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Full text of "The ports of Mobile, Alabama, and Pensacola, Florida"

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Fort and taubor conditioDj: pags. 

Gener&l description 1 

The outer harbor 1 

The inner hatbor 1 

Tides 1 

Tidal currents 2 

Anchorages 2 

Weather conditions 2 

Health conditioDS 4 

Bridges 4 

Harbor improvementB by the United States i 

Public terminal improvements 6 

Ownership of water trant 6 

Fort cuBtoms and regulations: 

Federal acts and regulations 7 

Local regulations 18 

Fort admlnistiation 28 

Port services and charges: 

Fire protection 29 

Pilotage 29 

Dockage 30 

Towage 3T 

Wharfage (Me Communications) 32 

Li^terage 34 

Storage (we CommunicationB) 34 

Loading and discharging vessels 34 

Labor 36 

Miscellaneoua chatgee 45 

Fuel and supplies: 

Electric current 47 

Water supply 47 

Ballast 47 

ProviaionB - 47 

Oil bunkering 47 

Coal bunkering 48 

Port and harbor tadlitiee: 

Piera, wharves, and docks 52 

Grun elevatoTB 72 

Storage warehouaee 72 

Bulk frei^t storage 74 

Dry docks and marine railways 75 

Marine repair plants 78 

Floating equipment 81 

Wrecking and salvage facilities 84 ~ 

M 



THE PORT OF MOBILE, ALA. 



PORT AND HARBOR COIVDITIONS. 

QENEKAI. DBSOSIFTIOK. 

The city of Mobile is in the southwestern part of the State of 
Alabama at the mouth of Mobile River and the head of Mobile Bay. 
By rail it is 141 miles northeast of Mew Orleans, La., and 105 miles 
west of Pensocola, Fla. The approach to the city is throngh Mobile 
Bay, an arm of the Gulf of Mexico, about 30 miles long and 8 miles 
wide. The main entrance into Mobile Bay is through a dredged 
channel across Mobile Bar between Mobile Point on the east side 
and Dauphin Island on the west side. This entrance is about 40 
nules from Mobile, 46 miles west of Pensacola Bar, and 104 milee 
east of the mouth of the Mississippi River. The Swash Channel 
leads from eastward close inshore and is used only by small araft. 
On the western aide of the entrance, between Dauphin Island and 
West Sand Island, are two channels known as Pelican Channel and 
Middle Channel. They are sometimes navigated by small vessels, 
but local knowledge is necessary for their use. From deep water in 
lower Mobile Bay a dredged channel extends in a northerly direction 
to the mouth of Mobile River, thence up the river and along the city 
front for a further distance of 6 miles to Chickasaw Creek. The bar 
diannel is exposed to heavy seas, while ike channel through Mobile 
Bay is better protected, but exposed to the storms that visit the 
locality. The river channel is well protected. Information regarding 
depths available in these channels is given later in the report. 



Under ordinary conditidna the mean tidal range at the lower end 
of the bay channel is 1.1 feet, and at the upper end of the bay chonnd 
1.4 feet. The extreme tidal range is 3.4 feet at the lower end of the 
bay channel and 3.6 feet ^t the upper end of this channel. Some- 
times, when the moon ia near the equator, thero aro four small tides 
in 24 hours, the range of these semidiumal tides being 0.1 foot in 
Mobile Bay entrance and 0.5 foot at the city of Mobile. Difring the 



tions. On June 30, 1922, the project was about 24 per cent comideted 
and the following resulte had been accomplished: In the outer bar 
channel a depth of 30 feet had been obtained orer about one-half 
the project width; the full project depth of 30 feet over a width of 
220 feet had been obtained in the Mobile Bay Channel throughout 
its entire length, from the mouth of Mobile River to deep water in 
lower Mobile Bay, a distance of 28.2 miles; the full project depth 
of 30 feet, over a width of 250 feet had been obtained in the river 
channel for a distance of 17,594 feet, extending downstream from a 
point 1,800 feet from the mouth of Coffee Bayou; and the full pro- 
ject depth of 30 feet and width of 300 feet had been obtained in the 
section 1,800 feet long below the mouth of Coffee Bayou. Tlie con- 
trolling depth in the outer bar channel, ascertained April 22, 1922, 
was 31 feet; and in the bay and river channels, ascertained June 13, 
1922, 27 feet. 

The total expenditures by the United States for channel improve- 
ments at this locality up to June 30, 1921 amounted to 18,876,677.89. 

PDBIJO TEBUINAI. I&IFKOVEM£NTe. 

The publicly owned terminals in existence at the present time are 
owned by the city of MobUe and consist of about 1,500 feet of wharf- 
age, located on tlie west side of the river near the center of the busi- 
ness section and extending from Dauphin ' Street to State Street. 
This wharf is equipped with a shed and has rail connection. 

The city has had under construction an earth-filled pier, known 
as Arlington Pier, on the west side of Mobile Bay, 1} miles below the 
mouth of Mobile Biver. The plan calls for a pier extending 8,300 
feet into the bay, 300 feet wide for the outer 5,800 feet of its length, 
and 1,315 feet wide for the remaining portion of its length; for the 
development of this pier by the construction of ample warehouses for 
storing and handling cargo; and for connecting the pier, by means of 
a mimicipal belt line, with all railroads entering the city. Due to 
increased cost of material, insu£Scient funds, and the development 
of unexpected difficultiee of construction, the work has been sus- 
pended with only 20 per cent of the project completed and with 
much of that constructed already diestroyed. 

The, Inland and Coastwise Waterways Service has constructed on 
Blakely Island, about I mile north of Mobile on the east side of 
Mobile Biver, a coal and ore handling plant, having a wharf frontage 
of 500 feet and a storage capacity of 40,000 tons of coal and ore. 
Adjacent to end south of this plant, the United States Shipping 
Board has constructed a fuel-oil station, with a wharf frontage of 
600 feet and a storage capacity of 110,000 barrels of <aL 



PORT CTTSTOHS AND REGULATIONS. 

FEDEBAL ACTS AND BEOUIATIONS. 

Oeneral reflations. — The port is open at all houis. Vessela 
may be cleared by agenta between 9 a. m. and 4.30 p. m. 

PDBUC HEALTH SERVICE. 

Quarantine. — The national quarantine station ia located on the 
south shore of Mobile Bay on Mobile Point, northeastward of Fort 
Morgan. Vessels are boarded by the doctor while at anchon^e near 
the station. 

Marine Hospital. — The Marine Hospital is located on St. Anthony 
and Bayou Streets about three-quarters of a mile from the city water 
front; it is under the control of the Public Health Service and the 
office of the surgeon in chaise is at the customhouse. 

The exclusion from the United States of the quarantinable diseases 
of cholera, plague, yellow fever, typhus fever, smallpox, leprosy, and 
anthrax is effected through the inspection abroad of vessels, their 
crews, passengers, and caigoes, by American consular or medical 
officers. They are also inspected, detained, and treated in this 
country by officers of quarantine stations which are established at or 
near the principal ports. These stations are provided with adequate 
equipment and personnel, for the effective treatment of such vessels 
and contents when infected or suspected of beii^ infected with 
quarantinable diseases. 

With the exception of vessels from certain Canadian, Mexican, and 
Cuban ports, and certain United States naval vessels, all vessels 
arriving at American ports from abroad must, before entering, present 
for examination to quarantine officers stationed there: 

1. BtiU of AeailA in dupUcaM, iaeued to tbem at porta of "deportura by Americaa 
consular (s medical offlcen whose authority bo to act is conditioned upon the full 
observance, by veweis concerned, of Americ&n quarantine requiremente, including 
inspection, applicable abroad to veewla, contents, and full personnel. (See Form No. 
1937.) 

2. 5u}>picmental MUi o/AmI(A similarly inued at ports of call en route. (See Form 
No. 1938.) 

3. Passenger and/or crew list, (Pa«enger liat, Potm Nob, 628, 630, and 600; crew 
list, 860.) 

4. Clintcol records covering all cases of illnees, births, and deaths at sea, maintained 
by sbipa' phyaiciani. (See Form No. M&.) 



^f vessels, to bring into or land in the United States by vessel or other- 
wise, either as passengers or as seamen (except under certain speci- 
fied conditions), aUens not lawfully entitled to enter or to reside 
tKerein; and they require that aliens so conveyed shall as soon as 
possible be returned in the vessels bringing them to the country 
■whence they came; the cjost of their maintenance on land and of their 
return to be borne by those vessels. They provide that immigra- 
tion officials shall board arriving vessels bearing aliens and either 
proceed immediately with the inspection of such aliens or order their 
temporary removal for later inspection. All expenses of removal 
and maintenance pending decision as to ehgibility to admission to 
be paid by the vessels. Masters of such vessels shall deliver to board- 
ing immigration officers the following documents: 

1. Beeciiptive Lust of United SMm citizens (panengCTB); Fomi 630. 

2. Dcecriptive list of alien puveiigen; Form 500. 

3. Deacriptive list of Chinese panengers (if any); Form 418. 

4. Deamptive iiat of aliens in crew, Bpecifying thoso to be paid ofi and discharged 
in the port of arrival; Porm 680. 

5. Descriptive list of Chinese seamen in crew (if any); Fonn 424. 

6. Report of ship's surgeon of diseases, injuries, bdrths, and deaths among paven- 
geiB at sea; Fonn 542. 

The immigration laws' further provide: 

(a) Thatthereshallbepaidlo the collector of customs by the master, agent, owner, 
or consignee of a veMel arriving at an American port a head tax of 18 for, with certain 
exceptions, every alien panenger and employee thereon entering the United Stat«e, 
the immigration ofBcers certifying to the collector the number, etc., of such aliens; 

(b) That after the arrival of such a vessel it ahall bo the duty of the owner, agent, 
consignee, or master thereof to report in writing to the principal immigrBtion officer 
in charge of the port, as soon as discovered, all cases in which alien employees have 
illegally landed from the vessel; and 

(e) Beft»« the departure of the vessel, to deliver to such immigrataon officer — 

1. A list (Form 6S9) containing the names of all alien employees who were not 
employed thereon at the time of arrival but who will leave port thereon at the time 
of departure, and also the names of those, if any, who have been paid oS and dis- 
chaiged, and of those, if any, who have deserted or landed; 

2. A full descriptive list (Form No, 628) of all alien pasKugera and all citizens of 
the United States or its insular possessions leaving this country thereon, indicating 
particularly those paesengera of American ca alien nationality who intend to reside 
permanently abroad. 

CUSTOMS SERVICE. 

TTie customhouse is located on Royal and St. Francis Streets, three 
blocks from the railroad yards and water front. It is open from 
da. m. to 4.30 p. m.; but these hours may be extended if necessary. 
There is no customs warehouse at Mobile. There is no cai^o handled 
between vessels and the customhouse, except a small amount of pack- 
age goods stored there; for these goods the owners are responsible. 
1 sn. I, Ht oinb. s, unT. 



of S8 for each ali^i on board shall be paid to him by the master or 
other representative of the vessel within 24 hours after the entry 
thereof. 

If the vessel be of foreign registry, the master must, within 48 
hours after arrival, deposit with the consular officer of the nation 
to ■which it belongs, if tnis practice be reciprocal between that nation 
and the United States, the renter or other document in lieu thereof, 
together with clearance and other ship's papers issued to the vessel 
at tlie port of departure for the United States; and the certificate of 
that officer that the papers have been so deposited must be delivered 
to the collector. Such papers shall not be returned to the master by 
that officer until the former exhibits a clearance from the collector. 

Kntry of the vessel having been made, the necessary permit for its 
discharge is issued by the collector; dischai^png inspectors are 
assigned to superintena unloading and delivery of cai^o and customs 
guards are posted. Discharging inspectors must take possession of 
specie and valuables in chaige of pursers as soon as possible after 
mey first board the vessel. 

The l^al time allowed for unloading by customs regulations ia 
as follows: Vessels of less than 500 tons, 10 working days after entry; 
of 500 tons and less than 1,000 tons, 15 working days; of 1,000 tons 
and less than 1,500 tons, 20 worHng days; and of 1,500 tons and 
upward, 25 working days. If additional discharge time is required, 
an extension not to exceed 15 days will be allowed by the collector, 
but inspectors' compensation for attendance after legal time shall 
be paid bv the vessel. "Working days" do not include the day 
of entry, legal holidays, and stormy days when discharge would 
endanger cargo's safety. Unloading between 6 p. m. of any day and 
7 a. m. of the following day wiU be allowed only under authority of 
a permit issued by the collector when the nature of the caigo or 
conditions at the pier will not jeopardize customs revenue. Similar 
permite are required for unloading or loading on Sundays and holi- 
days. Cargo remaining on board after the expiration of legal time, 
or additional period of 15 days, which is not recorded for trans- 
shipment to some other district or to some foreign place, must be 
taken possession of by the collector and stored at owner's expense. 
Ballast of no mercantile value may be unloaded under authority 
of a customs permit. Ballast cargo or coal can not be taken on 
board vessels while discharging except on a lading permit. 

Unless such production is impracticable no merchandise exceeding 
$100 in value, except personal effects accompanying passengers and 
goods entered for warehouse and immediate exportation, is ad- 
missible into the United States without the production, upon entry 
of the goods, of a "consular invoice" prepared before shipment, 
desmbing the goods and specifying the foreign sale price thereof 
and all charges assessed thereon to the point of exportation, and 
certified by the American consular officer at theplace of manufacture 
or exportation, or by designated substitutes. Formal customs entry 
must be made of all importations, whether free or dutiable and 
regardless of their value, and is made principally for the following 
purposes: (o) Consumption; (J) warehouse, for storage for three 
years, if desired, without payment of duty; (e) warohouse and 



13 ...... 

other ipurpoBes; (Ji) importers* private bonded warehouses used 
excliisively for storing imported merchandise owned and entered 
for warehouse by the proprietors; (c) bonded warehouses used for 
the general storage of imported goods; (ji) bonded yards or sheds 
used exclusively tor storing heavy and bullqr imported merchandise; 
(«) bonded bins or parts of buildings or elevators used for storing 
gi-ain; (f) warehouses for reconditioning articles made wholly or 
pai-tly of imported material or materials subject to internal revenue 
t&x: and intended principally for exportation, merchandise taken 
possession of as unclaimed, for which no entry is made within one 
year from the date of importation, and that on which duty has not 
been paid, remaining in bonded warehouse beyond three years from 
tlie date of importation^ are subject to sale bv the Government. 

Cartage of merchandise in customs custody is of two kinds: (a) 
Government cartage, which must be done by Ucensed customhouse 
cartmen under contract for that purpose and (b) importers cart^e 
■which m^ be done by any licensed customhouse cartmen. The 
cart^e ot packages designated for examination at the appraisers' 
stores, and taken possession of for other reasons, shall be done by a 
cartman under contract for that purpose at the expense of the im- 
porter. Importers and exporters shall designate on the entry of 
bonded merchandise the bonded cartman by whom they wish their 
merchandise to be conveyed. An adequate system of receipts cover- 
ing the transfer of merchandise between docks and bonded warehouses 
is provided by customs regulations. Cartmen will give receipts to the 
importing vessel for all packages or merchandise in bulk deUvered 
to them and shall be held liable under their bonds for its prompt de- 
livery and soimd condition unless specially relieved of rosponsibihty. 
Discharging inspectors will show the disposition of cargo by not- 
ing on the manifest the various entries made therefor and by in- 
dicating packages sent to pubhc stores and noting all discrepancies 
between manifest, permits, and merchandise. 

Prior to granting clearance to a vessel foreign boimd, the collector 
must receivefrom Uie master thereof all manifests, certificates, etc., pre- 
scribed by CustomsRegulations. Shipments forforeign delivery should 
not be accepted by such vessels unless accompamed by snipper's 
export declarations (Customs Form 7525) certified by the collector. If 
a complete outward manifest can not be filed before departure, or if 
all export declarations have not been filed, clearance may be granted 
upon the execution of a bond providing that such mamfest will be 
filed not later than the next busmess day after the vessel's departure; 
that proforma declarations, in lieu of regular export declarations not 
received, be filed with the complete manuest, and that export declara- 
tions so covered be filed not later than 15 days after clearance. 

Vessels about to clear from the first port of entry, bearing dutiable 
merchandise consigned to foreign ports, other United Stat^ customs 
districts, or both, shall give bond securing payment of duty upon 
merchandise landed in the United States. Before a vessel departs 
with residue cargo for another district the master must obtain from 
the collector a certified copy of the report and manifest filed upon 
entry, together with a lan(£ng certificate and a permit to proceed to 
Buch other district for discharge. 

The following additional custom requirements must be observed 
by masters upon clearance; if vessels bear goods subject to State 



15 

The certificate of payment of tonnage tax should be in vemet's files, also the certifi- 
e of fumigation, if veeeel has imdergone fumigation. 
pera required for departure and cleaiance (coaatwim): 
Certificate of i^iistry, enrollment and license, or license. 
Coastwise manifest with pennit thereon to depart. 
Count and list of passengera. 
Crew list, if engaged in the whale fishery. 
Shipping articlea, if veasel is of 75 tons burden or upward and bound from a 

port on the Atlantic to a port on the Pacific or vice versa. 
Forecastle card, if as above. 
Cerlaficate of inspection. 
Licenaee of offlcers. 

Laws governing the Steamboat- Inspection Service. 
Pilot rulee and regulations. 
RuleB for lights. 
Other fonna required by the Steamboat-Inspection Service according to nature 

of veeeel and voyage. (See list under St«iamboat^ Inspection Service.) 
Certificate of fumigation, if vessel has been fumigated. 
Certificate of inspection of drinking water system. 
Papers required for arrival and entry (from foreign port): 
Certificate of registry, enrollment and license, or Ucense. 
Official log book (at home port). 
Shipping articlea. 
Crew list. 

Inward foreign manifest (four copies). 
Store list (two copies). 
Clearance (from last port). 
List or manifest of aliens in crew. 
Passenger list. 

Report of diaettHea, deatha, birtha, and injuries among paasengen. 
Seaman's customs statement. 
Master's oath on entry of veteel from foreign port. 
Original bill of health. 
Supplemental bill of health. 

Certificate of discharge from local quaiantiae, pratique. 
Certificate of fumigation to be shown on demand. 
Certificate of payment of tonnage tax. 
FapoiB required for arrival and entry (coastwise): 

Certificate of registry, enrollment and license, or license. 

Coasting manifest. 

Count and list of passengers. 

Crew list, if engaged in the whale fishery. 

Shipping articles, if vessel is of 76 tons burden or above and enters a port on the 

Picific from a port on the Atlantic ac vice vena. 
Official 1(^ book, if as above. 

Detailed iuformatioa regarding the source, dispositioD, and use of 
the above forms will be found in the following table. 



i! 

P! 

TI 



1 ii 



I 111 




iiiiUi 

■ 11 : ! 



lirtl 



in 



iiif 



II 



IJiiSi |iS§iSlli| 




I 



FT 



19 

AviiB !XII. — When vesKla are ready to proceed down the cbannel and tbey find 
3maelveB blocked by other Teesels to the extent that they can not get under way, 
B officer in charge must report the same to the chief wharfinger at once, and not 
lit until the tugboat arrJTes before reporting the circumBtances. 
RuuB XIII. — MaeteiB of venela moored in the etream, will, at the request of the 
let wharfinger or deputy, remove rafts, bargee, or other obatructionB that may be 
ade faot alongside, eo as to permit other vemela to pan, bound up or down. A refusal 
' comply promptly with the request of the chief wharfinger or deputy, in the above 
tse, Bubjecta the parties oSending to a heavy fine. 

Rule XIV. — Vessels of all descriptions desiring to discbarge any kind of materials 

ich. as garbage, ashes, or rubbish of any kind into the waters of, or any of the water 

curses emptying into, Uobile Bay must obtain a permit from the office of the chief 

'harfinger, the permit designating the place of discharge, etc. Anyone violating 

bis rule shall be proceeded mainat under the law. 

RiTLB XV. — Ve»elB are not allowed to anchor in the river below Uadieon Street. 

Rule XVI.— ^The maximum rate of speed of vessels from One-HUe Creek to the 

3iouth of Mobile River shall be as follows; All veeeels, except launches, of 500 tone 

rrosB and under, 6 miles pn hour, and all vessels over 500 tons gross 4 miles per hour. 

Rni.B XVII.— The discharging of oil into the waters of Mobile River is prohibited, 

uid any violation of this rule will be prosecuted under the rulee and regulation of this 



Under the laws of the State, the dredged chaimel is under the management of the 
State harbor commission, and & violation of any of the laws governing the channel will 
be vigorously prosecuted by it. It is also ita duty to give masteis of vessels the maxi- 
mum draft allowed to vewels pasing up and down the channel. 

Mast«iB of veaele are warned that pUnts are instructed not to take charge of vesels 
whose draft exceeds the limit allowed by law. 

Rat gwxtdt. — The purpose of this ordinance is to prevent rats from getting ashore 
from vessels coming from certain porta. 

All linee, hawsers, and ropes must be rat guarded or bo arrai^^ as to keep mts from 
getting ashore. 

Vessels must be fended off at least 4 feet. 

All rat guards must be in good condition at all timee. Should a mt guard become 
deranged or damaged it must be promptly fixed at once. 

All ladders, gangways, staging, barges, or other apparatus need for loading or unload- 
ing shall be removed between sunset and sunrise or so arranged as to prevent rats going 
ashore. No unnecessary gangways shall be allowed at any time. 

Ports to which this ordinance and these regulations shall apply are: All ports of 
South America, Ueiico, Mediterranean Sea, Africa, the Orient, Hawaii, Liverpool, 
Galv«stoD, Fort Arthur Sabine, Beaumont, New Orleans, Pensacola, and any other 
such ports as may be designated from time to time. 



To prevent rats from coming ashore from vessels from ports infected or declared sus- 
pected of being infected with bubonic plague. 
Be it ordain^ by the board of atmmitnonert of the city of MobiU, at follovit: 
SscnoN 1. Thatall vessels coming from ports infected with bubonic plague, or from 
ports which are declared su^>ected of beii% infected with bubonic plague, shall not lie 
immediately alongside and against a wharf or dock within the limits of the city of 
Mobile, but Hboll maintain a distance of at least 4 feet thvelrom by the interposition 
of a raft or other nfe appliance that rats can not [»« directly from the vessel to the 
wharf or dock and that all hawsers, lines, or ropee pateing from the vessel to the shore 
shall be treated or arranged in a manner approved by the city health ofik^ei' so that rata 



21 

.?"^gou« objecta or of demtroying life or limb, but not including coUoided mtroceUn- 

.."^'weintAMetaot rods or grains not under one-eie^Qi of on inch in diameter, wet nitro- 

''^llulose containing 20 per cent or more moistuie, »nd vet nitro starch containing 20 

ler cent or mtoe moisture. For the purposes of this ordinance numufactured 

^""'^iticles shall not be held to be exploBives when the individual units contain explo- 

ives in such limited quantity, of such nature, or in such packing that it is impossible 

"o jnoduce a rimultaneous or a destructive explosion of such units to the injury of 

ife, limb, or proparty by fire, by friction, by ooncussion, by percussion, or by detonft- 

or, such as fixed unmunition for small arms, firecrackcra, snfety fuse, matches, etc. 

The tom " peraon " whenever used in tiiis ordinance shall be held to include cca- 

xnations, firms, and natural persons, and vcffds used in the wtngiiia.!- number shall 

bijg ^jiclude the plural, and the plural the singular, and the tram "dty" shall be hdd 

to mean the dty of Mobile. 

Sbc. 3. Be it JuTlher ordained: That all esploaivea coming within the dty shall 

Qiu,b9 packed and marked in compliuice with the Interstate CominMtM Commission 

^ ^^regulations governing the tnnaportation of explosives as formulat«d and published 

,lgj from time to time. Nothing contained in this ordinance or any section thereof 

^g^ shall apply or be held to apply to explosives in transit in the posseoion of any com- 

g ll,gU>ou carrier by laud or water, operatii^; under the rules and regulations of the Inter- 

^j^.. state Gorrmierce Commisnon, nor to explosives in the possesrion of any such carrierB 

!iiIeV °° operating to which the same shall have been delivered tor shipment, nor to explo- 

, sivee in the poneosion of any such carrier so operating and awaiting delivery to the 

. , consignee thereof: Provided, however, That the time that such explosives are held 

I awaiting further carriage beyond Mobile, or shipmeDt or delivery as aforesaid, shall 

liai '^'^^ exceed 24 hours, and shall be subject to the regulations hereinafter set forth 

Qj concerning explasives in ttansit to or from ships or vessels. No nitro^yccrine shall be 

' brought into or carried through the dly. 

■ Sbc. i. Be it further ordained; That ao peraon shall transport, keep, or store in 
any place within the dty any exptceivea unless such exploeiveB are completely 
, inclosed and incased in tight metal, wooden, or fiber containMs. No pason having 
in his poaession or control uiy explosives shall, under any drcumstances, permit 
or allow any explosives or grains or portides thereof to be or remain on the outrnde 
of or about the container i n which explosives are incased or inclosed. All explo- 
sives shall be kept apart and away from fire or artificial light other than electric fladi 
or mtsndeecent light, and no person shall have, drop, throw, or leave any fire, lifted 
match, cigar or cigarette stub oi pipe ashes within 50 feet of any receptade contain- 
ing any exploeivee. 

Sbc 10. Bt itfwOuT ordained: That before vessels having explosives aboard shall 

be allowed to unload or load exploeivee in the port of Mobile the harbor master shall 

, be notified as to the nature and quantity of explodves oa board or to be put on baud, 

and he shall deaigoste the dock or point at which said explosives shall be loaded or 

, unloaded. 

No veeeel coming into tiie port of Mobile with explosives destined for any other 
port or pcfflv shall be allowed to unload or load merchandise, other than exploaivee, 
, at said port until its cargo of explodvee shall first have been lightered and taken to 
safe anchorage north of One Mile Creek. 

Exploaivee unloaded from ve»ela shall be promptly loaded aboard can or hauled 
from the dock to suitable ntagarioe storage, and while they remain on the dock shall 
be in charge ot a competent person; and they shall not remain upon the dock after 
discharge thereto tor a greater space of time than six hours and not later than an 
hour before sunset. Any explosives hauled from the docks to any magoEine other 
than tlie dty magasine shall be hauled through the same streets as are designated 
iot the hauling inward ot such exjAosiveB. 



Sko. 20. Be it further ordiniud: That in looBeoing bndng in out of cacploraTea only ft 
wooden wedge and wooden mallet shall be ueed. 

Sbc. 21. Be it further ordained: That all the necenary work in the conatruction of 
flcxna, partitions, etc., or the removal of any combuBtiblee from that part of the hold 
of veasds in which exploBiTee are to be stored, ahall be completed before loading of the 
exploaivea ia commenced. , 

Sbc. 22. Be ilfwOur ordaintd: That in loading or unloading exploeiTee no artificial 
light ehall be permitted in the hold of the vewel except electric ObbIi lights or electric 
lanterns or regular electric installation of the veasel. Engine-room fires shall be care- 
fully banked during the time of receivii^ or delivering exploaivee, except auch fires 
aa are needed in the raising of the hoisting apparatus used in loading or discharging 
cargo. 

Sec. 23. Bt it further ordaintd: That the hold or other part of the veasel where 
explosives are to be stored in the ship must be entirely tree from grit and otherwise 
cleaned before explosives ore stored therein. 

Sbo. 24. Be it further ordained: That exploaivee shall not be loaded or carried on any 
Teeaels carrying inflammable liquids, inflammable solids, or oxidizing materials, mineisl 
acids, or articles liable tAspontaneousignition, or to giveofi inflammable gases, unleM 
the explosives be stored in separate rooms or otherwise bo separated therdrom as to 
effectually prevent danger to the explosivee from any of these articlea or from the 
vapor thea«of. 

Sbo. 25. Bt itfijrther ordained: That blasting caps or electric blasting caps shall not 
be cturied in a small boat or launch with other explosivee and shall not be loaded on » 
seagoing vessel at the same time with other exploeivee and when loaded shall be 
BuflSciently separated from other explomvee to prevent any fire or exploaion from being 
communicated from one to the other, 

Sbc. 26. Be it further ordained: That carloads of explosivee intended for trans* 
shipment via water shall not be brought into the city limits except when they can be 
loaded immediately the same day and during the dayligiht houis aboard vessel. 
Venels shall take exploedvee aboard the last thing before nUing and immediately drop 
out in the stream. 

Sec. 27. Be it further ordained: That explosives intended for shipment via wat€f 
which on arrival at dock can not immediately be transfnred to outgoiog vessel shall 
be in charge of a watchman and shall not remain oo the dock for more than six daylight 
hoius. 

Sbo. 28. Be it further ordained: That broken or damaged packages of explosives 
that can not be re-coopered in conformity with the Interstate Commerce Comminioii 
leguktiona are jvohibited from being forwarded by vessel. 

Sbo. 44. Be it farther ordained: That any poson violating or failing to comply with 
any of the provisions of this ordinance shall, on conviction before the records, be 
fined not leas than $10 nor more than SlOO for each offense. 

Sbo. 4K. Be U further ordained: That this ordinance shall be in force and eSect from 
and after its adoption and publication according to law. 
Piiotage— 

Kui.18 AND RBoDLATtoHS FOB THB GovBBNMBNT OF Bat and Baa Pilots. 

By the authority of the laws of the State of Alabama the board of harbor commis- 
sioners are empowered to prescribe rules and regulations for the government of the bay 
and bar pilots, not inconaiatent with existing laws. They may also impose auch pen- 
alties for n«$;lect of duty or violation of the rules and regulations as they may deem 
just and necessary. (See Code 1136.) 
2im'~ 



25 

where boftrd«d by pilot, pilot's Dune, mnd H any delay to vmmI uid vby. Reconl ftU 
i^.coUiaioiisoraccideiilsaiid lliectiuBe, record amvsl of all pilots for duty, io fact keep a 
^correct duly recofd. The pUot on watch shall keep the log and ago same when re- 
^ j, lieved by another pilot. The same rule applies to pilots on Mobile station. Log book 
ni^muBt be sent to the chief wharfinger's office on the first of each mouth or as soon there- 
after aa possible. 
I „ RuLX XI. — The launch at Fort Morgan shall not be taken off the station cm private 

buflineeB whileonlyouepilotbaatiaincommiasion. 
^, RvLX XII. — Pilotsgoingoffdutymustreporttochietwharfinger'si^ce. 

Rdlb XIII. — Pilots on incoming vessels shall give tc captain a copy of the Sulos 
and Regulations for Mobile Harbor. 
, RcTLB XIV. — The pilots on Mobile Bar shall be divided into five watches, to be 
known as watches Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Watches Noe. 1, 2, 3, and 4 to rotate equally 
- and No. 6 Htatiooary in Mobile. 

■d: 



'^ SbctionI. SeUonhmtdbytheboa^o/commiaioTierao/Uucib/o/ltobiU: Thatno 
^- dray, truck, wsgon, or othear irtieeled vehicles designed or used for hauling goods, 
''' ' whether opeiatMl by animal or motor power of any description, shall be stored on the 
"'' public whars'es of the dty of Mobile, extending from Dauphin Street northwardly to 
"^ what is known as Fler No. 2, of the Mobile & Ohio cotton shed, or upon the land lying 
'"' between said wharves and Front Street; and no such vehicle shall be allowed or 
*- suffered by the person in charge thereof or the owner thereof to stand or loiter undcar 
° the covered space known as the municipal steel sheds, or upon the wbui ia front of 
"* said sheds, save only during the time reasonably required in and about the loading w 
'^ unloading of mdi traffic vehicle and the receiving and discharging of goods from the 
*i same, from or to the said wharves or sheds. 

i' Sec. 2. Be it further ordained 6y Ihe board of txmmiationen of the city of MohiU: 

" That no person, driver, conductor, chauffeur, or other, conlfoUing or dominatii^ the 

^ movements of any dray, wagon, or truck, motor or otherwise, or of the animal or machine 

' propelling the same, shall drive or operate such vehicle under the said municipal steel 

sheds save while in and about the business of delivoing or receiving goods, and of 

' hauling the same to or from the said sheds; and they shall go into and out of the said 

sheds by the street entrance to eald sheds nearest to the point of discharge or reception 

of said goods; and no person shall drive any such truck, dray, or wagon, whether motor 

or an'mul drawn, along the front of the said sheds or the wharf in fKnt thereof, or along 

through said sheds northwardly or soutbwardly other than is reasonably necenary to 

reach a point of delivery of said goods front the nearest street entrance, or to reach the 

neaieet street outlet to the point where such goods are laden or to be laden on said 

truck, dray, or wagon. 

Seo. S- Be ttfuTlAer ordained by the board of commiuioTia-t of the city of MobiU: 
That no vehicle of any description whatever shall be driven or opoated through or 
along or across any portion of the area covered by said municipal steel sheds or into 
or out of stud steel sheds at any point where barricades or notices that such passage is 
forbidd«ai have been placed; and that all persons operating such vehicles under or 
acroee said sheds must obey all such barriers and warning notices so placed. 

See. 4. Be itfurtiter ordained by the board of commieaiojien of the city of MobiU: 
That no person shall drive or place under said steel sheds or on the space in front thereof 
toward llie river or the wharf in front thereof and leave for a space exceeding 10 minutes 
st any one time any automobile or other motor-driven vehicle demgned for the carriage 
of perstms; and no automobile or other vehicle oC similar kind, at cab or carriage, tor 
tbo conveyance of peisons, or hone or wagon, shall be stopped and held, even though 



27 

"*^ Skc. 3. Be it further ordaiTud by tht board of committiowrx of tlte city of UobUs: Thftt 
as a prerequisite to the depoait of cotton for export on any named steamer or User, the 
f °/ lagent or lepraaentative of Buch steamship or liner most furnish the date of the receipt 
"7 'of the cotton and of each lot thereof received, designating the veaael, to the superin- 
"^^tandent of wharves as fast as such lot or lots of cotton u« eo received upon said wharves, 
'^aud Bu<di agent bd designating the said receipt of cotton shall be held responsible for 
% ''the paymen^t of the wharfage on said cotton hereinabove required to be paid by the 
^"^ master of the said vessel. 

'^ Sbc. 4. Be itfurther ordained bg the botrd of oommiuvmeri of the city of Mobile: That 
all cotton 01 other goods deposited upon the wharves or under the sheds of the city ol 
"/ -I Mobile shall, whether loaded from the said wharves into tbe vessel or vessels or lliere- 
ovii tiiter removed from the wharves to any other wharf or place, be subject to the said 
' P"^ wharfage charges, such wharfage chargee being placed upon each bale of export cotton 
'"■ lodged upon Uie said whuves whether exported over them or shipped outward by 
i i other means or linefl. 

'^<i Sbc. 6. Be itfwther ordaintd by tht board of eommiitionen of the dty of MobUe: That 
the said city aasumes no responsibility as warebouseman or keeper for the safety or 
condition of any goods received upon or passing inward or outward over said whtuvea 
or under the said sheds, but maintains the said sheds as a needful protection tor the 
goods passing over the said wharves and assembled thereon — the watching, caring fot 
'olb and safeguarding of the same to renuun with the owner of the vessel or owner of the 
nil said goods. 

Sec. 6. Be it further ordained by the board of eommunorwra of the cily <f MobiU; That 

t: 1 in all things as to the location of loti of cotton hauled or carried to the said wharves 

'in [or export, the superintendent of wharves may designate where each lot or load of 

lui cotton or other goods shall be stored or deposited under the said sheds or on the said 

>et wharves, and no person shall interfere with or obatruct him in the performance of his 

tr duties, and his designation of iiib place of such lots or loads of cotton is to be obeyed. 

aj.i Sbc. 7. Be it further ordained by the board of eommitgioners of the city of MobiU: That 

la any tug boat, barge, stoamboat, sailing craft, rowboat, skiff, or other vemel of any de- 

It scriplion lying in front of and against the public wharves of the citj' of Uobile north 

r: of Dauphin Street which shall not be removed when needful for the accommodation 

LT of vessel orvessels at said wharves or at berths designated by the superintendent of 

1 wharves or by the harbor master, shall be charged and shall be liable for a dockage 

t of$5[or,eachdayorpartofa(laythattheysoTeihainunmoved,if under 50 tons capacity 

? or measurement; if 50 tons or over np to 100 tons capacity or measurement, $10 for each 

day or part of a day that they so remain unmoved; and for every such vessel if over 

I 100 tons capacity or measurement, $25 for each day or part of a day that they remain 

80 unmoved. The owner or person having the control of such vessel or vessels shall 

be liable to pay the same and to pay all costs and charges of removing said vessel or 

veeaels away from said wharves when so required to romove therefrom. 

Sec. 8. Be itfvrther ordained by the board of eommiuumert of the dty of ifodtis.- That 

all persons liable for the said wharfage or dockage charges hereinabove imposed shall 

f pay the same ondemand; and all persons who shall violate any of the provisioas of this 

I ordinance shall be fined by the recorder in the sum of not less than 96 nor more than 

I $100. 

Sbc. 9. Be itfvrther ordmntd by Oie board of commimoners of the city of MobiU: That 
this ordinance shall be in farce and lake effect from and after its adoption and publi- 
cation as required by law. 
Adopted November 11, 1913. 



PORT SERVICES AND CHARGES. 

FIBB PBOTBOTION. 

All piers and wharves at the port from Choctaw Point to One 
Mile Creek on the west side of Mobile River are within easy reach 
of city fire pings. The city mains Ue immediately in the rear of 
the piers and wharves along the entire water front and from 3 to 
8 plugs are available for each wharf. All the principal piers and 
wharves are connected with the city mains with pipe from 2 to 6 
inches in diameter, which have connections for hose and fire boat 
at intervals of from 30 to 60 feet along their entire lengths. The 
average water pressure afforded by the mains is 60 pounds. 

The Turner Terminal Co. 'a Pier No. 3 is equipped with 10 plugs 
in the warehouse, spaced 60 feet apart, with 100 feet of hose for 
each plug. Eight of the plugs are supplied by 6-inch mains and 2 
are suppUed with 4-inch mains. 

The Louisville & Nashville Kailroad Co.'s wharf is within easy 
reach of the city fire protection and is equipped with 4 plugs wiUi 
100 feet of 2i-inch hose per plug. It is also equipped with barrels, 
buckets, and chemical extingui^ers. 

The Mobile & Ohio and Southern Railway Co.'s joint Pier No. 3 
IS equipped with 7 plugs with 100 feet of 2i-inch fire hose each. 

The Mobile & Ohio Raiboad Co.'s Pier No. 8 is equipped with 
7 plugs with 100 feet of 2i-inch fire hoee each. 

All the pi«B owned by the Mobile & Ohio Raiboad Co. and the 
Southern Railway Co. are inspected monthly by insurance and 
underwriters' agents. 

In addition to the city fire protection the principal wharves and 
piers have fire buckets and barrels and chemical fire extinguishers. 
The floating equipment consists of one fire boat. It is equipped 
with one 8-inch, one 10-inch, and other small pumps; also a fire gun 
and an adequate amount of hose. The boat is maintained by a 
private concern but the fire equipment is maintained by the city. 

FILOTAOE. 

Pilotage is compulsory for vessels engaged in foreign trade but 
not compulsory for vessels engaged in coastwise trade. The follow- 
ing pilotage rates are fixed by State law: 

Fulootdnn. 

Sleotdrsft 12.60 

flf-lOifeetdiaft 3.00 

11-12 feet draft 3.26 

12H4 feet draft 3.50 

14J-20 feet draft 6.00 

20) feet draft and greater 6.00 

(29) 



36 

Among the stevedoriiig contractors of the port are: Nick 

Murray Stevedoring Co., Walsh Stevedoring Co., Ryan Stev^doi^-, 

Co., James Keoughan, and Henry Wilson. 

Transit cargo. — No separate terminal chaiges are assess^^d ol 
traffic moving under through rates and divisions via the regxil&r 
coastwise lines. 

Cargo landed In error. — ^As the indefinite storage of goods in 
railroad terminals is not permitted, special arrangement mu^t> Ik 
made with warehouse companies and stevedores Jot the stor^Lge, 
reembarking, and expenses of cargo landed in error. 

Undelivered and unclaimed freight is held by the warelxou^e 
owner, at the receiving warehouse for various periods and is firacLUy 
disposed of at pubhc auction. 

Checking and tallying. — Cargoes are checked as loaded or 
unloaded by checkers engaged by agents. Cargoes are also checlced 
as received at warehouse by checkers employed by the warehoisse 
companies. Check or tally clerks are employed only when alxips 
are loading or discharging cargoes. The receipt given ship for 
inward cargo is the bill of lading surrendered by consignee; receipt 
on outward cargo is given by the steamship companies in the form 
of bill of lading. 

LABOR. 



The labor supply is adequate for all needs and there are no com- 
petitive industries seeking the available supply. 

The following rates of wages and working conditions have been^ 
after conference, agreed to between employers and the International 
Longshoremen's Association as represented at Mobile, Ala., by Locals 
No. 543, No. 853, and No. 1022, to apply at the port of Mobile, Ala.: 

Houn of work, — Hours of work shall extend from 7 a. m. to 12 noon, and from 1 
p. m. to 4 p. m. every week day. 

Rates of wages, — ^Rates of wages shall be as follows: 

Foreign or deep-sea trade: 65 cents per hour regular time, 82) cents per hour over- 
time, including Sundays, holidays, and meal hours. 

Side carriers: Two side carriers shall be employed in the hold of the ship in each 
gang and shall be paid 5 cents per hour increase over r^ular and overtime, viz, 60 
cents regular time, 87) cents overtime. 

Foremen: Foremen shall be employed in charge of each gang and shall receive 
as compensation 10 cents in excess of regular and overtime, viz, 65 cents per hour 
regular time, 92) cents per hour overtime. I 

Coastwise trade: 50 cents per hour regular time, 75 cents per hour overtime, in- i 
eluding Sundays, holidays, and meal hours. ■' 

Side carriers: Two side carriers shall be employed in the hold of the ship in each 
gang and shall be paid 5 cents per hour increase over regular and overtime, viz, 55 
cents regular time, 80 cents overtime. 



38 



Companion o/ratufor deep-water longthoremen. 



Port. 



North Atlantic: 

Boston 

New York.... 
Philadelphia.. 

Baltimore 

Norfolk 

Soath Atlantic: 

Charleston 

Savannah 

OuUt 

MobOe. 

New Orleans. 
Qalveston 

Padflc: 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Portland 

Seattle 



July, 
1914. 


iSS: 


July, 

1916. 


July, 
1917. 


July, 
1918. 


Dec., 

1918. 


Oct., 
1919. 


90.33 


90.33 


10.40 


80.40 


90.60 


90.65 


90.70 


.33 


.83 


.40 


.40 


.60 


.66 


.70 


.30 


.30 


.40 


.40 


.60 


.65 


.TO 


.26 


.25 


.276 


.36 


.60 


.65 


.70 


.25 


.275 


.30 


.36 


.65 


.66 


.TO 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.25 


.36 


.60 


.60 


.26 


.25 


.25 


.25 


.30 


.50 


.60 


.30 


.30 


.30 


.35 


.50 


.66 


.80 


.40 


.40 


.40 


.40 


.60 


.65 


.80 


.40 


.40 


.40 


.40 


.50 


.65 


.80 


.60 


.60 


.60 


.70 


.80 


.80 


.80 


.56 


.56 


.55 


.70 


.80 


.80 


.90 


.56 


.56 


.55 


.60 


.80 


.80 


.90 


.45 


.45 


.50 


.66 


.80 


.80 


.90 



Oct., 
1990. 



ltt21 



90.80 



ao 
do 

80 
80 
80 

90 
90 
90 
90 












» 90.80, Mar. 1, 1922. « Aug. 1, 1921 . 

The handling of cotton is governed by the following agreement: 

Agreement entered into between the United States Shipping Board, steaznahip 
operators, and stevedores of the port of Mobile (on the one hand) and the Inter- 
national LongBhoremens' ABSociation (on the other hand) for the handling of cotton. 

It is hereby agreed between Local 331, affiliated with the International Longshore- 
mens' Association, and the United States Shipping Board, steamship operators, and 
stevedores of the port of Mobile, effective this 28th day of November, 1921, and termi- 
nating the 30th day of September, 1922, covering wages, hours of labor, etc., at the 
jkirt <^ Mobile, and it is further mutually agreed that any alterations as to the scale 
of wages or working conditions to be effective after September 30, 1922, must be sub- 
mitted not later than the first Monday in August, 1922. 

RuLB 1. — ^The United States Shipping Board, steamship operators, and stevedores 
agree to employ members of the above-named local in the loading and unloading of 
cotton on all veaaels consigned to them. 

RuLB 2. — ^Local 331 of the International Longshoremens' AssodatLon agrees to 
perform all work in a manner satisfactory to the United States Shipping Board, steam- 
ship operators, and stevedores. 

RuLB 3.— The United States Shipping Board, steamship operators, and stevedores 
agree to pay the following scale of prices for the loading and unloading of cotton aboard 
ships: 

Scale of prices — 
By hand: Per bale. 

Stowing cotton by hand $0.20 

When headed through doorways 25 

Cotton stowed on top of any other cargo in a space less than heading height 

to deck beams 24 

When cotton is piled three high (hand stowed) between beams to deck 24 

Stowing cotton in peaks or rooms 40 

Cotton headed between beams, hand stowed 20 

Stowing round bales, single 10 

With tools: 

Stowing cotton with tools 40 

When stowing round bales in conjunction with screwed cotton, two (2) bales 
to constitute one square bale 40 



40 

Observcmce of rules, — ^The above named local holds the foremen of gangs x-esponsi' 
for the Btrict observance of these rules. 

Any violations of any of the foregoing sections or rules shall be punished l>y a £: 
of $25 for each foreman; said fine to be collected by Local No. 331, Ix&t>ematio!^ 
Longshoremen's Association. 

Extra gangs. — ^When the commerce of the port demands that extra gangs l>e jn%\ 
to help expedite the dispatch of a ship or ships, then the stevedores shall fiimi>: 
such extra foremen with tackles and such other tools as are necessary to "^^orlc ir 
satisfactory manner. 

Ethics, — It is agreed that there will be no sarcastic or abusive language indulged : 
by either party. 

Pilferage, — ^The International Longshoremen's Association agrees to m&ke eve^ 
effort to prevent pilferage or broaching of cargo, and any man caught in tlie act 
broaching or pilfering or having broached or pilfered cargo in his posseasioii sb^ 
upon conviction in the courts, be expelled from the imion. The Interziartioiu 
Longshoremen's Association agrees not to uphold incompetency or shirking of viroril 
and, upon complaint by the stevedore, any man or group of men not properly pe? \ 
forming their duty shall be laid off, and the Intemationai Longshoremen's Asaocdatic: . 
agrees to provide additional men to take their places. 

Disputes. — It is agreed and understood that during the life of this contract there, 
shall be no stoppage of work or lockout under any circumstances whatsoever. It b 
further understood that in the case of dispute as to the interpretation of this eontnr. 
or any working rules agreed to in connection with this contract, there shall be bc 
cessation of work, and that the case shall be referred to a grievance committee com- 
posed of two representatives of the shipping and the stevedore interests, two repre- . 
sentatives of Local No. 331, and a neutral chairman acceptable to both sides. Thi? 
committee shall meet within 24 hours. Only in the event that the employers and 
employees can not agree, shall the neutral chairman be called upon. The deciaEon 
of this committee shall be final. 

GuararUy. — The Intemationai Longshoremen's Association guarantees the full 
observance of this contract by the individual members of the association. The 
employers also pledge themselves to the faithful perfcnrmance of their obligations 
under this contract. No rule or rules affecting in any way the cost of labor or the 
working of the vessels shall be adopted by either party to this agreement during the 
life of this agreement, except by mutual consent. 

jUNrrED States Shipping Board Emebobncy Fleet Cosfobation. 
\Intsbnational Lonoshorbmen's Association, Logaii No. 331. 

The following are extracts taken from an agreement entered into 
March 29, 1922, between the United States Shipping Board, steam- 
ship operators, and stevedores of the port of Mobile (on the one hand) 
and the Intemationai Longshoremen's Association (on the other 
hand) for the handling of timber: 

[Paragraph 1.] 

Hours of fo5or.— The hours of labor shall be from 7 a. m. to 4 p. m. for a full day; 7 
a. m. to 11 a. m. first half ; 12 noon to 4 p. m. second half. 

When going to work in Mobile Bay the hours shall be as follows: 7 a. m. to 9 a. m. 
first quarter; 9 a. m. to 11 a. m., second quarter; 12 noon to 2 p. m., third quarter; 
2 p. m. to 4 p. m., fourth quarter. 

When making time after 4 p.m. two hours or part thereof to constitute one-half day, 
anything over two hours and up to four hours to constitute a full day. 



I 



42 

[Pangnpli 34.] 

Refusal to work with unfair labor. — This local refuMB to work over any work that 
had been perfonned by unfair labor, or tx) work on the same vesBel where unfair labor 
is employed. 

This agreement to be in full force and effect until September 30, 1922. 

COMVinONS AND MAXIMUM RATBB COYBBING STEYBDOBINO OPERATIOKS ON UNITBD 
STATES SHIPFINO BOARD BMERGENCY FLEET CORPORATION VESSELS FOB THE MOBILE 
DISTRICT (MOBILE, GX7LFP0RT, AND PENSACOLA).^ 

IBflBettTe April 25, 1982.) 

(1) The ship shall furnish and maintain in good order the necessary steam winches 
capable of lifting 3 gross tons in single gear, and shall also furnish the necessary steam, 
blocks, ropes for falls, dunnage, hatch tents, gangways, and necessary light where 
work is to be performed at night. The stevedore shall furnish all other gear and 
equipment, including slings, ropes, hooks, trucks, conveyors, and save-alls for loading 
and discharging, and shall transport the same to and from the ship at his own expense, 
lig and unrig ship for loading and discharging (and imder no conditions shall he 
receive any compensation whatever for such rigging and unrigging), and remove su^h 
rigging, and shall take off and put on all hatches while the vessel is loading and dis- 
charging, but not after the completion of such loading and discharging. He shall 
also furnish and pay all winch men. 

(2) The stevedore shall order out men only on authority specifically given by the 
United States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, through its managing 
agents, and shall transport them to and from the vessel at his own expense, except 
to pioints for which extra travel expense is provided in the prevailing wage agreement. 
All wages paid longshoremen for straight time and overtime, waiting time, and for 
their transportation to and from work shall be according to the wage agreement now 
prevailing, but overtime and extra labor of every nature in loading and discharging 
must be authorized before performance by the United States Shipping Board Emer- 
gency Fleet Corporation through its managing agents, and when so authorized 10 
cents per man per hour over and above the amount paid for labor will be allowed 
on all overtime work performed. Overtime shall be billed on the basis of the differ- 
ence between the straight time and overtime paid the men and must be certified 
to by the managing agent or someone authorized by him, and the master of the vessel 
or his agent. If the stevedore is delayed beyond a reasonable time on account of 
breakdown in machinery, absence of cargo, or for shifts, he shall be paid for total 
time lost at actual cost of labor, provided the same is certified to by the managing 
agent, or some one authorized by him, and by the master of the vessel or his ^ent. 

(3) All rates on the cocomodity-rate sheet covered by these conditions shal 1 appiy 
on a long ton basis of 2,240 pounds, except as otherwise specifically provided in tb^ 
conmiodity list. General cargo shall include all commodities not named in the com- 
modity cargo list and for which no commodity rate is provided, and shall be £gaTed 
on the basis of a payable ton. 

(4) All legitimate ship's work, such as cleaning holds, coopering cazgo, and shifting 
bunkers may be performed by the stevedore only upon approval of the United States 
Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation through its agent, and then at actual 
cost of labor plus 10 cents per man per hour. Where such work is authorized the 
time shall be certified to each night by the managing agent or scxne one authorized 
by him, and the master of the vessel or his agent. 

(5) All liability and compensation insurance to protect the United States Shipping 
Board Emergency Fleet Corporation, and its agents, and stevedoring companies, 

1 Fumiflbed by the Division of Operattons of the United States Shipping Board. 



Filing, untreated, per linear ^Xlt 02f 

Pinetsr, pitch and roan 60 



45 

SiBol, loading, p«r bale 0. 13 

Staves, stowage aad cargo J.00 

Steel billets and elabfl 65 

Steel ttee and bands in bundles 6S 

Steel rails: 

Not over 33 feet 77 

Ov«33feet 87 

Tlinber, pne; 

Sawn, out o( water, per M teetb. m 2.50 

Sawn, ofl dock, per M feet b. m L 80 

Hewn, out ol water, per M feet b. m 2.60 

Hewn, off dock, pa M feet b. tn 2.06 

Tobacco, in hogaheads (Mobile and Gulfport only, tobacco rate at Pensacola 

to be agreed on) 65 

Turpentine, pa- barrel IS 

Venew, pencil slats (in caeee), heading (in bundles), cigar box liunber, shooks 

(inbundlM) 1.05 

Zinc 66 

NoTs. — At the port of Pensacola the actual cost of insurance will be allowed in 
addition to the above ratce. 

HiSOELLANEOnS CHABaBS. 

Anchorage dues. — There are none. 

Bill of health. — ^The chai^ variea. (See Quarantine Regula- 
tions.) 

Brokerage fees vary according to service from $3 to $10; cotton, 
S0.05 per bale; general cargo 11 per cent. 

Buoy hire. — There is no charge. 

Consular fees. — The charge of British consul for entering and 
clearing is $1 ; Norw^an, $1.10; Honduras, $10: others, according to 
Bervice. 

Customhouse entry fee ia $3.15 and the clearing fee is $2.70. 

Demurrage charge.— Terms contained in charter. 

Dispatch money. — Terms contained in charter. 

Fire Insurance varies from $0.76 to $1.50 per $100, according to 
location, and covers usually a storage period of 60 days. 

Hftrbor dues. — There are none. 

Hospital dues, — None. Services are free to heneficiaries of the 
service; $1.50 to memhers of the Army and Navy; $2.50 to foreign 
seamen. 

Inspection of cai^o.— Grain $0.75 per car or $0.60 per 1,000 
bushels in 1. c. 1. lots. 

Interpreters' fees vary from $2.50 upward, according to service. 

Launch hire. — $2.50 per hour. 

Port warden's fees. — There are none. 

Quarantine. — Inspection of vessels in excess of 500 gross tons 
SIO; inspection after sunset a surchaige of $10; fumigation charge 



is from $0.14} to $0.16 per 1,000 cubic feet plus $1 for supervision 
and $2 for labor. 

Running lines. — ^The charge for running lines is $4. 

Shipping documents. — ^Bill of lading on lumber $3 per car; on 
cotton $0.15 per bale. 

Surveying. — The chaise for surveying vessels is $10; for survey- 
ing damaged cargo $10. 

Tarpaulin rent. — ^The charges are $0.40 each per day. 

Tonnage dues. — ^The tonnage dues on vessels from Mexican and 
Central American ports are $0.02 per net registered ton; other foreign 
ports, $0.06 per net registered ton. 

Watchmen. — ^The charge for each watchman is $3 per day or 
night. 

Water. — Drinking water is supplied at $0.32 per ton. 

Weighing charges vary but are generally $0.50 per hour. 

Light money and alien tonnage tax. — In addition to the regu- 
lar tonnage dues, light money at the rate of 50 cents per net ton and 
an alien tonnage tax of the same amount are, with certain infrequent 
exceptions, imposed at each entry thereof into the ports of the United 
States upon vessels of countries vnth which the United States has no 
commercial treaty and upon vessels not exempted by presidential 
proclamation, except that upon foreign-owned vesseb built in the 
United States the aUen tonnage tax is 30 cents per ton. An alien 
tonnage tax of 50 cents per ton is also imposed upon vessels of Ameri- 
can r^istry carrying one or more foreign officers. 



48 



The XTnited States Shipping Board Emergency Fleet Corporation 
has recently constructed on Blakely Island a plant for handling fuel 
oil for storage and for bunkering vessels. It is equipped with facili- 
ties affording a bunkerage capacity of 1,500 barrels per hour. 

Fud-cUfaeUiitiea. 



Storage fodlltlM Tanla: 
Locatioii. 



Number of tanks 

Type of (xmstniatioii. . 
Total storage capacity 

(bomU). 
Intake pipe lines- 
Number, and Biie. 
Supply: 

Booioeofsapply 



TheTeoBBBCo. 



Hov reoiiTed. ....... , 

Grades 

Quantity kept in 
stock— 

Maximnm 

NormaL 

Bunkering facilities: 

Pipe-line piers, 

wharves, loading 

beads, or dolphins. 

Type and constrao- 

Actual berthing space 
far bunkering. 

Depth of water, mean 
low water. 

Bunkering capacity 
(per hour). 

Discbarge pipe lines.. . 
Sise. 



Totallengtfa 

Connections 

Number of holes 
in flanges. 

Banes 

Total number 

Towed or self- 
propelled. 

Canytng capacity 

Bunkering o^Moity 

(per hour). 
Method of delivery of 
oil to vessels. 

Hose.size 

Totallength 

Connections 

Number of hodes 
in flanges. 



Choctaw Point at month 
of Mobile Biver. 

4 

Steel; above groond. . . . 
Ii2,851 



One, 12 inches; One, 8 
inches. 

Port Arthur, Tez., and 

Mexico. 
Tank steamers 



The Qidf Refining Co. 



Near month Chickasaw 
Creek. 

5 

Steel; above ground 

30,000 



iao.OOObaneis. 
60,d00 barrels.. 



Wooden pier; treated 
pile foundation. 



20feet 

eoobarrete. 



One, 12 inches; one, 8 

inches. 
One, 6 inohes; one^ 4 

inches. 

20 and 25 feet 

6 and 4 inches 

Sand 6 



Stugbcats. 
Towed 



4,100 barrels. 
500 bairels... 



Tugboat. 



2to4inehes. 

20feet 

1 to 4 inches. 
6 



One, 4 inches. 



Port Arthur, Tex. 
Baigej 



80,000 barrels. 
15,000 barrels. 



17. 8 . Shi pping Board 
R Hier jgeocy Fleet Cor- 
poratuDKi, washingtoo, 



Wooden wharf: treated 
pile foundation. 



10 feet. 



2 

li inches. 



U inches. 



14 feet.... 
li inches. 



Gravity. 



Plant used efalefly for 
storage; bunkerinE 
faoUfties for small 
boats only. 



Blakely Island. 

2. 

Biter-Conley Standaid. 

110,000. 

One, 8 Inches. 



Vessds (tankers). 
Bunker "C"; gravity, 
14-10. 

105,000 barrels. 
60,000 ban«U. 

One pipe line pier, 
whac^ 2 loadheads. 

Wooden wharf; yellow 
tine pf* ■ 
feet. 

25 feet. 

1,500 banela. 



pine pUlng 60 feet loDg. 



1. 

o U1CO0B* 

einflbea. 

150feet. 

OinoheB. 

8. 

None. 



COAL BtTNKBBINO. 

Mobile has a number of facilities for handling coal, including two 
plants suitable for bunkering direct from cars to vessel. The Louis- 
ville & Nashville Raihoad Co. coal terminal is located at the foot of 
Augusta Street, adjoining the Mobile Coal Co. on the lower side. It 
consists of two elevated tracks over hoppers served by electrically- 
operated continuous-bucket conveyors which elevate the coal to the 



PORT AND HARBOR FACILITIES. 

PIERS, WHABYES, AND DOCKS. 

Mobile has 32 piers and wharves used for transportation purposes 
with depths of water ranging from 5 to 29 feet at mean low water. Of 
this niunber 2 axe owned by the city, 15 are owned by railroads, 13 
are privately owned, and 2 are owned by the United States Govern- 
ment. In addition to these there are 17 landings, dry docks, unused 
slips, and sUps belonging to shipbuilding companies. Of thQ total 
number, 36 are located on the west bank of Mobile River extending 
from the abandoned Arlington Pier, IJ miles below the city, to 1 
mile above the mouth of Chickasaw Greek, while the remaining 13 
axe located on the east bank of the river; 5 on Blakely Island, and 8 
on Pinto Island. All the piers and wharves are of pile construction, 
and 29 have railroad connections. 

Publicly owned wharves. — ^The only publicly owned terminal 
now in operation at Mobile is known as the municipal wharves. It 
is located near the center of the business district, extending from the 
foot of Dauphin Street to the vicinity of State Street. This wharf 
has a frontage of 1,500 feet, a width of 120 feet, and has a depth along- 
side of 22 feet at mean low water. It has two open transit sheds, one 
of which is constructed of steel with concrete floor, 1,242 feet long 
and 100 feet wide, the other of wood, 120 feet long and 70 feet wide. 
The wharf is used for handling river, coastwise, and export cargo. 
As there is no warehouse connected directly with this wharf, 
cargo can not be assembled for indefinite storage. All loading and 
unloading is done by hand labor or ship's tackle. The wharf has 
rail connections with the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. 

The Arlington Pier, which the city attempted to construct about 
3 miles south of the municipal wharves, was never completed. At 
present it is in a much damaged condition. The fill has slid under the 
bulkheads at numerous places, and part of the apron itself has been 
washed away. There seems to be no prospect of this pier being 
completed, and at the present rate of deterioration the structure 
will be destroyed in a short time. 

Railroad owned wharves. — ^The railroad piers and wharves are 
owned by the Mobile & Ohio, the Southern, the Louisville & Nashville, 
and the Gulf, Mobile & Northern. 

The Mobile & Ohio Railroad Co. has its terminals at Mobile. These 
terminals consist of 4 piers, including 1 upon which is constructed a 

(62) 



ite 



oo 



54 



water deptih of 30 feet. The handling facilities consist of an deo 
trically operated, movable unloading bridge, equipped with a grab 
bucket; also a conyeyor and reloading tower, with a reach of 63^ 
feet from the face of the wharf and a caipacity of 400 tons per hour. 

Immediately south of and adjoining the above plant the United 
States Shipping Board Emei^ency Fleet Corporation has a fuel- 
oil storage and bunkering plant. It has a berthing capacity of 394 
feet, and a depth of 30 feet will be provided alongside. The handling 
facilities consist of 2 steam-operated, fixed, cargo pumps with a 
capacity of 1,500 barrels per hour. 

Dry dock and shipbuilding companies. — Of the 17 wharves, 
slips, and docks owned by the dry dock and shipbuilding companies, 
11 are located on the east bank of the river, of which 3 are on Blakelr 
Island and 8 on Pinto Island, and the remainder on the west bank of 
the river. Further information relative to these facilities will be 
found under marine repair plants and also under piers, wharves, 
and docks. 



Ill 

111. 



I 



I- 



i 



i 



I 



] 



I, 



-II 
i' 

ri- 
ll 

i 

in 

m 



ii 



HI i: 



i 



r 



4 

L 



P 



78 



TariJf-^Ihy doeki, mcarine raStoc^, etc 



BftslsofehaiKB- 



Tttmage. 



Hanlion Bros., ssuJl 
w»78, foot Palmetto 
Street; tMsiiofobarge, 
siieofboat. 

Marine Ways, Blakdy 
Island; basis of 
charge^ tonnage. 

Ifurnan Sbipbuilding 
Corp. : basis of charge, 
siseofTeBsd. 



Bate for dock days. 



20 cents 



I cents per 
roglstereaU 



ton. 



Sift to 130.. 



20 cents per 
roglsterea ton. 



135 for baigOB; $60 
for steamboats. 



Bate for lay days. 



16 cents per ton baaed 
on gross registered 
tonnage of vessels. 



One-half of the amount 
charged for dock 
days. 

10 cents per gross reg- 
istered ton. 

One -half amount 
charged for dock 
days. 



Bate for 
hauling oat. 



20 cents 
ton. 



tl5tot20....1 



20 cents per 
ton. 

185 to ISO.... 



Uniform charssi: 
force at th ispon 

Hanl8anBni.i 
ICnnian Ship- 
huUdingCorp. 
TJaedabtyiacsMaLl 
bofttSfeto^ele. 



Used oDljr/orswill 



KABIKE BEPAIB PLANTS. 



The port of Mobile is well equipped for making repairs to vesseb. 
Information regarding these facilities is contained in the iuxsom- 
panying form. 



I 

t 
I 

\ 



Ill 


W^ WMmmmmi 


i' 


iliiiSiiiii 


H| 


a i ] ii 


$ 


!i !l i li 


1 1 n 


pi |SI11 J 

f ft 

p.! Pli 


\ 1 




1 
1 i 


km i 1 i g 




it mm II iilii 


lift 


pi m it 111 


If 


^f H ^ % 



n 



ii 



n 






s -sa- ill I -E| 

Jiii 



ii S* ml 



il 



"im 



III 

ji g,^. , -.,1 



,1 

I! 




84 



WRSCKINa AND BALVAGB TAGIUTIB8 (8BB ALSO FORM S). 



Name of firm or 
oompsiiy. 



Szaot locstioo (If 
no salYBge oom- 
panies are lo- 
cated in the 
port, Indicate 
nearest point 
available). 



Togi. 



Nnm- 

ber 

avaU- 

able. 



Indioatedl 
hone- 
power. 



Nimi' 
berof 
UshterB 
avaU- 
able. 



Chararter of other appUanoes avmllftbie. 



Onlf Wrecking A 
Salvage Co. 



On Water Street 
near month of 
One Mile Creek. 



U 



1,000 



»6 



Gnlf Towing A 
Wrecking Ca 



Mobile Towing & 
Wrecking Co. 



Mobile Harbor, 
foot of Dauphin 
Street. Ofiloe, 
Citv Bank 
Building. 

Foot of Dauphin 
Street (offloe 
and base of 
qperationsX 



1,000 



600,550, 
600,150^ 
160 



None. 



None. 



Two wrecking barges, one 100 feet long 
equipped with IS-tonstifl-leg derrick, 
andooe l(Mnch,oneS4nch,ooe e^nch, 
and one 3-lnoh wrecking panip; the 
other barge l36feetloQg,egmppea with 
500 hors^wer engine far operating 
30-inch centriftagaT wrecUns pump; 
also two IMnchy one KMu^ and two 
8-incfa wrecking pumps. Barge abo 
equipped with nro hoisting owg*"**, 
2»on lifting capacity each, '*a^ 
frame, capable of 504on Tertlcal lift; 
two aur oompreesers with capacity of 
700 feet free air per minute; loor sets 
acetylene torches, one set for catting 
under water. Company baa seven 
complete dlvhig outfits; SOO feet 
suction hose; l,000f eet chain; 10 wire 
sUngs, 1004on capacity each; two 12- 
inch hawsers TOOfeet long; hawser 3}- 
inches diameter 700 leetTana: 20seti 
254on blocks; 20 sets 50-toa blocks; 

_ hydraulic jacks, screw Jacks, etc. 

Tug is equipped with towing machine 
tackle ana other equipment of this 
character. It also nas one 1^4nch 
and one 8-lnch wrecking pump, and 
other equipment for salvage work. 

One 10-inch portable centilf u^al wreck- 
ing punw transferred to tugs as 
needed. Each tug equipped with 
smaller wrecking pumps. PortaUB 
holstlngenglne, i-tonliftingi 



oonmletely equipped wltfi hawsers, 
blocks, lacks, and other equipment 
of this character. 



1 Operated bv Oulf Towing A Wrecking Co. 

s One oU tanker, capacity 14/X)0 barrels, rigged with pomps, oU hose, ete. 



86 

The Alabama, Tennessee & Northern RaUroad also serves the port 
of Mobile. It reaches Mobile over the Southern Railway, with whidi 
it makes connection at Calvert, Ala. 

BWilXJUlNO. 

Switching charges of the Gulf , Mobile & Northern Railroad 

range from $2.50 to $6.50. Switching between private sidings and 
interchange tracks with other railroads is usually $2.50. The charge 
for switching export traffic from interchange track with connecting 
line to Gulf, Mobile & Northern piers is $2.50. Details are shown in 
Gjilf, Mobile & Northern Freight TariflF, I. C. C. 956. 

Switching chaises of the Louisville & NashrUle Railroad 
are similar to those of the Gulf, Mobile & Northern Railroad, ranging 
from $2.50 to $6.50 per car for movement between private sidings, 
between private sidings and interchange track of connecting line, and 
between interchange track of connecting line and piers served by 
the rails of the Lomsville & Nashville Railroad. (For details see its 
tariff G. F. O. 24A, I. C. C. A14868.) 

The Mississippi Central Railroad switching charges as 
shown in its tariff I. C. C. 479 range from $2.50 for switching a 
partly loaded car to $6.50 for intraterminal switching. The charge 
for switching per car for weighing on private track scale is 63 cents. 

The Mobile & Ohio Railroad charges for switching range 
from $2.50 to $8 per car. Some of the more important charges are 
noted here. 

Between public team tracks of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad and 
oonnectlog rail line, in connection with a line haul, the charge is 
$2.50; not in connection with line haul, $3. 

Between industries and private sidings on Mobile & Ohio Raiboad 
and interchange tracks of connection line, $2.50 to $4. 

Intraplant switching, $8; when shippers or consignees own cara 
are used, $3. Secondary switching, $2.50 to $6.50. Intraterminal 
and interterminal switching charges are the same as for intraplant 
switching. 

Switching between Gulf, Mobile & Northern interchange track at 
Tacon and Mobile & Ohio delivery tracks at Mobile, $6.50; between 
Gulf, Mobile & Northern track at Tacon and interchange track of 
connecting line in Mobile, $4; Imnber, carloads, between Gulf, Mobile 
& Northern track at Tacon and piers of Mobile & Ohio Railroad or 
sidings or public delivery tracks in Mobile or interchange track with 
connecting line, $8 per car; same when in connection with line haul, 
$6.50 per car. 

Lumber received via Mobile & Ohio for export, switched to planing 
mills and after dressing deUvered to vessels at wharves of Mobile & 
Ohio Railroad or Southern Railway, $2.50 per car. 




is $2 per car per day. Time begins from first 7 a. m. after no1iceoi|3ffl 
amvfJ is given to consignee, and cars are considered released wna 
vessel registers at first pier for cai^o or fueL Charges are assesMd 
on average time held during the period for which payment is made. 



3 
ft 



WHARFAGE. 1 L 



Although wharfage chaises are published, appUcable agamst prop- 
erty passing over the wharves of the several carriers and those ot 
private ownership, those charges are usually absorbed in the through 
rate on export, import, and coastwise traffic. (See Absorptions.) 
At the railroad wharves charges for wharfage and handling are com- 
bined and vary from 2 J to 5 cents per 100 pounds, as published in 
J. H. Glenn's Port Charges Tariff No. 2, 1. C. C. A320. 

No wharfage charge is assessed on imported tropical fruits, received 
from water carriers at Mobile & Ohio wharves for delivery to other 
rail lines. 

The Mobile & Ohio Raihoad has right to the use of Southern Rail- 
way Pier No. 4 at Mobile, paying therefor a charge of 15 cents per ton 
of 2,000 or 2,240 pounds, as rates apply. 

HANDUNO. 

Coke in self-clearing hopper cars, loaded on Mobile & Ohio Raihoaa 
at Mobile, will be assessed a charge of 50 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds 
for handling over the Southern Railway coal hoist. 

Southern Railway tariffs formerly provided for charges of $1.50 per 
car on coal or coke in carloads plus 12 J cents per ton of 2,000 poundS; 
tippling, for delivery over its docks or for export, when arriving at 
Mobile via Mobile & Ohio Railroad. 

Its current tariff, June, 1922, carries the following item: "Switch- 
ing, tippling, and handling coal through Southern Railway coal hoist 
(tipple) at Mobile, Ala., is hereby canceled." 

The terminal tariff of the Mobile & Ohio Raihoad, I. C. C. B359; 
however, in supplement 7, becoming effective July 15, 1922, provides 
as follows, a similar provision being previously in effect: On coal for 
forwarding via water, or for delivery to vessels and coke and coke ^ 
breeze for export, in carloads, arriving at Mobile over Mobile & Ohio i 
Railroad and earning revenue of $1 or more per ton of 2,000 pounds, 
which is handled over Southern Railway tipple. Mobile & Ohio Rail- 
road wiU absorb switching not to exceed $2.50 per car and tippling 
charges of not to exceed 27J cents per ton on coal, coke, and coke 
breeze in flat-bottom cars and on coke and coke, breeze in racked, 
stock, or box cars, and 20 cents per ton of 2,000 poimds on coal, coke, 
and coke breeze in other classes of equipment. 

This woidd seem to make rates on coal and coke of the Mobile & 
Ohio Railroad as well as the Southern Railway, cover the entire move* 



moving to warehouse located on line not receiving line hauL When 
leady for deUvery to shipside, car will be switched without charge, or 
drayage up to $1 per hogshead absorbed by railroad. Bill of lading 
must be surrendered and freight chargee (and switdiing charge, 3 
uiy) paid prior to placing in etorage. 

Mobile aud Ohio Tariff I. C. C. B359 provides that "shipments 
billed through to foreign destination, arriving at Mobile via Mobile & 
Ohio Railroad, will not be subject to storage-charges whUe being held 
at Uobile pending delivery to water carriers," except aa otherwise 
provided. 

Storage charges on export freight cease to accrue when vessel begins 
lo accept cargo at first berth. 

1 Or 1 pu cent par 100 poundi. 



90 

Import traffic is allowed 5 days' free storage on wharf or in 
exclusiye of Sundays and legal holidays, except that when for 1 
deliveryi or for deUveiy to another initial line, 2 days' free time 
allowed. 

Imported sisal is allowed 5 days' free storage. After the expiratii 
of free storage a charge of 9^ cents per 100 poimfls is made for first 
days or fraction thereof; for each succeeding 10 days or fraction, 1 
cent per 100 poimds. 

Straw or paper for loading ripe bananas may be stored free on fruit 
wharves or adjoining premises of LouisviUe & Nashville Railroad. 

Wharfage, handling and storage dtarges on tome of the principal commoditiea imparid 

and exported at Mobile, 

Cotton in balee, cotton lintera or regins: 

Wharfage, including 10 days storage per bale.. 5 

Handling between ship side and car do 20 

Handling between car and storage and/or turndown do 10 

Handling between storage or turndown and ship side do 20 

Turning down or heading for rehandling do 7} 

Storage per day, including Sundays and legal holidays do 1 

Cottonseed, flaxseed, peanut, etc., m^ and cake: 

Wharfage, including 10 da3rs storage per ton (2,000 pounds) . . 20 

Handling between car and ship side do 30 

Handling between car and storage do 30 

Handling between ship side and storage do. 30 

Storage chai^ after 10 day period, first and second 7 days, each do 10 

Each succeeding 7 days do..-. 5 

Sacking, owners to furnish sacks and twine I .per 100 pounds. . 4 

Pig iron and pig lead: 

Unloading from cars to pier, bulkhead or vacant land, including 60 days 

storage per 100 pounds. . 2 

Storage, each succeeding 30 days do 1 

Reloading do 2 

Published tariff rate for switching movement in care to pier. 
Iron and steel articles: 

Unloading from can to pier, bulkhead or vacant land, including 60 days 

storage per 100 pounds. • 3 

Storage each succeeding 30 days do 1 

Reloading do.... 3 

Published tariff rate for switching movement in cars to pier. 
Lumber, pine: 

Wharfage, including 10 days storage per 100 pounds.. 1 

Storage, each succeeding 30 days per 1,000 feet b. m.. 40 

Naval stores; rosin, pine, tar, pitch, turpentine, etc.: 

Wharfage per barrel.. 4 

Handling between ship side and cars do 10 

Handling between ship side and storage do. ... 10 

Handling between cars and storage do.... 10 

Storage to and including 14th of month foUowing that in which received, 

per barrel 4 

When packages are removed from storage prior to 15th of month following that 

in which received, no additional charge. 
If removed on the 15th or thereafter, charge for each calendar month, 

per barrel »«»••.«•.« 4 



ig export grain: 
In bulk from cars into elevator, 10 days storage, and thence into veasd at Mobile 

4 Ohio Pier, 7, IJ cento per bushel. 
In bulk from can into elevator, 10 days storage, sacked and loaded into can for 
delivery to veesel, owners to furnish sacks and twine, 1} centa per bushel. 
HandUng domestic grun: 

Receiving into elevator, |9 per car. 

Id bulk into elevator, and sicked, owners to fumi«h sacks and twine, 1} cents 

per bushel. 
Loading into cars for local or domestic delivery — 
In bulk, $3 per car. 
In sacks, fS per car. 
Clearing, cooling, blowing, screening, clipping, miring, or turning, ^ cent ptt 



92 

Handling domestic gndn--Oontiiiued. 

Scouring or Bmutting, 1 cent per bushel. 

Drying, No. 1 to No. 5 gndn, 1} cents per busbeL 

No. 6 grain, 2 cents per biishel. 

Sample grain, 2 cents per bushel. 

Salvage grain, 4 cents per bushel. 

Beans, peas, etc., 6 cents per bushel. 
Separating mixtures, 1 cent per bushel. 

Grain in sacks, from can into elevator, including chaxge for baling empty Back,| 
I cent per bushel. 

No chaige for mixing export grain while handling from elevator to vesseL 
Storage chaiges: 

Export grain, first 10 days, free. 

Each succeeding day, -jf cent per bushel. 

Domestic grain, first 6 days, free. 

Next 10 days or fraction, 1 cent per 100 pounds. 

Each succeeding 10 days, or fraction, f cent i>er 100 pounds. 
Inspection, 76 cents per car in or out; 60 cents per 1,000 bushels delivered to steamer. 
Weighing, 50 cents per car, in or out; 26 cents per 1,000 bushels delivered to steamer. 

OARTAGE OB DBATAGE. 

For transfer of less than carload freight between Gulf, Mobile & 
Northern and Louisville & Nashville, Mobile & Ohio, or Southern 
Bailway, the charge is 4 cents per 100 pounds, minimum charge 
19 cents. 

Explosives may lawfully be transferred through streets of Mobile 
only by the keeper or lessee of powder magazines. CSharges are from 
5 cents to 25 cents per package and apply on explosives interchanged 
between LouisviUe & Nashville, Oulf , Mobile & Northern, Mississippi 
Central, Mobile & Ohio, and (or) Southern Railway, moving on through 
rates via Mobile. 

For cotton received by Mississippi Central or Mobile & Ohio for 
local delivery and afterwards delivered to vessels for export at docks 
of Oulf, Mobile & Northern, Mobile & Ohio, Southern Railway, 
namicipal wharves, or Turner Terminal Co., the charge is 5 cents per 
100 pounds, which shall be in addition to the local rate. 

For all cotton received at depot or from connecting Ihie for delivery 
to vessels at Gulf, Mobile & Northern or Turner Terminal Co. docks, 
the charge is 5 cents per 100 poimds. 

WEIGHING. 

Wdghing cars loaded or empty at request of shippers, 63 cents. 

Reweighing cars by Gulf, Mobile & Northern and Mississippi 
Central, $2.50 per car. 

If difference in weight is 500 pounds or more, the weighing charge 
18 refunded and billing corrected. 



storage or taixing tanks is applied. 

TRANSIT PHTVILEaBa ON EXPORT FREIGHT. 



Tariffs of the carriers eotering Mobile provide that shipments of 
cotton and cotton linta^ or r^ins, which originate at stations where 
there is no compress, may be stopped in transit for compression; and 
alter compression, reforwarded to the port at the through rate in 
6flect on the date of original shipment, provided that reahipment 
occurs within one year. The tariffs further provide that the identity 
of the commodity must be preserved. A through export bill of lading 
will be issued at the compress station and, in the event that no through 
rate to the fordgn destination is published, the bill of lading must 
Bhow the total rate to the port and the ocean rate must be shown 
separately. Cottonseed oil may be refined in transit at Meridian, 






'^7" 






:fsi 



Miss., when consigned to Mobile or New Orleans from AUceyiUey Ala. 
The through rate in effect on the date of the original shipment governs. 

Orain may be stopped in transit at various milling points and I f^' 
accorded one or more of the following transit privileges: Bleaching, 1^^ 
blending, change of consignee or destination, or both, cleaning, dip- 1»^ 
ping, drying, grading, inspection, manufacture of mixed feed, milling, 
mixing, reshipping, sacking, shelling, shucking, storage, trans- 
ferring or weighing. The commodities on which these transit privi- 
leges are ordinarily granted are alfalfa meal, barley, buckwheat, 
com in the ear, com in shuck, shelled com, kafiSr com, barley skim- t-^ c 
mings, barley screenings, feed, milo maize, oats, oat cUppings, oat |I^ 
hulls, oat screenuigs, rye, spelt, and wheat. Certain other com- 
modities used in the manufacture of mixed feed are accorded transit V^ 
privUeges. The principal commodities in this class are straw, hay, | :k 
rough rice, rice hulls, and flaxseed. Shipments reforwarded must in 
all cases be the product of the inbound shipments. The through 
rate on the outbound product over the route via the transit point, 
in effect on the date of the original shipment, is generally applied. 

Iron and steel from Central Freight and Trunk Line Association 
territory consigned to Mobile may be stopped for fabrication at 
Birmingham, Ala., or Nashville, Tenn., when these points are on the 
direct route from points of origin to Mobile. Fabrication is described 
in the tariff as one or more of the following: Binding, bolting, boring, Vki 
burning, countersinking, catting, drilling, flanging, gagging, paints r:b 
ing, planing, punching, reaming, riveting, sawing, shearing, straight- ji 
ening, topping, threading, welding. A charge of 3^ cents per 100 lie si 
pounds is made for this privilege and the through freight rate in effect I Im 
on date of original shipment is applied, provided the fabricated \% 
product is reshipped within one year. 1 1 i 

Lumber and forest products such as billets, blocks, bolts, heading, 
logs, poles, staves, etc., may be stopped in transit at specified milling 
points for grading, dressing, drying, sorting, or manuf actiu*e, and the 
product reshipped within one year. The local rate is usually assessed . 
to the milling point, and on reshipment of the fabricated product this 
rate is reduced from 2 to 5 cents per 100 pounds, according to locality; 
and when only grading, dressing, drying, or sorting is performed the 
through rate from original point of shipment to final destination in ! 
effect on the date of original shipment is assessed. If the inbound ^ 
material has gone through other process of manufacture, the tariff 
rate on the manufactured product from the milling station to final ^ 
destination is ordinarily applied. 

There are many specific modifications of and exceptions to these 
general rules, and it is advisable for shippers to consult the represent- 
atives of the various carriers concerning the specific privileges. 



V 



J 



aosence oi rai«s specmcauy puDUsnea lo snip siae, raww num uk 
following States published to Mobile via Soutiiem and other cameis 
(though not so provided in the tariffs) will include all chai^ee for 
movement to and delivery to ship side on export traffic deKverd 
over wharves reached by Southern Railway and/or Mobile & Obw 
Railroad and over wharves of the Turner Terminal Co, and over 
such other wharves within switching limits as may be covered by 
contract with Southern Railway providing a maidtnum wharfage 
chaige of IJ cents per 100 pounds and a maximum switching chaige 
of $2.50 per car." 

The following are the States specified in the tariff referred to above; 
Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinoia, Iowa, Kansas, Michig&D, 
Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, 
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Washington, 
West Viiginia, and Wisconsin, also the following points in Kentucky: 
Ashland, Catlettebui^, Covington, Fort Thomas, Henderson, Louis- 
ville, Ludlow, Maysville, Newport, Owenaboro, and Paducah. 

This tariff also states that, "Where rates are not provided in 
tariffs appljdng on import traffic, domestic rates in tariffs issued 
by or for account of Southern Railway from Mobile, Ala., will be 
applied from ship side and include handling chaiges entailed in the 
movements from the wharves at Mobile, Ala., reached by the rails 
of the Southern Railway and/or Mobile & Ohio Railroad and wharves 
of the Turner Terminal Co., and such other wharves within switching 
limite of Mobile as may be covered by contract with the Southem 
Railway providing a maximum charge of 1 J cents per 100 pounds 
for wharfage and maximum switching absorption of S2.50 p©r car. 
Applies to traffic destined to any point in the following States: 
Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Rentuclcy. 
Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, NebrtskSj 
New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Penn- 
sylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, West VirgimSi 
and Wisconsin," 

The Southern Railway absorbs the charge on cotton for wharfage 
and storage, not exceeding 35 centa per bale, when transported over 
its rails. 

On traffic, coastwise, import or export, handled over the wharves 
of the Turner Terminal Co, , when rates apply to or from ship side, thB 
charges of the Turner Terminal Co, are absorbed on freight mowl 
over ihe Southern Railway from or to Mobile. 

In the absence of joint through rates in connection with water linM 
via Mobile, Ala., on traffic arriving at or forwarded from Mobile, Ala-j 
via the Southern Railway, when originating at or destined to points 
in the States of Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Idaho, QH- 



98 

YHien for convenience deliyery to or from ship aide la made by dm, 
the Mobile & Ohio absorbs drayage charges of 3 cents per 100 poirn^ 
with a Tninimmn of 15 cents for a single shipment. 

On all carload traffic from noncompetitive points between East St 
Louisi HI., and Jackson, Tenn., arriving over Mobile & Ohio, swiUh- 
ing charge of connecting line is absorbed out of the rate to Mobile. 

Switching charges of Louisville & Nashville Railroad or Southern 
Railway are absorbed on traffic paying Mobile & Ohio Railroad a 
line-haul rate, and that of Gulf, Mobile & Northern is absorbed oc 
competitive carload traffic to or from Mobile. Switching charges d 
Louisville & Nashville Railroad or Southern Railway are absorbed on 
traffic delivered to Mobile & Ohio Railroad by Southern Railway Bt 
Meridian, Miss. This railroad also absorbs loading chaige up to }6 
per car for loading bananas. 

The Louisville & NashYiUe Railroad absorbs switching charges, 
lawfully on file with the Interstate Commerce Commission, of the 
Alabama, Tennessee & Northern; Gulf, Mobile & Northern; Mobile 
& Ohio ; and Southern Railway on carload freight, and on less than i 
carload freight in lots of 10,000 potmds or more, moving from or to i 
competitive points, when Louisville & Nashville earns a line hsul ! 
except on oyster shells and live stock. Pig iron from local furnaces, 
cast-iron pipe from local foundries, coal and coke from mines and 
ovens, and phosphate rock, from mines on the Louisville & Nashville, 
cotton ties, iron and steel articles from Helena, Ala., and all traffic 
having equal or lower rates than the Louisville & Nashville are 
construed as competitive. 

The Louisville & Nashville Railroad also absorbs loading charges 
up to $6 per car for loading bananas. 

Wharfage and handling charges as published in Glenn's Port 
Charges tariff No. 2, 1. C. C. A320, are absorbed on competitive traffic 
received from or delivered to coastwise vessels, except when from or to 
points in the States of Alabama, Mississippi, or Tennessee. These 
charges are ia addition to the rates to or from Mobile where no through 
rates are in effect, except from or to points in the States of Arizona, 
Arkansas, California, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, 
Louisiana (west of Mississippi River), Michigan (northern peninsular], 
Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, 
North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, 
Washington, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and Memphis, Teim. 

On import traffic on which rates are not published applying from 
ship side, those published in other tariffs issued by the Louisville & 
Nashville from Mobile (though not so providing) are appUed fiom 
ship side and include all charges entailed in the movement from 
wharf to destination, except to Chattanooga and Knoxville, Tenn., 
Meridian, Colimibus, Aberdeen, Tupelo, and Corinth, Miss., and 



102 

The traffic statistics show -clearly the preponderance of one-iv 
traffic consisting principally of coal, iron, and steel. The rates (^ 
iron and steel products are in some respects governed by considdn- 
tions similar to those on coal. The Birmingham district is in direct 
competition with the Pittsburgh district on iron and steel produck 
and the decision of manufacturers of the Birmingham district respeci- 
ing the routing of their shipments is laigely governed by the nfx^ 
situation. 

The Mississippi River service may be regarded as higbly success^ 
but a niunber of conditions combine to make operation on the War- 
rior River less favorable than upon the Mississippi. The territmi^ 
served by the Mississippi River and its tributaries is large, but th&t 
served by the Warrior, both directly and through interchange rates, 
is so linuted in its scope as to make it difficult to secure a sufficient 
volume of paying freight under present rate conditions. The come- 
tion of this situation apparently lies in securing favorable joint rail 
and water rates over a more extended territory and in ohtaining& 
division of joint rates which will enable the Warrior service to derive 
some profit from its part of the movement. The Mississippi-WAnior 
service claims that the present divisions are unfair and that the future 
of water transportation, not only upon the Warrior, but upon otier 
navigable streams, is dependent upon the recognition of the right ol 
water carriers to a more liberal share of joint rail and water rat^s. 
Rate tables prepared by local interests indicate that on certion joint 
rail and water traffic, the barge line would actually owe money to 
the connecting rail carrier for the privil^e of hauling the freight part 
way by water. 

There are now pending before the Interstate Conunerce Commission 
two cases filed by the Mississippi- Warrior service, one asking for an 
equitable division of rates between the rail and water carriers and 
the other asking for an extension of joint rate territory. 

A coal unloading and reloading plant has just been completed at 
Mobile by the Inland and Coastwise Waterways Service. This coal 
terminal is located on Blakely Island, where its use wiU be confined 
to all water movements. It provides equipment for unloading barges 
by grab buckets, depositing the coal in the storage area in ^e rear, 
reclaiming coal from storage pile by buckets, and reloading either by 
buckets or conveyors. Those facilities are described under the head- 
ing "Piers, wharves, and docks." 

Switching, drayage, handlhig, and other terminal chaiges and 
absorptions, storage and reconsigning rules and charges and rules 
and regulations governing storage in transit privileges are contained 
in Mississippi-Warrior service freight tariff No. 9-A, I. C. C. No. 78, 
which contains among others the following provisions: 



106 



STORAGE BULES AND CHABGE8. 



Except on shipments of coal and coke, seven days' free time will 
be allowed, without deductions for Sundays or l^al holida}^, on 
carload shipments of frei^t for export or coastwise movement, vhen 
imloaded on wharves, or in wharf warehouses or when held in barges 
at the option of the Waterways, except that on shipments of expon 
cotton moving on through export bilk of lading, ten days' free tune 
will be allowed without deductions for Sundays or legal holidays. 

On commodities imported from all foreign countries stored by the 
Waterways upon its wharves or in warehouses, or if loaded in hsips 
at the option of the Waterways in order to relieve wharf, five days 
free storage exclusive of Sundays and l^gal holidays will be allowed. 

After the expiration of free time, storage charges which are usaally 
1 cent per 100 pounds for each 30 days or fractional part thereof are 
assessed. 

Charges for each 30 days or fraction, varying from the general rule, 
are quoted below: 

ArtideB not otherwise provided for, 2 cents per 100 poonda. 
AutomoMleB, trucks, or tractors, set up or knocked down, 25 cents each per day. 
MaximiiTTi storage for each 30 days, $5 per vehicle. 

Cottonseed, coconut, peanut, etc., oil, flats and soap stock, lard, lard compound, 
lard substitute, pancoline, stearine, and tallow, 4 cents per burel. 

Cottonseed, flaxseed, peanut, soya bean, velvet bean, copra and palm kernel meal 
and cake: 

Storage for first 7 days after free time, 10 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Storage for second 7 days, after free time, 10 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Storage for each additional 7 days, 5 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 
Cottonseed in sacks, 40 cents per ton of 2,000 poimds. 
Hoofs, horns, glue stock, and bones, 3 cents per 100 pounds. 
Naval stores, viz, rosin, pine tar, pitch, and turpentine, 4 cents per barrel. 

If removed prior to 15th of month succeeding the month in which placed is 
storage, no additional charge; if allowed to remain in storage on or after 15th of 
month next succeeding that in which placed in storage, charge for that and each 
succeeding calendar month, 4 cents per barrel. 
Pianos and organs, 2) cents per 100 pounds. 

Sand, flint pebbles, gravel, oyster shells, and stone, 3 cents per 100 pounds. 
Sisal, ixtle, and istle, in bales, first 30 days or fraction, 10 cents per 100 pounds. 

Each additional 10 days or fraction, 1 cent per 100 pounds. 

Tobacco, unmanufactured, in hogsheads or tierces: 
FiiBt 30 dajTB or fraction, 75 cents per package. 
Each additional 30 dajrs or fraction, 55 cents per package. 

The following is a list of water transportation lines having their 
headquarters in the Mobile, Ala., district. This list includes a num- 
ber of lines not operating to and from Mobile, but which serve terri- 
tory tributary to this port. 







SiUotL... 

Bmws (nonpro- 
....do 


wood Co. 




"W..r::;::::: 


:::::t::::::::::: 

J*ClW»,Al> 

lUrFlii,Ak. 







...do. 

...do. 

FrtJ^t' 

Fidght' 



TomblgbM Blnr, 



> I<agi, Imnber kod nod and gnvel. 

■ Lojaud himbs. 

■ Cdal, manolaetund sMd, lumber in 
< Lagi^^nb«r, uidoaaL 

'LoiiUdaUTM. 



. mlacieUaneom height. 



108 

TraniportaHcn line$ wiOh headquarteri in the Mobile ^ Ala.^ Strict en Januaary 1, 193- 

Continued. 



Name of line 
oroompany. 



Addxen. 



Vaticloopgated. 



Kind. 



Num- 
ber 



SbtvIoo. 



Operated betm 
whatpGrtivx 
wb/Xwaltemji 



Daphne Transport 

tatlonCo. 
Fairhope Transpor- 

UtUmCo. 
VapioHa SpiingB 

Transportation 

Co. 

Baoon, McMillan 
Veneer Co. 



Daphne, Ala 

Fairhope, Ala 

Point Clear, Ala... 



OaaoUne launch. 



Stockton, Ala. 



D.C. Byrne 

Peoples TranjQXV- 
tationCo. 



BayMlnnettOyAla. 
Fauhope,A]a 



Gasoline launch. 



FaraiBn gaslanndi. 



OaaoUne launch. 
Steamer. 



Freic^t 
isse 

.do. 

t • • • •\Aw» • 

Freight. 



and 



.....do.. 
Freight 






and 



Moss Point, MIn.. 



Steam tog. 



Friei^t 



Mobile, Pipbit; 

MofaOsBsLAL 
Faiihope. Mofaik, 

Mob&Ba7,Ak 
Mobile Bay, Ak 

Znndeb, Uaoc- 

lis SpiiiigB, ll^ 

bllB. 
Mobile, Stocboe. 

Tensas Bivs. 

Ala. 
Do. 
Fab-hope, Jfotsfe. 

MobfleBBy,Ak 
Moss Point, m 
New Or- / 



port, 
wans. 



In addition to the lines listed above the following lines operating 
between ports of the United States have agencies in the Mobile. 
Ala., district. 



MaDory Steamship 
Co. 

Pensaoola and St. 
Andrews O a 1 f 
Steamship Co. 



Mississippi Waixior 
Service. 



Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



Aflsncy. Mobile, 
Ala.; neadquar- 
ters. New York. 

Agency, box 444, 

ICoblle, Ala.; 

headqnarters, 

box 12S2, Pen- 

sacdla, Fla. 

Branch office, 
City Bank 
BuUdlng, Mo- 
bile, Ala. 

do 

.do. 



Branch office, 
City Bank 
Building, Mo- 
bile, Ala. 



Steamer. 



Self propelled 
barges, steam. 



Towboats, steam.. 
Non-propeliing 

bargBS. 
Self-pnipelled gas 

producer. 



3 
2 



Freight and 
passenger. 



.do.. 



Freight.. 



.do., 
.do.. 



.do. 



Mobile, Tsapt. 
New York. 

Pensaoola, St. Ao- 
dxewsy Fkoiffl 
aty, MlDvilk, 
Appalschieola, 
Canabelle, Mo- 
bile. 

Mobile, Ala., G# 
port, Miss., New 
Orleans, U. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH LINES. 

Mobile has telephone connection with all parts of the United States 
and Canada. The telephone system is operated by the Soutbeni 
Bell Telephone Co. Telegraph communication is afforded by the 
Western Union Telegraph Co. and the Postal Telegraph Co. 

NAVAL RADIO STATIONS. 

The wireless station at Mobile is controlled by the United States 
Navy and is used for Oovemment business exclusively. Thecal! 
letters are N. O. T. The station uses the spark transmission of 
messages on a wave length of 1,654 meters. The normal receiving 
waves are 600 and 975 meters with an approximate range of 150 
miles. The approximate position of the station is 30° 41' 34'' 
north and SS"* 02' 27" west. 



potasb, wood pulp, salte, aodaa, talc, and whiting. 




•■ 



■ 

I- 



Accompanying this report are tables giving comparisons of clas 
and commodity rates on import traffic from New York and from Golf 
ports. The table of class rates applying from Mobile and New Orleans 
shows that these ports have an advantage over New York on import 
traffic from Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Philippine Islands, Centd 
and South America of 7 cents first class to Chicago, Milwaukee, and 
Peoria, increasing at St. Louis, Cincinnati, Louisville, and other poiots 
nearer the Gulf. Import class rates from Galveston and Houston are 
the same as from New Orleans to points as far east as Cincinnati 

On bananas from Central America, Gulf ports have an advantage 
of 4 cents per 100 pounds to Chicago, but the advantage is reversed 
with respect to Milwaukee, where the New York rate is 83.5 cents as 
compared with 86 cents from Gulf ports. To Peoria, New York has 
an advantage of 13 cents, while to Cairo the advantage of Gulf ports 
amounts to 35.5 cents per himdred pounds. Large quantities of 
bananas move through Cairo for distribution to points beyond. 

On burlaps from India, Gulf ports have an advantage over New 
York of 6 cents to Chicago, Milwaukee, Peoria, and St. Louis, 3 cents 
to Cincinnati, 8.5 cents to Louisville and Evansville, and IZ-S- cents to 
Cairo. On coffee from South America, Gulf ports have an advantage 
over New York of 2.5 cents to Chicago and Milwaukee, 8 cents to P^ 
oria, 14 cents to St. Louis, 5 cents to Cincinnati, 5.5 cents to Louis- 
ville, 11 cents to Evansville, and 21 cents to Cairo. On sugar, the 
differentials in favor of Gulf ports as compared with New York are 
not so great as on some other commodities. It should be noted that 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Norfolk, and South Atlantic ports have dif- 
ferentials under the New York rates which give them even lower rat^ 
than Gulf ports on certain commodities. 

EXPORT RATES. 

There was no difference between the class rates from Chicago and 
Milwaukee to New York and from the same points to New Orleans 
prior to the various general advances beginning with the 5 per cent 
increase in 1914. 

The relationship was continued under the 5 per cent increase but 
was disturbed imder the 15 per cent and General Order 28 advances 
in 1917 and 1918, respectively. The relationship was restored by to 
adjustment of rates to the Gulf in December, 1919, but was again 
disturbed by the percentage increases allowed by Ex Parte 74 in 
August, 1920. 

From St. Louis, Cincinnati, Louisville, Evansville, and Cairo, prior 
to 1914, there was a uniform differential to the Gulf imder the rates 
from Chicago of 10, 8 J, 6 J, 4 J, 4, and 3^ cents per 100 pounds on 
classes 1 to 6, respectively. At present, these differentials under the 
Chicago to Gulf rates are as follows, expressed in cents per 100 pounds: 



foreign freight conuuittee after conference with shippers and others 
to the extent of making the rates from these Ohio Biver points and St. 
Louis to the Gulf, the same differential under the rates from Chicago 
to the Gulf as existed prior to the 5 per cent increase in 1914. This 
adjustment was disturbed again, however, by the unequal increases 
under Ex Parte 74. 

IVom Peoria to the Gulf, prior to the 5 per cent increase, rates were 
3, 2, }, I, 1, ^ cents less than from Chicago to the Gulf. The differ- 
entials were changed by General Order 28, were restored in 1919 aad 
are now slightly higher on first, second, fourth, and fifth classes. 



112 

Tables are also included showing export rates on a number of i 
portant commodities moving through Gulf ports, with the diS&m 
tials as compared with rates to New York. 

On agricultiu^al implements from Chicago, Milwaukee, and Cind- 
nati destihed to Central America, South America, or Asia, Gulf per: 
have a differential under the New York rate of 9 cents per 100 pou&i: 
On goods destined to Europe and Africa, Gulf ports have an adv^- 
tage of 15 cents from Chicago and Milwaukee, 10.5 cents from Cincb 
nati, and 25 cents from St. Louis. With favorable ocean rates i}» 
difference in favor of Gulf ports is sufficient to warrant a consid^&bk 
movement by thils route. On manufactured iron and steel artidi^. 
the foreign destination makes no difference in the rate. There is i 
differential on these commodities in favor of gulf ports of 14.5 cei 
from Chicago, 11.5 cents from Milwaukee, 24 cents from Peoria, ^ 
cents from St. Louis, 15 cents from Cincinnati, and 25.5 cents fron 
Louisville. On packing-house products there is likewise no difference 
in rates due to foreign destination, fiates from Chicago to the Gd 
are 15.5 cents lower than to New York. From Milwaukee they &r 
12 cents, St. Louis 27 cents, Cincinnati 10.5 cents, and Louisvilie li\ 
cents lower to Gulf ports than to New York. 

The position of Mobile with reference to exports of iron and st^ 
articles from southern producing points will be evident from the 
accompanying tables. These tables show that Mobile and PensacoJi 
have an advantage, except to Cuba, from Anniston, Birmingham, and 
Florence, Ala., and Chattanooga, Teim., over all other ports on ship- 
ments of manufactured iron and steel, billets, blooms, ingots, etc, 
cast iron, pipe and fittings, and raUs and railway track material. On 
shipments of these materials from Atlanta, however, the advantage 
is in favor of south Atlantic ports. The rates on these articles for 
export to points except Cuba are also applicable for traffic intended 
for transshipment to Pacific coast via the Panama Canal. Rates oo 
these commodities from the points named for export to Cuba are tlie 
same to Mobile and Pensacola as to New Orleans. 

As shown by other tables in this report, the domestic rates on iroB 
and steel products from southern producing points to south Atlantic 
and Gulf ports do not maintain the same relationship as the export 
rates. Rates applying on traffic to and from the Pacific coast are 
further discussed below. 

RATES ON INTEBOOASTAL TRAFFIC. 

Tariffs are in effect naming rates on classes and commodities fro|n 
Ohio and Mississippi River points and from Chicago and points lo 
Illinois, Iowa, Wiscoiisin, and Missouri to South Atlantic and GuH 
ports, to apply as proportional rates to shipside at the ports, on traffic 



116 

Companion ofimpori aU rail nUM in earloadifrom New Ybrt and from Ov^port^-dS' 

COFFSB. 
[Bat«8 in cents per 100 pounds.] 



To- 



Chicago, HI.: 

Prior to 1014. 

6per cent incraue, 1014 

15 per cent increeM, 1017 

0.0.28,1018. 

Adjustment, 1010 

Ez parte 74, 1020 

Reduoed rates, 1022. 

MQwaukee, Wis.: 

Fziortol014. 

5 per cent increase, 1014 

15 per cent increase, 1017 

0.0.28,1018 

Adjustment, 1010 

Ez parte 74, 1020 

Beduoed raies, 1022. 

Peoria, 111.: 

Prior to 1014. 

5 per cent increase, 1014 a 

lo per cent increase, 1017 

0.0.28,1018 

Adjustment, 1010 

Ez parte 74, 1020 

Reouoed rates, 1022. 

St. Louis, Mo.: 

Prior to 1014 

• 5 per cent increase, 1014 

15 per cent increase, 1017 

0.0.28,1018. 

Adjustment, 1010 

Ezparte74,1020 

Reduced rates, 1022. 

Cindnnati, Obio: 

Prior to 1014. 

5 per cent increase, 1014 

15 per cent increase, 1017 

O.T).28,iei8. 

Adjustment, 1010 

Exparte74,1020 

Reduced rates, 1022. 

LooisviUe, Kt.: 

Prior to 1014. 

5 per cent increase, 1014 

15 per cent increase, 1017 

0.0.28,1018 

Adjustment, 1010 

Exparte74,1020 

Reduced rates, 1022. 

EvBiisviIIe,Ind.: 

Prior to 1014. 

5 per cent increase, 1014 

15 per cent increase, 1017 

0.0.28,1018 

Adjustment, 1010 

Exparte74,102D 

Reauced rates, 1922 

Cairo, SI.: 

Prior to 1014. 

6 per cent increase, 1014. 

loper cent increase, 1017 , 

0.0.28,1018. 

Adjustment, 1010 

Ex parte 74, 1020 

Reduced rates, 1922 



I^nnn 
New York. 



30 

3L6 

36 

45 

45 

68 

55.5 

30 

3L5 

36 

45 

45 

63 

56.6 

33 

34.7 

30.5 

40.5 

49.5 

60.5 

62 

35 

36.0 

42 

52.5 

52.5 

73.5 

66 

26 

27.4 

31.5 

39.5 

30.5 

55 

40 

30 

3L5 

36 

45 

45 

63 

56.5 

83 

34.7 

30.5 

40.5 

40.5 

60.5 

62 

85 

37.8 

43 

54 

54 

75.5 

68 



FromOnlf 

ports when 

iramSootli 

Axnerica 

and 

Central 

America, 

etc 



25 

26^6 

26 

8L6 

45 

60 

54 

27 

2&6 

27 

34 

47 

62L5 

54 

27 

28.7 

2&7 

36 

40.5 

66 

54 

23 

24.5 

23 

20 

43 

57.5 

62 

25 

26.5 

25 

31.5 

45 

60 

44 

23 

24.5 

23 

20 

43 

57.5 

51 

27 

2&7 

28,7 

36 

40.5 

62 

51 

23 

24.5 

23 

20 

41.5 

52 

47 



Diflereo* 

tialOuIf 

rate under 

New York. 



Oolfi 



6 

6 

11 

ia.5 


8 
2.5 

8 

S 



U 

+2 

a5 

6 
6 

las 

13.5 


8.5 
8 

12 
12.4 
10 

23.5 
0.5 
16 
14 

1 

ao 

6.6 

8 
+5w6 
+5 

5 

7 

7 
13 
16 

2 

5.6 

&6 

6 
6 

las 

13.5 



7.6 
11 

12 

13.3 

20 

25 

12.5 

23.5 

21 



firooi 
Bnrope 

flmd 
AMoa. 



25 

26.6 

35 

81.5 

46 

60 

47 

27 

28.5 

27 

84 

47 

62.5 

47 

27 

28.7 

28.7 

86 

43.5 

58 

52 

23 

24.5 

23 

29 

43 

57.5 

66 

25 

26.5 

25 

8L5 

45 

60 

37.5 



28 

24.6 

23 

29 

43 

57.6 

44 

27 

28.7 

28.7 

86 

43.5 

64.5 

44 

23 

245 

23 

29 

41.5 

52 

47 



JMtBSt 

rate cad? 
NewYxi 



i 

II 
III 
8 
i 

i I 

i i 
« 1 
u 

« 

lasi 

Ui 
6 

nil 

12 

i> 

li 
u 

1 

il 

8 

115 

7 
1 

1} 
16 
2 

liS 

t 

t 

la? 

1X5 

« 

15 
IS 

13 

13.1 
» 
25 
ili 

a5 



I 1 



IfparMoit LMxua, UIT. 

a.o.ia,mB, 

Adhutmant, 1910 

BznaiteT4, IWD 

BedaMiTii^ltaa. 

Qndmiati, Ohio: 

Pilot to Ifill. 

fiparooit IncTMua, 1914.. 

ISptr cant Incniut, U17. 

0.0.28,1918. 

Adhvitmmt,1919 

SxinrteT4,1990 

Be£Mdr»Us,ig32. 

LmbTlllfl, Kt.: 

Pilntoliu 

5 per OBnt Inoean, 1914.. 

ISpcr cent Incnu*, 1917. 

a.^.2g,I918 

AdJiutmeDt, 1919 

Bi puts 71, 1910 

Kaduced rata, 1923. 

Knugvllle, Ind.: 

Prlactol914. 

S Mr Mat Incnaac, 1B14.. 

It M cent Incrase, 1917. 

0.0.3»,1918. 

Al)]DrtlIUDt,l*l9 

Sipaita74,iea) 

Baifw«dTkUB,1933. 

C*o,ni.: 

I'rloitoin4. 

t Mr cent Increan, 1914 . 

U per cent ImruM, 1917. 

0.0.28,1918, 

Adjninnoit, 1919 

BiB«to7*,19» 

BMuc«drstM,192a. 



ft 


ma 






































39 
























































at 


















































48. 


8 




39 


17 


13 














































4g.e 


13.S 


























































47 



118 

(kmparwm of import all raU raUa in ecBrloadsfrom New Tbrk and from Chdf jxyrit-C^ 

MANQAKS8B ORB. 
[Ratw in oentB per ton of 8,310 poonds.] 



Ghicago, m.: 

Prior to 1014. 

6 per cent tncraBse, 1914.. 

15 per oont incnan, 1917. 

0.0.28,1918. 

Adjustment, 1919 

Ex parte 74, 1920 

Bedaoed mieB, 1922. 

Ifilwsakee, Wis.: 

Prior to 1914 

6 per cent increese, 1914.. 

15 per cent incnoee, 1917. 

Q. 0.28,1918 

Adjustment, 1919 

£x parte 74. 1920 

Reduoed rates, 1922. 

Peoria. lU.: 

Prior to 1914 

6 per cent increase, 1914.. 

15 per cent increase, 1917. 

0.0.28,1918 

Adjustment, 1919 

Ex parte 74, 1920 

Reduced rotes, 1922 

St. Louis, Mo.: 

Prior to 1914. 

5 per cent increase, 1914.. 

lo per cent increase, 1917. 

0.0.28,1918 

Adjustment, 1919 

Ex parte 74, 1920 

Reduoed rates, 1922 

Cindnuati, Ohio: 

Prior to 1914 

5 per cent increase, 1914.. 

15 per cent increase, 1917. 

0.0.28,1918. 

Adjustment, 1919 

Ex parte 74, 1920 

Reduced rates, 1922 

Louisville, Ky.: 

Prior to 1914 

5 per cent increase, 1914.. 

15 per cent Increase, 1917 

0.0.28,1918 

Adjustment, 1919 

Ex parte 74, 1920 

Reduced rates, 1922. 

BTansville, Ind.: 

Prior to 1914 

5 per cent increase, 1914.. 

15 per cent Increase, 1917, 

0.0.28,1918 

Adjustment, 1919 

Ex parte 74, 1920 

Reduced rates, 1922 

Cairo, 111.: 

ftiortol914 

5 per cent increase, 1914.. 

lo per cent increase, 1917. 

0.0.28,1918 

Adjustment, 1919 

Ex parte 74, 1920 

Reduoed rates, 1922 



I^Kim 
New York. 



485 

418 

510 

037.6 

(MO 



620 

485 

446 

610 

637.6 

640 



620 

468 

400 
660 
700 
700 
980 
572 

407 
622 
600 
750 
750 
1,050 
606 

370 
388 
440 
650 
660 
785 
452 

425 

446 

610 

6S7.6 

640 

895 

620 

468 
490 
600 

700 
700 
980 
572 

610 
536 
610 
762.6 
770 
1,080 
624 



FramOulf 

ports when 

from South 

America 

and 

Central 

America, 

etc 



800 

880 

880 

360 

640 

853.5 

460 

an 

880 

280 

360 

640 

853.5 

460 



320 

320 

400 

700 

932.6 

612 

326 

348 

348 

440 

710 

046.6 

548 

210 

228 

228 

200 

560 

687.6 

802 

200 
280 
280 
360 
640 
800 
460 

806 
820 
320 
400 
700 
876 
612 

336 

360 

360 

450 

600 

737.5 

664 



tiolOolf 
rate under 
New York. 



Gulf 
parts wbea 
from 
Europe 

and 
AAioo. 



PiflERfr 

rsteinrfff 
Hew yea. 



166 
106 
830 
887.6 


41.6 

60 

166 
166 
230 
887.5 


41.6 

60 

170 
170 
240 
300 


46.6 

60 

173 
174 
252 
310 

40 
103.6 

60 

160 
160 
212 
200 

10 

07.5 

60 

165 
166 
230 
287.5 


05 

60 

170 
170 
810 
300 

106 
60 

174 
176 
260 
312.5 
180 
342.5 
60 



300 
380 
380 
850 

680 

O0S.5 

400 

300 



360 
680 
006.6 
4O0 



330 

820 

400 

580 

773.6 

458 

826 
348 
348 
440 
630 
840 
488 

210 

228 

228 

2B0 

430 

637.5 

332 

260 
280 
880 
350 
630 
660 
400 

208 
320 
820 
400 
680 
726 
468 

336 

360 

360 

460 

500 

737.6 

504 



IS 

m 

x.i 

IX 

M.i 

12 

m 

B 


V.l 
130 
Mi 
\3i 

m 
an 

130 

Hii 

m 
in 

310 
IS) 

m 
m 

IGO 

10 

212 

so 

130 

1» 

165 ] 

m \ 

90 ; 
2S7.S I 

130 ; 

130 
17D 

in 

900 
130 
2S5 

130 

m 

176 
2SQ 
Slii 

]» 

130 



lew York 

TVLlmin^oD ,^-,.--.^..-^.-^^..^--^. 

^tuutesion, SavanoBb. BniMWldt, Jack- 

BOnviUo ...'... 

Peniacols, UoUle, Oullpcrt, Nmr Orleuu. 
Port Artbur, Oal'veMw, Hoiutra 



i^ 


mi 


Lsst 


^ 


Lafc 


ji.1". 


L^ 


^?M 
























































761 


eat 


U 


3T1 


All 



Tuitl authorlt;; Curletl'a I. C. C, A79; Boathem I. C.C., ASMS; fl tan's I. C. C, A2W: Boyd's 



IRaleilaoraiUppr 


lOOpounds. IneBKtOct 


1, ifla.) 








New York 





101 
SI 


1» 


07 


™ 


107 


331 


HilmlngtoD, Charleston, Savannall, Bnins- 
»ick, JacksoavUk (do tliraugh nles pub- 

PoDsacola, Mobile, Oullport, New OrlMIis. 
Port Ariiur. cklvMtS, ' Hourton (QO 
IhroughraleapubUshed). 



TulffMiUlorit?: Curletfi I. C. C, A 7»i E 



TO PITTSBUHGH. 

[BatnlnomtapprlODpouoda. Ia>ff«tOct 


i.im. 













188* 
223 


IS* 


Ml 

i 


1' 




i 








1? 


Ftnamla Mobllr, Gullport, Now Otlesns. 
Port ArtJiur, Galveston, Houston (oa 
tfarougb tales pubUsbed). 



Ttria auUiorlty: CutlBtt's I. C. C, 1 



}-. Eroorsoii'9l.C.C.,«^Co«reU'8l.C.C.,36a8pe«Bn'«I.C 
TO ST. LOUIS. 



IRalesIn cents per lOOpouoda. Id effect Oct, 1, 10J3.] 



NewYott 

Wilmliinou.CliarleslDii.SavBDiiafa.Bniiu- 
"icli,l»ck9on\-illB 

Peniamla, Mobile, Oullport, New Orleans.. '{ 



'Applies or 
Pnillpplne Islsmis. 

Kppltes only on trefflc Imported (ri ^ , 

Applies only on tralfic Imptoled Irom Eun^. 
TBrlff»utttrtty;CiirlMt'sI.C. C, A79; Souths 
UMl,C.C.,66M; Leland'sI.C. C, 130S; Boyd's 

2496°— 23 9 



Europe and Abioa, 



A KK9; c. Dl Oa. 1. C. C, SH; Seaboard A 



120 



CUus rates between MobOe, Ala., and painU in Alabama via all water or wUerandjtl 
[Rates in oants per 100 poands. OovernedbyBoathemclMsIfloBtion. In effect Oct 1> 2^) 



Oroap. 



To DemopoUs, Ala 

'uaouoon. Ale.; Payne's Bend, Ala.; Cordova, 



To Ti 

Ala.; Blrminrtiam, Ala. 

From Demopous, Ala 

From Tusoaloosa, Ala.: Payne's Bend, Ala.; Cordova, 

Ala.; Birmingham, Ala 



80 

»i 

78 



4fi 

78 
45 

Mi 



3 




I f 



7t\ 2^1 ^ 



34 



57^ I 43 1 34 S 



War Department Inland and Coastwise Waterways, Missiasippi Warrior Bervloe 11 A and J. C. C Sa. 
80-AlO. 

Import dUraU rates on specified commodities Jrom GvlfporU to points named bdoff. 

[Bates in cents per 100 poonds. In efleet Oct. 1, 1822.} 



p • • • • *i 



AtcfaiSOQ. .«M» 

BaibUo,N.Y 

Chicago, HI 

Cindmiati, Ohio. 

Cleveland. Ohio 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
CoondlBluflsTlowa.. . 

Denver,Colo 

Detroit, Mich. 

Duloth.liinn 

£van8ville.Ind 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Kansas City, Mo 

Lincoln. Nebr 

Louisville, Ky 

Milwaukee. Wis 

Minneapolis , Minn 

Owensboro.JCy 

Fittsboiidi'Pa 

8t. Joseph. Mo 

St. Loui8,Mo 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Sioux Fails, S. Dak 

South Bena, Ind 

Toledo, Ohio 

Wheeling. W. Va 

Winona, Minn 



Fruit. 



071 

83 

72 

62 

72 

142i 

104 

142} 
72 

110 
68 
72 

110 
68 
72 

106 
68 
83 

68 

104 

110 

72 

72 

83 

106 



B 



122) 

107| 

07 

86 

07 
1671 
128 
167j 

97 
134} 

81 

97 



81 

97 
1291 

81 
1074 

'g 

128 
134 

97 

97 
107} 
129i 



Mahogany. 



48 



62 



48 
65i 



48 



54 
56i 



B 



60} 
45 

67} 



66} 

• • • • I 

'49" 



64 



45} 
66 



68 
53} 



30 



33} 



!•«••«•« 



42 



30 

22} 

42 



42 



B 



44} 



48 



30 

53 



30 

48 

56} 

30 



56} 



A. Bateappttes from Galvestan, Boostoa, Port Artbor, New Orleans, Golfport, Mobile, 

B. Rate applies from Key West only. 

C. Rate applies from Galveston, Houston, and New Orleans. 

Tariff authority: Boyd's I. C. C. A 1268. 




122 

All-raU rate» on niJtraU of toda and other fertilizer nuUericds from South Atlanlk 

Chdf ports to Boutheastem points ncaned. 



' 





[Bates In cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. In effect Oct. 1, 1 


[922.] 




To- 


New 

leans. 


OuU- 
I>ort. 


MobUe. 


Pensa- 
coia. 


Jack- 
son- 
TiUe. 


Feman- 
dina. 


1 

Brans- Savan- 'cbaiie- JJ 
wick. nah. ton. -^ 


Atlanta, 0% 


3M 
450 
338 
360 
293 
383 
394 
293 
315 
383 
383 
360 
383 
250 
394 
405 
282 
293 
383 
383 
383 
293 
383 
293 
372 
293 
383 
383 


894 
450 
338 
360 
293 
383 
394 
293 
315 
383 
383 
360 
383 
259 
394 
405 
282 
293 
383 
383 
383 
293 
383 
293 
372 
293 
383 
383 


394 

450 
338 
360 
293 
383 
394 
259 
315 
383 
383 
360 
383 
259 
394 
405 
282 
259 
383 
360 
383 
259 
383 
293 
338 
293 
383 
383 


394 
450 
338 
360 
293 
383 
394 
293 
315 
383 
383 
360 
383 
293 
394 
405 
282 
259 
383 
360 
383 
259 
383 
293 
338 
293 
383 
383 


360 
293 
360 
3S3 
383 
383 
360 


360 
293 
360 
383 
383 
383 
360 


360 
203 
360 
383 
383 
383 
360 


360 
293 
360 
383 
383 
383 
360 


1 
360 1 


Albanvy'Oft 


2» 1 


Anniston, Ala. 

Attalla,AlA 

Birmingham, Ala. . . 
Chattanooga. Temi. . 

Columbus, Oa. 

CdumbuB. MiBs 


360, 

3S3 • 

3831 

383' 

360 1 4 

r 


Corlnth,Mi88 










^ ^ ,1 ^ 


Decatur, Ala 

Floranoe,Ala 

Gadsden, Ala 

Hunt8Tine.AJa 

Tfick!?nn,MH" 


405 
405 
383 
405 


405 
405 
383 
405 


405 
405 
383 
406 


405 
405 
383 
405 


405 ' 

4051 i 

383 ^ 

406 ' 


JacksoniTenn 






........ 






Macon, ua.... 


304 
405 
360 
405 
360 
360 
360 
405 
360 
860 


304 
406 
360 
405 
360 
360 
360 
405 
360 
360 


304 

405 
360 
405 
360 
360 
383 
405 
360 
360 


304 
405 
360 
405 
360 
360 
3S3 
405 
360 
360 


""'304. ., 

406 (i 

3»i Jf 
405 « 

360 ' 

360 , 

383i n 

405, «S 

360 ' 

417 i 


Mempfds, Tenn 

Montgomery, Ala. . . 

NashTille, Tenn 

OpeUka,Ala 

Rome, Oa. 


RAtniA, Ala. ....... 1 . 


Sheffield, Ala 

Ta]ladeffa,A]a 

Troy. Ala 


Tui>elo,Mls8 

Tuacumhia, Ala..... 
West Point, Oa 


1 


405 
360 


405 
360 


405 
360 


406 

380 


""405 ti 
360 

. — -) 



Tarlil authority: Spelden's I. C. C. 583. 

Rates on specified commodities from Mobile y Ala,, to points named below via waUrsiii 

rail or all water. 



[Bates in cents per 100 i>onnds. In effect Oct. 1, 1922.] 



Anniston, Ala. 

Atlanta, Oa 

Attalla^AJa 

Birmingham, Ala. . 
Chattahoochee. Oa. 
ChattanooA, Tenn 

Corinth, Miss 

Decatur,Ala 

Florence, Ala 

Gadsden, Ala , 

HuntsviIle,Ala.... 

Borne, Oa. 

Sheffield, Ala 

Tupelo, Miss 

West Point, Miss.., 



Molasses 

and sirap 

(C. L.). 



\ 



33 

334 

12 

33 

33 

36 

16 

17 

33) 

19 

33) 

17 

33 

26 



i 



Molasses 
and sirup 
(L.C.L.). 



47i 
36 



47 
47 
«^ 
47 
47 
47 



Sugar. 



19 



19 
15 



32 

25 

20J 

19 

25 



204 

24 

24 



Boaln. 



1? 

25 
20) 



"i 



Turpen- 
tine. 



20J 



20) 
20 



284 



m 



16 



Petro- 
leaavi 
prodoeb- 



J! 

t 

31 

"ji 
t 

£ 
32 

t 



TWift authority: Mississippi Warrior Senrioe, L C. C. A 10; Speideif s I. C. C. MX 



/ill 



KSikibSiJJ 


sji,m 


3M,W 


JM,ai7 


u 




108, *!« 


78, WS 
30 


»,M1 


«8,<8( 




S87 


4CB 


S3 


«78 




^r'-^' 














loi 












18 
















IT 














" 


33 


es9 


".•« 




Petrotaum ud 






10 




B.«cn 






«0 


> 


• 


30 


BtnduldEnvd. 
Otm BOd meUlc 










- 


«. 


BK 


5S0 


<u 
























<B 












3,-ns 


^888 




3,870 






SSffl^ilSlSl^- 


m 


3.882 


«,SB7 


0,81« 


a, MO 


UO 




m,va 


2S0.8M 


W881 




1<«,701 


U1,IM4 


118, wa 


107, SN 










& 



4 



>.l 



u 



p>-