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Full text of "The Practical Spelling-book, with Reading Lessons"

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THE 



PRACTICAL 



SPELLING-BOOK, 



WITH 



READING LESSONS. 



BY T. H. GALLAUDET, 

. AMD 

• /HORACE HOOKER. 



HABTFOED: 
WILLIAM J. HAMERSLEY, PUBLISHER. 

PHILADELPHIA, J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO. 
1866. 









f /!'OOI[.iV/:.f k L ? 



r ; .«• *» , 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1840, by 


T. H. GALLAUDET 


HORACE HOOKER, 


in t*e q£]fg Ottce of (he |>istric$ Court afCannditiai. 



1 







- 




i ''»;,»? 




• 


* . 


: // 




Stereotyped by 

HlCHApD H. KOBQ8, 

Hartford, Conn. 






-rJ 



=5=58 



PREFACE. 



li 



f Thb prominent futures of this work, together with the labor expended 

|ipon it, will appear- from a simple statement of the manner in which the 

uithors proceeded in Ha preparation. Taking a Dictionary containing 

'eon forty and tifly thousand words, they carefully examined qach, to 

rtain whether it wati hrcorrirrion nap, and'simple in its orthography. If 

W*a found to be «o, it 'Was put-down in the class of easy words. ' If it con- 

ined any difficulty deserving notice, the, inquiry was made in what tfcjs 

onsisted. These difficulties- were classified ' as they 'occurred, and the words 

arranged accordingly. The few words which could not he thus classed, 

were placed by themselves. The result Was one great division of the words 

into- the comparatively easy and hard, and {he subdivision ot the latter into 

their respective-classes. The easy were arranged in lessorjs in the fh*st part 

of the book, to prepare the way for the more difficult. This slow, inductive 

process led to the notice of some ifeculiar facts respecting the spelling of 

certain classes' of words, which will' ISe found in the questions appended to 

the lessons, — and which, it is thought, will furnish considerable aid In this 

/very perplexing part of education. 

.' In thus attempting to cope with the many and singular anomalies in the 
orthography of our language, it has not been made a leading principle of 
classification to have the lessons composed of words of the same number of 
syllables, accented on the same syllable. Nor can this be done, if it is the 
rue object of a Spelling-Book to meet the greatest difficulties in orthogra- j 
>hy, — which are found m wards variously accented, and differing in the num- 
>er of syllables. For example, in words that end in ant and ent, as tenant, 
prudent ; in ar and er, as pillar, banner ^ and in numerous similar cases, the 
perplexity usually lies in its being difficult, on account of the obscure pro- 
lunciation of the unaccented syllables, to detect, by the ear merely, the proper 
Setters to be used. In other words, — and our language abounds in them, — , 
jsuch as, boat, note; through, new; humane, remain; and similar ones, it 
{arises from the same sounds being represented by different vowels, or com- 
binations of vowels. It is evident, therefore, that in both these cases, the 
{classification of words according to accent and the number of syllables should 
.hold a subordinate place. Still, in this work, the accentuation of every word 
is effectually provided for. 

» A few words containing more than one considerable .difficulty, have been 
rolaced, on that account, in two lessons. A few, also, concerning the 
{orthography of which good writers still differ, have been inserted in two 
Iforms ; leaving it for the teacher to give a preference if he pleases. Pro- 

£~ision has also been made, in some cases, for diversity of pronunciation of 
early equal authority. 
■ ^" ■■■■ TTT- i i — 



' PREFACE. 



The omission of obsolete, and, for the most part, of technical words ; of 
such as may bo derived from primitives without any danger of mistake in the 
spelling ; of easy compounds ; and of others formed by the addition of the 
common prefixes and suffixes, has afforded room for a very eopiofts collection 
of those words which the great mass of the people are in the habit of using, 
or which occur in their reading. 

The plan of classification, it is thought, will cultivate a methodical memory, 
and afford, in the various ways in which the lessons may be recited, peculiar 
advantages for keeping up the attention of the scholar, and for testing his 
accuracy. It furnishes, also, in connection with the questions appended to 
the lessons, a practical analysis of the principal anomalies in orthography, 
and, by a thorough exercise in them, impresses them more deeply on the 
mind. It has admitted the introduction of simple ^reading lessons in a very 
early part of the book, combining interest with moral instruction. These 
lessons, at first, consist of words which the scholar has previously learned to 
spell. Afterwards, as he makes progress, a few harder ones are introduced 
for the first time, and placed alto at the head of the lessons, that they may 
receive particular attention. 

'While the work is particularly designed for the use of common schools, 
it is believed that its general plan, jogether with the index, will make it 
eminently useful to the advanced elasses in Academies and higher Semi- 
naries ; as their attention can thus be directed immediately to what is more 
intricate, passing over the comparatively easy words in the first part of the 
book, with which they are supposed to be already familiar. 

That their work is free from all deficiency or error, the authors have not 
the presumption to claim ; and they will be thankful for any suggestions 
which may enable them, hereafter, to, correct and improve it. 



asms* 



J 



OF LETTERS AND THEIR SOUNDS. 



In the English Alphabet tfeere are twenty-six letters ; con- 
sisting of vowels and consonants. 

A vowel is a letter which can be folly sounded by itself. 

The rowels are, a, e, t, o, u ; and to and y when they do not 
begin a word or syllable. When to and y begin a word or syl- 
lable, they are consonants. 

A consonant is a letter which cannot be fully sounded with- 
out the help of a vowel. The consonants are b, c, d,f, g, h,j, 
k, I, m, n, p, q, r, s, 1 9 v 9 x, z; and sometimes to and y. 

A diphthong is the union of two vowels in one syllable, 
uttered at the same time ; as oi jn toil, ou in ground. 

A triphthong is the union of three vowels, uttered in like 
manner ; as tew in view. 

In a proper diphthong both the vowels are sounded. 

In an improper diphthong only one of the vowels is sounded ; 
as ea in neat, oa in boat 

OP THE VOWELS. 

A has five sounds ; as in hate, hat, bar 9 ball, wad. 

E has three sounds ; as in here, pen, they. It, also, has a 
peculiar sound, as in her, jerk. 

I has four sounds ; as in mine, pin, fatigue, bird* 

O Yarn four sounds ; as in globe, not, move, son. 

U has three sounds ; as in cube, nut, bush. 

Y, when a vowel, has two sounds ; as in type f hymn. 

W, when a vowel, sounds like tt, as in few. ^ 

Oi and oy sound as in point, boy; eu, ew, ieu, and iew, as n in 
cube. 

OF THE CONSONANTS. 

B has only one sound, as in web, bid. 

C has two principal sounds. Before a, o, and u, it is hard 
like k, as in came, cob, cut. Before e, i, and y, it is soft like s, 
as in cell, cite, and cymbal. 

D has one principal sound, as in did. It sometimes sounds 
like t, at the end of words, as in mixed. 

F has only one sound, except in of, where it sounds like v. 

G has two sounds ; one, as in gate, and the other as in gem. 



ri OF WORDS. 



i/ denotes a strong breathing before the utterance of the 
succeeding vowel ; as in hate. It is silent after r. as in rhyme. 

J has one soufld, as ki jet, except in hallelujah, where it 
sounds like y. 

K has but one sound, as in kite. Before n it is always silent. 

L has but one sound, as in let. 

M has but one sound, as in man. 

N has two sounds ; one pure, as in pen ; the other like ng, 
as in thank, pronounced thangk. , It is silent at the. end of a 
syllable, when preceded by 2 or m, as. in kiln, hymn* * 

P has but one sound, as in top. 

Q sounds like k, and is always followed by u sounded like w, 
as in quake, except when u is silent. < 

R has a rough sound, as in rage ; and a smooth one aajn card. 

S has two principal sounds ; one, as in sun ; the other like 
z, as in was. 

T has one principal saund/as in time. . 

V has but one sound, as in vale, hive. 

W, when a consonant, has but one sound, as in. web. Before 
r it is always silent, as in wrote. Before hi, w is usually pro- 
nounced as if following it, as in whip. 

X has two sounds ; like ks, as in box, and like gs, as in exist. 

Y, when a consonant, had but one sound, as in yoke. 
. Z has, one principal sound, as inJ^aze, zone* \ \ 

, Ch has three sounds ; as in chime, in ache, and in chaise. 

Gh, beginning a word, as in ghost, sounds like g as innate. 
In the middle, or at the end of a word, it is sometimes silent, as 
in right, plough ; and sometimes has the. sound of/, k, or g. 

Ph is usually pronounced like f r as in phrase. . . ' i 

Th has two sounds ; one as in thin ; the other a* in the. 

Sc has the sound, of ^before a,o t u, aa4r,\ : a#d of ? before 
ffitAniy. -.■r...» • ,-.■.•(•!' 

OF WORDS, ^ • ' . 

iinrf the Marks c in' this Book, which direct their Pronunciation. 

K monosyllable is a: word or one syllable. ' • ° 
%v A 'dissyllable is a word of two syllables. ' 

A trissyllable. is a word of Mfcc-syllables. ' 

A polysyllable is a word of four or more syllables. 

Silent letters in this book are printed in Italics \ sis' in grnl, 
limft. • 

' The long rowels are marked thus ; hate, here, mine, globe, 
dSb*, rhyme. 



BISECTIONS TO TEACHERS. vi| 



., The eh^y^wrtsareifiarked thuaj hat,pen,fin,pot,nut,^iymyu 

The figure 1 over a, denotes the sound of a,,ss. in bar.' 

The figure ? denotes. the sound of tt, as in bush. 

The figure 3 demotes the sound of a, as in ball. 

The $gure 4 denotes the sound of a, as in wad. 

The figure 5 over « denotes the souml of «;,as in -tarf. 

Q, q, marked thus, (JJ> 9,., has the $bund or ^ as in c,haise. 
This mark is. cstyed a cedilla. :,'",'•• ' 

Ck without this,, mark sounds as in chime, poj;c}} ? . except inj 
X<esson 206, where it has the sound of k. ._,»'. • 

The same mark under s, denotes that it sounds like.*; a^s.in rose. 

A dotunder the£,in $h, denotes that $h sounds asan the* jhine, 

Th without this dot* is sounded as in thin,, thistly. 

The accented syllables are marked, thus ;,la' dy, be long'; 

•Where a mark is placed oyer a vowel, it denotes, also, that! 
the voxels, in the monosyllables, and in the accented sellable*! 
of the succeeding wprda, have the same soiuxd until, a different 
msrkisssed. '.'.. /',",* * 

The mark for accent over any word, denotes tnVt the succeed- 
ing words, having an equal number of syllables, are accented: 
on the same syllable until it is placed oyer a clifTerent one. ' 

The pronunciation of .some words is given, in a parenthesis 
connected with them ; as. 0*1 (wun), an£ sometimes in ft note* 

When two or more words are connected together by a brace* 
it denotes that they are spelt .jlifferendy by ,gooa writers. 

In tnia work, unlaw otherwise designated, on sounds as in bo%u%&; oto as in cew j. td 
and ^, accente^i* « to *«*£ «d m, W« ia fei*. ' "' •• H * • 



DIRECTIONS TO TEACHERS. 

T»B teacher should be cne&Lte explain tfce.nwksi wed ix^ 
this took, and see that the scholar is fawaliar with thegt. 

The words as far as Lesson 30, are axzaaged to be speU 
aeross the page $ m that and nil the subsequent lessons, they 
are arranged to be spek in perpefidieular.c^jtonns. The 
teacher, in hearing the lessons, may occasionally vary: this 
order to advantage. • ■ 

To test the accuracy of the Scholar, Let the teaeheg often put 
Out words from the different columns indistriminately, especially 
in those lessons where peculiar difficulties are contrasted with 
each other. For example ; ia Lesson 76, let him give out a word 
ending m o ; then, another in en ; or in oe ; or in <w ; ,an4 so j 
on, to any extent he may deem necessary. Thus, also, in J,ee* | 



VlU DIRECTIONS TO TEACHERS. 



son 135, and. the three following, give out words ending in ant 
and ent from the different 'columns indiscriminately. 

Be careful in asking the questions at the end of the lessons, 
to see that they are thoroughly understood by the scholar. The 
questions, on the more difficult lessons, ihay be deferred, if the 
teacher deems best, till a review of such lessons. 
' Question the more advanced scholars on the heads of the 
difficult lessons. For example; in Lesson 76, let the teacher 
ask, in how rhany ways is the sound of o as in globe, represented 
in this lesson. If the scholar answers correctly, he will say, 
by o, oft, 0to, ey>, ough, eau, owe, and oe. 

In Lesson 100, ask what are the various terminations in this , 
lesson.. The answer should be, et, it, ute, ait, oat, ot, ut, and at. 

Another useful mode of hearing the more advanced scholars 
review the difficult lessons, is to call upon them, in turn, to men- 
tion words illustrating the difficulties. For example, in Lesson 
84, let the teacher say ; "Give me a word wtth a in it sounding 
as in hate — another with ea, having the same sound — another 
with at — and another with ei. 

Where words of peculiar orthography in a lesson are few in 
number, let the advanced scholars be called upon to repeat them, 
or to write them from memory on the blackboard. For exam- 
ple, in Lesson 108, let them tell what words end in ad; what, 
in od; and what, in ud. 

Wfcere new and difficult words occur in the Reading Lessons, 
they are placed at the head of the lesson. The teacher should 
see that the scholar is familiar with them before he proceeds to 
the reading lesson. 

When words of similar pronunciation, but differently spelt, oc- 
cur hi the same lesson, the teacher should direct the scholar to 
find their various significations in the table beginning on page 147. 
The teacher, "also, as he gives out these words, should he care- 
ful to mention their significations. An, for example, in Lessen 
76, will be found the words bow and beau ; dough and doe. 

The Alphabet, it will be seen, is divided into sections of Jour 
letters ; each section to be thoroughly learned before proceed- 
ing to the next. After thus learning the small letters, let the 
scholar proceed to the italic, the capital, and the double letters. 

The teacher is particularly requested, as the scholar advances 
in the lessons, to make him thoroughly acquainted with the rules 
spelling on page 160; giving, and requiring him to give, ad- 

"*nl illustrations. See additional remarks, page 163. 





THE PRACTICAL SPELLING-BOOK . 


* 




THE ALPHABET. 


a b 


o - d 


A 


q r st Ct 


b d 


a c 


B 


r t q 8 


R 


C a 


d b 


C 


S q t r 


S 


d P 


b a 

. 4 


p 


t ; ; 8 r.': q 




e f 
f b 


g h 
••' g 


•E'|«' T W X 




g '• 


h f 


G 


W U X • : V 


w 

X 


h g 


f e 


H 


T' , 


• 


.k 1 


I 


y z & : 


Y 


j .:* 


» Ik 


J 


Z & y ' 


z 


k i 


1 j 


K 


& z y 


& 


i k 


J \ f 


L 






m a 


P 


M 


a he d ft / 


» i * 


n p 


m o 


N 


g hi j hi 




m 


P n 


d 


mtk o p q, r 

s t U V 1* X 


■ r 


P '• 


n m 


p 


y * <f 1 


r 




Doable Letters, and Diphthongs. 




fi ff fl flj ffl se <*; 



r*o 



THE PRACTICAL 



ba 
da 

ha 

ma 

; r 



sa 






ga '! 
va : 
wa ; 
za > 

qua 

ya 

ca 

ga 



be 
de 
fe 



JLESSONL 

bi bo 

dr do 

. f * > f ° 

" hi ho 

^LESSON II. 



se T 


>S1 so 


P le> 


•li ^ i* 


me ~ 


. mi mo 


ke 


LESffONltL 

ki ko 
* xio 


ne / 


r ni up 


,pe. 


,,-P 1 . I*> 




LESSON It. 


ge. > 
re 

te * 


Jl JO 

^ / * 

ri 10 

ti " to 


; 


Lesson VL 


ve 


vi vo 



wo 
to 



we wi 

\. ze ^ zi 

\ • LESSON m 

'■ que qui- quo 

ye -yj • yd 

ce ci to 

ge gt, go 



bu 
du 
fu 
fiu' 

SU', 



ku 
cu J 

. nu ' 

PU ! 
> , 

ru 
tu ; 

T 

t I 

W 

VU 

wu 
;zu - 



cu 
gu 



by 
dy 



8J - 

lu v \j 

mu my 

t j 

ky 



t 



»y ■■> 

j?y ,>' 

jy . 

*y '■ 

% \ 

-' i 

yy 

wy 



off q 

gy 



In ce, ci, cy, c ootids -like s. 
" Lffl* ?£x cu > & sounds TSke k. 




J» ge, gi 

*h ga, go, 



gy, g usuaHy like j. 
gu, g sounds as in gato_._ 







M*ftH*0L*o<)Ki 




"I 


i r - 


• 


. L&SSON Vl£ 






5 bla! 


' ble " 


ili bio 


blii 


%' 


cla 


cle 


cli clo 


clu 


# : 


fla ;'" 


lie 


fli fib 


flu 




gla' 


'gift . 


gli ; glo 


glii . 


pla 


pie 


pli plo 


plu 


.Pty i 


sla 




sli . slo 


slu- 


sly j 


: t'./ 


<\ 


LESSON VIII. 




i • 


bra- ;* 


bre «*> 


. bri bro 


Jiru 


lusr 


era. , 


ere f»i 


> cri ; cro 


Jem 


«y 


dra } 


dre 


dri idro 


*m 


^ 1 


fra ' 


fre 


fri » fro 


4* 


% i 


; gra - 


gre .. 


> gn gro 


gru 


gW 


prfc r 


pre .. 


pri j pro 


ijpru 


«T 


tra 


tre 


tei k v £»& \ 


tru 


try " 


* 5 1 5 


wre 


wri ,. wro 

LESSON IX. 


wu 


. W 


ska 


ske 


ski sko 


sku 


sky 


sha '' 


she ' 


shi - sho 


ahu 


sky s 


spa'' 


spe 


* spi spo 


spu 


»py i 


1 sta 


ste 


sti sto 


sto 


«rty i 


| -spla' r 


sple 7 


spli v splo 


aplu 


aply 


| spr*' 1 


spre - 


spri spro 


Spnr 


Spjy j 


| stra 


stre 


stri*- /! sfcrt* 


stru 


stry { 


| ph*f r,8P 


phe '• 


<l)hi ' pho 


|)HU 


phy '. 


1 • c 




,££&SOAI<Jr. 


; 




abe . r 


ebe 


ibe, ' 


6l ? e .V 


u>,e 


ade. ... 


edq 


; ida* r 


ode %r . 


u # , 


"*?. .i 


eke. 


.v **,,* ' 


ofce "i 


u£e i 


aitye < 


em$ 


,i ?* e : 


omq . 


ume* 


ane,;. . 


ene* 


.1 me 4 


one 


tme 7 


ate.. ... 


ete* 


itei.... 


ote 


«te i 



rc 




TIME ***OT!CjUU 








LESSON XL " 




babe 


he 


kite 


rope 


mule 


plate 


here 


lime 


home 


tube 


cage 


me 


fire 


hole 


tune 


rake 


we 


pile 
hive 


colt • 


flute 


dale 


she 


mole 


plume 


gave 


ye 


side 


note 


mute 






LESSON XII. 




ab 


eb 


ib 


ob 


ub 


ac 


ec 


ic 


OC ; 


uc 


ad 


ed 


id ; 


' % od 


> ud 


af 


ef 


if 


of 


uf 


j 


i 


■ i 


•j- 


*■ 


am 


em 


im 


om 


urn 


* 




LESSON XIIL 


• > 


an 


en 


in 


on 


un ' 


ap 


ep 


ip 


op 


up 


ex 


e* 


it 


or 


ur 


as 


es 


is 


OS 


us 


at 


et 


it 


ot 


ut 


av 


ev 


iv 


ov 


uv 


ax 


ex 


ix 


ox 


ux 


az 


ez 


iz 


oz 


uz 






LESSON XIV. 




b% 


hen 


hiip 


pod 
hot 


sun 


.ham 


bed 


rib 


cub 


man. 


P e S 
web 


top ... 


nut 


hat 


tin 


dog 


bud 


net 
hem 


•IS 


cob 
yon 


sup 
mug- 


sap 


vex 


hit 


fox 


hum 


wax 


pen 


fix 


lot 


tub 


^ J» m 


yes 


yelk 


yet 


yelp 






- 







•rsi&tjte~B0OK. 



13 




LESSON XV. 

Words in which s sounds like z. 

a$ ha§ i? hi? 

LESSON XVI. 



James has a top. 
His kite is at home. 
Jane has a bag. 
He gave me a pen. 
The fox is in his hole. 



LESSON XVII. 
Words in which a sounds as in bar. 



bar 

ark 
mark 

ask 


car 
bark 
park 
task 


far 
dark 
shark 
cask 


mar 
hark 
spark 
flask 


tar 
lark 
stark 7 
mask 


asp 
art 
hard 


clasp 

cart 

bard 


gasp 

dart 

card 


grasp 

part 

lard 


rasp 

tart 

yard 




Words in 


LESSON XVIII. 
which a sounds as in balL 




ball 

hall 
tall 


call 
pall 
wall 


fall 
stall 
' all 


gall 

small 
war 


mall 

squall 

ward 


warm 
wasp 


warn 
swanr 


warp 
i sward 


want 
bald 


wart 
scald 






LESSON XIX. 






Words in 


which a sounds as in wad. 




wad 

swamp 

auart 


warn 

swan 

souad 


wand 
swap 
sauash 


wash 

salt 

scmat 


swab 

halt 

was 



il* 



THE PRACTICAL 



son 

come 

shove 



LESSON XX 

The hen is in the yard. 

The clog barks at the hen. 

He is a small dog. 

It is bad to vex the lien. 

Call the dog here. 

A man gave me the dog. 

He was a tall man. 



LESSON XXL 

Words in M$ich o Bounds as in son. . 

ton ..won dohe month 

some dove love glove 

front : word work world 






. LESSON XXIL 



Word* in which o sounds as in move, and oo as in fool ; both 
being the same sound. * » 

move to lo§e 

fool ' pool tool 

bloom boom \ ^pojaa. 

boon noon spoon 

loop, (!l sloop coop ( 

\ LESSON jtXIIL r\ [ ; 

Words in \yhich u sounds as in bush, and oo r o, and ou, as 
in book ; being the same sound. 



do 
stool 
vgloom 


prove 
spool 
loom 


moon 
droogp ; , 


9 soon 
too^ 



bush 

buU 

look 

croeR' 

hood 




push 

full 

nook 

took 

stood 

wdW. 



put 

book 

shook 

wool 

hoop 

Would 



puss 

cook 

took 

woo$ ; 

foot 

cottld 



pull 
look 
:>rook 
good ' 
root 
should 



SPELLINO-BOOK. 



I* 




LESSON XXIV. 

Puss sits by the fire. 
She is warm. 

She loves to sit t>y the fire. 
1 Come, let us go. 
We should do the task. 
We should pile up the wood. 
It is good to work. 



boil 
loii^ 

boy,, 



bound' 
found, 
stout -'; 
cloud; 
coW 
down k " 



t / ^ LESSON XXV. 

Wcttit coataiatng oi and oy. 
broil coil' coin 

hoist /7 moist T joint 
soil, , spoil toil 
coy ; - cloy \ joy 

LESSON XXVI. 

Wxfrds' containing ou and ow. 



sound 

mound 

out 

loud 

how - 

droWti^ 



rouiid 

sholit 

county 

proud*' 

now 

irQWn 



ground 

pout 

fotmt 

flour 

owl 

gown 



daub 
fault' *"' 
caw 
jaw .;' 
maf# ! 
cra$¥ j : 
brawft 1 ' 



LESSON XXV f l 
Words containing au and aw. 



fraud 

TBlllt 

daw 
lfew V 
straw' 
scrawl J 
dawn'' 



haul 

'drttw 
<' :; i J>afar 
/' thaw 
Sptawl 
l fa&n 



caul 
clause 

fcla*r 
' bfet^l 
-lawn 1 



jom 
point 
void 
toy 



hound 

rout 

mount 

oust 

fowl 

crowd 



maul 
pau$e* 
haw 
saw : ; 
awl / 
shawl 



1* 



THE PRACTICAL 




LESSON XXVIIt. 

James and Ms Hoop. 

This boy is James. 
He drives a hoop. 
The hoop is round. 
Look -how fasf he runs. 
He makes the hoop go fast. 
Boys love to drive hoops. 
It is a good play. m 



A good boy loves his bodes to*. 



LESSON XXIX. 



time 


tine * 


vile 


wile 


wife 


hire 


mire 


spire 


post 


bom | 


plan 


ran 


rag 


rap 


rat 


sad 


shad 


shag 


sham 


i slab 


slam 


slap 


snag 


snap 


span 


stag 


tan 


tap 


trap 


van 


vat 


wag 


jam 


wit 


bit 


£ 


sit 


wig 


trip 


din 


sin 


win 


bin 


kin 


pin 


sod 


sot 


gun 


run 


fun 


spun 


tun 


sum 


snug 


jug 


stub 


mud 


rut 


shut 




LESSON XXX. 




Words of two syllables accented on 


the first 


La'dy 


manly 


. fin ish 


frosty 


sha dy 


candy 


'p^y 


dust y 


tidy 


in step 


win 


try 


nut meg 


i vy 


en vy 


cob web 


pub liah 


duty 


plenty 


.pol 


ish 


pun ish 


tumult 


self ish 


l bon fire 


ut most 




SPELLING-BOOK. 17 



LESSON XXXI. 

Charles and the Dave. 

The dove has left the cage. 
She will fly to the wood. 
She loves to be free. . 
Charles has not Had her 

long. 
He found the dove on the 
ground. She was hurt. 
He toolTpity on the dove. He put her in the 
cage. He was kind to her. Now she is well, he 
lets her go. Charles is glad to see her go. He is 
a good boy. We should be kind like Charles. 

LESSON XXXIL 
Words of two syllables accented on the second. 

Be have 7 a like a fir re pent 

en grave. a bode a larm de test 

. a bide be hold de part ad mit 

pro vide pro mote re gard en list 

de file re mote a mend a loft 

re vile re buke in vent up on 

, a live con sume pre vent in suit 

LESSON XXX11L \ 
Words in which c sounds like s. 

cSde ace ice spruce cent 

cite race nice truce cell 

Words ill itfhich c sounds like k. 

cake cold clove can cot 

cape cope cube camp cub 

cavfi core cure clod cut 





,18 


THE PRACTICAL 








Words in wlpch g sounds like j. 






gem 


gill page change 


\ hinge 




gin 


gibe rage range 


fringe 




i 


Words in which g sounds as in gate. 




gale 


giind glad rig 


. ™§r 


■ 


game : 


gold gag > big 


gum 




glide 


gore tag hug 
LESSON XXXZV. m 


gust 




the 


this —with . thorn ' 


ring 




fry 


that thank thi^mp 


lojig 




those 
chat 


thus theft bang 


sung 

,. ecale 




.chub hatch 4rch % 




chest 


chump fetch chafe. 


_ pcold 




check 


bench ditch ; chide 


.scene 


' 


chin '» 


pinch notch choke ' 


' scud 




chop 


punch crutcih porch - 
IESSON XXXVi 


, scrub 

. • •] 1 




Words of two syllables accented on the first 




Bgl'fry 


emp'tjr com pend 


var nish * 




pan try 


, dgptifct , body 


tar nish ; 




dan dy 


rel ish , radish - 


ba by l 




brand ish 


ob long sul try 


navy^ ! 




band box 


trust y sun dry- 


va ry , 




cap tive 


pros pect burn ish 


safe ty 




en try 


ol itfe tarnipike 


du ly 


'• 


fyan ish 


act ive strip lipg 


fury 


1 

1 


dusk y 


con cavei dis c ( 6rd 


e^e ning i 


^Jk 


fes tive 


tap tist v prod uct 


-tru,ly . 



9P$LI,ltfGk-300K. 



l3l 



LESSON XXXVI. 

Jane and the Rose. 
This is Jane. 

She has a rose iiTher hand. 
It is in full b)oom. 
She took it .from that bush* 
She got it for a lady. 
The lady was kind tp Jane,, 
and g$ve her a g<?od book. 
Jane didliot forget this. The lady will thank 
hgr for the rose, and Jane will be happy. 

Wq should not forget those that do us good. 
We should be glad to do them, good, jaad to make 
them happy. 

lesson xxxvii. 

Words of two syllables accented on the second. 




A side' 
be side 
con trive 
iin bibe 
do ride 
con fide 
cte s6ribe 
in scribe 



Taste 

chaste 

haste 

pasts 

baste 

waste 



ex ten# 

1 f de cant : 

' up set ; 

ab surd 

, a drift 

a mid 

;o»iit 

p&r tend * 

* \a r . 
, LES^Olf 

bold 

fold • 

hold 

fort 

band 

bank' 



be fit; • 

be lohg f ' 
be yond*' 
disturb 
con suit 
con tend ; 
con yolve 
re volt : ' 



anen 
jde/ffend 
ex pect 
e volve 
ex pand 
£x pend 
in fest 
,! 'fe grfet 



gleb§ 

wide 

blind, 

find. 

hind 

Hind' 



xxxvin. r 

bland bent brisk* 

bl9.uk blend cling 

brand elk. : clink 

belt end . crisp, 

bend bhnk link : 

best . brink fond. 



J20 




THB PRACTICAL 




1 


1 font 


pond 
blunt 


blush 


brush 


clang 


crest 


, pomp 


brunt 


bump 


cramp 


cleft 


Let the scholar he requested to 


five examples of some of the words in. 


. this lesson, 


which contain a sounding as in hate ; e as in 


here ; t as in 


mine ; o as in globe ; a 


as in hat j 


e as in pen 


; t as in pin 


; o as in not; 


I u as in nut. 
















LESSON XXXIX. 




Mild 


most 


cast 


crank 


hank 


held 


child 


bolt 


craft 


damp 


lamp 
shelf 


ding 


mind 


jolt 


darn 


fang 


dish 


wind 


ford 


farm 


flank 


elm 


disk 


rind 


pork 


fast 


frank 


fend 


drift 


wild 


port 


garb 


gang 


flesh 


drink 


pint 
host 


sport 
did 


gasp 
grasp 


gland 
hand 


fresh 
heft 


fling 
flint 


Repeat b 


nquiries similar to those on the preceding . lesson, and add, 


" give examples of some words that contain a as in bar." 








LESSON XL. 




y 


Song 


bulb 


curl 


film 


land 


melt 


prong 


bulk 


curve 


fish 


lank 


mend 


strong 


bunch 


dung 


fist 


pang 


nest 


thong 


burn 


drunk 


frisk 


plank 


next 


throng 


clump dump 


grist 


prank 


pelf 


romp 


crump 


durst 


hilt 


rank 


pelt 


solve 


curb 


dusk 


hint 


samp 


pent 


soft 


curd 


dust 


hist 


sand 


went 






LESSON XLt 


• 




1 Biave 


ban 


den 


bid 


blot 


bug 


ape 


bat 


fen 


bit 


clot 


but . 


crape 


brag 


glen 


brim 


clog 


club 


crave 


bran 


ken 


clip 


crop 


cud 


i flake 


cag 


then 


crib 


dot 


drub 


I bind 


clam 


iet 


dig 


got 


drum 


^ spike 


clan 


leg 


dim 


drop 


dub 



8FKLLINO-BOOK. 



21 



LESSON XLIL 
poor. . food. 

The Blind Man and his Dog. 

That old man is Hind. 

He is led by a dog. 

He calls his dog Trip. 

Trip loves the blind old man; 
and he loves Trip too. 

That boy is Frank. 

He is not a selfish boy. 
, He takes pity on the poor man, and gives 
him some food. Frank thinks the man wants it 
more than himself. 

Trip wants some food too. The old man 
will give him a part Trip will frisk and be 

Slad. We should be kind like Frank, and help 
le poor. 

LESSON XLIIL 




Grape 


cram 


sited 


% 


hop 


scir 


grave 
lave 


crab 


shred ^ 


fit 


lop 


star 


crag 


sled 


glib 


mob 


par 


nape 


dam 


stem 


grim 


nod 


jar 


pave 


drag 


them 


grit 
hid 


not 


arc 


strife 


fag 


step^ 


mop 
plod 


barn 


strike 


fan 


wed 


hip 


barb 


strive 


fat 


bet 


if 


plot 


yarn 






LESSON XLIV. 







Stamp slang tank 

scalp stand tramp 

shalt strand apt 

shank pang desk 



helm jest lest 

help kept guest 

helve lend wept 

hemp pest dwelt 



*2 



THB 'PRACTICAL ' 



ft 



ink 

king 

lift 

limp 

lint 

lisp 

list 



milk fund , hurl musk send 

milt grunt hush plump sent 

gulf hint prompt shelve 

gulp husk rerid smelt 

.crust hump lump rent : swept 

flush hung lust rest spend 

furl hunt must self tend 



iimp 
burat 



: i.i ■ ZESSON XLV. ^ '" - 

Words of two syllabi oa accented on the first. 



Gen' try 
t im pulse 
flesh y 
par ish 
van ish 
pel try 
fretftd 



per ish 
res tive 
scur vy 
sen try 
con clave 
in cest 
gin'M 



stock rag 
stur dy 
suburb • 
sur ly 
trib une 
furlong 
pot ash > 



du ring 
glory 
wary 
brutish 

pry 
ze nith 

la tyi 



Repeat the " inquiries on lessons 38 and 39, and add, "iherition some 
words that contain u as in cube." Repeat these inquiries in the follow- 
ing lessons, till the scholar is familiar with the sounds of^the vowels ; and 
faiake him familiar, also, witfci the iriarks used to denote the;n. 

* ' ,. J LESSON XLV& ., '..*> 

! v [The Moon and Stars. 

It is evermgi • i 

See the moon rise. ^ s . 

It is round and full. 
How it mounts up in the sky. . 
John can see to come home. 
He 'was sent to the town, and 
told to be in haste. 
So he did not stop at all, but came as fast as 
he could. How dark it would* be without the 
oon and stars. God makes the moon shine, 
e makes the star& shine top: We should love 
oft f6r 'this. ' ... 




S**LLlN0*B06te. 



23 1 



' ' LESSON XLVIL 

Wortls of two syllables, accented on the second. 



Sub lime' 
as cnbe' # 
, be hind * 
* de spite 
' < de rive 
J de prive 
\ for sake 
,pearfu&*3 

: de piwe 



ab scond pre tend era vat 

,;a long « de spond a bet 

a mend§ je but be set 

rat an re lapse ad just 

be twixt v fe volve ' a bash 

convtlse respond enact 

de Itfolve trans mit sub tract 

himself ■. fo ment dis tract 

pfer hapfc e vent e rect 

de pict - on camp a dult 

. in flicfc im pend al cove 

, : LESSON XLVIIL * (t 

WoA of two syllables, accented on the first. 



o 9*ate' fi^ 
bale ful, 
g?avy 

[on ly 

i past ry 

j:pru cfch 

•:sli my 

ipony ; 

j wilf . 

,co hortr 



■\x 



fam ish. test y } lily 

lavish vestry . bashful 

br^ck i$h ver diet priv y 

ra&r ^h xel ict brim sto^e 

ad junct . , , cher ish in sect 

^abject r blemish *. .thrift y 

as pect / vert y . dis trict 

'bankrupt j con sprt instinct 

\oc tave f conjunct .city 

. con taqt I cos tive glob ule • 

;... !: V LES?ON XLIX. 

Rive * slave bile ■ drive gad * lad 

saft ' stave ; bride fife gap lag 

save tape ; clime file had ' lap 

scrape: Wave ■ crime hide hag ' jet 

shape* bate t dime <flap • hap \ let 

shave bide ' dive Hat have' met, s 



24 



THE PRACTICAL 



7" 

pet 

fret 

tret 

set 

wet 



beg 

leg 

keg 

lid 

mid 



nip . 

prim 

rid 

rim 



rip 

scrip 

ship 

sip 

•glut 



grub plum 

grum plug 

hut plunge 

lug pug 

mum •rug 



LESSON L. 




Jane and the Plums. . 
See that plum-tree. 
It is behind the wall 
It is full of nice ripe plums. 
Jane looks at the plums, and 

wants some of them. 
She asks Charles to get her 
some. 

She forgets that they do not belong to her. 
Charles tells her so, and that he must not take 
them. He is a good boy. Jane thanks him. 
Now she has no wish for the plums. She would 
not take them if she could. We should not 
wish to take things that do not belong to us. 

LESSON LL 

mint loft 

mist oft 

pink cost 

prink frog 



Hash 
cash 
dash 
gash 
lash 
clash 
flash 
splash 
slash 
mash 
smash 
sh 



tent 

test 

text 

vend 

vent 

vest 

weld 

welt 

wend 

west 

zest 

desk 



print 
rift 

risk 



frost 
froth 
pulp 



scrimp pump 



shift 
shrift 

shrimp churl 
shrink rung 



pulse 

purl 



lung 

rush 

rusk 

rust 

scurf 

slump 

stump 

stunt 

thrush 

thrust 

thump 

trump 



i 
arm 

are 

hasp 

lard 

last 

marl 

marsh 

mart 

mast 

past 

raft 

scarf 





flPBLLtKO-BOOK. 


21 




LESSON LIL 


* 


Words of two syllables, accented on the first. 


Hap 7 py 
eddy . 


jolly 


sab bath 


tally 


skit tish • 


clammy 


tab by » 


ferry 
hob by 


bonny 


curry % 


fop pish 


lob by 


snappish . 
chat lenge 


. sun ny 


hurry 


holly 


slop py 


dally 


cherry 


sully 


mummy 


ditty 


berry 


pen ny 


p^ppy . 


flurry 


mer ry 


poppy 
fin ny 
hub Dub 


sorry 


tar ry 


ral ly 


sot tish 


witty 


silly 


her ring 


J el ty 


rub bish 


car ry 


sally 
shrub by 


chub by 


put ty 


mar ry 


petty 


offing 


rud dy 


pudding 


ef fort 


mam moth 


pet tish 


"stir ry 


. 


LESSON MIL 




Words of two syllables, 


accented on the second. 


Ar rive 7 


com mand, 


as sist 


accept 


as sume 


ac cent 


sue cinct 


cor rect 


com mttcte 


al lot 


ef feet , 


ap peild 


con nive 


oc cult 


con nect 


arrest 


illume 


col lect 


attend 


of fend 


pol lute 


col lapse 


at tempt 


Slip plant 


com mute 


com mend 


addict 


dis sect 


oppugn 


af feet 


com mit 


at test 


arrange 


attract 


af flict 


.accost 


*1 lude 


attach 


dis sent 


corrupt 




LESSON LIV. 




Words having the sound of or, as in nor. - 


nor 


for 


north 


lorn 


or 


fork 


morn 


lord; 



36 



THE PEACTICAL 



cord 

cork 

corn 

corpse 

sort 

stork 

form 

storm 

gorge 

horn 



thorn 
born 
v orb 
scorn 
short 
snort 
torch* 
scorch 
ac cord' 
adorn 



for lorn 
as sort 
ex tort 
sub orn 
ab hor 
de form 
dis tort 
ab sorb 
per form 
re §ort 

LESSON LV. 
walk. be come'. 



re tort 
es cort 
dis gorge 
re cold 
re form 
inform 
con form 
trans form 
ab sorb' ent 
a bor tive 




The lame Man and the bad Boys. 

| That poor man walks with a 
cane. 
It helps him to walk. 
His foot is bent out of shape, 

and he is quite lame. 
He limps as he walks. 
See the boys that stand by 
him. They are not good boys. They make 
sport of the lame man. He looks sad, and I pity 
him. He dad not make himself lame. God 
made him so. He was born with a bent foot. 
He is, not to blame for it. 

These boys would be sorry to be made sport 
of, if they should become lame. I hope they 
will think of this, and do so no more. Only 
bad boys make sport of those that they should 
pity and help. 

LESSON LVL 



Skate fate 
L date bathe 




lathe bake 
swathe make 



take 
age 



stage 
sage 







SPELLING-BOOK. 


27 


/quite 


rive 


June lamft limi 


rob 


life 


scribe 


puke pad slip 


rod 


like 


slide 


rule pan sprig 


rot 


blithe 


slime 


huge pat strip 


scot 


mile 


smile 


mad ^nat swig 


shop 


pike 


thrive 


map shrank swim 


shot 


pride 


tide 


mat crept tip 


sob 


prime 


tale 


nag slept skip 


throb 


ride 


duke 


nap ship pot 


job 


rife 


fame 


jamft slim prop 

LESSON LVIL 


jot 


Sharp 


bled 


sing bulge, trash 


midst 


scarp 


fed 


sink trunk crash 


wing 
wind 


shaft 


tempt 


skim trust sash 


smart 


sect 


sling jump gnash 


wink 


snarl 


len§ 


spring shrunk lapse 


wish 


sparse 


wrest 


sting just act 


wisp 


start 


sift 


wiring tuft fapt 


wist 


vast 


silk 


singe turf tract 


jilt 


waft 


tilt 


cringe tush lent 


gwilt 


charm 


tint 


tinge tusk scent 


pri?m 


chart 


twist 


twinge duct delve 


wrong 


harsh 


wilt 


bilge wrung else 

LESSON LVIII. 


wroth 




Words ending in ll and 1. 




Bell 


spell 


shall chill 


shrill 


ell 


tell 


mall thill 


thrill 


dell 


quel 


[ ' ill -kill 


trill 


cell 


well 


bill skill 


siH 


fell 


yell 


dill mill 


till 


knell 


dwell fill pill 


still 


shell 


swell gill drill 


quill 


smell 


sell 


hill frill 


squill i 



2S 



THE PRACTICAL 



will 

swill 

spill 

rill 

doll 

loll 

scull 



ffldl 

hull 

lull 

null 

skull 

cull 

dull 



ex pel 
pro pel 
re bel 
extol 
until 
annul 
ho tel 



distal' 



distil S 
in still > 
in stil > 
fulfill) 
fulfil * 
foretell 



■j^gua^^ad 



ca nal 
ex eel 
re pel 
impel 
com pel 
dispel 

Monosyllables end in U, if preceded by a single vowel ; and if not, they 
end in Z. * 

Most, and probably all the dissyllables in common use, (except proper 
names,) that end in //, are to be found in Lessons 58, 67, 99, and 
96 ; viz. distill, instill, fulfill, patroll, enroll, controll, (which are sometimes 
spelt with one /,) foretell, bridewell, recall, befall, inthrall, install, and 
appall 

LESSON LIX. 

Tru' ant. does. school. girl. play. 

- The Truant Boy. 

Look at that boy. 
I will not telL his name ; for 
he is a lazy boy, and does 
not love to go to school. 
He should be in school now. 
The bell rung at nine. 
It is past the time, and the 
school has begun. He has a iish-p6le and line. 
He is going to fish in the brook. How he looks 
abound him. He thinks somebody may see him, 
and tell the man that keeps the school. God sees 
him, and he should think of that too. He is 
doing wrong. He will not be so happy in his 
sport, as he would be in school. Good boys and 
girls do not play truant .. 

LESSON lx. ' 

Words of three syllables, accented on the second. 

A boV ish as ton ish ac com 

mon ish de mol ish es tab lish 






ftPELLING-BOOK. 




99] 


'fern bel lish 


pre ?ump tive 


pre ven tive 1 


re plen ishT" 


se due tive 


in cen tive 


extinguish 


pre scrip tive 


de cep tive 


dis languish 


vin die tive 


pre cep tive 


re lin quish 


at ten tive 


re ten tive 


di min ish 


con sump tive 


sub 


junc tive 


as fcem bly 


in vec tive 


unrii ly 


de struc tive 


, per spec tive 


in qui ry 


dejscrip live 


pro spec tive 

LESSON IbXL 


pro ] 


mo tive. 


Words in the plural number. 




Band? elks 


flints 


jond? 


curl? 


skates 


lad? elms 


fig? 


lops 


nuts 


grapes 


clam? nests 


lid? ] 


ots 


club? 


mile? 


crab? den? 


ships 1 


lorn? 


drum? 


bone? 


maps steps 


wing? dog? 


lumps 


mule? 


In which of these wqrds has #, at the end, the sound of z ? 


* 


LES80N LXIL 






Gate climJ 


valve twig 


swing 


with ) 
withe j 


slate gtiide 


thrash twin 


slit 


mate tithe 


tact chin 


spit 


smith 


wage writhe 


champ shin 


split 


frith 


gawge ) scythe 
gage j sythe 
Anave shore 


\ ) cant skin 
J scant spin 


quit 


quilt 


flit 


squib 


plant grin 


font 


squint 


gwile store 


rant swift 


filth 


triip. 


chime truth 


van quip 

LESSON LXIIL 


thin 


width 


Barge carve 


Jath scab 


strap 


deit 


charge harm 


path scan 


spa?m 


depth 


large harp 


bath? scrap 


wrap 


length 


• blast gape 


lath? stab 


adz 


strength 


; carp bath 


path? stag 


wren 


glimpse, 



30 



THE PRACTICAL 



bwild 

built 

stint 

string 

thing 

think 

thrift 



chink 

pith 

stilt 

kiln 

hymn 

stop 

strop 



broth 

cloth 

cloth§ 

bronze 

moth 

moth? 

Anob 



kaot strut 
spot thrum 
troth scud 
sculk ) stud 
skulk j shun 
scum stun 
shrub buzz 



LESSON lxiv. 
Lit' tie. who. care. keep. 

The Little Lamb. 



dumb 

thumA 

plumi 

num& 

crum& 

be numfr' 

succumb 

Bi' ble. 



Who takes care of the little 
lamb t 

The'sheep takes care of it. 

Who takes care of the sheep? 

The boy takes care of her. 

Who takes care of the boy ? 

The man who is his father. 
Who takes care of the man? God takes care 
of the man. God takes care of us all. He is 
very good. He keeps us in life. He gives us 
food and clothes. He gives us all goo^things. 
We should think of this. We shouldjpve God. 
We should wish to do his will. Wipmould 




do 



all that he tells us to do in the Bible. 

LESSON LXV. 
Words of two syllables accented on the second. 



Be tide 7 
sub side 
re vive 
es cape 
con jure 
pre scribe 
pre §ume 



pre §ide 
di vide 
re port 
re §ume 
re §ide 
tran scribe 
di vine 



impugn 
be side§ 
de cide 
ex cept 
a dept 
con tempt 
sub mit 



pre diet 
ac quit 
per mit 
de sist 
in sist 
in volve 
di gest 





SPELLING- BOOK. 


31 




di vest 


sub sist 


sus pect 


re tard 




jap an 


tre pan 


in feet 


placard 




per sist 


ab rupt 


e lect 


im part 




e lapse 


infract 


e quip 


dis charge 




a dapt 


re fract 


for bid 


ci gar 




se dan 


com pact 


ce ment 


em bark 




a dopt 


sub ject 


por tent 


re mand 




ab §olve 


de feet 


de bar 


de mand 






LESSON LXVL 


. 




Words containing the diphthongs oi 


and 07. 




^Troy 


choice 


em broil 


con 7 voy 




roil. 


voice 


pur loin . 


en voy 




coil 


re joice'* 


turmoil 


in voice 




foist 


adjoin 


ex ploit 


mem oir 




groin 


a droit 


de coy 


boil er 




joist 


anoint 


enjoy 


clois ter 




quoit 


ap point 


al loy 


vice roy 




foil 


a void 


em ploy ^ 


e / qui poi$e 




noi?e 


de spoil 


an noy 


va' ri loid 




poi$e 


de void 


de stroy 


re? er voir^ 






LESSON LXVIL 






Words of two syllabi 


es, accented on 


the first. 




Sla^ ish 


post script gang way ar my 




e diet 


bi ped 


gen tile 


crafty 




pre cinct 


ho*b^ 


land scape dar ling 




home spun a pisflT ' 


misty 
bant ling 


far thing 




que ry - 


miry 


gar nish 
>t har py 




pa thos 


jurist 
hike wax 


con scrip 




pre text 


■m off spring sar ca?m 




pre cept 


furbish 


ram part 


tardy 




bride well 


ugly 


im post 


har dy 




tru i§m 


ex lie 


proxy 


pas time 




the i§m 


tran script cop y 


pass port ' 




de ism 


divh thomr wind fftoe shsst lv 1 





THE PRACTICAL 




LESSON LXVIIL 
Sit' ting. motk' er. why. lie. . jrou. 

The Little Girl wlw did not tell the Truth. 
That little girl is Mary. 
She is sitting by her mother. 
Why does she cry, and look 

so sad ? 
She has done wrong. 
She has not told the truth. 
She has told a he. 
She found a cent, and put it in her bag. Her 
mother had lost it Sh# told Mary to come to 
her. 

Mary, hare you found the cent? No, mother, 
I hare not Give me that bag. See, here is the 
cent, and you found it You have told me a lie. 
I am very sorry. You have done wrong. • I must 
punish you. You cannot go to ride with Charles 
and James. You must stay at home. I hope 
you will be sorry too, and ask God to forgive 
you, and help you to do so no more. 

LESSON LXIX. 
Words «nding in ack, ac, eck, ick, ©ck, and uck. 

Back snack quack ma ni ac 

hack pack thwack il ma nac 

jack rack bar 7 rack e le' gi ac 

lack crack ran sack de mo ni ac 

black &nack &nap sack beck 

clack track at tack 7 deck 

slack- - ' sack „ IT lac* check 

smack stack zo' di ac neck 



t See words enddf in ie on pages 41, 52, 128—130, 140—144. 



SPKLLINO-B^OK. 



■■■ 

33 



peck trick pock mat tock 

speck . sick rock but took 

wreck tick crock % cas sock 

be deck 7 stick frock hav ock 

thick quick sock buck 

kigk wick stock duck 

lick Anock pea 7 cock chuck 

click cock had dock luck 

slick dock pad lock cluck 

pick hock wedlock pluck 

rick shock hil lock muck 

brick lock * bul lock suck . 

crick block hem lock . truck 

chick clock fet lock " struck 

nick flock % ham mock tuck 

prick mock ban nock stuck 

Which words end in ac, and which of the dissyllables in ack, and ock T 
Are not these the only dissyllables in common use that end in ock and ock ? 

Do any monosyllables end in c ? Are there any words in common use that 
end in ick, except frolick, traffick t ^ 



Starch 

parch 

larch 

march 

drench 

stench 

trench 

wench 

wrench 

quench 

rich 

niche 

What word 

dinhtlinnff- 



LESSON LXX. 

Words ending in ch, che, and tch 
clinch such 

church 

lurch 

os 7 trich 

batch 

catch 

thatch 

latch 

match 

snatch 

patch 

scratch 



flinch 

linch 

inch 

winch 

filch 

milch 
3erch 
unch 
lunch 

munch 

much 

ends in iche ? 

in hssrh. tftirK 



watch 

etch 

sketch 

stretch 

ketch 

vetch 

wretch 

retch 

itch 

bitch 

hitch 

flitch 



pitch 

stitch 

witch 

switch 

twitch • 

botch 

scotch 

blotch 

crutch 

clutch 

dis patch 7 ) 



de spatch 



Ch is sometimes preceded by a long vowel or '\ 
Ta not tr.h alwavs nrp^nrlftri liv a short vowel 1 :l 



34 



THE PRACTICAL 



LESSON LXXL 
Woijds ending in sive and cfre. 



Mas 7 sive 
pas sive 
mis sive 
pen sive 
con du' cive 
a bu sive 
de lu sive 
in clu sive 
e hrsive 
ex clu sive « 
il lu sive 
in tru sive 
con clu sive 
ob tru sive 



dif fu sive 
co he sive 
ad he sive 
e va sive 
de ci sive 
cor ro sive 
per sua sive 
dis sua sive 
co er cive 
sub ver sive 
ex cur sive 
dis cur sive 
ex pan sive 
de fen sive 



of fen sive 
ex ten sive 
^x pen sive % 
ex ces sive 
pro gres sive 
op pres sive 
ex pres sive 
. sue ces sive 
re spon sive 
sub talis sive 



What two words end in cive ? 
sound, spelt sive ? 

LESSON LXXIL 
Grain, wheel, wa' ter. bolt' ed< 



com pul sive 
re pul sive 
com pre hen 7 sive 
ap pre hen sive 

Are not all others, ending with this 



bread, bowl. 



sis ter, 

The Grist-mill. 

Here is a mill. 
It stands by the brook. 
We call it a grist-mill, be- 
cause grain is ground in it. 
How fast the wheel turns 
round. 
B| The water makes the wheel 
go. The wheel makes the stones go, that are 
inside of the mill. The stones grind the grain, 
and make it fine. The .grain is bolted, and made 
flour. The boy must carry it home. His 




SPELLING-BOOK. 



35 



sister will make it into bread. In the morning, 
he will have some of it in a nice bowl of milk. 
Do you not love bread and milk ? * 

' LESSON LXXIIL 
Words of two syllables, accented on the second, 

y t>on sist' ob ject be troth pre §ent 

ab stract bi sect di vulge re §olve 

de tract de tect pro mulge re §ult 

ex tract con vict m dulge re quest 

con tract con flict de tach con test 

re tract re strict re trench con demn 

pro tract dis tinct as cend con tent 
se lect ex tinct trail scend in tent 

re fleet con coct as cent a yenge 

in fleet con duct de scend re venge 

per feet de duct de scent in fringe 

neg lect in duct fer ment im pinge 

re spect in struct tor ment ex punge 

in spect con struct re cant re pulse 

sua pect ob struct des cant e clipse 

direct extent contrast bequest 

e ject la ment mo lest. ex change 

in ject re mit pro test de range 

re ject e mit ro tund es trange 

pro tect ?ha grin re lent pro scribe 

pro ject ro bust re §ent van dyke 

LESSON LXXIV. 
Words of two syllables, accented on the first. 



Na' tive 
da tive 
motive 
vo tive 
a corn 



graceful 
dole ful 
wa vy 
n>hol ly 
pre fecty 



syr inge 
loz enge 
stin gy 
dam ask 
or ange 



plen ty 
murl y 
stud y 
sulk y 
com bat 



36 



PRACTICAL 



f con quest 
scant ling 
pigmy 
kid nap 
lofty 

•sol emn 
bran dy 

* These words 
ang guish, <fec. 



Inst y lin guist * skill ful 

lamft kin dis junct skil fill 

van quish for tune will ful 

an guish.* prov erb wil ful 

Ian guish * gri§ ly am bush 

hun gry* wish ful bul rush 

angry* scornful bulwarks 

are pronounced as if the first syllables ended with g, a* 



LESSON LXXV. 

Words ending in double, consonants, with others in which ough 

has the sound of uf. 



Butt 

add 
ebb 

e gg 

J a gg 
inn 

odd 



staff 

quaff 

cliff 

skiff 

miff 

stiff 

off 



chaff scoff 



doff 

buff 

cuff 

huff 

luff 

bluff 

muff 

snuff 



puff 

gruff 

stuff 

ruff 

rough 

tough 

slough 

e nough' 



Which of these words end in ough J 



re buff 
dis / taff 
mas tiff 
sher iff 
tariff 
pon tiff 
bailiff 
plain tiff 



LESSON LXXVL 

Words ending in o, with others in which oa, ow, ew, ough, 

eau, owe, and oe nave the sound of o, as in globe. 

&k? go ty ro ver ti go 

co coa buff a lo 

can to em bry o 

mot to por ti co 

grot to tor pe' do 

jun to vol ca no 

sal vo po ta to 
stuc co * oc ta vo 



quar to 
he ro 



ne gro 
ve to 
ha lo 
bra vo 
ze ro 
tri o 

80 10 



car i co 
in di go 



pro vi so 
to bac coj 



si roc co 
mo roc co 
me ment o 
mu lat to 
em bar go 
man i fesf o 
bow 
low 
blow 
flow 






WBLLINO-nOOK- 



37 



glow 

mow 

show) 

shew) 

snow 

&now 

tow 

throw 

erow 

grow 

tow 

strow 

sow 

stow 

slow 

sew , 

el' bow 

Which word 
In owe t In oe 



shad OW 
wid ow 
wind ow 
fal low 
shal low 
sal low 
tal low 
cal low 
bel low 
fel low 
mel low 
yel low 
bil low • 
pil low 
wil low 
fol low 
min now 

ends in oat 



win now 
At row 
bar row 
far row 
har row 
mar row 
nar row 
spar row 
bor row 
mor row 
sor row 
bur row 
fur row 
be low 7 
be stow 
-dough 
though/ 



&1 though' 

fur' lough > 

far low J 

beau 

bu' reau^ 

ba teau' 

port man' teau 

owe \ 

doe 

woe > 

wo > 

toe 

foe 

hoc 

sloe 



roe 
throe^r 

What worcls end in ought 



What in eaut 



Woe? 
car' goe? 
he roe? 



Plurals which end in oes. 



bra voe? cal i coe? mu lat toe? 
ne groe? po ta' toe? em bar goe? 
buff a loe? vol ca noe? man i fest' oe? 

LESSON LXXVIL 
Swore* throw, 




swear. 



vain. 



stands 



The Boy that Swore. 
It is noon. 
The school is out. 
Those boys are playing ball. 
See the boy that has the bat 

In his hand. 
His name is Robert. 
He shakes the bat at the boy 
him. He is angry at the boy. 



8 



THE PRACTICAL 



Why is he angry ? The boy did not throw 
lie ball right. Robert did not hit it, and he lost 
is turn. That made him angiy. He scolds his 
laymate. He swears at him. He takes the 
Lame of God in vain. It is wrong to do so — 
ery wrong. God forbids us to swear. That 
aan tells Robert it is wrong. He tells him to 
top. I hope he will stop, and swear no more, 
f boys swear, you must not do like them, but 
ell them it is wrong. 

LESSON LXXV1IL 
Words of three syllables accented variously. 



Rel' a tive 
neg a tive 
nar ra tive 
car a van 
cat a ract 
con tra band 
ap a thy 
par a sol 
big a my 
san a tive 
lax a tive 
sed a tive 
bot a nist 
prof it less 
9hiv al ry * 
dog ma tif m 
gal ax y 
tarn a rind 
tan ta mount 



van i§m 
scant i ly 
priv a tive 
voc a tive 
in fa my 
in fan try 
mal a dy 
mor al ist 
sub tra hend 
vag a bond 
in fan tfley 
<6straci ? m 
ped ant ry 
dram a tist 
sym pa thy 
par al lei 
pen al ty 
tyr an ny 
4og a rithm 



con tra dictf 
in ter diet 
in ter sect 
inter mit 
com pre hend 
cor re spond 
ap pre hend 
rep re hend 
Tin der stand 
rep re §ent 
in ter cept 
in ter rapt 
rec ol lect 
cir cum vent 
vio lin 
rec on cile 
im por tune 
op por tune 
co in ci&ej 



* Some pronounce tshiv' al re. 

In this leison, and m ItEwns 117, 113, 133 T 161, 162, 164, 171, 173, 
75, 176, and those ending in bU only, (pages 132—4,) the principal 





SPELLING-BOOK. 


39 


difficulty in spring lies in the syllable immediately preceding or succeeding 


the accented 


one, and to this 


tho attention of Itoth teacher and scholar i 


should be particularly directed> 


The teacher, also, 


in reviewing would do 


well to put out the words indiscriminately from the different columns. 




LESSON LXXIX 




flax 


Words ending in x and xe. 


bo 7 rax 


syntax 


per plex 


tax 


tho rax 


vertex 


trans fix 


lax 


cli max 


yor tex 


era 7 ci fix 


wax 


apex 


com plex 


e qui nox 


ax 


re flex 


con vex 


par a dox 


sex 


ra dix 


index 


or tho dox 


mix 


pro lix 


suffix 


par al lax 


six 


pre fix 


affix 


ctr cum flex 


ox 


phe nix 
larynx 


con flux 


ap pen 7 dix 


box 


in flux 


tes ta trix 


flux 


pha lanx 


an nex' 


het' e ro dox 




Do 


any other words, in common use, end in x, 


than those in 


this lesson 1 








LESSON LXXX. 




Words containing 


the diphthongs ou and ow. 


■ Couch 


spout 


pounce 


mouth 


vouch 


douit 


wound* 


mouth? 


pouch 


lout 


sound 


south 


slouch 


gouge 
lounge 


snout 


mouth 


crouch 


trout 


bou^A 


pound 


douse 


sour 


plough ) 
plow ) 


foul 


drou/^t 


Aour 


gout 


louse 


mouse 


slough 


flout 


noun 


spouse 


thou 


scour 


our 


rou?e 


a bound 7 


[ scout 


ounce 


sprout 


a bout 


bout 


bounce 


route * > 
rout* i 


ac count 


shroud 


flounce 


a mount 




* Some pronounce the. on as o in move. 



r d 



40 



mtassmtmam 

THE PRACTICAL 



tmSm 



m \ 



a round 
as tound 
ca rou§e 
con found 
sur round 
sur mount 
a rou?e 
es pou$e 
com pound 
ex pound 
pro pound 
pro found 
re dound 
re §ound 
a vouch 
de nounce 
de vour 



de vout 
re douftt 
boun' try- 
count er 
coun ty 
found ling 
floun der 
par" a mount 
en count' er 
ren count er 
count er mind* 
vow 
bow 
mow 
brow 
prow 
sow, 



growl # 
howl 
scowl 
prowl 
brown 
clown 
crown 
town 
browse 
drowse 
bow / el 
tow el 
trow el 
vow el 
bow er 
cow er 
dow er 



flow er 
low er 
pow er 
show er 
tow er 
dow TJ 
flow ret 
row en 
pow der 
cow ard 
cow herd 
cow slip 
al low 7 
a vow 
en dow 
re nown 
empow / er 



LESSON LXXXI. 



Sail. three. a cross'. deep. climb' ing. sail' or. 
France. what. car' ried. cot' ton. ex' change. 

The Ship. 

rHow fast that ship sails. 
Do you see those three tall 

poles ? 
We call them masts. 
Across the masts are the 




The sails stretch along the 
yards. The men pull the sails with ropes. The 
sails catch the wind, as it blows, and the wind 
drives the ship along in the deep water. A man 
is climbing up some ropes, that look like a ladder, 
e call them shrouds. He is a sailor. The ship 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



41 



lists come from France, and is full of silks and 
cloths. What did she carry to France? She 
carried bales of cotton. We have more of this 
than we want, and they have nfore silks and 
cloths than they want. So we let them have 
cotton, and they let us have silks and cloths. 
^We exchange with them. This is trade, or 
commerce.^/ 

LESSON LXXXIL 
Words in which ou, o, and oo have the sonad of u as in tun. 



Young 
touch 


word 
worm 


oth er 
col or 


son ship 
stom ach 


scourge 
coun' try 


worse 
worst 


come ly 
com fort 


ton nage 
thor ough 


cour age 


wort 


com pass 


work man 


cou? in 


wont 


cov er 


wont ed 


coup let 
douh let * 


sponge 
tqng^ 


cov ert 
cov et 


won der 
won drous 


flourish 
nour ish 


bomJ 
one (wun) 


cov ey 
coz en 


wor ry 
wor ship 


eoup le 
double 


Once (wunce} 

none* 


i doz en 
gov ern 


wor thy 
worth less 


troub le 


monk 


hon ey 


a bove' 


troub lous 


doth 


money 


af front 


jottr ney 
jour nal 


dost 
flood 


mon grel J 
monk ey 


r among 
a mongst 


south ern 


blood 


noth ing 


at tor 7 ney 


south ward .blood' y 
so journ blood shed 


ov en 
plov er 


an oth er 
bom bast ic 


adjourn 7 


bom bast 


pom mel 


dis com fit 


court' e ous 


bor ough 


shov el 


pomegranate 


court e sy 


broth er 


slov en 


col' an der 


courte sy 


moth er 


smoth er 


com pa ny 


* Some pronounce none. 


t Pronounced mung' grel. 



42 


THfi 


PRACTICAL 




con jur er 


cov et 


ous whor tie ber 17 


con sta ble 


sov er 


eign ef front' er y 


cov e nant 


love li 


ness wor' ship per \ 


cov er let 


drom' 


edary woi 


ship er, > 




LESSON LXXXIIL 




Words in which u and ui 


have the sound of 


u as in cube* 


<Lute 


de pute 


'con 7 sti tute 


re$ lute 


flute 


im pute 


des ti tute 


sub sti tute 


brute 


com pute 


dis so lute 


suit 


a cute' 


re pute 


ex e cute 


suite* 


confute 


dis pute 


in sti tute 


fruit 


sa lute 


refute 


per se cute , 


bruit 


dilute 


tribute 


pros e cute 


pur suit' 
re cruit^ 


transmute 


stat utej 


pros ti tute 


Juice 


* Some] 
ob tuse 


>ronounce swot 


a bu?e 


in duce 


sluice 


ref use 


con duce 


con fu§e 


cruse ) 
cruise > 


spruce 


pro duce 


ac cu§e 


truce 


in tro duce' 


diffuse 


use 


ad duce' 


u§e 


ex cu?e * 


a buse / 


traduce 


mu§e 


refuse 


ex cuse 


e duce 


fu§e 


af fu§e 


diffuse 


de duce 


bruije 


in fu§e 


re cluse 


re duce 


cruise 


pe ru§e 


ab struse/ 


se duce 


amu§e' 


suf fu§e 


What words end in uite, uit, 


uice, uise, and uise 1 


Which wordi are 


spelt alike and pronounced differently 1 






LESSON LXXXIV. 




Words in which a, ea, ai, and ei have the sound of a as in hate. 


Lake 


flake 


slake 


brake 


shake 


snake 


spake 


drake 





SPBLLINO-BOOK. 43 


"Sake phi cane 


s com plain cam pai^n' 


stake count 7 er pane ex plain ' pham paigu 




quake . hur n cane 


re mam ar rau/n 




wake chain 


do main dei/jn 




a wake' plain 


re frain feign 




par take main 


ob tain reign 




o paque > slain 


c6n strain came 


Jo pake f pain 


de tain lame 


■break rain 


re tain name 


I steak brain 


maintain dame 


■ache (ake) drain 


con tain fame 


■bane lain 


per tain shame 


Icane grain 


ab stain blame 


llane strain 


at tain flame 


' plane train 


sus tain frame 




mane sprain 


por'celain same 




crane stain 


ap per tain' tame 




sane twain 


ascertain aim 




vane vain 


entertain claim 




wane wain 


skein maim 




mem' brane swain 


rein ac claim' 




hu mane' gain 


' vein de claim 




in sane chU' blain 


feint re claim 




pro fane or dain' 


rein? pro claim 




ur bane di§ dain 


hei'nous ex claim 




Which word end* in atnut Which in cful What words in uJtl in 
aignl iheignl What end in, or contain ein ? 






LESSON LXXXV. 


i 


In the following words \ 


I sounds as in gate, go, gun. 




Gift giff 


girt gim let > 
get gim blet * 


' 


gimp gild 




give gird 


gear gid dy 




gilt girl 


geese giz zard 




giU/ girth 


gig' gle gir die 



44 



THE PRACTICAL 



trigger 
dag ger 
stag ger 
swag ger 
crag ged 
shag ged 
dog ged 
rug ged 
rag ged 

# The first 
nounced as if 



craggy 
shag gy 
wag gish 
foggy 
drug gist 
slug gish 
gewgaw 
tiger 
au ger 



mau ger > 
mau gre > 
mea ger > 
mea gre > 
eager 
target 
be get' 
for get , 
be gin 



syllable in this and the following 
it ended with g. 



for give 
dog' ger el 
wrag ger y 
to geth' er 
an' ger* 
fin ger 
lin ger 
hun ger 
Ion ger i 

words is pro- 



LESSON LXXXVI. 



Win' ter, be' gins. 



deep, car' lies. 




farm' er. horse, 
hop' ping. 

The Planting. 

The winter is past 
It begins to be warm. 
The farmer ploughs his land. 
His son drives the horse. 
The plough turns up the 
ground, and makes deep 
furrows. 
Then he plants the corn. The sun shines. 
The showers fall. The blades spring up, and 
grow fast. The farmer must take care of his 
corn. He ploughs the ground once more. He 
hoes out the weeds, and makes little hills around 
the blades.- Look at that black bird. What is 
he doing in the furrow ? He follows th^ farmer 
in his work„ and picks up the small worms* He 
carries them to his nest, and gives them to the 
young birds for food. He will soon be back to 
- ^ret more, hopping about in the furrow. Do not 





SPELLItfO-SOOK- 


45 


, — ... 

"kill him. It is wrong ; for he does much good 


■to the 


farmer. He destroys the 


worms that 


would hurt the corn. 






LESSON LXXXVIL 




.Words in 


which ay, ey, ei, and ai have the sound of a as in 




, hate. 

'stray /Wedne§ day* 




I$ay 


in vei^A' 


day 


say Thur§ day* 


nei^A' bor 


fay 


stay Fri day* 


paint 


gay 


way Sat' ur day* 


faint 


inay 


sway yes ter day 
de cay 7 / hoi y day 


plaint 


■jay- 


saint 


I^y 


delay sley 


taint 


■ clay 


re lay they 


quaint 


Pay 


al lay - whey 


faith 


flplay 


: dis play dey 


waist 


slay 


dis may bey 


waive f 


may 


de fray prey 


dai' ly 


nay 


ar ray hey 7 day 


dain ty 


pay 


be tray pur vey 7 


dai ry 


ray 


por tray o bey 


dai §y 


bray 


a stray " con vey 


rai ment 


dray 


assay survey 


ac quaint 


fray 


es say sur vey 7 or 


at taint 


gray 


be wray con vey ance 


com plainf 


pray 


Sun / day* neigh 


con straint 


spray 


Mon day* "weigh 


dis traint 


tray 
, Mnd 


Tue§ day* slei^A^ 


re straint 


iese words ay sounds obscurely, t Some, wave. ., ' 


.. 


What words end in, or contain ey 1 What $%gh 1 


'" 


LESSON LXXXVIIL 


v 


Words in 


which a, ai, ei, and ao have the sound of a as in hate. 


Vale 


.bale male 


sale 


ale 


hale pale 


tale 



1 46 



THE PRACTICAL 



'pstale 
wale 
re gale' 
in hale 
im pale ) 
em pale j 
ail 
bail 
fan 
hail 

J ail J 

gaol*) 

jail' er ) 

gaol er*j 

flail 

mail 

nail 

snail 

pail 

rail 

frail 



til) 



trail 
sail 
tail 
vail 
veil 
quail 
wail 
frail' ty 
sail or . 
tail or 
as sail' 
de tail 
en tail 
re tail 
curtail 
a vail 
pre vail 
fade 
bade 
shade 
lade 



/blade 
glade 
made 
spade 
trade 
wade 
bro cade' 
cas cade 
ar cade 
bri gade 
cock ade 
block ade 
de grade 
e vade 
pa rade 
per vade 
in vade 
per suade 
dis suade 
era sade 
stock ade 



/la rade 
com' rade 
bar ri cade'' 
ser e nade 
lem on ade 
can non ade 

- col on nade 
mas quer ade 
ret ro grade 
bal us trade 
pal i sade 
cav al cade 
prom e nade 
a fraid' 
up braid 
maid 
aid 
braid 
laid 
paid 
staid 



What words end in aid t Do any others, with this sound, end in «ut, 
except compounds 1 • p ron ounced jale, ja' ler. 

LESSON LXXXIX. 
Words in whidh a, ai, ea, and ei have the sound of a as in 

hate. 



Hate 

pate 

rate 

grate 

prate 

sate 

state 

Me 



bait 
gait 
plait 
trait 
strait 
;wfiit 
a waif 
trait' or > 



gait er 
great 
straight 
eight 
wei^At 
freight 
eighth (auh) 
eigh' teen 



eigh teenth 
eighty 
in nate 
stag nate 
tes tate 
fil trate • 
frus tra* 
die tate » 

Tij- . -T- 



<c 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



a n \ 

47* 



~7. 



narrate 

ornate 

quad'rate 

mrgrate 

vacate 

vrbrate 

locate 

arbate' 

de'bate 

"Which word 
contain eight 1 



/col late 
col' lo cate 
suf fo cate 
(lis lo cate 
in vo cate 
rev o cate 
con vo cate 
ab ro gate 
ar ro gate 

ends in eat J Which in aight ? What wordi end in, or 
What ad? Do any others, with this sound, end in aitt 



seMate 
■cremate 
re'late 
dilate 
e late 
inflate 
trans late 
es'tate 
mis tate 



der o gate 
snr ro gate 
per son ate 
in to nate 
dec o rate 
per fo rate 
el e vate 
ren o vate 
i so late ** 



• L&SSONXC. 
Words in which a, ai, ay, ei, e, and ea have the sound of 2 as 
in bare. 

lair 
pair 
stair 
affair/ 
re pair 
impair 
de spair 
cor' sair 
fairy 
pray er 
pa rent 
ap pa' rent 
trans pa rent 
their 
SoWie pronounce theV fore, wheV fore. 

Which word contains ay 1 What words end in «r ? What words end 
in, or contain, ere ? What ear t 



Bare 

care 

scare 

dare 

fare 

hare 

share 

flare 

glare 

mare 

snare 

pare 

spare 

rare 



tare 

stare 

square 

ware 

weF fare 

declare 7 

pre pare 

com pare 

a' ware 

be ware 

air 

fair 

hair 

chair/" 



Aeir ^ 

there 

where 

ere 

there' fore* 

where fore 

bear 

pear 

tear 

swear 

wear 

for bear' 

for swear 

for bear' ance 



They need much whom -nothing will content. 

Tell me with whom you go, and I will tell you what 

you Jo. 

"i T i n 1 ~T- • " =aHBB 



48 



THl PRACTICAL 







LESSON XCL 

Sum' mer. ri' pens, lies. work' ed(workt). pai' 

good' ness. 

The Husking. 

Now it is summer. 

The farmer is getting in his 

grain. 
See the tall corn, how it 
waves in the wind. . Soon 
the soft silk will be seen, 
and the c jrn begin to grow 
yellow. It ripens fast in the warm sun. It is 
quite ripe. The farmer and his sons pick it 
They carry it home to the barn. They are glad 
to see it as it lies on the floor. They worked 
hard to get it, and are well paid for their toiL 

The farmer asks some men and boys, to come 
and help him husk the corn. They are kind, and 
willing to do it. They come in the evening. 
As they work, they talk, and sing, and are happy. 
The farmer entertains them welL He gives 
them plenty of good food, and pure, sweet water. 
They want no rum, nor strong drink. He thanks 
them for helping him, and is grateful to God for 
his goodness. — They all go home before it is 
late. 

lesson xcn. 

Words in which o, oa, ou, and oo have the aomtd of 3 as in 

globe. 

bode strode 

code trode 

mode fore bode 

l ode ex plode 






^lobe 

probe 

robe 

-le 



cor rode 
in com mnde' 
ep'i sode 
goad 



1 




*FtLLiKO-BOOl£. 


49 


load 


%6& 


moulder ) 
molder * 


/blown 


■ road 


JtnoU 


mown 


■ toad 


poll 


poultty 


■ knovnt 


I joke* 


roU 


dome 


op* 


1 smoke* 


scroll 


'• coriift : 


"scope 


I poke 


droll 


foam : 


hope 


1 spoke 


stroll 


loam 


slope. . , 




broke 


fell 


roam 


mope 




stroke 


coal 


bone 


grope 




yoka 


foal 


prone 


taftpe 




re voke' 


goal 


cone 


^ e lope' 




invoke 


shoal 


lone 


^in ter lope 4 




provoke 


pa troll' > 
patrol > 


hone 


an' te lope 




con voke 


stone ! ' 


tel e scope" 




a woke 


en roll ) 
en rol > 


shone 


mi cro scope 




croak 


zone . : 


soap 




cloak 


con troll > 
control * 


tone • 


ghost 
boast 




soak 


drone 




oak 


bowl 


throne 


coast 




dole 


soul 


atone' 


roast 




pole 


. mould > 
mold > 


loan 


toast 


. 


sole 


moan 


broach : 




stole 


moult * 
molt > 


fban 


coach 


t. 


whole 


groan 


roach 


i 


pa role' 


yolk 


own 


approach' 


i 


ca jole 


sold 


shown ' 


en crouch 


1 . 


con dole 


told 


flown 


reproach ' 




con sole 


shonl'der^ 


f grown 


brooch -'' 


i 


What word* end in oad ? in o*k 


t mod? impel! 


^♦W,arcaaUinft! 




in «iu 7 in omb f in oan ? in own T 


in oH ? in ooek 1 








LESSON XCIIL 




i 


Words ending ia 6$« 


j, &e, ows, 5e$, end (fee. f ' 




R6?e 


clo§e 


ho?e 


' pro§e 


1 


nose 


chose 


pose 


lriclose'y 



50 


THB 


PJUOTKUU. 




£ro$e . 


j>*(»PQ§e 


transpoge 


gallovnp* 


de*poge . 


urppge 


interpose' 


close 


dis*clofge 


comvpofe 


doze 


dose* 


fore v clo?e 


oppose 


aT oe$ . . 


mo rose' 


re % po§e 


. sup>pof e 


mal lowf 


• jo 00*6 


ex^po^e 


dis^>o$e 


bel low$* 


verbote 


* 


Some pronounce beT lus, gal' 


10a. 


What vrorcb end in oze, in oc^ and mcf ? Which 


words an apelt alike 


bat pronouMd differently 1 






. : 


LEMON XCIV. 




Words in ykich o, oa, ed, end ou have die sound of dn a 


r 


i 


glebe. 




More: 


forge 
afford' 


course ' 


vote 


bore 


mourn 


ttrote 


lore 


suptport 


bourn* 


de vote' 


ore 


import 


borne 


de note 


snore 


export 


worn ( 


an' ec dote 


score 


transport 


shorn 


an ti dote 


sore* 


comport 


sworn 


gross 


tore 
pore 


g</iy 
sto ry 


fourth 
: gourd 


en gross' 
clothe 


wore 


' oar 


court 


quoth f 


swore 


xoar' 


con 7 course 


both 


yore 


hoar 


re source / 


sloth t 


a N dore' ' 


soar 


dis course 


boat 


be^ibre 


board 


in' ter course coat 


de plow . 


hoard 


horde 


bloat 


explore 


coarse ; 


oote 


float 


implore 


hoarse 


dote 

mofe 


gloat 


re store 


door 


goat 


conrfmodore floor 


smote 


moat 


syc a more 


four 


rote 


throat 


forth 
sword 


pour 
source 


quote 
shote >. 


afloaf 
loaA - 

fr,kwffi^sH&. 


^_ * Some pronounce the ou as o in move. tC 




8FBLI.IH9-BOOK. 51 

.. 'oath stove grove 

oath? clove throve ' 

oats cove dAve 

loath 7 some rove wfcve 

boat swain* strove low 7 er 

# Others pronounce 15th, bd"sn. 
What wokU end is, or contain oar? whatoorl What end in r&, «#, 

LESSON JTCK 
Words ending in ase, ass, ace, aze, size, ase, aise, and ize. 



th€? 



Base 


*J>lace 


case 


space 


chase 


brace 


vatse 


grace 


bass 


trace 


a base 7 


de face 7 


de base 


ef face 


e rase 


mi lace 


face 


re place 


lace 


dis place 


mace 


misplace 


pace/ 


gn macOj 



7 em brace 


baize , 


dis grace 
re trace 


maize ) 
maiz J 


gaze 

haze 

blaze 

glaze 

maze 


ra§e 

pha§e 

phrase 

par 7 a phra§e 

fhai^e 


raze 


rai§e 


craze 


praise - 


graze 
a maze 7 /. 


ap praise' ) 
ap prize j 



What words and in ase and &» ? What in aizt, and aist t 

LESSON XCVf. 

Words in which a, an, aw, awe, oa, and ou hare the sound of 

a as in ball. 



ba/k 

ca/k 

cha/k 

taflt 

staik 

dwarf 

wharif; 



thwart 
swart 
warmth 
al 7 ter 
al der 
al waj^ 
' al so 
cal dron. 



wa ter 
thrall dom ) 
thral dom j 
swarth y 
war fare 
warble 
ward en 
ward robe 



[52 


Tfil PRACTICAL 


j 


n 


yfwwlike 
war rior* 


' gaud y 
. fau cet 


/"a «r o naut j 
mausoleum j 




vmxr ing 


nau# h ty 


awe ■ 




altar 


hmgh ty 


hawk 




bal sam 


ban ble 


brawl 




with al' 


caustic 


drawl 




re ward 


au tumra 


spawn 


m 


re call 


au gur 


yawl 




befall 
in thrall 


Au gust 
be daub' 


yawn* 
aw' nil 


in stall 


de fraud 


awn ing 




ap pall 


as saiilt 


haw thorn 




athwart 


a vaunt 


law ful 




a ward 


ap plaud 


law suit 




taZk' a tive 


ap plau$e 
de bauch 


taw dry 




aid er man 


taw ny 




sauce 


aug ment 


awk ward 




gauzey 
laud 


an' di ble 


torn' a hawk 




au di ence; 


straw ber ry 




jcaught 


^u di tor 


broad 




tau^M 


au thor isse 


groat 




^mght 


au to crat 


a broad' 




frau^At 


au spi ce$ 


sought 




sagkt 


fratid u lent 


thought 


i 


slau^A' ter 


laud a ble 


bou^At 




dmxgh ter 


nau ti lus 


brou^At 




audit 


au turn' nal 


fou^At 




jplau dit 


au then tic 


wrought 




vm thor 


ma raud er 


nought 


, 


auburn 


au thor' i ty 


ou^At 




lau rel 


au torn a ton 


be sou^Atf 




pau per 


tau tol o gy 


cough t 




sau cer 


au' di to ry 


trouejh f , 




■^ What wond* contain oa 1 What run tain or end in tmgk 7 




Pronounced war' yur. t Pronounced kauf, tmuf. 




It 


m 




_^i 



1P£LL1NO-BOOK. 



« 



LESSON XCVIL 
ords in which a and au hare the Bound of I at ia"wad.- 

false hood 



F&se 
swath 
swath? 
quash \ \ 
wast* 
what 
wal' let 
wal nut 
wan der 
wanton 
waddle 
swaddle 
waffle j 

Tar'dy, does. 



pal frey 
pal try 

pal ?y 
swal low 
wallow 
wampum 
fal ter 
halt er 
pal ter 
/?sal ter 
quadrant 
quarry 



quart er 
quarrel 
squan der 
squad ron 
war rant 
war ren 
quad' ru ped 
quali ty 
quan ti ty 
quad ru pie 
laud arium 
sub ar tern 
e quaKi tvj > 



lesson xcvm. 

hear. goes. teach' er. gone. 
\The Tardy Boy. \ 

That boy is sliding on the ice. 
He has J>ut his books on the 
* stone. Y 

He was on the way to schopL 
His mother told hun to make 
haste, lest he should ite 
too late ; for it would soon 
be tame fc'jplock. But he does* hot love his books. 
He is a lazy boy, and very fond of piajr:' The 
jschdol-befl. rings.- He hears it, aftid should go 
jquidkiy^'teut he does not stop sliding. He slides 
a long tiihe. At' last, he goes to school. He* is 
very late. The teacher tells him he has done 
wrong, »ad that he must stay after his school- 




54 



THE PRACTICAL 



1 



mates have gone home. This will make him 
sony. His parents will be sorry too. For he 
will have to tell them of it. Good boys and 
girls will take care never to be tardy at school. 
Are you ever tardy 1 

lesson xcix. 

.Words In which a, au, and ea have the sound of a as in bar. 

Grant ba/m . guard branch 

chant cairn aunt ' stanch, 

pant psa/m daunt draft > 

ant qua/m haunt draught' 

slant pa/m jaunt laugh (laf ) 

snath . a/m§ flaunt laugh 7 ter 

wrath ca/f gaunt laugh 7 a ble 

aslant" hatf vaunt* hearth 

ca tsurh : ca?ve taunt hiart 

a gAast ha/ve saun' ter h*art' y 

en chant salve haunch heart less 

rAu' barb j?saZm' ist launch ) hart 

raspberry psalm' ody lanch > ay# 
, * Some pronounce vawnt. 

LESSON a 
Words ending in et, it, ute, ait, oa*, ot, ut, and at 



'Mir' ket 
b^s ket 
cas ket 
gant let ) 
gaunt let j 
scar let 
var let 
IjBtn cet 
pet 



hab it 
rab bit 
orb it 
credit 
limit 
summit 
vom it 
her mit 
meirit 
spirit 



por trait 
ri ot 
pi lot 
wain scot 
waist coat 
hir lot 
ab bot 
tur bot . 
fag got 
maggot 



horn et 
trumpet 
tippet 
pup pet 
clar et. 
tab ret 
garret 
fer re* 
lap pet 
oa. set 



49BU.IM-BSM. 



» 



' fet . , 
gib bet 
dulcet 
hatgh et 
latch et ! 
fresh ej 
jack et > 
rack 4t , 
pack it 
brack et 
pick et » 
thick et 
crick et •! 
tick et 
wick et 
dock et 
lock «t 



cul prit 

vi$ it 
:ex it 

transit 

minute (it) 

in hat/ it 
tophab it 

rhib it 
crep it 
in her it ; 
depb? it 
' de mer it 



big*ot , 
ingot 
spigot 
ballot 
despot 
car lot 
par rot 
pivot t: 
la'piicot ; 
pa t» ot* 
fid iet 
joty glot 



circuit (kit) > ■ al iquot 
*bfe cuit ; ; :gam*ut 
conduit (da) j elmtnut 
je? u it oar at 

bfan e fit duo at ^ 

• Some, pSf riot 
vadiauUT mwitfihkmUt bt*U? mmtt tfrife&f 



cio?;et 
' gusset 
ru« set 
^dvet: 
velvet 
bkriqpet 
ttAis ket 
tablet 
dftfrkt 
gt&itet 
fad let 
I'wllttt ; 
billet 
♦fillet 
skillet 
gullet 



LE980NCL 
Words ending in et, it, ifa q;ht»*it, 



Se 7 cret, 
diet 
qui et 
bracelet 
po et 
caret 
era et 
su et 
b&llet , 

p^iet - :, 

,J$fck et 
rock et J 



7 !: 



socket 
blanket 

trinket 
,.ringlet 
camlet 
hamlet 
inlet 
chap let 
trip let 
corse let 
helm et 
u nit 



ute, ip 9 ep, and op. 
vCtib* 

, kf sprit ' tli 

; ; gi^nite 
1 res pite ) r. , 
res pit J ; 
definite 
ia£nite 
hypoe#e £ 

;tB$rqui#*fch h 

*. «x qui $ite 



56 



THE PRACTICAL 



T 



'ap po ?ite 



op po flite 
fa vor ite 
com po?' ite 
fortf night 
forfeit 
surfeit 
coun' ter feit 
con trib'ute 
dis tribute 
at trib lite 
em' met 
plum met 
com et 
planet 
val et 
ten et 
mag net 
signet „ 



Tire 

dire 

sire 

ire 

quire I 

squire 

wire 

ac qtnrfc* 

requfrfe 



run net ^vi o let 

brisk et bay o net 

front let in ter' pret 

lin net 

bon net 

sonnet 

budget 

fidg et 

al'pha bet 

ep i thct 

am u let 

tit n let 

cabinet 

ep au let 

baronet 

coronet 

min a ret 

par a pet 

min u et . 

Some pronounce hlz' sup. 

Whit wondj end might 7 in at ? in uic 7 in ep? 

LESSON OIL 
Word* ending in ire, yre, ipe, and ype, 

con spire 
as pire 
re spire 



tuf lip 
cow slip 
gos sip 
turnip ) 
tur nep j 
pars nep 
bisb op 
gal lop 
seal lop 
shal lop 
•col lop 
hys sop* 
* ide vel' op 
en vel op ) 
en Tel ope j 



adiril* r 




m spire 
pet spire 

1 expire 
trans pire 
de ?ire 

"' te tire 
entire 



at tire 
sat' ire 
vampire 
em pire 
urn pire 
pis mire 
quag mire 
lyre 
pyre 
snipe 



"^Whit wordt end in yrfc f it t yft ? 



gripe 

ripe 
tripe 
stripe 
wipe 
type 
an' 
pro to 
ster'e p 



u f, 




mmmmm 



•*X**Uf<**4ftB« 



n 



LESSON Cfll 
In the following words yte, ight, and eight are pronounced Re. 

Mite {Jnyite , , 
bite Ve q\iite 

spite v ' ,ri; in diet (to)' 
rite • Write 

sprite le vite 
trite. '' o8n trite 
site ex' pe dite ' 

write '-• h> f Jfec on <Ste 
ex cite' ki feat el Ete 
: ' J £* n <Bte 
»pbr a site 
;/ appetite 
'ptoselyte 
• ; cckf mop 7 o lite wight \ highft (Mwh) 



irf rite 
re elte 
indite 
polite 
unite 1 
despite 



fight, 

"" ?ht de light 

Irht anp-*' 

it af fright 

plight twi' light 

slight flighty 

night might y . 

rigfit light eit 

bright brighten 

fHgk tighten 
flmght fnght'en 

sight sleighf 



ti^ht ( height 
wight (highft ^ 
ttfoht' in gule/Ataight height en 

hi the folloWing words yne and ign are pronounced ine. 



Difae 

fine' 

shine 

vine 

kine 

line 

minei. 

nine?/'* ni *te fine 

pine , • 

spine 

brine 1 

shrine 1 

thine l 



twine 
• ^ winfe *> v ! 

swine* 

tine . 
. .saline' 

com bine 
iil 'define 



^con fine 

' "de cline 

' '.recline 

Yin cline 

,'canine 



re pine 

•8U'>ltt fe l " 
o&i^cubhke 

t pi^telljne 

' a^uUipe . 
eg Ian tine 
in ter line n 
in fan tine 
por en pine 

/tur pen, tins 
yal en tine' 

; . brig an tine 
an o dyne 



What word* end in, or contain ign ? 
3« 



sft : per fine 

•sigh--, 
$n'trig*i 
as sign' 

J^e.nign 

,pon sign 
con <%n 

. de sign 
re §ign 
ina lign , 
coun' ter sign 
as sign ee' 
con sign ee f * 



PRACTICAL 



LJESSON CV. 
Les' son. read. 

TAc Gtn fl>fo loved herSook 






is 



Here is Jane once more 
She is coming from school, 

with a book in her hand. 
She looks happy. Why 

she happy ? 
Sh$ was agoqdgi^l at schooL 
She did not laugh nor play ; 
but was attentive to her lessons, a^4 careful to 
obey her teacher She was kind to "her school 
mates, and did to them as she woul4 wish them 
to do to her. *They all love- her p*uch. . The 
tether #ave Her j the book, ,whipjbi>^he h^pjb^ 
her hand, becaijss she behaved jve^L It is a 
useful book, wad she will love to read it She 
will carry it home. Her father and mother will 
be glad to see it, and to find that Jan# was a 
good girl ait school. Good boys and girls try 
to behave well at school, because & makes their 
parents happy. J>o you&& so ? ■,;..-*. ^ m( s 



r 



Ld&SON CVL . 



,nl1 



WorSs etiifing in fee, l&k, f ,'Igh, ye, 1^; left, 'and 
•Ice' ; ihrice '/'". \fise <# ,' '^cod 



Dice^ 

mice 

rice 

vice 

lice 

splice 

slice 

spice 



ihii 

iprice ; 
trice 
twice 
en tice / 
ad vice 
de vice 
rise 



fise 

pre cise' : 

con cise 

par' a dise 

wxj 

\my 

defy 7 

ally 



ilul 

f I 



r com ply 
un ply 
re ply 
apply ^ 
sup ply 
July . 
de ny 
de cry 



descry modify /vilify bye 

espy mollify 1 petrify eye 

re ly mor ti fy viv i fy dye 

awry nullify certify' rye ' : 

beou'ti;fy occupy liquefy : lye r> 

cru' ci fy os si ty am pli fy t pie 

glo ri fy rar e fy clas *i fy hie * »• 

notify; ratify : multiply! did • ' 

purify rectify falsify ., lie 

pu tre ij. jsanc tpL fy qual i fy > ti* , m.h\\ 

sti^pefy. /satisfy j&iifyj, 1|8 vi*^ UmJ 

deify r y r sigmfe j >|ind^(|f^|y fiknf d/rn 

dig iudy r p #im pj&jyr » , per scjft iffy pitd jkrw 

for ti to| u ,(stul ti fyj Vl 1 den ti fy • tortl^r. tt 

pat |^i^ lt ]ter ri fy; r , di vers i fy rak& r » / 

just fife .Justify, a «hl$* .; al'kfcfcu 

lullaby , verify imffh : . .;t gdat Lr' 

rnagj ^pti fy vers i fyy r sigrA •• .r Mo^i 

in if What e^d in efyf : ' ..» j : , Vl 

In the fefrwig wtjfe.n* at tht •*L t» lOettt. 

Bog ec' logue - vague brogue 

cog dem' a gogue plague vogue, i 

flog catalogue league , t rogue 

fog ep i logue col 7 league rogtt' ish 

hog dec a logue in trigue'* rogw' er y 

jog syn a gogue fa tigue * pro rogue" 

log ped a gogue ha rangue dis em bogue' 

frog di a logup/ tongue (tCfog) pro 7 loguq^ 
• Pronounced in trSg', fa tegl 



TUB PKACTICjLL 



<\ n\ 



., JLJSSSQN CVX1f.r i 

7 ^Vbrds ending, in eel, id, e& ml, and ud. 



ral/ id 
morbid 
tur bid A 
flac did 
r^hicia^ 
vis cid 
can did 



•^torpid 1 
sap id ''' 
■'- ar id « ; ' 
'ac rid 1 ■! 
bed ridr : 
florid '" 
hor rid? . 



spleil did ■■> torrid 



Ha' tred -i 
a ged » 
na ked 
sa cred> i* 
sto ried> > 
tro phiei* 
gnkrl ed • 
pal yieiir 
crab bedil 
wick id : 
nrretchjod 
kin dried 
huilifaied 
studied ^ 
ifewrantA' 
big's* ad,. 
i$' o la ted 
antiquated limpid 
• Pronounced lang'gwrf * ^^B^rs^ronounce in va leed*. 



%*alid 
gdid 
pal lid 
sol id 
timid 
jap id 
vapid 
tep id 



Ian 
"lKq^d ir : f 
> livid-* 
5 vivid * l 
w fer vit^* 
lu cid ' 



'stupid ' ' 

drri f i# 
' flu id ' 
^fetid 1 ' v : 
t: -squal v k : 

In valid t; 

in sip id 
sal' aft f " 
fcall^T 1 
f) WtKM' 
1 ^yndd 1 
iri ad 



tu ndA r ^ (ffl^ 
humid Hrtfriad 
>u trid l 6rym y pi ad 



G 



rid tal' mu^/ 



Field. 




LESSON PIX. 
dai' sy. pret'ty. eVf er*/. 

The Field Daisy. t 

Tip a pretty, little thing,, , 
Always coming with the Spring. 
In the meadows green I'm found, 
Peeping; just abore the ground j 
And my stalk is powered fiat 
With a white and yellow hat. 



*1 



, Lrttle lady, when you pass 
•I Lightly o'er the tender grass, 
&kip about, but plonot tread " 
©# itty meek and lowly head ; 
» For I always seem to say, 
' " Chilly Winter 's gone away." 



) i *i» 



vr*' 



♦ * , ■ . . . 
'". . •'"' 4 Where is' God?' 

i» «■ » i' • . " ' ' ' j 

, In the pun, the moon, the sky ; , j 

# u 0n4h^ mountain, wild and high ; 
. , Jn the thunder, in the fp, 

^ In ^'grore, the^waoAthe plain; 
In the little birds that ring ; 
God is seen In everything. " 



to ijiiiKw adi .». 1J4EAAQN Q%> . „ ,*^ »j.u.. ..*..../< 
Words in which ear, eer, ere, ire, aad ier have the sound of ere. 

jfeer : • < 

leer « 

sneer- ^ *•. ' 

jjeer - - 

seer •• I «> "• 

queer 

steer . 

» veer * 
ve n«er # 

• oa rear . 1/ 
mountain eer'* 
engineer 
d©m i neer i > 
Vol nil teer 



Cleat* >; 


year j ^ 


deta !'// 


gear j u 


fete : I) 


beriid* 


heofi : 


besmear' 


skear • 


ertde^r 


blear 1 


ap pear *; 


i ear : 


up rear 


1 smear 1 


ar reat . 


nealr ,;' 


dis aj) pear' 


speaar 


appearance » • 


rear ^ 


beer 


! drear .. 


deer 


sear 


cheer 


tear 


sheer' < 




* Some pronouiice herd. 



ft* 



THE PRACTICAL 



son net eer /^siii cere' 
gaz et teer . ad here 
pam phlet eer co here 
fu §il eer aus tere 

mu ti neer re veire 



pi o neer 1 
o ver seer 
pri va teer 
mu let eer 
auc tion eer 
char i ot eer^ 
mere 



se vere 

Eer se vere / 
emfi sphere 
at mos phere 
shire* 
bier 
tier 



^gla ci«r* 
c&ih ier 
dernier 
fin an tier 7 
brig % dier 
gren a dier 
cav a lier 
?hev a Uer 
9han de lier 
gon do lier 
can non ier 
buc anier 



sere pier cttor as sier 

sphere fron tier' r (kwer as seer 

* Some froBcmnce shire, gii sh£r'. t 



>n 



Words in 

tBead 
ead 
telead 

read 
,»uead 
read 
deed 
feed 
heed 
bleed 
meed 
need 
speed 
reed 
breed 



LESSON CXI. 
which ea, ee, e, { jfei, ?ey**d i^have the sound of § as 
•j . inhere. -.. > fa\\n .*.. ^ n-7! 

creed , se cede teat/: V ) 

freed con cede r wheat 

seed im pede ; de feaf 

w$ed in ter <&de' re peat 

steed su per sede en toeat 

s^bc cged' eat re treat 

pro ceed beat beet - 

ex ceed feat . fee* 

indeed cheat sheet 

mis deed bleat - fleet 

a greed heat sleet 

cede meat meet 

. ac cede 7 neat greet 

re cede peat : , street 

pre cede : treat /- * sweet / 



" 


UFBLLmOfMOWt. 


69 


dis creetf 


beak .. 


freak 


creek** 


mete 


leak 


screak 


greek 


re plete' 


bleak 


squeak 


seek 


com plete 


sneak 


weak 


week 1 


se crete 


peak 


cheek 


eke , 


f c5n' crete 


speak 


leek 


shriek 


lob 7 so lete 


streak 


sleek 


pique (pfik) 


de ceit' 


tweak 


meek 


ob lique'f 


con ceit 


wreak 


reek 


an tique 


re ceipt 


creak 


peek 


ii nique 


i 


• Others pronounce krlk, f ob like. i 


What words end in tad? i» #*rfr/ in «te/ i* tit and dtp* 1 inektf in 


t«£ and ique T 


t 




• i. 




LESSON CXIL 




Words in; which ea, ee, ei, 


e, i, ie, and e0 have the sound of. 3 




» iq here. 




Deal 


keel 


stream' er 


yean 


heal 


peel 


squeam ish 


sheen 


meal 


reel 


deem 


keen 


peal 


kneel 


seem 


spleen 


seal ., T 


steel i 


teem ■ ;. 


screen ) 
skreea j 


steal. 


gen teel' 


re deem 7 


fveal 


teil 


es teem 


green 


gsqueai 


ceil 


theme 


seen 


Bweal 


beam 


ex treme' 


teen 


zeal 


gleam 


su pre me 


queen 


• con ceal' 


ream 


bias pheme 


ween 


con geal 


scream 


bean 


ca reen' 


ap peal 


cream 


dean 


tu reen 


ire peal 


dream 


lean 


be tween 


re veal 


stream 


clean 


pis ta reen' 


eel 


seam 


glean 


scene 


feel 


team 


mean 


ob scene' 


heel ! 


steam 


wean ,r 


se rene 



64 THE PRACTICAL 




ter rene ma rine mien keep 




con vehe . rou;tine*' mari da rin 7 deep* aU 1 


gan 7 grdne mag a zine 7 weep ' reap « 1 


contravene 7 quarantine stefep- keap ft ] 


su per vene ma qhi' nist sweep • leap * ] 


in ter Vene ma phin 7 at y sleep tfheap m 


ravine 7 lien : sheep - neap 1 - m 


Ima <?hine sein ) . peep * stefc 7 pie 1 
[ton tine . seine \ . . creep. % people IB 


i What word* $ld in eil? ia,eme? mine? utiient in tin? aad im *n rfif 


What word contains «,? * ^ ^^ ^^ . . ; . 


1 


. ••• ■ lesson cxm. 


■ ' , 


Words in which ea, ee, ie, and ei, have the sound of 6 as in 




.'• hw« 




jBSach priest grief re Iieve 
(bleach teeth chief re prieve 


| 


leach wreath lief retrieve ,] 


preach heath- -••• thief grievous *• 




preach it *heath • Mief griev ancfe 




beach seethe be lief con ceive 7 
fteacli ;T'. n ;wreath m-rt Uef i >^fie ceive 


1 




fim peach 7 i sheathe >' sleevk + $ter deive ' 




!beech breathe peev 7 ish ** ceive ?i V 


leech be neath 7 cleave ei 7 the*- > Ij 


speech be queatib heave nei ther ' Ij 


♦breech* : wreath§ leave • leisure* 


\ 


-'screech ♦ sheath^ . Weave seizure *■• 




jbe seech' * beef be reave 7 * invei 7 gle 




ibeast t ; -teef thieve o bei sanoe 




least • sheaf grieve field • 




[yeast - }eaf * aggrieve 7 shield 


- 


'east . deaf* ». a chieve - wield 




1 feast *< » briefy * 'be li^ve yield 




• Some^pronounce bnch, def, lezh ur. 




> 





SPELLING-BOOK. 65 






vm wield' y siege ea' $y sieve (sfr) 

^end be siege 7 bea ver mis' chief (chif) 

liege leash wea ry hand' ker chief 

What word* end it.icst? in tafl in em ? What others contain ei f 

LESSON CXTfi 
Words ending in ea, ay, «y, ie, i, •, and ee. 

Pea miotley bee vendee 

lea lamprey fee mortgagee' 

flea chimney Anee obligee 

tea guinea thee refugee 

plea -clayey, lee deb an phee 

sea prairie flee ap pel lee 

ye^t* specie f J^lee 4 referee 

bo hea' cau §ey , iree dis a fp&e 

key parley tree promisee 

quay (ke) bar ley three o ver see 

lack' ey pars ley see . leg a tee 

jodk~ej ban dif li lev 7 ee gwar an tee 

turkey com tfiit tee coffee ab sen tee . 

med ley sper ma ce' ti gran dee' pat en tee 

al ley ac' me a gree dev o tee 

gal ley ; sifii' i Ie de gree rep ar tee 

val ley , hyper' bo le gran tee war ran tee 

vol ley e pit o me trus tee ju' bi lee 

pulley ek tern pore settee pedigree 

hackney, ca tas tro phe de cree rhar 1 see 

kid ney • g, pos tro phe ra zee Sad du cee 
* Some pronounce ya. f Pronounced spe' shy. 
' What wt>ids end in 6a? in ay I in ie? sad mi? 

LESSON CXV. 

j Words in which ea, ee, ie, ei, e, and i, in irionosyllables and 

the last syllables, have the sound of e as in here. 

Please I fea?e di$ ea$e 

ea§e ap pea§e' chee§e 



S*ABtf«feis 



66 



THE PHACflCJAt 



^r 



the§e 
breeze 
wheeze 
freeze 
squeeze 
frieze 
seizq 
lee§ 
se'rief 
ob'sequie? 
* Pronounced ab 

What words 



ab o rig' i ne§ * peace 
an tip 7 o de§f fleece 
cease 



lease 
crease 
grease* 
de crewe' 
in crease 
re lease 
de cease 



geese 
niece 
piece 
caprice' 
po liee 
valise 
pe lisse 
fronts is piece 



, 



o rij' e nez. f Some pronounce an' te podz. 
tod in itzt T in eize T iect 1 tec? **d ise t 




* LESSON CXVL 
Nev er. par tak' er. when. 

Proverbs; or short, wise sayings. 

Rolling the little snowball 

makes the great one. # 
An angry man never wants 

trouble. 
Nothing can need a lie. 
The partaker is as bad as 
the thief. 

A boy is known by the company that he keeps. 
Mitch would have more, and lost all. 
Tardy at school, tardy through life. 
When one will not quarrel, two cannot. 
Be slow to speak of the faults of others. 
A little wrong done to another, is a great wrong 
to one's self. 

Empty things sound the loudest 
One lie makes another. . ». -r.i- ■ 

It is good to begin well; it is better U* ehd 
well. 



SPELLINO-BOOK. 



67 



LESSON CXVIL 
Words of three syllables, accented on the first. 



X>V a dem 
di a gram 
do na tive 
cu ra tive 
lu era tire 
he bra i$m 
he bra 1st * 
di a lect 
hy a cintb 
dy xias ty 
ri val ry 
fe al ty 
rheu ma tiijm 
a the ifjm 
a the 1st 
du el list ) 
du el ist j 
pu ber ty 
cru el ty 
like li hood 
live li hood 
hast i ly 
fti gi tive 
pu ni tive 
u ni form 
u ni corn 
ho li ness 



wa n ness 
pu gi list . 
su i cide , 
ru bi cund 
sto i ci$m 
lone li ness 
boun ti fill 
e go ti?m 
e go tist 
hu mo rist 
eu lo gy 
pro to col 
luck i ly 
guax an ty 
leth ar gy 
am nes ty 
bod i ly 
as ter isk 
com e dy 
el e gy 
en e my 
en er gy 
lib er ty 
ob e lisk 
emp ti ness 
pan the i ? m 
pan the ist 



pen te cost 
pov er ty 
rem e dy 
tap es try 
trav es ty 
un der ling • 
in teLlect 
sol e ci§m 
sym me try 
mag ne ti$m 
maj es ty 
mod es ty 
hon es ty 
mul ber ry 
hap pi ness 
horn i ly 
man i fest 
man i fold 
man li ness 
mul ti form 
prod i gy 
par ti tive 
har di hood 
bar ba ri?m 
tar di ness 
craft i ty 
mount e bank 



LESSON CXV1IL 

Words of three syllables, accented on the first. 

Fam' i ly v . aqueduct *#ofv el ty 

an ces try nov el ist t , ; " tal i^roen 



68 



rm PRACTICAL 



I 



crit i ci?m 
cap ri corn 
difficult 
effigy 
trans itive .1 
po? i tive 
gen i tive 
sub stan tive 
epigram 
handicraft 
hand i work 
lab y rintb 
min is try 
rep ri maad 
rud dinees 
sub si dy • 
mys ti ci?m 
fan ci ful 
mer d ful" 
pit i ful 
plen ti ful 



. ret i cule 
rid i cule 
sat ir ist 
mat ri cide 
fratricide 

Earn cide^ 
omi cide 
pe*ii dy 
destiny 
adjective 
sen si tive 
ab m lute 
col o ny 
colonist 
big ot ry . 
cus to dy 
des pot 19m 
her o ipn 
tnon ody 
.pan o*ply 
* par o dy 



seep ti ci?m ) . pros o dy 
skep ti ci?m j • syl lo gi?m 
ves ti bule cam o mile 



croc o dile 
par ox y§m 
ex or ci?m 
ret ro spect 
mel o dy 
meth od i?m 
meth od ist; > 
col lo quy 
e>b lo quy 
al co hoi 
rAap so dy 
mon tone 
pan to mime 
casuist 
liturgy 
ex pie tive 
oculist 
cal am ny 
in du* try 
in ju ry 
perjiry 
cir'com spect 
man u script 
manumit 



LESSOIf cxix. 

Words of two and three syllables, accented on the first. 



Gar' land 
hoi l^nd. t % 
er rand 
gor mand 
hu§ band' 
husbandry 
vi'&nd 



thou $apd 
legend 
preb end 
dividend 
tev e rend 
stF pend 
sec ond 



al mond 
dT-a mond 
ger' und 

{*oc und 
ler aid 



em e raid 
scaffold 
scab bard 
£tai*d ard 
hag gard 



her" aid ry nig gard 
rib Aid ry slug gard 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



69 



or chard 
tank ard 
drunk ard 
spike nard 
leop ard 
jeop aid 

I custard 
mus tard 
wind waid 
back ward 
vineyard 

Whit 



haz and 
liz ard 
wiz ard 
giz zard 
buz zard 
dotard 
borne waxd 
steward 
steel yard 
fro ward 
to ward 



way ward 
hal herd * 
shep held 
pot sherd 
rec ard 
cupboard 
ballast 
mod est 
hon est 
tern pest 
forest 



short est 

Jong est 

swift est 

larg est 

har vest 

)a pist 

o cust 

)old est 

kind est 

in' ter est 

am e thyst 



waris end in on* f ihunit hdif mlmerdt 



LESSON CXX. 
Words iq which ea, ai,* ay, ie, and ei, have the round of e as 

in red. 



Bread 

dead 

dread 

head 

tread . 

Iea4 

read 

spread. 

stead 

thread . 

breadth 

breath' * 

death 

dearth 

ear& / 

heafch' 

stealth 

wealth 



breast 
cleanse 
earl 
pearl 
hearse \ 
learn ;- 
eap* \ 
ye&rn * 
realm 
dealt ; 
meanl 
; dreamt 
sweat / . 
threat 
search 
break' fast 
clean ly 
ear ly 



earn est 
earth en 
feather 
leath /er 
le^th 0th % 
hags head 
he$v. y 
Jpad en 
deaden 
deadly 
mead ow * 
leav en 
. beav en 
pea? ant 
pheay ant 
plea? ant 
read y . 
stead y 



stead fast 
bedstead 
stealthy 
threaten 
w«»p oji 
weaih er 
zeal ous . 
jeal QU0 • 
abreast 7 
ahead 
be head 
be spread 
be stead 
instead 
re search 
re hearse 
re heads' ai 
Si read y 



70 



THB PRACTICAL 



en deav or , trench, er ous saith says (sex J 

read / i ly treach er y a gain / friend 

read i ness said a gainst heif er 

What words contain at, ay, ic, and ci t 



Chance 
dance 
lance 
glanee 
prance 
trance 
mis chance 7 
per chance 
enhance 
a skance 
en trance' 
ad vance. 
ro mance 
finance 
ex panse 
dense 
sense 
tense 

con dense" 
immense 



LESSON CXXL 
Words ending in nee sad nse. 



dispense 
in tense 
ex pense 
sus pense 
ilk cense 
non' sense 
li cense 



mince 

prince 

since 

quince 

wince 

rinse 

e vince' 



frank fri' cense* con vince 



fence 
hence 
thence 
whence 
pence 

com mence' 
* defence ) 
defense J 
offence ) 
offense j 
pre tence ) 



proV ince 

sconce 

ounce 

bounce 

flounce 

pounce 

trounce 

de nounce' 

re nounce 

announce 

pro nounfee 

diince 



pre tense 

• Others, frSnV hi cense. 
What ^orda end in «ju* 7 in inte? in one*? tad unci T 



Flrce 

parse 
sparse 



verse 
terse 
hearse 



LESSON CXXII. 
Words ending in roe and roe* 

ftetee* scarce 

piefce* • co Srce' 
tierce* amerce 

Some pronounee fers, pers, ters. 



SPJBLLINO-BOOK. 



71 



jre hearse' 

jcvrse 

I nurse 

J purse 
con verse 7 
as perse 
clis perse 
im merse 
a verse 



re verse 
in verse 
per verse 
trans verse 
filter sperse' 
dis burse' 
re im burse' 
com' irieroe 
adverse 

What wordt 



trav erse 
diverse 
u' ni verse 
horse 
corse 
re morse' 
en dorse ) 
in dorse j 
force 

end in nw 7 



di vorce' 
source 
re source' 
coarse 
hoarse 
course 
re course' 
dis course 
con' course 



Gas 

alas' 

sas'sa firas 

ass 

bass 

lass 

class 



LESSON CXXI1L 
Words ending in 8, 33, sse, and see, 

dress 



mass 
pass 
brass 
grass 
a mass' 
re pass 
sur pass 
mo rass 
less 
bless 
tress 
mess 



press 
chess 



ac cess' 
success, 
re cess 
con fess 
pro fess 
ex cess 
mi less 
caress 
address 
re dress ■ . 
e gress 
aggress 
digress 
trans gteasf 
de press 



re press 
im press 
com press 
op press 
distress 
ex press 
as seas 
pos sess 
ab' scess 
in gress 
pre pos sess' 
nev er the less' 
fi hetse' 
: ac qui esce' 
00 a lesce 
ef fer vesce 
boss 
cross* 
loss 
gloss 



72 



THE PRACTICAL 




moss a cross / fuss 

dross . emboss ^ truss 

toss ma tross dis cubs' 

What wordf end in as ! What in «*« 1 in ttct ? What monosyllable* 
end in single * t See Rule IV. for spelling, page 161. . 

LESSON CXXIY. 
Blue. glad' den. 

nude ail things. 
God made the iky so bright and 
blue," 
God made the grass so green ; 
He made the flowers that smell 
so sweet, N 
In pretty colors seen. 

God made the little birds to fly ; 

How sweetly they have sung ; 
And though they soar so very high, 

They wont forget their young. 

God made the cow to give us milk, 

The horse for us to use'; 1 
' 111 treat them kindly for hi£ sake, 
rfor dare his gifts abuse. 

God made the sun that fehiijes so bright, , 

And gladdens all I set, > 
It comes to give u* heltt and light; 

Ho# (hankful I should be. 
• * » 
God pjsde the moon And. stars on high, 

To xule the darktor^e nigjit ; 
How bright they jtune in yonder sky, 

To cheer us with their light. 





'bpbllino-book. 


*3 


,. 


LESSON CXXV. 




Words ending in ss, s, se, 


and ce. 


Hiss 


pa ren the sis 
hy poth e sis 


edifice 


kiss 


or i fice 


bliss 


a nal y sis 


av a rice 


miss 


pa ral y sis 


den ti firice 


amis?' 


a mtfh u en' sis 


lie o rice 


re miss 


no' tice (tfa) 


ar mis tice 


(Ms miss 


powl tice 
p jatm dice 


ar ti fice ' • 


a byss 


ac com' plica 


l'ris 


of fice 


ap pren tice 


ba sis 


•mal ice 


mor' tise 


cri sis 


surplice 


prom ise ! 


gra tis 


cornice 


fran chi§e 


clas sis 


cop pice 
sol stice 


prac tice 


der vis 


treat ise 


ax is 


just ice 
lat tice 


pref ace 


em' pha sis 


sur face 


syn the sis 


crev ice 


pal ace 


gen e sis 


ttov ice 


neck lace 


o a' sis 


serv ice 


sol ace 


pro bos cis 


lettuce(tfe) 


men ace 


el lip sis 


tor toise 


pinnace 


sy nop sis 


cow' ard ice 


furnace 


me trop' o lis 


pre] u dice 


ter race 


an tith e sis 


ben e fice 


pur chase 


What word* end in y$* t in uee f in oise 


7 in ise? in cm 7 




LESSON CXXVL 




Words ending in 8, ss, and se7 


Can' vas 


c<Sp' per as 


tres pass 


at las 


er y sip' e las 


1 can vas£ 


bi as 


wind' lass 


har ass 




4 





74 



&mmmm 



THE PRACTICAL 



cut lass 
car cass 
em bar 7 rags 
ab 7 bess - 
prin c^ss : 
reckless;, .. 
burgess* r ; 
em presp , 
wit ness . 
congress"* 
prog ress 
actress • 
fortress 
mis tresd 
mat tress i 
mat ress y 
but tress 



ruth less * * 
pj press 
jew ess 
prow e»s 
heed less 
peerless 
child less 
seam stfe^e 
lar gess 
har ness 
di 7 o cese 
di o cess 
re' bus 
f o cus 
mu cus 
ge nus 
virus 

Pronounced kdng' 
yfhaX word* end in ete 1 in < 



I 



c!rcus 
sur plus 
Mh xnus 
cen sus 
in 7 cu bus 
ex o dus 
im pe tus 
ge nius 
ra di up 
pros pec 7 tu& 
co los sus 
Le vit 7 icus : 
as par a gus * 
ap pa ra 7 tus 
pur 7 pose 
por poise ) 
porpess j 

gres. 

f in oi*ff 



LESSON CXXVII. 
Words in w^iqh oo, and accented o Jiave the sound of o as in 



move. 



Rood 


booth 


hoof 


ooze 


brood 


.smooth 


woof , 


cool 


mood 


soothe 
toot)i 


broom. 


loon 


1 food 


groom 
lqqm 


swoon . 


moor 


scoop 


roost 


boor 


stoop 


room 


school 


poor 


, whoop . ,. 


goose 


groove 


moot 


swoop 


loose 


boo 7 by- 


boot 


troop 


moose 


boot y 


sho£|t/ c 


,. >roof ,.,.! 


.ttoo^e 


bo §om 


hoot 


proof 


choose 


bride groom 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



75 



pan ta loan 7 
for sooth 7 
a loof - 
bab oon 
bal loon 
bas soon 
buffoon 



dra goon 
fes toon 
harpoon 
lam poon 
la goon 
pla toon 
pon toon 



raccoon 
sa loon 
pol troon 
mon soon 
be hoof 
be hoove ) 
be hove i 



What word ends in zc? lb which words does single o 



re move 
re prove 
im prove 
ap prove 
dis prove 
en tomft 
hec 7 a torn ft 

sound as in move 1 



LESSON CXXVIIL 

Words in which ou, oeu, oo, oe, and the o in monosyllables 

and accented syllables, have the sound of o as in move. 



Group 
croup 
scrap 
sou 
tour 

tour 7 ist * 
car touch 7 
sur tout 
un couth 
con tour 



ac cou tre ) 

ae cou ter | 

ma noeu vre ) 

ma neu ver j 

ren 7 dez vou$ 

tour na ment 

two 

tomb 

coo 

woo 



too 

ado 7 

who ;• 

who§e 

whom 

who 7 so ev er 

cuck 7 oo 

tat too 7 

shoe 

canoe 7 



What words end in ous ? in oo ? in oe? 



Words in which 

Lieu (lu) " 
pur 7 lieu 
lieu ten 7 ant 
a dieu 7 (du) 
cue (ku) 
due 
hue 
flue 



lesson exxix. 

ieu, ue, ew, iew, ou, ewe, and 



blue 
glue 
rue 

true 
sue 

im bue 7 
sub due 
in due 



ven due 
im brue 
ac crue 
en sue 
pur sue 
res 7 cue ' 
kr gue 
a gue 



eau are found. 

val ue 
construe 
is sue* 
tis sue* ' 
stat ue 
v?r tue 
re? 7 i due 
av e nue 



Pronounced Tsh'u, tlsh'ti. 



r» 



THE FRAOTICAJi 



J 



rev e ime 

ret i nue 

con tin' ue 

'impromp tu 

dew 

few 

hew 

chew 

drew 

view 



clew ) 

clue J 

new 

threw 

flew 

brew 

crew 

screw 

shrew 

slew 



stew 

strew 

grew* 

Anew 

yew. 

ewe (yft) 

you 

youth 

Uxough 

mil' dew 



neph ew 
pur view 
cur few 
sin ew 
re neW 
re view 
in'ter view 
beau' ty 
beau' ti fill 
beau te cms 

in ewe ? in ough ? 



What words end in, or contain ieu ? What en^ in u 1 
in teto ? What contain eau ? 



LESSON C^XX. 
Fa' ble. , oft' en. which. thirst af ' ter. 

Tlie Fable of the Crow and the Jug. , 




[A fable is a short story, to teach the truth in a pleasing 
way. /It often supposes things to happen which never did 
. happen — not to deceive us, but to instruct and amuse. You 
will see this in the following fable.] 

A crow* that was dry, strove to quencK her 
thirst in a jug which had some water in it. 
But the neck of the jug was so long and nar- 
row, that the poor bird could not get her head 



SPBLLIKQ-BOOK. 



n 



ul "Well," suaid she, "I •think I can tell what 
to do with you yet Come, let me see ; I will 
fill you partly with stones, and then, I dare say, 
the water will rise to the top, do what you can 
to prevent it." So the crow went to work, as 
you see in the picture. She dropped in one 
stone after another; and in a short time the 
water rose so high, that she had as much df it 
as she pleased. ' 

This fable teaches us, that by planning and 
persevering ', we may often do what we think, at 
first, cannot be done. 

" I cannot" never did any thing. " I will try" 
has done wanders. 



Words in which 

Pure 
lure 

sure (shur) 
in sure" 
as sure 
se cure 
pro cure 
ob scure 
en dure 
abjure 
al lure 
de mure 
im mure 
ma nure 
in ure 
adjure 



LESSON CXXXL 
ure, our, eur, ewer, ew, eu, ude, eud, and ewd 



are found. 

ma ture 
your 

ep / i cure 
si ne cure 
o ver ture 
por trai ture 
pre ma ture 
lig a ture 
sig na ture 
cur va ture 
for feit ure 
fur ni ture 
ap er turet 
am a teur' 
con nois seur 
car^i ca ture* 



mini a ture 
tern per a ture 
lit er a ture 
ju di ca ture 
hew 7 er 
ew er 
skew er 
brew er 
sew er 
pew ter 
neu ter 
crude 
prude 
rude 

pre' lude 
pre elude' 



78 


THE PRACTICAL 


se elude 


Ion gi. tude 


al ti tude 


e hide 


lat i tude 


serv i tude 


in elude 


sol i tude 


prompt i tude 


con elude 


am pli tude 


qui e tude 


ex elude 


mag ni tude 


dis 'qui' e tude 


de hide 


tur pi tude 


si mil i tude 


al lude 


las si tude 


in fin i tude 


db trude 


rec ti tude 


de crep i tude 


in trude ■ 


grat i tude 


vi cis si tude 


pro trude 


at ti tude 


be at i tude 


ex ude 


mul ti tude 


feud 


in' ter lude 


apt i tude 


lewd 


hab i tude 


for ti tude 


shrewd 


What worfi end in our ? in cur T tntudJ in ewd ? in etudt ? 




LESSON CXXXIL 


, 


Words ending in 


a. 


So' fa 


a re a 


< form u la 


ga la 


hy e na 


stain i na 


dra ma 


au ro ra 


al ge bra 


e ra 


er ra ta 


gen e ra 


quo ta 


1 o ta 


op e ra 


so da 


di plo ma 


ret i na 


stra ta 


sa li va 


ef flu' vi a 


ze bra 


um brel la 


rnal ana 


vfl la 


di lem ma 


pen in su la 


stig ma 


e nig ma ,, 


a nath e ma 


dog ma 


ho §an na 


in sig ni a 


astA ma 


pi az za 


a poc ry pha 


i com ma 


mi a$ ma 


phe nom e na 


! vis ta 


ve ran da 


in flu en' za 


stan za 


cu' po la 


pan o ra ma 


man na 


ma ni a 


hy dro pho' bi a 


i de' a 


scrof u la 


encyclope'di a 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



79 



LESSON CXXXI1L 
Words of four and five syllables, accented variously. 

Re std'fative ge ome try figurative 
ac cu §a tive e van gel ist im I ta tive 
pro vo ca tive im pov er ish ca§ u al ty 



in tu j tive fa nat i ci?m 
le vi a than Hi fan ti cide 
en thu §i a§m a nal o gy 
en thu ?i ast a nat o my 
de rog a tive an tag o nist 
conservative apologist 
in} per a tive a ris to crat 
pre rog a tive as trol b gy 
in die a tive a pol o gy 
su per la tive as tron o my 



de fin i tive 
in fin i tive 
in qui? i tive 
re trib u tive 
dis trib u tive 
di min u tive 



e con o my 
ge ol o gy 
mo nop o ly 
theology 
my thol o gy 
phi lol o gy 



con sec u tive tau tol o gy 

antipathy 

a nom a ly 



presbytery 
em i nent ly * 
difficulty 
apoplexy 
casuistry v ' 
contumely l 
pol y the i§m 
affidavit * 
panegyrist / 
mul ti pli cand* 
com mil* ni ca live 
vi tu pe ra tive ' - 
demoniacal f 
ititerrog a tive" 
rep re §ent a tive 
ornithology 
gen e al o gy 



phre nol o gy min e ral o gy 
zo ol o gy trig o nom e try ' 

po lyg a my* mis an thro py et y mol o gy 
i dol a try dox ol o gy phy§ i ol o gy 
a cad e my ven tril o qui§m phra §e ol o gy 

lesson exxxrv. 

In the following words ise and ice have the sound of Ize. 

Rise ex cise' sur mise* 

guise de mise de spise 

wise pre mise a rise" 



*> 


TOS practical 




em prise 


bru tal ize 


par a lyze ) 


com prise 


idolize 


par a lize j 


apprise 
chastise 


hu man ize 


solemnize 


sera ti nize 


sat ir ize 


advise 


theorize 


stig ma tize 


de vise ^ 


meth od ize 


magnetize. 


revise 


gor man dize 


dog ma tize 


disguise 


aggrandize 


• an a lyze 


critf i cise 


rec og nize ) 


harmonize 


circumcise 


rec og nise ) 


i tal' i cize 


exercise 


colonize 


epitomize 


mer chan dise 


can on ize 


ex tern po rize 


compromise 


pat ron ize 


a pol o gize 


en ter prise 


jour nal ize 


a pos tro phiz& 


ex or cise 


pulverize 


phi los o phize 


modernize 


tern po rize 


un mor tal ize 


sym bol ize 


ser mon ize 


e van gel ize 


ad ver 1dse / 


sym pa thize 


mo nop o lize 


su per vise 
sufficed 


scan dal ize 


e con o mize 


sig nal ize 


a pos ta tize 


sacrifice 


mor al ize 


so lil o quize 


prize 


tantalize 


natf u raL ize 


size 


crys tal lize ) 


; gen er al ize 


assize 7 


crystal ize ). 


se'e u lar ize 


apprize 


fer til ize 


sys tern a tize 


bap tize 


civ il ize 


ma te' ri al ize 


e' qual ize 


tyr an nize 


par tic u lar ize 


neu tral ize 


sub si dize 


a nath e ma tize 


re al ize 


agonize 


spir/ it u al ize 


le gal ize 


or gan ize 


rev o lu' tion iz$ 


He who is behin 


Tiat words end in ice ? ii 


\yze1 

for himself, and trouble 


d-hand, maizes work 


for others. 






Virtue is the only true nobility. 


/ 



8PELLINO-B00K. 



81 



LESSON CXXXV. * 
Words ending in ant and ent, of two syllables, accented on the 



first. 



Vacant 
pa geant 
giant 
pli ant 
claim ant 
p<%n ant 
fla grant 
ty rant . 
tru ant 
fra grant 
va grant 
ped ant 
ver dant 
sergeant* 
in fant 
gal lant 
dor mant 
ten ant 



de cent 
re cent 
tri dent 
pru dent 
stu dent 
agent 
re gent 
co gent 
cli ent 
si lent 
pave ment 
ointment 
mo ment 
la tent 
po tent 
fluent 
lam bent 
cres cent 



stag nant 
rem*nant 
flip pant 
ar rant 
cur rant 
mer chant 
pen dant 
plea? ant 
pe# § ant 
phea§ ant 
dis tant 
in stant 
con stant 
ex tant 
sex tant 
serv ant 
tan gent 
pun gent 



• Others pronounce sar' jent. 



urg ent 
tal ent 
clem ent 
com ment 
pen dent 
vest ment 
ser pent 
cur rent 
ab sent 
pat ent 
pre§ ent * 
ad vent 
con vent 
fer vent 
sol vent 
ax dent 
gar ment 
parch ment 



LESSON CXXXVI. 

Words ending in ant and ent, of three syllables, accented on 

the second. 



Com pE'ant 
as sail ant 
com plain anf 
ac count ant 
pur su ant 
as cend ant 
de scend ant 



de fend ant 
at tend ant 
re cum bent 
in cum bent 
qui es cent 
tran scend ent 
re splen dent 

4* 



in dul gent 
ef fill gent 
re ftd gent 
as trin gent 
con tin gent 
in sur gent 
in clem ent 



82 



THE PRACTICAL 



im port ant 
as sist ant / 
ob §erv ant 
a bund ant 
re dund tot 
ac cord ant 
con cord ant 
dis cord ant 
in form ant 
in dig nant 
ma tig nant 
re pug nant 



in ces saftt 
re luct ant 
re pent ant 
a but ment 
con cur rent 
t% spond ent 
con ver gent 
con sist ent 
in sol vent 
de tin quent 
de pend ent 
ab hor rent 



ad ja cent 
com pla cent 
im pru dent 
de port mqnt 
de po nent 
com po nent 
op po nent 
ad he rent 
in he rent 
co he rent 
en roll ment 
a part ment 



LESSON CXXXVIL 

Words ending in ent and ant, of three syllables, accented on 

the first. 

Le'ni ent dil i gent 

o ri ent prev a lent 

'vi o lent pest i lent 

ve he ment ex eel lent 

ru di ment in do lent 

nu tri ment in so lent , 

in no cent tur bu lent 

ac ci dent op u lent 

in ci dent cor pu lent 

dif.fi dent vir u lent 

con fi dent flat u lent 

re§ i dent lig a ment 

pre§ i dent firm a ment 

ev i dent 8r na ment 

prov i dent sac ra'ment 

mi pu dent con fi dant 

in di gent el e gant 

neg li gent el e phant 



ar ro gant 
ad a mant 
ad ju tant 
com bat ant 
con ver sant 
com plai §ant 
t dis pu tant 
men di cant 
sup pli cant 
rec re ant 
mis ere ant 
ter ma gant 
sup pU ant 
dis so nant 
pet u lant 
stim u lant 
con so nant 
oc cu pant 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



ig no rant 
em i grant 
mil i tant 
vi§ it ant 
prot e»t ant 
rel e vant 
ri, di ant 
par )ia ment 
ar ma ment 
ar gn ment 
test a ment 
el e ment 
im pie ment 
com pie ment 
sup pie ment 



battle ment 
ten e ment ' 
chas ti?£ ment 
sed i ment 
con di ment 
al i ment 
com pli ment 
paer ri ment ' 
det rynent 
sen ti ment 
doc u ment 
mon u ment 
in stru ment 
per ma nent 
em i nent 

LESSON CXXXVIIL 



•im mi nent 
Lin i ment 
prom i nent 
con ti nent 
per ti nent 
db sti nent 
rev er ent 
com pe tent 
pen i tent 
es cu lent 
im po tent ; 
af flu ent 
sub se quent 
con se quent 
el o quent 



Words ending in ent and ant, of four and five' syllable*, 
accented variously. 



obe'dient 
ex pe di ent 
in gre di ent 
a pe ri ent . 
beneficent 
mag nif i cent 
mu nif i cent 
co in ci d#nt 
per cip i ent 
re cip i ent 
sub serv i ent 
incipient 
e quiv a lent 
ma lev o lent 



com mu ni cant e mol u ment 
lux u ri ant om nip o tent 
sig nif i cant con stit u ent 
ex trav a gant in tel Li gent 
pre pond er ant con va les' cent 
in tol er ant in de pend ent 
i tin er ant cor re spond ent 

in hab i tant om ni pre? ent 
con com i tant in ter mit tent 
in ad vert ent 
an te ce dent 
ad ver ti§e ment Lin' e a ment 
im ped i ment tern per a ment 
ex per i ment su per in tend 1 " ent 



i 



be nev o lent 
pre die a ment 



84, 



THE PRACTICAL 



LESSON CtxXIX. 
Fali' en. e' qual. 

The vain Jackdaw. 




A foolish jackdaw once picked up some feath- 
ers whiph had fallen from a peacock ; and* 
putting them on, made himself as fine as he 
could. Becoming very vain, he began to slight 
the company of other jackdaws. He joined a 
flock of beautiful peacocks, and thought himself 
as fine as the best of them. They knew who 
he was, and resolved to get rid of him. So 
they tore the borrowed plumes from his back, 
and pecked him out of their company. He 
then tried to get back among his old friends, 
the jackdaws. These, also, resenting his former 
pride, refused to receive him ; while one of the 
most honest among them thus addressed him. 
" If you had been contented tp remaiii a jack- 
daw, you would have avoided this double dis- 
grace." 

We learn from this, never to set ourselves 
up above our equals, nor to pretend to be what 
we are not 



■■ - - 


SPELLING-BOOK. 


85 




• 

LESSON CJCJL 


« 


In the*foHowing words, ur, er, and ir, hare 

sound. 


nearly the same 


Bur 


her 


perch 
herd 


third 


cur 


de ter' 


fir - ! 


slur 


de fer 


Aerb 


sir | 


' fur 


pre fer 


verb 


stir 


blur 


re fer 


_serf 


first 


spur 


infer •* serve 


whirl 


purr ) 
pur J 


confer 


swerve 


whir 


trans fer 


nerve 


sir' up 


oc ctir' 


aver 


were 


stirrup 


re cur 


inter 


pre $erve' 


dirge 


con cur 


jerk 


re §erve 


merge 


in cur 


clerk 


de §erve 


verge 


de mur 


yerk 


su perb 


e merge' 


ab surd 


berth 


mer' niaid 


di verge 


sul / phur 


sperm 


sterling 


con verge 


mur mur 


term 


di ver§ 


urge 


pur port 


germ 


ice berg 


purge 


err 


erst 


bird 


surge 




LESSON CXLL 




In the following words, ur, er 


or, ir, and yr, 


have nearly the 




same 


sound. 




Hurt 


return' 


cis tern 


spurt 


u 9urp 


pat tern 


lurk 


fern 


■ 


slat tern 


urn 


stern 


_ m 


bit tern 


burn 


con cern' 


cav ern 


chum 


di$ cern 


tav ern 


spurn 


mod' 


ern 


north ern 


turn 


Ian tern 


west ern 



06 


THE PRACTICAL V 




east em 


di vert * 


chirp 


pos tern 


l de §ert 


twirl 




acorn 


de§ sert 


birth 




stub born a lert 


mirth 




wert 


6' vert 


birch 




pert 


de? ert 


thirst 




ex pert 7 


filbert- 


squirm ' 




in sert 


^pn' tro vert 
an i macLvei 

dirt- *> 


firm 




as sert 


rt' af firm 7 




a vert 


in firm 




sub verl 


; shirt 


con firm 




ad vert 


flirt 


sir' loin 




inert 


squirt 


skirmish 




re vert 


quirk 


cir 7 cum stance 




con vert irk 


cir cum ventf 




con cerl 


i dirk 


myrrh (mfir) 






What words end in ornl in yrrh t 






LESSON CXLU. 






Words endiog in dge and,ge. 




Badge 


budge 


lodg ment 




edge 


judge 


abridgment 




hedge 


drudge 


ac knowY edg ment 




ledge 


grudge 


cot' tage 




pledge 


trudge 


cabbage 




sledge 


kaorvYedge 


ad age 




fledge 
dredge 


*elv edge 
por ridge 


band age 
bond age 




sedge 
wedge 


cartridge 


cord age 




a bridge 7 
dis lodge 


bag gage 
luggage 




bridge 


ac knorvY edge 


mort gage 




dodge 


fore &non>l edge 


car riage 




lodge 


judg 7 ment 


mar riage 





• 


SPELLING-BOOK. 


871 


pil lage 


im age 


1 . I 

spm age 


til lage 


pack age 


stop page 


village 


rum mage 


man age 


dam age 


horn age 


suffrage 


Plu' mage 


sav age 


dis par age 


out rage 


um brage 


ad van tage 


u §age 


Ian guage * 


ar rear age 


do tage 


salv age 


col 7 lege 


post age 
port age 


lin 7 e a^ • 
vas sal age 
pil grim age 
hem or rAage 


al lege 7 ) 
al ledge j 


vov age 


priv 7 i lege 


car nage 


sac ri lege m 


sau sage 


pat ron age 


ves 7 tige 


for age 


per son age 


del uge 


vi§ age 


eq ui page 


refuge 


mes sage 


av er age 


sub 7 ter fuge 


vint age ' 


bev er age 


en gage 7 


host age 


her mi tage 


as, suage 


pot age 


her i tage 


pre sage 


rav age 


ap pend 7 age 


o bligef 


* Pronounced lang' gwaj. t Soma pronounce o blej'. 


Which word ends in adgt? What in 


Uge ? inigct 




LESSON CXLIIl 




Words ending 


in am, em, egm, im, ym, ime, and om. 


Mac? am 


sa chem 


min 7 im 


bed lam 


po em 


max im 


1 buck ram 


i tern 


victim 


ep / i gram 


strat 7 a gem 


pil grim 


an them 


re qui em 


thum mim 


era blem 


the o rem 


u rim 


prob lem 


phlegm 


ser 7 a phim 


sys tern 


ap 7 o thegrm 


cher u bim 



88 



THE PRACTICAL 



san he drim wi§ dom bux om 

in ter lm fath om ran som 

syn o nym ven om cus torn 

mar i time . bios som free dom 

ver ba 7 tim at om be §om 

king 7 dom bot torn ac cus 7 torn 

sel dom phan torn id 7 i om 

ran dom symp torn mar tyr dom 

What words end in am 1 wegm? inym? iaimef 

lUssoiPcxltt. 

Words ending iiyim, ume, and ome. 

e qui lib 7 ri urn 



I 



F6 / rum 
quorum 
stra turn 
al urn 
vellum 
nos trum 
ros trum 
vol ume 
me'dium 
o dium 
o pium 
pre mi um 
pend u lum 
vac uum 
ly ce 7 um 



uyim, i 

mu §e tSq 
as y lum 
de co rum 
po ma turn 
mo men turn 
en co 7 mi um 
emporium 
opprobi um 
pal la di um 
gym na §i um 
com pend i um 
mil len ni um 
de lir ium 
mem o ran 7 dum 
in ter reg num 

THE BUTTERFLY. 

The Butterfly, an Idle thing, 

Nor honey makes, nor yet can ainf , 

Like to the bee and bird ; 
Nor does it, like the prudent ant, 
Lay np the grain for time* of want, 

A wise and cautious hoard. 
My youth is but a summer's day, 
Then like the bee and ant, 111 lay 

A store of learning by ; 
And though from flower to flower I rare, 
My stock of wisdom 1*11 improve, 

Nor be a butterfly. 



lone 7 some 
whole some 
tire some 
noi some 
wea 7 ri some 
blithe 7 some 
ful some 
wel come 
in come , 
glad some - 
hand some > 
frol 7 ic some ) 
frol ick some ] 
cum ber some 



SPELLING-BOOK. 

LESSON CXLV. 
Rey' nard. ven' ture. 

The Fox in the Well. 





i 






j|y 


PIT 

Mil!!! 


fpHsSi 


■1 





A fox haying fallen into a well contrived, 
by sticking his claws into the sides, to keep his 
head above water. Soon after, a wolf passing 
by came and peeped over the edge of the well. 
The fox begged him very earnestly in some 
way to help him get out. The wolf, seeming 
to pity the fox, replied; "Ah! poor Reynard, 
I am sorry for you with all my heart.* How 
came you to be so imprudent as to venture 
near this dangerous place?" "Nay, friend," 
said the fox, "if you feel as you say, do not 
stand pitying me, but lend me some aid as fast 
as you can. For pity is cold comfort when one 
is up to the chin in water, and within a hair'j 
breadth of drowning." 

Words are cheap. Not a few people are 
ready enough to say kind things to those who 
are in trouble, while they are very slow to 
afford relief. Help is the best proof of pity. 



90 ' 


TUB PRACTICAL 




H 












LESJSON CXLVL 




■ 


Words ending 


in er, ar, and or, 


of two syllables, accented on 






the first. 


*• 




Wa' fer 


hol ster 


slen der 


pilfer 




wa ger 


loi ter 


ren der 


ginger 


• 


paper 
draper 


join er 
oys ter 


ten der 
ledg er 


pitch er 
hith er • 




qua yer 


vouch er 


trench er 


thith er 




wa ver 


ffcller 


neth er 


with er 




ta per 


can cer 


teth er 


bick er 




game ster 


slan der 


. weth er 


flick er 




dan ger 


crack er 


ves per 


wick er 




man ger 


cank er 


cen ser 


primer 




cham ber 


Jiank er 


shel ter 


sim per 




lay er 


ant ler 


welter 


filter 




e ther 


/ scam per 


enter 


shiver 




fe ver 


ham per 


fes ter 


liv er . 




east er 


pam per 


pes ter 


sliv er 




bea ver 


tarn per 


tern per 


riv er 




bri er 


ban ter 


lep er 


quiv er 




ci der 


cafi ter 


ev er 


splin ter 




spi der 


chap ter 


lever 


win ter 




vi per 


sal ver . 


clev er 


sis' ter 




mi §er 


sam pier 


nev er 


pon der 




so ber 


gan der 


sev er 


yon der 
host ler ) 
ost ler ) 




o ver 


pan ther 


el der 




clo ver 


chand ler 


ped ler 




dro ver 


gath er 
lath er 


sil ver 


nee tar 




gro cer 


limber 


vie ar % 




bro ker 


rath er 


tim ber 


mortar 




port er 


member 


cinder 


pop lar i 
vulgar 




col ter 


fend er 


hin der 




bol ster 


gen der 


tinder 


ce dar 







flNMINO-BOOK. 


ai 


va por 


flavor 


odor 


can dor 


li ar 


sa vor 


hu mor 


val or 


po lar 


ra zor 


ru mor 


, clam or 


so lar 


may or 


tu mor 


hor ror 


lunar 


tre mor 


stupor 


act or 


la bor 


pri or 


juror 


fac tor 


major 


minor 


tutor 


cap tor 


fa vor 


do nor 


ran cor 


languor* 




* Proneunced lang' fwur. 






LESSON CXLVU. 




Words ending 


in er, ar, ir, yr, 


and or, of two s 


yllables, accented 




on 1 


the first. 




Lad" der 


let ter 


fod der 


gram mar 


blad der 


fet ter 


sod er 


beg gar 


adder 


sell er ' 


offer 


eel lar 


stam mer 


teller 


cof fer 


pil lar 


hpm mer 


differ" 


prof fer 


col lar 


ban ner 


glim mer 


cop per 


dol lar 


man ner 


sim mer 


hop per 


bur sar 


tan ner 


skim mer 


tot ter 


na dir 


bat ter 


in ner " 


ot ter 


satyr 


scat ter 


din ner 


pot ter'' 


martyr 


chat ter 


spin ner 
sinner 


rob ber 


zephyr 
splen dor 


shatter 


shud der 


tat ter 


bit ter 


rudder 


ten or 


flat ter 


litter 


blub ber 


cen sor 


mat ter 


glit ter 
fritter 


drum mer 


er ror • 


smat ter 


sum mer 


ter ror 


spat ter 


tit ter 


utter. 


debt or 


wrap per 


twit ter 


butter 


rec tor. 


pep per 


slip per 


gat ter 


fer vor 


better 


dip per 


flutter 


vie tor 




What word* end in tr t inyr7 





93 



THE PRACTICAL 



LESSON CXLVIII. 
Words ending in er and or, of two syllables, accented on the 



first. 



Muf ter 
sput ter 
stut ter 
cutter 
shut ter 
sup per 
up per 
suffer 
gun ner 
crup per 
or der 
bor der 
for mer 
cor ner 
mon ster 
both er 
prop er 
pros per 



lob ster 
song ster 
con quer 
fos ter 
cumber 
lumber 
slum ber 
number 
ul cer 
under 
thun der 
blun der 
plun der 
sunder 
mur der 
fur ther 
mus ter 
clus ter 

What word 



but ler 
cut ler 
huck ster 
turn bier 
butch er 
fither 
far ther 
gar ner 
after 
rafter 
barter 
gar ter 
plaster 
arch er 
bar ber 
part ner 
mas ter 
an swer 

ends iauor? 



farm er 
char ter 
har bor 
par lor 
pas tor 
ar bor 
ar dor 
w mor 
rigor 
vig or 
liqwor 
mirror 
Aon or 
tor por 
doc tor' 
spon sor 
sue cor 
sculp toi 



LESSON CXUX. ^ 

Words ending in or and er, of three syllables, accented 



Me' te or 
c*>un sel lor 
coun sel or 
bach & lor 
chan eel lor 
gov ern or 
em per or 
con quer or 



variously. 

sen a tor 
or a tor 
ed i tor 
cred i tor 
an pes tor 
mon i tor 
visitor) 
vi§ it er j 



de mean' or 
divisor 
ere a tor 
spec ta tor 
die ta tor 
tes ta tor 
e qua tor 
trans la tor 



•P£LL1NG«B00K. 93 



sur vi vor ) wag on er ob ject or 

sur vi ver j mes sen ger con tract or 
nar ra tor scav en ger pro ject or 



prov 7 en der cu cum ber in struct or ) 

) in struct er j 

por rin ger jew el er j e lect or 



cyl in der jew el ler ) in struct er 



can is ter di a per col lect or 

baluster usurer* inspector 

in te ger . pass o ver di rect or 

sin is ter har bin ger cal' en dar ) 

bar ri er ar bi ter kal en c|^r y 

far ri er grass hop per via e gar 

. bar ris ter gar den er aim i lar 

mar i ner con ductf or tab u lar 

al mo ner en am or glob u, lar 

cor o ner pre cur sor sec u lar - 

mil li ner sue cess or oc u lar 

min is ter con fess or cfr cu lar 

pass en ger pro fess or mug cu lar 

r res by ter ag gress or reg u lar 

kid nap per trans gress or an gu lart 

trav el \ej ) op press or * sin gu larf 

trav el er j as sess or pop u lar 

sor cer er pos sess or in su lar 

* Pronounced yu' zhu rer. 

t Pronounced ang' gu lar, sing' gu lar. 

LESSON CL. * 

Words ending in or and er, of three and four syllables, accented 

, ,. variously. 

Protect or September ventilator 

preceptor October speculator 

in vent or ) No vem ber cal cu la tor 

in vent er J De cem ber reg u la tor 



94 


TUB PRACTICAL * 1 


tormentor 


re mem' ber 


mod e ra' tor 


im pos tor 


in cum ber 


nu me ra tor 


a bet tor 


consider ' 


ar bi tra tor 


in fe / ri or 


be wil der 


im i ta tor 


su pe ri or 


sur ren der 


\ nav i ga tor 


aii te ri or 


dis or der 


com men ta tor 


ul te ri or 


dis tern per 


cultivator 


interior 


se ques ter 


con ser va tor 


ex te ri or 


dis sev er 


pros e eu tor 


pos tori or 


deliver 


persecutor 


pro praetor 


ex cheq #er 


co adjutdr 


am bas sa dor ) 


di? &$ ter 


prede oes sor 


embassador} 


remainder 


intercessor 


pro geu i tor . 
in qui? i tor 


em broid er 


mal e fac tor 


di am 7 e ter 


ben e fac tor 


compositor 


ther mom e ter ca lum ni a' tor 


expositor ' 


ba rom e ter 


de nom i na tor 


com pet i to* 


ad min is ter 


ad mih is tra tor 


con trib u tar 


pa rish ton er 
i dol a ter 


vernacular 


conspirator 


oraoular 


su per vT §or 


as tron o mer 


particular ' 


al li ga tor 


%*dul ter er 


pen in su lar 


in sti ga tor 


ar tif i cer 


caterpillar 


gla di a tor 


up hoi ster er 


per pen die' u lar 


t 


LESSON CLL 


Words ending in re 


and er. 


Lu' ere (k&r) 


fibre 


lus tre 


acre 


m&ugre 


theatre 


li vre 


seep tre 


sep ul chre 


*a bre * 


spefc tre 


mas s£ ere 


me tre 


cen tre 


re con noi' tre 


mi tre 


som ht e 


am phi the 7 a tre 


# Also spelt saber, meter, <fcc. 



*PELLINO*BO0K. 



96 



* LESSON CLIL 

V die. chiT dren. com pan' ion. bus' y. Ids' son. 

Industry and Idleness. 




' Who'll come and play with me, hew under the tree, 

My sisters have left me alone ; 
My sweet little sparrow, come hifiier to me, 
And play With me, while they are gone. 

O, no, little taraant, I can't come, indeed, 

Ft% no time to idle away, r > 

IVe got all my dear little children to feed, 

And my nest to new cover with hay. 

Pretty bee, do not buzz about over that flower, 
But come here and play with me, do ; 

The sparrow wont come and stay with me an hour, 
But say, pretty bee— will not you* ? 

O, no, little truant, for do yov not jaee 

Those muet work wha would prosper and thrive^ 
If I play they would call me a sad,' idle bee, 

Aid, perhaps, turn me out of the hive. 



96 THE PRACTICAL 



Stop ! stop ! little ant, do not run off so/ast, 

Wait with me a little and play ; 
I hope I shall find a companion at last, 

You are not so busy as they. 

O, no, little truant, I can't stay with you, 

We're not made to play, but to labor; 
I always have something or other to do, 

If not for myself, for my neighbor. 

What then ! have they all some employment but me, 

Who lie lounging herfe like a dunce T 
O, then, like the ant, awl the sparrow and bee/ 

I'll go to my lesson at once. 

# LESSON CLII2. 
Words ending in cy, $y, and zy. 

Ra 7 cy , ce lib a cy de gen eracy 

flee cy the oc ra cy a ris toes' ra cy 

i cy de moc ra cy ea 7 §y 

spi cy con spir a cy grea? y 

sau cy % e£ 7 fi ca cy dai §y 

mer cy del i ca cy noi? y 

>ol 7 i cy in tri ca cy ro §y 

)roph e cy prof li ga cy drow §y 

eg a cy in ti ma cy Aim $y 

fal la cy con tu ma cy quin ?y 

bank rupt cy *ob sti na cy gip sy 

{)i ra cy ac cu ra cy tip sy 

u na cy ob du ra cy drop sy 

se ere cy id i o cy tan §y . 

nri va cy ef f em 7 i na cy cltim §y 

ui plo 7 ma cy e pis co pa cy< pbren §y ) 

suprem a cy ton fed e ra cy fren zy ) 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



Trj 



ec' sta sy 
em bas sy 
lep ro sy 
jeal ous y 
proph e sy 
here sy 



court e sy 
pku ri sy 
dys pep' sy 
hy poc' ri sy 
a pos ta sy 
en' i lep sy 

What words end in sy ? 



cpn tro ver sy 
la" zy 
ha zy 
ma f zy 
era zy 
diz zy 



LESSON x CUV: 
Words ending in an, en, eign, 



x 



Hu / man 

pa gan 
5r gan 
tur ban 
sul tan 
>u' ri tan 
u the ran 
al co ran 
vet e ran 
pub li can 
he ti ?an 
par ti §an 
gward i an 
agrarian 
co me di an 
col le gi an 
ra' ven 
hea then 
widen 
deaf en * 
hyphen 
weak en 
maid en 



strait en 
li ken 
swol len 
o men 
ripen 
o pen 
molt en 
has ten 
^chas ten 
chief tain 
fount ain 
mount ain 
chap lain 
cap tain 
mur rain 
cer tain 
cur tain 
vil lain 
for eign 
bar gain 
ba con 
bea con 
dea con 

Some pronounce <Let 



ain, an<} on. 

si phon 
ci on 
rib bon j 
rib and > 
rib in ' 
flag on 
wag on 
beck on 
reck on 
tal on 
mel on 
gal Ion 
lem on 
sa/rn on 
gam mon 
mam mon 
com mon 
sum mon 
ser mon 
can non 
gramrrja'rian 
li bra ri an 
sec ta ri an- 

en. 



i>8 


THE PRACTICAL 






his to ri an 


"broth ren 


drag on 


tra ge di an 


kit ten 


matron* J 


re pub li can 


glad den 


pat ron * - 1 


mo ham me dan sad den 


per son | 


me rid i an 


red den 


ten don 9 


e ques tri an 


wax en 


ten on J 


pe des tri an 


kitch en 


can on 1 


the o 16' gi an 


to ken 


saf fron J 


pres by te ri an 


co Ion 


cit ron I 


e pis co pa' li an de mon 


pri§ on I 


antediluvian 


a pron 


dam §on 1 


ha 7 ven 


rea ?on 


crim §on I 


e ven 


trea §on 


les son I 


clc/ven 


ma son 


pis ton . ' 


wo ven 


poi $on 


cot ton 




bra zen 


cray on 


but ton 




fro zen 


bla zon 


glut ton 




• Others pronounce ma' tron, 


pa' tron. 




What words end in ain ? in eign 


f in and ? 






LESSON CLV. 






Words ending in en, in, ine 


t and on. 




Bid' den 


lin en 


mit ten 




hid den 


hap pen 


writ ten 




trod den 


as pen 


rot ten 




sod den 


bar ren 


seven 




sud den 


les sen 


gar den 
hard en 




bur.den 


oft en 




chil dren 


% ox en 


heark en 




chick en 


list en . 


fallen 




strick en 


glis ten 
fat ten 


6m bold' en 




i tick en 


a en men 




striven 


flat ten 


en light en | 


sul len 


smit ten 


be to ken I 





SPELLtNa-BOOK. 



09 



en li ven 
e lev en 
ab' do men 
cit i zen 
ba' sin 
ru in 
rai§ in 
rob in 
urchin 
vir gin 
firkin 
cab in 
bobbin 
bod kin 
cof fin 
muffin 
nap kin 
gob lin 
pip pin 
pump kin 
mu$ lin 
re? in ) 
ro? in j 
satin 
spav in 
jav* lin 
ver min 



mat in 
mar gin 
or' i gin 
as sas' sin 
me theg lin 
en' gine 
fam ine 
er mine 
rap ine 
doc trine 
destine 
san guine * 
vac cine 
med' i cine 
dis ci pline 
mas cu line 
jes sa mine 
jas mine 
fern i nine 
her o ine 
nee ta line 
lib er tine 



j 



muf ton 
par son 
par don 
jar gon 
o ri' on 
en vi ron 
ho ri zonf 
a ban don 
u' ni son 
cham pi on 
scor pi on 
cin na mon 
gridi ron | 
and i ron | 
moc ca son 
gar ri son 
skel e ton 
pen ta gon 
oc ta gon 
pol y gon 
cri te' ri on 
al lu vi on 
ob Hv i on 
phe nom e non 
com par i son 
sem i go' Ion 
dan' de IT on 



gen u me 
de ter' mine 
pre des tine 
in tes tine 
il lu mine 
• Pronounced aang' gwin. 
Some hor' i ion. J Pronounced grid' i um, ind 1 i um. 

In the following words geon and gion are pronounced jfta, 
and cheon, chun. 

Dun' geon sur geon blud geon c&sh ion 
lun clieon stur geon le gion fash ion 
pun cheon dud geon re gion «con ta' gion 



100 


THE PRACTICAL 




LESSON CLVL 


• 


Words ending in ure 


and eur. 


Na' ture 


pict ure 


pasture 


creat ure 


strict ure 


joint ure 


feat ure 


tinct ure 


pro ced'ure 
dis figure 


moist ure 


script ure 


fu ture 


fixture 


con text ure 


fail ure 


mixture 


admixture 


stature 


fig ure 


con ject ure 


fracture 


injure 


de bent ure 


capture 


torture , 


in dent ure 


rapt ure 


post ure 


ad vent ure # 


lect ure 


junct ure 


im post ure 


gest ure ~ 


punct ure 


con jiinct ure 


vest ure 


struct ure 


de part ure 


cine ture 


culture 


man u facf ure 


text ure 


vult ure 


no men clat ure 


verd ure 


rupt ure 


ag' ri cult ure 


per jure 


sculpt ure 


hor Id cult ure 


tenure 


nurt ure 


per ad venture 


vent ure 


grand eur 


su per struct ure 




What word ends hour? 




LESSON CLVIL 


Words ending in ance 


and ence. 


Fra' grance 


. ac cept' ance 


i dil / i gence 


guid ance 


ob §erv ance 


. pest i lence 


clear ance 


re §ist ance 


eminence 


Xfiii sance 


as sist ance 


prom i nence 


griev ance 


ad mit tance 


con ti nence 


sem blance 


i re mit tance 


ab sti nence 


pen ance 


ac cord ance 


pen i tence 


<veBge anc% 


con cord ance prev a lence 





SPELLING-BOOK. 


lOlJ 


de fi / ance 


al le' gi ance 


1 
per ma nence 


af d ance 


lux u ri ance 


defer ence 


re li ance 


ex trav a gance 


ref er ence 


al li ance 


pre pond er ance 


pref er ence 


compli ance 


pre dom i nance 


dif fer ence 


ap ph ance 


ca' dence 


in fer ence 


en dur ance 


ere dence 


con fer ence 


in sur ance * 


pru dence 


rev er ence 


as sur ance * 


sci ence 


com pe tence 


o bei sance 


si lence 


con se quence 


con triv ance 


vi' o lence 


ex pe' ri ence 


ac qnaint ance 


ve he menee 


be nef i cence 


an noy ance 


au di ence 


in tel li gence 


pur su ance 


in no cence 


ir rev er ence 


con niv ance 


con fi dence 


ma lev o lence 


al low ance 


re? i dence 


be nev o lence 


re ?em blance 


ev i dence 


im per ti nence 


at tend ance 


prov i dence 


mag nif i cence 


re mem brance 


in di gence 


munif i cence 


re pent ance 


neg li gence 


co in ri dance 


* Pronounced in shuY ans; as shur' ans. 




LESSON CLVIIL 




Words ending in ance and ence, t 


Bal' ance 


ut' ter ance 


af ' flu ence 


rid dance 


ig no ranee 


in flu ence 


dis tance 


com plaif ance 


con flu ence 


in stance 


ra di ance 


con do' lence 


pit tance 


ra ri ance 


ad he rence 


ord nance 


main te nance 


co he rence 


sub stance 


coun te nance 


de pend ence 


per form' ance 


de lly' er ance 


in dul gence 


re mon strance 


con tin n ance 


ef fill gence 


im port ance 


in her it ance 


di verg ence j 



102 


THB PRACTICAL 




dis turb ance 


ap pur' te nance ab hof rence 


a bund ance 


per se ve' ranee oc cur rence 


re dund ance 


ab' sence 


sub sist ence 


repugnance 


es sence 


con sist ence- 


in cum brance 


pre? ence 


ex cres cence 


re luct ance 


sen tence 


ac qui es 7 cence 


cog' ni zance * 


ex 7 eel lence 


con va les cence 1 


el e gance 


in do lence 


ef fer ves cence 


ar ro gance 
petulance 


in so lence 


rem i nis cence 


im po tence 


cor re spond ence 


ordinance 


el o quence 


om ni pre? ence 


sustenance 


im pu dence 


in^id vert ence 


dis so nance 


tur bu lence 


ju ris pru dence 


hin der ance 


cor pu lence 


in ter fe rence 


fur ther ance 


op u lence 


con cu' pis cence 


tern per ance 


vir u lence 


cir cum.fe rence 


• Some pronounce c5n' 


i zance. 




LESSON CLIX 


• 


Words ending in ancy and ency. 


Fan'cy % 


re gen cy 


de pend en cy 


va' can cy 


co gen cy 


de spond en cy 


pli an cy 


flu en cy 


con tin gen cy 


poign an cy 


fre quen cy 


e merg en cy 


in fan cy 


tend en cy 


con sist en cy 


con stan cy 


pun gen cy 


de lin quen cy 


nec / ro man cy 


urg en cy 


ap / pe ten cy 


oc cu pan cy 


clem en cy 


ex eel len cy 


dis crep' an cy 


cur ren cy 


ex i gen cy 


pre cip / i tan cy 


solv en cy 


in no cen cy 


sig nif i can cy 


com pla' cen cy pre? i den cy 


de' cen cy 


trans par en cy ex pe' di en cy 


a gen cy 


as cend en cy 


sub serv i en cy 



SPELLING- BOOK. 



Htfl 



LESSON CLX. 

The Storm. 




A violent gale is blowing through the woods. This 
oak, whjch had stood firm for more than a hundred years, 
as if proud of its strength, would riot yield Ao the blast. 
Its stout trunk is broken in die middle, and it is falling to 
the ground* . 

That young elm seems to feel the force of the storm, 
and wisely bending its trunk and branches, remains un- 
hurt. 

One man, like the oak, defies the gale. He loses his 
hat and cloak, and is himself nearly blown over. He, 
too, may fall to the ground. 

The other man sees that it will do no good to try to 
resist the blast. He yields to it, and goes back again. 
The storm will soon be over, and he will turn about and 
go on his way safely. 

Better bend than break. 



Proverbs. 

He that makes light of small sins, is in danger of 
falling into great ones. 

Better to be alone than in bad company. 

Rely not on another for what you can do yourself. 



104 THE PRACTICAL 



He that is discontented cannot find an easy seat. 

He that speaks ill of others to me, will also speak ill of 
me to others. 

A proud man has no God ; an envious man has no 
neighbor ; an angry man has not himself. / 

Oil and truth will get uppermost at last. 
. Single drops make up the sea. 

One may talk like a wise man, and yet act like a fool. 

A bad workman quarrels with his tools. 

Every light is not the sun. 

He that is good at making excuses, is Mdom good for 
any thing else. 

Turn a deaf ear to a backbiter. 

He that peeps through a hole, may see something to 
vex him. 

A good. name is better than riches. 

If you seek to lie upon roses when young, you may 
have to lie upon thorns when you are old. 

LESSON CLXL 
Words ending in ate, of three syllables, accented on the first. 

Cel' e brate pen e trate sup pli cate 

em a nate per pe trate fab n cate 

ex ca vate dem on strate * ex tri cate 

aggravate compensate* masticate 

prop a gate con tern plate * im pli cate 

dev as tate* en er vate * rus ti cate 

dep re cate al ter nate • can di date 

im pre cate nl cer ate liq ui date 

dep re date tol er ate ob li gate 

con gre gate gen er ate ir ri gate 

des e crate ven er ate lit i gate 

ex e crate ab di cate mit i gate 

lib e rate med i cate cas ti gate 

op e rate in di cate in sti gate 

• Others accent these on the second syllable. 





flPBLLING-BQOK. 


105 


nav i gate 


grav i tate 


cir cu late 


ven ti late 


sal i vate 


mod u late 


vac ci nate 


cul ti vate 


reg u late 


fas ci nate 


cap ti vate 


em u late 


nom i nate 


med i tate 


stim u late 


crim i nate 
1 germ i nate 


des ig aate 


rec re ate 


extirpate* 


pop u late 


tern^i nate 


im mo late 


sat u rate 


dis si pate> 


stip u late 


amputate 
un au late 


em i grate 


sup pu rate 
sub ju gate 


immigrate 


vi o late 


mil 1 tate 


con ju gate 


po ten tate 


imi tate 


ed u cate 


fu mi gate 


ir ri tate 


spec u late 


mu ti late 


he§ i tate 


, cal cu late 


ar bi trate 


# Some accent this on the second syllable. 




LESSON CLXIL 




Words ending in 


ate, of three and four syllables, accented 




variously. 




11 lus' trate 


com mu ni cate 


e rad i cate 


in un date 


e lu ci date 


pre var i cate 


in cul cate 


il hi mi nate 


au then ti cate 


ex cul pate 


ac cu mu late 


do mes ti cate 


pro mul gate 


a mal ga mate 


prog nos ti cate 


re mon strate 


re ver ber ate 


,- in tox i cate 


a pos tate 


pre pon der ate 


in val i date 


con cen trate 


vo cif er ate 


con sol i date 


j under rate' 


ac eel er ate 


in tim i date 


re in state 


i tin er ate 


di lap i date 


I va ri' e gate 


co op er ate 


in vest i g*te 


e nu me rate 


com mi? er ate 


as sim i late 


re mu ner ate 


re it er ate . 


con tarn i nate 


an ni hi l^te 


ob lit er ate 


dis sem i nate 



5* 



106 


THE PRACTICAL 




re crim i nate 


de bil i tate 


com mem o rate 


dis crijn i nate 


fa cil i tate 


e vap o rater 


abominate 


de cap i tate 


in cor po rate 


pre dom i nate 


ne ces si tate 


ex pec to rate 


de nom i nate 


re cip ro cate 


ges tic u late 


exterminate 


e quiv o cate 


in oc u late 


assassinate 


ac commodate 


> co ag^ u late 


e man ci pate 


in ter ro gate 
interpolate 
cor rob o rate 


de pop u/late 


pro eras ti nate 


con grat u late 


re sus ci tate 


ca pit n late 


pre med i tate 


in vig o rate 


ex p9s tu late 




/ 

LESSON CLXIIL 


Words ending in ate, of two, three, and four syllables, accented 




variously. 


\ 


Pri' vate 


del i cate 


in test ate 


pi rate 


as pi rate 


con sum mate 


cli mate 


ob sti nate 


col le' gi ate 


pro bate 


in tri cate 


imme diate 


cu rate 


prox i mate 


in vi o late 


palate 


prof li gate 


con sid er ate 


ag ate 


ui ti mate 


in vet er ate 


man date 


choc o late 


il lit er ate 


leg ate 


cor po rate 


ef fern i nate 


sen ate 


con su late 
tor tu nate 


in or di nate 


frig ate 


le git i mate 


du' pli cate 


ac cu rate 


dis con so late 


o pi ate 


ob du rate 


e lect o rate 


ad e quate 


in car' nate 


im mac u late 


. des ge rate 


ap pel late 


im port u nate 


tern per ate 

He that is slow 


al ter nate 


commensurate 

m the mighty; and he 


to anger is better tha 


that ruleth his spirit, than he that taketh 


a city. ^ 



SPELLING-BOOK- 



107 



When the folio win 
when used 

Sep' a rate 
del e gate 
con se crate 
ag gre gate 
moa er ate 
ded i cate 
pred i cate 
com pli cate 
es ti mate 



LESSON CLXIV. 

g words arc used as verbs, a in ate is long 
as nouns or adjectives, it is obscure. 



in ti mate 
an i mate 
con fis cate 
ad vo cate 
des o late 
rep ro bate 
con fed 7 er ate 
de gen er ate 
de lib er ate 

LESSON CLXV. 



re gen er ate 
cer tif i cate 
pre cip i tate 
pre des ti nate 
de term i n^te 
sub or di nate 
ap prox i mate 
e lab o rate 
ar tic u late 



In the following words, ci and ti before ate have the sound 
of ah, and when ihey follow i this sound is united with the 
preceding syllable in pronunciation ; as vi'iiate, pronounced 
vish' ate. 



Sa' tiate 
vi tiate 
in i' tiate 
pro pi tiate 
no vi tiate 
of fi ciate 
in gra tiate 
in sa tiate 
ex pa tiate 
e ma ciate 
ap pre ciate 
de pre cfete 
con so ciate 



as so ciate 
ne go tiate_ 
ex era ciate 
li cen tiate 
e nun ciate 
ra' di ate 
me di ate 
de vi ate 
spo li ate 
ro $e ate 
nau so ate * 
rec re ate 
pal li ate 



ob vi ate 
ac tu ate 
flue tu ate 
pune tu ate 
grad u ate 
sit u ate 
de lin' e ate 
re tal i ate 
con cil i ate 
ca lum ni ate 
ab bre vi ate 
al le vi ate 
ir ra di ate 



• Pronounced n aw' she at. Others, naw' sbat. 



108 THE PRACTICAL 



re pu di ate lux u ri ate in sin u ate 

in e bri ate ac cen tu ate e vac u ate 

ap pro pri ate at ten u ate in fat^u ate 

in fu ri ate ex ten u ate per pet u ate 



What words end in date ? 





LESSON CLXVL 


. 


Words 


ending in any, eny, iny, and ony. ' 


Bof a ny 


eb o ny 


igno min y 


lit any 


sym pho ny 


cer e mo ny 


tyr an ny 


fel o ny 


ac ri mo ny 


vil lain y 


col o ny 


mat ri mo ny 


des ti ny 


glut ton y 


pat ri mo ny 


mu ti ny 


i ro ny 


test i mo ny 


sera tiny 


lar ce ny 


par si mo ny 


bal co ny 


har mo ny 


ma hog 7 a ny 


agony 


mis / eel la ny 


mo not o ny 


— 


LESSON CLXVH. 




Words ending in 


i ary, ery,-ory, and ury, of three syllables, 




accented on the first 




Di' ary 


beggary 


found er y 


li brary 


contrary 


grocery 


pri mary 


gloss a ry 


droll er y 


ro ?aiy 


bur gla ry 


raillery* 


ro ta ry 


sum ma ry 


archery 


notary 


I dra per y 


arte ry 


votary 


brav er y 


chpn eery 


ro?e ma ry 


foiav er y 


bat ter y % 


pie na ry 
bound a ry 


slavery 


flattery 


seen er y 


gallery 


sal a ry 


brib er y 


quackery 


gran a ry 


fi er y 


rev er y 1 


sect a ry 


finery 


rev er ie j 


i 

r ■ in f 


3ome pronounce rll' lor e. 







SPELLING- BOOK. 


109 




ev ery 


drudg er y 


his to ry 




im age ry 


sur ger y 


sa vor y 




fish er y 


, gun ner y 


the o ry 




slip pery 


but ter y 


i vo ry 




frip per y 


nun ner y 


ar mor y 




mi? er y 


nurs er y 


u su ry* 




liv er y 


mys te ry 


augury 




sor ce ry 


mem o ry 


penury 




mock er y 


pleth o ry 


century 




crock er y 


rectory 


mer cu ry 




or i-e ry 


pil lo ry 


perjury 




lot ter y 


cur so ry 


injury 


. 


rob ber y 


fac to ry 


luxury 




shrub ber y 


vie tory 


treas ur y* 




* Pronounced yu' zhu re, trezh' ur e. 






LESSON CLXVIIL 






Words ending in ary, ery, and ory, of four i 


syllables, accented 






variously. 






Brer' i a ry 


sem i na ly 


form u la ly 




mo raent a ry 


san guin a ry 


sub lu na ry 




cu li na ry 


vision ary* 


vol un ta ry 


1 


lu mi na ry 


missionary* 


trib u ta ry 




ax bi tra ry 


em is sa ry 


saj u ta ry 


1 


mer ce pa ry 


com mis sa ry 


Jan u a ry 


\ 


lit er a ry 


military i 


Feb ru a ry 




ad ver sa ry 


sol i ta ry 


stat u a ry 




plan et a ry 


dig ni ta ry 


sane tu a ry 




sec re ta ry 


an ti qua ry 


sump tu a ry i 




1 sed en ta ty 


hon or a ry 


sal u ta ry 




com men ta ry 


tern po ra ry 


es tu a ry 




1 sec ond a ry 


put mo na ry , 


mon as ter y 




or di na ry * 


cus torn a ry 


cem e ter y 




* Pronounced vizh' un a re, mTsh 


' un a re. 











110 THE PRACTICAL 

dys en ter y in ven to ry ro ta to ry 

mil li ner y rep er to ry de lu' so ry 

presbytery promissory illusory 

pred a to ry dor mi to ry re fract o ry 

pref a to ry ter ri to ry re feet o ry 

pur ga to ry trans i to ry di rect o ry 

or a to ry prom on to ry ac ces so ry 

dil a to ry des ul to ry per emp to ry 

hortatory nugatory consistory 

al le go ry mi gra to ry com pul so ry 

LESSON CLXIX. 

Words ending in ary, ery, and ory, of four, five, and six syllables/ 

accented variously. 

Ac ces' sa ry man u fac to ry 

dis pens a ry sat is fac to ry 

in fmn a ry in ter ces so ry 

cor'ol la ry val e die to ry 

a poth' e ca ry con tra die to ry 

sub sid i a ry in tro due to ry 

in cen di a ry ex' pi a to ry 

pre lim i na ry ded i ca to ry 

he red i ta ry lab o ra to ry 

de po? i ta ry sup pli ca to ry 

im ag i na ry de fam' a to ry 

e pis to la ry \ de clam a to ry 

co tern po ra ry in flam ma to ry 

vo cab u la ry ex plan a to ry 

re §id u a ry de clar a to ry 

o bit u a ry pre par a to ry 

vo lup tu a ry com mend a to ry 

dis' ci pli na ry ob §erv a to ry 

an ni vers' a ry ob lig a to ry 

par lia ment a ry de rog a to ry 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



Ill 



test a ment' a ry 
el 'e ment a ry 
com pli ment a ry 
sup pie ment a ry 
rev o liV tion a ry 
su per nu mer a ry 
per fum' er y 
phi can er y 
de bauch er y 
a dul ter y 



con sor a to ry 
pro bib i to ry 
de po§ i to ry 
ad mon i to ry 
pre mon i to ry 
sa hi ta to ry 
in ter rog' a to ry 
re tal' i a to ry 
con cil i a to ry 
con grat u la to ry 



LESSON CLXX. 

The Self-made Man. 



■k^y 


|£k 




dag 




JpX gklBBi' 




J .,.,.J_. 

Sir 

III. 1 ' 


''ii^l^iiif 


fit 




±£&\ HSiisI 




_^ fir lj 


fl flK^U 



More than a hundred years ago, a man lived in Scot- 
lb nd, whose name was Edmund Stone. His father was 
poor, and worked in the garden of a rich man. This man, 
one day, found a learned book in Latin on the grass, and 
inquired to whom it belonged. He was told that it was 
young Edmund's. He was much astonished to find that 
the son of the gardener could read Latin, and understand 
such a book. He said to him, " How came you to know 
all these things ?" 

" A servant," replied the young man, (who was then 
eighteen years old,) " tpught me to read ten years ago. 



112 THE PRACTICAL 



Does one need to know any thing more than the twenty-six 
letters, to learn every thing else that he wishes ?" 

The rich man was still more surprised/ as he received 
from Edmund this further account. 

"I first learned to read," said he, "when the masons 
were at work on your house. Standing by them, one day, 
I observed that the builder used a rule and compass, and 
that he made figures on a slate. I asked what was the 
use of his doing so, and was told that by learning arith- 
metic, which enabled him to do this, I could do the same. 
So I bought a book and learned arithmetic. I was told 
there was another science, called geometry ; and getting 
the proper books, I learned that too. By reading, Ifound 
there were good books in Latin which taught arithmetic 
and geometry. So I bought a dictionary, and learned 
Latin. I understood, still further, that there were good 
books of the same kind in French. I bought a dictionary, 
and learned French. This, Sir, is what I have done. 
It seems to me, that we can learn every thing, when we 
know the twenty-six letters of the alphabet." 

Edmund, afterwards, became a very learned man And 
a distinguished writer of books ; — showing what a reso- 
lute and persevering boy can accomplish. How many 
other boys might do the same. 

LESSON CLXXL 

In the following words ending in ous, geous and gious have 

the sound of jua ; as gor* gcous, pronounced gor' jus. 

Fa' mous mon strous ri ot ous 

fi brous cum brous co pi ous 

pi ous va/ ri ous glo ri ous. 

po rous de vi ous o di ous 

joy ous pre vi ous o dor ous 

cal lous se ri ous cu ri ous 

ner vous te di ous du bi ous 

lep rous li be! lous ) du te ous 

pom pous li bel ous J fu ri ous 



j 


SPBL LINO-BOOK. 


113 


hu mor ons 


mur der ous 


con gru ous 


In di cf ous 


pit e ous 


cred u lous 


In mi nous 


plen te ous 


em u lous 


mu ti nous 


pros per ous 


fab u lous 


nu me rous 


rav en ous 


pop u lous 


'ru in ous 


slan der ous 


rapt ur ous 


scru pu lous 


en vi ous 


scrofulous 


spu n ous 
dan ger ous 


impious 
ob vi ous 


stren u ous 
sumpt u ous 


trait or ous 


om i nous 


trem u lous 


bois ter ous 


per il ous 


so no 7 rous 


poi? on ous 
boun te ous 


scur ril ous 


posthumous 
disastrous 


spir it ous 


moun tain ous 


mis chiev ous 


por ten tous 


bar bar ous 


dec o rous* 


stu pen dous 


mar vel lous ) 


clam or ous 


tre men dous 


marvelous .) 


friv o lous 


e nor mous 


arduous 


ven om ous 


gor' geous 


scan dal ous 


glut ton ous 


con ta' gious 


#iiv al rous 


ran cor ous 


com a geous 


haz ard ous 


rigorous 


out ra geous 


vil lain ous 


timorous 


e gre gious 


gen er ous 
hideous 


val or ous 


ad van ta' geous 


vigorous 


right? eoust 


• Others, de co' rous. t Pronounced rf chua. 




LESSON CLXXIl 




In the following words, ci, ti, se, and sci 


, before ous, have the 


sound of sh ; and when they follow e or i, this sound is united 


with the preceding syllable in pronunciation, as pre' cious, 


pronounced presh 


'us. 




Spa' cious 


cau tious 


frac tious 


gra cious 


nau seous 


cap tious 


spe cious 


faciious 


anx ious * 


* • 


Pronounced ank' shus. 



114 


THB VEACTICA* 


noxious*' 


fe ro cious 


fla gi tious 


con scious 


pre co cious 


ju di cious 


lus cious 


con ten tious 


ma li cious 


ca pa' cious 


li cen tious 


nu tri tious 


fal la cious 


in fee tious 


of fi cious 


pug na cious 


sen ten tious 


per ni cious 


au da cious 


pre 7 eious 


pro pi tious 


lo qua cious 


vicious ) 


se dl tious 


ra pa cious 


vi tious J 


sus pi cious 


sa ga cious 


am bi' tious 


avaricious 


te na cious 


fac ti tious 


ex pe di tious 


vo ra cious 


ca pri cious 


su per sti tious 


vex a tious 


aus pi eious 


con sci en tious 


fa ce tious 


de li eious 


ef fi ca cious 


a tro cious 


fie ti tious 


per ti na cious 


• 


Pronounced nok' shus. 


What word eofe in tout ? 


' 


LESSON CLXXIIL 


Words ending in ous 


, of four, five, and six syllables, accented 




variously. 




Gre ga' ri ous 


la bo ri ous 


ne fa ri ous 




me lo di ous 


pre ca ri ous 




no to ri ous 


spon ta ne ous 


op pro bri ous 


im pe ri ous 




vie to ri ous 


in ge ni ous 




cir cu i tous 


mys te ri ous 


; 


for tu i tous 


ob se qui ous 


\ 


gra tu i tous 


cen so ri ous 




in juri ous 


com mo di ous 


pe nu ri ous 


er rone ous 




sa lu bri bus 


fe lo ni ous 




u §u ri ous 


har mo ni ous 


vo lu mi nous 



SPEIfUNO-BOOIt. 115 


a nal o gous 






ri die u lous 


ca lam i tous 






yo cif er ous 


mag nan i mous 




a nom a lous 


mi rac u lous 






a non y mous 


u nan i mous 






i dol a trous 


ad ven tu rotis 






pre pos ter ous 


com pend i ous 






ca lum ni ous 


con tempt u ous 




il lus tri ous 


im pet u ous 






in dus tri ous 


in gen u ous 






pre §ump tu ous 


ne ces si tous 






tu mult u ous 


su per flu ous 






vo lup tu ous 
spir/ it u ous 


tern pest u ous 






am phib \ ous 






sub ter ra' ne ous 


as sid u ous 






si mul ta ne ous 


car niv o rous 






in stan ta ne ous 


n con tin u ous 






mis eel la ne ous 


con spic u ous 






ho mo ge ne ous 


con tig u ous 






cer e mo ni ous 


in iq ui tous 






ac ri mo ni ous 


in sid i ous 






mer i to ri ous 


in rid i ous 






par si mo ni ous 


las civ i ous 






pu sil Ian i mous 


per fid Lous 






ig no min i ous 


per spic u ous 






o do rif er ous 


pre cip i tous 






ex tern po rif ne ous 


pro mis cu ous 






heterogeneous 


• 

LESSON CLXXIV. 


Words ending in ity, 


ety, 


and 


uty, of three, four, and fir© 


syllables, accented variously. 


La' i ty 


pau ci ty grav i ty 


deity 


amity 


suav i ty 


unity 


cavity 


vanity 



116 



THE PRACTICAL 



a cer bi ty 
as per i ty 
ad ver si ty 
ce leb ri ty 
ce ler i ty 
dex ter i ty 
fidelity 
fraternity 
integrity 
Ion gev i ty 
necessity 
pos ter i ty 
pro pen si ty 
pros per i ty 
f e mer i ty 
ability 
agility 
ac cliv i ty 
a vid i ty 
benignity 
cu pid i ty 
de cliv i ty 
f a cil i ty 
fu til i ty 
gentility 
hu mil i ty 
no bil i ty 
fer til i ty 
ster il i ty 
se ren i ty 

it two ends in t ■- 
also the case in rickety and subtlety ; when 



sanctity 
verity 
brev i ty 
len i ty 
levity- 
enmity 
equity 
dignity 
comity 
jollity 
prob i ty 
polity 
par i ty 
an nu' i ty 
ere du li ty 
con gru i ty 
community- 
gar ru li ty 
im mu ni ty 
impunity 
sa lu bri ty 
gra tu i ty 
va cu i ty 
barbarity 
a lac ri ty 
ca lam i ty 
hilarity 
uajban i ty 
ex trem i ty 
prox im i ty 

When the last syllable but two ends in t or y, 

otne; 



tran quil li ty 
u biq ui ty 
u til i ty 
neu tral i ty 
sta bil i ty 
in iq ui ty 
vi tin i ty 
malignirty 
com mod i ty 
e nor mi ty 
fri vol i ty 
pom pos i ty 
pro fun di ty 
gay' e ty ) 
gaiety J 
piety 
ni ce ty 
moi e ty 
sub til ty * 
rick et y 
dep u ty 
va ri' e ty 
sa ti e ty 
e bri e ty 
so bri e ty 
anx i e tyf 
soci e ty 
pro pri e ty 
con tra ri / e ty 
no to id e ty 

the termination is ety, u is 
rwise, it is ity. 



Others, sub' tie ty, pronounced stit' U ty. 
t Pronounced ang zV e ty. 
What words end in Ity ? in ety ? in uty f 



SPELLIM-BOOK. 117 


LESSON CLXXV. 


Words ending in ity, of five and 


six syllables, accented ra- 




riously 




As si du' ity* 




prob a bil i ty 


i a\ja bi gii i ty 




sens i bil i ty 


1 qon ti gu i ty 




u na nim i ty 


1 in go nu i ty 




u ni vers i ty 


su per flu i ty 




vers a til i ty 


' spoil ta ne i ty 




vol a til i ty 


hos pi tal i ty 




vol u bil i ty 


af fa bil i ty 




cred i bil i ty 


ea pa bil i ty 




con san guin i ty 


♦ cul pa bil i ty 




cu ri os i ty 


du ra bil i ty 




gen er os4 ty 


e qua nim i ty 




me di oc ri ty 


fea§ i bil i ty 




an i mos ity „ 


flex i bil i ty 




im mu ta bil'' i ty 


im be oil i ty 




im pla ea bil i ty 


li a bil i ty 




ir ri ta bil i ty 


mag na nim i ty 




prac ti ca bil i ty- 


mu ta bil i ty 




res pect a bil i ty 


pla ca bil i ty 




com pat i bil ity 


plau ?i bil i ty 




di vi? i bil i ty 


pos si bil i ty 




el i gi bil i ty 


LESSON CLXXVL 


In the following words, c at the end of a syllable preceding i ; 


has the sound of s ; as ca pac* i 1 


ty, pronounced ca pas 1 ty 


Ca pac' i ty 




te nac i ty 


lo quae i ty 




ve rac i ty 


o pac i ty 




vivacity 


rapacity . 




pug nac i ty 
f e Tic i ty 


sa gac i ty 





118 


THE PRACTICAL 




-sim plic i ty 


in flam ma biT i ty 


du plic i ty 


in flex i bil i ty I 


rus tic i ty 


in vin ci bil i ty » 


ve loc i ty 


per fee ti bil i ty II 


a troc i ty 


pu sil la nim i ty 1 


' fe roc i ty 


re spon si bil i ty . [J 


per ti nac 7 i ty 


sus cep ti bil i ty V 


ec cen trie i ty 


im pen e tra bil 7 i ty 1 


e lee trie i ty 


in cor ri gi bil i ty . i 


e las tic i ty 


in tel li gi bil i ty 1 
in cor rupt i bil i ty 


au then tic i ty 


mul ti plic i ty 


in vi o la bil i ty 




rec i proc i ty 


in com pre hen si bil 7 i ty 




LES80N CLXXVIL 




W the following words 


, sion has the sound of acbun, and tion, 
of shun. ► 




Sua/ siont 


le gk tion 




per sua 7 sion 


dd na tion 




dis sua sion 


po ta tion 




occasion 


no ta tion 




ub ra sion 


o rfc tion 




e va sion 


mu ta tion 




in va sion 


du ra tion 




per va sion 


gra. da tion 




mis per sua' sion ci ta tion 




na 7 tion 


pri va tion 




ra tion 


sal va tion 




sta tion 


de fal ca 7 Hon 




pro W tiott : 


av o ca tion* 




car na tion ■' 


rev o ca tion 




vo ca tion 


per tur ba tion 




• ces sa tion 


com pli 6a tion 




pur ga tioii 


in vo ca tion | 





SPELLlN«-B«OK. 



119 



con vo ca tion 
prov o ca tion 
con se era tion 
trep i da tion *- 
obligation 
spo li a tion 
con ge la tion . 
rev e la tion 
ap pel la s tion 
con stel la tion 
dis til la tion 
trib u la tion 
pec u la tion 
.ad u la tion 
stran gu la tion 
def a ma tion 
dec la ma tion 
proc la ma tion 
in flam ma tion 
prof a na tion 
ex pla na tion 
in dig na tion 
re? ig na tion 
ap pro ba tion • 
com bi na tion 
or di na tion 
in cli na tion 
dec li na tion 
div i na tion 
cor o na tion 
in to na tion 
con 8ter na tion 
con dem na tion 
des ti na tion 



rep a ra tion 
prep a ration 
con fla gra tion 
im i ta tion 
min is tra tion 
an no ta tion 
men su ra tion 
hab i ta tion. 
vi$ i ta tion 
al le ga tion 
os ten ta tion 
dis ser ta tion 
ex hor ta tion 
ex cla ma tion 
refutation 
rep u ta tion 
der i va tion 
dep ri va tion 
val u a tion 
co rus ca tion 
e men da tion 
re§ er va tion 
pre? er va tion 
dis pen sa tion 
re nun ci a / tion 
de nun ci a tion 
e jac u la tion 
dis sim u la tion 
con cat e na tion 
hal lu ci na tion 
per e gri na tion 
in ter pre ta tion 
pre med i ta tion 
re sus ci ta tion 



120 



THE PRACTICAL 



con tin u a tion in ter lin e a / tion 

ma nip u la tion su per er o ga tion 

al lit e ra tion rec on cil i a tion 

How many words, and what are they, that end in arion ? Can you find j 
any others with the same termination 1 If not, all other words ending in I 
ion, (the accented syllable of which ends in a,) end in lion 



LESSON 

Examples of words ending in 

in y ; tion having 

Oc cu pa/ tion 
va ri a tion 
ap pli ca tion 
mul ti pli ca 7 tion 
clas si fi ca tion 
ed i fi ca ti on 
mod i fi ca tion 
am pli fi ca tion 
sig ni fi ca tion 
nul li fi ca tion 



CLXXVIIL 

ation, derived from verbs ending 

the sound of shun.' 

ver si fi ca tion 
pu ri fi ca tion 
rat i fi ca tion 
grat i fi ca tion 
sane ti fi ca tion 
for ti fi ca tion 
mor ti fi ca tion 
jus ti fi ca tion 
in dem ni fi ca / tion 
per son i fi ca tion 



LESSON CLXXIX. 
In the following words, sion has the sound of zhun, — tion and 
cian, of shun ; and when preceded by t, *h and sh are united 
in pronunciation with the preceding syllable. 



Ad he' sion 
in he sion 
co he sion 
de pie tion 
re pie tion 
com pie tion 
se ere tion 
ac ere tion 
clis ere tion* 



vi' sion 
re vi' sion 
di vi sion 
pro vi sion 
de ci sion 
pre ci sion 
in ci sion 
ex ci sion 
eli sion 

Pronounced dis kresh 



col li sion 
cir cum ci' sion 
am bi' tion 
tra di tion 
addition 
e dition 
se di tion 
con di tion 
per di tion. 

un. 

msammBsssssaGsmmm 



atttgfa 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



121 



vo li lion 
ignition 
mo ni tion 
con tri tion 
at tri tion 
nu tri tien 
mu ni tion 
tran si tion * 
partition 
fru i tion 
tuition 
pe ti tion 
sus pi cion 
pro hi bi' tion 
exhibition 
ex pe di tion 
er u di tion 
coalition 
ebullition 
ab o U tion 



dem o li tion 
rec og ni tion 
def i ni tion 
ad mo ni tion 
pre mo ni tion 
am mu ni tion 
dis qui §i tion 
ac qui §i tion 
in qui §i tion 
ap po §i tion 
dep o §i tion 
prep o §i tion 
im po §i tion 
com po §i tion 
prop o ?i tion 
op po §i tion 
sup po§i tion 
trans po §i tion 
dis po §i tion 
ex po §i tion 



rep e ti tion 
com pe ti tion 
su per sti tion 
in tu i tion 
de com po §i' tion 
in ter po §i tion 
ma gi' cian 
lo gi cian 
mu $i cian 
physician 
pa tri cian v 
op ti cian 
pol i ti / cian 
thet o ri cian 
mecA a ni cian 
a rith me ti' cian 
a cade mi, cian ^ 
ge om e tri cian 
math e ma ti' cian 
met a phy ?i cian 



# Pronounced tran slfch' un. 

What words end in cion 7 and in cian ? Those which end in cian denote 
agents. Can you find any others ending wittf a similar sound that also 
denote agents 1 / 

LESSON CLXXX. 

In ihe following words, sion has the sound of zhun, and tion 

of shun. 

e mo' tion " r 
com mo tion 
de yo tion 
lo co mo' tion 
o' cean* 
fu sion 
* Pronounced 6' shun, 
G 



Ex plo' sion 
cor ro sion 
mo'' tion 
no tion 
lo tion 
po tion 



8 rff fu" sion 
ef fu sion 
dif fu sion 
in fu sion 
con fu sion 
trans fu sion 



■ ; 



i>?2 


THE PRACTICAL 




con clu sion 


solution 


evolution 


ex clu sion 


ret ri bu' tion 


rev o lu tion 


delusion 


con tri bu tion 


in vo lu tion 


al In sion 


distribution 


diminution 


il lu sion 


pros e cu tion 


sub sti tu tion 


col lu sion 


per se cu tion 


des ti tu tioft 


pro fusion 


ex e cu tion 


restitution 


in tru sion 


el o cu tion 


institution 


con tu sion 


absolution 


con sti tu tion 


ab lu tion 


re§ o lu tion 


can' tion 


pol lu tion 


dis so lu tion 


: - pre cau' tion 




What wwd cafe ip esm* 


r 




LES&ON CLXXXL 


In the following words si, ti, and ci, have the sound of *b $ mi 


has also the same sound, united m pronunciation with the 


accented syllable 


* 




Man 7 sion 


con ten tion 


incurs^ ( . „. 


pen sion 


dis ten tion 


ex cur sion 


ex pan 7 sion 


at ten tion 


animadversion 


as cen sion 


.pre vention 
m ven tion 


por 7 tion 


de clen sion 


apportion 


di men sion • 


« ver 7 sion 


pro por tion 
de tfer tion* 


sus pen sion 


sub mer 7 sion 


dis sen sion 


im mer sion 


insertion 


pre ten sion 


as per sion 


as ser tion 


extension 


dis per sion 


con tor tion 


con de aoeft'-gion aversion 


dis tor tion ; 


rep re hen $ion 


sub ver sion 


ex tor tion . 


comprehension reversion 


coercion ^ 


ap pre hen sion 


di ver sion 


pas 7 sion , 


'men 7 tion 


in ver sion 


ses sion 


, detection 


con ver sion 


mis sion 


intention 


per ver sion 


ces sion 




SPELLING-BOO^. 



i23 



com pas' si<m 
ac ces sion 
sue ces sion 
se ces sion 
con ces sion 
pro ces sion ' 
con fes sion 
pro fes sion 
ag gres sion 
di gres sion 
in gres sion 
progression 



trans gres sion 
de pres sion 
impression 
com pres sion 
op pres sion 
suppression 
ex pres sion 
pos ses sion 
sub mis sion 
ad mis sion 
e mis sion 
re mis sion 



What words end in Hon ? in cum 1 Can you 
suspicion and coercion that mdm eion t 



com mis sion - ; 
o mis siop. 
per mis sion 
dis mis sion 
tranjsf mis sion. 
con cus sion 
per cos sion 
dis cus sion x 
., in ter ces / siqp 
pre pos ses sion 
in ter mis sion 
man u mis sion 

find any other words besides 



LESSON CLXXXIL 
In the following words sion, — and tion when not preceded by 
s, — have the sound of shun ; xi, of ksh ; and tion preceded 
by s, of chun. 



Cdm puT sion 
repulsion 
ex pul sion 
revulsion 
con vul sion 
cap 7 tion 
op tion 
decep / tion 
re cep tion 
con cep tion 
perception, 
exception 
as crip tion 
pro scrip tion 
sub scrip tion 



description 
tran scrip tion 
in scrip tion 
re demp tion 
pre emp tion 
resumption 
pre §ump tion 
con sump tion 
. as sump tion 
a dop tion 
ab sorp tion 
e rup tion 
irruption 
cor rup tion 
dis rup tion 



super scrip' tion 

ac / tion 

fac tion 

fraction 

sane tion 

section 

diction 

fiction 

fric tion 

function 

suction 

unction 

Sue tion 

de jec / tion 

pro tec tion 



* ... 



194 



•f HE PRACTICAL 



connection 
connexion 
re due tion 
se due tion ; 
subtraction 
de struction 
compunction 
ju ris die 7 tion 
belli e die tion 



f Her e He tion r 
y n ben efac' tion 
stupefaction 
rar e fac tion 
putre faction 
petrifaction 
resurrection 
pre di lee tion 
in stir rec tion 



in tro due tio'n 
flex 7 



ion 
fluxion 
complex 7 ^ 
c^ ci fix 7 ion 
question 
sugges'tion 
di ges tion ' 
combustion 

Are there any words that end in Ition 7 any that end in fsion ? any tfiat 
end in. c*aw 7 •, " j] <:. ! 

i, > ; i -'LESSON CLXXX1JL \ ! 

The Happy- Ecmdly; 




Oh ! sweet' as vernal dews that fill 
The closing buds on Zion*s hiU, 

When evening clouds draw, thither^; 
So sweet, sp heavenly 'tis to, $ee , ; % 
The members of one family 5 

Live peacefully together. : ■ 

The children, like the lily flowers, 

On which descend the sun .aftd. showers, 



"r: > 






^— = "W W 

3PEJULING-B00K. J$£ 



Their luies of beauty blending ; 
The parents, like the willow boughs, 
On which the lovely foliage grows, 
. Their friendly shade extending. 

But leaves the greenest will decay, 
And flowers the brightest fade away, , 

Wl#n autumn winds are f weeping ^ 
And be the heiaehold e'er so fair, • >1 

The hand of death will soon be there, ■ > <\ < ■} * 

And tiirtithosomie to 



i > 






Yet leaves ajpp will clothe the trees, 
• , And lilies wave beneath the breeze, 

When spring comes smiling hither; 
' And friends who parted at the tomb, 
May ye,t renew their loveliest bloom, . \ J 
# . And jneet in heaven together. . j, i; 

'•i~ - 1; » . » . . * 1 . oii 

LESSON CLXXXIV. 
In the following words i before a vowel has the sound of j; 
as serf far, pronounced sen' yur. 

Swfefot , pannier t spaniel J 

jun ior val iant ax iom 

cloth ier i *« brill iant pon iard 

fol io * bill iardj in dian 

al ien cftrist ian niff ian 

sav ior fust ian mill ion 

nn ion bil ions pill ion 

cowrt ier fil ial trill ion 

bull ion best ial bill ion 

coU ier cord ial min ion 
* Or, fa u o. 

_ *. 



itt TrfE PRACTICAL 



pinion ptmctilio opinion 

onion* seraglio punctilious 

pe cuT iar ci vil ian re bell ious 

be hav ior pa Til ion -brill' ian cy 

con ven ient post ill ion mel ior ate 

com mun ion ver mil ion : al ien ate 

pie be ian bat tall ion pe cun' ia ry 

celestial rebellion auxiliary 

familiar companion familiarize 

ely§ium* do mm ion eAristiabity 
, fin' jmif 6 fikhf ] 



LESSON CLXXXV. 
In the folio wing words si, zi, and s have the sound of zh. 



Gla' zier 


az ure 


treas ur y 


gra zier 
bra sier 


meas ure 
pleas ure 


vis u al 
u su al 


o sier 


treasure 


dis clo'sure 


hosier 


treas' ur er 


e rasure 



LESSON CLXXXVL 

In th* foUtwJng words, s before u,~-*ci, si, ci, and ti,sj*re the 

sound of sh. 

Pa' ttast * cen sure ne go tia ble 

an oient sens'' u al pro por tion ate 

pa tience so cia ble af fee tion ate 

ra tio sta / tion a ry con fee tion er 

quo tient die tion a ry so cia bil' i ty 

tran sient cen sur a ble pen i ten tia ry 

sen tient sta tion e ry pro ba' tion a ry 

con science in sa' tia ble ob jec tion a ble 

What word ends in cicnt f What wojdi entl in ary ? What one in ay f 



SMLLIHCHBOtS. 



12T 



LESSON CLXXXVII. 
In the following words, ci, sci, ti, — and ss before u and i, — have 
the sound of sh, which is united in pronunciation with the 
accented syllable. 

Press" ure om nis cience ju di cia ry 

fis sure mi li tia prac ti tkm er 

de fi' cient pas" sion ate su per fi' cie§ 

effioient defi'ciency benefi'ciary 

suf fi cient" ef fi cien cy dis ere 7 tion a ry 

pro fi cient suf fi cien cy in i tia to ry 

omniscient proficiency • propitiatory 

~ LESSON CLXXXVIIL 

In the following words, used only in the plural, the final s, 
when not preceded by c or t, has the sound of v. . 

sham bles 
cal ends 
vitals 
twee zers 
mea ?les 
wa ges - 
trow? era 
bow els 
spdc' ta ctetf 
jprem i ses 
mo las" ses ) 
me las ses J 
en vi rons 

LESSON CLXXXIX. 
The following words are pronounced as if h preceded w. 

Whip whist which whirl 

whim whisk v whdpt when 

whit whiff whfr whelp 



Tactics 


eaves 


ethics 
phy? ics 
optics 


dregs 
tongs 
an / nals 


hy s tei< ics 


entrails 


i tal ics 


embers 


statistics 
mathematics 


mppers 
pincers 


rick'ets 


snuffers 


ef fects' 
clothes 


sci? $ors 
ashes 


stays 
shears 


goggles 
riches 



128 

whence 

whet 

whiz 

whale 

whey (ay) 

wheat 

wheel * 



TM PRACTICAL 



wheeze 

whine 

white 

why 

while 

whilst 

where 



what 
wh&rf 
wheth' er 
whisk er 
whim per 
whis per 
whit low 



whiffle 
whis tie 
whittle 
whith er 
whee die 
^whim' §i cal 
o ver whelm' 



lesson cxa 

To the following word*, ending in ic, the termination al is not 

added. 

Pul/ lie col ic 

dor ic fab ric 

gas trie on tic 

epic tunic 

civ ic lu' na tb 

goth ic pleth o ric 

frol ick ) bish op ric 

frol ic ) cath o lie 

ton ic e clip 7 tic 

pan ic i tal ic 

plas tic phleg mat ic 

rel ic ec lee tic 

traffick) gigantic 

traf fie J do mes tic 

ire tic * pa cif ic ' 

gar lie prog nos tic 

LESSON CXCL 
The following words are not varied so as to end in ic. 

L6 / cal fis cal mfet ri cal 

fo cal rad' i cal ver ti cal 

vo cal prac ti cal drop si cal 

ras cal med i cal sur gi cal 



gym nas tic 
spa? mod ic 
terrific 
concentric 
vol canic 
re pub lie 
emetic 
a quat ic 
ath let ic 
Then mat ic 
pro $a ic 
ca thar tic 
dip lo mat 7 ic 
me te or ic 
pat ri ot ic 
tel e graph ic 



fin i cal re pip ro cal or a tor' i cal 

in im / i cal e quiv cal di a met ri cal 

non sen si cal pi rat i cal prob lem at i cal 

sym met ri cal le vit i cal par a dox i cal 

% 

LESSON CXCIL m 

The following words are sometimes, though seldom, used with 
the addition of al. 

Cu'bic organic prolific 

mimic monastic magnetic 

hec tic er rat ic e las tic 

rustic ecstatic epidem'ic 

mim ick (verb.) di dac tic tel e scop ic 

la con" ic spe ctf ic lith o graph ic 

ge ner ic nar cot ic ar o mat ic 

ex trin sic syl lab ic pan e gyr ic 

in trin sic jmeu. mat ic id i ot ic 

ec ceh trie me tallic par a lyt ic 

pe dan tic pri? mat ic cli mac 7 ter ic 

LESSON CXCIIL 

The following words are sometimes, though seldom, used 

without the termination al. 

Cler 7 i cal , dejst i cal met a phor i cal 

eth i cal , ' me thod i cal ge o met ri cal 

tecA ni cal . gram mat i cal met a phy§ i cal 

typ i cal 1 den ti cal tnath e mat i cal 

spherical sophistical hypothetical 

nau ti cal ca non i cal • hy po crit i cal 

ty ran 7 ni cal e van gel' i cal je? u it i cal 

i rbn i oaT ge o graph i cal ex e get i cal 

the at ri cal ' hy per bol i cal as tro nom i cal 

statistical . economical allegorical 



mmM 



130 



VHB PRACTICAL 



LESSON CXCJV. 
The following words are also used with the addition of al. 



Mu' sic 
sto ic if 
ru brie 
graph ft 
com ic 
tropic 
top ic 
lyr ic . 
clas sic 
phy? ic 
mys tic 
critic 
op tic 
cyn ic 
seep tic ) 
skep tic ) 
seen ic 
Thetf o ric 
pol i tic 
her e tic 
an gel 7 ic 
sym bol ic 
po lem ic 
do tan ic 
hys ter ic 



sa tir ic 
his tor ic 
e lee trie 
em phat ic 
dra mat ic 
sab bat ic 
dog mat ic 
sar cas tic 
ma jes tic 
nu mer ic 
fan tas tic 
phan tas tic 
fa nat ic 
po el ic 
des pot ic 
el lip tic 
pa thet ic 
pro phet ic 
em pir ic 
he ro ic 
mo §a ic 
pe ri 6d' ic 
sci en tif ic 
nhil o soph ic 
fti a bol ic 



ac a dem ic 
a pos tol ic 
pu ri tan ic 
at mos pher ic 
alphabetic 
em ble mat ic ■ 
sys te mat ic 
e nig mat ic 
misanthropic 
sym pa thet io 
typographic 
syl lo gis tic 
dem o prat ic 
en er get ic 
the o crat ic 
an a ly t ic 
pan to mim ic 
par a bol ic 
philanthropic 
a rith' me tic 
hi e ro glyph" ic 
% aristocrat ic 
id i o mat ic 
en thu §i as fie 
ec cle §i as tic 



lesson exev. 

Words ending in cle, kle, and kel. 

Cir' cle. pin na cle ■ spec ta cle i ci cle ) 
un cle mir a cle ob sta cle' i si cle J 



man 7 a cle or a cle 



re hi cle . tu ber cle 



WBLLIHO-BOOK. 



LSI 



bar na cle 
article 
par ti cle 
re cep' ta cle 
conventicle 
tab'ernacle 
twin / kle 
cackle 



sHic kle 
tackle 
spec kle 
free kle 
fickle 
pic kle 
prickle 
trickle 



sickle 
tickle 
stickle 
buckle 
chuc kle 
knuckle 
truckle 
sue kle 



Do any words of more than two •yHabiea «nd in kit? 
inkdt 



ankle 
ran kle 
crinkle 
sprinkle 
wrinkle 
tinkle 
spar kle 
shek el 

What woid ends 



LESSON CXCVL 
Words ending in cei, cle, cil, sel, sil, sal, cile and sile. 



Can 7 eel 
chan eel 
mus cle * 
pencil 
parcel 
eod' i cil 
dom i cil 
chi§' el 
damsel 
tinsel 
mor sel 
tas sel 



ves sel 
tea? el 
wea§f el 
coun sel 
council 
fossil 
u ten 7 sil 
vas' sal 
mis sal 
na§al 
re pri' §al 
sur pri §al 



pro po ?al \ 
dis po fjal 
perusal 
re fu §al 
es pou ?al 
ca rou §al 
re vers al 
u ni vers 7 al 
do 7 cile f 
missile 
pen sile 
in^beeilef 



* Pronounced may si. t Others, dos' il, im Ws' sil. 
What woids end in clef in celt and inilel 

LESSON CJCCVIL* 
Words ending in bal, bel, bol, and We. 



Cymbal 
verb al 
herb al 
can 7 ni bal 
reb" el 



label 


babble 


libel 


bub ble 


sym'bol 


amble* 


gambol 


crumble 


bramble 


gam ble 



grumble 
hobble 
humble 
jum ble 
nib ble 



132 



THE PttJlCTICAl 



nimble 
peb ble 
quibble 
rab ble 
ramble 
rum ble 
scram ble 
scrib ble 



stub ble 

stumble 

thimble 

trem ble 

tumble 

able 

cable 

fable 



What 



words 



feebl^ 
gable 
bible 
foi ble 
* no ble 
sable 
stable 
table 

end in a/, el, and tif 



g&r ble 
mar bie 
as sem' ble 
dis sem ble 
re §em ble 
en a ble 
ig no ble 
pre' am ble 



JJSSSON 

Words ending in able, uble, 

Prob' a ble 
pass a ble 
af fa ble 
syl la ble 
ten a ble 
cul pa ble 
pal pa ble 
ar a ble 
par a ble 
notable 
tract a ble 
tax a ble 
sol u ble 
vol u ble 
ford a ble « 
sal a ble 
blam a ble 
ca* pa ble 
e qua ble 
du ra ble 
cu ra ble 



CXCVIIL 

and ible, variously accented. 

pos si ble 

sens i ble 

vi$ i ble 

cred i ble 

tan gi ble 

fallible 

hor ri ble 

ter ri ble 

flex i ble 

for ci ble 

cru ci ble 

fea ?i ble 

pliu §i ble 
, el' i gi ble 

ad miss' ible 

com press i ble 

de fens i ble 

di vi$ i ble 

os ten si ble 
' re spons i ble 

in del i ble 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



133 



mu' ta ble • 
port a ble 
suit a ble 
li a ble 
teach a tie 
prac' ti ca ble 
pred i ca ble 
am i ca ble 
ap pli ca ble-s 
des pi ca ble 
ex pli ca ble 
rev o ca ble 
for mi da ble 
nav i ga ble 
es ti ma ble 
ad mi ra ble 
ex e era ble 
hon or a ble 
mem o ra ble 
mi? er a ble 
in de fatfi gable 



com bus 7 ti ble 
com pat i ble 
corruptibly 
• con tempt i ble 
con vert i ble 
de struc ti ble 
di gest i ble - 
per cep ti ble 
1 ras ci ble 
in vin ci ble 
dis cern i ble 
de du ci ble 
incorrigible 
in tel li gi ble 
in ex press' i ble 
ir re press i ble 
ir re vers i ble 
rep re hen si ble 
con tro vert i ble 
ir re sist i ble 
in com pre hen' si ble 



What word* end in vile 1 If there are cognate word* ending in tad, once, 
ate, or a/ion, the adjective ends in able. If there are cognate word* ending 
in ist, he, ision, or ition, the adjective ends in tide. *fte exceptions are 
definable, opposable, resistible, and irresistible. 

LESSON CXC1X. 
Words ending in abb, of four syllables, variously accented. 



L 



Pref er a ble 
ref er a ble 
tol er a ble 
ven er a ble 
vail ner a ble 
mal le a ble 
envia ble 



ex pi a ble 
pit i a ble 
val u a ble 
cred it a ble 
eq ui ta ble 
hab i ta ble 
hos pi ta ble 



j 



134 THE tRACTIOU. 


im i table 


as sail a ble 


4am en ta ble 


de §ir a ble 


pal a ta ble 


ac count a ble 


prof it a ble 


in dict^ ble 


plea? ur a ble* • 


in scru ta ble 


pat don a ble 


con ceiv a ble 


an swer a ble 


de ceiv a ble 


fa vor a ble 


per ceiv a ble 


a mi able 


re trtev a ble 


va ri a ble 


al low a ble 


rea §on a ble 


re doubt a ble 


sea ?on a ble 


commendable 


trea ?on a ble 


in flam ma ble 


im pla' ca ble 


con form a ble 


sup potable 


im preg na ble 


ex cu 9a ble 


de mon stra ble 


a void a ble . 


ob §erv a ble 


a me na ble 


trans f er a ble 


re claim a ble 


ac cept a ble 


as sign a ble 


de test a ble 


attainable 


in ef fa ble 


ob tain a ble 


in tract a ble 


a do ra ble 


re spect a ble 


de plo ra ble 


re m&rk a ble 


* Pronounced 


plezh'ur abl. 


lesson ca. 


Words ending in able, of five 


syllables, rariously accented. 


In ex' tri ca ble 


con sid er a ble 


in cal cu la ble 


in com pvra ble 


a bom i na ble 


in ex ra ble 


de term i nable' 


in sep a ra ble 


in term i na ble 


in suf fer a ble 


excep tionable 


ir rep a ra ble 



SFKLLINTG-SGOK. 



135 



im pen e tra ble 
un ut ter a ble 
in dom i ta ble 
in ev i ta We 
dis tin guish a ble 
ex tin gnish a ble 
in vi o la ble 
in su per a ble 
in mi mer a ble 
in du bi ta ble 



re me di a ble 
in dis pens' a ble 
mon o syl la ble 
in con test a ble 
jus ti fl a ble 
ir re proach a ble 
un con troll a ble 
rec on cil able 
in sup port a ble 
in sur mount a ble 



Adjectives in able, derived from words ending in e, are spelt 
without the e before a ; except when, as in die following ex- 
amples, the primitive ends in ce, ge, or ee. 

Peaces' a ble ser' vice a ble 

trace a ble * man age a bio 

change a ble mar riage a ble 

charge a ble a gree' a ble 

LESSON CCL 

Words of two syllables, ending in al, el, ail, il, lie, nle, ul, ol, 

and le> accented on the first. 



Med' al 
san dal 
scan dal 
form aU 
nor mal 
dismal 
signal 
ver nal . 
mor al 
central 
as tral 
metal 



model 
grav el 
ravel 
trav el 
level 
shriv el 
swivel 
hov el 
novel 
grovel 
camel 
tram mGl 



cavil 
civil 
an vil 
tran quil 
tehdril 
peril 
nostril 
evil 
pupil 
April 
pro file 
fe brile 



eagle 
sta pie 
maple 
sup pie 
scrfi pie 
bugle 
beetle 
title 
paddle 
strad die 
saddle 
med dla 



136 


THE PRACTICAL 




dental 


flan nel 


futile 


ped die 


men tal 


chan nel 


servile. 


fiddle 


mor tal 


panel 
ken nel 


fer tile 


middle 


festal 


due tile # " 


riddle 


ves tal 


fen nel 


rep tile 


hud die | 


crys tal 


fun nel 


ster ile 


pud die 


bridal 


tunnel 


ferule 


_ can die 


feu dal 


chap el 


con sul 


dandle 


naval 


god pel 


carol 


handle 


rival 


minstrel 


pistol 


' kindle 


oval 


timbrel 


idol 


spindle 


regal 


barrel 


vi ol 


dwindle. 


frugal 


squirrel* 


la die 


swin die 


legal 


sor rel 


era die 


fon die 


penal 


cud gel 


idle 


bundle 


venal 


sach el 


bridle 


trundle 


final 


hatch* el 


nee die* 


curdle , 


spi nal 


mantel 


rifle 


hurdle 


pa pal 


chat tel 


trifle 


baffle 


e qual 


travail 


stifle 


scuffle 




Wh*t word* ending/ mule 7 nil midt 




• Pronounced skweV rel. 






LESSON ccn. 




Words ending in al, el, le, il, and ile, of two and three syllables, 




accented 


variously. 




Cor'al 


vital * 


trial 


fiiel 


6 ral 


to tal 


loy al 


cru el 


spiral 


port al ] 
bru tal 


roy al 


gruel 


neu tral 


an gel 


jew el 


plu ral 


re a] 


se quel 


mar shal 


rural 


di al 


scoun drel 


mar vel 


fatal 


vi al ) 
phiaj j 


ha zel 


char nel 


natal 


dtael 


shuf fle 



SPELLING-BOOK. 



137 



muffle 
ruffle 
an gle * 
dan gle 
man gle 



ample 
sam pie 
tyam pie 
tern pie 
dim pie 



wran gle pirn pie 



span gle 

strangle 

tangle 

singlt 

jingle 

shin gle 

min gle 

tingle 

bun gle* 

gurgle 



sim pie 
apple 
dap pie 
gtap pie 
ripple 
crip pie 
tip pie 
stop pie 
purple 
mantle 



strag gle gen tie 



waggle 
joggle 
juggle 
smug gle 
strug gle 
triple 



turtle 
myr tie 
cas tie 
nes tie 
pes tie 
nrres tie 



this tie 
bris tie 
gris tie 
jos tie 
bus tie 
hustle 
bat tie 
cattle 
rattte 
tattle 
kettle 
mettle 
'nettle 
settle 
little 
spit tie 
brittle 
tattle 
bottle 
rustle 
scuttle 
shut tie 
axle 



sub tlef 



\ 






subtil 
sub tile 
friz zle 
daz zle 
driz zle 
muz zle 
puz zle 
gar ble 
star tie 
muF ti pie 
prin ciple 
dis ci' pie 
e pis tie 
a pos tie 
em bez zle 
autumnal 
in fer nal 
maternal 

Eater nal 
:a ter nal 
e ter nal 
internal 



* The words from angle to bungle, inclusive, are pronounced 
as if the first syllable ended wiih#. 
t Pronounced sut' tL 



LESSON CCIII. 

Words ending in al, el, ile, and ol, of three syllables, accented 

variously. 

Ar ri / val ca the dral de ni al 

f re vi val re ci tal tri bu nal 

co e val re qui tal re new al 

pri me val i de al a vow al 



1 



n$ 


THS PRACTICAL 


bap ti§ mal 


per son al 


ax se nal 


pa rent al 


nom i nal 


car di nal 


ac quit tal 


in te gral 


pas tor al 


di ur nal 


ad mi ral 


nu mer al 


noc tur nal 


tern po ral 


fu ner al 


ca tkxrh al 


cor po ral 


la bi al 


fes' ti vai 


nat u ral 


ge ni al 


in ter val 


script u ral 


me ni al 


prod i gal 


guttural 


jo vi al 


con ju gal 


Capital 


cat a del ♦ 


an i mal 


hospital 


in fi del 


ordinal 


pedestal 
lin e al 


cal o mel 


crimi nal 


sen ti nel 


doc trinal 


or de al 


di sher' el 


prin ci pal 
lib er al 


triv ial 


en am el 


grad u al 


em pan nel ) 
im pan nel ) 


fed er al 


annual 


gien er fcl 


ac tu al 


ap par el 


min er al 


ritual 


vol' a tile 


lat er al 


punc tu al 


vers a tile 


lit er al 


v!r tu al 


pu er ile 


sev er al 


sex u al 


cap i tol 


What wands pn* in •& t and ol t 




LESSON €CIV. 


Words ending in al, of four, five, and six syllable, accented 




variously. 




Ac ci dental 


sup pie ment al 


in ci dent al 


sen ti ment al 


o ri ent al 




det ri ment al 


fun da ment al 


mon u ment al 


sac ra ment al 


instrumental 


or na ment al 


con ti nent al 


el e ment al 


hor i zon tal 



* 8?ju.uk«*bqqk. 139 

diamond. eon. genial 

e phem et al a e ri al 

e lect or ai ma te ri al 

con ject ur al im pe ri al 

ad verb i al s me mo ri al 

pro verb i al ar te ri al 

bi en ni al mer cu ri al 

tri en ni al su i ci' dal 

mil len ni al ' ' spir' it u al 

per en ni al in di vid / u al 

ter res tri al in tel lect u al 

con vit i al in ter me' di al 

re ?id tt al min is te ri al 

con tin u al * cer e mo ni al 

ef lect u al • mat ri mo ni al 

>er pet u al pat ri mo ni al 



E 



ie bit ual test i mo ni al 

e vent u al sen f, to ri al 

in hug u ral e qu<* to ri al 

e the re al mon i to ri al 

corporeal territorial 

fu ne re al ex per i m&if al 

remedial media to' rial 



LESSON CCVj 

In the following words ci, si, and ti have the sound of sh ; and 
when ci and ti follow e or i, this sound is united with the 
preceding syllable in pronunciation. 

So' cial ( nup tial cir cum stan tial 

pro vin' cial sub statt' tial pre§ i den tial 

fi nan cial ere den tial prov i den tial 

commercial prudential pestilential 

par' tial - essential influential 

mar tial e qui noc' tial con se quen tial 



HO 



THE PRACTICAL 



national 
ra tion al 
no tion al 
frafc tion al 
sec tion al 
op tion al 
in ten 7 tion al 



de vo tion al . 
spe' cial 
ju di' cial 
of fi cial 
prej u di' cial 
ben e fi cial 
ar ti fi cial 



su per fi cial 
in i' tial 
sol sti tial 
tra di' tion al 
ad di tion al 
con di tion al 
con tro ver' sial 



LESSON CCVI. 
In the following words ch has the sound of k. 



Scheme 
ache 
chyle 
school* 
cha§m 
chord 
cha' os 
cho ral 
cho rus 
e poch 
te trarch 
schoon er* 
chol er 
christ eh 
christ mas 
chron it 
chem ist ) 
chim ist j 
an chor 
mon arch 
sched ule 
schol ar 
echo 



ech oe§ 
pas chal 
ar chive? 
cha of ic 
scho las tic 
me chan ic 
se pul chral 
arch an gel 
chi me ra 
char' ac ter 
chol er ic 
chor is ter 
chron i cle 
chiys a lis 
alchemy 
an^ chy 
cat e chi$e 
cat e chi§m 
pen ta teuch 
chem is tfy ) 
chim is try j 
mech a ni?m 
sac cha rine 
• o, as in more. 



arch a type 
arch i tect , • 
harp si chord 
hi e rarch 
patriarch 
eu cha rist 
cha me' le on 
pa ro chi al 
cha If b e atfc 
chi mer i caL 
chirography 
chro nol o gy 
chro nom e ter 
char ac ter ize 
mo narch i cal 
ar' chi tect lire 
81 i gar chy 
mel an chol y 
mel an chol ic 
pa tri arch" al 
mach i nation 
cat e chn men 
character is' tie 



»PBLTifrar*BO<»r. 141 


LESSON CCVIL 


- In the following words ph has the sound of t 


Tri' umph met a phor 


tro phy eu / pho ny 
ty phus v au to graph 
ci pher ' tri nm / pnant 
dot phiii " tri tun phal 


eph od phi lip pic 


soph i?m de ^ci pher 


seraph biog'raphy ' 


proph ei bi og ra pher 


' or phan • ' ste nog ra phy 


c&m phor or thog ra phy ' 


pam phlet * ge og ra phy % > 


aph' o ri^m '■ ty pog ra phy * 


b] 


as phe my "" ! phi los o phy 


bl 


as phe mous phi los o pher ; 


epitaph v " * '* ' apocryphal 1 


lith o graph - phe nom e noA ' 


par a graph phi Ian thro py 
tel e graph r ; ' l! e piph a ny •" • ; i 


syc o phant lex i cog' ra phy 


soph is try ^, > phy? i og no my 


LESSON CCVUL " ' ' ' 


In the following words, g at the end of syllables, and followed 


by e or j, has the sound of j ; and c* in similar cases, that 

of 8* * -• • i ' ♦ 


Log' io dig it leg er £ * 
mag id vig il = ledg er y ' 


tragic agile process 


rigid fragile placid' ' 


frigid tac i* • acid '» 



lit 



TUB P«ACTICiX 



prog' e ny 
veg e tate 
ag i tate 
cog i tate 
vig il ance 
leg i ble 
mag is trate 
leg is late 
reg i men 
reg i cide 
trag e dy 
reg is ter ; 
forgery 
vac il late 
tac i turn 
decimal 
lac er ate . 
prec i pice } 
prec e dent 
spec i men 
reci pe -,:* < 
pac i fy 



spec i fy 
imag' ine 
e lie it . 
illicit 
so lie it 
im plic it 
ex plic it 
an tie i pate 
par tic i pate 
ca pac i tate 
so lie i tude 
au dac i ty 
me die in al 
mu nic i pal 
rAi noc e ros 
so lie it ous 
so lie it or 
ijeCj' es sa ry 
rec i ta' tion 
o rig' in ate 
bel lig er ent 
o rig in al 

lesson ccix. 



in dig e nous 
veg / e ta ble 
mag is tra cy 
leg is lat ure 
reg i menr al 
im ag / in a ble 
im ag in a tive 
spec i fi ca' tion 
mag is te' rial 
du o dep i mo 
an a log i cal 
ge o Jog i oal 
zo o log i cat 
phren o log i cal 
tau to log i oal 
the o log i cal 
phi lo log i cal 
^Aron o log i cal 
et y mo log' i cal 
geta e a log i cal 
miii er a logical 
phy§ i o log i cal 



In the following words x has the sound of gz ; as ex' hort, 

. pronounced Sgzf hort 



Ex horf ,; 
ex ist 
ex eqapt 
ex Qit 
exact 
ex ult 
ex hale 



rtiXilflL: 

ex haust 
ex alt 
ex Mb' it 
ex em plar 
ex ist ence 
ex er tion 



ex am pie > 
ex am ine ' 
ex ot ioi. 1 
ex or' di Tim . 
ex hil a rate : 
ex on er ate 
ex em pla ty 



sswggggae m i ii 

SPELLING-BOOK. 



143 



ex em pli fy 
ex orb i tance 
ex ag ger ate 



ex ec u tive 
ex edu tor 
ex ec u trix 



ex u ber ance 
ex &s per ate 
ex am i na 7 tion 



lesson qcx. 

Irregular and vaty difficult words, or*which the particular pio- 
. nunciation is given. 

Prtaounoed. Pronooncod. 

Choir kwire bus*i ness biz' ness 

folks - fokes bus i ly biz 7 ze ly 

isle lie s corps kore 

is land V la#d . i ron % I' urn 

aisle lie \ ,. buoy bwoy 

schism sizm . buoy ant bwoy / ant 

bu ry beir' ry " pro vost pro vo 7 

bu ri al berf e al ap ro pos ap' ro po 

drachm dram belle bgl 

english ing'glish . spades spe 7 shiz 

fore head ft>r< ed co quet 1 ko kef 

man y > men' ny co quette J or co quet 7 

an y en' ny vig net \ . • w. 

phthisic ti£z 7 zik , vig nette J vm yer 

of 6v . < yacht yot 

pret ty pnt 7 ty sold ier • sol 7 jur 

plaid plad sug ar shug 7 ar 

been bin seign i©r seen 7 yur 

rheum rume worst ed vmstf ed 

rhyme *rim col o s$l km* nel 

thyme tJumartim victuals vitftlz 

rhythm rithm beau bo 

fran chise fran 7 chiz beaux ■• b©ze 

mi nu tke me nu 7 she does duz 

worn an wum 7 a*i ven i gon van' zn 

worn en wim 7 en pigjeon pid' jun 

bus y biz 7 zy mosque mosk - 



144 THB PRACTICAL' 



kins folk klnz' foke 

haut boy ho' boy 

schis mat ic siz maf ic 

mus ke toe^ ) ^^ v -, . 

, % > mus Ke to '••' 
mus que toe j 

rhyth mi cal rith' mi cal 

buoy an cy • bwoy' an sy 

•J**"* } etekef 
et 1 quette j 

bra nette . bru netf 

era zette ga zetf 

belles lettres > ))eV let ter 

men ag er y men &zh' er e 

exhaustion egz haws' chun < 

mis tie toe miz / zl to* 

sou ve Bir soo' *e ner* "»' 

av oir du pois '. av er du poiz / 

re lig ious re lid' jus 

re lig ion • re lid' jun < i ' ' 

li tig ions le fid' jus 

pro dig iou* " pro did' jus # j 

sacrilegious sakrele'jus 

. contagious ken ta' jus 

burlesquef burlesk' ! 

grotesque gro tesk' " ] 

pic tu resque pikt u resk' 

aid de camp ' ad' de kawng 

gone ' * gon ; or nearly, gaWii. 

o, as in move. 1 Others spell bur lesk', &c.' 



g*ELLING-BOOK. 148 




*-• J 


WORDS 


\ 




Spelt alike, 


but which vary in Accent. 




Signification when accented on the 


\ 


Slgniljcation when accented on the 




first syllable. 




second syllable. 




Not here. 


1 Absent. 


To keep away. 




an abridgment 


Abstract* 


to draw from. 




a stress of voice.- . 


'Accent* 


to express accent. 




something added to* the > 
end of a word* . y 


Affix.. 


, to unite to the end. 




an increase. . 


: Augment* 


to make larger. 




the eighth month. 


} August. 
Collect, 


grand. 




a short prayer. . 


to gather together. 




an agreement. 


r Compact. 


80lld. 




a mixture. 


Compound 


. to mix together. 




a musical performance. 


Concert 


C to plan by mutual agree* 
\ ment. 




behavior. 


Conduct. 


to lead. 




limit. :. ' . - 


* Confine^ 


to restrain; 




a smuggle. 


i Conflict. 


to strive against 




to practise charms. 


Conjure* ' 


to implore. . 




a companion. 


Consort. 


tQ associate with. 




a contention. * * ' 


' Contest. 


to dispute. 




a bargain. 


• Contract. 


to lessen. x 




opposition- of figures. v 


Contrast., 


to set in opposition. 




familiar discourse. 


Converse. 


to talk with. 




one who adopts a new i 
opinion. J 


Convert. 


C to change from one 
\ stateto another. 






a person proved guilty. 


Convict. 


to prove guilty. 




ajot accompanying pro- * 




jf to accompany for pro* 




tection, usually by > 


•Convoy. 


< teetton, usually by 




sea. . ) 




f sea. 




a growing less. 


Decrease. 


to grow less. 




a summary. of laws. 


Digest. 


to arrange in order. 




passage for entering. 


Entrance. 


to put in ecstasy. 




a guard. 


Escort. 


to attend as a guard. 




an attempt. 


Essay. 


to endeavor. 




banishment. 


Exile. 


to banish. 




a commodity sent to ) 
another country. > 


Export. ^ 


i to carry goods to ano- 
\ ther country. 




something drawn out. 


Extract. 


to draw out. 




a commotion. 


Ferment. 


to excite internal motion., 





TUB PBACnCJOt* 



Frequent. 
Gallant. 



Import, < 



14$: 

fimtyHaMft. 

happening often, 
high spirited. 

meaning. % 

a mark. 

a perfume burnt Incense. 

a growing larger. Incre***. 

a gross abuse. insult. 
something noticed. Object. 

complete. . Petfiet. 

sweet odor. Petfimm 
Jr crxtot. 

Prefix. 

Protest. 

one under government. * . Subject. 

an attentive view. Sufvey. 

anguish. _ Torment. 

a conveyance. r Transfn 

a vessel for carriage; [ 
rapture. 



a written! 
a particle put before a i 
word. « ! 

a solemn declaration. 



I Transport, 



seeoadayUaMa. 

to visit often! 
courteous to ladies, 
to bring from another 
country. 
to stamp" 
to make angry, 
to grow larger, 
to, treat aksnvery. 
to? oppose, 
to make complete, 
to fill with sweet odor, 
to allow. 

to put before. 

to affirm with solemnity. 

C to bring under the pow- 

\ er of. 
to view carefully, 
to put to extreme pain, 
to convey. • 

to carry; to enrapture,* 



WORDS', 



Spelt o&t*, but which vary in accent and division into syllable*. 



Cem' ent, that which unites. 
Ce ment', to unite; closely. 
Dos/ eit^ a wilderness. . 
De sert', te forsake. ; ■ 
Min' ute, a short space of time. 
Mi nute', very small. 
Pros' age, a prognostic. 
Pre sage', to forebode. 
Pres' ent, a gift. 
Pre sent', to offer. 
Prod' uce, that which is brought 

forth. 
Pro duce', to bring forth: "* 
Prog ress, onward motion. 
Pro gross' to advance. 



Proj' ect,^ scheme. 

Pro ject', to be prominent. ^ 

Reb' el, one who renounces 
lawful authority. 

Re bel', U renounce lawful au- 
thority. 

Rec' ord, a register. 

Re cord', to regitfter. '• 

Ref ' use, of no value. 

Re fuse', to deny a request 

At' tri bute, quality. 

At trib' ute, to ascribe. 

In val' id, of no force. 

In' val id, > . - 

Invalid';j anmfirm P erson 



lasA 



CPELLI*f><B*0fct 



woIrds 



141 



Which are alike in Pronunciation, but differ in Orthography. 

been, from b* ; as, he had been. ' 
bin, a box for commodities. 

beer, a kind of liquor. 
■ ' bier, a carriage for the detad*. 1 ' 
bell, a hollow sounding body, 
belle, an admired lady. ' 

berry, a small fruit. 

bury, to put under grottaaV 
blew, from blow ; as, the wind blew, 
brae, a kind of eotor. 

boar, a male swine. 

bore, to make a hole, as witfi an 
auger. * 

boll, the pod of a plant, as of flax, 
bowl, a round hollow vessel. 

borne, from bear, to carry. * 

bourn, , a limit ' ,J 

borough, an incorporated town, 
burrow, a hole for small animals. 

bough, a branch. ' 

bow, to bend. ' 

brake, fem. 
break, to force asunder. 

breach, a breaking. 

breech, the tower 
bread, a kind of fo 
bred, brought up. 

broach, tor pierce a vessel. 

brooch, an ornament. o:> 

bruit, a noise, a report J ? i: *** 
brute, a beast. "/"'*/' 

but, as, he has but brie'toyfer' ' 

butt, a mark ; to strike With 1 tEb 
head. 



Ail, to be sick, or in trouble. 

ale, a kind of malt liquor, 
air, that which we breathe, 
air, a tune ; the manner of a per- 
son, 
ere, before m time. 
Jieir, one. who inherits. 
m aisle, a walk or alley m a church. 
* isle, an island. * 

all, the w^iole. 
awl, a sharp pointed tool: 

altar, a place for sacrifice. 
•- alter, to change, 
ant, a small insect, 
aunt, the sister of one's parent. 

ark, a small chest ; a vessel. 

arc, a part of a circle, 
ascent, a going up. 
assent, agreement 

anger, a tool to bore with. 
. augur, one who foretells, 
aught, any thing, 
ought, bound in duty. 

bad, not good, vicious. 

bade, commanded, 
bail, a surety, 
bale, a bundle of goods, 
bale, to lade out. 

ball, a: round body. * 

bawl, to cry aloud, 
bare, without covering, 
bear, a wild animal, 
bear, to carry ; to produce. 

base, mean, vile. 

base, the bottom or foundation. 

bass, a part in music, 
bay, a color ; a bodjjrof water, 
bey, a Turkish governor. l 

be, to exist. 

bee, an insect which makes honey, 
beach, the sea-shore, 
beech, a kind of tree. 

beat, to strike. 

beet, an eatable root, 
beau, a gay gentleman. 
| bow, an instrument to shoot With. 



butt, a cask containing two hogs- 
heads. li ' 
buy, to get for money, 
by, with, near, 
bye, as, in good-bye. i 

Cain, the first murderer. ' ° 

cane, a staff, or reed, 
call, to name ; to speak aloud. ' 
cam, a membrane inclosing the 
bowels. 

cannon, a great gun. '. 

canon, a law, a rule. 



Ttf TUB S**?T1Q4* 


canvas, a kind of cloth. 


dear, beloved; costly. 


canvas*, to examine. 


r deer, a wild animal. 


cask, a barrel to contain fluids. 


dew, a kind of moisture. 


Casque, a helmet. 


due, owed. 


cede, to give up. 

seed, what produces plants. 


die, to cease to live in the body. 


dye, to stain, to color. 


ceil, to cover the top or roof of a 


doe, a female deer. 


room, 
seal, to fasten with a wafer, or wax. 


dough, meal prepared for baking. 
. done, mushed. 


seal, an animal. 


dun, a dark color. 


cell, a small apartment. 


dun, to demand a debt 


sell, to exchange for money. 


dram, a small weight. 


cent, a. hundred; a coin. 


■ dTii»hm, an ancient cdfta. 


, scent, a smell. 


dam, to stop a stream. 


sent, ordered, or put in the way 


damn, to condemn. 


to go. 


ewe, a female sheep.* 


cession, a giving up. 
'session, a sitting for business. 


yew, a kind of tree. 


you, the person, or persons, spo- 


. ejieir, a band of singers. 


ken to. 


. " quire, Si sheets of paper, 
cooler, anger, rage. 


eye, the organ of sight 


I, myself. , 


collar, a covering for the neck. 


nun, willingly, 
fane, a temple. • 


chord, a line in a circle. 


cord, a small rope. ,, 


feign, to dissemble. 


chronical, continuing long. 


faint, feeble, exhausted. 


chronicle, a history. 


feint, a false appearance. 


cion, a sprout. 


fair, a place of sale ; beautiful, 


Sion, a mountain. 


just. 


cite, to summon, to quote. 


fare, food ; price of passage. 


sisb^ jritjon, a view, 
sue, a situation. 


feat, a striking action. 


feet, the lower parts of the legs. 


climb, to ascend with effort. 


flea, a troublesome insect 


dime, a portion of the earth. 


flee, to run away. 


coarse, not fine, rough. 


flew, from fly; as, the bird flew. 


course, the line of motion. 


flue, a passage for smoke, 
flour, meal from grain. 


coat; a part of drees. 


cote, a sheep-fold. 
| jjsmplemeut, a full number. 


flower, a blossom, 
fere, going first. 


j compliment, an expression of chr- 


four, twice two. 


1 *• ^ty. 


forth, forward, out 


"core, the heart, or inner part of a 


fourth, next after the third. 


i thing. 

i corps, a body of men. 


foul, dirty, mUy. 
fowl, a wingflO animal. 


: cousin, a relation. 


freeze, to harden into ice. 


■ cozen, to cheat. 


frieze, a coarse kind of cloth. 


currant, a small fruit. 


fir, a sort of tree. 


current, a running stream. 


for, the soft hair of animals. 


cymbal, an instrument of music. 


gait, manner of walking. 


symbol, a sign. 


gate, a sort of door. 


day, a portion of time. . . 
day, a Moorish governor. 


gilt, adorned with gold. 


guilt, wickedness, crime. 



, 8?OLUN4?-!K>OK. 



IW 



grate, a frame made. with. hars. 

great, large. . 
groan, a sound uttered in pain, 
grown, increased. 

hail, frozen rain ; to call, to salute. 

hale, to drag ; sound in body*. 
hair, natural cover of the head. ' 
hare, a small animal. 

hall, a large room. 

haul, to pull forcibly. 
hart, a male deer* 
• heart, the seat of life. ; 

heal, to cure. 
. heel, the hind part of the foot, 
hear, to perceive by the ear. 
here, in this place. . 

heard, from hear; as, I heard it. 

herd, a drove or flock* 
new, to cut down, 
hue, color ; a clamor. 

hie, to move in haste. 

high, tall, lofty. 
him, from Ju; as, I saw him. 
hymn, a song of religious praise. 

hoard, to lay up in store. 

horde, a band of wandering peo- 
ple, 
hole, a hollow place, 
whole, having all its parts. 

hour, a portion of the day. 

our, belonging to us. 
in, within, 
hm, a tavern. 

indict, to charge with crime, 

indite, to write, to compote, . 
key, an instrument to fatten and 

open a lock, 
quay, a wharf. 

kill, to take away life. 

kiln, a large stove or oven, 
knave, a rogue, 
nave, the middle of a wheel. 

knead, to work dough. 

need, want, necessity, 
knew, from know; as, I knew him. 
new, fresh, not old. .< _ 

rt knight* a title of honor.. 

night, the darkness between the 
setting and the rising of the 
sun. 
knit, to make network with needles, 
nit, an insect's egg. 



knot, a tie; ; a hard part in wood. 

not, a word of denial or refotal. 
know, to understand clearly, 
no, a word of denial or refusal. 

laid, placed. 

lade, to bad ; to dipejut. 
lain, from lie* to rest, to remain, 
lane, a narrow road or street. 

lea, a meadow. 

lee,, opposite to the wind, 
lead, a soft heavy metaL 
led, guided, directed. 

leaf, a part of a plant. .» 

lief, willingly, 
leak, to run out as a liqujdi. - 
leek, a sort of onion. 

loan, wanting- flesh. 

lien, a claim on property, 
lessen, to make lets, 
lesson, something to .be seed or 
learned. 

levee, an assembly to visit tome 
distinguished person. 

levy, to raise money or troops ; 
to collect, 
liar, one who tells lies. '• 

lyre, a musical instrument. 

lie, a wilful falsehood. - - 

lie, to recline, to rest. 

lye, a liquor from wood-ashea 
lo, behold. ... v 

low, near the ground ; hambif . 
low, to make a noise like a cow. 

loan, to lend. 

lone, by itself, softer?, 
lore, learning, 
lower, to let dowai. 

made, finished. 

maid, an unmarried woman; 
mail, armor ; a bag to carry letter*, 
male, a he animal or plant. 

main, chief, principal. 

main, the ocean ; the continent. 

mane, hair on the neck of animals, 
maize, Indian com. 
maze, an intricate winding. 

mall, a wooden hammer. 

raasilt to beat, to bruise, : 
manner, mode, custom, 
manor, a lordship. 
' mantel, a chimney-piece; ' *; 

mantle, a loose garment. «, 



TTTii-TjI 



ISO 



THE WtACTtCAL . 



*nwnhnl, to arrange. 
martial, warlike. 

mead, a liquor made from honev . 

owed, reward, 
mean, a medium, 
mean, low ; to signify. A 

mien, look, air, manner. 

moat, animal food. ' ! 

meet, fit, proper. ' 

moot, to come together. 

mete, to measure. \ 

metal, iron, silver, gold, dct. 
mettle, spirit, ardor. 

might, power, ability. 

mite, a amaH inseet. 
moan, to lament aloud, 
mown, from to mow ; as, the grass 



moat, a ditch, 
vote, a email particle, 
naught, bad. ^ 
nought, nothing. 

nay, no* 
* neigh, to make a riois*' like a 
hone. 
O, Oh, alas. 
owe, to be indebted, 
oar, an mstroment to row with. 
ore, metal as dug from the earth. 
a»* a shotting, 
won, from win, to gain. 
. onfl, a wooden Teasel, 
vfde. a pointed stake; whitish, 
wan. 
pain, suformg of body, or of mind. 
pane, a square of glass, 
pair, a couple, 
pare, to cut off the ****** 
pear, a kind of fruit. 
><fjtjate, a part of the month, 
pallet, a small bed. 
panel, a part of a door 
- paanel, a small saddle, 
peace, quietness, calmness, 
piece, a separated part, 
peak, the pointed top of a hittor 

mountain, 
peek, to look through e«ravice. 
pique, a nudge, 
peal, a loud sound. 
peel, to skin, or take off the rind. 



pfeer, an equal ; a nobleman, 
pier, a support of a bridge. 

plain, level ground; distinct, even.. 

Diane, a level surface ; a tool. ( 
plait, to fold, to double. 
plate, wrought silver. 

plum, a fruit. 

plumb, a leaden weight. ' 
pole, a long stick. 
poll, the head ; an election. 

pore, a small hole in the skin. 

pour, to turn out a liquid. 
pray, to implore, to beseech, 
prey, plunder, booty. 

principal, chief. 

principle, a fixed general truth, 
profit, pecuniary or other advan- 
tage, 
prophet, one who foretells. 

rain, water from the clpuds. 

reign, to rule. 

rein, part of a bridle, 
raise, to Eft up, to elevate, 
raze,' to overthrow, to efface. 

rap, to strike. 
1 wrap, to fold together, 
read, to peruse, 
reed, a hollow knottea stalk. 

read, did read. 

red, a color, 
reek, to smoke, to steam, 
wreak, to take revenge. 

rest, repose ; remainder. 

wrest, to force from, 
retch, to strain, 
wretch/ a miserable person. 

rice, a kind of grain. 

rise, ascent, increase, 
right, straight, just, 
rite, a ceremony, 
write, to form letters whh a pen. 
wright, a woskman. 

ring, something circular. 

ring, to ring; as, he rings a bell. 

wring, to twist. 
road, a way. 
rode, from to ride ; as, he rode on 

* 'a horse. 
- roe, a female deer. 

row, a rank Mo move a boat with 
oars. 



1 



WELLINO-BOOK. 



151 



rote, a mere repetition of words. 
* wrote; from write ; as, he wrote 

a letter, 
rough, uneven, harsh, 
ruff; a part of dress for the neck. 

rout, a rabble. 

route, ) a way. (Some pronounce 

Tout, ) thfsroote.) 
rye, a kind of grain, 
wry, crooked. 

faQ, a part of a ship. 

sale, a selling, 
scene, a sight, 
seen, beheld. 

scull, to propel a boat with an oar 

over the stem, 
skull, the bone that incloses the 
brain. 
sea, a large body of water. 
see, to look, a*, to behold. . 
seam, two edges joined together, 
seem, to appear, 
sear, to bum to dryness, 
sere, dry, withered, 
seer, a prophet, 
seignior, * lord, 
senior, elder, 
sew, to unite with a needle and 

thread, 
so, in such a manner, 
jow, to scatter seed. 

shear,- to clip, or cut off with a 

two-bladed instrument, 
sheer, unmixed, pure.'! ' 
shire, a county. (Some pronounce- 
shire.) 
shone, from rnhmc; .as, the. son 

shone, 
shown, <from show ; as, it was shown 
to me. 
slay, Jo kill. 

sleigh, a vehicle drawn on snow, 
sley, a weave/sTeed, . 
sleight, an artful trick, 
slight, to neglect. 
■'. sloe, t son of wfltt ptanv • : 

slow, not quick, 
soar, to mount upward, 
sore, painfully tender. 



sole, single, only ; the bottom of 
a foot or shoe. 

soul, the immortal part of man. 
some, a part, 
sum, the whole. 

son, a male child. 

sun, the great source of light, 
stair, a step. 
stare, to look earnestly, 

stake, a post ; a wager. 

steak, a slice of meat, 
stationary, fixed in place, 
stationery, paper, ink, quills, Ac. 

steal, to take secretly and wreng- 

steel, renned hardened iron, 
stile, steps into a field, 
style, manner of writing ; to name. 

straight, direct, not crooked. 

strait, a narrow past, 
succor, help, aid. ' 
sucker, a young shoot. ' 

tail, the end. 

tale, a story ; a reckoning, 
tare, an allowance in weight. . 
tear, to rend. 

team, a number of horses or oxen 
for drawing. 

teem, to abound, to produce, 
tear, water shed from the eye. 
tier", a rank, or row. 

their, belonging to them. 

there, in that fHace. 
threw, from throw ; as, he threw a 

stone, 
-through, as, he passed through the 
door. 

throe, extreme pain. 

throw, to cast, 
throne, a royal seat* 
thrown, from throw ; as, the stoeo 
was thrown. 

to, towards a plafce. 

.two, one and one. 

too, also, 
toe, a part of the foot, 
tow, to drag with a rope, as a boat. 
ttrw, the coarse part of flax or 
hemp. 

travail, to labor. 

travei, to go a journey. 



\ 



mm 



152 



THE PRACTICAL 



vile, a apace between hills. • 
vain, empty, showy, useless, 
vane, a weathercocn. 
vein, a' tube to convey the blood. 

I&ji-dl bottle. / 

viol, a musical instrument. 

vice, wickedness. 

vise, a griping instrument closed 
by a screw. 
wail, to weep aloud, 
wale, a mark of a stripe. 

wain, a wagon. 

wane, to decrease. 



waist, the middle part of the body, 
wastes desolate, .to squander. 

wait, to tarry, to expect. 

weight, heaviness, 
waive, to put off. 
wave, a moving swell of water. 

ware, something to be sold, 

wear, to carry on the body, as 
clothes. 
way, a manner ; a load, 
weigh, to find out how heavy a body 
is. ( 

weak, feeble, infirm. 

week, seven days, 
wean, to withdraw from the breast, 
ween, to think. 



OF PREFIXES AND SUFFIXES. 



A prefix is a letter, syllable, or word, placed at the beginning 
of a word, to vary its meaning ; as un before able in unable, 
•and re in rebuild. 

A suffix is a letter, or syllable, annexed to the end of a 
word to modify its signification ; as or in beggar, and less in 
fatherly. 

In certain words, the prefixes and suffixes seem nearly or quite redundant. 

OF THE PREFIXES. 

Some of the prefixes drop or change their final consonant, so 
as to unite easily with the first syllable of the word to which 
they are joined ;• as con in co-exist, and ad in o/-fix. 

A denotes, oh, in, to, at, or from; as, ashore, abed, afield, 
afar, avert 

Want of, or without; as, atheist. 

Ab, abs —from or away ; as, ooduce, ofatract. 

Ad — to or at ; as, adjoin, appertain. 

. d in ad, becomes e, f, g, 1, n, p, r, s, and t, in words beginning with these 

letters ; as, accept, a/lot. 

Ante — before ; as, antedate. 
Anti — against ; as, anftchristian. 

— ceas-a • i mrwi nr l *■ i sasassassssssasBsass 



SPELLING-BOOK. 153 



Circum — about ; as, circumnavigate. 

Con, or its equivalents, co, cog, col, com, and cor — together 
or with ; as, conform, coequal, coAect. 

Contra, or counter — against; as, contradict, counterpart, 
countermand. 

De — down or from ; as, descend, deduct. 

Dis,.di, or dif — take from, away, not, or asunder ; as, disarm, 
discover, disbelieve, divide. 

Ex, e, ec, or ef — out, or out of; as, extend, exclude. 

Em, or en — in, into, or on ; as, embark, enthrone. 

Extra — beyond ; as, extraordinary. 

In, or ig, il, im, and ir — in, into, upon, or not ;_ as, incase, 
insert, impose, iflegal. 

Inter — between or among ; as, intermix. 

Intro — among ; as, introduce. 

Mis — wrong, defect, error; as, misconduct, miscall. 

Ob, or oc, of, and op — in the way, against, out; as, obstruct, 
oppose. 

Per — through, or thoroughly ; as, pervade, perfect. 

Post — after ; as, postscript. 

Pre — before; as, prefix, predict. 

Preter — beyond; as, preternatural. 

Pro —for, forward, or forth; as, pronoun, proceed, produce. 

Re — back, again, or anew; as, recall, rebuild, renew. 
• Se-^-aside, apart, or without; as, secede, seclude. 

Sub, or sue, suf, sug, sup, and sus — under; as, suoject, 
suggest? support. 

Syn, or s^, syl, and sym — together, with; as, synagogue, 
sympathy. 

Super, or sur — above, over, more than enough; as, superadd, 
superfluous, surpass. 

Trans — over, beyond, across; as, transgress, .transatlantic. 

Un — with verbs, to undo; as, unfurl, unseal. — with adjectives 
^and adverbs, it signifies not ; as, unkind, unjustly. 

With —from or against ; as, withdraw, uatAstand. 

OF SUFFIXES. 

The following denote the person who is in a certain state 
or condition, or who does a certain thing. 

•An, or ian — Historian, Christian. { 

Ant —disputant, inhabitant. 

B *^ H " iBSS 7* 



154 THE PRACTICAL 



At — liar, beggar. 

Ard — drunkard, sluggard. 

Ary — antiquary, adversary. N 

Ate — magistrate, associate. 

Ee — trustee, patentee. 

Eer.— engineer, auctioneer. 

Ent — student, agent. 

Er — baker, philosopher. 

1st — artist, botanist. 

Ite — favorite, hypocrite. 

Ive — relative, captive. 

Or — executor, doctor. 

Ster — songster, teamster. 

Ling — little, young; as, striping, dar&ng. 

The following relate to things. 

Acy — state or condition; as, obstinacy, celibacy. 

Age — condition, compensation; as, bondage, dotage, postage. 

Al — doing a thing; as, denial, removal. 

Ance, ancy — state of being; as, ignorance, vigilance, con- 
stancy. 

Ary — place in which; as, seminary, library. 

Cle and cule — little ; as, cantieie, globule. 

Dom — state or condition, extent of rule; as, freedom*, king- 
dom. 

Ence, ency — state of being; as, diligence, e mergency . 

Escence — growing, becoming; as, convalescence, efferves- 
cence. 

Hood — condition ; as, boyAooo*. 

les — science of; as, mathematics, politics. x 

Ion — doing a thing, state of being; as, creation, rebellion. 

Ism — condition, doctrine; as, barbarism, stoicism. 

Ment — state, of being, thing done; as, abasement, abridgment. 

Mony — state of being, thing done; as, harmony, testimony. 

Ness — state of being, or quality; as, blessedness, softness. 

Ory — place in which; as, factory, armory. 

Ship —estate, office ; as, partnership, clerkship. 

Tude — condition; as, disquietude, servitude. 

Ty — state of; as, fertility, ability. 

Ure — the thing, state, or afit; as, vesture, composure, de- 
parture. 



* *rKLLlNO~BOOK. 155 

SUFFIXES 

USED TO FORM ADJECTIVES. 

The following denote belonging, relating, or pertaining to, 
Ac, ic, ical — demoniac, despotic, politico/. 
Al — Glial, annual, ethereal. 
An — American, republican. 
Ar — insular, ocular. 
Ary — planetary, literary. 
Ine — marina, feminine. 

The following denote being or having. 

Ant — abunilan/, brillkm*. . 
Ate — accurate, temperate. 
Ent — absent, benevolent. 
Ous —dangerous, populous. 

The following ore of various significations. 

Ble —may or can be, worthy* of; as, araMe laudaM?, au- 
dita. 

En — made of; as, wooden. 

Fvl—fuUof; as, joy/W, care/uJ. 

He — may or can fe, quality ; as, ductiZe, dociZe. 

Ish —resembling, hme of; as, boywA, graemsA. 

Ive — having power, tending to produce; as, deciaiw, des- 
tructive. 

Less — not having; as, cloudi&K, (evtless. 

Like, ly — resembling; as* warlifte, friend/y. 

Ory — pertaining to, giving; as, prefatory, admonitory. 

Some —full of; as troublesome. 

y —full of made of; as, wealthy, horny. 

SUFFIXES 

USED TO FORM VERBS, THE GENERAL SIGNIFICATION OF WHICH 
IS, TO MAKE, GIVE, DO, OR SUFFER. 

v 

Ate — renovate, operate. 
En^g— harden, darken. 



156 


THE PRACTICAL * 


Fy- 


-puri/y, forti/y. 


Ish- 


■^-publwA, dimintsA. ; 


Ise, 


ize — chastise, agonise. 




SUFFIXES 




USED TO^FORM ADVERBS. 


Ly — like, manner or way ; as, bold/y, wisely. 


Ward — direction of; as, forward, eastward. 


Some of the foregoing suffixes have additional meanings, which it would 


require 


remarks of considerable length to unfold, and which can beat be 


learned 


t>y reference to a dictionary and by practice. 




CARDINAL NUMBERS. 


FlgQIM. 


Letters. Names. 


Figures. Letters. Names. 


1 


I one 


21 XXI twenty-oiie 


2 


II - two 


22- XXII twenty-two 


3 


III three 


23 XXIII twenty-three 


4 


IV four 


30 XXX thirty 


5 


V five 


40 XL forty 


6 


VI six 


50 L My 


7 


VII seven 


60 L# sixty 


8 


VIII eight 


70 LXX seventy 


9 


IX nine 


80 LXXX eighty 


10 


X ten 


90 XC ninety 


11 


XI eleven 


100 C one hundred 


12 


XII twelve 


200 CC two hundred 


13 


XIII thirteen 


300 CCC three hundred 


14 


XIV fourteen 


400 CGCC four hundred 


15 • 


XV fifteen 


500 D five hundred 


16 


, XVI sixteen 


600 DC six hundred 


17 


XVII seventeen 


700 DCC seven hundred 


18 


XVIII eighteen 


fiOO DCCC eight hundred 


19 


XIX nineteen 


900 DCCCC nine hundred 


.20 


XX twenty 


1000 M one thousand 


1840 


MDCCCXL one thousand eight hundred^and forty. 



* &PKUJN0-BOOK. . 157 


ORDINAL NUMBERS. 


1st first 


21st twenty-first 


2nd second 


22nd twenty-second 


3rd third 


23rd twenty-third 


4th fourth 


24th &c. twenty-fourth 


5th <fcc. fifth 


30th thirtieth 


10th tenth 


40th fortieth 


11th eleventh 


50th <fcc. fiftieth 


12th twelfth 


100th one hundreth 


13th Sic. thirteenth 


200th <fcc. two hundreth 


20th twentieth 


1000th one thousandth 


2000th &c. two thousandth. 


ABBREVIATIONS. 


A. or Ana. Answer. 


Cts. Cents. 


A. A. S. Fellow of the American 


Cwt. Hundred weight. 


Academy. • 


D. C. District of Columbia. 


A. B. Batchelor of Arts. 


D. D. Doctor of Divinity. 


Acct. Account. 


Dca. Deacon. 


A. D. In the year of oar Lord. 


Dec. December. 


Al. Alabama. 


Del. Delaware. 


i Master of Arts. 
A. M. < Before noon. 

( In the year of the world. 


Dept. Deputy. 


Deut. Deuteronomy. 


Do. or Ditto. The same. 


Apr. April. 


Dr. Doctor, or Debtor. 


Att'y. Attorney. 


E. East. . 


Aug. August. 


Eccl. Ecclesiastes. 


Ark. Arkansas. 


Ed. Editor, or Edition. 


B. V. Blessed .Virgin. . 


E. G. For example. 


C. or cent, a hundred. 


Eng. England, or English. 


C. A. S. Fellow of .the Connecticut 


Ep. Epistle; • 
Eph. Ephesiane. 


, Academy. 


Cant. Canticles. 


Esa. Esaias. 


Capt. Captain. 


Esq. Esquire. 


Chap. Chapter. 


Etc. and so forth. 


Chron. Chronicles. . 


Ex. Example, or Exodus. 


Co. Company, or County. 


Exr. Executor. ' ' 


Col. Colonel. 


Feb. February. 


Com. Commissioner.. Commodore. 


Fig. Figure. 


Conn, or Ct. Connecticut. • < - 


Fr. France, or Francis. 


Const. Constable. 


Flor. Florida. 


.Cor. Corinthians. •...!.,. 


F. R. S. Fellow «f the Royal (Society. 


Cr. Credit. Creditor. V 


Gal. Galatians- ■• '. ' ' \ 



158 THE PRACTICAL 


Gen. Genesis, or General. 


No. Number. 


Gent. Gentleman. 


Nov. November. 


Ga. Georgia. 


N. S. New Style. 1 


Gov. Governor. 


fr. W. T. North Western Territory. 


' Heb. Hebrews. 


N. Y. New York. 


Hhd. Hogshead. 


0. Ohio. 


Hon. Honorable. 


Obj. Objection. 


Hund. Hundred. 


Obt. Obedient. 


Ibid. In the same place. 


Oct. October. 


id. The same. 


0. S. Old Style. 


i. e. That is. 


Pari. Parliament. 


Ind. or la. Indiana. 


Penn. or Pa. Pennsylvania.* 


Inst. Instant. 


Per. By the ; as per cent., by the hun 


111. Illinois. 


dred. . 


Ja. James. ■ 


Pet. Peter. 


Jac. Jacob. 


Phil. Philippians, or Philip. 


Jan January. 


Philom. A lover of learning. 


Jno. John. 


P. M. Post Master, or afternoon. 


Jos. Joseph. 
Josh. Joshua. 


P. 0. Post Office. 


Pres. President. 


Jun. Junior. 


Prof. Professor. 


Km. Kingdom. 


P. ft. Postscript. 
Ps. Psalm. 


Ky. Kentucky. 


Lam. Lamentations. 


Q. Question. 


Lat. Latitude. 


q. d. As if he should**ay. 


lbs. Pounds. 


q. 1. As much as you please. 


L. C. Lower Canada. 


q. s. A sufficient quantity. N 


Lev. Leviticus. 


Regr. Register. 


Lieut. Lieutenant. 


Rep. Representative. 


LL D. Doctor of Laws. 


Rev. Revelation, or Reverend 


Lon. Longitude. 


Rt. Hon. Right Honorable. 
R. I. Rhode Island. 


Lou. or La. Louisiana. 


L. S. Place of the SeaL 


Rom. Romans. 


Maj. Major. 


S. South. 


Mi Mississippi 


S. C. South Carolina. 


Mass. Massachusetts. 


Sec. Secretary. 


Mich. Michigan. 


Sect. Section. 


Mo, Missouri. 


Sen. Senator, or Senior. 


M. C. Member of Congress, 


Sept; Septembers ^ 


M. D. Doctor of Physic. 


Serg. Sergeant. 


Md. Marylanfi ' 


Servt. Servant. • 


Me. Maine. 


St. Saint. 


Mr. Master, or Mistef, 


S. T. D. Doctor of Divinity. 


Mrs. Mistress. .' 


S. T. P. Professor of Drvimty. 


Messrs. Gentlemen, or &r*. 


ss. To wit ; namely. 


MS. Manuscript. 


Tenn. or Te. Tennessee. 


MSS. Manuscripts. 


These. Thessaloniamv 


N. North. 


Tho. Thomas. 1 


N. B. Note well. 


Tim. Timothy. 


N. Q. North QaroJin*. ,. \ 


U. C. Upper Canada. 
Ult. The last. 


N. H. New Hampshire, 


N. J. Nsar-J—ay. ___..!,>,.__.. 





SPKl/LtNO-BOfrK. 



159 



V. or Vide ; See. 

Va. Virginia. 

Viz. To wit ; namely. 

Vt. Vermont. 

W. West. 

W. I. Westlndiw. 



Wm. William. 

Wp. Worship. . 

Wt. Weight. 

Yd.- Yard. 

&. And. 

dec. And so forth. 



POINTS, MARKS, AND CAPITAL LETTERS. 



A caret, 
A quotation, 
A section, 
An index, 
A paragraph, 
Brackets, 
A dash, 

A brace, 






A comma, , 

A semicolon, ; 

A colon, : 

A period, 

An interrogation point, ? 
An exclamation poinj^ ! 
A hyphen, ' - 

A parenthesis, () 

An apostrophe, ' 

Adiceresis, 

A comma denotes that the voice must 1 stop aa long as in 
pronouncing one syllable. 

A semicolon denotes a pause twice as long as a comma. 

A colon denotes a pause three times as long as a comma. 

A period denotes a pause four times as long as a comma. 

An interrogation point show* that a question is asked. 

An exclamation point is a mark of wonder, or some other 
strong emotion. 

A hyphen connects compound words, as honey-comb. 

A parenthesis includes something affecting the sense, but 
which might be omitted without material injury. 

An apostrophe shows the onrisskm of one or more letters, as 
giv'n, tho', for though, given. ' i y 

It also denotes the possessive case, as Robert's pen. 

A caret shows that a letter, word, or figure, in writing, has 
v r 

been omitted through mistake, as xibrpw. 

A quotation shows that what is between tjie marks, is in die 
words of some other author. 



160 tAe practical 



A section divides a chapter, or discourse into parts. 

An index points to what requires particular attention. 

A paragraph shows the beginning of a new topic. 

Brackets include something explanatory. 

A dash shows a pause, sometimes abrupt, or a change of 
subject. 

A brace connects several words or lines. 

A diaeresis shows that the vowel over which it stands is 
sounded by itself, as creation. 

An asterisk or star, a dagger, and other marks, with let- 
ters and figures, refer to the margin or bottom of the page ; 

Capital letters should be used, at the beginning of every 
book, chapter, and sentence ; at the beginning of all the 
names of God ; of proper names of persons, places, rivers, 
mountains, seas, lakes, ships, &c; and of all adjectives de- 
rived from proper names ; at the beginning of a quotation, 
and of lines of poetry, and, somefmes, of an important word 
in a sentence. - ' : 

I and O are always written in capitals. x ' 



RULES FOR SPELLING. 

1. Words of one syllable, and words of more than one 
syllable accented on the last, ending in a single consonant 
after a single vowel, double that consonant, when another 
sellable beginning with a vowel is added ; as, son, sunny ; 
blot, blotting, blotted; permit, permitting, permitted; begin, 
beginner. 

Words ending in % do not follow this role, as wax, waxing ; nor those in 
which the additional syllable changes the accent, as confer, conference. ' To 
this, excellence is an exception. 

. II. But if the last consonant is not preceded by a single 
vowel, or the accent is not on the last syllable, the consonant 
is not doubled ; a*, toil, toiling ; read, reader; suffer, suffering, 
sufferer. 

In regard to most of the varis ending in /, that come under this rule, 
and also the derivatives of the^ord worship, there is still a difference of 
usage. Some, for example, write travel, traveling, .traveler — worship, 
worshiping, worshiper; and efters, ! traveiKng, travefltfr-^rorship^ing, . 
worshipper. , j. 

*^^^*SS^S«HM^^HSSHHsiaie*«HBH^SSS««HBB«MB5H 



SPELLING-BOOK. 161 



III. Words ending in two or more consonants, do not double 
the last letter, when another syllable is added; as, mend, 
mending ; watch, watching, watcher ; expect, expecting, ex- 
pected. 

IV. Monosyllables ending in f, I, or s, have these conso- 
nants double, when preceded by a single vowel ; as, staff, hill, 
glass. 

If, of, as, is, has, his, was, gas, yes, this, us, .and thus, are 
exceptions. 

V. Monosyllables, ending in any consonant but f I, or s, 
do not have the final consonant double, excepting add, jagg, 
ebb, e gg> * nn > odd, butt, err, buzz ; to which some add bunn, 
and purr. • 

VI. When an addition is made to a word ending in y, pre- 
ceded by a consonant, the y is changed into t ; as, cry, cries ; 
try, triest, trieth ; happy, happier, happiest, happiness ; pity, 
pitied, pitiable, pitiful ; duty, duties. 

But before ing the y is retained ; as, pity, pitying ; carry, 
carrying. 

VII. When an addition is made to a word ending in y, pre- 
ceded by a vowel, the y is not changed ; as, day, days ; key, 
keys; boy, boys; valley, valleys; money, moneys; decay, 
decaying, decayed; convey, conveying, conveyed; employ, 
employer. 

Laid, paid, said, and saith, from la£ pay, and say, are ex- 
ceptions. 

VIII. Words ending in double consonants retain both, when 
an additional termination is made ; as, careless, carelessness ; 
success, successful. 

Some except from this rule dulness, fulness,, skilful, and 
wilful . 

IX. When a vowel, or, a termination beginning with a 
vowel, is added to a word ending in silent e, the e is generally 
omitted; as, shine/ shiny; save, saving; force, forced, for- 
cible. 

The e is retained in hoeing and shoeing, and iq such adjec- 
tives ending in able as aye derived, from words that end in &, 
ge, or ee ; as, peaceable, traceable, changeable, chargeable, ser- 
viceable, manageable, marriageable, agreeable. 

X. If the added termination is a etmsonant, or begins with 
a consonant, the x silent e is generally retained ; as, fate, fates ; 
hate, hateful ; pale, nalenes*. 



16? THE PRACTICAL 



Judgment, lodgment, abridgment, argument, acknowledgment, 
duly, truly, awful, wholly, are exceptions. 

XL In forming the present participle of verbs ending in ie, 
the e is dropped, and the i changed into y ; as, lie, lying. But 
in the other variations of .'such verbs, the r and the e are re- 
tained ; as tie* lie&t, UeUji or lies, lied. 

The other verbs in ie, are hie, die, tie, vie, and their compounds. 

X!I. The plural of nouns is generally formed by adding s 
to the singular ; as, book, books ; dove, doves ; monarch, 
rhonarcbs. • 

When the singular ends in x, ss, sh, and ch as in porch, the 
plural is formed by adding es ; as, tax, taxes ; class, classes ; 
fish, fishes ; porch, porches. ( 

When the singular ends mforfe, the plural Is sometimes 
formed by changing these terminations into ves; as, half, 
halves ; life,- lives. 

XIII. The past tense and past participle df regular 'veifbs, 
are formed by the addition of ed, and the present participle by 
that of ing ; as, plant, planted, planting. Silent e at tfhe end 
is dropped ; as, love, loved, Roving. l • . / f 

When ed, in this case, follows t or d, it is pronounced as an 
additional syllable ) as, part, part-ed ; end, ertd-ed. 

When it follows any other letter, the e is usually silent, and 
the d is united in pronunciation with tjie preceding syllable ; 
as, curb, curb'd ; love, loVd'; tame, tamM; add its .sound is 
sometimes changed into that of t j as, pluck, pluck'd, — pro- 
nounced pluckt. : 

XIV. The correct spelling of words in common use, except- 
ing proper names., containing the diphthong ei or ie, may 
be determined thus: ' 

It is ei, when the diphthong has any of the sounds of & ; as 
in deign, their :*— when it is followed immediately by 7, ot the 
sound, of i; as in either, receipt, height -.—when, with* the 
preceding letter, it ha» the sound of see ; as m deceit, receive, 
ceil, sei^e, excepting siege, glacier, financier, and cuirassier. 

It is also ei in eider, foreign, sovereign, heifer, inveigle, leisure, 
obeisance, plebeian, teil, weird, and non-pareil. 

In all other cases it is ie'. . , 

XV. Compound words -generally retain the spelling of the 
simple words which compose them ; as, workman ; herein, 

Many words ending with double I, and some others, are 
exceptions ; as, already, welfare, wherever. 



SrELLl\G-BUOK. 163 



ADDITIONAL REMARKS TO TEACHERS. 



In those lessons which consist of words classed in refer- 
ence to the general resemblance of the obscure sounds in the 
closing, .unaccented syllables, it is not intended that these syl- 
lables have always the same sound. The teacher will be care- 
ful to notice this ; as in Lessons 100, 101, 143, 154, 155, and 
others of a 'similar kind. 

In addition to those modes of using the lessons which Jiave 
been already mentioned in the Directions {o Teachers, there are 
some others that may be pursued to advantage. Thus in Les- 
mgk 90, let the teacher ask for a word ending in are with the 
sound of a as in bare ; then for another ending with the same 
sound, but spelt differently ; then, for another ; and so on. 
The same course may be pursued in Lessons of a similar con- 
struction. 

In many lessons, after announcing a word, the selection 
being made from the various columns indiscriminately, the 
scholars, especially those who are somewhat advanced, may 
be required to answer by repeating only that part of the word 
which contains a peculiar difficulty. Thus in Lesson 76, the 
teacher can say ",veto," and the scholar will reply, o ; — " co- 
coa," and the answer will be, a ; — " blow, and the answer 
will be, w ; — " dough," " beau," " owe," and " hoe ;" and the 
answers ^wiU be, u g h, e au, owe, and e. In Lesson 135, 
the teacher can say " vacant," and the scholar will reply, a n 
t ,— * decent," " tyrant," " moment," and the answers will suc- 
cessively be, e n t, — a n t, and e n L. 

In Lessons containing words in which silent tetters are 
found, it will be a profitable exercise to call upon the scholars 
to repeat them, or to write them on the blackboard, from 
memory. 

In" giving .'out words to be spelt by the lower classes, the 
teacher may occasionally pronounce the vowel sounds in the 
unaccented syllables fully and distinctly ; but generally die 
words should be pronounced, both by teacher and scholar, as 
in common conversation and good speaking. 

_. ' m 



164 



THE PRACTICAL 



INDEX. 



This Index is designed for the more advanced scholars, and especially 
for teachers, and those who wish to attend, with critical accuracy, to $he 
anomalies of orthography and pronunciation. It will enable the teacher to 
form a methodical view and analysis of many of these anomalies. He can 
nee the lessons which contain them in reviewing ; in testing the accuracy 
of the learner ; in aiding him to overcome his peculiar difficulties ; and in 
such other practical exercises as may be * 



PART I. 



Vowel sounds, found in monosyllables, and sometimes in the closing 
syllables, but oftener in the preceding. 



Sound of a, as in hate. 



Sound of e, as in tore. 



i 84 88 8 > . O ft 



ai,. . . . .84-87- 

si,. . . ,, . . . 84-87-8bV8» 

*y»«y. 2 

ss% .» 



Sound of a as in bar. 

•» 

a,aB,va,ea, ...... 



Sound of a, a* in ball. 

*> 

an, aw, 

a, an, aw, awe, oe,*^ . . *. 



s, . 

a, an, 



Sound of a, as in waa\ 



Sound of Of as in bare. 
a, at, ay, ei, * «a, . : . . . . 90 



A in the last syllable, unaccented. 
a, 133 



6, . . . . 110-111— ltt-lH— 115 
ee, ea,te, 110-111-118-113-114-113 
el, ... . 111—113-113—115 
U . . . . 110-111-413—114—115 
ay, ey, . . .114 

Sound of t t as in red. 
e*ai,ay,ie,ei, ..... .1*0 



Sound of i, as in 
l,to,lgh,7,ye, . . , , . . 100 
tee, ign, yne, 104 



Us, 



,a*ht,yu, 



103 



Sound of a, as in globe. * 
%-fe~43-04 



70-0S~44 

oe,.; 70-03 

oo,. 93-04 

cm, . . . t . .98-34 
ow, owe, oofh, San, ew, . 70 

. Sound of o y as in nor. 
q, . . . t: . . ; . . . 04 



Sound of o f as in sen. 

o, « 

^S ••» ^e» • S3 

■oaavipSfeBBaBaBaasa 



•PEaXINO'BOQK* 



165 



Sound ofoy as in move. 

Less***. 

% , *— 

0,00, 33—127—128 

ou, oeu, oe, . . • '. . M8 

Sound of oo t om in booh ■ 
00,0,0a, .... . .93 



Sound of m end oy. ' 
ol, oy t . . . • , . 



Sound of o and ow, as in bound. 

Lessons. 
OO, ow, . . . . . . . 26—80 

Sound of u,as in bush. 
m S3 

Sound qfu, as in cube. 

«,vi, 83 

a, iem, no, ew, lew, on, ewe, eta, 
on, 139—131 



PART II. 
Long vowel sounds, found in monosyllables, and in the closing syllables. 

aje^ end Its sound, as in bare, . . . 90 
ade, ale, and their sounds, ... 88 
ake, ame, ane, and tbeir sounds, . , 84 

ate, and its sound, . j ^SZJg 

ase, ace, ........ 95 

lay, and its sound, 87 

'axe, and its sound, • .... 9ft 



see, and its sound, ...... 114 



eece, and its sound, 

eeeh, eei; eeve, and their t „ 

iede, eke, ete, and their sounds, 
!els, eme, ene, epe, and their sounds, 
*iw, and its sound, 



US 
113 
111 
112 
HO 
-eexe, 'and its sound, . . • . .115 



1, and its sound, . 
ice, and its sound, . 



, 106 
106 



me, and its sound, • • ... .104 

ipe, and its sound, ...... 102 

ire, and its sound, ...... 102 

ite, and its sound, 103 

ize, and its sound, 134 



o, and its sound, ...... 76 

ode, oke, ole, one, ope, and their sounds, 92 
ore, ote, and their sounds, . _ . • .94 

ose, 93 

oxe, and its sound, . .... 93 



u, and its sound, 129 

ude, and its sound, • . . . . .131 
ure, and its sound, • . • • . 131 
use, and its sound, . . • . • 83 

use, and its sound, 83 

ins, and its sound, . • • . .83 



PART III. 

The consonants and their sounds, found usually in monosyllables, and in 
the closing syllables. 

Double consonants in the middle of ad, ed, id, od, nd, at the end of words, 108 

words, 52—53 f, sound of, at the end, . . . 76—207 

Double consonants ) 58—63—67—76—92-05 ph sounding like f, .... 207 
' at the end, j 123— 125— 126— 140 189 g as in gate, before e and i, ... 85 



THE PRACTICAL SPEIAUtfG-BOOK. 



Lessons. 
as In gate, sound of, at the end, . 107 

e and dge, at the end, . . . .142 

sounding like j at the endof a syllable, 308 

, sound of in ch, 206 

., sound of at the end, 
ac, ack, eck, ick, oek, nek, 69-190—192 
ic, 190-192—194 

, 11, at the end, . 18-88r-58-67-98-96 

, sound of; unaccented, at the endV 
al, le, el, il, tie, ol, afl, ute, ul, 195 to 805 

n, sound of, unaccented, at the end, 
am, em, egm, im, ime, om, yin, 1 . 143 
urn, ume, ome, 144 

i, sound of, unaccented, at the end, 
an, en, in, eign, ain, on, ine, . 154 — 155 

sion and tk>n, . . , j 18Q—181— 182 
cian, . . ' ^.179 



cean, 
cton, 



i, sound or, unaccented, at Aha and, 

ep, lp, dp, '. . . i ; . . * . 



180 
161 



101 



\ Round of, * 
ut\ cr, ir, or, and yr, ) 
sounding nearly alike, ) 
ar, er, Ir, or, yr, at the find. 



Lessons. 

t, sound of, unaccented,* at the end, 
et, it, ute, alt, oat, ot, ut, At, j" , oM<B 
ite,ight,eit,ate, iiuu-iui ioa 

ant,eut, . . . 135—136—137-138 

y, sound of, at the end, 
cive, sive, 71 

z, and xe, at the end, 79 

x, sounding like gz, . . . . • . S09 

y, at the end, 
ancy,ency, . ....... 159 

any, eny, iny, ony, 166 

ary,ery,ory, ury, . . 167—168—169 
ety, ity, uty, . . . 174—175—176 

«y,*y,*y, ........ wa 

i before a rowel and sounding like y, 184 
s, and as. Bounding like sh, . . .186 
ci, si, sd,ti, and as, sounding like so,. 187 
si, xl* and a, sounding like ah, . . 185 
ten, ........ . 34—70 



149—141 
( 146— 14X-148 



1 .149—150 



re, . 
ure, eur, 



151 
156 



•at?* 

. no— i 



ii, sound of, ar the end, 
s, 88, sse, see, accented; 
*, se, ce, unaccented, . " . . 125—126 
nee, nse, . . . . . • .121 

rce, rse, . 122 

ance, enee, unaccented, . . . 157—158 
out 171-178-173 

• c,. sounding like s at the end of a 

syllable, ....... 208 



■donlytathe-ptafal, . 
Words pronounced as if h preced- 
ed w, 

Irregular and very difficult words, 



168 



169 

210 



Peg*. 
Words spelt alike, but varying in ac- 
cent, * . . . . 145 

Words spelt alike, but varying in ac- 
cent and division into syllables, . 146 
Words alike in pronunciation bat dWer- 

iiig in orthography, .... 147 
Prefixes and Sednxes, .... 159 
Numbers,. • • . . • , 156 

Abbreviations, 167 

Points, Marks, and Capitate, ... 159 
Rules for Spelling, ..... 160 
Additional Remarks to* Teachers,. . 163 



The Index may be used by those who are at a loss with regard. to the orta»gtapfcy of 
certain words, or classes of words, by referring to the Lessons in which they are to be 
found, and thus the recollection of them be promoted by cultivating a methodical memory. 
For example, one may not know how to spell the word laugh. His ear, however, readily 
notices the vowel sound of a as in bar which it contains. He finds this sound in Part I. 
and is referred to Lessons 17 and 99, in one of which the word will be found. 

The word portmanteau ends with the long sound of o. This is found in Part IL and 
reference is made to Lesson 76, which contains that word. 

The word confidence ends with the sound of $. This will be found in Part III. 
with the two terminating syllables which constitute the perplexity, met and ence. 
ence is made to Lessons 157 and 158 in one of which the word will be found. 

A little practice will make this use of the Index easy. 

THE ENB. 



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