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Full text of "The Powderhorn"



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The 1992-93 Student 
Government would 
like to express our 
sincere thanks to the 
administrators, faculty, 
staff, and the students 
for making this aca- 
demic year a success. 
We hope that we have 
served the needs of 
the students efficiently 
and we encourage all 
students to play an 
active role on campus. 



Some of our major 
achievements include: 

Active involvement in the 
search for a new Chancellor. 

Co-sponsored the first 
Multicultural Conference 
held by USCS. 

Lettter witing campaign and 
mock funeral (of higher ed.) 
seeking more support for 
funding of higher education. 

Voter registration drive and 
political forum. 



More recreational equipment 
for the Hodge (pool table). 

Heavily involved in commu- 
nity servicework like the 
United Way, American Can- 
cer Sociey, and the Children 
Shelter. 

Actively seeking the opinions 
of the students by surveys, 
forums, etc. 




k -^bers of the USCS Student Government Asociation gather to discuss the future of the campus 



More Than Just Books . . . 



1 



WE HAVE HATS 



BOOK BAGS 
AND BACKPACKS 



CALCULATORS 
MUGS - 



NOTEBOOKS 
AND BINDERS 

NOT TO 

MENTION 

BOOKS! 




SCHOOL 

PARAPHERNALIA 



T-SHIRTS AND 
SWEATSHIRTS 



Come Explore Your College Store! 

uses 

BOOKSTORE 



THEP0WDERH0RN3 



THE EDITOR'S PAGE 



l/1/elcome to the second 
issue of The Powderhorn. The 
staff and I have worked very hard 
to produce a quality magazine 
that we hope you will find both 
informative and entertaining. 

We intended to create articles 
that everyone could relate to and 
enjoy. We have listened to all of 
your suggestions. 




Left to right Editor-in-Chief Tanisha 
Jones and Managing Editor Meg 
Upchurch in Washington, D. C. 



Your letters had admiration and constructive criticism. Many of 
you asked that more minorities and women be included in this issue. 
We have done our best to fairly represent everyone. 

There were many letters written about the four pages dedicated to 
Greek Organizations. We have reduced the number of pages to only 
two. We covered traditionally African-American Greek Organizations 
in this issue in order to add to those discussed in the previous issue. 
Although we do not have any chapters on this campus, we do have 
students belonging to city-wide chapters or serving as general mem- 
bers in their fraternities and sororities. I understand that one of the 
top goals of Student Affairs is to bring several chapters to USC 
Spartanburg within the year. 

Overall, the response to the first issue of The Powderhorn was 
great. The top ten lists were a favorite of almost everyone. There 
were numerous letters commenting on the talent and creativity of the 
former staff. Their edition was definitely a hard act to follow. 

I must commend my staff for a job well done. Most of you had little 
experience, but you worked like pros. We were a terrific team. 

If you would like to join us, please complete the application located 
in the back. Everyone is welcome, and all replies will be answered. 

We hope you find delight in the fruits of our hard labor. So sit back, 
relax, and enjoy! 




Left to right, Ebony Hunter, Dann 
Lane, Tanisha Jones, and Austin 
Coleman sharing a smile 




Actor Lou Gossett, Jr. , left, and Editor- 
in-Chief Tanisha Jones during Black 
History Month Convocation 



Copyright 1 993 by The Powderhorn and the University of South Carolina at Spartanburg. The Powderhorn is published every 
semester by and for the students of the University of South Carolina at Spartanburg. 

Opinions expressed hiere are those of The Powderhorn staff and contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of the faculty, staff, 
Publications Board, or administration of the University of South Carolina at Spartanburg. 

The magazine is distributed free to USC-Spartanburg students, faculty, and staff. All questions and comments should be sent to The 
Powderhom, 244 Hodge Center, University of South Carolina at Spartanburg, Spartanburg, South Carolina 29303. 

Submissions to the magazine are welcome. Contributors should type all submissions and include name, address, and telephone 
number(s) of the author 



4 THE POWDERHORN 



POWDERHORN STAFF 
& CONTRIBUTORS 



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STAFF 


TANISHA JONES 


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 


MEG UPCHURCH 


MANAGING EDITOR 


JIM PENNINGTON.... 


FEATURES EDITOR 


LISA PAINTER 


CAMPUS LIFE EDITOR 
SPORTS EDITOR 


JEFF NEWMAN 


CAROLINE RASH ... 


PHOTO EDITOR 


MIKE MOTON 


..BUSINESS MANAGER 

S DESIGN EDITOR 

r....FACULTY ADVISOR 


CLARENCE HAWKIN 
DR. BILLJONG-EBO^ 


CONTRIBUTORS: 


Dorothy Edwards 
Henry McAnich 
Greg Herman 
Ainsley Williams 
Jason Garner 
Professor Jimm Cox 


Derrick Murray-Banks 
Marlon Burgess 
Johnnerlyn Este' Moore 
Tangela Rice 
Dr. Olin Sansbury 
Patti Bowers 


L^ 


=J) 




EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 






MANAGING EDITOR 



SPORTS EDITOR 




DESIGN EDITOR 



FEATURES EDITOR 



CAMPUS LIFE EDITOR 



THE POWDERHORN 5 



TABLE OF 



CULTURAL DIVERSITY 

Celebrate Uniqueness 8 

Race Relations 9 

Multicultural Conference 10 

Black History Month Speaker: Louis Gossett, Jr.... 12 
Film Commentary of Malcolm X. 15 

IN CLASS 

How to do Library Research 16 

Major Update 17 

Changes in English Curriculum 18 

Adult and Evening Students 20 

The Bubble Tape Experiment 22 

CAREER 

internships 24 

Graduate School 26 

HOMECOMING 1993 

Activities 28 

King and Queen 29 

ATHLETICS 

Basketball: Men's and Women's 30 

Baseball 32 

Soccer 33 

Volleyball 33 

Tennis: Men's and Women's 34 

uses Graduate Markets Tennis Shoe 34 



6 THE POWDERHOnN 




Professor Warren Carson chats with 
students Gary Leake and Gloria Mills 
after the Black History Month Convoca- 
tion 




Comedian John Reese , sponsored by 

Campus Activities Board, performs his 

routine in the Hodge lobby. 



CONTENTS 



FLASHBACK: The Year in Review 35 

CLUB MIX 

African-American Greek Organizations 36 

Campus Clubs and Organizations 38 

ROCKING THE VOTE 

Republican and Democratic Commentaries 40 

Politics on Campus 42 

LEAVING, LEAVING, LEAVING 

Dr. Sansbury's Farewell 44 

Senior Salute 46 

USC-S: Possible Separation from USC 48 



MIND AND BODY 

A Motivational Message 50 

Exercising Your Right to A Healthy Body. 

OUT OF CLASS 

Faculty Beach Trip 54 

Tuning into the Soaps 56 



FEEDBACK 

Survey Said 57 

How Do You Like the Powderhorn 58 

Poi^der/7orn Application 59 



.52 




A Rifles fan is up to some monkey 
business during a game 




Students cheer the Rifles on in the G.B. 
Hodge Center 

THE POWDERHORN ,7 




CELEBRATING 
UNIQUENESS 




By Tangela Rice 

DIVERSITY. The word in itself is 
very striking. There is no ques- 
tion that this is one of the hottest 
topics today. Diversity is under- 
standing the differences that 
mal<e each person unique! When 
uniqueness is respected, morale 
improves. Differences in unique- 
ness are what make the world 
interesting and allow for new 
perspectives to be shared. An 
increase in knowledge and inter- 
action are necessary for different 
people to function together and 
respect one another for their life- 
styles and beliefs. So celebrate! 
Take pride in your own unique- 
ness. Welcome others as indi- 
viduals with their special qualities. 
Enjoy your similarities and your 
differences. When you appreci- 
ate diversity, you enrich your 
world. 



We all make judgements abouti 
people based on our own experi 
ences with them. When we make 
a judgement before getting to 
know someone, we "pre-judge" 
the person. This is source of the 
word prejudice. 

Cultural diversity is a positive 
aspect of the USCS environment 
Diversity leads to change and 
development among people, 
often reducing anxiety over 
differences. Anxiety and fear of 
the unknown overwhelms some, 
preventing effective communica- 
tion and learning. Many cultural 
groups are represented at USCS 
However, tension remains among 
different groups. What are you 
doing to relieve or encourage this 
tension? 



8THEPOWDERHORN 



RACE RELATIONS 

by: Doivlln/ IJlituinls 



Racism. ..Does it still exist on 
college campuses? Administra- 
tors are taking steps at USCS to 
explore this problem, create 
discussion, and seek answers. 

The video "Racism 101" 
focuses on the problem of race 
relations among college students. 
The video shows how African- 
American and other minority 
students are often the victims of 
verbal and physical attacks 
because of racist attitudes. 

Some of the students who 
were interviewed acknowledge 
that racism does exist at colleges 
and universities and that it is just 
a "fact of life." Unfortunately, 
college administrators have not 
been effective at curtailing these 
sorts of attacks against students. 

Here at USCS, positive mea 
sures are being taken to improve 
race relations. 

Many are excited about the 
changes that have been impleme 
nted. Gloria Graves, Director of 
Multicultural Student Services 
(formerly Minority Student Affairs) 
asserts that her office focuses on 
the needs of students of all races 
and nationalities. 

The monthly symposiums that 
were formerly geared toward the 
interests and concerns of African- 
American students have been 
tailored to incorporate students 
from other races and cultures 
represented at USCS as well. 

Participation in the sympo- 
siums by those other than Afri- 
can-American students has been 
minimal, but Ms. Grave believes 
that this will change once 



"students have had time to ac- 
cept the multicultural term." 

Students themselves have 
taken measures to improve race 
relations as well. 

Sara Davis, a student in the 
Leadership Development Pro- 
gram, has challenged USCS 
students to take a stand for 
multiculturalism by attending 
sessions of the recently estab- 
lished club. Spectrum. The group 
is primahly concerned with bridg- 
ing the gap between students of 
all races and nationalities through 
education. They hold informative 
sessions such as the one to 
explain some of the holidays and 
traditions of the Jewish commu- 
nity. 

Spectrum's membership is 
small, but those who do partici- 
pate are consistent. Sara says 
she is not discouraged that group 
membership is hovering around 
10. She says she knows that 
there is a lot that needs to be 
done to improve relations and 
she will do her best to help. 

Racism is still a problem on 
many campuses. This is really 
no great surprise since as Ms. 
Graves observed, "the attitudes 
and behaviors of college students 
are a reflection of our society." 

It is hoped that the efforts 
toward improving attitudes here 
on campus will be successful. 
Ms. Graves adds that her office 
will do its part and whole 
heartedly "celebrate diversity." 




THE POWDERHORN 9 



EYEING 

DISCRIMINATION 



By Johnnerlyn Este' Moore 

Jane Elliot was one of the 
keynote speakers for the first- 
ever Multicultural Conference. 
Elliott is nationally and interna- 
tionally fannous for her extensive 
work on that all too familiar theme 
of racism. In order to demon- 
strate that discrimination does 
exist in even the least expectant 
of us, she devised the reknowned 
"Brown Eyes vs Blue Eyes Ex- 
periment." This experiment was 
concocted by Elliot in an honest 
effort to teach her uninformed 
third grade class of the bleak 
existence of racism immediately 
following the assassination of Dr. 
Martin Luther King, Jr. 

During her first "Brown Eyes vs 
Blue Eyes Experiment" with third 
graders, Elliot decided to base 
the discrimination on eye color 
because, unlike haircolor, height, 
and weight, it is a physical char- 
acteristic that cannot be changed 
permanently. Children with 
brown eyes were discriminated 
against first, and those with blue 
eyes were treated with superior- 
ity. Brown eyed children were 
not allowed to play with blue eyed 
children. They had to eat lunch 
after the" blue eyes," and they 
received shorter recesses than 
the blue eyes. The next day, the 
discrimination was reversed. The 
blue eyes were stripped of their 
privileges, but they were more 
sensitive to the bii a eyes.The 
basis of this expen. lent is a 
parallelism between discrimina- 
tion based on eye color and 




based on skin color. Neither 
physical characteristic can be 
controlled. Therefore, non-minori- 
ties, who usually have blue eyes 
are treated inferior to those with 
brown eyes. In essence, she 
used reversed racism to illustrate 
her point. Many times, people of 
color are not allowed the same 
privileges in life as Caucasians, 
such as top notch employment 
despite qualifications, entrance 
into certain clubs, and well de- 
served promotions. 

Despite being stereotyped as 
a "nigger lover," threats to her 
life, and international criticism, 
Elliott continues to perform the 
"Brown Eyes vs Blue Eyes Ex- 
periment" since her teaching 
resignation in 1985. She has 
performed the experiment on 
various television shows such as 
"The Donahue Show" and "The 
Oprah Winfrey Show". During 
her performances, some mem- 
bers of the audience and televi- 
sion viewers became vehemently 
offended and hostile. Some blue 
eyes left due to their anger. 

In the real world where dis- 
crimination is rampant, those 
who are faced with racism can- 
not just turn and walk away. 
Instead, they swallow their anger 
and bitterness remains, because 
often they have to continue to be 
involved with the racist. 

Elliott's presentation was 
relevant to the celebration of 
Black History Month. Her presen- 
tation not only included an in- 




Educational Consultant Jane Elliott 
during discussion witii participants 

depth discussion of her famous 
experiment, it also contained a 
detailed account of the vast 
contributions from people of color 
to humanity. She emphasized 
that if a person is going to be a 
racist, they should be a commit- 
ted racist. They would not use 
any contributions made by minori- 
ties. She gave a detailed list of 
discoveries, inventions, and 
contributions made by minorities 
that would leave racists without 
electricity, fire, pens, ink and ink 
products, paper, the alphabet, the 
numeric system, traffic signals, 
rubber and rubber products, 
blood transfusions, blood plasma, 
bicycles, the last for shoe-mak- 
ing, aspirin, peanut butter, bread, 
etc. Most of which were created 
by African-Americans. 

Well maybe the committed 
racist could pray! Oops. ..it would 
be very difficult to find religions 
based soley on non-minorities. In 
order to live a privileged life, the 
committed racist would just have 
to change, which is the purpose 
of Elliott's experiment-to teach 
us to accept, love, and respect 
one another, regardless of race, 
nationality, sex, creed, age, 
handicap, weight, sexual prefer- 
ence, economic status, or any 
other factor. 



10 THE POWDERHORN 



MULTICULTURALISM AND DIVERSITY: 
The Upstate Prepares for the Year 2000 



By Tangela Rice 

During the week of February 17-20, Spartanburg was blessed with the presence of its first 
Multiculturalism and Diversity: The Upstate Prepares for the Year 2000 conference. Administrative 
personnel with the aid of a few willing workers, who happen to be USCS students, tarried after school 
hours to put this conference in effect. The coordinators were Gloria Graves, Coordinator of Multicultural 
Student Services and Virginia Rector, Director of Career Services. Their comrDitment to making a dream 
become a reality resulted in a very successful conference. 

"The mission of the conveners of this conference was to provide a forum for the exhange of ideas on 
matters of diversity as they affect every walk of society-education, business and industry, politics, and 
social institutions and and interactions of all varieties, " as stated in the program booklet. Thus preparing 
you for the year 2000. 

From the Quality Hotel to the USCS campus the keynote speakers enhanced participants' understand- 
ing that "in order to best live in such a diverse society it is necessary that we begin now to change our 
perceptions and our attitudes toward diversity by becoming more aware of the strengths of our diverstiy, 
more sensitive to what the issues impacting diversity and more educated in how to deal with the broad 
spectrum of ideals represented by persons from such diverse backgrounds," according to the confer- 
ence booklet. With that hope in mind the Multicultural Conference was a success, and was more capable 
of preparing us for the year 2000. 




The AFRICAN-AMERICAN ASSOCIA TION is a vital part of the USCS campus. This organization /s 
active in promoting Minority Academic Excellence and community and campus relations. 

THE POWDERHORN H 



MR. GOSSETT COMES TO SPARTANBURG 



by: Jim Pennington 



Actor Louis Gossett, Jr. speaks at USCS 
for Black History Month Convocaton 



V 





Even in slavery we knew 
who we were, we knew our 
roots." 

Black History Month Speaker- 
Louis Gossett, Jr. 










.■>% 



^ ^' 



Mr. Gossett mal<ing liis passionate speech during the Black History 
Month Convocation 



There are many perks to being 
a student at a university. One of 
these perks is that every now and 
then, a celebrity in every sense of 
the word comes to your campus. 
USCS students were lucky 
enough to have that occur when 
Louis Gossett Jr spoke at the 
annual Black History Month 
Convocation 

For Gosseti It was more of a 
homecoming th ^n a job. His 
12 THE POWDERHuRN 



cousins Beulah Smith and Nellie 
Gossett Evans both live in the 
upstate. As he said in a press 
conference before the convoca- 
tion, "I definitely have roots here. 
The most important thing to 
remember since Roots came on 
television is your roots. Even in 
slavery we knew who we were, 
knew our roots." 

His aunt,Helen Gossett Greene 
and close friend, Mary Dixon both 



made the trip from Brooklyn, N.Y. 
to hear what would turn out to be 
a stirring and moving speech. 

At a special press conference 
for the local media, Gossett 
touched on a number of contro- 
versial subjects. The outspoken 
actor had no hesitation in com- 
menting on the lack of roles for 
minority performers. "They are 
offering more than they did be- 
fore. Most movies are still 99% 
white." 

Although Gossett seems to 
work constantly, he also finds 
time for other important activities, 
such as the United Way, the 
Muscular Dystrophy Association, 
the United Negro College Fund, 
the United Nations' "World Sum- 
mit for Children", Rebuild L.A., 
and others. 

"Most of the time I'm not 
working, I'm giving speeches like 




Mr. Gossett at press conference for 
local media 

I'm doing here. I'm over at the 
Challengers Boys Club in Watts, 
dealing with my children, or 
helping people become more 
aware of AIDS. That's part of 
being a member of the human 
race." 

The convocation began with a 
performance by the Gordon- 
Collums Gospel Choir. As a 
prologue to Gossett's exhilirating 
speech, the choir performed two 
numbers featuring two soloists. 
Gossett along with the rest of the 
crowd really enjoyed the music. 
Chancellor Olin Sansbury opened 
the convocation by calling it "the 
highlight of Black History Month." 

After the opening, Sansbury 
was awarded a plaque from the 

Earl Gordon Scholarship Com- 
mittee for his years of service as 
chancellor of uses. Gordon's 



widow, Anne presented the 
plaque to Sansbury. Gordon was 
the first Dean of Students at 
uses. The scholarship was 
established at the time of his 
death to honor him. 

Gloria Graves, Coordinator of 
Multicultural Student Services, 
took a humorous approach to 
introducing Gossett. 

"When I found out I would 
introduce Louis Gossett, Jr., I 
calmly closed my office door and 
yelled and screamed. I called my 
best friend 'Girlfriend, guess who's 
introducing Lou Gossett at the 
convocation.' It was thrilling then 
and it is thrilling now." 

Scenes from Gossett's better 
known films such as "Iron Eagle," 
"Diggstown," and his Emmy 
winning role as Fiddler in "Roots," 
and Oscar winning role in "An 
Officer and a Gentleman" were 
shown just prior to his speech. 

At the start of his speech 
Gossett did something that was 
both commendable and refresh- 
ing. 

"Before I start," Gossett said, "I 
would like every young person 
between the ages of 6 and 14 to 
please stand up. I want to take 
time out to thank you for coming 
to see me. I know how busy you 
are. If I say anything that would 
turn your lives around, I will be 
very happy." 

Gossett told plenty of stories as 
examples of how important family 
is. He often spoke of the many 
family gatherings he experienced 
as a child, and what he remem- 
bers most about them. 

Some of the stories were 
extremly funny as well as touch- 
ing. 



During one point in his speech 
a little girl climbed onto the stage 
to get a picture. Gossett stopped 
and playfully stuck out his tongue 
at her telling her to go ahead and 
take the photo. 

He also spoke of how children 
have seemed to stop listening to 
their parents. He said we should 
all listen to the teachings of our 
elders. "Somewhere around 
Vietnam time, there was a gen- 
eration of children who thought 
their elders didn't know anything. 
We went off to seek our inner- 
souls and forgot our parents. 
We never came back." 

Gossett urged young people to 
be more careful about having 
unwanted children. Gossett 
himself has two sons. Satie. 18 
is from his first marriage. 15 
year-old Sharon. was adopted 
(continued) 




Mr. Gossett expressing the need for 
close family relationsfiips and racial 
pride 



THE POWDERHORN 13 



Gossett Continued 



after seeing him on "Good IVlorn- 
ing America". 

Even with his busy schedule 
Gossett still makes time for his 
sons. He commented, "if there 
are any men who have left their 
son or daughter, go back. As- 
sume your responsibitlity as a 
parent. It doesn't take a man to 
father a child, but it takes a man 
to be a father to that child." 

Gossett adressed the issue of 
racism, his hopes for ending it. 
He said that until racism is com- 
pletely annihilated in all its forms, 
no one can live in freedom. 



He noted the great strides 
African-Americans have made in 
a relatively short time span. "We 
sit here in suits in a very short 
amount of time. If you use arith- 
metic, it would show how short a 
period it has been since slavery 
until now," Gossett said. "It 
wasn't supposed to happen that 
way. A miracle took place." 

Finally, Gossett asked the 
young people in the audience to 
take better care of themselves, 
by being more aware of AIDS. 
He revealed that he himself is 
tested every two months for the 



virus. 

Gossett concluded the evening 
by saying "Not many people can 
talk about making a living at 
doing what they love to do. I love 
to act. I love to please and enter- 
tain people." 

Perhaps someday, we will all 
live in a world where we won't be 
judged by our race and where 
people of all ethnic backgrounds 
will join hands and become one 
race in one color blind world. 



Family Vision Care Centers 



705 E. Main St. 
SpartanburgC SC 29305 
(803) 585-3281 




314 S.Alabama Ave. 
Chesnee, SC 29323 
(803)461-7119 



Dr. E.M. Poole, Jr. 
Optometrist 
Official Dr. of the Running Rifles 



14 THE POWDERHORN 



MALCOLM X 

THE MAN AND THE MOVIE 



By Clarence Hawkins II 



As an African-American male, I am truly thankful to GOD to hiave been blessed enough to see the year 
1993, but I will never forget what took place during 1992. During that year, American cinema made his- 
tory. It was the first time that a full length movie about the life and times of one of the many strong and 
courageous African-American historical leaders was featured in local theaters. The leader presented was 
El Hajj Malik El Shabazz, and the movie was Malcolm X . The movie was directed by actor/director 
Shelton "Spike" Lee. It touches on practically every aspect of the life of Malcolm X. from his childhood to 
his eventual assasination. 

Malcolm X exposes more history of the United States. Amencans of today are given a small glimpse of 
more African-American people standing up and risking their lives for justice and truth. The men and 
women of the NATION OF ISLAM emphasized the need for African-Americans to become aware of their 
contributions, unite, become reliant on self, defend one another, and rise to a greater nation. 

The movie Malcolm X only introduces its audience to the great leader. In order to fully understand the 
man and destroy the myths, we must read. We must listen to the speeches and read materials produced 
by Malcolm himself. He is not one dimensional. He lead a diverse and interesting life. 

Because the NATION OF ISLAM played a major role in both the film and Malcolm X's life. I encourage 
you to attend a study group with them to receive their perception of Malcolm. They are very open and 
honest, and they welcolm all to their study sessions. There are study groups in Spartanburg and 
Greenville. You will be amazed at what you learn. 

I would also encourage every one to watch the movie with an open mind, read more literature about 
Malcolm X, listen to speeches presented by him during every phase of his life, and create your ovjn inter- 
pretation of Malcolm. After all, there is more to Malcolm besides an X. 






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THE POWDERHORN 15 



RESEARCH: IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE SO HARD 



by: Patti Bowers and Henry McAnich 

Okay... So you 've waited until 
the last minute to begin your re- 
search assignment. You're not 
sure what you want to write about 
and, even if you were, you have 
no idea where you where to start. 
You walk into the libray and 
realize that you are obviously the 
only person on the planet in this 
situation, since everyone else is 
already deeply involved in re- 
search. What are all these com- 
puters for? Which one do you 
use first? Whom do you ask? It's 
too much ..You want to go home. 
Relax. ..All those people had to 
start somewhere, and so can 
you. Here, briefly, is research in 



choose from a list of suggues- 
tions. If not, this first step may 
seem the hardest; but there are 
ways to "jump start" your re- 
search, even if you're completely 
unfamiliar with the subject area. 
Here are just a couple of options: 
1 . Pick a broad, general topic 
which interests you (a particular 
person, movement, or current 
issue in the news, etc.). Then, 
look up that topic in an encyclo- 
pedia or dictionary, almost any 
will do. 

OR 

2. Go to the Reference Desk, 
and ask for help. 





Reference Librarian Jaqueline Rollins uses the USCAN , a computerized card 
catalog, which helps locate books quickly and efficiently 




STEP 2: GATHERING 
INFORMATION 

Once you have chosen a topic, 
your next step is to gather you r 
sources of information, into two 
groups: 1) Books and 2) Jour- 
nal (or magizine) articles. 

1 . To find BOOKS on your topic, 
use the Card Catalog or the 
USCAN (computerized card 
catalog) terminals. 

2. To find ARTICLES on your 
topic, use the periodical indexes 
located near the reference desk. 
Ask for help if you need it. 

3. The library can order both 
books and articles from other 
libraries through Interlibrary Loani 
(ILL). Ask at the reference desk 
for more information. 



the uses Library in three easy 
steps. 

STEP ONE: CHOOSE A TOPIC 

Sometimes you. instructor will 
assign a topic or aiiow you to 



16 THE POWDERHORN 



: FOR FUN 

• 

I The library subscribes to over 1 ,000 magazines that you may read 
•during your leisure time, like Essence, Rollingstone, Time, Working 
•Woman, Ebony, Billboard, and Esquire. There are also books in 
I the "Browsing" section that you may want to read for pleasure, such 
las your favorite novel. 




MAJOR UPDATE 



Many Theatre/Communications 

students were involved with The 
Shoestring Players' production of 
the blockbuster musical "Hair" 
this December. The show, a time 
trip back to 1969 and the hippie 
culture, created controversy on 
campus and in the community by 
including a brief nude scene in 
the production. "Hair" even 
brought out the cameras, receiv- 
ing coverage from several local 
news stations. 

Congratulations Nursing Pro- 
gram for receiving a 1 00% 
passing rate on the national 
licensing exams that were taken 
in July. The 1992 class is only 
the third class to graduate from 
the four-year nursing program, 
and they are the first to have 
100% success on the exams. 

The new degree program in 
Communications was finally 
implemented this year after a 
series of student protests got the 
attention of administration in the 
Spring of 1991. The program 
features concentration study 
areas including speech, journal- 
ism, and theatre. 




Hodge Drive 



The cast of the musical hit "Hair". The show played to packed house for five 
performances on campus in the Humanities and Performing Arts Center 



Handicapped students of all 
mayors will be especially glad to 
hear that USCS will come into 
compliance with the American 
Disabilites Act by January of 
1994. This means that there will 
be easier access to campus 
buildings and tougher regulations 
concerning handicapped parking 
spaces. 

University Business Students 

decided to take some time away 
from their boardroom studies to 
study the rooms of a castle. 
The business students took a trip 
to Biltmore House in 
Asheville in December. 







1 


^ 

fi 


QOOe CeNTER ■ 

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING^ ■ 
HANDICAPPED ENTRANCE ~ ■ 



f^ore handicapped entrances lil(e the 
one in the Administration building should 
appear with the Americans with Disabili- 
ties Act. 

THE POWDERHORN 1" 



EVENING STUDENTS 



Making the Grade at Night 



by: Lisa Painter 

Approximately 
1% of the 3,000 
students currently 
enrolled at USCS 
are adult evening 
students. Most of 
these students 
hope to receive a 
degree from USCS 
in the hope that it 
will lead to a higher 
paying job. 



In some cases, 
evening students 
are sent to USCS 
by their employers 
with all expenses 
paid. This is 
common in the 
computer science 
field. With the 
growth of the 
computer world, 
more and more 
/ 




corporations need 
employees with 
specialized com- 
puter skills. Unfor- 
tunately, these 
cases of employer 
paid tuitions are 
rare. 

Nevertheless, 
many of the 
evening students 
are attending 
USCS by personal 
choice. Some 
want a better job 
and a degree, 
while others just 
want to better 
themselves. 

Many evening 
students are re- 
turning to school 
after getting mar- 
ried and starting a 
family. This 
means that bud- 
geting time is a big 
challenge. Many 
of the students 



have day jobs as 
well. 

Penny Robinson, 
a USCS graduate 
received her Bach- 
elors Degree in 
Business Adminis- 
tration in May, 
1992. She be- 
lieves that in order 
to succeed in 
school, students 
must set priorities 
and follow them 
strictly. 

"When you're in 
school, your 
classes should 
take highest prior- 
ity and doing well 
should be a must," 
Penny says. 

Some students 
say that professors 
are more laid back 
in the evening 
classes than in the 
daytime classes 
because they can 



relate better with 
the evening stu- 
dents. They may 
have more in 
common with 
them, such as 
children. 

Eddie Ellis, an 
evening student at 
USCS, enjoys 
taking evening 
classes. He feels 
that professors 
"treat the night 
students better, 
more as an adult 
than just a college 
student". 

The USCS 
course offering for 
evening classes in 
not very broad. 
The classes are 
narrowed because 
many of them are 
specialized 
classes, such as 
Journalism and 
Computer Science; 



Financial Aid Administarfive Specalist Terry 
Williams is also an adu, ^-vening student 



18 THE POWDERHORN 



designed for 
students who only 
need certain 
classes to obtain 
a degree. How- 
ever, Robinson 
says, "The course 
offering at night 
has improved a 
great deal since I 
have been attend- 
ing uses over 
the past three 
years". 

Terry Williams, 
a uses student 




Adult Evening Student Eddie Ellis 



PRINTING ^ 

488 North Church Street 
Spartanburg, SC 29303 
803-582-7289 



has a different 
opinion about 
taking night 
classes. She says 
that there is "no 
access to tutors for 
night students, and 
you never know 
who your professor 
will be for the 
class." In some 
cases classes are 
set up but not given 
a professor until 
class begins. 
uses offers fine 



arts, business, 
social and behav- 
ioral sciences, 

education, math- 
ematics, computer 
science, nursing. 

and journalism 
classes in the 
evening. 

Evening classes 
are not for every- 
one. Nevertheless, 
for some, it is a 
great opportunity to 
better yourself and 
your knowledge. 




Health 
Questions 

First Aid 
Referral to MD 
Information 




See the eampus 

Nurse-599-2197 

9 a.m. -3 p.m. 

Hodge Center Rm 233 



THE POWDERHORN 19 



uses PROFESSOR TESTS 
BUBBLE TAPE 



by: Jim Pennington 



You've seen it, Bubble 
Tape. It's bubble gum 
shaped like a carpenter's 
measuring tape. The 
commercials show little 
kids chewing the gum 
and outsmarting their 
parents and teachers. 
The ads and the pack- 
age claim the tape is six 
feet long. Is it? Two 
Campobello junior high 
students decided to find 
out. 

Lee ann Gibson and 
Mandy Weaver, eighth 
graders at Campobello 
Gramling School at the 
time, tested the tape 
using statistics. The 
project, titled "Is Bubble 
Tape Really Tape Really 
Six Feet Long?", in- 
volved the use of de- 
scriptive statistics to test 
a claim made by a 
product many people are 



The experiment came 
about because Math- 
ematics Department 
Professor M.B. Ulmer 



high students who have 
not had algebra yet. 
Ulmer says the book will 
help motivate students 




left to right; Mandy Weaver, M.B. Ulmer, and Lee Ann Gibson 

wrote a statistics text- to learn algebra. The 
book titled Statistics! book also provides 

(I'm Serious) for junior examples of how 



statistics show up in 
everyday life. 

Gibson and Weaver 
were students in a pilot 
course taught by Ulmer 
in August of 1991, to try 
out his new textbook. 
With Ulmer's assistance, 
the students entered 
their Bubble Tape 
project in the Sixth 
Annual Statistics Project i 
Competition sponsored 
by the American Statisti- 
cal Association. 

Gibson and Weaver 
tested thirty packs of thai: 
gum and found that 
Bubble Tape is longer 
than six feet on the 
average. They used 
inferential techniques in 
their analysis and dis- 
played their findings 
using a variety of mod- 
ern graphical tech- 
niques. Gibson then 
presented the evidence 



Gamma Beta Phi 
Honor Society 




PHIMU 



"The Faithful Sisters" 




HODGE 216 
599-2102 



20 THE POWDERHORN 



in a hand-written report 
featuring all her calcula- 
tions figured out men- 
tally. She then used a 
computer to test the 
accuracy of her figures. 

The project won the 
students a $300 cash 
award, certificates, and 
a school plaque. 

The competition was 
divided into three grade- 
level categories and a 
computer use category. 
Ulmer's students won 
the 7th -9th grade divi- 
sion. 



"I wanted to 

show students 

that algebra and 

statistics really 

do show up 

in everyday 
life." 

-— M.B. Ulmer 



Ulmer says he wants 
people to understand 
that all these students 
were not top students. 
They were all average, 
some should not have 
been in an algebra 
class. He says he 
wanted to show stu- 
dents that algebra and 
statistics really do show 
up in every day life. 

"What I tried to do 
was to write a book that 
would use statistics to 



motivate the use of 
mathematics," Ulmer 
said. 

Ulmer has yet to find 
a publisher for his book, 
but educators in Geor- 
gia, Texas, and Arizona 
have expressed interest 
in adding the text to their 
curriculum once it is 
published. 



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THE POV\/DERHORN 2'. 



INTERNSHIPS: 



by: Meg Upchurch 

Ever dream of running a cam- 
era for a live broadcast or patrol- 
ling the streets in a police car? If 
you're anxious to get some prac- 
tical experience within your 
major, but can't afford to take the 




Senior Monica Hail can run camera 
thanlis to tier internc'vp with ETV liere 
on campus 



time away from school, an intern- 
ship may be the answer to your 
problem. 

An internship is a three hour 
course that allows a student to 
work in a real life setting in his/ 
her field of study. These courses 
must be set up with the instructor 
in charge of internships within 
your area. 

To be considered for an intern- 
ship, you should be of Junior or 
Senior status to insure that you 
will have taken at least a few 
classes which will help you on the 
job. 

The instructor will then set up 
an appointment between the 
student and an agency that is 
approved by the university. 

If both parties can agree to a 
work schedule and seem compat- 
ible, a University Internship 
Contract is signed. Then the 
work begins. 

Internships at USCS are cur- 
rently offered in journalism, 
criminal justice, government, 
history, sociology, and business, 
now on an international scale. 

Interns in the journalism pro- 
gram must work 130-140 hours 
during the semester, often per- 
forming a variety tasks at their 
agency. Students in criminal 
justice combine 100 hours of 
service with 50 hours of aca- 
demic work. They must also 
submit mid-term and final evalua- 
tions of the agency and their 
experience to their intern advisor. 



The grades are based on an 
evaluation of the student's perfor- 
mance by the agency. The 
instructor also holds an oral exam 
or discussion with the student at 
the completion of the internship 
to arrive at the final grade. 

Dr. Ray Merlock handles jour- 
nalism internships. Approved 
agencies he may set you up with 
include WSPA Channel 7, WYFF 
Channel 4, WRET-TV Channel 
49 located on campus, various 
local radio stations. The Tribune 
Times in Simpsonville, the 
Spartanburg i-ierald- Journal, the 
Spartanburg Phillies and 
Greenville Braves organizations, 
and public relations agencies 
such as within the Greenville 
Memorial Hospital. 

"As USCS grows, more firms 
contact us for students to do 
internships," Dr. Merlock said. "It 
[an internship] is a good way to 
find out if you can handle and 
enjoy the demands of a perspec- 
tive career. It can be a way to 
make contacts in the field and 
may sometimes even lead to a 
job opportunity." 

Junior Casey Cook interned 
this summer with the Tribune- 
Times of Simpsonville and is now 
a part-time employee doing ad 
layouts. 

"I really like my job at The 
Tribune Times," Casey said. "My 
internship was one of the most 
beneficial classes I have ever 
taken. It gave me practical expe- 
rience that will benefit me in the 
job market." 



22 THE POWDERHORN 



Students face challenges 
of the real world 




Shannon Waff's internship helped her to learn about the inner-workings of a 
television station 



Dr. Judith Harris advises 
students in criminal justice intern- 
ships. She has had students 
work with the Spartanburg 
County Jail, Spartanburg Public 
Defenders Office, the Solicitor's 
Office in Greenville, Parole, 
Probation, and Pardon Services, 
Northside Correctional Institution, 
the Spartanburg County Sheriff's 
Office, and Safe Homes, a place 
for victims of abuse. 

"Interns run the risk of becom- 
ing burned out in this field be- 
cause in helping people they 
often face tragedy and sadness. 
Still, internships have been a very 
positive experience for me as a 
faculty member and my students 



are glad to have gone through it," 
said Dr. Harris. 

Government internships fall 
into the categories of political 
science and public administra- 
tion. Students enrolled may earn 
1-6 credit hours depending on the 
hours worked with the agency. 
Students may work with the city 
of Spartanburg, the city of 
Greenville, Piedmont Legal 
services, or in politician's offices 
in some cases in addition to other 
agencies. 

Dr. Ron Romine, the advisor for 
government internships said. "An 
internship is a superb way to cap 
off your academic career." He 
also suggested that some sort of 



internship office, even part time, 
to handle the paper work in- 
volved, would benefit students as 
well as the advisors. 

Internships in business are 
slightly different from the others 
mentioned. They are set up on 
an international scale through a 
two year grant from the U. S. 
Department of Education. 

They take place dunng May 
and June for approximately 5-6 
weeks in places like France, 
Spain. Germany. Mexico, and 
England. 

This year, the grant will pay for 
transportation. The advisor will 
negotiate with the perspective 
company to provide the students' 
food and housing. 

Students interested should 
have strong language and/or 
business skills. Advisor Dr. 
Barbara Hastings said. "Students 
benefit from the experience and 
get potential for careers. We 
benefit when they come back and 
talk to us about their experience." 

The U.S. Department of Edu- 
cation grant will run out after this 
summer, but Dr. Hastings said 
that her department will seek 
other funding to continue the 
program. 

Most internships are similarly 
structured as the journalism and 
criminal justice programs. To find 
out more details talk with your 
advisor about internships oppor- 
tunities in your area of study and 
go get 'em. 



THE POWDERHORN 23 



GRADUATE SCHOOL: 



by: Jim Pennington 



Okay, so you're through four 
or more years of college. You're 
about to graduate. It is now time 
to make that decision, the weak 
and depressing job market or 
graduate school. This is a life- 
changing decision. If you are 
leaning toward graduate school, 
here are a few helpful hints. 

Enrollment has been on the 
rise, increasing by 3% in the last 
school year. Today over a 
million students are joining the 
ranks of graduate school, so the 
competition is stiff. 

These figures come from a 
book by Richard Moore titled 
Winning: The Ph.D. Game. 
Moore received his Ph.D. from 
.UCLA in 1981. 

Moore says the best way to 
start is to send a courteous letter 
to the school you wish to attend. 
The letter should include a re- 
quest for an application, a cata- 
log, and information about the 
department you're applying to. 
Once this is done, read about the 
school, and decide if it's the one 
for you. 

Next is something all gradu- 
ates dread the personal essay. 
The department needs this infor- 
mation on paper to prove to them 
that you have what it takes to 
succeed in graduate school. 
Your essay should include your 
current grade point average and 
any special skills you feel will 
serve you well in your graduate 

24 THE POWDERHORN 



MASTERS PROGRAMS AT USCS 

AH I 

COPE(Community Occupational 

Programs in Education) 
EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
HIGHER EDUCATION 
SECONDARY EDUCATION 
GUIDANCE and COUNSELING 
JOURNALISM 
LIBRARIANSHIP 
STUDENT PERSONNEL 
READING 
SOCIAL WORK 
PMBA(Professional Masters of Business 

Administration) 



studies. Breathe a sigh of relief 
USCS students. Graduate 
studies here do not require this. 

Your application should be 
typed. Appearance is everything. 
Also, answer all questions, and 
provide plenty of information 
about your work experience. A 
transcript from your current school 
will probably be required. 



Be completely honest about 
everything, especially grades. 
Each piece of information can be 
checked for accuracy, so honest 
is the best policy. 

Make sure you know the 
deadlines for all applications, 
transcripts, and letters of recom- 



How to Survive 
the Academic Wars 



mendation. Letters of recommen- 
dation should come from people 
you know will speak favorably of 
you. The best letter writers may 
be professors who have had you 
in class. Professors from the field 
you wish to study in are better 
than others. 

Some schools use standard- 
ized tests along with the essay. 
The most common test, and the 
one required here at USCS, is 
the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion or GRE. It is provided by 
the same people who put you 
through the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test, the SAT. Like the SAT, it 
features math and verbal sec- 
tions. The GRE also has a third 
analytical section that supposedly 
measures your ability to reason. 

Once accepted, all students 
have to deal with stress, particu- 
larly the fear of loneliness, com- 
petition, the future, and poverty. 

One student expressed his fear 
like this. "You wonder why you 
go through all this. I mean, I 
have this fear; I'll get out [gradu- 
ate], and the world will look at my 
lonely degree and just yawn." 

To relieve this stress, most 



^ 



Today over a 

million students 

are joining the 

ranks of graduate 

school, so the 

competition is 

stiff. 



# 



schools offer free counseling. 
Such counseling is available at 
USCS on the second floor of the 
Hodge Building. 

Students planning to take 
to take graduate courses at USCS 
should send their applications to 
the Office of Graduate Regional 
Studies. The application fee is a 
non-refundable $25. 

Graduate school is certainly 
a challenge, but it is a definite 
asset out in the big. bad world of 
the job market. 



' 


TOP TEN 


Reasons BMW is coming 




to the Upstate 


10. 


They were magnetically 




drawn to the peachoid 


9. 


Tired of saurkraut 


8. 


GRITS. GRITS. GRITS 


7. 


You can't get RBN in 




Germany 


6. 


Hate to miss an episode 




of "Mama's Family' 


5. 


The incredible night life 


4. 


Mickey's Silver Bullet 


3. 


Wanted to go cow tipp- 




ing 


2. 


Wanted to experience 




fine dining at the 




Beacon 


1. 


Heard there would be 




naked people in "Hair 



THE POWDERHORN 25 



WHAT'S ALL THE 
HOOPLA? 



By Lisa Painter 

The Homecom- 
ing festivities 
began early in 
February. Many 
events were held 
honoring Home- 
coming, including, 
a banner contest, a 
R.I.O.T., and a 
video dance party. 

T-shirts, caps, 
basketballs, and 
tumblers were 
given away during 
the festivities. 

The banner 
contest began on 
Wednesday, 
Februray, 10 and 
the winners were 
announced during 



the halftime of the girls' 
game. The winners 
were: First place, the 



was held with a 
recording booth, 
video buttons. 



uses Dance Team; 
Second place, Delta 
Zeta Sorority; Third 
place. Pi Kappa frater- 
nity. On Wednesday, 
February, 24, a R.I.O.T 



caricatures 
and intramural 
races for the 
students to 
participate in. 









26 THE POWDERHORN 



HOMECOMING 1993 




KING AND QUEEN 
1993 



Tanisha Jones, 

sponsored by the 
Student Govern- 
ment Association 

was crowned 
Homecoming 
Queen for 1993. 



Derrick Johnson, 

sponsored by the 
University Busi- 
ness Society was 

crowned Home- 
coming King for 
1993. 




THE POWDERHORN 27 



ATHLETICS 

by: Jeff Newman 



E 
N' 
S 

B 
A 
S 
K 

E 
T 
B 
A 
L 
L 



The Runnin' 
Rifles had another 
super season in 
1992 when they 
won the Peach 
Belt Athletic Con- 
ference for the 
second year in a 
row. They fol- 
lowed that 
achievement by 
making it to the 
round of sixteen in 
the NCAA Division 
II championship 
tournament for the 
second straight 
year. Their overall 





David Bright goes up for a shot in a game 
against Georgia College 




300 game winning Coach Jerry Waters watches 
his Rifles 



record last year 
was 24-6, ending 
the season ranked 
sixteenth in Divi- 
sion II polls. 

The Rifles con- 
tinued their incred- 
ible home heroics 
last season, 



going 13-0 at the 
Hodge Center. 
Some of their 
home success can 
probably be attrib- 
uted to the Hodge 
Hecklers, a group 
of students 



notorious for tor- 
menting the oppos- 
ing team. 

The Rifles lost 
their three time Ail- 
American forward 
Ulysses Hackett 
last season who 
graduated after 
rewriting the USCS 
record books. 
Although they lost 
their superstar and 
four other Seniors, 
the Rifles of the 
1992-1993 season 
do not seem to 
have noticed. With 
the contributions of 
guards Dwayne 
Prioleau and Greg 
Pounds leading the 
way, they have 
continued their 




Greg Pounds looks 
ahead to the basket as 
he comes down court 



winning ways, 
again topping the 
PBAC and having 
a very impressive 
record of 1 5-6 as 
of February 20. 

Possibly the 
most satisfying win 
for Coach Jerry 
Waters was 
against Lander 
earlier in the sea- \ 
son. With that 
victory. Waters 
reached a plateau 
not reached by 
many coaches; 
300 career wins. 
Unfortunately, 
there was a signifi- 
cant loss this 
season as well. < ; 
The Rifles played 
Francis Marion at 
the G.B. Hodge 
Center, having the 
nation's longest 
home winning 
streak of 50 
games. USCS losti 
this heartbreaker 
to snap their 
streak. 

Overall, the 
Rifles are having 
another great 
season under 
Coach Waters and 
we hope to see 
them in the NCAA 
Division II champi- 
onship. 



28THEPOWDERHORN 




by: Jeff Newman 

/ t is a year of 
fresh starts for the 
Lady Rifles basket- 
ball team and 
among those 
changes was the 
arrival of new head 
coach Peggy Sells. 
Sells comes to 
uses after spend- 
ing a season with 



with the Lady 
Tigers of Clemson 
as a graduate 
assistant. 

The Lady 
Rifles, like the 
men's team, lost 
their all time lead- 
ing scorer now that 
Jametria Hannah 
is no longer with 
the team. 




The Lady Rifles hustle on the court during their 
game against Georgia College 



w 
o 

\A 
E 
N' 
S 

B 
A 
S 
K 
E 
T 
B 
A 
L 
L 




New Head Coach Peggy Sells watches and 
instructs from the sidelines 



The record so 
far demonstrates 
what coach Sells 
said at the begin- 
ning of the season. 
"The Peach Belt 
Athletic Confer- 
ence will be very 
competitive again, 
but we have as 
good a shot as any 
to win the confer- 
ence crown," said 
Sells. 

These words 
proved to be pro- 
phetic, as the Lady 



Rifles shot to the 
top of the PBAC 
with the best start 
in school history. 
Although they 
play in one of the 
toughest confer- 
ences in the coun- 
try, the Lady Rifles 
have responded 
well and appear to 
be headed toward 
a very successful 
season and per- 
haps even a con- 
ference champion- 
ship. 




Paula BiacK,:e,', sets 
up for a free throw 



THE POWDERHORN 29 



BASEBALL 

by Jeff Newman 



The Rifles Baseball 
team in 1992 had a 
moderately successful 
season in baseball 
terms, finishing with a 
record of 20 wins versus 
22 losses. Although this 
is a losing record, it 
comes in what is widely 
recognized as one of the 
toughest baseball con- 
ferences in the nation. 
The Rifles play all of 
the ranked teams during 
the regular season and 
then play them again in 
the Conference tourna- 
ment at the end of the 
season. They have a 
relatively short schedule 
of 40 regular season 
games, followed by the 
double elimination 
tourney. 

Coach C. Bubba 
Dorman says he has 
high hopes for the Rifles' 
season this year. He 
attributes these expecta- 
tions to several key 
recruits and transfers 
during the off season. 



The Rifles added to 
their pitching staff when 
Jerry West transferred 
from Spartanburg Meth- 
odist to uses. Coach 
Dorman said that West 
is a very consistent 
pitcher and could possi- 
bly be the Rifles' second 
starter. 

The staff ace is 
Shane Johnson who is a 
returning Senior that 
posted a record of 4-4 
last year and will be the 
first pitcher in the rota- 
tion. 

Scott Lambert will be 
competing with West for 
the second spot in the 
rotation and Nick 
Consaluo, Clint Nalley, 
Greg Ort, and Chris 
Jackson round out the 
pitching staff. 

The Rifles improved 
offensively for the up- 
coming season as well. 
Jason Westbrook is a 
left handed batter and 
outfielder who hit an 
astonishing .453 at 




7/76 team talks it over on 
thie pitcfier's mound 

Brevard Junior College 
last year, and he 
should spark the Rifles 
lineup this season. 

Eric Smith, a return- 
ing Sophomore who 
started in the outfield 
as a Freshman will 
hopefully surpass his 
numbers from last year 
when he led the team 



Other athletics at 
uses include 
women's softball (rt.) 
and cross country. 
The cheerleading 
squad is also a vital 
part of Rifle athletics, 
cheering the teams 
on to victory. 



\i 



The wind up and the pitch from 
southpaw Greg Ort 

in home runs and runs 
batted in. 

Coach Dorman 
hopes that he has the 
winning formula for this 
season. He says that "if 
[the Rifles] pitching 
starts out quickly and 
gains some confidence, 
we can be competitive." 




30 THE POWDERHORN 



by Greg Herman 

The uses soccer 
team had an outstand- 
ing season this year. 
The Rifles finished with 
a 1 6-2-2 record after 
starting the regular 
season with a 7-0 win 
over Limestone. 

The team competed 
in the Hoechst Celanese 
Tournament of Champi- 
ons and emerged the 
victors with a 5-2 win 
over Barry in the cham- 
pionship game. 

Other victories in- 
cluded a 1-0 overtime 
game against Georgia 
Southern and a 10-0 win 
over USC-Aiken. 

At the end of the 
regular season, the 
uses campus was the 
site of the Peach Belt 
Athletic Conference 



tournament. The Rifles 
won the semi-final game 
3-1 over Lander, placing 
them in the champion- 
ship match against 
Augusta. USCS fell 
behind 0-2, then staged 
a comeback to win the 
PBAC title 4-2. 

This victory was 
number 15 in the team's 
winning streak. Unfortu- 
nately , all good things 
come to an end, and for 
the soccer team the end 
was at the hands of 
nationally ranked #2 
Florida Institute of Tech- 
nology in a 4-0 loss. 

The Rifles can cer- 
tainly be proud of their 
winning season with 
Coach Rob Russo in his 
second successful 
season here at USCS. 




The team gathers to 
encourage one another 



Sophomore Diana 
Mullins serves the 
ball 



s 
o 
c 
c 

E 
R 




Player #8 gets down to getting the ball 
away from his opponent 




A team celebration 



The USCS volleyball 
team had a moderately 
successful season, 
finishing with and record 
of 18-18. The Rifles 
went 1-4 in their Peach 
Belt Athletic Conference 
games, but they played 
against some tough 
opponents. 

The women had a 
busy schedule this 
season competing in 
several tournaments 
including the Catawba 
Classic, the SCAD 
tournament, and the 
Milligan tournament, in 



addition to the PBAC 
tourney. 

The team was led by 
the strong play of 
Sophomores Jantisha 
Chapman and Diana 
Mullins. The players 
averaged 2.7 and 2.6 
kills per game respec- 
tively. 

Attendance for home 
games averaged 101 
spectators. More stu- 
dent support may help 
this young team to really 
come alive in future 
seasons. 



THE POWDERHORN 31 



TENNIS 



By Jeff Newman 

The 1 992 season 
was very successful for 
the Runnin' Rifles 
Tennis Teams. The 
men finished with a 
record of 1 9-4 and 
were ranked fifth in the 
nation in the NCAA 
division II poll. 

In the Peach Belt 
Athletic Conference 
tournament, they 
placed second and 
went on to the national 
tournament where they 
took fifth place. 



The high ranking re- 
sulted from good team 
play but the Rifles had 
two players named to 
the 1992 Volvo Ail- 
American Tennis Team; 
Andres Gonzalea and 
James Homan. They 
finished the season 
ranked 1 7th and 25th 
respectively. 

The womens' team 
enjoyed much success 
as well in '92. They 
recorded a perfect 12-0 
record and were 



ranked 11th in the 
national poll. 

Missy O'Neill was 
named conference 
player of the year, and 
the team had four play- 
ers named to the All- 
Conference team. 

Coach Ferguason 
received Coach of the 
Year honors in the 
PBAC for the Lady 
Rifles and in the South 
Region, Division II, for 
the men. 



MEN'S 

& 
LADIES' 





uses ALUMNUNUS HOPES TO SERVE AN 
ACE HIS OWN BRAND OF TENNIS SHOE 



1977 uses graduate 
Wilson Casey is the man 
behind the manufacturing 
of a new line of tennis 
shoes. Don't look now, 
but the shoes, SPARTAN 
Footwear, are named 
after our very own fair city 
of Spartanburg. 

Casey, an avid tennis 
player himself, is a 
member of nearby Woo- 
druff High School's 



32 THE POWDERHORN 



Hall of Fame for his 
skill in the sport. He is 
also the owner of Shoe 
Mart Inc., a company 
that takes shoes retail- 
ers will not purchase 
and exports them to 
West Africa. 

Casey's tennis shoe 
was in development for 
two years. The result 
of the hard work is his 
first batch of footwear. 



the "Court Justice Se- 
ries". They are available 
in men's and ladies' 
designs. 

The company claims 
that the shoes will allow 
you to "combine the 
latest in fashion with the 
maximum of comfort, 
colors, and technology." 
Each pair will be a 
walking advertisement 
for the city, with 



"Spartanburg, SC" 
printed in small letters 
on the tongue of each 
shoe. It will not be easy 
to break into the tennis 
shoe market, but his 
uses alumnus will be 
giving the shoe world his 
best shot and publicizingi 
his hometown as well. 
Best of luck to 
SPARTAN Footwear! 




EVENTS TO REMEMBER 



BILL CLINTON BECOMES 
THE42NDU.S. PRESI- 
DENT, EMPLOYING MORE 
MINORITIES IN HIS CABI- 
NET THAN ANY OTHER 
PRESIDENT 

U.S TROOPS AIDS SOMA- 
LIA AND RETURNS FOR 
ANOTHER "IRAQ ATTACK" 

ATLANTA BRAVES GO TO 
THE WORLD 
SERIES.. ..AGAIN 

DR. MAE JAMISON BE- 
COMES THE FIRST AFRI- 
CAN-AMERICAN FEMALE 
TO TRAVEL TO THE 
MOON. 



TRACEY SAMUEL BE- 
COMES THE FIRST AFRI- 
CAN-AMERICAN MALE 
STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT 



JOHNNY CARSON, KING 
OF LATE NIGHT TV, 
LEAVES THE TONIGHT 
SHOW 

LOS ANGELES IS SWEPT 
BY RIOTS AFTER POLICE 
OFFICERS ARE AQUITTED 
IN THE BEATING OF MO- 
TORIST RODNEY KING 

THE LONG AWAITED ELVIS 
STAMP IS FINALLY ISSUED 



uses HOSTS FIRST 
MULTICULTURAL CON- 
FERENCE 

THE LADY RIFLES 
HOSTS NCAA DIVISION 
II WOMEN'S SOUTH AT- 
LANTIC REGIONAL 
TOURNAMENT 

DR. OLIN SANSBURY 
FIRST CHANCELLOR 
OF uses. LEAVES 
AFTER TWENTY YEARS 
OF SERVICE 

uses TEAM ATTENDS 
THE NATIONAL MODEL 
U. N. SESSIONS IN NEW 
YORK CITY FOR THE 
FIRST TIME 



THE POWDERHORN 33 



GREEK LIFE... 

TRADITIONALLY AFRICAN- 
AMERICAN SORORITIES AND 
FRATERNITIES 

By Derrick L. Murrary-Banks 

On the campus of Cornell University in 1906, the first Black Greek 
Letter Organization was founded by seven men who pledged to hold 
all things of their Brotherhood and of each other sacred. These men 
pledged themselves to the advancement of the Black community, 
scholarship, and service. They created a network of opportunities 
brotherhood and the community at large. This was the beginning of 
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and after them, came several other 
fraternities and sororities who also pledged for the cause of advance- 
ment. On college campuses around the world. Black students as well 
as the campuses they attended have benefited from Black Greek 
Organizations. 

Apart from their scholarship services, each of the Black Greek 
Letter Organizations sponsors programs geared towards upgrading 
Black communities. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. sponsors a 
reading academy targeted towards helping young people and which 
provides scholarships for students, along with many other contribu- 
tions. In 1989 Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. sponsored a 7.5 
million dollar Senior Citizen High-rise in Washington, D.C. In Africa, 
the sisters of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. committed themselves 
to a five year joint program with Africare, an organization that pro- 
vides developmental assistance to an increasing amount of African 
Countries. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. spear headed the Institute 
for Black Parenting, a non profit agency designed to find adoptive 
homes for African-American children. All over the world, one commu- 
nity after another have benefited from Black Greeks financially and 
morally. 

Members of the organizations stress high academic standards and 
leadership skills. On most college campuses, the leading African- 
American students belong to Black Greek Organizations. Michele 
Collison, author of "Black Fraternities on Campus", says that these 
organizations' are on campuses bring more African-American stu- 
dents and make for a "well-rounded" environment. 

In the Fall of 1993, USCS may very well have its first Black Greek 
Letter Organization titled Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Director 
of Student Activities Laura Puckett says that it is the department's 
goal to meet that deadline. Those interested must have at least a 
2.5 cumulative and a 2.5 for the semester before they pledge. 

We do have members of Black Greek Letters on this campus who 
pledge through city vvide or graduate chapters. Black Greeks need 
your support in order io establish chapters here. It can happen. 

34 THE POWDERHORN 





/ -o \ 




Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. during a step show 
uses students are trying to establish a chapter during 
the Fall of 1993. 




Epsilon Beta Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
Sorority, Inc. in Spartanburg helps youth with reading 





Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Inc. during a 
step show at Wofford College Renee 
Thompson of USCS is a member of the 
step team. 




USCS students Renee Thompson and Twyla Allen are 
proud sorors of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Inc. 



Toni Holloway is a sister of Alpha 
Kappa Alpha Sorority. Inc. Other 
USCS members not shown are Ann 
Jones and Tanisha Jones. 



THE POWDERHORN 35 



CLUB MIXIN' 




The Communications and Debate Association Club 

O rganizations and clubs at USCS are making 
life sweeter for others. Here are some of those who 
are making a difference throughout the campus and 
community, displaying their talents, and having much 
fun. By becoming involved, our students are receiv- 
ing a deeper appreciation for their college years. 
They are not just attending classes and leaving. 
They realize that there are many opportunities for 
learning and excitement here on campus. The friend- 
ships that develop may last forever. They feel joy in 
helping others, and you can see it. Viewing these 
pictures should motivate you to become involved. 
There are several organizations that center around 
your interests, so do not just sit there. Contact Stu- 
dent Affairs in the Hodge Center, Room 220, for a 
listing of organizations and clubs or call 599-2106 for 
more information. 



g 




The Gordon-Colloms Gospel Choir singing 
praises during anniversary 




Delta Zeta and Phi Kappa Psi meets students 




University Business Society (UBS) during a visit to Biltmore House 
36THEPOWDERHOh>J 



Pi kapa Phi for People Understanding the 
Severly Handicapped 




National Assocation for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) 
providing literature about thieir organization during a men^bership drive 



African-American Association members during 
tap to Virginia for a leadershiip conference 




College Republicans recruiting members 



Phi Mu women informs students on what their sisterhood is about 

THE POWDERHORN 37 



POLITICAL VIEWPOINTS 



by: Ainsley Williams, President College Republicans Club 



Now that the '92 
campaign season 
Is over, it is time to 
reflect on the past 
and predict the 
future of our great 
nation. In January, 
President George 
Herbert Walker 
Bush left the White 
House as a man 
who served his 
country well in a 
number of ways. 
President Bush not 
only provided 
leadership in the 
domestic arena, 
but in the interna- 
tional community 
as well. During his 
term, the Berlin 
Wall came tum- 
bling down, the 
foundation of a 
new united demo- 
cratic Germany 
was established, 
Soviet communism 
and the large 
threat of nuclear 
war is no more, 
and an Iraqi tyrant 
was defeated. For 
a four year term, 
these successes 
are unprec- 
edented. Not only 
should we, as 
Americans be 
grateful for Bush's 
remarkable 



leadership, but the 
world should be 
grateful as well. 

The voters 
seemed to have 
made their choice 
by evaluating their 
wallets, but many 
people did not 
realize that we are 
in a global reces- 
sion. Although the 
United States is 
hurting, we are 
better off than any 
other nation in the 
world. The Appro- 
priations Commit- 
tee actually allo- 
cates money 
spent, and for the 
past 56 out of 60 
years, the Demo- 
crats have con- 
trolled the House 
of Representatives 
and have con- 
trolled the Senate 
for 50 of the last 60 
years. Now that 
Democrats control 
both ends of Penn- 
sylvania Avenue, 
they will have no 
one to blame but 
themselves. 

On the defense 
side, I truly fear for 
the men and 
women who serve 
our country. Our 
foreign affairs are 



no stronger than 
our defense estab- 
lishment at home. 
President Clinton 
plans to slash 
defense by 
$150 
billion. A 
question 
we should 
all ask 
ourselves 
is where 
will we 
place the 
military 
personnel 
in society 
when they 
lose their 
jobs? With 
unemploy- 
ment the 
way it is, 
can we 
afford to have 
more men and 
women standing in 
the unemployment 
line? 

Another prob- 
lem is the upcom- 
ing lack of leader- 
ship in the military. 
How can a man be 
an effective Com- 
mander-in-Chief 
when he would not 
serve? It seems 
hypocritical to even 
consider sending 
our troops to a 



foreign land when 
the only experi- 
ence Clinton has is 
sending the Na- 
tional Guard into to 



dom told me fol- 
lowing the election, 
"President Bush 
can never be 
considered a 




the treacherous 
woods of Arkan- 
sas. It would be 
difficult to respect 
Clinton as a 
leader, when he 
himself would not 
follow. 

President Bush 
can look back and 
be proud of his 
hard work and 
accomplishments. 
Every election has 
a winner and a 
loser. My mother 
in her infinite wis- 



'loser', because he 
will continue to 
support his party, 
his beliefs, and this 
country." I will 
follow George 
Bush's lead and 
fight for what I 
believe. Although 
the Democrats 
were victorious in 
this election, I am 
proud to be a 
REPUBLICAN. It 
is now time to look 
forward. 



38 THE POWDERHORN 



Commentaries by Campus 
Representatives 



by: Jason Gamer, President College Democrats Club 



On November 3, 


The '92 cam- 


a new 


direction 


depend on his 


Americans went to 


paign was a drawn 


away 


rom the 


success. The 


the polls to make 


out test of endur- 


failed politics of the 


President's solu- 






past. 


Americans 


tions for these 






voted 


in favor of 
mean- 


problems should 
not be resisted 








"N 


ingtui 
health 


because of parti- 
san politics or 


THE TALE OF THE TAPE 






care 
reform. 


bitterness at hav- 
ing lost an election. 


Democratic P 
Born: 1789 


arty 






improv- 
ing our 
nations 


We must put the 
name calling and 
bickering of the 


Control of the White House= 25 terms 




schools. 


campaign behind 


Last president 


n Office: Current- Clinton 




and 
above all 


us, so we can face 
the problems of 










a bright 


our nation to- 


Republican p< 


arty 






future 


gether and learn 


Born: 1850 








guaran- 


from each other. 


Control of the White House= 21 terms 




teed by a 
strong 


We must always 
remember that 


Last president in Office: Bush 






economy. 


these are not my 










When 


problems, and they 








J 


Presi- 


aren't your prob- 








dent 


lems, but they are 


their opinions 


ance for all of the 


Clinton took the 


our problems. 


known as to who 


candidates. They 


oath of office in 


They will only be 


they wanted to 


spoke to crowds 


January, he faced 


solved when we 


lead our nation for 


both large and 


mom 


jmental prob- 


work together. 


the next four years. 


small in all corners 


lems 


These prob- 




On this faithful day 


of this nation. 


lems 


were com- 




they chose William 


Clinton with his 


pounded by a 




Jefferson Clinton 


bus tour. Bush with 


budget deficit far 




and Albert Gore, 


his train tour, and 


greater than any- 




Jr. to be our next 


Perot with his 


one had previously 




President and Vice 


electronic town 


imag 


ned. His 




President. The 


hall, appealed to 


decis 


ions on how 




weeks and months 


many Americans, 


to handle these 




leading up to this 


but in the end only 


probi 


ems will affect 




day were full of 


one could win. On 


every 


/ one of us, 




hope, anxiety, and 


November 3rd, 


and our success 




anticipation. 


Americans chose 


and we 


1 being 





TOP TEN 
Things Bush 
Can Do Nov^ 
10. Take up roller- 
blading 

9. Live out his 
dream of becoming 
a lounge singer 
8. Open a 
Stuckeys franchise 
7. Become Presi- 
dent of the Hair 
Club for Men 
6. Replace the 
quiet one in those 
Bartles and James 
commercials 
5. Stop hurling on 
important foreign 
diplomats 
4, Take Barb to 
Tahiti for a wacky 
weekend of love 
3. Join Reagan 
for an all ex-presi- 
dents version 
of "Bedtime for 
Bonzo" 

2. Learn guitar 
and tour with 
Mega-Death 
1. Replace Paul 
Shaeffer on 
Letterman's new 
"Late Night" 



THE POWDERHORN 39 



POLITICS ON CAMPUS 

Students are politically active '92 election 

by; Lisa Painter 



"The main reason Bill 
Clinton won was because 
people were dissatisfied 
with George Bush," says 
Dr. Ron Romine, Political 
Science professor at 
uses. On November 3, 
1992, Arkansa Governor 



The uses student 
involvement in this 
election was tremen- 
dous. For most stu- 
dents, this was the first 
presidential election 
that they could vote in. 
"I noticed more interest 





Imta 




Students on campus show (photo by Matt Fortner) 
support for their favorite candidate 

had been directed by 



Bill Clinton was elected 
President of the United 
States, defeating one- 
term President George 
Bush. 



the students toward 
this election than 
others in the past," said 
Dr. Romine. 




uses 

student 
involvement 
began as 
early as 
September 
9th, with a 
political 
forum on 
campus. 
Ainsley 
Williams, 
president of the Young among USCS students 



Bush and Bob Inglis 



Republicans Club said 
that the forum was 
intended to "stimulate 
political activity on 
campus, present the 
views and facts, and 
create a sense of 
thought." 

"Students are often 
politically apathetic," 
said Jason Garner, 
president of the Young 
Democrats Club. "This 
forum will inform them 
and let them get in- 
volved." 

In a national survey, 
Clinton won in popularity 
among 1 8 to 25-year- 
olds. Dr. Romine be- 
lieves, however, that if a 
survey had been taken 



that the outcome would 
have been different. In 
other words. Bush would 
have been the more 
popular candidate. 

Ross Perot's arrival 
into the presidential race 
offered a different 
choice to voters. Perot 
appealed to voters, 
because he presented 
them with a potential 
change. "He talked 
straight, appealing to 
voters, because he was 
in the position to do so 
since he would more 
than likely not be 
elected," said Romine. 



40 THE POWDERHORN 







TOP TEN 




Reasons Clinton 




won the election 


"1 voted for Ross 


10. Hilliary Clinton 


Perot. Clinton will have 


9. His wife doesn't 


to prove to me that he 


look like the 


can be a good presi- 


Quaker Oats guy 


dent," said Senior Amy 


8. Playkitty magazine 


Bowen. 


wants Socks for 


Some students are 


the centerfold 


excited by the prospect 


7. Al can spell potato 


of Clinton as president. 


6. The only one of the 


Sharon Oglesby, a 


candidates who 


Junior at USCS said, "I'm 


wanted his MTV 


glad Clinton is in office. 


5. He knows the words 


He is younger and can 


to "Respect" 


relate better to young 


4. Women now have a 


people and our prob- 


choice 


lems." 


3. Perot ran out of pie 


President Bill Clinton 


charts 


has a lot to prove to the 


2. "Don't stop thinking 


American people and 


about tomorrow" 


the world, and over the 


1 . First Prez in 30 


next four years we will 


years that women 


see if he is up to the 


don't feel guilty 


challenge. 


fantasizing about 




CAMPUS POLITICS 

How is your own student 
government performing? 

Here are some of the SGA's priority' 
goals for 1992-1993 

1. The cost of parking stickers and pa\- 
ing the campus parking lots 

2. Improving the campus bookstore 

3. Make students more aware of extra- 
curricular activities 

4. Dealing wdth academic grievances 

5. Consider competiti\e outside vend- 
ing 

6. Working with publications 

7. Improve variety of class selections 

8. Cultural diversity workshops 

9. Increase student involvement in 
faculty hiring and tenure 



Presiden t Bill Clinton 

(photo courtesy of Parade magazine) 



THE POWDERHORN 41 



DR. SANSBURY'S^l 
FAREWELL ADDRESS 






In early years at USCS In a class by himself Crowning a Queen Always working hard 

For twenty years I have enjoyed a rare privilege, being tlie chief executive of a university campus pro- 
viding educational opportunity to an under-served region and to deserving students willing to make the 
effort to take advantage of that opportunity. Not many people have the chance to spend such a large 
period of their lives doing something as satisfying and rewarding. 

My wife, Muffet, and I have shared many exciting and momentous events in the lives of the students 
who have passed through the halls of USCS. We have watched with pride as they have taken places of 
leadership and responsibility in our community, region, and even the nation. 

When we arrived in 1973, there were only about 700 students enrolled, but it already was clear that 
USCS was fulfilling a significant demand. Today, as I step down as chancellor, USCS is serving nearly 
4500 students. Only the limits of our resources and the lack of adequate student amenities (housing and 
food service) keep the enrollment from being considerably higher. 

The success of USCS over the years has been the result of the combined efforts of many people: 
dedicated faculty whose commitment to teaching has inspired a thirst for learning among student; hard 
working staff whose ingenuity and perseverance frequently have allowed us to overcome the want of 
resources; local political leaders whose courage and artful legislative skills have thwarted powerful state 
interests opposed to the development of USCS; and finally civic leaders and supporters whose concern 
and generous support, both moral and financial, have helped us meet the challenge of providing meaning- 
ful educational opportunity for the Upstate. 

As you complete your education here, I urge you to remember the efforts that have gone into creating 
this institution and that continue to be put forth every day to insure that you have access to a better life. 
There will always be naysayers among the public who will oppose the broad availability of educational 
opportunity. Their rationale is always weak, but sometimes seductive in our conservative society. "We 
cannot afford it," may sound logical, but what is the true cost of ignorance in an economy based on tech- 
nology and information? 

Many USCS graduates already are seeking in some way to insure that their Alma Mater will continue to 
be able to provide opportunity for deserving students. Their support of USCS is the best evidence of the 
value and benefit of USCS, and it is certainly the source of great satisfaction to me. It also encourages 
me to be optimistic about the future of USCS. 

Muffet and I "ill always treasure the part we have been allowed to play in the creation of USCS and we 
will always cheric the friendship and support we have enjoyed in that process. We wish for you all a 
bright future. 

42 THE POWDERHORI i 




Beside every great man is a great woman. Pictured above is Dr. Olin Sansbury with his wife Muffet. 

THE POWDERHORN 43 



SENIOR SALUTE 



BETTY ABERNATHY 
WILLIAM ADAIR, JR. 
ANDREAS ADAMIDES 
ALAN MARK ADAMS 
RONDA ELAINE ADAMS 
CAROL ADKINS 
DEBORAH ALEXANDER 
TAMMY ALEXANDER 
DARREN AMBROSE 
RANDY KEITH ATKINS 
H. W. AUSTILL, JR 
BRIDGETTE AVERY 
TRAGI BAGWELL 
JERRY BAILEY, III 
ELMA BANDIGAS 
THERESA LOU BANTZ 
JERRY M. BARBREY 
PATRIGIA BARNES 
HOLLY BARTLETT 
SANDY BATCHLER 
JAMES BEHELER 
S. BELLAMY-EVINS 
TARA BENFIELD 
SCARLETTE BENNETT 
T. M. BENNETT, JR. 
TAMMY BENNETT 
BUFFY BETENBAUGH 
RICHARD BILLINGS 
J. O. BILLINGSLEY, IV 
WILLIAM BLACK, JR. 
TRAVIS BLACKWOOD 
CHARLIE BOBO 
SUSAN BOITER 
JILL BOLLER 
CHERLY BORUM 
JAMES BOWLIN 
DEANNA BRIDGES 
DIANE BRIERLEY 
VICTORIA BROCK 
KATHERINE BROWN 
ROBIN CARROLL 
ALAN CASSELL 
MICHAELCHANEY 
44 THE POWDERHORN 



LYNELLE CHUDOBA 
MARY JEAN CLARK 
BILLY CLOSE 
HARRIET COHEN 
LESLIE DAVIS 
WALTER DAVIS 
MEREDITH DEHART 
PENNY SUE DININNY 
JAMES DORSEY 
DOROTHY EDWARDS 
LISA ELLIOTT 
JEFFREY EUBANKS 
TRACEY FARESS 
YVONDA FERNANDIS 
MICHELLE FORAKER 
DAWN GINTY 
MICHAEL GRAY 
MARY GUIDA 
SUSAN M. HALL 
TRACIE HALL 
CHRIS HANKE 
DAVID HENDRICS 
AMANDA HENSON 
SEAN HOGAN 
GLENNA HOLLINGS 
MARY HUNTER 
MICHAEL IRELAND 
DERRICK JOHNSON 
VANCE JOHNSON 




Jondia Durham during 
December 1992 gradua- 
tion 



TANISHA B. JONES 
DENNIS KARPINSKI 
AMY KENDRICK 
KARMEN KINGSMORE 
CANDY KOENIG 
ASHLIE LANCASTER 
JAN LANDRETH 
NANCY LANFORD 
JENNIFER LEMIRE 
WENDY LEWIS 
GINNY LOU LONG 
AMY LOYLESS 
RUSSELL MAHAFFEY 
MELINDA MALONE 
CARLUS MANSEL 
GLENN MARLOWE 
STEPHEN MAYBERRY 
PAULA MCABEE 
TEONNA MCCOLLUM 
LAURA MEADOWS 
MICHEL MEILINGER 
ANGELA MILLER 
BARTON MITCHELL 
ROGER MITTERLING 
ELIZABETH 
MOREHEAD 
R. B. NATIONS, JR. 
CONNIE OXFORD 
JULIANNE PARKER 
CINDY PARKS 
MICHAEL PAYMENT 
ANTHONY PHILLIPS 
WENDY PILKINGTON 
WILLARD RAMBO 
GAIL RHINEHART 
JOHN ROBINSON 
VICKI ROPER 
JASON ROSENBERG 
GEORGE RYALS 
PATRICIA SAULS 
GREGORY SMITH 
HEATHER SMITH 
REGINALD SMITH 



FANNIE SNODDY 
PATRICIA SPENCER 
FAYE STRICKLAND 
CINDY TALANGES 
DAISY TATE 
REBECCA THOMASON 
MICHELLE 
THOMPSON 
PAUL TUCKER 
ANGELA TURNER 
CHRISTINA TURNER 
ANGELA WALKER 
TONY LEE WATERS 
KIMBERLY WATKINS 
BRADFORD WEAVER 
AMY WESTMORELAND! 
SUSAN WETHINGTON 
AINSLEY WILLIAMS 
MICHAEL WILLIAMS i 
LEWIS WILSON 
VICTORIA WILSON 
MICHAEL WOFFORD 




Lewis Wilson, a May 
graduate 




December 1992 graduates enjoying their day 



DEANDRA ALVERSON 
BILLIE ARNOLD 
KEVIN ATKINS 
LUCILLE ATKINS 
KRISTIE BALLENGER 
EDNA BASKIN-JONES 
DAVID BEACHAM 
EVA BILLINGSLEY 
PATRICIA BISHOP 
ANIESA BITTNER 
LOUISA BLANCHARD 
JENNIFER BOEHMKE 
WILSON BOGGS 
J. L BOURGUIGNON 
LARRY BOYD 
JAY BOYTER 
LORETTA BRANNON 
CHRIS BRIDGES 
LORI BRIDGES 
HOLLY BULLARD 
TEENA BULMAN 
WILLIAM BURGESS 
JANET BURTON 
SANDRA BUSH 
RUBY BYERS 
LARRY CALLOWAY 
ANGELA CAMPBELL 
JONATHAN CARLTON 
NORMAN CHANDLER 
ROBERT CHILDERS 
DAVID LEE CHURCH 
CATHERINE CLAYTON 
CATHERINE CLEMENT 
CAROLYN COHEN 
RUTH A. REIDCOOK 
ROBERT COOPER 
JOAN COREY 
LORI COVIL 
JOSE CUETO 
PAM DAVIS 



JEANETTE 

DESHIELDS, 
MICHAEL 

DESHIELDS 
ROSA DEVLIN 
SHANNON DILLARD 
SHAE DOSTER 
DAVID DUNN 
JONDIA DURHAM 
VICKIE EASON 
LORI EATON 
ANGELA EDWARDS 
MICHAEL EDWARDS 
ANNA ELIAS 
LISA FIELDS 
DAVID FISH 
CARRIE FORD 
CHRISTOPHER 

FOWLER 
MICHELLE FOWLER 
HARRY FRIEZE 
MICHAEL GALE 
SCOTT GAMBLE 
CHAD GARDNER 
STEPHANIE GARRETT 
MITZI GARY 
PAULA GIVENS 
LATUNYA GLENN 
RYAN GODFREY 
JAMES GRINDSTAFF 
PAMELA GRUNWALD 
ULYSSES HACKETT 
MONICA HALL 
JOY HAMRICK 
JAMETRIA HANNAH 
GISELE HENDERSON 
DAVID HENRY 
JUDY HIGGINBOTHAM 

LINDA HOLDEN 
DANIEL HOLDER 



MARAHORTON 
KEVIN HOWLETT 
KELLY HUMPHRIES 
CECELIA HURLEY 
DAVID M. JACKSON 
SUSAN L, JACKSON 
BRAD R. KAISER 
SUZANNE KERN 
MELISSA KING 
TAMMIE KING 
JULIA KIRBY 
TANI KLINCK 
TAMMI KNIGHT 
VIOLA KONOPKA 
ROSELLEN LACEY 
DONNA LAMB 
DENNIS LAWTER 
TAMARA LAWTER 
LORA LEESON 
JULIE 

LENDERMAN 
MARIA LESTER 
JOHN LINDER 
MARY LITTLE 
CHRISTOPHER LONG 
LORI M. LOYD 
AUDREY MADDEN 
JAMES MAHON 
SCARLETTE MARTIN 
DONALD MCBRIDE 
DAVID MCCRAW 
MELISSA MCKITTRICK 
KIMBERLYMCMAKIN 
TERRI MERRITT 
LESLIE MEYER 
MICHAEL 

MEYERHOLTZ 
TODD MILLER 
GILMER MOODY 
JASON MORIS 
VICTORIA NEWELL 
KRISTEN NICHOLS 
DANANUNAMAKER 
LEWIS OGLESBY 
LORI OWENS 
JEWEL PARR 
TAMMY PARRIS 
PHILLIP PATTERSON 
LAURA PERRICONE 
GWEN PHILLIPS 



THARY PICH 
KENNETH PRESSLE/ 
MARY PRICE 
NANCY PRICE 
KATHLEEN PUSKER 
WILLIAM GUILLEN 
LISA REARDON 
REBA REYNOLDS 
MELANIE RICHARDS 
MELINDARICHEY 
STACY ROBERTS 
CYNTHIA ROLLINS 
RHONDA ROLLINS 
KEVIN RUFF 
RHONDA SEV/ARD 
BETTINA SHRIVER 
JULIE SIMS 
RANDY SISK 
DANA SMITH 
TERESA SPLAWN 
TRACEY STEPHENS 
TERRANCE STEWARD 
RONALD STOKES 
STAN SULLIVAN 
WILLIAM SUMEREL 
STEVEN SWIATEK 
DINNE TANNER 
STEPHEN TAYLOR 
RICHARD TESNER 
SUSAN THOMPSON 
ROBERT THRELKELD 
LYNN TURB-SCOTT 
ROBERT 

UNDERWOOD 
MARY VAUGHN 
JEANNIE ERAJA 
JULIA WAIT 
ERIC WALL 
LAWRENCE WARE 
MELISSA WATSON 
SUSAN 

WEATHERWAX 
MEREDITH WELLS 
BRIAN WEST 
DEANA WILLIAMS 
JOHN WILLIAMS 
SYDNEY WILLIMON 
BELINDA WORD 
CYNTHIA D. WYATT 

THE POWDERHORN 45 



INDEPENDENCE 



by: Meg Upchurch 



This June, University of Soutli 
Carolina President John Palms 
recommended that the 
Spartanburg and Aiken 
branches seek their sover- 
eignty. 

Palms' recommendation 
came closely on the heels of 
use trustees allowing Coastal 
Carolina its independence, 
something that the institution 
welcomed. 

In his address. President 
Palms said, "These four-year 
campuses should have the 
independent authority to pur- 
sue their own aspirations, and 
the Columbia campus should 
have the ability to achieve its 
distinct mission." 

This idea has brought 
controversy to the USCS 
campus with faculty and stu- 
dents expressing strong feel- 
ings on the subject. Many 
people are worried that disas- 
sociation with the system will 
cause the school to lose pres- 
tige. 

"We shouldn't leave the 
system," said Senior Patricia 
Dupree. It's better to have a 
well known name behind the 
school. It will definitely help 
when you go into the job 




University of 
Soutfi Caro- 
lina Presi- 
dent, Dr 
Palms, (pic- 
tured right) 
recommen- 
dation for a 
separation of 
USCS and 
use has 
been the 
source of 
much dis- 
cussion and 
thought here 
on campus. 



market." 

Senior Tammy Weaver 
expressed similar feelings. "I 
think students would be very 
disappointed [if we leave the 
system]. We really need the 
use name. It would be nice to 

have more independence, 
but it's not worth it. 

Of course professors are 
concerned about the situation 
as well. "I think it's a bad 



idea to leave the USC system," 
said Dr. Raymond Lee, theatre 
and communications 
professor. "It is important to 
many students to be able to 
transfer credits and to use the 
system's facilities." 

USCS Chancellor Olin 
Sansbury said, "The idea of 
leaving the system has not been 
something that we have advo- 
cated." He also noted that USCS 
is a very autonomous campus in 
many ways already. 



46 THE POWDERHORN 



Possible Autonomy for USCS 



Some faculty members feel 
that the separation will benefit 
the school, allowing it to grow 
in its own direction. 
"Given the fact that President 
Palms wants us out, there is 
really no point in trying to stay," 
said Dr. Dwight Lambert, 
professor of political science. 
"His [President Palms'] tone will 
eventually just filter down 
through the system. Gradually, 
they will make deals and condi- 
tions that will make us want to 
leave." 

Dr. Lambert cited some 
advantages to leaving the 
system including that USCS 



would be able to move toward 
Greenville more aggressively. 
The school could also repre- 
sent itself to the legislature and 
all such bodies rather than 
going through the Columbia 
campus. 

The final decision on this 
proposal is still under consider- 
ation by an executive commit- 
tee. Whether you support a 
separation or not, we all 
eagerly await the outcome of a 
controversy that could create 
significant changes for us all. 






KJP'IHN 


Names for USCS if we leave 




the system 


10 


1 IixIl'c 1 iii\LTsity 


';. 


You know. tli;it phice m 




Ironl ol f-al/ 


s. 


The house tliai Oliii huili 


7. 


School of the Cjolden 




Dome 


6. 


.Spartanburg State 


5. 


BMW University 


4. 


RunniiV Rifles Tech. 


3. 


Land of no parking 


1 


Somewhere to spend the 




best 6 to 8 years of \ our 


1. 


me 

The best liule school in 




town!!!!! 



This sign in front of ttie Administration Building may read differently in tfie future if 
USCS leaves ttie University of South Carolina System 



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THE POWDERHORN 47 



A MOTIVATIONAL MESSAGE 




Striving for more than Mediocrity 

by: Jimm Cox, Professor of Theatre and Communications 




Jimm tall<s to liis Ttieatre 398 Class, Stage l\/lovement, about striving to 
give class tfieir best attitude and performance 



We are all too 
often encouraged 
to aspire to medi- 
ocrity. Now there's 
a challenge that 
most of us wel- 
come. More than 
likely, each of us 
can hit that mark, 
since mediocrity 
demands little 
more than occupy- 
ing space on the 
planet. Somehow 
it seems unthink- 



able that we could 
be challenged by 
simply exchanging 
oxygen for carbon 
dioxide. Marking 
time and maintain- 
ing the status quo 
surely must be two 
of the factors that 
put sour expres- 
sions on many an 
unexpected face. 

We are all 
caught up in a 



system that even 
encourages us to 
settle for less. 
Most students in 
the university 
system come to 
the false assump- 
tion that life only 
demands a 60% 
success rate. After 
all, many courses 
in the curriculum 
only demand a 



score of 60% in 
order to receive a 
passable mark. 
This seems to 
indicate that the 
education system 
reinforces the 
belief that medio- 
cre performance is 
adequate to pre- 
pare students to 
face the chal- 
lenges they will 
meet. Common 
sense should 
sound a warning 
bell that this is a 
dangerous as- 
sumption. What 
joy can be found in 
mediocre accom- 
plishment? 

Many of us 
hope to be inter- 
viewed by the 
prospective emplo- 
yer who is eager to 
hire a fresh and 
excited new worker 
bee. The scenario 
is not a foreign 
one. Jane or John 
begins a wonderful 
new job prepared 
to set the firm on 
fire with youthful 
enthusiasm. Now 
here comes the 
glitch. The third 
day 



of the job assign- 
ment, Jane or John 
just needs a little 
break in the mun- 
dane schedule and 
decides to sleep in 
that day. Days 
four and five on thai 
job are tedious and I 
uneventful. Day 
six rolls around 
and the gang has 
decided to go on 
the annual skiing 
trip that Jane or 
John just can't 
miss. After all the 
trip will only means 
three days away 
from the job. Out 
of ten days of 
employment , four 
of those days have 
now become 
absences. No 
mathematician is 
needed to calcu- 
late a 60% atten- 
dance rate. The 
result seems 
obvious. ...one 
mediocre perfor- 
mance that results 
in one crisp pink 
slip. 

Colleges seem 
to be beleaguered 
with questions of 
relevance. . . relevance 
to the world and 
the workplace. The 



48 THE POWDERHORN 



"job" of student 
should be the 
perfect training 
ground for meeting 
the challenges and 
expectations of the 
real world. There 
seems, however, 
to be an energy 
gap. What stu- 
dents are willing to 
give and what they 
expect to receive 
in return are con- 
siderations that 
seem to have little 
to do with each 
other. Only the 
relevance of the 
real world and 
workplace seem to 
connect these two 
realities. 

Not one person 
that I know who 
faces serious 
surgery wants to 
go under the knife 
of a doctor who is 
successful only 60 
or even 70% of the 
time. Not one 
person I know who 
faces a major legal 
challenge wants to 
be represented by 
an attorney who 
wins only 60 or 
maybe 70% of his 
or her cases. I 
don't even know 
one person who 



wants to go to a 
restaurant and 
place an order and 
find that the food 
served there is 
edible only 60% of 
the time. That is 
certainly mediocre 
service. 

Recently, on a 
local television 
station, a sports- 
caster "proudly" 
boasted that one of 
the local area's top 
basketball recruits 
"proudly" maintains 
a 2.3 grade point 



brand of aspiration 
to mediocrity. The 
word "proudly" 
somehow seemed 
very misplaced. 
The system 
must change the 
bulimic manner in 
which knowledge 
is spoon fed in the 
classroom. Does 
this game plan 
sound familiar'?' 
With three weeks 
to prepare for a 
major exam, little 
investment is 
made in preparing 




average. The key 
word that I encour- 
age you to isolate 
here is proudly . 
This broadcaster 
has announced to 
the world that 
athletes should 
boast of their own 



until the night 
before the test. 
So, the student, 
like a bulimic, 
stuffs himself with 
as much of the 
information as he 
possibly can. 

Then, obediently, 
the student regur- 



gitates the material 
onto a piece of 
paper. This "eat 
and puke" prepara- 
tion is, at best, a 
vulgar attempt at 
just "getting by." 

We simply 
cannot collect 
dividends on 
stocks that were 
never purchased. 
One must invest 
time, energy, and 
effort so that when 
your diploma, that 
educational check, 
is presented on 



graduation day, 
there are sufficient 

funds in the knowl- 
edge bank. A 
diploma is a hollow 
and empty accom- 
plishment when it 
represents four 
years worth of 
aspiration to medi- 
ocrity. 

Joy will some- 
times come from 
the journey itself. It 
is often part of the 
struggle. The face 
of failure. ..even the 
face of mediocrity 
...knows little joy. 



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THE POWDERHORN 49 



EXERCISING YOUR 
RIGHT TO A 
HEALTHY BODY 




BY MARLON BURGESS 

The recently released study by 
the American Heart Foundation 
reveals that only 40% of the 
adults in America exercise on a 
regular basis and only 36% of the 
children participate in physical 
education at school. These 
statistics reveal the crisis in 
America with respect to the 
health and fitness of the nation. 
However, the good news is that it 
does not take much time, and it 
might not even take much sweat- 
ing to help reduce the risk of 
developing a list of ailments, 
including colon cancer, diabetes, 
high blood pressure and heart 
disease. 

For full cardiovascular benefits. 




Marlon Burgess practices what he 
preaches while doing what he loves- 
soccer 

50 THE POWDERHORN 




Intramural sports allow USCS students the opportunity to participate in physical 
extracurricular activities on a competitive basis, according to Assistant Athletic 
Director Steve Long. TAU KAPPA EPISILON enjoy the warm weather by playing 
baseball. 



you cannot avoid some kind of 
exercise which involves the large 
muscle groups and causes a 
relative increase in heart rate. 
The workout should last about 20 
minutes at least 3 times a week. 
An aerobic session will 
strengthen your heart muscle and 
lungs, while rapidly burning 
calories. 

The secret to exercise lies in 
getting off the couch! Once this 
first step has been taken, main- 
taining the exercise program 
becomes easy. Even moderate 
exercise is proving to be a life 
saver for people who would not 
know a stairmaster if they 
stepped on one. You do not 
have to change your lifestyle in 
any way, because you can build 
a physical fitness program into 



daily routine without ever setting 
foot into a gym. 

You can start with your morn- 
ing shower. This daily ritual offers: 
a perfect opportunity for exercisei 
Make sure that your tub has a 
slip-proof floor or slip-proof bath- 
tub mat. 

Once you have finished the 
lather cycle and started to rinse, i 
is time to begin the exercise. 
Face the opposite wall of the 
shower, about three to four feet 
from the wall, lean forward until 
your outstretched hands touch 
the wall, then, without bending 
your body, do as many push-offs 
as you can, remembering that the 
more you do, the better the 
fitness results. You will not only 
feel revitalized, but wind up with 
firmer arm, chest, and shoulder 
muscles. 



One of the biggest obstacles to 
physical fitness is people's habit 
of totally relying on the automo- 
bile to get around. Students 
waste valuable time and gas by 
riding around campus searching 
for that elusive parking space, 
closest to the venues of their 
classes. It is time for people to 
rediscover what the human body 
was designed for-locomotion! 
Resolve to use the car or public 
transportation for longer dis- 
tances and walk instead. If your 
job is in walking distance, walk! 
If not, park the car a reasonable 
enough distance from the office, 
school, mall, etc. and walk the 
rest of the way. 

If you own a dog, you have an 
excellent opportunity to combine 
the chores of walking your pooch 
with some serious fitness-en- 
hancing moves. All you have to 
do is increase the pace. 

Elevators, escalators, walk- 
ways, and several other mechani- 
cal conveyances were designed 
to make life a little easier, but in 
the process they have kept 
people from getting better than 
regular walks up and down stairs. 

Other opportuniteis for giving 
your body a much-needed work- 
out is going shopping, taking care 
of the lawn with the "hand-oper- 
ated" mower, romping with the 
children, "working out" on the 
dance floor at a disco or club, to 
name a few. You can reap the 
benefits of cardiovascular health 
without pain, and have fun at the 
same time. 



Obviously, not all of the pre- 
ceding suggestions are suitable 
for you. Be careful to consider 
each in terms of how it will fit your 
particular needs, lifestyle, and 
state of health. Most of all, be- 
fore choosing one or several of 
the various ways in which you 
can bring physical fitness into 
your life, consult your physician. 
Have him or her use a stress test 
to determine whether you are up 
to it. 

So make life a "moving" experi- 
ence. You will discover that the 
possibilities are endless and the 
benefits are tremendous. 





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THE POWDERHORN 51 



Faculty spends weekend of 
fun and learning on Fripp 



by: Jim Pennington 




Okay, imagine this: Your favor- 
ite professor in a Speedo or 
Bikini. If this frightens you beyond 
all rational thought, avoid Fripp 
Island in September at all costs. 
For the past fifteen years, except 
1989, the faculty and staff of our 
illustrious school have spent 
Friday through Sunday collecting 
seashells and tanlines. The '89 
trip was canceled due to Hurri- 
cane Hugo. 

The faculty always goes the 
last weekend in September. The 
dates for this trip were September 
25th through the 27th. 

In all seriousness , the trip is 
more of a learning experience 
than anything else. Each member 
contributes in some way to a 
series of lectures covering wild- 
life, vegetation, and undersea life 
forms. 



one of the marshy areas the 
group explored 



Until last year, the group 
camped out at the Hunting Island 
State Park in Beaufort. A change 
was made to rental houses this 
year and interest in the trip in- 
creased. It seems the houses 
had less mud and fewer bugs. 

Access to Fripp, a small barrier 
island, is via a bridge from the 
state park. 

The annual trip is organized by 
Lawrence and Nancy Moore of 
the Chemistry and English de- 
partment, respectively. About 35 
faculty and staff paid their own 
way to participate. 

On Friday night, the 25th, the 
group was treated to a big meal 
consisting mainly of seafood. 
Other than that, there were no 
other specific planned activities. 
Saturday and Sunday were days 
to enjoy the area 




Nancy Moore preparing to catch more goodies for the feast 



52 THE POWDERHORN 



beaches and other activities. Dr. 
Jack Turner and his wife took 
their bicycles. Some used the 
tennis courts. 

As much as they would love to 
think it, Nancy points out there 
was no disorderly conduct. In 
other words, your "favorite" pro- 
fessor didn't dance around with a 
lamp shade on his or her head. 

"We don't go to party. It would 
not be the faculty's way. It's one 
of the few fun activities that 
involves people across the divi- 
sions. It's safe, but still fun," 
Nancy said. 

Saturday was spent fishing for 
most of the group. As Lawrence 
Moore points out, "The trip is 
focused around net fishing and 
catching oysters." 



Nancy says they also catch 
shrimp and crabs. However 
according to South Carolina law, 
anyone over the age of sixteen 
years old had to pay 
$5.50 for a saltwater stamp to 
catch Harvest crabs and oysters. 

After a full day of fishing, a big 
cookout was held. Even though 
the number of participants grows 
every year, Nancy says, "We've 
never failed to get enough to feed 
everyone." 

"The main activity is the fellow- 
ship," Lawrence adds. "I've al- 
ways enjoyed the faculty camara- 
derie." 

The Moores say there were no 
major problems on this trip, and 
they are both looking forward to 
next September, weather permit- 
ting. 




Miriam Sheldon with quite a 
catch 




THE POWDERHORN 53 



COLLEGE STUDENTS: We Love Our Soaps 



by: Meg Upchurch 

On any given 
day you can walk 
into tiie cafeteria 
in Hodge Center 
and see legions 
of dedicated 
"soapers" sharing 
in the agony and 
ecstasy of their 
favorite daytime 
characters. 
The big- 
screen television 
is consistently 
tuned to Channel 
7, WSPA, the 
local CBS affili- 
ate, so that the 
students can all 
watch as Victor 
and Nicki, and 
Brook and Ridge 
split up, then 
reconcile ..again. 
Of course, we do 
not want to miss 
Marge's rape trial 
or Mindy's return 
to Springfield. 

What is it that 
draws college 
students in 
droves toward the 
soaps? Maybe 
we just need a 
brief escape from 
school into a 
world full of 
magic. Soaps 
allow you to 
ignore the ele- 
ment of time. 

54 THE POWDERHORN 



Only there could 
a 5 year-old turn 
16 in the course 
of a week (a la 
Victoria 
Newman). 

Where else 
can we think of 
death as, 
well. ..temporary? 



"Things in soaps 
are fantasy. 
Things that can't 
really happen do. 
It's fun to see what 
they'll do next," 
said Sophomore 
Ellen Grasser. 

Soaps also fall 
into that time slot 



tube? Soaps. 
There's really no- 
thing else to do 
during that time of 
the day," said 
Sophomore Jes- 
sica Pridemore. " I 
started watching 
and just got 
hooked. Besides, 
the soaps are 




After all, if the 
body is not recov- 
ered there is 
always hope. 
What the heck, 
even if they bury 
you, you could 
always come back 
as your own twin. 



just after lunch 
when many have 
finished a morn- 
ing of classes. 
Then, it's time to 
grab lunch and take 
a breather. 
What's on the 



always a hot 
topic around 
school." 

Don't fall for the 
old notion that 
daytime drama is 
just for women 
either. Guys can 



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get caught up in 
the soaps' serial 
format. Then 
they become fans 
too. Matt, a 
Sophomore, 
admitted, "My 
mom tapes 
the soap operas 
and watches 
them in the morn- 
ing so I watch 
them with her 
while I get ready 
to leave. I can't 
always watch 
them everyday, 
but I do try to 
keep up." This 
soap fan also 
advised checking 
the computer 
network Prodigy 
for updates if 
you've missed your 
favorite show's 
latest develop- 
ments. 

So, just keep 
in mind when you 
pass through the 
cafeteria; you can 
eat what you 
want and sit 
where you want. 
Just don't touch 
that dial. 




THIS IS WHAT YOU HAD TO SAY USCS! 



THE BEST 
Movie: 

Boomerang 
Malcolm X 
Aladdin 
A Few Good Men 

Song: 

"I Will Alway Love You" -- 
Whitney Houston 
"End of the Road" -- 
Boyz II Men 
"A Whole New World" -- 
Theme from Aladdin 

Actor: 

Denzel Washington 
Tom Cruise 

Eddie Murphy 

Actress: 

Halle Berry 

Demi Moore 

Meg Ryan 



Homosexuals should be allowed to serve in the military, 
Ross Perot should not run again in 1996. 
Saturday Night Live's PAT is a woman (an ugly one). 
Women should be allowed to attend the Citadel. 
The Atlanta Braves will make it to a third straight World 
Series. 

Bill Clinton is the right choice for President. 
Star Trek fans love both the original series and 
"The Next Generation". 

The Multicultural Conference was enjoyed, and there 
should be more conferences on multicultural diversity 





(courtesy of Upscale Magazine) 



> ALAD- 
DIN Who 
says there are 
no good movie 

roles for rugs' Disney s mag ' 
carpel transported two teenage 'o » 
ers— and a lew million moviegoers 

(courtesy of People Magazine) 



THE POWDERHORN 55 



WHAT YA ' 
GOTTA SAY? I 



The Powderhorn staff would like to know what you think of your campus magazine. Please complete 
this survey, and return it to our office, Room 244 of the Hodge Center. Thanks! 



1 . Did you enjoy the articles? If so, which ones? 



2. Did you like the photos? Graphics? If so, which ones? 



3. Was this magazine in a convenient place? If so, where? If not, where did you get it? Where is a 
better place to put future issues? 



4. What topics would you like to see covered in the next issue? 

5. What do you think should be changed about the magazine? 

6. Any other comments or questions. (Use the back if neccessary) 

Remember that this is your magazine. You are welcome to help create the next issue! 

56 THE POWDERHORN 



APPLY TODAY! 



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IV. REFERENCES 

NAME: 

1. 



ADDRESS: 



TIME EMPLO^TD: 



RELATIONSHIP: 



PHONE: 



THE POWDERHO'='' 



JOIN THE TEAM!!! 



V. POSITION APPLYING FOR: (circle one) 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
MANAGING EDITOR 
BUSINESS MANAGER 
PHOTO EDITOR 
STUDENT LIFE EDITOR 
FEATURES EDITOR 
SPORTS EDITOR 
DESIGN /GRAPHICS EDITOR 
STAFF WRITER 
PHOTOGRAPHER 
VOLUNTEER 
CARTOONIST 

VI. OTHER INFORMATION 
PRIOR EXPERIENCE: 



BRIEF STATEMENT ON WHY YOU WISH TO JOIN THE POWDERHORN TEAM. 



I certify that the above information is true and correct. I also understand that 
references and employer may be notified. I look forward to working with 
the POWDERHORN team! 



SIGNATURE: 

RETURN TO: 

The POWDERHORN 
Room 244, Hodge Center 
800 University Way 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 29303 
Telephone: (803)599-2113 

58 THE POWDERHORN 



DATE: 



FOR OFFICE USE ONLY 



Rifle Ridge Apartments 

400 Rifle Ridge Road 

Spartanburg, SC 29303 

(083) 578-1138 



HOME AWAY FROM HOME 

By Laurie Lee 
Director of Student Housing 



Experience campus living at its best at 
Rifle Ridge Apartments. Your new home 
away from home is designed exclusively for 
uses students. The apartments are lo- 
cated on the uses campus between the 
tennis courts and the baseball and soccer 
field, and is just five minutes walking dis- 
tance to classes. 

The apartments are located in a land- 
scaped, wooded environment, with a clear 
running stream that flows through the prop- 
erty. The quiet country atmosphere makes 
it a pleasure to be able to walk to class. 



Convenience is an added plus, some of 
theamenitiesyou will enjoy include a swim- 
ming pool, volleyball and basketball courts, 
grills picnic areas, and a laundry facility. 

There is also the convenience of being 
close to all of the University's athletic 
facilities, such as tennis courts, racquet- 
ball courts, an indoor basketball court, a 
soccer and baseball field, and a weight 
training center. 

We hope that you will make Rifle Ridge 
your new home away form home. DON'T 
LET CAMPUS LIVING PASS YOU BY ! ! ! 




THE POWDERHOF" 



THE 



RIFLE RIDGE 



Laurie D. Lee 

Dir. of Student Housing 

(803)578-1138 



For uses students, 

the best place 

to live and learn 

is on-campus 



Sandra Gonzalez 
Resident Manager 
(803)578-1138 



Discover the "student appeal" of The Rifle Ridge, 
on campus housing exclusively for USCS students. 

Each apartment is smartly furnished - right down to 
the study desks! And our floor plans are "roommate 
responsive"; four students share two bedrooms, two 
full baths, spacious living room and fully equipped 
kitchen. 

In case you're wondering how to spend the time 
you create by living on-campus, try your hand at 
tennis or relax poolside. The Rifle Ridge has a full 
line of recreational amenties plus school-sponsored 
activities for your enjoyment. 

Don't let campus life pass you by! Reserve your 
room today at The Rifle Ridge. 



Duke Power energy efficient rating 

Central heat and air 

Carpeting and mini-blinds 

Completely furnished throughout 

Fully equipped kitchen 

Smoke detectors 

Water and garbage service - included in rent 

Swimming pool 

Adjacent tennis courts 

Volleyball and basketball courts 

Ample parking 

Handicap units 

Laundry facilities