhood, which he attended at vari- 
ous intervals until sixteen years of age. He con- 
tinued upon the old homestead until the age of 
nineteen, when he began working at the carpen- 
ter's trade, serving a two-years apprenticeship. 
He followed that business in the Keystone State 
until 1836, when he removed to Stark County, 
Ohio, where he engaged in carpentering until 
1839. In that year he went to Cincinnati, but 
remained only a short time in that city. Going 
to Seven Mile, Butler County, Ohio, he there con- 
tinued until 1856, during which time he followed 
carpentering and farming. 

In the mean time, Mr. Krieg was married. On 
the 13th of October, 1842, he was joined in mar- 
riage with Miss Jane Ray, a native of Ohio. Six 
children have been born of their union, namely: 
Laura M., wife of Francis M. Haines, a farmer 
residing near Colchester, 111.; Francis R., who is 
proprietor of the Carthage Flouring Mills, and a 
leading business man of that city; John C, who 
is still living on the old home farm; Thomas B., 
an agriculturist of McDouough County; Charles 
O., who is engaged in farming in Hancock Coun- 
ty; and Elanor S., who completes the family. 

As before stated, the year 1856 witnessed the 
arrival of Mr. Krieg in Hancock County. He 
has seen much of the growth and progress made 
in this locality, and has always aided in its devel- 
opment, for he takes a warm interest in every 
thing pertaining to the welfare of the community. 
He has always followed farming, and in his un- 
dertakings has met with a well-merited prosper- 
ity. When he started out in life he determined 
to secure for himself, if possible, a comfortable 
home and property. He began making his own 
way in the world empty handed, but he has stead- 
ily pressed forward, overcoming the difficulties 
and obstacles in his path, until he reached the 
goal which was before him. He is now in comfort- 
able circumstances, and is supplied not only with 
the necessities, but with many of the luxuries of 
life. He cast his first Presidential vote for Will- 



iam Henry Harrison, and was an advocate of the 
Whig party until its dissolution, since which time 
he has been a stanch supporter of Republican 
principles. 



ISAAC S. BARTHOLOMEW, one of the rep- 
resentative and leading agriculturists of Han- 
cock County, who resides on stction 20, 
Prairie Township, is a native of Adams County, 
111. He was born near Camp Point, on the 21st 
of October, 1838, and is a son of Gillead and Sa- 
rah (Roseberry) Bartholomew. His father was a 
native of Virginia, and was of English descent. 
By trade he was a millwright. Emigrating west- 
ward in an early day, he became one of the pio- 
neer settlers of Adams Count}', and there spent 
the remainder of his life. He passed away in 
March, 1861, and his wife, who survived him 
about twenty-three years, was called to her final 
rest in 1883. This worthy couple were the par- 
ents of seven children, namely: Lemuel and Eliz- 
abeth, both deceased; Martha, wife of Joseph 
Hanks, a farmer of Adams County; Isaac S., of 
this notice; and Emma, Gillian and Johnnie, also 
deceased. 

Mr. Bartholomew whose name heads this rec- 
ord is a self-educated and self-made man. His 
school privileges were quite limited, and his ad- 
vantages in other directions were also meagre. 
Much of his boyhood was spent at work in his fa- 
ther's flouring and saw mill, and he became thor- 
oughly familiar with the milling business. At 
the age of twenty-two he left home and began life 
for himself. After his father's death he took 
charge of the mills, which he operated until the 
spring of 1865, when he sold out and removed to 
Hancock County, locating in Durham Township, 
where he purchased a farm. For two years he 
devoted his time and energies to the cultivation of 
that land, and then purchased the farm on which 
he now lives, an eighty-acre tract on section 20, 
Prairie Township. Here he carries on general 
farming and stock-raising. 

Mr. Bartholomew has been twice married. In 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



335 



1S61, he was joined in marriage with Miss Annie 
Adams, and they became the parents of five chil- 
dren, three sons and two daughters: Annie, who 
is now deceased; Gillead, a resident farmer of 
Prairie Township; Isaac, a minister of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, who is now located in 
Eivermore, Iowa; Mattie, wife of Otis French, 
who is engaged in farming in Bear Creek 
Township, Hancock County; and Addie, who is 
now deceased. The mother of this family passed 
away April i, 1872, and for his second wife Mr. 
Bartholomew chose Miss Sarah J. Gibson, a most 
estimable lady. Three children grace this union, 
namely: Josie, who is still living at home; Ed- 
ward and Grace, who are also under the parental 
roof. The family has a wide acquaintance in this 
community, its members rank high in social cir- 
cles, and the home is noted for its hospitality. 

In his political views, Mr. Bartholomew is a 
Democrat, but has never sought or desired the 
honors or emoluments of public office, his time 
being devoted to the enjoyments of the home and 
to his business interests. He is a thrifty and 
progressive farmer, who always keeps abreast 
with the times and has a well-developed and 
highly-cultivated tract of land. His place is well 
improved with good buildings, and its neat ap- 
pearance indicates the careful supervision of the 
owner. Although Mr. Bartholomew has led a 
busy life he has yet found time to devote to pub- 
lic interests, and his support is ever given to those 
enterprises which are calculated to prove of pub- 
lic benefit. 

to ' s ' (=J <*"T '"> &=j ai 

ELAYTON McGILL, a representative farmer 
of Chili Township, Hancock County, resid- 
ing on section 34, is one of the worthy citi- 
zens that Ohio has furnished to this community. 
He was born in Clermont County, of the Buckeye 
State, December 17, 1842, and is the only child 
of Alexander and Sarah (Carpenter) McGill. 
His father was a native of New York, and when 
a young man removed to Ohio, where he followed 
agricultural pursuits. After his marriage he em- 



igrated with his family to Illinois, locating in 
Adams County, four and a-half miles northwest 
of Camp Point. This was in 1852. There he 
remained until his death, which occurred at the 
age of sixty years. He was of Irish descent, for 
his parents were both born on the Emerald Isle. 
The mother of our subject was a native of Cler- 
mont County, Ohio, and there died at the early 
age of twenty-two. 

In taking up the personal history of our sub- 
ject we present to our readers the life record of 
one of the well-known and highly-respected 
farmers of this locality. He was a lad of only 
eight years when he became a resident of Adams 
Count}', 111., and upon the old home farm in that 
county he remained until the nth of August, 
1S62. Although he had not then attained his 
majority, he could no longer resist the impulse to 
enter his county's service, and enlisted among the 
boys in blue of Company G, Seventy -eighth Illi- 
nois Infantry. He followed the Old Flag until 
its supremacy was acknowledged throughout the 
South, when, the war having closed, he was 
honorably discharged, on the 7th of June, 1865. 
He participated in the battles of Mission Ridge, 
Resaca, Rome, Ga., and Atlanta, and at the last- 
named received a wound in the right leg, which 
caused him to be taken to the hospital, where he 
was confined for four months. After the battle 
of Nashville, he returned to his regiment and 
served as a private until the close of the war. 

Returning to his home in Adams County, Mr. 
McGill engaged in farming with his father until 
1869, when he came to Hancock County and pur- 
chased the farm upon which he now resides. He 
has placed his land under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and has one of the valuable farms in the 
neighborhood. He owns altogether six hundred 
and forty acres of rich laud in Hancock and Ad- 
ams Counties, and the well -tilled fields yield to 
the owner a golden tribute in return for the care 
and labor bestowed upon them. 

On the 4th of March, 1869, Mr. McGill mar- 
ried Miss Sophrona A. Gay, of Adams County, 
and by their union were born nine children. 
With the exception of one who died in infancy, 
all are still under the parental roof and in order 



336 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of birth are as follows: Sidney A., Lola V., Ettie 
and Hattie (twins), Vienna, Eunice, Ava and Fay. 
In his political views, Mr. McGill is a stanch Re- 
publican and takes an active interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the welfare of his party and 
its upbuilding, being always well informed on the 
issues of the day. He has been honored with 
several local offices, having served as Road Com- 
missioner for two terms and as School Director, 
while at this writing, in the spring of 1894, he is 
serving his fifth year as Supervisor of Chili 
Township. He is a member of Tobias Butler 
Post No. 428, G. A. R. , of Bowen, and though 
not a member of any church he contributes to the 
support of the same and to all worthy public en- 
terprises calculated to advance the general wel- 
fare. Aside from his agricultural interests Mr. 
McGill has other business connections, and is 
now the efficient President of the Farmers' Bank 
of Bowen, in which he is a stockholder. The 
greater part of his possessions has been acquired 
through his own efforts. He is a man of good 
business and executive ability, and his keen judg- 
ment and sagacity, supplemented by an enter- 
prising spirit, have brought him prosperity and 
made him one of the substantial citizens of Han- 
cock County. 

e_ . t=1 ^" l n .^^ ■ > 9 

U ' c=J"< T ">C~3 3) 

(3 IMEON B WALTON, one of the progressive 
Ny and public-spirited citizens of Hancock 
Q) County, is now living a retired life in Den- 
ver. As he is so widely known in this commun- 
ity we feel assured that the record of his life will 
prove of interest to many of our readers, and 
therefore gladly give it a place in this volume. 
Mr. Walton was born in Mason County, Ky., in 
the year 1818, and is a son of William and Bar- 
bara Walton, both of whom were natives of Vir- 
ginia. The Walton family is of Scotch-Irish 
lineage. His mother's people were among the 
first families to locate in Mason County, Ky., 
settling there when the Indians still lived in the 
neighborhood. When a young man William 
Walton removed to Kentucky, and was there 



married. He served as a private in the War of 
1 8 12. As a means of livelihood he followed 
farming during the greater part of his business 
career, and he also practiced medicine to a limi- 
ted extent in his own neighborhood. On leaving 
Mason County, Ky., he removed to Boone Coun- 
ty, that State, where his death occurred in 1864, 
at the age of seventy-six years. His wife passed 
away in 1838. 

This worth}- couple were the parents of thir- 
teen children, namely: John, Meredith, Fred- 
erick, Mary, Ann, Susan, Tabitha, Simeon B., 
Amanda, Eliza, William, Missouri and Lucy. 
Our subject is now the only one living. No event 
of special importance occurred during his child- 
hood. He was reared upon his father's farm, and 
attended the subscription schools, which were held 
in the old-time log schoolhouse, with its slab seats, 
puncheon floor and huge fireplace. The school 
was four miles from his home, so that the path of 
learning did not always seem to him a flowery 
one. He remained at home and to his . father 
gave the benefit of his services until twenty-three 
years of age, when he started out in life for him- 
self and began working for $9 per month. He 
was thus employed for two years. 

Mr. Walton continued to make his home in 
Kentucky until 1840, when he started on horse- 
back for Illinois. With the exception of two days 
when a companion rode with him, he traveled the 
entire distance alone. At length he arrived in 
Hancock County, and worked in Augusta Town- 
ship for his brother the first summer. After his 
marriage he took up his residence in Harmony 
Township. For one season he worked by the 
month as a farm hand, and then on horseback 
he returned to his native State; but after a short 
time he fitted up a wagon and team and again 
came to the West. This time he made a perma- 
nent location. He purchased two hundred and 
forty acres of land in Harmony Township, part 
timber and part prairie, and began opening up a 
farm. The land was all wild, and the only im- 
provement upon the place was a small log cabin. 
From sunrise to sunset, Mr. Walton in those 
early days could be found in the fields, clearing 
and developing his land, which in course of time 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



337 



was placed under the plow. The new and fer- 
tile soil yielded a ready return for his labors, and 
his financial resources were thereby greatly in- 
creased. He made many excellent improve- 
ments upon his farm, and it became one of the 
valuable and desirable places of the neighborhood. 

As a companion and helpmeet on life's journey, 
Mr. Walton chose Miss Elizabeth Stark, daugh- 
ter of James and Jessie (Drone) Stark. Their 
marriage was celebrated January 20, 1842. The 
lady was born in Auchtermechty. Scotland, 
March 24, 1823, and came to America with her 
parents in 1836 on a sailing-vessel, which after a 
voyage of seven weeks dropped anchor in the har- 
bor of New York. They at once came west to 
Illinois, and the father made a claim near Au- 
gusta, Hancock County, entering land from the 
Government. His death occurred in July, 1837, 
and his wife died when Mrs. Walton was only 
eleven years of age. There were no schools in 
the neighborhood when Mrs. Walton came here, 
and the nearest trading-point was at Rusliville. 
She well deserves mention among the pioneer set- 
tlers of the county, for since a very early day she 
has watched the growth and development of the 
entire community. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Walton were born seven chil- 
dren. William, George and David are all engaged 
in farming in Harmony Township; Ezekiel is now 
living on the old homestead; Margaret is the wife 
of Dr. Ray burn, a practicing physician of Den- 
ver, 111.; Mary E. is the wife of William Black, 
a farmer of Harmony Township; and Ella is the 
wife of Joel H. Todd, a practicing physician of 
Maryville, Mo. 

For many years Mr. Walton engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising. His landed pos- 
sessions now aggregate three hundred acres, in- 
cluding the old homestead. He continued upon 
the farm until 1890, when he removed to Denver, 
where he has since lived a retired life. He and 
his wife are both members of the Christian 
Church, and their many excellencies of character 
have gained for them the high regard of all with 
whom they have been brought in contact. Their 
friends are many throughout the community, and 
all who know them respect them. Mr. Walton 



cast his first Presidential vote for William Henry 
Harrison, and since the organization of the Re- 
publican party has been one of its stalwart sup- 
porters. He started out in life for himself with 
about a thousand dollars given him by his father 
and a determination to succeed. That he has 
succeeded is due not to favorable circumstances, 
but to industry and enterprise. He has made the 
most of his opportunities, and in his declining 
years, surrounded by all the comforts of life, he is 
enjoying a rest which he has so truly earned and 
richly deserves. 



(ILXIAM A. VANCE, deceased, was born 
in Washington Count}-, Pa., on the 18th 
of April, 1835, and died on his farm in Han- 
cock County, in June, 1884, respected by all who 
knew him. He was a leading citizen of the com- 
munity, and his sterling worth and excellencies 
of character won him the high regard of all. 

Mr. Vance was a son of Joseph Vance, and was 
reared on his father's farm. His school privileges 
were somewhat limited, but through experience, 
reading and observation he gained a practical 
business knowledge. He started out in life for 
himself on attaining his majority, and, bidding 
good-bye to his old home in the Keystone State, 
he emigrated westward to Illinois, taking up his 
residence in Hancock County. Locating in Chili 
Township, he purchased between three and four 
hundred acres of partially improved land. With 
characteristic energy he began its cultivation and 
development, and continued the operation of that 
land until 1871, in which year he removed to 
Harmony Township. Here he purchased three 
hundred and twenty acres of good land, upon 
which he made his home until his death. He was a 
successful farmer, who thoroughly understood 
his business, and by close attention to all details, 
combined with industry and good management, he 
won a well-deserved and comfortable competence. 

On the 18th of May, 1863, Mr. Vance was uni- 
ted in marriage with Miss Lydia Dick, and by 
their union were born five children, namely: 



338 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Joseph, who died on the 21st of August, 1864; 
Sherman D., who carries on general fanning in 
Harmony Township, Hancock County; Adeline, 
whe died in infancy on the 7th of January, 187 1; 
Thomas, at home: and James H., who died on 
the 9th of May, 1877. 

Throughout life, Mr. Vance was a supporter of 
the Republican party and its principles, and al- 
though never an office-seeker he was deeply inter- 
ested in what pertained to the welfare of his party, 
and did all in his power to promote its growth and 
insure its success. He was ever a valued and pub- 
lic-spirited citizen, and the best interests ever 
found in him a warm friend. His loyalty to the 
Government was manifested during the late war 
by a vear's service in the Union army. He was 
a prominent and influential citizen of Harmony 
Township, and all who knew him esteemed him 
highly, for his life was a straightforward and hon- 
orable one. He passed away in June, 1884, and 
his death was deeply mourned by many friends. 

After the death of her husband, Mrs. Vance was 
again married, and is now the wife of Jacob F. 
Sliger. They reside on the old home farm in Har- 
mon y Township, and are well-known and repre- 
sentative people of the community. 



IT NOCH RAMSEY, one of the wealthy farm- 
re) ers of Hancock County, has largely through 
I his own efforts won his well-deserved pros- 
perity. He now lives on section 34, Harmony 
Township, where he moved about 1 85 1 . He then 
owned only a quarter-section of land, but to this 
he has since added until his landed possessions 
now aggregate about two thousand acres. Young 
men would do well to study the methods which 
he has pursued, and his habits of diligence, in- 
dustry and enterprise. 

Mr. Ramsey was born near Charleston, Clarke 
County, Ind., January 30, 1824, and is a son of 
Samuel and Eleanor (Kime) Ramsey, who were 
natives of Kentucky. The father was of Scotch- 
Irish descent, and his mother was of German 
lineage. Nine children blessed their union: Han- 



nah, who is now the widow of George Browning, 
a resident farmer of Harmony Township; Enoch, 
of this sketch; Henry, who died October 1, 1875; 
Betsy A., who died March 8, 1830; James M., who 
died July 17, 1834; Samuel F., who passed away 
September 8, 1886; Sarah J. and Eleanora, who 
are still living; and Adeline, who died August 
27, 1847. 

On leaving his native State Samuel Ramsey 
removed to Clarke County, Ind., where he was 
married and made his home until 1836. He then 
removed to Logan County, but in the autumn of 
that year he came to Hancock County, 111., and 
settled in Chili Township. Here he purchased 
sixty acres of land, but after a year he removed 
to Harmony Township, and bought a partially 
improved tract of one hundred and sixty acres on 
section 25. He at once began opening up a farm, 
and soon furrows were turned upon the hitherto 
unbroken land, and fertile fields took the place of 
the once wild prairies. He continued to engage 
in agricultural pursuits until his death. A man 
of excellent business and executive ability, he was 
highly successful in his undertakings, and al- 
though he started out in life a poor boy he became 
one of the substantial farmers of his adopted 
count)'. In politics, he was a Democrat until the 
campaign of i860, when he supported Abraham 
Lincoln, and continued to affiliate with the Re- 
publican part}- throughout his remaining days. 
He was one of the first Supervisors of Harmony 
Township, aided in organizing the school districts, 
and took a prominent part in everything that 
pertained to the welfare of the community and its 
upbuilding. Both he and his wife were members 
of the Christian Church, and the poor and needy 
found in them faithful friends. Mr. Ramsey, who 
was born Novembers, 1797, died on the old home- 
stead on the 23d of March, 1861, and his wife, 
who was born October 5, 1800, was called to her 
final rest December 19, 1873. 

The family to which Enoch Ramsey belongs 
was one of prominence in the community. 
He spent the greater part of his life in Hancock 
County, and has seen much of its growth and up- 
building, for he was a lad of thirteen years at the 
time of the emigration westward. Upon the old 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



339 



homestead farm he was reared to manhood, and in 
the subscription schools he acquired an education. 
He had to walk a distance of a mile and a-half to 
the schoolhouse, which was a log structure and was 
furnished in the primitive manner of those days. 
He early began work in the fields, and soon be- 
came familiar with farm life in all of its details. 
He worked on his father's farm until twenty-seven 
years of age, and then began life for himself, hav- 
ing received very liberal assistance from his father, 
who gave each of his children a good start in life. 
He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
on section 34, Harmony Township, a tract of raw 
prairie, and with the exception of one year has 
since made his home thereon. The farm when it 
came into his possession was entirely unimproved, 
but he at one began its development and soon had 
placed it under a high state of cultivation. He 
placed upon it good buildings, divided it into 
fields of convenient size by well-kept fences, and 
all the accessories of a model farm were there sup- 
plied. His efforts were attended with success, and 
as his financial resources were increased the bound- 
aries of his farm were extended, until it now com- 
prises six hundred acres. He has altogether in 
Harmony Township thirteen hundred and sixt3 - 
acres, and is the owner of nineteen hundred and 
ninety acres in the county, the greater part of 
which is highly improved. In connection with 
its cultivation he has also been extensively en- 
gaged in stock-raising. 

On the 8th of May, 1853, Mr. Ramsey was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary J. Bettisworth, 
daughter of Evan and Rosalia Bettisworth, and a 
native of Virginia. To them have been born 
seven children: Samuel, who died September 20, 
1855: Enoch M., a farmer residing in Hutchinson, 
Kan.; Eleauora E., who became the wife of Henry 
J. Butler, and died December 10, 1879, leaving a 
daughter, Jennie; Tazwell T., who died May 22, 
1864; Hattie R., at home; Mary J., who died Au- 
gust 27, 1866; and Mattie H., who is still under 
the parental roof. The granddaughter, Jennie 
Butler, is also living with them. 

In politics, Mr. Ramsey has always been a sup- 
porter of the Democratic party, and has served 
his township as Supervisor, Treasurer, Collector 



and Road Commissioner. A prompt and efficient 
officer, he has ever discharged his duties in a faith- 
ful manner, that has won the commendation of all 
concerned. In his business career he has pros- 
pered greatly, his success coming to him as the 
result of judicious management, industry and en- 
terprise. He has always been generous with his 
means in support of public interests which are 
calculated to prove of public benefit, and is re- 
cognized as one of the valued citizens of the com- 
munity. Almost his entire life has been passed 
in Hancock County, where he has many friends, 
and in its history he well deserves mention as one 
of the honored pioneers. 



6~ * =J<'f"> G 

("JOSEPH MOCK, who carries on general farm- 
I ing on section 4, Chili Township, is a native 
\~) of Kentucky, his birth having occurred on 
the 5th of April, 1835, in Bourbon County. His 
parents, Abraham and Cynthia (Wilson) Mock, 
were also natives of that State, and the father was 
of German and French descent. Their family num- 
bered six children, three sons and three daugh- 
ters: Emily, now the wife of E. Rice; Samuel, who 
died in 1859; Joseph, of this sketch; Henry; Mar- 
garet, wife of John Robinson; and Cynthia, wife of 
Cain Hummel. The father of this family followed 
the vocation of farming, and both he and his wife 
always resided in their native State. 

Joseph Mock was reared under the parental roof 
in the usual manner of farmer lads. Through the 
winter he attended the subscription schools, 
which were held in a log schoolhouse, three miles 
from his home. In the summer he worked upon 
the farm. He was only eleven years of age at the 
time of his father's death, and thus early in life 
he was cast adrift upon the world to make his own 
way as best he could. He began earning his live- 
lihood by work as a farm hand, receiving $5 per 
month for his sendees. He continued his resi- 
dence in Kentucky until 1851, when he came to 
Adams County, 111. During the succeeding eleven 
years of his life he engaged in fanning in that lo- 
cality, and in 1862 he came to Hancock County, 



34° 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



locating upon land in Chili Township, which he 
had previously purchased. This was an eighty- 
acre tract on section 4, and though wild and unim- 
proved he soon transformed it into rich and fertile 
fields. He now owns one hundred and twenty 
acres of valuable land, and his place is well im- 
proved with all modern accessories and conven- 
iences. 

In 1862, Mr. Mock was united in marriage 
with Miss Eleanora Kennedy, daughter of Charles 
and Cornelia (Gates) Kennedy. The lady was 
born in Ohio, on the 23d of January, 1834. Three 
children graced the union of Mr. and Mrs. Mock, 
namely: Elmer, who now carries on farming in 
Chili Township; Ona, at home; and Wilson, who 
died July 28, 1884. The first-named married 
Theresa Cunningham. 

Since attaining his majority, Mr. Mock has been 
a supporter of the Democratic party and its prin- 
ciples, but the greater part of his time and atten- 
tion has been devoted to agricultural pursuits, in 
which he has met with good success. Though 
he has not amassed wealth, he has won a comfort- 
able competence and a pleasant home, and is now 
numbered among the substantial and representa- 
tive citizens of the community. 

(t)6JlLLIAM WILSON, a farmer residing on 
\ A / section 9, Carthage Township, Hancock 
VV County, was born in Rock Castle County, 
Ky., near Mt. Vernon, November 22, 1835. The 
Wilson family is of Irish origin, and was founded 
in America during Colonial days. The father of 
our subject, James Wilson, was a native of Vir- 
ginia. After arriving at years of maturity he was 
joined in wedlock with Miss Elizabeth Stewart, a 
native of Kentucky. By this union were born 
fifteen children, seven sons and eight daughters. 
Twelve of the number grew to mature years, and 
nine of the family are yet living. Sarah is now 
the widow of Stephen Thompson, who was a 
resident of Texas; Mary is the wife of Dr. Ralph 
Harris, a retired minister living in Macomb, 111. ; 
Delphia is the wife of Sidney Proctor, a farmer of 



South Mound, Kan.; James carries on agricultural 
pursuits in Missouri; Allen is a retired grocery 
merchant of Carthage; Annie L- is the wife of 
William Williams, a merchant of Colorado; Will- 
iam of this sketch is the next younger; Martha is 
the wife of Harry Taylor, a farmer residing in 
Ferris, 111. ; Joshua is an agriculturist of Webb 
City, Mo. ; and Samuel is a farmer living near 
Keokuk, Iowa. 

In the usual manner of farmer lads William 
Wilson spent his boyhood days. He remained in 
his native State until fourteen years of age, and 
then accompanied his parents on their emigration 
to Illinois in 1849. The family located in Carth- 
age Township, Hancock County, where the par- 
ents spent their remaining days, the death of the 
father occurring in 1852, while the mother passed 
away in 1862. 

In this county our subject grew to manhood, 
and in the district schools of the community his 
education was acquired. He remained with his 
father until his death, after which he took charge 
of the home farm and cared for his mother until 
she too was called away, in 1862. He then em- 
barked in the livery business in Carthage, where 
he remained until 1869, when he purchased the 
farm on which he now resides. He first bought 
one hundred and forty-five acres on section 9, 
Carthage Township, and to this he has since add- 
ed, until now two hundred acres of rich land yield 
to him a good income. He carries on general 
farming and stock-raising, and his well-directed 
efforts are crowned with success. The main- im- 
provements upon his place, and the valuable land 
under a high state of cultivation, make this one 
of the best farms in the neighborhood. 

On the 12th of May, 1864, Mr. Wilson was unit- 
ed in marriage with Miss Lydia Deuel, and to them 
were born eight children, namely: Ida, wife of 
Frederick Soules, who is living in Keokuk, Iowa; 
George C, Ellen, Eva, William, May and Lulu, 
all of whom are still with their parents; and Alice, 
who died on the 21st of July, 1881. She was the 
youngest of the family. The mother passed away 
on the 19th of July of the same year, and was 
laid to rest in Moss Ridge Cemetery in Carthage. 
She was a member of the Methodist Church, and 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



34i 



a most estimable woman, whose loss was deeply 
mourned throughout the community. 

We find 111 Mr. Wilson a public-spirited and 
progressive citizen, who, through the long years 
of his residence in Hancock County, has been al- 
ways interested in the development of the com- 
munity and the promotion of those enterprises 
which are calculated to prove of public benefit. 
In politics, he supports the Republican party and 
its principles, but has never been an office-seeker. 

s — *-=] <* 9 > &~ s> 



RUFUS LEACH, who is now occupying the 
responsible position of Postmaster of Ma- 
comb, was born six miles north of this city, 
on the 6th of September, 1S51, and is a represent- 
ative of one of the pioneer families of the comity. 
His father, Rufus Leach, Sr. , was born in New 
Jersey, but in early childhood, with the family of 
his father, John H. Leach, born July 18, 1786, 
and Sally (Parkist) Leach, born November 12, 
1786, and the families of two uncles, emigrated to 
Trumbull County, Ohio, where he grew to man- 
hood. In 1838, he came to McDonough County, 
111., and engaged in farming, locating on fine 
prairie land about six miles north of Macomb. 
April 9, 18-10, he was united in marriage with 
Lois Sarles, and to them were born four children, 
namely: Harriet, widow of W. M. Lipe; John H., 
Albert J. and Rufus. The father died August 
14, 1851, about one month before the subject of 
this sketch was born. The mother still survives. 
She was the second time married, March 15, 1853, 
this time to William McDaniel, and to them three 
children were born: Mary A. , James H. and Will- 
iamC. The daughter died in 1858. Lois (McDan- 
iel) Leach has been for many years a member of 
the Christian Church, and is widely known, loved 
and respected in the community in which she has 
so long made her home. She came to Illinois 
when a little girl from New Albany, Ind. At 
the date given above, she was married at the home 
of her sister, Mrs. Lewis Spangler, in Fulton 
County, 111., the Rev. W. K. Stewart, of the 
Presbyterian Church of this city, performing the 
17 



ceremony, and Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Spangler and 
George Boughmau signing the marriage certifi- 
cate as witnesses. 

Abner Leach, the father of John H. Leach, 
was a native of Sussex County, N. J., and was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War, up to the time 
of his death being on the pension roll of the Gov- 
ernment, in recognition of valiant services ren- 
dered in those trying times. James H. Sarles, 
maternal grandfather of Rufus Leach, Jr., was 
also in the service of his country, in the War of 
1812. Mr. Sarles was a shingle-maker by trade, 
and in the early days of McDonough County 
shaved many thousand shingles for the pioneers 
who came to this spot to build new homes for them- 
selves and their children. Mr. Sarles died about 
1 86 1 , and his remains were interred in the Stickle 
Graveyard. The remains of Rufus Leach, Sr. , 
rest in the same cemetery. The family of Rufus 
Leach, Sr. , was a large one, consisting of father, 
mother and eleven children, as follows: John H. 
Leach, Sally (Parkist) Leach, Charles, Abra- 
ham, Rufus, Nancy, David, Mary Ann, Hiram, 
Celia, Caroline, Betsey and Margaret. Lois Sarles 
was one of a family consisting of father and moth- 
er, James Harvey and Ruth (Parsels) Sarles, 
and the following children: Abelard, Harriet, 
Sarah Ann, Man-, Lois, James Harvey and Nancy 
Jane. 

From the time he was eight years of age, Rufus 
Leach has resided in Macomb. He began earn- 
ing his own livelihood when fourteen years old, 
and has since been dependent on his own efforts. 
It was in October, 1865, that he entered the office 
of the Macomb Eagle, to learn the printer's trade, 
which he has followed more or less continuously 
since. He afterward worked in the office of the 
Western Light for about two years, and was en- 
gaged in Monmouth and Galesburg for two years 
more, when he entered the office of the Macomb 
Journal , with which he was connected seventeen 
years. His faithfulness to his employers' inter- 
ests was manifested by his long-continued service. 

In December, 1890, with Thomas J. Dudman, 
he purchased the Macomb Eagle establishment, 
and continued in partnership one year, at the end 
of which period he retired from the business, but 



342 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL kECORD. 



remained with the Eagle in the capacity of fore- 
man until his appointment as Postmaster. He 
took charge of the postoffice February 20, 1894. 

On the 8th of January, 1879, Mr. Leach was 
united in marriage with Mrs. Hannah J. Intnan, 
widow of Randolph Inman, and a daughter of 
Felix and Abigail Navert. By their union have 
been born four children, two sons and two daugh- 
ters: Arthur S., Ernest R., Lois A. and Lena B. 
The parents are both members of the Christian 
Church, and Mr. Leach is now serving as Church 
Clerk. They have a pleasant home in Macomb, 
and have many friends in the community. 

In his political affiliations, Mr. Leach is a Dem- 
ocrat, and by President Cleveland was appointed 
Postmaster. He has but recently entered upon the 
duties of the office, yet his course thus far gives 
evidence that his administration will be satisfac- 
tory to the public. He also served as President 
of the School Board for one year, to which posi- 
tion he was appointed by C. I. Imes, Mayor of 
the city, and it was during his incumbency of this 
position that the First Ward school building was 
erected. He is an honored and active member of 
the Knights of Pythias, having served three terms 
as Chancellor Commander, and twice as delegate 
to the Grand Lodge; and of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, in which he has passed all the 
Chairs, and is a popular citizen of Macomb, where 
the greater part of his life has been passed. 

(S_ ir J^ L l <., i > [^ ■■> ^ 

Gl NDREW JACKSON DALE, who now re- 
I I sides on section 13, Carthage Township, 
/ 1 Hancock County, claims Kentucky as the 
State of his nativity. He was born in Woodford 
County, on the 28th of October, 1818, and is 
a sou of James B. and Poll}' (Dawson) Dale. 
When Andrew was only two years of age his 
parents removed to Indiana, making the jour- 
ney by team, and located in Fayette County. 
Later they removed to Elkhart County, where 
the father entered land from the Government and 
began the development of a farm. The year 1834 
witnessed his arrival in Illinois. For a year he 



operated rented land in Morgan County, and in 
1835 he came to Hancock County, settling on a 
farm on section 24, in what is now Carthage 
Township. He here made a claim of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, partly timber and partly 
prairie land, and with characteristic energy be- 
gan opening up a farm. 

In the Dale family were eight children, six 
sons and two daughters, but only two of the num- 
ber are now living: George W., who is engaged 
in mining in Nevada; and our subject. The latter 
was a young man of seventeen when he came to 
Illinois. His educational privileges were limited 
to those afforded by the district schools, and his 
advantages in other directions were likewise mea- 
gre. His training at farm labor, however, was 
not limited. He early began work in the fields, 
and soon became familiar with all the details of 
farm life. He continued under the parental roof 
until twenty -five years of age, and then started out 
in life for himself. 

In February, 1845, Mr. Dale was united in 
marriage with Miss Nancy N. Davis, and by that 
union were born eight children, namely : Sylvester, 
Wesley and Thomas, all of whom are now de- 
ceased; William, who is living in Kansas City, 
where he is serving on the police force; Mar}', 
wife of Reuben Jacoby, a resident of Carthage; 
Lillie, wife of J. C. Jacoby, who is also living in 
Carthage; Squire; and Maretta, who completes 
the family. The mother was called to her final 
rest November 17, 1871, and her remains were 
interred in Webster Cemetery. Her loss was 
deeply mourned, for she was a most estimable lady, 
and had the high regard of all who knew her. 
The family is one of prominence in the commu- 
nity, and its members have many friends through- 
out the county. 

Mr. Dale has led a busy and useful life, devot- 
ing the greater part of his time and attention 
to agricultural pursuits. He has also aided in 
the development of this community, and is num- 
bered among the honored pioneers who laid the 
foundation for the present prosperity and advanced 
condition of the county. The best interests of 
the community have ever found in him a friend, 
and he is always ready to aid in the promotion of 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



343 



those enterprises which are calculated to prove of 
public benefit. He cast his first Presidential vote 
for William Henry Harrison, and supported the 
> Whig candidates until the organization of the 
Republican party, when he joined its ranks. 



l<"f>G 



0AMUEL P. McGAW, who is successfully 
/\ engaged in merchandising in Elvaston, was 
\~J born on the 5th of October, 1827, in Abbey - 
ville, S. C His parents were John and Agnes 
McGaw. They too were natives of South Caro- 
lina, and Mr. McGaw was of Irish descent. 
Their family numbered six children. Sarah, who 
is now deceased; Samuel P., our subject; John 
B., a farmer who resided in Wilsouville, Neb., 
where he died in February, 1894; Louisa, widow 
of Wilson Hopkins, and the Matron of the Buf- 
falo Orphan Asylum, of Buffalo, X. V.; Rev. 
James A. P., who is pastor of a Presbyterian 
Churchiu Kansas City, Mo.; and Agnes, who 
died in 1838. 

In taking up the history of Samuel P. McGaw 
we present to our readers a sketch of one of the 
best-known citizens of Hancock Count}-. He 
was reared upon a farm, and received only such 
educational advantages as were afforded by the 
district schools of the neighborhood. In 1835, 
his parents emigrated westward with their family 
and took up their residence in Ocpiawka, Hender- 
son County, 111. The father and mother both 
died when our subject was only eleven years of 
age. He then went to live with his grandfather 
in Warren Count},', 111., and there continued to 
make his home until the fall of 1S42, when he re- 
turned to Henderson County, and for three years 
lived with an uncle. During this period he en- 
gaged in farm work through the summer months, 
while in the winter season he worked at the tailor's 
trade. 

On the expiration of that period, Mr. McGaw 
returned to Oquawka, and was employed in a 
tailoring establishment for a year. He then 
bought out his employer and engaged in business 
along that line in his own interest until 1852, 



when he disposed of his store, for in the autumn 
of that year he had been elected Sheriff of Hen- 
derson County for a term of two years. On his 
retirement from office he purchased land and 
embarked in fanning, which he followed until 
1862, when his farm labor was interrupted by his 
service in the Union army. 

In that year, in connection with his brother 
John, Mr. McGaw raised and organized what be- 
came Company K of the Eighty-fourth Regiment 
of Illinois Volunteers. His brother was chosen 
Captain of the company, but our subject went to 
the front as a private. The first engagement of 
importance in which he participated was at 
Prairieville, Ky. This was followed by the bat- 
tles of Stone River and Chickamauga. At the 
latter, which occurred September 20, 1863, he was 
wounded by a minie-ball in the left arm, and was 
taken to the field hospital, but for five days after 
receiving the injury no medical aid was given 
him. In the following November he was re- 
moved to Nashville, and on the 1st of January, 
1864, he returned to his home in Henderson 
County, having been granted a thirty-days fur- 
lough. On the expiration of that period he was 
discharged, being mustered out with the rank of 
Sergeant, February 25, 1864. 

While residing in Oquawka, Mr. McGaw 
served as clerk in the post-office for a year, and 
he also had charge of the Poor Farm of Hender- 
son County for a year. In the spring of 1S66 he 
came to Hancock County, and purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in Montebello 
Township; but the following year he purchased a 
quarter-section in Prairie Township, and upon 
that tract made his home for twenty years. He 
was a successful agriculturist, and his well-kept 
farm was one of the best in the neighborhood. 
In 1887, he purchased a store in Elvaston, and 
has since been engaged in general merchandising. 
He carries a good stock, and by his fair and hon- 
est dealings, his courteous treatment, and his 
earnest desire to please his customers, he has 
built up an excellent trade. 

In 1851, Mr. McGaw was united in marriage 
with Miss Elvira J. Hopkins, who died April 15, 
1855. They were the parents of two children; 



344 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Sarah L-, wife of Thomas J. Rudell, the present 
Postmaster of Elvaston ; and John, who died in 
infancy. Mr. McGaw was again married, in No- 
vember, 1856, his second union being with Eliza- 
beth P. Leslie. They have had a family of eight 
children: Francis, who is now pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church of Augusta, 111. ; James W. , a 
resident farmer of Prairie Township, Hancock 
County; Alice A., wife of George Hersman, a 
farmer of Brown County, 111.; Albert G., who is 
now attending college; Mary A., at home; Clar- 
ence and Clara, twins, who died in infancy; and 
Grace E., who is a student in a college in Rock- 
ford, 111. 

Mr. McGaw exercises his right of franchise in 
support of the Republican party, and has been 
honored with a number of local offices. He has 
served as Justice of the Peace and Supervisor, was 
Collector and School Trustee, and in April, 1889, 
was appointed Postmaster of Elvaston, which po- 
sition he held through the Republican adminis- 
tration. He holds membership with the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and is an Elder and lead- 
ing member of the Presbyterian Church of Elvas- 
ton. Mr. McGaw well deserves the high regard 
in which he is held, for his career has been a 
straightforward and honorable one, well worthy 
of emulation. He is true to every public and 
private trust, has always been faithful to his 
official duties, and is a man of firm convictions. 



REV. JACOB SHULL, a local minister of the 
United Brethren Church, and one of the 
substantial farmers of Hancock County, now 
living on section 19, Prairie Township, claims 
Ohio as the State of his nativity-. He was born 
on a farm in Hamilton County, near Cincinnati, 
on the 2 1 st of December, 1 8 1 5 , being a son of Sam- 
uel P. and Catherine (Shupe ) Shull. The family 
is of German origin, and was probably founded in 
America during early Colonial days. The father 
of our subject was a native of Pennsylvania. The 
Shull family numbered eight children, six of 
whom, three sons and three daughters, grew to 



mature years. They were Elizabeth, John M., 
David, Rebecca, Jacob and Mary A. 

Our subject is now the only surviving member 
of the family. He was born and reared on the 
old home farm in the Buckeye State, and the ed- 
ucational privileges he received were those af- 
forded by the subscription schools. His father 
died when he was twelve years of age, and by the 
death of his mother he was left an orphan at the 
age of sixteen. Thus thrown upon his own re- 
sources to make his way in the world unaided, he 
started out as a farm hand, and during the first 
nine months of his service received only $50. He 
continued working by the month for four years, 
and then rented land, which he operated until 
the spring of 1841. That year witnessed his re- 
moval to Switzerland, Ind. He there purchased 
a tract of partially improved land, and continued 
its further development and cultivation until 1862, 
when he removed to Decatur County, Ind., where 
he remained for a few years. His next place of 
residence was in Dearborn County, Ind., and he 
there continued until his removal to Illinois. 

Mr. Shull has been three times married. On 
the 5th of March, 1835, he wedded Miss Lucinda 
Cale, and to them were born twelve children, 
namely: Rebecca, George \V., Ilinda, Fabius, 
Alonzo, William J., Mary K., Lucinda, Azia (de- 
ceased), Azia (the second of that name), Ulysses 
P. and Erasmus. The mother of this family was 
called to her final rest in 1858, and the following 
year Rev. Mr. Schull was united in marriage with 
Miss Elizabeth Kile. They became the parents 
of two children: Emily E., and Lavina A., who 
is now deceased. Mrs. Shull passed away in 
1863, and in 1867 Mr. Shull led to the marriage 
altar Mrs. Nancy E. (Smith) Ludwig. Their 
family numbered six children: Eveline, Simon P., 
Albert E., Isalene, William J. and Isadore. 

Rev. Mr. Shull continued to reside in Indiana 
until 1S67, when he came to Hancock County, 111. , 
and located in Prairie Township upon the farm 
which has since been his home. He purchased 
three hundred and twenty acres of arable laud on 
section 19, and now has his place under a high 
state of cultivation. This is one of the valuable 
farms of the neighborhood, for the fields are well 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



345 



tilled, and it is improved with all modern acces- 
sories and conveniences. Mr. Shull carries on 
general fanning, and has been very successful in 
his undertakings. He may truly be called a self- 
made man, for he started out in life empty-handed, 
with nothing to depend upon save a determina- 
tion to succeed. He has steadily worked his way 
upward, overcoming the difficulties and obstacles 
in his path by enterprise and industry, and now 
occupies a place among the substantial citizens of 
his adopted county. In politics, he is a Prohibi- 
tionist, and while living in Indiana held the office 
of County Commissioner. For many years he has 
been a member of the United Brethren Church, 
and is now serving as one of its local ministers. 
He has long taken a prominent part in church 
and temperance work, and his influence is ever 
exerted in behalf of the right. His life has indeed 
been an honorable and upright one and worthy 
the emulation of all. 



!""<*■ ¥ "> &" 



GEORGE M. BROWNING, deceased, was 
I— born in Davidson Count}-, Tenn., on the 
\j[ 25th of March, 1820, and was a son of David 
and Vashti Browning. He was born and reared 
upon his father's farm, and the first fifteen years 
of his life were spent in the State of his nativity. 
He then accompanied his parents on their re- 
moval to Illinois. They made the journey west- 
ward with ox-teams, and after many long days 
upon the road they reached Hancock County, 
locating in Augusta Township. This was in 
1835. The county was then new and unimproved, 
and it seemed that the work of civilization and 
progress had hardly been begun. Much of the 
land was still in the possession of the Govern- 
ment, and the settlements were widely scattered. 

Mr. Browning acquired a very limited educa- 
tion. He conned his lessons in a log schoolhouse, 
the school being conducted on the subscription 
plan, but this he attended only through the winter 
season, for his labors were needed upon the farm 
during the summer months. His father died soon 
after coming to this county, and he operated the 



homestead for his mother until twenty-one years 
of age. He then removed to the farm which con- 
tinued to be his home throughout his remaining 
days. He located on one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 35, Harmony Township, of which 
only twenty acres had been broken, while a small 
house constituted the only improvement thereon. 

As a companion and helpmate on life's journey, 
Mr. Browning chose Miss Hannah Ramsey. 
Their marriage was celebrated on the 25th of No- 
vember, 1841, and was blessed with a family of 
eleven children. Four of the number, however, 
died in infancy. Adeline became the wife of 
Benjamin F. Spicer, and died August 15, 1865, 
leaving a daughter, Rose Browning. The mother 
was laid to rest in the Browning Cemetery. 
George M. is a farmer of Harmony Township. 
Hannah J. is the wife of James A. Thompson, 
also an agriculturist of Harmony Township. Me- 
linda A. is the wife of Eldridge Mayberry, a resi- 
dent of Kansas. Eleanora Y. is the wife of 
Thomas M. Orton, and they make their home in 
Denver, 111. Sarah is the widow of John J. Black. 
John J. carries on agricultural pursuits in Shelby 
County, Mo. 

In the year following their marriage, Mr. and 
Mrs. Browning removed to the farm upon which 
the lad}- now resides. He at once began its fur- 
ther development, and soon the greater part of the 
land was placed under the plow. He made it a 
highly cultivated tract, and placed thereon many 
excellent improvements, which stand as monu- 
ments to the thrift and enterprise of the owner. 
He carried on general farming and stock-raising, 
and both branches of his business proved to him 
a profitable source of income. Thus he acquired 
a comfortable competence and left to his family a 
pleasant home. 

Socially, Mr. Browning is connected with the 
Masonic fraternity, and was a member of the 
Christian Church. In politics, he was a suppor- 
ter of Democratic principles, and served as Town 
ship Supervisor, Road Commissioner, Assessor 
and School Director. Always faithful to the trust 
reposed in him, he proved a capable and efficient 
officer, and was a public-spirited and valued citi- 
zen. The cause of education found in him a warm 



346 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



friend, and other enterprises and interests of merit 
received his hearty support and co-operation. All 
who knew him respected him for his sterling 
worth and strict integrity, and his loss was deeply- 
mourned throughout the community. He passed 
away November 22, 1893, and was laid to rest in 
the home cemetery. 



i /I OSES SCOTT, a retired farmer, now resid- 
V ing on section 25, Harmony Township, 
(fj Hancock County, claims Ken tuck}' as the 
State of his nativity. He was born in Boone 
County, near Burlington, on the 2d of February, 
18 16, and is a son of William and Mary (Kyle) 
Scott. He was the eldest, and is the only sur- 
viving member of their family , which numbered 
three children, the others being William and Lu- 
cinda. 

Our subject was born and reared on the old 
homestead farm, and acquired his education in 
the subscription schools of the neighborhood. 
Although his privileges in that direction were 
limited, his training at farm labor was not meagre, 
for in early life he began work in the fields and 
soon became familiar with everything connected 
with agricultural pursuits. He continued under 
the parental roof until he had attained his ma- 
jority, and then began farming in his own inter- 
ests. He lived in Kentucky until 1850, when he 
determined to seek a home elsewhere, believing 
that he might thereby better his financial condi- 
tion. Bidding adieu to his native State he started 
for Illinois, making the journey by water. 

At length, Mr. Scott arrived in Hancock Coun- 
ty, where he has since made his home. He lo- 
cated on section 25, Harmony Township, on the 
farm where he now lives, and purchased three 
hundred and twenty acres of prairie land, then 
but partially improved. The only building then 
upon the place was a small log cabin, which 
furnished him shelter for several years until he 
could replace it by a more modern residence. 
The land he placed under the plow, and in course 
of time slathered abundant harvests in return. 



As the years passed the once wild land took on 
the appearance of a highly cultivated tract, and 
his farm became one of the best in the neighbor- 
hood. 

On the 20th of October, 1836, Mr. Scott was 
united in marriage with Miss Harriet Rice. Unto 
them have been born a family of thirteen chil- 
dren, seven of whom are yet living, while six 
have passed away. They are: William, who is 
now deceased; Mary, wife of Morrison B. Baker; 
Matilda, wife of Joseph Black, a resident of Brown 
County, 111.; Perry A., who resides in Harmony 
Township; Taylor, who makes his home in St. 
Mary's Township, Hancock County; Lucy, wife 
of David Walton; Elijah, who carries on agri- 
cultural pursuits in this locality; David, who is 
living in Chili Township; Calvin, Bird and Martha 
H., all of whom are now deceased; and one child 
who died in infancy. The mother of this family 
passed away February 2, 1886, and was laid to 
rest in Scott Cemetery. 

.Since the organization of the party, Mr. Scott 
has been a stalwart Republican, and does all in his 
power to advance the growth and insure the suc- 
cess of his party. He has served both as School 
Director and Supervisor. He is a public-spirited 
and progressive citizen and manifests a com- 
mendable interest in everything pertaining to the 
welfare of the community. His life vocation has 
been that of farming, but he is now living a re- 
tired life, spending his declining days in the en- 
joyment of the fruits of his former toil. He pos- 
sesses a comfortable competence, which has been 
acquired through his own industry and enter- 
prise. 

s — - — ■ £ ~-sr? H r^ r [ 



Sr"HOMAS NEWTON GILUS, who is en- 
f C gaged in grain-dealing in Bowen, is num- 
Vy bered among the early settlers of Hancock 
County, having for many years made his home 
within its borders. He was born December 9, 
1835, in East Tennessee, near Greenville, and 
was the youngest in a family of six children, 
whose parents were John and Mary (Register) 



PORTRAIT AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



347 



Gillis. The father was a native of Delaware, and 
in that State spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth. When a young man he removed to Ten- 
nessee, and in 1844 removed to Keokuk County, 
where his death occurred in August, 1845. He 
had taken a claim and partially improved it. 
His wife survived him only about six weeks, and 
thus the five orphan children were left largely de- 
pendent upon their own resources. One of the 
sons, however, was at that time a young man, and 
he kept the family together for several years. 
Only two of the children are now living, a brother 
of our subject being a resident of California. 

Thomas N. Gillis was a boy of only ten years 
at the time of his parents' deaths. He made his 
home with his brother in Iowa until 1852, when 
they went to Adams County, 111., locating upon 
a farm, to the cultivation and development of 
which they devoted their time and attention for 
two years. During the two succeeding years 
they engaged in merchandising in Coatsburg, 111., 
after which the) - again resumed farming, follow- 
ing that pursuit until the spring of 1865. In 
that year, our subject opened a general mercan- 
tile store in Denver, but after four years he sold 
out on account of failing health. Coming to 
Bowen, in connection with his brother he pur- 
chased a flouring-mill here, which he operated for 
two years, when he also disposed of that. He 
then again resumed farming, which he carried on 
until 1877, since which time he has been engaged 
in grain-dealing in Bowen. He built a good el- 
evator and is now doing a most successful busi- 
ness. 

In August, 1859, Mr. Gillis was joined in 
marriage with Miss Rebecca E. Hayworth, who 
resided in Adams County, just across the line 
from Hancock County. Two children have been 
born unto them, a son and daughter. William 
T. , the elder, has for twelve years engaged in the 
hardware business in Bowen, and is recognized as 
oue of the leading merchants and most progress- 
ive citizens. May is now the wife of Thomas E. 
Morgan, a resident of Peoria, 111. 

In his political views, Mr. Gillis was formerly 
a Republican, but is now a supporter of the Pro- 
hibition party. He has served as Town Clerk, 



but has never been an office-seeker, preferring to 
give his entire time and attention to his business 
interests. ' He has met with excellent success in 
his undertakings, his industry and well-directed 
efforts bringing him a comfortable competence. 
He holds membership with the Methodist Church, 
and has been one of its active members for many 
years. He has long served as Superintendent of 
the Sunday-school Association of the township, 
and is now one of the Church Trustees. His hon- 
orable, upright life has won him universal confi- 
dence and esteem, and his friends throughout the 
community are many. 

GlUGUST J. BEGER, one of the representa- 
LA tive young business men of Nauvoo, is now 
/ I a member of the firm of Atchinson & Beger, 
dealers in drugs, books, stationery, wall paper, 
paints and oils. This firm now has a good trade, 
which has constantly increased from the begin- 
ning. They carry a full and complete stock of 
everything found in their line, and by straight- 
forward dealings and courteous treatment of their 
customers they have secured a liberal patronage. 
Our subject was born on the 17th of April, 
1862, in this city, and is the seventh in a family 
o